WorldWideScience

Sample records for plasma precision measurements

  1. Precise Charge Measurement For Laser Plasma Accelerators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakamura, Kei; Gonsalves, Anthony; Lin, Chen; Sokollik, Thomas; Shiraishi, Satomi; van Tilborg, Jeroen; Osterhoff, Jens; Donahue, Rich; Rodgers, David; Smith, Alan; Byrne, Warren; Leemans, Wim

    2011-01-01

    Cross-calibrations of charge diagnostics are conducted to verify their validity for measuring electron beams produced by laser plasma accelerators (LPAs). Employed diagnostics are a scintillating screen, activation based measurement, and integrating current transformer. The diagnostics agreed within ±8 %, showing that they can provide accurate charge measurements for LPAs provided they are used properly.

  2. Sensitive method for precise measurement of endogenous angiotensins I, II and III in human plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawamura, M.; Yoshida, K.; Akabane, S.

    1987-01-01

    We measured endogenous angiotensins (ANGs) I, IIandIII using a system of extraction by Sep-Pak column followed by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) combined with radioimmunoassay (RIA). An excellent separation of ANGs was obtained by HPLC. The recovery of ANGs I, IIandIII was 80-84%, when these authentic peptides were added to 6 ml of plasma. The coefficient of variation of the ANGs was 0.04-0.09 for intra-assay and 0.08-0.13 for inter-assay, thereby indicating a good reproducibility. Plasma ANGs I, IIandIII measured by this method in 5 normal volunteers were 51,4.5 and 1.2 pg/ml. In the presence of captopril, ANGs IIandIII decreased by 84% and 77%, respectively, while ANG I increased 5.1 times. This method is therefore useful to assess the precise levels of plasma ANGs

  3. High-precision lead isotope ratio measurement by inductively coupled plasma multiple collector mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Walder, A.J.; Furuta, Naoki.

    1993-01-01

    An inductively coupled plasma (ICP) ion source coupled to a magnetic sector mass analyser equipped with seven Faraday detectors has been used to measure the lead isotope ratios in solutions of Sanshiro Pond sediment collected at the University of Tokyo, airborne particulates collected at Shinjuku in Tokyo and Merck multielement standard product number 97279494. A thallium correction technique was utilized to allow a simultaneous correction for mass bias. This work followed an earlier interlaboratory comparison study of the above-mentioned solutions using ICP quadrupole mass spectrometry, and has demonstrated a considerable improvement in analytical precision. The following isotope ratio measurements were recorded. Pond sediment solution containing 82 ng ml -1 lead: 206 Pb/ 204 Pb=17.762±0.014; 206 Pb/ 207 Pb=1.1424±0.0009; 208 Pb/ 204 Pb=37.678±0.034. Airborne particulate solution containing 45 ng ml -1 lead: 206 Pb/ 204 Pb=17.969±0.006; 206 Pb/ 207 Pb=1.1528±0.0003; 208 Pb/ 204 Pb=37.915±0.021. Merck multielement standard solution containing 100 ng ml -1 lead: 206 Pb/ 204 Pb=19.255±0.015; 206 Pb/ 207 Pb=1.2238±0.0004; 208 Pb/ 204 Pb=38.476±0.021 (All errors are given as ±2 standard deviations). (author)

  4. Pb and Sr isotope measurements by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometer: efficient time management for precision improvement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monna, F.; Loizeau, J.-L.; Thomas, B. A.; Guéguen, C.; Favarger, P.-Y.

    1998-08-01

    One of the factors limiting the precision of inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry is the counting statistics, which depend upon acquisition time and ion fluxes. In the present study, the precision of the isotopic measurements of Pb and Sr is examined. The time of measurement is optimally shared for each isotope, using a mathematical simulation, to provide the lowest theoretical analytical error. Different algorithms of mass bias correction are also taken into account and evaluated in term of improvement of overall precision. Several experiments allow a comparison of real conditions with theory. The present method significantly improves the precision, regardless of the instrument used. However, this benefit is more important for equipment which originally yields a precision close to that predicted by counting statistics. Additionally, the procedure is flexible enough to be easily adapted to other problems, such as isotopic dilution.

  5. The newest precision measurement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Jing Gu; Lee, Jong Dae

    1974-05-01

    This book introduces basic of precision measurement, measurement of length, limit gauge, measurement of angles, measurement of surface roughness, measurement of shapes and locations, measurement of outline, measurement of external and internal thread, gear testing, accuracy inspection of machine tools, three dimension coordinate measuring machine, digitalisation of precision measurement, automation of precision measurement, measurement of cutting tools, measurement using laser, and point of choosing length measuring instrument.

  6. Practical precision measurement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kwak, Ho Chan; Lee, Hui Jun

    1999-01-01

    This book introduces basic knowledge of precision measurement, measurement of length, precision measurement of minor diameter, measurement of angles, measurement of surface roughness, three dimensional measurement, measurement of locations and shapes, measurement of screw, gear testing, cutting tools testing, rolling bearing testing, and measurement of digitalisation. It covers height gauge, how to test surface roughness, measurement of plan and straightness, external and internal thread testing, gear tooth measurement, milling cutter, tab, rotation precision measurement, and optical transducer.

  7. High precision wavelength measurements of X-ray lines emitted from TS-Tokamak plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Platz, P. [Association Euratom-CEA, Centre d`Etudes de Cadarache, 13 - Saint-Paul-lez-Durance (France). Dept. de Recherches sur la Fusion Controlee; Cornille, M.; Dubau, J. [Observatoire de Paris, 92 - Meudon (France)

    1996-01-01

    X-ray line spectra from highly charged impurity ions have been taken with a high-resolution Bragg-crystal spectrometer on the Tore Supra (TS) tokamak. By cross-checking the wavelengths of reference lines from the heliumlike ions Ti20 + (2.6 Angstroms) and Ar16 + (3.95 Angstroms) we first demonstrate that it is possible to measure wavelengths with a precision, {lambda}/{delta}{lambda}, of better than 50000. We than determine the wavelengths of n=3 to n=2 transitions of neonlike Ag37+ in the 4 Angstroms spectral range. (authors). 16 refs., 7 figs., 3 tabs.

  8. Development of precise measurement method of neutron energy for plasma temperature diagnostics in thermonuclear fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mori, Chizuo; Gotoh, Junichi; Uritani, Akira; Miyahara, Hiroshi; Ikeda, Yuichiro; Kasugai, Yoshimi; Kaneko, Junichi

    1998-01-01

    There are many types of fast neutron spectrometers for plasma temperature diagnostics, 28 Si(n,α) 25 Mg reaction giving the energy resolution of 2.2% for 14 MeV neutrons, the 12 C(n,α) 9 Be reaction giving the resolution of 2.15%. These detectors, however suffer from radiation damage, which demands to exchange the detector to a new one in every a few month depending on the usage. Recoil proton method has also been developed by using liquid scintillator or plastic scintillator, as a neutron-to-proton converter in front of a Si-detector, which is called counter telescope type, giving a resolution of 4.0%. This type of spectrometer can reduce radiation damage by placing Si-detector at outside Neutron beam. The scintillator can measure the lost energy of protons in the converter (i.e. the scintillator) and the measured energy loss can be used for improving the energy resolution. However, the energy resolution of organic scintillator itself is generally not so good. We proposed to use a proportional counter with CH 4 as counting gas and also as a neutron-proton converter, which has far better energy resolution than plastic scintillators, although the time resolution of counting in proportional counters is generally inferior to that in organic scintillation counters. The characteristics of the new spectrometer were experimentally studied and also were simulated with analytical calculation. (author)

  9. High precision measurement of fuel density profiles in nuclear fusion plasmas

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Svensson, J.; von Hellermann, M.; Konig, R.

    2002-01-01

    This paper presents a method for deducing fuel density profiles of nuclear fusion plasmas in realtime during an experiment. A Multi Layer Perceptron (MLP) neural network is used to create a mapping between plasma radiation spectra and indirectly deduced hydrogen isotope densities. By combining

  10. High-precision measurement of variations in calcium isotope ratios in urine by multiple collector inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, J.L.L.; Gordon, G.W.; Arrua, R.C.; Skulan, J.L.; Anbar, A.D.; Bullen, T.D.

    2011-01-01

    We describe a new chemical separation method to isolate Ca from other matrix elements in biological samples, developed with the long-term goal of making high-precision measurement of natural stable Ca isotope variations a clinically applicable tool to assess bone mineral balance. A new two-column procedure utilizing HBr achieves the purity required to accurately and precisely measure two Ca isotope ratios (44Ca/42Ca and 44Ca/43Ca) on a Neptune multiple collector inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometer (MC-ICPMS) in urine. Purification requirements for Sr, Ti, and K (Ca/Sr > 10000; Ca/Ti > 10000000; and Ca/K > 10) were determined by addition of these elements to Ca standards of known isotopic composition. Accuracy was determined by (1) comparing Ca isotope results for samples and standards to published data obtained using thermal ionization mass spectrometry (TIMS), (2) adding a Ca standard of known isotopic composition to a urine sample purified of Ca, and (3) analyzing mixtures of urine samples and standards in varying proportions. The accuracy and precision of δ44/42Ca measurements of purified samples containing 25 μg of Ca can be determined with typical errors less than ±0.2‰ (2σ).

  11. Precise measurements of neutral gas temperature using Fiber Bragg Grating sensor in Argon capacitively coupled plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Daoman; Liu, Zigeng; Liu, Yongxin; Peng, Wei; Wang, Younian

    2016-09-01

    Neutral gas temperature was measured using Fiber Bragg Grating sensor (FBGs) in capacitively coupled argon plasmas. Thermometry is based on the thermal equilibrium between the sensor and neutral gases, which is found to become faster with increasing pressure. It is also observed that the neutral gas temperature is higher than the room temperature by 10 120 °depending on the experiental conditions, and gas temperature shows significant non-uniformity in space. In addition, radial profiles of neutral temperature at different pressures, resemble these of ion density, obtained by a floating double probe. Specifically, at low pressure, neutral gas temperature and ion density peak at the center of the reactor, while the peak appears at the edge of the electrode at higher pressure. The neutral gas heating is mainly caused by the elastic collisions of Ar + with neutral gas atoms in the sheath region after Ar + gaining a certain energy. This work was supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (NSFC) (Grants No. 11335004, 11405018, and 61137005).

  12. Precision electroweak measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Demarteau, M.

    1996-11-01

    Recent electroweak precision measurements fro e + e - and p anti p colliders are presented. Some emphasis is placed on the recent developments in the heavy flavor sector. The measurements are compared to predictions from the Standard Model of electroweak interactions. All results are found to be consistent with the Standard Model. The indirect constraint on the top quark mass from all measurements is in excellent agreement with the direct m t measurements. Using the world's electroweak data in conjunction with the current measurement of the top quark mass, the constraints on the Higgs' mass are discussed

  13. Precision lifetime measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanner, C.E.

    1994-01-01

    Precision measurements of atomic lifetimes provide important information necessary for testing atomic theory. The authors employ resonant laser excitation of a fast atomic beam to measure excited state lifetimes by observing the decay-in-flight of the emitted fluorescence. A similar technique was used by Gaupp, et al., who reported measurements with precisions of less than 0.2%. Their program includes lifetime measurements of the low lying p states in alkali and alkali like systems. Motivation for this work comes from a need to test the atomic many-body-perturbation theory (MBPT) that is necessary for interpretation of parity nonconservation experiments in atomic cesium. The authors have measured the cesium 6p 2 P 1/2 and 6p 2 P 3/2 state lifetimes to be 34.934±0.094 ns and 30.499±0.070 ns respectively. With minor changes to the apparatus, they have extended their measurements to include the lithium 2p 2 P 1/2 and 2p 2 P 3/2 states

  14. Precision measurements in supersymmetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feng, Johnathan Lee [Stanford Univ., CA (United States)

    1995-05-01

    Supersymmetry is a promising framework in which to explore extensions of the standard model. If candidates for supersymmetric particles are found, precision measurements of their properties will then be of paramount importance. The prospects for such measurements and their implications are the subject of this thesis. If charginos are produced at the LEP II collider, they are likely to be one of the few available supersymmetric signals for many years. The author considers the possibility of determining fundamental supersymmetry parameters in such a scenario. The study is complicated by the dependence of observables on a large number of these parameters. He proposes a straightforward procedure for disentangling these dependences and demonstrate its effectiveness by presenting a number of case studies at representative points in parameter space. In addition to determining the properties of supersymmetric particles, precision measurements may also be used to establish that newly-discovered particles are, in fact, supersymmetric. Supersymmetry predicts quantitative relations among the couplings and masses of superparticles. The author discusses tests of such relations at a future e{sup +}e{sup {minus}} linear collider, using measurements that exploit the availability of polarizable beams. Stringent tests of supersymmetry from chargino production are demonstrated in two representative cases, and fermion and neutralino processes are also discussed.

  15. MEASUREMENT AND PRECISION, EXPERIMENTAL VERSION.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harvard Univ., Cambridge, MA. Harvard Project Physics.

    THIS DOCUMENT IS AN EXPERIMENTAL VERSION OF A PROGRAMED TEXT ON MEASUREMENT AND PRECISION. PART I CONTAINS 24 FRAMES DEALING WITH PRECISION AND SIGNIFICANT FIGURES ENCOUNTERED IN VARIOUS MATHEMATICAL COMPUTATIONS AND MEASUREMENTS. PART II BEGINS WITH A BRIEF SECTION ON EXPERIMENTAL DATA, COVERING SUCH POINTS AS (1) ESTABLISHING THE ZERO POINT, (2)…

  16. Specifications for trueness and precision of a reference measurement system for serum/plasma 25-hydroxyvitamin D analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stöckl, Dietmar; Sluss, Patrick M; Thienpont, Linda M

    2009-10-01

    The divergence in analytical quality of serum/plasma 25-hydroxy-vitamin D analysis calls for defining specifications for a reference measurement system. Fundamentally, in a reference measurement system, there should be a relationship between the analytical specifications for higher- (reference) and lower-order (routine) measurements. Therefore, when setting specifications, we started with limits for routine imprecision (CV(rou)) and bias (B(rou)) using 4 models: (1) the misclassifications in diagnosis, (2) biological variation data (reference interval (RI) and monitoring), (3) expert recommendations, and (4) state-of-the-art performance. Then, we used the derived goals to tailor those for reference measurements and certified reference materials (CRMs) for calibration by setting the limits for CV(ref) at 0.5 CV(rou), B(ref) at 0.33 B(rou)(,) max. uncertainty (U(max)) at 0.33 B(ref). The established specifications ranged between CV(rou)model 3) and CV(rou)model 2, monitoring). Model 2 (monitoring) gave the most stringent goals, model 3, the most liberal ones. Accounting for state-of-the-art performance and certification capabilities, we used model 2 (RI) to recommend achievable goals: for routine testing, CV(rou)measurements, CV(ref)

  17. Precision measurement with atom interferometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Jin

    2015-01-01

    Development of atom interferometry and its application in precision measurement are reviewed in this paper. The principle, features and the implementation of atom interferometers are introduced, the recent progress of precision measurement with atom interferometry, including determination of gravitational constant and fine structure constant, measurement of gravity, gravity gradient and rotation, test of weak equivalence principle, proposal of gravitational wave detection, and measurement of quadratic Zeeman shift are reviewed in detail. Determination of gravitational redshift, new definition of kilogram, and measurement of weak force with atom interferometry are also briefly introduced. (topical review)

  18. Multi-site assessment of the precision and reproducibility of multiple reaction monitoring–based measurements of proteins in plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Addona, Terri A; Abbatiello, Susan E; Schilling, Birgit; Skates, Steven J; Mani, D R; Bunk, David M; Spiegelman, Clifford H; Zimmerman, Lisa J; Ham, Amy-Joan L; Keshishian, Hasmik; Hall, Steven C; Allen, Simon; Blackman, Ronald K; Borchers, Christoph H; Buck, Charles; Cardasis, Helene L; Cusack, Michael P; Dodder, Nathan G; Gibson, Bradford W; Held, Jason M; Hiltke, Tara; Jackson, Angela; Johansen, Eric B; Kinsinger, Christopher R; Li, Jing; Mesri, Mehdi; Neubert, Thomas A; Niles, Richard K; Pulsipher, Trenton C; Ransohoff, David; Rodriguez, Henry; Rudnick, Paul A; Smith, Derek; Tabb, David L; Tegeler, Tony J; Variyath, Asokan M; Vega-Montoto, Lorenzo J; Wahlander, Åsa; Waldemarson, Sofia; Wang, Mu; Whiteaker, Jeffrey R; Zhao, Lei; Anderson, N Leigh; Fisher, Susan J; Liebler, Daniel C; Paulovich, Amanda G; Regnier, Fred E; Tempst, Paul; Carr, Steven A

    2010-01-01

    Verification of candidate biomarkers relies upon specific, quantitative assays optimized for selective detection of target proteins, and is increasingly viewed as a critical step in the discovery pipeline that bridges unbiased biomarker discovery to preclinical validation. Although individual laboratories have demonstrated that multiple reaction monitoring (MRM) coupled with isotope dilution mass spectrometry can quantify candidate protein biomarkers in plasma, reproducibility and transferability of these assays between laboratories have not been demonstrated. We describe a multilaboratory study to assess reproducibility, recovery, linear dynamic range and limits of detection and quantification of multiplexed, MRM-based assays, conducted by NCI-CPTAC. Using common materials and standardized protocols, we demonstrate that these assays can be highly reproducible within and across laboratories and instrument platforms, and are sensitive to low µg/ml protein concentrations in unfractionated plasma. We provide data and benchmarks against which individual laboratories can compare their performance and evaluate new technologies for biomarker verification in plasma. PMID:19561596

  19. Precision measurements of electroweak parameters

    CERN Document Server

    Savin, Alexander

    2017-01-01

    A set of selected precise measurements of the SM parameters from the LHC experiments is discussed. Results on W-mass measurement and forward-backward asymmetry in production of the Drell--Yan events in both dielectron and dimuon decay channels are presented together with results on the effective mixing angle measurements. Electroweak production of the vector bosons in association with two jets is discussed.

  20. Proton gyromagnetic precision measurement system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhu Deming; Deming Zhu

    1991-01-01

    A computerized control and measurement system used in the proton gyromagnetic precision meausrement is descirbed. It adopts the CAMAC data acquisition equipment, using on-line control and analysis with the HP85 and PDP-11/60 computer systems. It also adopts the RSX11M computer operation system, and the control software is written in FORTRAN language

  1. Environment-assisted precision measurement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Goldstein, G.; Cappellaro, P.; Maze, J. R.

    2011-01-01

    We describe a method to enhance the sensitivity of precision measurements that takes advantage of the environment of a quantum sensor to amplify the response of the sensor to weak external perturbations. An individual qubit is used to sense the dynamics of surrounding ancillary qubits, which...... are in turn affected by the external field to be measured. The resulting sensitivity enhancement is determined by the number of ancillas that are coupled strongly to the sensor qubit; it does not depend on the exact values of the coupling strengths and is resilient to many forms of decoherence. The method...... achieves nearly Heisenberg-limited precision measurement, using a novel class of entangled states. We discuss specific applications to improve clock sensitivity using trapped ions and magnetic sensing based on electronic spins in diamond...

  2. Electroweak precision measurements in CMS

    CERN Document Server

    Dordevic, Milos

    2017-01-01

    An overview of recent results on electroweak precision measurements from the CMS Collaboration is presented. Studies of the weak boson differential transverse momentum spectra, Z boson angular coefficients, forward-backward asymmetry of Drell-Yan lepton pairs and charge asymmetry of W boson production are made in comparison to the state-of-the-art Monte Carlo generators and theoretical predictions. The results show a good agreement with the Standard Model. As a proof of principle for future W mass measurements, a W-like analysis of the Z boson mass is performed.

  3. Precision luminosity measurements at LHCb

    CERN Document Server

    Aaij, Roel; Adinolfi, Marco; Affolder, Anthony; Ajaltouni, Ziad; Akar, Simon; Albrecht, Johannes; Alessio, Federico; Alexander, Michael; Ali, Suvayu; Alkhazov, Georgy; Alvarez Cartelle, Paula; Alves Jr, Antonio Augusto; Amato, Sandra; Amerio, Silvia; Amhis, Yasmine; An, Liupan; Anderlini, Lucio; Anderson, Jonathan; Andreassen, Rolf; Andreotti, Mirco; Andrews, Jason; Appleby, Robert; Aquines Gutierrez, Osvaldo; Archilli, Flavio; Artamonov, Alexander; Artuso, Marina; Aslanides, Elie; Auriemma, Giulio; Baalouch, Marouen; Bachmann, Sebastian; Back, John; Badalov, Alexey; Baesso, Clarissa; Baldini, Wander; Barlow, Roger; Barschel, Colin; Barsuk, Sergey; Barter, William; Batozskaya, Varvara; Battista, Vincenzo; Bay, Aurelio; Beaucourt, Leo; Beddow, John; Bedeschi, Franco; Bediaga, Ignacio; Belogurov, Sergey; Belous, Konstantin; Belyaev, Ivan; Ben-Haim, Eli; Bencivenni, Giovanni; Benson, Sean; Benton, Jack; Berezhnoy, Alexander; Bernet, Roland; Bettler, Marc-Olivier; van Beuzekom, Martinus; Bien, Alexander; Bifani, Simone; Bird, Thomas; Bizzeti, Andrea; Bjørnstad, Pål Marius; Blake, Thomas; Blanc, Frédéric; Blouw, Johan; Blusk, Steven; Bocci, Valerio; Bondar, Alexander; Bondar, Nikolay; Bonivento, Walter; Borghi, Silvia; Borgia, Alessandra; Borsato, Martino; Bowcock, Themistocles; Bowen, Espen Eie; Bozzi, Concezio; Brambach, Tobias; Bressieux, Joël; Brett, David; Britsch, Markward; Britton, Thomas; Brodzicka, Jolanta; Brook, Nicholas; Brown, Henry; Bursche, Albert; Buytaert, Jan; Cadeddu, Sandro; Calabrese, Roberto; Calvi, Marta; Calvo Gomez, Miriam; Campana, Pierluigi; Campora Perez, Daniel; Carbone, Angelo; Carboni, Giovanni; Cardinale, Roberta; Cardini, Alessandro; Carson, Laurence; Carvalho Akiba, Kazuyoshi; Casse, Gianluigi; Cassina, Lorenzo; Castillo Garcia, Lucia; Cattaneo, Marco; Cauet, Christophe; Cenci, Riccardo; Charles, Matthew; Charpentier, Philippe; Chefdeville, Maximilien; Chen, Shanzhen; Cheung, Shu-Faye; Chiapolini, Nicola; Chrzaszcz, Marcin; Ciba, Krzystof; Cid Vidal, Xabier; Ciezarek, Gregory; Clarke, Peter; Clemencic, Marco; Cliff, Harry; Closier, Joel; Coco, Victor; Cogan, Julien; Cogneras, Eric; Cojocariu, Lucian; Collazuol, Gianmaria; Collins, Paula; Comerma-Montells, Albert; Contu, Andrea; Cook, Andrew; Coombes, Matthew; Coquereau, Samuel; Corti, Gloria; Corvo, Marco; Counts, Ian; Couturier, Benjamin; Cowan, Greig; Craik, Daniel Charles; Cruz Torres, Melissa Maria; Cunliffe, Samuel; Currie, Robert; D'Ambrosio, Carmelo; Dalseno, Jeremy; David, Pascal; David, Pieter; Davis, Adam; De Bruyn, Kristof; De Capua, Stefano; De Cian, Michel; De Miranda, Jussara; De Paula, Leandro; De Silva, Weeraddana; De Simone, Patrizia; Dean, Cameron Thomas; Decamp, Daniel; Deckenhoff, Mirko; Del Buono, Luigi; Déléage, Nicolas; Derkach, Denis; Deschamps, Olivier; Dettori, Francesco; Di Canto, Angelo; Dijkstra, Hans; Donleavy, Stephanie; Dordei, Francesca; Dorigo, Mirco; Dosil Suárez, Alvaro; Dossett, David; Dovbnya, Anatoliy; Dreimanis, Karlis; Dujany, Giulio; Dupertuis, Frederic; Durante, Paolo; Dzhelyadin, Rustem; Dziurda, Agnieszka; Dzyuba, Alexey; Easo, Sajan; Egede, Ulrik; Egorychev, Victor; Eidelman, Semen; Eisenhardt, Stephan; Eitschberger, Ulrich; Ekelhof, Robert; Eklund, Lars; El Rifai, Ibrahim; Elsasser, Christian; Ely, Scott; Esen, Sevda; Evans, Hannah Mary; Evans, Timothy; Falabella, Antonio; Färber, Christian; Farinelli, Chiara; Farley, Nathanael; Farry, Stephen; Fay, Robert; Ferguson, Dianne; Fernandez Albor, Victor; Ferreira Rodrigues, Fernando; Ferro-Luzzi, Massimiliano; Filippov, Sergey; Fiore, Marco; Fiorini, Massimiliano; Firlej, Miroslaw; Fitzpatrick, Conor; Fiutowski, Tomasz; Fol, Philip; Fontana, Marianna; Fontanelli, Flavio; Forty, Roger; Francisco, Oscar; Frank, Markus; Frei, Christoph; Frosini, Maddalena; Fu, Jinlin; Furfaro, Emiliano; Gallas Torreira, Abraham; Galli, Domenico; Gallorini, Stefano; Gambetta, Silvia; Gandelman, Miriam; Gandini, Paolo; Gao, Yuanning; García Pardiñas, Julián; Garofoli, Justin; Garra Tico, Jordi; Garrido, Lluis; Gascon, David; Gaspar, Clara; Gauld, Rhorry; Gavardi, Laura; Geraci, Angelo; Gersabeck, Evelina; Gersabeck, Marco; Gershon, Timothy; Ghez, Philippe; Gianelle, Alessio; Gianì, Sebastiana; Gibson, Valerie; Giubega, Lavinia-Helena; Gligorov, V.V.; Göbel, Carla; Golubkov, Dmitry; Golutvin, Andrey; Gomes, Alvaro; Gotti, Claudio; Grabalosa Gándara, Marc; Graciani Diaz, Ricardo; Granado Cardoso, Luis Alberto; Graugés, Eugeni; Graziani, Giacomo; Grecu, Alexandru; Greening, Edward; Gregson, Sam; Griffith, Peter; Grillo, Lucia; Grünberg, Oliver; Gui, Bin; Gushchin, Evgeny; Guz, Yury; Gys, Thierry; Hadjivasiliou, Christos; Haefeli, Guido; Haen, Christophe; Haines, Susan; Hall, Samuel; Hamilton, Brian; Hampson, Thomas; Han, Xiaoxue; Hansmann-Menzemer, Stephanie; Harnew, Neville; Harnew, Samuel; Harrison, Jonathan; He, Jibo; Head, Timothy; Heijne, Veerle; Hennessy, Karol; Henrard, Pierre; Henry, Louis; Hernando Morata, Jose Angel; van Herwijnen, Eric; Heß, Miriam; Hicheur, Adlène; Hill, Donal; Hoballah, Mostafa; Hombach, Christoph; Hulsbergen, Wouter; Hunt, Philip; Hussain, Nazim; Hutchcroft, David; Hynds, Daniel; Idzik, Marek; Ilten, Philip; Jacobsson, Richard; Jaeger, Andreas; Jalocha, Pawel; Jans, Eddy; Jaton, Pierre; Jawahery, Abolhassan; Jing, Fanfan; John, Malcolm; Johnson, Daniel; Jones, Christopher; Joram, Christian; Jost, Beat; Jurik, Nathan; Kandybei, Sergii; Kanso, Walaa; Karacson, Matthias; Karbach, Moritz; Karodia, Sarah; Kelsey, Matthew; Kenyon, Ian; Ketel, Tjeerd; Khanji, Basem; Khurewathanakul, Chitsanu; Klaver, Suzanne; Klimaszewski, Konrad; Kochebina, Olga; Kolpin, Michael; Komarov, Ilya; Koopman, Rose; Koppenburg, Patrick; Korolev, Mikhail; Kozlinskiy, Alexandr; Kravchuk, Leonid; Kreplin, Katharina; Kreps, Michal; Krocker, Georg; Krokovny, Pavel; Kruse, Florian; Kucewicz, Wojciech; Kucharczyk, Marcin; Kudryavtsev, Vasily; Kurek, Krzysztof; Kvaratskheliya, Tengiz; La Thi, Viet Nga; Lacarrere, Daniel; Lafferty, George; Lai, Adriano; Lambert, Dean; Lambert, Robert W; Lanfranchi, Gaia; Langenbruch, Christoph; Langhans, Benedikt; Latham, Thomas; Lazzeroni, Cristina; Le Gac, Renaud; van Leerdam, Jeroen; Lees, Jean-Pierre; Lefèvre, Regis; Leflat, Alexander; Lefrançois, Jacques; Leo, Sabato; Leroy, Olivier; Lesiak, Tadeusz; Leverington, Blake; Li, Yiming; Likhomanenko, Tatiana; Liles, Myfanwy; Lindner, Rolf; Linn, Christian; Lionetto, Federica; Liu, Bo; Lohn, Stefan; Longstaff, Iain; Lopes, Jose; Lopez-March, Neus; Lowdon, Peter; Lu, Haiting; Lucchesi, Donatella; Luo, Haofei; Lupato, Anna; Luppi, Eleonora; Lupton, Oliver; Machefert, Frederic; Machikhiliyan, Irina V; Maciuc, Florin; Maev, Oleg; Malde, Sneha; Malinin, Alexander; Manca, Giulia; Mancinelli, Giampiero; Mapelli, Alessandro; Maratas, Jan; Marchand, Jean François; Marconi, Umberto; Marin Benito, Carla; Marino, Pietro; Märki, Raphael; Marks, Jörg; Martellotti, Giuseppe; Martens, Aurelien; Martín Sánchez, Alexandra; Martinelli, Maurizio; Martinez Santos, Diego; Martinez Vidal, Fernando; Martins Tostes, Danielle; Massafferri, André; Matev, Rosen; Mathe, Zoltan; Matteuzzi, Clara; Maurin, Brice; Mazurov, Alexander; McCann, Michael; McCarthy, James; McNab, Andrew; McNulty, Ronan; McSkelly, Ben; Meadows, Brian; Meier, Frank; Meissner, Marco; Merk, Marcel; Milanes, Diego Alejandro; Minard, Marie-Noelle; Moggi, Niccolò; Molina Rodriguez, Josue; Monteil, Stephane; Morandin, Mauro; Morawski, Piotr; Mordà, Alessandro; Morello, Michael Joseph; Moron, Jakub; Morris, Adam Benjamin; Mountain, Raymond; Muheim, Franz; Müller, Katharina; Mussini, Manuel; Muster, Bastien; Naik, Paras; Nakada, Tatsuya; Nandakumar, Raja; Nasteva, Irina; Needham, Matthew; Neri, Nicola; Neubert, Sebastian; Neufeld, Niko; Neuner, Max; Nguyen, Anh Duc; Nguyen, Thi-Dung; Nguyen-Mau, Chung; Nicol, Michelle; Niess, Valentin; Niet, Ramon; Nikitin, Nikolay; Nikodem, Thomas; Novoselov, Alexey; O'Hanlon, Daniel Patrick; Oblakowska-Mucha, Agnieszka; Obraztsov, Vladimir; Oggero, Serena; Ogilvy, Stephen; Okhrimenko, Oleksandr; Oldeman, Rudolf; Onderwater, Gerco; Orlandea, Marius; Otalora Goicochea, Juan Martin; Owen, Patrick; Oyanguren, Maria Arantza; Pal, Bilas Kanti; Palano, Antimo; Palombo, Fernando; Palutan, Matteo; Panman, Jacob; Papanestis, Antonios; Pappagallo, Marco; Pappalardo, Luciano; Parkes, Christopher; Parkinson, Christopher John; Passaleva, Giovanni; Patel, Girish; Patel, Mitesh; Patrignani, Claudia; Pearce, Alex; Pellegrino, Antonio; Pepe Altarelli, Monica; Perazzini, Stefano; Perret, Pascal; Perrin-Terrin, Mathieu; Pescatore, Luca; Pesen, Erhan; Pessina, Gianluigi; Petridis, Konstantin; Petrolini, Alessandro; Picatoste Olloqui, Eduardo; Pietrzyk, Boleslaw; Pilař, Tomas; Pinci, Davide; Pistone, Alessandro; Playfer, Stephen; Plo Casasus, Maximo; Polci, Francesco; Poluektov, Anton; Polycarpo, Erica; Popov, Alexander; Popov, Dmitry; Popovici, Bogdan; Potterat, Cédric; Price, Eugenia; Price, Joseph David; Prisciandaro, Jessica; Pritchard, Adrian; Prouve, Claire; Pugatch, Valery; Puig Navarro, Albert; Punzi, Giovanni; Qian, Wenbin; Rachwal, Bartolomiej; Rademacker, Jonas; Rakotomiaramanana, Barinjaka; Rama, Matteo; Rangel, Murilo; Raniuk, Iurii; Rauschmayr, Nathalie; Raven, Gerhard; Redi, Federico; Reichert, Stefanie; Reid, Matthew; dos Reis, Alberto; Ricciardi, Stefania; Richards, Sophie; Rihl, Mariana; Rinnert, Kurt; Rives Molina, Vincente; Robbe, Patrick; Rodrigues, Ana Barbara; Rodrigues, Eduardo; Rodriguez Perez, Pablo; Roiser, Stefan; Romanovsky, Vladimir; Romero Vidal, Antonio; Rotondo, Marcello; Rouvinet, Julien; Ruf, Thomas; Ruiz, Hugo; Ruiz Valls, Pablo; Saborido Silva, Juan Jose; Sagidova, Naylya; Sail, Paul; Saitta, Biagio; Salustino Guimaraes, Valdir; Sanchez Mayordomo, Carlos; Sanmartin Sedes, Brais; Santacesaria, Roberta; Santamarina Rios, Cibran; Santovetti, Emanuele; Sarti, Alessio; Satriano, Celestina; Satta, Alessia; Saunders, Daniel Martin; Savrina, Darya; Schiller, Manuel; Schindler, Heinrich; Schlupp, Maximilian; Schmelling, Michael; Schmidt, Burkhard; Schneider, Olivier; Schopper, Andreas; Schubiger, Maxime; Schune, Marie Helene; Schwemmer, Rainer; Sciascia, Barbara; Sciubba, Adalberto; Semennikov, Alexander; Sepp, Indrek; Serra, Nicola; Serrano, Justine; Sestini, Lorenzo; Seyfert, Paul; Shapkin, Mikhail; Shapoval, Illya; Shcheglov, Yury; Shears, Tara; Shekhtman, Lev; Shevchenko, Vladimir; Shires, Alexander; Silva Coutinho, Rafael; Simi, Gabriele; Sirendi, Marek; Skidmore, Nicola; Skwarnicki, Tomasz; Smith, Anthony; Smith, Edmund; Smith, Eluned; Smith, Jackson; Smith, Mark; Snoek, Hella; Sokoloff, Michael; Soler, Paul; Soomro, Fatima; Souza, Daniel; Souza De Paula, Bruno; Spaan, Bernhard; Sparkes, Ailsa; Spradlin, Patrick; Sridharan, Srikanth; Stagni, Federico; Stahl, Marian; Stahl, Sascha; Steinkamp, Olaf; Stenyakin, Oleg; Stevenson, Scott; Stoica, Sabin; Stone, Sheldon; Storaci, Barbara; Stracka, Simone; Straticiuc, Mihai; Straumann, Ulrich; Stroili, Roberto; Subbiah, Vijay Kartik; Sun, Liang; Sutcliffe, William; Swientek, Krzysztof; Swientek, Stefan; Syropoulos, Vasileios; Szczekowski, Marek; Szczypka, Paul; Szumlak, Tomasz; T'Jampens, Stephane; Teklishyn, Maksym; Tellarini, Giulia; Teubert, Frederic; Thomas, Christopher; Thomas, Eric; van Tilburg, Jeroen; Tisserand, Vincent; Tobin, Mark; Tolk, Siim; Tomassetti, Luca; Tonelli, Diego; Topp-Joergensen, Stig; Torr, Nicholas; Tournefier, Edwige; Tourneur, Stephane; Tran, Minh Tâm; Tresch, Marco; Trisovic, Ana; Tsaregorodtsev, Andrei; Tsopelas, Panagiotis; Tuning, Niels; Ubeda Garcia, Mario; Ukleja, Artur; Ustyuzhanin, Andrey; Uwer, Ulrich; Vacca, Claudia; Vagnoni, Vincenzo; Valenti, Giovanni; Vallier, Alexis; Vazquez Gomez, Ricardo; Vazquez Regueiro, Pablo; Vázquez Sierra, Carlos; Vecchi, Stefania; Velthuis, Jaap; Veltri, Michele; Veneziano, Giovanni; Vesterinen, Mika; Viaud, Benoit; Vieira, Daniel; Vieites Diaz, Maria; Vilasis-Cardona, Xavier; Vollhardt, Achim; Volyanskyy, Dmytro; Voong, David; Vorobyev, Alexey; Vorobyev, Vitaly; Voß, Christian; de Vries, Jacco; Waldi, Roland; Wallace, Charlotte; Wallace, Ronan; Walsh, John; Wandernoth, Sebastian; Wang, Jianchun; Ward, David; Watson, Nigel; Websdale, David; Whitehead, Mark; Wicht, Jean; Wiedner, Dirk; Wilkinson, Guy; Williams, Matthew; Williams, Mike; Wilschut, Hans; Wilson, Fergus; Wimberley, Jack; Wishahi, Julian; Wislicki, Wojciech; Witek, Mariusz; Wormser, Guy; Wotton, Stephen; Wright, Simon; Wyllie, Kenneth; Xie, Yuehong; Xing, Zhou; Xu, Zhirui; Yang, Zhenwei; Yuan, Xuhao; Yushchenko, Oleg; Zangoli, Maria; Zavertyaev, Mikhail; Zhang, Liming; Zhang, Wen Chao; Zhang, Yanxi; Zhelezov, Alexey; Zhokhov, Anatoly; Zhong, Liang; Zvyagin, Alexander

    2014-12-05

    Measuring cross-sections at the LHC requires the luminosity to be determined accurately at each centre-of-mass energy $\\sqrt{s}$. In this paper results are reported from the luminosity calibrations carried out at the LHC interaction point 8 with the LHCb detector for $\\sqrt{s}$ = 2.76, 7 and 8 TeV (proton-proton collisions) and for $\\sqrt{s_{NN}}$ = 5 TeV (proton-lead collisions). Both the "van der Meer scan" and "beam-gas imaging" luminosity calibration methods were employed. It is observed that the beam density profile cannot always be described by a function that is factorizable in the two transverse coordinates. The introduction of a two-dimensional description of the beams improves significantly the consistency of the results. For proton-proton interactions at $\\sqrt{s}$ = 8 TeV a relative precision of the luminosity calibration of 1.47% is obtained using van der Meer scans and 1.43% using beam-gas imaging, resulting in a combined precision of 1.12%. Applying the calibration to the full data set determin...

  4. High Precision Seawater Sr/Ca Measurements in the Florida Keys by Inductively Coupled Plasma Atomic Emission Spectrometry: Analytical Method and Implications for Coral Paleothermometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khare, A.; Kilbourne, K. H.; Schijf, J.

    2017-12-01

    Standard methods of reconstructing past sea surface temperatures (SSTs) with coral skeletal Sr/Ca ratios assume the seawater Sr/Ca ratio is constant. However, there is little data to support this assumption, in part because analytical techniques capable of determining seawater Sr/Ca with sufficient accuracy and precision are expensive and time consuming. We demonstrate a method to measure seawater Sr/Ca using inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry where we employ an intensity ratio calibration routine that reduces the self- matrix effects of calcium and cancels out the matrix effects that are common to both calcium and strontium. A seawater standard solution cross-calibrated with multiple instruments is used to correct for long-term instrument drift and any remnant matrix effects. The resulting method produces accurate seawater Sr/Ca determinations rapidly, inexpensively, and with a precision better than 0.2%. This method will make it easier for coral paleoclimatologists to quantify potentially problematic fluctuations in seawater Sr/Ca at their study locations. We apply our method to test for variability in surface seawater Sr/Ca along the Florida Keys Reef Tract. We are collecting winter and summer samples for two years in a grid with eleven nearshore to offshore transects across the reef, as well as continuous samples collected by osmotic pumps at four locations adjacent to our grid. Our initial analysis of the grid samples indicates a trend of decreasing Sr/Ca values offshore potentially due to a decreasing groundwater influence. The values differ by as much as 0.05 mmol/mol which could lead to an error of 1°C in mean SST reconstructions. Future work involves continued sampling in the Florida Keys to test for seasonal and interannual variability in seawater Sr/Ca, as well as collecting data from small reefs in the Virgin Islands to test the stability of seawater Sr/Ca under different geologic, hydrologic and hydrographic environments.

  5. Precision measurements with atom interferometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schubert, Christian; Abend, Sven; Schlippert, Dennis; Ertmer, Wolfgang; Rasel, Ernst M.

    2017-04-01

    Interferometry with matter waves enables precise measurements of rotations, accelerations, and differential accelerations [1-5]. This is exploited for determining fundamental constants [2], in fundamental science as e.g. testing the universality of free fall [3], and is applied for gravimetry [4], and gravity gradiometry [2,5]. At the Institut für Quantenoptik in Hannover, different approaches are pursued. A large scale device is designed and currently being set up to investigate the gain in precision for gravimetry, gradiometry, and fundamental tests on large baselines [6]. For field applications, a compact and transportable device is being developed. Its key feature is an atom chip source providing a collimated high flux of atoms which is expected to mitigate systematic uncertainties [7,8]. The atom chip technology and miniaturization benefits from microgravity experiments in the drop tower in Bremen and sounding rocket experiments [8,9] which act as pathfinders for space borne operation [10]. This contribution will report about our recent results. The presented work is supported by the CRC 1227 DQ-mat, the CRC 1128 geo-Q, the RTG 1729, the QUEST-LFS, and by the German Space Agency (DLR) with funds provided by the Federal Ministry of Economic Affairs and Energy (BMWi) due to an enactment of the German Bundestag under Grant No. DLR 50WM1552-1557. [1] P. Berg et al., Phys. Rev. Lett., 114, 063002, 2015; I. Dutta et al., Phys. Rev. Lett., 116, 183003, 2016. [2] J. B. Fixler et al., Science 315, 74 (2007); G. Rosi et al., Nature 510, 518, 2014. [3] D. Schlippert et al., Phys. Rev. Lett., 112, 203002, 2014. [4] A. Peters et al., Nature 400, 849, 1999; A. Louchet-Chauvet et al., New J. Phys. 13, 065026, 2011; C. Freier et al., J. of Phys.: Conf. Series 723, 012050, 2016. [5] J. M. McGuirk et al., Phys. Rev. A 65, 033608, 2002; P. Asenbaum et al., arXiv:1610.03832. [6] J. Hartwig et al., New J. Phys. 17, 035011, 2015. [7] H. Ahlers et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 116, 173601

  6. High-precision measurements of uranium and thorium isotopic ratios by multi-collector inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (MC-ICPMS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lisheng; Ma, Zhibang; Duan, Wuhui

    2015-04-01

    Isotopic compositions of U-Th and 230Th dating have been widely used in earth sciences, such as chronology, geochemistry, oceanography and hydrology. In this study, five ages of different carbonate samples were measured using 230Th dating technique with U-Th high-precision isotopic measurements by multi-collector inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry, in Uranium-series Chronology Laboratory, Institute of Geology and Geophysics, Chinese Academy of Sciences.In this study, the precision and accuracy of uranium isotopic composition were estimated by measuring the uranium ratios of NBS-CRM 112A, NBS-CRM U500 and HU-1. The mean measured ratios, 234U/238U = 52.86 (±0.04) × 10-6 and δ234U = -38.36 (±0.77) × 10-3 for NBS-CRM 112A, 234U/238U = 10.4184 (±0.0001) × 10-3, 236U/238U = 15.43 (±0.01) × 10-4 and 238U/235U = 1.00021 (±0.00002) for NBS-CRM U500, 234U/238U = 54.911 (±0.007) and δ234U = -1.04 (±0.13) × 10-3 for HU-1 (95% confidence levels). The U isotope data for standard reference materials are in excellent agreement with previous studies, further highlighting the reliability and analytical capabilities of our technique. We measured the thorium isotopic ratios of three different thorium standards by MC-ICPMS. The three standards (Th-1, Th-2 and Th-3) were mixed by HU-1 and NBS 232Th standard, with the 230Th/232Th ratios from 10-4 to 10-6. The mean measured atomic ratios, 230Th/232Th = 2.1227 (±0.0024) × 10-6, 2.7246 (±0.0026) × 10-5, and 2.8358 (±0.0007) × 10-4 for Th-1, Th-2 and Th-3 (95% confidence levels), respectively. Using this technique, the following standard samples were dated by MC-ICPMS. Sample RKM-4, collected from Babardos Kendal Hill terrace, was used during the first stage of the Uranium-Series Intercomparison Project (USIP-I). Samples 76001, RKM-5 and RKM-6 were studied during the second stage of the USIP program (USIP-II). Sample 76001 is a laminated flowstone, collected from Sumidero Terejapa, Chiapas, Mexico, and samples

  7. Precision measurements at a muon collider

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dawson, S.

    1995-01-01

    We discuss the potential for making precision measurements of M W and M T at a muon collider and the motivations for each measurement. A comparison is made with the precision measurements expected at other facilities. The measurement of the top quark decay width is also discussed

  8. High-precision measurement of mercury isotope ratios in sediments using cold-vapor generation multi-collector inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Foucher, Delphine; Hintelmann, Holger

    2006-01-01

    An on-line Hg reduction technique using stannous chloride as the reductant was applied for accurate and precise mercury isotope ratio determinations by multi-collector (MC)-ICP/MS. Special attention has been paid to ensure optimal conditions (such as acquisition time and mercury concentration) allowing precision measurements good enough to be able to significantly detect the anticipated small differences in Hg isotope ratios in nature. Typically, internal precision was better than 0.002% (1 RSE) on all Hg ratios investigated as long as approximately 20 ng of Hg was measured with a 10-min acquisition time. Introducing higher amounts of mercury (50 ng Hg) improved the internal precision to 205 Tl/ 203 Tl correction coupled to a standard-sample bracketing approach. The large number of data acquired allowed us to validate the consistency of our measurements over a one-year period. On average, the short-term uncertainty determined by repeated runs of NIST SRM 1641d Hg standard during a single day was 202 Hg/ 198 Hg, 202 Hg/ 199 Hg, 202 Hg/ 200 Hg, and 202 Hg/ 201 Hg). The precision fell to 202 Hg/ 198 Hg expressed as δ values (per mil deviations relative to NIST SRM 1641d Hg standard solution) displayed differences from +0.74 to -4.00 permille. The magnitude of the Hg fractionation per amu was constant within one type of sample and did not exceed 1.00 permille. Considering all results (the reproducibility of Hg standard solutions, reference sediment samples, and the examination of natural samples), the analytical error of our δ values for the overall method was within ±0.28 permille (1 SD), which was an order of magnitude lower than the extent of fractionation (4.74 permille) observed in sediments. This study confirmed that analytical techniques have reached a level of long-term precision and accuracy that is sufficiently sensitive to detect even small differences in Hg isotope ratios that occur within one type of samples (e.g., between different sediments) and so

  9. Challenges for precision shape measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jarvis, M

    2014-01-01

    We discuss a number of physical effects about deeply depleted CCDs that have a significant impact on shape estimation. In particular, the focus is on issues related to measuring accurate shear values of galaxies for weak lensing science. There are three types of effects we discuss: effects related to the world coordinate system (WCS), the so-called brighter-fatter relation, and variable pixel size. In each case, we describe the effect, explain the impact on shape measurements, and propose possible solutions

  10. Quantum mechanics and precision measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramsey, N.F.

    1995-01-01

    The accuracies of measurements of almost all fundamental physical constants have increased by factors of about 10000 during the past 60 years. Although some of the improvements are due to greater care, most are due to new techniques based on quantum mechanics. Although the Heisenberg Uncertainty Principle often limits measurement accuracies, in many cases the validity of quantum mechanics makes possible the vastly improved measurement accuracies. Seven quantum features that have a profound influence on the science of measurements are: 1) Existence of discrete quantum states of energy. 2) Energy conservation in transitions between two states. 3) Electromagnetic radiation of frequency v is quantized with energy hv per quantum. 4) The identity principle. 5) The Heisenberg Uncertainty Principle. 6) Addition of probability amplitudes (not probabilities). 7) Wave and coherent phase phenomena. Of these seven quantum features, only the Heisenberg Uncertainty Principle limits the accuracy of measurements, and its effect is often negligibly small. The other six features make possible much more accurate measurements of quantum systems than with almost all classical systems. These effects are discussed and illustrated

  11. Prospects for Precision Neutrino Cross Section Measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harris, Deborah A. [Fermilab

    2016-01-28

    The need for precision cross section measurements is more urgent now than ever before, given the central role neutrino oscillation measurements play in the field of particle physics. The definition of precision is something worth considering, however. In order to build the best model for an oscillation experiment, cross section measurements should span a broad range of energies, neutrino interaction channels, and target nuclei. Precision might better be defined not in the final uncertainty associated with any one measurement but rather with the breadth of measurements that are available to constrain models. Current experience shows that models are better constrained by 10 measurements across different processes and energies with 10% uncertainties than by one measurement of one process on one nucleus with a 1% uncertainty. This article describes the current status of and future prospects for the field of precision cross section measurements considering the metric of how many processes, energies, and nuclei have been studied.

  12. Theory of precision electroweak measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peskin, M.E.

    1990-03-01

    In these lectures, I will review the theoretical concepts needed to understand the goals and implications of experiments in this new era of weak interactions. I will explain how to compute the most important order-α radiative corrections to weak interaction processes and discuss the physical implications of these correction terms. I hope that this discussion will be useful to those --- experimentalists and theorists --- who will try to interpret the new data that we will soon receive. This paper is organized as follows: I will review the structure of the standard weak interaction model at zeroth order. I will discuss the measurement of the Z 0 boson mass in e + e - annihilation. This measurement is affected by radiative correction to the form of the Z 0 resonance, and so I will review the theory of the resonance line shape. I will briefly review the modifications of the properties of the Z 0 which would be produced by additional neutral gauge bosons. I will review the theory of the renormalization of weak interaction parameters such as sin 2 θ ω , concentrating especially on the contributions of the top quark and other heavy, undiscovered particles

  13. Nucleon measurements at the precision frontier

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carlson, Carl E. [Physics Department, College of William and Mary, Williamsburg, VA 23187 (United States)

    2013-11-07

    We comment on nucleon measurements at the precision frontier. As examples of what can be learned, we concentrate on three topics, which are parity violating scattering experiments, the proton radius puzzle, and the symbiosis between nuclear and atomic physics.

  14. Technology on precision measurement of mass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2005-10-01

    This book mentions mass and scales about technology for precision measurement, which deal with how to measure mass with scale. So it describes the basic things of mass and scales. It includes translated book of international standard OIML with demand of measurement and technology and form for test report and international original standard OIML with metrological and technical requirements and test report format.

  15. Precision measurements in nuclear beta decay

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Naviliat-Cuncic, Oscar, E-mail: naviliat@nscl.msu.edu [Michigan State University, National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory and Department of Physics and Astronomy (United States)

    2013-03-15

    Precision measurements in nuclear beta decay provide sensitive means to determine the fundamental coupling of charged fermions to weak bosons and to test discrete symmetries in the weak interaction. The main motivation of such measurements is to find deviations from Standard Model predictions as possible indications of new physics. I focus here on two topics related to precision measurements in beta decay, namely: (i) the determination of the V{sub ud} element of the Cabibbo-Kobayashi-Maskawa quark mixing matrix from nuclear mirror transitions and (ii) selected measurements of time reversal violating correlations in nuclear and neutron decays. These topics complement those presented in other contributions to this conference.

  16. PRECISION ELECTROWEAK MEASUREMENTS AND THE HIGGS MASS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    MARCIANO, W.J.

    2004-01-01

    The utility of precision electroweak measurements for predicting the Standard Model Higgs mass via quantum loop effects is discussed. Current constraints from m w and sin 2 θ w (m z ) ovr MS imply a relatively light Higgs ∼< 154 GeV which is consistent with Supersymmetry expectations. The existence of Supersymmetry is further suggested by a discrepancy between experiment and theory for the muon anomalous magnetic moment. Constraints from precision studies on other types of ''New Physics'' are also briefly described

  17. Precise and accurate isotope ratio measurements by ICP-MS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker, J S; Dietze, H J

    2000-09-01

    The precise and accurate determination of isotope ratios by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) and laser ablation ICP-MS (LA-ICP-MS) is important for quite different application fields (e.g. for isotope ratio measurements of stable isotopes in nature, especially for the investigation of isotope variation in nature or age dating, for determining isotope ratios of radiogenic elements in the nuclear industry, quality assurance of fuel material, for reprocessing plants, nuclear material accounting and radioactive waste control, for tracer experiments using stable isotopes or long-lived radionuclides in biological or medical studies). Thermal ionization mass spectrometry (TIMS), which used to be the dominant analytical technique for precise isotope ratio measurements, is being increasingly replaced for isotope ratio measurements by ICP-MS due to its excellent sensitivity, precision and good accuracy. Instrumental progress in ICP-MS was achieved by the introduction of the collision cell interface in order to dissociate many disturbing argon-based molecular ions, thermalize the ions and neutralize the disturbing argon ions of plasma gas (Ar+). The application of the collision cell in ICP-QMS results in a higher ion transmission, improved sensitivity and better precision of isotope ratio measurements compared to quadrupole ICP-MS without the collision cell [e.g., for 235U/238U approximately 1 (10 microg x L(-1) uranium) 0.07% relative standard deviation (RSD) vs. 0.2% RSD in short-term measurements (n = 5)]. A significant instrumental improvement for ICP-MS is the multicollector device (MC-ICP-MS) in order to obtain a better precision of isotope ratio measurements (with a precision of up to 0.002%, RSD). CE- and HPLC-ICP-MS are used for the separation of isobaric interferences of long-lived radionuclides and stable isotopes by determination of spallation nuclide abundances in an irradiated tantalum target.

  18. Explicit Covariance Matrix for Particle Measurement Precision

    CERN Document Server

    Karimäki, Veikko

    1997-01-01

    We derive explicit and precise formulae for 3 by 3 error matrix of the particle transverse momentum, direction and impact parameter. The error matrix elements are expressed as functions of up to fourth order statistical moments of the measured coordinates. The formulae are valid for any curvature and track length in case of negligible multiple scattering.

  19. Electroweak Precision Measurements with the ATLAS Detector

    CERN Document Server

    Linck, Rebecca Anne; The ATLAS collaboration

    2018-01-01

    As part of its ongoing exploration into the nature of the particles produced in high energy proton-proton collisions, the ATLAS detector has been used to perform a number of new precision electroweak measurements. In this talk the recent measurements of the W-boson mass, the Drell-Yan triple-differential cross-section and the polarisation of tau leptons in Z/γ* → ττ decays will be discussed.

  20. Measurement of plasma parameters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1999-01-01

    The physics issues of the measurements of the plasma properties necessary to provide both the control and science data for achieving the goals of the ITER device are discussed. The assessment of the requirements for these measurements is first discussed, together with priorities that relate to the experimental program. Subsequently, some of the proposed measurement techniques, the plasma diagnostics, are described with particular emphasis on their implementation on ITER and their capability to meet the requirements. A judgement on the present status of the diagnostic program on ITER is provided with some indication of the research and development program necessary to demonstrate viability of techniques or their implementation. (author)

  1. Precision measurements of the CKM angle gamma

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2016-01-01

    The level of CP-violation permitted within the Standard Model cannot account for the matter dominated universe in which we live. Within the Standard Model the CKM matrix, which describes the quark couplings, is expected to be unitary. By making precise measurements of the CKM matrix parameters new physics models can be constrained, or with sufficient precision the effects of physics beyond the standard model might become apparent. The CKM angle gamma is the least well known angle of the unitarity triangle. It is the only angle easily accessible at tree-level, and furthermore has almost no theoretical uncertainties. Therefore it provides an invaluable Standard Model benchmark against which other new physics sensitive tests of the CP-violation can be made. I will discuss recent measurements of gamma using the the Run 1 LHCb dataset, which improve our knowledge of this key parameter.

  2. Precision and reproducibility in AMS radiocarbon measurements.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hotchkis, M A; Fink, D; Hua, Q; Jacobsen, G E; Lawson, E M; Smith, A M; Tuniz, C [Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation, Lucas Heights, NSW (Australia)

    1997-12-31

    Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (AMS) is a technique by which rare radioisotopes such as {sup 14}C can be measured at environmental levels with high efficiency. Instead of detecting radioactivity, which is very weak for long-lived environmental radioisotopes, atoms are counted directly. The sample is placed in an ion source, from which a negative ion beam of the atoms of interest is extracted, mass analysed, and injected into a tandem accelerator. After stripping to positive charge states in the accelerator HV terminal, the ions are further accelerated, analysed with magnetic and electrostatic devices and counted in a detector. An isotopic ratio is derived from the number of radioisotope atoms counted in a given time and the beam current of a stable isotope of the same element, measured after the accelerator. For radiocarbon, {sup 14}C/{sup 13}C ratios are usually measured, and the ratio of an unknown sample is compared to that of a standard. The achievable precision for such ratio measurements is limited primarily by {sup 14}C counting statistics and also by a variety of factors related to accelerator and ion source stability. At the ANTARES AMS facility at Lucas Heights Research Laboratories we are currently able to measure {sup 14}C with 0.5% precision. In the two years since becoming operational, more than 1000 {sup 14}C samples have been measured. Recent improvements in precision for {sup 14}C have been achieved with the commissioning of a 59 sample ion source. The measurement system, from sample changing to data acquisition, is under common computer control. These developments have allowed a new regime of automated multi-sample processing which has impacted both on the system throughput and the measurement precision. We have developed data evaluation methods at ANTARES which cross-check the self-consistency of the statistical analysis of our data. Rigorous data evaluation is invaluable in assessing the true reproducibility of the measurement system and aids in

  3. Precision and reproducibility in AMS radiocarbon measurements.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hotchkis, M.A.; Fink, D.; Hua, Q.; Jacobsen, G.E.; Lawson, E. M.; Smith, A.M.; Tuniz, C. [Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation, Lucas Heights, NSW (Australia)

    1996-12-31

    Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (AMS) is a technique by which rare radioisotopes such as {sup 14}C can be measured at environmental levels with high efficiency. Instead of detecting radioactivity, which is very weak for long-lived environmental radioisotopes, atoms are counted directly. The sample is placed in an ion source, from which a negative ion beam of the atoms of interest is extracted, mass analysed, and injected into a tandem accelerator. After stripping to positive charge states in the accelerator HV terminal, the ions are further accelerated, analysed with magnetic and electrostatic devices and counted in a detector. An isotopic ratio is derived from the number of radioisotope atoms counted in a given time and the beam current of a stable isotope of the same element, measured after the accelerator. For radiocarbon, {sup 14}C/{sup 13}C ratios are usually measured, and the ratio of an unknown sample is compared to that of a standard. The achievable precision for such ratio measurements is limited primarily by {sup 14}C counting statistics and also by a variety of factors related to accelerator and ion source stability. At the ANTARES AMS facility at Lucas Heights Research Laboratories we are currently able to measure {sup 14}C with 0.5% precision. In the two years since becoming operational, more than 1000 {sup 14}C samples have been measured. Recent improvements in precision for {sup 14}C have been achieved with the commissioning of a 59 sample ion source. The measurement system, from sample changing to data acquisition, is under common computer control. These developments have allowed a new regime of automated multi-sample processing which has impacted both on the system throughput and the measurement precision. We have developed data evaluation methods at ANTARES which cross-check the self-consistency of the statistical analysis of our data. Rigorous data evaluation is invaluable in assessing the true reproducibility of the measurement system and aids in

  4. Precision Mass Measurement of Argon Isotopes

    CERN Multimedia

    Lunney, D

    2002-01-01

    % IS388\\\\ \\\\ A precision mass measurement of the neutron-deficient isotopes $^{32,33,34}$Ar is proposed. Mass values of these isotopes are of importance for: a) a stringent test of the Isobaric-Multiplet- Mass-Equation, b) a verification of the correctness of calculated charge-dependent corrections as used in super-allowed $\\beta$- decay studies aiming at a test of the CVC hypothesis, and c) the determination of the kinematics in electron-neutrino correlation experiments searching for scalar currents in weak interaction. The measurements will be carried out with the ISOLTRAP Penning trap mass spectrometer.

  5. Precision measurements with LPCTrap at GANIL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liénard, E., E-mail: lienard@lpccaen.in2p3.fr; Ban, G. [LPC CAEN, ENSICAEN, Université de Caen, CNRS/IN2P3 (France); Couratin, C. [Instituut voor Kern- en Stralingsfysica, KU Leuven (Belgium); Delahaye, P. [GANIL, CEA/DSM-CNRS/IN2P3 (France); Durand, D.; Fabian, X. [LPC CAEN, ENSICAEN, Université de Caen, CNRS/IN2P3 (France); Fabre, B. [CELIA, Université Bordeaux, CNRS, CEA (France); Fléchard, X. [LPC CAEN, ENSICAEN, Université de Caen, CNRS/IN2P3 (France); Finlay, P. [Instituut voor Kern- en Stralingsfysica, KU Leuven (Belgium); Mauger, F. [LPC CAEN, ENSICAEN, Université de Caen, CNRS/IN2P3 (France); Méry, A. [CIMAP, CEA/CNRS/ENSICAEN, Université de Caen (France); Naviliat-Cuncic, O. [NSCL and Department of Physics and Astronomy, MSU (United States); Pons, B. [CELIA, Université Bordeaux, CNRS, CEA (France); Porobic, T. [Instituut voor Kern- en Stralingsfysica, KU Leuven (Belgium); Quéméner, G. [LPC CAEN, ENSICAEN, Université de Caen, CNRS/IN2P3 (France); Severijns, N. [Instituut voor Kern- en Stralingsfysica, KU Leuven (Belgium); Thomas, J. C. [GANIL, CEA/DSM-CNRS/IN2P3 (France); Velten, Ph. [Instituut voor Kern- en Stralingsfysica, KU Leuven (Belgium)

    2015-11-15

    The experimental achievements and the results obtained so far with the LPCTrap device installed at GANIL are presented. The apparatus is dedicated to the study of the weak interaction at low energy by means of precise measurements of the β − ν angular correlation parameter in nuclear β decays. So far, the data collected with three isotopes have enabled to determine, for the first time, the charge state distributions of the recoiling ions, induced by shakeoff process. The analysis is presently refined to deduce the correlation parameters, with the potential of improving both the constraint deduced at low energy on exotic tensor currents ({sup 6}He{sup 1+}) and the precision on the V{sub ud} element of the quark-mixing matrix ({sup 35}Ar{sup 1+} and {sup 19}Ne{sup 1+}) deduced from the mirror transitions dataset.

  6. Cyclotrons as Drivers for Precision Neutrino Measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alonso, J.; Barletta, W. A.; Winslow, L. A.; Shaevitz, M. H.; Spitz, J.; Conrad, J. M.; Toups, M.; Adelmann, A.

    2014-01-01

    As we enter the age of precision measurement in neutrino physics, improved flux sources are required. These must have a well defined flavor content with energies in ranges where backgrounds are low and cross-section knowledge is high. Very few sources of neutrinos can meet these requirements. However, pion/muon and isotope decay-at-rest sources qualify. The ideal drivers for decay-at-rest sources are cyclotron accelerators, which are compact and relatively inexpensive. This paper describes a scheme to produce decay-at-rest sources driven by such cyclotrons, developed within the DAEδALUS program. Examples of the value of the high precision beams for pursuing Beyond Standard Model interactions are reviewed. New results on a combined DAEδALUS—Hyper-K search for CP violation that achieve errors on the mixing matrix parameter of 4° to 12° are presented

  7. Precision of hyaline cartilage thickness measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jonsson, K.; Buckwalter, K.; Helvie, M.; Niklason, L.; Martel, W. (Univ. of Michigan Hospitals, Ann Arbor, MI (United States). Dept. of Radiology)

    1992-05-01

    Measurement of cartilage thickness in vivo is an important indicator of the status of a joint as the various degenerative and inflammatory arthritides directly affect the condition of the cartilage. In order to assess the precision of thickness measurements of hyaline articular cartilage, we undertook a pilot study using MR imaging, plain radiography, and ultrasonography (US). We measured the cartilage of the hip and knee joints in 10 persons (4 healthy volunteers and 6 patients). The joints in each patient were examined on two separate occasions using each modality. In the hips a swell as the knee joints, the most precise measuring method was plain film radiography. For radiographs of the knees obtained in the standing position, the coefficient of variation was 6.5%; in the hips this figure was 6.34%. US of the knees and MR imaging of the hips were the second best modalities in the measurement of cartilage thickness. In addition, MR imaging enabled the most complete visualization of the joint cartilage. (orig.).

  8. Electroweak Precision Measurements with the ATLAS Detector

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, Zhiqing; The ATLAS collaboration

    2018-01-01

    With the high integrated luminosities recorded at the LHC and the very good understanding of the ATLAS detector, it is possible to measure electroweak observables to the highest precision. In this talk, we present the tau polarisation, measured in $Z\\to \\tau\\tau$ using 20.3 fb$^{-1}$ of proton proton collision data collected at a centre of mass energy of 8 TeV. The talk also reviews the measurement of forward-background asymmetry based on the triple differential Drell-Yan cross-section obtained with the same data sample, which can be used to extract the weak mixing angle. We conclude with a presentation of the measurement of the $W$-boson mass using 4.6 fb$^{-1}$ data, collected at 7 TeV.

  9. Precise delay measurement through combinatorial logic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burke, Gary R. (Inventor); Chen, Yuan (Inventor); Sheldon, Douglas J. (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    A high resolution circuit and method for facilitating precise measurement of on-chip delays for FPGAs for reliability studies. The circuit embeds a pulse generator on an FPGA chip having one or more groups of LUTS (the "LUT delay chain"), also on-chip. The circuit also embeds a pulse width measurement circuit on-chip, and measures the duration of the generated pulse through the delay chain. The pulse width of the output pulse represents the delay through the delay chain without any I/O delay. The pulse width measurement circuit uses an additional asynchronous clock autonomous from the main clock and the FPGA propagation delay can be displayed on a hex display continuously for testing purposes.

  10. Electroweak Precision Measurements with the ATLAS Detector

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, Zhiqing; The ATLAS collaboration

    2018-01-01

    With the high integrated luminosities recorded at the LHC and the very good understanding of the ATLAS detector, it is possible to measure electroweak observables to the highest precision. In this talk, we review the measurement of the W boson mass using data, collected at 7 TeV. Special focus is drawn on a discussion of the modeling uncertainties and the physics potential of the latest low-mu runs, recorded at a center of mass energy of 5 and 13 TeV at the end of 2017. The talk will also review the measurement of the triple differential Drell-Yan cross-section at 8 TeV, which can be used to extract the weak mixing angle. We conclude with a presentation of the tau polarization, measured in Z->tautau using 20.3/fb of proton proton collision data collected at a center of mass energy of 8 TeV.

  11. Implementing and Characterizing Precise Multiqubit Measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Z. Blumoff

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available There are two general requirements to harness the computational power of quantum mechanics: the ability to manipulate the evolution of an isolated system and the ability to faithfully extract information from it. Quantum error correction and simulation often make a more exacting demand: the ability to perform nondestructive measurements of specific correlations within that system. We realize such measurements by employing a protocol adapted from Nigg and Girvin [Phys. Rev. Lett. 110, 243604 (2013], enabling real-time selection of arbitrary register-wide Pauli operators. Our implementation consists of a simple circuit quantum electrodynamics module of four highly coherent 3D transmon qubits, collectively coupled to a high-Q superconducting microwave cavity. As a demonstration, we enact all seven nontrivial subset-parity measurements on our three-qubit register. For each, we fully characterize the realized measurement by analyzing the detector (observable operators via quantum detector tomography and by analyzing the quantum backaction via conditioned process tomography. No single quantity completely encapsulates the performance of a measurement, and standard figures of merit have not yet emerged. Accordingly, we consider several new fidelity measures for both the detector and the complete measurement process. We measure all of these quantities and report high fidelities, indicating that we are measuring the desired quantities precisely and that the measurements are highly nondemolition. We further show that both results are improved significantly by an additional error-heralding measurement. The analyses we present here form a useful basis for the future characterization and validation of quantum measurements, anticipating the demands of emerging quantum technologies.

  12. Precision Electron Density Measurements in the SSX MHD Wind Tunnel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suen-Lewis, Emma M.; Barbano, Luke J.; Shrock, Jaron E.; Kaur, Manjit; Schaffner, David A.; Brown, Michael R.

    2017-10-01

    We characterize fluctuations of the line averaged electron density of Taylor states produced by the magnetized coaxial plasma gun of the SSX device using a 632.8 nm HeNe laser interferometer. The analysis method uses the electron density dependence of the refractive index of the plasma to determine the electron density of the Taylor states. Typical magnetic field and density values in the SSX device approach about B ≅ 0.3 T and n = 0 . 4 ×1016 cm-3 . Analysis is improved from previous density measurement methods by developing a post-processing method to remove relative phase error between interferometer outputs and to account for approximately linear phase drift due to low-frequency mechanical vibrations of the interferometer. Precision density measurements coupled with local measurements of the magnetic field will allow us to characterize the wave composition of SSX plasma via density vs. magnetic field correlation analysis, and compare the wave composition of SSX plasma with that of the solar wind. Preliminary results indicate that density and magnetic field appear negatively correlated. Work supported by DOE ARPA-E ALPHA program.

  13. Precision measurement of $D$ meson mass differences

    CERN Document Server

    INSPIRE-00258707; Abellan Beteta, C; Adeva, B; Adinolfi, M; Adrover, C; Affolder, A; Ajaltouni, Z; Albrecht, J; Alessio, F; Alexander, M; Ali, S; Alkhazov, G; Alvarez Cartelle, P; Alves Jr, A A; Amato, S; Amerio, S; Amhis, Y; Anderlini, L; Anderson, J; Andreassen, R; Appleby, R B; Aquines Gutierrez, O; Archilli, F; Artamonov, A; Artuso, M; Aslanides, E; Auriemma, G; Bachmann, S; Back, J J; Baesso, C; Balagura, V; Baldini, W; Barlow, R J; Barschel, C; Barsuk, S; Barter, W; Bauer, Th; Bay, A; Beddow, J; Bedeschi, F; Bediaga, I; Belogurov, S; Belous, K; Belyaev, I; Ben-Haim, E; Benayoun, M; Bencivenni, G; Benson, S; Benton, J; Berezhnoy, A; Bernet, R; Bettler, M -O; van Beuzekom, M; Bien, A; Bifani, S; Bird, T; Bizzeti, A; Bjørnstad, P M; Blake, T; Blanc, F; Blouw, J; Blusk, S; Bocci, V; Bondar, A; Bondar, N; Bonivento, W; Borghi, S; Borgia, A; Bowcock, T J V; Bowen, E; Bozzi, C; Brambach, T; van den Brand, J; Bressieux, J; Brett, D; Britsch, M; Britton, T; Brook, N H; Brown, H; Burducea, I; Bursche, A; Busetto, G; Buytaert, J; Cadeddu, S; Callot, O; Calvi, M; Calvo Gomez, M; Camboni, A; Campana, P; Campora Perez, D; Carbone, A; Carboni, G; Cardinale, R; Cardini, A; Carranza-Mejia, H; Carson, L; Carvalho Akiba, K; Casse, G; Cattaneo, M; Cauet, Ch; Charles, M; Charpentier, Ph; Chen, P; Chiapolini, N; Chrzaszcz, M; Ciba, K; Cid Vidal, X; Ciezarek, G; Clarke, P E L; Clemencic, M; Cliff, H V; Closier, J; Coca, C; Coco, V; Cogan, J; Cogneras, E; Collins, P; Comerma-Montells, A; Contu, A; Cook, A; Coombes, M; Coquereau, S; Corti, G; Couturier, B; Cowan, G A; Craik, D C; Cunliffe, S; Currie, R; D'Ambrosio, C; David, P; David, P N Y; Davis, A; De Bonis, I; De Bruyn, K; De Capua, S; De Cian, M; De Miranda, J M; De Paula, L; De Silva, W; De Simone, P; Decamp, D; Deckenhoff, M; Del Buono, L; Derkach, D; Deschamps, O; Dettori, F; Di Canto, A; Dijkstra, H; Dogaru, M; Donleavy, S; Dordei, F; Dosil Suárez, A; Dossett, D; Dovbnya, A; Dupertuis, F; Dzhelyadin, R; Dziurda, A; Dzyuba, A; Easo, S; Egede, U; Egorychev, V; Eidelman, S; van Eijk, D; Eisenhardt, S; Eitschberger, U; Ekelhof, R; Eklund, L; El Rifai, I; Elsasser, Ch; Elsby, D; Falabella, A; Färber, C; Fardell, G; Farinelli, C; Farry, S; Fave, V; Ferguson, D; Fernandez Albor, V; Ferreira Rodrigues, F; Ferro-Luzzi, M; Filippov, S; Fiore, M; Fitzpatrick, C; Fontana, M; Fontanelli, F; Forty, R; Francisco, O; Frank, M; Frei, C; Frosini, M; Furcas, S; Furfaro, E; Gallas Torreira, A; Galli, D; Gandelman, M; Gandini, P; Gao, Y; Garofoli, J; Garosi, P; Garra Tico, J; Garrido, L; Gaspar, C; Gauld, R; Gersabeck, E; Gersabeck, M; Gershon, T; Ghez, Ph; Gibson, V; Gligorov, V V; Göbel, C; Golubkov, D; Golutvin, A; Gomes, A; Gordon, H; Grabalosa Gándara, M; Graciani Diaz, R; Granado Cardoso, L A; Graugés, E; Graziani, G; Grecu, A; Greening, E; Gregson, S; Grünberg, O; Gui, B; Gushchin, E; Guz, Yu; Gys, T; Hadjivasiliou, C; Haefeli, G; Haen, C; Haines, S C; Hall, S; Hampson, T; Hansmann-Menzemer, S; Harnew, N; Harnew, S T; Harrison, J; Hartmann, T; He, J; Heijne, V; Hennessy, K; Henrard, P; Hernando Morata, J A; van Herwijnen, E; Hicks, E; Hill, D; Hoballah, M; Hombach, C; Hopchev, P; Hulsbergen, W; Hunt, P; Huse, T; Hussain, N; Hutchcroft, D; Hynds, D; Iakovenko, V; Idzik, M; Ilten, P; Jacobsson, R; Jaeger, A; Jans, E; Jaton, P; Jing, F; John, M; Johnson, D; Jones, C R; Jost, B; Kaballo, M; Kandybei, S; Karacson, M; Karbach, T M; Kenyon, I R; Kerzel, U; Ketel, T; Keune, A; Khanji, B; Kochebina, O; Komarov, I; Koopman, R F; Koppenburg, P; Korolev, M; Kozlinskiy, A; Kravchuk, L; Kreplin, K; Kreps, M; Krocker, G; Krokovny, P; Kruse, F; Kucharczyk, M; Kudryavtsev, V; Kvaratskheliya, T; La Thi, V N; Lacarrere, D; Lafferty, G; Lai, A; Lambert, D; Lambert, R W; Lanciotti, E; Lanfranchi, G; Langenbruch, C; Latham, T; Lazzeroni, C; Le Gac, R; van Leerdam, J; Lees, J -P; Lefèvre, R; Leflat, A; Lefrançois, J; Leo, S; Leroy, O; Lesiak, T; Leverington, B; Li, Y; Li Gioi, L; Liles, M; Lindner, R; Linn, C; Liu, B; Liu, G; Lohn, S; Longstaff, I; Lopes, J H; Lopez Asamar, E; Lopez-March, N; Lu, H; Lucchesi, D; Luisier, J; Luo, H; Machefert, F; Machikhiliyan, I V; Maciuc, F; Maev, O; Malde, S; Manca, G; Mancinelli, G; Marconi, U; Märki, R; Marks, J; Martellotti, G; Martens, A; Martin, L; Martín Sánchez, A; Martinelli, M; Martinez Santos, D; Martins Tostes, D; Massafferri, A; Matev, R; Mathe, Z; Matteuzzi, C; Maurice, E; Mazurov, A; McCarthy, J; McNab, A; McNulty, R; Meadows, B; Meier, F; Meissner, M; Merk, M; Milanes, D A; Minard, M -N; Molina Rodriguez, J; Monteil, S; Moran, D; Morawski, P; Morello, M J; Mountain, R; Mous, I; Muheim, F; Müller, K; Muresan, R; Muryn, B; Muster, B; Naik, P; Nakada, T; Nandakumar, R; Nasteva, I; Needham, M; Neufeld, N; Nguyen, A D; Nguyen, T D; Nguyen-Mau, C; Nicol, M; Niess, V; Niet, R; Nikitin, N; Nikodem, T; Nomerotski, A; Novoselov, A; Oblakowska-Mucha, A; Obraztsov, V; Oggero, S; Ogilvy, S; Okhrimenko, O; Oldeman, R; Orlandea, M; Otalora Goicochea, J M; Owen, P; Oyanguren, A; Pal, B K; Palano, A; Palutan, M; Panman, J; Papanestis, A; Pappagallo, M; Parkes, C; Parkinson, C J; Passaleva, G; Patel, G D; Patel, M; Patrick, G N; Patrignani, C; Pavel-Nicorescu, C; Pazos Alvarez, A; Pellegrino, A; Penso, G; Pepe Altarelli, M; Perazzini, S; Perego, D L; Perez Trigo, E; Pérez-Calero Yzquierdo, A; Perret, P; Perrin-Terrin, M; Pessina, G; Petridis, K; Petrolini, A; Phan, A; Picatoste Olloqui, E; Pietrzyk, B; Pilař, T; Pinci, D; Playfer, S; Plo Casasus, M; Polci, F; Polok, G; Poluektov, A; Polycarpo, E; Popov, D; Popovici, B; Potterat, C; Powell, A; Prisciandaro, J; Pugatch, V; Puig Navarro, A; Punzi, G; Qian, W; Rademacker, J H; Rakotomiaramanana, B; Rangel, M S; Raniuk, I; Rauschmayr, N; Raven, G; Redford, S; Reid, M M; dos Reis, A C; Ricciardi, S; Richards, A; Rinnert, K; Rives Molina, V; Roa Romero, D A; Robbe, P; Rodrigues, E; Rodriguez Perez, P; Roiser, S; Romanovsky, V; Romero Vidal, A; Rouvinet, J; Ruf, T; Ruffini, F; Ruiz, H; Ruiz Valls, P; Sabatino, G; Saborido Silva, J J; Sagidova, N; Sail, P; Saitta, B; Salzmann, C; Sanmartin Sedes, B; Sannino, M; Santacesaria, R; Santamarina Rios, C; Santovetti, E; Sapunov, M; Sarti, A; Satriano, C; Satta, A; Savrie, M; Savrina, D; Schaack, P; Schiller, M; Schindler, H; Schlupp, M; Schmelling, M; Schmidt, B; Schneider, O; Schopper, A; Schune, M -H; Schwemmer, R; Sciascia, B; Sciubba, A; Seco, M; Semennikov, A; Senderowska, K; Sepp, I; Serra, N; Serrano, J; Seyfert, P; Shapkin, M; Shapoval, I; Shatalov, P; Shcheglov, Y; Shears, T; Shekhtman, L; Shevchenko, O; Shevchenko, V; Shires, A; Silva Coutinho, R; Skwarnicki, T; Smith, N A; Smith, E; Smith, M; Sokoloff, M D; Soler, F J P; Soomro, F; Souza, D; Souza De Paula, B; Spaan, B; Sparkes, A; Spradlin, P; Stagni, F; Stahl, S; Steinkamp, O; Stoica, S; Stone, S; Storaci, B; Straticiuc, M; Straumann, U; Subbiah, V K; Swientek, S; Syropoulos, V; Szczekowski, M; Szczypka, P; Szumlak, T; T'Jampens, S; Teklishyn, M; Teodorescu, E; Teubert, F; Thomas, C; Thomas, E; van Tilburg, J; Tisserand, V; Tobin, M; Tolk, S; Tonelli, D; Topp-Joergensen, S; Torr, N; Tournefier, E; Tourneur, S; Tran, M T; Tresch, M; Tsaregorodtsev, A; Tsopelas, P; Tuning, N; Ubeda Garcia, M; Ukleja, A; Urner, D; Uwer, U; Vagnoni, V; Valenti, G; Vazquez Gomez, R; Vazquez Regueiro, P; Vecchi, S; Velthuis, J J; Veltri, M; Veneziano, G; Vesterinen, M; Viaud, B; Vieira, D; Vilasis-Cardona, X; Vollhardt, A; Volyanskyy, D; Voong, D; Vorobyev, A; Vorobyev, V; Voß, C; Voss, H; Waldi, R; Wallace, R; Wandernoth, S; Wang, J; Ward, D R; Watson, N K; Webber, A D; Websdale, D; Whitehead, M; Wicht, J; Wiechczynski, J; Wiedner, D; Wiggers, L; Wilkinson, G; Williams, M P; Williams, M; Wilson, F F; Wishahi, J; Witek, M; Wotton, S A; Wright, S; Wu, S; Wyllie, K; Xie, Y; Xing, F; Xing, Z; Yang, Z; Young, R; Yuan, X; Yushchenko, O; Zangoli, M; Zavertyaev, M; Zhang, F; Zhang, L; Zhang, W C; Zhang, Y; Zhelezov, A; Zhokhov, A; Zhong, L; Zvyagin, A

    2013-01-01

    Using three- and four-body decays of $D$ mesons produced in semileptonic $b$-hadron decays, precision measurements of $D$ meson mass differences are made together with a measurement of the $D^{0}$ mass. The measurements are based on a dataset corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 1.0 fb$^{-1}$ collected in $pp$ collisions at 7~TeV. Using the decay $D^0 \\rightarrow K^{+} K^{-} K^{-} \\pi^{+}$, the $D^0$ mass is measured to be \\begin{alignat*}{3} M(D^0) \\phantom{ghd} &=&~1864.75 \\pm 0.15 \\,({\\rm stat}) \\pm 0.11 \\,({\\rm syst}) \\, \\textrm{MeV}/c^2. \\end{alignat*} The mass differences \\begin{alignat*}{3} M(D^{+}) - M(D^{0}) &=& 4.76 \\pm 0.12 \\,({\\rm stat}) \\pm 0.07 \\,({\\rm syst}) \\, \\textrm{MeV}/c^2, \\\\ M(D^{+}_s) - M(D^{+}) &=& \\phantom{00}98.68 \\pm 0.03 \\,({\\rm stat}) \\pm 0.04 \\,({\\rm syst}) \\, \\textrm{MeV}/c^2 \\end{alignat*} are measured using the $D^0 \\rightarrow K^{+} K^{-} \\pi^{+} \\pi^{-}$ and $D^{+}_{(s)} \\rightarrow K^{+}K^{-} \\pi^{+}$ modes.

  14. Precision microwave applicators and systems for plasma and materials processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Asmussen, J.; Garard, R.

    1988-01-01

    Modern applications of microwave energy have imposed new requirements upon microwave processing systems. Interest in energy efficiency, processing uniformity and control of process cycles has placed new design conditions upon microwave power oscillators, microwave systems and microwave applicator design. One approach of meeting new application requirements is the use of single-mode or controlled multimode applicators. The use of a single-mode applicator for plasma generation and materials processing will be presented. Descriptions of actual applicator designs for heating, curing, and processing of solid materials and the generations of high and low pressure discharges will be given. The impact of these applicators on the total microwave system including the microwave power source will be described. Specific examples of applicator and associated microwave systems will be detailed for the applications of (1) plasma thin film deposition and (2) the precision processing and diagnosis of materials. Methods of process control and diagnosis, control of process uniformity and process scale up are discussed

  15. Sfermion Precision Measurements at a Linear Collider

    CERN Document Server

    Freitas, A.; Ananthanarayan, B.; Bartl, A.; Blair, G.A.; Blochinger, C.; Boos, E.; Brandenburg, A.; Datta, A.; Djouadi, A.; Fraas, H.; Guasch, J.; Hesselbach, S.; Hidaka, K.; Hollik, W.; Kernreiter, T.; Maniatis, M.; von Manteuffel, A.; Martyn, H.U.; Miller, D.J.; Moortgat-Pick, Gudrid A.; Muhlleitner, M.; Nauenberg, U.; Kluge, Hannelies; Porod, W.; Sola, J.; Sopczak, A.; Stahl, A.; Weber, M.M.; Zerwas, P.M.

    2002-01-01

    At future e+- e- linear colliders, the event rates and clean signals of scalar fermion production - in particular for the scalar leptons - allow very precise measurements of their masses and couplings and the determination of their quantum numbers. Various methods are proposed for extracting these parameters from the data at the sfermion thresholds and in the continuum. At the same time, NLO radiative corrections and non-zero width effects have been calculated in order to match the experimental accuracy. The substantial mixing expected for the third generation sfermions opens up additional opportunities. Techniques are presented for determining potential CP-violating phases and for extracting tan(beta) from the stau sector, in particular at high values. The consequences of possible large mass differences in the stop and sbottom system are explored in dedicated analyses.

