WorldWideScience

Sample records for plasma physics simulation

  1. Plasma physics via computer simulation

    CERN Document Server

    Birdsall, CK

    2004-01-01

    PART 1: PRIMER Why attempting to do plasma physics via computer simulation using particles makes good sense Overall view of a one dimensional electrostatic program A one dimensional electrostatic program ES1 Introduction to the numerical methods used Projects for ES1 A 1d electromagnetic program EM1 Projects for EM1 PART 2: THEORY Effects of the spatial grid Effects of the finitw time ste Energy-conserving simulation models Multipole models Kinetic theory for fluctuations and noise; collisions Kinetic properties: theory, experience and heuristic estimates PART 3: PRACTIC

  2. Monte Carlo simulations for plasma physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Okamoto, M.; Murakami, S.; Nakajima, N.; Wang, W.X. [National Inst. for Fusion Science, Toki, Gifu (Japan)

    2000-07-01

    Plasma behaviours are very complicated and the analyses are generally difficult. However, when the collisional processes play an important role in the plasma behaviour, the Monte Carlo method is often employed as a useful tool. For examples, in neutral particle injection heating (NBI heating), electron or ion cyclotron heating, and alpha heating, Coulomb collisions slow down high energetic particles and pitch angle scatter them. These processes are often studied by the Monte Carlo technique and good agreements can be obtained with the experimental results. Recently, Monte Carlo Method has been developed to study fast particle transports associated with heating and generating the radial electric field. Further it is applied to investigating the neoclassical transport in the plasma with steep gradients of density and temperatures which is beyong the conventional neoclassical theory. In this report, we briefly summarize the researches done by the present authors utilizing the Monte Carlo method. (author)

  3. Programmable physical parameter optimization for particle plasma simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ragan-Kelley, Benjamin; Verboncoeur, John; Lin, Ming-Chieh

    2012-10-01

    We have developed a scheme for interactive and programmable optimization of physical parameters for plasma simulations. The simulation code Object-Oriented Plasma Device 1-D (OOPD1) has been adapted to a Python interface, allowing sophisticated user or program interaction with simulations, and detailed numerical analysis via numpy. Because the analysis/diagnostic interface is the same as the input mechanism (the Python programming language), it is straightforward to optimize simulation parameters based on analysis of previous runs and automate the optimization process using a user-determined scheme and criteria. An example use case of the Child-Langmuir space charge limit in bipolar flow is demonstrated, where the beam current is iterated upon by measuring the relationship of the measured current and the injected current.

  4. Tech-X Corporation releases simulation code for solving complex problems in plasma physics : VORPAL code provides a robust environment for simulating plasma processes in high-energy physics, IC fabrications and material processing applications

    CERN Multimedia

    2005-01-01

    Tech-X Corporation releases simulation code for solving complex problems in plasma physics : VORPAL code provides a robust environment for simulating plasma processes in high-energy physics, IC fabrications and material processing applications

  5. Plasma physics

    CERN Document Server

    Drummond, James E

    2013-01-01

    A historic snapshot of the field of plasma physics, this fifty-year-old volume offers an edited collection of papers by pioneering experts in the field. In addition to assisting students in their understanding of the foundations of classical plasma physics, it provides a source of historic context for modern physicists. Highly successful upon its initial publication, this book was the standard text on plasma physics throughout the 1960s and 70s.Hailed by Science magazine as a ""well executed venture,"" the three-part treatment ranges from basic plasma theory to magnetohydrodynamics and microwa

  6. Recent advances in numerical simulation of space-plasma-physics problems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birmingham, T. J.

    1983-01-01

    Computer simulations have become an increasingly popular, important and insightful tool for studying space plasmas. This review describes MHD and particle simulations, both of which treat the plasma and the electromagnetic field in which it moves in a self consistent fashion but on drastically different spatial and temporal scales. The complementary roles of simulation, observations and theory are stressed. Several examples of simulations being carried out in the area of magnetospheric plasma physics are described to illustrate the power, potential and limitations of the approach.

  7. Plasma physics

    CERN Document Server

    Cairns, R A

    1985-01-01

    This book is intended as an introduction to plasma physics at a level suitable for advanced undergraduates or beginning postgraduate students in physics, applied mathematics or astrophysics. The main prerequisite is a knowledge of electromagnetism and of the associated mathematics of vector calculus. SI units are used throughout. There is still a tendency amongst some plasma physics researchers to· cling to C.g.S. units, but it is the author's view that universal adoption of SI units, which have been the internationally agreed standard since 1960, is to be encouraged. After a short introductory chapter, the basic properties of a plasma con­ cerning particle orbits, fluid theory, Coulomb collisions and waves are set out in Chapters 2-5, with illustrations drawn from problems in nuclear fusion research and space physics. The emphasis is on the essential physics involved and (he theoretical and mathematical approach has been kept as simple and intuitive as possible. An attempt has been made to draw attention t...

  8. Nonlinear Physics of Plasmas

    CERN Document Server

    Kono, Mitsuo

    2010-01-01

    A nonlinearity is one of the most important notions in modern physics. A plasma is rich in nonlinearities and provides a variety of behaviors inherent to instabilities, coherent wave structures and turbulence. The book covers the basic concepts and mathematical methods, necessary to comprehend nonlinear problems widely encountered in contemporary plasmas, but also in other fields of physics and current research on self-organized structures and magnetized plasma turbulence. The analyses make use of strongly nonlinear models solved by analytical techniques backed by extensive simulations and available experiments. The text is written for senior undergraduates, graduate students, lecturers and researchers in laboratory, space and fusion plasmas.

