WorldWideScience

Sample records for plasma processing device

  1. Plasma detachment in linear devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohno, N.

    2017-03-01

    Plasma detachment research in linear devices, sometimes called divertor plasma simulators, is reviewed. Pioneering works exploring the concept of plasma detachment were conducted in linear devices. Linear devices have contributed greatly to the basic understanding of plasma detachment such as volume plasma recombination processes, detached plasma structure associated with particle and energy transport, and other related issues including enhancement of convective plasma transport, dynamic response of plasma detachment, plasma flow reversal, and magnetic field effect. The importance of plasma detachment research using linear devices will be highlighted aimed at the design of future DEMO.

  2. Development of a simple device for processing whole-blood samples into measured aliquots of plasma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burtis, C A; Johnson, W F; Walker, W A

    1986-09-01

    A capillary processor and aliquoter has been designed and fabricated that is capable of accepting aliquots of whole blood and automatically processing them into discrete aliquots of plasma. The device consists of two disks, each of which contains 16 individual capillaries and a processing rotor. One disk accepts larger capillaries that hold approximately 100 microL of whole blood each. The second disk accepts 2.54-cm-long precision capillaries of various internal diameters, which provide exact sample volumes from 1 to 10 microL. The processing rotor contains 16 individual compartments and chambers to accept both disks. Applying centrifugal force transfers the aliquots of whole blood into their respective compartments, where they are separated into cellular and plasma fractions. As the rotor speed is slowly decreased, an aliquot of plasma is withdrawn by capillary action into each measuring capillary. The disk containing the 16 measured aliquots of plasma is then removed and placed into a modified rotor for conventional centrifugal analysis. This device can entrain and deliver microliter volumes of liquids with precision and accuracy (1-2%) near that of mechanical pipettes. Assays of the separated plasma aliquots also have acceptable precision (e.g., CVs approximately 3% for measurements of serum enzymes).

  3. Optical plasma microelectronic devices

    CERN Document Server

    Forati, Ebrahim; Dill, Thyler; Sievenpiper, Dan

    2015-01-01

    The semiconductor channel in conventional microelectronic devices was successfully replaced with an optically triggered gas plasma channel. The combination of DC and laser-induced gas ionizations controls the conductivity of the channel, enabling us to realize different electronic devices such as transistors, switches, modulators, etc. A special micro-scale metasurface was used to enhance the laser-gas interaction, as well as combining it with DC ionization properly. Optical plasma devices benefit form the advantages of plasma/vacuum electronic devices while preserving most of the integrablity of semiconductor based devices.

  4. Plasma process for development of a bulk heterojunction optoelectronic device: A highly sensitive UV detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Shyamalima; Pal, Arup R.; Chutia, Joyanti; Bailung, Heremba; Sarma, Neelotpal S.; Dass, Narendra N.; Patil, Dinkar

    2012-08-01

    Deposition of composite thin film of polyaniline/TiO2 (PAni/TiO2) has been carried out by a combined process of magnetron sputtering and plasma polymerization at a pressure of 5 × 10-2 Torr using titanium as a target material for sputtering, aniline as monomer, oxygen as reactive gas and argon as carrier gas/ion source for sputtering. The deposition has been achieved using direct current (dc) discharge power of 35 W for sputtering and radio frequency (rf) power of 8-12 W at substrate bias values in the ranges of -80 to -100 V for polymerization. The composition of the film has been studied using infrared spectroscopy, Raman spectroscopy as well as X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The morphology of the film has been characterized with the help of a transmission electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy. The ultraviolet (UV) photo-stability of the composite film has been studied by exposing the film deposited on silicon substrate for different reaction times up to 1 h under UV radiation at wave length range of 280-400 nm with an intensity of 0.4 mW/cm2. An organic/inorganic nanocomposite film based photovoltaic device has been developed. The device has an aluminum/composite/indium tin oxide sandwiched structure that shows strong photoresponse in ultraviolet region and hence the device has potential for application as an UV detector.

  5. Plasma devices for hydrocarbon reformation

    KAUST Repository

    Cha, Min Suk

    2017-02-16

    Plasma devices for hydrocarbon reformation are provided. Methods of using the devices for hydrocarbon reformation are also provided. The devices can include a liquid container to receive a hydrocarbon source, and a plasma torch configured to be submerged in the liquid. The plasma plume from the plasma torch can cause reformation of the hydrocarbon. The device can use a variety of plasma torches that can be arranged in a variety of positions in the liquid container. The devices can be used for the reformation of gaseous hydrocarbons and/or liquid hydrocarbons. The reformation can produce methane, lower hydrocarbons, higher hydrocarbons, hydrogen gas, water, carbon dioxide, carbon monoxide, or a combination thereof.

  6. Organic plasma process for simple and substrate-independent surface modification of polymeric BioMEMS devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiratsuka, Atsunori; Muguruma, Hitoshi; Lee, Kyong-Hoon; Karube, Isao

    2004-07-15

    A polymeric bio micro electromechanical systems (BioMEMS) device was fabricated using organic plasma polymerization, by which the surface of a polymeric substrate could easily be modified through vapor-phase deposition of organic thin films. This technique, capable of polymeric deposition of any kind of monomer, can serve the purpose of anti-fouling coating, wettability control, or layer-to-layer interface creation, on the surface of any given chemically-inert polymeric substrate without involving cumbersome surface organic reactions. A prototype device was fabricated to have an array of electrochemical glucose biosensors with the three electrode configuration, each of which has a microfluidic channel (500 microm x 800 microm) for capillary-action-driven sample delivery and the concerned enzymatic reaction. Stressing the advantages of the plasma polymerization process using a polymeric substrate together with some additional features accomplished in our device fabrication, new possibilities in the field of polymeric BioMEMS are discussed.

  7. Rapid Atmospheric-Pressure-Plasma-Jet Processed Porous Materials for Energy Harvesting and Storage Devices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jian-Zhang Chen

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Atmospheric pressure plasma jet (APPJ technology is a versatile technology that has been applied in many energy harvesting and storage devices. This feature article provides an overview of the advances in APPJ technology and its application to solar cells and batteries. The ultrafast APPJ sintering of nanoporous oxides and 3D reduced graphene oxide nanosheets with accompanying optical emission spectroscopy analyses are described in detail. The applications of these nanoporous materials to photoanodes and counter electrodes of dye-sensitized solar cells are described. An ultrashort treatment (1 min on graphite felt electrodes of flow batteries also significantly improves the energy efficiency.

  8. Plasma processing for VLSI

    CERN Document Server

    Einspruch, Norman G

    1984-01-01

    VLSI Electronics: Microstructure Science, Volume 8: Plasma Processing for VLSI (Very Large Scale Integration) discusses the utilization of plasmas for general semiconductor processing. It also includes expositions on advanced deposition of materials for metallization, lithographic methods that use plasmas as exposure sources and for multiple resist patterning, and device structures made possible by anisotropic etching.This volume is divided into four sections. It begins with the history of plasma processing, a discussion of some of the early developments and trends for VLSI. The second section

  9. Modelling of new generation plasma optical devices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Litovko Irina V.

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents new generation plasma optical devices based on the electrostatic plasma lens configuration that opens a novel attractive possibility for effective high-tech practical applications. Original approaches to use of plasma accelerators with closed electron drift and open walls for the creation of a cost-effective low-maintenance plasma lens with positive space charge and possible application for low-cost, low-energy rocket engine are described. The preliminary experimental, theoretical and simulation results are presented. It is noted that the presented plasma devices are attractive for many different applications in the state-of-the-art vacuum-plasma processing.

  10. Plasma processing of niobium for the production of thin-film superconducting devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tugwell, A.J.; Hutson, D.; Pegrum, C.M.; Donaldson, G.B.

    1987-01-01

    Josephson junctions, which are regions of weak electrical connection between two superconductors, are the active elements of very sensitive thin-film magnetometers. Junctions are fabricated by growing barriers of native oxide on thin Nb films and depositing a layer of PbIn alloy on top. High sensitivity magnetometers require junctions of small area, and to achieve this, edge junctions are fabricated in which one dimension is defined by the thickness of the Nb and the other is set by the limit of optical lithography. An edge with a suitable angle is produced by reactive ion etching using 5 vol % O/sub 2/ in CF/sub 4/ in a parallel plate rf plasma etcher. Details of etch rates and edge profiles are given. The barrier is formed by a cleaning and oxidation process in an rf plasma at a pressure of 10/sup -6/ bar. Details of the design of a purpose built rf cathode and the run-to-run reproducibility of junction characteristics are given. Different oxidation times and bias voltages are necessary to produce a given oxide thickness on a sloping edge of Nb, as compared to a planar surface, and an explanation for this is proposed. Examples are described of magnetometers made using the above processes.

  11. Modeling of plasma devices for pulsed power

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kunc, Joseph A.; Gundersen, Martin A.

    1984-07-01

    This letter considers quantitative models of microscopic processes in plasmas formed in gas phase devices for pulsed power. Although models have been developed for devices such as lasers, there are others, such as switches, where these processes have been treated only phenomenologically. Further, transport data must be adjusted to include the effects of high electron density. It is shown that it is necessary to use a microscopic model to correctly describe the device behavior. Examples presented include the effect of Coulomb collisions on conductivity in various gases, and the ionization processes in a hydrogen thyratron.

  12. Paradigm shifts in plasma processing and application of fundamental kinetics to problems targeting 5 nm technology device technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Lee

    2016-09-01

    It is often said that semiconductor technology is approaching the end of scaling. While fundamental device limits do approach, plasma etching has been doing the heavy lifting to supplement the basic limits in lithography. RF plasmas, pulsing in many forms, diffusion plasmas are but a few of the important developments over the last 20 years that have succeeded in the seemingly impossible tasks. The commonality of these plasmas is being self-consistent: their near-Boltzmann EEDf maintains ionization with its tail while providing charge-balance with its Te . To control the plasma chemistry is to control its EEDf; the entanglement of ionization with charge-balance in self-consistent plasmas places a constraint on the decoupling of plasma chemistry from ionization. Example like DC/RF parallel-plate hybridizes stochastic heating with DC-cathode injected e- -beam. While such arrangement offers some level of decoupling, it raised more questions than what it helped answered along the lines of beam-plasma instabilities, bounce-resonance ionization, etc. Pure e- -beam plasmas could be a drastic departure from the self-consistent plasmas. Examples like the NRL e- -beam system and the more recent TEL NEP (Nonambipolar e- Plasma) show strong decoupling of Te from ionization but it is almost certain, many more questions lurk: the functions connecting collisional relaxation with instabilities, the channels causing the dissociation of large fluorocarbons (controlling the ion-to- radical ratio), the production of the damaging deep UV in e- -beam plasmas, etc., and the list goes on. IADf is one factor on feature-profile and IEDf determines the surgical surface-excitation governing the selectivity, and both functions have Ti as the origin; what controls the e- -beam plasmas' Ti ? RF-bias has served well in applications requiring energetic excitation but, are there ways to improve the IEDf tightness? What are the adverse side-effects of ``improved IEDf''? Decades ago an infant RF-plasma

  13. Development of a Fabrication Process Using Suspension Plasma Spray for Titanium Oxide Photovoltaic Device

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hsian Sagr Hadi A

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available In order to reduce the high costs of conventional materials, and to reduce the power necessary for the deposition of titanium dioxide, titanium tetrabutoxide has been developed in the form of a suspension of TiO2 using water instead of expensive ethanol. To avoid sedimentation of hydroxide particles in the suspension, mechanical milling of the suspension was conducted in order to create diffusion in colloidal suspension before using it as feedstock. Consequently, through the creation of a colloidal suspension, coating deposition was able to be conducted without sedimentation of the hydroxide particles in the suspension during the deposition process. Though an amorphous as-deposited coating was able to be deposited, through post heat treatment at 630 °C for 60 min, the chemical structure became anatase rich. In addition, it was confirmed that the post heat treated anatase rich coating had enough photo-catalytic activity to decolor methylene-blue droplets. From these results, this technique was found to have high potential in the low cost photo-catalytic titanium coating production process.

  14. Plasma enhanced vortex fluidic device manipulation of graphene oxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Darryl B; Chen, Xianjue; Sibley, Alexander; Quinton, Jamie S; Shearer, Cameron J; Gibson, Christopher T; Raston, Colin L

    2016-08-25

    A vortex fluid device (VFD) with non-thermal plasma liquid processing within dynamic thin films has been developed. This plasma-liquid microfluidic platform facilitates chemical processing which is demonstrated through the manipulation of the morphology and chemical character of colloidal graphene oxide in water.

  15. Fundamental processes of plasma and reactive gas surface treatment for the recovery of hydrogen isotopes from carbon co-deposits in fusion devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moeller, Soeren

    2014-11-01

    The use of carbon-based plasma-facing wall components offers many advantages for plasma operation in magnetic confinement nuclear fusion devices. However, through reactions with the hydrogen based fusion plasma, carbon forms amorphous hydrogenated carbon co-deposits (a-C:H) in the vacuum vessels. If tritium is used to fuel the reactor, this co-deposition can quickly lead to an inacceptable high tritium inventory. Through co-deposition with carbon about 10% of the tritium injected into the reactor can be trapped. Even with other wall materials co-deposition can be significant. A method to recover the hydrogen isotopes from the co-deposits is necessary. The method has to be compatible with the requirements of the devices and nuclear fusion plasma operation. In this work thermo-chemical removal by neutral gases (TCR) and removal by plasmas is investigated. Models are developed to describe the involved processes of both removal methods. TCR is described using a reaction-diffusion model. Within this model the reactive gas diffuses into the co-deposits and subsequently reacts in a thermally activated process. The co-deposits are pyrolysed, forming volatile gases, e.g. CO{sub 2} and H{sub 2}O. These gases are pumped from the vacuum vessel and recycled. Applying the model to literature observations enables to connect data on exposure temperature, pressure, time and co-deposit properties. Two limits of TCR (reaction- or diffusion-limited) are identified. Plasma removal sputters co-deposits by their chemical and physical interaction with the impinging ions. The description uses a 0D plasma model from the literature which derives plasma parameters from the balance of input power to plasma power losses. The model is extended with descriptions of the plasma sheath and ion-surface interactions to derive the co-deposit removal rates. Plasma removal can be limited by this ion induced surface release rate or the rate of pumping of the released species. To test the models dedicated

  16. Arc plasma devices: Evolving mechanical design from numerical simulation

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    S Ghorui; A K Das

    2013-04-01

    Wide ranges of technological applications involve arc plasma devices as the primary plasma source for processing work. Recent findings exhibit the existence of appreciable thermal non-equilibrium in these so-called thermal plasma devices. Commercially available magnetohydrodynamic codes are not capable of handling such systems due to unavailability of non-equilibrium thermodynamic and transport property data and self-consistent models. A recipe for obtaining mechanical design of arc plasma devices from numerical simulation incorporating two-temperature thermal non-equilibrium model is presented in this article with reference to the plasma of the mixture of molecular gases like nitrogen and oxygen. Such systems are technologically important as they correspond to the plasma devices operating with air, oxygen plasma torches in cutting industries and plasma devices using nitrogen as shielding gas. Temperature field, associated fluid dynamics and electrical characteristics of a plasma torch are computed in a systematic manner to evaluate the performance of a conceived design using a two-fluid CFD model coupled with a two-temperature thermodynamic and transport property code. Important effects of different nozzle designs and plasma gases obtained from the formalism are discussed. Non-equilibrium thermo-dynamic properties are computed using modified two-temperature Saha equations and transport properties are computed using standard Chapman–Enskog approach.

  17. Slot-Antenna/Permanent-Magnet Device for Generating Plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foster, John E.

    2007-01-01

    A device that includes a rectangular-waveguide/slot-antenna structure and permanent magnets has been devised as a means of generating a substantially uniform plasma over a relatively large area, using relatively low input power and a low gas flow rate. The device utilizes electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) excited by microwave power to efficiently generate plasma in a manner that is completely electrodeless in the sense that, in principle, there is no electrical contact between the plasma and the antenna. Plasmas generated by devices like this one are suitable for use as sources of ions and/or electrons for diverse material-processing applications (e.g., etching or deposition) and for ion thrusters. The absence of plasma/electrode contact essentially prevents plasma-induced erosion of the antenna, thereby also helping to minimize contamination of the plasma and of objects exposed to the plasma. Consequently, the operational lifetime of the rectangular-waveguide/ slot-antenna structure is long and the lifetime of the plasma source is limited by the lifetime of the associated charged-particle-extraction grid (if used) or the lifetime of the microwave power source. The device includes a series of matched radiating slot pairs that are distributed along the length of a plasma-source discharge chamber (see figure). This arrangement enables the production of plasma in a distributed fashion, thereby giving rise to a uniform plasma profile. A uniform plasma profile is necessary for uniformity in any electron- or ion-extraction electrostatic optics. The slotted configuration of the waveguide/ antenna structure makes the device scalable to larger areas and higher powers. All that is needed for scaling up is the attachment of additional matched radiating slots along the length of the discharge chamber. If it is desired to make the power per slot remain constant in scaling up, then the input microwave power must be increased accordingly. Unlike in prior ECR microwave plasma

  18. Cold plasma processing to improve food safety

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cold plasma is an antimicrobial process being developed for application as a food processing technology. This novel intervention is the subject of an expanding research effort by groups around the world. A variety of devices can be used to generate cold plasma and apply it to the food commodity bein...

  19. Plasma cell treatment device Plasma-on-Chip: Monitoring plasma-generated reactive species in microwells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Jun-Seok; Kojima, Shinya; Sasaki, Minoru; Hatta, Akimitsu; Kumagai, Shinya

    2017-01-01

    We have developed a plasma cell treatment device called Plasma-on-Chip that enables the real-time monitoring of a single cell culture during plasma treatment. The device consists of three parts: 1) microwells for cell culture, 2) a microplasma device for generating reactive oxygen and nitrogen species (RONS) for use in cell treatment, and 3) through-holes (microchannels) that connect each microwell with the microplasma region for RONS delivery. Here, we analysed the delivery of the RONS to the liquid culture medium stored in the microwells. We developed a simple experimental set-up using a microdevice and applied in situ ultraviolet absorption spectroscopy with high sensitivity for detecting RONS in liquid. The plasma-generated RONS were delivered into the liquid culture medium via the through-holes fabricated into the microdevice. The RONS concentrations were on the order of 10–100 μM depending on the size of the through-holes. In contrast, we found that the amount of dissolved oxygen was almost constant. To investigate the process of RONS generation, we numerically analysed the gas flow in the through-holes. We suggest that the circulating gas flow in the through-holes promotes the interaction between the plasma (ionised gas) and the liquid, resulting in enhanced RONS concentrations. PMID:28176800

  20. Developments in Plasma Processes for Extractive Metallurgy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gauvin, W. H.; Drouet, M. G.; Munz, R. J.

    1987-12-01

    With the recent availability of commercial plasma-generating devices capable of reliable performance at powers as high as 30 MW, the applications of plasma technology in high-temperature extractive metallurgy are rapidly increasing. Some of the more promising process developments are reviewed in this paper, as are newer reactor designs.

  1. Fast Tunable Microwave Devices Using Self-driven Plasma Instabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biggs, David; Cappelli, Mark

    2016-10-01

    Tunable electromagnetic devices using plasmas are of interest for various applications such as high frequency communications and analog signal processing. At microwave frequencies of tens of gigahertz, low-pressure plasmas must be employed in order to avoid high wave damping from collisions. The drawback of low-pressure plasmas is that their diffusion timescales are long, on the order of hundreds of microseconds. Other mechanisms than diffusion must be employed to achieve fast tuning capabilities of these devices. One candidate mechanism is to use a self-driven plasma instability, which may allow for fast tuning of microwave resonant cavities. In this work, a microwave resonant cavity is studied consisting of a rectangular waveguide with two conducting posts spaced along the propagation direction to form a rectangular cavity. The cavity acts as a band pass filter and transmits microwave signals around its resonant frequency. Plasma may be introduced into the cavity between the conducting posts in order to change the refractive index and thus the resonant and transmission frequency of the device. The location of the plasma and its plasma density are important parameters in determining the resonant frequency, and both parameters are capable of being tuned with plasma instabilities. This work is supported by the Air Force Office of Scientific Research.

  2. Plasma surface interactions in controlled fusion devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ghendrih, Ph.; Becoulet, M.; Costanzo, L. [and others

    2000-07-01

    This report brings together all the contributions of EURATOM/CEA association to the 14. international conference on plasma surface interactions in controlled fusion devices. 24 papers are presented and they deal mainly with the ergodic divertor and the first wall of Tore-supra tokamak.

  3. A plasma process monitor/control system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stevenson, J.O.; Ward, P.P.; Smith, M.L. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Markle, R.J. [Advanced Micro Devices, Inc., Austin, TX (United States)

    1997-08-01

    Sandia National Laboratories has developed a system to monitor plasma processes for control of industrial applications. The system is designed to act as a fully automated, sand-alone process monitor during printed wiring board and semiconductor production runs. The monitor routinely performs data collection, analysis, process identification, and error detection/correction without the need for human intervention. The monitor can also be used in research mode to allow process engineers to gather additional information about plasma processes. The plasma monitor can perform real-time control of support systems known to influence plasma behavior. The monitor can also signal personnel to modify plasma parameters when the system is operating outside of desired specifications and requires human assistance. A notification protocol can be selected for conditions detected in the plasma process. The Plasma Process Monitor/Control System consists of a computer running software developed by Sandia National Laboratories, a commercially available spectrophotometer equipped with a charge-coupled device camera, an input/output device, and a fiber optic cable.

  4. Pulsed Plasma Lubrication Device and Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofer, Richard R. (Inventor); Bickler, Donald B. (Inventor); D'Agostino, Saverio A. (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    Disclosed herein is a lubrication device comprising a solid lubricant disposed between and in contact with a first electrode and a second electrode dimensioned and arranged such that application of an electric potential between the first electrode and the second electrode sufficient to produce an electric arc between the first electrode and the second electrode to produce a plasma in an ambient atmosphere at an ambient pressure which vaporizes at least a portion of the solid lubricant to produce a vapor stream comprising the solid lubricant. Methods to lubricate a surface utilizing the lubrication device in-situ are also disclosed.

  5. Sample processing device and method

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2011-01-01

    A sample processing device is disclosed, which sample processing device comprises a first substrate and a second substrate, where the first substrate has a first surface comprising two area types, a first area type with a first contact angle with water and a second area type with a second contact...... a sample liquid comprising the sample and the first preparation system is adapted to receive a receiving liquid. In a particular embodiment, a magnetic sample transport component, such as a permanent magnet or an electromagnet, is arranged to move magnetic beads in between the first and second substrates....

  6. Advanced plasma diagnostics for plasma processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malyshev, Mikhail Victorovich

    1999-10-01

    A new, non-intrusive, non-perturbing diagnostic method was developed that can be broadly applied to low pressure, weakly ionized plasmas and glow discharges-trace rare gases optical emission spectroscopy (TRG-OES). The method is based on a comparison of intensities of atomic emission from trace amounts of inert gases (He, Ne, Ar, Kr, and Xe) that are added to the discharge to intensities calculated from the theoretical model. The model assumes a Maxwellian electron energy distribution function (EEDF), computes the population of emitting levels both from the ground state and the metastable states of rare gases, and from the best fit between theory and experiment determines electron temperature (Te). Subject to conditions, TRG-OES can also yield electron density or its upper or lower limit. From the comparison of the emission from levels excited predominantly by high energy electrons to that excited by low energy electrons, information about the EEDF can be obtained. The use of TRG-OES also allows a traditionally qualitative actinometry technique (determination of concentration of radical species in plasma through optical emission) to become a precise quantitative method by including Te and rare gases metastables effects. A combination of TRG-OES, advanced actinometry, and Langmuir probe measurements was applied to several different plasma reactors and regimes of operation. Te measurements and experiments to correct excitation cross section were conducted in a laboratory helical resonator. Two chamber configuration of a commercial (Lam Research) metal etcher were studied to determine the effects of plasma parameters on plasma-induced damage. Two different methods (RF inductive coupling and ultra-high frequency coupling) for generating a plasma in a prototype reactor were also studied. Pulsed plasmas, a potential candidate to eliminate the plasma-induced damage to microelectronics devices that occurs in manufacturing due to differential charging of the wafer, have

  7. Variation of plasma parameters in a modified mode of plasma production in a double plasma device

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    A Phukan; M K Mishra; B K Saikia; M Chakraborty

    2010-03-01

    A modified mode of plasma production in a double plasma device is presented and plasma parameters are controlled in this configuration. Here plasma is produced by applying a discharge voltage between the hot filaments in the source (cathode) and the target magnetic cage (anode) of the device. In this configuration, the hot electron emitting filaments are present only in the source and the magnetic cage of this is kept at a negative bias such that due to the repulsion of the cage bias, the primary electrons can go to the grounded target and produce plasma there. The plasma parameters can be controlled by varying the voltages applied to the source magnetic cage and the separation grid of the device.

  8. Pulsed Plasma Methods in Materials Processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rej, D. J.

    1996-05-01

    Plasmas are routinely used to synthesize advanced materials, because of their ability to produce reactant species that enable a wide variety of chemical reactions. For example, in microelectronics manufacturing, plasmas are used to etch, clean, ash photoresist, implant, deposit, polymerize, and metalize. The use of pulsed power may extend the utility of plasma processing. Pulsed devices such as coaxial plasma guns, cathodic arcs, pseudosparks have been employed to synthesize materials ranging from novel steel alloys and high-temperature superconductors to diamond coatings. In this talk, we will highlight plasma immersion ion implantation and deposition, methods that improve conventional steady-state chemical and physical vapor deposition techniques. Pulsed power enables energetic ion bombardment before plasma deposition to promote better film adhesion through the formation of a graded interface. Ion bombardment during deposition reduces residual stress in the deposited film, thereby enabling formation of thick layers. Also, pulsed plasma sources have advantages over steady-state devices in that they conserve electrical power and can produce high-density, fully-dissociated plasmas. As an example, we will review recent experiments on the formation of adherent diamond-like carbon films deposited onto relatively large batches of automotive components.

  9. Plasma flow in peripheral region of detached plasma in linear plasma device

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hayashi, Y., E-mail: hayashi-yuki13@ees.nagoya-u.ac.jp; Ohno, N. [Graduate School of Engineering, Nagoya University, Nagoya, Aichi 464-8603 (Japan); Kajita, S. [EcoTopia Science Institute, Nagoya University, Nagoya, Aichi 464-8603 (Japan); Tanaka, H. [National Institute for Fusion Science, Toki, Gifu 509-5292 (Japan)

    2016-01-15

    A plasma flow structure is investigated using a Mach probe under detached plasma condition in a linear plasma device NAGDIS-II. A reverse flow along the magnetic field is observed in a steady-state at far-peripheral region of the plasma column in the upstream side from the recombination front. These experimental results indicate that plasma near the recombination front should strongly diffuse across the magnetic field, and it should be transported along the magnetic field in the reverse flow direction. Furthermore, bursty plasma density fluctuations associated with intermittent convective plasma transport are observed in the far-peripheral region of the plasma column in both upstream and downstream sides from the recombination front. Such a nondiffusive transport can contribute to the intermittent reverse plasma flow, and the experimental results indicate that intermittent transports are frequently produced near the recombination front.

  10. High-Throughput Dry Processes for Large-Area Devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    BUSS,RICHARD J.; HEBNER,GREGORY A.; RUBY,DOUGLAS S.; YANG,PIN

    1999-11-01

    In October 1996, an interdisciplinary team began a three-year LDRD project to study the plasma processes of reactive ion etching and plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition on large-area silicon devices. The goal was to develop numerical models that could be used in a variety of applications for surface cleaning, selective etching, and thin-film deposition. Silicon solar cells were chosen as the experimental vehicle for this project because an innovative device design was identified that would benefit from immediate performance improvement using a combination of plasma etching and deposition processes. This report presents a summary of the technical accomplishments and conclusions of the team.

  11. Thermovoltaic semiconductor device including a plasma filter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldasaro, Paul F.

    1999-01-01

    A thermovoltaic energy conversion device and related method for converting thermal energy into an electrical potential. An interference filter is provided on a semiconductor thermovoltaic cell to pre-filter black body radiation. The semiconductor thermovoltaic cell includes a P/N junction supported on a substrate which converts incident thermal energy below the semiconductor junction band gap into electrical potential. The semiconductor substrate is doped to provide a plasma filter which reflects back energy having a wavelength which is above the band gap and which is ineffectively filtered by the interference filter, through the P/N junction to the source of radiation thereby avoiding parasitic absorption of the unusable portion of the thermal radiation energy.

  12. Microencapsulation and Electrostatic Processing Device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrison, Dennis R. (Inventor); Mosier, Benjamin (Inventor); Cassanto, John M. (Inventor)

    2001-01-01

    A microencapsulation and electrostatic processing (MEP) device is provided for forming microcapsules. In one embodiment, the device comprises a chamber having a filter which separates a first region in the chamber from a second region in the chamber. An aqueous solution is introduced into the first region through an inlet port, and a hydrocarbon/ polymer solution is introduced into the second region through another inlet port. The filter acts to stabilize the interface and suppress mixing between the two immiscible solutions as they are being introduced into their respective regions. After the solutions have been introduced and have become quiescent, the interface is gently separated from the filter. At this point, spontaneous formation of microcapsules at the interface may begin to occur, or some fluid motion may be provided to induce microcapsule formation. In any case, the fluid shear force at the interface is limited to less than 100 dynes/sq cm. This low-shear approach to microcapsule formation yields microcapsules with good sphericity and desirable size distribution. The MEP device is also capable of downstream processing of microcapsules, including rinsing, re-suspension in tertiary fluids, electrostatic deposition of ancillary coatings, and free-fluid electrophoretic separation of charged microcapsules.

  13. INTRODUCTION: Nonequilibrium Processes in Plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrović, Zoran; Marić, Dragana; Malović, Gordana

    2009-07-01

    This book aims to give a cross section from a wide range of phenomena that, to different degrees, fall under the heading of non-equilibrium phenomenology. The selection is, of course, biased by the interests of the members of the scientific committee and of the FP6 Project 026328 IPB-CNP Reinforcing Experimental Centre for Non-equilibrium Studies with Application in Nano-technologies, Etching of Integrated Circuits and Environmental Research. Some of the papers included here are texts based on selected lectures presented at the Second International Workshop on Non-equilibrium Processes in Plasmas and Environmental Science. However, this volume is not just the proceedings of that conference as it contains a number of papers from authors that did not attend the conference. The goal was to put together a volume that would cover the interests of the project and support further work. It is published in the Institute of Physics journal Journal of Physics: Conference Series to ensure a wide accessibility of the articles. The texts presented here range from in-depth reviews of the current status and past achievements to progress reports of currently developed experimental devices and recently obtained still unpublished results. All papers have been refereed twice, first when speakers were selected based on their reputation and recently published results, and second after the paper was submitted both by the editorial board and individual assigned referees according to the standards of the conference and of the journal. Nevertheless, we still leave the responsibility (and honours) for the contents of the papers to the authors. The papers in this book are review articles that give a summary of the already published work or present the work in progress that will be published in full at a later date (or both). In the introduction to the first volume, in order to show how far reaching, ubiquitous and important non-equilibrium phenomena are, we claimed that ever since the early

  14. Autonomous Method and System for Minimizing the Magnitude of Plasma Discharge Current Oscillations in a Hall Effect Plasma Device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hruby, Vladimir (Inventor); Demmons, Nathaniel (Inventor); Ehrbar, Eric (Inventor); Pote, Bruce (Inventor); Rosenblad, Nathan (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    An autonomous method for minimizing the magnitude of plasma discharge current oscillations in a Hall effect plasma device includes iteratively measuring plasma discharge current oscillations of the plasma device and iteratively adjusting the magnet current delivered to the plasma device in response to measured plasma discharge current oscillations to reduce the magnitude of the plasma discharge current oscillations.

  15. Plasma Processing of Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    1985-02-22

    used in France. In this case, three ’ movable electrodes arranged about the central axis with a coaxial sheath gas are employed. Initially the...Demiocratic Republic plasma furnace. chrome -magnesite; the bottom section is lined with rammed chrome -magnesite refractory. Due to the high heat loads... sheath injector design, cathode tip shape, and degree of water cooling are important parameters in providing a stable, uncontaminating, long-lifetime

  16. A secondary fuel removal process: plasma processing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Min, J. Y.; Kim, Y. S. [Hanyang Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Bae, K. K.; Yang, M. S. [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1997-07-01

    Plasma etching process of UO{sub 2} by using fluorine containing gas plasma is studied as a secondary fuel removal process for DUPIC (Direct Use of PWR spent fuel Into Candu) process which is taken into consideration for potential future fuel cycle in Korea. CF{sub 4}/O{sub 2} gas mixture is chosen for reactant gas and the etching rates of UO{sub 2} by the gas plasma are investigated as functions of CF{sub 4}/O{sub 2} ratio, plasma power, substrate temperature, and plasma gas pressure. It is found that the optimum CF{sub 4}/O{sub 2} ratio is around 4:1 at all temperatures up to 400 deg C and the etching rate increases with increasing r.f. power and substrate temperature. Under 150W r.f. power the etching rate reaches 1100 monolayers/min at 400 deg C, which is equivalent to about 0.5mm/min. (author).

  17. Physical processes associated with current collection by plasma contactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katz, Ira; Davis, Victoria A.

    1990-01-01

    Recent flight data confirms laboratory observations that the release of neutral gas increases plasma sheath currents. Plasma contactors are devices which release a partially ionized gas in order to enhance the current flow between a spacecraft and the space plasma. Ionization of the expellant gas and the formation of a double layer between the anode plasma and the space plasma are the dominant physical processes. A theory is presented of the interaction between the contactor plasma and the background plasma. The conditions for formation of a double layer between the two plasmas are derived. Double layer formation is shown to be a consequence of the nonlinear response of the plasmas to changes in potential. Numerical calculations based upon this model are compared with laboratory measurements of current collection by hollow cathode-based plasma contactors.

  18. Status and challenges in electrical diagnostics of processing plasmas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stamate, Eugen

    2014-01-01

    Dry processing based on reactive plasmas was the main driven force for micro- and recently nano-electronic industry. Once with the increasing in plasma complexity new diagnostics methods have been developed to ensure a proper process control during etching, thin film deposition, ion implantation...... or other steps in device fabrication. This work reviews some of the unconventional methods developed in the last two decays to measure the parameters of reactive plasmas including, the test function method, thermal probes, and plasma-sheath-lens probes. The negative ion detection and surface contamination...... in plasmas with a high degree of contamination are also addressed. (C) 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved....

  19. In-liquid plasma devices and methods of use thereof

    KAUST Repository

    Cha, Min Suk

    2017-08-10

    Devices and methods for generating a plasma in a liquid are provided. A low- dielectric material can be placed in contact with the liquid to form an interface a distance from an anode. A voltage can be applied across the anode and a cathode submerged in the liquid to produce the plasma. A variety of devices are provided, including for continuous operation. The devices and methods can be used to generate a plasma in a variety of liquids, for example for water treatment, hydrocarbon reformation, or synthesis of nanomaterial.

  20. Plasma detachment with molecular processes in divertor plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ohno, N.; Ezumi, N.; Nishijima, D.; Takamura, S. [Dept. of Energy Engineering and Science, Graduate School of Engineering, Nagoya Univ., Nagoya, Aichi (Japan); Krasheninnikov, S.I.; Pigarov, A.Yu. [MIT Plasma Science and Fusion Center, Cambridge, MA (United States)

    2000-01-01

    Molecular processes in detached recombining plasmas are briefly reviewed. Several reactions with vibrationally excited hydrogen molecule related to recombination processes are described. Experimental evidence of molecular activated recombination observed in a linear divertor plasma simulator is also shown. (author)

  1. Modeling a Dry Etch Process for Large-Area Devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buss, R.J.; Hebner, G.A.; Ruby, D.S.; Yang, P.

    1999-07-28

    There has been considerable interest in developing dry processes which can effectively replace wet processing in the manufacture of large area photovoltaic devices. Environmental and health issues are a driver for this activity because wet processes generally increase worker exposure to toxic and hazardous chemicals and generate large volumes of liquid hazardous waste. Our work has been directed toward improving the performance of screen-printed solar cells while using plasma processing to reduce hazardous chemical usage.

  2. Analysis of Power Model for Linear Plasma Device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Weiwei; Deng, Baiquan; Zuo, Haoyi; Zheng, Xianjun; Cao, Xiaogang; Xue, Xiaoyan; Ou, Wei; Cao, Zhi; Gou, Fujun

    2016-08-01

    A single cathode linear plasma device has been designed and constructed to investigate the interactions between plasma and materials at the Sichuan University. In order to further investigate the Ohmic power of the device, the output heat load on the specimen and electric potential difference (between cathode and anode) have been tested under different discharge currents. This special power distribution in the radial direction of the plasma discharge channel has also been discussed and described by some improved integral equations in this paper; it can be further simplified as P ∝ α-2 in one-parameter. Besides, we have measured the power loss of the channel under different discharge currents by the calorimetric method, calculated the effective power of the device and evaluated the performances of the plasma device through the power efficiency analysis. supported by International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) Program (No. 2013GB114003) and National Natural Science Foundation of China (Nos. 11275135 and 11475122)

  3. Lightweight Portable Plasma Medical Device - Plasma Engineering Research Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-01

    sensitive surfaces. In this paper, the consumed power for plasma generation (plasma power) has been estimated from voltage-current waveform analysis in... consumed power for plasma generation is calculated by integrating the product of the discharge voltage and current over one cycle; according to the...Faculty Symposium: Course Design for the Millennial Student, Texas A&M University – Corpus Christi, 2011. (Showcased by the Center for Faculty

  4. Lightweight Portable Plasma Medical Device - Plasma Engineering Research Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-12-01

    research associates. The PI and the research team have published over 10 journal articles and over 50 conference proceedings and over 50 symposiums...reflections. Optical interference filters with center wavelength at 5322 or 632.82 nm are used in front of the ICCD to suppress the plasma self- luminescence ...wavelength at 532 ± 2 nm was used in front of the ICCD to suppress the plasma jet self- luminescence . The shadow of the laser induced plasma falls onto

  5. Plasma Processing of Lunar and Planetary Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Currier, R.; Blacic, J.

    2000-01-01

    Space exploration and colonization must include oxygen for propulsion and life support, as well as, structural materials for construction. To the extent possible, these should be derived from locally available planetary resources. We propose an extractive metallurgy and oxygen recovery process well-suited for resource utilization in space. Locally available minerals are placed in a radio frequency-generated hydrogen plasma. This is accomplished using a fluidized bed contacting device. Electromagnetic energy is coupled to the hydrogen gas forming a non-equilibrium plasma. The plasma produces the ideal reducing agent - atomic hydrogen - in direct and intimate contact with the solid particles. When using oxide minerals as a feed, atomic hydrogen extracts oxygen from the matrix through the formation of water. The water is subsequently split into oxygen and hydrogen (the hydrogen is then recycled back to the plasma reactor). The processed solids could then be refined to produce structural materials. A conceptual process flow diagram, which requires an initial charge of hydrogen, is given.

  6. The HelCat dual-source plasma device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lynn, Alan G; Gilmore, Mark; Watts, Christopher; Herrea, Janis; Kelly, Ralph; Will, Steve; Xie, Shuangwei; Yan, Lincan; Zhang, Yue

    2009-10-01

    The HelCat (Helicon-Cathode) device has been constructed to support a broad range of basic plasma science experiments relevant to the areas of solar physics, laboratory astrophysics, plasma nonlinear dynamics, and turbulence. These research topics require a relatively large plasma source capable of operating over a broad region of parameter space with a plasma duration up to at least several milliseconds. To achieve these parameters a novel dual-source system was developed utilizing both helicon and thermionic cathode sources. Plasma parameters of n(e) approximately 0.5-50 x 10(18) m(-3) and T(e) approximately 3-12 eV allow access to a wide range of collisionalities important to the research. The HelCat device and initial characterization of plasma behavior during dual-source operation are described.

  7. Versatile and Rapid Plasma Heating Device for Steel and Aluminum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reddy, G.S.

    2006-03-14

    The main objective of the research was to enhance steel and aluminum manufacturing with the development of a new plasma RPD device. During the project (1) plasma devices were manufactured (2) testing for the two metals were carried out and (3) market development strategies were explored. Bayzi Corporation has invented a Rapid Plasma Device (RPD) which produces plasma, comprising of a mixture of ionized gas and free electrons. The ions, when they hit a conducting surface, deposit heat in addition to the convective heat. Two generic models called the RPD-Al and RPD-S have been developed for the aluminum market and the steel market. Aluminum melting rates increased to as high as 12.7 g/s compared to 3 g/s of the current industrial practice. The RPD melting furnace operated at higher energy efficiency of 65% unlike most industrial processes operating in the range of 13 to 50%. The RPD aluminum melting furnace produced environment friendly cleaner melts with less than 1% dross. Dross is the residue in the furnace after the melt is poured out. Cast ingots were extremely clean and shining. Current practices produce dross in the range of 3 to 12%. The RPD furnace uses very low power ~0.2 kWh/Lb to melt aluminum. RPDs operate in one atmosphere using ambient air to produce plasma while the conventional systems use expensive gases like argon, or helium in air-tight chambers. RPDs are easy to operate and do not need intensive capital investment. Narrow beam, as well as wide area plasma have been developed for different applications. An RPD was developed for thermal treatments of steels. Two different applications have been pursued. Industrial air hardening steel knife edges were subjected to plasma beam hardening. Hardness, as measured, indicated uniform distribution without any distortion. The biggest advantage with this method is that the whole part need not be heated in a furnace which will lead to oxidation and distortion. No conventional process will offer localized

  8. The HelCat basic plasma science device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilmore, M.; Lynn, A. G.; Desjardins, T. R.; Zhang, Y.; Watts, C.; Hsu, S. C.; Betts, S.; Kelly, R.; Schamiloglu, E.

    2015-01-01

    The Helicon-Cathode(HelCat) device is a medium-size linear experiment suitable for a wide range of basic plasma science experiments in areas such as electrostatic turbulence and transport, magnetic relaxation, and high power microwave (HPM)-plasma interactions. The HelCat device is based on dual plasma sources located at opposite ends of the 4 m long vacuum chamber - an RF helicon source at one end and a thermionic cathode at the other. Thirteen coils provide an axial magnetic field B >= 0.220 T that can be configured individually to give various magnetic configurations (e.g. solenoid, mirror, cusp). Additional plasma sources, such as a compact coaxial plasma gun, are also utilized in some experiments, and can be located either along the chamber for perpendicular (to the background magnetic field) plasma injection, or at one of the ends for parallel injection. Using the multiple plasma sources, a wide range of plasma parameters can be obtained. Here, the HelCat device is described in detail and some examples of results from previous and ongoing experiments are given. Additionally, examples of planned experiments and device modifications are also discussed.

  9. 77 FR 58576 - Certain Wireless Communication Devices, Portable Music and Data Processing Devices, Computers...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-21

    ... COMMISSION Certain Wireless Communication Devices, Portable Music and Data Processing Devices, Computers, and... importation of certain wireless communication devices, portable music and data processing devices, computers... after importation of certain wireless communication devices, portable music and data processing...

  10. Plasma diagnostics in plasma processing for nanotechnology and nanolevel chemistry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiroshi Akatsuka

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available The author reviews the role of various plasma diagnostics in plasma processing for nanotechnology, and points out some essential methods of spectroscopic methods to diagnose plasmas for nanoprocessing. Two experimental examples are discussed between the characteristics of nanomaterials and plasma parameters. One is measurement of rotation temperature in processing of carbon nanotube. The other is that of vibrational temperature in surface nitriding of titanium by nitrogen plasma processing. We summarize what to measure and how to measure them from the technical viewpoint of plasma diagnostics.

  11. Design and Construction of a Dense Plasma Focus Device

    Science.gov (United States)

    1976-10-01

    breakdown phase ............ 6 3. Typical device waveforms ........ .................... . 11 4. Fluid models of pinch mechanisms...16 5. Ion trajectory models ........... ...................... 19 6. Fillipov-type plasma focus device ...... ................ ... 22 7...52 14a. Pulse amplifier .......... ......................... ... 56 14b. Triggering circuit for the thyratron tube and spark gap ........ 57 15

  12. New Large Diameter RF Complex Plasma Device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, John; Nosenko, Volodymyr; Thomas, Hubertus

    2016-10-01

    The Complex Plasma Research Group at the German Aerospace Center (DLR) in Oberpfaffenhofen has built a new large diameter rf plasma setup for dusty plasma experiments. The vacuum chamber is a stainless steel cylinder 0.90 m in diameter and 0.34 m in height with ports for viewing and measurement. A 0.85 m diameter plate in about the center serves as a powered electrode (13.56 MHz) with the chamber walls as the ground. It is pumped on by one of two Oerlikon turbo pumps with a pumping rate of 1100 l/s or 270 l/s. Argon gas is admitted into the chamber by an MKS mass flow meter and pumping is regulated by a butterfly valve to set pressure for experiments. A manual dropper is used to insert dust into the plasma. The dust is illuminated horizontally by a 660 nm 100 mW laser sheet and viewed from above by a Photron FASTCAM 1024 PCI camera. A vertical laser sheet of 635 nm will be used for side imaging. So far, single-layer plasma crystals of up to 15000 particles have been suspended. The particle velocity fluctuation spectra were measured and from these, the particle charge and screening length were calculated. Future experiments will explore the system-size dependence of the plasma crystal properties.

  13. Plasma parameters controlled by remote electron shower in a double plasma device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishra, M. K.; Phukan, A.

    2012-07-01

    The principal feature of this experiment is the electron showers consisting of three tungsten wires embedded by the plasma, which are heated up consequently emitting electrons inside the diffused plasma to control the plasma parameters in the discharge section of a double plasma device. These cold electrons emitted by the heated filament are free from maintenance of discharge which is sustained in the source section. The target plasma, where electrons are injected is produced as a result of diffusion from the source section. It is found that, plasma density and plasma potential can be effectively controlled in this way.

  14. Lightweight Portable Plasma Medical Device - Plasma Engineering Research Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-10-01

    Gadri, J. R. Roth , T. C. Montie, K. Kelly-Wintenberg, P. P. Y. Tsai, D. J. Helfritch, P. Feldman, D. M. Sherman, F. Karakaya, Z. Y. Chen, and U. P. S...Edinburgh, Scotland : 39th IEEE International Conference on Plasma Science (ICOPS), 2012). 20. Magesh Thiyagarajan, Xavier Gonzales$, Heather...Anderson# and Megan Norfolk. Non-thermal Plasma Induction of Pre-Programmed Cell Death in Monocytic Leukemia Cells. (Edinburgh, Scotland : 39th IEEE

  15. Parameters of atmospheric plasmas produced by electrosurgical devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keidar, Michael; Shashurin, Alexey; Canady, Jerome

    2013-10-01

    Electrosurgical systems are extensively utilized in general surgery, surgical oncology, plastic and reconstructive surgery etc. In this work we study plasma parameters created by electrosurgical system SS-200E/Argon 2 of US Medical Innovations. The maximal length of the discharge plasma column at which the discharge can be sustained was determined as function of discharge power and argon flow rate. Electrical parameters including discharge current and voltage were measured. Recently proposed Rayleigh microwave scattering method for temporally resolved density measurements of small-size atmospheric plasmas was utilized. Simultaneously, evolution of plasma column was observed using intensified charge-coupled device (ICCD) camera.

  16. 77 FR 51571 - Certain Wireless Communication Devices, Portable Music and Data Processing Devices, Computers...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-24

    ... COMMISSION Certain Wireless Communication Devices, Portable Music and Data Processing Devices, Computers, and... communication devices, portable music and data processing devices, computers, and components thereof. The.... International Trade Commission has received a complaint entitled Wireless Communication Devices, Portable...

  17. 78 FR 12785 - Certain Wireless Communication Devices, Portable Music and Data Processing Devices, Computers and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-25

    ... COMMISSION Certain Wireless Communication Devices, Portable Music and Data Processing Devices, Computers and... communication devices, portable music and data processing devices, computers and components thereof by reason of... evidence demonstrates that the existence of portable communication devices using ``touch sensitive...

  18. Non-logic devices in logic processes

    CERN Document Server

    Ma, Yanjun

    2017-01-01

    This book shows readers how to design semiconductor devices using the most common and lowest cost logic CMOS processes.  Readers will benefit from the author’s extensive, industrial experience and the practical approach he describes for designing efficiently semiconductor devices that typically have to be implemented using specialized processes that are expensive, time-consuming, and low-yield. The author presents an integrated picture of semiconductor device physics and manufacturing techniques, as well as numerous practical examples of device designs that are tried and true.

  19. Lightweight Portable Plasma Medical Device - Plasma Engineering Research Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-01

    34Nonthermal Plasma Technology as a Versatile Strategy for Polymeric Biomaterials Surface Modification: A Review," Biomacromolecules, vol. 10, pp. 2351...high aspect ratio for biomedical applications with complex 3D surface geometries, capillaries and microstructure dental cavities.15-18 Atmospheric

  20. Corrosion and wear in plasma electrosurgical devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaspredes, J.; Ryan, T. P.; Stalder, K. R.; Woloszko, J.

    2017-02-01

    Data were previously reported on studies of the effects of electrical discharges on the corrosion and wear of simple, single-wire test devices immersed in isotonic saline 1 . This work showed that there are a wide variety of mechanisms that can explain various aspects of electrode mass loss, even with very simple electrode geometries and operating conditions. It was found that the electrode material composition played an important role. Subsequently, our studies were expanded to include more realistic device geometries and operating conditions. This paper shows the results of studies on wear characteristics of electrodes made from a variety of highly corrosion resistant metals and alloys, including Waspaloy, Hastelloy, Inconel, Havar, Monel, and other pure metals such as Hafnium. All of these metals underwent wear testing under clinically relevant conditions. Depending on the operating conditions, multiple discrete physical and chemical effects were observed at different locations on the surface of an individual millimeter-scale device electrode. Scanning electron microscope (SEM) micrographs, Energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) and area loss data will be presented for a variety of test conditions and electrode materials.

  1. Operational status of the Magnum-PSI linear plasma device

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scholten, John, E-mail: j.scholten@differ.nl; Zeijlmans van Emmichoven, P.A.; Eck, H.J.N. van; Smeets, P.H.M.; De Temmerman, G.C.; Brons, S.; Berg, M.A. van den; Meiden, H.J. van der; Pol, M.J. van de; Graswinckel, M.F.; Groen, P.W.C.; Poelman, A.J.; Genuit, J.W.

    2013-10-15

    Highlights: • High heat flux, high density plasmas in a highly accessible linear plasma device. • Plasma exposure of targets of different sizes under selectable plasma beam angles. • Dedicated plasma and surface diagnostics. • Differential vacuum pumping system. -- Abstract: The construction phase of the linear plasma generator Magnum-PSI at the FOM institute DIFFER has been completed and the facility has been officially opened in March 2012. The scientific program to gain more insight in the plasma–wall interactions relevant for ITER and future fusion reactors has started. In Magnum-PSI, targets of a wide range of materials and shapes can be exposed to high particle, high heat flux plasmas (>10{sup 24} ions m{sup −2} s{sup −1}; >10 MW/m{sup 2}). For magnetization of the plasma, oil-cooled electromagnets are temporarily installed to enable pulsed operation until the device is upgraded with a superconducting magnet. The magnets generate a field of up to 1.9 T close to the plasma source for a duration of 6 s. Longer exposure times are available for lower field settings. Plasma characterizations were done with a variety of gases (H, D, He, Ne and Ar) to determine the machine performance and prepare for subsequent scientific experiments. Thomson scattering and optical emission spectroscopy were used to determine the plasma parameters while infrared thermography and target calorimetry were used to determine the power loads to the surface. This paper reports on the status of Magnum-PSI and its diagnostic systems. In addition, an overview of the plasma parameters that can be achieved in the present state will be given.

  2. Electronic devices for analog signal processing

    CERN Document Server

    Rybin, Yu K

    2012-01-01

    Electronic Devices for Analog Signal Processing is intended for engineers and post graduates and considers electronic devices applied to process analog signals in instrument making, automation, measurements, and other branches of technology. They perform various transformations of electrical signals: scaling, integration, logarithming, etc. The need in their deeper study is caused, on the one hand, by the extension of the forms of the input signal and increasing accuracy and performance of such devices, and on the other hand, new devices constantly emerge and are already widely used in practice, but no information about them are written in books on electronics. The basic approach of presenting the material in Electronic Devices for Analog Signal Processing can be formulated as follows: the study with help from self-education. While divided into seven chapters, each chapter contains theoretical material, examples of practical problems, questions and tests. The most difficult questions are marked by a diamon...

  3. Characterisation of a micro-plasma device sensor using electrical measurements and emission spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mariotti, D

    2002-04-01

    This thesis reports on research undertaken on the characterisation of a micro-plasma device to be used for gas analysis by mean of plasma emission spectroscopy. The work covers aspects related to the micro-plasma electrical and optical emission parameters, and their importance for the utilisation of the micro-plasma device in gas analysis. Experimental results have been used to analyse the fundamental micro-plasma processes and to develop a model, which could provide additional information. This dissertation contains a general literature review of topics related to plasma physics, plasma emission spectroscopy, gas analysis (chemical analysis and artificial olfaction) and other micro-plasma applications. Experimental work focuses on two main areas: electrical measurements and emission measurements. Firstly, electrical measurements are taken and interpretations are given. Where necessary, new theoretical treatments are suggested in order to describe better the physical phenomena. Plasma emission has been considered under different working conditions. This allowed the characterisation of the micro-plasma emission and also a better understanding of the micro-plasma processes. On the basis of the experimental data obtained and other assumptions a model has been developed. A computer simulation based on this model provided additional useful information on the micro- plasma behaviour. The first fundamental implication of this new research is the peculiar behaviour of the micro-plasma. This micro-plasma exhibited deviations from Paschen law and strong dependency on cathode material, which contributed to the formation of a low current stable regime. These results have been followed by physical interpretations and theoretical descriptions. The second implication is the establishment of the boundaries and of the influencing parameters for plasma emission spectroscopy as an analytical tool in this particular micro-plasma. From the applied perspective this study has shown that

  4. Bipolar Charge Plasma Transistor: A Novel Three Terminal Device

    OpenAIRE

    Kumar, M. Jagadesh; Nadda, Kanika

    2012-01-01

    A distinctive approach for forming a lateral Bipolar Charge Plasma Transistor (BCPT) is explored using 2-D simulations. Different metal work-function electrodes are used to induce n- and p-type charge plasma layers on undoped SOI to form the emitter, base and collector regions of a lateral NPN transistor. Electrical characteristics of the proposed device are simulated and compared with that of a conventionally doped lateral bipolar junction transistor with identical dimensions. Our simulation...

  5. Upgrading of the Magnetic Confinement Plasma Device KT-5E

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    何迎花; 余羿; 闻一之; 刘万东; 李定; 俞昌旋; 谢锦林; 李弘; 兰涛; 王昊宇

    2012-01-01

    In this article we present ideas of providing appropriate poloidal magnetic field for helimaks to help to generate toroidal magnetic plasma torus. Placing a conductive ring in the center of the cross-section to induce a suitable current, we change the helical magnetic field lines in the helimak discharge into magnetic surface. In this kind of discharge, the plasma density is greatly increased, and the corresponding density fluctuation is significantly decreased, showing a better confinement by magnetic shear. It allows more flexible and efficient experimental investigations on the toroidal magnetic confinement plasmas to be carried on in this kind of device.

  6. Study on plasma parameters and dust charging in an electrostatically plugged multicusp plasma device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kakati, B.; Kausik, S. S.; Saikia, B. K.; Bandyopadhyay, M.

    2011-06-01

    The effect of the electrostatic confinement potential on the charging of dust grains and its relationship with the plasma parameters has been studied in an electrostatically plugged multicusp dusty plasma device. Electrostatic plugging is implemented by biasing the electrically isolated magnetic multicusp channel walls. The experimental results show that voltage applied to the channel walls can be a controlling parameter for dust charging.

  7. Interaction of powerful hot plasma and fast ion streams with materials in dense plasma focus devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chernyshova, M., E-mail: maryna.chernyshova@ipplm.pl [Institute of Plasma Physics and Laser Microfusion, Warsaw (Poland); Gribkov, V.A. [Institute of Plasma Physics and Laser Microfusion, Warsaw (Poland); Institution of Russian Academy of Sciences A.A. Baikov Institute of Metallurgy and Material Science RAS, Moscow (Russian Federation); Kowalska-Strzeciwilk, E.; Kubkowska, M.; Miklaszewski, R.; Paduch, M.; Pisarczyk, T.; Zielinska, E. [Institute of Plasma Physics and Laser Microfusion, Warsaw (Poland); Demina, E.V.; Pimenov, V.N.; Maslyaev, S.A. [Institution of Russian Academy of Sciences A.A. Baikov Institute of Metallurgy and Material Science RAS, Moscow (Russian Federation); Bondarenko, G.G. [National Research University Higher School of Economics (HSE), Moscow (Russian Federation); Vilemova, M.; Matejicek, J. [Institute of Plasma Physics of the CAS, Prague (Czech Republic)

    2016-12-15

    Highlights: • Materials perspective for use in mainstream nuclear fusion facilities were studied. • Powerful streams of hot plasma and fast ions were used to induce irradiation. • High temporal, spatial, angular and spectral resolution available in experiments. • Results of irradiation were investigated by number of analysis techniques. - Abstract: A process of irradiating and ablating solid-state targets with hot plasma and fast ion streams in two Dense Plasma Focus (DPF) devices – PF-6 and PF-1000 was examined by applying a number of diagnostics of nanosecond time resolution. Materials perspective for use in chambers of the mainstream nuclear fusion facilities (mainly with inertial plasma confinement like NIF and Z-machine), intended both for the first wall and for constructions, have been irradiated in these simulators. Optical microscopy, SEM, Atomic Emission Spectroscopy, images in secondary electrons and in characteristic X-ray luminescence of different elements, and X-ray elemental analysis, gave results on damageability for a number of materials including low-activated ferritic and austenitic stainless steels, β-alloy of Ti, as well as two types of W and a composite on its base. With an increase of the number of shots irradiating the surface, its morphology changes from weakly pronounced wave-like structures or ridges to strongly developed ones. At later stages, due to the action of the secondary plasma produced near the target materials they melted, yielding both blisters and a fracturing pattern: first along the grain and then “in-between” the grains creating an intergranular net of microcracks. At the highest values of power flux densities multiple bubbles appeared. Furthermore, in this last case the cracks were developed because of microstresses at the solidification of melt. Presence of deuterium within the irradiated ferritic steel surface nanolayers is explained by capture of deuterons in lattice defects of the types of impurity atoms

  8. Effect of plasma processing reactor circuitry on plasma characteristics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rauf, S.; Kushner, M.J. [Univ. of Illinois, Urbana, IL (United States). Dept. of Electrical and Computer Engineering

    1997-12-31

    It is well known that external circuitry greatly influences the performance of plasma processing reactors. Simulation of external circuits difficult since the time in which the external circuit attains the steady-state is several orders of magnitude longer than typical plasma simulation time scales. In this paper, the authors present a technique to simulate the external circuit concurrently with the plasma, and implement it into the Hybrid Plasma Equipment Model (HPEM). The resulting model is used to investigate the influence of external circuitry on plasma behavior.

  9. Process compilation methods for thin film devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaman, Mohammed Hasanuz

    This doctoral thesis presents the development of a systematic method of automatic generation of fabrication processes (or process flows) for thin film devices starting from schematics of the device structures. This new top-down design methodology combines formal mathematical flow construction methods with a set of library-specific available resources to generate flows compatible with a particular laboratory. Because this methodology combines laboratory resource libraries with a logical description of thin film device structure and generates a set of sequential fabrication processing instructions, this procedure is referred to as process compilation, in analogy to the procedure used for compilation of computer programs. Basically, the method developed uses a partially ordered set (poset) representation of the final device structure which describes the order between its various components expressed in the form of a directed graph. Each of these components are essentially fabricated "one at a time" in a sequential fashion. If the directed graph is acyclic, the sequence in which these components are fabricated is determined from the poset linear extensions, and the component sequence is finally expanded into the corresponding process flow. This graph-theoretic process flow construction method is powerful enough to formally prove the existence and multiplicity of flows thus creating a design space {cal D} suitable for optimization. The cardinality Vert{cal D}Vert for a device with N components can be large with a worst case Vert{cal D}Vert≤(N-1)! yielding in general a combinatorial explosion of solutions. The number of solutions is hence controlled through a-priori estimates of Vert{cal D}Vert and condensation (i.e., reduction) of the device component graph. The mathematical method has been implemented in a set of algorithms that are parts of the software tool MISTIC (Michigan Synthesis Tools for Integrated Circuits). MISTIC is a planar process compiler that generates

  10. Atomic and molecular processes in fusion plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Janev, R.K. [International Atomic Energy Agency, Vienna (Austria)

    1997-01-01

    The role of atomic and molecular processes in achieving and maintaining the conditions for thermonuclear burn in a magnetically confined fusion plasma is described. Emphasis is given to the energy balance and power and particle exhaust issues. The most important atomic and molecular processes which affect the radiation losses and impurity transport in the core plasma, the neutral particle transport in the plasma edge and the radiative cooling of divertor plasmas are discussed in greater detail. (author)

  11. Chaos control and taming of turbulence in plasma devices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klinger, T.; Schröder, C.; Block, D.;

    2001-01-01

    Chaos and turbulence are often considered as troublesome features of plasma devices. In the general framework of nonlinear dynamical systems, a number of strategies have been developed to achieve active control over complex temporal or spatio-temporal behavior. Many of these techniques apply to p...