  16. PRECISE COSMIC RAYS MEASUREMENTS WITH PAMELA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Bruno

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The PAMELA experiment was launched on board the Resurs-DK1 satellite on June 15th 2006. The apparatus was designed to conduct precision studies of charged cosmic radiation over a wide energy range, from tens of MeV up to several hundred GeV, with unprecedented statistics. In five years of continuous data taking in space, PAMELA accurately measured the energy spectra of cosmic ray antiprotons and positrons, as well as protons, electrons and light nuclei, sometimes providing data in unexplored energetic regions. These important results have shed new light in several astrophysical fields like: an indirect search for Dark Matter, a search for cosmological antimatter (anti-Helium, and the validation of acceleration, transport and secondary production models of cosmic rays in the Galaxy. Some of the most important items of Solar and Magnetospheric physics were also investigated. Here we present the most recent results obtained by the PAMELA experiment.

  17. Atomic physics precise measurements and ultracold matter

    CERN Document Server

    Inguscio, Massimo

    2013-01-01

    Atomic Physics provides an expert guide to two spectacular new landscapes in physics: precision measurements, which have been revolutionized by the advent of the optical frequency comb, and atomic physics, which has been revolutionized by laser cooling. These advances are not incremental but transformative: they have generated a consilience between atomic and many-body physics, precipitated an explosion of scientific and technological applications, opened new areas of research, and attracted a brilliant generation of younger scientists. The research is advancing so rapidly, the barrage of applications is so dazzling, that students can be bewildered. For both students and experienced scientists, this book provides an invaluable description of basic principles, experimental methods, and scientific applications.

  18. Sfermion precision measurements at a linear collider

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Freitas, A.; Ananthanarayan, B.; Bartl, A.; Blair, G.; Bloechinger, C.; Boos, E.; Brandenburg, A.; Datta, A.; Djouadi, A.; Fraas, H.; Guasch, J.; Hesselbach, S.; Hidaka, K.; Hollik, W.; Kernreiter, T.; Maniatis, M.; Manteuffel, A. von; Martyn, H.-U.; Miller, D.J.; Moortgat-Pick, G.; Muehlleitner, M.; Nauenberg, U.; Nowak, H.; Porod, W.; Sola, J.; Sopczak, A.; Stahl, A.; Weber, M.M.; Zerwas, P.M.

    2003-01-01

    At prospective e ± e - linear colliders, the large cross-sections and clean signals of scalar fermion production--in particular for the scalar leptons - allow very precise measurements of their masses and couplings and the determination of their quantum numbers. Various methods are proposed for extracting these parameters from the data at the sfermion thresholds and in the continuum. At the same time, NLO radiative corrections and non-zero width effects have been calculated in order to match the experimental accuracy. The substantial mixing expected in the third generation opens up additional opportunities. Techniques are presented for determining potential CP-violating phases and for extracting tan β from the stau sector, in particular at high values. The consequences of possible large mass differences in the stop and sbottom system are explored in dedicated analyses

  19. Sfermion precision measurements at a linear collider

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Freitas, A.

    2003-01-01

    At future e + e - linear colliders, the event rates and clean signals of scalar fermion production--in particular for the scalar leptons--allow very precise measurements of their masses and couplings and the determination of their quantum numbers. Various methods are proposed for extracting these parameters from the data at the sfermion thresholds and in the continuum. At the same time, NLO radiative corrections and non-zero width effects have been calculated in order to match the experimental accuracy. The substantial mixing expected for the third generation sfermions opens up additional opportunities. Techniques are presented for determining potential CP-violating phases and for extracting tan β from the stau sector, in particular at high values. The consequences of possible large mass differences in the stop and sbottom system are explored in dedicated analyses

  20. Precision electroweak measurements on the $Z$ resonance

    CERN Document Server

    Schael, S; Brunelière, R; Buskulic, Damir; De Bonis, I; Décamp, D; Ghez, P; Goy, C; Jézéquel, S; Lees, J P; Lucotte, A; Martin, F; Merle, E; Minard, M N; Nief, J Y; Odier, P; Pietrzyk, B; Trocmé, B; Bravo, S; Casado, M P; Chmeissani, M; Comas, P; Crespo, J M; Fernández, E; Fernández-Bosman, M; Garrido, L; Graugès-Pous, E; Juste, A; Martínez, M; Merino, G; Miquel, R; Mir, L M; Orteu, S; Pacheco, A; Park, I C; Perlas, J; Riu, I; Ruiz, H; Sánchez, F; Colaleo, A; Creanza, D; De Filippis, N; De Palma, M; Iaselli, G; Maggi, G; Maggi, M; Nuzzo, S; Ranieri, A; Raso, G; Ruggieri, F; Selvaggi, G; Silvestris, L; Tempesta, P; Tricomi, A; Zito, G; Huang, X; Lin, J; Ouyang, Q; Wang, T; Xie, Y; Xu, R; Xue, S; Zhang, J; Zhang, L; Zhao, W; Abbaneo, D; Bazarko, A; Becker, U; Boix, G; Bird, F; Blucher, E; Bonvicini, B; Bright-Thomas, P; Barklow, T; Cattaneo, M; Cerutti, F; Clerbaux, B; Drevermann, H; Forty, R W; Frank, M; Greening, T C; Hagelberg, R; Halley, A W; Gianotti, F; Girone, M; Hansen, J B; Harvey, J; Jacobsen, R; Hutchcroft, D E; Janot, P; Jost, B; Knobloch, J; Kado, M; Lehraus, Ivan; Lazeyras, Pierre; Maley, P; Mato, P; May, J; Moutoussi, A; Pepé-Altarelli, M; Ranjard, F; Rolandi, Luigi; Schlatter, W D; Schmitt, B; Schneider, O; Tejessy, W; Teubert, F; Tomalin, I R; Tournefier, E; Veenhof, R; Valassi, A; Wiedenmann, W; Wright, A E; Ajaltouni, Ziad J; Badaud, F; Chazelle, G; Deschamps, O; Dessagne, S; Falvard, A; Ferdi, C; Fayolle, D; Gay, P; Guicheney, C; Henrard, P; Jousset, J; Michel, B; Monteil, S; Montret, J C; Pallin, D; Pascolo, J M; Perret, P; Podlyski, F; Bertelsen, H; Fernley, T; Hansen, J D; Hansen, J R; Hansen, P H; Kraan, A C; Lindahl, A; Møllerud, R; Nilsson, B S; Rensch, B; Wäänänen, A; Daskalakis, G; Kyriakis, A; Markou, C; Simopoulou, E; Siotis, I; Vayaki, A; Blondel, A; Bonneaud, G; Brient, J C; Machefert, F; Rougé, A; Rumpf, M; Swynghedauw, M; Tanaka, R; Verderi, M; Videau, H L; Ciulli, V; Focardi, E; Parrini, G; Zachariadou, K; Corden, M; Georgiopoulos, C H; Antonelli, A; Antonelli, M; Bencivenni, G; Bologna, G; Bossi, F; Campana, P; Capon, G; Chiarella, V; Felici, G; Laurelli, P; Mannocchi, G; Murtas, G P; Passalacqua, L; Picchi, P; Colrain, P; ten Have, I; Hughes, I S; Kennedy, J; Knowles, I G; Lynch, J G; Morton, W T; Negus, P; O'Shea, V; Raine, C; Reeves, P; Scarr, J M; Smith, K; Thompson, A S; Turnbull, R M; Wasserbaech, S R; Buchmüller, O L; Cavanaugh, R J; Dhamotharan, S; Geweniger, C; Hanke, P; Hansper, G; Hepp, V; Kluge, E E; Putzer, A; Sommer, J; Tittel, K; Werner, W; Wunsch, M; Beuselinck, R; Binnie, D M; Cameron, W; Davies, G; Dornan, P J; Goodsir, S M; Marinelli, N; Martin, E; Nash, J; Nowell, J; Rutherford, S A; Sedgbeer, J K; Thompson, J C; White, R; Williams, M D; Ghete, V M; Girtler, P; Kneringer, E; Kuhn, D; Rudolph, G; Bouhova-Thacker, E; Bowdery, C K; Buck, P G; Clarke, D P; Ellis, G; Finch, A J; Foster, F; Hughes, G; Jones, R W L; Keemer, N R; Pearson, M R; Robertson, N A; Sloan, T; Smizanska, M; Snow, S W; Williams, M I; van der Aa, O; Delaere, C; Leibenguth, G; Lemaître, V; Bauerdick, L A T; Blumenschein, U; Van Gemmeren, P; Giehl, I; Hölldorfer, F; Jakobs, K; Kasemann, M; Kayser, F; Kleinknecht, K; Müller, A S; Quast, G; Renk, B; Rohne, E; Sander, H G; Schmeling, S; Wachsmuth, H W; Wanke, R; Zeitnitz, C; Ziegler, T; Aubert, Jean-Jacques; Benchouk, C; Bonissent, A; Carr, J; Coyle, P; Curtil, C; Ealet, A; Etienne, F; Fouchez, D; Motsch, F; Payre, P; Rousseau, D; Talby, M; Thulasidas, M; Aleppo, M; Ragusa, F; Büscher, V; David, A; Dietl, H; Ganis, G; Hüttmann, K; Lütjens, G; Mannert, C; Männer, W; Moser, H G; Settles, R; Seywerd, H; Stenzel, H; Villegas, M; Wolf, G; Boucrot, J; Callot, O; Chen, S; Cordier, A; Davier, M; Duflot, L; Grivaz, J F; Heusse, P; Jacholkowska, A; Le Diberder, F R; Lefrançois, J; Mutz, A M; Schune, M H; Serin, L; Veillet, J J; Videau, I; Zerwas, D; Azzurri, P; Bagliesi, G; Bettarini, S; Boccali, T; Bozzi, C; Calderini, G; Dell'Orso, R; Fantechi, R; Ferrante, I; Fidecaro, F; Foà, L; Giammanco, A; Giassi, A; Gregorio, A; Ligabue, F; Lusiani, A; Marrocchesi, P S; Messineo, A; Palla, F; Rizzo, G; Sanguinetti, G; Sciabà, A; Sguazzoni, G; Spagnolo, P; Steinberger, J; Tenchini, R; Vannini, C; Venturi, A; Verdini, P G; Awunor, O; Blair, G A; Cowan, G; García-Bellido, A; Green, M G; Medcalf, T; Strong, J A; Teixeira-Dias, P; Botterill, David R; Clifft, R W; Edgecock, T R; Edwards, M; Haywood, S J; Norton, P R; Ward, J J; Bloch-Devaux, B; Boumediene, D E; Colas, P; Emery, S; Fabbro, B; Kozanecki, Witold; Lançon, E; Lemaire, M C; Locci, E; Pérez, P; Rander, J; Renardy, J F; Roussarie, A; Schuller, J P; Schwindling, J; Tuchming, B; Vallage, B; Black, S N; Dann, J H; Kim, H Y; Konstantinidis, N P; Litke, A M; McNeil, M A; Taylor, G; Booth, C N; Cartwright, S; Combley, F; Hodgson, P N; Lehto, M H; Thompson, L F; Affholderbach, K; Barberio, E; Böhrer, A; Brandt, S; Burkhardt, H; Feigl, E; Grupen, C; Hess, J; Lutters, G; Meinhard, H; Minguet-Rodríguez, J A; Mirabito, L; Misiejuk, A; Neugebauer, E; Ngac, A; Prange, G; Rivera, F; Saraiva, P; Schäfer, U; Sieler, U; Smolik, L; Stephan, F; Trier, H; Apollonio, M; Borean, C; Bosisio, L; Della Marina, R; Giannini, G; Gobbo, B; Musolino, G; Pitis, L; He, H; Kim, H; Pütz, J; Rothberg, J E; Armstrong, S R; Bellantoni, L; Berkelman, K; Cinabro, D; Conway, J S; Cranmer, K; Elmer, P; Feng, Z; Ferguson, D P S; Gao, Y; González, S; Grahl, J; Harton, J L; Hayes, O J; Hu, H; Jin, S; Johnson, R P; Kile, J; McNamara, P A; Nielsen, J; Orejudos, W; Pan, Y B; Saadi, Y; Scott, I J; Sharma, V; Walsh, A M; Walsh, J; Wear, J; Von Wimmersperg-Töller, J H; Wu, J; Wu, S L; Wu, X; Yamartino, J M; Zobernig, G; Dissertori, G; Abdallah, J; Abreu, P; Adam, W; Adye, T; Adzic, P; Ajinenko, I; Albrecht, T; Alderweireld, T; Alekseev, G D; Alemany-Fernandez, R; Allmendinger, T; Allport, P P; Almehed, S; Amaldi, Ugo; Amapane, N; Amato, S; Anashkin, E; Anassontzis, E G; Andersson, P; Andreazza, A; Andringa, S; Anjos, N; Antilogus, P; Apel, W D; Arnoud, Y; Ask, S; Åsman, B; Augustin, J E; Augustinus, A; Baillon, Paul; Ballestrero, A; Bambade, P; Barão, F; Barbiellini, G; Barbier, R; Bardin, D; Barker, G; Baroncelli, A; Battaglia, M; Baubillier, M; Becks, K H; Begalli, M; Behrmann, A; Beillière, P; Belokopytov, Yu A; Belous, K S; Ben-Haim, E; Benekos, N; Benvenuti, A C; Bérat, C; Berggren, M; Berntzon, L; Bertini, D; Bertrand, D; Besançon, M; Besson, N; Bianchi, F; Bigi, M; Bilenky, S M; Bizouard, M A; Bloch, D; Blom, M; Bluj, M; Bonesini, M; Bonivento, W; Boonekamp, M; Booth, P S L; Borgland, A W; Borisov, G; Bosio, C; Botner, O; Boudinov, E; Bouquet, B; Bourdarios, C; Bowcock, T J V; Boyko, I; Bozovic, I; Bozzo, M; Bracko, M; Branchini, P; Brenke, T; Brenner, R; Brodet, E; Brückman, P; Brunet, J M; Bugge, L; Buran, T; Burgsmüller, T; Buschbeck, Brigitte; Buschmann, P; Cabrera, S; Caccia, M; Calvi, M; Camacho-Rozas, A J; Camporesi, T; Canale, V; Canepa, M; Carena, F; Carroll, L; Caso, C; Castillo-Gimenez, M V; Castro, N; Cattai, A; Cavallo, F; Chabaud, V; Chapkin, M; Charpentier, P; Chaussard, L; Checchia, P; Chelkov, G A; Chen, M; Chierici, R; Shlyapnikov, P; Chochula, P; Chorowicz, V; Chudoba, J; Chung, S U; Cieslik, K; Collins, P; Colomer, M; Contri, R; Cortina, E; Cosme, G; Cossutti, F; Costa, M J; Cowell, J H; Crawley, H B; Crennell, D J; Crépé, S; Crosetti, G; Cuevas-Maestro, J; Czellar, S; D'Hondt, J; D'Almagne, B; Dalmau, J; Damgaard, G; Davenport, M; Da Silva, T; Da Silva, W; Deghorain, A; Della Ricca, G; Delpierre, P A; Demaria, N; De Angelis, A; de Boer, Wim; De Brabandere, S; De Clercq, C; De Lotto, B; De Maria, N; De Min, A; De Paula, L; Dijkstra, H; Di Ciaccio, L; Di Diodato, A; Di Simone, A; Djannati, A; Dolbeau, J; Doroba, K; Dracos, M; Drees, J; Drees, K A; Dris, M; Duperrin, A; Durand, J D; Ehret, R; Eigen, G; Ekelöf, T J C; Ekspong, G; Ellert, M; Elsing, M; Engel, J P; Erzen, B; Espirito-Santo, M C; Falk, E; Fanourakis, G K; Fassouliotis, D; Fayot, J; Feindt, M; Fenyuk, A; Fernández, J; Ferrari, P; Ferrer, A; Ferrer-Ribas, E; Ferro, F; Fichet, S; Firestone, A; Fischer, P A; Flagmeyer, U; Föth, H; Fokitis, E; Fontanelli, F; Franek, B; Frodesen, A G; Frühwirth, R; Fulda-Quenzer, F; Fuster, J; Galloni, A; Gamba, D; Gamblin, S; Gandelman, M; García, C; García, J; Gaspar, C; Gaspar, M; Gasparini, U; Gavillet, P; Gazis, E; Gelé, D; Gerber, J P; Gerdyukov, L N; Ghodbane, N; Gil, I; Glege, F; Gokieli, R; Golob, B; Gómez-Ceballos, G; Gonçalves, P; González-Caballero, I; Gopal, G; Gorn, L; Górski, M; Guz, Yu; Gracco, Valerio; Graziani, E; Green, C; Grefrath, A; Grimm, H J; Gris, P; Grosdidier, G; Grzelak, K; Günther, M; Guy, J; Haag, C; Hahn, F; Hahn, S; Haider, S; Hallgren, A; Hamacher, K; Hamilton, K; Hansen, J; Harris, F J; Haug, S; Hauler, F; Hedberg, V; Heising, S; Hennecke, M; Henriques, R; Hernández, J J; Herquet, P; Herr, H; Hessing, T L; Heuser, J M; Higón, E; Hoffman, J; Holmgren, S O; Holt, P J; Holthuizen, D J; Hoorelbeke, S; Houlden, M A; Hrubec, Josef; Huber, M; Huet, K; Hughes, G J; Hultqvist, K; Jackson, J N; Jacobsson, R; Jalocha, P; Janik, R; Jarlskog, C; Jarlskog, G; Jarry, P; Jean-Marie, B; Jeans, D; Johansson, E K; Johansson, P D; Jonsson, P; Joram, C; Juillot, P; Jungermann, L; Kapusta, F; Karafasoulis, K; Katsanevas, S; Katsoufis, E C; Keränen, R; Kernel, G; Kersevan, B P; Kerzel, U; Khomenko, B A; Khovanskii, N N; Kiiskinen, A P; King, B T; Kinvig, A; Kjaer, N J; Klapp, O; Klein, H; Kluit, P; Knoblauch, D; Kokkinias, P; Konoplyannikov, A K; Koratzinos, M; Kostyukhin, V; Kourkoumelis, C; Kuznetsov, O; Krammer, M; Kreuter, C; Kriznic, E; Krstic, J; Krumshtein, Z; Kubinec, P; Kucewicz, W; Kucharczyk, M; Kurowska, J; Kurvinen, K; Lamsa, J; Lanceri, L; Lane, D W; Langefeld, P; Lapin, V; Laugier, J P; Lauhakangas, R; Leder, G; Ledroit, F; Lefébure, V; Leinonen, L; Leisos, A; Leitner, R; Lemonne, J; Lenzen, G; Lepeltier, V; Lesiak, T; Lethuillier, M; Libby, J; Liebig, W; Liko, D; Lipniacka, A; Lippi, I; Lörstad, B; Lokajícek, M; Loken, J G; Lopes, J H; López, J M; López-Fernandez, R; Loukas, D; Lutz, P; Lyons, L; MacNaughton, J; Mahon, J R; Maio, A; Malek, A; Malmgren, T G M; Maltezos, S; Malychev, V; Mandl, F; Marco, J; Marco, R; Maréchal, B; Margoni, M; Marin, J C; Mariotti, C; Markou, A; Martínez-Rivero, C; Martínez-Vidal, F; Martí i García, S; Masik, J; Mastroyiannopoulos, N; Matorras, F; Matteuzzi, C; Matthiae, Giorgio; Mazzucato, F; Mazzucato, M; McCubbin, M; McKay, R; McNulty, R; McPherson, G; Meroni, C; Meyer, W T; Myagkov, A; Migliore, E; Mitaroff, W A; Mjörnmark, U; Moa, T; Moch, M; Møller, R; Mönig, K; Monge, R; Montenegro, J; Moraes, D; Moreau, X; Moreno, S; Morettini, P; Morton, G; Müller, U; Münich, K; Mulders, M; Mulet-Marquis, C; Mundim, L; Muresan, R; Murray, W; Muryn, B; Myatt, G; Myklebust, T; Naraghi, F; Nassiakou, M; Navarria, Francesco Luigi; Navas, S; Nawrocki, K; Negri, P; Neufeld, N; Neumann, W; Neumeister, N; Nicolaidou, R; Nielsen, B S; Nieuwenhuizen, M; Niezurawski, P; Nikolaenko, V; Nikolenko, M; Nomokonov, V P; Normand, A; Nygren, A; Oblakowska-Mucha, A; Obraztsov, V F; Olshevskii, A G; Onofre, A; Orava, R; Orazi, G; Österberg, K; Ouraou, A; Oyanguren, A; Paganini, P; Paganoni, M; Paiano, S; Pain, R; Paiva, R; Palacios, J P; Palka, H; Papadopoulou, T D; Papageorgiou, K; Pape, L; Parkes, C; Parodi, F; Parzefall, U; Passeri, A; Passon, O; Pavel, T; Pegoraro, M; Peralta, L; Perepelitsa, V F; Pernicka, M; Perrotta, A; Petridou, C; Petrolini, A; Phillips, H T; Piana, G; Piedra, J; Pieri, L; Pierre, F; Pimenta, M; Piotto, E; Podobnik, T; Poireau, V; Pol, M E; Polok, G; Polycarpo, E; Poropat, P; Pozdnyakov, V; Privitera, P; Pukhaeva, N; Pullia, A; Radojicic, D; Ragazzi, S; Rahmani, H; Rakoczy, D; Rames, J; Ramler, L; Ratoff, P N; Read, A; Rebecchi, P; Redaelli, N G; Regler, Meinhard; Rehn, J; Reid, D; Reinhardt, R; Renton, P B; Resvanis, L K; Richard, F; Rídky, J; Rinaudo, G; Ripp-Baudot, I; Rivero, M; Rodríguez, D; Rohne, O; Romero, A; Ronchese, P; Rosenberg, E I; Rosinsky, P; Roudeau, P; Rovelli, T; Royon, C; Ruhlmann-Kleider, V; Ruiz, A; Ryabtchikov, D; Saarikko, H; Sacquin, Yu; Sadovskii, A; Sajot, G; Salmi, L; Salt, J; Sampsonidis, D; Sannino, M; Savoy-Navarro, A; Scheidle, T; Schneider, H; Schwemling, P; Schwering, B; Schwickerath, U; Schyns, M A E; Scuri, F; Seager, P; Sedykh, Yu; Segar, A; Seibert, N; Sekulin, R L; Shellard, R C; Sheridan, A; Siebel, M; Silvestre, R; Simard, L; Simonetto, F; Sisakian, A; Skaali, T B; Smadja, G; Smirnov, N; Smirnova, O; Smith, G R; Sokolov, A; Sopczak, A; Sosnowski, R; Spassoff, Tz; Spiriti, E; Sponholz, P; Squarcia, S; Stampfer, D; Stanescu, C; Stanic, S; Stanitzki, M; Stapnes, S; Stevenson, K; Stocchi, A; Strauss, J; Strub, R; Stugu, B; Szczekowski, M; Szeptycka, M; Szumlak, T; Tabarelli de Fatis, T; Taffard, A C; Tegenfeldt, F; Terranova, F; Thomas, J; Tilquin, A; Timmermans, J; Tinti, N; Tkatchev, L G; Tobin, M; Todorov, T; Todorovova, S; Toet, D Z; Tomaradze, A G; Tomé, B; Tonazzo, A; Tortora, L; Tortosa, P; Tranströmer, G; Travnicek, P; Treille, D; Tristram, G; Trochimczuk, M; Trombini, A; Troncon, C; Tsirou, A; Turluer, M L; Tyapkin, I A; Tyapkin, P; Tzamarias, S; Ullaland, O; Uvarov, V; Valenti, G; Vallazza, E; Van der Velde, C; van Apeldoorn, G W; van Dam, P; Van den Boeck, W; Van Doninck, W K; Van Eldik, J; Van Lysebetten, A; Van Remortel, N; Van Vulpen, I; Vassilopoulos, N; Vegni, G; Veloso, F; Ventura, L; Venus, W; Verbeure, F; Verdier, P; Verlato, M; Vertogradov, L S; Verzi, V; Vilanova, D; Vitale, L; Vlasov, E; Vodopyanov, A S; Vollmer, C; Voulgaris, G; Vrba, V; Wahlen, H; Walck, C; Washbrook, A J; Weiser, C; Wetherell, Alan M; Wicke, D; Wickens, J; Wilkinson, G; Winter, M; Witek, M; Wlodek, T; Yi, J; Yushchenko, O P; Zaitsev, A; Zalewska-Bak, A; Zalewski, P; Zavrtanik, D; Zevgolatakos, E; Zhuravlov, V; Zimin, N I; Zintchenko, A; Zoller, P; Zucchelli, G C; Zumerle, G; Zupan, M; Acciarri, M; Achard, P; Adriani, O; Aguilar-Benítez, M; Alcaraz, J; Alemanni, G; Allaby, James V; Aloisio, A; Alviggi, M G; Ambrosi, G; Anderhub, H; Andreev, V P; Angelescu, T; Anselmo, F; Arefev, A; Azemoon, T; Aziz, T; Bagnaia, P; Bajo, A; Baksay, G; Baksay, L; Balandras, A; Baldew, S V; Ball, R C; Banerjee, S; Banerjee, Sw; Barczyk, A; Barillère, R; Barone, L; Bartalini, P; Basile, M; Batalova, N; Battiston, R; Bay, A; Becattini, F; Behner, F; Bellucci, L; Berbeco, R; Berdugo, J; Berges, P; Bertucci, B; Betev, B L; Bhattacharya, S; Biasini, M; Biglietti, M; Biland, A; Blaising, J J; Blyth, S C; Bobbink, G J; Böhm, A; Boldizsar, L; Borgia, B; Bottai, S; Bourilkov, D; Bourquin, M; Braccini, S; Branson, J G; Brigljevic, V; Brochu, F; Brock, I C; Buffini, A; Buijs, A; Burger, J D; Burger, W J; Button, A J; Cai, X D; Campanelli, M; Capell, M; Cara Romeo, G; Carlino, G; Cartacci, A; Casaus, J; Castellini, G; Cavallari, F; Cavallo, N; Cecchi, C; Cerrada, M; Cesaroni, F; Chamizo-Llatas, M; Chang, Y H; Chaturvedi, U K; Chemarin, M; Chen, A; Chen, G; Chen, G M; Chen, H F; Chen, H S; Chiefari, G; Cifarelli, L; Cindolo, F; Civinini, C; Clare, I; Clare, R; Coignet, G; Colijn, A P; Colino, N; Costantini, S; Cotorobai, F; Cozzoni, B; de la Cruz, B; Csilling, A; Cucciarelli, S; Dai, T S; van Dalen, J A; D'Alessandro, R; De Asmundis, R; Debreczeni, J; Deglon, P; Degré, A; Dehmelt, K; Deiters, K; Della Volpe, D; Delmeire, E; Denes, P; De Notaristefani, F; De Salvo, A; Diemoz, M; Dierckxsens, M; Van Dierendonck, D N; Di Lodovico, F; Dionisi, C; Dittmar, M; Dominguez, A; Doria, A; Dova, M T; Duchesneau, D; Dufournaud, D; Duda, M; Duinker, P; Durán, I; Dutta, S; Echenard, B; Eline, A; El-Hage, A; El-Mamouni, H; Engler, A; Eppling, F J; Erné, F C; Extermann, P; Fabre, M; Faccini, R; Falagán, M A; Falciano, S; Favara, A; Fay, J; Fedin, O; Felcini, M; Ferguson, T; Ferroni, F; Fesefeldt, H S; Fiandrini, E; Field, J H; Filthaut, F; Fisher, P H; Fisher, W; Fisk, I; Forconi, G; Fredj, L; Freudenreich, Klaus; Furetta, C; Galaktionov, Yu; Ganguli, S N; García-Abia, P; Gataullin, M; Gau, S S; Gentile, S; Gheordanescu, N; Giagu, S; Gong, Z F; Grenier, G; Grimm, O; Grünewald, M W; Guida, M; van Gulik, R; Gupta, V K; Gurtu, A; Gutay, L J; Haas, D; Hasan, A; Hatzifotiadou, D; Hebbeker, T; Hervé, A; Hidas, P; Hirschfelder, J; Hofer, H; Hohlmann, M; Holzner, G; Hoorani, H; Hou, S R; Iashvili, I; Innocente, V; Jin, B N; Jindal, P; Jones, L W; de Jong, P; Josa-Mutuberria, I; Khan, R A; Kaur, M; Kienzle-Focacci, M N; Kim, D; Kim, J K; Kirkby, Jasper; Kiss, D; Kittel, E W; Klimentov, A; König, A C; Koffeman, E; Kopal, M; Kopp, A; Koutsenko, V F; Kraber, M; Krämer, R W; Krenz, W; Krüger, A; Kuijten, H; Kunin, A; Ladrón de Guevara, P; Laktineh, I; Landi, G; Lassila-Perini, K M; Lebeau, M; Lebedev, A; Lebrun, P; Lecomte, P; Lecoq, P; Le Coultre, P; Lee, H J; Le Goff, J M; Leiste, R; Leonardi, E; Levtchenko, M; Levchenko, P M; Li, C; Likhoded, S; Lin, C H; Lin, W T; Linde, Frank L; Lista, L; Liu, Z A; Lohmann, W; Longo, E; Lü, Y S; Lu, W; Lübelsmeyer, K; Luci, C; Luckey, D; Luminari, L; Lugnier, L; Lustermann, W; Ma, W G; Maity, M; Malgeri, L; Malinin, A; Maña, C; Mangeol, D J J; Mans, J; Marchesini, P A; Marian, G; Martin, J P; Marzano, F; Massaro, G G G; Mazumdar, K; McNeil, R R; Mele, S; Merola, L; Merk, M; Meschini, M; Metzger, W J; Von der Mey, M; Mihul, A; Milcent, H; Mirabelli, G; Mnich, J; Mohanty, G B; Molnár, P; Monteleoni, B; Moulik, T; Muanza, G S; Muheim, F; Muijs, A J M; Musicar, B; Musy, M; Nagy, S; Natale, S; Napolitano, M; Nessi-Tedaldi, F; Newman, H; Niessen, T; Nisati, A; Novák, T; Nowak, H; Ofierzynski, R A; Organtini, G; Oulianov, A; Pal, I; Palomares, C; Pandoulas, D; Paoletti, S; Paoloni, A; Paolucci, P; Paramatti, R; Park, H K; Park, I H; Pascale, G; Passaleva, G; Patricelli, S; Paul, T; Pauluzzi, M; Paus, C; Pauss, F; Peach, D; Pedace, M; Pensotti, S; Perret-Gallix, D; Petersen, B; Piccolo, D; Pierella, F; Pieri, M; Pioppi, M; Piroué, P A; Pistolesi, E; Plyaskin, V; Pohl, M; Pozhidaev, V; Postema, H; Pothier, J; Produit, N; Prokofiev, D O; Prokofev, D; Quartieri, J; Rahal-Callot, G; Rahaman, M A; Raics, P; Raja, N; Ramelli, R; Rancoita, P G; Ranieri, R; Raspereza, A V; Razis, P; Ren, D; Rescigno, M; Reucroft, S; Van Rhee, T; Riemann, S; Riles, K; Robohm, A; Rodin, J; Roe, B P; Romero, L; Rosca, A; Rosemann, C; Rosenbleck, C; Rosier-Lees, S; Roth, S; Rubio, J A; Ruggiero, G; Ruschmeier, D; Rykaczewski, H; Sakharov, A; Saremi, S; Sarkar, S; Salicio, J; Sánchez, E; Sanders, M P; Sarakinos, M E; Schäfer, C; Shchegelskii, V; Schmidt-Kärst, S; Schmitz, D; Schopper, Herwig Franz; Schotanus, D J; Schwering, G; Sciacca, C; Sciarrino, D; Seganti, A; Servoli, L; Shevchenko, S; Shivarov, N; Shoutko, V; Shumilov, E; Shvorob, A; Siedenburg, T; Son, D; Smith, B; Souga, C; Spillantini, P; Steuer, M; Stickland, D P; Stone, A; Stone, H; Stoyanov, B; Strässner, A; Sudhakar, K; Sultanov, G G; Sun, L Z; Sushkov, S; Suter, H; Swain, J D; Szillási, Z; Sztaricskai, T; Tang, X W; Tarjan, P; Tauscher, L; Taylor, L; Tellili, B; Teyssier, D; Timmermans, C; Ting, Samuel C C; Ting, S M; Tonwar, S C; Tóth, J; Tully, C; Tung, K L; Uchida, Y; Ulbricht, J; Uwer, U; Valente, E; Van de Walle, R T; Vásquez, R; Veszpremi, V; Vesztergombi, G; Vetlitskii, I; Vicinanza, D; Viertel, G; Villa, S; Vivargent, M; Vlachos, S; Vodopyanov, I; Vogel, H; Vogt, H; Vorobev, I; Vorobyov, A A; Vorvolakos, A; Wadhwa, M; Wallraff, W; Wang, Q; Wang, X L; Wang, Z M; Weber, A; Weber, M; Wienemann, P; Wilkens, H; Wu, S X; Wynhoff, S; Xia, L; Xu, Z Z; Yamamoto, J; Yang, B Z; Yang, C G; Yang, H J; Yang, M; Ye, J B; Yeh, S C; You, J M; Zalite, A; Zalite, Yu; Zhang, Z P; Zhao, J; Zhu, G Y; Zhu, R Y; Zhuang, H L; Zichichi, A; Zilizi, G; Zimmermann, B; Zöller, M; Abbiendi, G; Ainsley, C; Åkesson, P F; Alexander, G; Allison, J; Altekamp, N; Amaral, P; Ametewee, K A; Anagnostou, G; Anderson, K J; Anderson, S; Arcelli, S; Armitage, J C; Asai, S; Ashby, S F; Ashton, P; Astbury, A; Axen, D; Azuelos, Georges; Bahan, G A; Bailey, I; Baines, J T M; Ball, A H; Banks, J; Barillari, T; Barker, G J; Barlow, R J; Barnett, S; Bartoldus, R; Batley, J Richard; Beaudoin, G; Bechtle, P; Bechtluft, J; Beck, A; Becker, J; Beeston, C; Behnke, T; Bell, A N; Bell, K W; Bell, P J; Bella, G; Bellerive, A; Benelli, G; Bentvelsen, Stanislaus Cornelius Maria; Berlich, P; Bethke, Siegfried; Biebel, O; Binder, U; Blobel, Volker; Bloodworth, Ian J; Bloomer, J E; Bock, P; Boden, B; Böhme, J; Boeriu, O; Bonacorsi, D; Bosch, H M; Bougerolle, S; Boutemeur, M; Bouwens, B T; Brabson, B B; Braibant, S; Breuker, H; Brigliadori, L; Brown, R M; Brun, R; Bürgin, R; Büsser, K; Burckhart, H J; Burgard, C; Cammin, J; Campana, S; Capiluppi, P; Carnegie, R K; Caron, B; Carter, A A; Carter, J R; Chang, C Y; Charlesworth, C; Charlton, D G; Chrin, J T M; Chrisman, D; Chu, S L; Ciocca, C; Clarke, P E L; Clay, E; Clayton, J C; Cohen, I; Collins, W J; Conboy, J E; Cooke, O C; Cooper, M; Couch, M; Couchman, J; Coupland, M; do Couto e Silva, E; Coxe, R L; Cuffiani, M; Dado, S; Dallapiccola, C; Dallavalle, G M; Dallison, S; Darling, C; De Jong, S; de Roeck, A; De Wolf, E A; Debu, P; Deng, H; Deninno, M M; Dervan, P; Desch, Klaus; Dieckmann, A; Dienes, B; Dixit, M S; Donkers, M; Doucet, M; Dubbert, J; Duchovni, E; Duckeck, G; Duerdoth, I P; Dumas, D J P; Eckerlin, G; Edwards, J E G; Elcombe, P A; Estabrooks, P G; Evans, H G; Evans, M; Fabbri, F; Fanti, M; Fath, P; Feld, L; Fiedler, F; Fierro, M; Fincke-Keeler, M; Fischer, H M; Fleck, I; Folman, R; Fong, D G; Ford, M; Foucher, M; Frey, A; Fürtjes, A; Fukui, H; Fukunaga, C; Futyan, D I; Gagnon, P; Gaidot, A; Ganel, O; Gary, J W; Gascon, J; Gascon-Shotkin, S M; Gaycken, G; Geddes, N I; Geich-Gimbel, C; Gensler, S W; Gentit, F X; Geralis, T; Giacomelli, G; Giacomelli, P; Giacomelli, R; Gibson, V; Gibson, W R; Gillies, James D; Gingrich, D M; Giunta, M; Glenzinski, D A; Goldberg, J; Goodrick, M J; Gorn, W; Graham, K; Grandi, C; Grant, F C; Gross, E; Grunhaus, Jacob; Gruwé, M; Günther, P O; Sen-Gupta, A; Hagemann, J; Hajdu, C; Hamann, M; Hanson, G G; Hansroul, M; Hapke, M; Harder, K; Harel, A; Hargrove, C K; Harin-Dirac, M; Harrison, P F; Hart, P A; Hartmann, C; Hattersley, P M; Hauschild, M; Hawkes, C M; Hawkings, R; Heflin, E; Hemingway, R J; Hensel, C; Herten, G; Heuer, R D; Hill, J C; Hillier, S J; Hilse, T; Hinshaw, D A; Ho, C; Hoare, J; Hobbs, J D; Hobson, P R; Hochman, D; Höcker, Andreas; Hoffman, K; Holl, B; Homer, R J; Honma, A K; Horváth, D; Hossain, K R; Howard, R; Howarth, C P; Hüntemeyer, P; Hughes-Jones, R E; Humbert, R; Igo-Kemenes, P; Ihssen, H; Imrie, D C; Ingram, M R; Ishii, K; Jacob, F R; Janissen, A C; Jawahery, A; Jeffreys, P W; Jeremie, H; Jimack, M; Jobes, M; Joly, A; Jones, C R; Jones, G; Jones, M; Jost, U; Jovanovic, P; Jui, C; Kanaya, N; Kanzaki, J; Karapetian, G V; Karlen, D; Kartvelishvili, V G; Kawagoe, K; Kawamoto, T; Keeler, R K; Kellogg, R G; Kennedy, B W; Kim, D H; King, B J; Kirk, J; Klein, K; Kleinwort, C; Klem, D E; Klier, A; Kluth, S; Kobayashi, T; Kobel, M; Köpke, L; Koetke, D S; Kokott, T P; Komamiya, S; Kormos, L; Kowalewski, R V; Kramer, T; Kral, J F; Kress, T; Kreutzmann, H; Krieger, P; Von Krogh, J; Kroll, J; Krop, D; Krüger, K; Kühl, T; Kupper, M; Kuwano, M; Kyberd, P; Lafferty, G D; Lafoux, H; Lahmann, R; Lai, W P; Lamarche, F; Landsman, H; Lanske, D; Larson, W J; Lauber, J; Lautenschlager, S R; Lawson, I; Layter, J G; Lazic, D; Le Dû, P; Leblanc, P; Lee, A M; Lefebvre, E; Leins, A; Lellouch, D; Lennert, P; Leroy, C; Lessard, L; Letts, J; Levegrün, S; Levinson, L; Lewis, C; Liebisch, R; Lillich, J; Littlewood, C; Lloyd, A W; Lloyd, S L; Loebinger, F K; Long, G D; Lorah, J M; Lorazo, B; Losty, Michael J; Lou, X C; Lü, J; Ludwig, A; Ludwig, J; Luig, A; Macchiolo, A; MacPherson, A; Mader, W; Mättig, P; Malik, A; Mannelli, M; Marcellini, S; Marchant, T E; Maringer, G; Markus, C; Martin, A J; Martínez, G; Masetti, G; Mashimo, T; Matthews, W; Maur, U; McDonald, W J; McGowan, R F; McKenna, J; McKigney, E A; McMahon, T J; McNab, A I; McNutt, J R; McPherson, A C; McPherson, R A; Meijers, F; Méndez-Lorenzo, P; Menges, W; Menke, S; Menszner, D; Merritt, F S; Mes, H; Meyer, J; Meyer, N; Michelini, A; Middleton, R P; Mihara, S; Mikenberg, G; Mildenberger, J; Miller, D J; Milstene, C; Mir, R; Moed, S; Mohr, W; Moisan, C; Montanari, A; Mori, T; Moss, M W; Mouthuy, T; Murphy, P G; Mutter, A; Nagai, K; Nakamura, I; Nanjo, H; Neal, H A; Nellen, B; Nguyen, H H; Nijjhar, B; Nisius, R; Nozaki, M; Oakham, F G; Odorici, F; Ogg, M; Ögren, H O; Oh, A; Oh, H; Okpara, A; Oldershaw, N J; Omori, T; O'Neale, S W; O'Neill, B P; Oram, C J; Oreglia, M J; Orito, S; Pahl, C; Pálinkás, J; Palmonari, F; Pansart, J P; Panzer-Steindel, B; Paschievici, P; Pásztor, G; Pater, J R; Patrick, G N; Pawley, S J; Paz-Jaoshvili, N; Pearce, M J; Petzold, S; Pfeifenschneider, P; Pfister, P; Pilcher, J E; Pinfold, J L; Pitman, D; Plane, D E; Poffenberger, P R; Poli, B; Polok, J; Pooth, O; Posthaus, A; Pouladdej, A; del Pozo, L A; Prebys, E; Pritchard, T W; Przybycien, M B; Przysiezniak, H; Quadt, A; Rabbertz, K; Raith, B; Redmond, M W; Rees, D L; Rembser, C; Renkel, P; Richards, G E; Rick, H; Rigby, D; Robins, S A; Robinson, D; Rodning, N; Rollnik, A; Roney, J M; Rooke, A M; Ros, E; Rosati, S; Roscoe, K; Rossberg, S; Rossi, A M; Rosvick, M; Routenburg, P; Rozen, Y; Runge, K; Runólfsson, O; Ruppel, U; Rust, D R; Rylko, R; Sachs, K; Saeki, T; Sahr, O; Sanghera, S; Sarkisyan-Grinbaum, E; Sasaki, M; Sbarra, C; Schaile, A D; Schaile, O; Schappert, W; Scharf, F; Scharff-Hansen, P; Schenk, P; Schieck, J; von der Schmitt, H; Schmitt, S; Schörner-Sadenius, T; Schreiber, S; Schröder, M; Schütz, P; Schultz-Coulon, H C; Schulz, M; Schumacher, M; Schwarz, J; Schwick, C; Scott, W G; Settles, M; Seuster, R; Shears, T G; Shen, B C; Shepherd-Themistocleous, C H; Sherwood, P; Shypit, R; Simon, A; Singh, P; Siroli, G P; Sittler, A; Skillman, A; Skuja, A; Smith, A M; Smith, T J; Snow, G A; Sobie, R J; Söldner-Rembold, S; Spagnolo, S; Spanó, F; Springer, R W; Sproston, M; Starks, M; Steiert, M; Stephens, K; Steuerer, J; Stier, H E; Stockhausen, B; Stoll, K; Ströhmer, R; Strom, D; Strumia, F; Stumpf, L; Surrow, B; Szymanski, P; Tafirout, R; Takeda, H; Takeshita, T; Talbot, S D; Tanaka, S; Taras, P; Tarem, S; Tasevsky, M; Taylor, R J; Tecchio, M; Tesch, N; Teuscher, R; Thackray, N J; Thiergen, M; Thomson, M A; Von Törne, E; Towers, S; Toya, D; Trócsányi, Z L; Tran, P; Trefzger, T; Tresilian, N J; Trigger, I; Tscheulin, M; Tsukamoto, T; Tsur, E; Turcot, A S; Turner-Watson, M F; Tysarczyk-Niemeyer, G; Ueda, I; Ujvári, B; Utzat, P; Vachon, B; Van den Plas, D; Van Kooten, R; VanDalen, G J; Vannerem, P; Vasseur, G; Vertesi, R; Verzocchi, M; Vikas, P; Vincter, M G; Virtue, C J; Vokurka, E H; Vollmer, C F; Voss, H; Vossebeld, Joost Herman; Wäckerle, F; Wagner, A; Wagner, D L; Wahl, C; Walker, J P; Waller, D; Ward, C P; Ward, D R; Watkins, P M; Watson, A T; Watson, N K; Weber, P; Weisz, S; Wells, P S; Wengler, T; Wermes, N; Wetterling, D; Weymann, M; Whalley, M A; White, J S; Wilkens, B; Wilson, J A; Wilson, G W; Wingerter, Isabelle; Winterer, V H; Wood, N C; Wotton, S; Wyatt, T R; Yaari, R; Yamashita, S; Yang, Y; Yeaman, A; Yekutieli, G; Yurko, M; Zacek, V; Zacharov, I E; Zer-Zion, D; Zeuner, W; Zivkovic, L; Zorn, G T; Abe, Kenji; Abe, Koya; Abe, T; Abt, I; Acton, P D; Adam, I; Agnew, G; Akagi, T; Akimoto, H; Allen, N J; Ash, W W; Aston, D; Bacchetta, N; Baird, K G; Baltay, C; Band, H R; Barakat, M B; Baranko, G J; Bardon, O; Barklow, T L; Bashindzhagian, G L; Bauer, J M; Bazarko, A O; Bean, A; Bellodi, G; Ben-David, R; Berger, R; Bienz, T; Bilei, G M; Bisello, D; Blaylock, G; Bogart, J R; Bolen, B; Bolton, T; Bower, G R; Brau, J E; Breidenbach, M; Bugg, W M; Burke, D; Burnett, T H; Burrows, P N; Busza, W; Calcaterra, A; Caldwell, D O; Camanzi, B; Carpinelli, M; Cassell, R; Castaldi, R; Castro, A; Cavalli-Sforza, M; Chadwick, George B; Chou, A; Church, E; Claus, R; Cohn, H O; Coller, J A; Convery, M R; Cook, V; Cotton, R; Cowan, R F; Coyne, D G; Crawford, G; de Oliveira, A; Damerell, C J S; Daoudi, M; Dasu, S; De Groot, N; De Sangro, R; De Simone, P; De Simone, S; Dervan, P J; Dima, M; Dong, D N; Doser, Michael; Du, P Y C; Dubois, R; Duboscq, J E; Eisenstein, B I; Elia, R; Erdos, E; Erofeeva, I; Eschenburg, V; Etzion, E; Fahey, S; Falciai, D; Fan, C; Fernández, J P; Fero, M J; Flood, K; Frey, R; Friedman, Jerome Isaac; Furuno, K; Garwin, E L; Gillman, T; Gladding, G; Hallewell, G D; Hart, E L; Hasegawa, Y; Hasuko, K; Hedges, S; Hertzbach, S S; Hildreth, M D; Hitlin, D G; Honma, A; Huber, J S; Huffer, M E; Hughes, E W; Huynh, X; Hwang, H; Iwasaki, M; Iwasaki, Y; Izen, J M; Jackson, D J; Jacques, P; Jaros, J A; Jiang, Z Y; Johnson, A S; Johnson, J R; Johnson, R A; Junk, T R; Kajikawa, R; Kalelkar, M; Kamyshkov, Yu A; Kang, H J; Karliner, I; Kawahara, H; Kelsey, M H; Kendall, H W; Kim, Y D; King, M; King, R; Kofler, R R; Krishna, N M; Kwon, Y; Labs, J F; Kroeger, R S; Langston, M; Lath, A; Lauber, J A; Leith, D W G S; Lia, V; Lin, C; Liu, M X; Loreti, M; Lu, A; Lynch, H L; Ma, J; Mancinelli, G; Manly, S; Mantovani, G C; Markiewicz, T W; Maruyama, T; Masuda, H; Mazzucato, E; McGowan, J F; McKemey, A K; Meadows, B T; Messner, R; Mockett, P M; Moffeit, K C; Moore, T B; Morii, M; Mours, B; Müller, D; Müller, G; Murzin, V; Nagamine, T; Narita, S; Nauenberg, U; Neal, H; Nesom, G; Nussbaum, M; Ohnishi, Y; Oishi, N; Onoprienko, D; Osborne, L S; Panvini, R S; Park, C H; Park, H; Pavel, T J; Peruzzi, I; Pescara, L; Piccolo, M; Piemontese, L; Pieroni, E; Pitts, K T; Plano, R J; Prepost, R; Prescott, C Y; Punkar, G; Quigley, J; Ratcliff, B N; Reeves, K; Reeves, T W; Reidy, J; Reinertsen, P L; Rensing, P E; Rochester, L S; Rowson, P C; Russell, J J; Saxton, O H; Schalk, T; Schindler, R H; Schneekloth, U; Schumm, B A; Schwiening, J; Seiden, A; Sen, S; Serbo, V V; Shaevitz, M H; Shank, J T; Shapiro, G; Sherden, D J; Shmakov, K D; Simopoulos, C; Sinev, N B; Smith, S R; Smy, M B; Snyder, J A; Sokoloff, M D; Stängle, H; Stahl, A; Stamer, P; Steiner, H; Steiner, R; Strauss, M G; Su, D; Suekane, F; Sugiyama, A; Suzuki, A; Suzuki, S; Swartz, M; Szumilo, A; Takahashi, T; Taylor, F E; Thaler, J J; Thom, J; Torrence, E; Trandafir, A I; Turk, J D; Usher, T; Vavra, J; Vella, E; Venuti, J P; Verdier, R; Wagner, S R; Waite, A P; Walston, S; Wang, J; Watts, S J; Weidemann, A W; Weiss, E R; Whitaker, J S; White, S L; Wickens, F J; Williams, D A; Williams, D C; Williams, S H; Willocq, S; Wilson, R J; Wisniewski, W J; Wittlin, J L; Woods, M; Word, G B; Wright, T R; Wyss, J; Yamamoto, R K; Yang, X Q; Yashima, J; Yellin, S J; Young, C C; Yuta, H; Zapalac, G; Zdarko, R W; Zeitlin, C; Zhou, J

    2006-01-01

    We report on the final electroweak measurements performed with data taken at the Z resonance by the experiments operating at the electron-positron colliders SLC and LEP. The data consist of 17 million Z decays accumulated by the ALEPH, DELPHI, L3 and OPAL experiments at LEP, and 600 thousand Z decays by the SLD experiment using a polarised beam at SLC. The measurements include cross-sections, forward-backward asymmetries and polarised asymmetries. The mass and width of the Z boson, $MZ$ and $GZ$, and its couplings to fermions, for example the $ ho$ parameter and the effective electroweak mixing angle for leptons, are precisely measured: egin{eqnarray*} MZ & = & 91.1875 pm 0.0021~GeV \\ GZ & = & 2.4952 pm 0.0023~GeV \\ ho_ell & = & 1.0050 pm 0.0010 \\ swsqeffl & =& 0.23153 pm 0.00016 ,. end{eqnarray*} The number of light neutrino species is determined to be $2.9840pm0.0082$, in agreement with the three observed generations of fundamental fermions. The results are compared to the pr...

  1. Factors affecting the precision of bone mineral measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cormack, J.; Evil, C.A.

    1990-01-01

    This paper discusses some statistical aspects of absorptiometric bone mineral measurements. In particular, the contribution of photon counting statistics to overall precision is estimated, and methods available for carrying out statistical comparisons of bone loss and determining their precision are reviewed. The use of replicate measurements as a means of improving measurement precision is also discussed. 11 refs

  2. Precision mechatronics based on high-precision measuring and positioning systems and machines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jäger, Gerd; Manske, Eberhard; Hausotte, Tino; Mastylo, Rostyslav; Dorozhovets, Natalja; Hofmann, Norbert

    2007-06-01

    Precision mechatronics is defined in the paper as the science and engineering of a new generation of high precision systems and machines. Nanomeasuring and nanopositioning engineering represents important fields of precision mechatronics. The nanometrology is described as the today's limit of the precision engineering. The problem, how to design nanopositioning machines with uncertainties as small as possible will be discussed. The integration of several optical and tactile nanoprobes makes the 3D-nanopositioning machine suitable for various tasks, such as long range scanning probe microscopy, mask and wafer inspection, nanotribology, nanoindentation, free form surface measurement as well as measurement of microoptics, precision molds, microgears, ring gauges and small holes.

  3. Precision Measurements of Tau Lepton Decays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nugent, Ian M. [Univ. of Victoria, BC (Canada)

    2008-01-01

    Using data collected with the BABAR detector at the SLAC PEP-II electron-positron storage ring operating at a centre-of-mass energy near 10.58 GeV, the branching fractions B(τ- → π-π-π+ντ) =(8.83±0.01±0.13)%, B(τ- → K-π-π+ντ) =(0.273± 0.002 ± 0.009)%, B(τ- → K-π-K+ντ) =(0.1346 ± 0.0010 ± 0.0036)%, and B(τ- → K-K-K+ντ) =(1.58 ± 0.13 ± 0.12) × 10-5 are measured where the uncertainties are statistical and systematic, respectively. The invariant mass distribution for the τ- → π-π-π+ντ , τ- → K-π-π+ντ , τ- → K-π-K+ντ and τ- → K-K-K+ντ decays are unfolded to correct for detector effects. A measurement of B(τ- → φπ-ντ ) =(3.42±0.55±0.25)×10-5, a measurement of B(τ- → φK-ντ) =(3.39±0.20±0.28)× 10-5 and an upper limit on B(τ- → K-K-K+ντ [ex.φ]) ≤ 2.5 × 10-6@90%CL are determined from a binned maximum likelihood fit of the τ- → K-π-K+ντ and τ- → K-K-K+ντ K+K- invariant mass distributions. The branching ratio B(τ-→K-ντ )/ B(τ-→π-ντ ) is measured to be (6.531±0.056±0.093)×10-2 from which |Vus| is determined to be 0.2255 ± 0.0023. The branching ratio B(τ-→μ-ντ $\\bar{v}$μ)/ B(τ-→e-ντ $\\bar{v}$e) =(9.796 ± 0.016 ± 0.035) × 10-1 is measured enabling a precision test of the Standard Model assumption of

  4. Seismic Motion Stability, Measurement and Precision Control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1979-12-01

    azimuth reference used for precision alignment of test fixtures and components is a porro prism mounted within the inner labora- tory. The orientation of...14 6.2 Low Frequency Tilt Loop. .................... 15 6.3 Mechanical Resonances . ..................... 17 6.4 Seismometer Matching...this prism is ascertained, using autocollimating theodolites, either by directly "swinging" Polaris into the laboratory from outside through optical

  5. Ultra-high-precision Nd-isotope measurements of geological materials by MC-ICPMS

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Saji, Nikitha Susan; Wielandt, Daniel Kim Peel; Paton, Chad

    2016-01-01

    We report novel techniques allowing the measurement of Nd-isotope ratios with unprecedented accuracy and precision by multi-collector inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. Using the new protocol, we have measured the Nd-isotopic composition of rock and synthetic Nd standards as well as th...

  6. Precision density measuring equipment: Design, selected examples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karasinski, T.; Patzelt, K.; Dieker, C.; Hansen, H.; Wenzl, H.; Schober, T.

    1987-06-01

    The report deals with solids density measurement using the pyknometer, the hydrostatic balance, or the floating specimen method. The mathematical relations are derived, and error sources are shown. A detailed description is given of a measuring set-up for measuring the density of solids and liquids. An error calculation is presented. After explaining the determination of density of a standard solid body, the report describes the density measurement of monocrystalline germanium, of niobium-tritide, Ni 3 Al, Ge-Si, and gallium arsenide, the determination of space-lattice expansion by hydrogen isotopes, and of the purity of H-D mixtures. (GG) [de

  7. Predicting Document Retrieval System Performance: An Expected Precision Measure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Losee, Robert M., Jr.

    1987-01-01

    Describes an expected precision (EP) measure designed to predict document retrieval performance. Highlights include decision theoretic models; precision and recall as measures of system performance; EP graphs; relevance feedback; and computing the retrieval status value of a document for two models, the Binary Independent Model and the Two Poisson…

  8. Recent progress in precision mass measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kluge, H.J.; Heidelberg Univ.

    1995-09-01

    During the last years, a new generation of technique for measuring directly masses of short-lived isotopes has evolved. The common features of these modern techniques are a transition from the measurement of kinetic energies or voltage ratios to a determination of time and frequency and in most cases storage of the ions for extended periods of time. (orig.)

  9. A Precise Measurement of the Tau Lifetime

    CERN Document Server

    Abdallah, J; Adam, W; Adzic, P; Albrecht, T; Alderweireld, T; Alemany-Fernandez, R; Allmendinger, T; Allport, P P; Amaldi, Ugo; Amapane, N; Amato, S; Anashkin, E; Andreazza, A; Andringa, S; Anjos, N; Antilogus, P; Apel, W D; Arnoud, Y; Ask, S; Åsman, B; Augustin, J E; Augustinus, A; Baillon, Paul; Ballestrero, A; Bambade, P; Barbier, R; Bardin, Dimitri Yuri; Barker, G J; Baroncelli, A; Battaglia, Marco; Baubillier, M; Becks, K H; Begalli, M; Behrmann, A; Ben-Haim, E; Benekos, N C; Benvenuti, Alberto C; Bérat, C; Berggren, M; Berntzon, L; Bertrand, D; Besançon, M; Besson, N; Bloch, D; Blom, M; Bluj, M; Bonesini, M; Boonekamp, M; Booth, P S L; Borisov, G; Botner, O; Bouquet, B; Bowcock, T J V; Boyko, I; Bracko, M; Brenner, R; Brodet, E; Brückman, P; Brunet, J M; Bugge, L; Buschmann, P; Calvi, M; Camporesi, T; Canale, V; Carena, F; Castro, N; Cavallo, F R; Chapkin, M M; Charpentier, P; Checchia, P; Chierici, R; Shlyapnikov, P; Chudoba, J; Chung, S U; Cieslik, K; Collins, P; Contri, R; Cosme, G; Cossutti, F; Costa, M J; Crennell, D J; Cuevas-Maestro, J; D'Hondt, J; Dalmau, J; Da Silva, T; Da Silva, W; Della Ricca, G; De Angelis, A; de Boer, Wim; De Clercq, C; De Lotto, B; De Maria, N; De Min, A; De Paula, L S; Di Ciaccio, L; Di Simone, A; Doroba, K; Drees, J; Dris, M; Eigen, G; Ekelöf, T J C; Ellert, M; Elsing, M; Espirito-Santo, M C; Fanourakis, G K; Fassouliotis, D; Feindt, M; Fernández, J; Ferrer, A; Ferro, F; Flagmeyer, U; Föth, H; Fokitis, E; Fulda-Quenzer, F; Fuster, J A; Gandelman, M; García, C; Gavillet, P; Gazis, E N; Gokieli, R; Golob, B; Gómez-Ceballos, G; Gonçalves, P; Graziani, E; Grosdidier, G; Grzelak, K; Guy, J; Haag, C; Hallgren, A; Hamacher, K; Hamilton, K; Haug, S; Hauler, F; Hedberg, V; Hennecke, M; Herr, H; Hoffman, J; Holmgren, S O; Holt, P J; Houlden, M A; Hultqvist, K; Jackson, J N; Jarlskog, G; Jarry, P; Jeans, D; Johansson, E K; Johansson, P D; Jonsson, P; Joram, C; Jungermann, L; Kapusta, F; Katsanevas, S; Katsoufis, E C; Kernel, G; Kersevan, B P; Kerzel, U; Kiiskinen, A P; King, B T; Kjaer, N J; Kluit, P; Kokkinias, P; Kourkoumelis, C; Kuznetsov, O; Krumshtein, Z; Kucharczyk, M; Lamsa, J; Leder, G; Ledroit, F; Leinonen, L; Leitner, R; Lemonne, J; Lepeltier, V; Lesiak, T; Liebig, W; Liko, D; Lipniacka, A; Lopes, J H; López, J M; Loukas, D; Lutz, P; Lyons, L; MacNaughton, J; Malek, A; Maltezos, S; Mandl, F; Marco, J; Marco, R; Maréchal, B; Margoni, M; Marin, J C; Mariotti, C; Markou, A; Martínez-Rivero, C; Masik, J; Mastroyiannopoulos, N; Matorras, F; Matteuzzi, C; Mazzucato, F; Mazzucato, M; McNulty, R; Meroni, C; Migliore, E; Mitaroff, W A; Mjörnmark, U; Moa, T; Moch, M; Mönig, K; Monge, R; Montenegro, J; Moraes, D; Moreno, S; Morettini, P; Müller, U; Münich, K; Mulders, M; Mundim, L; Murray, W; Muryn, B; Myatt, G; Myklebust, T; Nassiakou, M; Navarria, Francesco Luigi; Nawrocki, K; Nicolaidou, R; Nikolenko, M; Oblakowska-Mucha, A; Obraztsov, V F; Olshevskii, A G; Onofre, A; Orava, R; Österberg, K; Ouraou, A; Oyanguren, A; Paganoni, M; Paiano, S; Palacios, J P; Palka, H; Papadopoulou, T D; Pape, L; Parkes, C; Parodi, F; Parzefall, U; Passeri, A; Passon, O; Peralta, L; Perepelitsa, V F; Perrotta, A; Petrolini, A; Piedra, J; Pieri, L; Pierre, F; Pimenta, M; Piotto, E; Podobnik, T; Poireau, V; Pol, M E; Polok, G; Pozdnyakov, V; Pukhaeva, N; Pullia, A; Rames, J; Read, A; Rebecchi, P; Rehn, J; Reid, D; Reinhardt, R; Renton, P B; Richard, F; Rídky, J; Rivero, M; Rodríguez, D; Romero, A; Ronchese, P; Roudeau, P; Rovelli, T; Ruhlmann-Kleider, V; Ryabtchikov, D; Sadovskii, A; Salmi, L; Salt, J; Sander, C; Savoy-Navarro, A; Schwickerath, U; Segar, A; Sekulin, R L; Siebel, M; Sissakian, A N; Smadja, G; Smirnova, O G; Sokolov, A; Sopczak, A; Sosnowski, R; Spassoff, Tz; Stanitzki, M; Stocchi, A; Strauss, J; Stugu, B; Szczekowski, M; Szeptycka, M; Szumlak, T; Tabarelli de Fatis, T; Taffard, A C; Tegenfeldt, F; Timmermans, J; Tkatchev, L G; Tobin, M; Todorovova, S; Tomé, B; Tonazzo, A; Tortosa, P; Travnicek, P; Treille, D; Tristram, G; Trochimczuk, M; Troncon, C; Turluer, M L; Tyapkin, I A; Tyapkin, P; Tzamarias, S; Uvarov, V; Valenti, G; van Dam, P; Van Eldik, J; Van Lysebetten, A; Van Remortel, N; Van Vulpen, I; Vegni, G; Veloso, F; Venus, W A; Verdier, P; Verzi, V; Vilanova, D; Vitale, L; Vrba, V; Wahlen, H; Washbrook, A J; Weiser, C; Wicke, D; Wickens, J H; Wilkinson, G; Winter, M; Witek, M; Yushchenko, O P; Zalewska-Bak, A; Zalewski, P; Zavrtanik, D; Zhuravlov, V; Zimin, N I; Zintchenko, A; Zupan, M

    2004-01-01

    The tau lepton lifetime has been measured with the e+e- -> tau+tau- events collected by the DELPHI detector at LEP in the years 1991-1995. Three different methods have been exploited, using both one-prong and three-prong tau decay channels. Two measurements have been made using events in which both taus decay to a single charged particle. Combining these measurements gave tau_tau (1 prong) = 291.8 +/- 2.3 (stat) +/- 1.5 (sys) fs. A third measurement using taus which decayed to three charged particles yielded tau_tau (3 prong) = 288.6 +/- 2.4 (stat) +/- 1.3 (sys) fs. These were combined with previous DELPHI results to measure the tau lifetime, using the full LEP1 data sample, to be tau_tau = 290.9 +/- 1.4 (stat) +/- 1.0 (sys) fs.

  10. A precise measurement of the tau lifetime

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abdallah, J.; Abreu, P.; Adam, W.

    2004-01-01

    The tau lepton lifetime has been measured with the e + e - →τ + τ - events collected by the DELPHI detector at LEP in the years 1991-1995. Three different methods have been exploited, using both one-prong and three-prong τ decay channels. Two measurements have been made using events in which both taus decay to a single charged particle. Combining these measurements gave τ τ (1 prong) = 291.8±2.3 stat ±1.5 sys fs. A third measurement using taus which decayed to three charged particles yielded τ τ (3 prong) = 288.6±.4 stat ±1.3 sys fs. These were combined with previous DELPHI results to measure the tau lifetime, using the full LEP1 data sample, to be τ τ = 290.9±1.4 stat ±1.0 sys fs. (orig.)

  11. High precision measurements of the luminosity at LEP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pietrzyk, B.

    1994-01-01

    The art of the luminosity measurements at LEP is presented. First generation LEP detectors have measured the absolute luminosity with the precision of 0.3-0.5%. The most precise present detectors have reached the 0.07% precision and the 0.05% is not excluded in future. Center-of-mass energy dependent relative precision of the luminosity detectors and the use of the theoretical cross-section in the LEP experiments are also discussed. (author). 18 refs., 6 figs., 6 tabs

  12. Method for obtaining more precise measures of excreted organic carbon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1977-01-01

    A new method for concentrating and measuring excreted organic carbon by lyophilization and scintillation counting is efficient, improves measurable radioactivity, and increases precision for estimates of organic carbon excreted by phytoplankton and macrophytes

  13. Squeezed noise in precision force measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bocko, M.F.; Bordoni, F.; Fuligni, F.; Johnson, W.W.

    1986-01-01

    The effort to build gravitational radiation antennae with sensitivity sufficient to detect bursts of radiation from supernovae in the Virgo cluster of galaxies has caused a consideration of the fundamental limits for the detection of weak forces. The existing Weber bar detectors will be eventually limited, by the phase insensitive transducers now used, to noise temperatures no better than that of the first amplifier which follows the transducer. Even for a quantum limited amplifier this may not give the sensitivity required to definitively detect gravitational radiation. In a 'back action evasion' measurement a specific phase sensitive transducer would be used. It is believed that by the technique of measuring one of the two antenna phases it is possible to reach an effective noise temperature for the measured phase which is far below the amplifier noise temperature. This is at the expense of an infinite noise temperature in the unmeasured antenna phase and is thus described as squeezing the noise. The authors outline the theoretical model for the behavior of such systems and present data from several experiments which demonstrate the main features of a back action evasion measurement. (Auth.)

  14. On the precision of sedimentation balance measurements

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kranenburg, C.

    1991-01-01

    The settling velocities of fine sediments can be determined using a sedimentation balance essentially consisting of a settling tube at the bottom of which the weight of the sediment deposited is measured as a function of time. The distribution of settling velocities then is calculated from an

  15. Experiment for a precision neutrino mass measurement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fackler, O.; Mugge, M.; Sticker, H.; Woerner, R.

    1984-04-01

    We describe an experiment which is designed to determine the electron neutrino mass to better than 2 eV. Key features of the experiment are a high activity frozen tritium source and a high resolution electrostatic spectrometer designed to make a careful measurement of the tritium beta decay end point spectrum. The goal is to determine the neutrino mass to better than 1 eV statistically in a four day run. A series of these runs will allow study of potential systematics. The construction phase is nearly complete and preliminary data will be taken in late spring

  16. Covariate Imbalance and Precision in Measuring Treatment Effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiaofeng Steven

    2011-01-01

    Covariate adjustment can increase the precision of estimates by removing unexplained variance from the error in randomized experiments, although chance covariate imbalance tends to counteract the improvement in precision. The author develops an easy measure to examine chance covariate imbalance in randomization by standardizing the average…

  17. Workshop on Precision Measurements of $\\alpha_s$

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bethke, Siegfried; /Munich, Max Planck Inst.; Hoang, Andre H.; /Vienna U.; Kluth, Stefan; /Munich, Max Planck Inst.; Schieck, Jochen; /Munich U.; Stewart, Iain W.; Aoki, S.; Beneke, M.; Bethke, S.; Blumlein, J.; Brambilla, N.; Brodsky, S.; /MIT, LNS

    2011-10-01

    These are the proceedings of the Workshop on Precision Measurements of {alpha}{sub s} held at the Max-Planck-Institute for Physics, Munich, February 9-11, 2011. The workshop explored in depth the determination of {alpha}{sub s}(m{sub Z}) in the {ovr MS} scheme from the key categories where high precision measurements are currently being made, including DIS and global PDF fits, {tau}-decays, electro-weak precision observables and Z-decays, event-shapes, and lattice QCD. These proceedings contain a short summary contribution from the speakers, as well as the lists of authors, conveners, participants, and talks.

  18. Precision measurements of linear scattering density using muon tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Åström, E.; Bonomi, G.; Calliari, I.; Calvini, P.; Checchia, P.; Donzella, A.; Faraci, E.; Forsberg, F.; Gonella, F.; Hu, X.; Klinger, J.; Sundqvist Ökvist, L.; Pagano, D.; Rigoni, A.; Ramous, E.; Urbani, M.; Vanini, S.; Zenoni, A.; Zumerle, G.

    2016-07-01

    We demonstrate that muon tomography can be used to precisely measure the properties of various materials. The materials which have been considered have been extracted from an experimental blast furnace, including carbon (coke) and iron oxides, for which measurements of the linear scattering density relative to the mass density have been performed with an absolute precision of 10%. We report the procedures that are used in order to obtain such precision, and a discussion is presented to address the expected performance of the technique when applied to heavier materials. The results we obtain do not depend on the specific type of material considered and therefore they can be extended to any application.

  19. LDA measurements under plasma conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lesinski, J.; Mizera-Lesinska, B.; Fanton, J.C.; Boulos, M.I.

    1979-01-01

    A study was made of the application of Laser Doppler Anemometry (LDA) for the measurement of the fluid and particle velocities under plasma conditions. The flow configuration, is that of a dc plasma jet called the principal jet, in which an alumina powder of a mean particle diameter of 115 μm and a standard deviation of 11.3 μm was injected using a secondary jet. The plasma jet immerged from a 7.1 mm ID nozzle while that of the secondary jet was 2 nm in diameter. The secondary jet was introduced at the nozzle level of the plasma jet directed 90 0 to its axis. Details of the nozzle and the gas flow system are shown in Figure 2

  20. Turbulence measurements in fusion plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Conway, G D

    2008-01-01

    Turbulence measurements in magnetically confined toroidal plasmas have a long history and relevance due to the detrimental role of turbulence induced transport on particle, energy, impurity and momentum confinement. The turbulence-the microscopic random fluctuations in particle density, temperature, potential and magnetic field-is generally driven by radial gradients in the plasma density and temperature. The correlation between the turbulence properties and global confinement, via enhanced diffusion, convection and direct conduction, is now well documented. Theory, together with recent measurements, also indicates that non-linear interactions within the turbulence generate large scale zonal flows and geodesic oscillations, which can feed back onto the turbulence and equilibrium profiles creating a complex interdependence. An overview of the current status and understanding of plasma turbulence measurements in the closed flux surface region of magnetic confinement fusion devices is presented, highlighting some recent developments and outstanding problems.

  1. Validating precision--how many measurements do we need?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ÅSberg, Arne; Solem, Kristine Bodal; Mikkelsen, Gustav

    2015-10-01

    A quantitative analytical method should be sufficiently precise, i.e. the imprecision measured as a standard deviation should be less than the numerical definition of the acceptable standard deviation. We propose that the entire 90% confidence interval for the true standard deviation shall lie below the numerical definition of the acceptable standard deviation in order to assure that the analytical method is sufficiently precise. We also present power function curves to ease the decision on the number of measurements to make. Computer simulation was used to calculate the probability that the upper limit of the 90% confidence interval for the true standard deviation was equal to or exceeded the acceptable standard deviation. Power function curves were constructed for different scenarios. The probability of failure to assure that the method is sufficiently precise increases with decreasing number of measurements and with increasing standard deviation when the true standard deviation is well below the acceptable standard deviation. For instance, the probability of failure is 42% for a precision experiment of 40 repeated measurements in one analytical run and 7% for 100 repeated measurements, when the true standard deviation is 80% of the acceptable standard deviation. Compared to the CLSI guidelines, validating precision according to the proposed principle is more reliable, but demands considerably more measurements. Using power function curves may help when planning studies to validate precision.

  2. Precision measurements on trapped antihydrogen in the ALPHA experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eriksson, S.

    2018-03-01

    Both the 1S-2S transition and the ground state hyperfine spectrum have been observed in trapped antihydrogen. The former constitutes the first observation of resonant interaction of light with an anti-atom, and the latter is the first detailed measurement of a spectral feature in antihydrogen. Owing to the narrow intrinsic linewidth of the 1S-2S transition and use of two-photon laser excitation, the transition energy can be precisely determined in both hydrogen and antihydrogen, allowing a direct comparison as a test of fundamental symmetry. The result is consistent with CPT invariance at a relative precision of around 2×10-10. This constitutes the most precise measurement of a property of antihydrogen. The hyperfine spectrum of antihydrogen is determined to a relative uncertainty of 4×10-4. The excited state and the hyperfine spectroscopy techniques currently both show sensitivity at the few 100 kHz level on the absolute scale. Here, the most recent work of the ALPHA collaboration on precision spectroscopy of antihydrogen is presented together with an outlook on improving the precision of measurements involving lasers and microwave radiation. Prospects of measuring the Lamb shift and determining the antiproton charge radius in trapped antihydrogen in the ALPHA apparatus are presented. Future perspectives of precision measurements of trapped antihydrogen in the ALPHA apparatus when the ELENA facility becomes available to experiments at CERN are discussed. This article is part of the Theo Murphy meeting issue `Antiproton physics in the ELENA era'.

  3. Precision of a FDTD method to simulate cold magnetized plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pavlenko, I.V.; Melnyk, D.A.; Prokaieva, A.O.; Girka, I.O.

    2014-01-01

    The finite difference time domain (FDTD) method is applied to describe the propagation of the transverse electromagnetic waves through the magnetized plasmas. The numerical dispersion relation is obtained in a cold plasma approximation. The accuracy of the numerical dispersion is calculated as a function of the frequency of the launched wave and time step of the numerical grid. It is shown that the numerical method does not reproduce the analytical results near the plasma resonances for any chosen value of time step if there is not a dissipation mechanism in the system. It means that FDTD method cannot be applied straightforward to simulate the problems where the plasma resonances play a key role (for example, the mode conversion problems). But the accuracy of the numerical scheme can be improved by introducing some artificial damping of the plasma currents. Although part of the wave power is lost in the system in this case but the numerical scheme describes the wave processes in an agreement with analytical predictions.

  4. Damping Measurements of Plasma Modes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderegg, F.; Affolter, M.; Driscoll, C. F.

    2010-11-01

    For azimuthally symmetric plasma modes in a magnesium ion plasma, confined in a 3 Tesla Penning-Malmberg trap with a density of n ˜10^7cm-3, we measure a damping rate of 2s-1plasma column, alters the frequency of the mode from 16 KHz to 192 KHz. The oscillatory fluid displacement is small compared to the wavelength of the mode; in contrast, the fluid velocity, δvf, can be large compared to v. The real part of the frequency satisfies a linear dispersion relation. In long thin plasmas (α> 10) these modes are Trivelpiece-Gould (TG) modes, and for smaller values of α they are Dubin spheroidal modes. However the damping appears to be non-linear; initially large waves have weaker exponential damping, which is not yet understood. Recent theoryootnotetextM.W. Anderson and T.M. O'Neil, Phys. Plasmas 14, 112110 (2007). calculates the damping of TG modes expected from viscosity due to ion-ion collisions; but the measured damping, while having a similar temperature and density dependence, is about 40 times larger than calculated. This discrepancy might be due to an external damping mechanism.

  5. QCD corrections, virtual heavy quark effects and electroweak precision measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kniehl, B.A.; Kuehn, J.H.; Stuart, R.G.

    1988-01-01

    QCD corrections to virtual heavy quark effects on electroweak parameters are calculated, which may affect planned precision measurements at SLC and LEP. The influence of toponium and T b resonances is incorporated as well as the proper threshold behaviour of the imaginary part of the vacuum polarization function. The shift of the W-boson mass from these corrections and their influence on the polarization asymmetry are calculated and compared to the envisaged experimental precision. (orig.)

  6. Prospects for Precise Measurements with Echo Atom Interferometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brynle Barrett

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Echo atom interferometers have emerged as interesting alternatives to Raman interferometers for the realization of precise measurements of the gravitational acceleration g and the determination of the atomic fine structure through measurements of the atomic recoil frequency ω q . Here we review the development of different configurations of echo interferometers that are best suited to achieve these goals. We describe experiments that utilize near-resonant excitation of laser-cooled rubidium atoms by a sequence of standing wave pulses to measure ω q with a statistical uncertainty of 37 parts per billion (ppb on a time scale of ∼50 ms and g with a statistical precision of 75 ppb. Related coherent transient techniques that have achieved the most statistically precise measurements of atomic g-factor ratios are also outlined. We discuss the reduction of prominent systematic effects in these experiments using off-resonant excitation by low-cost, high-power lasers.

  7. Assessing Precision in Conventional Field Measurements of Individual Tree Attributes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ville Luoma

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Forest resource information has a hierarchical structure: individual tree attributes are summed at the plot level and then in turn, plot-level estimates are used to derive stand or large-area estimates of forest resources. Due to this hierarchy, it is imperative that individual tree attributes are measured with accuracy and precision. With the widespread use of different measurement tools, it is also important to understand the expected degree of precision associated with these measurements. The most prevalent tree attributes measured in the field are tree species, stem diameter-at-breast-height (dbh, and tree height. For dbh and height, the most commonly used measuring devices are calipers and clinometers, respectively. The aim of our study was to characterize the precision of individual tree dbh and height measurements in boreal forest conditions when using calipers and clinometers. The data consisted of 319 sample trees at a study area in Evo, southern Finland. The sample trees were measured independently by four trained mensurationists. The standard deviation in tree dbh and height measurements was 0.3 cm (1.5% and 0.5 m (2.9%, respectively. Precision was also assessed by tree species and tree size classes; however, there were no statistically significant differences between the mensurationists for dbh or height measurements. Our study offers insights into the expected precision of tree dbh and height as measured with the most commonly used devices. These results are important when using sample plot data in forest inventory applications, especially now, at a time when new tree attribute measurement techniques based on remote sensing are being developed and compared to the conventional caliper and clinometer measurements.

  8. Precise measurement and calculation of 238U neutron transmissions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olsen, D.K.; de Saussure, G.; Silver, E.G.; Perez, R.B.

    1975-01-01

    The total neutron cross section of 238 U has been measured above 0.5 eV in precise transmission experiments and results are compared with ENDF/B-IV. Emphasis has been on measuring transmissions through thick samples in order to obtain accurate total cross sections in the potential-resonance interference regions between resonances. 4 figures, 1 table

  9. High precision mass measurements in Ψ and Υ families revisited

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Artamonov, A.S.; Baru, S.E.; Blinov, A.E.

