WorldWideScience

Sample records for plasma precision measurements

  1. Accurate and precise plasma clearance measurement using four 99mTc-DTPA plasma samples over 4 h

    OpenAIRE

    Wanasundara, Surajith N.; Wesolowski, Michal J.; Barnfield, Mark C.; Waller, Michael L.; Murray, Anthony W.; Burniston, Maria T.; Babyn, Paul S.; Wesolowski, Carl A.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Glomerular filtration rate can be measured as the plasma clearance (CL) of a glomerular filtration rate marker despite body fluid disturbances using numerous, prolonged time samples. We desire a simplified technique without compromised accuracy and precision. Materials and methods We compared CL values derived from two plasma concentration curve area methods – (a) biexponential fitting [CL (E2)] and (b) Tikhonov adaptively regularized gamma variate fitting [CL (Tk-GV)] – for 4 vers...

  2. Diagnostic development in precise opacity measurement of radiatively heated Al plasma on Shenguang II laser facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhao Yang [Wuhan National Laboratory for Optoelectronics, Institute of Optoelectronics Science and Engineering, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430074 (China); Research Center of Laser Fusion, China Academy of Engineering Physics, Mianyang 621900 (China); Yang Jiamin; Zhang Jiyan [Research Center of Laser Fusion, China Academy of Engineering Physics, Mianyang 621900 (China); Liu Jinsong; Yuan Xiao [Wuhan National Laboratory for Optoelectronics, Institute of Optoelectronics Science and Engineering, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430074 (China); Jin Fengtao [Research Center of Laser Fusion, China Academy of Engineering Physics, Mianyang 621900 (China); Department of Physics, National University of Defense Technology, Changsha 410073 (China)

    2009-04-15

    Simultaneous measurements of the self-emission spectrum, the backlighting source spectrum, and the transmission spectrum in one shot, which reduce the experimental uncertainties from shot-to-shot fluctuation, are essential for precise opacity experiments. In order to achieve precise absorption spectrum of Al plasmas, a special half sample sandwich target was designed and short backlighter was used to provide time- and space-resolving diagnostics on the Shenguang II high power laser facility. In the measurement, a cylindrical cavity with CH foam baffles was used to provide a clean x-ray radiation environment for sample heating. The x-ray source spectrum, the transmission spectrum, and the self-emission spectrum of the soft x-ray heated Al sample were recorded in one shot with a penta-erythritol tetrakis (hydroxymethy) methane C(CH{sub 2}OH){sub 4} (PET) crystal spectrometer by using the point-projection method. Experimental results have been compared with the calculation results of a detailed level accounting opacity code.

  3. Matrix effects of calcium on high-precision sulfur isotope measurement by multiple-collector inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chenhui; Bian, Xiao-Peng; Yang, Tao; Lin, An-Jun; Jiang, Shao-Yong

    2016-05-01

    Multiple-collector inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (MC-ICP-MS) has been successfully applied in the rapid and high-precision measurement for sulfur isotope ratios in recent years. During the measurement, the presence of matrix elements would affect the instrumental mass bias for sulfur and these matrix-induced effects have aroused a lot of researchers' interest. However, these studies have placed more weight on highlighting the necessity for their proposed correction protocols (e.g., chemical purification and matrix-matching) while less attention on the key property of the matrix element gives rise to the matrix effects. In this study, four groups of sulfate solutions, which have different concentrations of sulfur (0.05-0.60mM) but a constant sequence of atomic calcium/sulfur ratios (0.1-50), are investigated under wet (solution) and dry (desolvation) plasma conditions to make a detailed evaluation on the matrix effects from calcium on sulfur isotope measurement. Based on a series of comparative analyses, we indicated that, the matrix effects of calcium on both measured sulfur isotope ratios and detected (32)S signal intensities are dependent mainly on the absolute calcium concentration rather than its relative concentration ratio to sulfur (i.e., atomic calcium/sulfur ratio). Also, for the same group of samples, the matrix effects of calcium under dry plasma condition are much more significant than that of wet plasma. This research affords the opportunity to realize direct and relatively precise sulfur isotope measurement for evaporite gypsum, and further provides some suggestions with regard to sulfur isotope analytical protocols for sedimentary pore water.

  4. Precision volume measurement system.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fischer, Erin E.; Shugard, Andrew D.

    2004-11-01

    A new precision volume measurement system based on a Kansas City Plant (KCP) design was built to support the volume measurement needs of the Gas Transfer Systems (GTS) department at Sandia National Labs (SNL) in California. An engineering study was undertaken to verify or refute KCP's claims of 0.5% accuracy. The study assesses the accuracy and precision of the system. The system uses the ideal gas law and precise pressure measurements (of low-pressure helium) in a temperature and computer controlled environment to ratio a known volume to an unknown volume.

  5. High precision measurement of fuel density profiles in nuclear fusion plasmas

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Svensson, J.; von Hellermann, M.; Konig, R.

    2002-01-01

    This paper presents a method for deducing fuel density profiles of nuclear fusion plasmas in realtime during an experiment. A Multi Layer Perceptron (MLP) neural network is used to create a mapping between plasma radiation spectra and indirectly deduced hydrogen isotope densities. By combining diffe

  6. Precision Measurement in Biology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quake, Stephen

    Is biology a quantitative science like physics? I will discuss the role of precision measurement in both physics and biology, and argue that in fact both fields can be tied together by the use and consequences of precision measurement. The elementary quanta of biology are twofold: the macromolecule and the cell. Cells are the fundamental unit of life, and macromolecules are the fundamental elements of the cell. I will describe how precision measurements have been used to explore the basic properties of these quanta, and more generally how the quest for higher precision almost inevitably leads to the development of new technologies, which in turn catalyze further scientific discovery. In the 21st century, there are no remaining experimental barriers to biology becoming a truly quantitative and mathematical science.

  7. Precision Electroweak Measurements

    CERN Document Server

    Przysiezniak, H

    2000-01-01

    This talk describes some of the precision electroweak measurements from around the world, namely those related to the Z and W bosons, the top quark mass, sin2 theta_ W at NuTeV, and three other fundamental measurements: alpha-1 m2_ Z, (g-2)_mu at the E821 BNL experiment as well as the atomic parity violation (APV) measurement for the Cesium atom. These and other measurements are set in the context of the Standard Model (SM) and of the electroweak fit predictions. Future prospects for forthcoming experiments are briefly discussed.

  8. Precision Chemical Abundance Measurements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yong, David; Grundahl, Frank; Meléndez, Jorge;

    2012-01-01

    This talk covers preliminary work in which we apply a strictly differential line-by-line chemical abundance analysis to high quality UVES spectra of the globular cluster NGC 6752. We achieve extremely high precision in the measurement of relative abundance ratios. Our results indicate that the ob......This talk covers preliminary work in which we apply a strictly differential line-by-line chemical abundance analysis to high quality UVES spectra of the globular cluster NGC 6752. We achieve extremely high precision in the measurement of relative abundance ratios. Our results indicate...... that the observed abundance dispersion exceeds the measurement uncertainties and that many pairs of elements show significant correlations when plotting [X1/H] vs. [X2/H]. Our tentative conclusions are that either NGC 6752 is not chemically homogeneous at the ~=0.03 dex level or the abundance variations...

  9. Precision measurements in supersymmetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feng, Johnathan Lee [Stanford Univ., CA (United States)

    1995-05-01

    Supersymmetry is a promising framework in which to explore extensions of the standard model. If candidates for supersymmetric particles are found, precision measurements of their properties will then be of paramount importance. The prospects for such measurements and their implications are the subject of this thesis. If charginos are produced at the LEP II collider, they are likely to be one of the few available supersymmetric signals for many years. The author considers the possibility of determining fundamental supersymmetry parameters in such a scenario. The study is complicated by the dependence of observables on a large number of these parameters. He proposes a straightforward procedure for disentangling these dependences and demonstrate its effectiveness by presenting a number of case studies at representative points in parameter space. In addition to determining the properties of supersymmetric particles, precision measurements may also be used to establish that newly-discovered particles are, in fact, supersymmetric. Supersymmetry predicts quantitative relations among the couplings and masses of superparticles. The author discusses tests of such relations at a future e{sup +}e{sup {minus}} linear collider, using measurements that exploit the availability of polarizable beams. Stringent tests of supersymmetry from chargino production are demonstrated in two representative cases, and fermion and neutralino processes are also discussed.

  10. Fundamental Physics and Precision Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hänsch, T. W.

    2006-11-01

    "Very high precision physics has always appealed to me. The steady improvement in technologies that afford higher and higher precision has been a regular source of excitement and challenge during my career. In science, as in most things, whenever one looks at something more closely, new aspects almost always come into play …" With these word from the book "How the Laser happened", Charles H. Townes expresses a passion for precision that is now shared by many scientists. Masers and lasers have become indispensible tools for precision measurements. During the past few years, the advent of femtosecond laser frequency comb synthesizers has revolutionized the art of directly comparing optical and microwave frequencies. Inspired by the needs of precision laser spectroscopy of the simple hydrogen atom, such frequency combs are now enabling ultra-precise spectroscopy over wide spectral ranges. Recent laboratory experiments are already setting stringent limits for possible slow variations of fundamental constants. Laser frequency combs also provide the long missing clockwork for optical atomic clocks that may ultimately reach a precision of parts in 1018 and beyond. Such tools will open intriguing new opportunities for fundamental experiments including new tests of special and general relativity. In the future, frequency comb techniques may be extended into the extreme ultraviolet and soft xray regime, opening a vast new spectral territory to precision measurements. Frequency combs have also become a key tool for the emerging new field of attosecond science, since they can control the electric field of ultrashort laser pulses on an unprecedented time scale. The biggest surprise in these endeavours would be if we found no surprise.

  11. Environment-assisted precision measurement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Goldstein, G.; Cappellaro, P.; Maze, J. R.

    2011-01-01

    We describe a method to enhance the sensitivity of precision measurements that takes advantage of the environment of a quantum sensor to amplify the response of the sensor to weak external perturbations. An individual qubit is used to sense the dynamics of surrounding ancillary qubits, which are ...

  12. Precision Metrology Using Weak Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Lijian; Datta, Animesh; Walmsley, Ian A.

    2015-05-01

    Weak values and measurements have been proposed as a means to achieve dramatic enhancements in metrology based on the greatly increased range of possible measurement outcomes. Unfortunately, the very large values of measurement outcomes occur with highly suppressed probabilities. This raises three vital questions in weak-measurement-based metrology. Namely, (Q1) Does postselection enhance the measurement precision? (Q2) Does weak measurement offer better precision than strong measurement? (Q3) Is it possible to beat the standard quantum limit or to achieve the Heisenberg limit with weak measurement using only classical resources? We analyze these questions for two prototypical, and generic, measurement protocols and show that while the answers to the first two questions are negative for both protocols, the answer to the last is affirmative for measurements with phase-space interactions, and negative for configuration space interactions. Our results, particularly the ability of weak measurements to perform at par with strong measurements in some cases, are instructive for the design of weak-measurement-based protocols for quantum metrology.

  13. Precision metrology using weak measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Lijian; Datta, Animesh; Walmsley, Ian A

    2015-05-29

    Weak values and measurements have been proposed as a means to achieve dramatic enhancements in metrology based on the greatly increased range of possible measurement outcomes. Unfortunately, the very large values of measurement outcomes occur with highly suppressed probabilities. This raises three vital questions in weak-measurement-based metrology. Namely, (Q1) Does postselection enhance the measurement precision? (Q2) Does weak measurement offer better precision than strong measurement? (Q3) Is it possible to beat the standard quantum limit or to achieve the Heisenberg limit with weak measurement using only classical resources? We analyze these questions for two prototypical, and generic, measurement protocols and show that while the answers to the first two questions are negative for both protocols, the answer to the last is affirmative for measurements with phase-space interactions, and negative for configuration space interactions. Our results, particularly the ability of weak measurements to perform at par with strong measurements in some cases, are instructive for the design of weak-measurement-based protocols for quantum metrology.

  14. Higgs Precision Measurements with ATLAS

    CERN Document Server

    Boumediene, Djamel Eddine; The ATLAS collaboration

    2017-01-01

    After the discovery of the Higgs boson, precise measurements of its properties are of particular importance to understand the true nature of the found particle, which could be the Standard Model predicted Higgs, or indeed offering to be a portal for new physics beyond the Standard Model. In this talk measurement of the mass, cross sections and the couplings of the Higgs boson in bosonic and fermionic decay channels with the ATLAS detector will be presented and compared with Standard Model predictions.

  15. Electroweak precision measurements in CMS

    CERN Document Server

    Dordevic, Milos

    2017-01-01

    An overview of recent results on electroweak precision measurements from the CMS Collaboration is presented. Studies of the weak boson differential transverse momentum spectra, Z boson angular coefficients, forward-backward asymmetry of Drell-Yan lepton pairs and charge asymmetry of W boson production are made in comparison to the state-of-the-art Monte Carlo generators and theoretical predictions. The results show a good agreement with the Standard Model. As a proof of principle for future W mass measurements, a W-like analysis of the Z boson mass is performed.

  16. Precision moisture generation and measurement.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thornberg, Steven Michael; White, Michael I.; Irwin, Adriane Nadine

    2010-03-01

    In many industrial processes, gaseous moisture is undesirable as it can lead to metal corrosion, polymer degradation, and other materials aging processes. However, generating and measuring precise moisture concentrations is challenging due to the need to cover a broad concentration range (parts-per-billion to percent) and the affinity of moisture to a wide range surfaces and materials. This document will discuss the techniques employed by the Mass Spectrometry Laboratory of the Materials Reliability Department at Sandia National Laboratories to generate and measure known gaseous moisture concentrations. This document highlights the use of a chilled mirror and primary standard humidity generator for the characterization of aluminum oxide moisture sensors. The data presented shows an excellent correlation in frost point measured between the two instruments, and thus provides an accurate and reliable platform for characterizing moisture sensors and performing other moisture related experiments.

  17. Precision QCD measurements at HERA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pirumov Hayk

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A review of recent experimental results on perturbative QCD from the HERA experiments H1 and ZEUS is presented. All inclusive deep inelastic cross sections measured by the H1 and ZEUS collaborations in neutral and charged current unpolarised ep scattering are combined. They span six orders of magnitude in negative four-momentum-transfer squared, Q2, and in Bjorken x. This data set is used as the sole input to NLO and NNLO QCD analyses to determine new sets of parton distributions, HERAPDF2.0, with small experimental uncertainties and an estimate of model and parametrisation uncertainties. Also shown are new results on inclusive jet, dijet and trijet differential cross sections measured in neutral current deep inelastic scattering. The precision jet data is used to extract the strong coupling αs at NLO with small experimental errors.

  18. Precision luminosity measurements at LHCb

    CERN Document Server

    Aaij, Roel; Adinolfi, Marco; Affolder, Anthony; Ajaltouni, Ziad; Akar, Simon; Albrecht, Johannes; Alessio, Federico; Alexander, Michael; Ali, Suvayu; Alkhazov, Georgy; Alvarez Cartelle, Paula; Alves Jr, Antonio Augusto; Amato, Sandra; Amerio, Silvia; Amhis, Yasmine; An, Liupan; Anderlini, Lucio; Anderson, Jonathan; Andreassen, Rolf; Andreotti, Mirco; Andrews, Jason; Appleby, Robert; Aquines Gutierrez, Osvaldo; Archilli, Flavio; Artamonov, Alexander; Artuso, Marina; Aslanides, Elie; Auriemma, Giulio; Baalouch, Marouen; Bachmann, Sebastian; Back, John; Badalov, Alexey; Baesso, Clarissa; Baldini, Wander; Barlow, Roger; Barschel, Colin; Barsuk, Sergey; Barter, William; Batozskaya, Varvara; Battista, Vincenzo; Bay, Aurelio; Beaucourt, Leo; Beddow, John; Bedeschi, Franco; Bediaga, Ignacio; Belogurov, Sergey; Belous, Konstantin; Belyaev, Ivan; Ben-Haim, Eli; Bencivenni, Giovanni; Benson, Sean; Benton, Jack; Berezhnoy, Alexander; Bernet, Roland; Bettler, Marc-Olivier; van Beuzekom, Martinus; Bien, Alexander; Bifani, Simone; Bird, Thomas; Bizzeti, Andrea; Bjørnstad, Pål Marius; Blake, Thomas; Blanc, Frédéric; Blouw, Johan; Blusk, Steven; Bocci, Valerio; Bondar, Alexander; Bondar, Nikolay; Bonivento, Walter; Borghi, Silvia; Borgia, Alessandra; Borsato, Martino; Bowcock, Themistocles; Bowen, Espen Eie; Bozzi, Concezio; Brambach, Tobias; Bressieux, Joël; Brett, David; Britsch, Markward; Britton, Thomas; Brodzicka, Jolanta; Brook, Nicholas; Brown, Henry; Bursche, Albert; Buytaert, Jan; Cadeddu, Sandro; Calabrese, Roberto; Calvi, Marta; Calvo Gomez, Miriam; Campana, Pierluigi; Campora Perez, Daniel; Carbone, Angelo; Carboni, Giovanni; Cardinale, Roberta; Cardini, Alessandro; Carson, Laurence; Carvalho Akiba, Kazuyoshi; Casse, Gianluigi; Cassina, Lorenzo; Castillo Garcia, Lucia; Cattaneo, Marco; Cauet, Christophe; Cenci, Riccardo; Charles, Matthew; Charpentier, Philippe; Chefdeville, Maximilien; Chen, Shanzhen; Cheung, Shu-Faye; Chiapolini, Nicola; Chrzaszcz, Marcin; Ciba, Krzystof; Cid Vidal, Xabier; Ciezarek, Gregory; Clarke, Peter; Clemencic, Marco; Cliff, Harry; Closier, Joel; Coco, Victor; Cogan, Julien; Cogneras, Eric; Cojocariu, Lucian; Collazuol, Gianmaria; Collins, Paula; Comerma-Montells, Albert; Contu, Andrea; Cook, Andrew; Coombes, Matthew; Coquereau, Samuel; Corti, Gloria; Corvo, Marco; Counts, Ian; Couturier, Benjamin; Cowan, Greig; Craik, Daniel Charles; Cruz Torres, Melissa Maria; Cunliffe, Samuel; Currie, Robert; D'Ambrosio, Carmelo; Dalseno, Jeremy; David, Pascal; David, Pieter; Davis, Adam; De Bruyn, Kristof; De Capua, Stefano; De Cian, Michel; De Miranda, Jussara; De Paula, Leandro; De Silva, Weeraddana; De Simone, Patrizia; Dean, Cameron Thomas; Decamp, Daniel; Deckenhoff, Mirko; Del Buono, Luigi; Déléage, Nicolas; Derkach, Denis; Deschamps, Olivier; Dettori, Francesco; Di Canto, Angelo; Dijkstra, Hans; Donleavy, Stephanie; Dordei, Francesca; Dorigo, Mirco; Dosil Suárez, Alvaro; Dossett, David; Dovbnya, Anatoliy; Dreimanis, Karlis; Dujany, Giulio; Dupertuis, Frederic; Durante, Paolo; Dzhelyadin, Rustem; Dziurda, Agnieszka; Dzyuba, Alexey; Easo, Sajan; Egede, Ulrik; Egorychev, Victor; Eidelman, Semen; Eisenhardt, Stephan; Eitschberger, Ulrich; Ekelhof, Robert; Eklund, Lars; El Rifai, Ibrahim; Elsasser, Christian; Ely, Scott; Esen, Sevda; Evans, Hannah Mary; Evans, Timothy; Falabella, Antonio; Färber, Christian; Farinelli, Chiara; Farley, Nathanael; Farry, Stephen; Fay, Robert; Ferguson, Dianne; Fernandez Albor, Victor; Ferreira Rodrigues, Fernando; Ferro-Luzzi, Massimiliano; Filippov, Sergey; Fiore, Marco; Fiorini, Massimiliano; Firlej, Miroslaw; Fitzpatrick, Conor; Fiutowski, Tomasz; Fol, Philip; Fontana, Marianna; Fontanelli, Flavio; Forty, Roger; Francisco, Oscar; Frank, Markus; Frei, Christoph; Frosini, Maddalena; Fu, Jinlin; Furfaro, Emiliano; Gallas Torreira, Abraham; Galli, Domenico; Gallorini, Stefano; Gambetta, Silvia; Gandelman, Miriam; Gandini, Paolo; Gao, Yuanning; García Pardiñas, Julián; Garofoli, Justin; Garra Tico, Jordi; Garrido, Lluis; Gascon, David; Gaspar, Clara; Gauld, Rhorry; Gavardi, Laura; Geraci, Angelo; Gersabeck, Evelina; Gersabeck, Marco; Gershon, Timothy; Ghez, Philippe; Gianelle, Alessio; Gianì, Sebastiana; Gibson, Valerie; Giubega, Lavinia-Helena; Gligorov, Vladimir; Göbel, Carla; Golubkov, Dmitry; Golutvin, Andrey; Gomes, Alvaro; Gotti, Claudio; Grabalosa Gándara, Marc; Graciani Diaz, Ricardo; Granado Cardoso, Luis Alberto; Graugés, Eugeni; Graziani, Giacomo; Grecu, Alexandru; Greening, Edward; Gregson, Sam; Griffith, Peter; Grillo, Lucia; Grünberg, Oliver; Gui, Bin; Gushchin, Evgeny; Guz, Yury; Gys, Thierry; Hadjivasiliou, Christos; Haefeli, Guido; Haen, Christophe; Haines, Susan; Hall, Samuel; Hamilton, Brian; Hampson, Thomas; Han, Xiaoxue; Hansmann-Menzemer, Stephanie; Harnew, Neville; Harnew, Samuel; Harrison, Jonathan; He, Jibo; Head, Timothy; Heijne, Veerle; Hennessy, Karol; Henrard, Pierre; Henry, Louis; Hernando Morata, Jose Angel; van Herwijnen, Eric; Heß, Miriam; Hicheur, Adlène; Hill, Donal; Hoballah, Mostafa; Hombach, Christoph; Hulsbergen, Wouter; Hunt, Philip; Hussain, Nazim; Hutchcroft, David; Hynds, Daniel; Idzik, Marek; Ilten, Philip; Jacobsson, Richard; Jaeger, Andreas; Jalocha, Pawel; Jans, Eddy; Jaton, Pierre; Jawahery, Abolhassan; Jing, Fanfan; John, Malcolm; Johnson, Daniel; Jones, Christopher; Joram, Christian; Jost, Beat; Jurik, Nathan; Kandybei, Sergii; Kanso, Walaa; Karacson, Matthias; Karbach, Moritz; Karodia, Sarah; Kelsey, Matthew; Kenyon, Ian; Ketel, Tjeerd; Khanji, Basem; Khurewathanakul, Chitsanu; Klaver, Suzanne; Klimaszewski, Konrad; Kochebina, Olga; Kolpin, Michael; Komarov, Ilya; Koopman, Rose; Koppenburg, Patrick; Korolev, Mikhail; Kozlinskiy, Alexandr; Kravchuk, Leonid; Kreplin, Katharina; Kreps, Michal; Krocker, Georg; Krokovny, Pavel; Kruse, Florian; Kucewicz, Wojciech; Kucharczyk, Marcin; Kudryavtsev, Vasily; Kurek, Krzysztof; Kvaratskheliya, Tengiz; La Thi, Viet Nga; Lacarrere, Daniel; Lafferty, George; Lai, Adriano; Lambert, Dean; Lambert, Robert W; Lanfranchi, Gaia; Langenbruch, Christoph; Langhans, Benedikt; Latham, Thomas; Lazzeroni, Cristina; Le Gac, Renaud; van Leerdam, Jeroen; Lees, Jean-Pierre; Lefèvre, Regis; Leflat, Alexander; Lefrançois, Jacques; Leo, Sabato; Leroy, Olivier; Lesiak, Tadeusz; Leverington, Blake; Li, Yiming; Likhomanenko, Tatiana; Liles, Myfanwy; Lindner, Rolf; Linn, Christian; Lionetto, Federica; Liu, Bo; Lohn, Stefan; Longstaff, Iain; Lopes, Jose; Lopez-March, Neus; Lowdon, Peter; Lu, Haiting; Lucchesi, Donatella; Luo, Haofei; Lupato, Anna; Luppi, Eleonora; Lupton, Oliver; Machefert, Frederic; Machikhiliyan, Irina V; Maciuc, Florin; Maev, Oleg; Malde, Sneha; Malinin, Alexander; Manca, Giulia; Mancinelli, Giampiero; Mapelli, Alessandro; Maratas, Jan; Marchand, Jean François; Marconi, Umberto; Marin Benito, Carla; Marino, Pietro; Märki, Raphael; Marks, Jörg; Martellotti, Giuseppe; Martens, Aurelien; Martín Sánchez, Alexandra; Martinelli, Maurizio; Martinez Santos, Diego; Martinez Vidal, Fernando; Martins Tostes, Danielle; Massafferri, André; Matev, Rosen; Mathe, Zoltan; Matteuzzi, Clara; Maurin, Brice; Mazurov, Alexander; McCann, Michael; McCarthy, James; McNab, Andrew; McNulty, Ronan; McSkelly, Ben; Meadows, Brian; Meier, Frank; Meissner, Marco; Merk, Marcel; Milanes, Diego Alejandro; Minard, Marie-Noelle; Moggi, Niccolò; Molina Rodriguez, Josue; Monteil, Stephane; Morandin, Mauro; Morawski, Piotr; Mordà, Alessandro; Morello, Michael Joseph; Moron, Jakub; Morris, Adam Benjamin; Mountain, Raymond; Muheim, Franz; Müller, Katharina; Mussini, Manuel; Muster, Bastien; Naik, Paras; Nakada, Tatsuya; Nandakumar, Raja; Nasteva, Irina; Needham, Matthew; Neri, Nicola; Neubert, Sebastian; Neufeld, Niko; Neuner, Max; Nguyen, Anh Duc; Nguyen, Thi-Dung; Nguyen-Mau, Chung; Nicol, Michelle; Niess, Valentin; Niet, Ramon; Nikitin, Nikolay; Nikodem, Thomas; Novoselov, Alexey; O'Hanlon, Daniel Patrick; Oblakowska-Mucha, Agnieszka; Obraztsov, Vladimir; Oggero, Serena; Ogilvy, Stephen; Okhrimenko, Oleksandr; Oldeman, Rudolf; Onderwater, Gerco; Orlandea, Marius; Otalora Goicochea, Juan Martin; Owen, Patrick; Oyanguren, Maria Arantza; Pal, Bilas Kanti; Palano, Antimo; Palombo, Fernando; Palutan, Matteo; Panman, Jacob; Papanestis, Antonios; Pappagallo, Marco; Pappalardo, Luciano; Parkes, Christopher; Parkinson, Christopher John; Passaleva, Giovanni; Patel, Girish; Patel, Mitesh; Patrignani, Claudia; Pearce, Alex; Pellegrino, Antonio; Pepe Altarelli, Monica; Perazzini, Stefano; Perret, Pascal; Perrin-Terrin, Mathieu; Pescatore, Luca; Pesen, Erhan; Pessina, Gianluigi; Petridis, Konstantin; Petrolini, Alessandro; Picatoste Olloqui, Eduardo; Pietrzyk, Boleslaw; Pilař, Tomas; Pinci, Davide; Pistone, Alessandro; Playfer, Stephen; Plo Casasus, Maximo; Polci, Francesco; Poluektov, Anton; Polycarpo, Erica; Popov, Alexander; Popov, Dmitry; Popovici, Bogdan; Potterat, Cédric; Price, Eugenia; Price, Joseph David; Prisciandaro, Jessica; Pritchard, Adrian; Prouve, Claire; Pugatch, Valery; Puig Navarro, Albert; Punzi, Giovanni; Qian, Wenbin; Rachwal, Bartolomiej; Rademacker, Jonas; Rakotomiaramanana, Barinjaka; Rama, Matteo; Rangel, Murilo; Raniuk, Iurii; Rauschmayr, Nathalie; Raven, Gerhard; Redi, Federico; Reichert, Stefanie; Reid, Matthew; dos Reis, Alberto; Ricciardi, Stefania; Richards, Sophie; Rihl, Mariana; Rinnert, Kurt; Rives Molina, Vincente; Robbe, Patrick; Rodrigues, Ana Barbara; Rodrigues, Eduardo; Rodriguez Perez, Pablo; Roiser, Stefan; Romanovsky, Vladimir; Romero Vidal, Antonio; Rotondo, Marcello; Rouvinet, Julien; Ruf, Thomas; Ruiz, Hugo; Ruiz Valls, Pablo; Saborido Silva, Juan Jose; Sagidova, Naylya; Sail, Paul; Saitta, Biagio; Salustino Guimaraes, Valdir; Sanchez Mayordomo, Carlos; Sanmartin Sedes, Brais; Santacesaria, Roberta; Santamarina Rios, Cibran; Santovetti, Emanuele; Sarti, Alessio; Satriano, Celestina; Satta, Alessia; Saunders, Daniel Martin; Savrina, Darya; Schiller, Manuel; Schindler, Heinrich; Schlupp, Maximilian; Schmelling, Michael; Schmidt, Burkhard; Schneider, Olivier; Schopper, Andreas; Schubiger, Maxime; Schune, Marie Helene; Schwemmer, Rainer; Sciascia, Barbara; Sciubba, Adalberto; Semennikov, Alexander; Sepp, Indrek; Serra, Nicola; Serrano, Justine; Sestini, Lorenzo; Seyfert, Paul; Shapkin, Mikhail; Shapoval, Illya; Shcheglov, Yury; Shears, Tara; Shekhtman, Lev; Shevchenko, Vladimir; Shires, Alexander; Silva Coutinho, Rafael; Simi, Gabriele; Sirendi, Marek; Skidmore, Nicola; Skwarnicki, Tomasz; Smith, Anthony; Smith, Edmund; Smith, Eluned; Smith, Jackson; Smith, Mark; Snoek, Hella; Sokoloff, Michael; Soler, Paul; Soomro, Fatima; Souza, Daniel; Souza De Paula, Bruno; Spaan, Bernhard; Sparkes, Ailsa; Spradlin, Patrick; Sridharan, Srikanth; Stagni, Federico; Stahl, Marian; Stahl, Sascha; Steinkamp, Olaf; Stenyakin, Oleg; Stevenson, Scott; Stoica, Sabin; Stone, Sheldon; Storaci, Barbara; Stracka, Simone; Straticiuc, Mihai; Straumann, Ulrich; Stroili, Roberto; Subbiah, Vijay Kartik; Sun, Liang; Sutcliffe, William; Swientek, Krzysztof; Swientek, Stefan; Syropoulos, Vasileios; Szczekowski, Marek; Szczypka, Paul; Szumlak, Tomasz; T'Jampens, Stephane; Teklishyn, Maksym; Tellarini, Giulia; Teubert, Frederic; Thomas, Christopher; Thomas, Eric; van Tilburg, Jeroen; Tisserand, Vincent; Tobin, Mark; Tolk, Siim; Tomassetti, Luca; Tonelli, Diego; Topp-Joergensen, Stig; Torr, Nicholas; Tournefier, Edwige; Tourneur, Stephane; Tran, Minh Tâm; Tresch, Marco; Trisovic, Ana; Tsaregorodtsev, Andrei; Tsopelas, Panagiotis; Tuning, Niels; Ubeda Garcia, Mario; Ukleja, Artur; Ustyuzhanin, Andrey; Uwer, Ulrich; Vacca, Claudia; Vagnoni, Vincenzo; Valenti, Giovanni; Vallier, Alexis; Vazquez Gomez, Ricardo; Vazquez Regueiro, Pablo; Vázquez Sierra, Carlos; Vecchi, Stefania; Velthuis, Jaap; Veltri, Michele; Veneziano, Giovanni; Vesterinen, Mika; Viaud, Benoit; Vieira, Daniel; Vieites Diaz, Maria; Vilasis-Cardona, Xavier; Vollhardt, Achim; Volyanskyy, Dmytro; Voong, David; Vorobyev, Alexey; Vorobyev, Vitaly; Voß, Christian; de Vries, Jacco; Waldi, Roland; Wallace, Charlotte; Wallace, Ronan; Walsh, John; Wandernoth, Sebastian; Wang, Jianchun; Ward, David; Watson, Nigel; Websdale, David; Whitehead, Mark; Wicht, Jean; Wiedner, Dirk; Wilkinson, Guy; Williams, Matthew; Williams, Mike; Wilschut, Hans; Wilson, Fergus; Wimberley, Jack; Wishahi, Julian; Wislicki, Wojciech; Witek, Mariusz; Wormser, Guy; Wotton, Stephen; Wright, Simon; Wyllie, Kenneth; Xie, Yuehong; Xing, Zhou; Xu, Zhirui; Yang, Zhenwei; Yuan, Xuhao; Yushchenko, Oleg; Zangoli, Maria; Zavertyaev, Mikhail; Zhang, Liming; Zhang, Wen Chao; Zhang, Yanxi; Zhelezov, Alexey; Zhokhov, Anatoly; Zhong, Liang; Zvyagin, Alexander

    2014-01-01

    Measuring cross-sections at the LHC requires the luminosity to be determined accurately at each centre-of-mass energy $\\sqrt{s}$. In this paper results are reported from the luminosity calibrations carried out at the LHC interaction point 8 with the LHCb detector for $\\sqrt{s}$ = 2.76, 7 and 8 TeV (proton-proton collisions) and for $\\sqrt{s_{NN}}$ = 5 TeV (proton-lead collisions). Both the "van der Meer scan" and "beam-gas imaging" luminosity calibration methods were employed. It is observed that the beam density profile cannot always be described by a function that is factorizable in the two transverse coordinates. The introduction of a two-dimensional description of the beams improves significantly the consistency of the results. For proton-proton interactions at $\\sqrt{s}$ = 8 TeV a relative precision of the luminosity calibration of 1.47% is obtained using van der Meer scans and 1.43% using beam-gas imaging, resulting in a combined precision of 1.12%. Applying the calibration to the full data set determin...

  19. Precision measurements with atom interferometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schubert, Christian; Abend, Sven; Schlippert, Dennis; Ertmer, Wolfgang; Rasel, Ernst M.

    2017-04-01

    Interferometry with matter waves enables precise measurements of rotations, accelerations, and differential accelerations [1-5]. This is exploited for determining fundamental constants [2], in fundamental science as e.g. testing the universality of free fall [3], and is applied for gravimetry [4], and gravity gradiometry [2,5]. At the Institut für Quantenoptik in Hannover, different approaches are pursued. A large scale device is designed and currently being set up to investigate the gain in precision for gravimetry, gradiometry, and fundamental tests on large baselines [6]. For field applications, a compact and transportable device is being developed. Its key feature is an atom chip source providing a collimated high flux of atoms which is expected to mitigate systematic uncertainties [7,8]. The atom chip technology and miniaturization benefits from microgravity experiments in the drop tower in Bremen and sounding rocket experiments [8,9] which act as pathfinders for space borne operation [10]. This contribution will report about our recent results. The presented work is supported by the CRC 1227 DQ-mat, the CRC 1128 geo-Q, the RTG 1729, the QUEST-LFS, and by the German Space Agency (DLR) with funds provided by the Federal Ministry of Economic Affairs and Energy (BMWi) due to an enactment of the German Bundestag under Grant No. DLR 50WM1552-1557. [1] P. Berg et al., Phys. Rev. Lett., 114, 063002, 2015; I. Dutta et al., Phys. Rev. Lett., 116, 183003, 2016. [2] J. B. Fixler et al., Science 315, 74 (2007); G. Rosi et al., Nature 510, 518, 2014. [3] D. Schlippert et al., Phys. Rev. Lett., 112, 203002, 2014. [4] A. Peters et al., Nature 400, 849, 1999; A. Louchet-Chauvet et al., New J. Phys. 13, 065026, 2011; C. Freier et al., J. of Phys.: Conf. Series 723, 012050, 2016. [5] J. M. McGuirk et al., Phys. Rev. A 65, 033608, 2002; P. Asenbaum et al., arXiv:1610.03832. [6] J. Hartwig et al., New J. Phys. 17, 035011, 2015. [7] H. Ahlers et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 116, 173601

  20. High-precision measurements of uranium and thorium isotopic ratios by multi-collector inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (MC-ICPMS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lisheng; Ma, Zhibang; Duan, Wuhui

    2015-04-01

    Isotopic compositions of U-Th and 230Th dating have been widely used in earth sciences, such as chronology, geochemistry, oceanography and hydrology. In this study, five ages of different carbonate samples were measured using 230Th dating technique with U-Th high-precision isotopic measurements by multi-collector inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry, in Uranium-series Chronology Laboratory, Institute of Geology and Geophysics, Chinese Academy of Sciences.In this study, the precision and accuracy of uranium isotopic composition were estimated by measuring the uranium ratios of NBS-CRM 112A, NBS-CRM U500 and HU-1. The mean measured ratios, 234U/238U = 52.86 (±0.04) × 10-6 and δ234U = -38.36 (±0.77) × 10-3 for NBS-CRM 112A, 234U/238U = 10.4184 (±0.0001) × 10-3, 236U/238U = 15.43 (±0.01) × 10-4 and 238U/235U = 1.00021 (±0.00002) for NBS-CRM U500, 234U/238U = 54.911 (±0.007) and δ234U = -1.04 (±0.13) × 10-3 for HU-1 (95% confidence levels). The U isotope data for standard reference materials are in excellent agreement with previous studies, further highlighting the reliability and analytical capabilities of our technique. We measured the thorium isotopic ratios of three different thorium standards by MC-ICPMS. The three standards (Th-1, Th-2 and Th-3) were mixed by HU-1 and NBS 232Th standard, with the 230Th/232Th ratios from 10-4 to 10-6. The mean measured atomic ratios, 230Th/232Th = 2.1227 (±0.0024) × 10-6, 2.7246 (±0.0026) × 10-5, and 2.8358 (±0.0007) × 10-4 for Th-1, Th-2 and Th-3 (95% confidence levels), respectively. Using this technique, the following standard samples were dated by MC-ICPMS. Sample RKM-4, collected from Babardos Kendal Hill terrace, was used during the first stage of the Uranium-Series Intercomparison Project (USIP-I). Samples 76001, RKM-5 and RKM-6 were studied during the second stage of the USIP program (USIP-II). Sample 76001 is a laminated flowstone, collected from Sumidero Terejapa, Chiapas, Mexico, and samples

  1. TIME-SPACE CONCEPT FOR PRECISION MEASUREMENT

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Xiaokang; PENG Donglin; ZHU Ge; WANG Xianquan

    2008-01-01

    The transformation between time and space is discussed. To improve real-time response speed of intelligent measuring system, the concept of exchanging program execution time with more circuitry is presented working in cycle mode. Displacement measuring by magnification is achieved with period measurement by magnification. To change the condition that traditional precision measurement depends on machining precision greatly, the concept of measuring space with time and theory of time-space coordinate transformation are proposed. Guided by the idea of measuring space with time, differential frequency measurement system and time grating displacement sensor are developed based on the proposed novel methods. And high-precision measurement is achieved without high-precision manufacture, which embeds the remarkable characteristics of low cost but high precision to the devices. Experiment and test results conform the validity of the proposed time-space concept.

  2. Precision Higgs boson measurement at CLIC

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(SzGeCERN)718111

    2016-01-01

    The design of the next generation collider in high energy physics will primarily focus on the possibility to achieve high precision of the measurements of interest. The necessary precision limits are set, in the first place, by the measurement of the Higgs boson but also by measurements that are sensitive to signs of New Physics. The Compact Linear Collider (CLIC) is an attractive option for a future multi-TeV linear electron-positron collider, with the potential to cover a rich physics program with high precision. In this lecture the CLIC accelerator, detector and backgrounds will be presented with emphesis on the capabilities of CLIC for precision Higgs physics.

  3. Precision Measurement Physics and Its Methodology

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chao-hui YE; Jia-ming LI; Jun LUO

    2009-01-01

    @@ Precision Measurement Physics deals with the frontier problems in science, and plays a multi-disciplinary and fundamental role in strongly advancing the sciences. It is well known that an improvement of measuring precision in physics by an order of magnitude often implies a new or unknown effect to be explored, consequently even a new physical law to be established. There is no doubt that the development of modern physics is so closely related to precision measurements. During the past few decades, the methodologies and physics of precision measurements have achieved tremendous breakthroughs, and therefore have extended our understanding of the physics world.In addition, some technologies developed in this process have been applied in our daily life. Also, we can expect Precision Measurement Physics to make more significant progress toward verifying the basic laws of physics, and to find more practical applications in the future.

  4. Towards Precision Measurements at UASLP

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamzeloui, S.; Arias, N.; Abediyeh, V.; Martínez, D.; Gutiérrez, M.; Uruñuela, E.; del Rio, E.; Cerda-Méndez, E.; Gomez, E.; Valenzuela, V. M.

    2016-03-01

    Atomic interferometry is a very sensitive technique to measure small forces. Here we present an overview of the progress towards interferometric measurements in our laboratory. We characterize the magnetic field noise and describe the strategies to minimize the sensitivity to magnetic field fluctuations. We introduce as well a system for Raman excitation with minimum phase noise and the frequency filtering needed to implement it. Finally, we demonstrate atomic interferometry with a frequency sensitivity of 3 Hz.

  5. Prospects for Precision Neutrino Cross Section Measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harris, Deborah A. [Fermilab

    2016-01-28

    The need for precision cross section measurements is more urgent now than ever before, given the central role neutrino oscillation measurements play in the field of particle physics. The definition of precision is something worth considering, however. In order to build the best model for an oscillation experiment, cross section measurements should span a broad range of energies, neutrino interaction channels, and target nuclei. Precision might better be defined not in the final uncertainty associated with any one measurement but rather with the breadth of measurements that are available to constrain models. Current experience shows that models are better constrained by 10 measurements across different processes and energies with 10% uncertainties than by one measurement of one process on one nucleus with a 1% uncertainty. This article describes the current status of and future prospects for the field of precision cross section measurements considering the metric of how many processes, energies, and nuclei have been studied.

  6. Electroweak precision measurements in ATLAS

    CERN Document Server

    Soldatov, Evgeny; The ATLAS collaboration

    2017-01-01

    The ATLAS collaboration has performed detailed measurements of integrated and differential cross sections of the production of heavy bosons and of di-boson pairs in fully-leptonic and semi-leptonic final states at centre-of-mass energies of 8 and 13 TeV. These measurements o constitute stringent tests of the electroweak sector of the Standard Model and provide a model-independent means to search for new physics at the TeV scale. The results are compared to predictions at NLO (and NNLO) in pQCD and provide constraints on new physics, by setting limits on anomalous triple gauge couplings.

  7. Precision luminosity measurements at LHCb

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aaij, R.; Adeva, B.; Adinolfi, M.; Affolder, A.; Ajaltouni, Z.; Akar, S.; Albrecht, J.; Alessio, F.; Alexander, M.; Ali, S.; Alkhazov, G.; Alvarez Cartelle, P.; Alves, A. A.; Amato, S.; Amerio, S.; Amhis, Y.; An, L.; Anderlini, L.; Anderson, J.; Andreassen, R.; Andreotti, M.; Andrews, J. E.; Appleby, R. B.; Gutierrez, O. Aquines; Archilli, F.; Artamonov, A.; Artuso, M.; Aslanides, E.; Auriemma, G.; Baalouch, M.; Bachmann, S.; Back, J. J.; Badalov, A.; Baesso, C.; Baldini, W.; Barlow, R. J.; Barschel, C.; Barsuk, S.; Barter, W.; Batozskaya, V.; Battista, V.; Bay, A.; Beaucourt, L.; Beddow, J.; Bedeschi, F.; Bediaga, I.; Belogurov, S.; Belous, K.; Belyaev, I.; Ben-Haim, E.; Bencivenni, G.; Benson, S.; Benton, J.; Berezhnoy, A.; Bernet, R.; Bettler, M. -O.; van Beuzekom, M.; Bien, A.; Bifani, S.; Bird, T.; Bizzeti, A.; Bjornstad, P. M.; Blake, T.; Blanc, F.; Blouw, J.; Blusk, S.; Bocci, V.; Bondar, A.; Bondar, N.; Bonivento, W.; Borghi, S.; Borgia, A.; Borsato, M.; Bowcock, T. J. V.; Bowen, E.; Bozzi, C.; Brambach, T.; Bressieux, J.; Brett, D.; Britsch, M.; Britton, T.; Brodzicka, J.; Brook, N. H.; Brown, H.; Bursche, A.; Buytaert, J.; Cadeddu, S.; Calabrese, R.; Calvi, M.; Calvo Gomez, M.; Campana, P.; Perez, D. Campora; Carbone, A.; Carboni, G.; Cardinale, R.; Cardini, A.; Carson, L.; Carvalho Akiba, K.; Casse, G.; Cassina, L.; Garcia, L. Castillo; Cattaneo, M.; Cauet, Ch.; Cenci, R.; Charles, M.; Charpentier, Ph.; Chefdeville, M.; Chen, S.; Cheung, S. -F.; Chiapolini, N.; Chrzaszcz, M.; Ciba, K.; Vidal, X. Cid; Ciezarek, G.; Clarke, P. E. L.; Clemencic, M.; Cliff, H. V.; Closier, J.; Coco, V.; Cogan, J.; Cogneras, E.; Cojocariu, L.; Collazuol, G.; Collins, P.; Comerma-Montells, A.; Contu, A.; Cook, A.; Coombes, M.; Coquereau, S.; Corti, G.; Corvo, M.; Counts, I.; Couturier, B.; Cowan, G. A.; Craik, D. C.; Cruz Torres, M.; Cunliffe, S.; Currie, R.; D'Ambrosio, C.; Dalseno, J.; David, P.; David, P. N. Y.; Davis, A.; De Bruyn, K.; De Capua, S.; De Cian, M.; De Miranda, J. M.; De Paula, L.; De Silva, W.; De Simone, P.; Dean, C. -T.; Decamp, D.; Deckenhoff, M.; Del Buono, L.; Deleage, N.; Derkach, D.; Deschamps, O.; Dettori, F.; Di Canto, A.; Dijkstra, H.; Donleavy, S.; Dordei, F.; Dorigo, M.; Dosil Suarez, A.; Dossett, D.; Dovbnya, A.; Dreimanis, K.; Dujany, G.; Dupertuis, F.; Durante, P.; Dzhelyadin, R.; Dziurda, A.; Dzyuba, A.; Easo, S.; Egede, U.; Egorychev, V.; Eidelman, S.; Eisenhardt, S.; Eitschberger, U.; Ekelhof, R.; Eklund, L.; El Rifai, I.; Elsasser, Ch.; Ely, S.; Esen, S.; Evans, H. -M.; Evans, T.; Falabella, A.; Faerber, C.; Farinelli, C.; Farley, N.; Farry, S.; Fay, R. F.; Ferguson, D.; Fernandez Albor, V.; Ferreira Rodrigues, F.; Ferro-Luzzi, M.; Filippov, S.; Fiore, M.; Fiorini, M.; Firlej, M.; Fitzpatrick, C.; Fiutowski, T.; Fol, P.; Fontana, M.; Fontanelli, F.; Forty, R.; Francisco, O.; Frank, M.; Frei, C.; Frosini, M.; Fu, J.; Furfaro, E.; Gallas Torreira, A.; Galli, D.; Gallorini, S.; Gambetta, S.; Gandelman, M.; Gandini, P.; Gao, Y.; Garcia Pardinas, J.; Garofoli, J.; Tico, J. Garra; Garrido, L.; Gascon, D.; Gaspar, C.; Gauld, R.; Gavardi, L.; Geraci, A.; Gersabeck, E.; Gersabeck, M.; Gershon, T.; Ghez, Ph.; Gianelle, A.; Giani, S.; Gibson, V.; Giubega, L.; Gligorov, V. V.; Goebel, C.; Golubkov, D.; Golutvin, A.; Gomes, A.; Gotti, C.; Gandara, M. Grabalosa; Graciani Diaz, R.; Cardoso, L. A. Granado; Grauges, E.; Graziani, G.; Grecu, A.; Greening, E.; Gregson, S.; Griffith, P.; Grillo, L.; Gruenberg, O.; Gui, B.; Gushchin, E.; Guz, Yu.; Gys, T.; Hadjivasiliou, C.; Haefeli, G.; Haen, C.; Haines, S. C.; Hall, S.; Hamilton, B.; Hampson, T.; Han, X.; Hansmann-Menzemer, S.; Harnew, N.; Harnew, S. T.; Harrison, J.; He, J.; Head, T.; Heijne, V.; Hennessy, K.; Henrard, P.; Henry, L.; Hernando Morata, J. A.; van Herwijnen, E.; Hess, M.; Hicheur, A.; Hill, D.; Hoballah, M.; Hombach, C.; Hulsbergen, W.; Hunt, P.; Hussain, N.; Hutchcroft, D.; Hynds, D.; Idzik, M.; Ilten, P.; Jacobsson, R.; Jaeger, A.; Jalocha, J.; Jans, E.; Jaton, P.; Jawahery, A.; Jing, F.; John, M.; Johnson, D.; Jones, C. R.; Joram, C.; Jost, B.; Jurik, N.; Kandybei, S.; Kanso, W.; Karacson, M.; Karbach, T. M.; Karodia, S.; Kelsey, M.; Kenyon, I. R.; Ketel, T.; Khanji, B.; Khurewathanakul, C.; Klaver, S.; Klimaszewski, K.; Kochebina, O.; Kolpin, M.; Komarov, I.; Koopman, R. F.; Koppenburg, P.; Korolev, M.; Kozlinskiy, A.; Kravchuk, L.; Kreplin, K.; Kreps, M.; Krocker, G.; Krokovny, P.; Kruse, F.; Kucewicz, W.; Kucharczyk, M.; Kudryavtsev, V.; Kurek, K.; Kvaratskheliya, T.; La Thi, V. N.; Lacarrere, D.; Lafferty, G.; Lai, A.; Lambert, D.; Lambert, R. W.; Lanfranchi, G.; Langenbruch, C.; Langhans, B.; Latham, T.; Lazzeroni, C.; Le Gac, R.; van Leerdam, J.; Lees, J. -P.; Lefevre, R.; Leflat, A.; Lefrancois, J.; Leo, S.; Leroy, O.; Lesiak, T.; Leverington, B.; Li, Y.; Likhomanenko, T.; Liles, M.; Lindner, R.; Linn, C.; Lionetto, F.; Liu, B.; Lohn, S.; Longstaff, I.; Lopes, J. H.; Lopez-March, N.; Lowdon, P.; Lu, H.; Lucchesi, D.; Luo, H.; Lupato, A.; Luppi, E.; Lupton, O.; Machefert, F.; Machikhiliyan, I. V.; Maciuc, F.; Maev, O.; Malde, S.; Malinin, A.; Manca, G.; Mancinelli, G.; Mapelli, A.; Maratas, J.; Marchand, J. F.; Marconi, U.; Marin Benito, C.; Marino, P.; Maerki, R.; Marks, J.; Martellotti, G.; Martens, A.; Sanchez, A. Martin; Martinelli, M.; Santos, D. Martinez; Martinez Vidal, F.; Martins Tostes, D.; Massafferri, A.; Matev, R.; Mathe, Z.; Matteuzzi, C.; Maurin, B.; Mazurov, A.; McCann, M.; McCarthy, J.; McNab, A.; McNulty, R.; McSkelly, B.; Meadows, B.; Meier, F.; Meissner, M.; Merk, M.; Milanes, D. A.; Minard, M. -N.; Moggi, N.; Molina Rodriguez, J.; Monteil, S.; Morandin, M.; Morawski, P.; Morda, A.; Morello, M. J.; Moron, J.; Morris, A. -B.; Mountain, R.; Muheim, F.; Mueller, K.; Mussini, M.; Muster, B.; Naik, P.; Nakada, T.; Nandakumar, R.; Nasteva, I.; Needham, M.; Neri, N.; Neubert, S.; Neufeld, N.; Neuner, M.; Nguyen, A. D.; Nguyen, T. D.; Nguyen-Mau, C.; Nicol, M.; Niess, V.; Niet, R.; Nikitin, N.; Nikodem, T.; Novoselov, A.; O'Hanlon, D. P.; Oblakowska-Mucha, A.; Obraztsov, V.; Oggero, S.; Ogilvy, S.; Okhrimenko, O.; Oldeman, R.; Onderwater, C. J. G.; Orlandea, M.; Otalora Goicochea, J. M.; Owen, P.; Oyanguren, A.; Pal, B. K.; Palano, A.; Palombo, F.; Palutan, M.; Panman, J.; Papanestis, A.; Pappagallo, M.; Pappalardo, L. L.; Parkes, C.; Parkinson, C. J.; Passaleva, G.; Patel, G. D.; Patel, M.; Patrignani, C.; Pearce, A.; Pellegrino, A.; Altarelli, M. Pepe; Perazzini, S.; Perret, P.; Perrin-Terrin, M.; Pescatore, L.; Pesen, E.; Pessina, G.; Petridis, K.; Petrolini, A.; Picatoste Olloqui, E.; Pietrzyk, B.; Pilar, T.; Pinci, D.; Pistone, A.; Playfer, S.; Plo Casasus, M.; Polci, F.; Poluektov, A.; Polycarpo, E.; Popov, A.; Popov, D.; Popovici, B.; Potterat, C.; Price, E.; Price, J. D.; Prisciandaro, J.; Pritchard, A.; Prouve, C.; Pugatch, V.; Navarro, A. Puig; Punzi, G.; Qian, W.; Rachwal, B.; Rademacker, J. H.; Rakotomiaramanana, B.; Rama, M.; Rangel, M. S.; Raniuk, I.; Rauschmayr, N.; Raven, G.; Redi, F.; Reichert, S.; Reid, M. M.; dos Reis, A. C.; Ricciardi, S.; Richards, S.; Rihl, M.; Rinnert, K.; Rives Molina, V.; Robbe, P.; Rodrigues, A. B.; Rodrigues, E.; Perez, P. Rodriguez; Roiser, S.; Romanovsky, V.; Romero Vidal, A.; Rotondo, M.; Rouvinet, J.; Ruf, T.; Ruiz, H.; Ruiz Valls, P.; Saborido Silva, J. J.; Sagidova, N.; Sail, P.; Saitta, B.; Salustino Guimaraes, V.; Sanchez Mayordomo, C.; Sanmartin Sedes, B.; Santacesaria, R.; Santamarina Rios, C.; Santovetti, E.; Sarti, A.; Satriano, C.; Satta, A.; Saunders, D. M.; Savrina, D.; Schiller, M.; Schindler, H.; Schlupp, M.; Schmelling, M.; Schmidt, B.; Schneider, O.; Schopper, A.; Schubiger, M.; Schune, M. -H.; Schwemmer, R.; Sciascia, B.; Sciubba, A.; Semennikov, A.; Sepp, I.; Serra, N.; Serrano, J.; Sestini, L.; Seyfert, P.; Shapkin, M.; Shapoval, I.; Shcheglov, Y.; Shears, T.; Shekhtman, L.; Shevchenko, V.; Shires, A.; Coutinho, R. Silva; Simi, G.; Sirendi, M.; Skidmore, N.; Skwarnicki, T.; Smith, N. A.; Smith, E.; Smith, E.; Smith, J.; Smith, M.; Snoek, H.; Sokoloff, M. D.; Soler, F. J. P.; Soomro, F.; Souza, D.; Souza De Paula, B.; Spaan, B.; Sparkes, A.; Spradlin, P.; Sridharan, S.; Stagni, F.; Stahl, M.; Stahl, S.; Steinkamp, O.; Stenyakin, O.; Stevenson, S.; Stoica, S.; Stone, S.; Storaci, B.; Stracka, S.; Straticiuc, M.; Straumann, U.; Stroili, R.; Subbiah, V. K.; Sun, L.; Sutcliffe, W.; Swientek, K.; Swientek, S.; Syropoulos, V.; Szczekowski, M.; Szczypka, P.; Szumlak, T.; T'Jampens, S.; Teklishyn, M.; Tellarini, G.; Teubert, F.; Thomas, C.; Thomas, E.; van Tilburg, J.; Tisserand, V.; Tobin, M.; Tolk, S.; Tomassetti, L.; Tonelli, D.; Topp-Joergensen, S.; Torr, N.; Tournefier, E.; Tourneur, S.; Tran, M. T.; Tresch, M.; Trisovic, A.; Tsaregorodtsev, A.; Tsopelas, P.; Tuning, N.; Garcia, M. Ubeda; Ukleja, A.; Ustyuzhanin, A.; Uwer, U.; Vacca, C.; Vagnoni, V.; Valenti, G.; Vallier, A.; Gomez, R. Vazquez; Vazquez Regueiro, P.; Vazquez Sierra, C.; Vecchi, S.; Velthuis, J. J.; Veltri, M.; Veneziano, G.; Vesterinen, M.; Viaud, B.; Vieira, D.; Vieites Diaz, M.; Vilasis-Cardona, X.; Vollhardt, A.; Volyanskyy, D.; Voong, D.; Vorobyev, A.; Vorobyev, V.; Voss, C.; de Vries, J. A.; Waldi, R.; Wallace, C.; Wallace, R.; Walsh, J.; Wandernoth, S.; Wang, J.; Ward, D. R.; Watson, N. K.; Websdale, D.; Whitehead, M.; Wicht, J.; Wiedner, D.; Wilkinson, G.; Williams, M. P.; Williams, M.; Wilschut, H. W.; Wilson, F. F.; Wimberley, J.; Wishahi, J.; Wislicki, W.; Witek, M.; Wormser, G.; Wotton, S. A.; Wright, S.; Wyllie, K.; Xie, Y.; Xing, Z.; Xu, Z.; Yang, Z.; Yuan, X.; Yushchenko, O.; Zangoli, M.; Zavertyaev, M.; Zhang, L.; Zhang, W. C.; Zhang, Y.; Zhelezov, A.; Zhokhov, A.; Zhong, L.; Zvyagin, A.

    2014-01-01

    Measuring cross-sections at the LHC requires the luminosity to be determined accurately at each centre-of-mass energy root s. In this paper results are reported from the luminosity calibrations carried out at the LHC interaction point 8 with the LHCb detector for root s = 2.76, 7 and 8TeV (proton-pr

  8. Electroweak precision measurements at CLIC

    CERN Document Server

    Weber, Matthias Artur; Boyko, Igor

    2017-01-01

    The Compact Linear Collider (CLIC) is an option for a future electron-positron collider operating at centre-of-mass energies from a few hundred GeV up to 3 TeV. Details will be presented on two recent physics benchmark analyses of electroweak measurements at CLIC based on full detector simulations and assuming centre-of-mass energies of 1.4 and 3 TeV. Vector boson scattering gives insight into the mechanism of electroweak symmetry breaking. The processes e$^+$e$^-\\rightarrow$WW$\

  9. Theory of precision electroweak measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peskin, M.E.

    1990-03-01

    In these lectures, I will review the theoretical concepts needed to understand the goals and implications of experiments in this new era of weak interactions. I will explain how to compute the most important order-{alpha} radiative corrections to weak interaction processes and discuss the physical implications of these correction terms. I hope that this discussion will be useful to those --- experimentalists and theorists --- who will try to interpret the new data that we will soon receive. This paper is organized as follows: I will review the structure of the standard weak interaction model at zeroth order. I will discuss the measurement of the Z{sup 0} boson mass in e{sup +}e{sup {minus}} annihilation. This measurement is affected by radiative correction to the form of the Z{sup 0} resonance, and so I will review the theory of the resonance line shape. I will briefly review the modifications of the properties of the Z{sup 0} which would be produced by additional neutral gauge bosons. I will review the theory of the renormalization of weak interaction parameters such as sin{sup 2} {theta}{sub {omega}}, concentrating especially on the contributions of the top quark and other heavy, undiscovered particles.

  10. Iterative Precise Conductivity Measurement with IDEs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hubálek, Jaromír

    2015-05-22

    The paper presents a new approach in the field of precise electrolytic conductivity measurements with planar thin- and thick-film electrodes. This novel measuring method was developed for measurement with comb-like electrodes called interdigitated electrodes (IDEs). Correction characteristics over a wide range of specific conductivities were determined from an interface impedance characterization of the thick-film IDEs. The local maximum of the capacitive part of the interface impedance is used for corrections to get linear responses. The measuring frequency was determined at a wide range of measured conductivity. An iteration mode of measurements was suggested to precisely measure the conductivity at the right frequency in order to achieve a highly accurate response. The method takes precise conductivity measurements in concentration ranges from 10(-6) to 1 M without electrode cell replacement.

  11. High Precision Measurements Using High Frequency Signals

    CERN Document Server

    Jin, Aohan; Sakurai, Atsunori; Liu, Liang; Edman, Fredrik; Öwall, Viktor; Pullerits, Tonu; Karki, Khadga J

    2014-01-01

    Generalized lock-in amplifiers use digital cavities with Q-factors as high as 5X10^8. In this letter, we show that generalized lock-in amplifiers can be used to analyze microwave (giga-hertz) signals with a precision of few tens of hertz. We propose that the physical changes in the medium of propagation can be measured precisely by the ultra-high precision measurement of the signal. We provide evidence to our proposition by verifying the Newton's law of cooling by measuring the effect of change in temperature on the phase and amplitude of the signals propagating through two calibrated cables. The technique could be used to precisely measure different physical properties of the propagation medium, for example length, resistance, etc. Real time implementation of the technique can open up new methodologies of in-situ virtual metrology in material design.

  12. Etching with atomic precision by using low electron temperature plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorf, L.; Wang, J.-C.; Rauf, S.; Monroy, G. A.; Zhang, Y.; Agarwal, A.; Kenney, J.; Ramaswamy, K.; Collins, K.

    2017-07-01

    There has been a steady increase in sub-nm precision requirement for many critical plasma etching processes in the semiconductor industry. In addition to high selectivity and low controllable etch rate, an important requirement of atomic precision etch processes is no (or minimal) damage to the remaining material surface. It has traditionally not been possible to avoid damage in conventional radio-frequency (RF) plasma processing systems, even during layer-by-layer or ‘atomic layer’ etch. To meet these increasingly stringent requirements, it is necessary to have an accurate control over ion energy and ion/radical composition during plasma processing. In this work, a new plasma etch system designed to facilitate atomic precision plasma processing is presented. An electron sheet beam parallel to the substrate surface is used to produce a plasma in this system. This plasma has a significantly lower electron temperature T e ~ 0.3 eV and ion energy E i  plasmas. Electron beam plasmas also have a higher ion-to-radical ratio compared to RF plasmas, so this plasma etch system employs an independent radical source for accurate control over relative ion and radical concentrations. A low frequency RF bias capability that allows control of ion energy in the 2-50 eV range is another important component of this plasma etch system. The results of etching of a variety of materials and structures in this low-electron temperature plasma system are presented in this study: (1) layer-by-layer etching of p-Si at E i ~ 25-50 eV using electrical and gas cycling is demonstrated; (2) continuous etching of epi-grown µ-Si in Cl2-based plasmas is performed, showing that surface damage can be minimized by keeping E i  etching at low E i.

  13. Workshop on Precision Measurements of alphas

    CERN Document Server

    Bethke, S; Kluth, S; Schieck, J; Stewart, I W; Aoki, S; Beneke, M; Blumlein, J; Brambilla, N; Brodsky, S; Descotes-Genon, S; Erler, J; Forte, S; Gehrmann, T; Golterman, M; Hashimoto, S; Kronfeld, A; Kuhn, J; Lepage, P; Martin, A; Mateu, V; Menke, S; Nomura, Y; Pahl, C; Petriello, F; Pich, A; Rabbertz, K; Salam, G; Schulz, H; Sommer, R; Steinhauser, M; Webber, B; Yuan, CP; Zanderighi, G

    2011-01-01

    These are the proceedings of the "Workshop on Precision Measurements of alphas" held at the Max-Planck-Institute for Physics, Munich, February 9-11, 2011. The workshop explored in depth the determination of alphas(mZ) in the MS-bar scheme from the key categories where high precision measurements are currently being made, including DIS and global PDF fits, tau-decays, electroweak precision observables and Z-decays, event-shapes, and lattice QCD. These proceedings contain a short summary contribution from the speakers, as well as the lists of authors, conveners, participants, and talks.

  14. Precision measurement for particle physics and cosmology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graham, Peter

    2017-01-01

    Axions and other light particles are strongly motivated. For example, the axion is the crucial element in the recently proposed solution to the hierarchy problem using dynamical relaxation in the early universe. However, such particles are challenging to search for experimentally. Precision measurement technologies such as atom interferometry, nuclear magnetic resonance, high precision magnetometry, and torsion balances allow novel, highly sensitive experiments for direct detection of such light dark matter and of gravitational waves. Thus precision measurement technologies open new avenues for probing the origin and composition of the universe.

  15. Precision Electroweak Measurements at FCC-ee

    CERN Document Server

    Tenchini, Roberto

    2014-01-01

    The prospects for electroweak precision measurements at the Future Circular Collider with electron-positron beams (FCC-ee) are discussed. The Z mass and width, as well as the value of the electroweak mixing angle, can be measured with very high precision at the Z pole thanks to an instantaneous luminosity five to six order of magnitudes larger than LEP. At centre-of-mass energies around 160 GeV, corresponding to the WW production threshold, the W mass can be determined very precisely with high-statistics cross section measurements at several energy points. Similarly, a very precise determination of the top mass can be provided by an energy scan at the $\\mathrm{t \\bar t}$ production threshold, around 350 GeV.

  16. Precision measurement of oscillation parameters with reactors

    OpenAIRE

    2003-01-01

    We review the potential of long and intermediate baseline reactor neutrino experiments in measuring the mass and mixing parameters. The KamLAND experiment can measure the solar mass squared difference very precisely. However it is not at the ideal baseline for measuring the solar neutrino mixing angle. If low-LMA is confirmed by the next results from KamLAND, a reactor experiment with a baseline of 70 km should be ideal to measure precisely the solar neutrino mixing angle. If on the contrary ...

  17. Precision position measurement of single atom

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ziauddin; Rahmatullah; Almas Khan

    2012-01-01

    Atom localization in a five-level atomic system under the effect of three driving fields and one standing wave field is suggested.A spontaneously emitted photon from the proposed system is measured in a detector.Precision position measurement of an atom is controlled via phase and vacuum field detuning without considering the parity violation.

  18. Precision frequency measurements with interferometric weak values

    CERN Document Server

    Starling, David J; Jordan, Andrew N; Howell, John C; 10.1103/PhysRevA.82.063822

    2011-01-01

    We demonstrate an experiment which utilizes a Sagnac interferometer to measure a change in optical frequency of 129 kHz per root Hz with only 2 mW of continuous wave, single mode input power. We describe the measurement of a weak value and show how even higher frequency sensitivities may be obtained over a bandwidth of several nanometers. This technique has many possible applications, such as precision relative frequency measurements and laser locking without the use of atomic lines.

  19. Needs and challenges in precision wear measurement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blau, P.J.

    1996-01-10

    Accurate, precise wear measurements are a key element in solving both current wear problems and in basic wear research. Applications range from assessing durability of micro-scale components to accurate screening of surface treatments and thin solid films. Need to distinguish small differences in wear tate presents formidable problems to those who are developing new materials and surface treatments. Methods for measuring wear in ASTM standard test methods are discussed. Errors in using alterate methods of wear measurement on the same test specimen are also described. Human judgemental factors are a concern in common methods for wear measurement, and an experiment involving measurement of a wear scar by ten different people is described. Precision in wear measurement is limited both by the capabilities of the measuring instruments and by the nonuniformity of the wear process. A method of measuring wear using nano-scale indentations is discussed. Current and future prospects for incorporating advanced, higher-precision wear measurement methods into standards are considered.

  20. Neutrino discoveries lead to precision measurements

    CERN Document Server

    Altmann, M

    2002-01-01

    The science of neutrino physics has reached a watershed, with discovery giving way to precision measurements. The author reports from the XXth International Conference on Neutrino Physics and Astrophysics. Topics covered are low-energy neutrinos, atmospheric neutrinos, long-baseline experiments, accelerator experiments, neutrino properties, neutrinos in astrophysics and cosmology, dark matter and neutrino telescopes.

  1. Precision measurements from the NOMAD experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Petti, R

    2004-01-01

    The NOMAD experiment collected unprecedent neutrino data samples, matching both the large statistics of massive calorimeters and the reconstruction quality of bubble chambers. This paper describes the determination of the weak mixing angle which is ongoing in NOMAD, with a target precision of $\\sim 1%$. In addition, measurements of the $\

  2. Toward precision measurements in solar neutrinos

    CERN Document Server

    De Holanda, P C; Smirnov, A Yu; Liao, Wei

    2004-01-01

    Solar neutrino physics enters the stage of precision measurements. In this connection we present the precise analytic description of the neutrino conversion in the context of the LMA MSW solution of the solar neutrino problem. Using the adiabatic perturbation theory we find an analytic formula for the survival probability which takes into account the non-adiabatic corrections and the regeneration effect inside the Earth. The probability is averaged over the neutrino production region. We find that the non-adiabatic corrections are of the order $10^{-9}-10^{-7}$. Using the formula for the Earth regeneration effect we discuss features of the zenith angle dependence of the $\

  3. PRECISION ELECTROWEAK MEASUREMENTS AND THE HIGGS MASS.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    MARCIANO, W.J.

    2004-08-02

    The utility of precision electroweak measurements for predicting the Standard Model Higgs mass via quantum loop effects is discussed. Current constraints from m{sub w} and sin{sup 2} {theta}{sub w} (m{sub z}){sub {ovr MS}} imply a relatively light Higgs {approx}< 154 GeV which is consistent with Supersymmetry expectations. The existence of Supersymmetry is further suggested by a discrepancy between experiment and theory for the muon anomalous magnetic moment. Constraints from precision studies on other types of ''New Physics'' are also briefly described.

  4. Precision measurement of oscillation parameters with reactors

    CERN Document Server

    Choubey, S

    2003-01-01

    We review the potential of long and intermediate baseline reactor neutrino experiments in measuring the mass and mixing parameters. The KamLAND experiment can measure the solar mass squared difference very precisely. However it is not at the ideal baseline for measuring the solar neutrino mixing angle. If low-LMA is confirmed by the next results from KamLAND, a reactor experiment with a baseline of 70 km should be ideal to measure precisely the solar neutrino mixing angle. If on the contrary KamLAND re-establishes high-LMA as a viable solution, then a 20--30 km intermediate baseline reactor experiment could yield very rich phenomenology.

  5. Using chaos to improve measurement precision

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    何斌; 杨灿军; 周银生; 陈鹰

    2002-01-01

    If the measuring signals wore input to the chaotic dynamic system as initial parameters, the system outputs might be in steady state, periodic state or chaos state. If the chaotic dynamic system outputs controlled in the periodic states, the periodic numbers would be changed most with the signals. Our novel method is to add chaotic dynamic vibration to the measurement or sensor system. The sensor sensitivity and precision of a measurement system would be improved with this method. Chaotic dynamics measurement algorithms are given and their sensitivity to parameters are analyzed in this paper. The effects of noises on the system are discussed,

  6. Using chaos to improve measurement precision

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    If the measuring signals were input to the chaotic dynamic system as initial parameters, the system outputs might be in steady state, periodic state or chaos state. If the chaotic dynamic system outputs controlled in the periodic states, the periodic numbers would be changed most with the signals. Our novel method is to add chaotic dynamic vibration to the measurement or sensor system.The sensor sensitivity and precision of a measurement system would be improved with this method. Chaotic dynamics measurement algorithms are given and their sensitivity to parameters are analyzed in this paper. The effects of noises on the system are discussed.

  7. High precision flux measurements with ENUBET

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pozzato, M.; ENUBET collaboration

    2017-09-01

    The challenges of precision neutrino physics (i.e the study of CP violation) require measurements of absolute ν cross sections at the GeV scale with exquisite (O(1)%) precision. Such precision is presently limited to about 10% by the uncertainties on neutrino flux at the source. A reduction of this uncertainty by one order of magnitude can be achieved monitoring the positron production in the decay tunnel originating from the Ke3 decays of charged kaons in a sign and momentum selected narrow band beam. This novel technique enables the measurement of the most relevant cross-sections for CP violation (νe and {\\displaystyle \\bar{ν }}e) with a precision of 1% and requires a special instrumented beam-line. Such non-conventional beam-line will be developed in the framework of the ENUBET Horizon-2020 Consolidator Grant (PI A. Longhin), recently approved by the European Research Council (grant agreement N° 681647). In this poster, we will present the Project and the early experimental results on ultra-compact calorimeters that can embedded in the instrumented decay tunnel.

  8. Precision lifetime measurements in light exotic nuclei

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCutchan, Elizabeth

    2017-01-01

    A new generation of ab-initio calculations, based on realistic two- and three-body forces have had a profound impact on our understanding of nuclei. They have shed light on topics such as the origin of effective forces (like spin-orbit and tensor interactions) and the mechanisms behind cluster and pairing correlations. New precise data are required to both better parameterize the three body forces and to improve numerical methods. A sensitive probe of the structure of light nuclei comes from their electromagnetic transition rates. A refined Doppler Shift Attenuation Method (DSAM) will be outlined which is used to precisely measure lifetimes in light nuclei and helps to reduce and quantity systematic uncertainties in the measurement. Using this careful DSAM, we have made a series of precise measurements of electromagnetic transition strengths in Li isotopes, A =10 nuclei, and the exotic halo nucleus, 12Be. Various phenomena, such as alpha clustering and meson-exchange currents, can be investigated in these seemingly simple systems, while the collection of data spanning stable to neutron-rich, allows us to probe the influence of additional valence neutrons. This talk will report on what has been learned, and the challenges that lie in the future, both in experiment and theory, as we push to describing and measuring even more exotic systems. Work supported by the Office of Nuclear Physics, Office of Science of the U.S. Department of Energy under contract No. DE-AC02-98CH10886.

  9. Precision frequency measurements with interferometric weak values

    Science.gov (United States)

    Starling, David J.; Dixon, P. Ben; Jordan, Andrew N.; Howell, John C.

    2010-12-01

    We demonstrate an experiment which utilizes a Sagnac interferometer to measure a change in optical frequency of 129 ± 7 kHz/Hz with only 2 mW of continuous-wave, single-mode input power. We describe the measurement of a weak value and show how even higher-frequency sensitivities may be obtained over a bandwidth of several nanometers. This technique has many possible applications, such as precision relative frequency measurements and laser locking without the use of atomic lines.

  10. Precision optical displacement measurements using biphotons

    CERN Document Server

    Lyons, Kevin; Kwiat, Paul G; Jordan, Andrew N

    2016-01-01

    We propose and examine the use of biphoton pairs, such as those created in parametric down conversion or four-wave mixing, to enhance the precision and the resolution of measuring optical displacements by position-sensitive detection. We show that the precision of measuring a small optical beam displacement with this method can be significantly enhanced by the correlation between the two photons, given the same optical mode. The improvement is largest if the correlations between the photons are strong, and falls off as the biphoton correlation weakens. More surprisingly, we find that the smallest resolvable parameter of a simple split detector scales as the inverse of the number of biphotons for small biphoton number ("Heisenberg scaling"), because the Fisher information diverges as the parameter to be estimated decreases in value. One usually sees this scaling only for systems with many entangled degrees of freedom. We discuss the transition for the split-detection scheme to the standard quantum limit scalin...

  11. Precision measurements of the CKM angle gamma

    CERN Document Server

    CERN. Geneva

    2016-01-01

    The level of CP-violation permitted within the Standard Model cannot account for the matter dominated universe in which we live. Within the Standard Model the CKM matrix, which describes the quark couplings, is expected to be unitary. By making precise measurements of the CKM matrix parameters new physics models can be constrained, or with sufficient precision the effects of physics beyond the standard model might become apparent. The CKM angle gamma is the least well known angle of the unitarity triangle. It is the only angle easily accessible at tree-level, and furthermore has almost no theoretical uncertainties. Therefore it provides an invaluable Standard Model benchmark against which other new physics sensitive tests of the CP-violation can be made. I will discuss recent measurements of gamma using the the Run 1 LHCb dataset, which improve our knowledge of this key parameter.

  12. Precision mass measurements utilizing beta endpoints

    CERN Document Server

    Moltz, D M; Kern, B D; Noma, H; Ritchie, B G; Toth, K S

    1981-01-01

    A technique for precise determination of beta endpoints with an intrinsic germanium detector has been developed. The energy calibration is derived from gamma -ray photopeak measurements. This analysis procedure has been checked with a /sup 27/Si source produced in a (p, n) reaction on a /sup 27/Al target and subsequently applied to mass separated samples of /sup 76/Rb, /sup 77/Rb and /sup 78/Rb. Results indicate errors <50 keV are obtainable. (29 refs).

  13. Low cost automated precise time measurement system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alpert, A.; Liposchak, P.

    1973-01-01

    The Aerospace Guidance and Metrology Center (AGMC) has the responsibility for the dissemination of Precise Time and Time Interval (PTTI) to Air Force timing systems requiring microsecond time. In order to maintain traceability to the USNO Master Clock in Washington D.C., and accomplish efficient logging of time and frequency data on individual precision clocks, a simple automatic means of acquiring precise time has been devised. The Automatic Time Interval Measurement System (ATIMS) consists of a minicomputer (8K Memory), teletype terminal, electronic counter, Loran C receiver, time base generator and locally-manufactured relay matrix panel. During the measurement process, the computer controls the relay matrix which selects for comparison 13 atomic clocks against a reference clock and the reference versus Loran C. Through use of the system teletype, the operator is able to set the system clock (hours, minutes and seconds), examine and/or modify all clock data and constants, and set measurement intervals. This is done in a conversational manner. A logic flow diagram, system schematic, source listing and software components are included in the presentation.

  14. Precision mass measurements of highly charged ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwiatkowski, A. A.; Bale, J. C.; Brunner, T.; Chaudhuri, A.; Chowdhury, U.; Ettenauer, S.; Frekers, D.; Gallant, A. T.; Grossheim, A.; Lennarz, A.; Mane, E.; MacDonald, T. D.; Schultz, B. E.; Simon, M. C.; Simon, V. V.; Dilling, J.

    2012-10-01

    The reputation of Penning trap mass spectrometry for accuracy and precision was established with singly charged ions (SCI); however, the achievable precision and resolving power can be extended by using highly charged ions (HCI). The TITAN facility has demonstrated these enhancements for long-lived (T1/2>=50 ms) isobars and low-lying isomers, including ^71Ge^21+, ^74Rb^8+, ^78Rb^8+, and ^98Rb^15+. The Q-value of ^71Ge enters into the neutrino cross section, and the use of HCI reduced the resolving power required to distinguish the isobars from 3 x 10^5 to 20. The precision achieved in the measurement of ^74Rb^8+, a superallowed β-emitter and candidate to test the CVC hypothesis, rivaled earlier measurements with SCI in a fraction of the time. The 111.19(22) keV isomeric state in ^78Rb was resolved from the ground state. Mass measurements of neutron-rich Rb and Sr isotopes near A = 100 aid in determining the r-process pathway. Advanced ion manipulation techniques and recent results will be presented.

  15. Precision and reproducibility in AMS radiocarbon measurements.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hotchkis, M.A.; Fink, D.; Hua, Q.; Jacobsen, G.E.; Lawson, E. M.; Smith, A.M.; Tuniz, C. [Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation, Lucas Heights, NSW (Australia)

    1996-12-31

    Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (AMS) is a technique by which rare radioisotopes such as {sup 14}C can be measured at environmental levels with high efficiency. Instead of detecting radioactivity, which is very weak for long-lived environmental radioisotopes, atoms are counted directly. The sample is placed in an ion source, from which a negative ion beam of the atoms of interest is extracted, mass analysed, and injected into a tandem accelerator. After stripping to positive charge states in the accelerator HV terminal, the ions are further accelerated, analysed with magnetic and electrostatic devices and counted in a detector. An isotopic ratio is derived from the number of radioisotope atoms counted in a given time and the beam current of a stable isotope of the same element, measured after the accelerator. For radiocarbon, {sup 14}C/{sup 13}C ratios are usually measured, and the ratio of an unknown sample is compared to that of a standard. The achievable precision for such ratio measurements is limited primarily by {sup 14}C counting statistics and also by a variety of factors related to accelerator and ion source stability. At the ANTARES AMS facility at Lucas Heights Research Laboratories we are currently able to measure {sup 14}C with 0.5% precision. In the two years since becoming operational, more than 1000 {sup 14}C samples have been measured. Recent improvements in precision for {sup 14}C have been achieved with the commissioning of a 59 sample ion source. The measurement system, from sample changing to data acquisition, is under common computer control. These developments have allowed a new regime of automated multi-sample processing which has impacted both on the system throughput and the measurement precision. We have developed data evaluation methods at ANTARES which cross-check the self-consistency of the statistical analysis of our data. Rigorous data evaluation is invaluable in assessing the true reproducibility of the measurement system and aids in

  16. Precision Mass Measurement of Argon Isotopes

    CERN Multimedia

    Lunney, D

    2002-01-01

    % IS388\\\\ \\\\ A precision mass measurement of the neutron-deficient isotopes $^{32,33,34}$Ar is proposed. Mass values of these isotopes are of importance for: a) a stringent test of the Isobaric-Multiplet- Mass-Equation, b) a verification of the correctness of calculated charge-dependent corrections as used in super-allowed $\\beta$- decay studies aiming at a test of the CVC hypothesis, and c) the determination of the kinematics in electron-neutrino correlation experiments searching for scalar currents in weak interaction. The measurements will be carried out with the ISOLTRAP Penning trap mass spectrometer.