  12. Initial damage processes for diamond film exposure to hydrogen plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deslandes, A., E-mail: acd@ansto.gov.au [Institute for Environmental Research, Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation, Sydney (Australia); Institute of Materials Engineering, Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation, Sydney (Australia); Guenette, M.C. [Institute of Materials Engineering, Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation, Sydney (Australia); Samuell, C.M. [Plasma Research Laboratory, Research School of Physics and Engineering, The Australian National University, Canberra 0200 (Australia); Karatchevtseva, I. [Institute of Materials Engineering, Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation, Sydney (Australia); Ionescu, M.; Cohen, D.D. [Institute for Environmental Research, Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation, Sydney (Australia); Blackwell, B. [Plasma Research Laboratory, Research School of Physics and Engineering, The Australian National University, Canberra 0200 (Australia); Corr, C., E-mail: cormac.corr@anu.edu.au [Plasma Research Laboratory, Research School of Physics and Engineering, The Australian National University, Canberra 0200 (Australia); Riley, D.P., E-mail: dry@ansto.gov.au [Institute of Materials Engineering, Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation, Sydney (Australia)

    2013-12-15

    Graphical abstract: -- Highlights: • Exposing chemical vapour deposited (CVD) diamond films in a recently constructed device, MAGPIE, specially commissioned to simulate fusion plasma conditions. • Non-diamond material is etched from the diamond. • There is no hydrogen retention observed, which suggests diamond is an excellent candidate for plasma facing materials. • Final structure of the surface is dependent on synergistic effects of etching and ion-induced structural change. -- Abstract: Diamond is considered to be a possible alternative to other carbon based materials as a plasma facing material in nuclear fusion devices due to its high thermal conductivity and resistance to chemical erosion. In this work CVD diamond films were exposed to hydrogen plasma in the MAGnetized Plasma Interaction Experiment (MAGPIE): a linear plasma device at the Australian National University which simulates plasma conditions relevant to nuclear fusion. Various negative sample stage biases of magnitude less than 500 V were applied to control the energies of impinging ions. Characterisation results from SEM, Raman spectroscopy and ERDA are presented. No measureable quantity of hydrogen retention was observed, this is either due to no incorporation of hydrogen into the diamond structure or due to initial incorporation as a hydrocarbon followed by subsequent etching back into the plasma. A model is presented for the initial stages of diamond erosion in fusion relevant hydrogen plasma that involves chemical erosion of non-diamond material from the surface by hydrogen radicals and damage to the subsurface region from energetic hydrogen ions. These results show that the initial damage processes in this plasma regime are comparable to previous studies of the fundamental processes as reported for less extreme plasma such as in the development of diamond films.

  13. 77 FR 52759 - Certain Wireless Communication Devices, Portable Music and Data Processing Devices, Computers and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-30

    ... COMMISSION Certain Wireless Communication Devices, Portable Music and Data Processing Devices, Computers and... importation of certain wireless communication devices, portable music and data processing devices, computers... to a data communications system.'' The Commission has determined to affirm the ID's finding...

  14. 78 FR 24775 - Certain Wireless Communication Devices, Portable Music and Data Processing Devices, Computers and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-26

    ... COMMISSION Certain Wireless Communication Devices, Portable Music and Data Processing Devices, Computers and... United States after importation of certain wireless communication devices, portable music and data processing devices, computers and components thereof by reason of ] infringement of certain claims of...

  15. The upgraded Large Plasma Device, a machine for studying frontier basic plasma physics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gekelman, W; Pribyl, P; Lucky, Z; Drandell, M; Leneman, D; Maggs, J; Vincena, S; Van Compernolle, B; Tripathi, S K P; Morales, G; Carter, T A; Wang, Y; DeHaas, T

    2016-02-01

    In 1991 a manuscript describing an instrument for studying magnetized plasmas was published in this journal. The Large Plasma Device (LAPD) was upgraded in 2001 and has become a national user facility for the study of basic plasma physics. The upgrade as well as diagnostics introduced since then has significantly changed the capabilities of the device. All references to the machine still quote the original RSI paper, which at this time is not appropriate. In this work, the properties of the updated LAPD are presented. The strategy of the machine construction, the available diagnostics, the parameters available for experiments, as well as illustrations of several experiments are presented here.

  16. Numerical Experiments Providing New Insights into Plasma Focus Fusion Devices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sing Lee

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Recent extensive and systematic numerical experiments have uncovered new insights into plasma focus fusion devices including the following: (1 a plasma current limitation effect, as device static inductance is reduced towards very small values; (2 scaling laws of neutron yield and soft x-ray yield as functions of storage energies and currents; (3 a global scaling law for neutron yield as a function of storage energy combining experimental and numerical data showing that scaling deterioration has probably been interpreted as neutron ‘saturation’; and (4 a fundamental cause of neutron ‘saturation’. The ground-breaking insights thus gained may completely change the directions of plasma focus fusion research.

  17. Understanding of Edge Plasmas in Magnetic Fusion Energy Devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rognlien, T

    2004-11-01

    A limited overview is given of the theoretical understanding of edge plasmas in fusion devices. This plasma occupies the thin region between the hot core plasma and material walls in magnetically confinement configurations. The region is often formed by a change in magnetic topology from close magnetic field lines (i.e., the core region) and open field lines that contact material surfaces (i.e., the scrape-off layer [SOL]), with the most common example being magnetically diverted tokamaks. The physics of this region is determined by the interaction of plasma with neutral gas in the presence of plasma turbulence, with impurity radiation being an important component. Recent advances in modeling strong, intermittent micro-turbulent edge-plasma transport is given, and the closely coupled self-consistent evolution of the edge-plasma profiles in tokamaks. In addition, selected new results are given for the characterization of edge-plasmas behavior in the areas of edge-pedestal relaxation and SOL transport via Edge-Localize Modes (ELMs), impurity formation including dust, and magnetic field-line stochasticity in tokamaks.

  18. Temporal evolution of electron beam generated Argon plasma in pasotron device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khandelwal, Neha; Pal, U. N.; Prakash, Ram; Choyal, Y.

    2016-10-01

    The plasma- assisted slow wave oscillator (PASOTRON) is a high power microwave source in which the electron beam in the interaction region is confined by the background plasma. The plasma is generated by impact ionization of background gas with the electron beam. A model has been developed for temporal evolution of Argon plasma in pasotron device. In this model, we consider electron beam of energy E interacting with Argon gas. The resulting ionization creates quasi neutral argon plasma composed of argon Ar atoms, singly ionized ions Ar+1and electrons having energy from 0 to E. Electron impact excitation, ionization, radiative decay, radiative recombination and three body recombination processes are considered in this model. Population of ground and excited states of argon atom, ground state of argon ion as well as the population of electron energy groups is calculated by solving time dependent rate equations. Temporal evolution of electron beam generated plasma is given.

  19. Dust particles in controlled fusion devices: morphology, observations in the plasma and influence on the plasma performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubel, M.; Cecconello, M.; Malmberg, J. A.; Sergienko, G.; Biel, W.; Drake, J. R.; Hedqvist, A.; Huber, A.; Philipps, V.

    2001-08-01

    The formation and release of particle agglomerates, i.e. debris and dusty objects, from plasma facing components and the impact of such materials on plasma operation in controlled fusion devices has been studied in the Extrap T2 reversed field pinch and the TEXTOR tokamak. Several plasma diagnostic techniques, camera observations and surface analysis methods were applied for in situ and ex situ investigation. The results are discussed in terms of processes that are decisive for dust transfer: localized power deposition connected with wall locked modes causing emission of carbon granules, brittle destruction of graphite and detachment of thick flaking co-deposited layers. The consequences for large next step devices are also addressed.

  20. Modeling a short cold cathode DC discharge device with controllable plasma parameters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kudryavtsev, Anatoly; Adams, Steven; Demidov, Vladimir; Bogdanov, Yevgeny

    2009-11-01

    A short (without positive column) DC gas-discharge device with a cold cathode has been modeled. The device consists of the plane disk-shaped cathode and anode while the inter-electrode gap is bounded by a cylindrical wall. The cathode and anode are each 2.5 cm in diameter, and the inter-electrode gap is 12 mm. The wall is made of conducting parts divided by an insulator. The modeling has been performed for argon plasma at 1 Torr pressure. It is demonstrated in the model that spatial distributions of electron density and temperature and argon metastable atom density depend on the DC voltage applied to different conducting parts of the wall. Applied voltage can trap within the device volume energetic electrons arising from atomic and molecular processes in the plasma. This leads to a modification in the heating of slow electrons by energetic electrons and as a result modifies the controlling plasma parameters.

  1. Scaled Laboratory Collisionless Shock Experiments in the Large Plasma Device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, S. E.; Schaeffer, D.; Everson, E.; Bondarenko, A.; Winske, D.; Constantin, C.; Niemann, C.

    2013-12-01

    Collisionless shocks in space plasmas have been investigated since the fifties and are typically studied via in-situ satellite observations, which are limited due to the large structure of collisionless shocks in space environments relative to the satellite observation platform. Scaled, repeatable experiments in the Large Plasma Device (LAPD) at UCLA provide a test bed for studying collisionless shocks in the laboratory, where questions of ion and electron heating and acceleration can be addressed and examined in detail. The experiments are performed by ablating a graphite or plastic target using the Raptor kilojoule-class laser facility at UCLA. The laser provides an on-target energy in the range of 100-500 J that drives a super-Alfvénic (MA > 1) debris plasma across a background magnetic field (200-800 G) into the ambient, magnetized LAPD plasma. Typical plasma parameters in the LAPD consist of a H+ or He+ ambient plasma with a core column (diameter > 20 cm ) density ni ~ 1013 cm-3 and electron temperature Te ~ 10 eV embedded in a larger plasma discharge (diameter ~ 80 cm) of density ni ~ 1012 cm-3 and Te ~ 5 eV. The ambient ion temperature is Ti ~ 1 eV. Experimental results from the latest collisionless shock campaign will be presented and compared with two dimensional hybrid simulations of the experiment. Fielded diagnostics include Thomson scattering, ion spectroscopy, magnetic flux probes, Langmuir probes, and microwave reflectometry.

  2. Two-fluid biasing simulations of the large plasma device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisher, Dustin M.; Rogers, Barrett N.

    2017-02-01

    External biasing of the Large Plasma Device (LAPD) and its impact on plasma flows and turbulence are explored for the first time in 3D simulations using the Global Braginskii Solver code. Without external biasing, the LAPD plasma spontaneously rotates in the ion diamagnetic direction. The application of a positive bias increases the plasma rotation in the simulations, which show the emergence of a coherent Kelvin Helmholtz (KH) mode outside of the cathode edge with poloidal mode number m ≃6 . Negative biasing reduces the rotation in the simulations, which exhibit KH turbulence modestly weaker than but otherwise similar to unbiased simulations. Biasing either way, but especially positively, forces the plasma potential inside the cathode edge to a spatially constant, KH-stable profile, leading to a more quiescent core plasma than the unbiased case. A moderate increase in plasma confinement and an associated steepening of the profiles are seen in the biasing runs. The simulations thus show that the application of external biasing can improve confinement while also driving a Kelvin-Helmholtz instability. Ion-neutral collisions have only a weak effect in the biased or unbiased simulations.

  3. Current and Perspective Applications of Dense Plasma Focus Devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gribkov, V. A.

    2008-04-01

    Dense Plasma Focus (DPF) devices' applications, which are intended to support the main-stream large-scale nuclear fusion programs (NFP) from one side (both in fundamental problems of Dense Magnetized Plasma physics and in its engineering issues) as well as elaborated for an immediate use in a number of fields from the other one, are described. In the first direction such problems as self-generated magnetic fields, implosion stability of plasma shells having a high aspect ratio, etc. are important for the Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) programs (e.g. as NIF), whereas different problems of current disruption phenomenon, plasma turbulence, mechanisms of generation of fast particles and neutrons in magnetized plasmas are of great interest for the large devices of the Magnetic Plasma Confinement—MPC (e.g. as ITER). In a sphere of the engineering problems of NFP it is shown that in particular the radiation material sciences have DPF as a very efficient tool for radiation tests of prospect materials and for improvement of their characteristics. In the field of broad-band current applications some results obtained in the fields of radiation material sciences, radiobiology, nuclear medicine, express Neutron Activation Analysis (including a single-shot interrogation of hidden illegal objects), dynamic non-destructive quality control, X-Ray microlithography and micromachining, and micro-radiography are presented. As the examples of the potential future applications it is proposed to use DPF as a powerful high-flux neutron source to generate very powerful pulses of neutrons in the nanosecond (ns) range of its duration for innovative experiments in nuclear physics, for the goals of radiation treatment of malignant tumors, for neutron tests of materials of the first wall, blankets and NFP device's constructions (with fluences up to 1 dpa per a year term), and ns pulses of fast electrons, neutrons and hard X-Rays for brachytherapy.

  4. Plasma chemistry study of PLAD processes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qin Shu; Brumfield, Kyle; Liu, Lequn Jennifer; Hu, Yongjun Jeff; McTeer, Allen; Hsu, Wei Hui; Wang Maoying [Nanya Technology Inc., Santa Clara, CA 95054 (United States); Micron Technology Inc., Boise, ID 83707 (United States)

    2012-11-06

    Plasma doping (PLAD) shows very different impurity profiles compared to the conventional beam-line-based ion implantations due to its non-mass separation property and plasma environment. There is no simulation for PLAD process so far due to a lack of a dopant profile model. Several factors determine impurity profiles of PLAD process. The most significant factors are: plasma chemistry and deposition/etching characteristics of multi-ion species plasmas. In this paper, we present plasma chemistry and deposition/etching characteristics of PLAD processes versus co-gas dilutions. Four dopant plasmas including B{sub 2}H{sub 6}, BF{sub 3}, AsH{sub 3}, and PH{sub 3}, and two non-dopant plasmas including CH{sub 4} and GeH{sub 4} are studied and demonstrated.

  5. Negative ion studies on the RF plasma device MAGPIE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willett, Hannah; Santoso, Jesse; Corr, Cormac; Gibson, Kieran

    2016-10-01

    Neutral beam injection (NBI) systems provide both heating and current drive in tokamak fusion reactors. High energy (> 1 MeV) neutral beams are produced by neutralising accelerated ions, for which negative ions are used; the neutralisation cross section for positive ions becomes negligible at these energies. This requires very high throughput negative ion sources. Currently this is achieved using inductively coupled plasma sources, which incorporate caesium to improve the production rate. It has been proposed that helicon plasma sources could provide a more efficient, higher throughput method of producing negative ions for NBI, possibly even removing the need for caesium. We report on studies of the negative hydrogen ion population in the MAGPIE helicon device (Australian National University) under a variety of operating conditions. The probe-based laser photodetachment method and Langmuir probes are employed to estimate the negative hydrogen ion density throughout the device. Initial results support the viability of helicon-based negative ion sources.

  6. Atmospheric Pressure Plasma Process And Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peter C. Kong; Myrtle

    2006-09-01

    This paper provides a general discussion of atmospheric-pressure plasma generation, processes, and applications. There are two distinct categories of atmospheric-pressure plasmas: thermal and nonthermal. Thermal atmospheric-pressure plasmas include those produced in high intensity arcs, plasma torches, or in high intensity, high frequency discharges. Although nonthermal plasmas are at room temperatures, they are extremely effective in producing activated species, e.g., free radicals and excited state atoms. Thus, both thermal and nonthermal atmosphericpressure plasmas are finding applications in a wide variety of industrial processes, e.g. waste destruction, material recovery, extractive metallurgy, powder synthesis, and energy conversion. A brief discussion of recent plasma technology research and development activities at the Idaho National Laboratory is included.

  7. Negative hydrogen ions in a linear helicon plasma device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corr, Cormac; Santoso, Jesse; Samuell, Cameron; Willett, Hannah; Manoharan, Rounak; O'Byrne, Sean

    2015-09-01

    Low-pressure negative ion sources are of crucial importance to the development of high-energy (>1 MeV) neutral beam injection systems for the ITER experimental tokamak device. Due to their high power coupling efficiency and high plasma densities, helicon devices may be able to reduce power requirements and potentially remove the need for caesium. In helicon sources, the RF power can be coupled efficiently into the plasma and it has been previously observed that the application of a small magnetic field can lead to a significant increase in the plasma density. In this work, we investigate negative ion dynamics in a high-power (20 kW) helicon plasma source. The negative ion fraction is measured by probe-based laser photodetachment, electron density and temperature are determined by a Langmuir probe and tuneable diode laser absorption spectroscopy is used to determine the density of the H(n = 2) excited atomic state and the gas temperature. The negative ion density and excited atomic hydrogen density display a maximum at a low applied magnetic field of 3 mT, while the electron temperature displays a minimum. The negative ion density can be increased by a factor of 8 with the application of the magnetic field. Spatial and temporal measurements will also be presented. The Australian Research Grants Council is acknowledged for funding.

  8. Study of plasma equilibrium in toroidal fusion devices using mesh-free numerical calculation method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasouli, C.; Abbasi Davani, F.; Rokrok, B.

    2016-08-01

    Plasma confinement using external magnetic field is one of the successful ways leading to the controlled nuclear fusion. Development and validation of the solution process for plasma equilibrium in the experimental toroidal fusion devices is the main subject of this work. Solution of the nonlinear 2D stationary problem as posed by the Grad-Shafranov equation gives quantitative information about plasma equilibrium inside the vacuum chamber of hot fusion devices. This study suggests solving plasma equilibrium equation which is essential in toroidal nuclear fusion devices, using a mesh-free method in a condition that the plasma boundary is unknown. The Grad-Shafranov equation has been solved numerically by the point interpolation collocation mesh-free method. Important features of this approach include truly mesh free, simple mathematical relationships between points and acceptable precision in comparison with the parametric results. The calculation process has been done by using the regular and irregular nodal distribution and support domains with different points. The relative error between numerical and analytical solution is discussed for several test examples such as small size Damavand tokamak, ITER-like equilibrium, NSTX-like equilibrium, and typical Spheromak.

  9. Synchronous pulsing plasma utilization in dummy poly gate removal process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Ruixuan; Meng, Xiao-Ying; Han, Qiu-Hua; Zhang, Hai-Yang

    2015-03-01

    When CMOS technology reaches 28/20nm node and beyond, several new schemes are implemented such as High K metal gate (HKMG) which can enhance the device performance and has better control of device current leakage. Dummy poly gate removal (DPGR) process is introduced for HKMG, and works as a key process to control the work function of metal gate and threshold voltage (Vt) shift. In dry etch technology, conventional continuous wave (CW) plasma process has been widely used, however, it may not be capable for some challenging process in 28nm node and beyond. In DPGR process for HKMG scheme, CW scheme may result in plasma damage of gate oxide/capping layer for its inherent high electron temperature (Te) and ion energy while synchronous pulsing scheme is capable to simultaneously pulse both source and bias power, which could achieve lower Te, independent control of ion and radical flux, well control the loading of polymer deposition on dense/ isolate features. It's the first attempt to utilize synchronous pulsing plasma in DPGR process. Experiment results indicate that synchronous pulsing could provide less silicon recess under thin gate oxide which is induced by the plasma oxidation. Furthermore, the loading of HK capping layer loss between long channel and short channel can be well controlled which plays a key role on transistor performance, such as leakage and threshold voltage shift. Additionally, it has been found that synchronous pulsing could distinctly improve ILD loss when compared with CW, which is helpful to broaden the whole process window.

  10. Integrated separation of blood plasma from whole blood for microfluidic paper-based analytical devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xiaoxi; Forouzan, Omid; Brown, Theodore P; Shevkoplyas, Sergey S

    2012-01-21

    Many diagnostic tests in a conventional clinical laboratory are performed on blood plasma because changes in its composition often reflect the current status of pathological processes throughout the body. Recently, a significant research effort has been invested into the development of microfluidic paper-based analytical devices (μPADs) implementing these conventional laboratory tests for point-of-care diagnostics in resource-limited settings. This paper describes the use of red blood cell (RBC) agglutination for separating plasma from finger-prick volumes of whole blood directly in paper, and demonstrates the utility of this approach by integrating plasma separation and a colorimetric assay in a single μPAD. The μPAD was fabricated by printing its pattern onto chromatography paper with a solid ink (wax) printer and melting the ink to create hydrophobic barriers spanning through the entire thickness of the paper substrate. The μPAD was functionalized by spotting agglutinating antibodies onto the plasma separation zone in the center and the reagents of the colorimetric assay onto the test readout zones on the periphery of the device. To operate the μPAD, a drop of whole blood was placed directly onto the plasma separation zone of the device. RBCs in the whole blood sample agglutinated and remained in the central zone, while separated plasma wicked through the paper substrate into the test readout zones where analyte in plasma reacted with the reagents of the colorimetric assay to produce a visible color change. The color change was digitized with a portable scanner and converted to concentration values using a calibration curve. The purity and yield of separated plasma was sufficient for successful operation of the μPAD. This approach to plasma separation based on RBC agglutination will be particularly useful for designing fully integrated μPADs operating directly on small samples of whole blood.

  11. Atomic processes in optically thin plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaastra, Jelle S.; Gu, Liyi; Mao, Junjie; Mehdipour, Missagh; Raassen, Ton; Urdampilleta, Igone

    2016-10-01

    The Universe contains a broad range of plasmas with quite different properties depending on distinct physical processes. In this contribution we give an overview of recent developments in modeling such plasmas with a focus on X-ray emission and absorption. Despite the fact that such plasmas have been investigated already for decades, and that overall there is a good understanding of the basic processes, there are still areas, where improvements have to be made that are important for the analysis of astrophysical plasmas. We present recent work on the update of atomic parameters in the codes that describe the emission from collisional plasmas, where older approximations are being replaced now by more accurate data. Further we discuss the development of models for photo-ionised plasmas in the context of outflows around supermassive black holes and models for charge transfer that are needed for analyzing the data from the upcoming ASTRO-H satellite.

  12. Experimental investigation of vapor shielding effects induced by ELM-like pulsed plasma loads using the double plasma gun device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakuma, I.; Kikuchi, Y.; Kitagawa, Y.; Asai, Y.; Onishi, K.; Fukumoto, N.; Nagata, M.

    2015-08-01

    We have developed a unique experimental device of so-called double plasma gun, which consists of two magnetized coaxial plasma gun (MCPG) devices, in order to clarify effects of vapor shielding on material erosion due to transient events in magnetically confined fusion devices. Two ELM-like pulsed plasmas produced by the two MCPG devices were injected into a target chamber with a variable time difference. For generating ablated plasmas in front of a target material, an aluminum foil sample in the target chamber was exposed to a pulsed plasma produced by the 1st MCPG device. The 2nd pulsed plasma was produced with a time delay of 70 μs. It was found that a surface absorbed energy measured by a calorimeter was reduced to ∼66% of that without the Al foil sample. Thus, the reduction of the incoming plasma energy by the vapor shielding effect was successfully demonstrated in the present experiment.

  13. Experimental investigation of vapor shielding effects induced by ELM-like pulsed plasma loads using the double plasma gun device

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sakuma, I., E-mail: eu13z002@steng.u-hyogo.ac.jp; Kikuchi, Y.; Kitagawa, Y.; Asai, Y.; Onishi, K.; Fukumoto, N.; Nagata, M.

    2015-08-15

    We have developed a unique experimental device of so-called double plasma gun, which consists of two magnetized coaxial plasma gun (MCPG) devices, in order to clarify effects of vapor shielding on material erosion due to transient events in magnetically confined fusion devices. Two ELM-like pulsed plasmas produced by the two MCPG devices were injected into a target chamber with a variable time difference. For generating ablated plasmas in front of a target material, an aluminum foil sample in the target chamber was exposed to a pulsed plasma produced by the 1st MCPG device. The 2nd pulsed plasma was produced with a time delay of 70 μs. It was found that a surface absorbed energy measured by a calorimeter was reduced to ∼66% of that without the Al foil sample. Thus, the reduction of the incoming plasma energy by the vapor shielding effect was successfully demonstrated in the present experiment.

  14. The ITER full size plasma source device design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sonato, P. [Consorzio RFX, EURATOM-ENEA Association, Corso Stati Uniti 4, I-35127 Padova (Italy)], E-mail: piergiorgio.sonato@igi.cnr.it; Agostinetti, P.; Anaclerio, G.; Antoni, V.; Barana, O.; Bigi, M.; Boldrin, M. [Consorzio RFX, EURATOM-ENEA Association, Corso Stati Uniti 4, I-35127 Padova (Italy); Cavenago, M. [INFN, Legnaro, Padova (Italy); Dal Bello, S.; Palma, M. Dalla [Consorzio RFX, EURATOM-ENEA Association, Corso Stati Uniti 4, I-35127 Padova (Italy); Daniele, A. [ENEA, Frascati, Roma (Italy); D' Arienzo, M.; De Lorenzi, A.; Ferro, A.; Fiorentin, A.; Gaio, E.; Gazza, E.; Grando, L.; Fantini, F.; Fellin, F. [Consorzio RFX, EURATOM-ENEA Association, Corso Stati Uniti 4, I-35127 Padova (Italy)] (and others)

    2009-06-15

    In the framework of the strategy for the development and the procurement of the NB systems for ITER, it has been decided to build in Padova a test facility, including two experimental devices: a full size plasma source with low voltage extraction and a full size NB injector at full beam power (1 MV). These two different devices will separately address the main scientific and technological issues of the 17 MW NB injector for ITER. In particular the full size plasma source of negative ions will address the ITER performance requirements in terms of current density and uniformity, limitation of the electron/ion ratio and stationary operation at full current with high reliability and constant performances for the whole operating time up to 1 h. The required negative ion current density to be extracted from the plasma source ranges from 290 A/m{sup 2} in D{sub 2} (D{sup -}) and 350 A/m{sup 2} in H{sub 2} (H{sup -}) and these values should be obtained at the lowest admissible neutral pressure in the plasma source volume, nominally at 0.3 Pa. The electron to ion ratio should be limited to less than 1 and the admissible ion inhomogeneity extracted from the grids should be better than 10% on the whole plasma cross-section having a surface exposed to the extraction grid of the order of 1 m{sup 2}. The main design choices will be presented in the paper as well as an overview of the design of the main components and systems.

  15. Proceedings of the international seminar on atomic processes in plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kato, Takako; Murakami, Izumi [eds.

    2000-01-01

    The International Seminar on Atomic Processes in Plasmas (ISAPP), a satellite meeting to the ICPEAC was held July 28-29 at the National Institute for Fusion Science in Toki, Gifu, Japan. About 110 scientists attended the ISAPP meeting and discussed atomic processes and atomic data required for fusion research. This Proceedings book includes the papers of the talks, posters and panel discussion given at the meeting. The invited talks described the super configuration array method for complex spectra, near-LTE atomic kinetics, R-matrix calculations, the binary-encounter dipole model for electron-impact ionization of molecules, other calculations of molecular processes, the ADAS project and the NIFS atomic data-base, and a survey of the role of molecular processes in divertor plasmas. On the experimental side crossed-beam ion-ion collision-experiments for charge transfer, and storage-ring and EBIT measurements of ionization, excitation and dielectronic recombination cross-sections were presented, and atomic processes important for x-ray laser experiments and x-ray spectroscopy of astrophysical plasmas were described. The new method of plasma polarization spectroscopy was outlined. There was also a spectroscopic study of particle transport in JT-60U, new results for detached plasmas, and a sketch of the first hot plasma experiments with the Large Helical Device recently completed at NIFS. The 63 of the presented papers are indexed individually. (J.P.N.)

  16. Ultrafast optical signal processing using semiconductor optical devices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mørk, Jesper; Bischoff, Svend; Berg, Tommy Winther;

    2002-01-01

    We discuss the operation principles of semiconductor devices for ultrafast optical processing, emphasizing the physical processes affecting the device characteristics and the approaches taken to simulate these.......We discuss the operation principles of semiconductor devices for ultrafast optical processing, emphasizing the physical processes affecting the device characteristics and the approaches taken to simulate these....

  17. Surface studies of plasma processed Nb samples

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tyagi, Puneet V. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States). Spallation Neutron Source (SNS); Doleans, Marc [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States). Spallation Neutron Source (SNS); Hannah, Brian S. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States). Spallation Neutron Source (SNS); Afanador, Ralph [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States). Spallation Neutron Source (SNS); Stewart, Stephen [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States). Spallation Neutron Source (SNS); Mammosser, John [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States). Spallation Neutron Source (SNS); Howell, Matthew P [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States). Spallation Neutron Source (SNS); Saunders, Jeffrey W [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States). Spallation Neutron Source (SNS); Degraff, Brian D [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States). Spallation Neutron Source (SNS); Kim, Sang-Ho [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States). Spallation Neutron Source (SNS)

    2015-01-01

    Contaminants present at top surface of superconducting radio frequency (SRF) cavities can act as field emitters and restrict the cavity accelerating gradient. A room temperature in-situ plasma processing technology for SRF cavities aiming to clean hydrocarbons from inner surface of cavities has been recently developed at the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS). Surface studies of the plasma-processed Nb samples by Secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) and Scanning Kelvin Probe (SKP) showed that the NeO2 plasma processing is very effective to remove carbonaceous contaminants from top surface and improves the surface work function by 0.5 to 1.0 eV.

  18. Dusty Plasma Experimental (DPEx) device for complex plasma experiments with flow

    CERN Document Server

    Jaiswal, S; Sen, A

    2015-01-01

    A versatile table-top dusty plasma experimental device (DPEx) to study flow induced excitations of linear and nonlinear waves/structures in a complex plasma is presented. In this $\\Pi$-shaped apparatus a DC glow discharge plasma is produced between a disc shaped anode and a grounded long cathode tray by applying a high voltage DC in the background of a neutral gas and subsequently a dusty plasma is created by introducing micron sized dust particles that get charged and levitated in the sheath region. A flow of the dust particles is induced in a controlled manner by adjusting the pumping speed and the gas flow rate into the device. A full characterisation of the plasma, using Langmuir and emissive probe data, and that of the dusty plasma using particle tracking data with the help of an idl based (super) Particle Identification and Tracking (sPIT) code is reported. Experimental results on the variation of the dust flow velocity as a function of the neutral pressure and the gas flow rate are given. The potential...

  19. Modeling of defect generation during plasma etching and its impact on electronic device performance—plasma-induced damage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eriguchi, Koji

    2017-08-01

    The increasing demand for the higher performance of ultra-large-scale integration (ULSI) circuits requires the aggressive shrinkage of device feature sizes in accordance with the scaling law. Plasma processing plays an important role in achieving fine patterns with anisotropic features in metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistors (MOSFETs). This article comprehensively addresses the negative aspects of plasma processing, i.e. plasma process-induced damage, in particular, the defect creation induced by ion bombardment in Si substrates during plasma etching. The ion bombardment damage forms a surface modified region and creates localized defect structures. Modeling and characterization techniques of the ion bombardment damage in Si substrates are overviewed. The thickness of the modified region, i.e. the damaged layer, is modeled by a modified range theory and the density of defects is characterized by photoreflectance spectroscopy (PRS) and the capacitance-voltage technique. The effects of plasma-induced damage (PID) on MOSFET performance are presented. In addition, some of the emerging topics—the enhanced parameter variability in ULSI circuits and recovery of the damage—are discussed as future perspectives.

  20. Space plasma physics: I - Stationary processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasegawa, Akira; Sato, Tetsuya

    1989-01-01

    The physics of stationary processes in space plasmas is examined theoretically in an introduction intended for graduate students. The approach involves the extensive use of numerical simulations. Chapters are devoted to fundamental principles, small-amplitude waves, and the stationary solar plasma system; typical measurement data and simulation results are presented graphically.

  1. A compact plasma focus device and its neutron emission

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王新新; 韩旻; 王志文; 刘坤

    1999-01-01

    A 2.2-kJ compact plasma focus device was developed and its characteristics of neutron emission were investigated. A maximum neutron yield of (3.1 ± 1.5) × 10~7 was obtained at 15 hPa deuterium filling pressure. It was found that the neutron yield Y_n is strongly correlated with the amplitude of the pinch dip in di/dt waveform. The time resolved measurement of the neutron pulse indicated that both the hard X-rays and the neutrons are emitted from plasma focus at the same instant and the width of neutron pulse (FWHM) changes slightly from 50 to 53 ns. The pinch time t_p varies from 1.5 to 16.5 ns and it is usually the case that the shorter t_p, the higher the neutron yield. It was also found that the squirrel cage cathode is better than the tubular cathode.

  2. Experimental results of breakdown in "Dena" plasma focus device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goudarzi, Shervin; Hoseinian, S. M.; Raeisdana, A.

    2014-06-01

    In spite of the intense research activities on Plasma Focus devices, the physics of the initial breakdown and surface discharge phase has not been realized completely. In this paper we have analyzed the surface discharge and initial breakdown phase in Filippov-type Plasma Focus Facility "Dena" (90 kJ, 25 kV) on the base of the current and current derivative measured signals by using Argon, Neon and Krypton as working gases at different discharge voltages and gas pressures, and the effects of working conditions (atomic weight, discharge voltage and gas pressure) on the breakdown and surface discharge phase have expressed. Also, on the base of these results, we have investigated about the relation of this phase with final pinch phase.

  3. High-throughput blood cell focusing and plasma isolation using spiral inertial microfluidic devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiang, Nan; Ni, Zhonghua

    2015-12-01

    Herein, we explored the blood cell focusing and plasma isolation using a spiral inertial microfluidic device. First, the flow-rate and concentration effects on the migration dynamics of blood cells were systematically investigated to uncover the focusing mechanisms and steric crowding effects of cells in Dean-coupled inertial flows. A novel phenomenon that the focusing status of discoid red blood cells (RBCs) changes according to the channel height was discovered. These experimental data may provide valuable insights for the high-throughput processing of blood samples using inertial microfluidics. On the basis of the improved understandings on blood cell focusing, efficient isolation of plasma from whole blood with a 20-fold dilution was achieved at a throughput up to 700 μl/min. The purity of the isolated blood plasma was close to 100 %, and the plasma yield was calculated to be 38.5 %. As compared with previously-reported devices, our spiral inertial microfluidic device provides a balanced overall performance, and has overriding advantages in terms of processing throughput and operating efficiency.

  4. Understanding plasma facing surfaces in magnetic fusion devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skinner, C. H.; Capece, A. M.; Koel, B. E.; Roszell, J. P.

    2013-09-01

    The plasma-material interface is recognized to be the most critical challenge in the realization of fusion energy. Liquid metals offer a self-healing, renewable interface that bypasses present issues with solid, neutron-damaged materials such as tungsten. Lithium in particular has dramatically improved plasma performance in many tokamaks through a reduction of hydrogen recycling. However the detailed chemical composition and properties of the top few nm that interact with the plasma are often obscure. Surface analysis has proven to be a key tool in semiconductor processing and a new laboratory has been established at PPPL to apply surface science techniques to plasma facing materials. We have shown that lithiated PFC surfaces in tokamaks will likely be oxidized during the intershot interval. Present work is focused on deuterium uptake of solid and liquid metals for plasma density control and sub-micron scale wetting of liquid metals on their substrates. The long-term goal is to provide a material database for designing liquid metal plasma facing components for tokamaks such as National Spherical Torus Experiment-Upgrade (NSTX-U) and Fusion Nuclear Science Facility-ST (FNSF-ST). Support was provided through DOE-PPPL Contract Number is DE-AC02-09CH11466.

  5. Fundamental Processes in Plasmas. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    O' Neil, Thomas M.; Driscoll, C. Fred

    2009-11-30

    This research focuses on fundamental processes in plasmas, and emphasizes problems for which precise experimental tests of theory can be obtained. Experiments are performed on non-neutral plasmas, utilizing three electron traps and one ion trap with a broad range of operating regimes and diagnostics. Theory is focused on fundamental plasma and fluid processes underlying collisional transport and fluid turbulence, using both analytic techniques and medium-scale numerical simulations. The simplicity of these systems allows a depth of understanding and a precision of comparison between theory and experiment which is rarely possible for neutral plasmas in complex geometry. The recent work has focused on three areas in basic plasma physics. First, experiments and theory have probed fundamental characteristics of plasma waves: from the low-amplitude thermal regime, to inviscid damping and fluid echoes, to cold fluid waves in cryogenic ion plasmas. Second, the wide-ranging effects of dissipative separatrices have been studied experimentally and theoretically, finding novel wave damping and coupling effects and important plasma transport effects. Finally, correlated systems have been investigated experimentally and theoretically: UCSD experients have now measured the Salpeter correlation enhancement, and theory work has characterized the 'guiding center atoms of antihydrogen created at CERN.

  6. Saturn Plasma Sources and Associated Transport Processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanc, M.; Andrews, D. J.; Coates, A. J.; Hamilton, D. C.; Jackman, C. M.; Jia, X.; Kotova, A.; Morooka, M.; Smith, H. T.; Westlake, J. H.

    2015-10-01

    This article reviews the different sources of plasma for Saturn's magnetosphere, as they are known essentially from the scientific results of the Cassini-Huygens mission to Saturn and Titan. At low and medium energies, the main plasma source is the H2O cloud produced by the "geyser" activity of the small satellite Enceladus. Impact ionization of this cloud occurs to produce on the order of 100 kg/s of fresh plasma, a source which dominates all the other ones: Titan (which produces much less plasma than anticipated before the Cassini mission), the rings, the solar wind (a poorly known source due to the lack of quantitative knowledge of the degree of coupling between the solar wind and Saturn's magnetosphere), and the ionosphere. At higher energies, energetic particles are produced by energy diffusion and acceleration of lower energy plasma produced by the interchange instabilities induced by the rapid rotation of Saturn, and possibly, for the highest energy range, by contributions from the CRAND process acting inside Saturn's magnetosphere. Discussion of the transport and acceleration processes acting on these plasma sources shows the importance of rotation-induced radial transport and energization of the plasma, and also shows how much the unexpected planetary modulation of essentially all plasma parameters of Saturn's magnetosphere remains an unexplained mystery.

  7. Hydrogen Plasma Processing of Iron Ore

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabat, Kali Charan; Murphy, Anthony B.

    2017-06-01

    Iron is currently produced by carbothermic reduction of oxide ores. This is a multiple-stage process that requires large-scale equipment and high capital investment, and produces large amounts of CO2. An alternative to carbothermic reduction is reduction using a hydrogen plasma, which comprises vibrationally excited molecular, atomic, and ionic states of hydrogen, all of which can reduce iron oxides, even at low temperatures. Besides the thermodynamic and kinetic advantages of a hydrogen plasma, the byproduct of the reaction is water, which does not pose any environmental problems. A review of the theory and practice of iron ore reduction using a hydrogen plasma is presented. The thermodynamic and kinetic aspects are considered, with molecular, atomic and ionic hydrogen considered separately. The importance of vibrationally excited hydrogen molecules in overcoming the activation energy barriers, and in transferring energy to the iron oxide, is emphasized. Both thermal and nonthermal plasmas are considered. The thermophysical properties of hydrogen and argon-hydrogen plasmas are discussed, and their influence on the constriction and flow in the of arc plasmas is considered. The published R&D on hydrogen plasma reduction of iron oxide is reviewed, with both the reduction of molten iron ore and in-flight reduction of iron ore particles being considered. Finally, the technical and economic feasibility of the process are discussed. It is shown that hydrogen plasma processing requires less energy than carbothermic reduction, mainly because pelletization, sintering, and cokemaking are not required. Moreover, the formation of the greenhouse gas CO2 as a byproduct is avoided. In-flight reduction has the potential for a throughput at least equivalent to the blast furnace process. It is concluded that hydrogen plasma reduction of iron ore is a potentially attractive alternative to standard methods.

  8. Hydrogen Plasma Processing of Iron Ore

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabat, Kali Charan; Murphy, Anthony B.

    2017-03-01

    Iron is currently produced by carbothermic reduction of oxide ores. This is a multiple-stage process that requires large-scale equipment and high capital investment, and produces large amounts of CO2. An alternative to carbothermic reduction is reduction using a hydrogen plasma, which comprises vibrationally excited molecular, atomic, and ionic states of hydrogen, all of which can reduce iron oxides, even at low temperatures. Besides the thermodynamic and kinetic advantages of a hydrogen plasma, the byproduct of the reaction is water, which does not pose any environmental problems. A review of the theory and practice of iron ore reduction using a hydrogen plasma is presented. The thermodynamic and kinetic aspects are considered, with molecular, atomic and ionic hydrogen considered separately. The importance of vibrationally excited hydrogen molecules in overcoming the activation energy barriers, and in transferring energy to the iron oxide, is emphasized. Both thermal and nonthermal plasmas are considered. The thermophysical properties of hydrogen and argon-hydrogen plasmas are discussed, and their influence on the constriction and flow in the of arc plasmas is considered. The published R&D on hydrogen plasma reduction of iron oxide is reviewed, with both the reduction of molten iron ore and in-flight reduction of iron ore particles being considered. Finally, the technical and economic feasibility of the process are discussed. It is shown that hydrogen plasma processing requires less energy than carbothermic reduction, mainly because pelletization, sintering, and cokemaking are not required. Moreover, the formation of the greenhouse gas CO2 as a byproduct is avoided. In-flight reduction has the potential for a throughput at least equivalent to the blast furnace process. It is concluded that hydrogen plasma reduction of iron ore is a potentially attractive alternative to standard methods.

  9. Shape reconstruction of merging spherical tokamak plasma in UTST device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ushiki, Tomohiko; Itagaki, Masafumi; Inomoto, Michiaki

    2016-10-01

    Spherical tokamak (ST) merging method is one of the ST start-up methods which heats the plasma through magnetic reconnection. In the present study reconstruction of eddy current profile and plasma shape was performed during spherical tokamak merging only using external sensor signals by the Cauchy condition surface (CCS) method. CCS method have been implemented for JT-60 (QST), QUEST (Kyushu University), KSTAR (NFRI), RELAX (KIT), and LHD (Nifs). In this method, CCS was assumed inside each plasmas, where both flux function and its normal derivative are unknown. Effect of plasma current was replaced by the boundary condition of CCS, assuming vacuum field everywhere. Also, the nodal points for the boundary integrals of eddy current density were set using quadratic elements in order to express the complicated vacuum vessel shape. Reconstructed profiles of the eddy current and the magnetic flux were well coincided with the reference in each phase of merging process. Magnetic sensor installation plan for UTST was determined from these calculation results. This work was supported by the JSPS A3 Foresight Program ``Innovative Tokamak Plasma Startup and Current Drive in Spherical Torus''.

  10. 77 FR 38826 - Certain Wireless Communication Devices, Portable Music and Data Processing Devices, Computers and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-29

    ... COMMISSION Certain Wireless Communication Devices, Portable Music and Data Processing Devices, Computers and... importation, and the sale within the United States after importation of certain wireless communication devices, portable music and data processing devices, computers and components thereof by reason of infringement...

  11. Plasma characterization studies for materials processing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pfender, E.; Heberlein, J. [Univ. of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN (United States)

    1995-12-31

    New applications for plasma processing of materials require a more detailed understanding of the fundamental processes occurring in the processing reactors. We have developed reactors offering specific advantages for materials processing, and we are using modeling and diagnostic techniques for the characterization of these reactors. The emphasis is in part set by the interest shown by industry pursuing specific plasma processing applications. In this paper we report on the modeling of radio frequency plasma reactors for use in materials synthesis, and on the characterization of the high rate diamond deposition process using liquid precursors. In the radio frequency plasma torch model, the influence of specific design changes such as the location of the excitation coil on the enthalpy flow distribution is investigated for oxygen and air as plasma gases. The diamond deposition with liquid precursors has identified the efficient mass transport in form of liquid droplets into the boundary layer as responsible for high growth, and the chemical properties of the liquid for the film morphology.

  12. Cluster processes in gases and plasmas

    CERN Document Server

    Smirnov, Boris M

    2009-01-01

    Boris M. Smirnov received his Ph.D. in physics from Leningrad State University in 1968. After working in different research positions, he finally accepted a post as head of one of the divisions of the Institute for High Temperatures at the Russian Academy of Sciences in Moscow in 1986. Professor Smirnov is the author and co-author of approximately 50 books as well as 400 research articles in plasma physics, atomic physics, and atomic clusters. He is Vice Chairman of the National Council for Low Temperature Plasma and Chairman ofa Section on Elementary Processes in Plasma. Professor Smirnov`s r

  13. Ultrasonic Plasma Spray--A New Plasma Spray Process

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LU Zhi-qing; ZHANG Hua-tang; WEN Xiong-wei; LI Lu-ming

    2004-01-01

    The method of arc- ultrasonic is introduced into plasma spray process. The process of spray ZrO2-NiCoCr AlY thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) using air plasma spray (APS) process is studied. A exciting source which can be adjusted from audio frequency to several hundred thousand Hertz is designed successfully. The ultrasonic exciting source is coupled with conventional DC spraying power supply. A few ultrasonic frequencies are selected in the testing. Several parts of the coatings with the coupling arc- ultrasonic are compared with the coatings without it. The results show: with 50 kHz and 80 kHz ultrasound, the coating qualities are improved, whereas 30 kHz has an opposite effect.

  14. Atmospheric plasma processes for environmental applications

    OpenAIRE

    Shapoval, Volodymyr

    2012-01-01

    Plasma chemistry is a rapidly growing field which covers applications ranging from technological processing of materials, including biological tissues, to environmental remediation and energy production. The so called atmospheric plasma, produced by electric corona or dielectric barrier discharges in a gas at atmospheric pressure, is particularly attractive for the low costs and ease of operation and maintenance involved. The high concentrations of energetic and chemically active species (e.g...

  15. Atmospheric plasma processes for environmental applications

    OpenAIRE

    Shapoval, Volodymyr

    2012-01-01

    Plasma chemistry is a rapidly growing field which covers applications ranging from technological processing of materials, including biological tissues, to environmental remediation and energy production. The so called atmospheric plasma, produced by electric corona or dielectric barrier discharges in a gas at atmospheric pressure, is particularly attractive for the low costs and ease of operation and maintenance involved. The high concentrations of energetic and chemically active species (e.g...

  16. Plasma processing of superconducting radio frequency cavities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Upadhyay, Janardan

    The development of plasma processing technology of superconducting radio frequency (SRF) cavities not only provides a chemical free and less expensive processing method, but also opens up the possibility for controlled modification of the inner surfaces of the cavity for better superconducting properties. The research was focused on the transition of plasma etching from two dimensional flat surfaces to inner surfaces of three dimensional (3D) structures. The results could be applicable to a variety of inner surfaces of 3D structures other than SRF cavities. Understanding the Ar/Cl2 plasma etching mechanism is crucial for achieving the desired modification of Nb SRF cavities. In the process of developing plasma etching technology, an apparatus was built and a method was developed to plasma etch a single cell Pill Box cavity. The plasma characterization was done with the help of optical emission spectroscopy. The Nb etch rate at various points of this cavity was measured before processing the SRF cavity. Cylindrical ring-type samples of Nb placed on the inner surface of the outer wall were used to measure the dependence of the process parameters on plasma etching. The measured etch rate dependence on the pressure, rf power, dc bias, temperature, Cl2 concentration and diameter of the inner electrode was determined. The etch rate mechanism was studied by varying the temperature of the outer wall, the dc bias on the inner electrode and gas conditions. In a coaxial plasma reactor, uniform plasma etching along the cylindrical structure is a challenging task due to depletion of the active radicals along the gas flow direction. The dependence of etch rate uniformity along the cylindrical axis was determined as a function of process parameters. The formation of dc self-biases due to surface area asymmetry in this type of plasma and its variation on the pressure, rf power and gas composition was measured. Enhancing the surface area of the inner electrode to reduce the

  17. Characterization of bismuth nanospheres deposited by plasma focus device

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahmad, M., E-mail: cscientific2@aec.org.sy [IBA Laboratory, Chemistry Department, Atomic Energy Commission of Syria, P.O. Box 6091, Damascus (Syrian Arab Republic); Al-Hawat, Sh.; Akel, M. [Physics Department, Atomic Energy Commission of Syria, P.O. Box 6091, Damascus (Syrian Arab Republic); Mrad, O. [Chemistry Department, Atomic Energy Commission of Syria, P.O. Box 6091, Damascus (Syrian Arab Republic)

    2015-02-14

    A new method for producing thin layer of bismuth nanospheres based on the use of low energy plasma focus device is demonstrated. Various techniques such as scanning electron microscopy, Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and Raman spectroscopy have been used to characterize the morphology and the composition of the nanospheres. Experimental parameters may be adjusted to favour the formation of bismuth nanospheres instead of microspheres. Therefore, the formation of large surface of homogeneous layer of bismuth nanospheres with sizes of below 100 nm can be obtained. The natural snowball phenomenon is observed to be reproduced in nanoscale where spheres roll over the small nanospheres and grow up to bigger sizes that can reach micro dimensions. The comet-like structure, a reverse phenomenon to snowball is also observed.

  18. Nonlinear instability in simulations of Large Plasma Device turbulence

    CERN Document Server

    Friedman, B; Umansky, M V; Schaffner, D; Joseph, I

    2013-01-01

    Several simulations of turbulence in the Large Plasma Device (LAPD) [W. Gekelman et al., Rev. Sci. Inst. 62, 2875 (1991)] are energetically analyzed and compared with each other and with the experiment. The simulations use the same model, but different axial boundary conditions. They employ either periodic, zero-value, zero-derivative, or sheath axial boundaries. The linear stability physics is different between the scenarios because the various boundary conditions allow the drift wave instability to access different axial structures, and the sheath boundary simulation contains a conducting wall mode instability which is just as unstable as the drift waves. Nevertheless, the turbulence in all the simulations is relatively similar because it is primarily driven by a robust nonlinear instability that is the same for all cases. The nonlinear instability preferentially drives $k_\\parallel = 0$ potential energy fluctuations, which then three-wave couple to $k_\\parallel \

  19. Evidence Considerations for Mobile Devices in the Occupational Therapy Process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kelly Erickson

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Mobile app-based device utilization, including smartphones and handheld tablets, suggests a need to evaluate evidence to guide selection and implementation of these devices in the occupational therapy process. The purpose of the research was to explore the current body of evidence in relation to mobile app-based devices and to identify factors in the use of these devices throughout the occupational therapy process. Following review of available occupational therapy profession guidelines, assistive technology literature, and available mobile device research, practitioners using mobile app-based devices in occupational therapy should consider three areas: client needs, practitioner competence, and device factors. The purpose of this guideline is to identify factors in the selection and use of mobile app-based devices throughout the occupational therapy process based on available evidence. Considerations for mobile device implementation during the occupational therapy process is addressed, including evaluating outcomes needs, matching device with the client, and identifying support needs of the client.

  20. Preliminary Results Of A 600 Joules Small Plasma Focus Device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, S. H.; Yap, S. L.; Wong, C. S.

    2009-07-01

    Preliminary results of a 600 J (3.7 μF, 18 kV) Mather type plasma focus device operated at low pressure will be presented. The discharge is formed between a solid anode with length of 6 cm and six symmetrically and coaxially arranged cathode rods of same lengths. The cathode base is profiled in a knife-edge design and a set of coaxial plasma gun are attached to it in order to initiate the breakdown and enhance the current sheath formation. The experiments have been performed in argon gas under a low pressure condition of several microbars. The discharge current and the voltage across the electrodes during the discharge are measured with high voltage probe and current coil. The current and voltage characteristics are used to determine the possible range of operating pressure that gives good focusing action. At a narrow pressure regime of 9.0±0.5 μbar, focusing action is observed with good reproducibility. Preliminary result of ion beam energy is presented. More work will be carried out to investigate the radiation output.

  1. Space plasma physics stationary processes

    CERN Document Server

    Hasegawa, Akira

    1989-01-01

    During the 30 years of space exploration, important discoveries in the near-earth environment such as the Van Allen belts, the plasmapause, the magnetotail and the bow shock, to name a few, have been made. Coupling between the solar wind and the magnetosphere and energy transfer processes between them are being identified. Space physics is clearly approaching a new era, where the emphasis is being shifted from discoveries to understanding. One way of identifying the new direction may be found in the recent contribution of atmospheric science and oceanography to the development of fluid dynamics. Hydrodynamics is a branch of classical physics in which important discoveries have been made in the era of Rayleigh, Taylor, Kelvin and Helmholtz. However, recent progress in global measurements using man-made satellites and in large scale computer simulations carried out by scientists in the fields of atmospheric science and oceanography have created new activities in hydrodynamics and produced important new discover...

  2. Signal processing methods for MFE plasma diagnostics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Candy, J.V.; Casper, T.; Kane, R.

    1985-02-01

    The application of various signal processing methods to extract energy storage information from plasma diamagnetism sensors occurring during physics experiments on the Tandom Mirror Experiment-Upgrade (TMX-U) is discussed. We show how these processing techniques can be used to decrease the uncertainty in the corresponding sensor measurements. The algorithms suggested are implemented using SIG, an interactive signal processing package developed at LLNL.

  3. CMOS and BiCMOS process integration and device characterization

    CERN Document Server

    El-Kareh, Badih

    2009-01-01

    Covers both the theoretical and practical aspects of modern silicon devices and the relationship between their electrical properties and processing conditions. This book also covers silicon devices and integrated process technologies. It discusses modern silicon devices, their characteristics, and interactions with process parameters.

  4. Hard X-ray sources from miniature plasma focus devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raspa, V. [Buenos Aires Univ., PLADEMA, CONICET and INFIP (Argentina); Silva, P.; Moreno, J.; Zambra, M.; Soto, L. [Comision Chilena de Energia Nuclear, Santiago (Chile)

    2004-07-01

    As first stage of a program to design a repetitive pulsed radiation generator for industrial applications, two miniature plasma foci have been designed and constructed at the Chilean commission of nuclear energy. The devices operate at an energy level of the order of tens of joules (PF-50 J, 160 nF capacitor bank, 20-35 kV, 32-100 J, {approx} 150 ns time to peak current) and hundred of joules (PF-400 J, 880 nF, 20-35 kV, 176-539 J, {approx} 300 ns time to peak current). Hard X-rays are being studied in these devices operating with hydrogen. Images of metallic plates with different thickness were obtained on commercial radiographic film, Agfa Curix ST-G2, in order to characterize the energy of the hard X-ray outside of the discharge chamber of PF-400 J. An effective energy of the order of 90 keV was measured under those conditions. X ray images of different metallic objects also have been obtained. (authors)

  5. Energy-dependent finite-orbit treatment for plasma buildup in mirror fusion devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Campbell, M.M.

    1980-01-01

    A computer simulation of hot plasma buildup in mirror fusion devices and results from this model are presented. In a small, hot magnetically confined plasma, the ion orbit radius (rho/sub i/) can be comparable to the plasma radius (R/sub p/). It a mirror-confined plasma were rho/sub i//R/sub p/ > 1/25 (such as 2XII-B), a point kinetic treatment of ion interactions becomes inaccurate and a finite gyro-radius (FGR) treatment must be used to adequately describe plasma buildup processes. This is particularly true for describing losses due to cold-gas charge exchange (c-x) near the plasma surface, since a particle lost near the vacuum interface may have contributed to the density as far as 2 rho/sub i/ radially inward from the c-x point. A similar FGR effect applies to beam-deposited ions whose large orbits influence the density up to 2 rho/sub i/ from the trapping point.

  6. Nonthermal Radiation Processes in Interplanetary Plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chian, A. C. L.

    1990-11-01

    RESUMEN. En la interacci6n de haces de electrones energeticos con plasmas interplanetarios, se excitan ondas intensas de Langmuir debido a inestabilidad del haz de plasma. Las ondas Langmuir a su vez interaccio nan con fluctuaciones de densidad de baja frecuencia para producir radiaciones. Si la longitud de las ondas de Langmujr exceden las condicio nes del umbral, se puede efectuar la conversi5n de modo no lineal a on- das electromagneticas a traves de inestabilidades parametricas. As se puede excitar en un plasma inestabilidades parametricas electromagneticas impulsadas por ondas intensas de Langmuir: (1) inestabilidades de decaimiento/fusi5n electromagnetica impulsadas por una bomba de Lang- muir que viaja; (2) inestabilidades dobles electromagneticas de decai- miento/fusi5n impulsadas por dos bombas de Langrnuir directamente opues- tas; y (3) inestabilidades de dos corrientes oscilatorias electromagne- ticas impulsadas por dos bombas de Langmuir de corrientes contrarias. Se concluye que las inestabilidades parametricas electromagneticas in- ducidas por las ondas de Langmuir son las fuentes posibles de radiacio- nes no termicas en plasmas interplanetarios. ABSTRACT: Nonthermal radio emissions near the local electron plasma frequency have been detected in various regions of interplanetary plasmas: solar wind, upstream of planetary bow shock, and heliopause. Energetic electron beams accelerated by solar flares, planetary bow shocks, and the terminal shock of heliosphere provide the energy source for these radio emissions. Thus, it is expected that similar nonthermal radiation processes may be responsible for the generation of these radio emissions. As energetic electron beams interact with interplanetary plasmas, intense Langmuir waves are excited due to a beam-plasma instability. The Langmuir waves then interact with low-frequency density fluctuations to produce radiations near the local electron plasma frequency. If Langmuir waves are of sufficiently large

  7. Advanced simulation technology for etching process design for CMOS device applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuboi, Nobuyuki; Fukasawa, Masanaga; Tatsumi, Tetsuya

    2016-07-01

    Plasma etching is a critical process for the realization of high performance in the next generation of CMOS devices. To predict and control fluctuations in the etching properties accurately during mass production, it is essential that etching process simulation technology considers fluctuations in the plasma chamber wall conditions, the effects of by-products on the critical dimensions, the Si recess dependence on the wafer open area ratio and local pattern structure, and the time-dependent plasma-induced damage distribution associated with the three-dimensional feature scale profile at the 100 nm level. This consideration can overcome the issues with conventional simulations performed under the assumed ideal conditions, which are not accurate enough for practical process design. In this article, these advanced process simulation technologies are reviewed, and, from the results of suitable process simulations, a new etching system that automatically controls the etching properties is proposed to enable stable CMOS device fabrication with high yields.

  8. On the history of plasma treatment and comparison of microbiostatic efficacy of a historical high-frequency plasma device with two modern devices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Napp, Judith

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Cold atmospheric pressure plasma (CAP with its many bioactive properties has defined a new medical field: the plasma medicine. However, in the related form of high-frequency therapy, CAP was even used briefly a century ago. The aim of this study was to review historic CAP treatments and to obtain data regarding the antimicrobial efficacy of a historical high-frequency plasma device.Methods: First, historic literature regarding the history of CAP treatment was evaluated, because in the modern literature no data were available. Second, the susceptibility of 5 different bacterial wound isolates, cultured on agar, to a historic plasma source (violet wand [VW] and two modern devices (atmospheric pressure plasma jet [APPJ] and Dielectric Barrier Discharge [DBD] was analyzed . The obtained inhibition areas (IA were compared.Results: First, the most convenient popular historical electromedical treatments produced a so-called effluvia by using glass electrodes, related to today’s CAP. Second, all three tested plasma sources showed complete eradication of all tested microbial strains in the treated area. The “historical” cold VW plasma showed antimicrobial effects similar to those of modern APPJ and DBD regarding the diameter of the IA.Conclusion: Some retrograde evidence may be deducted from this, especially for treatment of infectious diseases with historical plasma devices. The underlying technology may serve as model for construction of modern sucessive devices.

  9. Methods for characterising microphysical processes in plasmas

    CERN Document Server

    de Wit, T Dudok; Furno, I; Sorriso-Valvo, L; Zimbardo, G

    2013-01-01

    Advanced spectral and statistical data analysis techniques have greatly contributed to shaping our understanding of microphysical processes in plasmas. We review some of the main techniques that allow for characterising fluctuation phenomena in geospace and in laboratory plasma observations. Special emphasis is given to the commonalities between different disciplines, which have witnessed the development of similar tools, often with differing terminologies. The review is phrased in terms of few important concepts: self-similarity, deviation from self-similarity (i.e. intermittency and coherent structures), wave-turbulence, and anomalous transport.

  10. Simulations with Conventional and Gas Puff Plasma Focus Devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shan, Bing; Liu, Mahe; Lee, Paul; Lee, Sing

    2000-10-01

    An energy consistent plasma focus model is improved by considering the plasma ionization states based on the corona equilibrium. This provides the model with the capability of calculating the plasma dynamics and states for different gases in plasma focus. The model is employed to simulate the behavior of the NX2 plasma focus, with both neon and argon gases. The results show that much lower pressure is required to work with argon for x-ray. The model has also been modified to describe a gas-puff plasma focus based on a measured pressure distribution profile. The simulation result reveals that the gas-puff scheme is more efficient in plasma heating and can improve the stability of the plasma column. By comparing with the published results, agreements have been obtained between the computations and experiments of both machines in the major points regarding plasma dynamics, plasma column stability and appearances, plasma temperatures, and x-ray radiation properties.

  11. Plasma Processes : Microwave plasma deposition of diamond like carbon coatings

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    D S Patil; K Ramachandran; N Venkatramani; M Pandey; R D'Cunha

    2000-11-01

    The promising applications of the microwave plasmas have been appearing in the fields of chemical processes and semiconductor manufacturing. Applications include surface deposition of all types including diamond/diamond like carbon (DLC) coatings, etching of semiconductors, promotion of organic reactions, etching of polymers to improve bonding of the other materials etc. With a 2.45 GHz, 700 W, microwave induced plasma chemical vapor deposition (CVD) system set up in our laboratory we have deposited diamond like carbon coatings. The microwave plasma generation was effected using a wave guide single mode applicator. We have deposited DLC coatings on the substrates like stainless steel, Cu–Be, Cu and Si. The deposited coatings have been characterized by FTIR, Raman spectroscopy and ellipsometric techniques. The results show that we have achieved depositing ∼ 95% sp3 bonded carbon in the films. The films are uniform with golden yellow color. The films are found to be excellent insulators. The ellipsometric measurements of optical constant on silicon substrates indicate that the films are transparent above 900 nm.

  12. 77 FR 65580 - Certain Wireless Communication Devices, Portable Music and Data Processing Devices, Computers...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-29

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office ] INTERNATIONAL TRADE COMMISSION Certain Wireless Communication Devices, Portable Music and Data Processing Devices, Computers, and Components Thereof AGENCY: U.S. International Trade Commission. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: Notice is...

  13. Microwave plasma torch for processing hydrocarbon gases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alex G. Zherlitsyn

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available We designed and developed an ultrahigh-frequency (microwave plasma torch with a combined (nitrogen, methane plasma-forming environment, and microwave output of up to 2 kW, continuously. We demonstrate the possibility of using it in order to process natural and associated petroleum (APG gas into valuable products (hydrogen and carbon nanomaterial CNM with up to 70% efficiency. Based on the developed microwave plasma torch, we developed an apparatus capable of converting hydrocarbon feedstock at a capacity of 50 g/h yielding CNM and hydrogen of up to 70 vol. %. In its mobile small-tonnage version, this technology can be used on gas-condensate fields.

  14. Solar terrestrial coupling through space plasma processes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Birn, J. [and others

    2000-12-01

    This is the final report of a three-year, Laboratory-Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The project investigates plasma processes that govern the interaction between the solar wind, charged particles ejected from the sun, and the earth's magnetosphere, the region above the ionosphere governed by the terrestrial magnetic field. Primary regions of interest are the regions where different plasma populations interact with each other. These are regions of particularly dynamic plasma behavior, associated with magnetic flux and energy transfer and dynamic energy release. The investigations concerned charged particle transport and energization, and microscopic and macroscopic instabilities in the magnetosphere and adjacent regions. The approaches combined space data analysis with theory and computer simulations.

  15. A Novel Continuously Initiated Polymerization by One-Atmosphere Low Temperature Plasma Device

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    You qingliang; Meng yuedong; Wang jianhua; Ou qiongrong; Xu xu; Zhong shaofeng

    2005-01-01

    A novel atmospheric plasma device developed in this paper, which is more effective and convenient to study the plasma-initiated polymerization (PIP) than conventional setup. The structure and mechanism of the device is introduced. Some plasma-initiated polymerization experiments are carried out on the device, and the conversion of AA (Acrylic acid) and AM (Acryl amide) atmospheric (N2) plasma polymerization are respectively 89% and 94% after 120 h post polymerization, whereby IR spectra of the product (AA, AM). Our PIP result are confirmed.