    2000-01-01

    High precision mass measurements in Ψ and Υ families performed in 1980-1984 at the VEPP-4 collider with OLYA and MD-1 detectors are revisited. The corrections for the new value of the electron mass are presented. The effect of the updated radiative corrections has been calculated for the J/Ψ(1S) and Ψ(2S) mass measurements [ru

  10. A precise measurement of the $B^0$ meson oscillation frequency

    CERN Document Server

    Aaij, Roel; Adeva, Bernardo; Adinolfi, Marco; Affolder, Anthony; Ajaltouni, Ziad; Akar, Simon; Albrecht, Johannes; Alessio, Federico; Alexander, Michael; Ali, Suvayu; Alkhazov, Georgy; Alvarez Cartelle, Paula; Alves Jr, Antonio Augusto; Amato, Sandra; Amerio, Silvia; Amhis, Yasmine; An, Liupan; Anderlini, Lucio; Anderson, Jonathan; Andreassi, Guido; Andreotti, Mirco; Andrews, Jason; Appleby, Robert; Aquines Gutierrez, Osvaldo; Archilli, Flavio; d'Argent, Philippe; Artamonov, Alexander; Artuso, Marina; Aslanides, Elie; Auriemma, Giulio; Baalouch, Marouen; Bachmann, Sebastian; Back, John; Badalov, Alexey; Baesso, Clarissa; Baldini, Wander; Barlow, Roger; Barschel, Colin; Barsuk, Sergey; Barter, William; Batozskaya, Varvara; Battista, Vincenzo; Bay, Aurelio; Beaucourt, Leo; Beddow, John; Bedeschi, Franco; Bediaga, Ignacio; Bel, Lennaert; Bellee, Violaine; Belloli, Nicoletta; Belyaev, Ivan; Ben-Haim, Eli; Bencivenni, Giovanni; Benson, Sean; Benton, Jack; Berezhnoy, Alexander; Bernet, Roland; Bertolin, Alessandro; Bettler, Marc-Olivier; van Beuzekom, Martinus; Bien, Alexander; Bifani, Simone; Billoir, Pierre; Bird, Thomas; Birnkraut, Alex; Bizzeti, Andrea; Blake, Thomas; Blanc, Frédéric; Blouw, Johan; Blusk, Steven; Bocci, Valerio; Bondar, Alexander; Bondar, Nikolay; Bonivento, Walter; Borghi, Silvia; Borsato, Martino; Bowcock, Themistocles; Bowen, Espen Eie; Bozzi, Concezio; Braun, Svende; Britsch, Markward; Britton, Thomas; Brodzicka, Jolanta; Brook, Nicholas; Buchanan, Emma; Bursche, Albert; Buytaert, Jan; Cadeddu, Sandro; Calabrese, Roberto; Calvi, Marta; Calvo Gomez, Miriam; Campana, Pierluigi; Campora Perez, Daniel; Capriotti, Lorenzo; Carbone, Angelo; Carboni, Giovanni; Cardinale, Roberta; Cardini, Alessandro; Carniti, Paolo; Carson, Laurence; Carvalho Akiba, Kazuyoshi; Casse, Gianluigi; Cassina, Lorenzo; Castillo Garcia, Lucia; Cattaneo, Marco; Cauet, Christophe; Cavallero, Giovanni; Cenci, Riccardo; Charles, Matthew; Charpentier, Philippe; Chefdeville, Maximilien; Chen, Shanzhen; Cheung, Shu-Faye; Chiapolini, Nicola; Chrzaszcz, Marcin; Cid Vidal, Xabier; Ciezarek, Gregory; Clarke, Peter; Clemencic, Marco; Cliff, Harry; Closier, Joel; Coco, Victor; Cogan, Julien; Cogneras, Eric; Cogoni, Violetta; Cojocariu, Lucian; Collazuol, Gianmaria; Collins, Paula; Comerma-Montells, Albert; Contu, Andrea; Cook, Andrew; Coombes, Matthew; Coquereau, Samuel; Corti, Gloria; Corvo, Marco; Couturier, Benjamin; Cowan, Greig; Craik, Daniel Charles; Crocombe, Andrew; Cruz Torres, Melissa Maria; Cunliffe, Samuel; Currie, Robert; D'Ambrosio, Carmelo; Dall'Occo, Elena; Dalseno, Jeremy; David, Pieter; Davis, Adam; De Aguiar Francisco, Oscar; De Bruyn, Kristof; De Capua, Stefano; De Cian, Michel; De Miranda, Jussara; De Paula, Leandro; De Simone, Patrizia; Dean, Cameron Thomas; Decamp, Daniel; Deckenhoff, Mirko; Del Buono, Luigi; Déléage, Nicolas; Demmer, Moritz; Derkach, Denis; Deschamps, Olivier; Dettori, Francesco; Dey, Biplab; Di Canto, Angelo; Di Ruscio, Francesco; Dijkstra, Hans; Donleavy, Stephanie; Dordei, Francesca; Dorigo, Mirco; Dosil Suárez, Alvaro; Dossett, David; Dovbnya, Anatoliy; Dreimanis, Karlis; Dufour, Laurent; Dujany, Giulio; Dupertuis, Frederic; Durante, Paolo; Dzhelyadin, Rustem; Dziurda, Agnieszka; Dzyuba, Alexey; Easo, Sajan; Egede, Ulrik; Egorychev, Victor; Eidelman, Semen; Eisenhardt, Stephan; Eitschberger, Ulrich; Ekelhof, Robert; Eklund, Lars; El Rifai, Ibrahim; Elsasser, Christian; Ely, Scott; Esen, Sevda; Evans, Hannah Mary; Evans, Timothy; Falabella, Antonio; Färber, Christian; Farley, Nathanael; Farry, Stephen; Fay, Robert; Ferguson, Dianne; Fernandez Albor, Victor; Ferrari, Fabio; Ferreira Rodrigues, Fernando; Ferro-Luzzi, Massimiliano; Filippov, Sergey; Fiore, Marco; Fiorini, Massimiliano; Firlej, Miroslaw; Fitzpatrick, Conor; Fiutowski, Tomasz; Fohl, Klaus; Fol, Philip; Fontana, Marianna; Fontanelli, Flavio; Forshaw, Dean Charles; Forty, Roger; Frank, Markus; Frei, Christoph; Frosini, Maddalena; Fu, Jinlin; Furfaro, Emiliano; Gallas Torreira, Abraham; Galli, Domenico; Gallorini, Stefano; Gambetta, Silvia; Gandelman, Miriam; Gandini, Paolo; Gao, Yuanning; García Pardiñas, Julián; Garra Tico, Jordi; Garrido, Lluis; Gascon, David; Gaspar, Clara; Gauld, Rhorry; Gavardi, Laura; Gazzoni, Giulio; Gerick, David; Gersabeck, Evelina; Gersabeck, Marco; Gershon, Timothy; Ghez, Philippe; Gianì, Sebastiana; Gibson, Valerie; Girard, Olivier Göran; Giubega, Lavinia-Helena; Gligorov, V.V.; Göbel, Carla; Golubkov, Dmitry; Golutvin, Andrey; Gomes, Alvaro; Gotti, Claudio; Grabalosa Gándara, Marc; Graciani Diaz, Ricardo; Granado Cardoso, Luis Alberto; Graugés, Eugeni; Graverini, Elena; Graziani, Giacomo; Grecu, Alexandru; Greening, Edward; Gregson, Sam; Griffith, Peter; Grillo, Lucia; Grünberg, Oliver; Gui, Bin; Gushchin, Evgeny; Guz, Yury; Gys, Thierry; Hadavizadeh, Thomas; Hadjivasiliou, Christos; Haefeli, Guido; Haen, Christophe; Haines, Susan; Hall, Samuel; Hamilton, Brian; Han, Xiaoxue; Hansmann-Menzemer, Stephanie; Harnew, Neville; Harnew, Samuel; Harrison, Jonathan; He, Jibo; Head, Timothy; Heijne, Veerle; Heister, Arno; Hennessy, Karol; Henrard, Pierre; Henry, Louis; Hernando Morata, Jose Angel; van Herwijnen, Eric; Heß, Miriam; Hicheur, Adlène; Hill, Donal; Hoballah, Mostafa; Hombach, Christoph; Hulsbergen, Wouter; Humair, Thibaud; Hussain, Nazim; Hutchcroft, David; Hynds, Daniel; Idzik, Marek; Ilten, Philip; Jacobsson, Richard; Jaeger, Andreas; Jalocha, Pawel; Jans, Eddy; Jawahery, Abolhassan; Jing, Fanfan; John, Malcolm; Johnson, Daniel; Jones, Christopher; Joram, Christian; Jost, Beat; Jurik, Nathan; Kandybei, Sergii; Kanso, Walaa; Karacson, Matthias; Karbach, Moritz; Karodia, Sarah; Kecke, Matthieu; Kelsey, Matthew; Kenyon, Ian; Kenzie, Matthew; Ketel, Tjeerd; Khanji, Basem; Khurewathanakul, Chitsanu; Kirn, Thomas; Klaver, Suzanne; Klimaszewski, Konrad; Kochebina, Olga; Kolpin, Michael; Komarov, Ilya; Koopman, Rose; Koppenburg, Patrick; Kozeiha, Mohamad; Kravchuk, Leonid; Kreplin, Katharina; Kreps, Michal; Krocker, Georg; Krokovny, Pavel; Kruse, Florian; Krzemien, Wojciech; Kucewicz, Wojciech; Kucharczyk, Marcin; Kudryavtsev, Vasily; Kuonen, Axel Kevin; Kurek, Krzysztof; Kvaratskheliya, Tengiz; Lacarrere, Daniel; Lafferty, George; Lai, Adriano; Lambert, Dean; Lanfranchi, Gaia; Langenbruch, Christoph; Langhans, Benedikt; Latham, Thomas; Lazzeroni, Cristina; Le Gac, Renaud; van Leerdam, Jeroen; Lees, Jean-Pierre; Lefèvre, Regis; Leflat, Alexander; Lefrançois, Jacques; Lemos Cid, Edgar; Leroy, Olivier; Lesiak, Tadeusz; Leverington, Blake; Li, Yiming; Likhomanenko, Tatiana; Liles, Myfanwy; Lindner, Rolf; Linn, Christian; Lionetto, Federica; Liu, Bo; Liu, Xuesong; Loh, David; Longstaff, Iain; Lopes, Jose; Lucchesi, Donatella; Lucio Martinez, Miriam; Luo, Haofei; Lupato, Anna; Luppi, Eleonora; Lupton, Oliver; Lusardi, Nicola; Lusiani, Alberto; Machefert, Frederic; Maciuc, Florin; Maev, Oleg; Maguire, Kevin; Malde, Sneha; Malinin, Alexander; Manca, Giulia; Mancinelli, Giampiero; Manning, Peter Michael; Mapelli, Alessandro; Maratas, Jan; Marchand, Jean François; Marconi, Umberto; Marin Benito, Carla; Marino, Pietro; Marks, Jörg; Martellotti, Giuseppe; Martin, Morgan; Martinelli, Maurizio; Martinez Santos, Diego; Martinez Vidal, Fernando; Martins Tostes, Danielle; Massafferri, André; Matev, Rosen; Mathad, Abhijit; Mathe, Zoltan; Matteuzzi, Clara; Mauri, Andrea; Maurin, Brice; Mazurov, Alexander; McCann, Michael; McCarthy, James; McNab, Andrew; McNulty, Ronan; Meadows, Brian; Meier, Frank; Meissner, Marco; Melnychuk, Dmytro; Merk, Marcel; Michielin, Emanuele; Milanes, Diego Alejandro; Minard, Marie-Noelle; Mitzel, Dominik Stefan; Molina Rodriguez, Josue; Monroy, Ignacio Alberto; Monteil, Stephane; Morandin, Mauro; Morawski, Piotr; Mordà, Alessandro; Morello, Michael Joseph; Moron, Jakub; Morris, Adam Benjamin; Mountain, Raymond; Muheim, Franz; Müller, Dominik; Müller, Janine; Müller, Katharina; Müller, Vanessa; Mussini, Manuel; Muster, Bastien; Naik, Paras; Nakada, Tatsuya; Nandakumar, Raja; Nandi, Anita; Nasteva, Irina; Needham, Matthew; Neri, Nicola; Neubert, Sebastian; Neufeld, Niko; Neuner, Max; Nguyen, Anh Duc; Nguyen, Thi-Dung; Nguyen-Mau, Chung; Niess, Valentin; Niet, Ramon; Nikitin, Nikolay; Nikodem, Thomas; Novoselov, Alexey; O'Hanlon, Daniel Patrick; Oblakowska-Mucha, Agnieszka; Obraztsov, Vladimir; Ogilvy, Stephen; Okhrimenko, Oleksandr; Oldeman, Rudolf; Onderwater, Gerco; Osorio Rodrigues, Bruno; Otalora Goicochea, Juan Martin; Otto, Adam; Owen, Patrick; Oyanguren, Maria Aranzazu; Palano, Antimo; Palombo, Fernando; Palutan, Matteo; Panman, Jacob; Papanestis, Antonios; Pappagallo, Marco; Pappalardo, Luciano; Pappenheimer, Cheryl; Parkes, Christopher; Passaleva, Giovanni; Patel, Girish; Patel, Mitesh; Patrignani, Claudia; Pearce, Alex; Pellegrino, Antonio; Penso, Gianni; Pepe Altarelli, Monica; Perazzini, Stefano; Perret, Pascal; Pescatore, Luca; Petridis, Konstantinos; Petrolini, Alessandro; Petruzzo, Marco; Picatoste Olloqui, Eduardo; Pietrzyk, Boleslaw; Pilař, Tomas; Pinci, Davide; Pistone, Alessandro; Piucci, Alessio; Playfer, Stephen; Plo Casasus, Maximo; Poikela, Tuomas; Polci, Francesco; Poluektov, Anton; Polyakov, Ivan; Polycarpo, Erica; Popov, Alexander; Popov, Dmitry; Popovici, Bogdan; Potterat, Cédric; Price, Eugenia; Price, Joseph David; Prisciandaro, Jessica; Pritchard, Adrian; Prouve, Claire; Pugatch, Valery; Puig Navarro, Albert; Punzi, Giovanni; Qian, Wenbin; Quagliani, Renato; Rachwal, Bartolomiej; Rademacker, Jonas; Rama, Matteo; Rangel, Murilo; Raniuk, Iurii; Rauschmayr, Nathalie; Raven, Gerhard; Redi, Federico; Reichert, Stefanie; Reid, Matthew; dos Reis, Alberto; Ricciardi, Stefania; Richards, Sophie; Rihl, Mariana; Rinnert, Kurt; Rives Molina, Vincente; Robbe, Patrick; Rodrigues, Ana Barbara; Rodrigues, Eduardo; Rodriguez Lopez, Jairo Alexis; Rodriguez Perez, Pablo; Roiser, Stefan; Romanovsky, Vladimir; Romero Vidal, Antonio; Ronayne, John William; Rotondo, Marcello; Rouvinet, Julien; Ruf, Thomas; Ruiz Valls, Pablo; Saborido Silva, Juan Jose; Sagidova, Naylya; Sail, Paul; Saitta, Biagio; Salustino Guimaraes, Valdir; Sanchez Mayordomo, Carlos; Sanmartin Sedes, Brais; Santacesaria, Roberta; Santamarina Rios, Cibran; Santimaria, Marco; Santovetti, Emanuele; Sarti, Alessio; Satriano, Celestina; Satta, Alessia; Saunders, Daniel Martin; Savrina, Darya; Schael, Stefan; Schiller, Manuel; Schindler, Heinrich; Schlupp, Maximilian; Schmelling, Michael; Schmelzer, Timon; Schmidt, Burkhard; Schneider, Olivier; Schopper, Andreas; Schubiger, Maxime; Schune, Marie Helene; Schwemmer, Rainer; Sciascia, Barbara; Sciubba, Adalberto; Semennikov, Alexander; Sergi, Antonino; Serra, Nicola; Serrano, Justine; Sestini, Lorenzo; Seyfert, Paul; Shapkin, Mikhail; Shapoval, Illya; Shcheglov, Yury; Shears, Tara; Shekhtman, Lev; Shevchenko, Vladimir; Shires, Alexander; Siddi, Benedetto Gianluca; Silva Coutinho, Rafael; Silva de Oliveira, Luiz Gustavo; Simi, Gabriele; Sirendi, Marek; Skidmore, Nicola; Skwarnicki, Tomasz; Smith, Edmund; Smith, Eluned; Smith, Iwan Thomas; Smith, Jackson; Smith, Mark; Snoek, Hella; Sokoloff, Michael; Soler, Paul; Soomro, Fatima; Souza, Daniel; Souza De Paula, Bruno; Spaan, Bernhard; Spradlin, Patrick; Sridharan, Srikanth; Stagni, Federico; Stahl, Marian; Stahl, Sascha; Stefkova, Slavomira; Steinkamp, Olaf; Stenyakin, Oleg; Stevenson, Scott; Stoica, Sabin; Stone, Sheldon; Storaci, Barbara; Stracka, Simone; Straticiuc, Mihai; Straumann, Ulrich; Sun, Liang; Sutcliffe, William; Swientek, Krzysztof; Swientek, Stefan; Syropoulos, Vasileios; Szczekowski, Marek; Szczypka, Paul; Szumlak, Tomasz; T'Jampens, Stephane; Tayduganov, Andrey; Tekampe, Tobias; Teklishyn, Maksym; Tellarini, Giulia; Teubert, Frederic; Thomas, Christopher; Thomas, Eric; van Tilburg, Jeroen; Tisserand, Vincent; Tobin, Mark; Todd, Jacob; Tolk, Siim; Tomassetti, Luca; Tonelli, Diego; Topp-Joergensen, Stig; Torr, Nicholas; Tournefier, Edwige; Tourneur, Stephane; Trabelsi, Karim; Tran, Minh Tâm; Tresch, Marco; Trisovic, Ana; Tsaregorodtsev, Andrei; Tsopelas, Panagiotis; Tuning, Niels; Ukleja, Artur; Ustyuzhanin, Andrey; Uwer, Ulrich; Vacca, Claudia; Vagnoni, Vincenzo; Valenti, Giovanni; Vallier, Alexis; Vazquez Gomez, Ricardo; Vazquez Regueiro, Pablo; Vázquez Sierra, Carlos; Vecchi, Stefania; van Veghel, Maarten; Velthuis, Jaap; Veltri, Michele; Veneziano, Giovanni; Vesterinen, Mika; Viaud, Benoit; Vieira, Daniel; Vieites Diaz, Maria; Vilasis-Cardona, Xavier; Vollhardt, Achim; Volyanskyy, Dmytro; Voong, David; Vorobyev, Alexey; Vorobyev, Vitaly; Voß, Christian; de Vries, Jacco; Waldi, Roland; Wallace, Charlotte; Wallace, Ronan; Walsh, John; Wandernoth, Sebastian; Wang, Jianchun; Ward, David; Watson, Nigel; Websdale, David; Weiden, Andreas; Whitehead, Mark; Wilkinson, Guy; Wilkinson, Michael; Williams, Mark Richard James; Williams, Matthew; Williams, Mike; Williams, Timothy; Wilson, Fergus; Wimberley, Jack; Wishahi, Julian; Wislicki, Wojciech; Witek, Mariusz; Wormser, Guy; Wotton, Stephen; Wright, Simon; Wyllie, Kenneth; Xie, Yuehong; Xu, Zhirui; Yang, Zhenwei; Yu, Jiesheng; Yuan, Xuhao; Yushchenko, Oleg; Zangoli, Maria; Zavertyaev, Mikhail; Zhang, Liming; Zhang, Yanxi; Zhelezov, Alexey; Zhokhov, Anatoly; Zhong, Liang; Zhukov, Valery; Zucchelli, Stefano

    2016-07-21

    The oscillation frequency, $\\Delta m_d$, of $B^0$ mesons is measured using semileptonic decays with a $D^-$ or $D^{*-}$ meson in the final state, in a data sample of $pp$ collisions collected by the LHCb detector corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 3.0$\\mbox{fb}^{-1}$. A combination of the two decay modes gives $\\Delta m_d = (505.0 \\pm 2.1 \\pm 1.0) \\rm \\,ns^{-1}$, where the first uncertainty is statistical and the second is systematic. This is the most precise single measurement of this parameter. It is compatible with the current world average and has similar precision.

  11. Temperature measurements in thermonuclear plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Breton, D.

    1958-01-01

    The temperatures needed to produce thermonuclear reactions are of the order of several million degrees Kelvin. Devising methods for measuring such temperatures has been the subject of research in many countries. In order to present the problem clearly and to demonstrate its importance, the author reviews the various conditions which must be fulfilled in order that reactions may be qualified as thermonuclear. The relationship between the temperature and the cross-section of the reactions is studied, and it is shown that the notion of temperature in the plasmas is complex, which leads to a consideration of the temperature of the ions and that of the electrons. None of the methods for the temperature measurements is completely satisfactory because of the hypotheses which must be made, and which are seldom fulfilled during high-intensity discharges in the plasmas. In practice it is necessary to use several methods simultaneously. (author) [fr

  12. High-precision thickness measurements using beta backscatter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heckman, R.V.

    1978-11-01

    A two-axis, automated fixture for use with a high-intensity Pm-147 source and a photomultiplier-scintillation beta-backscatter probe for making thickness measurements has been designed and built. A custom interface was built to connect the system to a minicomputer, and software was written to position the tables, control the probe, and make the measurements. Measurements can be made in less time with much greater precision than by the method previously used

  13. Precise atomic mass measurements by deflection mass spectrometry

    CERN Document Server

    Barber, R C

    2003-01-01

    Since its inception nearly 90 years ago by J.J. Thomson, the precise determination of atomic masses by the classical technique of deflecting charged particles in electric and magnetic fields has provided a large body of data on naturally occurring nuclides. Currently, such measurements on stable nuclides have frequently achieved a precision of better than two parts in 10 sup 9 of the mass. A review of the technique, together with a brief summary of the important historical developments in the field of precise atomic mass measurements, will be given. The more recent contributions to this field by the deflection mass spectrometer at the University of Manitoba will be provided as illustrations of the culmination of the techniques used and the applications that have been studied. A brief comparison between this and newer techniques using Penning traps will be presented.

  14. The precision of higgs boson measurements and their implications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    J. Conway et al. email = crathbun@fnal.gov

    2002-01-01

    The prospects for a precise exploration of the properties of a single or many observed Higgs bosons at future accelerators are summarized, with particular emphasis on the abilities of a Linear Collider (LC). Some implications of these measurements for discerning new physics beyond the Standard Model (SM) are also discussed

  15. Precise measurement of chromium isotopes by MC-ICPMS

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schiller, Martin; Van Kooten, Elishevah; Holst, Jesper Christian

    2014-01-01

    We report novel analytical procedures allowing for the concurrent determination of the stable and mass-independent Cr isotopic composition of silicate materials by multiple collector inductively coupled mass spectrometry (MC-ICPMS). In particular, we focus on improved precision of the measurement...

  16. Applications of an automated stem measurer for precision forestry

    Science.gov (United States)

    N. Clark

    2001-01-01

    Accurate stem measurements are required for the determination of many silvicultural prescriptions, i.e., what are we going to do with a stand of trees. This would only be amplified in a precision forestry context. Many methods have been proposed for optimal ways to evaluate stems for a variety of characteristics. These methods usually involve the acquisition of total...

  17. Fast and precise luminosity measurement at the international linear ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    6. — journal of. December 2007 physics pp. 1151–1157. Fast and precise luminosity measurement ... The fast investigation of the collision quality for intrabunch feedback and the ... consisting of the sensor, the absorber and an interconnection structure. 2. ... outer radius of BeamCal is increased to keep the angular overlap.

  18. Fast and precise luminosity measurement at the international linear

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The detectors of the ILC will feature a calorimeter system in the very forward region. The system comprises mainly two electromagnetic calorimeters: LumiCal, which is dedicated to the measurement of the absolute luminosity with highest precision and BeamCal, which uses the energy deposition from beamstrahlung pairs ...

  19. Overview of the JYFLTRAP mass measurements and high-precision ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    nuclei, the mass difference can be determined with much higher precision than would normally be possible since for the mass doublets the systematic uncertainties become ..... The two-neutron separation energies in N = 60 indicate the. 338 ... Masses of zinc isotopes (Z = 30) were measured up to 80Zn, providing valuable.

  20. Precision half-life measurement of 17F

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brodeur, M.; Nicoloff, C.; Ahn, T.; Allen, J.; Bardayan, D. W.; Becchetti, F. D.; Gupta, Y. K.; Hall, M. R.; Hall, O.; Hu, J.; Kelly, J. M.; Kolata, J. J.; Long, J.; O'Malley, P.; Schultz, B. E.

    2016-02-01

    Background: The precise determination of f t values for superallowed mixed transitions between mirror nuclide are gaining attention as they could provide an avenue to test the theoretical corrections used to extract the Vu d matrix element from superallowed pure Fermi transitions. The 17F decay is particularly interesting as it proceeds completely to the ground state of 17O, removing the need for branching ratio measurements. The dominant uncertainty on the f t value of the 17F mirror transition stems from a number of conflicting half-life measurements. Purpose: A precision half-life measurement of 17F was performed and compared to previous results. Methods: The life-time was determined from the β counting of implanted 17F on a Ta foil that was removed from the beam for counting. The 17F beam was produced by transfers reaction and separated by the TwinSol facility of the Nuclear Science Laboratory of the University of Notre Dame. Results: The measured value of t1/2 new=64.402 (42) s is in agreement with several past measurements and represents one of the most precise measurements to date. In anticipation of future measurements of the correlation parameters for the decay and using the new world average t1/2 world=64.398 (61) s, we present a new estimate of the mixing ratio ρ for the mixed transition as well as the correlation parameters based on assuming Standard Model validity. Conclusions: The relative uncertainty on the new world average for the half-life is dominated by the large χ2=31 of the existing measurements. More precision measurements with different systematics are needed to remedy to the situation.

  1. Predicted precision of ion temperature and impurity fractional density measurements using the JET collective scattering diagnostic

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Orsitto, F.

    1992-11-01

    In a previous investigation the possibility of measuring the bulk ion temperature was considered in detail, in the context of the proposed Thomson scattering diagnostic for fast ions and alpha particles in the Joint European Torus project. In this report we give an affirmative answer to the question of whether good precision can be obtained in the simultaneous determination of the temperatures and densities of plasma ions from a collective scattering experiment provided some conditions are satisfied. (Author)

  2. Precision half-life measurement of 11C: The most precise mirror transition F t value

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valverde, A. A.; Brodeur, M.; Ahn, T.; Allen, J.; Bardayan, D. W.; Becchetti, F. D.; Blankstein, D.; Brown, G.; Burdette, D. P.; Frentz, B.; Gilardy, G.; Hall, M. R.; King, S.; Kolata, J. J.; Long, J.; Macon, K. T.; Nelson, A.; O'Malley, P. D.; Skulski, M.; Strauss, S. Y.; Vande Kolk, B.

    2018-03-01

    Background: The precise determination of the F t value in T =1 /2 mixed mirror decays is an important avenue for testing the standard model of the electroweak interaction through the determination of Vu d in nuclear β decays. 11C is an interesting case, as its low mass and small QE C value make it particularly sensitive to violations of the conserved vector current hypothesis. The present dominant source of uncertainty in the 11CF t value is the half-life. Purpose: A high-precision measurement of the 11C half-life was performed, and a new world average half-life was calculated. Method: 11C was created by transfer reactions and separated using the TwinSol facility at the Nuclear Science Laboratory at the University of Notre Dame. It was then implanted into a tantalum foil, and β counting was used to determine the half-life. Results: The new half-life, t1 /2=1220.27 (26 ) s, is consistent with the previous values but significantly more precise. A new world average was calculated, t1/2 world=1220.41 (32 ) s, and a new estimate for the Gamow-Teller to Fermi mixing ratio ρ is presented along with standard model correlation parameters. Conclusions: The new 11C world average half-life allows the calculation of a F tmirror value that is now the most precise value for all superallowed mixed mirror transitions. This gives a strong impetus for an experimental determination of ρ , to allow for the determination of Vu d from this decay.

  3. Precise measurement of fuel content of irradiated and nonirradiated materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harker, Y.D.; Napper, P.R.; Proctor, A.E.

    1984-01-01

    This paper discusses the application of precise reactivity measurements in the Advanced Reactivity Measurement Facility at Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) to determine th fuel content in irradiated and nonirradiated materials. Different methods of reactivity measurements and examples of how they have been are presented, which provides an insight in capabilities available to analyze samples with different geometrical sizes from small volumes approx. 100 cc to 12 ft long fuel pins and also samples with different fuel content ranges from approx. 2 mg to approx. 600 g. The overall accuracy of these measurements is approx. 0.5% (1sigma)

  4. Demonstration of a Fast, Precise Propane Measurement Using Infrared Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zahniser, M. S.; Roscioli, J. R.; Nelson, D. D.; Herndon, S. C.

    2016-12-01

    Propane is one of the primary components of emissions from natural gas extraction and processing activities. In addition to being an air pollutant, its ratio to other hydrocarbons such as methane and ethane can serve as a "fingerprint" of a particular facility or process, aiding in identifying emission sources. Quantifying propane has typically required laboratory analysis of flask samples, resulting in low temporal resolution and making plume-based measurements infeasible. Here we demonstrate fast (1-second), high precision (infrared spectroscopy at 2967 wavenumbers. In addition, we explore the impact of nearby water and ethane absorption lines on the accuracy and precision of the propane measurement. Finally, we discuss development of a dual-laser instrument capable of simultaneous measurements of methane, ethane, and propane (the C1-C3 compounds), all within a small spatial package that can be easily deployed aboard a mobile platform.

  5. A precision measurement of the Z0-line shape

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schmitt, B.

    1996-01-01

    A precise measurement of the cross section of the process e + e - → hadrons at energies around the Z 0 -resonance is performed. The aim is to achieve a systematic error of 0.1%. Data recorded with the OPAL detector at LEP during the years 1990 to 1994 are used. To achieve a small systematic luminosity error the OPAL detector was upgraded with a new luminosity monitor. The new luminosity detector, the luminosity measurement, and the selection of multi hadronic events is described in detail. The measured hadronic cross sections together with the leptonic cross sections are used to determine the mass and the width of the Z 0 -boson. The partial widths are used for a precision test of the standard model. (orig.)

  6. Examination of tumor diameter measurement precision by RECIST

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goto, Masami; Ino, Kenji; Akahane, Masaaki

    2007-01-01

    Image evaluation with Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors (RECIST) evaluates the change in a measurable lesion as determined by ruler or micrometer caliper. However, there is no definition of the conditions thought to influence the precision of measurement. We therefore examined the effects on measurement precision by changing image amplification, window width (WW), window level (WL), and time phase. Moreover, to determine response rate, one-dimensional evaluation with RECIST was compared with the two-dimensional evaluation of World Health Organization (WHO) for a hepatocellular carcinoma. The results of measuring the object lesion for measured value variation were as follows. Under image conditions of 1 time expansion/WW 150/WL 100 was (4.92±1.94)%. Under image conditions of 1 time expansion/WW 350/WL 75 was (4.42±1.70)%. Under image conditions of 4 times expansion/WW 150/WL 100 was (2.52±0.82)%. Under image conditions of 4 times expansion/WW 350/WL 75 was (2.83±1.10)%. When an image was enlarged to 4 times, precision doubled. There was no a difference in comparing RECIST to WHO in terms of response rate. Thus the best method was considered to be RECIST because of its convenience. (author)

  7. Progress in Precision Measurements of the Cosmic Microwave Background

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bernardis, P. de; Calvo, M.; Coppolecchia, A.; Cruciani, A.; Giordano, C.; Masi, S.; Nati, F.; Salatino, M.; Schillaci, A. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita La Sapienza, P.le A. Moro 2, 00185 Roma (Italy)

    2011-08-15

    High precision measurements of the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) represent one of the most difficult challenges in observational cosmology, but promise to unveil the mysteries of the very early Universe and of the birth of structures. Three observables are available. The small polarized CMB signal is probably carrying a signature of the early inflationary dynamics of the Universe. It is, however, embedded in overwhelming noise, systematic effects, and polarized foreground. The imprint of the large scale structure in the universe is present in the small-scale anisotropy of the CMB and in its spectral signatures (secondary anisotropy), again mixed with foreground contaminants. Low-level non-Gaussian components of CMB anisotropy and polarization also provide a very promising way to constrain inflation and the physics of ultra-high energies, if foregrounds can be efficiently separated from the measured signal. If measured with high precision, as required by the science issues above, the spectra of CMB anisotropy and polarization also constrain efficiently neutrino properties, hence their interest in this conference. Here we summarize the current status of CMB measurements, dominated by the Planck survey, and delineate the forthcoming activities, needed to exploit the huge scientific potential of precision measurements of the CMB, including the detection of neutrino masses.

  8. Precision Spectroscopy, Diode Lasers, and Optical Frequency Measurement Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hollberg, Leo (Editor); Fox, Richard (Editor); Waltman, Steve (Editor); Robinson, Hugh

    1998-01-01

    This compilation is a selected set of reprints from the Optical Frequency Measurement Group of the Time and Frequency Division of the National Institute of Standards and Technology, and consists of work published between 1987 and 1997. The two main programs represented here are (1) development of tunable diode-laser technology for scientific applications and precision measurements, and (2) research toward the goal of realizing optical-frequency measurements and synthesis. The papers are organized chronologically in five, somewhat arbitrarily chosen categories: Diode Laser Technology, Tunable Laser Systems, Laser Spectroscopy, Optical Synthesis and Extended Wavelength Coverage, and Multi-Photon Interactions and Optical Coherences.

  9. Precision Electroweak Measurements and Constraints on the Standard Model

    CERN Document Server

    ,

    2010-01-01

    This note presents constraints on Standard Model parameters using published and preliminary precision electroweak results measured at the electron-positron colliders LEP and SLC. The results are compared with precise electroweak measurements from other experiments, notably CDF and DØ at the Tevatron. Constraints on the input parameters of the Standard Model are derived from the combined set of results obtained in high-$Q^2$ interactions, and used to predict results in low-$Q^2$ experiments, such as atomic parity violation, Møller scattering, and neutrino-nucleon scattering. The main changes with respect to the experimental results presented in 2009 are new combinations of results on the width of the W boson and the mass of the top quark.

  10. Precise positional measurement system in transcranial magnetic stimulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inoue, Tomonori; Mishima, Yukuo; Hiwaki, Osamu

    2006-01-01

    Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) is a method for noninvasive stimulation of cerebral cortex, and it has contributed to clinical and basic researches of brain function. In order to estimate the accurate stimulating points of the cortex in TMS, precise measurement of the subject's head and the stimulating coil is necessary. In this study, we have developed the positioning TMS system with a three-dimensional (3-D) digitizer and a multi-articular system. We proposed a method for the accurate measurement of a subject's head and cortex, in which the location data of the subject's face surface captured by a 3-D digitizer were superimposed on the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) data of the subject's face surface. Using this system, the precise estimation of the stimulated sites of the cortex in TMS was achieved. The validity of the system was verified by the experiment on the TMS of the motor cortex. (author)

  11. Precision of single-engage micro Hall effect measurements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henrichsen, Henrik Hartmann; Hansen, Ole; Kjær, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    Recently a novel microscale Hall effect measurement technique has been developed to extract sheet resistance (RS), Hall sheet carrier density (NHS) and Hall mobility (μH) from collinear micro 4-point probe measurements in the vicinity of an insulating boundary [1]. The technique measures in less...... than a minute directly the local transport properties, which enables in-line production monitoring on scribe line test pads [2]. To increase measurement speed and reliability, a method in which 4-point measurements are performed using two different electrode pitches has been developed [3......]. In this study we calculate the measurement error on RS, NHS and μH resulting from electrode position errors, probe placement, sample size and Hall signal magnitude. We show the relationship between measurement precision and electrode pitch, which is important when down-scaling the micro 4-point probe to fit...

  12. Precision luminosity measurement at LHCb with beam-gas imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barschel, Colin

    2014-01-01

    The luminosity is the physical quantity which relates the cross-section to the production rate in collider experiments. The cross-section being the particle physics observable of interest, a precise determination of the luminosity is required. This work presents the absolute luminosity calibration results performed at the Large Hadron Collider beauty (LHCb) experiment at CERN using a novel method based on beam-gas interactions with data acquired at a center of mass energy √(s)=8 TeV and √(s)=2.76 TeV. Reconstructed beam-gas interaction vertices in LHCb are used to measure the beam profiles, thus making it possible to determine the beams overlap integral. An important element of this work was to install and use a neon gas injection system to increase the beam-gas interaction rate. The precision reached with the beam-gas imaging method relies on the two-dimensional beam shape determination developed in this work. For such precision, the interaction vertex resolution is an important ingredient. Therefore, a new method has been developed using all reconstructed vertices in order to improve the understanding of the vertex resolution. In addition to the overlap integral, the knowledge of the colliding bunch populations is required to measure the luminosity. The determination of the bunch populations relies on LHC instruments to measure the bunch population fractions and the total beam intensity. Studies performed as part of this work resulted in a reduction of the bunch current normalization uncertainty from ±2.7% to ±0.2% and making it possible to achieve precision luminosity measurements at all LHC experiments. Furthermore, information on beam-gas interactions not originating from nominally filled bunches was analyzed to determine the charge fraction not participating in bunch collisions. The knowledge of this fraction is required to correct the total beam intensity. The reference cross-section of pp interactions with at least two tracks in the vertex detector

  13. High-precision reflectivity measurements: improvements in the calibration procedure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jupe, Marco; Grossmann, Florian; Starke, Kai; Ristau, Detlev

    2003-05-01

    The development of high quality optical components is heavily depending on precise characterization procedures. The reflectance and transmittance of laser components are the most important parameters for advanced laser applications. In the industrial fabrication of optical coatings, quality management is generally insured by spectral photometric methods according to ISO/DIS 15386 on a medium level of accuracy. Especially for high reflecting mirrors, a severe discrepancy in the determination of the absolute reflectivity can be found for spectral photometric procedures. In the first part of the CHOCLAB project, a method for measuring reflectance and transmittance with an enhanced precision was developed, which is described in ISO/WD 13697. In the second part of the CHOCLAB project, the evaluation and optimization for the presented method is scheduled. Within this framework international Round-Robin experiment is currently in progress. During this Round-Robin experiment, distinct deviations could be observed between the results of high precision measurement facilities of different partners. Based on the extended experiments, the inhomogeneity of the sample reflectivity was identified as one important origin for the deviation. Consequently, this inhomogeneity is also influencing the calibration procedure. Therefore, a method was developed that allows the calibration of the chopper blade using always the same position on the reference mirror. During the investigations, the homogeneity of several samples was characterized by a surface mapping procedure for 1064 nm. The measurement facility was extended to the additional wavelength 532 nm and a similar set-up was assembled at 10.6 μm. The high precision reflectivity procedure at the mentioned wavelengths is demonstrated for exemplary measurements.

  14. An introduction about precise measurements of QED γ structure functions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Courau, A.

    1989-11-01

    Pure QED processes are theoretically exactly computable. However precise measurements and theoretical expectations of QED γ structure functions within a given experimental acceptance are not so trivial. Yet such a study is quite interesting. It supplies on the one hand a good QED test and, on the other hand, a good exercise for testing the procedure used for the determination of the hadronic γ structure functions

  15. Precise alignment of the collection fiber assisted by real-time plasma imaging in laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Motto-Ros, V., E-mail: vincent.motto-ros@univ-lyon1.fr [Institut Lumière Matière, UMR 5306 Université Lyon 1-CNRS, Université de Lyon, 69622 Villeurbanne cedex (France); Negre, E. [Institut Lumière Matière, UMR 5306 Université Lyon 1-CNRS, Université de Lyon, 69622 Villeurbanne cedex (France); CRITT Matériaux Alsace, 19, rue de St Junien, 67305 Schiltigheim (France); Pelascini, F. [CRITT Matériaux Alsace, 19, rue de St Junien, 67305 Schiltigheim (France); Panczer, G.; Yu, J. [Institut Lumière Matière, UMR 5306 Université Lyon 1-CNRS, Université de Lyon, 69622 Villeurbanne cedex (France)

    2014-02-01

    Improving the repeatability and the reproducibility of measurement with laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) is one of the actual challenging issues faced by the technique to fit the requirements of precise and accurate quantitative analysis. Among the numerous factors influencing the measurement stability in short and long terms, there are shot-to-shot and day-to-day fluctuations of the morphology of the plasma. Such fluctuations are due to the high sensitivity of laser-induced plasma to experimental conditions including properties of the sample, the laser parameters as well as properties of the ambient gas. In this paper, we demonstrate that precise alignment of the optical fiber for the collection of the plasma emission with respect to the actual morphology of the plasma assisted by real-time imaging, greatly improves the stability of LIBS measurements in short as well as in long terms. The used setup is based on a plasma imaging arrangement using a CCD camera and a real-time image processing. The obtained plasma image is displayed in a 2-dimensional frame where the position of the optical fiber is beforehand calibrated. In addition, the setup provides direct sample surface monitoring, which allows a precise control of the distance between the focusing lens and the sample surface. Test runs with a set of 8 reference samples show very high determination coefficient for calibration curves (R{sup 2} = 0.9999), and a long term repeatability and reproducibility of 4.6% (relative standard deviation) over a period of 3 months without any signal normalization. The capacity of the system to automatically correct the sample surface position for a tilted or non-regular sample surface during a surface mapping measurement is also demonstrated. - Highlights: • Automated alignment of the collection fiber by real-time plasma imaging • High level control of experimental parameters in LIBS experiments • Improvement of the short and long term stability in LIBS

  16. Precise alignment of the collection fiber assisted by real-time plasma imaging in laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Motto-Ros, V.; Negre, E.; Pelascini, F.; Panczer, G.; Yu, J.

    2014-01-01

    Improving the repeatability and the reproducibility of measurement with laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) is one of the actual challenging issues faced by the technique to fit the requirements of precise and accurate quantitative analysis. Among the numerous factors influencing the measurement stability in short and long terms, there are shot-to-shot and day-to-day fluctuations of the morphology of the plasma. Such fluctuations are due to the high sensitivity of laser-induced plasma to experimental conditions including properties of the sample, the laser parameters as well as properties of the ambient gas. In this paper, we demonstrate that precise alignment of the optical fiber for the collection of the plasma emission with respect to the actual morphology of the plasma assisted by real-time imaging, greatly improves the stability of LIBS measurements in short as well as in long terms. The used setup is based on a plasma imaging arrangement using a CCD camera and a real-time image processing. The obtained plasma image is displayed in a 2-dimensional frame where the position of the optical fiber is beforehand calibrated. In addition, the setup provides direct sample surface monitoring, which allows a precise control of the distance between the focusing lens and the sample surface. Test runs with a set of 8 reference samples show very high determination coefficient for calibration curves (R 2 = 0.9999), and a long term repeatability and reproducibility of 4.6% (relative standard deviation) over a period of 3 months without any signal normalization. The capacity of the system to automatically correct the sample surface position for a tilted or non-regular sample surface during a surface mapping measurement is also demonstrated. - Highlights: • Automated alignment of the collection fiber by real-time plasma imaging • High level control of experimental parameters in LIBS experiments • Improvement of the short and long term stability in LIBS measurements

  17. Plasma luminescence feedback control system for precise ultrashort pulse laser tissue ablation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Beop-Min; Feit, Michael D.; Rubenchik, Alexander M.; Gold, David M.; Darrow, Christopher B.; Marion, John E., II; Da Silva, Luiz B.

    1998-05-01

    Plasma luminescence spectroscopy was used for precise ablation of bone tissue without damaging nearby soft tissue using an ultrashort pulse laser. Strong contrast of the luminescence spectra between bone marrow and spinal cord provided the real time feedback control so bone tissue is selectively ablated while preserving the spinal cord.

  18. Exceptional points and quantum correlations in precise measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thilagam, A

    2012-01-01

    We examine the physical manifestations of exceptional points and passage times in a two-level system which is subjected to quantum measurements and which admits a non-Hermitian description. Using an effective Hamiltonian acting in the two-dimensional space spanned by the evolving initial and final states, the effects of highly precise quantum measurements in which the monitoring device interferes significantly with the evolution dynamics of the monitored two-level system is analyzed. The dynamics of a multipartite system consisting of the two-level system, a source of external potential and the measurement device is examined using correlation measures such as entanglement and non-classical quantum correlations. Results show that the quantum correlations between the monitored (monitoring) systems is considerably decreased (increased) as the measurement precision nears the exceptional point, at which the passage time is half of the measurement duration. The results indicate that the underlying mechanism by which the non-classical correlations of quantum systems are transferred from one subsystem to another may be better revealed via use of geometric approaches. This article is part of a special issue of Journal of Physics A: Mathematical and Theoretical devoted to ‘Quantum physics with non-Hermitian operators’. (paper)

  19. Precision cosmological measurements: Independent evidence for dark energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bothun, Greg; Hsu, Stephen D.H.; Murray, Brian

    2008-01-01

    Using recent precision measurements of cosmological parameters, we re-examine whether these observations alone, independent of type Ia supernova surveys, are sufficient to imply the existence of dark energy. We find that best measurements of the age of the Universe t 0 , the Hubble parameter H 0 and the matter fraction Ω m strongly favor an equation of state defined by (w<-1/3). This result is consistent with the existence of a repulsive, acceleration-causing component of energy if the Universe is nearly flat

  20. Precise measurement of velocity dependent friction in rotational motion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alam, Junaid; Hassan, Hafsa; Shamim, Sohaib; Mahmood, Waqas; Anwar, Muhammad Sabieh, E-mail: sabieh@lums.edu.pk [School of Science and Engineering, Lahore University of Management Sciences (LUMS), Opposite Sector U, D.H.A, Lahore 54792 (Pakistan)

    2011-09-15

    Frictional losses are experimentally determined for a uniform circular disc exhibiting rotational motion. The clockwise and anticlockwise rotations of the disc, that result when a hanger tied to a thread is released from a certain height, give rise to vertical oscillations of the hanger as the thread winds and unwinds over a pulley attached to the disc. It is thus observed how the maximum height is achieved by the hanger decrements in every bounce. From the decrements, the rotational frictional losses are measured. The precision is enhanced by correlating vertical motion with the angular motion. This method leads to a substantial improvement in precision. Furthermore, the frictional torque is shown to be proportional to the angular speed. The experiment has been successfully employed in the undergraduate lab setting.

  1. Top quark mass measurements: how precise does it get?

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2014-01-01

    The mass of the top quark is a fundamental parameter of the Standard Model and has to be determined experimentally. Its precise knowledge can be used to constrain new physics models or to check the internal consistency of the Standard Model. Dramatic improvements in experimental techniques over the last years allowed to achieve an unprecedented uncertainty of below 0.5%. In this talk, I present a legacy measurement of the top quark mass performed in lepton+jets final states using the full dataset of proton-antiproton collisions recorded by the DZero detector in Run II at the Tevatron collider, which achieves a relative precision of 0.43%, and outline the perspectives for future improvements at the LHC.

  2. A Precise Measurement of the W Boson Mass with CDF

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2012-01-01

    The W boson mass measurement probes quantum corrections to the W propagator, such as those arising from supersymmetric particles or Higgs bosons. The new measurement from CDF is more precise than the previous world average, providing a stringent constraint on the mass of the Higgs boson in the context of the Standard Model. I describe this measurement, performed with 2.2/fb of data using 1.1 million candidates in the electron and muon decay channels, with three kinematic fits in each channel. The measurement uses in-situ calibrations from cosmic rays, J/psi and Upsilon data, and W- and Z-boson decays, with multiple cross-checks including independent determinations of the Z boson mass in both channels. The W-boson mass is measured to be 80387 +- 19 MeV/c^2.

  3. Progress on precision measurements of inner shell transitions in highly charged ions at an ECR ion source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Szabo, Csilla I.; Indelicato, Paul; LeBigot, Eric-Olivier; Vallette, Alexandre; Amaro, Pedro; Guerra, Mauro; Gumberidze, Alex [Laboratoire Kastler Brossel, Ecole Normale Superieure, CNRS, Universite Pierre et Marie Curie- Paris 6, Case 74, 4 place Jussieu, F-75005 Paris (France); Centro de Fisica Atomica, CFA, Departamento de Fisica (Portugal); Faculdade de Ciencias e Tecnologia, FCT, Universidade Nova de Lisboa, 2829-516 Caparica (Portugal); Laboratoire Kastler Brossel, Ecole Normale Superieure, CNRS, Universite Pierre et Marie Curie- Paris 6, Case 74, 4 place Jussieu, F-75005 Paris (France)

    2012-05-25

    Inner shell transitions of highly charged ions produced in the plasma of an Electron Cyclotron Resonance Ion Source (ECRIS) were observed the first time by a Double Crystal Spectrometer (DCS). The DCS is a well-used tool in precision x-ray spectroscopy due to its ability of precision wavelength measurement traced back to a relative angle measurement. Because of its requirement for a bright x-ray source the DCS has not been used before in direct measurements of highly charged ions (HCI). Our new precision measurement of inner shell transitions in HCI is not just going to provide new x-ray standards for quantum metrology but can also give information about the plasma in which the ions reside. Ionic temperatures and with that the electron density can be determined by thorough examination of line widths measured with great accuracy.

  4. High Precision Infrared Temperature Measurement System Based on Distance Compensation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen Jing

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available To meet the need of real-time remote monitoring of human body surface temperature for optical rehabilitation therapy, a non-contact high-precision real-time temperature measurement method based on distance compensation was proposed, and the system design was carried out. The microcontroller controls the infrared temperature measurement module and the laser range module to collect temperature and distance data. The compensation formula of temperature with distance wass fitted according to the least square method. Testing had been performed on different individuals to verify the accuracy of the system. The results indicate that the designed non-contact infrared temperature measurement system has a residual error of less than 0.2°C and the response time isless than 0.1s in the range of 0 to 60cm. This provides a reference for developing long-distance temperature measurement equipment in optical rehabilitation therapy.

  5. Precision measurement of the Ds*+-Ds+ mass difference

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brown, D.N.; Fast, J.; McIlwain, R.L.; Miao, T.; Miller, D.H.; Modesitt, M.; Payne, D.; Shibata, E.I.; Shipsey, I.P.J.; Wang, P.N.; Battle, M.; Ernst, J.; Kwon, Y.; Roberts, S.; Thorndike, E.H.; Wang, C.H.; Dominick, J.; Lambrecht, M.; Sanghera, S.; Shelkov, V.; Skwarnicki, T.; Stroynowski, R.; Volobouev, I.; Wei, G.; Zadorozhny, P.; Artuso, M.; Goldberg, M.; He, D.; Horwitz, N.; Kennett, R.; Mountain, R.; Moneti, G.C.; Muheim, F.; Mukhin, Y.; Playfer, S.; Rozen, Y.; Stone, S.; Thulasidas, M.; Vasseur, G.; Zhu, G.; Bartelt, J.; Csorna, S.E.; Egyed, Z.; Jain, V.; Kinoshita, K.; Edwards, K.W.; Ogg, M.; Britton, D.I.; Hyatt, E.R.F.; MacFarlane, D.B.; Patel, P.M.; Akerib, D.S.; Barish, B.; Chadha, M.; Chan, S.; Cowen, D.F.; Eigen, G.; Miller, J.S.; O'Grady, C.; Urheim, J.; Weinstein, A.J.; Acosta, D.; Athanas, M.; Masek, G.; Paar, H.P.; Gronberg, J.; Kutschke, R.; Menary, S.; Morrison, R.J.; Nakanishi, S.; Nelson, H.N.; Nelson, T.K.; Qiao, C.; Richman, J.D.; Ryd, A.; Tajima, H.; Sperka, D.; Witherell, M.S.; Procario, M.; Balest, R.; Cho, K.; Daoudi, M.; Ford, W.T.; Johnson, D.R.; Lingel, K.; Lohner, M.; Rankin, P.; Smith, J.G.; Alexander, J.P.; Bebek, C.; Berkelman, K.; Bloom, K.; Browder, T.E.; Cassel, D.G.; Cho, H.A.; Coffman, D.M.; Drell, P.S.; Ehrlich, R.; Gaiderev, P.; Garcia-Sciveres, M.; Geiser, B.; Gittelman, B.; Gray, S.W.; Hartill, D.L.; Heltsley, B.K.; Jones, C.D.; Jones, S.L.; Kandaswamy, J.; Katayama, N.; Kim, P.C.; Kreinick, D.L.; Ludwig, G.S.; Masui, J.; Mevissen, J.; Mistry, N.B.; Ng, C.R.; Nordberg, E.; Patterson, J.R.; Peterson, D.; Riley, D.; Salman, S.; Sapper, M.; Wuerthwein, F.; Avery, P.; Freyberger, A.; Rodriguez, J.; Stephens, R.; Yang, S.; Yelton, J.; Cinabro, D.; Henderson, S.; Liu, T.; Saulnier, M.; Wilson, R.; Yamamoto, H.; Bergfeld, T.; Eisenstein, B.I.; Gollin, G.; Ong, B.; Palmer, M.; Selen, M.; Thaler, J.; Sadoff, A.J.; Ammar, R.; Ball, S.; Baringer, P.; Bean, A.; Besson, D.; Coppage, D.; Copty, N.; Davis, R.; Hancock, N.

    1994-01-01

    We have measured the vector-pseudoscalar mass splitting M(D s *+ )-M(D s + )=144.22±0.47±0.37 MeV significantly more precisely than the previous world average. We minimize the systematic errors by also measuring the vector-pseudoscalar mass difference M(D *0 )-M(D 0 ) using the radiative decay D *0 →D 0 γ, obtaining [M(D s *+ )-M(D s + )]-[M(D *0 )-M(D 0 )] =2.09±0.47±0.37 MeV. This is then combined with our previous high-precision measurement of M(D *0 )-M(D 0 ), which used the decay D *0 →D 0 π 0 . We also measure the mass difference M(D s + )-M(D + )=99.5±0.6±0.3 MeV, using the φπ + decay modes of the D s + and D + mesons

  6. A precision measurement of the mass of the top quark

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abazov, V.M.

    2004-01-01

    The standard model of particle physics contains parameters -- such as particle masses -- whose origins are still unknown and which cannot be predicted, but whose values are constrained through their interactions. In particular, the masses of the top quark (M t ) and W boson (M W ) constrain the mass of the long-hypothesized, but thus far not observed, Higgs boson. A precise measurement of M t can therefore indicate where to look for the Higgs, and indeed whether the hypothesis of a standard model Higgs is consistent with experimental data. As top quarks are produced in pairs and decay in only about 10 -24 s into various final states, reconstructing their masses from their decay products is very challenging. Here we report a technique that extracts more information from each top-quark event and yields a greatly improved precision (of +- 5.3 GeV/c 2 ) when compared to previous measurements. When our new result is combined with our published measurement in a complementary decay mode and with the only other measurements available, the new world average for M t becomes 178.0 +- 4.3 GeV/c 2 . As a result, the most likely Higgs mass increases from the experimentally excluded value of 96 to 117 GeV/c 2 , which is beyond current experimental sensitivity. The upper limit on the Higgs mass at the 95% confidence level is raised from 219 to 251 GeV/c 2

  7. Precision Electroweak measurements at the FCC-ee

    CERN Document Server

    Dam, Mogens

    2016-01-01

    Because of a luminosity of up to five orders of magnitude larger than at LEP, electroweak precision measurements at the FCC-ee -- the Future Circular Collider with electron-positron beams -- would provide improvements by orders of magnitude over the present status and constitute a broad search for the existence of new, weakly interacting particles up to very high energy scales. The FCC-ee will address centre-of-mass energies ranging from below the Z pole to the $\\mathrm{t\\bar{t}}$ threshold and above. At energies around the Z pole, the Z-boson mass and width can be measured to better than 100 keV each. Asymmetry measurements at the Z pole allow improvements in the determination of the weak mixing angle by at least a factor 30 to $\\delta\\sin^2\\theta\\mathrm{_W^{eff}}\\simeq 6\\times 10^{-6}$. A determination of the electromagnetic coupling constant at the Z energy scale, $\\alpha_\\mathrm{QED}(m_\\mathrm{Z}^2)$, to a relative precision of $3\\times 10^{-5}$ can be obtained via measurement of the forward-backward asym...

  8. Precision luminosity measurement at LHCb with beam-gas imaging

    CERN Document Server

    Barschel, Colin

    The luminosity is the physical quantity which relates the cross-section to the production rate in collider experiments. The cross-section being the particle physics observable of interest, a precise determination of the luminosity is required. This work presents the absolute luminosity calibration results performed at the Large Hadron Collider beauty (LHCb) experiment at CERN using a novel method based on beam-gas interactions with data acquired at a center of mass energy $\\sqrt{s}=8$ TeV and $\\sqrt{s}=2.76$ TeV. Reconstructed beam-gas interaction vertices in LHCb are used to measure the beam profiles, thus making it possible to determine the beams overlap integral. An important element of this work was to install and use a neon gas injection system to increase the beam-gas interaction rate. The precision reached with the beam-gas imaging method relies on the two-dimensional beam shape determination developed in this work. For such precision, the interaction vertex resolution is an important ingredient. There...

  9. Precision interplanar spacings measurements of boron doped silicon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soares, D.A.W.; Pimentel, C.A.F.

    1982-05-01

    A study of lattice parameters of boron doped silicon (10 14 -10 19 atom/cc) grown in and directions by Czochralski technique has been undertaken. Interplanar spacings (d) were measured by pseudo-Kossel technique to a precision up to 0,001%; different procedures to obtain d and the errors are discussed. It is concluded that the crystallographic planes contract preferentially and the usual study of parameter variation must be made as a function of d. The diffused B particularly contracts the [333] plane and in a more pronunciate way in high concentrations. An orientation dependence of the diffusion during growth was observed. (Author) [pt

  10. Ultracold atoms for precision measurement of fundamental physical quantities

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2003-01-01

    Cooling and trapping of neutral atoms has been one of the most active fields of research in physics in recent years. Several methods were demonstrated to reach temperatures as low as a few nanokelvin allowing, for example, the investigation of quantum degenerate gases. The ability to control the quantum degrees of freedom of atoms opens the way to applications for precision measurement of fundamental physical quantities. Experiments in progress, planned or being considered using new quantum devices based on ultracold atoms, namely atom interferometers and atomic clocks, will be discussed.

  11. Precision measurements in nuclear {beta}-decay with LPCTrap

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ban, Gilles; Durand, Dominique; Flechard, Xavier; Lienard, Etienne [LPC Caen, ENSICAEN, Universite de Caen, CNRS/IN2P3, Caen (France); Naviliat-Cuncic, Oscar [NSCL and Department of Physics and Astronomy, Michigan State University, East-Lansing, MI (United States)

    2013-09-15

    The experimental achievements and the current program with the LPCTrap device installed at the LIRAT beam line of the SPIRAL1-GANIL facility are presented. The device is dedicated to the study of the weak interaction at low energy by means of precise measurements of the {beta}-{nu} angular correlation parameter. Technical aspects as well as the main results are reviewed. The future program with new available beams is briefly discussed. (copyright 2013 by WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  12. High precision measurements of 26Naβ- decay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grinyer, G. F.; Svensson, C. E.; Andreoiu, C.; Andreyev, A. N.; Austin, R. A.; Ball, G. C.; Chakrawarthy, R. S.; Finlay, P.; Garrett, P. E.; Hackman, G.; Hardy, J. C.; Hyland, B.; Iacob, V. E.; Koopmans, K. A.; Kulp, W. D.; Leslie, J. R.; MacDonald, J. A.; Morton, A. C.; Ormand, W. E.; Osborne, C. J.; Pearson, C. J.; Phillips, A. A.; Sarazin, F.; Schumaker, M. A.; Scraggs, H. C.; Schwarzenberg, J.; Smith, M. B.; Valiente-Dobón, J. J.; Waddington, J. C.; Wood, J. L.; Zganjar, E. F.

    2005-04-01

    High-precision measurements of the half-life and β-branching ratios for the β- decay of 26Na to 26Mg have been measured in β-counting and γ-decay experiments, respectively. A 4π proportional counter and fast tape transport system were employed for the half-life measurement, whereas the γ rays emitted by the daughter nucleus 26Mg were detected with the 8π γ-ray spectrometer, both located at TRIUMF's isotope separator and accelerator radioactive beam facility. The half-life of 26Na was determined to be T1/2=1.07128±0.00013±0.00021s, where the first error is statistical and the second systematic. The logft values derived from these experiments are compared with theoretical values from a full sd-shell model calculation.

  13. External meeting - Geneva University: Precision measurements in spin physics

    CERN Multimedia

    2007-01-01

    GENEVA UNIVERSITY ECOLE DE PHYSIQUE Département de physique nucléaire et corspusculaire 24, Quai Ernest-Ansermet 1211 GENEVE 4 - Tél: 022 379 62 73 - Fax: 022 379 69 92 Wednesday 28 March 2007 PARTICLE PHYSICS SEMINAR at 17:00 - Stückelberg Auditorium Precision measurements in spin physics by Dr. Steven Bass / CERN - Innsbruck The proton spin problem has been challenging experimentalists and theorists alike for the last 20 years. Polarized deep inelastic scattering experiments at CERN, DESY and SLAC have told us that quark partons contribute only about 30% of the proton's spin whereas relativistic quark models predict 60%. Where is the missing spin and why is the quark spin contribution so small? In this talk I will give an overview of the proton spin problem and what it may be telling us about QCD, the vacuum and dynamical symmetry breaking. A precise measurement of neutrino-proton elastic scattering would make a vital contribution to resolving many of the outstanding issues. Information: http://dpnc...

  14. Precision top-quark mass measurement at CDF.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aaltonen, T; Alvarez González, B; Amerio, S; Amidei, D; Anastassov, A; Annovi, A; Antos, J; Apollinari, G; Appel, J A; Arisawa, T; Artikov, A; Asaadi, J; Ashmanskas, W; Auerbach, B; Aurisano, A; Azfar, F; Badgett, W; Bae, T; Barbaro-Galtieri, A; Barnes, V E; Barnett, B A; Barria, P; Bartos, P; Bauce, M; Bedeschi, F; Behari, S; Bellettini, G; Bellinger, J; Benjamin, D; Beretvas, A; Bhatti, A; Bisello, D; Bizjak, I; Bland, K R; Blumenfeld, B; Bocci, A; Bodek, A; Bortoletto, D; Boudreau, J; Boveia, A; Brigliadori, L; Bromberg, C; Brucken, E; Budagov, J; Budd, H S; Burkett, K; Busetto, G; Bussey, P; Buzatu, A; Calamba, A; Calancha, C; Camarda, S; Campanelli, M; Campbell, M; Canelli, F; Carls, B; Carlsmith, D; Carosi, R; Carrillo, S; Carron, S; Casal, B; Casarsa, M; Castro, A; Catastini, P; Cauz, D; Cavaliere, V; Cavalli-Sforza, M; Cerri, A; Cerrito, L; Chen, Y C; Chertok, M; Chiarelli, G; Chlachidze, G; Chlebana, F; Cho, K; Chokheli, D; Chung, W H; Chung, Y S; Ciocci, M A; Clark, A; Clarke, C; Compostella, G; Convery, M E; Conway, J; Corbo, M; Cordelli, M; Cox, C A; Cox, D J; Crescioli, F; Cuevas, J; Culbertson, R; Dagenhart, D; d'Ascenzo, N; Datta, M; de Barbaro, P; Dell'Orso, M; Demortier, L; Deninno, M; Devoto, F; d'Errico, M; Di Canto, A; Di Ruzza, B; Dittmann, J R; D'Onofrio, M; Donati, S; Dong, P; Dorigo, M; Dorigo, T; Ebina, K; Elagin, A; Eppig, A; Erbacher, R; Errede, S; Ershaidat, N; Eusebi, R; Farrington, S; Feindt, M; Fernandez, J P; Field, R; Flanagan, G; Forrest, R; Frank, M J; Franklin, M; Freeman, J C; Funakoshi, Y; Furic, I; Gallinaro, M; Garcia, J E; Garfinkel, A F; Garosi, P; Gerberich, H; Gerchtein, E; Giagu, S; Giakoumopoulou, V; Giannetti, P; Gibson, K; Ginsburg, C M; Giokaris, N; Giromini, P; Giurgiu, G; Glagolev, V; Glenzinski, D; Gold, M; Goldin, D; Goldschmidt, N; Golossanov, A; Gomez, G; Gomez-Ceballos, G; Goncharov, M; González, O; Gorelov, I; Goshaw, A T; Goulianos, K; Grinstein, S; Grosso-Pilcher, C; Group, R C; Guimaraes da Costa, J; Hahn, S R; Halkiadakis, E; Hamaguchi, A; Han, J Y; Happacher, F; Hara, K; Hare, D; Hare, M; Harr, R F; Hatakeyama, K; Hays, C; Heck, M; Heinrich, J; Herndon, M; Hewamanage, S; Hocker, A; Hopkins, W; Horn, D; Hou, S; Hughes, R E; Hurwitz, M; Husemann, U; Hussain, N; Hussein, M; Huston, J; Introzzi, G; Iori, M; Ivanov, A; James, E; Jang, D; Jayatilaka, B; Jeon, E J; Jindariani, S; Jones, M; Joo, K K; Jun, S Y; Junk, T R; Kamon, T; Karchin, P E; Kasmi, A; Kato, Y; Ketchum, W; Keung, J; Khotilovich, V; Kilminster, B; Kim, D H; Kim, H S; Kim, J E; Kim, M J; Kim, S B; Kim, S H; Kim, Y K; Kim, Y J; Kimura, N; Kirby, M; Klimenko, S; Knoepfel, K; Kondo, K; Kong, D J; Konigsberg, J; Kotwal, A V; Kreps, M; Kroll, J; Krop, D; Kruse, M; Krutelyov, V; Kuhr, T; Kurata, M; Kwang, S; Laasanen, A T; Lami, S; Lammel, S; Lancaster, M; Lander, R L; Lannon, K; Lath, A; Latino, G; LeCompte, T; Lee, E; Lee, H S; Lee, J S; Lee, S W; Leo, S; Leone, S; Lewis, J D; Limosani, A; Lin, C-J; Lindgren, M; Lipeles, E; Lister, A; Litvintsev, D O; Liu, C; Liu, H; Liu, Q; Liu, T; Lockwitz, S; Loginov, A; Lucchesi, D; Lueck, J; Lujan, P; Lukens, P; Lungu, G; Lys, J; Lysak, R; Madrak, R; Maeshima, K; Maestro, P; Malik, S; Manca, G; Manousakis-Katsikakis, A; Margaroli, F; Marino, C; Martínez, M; Mastrandrea, P; Matera, K; Mattson, M E; Mazzacane, A; Mazzanti, P; McFarland, K S; McIntyre, P; McNulty, R; Mehta, A; Mehtala, P; Mesropian, C; Miao, T; Mietlicki, D; Mitra, A; Miyake, H; Moed, S; Moggi, N; Mondragon, M N; Moon, C S; Moore, R; Morello, M J; Morlock, J; Movilla Fernandez, P; Mukherjee, A; Muller, Th; Murat, P; Mussini, M; Nachtman, J; Nagai, Y; Naganoma, J; Nakano, I; Napier, A; Nett, J; Neu, C; Neubauer, M S; Nielsen, J; Nodulman, L; Noh, S Y; Norniella, O; Oakes, L; Oh, S H; Oh, Y D; Oksuzian, I; Okusawa, T; Orava, R; Ortolan, L; Pagan Griso, S; Pagliarone, C; Palencia, E; Papadimitriou, V; Paramonov, A A; Patrick, J; Pauletta, G; Paulini, M; Paus, C; Pellett, D E; Penzo, A; Phillips, T J; Piacentino, G; Pianori, E; Pilot, J; Pitts, K; Plager, C; Pondrom, L; Poprocki, S; Potamianos, K; Prokoshin, F; Pranko, A; Ptohos, F; Punzi, G; Rahaman, A; Ramakrishnan, V; Ranjan, N; Redondo, I; Renton, P; Rescigno, M; Riddick, T; Rimondi, F; Ristori, L; Robson, A; Rodrigo, T; Rodriguez, T; Rogers, E; Rolli, S; Roser, R; Ruffini, F; Ruiz, A; Russ, J; Rusu, V; Safonov, A; Sakumoto, W K; Sakurai, Y; Santi, L; Sato, K; Saveliev, V; Savoy-Navarro, A; Schlabach, P; Schmidt, A; Schmidt, E E; Schwarz, T; Scodellaro, L; Scribano, A; Scuri, F; Seidel, S; Seiya, Y; Semenov, A; Sforza, F; Shalhout, S Z; Shears, T; Shepard, P F; Shimojima, M; Shochet, M; Shreyber-Tecker, I; Simonenko, A; Sinervo, P; Sliwa, K; Smith, J R; Snider, F D; Soha, A; Sorin, V; Song, H; Squillacioti, P; Stancari, M; St Denis, R; Stelzer, B; Stelzer-Chilton, O; Stentz, D; Strologas, J; Strycker, G L; Sudo, Y; Sukhanov, A; Suslov, I; Takemasa, K; Takeuchi, Y; Tang, J; Tecchio, M; Teng, P K; Thom, J; Thome, J; Thompson, G A; Thomson, E; Toback, D; Tokar, S; Tollefson, K; Tomura, T; Tonelli, D; Torre, S; Torretta, D; Totaro, P; Trovato, M; Ukegawa, F; Uozumi, S; Varganov, A; Vázquez, F; Velev, G; Vellidis, C; Vidal, M; Vila, I; Vilar, R; Vizán, J; Vogel, M; Volpi, G; Wagner, P; Wagner, R L; Wakisaka, T; Wallny, R; Wang, S M; Warburton, A; Waters, D; Wester, W C; Whiteson, D; Wicklund, A B; Wicklund, E; Wilbur, S; Wick, F; Williams, H H; Wilson, J S; Wilson, P; Winer, B L; Wittich, P; Wolbers, S; Wolfe, H; Wright, T; Wu, X; Wu, Z; Yamamoto, K; Yamato, D; Yang, T; Yang, U K; Yang, Y C; Yao, W-M; Yeh, G P; Yi, K; Yoh, J; Yorita, K; Yoshida, T; Yu, G B; Yu, I; Yu, S S; Yun, J C; Zanetti, A; Zeng, Y; Zhou, C; Zucchelli, S

    2012-10-12

    We present a precision measurement of the top-quark mass using the full sample of Tevatron √s = 1.96 TeV proton-antiproton collisions collected by the CDF II detector, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 8.7 fb(-1). Using a sample of tt¯ candidate events decaying into the lepton+jets channel, we obtain distributions of the top-quark masses and the invariant mass of two jets from the W boson decays from data. We then compare these distributions to templates derived from signal and background samples to extract the top-quark mass and the energy scale of the calorimeter jets with in situ calibration. The likelihood fit of the templates from signal and background events to the data yields the single most-precise measurement of the top-quark mass, M(top)=172.85±0.71(stat)±0.85(syst) GeV/c(2).

  15. Precise pointing knowledge for SCIAMACHY solar occultation measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Bramstedt

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available We present a method to precisely determine the viewing direction for solar occultation instruments from scans over the solar disk. Basic idea is the fit of the maximum intensity during the scan, which corresponds to the center of the solar disk in the scanning direction. We apply this method to the solar occultation measurements of the satellite instrument SCIAMACHY, which scans the Sun in elevation direction. The achieved mean precision is 0.46 mdeg, which corresponds to an tangent height error of about 26 m for individual occultation sequences. The deviation of the derived elevation angle from the geolocation information given along with the product has a seasonal cycle with an amplitude of 2.26 mdeg, which is in tangent height an amplitude of about 127 m. The mean elevation angle offset is −4.41 mdeg (249 m. SCIAMACHY's sun follower device controls the azimuth viewing direction during the occultation measurements. The derived mean azimuth direction has an standard error of 0.65 mdeg, which is about 36 m in horizontal direction at the tangent point. We observe also a seasonal cycle of the azimuth mispointing with an amplitude of 2.3 mdeg, which is slightly increasing with time. The almost constant mean offset is 88 mdeg, which is about 5.0 km horizontal offset at the tangent point.

  16. Measuring the Plasma Density of a Ferroelectric Plasma Source in an Expanding Plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dunaevsky, A.; Fisch, N.J.

    2003-01-01

    The initial density and electron temperature at the surface of a ferroelectric plasma source were deduced from floating probe measurements in an expanding plasma. The method exploits negative charging of the floating probe capacitance by fast flows before the expanding plasma reaches the probe. The temporal profiles of the plasma density can be obtained from the voltage traces of the discharge of the charged probe capacitance by the ion current from the expanding plasma. The temporal profiles of the plasma density, at two different distances from the surface of the ferroelectric plasma source, could be further fitted by using the density profiles for the expanding plasma. This gives the initial values of the plasma density and electron temperature at the surface. The method could be useful for any pulsed discharge, which is accompanied by considerable electromagnetic noise, if the initial plasma parameters might be deduced from measurements in expanding plasma

  17. Precision and accuracy of blood glucose measurements using three different instruments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nowotny, B; Nowotny, P J; Strassburger, K; Roden, M

    2012-02-01

    Assessment of insulin sensitivity by dynamic metabolic tests such as the hyperinsulinemic euglycemic clamp critically relies on the reproducible and fast measurement of blood glucose concentrations. Although various instruments have been developed over the last decades, little is known as to the accuracy and comparability. We therefore compared the best new instrument with the former gold standard instruments to measure glucose concentrations in metabolic tests. Fasting blood samples of 15 diabetic and 10 healthy subjects were collected into sodium-fluoride tubes, spiked with glucose (0, 2.8, 6.9 and 11.1 mmol/l) and measured either as whole blood (range 3.3-26.3 mmol/l) or following centrifugation as plasma (range 3.9-32.0 mmol/l). Plasma samples were analyzed in the YSI-2300 STAT plus (YSI), EKF Biosen C-Line (EKF) and the reference method, Beckman Glucose analyzer-II (BMG), whole blood samples in EKF instruments with YSI as reference method. The average deviation of the EKF from the reference, BMG, was 3.0 ± 3.5% without any concentration-dependent variability. Glucose measurements by YSI were in good agreement with that by BMG (plasma) and EKF (plasma and whole blood) up to concentrations of 13.13 mmol/l (0.5 ± 3.7%), but deviation increased to -6.2 ± 3.8% at higher concentrations. Precision (n = 6) was ±2.2% (YSI), ±3.9% (EKF) and ±5.2% (BMG). The EKF instrument is comparable regarding accuracy and precision to the reference method BMG and can be used in metabolic tests, while the YSI showed a systematic shift at higher glucose concentrations. Based on these results we decided to replace BMG with EKF instrument in metabolic tests. © 2012 The Authors. Diabetic Medicine © 2012 Diabetes UK.

  18. PRECISION MEASUREMENT OF MUON G-2 AND ACCELERATOR RELATED ISSUES

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    BROWN, H.N.; BUNCE, G.; CAREY, R.M.; CUSHMAN, P.; DANBY, G.T.; DEBEVEC, P.T.; DEILE, M.; DENG, H.; DENINGER, W.; DHAWAN, S.K.; MENG, W.

    2001-01-01

    A precision measurement of the anomalous g value, a μ =(g-2)/2, for the positive muon has been made using high intensity protons available at the Brookhaven AGS. The result based on the 1999 data a μ =11659202(14)(6) x 10 10 (1.3ppm) is in good agreement with previous measurements and has an error one third that of the combined previous data. The current theoretical value from the standard model is a μ (SM)=11659159.6(6.7) x 10 10 (0.57 ppm) and differ by over 2.5 standard deviation with experiment. Issues with reducing systematic errors and enhancing the injection and storage efficiencies are discussed

  19. Qweak: A Precision Measurement of the Proton's Weak Charge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    David Armstrong; Todd Averett; James Birchall; James Bowman; Roger Carlini; Swapan Chattopadhyay; Charles Davis; J. Doornbos; James Dunne; Rolf Ent; Jens Erler; Willie Falk; John Finn; Tony Forest; David Gaskell; Klaus Grimm; C. Hagner; F. Hersman; Maurik Holtrop; Kathleen Johnston; R.T. Jones; Kyungseon Joo; Cynthia Keppel; Elie Korkmaz; Stanley Kowalski; Lawrence Lee; Allison Lung; David Mack; Stanislaw Majewski; Gregory Mitchell; Hamlet Mkrtchyan; Norman Morgan; Allena Opper; Shelley Page; Seppo Penttila; Mark Pitt; Benard Poelker; Tracy Porcelli; William Ramsay; Michael Ramsey-musolf; Julie Roche; Neven Simicevic; Gregory Smith; Riad Suleiman; Simon Taylor; Willem Van Oers; Steven Wells; W.S. Wilburn; Stephen Wood; Carl Zorn

    2004-01-01

    The Qweak experiment at Jefferson Lab aims to make a 4% measurement of the parity-violating asymmetry in elastic scattering at very low Q 2 of a longitudinally polarized electron beam on a proton target. The experiment will measure the weak charge of the proton, and thus the weak mixing angle at low energy scale, providing a precision test of the Standard Model. Since the value of the weak mixing angle is approximately 1/4, the weak charge of the proton Q w p = 1-4 sin 2 θ w is suppressed in the Standard Model, making it especially sensitive to the value of the mixing angle and also to possible new physics. The experiment is approved to run at JLab, and the construction plan calls for the hardware to be ready to install in Hall C in 2007. The theoretical context of the experiment and the status of its design are discussed

  20. Precision measurements of the top quark couplings at the FCC

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2051271

    2015-01-01

    The design study of the Future Circular Colliders (FCC) in a 100-km ring in the Geneva area has started at CERN at the beginning of 2014, as an option for post-LHC particle accelerators. The study has an emphasis on proton-proton and electron-positron high-energy frontier machines. In the current plans, the first step of the FCC physics programme would exploit a high-luminosity e+e- collider called FCC-ee, with centre-of-mass energies ranging from below the Z pole to the t-tbar threshold and beyond, followed by 100\\,TeV proton-proton collisions as ultimate goal. When combined, these two steps offer a large palette of complementary measurements and sensitivity for new physics. In particular, the association of the FCC-ee and the FCC-hh allows measurements of the top-quark electroweak and Yukawa couplings to be performed with unrivaled precision.

  1. Precision measurements of electroweak observables with the ATLAS Detector

    CERN Document Server

    Vittori, Camilla; The ATLAS collaboration

    2017-01-01

    Measurements of the Drell-Yan production of W and Z/gamma bosons at the LHC provide a benchmark of our understanding of perturbative QCD and probe the proton structure in a unique way. The ATLAS collaboration measured the di-lepton mass range up to the TeV scale as well as the triple differential cross-section measurement as a function of Mll, dilepton rapidity and cosθ defined in the Collins-Soper frame. This measurement provides sensitivity to the PDFs and the weak mixing angle. The latest results of the ATLAS collaboration will be presented. A second important observable in the electroweak sector is the W boson mass in order to test the overall consistency of the Standard Model. Since the discovery of a Higgs Boson, the the W boson mass is predicted to 7 MeV precision, while the world average of all measurements is 15 MeV, making the improved measurement an important goal. Large samples of leptonic decays of W and Z bosons were collected with efficient single lepton triggers in the 7 TeV data set correspo...

  2. Precision measurements of thermodynamic parameters of heavy alkali metals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blagonravov, L. A.; Modenov, A. A.

    2017-11-01

    On the temperature dependences of a number of one-component liquids, regions of anomalous behavior in the form of kinks and also in the form of limited areas of forced growth have been previously observed (LA Blagonravov, LA Orlov, et al., TVT 2000, vol. 38, No. 4, p.566-572). However, the interpretation of these anomalies is complicated by the small magnitude of the effects themselves (the magnitude of the observed effect was 5%, a random error of 2-3%). An increase in the accuracy of measurements is required for a more confident determination of the detailed shape of the anomalies. In the proposed work, thermodynamic parameters are studied using a technique that uses the elastic-thermal effect. The adiabatic thermal coefficient of pressure (a.t.p.c.) is measured: χ = (1/T)(∂T/∂p)S. An installation in which the pressure change is carried out in a periodic mode is used for measurements. The software allows simultaneous averaging of the values of the amplitude of pressure oscillations and the amplitude of temperature response oscillations with the subsequent determination of their ratio. The facility uses an advanced pressure modulator, which allows creating pressure oscillations of the shape close to sinusoidal (the value of the second harmonic is not more than 10%) and a precision SR-810 nanovoltmeter with a synchronous digital detector. The currently used technique provides an acceptable measurement accuracy (error in the region of 0.5-1%). However, to further increase the accuracy, it was decided to make changes in the measuring path. Namely, by developing and applying a scheme of a precision low-noise preamplifier based on the instrument amplifier INA333, a circuit allowing simultaneous measurement of not only the two above parameters but also the current temperature of the sample (to exclude the effect of temperature drift.) Preliminary results of measurements of the temperature dependence of the a.t.p.c. of liquid cesium in the temperature range up to

  3. Research of precise pulse plasma arc powder welding technology of thin-walled inner hole parts

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li Zhanming; Du Xiaokun; Sun Xiaofeng; Song Wei

    2017-01-01

    The inner hole parts played an oriented or supporting role in engineering machinery and equipment,which are prone to appear surface damages such as wear,strain and corrosion.The precise pulse plasma arc powder welding method is used for surface damage repairing of inner hole parts in this paper.The working principle and process of the technology are illustrated,and the microstructure and property of repairing layer by precise pulse plasma powder welding and CO2 gas shielded welding are tested and observed by microscope,micro hardness tester and X-ray residual stress tester etc.Results showed that the substrate deformation of thin-walled inner hole parts samples by precise pulse plasma powder welding is relatively small.The repair layer and substrate is metallurgical bonding,the transition zones (including fusion zone and heat affected zone) are relatively narrow and the welding quality is good.h showed that the thin-walled inner hole parts can be repaired by this technology and equipment.

  4. Precision Tiltmeter as a Reference for Slope MeasuringInstruments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kirschman, Jonathan L.; Domning, Edward E.; Morrison, Gregory Y.; Smith, Brian V.; Yashchuk, Valeriy V.

    2007-08-01

    The next generation of synchrotrons and free electron lasers require extremely high-performance x-ray optical systems for proper focusing. The necessary optics cannot be fabricated without the use of precise optical metrology instrumentation. In particular, the Long Trace Profiler (LTP) based on the pencil-beam interferometer is a valuable tool for low-spatial-frequency slope measurement with x-ray optics. The limitations of such a device are set by the amount of systematic errors and noise. A significant improvement of LTP performance was the addition of an optical reference channel, which allowed to partially account for systematic errors associated with wiggling and wobbling of the LTP carriage. However, the optical reference is affected by changing optical path length, non-homogeneous optics, and air turbulence. In the present work, we experimentally investigate the questions related to the use of a precision tiltmeter as a reference channel. Dependence of the tiltmeter performance on horizontal acceleration, temperature drift, motion regime, and kinematical scheme of the translation stage has been investigated. It is shown that at an appropriate experimental arrangement, the tiltmeter provides a slope reference for the LTP system with accuracy on the level of 0.1 {micro}rad (rms).

  5. Precision Tiltmeter as a Reference for Slope Measuring Instruments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kirschman, Jonathan L.; Domning, Edward E.; Morrison, Gregory Y.; Smith, Brian V.; Yashchuk, Valeriy V.

    2007-01-01

    The next generation of synchrotrons and free electron lasers require extremely high-performance x-ray optical systems for proper focusing. The necessary optics cannot be fabricated without the use of precise optical metrology instrumentation. In particular, the Long Trace Profiler (LTP) based on the pencil-beam interferometer is a valuable tool for low-spatial-frequency slope measurement with x-ray optics. The limitations of such a device are set by the amount of systematic errors and noise. A significant improvement of LTP performance was the addition of an optical reference channel, which allowed to partially account for systematic errors associated with wiggling and wobbling of the LTP carriage. However, the optical reference is affected by changing optical path length, non-homogeneous optics, and air turbulence. In the present work, we experimentally investigate the questions related to the use of a precision tiltmeter as a reference channel. Dependence of the tiltmeter performance on horizontal acceleration, temperature drift, motion regime, and kinematical scheme of the translation stage has been investigated. It is shown that at an appropriate experimental arrangement, the tiltmeter provides a slope reference for the LTP system with accuracy on the level of 0.1 (micro)rad (rms)

  6. A neural measure of precision in visual working memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ester, Edward F; Anderson, David E; Serences, John T; Awh, Edward

    2013-05-01

    Recent studies suggest that the temporary storage of visual detail in working memory is mediated by sensory recruitment or sustained patterns of stimulus-specific activation within feature-selective regions of visual cortex. According to a strong version of this hypothesis, the relative "quality" of these patterns should determine the clarity of an individual's memory. Here, we provide a direct test of this claim. We used fMRI and a forward encoding model to characterize population-level orientation-selective responses in visual cortex while human participants held an oriented grating in memory. This analysis, which enables a precise quantitative description of multivoxel, population-level activity measured during working memory storage, revealed graded response profiles whose amplitudes were greatest for the remembered orientation and fell monotonically as the angular distance from this orientation increased. Moreover, interparticipant differences in the dispersion-but not the amplitude-of these response profiles were strongly correlated with performance on a concurrent memory recall task. These findings provide important new evidence linking the precision of sustained population-level responses in visual cortex and memory acuity.

  7. Real-time precision measuring device of tree diameter growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Mingming; Chen, Aijun; Li, Dongsheng; Liu, Nan; Yao, Jingyuan

    2016-01-01

    DBH(diameter at breast height) is an important factor to reflect of the quality of plant growth, also an important parameter indispensable in forest resources inventory and forest carbon sink, the accurate measurement of DBH or not is directly related to the research of forest resources inventory and forest carbon sink. In this paper, the principle and the mathematical model of DBH measurement device were introduced, the fixture measuring device and the hardware circuit for this tree diameter were designed, the measurement software programs were compiled, and the precision measuring device of tree diameter growth was developed. Some experiments with Australia fir were conducted. Based on experiment data, the correlations among the DBH variation of Australian fir, the environment temperature, air humility and PAR(photosynthetically active radiation) were obtained. The effects of environmental parameters (environment temperature, air humility and PAR) on tree diameter were analyzed. Experimental results show that there is a positive correlation between DBH variation of Australian fir and environment temperature, a negative correlation between DBH variation of Australian fir and air humility , so is PAR.

  8. Precision gravity measurement utilizing Accelerex vibrating beam accelerometer technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norling, Brian L.

    Tests run using Sundstrand vibrating beam accelerometers to sense microgravity are described. Lunar-solar tidal effects were used as a highly predictable signal which varies by approximately 200 billionths of the full-scale gravitation level. Test runs of 48-h duration were used to evaluate stability, resolution, and noise. Test results on the Accelerex accelerometer show accuracies suitable for precision applications such as gravity mapping and gravity density logging. The test results indicate that Accelerex technology, even with an instrument design and signal processing approach not optimized for microgravity measurement, can achieve 48-nano-g (1 sigma) or better accuracy over a 48-h period. This value includes contributions from instrument noise and random walk, combined bias and scale factor drift, and thermal modeling errors as well as external contributions from sampling noise, test equipment inaccuracies, electrical noise, and cultural noise induced acceleration.

  9. Impact of Precision Mass Measurements on Nuclear Physics and Astrophysics

    CERN Document Server

    Kreim, Susanne; Dilling, Jens; Litvinov, Yuri A

    2013-01-01

    Among all nuclear ground-state properties, atomic masses are highly specific for each particular combination of neutron and proton number, N and Z, respectively. The data obtained through mass measurements provide details of the nuclear interaction and thus apply to a variety of physics topics. Some of the most crucial questions to be addressed by mass spectrometry of unstable radionuclides are, on the one hand, nuclear forces and structure, describing phenomena such as the so-called neutron-halos or the evolution of magic numbers when moving towards the borders of nuclear existence. On the other hand, the understanding of the processes of element formation in the Universe poses a challenge and requires an accurate knowledge of nuclear astrophysics. Here, precision atomic mass values of a large number of exotic nuclei participating in nucleosynthesis processes are among the key input data in large-scale reaction network calculations.

  10. Precision measurement of the RaE shape factor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grau, C.A.; Grau, M.A.

    1996-01-01

    We apply to RaE a new method to determine the shape factor coefficients of pure beta transitions with energies over the Cherenkov threshold of water. This method is based on the precision measurement of one observable, the ft-value, and two quasi-observables, the Cherenkov counting efficiency and the position of the maximum point of the liquid-scintillation logarithmic pulse-height spectrum. We found for the revised shape factor function that the ground state wave function vertical stroke 210 Bi, 1 - right angle is the combination of the three wave functions vertical stroke 1h 9/2 2g 9/2 right angle, vertical stroke 1h 9/2 1i 11/2 right angle and vertical stroke 1h 9/2 2g 7/2 right angle. This result is also confirmed by the excellent agreement we obtain with experiment for the longitudinal electron polarization. (orig.)

  11. Expected precision of neutron multiplicity measurements of waste drums

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ensslin, N.; Krick, M.S.; Menlove, H.O.

    1995-01-01

    DOE facilities are beginning to apply passive neutron multiplicity counting techniques to the assay of plutonium scrap and residues. There is also considerable interest in applying this new measurement technique to 208-liter waste drums. The additional information available from multiplicity counting could flag the presence of shielding materials or improve assay accuracy by correcting for matrix effects such as (α,n) induced fission or detector efficiency variations. The potential for multiplicity analysis of waste drums, and the importance of better detector design, can be estimated by calculating the expected assay precision using a Figure of Merit code for assay variance. This paper reports results obtained as a function of waste drum content and detector characteristics. We find that multiplicity analysis of waste drums is feasible if a high-efficiency neutron counter is used. However, results are significantly poorer if the multiplicity analysis must be used to solve for detection efficiency

  12. Precision Measurement and Improvement of e+, e- Storage Rings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yan, Y.T.; Cai, Y.; Colocho, W.; Decker, F-J.; Seeman, J.; Sullivan, M.; Turner, J.; Wienands, U.; Woodley, M.; Yocky, G.

    2006-01-01

    Through horizontal and vertical excitations, we have been able to make a precision measurement of linear geometric optics parameters with a Model-Independent Analysis (MIA). We have also been able to build up a computer model that matches the real accelerator in linear geometric optics with an SVD-enhanced Least-square fitting process. Recently, with the addition of longitudinal excitation, we are able to build up a computer virtual machine that matches the real accelerators in linear optics including dispersion without additional fitting variables. With this optics-matched virtual machine, we are able to find solutions that make changes of selected normal and skew quadrupoles for machine optics improvement. It has made major contributions to improve PEP-II optics and luminosity. Examples from application to PEP-II machines will be presented

  13. Pulsed beams as field probes for precision measurement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hudson, J. J.; Ashworth, H. T.; Kara, D. M.; Tarbutt, M. R.; Sauer, B. E.; Hinds, E. A.