  9. Computational Plasma Physics at the Bleeding Edge: Simulating Kinetic Turbulence Dynamics in Fusion Energy Sciences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, William

    2013-04-01

    Advanced computing is generally recognized to be an increasingly vital tool for accelerating progress in scientific research in the 21st Century. The imperative is to translate the combination of the rapid advances in super-computing power together with the emergence of effective new algorithms and computational methodologies to help enable corresponding increases in the physics fidelity and the performance of the scientific codes used to model complex physical systems. If properly validated against experimental measurements and verified with mathematical tests and computational benchmarks, these codes can provide more reliable predictive capability for the behavior of complex systems, including fusion energy relevant high temperature plasmas. The magnetic fusion energy research community has made excellent progress in developing advanced codes for which computer run-time and problem size scale very well with the number of processors on massively parallel supercomputers. A good example is the effective usage of the full power of modern leadership class computational platforms from the terascale to the petascale and beyond to produce nonlinear particle-in-cell simulations which have accelerated progress in understanding the nature of plasma turbulence in magnetically-confined high temperature plasmas. Illustrative results provide great encouragement for being able to include increasingly realistic dynamics in extreme-scale computing campaigns to enable predictive simulations with unprecedented physics fidelity. Some illustrative examples will be presented of the algorithmic progress from the magnetic fusion energy sciences area in dealing with low memory per core extreme scale computing challenges for the current top 3 supercomputers worldwide. These include advanced CPU systems (such as the IBM-Blue-Gene-Q system and the Fujitsu K Machine) as well as the GPU-CPU hybrid system (Titan).

  10. Numerical simulation of dusty plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Winske, D.

    1995-09-01

    The numerical simulation of physical processes in dusty plasmas is reviewed, with emphasis on recent results and unresolved issues. Three areas of research are discussed: grain charging, weak dust-plasma interactions, and strong dust-plasma interactions. For each area, we review the basic concepts that are tested by simulations, present some appropriate examples, and examine numerical issues associated with extending present work.

  11. Plasma physics and engineering

    CERN Document Server

    Fridman, Alexander

    2011-01-01

    Part I: Fundamentals of Plasma Physics and Plasma ChemistryPlasma in Nature, in the Laboratory, and in IndustryOccurrence of Plasma: Natural and Man MadeGas DischargesPlasma Applications, Plasmas in IndustryPlasma Applications for Environmental ControlPlasma Applications in Energy ConversionPlasma Application for Material ProcessingBreakthrough Plasma Applications in Modern TechnologyElementary Processes of Charged Species in PlasmaElementary Charged Particles in Plasma and Their Elastic and Inelastic CollisionsIonization ProcessesMechanisms of Electron Losses: The Electron-Ion RecombinationEl

  12. Fusion plasma physics

    CERN Document Server

    Stacey, Weston M

    2012-01-01

    This revised and enlarged second edition of the popular textbook and reference contains comprehensive treatments of both the established foundations of magnetic fusion plasma physics and of the newly developing areas of active research. It concludes with a look ahead to fusion power reactors of the future. The well-established topics of fusion plasma physics -- basic plasma phenomena, Coulomb scattering, drifts of charged particles in magnetic and electric fields, plasma confinement by magnetic fields, kinetic and fluid collective plasma theories, plasma equilibria and flux surface geometry, plasma waves and instabilities, classical and neoclassical transport, plasma-materials interactions, radiation, etc. -- are fully developed from first principles through to the computational models employed in modern plasma physics. The new and emerging topics of fusion plasma physics research -- fluctuation-driven plasma transport and gyrokinetic/gyrofluid computational methodology, the physics of the divertor, neutral ...

  13. Plasma physics an introduction

    CERN Document Server

    Fitzpatrick, Richard

    2014-01-01

    Plasma Physics: An Introduction is based on a series of university course lectures by a leading name in the field, and thoroughly covers the physics of the fourth state of matter. This book looks at non-relativistic, fully ionized, nondegenerate, quasi-neutral, and weakly coupled plasma. Intended for the student market, the text provides a concise and cohesive introduction to plasma physics theory, and offers a solid foundation for students wishing to take higher level courses in plasma physics.

  14. Computational Methods in Plasma Physics

    CERN Document Server

    Jardin, Stephen

    2010-01-01

    Assuming no prior knowledge of plasma physics or numerical methods, Computational Methods in Plasma Physics covers the computational mathematics and techniques needed to simulate magnetically confined plasmas in modern magnetic fusion experiments and future magnetic fusion reactors. Largely self-contained, the text presents the basic concepts necessary for the numerical solution of partial differential equations. Along with discussing numerical stability and accuracy, the author explores many of the algorithms used today in enough depth so that readers can analyze their stability, efficiency,

  15. Reviews of plasma physics

    CERN Document Server

    2008-01-01

    "Reviews of Plasma Physics Volume 24," edited by V.D. Shafranov, presents two reviews from the cutting-edge of Russian plasma physics research. The first review by V.A. Rozhansky devoted to the mechanisms of transverse conductivity and generation of self-consistent electric fields in strongly ionized magnetized plasma. The second review by O.G. Bakunin considers numerous aspects of turbulent transport in plasma and fluids. This review is focused on scaling arguments for describing anomalous diffusion in the presence of complex structures. These topics are especially important for fusion plasma research, plasma astrophysics, discharge physics, and turbulence

  16. Reviews of plasma physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shafranov, Vitalii Dmitrievich (ed.); Bakunin, Oleg G. (comps.) [Rossijskij Nauchnyj Tsentr ' ' Kurchatovskij Inst.' ' , Moscow (Russian Federation). Nuclear Fusion Inst.; Rozhansky, V. [St. Petersburg State Polytechnical Univ. (Russian Federation)

    2008-07-01

    Reviews of Plasma Physics Volume 24, edited by V.D. Shafranov, presents two reviews from the cutting-edge of Russian plasma physics research. The first review by V.A. Rozhansky devoted to the mechanisms of transverse conductivity and generation of self-consistent electric fields in strongly ionized magnetized plasma. The second review by O.G. Bakunin considers numerous aspects of turbulent transport in plasma and fluids. This review is focused on scaling arguments for describing anomalous diffusion in the presence of complex structures. These topics are especially important for fusion plasma research, plasma astrophysics, discharge physics, and turbulence (orig.)