  17. Laser Feedback Technique for Precise Retardation Measurements

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    FEI Li-Gang; ZHANG Shu-Lian

    2006-01-01

    @@ A simple and precise retardation measurement based on laser feedback is demonstrated. The measurement principle is based on polarization flipping induced by optical feedback from an external birefringence cavity.The measured wave plate is located in the external cavity. When the length of the external cavity is tuned,the polarization states of laser will flip between two eigenstates, and the position of polarization flipping in one period of intensity modulation will vary with retardation of the wave plate. The duty ratio of two eigenstates is used to determine the retardation. Main advantages of the technique are that it is compact, low cost, fast and flexible. Especially, it is insensitive to a fluctuation of laser intensity and is suitable for on-line measurement. The experimental results have shown that the measurement uncertainty is better than 0.03° in the range 30°-150°.

  18. Precision measurements with LPCTrap at GANIL

    CERN Document Server

    Lienard, E; Couratin, C; Delahaye, P; Durand, D; Fabian, X; Fabre, B; Flechard, X; Finlay, P; Mauger, F; Mery, A; Naviliat-Cuncic, O; Pons, B; Porobic, T; Quemener, G; Severijns, N; Thomas, J C; Velten, Ph

    2015-01-01

    The experimental achievements and the results obtained so far with the LPCTrap device installed at GANIL are presented. The apparatus is dedicated to the study of the weak interaction at low energy by means of precise measurements of the BETA-NU angular correlation parameter in nuclear BETA decays. So far, the data collected with three isotopes have enabled to determine, for the first time, the charge state distributions of the recoiling ions, induced by shakeoff process. The analysis is presently refined to deduce the correlation parameters, with the potential of improving both the constraint deduced at low energy on exotic tensor currents (6He1+) and the precision on the V u d element of the quark-mixing matrix (35Ar1+ and 19Ne1+) deduced from the mirror transitions dataset.

  19. Precision measurements with LPCTrap at GANIL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liénard, E., E-mail: lienard@lpccaen.in2p3.fr; Ban, G. [LPC CAEN, ENSICAEN, Université de Caen, CNRS/IN2P3 (France); Couratin, C. [Instituut voor Kern- en Stralingsfysica, KU Leuven (Belgium); Delahaye, P. [GANIL, CEA/DSM-CNRS/IN2P3 (France); Durand, D.; Fabian, X. [LPC CAEN, ENSICAEN, Université de Caen, CNRS/IN2P3 (France); Fabre, B. [CELIA, Université Bordeaux, CNRS, CEA (France); Fléchard, X. [LPC CAEN, ENSICAEN, Université de Caen, CNRS/IN2P3 (France); Finlay, P. [Instituut voor Kern- en Stralingsfysica, KU Leuven (Belgium); Mauger, F. [LPC CAEN, ENSICAEN, Université de Caen, CNRS/IN2P3 (France); Méry, A. [CIMAP, CEA/CNRS/ENSICAEN, Université de Caen (France); Naviliat-Cuncic, O. [NSCL and Department of Physics and Astronomy, MSU (United States); Pons, B. [CELIA, Université Bordeaux, CNRS, CEA (France); Porobic, T. [Instituut voor Kern- en Stralingsfysica, KU Leuven (Belgium); Quéméner, G. [LPC CAEN, ENSICAEN, Université de Caen, CNRS/IN2P3 (France); Severijns, N. [Instituut voor Kern- en Stralingsfysica, KU Leuven (Belgium); Thomas, J. C. [GANIL, CEA/DSM-CNRS/IN2P3 (France); Velten, Ph. [Instituut voor Kern- en Stralingsfysica, KU Leuven (Belgium)

    2015-11-15

    The experimental achievements and the results obtained so far with the LPCTrap device installed at GANIL are presented. The apparatus is dedicated to the study of the weak interaction at low energy by means of precise measurements of the β − ν angular correlation parameter in nuclear β decays. So far, the data collected with three isotopes have enabled to determine, for the first time, the charge state distributions of the recoiling ions, induced by shakeoff process. The analysis is presently refined to deduce the correlation parameters, with the potential of improving both the constraint deduced at low energy on exotic tensor currents ({sup 6}He{sup 1+}) and the precision on the V{sub ud} element of the quark-mixing matrix ({sup 35}Ar{sup 1+} and {sup 19}Ne{sup 1+}) deduced from the mirror transitions dataset.

  20. Cyclotrons as Drivers for Precision Neutrino Measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Adelmann

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available As we enter the age of precision measurement in neutrino physics, improved flux sources are required. These must have a well defined flavor content with energies in ranges where backgrounds are low and cross-section knowledge is high. Very few sources of neutrinos can meet these requirements. However, pion/muon and isotope decay-at-rest sources qualify. The ideal drivers for decay-at-rest sources are cyclotron accelerators, which are compact and relatively inexpensive. This paper describes a scheme to produce decay-at-rest sources driven by such cyclotrons, developed within the DAEδALUS program. Examples of the value of the high precision beams for pursuing Beyond Standard Model interactions are reviewed. New results on a combined DAEδALUS—Hyper-K search for CP violation that achieve errors on the mixing matrix parameter of 4° to 12° are presented.

  1. Precision of hyaline cartilage thickness measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jonsson, K.; Buckwalter, K.; Helvie, M.; Niklason, L.; Martel, W. (Univ. of Michigan Hospitals, Ann Arbor, MI (United States). Dept. of Radiology)

    1992-05-01

    Measurement of cartilage thickness in vivo is an important indicator of the status of a joint as the various degenerative and inflammatory arthritides directly affect the condition of the cartilage. In order to assess the precision of thickness measurements of hyaline articular cartilage, we undertook a pilot study using MR imaging, plain radiography, and ultrasonography (US). We measured the cartilage of the hip and knee joints in 10 persons (4 healthy volunteers and 6 patients). The joints in each patient were examined on two separate occasions using each modality. In the hips a swell as the knee joints, the most precise measuring method was plain film radiography. For radiographs of the knees obtained in the standing position, the coefficient of variation was 6.5%; in the hips this figure was 6.34%. US of the knees and MR imaging of the hips were the second best modalities in the measurement of cartilage thickness. In addition, MR imaging enabled the most complete visualization of the joint cartilage. (orig.).

  2. Precise delay measurement through combinatorial logic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burke, Gary R. (Inventor); Chen, Yuan (Inventor); Sheldon, Douglas J. (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    A high resolution circuit and method for facilitating precise measurement of on-chip delays for FPGAs for reliability studies. The circuit embeds a pulse generator on an FPGA chip having one or more groups of LUTS (the "LUT delay chain"), also on-chip. The circuit also embeds a pulse width measurement circuit on-chip, and measures the duration of the generated pulse through the delay chain. The pulse width of the output pulse represents the delay through the delay chain without any I/O delay. The pulse width measurement circuit uses an additional asynchronous clock autonomous from the main clock and the FPGA propagation delay can be displayed on a hex display continuously for testing purposes.

  3. Ion manipulation and precision measurements at JYFLTRAP

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jokinen, A.; Eronen, T.; Hager, U.; Hakala, J.; Kopecky, S.; Rinta-Antila, S.; Aeystoe, J. [University of Jyvaeskylae, Department of Physics, Jyvaeskylae (Finland); Nieminen, A. [University of Manchester, Schuster Laboratory, Manchester (United Kingdom)

    2005-09-01

    Various ion manipulation tools based on ion trapping technologies have been implemented at the IGISOL-facility in JYFL. An RFQ ion cooler and buncher is used to enhance the sensitivity of collinear laser spectroscopy and as an injector to the Penning trap. Penning traps are utilized both in nuclear spectroscopy and for precision mass measurements, as explained in the paper. Atomic masses of neutron-rich Zr, Mo and Sr isotopes were found to be in disagreement with the Atomic-Mass Evaluation and two-neutron separation energies imply strong nuclear structure effects at the neutron number N=60. (orig.)

  4. Precision timing measurements for high energy photons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anderson, Dustin, E-mail: djanders@caltech.edu [California Institute of Technology, 1200 E California Blvd, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Apreysan, Artur; Bornheim, Adi; Duarte, Javier; Newman, Harvey; Pena, Cristian [California Institute of Technology, 1200 E California Blvd, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Ronzhin, Anatoly [Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory, P.O. Box 500, Batavia, IL 60510 (United States); Spiropulu, Maria; Trevor, Jason; Xie, Si; Zhu, Ren-Yuan [California Institute of Technology, 1200 E California Blvd, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States)

    2015-07-01

    Particle colliders operating at high luminosities present challenging environments for high energy physics event reconstruction and analysis. We discuss how timing information, with a precision on the order of 10 ps, can aid in the reconstruction of physics events under such conditions. We present calorimeter based timing measurements from test beam experiments in which we explore the ultimate timing precision achievable for high energy photons or electrons of 10 GeV and above. Using a prototype calorimeter consisting of a 1.7×1.7×1.7 cm{sup 3} lutetium–yttrium oxyortho-silicate (LYSO) crystal cube, read out by micro-channel plate photomultipliers, we demonstrate a time resolution of 33.5±2.1 ps for an incoming beam energy of 32 GeV. In a second measurement, using a 2.5×2.5×20 cm{sup 3} LYSO crystal placed perpendicularly to the electron beam, we achieve a time resolution of 59±11 ps using a beam energy of 4 GeV. We also present timing measurements made using a shashlik-style calorimeter cell made of LYSO and tungsten plates, and demonstrate that the apparatus achieves a time resolution of 54±5 ps for an incoming beam energy of 32 GeV.

  5. Precision timing measurements for high energy photons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anderson, Dustin [California Inst. of Technology (CalTech), Pasadena, CA (United States); Apreysan, Artur [California Inst. of Technology (CalTech), Pasadena, CA (United States); Bornheim, Adi [California Inst. of Technology (CalTech), Pasadena, CA (United States); Duarte, Javier [California Inst. of Technology (CalTech), Pasadena, CA (United States); Newman, Harvey [California Inst. of Technology (CalTech), Pasadena, CA (United States); Pena, Cristian [California Inst. of Technology (CalTech), Pasadena, CA (United States); Ronzhin, Anatoly [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Spiropulu, Maria [California Inst. of Technology (CalTech), Pasadena, CA (United States); Trevor, Jason [California Inst. of Technology (CalTech), Pasadena, CA (United States); Xie, Si [California Inst. of Technology (CalTech), Pasadena, CA (United States); Zhu, Ren-Yuan [California Inst. of Technology (CalTech), Pasadena, CA (United States)

    2014-11-21

    Particle colliders operating at high luminosities present challenging environments for high energy physics event reconstruction and analysis. We discuss how timing information, with a precision on the order of 10 ps, can aid in the reconstruction of physics events under such conditions. We present calorimeter based timing measurements from test beam experiments in which we explore the ultimate timing precision achievable for high energy photons or electrons of 10 GeV and above. Using a prototype calorimeter consisting of a 1.7×1.7×1.7 cm3 lutetium–yttrium oxyortho-silicate (LYSO) crystal cube, read out by micro-channel plate photomultipliers, we demonstrate a time resolution of 33.5±2.1 ps for an incoming beam energy of 32 GeV. In a second measurement, using a 2.5×2.5×20 cm3 LYSO crystal placed perpendicularly to the electron beam, we achieve a time resolution of 59±11 ps using a beam energy of 4 GeV. We also present timing measurements made using a shashlik-style calorimeter cell made of LYSO and tungsten plates, and demonstrate that the apparatus achieves a time resolution of 54±5 ps for an incoming beam energy of 32 GeV.

  6. Measuring Kinetic Plasma Eigenmodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattingly, Sean; Berumen, Jorge; Chu, Feng; Hood, Ryan; Skiff, Fred

    2015-11-01

    We present a method for measuring kinetic plasma eigenmodes of a cylindrical axially magnetized (1 kG) laboratory plasma (n ~109cm-3 , Te ~ 5eV , Ti ~ 0 . 06eV) by measuring velocity space correlation functions. This method simultaneously observes two separate laser induced fluorescence schemes. Each scheme has its own indepedently tunable laser and its own set of collection optics. With this setup, we are able to measure the time - averaged correlation function as a function of position on the cylindrical axis parallel to the magnetic field (z) and velocity on the deconvolved ion velocity distribution function (v) : C (z , v ,z' ,v' , τ) = t. The freedom of two lasers allows us to measure a two dimensional velocity correlation matrix. This matrix is investigated with the Vlasov equation in the collisionless and weakly collisional regime. The former case, which is continuous, is diagonalized with an integral transform defined by P. J. Morrison while the latter case, which is discrete, is diagonalized through the use of Hermite polynomials.

  7. Precision optical displacement measurements using biphotons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyons, Kevin; Pang, Shengshi; Kwiat, Paul G.; Jordan, Andrew N.

    2016-04-01

    We propose and examine the use of biphoton pairs, such as those created in parametric down-conversion or four-wave mixing, to enhance the precision and the resolution of measuring optical displacements by position-sensitive detection. We show that the precision of measuring a small optical beam displacement with this method can be significantly enhanced by the correlation between the two photons, given the same optical mode. The improvement is largest if the correlations between the photons are strong, and falls off as the biphoton correlation weakens. More surprisingly, we find that the smallest resolvable parameter of a simple split detector scales as the inverse of the number of biphotons for small biphoton number ("Heisenberg scaling"), because the Fisher information diverges as the parameter to be estimated decreases in value. One usually sees this scaling only for systems with many entangled degrees of freedom. We discuss the transition for the split-detection scheme to the standard quantum limit scaling for imperfect correlations as the biphoton number is increased. An analysis of an N -pixel detector is also given to investigate the benefit of using a higher resolution detector. The physical limit of these metrology schemes is determined by the uncertainty in the birth zone of the biphoton in the nonlinear crystal.

  8. Precision measurements in 20F beta decay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, Maximilian; Naviliat-Cuncic, Oscar; Voytas, Paul; George, Elizabeth; Paulauskas, Stan; Huyan, Xueying

    2017-01-01

    Precision measurements of the shape of the beta particle energy spectrum provide a sensitive window to search for new interactions beyond the standard model. The decay of 20F offers an attractive system due to the simple decay scheme for a coincidence measurement. A beam of 20F ions, produced at the National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory, was implanted into a beta-detector. A gamma-ray detection system surrounded the beta detector to detect the beta-delayed gammas in coincidence to reduce the background. Preliminary analysis of these data focus on the half-life of 20F due to the statistical inconsistency of previous work. Monte Carlo simulations are ongoing to analyze the shape of the beta energy spectrum. Results of the analysis of the half-life will be presented. Supported by National Science Foundation Grant PHY-1102511.

  9. Precision measurement of $D$ meson mass differences

    CERN Document Server

    Aaij, R; Adeva, B; Adinolfi, M; Adrover, C; Affolder, A; Ajaltouni, Z; Albrecht, J; Alessio, F; Alexander, M; Ali, S; Alkhazov, G; Alvarez Cartelle, P; Alves Jr, A A; Amato, S; Amerio, S; Amhis, Y; Anderlini, L; Anderson, J; Andreassen, R; Appleby, R B; Aquines Gutierrez, O; Archilli, F; Artamonov, A; Artuso, M; Aslanides, E; Auriemma, G; Bachmann, S; Back, J J; Baesso, C; Balagura, V; Baldini, W; Barlow, R J; Barschel, C; Barsuk, S; Barter, W; Bauer, Th; Bay, A; Beddow, J; Bedeschi, F; Bediaga, I; Belogurov, S; Belous, K; Belyaev, I; Ben-Haim, E; Benayoun, M; Bencivenni, G; Benson, S; Benton, J; Berezhnoy, A; Bernet, R; Bettler, M -O; van Beuzekom, M; Bien, A; Bifani, S; Bird, T; Bizzeti, A; Bjørnstad, P M; Blake, T; Blanc, F; Blouw, J; Blusk, S; Bocci, V; Bondar, A; Bondar, N; Bonivento, W; Borghi, S; Borgia, A; Bowcock, T J V; Bowen, E; Bozzi, C; Brambach, T; van den Brand, J; Bressieux, J; Brett, D; Britsch, M; Britton, T; Brook, N H; Brown, H; Burducea, I; Bursche, A; Busetto, G; Buytaert, J; Cadeddu, S; Callot, O; Calvi, M; Calvo Gomez, M; Camboni, A; Campana, P; Campora Perez, D; Carbone, A; Carboni, G; Cardinale, R; Cardini, A; Carranza-Mejia, H; Carson, L; Carvalho Akiba, K; Casse, G; Cattaneo, M; Cauet, Ch; Charles, M; Charpentier, Ph; Chen, P; Chiapolini, N; Chrzaszcz, M; Ciba, K; Cid Vidal, X; Ciezarek, G; Clarke, P E L; Clemencic, M; Cliff, H V; Closier, J; Coca, C; Coco, V; Cogan, J; Cogneras, E; Collins, P; Comerma-Montells, A; Contu, A; Cook, A; Coombes, M; Coquereau, S; Corti, G; Couturier, B; Cowan, G A; Craik, D C; Cunliffe, S; Currie, R; D'Ambrosio, C; David, P; David, P N Y; Davis, A; De Bonis, I; De Bruyn, K; De Capua, S; De Cian, M; De Miranda, J M; De Paula, L; De Silva, W; De Simone, P; Decamp, D; Deckenhoff, M; Del Buono, L; Derkach, D; Deschamps, O; Dettori, F; Di Canto, A; Dijkstra, H; Dogaru, M; Donleavy, S; Dordei, F; Dosil Suárez, A; Dossett, D; Dovbnya, A; Dupertuis, F; Dzhelyadin, R; Dziurda, A; Dzyuba, A; Easo, S; Egede, U; Egorychev, V; Eidelman, S; van Eijk, D; Eisenhardt, S; Eitschberger, U; Ekelhof, R; Eklund, L; El Rifai, I; Elsasser, Ch; Elsby, D; Falabella, A; Färber, C; Fardell, G; Farinelli, C; Farry, S; Fave, V; Ferguson, D; Fernandez Albor, V; Ferreira Rodrigues, F; Ferro-Luzzi, M; Filippov, S; Fiore, M; Fitzpatrick, C; Fontana, M; Fontanelli, F; Forty, R; Francisco, O; Frank, M; Frei, C; Frosini, M; Furcas, S; Furfaro, E; Gallas Torreira, A; Galli, D; Gandelman, M; Gandini, P; Gao, Y; Garofoli, J; Garosi, P; Garra Tico, J; Garrido, L; Gaspar, C; Gauld, R; Gersabeck, E; Gersabeck, M; Gershon, T; Ghez, Ph; Gibson, V; Gligorov, V V; Göbel, C; Golubkov, D; Golutvin, A; Gomes, A; Gordon, H; Grabalosa Gándara, M; Graciani Diaz, R; Granado Cardoso, L A; Graugés, E; Graziani, G; Grecu, A; Greening, E; Gregson, S; Grünberg, O; Gui, B; Gushchin, E; Guz, Yu; Gys, T; Hadjivasiliou, C; Haefeli, G; Haen, C; Haines, S C; Hall, S; Hampson, T; Hansmann-Menzemer, S; Harnew, N; Harnew, S T; Harrison, J; Hartmann, T; He, J; Heijne, V; Hennessy, K; Henrard, P; Hernando Morata, J A; van Herwijnen, E; Hicks, E; Hill, D; Hoballah, M; Hombach, C; Hopchev, P; Hulsbergen, W; Hunt, P; Huse, T; Hussain, N; Hutchcroft, D; Hynds, D; Iakovenko, V; Idzik, M; Ilten, P; Jacobsson, R; Jaeger, A; Jans, E; Jaton, P; Jing, F; John, M; Johnson, D; Jones, C R; Jost, B; Kaballo, M; Kandybei, S; Karacson, M; Karbach, T M; Kenyon, I R; Kerzel, U; Ketel, T; Keune, A; Khanji, B; Kochebina, O; Komarov, I; Koopman, R F; Koppenburg, P; Korolev, M; Kozlinskiy, A; Kravchuk, L; Kreplin, K; Kreps, M; Krocker, G; Krokovny, P; Kruse, F; Kucharczyk, M; Kudryavtsev, V; Kvaratskheliya, T; La Thi, V N; Lacarrere, D; Lafferty, G; Lai, A; Lambert, D; Lambert, R W; Lanciotti, E; Lanfranchi, G; Langenbruch, C; Latham, T; Lazzeroni, C; Le Gac, R; van Leerdam, J; Lees, J -P; Lefèvre, R; Leflat, A; Lefrançois, J; Leo, S; Leroy, O; Lesiak, T; Leverington, B; Li, Y; Li Gioi, L; Liles, M; Lindner, R; Linn, C; Liu, B; Liu, G; Lohn, S; Longstaff, I; Lopes, J H; Lopez Asamar, E; Lopez-March, N; Lu, H; Lucchesi, D; Luisier, J; Luo, H; Machefert, F; Machikhiliyan, I V; Maciuc, F; Maev, O; Malde, S; Manca, G; Mancinelli, G; Marconi, U; Märki, R; Marks, J; Martellotti, G; Martens, A; Martin, L; Martín Sánchez, A; Martinelli, M; Martinez Santos, D; Martins Tostes, D; Massafferri, A; Matev, R; Mathe, Z; Matteuzzi, C; Maurice, E; Mazurov, A; McCarthy, J; McNab, A; McNulty, R; Meadows, B; Meier, F; Meissner, M; Merk, M; Milanes, D A; Minard, M -N; Molina Rodriguez, J; Monteil, S; Moran, D; Morawski, P; Morello, M J; Mountain, R; Mous, I; Muheim, F; Müller, K; Muresan, R; Muryn, B; Muster, B; Naik, P; Nakada, T; Nandakumar, R; Nasteva, I; Needham, M; Neufeld, N; Nguyen, A D; Nguyen, T D; Nguyen-Mau, C; Nicol, M; Niess, V; Niet, R; Nikitin, N; Nikodem, T; Nomerotski, A; Novoselov, A; Oblakowska-Mucha, A; Obraztsov, V; Oggero, S; Ogilvy, S; Okhrimenko, O; Oldeman, R; Orlandea, M; Otalora Goicochea, J M; Owen, P; Oyanguren, A; Pal, B K; Palano, A; Palutan, M; Panman, J; Papanestis, A; Pappagallo, M; Parkes, C; Parkinson, C J; Passaleva, G; Patel, G D; Patel, M; Patrick, G N; Patrignani, C; Pavel-Nicorescu, C; Pazos Alvarez, A; Pellegrino, A; Penso, G; Pepe Altarelli, M; Perazzini, S; Perego, D L; Perez Trigo, E; Pérez-Calero Yzquierdo, A; Perret, P; Perrin-Terrin, M; Pessina, G; Petridis, K; Petrolini, A; Phan, A; Picatoste Olloqui, E; Pietrzyk, B; Pilař, T; Pinci, D; Playfer, S; Plo Casasus, M; Polci, F; Polok, G; Poluektov, A; Polycarpo, E; Popov, D; Popovici, B; Potterat, C; Powell, A; Prisciandaro, J; Pugatch, V; Puig Navarro, A; Punzi, G; Qian, W; Rademacker, J H; Rakotomiaramanana, B; Rangel, M S; Raniuk, I; Rauschmayr, N; Raven, G; Redford, S; Reid, M M; dos Reis, A C; Ricciardi, S; Richards, A; Rinnert, K; Rives Molina, V; Roa Romero, D A; Robbe, P; Rodrigues, E; Rodriguez Perez, P; Roiser, S; Romanovsky, V; Romero Vidal, A; Rouvinet, J; Ruf, T; Ruffini, F; Ruiz, H; Ruiz Valls, P; Sabatino, G; Saborido Silva, J J; Sagidova, N; Sail, P; Saitta, B; Salzmann, C; Sanmartin Sedes, B; Sannino, M; Santacesaria, R; Santamarina Rios, C; Santovetti, E; Sapunov, M; Sarti, A; Satriano, C; Satta, A; Savrie, M; Savrina, D; Schaack, P; Schiller, M; Schindler, H; Schlupp, M; Schmelling, M; Schmidt, B; Schneider, O; Schopper, A; Schune, M -H; Schwemmer, R; Sciascia, B; Sciubba, A; Seco, M; Semennikov, A; Senderowska, K; Sepp, I; Serra, N; Serrano, J; Seyfert, P; Shapkin, M; Shapoval, I; Shatalov, P; Shcheglov, Y; Shears, T; Shekhtman, L; Shevchenko, O; Shevchenko, V; Shires, A; Silva Coutinho, R; Skwarnicki, T; Smith, N A; Smith, E; Smith, M; Sokoloff, M D; Soler, F J P; Soomro, F; Souza, D; Souza De Paula, B; Spaan, B; Sparkes, A; Spradlin, P; Stagni, F; Stahl, S; Steinkamp, O; Stoica, S; Stone, S; Storaci, B; Straticiuc, M; Straumann, U; Subbiah, V K; Swientek, S; Syropoulos, V; Szczekowski, M; Szczypka, P; Szumlak, T; T'Jampens, S; Teklishyn, M; Teodorescu, E; Teubert, F; Thomas, C; Thomas, E; van Tilburg, J; Tisserand, V; Tobin, M; Tolk, S; Tonelli, D; Topp-Joergensen, S; Torr, N; Tournefier, E; Tourneur, S; Tran, M T; Tresch, M; Tsaregorodtsev, A; Tsopelas, P; Tuning, N; Ubeda Garcia, M; Ukleja, A; Urner, D; Uwer, U; Vagnoni, V; Valenti, G; Vazquez Gomez, R; Vazquez Regueiro, P; Vecchi, S; Velthuis, J J; Veltri, M; Veneziano, G; Vesterinen, M; Viaud, B; Vieira, D; Vilasis-Cardona, X; Vollhardt, A; Volyanskyy, D; Voong, D; Vorobyev, A; Vorobyev, V; Voß, C; Voss, H; Waldi, R; Wallace, R; Wandernoth, S; Wang, J; Ward, D R; Watson, N K; Webber, A D; Websdale, D; Whitehead, M; Wicht, J; Wiechczynski, J; Wiedner, D; Wiggers, L; Wilkinson, G; Williams, M P; Williams, M; Wilson, F F; Wishahi, J; Witek, M; Wotton, S A; Wright, S; Wu, S; Wyllie, K; Xie, Y; Xing, F; Xing, Z; Yang, Z; Young, R; Yuan, X; Yushchenko, O; Zangoli, M; Zavertyaev, M; Zhang, F; Zhang, L; Zhang, W C; Zhang, Y; Zhelezov, A; Zhokhov, A; Zhong, L; Zvyagin, A

    2013-01-01

    Using three- and four-body decays of $D$ mesons produced in semileptonic $b$-hadron decays, precision measurements of $D$ meson mass differences are made together with a measurement of the $D^{0}$ mass. The measurements are based on a dataset corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 1.0 fb$^{-1}$ collected in $pp$ collisions at 7~TeV. Using the decay $D^0 \\rightarrow K^{+} K^{-} K^{-} \\pi^{+}$, the $D^0$ mass is measured to be \\begin{alignat*}{3} M(D^0) \\phantom{ghd} &=&~1864.75 \\pm 0.15 \\,({\\rm stat}) \\pm 0.11 \\,({\\rm syst}) \\, \\textrm{MeV}/c^2. \\end{alignat*} The mass differences \\begin{alignat*}{3} M(D^{+}) - M(D^{0}) &=& 4.76 \\pm 0.12 \\,({\\rm stat}) \\pm 0.07 \\,({\\rm syst}) \\, \\textrm{MeV}/c^2, \\\\ M(D^{+}_s) - M(D^{+}) &=& \\phantom{00}98.68 \\pm 0.03 \\,({\\rm stat}) \\pm 0.04 \\,({\\rm syst}) \\, \\textrm{MeV}/c^2 \\end{alignat*} are measured using the $D^0 \\rightarrow K^{+} K^{-} \\pi^{+} \\pi^{-}$ and $D^{+}_{(s)} \\rightarrow K^{+}K^{-} \\pi^{+}$ modes.

  10. Precise geodynamic measurements in South America

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groten, E.

    First high precision gravity measurements carried out in 1984 were repeated in November 1987 when in a wider frame, ranging from Santa Cruz de la Sierra (Bolivia) down to Santiago de Chile and Mendoza (Argentina), a regional densified network in Northern Chile was observed. The carefully monumented regional network extends from the earthquake-active coastal area in Chile up to Salta in Argentina. The repeated measurements are considered as a first step in a longtime study where geometric vertical control will be provided by GPS-measurements. Additional geodynamic information is provided by parallel seismic and other observations. Special interest arose from the fact that briefly after the first observations in 1984 significant earthquake deformation occurred in the area of Mendoza and Santiago de Chile. As far as gravimetry is concerned, all possible error sources are being carefully considered where also absolute measurements in view of scaling errors are planned. Reference is being made with respect to those areas which appear to be decoupled from the well known uplift of the High Andes. A detailed discussion and analysis of gravimetric data is presented. Correlation with geodynamic phenomena is studied. Future prospects of the general concept "GPS-gravimetry" as a geodynamic tool for studying vertical phenomena are interpreted.

  11. KamLAND's precision neutrino oscillation measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Decowski, M. P.

    2016-07-01

    The KamLAND experiment started operation in the Spring of 2002 and is operational to this day. The experiment observes signals from electron antineutrinos from distant nuclear reactors. The program, spanning more than a decade, allowed the determination of LMA-MSW as the solution to the solar neutrino transformation results (under the assumption of CPT invariance) and the measurement of various neutrino oscillation parameters. In particular, the solar mass-splitting Δ m212 was determined to high precision. Besides the study of neutrino oscillation, KamLAND started the investigation of geologically produced antineutrinos (geo-ν‾e). The collaboration also reported on a variety of other topics related to particle and astroparticle physics.

  12. Precisely measuring the distance to the moon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faller, J. E.; Dickey, J. O.

    1990-01-01

    Continuing improvements in the lasers and the detection electronics over the years which have led to accurate measurements of the distance from the earth to the moon are discussed. The first reflector of laser light pulses, deployed on the moon surface twenty years ago by the Apollo 11 astronauts, consisted of 100 fused silica corner cubes, and reflected a beam of light directly back toward its point of origin. Observatories located in Texas, Hawaii, and France now regularly range the moon with an accuracy of approximately 1 inch. Ranging programs have also been carried out in Australia and the Soviet Union. The ranges are computer-analyzed to determine precisely the positions of the observatories on earth, the positions of the reflectors on the moon, the orbit of the moon around the earth, and the rotation and orientation of the earth and the moon. The most important scientific advances derived from lunar ranging are also reviewed.

  13. PRECISE COSMIC RAYS MEASUREMENTS WITH PAMELA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Bruno

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The PAMELA experiment was launched on board the Resurs-DK1 satellite on June 15th 2006. The apparatus was designed to conduct precision studies of charged cosmic radiation over a wide energy range, from tens of MeV up to several hundred GeV, with unprecedented statistics. In five years of continuous data taking in space, PAMELA accurately measured the energy spectra of cosmic ray antiprotons and positrons, as well as protons, electrons and light nuclei, sometimes providing data in unexplored energetic regions. These important results have shed new light in several astrophysical fields like: an indirect search for Dark Matter, a search for cosmological antimatter (anti-Helium, and the validation of acceleration, transport and secondary production models of cosmic rays in the Galaxy. Some of the most important items of Solar and Magnetospheric physics were also investigated. Here we present the most recent results obtained by the PAMELA experiment.

  14. Atomic physics precise measurements and ultracold matter

    CERN Document Server

    Inguscio, Massimo

    2013-01-01

    Atomic Physics provides an expert guide to two spectacular new landscapes in physics: precision measurements, which have been revolutionized by the advent of the optical frequency comb, and atomic physics, which has been revolutionized by laser cooling. These advances are not incremental but transformative: they have generated a consilience between atomic and many-body physics, precipitated an explosion of scientific and technological applications, opened new areas of research, and attracted a brilliant generation of younger scientists. The research is advancing so rapidly, the barrage of applications is so dazzling, that students can be bewildered. For both students and experienced scientists, this book provides an invaluable description of basic principles, experimental methods, and scientific applications.

  15. Precision Electroweak Measurements on the Z Resonance

    CERN Document Server

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Eisenstein, B I; Elia, R; Erdos, E; Erofeeva, I; Eschenburg, V; Etzion, E; Fahey, S; Falciai, D; Fan, C; Fernández, J P; Fero, M J; Flood, K; Frey, R; Friedman, Jerome Isaac; Furuno, K; Garwin, E L; Gillman, T; Gladding, G; Hallewell, G D; Hart, E L; Hasegawa, Y; Hasuko, K; Hedges, S; Hertzbach, S S; Hildreth, M D; Hitlin, D G; Honma, A; Huber, J S; Huffer, M E; Hughes, E W; Huynh, X; Hwang, H; Iwasaki, M; Iwasaki, Y; Izen, J M; Jackson, D J; Jacques, P; Jaros, J A; Jiang, Z Y; Johnson, A S; Johnson, J R; Johnson, R A; Junk, T R; Kajikawa, R; Kalelkar, M; Kamyshkov, Yu A; Kang, H J; Karliner, I; Kawahara, H; Kelsey, M H; Kendall, H W; Kim, Y D; King, M; King, R; Kofler, R R; Krishna, N M; Kwon, Y; Labs, J F; Kroeger, R S; Langston, M; Lath, A; Lauber, J A; Leith, D W G S; Lia, V; Lin, C; Liu, M X; Loreti, M; Lu, A; Lynch, H L; Ma, J; Mancinelli, G; Manly, S; Mantovani, G C; Markiewicz, T W; Maruyama, T; Masuda, H; Mazzucato, E; McGowan, J F; McKemey, A K; Meadows, B T; Messner, R; Mockett, P M; Moffeit, K C; Moore, T B; Morii, M; Mours, B; Müller, D; Müller, G; Murzin, V; Nagamine, T; Narita, S; Nauenberg, U; Neal, H; Nesom, G; Nussbaum, M; Ohnishi, Y; Oishi, N; Onoprienko, D; Osborne, L S; Panvini, R S; Park, C H; Park, H; Pavel, T J; Peruzzi, I; Pescara, L; Piccolo, M; Piemontese, L; Pieroni, E; Pitts, K T; Plano, R J; Prepost, R; Prescott, C Y; Punkar, G; Quigley, J; Ratcliff, B N; Reeves, K; Reeves, T W; Reidy, J; Reinertsen, P L; Rensing, P E; Rochester, L S; Rowson, P C; Russell, J J; Saxton, O H; Schalk, T; Schindler, R H; Schneekloth, U; Schumm, B A; Schwiening, J; Seiden, A; Sen, S; Serbo, V V; Shaevitz, M H; Shank, J T; Shapiro, G; Sherden, D J; Shmakov, K D; Simopoulos, C; Sinev, N B; Smith, S R; Smy, M B; Snyder, J A; Sokoloff, M D; Stängle, H; Stahl, A; Stamer, P; Steiner, H; Steiner, R; Strauss, M G; Su, D; Suekane, F; Sugiyama, A; Suzuki, A; Suzuki, S; Swartz, M; Szumilo, A; Takahashi, T; Taylor, F E; Thaler, J J; Thom, J; Torrence, E; Trandafir, A I; Turk, J D; Usher, T; Vavra, J; Vella, E; Venuti, J P; Verdier, R; Wagner, S R; Waite, A P; Walston, S; Wang, J; Watts, S J; Weidemann, A W; Weiss, E R; Whitaker, J S; White, S L; Wickens, F J; Williams, D A; Williams, D C; Williams, S H; Willocq, S; Wilson, R J; Wisniewski, W J; Wittlin, J L; Woods, M; Word, G B; Wright, T R; Wyss, J; Yamamoto, R K; Yang, X Q; Yashima, J; Yellin, S J; Young, C C; Yuta, H; Zapalac, G; Zdarko, R W; Zeitlin, C; Zhou, J

    2006-01-01

    We report on the final electroweak measurements performed with data taken at the Z resonance by the experiments operating at the electron-positron colliders SLC and LEP. The data consist of 17 million Z decays accumulated by the ALEPH, DELPHI, L3 and OPAL experiments at LEP, and 600 thousand Z decays by the SLD experiment using a polarised beam at SLC. The measurements include cross-sections, forward-backward asymmetries and polarised asymmetries. The mass and width of the Z boson, $MZ$ and $GZ$, and its couplings to fermions, for example the $ ho$ parameter and the effective electroweak mixing angle for leptons, are precisely measured: egin{eqnarray*} MZ & = & 91.1875 pm 0.0021~GeV \\ GZ & = & 2.4952 pm 0.0023~GeV \\ ho_ell & = & 1.0050 pm 0.0010 \\ swsqeffl & =& 0.23153 pm 0.00016 ,. end{eqnarray*} The number of light neutrino species is determined to be $2.9840pm0.0082$, in agreement with the three observed generations of fundamental fermions. The results are compared to the pr...

  16. Precision Electroweak Measurements on the Z Presonance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aleph,Delphi,L3,Opal,SLD , Collaborations

    2005-09-08

    The authors report on the final electroweak measurements performed with data taken at the Z resonance by the experiments operating at the electron-positron colliders SLC and LEP. the data consist of 17 million Z decays accumulated by the ALEPH, DELPHI, L3 and OPAL experiments at LEP, and 600 thousand Z decays by the SLD experiment using a polarized beam at SLC. The measurements include cross-sections, forward-backward asymmetries and polarized asymmetries. The mass and width of the Z boson, m{sub Z} and {Lambda}{sub Z}, and its couplings to fermions, for example the {rho} parameter and the effective electroweak mixing angle for leptons, are precisely measured: m{sub Z} = 91.1875 {+-} 0.0021 GeV; {Lambda}{sub Z} = 2.4952 {+-} 0.0023 GeV; {rho}{sub {ell}} = 1.0050 {+-} 0.0010; sin{sup 2} {theta}{sub eff}{sup lept} = 0.23153 {+-} 0.00016. The number of light neutrino species is determined to be 2.9840 {+-} 0.0082, in agreement with the three observed generations of fundamental fermions. The results are compared to the predictions of the Standard Model. At the Z-pole, electroweak radiative corrections beyond the running of the QED and QCD coupling constants are observed with a significance of five standard deviations, and in agreement with the Standard Model. of the many Z-pole measurements, the forward-backward asymmetry in b-quark production shows the largest difference with respect to its Standard Model expectation, at the level of 2.8 standard deviations. Through radiative corrections evaluated in the framework of the Standard Model, the Z-pole data are also used to predict the mass of the top quark, m{sub t} = 173{sub -10}{sup +13} GeV, and the mass of the W boson, m{sub W} = 80.363 {+-} 0.032 GeV. These indirect constraints are compared to the direct measurements, providing a stringent test of the Standard Model. Using in addition the direct measurements of m{sub t} and m{sub W}, the mass of the as yet unobserved Standard Model Higgs boson is predicted with a

  17. Precision mechatronics based on high-precision measuring and positioning systems and machines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jäger, Gerd; Manske, Eberhard; Hausotte, Tino; Mastylo, Rostyslav; Dorozhovets, Natalja; Hofmann, Norbert

    2007-06-01

    Precision mechatronics is defined in the paper as the science and engineering of a new generation of high precision systems and machines. Nanomeasuring and nanopositioning engineering represents important fields of precision mechatronics. The nanometrology is described as the today's limit of the precision engineering. The problem, how to design nanopositioning machines with uncertainties as small as possible will be discussed. The integration of several optical and tactile nanoprobes makes the 3D-nanopositioning machine suitable for various tasks, such as long range scanning probe microscopy, mask and wafer inspection, nanotribology, nanoindentation, free form surface measurement as well as measurement of microoptics, precision molds, microgears, ring gauges and small holes.

  18. High-precision Absolute Coordinate Measurement using Frequency Scanned Interferometry

    CERN Document Server

    Chen, Tianxiang; Riles, Keith; Li, Cheng

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, we report high-precision absolute position measurement performed with frequency scanned interferometry (FSI). We reported previously on measurement of absolute distance with FSI [1]. Absolute position is determined by several related absolute distances measured simultaneously. The achieved precision of 2-dimensional measurements is better than 1 micron, and in 3-dimensional measurements, the precision on X and Y is confirmed to be below 1 micron, while the confirmed precision on Z is about 2 microns, where the confirmation is limited by the lower precision of the moving stage in Z direction.

  19. Design of High Precision Temperature Measurement System based on Labview

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weimin Zhu

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Using the LabVIEW software platform, a high precision temperature measuring device is designed based on the principle of the thermocouple. The system uses the STM32 MCU as the main control chip, using AD7076 analog digital converter. The converter has 8 channel, synchronous sampling, and bipolar input. Improving the precision of temperature measurement by cold end compensation, fitting and other measures. The test results show that, the device temperature measurement precision can reach ±0.1 °C, has the advantages of small size, high precision, and reliable performance, this high precision temperature measurement can be widely used in industrial production.

  20. Precision laboratory measurements in nuclear astrophysics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gai, M. [Connecticut Univ., Storrs, CT (United States). Dept. of Physics

    2000-07-01

    After reviewing some of the basic concepts, nomenclatures and parametrizations of astronomy, astrophysics, cosmology, and nuclear physics, we introduce a few central problems in nuclear astrophysics, including the hot-CNO cycle, helium burning and solar neutrinos. We demonstrate that in this new era of precision nuclear astrophysics secondary or radioactive nuclear beams allow for progress. (orig.)

  1. Precision Measurements of Tau Lepton Decays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nugent, Ian M. [Univ. of Victoria, BC (Canada)

    2008-01-01

    Using data collected with the BABAR detector at the SLAC PEP-II electron-positron storage ring operating at a centre-of-mass energy near 10.58 GeV, the branching fractions B(τ- → π-π-π+ντ) =(8.83±0.01±0.13)%, B(τ- → K-π-π+ντ) =(0.273± 0.002 ± 0.009)%, B(τ- → K-π-K+ντ) =(0.1346 ± 0.0010 ± 0.0036)%, and B(τ- → K-K-K+ντ) =(1.58 ± 0.13 ± 0.12) × 10-5 are measured where the uncertainties are statistical and systematic, respectively. The invariant mass distribution for the τ- → π-π-π+ντ , τ- → K-π-π+ντ , τ- → K-π-K+ντ and τ- → K-K-K+ντ decays are unfolded to correct for detector effects. A measurement of B(τ- → φπ-ντ ) =(3.42±0.55±0.25)×10-5, a measurement of B(τ- → φK-ντ) =(3.39±0.20±0.28)× 10-5 and an upper limit on B(τ- → K-K-K+ντ [ex.φ]) ≤ 2.5 × 10-6@90%CL are determined from a binned maximum likelihood fit of the τ- → K-π-K+ντ and τ- → K-K-K+ντ K+K- invariant mass distributions. The branching ratio B(τ-→K-ντ )/ B(τ-→π-ντ ) is measured to be (6.531±0.056±0.093)×10-2 from which |Vus| is determined to be 0.2255 ± 0.0023. The branching ratio B(τ-→μ-ντ $\\bar{v}$μ)/ B(τ-→e-ντ $\\bar{v}$e) =(9.796 ± 0.016 ± 0.035) × 10-1 is measured enabling a precision test of the Standard Model assumption of

  2. Design of High Precision Temperature Measurement System based on Labview

    OpenAIRE

    Weimin Zhu; Jin Liu; Haima Yang; Chaochao Yan

    2015-01-01

    Using the LabVIEW software platform, a high precision temperature measuring device is designed based on the principle of the thermocouple. The system uses the STM32 MCU as the main control chip, using AD7076 analog digital converter. The converter has 8 channel, synchronous sampling, and bipolar input. Improving the precision of temperature measurement by cold end compensation, fitting and other measures. The test results show that, the device temperature measurement precision can reach ±0.1 ...

  3. Towards precise top mass measurement at LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Kawabata, Sayaka

    2015-01-01

    The top quark mass plays an important role in a variety of discussions both within and beyond the Standard Model. However, a precise determination of a theoretically well-defined top quark mass is still missing. Towards a precise determination of a theoretically well-defined top quark mass at the LHC, we propose a method which uses lepton energy distribution and has a boost-invariant nature. We investigate its experimental viability by performing a simulation analysis for ttbar production process and lepton+jets decay channel at the leading order. We estimate several major uncertainties in the top mass determination with this method and they amount to 1.7 GeV with an integrated luminosity of 100 fb^{-1} at sqrt{s}=14 TeV. The uncertainties should be reduced by considering the next-to-leading order corrections to the method.

  4. Plasma Beam Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-08-01

    GUN PLASMA BEAM / ,I 21 cm diameter = 0 GLASS DRIFT TUBE 50 cm diameter MCP CAMERA CLASS CROSSES (a) Gun muzzle /"- PLASA BEAM / TAROT z = 10 m MCP...discusses some of the hydrodynamic issues related to the calcula- tions. The reader may well wonder why hydrodynamics should be an issue in a 116 WL-TR-90...answer is yes for the slow beam cases and no for the fast beam cases. This is explained further. 118 WL-TR-90-83 The reader will recall the

  5. High Precision Current Measurement for Power Converters

    CERN Document Server

    Cerqueira Bastos, M

    2015-01-01

    The accurate measurement of power converter currents is essential to controlling and delivering stable and repeatable currents to magnets in particle accelerators. This paper reviews the most commonly used devices for the measurement of power converter currents and discusses test and calibration methods.

  6. A Precise Measurement of the Tau Lifetime

    CERN Document Server

    Abdallah, J; Adam, W; Adzic, P; Albrecht, T; Alderweireld, T; Alemany-Fernandez, R; Allmendinger, T; Allport, P P; Amaldi, Ugo; Amapane, N; Amato, S; Anashkin, E; Andreazza, A; Andringa, S; Anjos, N; Antilogus, P; Apel, W D; Arnoud, Y; Ask, S; Åsman, B; Augustin, J E; Augustinus, A; Baillon, Paul; Ballestrero, A; Bambade, P; Barbier, R; Bardin, Dimitri Yuri; Barker, G J; Baroncelli, A; Battaglia, Marco; Baubillier, M; Becks, K H; Begalli, M; Behrmann, A; Ben-Haim, E; Benekos, N C; Benvenuti, Alberto C; Bérat, C; Berggren, M; Berntzon, L; Bertrand, D; Besançon, M; Besson, N; Bloch, D; Blom, M; Bluj, M; Bonesini, M; Boonekamp, M; Booth, P S L; Borisov, G; Botner, O; Bouquet, B; Bowcock, T J V; Boyko, I; Bracko, M; Brenner, R; Brodet, E; Brückman, P; Brunet, J M; Bugge, L; Buschmann, P; Calvi, M; Camporesi, T; Canale, V; Carena, F; Castro, N; Cavallo, F R; Chapkin, M M; Charpentier, P; Checchia, P; Chierici, R; Shlyapnikov, P; Chudoba, J; Chung, S U; Cieslik, K; Collins, P; Contri, R; Cosme, G; Cossutti, F; Costa, M J; Crennell, D J; Cuevas-Maestro, J; D'Hondt, J; Dalmau, J; Da Silva, T; Da Silva, W; Della Ricca, G; De Angelis, A; de Boer, Wim; De Clercq, C; De Lotto, B; De Maria, N; De Min, A; De Paula, L S; Di Ciaccio, L; Di Simone, A; Doroba, K; Drees, J; Dris, M; Eigen, G; Ekelöf, T J C; Ellert, M; Elsing, M; Espirito-Santo, M C; Fanourakis, G K; Fassouliotis, D; Feindt, M; Fernández, J; Ferrer, A; Ferro, F; Flagmeyer, U; Föth, H; Fokitis, E; Fulda-Quenzer, F; Fuster, J A; Gandelman, M; García, C; Gavillet, P; Gazis, E N; Gokieli, R; Golob, B; Gómez-Ceballos, G; Gonçalves, P; Graziani, E; Grosdidier, G; Grzelak, K; Guy, J; Haag, C; Hallgren, A; Hamacher, K; Hamilton, K; Haug, S; Hauler, F; Hedberg, V; Hennecke, M; Herr, H; Hoffman, J; Holmgren, S O; Holt, P J; Houlden, M A; Hultqvist, K; Jackson, J N; Jarlskog, G; Jarry, P; Jeans, D; Johansson, E K; Johansson, P D; Jonsson, P; Joram, C; Jungermann, L; Kapusta, F; Katsanevas, S; Katsoufis, E C; Kernel, G; Kersevan, B P; Kerzel, U; Kiiskinen, A P; King, B T; Kjaer, N J; Kluit, P; Kokkinias, P; Kourkoumelis, C; Kuznetsov, O; Krumshtein, Z; Kucharczyk, M; Lamsa, J; Leder, G; Ledroit, F; Leinonen, L; Leitner, R; Lemonne, J; Lepeltier, V; Lesiak, T; Liebig, W; Liko, D; Lipniacka, A; Lopes, J H; López, J M; Loukas, D; Lutz, P; Lyons, L; MacNaughton, J; Malek, A; Maltezos, S; Mandl, F; Marco, J; Marco, R; Maréchal, B; Margoni, M; Marin, J C; Mariotti, C; Markou, A; Martínez-Rivero, C; Masik, J; Mastroyiannopoulos, N; Matorras, F; Matteuzzi, C; Mazzucato, F; Mazzucato, M; McNulty, R; Meroni, C; Migliore, E; Mitaroff, W A; Mjörnmark, U; Moa, T; Moch, M; Mönig, K; Monge, R; Montenegro, J; Moraes, D; Moreno, S; Morettini, P; Müller, U; Münich, K; Mulders, M; Mundim, L; Murray, W; Muryn, B; Myatt, G; Myklebust, T; Nassiakou, M; Navarria, Francesco Luigi; Nawrocki, K; Nicolaidou, R; Nikolenko, M; Oblakowska-Mucha, A; Obraztsov, V F; Olshevskii, A G; Onofre, A; Orava, R; Österberg, K; Ouraou, A; Oyanguren, A; Paganoni, M; Paiano, S; Palacios, J P; Palka, H; Papadopoulou, T D; Pape, L; Parkes, C; Parodi, F; Parzefall, U; Passeri, A; Passon, O; Peralta, L; Perepelitsa, V F; Perrotta, A; Petrolini, A; Piedra, J; Pieri, L; Pierre, F; Pimenta, M; Piotto, E; Podobnik, T; Poireau, V; Pol, M E; Polok, G; Pozdnyakov, V; Pukhaeva, N; Pullia, A; Rames, J; Read, A; Rebecchi, P; Rehn, J; Reid, D; Reinhardt, R; Renton, P B; Richard, F; Rídky, J; Rivero, M; Rodríguez, D; Romero, A; Ronchese, P; Roudeau, P; Rovelli, T; Ruhlmann-Kleider, V; Ryabtchikov, D; Sadovskii, A; Salmi, L; Salt, J; Sander, C; Savoy-Navarro, A; Schwickerath, U; Segar, A; Sekulin, R L; Siebel, M; Sissakian, A N; Smadja, G; Smirnova, O G; Sokolov, A; Sopczak, A; Sosnowski, R; Spassoff, Tz; Stanitzki, M; Stocchi, A; Strauss, J; Stugu, B; Szczekowski, M; Szeptycka, M; Szumlak, T; Tabarelli de Fatis, T; Taffard, A C; Tegenfeldt, F; Timmermans, J; Tkatchev, L G; Tobin, M; Todorovova, S; Tomé, B; Tonazzo, A; Tortosa, P; Travnicek, P; Treille, D; Tristram, G; Trochimczuk, M; Troncon, C; Turluer, M L; Tyapkin, I A; Tyapkin, P; Tzamarias, S; Uvarov, V; Valenti, G; van Dam, P; Van Eldik, J; Van Lysebetten, A; Van Remortel, N; Van Vulpen, I; Vegni, G; Veloso, F; Venus, W A; Verdier, P; Verzi, V; Vilanova, D; Vitale, L; Vrba, V; Wahlen, H; Washbrook, A J; Weiser, C; Wicke, D; Wickens, J H; Wilkinson, G; Winter, M; Witek, M; Yushchenko, O P; Zalewska-Bak, A; Zalewski, P; Zavrtanik, D; Zhuravlov, V; Zimin, N I; Zintchenko, A; Zupan, M

    2004-01-01

    The tau lepton lifetime has been measured with the e+e- -> tau+tau- events collected by the DELPHI detector at LEP in the years 1991-1995. Three different methods have been exploited, using both one-prong and three-prong tau decay channels. Two measurements have been made using events in which both taus decay to a single charged particle. Combining these measurements gave tau_tau (1 prong) = 291.8 +/- 2.3 (stat) +/- 1.5 (sys) fs. A third measurement using taus which decayed to three charged particles yielded tau_tau (3 prong) = 288.6 +/- 2.4 (stat) +/- 1.3 (sys) fs. These were combined with previous DELPHI results to measure the tau lifetime, using the full LEP1 data sample, to be tau_tau = 290.9 +/- 1.4 (stat) +/- 1.0 (sys) fs.

  7. Note: High precision measurements using high frequency gigahertz signals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Aohan; Fu, Siyuan; Sakurai, Atsunori; Liu, Liang; Edman, Fredrik; Pullerits, Tõnu; Öwall, Viktor; Karki, Khadga Jung

    2014-12-01

    Generalized lock-in amplifiers use digital cavities with Q-factors as high as 5 × 108 to measure signals with very high precision. In this Note, we show that generalized lock-in amplifiers can be used to analyze microwave (giga-hertz) signals with a precision of few tens of hertz. We propose that the physical changes in the medium of propagation can be measured precisely by the ultra-high precision measurement of the signal. We provide evidence to our proposition by verifying the Newton's law of cooling by measuring the effect of change in temperature on the phase and amplitude of the signals propagating through two calibrated cables. The technique could be used to precisely measure different physical properties of the propagation medium, for example, the change in length, resistance, etc. Real time implementation of the technique can open up new methodologies of in situ virtual metrology in material design.

  8. On precision and accuracy (bias) statements for measurement procedures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bruckner, L.A.; Hume, M.W.; Delvin, W.L.

    1988-01-01

    Measurement procedures are often required to contain precision and accuracy of precision and bias statements. This paper contains a glossary that explains various terms that often appear in these statements as well as an example illustrating such statements for a specific set of data. Precision and bias statements are shown to vary according to the conditions under which the data were collected. This paper emphasizes that the error model (an algebraic expression that describes how the various sources of variation affect the measurement) is an important consideration in the formation of precision and bias statements.

  9. Calibration of line-scan cameras for precision measurement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Bo; Zhu, Jigui; Yang, Linghui; Yang, Shourui; Niu, Zhiyuan

    2016-09-01

    Calibration of line-scan cameras for precision measurement should have large calibration volume and be flexible in the actual measurement field. In this paper, we present a high-precision calibration method. Instead of using a large 3D pattern, we use a small planar pattern and a precalibrated matrix camera to obtain plenty of points with a suitable distribution, which would ensure the precision of the calibration results. The matrix camera removes the necessity of precise adjustment and movement and links the line-scan camera to the world easily, both of which enhance flexibility in the measurement field. The method has been verified by experiments. The experimental results demonstrated that the proposed method gives a practical solution to calibrate line scan cameras for precision measurement.

  10. Precision electronics for ionization chamber measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santry, D.C.; Bowes, G.C.; Munzenmayer, K.

    1987-01-01

    By using commercially available units, an electrometer and an IBM personal computer, it was relatively inexpensive and simple to assemble a system which permits ..gamma..-ray-emitting radionuclide activities to be measured in an ionization chamber with an uncertainty of + - 0.5% and a reproducibility of + - 0.05%.

  11. Ultra-precise distance measurement for nanometrology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cip, Ondrej; Petru, Frantisek; Buchta, Zdenek; Lazar, Josef

    2004-09-01

    We present experimental results achieved by a method of direct conversion of the relative changes of the measurement optical path of Michelson interferometer to relative changes of the resonant optical-frequency of Fabry-Perot (F.-P.) resonator. We developed the method as a testing process for verification of scale-linearity of Michelson interferometer with total resolution 0,3 nm. The method consists of a mechanical coupled shift of the corner cube mirror of the interferometer measurement arm with one of the mirrors of F.-P. resonator. A piezoelectric transducer (PZT) with approximately 10 microns elongation drives that mechanical shift. An external tunable laser source at 633 nm wavelength provides identification of one of the resonant optical frequency of F.-P. resonator by the frequency locking mechanism with synchronous detection technique in the servo loop feedback. Because definition of the meter unit is based on iodine stabilized He-Ne laser, then the optical frequency of the locked tunable laser is frequency compared with HeNeI2 laser by the heterodyne optical mixing. A fast high-resolution counter counts the resultant radio-frequency signal as a product of the optical mixing. Measured frequency values and values of interference phase acquired by the interferometer are simultaneously sampled step by step for each elongation position of PZT element. The experimental data achieved by F.-P. resonator shows uncertainty of the relative distance change better than 0,01 nm. We verified the scale-linearity of Michelson interferometer to +/-1,0 nm limit.

  12. Michelson interferometer for precision angle measurement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikram, M; Hussain, G

    1999-01-01

    An angle-measuring technique based on an optical interferometer is reported. The technique exploits a Michelson interferometric configuration in which a right-angle prism and a glass strip are introduced into a probe beam. Simultaneous rotation of both components along an axis results in an optical path difference between the reference and the probe beams. In a second arrangement two right-angle prisms and glass strips are introduced into two beams of a Michelson interferometer. The prisms and the strips are rotated simultaneously to introduce an optical path difference between the two beams. In our arrangement, optimization of various parameters makes the net optical path difference between the two beams approximately linear for a rotation as great as +/-20 degrees . Results are simulated that show an improvement of 2-3 orders of magnitude in error and nonlinearity compared with a previously reported technique.

  13. Turbulence measurements in fusion plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conway, G. D.

    2008-12-01

    Turbulence measurements in magnetically confined toroidal plasmas have a long history and relevance due to the detrimental role of turbulence induced transport on particle, energy, impurity and momentum confinement. The turbulence—the microscopic random fluctuations in particle density, temperature, potential and magnetic field—is generally driven by radial gradients in the plasma density and temperature. The correlation between the turbulence properties and global confinement, via enhanced diffusion, convection and direct conduction, is now well documented. Theory, together with recent measurements, also indicates that non-linear interactions within the turbulence generate large scale zonal flows and geodesic oscillations, which can feed back onto the turbulence and equilibrium profiles creating a complex interdependence. An overview of the current status and understanding of plasma turbulence measurements in the closed flux surface region of magnetic confinement fusion devices is presented, highlighting some recent developments and outstanding problems.

  14. Precision measurement of cosmic magnification from 21 cm emitting galaxies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Pengjie; /Fermilab; Pen, Ue-Li; /Canadian Inst. Theor. Astrophys.

    2005-04-01

    We show how precision lensing measurements can be obtained through the lensing magnification effect in high redshift 21cm emission from galaxies. Normally, cosmic magnification measurements have been seriously complicated by galaxy clustering. With precise redshifts obtained from 21cm emission line wavelength, one can correlate galaxies at different source planes, or exclude close pairs to eliminate such contaminations. We provide forecasts for future surveys, specifically the SKA and CLAR. SKA can achieve percent precision on the dark matter power spectrum and the galaxy dark matter cross correlation power spectrum, while CLAR can measure an accurate cross correlation power spectrum. The neutral hydrogen fraction was most likely significantly higher at high redshifts, which improves the number of observed galaxies significantly, such that also CLAR can measure the dark matter lensing power spectrum. SKA can also allow precise measurement of lensing bispectrum.

  15. A rapid and precise method for measuring plasma apoE-rich HDL using polyethylene glycol and cation-exchange chromatography: a pilot study on the clinical significance of apoE-rich HDL measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikeda, Toru; Shinohata, Ryoko; Murakami, Masaaki; Hina, Kazuyoshi; Kamikawa, Shigeshi; Hirohata, Satoshi; Kusachi, Shozo; Tamura, Arisa; Usui, Shinichi

    2017-02-01

    High-density lipoprotein (HDL) containing apolipoprotein E (apoE-rich HDL) represents only a small portion of plasma HDL. Reliable methods for determining and isolating apoE-rich HDL have not been well studied. We established a novel analytical method for apoE-rich HDL using polyethylene glycol and a cation-exchange column (PEG-column method). Furthermore, we examined biochemical correlates of apoE-rich HDL-cholesterol (HDL-C) in 36 patients who underwent coronary computed tomographic angiography. Our PEG-column method demonstrated high reproducibility (coefficient of variation HDL-C concentrations. Isolated apoE-rich HDL exhibited a larger diameter (14.8nm) than apoE-poor HDL (10.8nm) and contained both apoE and apoA-I. ApoE-rich HDL-C concentrations correlated significantly with triglycerides (rs=-0.646), LDL size (rs=0.472), adiponectin (rs=0.476), and other lipoprotein components. No significant correlation was obtained with the coronary calcium score. Multiple regression analysis revealed that plasma triglycerides and adiponectin concentrations remained significant independent predictors of apoE-rich (adjusted R(2)=0.486) but not apoE-poor HDL-C. The PEG-column method demonstrated, to various degrees, significant correlations between HDL subfractions and several lipid-related biomarkers involved in an atherogenic lipoprotein profile. Our separation technique for apoE-rich HDL is useful to clarify the role of apoE-rich HDL in atherosclerosis. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Precision measurements of Linear Scattering Density using Muon Tomography

    CERN Document Server

    Åström, E; Calliari, I; Calvini, P; Checchia, P; Donzella, A; Faraci, E; Forsberg, F; Gonella, F; Hu, X; Klinger, J; Ödqvist, L S; Pagano, D; Rigoni, A; Ramous, E; Urbani, M; Vanini, S; Zenoni, A; Zumerle, G

    2016-01-01

    We demonstrate that muon tomography can be used to precisely measure the properties of various materials. The materials which have been considered have been extracted from an experimental blast furnace, including carbon (coke) and iron oxides, for which measurements of the linear scattering density relative to the mass density have been performed with an absolute precision of 10%. We report the procedures that are used in order to obtain such precision, and a discussion is presented to address the expected performance of the technique when applied to heavier materials. The results we obtain do not depend on the specific type of material considered and therefore they can be extended to any application.

  17. Precision measurements of linear scattering density using muon tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Åström, E.; Bonomi, G.; Calliari, I.; Calvini, P.; Checchia, P.; Donzella, A.; Faraci, E.; Forsberg, F.; Gonella, F.; Hu, X.; Klinger, J.; Sundqvist Ökvist, L.; Pagano, D.; Rigoni, A.; Ramous, E.; Urbani, M.; Vanini, S.; Zenoni, A.; Zumerle, G.

    2016-07-01

    We demonstrate that muon tomography can be used to precisely measure the properties of various materials. The materials which have been considered have been extracted from an experimental blast furnace, including carbon (coke) and iron oxides, for which measurements of the linear scattering density relative to the mass density have been performed with an absolute precision of 10%. We report the procedures that are used in order to obtain such precision, and a discussion is presented to address the expected performance of the technique when applied to heavier materials. The results we obtain do not depend on the specific type of material considered and therefore they can be extended to any application.

  18. Workshop on Precision Measurements of $\\alpha_s$

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bethke, Siegfried; /Munich, Max Planck Inst.; Hoang, Andre H.; /Vienna U.; Kluth, Stefan; /Munich, Max Planck Inst.; Schieck, Jochen; /Munich U.; Stewart, Iain W.; Aoki, S.; Beneke, M.; Bethke, S.; Blumlein, J.; Brambilla, N.; Brodsky, S.; /MIT, LNS

    2011-10-01

    These are the proceedings of the Workshop on Precision Measurements of {alpha}{sub s} held at the Max-Planck-Institute for Physics, Munich, February 9-11, 2011. The workshop explored in depth the determination of {alpha}{sub s}(m{sub Z}) in the {ovr MS} scheme from the key categories where high precision measurements are currently being made, including DIS and global PDF fits, {tau}-decays, electro-weak precision observables and Z-decays, event-shapes, and lattice QCD. These proceedings contain a short summary contribution from the speakers, as well as the lists of authors, conveners, participants, and talks.

  19. Precise measurement of chromium isotopes by MC-ICPMS

    OpenAIRE

    Schiller, Martin; Van Kooten, Elishevah; Holst, Jesper C.; Olsen, Mia B.; Bizzarro, Martin

    2014-01-01

    We report novel analytical procedures allowing for the concurrent determination of the stable and mass-independent Cr isotopic composition of silicate materials by multiple collector inductively coupled mass spectrometry (MC-ICPMS). In particular, we focus on improved precision of the measurement of the neutron-rich isotope 54Cr. Because nitride and oxide interferences are a major obstacle to precise and accurate 54Cr measurements by MC-ICPMS, our approach is designed to minimize these interf...

  20. Precise Measurement of Laser Power using an Optomechanical System

    CERN Document Server

    Agatsuma, Kazuhiro; Ballmer, Stefan; DeSalvo, Giulia; Sakata, Shihori; Nishida, Erina; Kawamura, Seiji

    2014-01-01

    This paper shows a novel method to precisely measure the laser power using an optomechanical system. By measuring a mirror displacement caused by the reflection of an amplitude modulated laser beam, the number of photons in the incident continuous-wave laser can be precisely measured. We have demonstrated this principle by means of a prototype experiment uses a suspended 25 mg mirror as an mechanical oscillator coupled with the radiation pressure and a Michelson interferometer as the displacement sensor. A measurement of the laser power with an uncertainty of less than one percent (1 sigma) is achievable.

  1. INVESTIGATION OF MEASUREMENT PRECISION OF LATENT VARIABLES IN EDUCATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anatoly A. Maslak Anatoly A.

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of the study is to investigate the measurement accuracy of latent variables depending on a number of dichotomous test items and variation range.Methods: Investigation is based on the simulation experiments.Results: The authors make recommendations for selecting a number of dichotomous test items and variation range depending on the required measurement precision of latent variables.Scientific novelty: The research demonstrates statistical correlation between the measurement precision of latent variables and a number of test items and variation range.Importance for practice: The research results can be used while developing the questionnaires and tests for measuring the latent variables.

  2. Plasma Anemometer Measurements and Optimization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshall, Curtis; Matlis, Eric; Corke, Thomas; Gogineni, Sivaram

    2013-11-01

    Velocity measurements using a constant-current plasma anemometer were performed in a Mach 0.4 jet in order to further optimize the anemometer design. The plasma anemometer uses an AC glow discharge (plasma) formed in the air gap between two protruding low profile electrodes as the flow sensing element. The output from the anemometer is an amplitude modulated version of the AC voltage input that contains information about the mean fluctuating velocity components. Experiments were performed to investigate the effect of the electrode gap, AC current, and AC frequency on the mean and fluctuating velocity sensitivity and repeatability of the sensor. This involved mean velocity calibrations from 0 to 140 m/s and mean and fluctuating velocity profiles through the shear layer of the jet. Measurements with a constant temperature hot-wire anemometer were used for reference. The results showed an improvement in performance with increasing AC frequency that was attributed a more stable glow discharge. The agreement with the hot-wire were good, with the advantage of the plasma anemometer being its 100-times higher frequency response. Supported by Air Force SBIR Phase II FA8650-11-C-2199.

  3. Precision Measurement of sin2(theta_w) at MESA

    CERN Document Server

    Bucoveanu, R; Spiesberger, H

    2016-01-01

    A forthcoming experiment of low-energy elastic electron proton scattering at the new MESA facility in Mainz is planned to provide a high-precision measurement of the parity-violating polarisation asymmetry. This experiment is expected to lead to a precision determination of the weak mixing angle, competitive with Z-pole data. We discuss the challenges for theory to derive predictions with the required accuracy.

  4. Precise measurement of chromium isotopes by MC-ICPMS

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schiller, Martin; Van Kooten, Elishevah; Holst, Jesper Christian

    2014-01-01

    of the neutron-rich isotope 54Cr. Because nitride and oxide interferences are a major obstacle to precise and accurate 54Cr measurements by MC-ICPMS, our approach is designed to minimize these interferences. Based on repeat measurements of standards, we show that the mass-independent 53Cr and 54Cr compositions......We report novel analytical procedures allowing for the concurrent determination of the stable and mass-independent Cr isotopic composition of silicate materials by multiple collector inductively coupled mass spectrometry (MC-ICPMS). In particular, we focus on improved precision of the measurement...... by equilibrium processes during production of the synthetic standards. The stable isotope data concurrently obtained have a precision of 0.05‰ Da-1, which is comparable to earlier studies. Comparison of the measured isotopic composition of four meteorites with published data indicates that Cr isotope data...

  5. Prospects for Precise Measurements with Echo Atom Interferometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brynle Barrett

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Echo atom interferometers have emerged as interesting alternatives to Raman interferometers for the realization of precise measurements of the gravitational acceleration g and the determination of the atomic fine structure through measurements of the atomic recoil frequency ω q . Here we review the development of different configurations of echo interferometers that are best suited to achieve these goals. We describe experiments that utilize near-resonant excitation of laser-cooled rubidium atoms by a sequence of standing wave pulses to measure ω q with a statistical uncertainty of 37 parts per billion (ppb on a time scale of ∼50 ms and g with a statistical precision of 75 ppb. Related coherent transient techniques that have achieved the most statistically precise measurements of atomic g-factor ratios are also outlined. We discuss the reduction of prominent systematic effects in these experiments using off-resonant excitation by low-cost, high-power lasers.

  6. Prospects for Precise Measurements with Echo Atom Interferometry

    CERN Document Server

    Barrett, Brynle; Beica, Hermina C; Vorozcovs, Andrejs; Pouliot, Alexander; Kumarakrishnan, A

    2016-01-01

    Echo atom interferometers have emerged as interesting alternatives to Raman interferometers for the realization of precise measurements of the gravitational acceleration $g$ and the determination of the atomic fine structure through measurements of the atomic recoil frequency $\\omega_q$. Here we review the development of different configurations of echo interferometers that are best suited to achieve these goals. We describe experiments that utilize near-resonant excitation of laser-cooled rubidium atoms by a sequence of standing wave pulses to measure $\\omega_q$ with a statistical uncertainty of 37 parts per billion (ppb) on a time scale of $\\sim 50$ ms and $g$ with a statistical precision of 75 ppb. Related coherent transient techniques that have achieved the most statistically precise measurements of atomic g-factor ratios are also outlined. We discuss the reduction of prominent systematic effects in these experiments using off-resonant excitation by low-cost, high-power lasers.

  7. Precise measurement of the positive muon anomalous magnetic moment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brown, HN; Bunce, G; Carey, RM; Cushman, P; Danby, GT; Debevec, PT; Deile, M; Deng, H; Deninger, W; Dhawan, SK; Druzhinin, VP; Duong, L; Efstathiadis, E; Farley, FJM; Fedotovich, GV; Giron, S; Gray, F; Grigoriev, D; Grosse-Perdekamp, M; Grossmann, A; Hare, MF; Hertzog, DW; Hughes, VW; Iwasaki, M; Jungmann, K; Kawall, D; Kawamura, M; Khazin, BI; Kindem, J; Krienen, F; Kronkvist, I.; Larsen, R; Lee, YY; Logashenko, I.; McNabb, R; Meng, W; Mi, J; Miller, JP; Morse, WM; Nikas, D; Onderwater, CJG; Orlov, Y; Ozben, CS; Paley, JM; Polly, C; Pretz, J; Prigl, R; Putlitz, GZ; Redin, SI; Rind, O; Roberts, BL; Ryskulov, N; Sedykh, S; Semertzidis, YK; Shatunov, YM; Sichtermann, EP; Solodov, E; Sossong, M; Steinmetz, A; Sulak, LR; Timmermans, C; Trofimov, A; Urner, D; von Walter, P; Warburton, D; Winn, D; Yamamoto, A; Zimmerman, D

    2001-01-01

    A precise measurement of the anomalous g value, a(mu) = (g - 2)/2, for the positive muon has been made at the Brookhaven Alternating Gradient Synchrotron. The result a(mu+) = 11 659 202(14) (6) X 10(-10) (1.3 ppm) is in good agreement with previous measurements and has an error one third that of the

  8. Precision of single-engage micro Hall effect measurements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henrichsen, Henrik Hartmann; Hansen, Ole; Kjær, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    ]. In this study we calculate the measurement error on RS, NHS and μH resulting from electrode position errors, probe placement, sample size and Hall signal magnitude. We show the relationship between measurement precision and electrode pitch, which is important when down-scaling the micro 4-point probe to fit...

  9. On measuring the neutron coherent scattering length with ultrahigh precision

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Sohrab Abbas; Apoorva G Wagh

    2004-08-01

    We propose an order of magnitude improvement in the present five parts in 105 precision of a nondispersive interferometric measurement of the neutron coherent scattering length c. For this purpose we make a judicious selection of the Bragg angle for the interferometer and the sample thickness. The precision is further improved by an optimal choice of the Bragg reflection (and a consequent neutron wavelength). By performing the experiment in vacuum, errors arising from possible variations in the pressure, composition or humidity of the ambient air can be eliminated. On attaining such precision, we ought to account for the neutron beam refraction at the sample-ambient interfaces, to infer the correct c from the observed phase. The formula for the phase used hitherto is approximate and would significantly overestimate c. The refractive index for neutrons can thus be determined to a phenomenal precision of a few parts in 1012.

  10. Space camera optical axis pointing precision measurement system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Gang; Meng, Fanbo; Yang, Zijun; Guo, Yubo; Ye, Dong

    2016-01-01

    In order to realize the space camera which on satellite optical axis pointing precision measurement, a monocular vision measurement system based on object-image conjugate is established. In this system the algorithms such as object-image conjugate vision models and point by point calibration method are applied and have been verified. First, the space camera axis controller projects a laser beam to the standard screen for simulating the space camera's optical axis. The laser beam form a target point and has been captured by monocular vision camera. Then the two-dimensional coordinates of the target points on the screen are calculated by a new vision measurement model which based on a looking-up and matching table, the table has been generated by object-image conjugate algorithm through point by point calibration. Finally, compare the calculation of coordinates offered by measurement system with the theory of coordinate offered by optical axis controller, the optical axis pointing precision can be evaluated. Experimental results indicate that the absolute precision of measurement system up to 0.15mm in 2m×2m FOV. This measurement system overcome the nonlinear distortion near the edge of the FOV and can meet the requirement of space camera's optical axis high precision measurement and evaluation.

  11. Precision X-ray measurements on kaonic atoms at LNF

    CERN Document Server

    Marton, J

    2007-01-01

    After the successfully performed DEAR experiment at DAFNE - resulting in the most precise data on the hadronic shift and width in kaonic hydrogen up-to-now - the next step will be the measurement at the percent level using new X-ray detectors. These detectors (silicon drift detectors) are developed within the SIDDHARTA project. The asynchronous background will be suppressed using the time correlation between the kaon and the X-ray by 2-3 orders of magnitude. These measurements will lead to precise values of the isospin-dependent antikaon-nucleon scattering lengths, thus opening a new insight in the low-energy kaon nucleon interaction.