    2007-01-01

    We describe a technique for mapping the spatial variation of static electric, static magnetic, and rf magnetic fields using a pulsed atomic or molecular beam. The method is demonstrated using a beam designed to measure the electric dipole moment of the electron. We present maps of the interaction region, showing sensitivity to (i) electric field variation of 1.5 V/cm at 3.3 kV/cm with a spatial resolution of 15 mm; (ii) magnetic field variation of 5 nT with 25 mm resolution; (iii) radio-frequency magnetic field amplitude with 15 mm resolution. This diagnostic technique is very powerful in the context of high-precision atomic and molecular physics experiments, where pulsed beams have not hitherto found widespread application

  14. Beta Beams for Precision Measurements of Neutrino Oscillation Parameters

    CERN Document Server

    Wildner, E; Hansen, C; De Melo Mendonca, T; Stora, T; Damjanovic, S; Payet, J; Chancé, A; Zorin, V; Izotov, I; Rasin, S; Sidorov, A; Skalyga, V; De Angelis, G; Prete, G; Cinausero, M; Kravchuk, V; Gramegna, F; Marchi, T; Collazuol, G; Mezzetto, M; Delbar, T; Loiselet, M; Keutgen, T; Mitrofanov, S; Burt, G; Dexter, A; Lamy, T; Latrasse, L; Marie-Jeanne, M; Sortais, P; Thuillier, T; Debray, F; Trophime, C; Hass, M; Hirsh, T; Berkovits, D; Stahl, A; Vardaci, E; Di Nitto, A; Brondi, A; La Rana, G; Moro, R; De Rosa, G; Palladino, V

    2012-01-01

    Neutrino oscillations have implications for the Standard Model of particle physics. The CERN Beta Beam has outstanding capabilities to contribute to precision measurements of the parameters governing neutrino oscillations. The FP7 collaboration EUROnu (2008-2012) is a design study that will review three facilities (Super-Beams, Beta Beams and Neutrino Factories) and perform a cost assessment that, coupled with the physics performance, will give means to the European research authorities to make decisions on future European neutrino oscillation facilities. ”Beta Beams” produce collimated pure electron (anti)neutrinos by accelerating beta active ions to high energies and having them decay in a storage ring. Using existing machines and infrastructure is an advantage for the cost evaluation; however, this choice is also constraining the Beta Beams. Recent work to make the Beta Beam facility a solid option will be described: production of Beta Beam isotopes, the 60 GHz pulsed ECR source development, integratio...

  15. A Computer Controlled Precision High Pressure Measuring System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadana, S.; Yadav, S.; Jha, N.; Gupta, V. K.; Agarwal, R.; Bandyopadhyay, A. K.; Saxena, T. K.

    2011-01-01

    A microcontroller (AT89C51) based electronics has been designed and developed for high precision calibrator based on Digiquartz pressure transducer (DQPT) for the measurement of high hydrostatic pressure up to 275 MPa. The input signal from DQPT is converted into a square wave form and multiplied through frequency multiplier circuit over 10 times to input frequency. This input frequency is multiplied by a factor of ten using phased lock loop. Octal buffer is used to store the calculated frequency, which in turn is fed to microcontroller AT89C51 interfaced with a liquid crystal display for the display of frequency as well as corresponding pressure in user friendly units. The electronics developed is interfaced with a computer using RS232 for automatic data acquisition, computation and storage. The data is acquired by programming in Visual Basic 6.0. This system is interfaced with the PC to make it a computer controlled system. The system is capable of measuring the frequency up to 4 MHz with a resolution of 0.01 Hz and the pressure up to 275 MPa with a resolution of 0.001 MPa within measurement uncertainty of 0.025%. The details on the hardware of the pressure measuring system, associated electronics, software and calibration are discussed in this paper.

  16. Precision Magnet Measurements for X-Band Accelerator Quadrupole Triplets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marsh, R A; Anderson, S G; Armstrong, J P

    2012-05-16

    An X-band test station is being developed at LLNL to investigate accelerator optimization for future upgrades to mono-energetic gamma-ray (MEGa-Ray) technology at LLNL. Beamline magnets will include an emittance compensation solenoid, windowpane steering dipoles, and quadrupole magnets. Demanding tolerances have been placed on the alignment of these magnets, which directly affects the electron bunch beam quality. A magnet mapping system has been established at LLNL in order to ensure the delivered magnets match their field specification, and the mountings are aligned and capable of reaching the specified alignment tolerances. The magnet measurement system will be described which uses a 3-axis Lakeshore gauss probe mounted on a 3-axis translation stage. Alignment accuracy and precision will be discussed, as well as centering measurements and analysis. The dependence on data analysis over direct multi-pole measurement allows a significant improvement in useful alignment information. Detailed analysis of measurements on the beamline quadrupoles will be discussed, including multi-pole content both from alignment of the magnets, and the intrinsic level of multi-pole magnetic field.

  17. Measurement of toroidal plasma current in RF heated helical plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Besshou, Sakae

    1993-01-01

    This report describes the measurement of toroidal plasma current by a semiflexible Rogowski coil in a helical vacuum chamber. A Rogowski coil measures the toroidal plasma current with a resolution of 0.1 kA, frequency range of up to 1 kHz and sensitivity of 6.5 x 10 -9 V · s/A. We measured the spontaneous toroidal plasma current (from -1.2 to +1.2 kA) under electron cyclotron resonance heating at 0.94 T toroidal field in the Heliotron-E device. We found that the measured direction of toroidal plasma current changes its sign as in the predicted behavior of a neoclassical diffusion-driven bootstrap current, depending on the horizontal position of the plasma column. We explain the observed plasma currents in terms of the compound phenomenon of an ohmic current and a neoclassical diffusion-driven current. The magnitude of the neoclassical current component is smaller than the value predicted by a collisionless neoclassical theory. (author)

  18. Precise determination of sodium in serum by simulated isotope dilution method of inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yan Ying; Zhang Chuanbao; Zhao Haijian; Chen Wenxiang; Shen Ziyu; Wang Xiaoru; Chen Dengyun

    2007-01-01

    A new precise and accurate method for the determination of sodium in serum by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) was developed. Since 23 Na is the single isotope element, 27 Al is selected as simulated isotope of Na. Al is spiked into serum samples and Na standard solution. 23 Na/ 27 Al ratio in the Na standard solution is determined to assume the natural Na isotope ratio. The serums samples are digested by purified HNO 3 /H 2 O 2 and diluted to get about 0.6 μg·g -1 Al solutions, and the 23 Na/ 27 Al ratios of the serum samples are obtained to calculate the accurate Na concentrations basing on the isotope dilution method. When the simulated isotope dilution method of ICP-MS is applied and Al is selected as the simulated isotope of Na, the precise and accurate Na concentrations in the serums are determined. The inter-day precision of CV<0.13% for one same serum sample is obtained during 3 days 4 measurements. The spike recoveries are between 99.69% and 100.60% for 4 different serum samples and 3 days multi-measurements. The results of measuring standard reference materials of serum sodium are agree with the certified value. The relative difference between 3 days is 0.22%-0.65%, and the relative difference in one bottle is 0.15%-0.44%. The ICP-MS and Al simulated isotope dilution method is proved to be not only precise and accurate, but also quick and convenient for measuring Na in serum. It is promising to be a reference method for precise determination of Na in serum. Since Al is a low cost isotope dilution reagent, the method is possible to be widely applied for serum Na determination. (authors)

  19. TLD array for precise dose measurements in stereotactic radiation techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ertl, A.; Kitz, K.; Griffitt, W.; Hartl, R.F.E.; Zehetmayer, M.

    1996-01-01

    We developed a new TLD array for precise dose measurement and verification of the spatial dose distribution in small radiation targets. It consists of a hemicylindrical, tissue-equivalent rod made of polystyrene with 17 parallel moulds for an exact positioning of each TLD. The spatial resolution of the TLD array was evaluated using the Leskell spherical phantom. Dose planning was performed with KULA 4.4 under stereotactic conditions on axial CT images. In the Leksell gamma unit the TLD array was irradiated with a maximal dose of 10 Gy with an unplugged 14 mm collimator. The doses delivered to the TLDs were rechecked by diode detector and film dosimetry and compared to the computer-generated dose profile. We found excellent agreement of our measured values, even at the critical penumbra decline. For the 14 mm and 18 mm collimator and for the 11 mm collimator combination we compared the measured and calculated data at full width at half maximum. This TLD array may be useful for phantom or tissue model studies on the spatial dose distribution in confined radiation targets as used in stereotactic radiotherapy. (author)

  20. Precision measurement of the weak charge of the proton.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-05-01

    Large experimental programmes in the fields of nuclear and particle physics search for evidence of physics beyond that explained by current theories. The observation of the Higgs boson completed the set of particles predicted by the standard model, which currently provides the best description of fundamental particles and forces. However, this theory's limitations include a failure to predict fundamental parameters, such as the mass of the Higgs boson, and the inability to account for dark matter and energy, gravity, and the matter-antimatter asymmetry in the Universe, among other phenomena. These limitations have inspired searches for physics beyond the standard model in the post-Higgs era through the direct production of additional particles at high-energy accelerators, which have so far been unsuccessful. Examples include searches for supersymmetric particles, which connect bosons (integer-spin particles) with fermions (half-integer-spin particles), and for leptoquarks, which mix the fundamental quarks with leptons. Alternatively, indirect searches using precise measurements of well predicted standard-model observables allow highly targeted alternative tests for physics beyond the standard model because they can reach mass and energy scales beyond those directly accessible by today's high-energy accelerators. Such an indirect search aims to determine the weak charge of the proton, which defines the strength of the proton's interaction with other particles via the well known neutral electroweak force. Because parity symmetry (invariance under the spatial inversion (x, y, z) → (-x, -y, -z)) is violated only in the weak interaction, it provides a tool with which to isolate the weak interaction and thus to measure the proton's weak charge 1 . Here we report the value 0.0719 ± 0.0045, where the uncertainty is one standard deviation, derived from our measured parity-violating asymmetry in the scattering of polarized electrons on protons, which is -226.5

  1. Precise measurement of the sup 2 sup 7 Al(n,2n) sup 2 sup 6 sup g Al excitation function near threshold and its relevance for fusion-plasma technology

    CERN Document Server

    Wallner, A; Priller, A; Steier, P; Vonach, H; Chuvaev, S V; Filatenkov, A A; Ikeda, Y; Mertens, G; Rochow, W

    2003-01-01

    A new accurate measurement of the sup 2 sup 7 Al(n,2n) sup 2 sup 6 Al excitation function leading to the ground state of sup 2 sup 6 Al(t sub 1 sub / sub 2 =7.1 x 10 sup 5 years) in the near-threshold region (E sub t sub h =13.55 MeV) was performed, with the goal to achieve relative cross-sections with the highest accuracy possible using proven methods. In addition, the measurements were also designed to provide good absolute cross-section values, since absolute cross-sections are important for radioactive waste predictions in future fusion reactor materials. Samples of Al metal were irradiated with neutrons in the energy range near threshold (E sub n =13.5-14.8 MeV) in Vienna and St. Petersburg, and at 14.8 MeV in Tokai-mura. In addition, irradiations with neutrons of higher energies (17 and 19 MeV) were performed in Tuebingen, to obtain also cross-section values well above threshold. The amount of sup 2 sup 6 Al produced during the irradiations was measured via accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS). With this...

  2. Precision and resolution on Tore-Supra ECE electron temperature profile measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Segui, J.L.; Molina, D.; Goniche, M.

    2003-01-01

    A 16-channel heterodyne radiometer, 2 GHz spaced, is used on Tore-Supra to measure the electron cyclotron emission in the frequency range 78-110 GHz for the O mode and 94 -126 GHz for the X mode. In the equatorial plane, a dual polarisation Gaussian optics lens antenna, with a perpendicular line of sight (with respect to the magnetic field), gives ECE measurements with very low refraction and Doppler effects. A separate O/X mode RF front-end allows the use of an IF electronic mode selector. This improves time stability calibration and gives the potentiality of simultaneous O/X mode measurements in the 94 -110 GHz RF band for polarisation studies. RF and IF filters reject the gyrotron frequency (118 GHz) in order to perform temperature measurements during ECRH plasmas. A precise absolute spectral calibration is performed outside the vacuum vessel by using a 600 deg. C black body, a digital signal averaging on the waveform generated by a mechanical chopper placed directly in front of it, and a simulation window without Fabry-Perot effects. The calibration precision leads to ECE temperature profiles which are very consistent with Thomson scattering measurements and guarantees a good stability of the ECE profiles for small changes on the magnetic field (absolute precision ± 6%, relative precision between channels ± 3%). Post-pulse data processing takes routinely into account the total magnetic field (B vacuum with ripple, B para , B dia , B pol , all with analytical formulations), the radial relativistic shift (analytical formulation is used), the refraction, not described in this paper, (cut-off detection with safety margin to avoid strong refraction), the nonthermal ECE spectra, not described in this paper, during LHCD (using an electron density threshold criterion). These previous analytical formulations are compatible with real time processing. Relativistic radial broadening simulations show that it is useful to fulfill 32 channels (1 GHz spaced). (authors)

  3. Precision and resolution on Tore-Supra ECE electron temperature profile measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Segui, J.L.; Molina, D.; Goniche, M. [Association EURATOM -CEA, CEA/DSM/DRFC CEA-Cadarache, 13108 St Paul-lez-Durance (France)

    2003-07-01

    A 16-channel heterodyne radiometer, 2 GHz spaced, is used on Tore-Supra to measure the electron cyclotron emission in the frequency range 78-110 GHz for the O mode and 94 -126 GHz for the X mode. In the equatorial plane, a dual polarisation Gaussian optics lens antenna, with a perpendicular line of sight (with respect to the magnetic field), gives ECE measurements with very low refraction and Doppler effects. A separate O/X mode RF front-end allows the use of an IF electronic mode selector. This improves time stability calibration and gives the potentiality of simultaneous O/X mode measurements in the 94 -110 GHz RF band for polarisation studies. RF and IF filters reject the gyrotron frequency (118 GHz) in order to perform temperature measurements during ECRH plasmas. A precise absolute spectral calibration is performed outside the vacuum vessel by using a 600 deg. C black body, a digital signal averaging on the waveform generated by a mechanical chopper placed directly in front of it, and a simulation window without Fabry-Perot effects. The calibration precision leads to ECE temperature profiles which are very consistent with Thomson scattering measurements and guarantees a good stability of the ECE profiles for small changes on the magnetic field (absolute precision {+-} 6%, relative precision between channels {+-} 3%). Post-pulse data processing takes routinely into account the total magnetic field (B{sub vacuum} with ripple, B{sub para}, B{sub dia}, B{sub pol}, all with analytical formulations), the radial relativistic shift (analytical formulation is used), the refraction, not described in this paper, (cut-off detection with safety margin to avoid strong refraction), the nonthermal ECE spectra, not described in this paper, during LHCD (using an electron density threshold criterion). These previous analytical formulations are compatible with real time processing. Relativistic radial broadening simulations show that it is useful to fulfill 32 channels (1 GHz

  4. Vacuum ultraviolet spectropolarimeter design for precise polarization measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narukage, Noriyuki; Auchère, Frédéric; Ishikawa, Ryohko; Kano, Ryouhei; Tsuneta, Saku; Winebarger, Amy R; Kobayashi, Ken

    2015-03-10

    Precise polarization measurements in the vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) region provide a new means for inferring weak magnetic fields in the upper atmosphere of the Sun and stars. We propose a VUV spectropolarimeter design ideally suited for this purpose. This design is proposed and adopted for the NASA-JAXA chromospheric lyman-alpha spectropolarimeter (CLASP), which will record the linear polarization (Stokes Q and U) of the hydrogen Lyman-α line (121.567 nm) profile. The expected degree of polarization is on the order of 0.1%. Our spectropolarimeter has two optically symmetric channels to simultaneously measure orthogonal linear polarization states with a single concave diffraction grating that serves both as the spectral dispersion element and beam splitter. This design has a minimal number of reflective components with a high VUV throughput. Consequently, these design features allow us to minimize the polarization errors caused by possible time variation of the VUV flux during the polarization modulation and by statistical photon noise.

  5. Measurement of the effective plasma ion mass in large tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lister, J.B.; Villard, L.; Ridder, G. de

    1997-01-01

    There is not yet a straightforward method for the measurement of the D-T ratio in the centre of a tokamak plasma. One of the simpler measurements put forward in the past is the interpretation of the MHD spectrum in the frequency range of the Global Alfven Eigenmodes (GAE). However, the frequencies of these modes do not only depend on the plasma mass, but are also quite strongly dependent on the details of the current and density profiles, creating a problem of deconvolution of the estimate of the plasma mass from an implicit relationship between several measurable plasma parameters and the detected eigenmode frequencies. This method has been revised to assess its likely precision for the JET tokamak. The low n GAE modes are sometimes too close to the continuum edge to be detectable and the interpretation of the GAE spectrum is rendered less direct than had been hoped. We present a statistical study on the precision with which the D-T ratio could be estimated from the GAE spectrum on JET. (author) 4 figs., 8 refs

  6. Francesca Hughes: Architecture of Error: Matter, Measure and the Misadventure of Precision

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Foote, Jonathan

    2016-01-01

    Review of "Architecture of Error: Matter, Measure and the Misadventure of Precision" by Francesca Hughes (MIT Press, 2014)......Review of "Architecture of Error: Matter, Measure and the Misadventure of Precision" by Francesca Hughes (MIT Press, 2014)...

  7. Interferometric measurements of plasma density in high-β plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quinn, W.E.

    1977-01-01

    The coupled-cavity laser interferometer technique is particularly applicable to the measurement of pulsed plasma densities. This technique is based on the fact that if a small fraction of a gas laser's output radiation is reflected into the laser with an external mirror, the intensity of the laser output is modulated. These amplitude or intensity modulations are produced by changes in the laser gain. A rotating corner mirror or an oscillating mirror can be used to produce a continuous feedback modulation of the interferometer which produces a continuous background fringe pattern. The presence of plasma in the outer cavity causes an additional change which results in a phase shift of the regular period of the background fringe pattern. The integral of the plasma density along the line of sight can be evaluated by comparison of the time history of the fringes obtained with and without plasma

  8. Plasma fluctuation measurements in tokamaks using beam-plasma interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fonck, R.J.; Duperrex, P.A.; Paul, S.F.

    1990-01-01

    High-frequency observations of light emitted from the interactions between plasma ions and injected neutral beam atoms allow the measurement of moderate-wavelength fluctuations in plasma and impurity ion densities. To detect turbulence in the local plasma ion density, the collisionally excited fluorescence from a neutral beam is measured either separately at several spatial points or with a multichannel imaging detector. Similarly, the role of impurity ion density fluctuations is measured using charge exchange recombination excited transitions emitted by the ion species of interest. This technique can access the relatively unexplored region of long-wavelength plasma turbulence with k perpendicular ρ i much-lt 1, and hence complements measurements from scattering experiments. Optimization of neutral beam geometry and optical sightlines can result in very good localization and resolution (Δx≤1 cm) in the hot plasma core region. The detectable fluctuation level is determined by photon statistics, atomic excitation processes, and beam stability, but can be as low as 0.2% in a 100 kHz bandwidth over the 0--1 MHz frequency range. The choices of beam species (e.g., H 0 , He 0 , etc.), observed transition (e.g., H α , L α , He I singlet or triplet transitions, C VI Δn=1, etc.) are dictated by experiment-specific factors such as optical access, flexibility of beam operation, plasma conditions, and detailed experimental goals. Initial tests on the PBX-M tokamak using the H α emissions from a heating neutral beam show low-frequency turbulence in the edge plasma region

  9. A Precision Measurement of Parity Violation in Moller Scattering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Relyea, D

    2004-05-13

    This thesis reports on E158, an experiment located in End Station A at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC). E158 has made the first observation of the parity violating right-left asymmetry (A{sub PV}) in fixed-target low-Q{sup 2} Moeller scattering. At tree level, A{sub PV} (expected to be around -150 ppb) is directly proportional to 1/4 - sin{sup 2} {theta}{sub W}. A precision measurement of A{sub PV} at low Q{sup 2} allows the running of sin{sup 2} {theta}{sub W} to be compared to the Standard Model prediction. Disagreements between the two might provide evidence for new physics at the TeV scale. This thesis presents the first physics data from E158, taken in the spring of 2002. The data were taken by scattering longitudinally polarized electrons at 45.0 and 48.3 GeV off a liquid hydrogen target at a Q{sup 2} of 0.027 GeV{sup 2}. A 60 meter long spectrometer/collimator system and a cooper-quartz calorimeter were used to detect the Moeller signal electrons. Both devices will be described in detail. The right-left parity violating asymmetry in Moeller scattering has been measured to be -152.3 {+-} 29.0(stat) {+-} 30.9(syst) ppb. The value of sin{sup 2} {theta}{sub W} derived from this measurement is 0.2370 {+-} 0.0025(stat) {+-} 0.0026(syst), in comparison with the Standard Model prediction of 0.2387 {+-} 0.0007.

  10. Local high precision 3D measurement based on line laser measuring instrument

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Renwei; Liu, Wei; Lu, Yongkang; Zhang, Yang; Ma, Jianwei; Jia, Zhenyuan

    2018-03-01

    In order to realize the precision machining and assembly of the parts, the geometrical dimensions of the surface of the local assembly surfaces need to be strictly guaranteed. In this paper, a local high-precision three-dimensional measurement method based on line laser measuring instrument is proposed to achieve a high degree of accuracy of the three-dimensional reconstruction of the surface. Aiming at the problem of two-dimensional line laser measuring instrument which lacks one-dimensional high-precision information, a local three-dimensional profile measuring system based on an accurate single-axis controller is proposed. First of all, a three-dimensional data compensation method based on spatial multi-angle line laser measuring instrument is proposed to achieve the high-precision measurement of the default axis. Through the pretreatment of the 3D point cloud information, the measurement points can be restored accurately. Finally, the target spherical surface is needed to make local three-dimensional scanning measurements for accuracy verification. The experimental results show that this scheme can get the local three-dimensional information of the target quickly and accurately, and achieves the purpose of gaining the information and compensating the error for laser scanner information, and improves the local measurement accuracy.

  11. A GPS measurement system for precise satellite tracking and geodesy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yunck, T. P.; Wu, S.-C.; Lichten, S. M.

    1985-01-01

    NASA is pursuing two key applications of differential positioning with the Global Positioning System (GPS): sub-decimeter tracking of earth satellites and few-centimeter determination of ground-fixed baselines. Key requirements of the two applications include the use of dual-frequency carrier phase data, multiple ground receivers to serve as reference points, simultaneous solution for use position and GPS orbits, and calibration of atmospheric delays using water vapor radiometers. Sub-decimeter tracking will be first demonstrated on the TOPEX oceanographic satellite to be launched in 1991. A GPS flight receiver together with at least six ground receivers will acquire delta range data from the GPS carriers for non-real-time analysis. Altitude accuracies of 5 to 10 cm are expected. For baseline measurements, efforts will be made to obtain precise differential pseudorange by resolving the cycle ambiguity in differential carrier phase. This could lead to accuracies of 2 or 3 cm over a few thousand kilometers. To achieve this, a high-performance receiver is being developed, along with improved calibration and data processing techniques. Demonstrations may begin in 1986.

  12. Measuring methods for the TFR plasma diagnostics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Etievant, C.

    1975-02-01

    The measuring methods in operation or still under development for the diagnostics of the TFR plasma parameters (ion and electron temperatures, electron density, current density are reviewed, the diagnostics of the electrical behavior of the discharge, the neutral gas densities, the impurities and the parameters of the plasma turbulence being also investigated. Actual works are principally devoted to: improving ion temperature measurements by the possible use of the Doppler effect or infra-red incoherent scattering; improving n(e) and T(e) measurement by Thomson scattering; measuring the poloidal field and current density; measuring impurities by X and UV spectroscopy and measuring instabilities and turbulence [fr

  13. Radio Telescopes' Precise Measurements Yield Rich Scientific Payoffs

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-01-01

    Having the sharpest pictures always is a big advantage, and a sophisticated radio-astronomy technique using continent-wide and even intercontinental arrays of telescopes is yielding extremely valuable scientific results in a wide range of specialties. That's the message delivered to the American Astronomical Society's meeting in Austin, Texas, by Mark Reid of the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, a leading researcher in the field of ultra-precise astronomical position measurements. Very Long Baseline Interferometry provides extremely high precision that can extend use of the parallax technique to many more celestial objects. Parallax is a direct means of measuring cosmic distances by detecting the slight shift in an object’s apparent position in the sky caused by Earth’s orbital motion. Credit: Bill Saxton, NRAO/AUI/NSF "Using radio telescopes, we are measuring distances and motions of celestial bodies with unprecedented accuracy. That's helping us better understand many processes ranging from star formation to the scale of the entire Universe," Reid said. The observing technique, called Very Long Baseline Interferometry (VLBI), was pioneered in 1967, but has come into continuous use only in the past 10-15 years. The National Science Foundation's Very Long Baseline Array (VLBA), a system of 10 radio-telescope antennas ranging from Hawaii to the Caribbean, was dedicated in 1993. There are other VLBI systems in Europe and Asia, and large radio telescopes around the world cooperate regularly to increase sensitivity. VLBI observations routinely produce images hundreds of times more detailed than those made at visible-light wavelengths by the Hubble Space Telescope. Several groups of researchers from across the globe use the VLBA to study stellar nurseries in our own Milky Way Galaxy and measure distances to regions where new stars are forming. The key has been to improve measurement accuracy to a factor of a hundred times better than that produced by the

  14. TRACEABILITY OF PRECISION MEASUREMENTS ON COORDINATE MEASURING MACHINES – PERFORMANCE VERIFICATION OF CMMs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    De Chiffre, Leonardo; Sobiecki, René; Tosello, Guido

    This document is used in connection with one exercise of 30 minutes duration as a part of the course VISION ONLINE – One week course on Precision & Nanometrology. The exercise concerns performance verification of the volumetric measuring capability of a small volume coordinate measuring machine...

  15. Molecular Classification and Pharmacogenetics of Primary Plasma Cell Leukemia: An Initial Approach toward Precision Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simeon, Vittorio; Todoerti, Katia; La Rocca, Francesco; Caivano, Antonella; Trino, Stefania; Lionetti, Marta; Agnelli, Luca; De Luca, Luciana; Laurenzana, Ilaria; Neri, Antonino; Musto, Pellegrino

    2015-07-30

    Primary plasma cell leukemia (pPCL) is a rare and aggressive variant of multiple myeloma (MM) which may represent a valid model for high-risk MM. This disease is associated with a very poor prognosis, and unfortunately, it has not significantly improved during the last three decades. New high-throughput technologies have allowed a better understanding of the molecular basis of this disease and moved toward risk stratification, providing insights for targeted therapy studies. This knowledge, added to the pharmacogenetic profile of new and old agents in the analysis of efficacy and safety, could contribute to help clinical decisions move toward a precision medicine and a better clinical outcome for these patients. In this review, we describe the available literature concerning the genomic characterization and pharmacogenetics of plasma cell leukemia (PCL).

  16. The laser, measuring instrument for plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anderegg, F.; Behn, R.; Paris, P.J.; Salito, S.A.; Siegrist, M.R.; Weisen, H.

    1988-06-01

    There are several different and in general complementary methods for the investigation of plasmas. All of them have different characteristics and properties covering a large spectrum of physical measuring techniques. Electromagnetic waves serving as 'thermometers' permit to detect the global behaviour of the plasma as well as that of the particles composing it. One of the advantages of these introspective methods is that it brings information on temporary and local conditions of the domain being interrogated. With the development of micro-wave sources and lasers after the war the principal tools of this type of plasma diagnostics are now available. In this paper the emphasis is on the lasers which are different according to the type of measurement. Their versatility in measuring plasma parameters is largely acknowledged. We illustrate the potential of measuring methods by lasers by means of the research work done at two experimental installations of CRPP. (author) 21 figs., 8 refs

  17. Pico-coulomb charge measured at BELLA to percent-level precision using a Turbo-ICT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakamura, K; Mittelberger, D E; Gonsalves, A J; Daniels, J; Mao, H-S; Leemans, W P; Stulle, F; Bergoz, J

    2016-01-01

    Precise diagnostics of picocoulomb level particle bunches produced by laser plasma accelerators (LPAs) can be a significant challenge. Without proper care, the small signals associated with such bunches can be dominated by a background generated by laser, target, laser–plasma interaction and particle induced radiation. In this paper, we report on first charge measurements using the newly developed Turbo-ICT for LPAs. We outline the Turbo-ICT working principle, which allows precise sub-picocoulomb measurements even in the presence of significant background signals. A comparison of the Turbo-ICT, a conventional integrating current transformer (ICT) and a scintillating screen (Lanex) was carried out at the Berkeley Lab Laser Accelerator. Results show that the Turbo-ICT can measure sub-picocoulomb charge accurately and has significantly improved noise immunity compared to the ICT. (paper)

  18. Pico-coulomb charge measured at BELLA to percent-level precision using a Turbo-ICT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, K.; Mittelberger, D. E.; Gonsalves, A. J.; Daniels, J.; Mao, H.-S.; Stulle, F.; Bergoz, J.; Leemans, W. P.

    2016-03-01

    Precise diagnostics of picocoulomb level particle bunches produced by laser plasma accelerators (LPAs) can be a significant challenge. Without proper care, the small signals associated with such bunches can be dominated by a background generated by laser, target, laser-plasma interaction and particle induced radiation. In this paper, we report on first charge measurements using the newly developed Turbo-ICT for LPAs. We outline the Turbo-ICT working principle, which allows precise sub-picocoulomb measurements even in the presence of significant background signals. A comparison of the Turbo-ICT, a conventional integrating current transformer (ICT) and a scintillating screen (Lanex) was carried out at the Berkeley Lab Laser Accelerator. Results show that the Turbo-ICT can measure sub-picocoulomb charge accurately and has significantly improved noise immunity compared to the ICT.

  19. Evaluation of measurement precision errors at different bone density values

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilson, M.; Wong, J.; Bartlett, M.; Lee, N.

    2002-01-01

    Full text: The precision error commonly used in serial monitoring of BMD values using Dual Energy X Ray Absorptometry (DEXA) is 0.01-0.015g/cm - for both the L2 L4 lumbar spine and total femur. However, this limit is based on normal individuals with bone densities similar to the population mean. The purpose of this study was to systematically evaluate precision errors over the range of bone density values encountered in clinical practice. In 96 patients a BMD scan of the spine and femur was immediately repeated by the same technologist with the patient taken off the bed and repositioned between scans. Nine technologists participated. Values were obtained for the total femur and spine. Each value was classified as low range (0.75-1.05 g/cm ) and medium range (1.05- 1.35g/cm ) for the spine, low range (0.55 0. 85 g/cm ) and medium range (0.85-1.15 g/cm ) for the total femur. Results show that the precision error was significantly lower in the medium range for total femur results with the medium range value at 0.015 g/cm - and the low range at 0.025 g/cm - (p<0.01). No significant difference was found for the spine results. We also analysed precision errors between three technologists and found a significant difference (p=0.05) occurred between only two technologists and this was seen in the spine data only. We conclude that there is some evidence that the precision error increases at the outer limits of the normal bone density range. Also, the results show that having multiple trained operators does not greatly increase the BMD precision error. Copyright (2002) The Australian and New Zealand Society of Nuclear Medicine Inc

  20. 2. Basis of measurement of plasma flow. 2.3 Plasma flow measurements. Spectroscopic methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kado, Shinichiro

    2007-01-01

    The construction of optical system, optical fiber incident system, reciprocal linear dispersion, grating smile and astigmatism of the reflection plane diffraction grating spectrometer are explained in order to measure the plasma flow. The specification of flow measurement and evaluation of 0 point of velocity are stated. For examples of measurements, the fine structures of He II (Δn = 3 - 4) in material and plasma(MAP)-II of Tokyo University, plasma flow measurement by the charge exchange recombination spectroscopy using Large Helical Device and by Zeeman spectroscopy using TRIAM-1M tokamak plasma are stated. (S.Y.)

  1. TRACEABILITY OF PRECISION MEASUREMENTS ON COORDINATE MEASURING MACHINES – TRACEABILITY, CALIBRATION AND PERFORMANCE VERIFICATION

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bariani, Paolo; De Chiffre, Leonardo; Tosello, Guido

    This document is used in connection with an exercise of 1 hour duration as a part of the course VISION ONLINE – One week course on Precision & Nanometrology. The exercise concerns establishment of traceability of measurements with optical coordinate machine by mean of using two different calibrated...

  2. Precision Measurements of Atomic Lifetimes and Hyperfine Energies in Alkali Like Systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanner, Carol E.

    2005-01-01

    Financial support of this research project has lead to advances in the study of atomic structure through precision measurements of atomic lifetimes, energy splittings, and transitions energies. The interpretation of data from many areas of physics and chemistry requires an accurate understanding of atomic structure. For example, scientists in the fields of astrophysics, geophysics, and plasma fusion depend on transition strengths to determine the relative abundances of elements. Assessing the operation of discharges and atomic resonance line filters also depends on accurate knowledge of transition strengths. Often relative transition strengths are measured precisely, but accurate atomic lifetimes are needed to obtain absolute values. Precision measurements of atomic lifetimes and energy splittings also provide fundamentally important atomic structure information. Lifetimes of allowed transitions depend most strongly on the electronic wave function far from the nucleus. Alternatively, hyperfine splittings give important information about the electronic wave function in the vicinity of the nucleus as well as the structure of the nucleus. Our main focus throughout this project has been the structure of atomic cesium because of its connection to the study of atomic parity nonconservation (PNC). The interpretation of atomic PNC experiments in terms of weak interaction coupling constants requires accurate knowledge of the electronic wave function near the nucleus as well as far from the nucleus. It is possible to address some of these needs theoretically with sophisticated many-electron atomic structure calculations. However, this program has been able to address these needs experimentally with a precision that surpasses current theoretical accuracy. Our measurements also play the important role of providing a means for testing the accuracy of many-electron calculations and guiding further theoretical development, Atomic systems such as cesium, with a single electron

  3. Precision Measurements of Atomic Lifetimes and Hyperfine Energies in Alkali Like Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tanner, Carol E.

    2005-03-04

    Financial support of this research project has lead to advances in the study of atomic structure through precision measurements of atomic lifetimes, energy splittings, and transitions energies. The interpretation of data from many areas of physics and chemistry requires an accurate understanding of atomic structure. For example, scientists in the fields of astrophysics, geophysics, and plasma fusion depend on transition strengths to determine the relative abundances of elements. Assessing the operation of discharges and atomic resonance line filters also depends on accurate knowledge of transition strengths. Often relative transition strengths are measured precisely, but accurate atomic lifetimes are needed to obtain absolute values. Precision measurements of atomic lifetimes and energy splittings also provide fundamentally important atomic structure information. Lifetimes of allowed transitions depend most strongly on the electronic wave function far from the nucleus. Alternatively, hyperfine splittings give important information about the electronic wave function in the vicinity of the nucleus as well as the structure of the nucleus. Our main focus throughout this project has been the structure of atomic cesium because of its connection to the study of atomic parity nonconservation (PNC). The interpretation of atomic PNC experiments in terms of weak interaction coupling constants requires accurate knowledge of the electronic wave function near the nucleus as well as far from the nucleus. It is possible to address some of these needs theoretically with sophisticated many-electron atomic structure calculations. However, this program has been able to address these needs experimentally with a precision that surpasses current theoretical accuracy. Our measurements also play the important role of providing a means for testing the accuracy of many-electron calculations and guiding further theoretical development, Atomic systems such as cesium, with a single electron

  4. High precision measurement of the micro-imaging system to check repeatability of precision

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheng Lin; Song Li; Ma Chuntao; Luo Hongxin; Wang Jie

    2010-01-01

    The beamlines slits of Shanghai Synchrotron Radiation Facility (SSRF) are required to have a repeatability of better than 1 μm. Before the slits installation, the off-line and/or on-line repeatability measurements must be conducted. A machine vision measuring system based on high resolution CCD and adjustable high magnification lens was used in this regard. A multi-level filtering method was used to treat the imaging data. After image binarization, the imaging noises were depressed effectively by using of algebraic mean filtering, statistics median filtering,and the least square filtering. Using the subtracted image between the images before and after slit movement, an average displacement of slit blades could be obtained, and the repeatability of slit could be measured, with a resolution of 0.3 μm of the measurement system. The experimental results show that this measurement system meets the requirements for non-contact measurements to the repeatability of slits. (authors)

  5. Precision Teaching: Advancing Student Achievement through Daily Drill and Measurement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rawers, Lois J.

    1983-01-01

    After reviewing the conceptual bases and practical application of precision teaching, this analysis traces its evolution as the Sacajawea Plan, reports on its implementation in central Oregon school districts, and details the costs and procedures of adoption. Developed by Ogden Lindsley from B. F. Skinner's work in operant conditioning and…

  6. Standardization of the method for measurement of plasma estrone by radioimmunoassay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vilanova, M.S.V.; Moreira, A.C.; Sala, M.M. de; Sa, M.F.S. de

    1994-01-01

    The present paper has as objective standardize a radioimmunoassay method for measurement of plasma estrone. Ethyl ether was used for plasma extraction. The sensitivity (Minimal detectable dose) was 3,7 pg/tube; the reproducibility (inter assay error) was 8,6%; the precision (intra assay error) was 4,1%. As a biological control the plasma estrone was ml) and in 24 patients with polycystic ovarian syndrome (median = 77,9 pg/ml). (author). 6 refs, 2 figs, 2 tabs

  7. Laser cooled ion beams and strongly coupled plasmas for precision experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bussmann, Michael

    2008-01-01

    This cumulative thesis summarizes experimental and theoretical results on cooling of ion beams using single-frequency, single-mode tabletop laser systems. It consists of two parts. One deals with experiments on laser-cooling of ion beams at relativistic energies, the other with simulations of stopping and sympathetic cooling of ions for precision in-trap experiments. In the first part, experimental results are presented on laser-cooling of relativistic C 3+ ion beams at a beam energy of 122 MeV/u, performed at the Experimental Storage Ring (ESR) at GSI. The main results presented in this thesis include the first attainment of longitudinally space-charge dominated relativistic ion beams using pure laser-cooling. The second part lists theoretical results on stopping and sympathetic cooling of ions in a laser-cooled one-component plasma of singly charged 24 Mg ions, which are confined in a three-dimensional harmonic trap potential. (orig.)

  8. Dual energy quantitative computed tomography (QCT). Precision of the mineral density measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Braillon, P.; Bochu, M.

    1989-01-01

    The improvement that could be obtained in quantitative bone mineral measurements by dual energy computed tomography was tested in vitro. From the results of 15 mineral density measurements (in mg Ca/cm 3 , done on a precise lumbar spine phantom (Hologic) and referred to the values obtained on the same slices on a Siemens Osteo-CT phantom, the precision found was 0.8%, six times better than the precision calculated from the uncorrected measured values [fr

  9. Neutron measurement techniques for tokamak plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jarvis, O.N.

    1994-01-01

    The present article reviews the neutron measurement techniques that are currently being applied to the study of tokamak plasmas. The range of neutron energies of primary interest is limited to narrow bands around 2.5 and 14 MeV, and the variety of measurements that can be made for plasma diagnostic purposes is also restricted. To characterize the plasma as a neutron source, it is necessary only to measure the total neutron emission, the relative neutron emissivity as a function of position throughout the plasma, and the energy spectra of the emitted neutrons. In principle, such measurements might be expected to be relatively easy. That this is not the case is, in part, attributable to practical problems of accessibility to a harsh environment but is mostly a consequence of the time-scale on which the measurements have to be made and of the wide range of neutron emission intensities that have to be covered: for tokamak studies, the time-scale is of the order of 1 to 100 ms and the neutron intensity ranges from 10 12 to 10 19 s -1 . (author)

  10. Athoropometric measurements and plasma proteins in protein ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Athoropometric measurements and plasma proteins in protein energy malnutrition. MH Etukudo, EO Agbedana, OO Akinyinka, BOA Osifo. Abstract. No Abstract. Global Journal of Medical Sciences Vol. 5(1) 2006: 7-11. Full Text: EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT · DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT DOWNLOAD ...

  11. Assessment of high precision, high accuracy Inductively Coupled Plasma-Optical Emission Spectroscopy to obtain concentration uncertainties less than 0.2% with variable matrix concentrations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rabb, Savelas A.; Olesik, John W.

    2008-01-01

    The ability to obtain high precision, high accuracy measurements in samples with complex matrices using High Performance Inductively Coupled Plasma-Optical Emission Spectroscopy (HP-ICP-OES) was investigated. The Common Analyte Internal Standard (CAIS) procedure was incorporated into the High Performance Inductively Coupled Plasma-Optical Emission Spectroscopy method to correct for matrix-induced changes in emission intensity ratios. Matrix matching and standard addition approaches to minimize matrix-induced errors when using High Performance Inductively Coupled Plasma-Optical Emission Spectroscopy were also assessed. The High Performance Inductively Coupled Plasma-Optical Emission Spectroscopy method was tested with synthetic solutions in a variety of matrices, alloy standard reference materials and geological reference materials

  12. Measurement of plasma 11-deoxycorticosterone levels by radioimmunoassay in man

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fukuchi, Soitsu; Nakajima, Katsuo; Takenouchi, Takahiko; Nishisato, Koji

    1974-01-01

    A radioimmunoassay procedure has been developed to measure 11-deoxycorticosterone (DOC) in human peripheral plasma. DOC-oxime was coupled with porcine gamma globulin and antibodies produced in rabbits. One to 3 ml of plasma, with 1, 2 3 H-DOC added for recovery, was extracted with dichloromethane and purification achieved by a silica gel column and by one paper chromatograph. After overnight incubation of the antibody-steroid mixture at 4 0 C, bound and free fractions were separated using ammonium sulfate. The mean recovery of 3 H-DOC, after extraction and chromatography, was 84.6 +- 7.4%. The method showed adequate specificity, precision and accuracy. Normal plasma DOC levels were found to be 4.4 +- 2.5 ng/100 ml (n=8). Plasma DOC levels were almost normal (0.3 - 26.8 ng/100 ml) in fifteen patients with benign essential hypertension. The mean level of 8.1 +- 8.2 ng/100 ml obtained in hypertensive patients with suppressed plasma renin activity, was not significantly different from normal. Plasma DOC showed a high level, 3.0 - 30.5 (11.4 +- 7.5) ng/100 ml, in 9 patients with primary aldosteronism. Four out of 8 patients with Cushing's syndrome were found to have elevated plasma DOC levels. Higher levels of 21.2 +- 15.8 ng/100 ml were found in 5 patients with adrenal hyperplasia than those of 12.3 +- 8.0 ng/100 ml in 3 with adrenal adenoma. Plasma DOC levels were high, 113 - 176 ng/100 ml, in 2 patients with 17α-hydroxylase deficiency. ACTH administered to 5 subjects produced a mean increase in plasma DOC from 4.8 to 25.8 ng/100 ml. Angiotensin II infused at a rate of 10 ng/kg/min for 30 min into 4 subjects did not increase mean plasma DOC. Similarly, dietary sodium restriction or postural change did not increase plasma DOC. (auth.)

  13. Do stochastic inhomogeneities affect dark-energy precision measurements?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben-Dayan, I; Gasperini, M; Marozzi, G; Nugier, F; Veneziano, G

    2013-01-11

    The effect of a stochastic background of cosmological perturbations on the luminosity-redshift relation is computed to second order through a recently proposed covariant and gauge-invariant light-cone averaging procedure. The resulting expressions are free from both ultraviolet and infrared divergences, implying that such perturbations cannot mimic a sizable fraction of dark energy. Different averages are estimated and depend on the particular function of the luminosity distance being averaged. The energy flux being minimally affected by perturbations at large z is proposed as the best choice for precision estimates of dark-energy parameters. Nonetheless, its irreducible (stochastic) variance induces statistical errors on Ω(Λ)(z) typically lying in the few-percent range.

  14. Do stochastic inhomogeneities affect dark-energy precision measurements?

    CERN Document Server

    Ben-Dayan, Ido; Marozzi, Giovanni; Nugier, Fabien; Veneziano, Gabriele

    2013-01-01

    The effect of a stochastic background of cosmological perturbations on the luminosity-redshift relation is computed to second order through a recently proposed covariant and gauge-invariant light-cone averaging procedure. The resulting expressions are free from both ultraviolet and infrared divergences, implying that such perturbations cannot mimic a sizable fraction of dark energy. Different averages are estimated and depend on the particular function of the luminosity distance being averaged. The energy flux, being minimally affected by perturbations at large z, is proposed as the best choice for precision estimates of dark-energy parameters. Nonetheless, its irreducible (stochastic) variance induces statistical errors on \\Omega_{\\Lambda}(z) typically lying in the few-percent range.

  15. Diffraction tomography for plasma refractive index measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Howard, J.; Nazikian, R.; Sharp, L.E.

    1989-01-01

    Measurement of the properties of probing beams of coherent electromagnetic radiation yields essential information about the line of sight integrated plasma refractive index. Presented is a scalar diffraction treatment of forward angle scattering plasma diagnostics based on the diffraction projection theorem first presented by E. Wolf in 1969. New results are obtained for near field scattering from probing Gaussian beams and it is demonstrated that the effects of diffraction need to be addressed for tomographic inversion of near field scattering and interferometry data. 33 refs., 10 figs

  16. Measurement of air entrainment in plasma jets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fincke, J.R.; Rodriquez, R.; Pentecost, C.G.

    1990-01-01

    The concentration and temperature of air entrained into argon and helium plasma jets has been measured using coherent anti-Stokes Raman spectroscopy (CARS). The argon plasma flow field is characterized by a short region of well behaved laminar flow near the nozzle exit followed by an abrupt transition to turbulence. Once the transition of turbulence occurs, air is rapidly mixed into the jet core. The location of the transition region is determined by the rapid cooling of the jet and the resulting increase in Reynolds number. In contrast, the helium plasma flow field never exceeds a Reynolds number of 200 and remains laminar. The entrainment process in this case is controlled by molecular diffusion rather than turbulent mixing. 9 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab

  17. Correlation measurements for fusion plasma diagnostics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pazsit, I.

    1995-01-01

    A list of a few methods for plasma diagnostics via fluctuations (noise) analysis of random (both temporally and spatially) system parameters is reviewed. Analogy is drawn with certain noise analysis methods, used in the diagnostics of fission reactors. These methods have been applied also to fusion measurements to some extent. However, the treatment of fusion plasma fluctuations is dominated by an approach that allows for temporal randomness, but assumes periodicity in space. This approach suits well a large class of phenomena such as magnetic fluctuations (MHD effects), but is much less suited to treat localised effects such as turbulence and density fluctuations. This paper discusses the potentials of the former approach, i.e. ordinary noise analysis methods of non-periodic variables in fusion plasma diagnostics. A new recommendation is to use the crossed beam correlation analysis of soft X-ray signals for determining the local short-range correlations in the plasma and to perform a systematic exploration of the plasma spatial correlation structure with that and other methods. 16 refs, 7 figs

  18. Loss-induced limits to phase measurement precision with maximally entangled states

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rubin, Mark A.; Kaushik, Sumanth

    2007-01-01

    The presence of loss limits the precision of an approach to phase measurement using maximally entangled states, also referred to as NOON states. A calculation using a simple beam-splitter model of loss shows that, for all nonzero values L of the loss, phase measurement precision degrades with increasing number N of entangled photons for N sufficiently large. For L above a critical value of approximately 0.785, phase measurement precision degrades with increasing N for all values of N. For L near zero, phase measurement precision improves with increasing N down to a limiting precision of approximately 1.018L radians, attained at N approximately equal to 2.218/L, and degrades as N increases beyond this value. Phase measurement precision with multiple measurements and a fixed total number of photons N T is also examined. For L above a critical value of approximately 0.586, the ratio of phase measurement precision attainable with NOON states to that attainable by conventional methods using unentangled coherent states degrades with increasing N, the number of entangled photons employed in a single measurement, for all values of N. For L near zero this ratio is optimized by using approximately N=1.279/L entangled photons in each measurement, yielding a precision of approximately 1.340√(L/N T ) radians

  19. Quadrature interferometry for plasma density measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Warthen, B.J.; Shlachter, J.S.

    1995-01-01

    A quadrature interferometer has been used routinely in several pulsed power experiments to measure the line-averaged electron density. The optical source is a 30 mW, continuous wave Nd-YAG laser operating at 1,300 nm. The light is coupled directly to an optical fiber and split into reference and scene beams with a fiber splitter. The scene beam is transported to and from the plasma using single mode optical fibers up to 100 m in length. To simplify alignment through the plasma, the authors have used GRIN lenses on both the launch and receive sides of the single pass transmission diagnostic where this is possible. The return beam passes through a half-wave plate which is used to compensate for polarization rotation associated with slow (hour) time scale drift in the single mode fibers. The reference beam is sent through a quarter-wave plate to produce circular polarization; mixing of the reference and scene beams is accomplished using a non-polarizing beam splitter, and the interference signals are focused into additional fibers which relay the light to fast photodiodes. The quadrature optics allow for an unambiguous determination of the slope of the density changes at inflection points. All of the beam processing optics are located on a stable optical table which is remote and protected from the experiment. Final setup of the interferometer is facilitated by looking at the Lissajous figure generated from the two quadrature components. The authors have used this interferometer to diagnose the background density in the Pegasus-II power flow channel, to study the plasma plume generated in foil implosion experiments, to measure the plasma blowoff during implosions, and to understand the plasma formation mechanism in a fusion target plasma system

  20. Various high precision measurements of pressure in atomic energy industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aritomi, Masanori; Inoue, Akira; Hosoma, Takashi; Tanaka, Izumi; Gabane, Tsunemichi.

    1987-01-01

    As for the pressure measurement in atomic energy industry, it is mostly the measurement using differential pressure transmitters and pressure transmitters for process measurement with the general accuracy of measurement of 0.2 - 0.5 % FS/year. However, recently for the development of nuclear fusion reactors and the establishment of nuclear fuel cycle accompanying new atomic energy technology, there are the needs of the pressure measurement having higher accuracy of 0.01 % FS/year and high resolution, and quartz vibration type pressure sensors appeared. New high accuracy pressure measurement techniques were developed by the advance of data processing and the rationalization of data transmission. As the results, the measurement of the differential pressure of helium-lithium two-phase flow in the cooling system of nuclear fusion reactors, the high accuracy measuring system for the level of plutonium nitrate and other fuel substance in tanks in fuel reprocessing and conversion, the high accuracy measurement of atmospheric pressure and wind velocity in ducts, chimneys and tunnels in nuclear facilities and so on became feasible. The principle and the measured data of quartz vibration type pressure sensors are shown. (Kako, I.)

  1. Design and Implementation of High Precision Temperature Measurement Unit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Xianzhen; Yu, Weiyu; Zhang, Zhijian; Liu, Hancheng

    2018-03-01

    Large-scale neutrino detector requires calibration of photomultiplier tubes (PMT) and electronic system in the detector, performed by plotting the calibration source with a group of designated coordinates in the acrylic sphere. Where the calibration source positioning is based on the principle of ultrasonic ranging, the transmission speed of ultrasonic in liquid scintillator of acrylic sphere is related to temperature. This paper presents a temperature measurement unit based on STM32L031 and single-line bus digital temperature sensor TSic506. The measurement data of the temperature measurement unit can help the ultrasonic ranging to be more accurate. The test results show that the temperature measurement error is within ±0.1°C, which satisfies the requirement of calibration source positioning. Take energy-saving measures, with 3.7V/50mAH lithium battery-powered, the temperature measurement unit can work continuously more than 24 hours.

  2. Precise measurements of neutron capture cross sections for FP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakamura, Shoji; Harada, Hideo; Katoh, Toshio

    2000-01-01

    The thermal neutron capture cross sections (σ 0 ) and the resonance integrals (I 0 ) of some fission products (FP), such as 137 Cs, 90 Sr, 99 Tc, 129 I and 135 Cs, were measured by the activation and γ-ray spectroscopic methods. Moreover, the cross section measurements were done for other FP elements, such as 127 I, 133 Cs and 134 Cs. This paper provides the summary of the FP cross section measurements, which have been performed by authors. (author)

  3. Deceleration and Trapping of Heavy Diatomic Molecules for Precision Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berg, J. E. Van Den; Turkesteen, S. N. Hoekman; Prinsen, E. B.; Hoekstra, S.

    2011-06-01

    We are setting up a novel type of Stark-decelerator optimized for the deceleration and trapping of heavy diatomic molecules. Aim of these experiments is to prepare a trapped sample of ultracold molecules for precision studies of fundamental symmetries. The decelerator uses ring-shaped electrodes to create a moving trapping potential, a prototype of which has been shown to work for CO molecules. Molecules can be decelerated and trapped in the weak-field seeking part of excited rotational states. The alkaline-earth monohalide molecules (currently we focus on the SrF molecule) are prime candidates for next generation parity violation and electron-EDM studies. We plan to combine the Stark deceleration with molecular laser cooling to create a trapped sample of molecules at a final temperature of ˜ 200 μK. A. Osterwalder, S. A. Meek, G. Hammer, H. Haak and G. Meijer Phys. Rev. A 81 (51401), 2010. T. A. Isaev, S. Hoekstra, R. Berger Phys. Rev. A 82 (52521), 2010

  4. Electric field measurements in moving ionization fronts during plasma breakdown

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wagenaars, E.; Bowden, M.D.; Kroesen, G.M.W.

    2006-01-01

    We have performed time-resolved, direct measurements of electric field strengths in moving ionization fronts during the breakdown phase of a pulsed plasma. Plasma breakdown, or plasma ignition, is a highly transient process marking the transition from a gas to a plasma. Some aspects of plasma

  5. Technology on precision measurement of torque and force

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2005-12-01

    This book gives a descriptions on force standards system about movement of object, direction and structure. Next, it deals with torque standards, torque measuring instrument and torque wrench with how to use, explanations, unit and test. This book written by Korea Association of standards and testing organizations is for exact measurement and test of force and torque.

  6. Influence of sulfur-bearing polyatomic species on high precision measurements of Cu isotopic composition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pribil, M.J.; Wanty, R.B.; Ridley, W.I.; Borrok, D.M.

    2010-01-01

    An increased interest in high precision Cu isotope ratio measurements using multi-collector inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (MC-ICP-MS) has developed recently for various natural geologic systems and environmental applications, these typically contain high concentrations of sulfur, particularly in the form of sulfate (SO42-) and sulfide (S). For example, Cu, Fe, and Zn concentrations in acid mine drainage (AMD) can range from 100??g/L to greater than 50mg/L with sulfur species concentrations reaching greater than 1000mg/L. Routine separation of Cu, Fe and Zn from AMD, Cu-sulfide minerals and other geological matrices usually incorporates single anion exchange resin column chromatography for metal separation. During chromatographic separation, variable breakthrough of SO42- during anion exchange resin column chromatography into the Cu fractions was observed as a function of the initial sulfur to Cu ratio, column properties, and the sample matrix. SO42- present in the Cu fraction can form a polyatomic 32S-14N-16O-1H species causing a direct mass interference with 63Cu and producing artificially light ??65Cu values. Here we report the extent of the mass interference caused by SO42- breakthrough when measuring ??65Cu on natural samples and NIST SRM 976 Cu isotope spiked with SO42- after both single anion column chromatography and double anion column chromatography. A set of five 100??g/L Cu SRM 976 samples spiked with 500mg/L SO42- resulted in an average ??65Cu of -3.50?????5.42??? following single anion column separation with variable SO42- breakthrough but an average concentration of 770??g/L. Following double anion column separation, the average SO42-concentration of 13??g/L resulted in better precision and accuracy for the measured ??65Cu value of 0.01?????0.02??? relative to the expected 0??? for SRM 976. We conclude that attention to SO42- breakthrough on sulfur-rich samples is necessary for accurate and precise measurements of ??65Cu and may require

  7. High precision speed measurement by using interferometric techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ávila, M A Rodríguez; Valiente, R Ochoa; Trujillo, L A García

    2015-01-01

    In this work we present the experimental realization of speed measurement by the use of a two wave interferometer and digital signal processing techniques. We built an automated Michelson interferometer and using an He-Ne laser and with the use of the Fast Fourier Transform (FFT) and computer algorithms we derived a method for finding the speed of displacement. We report uncertainties in the order of 2-3 μm/s. with the use of this procedure. This brings the potential of another physical variable measurement like distance or pressure by this indirect measurement method. This approach is compared with an ultrasonic Logger Pro ® speed measurement system, and the results are compared between systems

  8. A thermostat for precise measurements of thermoresistance of small samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rusinowski, Z.; Slowinski, B.; Winiewski, R.

    1996-01-01

    In the work a simple experimental set-up is described in which special attention is paid to the important problem of the thermal stability of thermoresistance measurements of small samples of manganin

  9. High Precision Atomic Mass Measurements: Tests of CVC and IMME

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eronen, Tommi

    2011-01-01

    Atomic mass is one of the key ingredients in testing the Conserved Vector Current (CVC) hypothesis and Isobaric Mass Multiplet Equation (IMME). With JYFLTRAP Penning trap installation at the University of Jyvaeskylae, Finland, several atomic massses related to these studies have been measured. The performed atomic mass measurements for CVC tests cover almost all the nuclei that are relevant for these studies. To test IMME, masses in two isobaric mass chains (A = 23 and A = 32) have been determined.

  10. High Precision Atomic Mass Measurements: Tests of CVC and IMME

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eronen, Tommi [Department of Physics, University of Jyvaeskylae, FI-40014 University of Jyvaeskylae (Finland); Collaboration: JYFLTRAP Collaboration

    2011-11-30

    Atomic mass is one of the key ingredients in testing the Conserved Vector Current (CVC) hypothesis and Isobaric Mass Multiplet Equation (IMME). With JYFLTRAP Penning trap installation at the University of Jyvaeskylae, Finland, several atomic massses related to these studies have been measured. The performed atomic mass measurements for CVC tests cover almost all the nuclei that are relevant for these studies. To test IMME, masses in two isobaric mass chains (A = 23 and A = 32) have been determined.

  11. Experience of precision measuring distances by invar wires at accelerators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Porubaj, N.I.

    1977-01-01

    With a view to determining the deformations and displacements of the ring foundation of the ITEP accelerator, the method of very accurate distance measurements by means of invar wires and strips is described. Measurement errors are analyzed. This method has allowed to measure distances up to 40 m with a mean-square error of less than 40 μm. The calibration accuracy of 3 and 25-m measuring wires has been determined to be +- 27 μm. Time instability of the wires is +- 16 μm. It is shown that strips are more stable in time than wires. Elongation of 6, 19, 25 and 38 m invar wires has been measured as function of the tension time. The error due to tension of a 38-m wire may be tangible. Data on thermal coefficient variation in time has been obtained for invar wires and strips. The multiannual measurements of the ring foundation deformations show that variations of the mean radius are caused by increases of concrete temperature. Temperature increase by only 1 deg caused mean radius increase of 0.3 mm

  12. Simultaneous measurement of 3 fluctuating plasma parameters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carlson, A.; Giannone, L.

    1991-01-01

    Langmuir triple probes can provide simultaneous measurements of n e , T e and V pl with good temporal and spatial resolution, and therefore are especially suited to detailed investigations of plasma turbulence in the scrape-off-layer. Unfortunately, the finite tip separation coupled with the fluctuating gradients prevents a simple interpretation of the results. We have developed a method using, essentially, two or more triple probes, which allows a good estimate of the three plasma parameters and their spatial derivatives at each point of time (assuming tip separation is much less than correlation length and dimensionless fluctuation levels are much less than unity). In particular, we can unambiguously measure the temperature fluctuations and the turbulent particle and heat flux. (author) 1 fig

  13. Simultaneous measurement of 3 fluctuating plasma parameters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carlson, A.; Giannone, L.

    1991-01-01

    Langmuir triple probes can provide simultaneous measurements of n e , T e , and V pl with good temporal and spatial resolution, and therefore are especially suited to detailed investigations of plasma turbulence in the scrape-off-layer. Unfortunately, the finite tip separation coupled with the fluctuating gradients prevents a simple interpretation of the results. We have developed a method using, essentially, two or more triple probes, which allows a good estimate of the three plasma parameters and their spatial derivatives at each point of time (assuming tip separation is much less than correlation length and dimensionless fluctuation levels are much less than unity). In particular, we can unambiguously measure the temperature fluctuations and the turbulent particle and heat flux. (orig.)

  14. Simultaneous measurement of 3 fluctuating plasma parameters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carlson, A; Giannone, L. (Max-Planck-Institut fuer Plasmaphysik, Garching (Germany))

    1991-01-01

    Langmuir triple probes can provide simultaneous measurements of n[sub e], T[sub e] and V[sub pl] with good temporal and spatial resolution, and therefore are especially suited to detailed investigations of plasma turbulence in the scrape-off-layer. Unfortunately, the finite tip separation coupled with the fluctuating gradients prevents a simple interpretation of the results. We have developed a method using, essentially, two or more triple probes, which allows a good estimate of the three plasma parameters and their spatial derivatives at each point of time (assuming tip separation is much less than correlation length and dimensionless fluctuation levels are much less than unity). In particular, we can unambiguously measure the temperature fluctuations and the turbulent particle and heat flux. (author) 1 fig.

  15. A precise measurement of the $\\tau$ lepton lifetime

    CERN Document Server

    Abreu, P; Adye, T; Agasi, E; Ajinenko, I; Aleksan, Roy; Alekseev, G D; Allport, P P; Almehed, S; Alvsvaag, S J; Amaldi, Ugo; Amato, S; Andreazza, A; Andrieux, M L; Antilogus, P; Apel, W D; Arnoud, Y; Åsman, B; Augustin, J E; Augustinus, A; Baillon, Paul; Bambade, P; Barão, F; Barate, R; Bardin, Dimitri Yuri; Barker, G J; Baroncelli, A; Bärring, O; Barrio, J A; Bartl, Walter; Bates, M J; Battaglia, Marco; Baubillier, M; Baudot, J; Becks, K H; Begalli, M; Beillière, P; Belokopytov, Yu A; Benvenuti, Alberto C; Berggren, M; Bertrand, D; Bianchi, F; Bigi, M; Bilenky, S M; Billoir, P; Bloch, D; Blume, M; Blyth, S; Bocci, V; Bolognese, T; Bonesini, M; Bonivento, W; Booth, P S L; Borisov, G; Bosio, C; Bosworth, S; Botner, O; Bouquet, B; Bourdarios, C; Bowcock, T J V; Bozzo, M; Branchini, P; Brand, K D; Brenke, T; Brenner, R A; Bricman, C; Brillault, L; Brown, R C A; Brückman, P; Brunet, J M; Bugge, L; Buran, T; Burgsmüller, T; Buschmann, P; Buys, A; Caccia, M; Calvi, M; Camacho-Rozas, A J; Camporesi, T; Canale, V; Canepa, M; Cankocak, K; Cao, F; Carena, F; Carrilho, P; Carroll, L; Caso, Carlo; Castillo-Gimenez, M V; Cattai, A; Cavallo, F R; Cerrito, L; Chabaud, V; Charpentier, P; Chaussard, L; Chauveau, J; Checchia, P; Chelkov, G A; Chierici, R; Chliapnikov, P V; Chochula, P; Chorowicz, V; Cindro, V; Collins, P; Contreras, J L; Contri, R; Cortina, E; Cosme, G; Cossutti, F; Crawley, H B; Crennell, D J; Crosetti, G; Cuevas-Maestro, J; Czellar, S; Dahl-Jensen, Erik; Dahm, J; D'Almagne, B; Dam, M; Damgaard, G; Dauncey, P D; Davenport, Martyn; Da Silva, W; Defoix, C; Deghorain, A; Della Ricca, G; Delpierre, P A; Demaria, N; De Angelis, A; De Boeck, H; de Boer, Wim; De Brabandere, S; De Clercq, C; La Vaissière, C de; De Lotto, B; De Min, A; De Paula, L S; De Saint-Jean, C; Dijkstra, H; Di Ciaccio, Lucia; Djama, F; Dolbeau, J; Dönszelmann, M; Doroba, K; Dracos, M; Drees, J; Drees, K A; Dris, M; Dufour, Y; Dupont, F; Edsall, D M; Ehret, R; Eigen, G; Ekelöf, T J C; Ekspong, Gösta; Elsing, M; Engel, J P; Ershaidat, N; Erzen, B; Espirito-Santo, M C; Falk, E; Fassouliotis, D; Feindt, Michael; Ferrer, A; Filippas-Tassos, A; Firestone, A; Fischer, P A; Föth, H; Fokitis, E; Fontanelli, F; Formenti, F; Franek, B J; Frenkiel, P; Fries, D E C; Frodesen, A G; Frühwirth, R; Fulda-Quenzer, F; Fuster, J A; Galloni, A; Gamba, D; Gandelman, M; García, C; García, J; Gaspar, C; Gasparini, U; Gavillet, P; Gazis, E N; Gelé, D; Gerber, J P; Gerdyukov, L N; Gibbs, M; Gokieli, R; Golob, B; Gopal, Gian P; Gorn, L; Górski, M; Guz, Yu; Gracco, Valerio; Graziani, E; Grosdidier, G; Grzelak, K; Gumenyuk, S A; Gunnarsson, P; Günther, M; Guy, J; Hahn, F; Hahn, S; Hallgren, A; Hamacher, K; Hao, W; Harris, F J; Hedberg, V; Henriques, R P; Hernández, J J; Herquet, P; Herr, H; Hessing, T L; Higón, E; Hilke, Hans Jürgen; Hill, T S; Holmgren, S O; Holt, P J; Holthuizen, D J; Hoorelbeke, S; Houlden, M A; Hrubec, Josef; Huet, K; Hultqvist, K; Jackson, J N; Jacobsson, R; Jalocha, P; Janik, R; Jarlskog, G; Jarry, P; Jean-Marie, B; Johansson, E K; Jönsson, L B; Jönsson, P E; Joram, Christian; Juillot, P; Kaiser, M; Kapusta, F; Karafasoulis, K; Karlsson, M; Karvelas, E; Katsanevas, S; Katsoufis, E C; Keränen, R; Khokhlov, Yu A; Khomenko, B A; Khovanskii, N N; King, B J; Kjaer, N J; Klein, H; Klovning, A; Kluit, P M; Köne, B; Kokkinias, P; Koratzinos, M; Korcyl, K; Kostyukhin, V; Kourkoumelis, C; Kuznetsov, O; Kramer, P H; Krammer, Manfred; Kreuter, C; Królikowski, J; Kronkvist, I J; Krumshtein, Z; Krupinski, W; Kubinec, P; Kucewicz, W; Kurvinen, K L; Lacasta, C; Laktineh, I; Lamblot, S; Lamsa, J; Lanceri, L; Lane, D W; Langefeld, P; Last, I; Laugier, J P; Lauhakangas, R; Leder, Gerhard; Ledroit, F; Lefébure, V; Legan, C K; Leitner, R; Lemoigne, Y; Lemonne, J; Lenzen, Georg; Lepeltier, V; Lesiak, T; Liko, D; Lindner, R; Lipniacka, A; Lippi, I; Lörstad, B; Lokajícek, M; Loken, J G; López, J M; López-Fernandez, A; López-Aguera, M A; Loukas, D; Lutz, P; Lyons, L; MacNaughton, J N; Maehlum, G; Maio, A; Malychev, V; Mandl, F; Maocun, C; Marco, J; Maréchal, B; Margoni, M; Marin, J C; Mariotti, C; Markou, A; Maron, T; Martínez-Rivero, C; Martínez-Vidal, F; Martí i García, S; Matorras, F; Matteuzzi, C; Matthiae, Giorgio; Mazzucato, M; McCubbin, M L; McKay, R; McNulty, R; Medbo, J; Meroni, C; Meyer, S; Meyer, W T; Myagkov, A; Michelotto, M; Migliore, E; Mirabito, L; Mitaroff, Winfried A; Mjörnmark, U; Moa, T; Møller, R; Mönig, K; Monge, M R; Morettini, P; Müller, H; Mundim, L M; Murray, W J; Muryn, B; Myatt, Gerald; Naraghi, F; Navarria, Francesco Luigi; Navas, S; Negri, P; Némécek, S; Neumann, W; Nicolaidou, R; Nielsen, B S; Nieuwenhuizen, M; Nikolaenko, V; Niss, P; Nomerotski, A; Normand, Ainsley; Oberschulte-Beckmann, W; Obraztsov, V F; Olshevskii, A G; Onofre, A; Orava, Risto; Österberg, K; Ouraou, A; Paganini, P; Paganoni, M; Pagès, P; Palka, H; Papadopoulou, T D; Papageorgiou, K; Pape, L; Parkes, C; Parodi, F; Passeri, A; Pegoraro, M; Peralta, L; Pernegger, H; Pernicka, Manfred; Perrotta, A; Petridou, C; Petrolini, A; Petrovykh, M; Phillips, H T; Piana, G; Pierre, F; Pimenta, M; Pindo, M; Plaszczynski, S; Podobrin, O; Pol, M E; Polok, G; Poropat, P; Pozdnyakov, V; Prest, M; Privitera, P; Pukhaeva, N; Radojicic, D; Ragazzi, S; Rahmani, H; Rames, J; Ratoff, P N; Read, A L; Reale, M; Rebecchi, P; Redaelli, N G; Regler, Meinhard; Reid, D; Renton, P B; Resvanis, L K; Richard, F; Richardson, J; Rídky, J; Rinaudo, G; Ripp, I; Romero, A; Roncagliolo, I; Ronchese, P; Roos, L; Rosenberg, E I; Rosso, E; Roudeau, Patrick; Rovelli, T; Rückstuhl, W; Ruhlmann-Kleider, V; Ruiz, A; Saarikko, H; Sacquin, Yu; Sadovskii, A; Sajot, G; Salt, J; Sánchez, J; Sannino, M; Schimmelpfennig, M; Schneider, H; Schwickerath, U; Schyns, M A E; Sciolla, G; Scuri, F; Seager, P; Sedykh, Yu; Segar, A M; Seitz, A; Sekulin, R L; Shellard, R C; Siccama, I; Siegrist, P; Simonetti, S; Simonetto, F; Sissakian, A N; Sitár, B; Skaali, T B; Smadja, G; Smirnov, N; Smirnova, O G; Smith, G R; Solovyanov, O; Sosnowski, R; Souza-Santos, D; Spiriti, E; Sponholz, P; Squarcia, S; Stanescu, C; Stapnes, Steinar; Stavitski, I; Stichelbaut, F; Stocchi, A; Strauss, J; Strub, R; Stugu, B; Szczekowski, M; Szeptycka, M; Tabarelli de Fatis, T; Tavernet, J P; Chikilev, O G; Tilquin, A; Timmermans, J; Tkatchev, L G; Todorov, T; Toet, D Z; Tomaradze, A G; Tomé, B; Tortora, L; Tranströmer, G; Treille, D; Trischuk, W; Tristram, G; Trombini, A; Troncon, C; Tsirou, A L; Turluer, M L; Tyapkin, I A; Tyndel, M; Tzamarias, S; Überschär, B; Ullaland, O; Uvarov, V; Valenti, G; Vallazza, E; Van der Velde, C; van Apeldoorn, G W; van Dam, P; Van Doninck, W K; Van Eldik, J; Vassilopoulos, N; Vegni, G; Ventura, L; Venus, W A; Verbeure, F; Verlato, M; Vertogradov, L S; Vilanova, D; Vincent, P; Vitale, L; Vlasov, E; Vodopyanov, A S; Vrba, V; Wahlen, H; Walck, C; Waldner, F; Weierstall, M; Weilhammer, Peter; Weiser, C; Wetherell, Alan M; Wicke, D; Wickens, J H; Wielers, M; Wilkinson, G R; Williams, W S C; Winter, M; Witek, M; Woschnagg, K; Yip, K; Yushchenko, O P; Zach, F; Zacharatou-Jarlskog, C; Zalewska-Bak, A; Zalewski, Piotr; Zavrtanik, D; Zevgolatakos, E; Zimin, N I; Zito, M; Zontar, D; Zuberi, R; Zucchelli, G C; Zumerle, G

    1996-01-01

    The tau lepton lifetime has been measured using three different methods with the DELPHI detector. Two measurements of one-prong decays are combined, accounting for correlations, giving a result of \\tau_\\tau = 291.8 \\pm 3.3 \\mbox{ (stat.)} \\pm 2.0 \\mbox{(sys.) fs} while the decay length distribution of three-prong decays gives the result \\tau_{\\tau} = 286.7 \\pm 4.9 \\mbox{ (stat.)} \\pm 3.3 \\mbox{ (sys.) fs}. Combining the results presented here with previous DELPHI measurements, we get \\tau_{\\tau} = 291.4 \\pm 3.0 fs and find that the ratio of the coupling constant for tau decay relative to that for muon decay is 0.990 \\pm 0.009, compatible with lepton universality.

  16. Precision Photometric Extinction Corrections from Direct Atmospheric Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGraw, John T.; Zimmer, P.; Linford, J.; Simon, T.; Measurement Astrophysics Research Group

    2009-01-01

    For decades astronomical extinction corrections have been accomplished using nightly mean extinction coefficients derived from Langley plots measured with the same telescope used for photometry. Because this technique results in lost time on program fields, observers only grudgingly made sporadic extinction measurements. Occasionally extinction corrections are not measured nightly but are made using tabulated mean monthly or even quarterly extinction coefficients. Any observer of the sky knows that Earth's atmosphere is an ever-changing fluid in which is embedded extinction sources ranging from Rayleigh (molecular) scattering to aerosol, smoke and dust scattering and absorption, to "just plain cloudy.” Our eyes also tell us that the type, direction and degree of extinction changes on time scales of minutes or less - typically shorter than many astronomical observations. Thus, we should expect that atmospheric extinction can change significantly during a single observation. Mean extinction coefficients might be well-defined nightly means, but those means have high variance because they do not accurately record the wavelength-, time-, and angle-dependent extinction actually affecting each observation. Our research group is implementing lidar measurements made in the direction of observation with one minute cadence, from which the absolute monochromatic extinction can be measured. Simultaneous spectrophotometry of nearby bright standard stars allows derivation and MODTRAN modeling atmospheric transmission as a function of wavelength for the atmosphere through which an observation is made. Application of this technique is demonstrated. Accurate real-time extinction measurements are an enabling factor for sub-1% photometry. This research is supported by NSF Grant 0421087 and AFRL Grant #FA9451-04-2-0355.

  17. Precision lifetime measurements using the recoil distance method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kruecken, R.

    2000-01-01

    The recoil distance method (RDM) for the measurements of lifetimes of excited nuclear levels in the range from about 1 ps to 1,000 ps is reviewed. The New Yale Plunger Device for RDM experiments is introduced and the Differential Decay Curve Method for their analysis is reviewed. Results from recent RDM experiments on SD bands in the mass-190 region, shears bands in the neutron deficient lead isotopes, and ground state bands in the mass-130 region are presented. Perspectives for the use of RDM measurements in the study of neutron-rich nuclei are discussed

  18. Precision Lifetime Measurements Using the Recoil Distance Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krücken, R.

    2000-01-01

    The recoil distance method (RDM) for the measurements of lifetimes of excited nuclear levels in the range from about 1 ps to 1000 ps is reviewed. The New Yale Plunger Device for RDM experiments is introduced and the Differential Decay Curve Method for their analysis is reviewed. Results from recent RDM experiments on SD bands in the mass-190 region, shears bands in the neutron deficient lead isotopes, and ground state bands in the mass-130 region are presented. Perspectives for the use of RDM measurements in the study of neutron-rich nuclei are discussed. PMID:27551587

  19. Precise mean sea level measurements using the Global Positioning System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelecy, Thomas M.; Born, George H.; Parke, Michael E.; Rocken, Christian

    1994-01-01

    This paper describes the results of a sea level measurement test conducted off La Jolla, California, in November of 1991. The purpose of this test was to determine accurate sea level measurements using a Global Positioning System (GPS) equipped buoy. These measurements were intended to be used as the sea level component for calibration of the ERS 1 satellite altimeter. Measurements were collected on November 25 and 28 when the ERS 1 satellite overflew the calibration area. Two different types of buoys were used. A waverider design was used on November 25 and a spar design on November 28. This provided the opportunity to examine how dynamic effects of the measurement platform might affect the sea level accuracy. The two buoys were deployed at locations approximately 1.2 km apart and about 15 km west of a reference GPS receiver located on the rooftop of the Institute of Geophysics and Planetary Physics at the Scripps Institute of Oceanography. GPS solutions were computed for 45 minutes on each day and used to produce two sea level time series. An estimate of the mean sea level at both locations was computed by subtracting tide gage data collected at the Scripps Pier from the GPS-determined sea level measurements and then filtering out the high-frequency components due to waves and buoy dynamics. In both cases the GPS estimate differed from Rapp's mean altimetric surface by 0.06 m. Thus, the gradient in the GPS measurements matched the gradient in Rapp's surface. These results suggest that accurate sea level can be determined using GPS on widely differing platforms as long as care is taken to determine the height of the GPS antenna phase center above water level. Application areas include measurement of absolute sea level, of temporal variations in sea level, and of sea level gradients (dominantly the geoid). Specific applications would include ocean altimeter calibration, monitoring of sea level in remote regions, and regional experiments requiring spatial and

  20. Precise optical Lamb shift measurements in atomic hydrogen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weitz, M.; Schmidt-Kaler, F.; Haensch, T.W.

    1992-01-01

    The 1S ground-state Lamb shift in atomic hydrogen has been measured to an accuracy of 1.3 parts in 10 5 by directly comparing the optical frequencies of the 1S-2S and the 2S-4S,4D two-photon transitions. The result, 8172.82(11) MHz, agrees with the theoretical prediction of 8172.94(9) MHz and rivals measurements of the 2S Lamb shift as a test of QED for a bound system. A comparison of the 2S-4S and 2S-4D intervals yields a 4S Lamb shift of 131.66(4) MHz

  1. Laser cooled ion beams and strongly coupled plasmas for precision experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bussmann, Michael

    2008-03-17

    This cumulative thesis summarizes experimental and theoretical results on cooling of ion beams using single-frequency, single-mode tabletop laser systems. It consists of two parts. One deals with experiments on laser-cooling of ion beams at relativistic energies, the other with simulations of stopping and sympathetic cooling of ions for precision in-trap experiments. In the first part, experimental results are presented on laser-cooling of relativistic C{sup 3+} ion beams at a beam energy of 122 MeV/u, performed at the Experimental Storage Ring (ESR) at GSI. The main results presented in this thesis include the first attainment of longitudinally space-charge dominated relativistic ion beams using pure laser-cooling. The second part lists theoretical results on stopping and sympathetic cooling of ions in a laser-cooled one-component plasma of singly charged {sup 24}Mg ions, which are confined in a three-dimensional harmonic trap potential. (orig.)

  2. Method of high precision interval measurement in pulse laser ranging system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhen; Lv, Xin-yuan; Mao, Jin-jin; Liu, Wei; Yang, Dong

    2013-09-01

    Laser ranging is suitable for laser system, for it has the advantage of high measuring precision, fast measuring speed,no cooperative targets and strong resistance to electromagnetic interference,the measuremen of laser ranging is the key paremeters affecting the performance of the whole system.The precision of the pulsed laser ranging system was decided by the precision of the time interval measurement, the principle structure of laser ranging system was introduced, and a method of high precision time interval measurement in pulse laser ranging system was established in this paper.Based on the analysis of the factors which affected the precision of range measure,the pulse rising edges discriminator was adopted to produce timing mark for the start-stop time discrimination,and the TDC-GP2 high precision interval measurement system based on TMS320F2812 DSP was designed to improve the measurement precision.Experimental results indicate that the time interval measurement method in this paper can obtain higher range accuracy. Compared with the traditional time interval measurement system,the method simplifies the system design and reduce the influence of bad weather conditions,furthermore,it satisfies the requirements of low costs and miniaturization.

  3. Plasma measurements with surface barrier detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Futch, A.H. Jr.; Bradley, A.E.

    1969-01-01

    A surface barrier detector system for measuring the loss rate of protons from a hydrogen plasma and their energy spectrum is described. A full width at half maximum (FWHM) resolution of 1.4 keV for 15-keV hydrogen atoms was obtained using a selected detector having a sensitive area of 3 mm 2 and a depletion depth of 700 microns

  4. Thomson scattering measurements in atmospheric plasma jets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gregori, G.; Schein, J.; Schwendinger, P.; Kortshagen, U.; Heberlein, J.; Pfender, E.

    1999-01-01

    Electron temperature and electron density in a dc plasma jet at atmospheric pressure have been obtained using Thomson laser scattering. Measurements performed at various scattering angles have revealed effects that are not accounted for by the standard scattering theory. Differences between the predicted and experimental results suggest that higher order corrections to the theory may be required, and that corrections to the form of the spectral density function may play an important role. copyright 1999 The American Physical Society

  5. Ion Distribution Measurement In Plasma Focus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suryadi; Sunardi; Usada, Widdi; Purwadi, Agus; Zaenuri, Akhmad

    1996-01-01

    Measurement of the Argon ion distribution in plasma focus by using Faraday cup has been done. The intensity of ion beam followed the I Rn rule, n=1,02. In the operation condition of 0,8 mbar and 12,5 kV the current sheath spen 2.2 to 2.4 μsecond in the rundown phase. Cu ion was also been observed in the Faraday cup

  6. Precision lifetime measurements of Ar II 4p doublet levels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marger, D.; Schmoranzer, H.

    1990-01-01

    The lifetimes of the Ar II 4p doublet fine-structure levels 4p 2 D 0 5/2 , 4p' 2 F 0 5/2 and 4p' 2 F 0 7/2 were measured by beam-dye laser spectroscopy. The experimental uncertainty was reduced to below 1%. (orig.)

  7. High precision stress measurements in semiconductor structures by Raman microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Uhlig, Benjamin

    2009-07-01

    Stress in silicon structures plays an essential role in modern semiconductor technology. This stress has to be measured and due to the ongoing miniaturization in today's semiconductor industry, the measuring method has to meet certain requirements. The present thesis deals with the question how Raman spectroscopy can be used to measure the state of stress in semiconductor structures. In the first chapter the relation between Raman peakshift and stress in the material is explained. It is shown that detailed stress maps with a spatial resolution close to the diffraction limit can be obtained in structured semiconductor samples. Furthermore a novel procedure, the so called Stokes-AntiStokes-Difference method is introduced. With this method, topography, tool or drift effects can be distinguished from stress related influences in the sample. In the next chapter Tip-enhanced Raman Scattering (TERS) and its application for an improvement in lateral resolution is discussed. For this, a study is presented, which shows the influence of metal particles on the intensity and localization of the Raman signal. A method to attach metal particles to scannable tips is successfully applied. First TERS scans are shown and their impact on and challenges for high resolution stress measurements on semiconductor structures is explained. (orig.)

  8. Investigation of Leveling Equipment for High Precision Measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gassner, G.

    2007-01-01

    At SLAC (Stanford Linear Accelerator Center) a fully automated vertical comparator for the calibration of digital levels and invar staffs was developed by the Metrology Department in cooperation with the Institute of Engineering Geodesy and Measurement Systems at the Graz University of Technology. This vertical comparator is the first in the US. With the vertical comparator it is possible to perform system calibration and CCD camera measurements of rods. System calibration uses the height readings of the digital level at different positions of the rod and compares them with the reference readings obtained by the interferometer. In the case of CCD camera measurements, the positions of the edges in the image is determined and again compared with the interferometer readings. This document gives an overview of the current set-up of the SLAC vertical comparator and experimental results of critical applications including measurements at the end sections of the rod, at critical sighting distances, with unfocused optics and under illumination with the digital levels in use at SLAC

  9. Light higgsinos at the ILC. Precision measurements and detector requirements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sert, Hale

    2016-01-01

    electrons can be identified with the same efficiency as the muons, the key observables can be reconstructed with the same precision as in the fast simulation case by taking two times more data.The presence of soft final-state particles makes the tracking of high relevance for the analysis. Therefore, a comprehensive hardware study related to the TPC of ILD has been performed. In this study, three commonly used gas mixtures have been investigated in a small gas chamber containing a triple Gas Electron Multiplier stack, and their performance has been compared. This study has enhanced the understanding of the dependency of the charge transfer on the gas type. It has confirmed that the gas proposed to be used in the TPC is the most promising one.