  17. A Hybrid Model for Multiscale Laser Plasma Simulations with Detailed Collisional Physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-06-23

    account for all processes of the collisional cascade during the relaxation of a hot plasma. To this end, the focus was in the development of (a) a...Collisional Radiative operator was necessary to accurately account for all processes of the collisional cascade during the relaxation of a hot plasma. To this...important to note that this is a code-to- code comparison and the validation of these simulations is an area of active research in the non-local

  18. Labotratory Simulation Experiments of Cometary Plasma

    OpenAIRE

    Minami, S; Baum, P. J.; Kamin, G.; R. S. White; 南, 繁行

    1986-01-01

    Laboratory simulation experiment to study the interaction between a cometary plasma and the solar wind has been performed using the UCR-T 1 space simulation facility at the Institute of Geophysics and Planetary Physics, the University of California, Riverside. Light emitting plasma composed of Sr, Ba and/or C simulating cometary coma plasma is produced by a plasma emitter which interacts with intense plasma flow produced by a co-axial plasma gun simulating the solar wind. The purpose of this ...

  19. Basic plasma physics

    CERN Document Server

    Ghosh, Basudev

    2014-01-01

    Basic Plasma Physics is designed to serve as an introductory compact textbook for advanced undergraduate, postgraduate and research students taking plasma physics as one of their subject of study for the first time. It covers the current syllabus of plasma physics offered by the most universities and technical institutions. The book requires no background in plasma physics but only elementary knowledge of basic physics and mathematics. Emphasis has been given on the analytical approach. Topics are developed from first principle so that the students can learn through self-study. One chapter has been devoted to describe some practical aspects of plasma physics. Each chapter contains a good number of solved and unsolved problems and a variety of review questions, mostly taken from recent examination papers. Some classroom experiments described in the book will surely help students as well as instructors.

  20. Plasma Simulation Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Greenwald, Martin

    2011-10-04

    Many others in the fusion energy and advanced scientific computing communities participated in the development of this plan. The core planning team is grateful for their important contributions. This summary is meant as a quick overview the Fusion Simulation Program's (FSP's) purpose and intentions. There are several additional documents referenced within this one and all are supplemental or flow down from this Program Plan. The overall science goal of the DOE Office of Fusion Energy Sciences (FES) Fusion Simulation Program (FSP) is to develop predictive simulation capability for magnetically confined fusion plasmas at an unprecedented level of integration and fidelity. This will directly support and enable effective U.S. participation in International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) research and the overall mission of delivering practical fusion energy. The FSP will address a rich set of scientific issues together with experimental programs, producing validated integrated physics results. This is very well aligned with the mission of the ITER Organization to coordinate with its members the integrated modeling and control of fusion plasmas, including benchmarking and validation activities. [1]. Initial FSP research will focus on two critical Integrated Science Application (ISA) areas: ISA1, the plasma edge; and ISA2, whole device modeling (WDM) including disruption avoidance. The first of these problems involves the narrow plasma boundary layer and its complex interactions with the plasma core and the surrounding material wall. The second requires development of a computationally tractable, but comprehensive model that describes all equilibrium and dynamic processes at a sufficient level of detail to provide useful prediction of the temporal evolution of fusion plasma experiments. The initial driver for the whole device model will be prediction and avoidance of discharge-terminating disruptions, especially at high performance, which are a

  1. Multi-scale and multi-physics simulations using the multi-fluid plasma model

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-04-25

    F ∂x = S The source Jacobian ∂S ∂Q has imaginary eigenvalues The equation system has dispersive sources The dispersion is physical (may be...ADDRESS(ES) 12. DISTRIBUTION/AVAILABILITY STATEMENT 13. SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES 14. ABSTRACT 15. SUBJECT TERMS 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: a...NUMBER (Include area code) 25 April 2017 Briefing Charts 01 April 2017 - 30 April 2017 Multi-scale and multi- physics simulations using the multi

  2. Physics of Plasmas

    CERN Document Server

    Woods, Leslie Colin

    2003-01-01

    A short, self-sufficient introduction to the physics of plasma for beginners as well as researchers in a number of fields. The author looks at the dynamics and stability of magnetoplasma and discusses wave and transport in this medium. He also looks at such applications as fusion research using magnetic confinement of Deuterium plasma, solar physics with its plasma loops reaching high into the corona, sunspots and solar wind, engineering applications to metallurgy, MHD direct generation of electricity, and railguns, finally touching on the relatively new and difficult subject of dusty plasmas.

  3. Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1990-01-01

    This report discusses the following topics: principal parameters achieved in experimental devices fiscal year 1990; tokamak fusion test reactor; compact ignition tokamak; Princeton beta experiment- modification; current drive experiment-upgrade; international collaboration; x-ray laser studies; spacecraft glow experiment; plasma processing: deposition and etching of thin films; theoretical studies; tokamak modeling; international thermonuclear experimental reactor; engineering department; project planning and safety office; quality assurance and reliability; technology transfer; administrative operations; PPPL patent invention disclosures for fiscal year 1990; graduate education; plasma physics; graduate education: plasma science and technology; science education program; and Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory reports fiscal year 1990.

  4. Physical simulation of the long-term dynamic action of a plasma beam on a space debris object

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shuvalov, Valentin A.; Gorev, Nikolai. B.; Tokmak, Nikolai A.; Kochubei, Galina S.

    2017-03-01

    A methodology is developed for physical (laboratory) simulation of the long-term dynamic action of plasma beam high-energy ions on a space debris object with the aim of removing it to a lower orbit followed by its burning in the Earth's atmosphere. The methodology is based on the use of a criterion for the equivalence of two plasma beam exposure regimes (in the Earth' ionosphere and in laboratory conditions) and an accelerated test procedure in what concerns space debris object material sputtering and space debris object erosion by a plasma beam in the Earth's ionosphere. The space debris coating material (blanket thermal insulation) sputtering yield and normal and tangential momentum transfer coefficients are determined experimentally as a function of the ion energy and the ion beam incidence angle.