  12. A precise measurement of the $B^0$ meson oscillation frequency

    CERN Document Server

    Aaij, Roel; Adeva, Bernardo; Adinolfi, Marco; Affolder, Anthony; Ajaltouni, Ziad; Akar, Simon; Albrecht, Johannes; Alessio, Federico; Alexander, Michael; Ali, Suvayu; Alkhazov, Georgy; Alvarez Cartelle, Paula; Alves Jr, Antonio Augusto; Amato, Sandra; Amerio, Silvia; Amhis, Yasmine; An, Liupan; Anderlini, Lucio; Anderson, Jonathan; Andreassi, Guido; Andreotti, Mirco; Andrews, Jason; Appleby, Robert; Aquines Gutierrez, Osvaldo; Archilli, Flavio; d'Argent, Philippe; Artamonov, Alexander; Artuso, Marina; Aslanides, Elie; Auriemma, Giulio; Baalouch, Marouen; Bachmann, Sebastian; Back, John; Badalov, Alexey; Baesso, Clarissa; Baldini, Wander; Barlow, Roger; Barschel, Colin; Barsuk, Sergey; Barter, William; Batozskaya, Varvara; Battista, Vincenzo; Bay, Aurelio; Beaucourt, Leo; Beddow, John; Bedeschi, Franco; Bediaga, Ignacio; Bel, Lennaert; Bellee, Violaine; Belloli, Nicoletta; Belyaev, Ivan; Ben-Haim, Eli; Bencivenni, Giovanni; Benson, Sean; Benton, Jack; Berezhnoy, Alexander; Bernet, Roland; Bertolin, Alessandro; Bettler, Marc-Olivier; van Beuzekom, Martinus; Bien, Alexander; Bifani, Simone; Billoir, Pierre; Bird, Thomas; Birnkraut, Alex; Bizzeti, Andrea; Blake, Thomas; Blanc, Frédéric; Blouw, Johan; Blusk, Steven; Bocci, Valerio; Bondar, Alexander; Bondar, Nikolay; Bonivento, Walter; Borghi, Silvia; Borsato, Martino; Bowcock, Themistocles; Bowen, Espen Eie; Bozzi, Concezio; Braun, Svende; Britsch, Markward; Britton, Thomas; Brodzicka, Jolanta; Brook, Nicholas; Buchanan, Emma; Bursche, Albert; Buytaert, Jan; Cadeddu, Sandro; Calabrese, Roberto; Calvi, Marta; Calvo Gomez, Miriam; Campana, Pierluigi; Campora Perez, Daniel; Capriotti, Lorenzo; Carbone, Angelo; Carboni, Giovanni; Cardinale, Roberta; Cardini, Alessandro; Carniti, Paolo; Carson, Laurence; Carvalho Akiba, Kazuyoshi; Casse, Gianluigi; Cassina, Lorenzo; Castillo Garcia, Lucia; Cattaneo, Marco; Cauet, Christophe; Cavallero, Giovanni; Cenci, Riccardo; Charles, Matthew; Charpentier, Philippe; Chefdeville, Maximilien; Chen, Shanzhen; Cheung, Shu-Faye; Chiapolini, Nicola; Chrzaszcz, Marcin; Cid Vidal, Xabier; Ciezarek, Gregory; Clarke, Peter; Clemencic, Marco; Cliff, Harry; Closier, Joel; Coco, Victor; Cogan, Julien; Cogneras, Eric; Cogoni, Violetta; Cojocariu, Lucian; Collazuol, Gianmaria; Collins, Paula; Comerma-Montells, Albert; Contu, Andrea; Cook, Andrew; Coombes, Matthew; Coquereau, Samuel; Corti, Gloria; Corvo, Marco; Couturier, Benjamin; Cowan, Greig; Craik, Daniel Charles; Crocombe, Andrew; Cruz Torres, Melissa Maria; Cunliffe, Samuel; Currie, Robert; D'Ambrosio, Carmelo; Dall'Occo, Elena; Dalseno, Jeremy; David, Pieter; Davis, Adam; De Aguiar Francisco, Oscar; De Bruyn, Kristof; De Capua, Stefano; De Cian, Michel; De Miranda, Jussara; De Paula, Leandro; De Simone, Patrizia; Dean, Cameron Thomas; Decamp, Daniel; Deckenhoff, Mirko; Del Buono, Luigi; Déléage, Nicolas; Demmer, Moritz; Derkach, Denis; Deschamps, Olivier; Dettori, Francesco; Dey, Biplab; Di Canto, Angelo; Di Ruscio, Francesco; Dijkstra, Hans; Donleavy, Stephanie; Dordei, Francesca; Dorigo, Mirco; Dosil Suárez, Alvaro; Dossett, David; Dovbnya, Anatoliy; Dreimanis, Karlis; Dufour, Laurent; Dujany, Giulio; Dupertuis, Frederic; Durante, Paolo; Dzhelyadin, Rustem; Dziurda, Agnieszka; Dzyuba, Alexey; Easo, Sajan; Egede, Ulrik; Egorychev, Victor; Eidelman, Semen; Eisenhardt, Stephan; Eitschberger, Ulrich; Ekelhof, Robert; Eklund, Lars; El Rifai, Ibrahim; Elsasser, Christian; Ely, Scott; Esen, Sevda; Evans, Hannah Mary; Evans, Timothy; Falabella, Antonio; Färber, Christian; Farley, Nathanael; Farry, Stephen; Fay, Robert; Ferguson, Dianne; Fernandez Albor, Victor; Ferrari, Fabio; Ferreira Rodrigues, Fernando; Ferro-Luzzi, Massimiliano; Filippov, Sergey; Fiore, Marco; Fiorini, Massimiliano; Firlej, Miroslaw; Fitzpatrick, Conor; Fiutowski, Tomasz; Fohl, Klaus; Fol, Philip; Fontana, Marianna; Fontanelli, Flavio; Forshaw, Dean Charles; Forty, Roger; Frank, Markus; Frei, Christoph; Frosini, Maddalena; Fu, Jinlin; Furfaro, Emiliano; Gallas Torreira, Abraham; Galli, Domenico; Gallorini, Stefano; Gambetta, Silvia; Gandelman, Miriam; Gandini, Paolo; Gao, Yuanning; García Pardiñas, Julián; Garra Tico, Jordi; Garrido, Lluis; Gascon, David; Gaspar, Clara; Gauld, Rhorry; Gavardi, Laura; Gazzoni, Giulio; Gerick, David; Gersabeck, Evelina; Gersabeck, Marco; Gershon, Timothy; Ghez, Philippe; Gianì, Sebastiana; Gibson, Valerie; Girard, Olivier Göran; Giubega, Lavinia-Helena; Gligorov, V.V.; Göbel, Carla; Golubkov, Dmitry; Golutvin, Andrey; Gomes, Alvaro; Gotti, Claudio; Grabalosa Gándara, Marc; Graciani Diaz, Ricardo; Granado Cardoso, Luis Alberto; Graugés, Eugeni; Graverini, Elena; Graziani, Giacomo; Grecu, Alexandru; Greening, Edward; Gregson, Sam; Griffith, Peter; Grillo, Lucia; Grünberg, Oliver; Gui, Bin; Gushchin, Evgeny; Guz, Yury; Gys, Thierry; Hadavizadeh, Thomas; Hadjivasiliou, Christos; Haefeli, Guido; Haen, Christophe; Haines, Susan; Hall, Samuel; Hamilton, Brian; Han, Xiaoxue; Hansmann-Menzemer, Stephanie; Harnew, Neville; Harnew, Samuel; Harrison, Jonathan; He, Jibo; Head, Timothy; Heijne, Veerle; Heister, Arno; Hennessy, Karol; Henrard, Pierre; Henry, Louis; Hernando Morata, Jose Angel; van Herwijnen, Eric; Heß, Miriam; Hicheur, Adlène; Hill, Donal; Hoballah, Mostafa; Hombach, Christoph; Hulsbergen, Wouter; Humair, Thibaud; Hussain, Nazim; Hutchcroft, David; Hynds, Daniel; Idzik, Marek; Ilten, Philip; Jacobsson, Richard; Jaeger, Andreas; Jalocha, Pawel; Jans, Eddy; Jawahery, Abolhassan; Jing, Fanfan; John, Malcolm; Johnson, Daniel; Jones, Christopher; Joram, Christian; Jost, Beat; Jurik, Nathan; Kandybei, Sergii; Kanso, Walaa; Karacson, Matthias; Karbach, Moritz; Karodia, Sarah; Kecke, Matthieu; Kelsey, Matthew; Kenyon, Ian; Kenzie, Matthew; Ketel, Tjeerd; Khanji, Basem; Khurewathanakul, Chitsanu; Kirn, Thomas; Klaver, Suzanne; Klimaszewski, Konrad; Kochebina, Olga; Kolpin, Michael; Komarov, Ilya; Koopman, Rose; Koppenburg, Patrick; Kozeiha, Mohamad; Kravchuk, Leonid; Kreplin, Katharina; Kreps, Michal; Krocker, Georg; Krokovny, Pavel; Kruse, Florian; Krzemien, Wojciech; Kucewicz, Wojciech; Kucharczyk, Marcin; Kudryavtsev, Vasily; Kuonen, Axel Kevin; Kurek, Krzysztof; Kvaratskheliya, Tengiz; Lacarrere, Daniel; Lafferty, George; Lai, Adriano; Lambert, Dean; Lanfranchi, Gaia; Langenbruch, Christoph; Langhans, Benedikt; Latham, Thomas; Lazzeroni, Cristina; Le Gac, Renaud; van Leerdam, Jeroen; Lees, Jean-Pierre; Lefèvre, Regis; Leflat, Alexander; Lefrançois, Jacques; Lemos Cid, Edgar; Leroy, Olivier; Lesiak, Tadeusz; Leverington, Blake; Li, Yiming; Likhomanenko, Tatiana; Liles, Myfanwy; Lindner, Rolf; Linn, Christian; Lionetto, Federica; Liu, Bo; Liu, Xuesong; Loh, David; Longstaff, Iain; Lopes, Jose; Lucchesi, Donatella; Lucio Martinez, Miriam; Luo, Haofei; Lupato, Anna; Luppi, Eleonora; Lupton, Oliver; Lusardi, Nicola; Lusiani, Alberto; Machefert, Frederic; Maciuc, Florin; Maev, Oleg; Maguire, Kevin; Malde, Sneha; Malinin, Alexander; Manca, Giulia; Mancinelli, Giampiero; Manning, Peter Michael; Mapelli, Alessandro; Maratas, Jan; Marchand, Jean François; Marconi, Umberto; Marin Benito, Carla; Marino, Pietro; Marks, Jörg; Martellotti, Giuseppe; Martin, Morgan; Martinelli, Maurizio; Martinez Santos, Diego; Martinez Vidal, Fernando; Martins Tostes, Danielle; Massafferri, André; Matev, Rosen; Mathad, Abhijit; Mathe, Zoltan; Matteuzzi, Clara; Mauri, Andrea; Maurin, Brice; Mazurov, Alexander; McCann, Michael; McCarthy, James; McNab, Andrew; McNulty, Ronan; Meadows, Brian; Meier, Frank; Meissner, Marco; Melnychuk, Dmytro; Merk, Marcel; Michielin, Emanuele; Milanes, Diego Alejandro; Minard, Marie-Noelle; Mitzel, Dominik Stefan; Molina Rodriguez, Josue; Monroy, Ignacio Alberto; Monteil, Stephane; Morandin, Mauro; Morawski, Piotr; Mordà, Alessandro; Morello, Michael Joseph; Moron, Jakub; Morris, Adam Benjamin; Mountain, Raymond; Muheim, Franz; Müller, Dominik; Müller, Janine; Müller, Katharina; Müller, Vanessa; Mussini, Manuel; Muster, Bastien; Naik, Paras; Nakada, Tatsuya; Nandakumar, Raja; Nandi, Anita; Nasteva, Irina; Needham, Matthew; Neri, Nicola; Neubert, Sebastian; Neufeld, Niko; Neuner, Max; Nguyen, Anh Duc; Nguyen, Thi-Dung; Nguyen-Mau, Chung; Niess, Valentin; Niet, Ramon; Nikitin, Nikolay; Nikodem, Thomas; Novoselov, Alexey; O'Hanlon, Daniel Patrick; Oblakowska-Mucha, Agnieszka; Obraztsov, Vladimir; Ogilvy, Stephen; Okhrimenko, Oleksandr; Oldeman, Rudolf; Onderwater, Gerco; Osorio Rodrigues, Bruno; Otalora Goicochea, Juan Martin; Otto, Adam; Owen, Patrick; Oyanguren, Maria Aranzazu; Palano, Antimo; Palombo, Fernando; Palutan, Matteo; Panman, Jacob; Papanestis, Antonios; Pappagallo, Marco; Pappalardo, Luciano; Pappenheimer, Cheryl; Parkes, Christopher; Passaleva, Giovanni; Patel, Girish; Patel, Mitesh; Patrignani, Claudia; Pearce, Alex; Pellegrino, Antonio; Penso, Gianni; Pepe Altarelli, Monica; Perazzini, Stefano; Perret, Pascal; Pescatore, Luca; Petridis, Konstantinos; Petrolini, Alessandro; Petruzzo, Marco; Picatoste Olloqui, Eduardo; Pietrzyk, Boleslaw; Pilař, Tomas; Pinci, Davide; Pistone, Alessandro; Piucci, Alessio; Playfer, Stephen; Plo Casasus, Maximo; Poikela, Tuomas; Polci, Francesco; Poluektov, Anton; Polyakov, Ivan; Polycarpo, Erica; Popov, Alexander; Popov, Dmitry; Popovici, Bogdan; Potterat, Cédric; Price, Eugenia; Price, Joseph David; Prisciandaro, Jessica; Pritchard, Adrian; Prouve, Claire; Pugatch, Valery; Puig Navarro, Albert; Punzi, Giovanni; Qian, Wenbin; Quagliani, Renato; Rachwal, Bartolomiej; Rademacker, Jonas; Rama, Matteo; Rangel, Murilo; Raniuk, Iurii; Rauschmayr, Nathalie; Raven, Gerhard; Redi, Federico; Reichert, Stefanie; Reid, Matthew; dos Reis, Alberto; Ricciardi, Stefania; Richards, Sophie; Rihl, Mariana; Rinnert, Kurt; Rives Molina, Vincente; Robbe, Patrick; Rodrigues, Ana Barbara; Rodrigues, Eduardo; Rodriguez Lopez, Jairo Alexis; Rodriguez Perez, Pablo; Roiser, Stefan; Romanovsky, Vladimir; Romero Vidal, Antonio; Ronayne, John William; Rotondo, Marcello; Rouvinet, Julien; Ruf, Thomas; Ruiz Valls, Pablo; Saborido Silva, Juan Jose; Sagidova, Naylya; Sail, Paul; Saitta, Biagio; Salustino Guimaraes, Valdir; Sanchez Mayordomo, Carlos; Sanmartin Sedes, Brais; Santacesaria, Roberta; Santamarina Rios, Cibran; Santimaria, Marco; Santovetti, Emanuele; Sarti, Alessio; Satriano, Celestina; Satta, Alessia; Saunders, Daniel Martin; Savrina, Darya; Schael, Stefan; Schiller, Manuel; Schindler, Heinrich; Schlupp, Maximilian; Schmelling, Michael; Schmelzer, Timon; Schmidt, Burkhard; Schneider, Olivier; Schopper, Andreas; Schubiger, Maxime; Schune, Marie Helene; Schwemmer, Rainer; Sciascia, Barbara; Sciubba, Adalberto; Semennikov, Alexander; Sergi, Antonino; Serra, Nicola; Serrano, Justine; Sestini, Lorenzo; Seyfert, Paul; Shapkin, Mikhail; Shapoval, Illya; Shcheglov, Yury; Shears, Tara; Shekhtman, Lev; Shevchenko, Vladimir; Shires, Alexander; Siddi, Benedetto Gianluca; Silva Coutinho, Rafael; Silva de Oliveira, Luiz Gustavo; Simi, Gabriele; Sirendi, Marek; Skidmore, Nicola; Skwarnicki, Tomasz; Smith, Edmund; Smith, Eluned; Smith, Iwan Thomas; Smith, Jackson; Smith, Mark; Snoek, Hella; Sokoloff, Michael; Soler, Paul; Soomro, Fatima; Souza, Daniel; Souza De Paula, Bruno; Spaan, Bernhard; Spradlin, Patrick; Sridharan, Srikanth; Stagni, Federico; Stahl, Marian; Stahl, Sascha; Stefkova, Slavomira; Steinkamp, Olaf; Stenyakin, Oleg; Stevenson, Scott; Stoica, Sabin; Stone, Sheldon; Storaci, Barbara; Stracka, Simone; Straticiuc, Mihai; Straumann, Ulrich; Sun, Liang; Sutcliffe, William; Swientek, Krzysztof; Swientek, Stefan; Syropoulos, Vasileios; Szczekowski, Marek; Szczypka, Paul; Szumlak, Tomasz; T'Jampens, Stephane; Tayduganov, Andrey; Tekampe, Tobias; Teklishyn, Maksym; Tellarini, Giulia; Teubert, Frederic; Thomas, Christopher; Thomas, Eric; van Tilburg, Jeroen; Tisserand, Vincent; Tobin, Mark; Todd, Jacob; Tolk, Siim; Tomassetti, Luca; Tonelli, Diego; Topp-Joergensen, Stig; Torr, Nicholas; Tournefier, Edwige; Tourneur, Stephane; Trabelsi, Karim; Tran, Minh Tâm; Tresch, Marco; Trisovic, Ana; Tsaregorodtsev, Andrei; Tsopelas, Panagiotis; Tuning, Niels; Ukleja, Artur; Ustyuzhanin, Andrey; Uwer, Ulrich; Vacca, Claudia; Vagnoni, Vincenzo; Valenti, Giovanni; Vallier, Alexis; Vazquez Gomez, Ricardo; Vazquez Regueiro, Pablo; Vázquez Sierra, Carlos; Vecchi, Stefania; van Veghel, Maarten; Velthuis, Jaap; Veltri, Michele; Veneziano, Giovanni; Vesterinen, Mika; Viaud, Benoit; Vieira, Daniel; Vieites Diaz, Maria; Vilasis-Cardona, Xavier; Vollhardt, Achim; Volyanskyy, Dmytro; Voong, David; Vorobyev, Alexey; Vorobyev, Vitaly; Voß, Christian; de Vries, Jacco; Waldi, Roland; Wallace, Charlotte; Wallace, Ronan; Walsh, John; Wandernoth, Sebastian; Wang, Jianchun; Ward, David; Watson, Nigel; Websdale, David; Weiden, Andreas; Whitehead, Mark; Wilkinson, Guy; Wilkinson, Michael; Williams, Mark Richard James; Williams, Matthew; Williams, Mike; Williams, Timothy; Wilson, Fergus; Wimberley, Jack; Wishahi, Julian; Wislicki, Wojciech; Witek, Mariusz; Wormser, Guy; Wotton, Stephen; Wright, Simon; Wyllie, Kenneth; Xie, Yuehong; Xu, Zhirui; Yang, Zhenwei; Yu, Jiesheng; Yuan, Xuhao; Yushchenko, Oleg; Zangoli, Maria; Zavertyaev, Mikhail; Zhang, Liming; Zhang, Yanxi; Zhelezov, Alexey; Zhokhov, Anatoly; Zhong, Liang; Zhukov, Valery; Zucchelli, Stefano

    2016-01-01

    The oscillation frequency, $\\Delta m_d$, of $B^0$ mesons is measured using semileptonic decays with a $D^-$ or $D^{*-}$ meson in the final state, in a data sample of $pp$ collisions collected by the LHCb detector corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 3.0$\\mbox{fb}^{-1}$. A combination of the two decay modes gives $\\Delta m_d = (505.0 \\pm 2.1 \\pm 1.0) \\rm \\,ns^{-1}$, where the first uncertainty is statistical and the second is systematic. This is the most precise single measurement of this parameter. It is compatible with the current world average and has similar precision.

  13. A precise measurement of the $B^0$ meson oscillation frequency

    CERN Document Server

    Vecchi, Stefania

    2015-01-01

    The oscillation frequency of $B^0$ mesons is measured using semileptonic decays with a charged $D$ or $D^*$ meson in the final state, on a data sample collected by the LHCb detector corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 3 fb$^{-1}$ of $pp$ collisions. A combination of the two decay modes gives $\\Delta m_d = (503.6 \\pm 2.0 \\pm 1.3)$ ns$^{-1}$ , where the first uncertainty is statistical and the second systematic. This is the most precise single measurement of this parameter. It is compatible with the current world average and has comparable precision

  14. Precision Electroweak Measurements and Constraints on the Standard Model

    CERN Document Server

    Alcaraz, J; Barberio, E; Bourilkov, D; Checchia, P; Chierici, R; Clare, R; D'Hondt, J; de la Cruz, B; de Jong, P; Della Ricca, G; Dierckxsens, M; Duchesneau, D; Duckeck, G; Elsing, M; Grünewald, M W; Gurtu, A; Hansen, J B; Hawkings, R; Jezequel, St; Jones, R W L; Kawamoto, T; Lançon, E; Liebig, W; Malgeri, L; Mele, S; Minard, M N; Mönig, K; Parkes, C; Parzefall, U; Pietrzyk, B; Quast, G; Renton, P B; Riemann, S; Sachs, K; Strässner, A; Strom, D; Tenchini, R; Teubert, F; Thomson, M A; Todorova-Nová, S; Valassi, A; Venturi, A; Voss, H; Ward, C P; Watson, N K; Wells, P S; Wynhoff, St

    2007-01-01

    This note presents constraints on Standard Model parameters using published and preliminary precision electroweak results measured at the electron-positron colliders LEP and SLC. The results are compared with precise electroweak measurements from other experiments, notably CDF and D{\\O}at the Tevatron. Constraints on the input parameters of the Standard Model are derived from the results obtained in high-$Q^2$ interactions, and used to predict results in low-$Q^2$ experiments, such as atomic parity violation, M{\\o}ller scattering, and neutrino-nucleon scattering.

  15. Precision measurements in nuclear {\\beta}-decay with LPCTrap

    CERN Document Server

    Ban, G; Fléchard, X; Liénard, E; Naviliat-Cuncic, O

    2013-01-01

    The experimental achievements and the current program with the LPCTrap device installed at the LIRAT beam line of the SPIRAL1-GANIL facility are presented. The device is dedicated to the study of the weak interaction at low energy by means of precise measurements of the {\\beta}-{\

  16. The precision of higgs boson measurements and their implications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    J. Conway et al.

    2002-12-05

    The prospects for a precise exploration of the properties of a single or many observed Higgs bosons at future accelerators are summarized, with particular emphasis on the abilities of a Linear Collider (LC). Some implications of these measurements for discerning new physics beyond the Standard Model (SM) are also discussed.

  17. Precision Measuring Equipment (PME) Individualized Instruction. Final Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, William E.; And Others

    Self-paced programed and audiovisual (AV) instructional materials covering portions of the Air Force course, Precision Measuring Equipment (PME) Specialist, were developed, administered, and evaluated as means of assessing the feasibility of individualizing the PME course as part of the Air Force's Advanced Instructional System (AIS). The…

  18. A precise measurement of the muon magnetic anomaly

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jungmann, KP

    2003-01-01

    At the Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) a precision experiment of the muon magnetic anomaly a(mu) in a magnetic storage ring is on its way. Measurements carried out on positive muons in 1999 have resulted in a(mu+) = 11,659,202(14)(6) x 10(-10) (1.3 ppm). A difference between this value and the

  19. Alveolar bone measurement precision for phosphor-plate images

    Science.gov (United States)

    HILDEBOLT, CHARLES F.; COUTURE, REX; GARCIA, NATHALIA M.; DIXON, DEBRA; SHANNON, WILLIAM DOUGLAS; LANGENWALTER, ERIC; CIVITELLI, ROBERTO

    2009-01-01

    Objectives To demonstrate methods for determining measurement precision and to determine the precision of alveolar-bone measurements made with a vacuum-coupled, positioning device and phosphor-plate images. Study design Subjects were rigidly attached to the x-ray tube by means of a vacuum coupling device and custom, cross-arch, bite plates. Original and repeat radiographs (taken within minutes of each other) were obtained of the mandibular posterior teeth of 51 subjects, and cementoenamel-junction-alveolar-crest (CEJ-AC) distances were measured on both sets of images. In addition, x-ray-transmission (radiodensity) and alveolar-crest-height differences were determined by subtracting one image from the other. Image subtractions and measurements were performed twice. Based on duplicate measurements, the root-mean-square standard deviation (precision) and least-significant change (LSC) were calculated. LSC is the magnitude of change in a measurement needed to indicate that a true biological change has occurred. Results The LSCs were 4% for x-ray transmission, 0.49 mm for CEJ-AC distance, and 0.06 mm for crest-height 0.06 mm. Conclusion The LSCs for our CEJ-AC and x-ray transmission measurements are similar to what has been reported. The LSC for alveolar-crest height (determined with image subtraction) was less than 0.1 mm. Compared with findings from previous studies, this represents a highly precise measurement of alveolar crest height. The methods demonstrated for calculating LSC can be used by investigators to determine how large changes in radiographic measurements need to be before the changes can be considered (with 95% confidence) true biological changes and not noise (that is, equipment/observer error). PMID:19716499

  20. Precision mass measurements at TITAN with radioactive ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kwiatkowski, A.A., E-mail: aniak@triumf.ca [TRIUMF, 4004 Wesbrook Mall, Vancouver, BC V6T 2A3 (Canada); Macdonald, T.D. [TRIUMF, 4004 Wesbrook Mall, Vancouver, BC V6T 2A3 (Canada); Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC V6T 1Z1 (Canada); Andreoiu, C. [Department of Chemistry, Simon Fraser University, Burnaby, BC V5A 1S6 (Canada); Bale, J.C. [Department of Physics, Simon Fraser University, Burnaby, BC V5A 1S6 (Canada); Brunner, T.; Chaudhuri, A. [TRIUMF, 4004 Wesbrook Mall, Vancouver, BC V6T 2A3 (Canada); Chowdhury, U. [TRIUMF, 4004 Wesbrook Mall, Vancouver, BC V6T 2A3 (Canada); Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, MB R3T 2N2 (Canada); Ettenauer, S.; Gallant, A.T. [TRIUMF, 4004 Wesbrook Mall, Vancouver, BC V6T 2A3 (Canada); Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC V6T 1Z1 (Canada); Grossheim, A. [TRIUMF, 4004 Wesbrook Mall, Vancouver, BC V6T 2A3 (Canada); Lennarz, A. [TRIUMF, 4004 Wesbrook Mall, Vancouver, BC V6T 2A3 (Canada); Institut für Kernphysik, Westfälische Wilhelms-Universität, D-48149 Münster (Germany); Mané, E.; Pearson, M.R.; Schultz, B.E.; Simon, M.C. [TRIUMF, 4004 Wesbrook Mall, Vancouver, BC V6T 2A3 (Canada); Simon, V.V. [TRIUMF, 4004 Wesbrook Mall, Vancouver, BC V6T 2A3 (Canada); Max-Planck-Institut für Kernphysik, Saupfercheckweg 1, 69117 Heidelberg (Germany); Fakultät für Physik und Astronomie, Ruprecht-Karls-Universität, 61920 Heidelberg (Germany); Dilling, J. [TRIUMF, 4004 Wesbrook Mall, Vancouver, BC V6T 2A3 (Canada); Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC V6T 1Z1 (Canada)

    2013-12-15

    Highlights: • The TITAN facility is the sole online Penning trap mass spectrometer with charge breeding capabilities. • Use of highly charged exotic ions reduces the beam time requirements. • Threshold charge breeding was developed as a novel technique to separate isobaric species. • Recent mass measurements have been performed to investigate nuclear structure, tests of electroweak theory, and neutrino physics. -- Abstract: Measurements of the atomic mass further our understanding in many disciplines from metrology to physics beyond the standard model. The accuracy and precision of Penning trap mass spectrometry have been well demonstrated at TITAN, including measurements of neutron-rich calcium and potassium isotopes to investigate three-body forces in nuclear structure and within the island of inversion to study the mechanism of shell quenching and deformation. By charge breeding ions, TITAN has enhanced the precision of the measurement technique. The precision achieved in the measurement of the superallowed β-emitter {sup 74}Rb in the 8+ charge state rivaled earlier measurements with singly charged ions in a fraction of the time. By breeding {sup 78}Rb to the same charge state, the ground state could be easily distinguished from the isomer. Further developments led to threshold charge breeding, which permitted capturing and measuring isobarically and elementally pure ion samples in the Penning trap. This was demonstrated via the Q-value determination of {sup 71}Ge. An overview of the TITAN facility and recent results are presented herein.

  1. Precision measurements of positronium decay rate and energy level

    CERN Document Server

    Asai, S; Kobayashi, T; Namba, T; Suehara, T; Akimoto, G; Ishida, A; Hashimoto, M M; Saito, H; Idehara, T; Yoshida, M

    2008-01-01

    Positronium is an ideal system for the research of the bound state QED. New precise measurement of orthopositronium decay rate has been performed with an accuracy of 150 ppm, and the result combined with the last three is 7.0401 +- 0.0007 mu s^-1. It is the first result to validate the 2nd order correction. The Hyper Fine Splitting of positronium is sensitive to the higher order corrections of the QED prediction and also to the new physics beyond Standard Model via the quantum oscillation into virtual photon. The discrepancy of 3.5 sigma is found recently between the measured values and the QED prediction (O(alpha^3)). It might be due to the contribution of the new physics or the systematic problems in the previous measurements: (non-thermalized Ps and non-uniformity of the magnetic field). We propose new methods to measure HFS precisely without the these uncertainties.

  2. Precision cosmological measurements: independent evidence for dark energy

    OpenAIRE

    Bothun, Greg; Hsu, Stephen D.H.; Murray, Brian

    2006-01-01

    Using recent precision measurements of cosmological paramters, we re-examine whether these observations alone, independent of type Ia supernova surveys, are sufficient to imply the existence of dark energy. We find that best measurements of the age of the universe $t_0$, the Hubble parameter $H_0$ and the matter fraction $\\Omega_m$ strongly favor an equation of state defined by ($w < -1/3$). This result is consistent with the existence of a repulsive, acceleration-causing component of energy ...

  3. Precision measurement of mu p capture in a hydrogen TPC

    CERN Document Server

    Kammel, P; Andreev, V A; Balin, D V; Case, T; Crowe, K; Deutsch, J; Dick, P U; Dijksman, A; Egger, J; Fetisov, A A; Ganzha, V A; Govaerts, J; Hartmann, F J; Herold, W D; Jatsoura, V I; Krivshich, A G; Maev, E M; Maev, O E; Markushin, V; Martino, J; Petitjean, C; Petrov, G E; Prieels, R; Sadetsky, S; Schapkin, G; Schmidt, R; Schöps, W; Schott, W; Semenchuk, G G; Egidy, T V; Vorobyov, A A; Voropaev, N I

    2000-01-01

    We plan to measure the rate of the electroweak charged-current reaction mu sup - + p -> n+nu submu with 1% precision using a new experimental technique based on a high pressure time projection chamber filled with ultrapure hydrogen gas [1]. The capture rate is sensitive to the weak form factors of the nucleon, in particular to the induced pseudoscalar coupling constant g sub P which will be measured with approx 6% accuracy.

  4. Nucleosynthesis Predictions and High-Precision Deuterium Measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Signe Riemer-Sørensen

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Two new high-precision measurements of the deuterium abundance from absorbers along the line of sight to the quasar PKS1937–1009 were presented. The absorbers have lower neutral hydrogen column densities (N(HI ≈ 18 cm − 2 than for previous high-precision measurements, boding well for further extensions of the sample due to the plenitude of low column density absorbers. The total high-precision sample now consists of 12 measurements with a weighted average deuterium abundance of D/H = 2 . 55 ± 0 . 02 × 10 − 5 . The sample does not favour a dipole similar to the one detected for the fine structure constant. The increased precision also calls for improved nucleosynthesis predictions. For that purpose we have updated the public AlterBBN code including new reactions, updated nuclear reaction rates, and the possibility of adding new physics such as dark matter. The standard Big Bang Nucleosynthesis prediction of D/H = 2 . 456 ± 0 . 057 × 10 − 5 is consistent with the observed value within 1.7 standard deviations.

  5. High precision quantification of human plasma proteins using the automated SISCAPA Immuno-MS workflow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Razavi, Morteza; Leigh Anderson, N; Pope, Matthew E; Yip, Richard; Pearson, Terry W

    2016-09-25

    Efficient robotic workflows for trypsin digestion of human plasma and subsequent antibody-mediated peptide enrichment (the SISCAPA method) were developed with the goal of improving assay precision and throughput for multiplexed protein biomarker quantification. First, an 'addition only' tryptic digestion protocol was simplified from classical methods, eliminating the need for sample cleanup, while improving reproducibility, scalability and cost. Second, methods were developed to allow multiplexed enrichment and quantification of peptide surrogates of protein biomarkers representing a very broad range of concentrations and widely different molecular masses in human plasma. The total workflow coefficients of variation (including the 3 sequential steps of digestion, SISCAPA peptide enrichment and mass spectrometric analysis) for 5 proteotypic peptides measured in 6 replicates of each of 6 different samples repeated over 6 days averaged 3.4% within-run and 4.3% across all runs. An experiment to identify sources of variation in the workflow demonstrated that MRM measurement and tryptic digestion steps each had average CVs of ∼2.7%. Because of the high purity of the peptide analytes enriched by antibody capture, the liquid chromatography step is minimized and in some cases eliminated altogether, enabling throughput levels consistent with requirements of large biomarker and clinical studies.

  6. Automated high precision secondary pH measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bastkowski, F.; Jakobsen, P. T.; Stefan, F.; Kristensen, H. B.; Jensen, H. D.; Kawiecki, R.; Wied, C. E.; Kauert, A.; Seidl, B.; Spitzer, P.; Eberhardt, R.; Adel, B.

    2013-04-01

    A new setup for high precision, automated secondary pH measurements together with a reference measurement procedure has been developed and tested in interlaboratory comparisons using buffers pH 4.005, pH 7.000, and pH 10.012 at 25 °C and 37 °C. Using primary buffers as standards, a standard uncertainty in pH better than 0.005 can be reached. The central measuring device is a one piece, thermostatted cell of PFA (perfluoroalkoxy) with a built-in Hamilton® Single Pore™ Glass electrode. Due to its flow-through principle this device allows pH measurements with low consumption of measurement solutions. The very hydrophobic and smooth PFA as construction material facilitates complete emptying of the cell. Furthermore, the tempering unit affords very precise temperature control and hence contributes to the low target uncertainty of the produced secondary buffer solutions. Use of a symmetric measurement sequence and the two point calibration was sufficient to reach high precision and accuracy.

  7. Precision luminosity measurement with the OPAL silicon-tungsten calorimeters

    CERN Document Server

    Arcelli, S

    1999-01-01

    A preliminary, high precision measurement of the luminosity of the LEP colliding beams for the LEP I data recorded between 1993 and 1995 with the OPAL experiment is presented, the measurement is based on the OPAL Silicon-Tungten luminosity monitor, which detects electrons from small-angle Bhabha scattering at angles between approximately 25 and 58 mrad. The overall experimental uncertainty on the measured luminosity is 3.3*10/sup -4/. Such uncertainty contributes negligibly to the uncertainty on the OPAL cross section measurements near the Z /sup 0/ resonance. (3 refs).

  8. Detecting dark matter waves with precision measurement tools

    CERN Document Server

    Derevianko, Andrei

    2016-01-01

    Virialized Ultra-Light Fields (VULFs) while being viable cold dark matter candidates can also solve the standard model hierarchy problem. Direct searches for VULFs due to their non-particle nature require low-energy precision measurement tools. Here we consider scalar VULF candidates. While the previous proposals have focused on detecting coherent oscillations of the measured signals at the VULF Compton frequencies at the device location, here we point out that VULFs also have a distinct spatial signature, forming dark matter waves. Thereby the discovery reach can be improved by using distributed networks of precision measurement tools. We find the expected dark-matter wave signal by deriving spatio-temporal two-point VULF correlation function. Based on the developed formalism for coherence properties of dark-matter fields, we propose several experiments for dark matter wave detection. In the most basic version, the modifications to already running experiments are minor and only require GPS-assisted time-stam...

  9. Precision measures of the primordial abundance of deuterium

    CERN Document Server

    Cooke, Ryan; Jorgenson, Regina A; Murphy, Michael T; Steidel, Charles C

    2013-01-01

    We report the discovery of deuterium absorption in the very metal-poor ([Fe/H] = -2.87) damped Lyman-alpha system at z_abs = 3.06726 towards the QSO SDSS J1358+6522. On the basis of 13 resolved D I absorption lines and the damping wings of the H I Lyman alpha transition, we have obtained a new, precise measure of the primordial abundance of deuterium. Furthermore, to bolster the present statistics of precision D/H measures, we have reanalyzed all of the known deuterium absorption-line systems that satisfy a set of strict criteria. We have adopted a blind analysis strategy (to remove human bias), and developed a software package that is specifically designed for precision D/H abundance measurements. For this reanalyzed sample of systems, we obtain a weighted mean of (D/H)_p = (2.53 +/- 0.04) x 10^-5, corresponding to a Universal baryon density 100 Omega_b h^2 = 2.202 +/- 0.045 for the standard model of Big Bang Nucleosynthesis. By combining our measure of (D/H)_p with observations of the cosmic microwave backg...

  10. Precise measurement of parity violation in polarized muon decay

    CERN Document Server

    Bueno, J F; Davydov, Yu I; Depommier, P; Faszer, W; Gagliardi, C A; Gaponenko, A; Gill, D R; Grossheim, A; Gumplinger, P; Hasinoff, M D; Henderson, R S; Hillairet, A; Hu, J; Koetke, D D; MacDonald, R P; Marshall, G M; Mathie, E L; Mischke, R E; Olchanski, K; Olin, A; Openshaw, R; Poutissou, J -M; Poutissou, R; Selivanov, V; Sheffer, G; Shin, B; Stanislaus, T D S; Tacik, R; Tribble, R E

    2011-01-01

    We present a new high precision measurement of parity violation in the weak interaction, using polarized muon decay. The TWIST collaboration has measured $P_\\mu^\\pi \\xi$, where $P_\\mu^\\pi$ is the polarization of the muon in pion decay and $\\xi$ describes the intrinsic asymmetry in muon decay. We find $P_\\mu^\\pi \\xi = 1.00084 \\pm 0.00029\\,(\\textrm{stat.})_{-0.00063}^{+0.00165}\\,(\\textrm{syst.})$, in good agreement with the standard model prediction of $P_\\mu^\\pi=\\xi=1$. Our result is a factor of seven more precise than the pre-TWIST value, setting new limits in left-right symmetric electroweak extensions to the standard model.

  11. A precise measurement of the B^0 meson oscillation frequency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aaij, R.; Abellán Beteta, C.; Adeva, B.; Adinolfi, M.; Affolder, A.; Ajaltouni, Z.; Akar, S.; Albrecht, J.; Alessio, F.; Alexander, M.; Ali, S.; Alkhazov, G.; Alvarez Cartelle, P.; Alves, A. A., Jr.; Amato, S.; Amerio, S.; Amhis, Y.; An, L.; Anderlini, L.; Anderson, J.; Andreassi, G.; Andreotti, M.; Andrews, J. E.; Appleby, R. B.; Aquines Gutierrez, O.; Archilli, F.; d'Argent, P.; Artamonov, A.; Artuso, M.; Aslanides, E.; Auriemma, G.; Baalouch, M.; Bachmann, S.; Back, J. J.; Badalov, A.; Baesso, C.; Baldini, W.; Barlow, R. J.; Barschel, C.; Barsuk, S.; Barter, W.; Batozskaya, V.; Battista, V.; Bay, A.; Beaucourt, L.; Beddow, J.; Bedeschi, F.; Bediaga, I.; Bel, L. J.; Bellee, V.; Belloli, N.; Belyaev, I.; Ben-Haim, E.; Bencivenni, G.; Benson, S.; Benton, J.; Berezhnoy, A.; Bernet, R.; Bertolin, A.; Bettler, M.-O.; van Beuzekom, M.; Bien, A.; Bifani, S.; Billoir, P.; Bird, T.; Birnkraut, A.; Bizzeti, A.; Blake, T.; Blanc, F.; Blouw, J.; Blusk, S.; Bocci, V.; Bondar, A.; Bondar, N.; Bonivento, W.; Borghi, S.; Borsato, M.; Bowcock, T. J. V.; Bowen, E.; Bozzi, C.; Braun, S.; Britsch, M.; Britton, T.; Brodzicka, J.; Brook, N. H.; Buchanan, E.; Bursche, A.; Buytaert, J.; Cadeddu, S.; Calabrese, R.; Calvi, M.; Calvo Gomez, M.; Campana, P.; Campora Perez, D.; Capriotti, L.; Carbone, A.; Carboni, G.; Cardinale, R.; Cardini, A.; Carniti, P.; Carson, L.; Carvalho Akiba, K.; Casse, G.; Cassina, L.; Castillo Garcia, L.; Cattaneo, M.; Cauet, Ch.; Cavallero, G.; Cenci, R.; Charles, M.; Charpentier, Ph.; Chefdeville, M.; Chen, S.; Cheung, S.-F.; Chiapolini, N.; Chrzaszcz, M.; Cid Vidal, X.; Ciezarek, G.; Clarke, P. E. L.; Clemencic, M.; Cliff, H. V.; Closier, J.; Coco, V.; Cogan, J.; Cogneras, E.; Cogoni, V.; Cojocariu, L.; Collazuol, G.; Collins, P.; Comerma-Montells, A.; Contu, A.; Cook, A.; Coombes, M.; Coquereau, S.; Corti, G.; Corvo, M.; Couturier, B.; Cowan, G. A.; Craik, D. C.; Crocombe, A.; Cruz Torres, M.; Cunliffe, S.; Currie, R.; D'Ambrosio, C.; Dall'Occo, E.; Dalseno, J.; David, P. N. Y.; Davis, A.; De Aguiar Francisco, O.; De Bruyn, K.; De Capua, S.; De Cian, M.; De Miranda, J. M.; De Paula, L.; De Simone, P.; Dean, C.-T.; Decamp, D.; Deckenhoff, M.; Del Buono, L.; Déléage, N.; Demmer, M.; Derkach, D.; Deschamps, O.; Dettori, F.; Dey, B.; Di Canto, A.; Di Ruscio, F.; Dijkstra, H.; Donleavy, S.; Dordei, F.; Dorigo, M.; Dosil Suárez, A.; Dossett, D.; Dovbnya, A.; Dreimanis, K.; Dufour, L.; Dujany, G.; Dupertuis, F.; Durante, P.; Dzhelyadin, R.; Dziurda, A.; Dzyuba, A.; Easo, S.; Egede, U.; Egorychev, V.; Eidelman, S.; Eisenhardt, S.; Eitschberger, U.; Ekelhof, R.; Eklund, L.; El Rifai, I.; Elsasser, Ch.; Ely, S.; Esen, S.; Evans, H. M.; Evans, T.; Falabella, A.; Färber, C.; Farley, N.; Farry, S.; Fay, R.; Ferguson, D.; Fernandez Albor, V.; Ferrari, F.; Ferreira Rodrigues, F.; Ferro-Luzzi, M.; Filippov, S.; Fiore, M.; Fiorini, M.; Firlej, M.; Fitzpatrick, C.; Fiutowski, T.; Fohl, K.; Fol, P.; Fontana, M.; Fontanelli, F.; C. Forshaw, D.; Forty, R.; Frank, M.; Frei, C.; Frosini, M.; Fu, J.; Furfaro, E.; Gallas Torreira, A.; Galli, D.; Gallorini, S.; Gambetta, S.; Gandelman, M.; Gandini, P.; Gao, Y.; García Pardiñas, J.; Garra Tico, J.; Garrido, L.; Gascon, D.; Gaspar, C.; Gauld, R.; Gavardi, L.; Gazzoni, G.; Gerick, D.; Gersabeck, E.; Gersabeck, M.; Gershon, T.; Ghez, Ph.; Gianì, S.; Gibson, V.; Girard, O. G.; Giubega, L.; Gligorov, V. V.; Göbel, C.; Golubkov, D.; Golutvin, A.; Gomes, A.; Gotti, C.; Grabalosa Gándara, M.; Graciani Diaz, R.; Granado Cardoso, L. A.; Graugés, E.; Graverini, E.; Graziani, G.; Grecu, A.; Greening, E.; Gregson, S.; Griffith, P.; Grillo, L.; Grünberg, O.; Gui, B.; Gushchin, E.; Guz, Yu.; Gys, T.; Hadavizadeh, T.; Hadjivasiliou, C.; Haefeli, G.; Haen, C.; Haines, S. C.; Hall, S.; Hamilton, B.; Han, X.; Hansmann-Menzemer, S.; Harnew, N.; Harnew, S. T.; Harrison, J.; He, J.; Head, T.; Heijne, V.; Heister, A.; Hennessy, K.; Henrard, P.; Henry, L.; Hernando Morata, J. A.; van Herwijnen, E.; Heß, M.; Hicheur, A.; Hill, D.; Hoballah, M.; Hombach, C.; Hulsbergen, W.; Humair, T.; Hussain, N.; Hutchcroft, D.; Hynds, D.; Idzik, M.; Ilten, P.; Jacobsson, R.; Jaeger, A.; Jalocha, J.; Jans, E.; Jawahery, A.; Jing, F.; John, M.; Johnson, D.; Jones, C. R.; Joram, C.; Jost, B.; Jurik, N.; Kandybei, S.; Kanso, W.; Karacson, M.; Karbach, T. M.; Karodia, S.; Kecke, M.; Kelsey, M.; Kenyon, I. R.; Kenzie, M.; Ketel, T.; Khanji, B.; Khurewathanakul, C.; Kirn, T.; Klaver, S.; Klimaszewski, K.; Kochebina, O.; Kolpin, M.; Komarov, I.; Koopman, R. F.; Koppenburg, P.; Kozeiha, M.; Kravchuk, L.; Kreplin, K.; Kreps, M.; Krocker, G.; Krokovny, P.; Kruse, F.; Krzemien, W.; Kucewicz, W.; Kucharczyk, M.; Kudryavtsev, V.; K. Kuonen, A.; Kurek, K.; Kvaratskheliya, T.; Lacarrere, D.; Lafferty, G.; Lai, A.

    2016-07-01

    The oscillation frequency, Δ m_d, of B^0 mesons is measured using semileptonic decays with a D^- or D^{*-} meson in the final state. The data sample corresponds to 3.0fb^{-1} of pp collisions, collected by the LHCb experiment at centre-of-mass energies √{s} = 7 and 8 TeV. A combination of the two decay modes gives Δ m_d = (505.0 ± 2.1 ± 1.0) ns^{-1}, where the first uncertainty is statistical and the second is systematic. This is the most precise single measurement of this parameter. It is consistent with the current world average and has similar precision.

  12. Atom lasers: Production, properties and prospects for precision inertial measurement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robins, N.P., E-mail: nick.robins@anu.edu.au; Altin, P.A.; Debs, J.E.; Close, J.D.

    2013-08-20

    We review experimental progress on atom lasers out-coupled from Bose–Einstein condensates, and consider the properties of such beams in the context of precision inertial sensing. The atom laser is the matter-wave analogue of the optical laser. Both devices rely on Bose-enhanced scattering to produce a macroscopically populated trapped mode that is output-coupled to produce an intense beam. In both cases, the beams often display highly desirable properties such as low divergence, high spectral flux and a simple spatial mode that make them useful in practical applications, as well as the potential to perform measurements at or below the quantum projection noise limit. Both devices display similar second-order correlations that differ from thermal sources. Because of these properties, atom lasers are a promising source for application to precision inertial measurements.

  13. Precise measurement of stellar temperatures using line-depth ratios

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gray, D.F.; Johanson, H.L. (Western Ontario, University, London (Canada))

    1991-05-01

    The ratio of line depth for two spectral lines is used to determine stellar temperatures with a precision = 10 K = 0.2 percent. For stars between late-F and early-K spectral types, the V I 6251 to Fe I 6253 depth ratio is easy to measure. It is also applicable to other temperature regimes if suitable lines can be found. 14 refs.

  14. Theoretical motivations for precision measurements of oscillation parameters

    CERN Document Server

    Pascoli, Silvia

    2016-01-01

    We discuss two theoretical motivations of precision measurements of oscillation parameters. One is the guidance for flavour model building with flavour symmetries, and the other is the connection with the origin of matter-antimatter asymmetry. We also present our recent progress in these aspects, a new approach of flavour model building based on cross coupling in the flavon potential and a novel mechanism of leptogenesis via phase transition.

  15. Precision Measurements in Electron-Positron Annihilation: Theory and Experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Chetyrkin, Konstantin

    2016-01-01

    Theory results on precision measurements in electron-positron annihilation at low and high energies are collected. These cover pure QCD calculations as well as mixed electroweak and QCD results, involving light and heavy quarks. The impact of QCD corrections on the $W$-boson mass is discussed and, last not least, the status and the perspectives for the Higgs boson decay rate into $b\\bar b$, $c\\bar c$ and into two gluons.

  16. New Precise Measurement of the Hyperfine Splitting of Positronium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ishida, A., E-mail: ishida@icepp.s.u-tokyo.ac.jp [Department of Physics, Graduate School of Science, The University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-0033 (Japan)

    2015-09-15

    Positronium (Ps) is an ideal system for precision test of bound state quantum electrodynamics. The hyperfine splitting (HFS) of the ground state of Ps, which is one of the most precisely tested quantity, has a large discrepancy of 16 ppm (4.5 σ) between previous experiments and theoretical calculation up to O(α{sup 3}lnα{sup −1}) and part of O(α{sup 3}) corrections. A new experiment which reduces possible systematic uncertainties of Ps thermalization effect and nonuniformity of magnetic field was performed. It revealed that the Ps thermalization effect was as large as 10 ± 2 ppm. Treating the thermalization effect correctly, a new result of 203.3942 ± 0.0016(stat., 8.0 ppm) ± 0.0013(sys., 6.4 ppm) GHz was obtained. This result is consistent with theory within 1.1 σ, whereas it disfavors the previous experimental result by 2.6 σ. It shows that the Ps thermalization effect is crucial for precision measurement of HFS. Future prospects for improved precision are briefly discussed.

  17. Precision Measurement of Cylinder Surface Profile on an Ultra-Precision Machine Tool

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, J. C.; Noh, Y. J.; Arai, Y.; Gao, W.; Park, C. H.

    2009-01-01

    This paper describes the measurement of the surface straightness profile of a cylinder workpiece on an ultra-precision machine tool which has a T-base design with a spindle, an X-slide and a Z-slide. The movement range of the X-slide is 220 mm and that of the Z-slide is 150 mm, which have roller bearings in common. Two capacitive sensors are employed to scan a cylinder workpiece mounted on the spindle along the Z-axis. The straightness error motion of the Z-slide is measured to be approximately 100 nm by the reversal method. The straightness profile of the cylinder workpiece is evaluated to be approximately 400 nm by separation of the motion error, simultaneously.

  18. Repeated High-Precision Gravity and GPS Measurement Techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gettings, P.; Harris, R. N.; Allis, R.; Chapman, D. S.

    2003-12-01

    Repeated high-precision gravity and GPS measurements are becoming a common tool for tracking changes in subsurface reservoirs. Despite this, there is little literature which discusses measurement techniques and the expected errors. Our research has focused on improving measurement techniques to be applied to ground water and geothermal steam reservoirs, including quantifying the minimum error levels with modern equipment. We applied these methods in two studies: ground water monitoring of the southern Salt Lake valley, Utah, USA, and steam monitoring of The Geysers geothermal field, California, USA. Gravity measurements using modern relative high-precision meters, such as Scintrex CG-3Ms or L&R E series, can now be routinely made to an accuracy of 5 μ Gal. Such accuracy requires the use of time series analysis at each station, and non-linear instrument drift functions. Modern computerized meters are capable of internally storing a time series of measurements for each station; older meters can often be fitted to log such data to a field computer. This time series, typically of 10-15 minute duration in our work, can then be analyzed in several ways to produce stable estimates of the gravity reading. In particular, our research has emphasized using a weighted arithmetic average (for long occupations), or a Thiele extrapolation scheme (for shorter station occupations). Instrument drift is removed through a superposition of a linear long-term drift function, and an empirical staircase function formed from differences between repeated station occupations. To achieve high-accuracy GPS measurements while maximizing the number of field stations in a survey, rapid-static measurements are necessary. We have tested the effect of occupation time and processing schemes on the absolute accuracy of the resulting GPS position. Using a post-processing differential method with a fixed (but not necessarily continuous) base station within 15 km, positioning error of <4 cm vertical is

  19. A precise measurement of the pion beta decay rate

    CERN Document Server

    Ritt, S

    2001-01-01

    The PIBETA project at PSI, Switzerland, is a program of measurements with the aim of making a precise determination of the pi /sup +/ to pi /sup 0/e/sup +/ nu /sub e ( pi beta ) decay rate, which provides a new constraint on the Cabibbo-Kobayashi-Masakava matrix element V/sub ud/. The PIBETA decay is measured with a stopped pion beam and normalized to pi /sup +/ to e/sup +/ nu events. A new detector has been built which is described with details of the trigger and front-end electronics.

  20. Precision measurement of a particle mass at the linear collider

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Milstene, C.; /Fermilab; Freitas, A.; /Zurich U.; Schmitt, M.; /Northwestern U.; Sopczak, A.; /Lancaster U.

    2007-06-01

    Precision measurement of the stop mass at the ILC is done in a method based on cross-sections measurements at two different center-of-mass energies. This allows to minimize both the statistical and systematic errors. In the framework of the MSSM, a light stop, compatible with electro-weak baryogenesis, is studied in its decay into a charm jet and neutralino, the Lightest Supersymmetric Particle (LSP), as a candidate of dark matter. This takes place for a small stop-neutralino mass difference.

  1. Precision X-ray measurements on kaonic atoms at LNF

    OpenAIRE

    Marton, J.

    2007-01-01

    After the successfully performed DEAR experiment at DAFNE - resulting in the most precise data on the hadronic shift and width in kaonic hydrogen up-to-now - the next step will be the measurement at the percent level using new X-ray detectors. These detectors (silicon drift detectors) are developed within the SIDDHARTA project. The asynchronous background will be suppressed using the time correlation between the kaon and the X-ray by 2-3 orders of magnitude. These measurements will lead to pr...

  2. Precision measurements of top quark production with the ATLAS detector

    CERN Document Server

    Stolte, Philipp; The ATLAS collaboration

    2016-01-01

    The top quark is the heaviest known fundamental particle. As it is the only quark that decays before it hadronizes, this gives us the unique opportunity to probe the properties of bare quarks and to test perturbative QCD. This talk will focus on a few recent precision top quark measurements by the ATLAS Collaboration: fiducial top pair and single top production cross sections including differential distributions will be presented and compared with QCD predictions. The results include the first top quark measurements at 13 TeV using data from LHC run 2.

  3. Fast and precise luminosity measurement at the international linear collider

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    C Grah; on behalf of the FCAL Collaboration

    2007-12-01

    The detectors of the ILC will feature a calorimeter system in the very forward region. The system comprises mainly two electromagnetic calorimeters: LumiCal, which is dedicated to the measurement of the absolute luminosity with highest precision and BeamCal, which uses the energy deposition from beamstrahlung pairs for a fast luminosity measure and the determination of beam parameters. The FCAL system is designed as a universal system fitting all detector concepts. It was implemented and simulated as a subsystem of the large detector concept [1]. The studies are carried out within the FCAL collaboration.

  4. Precision Measurements of Top Quark Production with the ATLAS Detector

    CERN Document Server

    Stolte, Philipp; The ATLAS collaboration

    2016-01-01

    The top quark is the heaviest known fundamental particle. It is the only quark that decays before it hadronises which gives us the unique opportunity to probe the properties of bare quarks and to test perturbative QCD. This overview will focus on a few recent precision top quark measurements by the ATLAS Collaboration at the LHC: Fiducial top pair and single top production cross-sections including differential distributions will be presented and compared with QCD predictions. The results include the first top quark measurements at 13 TeV using data from LHC Run 2.

  5. Photonic systems for high precision radial velocity measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halverson, Samuel

    2016-01-01

    I will discuss new instrumentation and techniques designed to maximize the Doppler radial velocity (RV) measurement precision of next generation exoplanet discovery instruments. These systems include a novel wavelength calibration device based on an all-fiber fabry-perot interferometer, a compact and efficient optical fiber image scrambler based on a single high-index ball lens, and a unique optical fiber mode mixer. These systems have been developed specifically to overcome three technological hurdles that have classically hindered high precision RV measurements in both the optical and near-infrared (NIR), namely: lack of available wavelength calibration sources, inadequate decoupling of the spectrograph from variable telescope illumination, and speckle-induced noise due to mode interference in optical fibers. The instrumentation presented here will be applied to the Habitable-zone Planet Finder, a NIR RV instrument designed to detect rocky planets orbiting in the habitable zones of nearby M-dwarfs, and represents a critical technological step towards the detection of potentially habitable Earth-like planets. While primarily focused in the NIR, many of these systems will be adapted to future optical RV instruments as well, such as NASA's new Extreme Precision Doppler Spectrometer for the WIYN telescope.

  6. Superallowed nuclear beta decay: Precision measurements for basic physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hardy, J. C. [Cylotron Institute, Texas A and M University, College station, TX, 77843-3366 (United States)

    2012-11-20

    For 60 years, superallowed 0{sup +}{yields}0{sup +} nuclear beta decay has been used to probe the weak interaction, currently verifying the conservation of the vector current (CVC) to high precision ({+-}0.01%) and anchoring the most demanding available test of the unitarity of the Cabibbo-Kobayashi-Maskawa (CKM) matrix ({+-}0.06%), a fundamental pillar of the electroweak standard model. Each superallowed transition is characterized by its ft-value, a result obtained from three measured quantities: the total decay energy of the transition, its branching ratio, and the half-life of the parent state. Today's data set is composed of some 150 independent measurements of 13 separate superallowed transitions covering a wide range of parent nuclei from {sup 10}C to {sup 74}Rb. Excellent consistency among the average results for all 13 transitions - a prediction of CVC - also confirms the validity of the small transition-dependent theoretical corrections that have been applied to account for isospin symmetry breaking. With CVC consistency established, the value of the vector coupling constant, G{sub V}, has been extracted from the data and used to determine the top left element of the CKM matrix, V{sub ud}. With this result the top-row unitarity test of the CKM matrix yields the value 0.99995(61), a result that sets a tight limit on possible new physics beyond the standard model. To have any impact on these fundamental weak-interaction tests, any measurement must be made with a precision of 0.1% or better - a substantial experimental challenge well beyond the requirements of most nuclear physics measurements. I overview the current state of the field and outline some of the requirements that need to be met by experimentalists if they aim to make measurements with this high level of precision.

  7. Note: precision viscosity measurement using suspended microchannel resonators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, I; Park, K; Lee, J

    2012-11-01

    We report the characterization of a suspended microchannel resonator (SMR) for viscosity measurements in a low viscosity regime (<10 mPa s) using two measurement schemes. First, the quality factor (Q-factor) of the SMR was characterized with glycerol-water mixtures. The measured Q-factor at 20 °C exhibits a bilinear behavior with the sensitivity of 1281 (mPa s)(-1) for a lower (1-4 mPa s) and 355 (mPa s)(-1) for a higher viscosity range (4-8 mPa s), respectively. The second scheme is the vibration amplitude monitoring of the SMR running in a closed loop feedback. When compared in terms of the measurement time, the amplitude-based measurement takes only 0.1 ~ 1 ms while the Q-factor-based measurement takes ~30 s. However, the viscosity resolution of the Q-factor-based measurement is at least three times better than the amplitude-based measurement. By comparing the Q-factors of heavy water and 9.65 wt.% glycerol-water mixture that have very similar viscosities but different densities, we confirmed that the SMR can measure the dynamic viscosity without the density correction. The obtained results demonstrate that the SMR can measure the fluid viscosity with high precision and even real-time monitoring of the viscosity change is possible with the amplitude-based measurement scheme.

  8. Precision of future experiments measuring primordial tensor fluctuation

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, Yi

    2014-01-01

    Recently the second phase of Background Imaging of Cosmic Extragalactic Polarization (BICEP2) claimed a detection of the tensor-to-scalar ratio ($r$) of primordial fluctuation at $5\\sigma$ confidence level. If it is true, this large and measurable amplitude ($r \\simeq 0.2$) of B-mode polarization indicates that it is possible to measure the shape of CMB B-mode polarization with future experiments. Given the current understanding of the experimental noise and foreground contamination, we forecast the precision of $r$ and the tensor spectral index $n_{\\rm t}$ measurements from Planck, Spider and POLARBEAR with $n_{\\rm t}$ as a free parameter. We quantitatively determine the signal-to-noise of the measurement in $r$-$n_{\\rm t}$ parameter space for the three experiments. The forecasted signal-to-noise ratio of the B-mode polarization somewhat depends on $n_{\\rm t}$, but strongly depends on the true value of $r$.

  9. Precise Measurement of Drift Velocities in Active-Target Detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, Louis

    2016-09-01

    Nuclear experiments with radioactive beams are needed to improve our understanding of nuclei structure far from stability. Radioactive beams typically have low beam rates, but active-target detectors can compensate for these low beam rates. In active-target detectors that are also Time-Projection Chambers (TPC), ionized electrons drift through an electric fieldto a detection device to imagethe trajectory of charged-particle ionization tracks within the chamber's gas volume. The measurement of the ionized electrons' drift velocity is crucial for the accurate imaging of these tracks. In order to measure this drift velocity, we will use a UV laser and photo-sensitive foil in a the ND-Cubedetector we are developing, periodically releasingelectrons from the foil at a known timesand a known distance from the electron detector, thereby precisely measuring the drift velocity in situ. We have surveyed several materials to find a material that will work well with typical solid-state UV lasers on the market. We plan to determine the best material and thickness of the foil to maximize the number of photoelectrons. The precision that will be afforded by this measurement of the drift velocity will allow us to eliminate a source of systematic uncertainty.

  10. A precision measurement of the mass of the top quark

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abazov, V. M.; Abbott, B.; Abdesselam, A.; Abolins, M.; Abramov, V.; Acharya, B. S.; Adams, D. L.; Adams, M.; Ahmed, S. N.; Alexeev, G. D.; Alton, A.; Alves, G. A.; Arnoud, Y.; Avila, C.; Babintsev, V. V.; Babukhadia, L.; Bacon, T. C.; Baden, A.; Baffioni, S.; Baldin, B.; Balm, P. W.; Banerjee, S.; Barberis, E.; Baringer, P.; Barreto, J.; Bartlett, J. F.; Bassler, U.; Bauer, D.; Bean, A.; Beaudette, F.; Begel, M.; Belyaev, A.; Beri, S. B.; Bernardi, G.; Bertram, I.; Besson, A.; Beuselinck, R.; Bezzubov, V. A.; Bhat, P. C.; Bhatnagar, V.; Bhattacharjee, M.; Blazey, G.; Blekman, F.; Blessing, S.; Boehnlein, A.; Bojko, N. I.; Bolton, T. A.; Borcherding, F.; Bos, K.; Bose, T.; Brandt, A.; Briskin, G.; Brock, R.; Brooijmans, G.; Bross, A.; Buchholz, D.; Buehler, M.; Buescher, V.; Burtovoi, V. S.; Butler, J. M.; Canelli, F.; Carvalho, W.; Casey, D.; Castilla-Valdez, H.; Chakraborty, D.; Chan, K. M.; Chekulaev, S. V.; Cho, D. K.; Choi, S.; Chopra, S.; Claes, D.; Clark, A. R.; Connolly, B.; Cooper, W. E.; Coppage, D.; Crépé-Renaudin, S.; Cummings, M. A. C.; Cutts, D.; da Motta, H.; Davis, G. A.; De, K.; de Jong, S. J.; Demarteau, M.; Demina, R.; Demine, P.; Denisov, D.; Denisov, S. P.; Desai, S.; Diehl, H. T.; Diesburg, M.; Doulas, S.; Dudko, L. V.; Duflot, L.; Dugad, S. R.; Duperrin, A.; Dyshkant, A.; Edmunds, D.; Ellison, J.; Eltzroth, J. T.; Elvira, V. D.; Engelmann, R.; Eno, S.; Eppley, G.; Ermolov, P.; Eroshin, O. V.; Estrada, J.; Evans, H.; Evdokimov, V. N.; Ferbel, T.; Filthaut, F.; Fisk, H. E.; Fortner, M.; Fox, H.; Fu, S.; Fuess, S.; Gallas, E.; Galyaev, A. N.; Gao, M.; Gavrilov, V.; Genik, R. J., II; Genser, K.; Gerber, C. E.; Gershtein, Y.; Ginther, G.; Gómez, B.; Goncharov, P. I.; Gounder, K.; Goussiou, A.; Grannis, P. D.; Greenlee, H.; Greenwood, Z. D.; Grinstein, S.; Groer, L.; Grünendahl, S.; Grünewald, M. W.; Gurzhiev, S. N.; Gutierrez, G.; Gutierrez, P.; Hadley, N. J.; Haggerty, H.; Hagopian, S.; Hagopian, V.; Hall, R. E.; Han, C.; Hansen, S.; Hauptman, J. M.; Hebert, C.; Hedin, D.; Heinmiller, J. M.; Heinson, A. P.; Heintz, U.; Hildreth, M. D.; Hirosky, R.; Hobbs, J. D.; Hoeneisen, B.; Huang, J.; Huang, Y.; Iashvili, I.; Illingworth, R.; Ito, A. S.; Jaffré, M.; Jain, S.; Jesik, R.; Johns, K.; Johnson, M.; Jonckheere, A.; Jöstlein, H.; Juste, A.; Kahl, W.; Kahn, S.; Kajfasz, E.; Kalinin, A. M.; Karmanov, D.; Karmgard, D.; Kehoe, R.; Kesisoglou, S.; Khanov, A.; Kharchilava, A.; Klima, B.; Kohli, J. M.; Kostritskiy, A. V.; Kotcher, J.; Kothari, B.; Kozelov, A. V.; Kozlovsky, E. A.; Krane, J.; Krishnaswamy, M. R.; Krivkova, P.; Krzywdzinski, S.; Kubantsev, M.; Kuleshov, S.; Kulik, Y.; Kunori, S.; Kupco, A.; Kuznetsov, V. E.; Landsberg, G.; Lee, W. M.; Leflat, A.; Lehner, F.; Leonidopoulos, C.; Li, J.; Li, Q. Z.; Lima, J. G. R.; Lincoln, D.; Linn, S. L.; Linnemann, J.; Lipton, R.; Lucotte, A.; Lueking, L.; Lundstedt, C.; Luo, C.; Maciel, A. K. A.; Madaras, R. J.; Malyshev, V. L.; Manankov, V.; Mao, H. S.; Marshall, T.; Martin, M. I.; Mattingly, S. E. K.; Mayorov, A. A.; McCarthy, R.; McMahon, T.; Melanson, H. L.; Melnitchouk, A.; Merkin, A.; Merritt, K. W.; Miao, C.; Miettinen, H.; Mihalcea, D.; Mokhov, N.; Mondal, N. K.; Montgomery, H. E.; Moore, R. W.; Mutaf, Y. D.; Nagy, E.; Narain, M.; Narasimham, V. S.; Naumann, N. A.; Neal, H. A.; Negret, J. P.; Nelson, S.; Nomerotski, A.; Nunnemann, T.; O'Neil, D.; Oguri, V.; Oshima, N.; Padley, P.; Papageorgiou, K.; Parashar, N.; Partridge, R.; Parua, N.; Patwa, A.; Peters, O.; Pétroff, P.; Piegaia, R.; Pope, B. G.; Prosper, H. B.; Protopopescu, S.; Przybycien, M. B.; Qian, J.; Rajagopalan, S.; Rapidis, P. A.; Reay, N. W.; Reucroft, S.; Ridel, M.; Rijssenbeek, M.; Rizatdinova, F.; Rockwell, T.; Royon, C.; Rubinov, P.; Ruchti, R.; Sabirov, B. M.; Sajot, G.; Santoro, A.; Sawyer, L.; Schamberger, R. D.; Schellman, H.; Schwartzman, A.; Shabalina, E.; Shivpuri, R. K.; Shpakov, D.; Shupe, M.; Sidwell, R. A.; Simak, V.; Sirotenko, V.; Slattery, P.; Smith, R. P.; Snow, G. R.; Snow, J.; Snyder, S.; Solomon, J.; Song, Y.; Sorín, V.; Sosebee, M.; Sotnikova, N.; Soustruznik, K.; Souza, M.; Stanton, N. R.; Steinbrück, G.; Stoker, D.; Stolin, V.; Stone, A.; Stoyanova, D. A.; Strang, M. A.; Strauss, M.; Strovink, M.; Stutte, L.; Sznajder, A.; Talby, M.; Taylor, W.; Tentindo-Repond, S.; Trippe, T. G.; Turcot, A. S.; Tuts, P. M.; Van Kooten, R.; Vaniev, V.; Varelas, N.; Villeneuve-Seguier, F.; Volkov, A. A.; Vorobiev, A. P.; Wahl, H. D.; Wang, Z.-M.; Warchol, J.; Watts, G.; Wayne, M.; Weerts, H.; White, A.; Whiteson, D.; Wijngaarden, D. A.; Willis, S.; Wimpenny, S. J.; Womersley, J.; Wood, D. R.; Xu, Q.; Yamada, R.; Yasuda, T.; Yatsunenko, Y. A.; Yip, K.; Yu, J.; Zanabria, M.; Zhang, X.; Zhou, B.; Zhou, Z.; Zielinski, M.; Zieminska, D.; Zieminski, A.; Zutshi, V.; Zverev, E. G.; Zylberstejn, A.

    2004-06-01

    The standard model of particle physics contains parameters-such as particle masses-whose origins are still unknown and which cannot be predicted, but whose values are constrained through their interactions. In particular, the masses of the top quark (Mt) and W boson (MW) constrain the mass of the long-hypothesized, but thus far not observed, Higgs boson. A precise measurement of Mt can therefore indicate where to look for the Higgs, and indeed whether the hypothesis of a standard model Higgs is consistent with experimental data. As top quarks are produced in pairs and decay in only about 10-24s into various final states, reconstructing their masses from their decay products is very challenging. Here we report a technique that extracts more information from each top-quark event and yields a greatly improved precision (of +/- 5.3GeV/c2) when compared to previous measurements. When our new result is combined with our published measurement in a complementary decay mode and with the only other measurements available, the new world average for Mt becomes 178.0 +/- 4.3GeV/c2. As a result, the most likely Higgs mass increases from the experimentally excluded value of 96 to 117GeV/c2, which is beyond current experimental sensitivity. The upper limit on the Higgs mass at the 95% confidence level is raised from 219 to 251GeV/c2.

  11. Precision Electroweak measurements at the FCC-ee

    CERN Document Server

    Dam, Mogens

    2016-01-01

    Because of a luminosity of up to five orders of magnitude larger than at LEP, electroweak precision measurements at the FCC-ee -- the Future Circular Collider with electron-positron beams -- would provide improvements by orders of magnitude over the present status and constitute a broad search for the existence of new, weakly interacting particles up to very high energy scales. The FCC-ee will address centre-of-mass energies ranging from below the Z pole to the $\\mathrm{t\\bar{t}}$ threshold and above. At energies around the Z pole, the Z-boson mass and width can be measured to better than 100 keV each. Asymmetry measurements at the Z pole allow improvements in the determination of the weak mixing angle by at least a factor 30 to $\\delta\\sin^2\\theta\\mathrm{_W^{eff}}\\simeq 6\\times 10^{-6}$. A determination of the electromagnetic coupling constant at the Z energy scale, $\\alpha_\\mathrm{QED}(m_\\mathrm{Z}^2)$, to a relative precision of $3\\times 10^{-5}$ can be obtained via measurement of the forward-backward asym...

  12. Precise measurement of chromium isotopes by MC-ICPMS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schiller, Martin; Van Kooten, Elishevah; Holst, Jesper C; Olsen, Mia B; Bizzarro, Martin

    2014-08-01

    We report novel analytical procedures allowing for the concurrent determination of the stable and mass-independent Cr isotopic composition of silicate materials by multiple collector inductively coupled mass spectrometry (MC-ICPMS). In particular, we focus on improved precision of the measurement of the neutron-rich isotope (54)Cr. Because nitride and oxide interferences are a major obstacle to precise and accurate (54)Cr measurements by MC-ICPMS, our approach is designed to minimize these interferences. Based on repeat measurements of standards, we show that the mass-independent (53)Cr and (54)Cr compositions can be routinely determined with an external reproducibility better than 2.5 and 5.8 ppm (2 sd), respectively. This represents at least a two-fold improvement compared to previous studies. Although this approach uses significantly more Cr (30-60 μg) than analysis by thermal ionization mass spectrometry (TIMS), our result indicate that it is possible to obtain an external reproducibility of 19 ppm for the μ(54)Cr when consuming amounts similar to that typically analyzed by TIMS (1 μg). In addition, the amount of time required for analysis by MC-ICPMS is much shorter thereby enabling a higher sample throughput. As a result of the improved analytical precision, we identified small apparent mass-independent differences between different synthetic Cr standards and bulk silicate Earth (BSE) when using the kinetic law for the mass bias correction. These differences are attributed to the Cr loss by equilibrium processes during production of the synthetic standards. The stable isotope data concurrently obtained have a precision of 0.05‰ Da (-1), which is comparable to earlier studies. Comparison of the measured isotopic composition of four meteorites with published data indicates that Cr isotope data measured by the technique described here are accurate to stated uncertainties. The stable Cr composition of the Bilanga and NWA 2999 achondrites suggests that the

  13. Thermospheric mass density measurement from precise orbit ephemeris

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Junyu Chen

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Atmospheric drag, which can be inferred from orbit information of low-Earth orbiting (LEO satellites, provides a direct means of measuring mass density. The temporal resolution of derived mass density could be in the range from minutes to days, depending on the precision of the satellite orbit data. This paper presents two methods potentially being able to estimate thermosphere mass density from precise obit ephemeris with high temporal resolution. One method is based on the drag perturbation equation of the semi-major axis and the temporal resolution of retrieved density could be 150 s for CHAMP satellite. Another method generates corrections to densities computed from a baseline density model through a Kalman filter orbit drag coefficient determination (KFOD process and the temporal resolution of derived density could be as high as 30 s for CHAMP satellite. The densities estimated from these two methods are compared with densities obtained from accelerometer data of CHAMP satellite. When the accelerometer data based densities are used as reference values, the mean relative accuracy of the densities derived from precision orbit data using the two methods is within approximately 10%. An application of the derived densities shows that the derived densities can reduce orbit predication errors.

  14. Thermospheric mass density measurement from precise orbit ephemeris

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Junyu Chen; Jizhang Sang

    2016-01-01

    Atmospheric drag,which can be inferred from orbit information of low-Earth orbiting (LEO)satellites,provides a direct means of measuring mass density.The temporal resolution of derived mass density could be in the range from minutes to days,depending on the precision of the satellite orbit data.This paper presents two methods potentially being able to estimate thermosphere mass density from precise obit ephemeris with high temporal resolution.One method is based on the drag perturbation equation of the semi-major axis and the temporal resolution of retrieved density could be 150 s for CHAMP satellite.Another method generates corrections to densities computed from a baseline density model through a Kalman filter orbit drag coefficient determination (KFOD) process and the temporal resolution of derived density could be as high as 30 s for CHAMP satellite.The densities estimated from these two methods are compared with densities obtained from accelerometer data of CHAMP satellite.When the accelerometer data based densities are used as reference values,the mean relative accuracy of the densities derived from precision orbit data using the two methods is within approximately 10%.An application of the derived densities shows that the derived densities can reduce orbit predication errors.

  15. Hadron structure beyond collinear level and precision DIS measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hautmann F

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available General formulations of QCD factorization for hadronic collisions extend the notion of ordinary parton distributions to transverse-momentum dependent (TMD parton density and parton decay functions. We discuss the use of the recent high-precision deep-inelastic scattering (DIS measurements for determination of TMD distributions. These are relevant for both low-pT and high-pT physics in hadron collisions. We comment on applications to multi-jet final states associated with electroweak gauge boson production at the LHC.

  16. High Efficiency Positron Accumulation for High-Precision Measurements

    CERN Document Server

    Hoogerheide, S Fogwell; Novitski, E; Gabrielse, G

    2015-01-01

    Positrons are accumulated within a Penning trap designed to make more precise measurements of the positron and electron magnetic moments. The retractable radioactive source used is weak enough to require no license for handling radioactive material and the radiation dosage one meter from the source gives an exposure several times smaller than the average radiation dose on the earth's surface. The 100 mK trap is mechanically aligned with the 4.2 K superconducting solenoid that produces a 6 tesla magnetic trapping field with a direct mechanical coupling.

  17. Precision Measurement of the Electron/Muon Gyromagnetic Factors

    CERN Document Server

    Awobode, A M

    2010-01-01

    Clear, persuasive arguments are brought forward to motivate the need for highly precise measurements of the electron/muon orbital g, i.e. gL. First, we briefly review results obtained using an extended Dirac equation, which conclusively showed that, as a consequence of quantum relativistic corrections arising from the time-dependence of the rest-energy, the electron gyromagnetic factors are corrected. It is next demonstrated, using the data of Kusch & Foley on the measurement of deltaS minus 2 deltaL together with the modern precise measurements of the electron deltaS where deltaS identically equal to gS minus 2, that deltaL may be a small, non-zero quantity, where we have assumed Russel-Saunders LS coupling and proposed, along with Kusch and Foley, that gS = 2 plus deltaS and gS = 1 plus deltaL. Therefore, there is probable evidence from experimental data that gS is not exactly equal to 1; the expectation that quantum effects will significantly modify the classical value of the orbital g is therefore rea...

  18. High precision measurement of electrical resistance across endothelial cell monolayers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tschugguel, W; Zhegu, Z; Gajdzik, L; Maier, M; Binder, B R; Graf, J

    1995-05-01

    Effects of vasoactive agonists on endothelial permeability was assessed by measurement of transendothelial electrical resistance (TEER) of human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) grown on porous polycarbonate supports. Because of the low values of TEER obtained in this preparation (< 5 omega cm2) a design of an Ussing type recording chamber was chosen that provided for a homogeneous electric field across the monolayer and for proper correction of series resistances. Precision current pulses and appropriate rates of sampling and averaging of the voltage signal allowed for measurement of < 0.1 omega resistance changes of the endothelium on top of a 21 omega series resistance of the support and bathing fluid layers. Histamine (10 microM) and thrombin (10 U/ml) induced an abrupt and substantial decrease of TEER, bradykinin (1 microM) was less effective, PAF (380 nM) and LTC4 (1 microM) had no effect. TEER was also reduced by the calcium ionophore A-23187 (10 microM). The technique allows for measurements of TEER in low resistance monolayer cultures with high precision and time resolution. The results obtained extend previous observations in providing quantitative data on the increase of permeability of HUVECs in response to vasoactive agonists.

  19. A Precision Measurement of the Mass of the Top Quark

    CERN Document Server

    Abazov, V M; Abdesselam, A; Abolins, M; Abramov, V; Acharya, B S; Adams, D L; Adams, M; Ahmed, S N; Alexeev, G D; Alton, A; Alves, G A; Arnoud, Y; Avila, C; Babintsev, V V; Babukhadia, L; Bacon, Trevor C; Baden, A; Baffioni, S; Baldin, B Yu; Balm, P W; Banerjee, S; Barberis, E; Baringer, P; Barreto, J; Bartlett, J F; Bassler, U; Bauer, D; Bean, A; Beaudette, F; Begel, M; Belyaev, A; Beri, S B; Bernardi, G; Bertram, I; Besson, A; Beuselinck, R; Bezzubov, V A; Bhat, P C; Bhatnagar, V; Bhattacharjee, M; Blazey, G; Blekman, F; Blessing, S; Böhnlein, A; Bozhko, N; Bolton, T A; Borcherding, F; Bos, K; Bose, T; Brandt, A; Briskin, G; Brock, R; Brooijmans, G; Bross, A; Buchholz, D; Bühler, M; Büscher, V; Burtovoi, V S; Butler, J M; Canelli, F; Carvalho, W; Casey, D; Castilla-Valdez, H; Chakraborty, D; Chan, K M; Chekulaev, S V; Cho, D K; Choi, S; Chopra, S; Claes, D; Clark, A R; Connolly, B; Cooper, W E; Coppage, D; Crepe-Renaudin, S; Cummings, M A C; Cutts, D; Da Motta, H; Davis, G A; De, K; De Jong, S J; Demarteau, M; Demina, R; Demine, P; Denisov, D; Denisov, S P; Desai, S; Diehl, H T; Diesburg, M; Doulas, S; Dudko, L V; Duflot, L; Dugad, S R; Duperrin, A; Dyshkant, A; Edmunds, D; Ellison, J; Eltzroth, J T; Elvira, V D; Engelmann, R; Eno, S; Eppley, G; Ermolov, P; Eroshin, O V; Estrada, J; Evans, H; Evdokimov, V N; Ferbel, T; Filthaut, F; Fisk, H E; Fortner, M; Fox, H; Fu, S; Fuess, S; Gallas, E; Galjaev, A N; Gao, M; Gavrilov, V; Genik, R J; Genser, K; Gerber, C E; Gershtein, Yu; Ginther, G; Gómez, B; Goncharov, P I; Gounder, K; Goussiou, A; Grannis, P D; Greenlee, H; Greenwood, Z D; Grinstein, S; Groer, L; Grünendahl, S; Grünewald, M W; Gurzhev, S N; Gutíerrez, G; Gutíerrez, P; Hadley, N J; Haggerty, H; Hagopian, S; Hagopian, V; Hall, R E; Han, C; Hansen, S; Hauptman, J M; Hebert, C; Hedin, D; Heinmiller, J M; Heinson, A P; Heintz, U; Hildreth, M D; Hirosky, R; Hobbs, J D; Hoeneisen, B; Huang, J; Huang, Y; Iashvili, I; Illingworth, R; Ito, A S; Jaffré, M; Jain, S; Jesik, R; Johns, K; Johnson, M; Jonckheere, A; Jöstlein, H; Juste, A; Kahl, W; Kahn, S; Kajfasz, E; Kalinin, A M; Karmanov, D; Karmgard, D; Kehoe, R; Kesisoglou, S; Khanov, A; Kharchilava, A I; Klima, B; Kohli, J M; Kostritskii, A V; Kotcher, J; Kothari, B; Kozelov, A V; Kozlovskii, E A; Krane, J; Krishnaswamy, M R; Krivkova, P; Krzywdzinski, S; Kubantsev, M A; Kuleshov, S; Kulik, Y; Kunori, S; Kupco, A; Kuznetsov, V E; Landsberg, G L; Lee, W M; Leflat, A; Lehner, F; Leonidopoulos, C; Li, J; Li, Q Z; Lima, J G R; Lincoln, D; Linn, S L; Linnemann, J; Lipton, R; Lucotte, A; Lueking, L; Lundstedt, C; Luo, C; Maciel, A K A; Madaras, R J; Malyshev, V L; Manankov, V; Mao, H S; Marshall, T; Martin, M I; Mattingly, S E K; Mayorov, A A; McCarthy, R; McMahon, T; Melanson, H L; Melnitchouk, A S; Merkin, M; Merritt, K W; Miao, C; Miettinen, H; Mihalcea, D; Mokhov, N V; Mondal, N K; Montgomery, H E; Moore, R W; Mutaf, Y D; Nagy, E; Narain, M; Narasimham, V S; Naumann, N A; Neal, H A; Negret, J P; Nelson, S; Nomerotski, A; Nunnemann, T; O'Neil, D; Oguri, V; Oshima, N; Padley, P; Papageorgiou, K; Parashar, N; Partridge, R; Parua, N; Patwa, A; Peters, O; Petroff, P; Piegaia, R; Pope, B G; Prosper, H B; Protopopescu, S D; Przybycien, M B; Qian, J; Rajagopalan, S; Rapidis, P A; Reay, N W; Reucroft, S; Ridel, M; Rijssenbeek, M; Rizatdinova, F K; Rockwell, T; Royon, C; Rubinov, P; Ruchti, R; Sabirov, B M; Sajot, G; Santoro, A F S; Sawyer, L; Schamberger, R D; Schellman, H; Schwartzman, A; Shabalina, E; Shivpuri, R K; Shpakov, D; Shupe, M; Sidwell, R A; Simák, V; Sirotenko, V I; Slattery, P F; Smith, R P; Snow, G R; Snow, J; Snyder, S; Solomon, J; Song, Y; Sorin, V; Sosebee, M; Sotnikova, N; Soustruznik, K; Souza, M; Stanton, N R; Steinbruck, G; Stoker, D; Stolin, V; Stone, A; Stoyanova, D A; Strang, M A; Strauss, M; Strovink, M; Stutte, L; Sznajder, A; Talby, M; Taylor, W; Tentindo-Repond, S; Trippe, T G; Turcot, A S; Tuts, P M; Van Kooten, R; Vaniev, V; Varelas, N; Villeneuve-Séguier, F; Volkov, A A; Vorobev, A P; Wahl, H D; Wang, Z M; Warchol, J; Watts, G; Wayne, M; Weerts, H; White, A; Whiteson, D; Wijngaarden, D A; Willis, S; Wimpenny, S J; Womersley, J; Wood, D R; Xu, Q; Yamada, R; Yasuda, T; Yatsunenko, Y A; Yip, K; Yu, J; Zanabria, M; Zhang, X; Zhou, B; Zhou, Z; Zielinski, M; Zieminska, D; Zieminski, A; Zutshi, V; Zverev, E G; Zylberstejn, A

    2004-01-01

    The Standard Model of particle physics contains about two dozen parameters - such as particle masses - whose origins are still unknown and cannot be predicted, but whose values are constrained through their interactions. In particular, the masses of the top (t) quark (M_t) and W boson constrain the mass of the long-hypothesized, but thus far not observed, Higgs boson. A precise measurement of the top-quark mass can therefore point to where to look for the Higgs, and indeed whether the hypothesis of a SM Higgs is consistent with experimental data. Since top quarks are produced in pairs and decay in only ~10^-24 s into various final states, reconstructing their mass from their decay products is very challenging. Here we report a technique that extracts far more information from each top-quark event and yields a greatly improved precision on the top mass of 5.3 GeV/c^2, compared to previous measurements. When our new result is combined with our published measurement in a complementary decay mode and with the onl...

  20. Precision Measurement of the Weak Mixing Angle in Moller Scattering

    CERN Document Server

    Anthony, P L; Arroyo, C; Bega, K; Biesiada, J; Bosted, P E; Bower, G; Cahoon, J; Carr, R; Cates, G D; Chen, J P; Chudakov, E; Cooke, M; Decowski, P; Deur, A; Emam, W; Erickson, R; Fieguth, T; Field, C; Gao, J; Gary, M; Gustafsson, K; Hicks, R S; Holmes, R; Hughes, E W; Humensky, T B; Jones, G M; Kaufman, L J; Keller, L; Kolomensky, Yu G; Kumar, K S; La Violette, P; Lhuillier, D; Lombard-Nelsen, R M; Marshall, Z; Mastromarino, P; McKeown, R D; Michaels, R; Niedziela, J; Olson, M; Paschke, K D; Peterson, G A; Pitthan, R; Relyea, D; Rock, S E; Saxton, O; Singh, J; Souder, P A; Szalata, Z M; Turner, J; Tweedie, B; Vacheret, A; Walz, D; Weber, T; Weisend, J; Woods, M; Younus, I

    2005-01-01

    We report on a precision measurement of the parity-violating asymmetry in fixed target electron-electron (Moller) scattering: A_PV = -131 +/- 14 (stat.) +/- 10 (syst.) parts per billion, leading to the determination of the weak mixing angle \\sin^2\\theta_W^eff = 0.2397 +/- 0.0010 (stat.) +/- 0.0008 (syst.), evaluated at Q^2 = 0.026 GeV^2. Combining this result with the measurements of \\sin^2\\theta_W^eff at the Z^0 pole, the running of the weak mixing angle is observed with over 6 sigma significance. The measurement sets constraints on new physics effects at the TeV scale.