  10. A precise measurement of the average b hadron lifetime

    CERN Document Server

    Buskulic, Damir; De Bonis, I; Décamp, D; Ghez, P; Goy, C; Lees, J P; Lucotte, A; Minard, M N; Odier, P; Pietrzyk, B; Ariztizabal, F; Chmeissani, M; Crespo, J M; Efthymiopoulos, I; Fernández, E; Fernández-Bosman, M; Gaitan, V; Garrido, L; Martínez, M; Orteu, S; Pacheco, A; Padilla, C; Palla, Fabrizio; Pascual, A; Perlas, J A; Sánchez, F; Teubert, F; Colaleo, A; Creanza, D; De Palma, M; Farilla, A; Gelao, G; Girone, M; Iaselli, Giuseppe; Maggi, G; Maggi, M; Marinelli, N; Natali, S; Nuzzo, S; Ranieri, A; Raso, G; Romano, F; Ruggieri, F; Selvaggi, G; Silvestris, L; Tempesta, P; Zito, G; Huang, X; Lin, J; Ouyang, Q; Wang, T; Xie, Y; Xu, R; Xue, S; Zhang, J; Zhang, L; Zhao, W; Bonvicini, G; Cattaneo, M; Comas, P; Coyle, P; Drevermann, H; Engelhardt, A; Forty, Roger W; Frank, M; Hagelberg, R; Harvey, J; Jacobsen, R; Janot, P; Jost, B; Knobloch, J; Lehraus, Ivan; Markou, C; Martin, E B; Mato, P; Meinhard, H; Minten, Adolf G; Miquel, R; Oest, T; Palazzi, P; Pater, J R; Pusztaszeri, J F; Ranjard, F; Rensing, P E; Rolandi, Luigi; Schlatter, W D; Schmelling, M; Schneider, O; Tejessy, W; Tomalin, I R; Venturi, A; Wachsmuth, H W; Wiedenmann, W; Wildish, T; Witzeling, W; Wotschack, J; Ajaltouni, Ziad J; Bardadin-Otwinowska, Maria; Barrès, A; Boyer, C; Falvard, A; Gay, P; Guicheney, C; Henrard, P; Jousset, J; Michel, B; Monteil, S; Montret, J C; Pallin, D; Perret, P; Podlyski, F; Proriol, J; Rossignol, J M; Saadi, F; Fearnley, Tom; Hansen, J B; Hansen, J D; Hansen, J R; Hansen, P H; Nilsson, B S; Kyriakis, A; Simopoulou, Errietta; Siotis, I; Vayaki, Anna; Zachariadou, K; Blondel, A; Bonneaud, G R; Brient, J C; Bourdon, P; Passalacqua, L; Rougé, A; Rumpf, M; Tanaka, R; Valassi, Andrea; Verderi, M; Videau, H L; Candlin, D J; Parsons, M I; Focardi, E; Parrini, G; Corden, M; Delfino, M C; Georgiopoulos, C H; Jaffe, D E; Antonelli, A; Bencivenni, G; Bologna, G; Bossi, F; Campana, P; Capon, G; Chiarella, V; Felici, G; Laurelli, P; Mannocchi, G; Murtas, F; Murtas, G P; Pepé-Altarelli, M; Dorris, S J; Halley, A W; ten Have, I; Knowles, I G; Lynch, J G; Morton, W T; O'Shea, V; Raine, C; Reeves, P; Scarr, J M; Smith, K; Smith, M G; Thompson, A S; Thomson, F; Thorn, S; Turnbull, R M; Becker, U; Braun, O; Geweniger, C; Graefe, G; Hanke, P; Hepp, V; Kluge, E E; Putzer, A; Rensch, B; Schmidt, M; Sommer, J; Stenzel, H; Tittel, K; Werner, S; Wunsch, M; Beuselinck, R; Binnie, David M; Cameron, W; Colling, D J; Dornan, Peter J; Konstantinidis, N P; Moneta, L; Moutoussi, A; Nash, J; San Martin, G; Sedgbeer, J K; Stacey, A M; Dissertori, G; Girtler, P; Kneringer, E; Kuhn, D; Rudolph, G; Bowdery, C K; Brodbeck, T J; Colrain, P; Crawford, G; Finch, A J; Foster, F; Hughes, G; Sloan, Terence; Whelan, E P; Williams, M I; Galla, A; Greene, A M; Kleinknecht, K; Quast, G; Raab, J; Renk, B; Sander, H G; Wanke, R; Van Gemmeren, P; Zeitnitz, C; Aubert, Jean-Jacques; Bencheikh, A M; Benchouk, C; Bonissent, A; Bujosa, G; Calvet, D; Carr, J; Diaconu, C A; Etienne, F; Thulasidas, M; Nicod, D; Payre, P; Rousseau, D; Talby, M; Abt, I; Assmann, R W; Bauer, C; Blum, Walter; Brown, D; Dietl, H; Dydak, Friedrich; Ganis, G; Gotzhein, C; Jakobs, K; Kroha, H; Lütjens, G; Lutz, Gerhard; Männer, W; Moser, H G; Richter, R H; Rosado-Schlosser, A; Schael, S; Settles, Ronald; Seywerd, H C J; Stierlin, U; Saint-Denis, R; Wolf, G; Alemany, R; Boucrot, J; Callot, O; Cordier, A; Courault, F; Davier, M; Duflot, L; Grivaz, J F; Heusse, P; Jacquet, M; Kim, D W; Le Diberder, F R; Lefrançois, J; Lutz, A M; Musolino, G; Nikolic, I A; Park, H J; Park, I C; Schune, M H; Simion, S; Veillet, J J; Videau, I; Abbaneo, D; Azzurri, P; Bagliesi, G; Batignani, G; Bettarini, S; Bozzi, C; Calderini, G; Carpinelli, M; Ciocci, M A; Ciulli, V; Dell'Orso, R; Fantechi, R; Ferrante, I; Foà, L; Forti, F; Giassi, A; Giorgi, M A; Gregorio, A; Ligabue, F; Lusiani, A; Marrocchesi, P S; Messineo, A; Rizzo, G; Sanguinetti, G; Sciabà, A; Spagnolo, P; Steinberger, Jack; Tenchini, Roberto; Tonelli, G; Triggiani, G; Vannini, C; Verdini, P G; Walsh, J; Betteridge, A P; Blair, G A; Bryant, L M; Cerutti, F; Gao, Y; Green, M G; Johnson, D L; Medcalf, T; Mir, L M; Perrodo, P; Strong, J A; Bertin, V; Botterill, David R; Clifft, R W; Edgecock, T R; Haywood, S; Edwards, M; Maley, P; Norton, P R; Thompson, J C; Bloch-Devaux, B; Colas, P; Duarte, H; Emery, S; Kozanecki, Witold; Lançon, E; Lemaire, M C; Locci, E; Marx, B; Pérez, P; Rander, J; Renardy, J F; Rosowsky, A; Roussarie, A; Schuller, J P; Schwindling, J; Si Mohand, D; Trabelsi, A; Vallage, B; Johnson, R P; Kim, H Y; Litke, A M; McNeil, M A; Taylor, G; Beddall, A; Booth, C N; Boswell, R; Cartwright, S L; Combley, F; Dawson, I; Köksal, A; Letho, M; Newton, W M; Rankin, C; Thompson, L F; Böhrer, A; Brandt, S; Cowan, G D; Feigl, E; Grupen, Claus; Lutters, G; Minguet-Rodríguez, J A; Rivera, F; Saraiva, P; Smolik, L; Stephan, F; Apollonio, M; Bosisio, L; Della Marina, R; Giannini, G; Gobbo, B; Ragusa, F; Rothberg, J E; Wasserbaech, S R; Armstrong, S R; Bellantoni, L; Elmer, P; Feng, P; Ferguson, D P S; Gao, Y S; González, S; Grahl, J; Harton, J L; Hayes, O J; Hu, H; McNamara, P A; Nachtman, J M; Orejudos, W; Pan, Y B; Saadi, Y; Schmitt, M; Scott, I J; Sharma, V; Turk, J; Walsh, A M; Wu Sau Lan; Wu, X; Yamartino, J M; Zheng, M; Zobernig, G

    1996-01-01

    An improved measurement of the average b hadron lifetime is performed using a sample of 1.5 million hadronic Z decays, collected during the 1991-1993 runs of ALEPH, with the silicon vertex detector fully operational. This uses the three-dimensional impact parameter distribution of lepton tracks coming from semileptonic b decays and yields an average b hadron lifetime of 1.533 \\pm 0.013 \\pm 0.022 ps.

  11. Precision measurement of the D*(0) decay branching fractions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ablikim, M.; Achasov, M. N.; Ai, X. C.; Albayrak, O.; Albrecht, M.; Ambrose, D. J.; Amoroso, A.; An, F. F.; An, Q.; Bai, J. Z.; Ferroli, R. Baldini; Ban, Y.; Bennett, D. W.; Bennett, J. V.; Bertani, M.; Bettoni, D.; Bian, J. M.; Bianchi, F.; Boger, E.; Bondarenko, O.; Boyko, I.; Briere, R. A.; Cai, H.; Cai, X.; Cakir, O.; Calcaterra, A.; Cao, G. F.; Cetin, S. A.; Chang, J. F.; Chelkov, G.; Chen, G.; Chen, H. S.; Chen, H. Y.; Chen, J. C.; Chen, M. L.; Chen, S. J.; Chen, X.; Chen, X. R.; Chen, Y. B.; Cheng, H. P.; Chu, X. K.; Cibinetto, G.; Cronin-Hennessy, D.; Dai, H. L.; Dai, J. P.; Dbeyssi, A.; Dedovich, D.; Deng, Z. Y.; Denig, A.; Denysenko, I.; Destefanis, M.; De Mori, F.; Ding, Y.; Dong, C.; Dong, J.; Dong, L. Y.; Dong, M. Y.; Du, S. X.; Duan, P. F.; Fan, J. Z.; Fang, J.; Fang, S. S.; Fang, X.; Fang, Y.; Fava, L.; Feldbauer, F.; Felici, G.; Feng, C. Q.; Fioravanti, E.; Fritsch, M.; Fu, C. D.; Gao, Q.; Gao, Y.; Garzia, I.; Goetzen, K.; Gong, W. X.; Gradl, W.; Greco, M.; Gu, M. H.; Gu, Y. T.; Guan, Y. H.; Guo, A. Q.; Guo, L. B.; Guo, T.; Guo, Y.; Guo, Y. P.; Haddadi, Z.; Hafner, A.; Han, S.; Han, Y. L.; Harris, F. A.; He, K. L.; He, Z. Y.; Held, T.; Heng, Y. K.; Hou, Z. L.; Hu, C.; Hu, H. M.; Hu, J. F.; Hu, T.; Hu, Y.; Huang, G. M.; Huang, G. S.; Huang, H. P.; Huang, J. S.; Huang, X. T.; Huang, Y.; Hussain, T.; Ji, Q.; Ji, Q. P.; Ji, X. B.; Ji, X. L.; Jiang, L. L.; Jiang, L. W.; Jiang, X. S.; Jiao, J. B.; Jiao, Z.; Jin, D. P.; Jin, S.; Johansson, T.; Julin, A.; Kalantar-Nayestanaki, N.; Kang, X. L.; Kang, X. S.; Kavatsyuk, M.; Ke, B. C.; Kliemt, R.; Kloss, B.; Kolcu, O. B.; Kopf, B.; Kornicer, M.; Kuehn, W.; Kupsc, A.; Lai, W.; Lange, J. S.; Lara, M.; Larin, P.; Li, C. H.; Li, Cheng; Li, D. M.; Li, F.; Li, G.; Li, H. B.; Li, J. C.; Li, Jin; Li, K.; Li, K.; Li, P. R.; Li, T.; Li, W. D.; Li, W. G.; Li, X. L.; Li, X. M.; Li, X. N.; Li, X. Q.; Li, Z. B.; Liang, H.; Liang, Y. F.; Liang, Y. T.; Liao, G. R.; Lin, D. X.; Liu, B. J.; Liu, C. L.; Liu, C. X.; Liu, F. H.; Liu, Fang; Liu, Feng; Liu, H. B.; Liu, H. H.; Liu, H. H.; Liu, H. M.; Liu, J.; Liu, J. P.; Liu, J. Y.; Liu, K.; Liu, K. Y.; Liu, L. D.; Liu, P. L.; Liu, Q.; Liu, S. B.; Liu, X.; Liu, X. X.; Liu, Y. B.; Liu, Z. A.; Liu, Zhiqiang; Liu, Zhiqing; Loehner, H.; Lou, X. C.; Lu, H. J.; Lu, J. G.; Lu, R. Q.; Lu, Y.; Lu, Y. P.; Luo, C. L.; Luo, M. X.; Luo, T.; Luo, X. L.; Lv, M.; Lyu, X. R.; Ma, F. C.; Ma, H. L.; Ma, L. L.; Ma, Q. M.; Ma, S.; Ma, T.; Ma, X. N.; Ma, X. Y.; Maas, F. E.; Maggiora, M.; Malik, Q. A.; Mao, Y. J.; Mao, Z. P.; Marcello, S.; Messchendorp, J. G.; Min, J.; Min, T. J.; Mitchell, R. E.; Mo, X. H.; Mo, Y. J.; Morales, C. Morales; Moriya, K.; Muchnoi, N. Yu.; Muramatsu, H.; Nefedov, Y.; Nerling, F.; Nikolaev, I. B.; Ning, Z.; Nisar, S.; Niu, S. L.; Niu, X. Y.; Olsen, S. L.; Ouyang, Q.; Pacetti, S.; Patteri, P.; Pelizaeus, M.; Peng, H. P.; Peters, K.; Ping, J. L.; Ping, R. G.; Poling, R.; Pu, Y. N.; Qi, M.; Qian, S.; Qiao, C. F.; Qin, L. Q.; Qin, N.; Qin, X. S.; Qin, Y.; Qin, Z. H.; Qiu, J. F.; Rashid, K. H.; Redmer, C. F.; Ren, H. L.; Ripka, M.; Rong, G.; Ruan, X. D.; Santoro, V.; Sarantsev, A.; Savrie, M.; Schoenning, K.; Schumann, S.; Shan, W.; Shao, M.; Shen, C. P.; Shen, P. X.; Shen, X. Y.; Sheng, H. Y.; Shepherd, M. R.; Song, W. M.; Song, X. Y.; Sosio, S.; Spataro, S.; Spruck, B.; Sun, G. X.; Sun, J. F.; Sun, S. S.; Sun, Y. J.; Sun, Y. Z.; Sun, Z. J.; Sun, Z. T.; Tang, C. J.; Tang, X.; Tapan, I.; Thorndike, E. H.; Tiemens, M.; Toth, D.; Ullrich, M.; Uman, I.; Varner, G. S.; Wang, B.; Wang, B. L.; Wang, D.; Wang, D. Y.; Wang, K.; Wang, L. L.; Wang, L. S.; Wang, M.; Wang, P.; Wang, P. L.; Wang, Q. J.; Wang, S. G.; Wang, W.; Wang, X. F.; Wang, Y. D.; Wang, Y. F.; Wang, Y. Q.; Wang, Z.; Wang, Z. G.; Wang, Z. H.; Wang, Z. Y.; Weber, T.; Wei, D. H.; Wei, J. B.; Weidenkaff, P.; Wen, S. P.; Wiedner, U.; Wolke, M.; Wu, L. H.; Wu, Z.; Xia, L. G.; Xia, Y.; Xiao, D.; Xiao, Z. J.; Xie, Y. G.; Xu, G. F.; Xu, L.; Xu, Q. J.; Xu, Q. N.; Xu, X. P.; Yan, L.; Yan, W. B.; Yan, W. C.; Yan, Y. H.; Yang, H. X.; Yang, L.; Yang, Y.; Yang, Y. X.; Ye, H.; Ye, M.; Ye, M. H.; Yin, J. H.; Yu, B. X.; Yu, C. X.; Yu, H. W.; Yu, J. S.; Yuan, C. Z.; Yuan, W. L.; Yuan, Y.; Yuncu, A.; Zafar, A. A.; Zallo, A.; Zeng, Y.; Zhang, B. X.; Zhang, B. Y.; Zhang, C.; Zhang, C. C.; Zhang, D. H.; Zhang, H. H.; Zhang, H. Y.; Zhang, J. J.; Zhang, J. L.; Zhang, J. Q.; Zhang, J. W.; Zhang, J. Y.; Zhang, J. Z.; Zhang, K.; Zhang, L.; Zhang, S. H.; Zhang, X. J.; Zhang, X. Y.; Zhang, Y.; Zhang, Y. H.; Zhang, Z. H.; Zhang, Z. P.; Zhang, Z. Y.; Zhao, G.; Zhao, J. W.; Zhao, J. Y.; Zhao, J. Z.; Zhao, Lei; Zhao, Ling; Zhao, M. G.; Zhao, Q.; Zhao, Q. W.; Zhao, S. J.; Zhao, T. C.; Zhao, Y. B.; Zhao, Z. G.; Zhemchugov, A.; Zheng, B.; Zheng, J. P.; Zheng, W. J.; Zheng, Y. H.; Zhong, B.; Zhou, L.; Zhou, Li; Zhou, X.; Zhou, X. K.; Zhou, X. R.; Zhou, X. Y.; Zhu, K.; Zhu, K. J.; Zhu, S.; Zhu, X. L.; Zhu, Y. C.; Zhu, Y. S.; Zhu, Z. A.; Zhuang, J.; Zou, B. S.; Zou, J. H.

    2015-01-01

    Using 482 pb(-1) of data taken at root s = 4.009 GeV, we measure the branching fractions of the decays of D*(0) into D-0 pi(0) and D-0 gamma to be B(D*(0) -> D-0 pi(0)) = (65.5 +/- 0.8 +/- 0.5)% and B(D*(0) -> D0 gamma) = (34.5 +/- 0.8 +/- 0.5)%, respectively, by assuming that the D*(0) decays only

  12. Precision measurement of the local bias of dark matter halos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lazeyras, Titouan; Wagner, Christian; Schmidt, Fabian [Max-Planck-Institut für Astrophysik, Karl-Schwarzschild-Str. 1, Garching, 85748 Germany (Germany); Baldauf, Tobias, E-mail: titouan@mpa-garching.mpg.de, E-mail: cwagner@mpa-garching.mpg.de, E-mail: t.baldauf@tbaweb.de, E-mail: fabians@mpa-garching.mpg.de [Institute for Advanced Study, Einstein Drive, Princeton, NJ, 08540 United States (United States)

    2016-02-01

    We present accurate measurements of the linear, quadratic, and cubic local bias of dark matter halos, using curved 'separate universe' N-body simulations which effectively incorporate an infinite-wavelength overdensity. This can be seen as an exact implementation of the peak-background split argument. We compare the results with the linear and quadratic bias measured from the halo-matter power spectrum and bispectrum, and find good agreement. On the other hand, the standard peak-background split applied to the Sheth and Tormen (1999) and Tinker et al. (2008) halo mass functions matches the measured linear bias parameter only at the level of 10%. The prediction from the excursion set-peaks approach performs much better, which can be attributed to the stochastic moving barrier employed in the excursion set-peaks prediction. We also provide convenient fitting formulas for the nonlinear bias parameters b{sub 2}(b{sub 1}) and b{sub 3}(b{sub 1}), which work well over a range of redshifts.

  13. Cryogenic current comparators for precise ion beam current measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kurian, Febin

    2015-01-01

    The planned Facility for Antiproton and Ion Research (FAIR) at GSI has to cope with a wide range of beam intensities in its high-energy beam transport systems and in the storage rings. To meet the requirements of a non-intercepting intensity measurement down to nA range, it is planned to install a number of Cryogenic Current Comparator (CCC) units at different locations in the FAIR beamlines. In this work, the first CCC system for intensity measurement of heavy ion beams, which was developed at GSI, was re-commissioned and upgraded to be used as a 'GSI - CCC prototype' for extensive optimization and development of an improved CCC for FAIR. After installation of a new SQUID sensor and related electronics, as well as implementation of improved data acquisition components, successful beam current measurements were performed at a SIS18 extraction line. The measured intensity values were compared with those of a Secondary Electron Monitor (SEM). Furthermore, the spill-structure of a slowly extracted beam was measured and analyzed, investigating its improvement due to bunching during the slow-extraction process. Due to the extreme sensitivity of the superconducting sensor, the determined intensity values as well as the adjustment of the system for optimal performance are strongly influenced by the numerous noise sources of the accelerators environment. For this reason, detailed studies of different effects caused by noise have been carried out, which are presented together with proposals to reduce them. Similarly, studies were performed to increase the dynamic range and overcome slew rate limitations, the results of which are illustrated and discussed as well. By combining the various optimizations and characterizations of the GSI CCC prototype with the experiences made during beam operation, criteria for a more efficient CCC System could be worked out, which are presented in this work. The details of this new design are worked out with respect to the

  14. A Superconducting Magnet UCN Trap for Precise Neutron Lifetime Measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Picker, R; Altarev, I; Bröcker, J; Gutsmiedl, E; Hartmann, J; Müller, A; Paul, S; Schott, W; Trinks, U; Zimmer, O

    2005-01-01

    Finite-element methods along with Monte Carlo simulations were used to design a magnetic storage device for ultracold neutrons (UCN) to measure their lifetime. A setup was determined which should make it possible to confine UCN with negligible losses and detect the protons emerging from β-decay with high efficiency: stacked superconducting solenoids create the magnetic storage field, an electrostatic extraction field inside the storage volume assures high proton collection efficiency. Alongside with the optimization of the magnetic and electrostatic design, the properties of the trap were investigated through extensive Monte Carlo simulation.

  15. Precision Measurement and Calibration. Volume 1. Statistical Concepts and Procedures

    Science.gov (United States)

    1969-02-01

    1950. When Both Variables are Subject to 11. R. D. Stiehler, G. G. Richey, and J. Man- Error," Biometrics , Vol. 5, No. 3, pp. del, "Measurement of...34Analysis of extreme values," Ann. Math. Stat., 21 (1950), 488-506. 3. W. J. DixoN, "Processing data for outliers," Biometrics , 9 (1953), 74-89. 4...standards written by John Perry-" and Figure 1-- hematic Riepesentatitl of Hierarhies ml lftarRalph W. Smith ( ’. Staldards Laberatorles Using

  16. Updated precision measurement of the average lifetime of B hadrons

    CERN Document Server

    Abreu, P; Adye, T; Agasi, E; Ajinenko, I; Aleksan, Roy; Alekseev, G D; Alemany, R; Allport, P P; Almehed, S; Amaldi, Ugo; Amato, S; Andreazza, A; Andrieux, M L; Antilogus, P; Apel, W D; Arnoud, Y; Åsman, B; Augustin, J E; Augustinus, A; Baillon, Paul; Bambade, P; Barate, R; Barbi, M S; Barbiellini, Guido; Bardin, Dimitri Yuri; Baroncelli, A; Bärring, O; Barrio, J A; Bartl, Walter; Bates, M J; Battaglia, Marco; Baubillier, M; Baudot, J; Becks, K H; Begalli, M; Beillière, P; Belokopytov, Yu A; Benvenuti, Alberto C; Berggren, M; Bertrand, D; Bianchi, F; Bigi, M; Bilenky, S M; Billoir, P; Bloch, D; Blume, M; Blyth, S; Bolognese, T; Bonesini, M; Bonivento, W; Booth, P S L; Borisov, G; Bosio, C; Bosworth, S; Botner, O; Boudinov, E; Bouquet, B; Bourdarios, C; Bowcock, T J V; Bozzo, M; Branchini, P; Brand, K D; Brenke, T; Brenner, R A; Bricman, C; Brillault, L; Brown, R C A; Brückman, P; Brunet, J M; Bugge, L; Buran, T; Burgsmüller, T; Buschmann, P; Buys, A; Cabrera, S; Caccia, M; Calvi, M; Camacho-Rozas, A J; Camporesi, T; Canale, V; Canepa, M; Cankocak, K; Cao, F; Carena, F; Carroll, L; Caso, Carlo; Castillo-Gimenez, M V; Cattai, A; Cavallo, F R; Cerrito, L; Chabaud, V; Charpentier, P; Chaussard, L; Chauveau, J; Checchia, P; Chelkov, G A; Chen, M; Chierici, R; Chliapnikov, P V; Chochula, P; Chorowicz, V; Chudoba, J; Cindro, V; Collins, P; Contreras, J L; Contri, R; Cortina, E; Cosme, G; Cossutti, F; Crawley, H B; Crennell, D J; Crosetti, G; Cuevas-Maestro, J; Czellar, S; Dahl-Jensen, Erik; Dahm, J; D'Almagne, B; Dam, M; Damgaard, G; Dauncey, P D; Davenport, Martyn; Da Silva, W; Defoix, C; Deghorain, A; Della Ricca, G; Delpierre, P A; Demaria, N; De Angelis, A; de Boer, Wim; De Brabandere, S; De Clercq, C; La Vaissière, C de; De Lotto, B; De Min, A; De Paula, L S; De Saint-Jean, C; Dijkstra, H; Di Ciaccio, Lucia; Djama, F; Dolbeau, J; Dönszelmann, M; Doroba, K; Dracos, M; Drees, J; Drees, K A; Dris, M; Dufour, Y; Edsall, D M; Ehret, R; Eigen, G; Ekelöf, T J C; Ekspong, Gösta; Elsing, M; Engel, J P; Ershaidat, N; Erzen, B; Espirito-Santo, M C; Falk, E; Fassouliotis, D; Feindt, Michael; Fenyuk, A; Ferrer, A; Filippas-Tassos, A; Firestone, A; Fischer, P A; Föth, H; Fokitis, E; Fontanelli, F; Formenti, F; Franek, B J; Frenkiel, P; Fries, D E C; Frodesen, A G; Frühwirth, R; Fulda-Quenzer, F; Fuster, J A; Galloni, A; Gamba, D; Gandelman, M; García, C; García, J; Gaspar, C; Gasparini, U; Gavillet, P; Gazis, E N; Gelé, D; Gerber, J P; Gibbs, M; Gokieli, R; Golob, B; Gopal, Gian P; Gorn, L; Górski, M; Guz, Yu; Gracco, Valerio; Graziani, E; Grosdidier, G; Grzelak, K; Gumenyuk, S A; Gunnarsson, P; Günther, M; Guy, J; Hahn, F; Hahn, S; Hajduk, Z; Hallgren, A; Hamacher, K; Hao, W; Harris, F J; Hedberg, V; Henriques, R P; Hernández, J J; Herquet, P; Herr, H; Hessing, T L; Higón, E; Hilke, Hans Jürgen; Hill, T S; Holmgren, S O; Holt, P J; Holthuizen, D J; Hoorelbeke, S; Houlden, M A; Hrubec, Josef; Huet, K; Hultqvist, K; Jackson, J N; Jacobsson, R; Jalocha, P; Janik, R; Jarlskog, C; Jarlskog, G; Jarry, P; Jean-Marie, B; Johansson, E K; Jönsson, L B; Jönsson, P E; Joram, Christian; Juillot, P; Kaiser, M; Kapusta, F; Karafasoulis, K; Karlsson, M; Karvelas, E; Katsanevas, S; Katsoufis, E C; Keränen, R; Khokhlov, Yu A; Khomenko, B A; Khovanskii, N N; King, B J; Kjaer, N J; Klein, H; Klovning, A; Kluit, P M; Köne, B; Kokkinias, P; Koratzinos, M; Korcyl, K; Kourkoumelis, C; Kuznetsov, O; Kramer, P H; Krammer, Manfred; Kreuter, C; Kronkvist, I J; Krumshtein, Z; Krupinski, W; Kubinec, P; Kucewicz, W; Kurvinen, K L; Lacasta, C; Laktineh, I; Lamblot, S; Lamsa, J; Lanceri, L; Lane, D W; Langefeld, P; Last, I; Laugier, J P; Lauhakangas, R; Leder, Gerhard; Ledroit, F; Lefébure, V; Legan, C K; Leitner, R; Lemoigne, Y; Lemonne, J; Lenzen, Georg; Lepeltier, V; Lesiak, T; Liko, D; Lindner, R; Lipniacka, A; Lippi, I; Lörstad, B; Loken, J G; López, J M; Loukas, D; Lutz, P; Lyons, L; MacNaughton, J N; Maehlum, G; Maio, A; Malychev, V; Mandl, F; Marco, J; Marco, R P; Maréchal, B; Margoni, M; Marin, J C; Mariotti, C; Markou, A; Maron, T; Martínez-Rivero, C; Martínez-Vidal, F; Martí i García, S; Masik, J; Matorras, F; Matteuzzi, C; Matthiae, Giorgio; Mazzucato, M; McCubbin, M L; McKay, R; McNulty, R; Medbo, J; Merk, M; Meroni, C; Meyer, S; Meyer, W T; Michelotto, M; Migliore, E; Mirabito, L; Mitaroff, Winfried A; Mjörnmark, U; Moa, T; Møller, R; Mönig, K; Monge, M R; Morettini, P; Müller, H; Mundim, L M; Murray, W J; Muryn, B; Myatt, Gerald; Naraghi, F; Navarria, Francesco Luigi; Navas, S; Nawrocki, K; Negri, P; Neumann, W; Nicolaidou, R; Nielsen, B S; Nieuwenhuizen, M; Nikolaenko, V; Niss, P; Nomerotski, A; Normand, Ainsley; Novák, M; Oberschulte-Beckmann, W; Obraztsov, V F; Olshevskii, A G; Onofre, A; Orava, Risto; Österberg, K; Ouraou, A; Paganini, P; Paganoni, M; Pagès, P; Palka, H; Papadopoulou, T D; Papageorgiou, K; Pape, L; Parkes, C; Parodi, F; Passeri, A; Pegoraro, M; Peralta, L; Pernegger, H; Pernicka, Manfred; Perrotta, A; Petridou, C; Petrolini, A; Petrovykh, M; Phillips, H T; Piana, G; Pierre, F; Pimenta, M; Pindo, M; Plaszczynski, S; Podobrin, O; Pol, M E; Polok, G; Poropat, P; Pozdnyakov, V; Prest, M; Privitera, P; Pukhaeva, N; Pullia, Antonio; Radojicic, D; Ragazzi, S; Rahmani, H; Ratoff, P N; Read, A L; Reale, M; Rebecchi, P; Redaelli, N G; Regler, Meinhard; Reid, D; Renton, P B; Resvanis, L K; Richard, F; Richardson, J; Rídky, J; Rinaudo, G; Ripp, I; Romero, A; Roncagliolo, I; Ronchese, P; Ronjin, V M; Roos, L; Rosenberg, E I; Rosso, E; Roudeau, Patrick; Rovelli, T; Rückstuhl, W; Ruhlmann-Kleider, V; Ruiz, A; Rybicki, K; Saarikko, H; Sacquin, Yu; Sadovskii, A; Sajot, G; Salt, J; Sánchez, J; Sannino, M; Schimmelpfennig, M; Schneider, H; Schwickerath, U; Schyns, M A E; Sciolla, G; Scuri, F; Seager, P; Sedykh, Yu; Segar, A M; Seitz, A; Sekulin, R L; Shellard, R C; Siccama, I; Siegrist, P; Simonetti, S; Simonetto, F; Sissakian, A N; Sitár, B; Skaali, T B; Smadja, G; Smirnov, N; Smirnova, O G; Smith, G R; Solovyanov, O; Sosnowski, R; Souza-Santos, D; Spassoff, Tz; Spiriti, E; Sponholz, P; Squarcia, S; Stanescu, C; Stapnes, Steinar; Stavitski, I; Stichelbaut, F; Stocchi, A; Strauss, J; Strub, R; Stugu, B; Szczekowski, M; Szeptycka, M; Tabarelli de Fatis, T; Tavernet, J P; Chikilev, O G; Tilquin, A; Timmermans, J; Tkatchev, L G; Todorov, T; Toet, D Z; Tomaradze, A G; Tomé, B; Tonazzo, A; Tortora, L; Tranströmer, G; Treille, D; Trischuk, W; Tristram, G; Trombini, A; Troncon, C; Tsirou, A L; Turluer, M L; Tyapkin, I A; Tyndel, M; Tzamarias, S; Überschär, B; Ullaland, O; Uvarov, V; Valenti, G; Vallazza, E; Van der Velde, C; van Apeldoorn, G W; van Dam, P; Van Doninck, W K; Van Eldik, J; Vassilopoulos, N; Vegni, G; Ventura, L; Venus, W A; Verbeure, F; Verlato, M; Vertogradov, L S; Vilanova, D; Vincent, P; Vitale, L; Vlasov, E; Vodopyanov, A S; Vrba, V; Wahlen, H; Walck, C; Weierstall, M; Weilhammer, Peter; Weiser, C; Wetherell, Alan M; Wicke, D; Wickens, J H; Wielers, M; Wilkinson, G R; Williams, W S C; Winter, M; Witek, M; Woschnagg, K; Yip, K; Yushchenko, O P; Zach, F; Zaitsev, A; Zalewska-Bak, A; Zalewski, Piotr; Zavrtanik, D; Zevgolatakos, E; Zimin, N I; Zito, M; Zontar, D; Zuberi, R; Zucchelli, G C; Zumerle, G; Belokopytov, Yu; Charpentier, Ph; Gavillet, Ph; Gouz, Yu; Jarlskog, Ch; Khokhlov, Yu; Papadopoulou, Th D

    1996-01-01

    The measurement of the average lifetime of B hadrons using inclusively reconstructed secondary vertices has been updated using both an improved processing of previous data and additional statistics from new data. This has reduced the statistical and systematic uncertainties and gives \\tau_{\\mathrm{B}} = 1.582 \\pm 0.011\\ \\mathrm{(stat.)} \\pm 0.027\\ \\mathrm{(syst.)}\\ \\mathrm{ps.} Combining this result with the previous result based on charged particle impact parameter distributions yields \\tau_{\\mathrm{B}} = 1.575 \\pm 0.010\\ \\mathrm{(stat.)} \\pm 0.026\\ \\mathrm{(syst.)}\\ \\mathrm{ps.}

  17. Precision measurement of the $\\Lambda_b^0$ baryon lifetime

    CERN Document Server

    INSPIRE-00258707; Adeva, B; Adinolfi, M; Adrover, C; Affolder, A; Ajaltouni, Z; Albrecht, J; Alessio, F; Alexander, M; Ali, S; Alkhazov, G; Alvarez Cartelle, P; Alves Jr, A A; Amato, S; Amerio, S; Amhis, Y; Anderlini, L; Anderson, J; Andreassen, R; Andrews, J E; Appleby, R B; Aquines Gutierrez, O; Archilli, F; Artamonov, A; Artuso, M; Aslanides, E; Auriemma, G; Baalouch, M; Bachmann, S; Back, J J; Baesso, C; Balagura, V; Baldini, W; Barlow, R J; Barschel, C; Barsuk, S; Barter, W; Bauer, Th; Bay, A; Beddow, J; Bedeschi, F; Bediaga, I; Belogurov, S; Belous, K; Belyaev, I; Ben-Haim, E; Bencivenni, G; Benson, S; Benton, J; Berezhnoy, A; Bernet, R; Bettler, M -O; van Beuzekom, M; Bien, A; Bifani, S; Bird, T; Bizzeti, A; Bjørnstad, P M; Blake, T; Blanc, F; Blouw, J; Blusk, S; Bocci, V; Bondar, A; Bondar, N; Bonivento, W; Borghi, S; Borgia, A; Bowcock, T J V; Bowen, E; Bozzi, C; Brambach, T; van den Brand, J; Bressieux, J; Brett, D; Britsch, M; Britton, T; Brook, N H; Brown, H; Burducea, I; Bursche, A; Busetto, G; Buytaert, J; Cadeddu, S; Callot, O; Calvi, M; Calvo Gomez, M; Camboni, A; Campana, P; Campora Perez, D; Carbone, A; Carboni, G; Cardinale, R; Cardini, A; Carranza-Mejia, H; Carson, L; Carvalho Akiba, K; Casse, G; Castillo Garcia, L; Cattaneo, M; Cauet, Ch; Cenci, R; Charles, M; Charpentier, Ph; Chen, P; Chiapolini, N; Chrzaszcz, M; Ciba, K; Cid Vidal, X; Ciezarek, G; Clarke, P E L; Clemencic, M; Cliff, H V; Closier, J; Coca, C; Coco, V; Cogan, J; Cogneras, E; Collins, P; Comerma-Montells, A; Contu, A; Cook, A; Coombes, M; Coquereau, S; Corti, G; Couturier, B; Cowan, G A; Craik, D C; Cunliffe, S; Currie, R; D'Ambrosio, C; David, P; David, P N Y; Davis, A; De Bonis, I; De Bruyn, K; De Capua, S; De Cian, M; De Miranda, J M; De Paula, L; De Silva, W; De Simone, P; Decamp, D; Deckenhoff, M; Del Buono, L; Déléage, N; Derkach, D; Deschamps, O; Dettori, F; Di Canto, A; Dijkstra, H; Dogaru, M; Donleavy, S; Dordei, F; Dosil Suárez, A; Dossett, D; Dovbnya, A; Dupertuis, F; Durante, P; Dzhelyadin, R; Dziurda, A; Dzyuba, A; Easo, S; Egede, U; Egorychev, V; Eidelman, S; van Eijk, D; Eisenhardt, S; Eitschberger, U; Ekelhof, R; Eklund, L; El Rifai, I; Elsasser, Ch; Falabella, A; Färber, C; Fardell, G; Farinelli, C; Farry, S; Ferguson, D; Fernandez Albor, V; Ferreira Rodrigues, F; Ferro-Luzzi, M; Filippov, S; Fiore, M; Fitzpatrick, C; Fontana, M; Fontanelli, F; Forty, R; Francisco, O; Frank, M; Frei, C; Frosini, M; Furcas, S; Furfaro, E; Gallas Torreira, A; Galli, D; Gandelman, M; Gandini, P; Gao, Y; Garofoli, J; Garosi, P; Garra Tico, J; Garrido, L; Gaspar, C; Gauld, R; Gersabeck, E; Gersabeck, M; Gershon, T; Ghez, Ph; Gibson, V; Giubega, L; Gligorov, V V; Göbel, C; Golubkov, D; Golutvin, A; Gomes, A; Gorbounov, P; Gordon, H; Grabalosa Gándara, M; Graciani Diaz, R; Granado Cardoso, L A; Graugés, E; Graziani, G; Grecu, A; Greening, E; Gregson, S; Griffith, P; Grünberg, O; Gui, B; Gushchin, E; Guz, Yu; Gys, T; Hadjivasiliou, C; Haefeli, G; Haen, C; Haines, S C; Hall, S; Hamilton, B; Hampson, T; Hansmann-Menzemer, S; Harnew, N; Harnew, S T; Harrison, J; Hartmann, T; He, J; Head, T; Heijne, V; Hennessy, K; Henrard, P; Hernando Morata, J A; van Herwijnen, E; Hicheur, A; Hicks, E; Hill, D; Hoballah, M; Hombach, C; Hopchev, P; Hulsbergen, W; Hunt, P; Huse, T; Hussain, N; Hutchcroft, D; Hynds, D; Iakovenko, V; Idzik, M; Ilten, P; Jacobsson, R; Jaeger, A; Jans, E; Jaton, P; Jawahery, A; Jing, F; John, M; Johnson, D; Jones, C R; Joram, C; Jost, B; Kaballo, M; Kandybei, S; Kanso, W; Karacson, M; Karbach, T M; Kenyon, I R; Ketel, T; Keune, A; Khanji, B; Kochebina, O; Komarov, I; Koopman, R F; Koppenburg, P; Korolev, M; Kozlinskiy, A; Kravchuk, L; Kreplin, K; Kreps, M; Krocker, G; Krokovny, P; Kruse, F; Kucharczyk, M; Kudryavtsev, V; Kvaratskheliya, T; La Thi, V N; Lacarrere, D; Lafferty, G; Lai, A; Lambert, D; Lambert, R W; Lanciotti, E; Lanfranchi, G; Langenbruch, C; Latham, T; Lazzeroni, C; Le Gac, R; van Leerdam, J; Lees, J -P; Lefèvre, R; Leflat, A; Lefrançois, J; Leo, S; Leroy, O; Lesiak, T; Leverington, B; Li, Y; Li Gioi, L; Liles, M; Lindner, R; Linn, C; Liu, B; Liu, G; Lohn, S; Longstaff, I; Lopes, J H; Lopez-March, N; Lu, H; Lucchesi, D; Luisier, J; Luo, H; Machefert, F; Machikhiliyan, I V; Maciuc, F; Maev, O; Malde, S; Manca, G; Mancinelli, G; Maratas, J; Marconi, U; Marino, P; Märki, R; Marks, J; Martellotti, G; Martens, A; Martín Sánchez, A; Martinelli, M; Martinez Santos, D; Martins Tostes, D; Massafferri, A; Matev, R; Mathe, Z; Matteuzzi, C; Maurice, E; Mazurov, A; Mc Skelly, B; McCarthy, J; McNab, A; McNulty, R; Meadows, B; Meier, F; Meissner, M; Merk, M; Milanes, D A; Minard, M -N; Molina Rodriguez, J; Monteil, S; Moran, D; Morawski, P; Mordà, A; Morello, M J; Mountain, R; Mous, I; Muheim, F; Müller, K; Muresan, R; Muryn, B; Muster, B; Naik, P; Nakada, T; Nandakumar, R; Nasteva, I; Needham, M; Neubert, S; Neufeld, N; Nguyen, A D; Nguyen, T D; Nguyen-Mau, C; Nicol, M; Niess, V; Niet, R; Nikitin, N; Nikodem, T; Nomerotski, A; Novoselov, A; Oblakowska-Mucha, A; Obraztsov, V; Oggero, S; Ogilvy, S; Okhrimenko, O; Oldeman, R; Orlandea, M; Otalora Goicochea, J M; Owen, P; Oyanguren, A; Pal, B K; Palano, A; Palczewski, T; Palutan, M; Panman, J; Papanestis, A; Pappagallo, M; Parkes, C; Parkinson, C J; Passaleva, G; Patel, G D; Patel, M; Patrick, G N; Patrignani, C; Pavel-Nicorescu, C; Pazos Alvarez, A; Pellegrino, A; Penso, G; Pepe Altarelli, M; Perazzini, S; Perez Trigo, E; Pérez-Calero Yzquierdo, A; Perret, P; Perrin-Terrin, M; Pescatore, L; Pesen, E; Pessina, G; Petridis, K; Petrolini, A; Phan, A; Picatoste Olloqui, E; Pietrzyk, B; Pilař, T; Pinci, D; Playfer, S; Plo Casasus, M; Polci, F; Polok, G; Poluektov, A; Polycarpo, E; Popov, A; Popov, D; Popovici, B; Potterat, C; Powell, A; Prisciandaro, J; Pritchard, A; Prouve, C; Pugatch, V; Puig Navarro, A; Punzi, G; Qian, W; Rademacker, J H; Rakotomiaramanana, B; Rangel, M S; Raniuk, I; Rauschmayr, N; Raven, G; Redford, S; Reid, M M; dos Reis, A C; Ricciardi, S; Richards, A; Rinnert, K; Rives Molina, V; Roa Romero, D A; Robbe, P; Roberts, D A; Rodrigues, E; Rodriguez Perez, P; Roiser, S; Romanovsky, V; Romero Vidal, A; Rouvinet, J; Ruf, T; Ruffini, F; Ruiz, H; Ruiz Valls, P; Sabatino, G; Saborido Silva, J J; Sagidova, N; Sail, P; Saitta, B; Salustino Guimaraes, V; Sanmartin Sedes, B; Sannino, M; Santacesaria, R; Santamarina Rios, C; Santovetti, E; Sapunov, M; Sarti, A; Satriano, C; Satta, A; Savrie, M; Savrina, D; Schaack, P; Schiller, M; Schindler, H; Schlupp, M; Schmelling, M; Schmidt, B; Schneider, O; Schopper, A; Schune, M -H; Schwemmer, R; Sciascia, B; Sciubba, A; Seco, M; Semennikov, A; Senderowska, K; Sepp, I; Serra, N; Serrano, J; Seyfert, P; Shapkin, M; Shapoval, I; Shatalov, P; Shcheglov, Y; Shears, T; Shekhtman, L; Shevchenko, O; Shevchenko, V; Shires, A; Silva Coutinho, R; Sirendi, M; Skwarnicki, T; Smith, N A; Smith, E; Smith, J; Smith, M; Sokoloff, M D; Soler, F J P; Soomro, F; Souza, D; Souza De Paula, B; Spaan, B; Sparkes, A; Spradlin, P; Stagni, F; Stahl, S; Steinkamp, O; Stevenson, S; Stoica, S; Stone, S; Storaci, B; Straticiuc, M; Straumann, U; Subbiah, V K; Sun, L; Swientek, S; Syropoulos, V; Szczekowski, M; Szczypka, P; Szumlak, T; T'Jampens, S; Teklishyn, M; Teodorescu, E; Teubert, F; Thomas, C; Thomas, E; van Tilburg, J; Tisserand, V; Tobin, M; Tolk, S; Tonelli, D; Topp-Joergensen, S; Torr, N; Tournefier, E; Tourneur, S; Tran, M T; Tresch, M; Tsaregorodtsev, A; Tsopelas, P; Tuning, N; Ubeda Garcia, M; Ukleja, A; Urner, D; Ustyuzhanin, A; Uwer, U; Vagnoni, V; Valenti, G; Vallier, A; Van Dijk, M; Vazquez Gomez, R; Vazquez Regueiro, P; Vázquez Sierra, C; Vecchi, S; Velthuis, J J; Veltri, M; Veneziano, G; Vesterinen, M; Viaud, B; Vieira, D; Vilasis-Cardona, X; Vollhardt, A; Volyanskyy, D; Voong, D; Vorobyev, A; Vorobyev, V; Voß, C; Voss, H; Waldi, R; Wallace, C; Wallace, R; Wandernoth, S; Wang, J; Ward, D R; Watson, N K; Webber, A D; Websdale, D; Whitehead, M; Wicht, J; Wiechczynski, J; Wiedner, D; Wiggers, L; Wilkinson, G; Williams, M P; Williams, M; Wilson, F F; Wimberley, J; Wishahi, J; Wislicki, W; Witek, M; Wotton, S A; Wright, S; Wu, S; Wyllie, K; Xie, Y; Xing, Z; Yang, Z; Young, R; Yuan, X; Yushchenko, O; Zangoli, M; Zavertyaev, M; Zhang, F; Zhang, L; Zhang, W C; Zhang, Y; Zhelezov, A; Zhokhov, A; Zhong, L; Zvyagin, A

    2013-01-01

    The ratio of the $\\Lambda_b^0$ baryon lifetime to that of the $\\overline{B}^0$ meson is measured using 1.0 fb$^{-1}$ of integrated luminosity in 7 TeV center-of-mass energy $pp$ collisions at the LHC. The $\\Lambda_b^0$ baryon is observed for the first time in the decay mode $\\Lambda_b^0 \\to J/\\psi p K^-$, while the $\\overline{B}^0$ meson decay used is the well known $\\overline{B}^0 \\to J/\\psi \\pi^+ K^-$ mode, where the $\\pi^+K^-$ mass is consistent with that of the $\\bar{K}^{*0}(892)$ meson. The ratio of lifetimes is measured to be $0.976\\pm0.012\\pm0.006$, in agreement with theoretical expectations based on the heavy quark expansion. Using previous determinations of the $\\overline{B}^0$ meson lifetime, the $\\Lambda_b^0$ lifetime is found to be $1.482 \\pm 0.018 \\pm 0.012$ ps. In both cases the first uncertainty is statistical and the second systematic.

  18. Precision measurement of the Λb(0) baryon lifetime.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aaij, R; Adeva, B; Adinolfi, M; Adrover, C; Affolder, A; Ajaltouni, Z; Albrecht, J; Alessio, F; Alexander, M; Ali, S; Alkhazov, G; Alvarez Cartelle, P; Alves, A A; Amato, S; Amerio, S; Amhis, Y; Anderlini, L; Anderson, J; Andreassen, R; Andrews, J E; Appleby, R B; Aquines Gutierrez, O; Archilli, F; Artamonov, A; Artuso, M; Aslanides, E; Auriemma, G; Baalouch, M; Bachmann, S; Back, J J; Baesso, C; Balagura, V; Baldini, W; Barlow, R J; Barschel, C; Barsuk, S; Barter, W; Bauer, Th; Bay, A; Beddow, J; Bedeschi, F; Bediaga, I; Belogurov, S; Belous, K; Belyaev, I; Ben-Haim, E; Bencivenni, G; Benson, S; Benton, J; Berezhnoy, A; Bernet, R; Bettler, M-O; van Beuzekom, M; Bien, A; Bifani, S; Bird, T; Bizzeti, A; Bjørnstad, P M; Blake, T; Blanc, F; Blouw, J; Blusk, S; Bocci, V; Bondar, A; Bondar, N; Bonivento, W; Borghi, S; Borgia, A; Bowcock, T J V; Bowen, E; Bozzi, C; Brambach, T; van den Brand, J; Bressieux, J; Brett, D; Britsch, M; Britton, T; Brook, N H; Brown, H; Burducea, I; Bursche, A; Busetto, G; Buytaert, J; Cadeddu, S; Callot, O; Calvi, M; Calvo Gomez, M; Camboni, A; Campana, P; Campora Perez, D; Carbone, A; Carboni, G; Cardinale, R; Cardini, A; Carranza-Mejia, H; Carson, L; Carvalho Akiba, K; Casse, G; Castillo Garcia, L; Cattaneo, M; Cauet, Ch; Cenci, R; Charles, M; Charpentier, Ph; Chen, P; Chiapolini, N; Chrzaszcz, M; Ciba, K; Cid Vidal, X; Ciezarek, G; Clarke, P E L; Clemencic, M; Cliff, H V; Closier, J; Coca, C; Coco, V; Cogan, J; Cogneras, E; Collins, P; Comerma-Montells, A; Contu, A; Cook, A; Coombes, M; Coquereau, S; Corti, G; Couturier, B; Cowan, G A; Craik, D C; Cunliffe, S; Currie, R; D'Ambrosio, C; David, P; David, P N Y; Davis, A; De Bonis, I; De Bruyn, K; De Capua, S; De Cian, M; De Miranda, J M; De Paula, L; De Silva, W; De Simone, P; Decamp, D; Deckenhoff, M; Del Buono, L; Déléage, N; Derkach, D; Deschamps, O; Dettori, F; Di Canto, A; Dijkstra, H; Dogaru, M; Donleavy, S; Dordei, F; Dosil Suárez, A; Dossett, D; Dovbnya, A; Dupertuis, F; Durante, P; Dzhelyadin, R; Dziurda, A; Dzyuba, A; Easo, S; Egede, U; Egorychev, V; Eidelman, S; van Eijk, D; Eisenhardt, S; Eitschberger, U; Ekelhof, R; Eklund, L; El Rifai, I; Elsasser, Ch; Falabella, A; Färber, C; Fardell, G; Farinelli, C; Farry, S; Ferguson, D; Fernandez Albor, V; Ferreira Rodrigues, F; Ferro-Luzzi, M; Filippov, S; Fiore, M; Fitzpatrick, C; Fontana, M; Fontanelli, F; Forty, R; Francisco, O; Frank, M; Frei, C; Frosini, M; Furcas, S; Furfaro, E; Gallas Torreira, A; Galli, D; Gandelman, M; Gandini, P; Gao, Y; Garofoli, J; Garosi, P; Garra Tico, J; Garrido, L; Gaspar, C; Gauld, R; Gersabeck, E; Gersabeck, M; Gershon, T; Ghez, Ph; Gibson, V; Giubega, L; Gligorov, V V; Göbel, C; Golubkov, D; Golutvin, A; Gomes, A; Gorbounov, P; Gordon, H; Grabalosa Gándara, M; Graciani Diaz, R; Granado Cardoso, L A; Graugés, E; Graziani, G; Grecu, A; Greening, E; Gregson, S; Griffith, P; Grünberg, O; Gui, B; Gushchin, E; Guz, Yu; Gys, T; Hadjivasiliou, C; Haefeli, G; Haen, C; Haines, S C; Hall, S; Hamilton, B; Hampson, T; Hansmann-Menzemer, S; Harnew, N; Harnew, S T; Harrison, J; Hartmann, T; He, J; Head, T; Heijne, V; Hennessy, K; Henrard, P; Hernando Morata, J A; van Herwijnen, E; Hicheur, A; Hicks, E; Hill, D; Hoballah, M; Hombach, C; Hopchev, P; Hulsbergen, W; Hunt, P; Huse, T; Hussain, N; Hutchcroft, D; Hynds, D; Iakovenko, V; Idzik, M; Ilten, P; Jacobsson, R; Jaeger, A; Jans, E; Jaton, P; Jawahery, A; Jing, F; John, M; Johnson, D; Jones, C R; Joram, C; Jost, B; Kaballo, M; Kandybei, S; Kanso, W; Karacson, M; Karbach, T M; Kenyon, I R; Ketel, T; Keune, A; Khanji, B; Kochebina, O; Komarov, I; Koopman, R F; Koppenburg, P; Korolev, M; Kozlinskiy, A; Kravchuk, L; Kreplin, K; Kreps, M; Krocker, G; Krokovny, P; Kruse, F; Kucharczyk, M; Kudryavtsev, V; Kvaratskheliya, T; La Thi, V N; Lacarrere, D; Lafferty, G; Lai, A; Lambert, D; Lambert, R W; Lanciotti, E; Lanfranchi, G; Langenbruch, C; Latham, T; Lazzeroni, C; Le Gac, R; van Leerdam, J; Lees, J-P; Lefèvre, R; Leflat, A; Lefrançois, J; Leo, S; Leroy, O; Lesiak, T; Leverington, B; Li, Y; Li Gioi, L; Liles, M; Lindner, R; Linn, C; Liu, B; Liu, G; Lohn, S; Longstaff, I; Lopes, J H; Lopez-March, N; Lu, H; Lucchesi, D; Luisier, J; Luo, H; Machefert, F; Machikhiliyan, I V; Maciuc, F; Maev, O; Malde, S; Manca, G; Mancinelli, G; Maratas, J; Marconi, U; Marino, P; Märki, R; Marks, J; Martellotti, G; Martens, A; Martín Sánchez, A; Martinelli, M; Martinez Santos, D; Martins Tostes, D; Massafferri, A; Matev, R; Mathe, Z; Matteuzzi, C; Maurice, E; Mazurov, A; Mc Skelly, B; McCarthy, J; McNab, A; McNulty, R; Meadows, B; Meier, F; Meissner, M; Merk, M; Milanes, D A; Minard, M-N; Molina Rodriguez, J; Monteil, S; Moran, D; Morawski, P; Mordà, A; Morello, M J; Mountain, R; Mous, I; Muheim, F; Müller, K; Muresan, R; Muryn, B; Muster, B; Naik, P; Nakada, T; Nandakumar, R; Nasteva, I; Needham, M; Neubert, S; Neufeld, N; Nguyen, A D; Nguyen, T D; Nguyen-Mau, C; Nicol, M; Niess, V; Niet, R; Nikitin, N; Nikodem, T; Nomerotski, A; Novoselov, A; Oblakowska-Mucha, A; Obraztsov, V; Oggero, S; Ogilvy, S; Okhrimenko, O; Oldeman, R; Orlandea, M; Otalora Goicochea, J M; Owen, P; Oyanguren, A; Pal, B K; Palano, A; Palczewski, T; Palutan, M; Panman, J; Papanestis, A; Pappagallo, M; Parkes, C; Parkinson, C J; Passaleva, G; Patel, G D; Patel, M; Patrick, G N; Patrignani, C; Pavel-Nicorescu, C; Pazos Alvarez, A; Pellegrino, A; Penso, G; Pepe Altarelli, M; Perazzini, S; Perez Trigo, E; Pérez-Calero Yzquierdo, A; Perret, P; Perrin-Terrin, M; Pescatore, L; Pesen, E; Pessina, G; Petridis, K; Petrolini, A; Phan, A; Picatoste Olloqui, E; Pietrzyk, B; Pilař, T; Pinci, D; Playfer, S; Plo Casasus, M; Polci, F; Polok, G; Poluektov, A; Polycarpo, E; Popov, A; Popov, D; Popovici, B; Potterat, C; Powell, A; Prisciandaro, J; Pritchard, A; Prouve, C; Pugatch, V; Puig Navarro, A; Punzi, G; Qian, W; Rademacker, J H; Rakotomiaramanana, B; Rangel, M S; Raniuk, I; Rauschmayr, N; Raven, G; Redford, S; Reid, M M; dos Reis, A C; Ricciardi, S; Richards, A; Rinnert, K; Rives Molina, V; Roa Romero, D A; Robbe, P; Roberts, D A; Rodrigues, E; Rodriguez Perez, P; Roiser, S; Romanovsky, V; Romero Vidal, A; Rouvinet, J; Ruf, T; Ruffini, F; Ruiz, H; Ruiz Valls, P; Sabatino, G; Saborido Silva, J J; Sagidova, N; Sail, P; Saitta, B; Salustino Guimaraes, V; Sanmartin Sedes, B; Sannino, M; Santacesaria, R; Santamarina Rios, C; Santovetti, E; Sapunov, M; Sarti, A; Satriano, C; Satta, A; Savrie, M; Savrina, D; Schaack, P; Schiller, M; Schindler, H; Schlupp, M; Schmelling, M; Schmidt, B; Schneider, O; Schopper, A; Schune, M-H; Schwemmer, R; Sciascia, B; Sciubba, A; Seco, M; Semennikov, A; Senderowska, K; Sepp, I; Serra, N; Serrano, J; Seyfert, P; Shapkin, M; Shapoval, I; Shatalov, P; Shcheglov, Y; Shears, T; Shekhtman, L; Shevchenko, O; Shevchenko, V; Shires, A; Silva Coutinho, R; Sirendi, M; Skwarnicki, T; Smith, N A; Smith, E; Smith, J; Smith, M; Sokoloff, M D; Soler, F J P; Soomro, F; Souza, D; Souza De Paula, B; Spaan, B; Sparkes, A; Spradlin, P; Stagni, F; Stahl, S; Steinkamp, O; Stevenson, S; Stoica, S; Stone, S; Storaci, B; Straticiuc, M; Straumann, U; Subbiah, V K; Sun, L; Swientek, S; Syropoulos, V; Szczekowski, M; Szczypka, P; Szumlak, T; T'Jampens, S; Teklishyn, M; Teodorescu, E; Teubert, F; Thomas, C; Thomas, E; van Tilburg, J; Tisserand, V; Tobin, M; Tolk, S; Tonelli, D; Topp-Joergensen, S; Torr, N; Tournefier, E; Tourneur, S; Tran, M T; Tresch, M; Tsaregorodtsev, A; Tsopelas, P; Tuning, N; Ubeda Garcia, M; Ukleja, A; Urner, D; Ustyuzhanin, A; Uwer, U; Vagnoni, V; Valenti, G; Vallier, A; Van Dijk, M; Vazquez Gomez, R; Vazquez Regueiro, P; Vázquez Sierra, C; Vecchi, S; Velthuis, J J; Veltri, M; Veneziano, G; Vesterinen, M; Viaud, B; Vieira, D; Vilasis-Cardona, X; Vollhardt, A; Volyanskyy, D; Voong, D; Vorobyev, A; Vorobyev, V; Voß, C; Voss, H; Waldi, R; Wallace, C; Wallace, R; Wandernoth, S; Wang, J; Ward, D R; Watson, N K; Webber, A D; Websdale, D; Whitehead, M; Wicht, J; Wiechczynski, J; Wiedner, D; Wiggers, L; Wilkinson, G; Williams, M P; Williams, M; Wilson, F F; Wimberley, J; Wishahi, J; Wislicki, W; Witek, M; Wotton, S A; Wright, S; Wu, S; Wyllie, K; Xie, Y; Xing, Z; Yang, Z; Young, R; Yuan, X; Yushchenko, O; Zangoli, M; Zavertyaev, M; Zhang, F; Zhang, L; Zhang, W C; Zhang, Y; Zhelezov, A; Zhokhov, A; Zhong, L; Zvyagin, A

    2013-09-06

    The ratio of the Λb(0) baryon lifetime to that of the B(0) meson is measured using 1.0  fb(-1) of integrated luminosity in 7 TeV center-of-mass energy pp collisions at the LHC. The Λb(0) baryon is observed for the first time in the decay mode Λb(0)→J/ψpK-, while the B(0) meson decay used is the well known B(0)→J/ψπ+ K- mode, where the π+ K- mass is consistent with that of the K(*0)(892) meson. The ratio of lifetimes is measured to be 0.976±0.012±0.006, in agreement with theoretical expectations based on the heavy quark expansion. Using previous determinations of the B(0) meson lifetime, the Λb(0) lifetime is found to be 1.482±0.018±0.012  ps. In both cases, the first uncertainty is statistical and the second systematic.

  19. A Precision measurement of the $W$ boson decaying to $\

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sengupta, Sinjini [Florida State U.

    2006-01-01

    This dissertation describes a measurement of the muon charge asymmetry from W boson decays. The charge asymmetry provides useful information about the momentum distribution of u and d quarks inside the proton. The charge asymmetry was measured using ≈ 230 pb-1 of data collected between 2002 and 2004 using the DØ detector at the Tevatron collider at Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory. In the Tevatron, protons and antiprotons collide with a center of mass energy of 1.96 TeV. The signal consists of one high transverse momentum muon and missing transverse energy while the background which comes from other events also producing a high transverse momentum muon. As the charge asymmetry depends on the number of positive and negative muons from the W boson decay in each bin of pseudorapidity, the background are removed. The resultant distribution is compared with predictions from NLO calculations using the CTEQ6.1M and the MRST02 PDFs. This is the first approved result for the W charge asymmetry from DØ.

  20. EDITORIAL: Precision Measurement Technology at the 56th International Scientific Colloquium in Ilmenau Precision Measurement Technology at the 56th International Scientific Colloquium in Ilmenau

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manske, E.; Froehlich, T.

    2012-07-01

    The 56th International Scientific Colloquium was held from 12th to 16th September 2011 at the Ilmenau University of Technology in Germany. This event was organized by the Faculty of Mechanical Engineering under the title: 'Innovation in Mechanical Engineering—Shaping the Future' and was intended to reflect the entire scope of modern mechanical engineering. In three main topics many research areas, all involving innovative mechanical engineering, were addressed, especially in the fields of Precision Engineering and Precision Measurement Technology, Mechatronics and Ambient-Assisted Living and Systems Technology. The participants were scientists from 21 countries, and 166 presentations were given. This special issue of Measurement Science and Technology presents selected contributions on 'Precision Engineering and Precision Measurement Technology'. Over three days the conference participants discussed novel scientific results in two sessions. The main topics of these sessions were: Measurement and Sensor Technology Process measurement Laser measurement Force measurement Weighing technology Temperature measurement Measurement dynamics and Nanopositioning and Nanomeasuring Technology Nanopositioning and nanomeasuring machines Nanometrology Probes and tools Mechanical design Signal processing Control and visualization in NPM devices Significant research results from the Collaborative Research Centre SFB 622 'Nanopositioning and Nanomeasuring Machines' funded by the German Research Foundation (DFG) were presented as part of this topic. As the Chairmen, our special thanks are due to the International Programme Committee, the Organization Committee and the conference speakers as well as colleagues from the Institute of Process Measurement and Sensor Technology who helped make the conference a success. We would like to thank all the authors for their contributions, the referees for their time spent reviewing the contributions and their valuable comments, and the whole

  1. A precision isotonic measuring system for isolated tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mellor, P M

    1984-12-01

    An isotonic measuring system is described which utilizes an angular position transducer of the linear differential voltage transformer type. Resistance to corrosion, protection against the ingress of solutions, and ease of mounting and setting up were the mechanical objectives. Accuracy, linearity, and freedom from drift were essential requirements of the electrical specification. A special housing was designed to accommodate the transducer to overcome these problems. A control unit incorporating a power supply and electronic filtering components was made to serve up to four such transducers. The transducer output voltage is sufficiently high to drive directly even low sensitivity chart recorders. Constructional details and a circuit diagram are included. Fifty such transducers have been in use for up to four years in these laboratories. Examples of some of the published work done using this transducer system are referenced.

  2. Physics potential of precision measurements of the LHC luminosity

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2012-01-01

    The uncertainty in the determination of the LHC luminosity is rapidly becoming a limiting factor for the analysis and interpretation of many important LHC processes. In this talk first of all we discuss the theoretical accuracy of total cross sections and examine in which cases the luminosity error is or will be dominant. We then review the impact of LHC data in PDF determinations, with enphasis on the effects of the luminosity uncertainty. We explore the requirements for the accuracy of the 2011 luminosity determination from the point of view of standard candle cross section and other important processes. Finally we discuss what we can learn from the accurate measurement of cross section ratios at different center of mass energies for processes like W, ttbar and dijet production.

  3. Precision measurement of the neutron spin dependent structure functions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kolomensky, Y.G.

    1997-02-01

    In experiment E154 at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center the spin dependent structure function g 1 n (x, Q 2 ) of the neutron was measured by scattering longitudinally polarized 48.3 GeV electrons off a longitudinally polarized 3 He target. The high beam energy allowed the author to extend the kinematic coverage compared to the previous SLAC experiments to 0.014 ≤ x ≤ 0.7 with an average Q 2 of 5 GeV 2 . The author reports the integral of the spin dependent structure function in the measured range to be ∫ 0.014 0.7 dx g 1 n (x, 5 GeV 2 ) = -0.036 ± 0.004(stat.) ± 0.005(syst.). The author observes relatively large values of g 1 n at low x that call into question the reliability of data extrapolation to x → 0. Such divergent behavior disagrees with predictions of the conventional Regge theory, but is qualitatively explained by perturbative QCD. The author performs a Next-to-Leading Order perturbative QCD analysis of the world data on the nucleon spin dependent structure functions g 1 p and g 1 n paying careful attention to the experimental and theoretical uncertainties. Using the parameterizations of the helicity-dependent parton distributions obtained in the analysis, the author evolves the data to Q 2 = 5 GeV 2 , determines the first moments of the polarized structure functions of the proton and neutron, and finds agreement with the Bjorken sum rule

  4. An assessment of the precision and confidence of aquatic eddy correlation measurements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Donis, Daphne; Holtappels, Moritz; Noss, Christian

    2015-01-01

    facility with well-constrained hydrodynamics. These observations are used to review data processing procedures and to recommend improved deployment methods, thus improving the precision, reliability, and confidence of EC measurements. Specifically, this study demonstrates that 1) the alignment of the time...... series based on maximum cross correlation improved the precision of EC flux estimations; 2) an oxygen sensor with a response time of

  5. Precision measurements of charmonium states formed in p bar p annihilation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Armstrong, T.A.; Bettoni, D.; Bharadwaj, V.; Biino, C.; Borreani, G.; Broemmelsiek, D.; Buzzo, A.; Calabrese, R.; Ceccucci, A.; Cester, R.; Church, M.D.; Dalpiaz, P.; Dalpiaz, P.F.; Fast, J.E.; Ferroni, S.; Ginsburg, C.M.; Gollwitzer, K.E.; Hahn, A.A.; Hasan, M.A.; Hsueh, S.Y.; Lewis, R.A.; Luppi, E.; Macrriaa, M.; Majewska, A.; Mandelkern, M.A.; Marchetto, F.; Marinelli, M.; Marques, J.L.; Marsh, W.; Martini, M.; Masuzawa, M.; Menichetti, E.; Migliori, A.; Mussa, R.; Palestini, S.; Pastrone, N.; Patrignani, C.; Peoples, J. Jr.; Pesando, L.; Petrucci, F.; Pia, M.G.; Pordes, S.; Rapidis, P.A.; Ray, R.E.; Reid, J.D.; Rinaudo, G.; Rosen, J.L.; Santroni, A.; Sarmiento, M.; Savrie, M.; Schultz, J.; Seth, K.K.; Smith, G.A.; Tecchio, L.; Tommasini, F.; Trokenheim, S.; Weber, M.F.; Werkema, S.J.; Zhao, J.L.; Zito, M.

    1992-01-01

    Fermilab experiment E-760 studies the resonant formation of charmonium states in proton-antiproton interactions using a hydrogen gas-jet target in the Antiproton Accumulator ring at Fermilab. Precision measurements of the mass and width of the charmonium states χ c1 ,χ c2 , a direct measurement of the ψ' width, and a new precision measurement of the J/ψ mass are presented

  6. Fighting the Global Cancer Epidemic through Precise Measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2014-01-01

    Cancer has passed heart disease to become the single leading cause of death worldwide. In 2000, there were 10.1 million new cases of cancer and 6.2 million deaths caused by cancer. By 2012, these numbers had risen respectively to 14.1 million and 8.2 million. As the global cancer epidemic continues to spread, the need for effective diagnosis and treatment is growing. Nuclear and other related technologies, such as diagnostic imaging techniques and radiotherapy, are fundamental to diagnosing and treating cancer. Both diagnostic imaging and radiotherapy involve radiation exposure, which can be highly effective for treating patients, but also dangerous to medical staff and patients if not used accurately and safely. Techniques such as medical dosimetry help to ensure the safe use of radiation. Medical dosimetry is a cornerstone of safe and effective cancer diagnosis and treatment. It deals with the measurement of absorbed doses and the optimization of dose delivery in radiation medicine. This includes activities such as audits and the calibration of equipment, the development and dissemination of dosimetry techniques, and the implementation of quality assurance programmes

  7. Precision evaluation of dual X-ray absorptiometry (iDXA) measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu Wei; Lin Qiang; Yu Xiaobo; Yao Jinpeng

    2009-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the precision of the iDXA measurements for lumbar spine, proximal femur and whole body bone density as well as body composition (lean and fat). Methods: The study recruited randomly 30 volunteers. Each subject was scanned by iDXA twice in the same day. Measurement sites included lumbar spine, proximal femur and whole body. Precision errors were expressed as root mean square of CV (RMS-CV). Results: Mean precision errors of bone density measurements at lumbar spine, femoral neck, Ward's triangle, great trochanter and total femur ranged from 0.8% to 2.0%, with the lowest of 0.8% at both lumbar spine and total femur, as well as with the highest of 2.0% at ward' s triangle; Mean precision errors of bone density measurements at whole body and its individual site ranged from 0.7% to 2.0%, with the lowest of 0.7% for the whole body measurement, mean precision errors of lean measurements at whole body and its individual site ranged from 0.6% to 2.1%, with the lowest of 0.6% for the whole body lean measurement; Mean precision errors of fat measurements at whole body and its individual site ranged from 1.0% to 3.2%, with the lowest of 1.0% for the whole body fat measurement. Conclusion: Measurement precision of iDXA at lumbar spine, proximal femur and whole body bone density could meet clinical needs; Precision values of the measurements of whole body and its individual composition may be helpful for future clinical use. (authors)

  8. Precision Measurement of Neutrino Oscillation Parameters with KamLAND

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    O' Donnell, Thomas [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2011-12-01

    This dissertation describes a measurement of the neutrino oscillation parameters m2 21, θ12 and constraints on θ13 based on a study of reactor antineutrinos at a baseline of ~ 180 km with the KamLAND detector. The data presented here was collected between April 2002 and November 2009, and amounts to a total exposure of 2.64 ± 0.07 × 1032 proton-years. For this exposure we expect 2140 ± 74(syst) antineutrino candidates from reactors, assuming standard model neutrino behavior, and 350±88(syst) candidates from background. The number observed is 1614. The ratio of background-subtracted candidates observed to expected is (NObs - NBkg)/ (NExp) = 0.59 ± 0.02(stat) ± 0.045(syst) which confirms reactor neutrino disappearance at greater than 5σ significance. Interpreting this deficit as being due to neutrino oscillation, the best-fit oscillation parameters from a three-flavor analysis are m2 21= 7.60+0.20 -0.19×10-5eV2, θ12 = 32.5 ± 2.9 degrees and sin2 θ13 = 0.025+0.035 -0.035, the 95% confidence-level upper limit on sin2 θ13 is sin2 θ13 < 0.083. Assuming CPT invariance, a combined analysis of KamLAND and solar neutrino data yields best-fit values: m2 21 = 7.60+0.20 -0.20 × 10-5eV2, θ12 = 33.5+1.0 -1.1 degrees, and sin2 θ13 = 0.013 ± 0.028 or sin2 θ13 < 0.06 at the 95% confidence level.

  9. High-precision measurement of the wavelength of a nickel-like silver X-ray laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hasegawa, Noboru; Kawachi, Tetsuya; Utsumi, Takayuki

    2004-01-01

    We conducted high-precision measurements of the wavelength of a 4d 1 S 0 →4p 1 P 1 line of a nickel-like silver X-ray laser. The Lyman series lines of hydrogen-like helium ions emitted from low-density plasmas were used as wavelength references, and the wavelength of the X-ray laser line was determined to be 13.887 nm (±0.002 nm). The experimental results were compared with Multiconfiguration Dirac-Fock calculations and were found to agree with theoretical wavelengths. (author)

  10. Flowing dusty plasma experiments: generation of flow and measurement techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaiswal, S.; Bandyopadhyay, P.; Sen, A.

    2016-12-01

    A variety of experimental techniques for the generation of subsonic/supersonic dust fluid flows and means of measuring such flow velocities are presented. The experiments have been carried out in a \\Pi -shaped dusty plasma experimental device with micron size kaolin/melamine formaldehyde particles embedded in a background of argon plasma created by a direct current glow discharge. A stationary dust cloud is formed over the cathode region by precisely balancing the pumping speed and gas flow rate. A flow of dust particles/fluid is generated by additional gas injection from a single or dual locations or by altering the dust confining potential. The flow velocity is then estimated by three different techniques, namely, by super particle identification code, particle image velocimetry analysis and the excitation of dust acoustic waves. The results obtained from these three different techniques along with their merits and demerits are discussed. An estimation of the neutral drag force responsible for the generation as well as the attenuation of the dust fluid flow is made. These techniques can be usefully employed in laboratory devices to investigate linear and non-linear collective excitations in a flowing dusty plasma.

  11. Precision of anterior and posterior corneal curvature measurements taken with the Oculus Pentacam

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizabeth Chetty

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available In the era of rapid advances in technology, new ophthalmic instruments are constantly influencing health sciences and necessitating investigations of the accuracy and precision of the new technology. The Oculus Pentacam (70700 has been available for some time now and numerous studies have investigated the precision of some of the parameters that the Pentacam is capable of measuring. Unfortunately some of these studies fall short in confusing the meaning of accuracy and precision and in not being able to analyse the data correctly or completely. The aim of this study was to investigate the precision of the anterior and posterior corneal curvature measurements taken with the Oculus Pentacam (70700 holistically with sound multivariate statistical methods. Twenty successive Pentacam measurements were taken over three different measuring sessions on one subject. Keratometric data for both the anterior and posterior corneal surfaces were analysed using multivariate statistics to determine the precision of the Oculus Pentacam. This instrument was found to have good precision both clinically and statistically for anterior corneal measurements but only good clinical precision for the posterior corneal surface. Key words: Oculus Pentacam; keratometric variation; corneal curvature; multivariate statistics

  12. Measurement of Debye length in laser-produced plasma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ehler, W.

    1973-01-01

    The Debye length of an expanded plasma created by placing an evacuated chamber with an entrance slit in the path of a freely expanding laser produced plasma was measured, using the slab geometry. An independent measurement of electron density together with the observed value for the Debye length also provided a means for evaluating the plasma electron temperature. This temperature has applications in ascertaining plasma conductivity and magnetic field necessary for confinement of the laser produced plasma. Also, the temperature obtained would be useful in analyzing electron-ion recombination rates in the expanded plasma and the dynamics of the cooling process of the plasma expansion.

  13. Spectropolarimetry with PEPSI at the LBT: accuracy vs. precision in magnetic field measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ilyin, Ilya; Strassmeier, Klaus G.; Woche, Manfred; Hofmann, Axel

    2009-04-01

    We present the design of the new PEPSI spectropolarimeter to be installed at the Large Binocular Telescope (LBT) in Arizona to measure the full set of Stokes parameters in spectral lines and outline its precision and the accuracy limiting factors.

  14. Electron density measurements on the plasma focus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rueckle, B.

    1976-01-01

    The paper presents a determination of the maximum electron density in a plasma focus, produced with the NESSI experimental setup, by the method of laser beam deflection. For each discharge a time-resolved measurement was performed at four different places. Neutron efficiency as well as the time of the initial X-ray emission was registrated. The principle and the economic aspects of the beam deflection method are presented in detail. The experimental findings and the resulting knowledge of the neutron efficiency are discussed. (GG) [de

  15. Surface resistivity measurement of plasma treated polymers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simon, D.; Pigram, P.J.; Liesegang, J.

    2000-01-01

    Full text: Resistivity of insulators is an important property of materials used within the integrated circuit and packaging industries. The measurement of electrical resistivity of insulator materials in the surface region in this work is interpreted through observations of surface charge decay. A self-field driven and diffusion charge transport theory is used to model the process and resistivity values obtained computationally. Data for the charge decay of surface charged samples are collected by suspending them inside a coaxial cylinder connected to an electrometer. Samples used have been low density polyethylene LDPE sheet, both pristine and surface treated. Some samples have been treated by air plasma at low vacuum pressures for different periods of time; others have been washed in ethyl acetate and then plasma treated before the resistivity measurement. The sets of resistivity measurements form the various treatments are compared below. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) has also been used to investigate and account for the observed variations in surface resistivity

  16. Nuclear Targets for a Precision Measurement of the Neutral Pion Radiative Width

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martel, Philippe; Clinton, Eric; McWilliams, R.; Lawrence, Dave; Miskimen, Rory; Ahmidouch, Abdellah; Ambrozewicz, Pawel; Asaturyan, Arshak; Baker, O.; Benton, LaRay; Bernstein, Aron; Cole, Philip; Collins, Patrick; Dale, Daniel; Danagoulian, Samuel; Davidenko, G.; Demirchyan, Raphael; Deur, Alexandre; Dolgolenko, A.; Dzyubenko, Georgiy; Evdokimov, Anatoly; Feng, JIng; Gabrielyan, Marianna; Gan, Liping; Gasparian, Ashot; Glamazdin, Oleksandr; Goryachev, Vladimir; Gyurjyan, Vardan; Hardy, K.; Ito, Mark; Khandaker, Mahbubul; Kingsberry, Paul; Kolarkar, Ameya; Konchatnyi, Mykhailo; Korchin, O.; Korsch, Wolfgang; Kowalski, Stanley; Kubantsev, Mikhail; Kubarovsky, Valery; Larin, Ilya; Matveev, V.; McNulty, Dustin; Milbrath, Brian; Minehart, Ralph; Mochalov, Vasiliy; Mtingwa, Sekazi; Nakagawa, Itaru; Overby, Steven; Pasyuk, Evgueni; Payen, Marvin; Pedroni, Ronald; Prok, Yelena; Ritchie, Barry; Salgado, Carlos; Sitnikov, Anatoly; Sober, Daniel; Stephens, W.; Teymurazyan, Aram; Underwood, Jarreas; Vasiliev, A.; Verebryusov, V.; Vishnyakov, Vladimir; Wood, Michael

    2009-01-01

    A technique is presented for precision measurements of the area densities, density * T, of approximately 5% radiation length carbon and 208Pb targets used in an experiment at Jefferson Laboratory to measure the neutral pion radiative width. The precision obtained in the area density for the carbon target is +/- 0.050%, and that obtained for the lead target through an x-ray attenuation technique is +/- 0.43%.

  17. PDF uncertainties in precision electroweak measurements, including the W mass, in ATLAS

    CERN Document Server

    Cooper-Sarkar, Amanda; The ATLAS collaboration

    2015-01-01

    Now that the Higgs mass is known all the parameters of the SM are known- but with what accuracy? Precision EW measurements test the self-consistency of the SM- and thus can give hints of BSM physics. Precision measurements of $sin^2\\theta _W$ and the W mass are limited by PDF uncertainties This contribution discusses these uncertainties and what can be done to improve them.

  18. Precise half-life measurement of the superallowed β+ emitter 38Km

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ball, G. C.; Boisvert, G.; Bricault, P.; Churchman, R.; Dombsky, M.; Lindner, T.; Macdonald, J. A.; Vandervoort, E.; Bishop, S.; D'Auria, J. M.; Hardy, J. C.; Iacob, V. E.; Leslie, J. R.; Mak, H.-B.

    2010-01-01

    The half-life of 38 K m has been measured to be 924.46(14) ms, a result that is a factor of two more precise than any of the five previous measurements of this quantity. The previous results are not consistent with one another, but our result agrees well with the two most recent ones. The derived ft value for 38 K m is now one of the three most precisely known superallowed ft values.

  19. Temperature measurements in thermonuclear plasmas; Mesures des temperatures dans les plasmas thermonucleaires

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Breton, D [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1958-07-01

    The temperatures needed to produce thermonuclear reactions are of the order of several million degrees Kelvin. Devising methods for measuring such temperatures has been the subject of research in many countries. In order to present the problem clearly and to demonstrate its importance, the author reviews the various conditions which must be fulfilled in order that reactions may be qualified as thermonuclear. The relationship between the temperature and the cross-section of the reactions is studied, and it is shown that the notion of temperature in the plasmas is complex, which leads to a consideration of the temperature of the ions and that of the electrons. None of the methods for the temperature measurements is completely satisfactory because of the hypotheses which must be made, and which are seldom fulfilled during high-intensity discharges in the plasmas. In practice it is necessary to use several methods simultaneously. (author) [French] Les temperatures necessaires pour produire des reactions thermonucleaires sont de l'ordre de plusieurs millions de degres Kelvin. Les methodes envisagees pour mesurer ces temperatures font l'objet de recherches dans de nombreux pays. Afin de preciser le probleme et de montrer son importance, l'auteur rappelle les conditions qui doivent etre reunies pour que des reactions puissent etre qualifiees thermonucleaires. Il etudie la relation entre la temperature et la section efficace des reactions et montre que la notion de temperature dans les plasmas est complexe, ce qui amene a considerer la temperature des ions et celle des electrons. Aucune des methodes de mesure des temperatures n'est completement satisfaisante en raison des hypotheses qu'elles exigent et qui sont rarement realisees lors des decharges a haute intensite dans les plasmas. En pratique, il est necessaire d'utiliser plusieurs methodes simultanement. (auteur)

  20. Precision of dual energy X-ray absorptiometry for body composition measurements in cats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borges, N.C.; Vasconcellos, R.S.; Canola, J.C.; Carciofi, A.C.; Pereira, G.T.; Paula, F.J.A.

    2008-01-01

    A short-term precision error of the individual subject and the DEXA technique, such as the effect of the repositioning of the cat on the examination table, were established. Four neutered adult cats (BW=4342 g) and three females (BW=3459 g) were submitted to five repeated scans with and without repositioning between them. Precision was estimated from the mean of the five measurements and expressed by the individual coefficient of variation (CV). The precision error of the technique was estimated by the variance of scan pool (n=35) and expressed in CV for the technique (CVt). The degrees of freedom and confidence intervals were determined to avoid underestimation of precision errors. Bone mineral content (BMC), lean mass (LM), and fat mass (FM) averages were higher (P<0.05) when animals were repositioned. The CVt was significantly higher (P<0.05) for bone mineral density (BMD), LM, and FM when the animals were repositioned. For short-term precision measurements, the repositioning of the animal was important to establish the precision of the technique. The dual energy xray absorptiometry method provided precision for body composition measurements in adult cats. (author)

  1. Design of a dual-axis optoelectronic level for precision angle measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fan, Kuang-Chao; Wang, Tsung-Han; Lin, Sheng-Yi; Liu, Yen-Chih

    2011-01-01

    The accuracy of machine tools is mainly determined by angular errors during linear motion according to the well-known Abbe principle. Precision angle measurement is important to precision machines. This paper presents the theory and experiments of a new dual-axis optoelectronic level with low cost and high precision. The system adopts a commercial DVD pickup head as the angle sensor in association with the double-layer pendulum mechanism for two-axis swings, respectively. In data processing with a microprocessor, the measured angles of both axes can be displayed on an LCD or exported to an external PC. Calibrated by a triple-beam laser angular interferometer, the error of the dual-axis optoelectronic level is better than ±0.7 arcsec in the measuring range of ±30 arcsec, and the settling time is within 0.5 s. Experiments show the applicability to the inspection of precision machines

  2. MRPC-PET: A new technique for high precision time and position measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doroud, K.; Hatzifotiadou, D.; Li, S.; Williams, M.C.S.; Zichichi, A.; Zuyeuski, R.

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to consider a new technology for medical diagnosis: the MRPC-PET. This technology allows excellent time resolution together with 2-D position information thus providing a fundamental step in this field. The principle of this method is based on the Multigap Resistive Plate Chamber (MRPC) capable of high precision time measurements. We have previously found that the route to precise timing is differential readout (this requires matching anode and cathode strips); thus crossed strip readout schemes traditionally used for 2-D readout cannot be exploited. In this paper we consider the time difference from the two ends of the strip to provide a high precision measurement along the strip; the average time gives precise timing. The MRPC-PET thus provides a basic step in the field of medical technology: excellent time resolution together with 2-D position measurement.

  3. Development of precise analytical methods for strontium and lanthanide isotopic ratios using multiple collector inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohno, Takeshi; Takaku, Yuichi; Hisamatsu, Shun'ichi

    2007-01-01

    We have developed precise analytical methods for strontium and lanthanide isotopic ratios using multiple collector-ICP-mass spectrometry (MC-ICP-MS) for experimental and environmental studies of their behavior. In order to obtain precise isotopic data using MC-ICP-MS, the mass discrimination effect was corrected by an exponential law correction method. The resulting isotopic data demonstrated that highly precise isotopic analyses (better than 0.1 per mille as 2SD) could be achieved. We also adopted a de-solvating nebulizer system to improve the sensitivity. This system could minimize the water load into the plasma and provided about five times larger intensity of analyte than a conventional nebulizer system did. (author)

  4. Unique electron polarimeter analyzing power comparison and precision spin-based energy measurement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Joseph Grames; Charles Sinclair; Joseph Mitchell; Eugene Chudakov; Howard Fenker; Arne Freyberger; Douglas Higinbotham; Poelker, B.; Michael Steigerwald; Michael Tiefenback; Christian Cavata; Stephanie Escoffier; Frederic Marie; Thierry Pussieux; Pascal Vernin; Samuel Danagoulian; Kahanawita Dharmawardane; Renee Fatemi; Kyungseon Joo; Markus Zeier; Viktor Gorbenko; Rakhsha Nasseripour; Brian Raue; Riad Suleiman; Benedikt Zihlmann

    2004-01-01

    Precision measurements of the relative analyzing powers of five electron beam polarimeters, based on Compton, Moller, and Mott scattering, have been performed using the CEBAF accelerator at the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (Jefferson Laboratory). A Wien filter in the 100 keV beamline of the injector was used to vary the electron spin orientation exiting the injector. High statistical precision measurements of the scattering asymmetry as a function of the spin orientation were made with each polarimeter. Since each polarimeter receives beam with the same magnitude of polarization, these asymmetry measurements permit a high statistical precision comparison of the relative analyzing powers of the five polarimeters. This is the first time a precise comparison of the analyzing powers of Compton, Moller, and Mott scattering polarimeters has been made. Statistically significant disagreements among the values of the beam polarization calculated from the asymmetry measurements made with each polarimeter reveal either errors in the values of the analyzing power, or failure to correctly include all systematic effects. The measurements reported here represent a first step toward understanding the systematic effects of these electron polarimeters. Such studies are necessary to realize high absolute accuracy (ca. 1%) electron polarization measurements, as required for some parity violation measurements planned at Jefferson Laboratory. Finally, a comparison of the value of the spin orientation exiting the injector that provides maximum longitudinal polarization in each experimental hall leads to an independent and very precise (better than 10-4) absolute measurement of the final electron beam energy

  5. Procedure to determine the two channel timing measurement accuracy and precision of a digital oscilloscope

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, M.; Matulik, M.