  5. The Numerical Tokamak Project (NTP) simulation of turbulent transport in the core plasma: A grand challenge in plasma physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-12-01

    The long-range goal of the Numerical Tokamak Project (NTP) is the reliable prediction of tokamak performance using physics-based numerical tools describing tokamak physics. The NTP is accomplishing the development of the most advanced particle and extended fluid model`s on massively parallel processing (MPP) environments as part of a multi-institutional, multi-disciplinary numerical study of tokamak core fluctuations. The NTP is a continuing focus of the Office of Fusion Energy`s theory and computation program. Near-term HPCC work concentrates on developing a predictive numerical description of the core plasma transport in tokamaks driven by low-frequency collective fluctuations. This work addresses one of the greatest intellectual challenges to our understanding of the physics of tokamak performance and needs the most advanced computational resources to progress. We are conducting detailed comparisons of kinetic and fluid numerical models of tokamak turbulence. These comparisons are stimulating the improvement of each and the development of hybrid models which embody aspects of both. The combination of emerging massively parallel processing hardware and algorithmic improvements will result in an estimated 10**2--10**6 performance increase. Development of information processing and visualization tools is accelerating our comparison of computational models to one another, to experimental data, and to analytical theory, providing a bootstrap effect in our understanding of the target physics. The measure of success is the degree to which the experimentally observed scaling of fluctuation-driven transport may be predicted numerically. The NTP is advancing the HPCC Initiative through its state-of-the-art computational work. We are pushing the capability of high performance computing through our efforts which are strongly leveraged by OFE support.

  6. Solar Physics - Plasma Physics Workshop

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baum, P. J.; Beckers, J. M.; Newman, C. E.; Priest, E. R.; Rosenberg, H.; Smith, D. F.; Sturrock, P. A.; Wentzel, D. G.

    1974-01-01

    A summary of the proceedings of a conference whose purpose was to explore plasma physics problems which arise in the study of solar physics is provided. Sessions were concerned with specific questions including the following: (1) whether the solar plasma is thermal or non-themal; (2) what spectroscopic data is required; (3) what types of magnetic field structures exist; (4) whether magnetohydrodynamic instabilities occur; (5) whether resistive or non-magnetohydrodynamic instabilities occur; (6) what mechanisms of particle acceleration have been proposed; and (7) what information is available concerning shock waves. Very few questions were answered categorically but, for each question, there was discussion concerning the observational evidence, theoretical analyses, and existing or potential laboratory and numerical experiments.

  7. Plasma Physics An Introduction to Laboratory, Space, and Fusion Plasmas

    CERN Document Server

    Piel, Alexander

    2010-01-01

    Plasma Physics gives a comprehensive introduction to the basic processes in plasmas and demonstrates that the same fundamental concepts describe cold gas-discharge plasmas, space plasmas, and hot fusion plasmas. Starting from particle drifts in magnetic fields, the principles of magnetic confinement fusion are explained and compared with laser fusion. Collective processes are discussed in terms of plasma waves and instabilities. The concepts of plasma description by magnetohydrodynamics, kinetic theory, and particle simulation are stepwise introduced. Space charge effects in sheath regions, double layers and plasma diodes are given the necessary attention. The new fundamental mechanisms of dusty plasmas are explored and integrated into the framework of conventional plasmas. The book concludes with a brief introduction to plasma discharges. Written by an internationally renowned researcher in experimental plasma physics, the text keeps the mathematical apparatus simple and emphasizes the underlying concepts. T...

  8. Theoretical Plasma Physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vahala, George M. [College of William and Mary, Williamsburg, VA (United States)

    2013-12-31

    Lattice Boltzmann algorithms are a mesoscopic method to solve problems in nonlinear physics which are highly parallelized – unlike the direction solution of the original problem. These methods are applied to both fluid and magnetohydrodynamic turbulence. By introducing entropic constraints one can enforce the positive definiteness of the distribution functions and so be able to simulate fluids at high Reynolds numbers without numerical instabilities. By introducing a vector distribution function for the magnetic field one can enforce the divergence free condition on the magnetic field automatically, without the need of divergence cleaning as needed in most direct numerical solutions of the resistive magnetohydrodynamic equations. The principal reason for the high parallelization of lattice Boltzmann codes is that they consist of a kinetic collisional relaxation step (which is purely local) followed by a simple shift of the relaxed data to neighboring lattice sites. In large eddy simulations, the closure schemes are highly nonlocal – the most famous of these schemes is that due to Smagorinsky. Under a lattice Boltzmann representation the Smagorinsky closure is purely local – being simply a particular moment on the perturbed distribution fucntions. After nonlocal fluid moment models were discovered to represent Landau damping, it was found possible to model these fluid models using an appropriate lattice Boltzmann algorithm. The close to ideal parallelization of the lattice Boltzmann codes permitted us to be Gordon Bell finalists on using the Earth Simulation in Japan. We have also been involved in the radio frequency propagation of waves into a tokamak and into a spherical overdense tokamak plasma. Initially we investigated the use of a quasi-optical grill for the launching of lower hybrid waves into a tokamak. It was found that the conducting walls do not prevent the rods from being properly irradiated, the overloading of the quasi-optical grill is not severe

  9. Solar flares. [plasma physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rust, D. M.

    1979-01-01

    The present paper deals with explosions in a magnetized solar plasma, known as flares, whose effects are seen throughout the electromagnetic spectrum, from gamma-rays through the visible and to the radio band. The diverse phenomena associated with flares are discussed, along with the physical mechanisms that have been advanced to explain them. The impact of solar flare research on the development of plasma physics and magnetohydrodynamics is noted. The rapid development of solar flare research during the past 20 years, owing to the availability of high-resolution images, detailed magnetic field measurements, and improved spectral data, is illustrated.

  10. Computations in Plasma Physics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Bruce I.; Killeen, John

    1983-01-01

    Discusses contributions of computers to research in magnetic and inertial-confinement fusion, charged-particle-beam propogation, and space sciences. Considers use in design/control of laboratory and spacecraft experiments and in data acquisition; and reviews major plasma computational methods and some of the important physics problems they…

  11. Fundamentals of plasma physics

    CERN Document Server

    Bittencourt, J A

    1986-01-01

    A general introduction designed to present a comprehensive, logical and unified treatment of the fundamentals of plasma physics based on statistical kinetic theory. Its clarity and completeness make it suitable for self-learning and self-paced courses. Problems are included.

  12. Space plasma physics: I - Stationary processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasegawa, Akira; Sato, Tetsuya

    1989-01-01

    The physics of stationary processes in space plasmas is examined theoretically in an introduction intended for graduate students. The approach involves the extensive use of numerical simulations. Chapters are devoted to fundamental principles, small-amplitude waves, and the stationary solar plasma system; typical measurement data and simulation results are presented graphically.