  16. Complex plasma experimental device – A test bed for studying dust vortices and other collective phenomena

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    MANJIT KAUR; SAYAK BOSE; P K CHATTOPADHYAY; J GHOSH; Y C SAXENA

    2016-12-01

    A typical device for carrying out sophisticated and complex dusty plasma experiments is designed, fabricated and made operational at the Institute for Plasma Research, India. The device is named as complex plasma experimental device (CPED). The main aim of this multipurpose machine is to study the formation and behaviour of dust vortices in the absence of external magnetic field under the effect of various plasma parameters. Further, the device is equipped with advanced imaging diagnostics for studying many other interesting phenomena such as dust oscillations, three-dimensional crystalline structures, dust rotation, etc. The device is quite flexible to accommodate many innovative experiments. Detailed design of the device, its diagnostics capabilities and theadvanced image analysis techniques are presented in this paper.

  17. The Dynamics of an Isolated Plasma Filament at the Edge of a Toroidal Device, Rev. 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ryutov, D D

    2006-09-28

    The dynamics of an isolated plasma filament (an isolated blob) in the far scrape-off layer (SOL) of a toroidal device is described, with a proper averaging of the geometrical parameters as well as plasma parameters along the filament. The analysis is limited to the magnetohydrodynamic description. The effects of the anchored ends and finite plasma resistivity are also discussed.

  18. High density and high temperature plasmas in Large Helical Device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komori, Akio

    2010-11-01

    Recently a new confinement regime called Super Dense Core (SDC) mode was discovered in Large Helical Device (LHD). An extremely high density core region with more than ~ 1 × 1021 m-3 is obtained with the formation of an Internal Diffusion Barrier (IDB). The density gradient at the IDB is very high and the particle confinement in the core region is ~ 0.2 s. It is expected, for the future reactor, that the IDB-SDC mode has a possibility to achieve the self-ignition condition with lower temperature than expected before. Conventional approaches to increase the temperature have also been tried in LHD. For the ion heating, the perpendicular neutral beam injection effectively increased the ion temperature up to 5.6 keV with the formation of the internal transport barrier (ITB). In the electron heating experiments with 77 GHz gyrotrons, the highest electron temperature more than 15 keV was achieved, where plasmas are in the neoclassical regime.

  19. High density and high temperature plasmas in Large Helical Device

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Komori, Akio, E-mail: komori@LHD.nifs.ac.jp [National Institute for Fusion Science, 322-6 Oroshi, Toki, Gifu 509-5292 (Japan)

    2010-11-01

    Recently a new confinement regime called Super Dense Core (SDC) mode was discovered in Large Helical Device (LHD). An extremely high density core region with more than {approx} 1 x 10{sup 21} m{sup -3} is obtained with the formation of an Internal Diffusion Barrier (IDB). The density gradient at the IDB is very high and the particle confinement in the core region is {approx} 0.2 s. It is expected, for the future reactor, that the IDB-SDC mode has a possibility to achieve the self-ignition condition with lower temperature than expected before. Conventional approaches to increase the temperature have also been tried in LHD. For the ion heating, the perpendicular neutral beam injection effectively increased the ion temperature up to 5.6 keV with the formation of the internal transport barrier (ITB). In the electron heating experiments with 77 GHz gyrotrons, the highest electron temperature more than 15 keV was achieved, where plasmas are in the neoclassical regime.

  20. Impurity screening and edge-plasma modifications for plasma devices with liquid walls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rognlien, Thomas D.

    2001-10-01

    The edge-plasma region of magnetic fusion confinement devices plays various important roles, two of which are (1), shielding the core plasma from gas and impurities, and (2), influencing the core-boundary plasma temperature and density. The first role is crucial to the successful use of liquid walls, and the second role, if controllable, could enhance core energy confinement by reducing drives for core turbulence. In fusion reactors, liquid walls would allow higher wall power-loading, and sufficiently thick walls would greatly reduce neutron activation of support structures.(R.W. Moir, Nucl. Fusion 37), 557 (1997); M. Abdou, et al., Fusion Eng. Design 54, 181 (2001). In addition, liquid divertors could largely eliminate the surface erosion problem.(J.N. Brooks, et al.), J. Nucl. Mater. 290-293, 185 (2001.); R.F. Mattas, et al., Fusion Eng. Design 49-50, 127 (2000). In this talk, results of self-consistent, 2-D edge transport simulations are presented to quantify the allowable influx of liquid-wall vapor for various candidate liquids (Li, Flibe, SnLi, Sn) which, in turn, set the allowable surface operating temperatures that controls the vapor evaporation rates. The results are explained and summarized by a reduced model that includes the radiation characteristics of different impurity species, and the competition between anomalous radial transport and parallel flow along the B-field. The modification of the edge plasma properties by liquid walls is also presented, with an emphasis on the low-recycling regime thought possible by the use of lithium, which naturally leads to a high edge-temperature regime. The effect of long mean-free-path parallel transport in the high-temperature regime is described by the bounce-averaged, particle- and energy-loss model.

  1. Advanced Plasma Pyrolysis Assembly (PPA) Reactor and Process Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wheeler, Richard R., Jr.; Hadley, Neal M.; Dahl, Roger W.; Abney, Morgan B.; Greenwood, Zachary; Miller, Lee; Medlen, Amber

    2012-01-01

    Design and development of a second generation Plasma Pyrolysis Assembly (PPA) reactor is currently underway as part of NASA's Atmosphere Revitalization Resource Recovery effort. By recovering up to 75% of the hydrogen currently lost as methane in the Sabatier reactor effluent, the PPA helps to minimize life support resupply costs for extended duration missions. To date, second generation PPA development has demonstrated significant technology advancements over the first generation device by doubling the methane processing rate while, at the same time, more than halving the required power. One development area of particular interest to NASA system engineers is fouling of the PPA reactor with carbonaceous products. As a mitigation plan, NASA MSFC has explored the feasibility of using an oxidative plasma based upon metabolic CO2 to regenerate the reactor window and gas inlet ports. The results and implications of this testing are addressed along with the advanced PPA reactor development.

  2. Innovation in the development of plasma propulsion devices in Israel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lev, Dan R.

    2017-04-01

    In this paper we review plasma propulsion development approach which focuses on innovation. We then bring the example of the state of Israel in general, and Rafael in particular, and show how it has adopted an innovative approach to develop a low power Hall thruster and a low current cathode. To present one special test-case of innovation we elaborate upon the development process of a heaterless hollow cathode that was developed at Rafael. In particular, by presenting the cathode characterization and wear test results we demonstrate that the heaterless cathode developed has a sufficiently wide operational range and may operate continuously for 1,500 hours without any measurable degradation in performance.

  3. New linear plasma devices in the trilateral euregio cluster for an integrated approach to plasma surface interactions in fusion reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Unterberg, B., E-mail: b.unterberg@fz-juelich.de [Institut fuer Energieforschung - Plasmaphysik, Forschungszentrum Juelich GmbH, Association EURATOM- Forschungszentrum Juelich, D-52425 Juelich (Germany); Jaspers, R. [Science and Technology of Nuclear Fusion, Eindhoven University of Technology, P.O. Box 513, 5600 MB Eindhoven (Netherlands); Koch, R. [Laboratoire de Physique des Plasmas/Laboratorium voor Plasmafysica, ERM/KMS, EURATOM-Association, B-1000 Brussels (Belgium); Massaut, V. [SCK-CEN, Belgian Nuclear Research Centre, EURATOM-Association, Boeretang 200, 2400 Mol (Belgium); Rapp, J. [FOM-Institute for Plasma Physics Rijnhuizen, Association EURATOM-FOM, PO Box 1207, 3430 BE Nieuwegein (Netherlands); Reiter, D.; Kraus, S.; Kreter, A.; Philipps, V.; Reimer, H.; Samm, U.; Scheibl, L.; Schweer, B. [Institut fuer Energieforschung - Plasmaphysik, Forschungszentrum Juelich GmbH, Association EURATOM- Forschungszentrum Juelich, D-52425 Juelich (Germany); Schuurmans, J.; Uytdenhouwen, I. [SCK-CEN, Belgian Nuclear Research Centre, EURATOM-Association, Boeretang 200, 2400 Mol (Belgium); Al, R.; Berg, M.A. van den; Brons, S.; Eck, H.J.N. van; Goedheer, W.J. [FOM-Institute for Plasma Physics Rijnhuizen, Association EURATOM-FOM, PO Box 1207, 3430 BE Nieuwegein (Netherlands)

    2011-10-15

    New linear plasma devices are currently being constructed or planned in the Trilateral Euregio Cluster (TEC) to meet the challenges with respect to plasma surface interactions in DEMO and ITER: i) MAGNUM-PSI (FOM), a high particle and power flux device with super-conducting magnetic field coils which will reach ITER-like divertor conditions at high magnetic field, ii) the newly proposed linear plasma device JULE-PSI (FZJ), which will allow to expose toxic and neutron activated target samples to ITER-like fluences and ion energies including in vacuo analysis of neutron activated samples, and iii) the plasmatron VISION I, a compact plasma device which will be operated inside the tritium lab at SCK-CEN Mol, capable to investigate tritium plasmas and moderately activated wall materials. This contribution shows the capabilities of the new devices and their forerunner experiments (Pilot-PSI at FOM and PSI-2 Juelich at FZJ) in view of the main objectives of the new TEC program on plasma surface interactions.

  4. Front and backside processed thin film electronic devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Paul G.; Lagally, Max G.; Ma, Zhenqiang; Yuan, Hao-Chih; Wang, Guogong; Eriksson, Mark A.

    2012-01-03

    This invention provides thin film devices that have been processed on their front- and backside. The devices include an active layer that is sufficiently thin to be mechanically flexible. Examples of the devices include back-gate and double-gate field effect transistors, double-sided bipolar transistors and 3D integrated circuits.

  5. CIGS Material and Device Stability: A Processing Perspective (Presentation)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ramanathan, K.

    2012-03-01

    This is a general overview of CIGS material and device fundamentals. In the first part, the basic features of high efficiency CIGS absorbers and devices are described. In the second part, some examples of previous collaboration with Shell Solar CIGSS graded absorbers and devices are shown to illustrate how process information was used to correct deviations and improve the performance and stability.

  6. Membrane device and process for mass exchange, separation, and filtration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Wei; Canfield, Nathan L.

    2016-11-15

    A membrane device and processes for fabrication and for using are disclosed. The membrane device may include a number of porous metal membranes that provide a high membrane surface area per unit volume. The membrane device provides various operation modes that enhance throughput and selectivity for mass exchange, mass transfer, separation, and/or filtration applications between feed flow streams and permeate flow streams.

  7. The pyrolytic-plasma method and the device for the utilization of hazardous waste containing organic compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Opalińska, Teresa; Wnęk, Bartłomiej; Witowski, Artur; Juszczuk, Rafał; Majdak, Małgorzata; Bartusek, Stanilav

    2016-11-15

    This paper is focused on the new method of waste processing. The waste, including hazardous waste, contain organic compounds. The method consists in two main processes: the pyrolysis of waste and the oxidation of the pyrolytic gas with a use of non-equilibrium plasma. The practical implementation of the method requires the design, construction and testing of the new device in large laboratory scale. The experiments were carried out for the two kinds of waste: polyethylene as a model waste and the electronic waste as a real waste. The process of polyethylene decomposition showed that the operation of the device is correct because 99.74% of carbon moles contained in the PE samples was detected in the gas after the process. Thus, the PE samples practically were pyrolyzed completely to hydrocarbons, which were completely oxidized in the plasma reactor. It turned out that the device is useful for decomposition of the electronic waste. The conditions in the plasma reactor during the oxidation process of the pyrolysis products did not promote the formation of PCDD/Fs despite the presence of the oxidizing conditions. An important parameter determining the efficiency of the oxidation of the pyrolysis products is gas temperature in the plasma reactor.

  8. Advanced plasma etching processes for dielectric materials in VLSI technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Juan Juan

    Manufacturable plasma etching processes for dielectric materials have played an important role in the Integrated Circuits (IC) industry in recent decades. Dielectric materials such as SiO2 and SiN are widely used to electrically isolate the active device regions (like the gate, source and drain from the first level of metallic interconnects) and to isolate different metallic interconnect levels from each other. However, development of new state-of-the-art etching processes is urgently needed for higher aspect ratio (oxide depth/hole diameter---6:1) in Very Large Scale Integrated (VLSI) circuits technology. The smaller features can provide greater packing density of devices on a single chip and greater number of chips on a single wafer. This dissertation focuses on understanding and optimizing of several key aspects of etching processes for dielectric materials. The challenges are how to get higher selectivity of oxide/Si for contact and oxide/TiN for vias; tight Critical Dimension (CD) control; wide process margin (enough over-etch); uniformity and repeatability. By exploring all of the parameters for the plasma etch process, the key variables are found and studied extensively. The parameters investigated here are Power, Pressure, Gas ratio, and Temperature. In particular, the novel gases such as C4F8, C5F8, and C4F6 were studied in order to meet the requirements of the design rules. We also studied CF4 that is used frequently for dielectric material etching in the industry. Advanced etch equipment was used for the above applications: the medium-density plasma tools (like Magnet-Enhanced Reactive Ion Etching (MERIE) tool) and the high-density plasma tools. By applying the Design of Experiments (DOE) method, we found the key factors needed to predict the trend of the etch process (such as how to increase the etch rates, selectivity, etc.; and how to control the stability of the etch process). We used JMP software to analyze the DOE data. The characterization of the

  9. Platelet-rich plasma: updating of extraction devices

    OpenAIRE

    Raquel Moreno; Marisa Gaspar Carreño; Jose María Alonso Herreros; Jose Antonio Romero Garrido; Piedad López-Sánchez

    2016-01-01

    Propose: To describe PRP extraction devices, through a review of kits available in Spain, taking into account AEMPS and SEFH working groups (GPS, Farmacotecnia, Hemoderivados groups) contributions. Methods: Three independent searches about PRP extraction devices were carried out. Device suppliers were contacted and an individually meeting was called with each one. Characteristics of each device was reviewed by virtual demonstration. A kits comparison chart was made with all the informatio...

  10. On the plasma chemistry of a cold atmospheric argon plasma jet with shielding gas device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt-Bleker, Ansgar; Winter, Jörn; Bösel, André; Reuter, Stephan; Weltmann, Klaus-Dieter

    2016-02-01

    A novel approach combining experimental and numerical methods for the study of reaction mechanisms in a cold atmospheric \\text{Ar} plasma jet is introduced. The jet is operated with a shielding gas device that produces a gas curtain of defined composition around the plasma plume. The shielding gas composition is varied from pure {{\\text{N}}2} to pure {{\\text{O}}2} . The density of metastable argon \\text{Ar}≤ft(4\\text{s}{{,}3}{{\\text{P}}2}\\right) in the plasma plume was quantified using laser atom absorption spectroscopy. The density of long-living reactive oxygen and nitrogen species (RONS), namely {{\\text{O}}3} , \\text{N}{{\\text{O}}2} , \\text{NO} , {{\\text{N}}2}\\text{O} , {{\\text{N}}2}{{\\text{O}}5} and {{\\text{H}}2}{{\\text{O}}2} , was quantified in the downstream region of the jet in a multipass cell using Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). The jet produces a turbulent flow field and features guided streamers propagating at several \\text{km}~{{\\text{s}}-1} that follow the chaotic argon flow pattern, yielding a plasma plume with steep spatial gradients and a time dependence on the \\text{ns} scale while the downstream chemistry unfolds within several seconds. The fast and highly localized electron impact reactions in the guided streamer head and the slower gas phase reactions of neutrals occurring in the plasma plume and experimental apparatus are therefore represented in two separate kinetic models. The first electron impact reaction kinetics model is correlated to the LAAS measurements and shows that in the guided streamer head primary reactive oxygen and nitrogen species are dominantly generated from \\text{Ar}≤ft(4\\text{s}{{,}3}{{\\text{P}}2}\\right) . The second neutral species plug-flow model hence uses an \\text{Ar}≤ft(4\\text{s}{{,}3}{{\\text{P}}2}\\right) source term as sole energy input and yields good agreement with the RONS measured by FTIR spectroscopy.

  11. Non-destructive testing of high heat flux components of fusion devices by infrared thermography: modeling and signal processing; Controle non destructif par thermographie infrarouge des composants face au plasma des machines de fusion controlee

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cismondi, F

    2007-07-01

    In Plasma Facing Components (PFCs) the joint of the CFC armour material onto the metallic CuCrZr heat sink needs to be significant defects free. Detection of material flaws is a major issue of the PFCs acceptance protocol. A Non-Destructive Technique (NDT) based upon active infrared thermography allows testing PFCs on SATIR tests bed in Cadarache. Up to now defect detection was based on the comparison of the surface temperature evolution of the inspected component with that of a supposed 'defect-free' one (used as a reference element). This work deals with improvement of thermal signal processing coming from SATIR. In particular the contributions of the thermal modelling and statistical signal processing converge in this work. As for thermal modelling, the identification of a sensitive parameter to defect presence allows improving the quantitative estimation of defect Otherwise Finite Element (FE) modeling of SATIR allows calculating the so called deterministic numerical tile. Statistical approach via the Monte Carlo technique extends the numerical tile concept to the numerical population concept. As for signal processing, traditional statistical treatments allow a better localization of the bond defect processing thermo-signal by itself, without utilising a reference signal. Moreover the problem of detection and classification of random signals can be solved by maximizing the signal-to-noise ratio. Two filters maximizing the signal-to-noise ratio are optimized: the stochastic matched filter aims at detects detection and the constrained stochastic matched filter aims at defects classification. Performances are quantified and methods are compared via the ROC curves. (author)

  12. Low Damage, High Anisotropy Inductively Coupled Plasma for Gallium Nitride based Devices

    KAUST Repository

    Ibrahim, Youssef H.

    2013-05-27

    Group III-nitride semiconductors possess unique properties, which make them versatile materials for suiting many applications. Structuring vertical and exceptionally smooth GaN profiles is crucial for efficient optical device operation. The processing requirements for laser devices and ridge waveguides are stringent as compared to LEDs and other electronic devices. Due to the strong bonding and chemically inert nature of GaN, dry etching becomes a critical fabrication step. The surface morphology and facet etch angle are analyzed using SEM and AFM measurements. The influence of different mask materials is also studied including Ni as well as a SiO2 and resist bilayer. The high selectivity Ni Mask is found to produce high sidewall angles ~79°. Processing parameters are optimized for both the mask material and GaN in order to achieve a highly anisotropic, smooth profile, without resorting to additional surface treatment steps. An optimizing a SF6/O2 plasma etch process resulted in smooth SiO2 mask sidewalls. The etch rate and GaN surface roughness dependence on the RF power was also examined. Under a low 2mTorr pressure, the RF and ICP power were optimized to 150W and 300W respectively, such that a smooth GaN morphology and sidewalls was achieved with reduced ion damage. The The AFM measurements of the etched GaN surface indicate a low RMS roughness ranging from 4.75 nm to 7.66 nm.

  13. The pyrolytic-plasma method and the device for the utilization of hazardous waste containing organic compounds

    OpenAIRE

    Opalińska, Teresa; Wnęk, Bartłomiej; Witowski, Artur; Juszczuk, Rafał; Majdak, Małgorzata; Bartusek, Stanislav

    2016-01-01

    This paper is focused on the new method of waste processing. The waste, including hazardous waste, contain organic compounds. The method consists in two main processes: the pyrolysis of waste and the oxidation of the pyrolytic gas with a use of non-equilibrium plasma. The practical implementation of the method requires the design, construction and testing of the new device in large laboratory scale. The experiments were carried out for the two kinds of waste: polyethylene as a model waste and...

  14. Achieving atomistic control in materials processing by plasma-surface interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Jeffrey; Chang, Jane P.

    2017-06-01

    The continuous down-scaling of electronic devices and the introduction of functionally improved novel materials require a greater atomic level controllability in the synthesis and patterning of thin film materials, especially with regards to deposition uniformity and conformality as well as etching selectivity and anisotropy. The richness of plasma chemistry and the corresponding plasma-surface interactions provide the much needed processing flexibility and efficacy. To achieve the integration of the novel materials into devices, plasma-enhanced atomic layer processing techniques are emerging as the enabling factors to obtain atomic scale control of complex materials and nanostructures. This review focuses on an overview of the role of respective plasma species involved in plasma-surface interactions, addressing their respective and synergistic effects, which is followed by two distinct applications: plasma-enhanced atomic layer deposition (ALD) and atomic layer etching (ALE). For plasma-enhanced ALD, this review emphasizes the use of plasma chemistry to enable alternative pathways to synthesize complex materials at low temperatures and the challenges associated with deposition conformality. For plasma enabled ALE processes, the review focuses on the surface-specific chemical reactions needed to achieve desirable selectivity and anisotropy.

  15. DEVICE FOR INVESTIGATION OF MAGNETRON AND PULSED-LASER PLASMA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. P. Burmakov

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Various modifications of complex pulsed laser and magnetron deposition thin-film structures unit are presented. They include joint and separate variants of layer deposition. Unit realizes the plasma parameters control and enhances the possibility of laser-plasma and magnetron methods of coatings deposition.

  16. Real-Time Fault Classification for Plasma Processes

    OpenAIRE

    Yang, Ryan; Chen, Rongshun

    2011-01-01

    Plasma process tools, which usually cost several millions of US dollars, are often used in the semiconductor fabrication etching process. If the plasma process is halted due to some process fault, the productivity will be reduced and the cost will increase. In order to maximize the product/wafer yield and tool productivity, a timely and effective fault process detection is required in a plasma reactor. The classification of fault events can help the users to quickly identify fault processes, ...

  17. Radiant-and-plasma technology for coal processing

    OpenAIRE

    Vladimir Messerle; Alexander Ustimenko

    2012-01-01

    Radiant-and-plasma technology for coal processing is presented in the article. Thermodynamic computation and experiments on plasma processing of bituminous coal preliminary electron-beam activated were fulfilled in comparison with plasma processing of the coal. Positive influence of the preliminary electron-beam activation of coal on synthesis gas yield was found. Experiments were carried out in the plasma gasifier of 100 kW power. As a result of the measurements of material and heat balance ...

  18. Nova tocha de plasma híbrida para o processamento de materiais New hybrid plasma torch for materials processing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard Thomas Lermen

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available O principal objetivo deste artigo foi apresentar um novo dispositivo para o processamento de materiais. Ele consiste em uma tocha de plasma híbrida, a qual é caracterizada pela formação simultânea de dois arcos plasma em apenas um dispositivo, gerando jato (de plasma com elevada densidade de energia. A tocha foi submetida aos seguintes testes experimentais: de funcionamento para verificar possíveis problemas de projeto e seus limites de operação; de caracterização, consistindo em determinar o comprimento do jato de plasma; de sua viabilidade para processamento de materiais (soldagem e corte. Com base nestes testes iniciais, alguns problemas de isolamento elétrico e térmico foram encontrados e resolvidos. Quanto aos resultados dos testes de caracterização, os parâmetros de funcionamento da tocha de plasma híbrida apresentaram influência significativa sobre o comprimento do jato de plasma. Os resultados obtidos nos testes de processamento de materiais foram satisfatórios, ou seja, é possível realizar soldagem e corte com esta tocha de plasma híbrida.The main aim of this paper was to present a new device for materials processing. It consist of a hybrid plasma torch which is characterized by the simultaneous formation of two plasma arcs in one device only, generating a (plasma jet with high energy density. The torch was submitted to the following trials: of operation to identify possible design problems and its operational torch limits; of characterization, consisting in plasma jet length determination; and of viability for materials processing (welding and cutting. Based on these initial trials, some electrical and thermal insulation problems were found and solved. Concerning the results of the characterization trials, the hybrid plasma torch parameters had a significant influence over the plasma jet length. The results obtained in the materials processing trials were satisfactory, i.e., it is possible to carry out welding and

  19. Main reaction process simulation of hydrogen gas discharge in a cold cathode electric vacuum device

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Jing-Ye Liu; Yuan Gao; Gang Wang

    2012-07-01

    Based on the related theory of plasma discharge process and the COMSOL multiphysics software, and considering the corresponding boundary conditions, the related recation types in the hydrogen plasma discharge were simulated and analysed, and the main reactions of hydrogen discharge in small electric vacuum components at low pressure and weak ionization were confirmed. Among the 21 types of reactions in hydrogen discharge process, 11 of them play importnat roles under low pressure and weak ionization in cold cathode electric vacuum device. The simulated results are consistent with the test result.

  20. Production of high transient heat and particle fluxes in a linear plasma device

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Temmerman, G.; Zielinski, J. J.; van der Meiden, H.; Melissen, W.; Rapp, J.

    2010-01-01

    We report on the generation of high transient heat and particle fluxes in a linear plasma device by pulsed operation of the plasma source. A capacitor bank is discharged into the source to transiently increase the discharge current up to 1.7 kA, allowing peak densities and temperature of 70x10(20) m

  1. Resonant excitation of waves by a spiraling ion beam on the large plasma device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tripathi, Shreekrishna

    2015-11-01

    The resonant interaction between energetic-ions and plasma waves is a fundamental topic of importance in the space, controlled magnetic-fusion, and laboratory plasma physics. We report new results on the spontaneous generation of traveling shear Alfvén waves and high-harmonic beam-modes in the lower-hybrid range of frequencies by an intense ion beam. In particular, the role of Landau and Doppler-shifted ion-cyclotron resonances (DICR) in extracting the free-energy from the ion-beam and destabilizing Alfvén waves was explored on the Large Plasma Device (LAPD). In these experiments, single and dual-species magnetized plasmas (n ~1010 -1012 cm-3, Te ~ 5.0-10.0 eV, B = 0.6-1.8 kG, He+ and H+ ions, 19.0 m long, 0.6 m diameter) were produced and a spiraling hydrogen ion beam (5-15 keV, 2-10 A, beam-speed/Alfvén-speed = 0.2-1.5, J ~ 50-150 mA/cm2, pitch-angle ~53°) was injected into the plasma. The interaction of the beam with the plasma was diagnosed using a retarding-field energy analyzer, three-axis magnetic-loop, and Langmuir probes. The resonance conditions for the growth of shear Alfvén waves were examined by varying the parameters of the ion-beam and ambient plasma. The experimental results demonstrate that the DICR process is particularly effective in exciting left-handed polarized shear Alfvén waves that propagate in the direction opposite to the ion beam. The high-harmonic beam modes were detected in the vicinity of the spiraling ion beam and contained more than 80 harmonics of Doppler-shifted gyro-frequency of the beam. Work jointly supported by US DOE and NSF and performed at the Basic Plasma Science Facility, UCLA.

  2. Platelet-rich plasma: updating of extraction devices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raquel Moreno

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Propose: To describe PRP extraction devices, through a review of kits available in Spain, taking into account AEMPS and SEFH working groups (GPS, Farmacotecnia, Hemoderivados groups contributions. Methods: Three independent searches about PRP extraction devices were carried out. Device suppliers were contacted and an individually meeting was called with each one. Characteristics of each device was reviewed by virtual demonstration. A kits comparison chart was made with all the information acquired. Kits were classified as Closed-Technique and Opened- Technique in accordance with the AEMPS technical committee report. Results: Ten devices were found: ACP®; Angel®, Cascade®, Endoret ®, GPS®, Magellan®, Minos®, Ortho-pras®, Smart-prepr® and Tricell®. However, we could found out the mechanism in detail of seven of them. Information about Cascade®, Magellan ® and Smart-prepr® kits was not enough. Conclusion: The review provided the main PRP extraction devices available with CE marking and its distinguishing characteristics, however, it is crucial to pay attention to PRP extraction procedure and administration, to guarantee the final product quality. Pharmacy Department must get involved in the device selections due to the close link with the manufactured drug quality. Working together with the AEMPS will contribute to defining extraction procedure specifically.

  3. 77 FR 28621 - Certain Wireless Communication Devices, Portable Music and Data Processing Devices, Computers and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-15

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office INTERNATIONAL TRADE COMMISSION Certain Wireless Communication Devices, Portable Music and Data Processing Devices, Computers and Components Thereof; Notice of Request for Statements on the Public Interest AGENCY: U.S. International...

  4. On the generation of magnetized collisionless shocks in the large plasma device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaeffer, D. B.; Winske, D.; Larson, D. J.; Cowee, M. M.; Constantin, C. G.; Bondarenko, A. S.; Clark, S. E.; Niemann, C.

    2017-04-01

    Collisionless shocks are common phenomena in space and astrophysical systems, and in many cases, the shocks can be modeled as the result of the expansion of a magnetic piston though a magnetized ambient plasma. Only recently, however, have laser facilities and diagnostic capabilities evolved sufficiently to allow the detailed study in the laboratory of the microphysics of piston-driven shocks. We review experiments on collisionless shocks driven by a laser-produced magnetic piston undertaken with the Phoenix laser laboratory and the Large Plasma Device at the University of California, Los Angeles. The experiments span a large parameter space in laser energy, background magnetic field, and ambient plasma properties that allow us to probe the physics of piston-ambient energy coupling, the launching of magnetosonic solitons, and the formation of subcritical shocks. The results indicate that piston-driven magnetized collisionless shocks in the laboratory can be characterized with a small set of dimensionless formation parameters that place the formation process in an organized and predictive framework.

  5. A plasma source driven predator-prey like mechanism as a potential cause of spiraling intermittencies in linear plasma devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reiser, D. [Research Center Jülich GmbH, Institute for Energy and Climate Research—Plasma Physics, D-52425 Jülich (Germany); Ohno, N. [Department of Energy Engineering and Science, Graduate School of Engineering, Nagoya University, Furo-cho, Chikusa-ku, Nagoya 464-8603 (Japan); Tanaka, H. [National Institute for Fusion Science, Toki 509-5292 (Japan); Vela, L. [Physics Department, Universidad Carlos III de Madrid, Avda de la Universidad 30, 28911-Leganés, Madrid (Spain)

    2014-03-15

    Three-dimensional global drift fluid simulations are carried out to analyze coherent plasma structures appearing in the NAGDIS-II linear device (nagoya divertor plasma Simulator-II). The numerical simulations reproduce several features of the intermittent spiraling structures observed, for instance, statistical properties, rotation frequency, and the frequency of plasma expulsion. The detailed inspection of the three-dimensional plasma dynamics allows to identify the key mechanism behind the formation of these intermittent events. The resistive coupling between electron pressure and parallel electric field in the plasma source region gives rise to a quasilinear predator-prey like dynamics where the axisymmetric mode represents the prey and the spiraling structure with low azimuthal mode number represents the predator. This interpretation is confirmed by a reduced one-dimensional quasilinear model derived on the basis of the findings in the full three-dimensional simulations. The dominant dynamics reveals certain similarities to the classical Lotka-Volterra cycle.

  6. A plasma source driven predator-prey like mechanism as a potential cause of spiraling intermittencies in linear plasma devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reiser, D.; Ohno, N.; Tanaka, H.; Vela, L.

    2014-03-01

    Three-dimensional global drift fluid simulations are carried out to analyze coherent plasma structures appearing in the NAGDIS-II linear device (nagoya divertor plasma Simulator-II). The numerical simulations reproduce several features of the intermittent spiraling structures observed, for instance, statistical properties, rotation frequency, and the frequency of plasma expulsion. The detailed inspection of the three-dimensional plasma dynamics allows to identify the key mechanism behind the formation of these intermittent events. The resistive coupling between electron pressure and parallel electric field in the plasma source region gives rise to a quasilinear predator-prey like dynamics where the axisymmetric mode represents the prey and the spiraling structure with low azimuthal mode number represents the predator. This interpretation is confirmed by a reduced one-dimensional quasilinear model derived on the basis of the findings in the full three-dimensional simulations. The dominant dynamics reveals certain similarities to the classical Lotka-Volterra cycle.

  7. Handbook of compound semiconductors growth, processing, characterization, and devices

    CERN Document Server

    Holloway, Paul H

    1996-01-01

    This book reviews the recent advances and current technologies used to produce microelectronic and optoelectronic devices from compound semiconductors. It provides a complete overview of the technologies necessary to grow bulk single-crystal substrates, grow hetero-or homoepitaxial films, and process advanced devices such as HBT's, QW diode lasers, etc.

  8. Collaborative Research: Fundamental studies of plasma control using surface embedded electronic devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raja, Laxminarayan L. [Univ. of Texas, Austin, TX (United States); PanneerChelvam, PremKumar [Univ. of Texas, Austin, TX (United States); Levko, Dimtry [Univ. of Texas, Austin, TX (United States)

    2016-02-26

    The proposed study will investigate the effect of active electron injection of from electrode surfaces To the best of our knowledge, no such a study has ever been attempted even though it could lead to the formation of whole new classes of plasma based devices and systems. We are motivated by recent articles and simple theory which gives strong reason to believe that embedded electronic devices can be used to exert control over the SEE coefficient of semiconductor surfaces (and maybe other surface types as well). Furthermore, the research will explore how such sub-surface electronic devices can best be used to exert control over an associated plasma.

  9. Molecular processes in plasmas collisions of charged particles with molecules

    CERN Document Server

    Itikawa, Yukikazu

    2007-01-01

    Molecular Processes in Plasmas describes elementary collision processes in plasmas, particularly those involving molecules or molecular ions. Those collision processes (called molecular processes) maintain plasmas, produce reactive species and emissions, and play a key role in energy balance in plasmas or more specifically in determining the energy distribution of plasma particles. Many books on plasma physics mention the elementary processes, but normally rather briefly. They only touch upon the general feature or fundamental concept of the collision processes. On the other hand, there are many books on atomic and molecular physics, but most of them are too general or too detailed to be useful to people in the application fields. The present book enumerates all the possible processes in the collisions of electrons, as well as ions, with molecules. For each process, a compact but informative description of its characteristics is given together with illustrative examples. Since the author has much experience a...

  10. Lagrangian coherent structures and plasma transport processes

    CERN Document Server

    Falessi, M V; Schep, T J

    2015-01-01

    A dynamical system framework is used to describe transport processes in plasmas embedded in a magnetic field. For periodic systems with one degree of freedom the Poincar\\'e map provides a splitting of the phase space into regions where particles have different kinds of motion: periodic, quasi-periodic or chaotic. The boundaries of these regions are transport barriers; i.e., a trajectory cannot cross such boundaries during the whole evolution of the system. Lagrangian Coherent Structure (LCS) generalize this method to systems with the most general time dependence, splitting the phase space into regions with different qualitative behaviours. This leads to the definition of finite-time transport barriers, i.e. trajectories cannot cross the barrier for a finite amount of time. This methodology can be used to identify fast recirculating regions in the dynamical system and to characterize the transport between them.

  11. Plasma Discharge Process in a Pulsed Diaphragm Discharge System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, Jianjin; Hu, Jue; Zhang, Chao; Wen, Yuanbin; Meng, Yuedong; Zhang, Chengxu

    2014-12-01

    As one of the most important steps in wastewater treatment, limited study on plasma discharge process is a key challenge in the development of plasma applications. In this study, we focus on the plasma discharge process of a pulsed diaphragm discharge system. According to the analysis, the pulsed diaphragm discharge proceeds in seven stages: (1) Joule heating and heat exchange stage; (2) nucleated site formation; (3) plasma generation (initiation of the breakdown stage); (4) avalanche growth and plasma expansion; (5) plasma contraction; (6) termination of the plasma discharge; and (7) heat exchange stage. From this analysis, a critical voltage criterion for breakdown is obtained. We anticipate this finding will provide guidance for a better application of plasma discharges, especially diaphragm plasma discharges.

  12. [Digital thoracic radiology: devices, image processing, limits].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frija, J; de Géry, S; Lallouet, F; Guermazi, A; Zagdanski, A M; De Kerviler, E

    2001-09-01

    In a first part, the different techniques of digital thoracic radiography are described. Since computed radiography with phosphore plates are the most commercialized it is more emphasized. But the other detectors are also described, as the drum coated with selenium and the direct digital radiography with selenium detectors. The other detectors are also studied in particular indirect flat panels detectors and the system with four high resolution CCD cameras. In a second step the most important image processing are discussed: the gradation curves, the unsharp mask processing, the system MUSICA, the dynamic range compression or reduction, the soustraction with dual energy. In the last part the advantages and the drawbacks of computed thoracic radiography are emphasized. The most important are the almost constant good quality of the pictures and the possibilities of image processing.

  13. Experimental Assessment of Plasma Transport in a 16-cm Multicusp Device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hubble, Aimee; Foster, John

    2012-10-01

    The physics of plasma transport from the bulk plasma through the magnetic cusp to the anode remains poorly understood. A proper accounting of plasma losses to the anode is critical to accurate modeling of multicusp device performance. In this work, plasma transport in a 16-cm multicusp discharge chamber was studied. Each ring was covered with an electrically isolated electrode, which enables the direct measurement of current to each individual ring as well as the discharge chamber wall. A translatable Langmuir probe was used to obtain maps of spatially resolved plasma parameters in bulk plasma region. These maps of spatially resolved plasma density, electron temperature, and plasma potential were compared to current collection at the cusps as well as the magnetic circuit and device performance. Ring electrode measurements coupled with spatially resolved plasma parameter measurements throughout the discharge chamber allow for an assessment of plasma losses to each ring in terms of an ``effective loss area'' which, multiplied by electron current density incident on the bulk/cusp boundary, gives the correct collected current to each ring. A relationship between effective loss area and the physical loss area was determined that can be applied to a 0-D particle and energy balance model.

  14. High heat flux capabilities of the Magnum-PSI linear plasma device

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De Temmerman, G., E-mail: g.c.detemmerman@differ.nl; Berg, M.A. van den; Scholten, J.; Lof, A.; Meiden, H.J. van der; Eck, H.J.N. van; Morgan, T.W.; Kruijf, T.M. de; Zeijlmans van Emmichoven, P.A.; Zielinski, J.J.

    2013-10-15

    Magnum-PSI is an advanced linear plasma device uniquely capable of producing plasma conditions similar to those expected in the divertor of ITER both steady-state and transients. The machine is designed both for fundamental studies of plasma–surface interactions under high heat and particle fluxes, and as a high-heat flux facility for the tests of plasma-facing components under realistic plasma conditions. To study the effects of transient heat loads on a plasma-facing surface, a novel pulsed plasma source system as well as a high power laser is available. In this article, we will describe the capabilities of Magnum-PSI for high-heat flux tests of plasma-facing materials.

  15. Atmospheric Pressure Plasma Processing for Polymer Adhesion: A Review

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kusano, Yukihiro

    2014-01-01

    Atmospheric pressure plasma processing has attracted significant interests over decades due to its usefulness and a variety of applications. Adhesion improvement of polymer surfaces is among the most important applications of atmospheric pressure plasma treatment. Reflecting recent significant de...... development of the atmospheric pressure plasma processing, this work presents its fundamental aspects, applications, and characterization techniques relevant to adhesion.......Atmospheric pressure plasma processing has attracted significant interests over decades due to its usefulness and a variety of applications. Adhesion improvement of polymer surfaces is among the most important applications of atmospheric pressure plasma treatment. Reflecting recent significant...

  16. Microbial adherence to a nonprecious alloy after plasma nitriding process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sonugelen, Mehmet; Destan, Uhmut Iyiyapici; Lambrecht, Fatma Yurt; Oztürk, Berran; Karadeniz, Süleyman

    2006-01-01

    To investigate the microbial adherence to the surfaces of a nonprecious metal alloy after plasma nitriding. The plasma-nitriding process was performed to the surfaces of metals prepared from a nickel-chromium alloy. The microorganisms were labeled with technetium-99m. After the labeling procedure, 60 metal disks were treated with a microorganism for each use. The results revealed that the amount of adherence of all microorganisms on surfaces was changed by plasma-nitriding process; adherence decreased substantially (P plasma nitriding time were not significant (P> .05) With the plasma-nitriding process, the surface properties of nonprecious metal alloys can be changed, leading to decreased microbial adherence.

  17. A quantum computer based on recombination processes in microelectronic devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theodoropoulos, K.; Ntalaperas, D.; Petras, I.; Konofaos, N.

    2005-01-01

    In this paper a quantum computer based on the recombination processes happening in semiconductor devices is presented. A "data element" and a "computational element" are derived based on Schokley-Read-Hall statistics and they can later be used to manifest a simple and known quantum computing process. Such a paradigm is shown by the application of the proposed computer onto a well known physical system involving traps in semiconductor devices.

  18. A quantum computer based on recombination processes in microelectronic devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Theodoropoulos, K [Computer Engineering and Informatics Department, University of Patras, Patras (Greece); Ntalaperas, D [Computer Engineering and Informatics Department, University of Patras, Patras (Greece); Research Academic Computer Technology Institute, Riga Feraiou 61, 26110, Patras (Greece); Petras, I [Computer Engineering and Informatics Department, University of Patras, Patras (Greece); Konofaos, N [Computer Engineering and Informatics Department, University of Patras, Patras (Greece)

    2005-01-01

    In this paper a quantum computer based on the recombination processes happening in semiconductor devices is presented. A 'data element' and a 'computational element' are derived based on Schokley-Read-Hall statistics and they can later be used to manifest a simple and known quantum computing process. Such a paradigm is shown by the application of the proposed computer onto a well known physical system involving traps in semiconductor devices.

  19. Lithography process for patterning HgI2 photonic devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mescher, Mark J.; James, Ralph B.; Hermon, Haim

    2004-11-23

    A photolithographic process forms patterns on HgI.sub.2 surfaces and defines metal sublimation masks and electrodes to substantially improve device performance by increasing the realizable design space. Techniques for smoothing HgI.sub.2 surfaces and for producing trenches in HgI.sub.2 are provided. A sublimation process is described which produces etched-trench devices with enhanced electron-transport-only behavior.

  20. Progress in high-efficient solution process organic photovoltaic devices fundamentals, materials, devices and fabrication

    CERN Document Server

    Li, Gang

    2015-01-01

    This book presents an important technique to process organic photovoltaic devices. The basics, materials aspects and manufacturing of photovoltaic devices with solution processing are explained. Solution processable organic solar cells - polymer or solution processable small molecules - have the potential to significantly reduce the costs for solar electricity and energy payback time due to the low material costs for the cells, low cost and fast fabrication processes (ambient, roll-to-roll), high material utilization etc. In addition, organic photovoltaics (OPV) also provides attractive properties like flexibility, colorful displays and transparency which could open new market opportunities. The material and device innovations lead to improved efficiency by 8% for organic photovoltaic solar cells, compared to 4% in 2005. Both academic and industry research have significant interest in the development of this technology. This book gives an overview of the booming technology, focusing on the solution process fo...

  1. Waveguiding and bending modes in a plasma photonic crystal bandgap device

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Wang

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Waveguiding and bending modes are investigated in a fully tunable plasma photonic crystal. The plasma device actively controls the propagation of free space electromagnetic waves in the S to X band of the microwave spectrum. An array of discharge plasma tubes form a square crystal lattice exhibiting a well-defined bandgap, with individual active switching of the plasma elements to allow for waveguiding and bending modes to be generated dynamically. We show, through simulations and experiments, the existence of transverse electric (TE mode waveguiding and bending modes.

  2. Preliminary Hazards Analysis Plasma Hearth Process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aycock, M.; Coordes, D.; Russell, J.; TenBrook, W.; Yimbo, P. [Science Applications International Corp., Pleasanton, CA (United States)

    1993-11-01

    This Preliminary Hazards Analysis (PHA) for the Plasma Hearth Process (PHP) follows the requirements of United States Department of Energy (DOE) Order 5480.23 (DOE, 1992a), DOE Order 5480.21 (DOE, 1991d), DOE Order 5480.22 (DOE, 1992c), DOE Order 5481.1B (DOE, 1986), and the guidance provided in DOE Standards DOE-STD-1027-92 (DOE, 1992b). Consideration is given to ft proposed regulations published as 10 CFR 830 (DOE, 1993) and DOE Safety Guide SG 830.110 (DOE, 1992b). The purpose of performing a PRA is to establish an initial hazard categorization for a DOE nuclear facility and to identify those processes and structures which may have an impact on or be important to safety. The PHA is typically performed during and provides input to project conceptual design. The PRA then is followed by a Preliminary Safety Analysis Report (PSAR) performed during Title I and II design. This PSAR then leads to performance of the Final Safety Analysis Report performed during construction, testing, and acceptance and completed before routine operation. Radiological assessments indicate that a PHP facility, depending on the radioactive material inventory, may be an exempt, Category 3, or Category 2 facility. The calculated impacts would result in no significant impact to offsite personnel or the environment. Hazardous material assessments indicate that a PHP facility will be a Low Hazard facility having no significant impacts either onsite or offsite to personnel and the environment.

  3. Platelet-rich plasma: updating of extraction devices

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Raquel Moreno; Marisa Gaspar Carreño; Jose María Alonso Herreros; Jose Antonio Romero Garrido; Piedad López-Sánchez

    2016-01-01

    ...: Ten devices were found: ACP®; Angel®, Cascade®, Endoret ®, GPS®, Magellan®, Minos®, Ortho-pras®, Smart-prepr® and Tricell®. However, we could found out the mechanism in detail of seven of them...

  4. Solution processed organic light-emitting diodes using the plasma cross-linking technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Kongduo; Liu, Yang; Gong, Junyi; Zeng, Pan; Kong, Xun; Yang, Xilu; Yang, Cheng; Yu, Yan; Liang, Rongqing; Ou, Qiongrong

    2016-09-01

    Solution processed multilayer organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs) present challenges, especially regarding dissolution of the first layer during deposition of a second layer. In this work, we first demonstrated a plasma cross-linking technology to produce a solution processed OLED. The surfaces of organic films can be cross-linked after mixed acetylene and Ar plasma treatment for several tens of seconds and resist corrosion of organic solvent. The film thickness and surface morphology of emissive layers (EMLs) with plasma treatment and subsequently spin-rinsed with chlorobenzene are nearly unchanged. The solution processed triple-layer OLED is successfully fabricated and the current efficiency increases 50% than that of the double-layer OLED. Fluorescent characteristics of EMLs are also observed to investigate factors influencing the efficiency of the triple-layer OLED. Plasma cross-linking technology may open up a new pathway towards fabrication of all-solution processed multilayer OLEDs and other soft electronic devices.

  5. Application of Atmospheric-Pressure Microwave Line Plasma for Low Temperature Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Haruka; Nakano, Suguru; Itoh, Hitoshi; Sekine, Makoto; Hori, Masaru; Toyoda, Hirotaka

    2015-09-01

    Atmospheric pressure (AP) plasmas have been given much attention because of its high cost benefit and a variety of possibilities for industrial applications. In various kinds of plasma production technique, pulsed-microwave discharge plasma using slot antenna is attractive due to its ability of high-density and stable plasma production. In this plasma source, however, size of the plasma has been limited up to a few cm in length due to standing wave inside a waveguide. To solve this, we have proposed a newly-developed AP microwave plasma source that utilizes not standing wave but travelling wave. By using this plasma source, spatially-uniform AP line plasma with 40 cm in length was realized by pure helium discharge in 60 cm slot and with nitrogen gas additive of 1%. Furthermore, gas temperature as low as 400 K was realized in this device. In this study, as an example of low temperature processes, hydrophilic treatment of PET films was performed. Processing speed increased with pulse frequency and a water contact angle of ~20° was easily obtained within 5 s with no thermal damage to the substrate. To evaluate treatment-uniformity of long line length, PET films were treated by 90 cm slot-antenna plasma and uniform treatment performance was confirmed.

  6. Plasma generated during underwater pulsed laser processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffman, Jacek; Chrzanowska, Justyna; Moscicki, Tomasz; Radziejewska, Joanna; Stobinski, Leszek; Szymanski, Zygmunt

    2017-09-01

    The plasma induced during underwater pulsed laser ablation of graphite is studied both experimentally and theoretically. The results of the experiment show that the maximum plasma temperature of 25000 K is reached 20 ns from the beginning of the laser pulse and decreases to 6500 K after 1000 ns. The observed OH absorption band shows that the plasma plume is surrounded by the thin layer of dissociated water vapour at a temperature around 5500 K. The hydrodynamic model applied shows similar maximum plasma temperature at delay times between 14 ns and 30 ns. The calculations show also that already at 14th ns, the plasma electron density reaches 0.97·1027 m-3, which is the critical density for 1064 nm radiation. At the same time the plasma pressure is 2 GPa, which is consisted with earlier measurements of the peak pressure exerted on a target in similar conditions.

  7. Plasma effect in Silicon Charge Couple Devices (CCDs)

    CERN Document Server

    Estrada, Juan; Blostein, J

    2011-01-01

    Plasma effect is observed in CCDs exposed to heavy ionizing alpha-particles with energies in the range 0.5 - 5.5 MeV. The results obtained for the size of the charge clusters reconstructed on the CCD pixels agrees with previous measurements in the high energy region (>3.5 MeV). The measurements were extended to lower energies using alpha-particles produced by (n,alpha) reactions of neutrons in a Boron-10 target. The effective linear charge density for the plasma column is measured as a function of energy. The results demonstrate the potential for high position resolution in the reconstruction of alpha particles, which opens an interesting possibility for using these detectors in neutron imaging applications.

  8. Plasma effect in silicon charge coupled devices (CCDs)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Estrada, J., E-mail: estrada@fnal.gov [Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory, Batavia, IL 60510 (United States); Molina, J., E-mail: jmolina@ing.una.py [Facultad de Ingenieria, Universidad Nacional de Asuncion, Laboratorio de Mecanica y Energia, Campus de la UNA, San Lorenzo 2160 (Paraguay); Blostein, J.J., E-mail: jeronimo@cab.cnea.gov.ar [CONICET (Argentina); Centro Atomico Bariloche, Comision Nacional de Energia Atomica, Bariloche (Argentina); Fernandez, G., E-mail: fmoroni.guillermo@gmail.com [Universidad Nacional del Sur, Bahia Blanca (Argentina)

    2011-02-11

    Plasma effect is observed in CCDs exposed to heavy ionizing {alpha}-particles with energies in the range 0.5-5.5 MeV. The results obtained for the size of the charge clusters reconstructed on the CCD pixels agree with previous measurements in the high energy region ({>=}3.5 MeV). The measurements were extended to lower energies using {alpha}-particles produced by (n,{alpha}) reactions of neutrons in a {sup 10}B target. The effective linear charge density for the plasma column is measured as a function of energy. The results demonstrate the potential for high position resolution in the reconstruction of {alpha} particles, which opens an interesting possibility for using these detectors in neutron imaging applications.

  9. Two-Step Plasma Process for Cleaning Indium Bonding Bumps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greer, Harold F.; Vasquez, Richard P.; Jones, Todd J.; Hoenk, Michael E.; Dickie, Matthew R.; Nikzad, Shouleh

    2009-01-01

    A two-step plasma process has been developed as a means of removing surface oxide layers from indium bumps used in flip-chip hybridization (bump bonding) of integrated circuits. The two-step plasma process makes it possible to remove surface indium oxide, without incurring the adverse effects of the acid etching process.

  10. Integrative device and process of oxidization, degassing, acidity adjustment of 1BP from APOR process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zuo, Chen; Zheng, Weifang, E-mail: wfazh@ciae.ac.cn; Yan, Taihong; He, Hui; Li, Gaoliang; Chang, Shangwen; Li, Chuanbo; Yuan, Zhongwei

    2016-02-15

    Graphical abstract: Previous (left) and present (right) device of oxidation, degassing, acidity adjustment of 1BP. - Highlights: • We designed an integrative device and process. • The utilization efficiency of N{sub 2}O{sub 4} is increased significantly. • Our work results in considerable simplification of the device. • Process parameters are determined by experiments. - Abstract: Device and process of oxidization, degassing, acidity adjustment of 1BP (The Pu production feed from U/Pu separation section) from APOR process (Advanced Purex Process based on Organic Reductants) were improved through rational design and experiments. The device was simplified and the process parameters, such as feed position and flow ratio, were determined by experiments. Based on this new device and process, the reductants N,N-dimethylhydroxylamine (DMHAN) and methylhydrazine (MMH) in 1BP solution could be oxidized with much less N{sub 2}O{sub 4} consumption.

  11. Functionalized graphene and other two-dimensional materials for photovoltaic devices: device design and processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhike; Lau, Shu Ping; Yan, Feng

    2015-08-07

    Graphene is the thinnest two-dimensional (2D) carbon material and has many advantages including high carrier mobilities and conductivity, high optical transparency, excellent mechanical flexibility and chemical stability, which make graphene an ideal material for various optoelectronic devices. The major applications of graphene in photovoltaic devices are for transparent electrodes and charge transport layers. Several other 2D materials have also shown advantages in charge transport and light absorption over traditional semiconductor materials used in photovoltaic devices. Great achievements in the applications of 2D materials in photovoltaic devices have been reported, yet numerous challenges still remain. For practical applications, the device performance should be further improved by optimizing the 2D material synthesis, film transfer, surface functionalization and chemical/physical doping processes. In this review, we will focus on the recent advances in the applications of graphene and other 2D materials in various photovoltaic devices, including organic solar cells, Schottky junction solar cells, dye-sensitized solar cells, quantum dot-sensitized solar cells, other inorganic solar cells, and perovskite solar cells, in terms of the functionalization techniques of the materials, the device design and the device performance. Finally, conclusions and an outlook for the future development of this field will be addressed.

  12. The MaPLE device of Saha Institute of Nuclear Physics: construction and its plasma aspects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pal, Rabindranath; Biswas, Subir; Basu, Subhasis; Chattopadhyay, Monobir; Basu, Debjyoti; Chaudhuri, Manis; Chowdhuri, Manis

    2010-07-01

    The Magnetized Plasma Linear Experimental (MaPLE) device is a low cost laboratory plasma device at Saha Institute of Nuclear Physics fabricated in-house with the primary aim of studying basic plasma physics phenomena such as plasma instabilities, wave propagation, and their nonlinear behavior in magnetized plasma regime in a controlled manner. The machine is specially designed to be a versatile laboratory device that can provide a number of magnetic and electric scenario to facilitate such studies. A total of 36 number of 20-turn magnet coils, designed such as to allow easy handling, is capable of producing a uniform, dc magnetic field of about 0.35 T inside the plasma chamber of diameter 0.30 m. Support structure of the coils is planned in an innovative way facilitating straightforward fabrication and easy positioning of the coils. Further special feature lies in the arrangement of the spacers between the coils that can be maneuvered rather easily to create different magnetic configurations. Various methods of plasma production can be suitably utilized according to the experimental needs at either end of the vacuum vessel. In the present paper, characteristics of a steady state plasma generated by electron cyclotron resonance method using 2.45 GHz microwave power are presented. Scans using simple probe drives revealed that a uniform and long plasma column having electron density approximately 3-5x10(10) cm(-3) and temperature approximately 7-10 eV, is formed in the center of the plasma chamber which is suitable for wave launching experiments.

  13. Atomic processes in high-density plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    More, R.M.

    1982-12-21

    This review covers dense atomic plasmas such as that produced in inertial confinement fusion. The target implosion physics along with the associated atomic physics, i.e., free electron collision phenomena, electron states I, electron states II, and nonequilibrium plasma states are described. (MOW)

  14. Surface modifications of fusion reactor relevant materials on exposure to fusion grade plasma in plasma focus device

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Niranjan, Ram, E-mail: niranjan@barc.gov.in [Applied Physics Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai 400085 (India); Rout, R.K.; Srivastava, R. [Applied Physics Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai 400085 (India); Chakravarthy, Y. [Laser and Plasma Technology Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai 400085 (India); Mishra, P. [Materials Processing Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai 400085 (India); Kaushik, T.C.; Gupta, Satish C. [Applied Physics Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai 400085 (India)

    2015-11-15

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Exposure of materials (W, Ni, SS, Mo and Cu) to fusion plasma in a plasma focus device. • The erosion and the formations of blisters, pores, craters, micro-cracks after irradiation. • The structural phase transformation in the SS sample after irradiation. • The surface layer alloying of the samples with the plasma focus anode material. - Abstract: An 11.5 kJ plasma focus (PF) device was used here to irradiate materials with fusion grade plasma. The surface modifications of different materials (W, Ni, stainless steel, Mo and Cu) were investigated using various available techniques. The prominent features observed through the scanning electron microscope on the sample surfaces were erosions, cracks, blisters and craters after irradiations. The surface roughness of the samples increased multifold after exposure as measured by the surface profilometer. The X-ray diffraction analysis indicated the changes in the microstructures and the structural phase transformation in surface layers of the samples. We observed change in volumes of austenite and ferrite phases in the stainless steel sample. The energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopic analysis suggested alloying of the surface layer of the samples with elements of the PF anode. We report here the comparative analysis of the surface damages of materials with different physical, thermal and mechanical properties. The investigations will be useful to understand the behavior of the perspective materials for future fusion reactors (either in pure form or in alloy) over the long operations.

  15. Thermomechanical processing of plasma sprayed intermetallic sheets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hajaligol, Mohammad R. (Midlothian, VA); Scorey, Clive (Cheshire, CT); Sikka, Vinod K. (Oak Ridge, TN); Deevi, Seetharama C. (Midlothian, VA); Fleischhauer, Grier (Midlothian, VA); Lilly, Jr., A. Clifton (Chesterfield, VA); German, Randall M. (State College, PA)

    2001-01-01

    A powder metallurgical process of preparing a sheet from a powder having an intermetallic alloy composition such as an iron, nickel or titanium aluminide. The sheet can be manufactured into electrical resistance heating elements having improved room temperature ductility, electrical resistivity, cyclic fatigue resistance, high temperature oxidation resistance, low and high temperature strength, and/or resistance to high temperature sagging. The iron aluminide has an entirely ferritic microstructure which is free of austenite and can include, in weight %, 4 to 32% Al, and optional additions such as .ltoreq.1% Cr, .gtoreq.0.05% Zr .ltoreq.2% Ti, .ltoreq.2% Mo, .ltoreq.1% Ni, .ltoreq.0.75% C, .ltoreq.0.1% B, .ltoreq.1% submicron oxide particles and/or electrically insulating or electrically conductive covalent ceramic particles, .ltoreq.1% rare earth metal, and/or .ltoreq.3% Cu. The process includes forming a non-densified metal sheet by consolidating a powder having an intermetallic alloy composition such as by roll compaction, tape casting or plasma spraying, forming a cold rolled sheet by cold rolling the non-densified metal sheet so as to increase the density and reduce the thickness thereof and annealing the cold rolled sheet. The powder can be a water, polymer or gas atomized powder which is subjecting to sieving and/or blending with a binder prior to the consolidation step. After the consolidation step, the sheet can be partially sintered. The cold rolling and/or annealing steps can be repeated to achieve the desired sheet thickness and properties. The annealing can be carried out in a vacuum furnace with a vacuum or inert atmosphere. During final annealing, the cold rolled sheet recrystallizes to an average grain size of about 10 to 30 .mu.m. Final stress relief annealing can be carried out in the B2 phase temperature range.

  16. Understanding plasma spraying process and characteristics of DC-arc plasma gun (PJ-100

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jovana Ružić

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The thermal spray processes are a group of coating processes used to apply metallic or non-metallic coatings. In these processes energy sources are used to heat the coating material (in the form of powder, wire, or rod form to a molten or semi-molten state and accelerated towards a prepared surface by either carrier gases or atomization jets. In plasma spraying process, the spraying material is generally in the form of powder and requires a carrier gas to feed the powder into the plasma jet, which is passing between the hot cathode and the cylindrical nozzle-shaped anode. The design of DC plasma gun (PJ - 100 is designed and manufactured in Serbia. Plasma spaying process, the powder injection with the heat, momentum and mass transfers between particles and plasma jet, and the latest developments related to the production of DC plasma gun are described in this article.

  17. Laser induced fluorescence measurements of axial velocity, velocity shear, and parallel ion temperature profiles during the route to plasma turbulence in a linear magnetized plasma device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakraborty Thakur, S.; Adriany, K.; Gosselin, J. J.; McKee, J.; Scime, E. E.; Sears, S. H.; Tynan, G. R.

    2016-11-01

    We report experimental measurements of the axial plasma flow and the parallel ion temperature in a magnetized linear plasma device. We used laser induced fluorescence to measure Doppler resolved ion velocity distribution functions in argon plasma to obtain spatially resolved axial velocities and parallel ion temperatures. We also show changes in the parallel velocity profiles during the transition from resistive drift wave dominated plasma to a state of weak turbulence driven by multiple plasma instabilities.

  18. 3D plasma turbulence and neutral simulations using the Hermes model in BOUT + + : a study of linear devices and the tokamak edge and divertor region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leddy, Jarrod; Dudson, Ben

    2016-10-01

    Understanding the transport processes in the low temperature plasma at the boundary region of magnetic confinement fusion (MCF) devices is crucial to the design and operation of future fusion reactor devices. It influences the divertor heat load, and probably the core confinement as well. The dominant source of this transport is turbulence, which serves to mix the high and low temperature regions of the plasma. The nature of this plasma turbulence is affected by not only the plasma parameters, but also the neutral species that also exist in these low temperature regions. The interaction of neutrals with the plasma turbulence is studied in linear device geometry (for its simplicity, yet similarity in plasma parameters), and the result is a strong interaction that impacts the local plasma and neutral densities, momenta and energies. The neutral gas is found to affect plasma edge turbulence primarily through momentum exchange, reducing the radial electric field and enhancing cross-field transport, with consequent implications for the SOL width and divertor heat loads. Therefore, turbulent plasma and fluid simulations have been performed in multiple tokamak geometries to more closely examine the effects of this interaction. These cases were chosen for the variety in configuration with ISTOK having a toroidal limiter (ie. no divertor), DIII-D having a standard divertor configuration, and MAST-U having a super-X divertor with extended outer divertor legs. Progress towards the characterization of neutral impact on detachment and edge behavior will be presented.

  19. MHD Instabilities and Their Effects on Plasma Confinement in Large Helical Device Plasmas with Intense Neutral Beam Injection

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    K. Toi; K. Narihara; K. Tanaka; T. Tokuzawa; H. Yamada; Q. Yang; LHD experimental group; S. Ohdachi; S. Yamamoto; S. Sakakibara; K. Y. Watanabe; N. Nakajima; X. Ding; J. Li; S. Morita

    2004-01-01

    MHD stability of the Large Helical Device (LHD) plasmas produced with intense neutral beam injection is experimentally studied. When the steep pressure gradient near the edge is produced through L-H transition or linear density ramp experiment, interchange-like MHD modes whose rational surface is located very close to the last closed flux surface are strongly excited in a certain discharge condition and affect the plasma transport appreciably. In NBI-heated energetic ion loss, but also trigger the formation of internal and edge transport barriers.