    1994-01-01

    The digital oscilloscope allows one to make numerous timing measurements, but just how good are those measurements? This document describes a procedure which can be used to determine the accuracy and precision to which a digital oscilloscope can make various two channel timing measurements

  6. High-precision measurements of seawater Pb isotope compositions by double spike thermal ionization mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul, Maxence; Bridgestock, Luke; Rehkämper, Mark; van DeFlierdt, Tina; Weiss, Dominik

    2015-03-10

    A new method for the determination of seawater Pb isotope compositions and concentrations was developed, which combines and optimizes previously published protocols for the separation and isotopic analysis of this element. For isotopic analysis, the procedure involves initial separation of Pb from 1 to 2L of seawater by co-precipitation with Mg hydroxide and further purification by a two stage anion exchange procedure. The Pb isotope measurements are subsequently carried out by thermal ionization mass spectrometry using a (207)Pb-(204)Pb double spike for correction of instrumental mass fractionation. These methods are associated with a total procedural Pb blank of 28±21 pg (1sd) and typical Pb recoveries of 40-60%. The Pb concentrations are determined by isotope dilution (ID) on 50 mL of seawater, using a simplified version of above methods. Analyses of multiple aliquots of six seawater samples yield a reproducibility of about ±1 to ±10% (1sd) for Pb concentrations of between 7 and 50 pmol/kg, where precision was primarily limited by the uncertainty of the blank correction (12±4 pg; 1sd). For the Pb isotope analyses, typical reproducibilities (±2sd) of 700-1500 ppm and 1000-2000 ppm were achieved for (207)Pb/(206)Pb, (208)Pb/(206)Pb and (206)Pb/(204)Pb, (207)Pb/(204)Pb, (208)Pb/(204)Pb, respectively. These results are superior to literature data that were obtained using plasma source mass spectrometry and they are at least a factor of five more precise for ratios involving the minor (204)Pb isotope. Both Pb concentration and isotope data, furthermore, show good agreement with published results for two seawater intercomparison samples of the GEOTRACES program. Finally, the new methods were applied to a seawater depth profile from the eastern South Atlantic. Both Pb contents and isotope compositions display a smooth evolution with depth, and no obvious outliers. Compared to previous Pb isotope data for seawater, the (206)Pb/(204)Pb ratios are well correlated

  7. Plasma rotation measurement in small tokamaks using an optical spectrometer and a single photomultiplier as detector.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Severo, J H F; Nascimento, I C; Kuznetov, Yu K; Tsypin, V S; Galvão, R M O; Tendler, M

    2007-04-01

    The method for plasma rotation measurement in the tokamak TCABR is reported in this article. During a discharge, an optical spectrometer is used to scan sequentially spectral lines of plasma impurities and spectral lines of a calibration lamp. Knowing the scanning velocity of the diffraction grating of the spectrometer with adequate precision, the Doppler shifts of impurity lines are determined. The photomultiplier output voltage signals are recorded with adequate sampling rate. With this method the residual poloidal and toroidal plasma rotation velocities were determined, assuming that they are the same as those of the impurity ions. The results show reasonable agreement with the neoclassical theory and with results from similar tokamaks.

  8. DAQ system for low density plasma parameters measurement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Joshi, Rashmi S.; Gupta, Suryakant B.

    2015-01-01

    In various cases where low density plasmas (number density ranges from 1E4 to 1E6 cm -3 ) exist for example, basic plasma studies or LEO space environment measurement of plasma parameters becomes very critical. Conventional tip (cylindrical) Langmuir probes often result into unstable measurements in such lower density plasma. Due to larger surface area, a spherical Langmuir probe is used to measure such lower plasma densities. Applying a sweep voltage signal to the probe and measuring current values corresponding to these voltages gives V-I characteristics of plasma which can be plotted on a digital storage oscilloscope. This plot is analyzed for calculating various plasma parameters. The aim of this paper is to measure plasma parameters using a spherical Langmuir probe and indigenously developed DAQ system. DAQ system consists of Keithley source-meter and a host system connected by a GPIB interface. An online plasma parameter diagnostic system is developed for measuring plasma properties for non-thermal plasma in vacuum. An algorithm is developed using LabVIEW platform. V-I characteristics of plasma are plotted with respect to different filament current values and different locations of Langmuir probe with reference to plasma source. V-I characteristics is also plotted for forward and reverse voltage sweep generated programmatically from the source meter. (author)

  9. Machine vision for high-precision volume measurement applied to levitated containerless material processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bradshaw, R.C.; Schmidt, D.P.; Rogers, J.R.; Kelton, K.F.; Hyers, R.W.

    2005-01-01

    By combining the best practices in optical dilatometry with numerical methods, a high-speed and high-precision technique has been developed to measure the volume of levitated, containerlessly processed samples with subpixel resolution. Containerless processing provides the ability to study highly reactive materials without the possibility of contamination affecting thermophysical properties. Levitation is a common technique used to isolate a sample as it is being processed. Noncontact optical measurement of thermophysical properties is very important as traditional measuring methods cannot be used. Modern, digitally recorded images require advanced numerical routines to recover the subpixel locations of sample edges and, in turn, produce high-precision measurements

  10. TRACEABILITY OF PRECISION MEASUREMENTS ON COORDINATE MEASURING MACHINES – UNCERTAINTY ASSESSMENT BY USING CALIBRATED WORPIECES ON CMMs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tosello, Guido; De Chiffre, Leonardo

    This document is used in connection with one exercise 30 minutes duration as a part of the course VISION ONLINE – One week course on Precision & Nanometrology. The exercise concerns establishment of traceability of precision measurements on coordinate measuring machines. This document contains...... a short description of each step in the exercise, the uncertainty budget as described in the ISO/TS 15530 part 3 and tables from the excel spreadsheets....

  11. High Precision Measurement of the differential W and Z boson cross-sections

    CERN Document Server

    Gasnikova, Ksenia; The ATLAS collaboration

    2017-01-01

    Measurements of the Drell-Yan production of W and Z/gamma bosons at the LHC provide a benchmark of our understanding of perturbative QCD and probe the proton structure in a unique way. The ATLAS collaboration has performed new high precision measurements at center-of-mass energies of 7. The measurements are performed for W+, W- and Z/gamma bosons integrated and as a function of the boson or lepton rapidity and the Z/gamma* mass. Unprecedented precision is reached and strong constraints on Parton Distribution functions, in particular the strange density are found. Z cross sections are also measured at a center-of-mass energies of 8TeV and 13TeV, and cross-section ratios to the top-quark pair production have been derived. This ratio measurement leads to a cancellation of several systematic effects and allows therefore for a high precision comparison to the theory predictions.

  12. Fast Plasma Potential Measurements Using an Emissive Probe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ready, Amanda; Clark, Michael; Endrizzi, Douglass; Forest, Cary; Peterson, Ethan

    2017-10-01

    A heated emissive probe was developed for making direct plasma potential (Vp) measurements in rapidly fluctuating plasmas. Previous experiments on the Big Red Ball (BRB) were hindered by sudden potential drops, making Langmuir measurements of the plasma potential difficult. DC heating of a tungsten filament to emission allowed for fast (4 MHz) floating potential measurements that closely matched Vp. Two BRB experiments currently use the emissive probe. The investigation of unmagnetized, collisionless shocks used plasma potential measurements to study the sub-structure of strong plasma shocks. A separate investigation of emulated magnetospheres in laboratory plasmas used the plasma potential to map the equilibria and instabilities in the electric field of such structures. Results showing electric field measurements and comparison with cold Langmuir measurements will be presented. Future plans for probe modifications and applications to other experiments on the BRB will also be shown.

  13. Measurement of temperature, electric conductivity and density of plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vasilevova, I.; Nefedov, A.; Oberman, F.; Urinson, A.

    1982-01-01

    Three instruments are briefly described developed by the High Temperatures Institute of the USSR Academy of Sciences for the measurement of plasma temperature, electric conductivity and density. The temperature measuring instrument uses as a standard a light source whose temperature may significantly differ from plasma temperature because three light fluxes are compared, namely the flux emitted by the plasma, the flux emitted directly by the standard source, and the flux emitted by the standard source after passage through the plasma. The results of measurement are computer processed. Electric conductivity is measured using a coil placed in a probe which is automatically extended for a time of maximally 0.3 seconds into the plasma stream. The equipment for measuring plasma density consists of a special single-channel monochromator, a temperature gauge, a plasma pressure gauge, and of a computer for processing the results of measurement. (Ha)

  14. Precision of INR measured with a patient operated whole blood coagulometer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Attermann, Jørn; Andersen, Niels Trolle; Korsgaard, Helle

    2003-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: The objective of the present study was to evaluate the precision of a portable whole blood coagulometer (CoaguChek S) in the hands of self-managing patients on oral anticoagulant therapy (OAT). MATERIALS AND METHODS: Fifteen patients on self-managed OAT performed measurements of INR...... and between patients was 15.0% and 14.7%, respectively. CONCLUSION: The precision of CoaguChek S is satisfactory....

  15. Plasma-equivalent glucose at the point-of-care: evaluation of Roche Accu-Chek Inform and Abbott Precision PCx glucose meters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghys, Timothy; Goedhuys, Wim; Spincemaille, Katrien; Gorus, Frans; Gerlo, Erik

    2007-01-01

    Glucose testing at the bedside has become an integral part of the management strategy in diabetes and of the careful maintenance of normoglycemia in all patients in intensive care units. We evaluated two point-of-care glucometers for the determination of plasma-equivalent blood glucose. The Precision PCx and the Accu-Chek Inform glucometers were evaluated. Imprecision and bias relative to the Vitros 950 system were determined using protocols of the Clinical Laboratory Standards Institute (CLSI). The effects of low, normal, and high hematocrit levels were investigated. Interference by maltose was also studied. Within-run precision for both instruments ranged from 2-5%. Total imprecision was less than 5% except for the Accu-Chek Inform at the low level (2.9 mmol/L). Both instruments correlated well with the comparison instrument and showed excellent recovery and linearity. Both systems reported at least 95% of their values within zone A of the Clarke Error Grid, and both fulfilled the CLSI quality criteria. The more stringent goals of the American Diabetes Association, however, were not reached. Both systems showed negative bias at high hematocrit levels. Maltose interfered with the glucose measurements on the Accu-Chek Inform but not on the Precision PCx. Both systems showed satisfactory imprecision and were reliable in reporting plasma-equivalent glucose concentrations. The most stringent performance goals were however not met.

  16. Laser produced plasma density measurement by Mach-Zehnder interferometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vaziri, A.; Kohanzadeh, Y.; Mosavi, R.K.

    1976-06-01

    This report describes an optical interferometric method of measuring the refractive index of the laser-produced plasma, giving estimates of its electron density. The plasma is produced by the interaction of a high power pulsed CO 2 laser beam with a solid target in the vacuum. The time varying plasma has a transient electron density. This transient electron density gives rise to a changing plasma refractive index. A Mach-Zehnder ruby laser interferometer is used to measure this refractive index change

  17. Precise measurement of cat patellofemoral joint surface geometry with multistation digital photogrammetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ronsky, J L; Boyd, S K; Lichti, D D; Chapman, M A; Salkauskas, K

    1999-04-01

    Three-dimensional joint models are important tools for investigating mechanisms related to normal and pathological joints. Often these models necessitate accurate three-dimensional joint surface geometric data so that reliable model results can be obtained; however, in models based on small joints, this is often problematic due to limitations of the present techniques. These limitations include insufficient measurement precision the requirement of contact for the measurement process, and lack of entire joint description. This study presents a new non-contact method for precise determination of entire joint surfaces using multistation digital photogrammetry (MDPG) and is demonstrated by determining the cartilage and subchondral bone surfaces of the cat patellofemoral (PF) joint. The digital camera-lens setup was precisely calibrated using 16 photographs arranged to achieve highly convergent geometry to estimate interior and distortion parameters of the camera-lens setup. Subsequently, six photographs of each joint surface were then acquired for surface measurement. The digital images were directly imported to a computer and newly introduced semi-automatic computer algorithms were used to precisely determine the image coordinates. Finally, a rigorous mathematical procedure named the bundle adjustment was used to determine the three-dimensional coordinates of the joint surfaces and to estimate the precision of the coordinates. These estimations were validated by comparing the MDPG measurements of a cylinder and plane to an analytical model. The joint surfaces were successfully measured using the MDPG method with mean precision estimates in the least favorable coordinate direction being 10.3 microns for subchondral bone and 17.9 microns for cartilage. The difference in measurement precision for bone and cartilage primarily reflects differences in the translucent properties of the surfaces.

  18. Electrical Measurements on a Moving Argon Plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abbas, A. A.M.; Howatson, A. M. [Oxford University (United Kingdom)

    1966-10-15

    Experimental current-voltage characteristic curves were obtained for a moving argon plasma at two stations in an electrically-driven 5 cm shock tube. The standard energy was 1 kj and the base pressure 10 torr, giving a shock of about Mach 4. The measurements were made on the highly-ionized driver gas which followed the shock at speeds between 800 and 1100 m/sec. Two types of electrode were used. One comprised circular solid electrodes of aluminium, molybdenum or stainless steel so machined as to be quite flush with the tube wall; the other comprised filaments of tungsten wire which were immersed in the free stream and could be used cold or heated for thermionic emission. Characteristics were obtained both for applied voltages and for MHD-generated voltages; for the latter a magnetic field of good uniformity up to 0.9 Wb/m{sup 2} was used. The results were always markedly dependent on the surface condition of the electrodes. For consistent results the flush electrodes had to be cleaned carefully by hand after every third discharge, while the filament electrodes were thermionically cleaned before every discharge. In general the cold electrode characteristics for applied voltage showed three distinct regions: a current increase such as would be expected from a double probe; a saturation region; and a linear increase, in order of increasing voltage. For the flush electrodes another apparent saturation was found before, finally, the transition to an arc-type discharge. The first saturation current for flush electrodes corresponded to a random ion current much less than that estimated to exist away from the tube walls, as is expected from a consideration of diffusion through a boundary layer. The value of the current varied somewhat with the electrode material. For the cold filaments, the saturation current density was of the same order as for the flush electrodes. From the linear region of the curves, an effective plasma conductivity was obtained. For comparison, the

  19. A comparison of manual anthropometric measurements with Kinect-based scanned measurements in terms of precision and reliability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bragança, Sara; Arezes, Pedro; Carvalho, Miguel; Ashdown, Susan P; Castellucci, Ignacio; Leão, Celina

    2018-01-01

    Collecting anthropometric data for real-life applications demands a high degree of precision and reliability. It is important to test new equipment that will be used for data collectionOBJECTIVE:Compare two anthropometric data gathering techniques - manual methods and a Kinect-based 3D body scanner - to understand which of them gives more precise and reliable results. The data was collected using a measuring tape and a Kinect-based 3D body scanner. It was evaluated in terms of precision by considering the regular and relative Technical Error of Measurement and in terms of reliability by using the Intraclass Correlation Coefficient, Reliability Coefficient, Standard Error of Measurement and Coefficient of Variation. The results obtained showed that both methods presented better results for reliability than for precision. Both methods showed relatively good results for these two variables, however, manual methods had better results for some body measurements. Despite being considered sufficiently precise and reliable for certain applications (e.g. apparel industry), the 3D scanner tested showed, for almost every anthropometric measurement, a different result than the manual technique. Many companies design their products based on data obtained from 3D scanners, hence, understanding the precision and reliability of the equipment used is essential to obtain feasible results.

  20. High-Precision Mass Measurements of Exotic Nuclei with the Triple-Trap Mass Spectrometer Isoltrap

    CERN Multimedia

    Blaum, K; Zuber, K T; Stanja, J

    2002-01-01

    The masses of close to 200 short-lived nuclides have already been measured with the mass spectrometer ISOLTRAP with a relative precision between 1$\\times$10$^{-7}$ and 1$\\times$10^{-8}$. The installatin of a radio-frequency quadrupole trap increased the overall efficiency by two orders of magnitude which is at present about 1%. In a recent upgrade, we installed a carbon cluster laser ion source, which will allow us to use carbon clusters as mass references for absolute mass measurements. Due to these improvements and the high reliability of ISOLTRAP we are now able to perform accurate high-precision mass measurements all over the nuclear chart. We propose therefore mass measurements on light, medium and heavy nuclides on both sides of the valley of stability in the coming four years. ISOLTRAP is presently the only instrument capable of the high precision required for many of the proposed studies.

  1. Recent progress in ATLAS top pair cross-sections: from precision measurements to rare processes

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2014-01-01

    High-precision top quark pair production cross-section measurements in proton-proton collisions at centre-of-mass energies of 7 and 8 TeV reach a precision of better than 4%, similar to that of recently achieved state-of-art NNLO+NNLL QCD calculations. These benchmark results can be used to extract physical parameters such as the top quark mass or constraints on new physics processes from the comparison between measurement and prediction. Inclusive, differential and fiducial cross section measurements for top pair production are also precision probes of QCD allowing to test latest Monte-Carlo generators. The large Run-1 data sample delivered by the LHC also allows the experiments to explore the production of top pair production in association with bosons.The seminar presents recent ATLAS results on cross-section measurements involving top quark pairs.

  2. [Designing and implementation of a web-based quality monitoring system for plasma glucose measurement in multicenter population study].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yong; Wang, Limin; Pang, Richard; Mo, Nanxun; Hu, Yan; Deng, Qian; Hu, Zhaohui

    2015-05-01

    The aim of this paper is to describe the designing and implementation of a web-based plasma glucose measurement quality monitoring system to assess the analytical quality of plasma glucose measurements in multicenter population study and provide evidence for the future studies. In the chronic non-communicable disease and related factor surveillance in China, a web based quality monitoring system for plasma glucose measurement was established to conduct evaluation on plasma glucose monitoring quality and effectiveness in 302 surveillance centers, including quality control data entry, transmission and feedback. The majority of the surveillance centers met the quality requirements and passed the evaluation of reproducibility and precision of plasma glucose measurement, only a few centers required intensive training and re-assessment. In order to ensure the completeness and reliability of plasma glucose measurement in the surveillance centers, the establishment of web-based plasma glucose measurement quality control system can facilitate the identification of the qualified surveillance centers and evaluation of plasma glucose measurement quality in different regions. Communication and training are important in ensuring plasma glucose measurement quality. It is necessary to further improve this web-based plasma glucose measurement quality monitoring system in the future to reduce the method specific plasma glucose measurement bias.

  3. Measurement of performance parameters of plasma source for plasma opening switch on Qiangguang-Ⅰ generator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luo Weixi; Zeng Zhengzhong; Lei Tianshi; Wang Liangping; Hu Yixiang; Sun Tieping; Huang Tao

    2012-01-01

    The plasma source (cable guns) of the plasma opening switch (POS) on Qiangguang Ⅰ generator was chosen as the study object. The plasma source performance was investigated by using charge collectors. Experimental results show that the plasma ejection density is positively correlated with the structural parameter, the distance between gun core tip and muzzle plane, and the plasma ejection velocity is negatively correlated with the parameter. The increasing rate of plasma ejection density is less than that of drive current. As far as a plasma source with tens of cable plasma guns is concerned, the influence of single cable gun's discharge dispersancy on plasma uniformity is little. Analysis of uncertainty shows that the uncertainty of measurement can be reduced by increasing the number of experiments and averaging the results. The combined standard uncertainty of plasma ejection density is less than 10%. (authors)

  4. Fast and Precise Beam Energy Measurement using Compton Backscattering at e+e- Colliders

    CERN Document Server

    Kaminskiy, V V; Muchnoi, N Yu; Zhilich, V N

    2017-01-01

    The report describes a method for a fast and precise beam energy measurement in the beam energy range 0.5-2 GeV and its application at various e+e- colliders. Low-energy laser photons interact head-on with the electron or positron beam and produce Compton backscattered photons whose energy is precisely measured by HPGe detector. The method allows measuring the beam energy with relative accuracy of ∼2-5.10-5. The method was successfully applied at VEPP-4M, VEPP-3, VEPP-2000 (BINP, Russia) and BEPC-II (IHEP, China).

  5. Measurement of effective renal plasma flow in congestive heart failure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tauxe, W.N.; Dubovsky, E.V.; Mantle, J.A.; Dustan, H.P.; Logic, J.R.

    1981-01-01

    In the management of patients with congestive heart failure (CHF), it is often desirable to have precise knowledge of overall renal function, including the effective renal plasma flow (ERPF). It has long been recognized that ERPF is diminished in CHF. Since glomerular filtration rate is often decreased to a much lesser extent, other noninvasive procedures such as the measurement of creatinine clearances may not be entirely suitable. ERPF determination by the single plasma sampling (SPS) method affords a rapid, simple, noninvasive, and economical technique that is quite accurate and reproducible. A SPS method has been well-tested in patients following renal transplantation plus a wide variety of nephrological disorders. We have been concerned whether the SPS method would be valid in volume expanded patients. In 28 determinations of ERPF in patients with CHF, and in five patients who did not have CHF, we have found the SPS estimation of ERPF to yield results that are not clinically significantly different from those obtained by the detailed compartmental analysis method. The volumes of 131 I-orthoiodohippurate (OIH) distribution were found to be somewhat higher in CHF than in controls, but fractional rate constants were proportionately lower so that intercompartmental flow rates and OIH concentrations were not different from controls. Therefore, the SPS estimation of ERPF is valid in patients with CHF and may be useful in monitoring the renal effects of various hemodynamic and pharmacological interventions. (orig.)

  6. Neutron measurements as fusion plasma diagnostics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishitani, Takeo; Hoek, M.

    1993-01-01

    Neutron measurements play important roles as the diagnostics of many aspects of the plasma in large tokamak devices such as JT-60U and JET. In the d-d discharges of JT-60U, the most important application of the neutron measurement is the investigation of the fusion performance using fission chambers. The ion velocity distribution function, and the triton slowing down are investigated by the neutron spectrometer and the 14 MeV neutron detector, respectively. TANSY is a combined proton-recoil and neutron time-of flight spectrometer for 14 MeV neutrons to be used during the d-t phase at JET. The detection principle is based on the measurements of the flight time of a scattered initial neutron and the energy of a corresponding recoil proton. The scattering medium is a polyethylene foil. The resolution and efficiency, using a thin foil (0.95 mg/cm 2 ), is 155 keV and 1.4x10 -5 cm 2 , respectively. (author)

  7. Using High-Precision Specific Gravity Measurements to Study Minerals in Undergraduate Geoscience Courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandriss, Mark E.

    2010-01-01

    This article describes ways to incorporate high-precision measurements of the specific gravities of minerals into undergraduate courses in mineralogy and physical geology. Most traditional undergraduate laboratory methods of measuring specific gravity are suitable only for unusually large samples, which severely limits their usefulness for student…

  8. Toward Precision Top Quark Measurements in $e^+e^−$ Collisions at Linear Colliders

    CERN Document Server

    Van Der Kolk, Naomi

    2017-01-01

    Linear lepton colliders offer an excellent environment for precision measurements of the top quark. An overview is given of the current prospects on the measurement of the top quark mass, rare top quark decays and top quark couplings at the International Linear Collider (ILC) and the Compact Linear Collider (CLIC).

  9. Measuring Constructs in Family Science: How Can Item Response Theory Improve Precision and Validity?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, Rachel A.

    2015-01-01

    This article provides family scientists with an understanding of contemporary measurement perspectives and the ways in which item response theory (IRT) can be used to develop measures with desired evidence of precision and validity for research uses. The article offers a nontechnical introduction to some key features of IRT, including its…

  10. High-Precision Half-Life Measurement for the Superallowed β+ Emitter Alm26

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finlay, P.; Ettenauer, S.; Ball, G. C.; Leslie, J. R.; Svensson, C. E.; Andreoiu, C.; Austin, R. A. E.; Bandyopadhyay, D.; Cross, D. S.; Demand, G.; Djongolov, M.; Garrett, P. E.; Green, K. L.; Grinyer, G. F.; Hackman, G.; Leach, K. G.; Pearson, C. J.; Phillips, A. A.; Sumithrarachchi, C. S.; Triambak, S.; Williams, S. J.

    2011-01-01

    A high-precision half-life measurement for the superallowed β+ emitter Alm26 was performed at the TRIUMF-ISAC radioactive ion beam facility yielding T1/2=6346.54±0.46stat±0.60systms, consistent with, but 2.5 times more precise than, the previous world average. The Alm26 half-life and ft value, 3037.53(61) s, are now the most precisely determined for any superallowed β decay. Combined with recent theoretical corrections for isospin-symmetry-breaking and radiative effects, the corrected Ft value for Alm26, 3073.0(12) s, sets a new benchmark for the high-precision superallowed Fermi β-decay studies used to test the conserved vector current hypothesis and determine the Vud element of the Cabibbo-Kobayashi-Maskawa quark mixing matrix.

  11. Measurements of experimental precision for trials with cowpea (Vigna unguiculata L. Walp.) genotypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teodoro, P E; Torres, F E; Santos, A D; Corrêa, A M; Nascimento, M; Barroso, L M A; Ceccon, G

    2016-05-09

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the suitability of statistics as experimental precision degree measures for trials with cowpea (Vigna unguiculata L. Walp.) genotypes. Cowpea genotype yields were evaluated in 29 trials conducted in Brazil between 2005 and 2012. The genotypes were evaluated with a randomized block design with four replications. Ten statistics that were estimated for each trial were compared using descriptive statistics, Pearson correlations, and path analysis. According to the class limits established, selective accuracy and F-test values for genotype, heritability, and the coefficient of determination adequately estimated the degree of experimental precision. Using these statistics, 86.21% of the trials had adequate experimental precision. Selective accuracy and the F-test values for genotype, heritability, and the coefficient of determination were directly related to each other, and were more suitable than the coefficient of variation and the least significant difference (by the Tukey test) to evaluate experimental precision in trials with cowpea genotypes.

  12. Measurement Model and Precision Analysis of Accelerometers for Maglev Vibration Isolation Platforms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qianqian Wu

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available High precision measurement of acceleration levels is required to allow active control for vibration isolation platforms. It is necessary to propose an accelerometer configuration measurement model that yields such a high measuring precision. In this paper, an accelerometer configuration to improve measurement accuracy is proposed. The corresponding calculation formulas of the angular acceleration were derived through theoretical analysis. A method is presented to minimize angular acceleration noise based on analysis of the root mean square noise of the angular acceleration. Moreover, the influence of installation position errors and accelerometer orientation errors on the calculation precision of the angular acceleration is studied. Comparisons of the output differences between the proposed configuration and the previous planar triangle configuration under the same installation errors are conducted by simulation. The simulation results show that installation errors have a relatively small impact on the calculation accuracy of the proposed configuration. To further verify the high calculation precision of the proposed configuration, experiments are carried out for both the proposed configuration and the planar triangle configuration. On the basis of the results of simulations and experiments, it can be concluded that the proposed configuration has higher angular acceleration calculation precision and can be applied to different platforms.

  13. Measurement Model and Precision Analysis of Accelerometers for Maglev Vibration Isolation Platforms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Qianqian; Yue, Honghao; Liu, Rongqiang; Zhang, Xiaoyou; Ding, Liang; Liang, Tian; Deng, Zongquan

    2015-08-14

    High precision measurement of acceleration levels is required to allow active control for vibration isolation platforms. It is necessary to propose an accelerometer configuration measurement model that yields such a high measuring precision. In this paper, an accelerometer configuration to improve measurement accuracy is proposed. The corresponding calculation formulas of the angular acceleration were derived through theoretical analysis. A method is presented to minimize angular acceleration noise based on analysis of the root mean square noise of the angular acceleration. Moreover, the influence of installation position errors and accelerometer orientation errors on the calculation precision of the angular acceleration is studied. Comparisons of the output differences between the proposed configuration and the previous planar triangle configuration under the same installation errors are conducted by simulation. The simulation results show that installation errors have a relatively small impact on the calculation accuracy of the proposed configuration. To further verify the high calculation precision of the proposed configuration, experiments are carried out for both the proposed configuration and the planar triangle configuration. On the basis of the results of simulations and experiments, it can be concluded that the proposed configuration has higher angular acceleration calculation precision and can be applied to different platforms.

  14. High-precision mass measurements for the rp-process at JYFLTRAP

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Canete Laetitia

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The double Penning trap JYFLTRAP at the University of Jyväskylä has been successfully used to achieve high-precision mass measurements of nuclei involved in the rapid proton-capture (rp process. A precise mass measurement of 31Cl is essential to estimate the waiting point condition of 30S in the rp-process occurring in type I x-ray bursts (XRBs. The mass-excess of 31C1 measured at JYFLTRAP, -7034.7(3.4 keV, is 15 more precise than the value given in the Atomic Mass Evaluation 2012. The proton separation energy Sp determined from the new mass-excess value confirmed that 30S is a waiting point, with a lower-temperature limit of 0.44 GK. The mass of 52Co effects both 51Fe(p,γ52Co and 52Co(p,γ53Ni reactions. The mass-excess value measured, - 34 331.6(6.6 keV is 30 times more precise than the value given in AME2012. The Q values for the 51Fe(p,γ52Co and 52Co(p,γ53Ni reactions are now known with a high precision, 1418(11 keV and 2588(26 keV respectively. The results show that 52Co is more proton bound and 53Ni less proton bound than what was expected from the extrapolated value.

  15. Plasmonic micropillars for precision cell force measurement across a large field-of-view

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Fan; Wen, Ximiao; Tan, Xing Haw Marvin; Chiou, Pei-Yu

    2018-01-01

    A plasmonic micropillar platform with self-organized gold nanospheres is reported for the precision cell traction force measurement across a large field-of-view (FOV). Gold nanospheres were implanted into the tips of polymer micropillars by annealing gold microdisks with nanosecond laser pulses. Each gold nanosphere is physically anchored in the center of a pillar tip and serves as a strong, point-source-like light scattering center for each micropillar. This allows a micropillar to be clearly observed and precisely tracked even under a low magnification objective lens for the concurrent and precision measurement across a large FOV. A spatial resolution of 30 nm for the pillar deflection measurement has been accomplished on this platform with a 20× objective lens.

  16. Surface temperature measurement of plasma facing components in tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amiel, Stephane

    2014-01-01

    During this PhD, the challenges on the non-intrusive surface temperature measurements of metallic plasma facing components in tokamaks are reported. Indeed, a precise material emissivity value is needed for classical infrared methods and the environment contribution has to be known particularly for low emissivities materials. Although methods have been developed to overcome these issues, they have been implemented solely for dedicated experiments. In any case, none of these methods are suitable for surface temperature measurement in tokamaks.The active pyrometry introduced in this study allows surface temperature measurements independently of reflected flux and emissivities using pulsed and modulated photothermal effect. This method has been validated in laboratory on metallic materials with reflected fluxes for pulsed and modulated modes. This experimental validation is coupled with a surface temperature variation induced by photothermal effect and temporal signal evolvement modelling in order to optimize both the heating source characteristics and the data acquisition and treatment. The experimental results have been used to determine the application range in temperature and detection wavelengths. In this context, the design of an active pyrometry system on tokamak has been completed, based on a bicolor camera for a thermography application in metallic (or low emissivity) environment.The active pyrometry method introduced in this study is a complementary technique of classical infrared methods used for thermography in tokamak environment which allows performing local and 2D surface temperature measurements independently of reflected fluxes and emissivities. (author) [fr

  17. Measurements of plasma position in TJ-I Tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qin, J.; Ascasibar, E.; Navarro, A.P.; Ochando, M.A.; Pastor, I.; Pedrosa, M.A.; Rodriguez, L.; Sanchez, J.; Team, TJ-I.

    1994-01-01

    This report presents the experimental measurements of plasma position in TJ-I tokamak by using small magnetic probes. The basis of method has been described in our previous work (1) in which the plasma current is considered as a filament current. The observed relations between the disruptive instabilities and plasma displacements are also show here. (Author) 7 refs

  18. Spectroscopic analysis applied to temperature measurement in plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fieffe-Prevost, P.

    1978-01-01

    The plasma temperature is defined only if the plasma is in a state near thermodynamic equilibrium. This plasma state is analysed in detail and spectroscopic methods for measuring the temperature are discussed. As an application the hydrogen arc of the National Institute of Metrology of the Conservatoire National des Arts et Metiers (Paris) is briefly described [fr

  19. Poloidal rotation velocity measurement in toroidal plasmas via microwave reflectometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pavlichenko, O.S.; Skibenko, A.I.; Fomin, I.P.; Pinos, I.B.; Ocheretenko, V.L.; Berezhniy, V.L.

    2001-01-01

    Results of experiment modeling backscattering of microwaves from rotating plasma layer perturbed by fluctuations are presented. It was shown that auto- and crosscorrelation of reflected power have a periodicity equal to rotation period. Such periodicity was observed by microwave reflectometry in experiments on RF plasma production on U-3M torsatron and was used for measurement of plasma poloidal rotation velocity. (author)

  20. Precision manufacturing

    CERN Document Server

    Dornfeld, David

    2008-01-01

    Today there is a high demand for high-precision products. The manufacturing processes are now highly sophisticated and derive from a specialized genre called precision engineering. Precision Manufacturing provides an introduction to precision engineering and manufacturing with an emphasis on the design and performance of precision machines and machine tools, metrology, tooling elements, machine structures, sources of error, precision machining processes and precision process planning. As well as discussing the critical role precision machine design for manufacturing has had in technological developments over the last few hundred years. In addition, the influence of sustainable manufacturing requirements in precision processes is introduced. Drawing upon years of practical experience and using numerous examples and illustrative applications, David Dornfeld and Dae-Eun Lee cover precision manufacturing as it applies to: The importance of measurement and metrology in the context of Precision Manufacturing. Th...

  1. Plasma-parameter measurements using neutral-particle-beam attenuation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Foote, J.H.; Molvik, A.W.; Turner, W.C.

    1982-01-01

    Intense and energetic neutral-particle-beam injection used for fueling or heating magnetically confined, controlled-fusion experimental plasmas can also provide diagnostic measurements of the plasmas. The attenuation of an atomic beam (mainly from charge-exchange and ionization interactions) when passing through a plasma gives the plasma line density. Orthogonal arrays of highly collimated detectors of the secondary-electron-emission type have been used in magnetic-mirror experiments to measure neutral-beam attenuation along chords through the plasma volume at different radial and axial positions. The radial array is used to infer the radial plasma-density profile; the axial array, to infer the axial plasma-density profile and the ion angular distribution at the plasma midplane

  2. Measuring brightness temperature distributions of plasma bunches

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kirko, V.I.; Stadnichenko, I.A.

    1981-01-01

    The possibility of restoration of brightness temperature distribution along plasma jet on the base of a simple ultra high- speed photography and subsequent photometric treatment is shown. The developed technique has been applied for finding spectral radiation intensity and brightness temperature of plasma jets of a tubular gas-cumulative charge and explosive plasma compressor. The problem of shock wave front has been successfully solved and thus distribution of above parameters beginning from the region preceeding the shock wave has been obtained [ru

  3. A precise measurement of the [Formula: see text] meson oscillation frequency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aaij, R; Abellán Beteta, C; Adeva, B; Adinolfi, M; Affolder, A; Ajaltouni, Z; Akar, S; Albrecht, J; Alessio, F; Alexander, M; Ali, S; Alkhazov, G; Alvarez Cartelle, P; Alves, A A; Amato, S; Amerio, S; Amhis, Y; An, L; Anderlini, L; Anderson, J; Andreassi, G; Andreotti, M; Andrews, J E; Appleby, R B; Aquines Gutierrez, O; Archilli, F; d'Argent, P; Artamonov, A; Artuso, M; Aslanides, E; Auriemma, G; Baalouch, M; Bachmann, S; Back, J J; Badalov, A; Baesso, C; Baldini, W; Barlow, R J; Barschel, C; Barsuk, S; Barter, W; Batozskaya, V; Battista, V; Bay, A; Beaucourt, L; Beddow, J; Bedeschi, F; Bediaga, I; Bel, L J; Bellee, V; Belloli, N; Belyaev, I; Ben-Haim, E; Bencivenni, G; Benson, S; Benton, J; Berezhnoy, A; Bernet, R; Bertolin, A; Bettler, M-O; van Beuzekom, M; Bien, A; Bifani, S; Billoir, P; Bird, T; Birnkraut, A; Bizzeti, A; Blake, T; Blanc, F; Blouw, J; Blusk, S; Bocci, V; Bondar, A; Bondar, N; Bonivento, W; Borghi, S; Borsato, M; Bowcock, T J V; Bowen, E; Bozzi, C; Braun, S; Britsch, M; Britton, T; Brodzicka, J; Brook, N H; Buchanan, E; Bursche, A; Buytaert, J; Cadeddu, S; Calabrese, R; Calvi, M; Calvo Gomez, M; Campana, P; Campora Perez, D; Capriotti, L; Carbone, A; Carboni, G; Cardinale, R; Cardini, A; Carniti, P; Carson, L; Carvalho Akiba, K; Casse, G; Cassina, L; Castillo Garcia, L; Cattaneo, M; Cauet, Ch; Cavallero, G; Cenci, R; Charles, M; Charpentier, Ph; Chefdeville, M; Chen, S; Cheung, S-F; Chiapolini, N; Chrzaszcz, M; Cid Vidal, X; Ciezarek, G; Clarke, P E L; Clemencic, M; Cliff, H V; Closier, J; Coco, V; Cogan, J; Cogneras, E; Cogoni, V; Cojocariu, L; Collazuol, G; Collins, P; Comerma-Montells, A; Contu, A; Cook, A; Coombes, M; Coquereau, S; Corti, G; Corvo, M; Couturier, B; Cowan, G A; Craik, D C; Crocombe, A; Cruz Torres, M; Cunliffe, S; Currie, R; D'Ambrosio, C; Dall'Occo, E; Dalseno, J; David, P N Y; Davis, A; De Aguiar Francisco, O; De Bruyn, K; De Capua, S; De Cian, M; De Miranda, J M; De Paula, L; De Simone, P; Dean, C-T; Decamp, D; Deckenhoff, M; Del Buono, L; Déléage, N; Demmer, M; Derkach, D; Deschamps, O; Dettori, F; Dey, B; Di Canto, A; Di Ruscio, F; Dijkstra, H; Donleavy, S; Dordei, F; Dorigo, M; Dosil Suárez, A; Dossett, D; Dovbnya, A; Dreimanis, K; Dufour, L; Dujany, G; Dupertuis, F; Durante, P; Dzhelyadin, R; Dziurda, A; Dzyuba, A; Easo, S; Egede, U; Egorychev, V; Eidelman, S; Eisenhardt, S; Eitschberger, U; Ekelhof, R; Eklund, L; El Rifai, I; Elsasser, Ch; Ely, S; Esen, S; Evans, H M; Evans, T; Falabella, A; Färber, C; Farley, N; Farry, S; Fay, R; Ferguson, D; Fernandez Albor, V; Ferrari, F; Ferreira Rodrigues, F; Ferro-Luzzi, M; Filippov, S; Fiore, M; Fiorini, M; Firlej, M; Fitzpatrick, C; Fiutowski, T; Fohl, K; Fol, P; Fontana, M; Fontanelli, F; C Forshaw, D; Forty, R; Frank, M; Frei, C; Frosini, M; Fu, J; Furfaro, E; Gallas Torreira, A; Galli, D; Gallorini, S; Gambetta, S; Gandelman, M; Gandini, P; Gao, Y; García Pardiñas, J; Garra Tico, J; Garrido, L; Gascon, D; Gaspar, C; Gauld, R; Gavardi, L; Gazzoni, G; Gerick, D; Gersabeck, E; Gersabeck, M; Gershon, T; Ghez, Ph; Gianì, S; Gibson, V; Girard, O G; Giubega, L; Gligorov, V V; Göbel, C; Golubkov, D; Golutvin, A; Gomes, A; Gotti, C; Grabalosa Gándara, M; Graciani Diaz, R; Granado Cardoso, L A; Graugés, E; Graverini, E; Graziani, G; Grecu, A; Greening, E; Gregson, S; Griffith, P; Grillo, L; Grünberg, O; Gui, B; Gushchin, E; Guz, Yu; Gys, T; Hadavizadeh, T; Hadjivasiliou, C; Haefeli, G; Haen, C; Haines, S C; Hall, S; Hamilton, B; Han, X; Hansmann-Menzemer, S; Harnew, N; Harnew, S T; Harrison, J; He, J; Head, T; Heijne, V; Heister, A; Hennessy, K; Henrard, P; Henry, L; Hernando Morata, J A; van Herwijnen, E; Heß, M; Hicheur, A; Hill, D; Hoballah, M; Hombach, C; Hulsbergen, W; Humair, T; Hussain, N; Hutchcroft, D; Hynds, D; Idzik, M; Ilten, P; Jacobsson, R; Jaeger, A; Jalocha, J; Jans, E; Jawahery, A; Jing, F; John, M; Johnson, D; Jones, C R; Joram, C; Jost, B; Jurik, N; Kandybei, S; Kanso, W; Karacson, M; Karbach, T M; Karodia, S; Kecke, M; Kelsey, M; Kenyon, I R; Kenzie, M; Ketel, T; Khanji, B; Khurewathanakul, C; Kirn, T; Klaver, S; Klimaszewski, K; Kochebina, O; Kolpin, M; Komarov, I; Koopman, R F; Koppenburg, P; Kozeiha, M; Kravchuk, L; Kreplin, K; Kreps, M; Krocker, G; Krokovny, P; Kruse, F; Krzemien, W; Kucewicz, W; Kucharczyk, M; Kudryavtsev, V; K Kuonen, A; Kurek, K; Kvaratskheliya, T; Lacarrere, D; Lafferty, G; Lai, A; Lambert, D; Lanfranchi, G; Langenbruch, C; Langhans, B; Latham, T; Lazzeroni, C; Le Gac, R; van Leerdam, J; Lees, J-P; Lefèvre, R; Leflat, A; Lefrançois, J; Lemos Cid, E; Leroy, O; Lesiak, T; Leverington, B; Li, Y; Likhomanenko, T; Liles, M; Lindner, R; Linn, C; Lionetto, F; Liu, B; Liu, X; Loh, D; Longstaff, I; Lopes, J H; Lucchesi, D; Lucio Martinez, M; Luo, H; Lupato, A; Luppi, E; Lupton, O; Lusardi, N; Lusiani, A; Machefert, F; Maciuc, F; Maev, O; Maguire, K; Malde, S; Malinin, A; Manca, G; Mancinelli, G; Manning, P; Mapelli, A; Maratas, J; Marchand, J F; Marconi, U; Marin Benito, C; Marino, P; Marks, J; Martellotti, G; Martin, M; Martinelli, M; Martinez Santos, D; Martinez Vidal, F; Martins Tostes, D; Massafferri, A; Matev, R; Mathad, A; Mathe, Z; Matteuzzi, C; Mauri, A; Maurin, B; Mazurov, A; McCann, M; McCarthy, J; McNab, A; McNulty, R; Meadows, B; Meier, F; Meissner, M; Melnychuk, D; Merk, M; Michielin, E; Milanes, D A; Minard, M-N; Mitzel, D S; Molina Rodriguez, J; Monroy, I A; Monteil, S; Morandin, M; Morawski, P; Mordà, A; Morello, M J; Moron, J; Morris, A B; Mountain, R; Muheim, F; Müller, D; Müller, J; Müller, K; Müller, V; Mussini, M; Muster, B; Naik, P; Nakada, T; Nandakumar, R; Nandi, A; Nasteva, I; Needham, M; Neri, N; Neubert, S; Neufeld, N; Neuner, M; Nguyen, A D; Nguyen, T D; Nguyen-Mau, C; Niess, V; Niet, R; Nikitin, N; Nikodem, T; Novoselov, A; O'Hanlon, D P; Oblakowska-Mucha, A; Obraztsov, V; Ogilvy, S; Okhrimenko, O; Oldeman, R; Onderwater, C J G; Osorio Rodrigues, B; Otalora Goicochea, J M; Otto, A; Owen, P; Oyanguren, A; Palano, A; Palombo, F; Palutan, M; Panman, J; Papanestis, A; Pappagallo, M; Pappalardo, L L; Pappenheimer, C; Parkes, C; Passaleva, G; Patel, G D; Patel, M; Patrignani, C; Pearce, A; Pellegrino, A; Penso, G; Pepe Altarelli, M; Perazzini, S; Perret, P; Pescatore, L; Petridis, K; Petrolini, A; Petruzzo, M; Picatoste Olloqui, E; Pietrzyk, B; Pilař, T; Pinci, D; Pistone, A; Piucci, A; Playfer, S; Plo Casasus, M; Poikela, T; Polci, F; Poluektov, A; Polyakov, I; Polycarpo, E; Popov, A; Popov, D; Popovici, B; Potterat, C; Price, E; Price, J D; Prisciandaro, J; Pritchard, A; Prouve, C; Pugatch, V; Puig Navarro, A; Punzi, G; Qian, W; Quagliani, R; Rachwal, B; Rademacker, J H; Rama, M; Rangel, M S; Raniuk, I; Rauschmayr, N; Raven, G; Redi, F; Reichert, S; Reid, M M; Dos Reis, A C; Ricciardi, S; Richards, S; Rihl, M; Rinnert, K; Rives Molina, V; Robbe, P; Rodrigues, A B; Rodrigues, E; Rodriguez Lopez, J A; Rodriguez Perez, P; Roiser, S; Romanovsky, V; Romero Vidal, A; W Ronayne, J; Rotondo, M; Rouvinet, J; Ruf, T; Ruiz Valls, P; Saborido Silva, J J; Sagidova, N; Sail, P; Saitta, B; Salustino Guimaraes, V; Sanchez Mayordomo, C; Sanmartin Sedes, B; Santacesaria, R; Santamarina Rios, C; Santimaria, M; Santovetti, E; Sarti, A; Satriano, C; Satta, A; Saunders, D M; Savrina, D; Schael, S; Schiller, M; Schindler, H; Schlupp, M; Schmelling, M; Schmelzer, T; Schmidt, B; Schneider, O; Schopper, A; Schubiger, M; Schune, M-H; Schwemmer, R; Sciascia, B; Sciubba, A; Semennikov, A; Sergi, A; Serra, N; Serrano, J; Sestini, L; Seyfert, P; Shapkin, M; Shapoval, I; Shcheglov, Y; Shears, T; Shekhtman, L; Shevchenko, V; Shires, A; Siddi, B G; Silva Coutinho, R; Silva de Oliveira, L; Simi, G; Sirendi, M; Skidmore, N; Skwarnicki, T; Smith, E; Smith, E; Smith, I T; Smith, J; Smith, M; Snoek, H; Sokoloff, M D; Soler, F J P; Soomro, F; Souza, D; Souza De Paula, B; Spaan, B; Spradlin, P; Sridharan, S; Stagni, F; Stahl, M; Stahl, S; Stefkova, S; Steinkamp, O; Stenyakin, O; Stevenson, S; Stoica, S; Stone, S; Storaci, B; Stracka, S; Straticiuc, M; Straumann, U; Sun, L; Sutcliffe, W; Swientek, K; Swientek, S; Syropoulos, V; Szczekowski, M; Szczypka, P; Szumlak, T; T'Jampens, S; Tayduganov, A; Tekampe, T; Teklishyn, M; Tellarini, G; Teubert, F; Thomas, C; Thomas, E; van Tilburg, J; Tisserand, V; Tobin, M; Todd, J; Tolk, S; Tomassetti, L; Tonelli, D; Topp-Joergensen, S; Torr, N; Tournefier, E; Tourneur, S; Trabelsi, K; Tran, M T; Tresch, M; Trisovic, A; Tsaregorodtsev, A; Tsopelas, P; Tuning, N; Ukleja, A; Ustyuzhanin, A; Uwer, U; Vacca, C; Vagnoni, V; Valenti, G; Vallier, A; Vazquez Gomez, R; Vazquez Regueiro, P; Vázquez Sierra, C; Vecchi, S; van Veghel, M; Velthuis, J J; Veltri, M; Veneziano, G; Vesterinen, M; Viaud, B; Vieira, D; Vieites Diaz, M; Vilasis-Cardona, X; Vollhardt, A; Volyanskyy, D; Voong, D; Vorobyev, A; Vorobyev, V; Voß, C; de Vries, J A; Waldi, R; Wallace, C; Wallace, R; Walsh, J; Wandernoth, S; Wang, J; Ward, D R; Watson, N K; Websdale, D; Weiden, A; Whitehead, M; Wilkinson, G; Wilkinson, M; Williams, M; Williams, M P; Williams, M; Williams, T; Wilson, F F; Wimberley, J; Wishahi, J; Wislicki, W; Witek, M; Wormser, G; Wotton, S A; Wright, S; Wyllie, K; Xie, Y; Xu, Z; Yang, Z; Yu, J; Yuan, X; Yushchenko, O; Zangoli, M; Zavertyaev, M; Zhang, L; Zhang, Y; Zhelezov, A; Zhokhov, A; Zhong, L; Zhukov, V; Zucchelli, S

    2016-01-01

    The oscillation frequency, [Formula: see text], of [Formula: see text] mesons is measured using semileptonic decays with a [Formula: see text] or [Formula: see text] meson in the final state. The data sample corresponds to 3.0[Formula: see text] of pp collisions, collected by the LHCb experiment at centre-of-mass energies [Formula: see text] = 7 and 8[Formula: see text]. A combination of the two decay modes gives [Formula: see text], where the first uncertainty is statistical and the second is systematic. This is the most precise single measurement of this parameter. It is consistent with the current world average and has similar precision.

  4. Investigation of the proton-neutron interaction by high-precision nuclear mass measurements

    CERN Multimedia

    Savreux, R P; Akkus, B

    2007-01-01

    We propose to measure the atomic masses of a series of short-lived nuclides, including $^{70}$Ni, $^{122-130}$Cd, $^{134}$Sn, $^{138,140}$Xe, $^{207-210}$Hg, and $^{223-225}$Rn, that contribute to the investigation of the proton-neutron interaction and its role in nuclear structure. The high-precision mass measurements are planned for the Penning trap mass spectrometer ISOLTRAP that reaches the required precision of 10 keV in the nuclear mass determination.

  5. High Precision Measurement of the differential vector boson cross-sections with the ATLAS detector

    CERN Document Server

    Armbruster, Aaron James; The ATLAS collaboration

    2017-01-01

    Measurements of the Drell-Yan production of W and Z/gamma bosons at the LHC provide a benchmark of our understanding of perturbative QCD and probe the proton structure in a unique way. The ATLAS collaboration has performed new high precision measurements at center-of-mass energies of 7. The measurements are performed for W+, W- and Z/gamma bosons integrated and as a function of the boson or lepton rapidity and the Z/gamma* mass. Unprecedented precision is reached and strong constraints on Parton Distribution functions, in particular the strange density are found. Z cross sections are also measured at center-of-mass energies of 8 eV and 13TeV, and cross-section ratios to the top-quark pair production have been derived. This ratio measurement leads to a cancellation of systematic effects and allows for a high precision comparison to the theory predictions. The cross section of single W events has also been measured precisely at center-of-mass energies of 8TeV and 13TeV and the W charge asymmetry has been determ...

  6. Study of multi-functional precision optical measuring system for large scale equipment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Wei; Lao, Dabao; Zhou, Weihu; Zhang, Wenying; Jiang, Xingjian; Wang, Yongxi

    2017-10-01

    The effective application of high performance measurement technology can greatly improve the large-scale equipment manufacturing ability. Therefore, the geometric parameters measurement, such as size, attitude and position, requires the measurement system with high precision, multi-function, portability and other characteristics. However, the existing measuring instruments, such as laser tracker, total station, photogrammetry system, mostly has single function, station moving and other shortcomings. Laser tracker needs to work with cooperative target, but it can hardly meet the requirement of measurement in extreme environment. Total station is mainly used for outdoor surveying and mapping, it is hard to achieve the demand of accuracy in industrial measurement. Photogrammetry system can achieve a wide range of multi-point measurement, but the measuring range is limited and need to repeatedly move station. The paper presents a non-contact opto-electronic measuring instrument, not only it can work by scanning the measurement path but also measuring the cooperative target by tracking measurement. The system is based on some key technologies, such as absolute distance measurement, two-dimensional angle measurement, automatically target recognition and accurate aiming, precision control, assembly of complex mechanical system and multi-functional 3D visualization software. Among them, the absolute distance measurement module ensures measurement with high accuracy, and the twodimensional angle measuring module provides precision angle measurement. The system is suitable for the case of noncontact measurement of large-scale equipment, it can ensure the quality and performance of large-scale equipment throughout the process of manufacturing and improve the manufacturing ability of large-scale and high-end equipment.

  7. Accuracy and Precision in Elemental Analysis of Environmental Samples using Inductively Coupled Plasma-Atomic Emission Spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quraishi, Shamsad Begum; Chung, Yong-Sam; Choi, Kwang Soon

    2005-01-01

    Inductively Coupled Plasma-Atomic Emission Spectrometry followed by micro-wave digestion have been performed on different environmental Certified Reference Materials (CRMs). Analytical results show that accuracy and precision in ICP-AES analysis were acceptable and satisfactory in case of soil and hair CRM samples. The relative error of most of the elements in these two CRMs is within 10% with few exceptions and coefficient of variation is also less than 10%. Z-score as an analytical performance was also within the acceptable range (±2). ICP-AES was found as an inadequate method for Air Filter CRM due to incomplete dissolution, low concentration of elements and very low mass of the sample. However, real air filter sample could have been analyzed with high accuracy and precision by increasing sample mass during collection. (author)

  8. Precision flux density measurements of the giant planets at 8420 MHz

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turegano, J. A.; Klein, M. J.

    1981-01-01

    Precision measurements of the 3.56 cm flux densities of Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus, and Neptune are reported. The results are compared with previously published measurements as a means of: remotely sensing long-term changes in the microwave emission from the atmospheres of these planets and measuring the effects of Saturn's rings on the disk temperature as observed from earth at different ring inclination angles.

  9. Setup for precise measurement of neutro lifetime by UCN storage method with inelastically scattered neutron detection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arzumanov, S.S; Bondarenko, L.N.; Gel'tenbort, P.; Morozov, V.I.; Nesvizhevskij, V.V.; Panin, Yu.N.; Strepetov, A.N.

    2007-01-01

    The experimental setup and the method of measuring the neutron lifetime with a precision less then 1 s is described. The measurements will be carried out by storage of ultracold neutrons (UCN) into vessels with inner walls coated with fluorine polymer oil with simultaneous registration of inelastically scattered UCN leaving storage vessels. The analysis of statistical and methodical errors is carried out. The calculated estimation of the measurement accuracy is presented [ru

  10. New precise measurement of muonium hyperfine structure interval at J-PARC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ueno, Y., E-mail: yueno@radphys4.c.u-tokyo.ac.jp [University of Tokyo, Graduate School of Arts and Sciences (Japan); Aoki, M. [Osaka University, Graduate School of Science (Japan); Fukao, Y. [KEK (Japan); Higashi, Y.; Higuchi, T. [University of Tokyo, Graduate School of Arts and Sciences (Japan); Iinuma, H.; Ikedo, Y. [KEK (Japan); Ishida, K. [RIKEN (Japan); Ito, T. U. [Japan Atomic Energy Agency (Japan); Iwasaki, M. [RIKEN (Japan); Kadono, R. [KEK (Japan); Kamigaito, O. [RIKEN (Japan); Kanda, S. [University of Tokyo, Department of Physics (Japan); Kawall, D. [University of Massachusetts, Amherst, Department of Physics (United States); Kawamura, N.; Koda, A.; Kojima, K. M. [KEK (Japan); Kubo, M. K. [International Christian University, Graduate School of Arts and Science (Japan); Matsuda, Y. [University of Tokyo, Graduate School of Arts and Sciences (Japan); Mibe, T. [KEK (Japan); and others

    2017-11-15

    MuSEUM is an international collaboration aiming at a new precise measurement of the muonium hyperfine structure at J-PARC (Japan Proton Accelerator Research Complex). Utilizing its intense pulsed muon beam, we expect a ten-fold improvement for both measurements at high magnetic field and zero magnetic field. We have developed a sophisticated monitoring system, including a beam profile monitor to measure the 3D distribution of muonium atoms to suppress the systematic uncertainty.

  11. Precision Cosmology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Bernard J. T.

    2017-04-01

    Preface; Notation and conventions; Part I. 100 Years of Cosmology: 1. Emerging cosmology; 2. The cosmic expansion; 3. The cosmic microwave background; 4. Recent cosmology; Part II. Newtonian Cosmology: 5. Newtonian cosmology; 6. Dark energy cosmological models; 7. The early universe; 8. The inhomogeneous universe; 9. The inflationary universe; Part III. Relativistic Cosmology: 10. Minkowski space; 11. The energy momentum tensor; 12. General relativity; 13. Space-time geometry and calculus; 14. The Einstein field equations; 15. Solutions of the Einstein equations; 16. The Robertson-Walker solution; 17. Congruences, curvature and Raychaudhuri; 18. Observing and measuring the universe; Part IV. The Physics of Matter and Radiation: 19. Physics of the CMB radiation; 20. Recombination of the primeval plasma; 21. CMB polarisation; 22. CMB anisotropy; Part V. Precision Tools for Precision Cosmology: 23. Likelihood; 24. Frequentist hypothesis testing; 25. Statistical inference: Bayesian; 26. CMB data processing; 27. Parametrising the universe; 28. Precision cosmology; 29. Epilogue; Appendix A. SI, CGS and Planck units; Appendix B. Magnitudes and distances; Appendix C. Representing vectors and tensors; Appendix D. The electromagnetic field; Appendix E. Statistical distributions; Appendix F. Functions on a sphere; Appendix G. Acknowledgements; References; Index.

  12. Precise measurement of neutrino and anti-neutrino differential cross sections on iron

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tzanov, Martin Mihaylov [Pittsburgh U.

    2005-11-01

    This thesis will present a precise measurement of the differential cross section for charged current neutrino and anti-neutrino scattering from iron. The NuTeV experiment took data during 1996-97 and collected 8.6 10 º and 2.4 10 º charged-current (CC) interactions. The experiment combines sign-selected neutrino and antineutrino beams and the upgraded CCFR iron-scintillator neutrino detector. A precision continuous calibration beam was used to determine the muon and hadron energy scales to a precision of about a factor of two better than previous experiments. The structure functions F (x,Q2) and xF3(x,Q2) are extracted and compared with theory and previous measurements.

  13. Precision Drell-Yan Measurements at the LHC and Implications for the Diphoton Excess

    CERN Document Server

    Goertz, Florian; Son, Minho; Urbano, Alfredo

    2016-01-01

    Precision measurements of the Drell-Yan (DY) cross section at the LHC constrain new physics scenarios that involve new states with electroweak (EW) charges. We analyze these constraints and apply them to models that can address the LHC diphoton excess at 750 GeV. We confront these findings with LEP EW precision tests and show that DY provides stronger constraints than the LEP data. While 8 TeV data can already probe some parts of the interesting region of parameter space, LHC14 results are expected to cover a substantial part of the relevant terrain. We derive the bounds from the existing data, estimate LHC14 reach and compare them to the bounds one gets from LEP and future FCC-ee precision measurements.

  14. A Precision Measurement of sin$^{2}\\theta$$_{w}$ from Semileptonic Neutrino Scattering

    CERN Document Server

    Wotschack, Jorg

    1987-01-01

    There is considerable interest in measuring the electroweak mixing parameter sin$^{2}\\Theta$$_{w}$, of the Glashow-Salam-Weinberg theory $^{1}$ as precisely as possible: first, its value may be predicted by models of Grand Unification;$^{2}$ second, precise measurements of sin$^{2}\\Theta$$_{w}$ from different processes would test the validity of electroweak radiative corrections. $^{3,$}$. Different methods have been used to determine sin$^{2}\\Theta$$_{w}$, over a large range of $Q^{2}$ values. FIGURE 1 gives a compilation of sin$^{2}\\Theta$$_{w}$ with remarkable agreement between the results. At present, it is most precisely determined in semileptonic neutrino-nucleon scattering from the ratio of neutral current (NC) to charged current (CC) cross and in proton-antiproton collisions from the W boson mass. $^{10,11}$.

  15. ICP magnetic sector multiple collector mass spectrometry and the precise measurement of isotopic compositions using nebulization of solutions and laser ablation of solids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Halliday, A.N.; Lee, D-C.; Christensen, J.N.; Yi, W.; Hall, C.M.; Jones, C.E.; Teagle, D.A.H.; Freedman, P.A.

    1996-01-01

    Inductively-coupled plasma (ICP) sources offer considerable advantages over thermal sources because the high ionization efficiency facilitates measurements of relatively high sensitivity for elements such as Hf or Sn, which can be difficult to measure precisely with thermal ionization mass spectrometry (TIMS). The mass discrimination (bias) is larger than for TIMS, favours the heavier ions, and decreases in magnitude with increasing mass. However, in contrast to TIMS, this discrimination is largely independent of the chemical or physical properties of the element or the duration of the analysis. This has been demonstrated to high precision with a double focussing multiple collector magnetic sector mass spectrometer with an ICP source. The principle of this instrument is briefly described. The potential of the instrument for high precision isotopic measurements of a very broad range of elements, using solution aspiration or laser ablation, is indicated. 15 refs

  16. Optimizing top precision performance measure of content-based image retrieval by learning similarity function

    KAUST Repository

    Liang, Ru-Ze

    2017-04-24

    In this paper we study the problem of content-based image retrieval. In this problem, the most popular performance measure is the top precision measure, and the most important component of a retrieval system is the similarity function used to compare a query image against a database image. However, up to now, there is no existing similarity learning method proposed to optimize the top precision measure. To fill this gap, in this paper, we propose a novel similarity learning method to maximize the top precision measure. We model this problem as a minimization problem with an objective function as the combination of the losses of the relevant images ranked behind the top-ranked irrelevant image, and the squared Frobenius norm of the similarity function parameter. This minimization problem is solved as a quadratic programming problem. The experiments over two benchmark data sets show the advantages of the proposed method over other similarity learning methods when the top precision is used as the performance measure.

  17. Optimizing top precision performance measure of content-based image retrieval by learning similarity function

    KAUST Repository

    Liang, Ru-Ze; Shi, Lihui; Wang, Haoxiang; Meng, Jiandong; Wang, Jim Jing-Yan; Sun, Qingquan; Gu, Yi

    2017-01-01

    In this paper we study the problem of content-based image retrieval. In this problem, the most popular performance measure is the top precision measure, and the most important component of a retrieval system is the similarity function used to compare a query image against a database image. However, up to now, there is no existing similarity learning method proposed to optimize the top precision measure. To fill this gap, in this paper, we propose a novel similarity learning method to maximize the top precision measure. We model this problem as a minimization problem with an objective function as the combination of the losses of the relevant images ranked behind the top-ranked irrelevant image, and the squared Frobenius norm of the similarity function parameter. This minimization problem is solved as a quadratic programming problem. The experiments over two benchmark data sets show the advantages of the proposed method over other similarity learning methods when the top precision is used as the performance measure.

  18. Precise measurement of muon momenta at LEP using the L3 detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gonzalez Romero, E.M.

    1990-01-01

    In this PhD report the author presents the studies and methods developed to achieve the optimization of the resolution in the momentum measurement of the L3 moun detector. Chapters 1 and 2 show the motivations to build a precision muon detector for the LEP e + e - collider. Special emphasis is applied to the study of the Higgs scalar boson search and identification and the guiding principles used to design the L3 muon detector are outlined. Chapter 3 is devoted to the description of the drift chambers. They are located in three concentric octagonal cylinders inside one solenoidal magnet, around the interaction point and coaxial with the beams. These chambers are the measuring elements of the detector. The chapter includes the description or the different tests applied to the chambers to obtain their resolution and calibration. In chapter 4 the alignment system of this chambers is described. This system is a key element to the precision of the detector, that being 12 meters long and of 12 meters of diameter has to measure the particles trajectories with precisions of just a few micrometers. Chapter 5 describes the third key piece for the detector precision, the monitoring and control system. It allows to know continually the precise values of the critical parameters of the detector. Finally in chapter 6 the author presents the results of the many test applied to the detector using cosmic rays, UV lasers and even the actual muons produced in the e + e - interactions. These tests prove that the L3 muon detector is the most precise measuring system for muon momenta installed at present in one e + e - collider ring. (Author)

  19. Accuracy of complete-arch dental impressions: a new method of measuring trueness and precision.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ender, Andreas; Mehl, Albert

    2013-02-01

    A new approach to both 3-dimensional (3D) trueness and precision is necessary to assess the accuracy of intraoral digital impressions and compare them to conventionally acquired impressions. The purpose of this in vitro study was to evaluate whether a new reference scanner is capable of measuring conventional and digital intraoral complete-arch impressions for 3D accuracy. A steel reference dentate model was fabricated and measured with a reference scanner (digital reference model). Conventional impressions were made from the reference model, poured with Type IV dental stone, scanned with the reference scanner, and exported as digital models. Additionally, digital impressions of the reference model were made and the digital models were exported. Precision was measured by superimposing the digital models within each group. Superimposing the digital models on the digital reference model assessed the trueness of each impression method. Statistical significance was assessed with an independent sample t test (α=.05). The reference scanner delivered high accuracy over the entire dental arch with a precision of 1.6 ±0.6 µm and a trueness of 5.3 ±1.1 µm. Conventional impressions showed significantly higher precision (12.5 ±2.5 µm) and trueness values (20.4 ±2.2 µm) with small deviations in the second molar region (PDigital impressions were significantly less accurate with a precision of 32.4 ±9.6 µm and a trueness of 58.6 ±15.8µm (Pdigital models were visible across the entire dental arch. The new reference scanner is capable of measuring the precision and trueness of both digital and conventional complete-arch impressions. The digital impression is less accurate and shows a different pattern of deviation than the conventional impression. Copyright © 2013 The Editorial Council of the Journal of Prosthetic Dentistry. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Precision measurements with an electroweak boson in the final state with the ATLAS detector

    CERN Document Server

    Lang, Valerie Susanne; The ATLAS collaboration

    2018-01-01

    Measurements of the Drell-Yan production of $W$ and $Z/\\gamma^*$ bosons at the LHC provide a benchmark of our understanding of perturbative QCD and probe the proton structure in a unique way. The ATLAS collaboration has performed new measurements for $W^+$, $W^-$ and $Z/\\gamma^*$ boson production, reaching unprecedented precision and strong constraints on parton distribution functions, in particular the strange quark density. Studying jet production in association with a vector boson, perturbative QCD predictions can be tested in a multi-scale environment. Once the QCD aspects of the vector boson production are understood, high precision measurements aim at the tests of the electroweak sector, such as measuring the $W$ boson mass. Here, a selection of recent ATLAS measurements, as presented at the \\emph{21st Particles and Nuclei International Conference}, in September 2017 in Beijing, China, is discussed.

  1. Computer-controlled detection system for high-precision isotope ratio measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McCord, B.R.; Taylor, J.W.

    1986-01-01

    In this paper the authors describe a detection system for high-precision isotope ratio measurements. In this new system, the requirement for a ratioing digital voltmeter has been eliminated, and a standard digital voltmeter interfaced to a computer is employed. Instead of measuring the ratio of the two steadily increasing output voltages simultaneously, the digital voltmeter alternately samples the outputs at a precise rate over a certain period of time. The data are sent to the computer which calculates the rate of charge of each amplifier and divides the two rates to obtain the isotopic ratio. These results simulate a coincident measurement of the output of both integrators. The charge rate is calculated by using a linear regression method, and the standard error of the slope gives a measure of the stability of the system at the time the measurement was taken

  2. Enhancement of precision and reduction of measuring points in tomographic reconstructions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lustfeld, H.; Hirschfeld, J.A.; Reissel, M.; Steffen, B.

    2011-01-01

    Accurate external measurements are required in tomographic problems to obtain a reasonable knowledge of the internal structures. Crucial is the distribution of the external measuring points. We suggest a procedure how to systematically optimize this distribution viz. to increase the precision (i.e. to shrink error bars) of the reconstruction by detecting the important and by eliminating the irrelevant measuring points. In a realistic numerical example we apply our scheme to magnetotomography of fuel cells. The result is striking: Starting from a smooth distribution of measuring points on a surface of a cuboid around the fuel cell, the number of measuring points can systematically be reduced by more than 90%. At the same time the precision increases by a factor of nearly 3.

  3. Program to make remote time measurement on the new precise clock system on totem

    CERN Document Server

    Martin, David

    2016-01-01

    For my project at CERN, I worked in the TOTEM team with Michele Quinto and Francesco Cafagna as supervisors. Their team is currently working on an update on TOTEM that includes a module able to measure precisely the time of flight of particles emitted from the collision at CMS. With this additional data, TOTEM will be able to reconstruct precisely the point of the collision in CMS. The main problem posed for this new module is to provide a precise synchronized clock signal to both the TOTEM detectors situated 200 meters after and before CMS. In fact, due to some external parameters, as temperature, the length of the optical fiber guiding the clock signal can vary yielding thus a unwanted phase difference of the clock between the two detectors. The idea is to get rid of the noisy phase difference to make very precise time of flight measurement of the order of the picosecond. This is achieved by continuously measuring the phase difference and correcting the time measurements according to the current phase diffe...

  4. High Precision Measurements of W Boson Transverse Momentum at 13 TeV

    CERN Document Server

    Eppler, Drew Galen

    2018-01-01

    The precision of the transverse momentum distribution of the W-boson is crucial for reducing the uncertainty of current and future measurements of the W-boson mass. For this kind of analysis several new recoil algorithms based on particle flow objects have been recently developed. This note studies the reconstruction performances of the different hadronic recoil algorithms.

  5. Experimental setup for precise measurement of losses in high-temperature superconducting transformer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janu, Z.; Wild, J.; Repa, P.; Jelinek, Z.; Zizek, F.; Peksa, L.; Soukup, F.; Tichy, R.

    2006-10-01

    A simple cryogenic system for testing of the superconducting power transformer was constructed. Thermal shielding is provided by additional liquid nitrogen bath instead of super-insulation. The system, together with use of a precise nitrogen liquid level meter, permitted calorimetric measurements of losses of the 8 kVA HTS transformer with a resolution of the order of 0.1 W.

  6. Use of 'MICROPROFILOMETER-2' in precise measurements of diameters of irradiated rod-type cylindrical specimens

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuprienko, M.V.; Dvoretsky, V.G.; Kubasov, E.V.; Rabinovich, A.D.

    2002-01-01

    The paper presents the basic principles of profilometer design, the imposed requirements and some problems emerged in their bringing into practice. Installation designed and made at SSC RF RIAR to precisely measure diameters of rod-type specimens is described. Some results of metrological certification of this installation are given. (author)

  7. Evaluating measurements of carbon dioxide emissions using a precision source--A natural gas burner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bryant, Rodney; Bundy, Matthew; Zong, Ruowen

    2015-07-01

    A natural gas burner has been used as a precise and accurate source for generating large quantities of carbon dioxide (CO2) to evaluate emissions measurements at near-industrial scale. Two methods for determining carbon dioxide emissions from stationary sources are considered here: predicting emissions based on fuel consumption measurements-predicted emissions measurements, and direct measurement of emissions quantities in the flue gas-direct emissions measurements. Uncertainty for the predicted emissions measurement was estimated at less than 1%. Uncertainty estimates for the direct emissions measurement of carbon dioxide were on the order of ±4%. The relative difference between the direct emissions measurements and the predicted emissions measurements was within the range of the measurement uncertainty, therefore demonstrating good agreement. The study demonstrates how independent methods are used to validate source emissions measurements, while also demonstrating how a fire research facility can be used as a precision test-bed to evaluate and improve carbon dioxide emissions measurements from stationary sources. Fossil-fuel-consuming stationary sources such as electric power plants and industrial facilities account for more than half of the CO2 emissions in the United States. Therefore, accurate emissions measurements from these sources are critical for evaluating efforts to reduce greenhouse gas emissions. This study demonstrates how a surrogate for a stationary source, a fire research facility, can be used to evaluate the accuracy of measurements of CO2 emissions.

  8. Plasma position from ring current measurements in Extrap T1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brunsell, P.; Jin Li.

    1989-11-01

    The inductive coupling between the plasma and the four octupole field coils in the Extrap T1 device is utilized as a means of estimating the plasma position. The current in each octupole ring as well as the plasma current is measured by a Rogowski coil and the ring - plasma mutual inductance is then computed assuming axisymmetric plasma displacements. The obtained position is in agreement with internal magnetic probe measurements. The time - evolution of the plasma position for different external vertical and toroidal field strengths is studied. For the present discharge parameter a vertical field of about .008 T is found to give an almost radially stationary plasma. The results are compared with a simple equilibrium model

  9. Spectroscopic measurements of anode plasma with cryogenic pulsed ion sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoneda, H.; Urata, T.; Ohbayashi, K.; Kim, Y.; Horioka, K.; Kasuya, K.

    1987-01-01

    In ion beam diodes, electromagnetic wave is coupled to ion beam. Ion is extracted from anode plasma, which is produced early in the power pulse. However, exact mechanism of anode plasma production, expansion and ion extraction process is unknown. In particularly, anode plasma expansion is seemed to be one of the reasons of rapid impedance collapse of the diode, which is serious problem in high power experiments. Some experimental results showed that anode plasma expansion velocity was about 5 times larger than that inferred from simple thermal velocity. Several explanations for these results were proposed; for example, electron collisionarity in anode plasma, fast neutral gas particle, diamagnetism. To solve this question, it is necessary to measure the characteristic of anode plasma with space and time resolution. The authors made spectroscopic measurements to investigate variety of electron temperature, electron density, expansion velocity of anode plasma with various ion sources

  10. Direct measurement of the plasma response to electrostatic ion waves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sarfaty, M.; DeSouza-Machado, S.; Skiff, F.

    1995-01-01

    Plasma wave-wave and wave-particle interactions are studied in a linear magnetized plasma. The relatively quiet plasma is produced by an argon gas-discharge. The plasma density is n e ≅ 10 9 cm -3 and the electron/ion temperatures are T e ≅ 5eV and T i = 0.05eV. A grid and a four ring antenna, both mounted on a scanning carriage, are used to launch electrostatic ion waves in the plasma. Laser Induced Fluorescence measurements of both the linear and the nonlinear plasma response to the wave fields are presented. The Vlasov-Poisson equations are used to explain the measured zero, first and second order terms of the ion distribution function in the presence of wave fields. In addition to the broadening (heating) of the ion distribution as the authors increase the wave amplitudes, induced plasma flows are observed both along and across the magnetic field

  11. Optimization of the data taking strategy for a high precision τ mass measurement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Y.K.; Mo, X.H.; Yuan, C.Z.; Liu, J.P.

    2007-01-01

    To achieve a high precision τ mass (m τ ) measurement at the forthcoming high luminosity experiment, Monte Carlo simulation and sampling technique are adopted to simulate various data taking cases from which the optimal scheme is determined. The study indicates that when m τ is the sole parameter to be fit, the optimal energy for data taking is located near the τ + τ - production threshold in the vicinity of the largest derivative of the cross-section to energy; one point in the optimal position with luminosity around 63pb -1 is sufficient for getting a statistical precision of 0.1MeV/c 2 or better

  12. Improved measurement linearity and precision for AMCW time-of-flight range imaging cameras.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Payne, Andrew D; Dorrington, Adrian A; Cree, Michael J; Carnegie, Dale A

    2010-08-10

    Time-of-flight range imaging systems utilizing the amplitude modulated continuous wave (AMCW) technique often suffer from measurement nonlinearity due to the presence of aliased harmonics within the amplitude modulation signals. Typically a calibration is performed to correct these errors. We demonstrate an alternative phase encoding approach that attenuates the harmonics during the sampling process, thereby improving measurement linearity in the raw measurements. This mitigates the need to measure the system's response or calibrate for environmental changes. In conjunction with improved linearity, we demonstrate that measurement precision can also be increased by reducing the duty cycle of the amplitude modulated illumination source (while maintaining overall illumination power).

  13. Accuracy and precision of four common peripheral temperature measurement methods in intensive care patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asadian, Simin; Khatony, Alireza; Moradi, Gholamreza; Abdi, Alireza; Rezaei, Mansour

    2016-01-01

    An accurate determination of body temperature in critically ill patients is a fundamental requirement for initiating the proper process of diagnosis, and also therapeutic actions; therefore, the aim of the study was to assess the accuracy and precision of four noninvasive peripheral methods of temperature measurement compared to the central nasopharyngeal measurement. In this observational prospective study, 237 patients were recruited from the intensive care unit of Imam Ali Hospital of Kermanshah. The patients' body temperatures were measured by four peripheral methods; oral, axillary, tympanic, and forehead along with a standard central nasopharyngeal measurement. After data collection, the results were analyzed by paired t-test, kappa coefficient, receiver operating characteristic curve, and using Statistical Package for the Social Sciences, version 19, software. There was a significant meaningful correlation between all the peripheral methods when compared with the central measurement (Ptemperatures of right and left tympanic membranes and the standard central nasopharyngeal measurement (88%). Paired t-test demonstrated an acceptable precision with forehead (P=0.132), left (P=0.18) and right (P=0.318) tympanic membranes, oral (P=1.00), and axillary (P=1.00) methods. Sensitivity and specificity of both the left and right tympanic membranes were more than for other methods. The tympanic and forehead methods had the highest and lowest accuracy for measuring body temperature, respectively. It is recommended to use the tympanic method (right and left) for assessing a patient's body temperature in the intensive care units because of high accuracy and acceptable precision.

  14. Identification and precise measurements of the wavelengths of high-n transitions in N-, O-, and F-like Zn ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fournier, K B; Faenov, A Ya; Pikuz, T A; Magunov, A I; Skobelev, I Yu; Belyaev, V S; Vinogradov, V I; Kyrilov, A S; Matafonov, A P; Flora, F; Bollanti, S; Lazzaro, P Di; Murra, D; Reale, A; Reale, L; Tomassetti, G; Ritucci, A; Francucci, M; Martellucci, S; Petrocelli, G

    2003-01-01

    We have observed spectra of highly charged zinc ions from a variety of laser-produced plasmas. High-precision measurements of transition wavelengths have been made in the range 6.7-8.6 A, with accuracies of ∼1 mA. Line identifications for high-n transitions (n ≤ 7) in the N-, O-, and F-like spectra of Zn XXIV, XXIII, XXII, respectively, are made by comparison with steady-state collisional-radiative models

  15. Identification and precise measurements of the wavelengths of high-n transitions in N-, O-, and F-like Zn ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fournier, K B [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, PO Box 808, L-41, Livermore, CA 94550 (United States); Faenov, A Ya [Multicharged Ions Spectra Data Centre of VNIIFTRI, Moscow, 141570 (Russian Federation); Pikuz, T A [Multicharged Ions Spectra Data Centre of VNIIFTRI, Moscow, 141570 (Russian Federation); Magunov, A I [Multicharged Ions Spectra Data Centre of VNIIFTRI, Moscow, 141570 (Russian Federation); Skobelev, I Yu [Multicharged Ions Spectra Data Centre of VNIIFTRI, Moscow, 141570 (Russian Federation); Belyaev, V S [Central Research Institute of Machine Building, 4, Pionerskaya Street, Korolev, Moscow Region, 141070 (Russian Federation); Vinogradov, V I [Central Research Institute of Machine Building, 4, Pionerskaya Street, Korolev, Moscow Region, 141070 (Russian Federation); Kyrilov, A S [Central Research Institute of Machine Building, 4, Pionerskaya Street, Korolev, Moscow Region, 141070 (Russian Federation); Matafonov, A P [Central Research Institute of Machine Building, 4, Pionerskaya Street, Korolev, Moscow Region, 141070 (Russian Federation); Flora, F [ENEA, Dipartimento Innovazione, Settore Fisica Applicata, 00044 Frascati, Rome (Italy); Bollanti, S [ENEA, Dipartimento Innovazione, Settore Fisica Applicata, 00044 Frascati, Rome (Italy); Lazzaro, P Di [ENEA, Dipartimento Innovazione, Settore Fisica Applicata, 00044 Frascati, Rome (Italy); Murra, D [ENEA, Dipartimento Innovazione, Settore Fisica Applicata, 00044 Frascati, Rome (Italy); Reale, A [Dipartimento di Fisica e INFM, INFN g.c. LNGS, Universita dell' Aquila, 67010 L' Aquila (Italy); Reale, L [Dipartimento di Fisica e INFM, INFN g.c. LNGS, Universita dell' Aquila, 67010 L' Aquila (Italy); Tomassetti, G [Dipartimento di Fisica e INFM, INFN g.c. LNGS, Universita dell' Aquila, 67010 L' Aquila (Italy); Ritucci, A [Dipartimento di Fisica e INFM, INFN g.c. LNGS, Universita dell' Aquila, 67010 L' Aquila (Italy)] [and others

    2003-09-28

    We have observed spectra of highly charged zinc ions from a variety of laser-produced plasmas. High-precision measurements of transition wavelengths have been made in the range 6.7-8.6 A, with accuracies of {approx}1 mA. Line identifications for high-n transitions (n {<=} 7) in the N-, O-, and F-like spectra of Zn XXIV, XXIII, XXII, respectively, are made by comparison with steady-state collisional-radiative models.

  16. Recent improvements of ISOLTRAP Absolute mass measurements of exotic nuclides at $10^{-8}$ precision

    CERN Document Server

    Kellerbauer, A G

    2003-01-01

    In the past three years, the sensitivity and the performance of the Penning trap mass spectrometer ISOLTRAP have been enhanced significantly. These improvements, which range from technical developments to systematic studies of the various factors contributing to the uncertainty of the final mass result, now allow mass measurements of short-lived radionuclides with half-lives of less than 100 ms and with a precision of better than 10$^{-8}$. Using a newly developed carbon cluster ion source, ISOLTRAP can perform absolute mass measurements relative to the microscopic mass standard $^{12}$C. These developments are reviewed as pertaining to the extension of ISOLTRAP mass measurements to higher precision and shorter half-lives and to molecular mass measurements.

  17. Precision analysis for standard deviation measurements of immobile single fluorescent molecule images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeSantis, Michael C; DeCenzo, Shawn H; Li, Je-Luen; Wang, Y M

    2010-03-29

    Standard deviation measurements of intensity profiles of stationary single fluorescent molecules are useful for studying axial localization, molecular orientation, and a fluorescence imaging system's spatial resolution. Here we report on the analysis of the precision of standard deviation measurements of intensity profiles of single fluorescent molecules imaged using an EMCCD camera.We have developed an analytical expression for the standard deviation measurement error of a single image which is a function of the total number of detected photons, the background photon noise, and the camera pixel size. The theoretical results agree well with the experimental, simulation, and numerical integration results. Using this expression, we show that single-molecule standard deviation measurements offer nanometer precision for a large range of experimental parameters.

  18. Precise measurement of the $W$-boson mass with the CDF II detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aaltonen, T.; /Helsinki Inst. of Phys.; Alvarez Gonzalez, B.; /Oviedo U. /Cantabria Inst. of Phys.; Amerio, S.; /INFN, Padua; Amidei, D.; /Michigan U.; Anastassov, A.; /Northwestern U. /Fermilab; Annovi, A.; /Frascati; Antos, J.; /Comenius U.; Apollinari, G.; /Fermilab; Appel, J.A.; /Fermilab; Arisawa, T.; /Waseda U.; Artikov, A.; /Dubna, JINR /Texas A-M

    2012-03-01

    We have measured the W-boson mass M{sub W} using data corresponding to 2.2 fb{sup -1} of integrated luminosity collected in p{bar p} collisions at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV with the CDF II detector at the Fermilab Tevatron collider. Samples consisting of 470 126 W {yields} e{nu} candidates and 624 708 W {yields} {mu}{nu} candidates yield the measurement M{sub W} = 80 387 {+-} 12{sub stat} {+-} 15{sub syst} = 80 387 {+-} 19 MeV/c{sup 2}. This is the most precise measurement of the W-boson mass to date and significantly exceeds the precision of all previous measurements combined.

  19. Recent measurements of electron density profiles of plasmas in PLADIS I, a plasma disruption simulator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bradley, J. III; Sharp, G.; Gahl, J.M. Kuznetsov, V.; Rockett, P.; Hunter, J.