  13. Theoretical plasma physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boozer, A. H.; Vahala, G. M.

    1992-05-01

    Work during the past year in the areas of classical and anomalous transport, three-dimensional equilibria, divertor physics, and diagnostic techniques using waves is reported. Although much work was done on classical transport, the validity of the guiding-center drift equations, which are the basis of much of the theory, has received little attention. The limitations of the drift approximation are being studied. Work on three-dimensional equilibria, which shows that quasi-helical symmetry is broken in third order in the inverse aspect ratio, on the modification of the current profile due to tearing modes was completed. This work is relevant to the maintenance of a steady-state tokamak by the bootstrap current. Divertor physics is a primary area that required development for ITER. One of the few methods by which the physics of the divertor can be modified or controlled is magnetic perturbations. The effect of magnetic perturbations on the divertor scrapeoff layer in collaboration with Hampton University is being studied. The evolution of magnetic field embedded in a moving plasma is a dynamics problem of potential importance. Renormalization techniques gave important insights first in the theory of phase transitions. The applications of these techniques has extended to many areas of physics, including turbulence in fluids and plasmas. Essentially no diagnostics for magnetic fluctuations inside a fusion-grade plasma exist. A collaborative program with Old Dominion University and the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory to develop such a diagnostic based on the conversion of electromagnetic waves from the ordinary to the extraordinary mode is underway.

  14. Plasma physics an introduction to laboratory, space, and fusion plasmas

    CERN Document Server

    Piel, Alexander

    2017-01-01

    The enlarged new edition of this textbook provides a comprehensive introduction to the basic processes in plasmas and demonstrates that the same fundamental concepts describe cold gas-discharge plasmas, space plasmas, and hot fusion plasmas. Starting from particle drifts in magnetic fields, the principles of magnetic confinement fusion are explained and compared with laser fusion. Collective processes are discussed in terms of plasma waves and instabilities. The concepts of plasma description by magnetohydrodynamics, kinetic theory, and particle simulation are stepwise introduced. Space charge effects in sheath regions, double layers and plasma diodes are given the necessary attention. The novel fundamental mechanisms of dusty plasmas are explored and integrated into the framework of conventional plasmas. The book concludes with a concise description of modern plasma discharges. Written by an internationally renowned researcher in experimental plasma physics, the text keeps the mathematical apparatus simple a...

  15. Nonthermal plasma chemistry and physics

    CERN Document Server

    Meichsner, Jurgen; Schneider, Ralf; Wagner, Hans-Erich

    2013-01-01

    In addition to introducing the basics of plasma physics, Nonthermal Plasma Chemistry and Physics is a comprehensive presentation of recent developments in the rapidly growing field of nonthermal plasma chemistry. The book offers a detailed discussion of the fundamentals of plasma chemical reactions and modeling, nonthermal plasma sources, relevant diagnostic techniques, and selected applications.Elucidating interconnections and trends, the book focuses on basic principles and illustrations across a broad field of applications. Expert contributors address environmental aspects of plasma chemist

  16. Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory:

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Phillips, C.A. (ed.)

    1986-01-01

    This paper discusses progress on experiments at the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory. The projects and areas discussed are: Principal Parameters Achieved in Experimental Devices, Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor, Princeton Large Torus, Princeton Beta Experiment, S-1 Spheromak, Current-Drive Experiment, X-ray Laser Studies, Theoretical Division, Tokamak Modeling, Spacecraft Glow Experiment, Compact Ignition Tokamak, Engineering Department, Project Planning and Safety Office, Quality Assurance and Reliability, and Administrative Operations.

  17. Plasma pharmacy - physical plasma in pharmaceutical applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Woedtke, Th; Haertel, B; Weltmann, K-D; Lindequist, U

    2013-07-01

    During the last years the use of physical plasma for medical applications has grown rapidly. A multitude of findings about plasma-cell and plasma-tissue interactions and its possible use in therapy have been provided. One of the key findings of plasma medical basic research is that several biological effects do not result from direct plasma-cell or plasma-tissue interaction but are mediated by liquids. Above all, it was demonstrated that simple liquids like water or physiological saline, are antimicrobially active after treatment by atmospheric pressure plasma and that these effects are attributable to the generation of different low-molecular reactive species. Besides, it could be shown that plasma treatment leads to the stimulation of specific aspects of cell metabolism and to a transient and reversible increase of diffusion properties of biological barriers. All these results gave rise to think about another new and innovative field of medical plasma application. In contrast to plasma medicine, which means the direct use of plasmas on or in the living organism for direct therapeutic purposes, this field - as a specific field of medical plasma application - is called plasma pharmacy. Based on the present state of knowledge, most promising application fields of plasma pharmacy might be: plasma-based generation of biologically active liquids; plasma-based preparation, optimization, or stabilization of - mainly liquid - pharmaceutical preparations; support of drug transport across biological barriers; plasma-based stimulation of biotechnological processes.

  18. Plasma physics and fusion plasma electrodynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Bers, Abraham

    2016-01-01

    Plasma is a ubiquitous state of matter at high temperatures. The electrodynamics of plasmas encompasses a large number of applications, from understanding plasmas in space and the stars, to their use in processing semiconductors, and their role in controlled energy generation by nuclear fusion. This book covers collective and single particle dynamics of plasmas for fully ionized as well as partially ionized plasmas. Many aspects of plasma physics in current fusion energy generation research are addressed both in magnetic and inertial confinement plasmas. Linear and nonlinear dynamics in hydrodynamic and kinetic descriptions are offered, making both simple and complex aspects of the subject available in nearly every chapter. The approach of dividing the basic aspects of plasma physics as "linear, hydrodynamic descriptions" to be covered first because they are "easier", and postponing the "nonlinear and kinetic descriptions" for later because they are "difficult" is abandoned in this book. For teaching purpose...