  20. Development of a microfluidic device for cell concentration and blood cell-plasma separation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maria, M Sneha; Kumar, B S; Chandra, T S; Sen, A K

    2015-12-01

    This work presents design, fabrication and test of a microfluidic device which employs Fahraeus-Lindqvist and Zweifach-Fung effects for cell concentration and blood cell-plasma separation. The device design comprises a straight main channel with a series of branched channels placed symmetrically on both sides of the main channel. The design implements constrictions before each junction (branching point) in order to direct cells that would have migrated closer to the wall (naturally or after liquid extraction at a junction) towards the centre of the main channel. Theoretical and numerical analysis are performed for design of the microchannel network to ensure that a minimum flow rate ratio (of 2.5:1, main channel-to-side channels) is maintained at each junction and predict flow rate at the plasma outlet. The dimensions and location of the constrictions were determined using numerical simulations. The effect of presence of constrictions before the junctions was demonstrated by comparing the performances of the device with and without constrictions. To demonstrate the performance of the device, initial experiments were performed with polystyrene microbeads (10 and 15 μm size) and droplets. Finally, the device was used for concentration of HL60 cells and separation of plasma and cells in diluted blood samples. The cell concentration and blood-plasma purification efficiency was quantified using Haemocytometer and Fluorescence-Activated Cell Sorter (FACS). A seven-fold cell concentration was obtained with HL60 cells and a purification efficiency of 70 % and plasma recovery of 80 % was observed for diluted (1:20) blood sample. FACS was used to identify cell lysis and the cell viability was checked using Trypan Blue test which showed that more than 99 % cells are alive indicating the suitability of the device for practical use. The proposed device has potential to be used as a sample preparation module in lab on chip based diagnostic platforms.

  1. Statistical characterization of the reproducibility of neutron emission of small plasma focus devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tarifeno-Saldivia, Ariel; Soto, Leopoldo [Comision Chilena de Energia Nuclear (CCHEN), Casilla 188-D, Santiago (Chile); Center for Research and Applications in Plasma Physics and Pulsed Power, P4 (Chile) and Departamento de Ciencias Fisicas, Universidad Andres Bello, Republica 220, Santiago (Chile)

    2012-09-15

    The purpose of this work is to discuss the techniques related to the detection of fast pulsed neutrons produced in plasma focus (PF) devices, the statistical analysis of the corresponding data, and the methodologies for evaluation of the device performance in low emission neutron sources. A general mathematical framework is presented for the assessment of the reproducibility of the neutron emission of small PF devices given the shot-to-shot distribution and detector efficiency. The effect on the reproducibility in case of using two independent detectors is also discussed. The analysis is applied to the neutron emission of the plasma focus device PF-50J operating in repetitive mode (0.1-0.5 Hz and 65 J bank energy).

  2. Electrochromic Devices Deposited on Low-Temperature Plastics by Plasma-Enhanced Chemical Vapor Deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robbins, Joshua; Seman, Michael

    2005-09-20

    Electrochromic windows have been identified by the Basic energy Sciences Advisory committee as an important technology for the reduction of energy spent on heating and cooling in residential and commercial buildings. Electrochromic devices have the ability to reversibly alter their optical properties in response to a small electric field. By blocking ultraviolet and infrared radiation, while modulating the incoming visible radiation, electrochromics could reduce energy consumption by several Quads per year. This amounts to several percent of the total annual national energy expenditures. The purpose of this project was to demonstrate proof of concept for using plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) for depositing all five layers necessary for full electrochromic devices, as an alternative to sputtering techniques. The overall goal is to produce electrochromic devices on flexible polymer substrates using PECVD to significantly reduce the cost of the final product. We have successfully deposited all of the films necessary for a complete electrochromic devices using PECVD. The electrochromic layer, WO3, displayed excellent change in visible transmission with good switching times. The storage layer, V2O5, exhibited a high storage capacity and good clear state transmission. The electrolyte, Ta2O5, was shown to functional with good electrical resistivity to go along with the ability to transfer Li ions. There were issues with leakage over larger areas, which can be address with further process development. We developed a process to deposit ZnO:Ga with a sheet resistance of < 50 W/sq. with > 90% transmission. Although we were not able to deposit on polymers due to the temperatures required in combination with the inverted position of our substrates. Two types of full devices were produced. Devices with Ta2O5 were shown to be functional using small aluminum dots as the top contact. The polymer electrolyte devices were shown to have a clear state transmission of

  3. Design and construction of Keda Space Plasma Experiment (KSPEX) for the investigation of the boundary layer processes of ionospheric depletions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yu; Zhang, Zhongkai; Lei, Jiuhou; Cao, Jinxiang; Yu, Pengcheng; Zhang, Xiao; Xu, Liang; Zhao, Yaodong

    2016-09-01

    In this work, the design and construction of the Keda Space Plasma EXperiment (KSPEX), which aims to study the boundary layer processes of ionospheric depletions, are described in detail. The device is composed of three stainless-steel sections: two source chambers at both ends and an experimental chamber in the center. KSPEX is a steady state experimental device, in which hot filament arrays are used to produce plasmas in the two sources. A Macor-mesh design is adopted to adjust the plasma density and potential difference between the two plasmas, which creates a boundary layer with a controllable electron density gradient and inhomogeneous radial electric field. In addition, attachment chemicals can be released into the plasmas through a tailor-made needle valve which leads to the generation of negative ions plasmas. Ionospheric depletions can be modeled and simulated using KSPEX, and many micro-physical processes of the formation and evolution of an ionospheric depletion can be experimentally studied.

  4. Design and construction of Keda Space Plasma Experiment (KSPEX) for the investigation of the boundary layer processes of ionospheric depletions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yu; Zhang, Zhongkai; Lei, Jiuhou; Cao, Jinxiang; Yu, Pengcheng; Zhang, Xiao; Xu, Liang; Zhao, Yaodong

    2016-09-01

    In this work, the design and construction of the Keda Space Plasma EXperiment (KSPEX), which aims to study the boundary layer processes of ionospheric depletions, are described in detail. The device is composed of three stainless-steel sections: two source chambers at both ends and an experimental chamber in the center. KSPEX is a steady state experimental device, in which hot filament arrays are used to produce plasmas in the two sources. A Macor-mesh design is adopted to adjust the plasma density and potential difference between the two plasmas, which creates a boundary layer with a controllable electron density gradient and inhomogeneous radial electric field. In addition, attachment chemicals can be released into the plasmas through a tailor-made needle valve which leads to the generation of negative ions plasmas. Ionospheric depletions can be modeled and simulated using KSPEX, and many micro-physical processes of the formation and evolution of an ionospheric depletion can be experimentally studied.

  5. Neutron and Ion Beams Emitted from Plasma Focus (112.5 J) Device

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Aragi M., G.

    2010-02-01

    Preliminary results of recent experiments performed within the Mather-type 112.5 J plasma focus device are presented. The ion beams from the focus device operated with deuterium filling at 1 mbar were registered using CR-39 solid state nuclear track detectors (SSNTD) and a Faraday cup detector for time-resolved measurements. The time-resolved neutron emission from the focus region measurements was detected with a photomultiplier tube (IP-28) optically coupled with a plastic scintillator NE 102.

  6. Enhancing the plasma illumination behaviour of microplasma devices using microcrystalline/ultra-nanocrystalline hybrid diamond materials as cathodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Tinghsun; Lou, Shiucheng; Chen, Huangchin; Chen, Chulung; Lee, Chiyoung; Tai, Nyanhwa; Lin, Inan

    2013-08-21

    The properties of capacity-type microplasma devices were significantly enhanced due to the utilisation of hybrid diamond films as cathodes. The performance of the microplasma devices was closely correlated with the electron field emission (EFE) properties of the diamond cathode materials. The nanoemitters, which were prepared by growing duplex-structured diamond films [microcrystalline diamond (MCD)/ultra-nanocrystalline diamond (UNCD)] on Si-pyramid templates via a two-step microwave plasma enhanced chemical vapour deposition (MPE-CVD) process, exhibited improved EFE properties (E0 = 5.99 V μm(-1), J(e) = 1.10 mA cm(-2) at 8.50 V μm(-1) applied field), resulting in superior microplasma device performance (with a lower threshold field of 200 V mm(-1) and a higher plasma current density of 7.80 mA cm(-2)) in comparison with UNCD film devices prepared using a single-step MPE-CVD process. The superior EFE properties of the duplex-structured MCD-UNCD films relative to those of the UNCD films can be attributed to the unique granular structure of the diamond films. High-resolution transmission electron microscopy reveals that the MCD-UNCD films consisted of abundant graphitic phases located at the periphery of large diamond aggregates and at the boundaries between the ultra-small diamond grains. The presence of the graphite phase is presumed to be the prime factor that renders these films more conductive and causes these films to exhibit higher EFE properties, thus resulting in the improved plasma illumination properties of the microplasma devices.

  7. Plasma Processes : Arc root dynamics in high power plasma torches – Evidence of chaotic behavior

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    A K Das

    2000-11-01

    Although plasma torches have been commercially available for about 50 years, areas such as plasma gun design, process efficiency, reproducibility, plasma stability, torch lives etc. have remained mostly unattended. Recent torch developments have been focusing on the basic understanding of the plasma column and its dynamics inside the plasma torch, the interaction of plasma jet and the powders, the interaction of the plasma jet with surroundings and the impingement of the jet on the substrate. Two of the major causes of erratic and poor performance of a variety of thermal plasma processes are currently identified as the fluctuations arising out of the arc root movement on the electrodes inside the plasma torch and the fluid dynamic instabilities arising out of entrainment of the air into the plasma jet. This paper reviews the current state of understanding of these fluctuations as well as the dynamics of arc root movement in plasma torches. The work done at the author’s laboratory on studying the fluctuations in arc voltage, arc current, acoustic emissions and optical emissions are also presented. These fluctuations are observed to be chaotic and interrelated. Real time monitoring and controlling the arc instabilities through chaos characterization parameters can greatly contribute to the understanding of electrode erosion as well as improvement of plasma torch lifetime.

  8. A spectral line survey from 17.5-250 nm of plasmas created in a magnetic confinement device

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCarthy, K. J.; Zurro, B.; Hollmann, E. M.; Hernández Sánchez, J.; TJ-II Team1, the

    2016-11-01

    Spectral emission lines continue to be a powerful tool for studying astrophysical, process, laser-produced, and magnetically confined plasmas, among others. Hence, numerous spectroscopy-based plasma diagnostics, from the x-ray to the infrared, make use of the relative intensity, width, displacement in wavelength, or temporal evolution of such emission lines emitted by the atoms and ions present in such plasmas. In this work, a spectral line survey, from 17.5-250 nm, is presented for electron cyclotron resonance heated (ECRH) and neutral beam injection (NBI) heated plasmas created and maintained in the TJ-II stellarator, a medium-sized magnetically confined plasma device. In these plasmas, for which hydrogen, deuterium or helium have been used as the working gas, central electron temperatures and densities up to 1 keV and 5 × 1019 m-3, respectively, are achieved. This work is a compilation of the identified spectral emission lines emitted by the working gas as well by the intrinsic and injected impurity ions in the above wavelength range. For this, spectra were recorded, over the past fifteen years of TJ-II operation, using a 1 m focal length normal incidence spectrometer equipped with a charge-coupled detector at its output focal plane. In total, almost 400 spectral emission lines from eighteen different elements have been identified using a number of atomic line emission databases.

  9. Inorganic and Organic Solution-Processed Thin Film Devices

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Morteza Eslamian

    2017-01-01

    Thin films and thin film devices have a ubiquitous presence in numerous conventional and emerging tech-nologies. This is because of the recent advances in nanotechnology, the development of functional and smart materials, conducting polymers, molecular semiconductors, carbon nanotubes, and graphene, and the employment of unique prop-erties of thin films and ultrathin films, such as high surface area, controlled nanostructure for effective charge transfer, and special physical and chemical properties, to develop new thin film devices. This paper is therefore intended to provide a concise critical review and research directions on most thin film devices, including thin film transistors, data storage memory, solar cells, organic light-emitting diodes, thermoelectric devices, smart materials, sensors, and actuators. The thin film devices may consist of organic, inorganic, and composite thin layers, and share similar functionality, properties, and fabrication routes. Therefore, due to the multidisciplinary nature of thin film devices, knowledge and advances already made in one area may be applicable to other similar areas. Owing to the importance of developing low-cost, scalable, and vacuum-free fabrication routes, this paper focuses on thin film devices that may be processed and deposited from solution.

  10. Experimental Investigation of Turbulent-driven Sheared Parallel Flows in the CSDX Plasma Device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tynan, George; Hong, Rongjie; Li, Jiacong; Thakur, Saikat; Diamond, Patrick

    2016-10-01

    Parallel velocity and its radial shear is a key element for both accessing improved confinement regimes and controlling the impurity transport in tokamak devices. In this study, the development of radially sheared parallel plasma flows in plasmas without magnetic shear is investigated using laser induced fluorescence, multi-tip Langmuir and Mach probes in the CSDX helicon linear plasma device. Results show that a mean parallel velocity shear grows as the radial gradient of plasma density increased. The sheared flow onset corresponds to the onset of a finite parallel Reynolds stress that acts to reinforce the flow. As a result, the mean parallel flow gains energy from the turbulence that, in turn, is driven by the density gradient. This results in a flow away from the plasma source in the central region of the plasma and a reverse flow in far-peripheral region of the plasma column. The results motivate a model of negative viscosity induced by the turbulent stress which may help explain the origin of intrinsic parallel flow in systems without magnetic shear.

  11. An Electrothermal Plasma Source Developed for Simulation of Transient Heat Loads in Future Large Fusion Devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gebhart, Trey; Baylor, Larry; Winfrey, Leigh

    2016-10-01

    The realization of fusion energy requires materials that can withstand high heat and particle fluxes at the plasma material interface. In this work, an electrothermal (ET) plasma source has been designed as a possible transient heat flux source for a linear plasma material interaction device. An ET plasma source operates in the ablative arc regime, which is driven by a DC capacitive discharge. The current travels through the 4mm bore of a boron nitride liner and subsequently ablates and ionizes the liner material. This results in a high density plasma with a large unidirectional bulk flow out of the source exit. The pulse length for the ET source has been optimized using a pulse forming network to have a duration of 1ms at full-width half maximum. The peak currents and maximum source energies seen in this system are 2kA and 5kJ. The goal of this work is to show that the ET source produces electron densities and heat fluxes that are comparable to transient events in future large magnetic confinement fusion devices. Heat flux, plasma temperature, and plasma density were determined for each test shot using infrared imaging and optical spectroscopy techniques. This work will compare the ET source output (heat flux, temperature, and density) with and without an applied magnetic field. Research sponsored by the Laboratory Directed Research and Development Program of Oak Ridge National Laboratory, managed by UT-Battelle, LLC, for the U. S. Department of Energy.

  12. Turbulent jet flow generated downstream of a low temperature dielectric barrier atmospheric pressure plasma device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whalley, Richard D.; Walsh, James L.

    2016-08-01

    Flowing low temperature atmospheric pressure plasma devices have been used in many technological applications ranging from energy efficient combustion through to wound healing and cancer therapy. The generation of the plasma causes a sudden onset of turbulence in the inhomogeneous axisymmetric jet flow downstream of the plasma plume. The mean turbulent velocity fields are shown to be self-similar and independent of the applied voltage used to generate the plasma. It is proposed that the production of turbulence is related to a combination of the small-amplitude plasma induced body forces and gas heating causing perturbations in the unstable shear layers at the jet exit which grow as they move downstream, creating turbulence.

  13. Turbulent jet flow generated downstream of a low temperature dielectric barrier atmospheric pressure plasma device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whalley, Richard D; Walsh, James L

    2016-08-26

    Flowing low temperature atmospheric pressure plasma devices have been used in many technological applications ranging from energy efficient combustion through to wound healing and cancer therapy. The generation of the plasma causes a sudden onset of turbulence in the inhomogeneous axisymmetric jet flow downstream of the plasma plume. The mean turbulent velocity fields are shown to be self-similar and independent of the applied voltage used to generate the plasma. It is proposed that the production of turbulence is related to a combination of the small-amplitude plasma induced body forces and gas heating causing perturbations in the unstable shear layers at the jet exit which grow as they move downstream, creating turbulence.

  14. Effect of impurities on kinetic transport processes in fusion plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Braun, Stefanie

    2010-12-10

    Within the framework of this thesis, different problems arising in connection with impurities have been investigated. Collisional damping of zonal flows in tokamaks: Since the Coulomb collision frequency increases with increasing ion charge, heavy, highly charged impurities play an important role in this process. The effect of such impurities on the linear response of the plasma to an external potential perturbation, as caused by zonal flows, is calculated with analytical methods. In comparison with a pure plasma, the damping of the flows occurs, as expected, considerably faster; for experimentally relevant parameters, the enhancement exceeds the effective charge Z{sub eff} of the plasma. Impurity transport driven by microturbulence in tokamaks: With regard to impurities, it is especially important whether the resulting flows are directed inwards or outwards, since they are deleterious for core energy confinement on the one hand, but on the other hand help protecting plasma-facing components from too high energy fluxes in the edge region. A semi-analytical model is presented describing the resulting impurity fluxes and the stability boundary of the underlying mode. The main goal is to bridge the gap between, on the one hand, costly numerical simulations, which are applicable to a broad range of problems but yield scarcely traceable results, and, on the other hand, analytical theory, which might ease the interpretation of the results but is so far rather rudimentary. The model is based on analytical formulae whenever possible but resorts to a numerical treatment when the approximations necessary for an analytical solution would lead to a substantial distortion of the results. Both the direction of the impurity flux and the stability boundary are found to depend sensitively on the plasma parameters such as the impurity density and the temperature gradient. Pfirsch-Schlueter transport in stellarators: Due to geometry effects, collisional transport plays a much more

  15. Silicon analog components device design, process integration, characterization, and reliability

    CERN Document Server

    El-Kareh, Badih

    2015-01-01

    This book covers modern analog components, their characteristics, and interactions with process parameters. It serves as a comprehensive guide, addressing both the theoretical and practical aspects of modern silicon devices and the relationship between their electrical properties and processing conditions. Based on the authors’ extensive experience in the development of analog devices, this book is intended for engineers and scientists in semiconductor research, development and manufacturing. The problems at the end of each chapter and the numerous charts, figures and tables also make it appropriate for use as a text in graduate and advanced undergraduate courses in electrical engineering and materials science.

  16. Low power signal processing electronics for wearable medical devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casson, Alexander J; Rodriguez-Villegas, Esther

    2010-01-01

    Custom designed microchips, known as Application Specific Integrated Circuits (ASICs), offer the lowest possible power consumption electronics. However, this comes at the cost of a longer, more complex and more costly design process compared to one using generic, off-the-shelf components. Nevertheless, their use is essential in future truly wearable medical devices that must operate for long periods of time from physically small, energy limited batteries. This presentation will demonstrate the state-of-the-art in ASIC technology for providing online signal processing for use in these wearable medical devices.

  17. [Platelet-rich plasma: updating of extraction devices].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreno, Raquel; Gaspar Carreño, Marisa; Alonso Herreros, Jose María; Romero Garrido, Jose Antonio; López-Sánchez, Piedad

    2016-09-01

    Objetivo: Describir los dispositivos para la obtención de Plasma Rico en Plaquetas (PRP) mediante la revisión de los productos existentes en España, teniendo en consideración las aportaciones de la Agencia Española de Medicamentos y Productos Sanitarios (AEMPS) y los grupos de trabajo de Productos Sanitarios (GPS), Farmacotecnia y Hemoderivados de la Sociedad Española de Farmacia Hospitalaria (SEFH). Método: Se realizaron tres búsquedas independientes sobre dispositivos de fraccionamiento de plasma. Se contactó con los proveedores y se estableció una reunión con cada uno de ellos. Se revisaron las características de cada dispositivo mediante una demostración del proceso de fraccionamiento virtual y se elaboró una tabla de comparación de kits. Los dispositivos se clasificaron como Técnica cerrada y Técnica abierta de acuerdo al informe del comité técnico de inspección de la AEMPS. Resultados: Se localizaron diez dispositivos: ACP®; Angel®, Cascade®, Endoret®, GPS®, Magellan®, Minos®, Ortho-pras®, Smart-prepr® y Tricell®, pudiendo conocer de forma detallada el funcionamiento en siete de ellos. Sin embargo, de Cascade ®, Magellan® y Smart-prepr® no se consiguió información suficiente. Conclusión: La revisión permitió conocer los principales dispositivos de extracción de PRP disponibles con marcado CE y sus características diferenciales; sin embargo, para garantizar la calidad del producto final es crucial poner atención en el propio proceso de extracción y administración del PRP. El Servicio de Farmacia debe implicarse en su selección por la estrecha relación que mantiene con la calidad del medicamento elaborado. El trabajo conjunto con la AEMPS permitirá definir de forma más específica el proceso correcto de elaboración.

  18. A comprehensive study of electrostatic turbulence and transport in the laboratory basic plasma device TORPEX

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furno, I.; Fasoli, A.; Avino, F.; Bovet, A.; Gustafson, K.; Iraji, D.; Labit, B.; Loizu, J.; Ricci, P.; Theiler, C.

    2012-04-01

    TORPEX is a toroidal device located at the CRPP-EPFL in Lausanne. In TORPEX, a vertical magnetic field superposed on a toroidal field creates helicoidal field lines with both ends terminating on the torus vessel. The turbulence driven by magnetic curvature and plasma gradients causes plasma transport in the radial direction while at the same time plasma is progressively lost along the field lines. The relatively simple magnetic geometry and diagnostic access of the TORPEX configuration facilitate the experimental study of low frequency instabilities and related turbulent transport, and make an accurate comparison between simulations and experiments possible. We first present a detailed investigation of electrostatic interchange turbulence, associated structures and their effect on plasma using high-resolution diagnostics of plasma parameters and wave fields throughout the whole device cross-section, fluid models and numerical simulations. Interchange modes nonlinearly develop blobs, radially propagating filaments of enhanced plasma pressure. Blob velocities and sizes are obtained from probe measurements using pattern recognition and are described by an analytical expression that includes ion polarization currents, parallel sheath currents and ion-neutral collisions. Then, we describe recent advances of a non-perturbative Li 6+ miniaturized ion source and a detector for the investigation of the interaction between supra thermal ions and interchange-driven turbulence. We present first measurements of the spatial and energy space distribution of the fast ion beam in different plasma scenarios, in which the plasma turbulence is fully characterized. The experiments are interpreted using two-dimensional fluid simulations describing the low-frequency interchange turbulence, taking into account the plasma source and plasma losses at the torus vessel. By treating fast ions as test particles, we integrate their equations of motion in the simulated electromagnetic fields, and

  19. Challenges in the characterization of plasma-processed three-dimensional polymeric scaffolds for biomedical applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisher, Ellen R

    2013-10-09

    Low-temperature plasmas offer a versatile method for delivering tailored functionality to a range of materials. Despite the vast array of choices offered by plasma processing techniques, there remain a significant number of hurdles that must be overcome to allow this methodology to realize its full potential in the area of biocompatible materials. Challenges include issues associated with analytical characterization, material structure, plasma processing, and uniform composition following treatment. Specific examples and solutions are presented utilizing results from analyses of three-dimensional (3D) poly(ε-caprolactone) scaffolds treated with different plasma surface modification strategies that illustrate these challenges well. Notably, many of these strategies result in 3D scaffolds that are extremely hydrophilic and that enhance human Saos-2 osteoblast cell growth and proliferation, which are promising results for applications including tissue engineering and advanced biomedical devices.

  20. A Review on Mobile Device's Digital Forensic Process Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anahita Farjamfar

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The main purpose of this study is to discuss the different comparative studies on digital forensics process models specially in the field of mobile devices. In order to legally pursue digital criminals, investigation should be conducted in a forensically sound manner so that the acquired evidence would be accepted in the court of law. Digital forensic process models define the important steps that should be followed to assure the investigation is performed successfully. There are a number of digital forensic process models developed by various organizations worldwide, but yet, there is no agreement among forensics investigation and legislative delegation which procedures to adhere to; specially in the case of facing mobile devices with latest technologies. This is vital, as mobile phones and other mobile devices such as PDAs or tablets are becoming ever-present as the main technology platform around the world and people are obtaining and using mobile phones more than ever. In this study we will give a review of the proposed digital forensics process models within last 7 years and to discuss the need for a consensus to follow the same underlying approaches while continually updating digital forensics process models to cover new emerging technologies and devices.

  1. Plasma Processes : Minimum dissipative relaxed states in toroidal plasmas

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    R Bhattacharyya; M S Janaki; B Dasgupta

    2000-11-01

    Relaxation of toroidal discharges is described by the principle of minimum energy dissipation together with the constraint of conserved global helicity. The resulting Euler-Lagrange equation is solved in toroidal coordinates for an axisymmetric torus by expressing the solutions in terms of Chandrasekhar-Kendall (C-K) eigenfunctions analytically continued in the complex domain. The C-K eigenfunctions are obtained as hypergeometric functions that are solutions of scalar Helmholtz equation in toroidal coordinates in the large aspect-ratio approximation. Equilibria are constructed by assuming the current to vanish at the edge of plasma. For the = 0; = 0 ( and are the poloidal and toroidal mode numbers respectively) relaxed states, the magnetic field, current, (safety factor) and pressure profiles are calculated for a given value of aspect-ratio of the torus and for different values of the eigenvalue 0. The new feature of the present model is that solutions allow for both tokamak as well as RFP-like behaviour with increase in the values of 0, which is related directly to volt-sec in the experiment.

  2. Plasma Processes : Plasma sprayed alumina coatings for radiation detector development

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Mary Alex; V Balagi; K R Prasad; K P Sreekumar; P V Ananthapadmanabhan

    2000-11-01

    Conventional design of radiation detectors uses sintered ceramic insulating modules. The major drawback of these ceramic components is their inherent brittleness. Ion chambers, in which these ceramic spacers are replaced by metallic components with plasma spray coated alumina, have been developed in our Research Centre. These components act as thin spacers that have good mechanical strength as well as high electrical insulation and replace alumina insulators with the same dimensions. As a result, the design of the beam loss monitor ion chamber for CAT could be simplified by coating the outer surface of the HT electrode with alumina. One of the chambers developed for isotope calibrator for brachytherapy gamma sources has its outer aluminium electrode (60 mm dia × 220 mm long) coated with 250 thick alumina (97%) + titania (3%). In view of potential applications in neutron-sensitive ion chambers used in reactor control instrumentation, studies were carried out on alumina 100 to 500 thick coatings on copper, aluminium and SS components. The electrical insulation varied from 108 ohms to 1012 ohms for coating thicknesses above 200 . The porosity in the coating resulted in some fall in electrical insulation due to moisture absorption. An improvement could be achieved by providing the ceramic surface with moisture-repellent silicone oil coating. Irradiation at Apsara reactor core location showed that the coating on aluminium was found to be unaffected after exposure to 1017 nvt fluence.

  3. Systems, Devices, and Materials for Digital Optical Processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Title, Mark Alan

    The massive parallelism and flexibility of three -dimensional optical communication may allow the development of new parallel computers free from the constraints of planar electronic technology. To bring the optical computer from possibility to reality, however, requires technological and scientific development in new optical systems, devices, and materials. We present here research results in each of these areas. First described is a prototype optical information processing system using CdS/liquid crystal spatial light modulators for optical logic and memory. This system has been developed as the first step in the implementation of a fine-grained, globally-interconnected optical processing element array. Notable system features include the implementation of programmable electronic control and the analysis of the optical power distribution within the processor, both directly applicable to the design of new and more advanced optical information processing systems. Next presented is the design and initial performance data for a new spatial light modulator combining an array of silicon phototransistors with the electro-optic material (Pb,La)(Zr,Ti)O _3, opening new possibilities for "intelligent" optical logic, memory, and switching devices. Important to the optimal performance of this Si/PLZT device is the fabrication of embedded electrodes in the electro-optic material, reducing the device operating voltage and switching energy while improving the uniformity of the optical modulation. An extensive computer model of embedded electrode performance and details of the electrode fabrication by reactive ion beam etching and electroless Ni deposition are presented. Finally, in the area of optical materials development we present initial results in the RF magnetron deposition of electro -optic PLZT on r-plane sapphire. This work is important to the fabrication of a monolithic, Si/PLZT-on-sapphire spatial light modulator, promising superior performance to devices using

  4. Process characteristics of fibre-laser-assisted plasma arc welding

    OpenAIRE

    Mahrle, A; SCHNICK, M; Rose, S; Demuth, C; Beyer, E.; Füssel, U

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Experimental and theoretical investigations on fibre-laser assisted plasma arc welding (LAPW) have been performed. Welding experiments were carried out on aluminium and steel sheets. In case of a highly focused laser beam and a separate arrangement of plasma torch and laser beam, high-speed video recordings of the plasma arc and corresponding measurements of the time-dependent arc voltage revealed differences in the process behaviour for both materials. In case of aluminium weldin...

  5. Capillary flow-driven microfluidic device with wettability gradient and sedimentation effects for blood plasma separation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maria, M. Sneha; Rakesh, P. E.; Chandra, T. S.; Sen, A. K.

    2017-01-01

    We report a capillary flow-driven microfluidic device for blood-plasma separation that comprises a cylindrical well between a pair of bottom and top channels. Exposure of the well to oxygen-plasma creates wettability gradient on its inner surface with its ends hydrophilic and middle portion hydrophobic. Due to capillary action, sample blood self-infuses into bottom channel and rises up the well. Separation of plasma occurs at the hydrophobic patch due to formation of a ‘self-built-in filter’ and sedimentation. Capillary velocity is predicted using a model and validated using experimental data. Sedimentation of RBCs is explained using modified Steinour’s model and correlation between settling velocity and liquid concentration is found. Variation of contact angle on inner surface of the well is characterized and effects of well diameter and height and dilution ratio on plasma separation rate are investigated. With a well of 1.0 mm diameter and 4.0 mm height, 2.0 μl of plasma was obtained (from <10 μl whole blood) in 15 min with a purification efficiency of 99.9%. Detection of glucose was demonstrated with the plasma obtained. Wetting property of channels was maintained by storing in DI water under vacuum and performance of the device was found to be unaffected over three weeks. PMID:28256564

  6. Capillary flow-driven microfluidic device with wettability gradient and sedimentation effects for blood plasma separation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maria, M. Sneha; Rakesh, P. E.; Chandra, T. S.; Sen, A. K.

    2017-03-01

    We report a capillary flow-driven microfluidic device for blood-plasma separation that comprises a cylindrical well between a pair of bottom and top channels. Exposure of the well to oxygen-plasma creates wettability gradient on its inner surface with its ends hydrophilic and middle portion hydrophobic. Due to capillary action, sample blood self-infuses into bottom channel and rises up the well. Separation of plasma occurs at the hydrophobic patch due to formation of a ‘self-built-in filter’ and sedimentation. Capillary velocity is predicted using a model and validated using experimental data. Sedimentation of RBCs is explained using modified Steinour’s model and correlation between settling velocity and liquid concentration is found. Variation of contact angle on inner surface of the well is characterized and effects of well diameter and height and dilution ratio on plasma separation rate are investigated. With a well of 1.0 mm diameter and 4.0 mm height, 2.0 μl of plasma was obtained (from purification efficiency of 99.9%. Detection of glucose was demonstrated with the plasma obtained. Wetting property of channels was maintained by storing in DI water under vacuum and performance of the device was found to be unaffected over three weeks.

  7. Analysis of the interaction of deuterium plasmas with tungsten in the Fuego-Nuevo II device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramos, Gonzalo; Castillo, Fermín; Nieto, Martín; Martínez, Marco; Rangel, José; Herrera-Velázquez, Julio

    2012-10-01

    Tungsten is one of the main candidate materials for plasma-facing components in future fusion power plants. The Fuego-Nuevo II, a plasma focus device, which can produce dense magnetized helium and deuterium plasmas, has been adapted to address plasma-facing materials questions. In this paper we present results of tungsten targets exposed to deuterium plasmas in the Fuego Nuevo II device, using different experimental conditions. The plasma generated and accelerated in the coaxial gun is expected to have, before the pinch, energies of the order of hundreds eV and velocities of the order of 40,000 m s-1. At the pinch, the ions are reported to have energies of the order of 1.5 keV at most. The samples, analysed with a scanning electron microscope (SEM) in cross section show a damage profile to depths of the order of 580 nm, which are larger than those expected for ions with 1.5 keV, and may be evidence of ion acceleration. An analysis with the SRIM (Stopping Range of Ions in Matter) package calculations is shown.

  8. Laser initiation and decay processes in an organic vapor plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Guowen

    A large volume organic molecular plasma (hundreds of cm3) is created by a 193 nm laser ionizing an organic molecule, Tetrakis-(dimethylamino)-ethylene (TMAE). The plasma is found to be characterized by high electron density (10 13-1011cm-3), low electron temperature (~0.1 eV), fast creation (~10 ns) and rapid decaying (electron-ion recombination coefficient ~10-6 cm3/s). Fast Langmuir probe (LP) techniques are developed for diagnosing this plasma, including a novel probe design and fabrication, a fast detection system, sampling, indirect probe heating, electro-magnetic shielding and dummy probe techniques. Plasma physical processes regarding fast LP diagnostics for different time scales (t> and <100 ns) are studied. A theory for the correction due to a rapidly decaying plasma to LP measurements is developed. The mechanisms responsible for the plasma decay are studied, and a delayed ionization process is found to be important in interpreting the decay processes. It is also found that nitrogen can enhance the delayed emission of a TMAE Rydberg state from the TMAE plasma. This result strongly suggests that a long-lifetime highly-excited state is important in the TMAE plasma decay process. This result supports the delayed ionization mechanism. A model combining electron-ion recombination and delayed ionization processes is developed to calculate the delayed ionization lifetime.

  9. Use of cold plasma in food processing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mastwijk, H.C.; Nierop Groot, M.N.

    2010-01-01

    Application of cold plasma has been reported in agriculture, food, and bioscience literature as an effective, non-chemical, gas-phase disinfection agent that can be applied at moderate temperatures. The unusual thermodynamic properties of these gases are discussed with focus on nitrogen-based

  10. Plasma processing methods for hydrogen production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mizeraczyk, Jerzy; Jasiński, Mariusz

    2016-08-01

    In the future a transfer from the fossil fuel-based economy to hydrogen-based economy is expected. Therefore the development of systems for efficient H2 production becomes important. The several conventional methods of mass-scale (or central) H2 production (methane, natural gas and higher hydrocarbons reforming, coal gasification reforming) are well developed and their costs of H2 production are acceptable. However, due to the H2 transport and storage problems the small-scale (distributed) technologies for H2 production are demanded. However, these new technologies have to meet the requirement of producing H2 at a production cost of (1-2)/kg(H2) (or 60 g(H2)/kWh) by 2020 (the U.S. Department of Energy's target). Recently several plasma methods have been proposed for the small-scale H2 production. The most promising plasmas for this purpose seems to be those generated by gliding, plasmatron and nozzle arcs, and microwave discharges. In this paper plasma methods proposed for H2 production are briefly described and critically evaluated from the view point of H2 production efficiency. The paper is aiming at answering a question if any plasma method for the small-scale H2 production approaches such challenges as the production energy yield of 60 g(H2)/kWh, high production rate, high reliability and low investment cost. Contribution to the topical issue "6th Central European Symposium on Plasma Chemistry (CESPC-6)", edited by Nicolas Gherardi, Ester Marotta and Cristina Paradisi

  11. Process and Radiation Induced Defects in Electronic Materials and Devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Washington, Kenneth; Fogarty, T. N.

    1997-01-01

    Process and radiation induced defects are characterized by a variety of electrical techniques, including capacitance-voltage measurements and charge pumping. Separation of defect type into stacking faults, displacement damage, oxide traps, interface states, etc. and their related causes are discussed. The defects are then related to effects on device parameters. Silicon MOS technology is emphasized. Several reviews of radiation effects and silicon processing exist.

  12. Synthesis of functional nanocrystallites through reactive thermal plasma processing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takamasa Ishigaki and Ji-Guang Li

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available A method of synthesizing functional nanostructured powders through reactive thermal plasma processing has been developed. The synthesis of nanosized titanium oxide powders was performed by the oxidation of solid and liquid precursors. Quench gases, either injected from the shoulder of the reactor or injected counter to the plasma plume from the bottom of the reactor, were used to vary the quench rate, and therefore the particle size, of the resultant powders. The experimental results are well supported by numerical analysis on the effects of the quench gas on the flow pattern and temperature field of the thermal plasma as well as on the trajectory and temperature history of the particles. The plasma-synthesized TiO2 nanoparticles showed phase preferences different from those synthesized by conventional wet-chemical processes. Nanosized particles of high crystallinity and nonequilibrium chemical composition were formed in one step via reactive thermal plasma processing.

  13. Some physics and chemistry of Coblation® electrosurgical plasma devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stalder, Kenneth R.; Ryan, Thomas P.; Woloszko, Jean

    2013-02-01

    Electrosurgical devices employing plasmas to ablate, cut and otherwise treat tissues have been in widespread use for decades. Following d'Arsonval's 19th century work on the neuromuscular response from high-frequency excitation of tissue, Doyen treated skin blemishes with a spark-gap generator in 1909. In the late 1920's, physician Harvey Cushing and Harvard physicist William Bovie developed an electrosurgical device and power source that eventually became a standard of care for cutting, coagulating, desiccating, or fulgurating tissue. Beginning in the 1990's a new class of low-voltage electrosurgical devices employing electricallyconducting saline fluids were developed by ArthroCare Corp. These modern Coblation® devices are now widely used in many different surgical procedures, including those in arthroscopic surgery, otorhinolaryngology, spine surgery, urology, gynecological surgery, and others. This paper summarizes some of the research we have been doing over the last decade to elucidate the physics and chemistry underlying Coblation® electrosurgical devices. Electrical-, thermal-, fluid-, chemicaland plasma-physics all play important roles in these devices and give rise to a rich variety of observations. Experimental techniques employed include optical and mass spectroscopy, fast optical imaging, and electrical voltage and current measurements. Many of the features occur on fast time scales and small spatial scales, making laboratory measurements difficult, so coupled-physics, finite-element-modeling can also be employed to glean more information than has been acquired thus far through physical observation.

  14. Mirror-field confined compact plasma source using permanent magnet for plasma processings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goto, Tetsuya; Sato, Kei-ichiro; Yabuta, Yuki; Sugawa, Shigetoshi

    2016-12-01

    A mirror-field confined compact electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) plasma source using permanent magnets was developed, aiming for the realization of high-quality plasma processings where high-density reactive species are supplied to a substrate with minimizing the ion bombardment damages. The ECR position was located between a microwave transmissive window and a quartz limiter, and plasmas were transported from the ECR position to a midplane of the magnetic mirror field through the quartz limiter. Thus, a radius of core plasma could be determined by the limiter, which was 15 mm in this study. Plasma parameters were investigated by the Langmuir probe measurement. High-density plasma larger than 1011 cm-3 could be produced by applying 5.85-GHz microwave power of 10 W or more. For the outside region of the core plasma where a wafer for plasma processings will be set at, the ion current density was decreased dramatically with distance from the core plasma and became smaller by approximately two orders of magnitude that in the core plasma region for the radial position of 40 mm, suggesting the realization of reduction in ion bombardment damages.

  15. Mirror-field confined compact plasma source using permanent magnet for plasma processings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goto, Tetsuya; Sato, Kei-Ichiro; Yabuta, Yuki; Sugawa, Shigetoshi

    2016-12-01

    A mirror-field confined compact electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) plasma source using permanent magnets was developed, aiming for the realization of high-quality plasma processings where high-density reactive species are supplied to a substrate with minimizing the ion bombardment damages. The ECR position was located between a microwave transmissive window and a quartz limiter, and plasmas were transported from the ECR position to a midplane of the magnetic mirror field through the quartz limiter. Thus, a radius of core plasma could be determined by the limiter, which was 15 mm in this study. Plasma parameters were investigated by the Langmuir probe measurement. High-density plasma larger than 10(11) cm(-3) could be produced by applying 5.85-GHz microwave power of 10 W or more. For the outside region of the core plasma where a wafer for plasma processings will be set at, the ion current density was decreased dramatically with distance from the core plasma and became smaller by approximately two orders of magnitude that in the core plasma region for the radial position of 40 mm, suggesting the realization of reduction in ion bombardment damages.

  16. A titanium hydride gun for plasma injection into the T2-reversed field pinch device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voronin, A. V.; Hellblom, K. G.

    1999-02-01

    A study of a plasma gun (modified Bostic type) with titanium hydride electrodes has been carried out. The total number of released hydrogen atoms was in the range 1016-1018 and the maximum plasma flow velocity was 2.5×105 m s-1. The ion density near the gun edge reached 1.8×1020 m-3 and the electron temperature was around 40 eV as estimated from probe measurements. No species other than hydrogen or titanium were seen in the plasma line radiation. The plasma injector was successfully used for gas pre-ionization in the Extrap T2 reversed-field pinch device (ohmic heating toroidal experiment (OHTE)).

  17. Automation of plasma protein binding assay using rapid equilibrium dialysis device and Tecan workstation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Zhengqi; Zetterberg, Craig; Gao, Hong

    2017-03-14

    Binding of drug molecules to plasma proteins is an important parameter in assessing drug ADME properties. Plasma protein binding (PPB) assays are routinely performed during drug discovery and development. A fully automated PPB assay was developed using rapid equilibrium dialysis (RED) device and Tecan workstation coupled to an automated incubator. The PPB assay was carried out in unsealed RED plates which allowed the assay to be fully automated. The plasma pH was maintained at 7.4 during the 6-h dialysis under 2% CO2 condition. The samples were extracted with acetonitrile and analyzed by liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry. The percent bound results of 10 commercial drugs in plasma protein binding were very similar between the automated and manual assays, and were comparable to literature values. The automated assay increases laboratory productivity and is applicable to high-throughput screening of drug protein binding in drug discovery.

  18. Removal of Elemental Mercury from a Gas Stream Facilitated by a Non-Thermal Plasma Device

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Charles Mones

    2006-12-01

    Mercury generated from anthropogenic sources presents a difficult environmental problem. In comparison to other toxic metals, mercury has a low vaporization temperature. Mercury and mercury compounds are highly toxic, and organic forms such as methyl mercury can be bio-accumulated. Exposure pathways include inhalation and transport to surface waters. Mercury poisoning can result in both acute and chronic effects. Most commonly, chronic exposure to mercury vapor affects the central nervous system and brain, resulting in neurological damage. The CRE technology employs a series of non-thermal, plasma-jet devices to provide a method for elemental mercury removal from a gas phase by targeting relevant chemical reactions. The technology couples the known chemistry of converting elemental mercury to ionic compounds by mercury-chlorine-oxygen reactions with the generation of highly reactive species in a non-thermal, atmospheric, plasma device. The generation of highly reactive metastable species in a non-thermal plasma device is well known. The introduction of plasma using a jet-injection device provides a means to contact highly reactive species with elemental mercury in a manner to overcome the kinetic and mass-transfer limitations encountered by previous researchers. To demonstrate this technology, WRI has constructed a plasma test facility that includes plasma reactors capable of using up to four plasma jets, flow control instrumentation, an integrated control panel to operate the facility, a mercury generation system that employs a temperature controlled oven and permeation tube, combustible and mercury gas analyzers, and a ductless fume hood designed to capture fugitive mercury emissions. Continental Research and Engineering (CR&E) and Western Research Institute (WRI) successfully demonstrated that non-thermal plasma containing oxygen and chlorine-oxygen reagents could completely convert elemental mercury to an ionic form. These results demonstrate potential the

  19. Plasma Processing with Fluorine Chemistry for Modification of Surfaces Wettability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Veronica Satulu

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Using plasma in conjunction with fluorinated compounds is widely encountered in material processing. We discuss several plasma techniques for surface fluorination: deposition of fluorocarbon thin films either by magnetron sputtering of polytetrafluoroethylene targets, or by plasma-assisted chemical vapor deposition using tetrafluoroethane as a precursor, and modification of carbon nanowalls by plasma treatment in a sulphur hexafluoride environment. We showed that conformal fluorinated thin films can be obtained and, according to the initial surface properties, superhydrophobic surfaces can be achieved.

  20. Antireflection coatings on plastics deposited by plasma polymerization process

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    K M K Srivatsa; M Bera; A Basu; T K Bhattacharya

    2008-08-01

    Antireflection coatings (ARCs) are deposited on the surfaces of optical elements like spectacle lenses to increase light transmission and improve their performance. In the ophthalmic industry, plastic lenses are rapidly displacing glass lenses due to several advantageous features. However, the deposition of ARCs on plastic lenses is a challenging task, because the plastic surface needs treatment for adhesion improvement and surface hardening before depositing the ARC. This surface treatment is usually done in a multi-stage process—exposure to energetic radiations, followed by deposition of a carbonyl hard coating by spin or dip coating processes, UV curing, etc. However, this treatment can also be done by plasma processes. Moreover, the plasma polymerization process allows deposition of optical films at room temperature, essential for plastics. The energetic ions in plasma processes provide similar effects as in ion assisted physical deposition processes to produce hard coatings, without requiring sophisticated ion sources. The plasma polymerization process is more economical than ion-assisted physical vapour deposition processes as regards equipment and source materials and is more cost-effective, enabling the surface treatment and deposition of the ARC in the same deposition system in a single run by varying the system parameters at each step. Since published results of the plasma polymerization processes developed abroad are rather sketchy and the techniques are mostly veiled in commercial secrecy, innovative and indigenous plasma-based techniques have been developed in this work for depositing the complete ARCs on plastic substrates.

  1. EDTA-treated cotton-thread microfluidic device used for one-step whole blood plasma separation and assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulum, Mokhamad Fakhrul; Maylina, Leni; Noviana, Deni; Wicaksono, Dedy Hermawan Bagus

    2016-04-21

    This study aims to observe the wicking and separation characteristics of blood plasma in a cotton thread matrix functioning as a microfluidic thread-based analytical device (μTAD). We investigated several cotton thread treatment methods using ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) anticoagulant solution for wicking whole blood samples and separating its plasma. The blood of healthy Indonesian thin tailed sheep was used in this study to understand the properties of horizontal wicking and separation on the EDTA-treated μTAD. The wicking distance and blood cell separation from its plasma was observed for 120 s and documented using a digital phone camera. The results show that untreated cotton-threads stopped the blood wicking process on the μTAD. On the other hand, the deposition of EDTA anticoagulant followed by its drying on the thread at room temperature for 10 s provides the longest blood wicking with gradual blood plasma separation. Furthermore, the best results in terms of the longest wicking and the clearest on-thread separation boundary between blood cells and its plasma were obtained using the μTAD treated with EDTA deposition followed by 60 min drying at refrigerated temperature (2-8 °C). The separation length of blood plasma in the μTADs treated with dried-EDTA at both room and refrigerated temperatures was not statistically different (P > 0.05). This separation occurs through the synergy of three factors, cotton fiber, EDTA anticoagulant and blood platelets, which induce the formation of a fibrin-filter via a partial coagulation process in the EDTA-treated μTAD. An albumin assay was employed to demonstrate the efficiency of this plasma separation method during a one-step assay on the μTAD. Albumin in blood is an important biomarker for kidney and heart disease. The μTAD has a slightly better limit of detection (LOD) than conventional blood analysis, with an LOD of 114 mg L(-1) compared to 133 mg L(-1), respectively. However, the μTAD performed

  2. Development of a new experimental device for long-duration magnetic reconnection in weakly ionized plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yanai, Ryoma; Kaminou, Yasuhiro; Nishida, Kento; Inomoto, Michiaki

    2016-10-01

    Magnetic reconnection is a universal phenomenon which determines global structure and energy conversion in magnetized plasmas. Many experimental studies have been carried out to explore the physics of magnetic reconnection in fully ionized condition. However, it is predicted that the behavior of magnetic reconnection in weakly ionized plasmas such as solar chromosphere plasma will show different behavior such as ambipolar diffusion caused by interaction with neutral particles. In this research, we are developing a new experimental device to uncover the importance of ambipolar diffusion during magnetic reconnection in weakly ionized plasmas. We employ an inverter-driven rotating magnetic fields technique, which is used for generating steady azimuthal plasma current, to establish long-duration ( 1 ms) anti-parallel reconnection with magnetic field of 5 mT in weakly ionized plasma. We will present development status and initial results from the new experimental setup. This work was supported by JSPS A3 Foresight Program ``Innovative Tokamak Plasma Startup and Current Drive in Spherical Torus'', Giant-in Aid for Scientific Research (KAKENHI) 15H05750, 15K14279, 26287143 and the NIFS Collaboration Research program (NIFS14KNWP004).

  3. Fluorophore-based sensor for oxygen radicals in processing plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choudhury, Faraz A.; Shohet, J. Leon, E-mail: shohet@engr.wisc.edu [Plasma Processing and Technology Laboratory and Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, Wisconsin 53706 (United States); Sabat, Grzegorz; Sussman, Michael R. [Department of Biochemistry, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, Wisconsin 53706 (United States); Nishi, Yoshio [Department of Electrical Engineering, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 (United States)

    2015-11-15

    A high concentration of radicals is present in many processing plasmas, which affects the processing conditions and the properties of materials exposed to the plasma. Determining the types and concentrations of free radicals present in the plasma is critical in order to determine their effects on the materials being processed. Current methods for detecting free radicals in a plasma require multiple expensive and bulky instruments, complex setups, and often, modifications to the plasma reactor. This work presents a simple technique that detects reactive-oxygen radicals incident on a surface from a plasma. The measurements are made using a fluorophore dye that is commonly used in biological and cellular systems for assay labeling in liquids. Using fluorometric analysis, it was found that the fluorophore reacts with oxygen radicals incident from the plasma, which is indicated by degradation of its fluorescence. As plasma power was increased, the quenching of the fluorescence significantly increased. Both immobilized and nonimmobilized fluorophore dyes were used and the results indicate that both states function effectively under vacuum conditions. The reaction mechanism is very similar to that of the liquid dye.

  4. Magnetostrictive pressure device for thermoplastic fiber placement process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahrens, Markus; Mallick, Vishal

    1999-07-01

    Fiber reinforced composites offer excellent specific stiffness and strength and are therefore interesting for rotating machinery applications. The main disadvantage of high performance composites is the manufacturing process which is labor intensive and thus slow and expensive. The Thermoplastic Fiber Placement process overcomes these difficulties due to its high degree of automation. During the process, an impregnated tape is heated up and then consolidated in-situ under pressure. The process which is used at ABB consists of a six axis robot, a heat source and a pressure device for consolidation. Today mechanical roller element are used to apply the forces normal to the surface to the composite part. These forces are necessary for proper consolidation. The roller action prevents damage due to shearing of the tape during lay down. To improve the processing sped, and to expand the use of the Thermoplastic Fiber Placement process for more complex structures, two severe drawbacks of the solid roller approach need to be overcome; the small pressure contact area which limits the speed of the process and the poor conformability which prevents the process from being applied to highly 3D surfaces. Smart materials such as piezoelectrics, electrostrictives and magnetostrictives can produce high forces at high operating frequencies and enable a large, conformable actuated surface to be realized. A pressure device made with a magnetostrictive actuator has been tested. The main design goal is to apply the consolidation pressure correctly, without introducing shear forces on the tape, in order to produce parts with optimal mechanical properties.

  5. The in-situ diagnosis of plasma-wall interactions on magnetic fusion devices with accelerators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartwig, Zachary

    2013-10-01

    We present the first in-situ, time-resolved measurements of low-Z isotope composition and deuterium retention over a large plasma-facing component (PFC) surface area in a magnetic fusion device. These critical measurements were made using a novel diagnostic technique based on the analysis of induced nuclear reactions from PFC surfaces on the Alcator C-Mod tokamak. Achieving an integrated understanding of plasma physics and materials science in magnetic fusion devices is severely hindered by a dearth of in-situ PFC surface diagnosis. Plasma-wall interactions, such as the erosion/redeposition of PFC material, the evolution of PFC surface isotope composition, and fusion fuel retention present significant plasma physics and materials science challenges for long pulse or steady-state devices. Our diagnostic uses a compact (~1 meter), high-current (~1 milliamp) radio-frequency quadrupole accelerator to inject ~1 MeV deuterons into the vacuum vessel. We control the tokamak's magnetic fields - in between plasma shots - to steer the deuterons to PFC surfaces, where they induce high-Q nuclear reactions with low-Z isotopes in the first ~10 microns of material. Analysis of the induced gamma and neutron energy spectra provides quantitative reconstruction of PFC surface conditions. This nondestructive, in-situ technique achieves PFC surface composition measurements with plasma shot-to-shot time resolution and 1 centimeter spatial resolution over large PFC areas. Work supported by U.S. DOE Grant DE-FG02-94ER54235 and Cooperative Agreement DE-FC02-99ER54512.

  6. Method and system for nanoscale plasma processing of objects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oehrlein, Gottlieb S.; Hua, Xuefeng; Stolz, Christian

    2008-12-30

    A plasma processing system includes a source of plasma, a substrate and a shutter positioned in close proximity to the substrate. The substrate/shutter relative disposition is changed for precise control of substrate/plasma interaction. This way, the substrate interacts only with a fully established, stable plasma for short times required for nanoscale processing of materials. The shutter includes an opening of a predetermined width, and preferably is patterned to form an array of slits with dimensions that are smaller than the Debye screening length. This enables control of the substrate/plasma interaction time while avoiding the ion bombardment of the substrate in an undesirable fashion. The relative disposition between the shutter and the substrate can be made either by moving the shutter or by moving the substrate.

  7. Apparatus and method for plasma processing of SRF cavities

    CERN Document Server

    Upadhyay, J; Peshl, J; Bašović, M; Popović, S; Valente-Feliciano, A -M; Phillips, L; Vuškovića, L

    2015-01-01

    An apparatus and a method are described for plasma etching of the inner surface of superconducting radio frequency (SRF) cavities. Accelerator SRF cavities are formed into a variable-diameter cylindrical structure made of bulk niobium, for resonant generation of the particle accelerating field. The etch rate non-uniformity due to depletion of the radicals has been overcome by the simultaneous movement of the gas flow inlet and the inner electrode. An effective shape of the inner electrode to reduce the plasma asymmetry for the coaxial cylindrical rf plasma reactor is determined and implemented in the cavity processing method. The processing was accomplished by moving axially the inner electrode and the gas flow inlet in a step-wise way to establish segmented plasma columns. The test structure was a pillbox cavity made of steel of similar dimension to the standard SRF cavity. This was adopted to experimentally verify the plasma surface reaction on cylindrical structures with variable diameter using the segment...

  8. Status and challenges in electrical diagnostics of processing plasmas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stamate, Eugen

    Reactive plasmas produced in oxygen, nitrogen, hydrogen and other complex gas mixture are used for various applications including thin films, etching, ion implantation, ashing, particles growth, oxidation and other surface functionalization processes. Most of the reactive gases are also...... the possibility to control and use these plasmas for processing. Development of reactive plasma sources for both applications and basic science is rather challenging and some of these efforts will be presented in direct correlation with diagnostic approaches....... electronegative so that, the role of negative ions cannot be neglected. The continuous decrease of the features size in micro- and nanoelectronic industry requires a precise control of plasma parameters including the negative ions. Despite of a good progress in plasma diagnostics, yet more is to be done...

  9. Radiant-and-plasma technology for coal processing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vladimir Messerle

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Radiant-and-plasma technology for coal processing is presented in the article. Thermodynamic computation and experiments on plasma processing of bituminous coal preliminary electron-beam activated were fulfilled in comparison with plasma processing of the coal. Positive influence of the preliminary electron-beam activation of coal on synthesis gas yield was found. Experiments were carried out in the plasma gasifier of 100 kW power. As a result of the measurements of material and heat balance of the process gave the following integral indicators: weight-average temperature of 2200-2300 K, and carbon gasification degree of 82,4-83,2%. Synthesis gas yield at thermochemical preparation of raw coal dust for burning was 24,5% and in the case of electron-beam activation of coal synthesis gas yield reached 36,4%, which is 48% higher.

  10. SOME COLLISION PROCESSES IN PLASMAS WITH HIGHER TEMPERATURE AND DENSITY

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    KazuoTakayanagi

    1990-01-01

    Some collision processes important in hot and dense plasmas are discussed.Recent calculation of secondary electron velocity distribution in ionizing collision between an electron and a multiply-charged ion is reported.

  11. Reactive Atom Plasma Processing of Slumped Glass Wedges Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Reactive Atom Plasma (RAPTM) process will be evaluated as a rapid and practical method for fabricating precision wedges in glass sheets. The glass sheets are to...

  12. Modelling of the internal dynamics and density in a tens of joules plasma focus device

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marquez, Ariel [CNEA and Instituto Balseiro, 8402 Bariloche (Argentina); Gonzalez, Jose [INVAP-CONICET and Instituto Balseiro, 8402 Bariloche, Argentina. (Argentina); Tarifeno-Saldivia, Ariel; Pavez, Cristian; Soto, Leopoldo [CCHEN, Comision Chilena de Energia Nuclear, Casilla 188-D, Santiago (Chile); Center for Research and Applications in Plasma Physics and Pulsed Power, P4 (Chile); Clausse, Alejandro [CNEA-CONICET and Universidad Nacional del Centro, 7000 Tandil (Argentina)

    2012-01-15

    Using MHD theory, coupled differential equations were generated using a lumped parameter model to describe the internal behaviour of the pinch compression phase in plasma focus discharges. In order to provide these equations with appropriate initial conditions, the modelling of previous phases was included by describing the plasma sheath as planar shockwaves. The equations were solved numerically, and the results were contrasted against experimental measurements performed on the device PF-50J. The model is able to predict satisfactorily the timing and the radial electron density profile at the maximum compression.

  13. Development of Expert Controller for Plasma Spraying Process

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIChun-xu; CHENKe-xuan; LIHe-qi; LIDe-wu

    2004-01-01

    Aiming at the plasma spraying process control, the control system model is developed on the basis of analyzing control parameters and coating properties and their correlation, and the corresponding control method and regulations are also given. With the developed expert controller for plasma spraying process, stable spraying can be realized using ordinary spraying powder and the coating of compaction, homogeneity and high bonding strength can be obtained.

  14. Development and experimental study of oil-free capacitor module for plasma focus device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Ravindra Kumar; Sharma, Archana

    2017-03-01

    This development is concerned with the compact capacitor module for a plasma focus device. Oil-free, non-standard geometry capacitors are designed and developed for high current delivery in sub-microseconds time. Metalized dielectric film based pulse capacitor becomes progressively less viable at currents above 10 kA. It is due to reliability and energy scaling difficulties, based on effects such as vaporization, high resistivity, and end connection. Bipolar electrolytic capacitors are also not preferred due to their limited life and comparatively low peak current delivery. Bi-axially oriented polypropylene (BOPP) film with extended aluminum foil is a combination to deliver moderately high power. But, electrically weak points, relative permittivity, and the edge gap margins have made its adoption difficult. A concept has been developed in lab for implementing the above combination in a less complex and costly manner. This paper concerns the development and testing process techniques for quite different hollow cylindrical, oil-free capacitors (4 μ F , 10 kV, 20 nH). Shot life of 1000 has been experimentally performed on the test bed at its rated energy density level. The technological methods and engineering techniques are now available and utilized for manufacturing and testing of BOPP film based oil-free capacitors.

  15. Investigation of structural properties of chromium thin films prepared by a plasma focus device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Javadi, S.; Habibi, M.; Ghoranneviss, M.; Lee, S.; Saw, S. H.; Behbahani, R. A.

    2012-08-01

    We report the synthesis of chromium thin films on Si(400) substrates by utilizing a low-energy (1.6 kJ) plasma focus device. The films of chromium are deposited with different numbers of focus shots (15, 25 and 35) at a distance of 8 cm and at 0° angular position with respect to the anode axis. The films are investigated structurally by x-ray diffraction analysis and morphologically by atomic force microscopy and scanning electron microscopy. The elemental composition is characterized by energy dispersive x-ray analysis. Furthermore, Vicker's micro hardness is used to study the mechanical properties of the deposited films. The degree of crystallinity of chromium films, the size of the particles and the hardness values of the films increase when the number of focus shots is raised from 15 to 25 and then decrease when the substrate is treated with 35 shots. We discuss the dynamic processes involved in the formation of the chromium films.

  16. Time dependent atomic processes in discharge produced low Z plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuyama, M.; Sasaki, T.; Horioka, K.; Kawamura, T.

    2008-05-01

    The z-pinch simulation have been performed with magneto-hydro dynamics and atomic population kinetics codes. A factor associated with transient atomic processes was proposed. The atomic transient degrees of dopant lithium in hydrogen plasma were calculated with initial plasma densities of 1.0 × 1016 ~ 5.0 × 1017cm-3. The higher initial plasma density is, the lower is the transient degree generally. It is also found that the transient properties of the atomic processes are sensitive to ionization energy and electron temperature.

  17. Plasma-on-chip device for stable irradiation of cells cultured in media with a low-temperature atmospheric pressure plasma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okada, Tomohiro; Chang, Chun-Yao; Kobayashi, Mime; Shimizu, Tetsuji; Sasaki, Minoru; Kumagai, Shinya

    2016-09-01

    We have developed a micro electromechanical systems (MEMS) device which enables plasma treatment for cells cultured in media. The device, referred to as the plasma-on-chip, comprises microwells and microplasma sources fabricated together in a single chip. The microwells have through-holes between the microwells and microplasma sources. Each microplasma source is located on the backside of each microwells. The reactive components generated by the microplasma sources pass through the through-holes and reach cells cultured in the microwells. In this study, a plasma-on-chip device was modified for a stable plasma treatment. The use of a dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) technique allowed a stable plasma treatment up to 3 min. The plasma-on-chip with the original electrode configuration typically had the maximum stable operation time of around 1 min. Spectral analysis of the plasma identified reactive species such as O and OH radicals that can affect the activity of cells. Plasma treatment was successfully performed on yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) and green algae (Chlorella) cells. While no apparent change was observed with yeast, the treatment degraded the activity of the Chlorella cells and decreased their fluorescence. The device has the potential to help understand interactions between plasma and cells.

  18. Passive silicon photonic devices for microwave photonic signal processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Jiayang; Peng, Jizong; Liu, Boyu; Pan, Ting; Zhou, Huanying; Mao, Junming; Yang, Yuxing; Qiu, Ciyuan; Su, Yikai

    2016-08-01

    We present our recent progress on microwave signal processing (MSP) using on-chip passive silicon photonic devices, including tunable microwave notch filtering/millimeter-wave (MMW) signal generation based on self-coupled micro-resonators (SCMRs), and tunable radio-frequency (RF) phase shifting implemented by a micro-disk resonator (MDR). These schemes can provide improved flexibility and performances of MSP. The experimental results are in good agreement with theoretical predictions, which validate the effectiveness of the proposed schemes.