    1995-01-01

    Tokamak disruption simulation experiments are being conducted at the University of New Mexico (UNM) using the PLADIS I plasma gun system. PLADIS I is a high power, high energy coaxial plasma gun configured to produce an intense plasma beam. First wall candidate materials are placed in the beam path to determine their response under disruption relevant energy densities. An optically thick vapor shield plasma has been observed to form above the target surface in PLADIS I. Various diagnostics have been used to determine the characteristics of the incident plasma and the vapor shielding plasma. The cross sectional area of the incident plasma beam is a critical characteristic, as it is used in the calculation of the incident plasma energy density. Recently, a HeNe interferometer in the Mach-Zehnder configuration has been constructed and used to probe the electron density of the incident plasma beam and vapor shield plasma. The object beam of the interferometer is scanned across the plasma beam on successive shots, yielding line integrals of beam density on different chords through the plasma. Data from the interferometer is used to determine the electron density profile of the incident plasma beam as a function of beam radius. This data is then used to calculate the effective beam area. Estimates. of beam area, obtained from other diagnostics such as damage targets, calorimeter arrays and off-axis measurements of surface pressure, will be compared with data from the interferometer to obtain a better estimate of the beam cross sectional area

  20. High-precision 41K/39K measurements by MC-ICP-MS indicate terrestrial variability of δ41K

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, Leah; Santiago Ramos, Danielle P.; Davidheiser-Kroll, Brett; Faithfull, John; Lloyd, Nicholas S.; Ellam, Rob M.; Higgins, John A.

    2018-01-01

    Potassium is a major component in continental crust, the fourth-most abundant cation in seawater, and a key element in biological processes. Until recently, difficulties with existing analytical techniques hindered our ability to identify natural isotopic variability of potassium isotopes in terrestrial materials. However, measurement precision has greatly improved and a range of K isotopic compositions has now been demonstrated in natural samples. In this study, we present a new technique for high-precision measurement of K isotopic ratios using high-resolution, cold plasma multi-collector mass spectrometry. We apply this technique to demonstrate natural variability in the ratio of 41K to 39K in a diverse group of geological and biological samples, including silicate and evaporite minerals, seawater, and plant and animal tissues. The total range in 41K/39K ratios is ca. 2.6‰, with a long-term external reproducibility of 0.17‰ (2, N=108). Seawater and seawater-derived evaporite minerals are systematically enriched in 41K compared to silicate minerals by ca. 0.6‰, a result consistent with recent findings1, 2. Although our average bulk-silicate Earth value (-0.54‰) is indistinguishable from previously published values, we find systematic δ41K variability in some high-temperature sample suites, particularly those with evidence for the presence of fluids. The δ41K values of biological samples span a range of ca. 1.2‰ between terrestrial mammals, plants, and marine organisms. Implications of terrestrial K isotope variability for the atomic weight of K and K-based geochronology are discussed. Our results indicate that high-precision measurements of stable K isotopes, made using commercially available mass spectrometers, can provide unique insights into the chemistry of potassium in geological and biological systems. 

  1. Precise half-life measurement of the superallowed emitter 30S

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iacob, V. E.; Hardy, J. C.; Chen, L.; Horvat, V.; Bencomo, M.; Nica, N.; Park, H. I.; Roeder, B. T.; Saastamoinen, A.

    2018-03-01

    We have measured the half-life of 30S, the parent of a superallowed 0+→0+β transition, to a high precision using very pure sources and a 4 π proportional gas counter to detect the decay positrons. Our result for the half-life is 1.179 92(34) s. As a by-product of this measurement, we determine the half-life of its daughter, 30P, to be 2.501(2) min.

  2. Impact of beam-beam effects on precision luminosity measurements at the ILC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rimbault, C [LAL, Univ Paris-Sud, IN2P3/CNRS, Orsay (France); Bambade, P [LAL, Univ Paris-Sud, IN2P3/CNRS, Orsay (France); Moenig, K [DESY, Zeuthen (Germany); Schulte, D [CERN, Geneva (Switzerland)

    2007-09-15

    In this paper, the impact of beam-beam effects on the precision luminosity measurement at the International Linear Collider is investigated quantitatively for the first time. GUINEA-PIG, a beam-beam interaction simulation tool, is adapted to treat the space charge effects affecting the Bhabha events used in this measurement. The biases due to the resulting changes in kinematics are evaluated for different center-of-mass energies and beam parameters.

  3. Precision Column CO2 Measurement from Space Using Broad Band LIDAR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heaps, William S.

    2009-01-01

    In order to better understand the budget of carbon dioxide in the Earth's atmosphere it is necessary to develop a global high precision understanding of the carbon dioxide column. To uncover the missing sink" that is responsible for the large discrepancies in the budget as we presently understand it, calculation has indicated that measurement accuracy of 1 ppm is necessary. Because typical column average CO2 has now reached 380 ppm this represents a precision on the order of 0.25% for these column measurements. No species has ever been measured from space at such a precision. In recognition of the importance of understanding the CO2 budget to evaluate its impact on global warming the National Research Council in its decadal survey report to NASA recommended planning for a laser based total CO2 mapping mission in the near future. The extreme measurement accuracy requirements on this mission places very strong constraints on the laser system used for the measurement. This work presents an overview of the characteristics necessary in a laser system used to make this measurement. Consideration is given to the temperature dependence, pressure broadening, and pressure shift of the CO2 lines themselves and how these impact the laser system characteristics. We are examining the possibility of making precise measurements of atmospheric carbon dioxide using a broad band source of radiation. This means that many of the difficulties in wavelength control can be treated in the detector portion of the system rather than the laser source. It also greatly reduces the number of individual lasers required to make a measurement. Simplifications such as these are extremely desirable for systems designed to operate from space.

  4. Impact of beam-beam effects on precision luminosity measurements at the ILC

    CERN Document Server

    Rimbault, C; Mönig, K; Schulte, D

    2007-01-01

    In this paper, the impact of beam-beam effects on the precision luminosity measurement at the International Linear Collider is investigated quantitatively for the first time. GUINEA-PIG, a beam-beam interaction simulation tool, is adapted to treat the space charge effects affecting the Bhabha events used in this measurement. The biases due to the resulting changes in kinematics are evaluated for different center-of-mass energies and beam parameters.

  5. Critical Steps in Data Analysis for Precision Casimir Force Measurements with Semiconducting Films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banishev, A. A.; Chang, Chia-Cheng; Mohideen, U.

    2011-06-01

    Some experimental procedures and corresponding results of the precision measurement of the Casimir force between low doped Indium Tin Oxide (ITO) film and gold sphere are described. Measurements were performed using an Atomic Force Microscope in high vacuum. It is shown that the magnitude of the Casimir force decreases after prolonged UV treatment of the ITO film. Some critical data analysis steps such as the correction for the mechanical drift of the sphere-plate system and photodiodes are discussed.

  6. Accuracy of complete-arch dental impressions: a new method of measuring trueness and precision

    OpenAIRE

    Ender, Andreas; Mehl, Albert

    2013-01-01

    STATEMENT OF PROBLEM: A new approach to both 3-dimensional (3D) trueness and precision is necessary to assess the accuracy of intraoral digital impressions and compare them to conventionally acquired impressions. PURPOSE: The purpose of this in vitro study was to evaluate whether a new reference scanner is capable of measuring conventional and digital intraoral complete-arch impressions for 3D accuracy. MATERIAL AND METHODS: A steel reference dentate model was fabricated and measured with a...

  7. Precise measurement of cosmic ray fluxes with the AMS-02 experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vecchi, Manuela, E-mail: manuela.vecchi@ifsc.usp.br [Instituto de Física de São Carlos, Universidade de São Paulo, CP 369, 13560-970, São Carlos, SP (Brazil)

    2015-12-17

    The AMS-02 detector is a large acceptance magnetic spectrometer operating onboard the International Space Station since May 2011. The main goals of the detector are the search for antimatter and dark matter in space, as well as the measurement of cosmic ray composition and flux. In this document we present precise measurements of cosmic ray positrons, electrons and protons, collected during the first 30 months of operations.

  8. The development of the miniaturized waveform receiver with the function measuring Antenna Impedance in space plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishii, H.; Kojima, H.; Fukuhara, H.; Okada, S.; Yamakawa, H.

    2012-04-01

    Plasma wave is one of the most essential physical quantities in the solar terrestrial physics. The role of plasma wave receiver onboard satellites is to detect plasma waves in space with a good signal to noise ratio. There are two types of plasma wave receivers, the sweep frequency analyzer and the waveform capture. While the sweep frequency analyzer provides plasma wave spectra, the waveform capture obtains waveforms with phase information that is significant in studying nonlinear phenomena. Antenna sensors to observe electric fields of the plasma waves show different features in plasmas from in vacuum. The antenna impedances have specific characteristics in the frequency domain because of the dispersion of plasmas. These antenna impedances are expressed with complex number. We need to know not only the antenna impedances but also the transfer functions of plasma wave receiver's circuits in order to calibrate observed waveforms precisely. The impedances of the electric field antennas are affected by a state of surrounding plasmas. Since satellites run through various regions with different plasma parameters, we precisely should measure the antenna impedances onboard spacecraft. On the contrary, we can obtain the plasma density and by measuring the antenna impedances. Several formulas of the antenna impedance measurement system were proposed. A synchronous detection method is used on the BepiColombo Mercury Magnetospheric Orbiter (MMO), which will be launched in 2014. The digital data are stored in the onboard memory. They are read out and converted to the analog waveforms by D/A converter. They are fed into the input of the preamplifiers of antenna sensors through a resistor. We can calculate a transfer function of the circuit by applying the synchronous detection method to the output waveform from waveform receivers and digital data as a signal source. The size of this system is same as an A5 board. In recent years, Application Specific Integrated Circuit (ASIC

  9. Plasma flow measurements in a simulated low earth orbit plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gabriel, S.B.; Mccoy, J.E.; Carruth, M.R. Jr.

    1982-01-01

    The employment of large, higher power solar arrays for space operation has been considered, taking into account a utilization of high operating voltages. In connection with the consideration of such arrays, attention must be given to the fact that the ambient environment of space contains a tenuous low energy plasma which can interact with the high voltage array causing power 'leakage' and arcing. An investigation has been conducted with the aim to simulate the behavior of such an array in low-earth-orbit (LEO). During the experiments, local concentrations of the 'leakage' current were observed when the panel was at a high voltage. These concentrations could overload or damage a small area of cells in a large string. It was hypothesized that this effect was produced by electrostatic focusing of the particles by the sheath fields. To verify this experimentally, an end-effect Langmuir probe was employed. The obtained results are discussed

  10. Measurements of EEDF in recombination dominated afterglow plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plasil, R.; Korolov, I.; Kotrik, T.; Varju, J.; Dohnal, P.; Donko, Z.; Bano, G.; Glosik, J.

    2009-11-01

    Electron energy distribution functions (EEDF) have been measured in decaying plasma in Flowing Afterglow Langmuir Probe (FALP) experiment. The measurements have been carried out in diffusion and recombination governed plasmas used for studies of recombination of KrD+ and H3+ ions.

  11. Measurements of EEDF in recombination dominated afterglow plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Plasil, R; Korolov, I; Kotrik, T; Varju, J; Dohnal, P; Glosik, J [Charles University, Faculty of Mathematics and Physics, Department of Surface and Plasma Science, Prague (Czech Republic); Donko, Z; Bano, G, E-mail: radek.plasil@mff.cuni.c [Research Institute for Solid State Physics and Optics, Hungarian Academy of Sciences, Budapest (Hungary)

    2009-11-15

    Electron energy distribution functions (EEDF) have been measured in decaying plasma in Flowing Afterglow Langmuir Probe (FALP) experiment. The measurements have been carried out in diffusion and recombination governed plasmas used for studies of recombination of KrD{sup +} and H{sub 3}{sup +} ions.

  12. Measurements of EEDF in recombination dominated afterglow plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Plasil, R; Korolov, I; Kotrik, T; Varju, J; Dohnal, P; Glosik, J; Donko, Z; Bano, G

    2009-01-01

    Electron energy distribution functions (EEDF) have been measured in decaying plasma in Flowing Afterglow Langmuir Probe (FALP) experiment. The measurements have been carried out in diffusion and recombination governed plasmas used for studies of recombination of KrD + and H 3 + ions.

  13. Measurement of the argon plasma temperature by use of pyrometer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Fanhou; Jing Fuqian

    2002-01-01

    The author describes in detail how to use pyrometer to measure the plasma temperature. The temperatures of shock-generated argon plasmas are given in the present work. Measured results of temperature-pressure curve are compared with calculated results using Saha-Debye-Huckel model, which are in good agreement

  14. Study on the technique for precision measurement of density of SiO_2 foam shells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ma Xiaojun; Gao Dangzhong; Meng Jie

    2013-01-01

    The measuring method based on vertical scanning interference and combined with the relation between refraction index and density of SiO_2 foam shells is introduced, and the relation is analyzed according to formulas of Lorentz-Lorenz and Gladstone-Dale. The experimental result and measuring uncertainty evaluation indicate that the precision measurement of density of low density SiO_2 foam shells can be realized by using the vertical scanning interference technique and combining with Gladstone and Dale analysis method, and the measuring uncertainty is about 5%. (authors)

  15. High-Precision Measurements of the Bound Electron’s Magnetic Moment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sven Sturm

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Highly charged ions represent environments that allow to study precisely one or more bound electrons subjected to unsurpassed electromagnetic fields. Under such conditions, the magnetic moment (g-factor of a bound electron changes significantly, to a large extent due to contributions from quantum electrodynamics. We present three Penning-trap experiments, which allow to measure magnetic moments with ppb precision and better, serving as stringent tests of corresponding calculations, and also yielding access to fundamental quantities like the fine structure constant α and the atomic mass of the electron. Additionally, the bound electrons can be used as sensitive probes for properties of the ionic nuclei. We summarize the measurements performed so far, discuss their significance, and give a detailed account of the experimental setups, procedures and the foreseen measurements.

  16. Precision Lifetime Measurements Using LaBr3 Detectors With Stable and Radioactive Beams

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Regan P.H.

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available A range of high resolution gamma-ray spectroscopy measurements have been carried out using arrays which include a number of Cerium-doped Lanthanum-Tribromide (LrBr3(Ce scintillation detectors used in conjunction with high-resolution hyper-pure germanium detectors. Examples of the spectral and temporal responses of such set-ups, using both standard point radioactive sources 152Eu and 56Co, and in-beam fusionevaporation reaction experiments for precision measurements of nuclear excited states in 34P and 138Ce are presented. The current and future use of such arrays at existing (EURICA at RIKEN and future (NUSTAR at FAIR secondary radioactive beam facilities for precision measurements of excited nuclear state lifetimes in the 10 ps to 10 ns regime are also discussed.

  17. Precise Measurements of the Density and Critical Phenomena Near Phase Transitions in Liquid Helium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeh, Nai-Chang

    1997-01-01

    The first-year progress for the project of precise measurements of the density and critical phenomena of helium near phase transitions is summarized below: (1) completion of a cryogenic sample probe for the proposed measurements, and the rehabilitation of a designated laboratory at Caltech for this project; (2) construction and testing of a superconducting niobium cavity; (3) acquisition of one phase-locked-loop system for high-resolution frequency control and read- out; (4) setting up high-resolution thermometry (HRT) for temperature readout and control; (5) developing new approaches for calibrating the coefficient between the resonant frequency shift (delta f) and the helium density (rho), as well as for measuring the effect of gravity on T(sub lambda) to a much better precision; (6) programming of the interface control of all instruments for automatic data acquisition; and (7) improving data analyses and fitting procedures.

  18. Peak Measurement for Vancomycin AUC Estimation in Obese Adults Improves Precision and Lowers Bias.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pai, Manjunath P; Hong, Joseph; Krop, Lynne

    2017-04-01

    Vancomycin area under the curve (AUC) estimates may be skewed in obese adults due to weight-dependent pharmacokinetic parameters. We demonstrate that peak and trough measurements reduce bias and improve the precision of vancomycin AUC estimates in obese adults ( n = 75) and validate this in an independent cohort ( n = 31). The precision and mean percent bias of Bayesian vancomycin AUC estimates are comparable between covariate-dependent ( R 2 = 0.774, 3.55%) and covariate-independent ( R 2 = 0.804, 3.28%) models when peaks and troughs are measured but not when measurements are restricted to troughs only ( R 2 = 0.557, 15.5%). Copyright © 2017 American Society for Microbiology.

  19. Spectroscopic measurements of plasma emission light for plasma-based acceleration experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Filippi, F.; Mostacci, A.; Palumbo, L.; Anania, M.P.; Biagioni, A.; Chiadroni, E.; Ferrario, M.; Cianchi, A.; Zigler, A.

    2016-01-01

    Advanced particle accelerators are based on the excitation of large amplitude plasma waves driven by either electron or laser beams. Future experiments scheduled at the SPARC-LAB test facility aim to demonstrate the acceleration of high brightness electron beams through the so-called resonant Plasma Wakefield Acceleration scheme in which a train of electron bunches (drivers) resonantly excites wakefields into a preformed hydrogen plasma; the last bunch (witness) injected at the proper accelerating phase gains energy from the wake. The quality of the accelerated beam depends strongly on plasma density and its distribution along the acceleration length. The measurements of plasma density of the order of 10 16 –10 17  cm −3 can be performed with spectroscopic measurements of the plasma-emitted light. The measured density distribution for hydrogen filled capillary discharge with both Balmer alpha and Balmer beta lines and shot-to-shot variation are here reported.

  20. Spectroscopic measurements of plasma emission light for plasma-based acceleration experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filippi, F.; Anania, M. P.; Biagioni, A.; Chiadroni, E.; Cianchi, A.; Ferrario, M.; Mostacci, A.; Palumbo, L.; Zigler, A.

    2016-09-01

    Advanced particle accelerators are based on the excitation of large amplitude plasma waves driven by either electron or laser beams. Future experiments scheduled at the SPARC_LAB test facility aim to demonstrate the acceleration of high brightness electron beams through the so-called resonant Plasma Wakefield Acceleration scheme in which a train of electron bunches (drivers) resonantly excites wakefields into a preformed hydrogen plasma; the last bunch (witness) injected at the proper accelerating phase gains energy from the wake. The quality of the accelerated beam depends strongly on plasma density and its distribution along the acceleration length. The measurements of plasma density of the order of 1016-1017 cm-3 can be performed with spectroscopic measurements of the plasma-emitted light. The measured density distribution for hydrogen filled capillary discharge with both Balmer alpha and Balmer beta lines and shot-to-shot variation are here reported.

  1. Precision measurements with W and Z/gamma* bosons with the ATLAS detector

    CERN Document Server

    Anulli, Fabio; The ATLAS collaboration

    2016-01-01

    The inclusive production of single W and $Z/\\gamma^{*}$ bosons are standard candles at hadron colliders. ATLAS has recently completed a set of very precise measurements of production cross-sections and lepton decay angular distributions integrated and differential in several variables at centre-of-mass energies of 7, 8, and 13 TeV. ATLAS has performed a measurement of the complete set of coefficients that describe the angular distributions of the decay leptons in Z events in fine bins of the Z transverse momentum and in several bins of Z rapidity. Furthermore a measurement of the dilepton transverse momentum spectrum as well as the related angular decorrelation variable $\\phi^{*}$ was performed in a wide range of dilepton masses from 12 to 150 GeV. Precise double-differential measurements of the Drell-Yan cross section in the region above the Z peak up to dilepton masses of 1500 GeV are presented as well. Finally, first precise measurements of integrated W and Z cross sections and cross section ratios at 13 T...

  2. Recent developments for high-precision mass measurements of the heaviest elements at SHIPTRAP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Minaya Ramirez, E.; Ackermann, D.; Blaum, K.; Block, M.; Droese, C.; Düllmann, Ch. E.; Eibach, M.; Eliseev, S.; Haettner, E.; Herfurth, F.; Heßberger, F.P.

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: • Direct high-precision mass measurements of No and Lr isotopes performed. • High-precision mass measurements with a count rate of 1 ion/hour demonstrated. • The results provide anchor points for a large region connected by alpha-decay chains. • The binding energies determine the strength of the deformed shell closure N = 152. • Technical developments and new techniques will pave the way towards heavier elements. -- Abstract: Atomic nuclei far from stability continue to challenge our understanding. For example, theoretical models have predicted an “island of stability” in the region of the superheavy elements due to the closure of spherical proton and neutron shells. Depending on the model, these are expected at Z = 114, 120 or even 126 and N = 172 or 184. Valuable information on the road to the island of stability is derived from high-precision mass measurements, which give direct access to binding energies of short-lived trans-uranium nuclei. Recently, direct mass measurements at SHIPTRAP have been extended to nobelium and lawrencium isotopes around the deformed shell gap N = 152. In order to further extend mass measurements to the region of superheavy elements, new technical developments are required to increase the performance of our setup. The sensitivity will increase through the implementation of a new detection method, where observation of one single ion is sufficient. Together with the use of a more efficient gas stopping cell, this will us allow to significantly enhance the overall efficiency of SHIPTRAP

  3. High-precision branching ratio measurement for the superallowed β+ emitter Ga62

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finlay, P.; Ball, G. C.; Leslie, J. R.; Svensson, C. E.; Towner, I. S.; Austin, R. A. E.; Bandyopadhyay, D.; Chaffey, A.; Chakrawarthy, R. S.; Garrett, P. E.; Grinyer, G. F.; Hackman, G.; Hyland, B.; Kanungo, R.; Leach, K. G.; Mattoon, C. M.; Morton, A. C.; Pearson, C. J.; Phillips, A. A.; Ressler, J. J.; Sarazin, F.; Savajols, H.; Schumaker, M. A.; Wong, J.

    2008-08-01

    A high-precision branching ratio measurement for the superallowed β+ decay of Ga62 was performed at the Isotope Separator and Accelerator (ISAC) radioactive ion beam facility. The 8π spectrometer, an array of 20 high-purity germanium detectors, was employed to detect the γ rays emitted following Gamow-Teller and nonanalog Fermi β+ decays of Ga62, and the SCEPTAR plastic scintillator array was used to detect the emitted β particles. Thirty γ rays were identified following Ga62 decay, establishing the superallowed branching ratio to be 99.858(8)%. Combined with the world-average half-life and a recent high-precision Q-value measurement for Ga62, this branching ratio yields an ft value of 3074.3±1.1 s, making Ga62 among the most precisely determined superallowed ft values. Comparison between the superallowed ft value determined in this work and the world-average corrected F tmacr value allows the large nuclear-structure-dependent correction for Ga62 decay to be experimentally determined from the CVC hypothesis to better than 7% of its own value, the most precise experimental determination for any superallowed emitter. These results provide a benchmark for the refinement of the theoretical description of isospin-symmetry breaking in A⩾62 superallowed decays.

  4. High precision flux measurements in conventional neutrino beams: the ENUBET project

    CERN Document Server

    Longhin, Andrea

    2017-01-01

    The challenges of precision neutrino physics require measurements of absolute neutrino cross sec- tions at the GeV scale with exquisite (1%) precision. This precision is presently limited to by the uncertainties on neutrino flux at the source. A reduction of this uncertainty by one order of mag- nitude can be achieved monitoring the positron production in the decay tunnel originating from the K e 3 decays of charged kaons in a sign and momentum selected narrow band beam. This novel technique enables the measurement of the most relevant cross-sections for CP violation ( ν e and ̄ ν e ) with a precision of 1% and requires a special instrumented beam-line. Such non-conventional beam-line will be developed in the framework of the ENUBET Horizon-2020 Consolidator Grant, recently approved by the European Research Council. We present the Project, the first experimen- tal results on ultra-compact calorimeters that can embedded in the instrumented decay tunnel and the advances on the simulation of the beamline. A r...

  5. Methodologies for the measurement of bone density and their precision and accuracy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goodwin, P.N.

    1987-01-01

    Radiographic methods of determining bone density have been available for many years, but recently most of the efforts in this field have focused on the development of instruments which would accurately and automatically measure bone density by absorption, or by the use of x-ray computed tomography (CT). Single energy absorptiometers using I-125 have been available for some years, and have been used primarily for measurements on the radius, although recently equipment for measuring the os calcis has become available. Accuracy of single energy measurements is about 3% to 5%; precision, which has been poor because of the difficulty of exact repositioning, has recently been improved by automatic methods so that it now approaches 1% or better. Dual energy sources offer the advantages of greater accuracy and the ability to measure the spine and other large bones. A number of dual energy scanners are now on the market, mostly using gadolinium-153 as a source. Dual energy scanning is capable of an accuracy of a few percent, but the precision when scanning patients can vary widely, due to the difficulty of comparing exactly the same areas; 2 to 4% would appear to be typical. Quantitative computed tomography (QCT) can be used to directly measure the trabecular bone within the vertebral body. The accuracy of single-energy QCT is affected by the amount of marrow fat present, which can lead to underestimations of 10% or more. An increase in marrow fat would cause an apparent decrease in bone mineral. However, the precision can be quite good, 1% or 2% on phantoms, and nearly as good on patients when four vertebrae are averaged. Dual energy scanning can correct for the presence of fat, but is less precise, and not available on all CT units. 52 references

  6. Comparison of Theory with Rotation Measurements in JET ICRH Plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    R.V. Budny; C.S. Chang; C. Giroud; R.J. Goldston; D. McCune; J. Ongena; F.W. Perkins; R.B. White; K.-D. Zastrow; and contributors to the EFDA-JET work programme

    2001-01-01

    Plasma rotation appears to improve plasma performance by increasing the E x B flow shearing rate, thus decreasing radial correlations in the microturbulence. Also, plasma rotation can increase the stability to resistive MHD modes. In the Joint European Torus (JET), toroidal rotation rates omega (subscript ''tor'') with high Mach numbers are generally measured in NBI-heated plasmas (since the neutral beams aim in the co-plasma current direction). They are considerably lower with only ICRH (and Ohmic) heating, but still surprisingly large considering that ICRH appears to inject relatively small amounts of angular momentum. Either the applied torques are larger than naively expected, or the anomalous transport of angular momentum is smaller than expected. Since ICRH is one of the main candidates for heating next-step tokamaks, and for creating burning plasmas in future tokamak reactors, this paper attempts to understand ICRH-induced plasma rotation

  7. Interferometer for electron density measurement in exploding wire plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Batra, Jigyasa; Jaiswar, Ashutosh; Kaushik, T.C.

    2016-12-01

    Mach-Zehnder Interferometer (MZI) has been developed for measuring electron density profile in pulsed plasmas. MZI is to be used for characterizing exploding wire plasmas for correlating electron density dynamics with x-rays emission. Experiments have been carried out for probing electron density in pulsed plasmas produced in our laboratory like in spark gap and exploding wire plasmas. These are microsecond phenomenon. Changes in electron density have been registered in interferograms with the help of a streak camera for specific time window. Temporal electron density profiles have been calculated by analyzing temporal fringe shifts in interferograms. This report deals with details of MZI developed in our laboratory along with its theory. Basic introductory details have also been provided for exploding wire plasmas to be probed. Some demonstrative results of electron density measurements in pulsed plasmas of spark gap and single exploding wires have been described. (author)

  8. A precision analogue integrator system for heavy current measurement in MFDC resistance spot welding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xia, Yu-Jun; Zhang, Zhong-Dian; Xia, Zhen-Xin; Zhu, Shi-Liang; Zhang, Rui

    2016-01-01

    In order to control and monitor the quality of middle frequency direct current (MFDC) resistance spot welding (RSW), precision measurement of the welding current up to 100 kA is required, for which Rogowski coils are the only viable current transducers at present. Thus, a highly accurate analogue integrator is the key to restoring the converted signals collected from the Rogowski coils. Previous studies emphasised that the integration drift is a major factor that influences the performance of analogue integrators, but capacitive leakage error also has a significant impact on the result, especially in long-time pulse integration. In this article, new methods of measuring and compensating capacitive leakage error are proposed to fabricate a precision analogue integrator system for MFDC RSW. A voltage holding test is carried out to measure the integration error caused by capacitive leakage, and an original integrator with a feedback adder is designed to compensate capacitive leakage error in real time. The experimental results and statistical analysis show that the new analogue integrator system could constrain both drift and capacitive leakage error, of which the effect is robust to different voltage levels of output signals. The total integration error is limited within  ±0.09 mV s −1 0.005% s −1 or full scale at a 95% confidence level, which makes it possible to achieve the precision measurement of the welding current of MFDC RSW with Rogowski coils of 0.1% accuracy class. (paper)

  9. Precision measurements with an electroweak boson in the final state with the ATLAS detector

    CERN Document Server

    Lang, Valerie Susanne; The ATLAS collaboration

    2017-01-01

    Measurements of the Drell-Yan production of W and Z/gamma* bosons at the LHC provide a benchmark of our understanding of perturbative QCD and probe the proton structure in a unique way. The ATLAS collaboration has performed new high precision measurements for W+, W- and Z/gamma* bosons integrated and as a function of the boson or lepton rapidity and the Z/gamma* mass. Also a new three dimensional cross-section measurement of Z boson vs. its invariant mass, the absolute dilepton rapidity, and the angular variable between the lepton and the quark in the Collins-Soper frame will be discussed. Unprecedented precision is reached and strong constraints on Parton Distribution functions, in particular the strange density are found. When also studying light and heavy quark iniated jet production in association with vector bosons, perturbative QCD prediction in a multi-scale environment can be tested. Once the QCD aspects of the vector boson production are understood, high precision measurements aiming at the tests of ...

  10. Plasma turbulence measured by fast sweep reflectometry on Tore Supra

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clairet, F.; Vermare, L.; Leclert, G.

    2004-01-01

    Traditionally devoted to electron density profile measurement we show that fast frequency sweeping reflectometry technique can bring valuable and innovative measurements onto plasma turbulence. While fast frequency sweeping technique is traditionally devoted to electron density radial profile measurements we show in this paper how we can handle the fluctuations of the reflected signal to recover plasma density fluctuation measurements with a high spatial and temporal resolution. Large size turbulence related to magneto-hydrodynamic (MHD) activity and the associated magnetic islands can be detected. The radial profile of the micro-turbulence, which is responsible for plasma anomalous transport processes, is experimentally determined through the fluctuation of the reflected phase signal. (authors)

  11. Plasma turbulence measured by fast sweep reflectometry on Tore Supra

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clairet, F.; Vermare, L.; Heuraux, S.; Leclert, G.

    2004-01-01

    Traditionally devoted to electron density profile measurement we show that fast frequency sweeping reflectometry technique can bring valuable and innovative measurements onto plasma turbulence. While fast frequency sweeping technique is traditionally devoted to electron density radial profile measurements we show in this paper how we can handle the fluctuations of the reflected signal to recover plasma density fluctuation measurements with a high spatial and temporal resolution. Large size turbulence related to magneto-hydrodynamic (MHD) activity and the associated magnetic islands can be detected. The radial profile of the micro-turbulence, which is responsible for plasma anomalous transport processes, is experimentally determined through the fluctuation of the reflected phase signal

  12. A precise Higgs mass measurement at the ILC and test beam data analyses with CALICE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruan, Manqi

    2008-01-01

    Utilizing Monte Carlo tools and test-beam data, some basic detector performance properties are studied for the International Linear Collider (ILC). The contributions of this thesis are mainly twofold, first, a study of the Higgs mass and cross section measurements at the ILC (with full simulation to the e + e - → HZ→Hμμ channel and backgrounds); and second, an analysis of test-beam data of the Calorimeter for Linear Collider Experiment (CALICE). For a most general type of Higgs particle with 120 GeV the mass, setting the center-of-mass energy to 230 GeV and with an integrated luminosity of 500fb -1 , a precision of 38.4 MeV is obtained in a model independent analysis for the Higgs boson mass measurement, while the cross section could be measured to 5%; if we make some assumptions about the Higgs boson's decay, for example a Standard Model Higgs boson with a dominant invisible decay mode, the measurement result can be improved by 25% (achieving a mass measurement precision of 29 MeV and a cross section measurement precision of 4%). For the CALICE test-beam data analysis, our work is mainly focused upon two aspects: data quality checks and the track-free ECAL angular measurement. Data quality checks aim to detect strange signals or unexpected phenomena in the test-beam data so that one knows quickly how the overall data taking quality is. They also serve to classify all the data and give useful information for the later offline data analyses. The track-free ECAL angular resolution algorithm is designed to precisely measure the direction of a photon, a very important component in determining the direction of the neutral components in jets. We found that the angular resolution can be well fitted as a function of the square root of the beam energy (in a similar way as for the energy resolution) with a precision of approximately 80 mrad/√(E/GeV) in the angular resolution. (author)

  13. The Galileo System of Measurement: Preliminary Evidence for Precision, Stability, and Equivalance to Traditional Measures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillham, James; Woelfel, Joseph

    1977-01-01

    Describes the Galileo system of measurement operations including reliability and validity data. Illustrations of some of the relations between Galileo measures and traditional procedures are provided. (MH)

  14. Circuit and Measurement Technique for Radiation Induced Drift in Precision Capacitance Matching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasad, Sudheer; Shankar, Krishnamurthy Ganapathy

    2013-04-01

    In the design of radiation tolerant precision ADCs targeted for space market, a matched capacitor array is crucial. The drift of capacitance ratios due to radiation should be small enough not to cause linearity errors. Conventional methods for measuring capacitor matching may not achieve the desired level of accuracy due to radiation induced gain errors in the measurement circuits. In this work, we present a circuit and method for measuring capacitance ratio drift to a very high accuracy (<; 1 ppm) unaffected by radiation levels up to 150 krad.

  15. Precision and accuracy, two steps towards the standardization of XRPD measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berti, G [Pisa Univ. (Italy). Dept. of Earth Sciences

    1996-09-01

    Any standardization process requires to get at results comprehensible, reproducible and traceable. Precision and accuracy of the measurements play a key role in getting at these requirements. The adoption of either physical (standard) or mathematical models allows for describing the whole diffraction measurement process with the necessary physical significance. From an other hand, the adoption of procedure, which are capable of controlling the measurement process, renders it reproducible and traceable. The falling of those requirements make difficult to transfer or replicate elsewhere experiences which may give even excellent result in a given laboratory.

  16. Precision and accuracy, two steps towards the standardization of XRPD measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berti, G.

    1996-01-01

    Any standardization process requires to get at results comprehensible, reproducible and traceable. Precision and accuracy of the measurements play a key role in getting at these requirements. The adoption of either physical (standard) or mathematical models allows for describing the whole diffraction measurement process with the necessary physical significance. From an other hand, the adoption of procedure, which are capable of controlling the measurement process, renders it reproducible and traceable. The falling of those requirements make difficult to transfer or replicate elsewhere experiences which may give even excellent result in a given laboratory

  17. Precision measurement of the K{sub S} meson lifetime with the KLOE detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ambrosino, F.; Massarotti, P.; Meola, S.; Napolitano, M. [Dipt. di Scienze Fisiche dell' Univ. ' Federico II' , Napoli (Italy); INFN Sezione di Napoli (Italy); Antonelli, A.; Antonelli, M.; Bencivenni, G.; Bloise, C.; Bossi, F.; Capon, G.; Capussela, T.; Ciambrone, P.; De Lucia, E.; De Simone, P.; Dreucci, M.; Felici, G.; Gatti, C.; Giovannella, S.; Jacewicz, M.; Miscetti, S.; Moulson, M.; Murtas, F.; Palutan, M.; Santangelo, P.; Sciascia, B.; Sibidanov, A.; Spadaro, T.; Venanzoni, G. [Lab. Nazionali di Frascati dell' INFN (Italy); Archilli, F. [Dipt. di Fisica dell' Universita ' Tor Vergata' , Roma (Italy); INFN Sezione di Roma Tor Vergata, Roma (Italy); Bini, C.; De Santis, A.; De Zorzi, G.; Di Domenico, A.; Fiore, S.; Franzini, P.; Gauzzi, P. [Dipt. di Fisica dell' Univ. ' La Sapienza' , Roma (Italy); INFN Sezione di Roma, Roma (Italy); Bocchetta, S.; Ceradini, F.; Di Micco, B.; Nguyen, F.; Taccini, C. [Dipt. di Fisica dell' Univ. Roma Tre, Roma (Italy); INFN Sezione di Roma Tre, Roma (Italy); Branchini, P.; Graziani, E.; Passeri, A.; Tortora, L. [INFN Sezione di Roma Tre, Roma (Italy); De Angelis, A. [Univ. of Udine (Italy); LIP/IST, INFN Sezione di Trieste, Trieste (Italy); De Maria, M. [Univ. di Udine (Italy); IUAV, Venezia (Italy); Denig, A.; Mueller, S. [Johannes Gutenberg - Univ. Mainz, Inst. fuer Kernphysik, Mainz (Germany); Di Donato, C. [INFN Sezione di Napoli (Italy); Kulikov, V. [Inst. for Theoretical and Experimental Physics, Moscow (Russian Federation); Lee-Franzini, J. [Lab. Nazionali di Frascati dell' INFN (Italy); State Univ. of New York, Physics Dept., Stony Brook, NY (United States); Martini, M. [Lab. Nazionali di Frascati dell' INFN, Frascati (Italy); Dipt. di Energetica dell' Universita ' La Sapienza' , Roma (Italy); Univ. Guglielmo Marconi, Dipt. di Scienza e Tecnologie applicate, Roma (Italy); Patera, V. [Lab. Nazionali di Frascati dell' INFN, Frascati (Italy); Dipt. di Energetica dell' Universita ' La Sapienza' , Roma (Italy)] [and others

    2011-03-15

    Using a large sample of pure, slow, short lived K{sup 0} mesons collected with KLOE detector at DA{phi}NE, we have measured the K{sub S} lifetime. From a fit to the proper time distribution we find {tau}(K{sub S})=(89.562 {+-}0.029{sub stat}{+-}0.043{sub syst}) ps. This is the most precise measurement to date of the short lived K{sup 0} meson lifetime, in good agreement with the world average derived from previous measurements. We observe no dependence of the lifetime on the direction of the K{sub S} in galactic coordinates. (orig.)

  18. Measurement of plasma flows into tile gaps

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Dejarnac, Renaud; Komm, Michael; Stöckel, Jan; Pánek, Radomír

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 382, č. 1 (2008), s. 31-34 ISSN 0022-3115 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR KJB100430602 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20430508 Keywords : Tokamak diagnostic * Gaps * Ion saturation current * Edge modeling * Sheaths Subject RIV: BL - Plasma and Gas Discharge Physics Impact factor: 1.501, year: 2008

  19. A measurement control program to meet desired levels of precision and accuracy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bruckner, L.A.

    1991-01-01

    Measurement control programs are usually designed to test for precision and accuracy. Many instruments, however, display non-random data patterns such as biases or seasonal variations which are statistically significant but are of no practical significance. Application of the usual statistical tests can cause these instruments to be removed from service unnecessarily. It is tempting to try to overcome this problem by frequently adjusting the instrument or by arbitrarily changing the parameters of the statistical tests so that failures occur less often. This, of course invalidates the statistical tests. In the author's opinion, the correct way to handle this problem is to identify the desired levels of precision and accuracy, and then to combine these levels with valid statistical techniques in the measurement control-program. This paper describes one way to accomplish this

  20. a High-Precision Branching-Ratio Measurement for the Superallowed β+ Emitter 74Rb

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunlop, R.; Chagnon-Lessard, S.; Finlay, P.; Garrett, P. E.; Hadinia, B.; Leach, K. G.; Svensson, C. E.; Wong, J.; Ball, G.; Garnsworthy, A. B.; Glister, J.; Hackman, G.; Tardiff, E. R.; Triambak, S.; Williams, S. J.; Leslie, J. R.; Andreoiu, C.; Chester, A.; Cross, D.; Starosta, K.; Yates, S. W.; Zganjar, E. F.

    2013-03-01

    Precision measurements of superallowed Fermi beta decay allow for tests of the Cabibbo-Kobayashi-Maskawa matrix (CKM) unitarity, the conserved vector current hypothesis, and the magnitude of isospin-symmetry-breaking effects in nuclei. A high-precision measurement of the branching ratio for the β+ decay of 74Rb has been performed at the Isotope Separator and ACcelerator (ISAC) facility at TRIUMF. The 8π spectrometer, an array of 20 close-packed HPGe detectors, was used to detect gamma rays emitted following the decay of 74Rb. PACES, an array of 5 Si(Li) detectors, was used to detect emitted conversion electrons, while SCEPTAR, an array of plastic scintillators, was used to detect emitted beta particles. A total of 51γ rays have been identified following the decay of 21 excited states in the daughter nucleus 74Kr.

  1. MC simulation of the collimation effects on measurement precision of high-resolution logging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu Wensheng; Xiao Lizhi

    2010-01-01

    In this paper,the MCNP code is used to calculate responses to detector counting rate and formation sensitivity in oil-well logging with different opening shapes and angles of the γ-ray source aperture and detector collimator. The results show that the opening shape and angle of the source aperture affect the measurement precision far more than the opening shape and angle of the detector collimator, and the influences are greater than that of the formation sensitivity. A logging system that is equipped with a γ-ray source having a cuniform aperture of 45 degree opening angle, and a window aperture of 0 degree opening angle for a long-spacing detector or a short-spacing detector, and 5 degree-15 degree opening angle for a middle-spacing detector, will improve the measurement precision. (authors)

  2. Optimized spectroscopic scheme for enhanced precision CO measurements with applications to urban source attribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nottrott, A.; Hoffnagle, J.; Farinas, A.; Rella, C.

    2014-12-01

    Carbon monoxide (CO) is an urban pollutant generated by internal combustion engines which contributes to the formation of ground level ozone (smog). CO is also an excellent tracer for emissions from mobile combustion sources. In this work we present an optimized spectroscopic sampling scheme that enables enhanced precision CO measurements. The scheme was implemented on the Picarro G2401 Cavity Ring-Down Spectroscopy (CRDS) analyzer which measures CO2, CO, CH4 and H2O at 0.2 Hz. The optimized scheme improved the raw precision of CO measurements by 40% from 5 ppb to 3 ppb. Correlations of measured CO2, CO, CH4 and H2O from an urban tower were partitioned by wind direction and combined with a concentration footprint model for source attribution. The application of a concentration footprint for source attribution has several advantages. The upwind extent of the concentration footprint for a given sensor is much larger than the flux footprint. Measurements of mean concentration at the sensor location can be used to estimate source strength from a concentration footprint, while measurements of the vertical concentration flux are necessary to determine source strength from the flux footprint. Direct measurement of vertical concentration flux requires high frequency temporal sampling and increases the cost and complexity of the measurement system.

  3. Plasma metabolic changes in Chinese HIV-infected patients receiving lopinavir/ritonavir based treatment: Implications for HIV precision therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiaolin; Wu, Tong; Jiang, Yongjun; Zhang, Zining; Han, Xiaoxu; Geng, Wenqing; Ding, Haibo; Kang, Jing; Wang, Qi; Shang, Hong

    2018-05-16

    The goal of this study is to profile the metabolic changes in the plasma of HIV patients receiving lopinavir/ritonavir (LPV/r)-based highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) relative to their treatment-naïve phase, aimed to identify precision therapy for HIV for improving prognosis and predicting dyslipidemia caused by LPV/r. 38 longitudinal plasma samples were collected from 19 HIV-infected patients both before and after antiretroviral therapy, and 18 samples from healthy individuals were used as controls. Untargeted metabolomics profiling of these plasma samples was performed using liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS) and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). A total of 331 compounds of known identity were detected among these metabolites, a 67-metabolite signature mainly mapping to tryptophan, histidine, acyl carnitine, ketone bodies and fatty acid metabolism distinguished HIV patients from healthy controls. The levels of 19 out of the 67 altered metabolites including histidine, kynurenine, and 3-hydroxybutyrate (BHBA), recovered after LPV/r-based antiretroviral therapy, and histidine was positively correlated with the presence of CD4 + T lymphocytes. Furthermore, using receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analyses, we discovered that butyrylcarnitine in combination with myristic acid from plasma in treatment-naïve patients could predict dyslipidemia caused by LPV/r with 87% accuracy. Metabolites alterations in treatment-naïve HIV patients may indicate an inflammatory, oxidative state and mitochondrial dysfunction that is permissive for disease progression. Histidine may provide a specific protective function for HIV patients. Besides, elevated fatty acids levels including butyrylcarnitine and myristic acid after infection may indicate patients at risk of suffering from dyslipidemia after LPV/r-based HAART. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. High-precision relative position and attitude measurement for on-orbit maintenance of spacecraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Bing; Chen, Feng; Li, Dongdong; Wang, Ying

    2018-02-01

    In order to realize long-term on-orbit running of satellites, space stations, etc spacecrafts, in addition to the long life design of devices, The life of the spacecraft can also be extended by the on-orbit servicing and maintenance. Therefore, it is necessary to keep precise and detailed maintenance of key components. In this paper, a high-precision relative position and attitude measurement method used in the maintenance of key components is given. This method mainly considers the design of the passive cooperative marker, light-emitting device and high resolution camera in the presence of spatial stray light and noise. By using a series of algorithms, such as background elimination, feature extraction, position and attitude calculation, and so on, the high precision relative pose parameters as the input to the control system between key operation parts and maintenance equipment are obtained. The simulation results show that the algorithm is accurate and effective, satisfying the requirements of the precision operation technique.

  5. Development of Neutron Interferometer with Wide-Gapped ''BSE''s for Precision Measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seki, Y.; Kitaguchi, M.; Hino, M.; Funahashi, H.; Taketani, K.; Otake, Y.; Shimizu, H. M.

    2007-01-01

    We are developing large-dimensional cold-neutron interferometers with multilayer mirrors in order to investigate small interactions. In particular Jamin type interferometers composed of wide-gapped 'BSE's, which divide the beam completely, can realize the precision measurement of topological Aharonov-Casher effect. We have made a prototype with 200 μm gapped BSEs and confirmed the spatial separation of its two paths at monochromatic cold-neutron beamline MINE2 on JRR-3M reactor in JAEA

  6. Evaluation of precision in measurements of uranium isotope ratio by thermionic mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moraes, N.M.P. de; Rodrigues, C.

    1977-01-01

    The parameters which affect the precision and accuracy of uranium isotopic ratios measurements by thermionic mass spectrometry are discussed. A statistical designed program for the analysis of the internal and external variances are presented. It was done an application of this statistical methods, in order to get mass discrimination factor, and its standard mean deviation, by using some results already published for 235 U/ 238 U ratio in NBS uranium samples, and natural uranium [pt

  7. Precision Measurements of the b Forward-Backward Asymmetry at the Z Pole from LEP

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2068137

    2003-01-01

    The four LEP experiments have measured the forward-backward asymmetry for the process e + e − → Z → b b at centre-of-mass energies close to mz with very high precision. Sophisticated techniques have been developed to reconstruct either the production flavour in exclusive final states like B → l ± , or the hemisphere charge on a large-size b-enriched sample. The two methods provide largely independent determinations of A FB b and are briefly presented.

  8. Report of the working group on precision measurements. - Measurement of the W boson mass and width

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brock, R.; Erler, J.; Kim, Y.-K.; Marciano, W.; Ashmanskas, W.; Baur, U.; Ellison, J.; Lancaster, M.; Nodulman, L.; Rha, J.; Waters, D.; Womersley, J.

    2000-01-01

    We discuss the prospects for measuring the W mass and width in Run II. The basic techniques used to measure M W are described and the statistical, theoretical and detector-related uncertainties are discussed in detail. Alternative methods of measuring the W mass at the Tevatron and the prospects for M W measurements at other colliders are also described

  9. Factors affecting in vivo measurement precision and accuracy of 109Cd K x-ray fluorescence measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McNeill, F.E.; Stokes, L.; Kaye, W.E.

    1999-01-01

    109 Cd K x-ray fluorescence (XRF) measurement systems from two research centres were used to measure tibia lead content in a population (n=530) of young adults. The group mean bone lead contents (±SEM) determined by McMaster University (n=214) and the University of Maryland (n=316) were 2.80±0.51 and 2.33±0.50 μg Pb/(g bone mineral) respectively. The mean difference of 0.47±0.71 μg Pb/(g bone mineral) was not significant. There was no evidence of a systematic difference between measurements from the two systems. Measurement uncertainties for the young adults were poorer overall than uncertainties for a population of occupationally exposed men. This was because obese subjects and women were included in the study. Regressions of precision against body mass index (BMI, defined as weight/height 2 ) determined that uncertainties increased with BMI and were poorer for women than men. Measurement uncertainties (1σ) were >8 μg Pb/(g bone mineral) for women with a BMI > 0.004 kg cm -2 . Poor-precision data affected population estimates of bone lead content; an inverse correlation was found between precision and bone lead content. A small number (0.4%) of individual measurements with poor uncertainties were inaccurate to within the precision. It is suggested that obese subjects, whose BMI > 0.004 kg cm -2 , should be excluded from 109 Cd K XRF studies, as the measurement provides limited information and may be inaccurate. (author)

  10. Precision Beam Parameter Monitoring in a Measurement of the Weak Mixing Angle in Moeller Scattering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cooke, M.S.

    2005-04-11

    A precision measurement of the parity nonconserving left-right asymmetry, A{sub LR}, in Moeller scattering (e{sup -}e{sup -} {yields} e{sup -}e{sup -}) is currently in progress at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC). This experiment, labeled SLAC-E158, scatters longitudinally polarized electrons off atomic electrons in an unpolarized hydrogen target at a Q{sup 2} of 0.03 (GeV/c){sup 2}. The asymmetry, which is the fractional difference in the scattering cross-sections, measures the effective pseudo-scalar weak neutral current coupling, g{sub ee}, governing Moeller scattering. This quantity is in turn proportional to (1/4 - sin{sup 2} {theta}{sub w}), where {theta}{sub w} is the electroweak mixing angle. The goal is to measure the asymmetry to a precision of 1 x 10{sup -8} which corresponds to {delta}(sin{sup 2} {theta}{sub w}) {approx} 0.0007. Since A{sub LR} is a function of the cross-sections, and the cross-sections depend on the beam parameters, the desired precision of A{sub LR} places stringent requirements on the beam parameters. This paper investigates the requirements on the beam parameters and discusses the means by which they are monitored and accounted for.

  11. An investigation of highly accurate and precise robotic hole measurements using non-contact devices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Usman Zahid

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Industrial robots arms are widely used in manufacturing industry because of their support for automation. However, in metrology, robots have had limited application due to their insufficient accuracy. Even using error compensation and calibration methods, robots are not effective for micrometre (μm level metrology. Non-contact measurement devices can potentially enable the use of robots for highly accurate metrology. However, the use of such devices on robots has not been investigated. The research work reported in this paper explores the use of different non-contact measurement devices on an industrial robot. The aim is to experimentally investigate the effects of robot movements on the accuracy and precision of measurements. The focus has been on assessing the ability to accurately measure various geometric and surface parameters of holes despite the inherent inaccuracies of industrial robot. This involves the measurement of diameter, roundness and surface roughness. The study also includes scanning of holes for measuring internal features such as start and end point of a taper. Two different non-contact measurement devices based on different technologies are investigated. Furthermore, effects of eccentricity, vibrations and thermal variations are also assessed. The research contributes towards the use of robots for highly accurate and precise robotic metrology.

  12. Temperature measurement in low pressure plasmas. Temperaturmessungen im Niederdruckplasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rosenbauer, K.A.; Wilting, H.; Schramm, G. (Duesseldorf Univ. (Germany, F.R.). Abt. fuer Histologie und Embryologie)

    1989-11-01

    The present work discusses the influence of various parameters on the substrate temperature in a low pressure plasma. The measurement method chosen utilized Signotherm (Merck) temperature sensors embedded in silicon between two glass substrates. All measurements were made in a 200 G Plasma Processor from Technics Plasma GmbH. The substrate temperature is dependent on the process time, the RF power, the process gas and the position in the chamber. The substrate temperature increases with increasing process time and increasing power. Due to the location of the microwave port from the magnetron to the chamber, the substrate temperature is highest in the center of the chamber. Measurements performed in an air plasma yielded higher results than in an oxygen plasma. (orig.).

  13. Accuracy and precision of four common peripheral temperature measurement methods in intensive care patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asadian S

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Simin Asadian,1 Alireza Khatony,1 Gholamreza Moradi,2 Alireza Abdi,1 Mansour Rezaei,3 1Nursing and Midwifery School, Kermanshah University of Medical Sciences, 2Department of Anesthesiology, 3Biostatistics & Epidemiology Department, Kermanshah University of Medical Sciences, Kermanshah, Iran Introduction: An accurate determination of body temperature in critically ill patients is a fundamental requirement for initiating the proper process of diagnosis, and also therapeutic actions; therefore, the aim of the study was to assess the accuracy and precision of four noninvasive peripheral methods of temperature measurement compared to the central nasopharyngeal measurement. Methods: In this observational prospective study, 237 patients were recruited from the intensive care unit of Imam Ali Hospital of Kermanshah. The patients’ body temperatures were measured by four peripheral methods; oral, axillary, tympanic, and forehead along with a standard central nasopharyngeal measurement. After data collection, the results were analyzed by paired t-test, kappa coefficient, receiver operating characteristic curve, and using Statistical Package for the Social Sciences, version 19, software. Results: There was a significant meaningful correlation between all the peripheral methods when compared with the central measurement (P<0.001. Kappa coefficients showed good agreement between the temperatures of right and left tympanic membranes and the standard central nasopharyngeal measurement (88%. Paired t-test demonstrated an acceptable precision with forehead (P=0.132, left (P=0.18 and right (P=0.318 tympanic membranes, oral (P=1.00, and axillary (P=1.00 methods. Sensitivity and specificity of both the left and right tympanic membranes were more than for other methods. Conclusion: The tympanic and forehead methods had the highest and lowest accuracy for measuring body temperature, respectively. It is recommended to use the tympanic method (right and left for

  14. Reliability of Pressure Ulcer Rates: How Precisely Can We Differentiate Among Hospital Units, and Does the Standard Signal‐Noise Reliability Measure Reflect This Precision?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cramer, Emily

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Hospital performance reports often include rankings of unit pressure ulcer rates. Differentiating among units on the basis of quality requires reliable measurement. Our objectives were to describe and apply methods for assessing reliability of hospital‐acquired pressure ulcer rates and evaluate a standard signal‐noise reliability measure as an indicator of precision of differentiation among units. Quarterly pressure ulcer data from 8,199 critical care, step‐down, medical, surgical, and medical‐surgical nursing units from 1,299 US hospitals were analyzed. Using beta‐binomial models, we estimated between‐unit variability (signal) and within‐unit variability (noise) in annual unit pressure ulcer rates. Signal‐noise reliability was computed as the ratio of between‐unit variability to the total of between‐ and within‐unit variability. To assess precision of differentiation among units based on ranked pressure ulcer rates, we simulated data to estimate the probabilities of a unit's observed pressure ulcer rate rank in a given sample falling within five and ten percentiles of its true rank, and the probabilities of units with ulcer rates in the highest quartile and highest decile being identified as such. We assessed the signal‐noise measure as an indicator of differentiation precision by computing its correlations with these probabilities. Pressure ulcer rates based on a single year of quarterly or weekly prevalence surveys were too susceptible to noise to allow for precise differentiation among units, and signal‐noise reliability was a poor indicator of precision of differentiation. To ensure precise differentiation on the basis of true differences, alternative methods of assessing reliability should be applied to measures purported to differentiate among providers or units based on quality. © 2016 The Authors. Research in Nursing & Health published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27223598

  15. Methods for direct measurement of the plasma potential

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, S. A.; Christoffersen, G. B.; Jensen, Vagn Orla

    1972-01-01

    Reports on a simple experimental technique which can be used for determination of the plasma where the plasma potential prevails; these ions are accepted by the analyser plate when phi c= phi pl. Part of this technique has been used by Andersen, Jensen, Michelsen and Nielsen (1971) in measurements...

  16. Measurements of plasma temperature and electron density in laser

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The temperature and electron density characterizing the plasma are measured by time-resolved spectroscopy of neutral atom and ion line emissions in the time window of 300–2000 ns. An echelle spectrograph coupled with a gated intensified charge coupled detector is used to record the plasma emissions.

  17. Measuring the equations of state in a relaxed magnetohydrodynamic plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaur, M.; Barbano, L. J.; Suen-Lewis, E. M.; Shrock, J. E.; Light, A. D.; Brown, M. R.; Schaffner, D. A.

    2018-01-01

    We report measurements of the equations of state of a fully relaxed magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) laboratory plasma. Parcels of magnetized plasma, called Taylor states, are formed in a coaxial magnetized plasma gun, and are allowed to relax and drift into a closed flux conserving volume. Density, ion temperature, and magnetic field are measured as a function of time as the Taylor states compress and heat. The theoretically predicted MHD and double adiabatic equations of state are compared to experimental measurements. We find that the MHD equation of state is inconsistent with our data.

  18. A high precision method for quantitative measurements of reactive oxygen species in frozen biopsies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kirsti Berg

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: An electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR technique using the spin probe cyclic hydroxylamine 1-hydroxy-3-methoxycarbonyl-2,2,5,5-tetramethylpyrrolidine (CMH was introduced as a versatile method for high precision quantification of reactive oxygen species, including the superoxide radical in frozen biological samples such as cell suspensions, blood or biopsies. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Loss of measurement precision and accuracy due to variations in sample size and shape were minimized by assembling the sample in a well-defined volume. Measurement was carried out at low temperature (150 K using a nitrogen flow Dewar. The signal intensity was measured from the EPR 1st derivative amplitude, and related to a sample, 3-carboxy-proxyl (CP• with known spin concentration. RESULTS: The absolute spin concentration could be quantified with a precision and accuracy better than ±10 µM (k = 1. The spin concentration of samples stored at -80°C could be reproduced after 6 months of storage well within the same error estimate. CONCLUSION: The absolute spin concentration in wet biological samples such as biopsies, water solutions and cell cultures could be quantified with higher precision and accuracy than normally achievable using common techniques such as flat cells, tissue cells and various capillary tubes. In addition; biological samples could be collected and stored for future incubation with spin probe, and also further stored up to at least six months before EPR analysis, without loss of signal intensity. This opens for the possibility to store and transport incubated biological samples with known accuracy of the spin concentration over time.

  19. A novel approach for pulse width measurements with a high precision (8 ps RMS) TDC in an FPGA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ugur, C.; Linev, S.; Schweitzer, T.; Traxler, M.; Michel, J.

    2016-01-01

    High precision time measurements are a crucial element in particle identification experiments, which likewise require pulse width information for Time-over-Threshold (ToT) measurements and charge measurements (correlated with pulse width). In almost all of the FPGA-based TDC applications, pulse width measurements are implemented using two of the TDC channels for leading and trailing edge time measurements individually. This method however, requires twice the number of resources. In this paper we present the latest precision improvements in the high precision TDC (8 ps RMS) developed before [1], as well as the novel way of measuring ToT using a single TDC channel, while still achieving high precision (as low as 11.7 ps RMS). The effect of voltage, generated by a DC-DC converter, over the precision is also discussed. Finally, the outcome of the temperature change over the pulse width measurement is shown and a correction method is suggested to limit the degradation

  20. Reliability, precision, and gender differences in knee internal/external rotation proprioception measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagai, Takashi; Sell, Timothy C; Abt, John P; Lephart, Scott M

    2012-11-01

    To develop and assess the reliability and precision of knee internal/external rotation (IR/ER) threshold to detect passive motion (TTDPM) and determine if gender differences exist. Test-retest for the reliability/precision and cross-sectional for gender comparisons. University neuromuscular and human performance research laboratory. Ten subjects for the reliability and precision aim. Twenty subjects (10 males and 10 females) for gender comparisons. All TTDPM tests were performed using a multi-mode dynamometer. Subjects performed TTDPM at two knee positions (near IR or ER end-range). Intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC (3,k)) and standard error of measurement (SEM) were used to evaluate the reliability and precision. Independent t-tests were used to compare genders. TTDPM toward IR and ER at two knee positions. Intrasession and intersession reliability and precision were good (ICC=0.68-0.86; SEM=0.22°-0.37°). Females had significantly diminished TTDPM toward IR at IR-test position (males: 0.77°±0.14°, females: 1.18°±0.46°, p=0.021) and TTDPM toward IR at the ER-test position (males: 0.87°±0.13°, females: 1.36°±0.58°, p=0.026). No other significant gender differences were found (p>0.05). The current IR/ER TTDPM methods are reliable and accurate for the test-retest or cross-section research design. Gender differences were found toward IR where the ACL acts as the secondary restraint. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Reexamination of plasma measurements from the Mariner 5 Venus encounter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shefer, R.E.; Lazarus, A.J.; Bridge, H.S.

    1979-01-01

    Mariner 5 plasma data from the Venus encounter have been analyzed with twice the time resolution of the original analysis of Bridge et al. (1967). The velocity distribution function for each spectrum is used to determine more precisely the locations of boundaries and characteristic flow parameters in the interaction region around the planet. We identify a new region in the flow located between magnetosheathlike plasma inside the shock front and an interior low-flux region near the geometrical shadow of the planet. The region is characterized by a wide velocity distribution function and a decrease in ion flux. Using the highest time resolution magnetic field data made available by Smith et al., we propose that rapid magnetic field fluctuations in this region may result in an artificial broadening of the distribution function. We conclude that very high time resolution is required in future experiments in order to determine the true nature of the plasma in this region

  2. Precise measurement of a subpicosecond electron single bunch by the femtosecond streak camera

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uesaka, M.; Ueda, T.; Kozawa, T.; Kobayashi, T.

    1998-01-01

    Precise measurement of a subpicosecond electron single bunch by the femtosecond streak camera is presented. The subpicosecond electron single bunch of energy 35 MeV was generated by the achromatic magnetic pulse compressor at the S-band linear accelerator of nuclear engineering research laboratory (NERL), University of Tokyo. The electric charge per bunch and beam size are 0.5 nC and the horizontal and vertical beam sizes are 3.3 and 5.5 mm (full width at half maximum; FWHM), respectively. Pulse shape of the electron single bunch is measured via Cherenkov radiation emitted in air by the femtosecond streak camera. Optical parameters of the optical measurement system were optimized based on much experiment and numerical analysis in order to achieve a subpicosecond time resolution. By using the optimized optical measurement system, the subpicosecond pulse shape, its variation for the differents rf phases in the accelerating tube, the jitter of the total system and the correlation between measured streak images and calculated longitudinal phase space distributions were precisely evaluated. This measurement system is going to be utilized in several subpicosecond analyses for radiation physics and chemistry. (orig.)

  3. Precise measurement of the neutron capture reaction 54Fe(n,γ)55Fe via AMS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wallner, A; Buczak, K; Forstner, O; Golser, R; Kutschera, W; Lederer, C; Priller, A; Steier, P; Belgya, T; Szentmiklosi, L; Bichler, M; Coquard, L; Dillmann, I; Kaeppeler, F; Mengoni, A; Reifarth, R

    2010-01-01

    The measurement of cross sections relevant to nuclear astrophysics has become one main research topic at the VERA (Vienna Environmental Research Accelerator) facility. The technique applied, accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS), offers excellent sensitivity for the detection of long-lived radionuclides through ultra-low isotope ratio measurements. We discuss the potential and preliminary results of ongoing precision measurements of neutron-capture cross sections of 54 Fe. Such measurements might help to clarify the recently found discrepancy of s-process nucleosynthesis at lower-mass nuclei (A 55 Fe (t 1/2 = 2.72 yr) was analyzed using AMS. At VERA, detection of 55 Fe was developed with a reproducibility of about 1%, which makes the 54 Fe(n,γ) 55 Fe reaction a precise and unique laboratory measurement, which can serve as a reference to complementary techniques. In this regard a new 55 Fe standard for AMS measurements was produced. The final cross-section data are expected to be accurate to better than 3%. We report a preliminary, however, already significantly improved thermal neutron cross section value of (2.32 ± 0.10) barn, and a value of (6.3 ± 0.6) mbarn for E n = (520 ± 50) keV.

  4. Ultra-precise measurement of optical aberrations for sub-Aangstroem transmission electron microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barthel, J.

    2008-06-15

    Quantitative investigations of material structures on an atomic scale by means of highresolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) impose not only extreme demands on the mechanic and electromagnetic stability of the applied instruments but require also their precise electron-optical adjustment. Today a physical resolution well below one Aangstroem can be achieved with commercially available microscopes on a daily basis. However, the achieved resolution can often not be reliably exploited for the interpretation of the resulting microscopical data due to the presence of so-called higher-order lens aberrations. At the starting time of this work, a sufficiently accurate procedure to measure higher-order aberrations was urgently missing. Since aberration measurement is a mandatory prerequisite for any technique of aberration control enabling quantitative high-resolution microscopy, the goal of this work is to develop such a measurement procedure for the Sub-Aangstroem regime. The measurement procedures developed in the course of this work are based on the numerical evaluation of a series of images taken from an amorphous object under electron-beam illumination with varying tilt. New techniques have been developed for the evaluation of single images as well as for the optimised evaluation of the whole series. These procedures allow microscope users to perform quantitative HRTEM even at a resolution of 0.5 Aangstroem. The precision reached with the newly developed measurement procedures is unprecedented and surpasses existing solutions by at least one order of magnitude in any respect. All the concepts and procedures for aberration measurement developed in this work have been implemented in a software package which satisfies professional demands with respect to robustness, precision, speed and user-friendliness. The new automatic aberrationmeasurement procedures are suitable to establish HRTEM as a quantitative technique for material science investigations in the

  5. Ultra-precise measurement of optical aberrations for sub-Aangstroem transmission electron microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barthel, J.

    2008-06-01

    Quantitative investigations of material structures on an atomic scale by means of highresolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) impose not only extreme demands on the mechanic and electromagnetic stability of the applied instruments but require also their precise electron-optical adjustment. Today a physical resolution well below one Aangstroem can be achieved with commercially available microscopes on a daily basis. However, the achieved resolution can often not be reliably exploited for the interpretation of the resulting microscopical data due to the presence of so-called higher-order lens aberrations. At the starting time of this work, a sufficiently accurate procedure to measure higher-order aberrations was urgently missing. Since aberration measurement is a mandatory prerequisite for any technique of aberration control enabling quantitative high-resolution microscopy, the goal of this work is to develop such a measurement procedure for the Sub-Aangstroem regime. The measurement procedures developed in the course of this work are based on the numerical evaluation of a series of images taken from an amorphous object under electron-beam illumination with varying tilt. New techniques have been developed for the evaluation of single images as well as for the optimised evaluation of the whole series. These procedures allow microscope users to perform quantitative HRTEM even at a resolution of 0.5 Aangstroem. The precision reached with the newly developed measurement procedures is unprecedented and surpasses existing solutions by at least one order of magnitude in any respect. All the concepts and procedures for aberration measurement developed in this work have been implemented in a software package which satisfies professional demands with respect to robustness, precision, speed and user-friendliness. The new automatic aberrationmeasurement procedures are suitable to establish HRTEM as a quantitative technique for material science investigations in the

  6. Precise electrical transport measurements by using Bridgman type pressure cell at low temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oishi, Takayuki [Division of Civil and Enviromental Engineering, Kanazawa University, Kakuma-machi, Kanazawa 920-1192 (Japan); Ohashi, Masashi [Faculty of Environmental Design, Kanazawa University, Kakuma-machi, Kanazawa 920-1192 (Japan)

    2010-03-01

    We report a technique for the precise measurement of the electrical resisivity under high pressure at low temperature by using Bridgman anvils made of tungsten carbide. Quasi-hydrostatic pressure is generated up to {approx}15 GPa in the relatively large working space which allows the use of large specimens and simple experimental procedures rather than using a standard diamond anvil cell. The application is demonstrated by the measurements of the electrical resistivity of lead in order to describe the effect of pressure on the superconducting transition.

  7. Testing the Standard Model by precision measurement of the weak charges of quarks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ross Young; Roger Carlini; Anthony Thomas; Julie Roche

    2007-05-01

    In a global analysis of the latest parity-violating electron scattering measurements on nuclear targets, we demonstrate a significant improvement in the experimental knowledge of the weak neutral-current lepton-quark interactions at low-energy. The precision of this new result, combined with earlier atomic parity-violation measurements, limits the magnitude of possible contributions from physics beyond the Standard Model - setting a model-independent, lower-bound on the scale of new physics at ~1 TeV.

  8. Tests of a Fast Plastic Scintillator for High-Precision Half-Life Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laffoley, A. T.; Dunlop, R.; Finlay, P.; Leach, K. G.; Michetti-Wilson, J.; Rand, E. T.; Svensson, C. E.; Grinyer, G. F.; Thomas, J. C.; Ball, G.; Garnsworthy, A. B.; Hackman, G.; Orce, J. N.; Triambak, S.; Williams, S. J.; Andreoiu, C.; Cross, D.

    2013-03-01

    A fast plastic scintillator detector is evaluated for possible use in an ongoing program of high-precision half-life measurements of short lived β emitters. Using data taken at TRI-UMF's Isotope Separator and Accelerator Facility with a radioactive 26Na beam, a detailed investigation of potential systematic effects with this new detector setup is being performed. The technique will then be applied to other β-decay half-life measurements including the superallowed Fermi β emitters 10C, 14O, and T = 1/2 decay of 15O.

  9. Precise Measurement of the Deuteron Elastic structure Function A(Q2)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    D. Abbott; A. Ahmidouch; H. Anklin; J. Arvieux; J. Bail; S. Beedoe; E. J. Beise; L. Bimbot; W. Boeglin; H. Breuer; R. Carlini; N. S. Chant; S. Danagoulian; K. Dow; J.E. Ducret; J. Dunne; R. Ent; L. Ewell; L. Eyraud; C. Furget; M. Garcon; R. Gilman; C. Glashausser; P. Gucye; K. Gustafsson; K. Hafidi; A. Honegger; J. Jourdan; S. Kox; G. Kumbartzki; L. Lu; A. Lung; D. Mack; P. Markowitz; J. McIntyre; D. Meekins; F. Merchez; J. Mitchell; R. Mohring; S. Mtingwa; H. Mrktchyan; D. Pitz; L. Qin; R. Ransome; J.S. Real; P. G. Roos; P. Rutt; R. Sawafta; S. Stepanyan; R. Tieulent; E. Tomasi-Gustafsson; W. Turchinetz; K. Vansyoc; J. Volmer; E. Voutier; W. Vulcan; C. Williamson; S. A. Wood; C. Yan; J. Zhao; W. Zhao

    1999-01-01

    The A(Q 2 ) structure function in elastic electron-deuteron scattering was measured at six momentum transfers Q 2 between 0.66 and 1.80 (GeV/c) 2 in Hall C at Jefferson Laboratory. The scattered electrons and recoil deuterons were detected in coincidence, at a fixed deuteron angle of 60.5 o . These new precise measurements resolve discrepancies between older sets of data. They put significant constraints on existing models of the deuteron electromagnetic structure, and on the strength of isoscalar meson exchange currents

  10. Precise Measurement of the Deuteron Elastic Structure Function A(Q2 )

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ball, J.; Ducret, J.; Garcon, M.; Hafidi, K.; Pitz, D.; Tomasi-Gustafsson, E.; Honegger, A.; Jourdan, J.; Zhao, J.; Beise, E.J.; Breuer, H.; Chant, N.S.; Ewell, L.; Gustafsson, K.; Lung, A.; Mohring, R.; Pitz, D.; Roos, P.G.; Eyraud, L.; Furget, C.; Kox, S.; Lu, L.; Merchez, F.; Real, J.; Tieulent, R.; Voutier, E.; Abbott, D.; Carlini, R.; Dunne, J.; Ent, R.; Gilman, R.; Gueye, P.; Mack, D.; Meekins, D.; Mitchell, J.; Pitz, D.; Qin, L.; Vansyoc, K.; Volmer, J.; Vulcan, W.; Wood, S.A.; Yan, C.; Gilman, R.; Glashausser, C.; Kumbartzki, G.; McIntyre, J.; Ransome, R.; Rutt, P.; Ahmidouch, A.; Dow, K.; Turchinetz, W.; Williamson, C.; Zhao, W.; Anklin, H.; Boeglin, W.; Markowitz, P.; Mrktchyan, H.; Stepanyan, S.; Ahmidouch, A.; Beedoe, S.; Danagoulian, S.; Mtingwa, S.; Sawafta, R.; Arvieux, J.; Ball, J.; Tomasi-Gustafsson, E.; Arvieux, J.; Bimbot, L.

    1999-01-01

    The A(Q 2 ) structure function in elastic electron-deuteron scattering was measured at six momentum transfers Q 2 between 0.66 and 1.80 (GeV/c) 2 in Hall C at Jefferson Laboratory. The scattered electrons and recoil deuterons were detected in coincidence, at a fixed deuteron angle of 60.5 degree. These new precise measurements resolve discrepancies between older sets of data. They put significant constraints on existing models of the deuteron electromagnetic structure, and on the strength of isoscalar meson exchange currents. copyright 1999 The American Physical Society

  11. Measurement of high-mass dilepton production with the CMS-TOTEM Precision Proton Spectrometer

    CERN Document Server

    Shchelina, Ksenia

    2017-01-01

    The measurements of dilepton production in photon-photon fusion with the CMS-TOTEM Precision Proton Spectrometer (CT-PPS) are presented. For the first time, exclusive dilepton production at high masses have been observed in the CMS detector while one or two outgoing protons are measured in CT-PPS using around 10~${\\rm fb}^{-1}$ of data accumulated in 2016 during high-luminosity LHC operation. These first results show a good understanding, calibration and alignment of the new CT-PPS detectors installed in 2016.

  12. Precise electrical transport measurements by using Bridgman type pressure cell at low temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oishi, Takayuki; Ohashi, Masashi

    2010-01-01

    We report a technique for the precise measurement of the electrical resisivity under high pressure at low temperature by using Bridgman anvils made of tungsten carbide. Quasi-hydrostatic pressure is generated up to ∼15 GPa in the relatively large working space which allows the use of large specimens and simple experimental procedures rather than using a standard diamond anvil cell. The application is demonstrated by the measurements of the electrical resistivity of lead in order to describe the effect of pressure on the superconducting transition.

  13. Precise VLA positions and flux-density measurements of the Jupiter system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muhleman, D.O.; Berge, G.L.; Rudy, D.; Niell, A.E.

    1986-01-01

    VLA C array configuration observations at 2 and 6 cm are presented for Europa, Ganymede, and Callisto at eastern and western elongations with respect to Jupiter, which allowed measurements in right ascension and declination of the satellites with an rms precision of about + or - 0.03 arcsec. The transfer of the mean offsets of Ganymede to Jupiter yields offsets of -0.185 + or - 0.03 arcsec and -0.06 + or - 0.03 arcsec, with respect to JPL-DE-200, at the mean epoch of April 28, 1983; the large offset in right ascension is a combination of the Jupiter ephemeris error and the error in the frame tie of the Jovian planets with the VLBI system of precise positions which was used as the absolute reference frame for the observations. A significant error is noted in the orbital position of Callisto with respect to Ganymede. 12 references

  14. Utilization of the Rutherford backscattering technique for precise measurements of thickness by an alternative procedure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chagas, E.F.

    1985-01-01

    This technique was used to determine the thickness of targets on very thick substrates as this type of target is used a lot in nuclear physics, and especially in γ spectroscpy. The difficulties introduced in this case, occur because of the appearance of a small peak on a very high continuous background, due to the fact that the atomic number of the substrate is bigger than that of the targets. These difficulties are overcome using an alternative procedure to determine precisely the loss of energy of the beam whilst crossing the refered target. Targets of 59 Co, 46-48-50 Ti and 10 B on substrate of Pd and Ta, with thicknesses betwnn 30μg/cm 2 and 500μg/cm 2 were measured with a precision of 5%. The biggest sources of imprecision are the amounts of dE/dX. (Author) [pt

  15. Precision of dosimetry-related measurements obtained on current multidetector computed tomography scanners

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mathieu, Kelsey B.; McNitt-Gray, Michael F.; Zhang, Di; Kim, Hyun J.; Cody, Dianna D.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: Computed tomography (CT) intrascanner and interscanner variability has not been well characterized. Thus, the purpose of this study was to examine the within-run, between-run, and between-scanner precision of physical dosimetry-related measurements collected over the course of 1 yr on three different makes and models of multidetector row CT (MDCT) scanners. Methods: Physical measurements were collected using nine CT scanners (three scanners each of GE VCT, GE LightSpeed 16, and Siemens Sensation 64 CT). Measurements were made using various combinations of technical factors, including kVp, type of bowtie filter, and x-ray beam collimation, for several dosimetry-related quantities, including (a) free-in-air CT dose index (CTDI 100,air ); (b) calculated half-value layers and quarter-value layers; and (c) weighted CT dose index (CTDI w ) calculated from exposure measurements collected in both a 16 and 32 cm diameter CTDI phantom. Data collection was repeated at several different time intervals, ranging from seconds (for CTDI 100,air values) to weekly for 3 weeks and then quarterly or triannually for 1 yr. Precision of the data was quantified by the percent coefficient of variation (%CV). Results: The maximum relative precision error (maximum %CV value) across all dosimetry metrics, time periods, and scanners included in this study was 4.33%. The median observed %CV values for CTDI 100,air ranged from 0.05% to 0.19% over several seconds, 0.12%-0.52% over 1 week, and 0.58%-2.31% over 3-4 months. For CTDI w for a 16 and 32 cm CTDI phantom, respectively, the range of median %CVs was 0.38%-1.14% and 0.62%-1.23% in data gathered weekly for 3 weeks and 1.32%-2.79% and 0.84%-2.47% in data gathered quarterly or triannually for 1 yr. Conclusions: From a dosimetry perspective, the MDCT scanners tested in this study demonstrated a high degree of within-run, between-run, and between-scanner precision (with relative precision errors typically well under 5%).

  16. High precision instrumentation for measuring the true exposure time in diagnostic X-ray examinations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silva, Danubia B.; Santos, Marcus A.P.; Barros, Fabio R.; Santos, Luiz A.P.

    2013-01-01

    One of the most important physical quantities to be evaluated in diagnostic radiology is the radiation exposure time experimented by the patient during the X-ray examination. IAEA and WHO organizations have suggested that any country must create a quality surveillance program to verify if each type of ionizing radiation equipment used in the hospitals and medical clinics are in conformity with the accepted uncertainties following the international standards. The purpose of this work is to present a new high precision methodology for measuring true exposure time in diagnostic X-ray examinations: pulsed, continuous or digital one. An electronic system named CronoX, which will be soon registered at the Brazilian Patent Office (INPI), is the equipment that provides such a high precision measurement. The principle of measurement is based on the electrical signal captured by a sensor that enters in a regeneration amplifier to transform it in a digital signal, which is treated by a microprocessor (uP). The signal treatment results in a two measured times: 1) T rx , the true X-ray exposure time; 2) T nx , the time in which the X-ray machine is repeatedly cut off during the pulsed irradiation and there is no delivery dose to the patient. Conventional Polymat X-ray equipment and dental X-ray machines were used to generate X-ray photons and take the measurements with the electronic systems. The results show that such a high precision instrumentation displays the true exposure time in diagnostic X-ray examinations and indicates a new method to be purposed for the quality surveillance programs in radiology. (author)

  17. Novel double-isotope technique for enzymatic assay of catecholamines, permitting high precision, sensitivity and plasma sample capacity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brown, M.J.; Jenner, D.A.

    1981-01-01

    A novel use of a double-isotope method is described which allows radioenzymatic assays to combine precision and sensitivity. In the catechol O-methyltransferase assay separate portions of each plasma sample are incubated with either S-[ 3 H]- or S-[ 14 C]-adenosyl-L-methionine. Standards of noradrenaline and adrenaline are added to the latter portions and are thus converted into standards of [ 14 C]metadrenalines. These are added to the 3 H-labelled portions after the incubation, where they function as tracers. The final recovery of 14 C radioactivity corrects for (a) the efficiency of methylation in the plasma sample concerned and (b) the recovery of metadrenalines during the extraction procedures. The 3 H/ 14 C ratio is constant in each assay for a given catecholamine concentration and is determined for samples to which standards of noradrenaline and adrenaline are added to the 3 H- (as well as the 14 C-) labelled portions before the initial incubation. The sensitivity of the assay is increased by using high specific radioactivity S-[ 3 H]adenosyl-L-methionine, and low backgrounds are maintained by catecholamine depletion in vivo in the rats used for enzyme preparation. Both catecholamines (1.5 pg/ml; 10 pmol/l) may be detected; the coefficients of variation are 3.0 and 3.2% for noradrenaline and adrenaline respectively (intra-assay) and 4.6 and 5.0% (inter-assay). (author)

  18. Low-cost precise measurement of oscillator frequency instability based on GNSS carrier observation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kou, Yanhong; Jiao, Yue; Xu, Dongyang; Zhang, Meng; Liu, Ya; Li, Xiaohui

    2013-03-01

    Global navigation satellite systems (GNSS) receivers can be used in time and frequency metrology by exploiting stable GNSS time scales. This paper proposes a low-cost method for precise measurement of oscillator frequency instability using a single-frequency software GNSS receiver. The only required hardware is a common radio frequency (RF) data collection device driven by the oscillator under test (OUT). The receiver solves the oscillator frequency error in high time resolution using the carrier Doppler observation and the broadcast ephemeris from one of the available satellites employing the onboard reference atomic frequency standard that is more stable than the OUT. Considering the non-stable and non-Gaussian properties of the frequency error measurement, an unbiased finite impulse response (FIR) filter is employed to obtain robust estimation and filter out measurement noise. The effects of different filter orders and convolution lengths are further discussed. The frequency error of an oven controlled oscillator (OCXO) is measured using live Beidou-2/Compass signals. The results are compared with the synchronous measurement using a specialized phase comparator with the standard coordinated universal time (UTC) signal from the master clock H226 in the national time service center (NTSC) of China as its reference. The Allan deviation (ADEV) estimates using the two methods have a 99.9% correlation coefficient and a 0.6% mean relative difference over 1-1000 s intervals. The experiment demonstrates the effectiveness and high precision of the software receiver method.

  19. Precision measurements of inclusive and differential Drell-Yan cross sections with the ATLAS detector

    CERN Document Server

    Camarda, Stefano; The ATLAS collaboration

    2016-01-01

    Measurements of the Drell-Yan production of W and Z/gamma* bosons at the LHC provide a benchmark of our understanding of perturbative QCD and probe the proton structure in a unique way. The measurements are compared to state-of-the-art calculations at NNLO in QCD. New 7 TeV measurements are performed for W and Z/gamma* bosons integrated and as a function of lepton rapidity and boson mass. Unprecedented precision is reached and strong constraints on parton distribution functions are found. First precise inclusive measurements of W and Z production at 13 TeV are presented. W/Z and W charge ratios profit from a cancellation of experimental uncertainties. The collaboration has also performed a measurement of ratios of the cross sections for the production of single Z bosons and top-quark pairs at various center-of-mass energies which exploit differences in the range of the probed parton momenta. The angular distributions of the Drell-Yan lepton pairs around the Z-boson mass peak probe the underlying QCD dynamic o...

  20. A Precision Measurement of the Neutron Spin Structure Functions Using a Polarized HE-3 Target

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, T

    2003-01-01

    This thesis describes a precision measurement of the neutron spin dependent structure function, g 1 n (x). The measurement was made by the E154 collaboration at SLAC using a longitudinally polarized, 48.3 GeV electron beam, and a 3 He target polarized by spin exchange with optically pumped rubidium. A target polarization as high as 50% was achieved. The elements of the experiment which pertain to the polarized 3 He target will be described in detail in this thesis. To achieve a precision measurement, it has been necessary to minimize the systematic error from the uncertainty in the target parameters. All of the parameters of the target have been carefully measured, and the most important parameters of the target have been measured using multiple techniques. The polarization of the target was measured using nuclear magnetic resonance techniques, and has been calibrated using both proton NMR and by measuring the shift of the Rb Zeeman resonance frequency due to the 3 He polarization. The fraction of events which originated in the 3 He, as measured by the spectrometers, has been determined using a physical model of the target and the spectrometers. It was also measured during the experiment using a variable pressure 3 He reference cell in place of the polarized 3 He target. The spin dependent structure function g 1 n (z) was measured in the Bjorken x range of 0.014 2 of 5 (GeV/c) 2 . One of the primary motivations for this experiment was to test the Bjorken sum rule. Because the experiment had smaller statistical errors and a broader kinematic coverage than previous experiments, the behavior of the spin structure function g 1 n (x) could be studied in detail at low values of the Bjorken scaling variable x. It was found that g 1 n (x) has a strongly divergent behavior at low values of x, calling into question the methods commonly used to extrapolate the value of g 1 n (x) to low x. The precision of the measurement made by the E154 collaboration at SLAC puts a tighter

  1. A Precision Measurement of the Neutron Spin Structure Functions Using a Polarized HE-3 Target

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, T

    2003-11-05

    This thesis describes a precision measurement of the neutron spin dependent structure function, g{sub 1}{sup n}(x). The measurement was made by the E154 collaboration at SLAC using a longitudinally polarized, 48.3 GeV electron beam, and a {sup 3}He target polarized by spin exchange with optically pumped rubidium. A target polarization as high as 50% was achieved. The elements of the experiment which pertain to the polarized {sup 3}He target will be described in detail in this thesis. To achieve a precision measurement, it has been necessary to minimize the systematic error from the uncertainty in the target parameters. All of the parameters of the target have been carefully measured, and the most important parameters of the target have been measured using multiple techniques. The polarization of the target was measured using nuclear magnetic resonance techniques, and has been calibrated using both proton NMR and by measuring the shift of the Rb Zeeman resonance frequency due to the {sup 3}He polarization. The fraction of events which originated in the {sup 3}He, as measured by the spectrometers, has been determined using a physical model of the target and the spectrometers. It was also measured during the experiment using a variable pressure {sup 3}He reference cell in place of the polarized {sup 3}He target. The spin dependent structure function g{sub 1}{sup n}(z) was measured in the Bjorken x range of 0.014 < x < 0.7 with an average Q{sup 2} of 5 (GeV/c){sup 2}. One of the primary motivations for this experiment was to test the Bjorken sum rule. Because the experiment had smaller statistical errors and a broader kinematic coverage than previous experiments, the behavior of the spin structure function g{sub 1}{sup n}(x) could be studied in detail at low values of the Bjorken scaling variable x. It was found that g{sub 1}{sup n}(x) has a strongly divergent behavior at low values of x, calling into question the methods commonly used to extrapolate the value of g

  2. Electron reconstruction and electroweak processes as tools to achieve precision measurements at a hadron collider: From CDF to CMS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Giolo-Nicollerat, Anne-Sylvie [Univ. of Lausanne (Switzerland)

    2004-01-01

    Precision measurements are an important aspect of hadron colliders physics program. This thesis describes a method, together with a first application, of how to achieve and use precision measurements at the LHC. The idea is to use refernce processes to control the detector systematics and to constrain the theoretical predictions.