  19. A Hybrid Model for Multiscale Laser Plasma Simulations with Detailed Collisional Physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-11-29

    other provision of law, no person shall be subject to any penalty for failing to comply with a collection of information if it does not display a ...Briefing Charts 3. DATES COVERED (From - To) 02 November 2016 – 30 November 2016 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE A Hybrid Model for Multiscale Laser Plasma...Briefing Charts 15. SUBJECT TERMS N/ A 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: 17. LIMITATION OF ABSTRACT 18. NUMBER OF PAGES 19a. NAME OF RESPONSIBLE

  20. Edge physics Simulations

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    X.Q. Xu; C.S. Chang

    2007-01-01

    @@ The plasma edge includes the pedestal, scrape-off, and divertor regions. A complete edge physics should deal with the plasma, atomic, and the plasma-wall interaction phenomena. The edge provides the source of plasma through ionization of the incoming neutral particles and source of impurity through the wall sputtering. Edge plasma sets a boundary condition for the core confinement physics. Importance of the edge plasma has been elevated to the top list of the ITER physics research needs due to the necessity of the self-organized plasma pedestal and its destruction by edge localized mode activities. Extrapolation of the present tokamak data base predicts that a sufficient pedestal height is a necessary condition for the success of ITER.

  1. Welding arc plasma physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cain, Bruce L.

    1990-01-01

    The problems of weld quality control and weld process dependability continue to be relevant issues in modern metal welding technology. These become especially important for NASA missions which may require the assembly or repair of larger orbiting platforms using automatic welding techniques. To extend present welding technologies for such applications, NASA/MSFC's Materials and Processes Lab is developing physical models of the arc welding process with the goal of providing both a basis for improved design of weld control systems, and a better understanding of how arc welding variables influence final weld properties. The physics of the plasma arc discharge is reasonably well established in terms of transport processes occurring in the arc column itself, although recourse to sophisticated numerical treatments is normally required to obtain quantitative results. Unfortunately the rigor of these numerical computations often obscures the physics of the underlying model due to its inherent complexity. In contrast, this work has focused on a relatively simple physical model of the arc discharge to describe the gross features observed in welding arcs. Emphasis was placed of deriving analytic expressions for the voltage along the arc axis as a function of known or measurable arc parameters. The model retains the essential physics for a straight polarity, diffusion dominated free burning arc in argon, with major simplifications of collisionless sheaths and simple energy balances at the electrodes.

  2. The Framework of Plasma Physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cowley, Steven

    There have been relatively few good textbooks on plasma physics. Most become simple reference books that might be titled, “Plasma Physics Recipes.” Despite their utility such books do not make good textbooks. For teaching, one needs a book that shows how the basic results and models are part of a coherent whole. Richard Hazeltine and Francois Waelbroeck have written such a textbook: The Framework of Plasma PhysicsAn this book, plasma physics is developed carefully and logically from basic physics principles. The book is not, however, overly formal; physical arguments are used to reduce mathematical complexity.

  3. Colloidal Plasmas : Basic physics of colloidal plasmas

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    C B Dwivedi

    2000-11-01

    Colloidal plasma is a distinct class of the impure plasmas with multispecies ionic composition. The distinction lies in the phase distribution of the impurity-ion species. The ability to tailor the electrostatic interactions between these colloidal particles provides a fertile ground for scientists to investigate the fundamental aspects of the Coulomb phase transition behavior. The present contribution will review the basic physics of the charging mechanism of the colloidal particles as well as the physics of the collective normal mode behavior of the general multi-ion species plasmas. Emphasis will be laid on the clarification of the prevailing confusing ideas about distinct qualities of the various acoustic modes, which are likely to exist in colloidal plasmas as well as in normal multi-ion species plasmas. Introductory ideas about the proposed physical models for the Coulomb phase transition in colloidal plasma will also be discussed.

  4. Plasma Theory and Simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-09-30

    William Nevins L439 LLL (422-7032) Lecturers , UCB; Physicists -LLL Dr. William Fawley Guest, UCB; Physicist LLL L321 LLL (422-9272) Yu-Jiuan Chen, Douglas... MHD - Particle Codes." Three abstracts of papers prepared for the APS Division of Plasma Physics Meeting, November 10-14, 1980, at San Diego, follow

  5. Introduction to Plasma Physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurnett, Donald A.; Bhattacharjee, Amitava

    2017-03-01

    Preface; 1. Introduction; 2. Characteristic parameters of a plasma; 3. Single particle motions; 4. Waves in a cold plasma; 5. Kinetic theory and the moment equations; 6. Magnetohydrodynamics; 7. MHD equilibria and stability; 8. Discontinuities and shock waves; 9. Electrostatic waves in a hot unmagnetized plasma; 10. Waves in a hot magnetized plasma; 11. Nonlinear effects; 12. Collisional processes; Appendix A. Symbols; Appendix B. Useful trigonometric identities; Appendix C. Vector differential operators; Appendix D. Vector calculus identities; Index.

  6. Space plasma physics research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Comfort, Richard H.; Horwitz, James L.

    1993-01-01

    During the course of this grant, work was performed on a variety of topics and there were a number of significant accomplishments. A summary of these accomplishments is included. The topics studied include empirical model data base, data reduction for archiving, semikinetic modeling of low energy plasma in the inner terrestrial magnetosphere and ionosphere, O(+) outflows, equatorial plasma trough, and plasma wave ray-tracing studies. A list of publications and presentations which have resulted from this research is also included.

  7. Computer Simulation of Convective Plasma Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Carboni, Rodrigo; Frutos-Alfaro, Francisco

    2015-01-01

    Computer simulations of plasmas are relevant nowadays, because it helps us understand physical processes taking place in the sun and other stellar objects. We developed a program called PCell which is intended for displaying the evolution of the magnetic field in a 2D convective plasma cell with perfect conducting walls for different stationary plasma velocity fields. Applications of this program are presented. This software works interactively with the mouse and the users can create their ow...