  1. Precision measurements in ion traps using slowly moving standing waves

    CERN Document Server

    Walther, A; Singer, K; Schmidt-Kaler, F

    2011-01-01

    The present paper describes the experimental implementation of a measuring technique employing a slowly moving, near resonant, optical standing wave in the context of trapped ions. It is used to measure several figures of merit that are important for quantum computation in ion traps and which are otherwise not easily obtainable. Our technique is shown to offer high precision, and also in many cases using a much simpler setup than what is normally used. We demonstrate here measurements of i) the distance between two crystalline ions, ii) the Lamb-Dicke parameter, iii) temperature of the ion crystal, and iv) the interferometric stability of a Raman setup. The exact distance between two ions, in units of standing wave periods, is very important for motional entangling gates, and our method offers a practical way of calibrating this distance in the typical lab situation.

  2. Constraints on proton structure from precision atomic physics measurements

    CERN Document Server

    Brodsky, S J; Hiller, J R; Hwang, D S

    2004-01-01

    The ground-state hyperfine splittings in hydrogen and muonium are extremely well measured. The difference between them, after correcting for the different magnetic moments of the muon and proton and for reduced mass effects, is due solely to the structure of the proton - the large QED contributions for a pointlike nucleus essentially cancel. A major contribution to the rescaled hyperfine difference is proportional to the Zemach radius, a fundamental measure of the proton which can be computed as an integral over the product of the elastic electric and magnetic form factors of the proton. The remaining proton structure corrections, the polarization contribution from inelastic states in the spin-dependent virtual Compton amplitude and the proton size dependence of the relativistic recoil corrections, have small uncertainties. The resulting high precision determination of the Zemach radius (1.013 +/- 0.016) fm from atomic physics provides an important constraint on fits to accelerator measurements of the proton ...

  3. Precise measurement of the {Sigma}{sup 0} mass

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, M.H.; Hartouni, E.P.; Kreisler, M.N.; Uribe, J. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Massachusetts, Amherst, Massachusetts 01003 (United States); Church, M.D.; Gottschalk, E.E.; Knapp, B.C.; Stern, B.J.; Wiencke, L.R. [Columbia University, Nevis Laboratories, Irvington, New York 10533 (United States); Christian, D.C.; Gutierrez, G.; Wehmann, A. [Fermilab, Batavia, Illinois 60510 (United States); Avilez, C.; Felix, J.; Moreno, G. [Instituto de Fisica, Universidad de Guanajuato, 37150 Leon, Guanajuato (Mexico); Forbush, M.; Huson, F.R.; White, J.T. [Department of Physics, Texas AM University, College Station, Texas 77843 (United States)

    1997-09-01

    We have obtained precise measurements of the {Sigma}{sup 0} mass and the {Sigma}{sup 0}-{Lambda}{sup 0} mass difference from a fit to the {Lambda}{sup 0}{gamma} invariant mass distribution of 3327 {Sigma}{sup 0}{r_arrow}{Lambda}{sup 0}+{gamma} decays. Our measurements yield M{sub {Sigma}{sup 0}}=1192.65{plus_minus}0.020{plus_minus}0.014 MeV/c{sup 2} and M{sub {Sigma}{sup 0}}{minus}M{sub {Lambda}{sup 0}}=76.966{plus_minus}0.020{plus_minus}0.013 MeV/c{sup 2}, where the uncertainties are statistical and systematic in that order. This represents a significant improvement over all previous determinations and is the first direct measurement of the {Sigma}{sup 0} mass itself. {copyright} {ital 1997} {ital The American Physical Society}

  4. Hollow ballistic pendulum for plasma momentum measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goncharov, S. F.; Pashinin, P. P.; Perov, V. Y.; Serov, R. V.; Yanovsky, V. P.

    1988-05-01

    A novel pendulum design—hollow ballistic pendulum—is suggested for plasma momentum measurements. It has an advantage over the pendula used earlier in laser plasma experiments of being insensitive to a momentum of matter evaporated and scattered by the pendulum wall exposed to the plasma, which usually exceeds plasma momentum to be measured. Simple expressions describing pendulum performance are derived, and requirements of shape and size are established. Using this kind of pendulum in experiments on laser acceleration of thin foils made it possible to measure the momentum of accelerated foil with an accuracy of about 10%.

  5. Precision top-quark mass measurement at CDF.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aaltonen, T; Alvarez González, B; Amerio, S; Amidei, D; Anastassov, A; Annovi, A; Antos, J; Apollinari, G; Appel, J A; Arisawa, T; Artikov, A; Asaadi, J; Ashmanskas, W; Auerbach, B; Aurisano, A; Azfar, F; Badgett, W; Bae, T; Barbaro-Galtieri, A; Barnes, V E; Barnett, B A; Barria, P; Bartos, P; Bauce, M; Bedeschi, F; Behari, S; Bellettini, G; Bellinger, J; Benjamin, D; Beretvas, A; Bhatti, A; Bisello, D; Bizjak, I; Bland, K R; Blumenfeld, B; Bocci, A; Bodek, A; Bortoletto, D; Boudreau, J; Boveia, A; Brigliadori, L; Bromberg, C; Brucken, E; Budagov, J; Budd, H S; Burkett, K; Busetto, G; Bussey, P; Buzatu, A; Calamba, A; Calancha, C; Camarda, S; Campanelli, M; Campbell, M; Canelli, F; Carls, B; Carlsmith, D; Carosi, R; Carrillo, S; Carron, S; Casal, B; Casarsa, M; Castro, A; Catastini, P; Cauz, D; Cavaliere, V; Cavalli-Sforza, M; Cerri, A; Cerrito, L; Chen, Y C; Chertok, M; Chiarelli, G; Chlachidze, G; Chlebana, F; Cho, K; Chokheli, D; Chung, W H; Chung, Y S; Ciocci, M A; Clark, A; Clarke, C; Compostella, G; Convery, M E; Conway, J; Corbo, M; Cordelli, M; Cox, C A; Cox, D J; Crescioli, F; Cuevas, J; Culbertson, R; Dagenhart, D; d'Ascenzo, N; Datta, M; de Barbaro, P; Dell'Orso, M; Demortier, L; Deninno, M; Devoto, F; d'Errico, M; Di Canto, A; Di Ruzza, B; Dittmann, J R; D'Onofrio, M; Donati, S; Dong, P; Dorigo, M; Dorigo, T; Ebina, K; Elagin, A; Eppig, A; Erbacher, R; Errede, S; Ershaidat, N; Eusebi, R; Farrington, S; Feindt, M; Fernandez, J P; Field, R; Flanagan, G; Forrest, R; Frank, M J; Franklin, M; Freeman, J C; Funakoshi, Y; Furic, I; Gallinaro, M; Garcia, J E; Garfinkel, A F; Garosi, P; Gerberich, H; Gerchtein, E; Giagu, S; Giakoumopoulou, V; Giannetti, P; Gibson, K; Ginsburg, C M; Giokaris, N; Giromini, P; Giurgiu, G; Glagolev, V; Glenzinski, D; Gold, M; Goldin, D; Goldschmidt, N; Golossanov, A; Gomez, G; Gomez-Ceballos, G; Goncharov, M; González, O; Gorelov, I; Goshaw, A T; Goulianos, K; Grinstein, S; Grosso-Pilcher, C; Group, R C; Guimaraes da Costa, J; Hahn, S R; Halkiadakis, E; Hamaguchi, A; Han, J Y; Happacher, F; Hara, K; Hare, D; Hare, M; Harr, R F; Hatakeyama, K; Hays, C; Heck, M; Heinrich, J; Herndon, M; Hewamanage, S; Hocker, A; Hopkins, W; Horn, D; Hou, S; Hughes, R E; Hurwitz, M; Husemann, U; Hussain, N; Hussein, M; Huston, J; Introzzi, G; Iori, M; Ivanov, A; James, E; Jang, D; Jayatilaka, B; Jeon, E J; Jindariani, S; Jones, M; Joo, K K; Jun, S Y; Junk, T R; Kamon, T; Karchin, P E; Kasmi, A; Kato, Y; Ketchum, W; Keung, J; Khotilovich, V; Kilminster, B; Kim, D H; Kim, H S; Kim, J E; Kim, M J; Kim, S B; Kim, S H; Kim, Y K; Kim, Y J; Kimura, N; Kirby, M; Klimenko, S; Knoepfel, K; Kondo, K; Kong, D J; Konigsberg, J; Kotwal, A V; Kreps, M; Kroll, J; Krop, D; Kruse, M; Krutelyov, V; Kuhr, T; Kurata, M; Kwang, S; Laasanen, A T; Lami, S; Lammel, S; Lancaster, M; Lander, R L; Lannon, K; Lath, A; Latino, G; LeCompte, T; Lee, E; Lee, H S; Lee, J S; Lee, S W; Leo, S; Leone, S; Lewis, J D; Limosani, A; Lin, C-J; Lindgren, M; Lipeles, E; Lister, A; Litvintsev, D O; Liu, C; Liu, H; Liu, Q; Liu, T; Lockwitz, S; Loginov, A; Lucchesi, D; Lueck, J; Lujan, P; Lukens, P; Lungu, G; Lys, J; Lysak, R; Madrak, R; Maeshima, K; Maestro, P; Malik, S; Manca, G; Manousakis-Katsikakis, A; Margaroli, F; Marino, C; Martínez, M; Mastrandrea, P; Matera, K; Mattson, M E; Mazzacane, A; Mazzanti, P; McFarland, K S; McIntyre, P; McNulty, R; Mehta, A; Mehtala, P; Mesropian, C; Miao, T; Mietlicki, D; Mitra, A; Miyake, H; Moed, S; Moggi, N; Mondragon, M N; Moon, C S; Moore, R; Morello, M J; Morlock, J; Movilla Fernandez, P; Mukherjee, A; Muller, Th; Murat, P; Mussini, M; Nachtman, J; Nagai, Y; Naganoma, J; Nakano, I; Napier, A; Nett, J; Neu, C; Neubauer, M S; Nielsen, J; Nodulman, L; Noh, S Y; Norniella, O; Oakes, L; Oh, S H; Oh, Y D; Oksuzian, I; Okusawa, T; Orava, R; Ortolan, L; Pagan Griso, S; Pagliarone, C; Palencia, E; Papadimitriou, V; Paramonov, A A; Patrick, J; Pauletta, G; Paulini, M; Paus, C; Pellett, D E; Penzo, A; Phillips, T J; Piacentino, G; Pianori, E; Pilot, J; Pitts, K; Plager, C; Pondrom, L; Poprocki, S; Potamianos, K; Prokoshin, F; Pranko, A; Ptohos, F; Punzi, G; Rahaman, A; Ramakrishnan, V; Ranjan, N; Redondo, I; Renton, P; Rescigno, M; Riddick, T; Rimondi, F; Ristori, L; Robson, A; Rodrigo, T; Rodriguez, T; Rogers, E; Rolli, S; Roser, R; Ruffini, F; Ruiz, A; Russ, J; Rusu, V; Safonov, A; Sakumoto, W K; Sakurai, Y; Santi, L; Sato, K; Saveliev, V; Savoy-Navarro, A; Schlabach, P; Schmidt, A; Schmidt, E E; Schwarz, T; Scodellaro, L; Scribano, A; Scuri, F; Seidel, S; Seiya, Y; Semenov, A; Sforza, F; Shalhout, S Z; Shears, T; Shepard, P F; Shimojima, M; Shochet, M; Shreyber-Tecker, I; Simonenko, A; Sinervo, P; Sliwa, K; Smith, J R; Snider, F D; Soha, A; Sorin, V; Song, H; Squillacioti, P; Stancari, M; St Denis, R; Stelzer, B; Stelzer-Chilton, O; Stentz, D; Strologas, J; Strycker, G L; Sudo, Y; Sukhanov, A; Suslov, I; Takemasa, K; Takeuchi, Y; Tang, J; Tecchio, M; Teng, P K; Thom, J; Thome, J; Thompson, G A; Thomson, E; Toback, D; Tokar, S; Tollefson, K; Tomura, T; Tonelli, D; Torre, S; Torretta, D; Totaro, P; Trovato, M; Ukegawa, F; Uozumi, S; Varganov, A; Vázquez, F; Velev, G; Vellidis, C; Vidal, M; Vila, I; Vilar, R; Vizán, J; Vogel, M; Volpi, G; Wagner, P; Wagner, R L; Wakisaka, T; Wallny, R; Wang, S M; Warburton, A; Waters, D; Wester, W C; Whiteson, D; Wicklund, A B; Wicklund, E; Wilbur, S; Wick, F; Williams, H H; Wilson, J S; Wilson, P; Winer, B L; Wittich, P; Wolbers, S; Wolfe, H; Wright, T; Wu, X; Wu, Z; Yamamoto, K; Yamato, D; Yang, T; Yang, U K; Yang, Y C; Yao, W-M; Yeh, G P; Yi, K; Yoh, J; Yorita, K; Yoshida, T; Yu, G B; Yu, I; Yu, S S; Yun, J C; Zanetti, A; Zeng, Y; Zhou, C; Zucchelli, S

    2012-10-12

    We present a precision measurement of the top-quark mass using the full sample of Tevatron √s = 1.96 TeV proton-antiproton collisions collected by the CDF II detector, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 8.7 fb(-1). Using a sample of tt¯ candidate events decaying into the lepton+jets channel, we obtain distributions of the top-quark masses and the invariant mass of two jets from the W boson decays from data. We then compare these distributions to templates derived from signal and background samples to extract the top-quark mass and the energy scale of the calorimeter jets with in situ calibration. The likelihood fit of the templates from signal and background events to the data yields the single most-precise measurement of the top-quark mass, M(top)=172.85±0.71(stat)±0.85(syst) GeV/c(2).

  6. External meeting - Geneva University: Precision measurements in spin physics

    CERN Multimedia

    2007-01-01

    GENEVA UNIVERSITY ECOLE DE PHYSIQUE Département de physique nucléaire et corspusculaire 24, Quai Ernest-Ansermet 1211 GENEVE 4 - Tél: 022 379 62 73 - Fax: 022 379 69 92 Wednesday 28 March 2007 PARTICLE PHYSICS SEMINAR at 17:00 - Stückelberg Auditorium Precision measurements in spin physics by Dr. Steven Bass / CERN - Innsbruck The proton spin problem has been challenging experimentalists and theorists alike for the last 20 years. Polarized deep inelastic scattering experiments at CERN, DESY and SLAC have told us that quark partons contribute only about 30% of the proton's spin whereas relativistic quark models predict 60%. Where is the missing spin and why is the quark spin contribution so small? In this talk I will give an overview of the proton spin problem and what it may be telling us about QCD, the vacuum and dynamical symmetry breaking. A precise measurement of neutrino-proton elastic scattering would make a vital contribution to resolving many of the outstanding issues. Information: http://dpnc...

  7. Accurate and precise zinc isotope ratio measurements in urban aerosols.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gioia, Simone; Weiss, Dominik; Coles, Barry; Arnold, Tim; Babinski, Marly

    2008-12-15

    We developed an analytical method and constrained procedural boundary conditions that enable accurate and precise Zn isotope ratio measurements in urban aerosols. We also demonstrate the potential of this new isotope system for air pollutant source tracing. The procedural blank is around 5 ng and significantly lower than published methods due to a tailored ion chromatographic separation. Accurate mass bias correction using external correction with Cu is limited to Zn sample content of approximately 50 ng due to the combined effect of blank contribution of Cu and Zn from the ion exchange procedure and the need to maintain a Cu/Zn ratio of approximately 1. Mass bias is corrected for by applying the common analyte internal standardization method approach. Comparison with other mass bias correction methods demonstrates the accuracy of the method. The average precision of delta(66)Zn determinations in aerosols is around 0.05 per thousand per atomic mass unit. The method was tested on aerosols collected in Sao Paulo City, Brazil. The measurements reveal significant variations in delta(66)Zn(Imperial) ranging between -0.96 and -0.37 per thousand in coarse and between -1.04 and 0.02 per thousand in fine particular matter. This variability suggests that Zn isotopic compositions distinguish atmospheric sources. The isotopic light signature suggests traffic as the main source. We present further delta(66)Zn(Imperial) data for the standard reference material NIST SRM 2783 (delta(66)Zn(Imperial) = 0.26 +/- 0.10 per thousand).

  8. Precision Top-Quark Mass Measurements at CDF

    CERN Document Server

    Aaltonen, T.; Amerio, S.; Amidei, D.; Anastassov, A.; Annovi, A.; Antos, J.; Apollinari, G.; Appel, J.A.; Arisawa, T.; Artikov, A.; Asaadi, J.; Ashmanskas, W.; Auerbach, B.; Aurisano, A.; Azfar, F.; Badgett, W.; Bae, T.; Barbaro-Galtieri, A.; Barnes, V.E.; Barnett, B.A.; Barria, P.; Bartos, P.; Bauce, M.; Bedeschi, F.; Behari, S.; Bellettini, G.; Bellinger, J.; Benjamin, D.; Beretvas, A.; Bhatti, A.; Bisello, D.; Bizjak, I.; Bland, K.R.; Blumenfeld, B.; Bocci, A.; Bodek, A.; Bortoletto, D.; Boudreau, J.; Boveia, A.; Brigliadori, L.; Bromberg, C.; Brucken, E.; Budagov, J.; Budd, H.S.; Burkett, K.; Busetto, G.; Bussey, P.; Buzatu, A.; Calamba, A.; Calancha, C.; Camarda, S.; Campanelli, M.; Campbell, M.; Canelli, F.; Carls, B.; Carlsmith, D.; Carosi, R.; Carrillo, S.; Carron, S.; Casal, B.; Casarsa, M.; Castro, A.; Catastini, P.; Cauz, D.; Cavaliere, V.; Cavalli-Sforza, M.; Cerri, A.; Cerrito, L.; Chen, Y.C.; Chertok, M.; Chiarelli, G.; Chlachidze, G.; Chlebana, F.; Cho, K.; Chokheli, D.; Chung, W.H.; Chung, Y.S.; Ciocci, M.A.; Clark, A.; Clarke, C.; Compostella, G.; Convery, M.E.; Conway, J.; Corbo, M.; Cordelli, M.; Cox, C.A.; Cox, D.J.; Crescioli, F.; Cuevas, J.; Culbertson, R.; Dagenhart, D.; d'Ascenzo, N.; Datta, M.; de Barbaro, P.; Dell'Orso, M.; Demortier, L.; Deninno, M.; Devoto, F.; d'Errico, M.; Di Canto, A.; Di Ruzza, B.; Dittmann, J.R.; D'Onofrio, M.; Donati, S.; Dong, P.; Dorigo, M.; Dorigo, T.; Ebina, K.; Elagin, A.; Eppig, A.; Erbacher, R.; Errede, S.; Ershaidat, N.; Eusebi, R.; Farrington, S.; Feindt, M.; Fernandez, J.P.; Field, R.; Flanagan, G.; Forrest, R.; Frank, M.J.; Franklin, M.; Freeman, J.C.; Funakoshi, Y.; Furic, I.; Gallinaro, M.; Garcia, J.E.; Garfinkel, A.F.; Garosi, P.; Gerberich, H.; Gerchtein, E.; Giagu, S.; Giakoumopoulou, V.; Giannetti, P.; Gibson, K.; Ginsburg, C.M.; Giokaris, N.; Giromini, P.; Giurgiu, G.; Glagolev, V.; Glenzinski, D.; Gold, M.; Goldin, D.; Goldschmidt, N.; Golossanov, A.; Gomez, G.; Gomez-Ceballos, G.; Goncharov, M.; Gonzalez, O.; Gorelov, I.; Goshaw, A.T.; Goulianos, K.; Grinstein, S.; Grosso-Pilcher, C.; Group, R.C.; Guimaraes da Costa, J.; Hahn, S.R.; Halkiadakis, E.; Hamaguchi, A.; Han, J.Y.; Happacher, F.; Hara, K.; Hare, D.; Hare, M.; Harr, R.F.; Hatakeyama, K.; Hays, C.; Heck, M.; Heinrich, J.; Herndon, M.; Hewamanage, S.; Hocker, A.; Hopkins, W.; Horn, D.; Hou, S.; Hughes, R.E.; Hurwitz, M.; Husemann, U.; Hussain, N.; Hussein, M.; Huston, J.; Introzzi, G.; Iori, M.; Ivanov, A.; James, E.; Jang, D.; Jayatilaka, B.; Jeon, E.J.; Jindariani, S.; Jones, M.; Joo, K.K.; Jun, S.Y.; Junk, T.R.; Kamon, T.; Karchin, P.E.; Kasmi, A.; Kato, Y.; Ketchum, W.; Keung, J.; Khotilovich, V.; Kilminster, B.; Kim, D.H.; Kim, H.S.; Kim, J.E.; Kim, M.J.; Kim, S.B.; Kim, S.H.; Kim, Y.K.; Kim, Y.J.; Kimura, N.; Kirby, M.; Klimenko, S.; Knoepfel, K.; Kondo, K.; Kong, D.J.; Konigsberg, J.; Kotwal, A.V.; Kreps, M.; Kroll, J.; Krop, D.; Kruse, M.; Krutelyov, V.; Kuhr, T.; Kurata, M.; Kwang, S.; Laasanen, A.T.; Lami, S.; Lammel, S.; Lancaster, M.; Lander, R.L.; Lannon, K.; Lath, A.; Latino, G.; LeCompte, T.; Lee, E.; Lee, H.S.; Lee, J.S.; Lee, S.W.; Leo, S.; Leone, S.; Lewis, J.D.; Limosani, A.; Lin, C.J.; Lindgren, M.; Lipeles, E.; Lister, A.; Litvintsev, D.O.; Liu, C.; Liu, H.; Liu, Q.; Liu, T.; Lockwitz, S.; Loginov, A.; Lucchesi, D.; Lueck, J.; Lujan, P.; Lukens, P.; Lungu, G.; Lys, J.; Lysak, R.; Madrak, R.; Maeshima, K.; Maestro, P.; Malik, S.; Manca, G.; Manousakis-Katsikakis, A.; Margaroli, F.; Marino, C.; Martinez, M.; Mastrandrea, P.; Matera, K.; Mattson, M.E.; Mazzacane, A.; Mazzanti, P.; McFarland, K.S.; McIntyre, P.; McNulty, R.; Mehta, A.; Mehtala, P.; Mesropian, C.; Miao, T.; Mietlicki, D.; Mitra, A.; Miyake, H.; Moed, S.; Moggi, N.; Mondragon, M.N.; Moon, C.S.; Moore, R.; Morello, M.J.; Morlock, J.; Movilla Fernandez, P.; Mukherjee, A.; Muller, Th.; Murat, P.; Mussini, M.; Nachtman, J.; Nagai, Y.; Naganoma, J.; Nakano, I.; Napier, A.; Nett, J.; Neu, C.; Neubauer, M.S.; Nielsen, J.; Nodulman, L.; Noh, S.Y.; Norniella, O.; Oakes, L.; Oh, S.H.; Oh, Y.D.; Oksuzian, I.; Okusawa, T.; Orava, R.; Ortolan, L.; Pagan Griso, S.; Pagliarone, C.; Palencia, E.; Papadimitriou, V.; Paramonov, A.A.; Patrick, J.; Pauletta, G.; Paulini, M.; Paus, C.; Pellett, D.E.; Penzo, A.; Phillips, T.J.; Piacentino, G.; Pianori, E.; Pilot, J.; Pitts, K.; Plager, C.; Pondrom, L.; Poprocki, S.; Potamianos, K.; Prokoshin, F.; Pranko, A.; Ptohos, F.; Punzi, G.; Rahaman, A.; Ramakrishnan, V.; Ranjan, N.; Redondo, I.; Renton, P.; Rescigno, M.; Riddick, T.; Rimondi, F.; Ristori, L.; Robson, A.; Rodrigo, T.; Rodriguez, T.; Rogers, E.; Rolli, S.; Roser, R.; Ruffini, F.; Ruiz, A.; Russ, J.; Rusu, V.; Safonov, A.; Sakumoto, W.K.; Sakurai, Y.; Santi, L.; Sato, K.; Saveliev, V.; Savoy-Navarro, A.; Schlabach, P.; Schmidt, A.; Schmidt, E.E.; Schwarz, T.; Scodellaro, L.; Scribano, A.; Scuri, F.; Seidel, S.; Seiya, Y.; Semenov, A.; Sforza, F.; Shalhout, S.Z.; Shears, T.; Shepard, P.F.; Shimojima, M.; Shochet, M.; Shreyber-Tecker, I.; Simonenko, A.; Sinervo, P.; Sliwa, K.; Smith, J.R.; Snider, F.D.; Soha, A.; Sorin, V.; Song, H.; Squillacioti, P.; Stancari, M.; St. Denis, R.; Stelzer, B.; Stelzer-Chilton, O.; Stentz, D.; Strologas, J.; Strycker, G.L.; Sudo, Y.; Sukhanov, A.; Suslov, I.; Takemasa, K.; Takeuchi, Y.; Tang, J.; Tecchio, M.; Teng, P.K.; Thom, J.; Thome, J.; Thompson, G.A.; Thomson, E.; Toback, D.; Tokar, S.; Tollefson, K.; Tomura, T.; Tonelli, D.; Torre, S.; Torretta, D.; Totaro, P.; Trovato, M.; Ukegawa, F.; Uozumi, S.; Varganov, A.; Vazquez, F.; Velev, G.; Vellidis, C.; Vidal, M.; Vila, I.; Vilar, R.; Vizan, J.; Vogel, M.; Volpi, G.; Wagner, P.; Wagner, R.L.; Wakisaka, T.; Wallny, R.; Wang, S.M.; Warburton, A.; Waters, D.; Wester, W.C., III; Whiteson, D.; Wicklund, A.B.; Wicklund, E.; Wilbur, S.; Wick, F.; Williams, H.H.; Wilson, J.S.; Wilson, P.; Winer, B.L.; Wittich, P.; Wolbers, S.; Wolfe, H.; Wright, T.; Wu, X.; Wu, Z.; Yamamoto, K.; Yamato, D.; Yang, T.; Yang, U.K.; Yang, Y.C.; Yao, W.M.; Yeh, G.P.; Yi, K.; Yoh, J.; Yorita, K.; Yoshida, T.; Yu, G.B.; Yu, I.; Yu, S.S.; Yun, J.C.; Zanetti, A.; Zeng, Y.; Zhou, C.; Zucchelli, S.

    2012-01-01

    We present a precision measurement of the top-quark mass using the full sample of Tevatron $\\sqrt{s}=1.96$ TeV proton-antiproton collisions collected by the CDF II detector, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 8.7 $fb^{-1}$. Using a sample of $t\\bar{t}$ candidate events decaying into the lepton+jets channel, we obtain distributions of the top-quark masses and the invariant mass of two jets from the $W$ boson decays from data. We then compare these distributions to templates derived from signal and background samples to extract the top-quark mass and the energy scale of the calorimeter jets with {\\it in situ} calibration. The likelihood fit of the templates from signal and background events to the data yields the single most-precise measurement of the top-quark mass, $\\mtop = 172.85 $\\pm$ 0.71 (stat) $\\pm$ 0.85 (syst) GeV/c^{2}.$

  9. Precision Top-Quark Mass Measurements at CDF

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aaltonen, T.; /Helsinki Inst. of Phys.; Alvarez Gonzalez, B.; /Oviedo U. /Cantabria Inst. of Phys.; Amerio, S.; /INFN, Padua; Amidei, D.; /Michigan U.; Anastassov, A.; /Northwestern U. /Fermilab; Annovi, A.; /Frascati; Antos, J.; /Comenius U.; Apollinari, G.; /Fermilab; Appel, J.A.; /Fermilab; Arisawa, T.; /Waseda U.; Artikov, A.; /Dubna, JINR /Texas A-M

    2012-07-01

    We present a precision measurement of the top-quark mass using the full sample of Tevatron {radical}s = 1.96 TeV proton-antiproton collisions collected by the CDF II detector, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 8.7 fb{sup -1}. Using a sample of t{bar t} candidate events decaying into the lepton+jets channel, we obtain distributions of the top-quark masses and the invariant mass of two jets from the W boson decays from data. We then compare these distributions to templates derived from signal and background samples to extract the top-quark mass and the energy scale of the calorimeter jets with in situ calibration. The likelihood fit of the templates from signal and background events to the data yields the single most-precise measurement of the top-quark mass, mtop = 172.85 {+-} 0.71 (stat) {+-} 0.85 (syst) GeV/c{sup 2}.

  10. Precision Measures of the Primordial Abundance of Deuterium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooke, Ryan J.; Pettini, Max; Jorgenson, Regina A.; Murphy, Michael T.; Steidel, Charles C.

    2014-01-01

    We report the discovery of deuterium absorption in the very metal-poor ([Fe/H] = -2.88) damped Lyα system at z abs = 3.06726 toward the QSO SDSS J1358+6522. On the basis of 13 resolved D I absorption lines and the damping wings of the H I Lyα transition, we have obtained a new, precise measure of the primordial abundance of deuterium. Furthermore, to bolster the present statistics of precision D/H measures, we have reanalyzed all of the known deuterium absorption-line systems that satisfy a set of strict criteria. We have adopted a blind analysis strategy (to remove human bias) and developed a software package that is specifically designed for precision D/H abundance measurements. For this reanalyzed sample of systems, we obtain a weighted mean of (D/H)p = (2.53 ± 0.04) × 10-5, corresponding to a universal baryon density 100 Ωb, 0 h 2 = 2.202 ± 0.046 for the standard model of big bang nucleosynthesis (BBN). By combining our measure of (D/H)p with observations of the cosmic microwave background (CMB), we derive the effective number of light fermion species, N eff = 3.28 ± 0.28. We therefore rule out the existence of an additional (sterile) neutrino (i.e., N eff = 4.046) at 99.3% confidence (2.7σ), provided that the values of N eff and of the baryon-to-photon ratio (η10) did not change between BBN and recombination. We also place a strong bound on the neutrino degeneracy parameter, independent of the 4He primordial mass fraction, Y P: ξD = +0.05 ± 0.13 based only on the CMB+(D/H)p observations. Combining this value of ξD with the current best literature measure of Y P, we find a 2σ upper bound on the neutrino degeneracy parameter, |ξ| financial support of the W. M. Keck Foundation. Keck telescope time was partially granted by NOAO, through the Telescope System Instrumentation Program (TSIP). TSIP is funded by NSF.

  11. Interferometer measurements in pulsed plasma experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lisitsyn, I.V.; Kohno, Susumu; Kawauchi, Toshinori; Sueda, Tsuyoshi; Katsuki, Sunao; Akiyama, Hidenori [Kumamoto Univ. (Japan). Faculty of Engineering

    1997-11-01

    The interferometer measurements are extremely informative in plasma experiments allowing direct evaluations of the electron density. The primary goal of the work presented, is to build a laser interferometer which meets the requirements of the highest possible simplicity, economy, convenience and ease of construction. These requirements are successfully satisfied while maintaining high sensitivity ({+-}0.5deg - of phase shift) and a wide density range (10{sup 14} and 10{sup 19} cm{sup -2} - line-integrated) of the interferometer. In our experiments we used a low average power (5 mW) He-Ne laser without complicated and costly stabilization or detection environments. The He-Ne laser interferometer with the Michelson arrangement was used to measure the line-integrated plasma densities in various plasma experiments. Time- and spatially-resolved density measurements were performed for a plasma opening switch, a laser produced plasma, an electrothermal launcher and railgun plasmas. (author)

  12. Acceleration of matrix element computations for precision measurements

    CERN Document Server

    Brandt, Oleg; Wang, Michael H L S; Ye, Zhenyu

    2014-01-01

    The matrix element technique provides a superior statistical sensitivity for precision measurements of important parameters at hadron colliders, such as the mass of the top quark or the cross section for the production of Higgs bosons. The main practical limitation of the technique is its high computational demand. Using the concrete example of the top quark mass, we present two approaches to reduce the computation time of the technique by two orders of magnitude. First, we utilize low-discrepancy sequences for numerical Monte Carlo integration in conjunction with a dedicated estimator of numerical uncertainty, a novelty in the context of the matrix element technique. Second, we utilize a new approach that factorizes the overall jet energy scale from the matrix element computation, a novelty in the context of top quark mass measurements. The utilization of low-discrepancy sequences is of particular general interest, as it is universally applicable to Monte Carlo integration, and independent of the computing e...

  13. Precision Measurement of the Mass of the $\\tau$ Lepton

    CERN Document Server

    Ablikim, M; Ai, X C; Albayrak, O; Albrecht, M; Ambrose, D J; An, F F; An, Q; Bai, J Z; Ferroli, R Baldini; Ban, Y; Bennett, J V; Bertani, M; Bian, J M; Boger, E; Bondarenko, O; Boyko, I; Braun, S; Briere, R A; Cai, H; Cai, X; Cakir, O; Calcaterra, A; Cao, G F; Cetin, S A; Chang, J F; Chelkov, G; Chen, G; Chen, H S; Chen, J C; Chen, M L; Chen, S J; Chen, X; Chen, X R; Chen, Y B; Cheng, H P; Chu, X K; Chu, Y P; Cronin-Hennessy, D; Dai, H L; Dai, J P; Dedovich, D; Deng, Z Y; Denig, A; Denysenko, I; Destefanis, M; Ding, W M; Ding, Y; Dong, C; Dong, J; Dong, L Y; Dong, M Y; Du, S X; Fan, J Z; Fang, J; Fang, S S; Fang, Y; Fava, L; Feng, C Q; Fu, C D; Fuks, O; Gao, Q; Gao, Y; Geng, C; Goetzen, K; Gong, W X; Gradl, W; Greco, M; Gu, M H; Gu, Y T; Guan, Y H; Guo, A Q; Guo, L B; Guo, T; Guo, Y P; Han, Y L; Harris, F A; He, K L; He, M; He, Z Y; Held, T; Heng, Y K; Hou, Z L; Hu, C; Hu, H M; Hu, J F; Hu, T; Huang, G M; Huang, G S; Huang, H P; Huang, J S; Huang, L; Huang, X T; Huang, Y; Hussain, T; Ji, C S; Ji, Q; Ji, Q P; Ji, X B; Ji, X L; Jiang, L L; Jiang, L W; Jiang, X S; Jiao, J B; Jiao, Z; Jin, D P; Jin, S; Johansson, T; Kalantar-Nayestanaki, N; Kang, X L; Kang, X S; Kavatsyuk, M; Kloss, B; Kopf, B; Kornicer, M; Kuehn, W; Kupsc, A; Lai, W; Lange, J S; Lara, M; Larin, P; Leyhe, M; Li, C H; Li, Cheng; Li, Cui; Li, D; Li, D M; Li, F; Li, G; Li, H B; Li, J C; Li, K; Li, Lei; Li, P R; Li, Q J; Li, T; Li, W D; Li, W G; Li, X L; Li, X N; Li, X Q; Li, Z B; Liang, H; Liang, Y F; Liang, Y T; Lin, D X; Liu, B J; Liu, C L; Liu, C X; Liu, F H; Liu, Fang; Liu, Feng; Liu, H B; Liu, H H; Liu, H M; Liu, J; Liu, J P; Liu, K; Liu, K Y; Liu, P L; Liu, Q; Liu, S B; Liu, X; Liu, Y B; Liu, Z A; Liu, Zhiqiang; Liu, Zhiqing; Loehner, H; Lou, X C; Lu, G R; Lu, H J; Lu, H L; Lu, J G; Lu, X R; Lu, Y; Lu, Y P; Luo, C L; Luo, M X; Luo, T; Luo, X L; Lv, M; Ma, F C; Ma, H L; Ma, Q M; Ma, S; Ma, T; Ma, X Y; Maas, F E; Maggiora, M; Malik, Q A; Mao, Y J; Mao, Z P; Messchendorp, J G; Min, J; Min, T J; Mitchell, R E; Mo, X H; Mo, Y J; Moeini, H; Morales, C Morales; Moriya, K; Muchnoi, N Yu; Muramatsu, H; Nefedov, Y; Nikolaev, I B; Ning, Z; Nisar, S; Niu, X Y; Olsen, S L; Ouyang, Q; Pacetti, S; Pelizaeus, M; Peng, H P; Peters, K; Ping, J L; Ping, R G; Poling, R; Q., N; Qi, M; Qian, S; Qiao, C F; Qin, L Q; Qin, X S; Qin, Y; Qin, Z H; Qiu, J F; Rashid, K H; Redmer, C F; Ripka, M; Rong, G; Ruan, X D; Sarantsev, A; Schoenning, K; Schumann, S; Shan, W; Shao, M; Shen, C P; Shen, X Y; Sheng, H Y; Shepherd, M R; Song, W M; Song, X Y; Spataro, S; Spruck, B; Sun, G X; Sun, J F; Sun, S S; Sun, Y J; Sun, Y Z; Sun, Z J; Sun, Z T; Tang, C J; Tang, X; Tapan, I; Thorndike, E H; Toth, D; Ullrich, M; Uman, I; Varner, G S; Wang, B; Wang, D; Wang, D Y; Wang, K; Wang, L L; Wang, L S; Wang, M; Wang, P; Wang, P L; Wang, Q J; Wang, S G; Wang, W; Wang, X F; Wang, Y D; Wang, Y F; Wang, Y Q; Wang, Z; Wang, Z G; Wang, Z H; Wang, Z Y; Wei, D H; Wei, J B; Weidenkaff, P; Wen, S P; Werner, M; Wiedner, U; Wolke, M; Wu, L H; Wu, N; Wu, Z; Xia, L G; Xia, Y; Xiao, D; Xiao, Z J; Xie, Y G; Xiu, Q L; Xu, G F; Xu, L; Xu, Q J; Xu, Q N; Xu, X P; Xue, Z; Yan, L; Yan, W B; Yan, W C; Yan, Y H; Yang, H X; Yang, L; Yang, Y; Yang, Y X; Ye, H; Ye, M; Ye, M H; Yu, B X; Yu, C X; Yu, H W; Yu, J S; Yu, S P; Yuan, C Z; Yuan, W L; Yuan, Y; Zafar, A A; Zallo, A; Zang, S L; Zeng, Y; Zhang, B X; Zhang, B Y; Zhang, C; Zhang, C B; Zhang, C C; Zhang, D H; Zhang, H H; Zhang, H Y; Zhang, J J; Zhang, J Q; Zhang, J W; Zhang, J Y; Zhang, J Z; Zhang, S H; Zhang, X J; Zhang, X Y; Zhang, Y; Zhang, Y H; Zhang, Z H; Zhang, Z P; Zhang, Z Y; Zhao, G; Zhao, J W; Zhao, Lei; Zhao, Ling; Zhao, M G; Zhao, Q; Zhao, Q W; Zhao, S J; Zhao, T C; Zhao, X H; Zhao, Y B; Zhao, Z G; Zhemchugov, A; Zheng, B; Zheng, J P; Zheng, Y H; Zhong, B; Zhou, L; Zhou, Li; Zhou, X; Zhou, X K; Zhou, X R; Zhou, X Y; Zhu, K; Zhu, K J; Zhu, X L; Zhu, Y C; Zhu, Y S; Zhu, Z A; Zhuang, J; Zou, B S; Zou, J H

    2014-01-01

    An energy scan near the $\\tau$ pair production threshold has been performed using the BESIII detector. About $24$ pb$^{-1}$ of data, distributed over four scan points, was collected. This analysis is based on $\\tau$ pair decays to $ee$, $e\\mu$, $eh$, $\\mu\\mu$, $\\mu h$, $hh$, $e\\rho$, $\\mu\\rho$ and $\\pi\\rho$ final states, where $h$ denotes a charged $\\pi$ or $K$. The mass of the $\\tau$ lepton is measured from a maximum likelihood fit to the $\\tau$ pair production cross section data to be $m_{\\tau} = (1776.91\\pm0.12 ^{+0.10}_{-0.13}$) MeV/$c^2$, which is currently the most precise value in a single measurement.

  14. Precise Measurement of the Positive Muon Anomalous Magnetic Moment

    CERN Document Server

    Brown, H N; Carey, R M; Cushman, P B; Danby, G T; Debevec, P T; Deile, M; Deng, H; Deninger, W J; Dhawan, S K; Druzhinin, V P; Duong, L; Efstathiadis, E F; Farley, Francis J M; Fedotovich, G V; Giron, S; Gray, F; Grigoriev, D; Grosse-Perdekamp, M; Grossmann, A; Hare, M; Hertzog, D W; Hughes, V W; Iwasaki, M; Jungmann, Klaus; Kawall, D; Kawamura, M; Khazin, B I; Kindem, J; Krienen, F; Kronkvist, I J; Larsen, R; Lee, Y Y; Logashenko, I B; McNabb, R; Meng, W; Mi, J; Miller, J P; Morse, W M; Nikas, D; Onderwater, Gerco; Orlov, Yu F; Ozben, C S; Paley, J M; Polly, C; Pretz, J; Prigl, R; zu Putlitz, Gisbert; Redin, S I; Rind, O; Roberts, B L; Ryskulov, N M; Sedykh, S N; Semertzidis, Y K; Shatunov, Yu M; Sichtermann, E P; Solodov, E P; Sossong, M; Steinmetz, A; Sulak, Lawrence R; Timmermans, C; Trofimov, A V; Urner, D; Von Walter, P; Warburton, D; Winn, D; Yamamoto, A; Zimmerman, D

    2001-01-01

    A precise measurement of the anomalous g value, a_mu=(g-2)/2, for the positive muon has been made at the Brookhaven Alternating Gradient Synchrotron. The result a_mu^+=11 659 202(14)(6) X 10^{-10} (1.3 ppm) is in good agreement with previous measurements and has an error one third that of the combined previous data. The current theoretical value from the standard model is a_mu(SM)=11 659 159.6(6.7) X 10^{-10} (0.57 ppm) and a_mu(exp)-a_mu(SM)=43(16) X 10^{-10} in which a_mu(exp) is the world average experimental value. This difference may be due to physics beyond the standard model.

  15. Precision Measurement of the Anomalous Magnetic Moment of the Muon

    CERN Document Server

    Ozben, C S

    2002-01-01

    The muon g-2 experiment at Brookhaven National Laboratory measures the anomalous magnetic moment of the muon, $a_\\mu$, very precisely. This measurement tests the Standard Model theory. The analysis for the data collected in 2000 (a $\\mu^+$ run) is completed and the accuracy on $a_\\mu$ is improved to 0.7 ppm, including statistical and systematic errors. The data analysis was performed blindly between the precession frequency and the field analysis groups in order to prevent a possible bias in the $a_\\mu$ result. The observed difference between the theory and our most recent experimental result is quite important for further studies of the Standard Model theory. In 2001, we ran for the first time with $\\mu^-$ and the analysis of this data will provide $a_\\mu$ with similar statistical power.

  16. Qweak A Precision Measurement of the Proton's Weak Charge

    CERN Document Server

    Mitchell, G S; Averett, T D; Birchall, J; Bowman, J D; Carlini, R D; Chattopadhyay, S; Davis, C A; Doornbos, J; Dunne, J A; Ent, R; Erler, J; Falk, W R; Finn, J M; Forest, T A; Gaskell, D J; Grimm, K H; Hagner, C; Hersman, F W; Holtrop, M; Johnston, K; Jones, R T; Joo, K; Keppel, C E; Korkmaz, E J; Kowalski, S; Lee, L; Lung, A; Mack, D; Majewski, S R; Mitchell, G S; Mkrtchyan, H G; Morgan, N; Opper, A K; Page, S A; Penttila, S I; Pitt, M; Poelker, M; Porcelli, T; Ramsay, W D; Ramsey-Musolf, M J; Roche, J; Simicevic, N; Smith, G R; Suleiman, R; Taylor, S; Van Oers, W T H; Wells, S B; Wilburn, W S; Wood, S A; Zorn, C; Mitchell, Gregory S.

    2003-01-01

    The Qweak experiment at Jefferson Lab aims to make a 4% measurement of the parity-violating asymmetry in elastic scattering at very low $Q^2$ of a longitudinally polarized electron beam on a proton target. The experiment will measure the weak charge of the proton, and thus the weak mixing angle at low energy scale, providing a precision test of the Standard Model. Since the value of the weak mixing angle is approximately 1/4, the weak charge of the proton $Q_w^p = 1-4 \\sin^2 \\theta_w$ is suppressed in the Standard Model, making it especially sensitive to the value of the mixing angle and also to possible new physics. The experiment is approved to run at JLab, and the construction plan calls for the hardware to be ready to install in Hall C in 2007. The theoretical context of the experiment and the status of its design are discussed.

  17. Precision measurements of the top quark couplings at the FCC

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2051271

    2015-01-01

    The design study of the Future Circular Colliders (FCC) in a 100-km ring in the Geneva area has started at CERN at the beginning of 2014, as an option for post-LHC particle accelerators. The study has an emphasis on proton-proton and electron-positron high-energy frontier machines. In the current plans, the first step of the FCC physics programme would exploit a high-luminosity e+e- collider called FCC-ee, with centre-of-mass energies ranging from below the Z pole to the t-tbar threshold and beyond, followed by 100\\,TeV proton-proton collisions as ultimate goal. When combined, these two steps offer a large palette of complementary measurements and sensitivity for new physics. In particular, the association of the FCC-ee and the FCC-hh allows measurements of the top-quark electroweak and Yukawa couplings to be performed with unrivaled precision.

  18. Precision measurements of electroweak observables with the ATLAS Detector

    CERN Document Server

    Vittori, Camilla; The ATLAS collaboration

    2017-01-01

    Measurements of the Drell-Yan production of W and Z/gamma bosons at the LHC provide a benchmark of our understanding of perturbative QCD and probe the proton structure in a unique way. The ATLAS collaboration measured the di-lepton mass range up to the TeV scale as well as the triple differential cross-section measurement as a function of Mll, dilepton rapidity and cosθ defined in the Collins-Soper frame. This measurement provides sensitivity to the PDFs and the weak mixing angle. The latest results of the ATLAS collaboration will be presented. A second important observable in the electroweak sector is the W boson mass in order to test the overall consistency of the Standard Model. Since the discovery of a Higgs Boson, the the W boson mass is predicted to 7 MeV precision, while the world average of all measurements is 15 MeV, making the improved measurement an important goal. Large samples of leptonic decays of W and Z bosons were collected with efficient single lepton triggers in the 7 TeV data set correspo...

  19. Broadband Lidar Technique for Precision CO2 Measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heaps, William S.

    2008-01-01

    Presented are preliminary experimental results, sensitivity measurements and discuss our new CO2 lidar system under development. The system is employing an erbium-doped fiber amplifier (EDFA), superluminescent light emitting diode (SLED) as a source and our previously developed Fabry-Perot interferometer subsystem as a detector part. Global measurement of carbon dioxide column with the aim of discovering and quantifying unknown sources and sinks has been a high priority for the last decade. The goal of Active Sensing of CO2 Emissions over Nights, Days, and Seasons (ASCENDS) mission is to significantly enhance the understanding of the role of CO2 in the global carbon cycle. The National Academy of Sciences recommended in its decadal survey that NASA put in orbit a CO2 lidar to satisfy this long standing need. Existing passive sensors suffer from two shortcomings. Their measurement precision can be compromised by the path length uncertainties arising from scattering within the atmosphere. Also passive sensors using sunlight cannot observe the column at night. Both of these difficulties can be ameliorated by lidar techniques. Lidar systems present their own set of problems however. Temperature changes in the atmosphere alter the cross section for individual CO2 absorption features while the different atmospheric pressures encountered passing through the atmosphere broaden the absorption lines. Currently proposed lidars require multiple lasers operating at multiple wavelengths simultaneously in order to untangle these effects. The current goal is to develop an ultra precise, inexpensive new lidar system for precise column measurements of CO2 changes in the lower atmosphere that uses a Fabry-Perot interferometer based system as the detector portion of the instrument and replaces the narrow band laser commonly used in lidars with the newly available high power SLED as the source. This approach reduces the number of individual lasers used in the system from three or more

  20. Picometer Precision Measurements of Fringe Phase and Wavelengths in MAM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, X.; Shao, M.; Goullioud, R.

    2004-12-01

    The Space Interferometry Mission (SIM), a micro-arcsecond astrometry mission, is the only mission, either operational or in planning, that will be capable of measuring the mass of extra-solar planets, mass being the fundamental property that determines whether the planet is capable of holding an Earth-like atmosphere. One of the SIM testbeds at JPL, the Micro-Arcsecond Metrology (MAM) testbed, addresses how to measure interferometer fringe phase and wavelengths accurately at the level of picometers (10-12 m). The MAM testbed uses a pathlength modulation scheme for fringe detection, using ten samples per stroke, with stroke-length close to the wavelength of a spectral channel. The MAM testbed has demonstrated the measurement of optical pathlength delays to picometer precision. Longer strokes (tens of microns) enable both fringe and modulation envelope to be detected, yielding accurate wavelength measurements at the picometer level for the first time. This paper describes the fundamental principles of a new technique for calibration and measurement of fringes for targets that have various spectra, in which effective wavelength varies significantly for different spectral channels. Test results and variations with time are analyzed. Conformation of measurenet accuracy and stability are described in this paper.

  1. Real-time precision measuring device of tree diameter growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Mingming; Chen, Aijun; Li, Dongsheng; Liu, Nan; Yao, Jingyuan

    2016-01-01

    DBH(diameter at breast height) is an important factor to reflect of the quality of plant growth, also an important parameter indispensable in forest resources inventory and forest carbon sink, the accurate measurement of DBH or not is directly related to the research of forest resources inventory and forest carbon sink. In this paper, the principle and the mathematical model of DBH measurement device were introduced, the fixture measuring device and the hardware circuit for this tree diameter were designed, the measurement software programs were compiled, and the precision measuring device of tree diameter growth was developed. Some experiments with Australia fir were conducted. Based on experiment data, the correlations among the DBH variation of Australian fir, the environment temperature, air humility and PAR(photosynthetically active radiation) were obtained. The effects of environmental parameters (environment temperature, air humility and PAR) on tree diameter were analyzed. Experimental results show that there is a positive correlation between DBH variation of Australian fir and environment temperature, a negative correlation between DBH variation of Australian fir and air humility , so is PAR.

  2. Precision Measurement of the Newtonian Gravitational Constant Using Cold Atoms

    CERN Document Server

    Rosi, G; Cacciapuoti, L; Prevedelli, M; Tino, G M

    2014-01-01

    About 300 experiments have tried to determine the value of the Newtonian gravitational constant, G, so far, but large discrepancies in the results have made it impossible to know its value precisely. The weakness of the gravitational interaction and the impossibility of shielding the effects of gravity make it very difficult to measure G while keeping systematic effects under control. Most previous experiments performed were based on the torsion pendulum or torsion balance scheme as in the experiment by Cavendish in 1798, and in all cases macroscopic masses were used. Here we report the precise determination of G using laser-cooled atoms and quantum interferometry. We obtain the value G=6.67191(99) x 10^(-11) m^3 kg^(-1) s^(-2) with a relative uncertainty of 150 parts per million (the combined standard uncertainty is given in parentheses). Our value differs by 1.5 combined standard deviations from the current recommended value of the Committee on Data for Science and Technology. A conceptually different exper...

  3. Precision Tiltmeter as a Reference for Slope MeasuringInstruments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kirschman, Jonathan L.; Domning, Edward E.; Morrison, Gregory Y.; Smith, Brian V.; Yashchuk, Valeriy V.

    2007-08-01

    The next generation of synchrotrons and free electron lasers require extremely high-performance x-ray optical systems for proper focusing. The necessary optics cannot be fabricated without the use of precise optical metrology instrumentation. In particular, the Long Trace Profiler (LTP) based on the pencil-beam interferometer is a valuable tool for low-spatial-frequency slope measurement with x-ray optics. The limitations of such a device are set by the amount of systematic errors and noise. A significant improvement of LTP performance was the addition of an optical reference channel, which allowed to partially account for systematic errors associated with wiggling and wobbling of the LTP carriage. However, the optical reference is affected by changing optical path length, non-homogeneous optics, and air turbulence. In the present work, we experimentally investigate the questions related to the use of a precision tiltmeter as a reference channel. Dependence of the tiltmeter performance on horizontal acceleration, temperature drift, motion regime, and kinematical scheme of the translation stage has been investigated. It is shown that at an appropriate experimental arrangement, the tiltmeter provides a slope reference for the LTP system with accuracy on the level of 0.1 {micro}rad (rms).

  4. A neural measure of precision in visual working memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ester, Edward F; Anderson, David E; Serences, John T; Awh, Edward

    2013-05-01

    Recent studies suggest that the temporary storage of visual detail in working memory is mediated by sensory recruitment or sustained patterns of stimulus-specific activation within feature-selective regions of visual cortex. According to a strong version of this hypothesis, the relative "quality" of these patterns should determine the clarity of an individual's memory. Here, we provide a direct test of this claim. We used fMRI and a forward encoding model to characterize population-level orientation-selective responses in visual cortex while human participants held an oriented grating in memory. This analysis, which enables a precise quantitative description of multivoxel, population-level activity measured during working memory storage, revealed graded response profiles whose amplitudes were greatest for the remembered orientation and fell monotonically as the angular distance from this orientation increased. Moreover, interparticipant differences in the dispersion-but not the amplitude-of these response profiles were strongly correlated with performance on a concurrent memory recall task. These findings provide important new evidence linking the precision of sustained population-level responses in visual cortex and memory acuity.

  5. Precision measurement of the carrier drift velocities in <100> silicon

    CERN Document Server

    Scharf, C

    2015-01-01

    Measurements of the drift velocities of electrons and holes as functions of electric field and temperature in high-purity n- and p-type silicon with crystal orientation are presented. The measurements cover electric field values between 2.4 and 50 kV/cm and temperatures between 233 and 333 K. Two methods have been used for extracting the drift velocities from current transient measurements: A time-of-flight (tof) method and fits of simulated transients to the measured transients, with the parameters describing the field and temperature dependence of the electron and hole mobilities as free parameters. A new mobility parametrization, which also provides a better description of existing data than previous ones, allowed an extension of the classical tof method to the situation of non-uniform fields. For the fit method, the use of the convolution theorem of Fourier transforms enabled us to precisely determine the electronics transfer function of the complete set-up, including the sensor properties. The agreement...

  6. Prospects for Precision Measurement of CO2 Column from Space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heaps, William S.; Kawa, S. Randolph; Burris, John F.; Wilson, Emily L.; Georgieva, Elena; Miodek, Marty

    2005-01-01

    In order to address the problem of sources and sinks of CO2 measurements are needed on a global scale. Clearly a satellite is a promising approach to meeting this requirement. Unfortunately, most methods for making a CO2 measurement from space involve the whole column. Since sources and sinks at the surface represent a small perturbation to the total column one is faced with the need to measure the column with a precision better than 1%. No species has ever been measured from space at this level. We have developed over the last 3 years a small instrument based upon a Fabry-Perot interferometer that is very sensitive to atmospheric CO2 and has a high signal to noise ratio. We have tested this instrument in a ground based configuration and from aircraft platforms simulating operation from a satellite. We will present results from these tests and discuss ways that this promising new instrument could be used to improve our understanding of the global carbon budget.

  7. A Computer Controlled Precision High Pressure Measuring System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadana, S.; Yadav, S.; Jha, N.; Gupta, V. K.; Agarwal, R.; Bandyopadhyay, A. K.; Saxena, T. K.

    2011-01-01

    A microcontroller (AT89C51) based electronics has been designed and developed for high precision calibrator based on Digiquartz pressure transducer (DQPT) for the measurement of high hydrostatic pressure up to 275 MPa. The input signal from DQPT is converted into a square wave form and multiplied through frequency multiplier circuit over 10 times to input frequency. This input frequency is multiplied by a factor of ten using phased lock loop. Octal buffer is used to store the calculated frequency, which in turn is fed to microcontroller AT89C51 interfaced with a liquid crystal display for the display of frequency as well as corresponding pressure in user friendly units. The electronics developed is interfaced with a computer using RS232 for automatic data acquisition, computation and storage. The data is acquired by programming in Visual Basic 6.0. This system is interfaced with the PC to make it a computer controlled system. The system is capable of measuring the frequency up to 4 MHz with a resolution of 0.01 Hz and the pressure up to 275 MPa with a resolution of 0.001 MPa within measurement uncertainty of 0.025%. The details on the hardware of the pressure measuring system, associated electronics, software and calibration are discussed in this paper.

  8. Correlation between precision gravity and subsidence measurements at Cerro Prieto

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zelwer, R.; Grannell, R.B.

    1982-10-01

    Precision gravity measurements were made in the region of the Cerro Prieto geothermal field at yearly intervals from 1977 to 1981 to assess the feasibility of using gravity to determine subsurface reservoir changes with time. The extent of mass recharge in response to the continued production of fluids from this field was studied. Changes in gravity and ground elevation were observed throughout the region for the period of observation. Results indicate that the largest changes observed were the result of the Magnitude 6.1 (Caltech) Victoria earthquake of 8 June 1980. The epicenter of this earthquake was located 25 km southeast of the field on the Cerro Prieto Fault, which bounds the field on the southwest. Subsidence of up to 55 cm was measured east of the power plant, in the region between the northern end of the Cerro Prieto Fault and the southern end of the Imperial Fault. This area has been postulated to be the site of an active spreading center or pull-apart basin, and has been characterized by a high level of seismic activity during the last 10 years. Minor subsidence and small related gravity changes for the period preceeding the Victoria earthquake suggest that in spite of large fluid production rates, the reservoir is being almost completely recharged and that a measurable increase in subsurface density may be taking place. The results of measurements of horizontal ground motions made in this area are discussed in relation to the gravity and subsidence observations.

  9. Constraints on proton structure from precision atomic physics measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brodsky, S

    2004-08-10

    The ground-state hyperfine splittings in hydrogen and muonium are extremely well measured. The difference between them, after correcting for the different magnetic moments of the muon and proton and for reduced mass effects, is due solely to the structure of the proton - the large QED contributions for a pointlike nucleus essentially cancel. A major contribution to the rescaled hyperfine difference is proportional to the Zemach radius, a fundamental measure of the proton which can be computed as an integral over the product of the elastic electric and magnetic form factors of the proton. The remaining proton structure corrections, the polarization contribution from inelastic states in the spin-dependent virtual Compton amplitude and the proton size dependence of the relativistic recoil corrections, have small uncertainties. The resulting high precision determination of the Zemach radius (1.013 {+-} 0.016) fm from atomic physics provides an important constraint on fits to accelerator measurements of the proton electric and magnetic form factors. Conversely, the authors use the muonium data to extract an 'experimental' value for the QED corrections to the hyperfine splitting of hydrogenic atoms. There is a significant discrepancy between measurement and theory which is in the same direction as a corresponding discrepancy in positronium.

  10. Precise measurement of the performance of thermoelectric modules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Díaz-Chao, Pablo; Muñiz-Piniella, Andrés; Selezneva, Ekaterina; Cuenat, Alexandre

    2016-08-01

    The potential exploitation of thermoelectric modules into mass market applications such as exhaust gas heat recovery in combustion engines requires an accurate knowledge of their performance. Further expansion of the market will also require confidence on the results provided by suppliers to end-users. However, large variation in performance and maximum operating point is observed for identical modules when tested by different laboratories. Here, we present the first metrological study of the impact of mounting and testing procedures on the precision of thermoelectric modules measurement. Variability in the electrical output due to mechanical pressure or type of thermal interface materials is quantified for the first time. The respective contribution of the temperature difference and the mean temperature to the variation in the output performance is quantified. The contribution of these factors to the total uncertainties in module characterisation is detailed.

  11. Precision measurement of the $D^{*0}$ decay branching fractions

    CERN Document Server

    Ablikim, M; Ai, X C; Albayrak, O; Albrecht, M; Ambrose, D J; Amoroso, A; An, F F; An, Q; Bai, J Z; Ferroli, R Baldini; Ban, Y; Bennett, D W; Bennett, J V; Bertani, M; Bettoni, D; Bian, J M; Bianchi, F; Boger, E; Bondarenko, O; Boyko, I; Briere, R A; Cai, H; Cai, X; Cakir, O; Calcaterra, A; Cao, G F; Cetin, S A; Chang, J F; Chelkov, G; Chen, G; Chen, H S; Chen, H Y; Chen, J C; Chen, M L; Chen, S J; Chen, X; Chen, X R; Chen, Y B; Cheng, H P; Chu, X K; Cibinetto, G; Cronin-Hennessy, D; Dai, H L; Dai, J P; Dbeyssi, A; Dedovich, D; Deng, Z Y; Denig, A; Denysenko, I; Destefanis, M; De Mori, F; Ding, Y; Dong, C; Dong, J; Dong, L Y; Dong, M Y; Du, S X; Duan, P F; Fan, J Z; Fang, J; Fang, S S; Fang, X; Fang, Y; Fava, L; Feldbauer, F; Felici, G; Feng, C Q; Fioravanti, E; Fritsch, M; Fu, C D; Gao, Q; Gao, Y; Garzia, I; Goetzen, K; Gong, W X; Gradl, W; Greco, M; Gu, M H; Gu, Y T; Guan, Y H; Guo, A Q; Guo, L B; Guo, T; Guo, Y; Guo, Y P; Haddadi, Z; Hafner, A; Han, S; Han, Y L; Harris, F A; He, K L; He, Z Y; Held, T; Heng, Y K; Hou, Z L; Hu, C; Hu, H M; Hu, J F; Hu, T; Hu, Y; Huang, G M; Huang, G S; Huang, H P; Huang, J S; Huang, X T; Huang, Y; Hussain, T; Ji, Q; Ji, Q P; Ji, X B; Ji, X L; Jiang, L L; Jiang, L W; Jiang, X S; Jiao, J B; Jiao, Z; Jin, D P; Jin, S; Johansson, T; Julin, A; Kalantar-Nayestanaki, N; Kang, X L; Kang, X S; Kavatsyuk, M; Ke, B C; Kliemt, R; Kloss, B; Kolcu, O B; Kopf, B; Kornicer, M; Kuehn, W; Kupsc, A; Lai, W; Lange, J S; Lara, M; Larin, P; Li, C H; Li, Cheng; Li, D M; Li, F; Li, G; Li, H B; Li, J C; Li, Jin; Li, K; Li, P R; Li, T; Li, W D; Li, W G; Li, X L; Li, X M; Li, X N; Li, X Q; Li, Z B; Liang, H; Liang, Y F; Liang, Y T; Liao, G R; Lin, D X; Liu, B J; Liu, C L; Liu, C X; Liu, F H; Liu, Fang; Liu, Feng; Liu, H B; Liu, H H; Liu, H M; Liu, J; Liu, J P; Liu, J Y; Liu, K; Liu, K Y; Liu, L D; Liu, P L; Liu, Q; Liu, S B; Liu, X; Liu, X X; Liu, Y B; Liu, Z A; Liu, Zhiqiang; Liu, Zhiqing; Loehner, H; Lou, X C; Lu, H J; Lu, J G; Lu, R Q; Lu, Y; Lu, Y P; Luo, C L; Luo, M X; Luo, T; Luo, X L; Lv, M; Lyu, X R; Ma, F C; Ma, H L; Ma, L L; Ma, Q M; Ma, S; Ma, T; Ma, X N; Ma, X Y; Maas, F E; Maggiora, M; Malik, Q A; Mao, Y J; Mao, Z P; Marcello, S; Messchendorp, J G; Min, J; Min, T J; Mitchell, R E; Mo, X H; Mo, Y J; Morales, C Morales; Moriya, K; Muchnoi, N Yu; Muramatsu, H; Nefedov, Y; Nerling, F; Nikolaev, I B; Ning, Z; Nisar, S; Niu, S L; Niu, X Y; Olsen, S L; Ouyang, Q; Pacetti, S; Patteri, P; Pelizaeus, M; Peng, H P; Peters, K; Ping, J L; Ping, R G; Poling, R; Pu, Y N; Qi, M; Qian, S; Qiao, C F; Qin, L Q; Qin, N; Qin, X S; Qin, Y; Qin, Z H; Qiu, J F; Rashid, K H; Redmer, C F; Ren, H L; Ripka, M; Rong, G; Ruan, X D; Santoro, V; Sarantsev, A; Savrié, M; Schoenning, K; Schumann, S; Shan, W; Shao, M; Shen, C P; Shen, P X; Shen, X Y; Sheng, H Y; Shepherd, M R; Song, W M; Song, X Y; Sosio, S; Spataro, S; Spruck, B; Sun, G X; Sun, J F; Sun, S S; Sun, Y J; Sun, Y Z; Sun, Z J; Sun, Z T; Tang, C J; Tang, X; Tapan, I; Thorndike, E H; Tiemens, M; Toth, D; Ullrich, M; Uman, I; Varner, G S; Wang, B; Wang, B L; Wang, D; Wang, D Y; Wang, K; Wang, L L; Wang, L S; Wang, M; Wang, P; Wang, P L; Wang, Q J; Wang, S G; Wang, W; Wang, X F; Wang, Y D; Wang, Y F; Wang, Y Q; Wang, Z; Wang, Z G; Wang, Z H; Wang, Z Y; Weber, T; Wei, D H; Wei, J B; Weidenkaff, P; Wen, S P; Wiedner, U; Wolke, M; Wu, L H; Wu, Z; Xia, L G; Xia, Y; Xiao, D; Xiao, Z J; Xie, Y G; Xu, G F; Xu, L; Xu, Q J; Xu, Q N; Xu, X P; Yan, L; Yan, W B; Yan, W C; Yan, Y H; Yang, H X; Yang, L; Yang, Y; Yang, Y X; Ye, H; Ye, M; Ye, M H; Yin, J H; Yu, B X; Yu, C X; Yu, H W; Yu, J S; Yuan, C Z; Yuan, W L; Yuan, Y; Yuncu, A; Zafar, A A; Zallo, A; Zeng, Y; Zhang, B X; Zhang, B Y; Zhang, C; Zhang, C C; Zhang, D H; Zhang, H H; Zhang, H Y; Zhang, J J; Zhang, J L; Zhang, J Q; Zhang, J W; Zhang, J Y; Zhang, J Z; Zhang, K; Zhang, L; Zhang, S H; Zhang, X Y; Zhang, Y; Zhang, Y H; Zhang, Z H; Zhang, Z P; Zhang, Z Y; Zhao, G; Zhao, J W; Zhao, J Y; Zhao, J Z; Zhao, Lei; Zhao, Ling; Zhao, M G; Zhao, Q; Zhao, Q W; Zhao, S J; Zhao, T C; Zhao, Y B; Zhao, Z G; Zhemchugov, A; Zheng, B; Zheng, J P; Zheng, W J; Zheng, Y H; Zhong, B; Zhou, L; Zhou, Li; Zhou, X; Zhou, X K; Zhou, X R; Zhou, X Y; Zhu, K; Zhu, K J; Zhu, S; Zhu, X L; Zhu, Y C; Zhu, Y S; Zhu, Z A; Zhuang, J; Zou, B S; Zou, J H

    2014-01-01

    Using 482 pb$^{-1}$ of data taken at $\\sqrt{s}=4.009$ GeV, we measure the branching fractions of the decays of $D^{*0}$ into $D^0\\pi^0$ and $D^0\\gamma$ to be $\\BR(D^{*0} \\to D^0\\pi^0)=(65.5\\pm 0.8\\pm 0.5)%$ and $\\BR(D^{*0} \\to D^0\\gamma)=(34.5\\pm 0.8\\pm 0.5)%$ respectively, by assuming that the $D^{*0}$ decays only into these two modes. The ratio of the two branching fractions is $\\BR(D^{*0} \\to D^0\\pi^0)/\\BR(D^{*0} \\to D^0\\gamma) =1.90\\pm 0.07\\pm 0.05$, which is independent of the assumption made above. The first uncertainties are statistical and the second ones systematic. The precision is improved by a factor of three compared to the present world average values.

  12. Ultracold Molecules in Lattices for Metrology and Precision Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reinaudi, Gael; Osborn, Chris; McDonald, Mickey; Wang, Dili; Zelevinsky, Tanya

    2012-06-01

    Ultracold diatomic molecules offer exciting possibilities for studies of novel states of matter, quantum information, and metrology. Two-electron-atom based molecules are particularly promising for precision measurements, such as molecular time metrology and variations of the proton-electron mass ratio. We present an experimental setup that allows for the photoassociation, in an optical lattice, of strontium atoms into molecules using the narrow singlet-triplet transitions. We feature newly observed two-photon photoassociation to deeply bound molecular levels, as well as the study of the lifetime of such molecules in lattices, which is a determining factor concerning the practical use of this system. Other characteristics of our setup are presented, such as a computer controlled permanent-magnet Zeeman slower optimized with a genetic algorithm.

  13. Beta Beams for Precision Measurements of Neutrino Oscillation Parameters

    CERN Document Server

    Wildner, E; Hansen, C; De Melo Mendonca, T; Stora, T; Damjanovic, S; Payet, J; Chancé, A; Zorin, V; Izotov, I; Rasin, S; Sidorov, A; Skalyga, V; De Angelis, G; Prete, G; Cinausero, M; Kravchuk, V; Gramegna, F; Marchi, T; Collazuol, G; Mezzetto, M; Delbar, T; Loiselet, M; Keutgen, T; Mitrofanov, S; Burt, G; Dexter, A; Lamy, T; Latrasse, L; Marie-Jeanne, M; Sortais, P; Thuillier, T; Debray, F; Trophime, C; Hass, M; Hirsh, T; Berkovits, D; Stahl, A; Vardaci, E; Di Nitto, A; Brondi, A; La Rana, G; Moro, R; De Rosa, G; Palladino, V

    2012-01-01

    Neutrino oscillations have implications for the Standard Model of particle physics. The CERN Beta Beam has outstanding capabilities to contribute to precision measurements of the parameters governing neutrino oscillations. The FP7 collaboration EUROnu (2008-2012) is a design study that will review three facilities (Super-Beams, Beta Beams and Neutrino Factories) and perform a cost assessment that, coupled with the physics performance, will give means to the European research authorities to make decisions on future European neutrino oscillation facilities. ”Beta Beams” produce collimated pure electron (anti)neutrinos by accelerating beta active ions to high energies and having them decay in a storage ring. Using existing machines and infrastructure is an advantage for the cost evaluation; however, this choice is also constraining the Beta Beams. Recent work to make the Beta Beam facility a solid option will be described: production of Beta Beam isotopes, the 60 GHz pulsed ECR source development, integratio...

  14. Monolithic interferometer for high precision radial velocity measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan, Xiaoke; Ge, Jian; Wang, Ji; Lee, Brian

    2009-08-01

    In high precision radial velocity (RV) measurements for extrasolar planets searching and studies, a stable wide field Michelson interferometer is very critical in Exoplanet Tracker (ET) instruments. Adopting a new design, monolithic interferometers are homogenous and continuous in thermal expansion, and field compensation and thermal compensation are both satisfied. Interferometer design and fabrication are decrypted in details. In performance evaluations, field angle is typically 22° and thermal sensitivity is typically -1.7 x 10-6/°C, which corresponds to ~500 m/s /°C in RV scale. In interferometer stability monitoring using a wavelength stabilized laser source, phase shift data was continuously recorded for nearly seven days. Appling a frequent calibration every 30 minutes as in typical star observations, the interferometer instability contributes less than 1.4 m/s in RV error, in a conservative estimation.

  15. Precise measurement technique for the stable acoustic cavitation bubble

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HUANG Wei; CHEN Weizhong; LIU Yanan; GAO Xianxian; JIANG Lian; XU Junfeng; ZHU Yifei

    2005-01-01

    Based on the periodic oscillation of the stable acoustic cavitation bubble, we present a precise measurement technique for the bubble evolution. This technique comprises the lighting engineering of pulsing laser beam whose phase can be digitally shifted, and the long distance microphotographics. We used a laser, an acousto-optic modulator, a pulse generator, and a long distance microscope. The evolution of a levitated bubble can be directly shown by a series of bubble's images at different phases. Numerical simulation in the framework of the Rayleigh-Plesset bubble dynamics well supported the experimental result, and the ambient radius of the bubble, an important parameter related to the mass of the gas inside the bubble, was obtained at the same time.

  16. Precise measurement of the sup 2 sup 7 Al(n,2n) sup 2 sup 6 sup g Al excitation function near threshold and its relevance for fusion-plasma technology

    CERN Document Server

    Wallner, A; Priller, A; Steier, P; Vonach, H; Chuvaev, S V; Filatenkov, A A; Ikeda, Y; Mertens, G; Rochow, W

    2003-01-01

    A new accurate measurement of the sup 2 sup 7 Al(n,2n) sup 2 sup 6 Al excitation function leading to the ground state of sup 2 sup 6 Al(t sub 1 sub / sub 2 =7.1 x 10 sup 5 years) in the near-threshold region (E sub t sub h =13.55 MeV) was performed, with the goal to achieve relative cross-sections with the highest accuracy possible using proven methods. In addition, the measurements were also designed to provide good absolute cross-section values, since absolute cross-sections are important for radioactive waste predictions in future fusion reactor materials. Samples of Al metal were irradiated with neutrons in the energy range near threshold (E sub n =13.5-14.8 MeV) in Vienna and St. Petersburg, and at 14.8 MeV in Tokai-mura. In addition, irradiations with neutrons of higher energies (17 and 19 MeV) were performed in Tuebingen, to obtain also cross-section values well above threshold. The amount of sup 2 sup 6 Al produced during the irradiations was measured via accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS). With this...

  17. Measurement of the effective plasma ion mass in large tokamaks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lister, J.B.; Villard, L.; Ridder, G. de [Ecole Polytechnique Federale, Lausanne (Switzerland). Centre de Recherche en Physique des Plasma (CRPP)

    1997-06-01

    There is not yet a straightforward method for the measurement of the D-T ratio in the centre of a tokamak plasma. One of the simpler measurements put forward in the past is the interpretation of the MHD spectrum in the frequency range of the Global Alfven Eigenmodes (GAE). However, the frequencies of these modes do not only depend on the plasma mass, but are also quite strongly dependent on the details of the current and density profiles, creating a problem of deconvolution of the estimate of the plasma mass from an implicit relationship between several measurable plasma parameters and the detected eigenmode frequencies. This method has been revised to assess its likely precision for the JET tokamak. The low n GAE modes are sometimes too close to the continuum edge to be detectable and the interpretation of the GAE spectrum is rendered less direct than had been hoped. We present a statistical study on the precision with which the D-T ratio could be estimated from the GAE spectrum on JET. (author) 4 figs., 8 refs.

  18. Precision Neutron Scattering Length Measurements with Neutron Interferometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huber, M. G.; Arif, M.; Jacobson, D. L.; Pushin, D. A.; Abutaleb, M. O.; Shahi, C. B.; Wietfeldt, F. E.; Black, T. C.

    2011-10-01

    Since its inception, single-crystal neutron interferometry has often been utilized for precise neutron scattering length, b, measurements. Scattering length data of light nuclei is particularly important in the study of few nucleon interactions as b can be predicted by two + three nucleon interaction (NI) models. As such they provide a critical test of the accuracy 2+3 NI models. Nuclear effective field theories also make use of light nuclei b in parameterizing mean-field behavior. The NIST neutron interferometer and optics facility has measured b to less than 0.8% relative uncertainty in polarized 3He and to less than 0.1% relative uncertainty in H, D, and unpolarized 3He. A neutron interferometer consists of a perfect silicon crystal machined such that there are three separate blades on a common base. Neutrons are Bragg diffracted in the blades to produce two spatially separate (yet coherent) beam paths much like an optical Mach-Zehnder interferometer. A gas sample placed in one of the beam paths of the interferometer causes a phase difference between the two paths which is proportional to b. This talk will focus on the latest scattering length measurement for n-4He which ran at NIST in Fall/Winter 2010 and is currently being analyzed.

  19. Precision and Resolution on Tore-Supra Ece Electron Temperature Profile Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ségui, J. L.; Molina, D.; Goniche, M.

    2003-02-01

    A 16-channel heterodyne radiometer, 2 GHz spaced, is used on Tore-Supra to measure the electron cyclotron emission in the frequency range 78-110 GHz for the O mode and 94 -126 GHz for the Xmode. In the equatorial plane, a dual polarisation gaussian optics lens antenna, with a perpendicular line of sight (with respect to the magnetic field), gives ECE measurements with very low refraction and Doppler effects. A separate O/X mode RF front-end allows the use of an IF electronic mode selector. This improves time stability calibration and gives the potentiality of simultaneous O/X mode measurements in the 94 -110 Ghz RF band for polarisation studies. RF and IF filters reject the gyrotron frequency (118 Ghz) in order to perform temperature measurements during ECRH plasmas. A precise absolute spectral calibration is performed outside the vacuum vessel by using a 600°C black body, a digital signal averaging on the waveform generated by a mechanical chopper placed directly in front of it, and a simulation window without Fabry-Pérot effects. The calibration precision leads to ECE temperature profiles which are very consistent with Thomson scattering measurements and guarantees a good stability of the ECE profiles for small changes on the magnetic field (absolute precision +/-6%, relative precision between channels +/-3%). Post-pulse data processing takes routinely into account the total magnetic field (Bvacuum with ripple, Bpara, Bdia, Bpol, all with analytical formulations), the radial relativistic shift (analytical formulation is used), the refractionREFID="9789812705082_0032FN001"> (cut-offs detection with safety margin to avoid strong refraction), the nonthermal ECE spectraREFID="9789812705082_0032FN001"> during LHCD (using an electron density threshold criterion). These previous analytical formulations are compatible with real time processing. Relativistic radial broadening simulations show that it is useful to fulfil 32 channels (1GHz spaced).

  20. New Precision Measurement of Hyperfine Splitting of Positronium

    CERN Document Server

    Ishida, A; Asai, S; Kobayashi, T; Saito, H; Yoshida, M; Tanaka, K; Yamamoto, A

    2014-01-01

    The ground state hyperfine splitting of positronium $\\Delta_{\\mathrm{HFS}}$ is sensitive to high order corrections of quantum electrodynamics (QED) in bound state. The theoretical prediction and the averaged experimental value for $\\Delta_{\\mathrm{HFS}}$ has a discrepancy of 15 ppm, which is equivalent to 3.9 standard deviations (s.d.). A new precision measurement which reduces the systematic uncertainty from the positronium thermalization effect was performed, in which the non-thermalization effect was measured to be as large as $10 \\pm 1\\,{\\mathrm{ppm}}$ in a timing window we used. When this effect is taken into account, our new result becomes $\\Delta_{\\mathrm{HFS}} = 203.394\\,1 \\pm 0.001\\,6 ({\\mathrm{stat., 8.0\\,ppm}}) \\pm 0.001\\,1 ({\\mathrm{sys., 5.4\\,ppm}})$\\,GHz, which favors the QED prediction within 1.2 s.d. and disfavors the previous experimental average by 2.7 s.d.

  1. Breaking Quantum and Thermal Limits on Precision Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, James K.

    2016-05-01

    I will give an overview of our efforts to use correlations and entanglement between many atoms to overcome quantum and thermal limits on precision measurements. In the first portion of my talk, I will present a path toward a 10000 times reduced sensitivity to the thermal mirror motion that limits the linewidth of today's best lasers. By utilizing narrow atomic transitions, the laser's phase information is primarily stored in the atomic gain medium rather than in the vibration-sensitive cavity field. To this end, I will present the first observation of lasing based on the mHz linewidth optical-clock transition in a laser-cooled ensemble of strontium atoms. In the second portion of my talk, I will describe how we use collective measurements to surpass the standard quantum limit on phase estimation 1 /√{ N} for N unentangled atoms. We achieve a directly observed reduction in phase variance relative to the standard quantum limit of as much as 17.7(6) dB. Supported by DARPA QuASAR, NIST, ARO, and NSF PFC. This material is based upon work supported by the National Science Foundation under Grant Number 1125844 Physics Frontier Center.

  2. A precise measurement of the top quark mass

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mohr, Brian N. [Univ. of California, Los Angeles, CA (United States)

    2007-04-01

    We present a measurement of the mass of the top quark using data from proton-antiproton collisions recorded at the CDF experiment in Run II of the Fermilab Tevatron. Events are selected from the single lepton plus jets final state (t$\\bar{t}$ → W+bW-$\\bar{b}$ → ℓvbq$\\bar{q}$'$\\bar{b}$). The top quark mass is extracted using a calculation of the probability density for a t$\\bar{t}$ final state to resemble a data event. This probability density is a function of both top quark mass and energy scale of calorimeter jets, constrained in situ with the hadronic W boson mass. Using 167 events observed in 955 pb-1 integrated luminosity, we achieve the single most precise measurement of top quark mass to date of 170.8 ± 2.2 (stat.) ± 1.4 (syst.) GeV/c2, where the quoted statistical uncertainty includes uncertainty from the determination of the jet energy scale.