  3. Design and testing of miniaturized plasma sensor for measuring hypervelocity impact plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goel, A., E-mail: ashish09@stanford.edu; Tarantino, P. M.; Lauben, D. S.; Close, S. [Department of Aeronautics and Astronautics, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 (United States)

    2015-04-15

    An increasingly notable component of the space environment pertains to the impact of meteoroids and orbital debris on spacecraft and the resulting mechanical and electrical damages. Traveling at speeds of tens of km/s, when these particles, collectively referred to as hypervelocity particles, impact a satellite, they vaporize, ionize, and produce a radially expanding plasma that can generate electrically harmful radio frequency emission or serve as a trigger for electrostatic discharge. In order to measure the flux, composition, energy distribution, and temperature of ions and electrons in this plasma, a miniaturized plasma sensor has been developed for carrying out in-situ measurements in space. The sensor comprises an array of electrostatic analyzer wells split into 16 different channels, catering to different species and energy ranges in the plasma. We present results from numerical simulation based optimization of sensor geometry. A novel approach of fabricating the sensor using printed circuit boards is implemented. We also describe the test setup used for calibrating the sensor and show results demonstrating the energy band pass characteristics of the sensor. In addition to the hypervelocity impact plasmas, the plasma sensor developed can also be used to carry out measurements of ionospheric plasma, diagnostics of plasma propulsion systems, and in other space physics experiments.

  4. Single-shot optical conductivity measurement of dense aluminum plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Churina, I. V.; Cho, B.-I.; Bernstein, A.; Stoker, D. S.; Dalton, A.; Symes, D. R.; Ditmire, T.

    2009-01-01

    The optical conductivity of a dense femtosecond laser-heated aluminum plasma heated to 0.1-1.5 eV was measured using frequency-domain interferometry with chirped pulses, permitting simultaneous observation of optical probe reflectivity and probe pulse phase shift. Coupled with published models of bound-electron contributions to the conductivity, these two independent experimental data yielded a direct measurement of both real and imaginary components of the plasma conductivity.

  5. Precision Measurement of the Beryllium-7 Solar Neutrino Interaction Rate in Borexino

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saldanha, Richard Nigel

    Solar neutrinos, since their first detection nearly forty years ago, have revealed valuable information regarding the source of energy production in the Sun, and have demonstrated that neutrino oscillations are well described by the Large Mixing Angle (LMA) oscillation parameters with matter interactions due to the Mikheyev-Smirnov-Wolfenstein (MSW) effect. This thesis presents a precision measurement of the 7Be solar neutrino interaction rate within Borexino, an underground liquid scintillator detector that is designed to measure solar neutrino interactions through neutrino-electron elastic scattering. The thesis includes a detailed description of the analysis techniques developed and used for this measurement as well as an evaluation of the relevant systematic uncertainties that affect the precision of the result. The rate of neutrino-electron elastic scattering from 0.862 MeV 7Be neutrinos is determined to be 45.4 +/- 1.6 (stat) +/- 1.5 (sys) counts/day/100 ton. Due to extensive detector calibrations and improved analysis methods, the systematic uncertainty in the interaction rate has been reduced by more than a factor of two from the previous evaluation. In the no-oscillation hypothesis, the interaction rate corresponds to a 0.862 MeV 7Be electron neutrino flux of (2.75 +/- 0.13) x 10 9 cm-2 sec-1. Including the predicted neutrino flux from the Standard Solar Model yields an electron neutrino survival probability of Pee 0.51 +/- 0.07 and rules out the no-oscillation hypothesis at 5.1sigma The LMA-MSW neutrino oscillation model predicts a transition in the solar Pee value between low ( 10 MeV) energies which has not yet been experimentally confirmed. This result, in conjunction with the Standard Solar Model, represents the most precise measurement of the electron neutrino survival probability for solar neutrinos at sub-MeV energies.

  6. [Measurement of maternal plasma volume during pregnancy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uzan, S; Beaufils, M; Uzan, M; Donsimoni, R; Mareck, A; Salat-Baroux, J; Sureau, C

    1988-02-01

    An increased maternal plasma volume (PV) is a characteristic phenomenon of normal pregnancy, which may be related to a physiological decrease of peripheral resistances. The authors have studied the plasma volume of 1,105 patients distributed as follows: normal (387), permanently hypertensive patients (84), hypertensive patients during pregnancy (390), patients with apparently isolated RCIU (154) or with a pathological past-history during previous pregnancies (90). It appears that the PV is a sign of a severe HBP, and presents a rather early and good predictive value regarding the weight of the fetus and some complications such as severe UCIU and fetal death in utero. In case of pathological past events or pre-existing hypertension, the PV enables to differentiate rather well patients who will be prone to a complicated pregnancy. In view of these results, utilization and interpretation criteria of this parameter during pregnancies with hypertension or pregnancies in which there is a suspicion or a risk of intra-uterine growth delay, are defined.

  7. Femtosecond precision measurement of laser–rf phase jitter in a photocathode rf gun

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shi, Libing; Zhao, Lingrong; Lu, Chao; Jiang, Tao; Liu, Shengguang; Wang, Rui; Zhu, Pengfei; Xiang, Dao

    2017-01-01

    We report on the measurement of the laser–rf phase jitter in a photocathode rf gun with femtosecond precision. In this experiment four laser pulses with equal separation are used to produce electron bunch trains; then the laser–rf phase jitter is obtained by measuring the variations of the electron bunch spacing with an rf deflector. Furthermore, we show that when the gun and the deflector are powered by the same rf source, it is possible to obtain the laser–rf phase jitter in the gun through measurement of the beam–rf phase jitter in the deflector. Based on these measurements, we propose an effective time-stamping method that may be applied in MeV ultrafast electron diffraction facilities to enhance the temporal resolution.

  8. Precision interferometric measurement of right angles with the aid of an etalon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oreb, B.; Walsh, C.; Leistner, A.

    2000-01-01

    Full text: An interferometric set up has been developed to measure right angles between faces of components such as prisms or cubes, to sub arc second resolution. The component to be measured is placed inside an air spaced etalon and the right angle is measured by a Fizeau interferometer with respect to a transmission reference flat. The etalon consists of two precision glass flats which are aligned to be parallel by optically contacting these to a cylindrical Zerodur sleeve having flat and parallel ends. A circular cut out in the cylindrical sleeve is made to allow the test component and the light from the interferometer to enter the etalon. The phase difference in the two halves of the interferogram corresponding to the two sides of the test component is a measure of the angle deviation from 90 deg

  9. Femtosecond precision measurement of laser–rf phase jitter in a photocathode rf gun

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shi, Libing; Zhao, Lingrong; Lu, Chao; Jiang, Tao; Liu, Shengguang; Wang, Rui; Zhu, Pengfei; Xiang, Dao, E-mail: dxiang@sjtu.edu.cn

    2017-03-21

    We report on the measurement of the laser–rf phase jitter in a photocathode rf gun with femtosecond precision. In this experiment four laser pulses with equal separation are used to produce electron bunch trains; then the laser–rf phase jitter is obtained by measuring the variations of the electron bunch spacing with an rf deflector. Furthermore, we show that when the gun and the deflector are powered by the same rf source, it is possible to obtain the laser–rf phase jitter in the gun through measurement of the beam–rf phase jitter in the deflector. Based on these measurements, we propose an effective time-stamping method that may be applied in MeV ultrafast electron diffraction facilities to enhance the temporal resolution.

  10. Precise measurements and shimming of magnetic field gradients in the low field regime

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Allmendinger, Fabian; Schmidt, Ulrich [Physikalisches Institut, Universitaet Heidelberg (Germany); Grasdijk, Olivier; Jungmann, Klaus; Willmann, Lorenz [University of Groningen (Netherlands); Heil, Werner; Karpuk, Sergei; Repetto, Maricel; Sobolev, Yuri; Zimmer, Stefan [Institut fuer Physik, Universitaet Mainz (Germany); Krause, Hans-Joachim; Offenhaeuser, Andreas [Peter Gruenberg Institut, Forschungszentrum Juelich (Germany); Collaboration: MIXed-Collaboration

    2016-07-01

    For many experiments at the precision frontier of fundamental physics, the accurate measurement and knowledge of magnetic field gradients in particular in the low field regime (<μT) is a necessity: On the one hand, in the search for an Electric Dipole Moment (EDM) of free neutrons or atoms, field gradients contribute to geometric-phase-induced false EDM signals for particles in traps. On the other hand, clock comparison experiments like the {sup 3}He/{sup 129}Xe spin clock experiment suffer from gradients, since the coherent T{sub 2}*-time of free spin precession, and thus the measurement sensitivity, scales ∝ ∇ vector B{sup -2}. Here we report on a new and very effective method, to shim and to measure tiny magnetic field gradients in the range of pT/cm by using effective T{sub 2}*-measurement sequences in varying the currents of trim coils of known geometry.

  11. Calorimeters for Precision Power Dissipation Measurements on Controlled-Temperature Superconducting Radiofrequency Samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xiao, Binping P.; Kelley, Michael J.; Reece, Charles E.; Phillips, H. L.

    2012-01-01

    Two calorimeters, with stainless steel and Cu as the thermal path material for high precision and high power versions, respectively, have been designed and commissioned for the surface impedance characterization (SIC) system at Jefferson Lab to provide low temperature control and measurement for CW power up to 22 W on a 5 cm dia. disk sample which is thermally isolated from the RF portion of the system. A power compensation method has been developed to measure the RF induced power on the sample. Simulation and experimental results show that with these two calorimeters, the whole thermal range of interest for superconducting radiofrequency (SRF) materials has been covered. The power measurement error in the interested power range is within 1.2% and 2.7% for the high precision and high power versions, respectively. Temperature distributions on the sample surface for both versions have been simulated and the accuracy of sample temperature measurements have been analysed. Both versions have the ability to accept bulk superconductors and thin film superconducting samples with a variety of substrate materials such as Al, Al 2 O 3 , Cu, MgO, Nb and Si

  12. Precision measurement of the 1S Lamb shift in atomic hydrogen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beausoleil, R.G.; McIntyre, D.H.; Foot, C.J.; Couillaud, B.; Hildum, E.A.; Hansch, T.W.

    1987-01-01

    The authors used cw Doppler-free two-photon spectroscopy to measure the 1S-2S transition frequency in atomic hydrogen gas with a precision of 6 parts in 10 10 . Their result for the energy level separation is f(1S-2S) = 2 466 061 413.3(1.5) MHz and can be used to extract a value of the 1S Lamb shift. Choosing a value of the Rydberg constant measured independently by high-resolution spectroscopy of the hydrogen Balmer-β transition, the authors obtain a value of Δf/sub Lamb/(1S) = 8 173.3(1.7) MHz, in good agreement with the theoretical prediction of 8 173.06(20) MHz. On the other hand, if they trust the theoretical determination of the 1S Lamb shift, they can interpret our experimental result as a measurement of the Rydberg constant. The authors obtain R∞ = 109 737.315(7) cm -1 , in agreement with recent precise measurements

  13. Precision measurement of the mass difference between light nuclei and anti-nuclei

    CERN Document Server

    Adam, Jaroslav; Aggarwal, Madan Mohan; Aglieri Rinella, Gianluca; Agnello, Michelangelo; Agrawal, Neelima; Ahammed, Zubayer; Ahmed, Ijaz; Ahn, Sang Un; Aimo, Ilaria; Aiola, Salvatore; Ajaz, Muhammad; Akindinov, Alexander; Alam, Sk Noor; Aleksandrov, Dmitry; Alessandro, Bruno; Alexandre, Didier; Alfaro Molina, Jose Ruben; Alici, Andrea; Alkin, Anton; Alme, Johan; Alt, Torsten; Altinpinar, Sedat; Altsybeev, Igor; Alves Garcia Prado, Caio; Andrei, Cristian; Andronic, Anton; Anguelov, Venelin; Anielski, Jonas; Anticic, Tome; Antinori, Federico; Antonioli, Pietro; Aphecetche, Laurent Bernard; Appelshaeuser, Harald; Arcelli, Silvia; Armesto Perez, Nestor; Arnaldi, Roberta; Aronsson, Tomas; Arsene, Ionut Cristian; Arslandok, Mesut; Augustinus, Andre; Averbeck, Ralf Peter; Azmi, Mohd Danish; Bach, Matthias Jakob; Badala, Angela; Baek, Yong Wook; Bagnasco, Stefano; Bailhache, Raphaelle Marie; Bala, Renu; Baldisseri, Alberto; Ball, Markus; Baltasar Dos Santos Pedrosa, Fernando; Baral, Rama Chandra; Barbano, Anastasia Maria; Barbera, Roberto; Barile, Francesco; Barnafoldi, Gergely Gabor; Barnby, Lee Stuart; Ramillien Barret, Valerie; Bartalini, Paolo; Bartke, Jerzy Gustaw; Bartsch, Esther; Basile, Maurizio; Bastid, Nicole; Basu, Sumit; Bathen, Bastian; Batigne, Guillaume; Batista Camejo, Arianna; Batyunya, Boris; Batzing, Paul Christoph; Bearden, Ian Gardner; Beck, Hans; Bedda, Cristina; Behera, Nirbhay Kumar; Belikov, Iouri; Bellini, Francesca; Bello Martinez, Hector; Bellwied, Rene; Belmont Iii, Ronald John; Belmont Moreno, Ernesto; Belyaev, Vladimir; Bencedi, Gyula; Beole, Stefania; Berceanu, Ionela; Bercuci, Alexandru; Berdnikov, Yaroslav; Berenyi, Daniel; Bertens, Redmer Alexander; Berzano, Dario; Betev, Latchezar; Bhasin, Anju; Bhat, Inayat Rasool; Bhati, Ashok Kumar; Bhattacharjee, Buddhadeb; Bhom, Jihyun; Bianchi, Livio; Bianchi, Nicola; Bianchin, Chiara; Bielcik, Jaroslav; Bielcikova, Jana; Bilandzic, Ante; Biswas, Saikat; Bjelogrlic, Sandro; Blanco, Fernando; Blau, Dmitry; Blume, Christoph; Bock, Friederike; Bogdanov, Alexey; Boggild, Hans; Boldizsar, Laszlo; Bombara, Marek; Book, Julian Heinz; Borel, Herve; Borissov, Alexander; Borri, Marcello; Bossu, Francesco; Botje, Michiel; Botta, Elena; Boettger, Stefan; Braun-Munzinger, Peter; Bregant, Marco; Breitner, Timo Gunther; Broker, Theo Alexander; Browning, Tyler Allen; Broz, Michal; Brucken, Erik Jens; Bruna, Elena; Bruno, Giuseppe Eugenio; Budnikov, Dmitry; Buesching, Henner; Bufalino, Stefania; Buncic, Predrag; Busch, Oliver; Buthelezi, Edith Zinhle; Buxton, Jesse Thomas; Caffarri, Davide; Cai, Xu; Caines, Helen Louise; Calero Diaz, Liliet; Caliva, Alberto; Calvo Villar, Ernesto; Camerini, Paolo; Carena, Francesco; Carena, Wisla; Castillo Castellanos, Javier Ernesto; Castro, Andrew John; Casula, Ester Anna Rita; Cavicchioli, Costanza; Ceballos Sanchez, Cesar; Cepila, Jan; Cerello, Piergiorgio; Chang, Beomsu; Chapeland, Sylvain; Chartier, Marielle; Charvet, Jean-Luc Fernand; Chattopadhyay, Subhasis; Chattopadhyay, Sukalyan; Chelnokov, Volodymyr; Cherney, Michael Gerard; Cheshkov, Cvetan Valeriev; Cheynis, Brigitte; Chibante Barroso, Vasco Miguel; Dobrigkeit Chinellato, David; Chochula, Peter; Choi, Kyungeon; Chojnacki, Marek; Choudhury, Subikash; Christakoglou, Panagiotis; Christensen, Christian Holm; Christiansen, Peter; Chujo, Tatsuya; Chung, Suh-Urk; Cicalo, Corrado; Cifarelli, Luisa; Cindolo, Federico; Cleymans, Jean Willy Andre; Colamaria, Fabio Filippo; Colella, Domenico; Collu, Alberto; Colocci, Manuel; Conesa Balbastre, Gustavo; Conesa Del Valle, Zaida; Connors, Megan Elizabeth; Contreras Nuno, Jesus Guillermo; Cormier, Thomas Michael; Corrales Morales, Yasser; Cortes Maldonado, Ismael; Cortese, Pietro; Cosentino, Mauro Rogerio; Costa, Filippo; Crochet, Philippe; Cruz Albino, Rigoberto; Cuautle Flores, Eleazar; Cunqueiro Mendez, Leticia; Dahms, Torsten; Dainese, Andrea; Danu, Andrea; Das, Debasish; Das, Indranil; Das, Supriya; Dash, Ajay Kumar; Dash, Sadhana; De, Sudipan; De Caro, Annalisa; De Cataldo, Giacinto; De Cuveland, Jan; De Falco, Alessandro; De Gruttola, Daniele; De Marco, Nora; De Pasquale, Salvatore; Deisting, Alexander; Deloff, Andrzej; Denes, Ervin Sandor; D'Erasmo, Ginevra; Di Bari, Domenico; Di Mauro, Antonio; Di Nezza, Pasquale; Diaz Corchero, Miguel Angel; Dietel, Thomas; Dillenseger, Pascal; Divia, Roberto; Djuvsland, Oeystein; Dobrin, Alexandru Florin; Dobrowolski, Tadeusz Antoni; Domenicis Gimenez, Diogenes; Donigus, Benjamin; Dordic, Olja; Dubey, Anand Kumar; Dubla, Andrea; Ducroux, Laurent; Dupieux, Pascal; Ehlers Iii, Raymond James; Elia, Domenico; Engel, Heiko; Erazmus, Barbara Ewa; Erhardt, Filip; Eschweiler, Dominic; Espagnon, Bruno; Estienne, Magali Danielle; Esumi, Shinichi; Evans, David; Evdokimov, Sergey; Eyyubova, Gyulnara; Fabbietti, Laura; Fabris, Daniela; Faivre, Julien; Fantoni, Alessandra; Fasel, Markus; Feldkamp, Linus; Felea, Daniel; Feliciello, Alessandro; Feofilov, Grigorii; Ferencei, Jozef; Fernandez Tellez, Arturo; Gonzalez Ferreiro, Elena; Ferretti, Alessandro; Festanti, Andrea; Figiel, Jan; Araujo Silva Figueredo, Marcel; Filchagin, Sergey; Finogeev, Dmitry; Fionda, Fiorella; Fiore, Enrichetta Maria; Fleck, Martin Gabriel; Floris, Michele; Foertsch, Siegfried Valentin; Foka, Panagiota; Fokin, Sergey; Fragiacomo, Enrico; Francescon, Andrea; Frankenfeld, Ulrich Michael; Fuchs, Ulrich; Furget, Christophe; Furs, Artur; Fusco Girard, Mario; Gaardhoeje, Jens Joergen; Gagliardi, Martino; Gago Medina, Alberto Martin; Gallio, Mauro; Gangadharan, Dhevan Raja; Ganoti, Paraskevi; Gao, Chaosong; Garabatos Cuadrado, Jose; Garcia-Solis, Edmundo Javier; Gargiulo, Corrado; Gasik, Piotr Jan; Germain, Marie; Gheata, Andrei George; Gheata, Mihaela; Ghosh, Premomoy; Ghosh, Sanjay Kumar; Gianotti, Paola; Giubellino, Paolo; Giubilato, Piero; Gladysz-Dziadus, Ewa; Glassel, Peter; Gomez Ramirez, Andres; Gonzalez Zamora, Pedro; Gorbunov, Sergey; Gorlich, Lidia Maria; Gotovac, Sven; Grabski, Varlen; Graczykowski, Lukasz Kamil; Grelli, Alessandro; Grigoras, Alina Gabriela; Grigoras, Costin; Grigoryev, Vladislav; Grigoryan, Ara; Grigoryan, Smbat; Grynyov, Borys; Grion, Nevio; Grosse-Oetringhaus, Jan Fiete; Grossiord, Jean-Yves; Grosso, Raffaele; Guber, Fedor; Guernane, Rachid; Guerzoni, Barbara; Gulbrandsen, Kristjan Herlache; Gulkanyan, Hrant; Gunji, Taku; Gupta, Anik; Gupta, Ramni; Haake, Rudiger; Haaland, Oystein Senneset; Hadjidakis, Cynthia Marie; Haiduc, Maria; Hamagaki, Hideki; Hamar, Gergoe; Hanratty, Luke David; Hansen, Alexander; Harris, John William; Hartmann, Helvi; Harton, Austin Vincent; Hatzifotiadou, Despina; Hayashi, Shinichi; Heckel, Stefan Thomas; Heide, Markus Ansgar; Helstrup, Haavard; Herghelegiu, Andrei Ionut; Herrera Corral, Gerardo Antonio; Hess, Benjamin Andreas; Hetland, Kristin Fanebust; Hilden, Timo Eero; Hillemanns, Hartmut; Hippolyte, Boris; Hristov, Peter Zahariev; Huang, Meidana; Humanic, Thomas; Hussain, Nur; Hussain, Tahir; Hutter, Dirk; Hwang, Dae Sung; Ilkaev, Radiy; Ilkiv, Iryna; Inaba, Motoi; Ionita, Costin; Ippolitov, Mikhail; Irfan, Muhammad; Ivanov, Marian; Ivanov, Vladimir; Izucheev, Vladimir; Jacobs, Peter Martin; Jahnke, Cristiane; Jang, Haeng Jin; Janik, Malgorzata Anna; Pahula Hewage, Sandun; Jena, Chitrasen; Jena, Satyajit; Jimenez Bustamante, Raul Tonatiuh; Jones, Peter Graham; Jung, Hyungtaik; Jusko, Anton; Kalinak, Peter; Kalweit, Alexander Philipp; Kamin, Jason Adrian; Kang, Ju Hwan; Kaplin, Vladimir; Kar, Somnath; Karasu Uysal, Ayben; Karavichev, Oleg; Karavicheva, Tatiana; Karpechev, Evgeny; Kebschull, Udo Wolfgang; Keidel, Ralf; Keijdener, Darius Laurens; Keil, Markus; Khan, Kamal; Khan, Mohammed Mohisin; Khan, Palash; Khan, Shuaib Ahmad; Khanzadeev, Alexei; Kharlov, Yury; Kileng, Bjarte; Kim, Beomkyu; Kim, Do Won; Kim, Dong Jo; Kim, Hyeonjoong; Kim, Jinsook; Kim, Mimae; Kim, Minwoo; Kim, Se Yong; Kim, Taesoo; Kirsch, Stefan; Kisel, Ivan; Kiselev, Sergey; Kisiel, Adam Ryszard; Kiss, Gabor; Klay, Jennifer Lynn; Klein, Carsten; Klein, Jochen; Klein-Boesing, Christian; Kluge, Alexander; Knichel, Michael Linus; Knospe, Anders Garritt; Kobayashi, Taiyo; Kobdaj, Chinorat; Kofarago, Monika; Kohler, Markus Konrad; Kollegger, Thorsten; Kolozhvari, Anatoly; Kondratev, Valerii; Kondratyeva, Natalia; Kondratyuk, Evgeny; Konevskikh, Artem; Kouzinopoulos, Charalampos; Kovalenko, Vladimir; Kowalski, Marek; Kox, Serge; Koyithatta Meethaleveedu, Greeshma; Kral, Jiri; Kralik, Ivan; Kravcakova, Adela; Krelina, Michal; Kretz, Matthias; Krivda, Marian; Krizek, Filip; Kryshen, Evgeny; Krzewicki, Mikolaj; Kubera, Andrew Michael; Kucera, Vit; Kucheryaev, Yury; Kugathasan, Thanushan; Kuhn, Christian Claude; Kuijer, Paulus Gerardus; Kulakov, Igor; Kumar, Jitendra; Lokesh, Kumar; Kurashvili, Podist; Kurepin, Alexander; Kurepin, Alexey; Kuryakin, Alexey; Kushpil, Svetlana; Kweon, Min Jung; Kwon, Youngil; La Pointe, Sarah Louise; La Rocca, Paola; Lagana Fernandes, Caio; Lakomov, Igor; Langoy, Rune; Lara Martinez, Camilo Ernesto; Lardeux, Antoine Xavier; Lattuca, Alessandra; Laudi, Elisa; Lea, Ramona; Leardini, Lucia; Lee, Graham Richard; Lee, Seongjoo; Legrand, Iosif; Lehnert, Joerg Walter; Lemmon, Roy Crawford; Lenti, Vito; Leogrande, Emilia; Leon Monzon, Ildefonso; Leoncino, Marco; Levai, Peter; Li, Shuang; Li, Xiaomei; Lien, Jorgen Andre; Lietava, Roman; Lindal, Svein; Lindenstruth, Volker; Lippmann, Christian; Lisa, Michael Annan; Ljunggren, Hans Martin; Lodato, Davide Francesco; Lonne, Per-Ivar; Loggins, Vera Renee; Loginov, Vitaly; Loizides, Constantinos; Lopez, Xavier Bernard; Lopez Torres, Ernesto; Lowe, Andrew John; Lu, Xianguo; Luettig, Philipp Johannes; Lunardon, Marcello; Luparello, Grazia; Maevskaya, Alla; Mager, Magnus; Mahajan, Sanjay; Mahmood, Sohail Musa; Maire, Antonin; Majka, Richard Daniel; Malaev, Mikhail; Maldonado Cervantes, Ivonne Alicia; Malinina, Liudmila; Mal'Kevich, Dmitry; Malzacher, Peter; Mamonov, Alexander; Manceau, Loic Henri Antoine; Manko, Vladislav; Manso, Franck; Manzari, Vito; Marchisone, Massimiliano; Mares, Jiri; Margagliotti, Giacomo Vito; Margotti, Anselmo; Margutti, Jacopo; Marin, Ana Maria; Markert, Christina; Marquard, Marco; Martashvili, Irakli; Martin, Nicole Alice; Martin Blanco, Javier; Martinengo, Paolo; Martinez Hernandez, Mario Ivan; Martinez-Garcia, Gines; Martinez Pedreira, Miguel; Martynov, Yevgen; Mas, Alexis Jean-Michel; Masciocchi, Silvia; Masera, Massimo; Masoni, Alberto; Massacrier, Laure Marie; Mastroserio, Annalisa; Matyja, Adam Tomasz; Mayer, Christoph; Mazer, Joel Anthony; Mazzoni, Alessandra Maria; Mcdonald, Daniel; Meddi, Franco; Menchaca-Rocha, Arturo Alejandro; Meninno, Elisa; Mercado-Perez, Jorge; Meres, Michal; Miake, Yasuo; Mieskolainen, Matti Mikael; Mikhaylov, Konstantin; Milano, Leonardo; Milosevic, Jovan; Minervini, Lazzaro Manlio; Mischke, Andre; Mishra, Aditya Nath; Miskowiec, Dariusz Czeslaw; Mitra, Jubin; Mitu, Ciprian Mihai; Mohammadi, Naghmeh; Mohanty, Bedangadas; Molnar, Levente; Montano Zetina, Luis Manuel; Montes Prado, Esther; Morando, Maurizio; Moreira De Godoy, Denise Aparecida; Moretto, Sandra; Morreale, Astrid; Morsch, Andreas; Muccifora, Valeria; Mudnic, Eugen; Muhlheim, Daniel Michael; Muhuri, Sanjib; Mukherjee, Maitreyee; Muller, Hans; Mulligan, James Declan; Gameiro Munhoz, Marcelo; Murray, Sean; Musa, Luciano; Musinsky, Jan; Nandi, Basanta Kumar; Nania, Rosario; Nappi, Eugenio; Naru, Muhammad Umair; Nattrass, Christine; Nayak, Kishora; Nayak, Tapan Kumar; Nazarenko, Sergey; Nedosekin, Alexander; Nellen, Lukas; Ng, Fabian; Nicassio, Maria; Niculescu, Mihai; Niedziela, Jeremi; Nielsen, Borge Svane; Nikolaev, Sergey; Nikulin, Sergey; Nikulin, Vladimir; Noferini, Francesco; Nomokonov, Petr; Nooren, Gerardus; Norman, Jaime; Nyanin, Alexander; Nystrand, Joakim Ingemar; Oeschler, Helmut Oskar; Oh, Saehanseul; Oh, Sun Kun; Ohlson, Alice Elisabeth; Okatan, Ali; Okubo, Tsubasa; Olah, Laszlo; Oleniacz, Janusz; Oliveira Da Silva, Antonio Carlos; Oliver, Michael Henry; Onderwaater, Jacobus; Oppedisano, Chiara; Ortiz Velasquez, Antonio; Oskarsson, Anders Nils Erik; Otwinowski, Jacek Tomasz; Oyama, Ken; Ozdemir, Mahmut; Pachmayer, Yvonne Chiara; Pagano, Paola; Paic, Guy; Pajares Vales, Carlos; Pal, Susanta Kumar; Pan, Jinjin; Pandey, Ashutosh Kumar; Pant, Divyash; Papikyan, Vardanush; Pappalardo, Giuseppe; Pareek, Pooja; Park, Woojin; Parmar, Sonia; Passfeld, Annika; Paticchio, Vincenzo; Paul, Biswarup; Pawlak, Tomasz Jan; Peitzmann, Thomas; Pereira Da Costa, Hugo Denis Antonio; Pereira De Oliveira Filho, Elienos; Peresunko, Dmitry Yurevich; Perez Lara, Carlos Eugenio; Peskov, Vladimir; Pestov, Yury; Petracek, Vojtech; Petrov, Viacheslav; Petrovici, Mihai; Petta, Catia; Piano, Stefano; Pikna, Miroslav; Pillot, Philippe; Pinazza, Ombretta; Pinsky, Lawrence; Piyarathna, Danthasinghe; Ploskon, Mateusz Andrzej; Planinic, Mirko; Pluta, Jan Marian; Pochybova, Sona; Podesta Lerma, Pedro Luis Manuel; Poghosyan, Martin; Polishchuk, Boris; Poljak, Nikola; Poonsawat, Wanchaloem; Pop, Amalia; Porteboeuf, Sarah Julie; Porter, R Jefferson; Pospisil, Jan; Prasad, Sidharth Kumar; Preghenella, Roberto; Prino, Francesco; Pruneau, Claude Andre; Pshenichnov, Igor; Puccio, Maximiliano; Puddu, Giovanna; Pujahari, Prabhat Ranjan; Punin, Valery; Putschke, Jorn Henning; Qvigstad, Henrik; Rachevski, Alexandre; Raha, Sibaji; Rajput, Sonia; Rak, Jan; Rakotozafindrabe, Andry Malala; Ramello, Luciano; Raniwala, Rashmi; Raniwala, Sudhir; Rasanen, Sami Sakari; Rascanu, Bogdan Theodor; Rathee, Deepika; Razazi, Vahedeh; Read, Kenneth Francis; Real, Jean-Sebastien; Redlich, Krzysztof; Reed, Rosi Jan; Rehman, Attiq Ur; Reichelt, Patrick Simon; Reicher, Martijn; Reidt, Felix; Ren, Xiaowen; Renfordt, Rainer Arno Ernst; Reolon, Anna Rita; Reshetin, Andrey; Rettig, Felix Vincenz; Revol, Jean-Pierre; Reygers, Klaus Johannes; Riabov, Viktor; Ricci, Renato Angelo; Richert, Tuva Ora Herenui; Richter, Matthias Rudolph; Riedler, Petra; Riegler, Werner; Riggi, Francesco; Ristea, Catalin-Lucian; Rivetti, Angelo; Rocco, Elena; Rodriguez Cahuantzi, Mario; Rodriguez Manso, Alis; Roeed, Ketil; Rogochaya, Elena; Rohr, David Michael; Roehrich, Dieter; Romita, Rosa; Ronchetti, Federico; Ronflette, Lucile; Rosnet, Philippe; Rossi, Andrea; Roukoutakis, Filimon; Roy, Ankhi; Roy, Christelle Sophie; Roy, Pradip Kumar; Rubio Montero, Antonio Juan; Rui, Rinaldo; Russo, Riccardo; Ryabinkin, Evgeny; Ryabov, Yury; Rybicki, Andrzej; Sadovskiy, Sergey; Safarik, Karel; Sahlmuller, Baldo; Sahoo, Pragati; Sahoo, Raghunath; Sahoo, Sarita; Sahu, Pradip Kumar; Saini, Jogender; Sakai, Shingo; Saleh, Mohammad Ahmad; Salgado Lopez, Carlos Alberto; Salzwedel, Jai Samuel Nielsen; Sambyal, Sanjeev Singh; Samsonov, Vladimir; Sanchez Castro, Xitzel; Sandor, Ladislav; Sandoval, Andres; Sano, Masato; Santagati, Gianluca; Sarkar, Debojit; Scapparone, Eugenio; Scarlassara, Fernando; Scharenberg, Rolf Paul; Schiaua, Claudiu Cornel; Schicker, Rainer Martin; Schmidt, Christian Joachim; Schmidt, Hans Rudolf; Schuchmann, Simone; Schukraft, Jurgen; Schulc, Martin; Schuster, Tim Robin; Schutz, Yves Roland; Schwarz, Kilian Eberhard; Schweda, Kai Oliver; Scioli, Gilda; Scomparin, Enrico; Scott, Rebecca Michelle; Seeder, Karin Soraya; Seger, Janet Elizabeth; Sekiguchi, Yuko; Selyuzhenkov, Ilya; Senosi, Kgotlaesele; Seo, Jeewon; Serradilla Rodriguez, Eulogio; Sevcenco, Adrian; Shabanov, Arseniy; Shabetai, Alexandre; Shadura, Oksana; Shahoyan, Ruben; Shangaraev, Artem; Sharma, Ankita; Sharma, Natasha; Shigaki, Kenta; Shtejer Diaz, Katherin; Sibiryak, Yury; Siddhanta, Sabyasachi; Sielewicz, Krzysztof Marek; Siemiarczuk, Teodor; Silvermyr, David Olle Rickard; Silvestre, Catherine Micaela; Simatovic, Goran; Simonetti, Giuseppe; Singaraju, Rama Narayana; Singh, Ranbir; Singha, Subhash; Singhal, Vikas; Sinha, Bikash; Sarkar - Sinha, Tinku; Sitar, Branislav; Sitta, Mario; Skaali, Bernhard; Slupecki, Maciej; Smirnov, Nikolai; Snellings, Raimond; Snellman, Tomas Wilhelm; Soegaard, Carsten; Soltz, Ron Ariel; Song, Jihye; Song, Myunggeun; Song, Zixuan; Soramel, Francesca; Sorensen, Soren Pontoppidan; Spacek, Michal; Spiriti, Eleuterio; Sputowska, Iwona Anna; Spyropoulou-Stassinaki, Martha; Srivastava, Brijesh Kumar; Stachel, Johanna; Stan, Ionel; Stefanek, Grzegorz; Steinpreis, Matthew Donald; Stenlund, Evert Anders; Steyn, Gideon Francois; Stiller, Johannes Hendrik; Stocco, Diego; Strmen, Peter; Alarcon Do Passo Suaide, Alexandre; Sugitate, Toru; Suire, Christophe Pierre; Suleymanov, Mais Kazim Oglu; Sultanov, Rishat; Sumbera, Michal; Symons, Timothy; Szabo, Alexander; Szanto De Toledo, Alejandro; Szarka, Imrich; Szczepankiewicz, Adam; Szymanski, Maciej Pawel; Takahashi, Jun; Tanaka, Naoto; Tangaro, Marco-Antonio; Tapia Takaki, Daniel Jesus; Tarantola Peloni, Attilio; Tariq, Mohammad; Tarzila, Madalina-Gabriela; Tauro, Arturo; Tejeda Munoz, Guillermo; Telesca, Adriana; Terasaki, Kohei; Terrevoli, Cristina; Teyssier, Boris; Thaeder, Jochen Mathias; Thomas, Deepa; Tieulent, Raphael Noel; Timmins, Anthony Robert; Toia, Alberica; Trogolo, Stefano; Trubnikov, Victor; Trzaska, Wladyslaw Henryk; Tsuji, Tomoya; Tumkin, Alexandr; Turrisi, Rosario; Tveter, Trine Spedstad; Ullaland, Kjetil; Uras, Antonio; Usai, Gianluca; Utrobicic, Antonija; Vajzer, Michal; Vala, Martin; Valencia Palomo, Lizardo; Vallero, Sara; Van Der Maarel, Jasper; Van Hoorne, Jacobus Willem; Van Leeuwen, Marco; Vanat, Tomas; Vande Vyvre, Pierre; Varga, Dezso; Diozcora Vargas Trevino, Aurora; Vargyas, Marton; Varma, Raghava; Vasileiou, Maria; Vasiliev, Andrey; Vauthier, Astrid; Vechernin, Vladimir; Veen, Annelies Marianne; Veldhoen, Misha; Velure, Arild; Venaruzzo, Massimo; Vercellin, Ermanno; Vergara Limon, Sergio; Vernet, Renaud; Verweij, Marta; Vickovic, Linda; Viesti, Giuseppe; Viinikainen, Jussi Samuli; Vilakazi, Zabulon; Villalobos Baillie, Orlando; Vinogradov, Alexander; Vinogradov, Leonid; Vinogradov, Yury; Virgili, Tiziano; Vislavicius, Vytautas; Viyogi, Yogendra; Vodopyanov, Alexander; Volkl, Martin Andreas; Voloshin, Kirill; Voloshin, Sergey; Volpe, Giacomo; Von Haller, Barthelemy; Vorobyev, Ivan; Vranic, Danilo; Vrlakova, Janka; Vulpescu, Bogdan; Vyushin, Alexey; Wagner, Boris; Wagner, Jan; Wang, Hongkai; Wang, Mengliang; Wang, Yifei; Watanabe, Daisuke; Weber, Michael; Weber, Steffen Georg; Wessels, Johannes Peter; Westerhoff, Uwe; Wiechula, Jens; Wikne, Jon; Wilde, Martin Rudolf; Wilk, Grzegorz Andrzej; Wilkinson, Jeremy John; Williams, Crispin; Windelband, Bernd Stefan; Winn, Michael Andreas; Yaldo, Chris G; Yamaguchi, Yorito; Yang, Hongyan; Yang, Ping; Yano, Satoshi; Yasnopolskiy, Stanislav; Yin, Zhongbao; Yokoyama, Hiroki; Yoo, In-Kwon; Yurchenko, Volodymyr; Yushmanov, Igor; Zaborowska, Anna; Zaccolo, Valentina; Zaman, Ali; Zampolli, Chiara; Correia Zanoli, Henrique Jose; Zaporozhets, Sergey; Zarochentsev, Andrey; Zavada, Petr; Zavyalov, Nikolay; Zbroszczyk, Hanna Paulina; Zgura, Sorin Ion; Zhalov, Mikhail; Zhang, Haitao; Zhang, Xiaoming; Zhang, Yonghong; Zhao, Chengxin; Zhigareva, Natalia; Zhou, Daicui; Zhou, You; Zhou, Zhuo; Zhu, Hongsheng; Zhu, Jianhui; Zhu, Xiangrong; Zichichi, Antonino; Zimmermann, Alice; Zimmermann, Markus Bernhard; Zinovjev, Gennady; Zyzak, Maksym

    2015-08-17

    The measurement of the mass differences for systems bound by the strong force has reached a very high precision with protons and anti-protons. The extension of such measurement from (anti-)baryons to (anti-)nuclei allows one to probe any difference in the interactions between nucleons and anti-nucleons encoded in the (anti-)nuclei masses. This force is a remnant of the underlying strong interaction among quarks and gluons and can be described by effective theories, but cannot yet be directly derived from quantum chromodynamics. Here we report a measurement of the difference between the ratios of the mass and charge of deuterons (d) and anti-deuterons ($\\bar{d}$), and $^{3}{\\rm He}$ and $^3\\overline{\\rm He}$ nuclei carried out with the ALICE (A Large Ion Collider Experiment) detector in Pb-Pb collisions at a centre-of-mass energy per nucleon pair of 2.76 TeV. Our direct measurement of the mass-over-charge differences confirm CPT invariance to an unprecedented precision in the sector of light nuclei. This funda...

  14. Analysis and Optimization of Dynamic Measurement Precision of Fiber Optic Gyroscope

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hui Li

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In order to improve the dynamic performance of high precision interferometer fiber optic gyroscope (IFOG, the influencing factors of the fast response characteristics are analyzed based on a proposed assistant design setup, and a high dynamic detection method is proposed to suppress the adverse effects of the key influencing factors. The assistant design platform is built by using the virtual instrument technology for IFOG, which can monitor the closed-loop state variables in real time for analyzing the influence of both the optical components and detection circuit on the dynamic performance of IFOG. The analysis results indicate that nonlinearity of optical Sagnac effect, optical parameter uncertainty, dynamic characteristics of internal modules and time delay of signal detection circuit are the major causes of dynamic performance deterioration, which can induce potential system instability in practical control systems. By taking all these factors into consideration, we design a robust control algorithm to realize the high dynamic closed-loop detection of IFOG. Finally, experiments show that the improved 0.01 deg/h high precision IFOG with the proposed control algorithm can achieve fast tracking and good dynamic measurement precision.

  15. High precision measurement of the {eta} meson mass at COSY-ANKE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goslawski, Paul

    2013-07-01

    Previous measurements of the {eta} meson mass performed at different experimental facilities resulted in very precise data but differ by up to more than eight standard deviations, i.e., 0.5 MeV/c. Interestingly, the difference seems to be dependent on the measuring method: two missing mass experiments, which produce the {eta} meson in the {sup 3}He{eta} final state, deviate from the recent invariant mass ones. In order to clarify this ambiguous situation a high precision mass measurement was realised at the COSY-ANKE facility. Therefore, a set of deuteron laboratory beam momenta and their associated {sup 3}He centre-of-mass momenta was measured in the dp{yields}{sup 3}HeX reaction near the {eta} production threshold. The {eta} meson was identified by the missing mass peak, whereas its mass was extracted by fixing the production threshold. The individual beam momenta were determined with a relative precision of 3 x 10{sup -5} for values just above 3 GeV/c by using a polarised deuteron beam and inducing an artificial depolarising spin resonance occurring at a well-defined frequency. The final state momenta in the two-body reaction dp{yields}{sup 3}He{eta} were investigated in detail by studying the size of the {sup 3}He momentum sphere with the forward detection system of the ANKE spectrometer. Final alignment and momentum calibration of the spectrometer was achieved by a comprehensive study of the {sup 3}He final state momenta as a function of the centre-of-mass angles, taking advantage of the full geometrical acceptance. The value obtained for the mass at COSY-ANKE m{sub {eta}}=(547.873{+-}0.005{sub stat.}{+-}0.027{sub syst.}) MeV/c{sup 2} is therefore worldwide the most precise one. This mass value is contrary to earlier missing mass experiments but it is consistent and competitive with recent invariant mass measurements, in which the meson was detected through its decay products.

  16. EXAMINATION ABOUT INFLUENCE FOR PRECISION OF 3D IMAGE MEASUREMENT FROM THE GROUND CONTROL POINT MEASUREMENT AND SURFACE MATCHING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Anai

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available As the 3D image measurement software is now widely used with the recent development of computer-vision technology, the 3D measurement from the image is now has acquired the application field from desktop objects as wide as the topography survey in large geographical areas. Especially, the orientation, which used to be a complicated process in the heretofore image measurement, can be now performed automatically by simply taking many pictures around the object. And in the case of fully textured object, the 3D measurement of surface features is now done all automatically from the orientated images, and greatly facilitated the acquisition of the dense 3D point cloud from images with high precision. With all this development in the background, in the case of small and the middle size objects, we are now furnishing the all-around 3D measurement by a single digital camera sold on the market. And we have also developed the technology of the topographical measurement with the air-borne images taken by a small UAV [1~5]. In this present study, in the case of the small size objects, we examine the accuracy of surface measurement (Matching by the data of the experiments. And as to the topographic measurement, we examine the influence of GCP distribution on the accuracy by the data of the experiments. Besides, we examined the difference of the analytical results in each of the 3D image measurement software. This document reviews the processing flow of orientation and the 3D measurement of each software and explains the feature of the each software. And as to the verification of the precision of stereo-matching, we measured the test plane and the test sphere of the known form and assessed the result. As to the topography measurement, we used the air-borne image data photographed at the test field in Yadorigi of Matsuda City, Kanagawa Prefecture JAPAN. We have constructed Ground Control Point which measured by RTK-GPS and Total Station. And we show the results

  17. Examination about Influence for Precision of 3d Image Measurement from the Ground Control Point Measurement and Surface Matching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anai, T.; Kochi, N.; Yamada, M.; Sasaki, T.; Otani, H.; Sasaki, D.; Nishimura, S.; Kimoto, K.; Yasui, N.

    2015-05-01

    As the 3D image measurement software is now widely used with the recent development of computer-vision technology, the 3D measurement from the image is now has acquired the application field from desktop objects as wide as the topography survey in large geographical areas. Especially, the orientation, which used to be a complicated process in the heretofore image measurement, can be now performed automatically by simply taking many pictures around the object. And in the case of fully textured object, the 3D measurement of surface features is now done all automatically from the orientated images, and greatly facilitated the acquisition of the dense 3D point cloud from images with high precision. With all this development in the background, in the case of small and the middle size objects, we are now furnishing the all-around 3D measurement by a single digital camera sold on the market. And we have also developed the technology of the topographical measurement with the air-borne images taken by a small UAV [1~5]. In this present study, in the case of the small size objects, we examine the accuracy of surface measurement (Matching) by the data of the experiments. And as to the topographic measurement, we examine the influence of GCP distribution on the accuracy by the data of the experiments. Besides, we examined the difference of the analytical results in each of the 3D image measurement software. This document reviews the processing flow of orientation and the 3D measurement of each software and explains the feature of the each software. And as to the verification of the precision of stereo-matching, we measured the test plane and the test sphere of the known form and assessed the result. As to the topography measurement, we used the air-borne image data photographed at the test field in Yadorigi of Matsuda City, Kanagawa Prefecture JAPAN. We have constructed Ground Control Point which measured by RTK-GPS and Total Station. And we show the results of analysis made

  18. Plasma potential measurements in the edge region of the ISTTOK plasma, using electron emissive probes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ionita, C.; Balan, P.; Schrittwieser, R.; Cabral, J.A.; Fernandes, H.; Figueiredo, H. F.C.; Varandas, C.

    2001-01-01

    We have recently started to use electron-emissive probes for direct measurements of the plasma potential and its fluctuations in the edge region of the plasma ring in the tokamak ISTTOK in Lisbon, Portugal. This method is based on the fact that the electron emission current of such a probe is able to compensate electron temperature variations and electron drifts, which can occur in the edge plasma region of magnetized fusion devices, and which are making measurements with cold probes prone to errors. In this contribution we present some of the first results of our investigations in ISTTOK.(author)

  19. Simulation of density measurements in plasma wakefields using photo acceleration

    CERN Document Server

    Kasim, Muhammad Firmansyah; Ceurvorst, Luke; Sadler, James; Burrows, Philip N; Trines, Raoul; Holloway, James; Wing, Matthew; Bingham, Robert; Norreys, Peter

    2015-01-01

    One obstacle in plasma accelerator development is the limitation of techniques to diagnose and measure plasma wakefield parameters. In this paper, we present a novel concept for the density measurement of a plasma wakefield using photon acceleration, supported by extensive particle in cell simulations of a laser pulse that copropagates with a wakefield. The technique can provide the perturbed electron density profile in the laser’s reference frame, averaged over the propagation length, to be accurate within 10%. We discuss the limitations that affect the measurement: small frequency changes, photon trapping, laser displacement, stimulated Raman scattering, and laser beam divergence. By considering these processes, one can determine the optimal parameters of the laser pulse and its propagation length. This new technique allows a characterization of the density perturbation within a plasma wakefield accelerator.

  20. Simulation of density measurements in plasma wakefields using photon acceleration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Firmansyah Kasim

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available One obstacle in plasma accelerator development is the limitation of techniques to diagnose and measure plasma wakefield parameters. In this paper, we present a novel concept for the density measurement of a plasma wakefield using photon acceleration, supported by extensive particle in cell simulations of a laser pulse that copropagates with a wakefield. The technique can provide the perturbed electron density profile in the laser’s reference frame, averaged over the propagation length, to be accurate within 10%. We discuss the limitations that affect the measurement: small frequency changes, photon trapping, laser displacement, stimulated Raman scattering, and laser beam divergence. By considering these processes, one can determine the optimal parameters of the laser pulse and its propagation length. This new technique allows a characterization of the density perturbation within a plasma wakefield accelerator.

  1. Gas and particle velocity measurements in an induction plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lesinski, J.; Gagne, R.; Boulos, M.I.

    1981-08-01

    Laser doppler anemometry was used for the measurements of the plasma and particle velocity profiles in the coil region of an inductively coupled plasma. Results are reported for a 50 mm ID induction torch operated at atmospheric pressure with argon as the plasma gas. The oscillator frequency was 3 MHz and the power in the coil was varied between 4.6 and 10.5 kW. The gas velocity measurements were made using a fine carbon powder as a tracer (dp approx. = 1 μm). Measurements were also made with larger silicon particles (dp = 33 μm and sigma = 13 μm) centrally injected in the plasma under different operating conditions

  2. Precision measurement of electric organ discharge timing from freely moving weakly electric fish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jun, James J; Longtin, André; Maler, Leonard

    2012-04-01

    Physiological measurements from an unrestrained, untethered, and freely moving animal permit analyses of neural states correlated to naturalistic behaviors of interest. Precise and reliable remote measurements remain technically challenging due to animal movement, which perturbs the relative geometries between the animal and sensors. Pulse-type electric fish generate a train of discrete and stereotyped electric organ discharges (EOD) to sense their surroundings actively, and rapid modulation of the discharge rate occurs while free swimming in Gymnotus sp. The modulation of EOD rates is a useful indicator of the fish's central state such as resting, alertness, and learning associated with exploration. However, the EOD pulse waveforms remotely observed at a pair of dipole electrodes continuously vary as the fish swims relative to the electrodes, which biases the judgment of the actual pulse timing. To measure the EOD pulse timing more accurately, reliably, and noninvasively from a free-swimming fish, we propose a novel method based on the principles of waveform reshaping and spatial averaging. Our method is implemented using envelope extraction and multichannel summation, which is more precise and reliable compared with other widely used threshold- or peak-based methods according to the tests performed under various source-detector geometries. Using the same method, we constructed a real-time electronic pulse detector performing an additional online pulse discrimination routine to enhance further the detection reliability. Our stand-alone pulse detector performed with high temporal precision (<10 μs) and reliability (error <1 per 10(6) pulses) and permits longer recording duration by storing only event time stamps (4 bytes/pulse).

  3. Spectrophotometric high-precision seawater pH determination for use in underway measuring systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Aßmann

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Autonomous sensors are required for a comprehensive documentation of the changes in the marine carbon system and thus to differentiate between its natural variability and anthropogenic impacts. Spectrophotometric determination of pH – a key variable of the seawater carbon system – is particularly suited to achieve precise and drift-free measurements. However, available spectrophotometric instruments are not suitable for integration into automated measurement systems (e.g. FerryBox since they do not meet the major requirements of reliability, stability, robustness and moderate cost. Here we report on the development and testing of a~new indicator-based pH sensor that meets all of these requirements. This sensor can withstand the rough conditions during long-term deployments on ships of opportunity and is applicable to the open ocean as well as to coastal waters with a complex matrix and highly variable conditions. The sensor uses a high resolution CCD spectrometer as detector connected via optical fibers to a custom-made cuvette designed to reduce the impact of air bubbles. The sample temperature can be precisely adjusted (25 °C ± 0.006 °C using computer-controlled power supplies and Peltier elements thus avoiding the widely used water bath. The overall setup achieves a measurement frequency of 1 min−1 with a precision of ±0.0007 pH units, an average offset of +0.0005 pH units to a reference system, and an offset of +0.0081 pH units to a certified standard buffer. Application of this sensor allows monitoring of seawater pH in autonomous underway systems, providing a key variable for characterization and understanding of the marine carbon system.

  4. Magnetic Field Measurements In Magnetized Plasmas Using Zeeman Broadening Diagnostics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haque, Showera; Wallace, Matthew; Presura, Radu; Neill, Paul

    2017-10-01

    The Zeeman effect has been used to measure the magnetic field in high energy density plasmas. This method is limited when plasma conditions are such that the line broadening due to the high plasma density and temperature surpasses the Zeeman splitting. We have measured magnetic fields in magnetized laser plasmas under conditions where the Zeeman splitting was not spectrally resolved. The magnetic field strength was determined from the difference in widths of two doublet components, using an idea proposed by Tessarin et al. (2011). Time-gated spectra with one-dimensional space-resolution were obtained at the Nevada Terawatt Facility for laser plasmas created by 20 J, 1 ns Leopard laser pulses, and expanding in the azimuthal magnetic field produced by the 0.6 MA Zebra pulsed power generator. We explore the response of the Al III 4s 2S1/2 - 4p 2P1 / 2 , 3 / 2 doublet components to the external magnetic field spatially along the plasma. Radial magnetic field and electron density profiles were measured within the plasma plume. This work was supported by the DOE/OFES Grant DE-SC0008829 and DOE/NNSA contract DE-FC52-06NA27616.

  5. An in-process form error measurement system for precision machining

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gao, Y; Huang, X; Zhang, Y

    2010-01-01

    In-process form error measurement for precision machining is studied. Due to two key problems, opaque barrier and vibration, the study of in-process form error optical measurement for precision machining has been a hard topic and so far very few existing research works can be found. In this project, an in-process form error measurement device is proposed to deal with the two key problems. Based on our existing studies, a prototype system has been developed. It is the first one of the kind that overcomes the two key problems. The prototype is based on a single laser sensor design of 50 nm resolution together with two techniques, a damping technique and a moving average technique, proposed for use with the device. The proposed damping technique is able to improve vibration attenuation by up to 21 times compared to the case of natural attenuation. The proposed moving average technique is able to reduce errors by seven to ten times without distortion to the form profile results. The two proposed techniques are simple but they are especially useful for the proposed device. For a workpiece sample, the measurement result under coolant condition is only 2.5% larger compared with the one under no coolant condition. For a certified Wyko test sample, the overall system measurement error can be as low as 0.3 µm. The measurement repeatability error can be as low as 2.2%. The experimental results give confidence in using the proposed in-process form error measurement device. For better results, further improvement in design and tests are necessary

  6. A precision measurement of sin2θw in neutrino nucleon scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    King, B.J.; Arroyo, C.G.; Bachmann, K.T.; Bazarko, A.O.; Bolton, T.; Foudas, C.; Lefmann, W.C.; Leung, W.C.; Mishra, S.R.; Oltman, E.; Quintas, P.Z.; Rabinowitz, S.A.; Sciulli, F.J.; Seligman, W.G.; Shaevitz, M.H.; Merritt, F.S.; Oreglia, M.J.; Schumm, B.A.; Bernstein, R.H.; Borcherding, F.; Fisk, H.E.; Lamm, M.J.; Marsh, W.; Merritt, K.W.B.; Schellman, H.M.; Yovanovitch, D.D.; Bodek, A.; Budd, H.S.; Barbaro, P. de; Sakumoto, W.K.; Kinnel, T.; Sandler, P.H.; Smith, W.H.

    1993-01-01

    A precise measurement of the weak mixing angle is reported from the ratio of the neutral current to charged current inclusive cross-sections in deep-inelastic neutrino-nucleon scattering. Using the on-shell definition, the value obtained is currently the most accurate determination of sin 2 θ w in a single experiment. The data were gathered at the CCFR neutrino detector in the Fermilab quadrupole-triplet wide-band neutrino beam, with neutrino energies up to 600 GeV. 2 figs., 1 tab., 14 refs

  7. High-precision branching-ratio measurement for the superallowed β+ emitter 26Alm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finlay, P.; Ball, G. C.; Leslie, J. R.; Svensson, C. E.; Andreoiu, C.; Austin, R. A. E.; Bandyopadhyay, D.; Cross, D. S.; Demand, G.; Djongolov, M.; Ettenauer, S.; Garrett, P. E.; Green, K. L.; Grinyer, G. F.; Hackman, G.; Leach, K. G.; Pearson, C. J.; Phillips, A. A.; Rand, E. T.; Sumithrarachchi, C. S.; Triambak, S.; Williams, S. J.

    2012-05-01

    A high-precision branching-ratio measurement for the superallowed β+ emitter 26Alm was performed at the TRIUMF-ISAC radioactive ion beam facility. An upper limit of ⩽12 ppm at 90% confidence level was found for the second forbidden β+ decay of 26Alm to the 21+ state at 1809 keV in 26Mg. An inclusive upper limit of ⩽15 ppm at 90% confidence level was found when considering all possible nonanalog β+/EC decay branches of 26Alm, resulting in a superallowed branching ratio of 100.0000-0.0015+0%.

  8. Frequency Comb Driven Raman Transitions in the THz Range: High Precision Isotope Shift Measurements in Ca+

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Meyer, Steffen

    2017-01-01

    and frequency resolved optical gating (FROG) are used, and the two frequency comb systems used for the experiments are thoroughly characterized, a Coherent Mira Ti:sapph oscillator and a MenloSystems fiber based frequency comb system. The potential of frequency comb driven Raman transitions is shown...... transition frequencies typically are on the order of a few THz. High precision measurements on these ions have many intriguing applications, for example the test of time-variations of fundamental constants, ultracold chemistry on the quantum level, and quantum information and computing, to name just a few...

  9. Compendium of Neutron Beam Facilities for High Precision Nuclear Data Measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2014-07-01

    The recent advances in the development of nuclear science and technology, demonstrating the globally growing economy, require highly accurate, powerful simulations and precise analysis of the experimental results. Confidence in these results is still determined by the accuracy of the atomic and nuclear input data. For studying material response, neutron beams produced from accelerators and research reactors in broad energy spectra are reliable and indispensable tools to obtain high accuracy experimental results for neutron induced reactions. The IAEA supports the accomplishment of high precision nuclear data using nuclear facilities in particular, based on particle accelerators and research reactors around the world. Such data are essential for numerous applications in various industries and research institutions, including the safety and economical operation of nuclear power plants, future fusion reactors, nuclear medicine and non-destructive testing technologies. The IAEA organized and coordinated the technical meeting Use of Neutron Beams for High Precision Nuclear Data Measurements, in Budapest, Hungary, 10–14 December 2012. The meeting was attended by participants from 25 Member States and three international organizations — the European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN), the Joint Research Centre (JRC) and the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) Nuclear Energy Agency (OECD/NEA). The objectives of the meeting were to provide a forum to exchange existing know-how and to share the practical experiences of neutron beam facilities and associated instrumentation, with regard to the measurement of high precision nuclear data using both accelerators and research reactors. Furthermore, the present status and future developments of worldwide accelerator and research reactor based neutron beam facilities were discussed. This publication is a summary of the technical meeting and additional materials supplied by the international

  10. Compendium of Neutron Beam Facilities for High Precision Nuclear Data Measurements. Annex: Individual Reports

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2014-07-01

    The recent advances in the development of nuclear science and technology, demonstrating the globally growing economy, require highly accurate, powerful simulations and precise analysis of the experimental results. Confidence in these results is still determined by the accuracy of the atomic and nuclear input data. For studying material response, neutron beams produced from accelerators and research reactors in broad energy spectra are reliable and indispensable tools to obtain high accuracy experimental results for neutron induced reactions. The IAEA supports the accomplishment of high precision nuclear data using nuclear facilities in particular, based on particle accelerators and research reactors around the world. Such data are essential for numerous applications in various industries and research institutions, including the safety and economical operation of nuclear power plants, future fusion reactors, nuclear medicine and non-destructive testing technologies. The IAEA organized and coordinated the technical meeting Use of Neutron Beams for High Precision Nuclear Data Measurements, in Budapest, Hungary, 10–14 December 2012. The meeting was attended by participants from 25 Member States and three international organizations — the European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN), the Joint Research Centre (JRC) and the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) Nuclear Energy Agency (OECD/NEA). The objectives of the meeting were to provide a forum to exchange existing know-how and to share the practical experiences of neutron beam facilities and associated instrumentation, with regard to the measurement of high precision nuclear data using both accelerators and research reactors. Furthermore, the present status and future developments of worldwide accelerator and research reactor based neutron beam facilities were discussed. This publication is a summary of the technical meeting and additional materials supplied by the international

  11. A time-of-flight system for precise measurements of a relativistic charged particle beam momentum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Avramenko, S.A.; Belikov, Yu.A.; Golokhvastov, A.I.; Lukstin'sh, Yu.; Man'yakov, P.K.; Rukoyatkin, P.A.; Khorozov, S.A.

    1996-01-01

    A time-of-flight system with a time resolution (σ) about 100 ps is described. The methods for the calibration, stability verification and the method for the time resolution evaluation in conditions of a nonmonochromatic beam are discussed especially. The system was applied in charge exchange ( 3 H, 3 He) experiments with the GIBS spectrometer for a measurement of 3 H-nuclei momenta at 2 GeV/c per nucleon with a precision about 0.2%. (author). 4 refs., 7 figs., 1 tab

  12. Precise measurements of beam spin asymmetries in semi-inclusive π0 production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aghasyan, M.; Avakian, H.; Rossi, P.; De Sanctis, E.; Hasch, D.; Mirazita, M.; Adikaram, D.; Amaryan, M. J.; Anghinolfi, M.; Baghdasaryan, H.; Ball, J.; Battaglieri, M.; Batourine, V.; Bedlinskiy, I.; Bennett, R. P.; Biselli, A. S.; Branford, D.; Briscoe, W. J.; Bültmann, S.; Burkert, V. D.; Carman, D. S.; Chandavar, S.; Cole, P. L.; Collins, P.; Contalbrigo, M.; Crede, V.; D'Angelo, A.; Daniel, A.; Dashyan, N.; De Vita, R.; Deur, A.; Dey, B.; Dickson, R.; Djalali, C.; Dodge, G. E.; Doughty, D.; Dupre, R.; Egiyan, H.; El Alaoui, A.; Elouadrhiri, L.; Eugenio, P.; Fedotov, G.; Fegan, S.; Fradi, A.; Gabrielyan, M. Y.; Garçon, M.; Gevorgyan, N.; Gilfoyle, G. P.; Giovanetti, K. L.; Girod, F. X.; Goetz, J. T.; Gohn, W.; Golovatch, E.; Gothe, R. W.; Graham, L.; Griffioen, K. A.; Guegan, B.; Guidal, M.; Guler, N.; Guo, L.; Hafidi, K.; Hanretty, C.; Hicks, K.; Holtrop, M.; Hyde, C. E.; Ilieva, Y.; Ireland, D. G.; Isupov, E. L.; Jawalkar, S. S.; Jenkins, D.; Jo, H. S.; Joo, K.; Keller, D.; Khandaker, M.; Khetarpal, P.; Kim, A.; Kim, W.; Klein, A.; Klein, F. J.; Kubarovsky, V.; Kuhn, S. E.; Kuleshov, S. V.; Kuznetsov, V.; Kvaltine, N. D.; Livingston, K.; Lu, H. Y.; MacGregor, I. J. D.; Markov, N.; Mayer, M.; McAndrew, J.; McKinnon, B.; Meyer, C. A.; Micherdzinska, A. M.; Mokeev, V.; Moreno, B.; Moutarde, H.; Munevar, E.; Nadel-Turonski, P.; Ni, A.; Niccolai, S.; Niculescu, G.; Niculescu, I.; Osipenko, M.; Ostrovidov, A. I.; Paolone, M.; Pappalardo, L.; Paremuzyan, R.; Park, K.; Park, S.; Pasyuk, E.; Pereira, S. Anefalos; Phelps, E.; Pisano, S.; Pogorelko, O.; Pozdniakov, S.; Price, J. W.; Procureur, S.; Prok, Y.; Protopopescu, D.; Raue, B. A.; Ricco, G.; Rimal, D.; Ripani, M.; Rosner, G.; Sabatié, F.; Saini, M. S.; Salgado, C.; Schott, D.; Schumacher, R. A.; Seder, E.; Seraydaryan, H.; Sharabian, Y. G.; Smith, G. D.; Sober, D. I.; Stepanyan, S. S.; Stepanyan, S.; Stoler, P.; Strakovsky, I.; Strauch, S.; Taiuti, M.; Tang, W.; Taylor, C. E.; Tkachenko, S.; Ungaro, M.; Voskanyan, H.; Voutier, E.; Watts, D.; Weinstein, L. B.; Weygand, D. P.; Wood, M. H.; Zana, L.; Zhang, J.; Zhao, B.; Zhao, Z. W.

    2011-10-01

    We present studies of single-spin asymmetries for neutral pion electroproduction in semi-inclusive deep-inelastic scattering of 5.776 GeV polarized electrons from an unpolarized hydrogen target, using the CEBAF Large Acceptance Spectrometer (CLAS) at the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility. A substantial sinϕh amplitude has been measured in the distribution of the cross section asymmetry as a function of the azimuthal angle ϕh of the produced neutral pion. The dependence of this amplitude on Bjorken x and on the pion transverse momentum is extracted with significantly higher precision than previous data and is compared to model calculations.

  13. High-precision diode-laser-based temperature measurement for air refractive index compensation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hieta, Tuomas; Merimaa, Mikko; Vainio, Markku; Seppä, Jeremias; Lassila, Antti

    2011-11-01

    We present a laser-based system to measure the refractive index of air over a long path length. In optical distance measurements, it is essential to know the refractive index of air with high accuracy. Commonly, the refractive index of air is calculated from the properties of the ambient air using either Ciddor or Edlén equations, where the dominant uncertainty component is in most cases the air temperature. The method developed in this work utilizes direct absorption spectroscopy of oxygen to measure the average temperature of air and of water vapor to measure relative humidity. The method allows measurement of temperature and humidity over the same beam path as in optical distance measurement, providing spatially well-matching data. Indoor and outdoor measurements demonstrate the effectiveness of the method. In particular, we demonstrate an effective compensation of the refractive index of air in an interferometric length measurement at a time-variant and spatially nonhomogeneous temperature over a long time period. Further, we were able to demonstrate 7 mK RMS noise over a 67 m path length using a 120 s sample time. To our knowledge, this is the best temperature precision reported for a spectroscopic temperature measurement. © 2011 Optical Society of America

  14. High-precision diode-laser-based temperature measurement for air refractive index compensation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hieta, Tuomas; Merimaa, Mikko; Vainio, Markku; Seppae, Jeremias; Lassila, Antti

    2011-01-01

    We present a laser-based system to measure the refractive index of air over a long path length. In optical distance measurements, it is essential to know the refractive index of air with high accuracy. Commonly, the refractive index of air is calculated from the properties of the ambient air using either Ciddor or Edlen equations, where the dominant uncertainty component is in most cases the air temperature. The method developed in this work utilizes direct absorption spectroscopy of oxygen to measure the average temperature of air and of water vapor to measure relative humidity. The method allows measurement of temperature and humidity over the same beam path as in optical distance measurement, providing spatially well-matching data. Indoor and outdoor measurements demonstrate the effectiveness of the method. In particular, we demonstrate an effective compensation of the refractive index of air in an interferometric length measurement at a time-variant and spatially nonhomogeneous temperature over a long time period. Further, we were able to demonstrate 7 mK RMS noise over a 67 m path length using a 120 s sample time. To our knowledge, this is the best temperature precision reported for a spectroscopic temperature measurement.

  15. A high sensitivity momentum flux measuring instrument for plasma thruster exhausts and diffusive plasmas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    West, Michael D; Charles, Christine; Boswell, Rod W

    2009-05-01

    A high sensitivity momentum flux measuring instrument based on a compound pendulum has been developed for use with electric propulsion devices and radio frequency driven plasmas. A laser displacement system, which builds upon techniques used by the materials science community for surface stress measurements, is used to measure with high sensitivity the displacement of a target plate placed in a plasma thruster exhaust. The instrument has been installed inside a vacuum chamber and calibrated via two different methods and is able to measure forces in the range of 0.02-0.5 mN with a resolution of 15 microN. Measurements have been made of the force produced from the cold gas flow and with a discharge ignited using argon propellant. The plasma is generated using a Helicon Double Layer Thruster prototype. The instrument target is placed about 1 mean free path for ion-neutral charge exchange collisions downstream of the thruster exit. At this position, the plasma consists of a low density ion beam (10%) and a much larger downstream component (90%). The results are in good agreement with those determined from the plasma parameters measured with diagnostic probes. Measurements at various flow rates show that variations in ion beam velocity and plasma density and the resulting momentum flux can be measured with this instrument. The instrument target is a simple, low cost device, and since the laser displacement system used is located outside the vacuum chamber, the measurement technique is free from radio frequency interference and thermal effects. It could be used to measure the thrust in the exhaust of other electric propulsion devices and the momentum flux of ion beams formed by expanding plasmas or fusion experiments.

  16. A Precision Measurement of the Spin Structure Function G(2)(P)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benmouna, N

    2004-01-05

    The spin structure function g{sub 2}(x,Q{sup 2}) and the virtual photon asymmetry A{sub 2}(x,Q{sup 2}) were measured for the proton using deep inelastic scattering. The experiment was conducted at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC), where longitudinally polarized electrons at 29.1 and 32.3 GeV were scattered from a transversely polarized NH{sub 3} target. Large data sets were accumulated using three independent spectrometers covering a kinematic range 0.02 {le} x {le} 0.8 and 1 {le} Q{sup 2} {le} 20 (GeV/c){sup 2}. This new data is the first data precise enough to distinguish between current models for the proton. The structure function g{sub 2}{sup p} was found to be reasonably consistent with the twist-2 Wandzura-Wilczek calculation. The Q{sup 2} dependence of g{sub 2} approximately follows the Q{sup 2} dependence of g{sub 2}{sup WW}, although the data are not precise enough to rule out no Q{sup 2} dependence. The absolute value for A{sub 2}{sup p} was found to be significantly smaller than the Soffer limit over the measured range. The virtual photon asymmetry A{sub 2} was also found to be inconsistent with zero over much of the measured range.

  17. Search for new physics in a precise 20F beta spectrum shape measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    George, Elizabeth; Voytas, Paul; Chuna, Thomas; Naviliat-Cuncic, Oscar; Gade, Alexandra; Hughes, Max; Huyan, Xueying; Liddick, Sean; Minamisono, Kei; Paulauskas, Stanley; Weisshaar, Dirk; Ban, Gilles; Flechard, Xavier; Lienard, Etienne

    2015-10-01

    We are carrying out a measurement of the shape of the energy spectrum of β particles from 20F decay. We aim to achieve a relative precision below 3%, representing an order of magnitude improvement compared to previous experiments. This level of precision will enable a test of the so-called strong form of the conserved vector current (CVC) hypothesis, and should also enable us to place competitive limits on the contributions of exotic tensor couplings in beta decay. In order to control systematic effects, we are using a technique that takes advantage of high energy radioactive beams at the NSCL to implant the decaying nuclei in a scintillation detector deep enough that the emitted beta particles cannot escape. The β-particle energy is measured with the implantation detector after switching off the beam implantation. Ancillary detectors are used to tag the 1.633-MeV γ-rays following the β decay for coincidence measurements in order to reduce backgrounds. We will give an overview and report on the status of the experiment.

  18. A Broad Bank Lidar for Precise Atmospheric CO2 Column Absorption Measurement from Space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Georgieva, E. M.; Heaps, W. S.; Huang, W.

    2010-01-01

    Accurate global measurement of carbon dioxide column with the aim of discovering and quantifying unknown sources and sinks has been a high priority for the last decade. In order to uncover the "missing sink" that is responsible for the large discrepancies in the budget the critical precision for a measurement from space needs to be on the order of 1 ppm. To better understand the CO2 budget and to evaluate its impact on global warming the National Research Council (NRC) in its recent decadal survey report (NACP) to NASA recommended a laser based total CO2 mapping mission in the near future. That's the goal of Active Sensing of CO2 Emissions over Nights, Days, and Seasons (ASCENDS) mission - to significantly enhance the understanding of the role of CO2 in the global carbon cycle. Our current goal is to develop an ultra precise, inexpensive new lidar system for column measurements of CO2 changes in the lower atmosphere that uses a Fabry-Perot interferometer based system as the detector portion of the instrument and replaces the narrow band laser commonly used in lidars with a high power broadband source. This approach reduces the number of individual lasers used in the system and considerably reduces the risk of failure. It also tremendously reduces the requirement for wavelength stability in the source putting this responsibility instead on the Fabry- Perot subsystem.

  19. Precision measurement of the top-quark mass in lepton+jets final states

    CERN Document Server

    Abazov, Victor Mukhamedovich; Acharya, Bannanje Sripath; Adams, Mark Raymond; Adams, Todd; Agnew, James P; Alexeev, Guennadi D; Alkhazov, Georgiy D; Alton, Andrew K; Askew, Andrew Warren; Atkins, Scott; Augsten, Kamil; Avila, Carlos A; Badaud, Frederique; Bagby, Linda F; Baldin, Boris; Bandurin, Dmitry V; Banerjee, Sunanda; Barberis, Emanuela; Baringer, Philip S; Bartlett, JFrederick; Bassler, Ursula Rita; Bazterra, Victor; Bean, Alice L; Begalli, Marcia; Bellantoni, Leo; Beri, Suman B; Bernardi, Gregorio; Bernhard, Ralf Patrick; Bertram, Iain A; Besancon, Marc; Beuselinck, Raymond; Bhat, Pushpalatha C; Bhatia, Sudeep; Bhatnagar, Vipin; Blazey, Gerald Charles; Blessing, Susan K; Bloom, Kenneth A; Boehnlein, Amber S; Boline, Daniel Dooley; Boos, Edward E; Borissov, Guennadi; Borysova, Maryna; Brandt, Andrew; Brandt, Oleg; Brock, Raymond L; Bross, Alan D; Brown, Duncan Paul; Bu, Xue-Bing; Buehler, Marc; Buescher, Volker; Bunichev, Viacheslav Yevgenyevich; Burdin, Sergey; Buszello, Claus Peter; Camacho-Perez, Enrique; Casey, Brendan Cameron Kieran; Castilla-Valdez, Heriberto; Caughron, Seth Aaron; Chakrabarti, Subhendu; Chan, Kwok Ming Leo; Chandra, Avdhesh; Chapon, Emilien; Chen, Guo; Cho, Sung-Woong; Choi, Suyong; Choudhary, Brajesh C; Cihangir, Selcuk; Claes, Daniel R; Clutter, Justace Randall; Cooke, Michael P; Cooper, William Edward; Corcoran, Marjorie D; Couderc, Fabrice; Cousinou, Marie-Claude; Cutts, David; Das, Amitabha; Davies, Gavin John; de Jong, Sijbrand Jan; De La Cruz-Burelo, Eduard; Deliot, Frederic; Demina, Regina; Denisov, Dmitri S; Denisov, Sergei P; Desai, Satish Vijay; Deterre, Cecile; DeVaughan, Kayle Otis; Diehl, HThomas; Diesburg, Michael; Ding, Pengfei; Dominguez, DAaron M; Dubey, Abhinav Kumar; Dudko, Lev V; Duperrin, Arnaud; Dutt, Suneel; Eads, Michael T; Edmunds, Daniel L; Ellison, John A; Elvira, VDaniel; Enari, Yuji; Evans, Harold G; Evdokimov, Valeri N; Faure, Alexandre; Feng, Lei; Ferbel, Thomas; Fiedler, Frank; Filthaut, Frank; Fisher, Wade Cameron; Fisk, HEugene; Fortner, Michael R; Fox, Harald; Fuess, Stuart C; Garbincius, Peter H; Garcia-Bellido, Aran; Garcia-Gonzalez, Jose Andres; Gavrilov, Vladimir B; Geng, Weigang; Gerber, Cecilia Elena; Gershtein, Yuri S; Ginther, George E; Gogota, Olga; Golovanov, Georgy Anatolievich; Grannis, Paul D; Greder, Sebastien; Greenlee, Herbert B; Grenier, Gerald Jean; Gris, Phillipe Luc; Grivaz, Jean-Francois; Grohsjean, Alexander; Gruenendahl, Stefan; Gruenewald, Martin Werner; Guillemin, Thibault; Gutierrez, Gaston R; Gutierrez, Phillip; Haley, Joseph Glenn Biddle; Han, Liang; Harder, Kristian; Harel, Amnon; Hauptman, John Michael; Hays, Jonathan M; Head, Tim; Hebbeker, Thomas; Hedin, David R; Hegab, Hatim; Heinson, Ann; Heintz, Ulrich; Hensel, Carsten; Heredia-De La Cruz, Ivan; Herner, Kenneth Richard; Hesketh, Gavin G; Hildreth, Michael D; Hirosky, Robert James; Hoang, Trang; Hobbs, John D; Hoeneisen, Bruce; Hogan, Julie; Hohlfeld, Mark; Holzbauer, Jenny Lyn; Howley, Ian James; Hubacek, Zdenek; Hynek, Vlastislav; Iashvili, Ia; Ilchenko, Yuriy; Illingworth, Robert A; Ito, Albert S; Jabeen, Shabnam; Jaffre, Michel J; Jayasinghe, Ayesh; Jeong, Min-Soo; Jesik, Richard L; Jiang, Peng; Johns, Kenneth Arthur; Johnson, Emily; Johnson, Marvin E; Jonckheere, Alan M; Jonsson, Per Martin; Joshi, Jyoti; Jung, Andreas Werner; Juste, Aurelio; Kajfasz, Eric; Karmanov, Dmitriy Y; Katsanos, Ioannis; Kaur, Manbir; Kehoe, Robert Leo Patrick; Kermiche, Smain; Khalatyan, Norayr; Khanov, Alexander; Kharchilava, Avto; Kharzheev, Yuri N; Kiselevich, Ivan Lvovich; Kohli, Jatinder M; Kozelov, Alexander V; Kraus, James Alexander; Kumar, Ashish; Kupco, Alexander; Kurca, Tibor; Kuzmin, Valentin Alexandrovich; Lammers, Sabine Wedam; Lebrun, Patrice; Lee, Hyeon-Seung; Lee, Seh-Wook; Lee, William M; Lei, Xiaowen; Lellouch, Jeremie; Li, Dikai; Li, Hengne; Li, Liang; Li, Qi-Zhong; Lim, Jeong Ku; Lincoln, Donald W; Linnemann, James Thomas; Lipaev, Vladimir V; Lipton, Ronald J; Liu, Huanzhao; Liu, Yanwen; Lobodenko, Alexandre; Lokajicek, Milos; Lopes de Sa, Rafael; Luna-Garcia, Rene; Lyon, Adam Leonard; Maciel, Arthur KA; Madar, Romain; Magana-Villalba, Ricardo; Malik, Sudhir; Malyshev, Vladimir L; Mansour, Jason; Martinez-Ortega, Jorge; McCarthy, Robert L; Mcgivern, Carrie Lynne; Meijer, Melvin M; Melnitchouk, Alexander S; Menezes, Diego D; Mercadante, Pedro Galli; Merkin, Mikhail M; Meyer, Arnd; Meyer, Jorg Manfred; Miconi, Florian; Mondal, Naba K; Mulhearn, Michael James; Nagy, Elemer; Narain, Meenakshi; Nayyar, Ruchika; Neal, Homer A; Negret, Juan Pablo; Neustroev, Petr V; Nguyen, Huong Thi; Nunnemann, Thomas P; Hernandez Orduna, Jose de Jesus; Osman, Nicolas Ahmed; Osta, Jyotsna; Pal, Arnab; Parashar, Neeti; Parihar, Vivek; Park, Sung Keun; Partridge, Richard A; Parua, Nirmalya; Patwa, Abid; Penning, Bjoern; Perfilov, Maxim Anatolyevich; Peters, Reinhild Yvonne Fatima; Petridis, Konstantinos; Petrillo, Gianluca; Petroff, Pierre; Pleier, Marc-Andre; Podstavkov, Vladimir M; Popov, Alexey V; Prewitt, Michelle; Price, Darren; Prokopenko, Nikolay N; Qian, Jianming; Quadt, Arnulf; Quinn, Gene Breese; Ratoff, Peter N; Razumov, Ivan A; Ripp-Baudot, Isabelle; Rizatdinova, Flera; Rominsky, Mandy Kathleen; Ross, Anthony; Royon, Christophe; Rubinov, Paul Michael; Ruchti, Randal C; Sajot, Gerard; Sanchez-Hernandez, Alberto; Sanders, Michiel P; Santos, Angelo Souza; Savage, David G; Savitskyi, Mykola; Sawyer, HLee; Scanlon, Timothy P; Schamberger, RDean; Scheglov, Yury A; Schellman, Heidi M; Schwanenberger, Christian; Schwienhorst, Reinhard H; Sekaric, Jadranka; Severini, Horst; Shabalina, Elizaveta K; Shary, Viacheslav V; Shaw, Savanna; Shchukin, Andrey A; Simak, Vladislav J; Skubic, Patrick Louis; Slattery, Paul F; Smirnov, Dmitri V; Snow, Gregory R; Snow, Joel Mark; Snyder, Scott Stuart; Soldner-Rembold, Stefan; Sonnenschein, Lars; Soustruznik, Karel; Stark, Jan; Stoyanova, Dina A; Strauss, Michael G; Suter, Louise; Svoisky, Peter V; Titov, Maxim; Tokmenin, Valeriy V; Tsai, Yun-Tse; Tsybychev, Dmitri; Tuchming, Boris; Tully, Christopher George T; Uvarov, Lev; Uvarov, Sergey L; Uzunyan, Sergey A; Van Kooten, Richard J; van Leeuwen, Willem M; Varelas, Nikos; Varnes, Erich W; Vasilyev, Igor A; Verkheev, Alexander Yurievich; Vertogradov, Leonid S; Verzocchi, Marco; Vesterinen, Mika; Vilanova, Didier; Vokac, Petr; Wahl, Horst D; Wang, Michael HLS; Warchol, Jadwiga; Watts, Gordon Thomas; Wayne, Mitchell R; Weichert, Jonas; Welty-Rieger, Leah Christine; Williams, Mark Richard James; Wilson, Graham Wallace; Wobisch, Markus; Wood, Darien Robert; Wyatt, Terence R; Xie, Yunhe; Yamada, Ryuji; Yang, Siqi; Yasuda, Takahiro; Yatsunenko, Yuriy A; Ye, Wanyu; Ye, Zhenyu; Yin, Hang; Yip, Kin; Youn, Sungwoo; Yu, Jiaming; Zennamo, Joseph; Zhao, Tianqi Gilbert; Zhou, Bing; Zhu, Junjie; Zielinski, Marek; Zieminska, Daria; Zivkovic, Lidija

    2015-06-04

    We measure the mass of the top quark in lepton$+$jets final states using the full sample of $p\\bar{p}$ collision data collected by the D0 experiment in Run II of the Fermilab Tevatron Collider at $\\sqrt s=1.96 $TeV, corresponding to $9.7 {\\rm fb}^{-1}$ of integrated luminosity. We use a matrix element technique that calculates the probabilities for each event to result from $t\\bar t$ production or background. The overall jet energy scale is constrained in situ by the mass of the $W$ boson. We measure $m_t=174.98\\pm0.76$ GeV. This constitutes the most precise single measurement of the top-quark mass.

  20. Spherical ionization chamber of 14 liter for precise measurement of environmental radiation dose rate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagaoka, Toshi; Saito, Kimiaki; Moriuchi, Shigeru

    1991-05-01

    A spherical ionization chamber of 14 liter filled with 1 atm. nitrogen gas was arranged aiming at precise measurement of dose rate due to environmental gamma rays and cosmic rays. Ionization current-dose rate conversion factor for this ionization chamber was derived from careful cons