  8. Variational integrators in plasma physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kraus, Michael

    2013-07-01

    To a large extent, research in plasma physics is concerned with the description and analysis of energy and momentum transfer between different scales and different kinds of waves. In the numerical modelling of such phenomena it appears to be crucial to describe the transfer processes preserving the underlying conservation laws in order to prevent physically spurious solutions. In this work, special numerical methods, so called variational integrators, are developed for several models of plasma physics. Special attention is given to conservation properties like conservation of energy and momentum. By design, variational integrators are applicable to all systems that have a Lagrangian formulation. Usually, equations of motion are derived by Hamilton's action principle and then discretised. In the application of the variational integrator theory, the order of these steps is reversed. At first, the Lagrangian and the accompanying variational principle are discretised, such that discrete equations of motion can be obtained directly by applying the discrete variational principle to the discrete Lagrangian. The advantage of this approach is that the resulting discretisation automatically retains the conservation properties of the continuous system. Following an overview of the geometric formulation of classical mechanics and field theory, which forms the basis of the variational integrator theory, variational integrators are introduced in a framework adapted to problems from plasma physics. The applicability of variational integrators is explored for several important models of plasma physics: particle dynamics (guiding centre dynamics), kinetic theory (the Vlasov-Poisson system) and fluid theory (magnetohydrodynamics). These systems, with the exception of guiding centre dynamics, do not possess a Lagrangian formulation to which the variational integrator methodology is directly applicable. Therefore the theory is extended by linking it to Ibragimov's theory of

  9. Simulating plasma production from hypervelocity impacts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fletcher, Alex; Close, Sigrid; Mathias, Donovan

    2015-09-01

    Hypervelocity particles, such as meteoroids and space debris, routinely impact spacecraft and are energetic enough to vaporize and ionize themselves and as well as a portion of the target material. The resulting plasma rapidly expands into the surrounding vacuum. While plasma measurements from hypervelocity impacts have been made using ground-based technologies such as light gas guns and Van de Graaff dust accelerators, some of the basic plasma properties vary significantly between experiments. There have been both ground-based and in-situ measurements of radio frequency (RF) emission from hypervelocity impacts, but the physical mechanism responsible and the possible connection to the impact-produced plasma are not well understood. Under certain conditions, the impact-produced plasma can have deleterious effects on spacecraft electronics by providing a new current path, triggering an electrostatic discharge, causing electromagnetic interference, or generating an electromagnetic pulse. Multi-physics simulations of plasma production from hypervelocity impacts are presented. These simulations incorporate elasticity and plasticity of the solid target, phase change and plasma formation, and non-ideal plasma physics due to the high density and low temperature of the plasma. A smoothed particle hydrodynamics method is used to perform a continuum dynamics simulation with these additional physics. By examining a series of hypervelocity impacts, basic properties of the impact produced plasma plume (density, temperature, expansion speed, charge state) are determined for impactor speeds between 10 and 72 km/s. For a large range of higher impact speeds (30-72 km/s), we find the temperature is unvarying at 2.5 eV. We also find that the plasma plume is weakly ionized for impact speeds less than 14 km/s and fully ionized for impact speeds greater than 20 km/s, independent of impactor mass. This is the same velocity threshold for the detection of RF emission in recent Van de Graaff

  10. Dense magnetized plasma numerical simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bilbao, L [INFIP-CONICET, and Physics Department (FCEN-UBA), Ciudad Universitaria, Pab. I, 1428 Buenos Aires (Argentina); Bernal, L, E-mail: bilbao@df.uba.a [Physics Department (FCEYN-UNMDP), Complejo Universitario, Funes y Pena, 7600 Mar del Plata (Argentina)

    2010-06-15

    The scope for developing the present numerical method was to perform parametric studies for optimization of several configurations in magnetized plasmas. Nowadays there exist several efficient numerical codes in the subject. However, the construction of one's own computational codes brings the following important advantages: (a) to get a deeper knowledge of the physical processes involved and the numerical methods used to simulate them and (b) more flexibility to adapt the code to particular situations in a more efficient way than would be possible for a closed general code. The code includes ion viscosity, thermal conduction (electrons and ions), magnetic diffusion, thermonuclear or chemical reaction, Bremsstrahlung radiation, and equation of state (from the ideal gas to the degenerate electron gas). After each calculation cycle, mesh vertices are moved arbitrarily over the fluid. The adaptive method consists of shifting mesh vertices over the fluid in order to keep a reasonable mesh structure and increase the spatial resolution where the physical solution demands. The code was a valuable tool for parametric study of different physical problems, mainly optimization of plasma focus machine, detonation and propagation of thermonuclear reactions and Kelvin-Helmholtz instabilities in the boundary layer of the terrestrial magnetopause.

  11. Controlled fusion and plasma physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-12-31

    This document presents the several speeches that took place during the 22nd European Physical Society conference on Controlled Fusion and Plasma Physics in Bournemouth, UK, between the 2nd and 7th July 1995. The talks deal with new experiments carried out on several tokamaks, particularly Tore Supra, concerning plasma confinement and fusion. Some information on specific fusion devices or tokamak devices is provided, as well as results of experiments concerning plasma instability. Separate abstracts were prepared for all the 31 papers in this volume. (TEC).

  12. Boundary Plasma Turbulence Simulations for Tokamaks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, X; Umansky, M; Dudson, B; Snyder, P

    2008-05-15

    The boundary plasma turbulence code BOUT models tokamak boundary-plasma turbulence in a realistic divertor geometry using modified Braginskii equations for plasma vorticity, density (ni), electron and ion temperature (T{sub e}; T{sub i}) and parallel momenta. The BOUT code solves for the plasma fluid equations in a three dimensional (3D) toroidal segment (or a toroidal wedge), including the region somewhat inside the separatrix and extending into the scrape-off layer; the private flux region is also included. In this paper, a description is given of the sophisticated physical models, innovative numerical algorithms, and modern software design used to simulate edge-plasmas in magnetic fusion energy devices. The BOUT code's unique capabilities and functionality are exemplified via simulations of the impact of plasma density on tokamak edge turbulence and blob dynamics.

  13. Computer Simulation of Convective Plasma Cells

    CERN Document Server

    Carboni, Rodrigo

    2015-01-01

    Computer simulations of plasmas are relevant nowadays, because it helps us understand physical processes taking place in the sun and other stellar objects. We developed a program called PCell which is intended for displaying the evolution of the magnetic field in a 2D convective plasma cell with perfect conducting walls for different stationary plasma velocity fields. Applications of this program are presented. This software works interactively with the mouse and the users can create their own movies in MPEG format. The programs were written in Fortran and C. There are two versions of the program (GNUPLOT and OpenGL). GNUPLOT and OpenGL are used to display the simulation.