  3. Precise Measurement of the K - to Pi -E E- Decay

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Batley, J.R.; Culling, A.J.; Kalmus, G.; /Cambridge U.; Lazzeroni, C.; /Cambridge U. /Birmingham U.; Munday, D.J.; /Cambridge U.; Slater, M.W.; /Cambridge U. /Birmingham U.; Wotton, S.A.; /Cambridge U.; Arcidiacono, R.; /CERN /Turin U. /INFN, Turin; Bocquet, G.; /CERN; Cabibbo, N.; /CERN /Rome U. /INFN, Rome; Ceccucci, A.; /CERN; Cundy, D.; /CERN /Turin, Cosmo-Geofisica Lab; Falaleev, V.; Fidecaro, M.; Gatignon, L.; Gonidec, A.; Kubischta, W.; /CERN; Norton, A.; /CERN /Ferrara U. /INFN, Ferrara; Maier, A.; Patel, M.; Peters, A.; /CERN /Dubna, JINR /Pisa, Scuola Normale Superiore /Dubna, JINR /Dubna, JINR /Birmingham U. /Dubna, JINR /CERN /Dubna, JINR /Dubna, JINR /Sofiya U. /Dubna, JINR /Dubna, JINR /INFN, Perugia /Dubna, JINR /Dubna, JINR /Northwestern U. /Dubna, JINR /Chicago U., EFI /Marseille, CPPM /Chicago U., EFI /Edinburgh U. /George Mason U. /Edinburgh U. /Ferrara U. /INFN, Ferrara /Ferrara U. /INFN, Ferrara /CERN /Ferrara U. /INFN, Ferrara /Florence U. /INFN, Florence /Modena U. /Florence U. /INFN, Florence /Florence U. /INFN, Florence /Urbino U. /Florence U. /INFN, Florence /Pisa, Scuola Normale Superiore /Florence U. /INFN, Florence /Urbino U. /Mainz U., Inst. Phys. /Mainz U., Inst. Phys. /Bonn U. /Mainz U., Inst. Phys. /Northwestern U. /SLAC /Northwestern U. /Northwestern U. /Royal Holloway, U. of London /Northwestern U. /Northwestern U. /UCLA /Perugia U. /INFN, Perugia /Perugia U. /INFN, Perugia /Frascati /Perugia U. /INFN, Perugia /INFN, Pisa /Pisa, Scuola Normale Superiore /INFN, Pisa /Pisa U. /INFN, Pisa /Pisa U. /INFN, Pisa /Barcelona, IFAE /Pisa U. /INFN, Pisa /DAPNIA, Saclay /DAPNIA, Saclay /CERN /DAPNIA, Saclay /Siegen U. /Turin U. /INFN, Turin /Bern U. /Turin U. /INFN, Turin /Turin U. /INFN, Turin /CERN /Turin U. /INFN, Turin /Madrid, CIEMAT /Turin U. /INFN, Turin /Vienna, OAW

    2011-11-22

    A sample of 7253 K{sup {+-}} {yields} {pi}{sup {+-}}e{sup +}e{sup -}({gamma}) decay candidates with 1.0% background contamination has been collected by the NA 48/2 experiment at the CERN SPS, which allowed a precise measurement of the decay properties. The branching ratio in the full kinematic range was measured to be BR = (3.11 {+-} 0.12) x 10{sup -7}, where the uncertainty includes also the model dependence. The shape of the form factor W(z), where z = (M{sub ee}/M{sub K}){sup 2}, was parameterized according to several models, and, in particular, the slope {delta} of the linear form factor W(z) = W{sub 0}(1 + {delta}z) was determined to be {delta} = 2.32 {+-} 0.18. A possible CP violating asymmetry of K{sup +} and K{sup -} decay widths was investigated, and a conservative upper limit of 2.1 x 10{sup -2} at 90% CL was established.

  4. A precise measurement of the top quark mass

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mohr, Brian N. [Univ. of California, Los Angeles, CA (United States)

    2007-04-01

    We present a measurement of the mass of the top quark using data from proton-antiproton collisions recorded at the CDF experiment in Run II of the Fermilab Tevatron. Events are selected from the single lepton plus jets final state (t$\\bar{t}$ → W+bW-$\\bar{b}$ → ℓvbq$\\bar{q}$'$\\bar{b}$). The top quark mass is extracted using a calculation of the probability density for a t$\\bar{t}$ final state to resemble a data event. This probability density is a function of both top quark mass and energy scale of calorimeter jets, constrained in situ with the hadronic W boson mass. Using 167 events observed in 955 pb-1 integrated luminosity, we achieve the single most precise measurement of top quark mass to date of 170.8 ± 2.2 (stat.) ± 1.4 (syst.) GeV/c2, where the quoted statistical uncertainty includes uncertainty from the determination of the jet energy scale.

  5. Precision measurements of b hadron lifetimes at LHCb

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2081390

    2014-01-01

    Precision lifetime measurements of $B^+, B^0$ and $B^0_s$ mesons and the $\\Lambda^0_b$ baryon are presented. The hadrons are required to decay into a final state containing a $J/\\psi$ resonance. The used dataset represents an integrated luminosity of 1 fb$^{-1}$. The average decay times are measured to be $\\tau_{B^+ \\to J/\\psi K^+} = 1.637 \\pm 0.004 \\pm 0.003$ ps, $\\tau_{B^0 \\to J/\\psi K^{*0}}= 1.524 \\pm 0.006 \\pm 0.004$ ps, $\\tau_{B^0 \\to J/\\psi K^0_s} = 1.499 \\pm 0.013 \\pm 0.005$ ps, $\\tau_{\\Lambda^0_b \\to J/\\psi \\Lambda} = 1.415 \\pm 0.027 \\pm 0.006$ ps and $\\tau_{B^0_s \\to J/\\psi \\phi} = 1.480 \\pm 0.011 \\pm 0.005$ ps, where the first uncertainty is statistical and the second systematic. Furthermore lifetime ratios are determined.

  6. Correlation between precision gravity and subsidence measurements at Cerro Prieto

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zelwer, R.; Grannell, R. B.

    1982-10-01

    Precision gravity measurements were made in the region of the Cerro Prieto geothermal field at yearly intervals from 1977 to 1981 to assess the feasibility of using gravity to determine subsurface reservoir changes with time. The extent of mass recharge in response to the continued production of fluids from this field was studied. Changes in gravity and ground elevation were observed throughout the region for the period of observation. Results indicate that the largest changes observed were the result of the Magnitude 6.1 (Caltech) Victoria earthquake of 8 June 1980. The epicenter of this earthquake was located 25 km southeast of the field on the Cerro Prieto Fault, which bounds the field on the southwest. Subsidence of up to 55 cm was measured east of the power plant, in the region between the northern end of the Cerro Prieto Fault and the southern end of the Imperial Fault. This area has been postulated to be the site of an active spreading center or pull-apart basin, and has been characterized by a high level of seismic activity during the last 10 years.

  7. Precise Measurement of Muon Capture on the Proton

    CERN Document Server

    Kammel, P; Balin, D V; Carey, R M; Case, T; Chitwood, D B; Clayton, S M; Crowe, K M; Deutsch, J; Debevec, P T; Dick, P U; Dijksman, A; Egger, J; Fahrni, D; Fetisov, A A; Freedman, S J; Ganzha, V A; Gartner, B; Govaerts, J; Gray, F E; Hartmann, F J; Herold, W D; Hertzog, D W; Jatsoura, V I; Krivshich, A G; Lauss, B; Maev, E M; Maev, O E; Markushin, V E; Onderwater, Gerco; Petitjean, C; Petrov, G E; Polly, C C; Prieels, R; Sadetsky, S M; Schapkin, G N; Schmidt, R; Semenchuk, G G; Soroka, M; Vorobyov, A A; Voropaev, N I

    2002-01-01

    The aim of the MuCap experiment is a 1% measurement of the singlet capture rate Lambda_S for the basic electro-weak reaction mu + p -> n + nu_mu. This observable is sensitive to the weak form-factors of the nucleon, in particular to the induced pseudoscalar coupling constant g_P. It will provide a rigorous test of theoretical predictions based on the Standard Model and effective theories of QCD. The present method is based on high precision lifetime measurements of mu^- in hydrogen gas and the comparison with the free mu^+ lifetime. The mu^- experiment will be performed in ultra-clean, deuterium-depleted H_2 gas at 10 bar. Low density compared to liquid H_2 is chosen to avoid uncertainties due to ppmu formation. A time projection chamber acts as a pure hydrogen active target. It defines the muon stop position in 3-D and detects rare background reactions. Decay electrons are tracked in cylindrical wire-chambers and a scintillator array covering 75% of 4 pi.

  8. Francesca Hughes: Architecture of Error: Matter, Measure and the Misadventure of Precision

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Foote, Jonathan

    2016-01-01

    Review of "Architecture of Error: Matter, Measure and the Misadventure of Precision" by Francesca Hughes (MIT Press, 2014)......Review of "Architecture of Error: Matter, Measure and the Misadventure of Precision" by Francesca Hughes (MIT Press, 2014)...

  9. A Precision Measurement of Parity Violation in Moller Scattering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Relyea, D

    2004-05-13

    This thesis reports on E158, an experiment located in End Station A at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC). E158 has made the first observation of the parity violating right-left asymmetry (A{sub PV}) in fixed-target low-Q{sup 2} Moeller scattering. At tree level, A{sub PV} (expected to be around -150 ppb) is directly proportional to 1/4 - sin{sup 2} {theta}{sub W}. A precision measurement of A{sub PV} at low Q{sup 2} allows the running of sin{sup 2} {theta}{sub W} to be compared to the Standard Model prediction. Disagreements between the two might provide evidence for new physics at the TeV scale. This thesis presents the first physics data from E158, taken in the spring of 2002. The data were taken by scattering longitudinally polarized electrons at 45.0 and 48.3 GeV off a liquid hydrogen target at a Q{sup 2} of 0.027 GeV{sup 2}. A 60 meter long spectrometer/collimator system and a cooper-quartz calorimeter were used to detect the Moeller signal electrons. Both devices will be described in detail. The right-left parity violating asymmetry in Moeller scattering has been measured to be -152.3 {+-} 29.0(stat) {+-} 30.9(syst) ppb. The value of sin{sup 2} {theta}{sub W} derived from this measurement is 0.2370 {+-} 0.0025(stat) {+-} 0.0026(syst), in comparison with the Standard Model prediction of 0.2387 {+-} 0.0007.

  10. TRACEABILITY OF PRECISION MEASUREMENTS ON COORDINATE MEASURING MACHINES – PERFORMANCE VERIFICATION OF CMMs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    De Chiffre, Leonardo; Sobiecki, René; Tosello, Guido

    This document is used in connection with one exercise of 30 minutes duration as a part of the course VISION ONLINE – One week course on Precision & Nanometrology. The exercise concerns performance verification of the volumetric measuring capability of a small volume coordinate measuring machine. ....... This section contains reference to the American standard normative ANSI/ASME and a description of the exercise....

  11. TRACEABILITY OF PRECISION MEASUREMENTS ON COORDINATE MEASURING MACHINES – PERFORMANCE VERIFICATION OF CMMs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    De Chiffre, Leonardo; Sobiecki, René; Tosello, Guido

    This document is used in connection with one exercise of 30 minutes duration as a part of the course VISION ONLINE – One week course on Precision & Nanometrology. The exercise concerns performance verification of the volumetric measuring capability of a small volume coordinate measuring machine...

  12. Molecular Classification and Pharmacogenetics of Primary Plasma Cell Leukemia: An Initial Approach toward Precision Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simeon, Vittorio; Todoerti, Katia; La Rocca, Francesco; Caivano, Antonella; Trino, Stefania; Lionetti, Marta; Agnelli, Luca; De Luca, Luciana; Laurenzana, Ilaria; Neri, Antonino; Musto, Pellegrino

    2015-07-30

    Primary plasma cell leukemia (pPCL) is a rare and aggressive variant of multiple myeloma (MM) which may represent a valid model for high-risk MM. This disease is associated with a very poor prognosis, and unfortunately, it has not significantly improved during the last three decades. New high-throughput technologies have allowed a better understanding of the molecular basis of this disease and moved toward risk stratification, providing insights for targeted therapy studies. This knowledge, added to the pharmacogenetic profile of new and old agents in the analysis of efficacy and safety, could contribute to help clinical decisions move toward a precision medicine and a better clinical outcome for these patients. In this review, we describe the available literature concerning the genomic characterization and pharmacogenetics of plasma cell leukemia (PCL).

  13. Measurement of the gravitational quantities g and G: How ideas for precision measurement experiments come about

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faller, James

    2012-02-01

    I will talk about g and G whose determinations go back to some of the earliest measurements in the history of metrology. Although today's measurement accuracy for g, the free-fall acceleration due to the Earth's gravity, has improved by nearly nine orders of magnitude, the measurement accuracy of G, the Newtonian Constant of Gravitation, has improved by only two orders of magnitude over its 300 year measurement history. I will discuss what has driven (and impeded) this progress, and how ideas for improvements in these measurements have helped advance the frontiers of measurement science. Finally, I will point out the interconnectedness of all precision measurement experiments.

  14. Precision and Accuracy of Topography Measurements on Europa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenberg, R.; Hurford, T. A.; Foley, M. A.; Varland, K.

    2007-03-01

    Reports of the death of the melt-through model for chaotic terrain on Europa have been greatly exaggerated, to paraphrase Mark Twain. They are based on topographic maps of insufficient quantitative accuracy and precision.

  15. Pico-coulomb charge measured at BELLA to percent-level precision using a Turbo-ICT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, K.; Mittelberger, D. E.; Gonsalves, A. J.; Daniels, J.; Mao, H.-S.; Stulle, F.; Bergoz, J.; Leemans, W. P.

    2016-03-01

    Precise diagnostics of picocoulomb level particle bunches produced by laser plasma accelerators (LPAs) can be a significant challenge. Without proper care, the small signals associated with such bunches can be dominated by a background generated by laser, target, laser-plasma interaction and particle induced radiation. In this paper, we report on first charge measurements using the newly developed Turbo-ICT for LPAs. We outline the Turbo-ICT working principle, which allows precise sub-picocoulomb measurements even in the presence of significant background signals. A comparison of the Turbo-ICT, a conventional integrating current transformer (ICT) and a scintillating screen (Lanex) was carried out at the Berkeley Lab Laser Accelerator. Results show that the Turbo-ICT can measure sub-picocoulomb charge accurately and has significantly improved noise immunity compared to the ICT.

  16. Measurements of an expanding surface flashover plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harris, J. R., E-mail: john.harris@colostate.edu [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, Colorado 80523 (United States)

    2014-05-21

    A better understanding of vacuum surface flashover and the plasma produced by it is of importance for electron and ion sources, as well as advanced accelerators and other vacuum electronic devices. This article describes time-of-flight and biased-probe measurements made on the expanding plasma generated from a vacuum surface flashover discharge. The plasma expanded at velocities of 1.2–6.5 cm/μs, and had typical densities of 10{sup 10}–10{sup 12} cm{sup −3}. The expansion velocity of the plasma leading edge often exhibited a sharp increase at distances of about 50 mm from the discharge site. Comparison with biased-probe data suggests that, under most conditions, the plasma leading edge was dominated by negative ions, with the apparent increase in velocity being due to fast H{sup −} overtaking slower, heavier ions. In some cases, biased-probe data also showed abrupt discontinuities in the plasma energy distribution co-located with large changes in the intercepted plasma current, suggesting the presence of a shock in the leading edge of the expanding plasma.

  17. Thomson Scattering Measurements of Plasma Dynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holl, A; Redmer, R; Tschentscher, T; Toleikis, S; Forster, E; Cao, L; Glenzer, S H; Neumayer, P

    2006-03-29

    The authors propose to investigate the dynamics of plasmas in the warm dense matter (WDM) regime on ultra-short time scales. Accessible plasma conditions are in the density range of n = 10{sup 20} - 10{sup 23} cm{sup -3} and at moderate temperatures of T = 1 - 20 eV. These plasmas are of importance for laboratory astrophysics, high energy density science and inertial confinement fusion. They are characterized by a coupling parameter of {Lambda} {approx}> 1, where electromagnetic interactions are of the same order as the kinetic energy. The high density of the plasma makes it opaque to radiation in the visible range and, as a consequence, UV up to x-ray radiation can be used to probe such systems. Therefore a wide range in the temperature-density plane of WDM is presently unexplored and only the VUV-FEL opens for the first time the opportunity for its detailed investigation. In equilibrium, the macroscopic state of the plasma is completely characterized by its density and temperature. In pump-probe experiments however, the plasma is initially in a nonequilibrium state and relaxes towards equilibrium within the relaxation time {tau}{sub R}. For t > {tau}{sub R}, the plasma is in an equilibrium state and expands hydrodynamically on a time scale {tau}{sub H}. The proposed experiment measures the time-resolved Thomson scattering signal with the VUV-FEL radiation characterizing the plasma in equilibrium and nonequilibrium states. Both regimes are extremely interesting and will provide new insight into the following phenomena: (1) details of nonequilibrium correlations, (2) relaxation phenomena, (3) hydrodynamic expansion, (4) recombination kinetics. The time-resolved Thomson scattering signal is obtained in a pump-probe experiment by varying the delay between pump and probe. The final stage of the relaxation process (t {approx} {tau}{sub R}) is of special interest since the plasma components (electrons and ion species) can be assumed to be in quasi-equilibrium. This

  18. An Advanced Model to Precisely Estimate the Cell-Free Fetal DNA Concentration in Maternal Plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Huixin; Jiang, Haojun; Xie, Weiwei; Chen, Fang; Zeng, Peng; Li, Xuchao; Xie, Yifan; Liu, Hongtai; Huang, Guodong; Chen, Dayang; Liu, Ping; Jiang, Hui; Zhang, Xiuqing

    2016-01-01

    Background With the speedy development of sequencing technologies, noninvasive prenatal testing (NIPT) has been widely applied in clinical practice for testing for fetal aneuploidy. The cell-free fetal DNA (cffDNA) concentration in maternal plasma is the most critical parameter for this technology because it affects the accuracy of NIPT-based sequencing for fetal trisomies 21, 18 and 13. Several approaches have been developed to calculate the cffDNA fraction of the total cell-free DNA in the maternal plasma. However, most approaches depend on specific single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) allele information or are restricted to male fetuses. Methods In this study, we present an innovative method to accurately deduce the concentration of the cffDNA fraction using only maternal plasma DNA. SNPs were classified into four maternal-fetal genotype combinations and three boundaries were added to capture effective SNP loci in which the mother was homozygous and the fetus was heterozygous. The median value of the concentration of the fetal DNA fraction was estimated using the effective SNPs. A depth-bias correction was performed using simulated data and corresponding regression equations for adjustments when the depth of the sequencing data was below 100-fold or the cffDNA fraction is less than 10%. Results Using our approach, the median of the relative bias was 0.4% in 18 maternal plasma samples with a median sequencing depth of 125-fold. There was a significant association (r = 0.935) between our estimations and the estimations inferred from the Y chromosome. Furthermore, this approach could precisely estimate a cffDNA fraction as low as 3%, using only maternal plasma DNA at the targeted region with a sequencing depth of 65-fold. We also used PCR instead of parallel sequencing to calculate the cffDNA fraction. There was a significant association (r = 98.2%) between our estimations and those inferred from the Y chromosome. PMID:27662469

  19. Precision Teaching: Advancing Student Achievement through Daily Drill and Measurement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rawers, Lois J.

    1983-01-01

    After reviewing the conceptual bases and practical application of precision teaching, this analysis traces its evolution as the Sacajawea Plan, reports on its implementation in central Oregon school districts, and details the costs and procedures of adoption. Developed by Ogden Lindsley from B. F. Skinner's work in operant conditioning and…

  20. Precision Teaching: Advancing Student Achievement through Daily Drill and Measurement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rawers, Lois J.

    1983-01-01

    After reviewing the conceptual bases and practical application of precision teaching, this analysis traces its evolution as the Sacajawea Plan, reports on its implementation in central Oregon school districts, and details the costs and procedures of adoption. Developed by Ogden Lindsley from B. F. Skinner's work in operant conditioning and…

  1. Inductive Measurement of Plasma Jet Electrical Conductivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, Matthew W.; Hawk, Clark W.; Litchford, Ron J.

    2005-01-01

    An inductive probing scheme, originally developed for shock tube studies, has been adapted to measure explosive plasma jet conductivities. In this method, the perturbation of an applied magnetic field by a plasma jet induces a voltage in a search coil, which, in turn, can be used to infer electrical conductivity through the inversion of a Fredholm integral equation of the first kind. A 1-inch diameter probe was designed and constructed, and calibration was accomplished by firing an aluminum slug through the probe using a light-gas gun. Exploratory laboratory experiments were carried out using plasma jets expelled from 15-gram high explosive shaped charges. Measured conductivities were in the range of 3 kS/m for unseeded octol charges and 20 kS/m for seeded octol charges containing 2% potassium carbonate by mass.

  2. Preparation of cold molecules for high-precision measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wall, T. E.

    2016-12-01

    Molecules can be used to test fundamental physics. Such tests often require cold molecules for detailed spectroscopic analysis. Cooling internal degrees of freedom provides a high level of state-selectivity, with large populations in the molecular states of interest. Cold translational motion allows slow, bright beams to be created, allowing long interaction times. In this tutorial article we describe the common techniques for producing cold molecules for high-precision spectroscopy experiments. For each technique we give examples of its application in experiments that use molecular structure to probe fundamental physics, choosing one experiment in particular as a case study. We then discuss a number of new techniques, some currently under development, others proposed, that promise high flux sources of cold molecules applicable to precise spectroscopic tests of fundamental physics.

  3. Simplified micromethod for the HPLC measurement of diclofenac in plasma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, S R; Donzella, H; Bertoline, M A; Pereira, M D; Omosako, C E; Porta, V

    1992-01-01

    A simple and sensitive micromethod based on HPLC is described for the measurement of diclofenac in 200 microliters plasma. A single extraction with dichloromethane in acidic medium was an essential clean-up step. Diclofenac and its internal standard (cyclohexendiphenyl propionic acid) was eluted at 3.3 and 6.5 min from a 4-micron C18 reverse-phase column using a mobile phase consisting of 0.75 M sodium acetate buffer, pH 5.0, and acetonitrile (55:45, v/v) at a flow rate of 0.9 ml/min with detection at 282 nm. The method, validated on the basis of parameters evaluated for the confidence limits of diclofenac measurements in spiked plasma, presented 1 ng/ml sensitivity, 10-10,000 ng/ml linearity, and 3.5% and 5.7% intra- and interassay precision, respectively. Peak plasma diclofenac levels ranging from 177 to 841 ng/ml and from 276 to 1008 ng/ml were obtained for two slow-release formulations. A wide range (1 ng/ml-3 micrograms/ml) was observed for plasma diclofenac levels of volunteers during a 24-h study period.

  4. Design of High-Precision Frequency Measure System Based on CPLD Time Delay Unit

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feng Qian; Ding Wei; Wang Hao, E-mail: fengqian@eqhb.gov.cn [Institute of Seismology, China Earthquake Administration, 40 Hongshan Road, Wuchang District, Wuhan (China)

    2011-02-01

    Introduced a method for high-precision frequency measurement, which do do not need the complicated measuring control circumstance. CPLD is used for improving the precision of measurement by the method of quantization time-delay. High precision frequency adjustable module based on the method has been used on the photoelectricity data acquisition system. Frequency accuracy is -8.306x10{sup -10}, which meet the requirement of instrument.

  5. Precise Measurement of Solar Neutrino Oscillation Parameters from Recent Experiments

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG Ping; LIU Qiu-Yu

    2009-01-01

    We analyse the available data of solar neutrino experiments up to the date May 2008,including SK-I,SK-II,SNO phase-I,SNO phase-II and first-generation Ga and C1 experiments.They show great improvement in constraints on solar neutrino oscillation parameters.Together with the new results from long base line reactor experiment KamLAND,the parameters are precisely determined,with la allowed region in △m212 = 7 586+0.212-0.203×10-5 eV2,tan2 θ12=0.457+0.076-0.067

  6. Plasma metabolomic profiles enhance precision medicine for volunteers of normal health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Lining; Milburn, Michael V; Ryals, John A; Lonergan, Shaun C; Mitchell, Matthew W; Wulff, Jacob E; Alexander, Danny C; Evans, Anne M; Bridgewater, Brandi; Miller, Luke; Gonzalez-Garay, Manuel L; Caskey, C Thomas

    2015-09-01

    Precision medicine, taking account of human individuality in genes, environment, and lifestyle for early disease diagnosis and individualized therapy, has shown great promise to transform medical care. Nontargeted metabolomics, with the ability to detect broad classes of biochemicals, can provide a comprehensive functional phenotype integrating clinical phenotypes with genetic and nongenetic factors. To test the application of metabolomics in individual diagnosis, we conducted a metabolomics analysis on plasma samples collected from 80 volunteers of normal health with complete medical records and three-generation pedigrees. Using a broad-spectrum metabolomics platform consisting of liquid chromatography and GC coupled with MS, we profiled nearly 600 metabolites covering 72 biochemical pathways in all major branches of biosynthesis, catabolism, gut microbiome activities, and xenobiotics. Statistical analysis revealed a considerable range of variation and potential metabolic abnormalities across the individuals in this cohort. Examination of the convergence of metabolomics profiles with whole-exon sequences (WESs) provided an effective approach to assess and interpret clinical significance of genetic mutations, as shown in a number of cases, including fructose intolerance, xanthinuria, and carnitine deficiency. Metabolic abnormalities consistent with early indications of diabetes, liver dysfunction, and disruption of gut microbiome homeostasis were identified in several volunteers. Additionally, diverse metabolic responses to medications among the volunteers may assist to identify therapeutic effects and sensitivity to toxicity. The results of this study demonstrate that metabolomics could be an effective approach to complement next generation sequencing (NGS) for disease risk analysis, disease monitoring, and drug management in our goal toward precision care.

  7. Precise On-line Position Measurement for Particle Therapy

    CERN Document Server

    Actis, O; König, S

    2014-01-01

    An on-line beam position monitoring and regular beam stability tests are of utmost importance for the Quality Assurance (QA) of the patient treatment at any particle therapy facility. The Gantry${0.5 mm}2$ at the Paul Scherrer Institute uses a strip ionization chamber for the on-line beam position verification. The design of the strip chamber placed in the beam in front of the patient allows for a small beam penumbra in order to achieve a high-quality lateral beam delivery. The detector granularity and the low noise allow the reconstruction of the signals offered by Gantry${0.5 mm}2$ with a precision of about 0.1 mm. The frond-end electronics and the whole data processing sequence have been optimized for minimizing the dead time between the beam applications to about 2 ms: the charge collection is performed in about 1 ms, read-out takes place in 100 $\\mu$s while data verification and logging are completed in less than 1 ms. The sub-millimeter precision of the lateral reconstruction allows the dose inhomogenei...

  8. Electronic measurement of variable torques in precision work technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maehr, M.

    1978-01-01

    Approaches for the determination of torques on the basis of length measurements are discussed. Attention is given to torque determinations in which the deformation of a shaft is measured, an electric measurement of the torsion angle, and an approach proposed by Buschmann (1970). Methods for a torque determination conducted with the aid of force measurements make use of piezoelectric approaches. The components used by these methods include a quartz crystal and a charge amplifier.

  9. A precision analysis and determination of the technical requirements of an atom interferometer for gravity measurement

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhao-ying WANG; Tao CHEN; Xiao-long WANG; Zhang ZHANG; Yun-fei XU; Qiang LIN

    2009-01-01

    The influence of the wave-front curvature of Raman pulses on the measurement precision of gravitational acceleration in atom interferometry is analysed by the method of a transmission matrix. It is shown that the measurement precision of gravitational acceleration is largely dependent on the spot size of the Raman pulse, the temporal interval between Raman pulses and the optical path difference of the two counter-propagating Raman pulses. Moreover, the influence of Doppler frequency shift on the precision is discussed. In order to get a certain measurement precision, the requirement for the accuracy of frequency scanning of the Raman pulse to compensate for the Doppler frequency shift is obtained.

  10. Development of Precision Information Measuring System for Ultraviolet Radiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ROSHCHUPKIN, O.

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Results of studying the neural network method are presented to reduce the amount of calibration points for the multisensor (MS, in particular for the photodiode. This allows transmitting to the MS individual conversion function and provides the high accuracy of measurement. The structure of synthesized information-measuring system and its measuring channel has created for implementing of the proposed approach. A structural scheme is proposed as well for values transmitting the etalon measures to measuring systems. Its used to determine the errors of photodiodes, as those which are produced for customers. This assures the interchangeability of sensors when using the individual conversion function.

  11. Analytical developments for high-precision measurements of W isotopes in iron meteorites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Liping; Dauphas, Nicolas; Janney, Philip E; Wadhwa, Meenakshi

    2007-04-15

    A procedure was developed to accurately measure the W isotopic compositions of iron meteorites with a precision of better than +/-0.1 epsilon on epsilon182W and epsilon184W (normalized to 186W/183W). Purification of W was achieved through a two-step, ion-exchange procedure. In most cases, the yield is better than 80%, and purified W solutions are clear of matrix elements and direct isobars of W. The final W solutions were analyzed using a Micromass Isoprobe multicollector inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometer (MC-ICPMS). Tests performed on mixtures of terrestrial standards and meteorite samples demonstrate that the method is accurate and that epsilon182W variations as small as approximately 0.1 epsilon can be detected. Analyses of three different aliquots of the Gibeon (IVA) iron meteorite obtained over a period of 6 months show identical epsilon182W values with a weighted mean of 3.38 +/- 0.05, consistent with literature data for IVA iron meteorites, and indicating that the metal-silicate differentiation event in its parent body was either contemporaneous with or slightly postdated (by up to approximately 2.5 My) the formation of refractory inclusions. We demonstrate our ability to measure epsilon184W accurately and precisely (within +/-0.1 epsilon), which is useful for characterizing cosmogenic and nucleosynthetic effects that may be present in iron meteorites. We also report for the first time measurements of epsilon180W, albeit with large error bars (<+/-4 epsilon, in most cases).

  12. Development of Data Registration and Fusion Methods for Measurement of Ultra-Precision Freeform Surfaces

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Ling Bao Kong; Ming Jun Ren; Min Xu

    2017-01-01

    .... The accuracy of the overlapping area is further improved by developing a Gaussian process based data fusion method with full consideration of the associated uncertainties in the measured datasets. Experimental studies are undertaken to examine the effectiveness of the proposed method. The study should contribute to the high precision and efficient measurement of ultra-precision freeform surfaces on multi-sensor systems.

  13. High precision Hugoniot measurements of D2 near maximum compression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benage, John; Knudson, Marcus; Desjarlais, Michael

    2015-11-01

    The Hugoniot response of liquid deuterium has been widely studied due to its general importance and to the significant discrepancy in the inferred shock response obtained from early experiments. With improvements in dynamic compression platforms and experimental standards these results have converged and show general agreement with several equation of state (EOS) models, including quantum molecular dynamics (QMD) calculations within the Generalized Gradient Approximation (GGA). This approach to modeling the EOS has also proven quite successful for other materials and is rapidly becoming a standard approach. However, small differences remain among predictions obtained using different local and semi-local density functionals; these small differences show up in the deuterium Hugoniot at ~ 30-40 GPa near the region of maximum compression. Here we present experimental results focusing on that region of the Hugoniot and take advantage of advancements in the platform and standards, resulting in data with significantly higher precision than that obtained in previous studies. These new data may prove to distinguish between the subtle differences predicted by the various density functionals. Results of these experiments will be presented along with comparison to various QMD calculations. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin company, for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  14. Development of Methods Precision Length Measurement Using Transported Laser Interferometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavrov, E. A.; Epikhin, V. M.; Mazur, M. M.; Suddenok, Y. A.; Shorin, V. N.

    The paper shows the results of a comparison of a developed transported laser interferometer (TLI) with a measurement interferometer XL-80 Renishaw at the distance 0-60 meters. Testings of a breadboard model of the TLI showed that a difference between the travel measurements of the two interferometers does not exceed 6 μm. The mean value of the difference of indications between the TLI and a Renishaw travel measurer at the distance near 58 m approximately equals to 0,5 μm. Root-mean square deviation of the indications of the interferometers approximately equals to 3 μm. At comparison of the sections with the same name between the TLI and the Renishaw travel measurer, measured at different days, a repeatability of the results for the sections with the same name is noted.

  15. Precision measurement of antiprotonic hydrogen and deuterium X-rays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heitlinger, K.; Bacher, R.; Badertscher, A.; Blüm, P.; Eades, J.; Egger, J.; Elsener, K.; Gotta, D.; Morenzoni, E.; Simons, L. M.

    1992-09-01

    X-rays from antiprotonic hydrogen and deuterium have been measured at low pressures. Using the cyclotron trap, a 105 MeV/c antiproton beam from LEAR was stopped with an efficiency of 86% in 30 mbar hydrogen gas in a volume of only 100 cm3. The X-rays were measured with Si(Li) detectors and a Xe-CH4 drift chamber. The strong interaction shift and broadening of the Lyman α transition and the spin-averaged 2p width in antiprotonic hydrogen was measured with unprecedented accuracy. The triplet component of the ground state in antiprotonic hydrogen was determined for the first time.

  16. Precision mass measurements of radioactive nuclei at JYFLTRAP

    CERN Document Server

    Rahaman, S; Eronen, T; Hager, U; Hakala, J; Jokinen, A; Kankainen, A; Moore, I D; Pentillä, H; Rinta-Antila, S; Rissanen, J; Saastamoinen, A; Sonoda, T; Weber, C; Äystö, J

    2007-01-01

    The Penning trap mass spectrometer JYFLTRAP was used to measure the atomic masses of radioactive nuclei with an uncertainty better than 10 keV. The atomic masses of the neutron-deficient nuclei around the N = Z line were measured to improve the understanding of the rp-process path and the SbSnTe cycle. Furthermore, the masses of the neutron-rich gallium (Z = 31) to palladium (Z = 46) nuclei have been measured. The physics impacts on the nuclear structure and the r-process paths are reviewed. A better understanding of the nuclear deformation is presented by studying the pairing energy around A = 100.

  17. Influence of sulfur-bearing polyatomic species on high precision measurements of Cu isotopic composition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pribil, M.J.; Wanty, R.B.; Ridley, W.I.; Borrok, D.M.

    2010-01-01

    An increased interest in high precision Cu isotope ratio measurements using multi-collector inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (MC-ICP-MS) has developed recently for various natural geologic systems and environmental applications, these typically contain high concentrations of sulfur, particularly in the form of sulfate (SO42-) and sulfide (S). For example, Cu, Fe, and Zn concentrations in acid mine drainage (AMD) can range from 100??g/L to greater than 50mg/L with sulfur species concentrations reaching greater than 1000mg/L. Routine separation of Cu, Fe and Zn from AMD, Cu-sulfide minerals and other geological matrices usually incorporates single anion exchange resin column chromatography for metal separation. During chromatographic separation, variable breakthrough of SO42- during anion exchange resin column chromatography into the Cu fractions was observed as a function of the initial sulfur to Cu ratio, column properties, and the sample matrix. SO42- present in the Cu fraction can form a polyatomic 32S-14N-16O-1H species causing a direct mass interference with 63Cu and producing artificially light ??65Cu values. Here we report the extent of the mass interference caused by SO42- breakthrough when measuring ??65Cu on natural samples and NIST SRM 976 Cu isotope spiked with SO42- after both single anion column chromatography and double anion column chromatography. A set of five 100??g/L Cu SRM 976 samples spiked with 500mg/L SO42- resulted in an average ??65Cu of -3.50?????5.42??? following single anion column separation with variable SO42- breakthrough but an average concentration of 770??g/L. Following double anion column separation, the average SO42-concentration of 13??g/L resulted in better precision and accuracy for the measured ??65Cu value of 0.01?????0.02??? relative to the expected 0??? for SRM 976. We conclude that attention to SO42- breakthrough on sulfur-rich samples is necessary for accurate and precise measurements of ??65Cu and may require

  18. Precise measurement of $\\sin^22\\theta_{13}$ using Japanese Reactors

    CERN Document Server

    Suekane, F; Araki, T; Jongok, K

    2004-01-01

    After the KamLAND results, the remaining important targets in neutrino experiments are to measure still unknown 3 basic parameters; absolute neutrino mass scale, CP violation phase $\\delta_{CP}$ and last mixing angle $\\theta_{13}$. The angle $\\theta_{13}$ among them is expected to be measured in near future by long baseline accelerator experiments and reactor experiments. In this paper, a realistic idea of high sensitivity reactor measurement of $\\sin^22\\theta_{13}$ is described. This experiment uses a giant nuclear power plant as the neutrino source and three identical detectors are used to cancel detector and neutrino flux uncertainties. The sensitivity reach on $\\sin^22\\theta_{13}$ is $0.017\\sim0.026$ at $\\Delta m^2_{13} \\sim 3 \\times 10^{-3}eV^2$, which is five to seven times better than the current upper limit measured by CHOOZ.

  19. Precision frequency measurement of visible intercombination lines of strontium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrari, G; Cancio, P; Drullinger, R; Giusfredi, G; Poli, N; Prevedelli, M; Toninelli, C; Tino, G M

    2003-12-12

    We report the direct frequency measurement of the visible 5s(2) 1S0-5s5p 3P1 intercombination line of strontium that is considered a possible candidate for a future optical-frequency standard. The frequency of a cavity-stabilized laser is locked to the saturated fluorescence in a thermal Sr atomic beam and is measured with an optical-frequency comb generator referenced to the SI second through a global positioning system signal. The 88Sr transition is measured to be at 434 829 121 311 (10) kHz. We measure also the 88Sr-86Sr isotope shift to be 163 817.4 (0.2) kHz.

  20. Design of precision measurement circuits for the relative humidity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yanpeng; Gao, Guanwang; Sha, Zhanyou

    2009-07-01

    The two methods of the relative humidity measurement are introduced in this paper. The one is adopting transistor and operational amplifier to compose a logarithmic amplifier, by which to realize the linearization of exponent mode character curve of moisture-sensitive resistor. And using the positive temperature coefficient of the adjustable current source (+0.33%/°C) compensate the negative temperature coefficient of the thermistor (-0.36%/°C). Zero temperature drift is realized by the methods and the measurement accuracy reached +/-2%. The two is adopting intelligent temperature/relative humidity sensor, which combined the multiple parameter sensor and transmitter, to realize the accurately measurement not only of the relative humidity, but also of the temperature and dew point. Through the 2-wires serial port the system can be connected to MCS-51 MCU. The accuracy of the relative humidity measurement is +/-1.8% the nonlinear error can be reduced to +/-0.1% after software arithmetic compensation. The temperature range measured is -40{ + 123.8°C. The accuracy of dew point measurement is ?+/-1°C

  1. Precise measurement of the micron-scale spot of ultrashort laser pulse based on film scanning

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Fengtie Wu; Jianrong Zhang; Yunbin Chen; Dongdong Guo

    2008-01-01

    @@ A novel and precise micron-scale nanosecond laser spot measurement based on film-scanning method is presented. The method can be used to measure the spot size, beam profile, and intensity distribution of the pulse.

  2. Plasma Density Measurements on Refuelling by Solid Hydrogen Pellets in a Rotating Plasma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, L. W.; Sillesen, A. H.

    1978-01-01

    The authors used laser interferometry to directly measure the increase in plasma density caused by the ablation of a solid hydrogen pellet situated in a rotating plasma.......The authors used laser interferometry to directly measure the increase in plasma density caused by the ablation of a solid hydrogen pellet situated in a rotating plasma....

  3. Intercomparison of snow density measurements: bias, precision and spatial resolution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Proksch

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Density is a fundamental property of porous media such as snow. A wide range of snow properties and physical processes are linked to density, but few studies have addressed the uncertainty in snow density measurements. No study has yet considered the recent advances in snow measurement methods such as micro-computed tomography (CT. During the MicroSnow Davos 2014 workshop different approaches to measure snow density were applied in a controlled laboratory environment and in the field. Overall, the agreement between CT and gravimetric methods (density cutters was 5 to 9 %, with a bias of −5 to 2 %, expressed as percentage of the mean CT density. In the field, the density cutters tend to overestimate (1 to 6 % densities below and underestimate (1 to 6 % densities above 296 to 350 kg m−3, respectively, depending on the cutter type. Using the mean per layer of all measurement methods applied in the field (CT, box, wedge and cylinder cutter and ignoring ice layers, the variation of layer density between the methods was 2 to 5 % with a bias of −1 to 1 %. In general, our result suggests that snow densities measured by different methods agree within 9 %. However, the density profiles resolved by the measurement methods differed considerably. In particular, the millimeter scale density variations revealed by the high resolution CT contrasted the thick layers with sharp boundaries introduced by the observer. In this respect, the unresolved variation, i.e. the density variation within a layer, which is lost by sampling with lower resolution or layer aggregation, is critical when snow density measurements are used as boundary or initial conditions in numerical simulations.

  4. Impact of Planetary Gravitation on High Precision Neutral Atom Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kucharek, H.; Galli, A.; Wurz, P.; Moebius, E.; Lee, M. A.; Park, J.; Fuselier, S. A.; Bzowski, M.; Schwadron, N.; McComas, D. J.

    2015-12-01

    Measurements of energetic neutral atoms (ENAs) have been extremely successful in providing very important information on physical processes inside and outside our heliosphere. For instance, recent IBEX observations provided new insights into the local interstellar environment and improved measurements of the interstellar He temperature, velocity, and direction of the interstellar flow vector. Since particle collisions are rare and radiation pressure is negligible for these neutrals, gravitational forces mainly determine the trajectories of neutral He atoms. Depending on the distance of an ENA to the source of a gravitational field and its relative speed and direction this can result in a significant deflection and acceleration. In this presentation we study the impact of the gravitational effects of the Earth, Moon, and Jupiter on ENA measurements performed in Earth orbit. We show that planetary gravitational effects do not significantly affect the interstellar neutral gas parameters obtained from IBEX observations. We further study the possibility whether the He focusing cone of the Sun or Jupiter could be measured by IBEX, and whether these cones could be used as an independent measure of the interstellar He temperature. These topics are of particular importance for future missions such as IMAP, which will provide ENA images for a broader energy range and with better sensitivity and resolution.

  5. Effects of partial-collapse measurement on the parameter-estimation precision of noisy quantum channels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Xiang-Ping; Fang, Mao-Fa; Zhou, Xin

    2017-10-01

    An efficient method is proposed to enhance the parameter-estimation precision for noisy quantum channels based on measurement reversal from partial-collapse measurement. It is shown that the quantum Fisher information can be distinctly improved for amplitude-damping channel, phase-damping channel and depolarizing channel with partial-collapse measurement. This also means that choosing the appropriate measurement strengths can lead to higher precision of estimation on noisy quantum channels.

  6. Plasma ion composition measurements for Europa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sittler, E. C.; Cooper, J. F.; Hartle, R. E.; Paterson, W. R.; Christian, E. R.; Lipatov, A. S.; Mahaffy, P. R.; Paschalidis, N. P.; Coplan, M. A.; Cassidy, T. A.; Richardson, J. D.; Fegley, B.; Andre, N.

    2013-11-01

    Jupiter magnetospheric interactions and surface composition, both important to subsurface ocean detection for the Galilean icy moons Europa, Ganymede, and Callisto, can be measured using plasma ion mass spectrometry on either an orbiting spacecraft or one designed for multiple flybys of these moons. Detection of emergent oceanic materials at the Europa surface is more likely than at Ganymede and Callisto. A key challenge is to resolve potential intrinsic Europan materials from the space weathering patina of iogenic species implanted onto the sensible surface by magnetospheric interactions. Species-resolved measurements of pickup ion currents are also critical to extraction of oceanic induced magnetic fields from magnetospheric interaction background dominated by these currents. In general the chemical astrobiological potential of Europa should be determined through the combination of surface, ionospheric, and pickup ion composition measurements. The requisite Ion Mass Spectrometer (IMS) for these measurements would need to work in the high radiation environment of Jupiter's magnetosphere between the orbits of Europa and Ganymede, and beyond. A 3D hybrid model of the moon-magnetosphere interaction is also needed to construct a global model of the electric and magnetic fields, and the plasma environment, around Europa. Europa's ionosphere is probably usually dominated by hot pickup ions with 100-1000 eV temperatures, excursions to a "classical" cold ionosphere likely being infrequent. A field aligned ionospheric wind driven by the electron polarization electric field should arise and be measurable.

  7. Precision measurement of antiprotonic hydrogen and deuterium X-rays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heitlinger, K.; Bluem, P. (Kernforschungszentrum Karlsruhe GmbH (Germany). Inst. fuer Kernphysik Karlsruhe Univ. (T.H.) (Germany). Inst. fuer Experimentelle Kernphysik); Bacher, R.; Badertscher, A.; Egger, J.; Morenzoni, E.; Simons, L.M. (Paul Scherrer Inst. (PSI), Villigen (Switzerland)); Eades, J.; Elsener, K. (European Organization for Nuclear Research, Geneva (Switzerland)); Gotta, D. (Forschungszentrum Juelich GmbH (Germany). Inst. fuer Kernphysik)

    1992-05-01

    X-rays from antiprotonic hydrogen and deuterium have been measured at low pressures. Using the cylcotron trap, a 105 MeV/c antiproton beam from LEAR was stopped with an efficiency of 86% in 30 mbar hydrogen gas in a volume of only 100 cm{sup 3}. The X-rays were measured with Si(Li) detectors and a Xe-CH{sub 4} drift chamber. The strong interaction shift and broadening of the Lyman {alpha} transition and the spin-averaged 2p width in antiprotonic hydrogen was measured with unprecedented accuracy. The triplet component of the ground state in antiprotonic hydrogen was determined for the first time. (orig.).

  8. A Precision Measurement of the Lambda_c Baryon Mass

    CERN Document Server

    Aubert, B; Boutigny, D; Couderc, F; Karyotakis, Yu; Lees, J P; Poireau, V; Tisserand, V; Zghiche, A; Graugès-Pous, E; Palano, A; Pompili, A; Chen, J C; Qi, N D; Rong, G; Wang, P; Zhu, Y S; Eigen, G; Ofte, I; Stugu, B; Abrams, G S; Borgland, A W; Breon, A B; Brown, D N; Button-Shafer, J; Cahn, R N; Charles, E; Day, C T; Gill, M S; Gritsan, A V; Groysman, Y; Jacobsen, R G; Kadel, R W; Kadyk, J; Kerth, L T; Kolomensky, Yu G; Kukartsev, G; Lynch, G; Mir, L M; Oddone, P J; Orimoto, T J; Pripstein, M; Roe, N A; Ronan, Michael T; Wenzel, W A; Barrett, M; Ford, K E; Harrison, T J; Hart, A J; Hawkes, C M; Morgan, S E; Watson, A T; Fritsch, M; Goetzen, K; Held, T; Koch, H; Lewandowski, B; Pelizaeus, M; Peters, K; Schröder, T; Steinke, M; Boyd, J T; Burke, J P; Chevalier, N; Cottingham, W N; Kelly, M P; Latham, T E; Wilson, F F; Çuhadar-Dönszelmann, T; Hearty, C; Knecht, N S; Mattison, T S; McKenna, J A; Thiessen, D; Khan, A; Kyberd, P; Teodorescu, L; Blinov, A E; Blinov, V E; Druzhinin, V P; Golubev, V B; Ivanchenko, V N; Kravchenko, E A; Onuchin, A P; Serednyakov, S I; Skovpen, Yu I; Solodov, E P; Yushkov, A N; Best, D; Bruinsma, M; Chao, M; Eschrich, I; Kirkby, D; Lankford, A J; Mandelkern, M A; Mommsen, R K; Röthel, W; Stoker, D P; Buchanan, C; Hartfiel, B L; Weinstein, A J R; Foulkes, S D; Gary, J W; Long, O; Shen, B C; Wang, K; Del Re, D; Hadavand, H K; Hill, E J; MacFarlane, D B; Paar, H P; Rahatlou, S; Sharma, V; Berryhill, J W; Campagnari, C; Cunha, A; Dahmes, B; Hong, T M; Lu, A; Mazur, M A; Richman, J D; Verkerke, W; Beck, T W; Eisner, A M; Flacco, C J; Heusch, C A; Kroseberg, J; Lockman, W S; Nesom, G; Schalk, T; Schumm, B A; Seiden, A; Spradlin, P; Williams, D C; Wilson, M G; Albert, J; Chen, E; Dubois-Felsmann, G P; Dvoretskii, A; Hitlin, D G; Narsky, I; Piatenko, T; Porter, F C; Ryd, A; Samuel, A; Yang, S; Jayatilleke, S M; Mancinelli, G; Meadows, B T; Sokoloff, M D; Blanc, F; Bloom, P; Chen, S; Ford, W T; Nauenberg, U; Olivas, A; Rankin, P; Ruddick, W O; Smith, J G; Ulmer, K A; Zhang, J; Zhang, L; Chen, A; Eckhart, E A; Harton, J L; Soffer, A; Toki, W H; Wilson, R J; Zeng, Q; Spaan, B; Altenburg, D; Brandt, T; Brose, J; Dickopp, M; Feltresi, E; Hauke, A; Lacker, H M; Maly, E; Nogowski, R; Otto, S; Petzold, A; Schott, G; Schubert, J; Schubert, K R; Schwierz, R; Sundermann, J E; Bernard, D; Bonneaud, G R; Grenier, P; Schrenk, S; Thiebaux, C; Vasileiadis, G; Verderi, M; Bard, D J; Clark, P J; Muheim, F; Playfer, S; Xie, Y; Andreotti, M; Azzolini, V; Bettoni, D; Bozzi, C; Calabrese, R; Cibinetto, G; Luppi, E; Negrini, M; Piemontese, L; Sarti, A; Anulli, F; Baldini-Ferroli, R; Calcaterra, A; De, R; Sangro; Finocchiaro, G; Patteri, P; Peruzzi, I M; Piccolo, M; Zallo, A; Buzzo, A; Capra, R; Contri, R; Crosetti, G; Lo Vetere, M; Macri, M; Monge, M R; Passaggio, S; Patrignani, C; Robutti, E; Santroni, A; Tosi, S; Bailey, S; Brandenburg, G; Chaisanguanthum, K S; Morii, M; Won, E; Dubitzky, R S; Langenegger, U; Marks, J; Uwer, U; Bhimji, W; Bowerman, D A; Dauncey, P D; Egede, U; Gaillard, J R; Morton, G W; Nash, J A; Nikolich, M B; Taylor, G P; Charles, M J; Grenier, G J; Mallik, U; Mohapatra, A K; Cochran, J; Crawley, H B; Lamsa, J; Meyer, W T; Prell, S; Rosenberg, E I; Rubin, A E; Yi, J; Arnaud, N; Davier, M; Giroux, X; Grosdidier, G; Höcker, A; Le Diberder, F R; Lepeltier, V; Lutz, A M; Petersen, T C; Pierini, M; Plaszczynski, S; Schune, M H; Wormser, G; Cheng, C H; Lange, D J; Simani, M C; Wright, D M; Bevan, A J; Chavez, C A; Coleman, J P; Forster, I J; Fry, J R; Gabathuler, Erwin; Gamet, R; Hutchcroft, D E; Parry, R J; Payne, D J; Touramanis, C; Cormack, C M; Di Lodovico, F; Brown, C L; Cowan, G; Flack, R L; Flächer, H U; Green, M G; Jackson, P S; McMahon, T R; Ricciardi, S; Salvatore, F; Winter, M A; Brown, D; Davis, C L; Allison, J; Barlow, N R; Barlow, R J; Hodgkinson, M C; Lafferty, G D; Naisbit, M T; Williams, J C; Chen, C; Farbin, A; Hulsbergen, W D; Jawahery, A; Kovalskyi, D; Lae, C K; Lillard, V; Roberts, D A; Blaylock, G; Dallapiccola, C; Hertzbach, S S; Kofler, R; Koptchev, V B; Moore, T B; Saremi, S; Stängle, H; Willocq, S; Cowan, R; Koeneke, K; Sciolla, G; Sekula, S J; Taylor, F; Yamamoto, R K; Patel, P M; Robertson, S H; Lazzaro, A; Lombardo, V; Palombo, F; Bauer, J M; Cremaldi, L M; Eschenburg, V; Godang, R; Kroeger, R; Reidy, J; Sanders, D A; Summers, D J; Zhao, H W; Brunet, S; Côté, D; Taras, P; Nicholson, H; Cavallo, N; Fabozzi, F; Gatto, C; Lista, L; Monorchio, D; Paolucci, P; Piccolo, D; Sciacca, C; Baak, M; Bulten, H; Raven, G; Snoek, H L; Wilden, L; Jessop, C P; LoSecco, J M; Allmendinger, T; Benelli, G; Gan, K K; Honscheid, K; Hufnagel, D; Kagan, H; Kass, R; Pulliam, T; Rahimi, A M; Ter-Antonian, R; Wong, Q K; Brau, J E; Frey, R; Igonkina, O; Lu, M; Potter, C T; Sinev, N B; Strom, D; Torrence, E; Colecchia, F; Dorigo, A; Galeazzi, F; Margoni, M; Morandin, M; Posocco, M; Rotondo, M; Simonetto, F; Stroili, R; Voci, C; Benayoun, M; Briand, H; Chauveau, J; David, P; Del Buono, L; La Vaissière, C de; Hamon, O; John, M J J; Leruste, P; Malcles, J; Ocariz, J; Roos, L; Therin, G; Behera, P K; Gladney, L; Guo, Q H; Panetta, J; Biasini, M; Covarelli, R; Pioppi, M; Angelini, C; Batignani, G; Bettarini, S; Bondioli, M; Bucci, F; Calderini, G; Carpinelli, M; Forti, F; Giorgi, M A; Lusiani, A; Marchiori, G; Morganti, M; Neri, N; Paoloni, E; Rama, M; Rizzo, G; Simi, G; Walsh, J; Haire, M; Judd, D; Paick, K; Wagoner, D E; Danielson, N; Elmer, P; Lau, Y P; Lü, C; Miftakov, V; Olsen, J; Smith, A J S; Telnov, A V; Bellini, F; Cavoto, G; D'Orazio, A; Di Marco, E; Faccini, R; Ferrarotto, F; Ferroni, F; Gaspero, M; Li Gioi, L; Mazzoni, M A; Morganti, S; Piredda, G; Polci, F; Safai, F; Tehrani; Voena, C; Christ, S; Schröder, H; Wagner, G; Waldi, R; Adye, T; De Groot, N; Franek, B J; Gopal, G P; Olaiya, E O; Aleksan, Roy; Emery, S; Gaidot, A; Ganzhur, S F; Giraud, P F; Graziani, G; Hamel de Monchenault, G; Kozanecki, Witold; Legendre, M; London, G W; Mayer, B; Vasseur, G; Yéche, C; Zito, M; Purohit, M V; Weidemann, A W; Wilson, J R; Yumiceva, F X; Abe, T; Aston, D; Bartoldus, R; Berger, N; Boyarski, A M; Buchmüller, O L; Claus, R; Convery, M R; Cristinziani, M; De Nardo, Gallieno; Dingfelder, J C; Dong, D; Dorfan, J; Dujmic, D; Dunwoodie, W M; Fan, S; Field, R C; Glanzman, T; Gowdy, S J; Hadig, T; Halyo, V; Hast, C; Hrynóva, T; Innes, W R; Kelsey, M H; Kim, P; Kocian, M L; Leith, D W G S; Libby, J; Luitz, S; Lüth, V; Lynch, H L; Marsiske, H; Messner, R; Müller, D R; O'Grady, C P; Ozcan, V E; Perazzo, A; Perl, M; Ratcliff, B N; Roodman, A; Salnikov, A A; Schindler, R H; Schwiening, J; Snyder, A; Soha, A; Stelzer, J; Strube, J; Su, D; Sullivan, M K; Vavra, J; Wagner, S R; Weaver, M; Wisniewski, W J; Wittgen, M; Wright, D H; Yarritu, A K; Young, C C; Burchat, Patricia R; Edwards, A J; Majewski, S A; Petersen, B A; Roat, C; Ahmed, M; Ahmed, S; Alam, M S; Ernst, J A; Saeed, M A; Saleem, M; Wappler, F R; Bugg, W; Krishnamurthy, M; Spanier, S M; Eckmann, R; Kim, H; Ritchie, J L; Satpathy, A; Schwitters, R F; Izen, J M; Kitayama, I; Lou, X C; Ye, S; Bianchi, F; Bóna, M; Gallo, F; Gamba, D; Bosisio, L; Cartaro, C; Cossutti, F; Della Ricca, G; Dittongo, S; Grancagnolo, S; Lanceri, L; Poropat, P; Vitale, L; Vuagnin, G; Martínez-Vidal, F; Panvini, R S; Banerjee, S W; Bhuyan, B; Brown, C M; Fortin, D; Hamano, K; Jackson, P D; Kowalewski, R V; Roney, J M; Sobie, R J; Back, J J; Harrison, P F; Mohanty, G B; Band, H R; Chen, X; Cheng, B; Dasu, S; Datta, M; Eichenbaum, A M; Flood, K T; Graham, M; Hollar, J J; Johnson, J R; Kutter, P E; Li, H; Liu, R; Mihályi, A; Pan, Y; Prepost, R; Tan, P; Von Wimmersperg-Töller, J H; Wu, J; Wu, S L; Yu, Z; Greene, M G; Neal, H

    2005-01-01

    The $\\Lambda_c^+$ baryon mass is measured using $\\Lambda_c^+\\to\\Lambda K^0_S K^+$ and $\\Lambda_c^+\\to\\Sigma^0 K^0_S K^+$ decays reconstructed in 232 fb$^{-1}$ of data collected with the BaBar detector at the PEP-II asymmetric-energy $e^+e^-$ storage ring. The $\\Lambda_c^+$ mass is measured to be $2286.46\\pm0.14\\mathrm{MeV}/c^2$. The dominant systematic uncertainties arise from the amount of material in the tracking volume and from the magnetic field strength.

  9. Impact of measurement precision and noise on superresolution image reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, Sally L; Lee, Shu-Ting; Yang, Gao; Christensen, Marc P; Rajan, Dinesh

    2008-04-01

    The performance of uniform and nonuniform detector arrays for application to the PANOPTES (processing arrays of Nyquist-limited observations to produce a thin electro-optic sensor) flat camera design is analyzed for measurement noise environments including quantization noise and Gaussian and Poisson processes. Image data acquired from a commercial camera with 8 bit and 14 bit output options are analyzed, and estimated noise levels are computed. Noise variances estimated from the measurement values are used in the optimal linear estimators for superresolution image reconstruction.

  10. Plasma Density Measurements in Cable Gun Experiments with a Sensitive He-Ne Interferometer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Lin; HE An; JIANG Wei; XU Min; WU Shoudong; LI Ye

    2007-01-01

    A time-resolved sensitive He-Ne laser interferometer without complicated active stabilization was built up and applied to low-density plasma measurements. A precision of about 0.2° in phase measurements was achieved with a minimum line-integrated plasma density as low as 8.3×l013 cm-2. With this interferometer, the characteristics of the plasma generated by a cable plasma gun was investigated systematically. The reproducibility, spatial and temporal distributions and the averaged injection velocity of the plasma are presented. In addition, the interaction of the plasma flow with a conductor was studied by placing a metal plate in the downstream of the cable gun.

  11. High precision stress measurements in semiconductor structures by Raman microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Uhlig, Benjamin

    2009-07-01

    Stress in silicon structures plays an essential role in modern semiconductor technology. This stress has to be measured and due to the ongoing miniaturization in today's semiconductor industry, the measuring method has to meet certain requirements. The present thesis deals with the question how Raman spectroscopy can be used to measure the state of stress in semiconductor structures. In the first chapter the relation between Raman peakshift and stress in the material is explained. It is shown that detailed stress maps with a spatial resolution close to the diffraction limit can be obtained in structured semiconductor samples. Furthermore a novel procedure, the so called Stokes-AntiStokes-Difference method is introduced. With this method, topography, tool or drift effects can be distinguished from stress related influences in the sample. In the next chapter Tip-enhanced Raman Scattering (TERS) and its application for an improvement in lateral resolution is discussed. For this, a study is presented, which shows the influence of metal particles on the intensity and localization of the Raman signal. A method to attach metal particles to scannable tips is successfully applied. First TERS scans are shown and their impact on and challenges for high resolution stress measurements on semiconductor structures is explained. (orig.)

  12. Precise Measurement of Separation Between Two Spherical Source Masses

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈德才; 罗俊; 胡忠坤; 赵亮

    2004-01-01

    A driving gauge method is performed to determine the separation between two spherical source masses in the measurement of Newtonian gravitational constant G. The experimental result shows that the uncertainty of determining the separation is about 0.35μm, which would contribute an uncertainty of 7.3ppm to the value of G.

  13. Improving Measurement Precision of Hierarchical Latent Traits Using Adaptive Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chun

    2014-01-01

    Many latent traits in social sciences display a hierarchical structure, such as intelligence, cognitive ability, or personality. Usually a second-order factor is linearly related to a group of first-order factors (also called domain abilities in cognitive ability measures), and the first-order factors directly govern the actual item responses.…

  14. The impact of atomic precision measurements in high energy physics

    OpenAIRE

    Casalbuoni, Roberto

    2000-01-01

    In this talk I discuss the relevance of atomic physics in understanding some important questions about elementary particle physics. A particular attention is devoted to atomic parity violation measurements which seem to suggest new physics beyond the Standard Model. Atomic physics might also be relevant in discovering possible violations of the CPT symmetry.

  15. Precise measurement of muon capture on the proton

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kammel, P; Andreev, VA; Balin, DV; Carey, RM; Case, T; Chitwood, DB; Clayton, SM; Crowe, KM; Deutsch, J; Debevec, PT; Dick, PU; Dijksman, A; Egger, J; Fahrni, D; Fetisov, AA; Freedman, SJ; Ganzha, VA; Gartner, B; Govaerts, J; Gray, FE; Hartmann, FJ; Herold, WD; Hertzog, DW; Jatsoura, [No Value; Krivshich, AG; Lauss, B; Maev, EM; Maev, OE; Markushin, VE; Onderwater, CJG; Petitjean, C; Petrov, GE; Polly, CC; Prieels, R; Sadetsky, SM; Schapkin, GN; Schmidt, R; Semenchuk, GG; Soroka, M; Vorobyov, AA; Voropaev, NI

    2001-01-01

    The aim of the muCap experiment is a 1% measurement of the singlet capture rate Lambda(S) for the basic electro-weak reaction mu + p --> n + nu(mu). This observable is sensitive to the weak form-factors of the nucleon, in particular to the induced pseudoscalar coupling constant g(p). It will provide

  16. TRACEABILITY OF PRECISION MEASUREMENTS ON COORDINATE MEASURING MACHINES – UNCERTAINTY ASSESSMENT BY USING CALIBRATED WORPIECES ON CMMs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tosello, Guido; De Chiffre, Leonardo

    This document is used in connection with one exercise 30 minutes duration as a part of the course VISION ONLINE – One week course on Precision & Nanometrology. The exercise concerns establishment of traceability of precision measurements on coordinate measuring machines. This document contains...

  17. Laser cooled ion beams and strongly coupled plasmas for precision experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bussmann, Michael

    2008-03-17

    This cumulative thesis summarizes experimental and theoretical results on cooling of ion beams using single-frequency, single-mode tabletop laser systems. It consists of two parts. One deals with experiments on laser-cooling of ion beams at relativistic energies, the other with simulations of stopping and sympathetic cooling of ions for precision in-trap experiments. In the first part, experimental results are presented on laser-cooling of relativistic C{sup 3+} ion beams at a beam energy of 122 MeV/u, performed at the Experimental Storage Ring (ESR) at GSI. The main results presented in this thesis include the first attainment of longitudinally space-charge dominated relativistic ion beams using pure laser-cooling. The second part lists theoretical results on stopping and sympathetic cooling of ions in a laser-cooled one-component plasma of singly charged {sup 24}Mg ions, which are confined in a three-dimensional harmonic trap potential. (orig.)

  18. Precision charging of microparticles in plasma via the Rayleigh instability for evaporating charged liquid droplets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennet, Euan; Mahony, Charles M. O.; Potts, Hugh E.; Everest, Paul; Rutherford, David; Askari, Sadegh; Kelsey, Colin; Perez-Martin, Fatima; Hamilton, Neil; McDowell, David A.; Mariotti, Davide; Maguire, Paul; Diver, Declan A.

    2015-09-01

    In this paper we describe a novel method for delivering a precise, known amount of electric charge to a micron-sized solid target. Aerosolised microparticles passed through a plasma discharge will acquire significant electric charge. The fluid stability under evaporative stress is a key aspect that is core to the research. Initially stable charged aerosols subject to evaporation (i.e. a continually changing radius) may encounter the Rayleigh stability limit. This limit arises from the electrostatic and surface tension forces and determines the maximum charge a stable droplet can retain, as a function of radius. We demonstrate that even if the droplet charge is initially much less than the Rayleigh limit, the stability limit will be encountered as the droplet evaporates. The instability emission mechanism is strongly linked to the final charge deposited on the target, providing a mechanism that can be used to ensure a predictable charge deposit on a known encapsulated microparticle. The authors gratefully acknowledge support from EPSRC via Grant Numbers EP/K006142/1 and EP/K006088/1.

  19. A Precision Measurement of the Lambda_c Baryon Mass

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aubert, B.; Barate, R.; Boutigny, D.; Couderc, F.; Karyotakis, Y.; Lees, J.P.; Poireau, V.; Tisserand, V.; Zghiche, A.; /Annecy, LAPP; Grauges, E.; /Barcelona, IFAE; Palano, A.; Pappagallo, M.; Pompili, A.; /Bari U. /INFN, Bari; Chen, J.C.; Qi, N.D.; Rong, G.; Wang, P.; Zhu, Y.S.; /Beijing, Inst. High Energy Phys.; Eigen, G.; Ofte, I.; Stugu, B.

    2005-07-06

    The {Lambda}{sub c}{sup +} baryon mass is measured using {Lambda}{sub c}{sup +} {yields} {Lambda}K{sub S}{sup 0}K{sup +} and {Lambda}{sub c}{sup +} {yields} {Sigma}{sup 0}K{sub S}{sup 0}K{sup +} decays reconstructed in 232 fb{sup -1} of data collected with the BABAR detector at the PEP-II asymmetric-energy e{sup +}e{sup -} storage ring. The {Lambda}{sub c}{sup +} mass is measured to be 2286.46 {+-} 0.14 MeV/c{sup 2}. The dominant systematic uncertainties arise from the amount of material in the tracking volume and from the magnetic field strength.

  20. A Precision Measurement of the Lambda_c Baryon Mass

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aubert, B.; Barate, R.; Boutigny, D.; Couderc, F.; Karyotakis, Y.; Lees, J.P.; Poireau, V.; Tisserand, V.; Zghiche, A.; /Annecy, LAPP; Grauges, E.; /Barcelona, IFAE; Palano, A.; Pappagallo, M.; Pompili, A.; /Bari U. /INFN, Bari; Chen, J.C.; Qi, N.D.; Rong, G.; Wang, P.; Zhu, Y.S.; /Beijing, Inst. High Energy Phys.; Eigen, G.; Ofte, I.; Stugu, B.

    2005-07-06

    The {Lambda}{sub c}{sup +} baryon mass is measured using {Lambda}{sub c}{sup +} {yields} {Lambda}K{sub S}{sup 0}K{sup +} and {Lambda}{sub c}{sup +} {yields} {Sigma}{sup 0}K{sub S}{sup 0}K{sup +} decays reconstructed in 232 fb{sup -1} of data collected with the BABAR detector at the PEP-II asymmetric-energy e{sup +}e{sup -} storage ring. The {Lambda}{sub c}{sup +} mass is measured to be 2286.46 {+-} 0.14 MeV/c{sup 2}. The dominant systematic uncertainties arise from the amount of material in the tracking volume and from the magnetic field strength.

  1. Navy Precision Optical Interferometer Measurements of 10 Stellar Oscillators

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-02-01

    Kornilov et al. (1991), Eggen (1968), Johnson et al. (1966), Cutri et al. (2003), and Gezari et al. (1993) as well as spectrophotometry from Glushneva...Two Micron All Sky Survey infrared measure- ments are as reported in Cutri et al. (2003), and an uncertainty of 0.05 mag was assigned to the optical...makes use of data products from the Two Micron All Sky Survey, which is a joint project of the University of Massachusetts and the Infrared Processing

  2. A precise measurement of the average b hadron lifetime

    CERN Document Server

    Buskulic, Damir; De Bonis, I; Décamp, D; Ghez, P; Goy, C; Lees, J P; Lucotte, A; Minard, M N; Odier, P; Pietrzyk, B; Ariztizabal, F; Chmeissani, M; Crespo, J M; Efthymiopoulos, I; Fernández, E; Fernández-Bosman, M; Gaitan, V; Garrido, L; Martínez, M; Orteu, S; Pacheco, A; Padilla, C; Palla, Fabrizio; Pascual, A; Perlas, J A; Sánchez, F; Teubert, F; Colaleo, A; Creanza, D; De Palma, M; Farilla, A; Gelao, G; Girone, M; Iaselli, Giuseppe; Maggi, G; Maggi, M; Marinelli, N; Natali, S; Nuzzo, S; Ranieri, A; Raso, G; Romano, F; Ruggieri, F; Selvaggi, G; Silvestris, L; Tempesta, P; Zito, G; Huang, X; Lin, J; Ouyang, Q; Wang, T; Xie, Y; Xu, R; Xue, S; Zhang, J; Zhang, L; Zhao, W; Bonvicini, G; Cattaneo, M; Comas, P; Coyle, P; Drevermann, H; Engelhardt, A; Forty, Roger W; Frank, M; Hagelberg, R; Harvey, J; Jacobsen, R; Janot, P; Jost, B; Knobloch, J; Lehraus, Ivan; Markou, C; Martin, E B; Mato, P; Meinhard, H; Minten, Adolf G; Miquel, R; Oest, T; Palazzi, P; Pater, J R; Pusztaszeri, J F; Ranjard, F; Rensing, P E; Rolandi, Luigi; Schlatter, W D; Schmelling, M; Schneider, O; Tejessy, W; Tomalin, I R; Venturi, A; Wachsmuth, H W; Wiedenmann, W; Wildish, T; Witzeling, W; Wotschack, J; Ajaltouni, Ziad J; Bardadin-Otwinowska, Maria; Barrès, A; Boyer, C; Falvard, A; Gay, P; Guicheney, C; Henrard, P; Jousset, J; Michel, B; Monteil, S; Montret, J C; Pallin, D; Perret, P; Podlyski, F; Proriol, J; Rossignol, J M; Saadi, F; Fearnley, Tom; Hansen, J B; Hansen, J D; Hansen, J R; Hansen, P H; Nilsson, B S; Kyriakis, A; Simopoulou, Errietta; Siotis, I; Vayaki, Anna; Zachariadou, K; Blondel, A; Bonneaud, G R; Brient, J C; Bourdon, P; Passalacqua, L; Rougé, A; Rumpf, M; Tanaka, R; Valassi, Andrea; Verderi, M; Videau, H L; Candlin, D J; Parsons, M I; Focardi, E; Parrini, G; Corden, M; Delfino, M C; Georgiopoulos, C H; Jaffe, D E; Antonelli, A; Bencivenni, G; Bologna, G; Bossi, F; Campana, P; Capon, G; Chiarella, V; Felici, G; Laurelli, P; Mannocchi, G; Murtas, F; Murtas, G P; Pepé-Altarelli, M; Dorris, S J; Halley, A W; ten Have, I; Knowles, I G; Lynch, J G; Morton, W T; O'Shea, V; Raine, C; Reeves, P; Scarr, J M; Smith, K; Smith, M G; Thompson, A S; Thomson, F; Thorn, S; Turnbull, R M; Becker, U; Braun, O; Geweniger, C; Graefe, G; Hanke, P; Hepp, V; Kluge, E E; Putzer, A; Rensch, B; Schmidt, M; Sommer, J; Stenzel, H; Tittel, K; Werner, S; Wunsch, M; Beuselinck, R; Binnie, David M; Cameron, W; Colling, D J; Dornan, Peter J; Konstantinidis, N P; Moneta, L; Moutoussi, A; Nash, J; San Martin, G; Sedgbeer, J K; Stacey, A M; Dissertori, G; Girtler, P; Kneringer, E; Kuhn, D; Rudolph, G; Bowdery, C K; Brodbeck, T J; Colrain, P; Crawford, G; Finch, A J; Foster, F; Hughes, G; Sloan, Terence; Whelan, E P; Williams, M I; Galla, A; Greene, A M; Kleinknecht, K; Quast, G; Raab, J; Renk, B; Sander, H G; Wanke, R; Van Gemmeren, P; Zeitnitz, C; Aubert, Jean-Jacques; Bencheikh, A M; Benchouk, C; Bonissent, A; Bujosa, G; Calvet, D; Carr, J; Diaconu, C A; Etienne, F; Thulasidas, M; Nicod, D; Payre, P; Rousseau, D; Talby, M; Abt, I; Assmann, R W; Bauer, C; Blum, Walter; Brown, D; Dietl, H; Dydak, Friedrich; Ganis, G; Gotzhein, C; Jakobs, K; Kroha, H; Lütjens, G; Lutz, Gerhard; Männer, W; Moser, H G; Richter, R H; Rosado-Schlosser, A; Schael, S; Settles, Ronald; Seywerd, H C J; Stierlin, U; Saint-Denis, R; Wolf, G; Alemany, R; Boucrot, J; Callot, O; Cordier, A; Courault, F; Davier, M; Duflot, L; Grivaz, J F; Heusse, P; Jacquet, M; Kim, D W; Le Diberder, F R; Lefrançois, J; Lutz, A M; Musolino, G; Nikolic, I A; Park, H J; Park, I C; Schune, M H; Simion, S; Veillet, J J; Videau, I; Abbaneo, D; Azzurri, P; Bagliesi, G; Batignani, G; Bettarini, S; Bozzi, C; Calderini, G; Carpinelli, M; Ciocci, M A; Ciulli, V; Dell'Orso, R; Fantechi, R; Ferrante, I; Foà, L; Forti, F; Giassi, A; Giorgi, M A; Gregorio, A; Ligabue, F; Lusiani, A; Marrocchesi, P S; Messineo, A; Rizzo, G; Sanguinetti, G; Sciabà, A; Spagnolo, P; Steinberger, Jack; Tenchini, Roberto; Tonelli, G; Triggiani, G; Vannini, C; Verdini, P G; Walsh, J; Betteridge, A P; Blair, G A; Bryant, L M; Cerutti, F; Gao, Y; Green, M G; Johnson, D L; Medcalf, T; Mir, L M; Perrodo, P; Strong, J A; Bertin, V; Botterill, David R; Clifft, R W; Edgecock, T R; Haywood, S; Edwards, M; Maley, P; Norton, P R; Thompson, J C; Bloch-Devaux, B; Colas, P; Duarte, H; Emery, S; Kozanecki, Witold; Lançon, E; Lemaire, M C; Locci, E; Marx, B; Pérez, P; Rander, J; Renardy, J F; Rosowsky, A; Roussarie, A; Schuller, J P; Schwindling, J; Si Mohand, D; Trabelsi, A; Vallage, B; Johnson, R P; Kim, H Y; Litke, A M; McNeil, M A; Taylor, G; Beddall, A; Booth, C N; Boswell, R; Cartwright, S L; Combley, F; Dawson, I; Köksal, A; Letho, M; Newton, W M; Rankin, C; Thompson, L F; Böhrer, A; Brandt, S; Cowan, G D; Feigl, E; Grupen, Claus; Lutters, G; Minguet-Rodríguez, J A; Rivera, F; Saraiva, P; Smolik, L; Stephan, F; Apollonio, M; Bosisio, L; Della Marina, R; Giannini, G; Gobbo, B; Ragusa, F; Rothberg, J E; Wasserbaech, S R; Armstrong, S R; Bellantoni, L; Elmer, P; Feng, P; Ferguson, D P S; Gao, Y S; González, S; Grahl, J; Harton, J L; Hayes, O J; Hu, H; McNamara, P A; Nachtman, J M; Orejudos, W; Pan, Y B; Saadi, Y; Schmitt, M; Scott, I J; Sharma, V; Turk, J; Walsh, A M; Wu Sau Lan; Wu, X; Yamartino, J M; Zheng, M; Zobernig, G

    1996-01-01

    An improved measurement of the average b hadron lifetime is performed using a sample of 1.5 million hadronic Z decays, collected during the 1991-1993 runs of ALEPH, with the silicon vertex detector fully operational. This uses the three-dimensional impact parameter distribution of lepton tracks coming from semileptonic b decays and yields an average b hadron lifetime of 1.533 \\pm 0.013 \\pm 0.022 ps.

  3. A Precision Measurement of Nuclear Muon Capture on $^{3}He$

    CERN Document Server

    Ackerbauer, P; Baturin, V N; Beer, G A; Breunlich, W H; Case, T; Crowe, K M; Daniel, H; Deutsch, J; Govaerts, J; Grigoriev, Yu S; Hartmann, F J; Kammel, P; King, R; Lauss, B; Maev, E M; Markushin, V E; Marton, J; Mühlbauer, M; Petitjean, C; Petitjean, T; Petrov, G E; Prieels, R; Prymas, W; Schott, W; Semenchuk, G G; Smirenin, Yu V; Vorobyov, A A; Voropaev, N I; Wojciechowski, P; Grigoriev, Yu.S.; Petitjean, Th.; Smirenin, Yu.V.

    1998-01-01

    The muon capture rate in the reaction mu- 3He -> nu + 3H has been measured at PSI using a modular high pressure ionization chamber. The rate corresponding to statistical hyperfine population of the mu-3He atom is (1496.0 +- 4.0) s^-1. This result confirms the PCAC prediction for the pseudoscalar form factors of the 3He-3H system and the nucleon.

  4. Compton scattering measurements from dense plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Glenzer, S H; Neumayer, P; Doeppner, T; Landen, L; Lee, R W; Wallace, R; Weber, S; Lee, H J; Kritcher, A L; Falcone, R; Regan, S P; Sawada, H; Meyerhofer, D D; Gregori, G; Fortmann, C; Schwarz, V; Redmer, R

    2007-10-02

    Compton scattering has been developed for accurate measurements of densities and temperatures in dense plasmas. One future challenge is the application of this technique to characterize compressed matter on the National Ignition Facility where hydrogen and beryllium will approach extremely dense states of matter of up to 1000 g/cc. In this regime, the density, compressibility, and capsule fuel adiabat may be directly measured from the Compton scattered spectrum of a high-energy x-ray line source. Specifically, the scattered spectra directly reflect the electron velocity distribution. In non-degenerate plasmas, the width provides an accurate measure of the electron temperatures, while in partially Fermi degenerate systems that occur in laser-compressed matter it provides the Fermi energy and hence the electron density. Both of these regimes have been accessed in experiments at the Omega laser by employing isochorically heated solid-density beryllium and moderately compressed beryllium foil targets. In the latter experiment, compressions by a factor of 3 at pressures of 40 Mbar have been measured in excellent agreement with radiation hydrodynamic modeling.

  5. Compton scattering measurements from dense plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Glenzer, S H; Neumayer, P; Doeppner, T; Landen, O L; Lee, R W; Wallace, R J; Weber, S [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, CA (United States); Lee, H J; Kritcher, A L; Falcone, R [University of California Berkeley, Berkeley, CA 94709 (United States); Regan, S P; Sawada, H; Meyerhofer, D D [Laboratory for Laser Energetics, Rochester, NY (United States); Gregori, G [Clarendon Laboratory, University of Oxford, Oxford OX1 3PU (United Kingdom); Fortmann, C; Schwarz, V; Redmer, R [Institut fuer Physik, Universitaet Rostock, D-18051 Rostock (Germany)], E-mail: glenzer1@llnl.gov

    2008-05-15

    Compton scattering techniques have been developed for accurate measurements of densities and temperatures in dense plasmas. One future challenge is the application of this technique to characterize compressed matter on the National Ignition Facility where hydrogen and beryllium will approach extremely dense states of matter of up to 1000 g/cc. In this regime, the density, compressibility, and capsule fuel adiabat may be directly measured from the Compton scattered spectrum of a high-energy x-ray line source. Specifically, the scattered spectra directly reflect the electron velocity distribution. In non-degenerate plasmas, the width provides an accurate measure of the electron temperatures, while in partially Fermi degenerate systems that occur in laser-compressed matter it provides the Fermi energy and hence the electron density. Both of these regimes have been accessed in experiments at the Omega laser by employing isochorically heated solid-density beryllium and moderately compressed beryllium foil targets. In the latter experiment, compressions by a factor of 3 at pressures of 40 Mbar have been measured in excellent agreement with radiation hydrodynamic modeling.

  6. Pulsed beams as field probes for precision measurement

    OpenAIRE

    Hudson, J. J.; Ashworth, H. T.; Kara, D. M.; Tarbutt, M. R.; Sauer, B.E.; Hinds, E. A.

    2007-01-01

    We describe a technique for mapping the spatial variation of static electric, static magnetic, and rf magnetic fields using a pulsed atomic or molecular beam. The method is demonstrated using a beam designed to measure the electric dipole moment of the electron. We present maps of the interaction region, showing sensitivity to (i) electric field variation of 1.5 V/cm at 3.3 kV/cm with a spatial resolution of 15 mm; (ii) magnetic field variation of 5 nT with 25 mm resolution; (iii) radio-frequ...

  7. Low magnetic Johnson noise electric field plates for precision measurement

    CERN Document Server

    Rabey, I M; Hinds, E A; Sauer, B E

    2016-01-01

    We describe a parallel pair of high voltage electric field plates designed and constructed to minimise magnetic Johnson noise. They are formed by laminating glass substrates with commercially available polyimide (Kapton) tape, covered with a thin gold film. Tested in vacuum, the outgassing rate is less than $5\\times10^{-5}$ mbar.l/s. The plates have been operated at electric fields up to 8.3 kV/cm, when the leakage current is at most a few hundred pA. The design is discussed in the context of a molecular spin precession experiment to measure the permanent electric dipole moment of the electron.