  19. Real-Time Fault Classification for Plasma Processes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryan Yang

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Plasma process tools, which usually cost several millions of US dollars, are often used in the semiconductor fabrication etching process. If the plasma process is halted due to some process fault, the productivity will be reduced and the cost will increase. In order to maximize the product/wafer yield and tool productivity, a timely and effective fault process detection is required in a plasma reactor. The classification of fault events can help the users to quickly identify fault processes, and thus can save downtime of the plasma tool. In this work, optical emission spectroscopy (OES is employed as the metrology sensor for in-situ process monitoring. Splitting into twelve different match rates by spectrum bands, the matching rate indicator in our previous work (Yang, R.; Chen, R.S. Sensors 2010, 10, 5703-5723 is used to detect the fault process. Based on the match data, a real-time classification of plasma faults is achieved by a novel method, developed in this study. Experiments were conducted to validate the novel fault classification. From the experimental results, we may conclude that the proposed method is feasible inasmuch that the overall accuracy rate of the classification for fault event shifts is 27 out of 28 or about 96.4% in success.

  20. Real-time fault classification for plasma processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Ryan; Chen, Rongshun

    2011-01-01

    Plasma process tools, which usually cost several millions of US dollars, are often used in the semiconductor fabrication etching process. If the plasma process is halted due to some process fault, the productivity will be reduced and the cost will increase. In order to maximize the product/wafer yield and tool productivity, a timely and effective fault process detection is required in a plasma reactor. The classification of fault events can help the users to quickly identify fault processes, and thus can save downtime of the plasma tool. In this work, optical emission spectroscopy (OES) is employed as the metrology sensor for in-situ process monitoring. Splitting into twelve different match rates by spectrum bands, the matching rate indicator in our previous work (Yang, R.; Chen, R.S. Sensors 2010, 10, 5703-5723) is used to detect the fault process. Based on the match data, a real-time classification of plasma faults is achieved by a novel method, developed in this study. Experiments were conducted to validate the novel fault classification. From the experimental results, we may conclude that the proposed method is feasible inasmuch that the overall accuracy rate of the classification for fault event shifts is 27 out of 28 or about 96.4% in success.

  1. Study on the ignition process of a segmented plasma torch

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Xiuquan; Yu, Deping; Xiang, Yong; Li, Chao; Jiang, Hui; Yao, Jin

    2017-07-01

    Direct current plasma torches have been applied to generate unique sources of thermal energy in many industrial applications. Nevertheless, the successful ignition of a plasma torch is the key process to generate the unique source (plasma jet). However, there has been little study on the underlying mechanism of this key process. A thorough understanding of the ignition process of a plasma torch will be helpful for optimizing the design of the plasma torch structure and selection of the ignition parameters to prolong the service life of the ignition module. Thus, in this paper, the ignition process of a segmented plasma torch (SPT) is theoretically and experimentally modeled and analyzed. Corresponding electrical models of different stages of the ignition process are set up and used to derive the electrical parameters, e.g. the variations of the arc voltage and arc current between the cathode and anode. In addition, the experiments with different ignition parameters on a home-made SPT have been conducted. At the same time, the variations of the arc voltage and arc current have been measured, and used to verify the ones derived in theory and to determine the optimal ignition parameters for a particular SPT.

  2. Spontaneous excitation of waves by an intense ion beam on the Large Plasma Device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tripathi, Shreekrishna; van Compernolle, Bart; Gekelman, Walter; Pribyl, Patrick; Heidbrink, William

    2016-10-01

    A hydrogen ion beam (15 keV, 10 A) has been injected into a large magnetized plasma (n 1010 -1013 cm-3, Te = 5.0 - 15.0 eV, B = 0.6 - 1.8 kG, He+ and H+ ions, 19 m long, 0.6 m diameter) for performing fast-ion studies on the Large Plasma Device (LAPD). The beam forms a helical orbit (pitch-angle 7° -55°), propagates with an Alfvénic speed (beam-speed/Alfvén-speed = 0.2 - 3.0), and significantly enhances the electron temperature and density when injected during the plasma afterglow. We report results on spontaneous generation of Alfvén waves and electrostatic waves in the lower-hybrid range of frequencies by the beam. Roles of normal and anomalous Doppler-shifted ion-cyclotron resonances in destabilizing the Alfvén waves were examined by measuring the phase-speed of waves and relevant parameters of the plasma using a variety of diagnostic tools (retarding-field energy analyzer, three-axis magnetic-loop, Dipole, and Langmuir probes). Conditions for the maximum growth of these waves were determined by varying the parameters of the beam and ambient plasma and examining the mode-structures in the fluctuation-spectra. Work jointly supported by US DOE and NSF and performed at the Basic Plasma Science Facility, UCLA.

  3. Mobile Devices and GPU Parallelism in Ionospheric Data Processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mascharka, D.; Pankratius, V.

    2015-12-01

    Scientific data acquisition in the field is often constrained by data transfer backchannels to analysis environments. Geoscientists are therefore facing practical bottlenecks with increasing sensor density and variety. Mobile devices, such as smartphones and tablets, offer promising solutions to key problems in scientific data acquisition, pre-processing, and validation by providing advanced capabilities in the field. This is due to affordable network connectivity options and the increasing mobile computational power. This contribution exemplifies a scenario faced by scientists in the field and presents the "Mahali TEC Processing App" developed in the context of the NSF-funded Mahali project. Aimed at atmospheric science and the study of ionospheric Total Electron Content (TEC), this app is able to gather data from various dual-frequency GPS receivers. It demonstrates parsing of full-day RINEX files on mobile devices and on-the-fly computation of vertical TEC values based on satellite ephemeris models that are obtained from NASA. Our experiments show how parallel computing on the mobile device GPU enables fast processing and visualization of up to 2 million datapoints in real-time using OpenGL. GPS receiver bias is estimated through minimum TEC approximations that can be interactively adjusted by scientists in the graphical user interface. Scientists can also perform approximate computations for "quickviews" to reduce CPU processing time and memory consumption. In the final stage of our mobile processing pipeline, scientists can upload data to the cloud for further processing. Acknowledgements: The Mahali project (http://mahali.mit.edu) is funded by the NSF INSPIRE grant no. AGS-1343967 (PI: V. Pankratius). We would like to acknowledge our collaborators at Boston College, Virginia Tech, Johns Hopkins University, Colorado State University, as well as the support of UNAVCO for loans of dual-frequency GPS receivers for use in this project, and Intel for loans of

  4. Spectroscopic diagnostics of plasma during laser processing of aluminium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lober, R.; Mazumder, J.

    2007-10-01

    The role of the plasma in laser-metal interaction is of considerable interest due to its influence in the energy transfer mechanism in industrial laser materials processing. A 10 kW CO2 laser was used to study its interaction with aluminium under an argon environment. The objective was to determine the absorption and refraction of the laser beam through the plasma during the processing of aluminium. Laser processing of aluminium is becoming an important topic for many industries, including the automobile industry. The spectroscopic relative line to continuum method was used to determine the electron temperature distribution within the plasma by investigating the 4158 Å Ar I line emission and the continuum adjacent to it. The plasmas are induced in 1.0 atm pure Ar environment over a translating Al target, using f/7 and 10 kW CO2 laser. Spectroscopic data indicated that the plasma composition and behaviour were Ar-dominated. Experimental results indicated the plasma core temperature to be 14 000-15 300 K over the incident range of laser powers investigated from 5 to 7 kW. It was found that 7.5-29% of the incident laser power was absorbed by the plasma. Cross-section analysis of the melt pools from the Al samples revealed the absence of any key-hole formation and confirmed that the energy transfer mechanism in the targets was conduction dominated for the reported range of experimental data.

  5. Capillarity-driven blood plasma separation on paper-based devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kar, Shantimoy; Maiti, Tapas Kumar; Chakraborty, Suman

    2015-10-01

    We demonstrate capillarity-driven plasma separation from whole blood on simple paper-based H-channels. This methodology, unlike other reported techniques, does not necessitate elaborate and complex instrumentation, and the usage of expensive consumables. We believe that this technique will be ideally suited to be implemented in rapid and portable blood diagnostic devices designed to be operative at locations with limited resources.

  6. Numerical Analysis of Amirkabir Plasma Focus (APF) Device for Neon and Argon Gases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niknam Sharak, M.; Goudarzi, S.; Raeisdana, A.; Jafarabadi, M.

    2013-04-01

    In this paper the experimental results in different working conditions in Amirkabir Plasma Focus (APF) Device have been compared with the numerical results of a two-dimensional simulation code based on Lee's model. The experiments were done with pure Neon and Argon as operating gases over a wide range of working conditions (gas pressures and discharge voltages). It is observed that by a proper choice for values of the efficiency factors, comparison between numerical and experimental results shows a good agreement.

  7. Application of SCM to process development of novel devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duhayon, N.; Vandervorst, W.; Hellemans, L.

    2003-09-01

    Due to the continuous shrinkage of semiconductor devices, the use of a good 2D-profiling technique is essential as these structures are entirely two-dimensional and dopant nor carrier profiles are accessible with the standard 1D profiling techniques such as SRP and SIMS. In this work we present the application of SCM in support of the process development for a wide range of novel devices, such as trenchMOSFET, vertical RESURF diode, bipolar transistor. In all these applications, one of the most important issues to get good qualitative results is the sample preparation of the device. Therefore the sample preparation was optimized to get the best contrast in doping concentration at the same time avoiding the effects of contrast reversal. Also SCM at different dc-bias in amplitude and phase mode is investigated in more detail. We systematically observe for both p- and n-type a phase shift for high voltages as well as a large shift of the flatband voltage. With this knowledge reliable results are achieved for the different devices and especially measuring in phase mode offers more advantages in delineating p- and n-type regions in comparison to SCM in amplitude mode.

  8. Atmospheric pressure plasmas for aerosols processes in materials and environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borra, J. P.; Jidenko, N.; Bourgeois, E.

    2009-08-01

    The paper highlights applications of some atmospheric pressure plasmas (dc-corona, streamer and spark and ac-Dielectric Barrier Discharges) to aerosol processes for Materials and Environment (filtration, diagnostics). The production of vapor i.e. condensable gaseous species, leads to nano-sized particles by physical and chemical routes of nucleation in these AP plasmas: (i) when dc streamer and spark filamentary discharges as well as ac filamentary dielectric barrier discharges interact with metal or dielectric surfaces, and (ii) when discharges induce reactions with gaseous precursors in volume. It is shown how composition, size and structure of primary nano-particles are related to plasma parameters (energy, number per unit surface and time and thermal gradients). Then the growth by coagulation controls the final size of agglomerates versus plasma parameters and transit time in and after the plasma. Charging and electro-thermal collection are depicted to account for the related potential applications of controlled kinematics of charged aerosol.

  9. Effect of the RF wall conditioning on the high performance plasmas in the Large Helical Device

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takahashi, H., E-mail: takahashi.hiromi@LHD.nifs.ac.jp [National Institute for Fusion Science, Toki 509-5292 (Japan); Osakabe, M.; Nagaoka, K.; Nakano, H.; Tokitani, M. [National Institute for Fusion Science, Toki 509-5292 (Japan); Fujii, K. [Department of Mechanical Engineering and Science, Kyoto University, Kyoto 615-8540 (Japan); Murakami, S. [Department of Nuclear Engineering, Kyoto University, Kyoto 606-8501 (Japan); Takeiri, Y.; Seki, T.; Saito, K.; Kasahara, H.; Seki, R.; Kamio, S.; Masuzaki, S.; Mutoh, T. [National Institute for Fusion Science, Toki 509-5292 (Japan)

    2015-08-15

    The wall conditioning using radio frequency (RF) plasma was carried out using Ion Cyclotron Range of Frequency (ICRF) heating and/or Electron Cyclotron Resonance Heating (ECRH) with the working gas of helium under the established confinement magnetic field. After sufficient numbers of repetitive wall discharge conditioning (DC, ICDC for ICRF and ECDC for ECRH), the formation of the parabolic electron density profile and the increase of the central ion temperature T{sub i} were observed. There was no difference in the attained central T{sub i} of the NBI discharge just after the conditioning using a similar value of input energy regardless of the applied RF source. Thus, it is concluded that both ICDC and the ECDC are effective for the higher T{sub i} plasma production under the established magnetic field in the Large Helical Device. The effective RF wall conditioning scenarios are also investigated for high T{sub i} plasma production.

  10. The power-supply control system in the device of acetylene production by H-plasma pyrolysis coal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, F.Y.; Zhang, M.; Fu, P.; Weng, P.D. [Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei (China)

    2006-09-15

    The device of acetylene production by hydrogen (H{sub 2}) plasma pyrolysis coal is examined and developed not only for studying the application of low temperature plasma but also for studying the clean use of coal. The power-supply control system is used to ensure supplying a steady energy to generate and maintain the plasma electric arc of the device. The hardware configuration and the software design of the system are described in this paper. Verified by experiments, this system can meet the requirements of real-time performance, reliability and extensibility for the device.

  11. The Power-Supply Control System in the Device of Acetylene Production by H-Plasma Pyrolysis Coal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Feiyun; Zhang, Ming; Fu, Peng; Weng, Peide

    2006-09-01

    The device of acetylene production by hydrogen (H-) plasma pyrolysis coal is examined and developed not only for studying the application of low temperature plasma but also for studying the clean use of coal. The power-supply control system is used to ensure supplying a steady energy to generate and maintain the plasma electric arc of the device. The hardware configuration and the software design of the system are described in this paper. Verified by experiments, this system can meet the requirements of real-time performance, reliability and extensibility for the device.

  12. Advanced processing of gallium nitride for novel electronic devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Xian-An

    2000-10-01

    The 1990s have brought commercial viability of GaN-based photonic devices and startling progress of GaN-based field effect transistors. However, continued research is required to explore the full potential offered by the III-V nitride system, especially for microelectronic applications and power switches. Further improvement of fabrication procedures is one of high priorities of current research. A host of processing challenges are presented by GaN and related materials because of their wide-bandgap nature and chemical stability. A complete understanding in the critical areas such as ion implantation doping and isolation, rapid thermal annealing, metal contact, and dry etching process, is necessary to improve the routine device reproducibility, and should directly lead to optimization of device performance. This dissertation has focused on understanding and optimization of several key aspects of GaN device processing. A novel rapid thermal processing up to 1500°C, in conjunction with AlN encapsulation, has been developed. The activation processes of implanted Si or Group VI donors, and common acceptors in GaN by using this ultrahigh temperature annealing, along with its effects on surface degradation, dopant redistribution and damage removal have been examined. 1400°C has proven to be the optimum temperature to achieve high activation efficiency and to repair the ion-induced lattice defects. Ion implantation was also employed to create high resistivity GaN. Damage-related isolation with sheet resistances of 1012 O/□ in n-GaN and 1010 O/□ in p-GaN has been achieved by implant of O and transition metal elements. Effects of surface cleanliness on characteristics of GaN Schottky contacts have been investigated, and the reduction in barrier height was correlated with removing the native oxide that forms an insulating layer on the conventionally-cleaned surface. W alloys have been deposited on Si-implanted samples and Mg-doped epilayers to achieve ohmic contacts

  13. High mobility epitaxial graphene devices via aqueous-ozone processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yager, Tom; Webb, Matthew J.; Grennberg, Helena; Yakimova, Rositsa; Lara-Avila, Samuel; Kubatkin, Sergey

    2015-02-01

    We find that monolayer epitaxial graphene devices exposed to aggressive aqueous-ozone processing and annealing became cleaner from post-fabrication organic resist residuals and, significantly, maintain their high carrier mobility. Additionally, we observe a decrease in carrier density from inherent strong n-type doping to extremely low p-type doping after processing. This transition is explained to be a consequence of the cleaning effect of aqueous-ozone processing and annealing, since the observed removal of resist residuals from SiC/G enables the exposure of the bare graphene to dopants present in ambient conditions. The resulting combination of charge neutrality, high mobility, large area clean surfaces, and susceptibility to environmental species suggest this processed graphene system as an ideal candidate for gas sensing applications.

  14. Linear and Nonlinear MHD Wave Processes in Plasmas. Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tataronis, J. A.

    2004-06-01

    This program treats theoretically low frequency linear and nonlinear wave processes in magnetized plasmas. A primary objective has been to evaluate the effectiveness of MHD waves to heat plasma and drive current in toroidal configurations. The research covers the following topics: (1) the existence and properties of the MHD continua in plasma equilibria without spatial symmetry; (2) low frequency nonresonant current drive and nonlinear Alfven wave effects; and (3) nonlinear electron acceleration by rf and random plasma waves. Results have contributed to the fundamental knowledge base of MHD activity in symmetric and asymmetric toroidal plasmas. Among the accomplishments of this research effort, the following are highlighted: Identification of the MHD continuum mode singularities in toroidal geometry. Derivation of a third order ordinary differential equation that governs nonlinear current drive in the singular layers of the Alfvkn continuum modes in axisymmetric toroidal geometry. Bounded solutions of this ODE implies a net average current parallel to the toroidal equilibrium magnetic field. Discovery of a new unstable continuum of the linearized MHD equation in axially periodic circular plasma cylinders with shear and incompressibility. This continuum, which we named “accumulation continuum” and which is related to ballooning modes, arises as discrete unstable eigenfrequency accumulate on the imaginary frequency axis in the limit of large mode numbers. Development of techniques to control nonlinear electron acceleration through the action of multiple coherent and random plasmas waves. Two important elements of this program aye student participation and student training in plasma theory.

  15. Carbon Nanofibers Functionalized with Active Screen Plasma-Deposited Metal Nanoparticles for Electrical Energy Storage Devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corujeira Gallo, Santiago; Li, Xiaoying; Fütterer, Klaus; Charitidis, Constantinos A; Dong, Hanshan

    2017-07-12

    Supercapacitors are energy storage devices with higher energy densities than conventional capacitors but lower than batteries or fuel cells. There is a strong interest in increasing the volumetric and gravimetric capacitance of these devices to meet the growing demands of the electrical and electronic sectors. The capacitance depends largely on the electrode material, and carbon nanofibers (CNFs) have attracted much attention because of their relatively low cost, large surface area, and good electrical conductivity as well as chemical and thermal stability. The deposition of metal nanoparticles on CNFs is a promising way to increase their surface properties and, ultimately, the capacitance of the devices. In this study, nickel and silver nanoparticles were deposited on CNFs using the active screen plasma technology. The CNFs were characterized, and their electrochemical performance was assessed in a three-electrode cell. The results show significant improvements over the untreated CNFs, particularly after functionalization with silver nanoparticles.

  16. Moderation of neoclassical impurity accumulation in high temperature plasmas of helical devices

    CERN Document Server

    Velasco, J L; Satake, S; Alonso, A; Nunami, M; Yokoyama, M; Sato, M; Dinklage, A; Estrada, T; Fontdecaba, J M; Liniers, M; McCarthy, K J; Medina, F; Van Milligen, B Ph; Ochando, M; Parra, F; Sugama, H; Zhezhera, A

    2016-01-01

    Achieving impurity and helium ash control is a crucial issue in the path towards fusion-grade magnetic confinement devices, and this is particularly the case of helical reactors, whose low-collisionality ion-root operation scenarios usually display a negative radial electric field which is expected to cause inwards impurity pinch. In these work we discuss, based on experimental measurements and standard predictions of neoclassical theory, how plasmas of very low ion collisionality, similar to those observed in the impurity hole of the Large Helical Device, can be an exception to this general rule, and how a negative radial electric field can coexist with an outward impurity flux. This interpretation is supported by comparison with documented discharges available in the International Stellarator-Heliotron Profile Database, and it can be extrapolated to show that achievement of high ion temperature in the core of helical devices is not fundamentally incompatible with low core impurity content.

  17. Plasma Processing of Large Curved Surfaces for SRF Cavity Modification

    CERN Document Server

    Upadhyay, J; Popović, S; Valente-Feliciano, A -M; Phillips, L; Vušković, L

    2014-01-01

    Plasma based surface modification of niobium is a promising alternative to wet etching of superconducting radio frequency (SRF) cavities. The development of the technology based on Cl2/Ar plasma etching has to address several crucial parameters which influence the etching rate and surface roughness, and eventually, determine cavity performance. This includes dependence of the process on the frequency of the RF generator, gas pressure, power level, the driven (inner) electrode configuration, and the chlorine concentration in the gas mixture during plasma processing. To demonstrate surface layer removal in the asymmetric non-planar geometry, we are using a simple cylindrical cavity with 8 ports symmetrically distributed over the cylinder. The ports are used for diagnosing the plasma parameters and as holders for the samples to be etched. The etching rate is highly correlated with the shape of the inner electrode, radio-frequency (RF) circuit elements, chlorine concentration in the Cl2/Ar gas mixtures, residence...

  18. An in-mold packaging process for plastic fluidic devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoo, Y E; Lee, K H; Je, T J; Choi, D S; Kim, S K

    2011-01-01

    Micro or nanofluidic devices have many channel shapes to deliver chemical solutions, body fluids or any fluids. The channels in these devices should be covered to prevent the fluids from overflowing or leaking. A typical method to fabricate an enclosed channel is to bond or weld a cover plate to a channel plate. This solid-to-solid bonding process, however, takes a considerable amount of time for mass production. In this study, a new process for molding a cover layer that can enclose open micro or nanochannels without solid-to-solid bonding is proposed and its feasibility is estimated. First, based on the design of a model microchannel, a brass microchannel master core was machined and a plastic microchannel platform was injection-molded. Using this molded platform, a series of experiments was performed for four process or mold design parameters. Some feasible conditions were successfully found to enclosed channels without filling the microchannels for the injection molding of a cover layer over the plastic microchannel platform. In addition, the bond strength and seal performance were estimated in a comparison with those done by conventional bonding or welding processes.

  19. Processes for multi-layer devices utilizing layer transfer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nielson, Gregory N; Sanchez, Carlos Anthony; Tauke-Pedretti, Anna; Kim, Bongsang; Cederberg, Jeffrey; Okandan, Murat; Cruz-Campa, Jose Luis; Resnick, Paul J

    2015-02-03

    A method includes forming a release layer over a donor substrate. A plurality of devices made of a first semiconductor material are formed over the release layer. A first dielectric layer is formed over the plurality of devices such that all exposed surfaces of the plurality of devices are covered by the first dielectric layer. The plurality of devices are chemically attached to a receiving device made of a second semiconductor material different than the first semiconductor material, the receiving device having a receiving substrate attached to a surface of the receiving device opposite the plurality of devices. The release layer is etched to release the donor substrate from the plurality of devices. A second dielectric layer is applied over the plurality of devices and the receiving device to mechanically attach the plurality of devices to the receiving device.

  20. Processes for multi-layer devices utilizing layer transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nielson, Gregory N; Sanchez, Carlos Anthony; Tauke-Pedretti, Anna; Kim, Bongsang; Cederberg, Jeffrey; Okandan, Murat; Cruz-Campa, Jose Luis; Resnick, Paul J

    2015-02-03

    A method includes forming a release layer over a donor substrate. A plurality of devices made of a first semiconductor material are formed over the release layer. A first dielectric layer is formed over the plurality of devices such that all exposed surfaces of the plurality of devices are covered by the first dielectric layer. The plurality of devices are chemically attached to a receiving device made of a second semiconductor material different than the first semiconductor material, the receiving device having a receiving substrate attached to a surface of the receiving device opposite the plurality of devices. The release layer is etched to release the donor substrate from the plurality of devices. A second dielectric layer is applied over the plurality of devices and the receiving device to mechanically attach the plurality of devices to the receiving device.

  1. Challenges in the Plasma Etch Process Development in the sub-20nm Technology Nodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Kaushik

    2013-09-01

    For multiple generations of semiconductor technologies, RF plasmas have provided a reliable platform for critical and non-critical patterning applications. The electron temperature of processes in a RF plasma is typically several electron volts. A substantial portion of the electron population is within the energy range accessible for different types of electron collision processes, such as electron collision dissociation and dissociative electron attachment. When these electron processes occur within a small distance above the wafer, the neutral species, radicals and excited molecules, generated from these processes take part in etching reactions impacting selectivity, ARDE and micro-loading. The introduction of finFET devices at 22 nm technology node at Intel marks the transition of planar devices to 3-dimensional devices, which add to the challenges to etch process in fabricating such devices. In the sub-32 nm technology node, Back-end-of-the-line made a change with the implementation of Trench First Metal Hard Mask (TFMHM) integration scheme, which has hence gained traction and become the preferred integration of low-k materials for BEOL. This integration scheme also enables Self-Aligned Via (SAV) patterning which prevents via CD growth and confines via by line trenches to better control via to line spacing. In addition to this, lack of scaling of 193 nm Lithography and non-availability of EUV based lithography beyond concept, has placed focus on novel multiple patterning schemes. This added complexity has resulted in multiple etch schemes to enable technology scaling below 80 nm Pitches, as shown by the memory manufacturers. Double-Patterning and Quad-Patterning have become increasingly used techniques to achieve 64 nm, 56 nm and 45 nm Pitch technologies in Back-end-of-the-line. Challenges associated in the plasma etching of these multiple integration schemes will be discussed in the presentation. In collaboration with A. Ranjan, TEL Technology Center, America

  2. Modelling of the arc reattachment process in plasma torches

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trelles, J P; Pfender, E; Heberlein, J V R [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN 55455 (United States)

    2007-09-21

    The need to improve plasma spraying processes has motivated the development of computational models capable of describing the arc dynamics inside plasma torches. Although progress has been made in the development of such models, the realistic simulation of the arc reattachment process, a central part of the arc dynamics inside plasma torches, is still an unsolved problem. This study presents a reattachment model capable of mimicking the physical reattachment process as part of a local thermodynamic equilibrium description of the plasma flow. The fluid and electromagnetic equations describing the plasma flow are solved in a fully-coupled approach by a variational multi-scale finite element method, which implicitly accounts for the multi-scale nature of the flow. The effectiveness of our modelling approach is demonstrated by simulations of a commercial plasma spraying torch operating with Ar-He under different operating conditions. The model is able to match the experimentally measured peak frequencies of the voltage signal, arc lengths and anode spot sizes, but produces voltage drops exceeding those measured. This finding, added to the apparent lack of a well-defined cold boundary layer all around the arc, points towards the importance of non-equilibrium effects inside the torch, especially in the anode attachment region.

  3. A Course on Plasma Processing in Integrated Circuit Fabrication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawin, Herbert H.; Reif, Rafael

    1983-01-01

    Describes a course, taught jointly by electrical/chemical engineering departments at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, designed to teach the fundamental science of plasma processing as well as to give an overview of the present state of industrial processes. Provides rationale for course development, texts used, class composition, and…

  4. Imperative function of electron beams in low-energy plasma focus device

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    M Z Khan; L K Lim; S L Yap; C S Wong

    2015-12-01

    A 2.2 kJ plasma focus device was analysed as an electron beam and an X-ray source that operates with argon gas refilled at a specific pressure. Time-resolved X-ray signals were observed using an array of PIN diode detectors, and the electron beam energy was detected using a scintillator-assisted photomultiplier tube. The resultant X-rays were investigated by plasma focus discharge for pressures ranging from 1.5 mbar to 2.0 mbar. This range corresponded to the significant values of X-ray yields and electron beam energies from the argon plasma. The electron temperature of argon plasma at an optimum pressure range was achieved by an indirect method using five-channel BPX65 PIN diodes of aluminum foils with different thicknesses. X-ray yield, electron beam energy, and electron temperature of argon plasma were achieved at 1.5–2.0 mbar because of the strong bombardment of the energetic electron beam.

  5. The Multiple Resonance Probe: A Novel Device for Industry Compatible Plasma Diagnostics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brinkmann, Ralf Peter; Storch, Robert; Lapke, Martin; Oberrath, Jens; Schulz, Christian; Styrnoll, Tim; Zietz, Christian; Awakowicz, Peter; Musch, Thomas; Mussenbrock, Thomas; Rolfes, Ilona

    2012-10-01

    To be useful for the supervision or control of technical plasmas, a diagnostic method must be i) robust and stable, ii) insensitive to perturbation by the process, iii) itself not perturbing the process, iv) clearly and easily interpretable without the need for calibration, v) compliant with the requirements of process integration, and, last but not least, vi) economical in terms of investment, footprint, and maintenance. Plasma resonance spectroscopy, exploiting the natural ability of plasmas to resonate on or near the electron plasma frequency, provides a good basis for such an ``industry compatible'' plasma diagnostics. The contribution will describe the general idea of active plasma resonance spectroscopy and introduce a mathematical formalism for its analysis. It will then focus on the novel multipole resonance probe (MRP), where the excited resonances can be classified explicitly and the connection between the probe response and the desired electron density can be cast as a simple formula. The current state of the MRP project will be described, including the experimental characterization of a prototype in comparison with Langmuir probes, and the development of a specialized measurement circuit.

  6. Atomic and molecular processes in JT-60U divertor plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takenaga, H.; Shimizu, K.; Itami, K. [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Naka, Ibaraki (Japan). Naka Fusion Research Establishment] [and others

    1997-01-01

    Atomic and molecular data are indispensable for the understanding of the divertor characteristics, because behavior of particles in the divertor plasma is closely related to the atomic and molecular processes. In the divertor configuration, heat and particles escaping from the main plasma flow onto the divertor plate along the magnetic field lines. In the divertor region, helium ash must be effectively exhausted, and radiation must be enhanced for the reduction of the heat load onto the divertor plate. In order to exhaust helium ash effectively, the difference between behavior of neutral hydrogen (including deuterium and tritium) and helium in the divertor plasma should be understood. Radiation from the divertor plasma generally caused by the impurities which produced by the erosion of the divertor plate and/or injected by gas-puffing. Therefore, it is important to understand impurity behavior in the divertor plasma. The ions hitting the divertor plate recycle through the processes of neutralization, reflection, absorption and desorption at the divertor plates and molecular dissociation, charge-exchange reaction and ionization in the divertor plasma. Behavior of hydrogen, helium and impurities in the divertor plasmas can not be understood without the atomic and molecular data. In this report, recent results of the divertor study related to the atomic and molecular processes in JT-60U were summarized. Behavior of neural deuterium and helium was discussed in section 2. In section 3, the comparisons between the modelling of the carbon impurity transport and the measurements of C II and C IV were discussed. In section 4, characteristics of the radiative divertor using Ne puffing were reported. The new diagnostic method for the electron density and temperature in the divertor plasmas using the intensity ratios of He I lines was described in section 5. (author)

  7. DATA PROCESSING FROM THE MEASURING DEVICE BALLBAR QC20

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matúš Košinár

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents an innovative method of data processing from the measurement device – Ballbar QC20W. It was created with a program for data transformation (Visual Basic.NET and it used Fourier transformation. The paper deals with the measuring method of CNC machine tools using Ballbar QC20W. There is an influence between qualitative parameters of machine tools and qualitative parameters of products (tolerances, roughness, etc.. It is very important to hold the stability of qualitative parameters of products as a key factor of production quality. Therefore, is also important to evaluate the accuracy of machine tools and make prediction of possible accuracy.

  8. Grasping devices and methods in automated production processes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fantoni, Gualtiero; Santochi, Marco; Dini, Gino

    2014-01-01

    In automated production processes grasping devices and methods play a crucial role in the handling of many parts, components and products. This keynote paper starts with a classification of grasping phases, describes how different principles are adopted at different scales in different applications...... and continues explaining different releasing strategies and principles. Then the paper classifies the numerous sensors used to monitor the effectiveness of grasping (part presence, exchanged force, stick-slip transitions, etc.). Later the grasping and releasing problems in different fields (from mechanical...

  9. Advanced materials and processes for polymer solar cell devices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Martin Helgesen; Søndergaard, Roar; Krebs, Frederik C

    2010-01-01

    /fullerene mixtures and evaporated metal electrodes in a flat multilayer geometry. It is likely that significant advances can be found by pursuing many of these novel ideas further and the purpose of this review is to highlight these reports and hopefully spark new interest in materials and methods that may......The rapidly expanding field of polymer and organic solar cells is reviewed in the context of materials, processes and devices that significantly deviate from the standard approach which involves rigid glass substrates, indium-tin-oxide electrodes, spincoated layers of conjugated polymer...

  10. Experimental study of the performance of a very small repetitive plasma focus device in different working conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goudarzi, S.; Babaee, H.; Esmaeli, A.; Nasiri, A.

    2017-01-01

    SORENA-1 is a very small repetitive Mather-type plasma focus device (20 J) that can operate at frequencies up to 1 Hz. This device has been designed and constructed in the Plasma and Nuclear Fusion Research School of the Nuclear Science and Technology Research Institute of Iran. In this article, the structure of SORENA-1 is described and results of experiments with Ar, Ne, and D2 working gases at several discharge voltages and initial pressures are presented and analyzed.

  11. Plasma Processes : Sheath and plasma parameters in a magnetized plasma system

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Bornali Singha; A Sharma; J Chutia

    2000-11-01

    The variation of electron temperature and plasma density in a magnetized 2 plasma is studied experimentally in presence of a grid placed at the middle of the system. Plasma leaks through the negatively biased grid from the source region into the diffused region. It is observed that the electron temperature increases with the magnetic field in the diffused region whereas it decreases in the source region of the system for a constant grid biasing voltage. Also, investigation is done to see the change of electron temperature with grid biasing voltage for a constant magnetic field. This is accompanied by the study of the variation of sheath structure across the grid for different magnetic field and grid biasing voltage as well. It reveals that with increasing magnetic field and negative grid biasing voltage, the sheath thickness expands.

  12. Hole injection enhancement in organic light emitting devices using plasma treated graphene oxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jesuraj, P. Justin; Parameshwari, R.; Kanthasamy, K.; Koch, J.; Pfnür, H.; Jeganathan, K.

    2017-03-01

    The hole injection layer (HIL) with high work function (WF) is desirable to reduce the injection barrier between anode and hole transport layer in organic light emitting devices (OLED). Here, we report a novel approach to tune the WF of graphene oxide (GO) using oxygen and hydrogen plasma treatment and its hole injection properties in OLEDs. The mild exposure of oxygen plasma on GO (O2-GO) significantly reduces the injection barrier by increasing the WF of anode (4.98 eV) through expansion of Csbnd O bonds. In contrast, the hole injection barrier was drastically increased for hydrogen plasma treated GO (H2-GO) layers as the WF is lowered by the contraction of Csbnd O bond. By employing active O2-GO as HIL in OLEDs found to exhibit superior current efficiency of 4.2 cd/A as compared to 3.3 cd/A for pristine GO. Further, the high injection efficiency of O2-GO infused hole only device can be attributed to the improved energy level matching. Ultraviolet and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy were used to correlate the WF of HIL infused anode towards the enhanced performance of OLEDs with their capricious content of Csbnd O in GO matrix.

  13. The differing behavior of electrosurgical devices made of various electrode materials operating under plasma conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stalder, K. R.; Ryan, T. P.; Gaspredes, J.; Woloszko, J.

    2015-03-01

    Coblation® is an electrosurgical technology which employs electrically-excited electrodes in the presence of saline solution to produce a localized and ionized plasma that can cut, ablate, and otherwise treat tissues for many different surgical needs. To improve our understanding of how Coblation plasmas develop from devices made from different electrode materials we describe several experiments designed to elucidate material effects. Initial experiments studied simple, noncommercial cylindrical electrode test devices operating in buffered isotonic saline without applied suction. The applied RF voltage, approximately 300 V RMS, was sufficient to form glow discharges around the active electrodes. The devices exhibited significantly different operating characteristics, which we ascribe to the differing oxidation tendencies and other physical properties of the electrode materials. Parameters measured include RMS voltage and current, instantaneous voltage and current, temporally-resolved light emission and optical emission spectra, and electrode mass-loss measurements. We correlate these measured properties with some of the bulk characteristics of the electrode materials such as work functions, standard reduction potentials and sputter yields.

  14. Moderation of neoclassical impurity accumulation in high temperature plasmas of helical devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velasco, J. L.; Calvo, I.; Satake, S.; Alonso, A.; Nunami, M.; Yokoyama, M.; Sato, M.; Estrada, T.; Fontdecaba, J. M.; Liniers, M.; McCarthy, K. J.; Medina, F.; Van Milligen, B. Ph; Ochando, M.; Parra, F.; Sugama, H.; Zhezhera, A.; The LHD Experimental Team; The TJ-II Team

    2017-01-01

    Achieving impurity and helium ash control is a crucial issue in the path towards fusion-grade magnetic confinement devices, and this is particularly the case of helical reactors, whose low-collisionality ion-root operation scenarios usually display a negative radial electric field which is expected to cause inwards impurity pinch. In this work we discuss, based on experimental measurements and standard predictions of neoclassical theory, how plasmas of very low ion collisionality, similar to those observed in the impurity hole of the large helical device (Yoshinuma et al and The LHD Experimental Group 2009 Nucl. Fusion 49 062002, Ida et al and The LHD Experimental Group 2009 Phys. Plasmas 16 056111 and Yokoyama et al and LHD Experimental Group 2002 Nucl. Fusion 42 143), can be an exception to this general rule, and how a negative radial electric field can coexist with an outward impurity flux. This interpretation is supported by comparison with documented discharges available in the International Stellarator-Heliotron Profile Database, and it can be extrapolated to show that achievement of high ion temperature in the core of helical devices is not fundamentally incompatible with low core impurity content.

  15. A 5 kA pulsed power supply for inductive and plasma loads in large volume plasma device

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Srivastava, P. K., E-mail: pkumar@ipr.res.in; Singh, S. K.; Sanyasi, A. K.; Awasthi, L. M., E-mail: kushagra.lalit@gmail.com; Mattoo, S. K. [Institute for Plasma Research, Gandhinagar (India)

    2016-07-15

    This paper describes 5 kA, 12 ms pulsed power supply for inductive load of Electron Energy Filter (EEF) in large volume plasma device. The power supply is based upon the principle of rapid sourcing of energy from the capacitor bank (2.8 F/200 V) by using a static switch, comprising of ten Insulated Gate Bipolar Transistors (IGBTs). A suitable mechanism is developed to ensure equal sharing of current and uniform power distribution during the operation of these IGBTs. Safe commutation of power to the EEF is ensured by the proper optimization of its components and by the introduction of over voltage protection (>6 kV) using an indigenously designed snubber circuit. Various time sequences relevant to different actions of power supply, viz., pulse width control and repetition rate, are realized through optically isolated computer controlled interface.

  16. A 5 kA pulsed power supply for inductive and plasma loads in large volume plasma device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srivastava, P. K.; Singh, S. K.; Sanyasi, A. K.; Awasthi, L. M.; Mattoo, S. K.

    2016-07-01

    This paper describes 5 kA, 12 ms pulsed power supply for inductive load of Electron Energy Filter (EEF) in large volume plasma device. The power supply is based upon the principle of rapid sourcing of energy from the capacitor bank (2.8 F/200 V) by using a static switch, comprising of ten Insulated Gate Bipolar Transistors (IGBTs). A suitable mechanism is developed to ensure equal sharing of current and uniform power distribution during the operation of these IGBTs. Safe commutation of power to the EEF is ensured by the proper optimization of its components and by the introduction of over voltage protection (>6 kV) using an indigenously designed snubber circuit. Various time sequences relevant to different actions of power supply, viz., pulse width control and repetition rate, are realized through optically isolated computer controlled interface.

  17. Numerical simulation study on density dependence of plasma detachment in simulated gas divertor experiments of the TPD-I device

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ohno, N. [Nagoya Univ. (Japan). Dept. of Energy Eng. and Sci.; Mori, S. [Nagoya Univ. (Japan). Dept. of Energy Eng. and Sci.; Ezumi, N. [Nagoya Univ. (Japan). Dept. of Energy Eng. and Sci.; Takagi, M. [Nagoya Univ. (Japan). Dept. of Energy Eng. and Sci.; Takamura, S. [Nagoya Univ. (Japan). Dept. of Energy Eng. and Sci.; Suzuki, H. [National Inst. for Fusion Science, Nagoya (Japan)

    1996-08-01

    It is one of the most critical requirements to reduce the heat load to the divertor plate in the next generation fusion devices such as ITER, intended to have a long pulse or a steady state operation. Dynamic gas target divertor as well as high recycling divertor is one of the most important candidates for ITER. Recently a detached plasma has been observed in experimental fusion devices. Knowledge of the basic physics of the plasma detachment is required for any application of the gas target and high recycling divertor to the next generation experimental reactors. Linear plasma divertor simulators with high heat flux plasmas are used to investigate the plasma detachment because its good accessibility for comprehensive measurements and simple geometry leads a deeper understanding of the plasma detachment by comparing between simulation predictions and the experimental results. (orig.)

  18. Numerical simulation of chemical processes in atmospheric plasmas

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ouyang Jian-Ming; Guo Wei; Wang Long; Shao Fu-Qiu

    2004-01-01

    A model is built to study chemical processes in atmospheric plasmas at low altitude (high pressure) and at high altitude (low pressure). The plasma lifetime and the temporal evolution of the main charged species are presented.The electron number density does not strictly obey the exponential damping law in a long period. The heavy charged species are dominant at low altitude in comparison with the light species at high altitude. Some species of small amount in natural air play an important role in the processes.

  19. Growing perovskite into polymers for easy-processable optoelectronic devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masi, Sofia; Colella, Silvia; Listorti, Andrea; Roiati, Vittoria; Liscio, Andrea; Palermo, Vincenzo; Rizzo, Aurora; Gigli, Giuseppe

    2015-01-01

    Here we conceive an innovative nanocomposite to endow hybrid perovskites with the easy processability of polymers, providing a tool to control film quality and material crystallinity. We verify that the employed semiconducting polymer, poly[2-methoxy-5-(2-ethylhexyloxy)-1,4-phenylenevinylene] (MEH-PPV), controls the self-assembly of CH3NH3PbI3 (MAPbI3) crystalline domains and favors the deposition of a very smooth and homogenous layer in one straightforward step. This idea offers a new paradigm for the implementation of polymer/perovskite nanocomposites towards versatile optoelectronic devices combined with the feasibility of mass production. As a proof-of-concept we propose the application of such nanocomposite in polymer solar cell architecture, demonstrating a power conversion efficiency up to 3%, to date the highest reported for MEH-PPV. On-purpose designed polymers are expected to suit the nanocomposite properties for the integration in diverse optoelectronic devices via facile processing condition.

  20. Solution processed integrated pixel element for an imaging device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swathi, K.; Narayan, K. S.

    2016-09-01

    We demonstrate the implementation of a solid state circuit/structure comprising of a high performing polymer field effect transistor (PFET) utilizing an oxide layer in conjunction with a self-assembled monolayer (SAM) as the dielectric and a bulk-heterostructure based organic photodiode as a CMOS-like pixel element for an imaging sensor. Practical usage of functional organic photon detectors requires on chip components for image capture and signal transfer as in the CMOS/CCD architecture rather than simple photodiode arrays in order to increase speed and sensitivity of the sensor. The availability of high performing PFETs with low operating voltage and photodiodes with high sensitivity provides the necessary prerequisite to implement a CMOS type image sensing device structure based on organic electronic devices. Solution processing routes in organic electronics offers relatively facile procedures to integrate these components, combined with unique features of large-area, form factor and multiple optical attributes. We utilize the inherent property of a binary mixture in a blend to phase-separate vertically and create a graded junction for effective photocurrent response. The implemented design enables photocharge generation along with on chip charge to voltage conversion with performance parameters comparable to traditional counterparts. Charge integration analysis for the passive pixel element using 2D TCAD simulations is also presented to evaluate the different processes that take place in the monolithic structure.

  1. NMR data visualization, processing, and analysis on mobile devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cobas, Carlos; Iglesias, Isaac; Seoane, Felipe

    2015-08-01

    Touch-screen computers are emerging as a popular platform for many applications, including those in chemistry and analytical sciences. In this work, we present our implementation of a new NMR 'app' designed for hand-held and portable touch-controlled devices, such as smartphones and tablets. It features a flexible architecture formed by a powerful NMR processing and analysis kernel and an intuitive user interface that makes full use of the smart devices haptic capabilities. Routine 1D and 2D NMR spectra acquired in most NMR instruments can be processed in a fully unattended way. More advanced experiments such as non-uniform sampled NMR spectra are also supported through a very efficient parallelized Modified Iterative Soft Thresholding algorithm. Specific technical development features as well as the overall feasibility of using NMR software apps will also be discussed. All aspects considered the functionalities of the app allowing it to work as a stand-alone tool or as a 'companion' to more advanced desktop applications such as Mnova NMR.

  2. Diamond MEMS: wafer scale processing, devices, and technology insertion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlisle, J. A.

    2009-05-01

    Diamond has long held the promise of revolutionary new devices: impervious chemical barriers, smooth and reliable microscopic machines, and tough mechanical tools. Yet it's been an outsider. Laboratories have been effectively growing diamond crystals for at least 25 years, but the jump to market viability has always been blocked by the expense of diamond production and inability to integrate with other materials. Advances in chemical vapor deposition (CVD) processes have given rise to a hierarchy of carbon films ranging from diamond-like carbon (DLC) to vapor-deposited diamond coatings, however. All have pros and cons based on structure and cost, but they all share some of diamond's heralded attributes. The best performer, in theory, is the purest form of diamond film possible, one absent of graphitic phases. Such a material would capture the extreme hardness, high Young's modulus and chemical inertness of natural diamond. Advanced Diamond Technologies Inc., Romeoville, Ill., is the first company to develop a distinct chemical process to create a marketable phase-pure diamond film. The material, called UNCD® (for ultrananocrystalline diamond), features grain sizes from 3 to 300 nm in size, and layers just 1 to 2 microns thick. With significant advantages over other thin films, UNCD is designed to be inexpensive enough for use in atomic force microscopy (AFM) probes, microelectromechanical machines (MEMS), cell phone circuitry, radio frequency devices, and even biosensors.

  3. Vehicle Embedded Data Stream Processing Platform for Android Devices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shingo Akiyama

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Automotive information services utilizing vehicle data are rapidly expanding. However, there is currently no data centric software architecture that takes into account the scale and complexity of data involving numerous sensors. To address this issue, the authors have developed an in-vehicle data-stream management system for automotive embedded systems (eDSMS as data centric software architecture. Providing the data stream functionalities to drivers and passengers are highly beneficial. This paper describes a vehicle embedded data stream processing platform for Android devices. The platform enables flexible query processing with a dataflow query language and extensible operator functions in the query language on the platform. The platform employs architecture independent of data stream schema in in-vehicle eDSMS to facilitate smoother Android application program development. This paper presents specifications and design of the query language and APIs of the platform, evaluate it, and discuss the results.

  4. Nonlinear Silicon Photonic Signal Processing Devices for Future Optical Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cosimo Lacava

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we present a review on silicon-based nonlinear devices for all optical nonlinear processing of complex telecommunication signals. We discuss some recent developments achieved by our research group, through extensive collaborations with academic partners across Europe, on optical signal processing using silicon-germanium and amorphous silicon based waveguides as well as novel materials such as silicon rich silicon nitride and tantalum pentoxide. We review the performance of four wave mixing wavelength conversion applied on complex signals such as Differential Phase Shift Keying (DPSK, Quadrature Phase Shift Keying (QPSK, 16-Quadrature Amplitude Modulation (QAM and 64-QAM that dramatically enhance the telecom signal spectral efficiency, paving the way to next generation terabit all-optical networks.

  5. Solution-Processable Silicon Phthalocyanines in Electroluminescent and Photovoltaic Devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zysman-Colman, Eli; Ghosh, Sanjay S; Xie, Guohua; Varghese, Shinto; Chowdhury, Mithun; Sharma, Nidhi; Cordes, David B; Slawin, Alexandra M Z; Samuel, Ifor D W

    2016-04-13

    Phthalocyanines and their main group and metal complexes are important classes of organic semiconductor materials but are usually highly insoluble and so frequently need to be processed by vacuum deposition in devices. We report two highly soluble silicon phthalocyanine (SiPc) diester compounds and demonstrate their potential as organic semiconductor materials. Near-infrared (λ(EL) = 698-709 nm) solution-processed organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs) were fabricated and exhibited external quantum efficiencies (EQEs) of up to 1.4%. Binary bulk heterojunction solar cells employing P3HT or PTB7 as the donor and the SiPc as the acceptor provided power conversion efficiencies (PCE) of up to 2.7% under simulated solar illumination. Our results show that soluble SiPcs are promising materials for organic electronics.

  6. Simulation of electrical discharge in a 3.6 Joule miniature plasma focus device using SIMULINK

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jafari, Hossein; Habibi, Morteza

    2014-08-01

    A novel technique has been developed and studied in this paper to simulate the electrical discharge circuit of a 3.6 J miniature plasma focus device (PFD) and investigate the effect of inductance variation on voltage spike and current dip. The technique is based on a correlation between the electrical discharge circuit and plasma dynamics in a very small PFD that operates at the energy of 3.6 J. The simulation inputs include the charging voltage, capacitor bank capacitance, current limiter resistance, by-pass resistance as well as the time-dependent inductance and resistance of the plasma sheath which are calculated by assuming the plasma dynamics as transit times in going from one phase to the next. The variations of the most important elements in the circuit (i.e. the constant and breakdown inductances) and their effects on the current dip are studied in PFDs with low and high constant inductance. The model demonstrated for achieving a good pinch in the PFD, although the total inductance of the system should be low; however there is always an optimum inductance which causes an appropriate pinch. Furthermore, the electrical power produced by the pulsed power supply, the mechanical energy as well as the magnetic energy which are transferred into the plasma tube were obtained from simulation. The graph of electrical power demonstrated a high instantaneous increment in the power transferred into the plasma as one of the greatest advantages of the pulsed power supply. The simulation was performed using software tools within the MATLAB/SIMULINK simulation environment.

  7. From pulsed power to processing: Plasma initiated chemical process intensification

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heesch, E.J.M. van; Yan, K.; Pemen, A.J.M.; Winands, G.J.J.; Beckers, F.J.C.M.; Hoeben, W.F.L.M.

    2012-01-01

    Smart electric power for process intensification is a challenging research field that integrates power engineering, chemistry and green technology. Pulsed power technology is offering elegant solutions. This work focuses on backgrounds of matching the power source to the process. Important items are

  8. Collisional damping of helicon waves in a high density hydrogen linear plasma device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caneses, Juan F.; Blackwell, Boyd D.

    2016-10-01

    In this paper, we investigate the propagation and damping of helicon waves along the length (50 cm) of a helicon-produced 20 kW hydrogen plasma ({{n}\\text{e}}∼ 1–2 × 1019 m‑3, {{T}\\text{e}}∼ 1–6 eV, H2 8 mTorr) operated in a magnetic mirror configuration (antenna region: 50–200 G and mirror region: 800 G). Experimental results show the presence of traveling helicon waves (4–8 G and {λz}∼ 10–15 cm) propagating away from the antenna region which become collisionally absorbed within 40–50 cm. We describe the use of the WKB method to calculate wave damping and provide an expression to assess its validity based on experimental measurements. Theoretical calculations are consistent with experiment and indicate that for conditions where Coulomb collisions are dominant classical collisionality is sufficient to explain the observed wave damping along the length of the plasma column. Based on these results, we provide an expression for the scaling of helicon wave damping relevant to high density discharges and discuss the location of surfaces for plasma-material interaction studies in helicon based linear plasma devices.

  9. Hybrid simulation of a parallel collisionless shock in the Large Plasma Device

    CERN Document Server

    Weidl, M S; Jenko, F; Niemann, C

    2016-01-01

    We present two-dimensional hybrid kinetic/magnetohydrodynamic simulations of planned laser-ablation experiments in the Large Plasma Device (LAPD). Our results, based on parameters which have been validated in previous experiments, show that a parallel collisionless shock can begin forming within the available space. Carbon-debris ions that stream along the magnetic-field direction with a blow-off speed of four times the Alfven velocity excite strong magnetic fluctuations, eventually transfering part of their kinetic energy to the surrounding hydrogen ions. This acceleration and compression of the background plasma creates a shock front, which satisfies the Rankine-Hugoniot conditions and can therefore propagate on its own. Furthermore, we analyze the upstream turbulence and show that it is dominated by the right-hand resonant instability.

  10. Palm top plasma focus device as a portable pulsed neutron source.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rout, R K; Niranjan, Ram; Mishra, P; Srivastava, R; Rawool, A M; Kaushik, T C; Gupta, Satish C

    2013-06-01

    Development of a palm top plasma focus device generating (5.2 ± 0.8) × 10(4) neutrons∕pulse into 4π steradians with a pulse width of 15 ± 3 ns is reported for the first time. The weight of the system is less than 1.5 kg. The system comprises a compact capacitor bank, a triggered open air spark gap switch, and a sealed type miniature plasma focus tube. The setup is around 14 cm in diameter and 12.5 cm in length. The energy driver for the unit is a capacitor bank of four cylindrical commercially available electrolytic capacitors. Each capacitor is of 2 μF capacity, 4.5 cm in diameter, and 9.8 cm in length. The cost of each capacitor is less than US$ 10. The internal diameter and the effective length of the plasma focus unit are 2.9 cm and 5 cm, respectively. A DC to DC converter power supply powered by two rechargeable batteries charges the capacitor bank to the desired voltage and also provides a trigger pulse of -15 kV to the spark gap. The maximum energy of operation of the device is 100 J (8 μF, 5 kV, 59 kA) with deuterium gas filling pressure of 3 mbar. The neutrons have also been produced at energy as low as 36 J (3 kV) of operation. The neutron diagnostics are carried out with a bank of (3)He detectors and with a plastic scintillator detector. The device is portable, reusable, and can be operated for multiple shots with a single gas filling.

  11. Parabolic lithium mirror for a laser-driven hot plasma producing device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baird, James K.

    1979-06-19

    A hot plasma producing device is provided, wherein pellets, singly injected, of frozen fuel are each ignited with a plurality of pulsed laser beams. Ignition takes place within a void area in liquid lithium contained within a pressure vessel. The void in the liquid lithium is created by rotating the pressure vessel such that the free liquid surface of molten lithium therein forms a paraboloid of revolution. The paraboloid functions as a laser mirror with a reflectivity greater than 90%. A hot plasma is produced when each of the frozen deuterium-tritium pellets sequentially arrive at the paraboloid focus, at which time each pellet is illuminated by the plurality of pulsed lasers whose rays pass through circular annuli across the top of the paraboloid. The beams from the lasers are respectively directed by associated mirrors, or by means of a single conical mirror in another embodiment, and by the mirror-like paraboloid formed by the rotating liquid lithium onto the fuel pellet such that the optical flux reaching the pellet can be made to be uniform over 96% of the pellet surface area. The very hot plasma produced by the action of the lasers on the respective singly injected fuel pellets in turn produces a copious quantity of neutrons and X-rays such that the device has utility as a neutron source or as an x-ray source. In addition, the neutrons produced in the device may be utilized to produce tritium in a lithium blanket and is thus a mechanism for producing tritium.

  12. Microwave plasma monitoring system for the elemental composition analysis of high temperature process streams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Woskov, Paul P. (Bedford, MA); Cohn, Daniel R. (Chestnuthill, MA); Titus, Charles H. (Newtown Square, PA); Surma, Jeffrey E. (Kennewick, WA)

    1997-01-01

    Microwave-induced plasma for continuous, real time trace element monitoring under harsh and variable conditions. The sensor includes a source of high power microwave energy and a shorted waveguide made of a microwave conductive, high temperature capability refractory material communicating with the source of the microwave energy to generate a plasma. The high power waveguide is constructed to be robust in a hot, hostile environment. It includes an aperture for the passage of gases to be analyzed and a spectrometer is connected to receive light from the plasma. Provision is made for real time in situ calibration. The spectrometer disperses the light, which is then analyzed by a computer. The sensor is capable of making continuous, real time quantitative measurements of desired elements, such as the heavy metals lead and mercury. The invention may be incorporated into a high temperature process device and implemented in situ for example, such as with a DC graphite electrode plasma arc furnace. The invention further provides a system for the elemental analysis of process streams by removing particulate and/or droplet samples therefrom and entraining such samples in the gas flow which passes through the plasma flame. Introduction of and entraining samples in the gas flow may be facilitated by a suction pump, regulating gas flow, gravity or combinations thereof.

  13. Calibration constant of a silver activation counter used with plasma focus devices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    GR Etaati

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available The silver activation counters are commonly used for pulsed-neutron yield measurements especially in plasma focus devices. The counter normally consists of a Geiger-Muller tube along with silver foils and polyethylene (as a moderator, which is calibrated against an Am-Be radioisotope neutron source. The neutrons, after being slowed-down in the polyethylene, activate the silver foils. By measuring the foil activity with a Geiger-Muller counter, the neutron yield is determined. In the present paper, the activation counter’s calibration constant calculation using the MCNP4C code is explained. The calculated calibration constant is in good agreement with the experimental results.

  14. Design of a 500-kJ Mather-type plasma focus device

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heidarnia, A., E-mail: a-heidarnia@yahoo.com; Sadighzadeh, A.; Zaeem, A. A.; Damideh, V. [Nuclear Science and Technology Research Institute, Plasma Physics and Nuclear Fusion Research School (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2016-12-15

    In this article, design of a 500-kJ Mather-type plasma focus device to achieve 10{sup 11} neutrons/shot is reported. One of its important characteristics is the triple-part anode design. The anode is surrounded by an alumina insulator. The second part of the anode is changeable in order to locate cylindrical, conical, or other shapes of pieces mounted on it. This geometry leads to the easier investigation of the neutron and X-ray emissions of the device. The third part of the anode is for changing the materials exposed to different kinds of radiations. The design parameters are considered by semiempirical and empirical formulas and are sketched by Solidworks software. Also, the peak current and neutron yield are estimated.

  15. Design of a 500-kJ Mather-type plasma focus device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heidarnia, A.; Sadighzadeh, A.; Zaeem, A. A.; Damideh, V.

    2016-12-01

    In this article, design of a 500-kJ Mather-type plasma focus device to achieve 1011 neutrons/shot is reported. One of its important characteristics is the triple-part anode design. The anode is surrounded by an alumina insulator. The second part of the anode is changeable in order to locate cylindrical, conical, or other shapes of pieces mounted on it. This geometry leads to the easier investigation of the neutron and X-ray emissions of the device. The third part of the anode is for changing the materials exposed to different kinds of radiations. The design parameters are considered by semiempirical and empirical formulas and are sketched by Solidworks software. Also, the peak current and neutron yield are estimated.

  16. 14th High-Tech Plasma Processes Conference (HTPP 14)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-04-01

    Preface The High-Tech Plasma Processes Conference (HTPP) is a bi-annual international conference based in Europe with topics encompassing the whole area of plasma processing science. This conference is open to all the international community in the world involved in plasma science and plasma technology. The aim of the conference is to bring different scientific communities together, facilitate the contacts between science, technology and industry and provide a platform for the exploration of both fundamental topics and new applications of plasmas. For this edition of HTPP, as was the case for the last, we have achieved a well balanced participation from the communities of both thermal and non-thermal plasma researchers. 75 people from 17 countries attended the conference with the total number of contributions being 74, consisting of 19 invited talks and 55 poster contributions. As a HTPP tradition a poster competition has been carried out during the conference. The winner of the poster competition was Fabrice Mavier from Université de Limoges, France with his paper “Pulsed arc plasma jet synchronized with drop-on-demand dispenser” All the participants also ejoyed the social program including an “unconventional” tour of the city, the visit to the famous Hofbräuhaus and the dinner at the Blutenburg, a beautiful inner-city castle. We have received papers corresponding to the contributions of HTPP-2014 that have been submitted for publication in this volume of Journal of Physics: Conference Series. Each submitted contribution has been peer reviewed and the Editors are very grateful to the referees for their careful support in improving the original manuscripts. In total, 18 manuscripts have been accepted for publication covering a range of topics of plasma processing science from plasma fundamentals to process applications through to experiments, diagnostics and modelling. We deeply thank the authors for their enthusiastic and high-grade contributions and we

  17. On the iodine doping process of plasma polymerised thiophene layers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Groenewoud, L.M.H.; Engbers, G.H.M.; White, R.; Feijen, Jan

    2002-01-01

    To make a fair comparison of the conductive properties of plasma polymerised thiophene (PPT) layers deposited under different conditions, optimal doping procedures should be applied. The iodine doping process of PPT layers deposited at high (HP) and low (LP) pressure has been studied in detail.

  18. Cold plasma as a nonthermal food processing technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Contamination of meats, seafood, poultry, eggs, and fresh and fresh-cut fruits and vegetables is an ongoing concern. Although well-established in non-food applications for surface treatment and modification, cold plasma is a relatively new food safety intervention. As a nonthermal food processing te...

  19. Electron beam generated plasmas for the processing of graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walton, S. G.; Hernández, S. C.; Boris, D. R.; Petrova, Tz B.; Petrov, G. M.

    2017-09-01

    The Naval Research Laboratory (NRL) has developed a processing system based on an electron beam-generated plasma and applied it to the processing of graphene. Unlike conventional discharges produced by electric fields (DC, RF, microwave, etc), the plasma is driven by a high-energy (~few keV) electron beam, an approach that simplifies the relative production of species while providing comparatively high ion-to-radical production rates. The resulting plasmas are characterized by high charged particle densities (1010-1011 cm-3) and electron temperatures that are typically about 1.0 eV or lower. Accordingly, the flux to adjacent surfaces is generally dominated by ions with kinetic energies in the range of 1-5 eV, a value at or near the bond strength of most materials. This provides the potential for controllably engineering materials with monolayer precision, an attribute attractive for the processing of atomically thin material systems. This work describes the attributes of electron beam driven plasma processing system and its use in modification of graphene.

  20. On the iodine doping process of plasma polymerised thiophene layers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Groenewoud, L.M.H.; Engbers, G.H.M.; White, R.; Feijen, J.

    2001-01-01

    To make a fair comparison of the conductive properties of plasma polymerised thiophene (PPT) layers deposited under different conditions, optimal doping procedures should be applied. The iodine doping process of PPT layers deposited at high (HP) and low (LP) pressure has been studied in detail. Dopi

  1. Measurements of line-averaged electron density of pulsed plasmas using a He-Ne laser interferometer in a magnetized coaxial plasma gun device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwamoto, D.; Sakuma, I.; Kitagawa, Y.; Kikuchi, Y.; Fukumoto, N.; Nagata, M.

    2012-10-01

    In next step of fusion devices such as ITER, lifetime of plasma-facing materials (PFMs) is strongly affected by transient heat and particle loads during type I edge localized modes (ELMs) and disruption. To clarify damage characteristics of the PFMs, transient heat and particle loads have been simulated by using a plasma gun device. We have performed simulation experiments by using a magnetized coaxial plasma gun (MCPG) device at University of Hyogo. The line-averaged electron density measured by a He-Ne interferometer is 2x10^21 m-3 in a drift tube. The plasma velocity measured by a time of flight technique and ion Doppler spectrometer was 70 km/s, corresponding to the ion energy of 100 eV for helium. Thus, the ion flux density is 1.4x10^26 m-2s-1. On the other hand, the MCPG is connected to a target chamber for material irradiation experiments. It is important to measure plasma parameters in front of target materials in the target chamber. In particular, a vapor cloud layer in front of the target material produced by the pulsed plasma irradiation has to be characterized in order to understand surface damage of PFMs under ELM-like plasma bombardment. In the conference, preliminary results of application of the He-Ne laser interferometer for the above experiment will be shown.

  2. Plasma Processes and Polymers: 16th International Symposium on Plasma Chemistry Taormina, Italy June 22-27, 2003

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Agostino, Riccardo; Favia, Pietro; Oehr, Christian; Wertheimer, Michael R.

    2005-04-01

    This volume compiles essential contributions to the most innovative fields of Plasma Processes and Polymers. High-quality contributions cover the fields of plasma deposition, plasma treatment of polymers and other organic compounds, plasma processes under partial vacuum and at atmospheric pressure, biomedical, textile, automotive, and optical applications as well as surface treatment of bulk materials, clusters, particles and powders. This unique collection of refereed papers is based on the best contributions presented at the 16th International Symposium on Plasma Chemistry in Taormina, Italy (ISPC-16, June 2003). A high class reference of relevance to a large audience in plasma community as well as in the area of its industrial applications.

  3. Research of Plasma Spraying Process on Aluminum-Magnesium Alloy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patricija Kavaliauskaitė

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The article examines plasma sprayed 95Ni-5Al coatings on alu-minum-magnesium (Mg ≈ 2,6‒3,6 % alloy substrate. Alumi-num-magnesium samples prior spraying were prepared with mechanical treatment (blasting with Al2O3. 95Ni-5Al coatings on aluminum-magnesium alloys were sprayed with different parameters of process and coating‘s thickness, porosity, micro-hardness and microstructure were evaluated. Also numerical simulations in electric and magnetic phenomena of plasma spray-ing were carried out.

  4. Surface loss rate of H and N radicals in H2/N2 plasma etching process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moon, Chang Sung; Takeda, Keigo; Hayashi, Toshio; Takashima, Seigo; Sekine, Makoto; Setsuhara, Yuichi; Shiratani, Masaharu; Hori, Masaru

    2008-10-01

    As ULSI devices are down to nano-scale size, there have been many efforts to develop low dielectric constant (low-k) materials and establish the plasma etching technology. Especially, the interaction between the plasma and the surface has an enormous influence on characterizing the etching process. However, the reactions in contact with solid surface such as substrate and wall are very complicated and moreover, at present, there are many interactions unknown and they are not fully understood yet. In this study, surface loss probabilities of H, N radicals on stainless steel and organic low-k film surfaces are investigated by vacuum ultraviolet absorption spectroscopy (VUVAS) technique. The changes of H, N radical densities are quantitatively measured in H2/N2 plasma afterglow and the loss rates on each surface are evaluated. It is expected that the development of plasma etching process can be advanced by understanding the reaction of radicals with the surface during organic low-k etching process.

  5. Optimization of the process of plasma ignition of coal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peregudov, V.S. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Novosibirsk (Russian Federation)

    2009-04-15

    Results are given of experimental and theoretical investigations of plasma ignition of coal as a result of its thermochemical preparation in application to the processes of firing up a boiler and stabilizing the flame combustion. The experimental test bed with a commercial-scale burner is used for determining the conditions of plasma ignition of low-reactivity high-ash anthracite depending on the concentration of coal in the air mixture and velocity of the latter. The calculations produce an equation (important from the standpoint of practical applications) for determining the energy expenditure for plasma ignition of coal depending on the basic process parameters. The tests reveal the difficulties arising in firing up a boiler with direct delivery of pulverized coal from the mill to furnace. A scheme is suggested, which enables one to reduce the energy expenditure for ignition of coal and improve the reliability of the process of firing up such a boiler. Results are given of calculation of plasma thermochemical preparation of coal under conditions of lower concentration of oxygen in the air mixture.

  6. Hundred joules plasma focus device as a potential pulsed source for in vitro cancer cell irradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, J.; Moreno, J.; Andaur, R.; Armisen, R.; Morales, D.; Marcelain, K.; Avaria, G.; Bora, B.; Davis, S.; Pavez, C.; Soto, L.

    2017-08-01

    Plasma focus devices may arise as useful source to perform experiments aimed to study the effects of pulsed radiation on human cells in vitro. In the present work, a table top hundred joules plasma focus device, namely "PF-400J", was adapted to irradiate colorectal cancer cell line, DLD-1. For pulsed x-rays, the doses (energy absorbed per unit mass, measured in Gy) were measured using thermoluminescence detectors (TLD-100 dosimeters). The neutron fluence and the average energy were used to estimate the pulsed neutron doses. Fifty pulses of x-rays (0.12 Gy) and fifty pulses of neutrons (3.5 μGy) were used to irradiate the cancer cells. Irradiation-induced DNA damage and cell death were assessed at different time points after irradiation. Cell death was observed using pulsed neutron irradiation, at ultralow doses. Our results indicate that the PF-400J can be used for in vitro assessment of the effect of pulsed radiation in cancer cell research.

  7. Assessment of image quality in x-ray radiography imaging using a small plasma focus device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanani, A.; Shirani, B.; Jabbari, I.; Mokhtari, J.

    2014-08-01

    This paper offers a comprehensive investigation of image quality parameters for a small plasma focus as a pulsed hard x-ray source for radiography applications. A set of images were captured from some metal objects and electronic circuits using a low energy plasma focus at different voltages of capacitor bank and different pressures of argon gas. The x-ray source focal spot of this device was obtained to be about 0.6 mm using the penumbra imaging method. The image quality was studied by several parameters such as image contrast, line spread function (LSF) and modulation transfer function (MTF). Results showed that the contrast changes by variations in gas pressure. The best contrast was obtained at a pressure of 0.5 mbar and 3.75 kJ stored energy. The results of x-ray dose from the device showed that about 0.6 mGy is sufficient to obtain acceptable images on the film. The measurements of LSF and MTF parameters were carried out by means of a thin stainless steel wire 0.8 mm in diameter and the cut-off frequency was obtained to be about 1.5 cycles/mm.

  8. Prediction of plasma simulation data with the Gaussian process method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Preuss, R.; Toussaint, U. von, E-mail: udo.v.toussaint@ipp.mpg.de [Max-Planck-Institute for Plasma Physics, EURATOM Association, 85748 Garching (Germany)

    2014-12-05

    The simulation of plasma-wall interactions of fusion plasmas is extremely costly in computer power and time - the running time for a single parameter setting is easily in the order of weeks or months. We propose to exploit the already gathered results in order to predict the outcome for parametric studies within the high dimensional parameter space. For this we utilize Gaussian processes within the Bayesian framework and perform validation with one and two dimensional test cases from which we learn how to assess the outcome. Finally, the newly implemented method is applied to simulated data from the scrape-off layer of a fusion plasma. Uncertainties of the predictions are provided which point the way to parameter settings of further (expensive) simulations.

  9. Generation of low-temperature air plasma for food processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stepanova, Olga; Demidova, Maria; Astafiev, Alexander; Pinchuk, Mikhail; Balkir, Pinar; Turantas, Fulya

    2015-11-01

    The project is aimed at developing a physical and technical foundation of generating plasma with low gas temperature at atmospheric pressure for food industry needs. As known, plasma has an antimicrobial effect on the numerous types of microorganisms, including those that cause food spoilage. In this work an original experimental setup has been developed for the treatment of different foods. It is based on initiating corona or dielectric-barrier discharge in a chamber filled with ambient air in combination with a certain helium admixture. The experimental setup provides various conditions of discharge generation (including discharge gap geometry, supply voltage, velocity of gas flow, content of helium admixture in air and working pressure) and allows for the measurement of the electrical discharge parameters. Some recommendations on choosing optimal conditions of discharge generation for experiments on plasma food processing are developed.

  10. Influence of material quality and process-induced defects on semiconductor device performance and yield

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porter, W. A.; Mckee, W. R.

    1974-01-01

    An overview of major causes of device yield degradation is presented. The relationships of device types to critical processes and typical defects are discussed, and the influence of the defect on device yield and performance is demonstrated. Various defect characterization techniques are described and applied. A correlation of device failure, defect type, and cause of defect is presented in tabular form with accompanying illustrations.

  11. Nonlinear processes in the strong wave-plasma interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pegoraro, Francesco; Califano, Francesco; Attico, Nicola; Bulanov, Sergei

    2000-10-01

    Nonlinear interactions in hot laboratory and/or astrophysical plasmas are a very efficient mechanism able to transfer the energy from the large to the small spatial scales of the system. As a result, kinetic processes are excited and play a key role in the plasma dynamics since the typical fluid dissipative length scales (where the nonlinear cascade is stopped) are (much) smaller then the kinetic length scales. Then, the key point is the role of the kinetic effects in the global plasma dynamics, i.e. whether the kinetic effects remains confined to the small scales of the system or whether there is a significant feedback on the large scales. Here we will address this problem by discussing the nonlinear kinetic evolution of the electromagnetic beam plasma instability where phase space vortices, as well as large scale vortex like magnetic structures in the physical space, are generated by wave - particle interactions. The role and influence of kinetic effects on the large scale plasma dynamics will be also discussed by addressing the problem of collisionless magnetic reconection.

  12. Process characteristics of fibre-laser-assisted plasma arc welding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mahrle, A; Schnick, M; Rose, S; Demuth, C; Beyer, E; Fuessel, U, E-mail: achim.mahrle@iws.fraunhofer.de [Dresden University of Technology, Institute of Surface and Manufacturing Technology, PO Box, D-01062 Dresden (Germany)

    2011-08-31

    Experimental and theoretical investigations on fibre-laser-assisted plasma arc welding (LAPW) were performed. Welding experiments were carried out on aluminium and steel sheets. In the case of a highly focused laser beam and a separate arrangement of plasma torch and laser beam, high-speed video recordings of the plasma arc and corresponding measurements of the time-dependent arc voltage revealed differences in the process behaviour for both materials. In the case of aluminium welding, a sharp decline in arc voltage and stabilization and guiding of the anodic arc root was observed whereas in steel welding the arc voltage was slightly increased after the laser beam was switched on. However, significant improvement of the melting efficiency with the combined action of plasma arc and laser beam was achieved for both types of material. Theoretical results of additional numerical simulations of the arc behaviour suggest that the properties of the arc plasma are mainly influenced not by a direct interaction with the laser radiation but by the laser-induced evaporation of metal. Arc stabilization with increased current densities is predicted for moderate rates of evaporated metal only whereas metal vapour rates above a certain threshold causes a destabilization of the arc and reduced current densities along the arc axis.

  13. Plasma process optimization for N-type doping applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raj, Deven; Persing, Harold; Salimian, Siamak; Lacey, Kerry; Qin Shu; Hu, Jeff Y.; McTeer, Allen [Applied Materials, Inc., Varian Semiconductor Business Unit, 35 Dory Road, Gloucester, MA 01930 (United States); Micron Technology, Inc., 8000 S. Federal Way, Boise, ID 83707 (United States)

    2012-11-06

    Plasma doping (PLAD) has been adopted across the implant technology space and into high volume production for both conventional DRAM and NAND doping applications. PLAD has established itself as an alternative to traditional ion implantation by beamline implantation. The push for high doping concentration, shallow doping depth, and conformal doping capability expand the need for a PLAD solution to meet such requirements. The unique doping profile and doping characteristics at high dose rates allow for PLAD to deliver a high throughput, differentiated solution to meet the demand of evolving transistor technology. In the PLAD process, ions are accelerated to the wafer as with a negative wafer bias applied to the wafer. Competing mechanisms, such as deposition, sputtering, and etching inherent in plasma doping require unique control and process optimization. In this work, we look at the distinctive process tool control and characterization features which enable an optimized doping process using n-type (PH{sub 3} or AsH{sub 3}) chemistries. The data in this paper will draw the relationship between process optimization through plasma chemistry study to the wafer level result.

  14. Investigation of the Effect of Plasma Polymerized Siloxane Coating for Enzyme Immobilization and Microfluidic Device Conception

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kalim Belhacene

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes the impact of a physical immobilization methodology, using plasma polymerized 1,1,3,3, tetramethyldisiloxane, on the catalytic performance of β-galactosidase from Aspergillus oryzae in a microfluidic device. The β-galactosidase was immobilized by a polymer coating grown by Plasma Enhanced Chemical Vapor Deposition (PEVCD. Combined with a microchannel patterned in the silicone, a microreactor was obtained with which the diffusion through the plasma polymerized layer and the hydrolysis of a synthetic substrate, the resorufin-β-d-galactopyranoside, were studied. A study of the efficiency of the immobilization procedure was investigated after several uses and kinetic parameters of immobilized β-galactosidase were calculated and compared with those of soluble enzyme. Simulation and a modelling approach were also initiated to understand phenomena that influenced enzyme behavior in the physical immobilization method. Thus, the catalytic performances of immobilized enzymes were directly influenced by immobilization conditions and particularly by the diffusion behavior and availability of substrate molecules in the enzyme microenvironment.

  15. Fast Three Dimensional Reconstruction of Magnetohydrodynamic Equilibria in Plasma Confinement Devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seal, S. K.; Cianciosa, M. R.; Hirshman, S. P.; Wingen, A.; Wilcox, R. S.; Unterberg, E. A.

    2016-10-01

    High-fidelity reconstruction of plasma equilibria in confinement devices like stellarators and tokamaks with external three dimensional (3D) fields is computationally very expensive and routinely requires days, even weeks, to complete using serial approaches. Here, we present the performance results of coupling the 3D plasma reconstruction code, V3FIT, with PARVMEC, the recently developed parallel version of VMEC. We present the parallel design of this coupled software along with a scalability analysis to identify its performance bottlenecks. Dependence of its scalability limits on model parameters is derived. These analyses are supported by scaling studies on over 6,000 processor cores of a Cray XC30 supercomputer. PARVMEC, which dominates the total runtime of the reconstruction procedure, is shown to deliver speedup improvements of over one to two orders of magnitude, depending on whether the equilibrium computations are carried out in a free or fixed boundary mode. The overall speedup of the coupled reconstruction code is shown to deliver over 40X improvement enabling fusion scientists to carry out high-fidelity 3D plasma reconstruction analyses in only a few hours instead of in days/weeks for the first time. This work was supported by the U.S. D.O.E. contract DE-AC05-00OR22725.

  16. Formation of annular plasma downstream by magnetic aperture in the helicon experimental device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, Soumen; Yadav, S.; Barada, K. K.; Chattopadhyay, P. K.; Ghosh, J.; Pal, R.; Bora, D.

    2017-02-01

    In the Helicon eXperimental (HeX) device, the geometric aperture is fixed, but the position of the magnetic aperture can be varied. Working with Argon gas in the pressure range of 1 - 10 × 10 - 4 mbar, an annular plasma (density ˜ 10 16 m - 3 ) is formed downstream, always in front of the magnetic aperture. This occurs irrespective of the relative position of the geometric aperture or the presence of a radial electric field. This is in contrary to the earlier proposition made by others that a radial electric field is necessary to produce a hollow plasma profile. Instead, the ionization of neutrals in the radially outer region by the tail electrons, rotating fast due to gradient-B drift in the azimuthal direction, seems to account for the observed off-axis density peaking in the present experiment. This also explains the variation of the plasma annulus diameter seen here by changing the input radio frequency power ( 100 - 800 W ) .

  17. Frequency dependent plasma characteristics in a capacitively coupled 300 mm wafer plasma processing chamber

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hebner, Gregory A [Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque NM 87185-1423 (United States); Barnat, Edward V [Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque NM 87185-1423 (United States); Miller, Paul A [Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque NM 87185-1423 (United States); Paterson, Alex M [Applied Materials, 974 Arques Avenue, Sunnyvale CA, 94086 (United States); Holland, John P [Applied Materials, 974 Arques Avenue, Sunnyvale CA, 94086 (United States)

    2006-11-01

    Argon plasma characteristics in a dual-frequency, capacitively coupled, 300 mm-wafer plasma processing system were investigated for rf drive frequencies between 10 and 190 MHz. We report spatial and frequency dependent changes in plasma parameters such as line-integrated electron density, ion saturation current, optical emission and argon metastable density. For the conditions investigated, the line-integrated electron density was a nonlinear function of drive frequency at constant rf power. In addition, the spatial distribution of the positive ions changed from uniform to peaked in the centre as the frequency was increased. Spatially resolved optical emission increased with frequency and the relative optical emission at several spectral lines depended on frequency. Argon metastable density and spatial distribution were not a strong function of drive frequency. Metastable temperature was approximately 400 K.

  18. Plasma process control for improved PEO coatings on magnesium alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hussein, Riyad Omran

    Plasma Electrolytic Oxidation (PEO) is a high voltage plasma-assisted oxidation process uses an environmentally-friendly aqueous electrolyte to oxidize the metal surfaces to form ceramic oxide coatings which impart a high corrosion and wear resistance. One of the main advantages of PEO process is that it can be applied to treat samples with complex shapes, and surfaces with different composition and microstructure. The PEO process of Mg alloys is strongly influenced by such parameters as electrolyte composition and concentration, current or voltage applied and substrate alloy. Generally, these parameters have a direct influence on the discharging behavior. The discharges play an essential role in the formation and resulting composition of the 3-layer oxide structure. A detailed knowledge of the coating mechanisms is extremely important in order to produce a desired coating quality to reach the best performance of the PEO coatings in terms of corrosion resistance and tribological properties (wear rate, COF). During PEO processing of magnesium, some of the metal cations are transferred outwards from the substrate and react with anions to form ceramic coatings. Also, due to the high electric field in the discharge channels, oxygen anions transfer towards the magnesium substrate and react with Mg2+ cations to form a ceramic coating. Although, in general, PEO coating of Mg alloys produces the three-layered structure, the relative proportions of the three-layers are strongly influenced by the PEO processing parameters. In PEO process, the ceramic coating grows inwards to the alloy substrate and outwards to the coating surface simultaneously. For the coating growth, there are three simultaneous processes taking place, namely the electrochemical, the plasma chemical reactions and thermal diffusion. Optical emission spectroscopy (OES) was employed for the discharge characterization by following the substrate and electrolyte element present in the plasma discharge during the

  19. Spectroscopic Studies of Atomic and Molecular Processes in the Edge Region of Magnetically Confined Fusion Plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hey, J. D.; Brezinsek, S.; Mertens, Ph.; Unterberg, B.

    2006-12-01

    Edge plasma studies are of vital importance for understanding plasma-wall interactions in magnetically confined fusion devices. These interactions determine the transport of neutrals into the plasma, and the properties of the plasma discharge. This presentation deals with optical spectroscopic studies of the plasma boundary, and their rôle in elucidating the prevailing physical conditions. Recorded spectra are of four types: emission spectra of ions and atoms, produced by electron impact excitation and by charge-exchange recombination, atomic spectra arising from electron impact-induced molecular dissociation and ionisation, visible spectra of molecular hydrogen and its isotopic combinations, and laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) spectra. The atomic spectra are strongly influenced by the confining magnetic field (Zeeman and Paschen-Back effects), which produces characteristic features useful for species identification, temperature determination by Doppler broadening, and studies of chemical and physical sputtering. Detailed analysis of the Zeeman components in both optical and LIF spectra shows that atomic hydrogen is produced in various velocity classes, some related to the relevant molecular Franck-Condon energies. The latter reflect the dominant electron collision processes responsible for production of atoms from molecules. This assignment has been verified by gas-puffing experiments through special test limiters. The higher-energy flanks of hydrogen line profiles probably also show the influence of charge-exchange reactions with molecular ions accelerated in the plasma sheath (`scrape-off layer') separating limiter surfaces from the edge plasma, in analogy to acceleration in the cathode-fall region of gas discharges. While electron collisions play a vital rôle in generating the spectra, ion collisions with excited atomic radiators act through re-distribution of population among the atomic fine-structure sublevels, and momentum transfer to the atomic nuclei

  20. 75 FR 38118 - In the Matter of Certain Electronic Devices With Image Processing Systems, Components Thereof...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... COMMISSION In the Matter of Certain Electronic Devices With Image Processing Systems, Components Thereof, and... certain electronic devices with image processing systems, components thereof, and associated software that... importation, and the sale within the United States after importation of certain electronic devices with...

  1. Extended device profiles and testing procedures for the approval process of integrated medical devices using the IEEE 11073 communication standard.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janß, Armin; Thorn, Johannes; Schmitz, Malte; Mildner, Alexander; Dell'Anna-Pudlik, Jasmin; Leucker, Martin; Radermacher, Klaus

    2017-08-25

    Nowadays, only closed and proprietary integrated operating room systems (IORS) from big manufacturers are available on the market. Hence, the interconnection of components from third-party vendors is only possible with increased time and costs. In the context of the German Federal Ministry of Education and Research (BMBF)-funded project OR.NET (2012-2016), the open integration of medical devices from different manufacturers was addressed. An integrated operating theater based on the open communication standard IEEE 11073 shall give clinical operators the opportunity to choose medical devices independently of the manufacturer. This approach would be advantageous especially for hospital operators and small- and medium-sized enterprises (SME) of medical devices. Actual standards and concepts regarding technical feasibility and the approval process do not cope with the requirements for a modular integration of medical devices in the operating room (OR), based on an open communication standard. Therefore, innovative approval strategies and corresponding certification and test procedures, which cover actual legal and normative standards, have to be developed in order to support the future risk management and the usability engineering process of open integrated medical devices in the OR. The use of standardized device and service profiles and a three-step testing procedure, including conformity, interoperability and integration tests are described in this paper and shall support the manufacturers to integrate their medical devices without disclosing the medical devices' risk analysis and related confidential expertise or proprietary information.

  2. Plasma nitriding monitoring reactor: A model reactor for studying plasma nitriding processes using an active screen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hamann, S., E-mail: hamann@inp-greifswald.de; Röpcke, J. [INP-Greifswald, Felix-Hausdorff-Str. 2, 17489 Greifswald (Germany); Börner, K.; Burlacov, I.; Spies, H.-J. [TU Bergakademie Freiberg, Institute of Materials Engineering, Gustav-Zeuner-Str. 5, 09599 Freiberg (Germany); Strämke, M.; Strämke, S. [ELTRO GmbH, Arnold-Sommerfeld-Ring 3, 52499 Baesweiler (Germany)

    2015-12-15

    A laboratory scale plasma nitriding monitoring reactor (PLANIMOR) has been designed to study the basics of active screen plasma nitriding (ASPN) processes. PLANIMOR consists of a tube reactor vessel, made of borosilicate glass, enabling optical emission spectroscopy (OES) and infrared absorption spectroscopy. The linear setup of the electrode system of the reactor has the advantages to apply the diagnostic approaches on each part of the plasma process, separately. Furthermore, possible changes of the electrical field and of the heat generation, as they could appear in down-scaled cylindrical ASPN reactors, are avoided. PLANIMOR has been used for the nitriding of steel samples, achieving similar results as in an industrial scale ASPN reactor. A compact spectrometer using an external cavity quantum cascade laser combined with an optical multi-pass cell has been applied for the detection of molecular reaction products. This allowed the determination of the concentrations of four stable molecular species (CH{sub 4}, C{sub 2}H{sub 2}, HCN, and NH{sub 3}). With the help of OES, the rotational temperature of the screen plasma could be determined.

  3. Plasma nitriding monitoring reactor: A model reactor for studying plasma nitriding processes using an active screen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamann, S.; Börner, K.; Burlacov, I.; Spies, H.-J.; Strämke, M.; Strämke, S.; Röpcke, J.

    2015-12-01

    A laboratory scale plasma nitriding monitoring reactor (PLANIMOR) has been designed to study the basics of active screen plasma nitriding (ASPN) processes. PLANIMOR consists of a tube reactor vessel, made of borosilicate glass, enabling optical emission spectroscopy (OES) and infrared absorption spectroscopy. The linear setup of the electrode system of the reactor has the advantages to apply the diagnostic approaches on each part of the plasma process, separately. Furthermore, possible changes of the electrical field and of the heat generation, as they could appear in down-scaled cylindrical ASPN reactors, are avoided. PLANIMOR has been used for the nitriding of steel samples, achieving similar results as in an industrial scale ASPN reactor. A compact spectrometer using an external cavity quantum cascade laser combined with an optical multi-pass cell has been applied for the detection of molecular reaction products. This allowed the determination of the concentrations of four stable molecular species (CH4, C2H2, HCN, and NH3). With the help of OES, the rotational temperature of the screen plasma could be determined.

  4. Plasma nitriding monitoring reactor: A model reactor for studying plasma nitriding processes using an active screen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamann, S; Börner, K; Burlacov, I; Spies, H-J; Strämke, M; Strämke, S; Röpcke, J

    2015-12-01

    A laboratory scale plasma nitriding monitoring reactor (PLANIMOR) has been designed to study the basics of active screen plasma nitriding (ASPN) processes. PLANIMOR consists of a tube reactor vessel, made of borosilicate glass, enabling optical emission spectroscopy (OES) and infrared absorption spectroscopy. The linear setup of the electrode system of the reactor has the advantages to apply the diagnostic approaches on each part of the plasma process, separately. Furthermore, possible changes of the electrical field and of the heat generation, as they could appear in down-scaled cylindrical ASPN reactors, are avoided. PLANIMOR has been used for the nitriding of steel samples, achieving similar results as in an industrial scale ASPN reactor. A compact spectrometer using an external cavity quantum cascade laser combined with an optical multi-pass cell has been applied for the detection of molecular reaction products. This allowed the determination of the concentrations of four stable molecular species (CH4, C2H2, HCN, and NH3). With the help of OES, the rotational temperature of the screen plasma could be determined.

  5. The variable polarity plasma arc welding process: Characteristics and performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hung, R. J.; Zhu, G. J.

    1991-01-01

    Significant advantages of the Variable Polarity Plasma Arc (VPPA) Welding Process include faster welding, fewer repairs, less joint preparation, reduced weldment distortion, and absence of porosity. The power distribution was analyzed for an argon plasma gas flow constituting the fluid in the VPPA Welding Process. The major heat loss at the torch nozzle is convective heat transfer; in the space between the outlet of the nozzle and the workpiece; radiative heat transfer; and in the keyhole in the workpiece, convective heat transfer. The power absorbed at the workpiece produces the molten puddle that solidifies into the weld bead. Crown and root widths, and crown and root heights of the weld bead are predicted. The basis is provided for an algorithm for automatic control of VPPA welding machine parameters to obtain desired weld bead dimensions.

  6. EXAFS investigation of nanoparticles produced in a thermal plasma process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luetzenkirchen-Hecht, D.; Frahm, R. [Heinrich-Heine-Univ. Duesseldorf, Inst. fuer Angewandte Physik (Germany); Buchner, P. [Heinrich-Heine-Univ. Duesseldorf, Inst. fuer Laser- und Plasmaphysik (Germany); Strehblow, H.H. [Heinrich-Heine-Univ., Inst. fuer Physikalische Chemie (Germany)

    1999-11-01

    Nanosized ceramic powders (Cu/SiC, Y{sub 2}O{sub 3}-stabilized cubic ZrO{sub 2}) were produced by evaporation of coarsely grained powders of the respective materials in an inductively coupled thermal plasma process and rapid quenching of the vapor. The atomic short range order of these nanoparticles with an average diameter of about 10 nm was investigated ex situ with EXAFS. The results are compared to crystalline reference materials. (au) 10 refs.

  7. ELM-induced melting: assessment of shallow melt layer damage and the power handling capability of tungsten in a linear plasma device

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Morgan, T. W.; van Eden, G. G.; de Kruif, T. M.; van den Berg, M. A.; J Matejicek,; T Chraska,; De Temmerman, G.

    2014-01-01

    Tungsten samples were exposed to combined steady state and edge localised mode transient replication experiments in a linear plasma device; either in combined hydrogen plasma and high powered laser exposures at Magnum-PSI or steady state hydrogen plasma and superimposed plasma pulses created using a

  8. Deposição por plasma com arco transferido Hardfacing by plasma transfer arc process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Víctor Vergara Díaz

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Em virtude do Processo de Soldagem Plasma com Alimentação de Pó ter similaridades com o Processo de Soldagem Plasma com Alimentação de Arame, foi realizado um estudo comparativo entre ambos os processos utilizando-se a liga a base de cobalto comercialmente conhecida como Stellite 6, como material de adição na forma de pó e arame. A pesquisa foi realizada com a expectativa de ser aplicada nas operações de revestimentos de superfícies, em especial em pás de turbinas hidráulicas desgastadas por cavitação. A seleção do material de adição a ser empregado depende da natureza do mecanismo de desgaste encontrado. No Labsolda, a liga Stellite 6 vem sendo uma das mais utilizadas, por apresentar uma excelente resistência ao desgaste erosivo por cavitação. Foi avaliada a influência da vazão de gás de plasma a partir dos valores de diluição, dimensões do cordão, dureza e microestrutura. O Processo de Soldagem Plasma com Alimentação de Pó foi o que produziu o melhor acabamento superficial, menor diluição, melhor molhamento e maior largura. Com isto abre-se uma nova perspectiva para revestimentos metálicos e neste contexto se insere a recuperação por soldagem de partes erodidas de turbinas hidráulicas.The Plasma powder transferred arc welding process, which uses feed stock in the powder form, has similarities with Plasma wire transferred arc welding. This work describes a comparative study of the two processes using a Cobalt-based alloy commercially known as Stellite 6. This Co-based alloy is recognized for its superior cavitation erosion resistance. The aim of this work is to investigate the potential of PTA coatings for the protection and refurbishiment hydraulic turbine blades. Coatings were evaluated for the influence of Plasma gas flow rate on coating dilution, geometry, hardness and microstructure. Coatings processed with the atomized Stellite 6 powder feestock showed a superior surface quality, lower dilution

  9. The expansion of a plasma into a vacuum - Basic phenomena and processes and applications to space plasma physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, K. H., Jr.; Stone, N. H.; Samir, U.

    1983-01-01

    In this review attention is called to basic phenomena and physical processes involved in the expansion of a plasma into a vacuum, or the expansion of a plasma into a more tenuous plasma, in particular the fact that upon the expansion, ions are accelerated and reach energies well above their thermal energy. Also, in the process of the expansion a rarefaction wave propagates into the ambient plasma, an ion front moves into the expansion volume, and discontinuities in plasma parameters occur. The physical processes which cause the above phenomena are discussed, and their possible application is suggested for the case of the distribution of ions and electrons (hence plasma potential and electric fields) in the wake region behind artificial and natural obstacles moving supersonically in a rarefied space plasma. To illustrate this, some in situ results are reexamined. Directions for future work in this area via the utilization of the Space Shuttle and laboratory work are also mentioned.

  10. Process chains for the manufacturing of moulded interconnect devices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Islam, Mohammad Aminul; Hansen, Hans Nørgaard; Tang, Peter Torben

    2009-01-01

    Moulded interconnect device (MID) can be defined as an injection-molded plastic part that incorporates both electrical and mechanical functionalities in a single device. It is a relatively new area with enormous potential for industrial applications. At present, there are a number of available pr...

  11. 3D TCAD Simulation for Semiconductor Processes, Devices and Optoelectronics

    CERN Document Server

    Li, Simon

    2012-01-01

    Technology computer-aided design, or TCAD, is critical to today’s semiconductor technology and anybody working in this industry needs to know something about TCAD.  This book is about how to use computer software to manufacture and test virtually semiconductor devices in 3D.  It brings to life the topic of semiconductor device physics, with a hands-on, tutorial approach that de-emphasizes abstract physics and equations and emphasizes real practice and extensive illustrations.  Coverage includes a comprehensive library of devices, representing the state of the art technology, such as SuperJunction LDMOS, GaN LED devices, etc. Provides a vivid, internal view of semiconductor devices, through 3D TCAD simulation; Includes comprehensive coverage of  TCAD simulations for both optic and electronic devices, from nano-scale to high-voltage high-power devices; Presents material in a hands-on, tutorial fashion so that industry practitioners will find maximum utility; Includes a comprehensive library of devices, re...

  12. Low-Energy Plasma Focus Device as an Electron Beam Source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seong Ling, Yap; Naresh Kumar, Nitturi; Lian Kuang, Lim; Chiow San, Wong

    2014-01-01

    A low-energy plasma focus device was used as an electron beam source. A technique was developed to simultaneously measure the electron beam intensity and energy. The system was operated in Argon filling at an optimum pressure of 1.7 mbar. A Faraday cup was used together with an array of filtered PIN diodes. The beam-target X-rays were registered through X-ray spectrometry. Copper and lead line radiations were registered upon usage as targets. The maximum electron beam charge and density were estimated to be 0.31 μC and 13.5 × 1016/m3, respectively. The average energy of the electron beam was 500 keV. The high flux of the electron beam can be potentially applicable in material sciences. PMID:25544952

  13. Low-Energy Plasma Focus Device as an Electron Beam Source

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Zubair Khan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A low-energy plasma focus device was used as an electron beam source. A technique was developed to simultaneously measure the electron beam intensity and energy. The system was operated in Argon filling at an optimum pressure of 1.7 mbar. A Faraday cup was used together with an array of filtered PIN diodes. The beam-target X-rays were registered through X-ray spectrometry. Copper and lead line radiations were registered upon usage as targets. The maximum electron beam charge and density were estimated to be 0.31 μC and 13.5×1016/m3, respectively. The average energy of the electron beam was 500 keV. The high flux of the electron beam can be potentially applicable in material sciences.

  14. Argon ion beam interaction on polyethylene terephthalate surface by a 4 kJ plasma focus device

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Habibi Morteza; Alavi M H S

    2016-03-01

    Polyethylene terephthalate (PET) has a wide variety of applications ranging from making regular bottles to biosensors. However, for many of these applications, surface treatment is needed to improve its surface characteristics such as adhesion to other materials. In this study, we focussed on treating PET foils by dense Ar pulsed plasma produced by a 4.5 kJ Mather-type plasmafocus device (20 kV, 40 $\\mu$f, 115 nH) to examine its ability to make the PET surface hydrophilic. The most common method to examine this characteristic is measuring the water contact angle on a polymer surface. The results show that while the energy and density of plasma in our device are higher compared to other devices, as the exposure time is very low, the device can enhance thewettability of PET film surfaces.

  15. Radicals and Non-Equilibrium Processes in Low-Temperature Plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrović, Zoran; Mason, Nigel; Hamaguchi, Satoshi; Radmilović-Radjenović, Marija

    2007-06-01

    discharges, plasma chemistry - particularly in oxygen containing plasmas, modeling of plasmas and plasma surface interactions in complex comprehensive plasma codes, modeling of the development of surface profiles and kinetics of surface collisions, plasma treatment of materials, plasma processing and applications in thin film deposition, nanoscale device production and many other applications. Yet all the papers, one way or the other, address the key issues of the next generation of plasma technologies in the micro and nano electronic industry. The issue of radicals and also of electron molecule collisions is addressed by J Tennyson who presents a guide into using a code for R-matrix calculations of electron-molecule collisions at low and intermediate energies. Related experimental results are presented by T Field who showed recent measurements of electron radical attachment cross sections, by T Märk who discusses electron impact ionization/dissociation of molecules and subsequent production of energetic radicals, and by M Kimura and his coauthors who discuss productions of radicals and ions by electron and photon impacts on CH4. Finally T Maddern and M Brunger share with us the first results from the new very complex system for comprehensive measurements of electron radical cross sections, the first example being CF2. B Marinković mainly focuses on recent results of his group having in mind the data needs for plasma modeling. Collisions at surfaces are addressed by P Tegeder and more specifically she presents here the evolution of negative ion resonances at surfaces. The electron swarm data as projected onto gaseous dielectrics but also having application in plasma processing is covered by J De Urquijo who attempted to answer the question whether CF3I is a better dielectric than SF6. The basic processes leading to the gas breakdown have been addressed by D Marić and Z Lj Petrović who focus on the transition from Townsend to constricted-normal glow regime while trying to

  16. A simple process for the fabrication of large-area CVD graphene based devices via selective in situ functionalization and patterning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexeev, Arseny M.; Barnes, Matthew D.; Karthik Nagareddy, V.; Craciun, Monica F.; Wright, C. David

    2017-03-01

    We report a novel approach for the fabrication of micro- and nano-scale graphene devices via the in situ plasma functionalization and in situ lithographic patterning of large-area graphene directly on CVD catalytic metal (Cu) substrates. This enables us to create graphene-based devices in their entirety prior to any transfer processes, simplifying very significantly the device fabrication process and potentially opening up the route to the use of a wider range of target substrates. We demonstrate the capabilities of our technique via the fabrication of a flexible, transparent, graphene/graphene oxide humidity sensor that outperforms a conventional commercial sensor.

  17. Nanofocus: an ultra-miniature dense pinch plasma focus device with submillimetric anode operating at 0.1 J

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soto, Leopoldo; Pavez, Cristian; Moreno, Jose [Comision Chilena de Energia Nuclear, Casilla 188-D, Santiago (Chile); Barbaglia, Mario; Clausse, Alejandro [CNEA-CONICET and Universidad Nacional del Centro, 7000 Tandil (Argentina)], E-mail: lsoto@cchen.cl

    2009-02-01

    As a method for investigating the minimum energy to produce a pinch plasma focus (PF) discharge, an ultra-miniature device for pinch discharges has been designed, constructed and characterized (nanofocus (NF): 5 nF, 5-10 kV, 5-10 kA, 60-250 mJ, 16 ns time to peak current). Submillimetric anode radii (0.8 and 0.21 mm) covered by coaxial insulators were used for experiments in hydrogen. Evidence of pinch was observed in electrical signals in discharges operating at 3 mbar and {approx}100 mJ. A single-frame image converter camera (4 ns exposure) was used to obtain plasma images in the visible range. The dynamics observed from the photographs is consistent with (a) the formation of a plasma sheath close to the insulator surface, (b) the plasma covering the anode, (c) radial compression over the anode; (d) finally the plasma is detached from the anode in the axial direction. The total time from stages (a) to (d) was observed in {approx}30 ns. This ultra-miniature device has a value for the 'plasma energy density parameter' and for the 'drive parameter' of the same order or greater than PF devices operating at energies several orders of magnitude higher.

  18. FAST TRACK COMMUNICATION: Self-patterned aluminium interconnects and ring electrodes for arrays of microcavity plasma devices encapsulated in Al2O3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, K. S.; Park, S.-J.; Eden, J. G.

    2008-01-01

    Automatic formation of Al interconnects and ring electrodes, fully encapsulated by alumina, in planar arrays of Al2O3/Al/Al2O3 microcavity plasma devices has been accomplished by electrochemical processing of Al foil. Following the fabrication of cylindrical microcavities (50-350 µm in diameter) in 127 µm thick Al foil, virtually complete anodization of the foil yields azimuthally symmetric Al electrodes surrounding each cavity and interconnects between adjacent microcavities that are produced and simultaneously buried within a transparent Al2O3 film without the need for conventional patterning techniques. The diameter and pitch of the microcavities prior to anodization, as well as the anodization process parameters, determine which of the microcavity plasma devices in a one- or two-dimensional array are connected electrically. Data presented for 200 µm diameter cavities with a pitch of 150-225 µm illustrate the patterning of the interconnects and electrode connectivity after 4-10 h of anodization in oxalic acid. Self-patterned, linear arrays comprising 25 dielectric barrier devices have been excited by a sinusoidal or bipolar pulse voltage waveform and operated in 400-700 Torr of rare gas. Owing to the electrochemical conversion of most of the Al foil into Al2O3, the self-formed arrays exhibit an areal capacitance ~82% lower than that characteristic of previous Al/Al2O3 device arrays (Park et al 2006 J. Appl. Phys. 99 026107).

  19. Improved stability of solution processed photovoltaic devices using PQT-12

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yuen, Avery P.; Jovanovic, Stephen M.; Preston, John S.; Bamsey, Nathan M. [Department of Engineering Physics, McMaster University, 1280 Main Street West, Hamilton, Ontario (Canada); Hor, Ah-Mee; Klenkler, Richard A. [Xerox Research Centre of (Canada); Loutfy, Rafik O. [Department of Chemical Engineering, McMaster University, 1280 Main Street West, Hamilton, Ontario (Canada)

    2010-12-15

    Photovoltaic devices made from blends of electron donating poly(3,3'''-didodecylquaterthiophene) (PQT-12) and electron accepting [6,6]-phenyl C{sub 61} butyric acid methyl ester (PCBM) are fabricated, and the device performance is measured over a period of 88 h to determine device stability. Results are compared against similar devices incorporating P3HT as the electron donor. Devices based on PQT-12 demonstrate a significant improvement in device stability, with a calculated half-life of 190,000 h when operated in an inert environment. A fluorescence study is also conducted on bare films of PQT-12 and P3HT and shows that the PQT-12 films are significantly more stable in air than P3HT. In addition, given the slower decay of bare films stored in vacuum, the results indicate that the exposure of the active layer to air is a significant contributor to performance decay of completed devices. (author)

  20. Measurements of ion temperature and flow of pulsed plasmas produced by a magnetized coaxial plasma gun device using an ion Doppler spectrometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitagawa, Y.; Sakuma, I.; Iwamoto, D.; Kikuchi, Y.; Fukumoto, N.; Nagata, M.

    2012-10-01

    It is important to know surface damage characteristics of plasma-facing component materials during transient heat and particle loads such as type I ELMs. A magnetized coaxial plasma gun (MCPG) device has been used as transient heat and particle source in ELM simulation experiments. Characteristics of pulsed plasmas produced by the MCPG device play an important role for the plasma material interaction. In this study, ion temperature and flow velocity of pulsed He plasmas were measured by an ion Doppler spectrometer (IDS). The IDS system consists of a light collection system including optical fibers, 1m-spectrometer and a 16 channel photomultiplier tube (PMT) detector. The IDS system measures the width and Doppler shift of HeII (468.58 nm) emission line with the time resolution of 1 μs. The Doppler broadened and shifted spectra were measured with 45 and 135 degree angles with respect to the plasmoid traveling direction. The observed emission line profile was represented by sum of two Gaussian components to determine the temperature and flow velocity. The minor component at around the wavelength of zero-velocity was produced by the stationary plasma. As the results, the ion velocity and temperature were 68 km/s and 19 eV, respectively. Thus, the He ion flow energy is 97 eV. The observed flow velocity agrees with that measured by a time of flight technique.

  1. Laser-driven, magnetized quasi-perpendicular collisionless shocks on the Large Plasma Device

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schaeffer, D. B., E-mail: dschaeffer@physics.ucla.edu; Everson, E. T.; Bondarenko, A. S.; Clark, S. E.; Constantin, C. G.; Vincena, S.; Van Compernolle, B.; Tripathi, S. K. P.; Gekelman, W.; Niemann, C. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of California - Los Angeles, Los Angeles, California 90095 (United States); Winske, D. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States)

    2014-05-15

    The interaction of a laser-driven super-Alfvénic magnetic piston with a large, preformed magnetized ambient plasma has been studied by utilizing a unique experimental platform that couples the Raptor kJ-class laser system [Niemann et al., J. Instrum. 7, P03010 (2012)] to the Large Plasma Device [Gekelman et al., Rev. Sci. Instrum. 62, 2875 (1991)] at the University of California, Los Angeles. This platform provides experimental conditions of relevance to space and astrophysical magnetic collisionless shocks and, in particular, allows a detailed study of the microphysics of shock formation, including piston-ambient ion collisionless coupling. An overview of the platform and its capabilities is given, and recent experimental results on the coupling of energy between piston and ambient ions and the formation of collisionless shocks are presented and compared to theoretical and computational work. In particular, a magnetosonic pulse consistent with a low-Mach number collisionless shock is observed in a quasi-perpendicular geometry in both experiments and simulations.

  2. Performance study of microfluidic devices for blood plasma separation—a designer’s perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tripathi, Siddhartha; Bala Varun Kumar, Y. V.; Prabhakar, Amit; Joshi, Suhas S.; Agrawal, Amit

    2015-08-01

    In this work, design and experiments on various blood plasma microdevices based on hydrodynamic flow separation techniques is carried out. We study their performance as a function of dependent governing parameters such as flow rate, feed hematocrit, and microchannel geometry. This work focuses on understanding separation phenomena in simple geometries; subsequently, individual simple geometrical parameters and biophysical effects are combined to fabricate hybridized designs, resulting in higher separation efficiencies. The distinctive features of our microfluidic devices are that they employ elevated dimensions (of the order of hundreds of microns), and thereby can be operated continuously over sufficient duration without clogging, while simplicity of fabrication makes them cost effective. The microdevices have been experimentally demonstrated over the entire range of hematocrit (i.e. from Hct 7% to Hct 45%). A high separation efficiency of about (78.34  ±  2.7)% with pure blood is achieved in our best hybrid design. We believe that the theory and experimental results presented in this study will aid designers and researchers working in the field of blood plasma separation microdevices.

  3. Validation study of a drift-wave turbulence model for CSDX linear plasma device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaezi, P.; Holland, C.; Thakur, S. C.; Tynan, G. R.

    2017-09-01

    A validation study of self-regulating drift-wave turbulence/zonal flow dynamics in the Controlled Shear Decorrelation Experiment linear plasma device using Langmuir probe synthetic diagnostics is presented in this paper. We use a set of nonlocal 3D equations, which evolve density, vorticity, and electron temperature fluctuations, and include proper sheath boundary conditions. Nonlinear simulations of these equations are carried out using BOUndary Turbulence (BOUT++) framework. To identify the dominant parametric dependencies of the model, a linear growth rate sensitivity analysis is performed using input parameter uncertainties, which are taken from the experimental measurements. For the direct comparison of nonlinear simulation results to experiment, we use synthetic Langmuir probe diagnostics to generate a set of synthetic ion saturation current and floating potential fluctuations. In addition, comparisons of azimuthal velocities determined via time-delay estimation, and nonlinear energy transfer are shown. We observe a significant improvement of model-experiment agreement relative to the previous 2D simulations. An essential component of this improved agreement is found to be the effect of electron temperature fluctuations on floating potential measurements, which introduces clear amplitude and phase shifts relative to the plasma potential fluctuations in synthetically measured quantities, where the simulations capture the experimental measurements in the core of plasma. However, the simulations overpredict the fluctuation levels at larger radii. Moreover, systematic simulation scans show that the self-generated E × B zonal flows profile is very sensitive to the steepening of density equilibrium profile. This suggests that evolving both fluctuations and equilibrium profiles, along with the inclusion of modest axial variation of radial profiles in the model are needed for further improvement of simulation results against the experimental measurements.

  4. Dynamics of Fluctuations, Flows and Global Stability Under Electrode Biasing in a Linear Plasma Device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desjardins, Tiffany

    2015-11-01

    Various bias electrodes have been inserted into the Helicon-Cathode (HelCat) device at the University of New Mexico, in order to affect intrinsic drift-wave turbulence and flows. The goal of the experiments was to suppress and effect the intrinsic turbulence and with detailed measurements, understand the changes that occur during biasing. The drift-mode in HelCat varies from coherent at low magnetic field (1kG). The first electrode consists of 6 concentric rings set in a ceramic substrate; these rings act as a boundary condition, sitting at the end of the plasma column 2-m away from the source. A negative bias has been found to have no effect on the fluctuations, but a positive bias (Vr>5Te) is required in order to suppress the drift-mode. Two molybdenum grids can also be inserted into the plasma and sit close to the source. Floating or grounding a grid results in suppressing the drift-mode of the system. A negative bias (>-5Te) is found to return the drift-mode, and it is possible to drive a once coherent mode into a broad-band turbulent one. From a bias voltage of -5Tenew mode, which is identified as a parallel-driven Kelvin-Helmholtz mode. At high positive bias, Vg>10Te, a new large-scale global mode is excited. This mode exhibits fluctuations in the ion saturation current, as well as in the potential, with a magnitude >50%. This mode has been identified as the potential relaxation instability (PRI). In order to better understand the modes and changes observed in the plasma, a linear stability code, LSS, was employed. As well, a 1D3V-PIC code utilizing Braginskii's equations was also utilized to understand the high-bias instability.

  5. Axial and radial preliminary results of the neutron radiation from miniature plasma focus devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moreno, J.; Silva, P.; Soto, L. [Comision Chilena de Energia Nuclear, Santiago (Chile)

    2004-07-01

    As first step of a program to design a repetitive pulsed neutron generator for applications, two miniature plasma foci have been designed and constructed at the Chilean commission of nuclear energy. The devices operate at an energy level of the order of tens of joules (PF-50 J, 160 nF capacitor bank, 20-35 kV, 32-100 J, {approx} 150 ns time to peak current) and hundred of joules (PF-400 J, 880 nF, 20-35 kV, 176-539 J, {approx} 300 ns time to peak current). Neutron emission has been obtained in both devices operating in deuterium. A specific technique was necessary to develop in order to detect neutron pulsed of 10{sup 4} neutrons per shot. The maximum total neutron yield measured was of the order of 10{sup 6} and 10{sup 4} neutrons per shot in the PF-400 J and PF-50 J respectively. Axial and radial measurements of the neutron emission are presented and the anisotropy is evaluated in this work. The neutrons are measured by pairs of silver activation counters, {sup 3}He detectors and scintillator-photomultiplier detectors. (authors)

  6. Quality management for the processing of medical devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klosz, Kerstin

    2008-09-03

    Rules on the reprocessing of medical devices were put into place in Germany in 2001. The present article explains the background situation and the provisions that are currently in force.The implementation of these statutory requirements is described using the example of the quality management system of Germany's market leader, Vanguard AG. This quality management system was successfully certified pursuant to DIN EN ISO 13485:2003 for the scope "reprocessing of medical devices", including class "critical C", in accordance with the recommendation of the Commission for Hospital Hygiene and the Prevention of Infection at the Robert-Koch-Institute (RKI) and the German Federal Institute for Drugs and Medical Devices (BfArM) on the "Hygiene requirements for reprocessing of medical devices".

  7. Semiconductor nanostructures for optoelectronic devices processing, characterization and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Yi, Gyu-Chul

    2012-01-01

    This book summarizes the current state of semiconductor nanodevice development, examining nanowires, nanorods, hybrid semiconductor nanostructures, wide bandgap nanostructures for visible light emitters and graphene and describing their device applications.

  8. Magnetic Reconnection: A Fundamental Process in Space Plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hesse, Michael

    2010-01-01

    For many years, collisionless magnetic reconnect ion has been recognized as a fundamental process, which facilitates plasma transport and energy release in systems ranging from the astrophysical plasmas to magnetospheres and even laboratory plasma. Beginning with work addressing solar dynamics, it has been understood that reconnection is essential to explain solar eruptions, the interaction of the solar wind with the magnetosphere, and the dynamics of the magnetosphere. Accordingly, the process of magnetic reconnection has been and remains a prime target for space-based and laboratory studies, as well as for theoretical research. Much progress has been made throughout the years, beginning with indirect verifications by studies of processes enabled by reconnection, such as Coronal Mass Ejections, Flux Transfer Events, and Plasmoids. Theoretical advances have accompanied these observations, moving knowledge beyond the Sweet-Parker theory to the recognition that other, collisionless, effects are available and likely to support much faster reconnect ion rates. At the present time we are therefore near a break-through in our understanding of how collisionless reconnect ion works. Theory and modeling have advanced to the point that two competing theories are considered leading candidates for explaining the microphysics of this process. Both theories predict very small spatial and temporal scales. which are. to date, inaccessible to space-based or laboratory measurements. The need to understand magnetic reconnect ion has led NASA to begin the implementation of a tailored mission, Magnetospheric MultiScale (MMS), a four spacecraft cluster equipped to resolve all relevant spatial and temporal scales. In this presentation, we present an overview of current knowledge as well as an outlook towards measurements provided by MMS.

  9. 21 CFR 801.122 - Medical devices for processing, repacking, or manufacturing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... manufacturing. 801.122 Section 801.122 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND....122 Medical devices for processing, repacking, or manufacturing. A device intended for processing... act if its label bears the statement “Caution: For manufacturing, processing, or repacking”. ...

  10. Review of relaxation oscillations in plasma processing discharges

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhou Zhu-Wen; M.A.Lieberman; Sungjin Kim

    2007-01-01

    Relaxation oscillations due to plasma instabilities at frequencies ranging from a few Hz to tens of kHz have been observed in various types of plasma processing discharges.Relaxation oscillations have been observed in electropositive capacitive discharges between a powered anode and a metallic chamber whose periphery iS grounded through a slot with dielectric spacers.The oscillations of time-varying optical emission from the main discharge chamber show,for example,a high-frequency (~40 kHz) relaxation oscillation at 13.33Pa,with an absorbed power being nearly the peripheral breakdown power,and a low-frequency (~3 Hz) oscillation,with an even higher absorbed power.The high-frequency oscillation is found to ignite plasma in the slot,but usually not in the peripheral chamber.The kilohertz oscillations are modelled using an electromagnetic model of the slot impedance,coupled to a circuit analysis of the system including the matching network.The model results are in general agreement with the experimental observations,and indicate a variety of behaviours dependent on the matching conditions.In low-pressure inductive discharges,oscillations appear in the transition between low-density capacitively driven and high-density inductively driven discharges when attaching gases such as SF6 and Ar/SF6 mixtures are used.Oscillations of charged particles,plasma potential,and light,at frequencies ranging from a few Hz to tens of kHz,are seen for gas pressures between 0.133 Pa and 13.33 Pa and discharge powers in a range of 75-1200 W.The region of instability increases as the plasma becomes more electronegative,and the frequency of plasma oscillation increases as the power,pressure,and gas flow rate increase.A volume-averaged (global) model of the kilohertz instability has been developed;the results obtained from the model agree well with the experimental observations.

  11. Plasma aided coal gasification and the variables in this process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pang, X.; Lu, Y.; Zhu, S. [Taiyuan University of Technology, Taiyuan (China)

    2005-12-15

    In order to investigate the characters of plasma aided coal gasification in the industry-scale equipment, the tests with changing feeding rate, steam output pressure, feeding gas flux, input power of plasma generator and the additives were carried out with Datong coal. The produced gas components were analyzed by gas chromatography. And the optimal process conditions, such as, the feeding rate of 150 g/min, the feeding gas flow of 18 m{sup 3}/h, the output power of plasma generator of 100 kW, the steam output pressure of 0.3 MPa are obtained. When the contents of CaO and CaCO{sub 3} in the whole feed are 10 and 5% respectively, the experimental data show their catalytic effect is the best. Considering the molar mass of CaO and CaCO{sub 3}, it is concluded that the catalytic effect of CaO is more important than the reduction of CO{sub 2} in the gasification. 12 refs., 2 figs., 3 tabs.

  12. Electron-silane scattering cross section for plasma assisted processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verma, Pankaj; Kaur, Jaspreet; Antony, Bobby

    2017-03-01

    Silane is an important molecule with numerous applications to natural and technological plasmas. In such environments, where plasma assisted processes are vital, electron induced reactions play a major role in its chemistry. In view of this, electron induced scattering of molecules such as silane finds significance. This article reports a comprehensive study of electron impact cross sections for silane over a wide energy range. In particular, the emphasis is given in providing a complete dataset for various electron scattering events possible with silane. Such dataset is the need for the plasma modeling community. Moreover, literature survey shows that the cross section database for silane is fragmentary. To fill this void, we have computed the differential elastic, total, rotational excitation, and momentum transfer cross sections. Two formalisms that are reliable in their energy domain are employed to accomplish the task: the R-matrix method through QUANTEMOL-N at low incident energies and the spherical complex optical potential formalism at intermediate to high energies. Interestingly, the comparison of the present cross section exhibits a good concurrence with the previous data, wherever available.

  13. Use of plasma "reconstitution" during cardio pulmonary bypass for a heart transplant after previous left ventricular assist device implant surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babaev, A; Saczkowski, R; Hynes, M; Boodhwani, M; Hudson, C C C

    2014-01-01

    The case report describes a novel technique of pre-emptive plasma "reconstitution" prior to disengagement from cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) to minimize RV volume overload. The concomitant use of hemoconcentration facilitates volume and blood product management in cardiac transplant after previous left ventricular assist device implant surgery.

  14. Investigation of the electron capture process in semiclassical plasma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seisembayeva Madina M.

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available In this work, the process of electron capture in partially ionized plasma is considered. Electron-atom interaction was described by the effective interaction potential, which takes into account the screening effect at large distances and the diffraction effect at the small distances. The results of numerical calculations of the electron capture radius, differential cross-section for different values of the coupling and density parameters are presented. The differential cross-section was obtained on the basis of perturbation theory and also by solving of the equation of motion of the projectile electron.

  15. Scattering processes and electrical conductivity of partially ionized hydrogen plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ramazanov, T. [Fachbereich Physik, Universitaet Rostock, D-18051 Rostock (Germany); SRIETP, Al Farabi Kazakh National University, Tole bi, 96a, 480012, Almaty (Kazakhstan); Galiyev, K.; Dzhumagulova, K.N. [SRIETP, Al Farabi Kazakh National University, Tole bi, 96a, 480012, Almaty (Kazakhstan); Roepke, G.; Redmer, R. [Fachbereich Physik, Universitaet Rostock, D-18051 Rostock (Germany)

    2003-07-01

    We consider partially ionized hydrogen plasma for the density region n{sub e} = (10{sup 18} / 10{sup 22}) cm{sup -} {sup 3}. The cross sections for scattering processes between the particles are calculated within the partial wave method. Charged particles in the system (electrons, protons) interact via an effective potential that takes into account three-particle correlations. The Buckingham polarization potential is used to describe electron-atom and proton-atom interactions. The electrical conductivity is determined using the Chapman-Enskog method. The results are compared with other available data. (Abstract Copyright [2003], Wiley Periodicals, Inc.)

  16. 2D Material Device Architectures: Process Optimisation and Characterisation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gammelgaard, Lene

    encapsulated in hexagonal boron nitride have been fabricated and studied electrically. These devices have field-effect mobilities comparable with the highest values reported. Furthermore, state of the art nano-patterns have been fabricated into encapsulated graphene. It was also explore how graphene layers...... perform as tunable contacts to transition metal dichalcogenides layers encapsulated in hexagonal boron nitride. This architecture yields high performance devices, where high mobilities of the air sensitive MoTe2 crystals have measured, and metal-insulator transition have been observed in monolayer MoS2...... devices. Additionally, the long-term stability of transition metal dichalcogenides has been studied, and the order of the layers has been demonstrated detectable by atomic force microscopy. The encapsulated van der Waals heterostructures give high performance and long-term stability of two...

  17. Comparative study of radiation emission without and with target in a 2.2 kJ plasma focus device

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khan, Muhammad Zubair, E-mail: mzubairkhan-um76@yahoo.com [Plasma Technology Research Center, Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, University Malaya, 50603 Kuala Lumpur Malaysia and Department of Physics, Federal Urdu University of Arts, Science and Technology, 45320 Islamabad (Pakistan); Ling, Yap Seong; San, Wong Chiow [Plasma Technology Research Center, Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, University Malaya, 50603 Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia)

    2014-03-24

    The radiation emission in a 2.2 kJ Mather-type dense plasma focus device is investigated using a five channel BPX65 PIN diode spectrometer. Estimated X-ray associated with the hollow anode without and with target in Argon gas medium is compared. At optimum conditions, the radiation emission from the system is found to be strongly influenced with target in hollow anode and the filling gas pressure. The maximum X-ray yield in 4π sr was obtained in case of hollow anode in argon gas medium with target 'Lead' due to interaction of electron beam. Results indicated that an appropriate design of hollow anode with target could enhance the radiation emission by more intense interaction of expected electron beam with target. The outcomes are helpful in designing a plasma focus with enhanced X-ray radiation with improved shot to shot reproducibility in plasma focus device.

  18. Monitoring and Improving the Reliability of Plasma Spray Processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mauer, Georg; Rauwald, Karl-Heinz; Mücke, Robert; Vaßen, Robert

    2017-06-01

    Monitoring and improving of process reliability are prevalent issues in thermal spray technology. They are intended to accomplish specific quality characteristics by controlling the process. For this, implicit approaches are in demand to rapidly conclude on relevant coating properties, i.e., they are not directly measured, but it is assumed that the monitored variables are in fact suggestive for them. Such monitoring can be performed in situ (during the running process) instead of measuring coating characteristics explicitly (directly) and ex situ (after the process). Implicit approaches can be based on extrinsic variables (set from outside) as well as on intrinsic parameters (internal, not directly adjustable) having specific advantages and disadvantages, each. In this work, the effects of atmospheric plasma spray process variables are systemized in process schemes. On this basis, different approaches to contribute to improved process reliability are described and assessed paying particular attention to in-flight particle diagnostics. Finally, a new test applying spray bead analysis is introduced and first results are presented.

  19. Real-Time Plasma Process Condition Sensing and Abnormal Process Detection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryan Yang

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available The plasma process is often used in the fabrication of semiconductor wafers. However, due to the lack of real-time etching control, this may result in some unacceptable process performances and thus leads to significant waste and lower wafer yield. In order to maximize the product wafer yield, a timely and accurately process fault or abnormal detection in a plasma reactor is needed. Optical emission spectroscopy (OES is one of the most frequently used metrologies in in-situ process monitoring. Even though OES has the advantage of non-invasiveness, it is required to provide a huge amount of information. As a result, the data analysis of OES becomes a big challenge. To accomplish real-time detection, this work employed the sigma matching method technique, which is the time series of OES full spectrum intensity. First, the response model of a healthy plasma spectrum was developed. Then, we defined a matching rate as an indictor for comparing the difference between the tested wafers response and the health sigma model. The experimental results showed that this proposal method can detect process faults in real-time, even in plasma etching tools.

  20. Proceedings of US/Japan workshop, Q219 on high heat flux components and plasma surface interactions for next fusion devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ulrickson, M.A.; Stevens, P.L.; Hino, T.; Hirohata, Y. [eds.

    1996-12-01

    This report contains the viewgraphs from the proceedings of US/Japan Workshop on High Heat Flux Components and Plasma Surface Interactions for Next Fusion Devices. Some of the general topics covered by this report are: PFC/PSI in tokamak and helical devices; development of high heat flux components; PSIS and plasma facing materials;tritium; and material damage.

  1. The Processing of High Temperature Ceramic Superconducting Devices. Volume 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-01-31

    vacuum packaging of HTS devices. I STI further recognized that there is an urgent need for these components. Based on experience from the infrared...develop "common modules" which are produced at low cost, reliable, industry standardized, flexible, and universally accepted for vacuum packaging cryogenically

  2. Functionalization of polymer powders for SLS-processes using an atmospheric plasma jet in a fluidized bed reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sachs, Marius; Schmitt, Adeliene; Schmidt, Jochen; Peukert, Wolfgang; Wirth, Karl-Ernst [Institute of Particle Technology, Friedrich-Alexander-University Erlangen-Nuremberg (Germany)

    2015-05-22

    Recently additive manufacturing processes such as selective laser sintering (SLS) of polymers have gained more importance for industrial applications [1]. Tailor-made modification of polymers is essential in order to make these processes more efficient and to cover the industrial demands. The so far used polymer materials show weak performance regarding the mechanical stability of processed parts. To overcome this limitation, a new route to functionalize the surface of commercially available polymer particles (PA12; PE-HD; PP) using an atmospheric plasma jet in combination with a fluidized bed reactor has been investigated. Consequently, an improvement of adhesion and wettability [2] of the polymer surface without restraining the bulk properties of the powder is achieved. The atmospheric plasma jet process can provide reactive species at moderate temperatures which are suitable for polymer material. The functionalization of the polymer powders improves the quality of the devices build in a SLS-process.