  8. Precision Measurement of the Neutron Beta-Decay Asymmetry

    CERN Document Server

    Mendenhall, M P; Bagdasarova, Y; Berguno, D B; Broussard, L J; Carr, R; Clayton, S; Currie, S; Ding, X; García, A; Geltenbort, P; Hickerson, K P; Hoagland, J; Hogan, G E; Holley, A T; Hong, R; Ito, T M; Filippone, B W; Knecht, A; Liu, C -Y; Liu, J L; Makela, M; Mammei, R R; Martin, J W; Melconian, D; Moore, S D; Morris, C L; Galván, A Pérez; Picker, R; Pitt, M L; Plaster, B; Rios, R; Saunders, A; Seestrom, S J; Sondheim, W E; Tatar, E; Vogelaar, R B; VornDick, B; Wrede, C; Young, A R; Zeck, B A

    2012-01-01

    A new measurement of the neutron $\\beta$-decay asymmetry $A_0$ has been carried out by the UCNA collaboration using polarized ultracold neutrons (UCN) from the solid deuterium UCN source at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE). Improvements in the experiment have led to reductions in both statistical and systematic uncertainties leading to $A_0 = -0.11954(55)_{\\rm stat.}(98)_{\\rm syst.}$, corresponding to the ratio of axial-vector to vector coupling $\\lambda \\equiv g_A/g_V = -1.2756(30)$.

  9. Precise measurement of theta_13 at Daya Bay

    CERN Document Server

    Chu, M -C

    2008-01-01

    The Daya Bay Reactor Neutrino Experiment is designed to determine the yet unknown neutrino mixing angle theta_13 by measuring the disappearance of electron antineutrinos from several nuclear reactor cores, using multiple underground detectors at different baselines to minimize systematic errors and to suppress the cosmogenic background. The civil construction has begun since October 2007, enabling first commissioning data in 2009, and full data taking will begin in late 2010. The planned sensitivity in sin^2 (2theta_13) of better than 0.01 at 90% CL will be achieved in three years of data-taking. I will present an overview and current status of the experiment.

  10. Precision measurement of the {Sigma}{sup 0} hyperon mass

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, M.H.; Hartouni, E.P.; Kreisler, M.N.; Uribe, J.; Church, M.D.; Gottschalk, E.E.; Knapp, B.C.; Stern, B.J.; Wiencke, L.R.; Christian, D.C.; Gutierrez, G.; Wehmann, A.; Avilez, C.; Felix, J.; Moreno, G.; Forbush, M.; Huson, F.R.; White, J.T. [BNL E766 Collaboration (United States)

    1998-10-01

    Using pp{r_arrow}p+ all charged particles at 800 GeV/c and 27.5 GeV/c incident protons at Fermilah and Brookhaven, respectively, the mass of the {Sigma}{sup 0} hyperon has been measured with an uncertainty of 7 times smaller than the best previous result. This result, M{sub {Sigma}{sup 0}}=1192.65{plus_minus}0.020{plus_minus}0.014 MeV/c{sup 2} is based on 16 times the statistics of previous results. {copyright} {ital 1998 American Institute of Physics.}

  11. Precision measurement of the {Sigma}{sup 0} hyperon mass

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, M.H.L.S.; Hartouni, E.P.; Kreisler, M.N. [and others

    1998-02-17

    The research that is described in this paper is part of a program to study strong interaction mechanisms in proton proton collisions. The program consists of two experiments: Brookhaven E766 in which we studied the reactions pp {yields} p+ all charged particles with 27.5 GeV/c incident protons and Fermilab E690 in which we studied the reactions pp {yields} p+ all charged particles with 800 GeV/c incident protons. In these experiments, we employed state-of-the-art data acquisition sys- tems and acquired large samples of data: at Brookhaven we amassed 300 million high multiplicity events and at Fermilab, 5.5 billion events. Our uncertainty in the {Sigma}{sup 0} mass is more than 7 times smaller than the best previous result and was based on 16 times the statistics. Likewise, the {Sigma}{sup 0} - {Lambda}{sup 0} mass difference is more than 14 times more accurate than the previous best result. Finally, we note that this measurement is the first direct measurement of the {Sigma}{sup 0} mass.

  12. Precision measurement of the $\\Lambda_b^0$ baryon lifetime

    CERN Document Server

    Aaij, R; Adinolfi, M; Adrover, C; Affolder, A; Ajaltouni, Z; Albrecht, J; Alessio, F; Alexander, M; Ali, S; Alkhazov, G; Alvarez Cartelle, P; Alves Jr, A A; Amato, S; Amerio, S; Amhis, Y; Anderlini, L; Anderson, J; Andreassen, R; Andrews, J E; Appleby, R B; Aquines Gutierrez, O; Archilli, F; Artamonov, A; Artuso, M; Aslanides, E; Auriemma, G; Baalouch, M; Bachmann, S; Back, J J; Baesso, C; Balagura, V; Baldini, W; Barlow, R J; Barschel, C; Barsuk, S; Barter, W; Bauer, Th; Bay, A; Beddow, J; Bedeschi, F; Bediaga, I; Belogurov, S; Belous, K; Belyaev, I; Ben-Haim, E; Bencivenni, G; Benson, S; Benton, J; Berezhnoy, A; Bernet, R; Bettler, M -O; van Beuzekom, M; Bien, A; Bifani, S; Bird, T; Bizzeti, A; Bjørnstad, P M; Blake, T; Blanc, F; Blouw, J; Blusk, S; Bocci, V; Bondar, A; Bondar, N; Bonivento, W; Borghi, S; Borgia, A; Bowcock, T J V; Bowen, E; Bozzi, C; Brambach, T; van den Brand, J; Bressieux, J; Brett, D; Britsch, M; Britton, T; Brook, N H; Brown, H; Burducea, I; Bursche, A; Busetto, G; Buytaert, J; Cadeddu, S; Callot, O; Calvi, M; Calvo Gomez, M; Camboni, A; Campana, P; Campora Perez, D; Carbone, A; Carboni, G; Cardinale, R; Cardini, A; Carranza-Mejia, H; Carson, L; Carvalho Akiba, K; Casse, G; Castillo Garcia, L; Cattaneo, M; Cauet, Ch; Cenci, R; Charles, M; Charpentier, Ph; Chen, P; Chiapolini, N; Chrzaszcz, M; Ciba, K; Cid Vidal, X; Ciezarek, G; Clarke, P E L; Clemencic, M; Cliff, H V; Closier, J; Coca, C; Coco, V; Cogan, J; Cogneras, E; Collins, P; Comerma-Montells, A; Contu, A; Cook, A; Coombes, M; Coquereau, S; Corti, G; Couturier, B; Cowan, G A; Craik, D C; Cunliffe, S; Currie, R; D'Ambrosio, C; David, P; David, P N Y; Davis, A; De Bonis, I; De Bruyn, K; De Capua, S; De Cian, M; De Miranda, J M; De Paula, L; De Silva, W; De Simone, P; Decamp, D; Deckenhoff, M; Del Buono, L; Déléage, N; Derkach, D; Deschamps, O; Dettori, F; Di Canto, A; Dijkstra, H; Dogaru, M; Donleavy, S; Dordei, F; Dosil Suárez, A; Dossett, D; Dovbnya, A; Dupertuis, F; Durante, P; Dzhelyadin, R; Dziurda, A; Dzyuba, A; Easo, S; Egede, U; Egorychev, V; Eidelman, S; van Eijk, D; Eisenhardt, S; Eitschberger, U; Ekelhof, R; Eklund, L; El Rifai, I; Elsasser, Ch; Falabella, A; Färber, C; Fardell, G; Farinelli, C; Farry, S; Ferguson, D; Fernandez Albor, V; Ferreira Rodrigues, F; Ferro-Luzzi, M; Filippov, S; Fiore, M; Fitzpatrick, C; Fontana, M; Fontanelli, F; Forty, R; Francisco, O; Frank, M; Frei, C; Frosini, M; Furcas, S; Furfaro, E; Gallas Torreira, A; Galli, D; Gandelman, M; Gandini, P; Gao, Y; Garofoli, J; Garosi, P; Garra Tico, J; Garrido, L; Gaspar, C; Gauld, R; Gersabeck, E; Gersabeck, M; Gershon, T; Ghez, Ph; Gibson, V; Giubega, L; Gligorov, V V; Göbel, C; Golubkov, D; Golutvin, A; Gomes, A; Gorbounov, P; Gordon, H; Grabalosa Gándara, M; Graciani Diaz, R; Granado Cardoso, L A; Graugés, E; Graziani, G; Grecu, A; Greening, E; Gregson, S; Griffith, P; Grünberg, O; Gui, B; Gushchin, E; Guz, Yu; Gys, T; Hadjivasiliou, C; Haefeli, G; Haen, C; Haines, S C; Hall, S; Hamilton, B; Hampson, T; Hansmann-Menzemer, S; Harnew, N; Harnew, S T; Harrison, J; Hartmann, T; He, J; Head, T; Heijne, V; Hennessy, K; Henrard, P; Hernando Morata, J A; van Herwijnen, E; Hicheur, A; Hicks, E; Hill, D; Hoballah, M; Hombach, C; Hopchev, P; Hulsbergen, W; Hunt, P; Huse, T; Hussain, N; Hutchcroft, D; Hynds, D; Iakovenko, V; Idzik, M; Ilten, P; Jacobsson, R; Jaeger, A; Jans, E; Jaton, P; Jawahery, A; Jing, F; John, M; Johnson, D; Jones, C R; Joram, C; Jost, B; Kaballo, M; Kandybei, S; Kanso, W; Karacson, M; Karbach, T M; Kenyon, I R; Ketel, T; Keune, A; Khanji, B; Kochebina, O; Komarov, I; Koopman, R F; Koppenburg, P; Korolev, M; Kozlinskiy, A; Kravchuk, L; Kreplin, K; Kreps, M; Krocker, G; Krokovny, P; Kruse, F; Kucharczyk, M; Kudryavtsev, V; Kvaratskheliya, T; La Thi, V N; Lacarrere, D; Lafferty, G; Lai, A; Lambert, D; Lambert, R W; Lanciotti, E; Lanfranchi, G; Langenbruch, C; Latham, T; Lazzeroni, C; Le Gac, R; van Leerdam, J; Lees, J -P; Lefèvre, R; Leflat, A; Lefrançois, J; Leo, S; Leroy, O; Lesiak, T; Leverington, B; Li, Y; Li Gioi, L; Liles, M; Lindner, R; Linn, C; Liu, B; Liu, G; Lohn, S; Longstaff, I; Lopes, J H; Lopez-March, N; Lu, H; Lucchesi, D; Luisier, J; Luo, H; Machefert, F; Machikhiliyan, I V; Maciuc, F; Maev, O; Malde, S; Manca, G; Mancinelli, G; Maratas, J; Marconi, U; Marino, P; Märki, R; Marks, J; Martellotti, G; Martens, A; Martín Sánchez, A; Martinelli, M; Martinez Santos, D; Martins Tostes, D; Massafferri, A; Matev, R; Mathe, Z; Matteuzzi, C; Maurice, E; Mazurov, A; Mc Skelly, B; McCarthy, J; McNab, A; McNulty, R; Meadows, B; Meier, F; Meissner, M; Merk, M; Milanes, D A; Minard, M -N; Molina Rodriguez, J; Monteil, S; Moran, D; Morawski, P; Mordà, A; Morello, M J; Mountain, R; Mous, I; Muheim, F; Müller, K; Muresan, R; Muryn, B; Muster, B; Naik, P; Nakada, T; Nandakumar, R; Nasteva, I; Needham, M; Neubert, S; Neufeld, N; Nguyen, A D; Nguyen, T D; Nguyen-Mau, C; Nicol, M; Niess, V; Niet, R; Nikitin, N; Nikodem, T; Nomerotski, A; Novoselov, A; Oblakowska-Mucha, A; Obraztsov, V; Oggero, S; Ogilvy, S; Okhrimenko, O; Oldeman, R; Orlandea, M; Otalora Goicochea, J M; Owen, P; Oyanguren, A; Pal, B K; Palano, A; Palczewski, T; Palutan, M; Panman, J; Papanestis, A; Pappagallo, M; Parkes, C; Parkinson, C J; Passaleva, G; Patel, G D; Patel, M; Patrick, G N; Patrignani, C; Pavel-Nicorescu, C; Pazos Alvarez, A; Pellegrino, A; Penso, G; Pepe Altarelli, M; Perazzini, S; Perez Trigo, E; Pérez-Calero Yzquierdo, A; Perret, P; Perrin-Terrin, M; Pescatore, L; Pesen, E; Pessina, G; Petridis, K; Petrolini, A; Phan, A; Picatoste Olloqui, E; Pietrzyk, B; Pilař, T; Pinci, D; Playfer, S; Plo Casasus, M; Polci, F; Polok, G; Poluektov, A; Polycarpo, E; Popov, A; Popov, D; Popovici, B; Potterat, C; Powell, A; Prisciandaro, J; Pritchard, A; Prouve, C; Pugatch, V; Puig Navarro, A; Punzi, G; Qian, W; Rademacker, J H; Rakotomiaramanana, B; Rangel, M S; Raniuk, I; Rauschmayr, N; Raven, G; Redford, S; Reid, M M; dos Reis, A C; Ricciardi, S; Richards, A; Rinnert, K; Rives Molina, V; Roa Romero, D A; Robbe, P; Roberts, D A; Rodrigues, E; Rodriguez Perez, P; Roiser, S; Romanovsky, V; Romero Vidal, A; Rouvinet, J; Ruf, T; Ruffini, F; Ruiz, H; Ruiz Valls, P; Sabatino, G; Saborido Silva, J J; Sagidova, N; Sail, P; Saitta, B; Salustino Guimaraes, V; Sanmartin Sedes, B; Sannino, M; Santacesaria, R; Santamarina Rios, C; Santovetti, E; Sapunov, M; Sarti, A; Satriano, C; Satta, A; Savrie, M; Savrina, D; Schaack, P; Schiller, M; Schindler, H; Schlupp, M; Schmelling, M; Schmidt, B; Schneider, O; Schopper, A; Schune, M -H; Schwemmer, R; Sciascia, B; Sciubba, A; Seco, M; Semennikov, A; Senderowska, K; Sepp, I; Serra, N; Serrano, J; Seyfert, P; Shapkin, M; Shapoval, I; Shatalov, P; Shcheglov, Y; Shears, T; Shekhtman, L; Shevchenko, O; Shevchenko, V; Shires, A; Silva Coutinho, R; Sirendi, M; Skwarnicki, T; Smith, N A; Smith, E; Smith, J; Smith, M; Sokoloff, M D; Soler, F J P; Soomro, F; Souza, D; Souza De Paula, B; Spaan, B; Sparkes, A; Spradlin, P; Stagni, F; Stahl, S; Steinkamp, O; Stevenson, S; Stoica, S; Stone, S; Storaci, B; Straticiuc, M; Straumann, U; Subbiah, V K; Sun, L; Swientek, S; Syropoulos, V; Szczekowski, M; Szczypka, P; Szumlak, T; T'Jampens, S; Teklishyn, M; Teodorescu, E; Teubert, F; Thomas, C; Thomas, E; van Tilburg, J; Tisserand, V; Tobin, M; Tolk, S; Tonelli, D; Topp-Joergensen, S; Torr, N; Tournefier, E; Tourneur, S; Tran, M T; Tresch, M; Tsaregorodtsev, A; Tsopelas, P; Tuning, N; Ubeda Garcia, M; Ukleja, A; Urner, D; Ustyuzhanin, A; Uwer, U; Vagnoni, V; Valenti, G; Vallier, A; Van Dijk, M; Vazquez Gomez, R; Vazquez Regueiro, P; Vázquez Sierra, C; Vecchi, S; Velthuis, J J; Veltri, M; Veneziano, G; Vesterinen, M; Viaud, B; Vieira, D; Vilasis-Cardona, X; Vollhardt, A; Volyanskyy, D; Voong, D; Vorobyev, A; Vorobyev, V; Voß, C; Voss, H; Waldi, R; Wallace, C; Wallace, R; Wandernoth, S; Wang, J; Ward, D R; Watson, N K; Webber, A D; Websdale, D; Whitehead, M; Wicht, J; Wiechczynski, J; Wiedner, D; Wiggers, L; Wilkinson, G; Williams, M P; Williams, M; Wilson, F F; Wimberley, J; Wishahi, J; Wislicki, W; Witek, M; Wotton, S A; Wright, S; Wu, S; Wyllie, K; Xie, Y; Xing, Z; Yang, Z; Young, R; Yuan, X; Yushchenko, O; Zangoli, M; Zavertyaev, M; Zhang, F; Zhang, L; Zhang, W C; Zhang, Y; Zhelezov, A; Zhokhov, A; Zhong, L; Zvyagin, A

    2013-01-01

    The ratio of the $\\Lambda_b^0$ baryon lifetime to that of the $\\overline{B}^0$ meson is measured using 1.0 fb$^{-1}$ of integrated luminosity in 7 TeV center-of-mass energy $pp$ collisions at the LHC. The $\\Lambda_b^0$ baryon is observed for the first time in the decay mode $\\Lambda_b^0 \\to J/\\psi p K^-$, while the $\\overline{B}^0$ meson decay used is the well known $\\overline{B}^0 \\to J/\\psi \\pi^+ K^-$ mode, where the $\\pi^+K^-$ mass is consistent with that of the $\\bar{K}^{*0}(892)$ meson. The ratio of lifetimes is measured to be $0.976\\pm0.012\\pm0.006$, in agreement with theoretical expectations based on the heavy quark expansion. Using previous determinations of the $\\overline{B}^0$ meson lifetime, the $\\Lambda_b^0$ lifetime is found to be $1.482 \\pm 0.018 \\pm 0.012$ ps. In both cases the first uncertainty is statistical and the second systematic.

  13. ECE Measurements of Helical Plasmas in LHD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagayama, Y.; Inagaki, S.; Ito, Y.; Kawahata, K.; Sasao, H.; de Vries, P.

    1999-11-01

    This paper presents ECE measurements on LHD, which is the l=2, n=10 heriotron with the major radius of 3.8 m, with the averaged minor radius of 60 cm and with the helical field of up to 3 T. The ECE is collected from both inner and outer sides, since the magnetic field has a peaked profile. ECE is detcted with Michelson, GPC and 70 GHz and 140 GHz radiometers. The LHD plasma is generated using ECH of up to 1 MW and is heated using NBI of up to 8 GW. Notch filters reduce the ECH leakage. The polarization of ECE is theoretically and experimentally investigated in the heriotoron system, where the field angle rotates -30 to 30^o. The polarization follows as the field angle changes. Since the density profile is flat, ECE is cut off in the edge region in the high density LHD plasma. An interesting observation is the breathing phenomena, which is as follows: the electron temperature and other plasma parameters oscillate with frequency of 0.5-1Hz like a sine-wave when the NBI power is about 1 MW.

  14. Flowing dusty plasma experiments: generation of flow and measurement techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaiswal, S.; Bandyopadhyay, P.; Sen, A.

    2016-12-01

    A variety of experimental techniques for the generation of subsonic/supersonic dust fluid flows and means of measuring such flow velocities are presented. The experiments have been carried out in a \\Pi -shaped dusty plasma experimental device with micron size kaolin/melamine formaldehyde particles embedded in a background of argon plasma created by a direct current glow discharge. A stationary dust cloud is formed over the cathode region by precisely balancing the pumping speed and gas flow rate. A flow of dust particles/fluid is generated by additional gas injection from a single or dual locations or by altering the dust confining potential. The flow velocity is then estimated by three different techniques, namely, by super particle identification code, particle image velocimetry analysis and the excitation of dust acoustic waves. The results obtained from these three different techniques along with their merits and demerits are discussed. An estimation of the neutral drag force responsible for the generation as well as the attenuation of the dust fluid flow is made. These techniques can be usefully employed in laboratory devices to investigate linear and non-linear collective excitations in a flowing dusty plasma.

  15. Effect of inhomogeneities on high precision measurements of cosmological distances

    CERN Document Server

    Peel, Austin; Ishak, Mustapha

    2014-01-01

    We study exact relativistic effects of inhomogeneities on distance measures, focusing on the distance modulus, in a Swiss-cheese model of the universe with $\\Lambda$CDM background dynamics, and where the `holes' are non-symmetric structures described by the Szekeres metric. The Szekeres exact solution of Einstein's equations, which is inhomogeneous and anisotropic, allows us to capture potentially relevant effects on light propagation due to nontrivial evolution of structures. Unlike Swiss-cheese model studies with spherically symmetric holes, we find a net shift in the distance modulus $\\mu$ to distant sources even when we average over many lines of sight with randomized hole orientations and impact parameters. The light also need not propagate strictly through underdense regions to result in an overall bias, which is an accumulated effect associated with the evolution of the anisotropic holes. We find the average shift $\\langle\\Delta\\mu\\rangle$ relative to a pure $\\Lambda$CDM model to increase with redshift...

  16. Precision measurement of the ionization energy of Cs I

    CERN Document Server

    Deiglmayr, Johannes; Saßmannshausen, Heiner; Jansen, Paul; Schmutz, Hansjürg; Merkt, Frédéric

    2016-01-01

    We present absolute-frequency measurements for the transitions from the 6s$_{1/2}$ ground state of $^{133}$Cs to $n$p$_{1/2}$ and $n$p$_{3/2}$ Rydberg states. The transition frequencies are determined by one-photon UV spectroscopy in ultracold samples of Cs atoms using a narrowband laser system referenced to a frequency comb. From a global fit of the ionization energy $E_\\mathrm{I}$ and the quantum defects of the two series we determine an improved value of $E_\\mathrm{I} = h c \\cdot 31 406.467 732 5(14)$ cm$^{-1}$ for the ionization energy of Cs with a relative uncertainty of $5\\times10^{-11}$. We also report improved values for the quantum defects of the $n$p$_{1/2}$, $n$p$_{3/2}$, $n$s$_{1/2}$, and $n$d$_{5/2}$ series.

  17. Precise measurement of prompt photon emission for carbon ion therapy

    CERN Document Server

    Agodi, C; Cirrone, G A P; Collamati, F; Cuttone, G; De Lucia, E; De Napoli, M; Di Domenico, A; Faccini, R; Ferroni, F; Fiore, S; Gauzzi, P; Iarocci, E; Marafini, M; Mattei, I; Paoloni, A; Patera, V; Piersanti, L; Romano, F; Sarti, A; Sciubba, A; Voena, C

    2011-01-01

    Proton and carbon ion therapy is an emerging technique used for the treatment of solid cancers. The monitoring of the dose delivered during such treatments is still a matter of research. A possible technique exploits the information provided by single photon emission from nuclear decays induced by the irradiation. This paper reports the measurements of the spectrum and rate of such photons produced from the interaction of a 80 MeV/u fully stripped carbon ion beam at the Laboratori Nazionali del Sud of INFN, Catania, with a Poly-methyl methacrylate target. The differential production rate for photons with energy E > 2 MeV and emitted at 90 degree is found to be $dN_{\\gamma}/(dN_C d\\Omega)=(2.92\\pm 0.19)\\times 10^{-2}$sr$^{-1}$.

  18. Precision measurement of the neutron spin dependent structure functions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kolomensky, Y.G.

    1997-02-01

    In experiment E154 at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center the spin dependent structure function g{sub 1}{sup n} (x, Q{sup 2}) of the neutron was measured by scattering longitudinally polarized 48.3 GeV electrons off a longitudinally polarized {sup 3}He target. The high beam energy allowed the author to extend the kinematic coverage compared to the previous SLAC experiments to 0.014 {le} x {le} 0.7 with an average Q{sup 2} of 5 GeV{sup 2}. The author reports the integral of the spin dependent structure function in the measured range to be {integral}{sub 0.014}{sup 0.7} dx g{sub 1}{sup n}(x, 5 GeV{sup 2}) = {minus}0.036 {+-} 0.004(stat.) {+-} 0.005(syst.). The author observes relatively large values of g{sub 1}{sup n} at low x that call into question the reliability of data extrapolation to x {r_arrow} 0. Such divergent behavior disagrees with predictions of the conventional Regge theory, but is qualitatively explained by perturbative QCD. The author performs a Next-to-Leading Order perturbative QCD analysis of the world data on the nucleon spin dependent structure functions g{sub 1}{sup p} and g{sub 1}{sup n} paying careful attention to the experimental and theoretical uncertainties. Using the parameterizations of the helicity-dependent parton distributions obtained in the analysis, the author evolves the data to Q{sup 2} = 5 GeV{sup 2}, determines the first moments of the polarized structure functions of the proton and neutron, and finds agreement with the Bjorken sum rule.

  19. Drift chambers for a precision measurement of the Michel parameters in muon decay

    CERN Document Server

    Davydov, Y; Comyn, M; Depommier, P; Doornbos, J; Faszer, W; Gagliardi, C A; Gill, D R; Green, P; Gumplinger, P; Hardy, J C; Hasinoff, M D; Helmer, R; Henderson, R; Khruchinsky, A; Kitching, P; Koetke, D D; Korkmaz, E J; Lachin, Yu Yu; Maas, D; MacDonald, J A; MacDonald, R; Manweiler, R; Marshall, G; Mathie, E L; Miassoedov, L; Musser, J R; Nord, P M; Olin, A; Openshaw, R; Ottewell, D; Porcelli, T; Poutissou, J M; Poutissou, R; Price, G; Quraan, M A; Rodning, N L; Schaapman, J; Selivanov, V; Sheffer, G; Shin, B; Sobratee, F; Soukup, J; Stanislaus, T D S; Stinson, G M; Tacik, R; Torokhov, V D; Tribble, R E; Vasilev, M A; Walter, H C; Wright, D

    2001-01-01

    Planar drift chambers will be used in a solenoidal magnetic field to measure the Michel parameters in muon decay. The chamber manufacture procedure uses flat glass tables and precise ceramic glass spacers to provide precise anode-cathode spacing. Results of bench and beam tests of the prototype chambers are discussed.

  20. Precision electron flow measurements in a disk transmission line.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clark, Waylon T.; Pelock, Michael D.; Martin, Jeremy Paul; Jackson, Daniel Peter Jr.; Savage, Mark Edward; Stoltzfus, Brian Scott; Mendel, Clifford Will, Jr.; Pointon, Timothy David

    2008-01-01

    An analytic model for electron flow in a system driving a fixed inductive load is described and evaluated with particle in cell simulations. The simple model allows determining the impedance profile for a magnetically insulated transmission line given the minimum gap desired, and the lumped inductance inside the transition to the minimum gap. The model allows specifying the relative electron flow along the power flow direction, including cases where the fractional electron flow decreases in the power flow direction. The electrons are able to return to the cathode because they gain energy from the temporally rising magnetic field. The simulations were done with small cell size to reduce numerical heating. An experiment to compare electron flow to the simulations was done. The measured electron flow is {approx}33% of the value from the simulations. The discrepancy is assumed to be due to a reversed electric field at the cathode because of the inductive load and falling electron drift velocity in the power flow direction. The simulations constrain the cathode electric field to zero, which gives the highest possible electron flow.

  1. Alignment Jig for the Precise Measurement of THz Radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Javadi, Hamid H.

    2009-01-01

    A miniaturized instrumentation package comprising a (1) Global Positioning System (GPS) receiver, (2) an inertial measurement unit (IMU) consisting largely of surface-micromachined sensors of the microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) type, and (3) a microprocessor, all residing on a single circuit board, is part of the navigation system of a compact robotic spacecraft intended to be released from a larger spacecraft [e.g., the International Space Station (ISS)] for exterior visual inspection of the larger spacecraft. Variants of the package may also be useful in terrestrial collision-detection and -avoidance applications. The navigation solution obtained by integrating the IMU outputs is fed back to a correlator in the GPS receiver to aid in tracking GPS signals. The raw GPS and IMU data are blended in a Kalman filter to obtain an optimal navigation solution, which can be supplemented by range and velocity data obtained by use of (l) a stereoscopic pair of electronic cameras aboard the robotic spacecraft and/or (2) a laser dynamic range imager aboard the ISS. The novelty of the package lies mostly in those aspects of the design of the MEMS IMU that pertain to controlling mechanical resonances and stabilizing scale factors and biases.

  2. A Precision Measurement of the Top Quark Mass

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Black, Kevin Matthew

    2005-05-01

    This dissertation describes the measurement of the top quark mass using events recorded during a {approx} 230 pb{sup -1} exposure of the D0 detector to proton-anti-proton (p{bar p}) collisions at a center of mass energy of 1.96 TeV. The Standard Model of particle physics predicts that the top quark will decay into a bottom quark and a W boson close to 100% of the time. The bottom quark will hadronize (bind with another quark) and produce a jet of hadronic particles. The W bosons can decay either into a charged lepton and a neutrino or a pair of quarks. this dissertation focuses on the top quark (t{bar t}) events in which one W decays hadronically and the other decays leptonically. Two methods of identifying t{bar t} events from the large number of events produced are used. The first is based on the unique topology of the final state particles of a heavy particle. By using the topological information of the event, the t{bar t} events can be efficiently extracted from the background. The second method relies on the identification of the remnants of the long lived bottom quarks that are expected to be produced in the decay of almost every top quark. Because the largest background processes do not contain bottom quarks, this is an extremely efficient way to select the events retaining about 60% of the t{bar t} events and removing almost 90% of the background. A kinematic fit to the top quark mass is performed on the t{bar t} candidate events using the final state particles that are seen in the detector. A likelihood technique is then used to extract the most likely value of the top quark mass, m{sub t}, and signal fraction. The result for the topological selection is m{sub t} = 169.9 {+-} 5.8(statistical){sub -7.8}{sup +8.0}(systematic) GeV while the results on the sample selected from identification of a b quark in the event is m{sub t} = 170.6 {+-} 4.2(statistical){sub -6.8}{sup +6.3}(systematic) GeV.

  3. Effect of inhomogeneities on high precision measurements of cosmological distances

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peel, Austin; Troxel, M. A.; Ishak, Mustapha

    2014-12-01

    We study effects of inhomogeneities on distance measures in an exact relativistic Swiss-cheese model of the Universe, focusing on the distance modulus. The model has Λ CDM background dynamics, and the "holes" are nonsymmetric structures described by the Szekeres metric. The Szekeres exact solution of Einstein's equations, which is inhomogeneous and anisotropic, allows us to capture potentially relevant effects on light propagation due to nontrivial evolution of structures in an exact framework. Light beams traversing a single Szekeres structure in different ways can experience either magnification or demagnification, depending on the particular path. Consistent with expectations, we find a shift in the distance modulus μ to distant sources due to demagnification when the light beam travels primarily through the void regions of our model. Conversely, beams are magnified when they propagate mainly through the overdense regions of the structures, and we explore a small additional effect due to time evolution of the structures. We then study the probability distributions of Δ μ =μΛ CDM-μSC for sources at different redshifts in various Swiss-cheese constructions, where the light beams travel through a large number of randomly oriented Szekeres holes with random impact parameters. We find for Δ μ the dispersions 0.004 ≤σΔ μ≤0.008 mag for sources with redshifts 1.0 ≤z ≤1.5 , which are smaller than the intrinsic dispersion of, for example, magnitudes of type Ia supernovae. The shapes of the distributions we obtain for our Swiss-cheese constructions are peculiar in the sense that they are not consistently skewed toward the demagnification side, as they are in analyses of lensing in cosmological simulations. Depending on the source redshift, the distributions for our models can be skewed to either the demagnification or the magnification side, reflecting a limitation of these constructions. This could be the result of requiring the continuity of Einstein

  4. Precision Measurement of Neutrino Oscillation Parameters with KamLAND

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    O' Donnell, Thomas [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2011-12-01

    This dissertation describes a measurement of the neutrino oscillation parameters m2 21, θ12 and constraints on θ13 based on a study of reactor antineutrinos at a baseline of ~ 180 km with the KamLAND detector. The data presented here was collected between April 2002 and November 2009, and amounts to a total exposure of 2.64 ± 0.07 × 1032 proton-years. For this exposure we expect 2140 ± 74(syst) antineutrino candidates from reactors, assuming standard model neutrino behavior, and 350±88(syst) candidates from background. The number observed is 1614. The ratio of background-subtracted candidates observed to expected is (NObs - NBkg)/ (NExp) = 0.59 ± 0.02(stat) ± 0.045(syst) which confirms reactor neutrino disappearance at greater than 5σ significance. Interpreting this deficit as being due to neutrino oscillation, the best-fit oscillation parameters from a three-flavor analysis are m2 21= 7.60+0.20 -0.19×10-5eV2, θ12 = 32.5 ± 2.9 degrees and sin2 θ13 = 0.025+0.035 -0.035, the 95% confidence-level upper limit on sin2 θ13 is sin2 θ13 < 0.083. Assuming CPT invariance, a combined analysis of KamLAND and solar neutrino data yields best-fit values: m2 21 = 7.60+0.20 -0.20 × 10-5eV2, θ12 = 33.5+1.0 -1.1 degrees, and sin2 θ13 = 0.013 ± 0.028 or sin2 θ13 < 0.06 at the 95% confidence level.

  5. A Precision Measurement of the Top Quark Mass

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Black, Kevin Matthew [Boston Univ., MA (United States)

    2005-01-01

    This dissertation describes the measurement of the top quark mass using events recorded during a ~ 230 pb-1 exposure of the D0 detector to proton-anti-proton (p$\\bar{p}$) collisions at a center of mass energy of 1.96 TeV. The Standard Model of particle physics predicts that the top quark will decay into a bottom quark and a W boson close to 100% of the time. The bottom quark will hadronize (bind with another quark) and produce a jet of hadronic particles. The W bosons can decay either into a charged lepton and a neutrino or a pair of quarks. this dissertation focuses on the top quark (t$\\bar{t}$) events in which one W decays hadronically and the other decays leptonically. Two methods of identifying t$\\bar{t}$ events from the large number of events produced are used. The first is based on the unique topology of the final state particles of a heavy particle. By using the topological information of the event, the t$\\bar{t}$ events can be efficiently extracted from the background. The second method relies on the identification of the remnants of the long lived bottom quarks that are expected to be produced in the decay of almost every top quark. Because the largest background processes do not contain bottom quarks, this is an extremely efficient way to select the events retaining about 60% of the t$\\bar{t}$ events and removing almost 90% of the background. A kinematic fit to the top quark mass is performed on the t$\\bar{t}$ candidate events using the final state particles that are seen in the detector. A likelihood technique is then used to extract the most likely value of the top quark mass, mt, and signal fraction. The result for the topological selection is mt = 169.9 ± 5.8(statistical)$+8.0\\atop{-7.8}$(systematic) GeV while the results on the sample selected from identification of a b quark in the event is mt = 170.6 ± 4.2(statistical)$+6.3\\atop{-6.8}$(systematic) GeV.

  6. Precision of anterior and posterior corneal curvature measurements taken with the Oculus Pentacam

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizabeth Chetty

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available In the era of rapid advances in technology, new ophthalmic instruments are constantly influencing health sciences and necessitating investigations of the accuracy and precision of the new technology. The Oculus Pentacam (70700 has been available for some time now and numerous studies have investigated the precision of some of the parameters that the Pentacam is capable of measuring. Unfortunately some of these studies fall short in confusing the meaning of accuracy and precision and in not being able to analyse the data correctly or completely. The aim of this study was to investigate the precision of the anterior and posterior corneal curvature measurements taken with the Oculus Pentacam (70700 holistically with sound multivariate statistical methods. Twenty successive Pentacam measurements were taken over three different measuring sessions on one subject. Keratometric data for both the anterior and posterior corneal surfaces were analysed using multivariate statistics to determine the precision of the Oculus Pentacam. This instrument was found to have good precision both clinically and statistically for anterior corneal measurements but only good clinical precision for the posterior corneal surface. Key words: Oculus Pentacam; keratometric variation; corneal curvature; multivariate statistics

  7. Learning from microarray interlaboratory studies: measures of precision for gene expression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reid Laura H

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The ability to demonstrate the reproducibility of gene expression microarray results is a critical consideration for the use of microarray technology in clinical applications. While studies have asserted that microarray data can be "highly reproducible" under given conditions, there is little ability to quantitatively compare amongst the various metrics and terminology used to characterize and express measurement performance. Use of standardized conceptual tools can greatly facilitate communication among the user, developer, and regulator stakeholders of the microarray community. While shaped by less highly multiplexed systems, measurement science (metrology is devoted to establishing a coherent and internationally recognized vocabulary and quantitative practice for the characterization of measurement processes. Results The two independent aspects of the metrological concept of "accuracy" are "trueness" (closeness of a measurement to an accepted reference value and "precision" (the closeness of measurement results to each other. A carefully designed collaborative study enables estimation of a variety of gene expression measurement precision metrics: repeatability, several flavors of intermediate precision, and reproducibility. The three 2004 Expression Analysis Pilot Proficiency Test collaborative studies, each with 13 to 16 participants, provide triplicate microarray measurements on each of two reference RNA pools. Using and modestly extending the consensus ISO 5725 documentary standard, we evaluate the metrological precision figures of merit for individual microarray signal measurement, building from calculations appropriate to single measurement processes, such as technical replicate expression values for individual probes on a microarray, to the estimation and display of precision functions representing all of the probes in a given platform. Conclusion With only modest extensions, the established metrological framework

  8. Precision Mass Property Measurements Using a Five-Wire Torsion Pendulum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swank, Aaron J.

    2012-01-01

    A method for measuring the moment of inertia of an object using a five-wire torsion pendulum design is described here. Typical moment of inertia measurement devices are capable of 1 part in 10(exp 3) accuracy and current state of the art techniques have capabilities of about one part in 10(exp 4). The five-wire apparatus design shows the prospect of improving on current state of the art. Current measurements using a laboratory prototype indicate a moment of inertia measurement precision better than a part in 10(exp 4). In addition, the apparatus is shown to be capable of measuring the mass center offset from the geometric center. Typical mass center measurement devices exhibit a measurement precision up to approximately 1 micrometer. Although the five-wire pendulum was not originally designed for mass center measurements, preliminary results indicate an apparatus with a similar design may have the potential of achieving state of the art precision.

  9. Measuring atomic NOON-states and using them to make precision measurements

    CERN Document Server

    Hallwood, David W; Cooper, Jessica J; Dunningham, Jacob

    2009-01-01

    A scheme for creating NOON-states of the quasi-momentum of ultra-cold atoms has recently been proposed [New J. Phys. 8, 180 (2006)]. This was achieved by trapping the atoms in an optical lattice in a ring configuration and rotating the potential at a rate equal to half a quantum of angular momentum . In this paper we present a scheme for confirming that a NOON-state has indeed been created. This is achieved by spectroscopically mapping out the anti-crossing between the ground and first excited levels by modulating the rate at which the potential is rotated. Finally we show how the NOON-state can be used to make precision measurements of rotation.

  10. Measuring atomic NOON-states and using them to make precision measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hallwood, David W; Stokes, Adam; Cooper, Jessica J; Dunningham, Jacob [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Leeds, Leeds, LS2 9JT (United Kingdom)], E-mail: dwhallwood@googlemail.com

    2009-10-15

    A scheme for creating NOON-states of the quasi-momentum of ultra-cold atoms has recently been proposed (2006 New J. Phys. 8 180). This was achieved by trapping the atoms in an optical lattice in a ring configuration and rotating the potential at a rate equal to half a quantum of angular momentum. In this paper, we present a scheme for confirming that a NOON-state has indeed been created. This is achieved by spectroscopically mapping out the anti-crossing between the ground and first excited levels by modulating the rate at which the potential is rotated. Finally, we show how the NOON-state can be used to make precision measurements of rotation.

  11. Interpreting Power Anisotropy Measurements in Plasma Turbulence

    CERN Document Server

    Chen, C H K; Horbury, T S; Schekochihin, A A

    2009-01-01

    A relationship between power anisotropy and wavevector anisotropy in turbulent fluctuations is derived. This can be used to interpret plasma turbulence measurements, for example in the solar wind. If fluctuations are anisotropic in shape then the ion gyroscale break point in spectra in the directions parallel and perpendicular to the magnetic field would not occur at the same frequency, and similarly for the electron gyroscale break point. This is an important consideration when interpreting solar wind observations in terms of anisotropic turbulence theories. Model magnetic field power spectra are presented assuming a cascade of critically balanced Alfven waves in the inertial range and kinetic Alfven waves in the dissipation range. The variation of power anisotropy with scale is compared to existing solar wind measurements and the similarities and differences are discussed.

  12. Spectropolarimetry with PEPSI at the LBT: accuracy vs. precision in magnetic field measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ilyin, Ilya; Strassmeier, Klaus G.; Woche, Manfred; Hofmann, Axel

    2009-04-01

    We present the design of the new PEPSI spectropolarimeter to be installed at the Large Binocular Telescope (LBT) in Arizona to measure the full set of Stokes parameters in spectral lines and outline its precision and the accuracy limiting factors.

  13. Nuclear Targets for a Precision Measurement of the Neutral Pion Radiative Width

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martel, Philippe; Clinton, Eric; McWilliams, R.; Lawrence, Dave; Miskimen, Rory; Ahmidouch, Abdellah; Ambrozewicz, Pawel; Asaturyan, Arshak; Baker, O.; Benton, LaRay; Bernstein, Aron; Cole, Philip; Collins, Patrick; Dale, Daniel; Danagoulian, Samuel; Davidenko, G.; Demirchyan, Raphael; Deur, Alexandre; DOLGOLENKO, A.; Dzyubenko, Georgiy; Evdokimov, Anatoly; Feng, JIng; Gabrielyan, Marianna; Gan, Liping; Gasparian, Ashot; Glamazdin, Oleksandr; Goryachev, Vladimir; Gyurjyan, Vardan; Hardy, K.; Ito, Mark; Khandaker, Mahbubul; Kingsberry, Paul; Kolarkar, Ameya; Konchatnyi, Mykhailo; Korchin, O.; Korsch, Wolfgang; Kowalski, Stanley; Kubantsev, Mikhail; Kubarovsky, Valery; LARIN, Ilya; MATVEEV, V.; McNulty, Dustin; Milbrath, Brian; Minehart, Ralph; Mochalov, Vasiliy; Mtingwa, Sekazi; Nakagawa, Itaru; Overby, Steven; Pasyuk, Evgueni; Payen, Marvin; Pedroni, Ronald; Prok, Yelena; Ritchie, Barry; Salgado, Carlos; Sitnikov, Anatoly; Sober, Daniel; Stephens, W.; Teymurazyan, Aram; Underwood, Jarreas; VASILIEV, A.; VEREBRYUSOV, V.; Vishnyakov, Vladimir; Wood, Michael

    2009-12-01

    A technique is presented for precision measurements of the area densities, density * T, of approximately 5% radiation length carbon and 208Pb targets used in an experiment at Jefferson Laboratory to measure the neutral pion radiative width. The precision obtained in the area density for the carbon target is +/- 0.050%, and that obtained for the lead target through an x-ray attenuation technique is +/- 0.43%.

  14. On the Use of Context Information for Precise Measurement-Based Execution Time Estimation

    OpenAIRE

    Stattelmann, Stefan; Martin, Florian

    2010-01-01

    The present paper investigates the influence of the execution history on the precision of measurement-based execution time estimates for embedded software. A new approach to timing analysis is presented which was designed to overcome the problems of existing static and dynamic methods. By partitioning the analyzed programs into easily traceable segments and by precisely controlling run-time measurements with on-chip tracing facilities, the new method is able to preserve information about th...

  15. MRPC-PET: A new technique for high precision time and position measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doroud, K., E-mail: kdoroud@cern.ch [World Laboratory, Geneva (Switzerland); Hatzifotiadou, D. [Sezione INFN, Bologna (Italy); Li, S. [World Laboratory, Geneva (Switzerland); Williams, M.C.S. [Sezione INFN, Bologna (Italy); Zichichi, A. [Dipartimento di Fisica dell' Universita, Bologna (Italy); PH Dept, CERN, Geneva (Switzerland); Zuyeuski, R. [World Laboratory, Geneva (Switzerland)

    2011-12-21

    The purpose of this paper is to consider a new technology for medical diagnosis: the MRPC-PET. This technology allows excellent time resolution together with 2-D position information thus providing a fundamental step in this field. The principle of this method is based on the Multigap Resistive Plate Chamber (MRPC) capable of high precision time measurements. We have previously found that the route to precise timing is differential readout (this requires matching anode and cathode strips); thus crossed strip readout schemes traditionally used for 2-D readout cannot be exploited. In this paper we consider the time difference from the two ends of the strip to provide a high precision measurement along the strip; the average time gives precise timing. The MRPC-PET thus provides a basic step in the field of medical technology: excellent time resolution together with 2-D position measurement.

  16. Development of a simple device for processing whole-blood samples into measured aliquots of plasma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burtis, C A; Johnson, W F; Walker, W A

    1986-09-01

    A capillary processor and aliquoter has been designed and fabricated that is capable of accepting aliquots of whole blood and automatically processing them into discrete aliquots of plasma. The device consists of two disks, each of which contains 16 individual capillaries and a processing rotor. One disk accepts larger capillaries that hold approximately 100 microL of whole blood each. The second disk accepts 2.54-cm-long precision capillaries of various internal diameters, which provide exact sample volumes from 1 to 10 microL. The processing rotor contains 16 individual compartments and chambers to accept both disks. Applying centrifugal force transfers the aliquots of whole blood into their respective compartments, where they are separated into cellular and plasma fractions. As the rotor speed is slowly decreased, an aliquot of plasma is withdrawn by capillary action into each measuring capillary. The disk containing the 16 measured aliquots of plasma is then removed and placed into a modified rotor for conventional centrifugal analysis. This device can entrain and deliver microliter volumes of liquids with precision and accuracy (1-2%) near that of mechanical pipettes. Assays of the separated plasma aliquots also have acceptable precision (e.g., CVs approximately 3% for measurements of serum enzymes).

  17. A study of artificial eyes for the measurement of precision in eye-trackers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Dong; Mulvey, Fiona B; Pelz, Jeff B; Holmqvist, Kenneth

    2016-07-06

    The precision of an eye-tracker is critical to the correct identification of eye movements and their properties. To measure a system's precision, artificial eyes (AEs) are often used, to exclude eye movements influencing the measurements. A possible issue, however, is that it is virtually impossible to construct AEs with sufficient complexity to fully represent the human eye. To examine the consequences of this limitation, we tested currently used AEs from three manufacturers of eye-trackers and compared them to a more complex model, using 12 commercial eye-trackers. Because precision can be measured in various ways, we compared different metrics in the spatial domain and analyzed the power-spectral densities in the frequency domain. To assess how precision measurements compare in artificial and human eyes, we also measured precision using human recordings on the same eye-trackers. Our results show that the modified eye model presented can cope with all eye-trackers tested and acts as a promising candidate for further development of a set of AEs with varying pupil size and pupil-iris contrast. The spectral analysis of both the AE and human data revealed that human eye data have different frequencies that likely reflect the physiological characteristics of human eye movements. We also report the effects of sample selection methods for precision calculations. This study is part of the EMRA/COGAIN Eye Data Quality Standardization Project.

  18. Unique electron polarimeter analyzing power comparison and precision spin-based energy measurement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joseph Grames; Charles Sinclair; Joseph Mitchell; Eugene Chudakov; Howard Fenker; Arne Freyberger; Douglas Higinbotham; B. Poelker; Michael Steigerwald; Michael Tiefenback; Christian Cavata; Stephanie Escoffier; Frederic Marie; Thierry Pussieux; Pascal Vernin; Samuel Danagoulian; Kahanawita Dharmawardane; Renee Fatemi; Kyungseon Joo; Markus Zeier; Viktor Gorbenko; Rakhsha Nasseripour; Brian Raue; Riad Suleiman; Benedikt Zihlmann

    2004-03-01

    Precision measurements of the relative analyzing powers of five electron beam polarimeters, based on Compton, Moller, and Mott scattering, have been performed using the CEBAF accelerator at the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (Jefferson Laboratory). A Wien filter in the 100 keV beamline of the injector was used to vary the electron spin orientation exiting the injector. High statistical precision measurements of the scattering asymmetry as a function of the spin orientation were made with each polarimeter. Since each polarimeter receives beam with the same magnitude of polarization, these asymmetry measurements permit a high statistical precision comparison of the relative analyzing powers of the five polarimeters. This is the first time a precise comparison of the analyzing powers of Compton, Moller, and Mott scattering polarimeters has been made. Statistically significant disagreements among the values of the beam polarization calculated from the asymmetry measurements made with each polarimeter reveal either errors in the values of the analyzing power, or failure to correctly include all systematic effects. The measurements reported here represent a first step toward understanding the systematic effects of these electron polarimeters. Such studies are necessary to realize high absolute accuracy (ca. 1%) electron polarization measurements, as required for some parity violation measurements planned at Jefferson Laboratory. Finally, a comparison of the value of the spin orientation exiting the injector that provides maximum longitudinal polarization in each experimental hall leads to an independent and very precise (better than 10-4) absolute measurement of the final electron beam energy.

  19. On Improving Impedance Probe Plasma Potential Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-02-21

    assumption of a collisionless, stationary Maxwellian plasma and are seen to work well in non -flowing plasmas of sufficient density. However, as plasma...collection area. For Maxwellian electrons, np = n exp(Vp-φp)/Te and so at low frequency from Eq. (1) above, the resistive component of the ac

  20. Electron Temperature and Plasma Flow Measurements of NIF Hohlraum Plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrios, M. A.; Liedahl, D. A.; Schneider, M. B.; Jones, O.; Brow, G. V.; Regan, S. P.; Fournier, K. B.; Moore, A. S.; Ross, J. S.; Eder, D.; Landen, O.; Kauffman, R. L.; Nikroo, A.; Kroll, J.; Jaquez, J.; Huang, H.; Hansen, S. B.; Callahan, D. A.; Hinkel, D. E.; Bradley, D.; Moody, J. D.; LLNL Collaboration; LLE Collaboration; GA Collaboration; SNL Collaboration

    2016-10-01

    Characterizing the plasma conditions inside NIF hohlraums, in particular mapping the plasma Te, is critical to gaining insight into mechanisms that affect energy coupling and transport in the hohlraum. The dot spectroscopy platform provides a temporal history of the localized Te and plasma flow inside a NIF hohlraum, by introducing a Mn-Co tracer dot, at strategic locations inside the hohlraum, that comes to equilibrium with the local plasma. K-shell X-ray spectroscopy of the tracer dot is recorded onto an absolutely calibrated X-ray streak spectrometer. Isoelectronic and interstage line ratios are used to infer localized Te through comparison with atomic physics calculations using SCRAM. Time resolved X-ray images are simultaneously taken of the expanding dot, providing plasma (ion) flow information. We present recent results provided by this platform and compare with simulations using HYDRA. This work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by LLNL under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  1. Precise measurement of the W-boson mass with the CDF II detector

    CERN Document Server

    Aaltonen, T.; Amerio, S.; Amidei, D.; Anastassov, A.; Annovi, A.; Antos, J.; Apollinari, G.; Appel, J.A.; Arisawa, T.; Artikov, A.; Asaadi, J.; Ashmanskas, W.; Auerbach, B.; Aurisano, A.; Azfar, F.; Badgett, W.; Bae, T.; Barbaro-Galtieri, A.; Barnes, V.E.; Barnett, B.A.; Barria, P.; Bartos, P.; Bauce, M.; Bedeschi, F.; Behari, S.; Bellettini, G.; Bellinger, J.; Benjamin, D.; Beretvas, A.; Bhatti, A.; Binkley, M.; Bisello, D.; Bizjak, I.; Bland, K.R.; Blumenfeld, B.; Bocci, A.; Bodek, A.; Bortoletto, D.; Boudreau, J.; Boveia, A.; Brigliadori, L.; Bromberg, C.; Brucken, E.; Budagov, J.; Budd, H.S.; Burkett, K.; Busetto, G.; Bussey, P.; Buzatu, A.; Calamba, A.; Calancha, C.; Camarda, S.; Campanelli, M.; Campbell, M.; Canelli, F.; Carls, B.; Carlsmith, D.; Carosi, R.; Carrillo, S.; Carron, S.; Casal, B.; Casarsa, M.; Castro, A.; Catastini, P.; Cauz, D.; Cavaliere, V.; Cavalli-Sforza, M.; Cerri, A.; Cerrito, L.; Chen, Y.C.; Chertok, M.; Chiarelli, G.; Chlachidze, G.; Chlebana, F.; Cho, K.; Chokheli, D.; Chung, W.H.; Chung, Y.S.; Ciocci, M.A.; Clark, A.; Clarke, C.; Compostella, G.; Convery, M.E.; Conway, J.; Corbo, M.; Cordelli, M.; Cox, C.A.; Cox, D.J.; Crescioli, F.; Cuevas, J.; Culbertson, R.; Dagenhart, D.; d'Ascenzo, N.; Datta, M.; de Barbaro, P.; Dell'Orso, M.; Demortier, L.; Deninno, M.; Devoto, F.; d'Errico, M.; Di Canto, A.; Di Ruzza, B.; Dittmann, J.R.; D'Onofrio, M.; Donati, S.; Dong, P.; Dorigo, M.; Dorigo, T.; Ebina, K.; Elagin, A.; Eppig, A.; Erbacher, R.; Errede, S.; Ershaidat, N.; Eusebi, R.; Farrington, S.; Feindt, M.; Fernandez, J.P.; Field, R.; Flanagan, G.; Forrest, R.; Frank, M.J.; Franklin, M.; Freeman, J.C.; Funakoshi, Y.; Furic, I.; Gallinaro, M.; Garcia, J.E.; Garfinkel, A.F.; Garosi, P.; Gerberich, H.; Gerchtein, E.; Giagu, S.; Giakoumopoulou, V.; Giannetti, P.; Gibson, K.; Ginsburg, C.M.; Giokaris, N.; Giromini, P.; Giurgiu, G.; Glagolev, V.; Glenzinski, D.; Gold, M.; Goldin, D.; Goldschmidt, N.; Golossanov, A.; Gomez, G.; Gomez-Ceballos, G.; Goncharov, M.; Gonzalez, O.; Gorelov, I.; Goshaw, A.T.; Goulianos, K.; Grinstein, S.; Grosso-Pilcher, C.; Group, R.C.; Guimaraes da Costa, J.; Hahn, S.R.; Halkiadakis, E.; Hamaguchi, A.; Han, J.Y.; Happacher, F.; Hara, K.; Hare, D.; Hare, M.; Harr, R.F.; Hatakeyama, K.; Hays, C.; Heck, M.; Heinrich, J.; Herndon, M.; Hewamanage, S.; Hocker, A.; Hopkins, W.; Horn, D.; Hou, S.; Hughes, R.E.; Hurwitz, M.; Husemann, U.; Hussain, N.; Hussein, M.; Huston, J.; Introzzi, G.; Iori, M.; Ivanov, A.; James, E.; Jang, D.; Jayatilaka, B.; Jeon, E.J.; Jindariani, S.; Jones, M.; Joo, K.K.; Jun, S.Y.; Junk, T.R.; Kamon, T.; Karchin, P.E.; Kasmi, A.; Kato, Y.; Ketchum, W.; Keung, J.; Khotilovich, V.; Kilminster, B.; Kim, D.H.; Kim, H.S.; Kim, J.E.; Kim, M.J.; Kim, S.B.; Kim, S.H.; Kim, Y.K.; Kim, Y.J.; Kimura, N.; Kirby, M.; Klimenko, S.; Knoepfel, K.; Kondo, K.; Kong, D.J.; Konigsberg, J.; Kotwal, A.V.; Kreps, M.; Kroll, J.; Krop, D.; Kruse, M.; Krutelyov, V.; Kuhr, T.; Kurata, M.; Kwang, S.; Laasanen, A.T.; Lami, S.; Lammel, S.; Lancaster, M.; Lander, R.L.; Lannon, K.; Lath, A.; Latino, G.; LeCompte, T.; Lee, E.; Lee, H.S.; Lee, J.S.; Lee, S.W.; Leo, S.; Leone, S.; Lewis, J.D.; Limosani, A.; Lin, C.J.; Lindgren, M.; Lipeles, E.; Lister, A.; Litvintsev, D.O.; Liu, C.; Liu, H.; Liu, Q.; Liu, T.; Lockwitz, S.; Loginov, A.; Lucchesi, D.; Lueck, J.; Lujan, P.; Lukens, P.; Lungu, G.; Lys, J.; Lysak, R.; Madrak, R.; Maeshima, K.; Maestro, P.; Malik, S.; Manca, G.; Manousakis-Katsikakis, A.; Margaroli, F.; Marino, C.; Martinez, M.; Mastrandrea, P.; Matera, K.; Mattson, M.E.; Mazzacane, A.; Mazzanti, P.; McFarland, K.S.; McIntyre, P.; McNulty, R.; Mehta, A.; Mehtala, P.; Mesropian, C.; Miao, T.; Mietlicki, D.; Mitra, A.; Miyake, H.; Moed, S.; Moggi, N.; Mondragon, M.N.; Moon, C.S.; Moore, R.; Morello, M.J.; Morlock, J.; Movilla Fernandez, P.; Mukherjee, A.; Muller, Th.; Murat, P.; Mussini, M.; Nachtman, J.; Nagai, Y.; Naganoma, J.; Nakano, I.; Napier, A.; Nett, J.; Neu, C.; Neubauer, M.S.; Nielsen, J.; Nodulman, L.; Noh, S.Y.; Norniella, O.; Oakes, L.; Oh, S.H.; Oh, Y.D.; Oksuzian, I.; Okusawa, T.; Orava, R.; Ortolan, L.; Pagan Griso, S.; Pagliarone, C.; Palencia, E.; Papadimitriou, V.; Paramonov, A.A.; Patrick, J.; Pauletta, G.; Paulini, M.; Paus, C.; Pellett, D.E.; Penzo, A.; Phillips, T.J.; Piacentino, G.; Pianori, E.; Pilot, J.; Pitts, K.; Plager, C.; Pondrom, L.; Poprocki, S.; Potamianos, K.; Prokoshin, F.; Pranko, A.; Ptohos, F.; Punzi, G.; Rahaman, A.; Ramakrishnan, V.; Ranjan, N.; Redondo, I.; Renton, P.; Rescigno, M.; Riddick, T.; Rimondi, F.; Ristori, L.; Robson, A.; Rodrigo, T.; Rodriguez, T.; Rogers, E.; Rolli, S.; Roser, R.; Ruffini, F.; Ruiz, A.; Russ, J.; Rusu, V.; Safonov, A.; Sakumoto, W.K.; Sakurai, Y.; Santi, L.; Sato, K.; Saveliev, V.; Savoy-Navarro, A.; Schlabach, P.; Schmidt, A.

    2012-01-01

    We have measured the W-boson mass MW using data corresponding to 2.2/fb of integrated luminosity collected in proton-antiproton collisions at 1.96 TeV with the CDF II detector at the Fermilab Tevatron collider. Samples consisting of 470126 W->enu candidates and 624708 W->munu candidates yield the measurement MW = 80387 +- 12 (stat) +- 15 (syst) = 80387 +- 19 MeV. This is the most precise measurement of the W-boson mass to date and significantly exceeds the precision of all previous measurements combined.

  2. Precise Measurement of a Magnetic Field Generated by the Electromagnetic Flux Compression Technique

    CERN Document Server

    Nakamura, D; Matsuda, Y H; Takeyama, S

    2013-01-01

    The precision of the values of a magnetic field generated by electromagnetic flux compression was investigated in ultra-high magnetic fields of up to 700 T. In an attempt to calibrate the magnetic field measured by pickup coils, precise Faraday rotation (FR) measurements were conducted on optical (quartz and crown) glasses. A discernible "turn-around" phenomenon was observed in the FR signal as well as the pickup coils before the end of a liner implosion. We found that the magnetic field measured by pickup coils should be corrected by taking into account the high-frequency response of the signal transmission line. Near the peak magnetic field, however, the pickup coils failed to provide reliable values, leaving the FR measurement as the only method to precisely measure an extremely high magnetic fields.

  3. A Proposed Precision Network Measurements Architecture for the Philippine Research, Education, and Government Information Network (PREGINET)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    The paper proposes a network measurements architecture for the Philippine research, education, and government information network (PREGINET). The proposed architecture is an NTP-based hybrid network measurements system, which offers precise measurements, easily managed, and less bandwidth-consuming system. An NTP via GPS setup is included in the architecture to provide precise time synchronization all over the network. This setup provides a precise time reference for both the source of the measurements data and the collecting or processing machines.The current network measurements implementations in PREGINET, as presented in the latter part of the paper, will provide a hint on what tools have to be developed in order to implement the proposed architecture.

  4. High Precision Measurement of the differential W and Z boson cross-sections

    CERN Document Server

    Gasnikova, Ksenia; The ATLAS collaboration

    2017-01-01

    Measurements of the Drell-Yan production of W and Z/gamma bosons at the LHC provide a benchmark of our understanding of perturbative QCD and probe the proton structure in a unique way. The ATLAS collaboration has performed new high precision measurements at center-of-mass energies of 7. The measurements are performed for W+, W- and Z/gamma bosons integrated and as a function of the boson or lepton rapidity and the Z/gamma* mass. Unprecedented precision is reached and strong constraints on Parton Distribution functions, in particular the strange density are found. Z cross sections are also measured at a center-of-mass energies of 8TeV and 13TeV, and cross-section ratios to the top-quark pair production have been derived. This ratio measurement leads to a cancellation of several systematic effects and allows therefore for a high precision comparison to the theory predictions.

  5. Precise measurement of a magnetic field generated by the electromagnetic flux compression technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, D; Sawabe, H; Matsuda, Y H; Takeyama, S

    2013-04-01

    The precision of the values of a magnetic field generated by electromagnetic flux compression was investigated in ultra-high magnetic fields of up to 700 T. In an attempt to calibrate the magnetic field measured by pickup coils, precise Faraday rotation (FR) measurements were conducted on optical (quartz and crown) glasses. A discernible "turn-around" phenomenon was observed in the FR signal as well as the pickup coils before the end of a liner implosion. We found that the magnetic field measured by pickup coils should be corrected by taking into account the high-frequency response of the signal transmission line. Near the peak magnetic field, however, the pickup coils failed to provide reliable values, leaving the FR measurement as the only method to precisely measure extremely high magnetic fields.

  6. [Designing and implementation of a web-based quality monitoring system for plasma glucose measurement in multicenter population study].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yong; Wang, Limin; Pang, Richard; Mo, Nanxun; Hu, Yan; Deng, Qian; Hu, Zhaohui

    2015-05-01

    The aim of this paper is to describe the designing and implementation of a web-based plasma glucose measurement quality monitoring system to assess the analytical quality of plasma glucose measurements in multicenter population study and provide evidence for the future studies. In the chronic non-communicable disease and related factor surveillance in China, a web based quality monitoring system for plasma glucose measurement was established to conduct evaluation on plasma glucose monitoring quality and effectiveness in 302 surveillance centers, including quality control data entry, transmission and feedback. The majority of the surveillance centers met the quality requirements and passed the evaluation of reproducibility and precision of plasma glucose measurement, only a few centers required intensive training and re-assessment. In order to ensure the completeness and reliability of plasma glucose measurement in the surveillance centers, the establishment of web-based plasma glucose measurement quality control system can facilitate the identification of the qualified surveillance centers and evaluation of plasma glucose measurement quality in different regions. Communication and training are important in ensuring plasma glucose measurement quality. It is necessary to further improve this web-based plasma glucose measurement quality monitoring system in the future to reduce the method specific plasma glucose measurement bias.

  7. Precise measurement of hyperfine intervals using avoided crossing of dressed states

    CERN Document Server

    Rapol, U D; Rapol, Umakant D.; Natarajan, Vasant

    2002-01-01

    We demonstrate a technique for precisely measuring hyperfine intervals in alkali atoms. The atoms form a three-level $\\Lambda$ system in the presence of a strong control laser and a weak probe laser. The dressed states created by the control laser show significant linewidth reduction. We have developed a technique for Doppler-free spectroscopy that enables the separation between the dressed states to be measured with high accuracy even in room-temperature atoms. The states go through an avoided crossing as the detuning of the control laser is changed from positive to negative. By studying the separation as a function of detuning, the center of the level-crossing diagram is determined with high precision, which yields the hyperfine interval. Using room-temperature Rb vapor, we obtain a precision of 44 kHz. This is a significant improvement over the current precision of ~ 1 MHz.

  8. Measurement of effective renal plasma flow in congestive heart failure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tauxe, W.N.; Dubovsky, E.V.; Mantle, J.A.; Dustan, H.P.; Logic, J.R.

    1981-12-01

    In the management of patients with congestive heart failure (CHF), it is often desirable to have precise knowledge of overall renal function, including the effective renal plasma flow (ERPF). It has long been recognized that ERPF is diminished in CHF. Since glomerular filtration rate is often decreased to a much lesser extent, other noninvasive procedures such as the measurement of creatinine clearances may not be entirely suitable. ERPF determination by the single plasma sampling (SPS) method affords a rapid, simple, noninvasive, and economical technique that is quite accurate and reproducible. A SPS method has been well-tested in patients following renal transplantation plus a wide variety of nephrological disorders. We have been concerned whether the SPS method would be valid in volume expanded patients. In 28 determinations of ERPF in patients with CHF, and in five patients who did not have CHF, we have found the SPS estimation of ERPF to yield results that are not clinically significantly different from those obtained by the detailed compartmental analysis method. The volumes of /sup 131/I-orthoiodohippurate (OIH) distribution were found to be somewhat higher in CHF than in controls, but fractional rate constants were proportionately lower so that intercompartmental flow rates and OIH concentrations were not different from controls. Therefore, the SPS estimation of ERPF is valid in patients with CHF and may be useful in monitoring the renal effects of various hemodynamic and pharmacological interventions.

  9. Flowing dusty plasma experiments: Generation of flow and measurement techniques

    CERN Document Server

    Jaiswal, S; Sen, A

    2016-01-01

    A variety of experimental techniques for the generation of subsonic/supersonic dust fluid flows and means of measuring such flow velocities are presented. The experiments have been carried out in a $\\Pi-$shaped Dusty Plasma Experimental (DPEx) device with micron size kaolin/Melamine Formaldehyde (MF) particles embedded in a background of Argon plasma created by a direct current (DC) glow discharge. A stationary dust cloud is formed over the cathode region by precisely balancing the pumping speed and gas flow rate. A flow of dust particles/fluid is generated by additional gas injection from a single or dual locations or by altering the dust confining potential. The flow velocity is then estimated by three different techniques, namely, by super Particle Identification (sPIT) code, Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) analysis and the excitation of Dust Acoustic Waves (DAWs). The results obtained from these three different techniques along with their merits and demerits are discussed. An estimation of the neutral dr...

  10. Study of the data taking strategy for a high precision τ mass measurement

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG You-Kai; ZHANG Jian-Yong; MO Xiao-Hu; YUAN Chang-Zheng

    2009-01-01

    To achieve a high precision τ mass measurement at the high luminosity experiment BESⅢ, Monte Carlo simulation and sampling technique are utilized to simulate various data taking cases for single and multi-parameter fits by virtue of which the optimal scheme is determined. The optimized proportion of luminosity distributed at selected points and the relation between precision and luminosity are obtained. In addition, the optimization of the fit scheme is confirmed by scrutinizing a variety of fit possibilities.

  11. The precise measurement of Tl isotopic compositions by MC-ICPMS: Application to the analysis of geological materials and meteorites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rehkaemper, M. [Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States). Dept. of Geological Sciences]|[Univ. Muenster (Germany). Zentrallabor fuer Geochronologie; Halliday, A.N. [Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States). Dept. of Geological Sciences]|[ETH Zuerich (Switzerland). Inst. for Isotope Geology and Mineral Resources

    1999-03-01

    The precision of Tl isotopic measurements by thermal ionization mass spectrometry (TIMS) is severely limited by the fact that Tl possesses only two naturally occurring isotopes, such that there is no invariant isotope ratio that can be used to correct for instrumental mass discrimination. In this paper the authors describe new chemical and mass spectrometric techniques for the determination of Tl isotopic compositions at a level of precision hitherto unattained. Thallium is first separated from the geological matrix using a two-stage anion-exchange procedure. Thallium isotopic compositions are then determined by multiple-collector inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry with correction for mass discrimination using the known isotopic composition of Pb that is admixed to the sample solutions. With these procedures they achieve a precision of 0.01--0.02% for Tl isotope ratio measurements in geological samples and this is a factor of {ge}3--4 better than the best published results by TIMS. Results are discussed for five terrestrial samples and for the C3V chondrite Allende.

  12. High-Precision Mass Measurements of Exotic Nuclei with the Triple-Trap Mass Spectrometer Isoltrap

    CERN Multimedia

    Blaum, K; Zuber, K T; Stanja, J

    2002-01-01

    The masses of close to 200 short-lived nuclides have already been measured with the mass spectrometer ISOLTRAP with a relative precision between 1$\\times$10$^{-7}$ and 1$\\times$10^{-8}$. The installatin of a radio-frequency quadrupole trap increased the overall efficiency by two orders of magnitude which is at present about 1%. In a recent upgrade, we installed a carbon cluster laser ion source, which will allow us to use carbon clusters as mass references for absolute mass measurements. Due to these improvements and the high reliability of ISOLTRAP we are now able to perform accurate high-precision mass measurements all over the nuclear chart. We propose therefore mass measurements on light, medium and heavy nuclides on both sides of the valley of stability in the coming four years. ISOLTRAP is presently the only instrument capable of the high precision required for many of the proposed studies.

  13. A high-precision K-band LFMCW radar for range measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Yingzhuo; Chen, Xiuwei; Zou, Yongliao

    2016-11-01

    K-band LFMCW radar may be applied in high-precision range measurement, if its range resolution is made be close to mm magnitude, good performance is not only needed in hardware design, algorithm selection and optimization is but also needed. In K-band LFMCW radar system, CZT algorithm is modified according to practical radar echo signal, its simulation model is built in the System Generator tool software, the corresponding algorithm is implemented in FPGA. K-band LFMCW radar may be applied in range measurement of great volume storage tank, the outfield experiment was done according to application, experiment result shows that range measurement precision may reach mm magnitude, the system can meet the requirement of remote high-precision measurement.

  14. Interferometric Set-Up for Measuring Thermal Deformations of Precision Construction Elements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dobosz Marek

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Many precision devices, especially measuring devices, must maintain their technical parameters in variable ambient conditions, particularly at varying temperatures. Examples of such devices may be super precise balances that must keep stability and accuracy of the readings in varying ambient temperatures. Due to that fact, there is a problem of measuring the impact of temperature changes, mainly on geometrical dimensions of fundamental constructional elements of these devices. In the paper a new system for measuring micro-displacements of chosen points of a constructional element of balance with a resolution of single nanometres and accuracy at a level of fractions of micrometres has been proposed.

  15. High precision measurement of the differential $W$ and $Z$ boson production cross sections

    CERN Document Server

    Sommer, Philip; The ATLAS collaboration

    2017-01-01

    Measurements of the Drell-Yan production of $W$ and $Z/\\gamma^*$ bosons at the LHC provide a benchmark of our understanding of perturbative QCD and probe the proton structure in a unique way. The ATLAS collaboration has performed new high precision measurements at center-of-mass energies of 7 TeV. The measurements are performed for $W^+$, $W^-$ and $Z/\\gamma^*$ bosons integrated and as a function of the boson or lepton rapidity and the $Z/\\gamma^*$ mass. Unprecedented precision is reached and strong constraints on Parton Distribution functions, in particular the strange density are found. Slides for DIS 2017 in Birmingham

  16. Hybrid measurement to achieve satisfactory precision in perioperative cardiac output monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peyton, P

    2014-05-01

    Advanced haemodynamic monitoring employing minimally invasive cardiac output measurement may lead to significant improvements in patient outcomes in major surgery. However, the precision (scatter) of measurement of available generic technologies has been shown to be unsatisfactory with percentage error of agreement with bolus thermodilution (% error) of 40% to 50%. Simultaneous measurement and averaging by two or more technologies may reduce random measurement scatter and improve precision. This concept, called the hybrid method, was tested by comparing accuracy and precision of measurement relative to bolus thermodilution using combinations of three component methods. Thirty patients scheduled for either elective cardiac surgery or liver transplantation were studied. Agreement with simultaneous bolus thermodilution of hybrid combinations of continuous thermodilution (QtCCO) or Vigeleo™/FloTrac™ pulse contour measurement (QtFT) with pulmonary Capnotracking (QtCO2) was assessed pre- and post-cardiopulmonary bypass or pre- and post-reperfusion of the donor liver and compared with that of the component methods alone. Hybridisation of QtCO2 (% error 42.2) and QtCCO (% error 51.3) achieved significantly better precision (% error 31.3) than the component methods (P=0.0004) and (P=0.0195). Due to poor inherent precision of QtFT (% error 82.8), hybrid combination of QtFT with QtCO2 did not result in better precision than QtCO2 alone. Hybrid measurement can approach a 30% error, which is recommended as the upper limit for acceptability. This is a practical option where at least one component method, such as Capnotracking, is automated and does not increase the cost or complexity of the measurement process.

  17. High precision planar waveguide propagation loss measurement technique using a Fabry-Perot cavity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Feuchter, Thomas; Thirstrup, Carsten

    1994-01-01

    A high precision measurement technique for characterizing the propagation loss in silica low-loss optical waveguides, based on measuring the contrast of a Fabry-Perot cavity, is demonstrated. The cavity consists of the waveguide coupled to two polarization-maintaining fibers, each end facet coated...

  18. Progress on Passive Sensor for Ultra-Precise Measurement of C02

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heaps, William S.; Kawa, S. Randolph; Georgieva, Elena; Wilson, Emily

    2003-01-01

    We will present results from a novel instrument employing a Fabry-Perot interferometer to measure column carbon dioxide with great precision. These measurements are very important for improving our understanding of the global warming phenomenon. The instrument technique can be extended to a number of other important trace gases in the atmosphere.

  19. Precision of measurement of cerebral tissue oxygenation index using near-infrared spectroscopy in preterm neonates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sorensen, Line C; Greisen, Gorm

    2006-01-01

    The use of cerebral tissue oxygenation index (c-TOI) in a clinical setting is limited by doubts concerning the accuracy of the measurements. Since there is no gold standard, validation is difficult. Our modest aim was to quantify the precision of c-TOI doing repeated measurements by reapplying th...

  20. Displacement sensor with controlled measuring force and its error analysis and precision verification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Liangen; Wang, Xuanze; Lv, Wei

    2011-05-01

    A displacement sensor with controlled measuring force and its error analysis and precision verification are discussed in this paper. The displacement sensor consists of an electric induction transducer with high resolution and a voice coil motor (VCM). The measuring principles, structure, method enlarging measuring range, signal process of the sensor are discussed. The main error sources such as parallelism error and incline of framework by unequal length of leaf springs, rigidity of measuring rods, shape error of stylus, friction between iron core and other parts, damping of leaf springs, variation of voltage, linearity of induction transducer, resolution and stability are analyzed. A measuring system for surface topography with large measuring range is constructed based on the displacement sensor and 2D moving platform. Measuring precision and stability of the measuring system is verified. Measuring force of the sensor in measurement process of surface topography can be controlled at μN level and hardly changes. It has been used in measurement of bearing ball, bullet mark, etc. It has measuring range up to 2mm and precision of nm level.

  1. Measurements of experimental precision for trials with cowpea (Vigna unguiculata L. Walp.) genotypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teodoro, P E; Torres, F E; Santos, A D; Corrêa, A M; Nascimento, M; Barroso, L M A; Ceccon, G

    2016-05-09

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the suitability of statistics as experimental precision degree measures for trials with cowpea (Vigna unguiculata L. Walp.) genotypes. Cowpea genotype yields were evaluated in 29 trials conducted in Brazil between 2005 and 2012. The genotypes were evaluated with a randomized block design with four replications. Ten statistics that were estimated for each trial were compared using descriptive statistics, Pearson correlations, and path analysis. According to the class limits established, selective accuracy and F-test values for genotype, heritability, and the coefficient of determination adequately estimated the degree of experimental precision. Using these statistics, 86.21% of the trials had adequate experimental precision. Selective accuracy and the F-test values for genotype, heritability, and the coefficient of determination were directly related to each other, and were more suitable than the coefficient of variation and the least significant difference (by the Tukey test) to evaluate experimental precision in trials with cowpea genotypes.

  2. Measurement Model and Precision Analysis of Accelerometers for Maglev Vibration Isolation Platforms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qianqian Wu

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available High precision measurement of acceleration levels is required to allow active control for vibration isolation platforms. It is necessary to propose an accelerometer configuration measurement model that yields such a high measuring precision. In this paper, an accelerometer configuration to improve measurement accuracy is proposed. The corresponding calculation formulas of the angular acceleration were derived through theoretical analysis. A method is presented to minimize angular acceleration noise based on analysis of the root mean square noise of the angular acceleration. Moreover, the influence of installation position errors and accelerometer orientation errors on the calculation precision of the angular acceleration is studied. Comparisons of the output differences between the proposed configuration and the previous planar triangle configuration under the same installation errors are conducted by simulation. The simulation results show that installation errors have a relatively small impact on the calculation accuracy of the proposed configuration. To further verify the high calculation precision of the proposed configuration, experiments are carried out for both the proposed configuration and the planar triangle configuration. On the basis of the results of simulations and experiments, it can be concluded that the proposed configuration has higher angular acceleration calculation precision and can be applied to different platforms.

  3. Segmentation quality evaluation using region-based precision and recall measures for remote sensing images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xueliang; Feng, Xuezhi; Xiao, Pengfeng; He, Guangjun; Zhu, Liujun

    2015-04-01

    Segmentation of remote sensing images is a critical step in geographic object-based image analysis. Evaluating the performance of segmentation algorithms is essential to identify effective segmentation methods and optimize their parameters. In this study, we propose region-based precision and recall measures and use them to compare two image partitions for the purpose of evaluating segmentation quality. The two measures are calculated based on region overlapping and presented as a point or a curve in a precision-recall space, which can indicate segmentation quality in both geometric and arithmetic respects. Furthermore, the precision and recall measures are combined by using four different methods. We examine and compare the effectiveness of the combined indicators through geometric illustration, in an effort to reveal segmentation quality clearly and capture the trade-off between the two measures. In the experiments, we adopted the multiresolution segmentation (MRS) method for evaluation. The proposed measures are compared with four existing discrepancy measures to further confirm their capabilities. Finally, we suggest using a combination of the region-based precision-recall curve and the F-measure for supervised segmentation evaluation.

  4. A novel wide-range precision instrument for measuring three-dimensional surface topography

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG Xu-dong; CHEN Yu-rong; XIE Tie-bang

    2008-01-01

    We developed a measuring instrument that had wide range, high precision, small measuring touch force. The instrument for three-dimensional (3D) surface topography measurement was composed of a high precision displacement sensor based on the Michelson interference principle, a 3D platform based on vertical scanning, a measuring and control circuit, and an industrial control computer. It was a closed loop control system, which changed the traditional moving stylus scanning style into a moving platform scanning style. When the workpiece was measured, the lever of the displacement sensor returned to the balanced position in every sample interval according to the zero offset of the displacement sensor. The non-linear error caused by the rotation of the lever was, therefore, very small even if the measuring range was wide. The instrument can measure the roughness and the profile size of a curved surface.

  5. Navigation Doppler Lidar Sensor for Precision Altitude and Vector Velocity Measurements Flight Test Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierrottet, Diego F.; Lockhard, George; Amzajerdian, Farzin; Petway, Larry B.; Barnes, Bruce; Hines, Glenn D.

    2011-01-01

    An all fiber Navigation Doppler Lidar (NDL) system is under development at NASA Langley Research Center (LaRC) for precision descent and landing applications on planetary bodies. The sensor produces high resolution line of sight range, altitude above ground, ground relative attitude, and high precision velocity vector measurements. Previous helicopter flight test results demonstrated the NDL measurement concepts, including measurement precision, accuracies, and operational range. This paper discusses the results obtained from a recent campaign to test the improved sensor hardware, and various signal processing algorithms applicable to real-time processing. The NDL was mounted in an instrumentation pod aboard an Erickson Air-Crane helicopter and flown over vegetation free terrain. The sensor was one of several sensors tested in this field test by NASA?s Autonomous Landing and Hazard Avoidance Technology (ALHAT) project.

  6. Precision ESR measurements of transverse anisotropy in the single-molecule magnet Ni4

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collett, Charles A.; Allão Cassaro, Rafael A.; Friedman, Jonathan R.

    2016-12-01

    We present a method for precisely measuring the tunnel splitting in single-molecule magnets (SMMs) using electron-spin resonance, and use these measurements to precisely and independently determine the underlying transverse anisotropy parameter, given a certain class of transitions. By diluting samples of the SMM Ni4 via cocrystallization in a diamagnetic isostructural analog we obtain markedly narrower resonance peaks than are observed in undiluted samples. Using custom loop-gap resonators we measure the transitions at several frequencies, allowing a precise determination of the tunnel splitting. Because the transition under investigation occurs at zero field, and arises due to a first-order perturbation from the transverse anisotropy, we can determine the magnitude of this anisotropy independent of any other Hamiltonian parameters. This method can be applied to other SMMs with tunnel splittings arising from first-order transverse anisotropy perturbations.