  3. Study of selective heating at ion cyclotron resonance for the plasma separation process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Compant La Fontaine, A.; Pashkovsky, V. G.

    1995-12-01

    The plasma separation process by ion cyclotron resonance heating (ICRH) is studied both theoretically and experimentally on two devices: the first one called ERIC (Ion Cyclotron Resonance Experiment) at Saclay (France) [P. Louvet, Proceedings of the 2nd Workshop on Separation Phenomena in Liquids and Gases, Versailles, France, 1989, edited by P. Louvet, P. Noe, and Soubbaramayer (Centre d'Etudes Nucléaires de Saclay and Cité Scientifique Parcs et Technopoles, Ile de France Sud, France, 1989), Vol. 1, p. 5] and the other one named SIRENA at the Kurchatov Institute, Moscow, Russia [A. I. Karchevskii et al., Plasma Phys. Rep. 19, 214 (1993)]. The radio frequency (RF) transversal magnetic field is measured by a magnetic probe both in plasma and vacuum and its Fourier spectrum versus the axial wave number kz is obtained. These results are in agreement with the electromagnetic (EM) field calculation model based on resolution of Maxwell equations by a time-harmonic scheme studied here. Various axial boundary conditions models used to compute the EM field are considered. The RF magnetic field is weakly influenced by the plasma while the electric field components are strongly disturbed due to space-charge effects. In the plasma the transversal electric field is enhanced and the kz spectrum is narrower than in vacuum. The calculation of the resonant isotope heating is made by the Runge-Kutta method. The influence of ion-ion collisions, inhomogeneity of the static magnetic field B0, and the RF transversal magnetic field component on the ion acceleration is examined. These results are successfully compared with experiments of a minor isotope 44Ca heating measurements, made with an energy analyzer.

  4. Study of selective heating at ion cyclotron resonance for the plasma separation process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Compant La Fontaine, A. [Direction du Cycle du Combustible/Departement des Procedes d` Enrichissement, Service de Physique, d` Experimentation et d` Analyse, Commissariat a l` Energie Atomique, Centre d` Etudes de Saclay, 91191 Gif-sur-Yvette Cedex (France); Pashkovsky, V.G. [Molecular Physics Institute, RRC Kurchatov Institute 123182, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    1995-12-01

    The plasma separation process by ion cyclotron resonance heating (ICRH) is studied both theoretically and experimentally on two devices: the first one called ERIC (Ion Cyclotron Resonance Experiment) at Saclay (France) [P. Louvet, {ital Proceedings} {ital of} {ital the} 2{ital nd} {ital Workshop} {ital on} {ital Separation} {ital Phenomena} {ital in} {ital Liquids} {ital and} {ital Gases}, Versailles, France, 1989, edited by P. Louvet, P. Noe, and Soubbaramayer (Centre d`Etudes Nucleaires de Saclay and Cite Scientifique Parcs et Technopoles, Ile de France Sud, France, 1989), Vol. 1, p. 5] and the other one named SIRENA at the Kurchatov Institute, Moscow, Russia [A. I. Karchevskii {ital et} {ital al}., Plasma Phys. Rep. {bold 19}, 214 (1993)]. The radio frequency (RF) transversal magnetic field is measured by a magnetic probe both in plasma and vacuum and its Fourier spectrum versus the axial wave number {ital k}{sub {ital z}} is obtained. These results are in agreement with the electromagnetic (EM) field calculation model based on resolution of Maxwell equations by a time-harmonic scheme studied here. Various axial boundary conditions models used to compute the EM field are considered. The RF magnetic field is weakly influenced by the plasma while the electric field components are strongly disturbed due to space-charge effects. In the plasma the transversal electric field is enhanced and the {ital k}{sub {ital z}} spectrum is narrower than in vacuum. The calculation of the resonant isotope heating is made by the Runge--Kutta method. The influence of ion--ion collisions, inhomogeneity of the static magnetic field {ital B}{sub 0}, and the RF transversal magnetic field component on the ion acceleration is examined. These results are successfully compared with experiments of a minor isotope {sup 44}Ca heating measurements, made with an energy analyzer. {copyright} {ital 1995} {ital American} {ital Institute} {ital of} {ital Physics}.

  5. Processing of bulk Al7075 alloy by spark plasma sintering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Málek, P.; Molnárová, O.; Cinert, J.; Lukáč, F.; Chráska, T.

    2017-02-01

    The main advantages of powder metallurgy processing route are the possibility to produce near-net-shape compacts and to minimize the finish machining and material loss. The main problem in particle consolidation process is to suppress porosity, to remove oxide layers, and to retain the microstructure of powder materials. Spark plasma sintering (SPS) combines concurrent uniaxial pressure and direct heating by a pulsed DC current. Sintering occurs at relatively low temperatures for a short time and does not influence significantly the microstructure in the interiors of original powder particles. The efficiency of SPS in producing compacts with low porosity might be dependent on the distribution of particle size in original powder material. The gas atomized Al7075 powder was sieved to several charges and then sintered by SPS. Microstructure of sintered compacts was studied by light and scanning electron microscopy. The phase composition was investigated using X-ray diffraction. The mechanical behaviour was tested by bending tests.

  6. Dusty plasma processes in Earth's polar summer mesosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popel, S. I.; Dubinsky, A. Yu.; Dubinsky

    2013-08-01

    A self-consistent model for the description of dusty plasma structures, such as noctilucent clouds (NLC) and polar mesosphere summer echoes (PMSE), which are frequently grouped together under the common term polar mesospheric clouds, is presented. The model takes into account the processes of condensation of water vapor, ionization, recombination, action of solar radiation, sedimentation, dust particle growth, dust particle charging, electric fields, etc. Using the model, we explain the basic data of observations on the behavior of charged component in polar summer mesosphere. Furthermore, we show the influence of initial distributions of fine particles as well as that of the processes of condensation and water molecule absorption by fine particles on the formation of NLC and PMSE. We also illustrate the possibility of the formation of layered structure and sharp boundaries of NLC.

  7. A continuous flow micro filtration device for plasma/blood separation using submicron vertical pillar gap structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Tae Goo; Yoon, Yong-Jin; Ji, Hongmiao; Lim, Pei Yi; Chen, Yu

    2014-08-01

    This work demonstrates a continuous flow plasma/blood separator using a vertical submicron pillar gap structure. The working principle of the proposed separator is based on size exclusion of cells through cross-flow filtration, in which only plasma is allowed to pass through submicron vertical pillars located tangential to the main flow path of the blood sample. The maximum filtration efficiency of 99.9% was recorded with a plasma collection rate of 0.67 µl min-1 for an input blood flow rate of 12.5 µl min-1. The hemolysis phenomenon was observed for an input blood flow rate above 30 µl min-1. Based on the experimental results, we can conclude that the proposed device shows potential for the application of on-chip plasma/blood separation as a part of integrated point-of-care (POC) diagnostics systems.

  8. Integrated Prediction and Mitigation Methods of Materials Damage and Lifetime Assessment during Plasma Operation and Various Instabilities in Fusion Devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hassanein, Ahmed [Purdue Univ., West Lafayette, IN (United States)

    2015-03-31

    This report describes implementation of comprehensive and integrated models to evaluate plasma material interactions during normal and abnormal plasma operations. The models in full3D simulations represent state-of-the art worldwide development with numerous benchmarking of various tokamak devices and plasma simulators. In addition, significant number of experimental work has been performed in our center for materials under extreme environment (CMUXE) at Purdue to benchmark the effect of intense particle and heat fluxes on plasma-facing components. This represents one-year worth of work and resulted in more than 23 Journal Publications and numerous conferences presentations. The funding has helped several students to obtain their M.Sc. and Ph.D. degrees and many of them are now faculty members in US and around the world teaching and conducting fusion research. Our work has also been recognized through many awards.

  9. The role of the user within the medical device design and development process: medical device manufacturers' perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Craven Michael P

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Academic literature and international standards bodies suggest that user involvement, via the incorporation of human factors engineering methods within the medical device design and development (MDDD process, offer many benefits that enable the development of safer and more usable medical devices that are better suited to users' needs. However, little research has been carried out to explore medical device manufacturers' beliefs and attitudes towards user involvement within this process, or indeed what value they believe can be added by doing so. Methods In-depth interviews with representatives from 11 medical device manufacturers are carried out. We ask them to specify who they believe the intended users of the device to be, who they consult to inform the MDDD process, what role they believe the user plays within this process, and what value (if any they believe users add. Thematic analysis is used to analyse the fully transcribed interview data, to gain insight into medical device manufacturers' beliefs and attitudes towards user involvement within the MDDD process. Results A number of high-level themes emerged, relating who the user is perceived to be, the methods used, the perceived value and barriers to user involvement, and the nature of user contributions. The findings reveal that despite standards agencies and academic literature offering strong support for the employment formal methods, manufacturers are still hesitant due to a range of factors including: perceived barriers to obtaining ethical approval; the speed at which such activity may be carried out; the belief that there is no need given the 'all-knowing' nature of senior health care staff and clinical champions; a belief that effective results are achievable by consulting a minimal number of champions. Furthermore, less senior health care practitioners and patients were rarely seen as being able to provide valuable input into the process. Conclusions Medical

  10. Methods of measurement for semiconductor materials, process control, and devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bullis, W. M. (Editor)

    1972-01-01

    Significant accomplishments include development of a procedure to correct for the substantial differences of transistor delay time as measured with different instruments or with the same instrument at different frequencies; association of infrared response spectra of poor quality germanium gamma ray detectors with spectra of detectors fabricated from portions of a good crystal that had been degraded in known ways; and confirmation of the excellent quality and cosmetic appearance of ultrasonic bonds made with aluminum ribbon wire. Work is continuing on measurement of resistivity of semiconductor crystals; study of gold-doped silicon, development of the infrared response technique; evaluation of wire bonds and die attachment; and measurement of thermal properties of semiconductor devices, delay time and related carrier transport properties in junction devices, and noise properties of microwave diodes.

  11. A novel device for the study of somatosensory information processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holden, Jameson K; Nguyen, Richard H; Francisco, Eric M; Zhang, Zheng; Dennis, Robert G; Tommerdahl, Mark

    2012-03-15

    Current methods for applying multi-site vibratory stimuli to the skin typically involve the use of multiple, individual vibrotactile stimulators. Limitations of such an arrangement include difficulty with both positioning the stimuli as well as ensuring that stimuli are delivered in a synchronized and deliberate manner. Previously, we reported a two-site tactile stimulator that was developed in order to solve these problems (Tannan et al., 2007a). Due to both the success of that novel stimulator and the limitations that were inherent in that device, we designed and fabricated a four-site stimulator that provides a number of advantages over the previous version. First, the device can stimulate four independent skin sites and is primarily designed for stimulating the digit tips. Second, the positioning of the probe tips has been re-designed to provide better ergonomic hand placement. Third, the device is much more portable than the previously reported stimulator. Fourth, the stimulator head has a much smaller footprint on the table or surface where it resides. To demonstrate the capacity of the device for delivering tactile stimulation at four independent sites, a finger agnosia protocol, in the presence and absence of conditioning stimuli, was conducted on seventeen healthy control subjects. The study demonstrated that with increasing amplitudes of vibrotactile conditioning stimuli concurrent with the agnosia test, inaccuracies of digit identification increased, particularly at digits D3 and D4. The results are consistent with prior studies that implicated synchronization of adjacent and near-adjacent cortical ensembles with conditioning stimuli in impacting TOJ performance (Tommerdahl et al., 2007a,b).

  12. A novel device for the study of somatosensory information processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holden, Jameson K.; Nguyen, Richard H.; Francisco, Eric M.; Zhang, Zheng; Dennis, Robert G.; Tommerdahl, Mark

    2012-01-01

    Current methods for applying multi-site vibratory stimuli to the skin typically involve the use of multiple, individual vibrotactile stimulators. Limitations of such an arrangement include difficulty with both positioning the stimuli as well as ensuring that stimuli are delivered in a synchronized and deliberate manner. Previously, we reported a two-site tactile stimulator that was developed in order to solve these problems (Tannan et al., 2007a). Due to both the success of that novel stimulator and the limitations that were inherent in that device, we designed and fabricated a four-site stimulator that provides a number of advantages over the previous version. First, the device can stimulate four independent skin sites and is primarily designed for stimulating the digit tips. Second, the positioning of the probe tips has been re-designed to provide better ergonomic hand placement. Third, the device is much more portable than the previously-reported stimulator. Fourth, the stimulator head has a much smaller footprint on the table or surface where it resides. To demonstrate the capacity of the device for delivering tactile stimulation at four independent sites, a finger agnosia protocol, in the presence and absence of conditioning stimuli, was conducted on seventeen healthy control subjects. The study demonstrated that with increasing amplitudes of vibrotactile conditioning stimuli concurrent with the agnosia test, inaccuracies of digit identification increased, particularly at digits D3 and D4. The results are consistent with prior studies that implicated synchronization of adjacent and near-adjacent cortical ensembles with conditioning stimuli in impacting TOJ performance (Tommerdahl et al., 2007). PMID:22155443

  13. Process for attaching molecular wires and devices to carbon nanotubes and compositions thereof

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tour, James M. (Inventor); Bahr, Jeffrey L. (Inventor); Yang, Jiping (Inventor)

    2008-01-01

    The present invention is directed towards processes for covalently attaching molecular wires and molecular electronic devices to carbon nanotubes and compositions thereof. Such processes utilize diazonium chemistry to bring about this marriage of wire-like nanotubes with molecular wires and molecular electronic devices.

  14. On the Role of Metastable Argon in Cold Atmospheric Pressure Plasma Jets with Shielding Gas Device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt-Bleker, Ansgar; Winter, Jorn; Sousa, Joao Santos; Puech, Vincent; Weltmann, Klaus-Dieter; Reuter, Stephan; ZIK plasmatis at the INP Greifswald e. V. Team; Laboratoire de Physique des Gaz et des Plasmas (LPGP), CNRS; Université Paris-Sud Team

    2014-10-01

    Shielding gas devices are a valuable tool for controlling the reactive species output of Cold Atmospheric Pressure Plasma (CAPP) Jets for biomedical applications. In this work we investigate the effect of different shielding gas compositions using a CAPP jet (kinpen) operated with argon. As shielding gas various mixtures of N2 and O2 are used. Metastable argon (Ar*) has been quantified using laser absorption spectroscopy and was identified as an important energy carrier in the CAPP jets effluent. The Ar* excitation dynamics was studied using phase resolve optical emission spectroscopy. Based on these findings a kinetic model for the gas phase chemistry has been developed that uses the Ar* density and dynamics as input and yields densities of O3, NO2, HNO2, HNO3, N2O5, H2O2 and N2O produced by the CAPP jet for different shielding gas compositions. The results are in good agreement with Fourier-Transform Infrared Spectroscopy measurements on these species. Authors gratefully acknowledge the funding by German Federal Ministry of Education a Research (BMBF) (Grant # 03Z2DN12).

  15. A new attempt using LabVIEW into a computational experiment of plasma focus device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Myungkyu

    2017-03-01

    The simulation program of plasma focus device based on S. Lee's model has been first developed since 30 years ago and it is widely used to date. Originally the program made by GWbasic language, and then modified by visual basic which was included in the Microsoft Excel. Using Excel well-known to researchers is a key advantage of this program. But it has disadvantages in displaying data in same graph, in slow calculation speed, and in displaying data and calculation of smaller time step. To overcome all these points, the LabVIEW that made by national instrument and based on graphical environment is used for simulation. Furthermore it is correlated with data acquisition of experiment, once experiment being the data is directly transferred to the simulation program and then analyzes and predicts for the next shot. The mass swept factor (fm) and current factor (fc) can be easily find out using this program. This paper describes the detail function and usage of the program and compares the results with the existing one.

  16. Novel atmospheric pressure plasma device releasing atomic hydrogen: reduction of microbial-contaminants and OH radicals in the air

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nojima, Hideo; Park, Rae-Eun; Kwon, Jun-Hyoun; Suh, Inseon; Jeon, Junsang; Ha, Eunju; On, Hyeon-Ki; Kim, Hye-Ryung; Choi, Kyoung Hui; Lee, Kwang-Hee; Seong, Baik-Lin; Jung, Hoon; Kang, Shin Jung; Namba, Shinichi; Takiyama, Ken

    2007-01-01

    A novel atmospheric pressure plasma device releasing atomic hydrogen has been developed. This device has specific properties such as (1) deactivation of airborne microbial-contaminants, (2) neutralization of indoor OH radicals and (3) being harmless to the human body. It consists of a ceramic plate as a positive ion generation electrode and a needle-shaped electrode as an electron emission electrode. Release of atomic hydrogen from the device has been investigated by the spectroscopic method. Optical emission of atomic hydrogen probably due to recombination of positive ions, H+(H2O)n, generated from the ceramic plate electrode and electrons emitted from the needle-shaped electrode have been clearly observed in the He gas (including water vapour) environment. The efficacy of the device to reduce airborne concentrations of influenza virus, bacteria, mould fungi and allergens has been evaluated. 99.6% of airborne influenza virus has been deactivated with the operation of the device compared with the control test in a 1 m3 chamber after 60 min. The neutralization of the OH radical has been investigated by spectroscopic and biological methods. A remarkable reduction of the OH radical in the air by operation of the device has been observed by laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy. The cell protection effects of the device against OH radicals in the air have been observed. Furthermore, the side effects have been checked by animal experiments. The harmlessness of the device has been confirmed.

  17. Isolation of Circulating Plasma Cells in Multiple Myeloma Using CD138 Antibody-Based Capture in a Microfluidic Device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qasaimeh, Mohammad A.; Wu, Yichao C.; Bose, Suman; Menachery, Anoop; Talluri, Srikanth; Gonzalez, Gabriel; Fulciniti, Mariateresa; Karp, Jeffrey M.; Prabhala, Rao H.; Karnik, Rohit

    2017-04-01

    The necessity for bone marrow aspiration and the lack of highly sensitive assays to detect residual disease present challenges for effective management of multiple myeloma (MM), a plasma cell cancer. We show that a microfluidic cell capture based on CD138 antigen, which is highly expressed on plasma cells, permits quantitation of rare circulating plasma cells (CPCs) in blood and subsequent fluorescence-based assays. The microfluidic device is based on a herringbone channel design, and exhibits an estimated cell capture efficiency of ~40-70%, permitting detection of <10 CPCs/mL using 1-mL sample volumes, which is difficult using existing techniques. In bone marrow samples, the microfluidic-based plasma cell counts exhibited excellent correlation with flow cytometry analysis. In peripheral blood samples, the device detected a baseline of 2-5 CD138+ cells/mL in healthy donor blood, with significantly higher numbers in blood samples of MM patients in remission (20-24 CD138+ cells/mL), and yet higher numbers in MM patients exhibiting disease (45-184 CD138+ cells/mL). Analysis of CPCs isolated using the device was consistent with serum immunoglobulin assays that are commonly used in MM diagnostics. These results indicate the potential of CD138-based microfluidic CPC capture as a useful ‘liquid biopsy’ that may complement or partially replace bone marrow aspiration.

  18. Glass-to-metal bonding process improves stability and performance of semiconductor devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trent, R. L.

    1970-01-01

    Anodic bonding of glass coverslips to photodiodes and photovoltaic devices eliminates the need for adhesive. The process requires relatively low temperatures /less than 560 degrees C/ and the metals and glass remain solid throughout the bonding process.

  19. Spatial and Temporal characterization of plasma properties via emission spectroscopy in fusion materials testing device Proto-MPEX

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morean, Casey; Biewer, Theodore; Shaw, Guinevere; Beers, Josh; Ray, Holly

    2016-10-01

    The Prototype Material Plasma Exposure eXperiment (Proto-MPEX) is a linear plasma source, and is intended to study plasma-material interactions (PMI) in conditions similar to those found in future fusion reactors. A high-resolution McPherson Czerny-Turner visible range spectrometer has been utilized to study the behavior of ions in the plasma. Analysis of the spectral lines, D_beta, D_gamma, and D_delta yields valuable information regarding the temperature and density of plasma ions at various locations along Proto-MPEX. Spectroscopic temperature and density measurements are compared to double Langmuir probe measurements to determine plasma behavior as a function of radius. Temporal and spatial measurements along the length of Proto-MPEX are constructed and compared to a photomultiplier tube based diagnostic manufactured at ORNL to determine the plasma's axial behavior along Proto-MPEX. Relative emission of beta, gamma, and delta lines are used to assess recycling effects in the device. This work was supported by the U.S. D.O.E. contract DE-AC05-00OR22725.

  20. Analysis of suprathermal nuclear processes in the solar core plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voronchev, Victor T.; Nakao, Yasuyuki; Watanabe, Yukinobu

    2017-04-01

    A consistent model for the description of suprathermal processes in the solar core plasma naturally triggered by fast particles generated in exoergic nuclear reactions is formulated. This model, based on the formalism of in-flight reaction probability, operates with different methods of treating particle slow-down in the plasma, and allows for the influence of electron degeneracy and electron screening on processes in the matter. The model is applied to examine slowing-down of 8.7 MeV α-particles produced in the {}7{Li}(p,α )α reaction of the pp chain, and to analyze suprathermal processes in the solar CNO cycle induced by them. Particular attention is paid to the suprathermal {}14{{N}}{(α ,{{p}})}17{{O}} reaction unappreciated in standard solar model simulations. It is found that an appreciable non-standard (α ,p) nuclear flow due to this reaction appears in the matter and modifies running of the CNO cycle in ∼95% of the solar core region. In this region at R> 0.1{R}ȯ , normal branching of nuclear flow {}14{{N}}≤ftarrow {}17{{O}}\\to {(}18{{F}})\\to {}18{{O}} transforms to abnormal sequential flow {}14{{N}}\\to {}17{{O}}\\to {(}18{{F}})\\to {}18{{O}}, altering some element abundances. In particular, nuclear network calculations reveal that in the outer core the abundances of 17O and 18O isotopes can increase by a factor of 20 as compared with standard estimates. A conjecture is made that other CNO suprathermal (α ,p) reactions may also affect abundances of CNO elements, including those generating solar neutrinos.

  1. Secondary electron emission from plasma processed accelerating cavity grade niobium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basovic, Milos

    by different techniques. Specifically, this work provides the results of SEY from the plasma cleaned cavity grade niobium (Nb) samples. Pure niobium is currently the material of choice for the fabrication of Superconducting Radio Frequency (SRF) cavities. The effect of plasma processing with two different gases will be examined in two groups of samples. The first group of samples is made from cavity grade niobium. The second group of samples is made from the same material, but include a welded joint made by electron beam welding, since in niobium SRF cavities the peak electric and magnetic field are seen in close proximity to the welded joints. Both groups of samples will be exposed to nitrogen (N2) and a mixture of argon with oxygen (Ar/O2) plasma. It is the goal of this research to determine the SEY on these two groups of samples before and after plasma processing as a function of the energy of primary electrons. The SEY as a function of the angle of incidence of the primary electrons is tested on the samples treated with Ar/O2 plasma.

  2. Secondary Electron Emission from Plasma Processed Accelerating Cavity Grade Niobium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Basovic, Milos [Old Dominion Univ., Norfolk, VA (United States)

    2016-05-01

    by different techniques. Specifically, this work provides the results of SEY from the plasma cleaned cavity grade niobium (Nb) samples. Pure niobium is currently the material of choice for the fabrication of Superconducting Radio Frequency (SRF) cavities. The effect of plasma processing with two different gases will be examined in two groups of samples. The first group of samples is made from cavity grade niobium. The second group of samples is made from the same material, but include a welded joint made by electron beam welding, since in niobium SRF cavities the peak electric and magnetic field are seen in close proximity to the welded joints. Both groups of samples will be exposed to nitrogen (N2) and a mixture of argon with oxygen (Ar/O2) plasma. It is the goal of this research to determine the SEY on these two groups of samples before and after plasma processing as a function of the energy of primary electrons. The SEY as a function of the angle of incidence of the primary electrons is tested on the samples treated with Ar/O2 plasma.

  3. Plasma assisted measurements of alkali metal concentrations in pressurized combustion processes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hernberg, R.; Haeyrinen, V. [Tampere Univ. of Technology (Finland). Dept. of Physics

    1996-12-01

    The plasma assisted method for continuous measurement of alkali concentrations in product gas flows of pressurized energy processes will be tested and applied at the 1.6 MW PFBC/G facility at Delft University of Technology in the Netherlands. During the reporting period the alkali measuring device has been tested under pressurized conditions at VTT Energy, DMT, Foster-Wheeler Energia and ABB Carbon. Measurements in Delft will be performed during 1996 after installation of the hot gas filter. The original plan for measurements in Delft has been postponed due to schedule delays in Delft. The results are expected to give information about the influence of different process conditions on the generation of alkali vapours, the comparison of different methods for alkali measurement and the specific performance of our system. This will be the first test of the plasma assisted measurement method in a gasification process. The project belongs to the Joule II extension program under contract JOU2-CT93-0431. (author)

  4. Analyses of quenching process during turn-off of plasma electrolytic carburizing on carbon steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Jie; Liu, Run [Key Laboratory for Beam Technology and Materials Modification of Ministry of Education, College of Nuclear Science and Technology, Beijing Normal University, Beijing 100875 (China); Beijing Radiation Center, Beijing 100875 (China); Xue, Wenbin, E-mail: xuewb@bnu.edu.cn [Key Laboratory for Beam Technology and Materials Modification of Ministry of Education, College of Nuclear Science and Technology, Beijing Normal University, Beijing 100875 (China); Beijing Radiation Center, Beijing 100875 (China); Wang, Bin; Jin, Xiaoyue; Du, Jiancheng [Key Laboratory for Beam Technology and Materials Modification of Ministry of Education, College of Nuclear Science and Technology, Beijing Normal University, Beijing 100875 (China); Beijing Radiation Center, Beijing 100875 (China)

    2014-10-15

    Highlights: • Cooling rate of carburized steel at the end of PEC treatment is measured. • The quench hardening in the fast or slow turn-off mode hardly takes place. • Decrease of the surface roughness during slow turn-off process is found. • A slow turn-off mode is recommended to replace the conventional turn-off mode. - Abstract: Plasma electrolytic carburizing (PEC) under different turn-off modes was employed to fabricate a hardening layer on carbon steel in glycerol solution without stirring at 380 V for 3 min. The quenching process in fast turn-off mode or slow turn-off mode of power supply was discussed. The temperature in the interior of steel and electron temperature in plasma discharge envelope during the quenching process were evaluated. It was found that the cooling rates of PEC samples in both turn-off modes were below 20 °C/s, because the vapor film boiling around the steel sample reduced the cooling rate greatly in terms of Leidenfrost effect. Thus the quench hardening hardly took place, though the slow turn-off mode slightly decreased the surface roughness of PEC steel. At the end of PEC treatment, the fast turn-off mode used widely at present cannot enhance the surface hardness by quench hardening, and the slow turn-off mode was recommended in order to protect the electronic devices against a large current surge.

  5. Plasma Diagnostics and Plasma-Surface Interactions in Inductively Coupled Plasmas

    OpenAIRE

    Titus, Monica Joy

    2010-01-01

    The semiconductor industry's continued trend of manufacturing device features on the nanometer scale requires increased plasma processing control and improved understanding of plasma characteristics and plasma-surface interactions. This dissertation presents a series of experimental results for focus studies conducted in an inductively coupled plasma (ICP) system. First novel "on-wafer" diagnostic tools are characterized and related to plasma characteristics. Second, plasma-polymer interactio...

  6. Spatial control of processing plasmas in a multicusp plasma source equipped with a movable magnetic filter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fukumasa, O.; Naitou, H.; Sakiyama, S. (Yamaguchi Univ., Yamaguchi (Japan))

    1991-12-20

    The plasma chemical vapor deposition (p-CVD) method has been used in the preparation of various sorts of thin films such as hydrogenated amorphous silicon films and hydrogenated amorphous carbon films, etc. and the application feasibility of a magnetically filtered multicusp plasma source has been studied. In this paper, it is confirmed that plasma parameters (H {sub 2} - ch {sub 4} or Ar-CH {sub 4} plasmas) are spatially well controlled by using both a movable magnetic filter and a plasma grid. Plasma parameters change sharply across the magnetic filter at any filter position and the whole plasma is divided clearly into the region of source plasma with high-energy electrons and the region of diffused plasma without high-energy electrons. Concerning the role of the magnetic filter which reflects preferentially high-energy electrons, a study is made through computer simulation. 7 refs., 9 figs.

  7. Plasma Separation Process: Betacell (BCELL) code: User's manual. [Bipolar barrier junction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taherzadeh, M.

    1987-11-13

    The emergence of clearly defined applications for (small or large) amounts of long-life and reliable power sources has given the design and production of betavoltaic systems a new life. Moreover, because of the availability of the plasma separation program, (PSP) at TRW, it is now possible to separate the most desirable radioisotopes for betacell power generating devices. A computer code, named BCELL, has been developed to model the betavoltaic concept by utilizing the available up-to-date source/cell parameters. In this program, attempts have been made to determine the betacell energy device maximum efficiency, degradation due to the emitting source radiation and source/cell lifetime power reduction processes. Additionally, comparison is made between the Schottky and PN junction devices for betacell battery design purposes. Certain computer code runs have been made to determine the JV distribution function and the upper limit of the betacell generated power for specified energy sources. A Ni beta emitting radioisotope was used for the energy source and certain semiconductors were used for the converter subsystem of the betacell system. Some results for a Promethium source are also given here for comparison. 16 refs.

  8. Magnetic shield for turbomolecular pump of the Magnetized Plasma Linear Experimental device at Saha Institute of Nuclear Physics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biswas, Subir; Chattopadhyay, Monobir; Pal, Rabindranath

    2011-01-01

    The turbo molecular pump of the Magnetized Plasma Linear Experimental device is protected from damage by a magnetic shield. As the pump runs continuously in a magnetic field environment during a plasma physics experiment, it may get damaged owing to eddy current effect. For design and testing of the shield, first we simulate in details various aspects of magnetic shield layouts using a readily available field design code. The performance of the shield made from two half cylinders of soft iron material, is experimentally observed to agree very well with the simulation results.

  9. Comparison of a new blood sampling device with the vacuum tube system for plasma and hematological analyses in healthy dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reynolds, Brice S; Boudet, Karine G; Faucher, Mathieu R; Geffre, Anne; Germain, Claude; Lefebvre, Hervé P

    2008-01-01

    Pediatric devices based on a capillary system may provide an alternative to vacuum tubes for canine blood sampling. The potential advantages are absence of vein collapse, limited blood volume sampled, and improved safety. The aim of this study was to compare routine plasma and hematological variables in seven healthy dogs using both techniques. Five biochemical analytes were measured, and a complete hematological examination and plasma exogenous creatinine clearance test were performed. No clinically relevant difference between the two techniques was observed for any variable or functional test assessed.

  10. Construction and experimental study of a 2.5 kJ, simply configured, Mather type plasma focus device

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shirani, B.; Abbasi, F. [Shahid Beheshti University, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of). Radiation Application Department

    2010-06-15

    In this work, a 2.5 kJ plasma focus device (named as SBUPF1) has been constructed on the basis of a simple configuration. The most important characteristics of this configuration is relative simplicity and using less components in its structure compared with common configurations. SBUPF1 has been tested between 18- 25 kV and wide range of pressure for various gases including Argon, Neon and Deuterium. The system shows consistent and reproducible plasma focusing action as well as fusion neutron production (when deuterium is used as working gas). (author)

  11. Independent control of ion current and ion impact energy onto electrodes in dual frequency plasma devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boyle, P C; Ellingboe, A R; Turner, M M [Plasma Research Laboratory, National Centre for Plasma Science and Technology and School of Physical Sciences, Dublin City University, Dublin 9 (Ireland)

    2004-03-07

    Dual frequency capacitive discharges are designed to offer independent control of the flux and energy of ions impacting on an object immersed in a plasma. This is desirable in applications such as the processing of silicon wafers for microelectronics manufacturing. In such discharges, a low frequency component couples predominantly to the ions, while a high frequency component couples predominantly to electrons. Thus, the low frequency component controls the ion energy, while the high frequency component controls the plasma density. Clearly, this desired behaviour is not achieved for arbitrary configurations of the discharge, and in general one expects some unwanted coupling of ion flux and energy. In this paper we use computer simulations with the particle-in-cell method to show that the most important governing parameter is the ratio of the driving frequencies. If the ratio of the high and low frequencies is great enough, essentially independent control of the ion energy and flux is possible by manipulation of the high and low frequency power sources. Other operating parameters, such as pressure, discharge geometry, and absolute power, are of much less significance.

  12. Catalyst materials based on plasma-processed alumina nanopowder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dubencovs Konstantins

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available A platinum catalyst for glycerol oxidation by molecular oxygen has been developed applying the extractive-pyrolytic method and using, as a support, a fine alumina powder with an average particle size of 30-60 nm processed by plasma technology. The extractive-pyrolytic method (EPM allows affixing small amounts of catalytic metals (1-5% with the particle size ranging from several nanometers to several tens of nanometers onto the surface of the support. The prepared material - 4.8 wt. % platinum on nano-sized alumina - can be used as a catalyst for glycerol oxidation by oxygen with conversion up to 84%, in order to produce some organic acids (glyceric and lactic acid with a selectivity of about 60%.

  13. Orthopaedic Device Approval Through the Premarket Approval Process: A Financial Feasibility Analysis for a Single Center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Brian W; Iorio, Matthew L; Day, Charles S

    2017-03-15

    The 2 main routes of medical device approval through the U.S. Food and Drug Administration are the premarket approval (PMA) process, which requires clinical trials, and the 510(k) premarket notification, which exempts devices from clinical trials if they are substantially equivalent to an existing device. Recently, there has been growing concern regarding the safety of devices approved through the 510(k) premarket notification. The PMA process decreases the potential for device recall; however, it is substantially more costly and time-consuming. Investors and medical device companies are only willing to invest in devices if they can expect to recoup their investment within a timeline of roughly 7 years. Our study utilizes financial modeling to assess the financial feasibility of approving various orthopaedic medical devices through the 510(k) and PMA processes. The expected time to recoup investment through the 510(k) process ranged from 0.585 years to 7.715 years, with an average time of 2.4 years; the expected time to recoup investment through the PMA route ranged from 2.9 years to 24.5 years, with an average time of 8.5 years. Six of the 13 orthopaedic device systems that we analyzed would require longer than our 7-year benchmark to recoup the investment costs of the PMA process. With the 510(k) premarket notification, only 1 device system would take longer than 7 years to recoup its investment costs. Although the 510(k) premarket notification has demonstrated safety concerns, broad requirements for PMA authorization may limit device innovation for less-prevalent orthopaedic conditions. As a result, new approval frameworks may be beneficial. Our report demonstrates how current regulatory policies can potentially influence orthopaedic device innovation.

  14. Ni/Al Intermetallics Plasma Transferred Arc Processing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    VeronicaA.B.Almeida; AnaSofiaC.M.D'Oliveira

    2004-01-01

    In-situ alloy development during surface processing allows for a limitless materials selection to protect components exposed to severe service conditions. In fact surface alloying offers the possibility to strengthen surface components with alloys that would not be possible to process otherwise. This work used Plasma transferred arc (PTA) hardfacing for surface alloying. Different amounts of aluminium powder, 5-25%, were added to a Ni based superalloy, from Hastealloy C family, in the atomized form. The mixture was homogeneized in a ball mill and PTA deposited on carbon steel substrate. The influence of different processing parameters on the final surface alloy was evaluated as current intensity and depositing velocity were varied. Coatings were characterized by optical and scanning electronic microscopy, X-ray diffraction and Vickers microhardness profiles, under a 500g load. Results showed that PTA hardfacing is an adequate surface alloying. For the conditions tested increasing hardness was obtained by solid solution for the lower amounts of Al added and due to the new intermetallic phases for the richer Al mixture.

  15. Ni/Al Intermetallics Plasma Transferred Arc Processing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ver(o)nica A. B. Almeida; Ana Sofia C. M. D'Oliveira

    2004-01-01

    In-situ alloy development during surface processing allows for a limitless materials selection to protect components exposed to severe service conditions. In fact surface alloying offers the possibility to strengthen surface components with alloys that would not be possible to process otherwise. This work used Plasma transferred arc (PTA) hardfacing for surface alloying. Different amounts of aluminium powder, 5-25%, were added to a Ni based superalloy, from Hastealloy C family, in the atomized form. The mixture was homogeneized in a ball mill and PTA deposited on carbon steel substrate. The influence of different processing parameters on the final surface alloy was evaluated as current intensity and depositing velocity were varied. Coatings were characterized by optical and scanning electronic microscopy, X-ray diffraction and Vickers microhardness profiles, under a 500g load. Results showed that PTA hardfacing is an adequate surface alloying. For the conditions tested increasing hardness was obtained by solid solution for the lower amounts of Al added and due to the new intermetallic phases for the richer Al mixture.

  16. SEMICONDUCTOR DEVICES Process optimization of a deep trench isolation structure for high voltage SOI devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuiying, Zhu; Qinsong, Qian; Jing, Zhu; Weifeng, Sun

    2010-12-01

    The process reasons for weak point formation of the deep trench on SOI wafers have been analyzed in detail. An optimized trench process is also proposed. It is found that there are two main reasons: one is over-etching laterally of the silicon on the surface of the buried oxide caused by a fringe effect; and the other is the slow growth rate of the isolation oxide in the concave silicon corner of the trench bottom. In order to improve the isolation performance of the deep trench, two feasible ways for optimizing the trench process are proposed. The improved process thickens the isolation oxide and rounds sharp silicon corners at their weak points, increasing the applied voltage by 15-20 V at the same leakage current. The proposed new trench isolation process has been verified in the foundry's 0.5-μm HV SOI technology.

  17. Development of a double plasma gun device for investigation of effects of vapor shielding on erosion of PFC materials under ELM-like pulsed plasma bombardment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakuma, I.; Iwamoto, D.; Kitagawa, Y.; Kikuchi, Y.; Fukumoto, N.; Nagata, M.

    2012-10-01

    It is considered that thermal transient events such as type I edge localized modes (ELMs) could limit the lifetime of plasma-facing components (PFCs) in ITER. We have investigated surface damage of tungsten (W) materials under transient heat and particle loads by using a magnetized coaxial plasma gun (MCPG) device at University of Hyogo. The capacitor bank energy for the plasma discharge is 144 kJ (2.88 mF, 10 kVmax). Surface melting of a W material was clearly observed at the energy density of ˜2 MJ/m2. It is known that surface melting and evaporation during a transient heat load could generate a vapor cloud layer in front of the target material [1]. Then, the subsequent erosion could be reduced by the vapor shielding effect. In this study, we introduce a new experiment using two MCPG devices (MCPG-1, 2) to understand vapor shielding effects of a W surface under ELM-like pulsed plasma bombardment. The capacitor bank energy of MCPG-2 is almost same as that of MCPG-1. The second plasmoid is applied with a variable delay time after the plasmoid produced by MCPG-1. Then, a vapor cloud layer could shield the second plasma load. To verify the vapor shielding effects, surface damage of a W material is investigated by changing the delay time. In the conference, the preliminary experimental results will be shown.[4pt] [1] A. Hassanein et al., J. Nucl. Mater. 390-391, pp. 777-780 (2009).

  18. Plasma sputtering robotic device for in-situ thick coatings of long, small diameter vacuum tubesa)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hershcovitch, A.; Blaskiewicz, M.; Brennan, J. M.; Custer, A.; Dingus, A.; Erickson, M.; Fischer, W.; Jamshidi, N.; Laping, R.; Liaw, C.-J.; Meng, W.; Poole, H. J.; Todd, R.

    2015-05-01

    A novel robotic plasma magnetron mole with a 50 cm long cathode was designed, fabricated, and operated. The reason for this endeavor is to alleviate the problems of unacceptable resistive heating of stainless steel vacuum tubes in the BNL Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC). The magnetron mole was successfully operated to copper coat an assembly containing a full-size, stainless steel, cold bore, RHIC magnet tubing connected to two types of RHIC bellows, to which two additional pipes made of RHIC tubing were connected. To increase the cathode lifetime, a movable magnet package was developed, and the thickest possible cathode was made, with a rather challenging target to substrate (de facto anode) distance of less than 1.5 cm. Achieving reliable steady state magnetron discharges at such a short cathode to anode gap was rather challenging, when compared to commercial coating equipment, where the target to substrate distance is 10's cm; 6.3 cm is the lowest experimental target to substrate distance found in the literature. Additionally, the magnetron developed during this project provides unique omni-directional uniform coating. The magnetron is mounted on a carriage with spring loaded wheels that successfully crossed bellows and adjusted for variations in vacuum tube diameter, while keeping the magnetron centered. Electrical power and cooling water were fed through a cable bundle. The umbilical cabling system is driven by a motorized spool. Excellent coating adhesion was achieved. Measurements indicated that well-scrubbed copper coating reduced secondary electron yield to 1, i.e., the problem of electron clouds can be eliminated. Room temperature RF resistivity measurement indicated that a 10 μm copper coated stainless steel RHIC tube has a conductivity close to that of pure copper tubing. Excellent coating adhesion was achieved. The device details and experimental results are described.

  19. Plasma Sputtering Robotic Device for In-Situ Thick Coatings of Long, Small Diameter Vacuum Tubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hershcovitch, Ady

    2014-10-01

    A novel robotic plasma magnetron mole with a 50 cm long cathode was designed fabricated & operated. Reason for this endeavor is to alleviate the problems of unacceptable ohmic heating of stainless steel vacuum tubes and of electron clouds, due to high secondary electron yield (SEY), in the BNL Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC). The magnetron mole was successfully operated to copper coat an assembly containing a full-size, stainless steel, cold bore, RHIC magnet tubing connected to two types of RHIC bellows, to which two additional pipes made of RHIC tubing were connected. To increase cathode lifetime, movable magnet package was developed, and thickest possible cathode was made, with a rather challenging target to substrate (de facto anode) distance of less than 1.5 cm. Achieving reliable steady state magnetron discharges at such a short cathode to anode gap was rather challenging, when compared to commercial coating equipment, where the target to substrate distance is 10's cm; 6.3 cm is the lowest experimental target to substrate distance found in the literature. Additionally, the magnetron developed during this project provides unique omni-directional uniform coating. The magnetron is mounted on a carriage with spring loaded wheels that successfully crossed bellows and adjusted for variations in vacuum tube diameter, while keeping the magnetron centered. Electrical power and cooling water were fed through a cable bundle. The umbilical cabling system is driven by a motorized spool. Excellent coating adhesion was achieved. Measurements indicated that well-scrubbed copper coating reduced SEY to 1, i.e., the problem of electron clouds can be eliminated. Room temperature RF resistivity measurement indicated that 10 μm Cu coated stainless steel RHIC tube has conductivity close to that of pure copper tubing. Excellent coating adhesion was achieved. Device detail and experimental results will be presented. Work supported by Brookhaven Science Associates, LLC under

  20. Plasma sputtering robotic device for in-situ thick coatings of long, small diameter vacuum tubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hershcovitch, A., E-mail: hershcovitch@bnl.gov; Blaskiewicz, M.; Brennan, J. M.; Fischer, W.; Liaw, C.-J.; Meng, W.; Todd, R. [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, New York 11973 (United States); Custer, A.; Dingus, A.; Erickson, M.; Jamshidi, N.; Laping, R.; Poole, H. J. [PVI, Oxnard, California 93031 (United States)

    2015-05-15

    A novel robotic plasma magnetron mole with a 50 cm long cathode was designed, fabricated, and operated. The reason for this endeavor is to alleviate the problems of unacceptable resistive heating of stainless steel vacuum tubes in the BNL Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC). The magnetron mole was successfully operated to copper coat an assembly containing a full-size, stainless steel, cold bore, RHIC magnet tubing connected to two types of RHIC bellows, to which two additional pipes made of RHIC tubing were connected. To increase the cathode lifetime, a movable magnet package was developed, and the thickest possible cathode was made, with a rather challenging target to substrate (de facto anode) distance of less than 1.5 cm. Achieving reliable steady state magnetron discharges at such a short cathode to anode gap was rather challenging, when compared to commercial coating equipment, where the target to substrate distance is 10's cm; 6.3 cm is the lowest experimental target to substrate distance found in the literature. Additionally, the magnetron developed during this project provides unique omni-directional uniform coating. The magnetron is mounted on a carriage with spring loaded wheels that successfully crossed bellows and adjusted for variations in vacuum tube diameter, while keeping the magnetron centered. Electrical power and cooling water were fed through a cable bundle. The umbilical cabling system is driven by a motorized spool. Excellent coating adhesion was achieved. Measurements indicated that well-scrubbed copper coating reduced secondary electron yield to 1, i.e., the problem of electron clouds can be eliminated. Room temperature RF resistivity measurement indicated that a 10 μm copper coated stainless steel RHIC tube has a conductivity close to that of pure copper tubing. Excellent coating adhesion was achieved. The device details and experimental results are described.

  1. All-Optical Signal Processing using Silicon Devices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Oxenløwe, Leif Katsuo; Pu, Minhao; Ding, Yunhong;

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents an overview of recent wo rk on the use of silicon waveguides for processing optical data signals. We will describe ultra-fast, ultra-broadband, polarisation-insensitive and phase-sensitive applications including processing of spectrally-efficient data formats and optical phase...

  2. Dynamic Control of Microwave Plasma Sources for Material Processing by Using Hyper-Simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yasaka, Yasuyoshi; Tsuji, Akihiro

    2010-11-01

    Uniformity of etching or deposition over a wafer is one of the key features for plasma processing with large-size wafers. The uniformity can be measured as a result of a process, and correction or improvement of the uniformity is made by changing device parameters such as power levels, gas flow rates, timings, and so on. Evaluation and control are, however, not combined or unified as a problem of plasma physics. They are assigned as the input and output of a black box of empirical transfer function obtained by expert systems or neural networks. We are going to establish a novel control system based on physics, in which a fluid simulation is used to obtain a power deposition profile necessary to produce the two-dimensional density distribution of desire. A control system of a microwave slot antenna then changes power distribution dynamically according to the output of the simulation. It should be noted that this simulation has inputs and outputs opposite to conventional ones, which, we call hyper-simulation, is one of the novel features of the control system.

  3. Analyses of quenching process during turn-off of plasma electrolytic carburizing on carbon steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Jie; Liu, Run; Xue, Wenbin; Wang, Bin; Jin, Xiaoyue; Du, Jiancheng

    2014-10-01

    Plasma electrolytic carburizing (PEC) under different turn-off modes was employed to fabricate a hardening layer on carbon steel in glycerol solution without stirring at 380 V for 3 min. The quenching process in fast turn-off mode or slow turn-off mode of power supply was discussed. The temperature in the interior of steel and electron temperature in plasma discharge envelope during the quenching process were evaluated. It was found that the cooling rates of PEC samples in both turn-off modes were below 20 °C/s, because the vapor film boiling around the steel sample reduced the cooling rate greatly in terms of Leidenfrost effect. Thus the quench hardening hardly took place, though the slow turn-off mode slightly decreased the surface roughness of PEC steel. At the end of PEC treatment, the fast turn-off mode used widely at present cannot enhance the surface hardness by quench hardening, and the slow turn-off mode was recommended in order to protect the electronic devices against a large current surge.

  4. Comparative study of nanocomposites prepared by pulsed and dc sputtering combined with plasma polymerization suitable for photovoltaic device applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hussain, Amreen A. [Physical Sciences Division, Institute of Advanced Study in Science and Technology, Guwahati, Assam (India); Pal, Arup R., E-mail: arpal@iasst.gov.in [Physical Sciences Division, Institute of Advanced Study in Science and Technology, Guwahati, Assam (India); Kar, Rajib [Laser and Plasma Technology Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Center, Trombay, Mumbai (India); Bailung, Heremba; Chutia, Joyanti [Physical Sciences Division, Institute of Advanced Study in Science and Technology, Guwahati, Assam (India); Patil, Dinkar S. [Laser and Plasma Technology Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Center, Trombay, Mumbai (India)

    2014-12-15

    Plasma processing, a single step method for production of large area composite films, is employed to deposit plasma polymerized aniline-Titanium dioxide (PPani-TiO{sub 2}) nanocomposite thin films. The deposition of PPani-TiO{sub 2} nanocomposite films are made using reactive magnetron sputtering and plasma polymerization combined process. This study focuses on the direct comparison between continuous and pulsed dc magnetron sputtering techniques of titanium in combination with rf plasma polymerization of aniline. The deposited PPani-TiO{sub 2} nanocomposite films are characterized and discussed in terms of structural, morphological and optical properties. A self powered hybrid photodetector has been developed by plasma based process. The proposed method provides a new route where the self-assembly of molecules, that is, the spontaneous association of atomic or molecular building blocks under plasma environment, emerge as a successful strategy to form well-defined structural and morphological units of nanometer dimensions. - Highlights: • PPani-TiO{sub 2} nanocomposite by pulsed and dc sputtering with rf plasma polymerization. • In-situ and Ex-situ H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} doping in PPani-TiO{sub 2} nanocomposite. • PPani-TiO{sub 2} nanocomposite based self-powered-hybrid photodetector.

  5. Work function tuning of plasma-enhanced atomic layer deposited WC{sub x}N{sub y} electrodes for metal/oxide/semiconductor devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zonensain, Oren; Fadida, Sivan; Eizenberg, Moshe [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Technion-Israel Institute of Technology, Haifa 32000 (Israel); Fisher, Ilanit; Gao, Juwen; Chattopadhyay, Kaushik; Harm, Greg; Mountsier, Tom; Danek, Michal [Lam Research Corporation, 4000 N. First Street, San Jose, California 95134 (United States)

    2015-02-23

    One of the main challenges facing the integration of metals as gate electrodes in advanced MOS devices is control over the Fermi level position at the metal/dielectric interface. In this study, we demonstrate the ability to tune the effective work function (EWF) of W-based electrodes by process modifications of the atomic layer deposited (ALD) films. Tungsten carbo-nitrides (WC{sub x}N{sub y}) films were deposited via plasma-enhanced and/or thermal ALD processes using organometallic precursors. The process modifications enabled us to control the stoichiometry of the WC{sub x}N{sub y} films. Deposition in hydrogen plasma (without nitrogen based reactant) resulted in a stoichiometry of WC{sub 0.4} with primarily W-C chemical bonding, as determined by x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. These films yielded a relatively low EWF of 4.2 ± 0.1 eV. The introduction of nitrogen based reactant to the plasma or the thermal ALD deposition resulted in a stoichiometry of WC{sub 0.1}N{sub 0.6–0.8} with predominantly W-N chemical bonding. These films produced a high EWF of 4.7 ± 0.1 eV.

  6. Evidence of nuclear fusion neutrons in an extremely small plasma focus device operating at 0.1 Joules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soto, Leopoldo; Pavéz, Cristián; Moreno, José; Altamirano, Luis; Huerta, Luis; Barbaglia, Mario; Clausse, Alejandro; Mayer, Roberto E.

    2017-08-01

    We report on D-D fusion neutron emission in a plasma device with an energy input of only 0.1 J, within a range where fusion events have been considered very improbable. The results presented here are the consequence of scaling rules we have derived, thus being the key point to assure the same energy density plasma in smaller devices than in large machines. The Nanofocus (NF)—our device—was designed and constructed at the P4 Lab of the Chilean Nuclear Energy Commission. Two sets of independent measurements, with different instrumentation, were made at two laboratories, in Chile and Argentina. The neutron events observed are 20σ greater than the background. The NF plasma is produced from a pulsed electrical discharge using a submillimetric anode, in a deuterium atmosphere, showing empirically that it is, in fact, possible to heat and compress the plasma. The strong evidence presented here stretches the limits beyond what was expected. A thorough understanding of this could possibly tell us where the theoretical limits actually lie, beyond conjectures. Notwithstanding, a window is thus open for low cost endeavours for basic fusion research. In addition, the development of small, portable, safe nonradioactive neutron sources becomes a feasible issue.

  7. Demonstration of neutron production in a table-top pinch plasma focus device operating at only tens of joules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soto, Leopoldo; Silva, Patricio; Moreno, Jose; Zambra, Marcelo; Pavez, Cristian [Comision Chilena de EnergIa Nuclear, Casilla 188-D, Santiago (Chile); Kies, Walter; Altamirano, Luis; Huerta, Luis [Center for Research and Applications in Plasma Physics and Pulsed Power, P4 (Chile); Mayer, Roberto E [Centro Atomico Bariloche and Instituto Balseiro, 8400 Bariloche (Argentina); Clausse, Alejandro [CNEA-CONICET and Universidad Nacional del Centro, 7000 Tandil (Argentina)], E-mail: lsoto@cchen.cl

    2008-10-21

    Neutron emission from a deuterium plasma pinch generated in a very small plasma focus (6 mm anode diameter) operating at only tens of joules is presented. A maximum current of 50 kA is achieved 140 ns after the beginning of the discharge, when the device is charged at 50 J (160 nF capacitor bank, 38 nH, 20-30 kV, 32-72 J). Although the stored energy is very low, the estimated energy density in the plasma and the energy per particle in the plasma are of the same order as in higher energy devices. The dependence of the neutron yield on the filling pressure of deuterium was obtained for discharges with 50 and 67 J stored in the capacitor bank. Neutrons were measured by means of a system based on a {sup 3}He proportional counter in current mode. The average neutron yield for 50 J discharges at 6 mbar was (1.2 {+-} 0.5) x 10{sup 4} neutrons per shot, and (3.6 {+-} 1.6) x 10{sup 4} for 67 J discharges at 9 mbar. The maximum energy of the neutrons was (2.7 {+-} 1.8) MeV. Possible applications related to substance detection and others are discussed.

  8. Production of stable isotopes utilizing the plasma separation process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bigelow, T. S.; Tarallo, F. J.; Stevenson, N. R.

    2005-12-01

    A plasma separation process (PSP) is being operated at Theragenics Corporation's®, Oak Ridge, TN, facility for the enrichment of stable isotopes. The PSP utilizes ion cyclotron mass discrimination to separate isotopes on a relatively large scale. With a few exceptions, nearly any metallic element could be processed with PSP. Output isotope enrichment factor depends on natural abundance and mass separation and can be fairly high in some cases. The Theragenics™ PSP facility is believed to be the only such process currently in operation. This system was developed and formerly operated under the US Department of Energy Advanced Isotope Separation program. Theragenics™ also has a laboratory at the PSP site capable of harvesting the isotopes from the process and a mass spectrometer system for analyzing enrichment and product purity. Since becoming operational in 2002, Theragenics™ has utilized the PSP to separate isotopes of several elements including: dysprosium, erbium, gadolinium, molybdenum and nickel. Currently, Theragenics™ is using the PSP for the separation of 102Pd, which is used as precursor for the production of 103Pd. The 103Pd radioisotope is the active ingredient in TheraSeed®, which is used in the treatment of early stage prostate cancer and being investigated for other medical applications. New industrial, medical and research applications are being investigated for isotopes that can be enriched on the PSP. Pre-enrichment of accelerator or reactor targets offers improved radioisotope production. Theragenics operates 14 cyclotrons for proton activation and has access to HFIR at ORNL for neutron activation of radioisotopes.

  9. Thermal compression chip interconnection using organic solderability preservative etched substrate by plasma processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Sung-Won; Choi, JoonYoung; Chung, Chin-Wook

    2014-12-01

    The solderability of copper organic solderbility preservative (CuOSP) finished substrate was enhanced by the plasma etching. To improve the solderability of TC interconnection with the CuOSP finished substrate, the plasma etching process is used. An Oxygen-Hydrogen plasma treatment process is performed to remove OSP material. To prevent the oxidation by oxygen plasma treatment, hydrogen reducing process is also performed before TC interconnection process. The thickness of OSP material after plasma etching is measured by optical reflection method and the component analysis by Auger Electron Spectroscopy is performed. From the lowered thickness, the bonding force of TC interconnection after OSP etching process is lowered. Also the electrical open/short test was performed after assembling the completed semiconductor packaging. The improved yield due to the plasma etching process is achieved.

  10. Research progress of laser welding process dynamic monitoring technology based on plasma characteristics signal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teng WANG

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available During the high-power laser welding process, plasmas are induced by the evaporation of metal under laser radiation, which can affect the coupling of laser energy and the workpiece, and ultimately impact on the reliability of laser welding quality and process directly. The research of laser-induced plasma is a focus in high-power deep penetration welding field, which provides a promising research area for realizing the automation of welding process quality inspection. In recent years, the research of laser welding process dynamic monitoring technology based on plasma characteristics is mainly in two aspects, namely the research of plasma signal detection and the research of laser welding process modeling. The laser-induced plasma in the laser welding is introduced, and the related research of laser welding process dynamic monitoring technology based on plasma characteristics at home and abroad is analyzed. The current problems in the field are summarized, and the future development trend is put forward.

  11. Pretreatment of plasma samples by a novel hollow fiber centrifugal ultrafiltrate device for the determination of cefaclor concentrations in human plasma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jun-Mei; Li, Cen; Jiang, Ye; Ren, Shu-Meng

    2010-10-29

    A simple sample preparation method was developed by using a centrifugal ultrafiltration (CF-UF) device with hollow fiber (HF) for the determination of cefaclor in plasma by HPLC. Samples were placed into a homemade device, which was consisted of a glass tube and a U-shaped hollow fiber. The filtrate was withdrawn from the hollow fiber into a syringe after centrifugation and 20 μL was directly injected into the HPLC for analysis. The HPLC method had a linear calibration curve in the concentration range of 6.00×10(-2)-30.7 μg mL(-1)(r=0.9996). The limit of detection (LOD) and limit of quantitation (LOQ) were 0.02 and 0.06 μg mL(-1), respectively. The intra and inter-day precisions (RSD) were 1.7%, 1.2%, 1.0% and 3.6%, 2.5%, 1.9%, respectively, for three concentrations. Assay accuracy was higher than 99.2% and the absolute recovery was 86.8-92.5%. It is feasible to use this novel and low cost device for sample pretreatment for the analysis of cefaclor in plasma.

  12. Charge Splitting In Situ Recorder (CSIR) for Real-Time Examination of Plasma Charging Effect in FinFET BEOL Processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Yi-Pei; Hsieh, Ting-Huan; Lin, Chrong Jung; King, Ya-Chin

    2017-09-18

    A novel device for monitoring plasma-induced damage in the back-end-of-line (BEOL) process with charge splitting capability is first-time proposed and demonstrated. This novel charge splitting in situ recorder (CSIR) can independently trace the amount and polarity of plasma charging effects during the manufacturing process of advanced fin field-effect transistor (FinFET) circuits. Not only does it reveal the real-time and in situ plasma charging levels on the antennas, but it also separates positive and negative charging effect and provides two independent readings. As CMOS technologies push for finer metal lines in the future, the new charge separation scheme provides a powerful tool for BEOL process optimization and further device reliability improvements.

  13. Collaborative Research: Fundamental Studies of Plasma Control Using Surface Embedded Electronic Devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Overzet, Lawrence J. [Univ. of Texas, Dallas, TX (United States); Raja, L. [Univ. of Texas, Austin, TX (United States)

    2015-06-06

    The research program was collaborative between the researchers at the University of Texas at Dallas and the University of Texas at Austin. The primary subject of this program was to investigate the possibility of active control of secondary electron emission (SEE) from surfaces in contact with plasmas and thereby actively control plasmas. Very few studies of ion-induced electron emission (IIEE) from semiconductors exist, and those that do exist primarily used high-energy ion beams in the experiments. Furthermore, those few studies took extreme measures to ensure that the measurements were performed on atomically clean surfaces because of the surface sensitivity of the IIEE process. Even a small exposure to air can change the IIEE yield significantly. In addition, much of the existing data for IIEE from semiconductors was obtained in the 1950s and ‘60s, when semiconductor materials were first being refined. As a result, nearly all of that data is for p-type Ge and Si. Before this investigation, experimental data on n-type materials was virtually non-existent. While the basic theory assumed that IIEE yields ought to be substantially independent of doping type and concentration, recent measurements of near atmospheric pressure plasmas and of breakdown suggested otherwise. These indirect measurements were made on surfaces that were not atomically clean and seemed to indicate that deep sub-surface changes to the bulk conduction band electron density could lead to substantial variations in the IIEE yield. Exactly in contradiction to the generally accepted theory. Insufficient direct data existed to settle the matter. We performed both experimental measurements and theoretical calculations of IIEE yields from both Si and Ge in order to help clarify whether or not conduction band electrons substantially change the IIEE yield. We used three wafers of each material to carry out the investigation: a heavily doped p-type, an intrinsic and a heavily doped n-type wafer. There

  14. Toward lightweight biometric signal processing for wearable devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Francescon, Roberto; Hooshmand, Mohsen; Gadaleta, Matteo; Grisan, Enrico; Yoon, Seung Keun; Rossi, Michele

    2015-01-01

    Wearable devices are becoming a natural and economic means to gather biometric data from end users. The massive amount of information that they will provide, unimaginable until a few years ago, owns an immense potential for applications such as continuous monitoring for personalized healthcare and use within fitness applications. Wearables are however heavily constrained in terms of amount of memory, transmission capability and energy reserve. This calls for dedicated, lightweight but still effective algorithms for data management. This paper is centered around lossy data compression techniques, whose aim is to minimize the amount of information that is to be stored on their onboard memory and subsequently transmitted over wireless interfaces. Specifically, we analyze selected compression techniques for biometric signals, quantifying their complexity (energy consumption) and compression performance. Hence, we propose a new class of codebook-based (CB) compression algorithms, designed to be energy efficient, online and amenable to any type of signal exhibiting recurrent patterns. Finally, the performance of the selected and the new algorithm is assessed, underlining the advantages offered by CB schemes in terms of memory savings and classification algorithms.

  15. Imaging of the Staphylococcus aureus Inactivation Process Induced by a Multigas Plasma Jet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takamatsu, Toshihiro; Kawano, Hiroaki; Sasaki, Yota; Uehara, Kodai; Miyahara, Hidekazu; Matsumura, Yuriko; Iwasawa, Atsuo; Azuma, Takeshi; Okino, Akitoshi

    2016-12-01

    To identify mechanisms underlying the bacterial inactivation process by atmospheric nonthermal plasma using a unique plasma jet that can generate various gas plasmas, Staphylococcus aureus were irradiated with carbon dioxide plasma, which produces a large amount of singlet oxygens, and nitrogen plasma, which produces a large amount of OH radicals. And damaged areas of plasma-treated bacteria were observed by field emission scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, and atomic force microscopy. As a result, bacteria were damaged by both gas plasmas, but the site of damage differed according to gas species. Therefore, it suggests that singlet oxygen generated by carbon dioxide plasma or other reactive species caused by singlet oxygen contributes to the damage of internal structures of bacteria through the cell wall and membrane, and OH radicals generated by nitrogen plasma or other reactive species derived from OH radicals contribute to damage of the cell wall and membrane.

  16. Solution-processing of chalcogenide materials for device applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zha, Yunlai

    Chalcogenide glasses are well-known for their desirable optical properties, which have enabled many infrared applications in the fields of photonics, medicine, environmental sensing and security. Conventional deposition methods such as thermal evaporation, chemical vapor deposition, sputtering or pulse laser deposition are efficient for fabricating structures on flat surfaces. However, they have limitations in deposition on curved surfaces, deposition of thick layers and component integration. In these cases, solution-based methods, which involve the dissolution of chalcogenide glasses and processing as a liquid, become a better choice for their flexibility. After proper treatment, the associated structures can have similar optical, chemical and physical properties to the bulk. This thesis presents an in-depth study of solution-processing chalcogenide glasses, starting from the "solution state" to the "film state" and the "structure state". Firstly, chalcogenide dissolution is studied to reveal the mechanisms at molecular level and build a foundation for material processing. Dissolution processes for various chalcogenide solvent pairs are reviewed and compared. Secondly, thermal processing, in the context of high temperature annealing, is explained along with the chemical and physical properties of the annealed films. Another focus is on nanopore formation in propylamine-processed arsenic sulfide films. Pore density changes with respect to annealing temperatures and durations are characterized. Base on a proposed vacancy coalescence theory, we have identified new dissolution strategies and achieved the breakthrough of pore-free film deposition. Thirdly, several solution methods developed along with the associated photonic structures are demonstrated. The first example is "spin-coating and lamination", which produces thick (over 10 mum) chalcogenide structures. Both homogeneous thick chalcogenide structures and heterogeneous layers of different chalcogenide glasses

  17. Transferred plasma jet from a dielectric barrier discharge for processing of poly(dimethylsiloxane) surfaces

    CERN Document Server

    Nascimento, Fellype do; Canesqui, Mara A; Moshkalev, Stanislav

    2016-01-01

    In this work we studied processing of poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) surfaces using dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) plasma in two different assemblies, one using the primary plasma jet obtained from a conventional DBD and the other using a DBD plasma jet transfer. The evolution of water contact angle (WCA) in function of plasma processing time and in function of aging time as well as the changes in the surface roughness of PDMS samples for both plasma treatments have been studied. We also compared vibrational and rotational temperatures for both plasmas and for the first time the vibrational temperature (T_vib) for the transferred plasma jet has been shown to be higher as compared with the primary jet. The increment in the T_vib value seems to be the main reason for the improvements in adhesion properties and surface wettability for the transferred plasma jet. Possible explanations for the increase in the vibrational temperature are presented.

  18. Imploding process and x-ray emission of shotgun z-pinch plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muto, Ryusuke [Nihon University, College of Science and Technology, Tokyo (Japan); Takasugi, Keiichi; Miyamoto, Tetsu [Nihon University, Atomic Energy Research Institute, Tokyo (Japan)

    2001-09-01

    Rayleigh-Taylor instability was observed on the surface of a contracting z-pinch plasma. Wavelength of the instability was analyzed from the envelope of the profile, and it increased with implosion. Analysis with finite Larmor radius effect shows that there is some acceleration of ions during the contraction process. A suggestion to obtain macroscopically uniform plasma is to increase plasma current without heating the plasma. (author)

  19. Numerical simulation of chemical processes in helium plasmas in atmosphere environment

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    欧阳建明; 郭伟; 王龙; 邵福球

    2005-01-01

    A model is built to study chemical processes in plasmas generated in helium with trace amounts of air at atmospheric pressure or low pressures. The plasma lifetimes and the temporal evolutions of the main charged species are presented. The plasma lifetimes are longer than that in air plasma at atmospheric pressure, but this is not true at low pressures. The electron number density does not strictly obey the exponential damping law in a longer period.

  20. Control of Beam Energy and Flux Ratio in an Ion-Beam-Background Plasma System Produced in a Double Plasma Device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Zian; Ma, Jinxiu; Li, Yuanrui; Sun, Yan; Jiang, Zhengqi

    2016-11-01

    Plasmas containing ion beams have various applications both in plasma technology and in fundamental research. The ion beam energy and flux are the two factors characterizing the beam properties. Previous studies have not achieved the independent adjustment of these two parameters. In this paper, an ion-beam-background-plasma system was produced with hot-cathode discharge in a double plasma device separated by two adjacent grids, with which the beam energy and flux ratio (the ratio between the beam flux and total ion flux) can be controlled independently. It is shown that the discharge voltage (i.e., voltage across the hot-cathode and anode) and the voltage drop between the two separation grids can be used to effectively control the beam energy while the flux ratio is not affected by these voltages. The flux ratio depends sensitively on hot-filaments heating current whose influence on the beam energy is relatively weak, and thus enabling approximate control of the flux ratio supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China (Nos. 11575183, 11175177)

  1. Calibration of the RSS-131 high efficiency ionization chamber for radiation dose monitoring during plasma experiments conducted on plasma focus device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szewczak, Kamil; Jednoróg, Sławomir

    2014-10-01

    Plasma research poses a radiation hazard. Due to the program of deuterium plasma research using the PF-1000 device, it is an intensive source of neutrons (up to 1011 n · pulse -1) with energy of 2,45 MeV and ionizing electromagnetic radiation with a broad energy spectrum. Both types of radiation are mostly emitted in ultra-short pulses (˜100 ns). The aim of this work was to test and calibrate the RSS-131 radiometer for its application in measurements of ultra-short electromagnetic radiation pulses with broad energy spectrum emitted during PF-1000 discharge. In addition, the results of raw measurements performed in the control room are presented.

  2. Ablation of high-Z material dust grains in edge plasmas of magnetic fusion devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marenkov, E. D.; Krasheninnikov, S. I.

    2014-12-01

    The model, including shielding effects of high-Z dust grain ablation in tokamak edge plasma, is presented. In a contrast to shielding models developed for pellets ablation in a hot plasma core, this model deals with the dust grain ablation in relatively cold edge plasma. Using some simplifications, a closed set of equations determining the grain ablation rate Γ is derived and analyzed both analytically and numerically. The scaling law for Γ versus grain radius and ambient plasma parameters is obtained and confirmed by the results of numerical solutions. The results obtained are compared with both dust grain models containing no shielding effects and the pellet ablation models.

  3. Plasma-Material Interface Development for Future Spherical Tokamak-based Devices in NSTX.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    et. al, V

    2011-09-24

    , ELMs otherwise suppressed due to lithium conditioning. Fast divertor measurements showed that impulsive particle and heat fluxes due to the ELMs were significantly dissipated in the high magnetic flux expansion region of the snowflake divertor. The snowflake divertor configuration is being combined in experiments with extrinsic deuterium or impurity gas puffing for increased dissipative divertor power losses, additional upper divertor nulls for increased power sharing between the upper and the lower divertors, and lithium coated plasma facing components for large area ion pumping. These efforts are aimed at the development of an integrated PMI for future ST-based devices for fusion development applications.

  4. Plasma diagnostics in a pulsed accelerator used for material processing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhukeshov, A [Science Research Institute of Experimental and Theoretical Physics, al-Farabi Kazakh National University, 96a Tole bi str., 050012 Almaty (Kazakhstan)

    2007-04-15

    Results of research work of a pulsed plasma accelerator, designed as diagnostic and material science stands in SRIETP are presented. We present results on the development of electric and magnetic probes used for measurement of plasma parameters. The physical properties and changes in structure of vanadium alloy, common quality carbon and stainless steels have been investigated as well.

  5. Titanium Metal Powder Production by the Plasma Quench Process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    R. A. Cordes; A. Donaldson

    2000-09-01

    The goals of this project included the scale-up of the titanium hydride production process to a production rate of 50 kg/hr at a purity level of 99+%. This goal was to be achieved by incrementally increasing the production capability of a series of reactor systems. This methodic approach was designed to allow Idaho Titanium Technologies to systematically address the engineering issues associated with plasma system performance, and powder collection system design and performance. With quality powder available, actual fabrication with the titanium hydride was to be pursued. Finally, with a successful titanium production system in place, the production of titanium aluminide was to be pursued by the simultaneously injection of titanium and aluminum precursors into the reactor system. Some significant accomplishments of the project are: A unique and revolutionary torch/reactor capable of withstanding temperatures up to 5000 C with high thermal efficiency has been operated. The dissociation of titanium tetrachloride into titanium powder and HC1 has been demonstrated, and a one-megawatt reactor potentially capable of producing 100 pounds per hour has been built, but not yet operated at the powder level. The removal of residual subchlorides and adsorbed HC1 and the sintering of powder to form solid bodies have been demonstrated. The production system has been operated at production rates up to 40 pounds per hour. Subsequent to the end of the project, Idaho Titanium Technologies demonstrated that titanium hydride powder can indeed be sintered into solid titanium metal at 1500 C without sintering aids.

  6. AlN/GaN-Based MOS-HEMT Technology: Processing and Device Results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Taking

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Process development of AlN/GaN MOS-HEMTs is presented, along with issues and problems concerning the fabrication processes. The developed technology uses thermally grown Al2O3 as a gate dielectric and surface passivation for devices. Significant improvement in device performance was observed using the following techniques: (1 Ohmic contact optimisation using Al wet etch prior to Ohmic metal deposition and (2 mesa sidewall passivation. DC and RF performance of the fabricated devices will be presented and discussed in this paper.

  7. Highly sensitive devices for primary signal processing of the micromechanical capacitive transducers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konoplev, B.; Ryndin, E.; Lysenko, I.; Denisenko, M.; Isaeva, A.

    2016-12-01

    A method of signal processing devices design for micromechanical accelerometers with capacitive transducers is proposed. This method provides the complex solution of the sensibility increasing and noise immunity problems by finding of the difference frequency of signals, which are formed by two identical generators with micromechanical capacitive transducers in frequency control circuits. In this study the analog and digital versions of the highly sensitive signal processing devices circuits with frequency output were developed. The breadboards of these devices are fabricated and studied and the project of their integral realization is designed.

  8. The Main Plasma Chemical Process of Nitric Oxide Production by Arc Discharge%The Main Plasma Chemical Process of Nitric Oxide Production by Arc Discharge

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨旗; 胡辉; 陈卫鹏; 许杰; 张锦丽; 吴双

    2011-01-01

    By adopting the optical multi-channel analyzer combined with fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectrometer, the dominant free radicals and products generated by arc discharge were measured and studied, and the main plasma chemical reaction process in the nitric oxide production by arc discharge was identified. Plasma chemical kinetic curves of O, O2, N2, N and NO were simulated by using CHEMKIN and MATLAB. The results show that the main plasma chemical reaction process of nitric oxide production by arc discharge is a replacement reaction between O and N2, where NO can be generated instantaneously when discharging reaches stable.

  9. Development of plasma sources for ICRF heating experiment in KMAX mirror device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Xuan; Liu, Ming; Yi, Hongshen; Lin, Munan; Shi, Peiyun

    2016-10-01

    KMAX, Keda Mirror with AXisymmeticity, is a tandem mirror machine with a length of 10 meters and diameters of 1.2 meters in the central cell and 0.3 meters in the mirror throat. In the past experiments, the plasma was generated by helicon wave launched from the west end. We obtained the blue core mode in argon discharge, however, it cannot provide sufficient plasma for hydrogen discharge, which is at least 1012 cm-3 required for effective ICRF heating. Several attempts have thus been tried or under design to increase the central cell's plasma density: (1) a washer gun with aperture of 1cm has been successfully tested, and a plasma density of 1013 cm-3 was achieved in the west cell near the gun, however, the plasma is only 1011 cm-3 in the central cell possible due to the mirror trapping and/or neutral quenching effect (2) a larger washer gun with aperture of 2.5 cm and a higher power capacitor bank are being assembled in order to generate more plasmas. In addition, how to mitigate the neutrals is under consideration (3) A hot cathode is been designed and will be tested in combination with plasma gun or alone. Preliminary results from those plasma sources will be presented and discussed.

  10. XPS, SIMS and FTIR-ATR characterization of boronized graphite from the thermonuclear plasma device RFX-mod

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ghezzi, F., E-mail: ghezzi@ifp.cnr.it [Istituto di Fisica del Plasma, Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche, via Cozzi 53, 20125 Milan (Italy); Laguardia, L.; Caniello, R. [Istituto di Fisica del Plasma, Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche, via Cozzi 53, 20125 Milan (Italy); Canton, A.; Dal Bello, S.; Rais, B. [Consorzio RFX, Corso Stati Uniti 4, 35127 Padova (Italy); Anderle, M. [Knowledge Department, Provincia Autonoma di Trento, 38123, Trento (Italy)

    2015-11-01

    Highlights: • XPS, ATR and SIMS characterization of samples from the first wall of RFX-mod device. • Amorphous hydrogenated boron carbide plus other carbon type bonds. • Results suggest to increase the number of electrode used for boronization. - Abstract: In this paper the characterization of a thin (tens of nanometers) boron layer on fine grain polycrystalline graphite substrate is presented. The boron film is used as conditioning technique for the full graphite wall of the Reversed Field eXperiment–modified (RFX-mod) experiment, a device for the magnetic confinement of plasmas of thermonuclear interest. Aim of the present analysis is to enlighten the chemical structure of the film, the trapping mechanism that makes it a getter for oxygen and hydrogen and the reason of its loss of effectiveness after exposure to about 100 s of hydrogen plasma. X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS), Secondary Ions Mass Spectrometry (SIMS) and Fourier Transform Infra Red spectroscopy in combination with the Attenuated Total Reflectance (FTIR-ATR) were used to obtain the structure and the chemical composition of graphitic samples as coated or coated and subsequently exposed to hydrogen plasma after boron deposition. The boron layers on the only coated samples were found to be amorphous hydrogenated boron carbide plus a variety of bonds like B-B, B-H, B-O, B-OH, C-C, C-H, C-O, C-OH. Both the thickness and the homogeneity of the layers were found to depend on the distance of the sample from the anode during the deposition. The samples contained oxygen along the layer thickness, at level of 5%, bound to boron. The gettering action of the boron is therefore already active during the deposition itself. The exposure to plasma caused erosion of the boron film and higher content of H and O bound to boron throughout the whole thickness. The interaction of the B layer with plasma is therefore a bulk phenomenon.

  11. An in situ accelerator-based diagnostic for plasma-material interactions science on magnetic fusion devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartwig, Zachary S.; Barnard, Harold S.; Lanza, Richard C.; Sorbom, Brandon N.; Stahle, Peter W.; Whyte, Dennis G.

    2013-12-01

    This paper presents a novel particle accelerator-based diagnostic that nondestructively measures the evolution of material surface compositions inside magnetic fusion devices. The diagnostic's purpose is to contribute to an integrated understanding of plasma-material interactions in magnetic fusion, which is severely hindered by a dearth of in situ material surface diagnosis. The diagnostic aims to remotely generate isotopic concentration maps on a plasma shot-to-shot timescale that cover a large fraction of the plasma-facing surface inside of a magnetic fusion device without the need for vacuum breaks or physical access to the material surfaces. Our instrument uses a compact (˜1 m), high-current (˜1 milliamp) radio-frequency quadrupole accelerator to inject 0.9 MeV deuterons into the Alcator C-Mod tokamak at MIT. We control the tokamak magnetic fields - in between plasma shots - to steer the deuterons to material surfaces where the deuterons cause high-Q nuclear reactions with low-Z isotopes ˜5 μm into the material. The induced neutrons and gamma rays are measured with scintillation detectors; energy spectra analysis provides quantitative reconstruction of surface compositions. An overview of the diagnostic technique, known as accelerator-based in situ materials surveillance (AIMS), and the first AIMS diagnostic on the Alcator C-Mod tokamak is given. Experimental validation is shown to demonstrate that an optimized deuteron beam is injected into the tokamak, that low-Z isotopes such as deuterium and boron can be quantified on the material surfaces, and that magnetic steering provides access to different measurement locations. The first AIMS analysis, which measures the relative change in deuterium at a single surface location at the end of the Alcator C-Mod FY2012 plasma campaign, is also presented.

  12. Microwave annealing, a low-thermal-budget process for dopant activation in phosphorus-implanted MOSFET devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Cheol-Min; Cho, Won-Ju

    2016-09-01

    In this work, we investigated a low-thermal-budget dopant activation process based on microwave annealing (MWA) of phosphorus ions implanted by plasma doping and compared the proposed technique with the conventional furnace annealing and the rapid thermal annealing processes. We fabricated p-n junction diodes and metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistors (MOSFETs) on silicon and silicon-on-insulator substrates, respectively, in order to examine the dopant activation resulting from MWA. The investigated low-thermal-budget MWA technique proved effective for implanted dopant atom activation and diffusion suppression. In addition, a good interface property between the gate oxide and the silicon channel was achieved. Thus, low-thermal-budget MWA is a promising and effective method for the fabrication of highly-integrated semiconductor devices.

  13. Recombination processes in a flowing magnetized plasma: Application to ionization energy recovery in the variable specific impulse magnetoplasma rocket (VASIMR)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chavers, Donald Gregory

    Electric propulsion involves the acceleration of charged particles (ions and electrons) through electric and magnetic body forces. The collection of these charged particles, or plasma, cannot be stored but must be created in-situ. Therefore, energy must be supplied to a neutral gas to create the plasma that is accelerated by the body forces. The energy that is used to create the plasma, i.e., ionization energy, is typically lost, "frozen" in the exhaust of the thruster. When the kinetic energy in the plasma flow is much larger than the energy used to create the plasma, this frozen-flow loss is negligible. Conversely, if the frozen-flow loss is a major fraction of the total plasma energy, its recovery, even in a partial way, may improve the energy efficiency of the thruster while also providing a potential means for thrust augmentation. This dissertation investigates the underlying physics, which could enable the practical recovery of frozen-flow losses by processes such as surface and volume recombination. For surface recombination, the ions approach the surface of the metal and are neutralized by electrons from the metal via the Auger neutralization process. For volume recombination, the ions and electrons recombine, with energy released via line radiation or by transferring energy to a third body such as another electron. Since the total energy of the neutralized ion, an atom, is less than the total energy of the ion and electron pair before recombination, conservation of energy requires the release of energy as the ion and electron recombine. The measurements described in this dissertation were performed on the VX-10 experiment, a plasma device supporting the development of the Variable Specific Impulse Magnetoplasma Rocket (VASIMR) concept and located at the Advanced Space Propulsion Laboratory of the Johnson Space Center. Results suggest that the recombination energy can be recovered. The available energy and power recovered depends on the local plasma

  14. Addressable inverter matrix for process and device characterization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buehler, M. G.; Sayah, H. R.

    1985-01-01

    The addressable inverter matrix consists of 222 inverters each accessible with the aid of a shift register. The structure has proven useful in characterizing the variability of inverter transfer curves and in diagnosing processing faults. For good 3-micron CMOS bulk inverters investigated, the percent standard deviation of the inverter threshold voltage was less than one percent and the inverter gain (the slope of the inverter transfer curve at the inverter threshold vltage) was less than 3 percent. The average noise margin for the inverters was near 2 volts for a power supply voltage of 5 volts. The specific faults studied included undersize pull-down transistor widths and various open contacts in the matrix.

  15. Heat and Mass Transfer Processes in Scrubber of Flue Gas Heat Recovery Device

    OpenAIRE

    Veidenbergs, I; Blumberga, D; Vīgants, E; Kozuhars, G

    2010-01-01

    The paper deals with the heat and mass transfer process research in a flue gas heat recovery device, where complicated cooling, evaporation and condensation processes are taking place simultaneously. The analogy between heat and mass transfer is used during the process of analysis. In order to prepare a detailed process analysis based on heat and mass process descriptive equations, as well as the correlation for wet gas parameter calculation, software in the Microsoft Office Excel environment...

  16. An Intelligent Software Workflow Process Design for Location Management on Mobile Devices

    CERN Document Server

    Rao, N Mallikharjuna

    2012-01-01

    Advances in the technologies of networking, wireless communication and trimness of computers lead to the rapid development in mobile communication infrastructure, and have drastically changed information processing on mobile devices. Users carrying portable devices can freely move around, while still connected to the network. This provides flexibility in accessing information anywhere at any time. For improving more flexibility on mobile device, the new challenges in designing software systems for mobile networks include location and mobility management, channel allocation, power saving and security. In this paper, we are proposing intelligent software tool for software design on mobile devices to fulfill the new challenges on mobile location and mobility management. In this study, the proposed Business Process Redesign (BPR) concept is aims at an extension of the capabilities of an existing, widely used process modeling tool in industry with 'Intelligent' capabilities to suggest favorable alternatives to an ...

  17. Analysis of Physics Processes in the AC Plasma Torch Discharge under High Pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Safronov, A. A.; Vasilieva, O. B.; Dudnik, J. D.; E Kuznetsov, V.; Kuchina, J. A.; Shiryaev, V. N.; Pavlov, A. V.

    2017-04-01

    The paper is devoted to investigation of electrophysical processes in the electric discharge generated by a three-phase AC plasma torch when using a high pressure inert working gas. AC plasma torch design with end electrodes intended for work on inert gases at pressures up to 81 bar is studied. Current-voltage characteristics for different gas flow rates and pressures are presented. Physical processes characteristics of the arising voltage ripples which depend on various working parameters of the plasma torch have been investigated. Arc burning processes in the electric discharge chamber of the three-phase AC plasma torch at various working parameters were photographed.

  18. The kinetic studies of direct methane oxidation to methanol in the plasma process

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    INDARTO Antonius; CHOI Jae-Wook; LEE Hwaung; SONG Hyung Keun

    2008-01-01

    The research outlined here includes a study of methanol production from direct methane conversion by means of thermal and plasma method. The kinetic study, derived from thermal-based approach, was carried out to investigate thoroughly the possible intermediate species likely to be presented in the process. A set of plasma experiments was undertaken by using dielectric barrier discharge (DBD), classified as non-thermal plasma, done at atmospheric pressure and room temperature. Plasma proc-ess yields more methanol than thermal process at the same methane conversion rates and methane to oxygen feed ratios. Oxidation reaction of thermal process resulted CO and CO2 as the most dominant products and the selectivity reached 19% and 68%, respectively. Moreover, more CO and less CO2 were produced in plasma process than in thermal process. The selectivity of CO and CO2 by plasma was 47% and 20%, respectively. Ethane (C2H6) was detected as the only higher hydrocarbon with a signifi-cant concentration. The concentration of ethane reached 9% of the total products in plasma process and 17% in thermal process. The maximum selectivity of methanol, the target material of this research, was 12% obtained by plasma method and less than 5% by thermal process. In some certain points, the kinetic model closely matched with the experimental results.

  19. Applications and challenges of plasma processes in nanobiotechnology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rossi, F; Colpo, P, E-mail: francois.rossi@jrc.ec.europa.eu [European Commission, Joint Research Centre, Institute for Health and Consumer Protection (IHCP), I-21020, Ispra (Italy)

    2011-05-04

    We present an overview of the possibilities offered by plasma technologies, in particular the combination plasma polymers deposition, colloidal lithography, e-beam lithography and microcontact printing, to produce micro- and nanostructured surfaces with chemical and topographical contrast for applications in nanobiotechnology. It is shown that chemical and topographical patterns can be obtained on different substrates, with dimensions down to a few tenths of 10 nm. The applications of these nanostructured surfaces in biology, biochemistry and biodetection are presented and the advantages and limitation of the plasma techniques in this context underlined.

  20. On the history of plasma treatment and comparison of microbiostatic efficacy of a historical high-frequency plasma device with two modern devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Napp, Judith; Daeschlein, Georg; Napp, Matthias; von Podewils, Sebastian; Gümbel, Denis; Spitzmueller, Romy; Fornaciari, Paolo; Hinz, Peter; Jünger, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Hintergrund: Kaltes Atmosphärendruckplasma (CAP) hat durch seine mannigfaltigen bioaktiven Eigenschaften ein neues medizinisches Feld definiert: die Plasmamedizin. Allerdings wurde vor etwa 100 Jahren CAP in verwandter Form in der Hochfrequenztherapie genutzt. Zielsetzung dieser Studie war eine Übersicht über die historischen Plasmabehandlungen zu gewinnen und Daten bezüglich der antimikrobiellen Wirkung eines historischen Hochfrequenzapparats zu gewinnen.Methode: Erstens wurde historische Literatur bezüglich CAP-Behandlungen ausgewertet, da aus dem heutigen Schrifttum keine Angaben gewonnen werden konnten. Zweitens wurde die Empfindlichkeit von fünf verschiedenen bakteriellen Wundisolaten auf Agar gegenüber einer historischen Plasmaquelle (violet wand [VW]) und zwei modernen Geräten (atmospheric pressure plasma jet [APPJ] und Dielectric Barrier Discharge [DBD]) ermittelt. Die erzielten Hemmhöfe wurde verglichen. Ergebnisse: Die seinerzeit populärsten elektromedizinischen Anwendungen erzeugten durch Glaselektroden sogenannte Effluvien, die mit modernem CAP verwandt sind. Alle drei untersuchten Plasmaquellen zeigten eine vollständige Eradikation aller behandelter Isolate im plasmabehandelten Bereich. Die historische Plasmaquelle (VW) war dabei ähnlich wirksam wie die modernen Plasmaquellen. Schlussfolgerung: In begrenztem Umfang kann retrograd ein Wirksamkeitsnachweis der historischen Plasmabehandlungen abgeleitet werden, insbesondere bei der Behandlung infektiöser Erkrankungen. Die zugrunde liegende Technologie könnte für die Entwicklung moderner Nachfolgegeräte genutzt werden.

  1. Value driven innovation in medical device design: a process for balancing stakeholder voices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Ana, F J; Umstead, K A; Phillips, G J; Conner, C P

    2013-09-01

    The innovation process has often been represented as a linear process which funnels customer needs through various business and process filters. This method may be appropriate for some consumer products, but in the medical device industry there are some inherent limitations to the traditional innovation funnel approach. In the medical device industry, there are a number of stakeholders who need to have their voices heard throughout the innovation process. Each stakeholder has diverse and unique needs relating to the medical device, the needs of one may highly affect the needs of another, and the relationships between stakeholders may be tenuous. This paper describes the application of a spiral innovation process to the development of a medical device which considers three distinct stakeholder voices: the Voice of the Customer, the Voice of the Business and the Voice of the Technology. The process is presented as a case study focusing on the front-end redesign of a class III medical device for an orthopedics company. Starting from project initiation and scope alignment, the process describes four phases, Discover, Envision, Create, and Refine, and concludes with value assessment of the final design features.

  2. Impacts of Ambient and Ablation Plasmas on Short- and Ultrashort-Pulse Laser Processing of Surfaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nadezhda M. Bulgakova

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available In spite of the fact that more than five decades have passed since the invention of laser, some topics of laser-matter interaction still remain incompletely studied. One of such topics is plasma impact on the overall phenomenon of the interaction and its particular features, including influence of the laser-excited plasma re-radiation, back flux of energetic plasma species, and massive material redeposition, on the surface quality and processing efficiency. In this paper, we analyze different plasma aspects, which go beyond a simple consideration of the well-known effect of plasma shielding of laser radiation. The following effects are considered: ambient gas ionization above the target on material processing with formation of a “plasma pipe”; back heating of the target by both laser-driven ambient and ablation plasmas through conductive and radiative heat transfer; plasma chemical effects on surface processing including microstructure growth on liquid metals; complicated dynamics of the ablation plasma flow interacting with an ambient gas that can result in substantial redeposition of material around the ablation spot. Together with a review summarizing our main to-date achievements and outlining research directions, we present new results underlining importance of laser plasma dynamics and photoionization of the gas environment upon laser processing of materials.

  3. Formation and sustainment of low aspect ratio torus plasma by ECH in the LATE device

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Uchida, Masaki; Higaki, Kenichi; Yoshinaga, Tomokazu; Igami, Hiroe; Tanaka, Hitoshi; Maekawa, Takashi [Kyoto Univ., Kyoto (Japan)

    2003-07-01

    A plasma current of I{sub p} {approx_equal} 3 kA is generated and maintained for 1 second by injecting a 2.45 GHz microwave power of 5 kW without Ohmic heating power. Magnetic measurements suggest that closed flux surfaces are formed. The electron density inferred from an interferometer is more than 1.0 x 10{sup 11} cm{sup -3} which is beyond the plasma cut off density, suggesting that electron cyclotron heating by mode-converted electron Bernstein waves may be responsible for plasma heating and current drive. The plasma currents are observed to increase with the increase of RF power and equilibrium vertical field, and I{sub p} {approx_equal} 5 kA have been obtained by 2 GHz klystron power of 53 kW. (author)

  4. Ion sensitive probe measurement in the linear plasma device PSI-2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ezumi, N. [Nagano National College of Technology, 716 Tokuma, Nagano 381-8550 (Japan)]. E-mail: ezumi@ec.nagano-nct.ac.jp; Kiss' ovski, Zh. [Faculty of Physics, Sofia University, Sofia 1164 (Bulgaria); Bohmeyer, W. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Plasmaphysik, Bereich Plasmadiagnostik, Brook-Taylor-Str. 6, 12489 Berlin (Germany); Fussmann, G. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Plasmaphysik, Bereich Plasmadiagnostik, Brook-Taylor-Str. 6, 12489 Berlin (Germany)

    2005-03-01

    The suitability of an ion sensitive probe (ISP) with respect to ion temperature (T {sub i}) measurements has been tested in the linear plasma generator in PSI-2. Current-voltage (I-V) characteristics were recorded as a function of two key parameters: shielding height (h) and potential differences between inner and outer electrodes (V {sub B}). It could be experimentally confirmed that the current within the electron saturation region is reduced with increasing h. Furthermore, the I-V characteristics change drastically when V {sub B} is varied. Radial profiles of the plasma parameters including plasma and floating potentials could be taken. Whereas the T {sub i} values determined by ISP in the plasma core region agree fairly with those obtained by using a local optical probe, severe interpretation difficulties occurred for the outer regions.

  5. Hybrid processing of Ti-6Al-4V using plasma immersion ion implantation combined with plasma nitriding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silva Maria Margareth da

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Based on the fact that the Ti-6Al-4V alloy has good mechanical properties, excellent resistance to corrosion and also excellent biocompatibility, however with low wear resistance, this work aims to test plasma processes or combination of plasma and ion implantation processes to improve these characteristics. Two types of processing were used: two steps PIII (Plasma Immersion Ion Implantation combined with PN (Plasma Nitriding and single step PIII treatment. According to Auger Electron Spectroscopy (AES results, the best solution was obtained by PIII for 150 minutes resulting in ~ 65 nm of nitrogen implanted layer, while the sample treated with PIII (75 minutes and PN (75 minutes reached ~ 35 nm implanted layer. The improvement of surface properties could also be confirmed by the nanoindentation technique, with values of hardness increasing for both processes. AFM (Atomic Force Microscopy characterization showed that the single step PIII process presented greater efficiency than the duplex process (PIII + PN, probably due to the sputtering occurring during the second step (PN removing partially the implanted layer of first step (PIII.

  6. Effect of oxygen plasma treatment on the electrochemical properties of Prussian blue electrodes for transparent electrochromic devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, A-Young [Advanced Energy Materials Processing Laboratory, Center for Energy Convergence Research, Green City Research Institute, Korea Institute of Science and Technology, Hwarangno 14-gil 5, Seongbuk-gu, Seoul 136-791 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Material Science and Engineering, Korea University, Seoul 136-701 (Korea, Republic of); Park, Ji Hun [Advanced Energy Materials Processing Laboratory, Center for Energy Convergence Research, Green City Research Institute, Korea Institute of Science and Technology, Hwarangno 14-gil 5, Seongbuk-gu, Seoul 136-791 (Korea, Republic of); Byun, Dongjin [Department of Material Science and Engineering, Korea University, Seoul 136-701 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Joong Kee, E-mail: leejk@kist.re.kr [Advanced Energy Materials Processing Laboratory, Center for Energy Convergence Research, Green City Research Institute, Korea Institute of Science and Technology, Hwarangno 14-gil 5, Seongbuk-gu, Seoul 136-791 (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-11-01

    The effect of oxygen plasma on the electrochromic characteristics of electrochromic devices that utilize Prussian blue electrodes is investigated. Prussian blue working electrodes were electrodeposited on fluorine-doped tin oxide films that were grown on glass substrates by electron cyclotron resonance-metal organic chemical vapor deposition. An indium tin oxide coated glass was employed as the counter electrode that served as an ion storage layer. The goal of the oxygen plasma treatment is to increase the oxygen functional groups on the surface of the Prussian blue electrode leading to the enhancement of the oxidation reaction and eventually the increase in coloration efficiency. Improvement of electrochromic properties, such as optical density and response time, was also observed following plasma treatment. - Highlights: • Prussian blue (PB) films on SnOx:F thin film as a working electrode are investigated. • PB color changed that in oxidation state is blue and in reduction state is transparent. • Enhancement of electrochemical performance of electrode after oxygen plasma treatment.

  7. Ammonia formation and W coatings interaction with deuterium/nitrogen plasmas in the linear device GyM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laguardia, L.; Caniello, R.; Cremona, A.; Dellasega, D.; Dell'Era, F.; Ghezzi, F.; Gittini, G.; Granucci, G.; Mellera, V.; Minelli, D.; Pallotta, F.; Passoni, M.; Ricci, D.; Vassallo, E.

    2015-08-01

    In this work results of the first D2/N2 experiments in GyM, a linear device able to produce plasmas of interest for the ITER divertor (ne 5 ṡ 1010 cm-3, Te 5 eV, ion flux 3-5 ṡ 1020 m-2s-1) are presented. Plasmas simulating a N-seeding scenario have been performed to evaluate ammonia formation and its effect on exposed W coatings. The presence of ND emission lines in the plasma can be correlated with the formation of ammonia, further directly detected and quantified by chromatography analysis of the exhaust. Four different W specimens were exposed in GyM to a plasma fluence of 8.78 ṡ 1023 m-2. XPS analysis evidenced the formation of WxNy layers with nitrogen concentration in the range of 1-10% depending on the initial morphology and structure of the W samples. In all analyzed cases, nitrogen was bound and retained within the first 6 nm below the surface and no further diffusion of N into the bulk was observed.

  8. Development of a magnetized coaxial plasma gun for compact toroid injection into the C-2 field-reversed configuration device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsumoto, T; Sekiguchi, J; Asai, T; Gota, H; Garate, E; Allfrey, I; Valentine, T; Morehouse, M; Roche, T; Kinley, J; Aefsky, S; Cordero, M; Waggoner, W; Binderbauer, M; Tajima, T

    2016-05-01

    A compact toroid (CT) injector was developed for the C-2 device, primarily for refueling of field-reversed configurations. The CTs are formed by a magnetized coaxial plasma gun (MCPG), which consists of coaxial cylindrical electrodes and a bias coil for creating a magnetic field. First, a plasma ring is generated by a discharge between the electrodes and is accelerated by Lorenz self-force. Then, the plasma ring is captured by an interlinkage flux (poloidal flux). Finally, the fully formed CT is ejected from the MCPG. The MCPG described herein has two gas injection ports that are arranged tangentially on the outer electrode. A tungsten-coated inner electrode has a head which can be replaced with a longer one to extend the length of the acceleration region for the CT. The developed MCPG has achieved supersonic CT velocities of ∼100 km/s. Plasma parameters for electron density, electron temperature, and the number of particles are ∼5 × 10(21) m(-3), ∼40 eV, and 0.5-1.0 × 10(19), respectively.

  9. Ammonia formation and W coatings interaction with deuterium/nitrogen plasmas in the linear device GyM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laguardia, L., E-mail: laguardia@ifp.cnr.it [CNR, Istituto di Fisica del Plasma“P. Caldirola”, Milan (Italy); Caniello, R.; Cremona, A. [CNR, Istituto di Fisica del Plasma“P. Caldirola”, Milan (Italy); Dellasega, D. [CNR, Istituto di Fisica del Plasma“P. Caldirola”, Milan (Italy); Politecnico di Milano, Dipartimento di Energia, Milan (Italy); Dell’Era, F.; Ghezzi, F.; Gittini, G.; Granucci, G.; Mellera, V.; Minelli, D.; Pallotta, F. [CNR, Istituto di Fisica del Plasma“P. Caldirola”, Milan (Italy); Passoni, M. [CNR, Istituto di Fisica del Plasma“P. Caldirola”, Milan (Italy); Politecnico di Milano, Dipartimento di Energia, Milan (Italy); Ricci, D.; Vassallo, E. [CNR, Istituto di Fisica del Plasma“P. Caldirola”, Milan (Italy)

    2015-08-15

    In this work results of the first D{sub 2}/N{sub 2} experiments in GyM, a linear device able to produce plasmas of interest for the ITER divertor (n{sub e} 5 ⋅ 10{sup 10} cm{sup −3}, Te 5 eV, ion flux 3–5 ⋅ 10{sup 20} m{sup −2}s{sup −1}) are presented. Plasmas simulating a N-seeding scenario have been performed to evaluate ammonia formation and its effect on exposed W coatings. The presence of ND emission lines in the plasma can be correlated with the formation of ammonia, further directly detected and quantified by chromatography analysis of the exhaust. Four different W specimens were exposed in GyM to a plasma fluence of 8.78 ⋅ 10{sup 23} m{sup −2}. XPS analysis evidenced the formation of W{sub x}N{sub y} layers with nitrogen concentration in the range of 1–10% depending on the initial morphology and structure of the W samples. In all analyzed cases, nitrogen was bound and retained within the first 6 nm below the surface and no further diffusion of N into the bulk was observed.

  10. Atmospheric-Pressure Plasma Interaction with Soft Materials as Fundamental Processes in Plasma Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takenaka, Kosuke; Miyazaki, Atsushi; Uchida, Giichiro; Setsuhara, Yuichi

    2015-03-01

    Molecular-structure variation of organic materials irradiated with atmospheric pressure He plasma jet have been investigated. Optical emission spectrum in the atmospheric-pressure He plasma jet has been measured. The spectrum shows considerable emissions of He lines, and the emission of O and N radicals attributed to air. Variation in molecular structure of Polyethylene terephthalate (PET) film surface irradiated with the atmospheric-pressure He plasma jet has been observed via X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR). These results via XPS and FT-IR indicate that the PET surface irradiated with the atmospheric-pressure He plasma jet was oxidized by chemical and/or physical effect due to irradiation of active species.

  11. Experimental study of soft X-ray intensity with different anode tips in Amirkabir plasma focus device

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    HABIBI MORTEZA; MAHTAB MAHSA

    2016-07-01

    To study the effect of different anode tip geometries on the intensity of soft X-rays emitted from a 4 kJ plasma focus device (PFD), we considered five different anode tips which were cylindrical-flat, cylindricalhollow, spherical-convex, cone-flat and cone-hollow tips. BPX-65 PIN diodes covered by four different filters are used to register the intensity of soft X-rays. The use of cone-flat anode tip has augmented the emitted X-ray three times compared to the conventional cylindrical-flat anode.

  12. Direct measurement of refracted trajectory of transmitting electron cyclotron beam through plasma on the Large Helical Device

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takahashi Hiromi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The electron-cyclotron (EC -beam refraction due to the presence of plasma was investigated in the Large Helical Device. The transmitted-EC-beam measurement system was constructed and the beam pattern on the opposite side of the irradiated surface was measured using an IR camera. Clear dependence of the EC-beam refraction on the electron density was observed and the beam shift in the toroidal direction showed good agreement with the ray-trace calculation of TRAVIS. The influence of the peripheral density profile and the thermal effect on the beam refraction were discussed.

  13. A Pull-in Based Test Mechanism for Device Diagnostic and Process Characterization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. A. Rocha

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available A test technique for capacitive MEMS accelerometers and electrostatic microactuators, based on the measurement of pull-in voltages and resonance frequency, is described. Using this combination of measurements, one can estimate process-induced variations in the device layout dimensions as well as deviations from nominal value in material properties, which can be used either for testing or device diagnostics purposes. Measurements performed on fabricated devices confirm that the 250 nm overetch observed on SEM images can be correctly estimated using the proposed technique.

  14. The role of point defects and defect complexes in silicon device processing. Summary report and papers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sopori, B.; Tan, T.Y.

    1994-08-01

    This report is the summary of the third workshop on the role of point defects and defect complexes in silicon device processing. The workshop was organized: (1) to discuss recent progress in the material quality produced by photovoltaic Si manufacturers, (2) to foster the understanding of point defect issues in Si device processing, (3) to review the effects of inhomogeneities on large- area solar cell performance, (4) to discuss how to improve Si solar cell processing, and (5) to develop a new understanding of gettering, defect passivation, and defect annihilation. Separate abstract were prepared for the individual papers, for the database.

  15. Microfabricated modular scale-down device for regenerative medicine process development.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcel Reichen

    Full Text Available The capacity of milli and micro litre bioreactors to accelerate process development has been successfully demonstrated in traditional biotechnology. However, for regenerative medicine present smaller scale culture methods cannot cope with the wide range of processing variables that need to be evaluated. Existing microfabricated culture devices, which could test different culture variables with a minimum amount of resources (e.g. expensive culture medium, are typically not designed with process development in mind. We present a novel, autoclavable, and microfabricated scale-down device designed for regenerative medicine process development. The microfabricated device contains a re-sealable culture chamber that facilitates use of standard culture protocols, creating a link with traditional small-scale culture devices for validation and scale-up studies. Further, the modular design can easily accommodate investigation of different culture substrate/extra-cellular matrix combinations. Inactivated mouse embryonic fibroblasts (iMEF and human embryonic stem cell (hESC colonies were successfully seeded on gelatine-coated tissue culture polystyrene (TC-PS using standard static seeding protocols. The microfluidic chip included in the device offers precise and accurate control over the culture medium flow rate and resulting shear stresses in the device. Cells were cultured for two days with media perfused at 300 µl.h(-1 resulting in a modelled shear stress of 1.1×10(-4 Pa. Following perfusion, hESC colonies stained positively for different pluripotency markers and retained an undifferentiated morphology. An image processing algorithm was developed which permits quantification of co-cultured colony-forming cells from phase contrast microscope images. hESC colony sizes were quantified against the background of the feeder cells (iMEF in less than 45 seconds for high-resolution images, which will permit real-time monitoring of culture progress in future

  16. Physical Removal of Metallic Carbon Nanotubes from Nanotube Network Devices Using a Thermal and Fluidic Process

    OpenAIRE

    Ford, Alexandra C.; Shaughnessy, Michael; Wong, Bryan M.; Kane, Alexander A.; Kuznetsov, Oleksandr V.; Krafcik, Karen L.; Billups, W. E.; Hauge, Robert H.; Léonard, François

    2013-01-01

    Electronic and optoelectronic devices based on thin films of carbon nanotubes are currently limited by the presence of metallic nanotubes. Here we present a novel approach based on nanotube alkyl functionalization to physically remove the metallic nanotubes from such network devices. The process relies on preferential thermal desorption of the alkyls from the semiconducting nanotubes and the subsequent dissolution and selective removal of the metallic nanotubes in chloroform. The approach is ...

  17. Glass composition and process for sealing void spaces in electrochemical devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meinhardt, Kerry D.; Kirby, Brent W.

    2012-05-01

    A glass foaming material and method are disclosed for filling void spaces in electrochemical devices. The glass material includes a reagent that foams at a temperature above the softening point of the glass. Expansion of the glass fills void spaces including by-pass and tolerance channels of electrochemical devices. In addition, cassette to cassette seals can also be formed while channels and other void spaces are filled, reducing the number of processing steps needed.

  18. Atmospheric pressure plasma processing of polymeric materials utilizing close proximity indirect exposure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paulauskas, Felix L.; Bonds, Truman

    2016-09-20

    A plasma treatment method that includes providing treatment chamber including an intermediate heating volume and an interior treatment volume. The interior treatment volume contains an electrode assembly for generating a plasma and the intermediate heating volume heats the interior treatment volume. A work piece is traversed through the treatment chamber. A process gas is introduced to the interior treatment volume of the treatment chamber. A plasma is formed with the electrode assembly from the process gas, wherein a reactive species of the plasma is accelerated towards the fiber tow by flow vortices produced in the interior treatment volume by the electrode assembly.

  19. 76 FR 81363 - Temperature-Indicating Devices; Thermally Processed Low-Acid Foods Packaged in Hermetically...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-28

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration 21 CFR Part 113 (formerly 2007N-0026) Temperature-Indicating Devices; Thermally Processed Low-Acid Foods Packaged in Hermetically Sealed Containers; Correction AGENCY... (76 FR 11892). The final rule amended FDA's regulations for thermally processed low-acid...

  20. Electric poling-assisted additive manufacturing process for PVDF polymer-based piezoelectric device applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, ChaBum; Tarbutton, Joshua A.

    2014-09-01

    This paper presents a new additive manufacturing (AM) process to directly and continuously print piezoelectric devices from polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) polymeric filament rods under a strong electric field. This process, called ‘electric poling-assisted additive manufacturing or EPAM, combines AM and electric poling processes and is able to fabricate free-form shape piezoelectric devices continuously. In this process, the PVDF polymer dipoles remain well-aligned and uniform over a large area in a single design, production and fabrication step. During EPAM process, molten PVDF polymer is simultaneously mechanically stresses in-situ by the leading nozzle and electrically poled by applying high electric field under high temperature. The EPAM system was constructed to directly print piezoelectric structures from PVDF polymeric filament while applying high electric field between nozzle tip and printing bed in AM machine. Piezoelectric devices were successfully fabricated using the EPAM process. The crystalline phase transitions that occurred from the process were identified by using the Fourier transform infrared spectroscope. The results indicate that devices printed under a strong electric field become piezoelectric during the EPAM process and that stronger electric fields result in greater piezoelectricity as marked by the electrical response and the formation of sharper peaks at the polar β crystalline wavenumber of the PVDF polymer. Performing this process in the absence of an electric field does not result in dipole alignment of PVDF polymer. The EPAM process is expected to lead to the widespread use of AM to fabricate a variety of piezoelectric PVDF polymer-based devices for sensing, actuation and energy harvesting applications with simple, low cost, single processing and fabrication step.

  1. Reliability of plasma-sprayed coatings: monitoring the plasma spray process and improving the quality of coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fauchais, P.; Vardelle, M.; Vardelle, A.

    2013-06-01

    As for every coating technology, the reliability and reproducibility of coatings are essential for the development of the plasma spraying technology in industrial manufacturing. They mainly depend on the process reliability, equipment and spray booth maintenance, operator training and certification, implementation and use of consistent production practices and standardization of coating testing. This paper deals with the first issue, that is the monitoring and control of the plasma spray process; it does not tackle the coating characterization and testing methods. It begins with a short history of coating quality improvement under plasma spray conditions over the last few decades, details the plasma spray torches used in the industry, the development of the measurements of in-flight and impacting particle parameters and then of sensors. It concludes with the process maps that describe the interrelations between the operating parameters of the spray process, in-flight particle characteristics and coating properties and with the potential of in situ monitoring of the process by artificial neural networks and fuzzy logic methods.

  2. Reverse of mixing process with a two-dimensional electro-fluid-dynamic device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chang; Luo, Yong; Maxwell, E Jane; Fang, Ning; Chen, David D Y

    2010-03-15

    Mixing of two solutions into one is a spontaneous process with a net increase in entropy. However, the reverse of the mixing process is usually not possible unless certain conditions are met. A continuous solution stream containing a mixture of two compounds can be separated into two channels, each containing a pure compound, thus reversing the mixing process using a two-dimensional microfluidic electro-fluid-dynamic (EFD) device. When the electric field is strategically applied in the interconnecting channels of an EFD device, the pressure required to direct an analyte into a certain channel can be calculated by using the solutions of electric field and fluid dynamics in the mass balance equation. If the pressure and electric potential at various inlets and outlets satisfy these predetermined conditions, the reverse of a mixing process is observed. Conventional microfluidic devices have been used to introduce samples from interconnecting channels or efficiently mix different solutions into a single channel. The EFD devices expand the spatial separation of analytes from one dimension to two using both the differential migration behavior of analytes and the velocity field distribution in different channel geometries. The devices designed according to these basic physicochemical principles can be used for complete processing of minute samples and to obtain pure chemical species from complex mixtures.

  3. The long way to steady state fusion plasmas - the superconducting stellarator device Wendelstein 7-X

    CERN Document Server

    CERN. Geneva

    2016-01-01

    The stable generation of high temperature Hydrogen plasmas (ion and electron temperature in the range 10-20 keV) is the basis for the use of nuclear fusion to generate heat and thereby electric power. The most promising path is to use strong, toroidal, twisted magnetic fields to confine the electrically charged plasma particles in order to avoid heat losses to the cold, solid wall elements. Two magnetic confinement concepts have been proven to be most suitable: (a) the tokamak and (b) the stellarator. The stellarator creates the magnetic field by external coils only, the tokamak by combining the externally created field with the magnetic field generated by a strong current in the plasma. “Wendelstein 7-X” is the name of a large superconducting stellarator that went successfully into operation after 15 years of construction. With 30 m3 plasma volume, 3 T magnetic field on axis, and 10 MW micro wave heating power, Hydrogen plasmas are generated that allow one to establish a scientific basis for the extrapol...

  4. Plasma processes and applications in NanoBiotechnology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rossi, F; Colpo, P, E-mail: francois.rossi@jrc.ec.europa.eu [European Commission, Joint Research Centre, Institute for Health and Consumer Protection (IHCP), I-21020, Ispra (Italy)

    2010-11-01

    Nanostructured surfaces presenting chemical or topographical patterns are now being increasingly developed in nanobiotechnology. Major applications are related to cell culture models and biodetection. We show that plasma technologies, in particular the combination plasma polymers deposition and etching, together with colloidal lithography, e-beam lithography and microcontact printing, are essential tools to produce nanostructured surfaces. We show that chemical and topographical patterns can be obtained on different substrates, with dimensions down to some 10 nm. The applications of these nanostructured surfaces in biology and bio-detection are reviewed and the advantages and limitation of the techniques underlined.

  5. Plasma Surface Treatment of Powder Materials — Process and Application

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monika Pavlatová

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Polyolefin particles are hydrophobic, and this prevents their use for various applications. Plasma treatment is an environment-friendly polyolefin hydrophilisation method. We developed an industrial-scale plant for plasma treatment of particles as small as micrometers in diameter. Materials such as PE waxes, UHMWPE and powders for rotomolding production were tested to verify their new surface properties. We achieved significantly increased wettability of the particles, so that they are very easily dispersive in water without agglomeration, and their higher surface energy is retained even after sintering in the case of rotomolding powders.

  6. Aquaregia and Oxygen Plasma Treatments on Fluorinated Tin Oxide for Assembly of PLEDs Devices Using OC1C10-PPV as Emissive Polymer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emerson Roberto SANTOS

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available In this work were carried out treatments with oxygen plasma and aquaregia on fluorinated tin oxide (FTO films varying the treatment times. After treatments, the samples were analyzed by techniques measurements: sheet resistance, thickness, Hall effect, transmittance and superficial roughness. Devices using FTO/PEDOT:PSS/OC1C10-PPV/Al were assembled. In this experiment some variations were observed by sheet resistance and thickness and Hall effect measurements indicated most elevated carriers concentration and resistivity for aquaregia than that oxygen plasma. The roughness was elevated for the first minutes with treatment by aquaregia too. In the I-V curves the aquaregia devices presented the lowest threshold voltage for 30 minutes and devices treated by oxygen plasma presented a behavior most resistivity different of typical curves for PLEDs devices.

  7. Research on the Plasma Spray Process Applying the Finite Element Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raimonda Lukauskaitė

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The article investigates the physical processes of plasma spraying. The application of the finite element method has assisted in establishing the distribution of the voltage of the plasma arc and current density in the plasma stream during numerical simulation. With reference to the results of experimental data, the real location of an anode spot of the electric arc in the plasma spray process has been evaluated. The paper has calculated the values of electromagnetic Lorentz forces and established their influence on plasma flow. With the help of the two-layer model for the semi-molten nickel particle, contact between the particle and substrate during plasma spraying has been simulated.

  8. Influence of radiative processes on the ignition of deuterium–tritium plasma containing inactive impurities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gus’kov, S. Yu., E-mail: guskov@sci.lebedev.ru [Russian Academy of Sciences, Lebedev Physical Institute (Russian Federation); Sherman, V. E. [Peter the Great St. Petersburg Polytechnic University (Russian Federation)

    2016-08-15

    The degree of influence of radiative processes on the ignition of deuterium–tritium (DT) plasma has been theoretically studied as dependent on the content of inactive impurities in plasma. The analytic criterion of plasma ignition in inertial confinement fusion (ICF) targets is modified taking into account the absorption of intrinsic radiation from plasma in the ignition region. The influence of radiative processes on the DT plasma ignition has been analytically and numerically studied for plasma that contains a significant fraction of inactive impurities either as a result of DT fuel mixing with ICF target ablator material or as a result of using light metal DT-hydrides as solid noncryogenic fuel. It has been shown that the effect of the absorption of intrinsic radiation leads to lower impurity-induced increase in the ignition energy as compared to that calculated in the approximation of optically transparent ignition region.

  9. Influence of radiative processes on the ignition of deuterium-tritium plasma containing inactive impurities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gus'kov, S. Yu.; Sherman, V. E.

    2016-08-01

    The degree of influence of radiative processes on the ignition of deuterium-tritium (DT) plasma has been theoretically studied as dependent on the content of inactive impurities in plasma. The analytic criterion of plasma ignition in inertial confinement fusion (ICF) targets is modified taking into account the absorption of intrinsic radiation from plasma in the ignition region. The influence of radiative processes on the DT plasma ignition has been analytically and numerically studied for plasma that contains a significant fraction of inactive impurities either as a result of DT fuel mixing with ICF target ablator material or as a result of using light metal DT-hydrides as solid noncryogenic fuel. It has been shown that the effect of the absorption of intrinsic radiation leads to lower impurity-induced increase in the ignition energy as compared to that calculated in the approximation of optically transparent ignition region.

  10. XPS, SIMS and FTIR-ATR characterization of boronized graphite from the thermonuclear plasma device RFX-mod

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghezzi, F.; Laguardia, L.; Caniello, R.; Canton, A.; Dal Bello, S.; Rais, B.; Anderle, M.

    2015-11-01

    In this paper the characterization of a thin (tens of nanometers) boron layer on fine grain polycrystalline graphite substrate is presented. The boron film is used as conditioning technique for the full graphite wall of the Reversed Field eXperiment-modified (RFX-mod) experiment, a device for the magnetic confinement of plasmas of thermonuclear interest. Aim of the present analysis is to enlighten the chemical structure of the film, the trapping mechanism that makes it a getter for oxygen and hydrogen and the reason of its loss of effectiveness after exposure to about 100 s of hydrogen plasma. X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS), Secondary Ions Mass Spectrometry (SIMS) and Fourier Transform Infra Red spectroscopy in combination with the Attenuated Total Reflectance (FTIR-ATR) were used to obtain the structure and the chemical composition of graphitic samples as coated or coated and subsequently exposed to hydrogen plasma after boron deposition. The boron layers on the only coated samples were found to be amorphous hydrogenated boron carbide plus a variety of bonds like B-B, B-H, B-O, B-OH, C-C, C-H, C-O, C-OH. Both the thickness and the homogeneity of the layers were found to depend on the distance of the sample from the anode during the deposition. The samples contained oxygen along the layer thickness, at level of 5%, bound to boron. The gettering action of the boron is therefore already active during the deposition itself. The exposure to plasma caused erosion of the boron film and higher content of H and O bound to boron throughout the whole thickness. The interaction of the B layer with plasma is therefore a bulk phenomenon.

  11. Excitation and Propagetion of Modified Fluctuation in a Toroidal Plasma in KT-5C Device

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    孙玄; 王之江; 陆荣华; 闻一之; 万树德; 俞昌旋; 刘万东; 王成; 潘阁生; 王文浩; 王俊

    2002-01-01

    Understanding the propagation of the turbulent perturbation in the tokamak edge plasma is an important issue to actively modify or control the turbulence, reduce the anomalous transport and improve plasma confmement. To realize active modification of the edge perturbation, a high dynamic output, broad-band, low-cost power amplifier is set up, and used to drive the active probes in the experiments on KT-5C Tokmak. By using small-size magnetic probes together with Langmiur probes, It is observed that the modified perturbation by the active probes with sufficiently driving power may spread with electrostatic mode, and electromagnetic mode as well.

  12. Processing Device for High-Speed Execution of an Xrisc Computer Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Tak-Kwong (Inventor); Mills, Carl S. (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    A processing device for high-speed execution of a computer program is provided. A memory module may store one or more computer programs. A sequencer may select one of the computer programs and controls execution of the selected program. A register module may store intermediate values associated with a current calculation set, a set of output values associated with a previous calculation set, and a set of input values associated with a subsequent calculation set. An external interface may receive the set of input values from a computing device and provides the set of output values to the computing device. A computation interface may provide a set of operands for computation during processing of the current calculation set. The set of input values are loaded into the register and the set of output values are unloaded from the register in parallel with processing of the current calculation set.

  13. The analysis of the wax foundry models fabrication process for the CPX3000 device

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Budzik

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents possibilities of creating wax founding models by means of CPX3000 device. The device is used for Rapid Prototypingof models made of foundry wax in an incremental process. The paper also presents problems connected with choosing technologicalparameters for incremental shaping which influence the accuracy of created models. Issues connected with post-processing are alsodescribed. This process is of great importance for obtaining geometrically correct models. The analysis of parameters of cleaning models from supporting material is also presented. At present CPX3000 printer is the first used in Poland device by 3D Systems firm for creating wax models. The printer is at The Faculty of Mechanical Engineering at Rzeszów University of Technology.

  14. Comparison endpoint study of process plasma and secondary electron beam exciter optical emission spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stephan Thamban, P. L.; Yun, Stuart; Padron-Wells, Gabriel; Hosch, Jimmy W.; Goeckner, Matthew J. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Texas at Dallas, 800W Campbell Road, Richardson, Texas 75080 (United States); Department of Electrical Engineering, University of Texas at Dallas, 800W Campbell Road, Richardson, Texas 75080 (United States); Verity Instruments, Inc., 2901 Eisenhower Street, Carrollton, Texas 75007 (United States); Department of Mathematical Sciences, University of Texas at Dallas, 800 W Campbell Road, Richardson, Texas 75080 (United States)

    2012-11-15

    Traditionally process plasmas are often studied and monitored by optical emission spectroscopy. Here, the authors compare experimental measurements from a secondary electron beam excitation and direct process plasma excitation to discuss and illustrate its distinctiveness in the study of process plasmas. They present results that show excitations of etch process effluents in a SF{sub 6} discharge and endpoint detection capabilities in dark plasma process conditions. In SF{sub 6} discharges, a band around 300 nm, not visible in process emission, is observed and it can serve as a good indicator of etch product emission during polysilicon etches. Based on prior work reported in literature the authors believe this band is due to SiF{sub 4} gas phase species.

  15. Elementary Processes and Kinetic Modeling for Hydrogen and Helium Plasmas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberto Celiberto

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available We report cross-sections and rate coefficients for excited states colliding with electrons, heavy particles and walls useful for the description of H 2 /He plasma kinetics under different conditions. In particular, the role of the rotational states in resonant vibrational excitations of the H 2 molecule by electron impact and the calculation of the related cross-sections are illustrated. The theoretical determination of the cross-section for the rovibrational energy exchange and dissociation of H 2 molecule, induced by He atom impact, by using the quasi-classical trajectory method is discussed. Recombination probabilities of H atoms on tungsten and graphite, relevant for the determination of the nascent vibrational distribution, are also presented. An example of a state-to-state plasma kinetic model for the description of shock waves operating in H 2 and He-H 2 mixtures is presented, emphasizing also the role of electronically-excited states in affecting the electron energy distribution function of free electrons. Finally, the thermodynamic properties and the electrical conductivity of non-ideal, high-density hydrogen plasma are finally discussed, in particular focusing on the pressure ionization phenomenon in high-pressure high-temperature plasmas.

  16. Plasma processing of fibre materials for enhanced impact protection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Creyghton, Y.L.M.; Simor, M.

    2009-01-01

    The performance of lightweight impact protective clothing depends on the constituting materials, their assembly in a system and interaction under various dynamic impact conditions. In this paper an overview of options for improved impact protective clothing systems based on a new plasma technology i

  17. Plasma processing of fibre materials for enhanced impact protection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Creyghton, Y.L.M.; Simor, M.

    2009-01-01

    The performance of lightweight impact protective clothing depends on the constituting materials, their assembly in a system and interaction under various dynamic impact conditions. In this paper an overview of options for improved impact protective clothing systems based on a new plasma technology i

  18. Thomson Scattering Process in Laser-Produced Plasmas

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YU Quan-Zhi; JIANG Xiao-Hua; LI Wen-Hong; LIU Shen-Ye; ZHENG Zhi-Jian; ZHANG Jie; LI Yu-Tong; ZHENG Jun; YAN Fei; LU Xin; WANG Zhe-Bin; ZHENG Jian; YU Chang-Xuan

    2005-01-01

    @@ We present the evolutions of the electron temperature and plasma expansion velocity with Thomson scattering experiment. The observed time-resolved ion-acoustic image is reproduced by a numerical code which couples the Thomson scattering theory with the output parameters of the one-dimensional hydrocode MEDUSA.

  19. Plasma processing of fibre materials for enhanced impact protection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Creyghton, Y.L.M.; Simor, M.

    2009-01-01

    The performance of lightweight impact protective clothing depends on the constituting materials, their assembly in a system and interaction under various dynamic impact conditions. In this paper an overview of options for improved impact protective clothing systems based on a new plasma technology

  20. Safety-cost trade-offs in medical device reuse: a Markov decision process model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sloan, Thomas W

    2007-02-01

    Healthcare expenditures in the US are approaching 2 trillion dollars, and hospitals and other healthcare providers are under tremendous pressure to rein in costs. One cost-saving approach which is gaining popularity is the reuse of medical devices which were designed only for a single use. Device makers decry this practice as unsanitary and unsafe, but a growing number of third-party firms are willing to sterilize, refurbish, and/or remanufacture devices and resell them to hospitals at a fraction of the original price. Is this practice safe? Is reliance on single-use devices sustainable? A Markov decision process (MDP) model is formulated to study the trade-offs involved in these decisions. Several key parameters are examined: device costs, device failure probabilities, and failure penalty cost. For each of these parameters, expressions are developed which identify the indifference point between using new and reprocessed devices. The results can be used to inform the debate on the economic, ethical, legal, and environmental dimensions of this complex issue.