  7. Precision Measurements: Testing the Time Variation of the Fine Structure Constant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamoreaux, Steve

    2004-05-01

    Often, precision measurements from diverse fields can be used to learn new facts about the universe. The usual definition of "precision" is based on improvements over previous measurements. A review of the present state of knowledge regarding the possible time variation of the fine structure constant α will be presented; "precise" data from natural phenomena, which include an apparent shift in the red-shift-scaled fine structure in the absorption spectra of quasar light, and the isotopic abundances in the fission products of a prehistoric natural reactor in Oklo, Gabon. Prospects to improve the accuracy for the constancy of α with laboratory experiments will be discussed. Our two experimental investigations currently being developed are based on optical spectroscopy of trapped ions and on radiofrequency spectroscopy of an atomic dysprosium beam. A sensitivity of dotα/α≈ 10-18/yr is anticipated. Because this accuracy exceeds that by which the second is defined, these measurements will necessarily be differential.

  8. Method for precise charge measurements of relativistic light nuclei, Z<=3, in nuclear track emulsion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bloomer, M.A.; Heckman, H.H.; Karant, Y.J. (California Univ., Berkeley (USA). Div. of Nuclear Science)

    1983-09-15

    A technique for precise charge measurement of particle tracks in nuclear emulsion is described. The method is based on measurements of the lacunarity, i.e., fractional transparency, and/or the fractional opacity in the linear track structure of ionization tracks observed in the developed emulsion. The method yields estimates of charge for relativistic Z=1 and 2 nuclei to a precision of proportional +- 0.05 charge units, in agreement with Barkas' theoretical model of track structure. The technique is applicable up to Zapprox.=6, but with diminished charge resolution with increasing charge above Z=3. Systematics that affect the accuracy of the method are noted and discussed.

  9. Investigation of the proton-neutron interaction by high-precision nuclear mass measurements

    CERN Multimedia

    Savreux, R P; Akkus, B

    2007-01-01

    We propose to measure the atomic masses of a series of short-lived nuclides, including $^{70}$Ni, $^{122-130}$Cd, $^{134}$Sn, $^{138,140}$Xe, $^{207-210}$Hg, and $^{223-225}$Rn, that contribute to the investigation of the proton-neutron interaction and its role in nuclear structure. The high-precision mass measurements are planned for the Penning trap mass spectrometer ISOLTRAP that reaches the required precision of 10 keV in the nuclear mass determination.

  10. Precise Measurement of Neutrino and Anti-neutrino Differential Cross Sections

    CERN Document Server

    Tzanov, M; Boyd, S; McDonald, J; Radescu, V; Adams, T; Alton, A; Avvakumov, S; De Barbaro, L; De Barbaro, P; Bernstein, R H; Bodek, A; Bolton, T; Brau, J E; Buchholz, D; Budd, H; Bugel, L; Conrad, J; Drucker, R B; Fleming, B T; Frey, R; Formaggio, J A; Goldman, J; Goncharov, M; Harris, D A; Johnson, R A; Kim, J H; Koutsoliotas, S; Lamm, M J; Marsh, W; Mason, D; McFarland, K S; McNulty, C; Nienaber, P; Romosan, A; Sakumoto, W K; Schellman, H; Shaevitz, M H; Spentzouris, P; Stern, E G; Suwonjandee, N; Tobien, N; Vakili, M; Vaitaitis, A; Yang, U K; Yu, J; Zeller, G P; Zimmerman, E D

    2006-01-01

    The NuTeV experiment at Fermilab has obtained a unique high statistics sample of neutrino and anti-neutrino interactions using its high-energy sign-selected beam. We present a measurement of the differential cross section for charged-current neutrino and anti-neutrino scattering from iron. Structure functions, F_2(x,Q^2) and xF_3(x,Q^2), are determined by fitting the inelasticity, y, dependence of the cross sections. This measurement has significantly improved systematic precision as a consequence of more precise understanding of hadron and muon energy scales.

  11. High Precision Measurement of the differential vector boson cross-sections with the ATLAS detector

    CERN Document Server

    Armbruster, Aaron James; The ATLAS collaboration

    2017-01-01

    Measurements of the Drell-Yan production of W and Z/gamma bosons at the LHC provide a benchmark of our understanding of perturbative QCD and probe the proton structure in a unique way. The ATLAS collaboration has performed new high precision measurements at center-of-mass energies of 7. The measurements are performed for W+, W- and Z/gamma bosons integrated and as a function of the boson or lepton rapidity and the Z/gamma* mass. Unprecedented precision is reached and strong constraints on Parton Distribution functions, in particular the strange density are found. Z cross sections are also measured at center-of-mass energies of 8 eV and 13TeV, and cross-section ratios to the top-quark pair production have been derived. This ratio measurement leads to a cancellation of systematic effects and allows for a high precision comparison to the theory predictions. The cross section of single W events has also been measured precisely at center-of-mass energies of 8TeV and 13TeV and the W charge asymmetry has been determ...

  12. Precise and feasible measurements of lateral calcaneal lengthening osteotomies by radiostereometric analysis in cadaver feet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinkevich, P.; Rahbek, O.; Møller-Madsen, B.; Søballe, K.; Stilling, M.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Lengthening osteotomies of the calcaneus in children are in general grafted with bone from the iliac crest. Artificial bone grafts have been introduced, however, their structural and clinical durability has not been documented. Radiostereometric analysis (RSA) is a very accurate and precise method for measurements of rigid body movements including the evaluation of joint implant and fracture stability, however, RSA has not previously been used in clinical studies of calcaneal osteotomies. We assessed the precision of RSA as a measurement tool in a lateral calcaneal lengthening osteotomy (LCLO). Methods LCLO was performed in six fixed adult cadaver feet. Tantalum markers were inserted on each side of the osteotomy and in the cuboideum. Lengthening was done with a plexiglas wedge. A total of 24 radiological double examinations were obtained. Two feet were excluded due to loose and poorly dispersed markers. Precision was assessed as systematic bias and 95% repeatability limits. Results Systematic bias was generally below 0.10 mm for translations. Precision of migration measurements was below 0.2 mm for translations in the osteotomy. Conclusion RSA is a precise tool for the evaluation of stability in LCLO. Cite this article: Bone Joint Res 2015;4:78–83. PMID:25957380

  13. Non-contact precision profile measurement to rough-surface objects with optical frequency combs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onoe, Taro; Takahashi, Satoru; Takamasu, Kiyoshi; Matsumoto, Hirokazu

    2016-12-01

    In this research, we developed a new method for the high precision and contactless profile measurement of rough-surfaced objects using optical frequency combs. The uncertainty of the frequency beats of an optical frequency comb is very small (relative uncertainty is 10-10 in our laboratory). In addition, the wavelengths corresponding to these frequency beats are long enough to measure rough-surfaced objects. We can conduct high-precision measurement because several GHz frequency beats can be used if the capability of the detector permits. Moreover, two optical frequency combs with Rb-stabilized repetition frequencies are used for the measurement instead of an RF frequency oscillator; thus, we can avoid the cyclic error caused by the RF frequency oscillator. We measured the profile of a wood cylinder with a rough surface (diameter is approximately 113.2 mm) and compared the result with that of coordinate measuring machine (CMM).

  14. Towards a precise measurement of the top quark Yukawa coupling at the ILC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Juste, A.

    2005-12-01

    A precise measurement of the top quark Yukawa coupling is of great importance, since it may shed light on the mechanism of EWSB. We study the prospects of such measurement during the first phase of the ILC at {radical}s = 500 GeV, focusing in particular on recent theoretical developments as well as the potential benefits of beam polarization. It is shown that both yield improvements that could possibly lead to a measurement competitive with the LHC.

  15. New precise measurement of muonium hyperfine structure interval at J-PARC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ueno, Y., E-mail: yueno@radphys4.c.u-tokyo.ac.jp [University of Tokyo, Graduate School of Arts and Sciences (Japan); Aoki, M. [Osaka University, Graduate School of Science (Japan); Fukao, Y. [KEK (Japan); Higashi, Y.; Higuchi, T. [University of Tokyo, Graduate School of Arts and Sciences (Japan); Iinuma, H.; Ikedo, Y. [KEK (Japan); Ishida, K. [RIKEN (Japan); Ito, T. U. [Japan Atomic Energy Agency (Japan); Iwasaki, M. [RIKEN (Japan); Kadono, R. [KEK (Japan); Kamigaito, O. [RIKEN (Japan); Kanda, S. [University of Tokyo, Department of Physics (Japan); Kawall, D. [University of Massachusetts, Amherst, Department of Physics (United States); Kawamura, N.; Koda, A.; Kojima, K. M. [KEK (Japan); Kubo, M. K. [International Christian University, Graduate School of Arts and Science (Japan); Matsuda, Y. [University of Tokyo, Graduate School of Arts and Sciences (Japan); Mibe, T. [KEK (Japan); and others

    2017-11-15

    MuSEUM is an international collaboration aiming at a new precise measurement of the muonium hyperfine structure at J-PARC (Japan Proton Accelerator Research Complex). Utilizing its intense pulsed muon beam, we expect a ten-fold improvement for both measurements at high magnetic field and zero magnetic field. We have developed a sophisticated monitoring system, including a beam profile monitor to measure the 3D distribution of muonium atoms to suppress the systematic uncertainty.

  16. Digital PCR modeling for maximal sensitivity, dynamic range and measurement precision.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nivedita Majumdar

    Full Text Available The great promise of digital PCR is the potential for unparalleled precision enabling accurate measurements for genetic quantification. A challenge associated with digital PCR experiments, when testing unknown samples, is to perform experiments at dilutions allowing the detection of one or more targets of interest at a desired level of precision. While theory states that optimal precision (Po is achieved by targeting ~1.59 mean copies per partition (λ, and that dynamic range (R includes the space spanning one positive (λL to one negative (λU result from the total number of partitions (n, these results are tempered for the practitioner seeking to construct digital PCR experiments in the laboratory. A mathematical framework is presented elucidating the relationships between precision, dynamic range, number of partitions, interrogated volume, and sensitivity in digital PCR. The impact that false reaction calls and volumetric variation have on sensitivity and precision is next considered. The resultant effects on sensitivity and precision are established via Monte Carlo simulations reflecting the real-world likelihood of encountering such scenarios in the laboratory. The simulations provide insight to the practitioner on how to adapt experimental loading concentrations to counteract any one of these conditions. The framework is augmented with a method of extending the dynamic range of digital PCR, with and without increasing n, via the use of dilutions. An example experiment demonstrating the capabilities of the framework is presented enabling detection across 3.33 logs of starting copy concentration.

  17. Precision Drell-Yan Measurements at the LHC and Implications for the Diphoton Excess

    CERN Document Server

    Goertz, Florian; Son, Minho; Urbano, Alfredo

    2016-01-01

    Precision measurements of the Drell-Yan (DY) cross section at the LHC constrain new physics scenarios that involve new states with electroweak (EW) charges. We analyze these constraints and apply them to models that can address the LHC diphoton excess at 750 GeV. We confront these findings with LEP EW precision tests and show that DY provides stronger constraints than the LEP data. While 8 TeV data can already probe some parts of the interesting region of parameter space, LHC14 results are expected to cover a substantial part of the relevant terrain. We derive the bounds from the existing data, estimate LHC14 reach and compare them to the bounds one gets from LEP and future FCC-ee precision measurements.

  18. Precision Drell-Yan Measurements at the LHC and Implications for the Diphoton Excess

    CERN Document Server

    Goertz, Florian; Son, Minho; Urbano, Alfredo

    2016-01-01

    Precision measurements of the Drell-Yan (DY) cross section at the LHC constrain new physics scenarios that involve new states with electroweak (EW) charges. We analyze these constraints and apply them to models that can address the LHC diphoton excess at 750 GeV. We confront these findings with LEP EW precision tests and show that DY provides stronger constraints than the LEP data. While 8 TeV data can already probe some parts of the interesting region of parameter space, LHC14 results are expected to cover a substantial part of the relevant terrain. We derive the bounds from the existing data, estimate LHC14 reach and compare them to the bounds one gets from LEP and future FCC-ee precision measurements.

  19. Precise Half-Life Measurement of the Superallowed Beta+ Emitter 26Si

    CERN Document Server

    Iacob, V E; Banu, A; Chen, L; Golovko, V V; Goodwin, J; Horvat, V; Nica, N; Park, H I; Trache, L; Tribble, R E

    2010-01-01

    We have measured the half-life of the superallowed 0+ -to- 0+ beta+ emitter 26Si to be 2245.3(7) ms. We used pure sources of 26Si and employed a high-efficiency gas counter, which was sensitive to positrons from both this nuclide and its daughter 26mAl. The data were analyzed as a linked parent-daughter decay. To contribute meaningfully to any test of the unitarity of the Cabibbo-Kobayashi-Maskawa (CKM) matrix, the ft value of a superallowed transition must be determined to a precision of 0.1% or better. With a precision of 0.03% the present result is more than sufficient to be compatable with that requirement. Only the branching ratio now remains to be measured precisely before a +/-0.1% ft value can be obtained for the superallowed transition from 26Si.

  20. High precision measurements of the diamond Hugoniot in and above the melt region

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hicks, D; Boehly, T; Celliers, P; Bradley, D; Eggert, J; McWilliams, R S; Collins, G

    2008-08-05

    High precision laser-driven shock wave measurements of the diamond principal Hugoniot have been made at pressures between 6 and 19 Mbar. Shock velocities were determined with 0.3-1.1% precision using a velocity interferometer. Impedance matching analysis, incorporating systematic errors in the equation-of-state of the quartz standard, was used to determine the Hugoniot with 1.2-2.7% precision in density. The results are in good agreement with published ab initio calculations which predict a small negative melt slope along the Hugoniot, but disagree with previous laser-driven shock wave experiments which had observed a large density increase in the melt region. In the extensive solid-liquid coexistence regime between 6 and 10 Mbar these measurements indicate that the mixed phase may be slightly more dense than would be expected from a simple interpolation between liquid and solid Hugoniots.

  1. Measurement of precision oscillator phase noise using the two-oscillator coherent down-conversion technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pagnanelli, Christopher J.; Cashin, William F.

    1992-01-01

    The characterization of precision frequency standard phase noise and spurious outputs is addressed, using the two-oscillator coherent downconversion technique. Focus is on techniques for making accurate measurements of phase noise and spurious outputs within 100 KHz of a carrier. Significant sources of measurement error related to hardware design problems and inadequate measurement procedures are discussed: measurement errors resulting from system noise sources, phase-locked loop effects, and system bandwidth limitations. In addition, methods and design considerations for minimizing the effects of such errors are presented. Analytic discussions and results are supplemented with actual test data and measurements made using measurement hardware developed at the Ball Corporation, Efratom Division.

  2. Optimizing top precision performance measure of content-based image retrieval by learning similarity function

    KAUST Repository

    Liang, Ru-Ze

    2017-04-24

    In this paper we study the problem of content-based image retrieval. In this problem, the most popular performance measure is the top precision measure, and the most important component of a retrieval system is the similarity function used to compare a query image against a database image. However, up to now, there is no existing similarity learning method proposed to optimize the top precision measure. To fill this gap, in this paper, we propose a novel similarity learning method to maximize the top precision measure. We model this problem as a minimization problem with an objective function as the combination of the losses of the relevant images ranked behind the top-ranked irrelevant image, and the squared Frobenius norm of the similarity function parameter. This minimization problem is solved as a quadratic programming problem. The experiments over two benchmark data sets show the advantages of the proposed method over other similarity learning methods when the top precision is used as the performance measure.

  3. Remote and high precision step height measurement with an optical fiber multiplexing interferometric system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yunzhi; Xie, Fang; Ma, Sen; Chen, Liang

    2015-03-01

    An optical fiber multiplexing low coherence and high coherence interferometric system, which includes a Fizeau interferometer as the sensing element and a Michelson interferometer as the demodulating element, is designed for remote and high precision step height measurement. The Fizeau interferometer is placed in the remote field for sensing the measurand, while the Michelson interferometer which works in both modes of low coherence interferometry and high coherence interferometry is employed for demodulating the measurand. The range of the step height is determined by the low coherence interferometry and the value of it is measured precisely by the high coherence interferometry. High precision has been obtained by searching precisely the peak of the low coherence interferogram symmetrically from two sides of the low coherence interferogram and stabilizing the Michelson interferometer with a feedback loop. The maximum step height that could be measured is 6 mm while the measurement resolution is less than 1 nm. The standard deviation of 10 times measurement results of a step height of 1 mm configurated with two gauge blocks is 0.5 nm.

  4. An optical fiber multiplexing interferometric system for measuring remote and high precision step height

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yunzhi; Xie, Fang; Ma, Sen; Chen, Liang

    2015-02-01

    In this paper, an optical fiber multiplexing interferometric system including a Fizeau interferometer and a Michelson interferometer is designed for remote and high precision step height measurement. The Fizeau interferometer which is inserted in the remote sensing field is used for sensing the measurand, while the Michelson interferometer which is stabilized by a feedback loop works in both modes of low coherence interferometry and high coherence interferometry to demodulate the measurand. The range of the step height is determined by the low coherence interferometry and the value of it is measured precisely by the high coherence interferometry. High precision has been obtained by using the symmetrical peak-searching method to address the peak of the low coherence interferogram precisely and stabilizing the Michelson interferometer with a feedback loop. The maximum step height that could be measured is 6 mm while the measurement resolution is less than 1 nm. The standard deviation of 10 times measurement results of a step height of 1 mm configurated with two gauge blocks is 0.5 nm.

  5. Precision Measurement of the 29Si, 33S, and 36Cl Binding Energies

    CERN Document Server

    Dewey, M S; Deslattes, R D; Doll, C; Jentschel, M; Mutti, P

    2006-01-01

    The binding energies of 29Si, 33S, and 36Cl have been measured with a relative uncertainty $< 0.59 \\times 10^{-6}$ using a flat-crystal spectrometer. The unique features of these measurements are 1) nearly perfect crystals whose lattice spacing is known in meters, 2) a highly precise angle scale that is derived from first principles, and 3) a gamma-ray measurement facility that is coupled to a high flux reactor with near-core source capability. The binding energy is obtained by measuring all gamma-rays in a cascade scheme connecting the capture and ground states. The measurements require the extension of precision flat-crystal diffraction techniques to the 5 to 6 MeV energy region, a significant precision measurement challenge. The binding energies determined from these gamma-ray measurements are consistent with recent highly accurate atomic mass measurements within a relative uncertainty of $4.3 \\times 10^{-7}$. The gamma-ray measurement uncertainties are the dominant contributors to the uncertainty of th...

  6. Precision manufacturing

    CERN Document Server

    Dornfeld, David

    2008-01-01

    Today there is a high demand for high-precision products. The manufacturing processes are now highly sophisticated and derive from a specialized genre called precision engineering. Precision Manufacturing provides an introduction to precision engineering and manufacturing with an emphasis on the design and performance of precision machines and machine tools, metrology, tooling elements, machine structures, sources of error, precision machining processes and precision process planning. As well as discussing the critical role precision machine design for manufacturing has had in technological developments over the last few hundred years. In addition, the influence of sustainable manufacturing requirements in precision processes is introduced. Drawing upon years of practical experience and using numerous examples and illustrative applications, David Dornfeld and Dae-Eun Lee cover precision manufacturing as it applies to: The importance of measurement and metrology in the context of Precision Manufacturing. Th...

  7. Plasma Diagnostics by Antenna Impedance Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swenson, C. M.; Baker, K. D.; Pound, E.; Jensen, M. D.

    1993-01-01

    The impedance of an electrically short antenna immersed in a plasma provides an excellent in situ diagnostic tool for electron density and other plasma parameters. By electrically short we mean that the wavelength of the free-space electromagnetic wave that would be excited at the driving frequency is much longer than the physical size of the antenna. Probes using this impedance technique have had a long history with sounding rockets and satellites, stretching back to the early 1960s. This active technique could provide information on composition and temperature of plasmas for comet or planetary missions. Advantages of the impedance probe technique are discussed and two classes of instruments built and flown by SDL-USU for determining electron density (the capacitance and plasma frequency probes) are described.

  8. ALTERABLE INTERVAL OPTICAL-ELECTRONIC AUTOCOLLIMATION METHOD FOR STRAIGHTNESS MEASUREMENT OF PRECISION GUIDE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xue Zi; Tan Jiubin; Zhao Weiqian; Zhang Heng

    2005-01-01

    Optical-electronic autocollimation method is commonly used to measure straightness of precision guides in engineering application. However, the traditional fixed interval optical-electronic autocollimation method is not suitable for measuring straightness of an air-bearing guide with a long air-bearing bush or a precision straight guide with a long slide-carriage, because the air-bearing bush and the slide-carriage are actually taken as a big bridgeboard bigger than the length of the bridgeboard with the reflector, which is about 1/4~1/2 of total length of the measured guide. If straightness is measured according to the traditional method, only a few points are sampled so that the guide straightness can not be evaluated fully or accurately. In order to solve the problem, an alterable measuring interval method is proposed for straightness measurement based on analyzing the mutual relations and effects among the tilting angle of the reflector, the length of the bridgeboard, the measuring interval and the straightness of the guide. A straightness calculation model is also developed using the method, and the errors stemming from the method proposed are introduced in brief. A precision air-bearing guide with a long air-bearing bush is measured and evaluated using the method proposed, and the actual measurement and evaluation results prove that the method is correct in theory and practical in operation. The method proposed gives an effective and flexible solution to the straightness measurement of the precision guide with long slide-carriage or air-bearing bush in application. It is an extension of the traditional optical-electronic autocollimation method for straightness measurement.

  9. Precise measurements of the eta meson and the neutral kaon masses with the KLOE detector

    CERN Document Server

    Ambrosino, F; Antonelli, M; Archilli, F; Bacci, C; Beltrame, P; Bencivenni, G; Bertolucci, S; Bini, C; Bloise, C; Bocchetta, S; Bossi, F; Branchini, P; Caloi, R; Campana, P; Capon, G; Capussela, T; Ceradini, F; Chi, S; Chiefari, G; Ciambrone, P; De Lucia, E; De Santis, A; De Simone, P; De Zorzi, G; Denig, A; Di Domenico, A; Di Donato, C; Di Micco, B; Doria, A; Dreucci, M; Felici, G; Ferrari, A; Ferrer, M L; Fiore, S; Forti, C; Franzini, P; Gatti, C; Gauzzi, P; Giovannella, S; Gorini, E; Graziani, E; Kluge, W; Kulikov, V; Lacava, F; Lanfranchi, G; Lee-Franzini, J; Leone, D; Martini, M; Massarotti, P; Mei, W; Meola, S; Miscetti, S; Moulson, M; Müller, S; Murtas, F; Napolitano, M; Nguyen, F; Palutan, M; Pasqualucci, E; Passeri, A; Patera, V; Perfetto, F; Primavera, M; Santangelo, P; Saracino, G; Sciascia, B; Sciubba, A; Sibidanov, A; Spadaro, T; Testa, M; Tortora, L; Valente, P; Venanzoni, G; Versaci, R; Xu, G

    2007-01-01

    We present precise measurements of the eta and K0 masses using the processes phi to eta gamma, eta to gamma gamma and phi to Ks Kl, Ks to pi+ pi-. The K0 mass measurement, M_K=497.583 +/- 0.005 (stat) +/- 0.020 (syst) MeV, is in acceptable agreement with the previous measurements but is more accurate. We find m(eta) = 547.874 +/- 0.007 (stat) +/- 0.031 (syst) MeV. Our value is the most accurate to date and is in agreement with two recent measurements based on eta decays, but is inconsistent, by about 10 sigma, with a measurement of comparable precision based on eta production at threshold.

  10. Precision Excited State Lifetime Measurements for Atomic Parity Violation and Atomic Clocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sell, Jerry; Patterson, Brian; Gearba, Alina; Snell, Jeremy; Knize, Randy

    2016-05-01

    Measurements of excited state atomic lifetimes provide a valuable test of atomic theory, allowing comparisons between experimental and theoretical transition dipole matrix elements. Such tests are important in Rb and Cs, where atomic parity violating experiments have been performed or proposed, and where atomic structure calculations are required to properly interpret the parity violating effect. In optical lattice clocks, precision lifetime measurements can aid in reducing the uncertainty of frequency shifts due to the surrounding blackbody radiation field. We will present our technique for precisely measuring excited state lifetimes which employs mode-locked ultrafast lasers interacting with two counter-propagating atomic beams. This method allows the timing in the experiment to be based on the inherent timing stability of mode-locked lasers, while counter-propagating atomic beams provides cancellation of systematic errors due to atomic motion to first order. Our current progress measuring Rb excited state lifetimes will be presented along with future planned measurements in Yb.

  11. Plasma scattering of electromagnetic radiation theory and measurement techniques

    CERN Document Server

    Froula, Dustin H; Luhmann, Neville C Jr; Sheffield, John

    2011-01-01

    This work presents one of the most powerful methods of plasma diagnosis in exquisite detail to guide researchers in the theory and measurement techniques of light scattering in plasmas. Light scattering in plasmas is essential in the research and development of fusion energy, environmental solutions, and electronics.Referred to as the "Bible" by researchers the work encompasses fusion and industrial applications essential in plasma research. It is the only comprehensive resource specific to the plasma scattering technique. It provides a wide-range of experimental examples and discussion of the

  12. Precision and accuracy of 3D lower extremity residua measurement systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Commean, Paul K.; Smith, Kirk E.; Vannier, Michael W.; Hildebolt, Charles F.; Pilgram, Thomas K.

    1996-04-01

    Accurate and reproducible geometric measurement of lower extremity residua is required for custom prosthetic socket design. We compared spiral x-ray computed tomography (SXCT) and 3D optical surface scanning (OSS) with caliper measurements and evaluated the precision and accuracy of each system. Spiral volumetric CT scanned surface and subsurface information was used to make external and internal measurements, and finite element models (FEMs). SXCT and OSS were used to measure lower limb residuum geometry of 13 below knee (BK) adult amputees. Six markers were placed on each subject's BK residuum and corresponding plaster casts and distance measurements were taken to determine precision and accuracy for each system. Solid models were created from spiral CT scan data sets with the prosthesis in situ under different loads using p-version finite element analysis (FEA). Tissue properties of the residuum were estimated iteratively and compared with values taken from the biomechanics literature. The OSS and SXCT measurements were precise within 1% in vivo and 0.5% on plaster casts, and accuracy was within 3.5% in vivo and 1% on plaster casts compared with caliper measures. Three-dimensional optical surface and SXCT imaging systems are feasible for capturing the comprehensive 3D surface geometry of BK residua, and provide distance measurements statistically equivalent to calipers. In addition, SXCT can readily distinguish internal soft tissue and bony structure of the residuum. FEM can be applied to determine tissue material properties interactively using inverse methods.

  13. Precise force measurement method by a Y-shaped cavity dual-frequency laser

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Guangzong Xiao; Xingwu Long; Bin Zhang; Geng Li

    2011-01-01

    A novel precise force measurement based on a Y-shaped cavity dual-frequency laser is proposed. The principle of force measurement with this method is analyzed, and the analytic relation expression between the input force and the change in the output beat frequency is derived. Experiments using a 632.8-nm Y-shaped cavity He-Ne dual-frequency laser are then performed; they demonstrate that the force measurement is proportional to a high degree over almost five decades of input signal range. The maximum scale factor is observed as 5.02×109 Hz/N, with beat frequency instability equivalent resolution of 10-5 N. By optimizing the optical and geometrical parameters of the laser sensor, a force measurement resolution of 10-6i N could be expected.%A novel precise force measurement based on a Y-shaped cavity dual-frequency laser is proposed.The principle of force measurement with this method is analyzed,and the analytic relation expression between the input force and the change in the output beat frequency is derived.Experiments using a 632.8-nm Y-shaped cavity He-Ne dual-frequency laser are then performed;they demonstrate that the force measurement is proportional to a high degree over almost five decades of input signal range.The maximum scale factor is observed as 5.02× 109 Hz/N,with beat frequency instability equivalent resolution of 10-5 N.By optimizing the optical and geometrical parameters of the laser sensor,a force measurement resolution of 10 -6 N could be expected.Precise measurement of force and force-related nagnitudes,such as acceleration,pressure,and mass,is an often demanded task in modern engineering and science[1-3].In recent decades,some research efforts have been intensified to utilize optical measnrement procedures for obtaining precise force measurement.

  14. Constraints from precision measurements on the hadron-molecule interpretation of X, Y, Z resonances

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.D. Polosa

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The precise measurement of binding energy, total width and DDπ branching fraction, constrains, in a model independent way, the loosely bound hadron molecule interpretation of X(3872. A full discernment is not yet possible on the basis of present data. Similar considerations might be extended to all those Y,Z resonances susceptible of a molecular description.

  15. Towards a precise measurement of atomic parity violation in a single Ra+ ion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nunez Portela, M.; van den Berg, J. E.; Bekker, H.; Giri, G.S.; Hoekstra, S.; Jungmann, K.; Mohanty, A.; Onderwater, G.J.C.; Santra, B.; Schlesser, S.; Timmermans, R.G.E.; Versolato, O.O.; Wansbeek, L.W.; Willmann, L.; Wilschut, H.W.

    2013-01-01

    A single trapped Ra+(Z= 88) ion provides a very promising route towards a most precise measurement of Atomic Parity Violation (APV), since APV effects grow faster than Z 3. This experiment promises the best determination of the electroweak coupling constant at the lowest accessible energies. Such a

  16. Program to make remote time measurement on the new precise clock system on totem

    CERN Document Server

    Martin, David

    2016-01-01

    For my project at CERN, I worked in the TOTEM team with Michele Quinto and Francesco Cafagna as supervisors. Their team is currently working on an update on TOTEM that includes a module able to measure precisely the time of flight of particles emitted from the collision at CMS. With this additional data, TOTEM will be able to reconstruct precisely the point of the collision in CMS. The main problem posed for this new module is to provide a precise synchronized clock signal to both the TOTEM detectors situated 200 meters after and before CMS. In fact, due to some external parameters, as temperature, the length of the optical fiber guiding the clock signal can vary yielding thus a unwanted phase difference of the clock between the two detectors. The idea is to get rid of the noisy phase difference to make very precise time of flight measurement of the order of the picosecond. This is achieved by continuously measuring the phase difference and correcting the time measurements according to the current phase diffe...

  17. SMILETRAP - A Penning trap facility for precision mass measurements using highly charged ions

    CERN Document Server

    Bergström, I; Fritioff, T; Douysset, G; Schoenfelder, J; Schuch, R

    2002-01-01

    The precision of mass measurements in a Penning trap increases linearly with the charge of the ion. Therefore we have attached a Penning trap, named SMILETRAP, to the electron beam ion source CRYSIS at MSL. CRYSIS is via an isotope separator connected to an ion source that can deliver singly charged ions of practically any element. In CRYSIS charge state breeding occurs by intense electron bombardment. We have shown that it is possible to produce, catch and measure the cyclotron frequencies of ions in the charge region 1+ to 52+. The relevant observable in mass measurements using a Penning trap is the ratio of the cyclotron frequencies of the ion of interest and ion used as a mass reference. High precision requires that the two frequencies are measured after one another in the shortest possible time. For reasons of convenience the precision trap operates at room temperature. So far it has been believed that warm traps working at 4 K are required for high mass precision with exactly one ion in the trap at a ti...

  18. Precision Cosmology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Bernard J. T.

    2017-04-01

    Preface; Notation and conventions; Part I. 100 Years of Cosmology: 1. Emerging cosmology; 2. The cosmic expansion; 3. The cosmic microwave background; 4. Recent cosmology; Part II. Newtonian Cosmology: 5. Newtonian cosmology; 6. Dark energy cosmological models; 7. The early universe; 8. The inhomogeneous universe; 9. The inflationary universe; Part III. Relativistic Cosmology: 10. Minkowski space; 11. The energy momentum tensor; 12. General relativity; 13. Space-time geometry and calculus; 14. The Einstein field equations; 15. Solutions of the Einstein equations; 16. The Robertson–Walker solution; 17. Congruences, curvature and Raychaudhuri; 18. Observing and measuring the universe; Part IV. The Physics of Matter and Radiation: 19. Physics of the CMB radiation; 20. Recombination of the primeval plasma; 21. CMB polarisation; 22. CMB anisotropy; Part V. Precision Tools for Precision Cosmology: 23. Likelihood; 24. Frequentist hypothesis testing; 25. Statistical inference: Bayesian; 26. CMB data processing; 27. Parametrising the universe; 28. Precision cosmology; 29. Epilogue; Appendix A. SI, CGS and Planck units; Appendix B. Magnitudes and distances; Appendix C. Representing vectors and tensors; Appendix D. The electromagnetic field; Appendix E. Statistical distributions; Appendix F. Functions on a sphere; Appendix G. Acknowledgements; References; Index.

  19. Evaluation of a high-precision gear measuring machine for helix measurement using helix and wedge artifacts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taguchi, Tetsuya; Kondo, Yohan

    2016-08-01

    High-precision gears are required for advanced motion and power transmission. The reliability of the measured value becomes important as the gear accuracy increases, and the establishment of a traceability system is needed. Therefore, a high-precision gear measuring machine (GMM) with a smaller uncertainty is expected to improve the gear calibration uncertainty. For this purpose, we developed a prototype of a high-precision GMM that adopts a direct drive mechanism and other features. Then, the high measurement capability of the developed GMM was verified using gear artifacts. Recently, some new measurement methods using simple shapes such as spheres and planes have been proposed as standards. We have verified the tooth profile measurement using a sphere artifact and reported the results that the developed GMM had a high capability in tooth profile measurement. Therefore, we attempted to devise a new evaluation method for helix measurement using a wedge artifact (WA) whose plane was treated as the tooth flank, and the high measurement capability of the developed GMM was verified. The results will provide a part of information to fully assess measurement uncertainty as our future work. This paper describes the evaluation results of the developed GMM for helix measurement using both a helix artifact and the WA, and discusses the effectiveness of the WA as a new artifact to evaluate the GMMs.

  20. Development of high precision laser measurement to Space Debris and Applications in SHAO

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhongping; Chen, Juping; Xiong, Yaoheng; Han, Xingwei

    2016-07-01

    Artificial space debris has become the focus during the space exploration because of producing the damage for the future active spacecrafts and high precision measurement for space debris are required for debris surveillance and collision avoidance. Laser ranging technology is inherently high accurate and will play an important role in precise orbit determination, accurate catalog of space debris. Shanghai Astronomical Observatory (SHAO) of CAS, has been developing the technology of laser measurement to space debris for several years. According to characteristics of laser echoes from space debris and the experiences of relevant activities, high repetition rate, high power laser system and low dark noise APD detector with high quantum efficiency and high transmissivity of narrow bandwidth spectral filter are applied to laser measurement to space debris in SHAO. With these configurations, great achievements of laser measurement to space debris are made with hundreds of passes of laser data from space debris in the distance between 500km and 2500km with Radar Cross Section (RCS) of more than 10 m^{2} to less than 0.5m^{2} at the measuring precision of less than 1m (RMS). For better application of laser ranging technology, Chinese Space Debris Observation network, consisting of Shanghai, Changchun and Kunming station, has been preliminary developed and the coordinated observation has been performed to increase the measuring efficiency for space debris. It is referred from data that laser ranging technology can be as the essential high accuracy measurement technology in the study of space debris.

  1. Towards high precision measurements of nuclear g-factors for the Be isotopes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takamine, A., E-mail: icot@riken.jp [RIKEN, Nishina Center for Accelerator Based Science, Wako City, Saitama (Japan); Wada, M. [RIKEN, Nishina Center for Accelerator Based Science, Wako City, Saitama (Japan); Okada, K. [Department of Physics, Sophia University, Chiyoda Ward, Tokyo (Japan); Ito, Y. [RIKEN, Nishina Center for Accelerator Based Science, Wako City, Saitama (Japan); Schury, P.; Arai, F. [RIKEN, Nishina Center for Accelerator Based Science, Wako City, Saitama (Japan); Institute of Physics, University of Tsukuba, Tsukuba City, Ibaraki (Japan); Katayama, I. [RIKEN, Nishina Center for Accelerator Based Science, Wako City, Saitama (Japan); Imamura, K. [RIKEN, Nishina Center for Accelerator Based Science, Wako City, Saitama (Japan); Department of Physics, Meiji University, Kawasaki City, Kanagawa (Japan); Ichikawa, Y.; Ueno, H. [RIKEN, Nishina Center for Accelerator Based Science, Wako City, Saitama (Japan); Wollnik, H. [Department of Chemistry and BioChemistry, New Mexico State University, Las Cruces, NM (United States); Schuessler, H.A. [Department of Physics, Texas A& M University, College Station, TX (United States)

    2016-06-01

    We describe the present status of future high-precision measurements of nuclear g-factors utilizing laser-microwave double and laser-microwave-rf triple resonance methods for online-trapped, laser-cooled radioactive beryllium isotope ions. These methods have applicability to other suitably chosen isotopes and for beryllium show promise in deducing the hyperfine anomaly of {sup 11}Be with a sufficiently high precision to study the nuclear magnetization distribution of this one-neutron halo nucleus in a nuclear-model-independent manner.

  2. Precise measurement of the $W$-boson mass with the CDF II detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aaltonen, T.; /Helsinki Inst. of Phys.; Alvarez Gonzalez, B.; /Oviedo U. /Cantabria Inst. of Phys.; Amerio, S.; /INFN, Padua; Amidei, D.; /Michigan U.; Anastassov, A.; /Northwestern U. /Fermilab; Annovi, A.; /Frascati; Antos, J.; /Comenius U.; Apollinari, G.; /Fermilab; Appel, J.A.; /Fermilab; Arisawa, T.; /Waseda U.; Artikov, A.; /Dubna, JINR /Texas A-M

    2012-03-01

    We have measured the W-boson mass M{sub W} using data corresponding to 2.2 fb{sup -1} of integrated luminosity collected in p{bar p} collisions at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV with the CDF II detector at the Fermilab Tevatron collider. Samples consisting of 470 126 W {yields} e{nu} candidates and 624 708 W {yields} {mu}{nu} candidates yield the measurement M{sub W} = 80 387 {+-} 12{sub stat} {+-} 15{sub syst} = 80 387 {+-} 19 MeV/c{sup 2}. This is the most precise measurement of the W-boson mass to date and significantly exceeds the precision of all previous measurements combined.

  3. Spectroscopic measurements of plasma emission light for plasma-based acceleration experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filippi, F.; Anania, M. P.; Biagioni, A.; Chiadroni, E.; Cianchi, A.; Ferrario, M.; Mostacci, A.; Palumbo, L.; Zigler, A.

    2016-09-01

    Advanced particle accelerators are based on the excitation of large amplitude plasma waves driven by either electron or laser beams. Future experiments scheduled at the SPARC_LAB test facility aim to demonstrate the acceleration of high brightness electron beams through the so-called resonant Plasma Wakefield Acceleration scheme in which a train of electron bunches (drivers) resonantly excites wakefields into a preformed hydrogen plasma; the last bunch (witness) injected at the proper accelerating phase gains energy from the wake. The quality of the accelerated beam depends strongly on plasma density and its distribution along the acceleration length. The measurements of plasma density of the order of 1016-1017 cm-3 can be performed with spectroscopic measurements of the plasma-emitted light. The measured density distribution for hydrogen filled capillary discharge with both Balmer alpha and Balmer beta lines and shot-to-shot variation are here reported.

  4. Precise measurement of cosmic ray fluxes with the AMS-02 experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vecchi, Manuela, E-mail: manuela.vecchi@ifsc.usp.br [Instituto de Física de São Carlos, Universidade de São Paulo, CP 369, 13560-970, São Carlos, SP (Brazil)

    2015-12-17

    The AMS-02 detector is a large acceptance magnetic spectrometer operating onboard the International Space Station since May 2011. The main goals of the detector are the search for antimatter and dark matter in space, as well as the measurement of cosmic ray composition and flux. In this document we present precise measurements of cosmic ray positrons, electrons and protons, collected during the first 30 months of operations.

  5. Precision mass measurements of short-lived nuclides for nuclear structure studies at TITAN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chaudhuri A.

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available TITAN (TRIUMF’s Ion Trap for Atomic and Nuclear science at TRIUMF’s rare isotope beam facility ISAC is an advanced Penning trap based mass spectrometer dedicated to precise and accurate mass determinations. An overview of TITAN, the measurement technique and a highlight of recent mass measurements of the short-lived nuclides important to the nuclear structure program at TITAN are presented.

  6. Research on Precision Assembly Robot's Joint Torque Control Based on Current Measurement

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    董高云; 许春山; 费燕琼; 赵锡芳

    2003-01-01

    A set of new current sensing device is used to realize joint torque control based on current measurement in a precision assembly robot's third joint. The output torque's model of the joint's brnshless DC motor is founded. Disturbance factors and the compensated effect of the torque's closed loop based on current measurement are analyzed. Related simulations and experiments show that the system has good current tracking and anti-disturbances performance, which improve the force control performance of the robot in assembly.

  7. Precision measurement of transverse velocity distribution of a strontium atomic beam

    OpenAIRE

    Gao, F.; H. Liu; Xu, P.; X. Tian; Y. Wang; Ren, J; Haibin Wu; Hong Chang

    2014-01-01

    We measure the transverse velocity distribution in a thermal Sr atomic beam precisely by velocity-selective saturated fluorescence spectroscopy. The use of an ultrastable laser system and the narrow intercombination transition line of Sr atoms mean that the resolution of the measured velocity can reach 0.13 m/s, corresponding to 90$\\mu K$ in energy units. The experimental results are in very good agreement with the results of theoretical calculations. Based on the spectroscopic techniques use...

  8. New precision measurements of free neutron beta decay with cold neutrons

    CERN Document Server

    Baeßler, S; Penttilä, S; Počanić, D

    2014-01-01

    Precision measurements in free neutron beta decay serve to determine the coupling constants of beta decay, and offer several stringent tests of the Standard Model. This paper describes the free neutron beta decay program planned for the Fundamental Physics Beamline at the Spallation Neutron Source at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, and puts it into the context of other recent and planned measurements of neutron beta decay observables.

  9. Impact of beam-beam effects on precision luminosity measurements at the ILC

    CERN Document Server

    Rimbault, C; Mönig, K; Schulte, D

    2007-01-01

    In this paper, the impact of beam-beam effects on the precision luminosity measurement at the International Linear Collider is investigated quantitatively for the first time. GUINEA-PIG, a beam-beam interaction simulation tool, is adapted to treat the space charge effects affecting the Bhabha events used in this measurement. The biases due to the resulting changes in kinematics are evaluated for different center-of-mass energies and beam parameters.

  10. FPGA-based High-precision Measurement Algorithm for the Ultrasonic Echo Time of Flight

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Bo-xiong WANG; Jin ZHANG

    2010-01-01

    Based on the evaluation of advantages and disadvantages of high-precision digital time interval measuring algorithms, and combined with the principle of the typical time-difference ultrasonic flow measurement,the requirements far the measurement of echo time of flight put forward by the ultrasonic flow measurement are an-alyzed.A new high-precision time interval measurement algorithm is presented, which combines the pulse counting method with the phase delay interpolation. The pulse counting method is used to ensure a large dynamic measuring range, and a double-edge triggering counter is designed to improve the accuracy and reduce the counting quantiza-tion error.The phase delay interpolation is used to reduce the quanti-zation error of pulse counting for further improving the time measure-ment resolution.Test data show that the system for the measurement of the ultrasonic echo time of flight based on this algorithm and im-plemented on an Field Programmable Gate Array(FPGA) needs a rel-atively short time for measurement,and has a measurement error of less than 105 ps.

  11. Precise Half-Life Measurement of the Superallowed Beta+ Emitter 46V

    CERN Document Server

    Park, H I; Iacob, V E; Chen, L; Goodwin, J; Nica, N; Simmons, E; Trache, L; Tribble, R E

    2011-01-01

    The half-life of 46V has been measured to be 422.66(6) ms, which is a factor of two more precise than the best previous measurement. Our result is also consistent with the previous measurements, with no repeat of the disagreement recently encountered with Q_{EC} values measured for the same transition. The Ft value for the 46V superallowed transition, incorporating all world data, is determined to be 3074.1(26) s, a result consistent with the average Ft value of 3072.08(79) s established from the 13 best-known superallowed transitions.

  12. SMILETRAP - A Penning trap facility for precision mass measurements using highly charged ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bergstroem, I.; Carlberg, C.; Fritioff, T.; Douysset, G.; Schoenfelder, J.; Schuch, R. E-mail: schuch@physto.se

    2002-07-21

    The precision of mass measurements in a Penning trap increases linearly with the charge of the ion. Therefore we have attached a Penning trap, named SMILETRAP, to the electron beam ion source CRYSIS at MSL. CRYSIS is via an isotope separator connected to an ion source that can deliver singly charged ions of practically any element. In CRYSIS charge state breeding occurs by intense electron bombardment. We have shown that it is possible to produce, catch and measure the cyclotron frequencies of ions in the charge region 1+ to 52+. The relevant observable in mass measurements using a Penning trap is the ratio of the cyclotron frequencies of the ion of interest and ion used as a mass reference. High precision requires that the two frequencies are measured after one another in the shortest possible time. For reasons of convenience the precision trap operates at room temperature. So far it has been believed that warm traps working at 4 K are required for high mass precision with exactly one ion in the trap at a time. In this paper we demonstrate that mass precision of a few parts in 10{sup 10} also can be obtained in a warm trap at a pressure of about 5x10{sup -12} mbar by stabilizing the pressure in the He-dewar, the trap temperature and the frequency synthesizer. In order to reduce the influence of changes of the magnetic field to a level below 10{sup -10}, the scanning of the frequencies close to the resonances of both the ion of interest and the reference ion is done in a total time <2 min. Trapping of ions is a statistical procedure, allowing more than one ion to be trapped in each measurement cycle. However, after completing the measurements it is possible to reject all information except for events based on 1 and 2 trapped ions. The procedures of producing, transporting, catching, exciting and measuring the cyclotron resonance frequencies of highly charged ions and the mass reference ions with the time-of-flight method are described. In routine measurements with

  13. Plasma actuator electron density measurement using microwave perturbation method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mirhosseini, Farid; Colpitts, Bruce [Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of New Brunswick, Fredericton, New Brunswick E3B 5A3 (Canada)

    2014-07-21

    A cylindrical dielectric barrier discharge plasma under five different pressures is generated in an evacuated glass tube. This plasma volume is located at the center of a rectangular copper waveguide cavity, where the electric field is maximum for the first mode and the magnetic field is very close to zero. The microwave perturbation method is used to measure electron density and plasma frequency for these five pressures. Simulations by a commercial microwave simulator are comparable to the experimental results.

  14. Direct detection of cosmic rays: through a new era of precision measurements of particle fluxes

    CERN Document Server

    Mocchiutti, Emiliano

    2014-01-01

    In the last years the direct measurement of cosmic rays received a push forward by the possibility of conducting experiments on board long duration balloon flights, satellites and on the International Space Station. The increase in the collected statistics and the technical improvements in the construction of the detectors permit the fluxes measurement to be performed at higher energies with a reduced discrepancy among different experiments respect to the past. However, high statistical precision is not always associated to the needed precision in the estimation of systematics; features in the particle spectra can be erroneously introduced or hidden. A review and a comparison of the latest experimental results on direct cosmic rays measurements will be presented with particular emphasis on their similarities and discrepancies.

  15. High-Precision Measurements of the Bound Electron’s Magnetic Moment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sven Sturm

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Highly charged ions represent environments that allow to study precisely one or more bound electrons subjected to unsurpassed electromagnetic fields. Under such conditions, the magnetic moment (g-factor of a bound electron changes significantly, to a large extent due to contributions from quantum electrodynamics. We present three Penning-trap experiments, which allow to measure magnetic moments with ppb precision and better, serving as stringent tests of corresponding calculations, and also yielding access to fundamental quantities like the fine structure constant α and the atomic mass of the electron. Additionally, the bound electrons can be used as sensitive probes for properties of the ionic nuclei. We summarize the measurements performed so far, discuss their significance, and give a detailed account of the experimental setups, procedures and the foreseen measurements.

  16. Precise measurements of hyperfine components in the spectrum of molecular iodine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sansonetti, C.J. [National Inst. of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, MD (United States)

    1996-05-01

    Absolute wave numbers with a typical uncertainty of 1 MHz (95% confidence) were measured for 102 hyperfine-structure components of {sup 127}I{sub 2}. The data cover the range 560-656 nm, with no gaps over 50 cm{sup -1}. The spectra were observed using Doppler-free frequency modulation spectroscopy with tunable cw laser. The laser was locked to selected iodine components and its wave number measured with a high precision Fabry-Perot wavemeter. Accuracy is confirmed by good agreement of 9 of the lines with previous results from other laboratories. These measurements provide a well-distributed set of precise reference lines for this spectral region.

  17. Precision measurement of the nuclear polarization in laser-cooled, optically pumped $^{37}\\mathrm{K}$

    CERN Document Server

    Fenker, Benjamin; Melconian, Dan; Anderson, Rhys M A; Anholm, Melissa; Ashery, Daniel; Behling, Richard S; Cohen, Iuliana; Craiciu, Ioana; Donohue, John M; Farfan, Christian; Friesen, Daniel; Gorelov, Alexandre; McNeil, James; Mehlman, Michael; Norton, Heather; Olchanski, Konstantin; Smale, Scott; Theriault, O; Vantyghem, Adrian N; Warner, Claire L

    2016-01-01

    We report a measurement of the nuclear polarization of laser-cooled, optically-pumped $^{37}\\mathrm{K}$ atoms which will allow us to precisely measure angular correlation parameters in the beta-decay of the same atoms. These results will be used to test the $V-A$ framework of the weak interaction at high precision. At the TRIUMF Neutral Atom Trap (TRINAT), a magneto-optical trap (MOT) confines and cools neutral $^{37}\\mathrm{K}$ atoms and optical pumping spin-polarizes them. We monitor the nuclear polarization of the same atoms that are decaying in situ by photoionizing a small fraction of the partially polarized atoms and then use the standard optical Bloch equations to model their population distribution. We obtain an average nuclear polarization of $P = 0.9913\\pm0.0008$, which is significantly more precise than previous measurements with this technique. Since our current measurement of the beta-asymmetry has $0.2\\%$ statistical uncertainty, the polarization measurement reported here will not limit its over...

  18. Precision measurements with W and Z/gamma* bosons with the ATLAS detector

    CERN Document Server

    Anulli, Fabio; The ATLAS collaboration

    2016-01-01

    The inclusive production of single W and $Z/\\gamma^{*}$ bosons are standard candles at hadron colliders. ATLAS has recently completed a set of very precise measurements of production cross-sections and lepton decay angular distributions integrated and differential in several variables at centre-of-mass energies of 7, 8, and 13 TeV. ATLAS has performed a measurement of the complete set of coefficients that describe the angular distributions of the decay leptons in Z events in fine bins of the Z transverse momentum and in several bins of Z rapidity. Furthermore a measurement of the dilepton transverse momentum spectrum as well as the related angular decorrelation variable $\\phi^{*}$ was performed in a wide range of dilepton masses from 12 to 150 GeV. Precise double-differential measurements of the Drell-Yan cross section in the region above the Z peak up to dilepton masses of 1500 GeV are presented as well. Finally, first precise measurements of integrated W and Z cross sections and cross section ratios at 13 T...

  19. High-Precision Superallowed Fermi β Decay Measurements at TRIUMF-ISAC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svensson, C. E.

    2016-09-01

    High-precision measurements of the ft -values for superallowed Fermi β decays between nuclear isobaric analogue states provide demanding tests of the electroweak Standard Model, including confirmation of the Conserved Vector Current hypothesis at the level of 1 . 2 ×10-4 , the most stringent limits on weak scalar currents, and the most precise determination of the Vud element of the CKM quark-mixing matrix. The Isotope Separator and Accelerator (ISAC) facility at TRIUMF produces high-quality beams of several of the superallowed emitters with world-record intensities and hosts a suite of state-of-the-art spectrometers for the measurement of superallowed half-lives, branching ratios, QEC values, and charge-radii. Recent highlights from the superallowed program at ISAC, including high-precision half-life measurements for the light superallowed emitters 10C, 14O, 18Ne, and 26mAl and branching-ratio measurements for the heavy superallowed emitters 62Ga and 74Rb will be presented. The impact of these measurements on tests of the Standard Model, and future developments in the superallowed program at ISAC with the new high-efficiency GRIFFIN γ - ray spectrometer, will be discussed. Research supported by the Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada, the Canada Foundation for Innovation, and the Canada Research Chairs Program. TRIUMF receives federal funding via the National Research Council of Canada.

  20. Lamb-shift and electric field measurements in plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doveil, F.; Chérigier-Kovacic, L.; Ström, P.

    2017-01-01

    The electric field is a quantity of particular relevance in plasma physics. Indeed, its fluctuations are responsible for different macroscopic phenomena such as anomalous transport in fusion plasmas. Answering a long-standing challenge, we offer a new method to locally and non-intrusively measure weak electric fields and their fluctuations in plasmas, by means of a beam of hydrogen ions or atoms. We present measurements of the electric field in vacuum and in a plasma where Debye shielding is measured. For the first time, we have used the Lamb-shift resonance to measure oscillating electric fields around 1 GHz and observed the strong enhancement of the Lyman-α signal. The measurement is both direct and non-intrusive. This method provides sensitivity (mV cm-1) and temporal resolution (ns) that are three orders higher compared to current diagnostics. It thus allows measuring fluctuations of the electric field at scales not previously reached experimentally.

  1. Hemolysis interference in measuring fish plasma biochemical indicators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirghaed, Ali Taheri; Ghelichpour, Melika; Hoseini, Seyyed Morteza; Amini, Kourosh

    2017-08-01

    The present study aimed to determine hemolysis interference in measurement of plasma biochemical parameters in fish specimens. For this purpose, blood samples were harvested from 24 Huso huso juveniles. After centrifugation, each plasma sample was divided into seven portions to make seven levels of hemolysis. Hemolysis was induced by addition of different percentages of the corresponding whole blood [0 (non-hemolyzed control group), 1, 3, 5, 10, 15, and 20% of whole blood]. Albumin, total protein, calcium, phosphorus, glucose, sodium, potassium, chloride, alkaline phosphatase (ALP), aspartate transaminase (AST), and alanine transaminase (ALT) were measured in different samples. Results showed that plasma albumin, ALP, potassium, and AST significantly increased (more than 200% at the highest hemolysis level) in the hemolyzed samples. Also, plasma total protein and phosphorus showed significant elevation in the hemolyzed samples (more than 70% at the highest hemolysis level). Plasma glucose, calcium, chloride, and ALT showed narrow but significant increase in hemolyzed samples (11.8-35.2% at the highest hemolysis level). Plasma sodium showed no significant changes in the hemolyzed samples. In conclusion, the present results show that hemolysis markedly affects plasma parameters levels, which interferes with plasma results interpretation. Therefore, analysis of hemolyzed samples should be avoided or the results should be interpreted with caution. This study encourages further investigations to develop methods for omitting the effects of hemolysis by sample blanking and/or presenting correction coefficients for measurement of plasma parameters in samples with different levels of hemolysis.

  2. An Inexpensive Field-Widened Monolithic Michelson Interferometer for Precision Radial Velocity Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahadevan, Suvrath; Ge, Jian; Fleming, Scott W.; Wan, Xiaoke; DeWitt, Curtis; van Eyken, Julian C.; McDavitt, Dan

    2008-09-01

    We have constructed a thermally compensated field-widened monolithic Michelson interferometer that can be used with a medium-resolution spectrograph to measure precise Doppler radial velocities of stars. Our prototype monolithic fixed-delay interferometer is constructed with off-the-shelf components and assembled using a hydrolysis bonding technique. We installed and tested this interferometer in the Exoplanet Tracker (ET) instrument at the Kitt Peak 2.1 m telescope, an instrument built to demonstrate the principles of dispersed fixed-delay interferometry. An iodine cell allows the interferometer drift to be accurately calibrated, relaxing the stability requirements on the interferometer itself. When using our monolithic interferometer, the ET instrument has no moving parts (except the iodine cell), greatly simplifying its operation. We demonstrate differential radial velocity precision of a few m s-1 on well known radial velocity standards and planet bearing stars when using this interferometer. Such monolithic interferometers will make it possible to build relatively inexpensive instruments that are easy to operate and capable of precision radial velocity measurements. A larger multiobject version of the Exoplanet Tracker will be used to conduct a large scale survey for planetary systems as part of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey III (SDSS III). Variants of the techniques and principles discussed in this paper can be directly applied to build large monolithic interferometers for such applications, enabling the construction of instruments capable of efficiently observing many stars simultaneously at high velocity precision.

  3. The Galileo System of Measurement: Preliminary Evidence for Precision, Stability, and Equivalance to Traditional Measures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillham, James; Woelfel, Joseph

    1977-01-01

    Describes the Galileo system of measurement operations including reliability and validity data. Illustrations of some of the relations between Galileo measures and traditional procedures are provided. (MH)

  4. In situ impedance measurement of microwave atmospheric pressure plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, S. T.; Nam, W. J.; Lee, J. K.; Yun, G. S.

    2017-04-01

    The impedance of atmospheric pressure argon plasma jets driven by microwave frequency is determined in situ by a novel ‘two frequency method’. In the conventional method of reflection coefficient ({{S}}11) measurement, the frequency of the driving microwave power is scanned, which inevitably affects the plasma characters and leads to uncertainty in the estimated plasma impedance. In our proposed method, the frequency-scanning signal additional to the driving power is used to measure {{S}}11 over a wide frequency range, which enables accurate determination of the plasma impedance based on an equivalent circuit model. The measured resistance and reactance of the plasma increase with the driving power in agreement with the transmission line theory. Based on this in situ measurement of the plasma impedance, the net power coupled to the plasma has been determined. The overall power efficiency remains approximately unchanged around 45% for different input power levels owing to the competing effects between the impedance mismatch and the volume change of the plasma.

  5. Toroidal and poloidal plasma rotation measurements in Tore Supra

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hess, W.R.; Garbet, X.; Guirlet, R.; Hesse, M.; Payan, J. [Association Euratom-CEA, Centre d`Etudes Nucleaires de Cadarache, 13 - Saint-Paul-lez-Durance (France). Dept. de Recherches sur la Fusion Controlee

    1993-12-31

    Plasma rotation measurements by visible spectroscopy and by a CO{sub 2}-laser scattering experiment (ALTAIR) are presented. The ALTAIR diagnostic is used to study the turbulence changes at the plasma edge during operation of the ergodic divertor (ED). Heterodyne detection allows discrimination between waves propagating in the electron or in the ion diamagnetic direction. (author) 6 refs., 4 figs.

  6. A precision analogue integrator system for heavy current measurement in MFDC resistance spot welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Yu-Jun; Zhang, Zhong-Dian; Xia, Zhen-Xin; Zhu, Shi-Liang; Zhang, Rui

    2016-02-01

    In order to control and monitor the quality of middle frequency direct current (MFDC) resistance spot welding (RSW), precision measurement of the welding current up to 100 kA is required, for which Rogowski coils are the only viable current transducers at present. Thus, a highly accurate analogue integrator is the key to restoring the converted signals collected from the Rogowski coils. Previous studies emphasised that the integration drift is a major factor that influences the performance of analogue integrators, but capacitive leakage error also has a significant impact on the result, especially in long-time pulse integration. In this article, new methods of measuring and compensating capacitive leakage error are proposed to fabricate a precision analogue integrator system for MFDC RSW. A voltage holding test is carried out to measure the integration error caused by capacitive leakage, and an original integrator with a feedback adder is designed to compensate capacitive leakage error in real time. The experimental results and statistical analysis show that the new analogue integrator system could constrain both drift and capacitive leakage error, of which the effect is robust to different voltage levels of output signals. The total integration error is limited within  ±0.09 mV s-1 0.005% s-1 or full scale at a 95% confidence level, which makes it possible to achieve the precision measurement of the welding current of MFDC RSW with Rogowski coils of 0.1% accuracy class.

  7. Precision measurements with an electroweak boson in the final state with the ATLAS detector

    CERN Document Server

    Lang, Valerie Susanne; The ATLAS collaboration

    2017-01-01

    Measurements of the Drell-Yan production of W and Z/gamma* bosons at the LHC provide a benchmark of our understanding of perturbative QCD and probe the proton structure in a unique way. The ATLAS collaboration has performed new high precision measurements for W+, W- and Z/gamma* bosons integrated and as a function of the boson or lepton rapidity and the Z/gamma* mass. Also a new three dimensional cross-section measurement of Z boson vs. its invariant mass, the absolute dilepton rapidity, and the angular variable between the lepton and the quark in the Collins-Soper frame will be discussed. Unprecedented precision is reached and strong constraints on Parton Distribution functions, in particular the strange density are found. When also studying light and heavy quark iniated jet production in association with vector bosons, perturbative QCD prediction in a multi-scale environment can be tested. Once the QCD aspects of the vector boson production are understood, high precision measurements aiming at the tests of ...

  8. 3D precision measurements of meter sized surfaces using low cost illumination and camera techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ekberg, Peter; Daemi, Bita; Mattsson, Lars

    2017-04-01

    Using dedicated stereo camera systems and structured light is a well-known method for measuring the 3D shape of large surfaces. However the problem is not trivial when high accuracy, in the range of few tens of microns, is needed. Many error sources need to be handled carefully in order to obtain high quality results. In this study, we present a measurement method based on low-cost camera and illumination solutions combined with high-precision image analysis and a new approach in camera calibration and 3D reconstruction. The setup consists of two ordinary digital cameras and a Gobo projector as a structured light source. A matrix of dots is projected onto the target area. The two cameras capture the images of the projected pattern on the object. The images are processed by advanced subpixel resolution algorithms prior to the application of the 3D reconstruction technique. The strength of the method lays in a different approach for calibration, 3D reconstruction, and high-precision image analysis algorithms. Using a 10 mm pitch pattern of the light dots, the method is capable of reconstructing the 3D shape of surfaces. The precision (1σ repeatability) in the measurements is  cost of ~2% of available advanced measurement techniques. The expanded uncertainty (95% confidence level) is estimated to be 83 µm, with the largest uncertainty contribution coming from the absolute length of the metal ruler used as reference.

  9. Electro-optic probe measurements of electric fields in plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishiura, M.; Yoshida, Z.; Mushiake, T.; Kawazura, Y.; Osawa, R.; Fujinami, K.; Yano, Y.; Saitoh, H.; Yamasaki, M.; Kashyap, A.; Takahashi, N.; Nakatsuka, M.; Fukuyama, A.

    2017-02-01

    The direct measurements of high-frequency electric fields in a plasma bring about significant advances in the physics and engineering of various waves. We have developed an electro-optic sensor system based on the Pockels effect. Since the signal is transmitted through an optical fiber, the system has high tolerance for electromagnetic noises. To demonstrate its applicability to plasma experiments, we report the first result of measurement of the ion-cyclotron wave excited in the RT-1 magnetosphere device. This study compares the results of experimental field measurements with simulation results of electric fields in plasmas.

  10. Precision and accuracy, two steps towards the standardization of XRPD measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berti, G. [Pisa Univ. (Italy). Dept. of Earth Sciences

    1996-09-01

    Any standardization process requires to get at results comprehensible, reproducible and traceable. Precision and accuracy of the measurements play a key role in getting at these requirements. The adoption of either physical (standard) or mathematical models allows for describing the whole diffraction measurement process with the necessary physical significance. From an other hand, the adoption of procedure, which are capable of controlling the measurement process, renders it reproducible and traceable. The falling of those requirements make difficult to transfer or replicate elsewhere experiences which may give even excellent result in a given laboratory.

  11. Precision measurement of the K{sub S} meson lifetime with the KLOE detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ambrosino, F.; Massarotti, P.; Meola, S.; Napolitano, M. [Dipt. di Scienze Fisiche dell' Univ. ' Federico II' , Napoli (Italy); INFN Sezione di Napoli (Italy); Antonelli, A.; Antonelli, M.; Bencivenni, G.; Bloise, C.; Bossi, F.; Capon, G.; Capussela, T.; Ciambrone, P.; De Lucia, E.; De Simone, P.; Dreucci, M.; Felici, G.; Gatti, C.; Giovannella, S.; Jacewicz, M.; Miscetti, S.; Moulson, M.; Murtas, F.; Palutan, M.; Santangelo, P.; Sciascia, B.; Sibidanov, A.; Spadaro, T.; Venanzoni, G. [Lab. Nazionali di Frascati dell' INFN (Italy); Archilli, F. [Dipt. di Fisica dell' Universita ' Tor Vergata' , Roma (Italy); INFN Sezione di Roma Tor Vergata, Roma (Italy); Bini, C.; De Santis, A.; De Zorzi, G.; Di Domenico, A.; Fiore, S.; Franzini, P.; Gauzzi, P. [Dipt. di Fisica dell' Univ. ' La Sapienza' , Roma (Italy); INFN Sezione di Roma, Roma (Italy); Bocchetta, S.; Ceradini, F.; Di Micco, B.; Nguyen, F.; Taccini, C. [Dipt. di Fisica dell' Univ. Roma Tre, Roma (Italy); INFN Sezione di Roma Tre, Roma (Italy); Branchini, P.; Graziani, E.; Passeri, A.; Tortora, L. [INFN Sezione di Roma Tre, Roma (Italy); De Angelis, A. [Univ. of Udine (Italy); LIP/IST, INFN Sezione di Trieste, Trieste (Italy); De Maria, M. [Univ. di Udine (Italy); IUAV, Venezia (Italy); Denig, A.; Mueller, S. [Johannes Gutenberg - Univ. Mainz, Inst. fuer Kernphysik, Mainz (Germany); Di Donato, C. [INFN Sezione di Napoli (Italy); Kulikov, V. [Inst. for Theoretical and Experimental Physics, Moscow (Russian Federation); Lee-Franzini, J. [Lab. Nazionali di Frascati dell' INFN (Italy); State Univ. of New York, Physics Dept., Stony Brook, NY (United States); Martini, M. [Lab. Nazionali di Frascati dell' INFN, Frascati (Italy); Dipt. di Energetica dell' Universita ' La Sapienza' , Roma (Italy); Univ. Guglielmo Marconi, Dipt. di Scienza e Tecnologie applicate, Roma (Italy); Patera, V. [Lab. Nazionali di Frascati dell' INFN, Frascati (Italy); Dipt. di Energetica dell' Universita ' La Sapienza' , Roma (Italy)] [and others

    2011-03-15

    Using a large sample of pure, slow, short lived K{sup 0} mesons collected with KLOE detector at DA{phi}NE, we have measured the K{sub S} lifetime. From a fit to the proper time distribution we find {tau}(K{sub S})=(89.562 {+-}0.029{sub stat}{+-}0.043{sub syst}) ps. This is the most precise measurement to date of the short lived K{sup 0} meson lifetime, in good agreement with the world average derived from previous measurements. We observe no dependence of the lifetime on the direction of the K{sub S} in galactic coordinates. (orig.)

  12. Precise measurement of the W-boson mass with the Collider Detector at Fermilab

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aaltonen, T.; Amerio, S.; Amidei, D.; Anastassov, A.; Annovi, A.; Antos, J.; Apollinari, G.; Appel, J. A.; Arisawa, T.; Artikov, A.; Asaadi, J.; Ashmanskas, W.; Auerbach, B.; Aurisano, A.; Azfar, F.; Badgett, W.; Bae, T.; Barbaro-Galtieri, A.; Barnes, V. E.; Barnett, B. A.; Guimaraes da Costa, J.; Barria, P.; Bartos, P.; Bauce, M.; Bedeschi, F.; Beecher, D.; Behari, S.; Bellettini, G.; Bellinger, J.; Benjamin, D.; Beretvas, A.; Bhatti, A.; Binkley, M.; Bizjak, I.; Bland, K. R.; Blumenfeld, B.; Bocci, A.; Bodek, A.; Bortoletto, D.; Boudreau, J.; Boveia, A.; Brigliadori, L.; Bromberg, C.; Brucken, E.; Budagov, J.; Budd, H. S.; Burkett, K.; Busetto, G.; Bussey, P.; Butti, P.; Buzatu, A.; Calamba, A.; Camarda, S.; Campanelli, M.; Canelli, F.; Carls, B.; Carlsmith, D.; Carosi, R.; Carrillo, S.; Casal, B.; Casarsa, M.; Castro, A.; Catastini, P.; Cauz, D.; Cavaliere, V.; Cavalli-Sforza, M.; Cerri, A.; Cerrito, L.; Chen, Y. C.; Chertok, M.; Chiarelli, G.; Chlachidze, G.; Cho, K.; Chokheli, D.; Clark, A.; Clarke, C.; Convery, M. E.; Conway, J.; Corbo, M.; Cordelli, M.; Cox, C. A.; Cox, D. J.; Cremonesi, M.; Cruz, D.; Cuevas, J.; Culbertson, R.; d'Ascenzo, N.; Datta, M.; de Barbaro, P.; Demortier, L.; Deninno, M.; D'Errico, M.; Devoto, F.; Di Canto, A.; Di Ruzza, B.; Dittmann, J. R.; Donati, S.; D'Onofrio, M.; Dorigo, M.; Driutti, A.; Ebina, K.; Edgar, R.; Elagin, A.; Erbacher, R.; Errede, S.; Esham, B.; Eusebi, R.; Farrington, S.; Fernández Ramos, J. P.; Field, R.; Flanagan, G.; Forrest, R.; Franklin, M.; Freeman, J. C.; Frisch, H.; Funakoshi, Y.; Galloni, C.; Garfinkel, A. F.; Garosi, P.; Gerberich, H.; Gerchtein, E.; Giagu, S.; Giakoumopoulou, V.; Gibson, K.; Ginsburg, C. M.; Giokaris, N.; Giromini, P.; Giurgiu, G.; Glagolev, V.; Glenzinski, D.; Gold, M.; Goldin, D.; Golossanov, A.; Gomez, G.; Gomez-Ceballos, G.; Goncharov, M.; González López, O.; Gorelov, I.; Goshaw, A. T.; Goulianos, K.; Gramellini, E.; Grinstein, S.; Grosso-Pilcher, C.; Group, R. C.; Hahn, S. R.; Han, J. Y.; Happacher, F.; Hara, K.; Hare, M.; Harr, R. F.; Harrington-Taber, T.; Hatakeyama, K.; Hays, C.; Heinrich, J.; Herndon, M.; Hocker, A.; Hong, Z.; Hopkins, W.; Hou, S.; Hughes, R. E.; Husemann, U.; Hussein, M.; Huston, J.; Introzzi, G.; Iori, M.; Ivanov, A.; James, E.; Jang, D.; Jayatilaka, B.; Jeon, E. J.; Jindariani, S.; Jones, M.; Joo, K. K.; Jun, S. Y.; Junk, T. R.; Kambeitz, M.; Kamon, T.; Karchin, P. E.; Kasmi, A.; Kato, Y.; Ketchum, W.; Keung, J.; Kilminster, B.; Kim, D. H.; Kim, H. S.; Kim, J. E.; Kim, M. J.; Kim, S. H.; Kim, S. B.; Kim, Y. J.; Kim, Y. K.; Kimura, N.; Kirby, M.; Knoepfel, K.; Kondo, K.; Kong, D. J.; Konigsberg, J.; Kotwal, A. V.; Kreps, M.; Kroll, J.; Kruse, M.; Kuhr, T.; Kurata, M.; Laasanen, A. T.; Lammel, S.; Lancaster, M.; Lannon, K.; Latino, G.; Lee, H. S.; Lee, J. S.; Leo, S.; Leone, S.; Lewis, J. D.; Limosani, A.; Lipeles, E.; Lister, A.; Liu, H.; Liu, Q.; Liu, T.; Lockwitz, S.; Loginov, A.; Lucchesi, D.; Lucà, A.; Lueck, J.; Lujan, P.; Lukens, P.; Lungu, G.; Lys, J.; Lysak, R.; Madrak, R.; Maestro, P.; Malik, S.; Manca, G.; Manousakis-Katsikakis, A.; Marchese, L.; Margaroli, F.; Marino, P.; Martínez, M.; Matera, K.; Mattson, M. E.; Mazzacane, A.; Mazzanti, P.; McNulty, R.; Mehta, A.; Mehtala, P.; Mesropian, C.; Miao, T.; Mietlicki, D.; Mitra, A.; Miyake, H.; Moed, S.; Moggi, N.; Moon, C. S.; Moore, R.; Morello, M. J.; Mukherjee, A.; Muller, Th.; Murat, P.; Mussini, M.; Nachtman, J.; Nagai, Y.; Naganoma, J.; Nakano, I.; Napier, A.; Nett, J.; Neu, C.; Nigmanov, T.; Nodulman, L.; Noh, S. Y.; Norniella, O.; Nurse, E.; Oakes, L.; Oh, S. H.; Oh, Y. D.; Oksuzian, I.; Okusawa, T.; Orava, R.; Ortolan, L.; Pagliarone, C.; Palencia, E.; Palni, P.; Papadimitriou, V.; Parker, W.; Pauletta, G.; Paulini, M.; Paus, C.; Phillips, T. J.; Piacentino, G.; Pianori, E.; Pilot, J.; Pitts, K.; Plager, C.; Pondrom, L.; Poprocki, S.; Potamianos, K.; Pranko, A.; Prokoshin, F.; Ptohos, F.; Punzi, G.; Ranjan, N.; Redondo Fernández, I.; Renton, P.; Rescigno, M.; Riddick, T.; Rimondi, F.; Ristori, L.; Robson, A.; Rodriguez, T.; Rolli, S.; Ronzani, M.; Roser, R.; Rosner, J. L.; Ruffini, F.; Ruiz, A.; Russ, J.; Rusu, V.; Sakumoto, W. K.; Sakurai, Y.; Santi, L.; Sato, K.; Saveliev, V.; Savoy-Navarro, A.; Schlabach, P.; Schmidt, E. E.; Schwarz, T.; Scodellaro, L.; Scuri, F.; Seidel, S.; Seiya, Y.; Semenov, A.; Sforza, F.; Shalhout, S. Z.; Shears, T.; Shekhar, R.; Shepard, P. F.; Shimojima, M.; Shochet, M.; Simonenko, A.; Sliwa, K.; Smith, J. R.; Snider, F. D.; Song, H.; Sorin, V.; St. Denis, R.; Stancari, M.; Stelzer-Chilton, O.; Stentz, D.; Strologas, J.; Sudo, Y.; Sukhanov, A.; Sun, S.; Suslov, I.; Takemasa, K.; Takeuchi, Y.; Tang, J.; Tecchio, M.; Shreyber-Tecker, I.; Teng, P. K.; Thom, J.; Thomson, E.; Thukral, V.; Toback, D.; Tokar, S.; Tollefson, K.; Tomura, T.; Tonelli, D.; Torre, S.; Torretta, D.; Totaro, P.; Trovato, M.; Ukegawa, F.; Uozumi, S.; Vázquez, F.; Velev, G.; Vellidis, C.; Vernieri, C.; Vidal, M.; Vilar, R.; Vizán, J.; Vogel, M.; Volpi, G.; Wagner, P.; Wallny, R.; Wang, S. M.; Waters, D.; Wester, W. C., III; Whiteson, D.; Wicklund, A. B.; Wilbur, S.; Williams, H. H.; Wilson, J. S.; Wilson, P.; Winer, B. L.; Wittich, P.; Wolbers, S.; Wolfe, H.; Wright, T.; Wu, X.; Wu, Z.; Yamamoto, K.; Yamato, D.; Yang, T.; Yang, U. K.; Yang, Y. C.; Yao, W.-M.; Yeh, G. P.; Yi, K.; Yoh, J.; Yorita, K.; Yoshida, T.; Yu, G. B.; Yu, I.; Zanetti, A. M.; Zeng, Y.; Zhou, C.; Zucchelli, S.; CDF Collaboration

    2014-04-01

    We present a measurement of the W-boson mass, MW, using data corresponding to 2.2 fb-1 of integrated luminosity collected in pp ¯ collisions at √s =1.96 TeV with the CDF II detector at the Fermilab Tevatron. The selected sample of 470 126 W→eν candidates and 624 708 W→μν candidates yields the measurement MW=80387±12(stat)±15(syst)=80387±19 MeV /c2. This is the most precise single measurement of the W-boson mass to date.

  13. Precision Measurement of the Three 23PJ Helium Fine Structure Intervals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zelevinsky, T.; Farkas, D.; Gabrielse, G.

    2005-11-01

    The three 23P fine structure intervals of He4 are measured at an improved accuracy that is sufficient to test two-electron QED theory and to determine the fine structure constant α to 14 parts in 109. The more accurate determination of α, to a precision higher than attained with the quantum Hall and Josephson effects, awaits the reconciliation of two inconsistent theoretical calculations now being compared term by term. A low pressure helium discharge presents experimental uncertainties quite different than for earlier measurements and allows direct measurements of light pressure shifts.

  14. Precision measurement of transverse velocity distribution of a Strontium atomic beam

    CERN Document Server

    Gao, F; Xu, P; Tian, X; Wang, Y; Ren, J; Wu, Haibin; Chang, Hong

    2013-01-01

    We measure precisely the transverse velocity distribution in a thermal Sr atomic beam with a velocity selective saturated fluorescence spectroscopy. By using the ultrastable laser system and narrow intercombination transition line of Sr atoms, the resolution of the velocity measured can be reached 0.13m/s, corresponding to 90$\\mu K$ in energy unit. The experimental results are agreement very well with a theoretical calculation. With the spectroscopic techniques, the absolute frequency of the intercombination transition of $^{88}$Sr is measured by an optical-frequency comb generator referenced to the SI second through an H maser, which is given by 434 829 121 318(10)kHz.

  15. Precision measurement of the photon detection efficiency of silicon photomultipliers using two integrating spheres.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Seul Ki; Lee, J; Kim, Sug-Whan; Lee, Hye-Young; Jeon, Jin-A; Park, I H; Yoon, Jae-Ryong; Baek, Yang-Sik

    2014-01-13

    We report a new and improved photon counting method for the precision PDE measurement of SiPM detectors, utilizing two integrating spheres connected serially and calibrated reference detectors. First, using a ray tracing simulation and irradiance measurement results with a reference photodiode, we investigated irradiance characteristics of the measurement instrument, and analyzed dominating systematic uncertainties in PDE measurement. Two SiPM detectors were then used for PDE measurements between wavelengths of 368 and 850 nm and for bias voltages varying from around 70V. The resulting PDEs of the SiPMs show good agreement with those from other studies, yet with an improved accuracy of 1.57% (1σ). This was achieved by the simultaneous measurement with the NIST calibrated reference detectors, which suppressed the time dependent variation of source light. The technical details of the instrumentation, measurement results and uncertainty analysis are reported together with their implications.

  16. High-precision RCS measurement of aircraft’s weak scattering source

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hu Chufeng

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The radar cross section (RCS of weak scattering source on the surface of an aircraft is usually less than −40 dBsm. How to accurately measure the RCS characteristics of weak scattering source is a technical challenge for the aircraft’s RCS measurement. This paper proposes separating and extracting the two-dimensional (2D reflectivity distribution of the weak scattering source with the microwave imaging algorithm and spectral transform so as to enhance its measurement precision. Firstly, we performed the 2D microwave imaging of the target and then used the 2D gating function to separate and extract the reflectivity distribution of the weak scattering source. Secondly, we carried out the spectral transform of the reflectivity distribution and eventually obtained the RCS of the weak scattering source through calibration. The prototype experimental results and their analysis show that the measurement method is effective. The experiments on an aircraft’s low-scattering conformal antenna verify that the measurement method can eliminate the clutter on the surface of aircraft. The precision of measuring a −40 dBsm target is 3–5 dB better than the existing RCS measurement methods. The measurement method can more accurately obtain the weak scattering source’s RCS characteristics.

  17. High-precision RCS measurement of aircraft’s weak scattering source

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hu Chufeng; Li Nanjing; Chen Weijun; Zhang Linxi

    2016-01-01

    The radar cross section (RCS) of weak scattering source on the surface of an aircraft is usually less than ?40 dBsm. How to accurately measure the RCS characteristics of weak scattering source is a technical challenge for the aircraft’s RCS measurement. This paper proposes separating and extracting the two-dimensional (2D) reflectivity distribution of the weak scattering source with the microwave imaging algorithm and spectral transform so as to enhance its measurement preci-sion. Firstly, we performed the 2D microwave imaging of the target and then used the 2D gating function to separate and extract the reflectivity distribution of the weak scattering source. Secondly, we carried out the spectral transform of the reflectivity distribution and eventually obtained the RCS of the weak scattering source through calibration. The prototype experimental results and their analysis show that the measurement method is effective. The experiments on an aircraft’s low-scattering conformal antenna verify that the measurement method can eliminate the clutter on the surface of aircraft. The precision of measuring a ?40 dBsm target is 3–5 dB better than the existing RCS measurement methods. The measurement method can more accurately obtain the weak scattering source’s RCS characteristics.

  18. Precision measurements of the top quark mass from the Tevatron in the pre-LHC era.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galtieri, Angela Barbaro; Margaroli, Fabrizio; Volobouev, Igor

    2012-05-01

    The top quark is the heaviest of the six quarks of the standard model (SM). Precise knowledge of its mass is important for imposing constraints on a number of physics processes, including interactions of the as yet unobserved Higgs boson. The Higgs boson is the only missing particle of the SM, central to the electroweak symmetry breaking mechanism and generation of particle masses. In this review, experimental measurements of the top quark mass accomplished at the Tevatron, a proton-antiproton collider located at the Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory, are described. Topologies of top quark events and the methods used to separate signal events from background sources are discussed. Data analysis techniques used to extract information about the top mass value are reviewed. The combination of several of the most precise measurements performed with the two Tevatron particle detectors, CDF and DØ, yields a value of M(t) = 173.2 ± 0.9 GeV/c(2).

  19. Measure and Control Technology Based on DSP for HighPrecision Scanning Motor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, N; Yang, X Y; Wu, B; Ye, S H [State Key Lab of Precision Measuring Technology and Instruments of Tianjin University, Tianjin, 300072 (China)

    2006-10-15

    A welding seam tracking visual sensor based on laser scanning is designed to solve the problems, such as indistinct image, difficulty in processing image etc., caused by serious arc light interference during welding. This visual sensor is mainly composed of a scanning motor, a linear-array CCD, a scanning rotating mirror and a semiconductor laser. Because the sensor measurement precision relies dramatically on the rotate speed stability of the scanning motor, the crux in the sensor design is to control the rotate speed of the scanning motor. Selecting a brushless direct current motor as the scanning motor and using TMS320F2812 DSP to drive it, we adopted fuzzy algorithm to control the motor rotate speed and made the steadiness error of the rotate speed less than 0.5%, which guarantees the sensor measurement precision and is of great importance for enhancing the welding quality of the industry welding robot.

  20. A High Precision, Optical Polarimeter to Measure Inclinations of High Mass X-Ray Binaries

    CERN Document Server

    Wiktorowicz, Sloane J

    2008-01-01

    We present commissioning data for the POLISH instrument obtained on the Hale 5-m telescope. The goal of this high precision polarimeter is to constrain orbital inclination of high mass X-ray binaries and to therefore obtain independent mass estimates for their black hole companions. We have obtained photon shot noise limited precision on standard stars, and we have measured the polarization of bright stars at the part per million level on a nightly basis. Systematic effects have been reduced to less than 1% of the measured polarization for polarized sources and to the part per million level for weakly polarized sources. The high sensitivity of this instrument to asymmetry suggests that valuable contributions will be made in many other fields, including studies of extrasolar planets, debris disks, and stellar astrophysics.

  1. What can we learn from high precision measurements of neutrino mixing angles?

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    R N Mohapatra

    2004-12-01

    Many experiments are being planned to measure the neutrino mixing angles more precisely. In this note, the theoretical significance of a high precision measurement of these parameters is discussed. It is emphasized that they can provide crucial information about different ways to understand the origin of large atmospheric neutrino mixing and move us closer towards determining the neutrino mass matrix. They may also be able to throw light on the question of lepton–quark unification as well as the existence of any leptonic symmetries. For instance if exact ↔ symmetry in the neutrino mass matrix is assumed to be the reason for maximal - mixing, one gets 13 = 0 and 13 ≃ $\\sqrt{ m^{2}_{\\odot} / m^{2}_{{\\text{A}}}$ or 13 ≃ $ m^{2}_{\\odot} / m^{2}_{{\\text{A}}}$ can provide information about the way the ↔ symmetry breaking manifests in the case of normal hierarchy.

  2. Precise half-life measurements for $^{38}$Ca and $^{39}$Ca

    CERN Document Server

    Blank, B; Demonchy, C-E; Borge, M J G; Matea, I; Munoz, F; Huikari, J; Dominguez-Reyes, R; Plaisir, C; Sturm, S; Canchel, G; Delahaye, P; Audirac, L; Fraile, L M; Serani, L; Lunney, D; Pedroza, J-L; Bey, A; Souin, J; Hui, Tran Trong; Delalee, F; Tengblad, O; Wenander, F

    2010-01-01

    The half-lives of Ca-38 and Ca-39 have been measured at ISOLDE of CERN. The REXTRAP facility was used to prepare ultra-clean samples of radioactive nuclei for precision decay spectroscopy. Ca-38 is one of the T-z = -1, 0(+). 0(+) beta-emitting nuclides used to determine the vector coupling constant of the weak interaction and the V-ud quark-mixing matrix element. The result obtained, T-1/2 = 443.8(19) ms, is four times more precise than the average of previous measurements. For Ca-39, a half-life of T-1/2 = 860.7(10) ms is obtained, a result in agreement with the average value from the literature.

  3. Precise Lifetime Measurements in Light Nuclei for Benchmarking Modern Ab-initio Nuclear Structure Models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lister, C.J. [Department of Physics, University of Massachusetts, Lowell, Lowell MA 01854 (United States); McCutchan, E.A. [National Nuclear Data Center, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973-5000 (United States)

    2014-06-15

    A new generation of ab-initio calculations, based on realistic two- and three-body forces, is having a profound impact on our view of how nuclei work. To improve the numerical methods, and the parameterization of 3-body forces, new precise data are needed. Electromagnetic transitions are very sensitive to the dynamics which drive mixing between configurations. We have made a series of precise (< 3%) measurements of electromagnetic transitions in the A=10 nuclei {sup 10}C and {sup 10}Be by using the Doppler Shift Attenuation method carefully. Many interesting features can be reproduced including the strong α clustering. New measurements on {sup 8}Be and {sup 12}Be highlight the interplay between the alpha clusters and their valence neutrons.

  4. Time-of-flight measurement with femtosecond pulses for high precision ranging lidar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, J.; Kim, Y.-J.; Lee, K.; Lee, S.; Kim, S.-W.

    2010-10-01

    The time-of-flight of light pulses has long been used as a direct measure of distance, but the state-of-the-art measurement precision using conventional light pulses or microwaves reaches only several hundreds of micromeres. This is due to the bandwidth limit of the photodetectors available today, which is in the picosecond range at best. Here, we improve the time-of-flight precision to the nanometer regime by timing femtosecond pulses through phase-locking control of the pulse repetition rate using the optical cross-correlation technique that exploits a second-harmonic birefringence crystal and a balance photodetector. The enhanced capability is maintained at long range without periodic ambiguity, being well suited to terrestrial lidar applications such as geodetic surveying, range finders and absolute altimeters. This method could also be applied to future space missions of formation-flying satellites for synthetic aperture imaging and remote experiments related to the general relativity theory.

  5. A new reactive atom plasma technology (RAPT) for precision machining: the etching of ULE optical surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fanara, Carlo; Shore, Paul; Nicholls, John R.; Lyford, Nicholas; Sommer, Phil; Fiske, Peter

    2006-06-01

    The next generation of 30-100 metre diameter extremely large telescopes (ELTs) requires large numbers of hexagonal primary mirror segments. As part of the Basic Technology programme run jointly by UCL and Cranfield University, a reactive atomic plasma technology (RAP(tm)) emerged from the US Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), is employed for the finishing of these surfaces. Results are presented on this novel etching technology. The Inductively Coupled Plasma (ICP) operated at atmospheric pressure using argon, activates the chemical species injected through its centre and promotes the fluorine-based chemical reactions at the surface. Process assessment trials on Ultra Low Expansion (ULE(tm)) plates, previously ground at high material removal rates, have been conducted. The quality of the surfaces produced on these samples using the RAP process are discussed. Substantial volumetric material removal rates of up to 0.446(21) mm 3/s at the highest process speed (1,200 mm/min) were found to be possible without pre-heating the substrate. The influences of power transfer, process speed and gas concentration on the removal rates have been determined. The suitability of the RAP process for revealing and removing sub-surface damage induced by high removal rate grinding is discussed. The results on SiC samples are reported elsewhere in this conference.

  6. Measuring and Modelling Delays in Robot Manipulators for Temporally Precise Control using Machine Learning.

    OpenAIRE

    Andersen, Thomas Timm; Amor, Heni Ben; Andersen, Nils Axel; Ravn, Ole

    2015-01-01

    Latencies and delays play an important role in temporally precise robot control. During dynamic tasks in particular, a robot has to account for inherent delays to reach manipulated objects in time. The different types of occurring delays are typically convoluted and thereby hard to measure and separate. In this paper, we present a data-driven methodology for separating and modelling inherent delays during robot control. We show how both actuation and response delays can be modelled using mode...

  7. J.J. Sakurai Prize Talk: Precision measurements and New Physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marciano, William

    2002-04-01

    The Standard Model of strong and electroweak interactions is a renormalizable quantum field theory. In that framework, quantum corrections to observables can be calculated with extraordinary accuracy. Comparison of those predictions with precision experimental measurements tests the theory and probes for small deviations from new physics effects. Recent examples of such tests and their implications will be described and the outlook for future advances will be discussed.

  8. Precise Half-Life Measurement of the Superallowed beta emitter 10C

    CERN Document Server

    Iacob, V E; Golovko, V; Goodwin, J; Nica, N; Park, H I; Trache, L; Tribble, R E

    2007-01-01

    The half-life of 10C has been measured to be 19.310(4)s, a result with 0.02% precision, which is a factor of three improvement over the best previous result. Since 10C is the lightest superallowed 0+ --> 0+ beta emitter, its ft value has the greatest weight in setting an upper limit on the possible presence of scalar currents.

  9. An Inexpensive Field-Widened Monolithic Michelson Interferometer for Precision Radial Velocity Measurements

    OpenAIRE

    Mahadevan, Suvrath; Ge, Jian; Fleming, Scott W.; Wan, Xiaoke; DeWitt, Curtis; van Eyken, Julian C.; McDavitt, Dan

    2008-01-01

    We have constructed a thermally compensated field-widened monolithic Michelson interferometer that can be used with a medium-resolution spectrograph to measure precise Doppler radial velocities of stars. Our prototype monolithic fixed-delay interferometer is constructed with off-the-shelf components and assembled using a hydrolysis bonding technique. We installed and tested this interferometer in the Exoplanet Tracker (ET) instrument at the Kitt Peak 2.1m telescope, an instrument built to dem...

  10. High Precision Measurements of $\\theta_{\\odot}$ in Solar and Reactor Neutrino Experiments

    CERN Document Server

    Bandyopadhyay, A; Goswami, S; Petcov, S T; Bandyopadhyay, Abhijit; Choubey, Sandhya; Goswami, Srubabati

    2004-01-01

    We discuss the possibilities of high precision measurement of the solar neutrino mixing angle $\\theta_\\odot \\equiv \\theta_{12}$ in solar and reactor neutrino experiments. The improvements in the determination of $\\sin^2\\theta_{12}$, which can be achieved with the expected increase of statistics and reduction of systematic errors in the currently operating solar and KamLAND experiments, are summarised. The potential of LowNu $\

  11. Precise measurement of the weak mixing angle in neutrino-nucleon scattering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arroyo, C.G.; King, B.J.; Bachmann, K.T.; Bazarko, A.O.; Bolton, T.; Foudas, C.; Lefmann, W.C.; Leung, W.C.; Mishra, S.R.; Oltman, E.; Quintas, P.Z.; Rabinowitz, S.A.; Sciulli, F.J.; Seligman, W.G.; Shaevitz, M.H. (Columbia University, New York, New York 10027 (United States)); Merritt, F.S.; Oreglia, M.J.; Schumm, B.A. (University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois 60637 (United States)); Bernstein, R.H.; Borcherding, F.; Fisk, H.E.; Lamm, M.J.; Marsh, W.; Merritt, K.W.B.; Schellman, H.M.; Yovanovitch, D.D. (Fermilab, Batavia, Illinois 60510 (United States)); Bodek, A.; Budd, H.S.; de Barbaro, P.; Sakumoto, W.K. (University of Rochester, Rochester, New York 14627 (United States)); Kinnel, T.; Sandler, P.H.; Smith, W.H. (University of Wisconsin Madison, Wisconsin 53706 (United States))

    1994-05-30

    We report a precise measurement of the weak mixing angle from the ratio of neutral current to charged current inclusive cross sections in deep-inelastic neutrino-nucleon scattering. The data were gathered at the CCFR neutrino detector in the Fermilab quadrupole-triplet beam, with neutrino energies up to 600 GeV. Using the on-shell definition, sin[sup 2][theta][sub [ital W

  12. Computer Vision Approach for Low Cost, High Precision Measurement of Grapevine Trunk Diameter in Outdoor Conditions

    OpenAIRE

    Pérez, Diego Sebastián; Bromberg, Facundo; Antivilo, Francisco Gonzalez

    2014-01-01

    Trunk diameter is a variable of agricultural interest, used mainly in the prediction of fruit trees production. It is correlated with leaf area and biomass of trees, and consequently gives a good estimate of the potential production of the plants. This work presents a low cost, high precision method for the measurement of trunk diameter of grapevines based on Computer Vision techniques. Several methods based on Computer Vision and other techniques are introduced in the literature. These metho...

  13. Modeling Method for Increased Precision and Scope of Directly Measurable Fluxes at a Genome-Scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCloskey, Douglas; Young, Jamey D; Xu, Sibei; Palsson, Bernhard O; Feist, Adam M

    2016-04-05

    Metabolic flux analysis (MFA) is considered to be the gold standard for determining the intracellular flux distribution of biological systems. The majority of work using MFA has been limited to core models of metabolism due to challenges in implementing genome-scale MFA and the undesirable trade-off between increased scope and decreased precision in flux estimations. This work presents a tunable workflow for expanding the scope of MFA to the genome-scale without trade-offs in flux precision. The genome-scale MFA model presented here, iDM2014, accounts for 537 net reactions, which includes the core pathways of traditional MFA models and also covers the additional pathways of purine, pyrimidine, isoprenoid, methionine, riboflavin, coenzyme A, and folate, as well as other biosynthetic pathways. When evaluating the iDM2014 using a set of measured intracellular intermediate and cofactor mass isotopomer distributions (MIDs),1 it was found that a total of 232 net fluxes of central and peripheral metabolism could be resolved in the E. coli network. The increase in scope was shown to cover the full biosynthetic route to an expanded set of bioproduction pathways, which should facilitate applications such as the design of more complex bioprocessing strains and aid in identifying new antimicrobials. Importantly, it was found that there was no loss in precision of core fluxes when compared to a traditional core model, and additionally there was an overall increase in precision when considering all observable reactions.

  14. The iLocater cryostat: design and thermal control strategy for precision radial velocity measurements

    CERN Document Server

    Crass, Jonathan; Hearty, Frederick R; Crepp, Justin R; Nelson, Matthew J; Wall, Sheila M; Cavalieri, David A; Koca, Corina; King, David L; Reynolds, Robert O; Stapelfeldt, Karl R

    2016-01-01

    The current generation of precision radial velocity (RV) spectrographs are seeing-limited instruments. In order to achieve high spectral resolution on 8m class telescopes, these spectrographs require large optics and in turn, large instrument volumes. Achieving milli-Kelvin thermal stability for these systems is challenging but is vital in order to obtain a single measurement RV precision of better than 1m/s. This precision is crucial to study Earth-like exoplanets within the habitable zone. iLocater is a next generation RV instrument being developed for the Large Binocular Telescope. Unlike seeing-limited RV instruments, iLocater uses adaptive optics (AO) to inject a diffraction-limited beam into single-mode fibers. These fibers illuminate the instrument spectrograph, facilitating a diffraction-limited design and a small instrument volume compared to present-day instruments. This enables intrinsic instrument stability and facilitates precision thermal control. We present the current design of the iLocater cr...

  15. An investigation of highly accurate and precise robotic hole measurements using non-contact devices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Usman Zahid

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Industrial robots arms are widely used in manufacturing industry because of their support for automation. However, in metrology, robots have had limited application due to their insufficient accuracy. Even using error compensation and calibration methods, robots are not effective for micrometre (μm level metrology. Non-contact measurement devices can potentially enable the use of robots for highly accurate metrology. However, the use of such devices on robots has not been investigated. The research work reported in this paper explores the use of different non-contact measurement devices on an industrial robot. The aim is to experimentally investigate the effects of robot movements on the accuracy and precision of measurements. The focus has been on assessing the ability to accurately measure various geometric and surface parameters of holes despite the inherent inaccuracies of industrial robot. This involves the measurement of diameter, roundness and surface roughness. The study also includes scanning of holes for measuring internal features such as start and end point of a taper. Two different non-contact measurement devices based on different technologies are investigated. Furthermore, effects of eccentricity, vibrations and thermal variations are also assessed. The research contributes towards the use of robots for highly accurate and precise robotic metrology.

  16. Flying spot laser triangulation scanner using lateral synchronization for surface profile precision measurement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hanlin; Ren, Yongjie; Liu, Changjie; Zhu, Jigui

    2014-07-10

    High-speed surface profile measurement with high precision is crucial for target inspection and quality control. In this study, a laser scanner based on a single point laser triangulation displacement sensor and a high-speed rotating polygon mirror is proposed. The autosynchronized scanning scheme is introduced to alleviate the trade-off between the field of view and the range precision, which is the inherent deficiency of the conventional triangulation. The lateral synchronized flying spot technology has excellent characteristics, such as programmable and larger field of view, high immunity to ambient light or secondary reflections, high optical signal-to-noise ratio, and minimum shadow effect. Owing to automatic point-to-point laser power control, high accuracy and superior data quality are possible when measuring objects featuring varying surface characteristics even in demanding applications. The proposed laser triangulation scanner is validated using a laboratory-built prototype and practical considerations for design and implementation of the system are described, including speckle noise reduction method and real-time signal processing. A method for rapid and accurate calibration of the laser triangulation scanner using lookup tables is also devised, and the system calibration accuracy is generally smaller than ±0.025  mm. Experimental results are presented and show a broad application prospect for fast surface profile precision measurement.

  17. Effect of Experience and Training on the Concordance and Precision of Strain Measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Negishi, Tomoko; Negishi, Kazuaki; Thavendiranathan, Paaladinesh; Cho, Goo-Yeong; Popescu, Bogdan A; Vinereanu, Dragos; Kurosawa, Koji; Penicka, Martin; Marwick, Thomas H

    2017-05-01

    This study sought to show the degree to which experience and training affect the precision and validity of global longitudinal strain (GLS) measurement and to evaluate the variability of strain measurement after feedback. The application of GLS for the detection of subclinical dysfunction has been recommended in an expert consensus document and is being used with increasing frequency. The role of experience in the precision and validity of GLS measurement is unknown, as is the efficacy of training. Fifty-eight readers, divided into 4 groups on the basis of their experience with GLS, calculated GLS from speckle strain analysis of 9 cases with various degrees of image quality. Intraclass correlation coefficients (ICCs), mean difference, SD, and coefficient of variation (CV) were compared against the measurements of a reference group that had experience with >1,000 cases of strain measurement. Individualized feedback was distributed, and repeat measurements were performed by 40 readers. Comparisons with the baseline variation provided information about whether feedback was effective. The ICC for GLS was significantly greater than that for ejection fraction regardless of image quality. Experience with strain measurement affected the concordance in strain values among the readers; the group with the highest level of experience showed significantly better ICC than those with no experience, although the ICC of the inexperienced readers was still very good (0.996 vs. 0.975; p = 0.0002). As experience increased, the mean difference, SD, and CV became significantly smaller. The CV of segmental strain analysis showed significant improvement after training, regardless of experience. The favorable interobserver agreement of GLS makes it more attractive than ejection fraction for follow-up of left ventricular function by multiple observers. Although experience is important, the precision of GLS was high for all groups. Training appears to be of most value for the assessment of

  18. Accuracy and precision of four common peripheral temperature measurement methods in intensive care patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asadian S

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Simin Asadian,1 Alireza Khatony,1 Gholamreza Moradi,2 Alireza Abdi,1 Mansour Rezaei,3 1Nursing and Midwifery School, Kermanshah University of Medical Sciences, 2Department of Anesthesiology, 3Biostatistics & Epidemiology Department, Kermanshah University of Medical Sciences, Kermanshah, Iran Introduction: An accurate determination of body temperature in critically ill patients is a fundamental requirement for initiating the proper process of diagnosis, and also therapeutic actions; therefore, the aim of the study was to assess the accuracy and precision of four noninvasive peripheral methods of temperature measurement compared to the central nasopharyngeal measurement. Methods: In this observational prospective study, 237 patients were recruited from the intensive care unit of Imam Ali Hospital of Kermanshah. The patients’ body temperatures were measured by four peripheral methods; oral, axillary, tympanic, and forehead along with a standard central nasopharyngeal measurement. After data collection, the results were analyzed by paired t-test, kappa coefficient, receiver operating characteristic curve, and using Statistical Package for the Social Sciences, version 19, software. Results: There was a significant meaningful correlation between all the peripheral methods when compared with the central measurement (P<0.001. Kappa coefficients showed good agreement between the temperatures of right and left tympanic membranes and the standard central nasopharyngeal measurement (88%. Paired t-test demonstrated an acceptable precision with forehead (P=0.132, left (P=0.18 and right (P=0.318 tympanic membranes, oral (P=1.00, and axillary (P=1.00 methods. Sensitivity and specificity of both the left and right tympanic membranes were more than for other methods. Conclusion: The tympanic and forehead methods had the highest and lowest accuracy for measuring body temperature, respectively. It is recommended to use the tympanic method (right and left for

  19. Preliminary Research on Data Abnormality Diagnosis Methods of Spacecraft Precision Measurement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rui Zhang

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available For precision measuring the satellite equipments, providing technical support for satellite assembly, combined with satellite small size, complex structure, satellite equipment shapes vary, and other characteristics, presently, indirect method that using electronic theodolite to measure cube mirror are commonly used to obtain the relative attitude of the respective devices. But in the actual measurement process, there are measurement errors in the measurement data. How to detect anomalies in the data is the focus of this study. This paper proposes two methods to detect abnormal data, that is mathematical geometric method and outlier detection methods. This paper analyzes their theoretical basis and verifies the feasibility of the two methods through part of the actual measurement data to.

  20. A novel approach for pulse width measurements with a high precision (8 ps RMS) TDC in an FPGA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ugur, C.; Linev, S.; Michel, J.; Schweitzer, T.; Traxler, M.

    2016-01-01

    High precision time measurements are a crucial element in particle identification experiments, which likewise require pulse width information for Time-over-Threshold (ToT) measurements and charge measurements (correlated with pulse width). In almost all of the FPGA-based TDC applications, pulse width measurements are implemented using two of the TDC channels for leading and trailing edge time measurements individually. This method however, requires twice the number of resources. In this paper we present the latest precision improvements in the high precision TDC (8 ps RMS) developed before [1], as well as the novel way of measuring ToT using a single TDC channel, while still achieving high precision (as low as 11.7 ps RMS). The effect of voltage, generated by a DC-DC converter, over the precision is also discussed. Finally, the outcome of the temperature change over the pulse width measurement is shown and a correction method is suggested to limit the degradation.

  1. Reliability of Pressure Ulcer Rates: How Precisely Can We Differentiate Among Hospital Units, and Does the Standard Signal-Noise Reliability Measure Reflect This Precision?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staggs, Vincent S; Cramer, Emily

    2016-08-01

    Hospital performance reports often include rankings of unit pressure ulcer rates. Differentiating among units on the basis of quality requires reliable measurement. Our objectives were to describe and apply methods for assessing reliability of hospital-acquired pressure ulcer rates and evaluate a standard signal-noise reliability measure as an indicator of precision of differentiation among units. Quarterly pressure ulcer data from 8,199 critical care, step-down, medical, surgical, and medical-surgical nursing units from 1,299 US hospitals were analyzed. Using beta-binomial models, we estimated between-unit variability (signal) and within-unit variability (noise) in annual unit pressure ulcer rates. Signal-noise reliability was computed as the ratio of between-unit variability to the total of between- and within-unit variability. To assess precision of differentiation among units based on ranked pressure ulcer rates, we simulated data to estimate the probabilities of a unit's observed pressure ulcer rate rank in a given sample falling within five and ten percentiles of its true rank, and the probabilities of units with ulcer rates in the highest quartile and highest decile being identified as such. We assessed the signal-noise measure as an indicator of differentiation precision by computing its correlations with these probabilities. Pressure ulcer rates based on a single year of quarterly or weekly prevalence surveys were too susceptible to noise to allow for precise differentiation among units, and signal-noise reliability was a poor indicator of precision of differentiation. To ensure precise differentiation on the basis of true differences, alternative methods of assessing reliability should be applied to measures purported to differentiate among providers or units based on quality. © 2016 The Authors. Research in Nursing & Health published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 The Authors. Research in Nursing & Health published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. A high precision method for quantitative measurements of reactive oxygen species in frozen biopsies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kirsti Berg

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: An electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR technique using the spin probe cyclic hydroxylamine 1-hydroxy-3-methoxycarbonyl-2,2,5,5-tetramethylpyrrolidine (CMH was introduced as a versatile method for high precision quantification of reactive oxygen species, including the superoxide radical in frozen biological samples such as cell suspensions, blood or biopsies. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Loss of measurement precision and accuracy due to variations in sample size and shape were minimized by assembling the sample in a well-defined volume. Measurement was carried out at low temperature (150 K using a nitrogen flow Dewar. The signal intensity was measured from the EPR 1st derivative amplitude, and related to a sample, 3-carboxy-proxyl (CP• with known spin concentration. RESULTS: The absolute spin concentration could be quantified with a precision and accuracy better than ±10 µM (k = 1. The spin concentration of samples stored at -80°C could be reproduced after 6 months of storage well within the same error estimate. CONCLUSION: The absolute spin concentration in wet biological samples such as biopsies, water solutions and cell cultures could be quantified with higher precision and accuracy than normally achievable using common techniques such as flat cells, tissue cells and various capillary tubes. In addition; biological samples could be collected and stored for future incubation with spin probe, and also further stored up to at least six months before EPR analysis, without loss of signal intensity. This opens for the possibility to store and transport incubated biological samples with known accuracy of the spin concentration over time.

  3. Measurement of Heat Propagation in a Laser Produced Plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gregori, G; Glenzer, S H; Knight, J; Niemann, C; Price, D; Froula, D H; Edwards, J; Town, R P J; Brantov, A; Bychenkov, V Y; Rozmus, W

    2003-08-22

    We present the observation of a nonlocal heat wave by measuring spatially and temporally resolved electron temperature profiles in a laser produced nitrogen plasma. Absolutely calibrated measurements have been performed by resolving the ion-acoustic wave spectra across the plasma volume with Thomson scattering. We find that the experimental electron temperature profiles disagree with flux-limited models, but are consistent with transport models that account for the nonlocal effects in heat conduction by fast electrons.

  4. Design and testing of miniaturized plasma sensor for measuring hypervelocity impact plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goel, A., E-mail: ashish09@stanford.edu; Tarantino, P. M.; Lauben, D. S.; Close, S. [Department of Aeronautics and Astronautics, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 (United States)

    2015-04-15

    An increasingly notable component of the space environment pertains to the impact of meteoroids and orbital debris on spacecraft and the resulting mechanical and electrical damages. Traveling at speeds of tens of km/s, when these particles, collectively referred to as hypervelocity particles, impact a satellite, they vaporize, ionize, and produce a radially expanding plasma that can generate electrically harmful radio frequency emission or serve as a trigger for electrostatic discharge. In order to measure the flux, composition, energy distribution, and temperature of ions and electrons in this plasma, a miniaturized plasma sensor has been developed for carrying out in-situ measurements in space. The sensor comprises an array of electrostatic analyzer wells split into 16 different channels, catering to different species and energy ranges in the plasma. We present results from numerical simulation based optimization of sensor geometry. A novel approach of fabricating the sensor using printed circuit boards is implemented. We also describe the test setup used for calibrating the sensor and show results demonstrating the energy band pass characteristics of the sensor. In addition to the hypervelocity impact plasmas, the plasma sensor developed can also be used to carry out measurements of ionospheric plasma, diagnostics of plasma propulsion systems, and in other space physics experiments.

  5. Design and testing of miniaturized plasma sensor for measuring hypervelocity impact plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goel, A.; Tarantino, P. M.; Lauben, D. S.; Close, S.

    2015-04-01

    An increasingly notable component of the space environment pertains to the impact of meteoroids and orbital debris on spacecraft and the resulting mechanical and electrical damages. Traveling at speeds of tens of km/s, when these particles, collectively referred to as hypervelocity particles, impact a satellite, they vaporize, ionize, and produce a radially expanding plasma that can generate electrically harmful radio frequency emission or serve as a trigger for electrostatic discharge. In order to measure the flux, composition, energy distribution, and temperature of ions and electrons in this plasma, a miniaturized plasma sensor has been developed for carrying out in-situ measurements in space. The sensor comprises an array of electrostatic analyzer wells split into 16 different channels, catering to different species and energy ranges in the plasma. We present results from numerical simulation based optimization of sensor geometry. A novel approach of fabricating the sensor using printed circuit boards is implemented. We also describe the test setup used for calibrating the sensor and show results demonstrating the energy band pass characteristics of the sensor. In addition to the hypervelocity impact plasmas, the plasma sensor developed can also be used to carry out measurements of ionospheric plasma, diagnostics of plasma propulsion systems, and in other space physics experiments.

  6. The vector modulation method to make precise measurements with directional sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Y. S.; Lin, Y. R.; Deng, Z. L.

    2007-01-01

    The best plan to curtail measurement errors is to modulate the input signal before it enters a sensor. As far as linear directional sensors are concerned, VMM (the vector modulation method) can make the earliest modulation and appropriate demodulation to curtail measurement errors and then improve the precision of measurement. According to the modulation-demodulation principle and the linear system theory, especially the frequency-remaining character and the superposition theorem of linear systems, a precise response to the input signal will be resolved by means of demodulation. VMM curtails the main elements of errors, including quantization error and bias of a measurement system, along with bias, drift, noise and disturbance of sensors. Experiments measuring ERR (the Earth's rate of rotation) are presented, and a design for an experiment measuring gravitational acceleration with VMM is presented. The preliminary experiments have given positive support. VMM, which can remarkably get rid of errors, is much clearer in theory and easier to implement in engineering practice.

  7. CONCEPTUAL PAPER : Utilization of GPS Satellites for Precise Irradiation Measurement and Monitoring

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    S. Vijayan

    2008-03-01

    Precise measurement of irradiance over the earth under various circumstances like solar flares, coronal mass ejections, over an 11-year solar cycle, etc. leads to better understanding of Sun–earth relationship. To continuously monitor the irradiance over earth-space regions several satellites at several positions are required. For that continuous and multiple satellite monitoring we can use GPS (Global Positioning System) satellites (like GLONASS, GALILEO, future satellites) installed with irradiance measuring and monitoring instruments. GPS satellite system consists of 24 constellations of satellites. Therefore usage of all the satellites leads to 24 measurements of irradiance at the top of the atmosphere (or 12 measurements of those satellites which are pointing towards the Sun) at an instant. Therefore in one day, numerous irradiance observations can be obtained for the whole globe, which will be very helpful for several applications like Albedo calculation, Earth Radiation Budget calculation, monitoring of near earth-space atmosphere, etc. Moreover, measuring irradiance both in ground (using ground instruments) and in space at the same instant of time over a same place, leads to numerous advantages. That is, for a single position we obtain irradiance at the top of the atmosphere, irradiance at ground and the difference in irradiance from over top of the atmosphere to the ground. Measurement of irradiance over the atmosphere and in ground at a precise location gives more fine details about the solar irradiance influence over the earth, path loss and interaction of irradiance with the atmosphere.

  8. Technical note: Aerosol light absorption measurements with a carbon analyser - Calibration and precision estimates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ammerlaan, B. A. J.; Holzinger, R.; Jedynska, A. D.; Henzing, J. S.

    2017-09-01

    Equivalent Black Carbon (EBC) and Elemental Carbon (EC) are different mass metrics to quantify the amount of combustion aerosol. Both metrics have their own measurement technique. In state-of-the-art carbon analysers, optical measurements are used to correct for organic carbon that is not evolving because of pyrolysis. These optical measurements are sometimes used to apply the technique of absorption photometers. Here, we use the transmission measurements of our carbon analyser for simultaneous determination of the elemental carbon concentration and the absorption coefficient. We use MAAP data from the CESAR observatory, the Netherlands, to correct for aerosol-filter interactions by linking the attenuation coefficient from the carbon analyser to the absorption coefficient measured by the MAAP. Application of the calibration to an independent data set of MAAP and OC/EC observations for the same location shows that the calibration is applicable to other observation periods. Because of simultaneous measurements of light absorption properties of the aerosol and elemental carbon, variation in the mass absorption efficiency (MAE) can be studied. We further show that the absorption coefficients and MAE in this set-up are determined within a precision of 10% and 12%, respectively. The precisions could be improved to 4% and 8% when the light transmission signal in the carbon analyser is very stable.

  9. Ultra-precise measurement of optical aberrations for sub-Aangstroem transmission electron microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barthel, J.

    2008-06-15

    Quantitative investigations of material structures on an atomic scale by means of highresolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) impose not only extreme demands on the mechanic and electromagnetic stability of the applied instruments but require also their precise electron-optical adjustment. Today a physical resolution well below one Aangstroem can be achieved with commercially available microscopes on a daily basis. However, the achieved resolution can often not be reliably exploited for the interpretation of the resulting microscopical data due to the presence of so-called higher-order lens aberrations. At the starting time of this work, a sufficiently accurate procedure to measure higher-order aberrations was urgently missing. Since aberration measurement is a mandatory prerequisite for any technique of aberration control enabling quantitative high-resolution microscopy, the goal of this work is to develop such a measurement procedure for the Sub-Aangstroem regime. The measurement procedures developed in the course of this work are based on the numerical evaluation of a series of images taken from an amorphous object under electron-beam illumination with varying tilt. New techniques have been developed for the evaluation of single images as well as for the optimised evaluation of the whole series. These procedures allow microscope users to perform quantitative HRTEM even at a resolution of 0.5 Aangstroem. The precision reached with the newly developed measurement procedures is unprecedented and surpasses existing solutions by at least one order of magnitude in any respect. All the concepts and procedures for aberration measurement developed in this work have been implemented in a software package which satisfies professional demands with respect to robustness, precision, speed and user-friendliness. The new automatic aberrationmeasurement procedures are suitable to establish HRTEM as a quantitative technique for material science investigations in the

  10. Plasma absorption evidence via chirped pulse spectral transmission measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jedrkiewicz, Ottavia, E-mail: ottavia.jedrkiewicz@ifn.cnr.it [Istituto di Fotonica e Nanotecnologie, CNR and CNISM UdR Como, Via Valleggio 11, I-22100 Como (Italy); Minardi, Stefano [Institute of Applied Physics, Friedrich-Schiller-University Jena, Max-Wien-Platz 1, 07743 Jena (Germany); Couairon, Arnaud; Jukna, Vytautas [Centre de Physique Theorique, CNRS, Ecole Polytechnique, F-91128 Palaiseau (France); Selva, Marco; Di Trapani, Paolo [Dipartimento di Scienza e Alta Tecnologia, University of Insubria and CNISM UdR Como, Via Valleggio 11, I-22100 Como (Italy)

    2015-06-08

    This work aims at highlighting the plasma generation dynamics and absorption when a Bessel beam propagates in glass. We developed a simple diagnostics allowing us to retrieve clear indications of the formation of the plasma in the material, thanks to transmission measurements in the angular and wavelength domains. This technique featured by the use of a single chirped pulse having the role of pump and probe simultaneously leads to results showing the plasma nonlinear absorption effect on the trailing part of the pulse, thanks to the spectral-temporal correspondence in the measured signal, which is also confirmed by numerical simulations.

  11. Testing the standard model by precision measurement of the weak charges of quarks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, R D; Carlini, R D; Thomas, A W; Roche, J

    2007-09-21

    In a global analysis of the latest parity-violating electron scattering measurements on nuclear targets, we demonstrate a significant improvement in the experimental knowledge of the weak neutral-current lepton-quark interactions at low energy. The precision of this new result, combined with earlier atomic parity-violation measurements, places tight constraints on the size of possible contributions from physics beyond the standard model. Consequently, this result improves the lower-bound on the scale of relevant new physics to approximately 1 TeV.

  12. Progress towards precision measurements of beta-decay correlation parameters using atom and ion traps

    CERN Document Server

    Melconian, D; Fenker, B; Mehlman, M; Shidling, P D; Anholm, M; Ashery, D; Behr, J A; Gorelov, A; Gwinner, G; Olchankski, K; Smale, S

    2014-01-01

    The correlations of the decay products following the beta decay of nuclei have a long history of providing a low-energy probe of the fundamental symmetries of our universe. Over half a century ago, the correlation of the electrons following the decay of polarized 60Co demonstrated that parity is not conserved in weak interactions. Today, the same basic idea continues to be applied to search for physics beyond the standard model: make precision measurements of correlation parameters and look for deviations compared to their standard model predictions. Efforts to measure these parameters to the 0.1% level utilizing atom and ion trapping techniques are described.

  13. Improving the precision of Hall effect measurements using a single-crystal copper probe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cha, Su-Young; Shin, Jong Moon; Kim, Su Jae; Park, Sang Eon; Cho, Chae Ryong; Cho, Yong Chan; Jeong, Se-Young

    2012-01-01

    The circuitry and components of a Hall measurement kit were replaced with single-crystal copper (SCC) wires and parts prepared by a novel wire fabrication process. This process preserved the grain-free structure of SCC grown by the Czochralski method. The new kit was used to determine, with greatly improved precision, the electrical coefficients such as carrier density and mobility, establish the reproducibility of the measured values, and define the semiconductor type. The observed reduction in electrical signal losses and distortion has been attributed to grain boundary elimination.

  14. Precision measurement of CP violation in D0-->pipi at CDF

    Science.gov (United States)

    di Canto, A.

    We report a preliminary measurement of the CP violating asymmetry in D0->pi+pi- using approximately 215,000 decays reconstructed in about 5.94/fb of CDF data. We use the strong D*+->D0pi+ decay ("D* tag") to identify the flavor of the charmed meson at production time and exploit CP-conserving strong c-cbar pair-production in p-pbar collisions. Higher statistic samples of Cabibbo-favored D0->K-pi+ decays with and without D* tag are used to highly suppress systematic uncertainties due to detector effects. The result is the world's most precise measurement to date.

  15. Precision measurement and compensation of optical stark shifts for an ion-trap quantum processor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Häffner, H; Gulde, S; Riebe, M; Lancaster, G; Becher, C; Eschner, J; Schmidt-Kaler, F; Blatt, R

    2003-04-11

    Using optical Ramsey interferometry, we precisely measure the laser-induced ac-Stark shift on the S(1/2)-D(5/2) "quantum bit" transition near 729 nm in a single trapped 40Ca+ ion. We cancel this shift using an additional laser field. This technique is of particular importance for the implementation of quantum information processing with cold trapped ions. As a simple application we measure the atomic phase evolution during a n x 2 pi rotation of the quantum bit.

  16. Precise Measurement of Cosmic-Ray Proton and Helium Spectra with the BESS Spectrometer

    CERN Document Server

    Sanuki, T; Matsumoto, H; Seo, E S; Wang, J Z; Abe, K; Anraku, K; Asaoka, Y; Fujikawa, M; Imori, M; Maeno, T; Makida, Y; Matsui, N; Matsunaga, H; Mitchell, J; Mitsui, T; Moiseev, A; Nishimura, J; Nozaki, M; Orito, S; Ormes, J F; Saeki, T; Sasaki, M; Shikaze, Y; Sonoda, T; Streitmatter, R E; Suzuki, J; Tanaka, K; Ueda, I; Yajima, N; Yamagami, T; Yamamoto, A; Yoshida, T; Yoshimura, K

    2000-01-01

    We report cosmic-ray proton and helium spectra in energy ranges of 1 to 120GeV and 1 to 54 GeV/nucleon, respectively, measured by a balloon flight of theBESS spectrometer in 1998. The magnetic-rigidity of the cosmic-rays wasreliably determined by highly precise measurement of the circular track in auniform solenoidal magnetic field of 1 Tesla. Those spectra were determinedwithin overall uncertainties of +-5 0.000000or protons and +- 10 0.000000or helium nucleiincluding statistical and systematic errors.

  17. An assessment of the precision and confidence of aquatic eddy correlation measurements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Donis, Daphne; Holtappels, Moritz; Noss, Christian

    2015-01-01

    , an accurate assessment of the errors introduced by the spatial alignment of velocity and water constituent measurements and by their different response times is still needed. Here, this paper discusses uncertainties and biases in the data treatment based on oxygen EC flux measurements in a large-scale flume...... series based on maximum cross correlation improved the precision of EC flux estimations; 2) an oxygen sensor with a response time of ...) between the oxygen sensor and the ADV's sampling volume is important for accurate EC flux estimates, especially when the flow direction is perpendicular to the sensor's orientation....

  18. Testing the Standard Model by precision measurement of the weak charges of quarks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ross Young; Roger Carlini; Anthony Thomas; Julie Roche

    2007-05-01

    In a global analysis of the latest parity-violating electron scattering measurements on nuclear targets, we demonstrate a significant improvement in the experimental knowledge of the weak neutral-current lepton-quark interactions at low-energy. The precision of this new result, combined with earlier atomic parity-violation measurements, limits the magnitude of possible contributions from physics beyond the Standard Model - setting a model-independent, lower-bound on the scale of new physics at ~1 TeV.

  19. Plasma Measurements: An Overview of Requirements and Status

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kenneth M. Young

    2008-01-04

    This paper introduces this special issue on plasma diagnostics for magnetic fusion devices. Its primary purpose is to relate the measurements of plasma parameters to the physics challenges to be faced on operating and planned devices, and also to identify the diagnostic techniques that are used to make these measurements. The specific physics involved in the application of the techniques will be addressed in subsequent chapters. This chapter is biased toward measurements for tokamaks because of their proximity to the burning plasma frontier, and to set the scene for the development work associated with ITER. Hence, there is some emphasis on measurements for alpha-physics studies and the needs for plasma measurements as input to actuators to control the plasma, both for optimizing the device performance and for protection of the surrounding material. The very different approach to the engineering of diagnostics for a burning plasma is considered, emphasizing the needs for new calibration ideas, reliability and hardness against, and compatibility with, radiation. New ideas take a long time to be converted into "work-horse" sophisticated diagnostics so that investment in new developments is essential for ITER, particularly for the measurement of alpha-particles.

  20. Measurement and correction of variations in interstellar dispersion in high-precision pulsar timing

    CERN Document Server

    Keith, M J; Shannon, R M; Hobbs, G B; Manchester, R N; Bailes, M; Bhat, N D R; Burke-Spolaor, S; Champion, D J; Chaudhary, A; Hotan, A W; Khoo, J; Kocz, J; Oslowski, S; Ravi, V; Reynolds, J E; Sarkissian, J; van Straten, W; Yardley, D R B

    2012-01-01

    Signals from radio pulsars show a wavelength-dependent delay due to dispersion in the interstellar plasma. At a typical observing wavelength, this delay can vary by tens of microseconds on five-year time scales, far in excess of signals of interest to pulsar timing arrays, such as that induced by a gravitational-wave background. Measurement of these delay variations is not only crucial for the detection of such signals, but also provides an unparallelled measurement of the turbulent interstellar plasma at au scales. In this paper we demonstrate that without consideration of wavelength- independent red-noise, 'simple' algorithms to correct for interstellar dispersion can attenuate signals of interest to pulsar timing arrays. We present a robust method for this correction, which we validate through simulations, and apply it to observations from the Parkes Pulsar Timing Array. Correction for dispersion variations comes at a cost of increased band-limited white noise. We discuss scheduling to minimise this additi...

  1. High-precision mass measurements of {sup 25}Al and {sup 30}P at JYFLTRAP

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Canete, L.; Kankainen, A.; Eronen, T.; Gorelov, D.; Hakala, J.; Jokinen, A.; Kolhinen, V.S.; Koponen, J.; Moore, I.D.; Reinikainen, J.; Rinta-Antila, S. [University of Jyvaskylae (Finland)

    2016-05-15

    The masses of the astrophysically relevant nuclei {sup 25}Al and {sup 30}P have been measured with a Penning trap for the first time. The mass-excess values for {sup 25}Al (Δ=-8915.962(63) keV) and {sup 30}P (Δ=-20200.854(64) keV) obtained with the JYFLTRAP double Penning trap mass spectrometer are in good agreement with the Atomic Mass Evaluation 2012 values but ∼5-10 times more precise. A high precision is required for calculating resonant proton-capture rates of astrophysically important reactions {sup 25}Al(p,γ){sup 26}Si and {sup 30}P(p,γ){sup 31}S. In this work, Q{sub (p,γ)}=5513.99(13) keV and Q{sub (p,γ)}=6130.64(24) keV were obtained for {sup 25}Al and {sup 30}P, respectively. The effect of the more precise values on the resonant proton-capture rates has been studied. In addition to nuclear astrophysics, the measured Q{sub EC} value of {sup 25}Al, 4276.805(45) keV, is relevant for studies of T=1/2 mirror beta decays which have a potential to be used to test the Conserved Vector Current hypothesis. (orig.)

  2. Study of magnetic hysteresis effects in a storage ring using precision tune measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wei; Hao, Hao; Mikhailov, Stepan F.; Xu, Wei; Li, Jing-Yi; Li, Wei-Min; Wu, Ying. K.

    2016-12-01

    With the advances in accelerator science and technology in recent decades, the accelerator community has focused on the development of next-generation light sources, for example diffraction-limited storage rings (DLSRs), which require precision control of the electron beam energy and betatron tunes. This work is aimed at understanding magnet hysteresis effects on the electron beam energy and lattice focusing in circular accelerators, and developing new methods to gain better control of these effects. In this paper, we will report our recent experimental study of the magnetic hysteresis effects and their impacts on the Duke storage ring lattice using the transverse feedback based precision tune measurement system. The major magnet hysteresis effects associated with magnet normalization and lattice ramping are carefully studied to determine an effective procedure for lattice preparation while maintaining a high degree of reproducibility of lattice focusing. The local hysteresis effects are also studied by measuring the betatron tune shifts which result from adjusting the setting of a quadrupole. A new technique has been developed to precisely recover the focusing strength of the quadrupole by returning it to a proper setting to overcome the local hysteresis effect. Supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China (11175180, 11475167) and US DOE (DE-FG02-97ER41033)

  3. Coordinates calibration in precision detection of 3D optical deformation measurement system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Honggang; Hu, Chunsheng; Wang, Xingshu; Gao, Yang; Wu, Wei

    2012-11-01

    In order to validate the detection precision of a three Dimensions Optical Deformation Measure System (3D-OMS), a calibration method of auxiliary coordinate and the optical coordinate base on theodolites has been proposed. The installation method by using theodolites to calibrate the auxiliary coordinate and the optical coordinate has been proposed. Specifically, after the auxiliary mirrors installed, the installation accuracy is detected, then we analyzed the influence of Axis-Error of theodolite under the practical condition of our experiment. Furthermore, the influence of validation precision for the 3D-OMS caused by the misalignment of auxiliary coordinate and optical coordinate is analyzed. According to our theoretical analysis and experiments results, the validation precision of the 3D-OMS can achieve an accuracy of 1″ at the conditions of the coordinate alignment accuracy is no more than 10' and the measuring range of 3D-OMS within +/-3'. Therefore, the proposed method can meet our high accuracy requirement while not sensitive to the installation error of auxiliary mirrors. This method is also available for other similar work.

  4. A proposed experimental method for interpreting Doppler effect measurements and determining their precision

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klann, P. G.

    1973-01-01

    The principal problem in the measurement of the Doppler reactivity effect is separating it from the thermal reactivity effects of the expansion of the heated sample. It is shown in this proposal that the thermal effects of sample expansion can be experimentally determined by making additional measurements with porous samples having the same mass and/or volume as the primary sample. By combining these results with independent measurements of the linear temperature coefficient and the computed temperature dependence of the Doppler coefficient the magnitude of the Doppler coefficient may be extracted from the data. These addiational measurements are also useful to experimentally determine the precision of the reactivity oscillator technique used to measure the reactivity effects of the heated sample.

  5. High stability interleaved fiber Michelson interferometer for on-line precision displacement measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Fang; Chen, Xianfeng; Zhang, Lin

    2009-11-01

    A self-reference fiber Michelson interferometer measurement system, which employs fiber Bragg gratings (FBGs) as in-fiber reflective mirrors and interleaves together two fiber Michelson interferometers that share the common-interferometric-optical path, is presented. One of the fiber interferometers is used to stabilise the system by the use of an electronic feedback loop to compensate the influences resulting from the environmental disturbances, while the other one is used to perform the measurement task. The influences resulting from the environmental disturbances have been eliminated by the compensating action of the electronic feedback loop, this makes the system suitable for on-line precision measurement. By means of the homodyne phase-tracking technique, the linearity of the measurement results of displacement measurements has been very high.

  6. Practical resolution requirements of measurement instruments for precise characterization of autostereoscopic 3D displays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boher, Pierre; Leroux, Thierry; Collomb-Patton, Véronique; Bignon, Thibault

    2014-03-01

    Different ways to evaluate the optical performances of auto-stereoscopic 3D displays are reviewed. Special attention is paid to the crosstalk measurements that can be performed by measuring, either the precise angular emission at one or few locations on the display surface, or the full display surface emission from very specific locations in front of the display. Using measurements made in the two ways with different instruments on different auto-stereoscopic displays, we show that measurement instruments need to match the resolution of the human eye to obtain reliable results in both cases. Practical requirements in terms of angular resolution for viewing angle measurement instruments and in terms of spatial resolution for imaging instruments are derived and verified on practical examples.

  7. Precision of INR measured with a patient operated whole blood coagulometer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Attermann, Jørn; Andersen, Niels Trolle; Korsgaard, Helle;

    2003-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: The objective of the present study was to evaluate the precision of a portable whole blood coagulometer (CoaguChek S) in the hands of self-managing patients on oral anticoagulant therapy (OAT). MATERIALS AND METHODS: Fifteen patients on self-managed OAT performed measurements of INR...... by two types of portable whole blood coagulometers (CoaguChek and CoaguChek S) at home for 10 weeks. RESULTS: The coefficient of variation (CV) of INRs determined at home by CoaguChek S by patients on self-managed OAT was 5.5% (95% confidence limits: 4.9%, 6.1%). The biological CV of INR within...... and between patients was 15.0% and 14.7%, respectively. CONCLUSION: The precision of CoaguChek S is satisfactory....

  8. An Inexpensive Field-Widened Monolithic Michelson Interferometer for Precision Radial Velocity Measurements

    CERN Document Server

    Mahadevan, Suvrath; Fleming, Scott W; Wan, Xiaoke; DeWitt, Curtis; van Eyken, Julian C; McDavitt, Dan

    2008-01-01

    We have constructed a thermally compensated field-widened monolithic Michelson interferometer that can be used with a medium-resolution spectrograph to measure precise Doppler radial velocities of stars. Our prototype monolithic fixed-delay interferometer is constructed with off-the-shelf components and assembled using a hydrolysis bonding technique. We installed and tested this interferometer in the Exoplanet Tracker (ET) instrument at the Kitt Peak 2.1m telescope, an instrument built to demonstrate the principles of dispersed fixed delay interferometry. An iodine cell allows the interferometer drift to be accurately calibrated, relaxing the stability requirements on the interferometer itself. When using our monolithic interferometer, the ET instrument has no moving parts (except the iodine cell), greatly simplifying its operation. We demonstrate differential radial velocity precision of a few m s$^{-1}$ on well known radial velocity standards and planet bearing stars when using this interferometer. Such mon...

  9. Study of Magnetic Hysteresis Effects in a Storage Ring Using Precision Tune Measurement

    CERN Document Server

    Li, Wei; Mikhailov, Stepan F; Xu, Wei; Li, Jing-Yi; Li, Wei-Min; Wu, Ying K

    2016-01-01

    With advances in accelerator science and technology in the recent decades, the accelerator community has focused on the development of next-generation light sources, for example the diffraction-limited storage rings (DLSRs), which requires precision control of the electron beam energy and betatron tunes. This work is aimed at understanding magnet hysteresis effects on the electron beam energy and lattice focusing in the circular accelerators, and developing new methods to gain better control of these effects. In this paper, we will report our recent experimental study of the magnetic hysteresis effects and their impacts on the Duke storage ring lattice using the transverse feedback based precision tune measurement system. The major magnet hysteresis effects associated with magnet normalization and lattice ramping are carefully studied to determine an effective procedure for lattice preparation while maintaining a high degree of reproducibility of lattice focusing. The local hysteresis effects are also studied...

  10. Theory confronts experiment in the Casimir force measurements: quantification of errors and precision

    CERN Document Server

    Chen, F; Mohideen, U; Mostepanenko, V M

    2004-01-01

    We compare theory and experiment in the Casimir force measurement between gold surfaces performed with the atomic force microscope. Both random and systematic experimental errors are found leading to a total absolute error equal to 8.5 pN at 95% confidence. In terms of the relative errors, experimental precision of 1.75% is obtained at the shortest separation of 62 nm at 95% confidence level (at 60% confidence the experimental precision of 1% is confirmed at the shortest separation). An independent determination of the accuracy of the theoretical calculations of the Casimir force and its application to the experimental configuration is carefully made. Special attention is paid to the sample-dependent variations of the optical tabulated data due to the presence of grains, contribution of surface plasmons, and errors introduced by the use of the proximity force theorem. Nonmultiplicative and diffraction-type contributions to the surface roughness corrections are examined. The electric forces due to patch potent...

  11. Formulas for precisely and efficiently estimating the bias and variance of the length measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Shuqiang; Yang, Yuanxi; Dang, Yamin

    2016-10-01

    Error analysis in length measurements is an important problem in geographic information system and cartographic operations. The distance between two random points—i.e., the length of a random line segment—may be viewed as a nonlinear mapping of the coordinates of the two points. In real-world applications, an unbiased length statistic may be expected in high-precision contexts, but the variance of the unbiased statistic is of concern in assessing the quality. This paper suggesting the use of a k-order bias correction formula and a nonlinear error propagation approach to the distance equation provides a useful way to describe the length of a line. The study shows that the bias is determined by the relative precision of the random line segment, and that the use of the higher-order bias correction is only needed for short-distance applications.

  12. Progress on Passive Sensor for Ultra-Precise Measurement of Carbon Dioxide from Space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heaps, William S.; Kawa, S. Randolph

    2002-01-01

    Global measurements of atmospheric carbon dioxides (CO2) are needed to resolve significant discrepancies that exist in our understanding of the global carbon budget and, therefore, man's role in global climate change. The science measurement requirements for CO2 are extremely demanding (precision c .3%) No atmospheric chemical species has ever been measured from space with this precision. We are developing a novel application of a Fabry-Perot interferometer to detect spectral absorption of reflected sunlight by CO2 and O2 in the atmosphere. Preliminary design studies indicate that the method will be able to achieve the sensitivity and signal-to-noise required to measure column CO2 at the target specification. We are presently engaged in the construction of a prototype instrument for deployment on an aircraft to test the instrument performance and our ability to retrieve the data in the real atmosphere. In the first 6 months we have assembled a laboratory bench system to begin testing the optical and electronic components. We are also undertaking some measurements of signal and noise levels for actual sunlight reflecting from the ground. We shall present results from some of these ground based studies and discuss their implications for a space based system.

  13. Precision measurements of inclusive and differential Drell-Yan cross sections with the ATLAS detector

    CERN Document Server

    Camarda, Stefano; The ATLAS collaboration

    2016-01-01

    Measurements of the Drell-Yan production of W and Z/gamma* bosons at the LHC provide a benchmark of our understanding of perturbative QCD and probe the proton structure in a unique way. The measurements are compared to state-of-the-art calculations at NNLO in QCD. New 7 TeV measurements are performed for W and Z/gamma* bosons integrated and as a function of lepton rapidity and boson mass. Unprecedented precision is reached and strong constraints on parton distribution functions are found. First precise inclusive measurements of W and Z production at 13 TeV are presented. W/Z and W charge ratios profit from a cancellation of experimental uncertainties. The collaboration has also performed a measurement of ratios of the cross sections for the production of single Z bosons and top-quark pairs at various center-of-mass energies which exploit differences in the range of the probed parton momenta. The angular distributions of the Drell-Yan lepton pairs around the Z-boson mass peak probe the underlying QCD dynamic o...

  14. Ultrasonic scattering from a hemispherical pit theory and experimental measurement precision

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eason, Thomas J.; Bond, Leonard J.; Lozev, Mark G.

    2017-02-01

    The accuracy and precision of pulse-echo ultrasonic thickness measurement systems are influenced by systematic and environmental factors including the topographic profile of the back-wall surface. For the case of thickness measurement from the outside surface of a pipe, the back-wall surface can vary in roughness as a result of internal corrosion. A single corrosive pit can be geometrically represented by a hemisphere in a half-space to model the initiation point of rough surface corrosion, or to model isolated pitting degradation as is possible with naphthenic acid corrosion in oil refineries. The elastic wave scattering from a single hemispherical pit has been studied in the Non-Destructive Evaluation (NDE) community, as well as scattering from a hemispherical canyon in the seismology community for various incident and reflected wave angles, modes, and frequency ranges with both analytical and discretized numerical methods. This paper looks to first review recent scattering theory (developed in the seismology community) on a full frequency range analytical solution for a normal incident longitudinal wave at a normal reflection angle from a hemispherical canyon, and then extend this theory to NDE applications with the introduction of a new far-field scattering amplitude term. Next, a selection of new theoretical scattering amplitude solutions are presented along with semi-analytical simulation and experimental measurement results. Finally, a statistical methodology to determine thickness measurement accuracy and precision taking into consideration asymmetric measurement uncertainty is referenced.

  15. Testing THEMIS wave measurements against the cold plasma theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taubenschuss, Ulrich; Santolik, Ondrej; Le Contel, Olivier; Bonnell, John

    2016-04-01

    The THEMIS (Time History of Events and Macroscale Interactions during Substorms) mission records a multitude of electromagnetic waves inside Earth's magnetosphere and provides data in the form of high-resolution electric and magnetic waveforms. We use multi-component measurements of whistler mode waves and test them against the theory of wave propagation in a cold plasma. The measured ratio cB/E (c is speed of light in vacuum, B is magnetic wave amplitude, E is electric wave amplitude) is compared to the same quantity calculated from cold plasma theory over linearized Faraday's law. The aim of this study is to get estimates for measurement uncertainties, especially with regard to the electric field and the cold plasma density, as well as evaluating the validity of cold plasma theory inside Earth's radiation belts.

  16. Simulation of density measurements in plasma wakefields using photo acceleration

    CERN Document Server

    Kasim, Muhammad Firmansyah; Ceurvorst, Luke; Sadler, James; Burrows, Philip N; Trines, Raoul; Holloway, James; Wing, Matthew; Bingham, Robert; Norreys, Peter

    2015-01-01

    One obstacle in plasma accelerator development is the limitation of techniques to diagnose and measure plasma wakefield parameters. In this paper, we present a novel concept for the density measurement of a plasma wakefield using photon acceleration, supported by extensive particle in cell simulations of a laser pulse that copropagates with a wakefield. The technique can provide the perturbed electron density profile in the laser’s reference frame, averaged over the propagation length, to be accurate within 10%. We discuss the limitations that affect the measurement: small frequency changes, photon trapping, laser displacement, stimulated Raman scattering, and laser beam divergence. By considering these processes, one can determine the optimal parameters of the laser pulse and its propagation length. This new technique allows a characterization of the density perturbation within a plasma wakefield accelerator.

  17. Langmuir-Probe Measurements in Flowing-Afterglow Plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnsen, R.; Shunko, E. V.; Gougousi, T.; Golde, M. F.

    1994-01-01

    The validity of the orbital-motion theory for cylindrical Langmuir probes immersed in flowing- afterglow plasmas is investigated experimentally. It is found that the probe currents scale linearly with probe area only for electron-collecting but not for ion-collecting probes. In general, no agreement is found between the ion and electron densities derived from the probe currents. Measurements in recombining plasmas support the conclusion that only the electron densities derived from probe measurements can be trusted to be of acceptable accuracy. This paper also includes a brief derivation of the orbital-motion theory, a discussion of perturbations of the plasma by the probe current, and the interpretation of plasma velocities obtained from probe measurements.

  18. Precision measurements of the RSA method using a phantom model of hip prosthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mäkinen, Tatu J; Koort, Jyri K; Mattila, Kimmo T; Aro, Hannu T

    2004-04-01

    Radiostereometric analysis (RSA) has become one of the recommended techniques for pre-market evaluation of new joint implant designs. In this study we evaluated the effect of repositioning of X-ray tubes and phantom model on the precision of the RSA method. In precision measurements, we utilized mean error of rigid body fitting (ME) values as an internal control for examinations. ME value characterizes relative motion among the markers within each rigid body and is conventionally used to detect loosening of a bone marker. Three experiments, each consisting of 10 double examinations, were performed. In the first experiment, the X-ray tubes and the phantom model were not repositioned between one double examination. In experiments two and three, the X-ray tubes were repositioned between one double examination. In addition, the position of the phantom model was changed in experiment three. Results showed that significant differences could be found in 2 of 12 comparisons when evaluating the translation and rotation of the prosthetic components. Repositioning procedures increased ME values mimicking deformation of rigid body segments. Thus, ME value seemed to be a more sensitive parameter than migration values in this study design. These results confirmed the importance of standardized radiographic technique and accurate patient positioning for RSA measurements. Standardization and calibration procedures should be performed with phantom models in order to avoid unnecessary radiation dose of the patients. The present model gives the means to establish and to follow the intra-laboratory precision of the RSA method. The model is easily applicable in any research unit and allows the comparison of the precision values in different laboratories of multi-center trials.

  19. A Precision Measurement of the Neutron Spin Structure Functions Using a Polarized HE-3 Target

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, T

    2003-11-05

    This thesis describes a precision measurement of the neutron spin dependent structure function, g{sub 1}{sup n}(x). The measurement was made by the E154 collaboration at SLAC using a longitudinally polarized, 48.3 GeV electron beam, and a {sup 3}He target polarized by spin exchange with optically pumped rubidium. A target polarization as high as 50% was achieved. The elements of the experiment which pertain to the polarized {sup 3}He target will be described in detail in this thesis. To achieve a precision measurement, it has been necessary to minimize the systematic error from the uncertainty in the target parameters. All of the parameters of the target have been carefully measured, and the most important parameters of the target have been measured using multiple techniques. The polarization of the target was measured using nuclear magnetic resonance techniques, and has been calibrated using both proton NMR and by measuring the shift of the Rb Zeeman resonance frequency due to the {sup 3}He polarization. The fraction of events which originated in the {sup 3}He, as measured by the spectrometers, has been determined using a physical model of the target and the spectrometers. It was also measured during the experiment using a variable pressure {sup 3}He reference cell in place of the polarized {sup 3}He target. The spin dependent structure function g{sub 1}{sup n}(z) was measured in the Bjorken x range of 0.014 < x < 0.7 with an average Q{sup 2} of 5 (GeV/c){sup 2}. One of the primary motivations for this experiment was to test the Bjorken sum rule. Because the experiment had smaller statistical errors and a broader kinematic coverage than previous experiments, the behavior of the spin structure function g{sub 1}{sup n}(x) could be studied in detail at low values of the Bjorken scaling variable x. It was found that g{sub 1}{sup n}(x) has a strongly divergent behavior at low values of x, calling into question the methods commonly used to extrapolate the value of g

  20. A high sensitivity momentum flux measuring instrument for plasma thruster exhausts and diffusive plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    West, Michael D.; Charles, Christine; Boswell, Rod W. [Space Plasma, Power and Propulsion Group, Research School of Physics and Engineering, Australian National University, Canberra ACT 0200 (Australia)

    2009-05-15

    A high sensitivity momentum flux measuring instrument based on a compound pendulum has been developed for use with electric propulsion devices and radio frequency driven plasmas. A laser displacement system, which builds upon techniques used by the materials science community for surface stress measurements, is used to measure with high sensitivity the displacement of a target plate placed in a plasma thruster exhaust. The instrument has been installed inside a vacuum chamber and calibrated via two different methods and is able to measure forces in the range of 0.02-0.5 mN with a resolution of 15 {mu}N. Measurements have been made of the force produced from the cold gas flow and with a discharge ignited using argon propellant. The plasma is generated using a Helicon Double Layer Thruster prototype. The instrument target is placed about 1 mean free path for ion-neutral charge exchange collisions downstream of the thruster exit. At this position, the plasma consists of a low density ion beam (10%) and a much larger downstream component (90%). The results are in good agreement with those determined from the plasma parameters measured with diagnostic probes. Measurements at various flow rates show that variations in ion beam velocity and plasma density and the resulting momentum flux can be measured with this instrument. The instrument target is a simple, low cost device, and since the laser displacement system used is located outside the vacuum chamber, the measurement technique is free from radio frequency interference and thermal effects. It could be used to measure the thrust in the exhaust of other electric propulsion devices and the momentum flux of ion beams formed by expanding plasmas or fusion experiments.

  1. A high sensitivity momentum flux measuring instrument for plasma thruster exhausts and diffusive plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    West, Michael D.; Charles, Christine; Boswell, Rod W.

    2009-05-01

    A high sensitivity momentum flux measuring instrument based on a compound pendulum has been developed for use with electric propulsion devices and radio frequency driven plasmas. A laser displacement system, which builds upon techniques used by the materials science community for surface stress measurements, is used to measure with high sensitivity the displacement of a target plate placed in a plasma thruster exhaust. The instrument has been installed inside a vacuum chamber and calibrated via two different methods and is able to measure forces in the range of 0.02-0.5mN with a resolution of 15μN. Measurements have been made of the force produced from the cold gas flow and with a discharge ignited using argon propellant. The plasma is generated using a Helicon Double Layer Thruster prototype. The instrument target is placed about 1 mean free path for ion-neutral charge exchange collisions downstream of the thruster exit. At this position, the plasma consists of a low density ion beam (10%) and a much larger downstream component (90%). The results are in good agreement with those determined from the plasma parameters measured with diagnostic probes. Measurements at various flow rates show that variations in ion beam velocity and plasma density and the resulting momentum flux can be measured with this instrument. The instrument target is a simple, low cost device, and since the laser displacement system used is located outside the vacuum chamber, the measurement technique is free from radio frequency interference and thermal effects. It could be used to measure the thrust in the exhaust of other electric propulsion devices and the momentum flux of ion beams formed by expanding plasmas or fusion experiments.

  2. Electron reconstruction and electroweak processes as tools to achieve precision measurements at a hadron collider: From CDF to CMS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Giolo-Nicollerat, Anne-Sylvie [Univ. of Lausanne (Switzerland)

    2004-01-01

    Precision measurements are an important aspect of hadron colliders physics program. This thesis describes a method, together with a first application, of how to achieve and use precision measurements at the LHC. The idea is to use refernce processes to control the detector systematics and to constrain the theoretical predictions.

  3. Measurement of the Positive Muon Lifetime and Determination of the Fermi Constant to Part-per-Million Precision

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Webber, D. M.; Tishchenko, V.; Peng, Q.; Battu, S.; Carey, R. M.; Chitwood, D. B.; Crnkovic, J.; Debevec, P. T.; Dhamija, S.; Earle, W.; Gafarov, A.; Giovanetti, K.; Gorringe, T. P.; Gray, F. E.; Hartwig, Z.; Hertzog, D. W.; Johnson, B.; Kammel, P.; Kiburg, B.; Kizilgul, S.; Kunkle, J.; Lauss, B.; Logashenko, I.; Lynch, K. R.; McNabb, R.; Miller, J. P.; Mulhauser, F.; Onderwater, C. J. G.; Phillips, J.; Rath, S.; Roberts, B. L.; Winter, P.; Wolfe, B.

    2011-01-01

    We report a measurement of the positive muon lifetime to a precision of 1.0 ppm; it is the most precise particle lifetime ever measured. The experiment used a time-structured, low-energy muon beam and a segmented plastic scintillator array to record more than 2 X 10(12) decays. Two different stoppin

  4. Taking the Measure of the Universe : Precision Astrometry with SIM PlanetQuest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Unwin, Stephen C.; Shao, Michael; Tanner, Angelle M.; Allen, Ronald J.; Beichman, Charles A.; Boboltz, David; Catanzarite, Joseph H.; Chaboyer, Brian C.; Ciardi, David R.; Edberg, Stephen J.; Fey, Alan L.; Fischer, Debra A.; Gelino, Christopher R.; Gould, Andrew P.; Grillmair, Carl; Henry, Todd J.; Johnston, Kathryn V.; Johnston, Kenneth J.; Jones, Dayton L.; Kulkarni, Shrinivas R.; Law, Nicholas M.; Majewski, Steven R.; Makarov, Valeri V.; Marcy, Geoffrey W.; Meier, David L.

    2008-01-01

    Precision astrometry at microarcsecond accuracy has application to a wide range of astrophysical problems. This paper is a study of the science questions that can be addressed using an instrument with flexible scheduling that delivers parallaxes at about 4 microarcsec (microns)as) on targets as faint as V = 20, and differential accuracy of 0.6 (microns)as on bright targets. The science topics are drawn primarily from the Team Key Projects, selected in 2000, for the Space Interferometry Mission PlanetQuest (SIM PlanetQuest). We use the capabilities of this mission to illustrate the importance of the next level of astrometric precision in modern astrophysics. SIM PlanetQuest is currently in the detailed design phase, having completed in 2005 all of the enabling technologies needed for the flight instrument. It will be the first space-based long baseline Michelson interferometer designed for precision astrometry. SIM will contribute strongly to many astronomical fields including stellar and galactic astrophysics, planetary systems around nearby stars, and the study of quasar and AGN nuclei. Using differential astrometry SIM will search for planets with masses as small as an Earth orbiting in the 'habitable zone' around the nearest stars, and could discover many dozen if Earth-like planets are common. It will characterize the multiple-planet systems that are now known to exist, and it will be able to search for terrestrial planets around all of the candidate target stars in the Terrestrial Planet Finder and Darwin mission lists. It will be capable of detecting planets around young stars, thereby providing insights into how planetary systems are born and how they evolve with time. Precision astrometry allows the measurement of accurate dynamical masses for stars in binary systems. SIM will observe significant numbers of very high- and low-mass stars, providing stellar masses to 1%, the accuracy needed to challenge physical models. Using precision proper motion

  5. Precise Gravitational Tests via the SEE Mission: A Proposal for Space-Based Measurements

    CERN Document Server

    Sanders, Alvin J

    2010-01-01

    The objective of a SEE mission is to support development of unification theory by carrying out sensitive gravitational tests capable of determining whether various alternative theories are compatible with nature. Gravitation is a key "missing link" in unification theory. Nearly all unification theories incorporate gravity at a fundamental level, and therefore precise measurements of gravitational forces will place important constraints on unification theories. Ground-based gravitational measurements to the accuracy required are impossible due to the many sources of noise present in the terrestrial environment. The proposed space-based Satellite Energy Exchange (SEE) mission will measure several important parameters to an accuracy between 100 and 10,000 times better than current or planned measurement capabilities. It will test for time variation of the gravitational "constant" G and for violations of the weak equivalence principle (WEP) and the inverse-square-law (ISL), and it will determine G. It is well-kno...

  6. Femtosecond precision measurement of laser-rf phase jitter in a photocathode rf gun

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Libing; Zhao, Lingrong; Lu, Chao; Jiang, Tao; Liu, Shengguang; Wang, Rui; Zhu, Pengfei; Xiang, Dao

    2017-03-01

    We report on the measurement of the laser-rf phase jitter in a photocathode rf gun with femtosecond precision. In this experiment four laser pulses with equal separation are used to produce electron bunch trains; then the laser-rf phase jitter is obtained by measuring the variations of the electron bunch spacing with an rf deflector. Furthermore, we show that when the gun and the deflector are powered by the same rf source, it is possible to obtain the laser-rf phase jitter in the gun through measurement of the beam-rf phase jitter in the deflector. Based on these measurements, we propose an effective time-stamping method that may be applied in MeV ultrafast electron diffraction facilities to enhance the temporal resolution.

  7. A Lossless Differential Fourier-Transform Spectrometer for precision Sunyaev-Zel'dovich effect measurements

    CERN Document Server

    Schillaci, Alessandro; de Bernardis, Paolo; Masi, Silvia; Novaes, Camila Paiva; Gervasi, Massimo; Zannoni, Mario

    2014-01-01

    Precision measurements of the Sunyaev-Zel'dovich Effect (SZE) in clusters of galaxies require excellent rejection of common-mode signals and wide frequency coverage. We describe an imaging, lossless, differential Fourier Transform Spectrometer (FTS), optimized for measurements of faint brightness gradients at millimeter wavelengths. Our instrument is based on a Martin-Puplett Interferometer (MPI) configuration. We combine two MPIs working synchronously, in order to use the whole input power. In our implementation the observed sky field is divided in two halves along the meridian, and each half field corresponds to one of the two input ports of the MPI. In this way each detector in the FTS focal planes measures the difference in brightness between two sky pixels, symmetrically located with respect to the meridian. Exploiting the high common-mode rejection of the MPI we can measure small sky brightness gradients over a large isotropic background. The instrument works in the range $\\sim$ 1$\\div$20 cm$^{-1}$ (30$...

  8. The high precision measurement of the 144Ce activity in the SOX experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Noto, L.; Agostini, M.; Althenmüller, K.; Appel, S.; Bellini, G.; Benziger, J.; Berton, N.; Bick, D.; Bonfini, G.; Bravo—Berguño, D.; Caccianiga, B.; Calaprice, F.; Caminata, A.; Cavalcante, P.; Cereseto, R.; Chepurnov, A.; Choi, K.; Cribier, M.; DAngelo, D.; Davini, S.; Derbin, A.; Drachnev, I.; Durero, M.; Etenko, A.; Farinon, S.; Fischer, V.; Fomenko, K.; Franco, D.; Gabriele, F.; Gaffiot, J.; Galbiati, C.; Ghiano, C.; Giammarchi, M.; Göeger-Neff, M.; Goretti, A.; Gromov, M.; Hagner, C.; Houdy, Th; Hungerford, E.; Ianni, Aldo; Ianni, Andrea; Jonquères, N.; Jedrzejczak, K.; Kaiser, M.; Kobychev, V.; Korablev, D.; Korga, G.; Kornoukhov, V.; Kryn, D.; Lachenmaier, T.; Lasserre, T.; Laubenstein, M.; Lehnert, T.; Link, J.; Litvinovich, E.; Lombardi, F.; Lombardi, P.; Ludhova, L.; Lukyanchenko, G.; Machulin, I.; Manecki, S.; Maneschg, W.; Marcocci, S.; Maricic, J.; Mention, G.; Meroni, E.; Meyer, M.; Miramonti, L.; Misiaszek, M.; Montuschi, M.; Mosteiro, P.; Muratova, V.; Musenich, R.; Neumair, B.; Oberauer, L.; Obolensky, M.; Ortica, F.; Pallavicini, M.; Papp, L.; Perasso, L.; Pocar, A.; Ranucci, G.; Razeto, A.; Re, A.; Romani, A.; Roncin, R.; Rossi, C.; Rossi, N.; Schönert, S.; Scola, L.; Semenov, D.; Simgen, H.; Skorokhvatov, M.; Smirnov, O.; Sotnikov, A.; Sukhotin, S.; Suvorov, Y.; Tartaglia, R.; Testera, G.; Thurn, J.; Toropova, M.; Veyssière, C.; Vivier, M.; Unzhakov, E.; Vogelaar, R. B.; von Feilitzsch, F.; Wang, H.; Weinz, S.; Winter, J.; Wojcik, M.; Wurm, M.; Yokley, Z.; Zaimidoroga, O.; Zavatarelli, S.; Zuber, K.; Zuzel, G.

    2016-02-01

    In order to perform a resolutive measurement to clarify the neutrino anomalies and to observe possible short distance neutrino oscillations, the SOX (Short distance neutrino Oscillations with BoreXino) experiment is under construction. In the first phase, a 100 kCi 144Ce-144Pr antineutrino source will be placed under the Borexino detector at the Laboratori Nazionali del Gran Sasso (LNGS), in center of Italy, and the rate measurement of the antineutrino events, observed by the very low radioactive background Borexino detector, will be compared with the high precision (< 1%) activity measurement performed by two calorimeters. The source will be embedded in a 19 mm thick tungsten alloy shield and both the calorimeters have been conceived for measuring the thermal heat absorbed by a water flow. In this report the design of the calorimeters will be described in detail and very preliminary results will be also shown.

  9. Precision Measurement of the Casimir Force for Au Using a Dynamic Afm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, C.-C.; Banishev, A. A.; Castillo-Garza, R.; Klimchitskaya, G. L.; Mostepanenko, V. M.; Mohideen, U.

    2012-07-01

    The gradient of the Casimir force between carefully cleaned Au surfaces of a sphere and a plate is measured using a dynamic atomic force microscope in the frequency modulation regime in high vacuum. The electrostatic calibration of the setup did not reveal any effect of patches or surface contaminants. The experimental data for the force gradient are found to be consistent with theory using the plasma model approach over the entire measurement range. The Drude model approach is excluded by the data at separations from 235 to 400 nm at a 67% confidence level.

  10. Precision measurement of the D$_{s}^{*+}$ - D$_{s}^{+}$ mass difference

    CERN Document Server

    Cornell Univ. Ithaca

    1994-01-01

    We have measured the vector-pseudoscalar mass splitting M(D.sub(s).sup(*+))- M(D.sub(s).sup(+)) =144.22\\pm 0.47\\pm 0.37 MeV, significantly more precise than the previous world average. We minimize the systematic errors by also measuring the vector-pseudoscalar mass difference M(D^{*0})-M(D^0) using the radiative decay D^{*0}\\rightarrow D^0\\gamma, obtaining [M(D_s^{*+})-M(D_s^+)]- [M(D^{*0})-M(D^0)] = 2.09\\pm 0.47\\pm 0.37 MeV. This is then combined with our previous high-precision measurement of M(D^{*0})-M(D^0), which used the decay D^{*0}\\rightarrow D^0\\pi^0. We also measure the mass difference M(D_s^+)-M(D^+)=99.5\\pm 0.6\\pm 0.3 MeV, using the \\phi\\pi^+ decay modes of the D_s^+ and D^+ mesons. hardcopies with figures can be obtained upon written request to: Pam Morehouse preprint secretary Newman Lab Cornell University Ithaca, NY 14853 or by sending mail to: preprints@lns62.lns.cornell.edu

  11. Precision Measurement of {eta} --> {gamma} {gamma} Decay Width via the Primakoff Effect

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gan, Liping Gin [University of North Carolina at Wilmington, JLAB

    2013-08-01

    A precision measurement of the {eta} --> {gamma} {gamma} decay width via the Primakoff effect is underway in Hall D at Jefferson Lab. The decay width will be extracted from measured differential cross sections at forward angles on two light targets, liquid hydrogen and 4He, using a 11.5 GeV tagged photon beam. Results of this experiment will not only potentially resolve a long standing discrepancy between the Primakoff and the collider measurements, but will also reduce the experimental uncertainty by a factor of two on the average value of previous experimental results listed by the Particle Data Group(PDG). It will directly improve all other eta partial decay widths which rely on the accuracy of the eta radiative decay width. The projected 3% precision on the {Gamma}({eta} --> {gamma} {gamma} ) measurement will have a significant impact on the experimental determination of the fundamental parameters in QCD, such as the ratio of light quark masses (m{sub u},m{sub d},m{sub s}) and the {eta} - {eta}' mixing angle. It will be a sensitive probe for understanding QCD symmetries and the origin and the dynamics of QCD symmetry breaking.

  12. Calorimeters for precision power dissipation measurements on controlled-temperature superconducting radiofrequency samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, B P; Reece, C E; Phillips, H L; Kelley, M J

    2012-12-01

    Two calorimeters, with stainless steel and Cu as the thermal path material for high precision and high power versions, respectively, have been designed and commissioned for the 7.5 GHz surface impedance characterization system at Jefferson Lab to provide low temperature control and measurement for CW power up to 22 W on a 5 cm diameter disk sample which is thermally isolated from the radiofrequency (RF) portion of the system. A power compensation method has been developed to measure the RF induced power on the sample. Simulation and experimental results show that with these two calorimeters, the whole thermal range of interest for superconducting radiofrequency materials has been covered. The power measurement error in the interested power range is within 1.2% and 2.7% for the high precision and high power versions, respectively. Temperature distributions on the sample surface for both versions have been simulated and the accuracy of sample temperature measurements have been analyzed. Both versions have the ability to accept bulk superconductors and thin film superconducting samples with a variety of substrate materials such as Al, Al(2)O(3), Cu, MgO, Nb, and Si.

  13. Optical measurements of phase steps in segmented mirrors - fundamental precision limits

    CERN Document Server

    Noethe, L

    2006-01-01

    Phase steps are an important type of wavefront aberrations generated by large telescopes with segmented mirrors. In a closed-loop correction cycle these phase steps have to be measured with the highest possible precision using natural reference stars, that is with a small number of photons. In this paper the classical Fisher information of statistics is used for calculating the Cramer-Rao bound, which determines the limit to the precision with which the height of the steps can be estimated in an unbiased fashion with a given number of photons and a given measuring device. Four types of measurement devices are discussed: a Shack-Hartmann sensor with one small cylindrical lenslet covering a sub-aperture centred over a border, a modified Mach-Zehnder interferometer, a Foucault test, and a curvature sensor. The Cramer-Rao bound is calculated for all sensors under ideal conditions, that is narrowband measurements without additional noise or disturbances apart from the photon shot noise. This limit is compared with...

  14. Towards high-precision mass measurements of neutron-rich fission products at TRIGA-SPEC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nagy, Szilard [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Kernphysik, Heidelberg (Germany); GSI Helmholtzzentrum fuer Schwerionenforschung GmbH, Darmstadt (Germany)

    2010-07-01

    TRIGA-TRAP, the only Penning trap mass spectrometer worldwide at a nuclear research reactor, is installed at TRIGA Mainz as part of the TRIGA-SPEC experiment. The scientific goal is to perform high-precision mass measurements on lanthanoids, actinoids and neutron-rich fission products produced by thermal neutron induced fission of a target inside the reactor. High-precision mass data are scarce in this region of the nuclear chart, and further experimental data are needed for nuclear structure studies of heavy elements, to test the predictive power of nuclear mass models, or as input to nucle