  14. Topics in Plasma Physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vahala, Linda [Old Dominion Univ., Norfolk, VA (United States)

    2015-05-31

    During the period 1998-2013, research under the auspices of the Department of Energy was performed on RF waves in plasmas. This research was performed in close collaboration with Josef Preinhaelter, Jakub Urban, Vladimir Fuchs, Pavol Pavlo and Frantisek Zacek (Czech Academy of Sciences), Martin Valovic and Vladimir Shevchenko (Culham). This research is detailed and all 38 papers which were published by this team are cited.

  15. Variational Integrators in Plasma Physics

    CERN Document Server

    Kraus, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Variational integrators are a special kind of geometric discretisation methods applicable to any system of differential equations that obeys a Lagrangian formulation. In this thesis, variational integrators are developed for several important models of plasma physics: guiding centre dynamics (particle dynamics), the Vlasov-Poisson system (kinetic theory), and ideal magnetohydrodynamics (plasma fluid theory). Special attention is given to physical conservation laws like conservation of energy and momentum. Most systems in plasma physics do not possess a Lagrangian formulation to which the variational integrator methodology is directly applicable. Therefore the theory is extended towards nonvariational differential equations by linking it to Ibragimov's theory of integrating factors and adjoint equations. It allows us to find a Lagrangian for all ordinary and partial differential equations and systems thereof. Consequently, the applicability of variational integrators is extended to a much larger family of syst...

  16. Research in plasma physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    1973-01-01

    Three aspects of barium ion cloud dynamics are discussed. First, the effect of the ratio of ion cloud conductivity to background ionospheric conductivity on the motion of barium ion clouds is investigated and compared with observations of barium ion clouds. This study led to the suggestion that the conjugate ionosphere participates in the dynamics of barium ion clouds. Second, analytic work on the deformation of ion clouds is presented. Third, a linearized stability theory was extended to include the effect of the finite extent of an ion cloud, as well as the effect of the ratio of ion cloud to ionospheric conductivities. The stability properties of a plasma with contra-streaming ion beams parallel to a magnetic field are investigated. The results are interpreted in terms of parameters appropriate for collisionless shock waves. It is found that this particular instability can be operative only if the up-stream Alfven Mach number exceeds 5.5.

  17. Controlled fusion and plasma physics

    CERN Document Server

    Miyamoto, Kenro

    2006-01-01

    Resulting from ongoing, international research into fusion processes, the International Tokamak Experimental Reactor (ITER) is a major step in the quest for a new energy source.The first graduate-level text to cover the details of ITER, Controlled Fusion and Plasma Physics introduces various aspects and issues of recent fusion research activities through the shortest access path. The distinguished author breaks down the topic by first dealing with fusion and then concentrating on the more complex subject of plasma physics. The book begins with the basics of controlled fusion research, foll

  18. Dusty plasma as a unique object of plasma physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norman, G. E.; Timofeev, A. V.

    2016-11-01

    The self-consistency and basic openness of dusty plasma, charge fluctuations, high dissipation and other features of dusty plasma system lead to the appearance of a number of unusual and unique properties of dusty plasma. “Anomalous” heating of dusty particles, anisotropy of temperatures and other features, parametric resonance, charge fluctuations and interaction potential are among these unique properties. Study is based on analytical approach and numerical simulation. Mechanisms of “anomalous” heating and energy transfer are proposed. Influence of charge fluctuations on the system properties is discussed. The self-consistent, many-particle, fluctuation and anisotropic interparticle interaction potential is studied for a significant range of gas temperature. These properties are interconnected and necessary for a full description of dusty plasmas physics.

  19. Space Plasma Physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, S. T.

    2000-01-01

    Dr. James L. Horwitz and R. Hugh Comfort's studies with the high altitude TIDE data have been progressing well. We concluded a study on the relationship of polar cap ion properties observed by TIDE near apogee with solar wind and IMF conditions. We found that in general H+ did not correlate as well as O+ with solar wind and IMF parameters. O+ density correlated(sub IMF), and Kp. At lower solar wind speeds, O+ density decreased with increasing latitude, but this trend was not observed at higher solar wind speeds. By comparing these results with results from other studies of O+ in different parts of the magnetosphere, we concluded that O+ ions often leave the ionosphere near the foot point of the cusp/cleft region, pass through the high-altitude polar cap lobes, and eventually arrive in the plasma sheet. We found that H+ outflows are a persistent feature of the polar cap and are not as dependent on the geophysical conditions; even classical polar wind models show H+ ions readily escaping owing to their low mass. Minor correlations with solar wind drivers were found; specifically, H+ density correlated best with IMF By, V(sub sw)B(sub IMF), and ESW(sub sw).

  20. PREFACE: 1982 International Conference on Plasma Physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilhelmsson, Hans

    1982-01-01

    Invited Papers: The Physics of Hot Plasmas During the last decade a dramatic evolution of plasma physics has occurred. Not only have gigantic fusion plasma machines been planned, and are now being built, and elaborate spaceships and antenna systems been constructed to explore remote parts of the cosmos; new observations have revealed fascinating structures in space, ranging from pulsar plasmas under extreme conditions in very strong magnetic fields to large-scale magnetic field and electric current systems in cosmic plasmas. X-rays from very distant sources as well as radio-waves from the plasma in the magnetosphere and in the Aurora have recently been studied with new observational techniques. Ingenious laboratory experiments are continuously being carried out to exploit new fundamental processes in plasmas. These are of great interest for the basic understanding of plasmas and also have immediate consequences for applications, like plasma heating and diagnostics. The theoretical description of new plasma phenomena, and of the plasma state in general poses challenging problems, particularly in situations where high concentration of energy is located in the plasmas. Nonlinear wave analysis and turbulence theory have accordingly been extensively developed to describe in particular the collective plasma phenomena. New concepts have been envisaged like plasma solitons, which may be thought of as excitations of local concentrations of longitudinal plasma waves which turn out to be particularly stable. More and more sophisticated structures of nonlinear nature are being revealed by means of high capacity computer facilities. Simulation experiments allow for studies of chaotic behaviour of plasma particles. Related fields of activity form new trends in the development of plasma theory. The programme of the 1982 International Conference on Plasma Physics, which was held in Göteborg, Sweden, stressed the role of the Physics of Hot Plasmas. Studies of such plasmas are

  1. Simulating the Physical World

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berendsen, Herman J. C.

    2004-06-01

    The simulation of physical systems requires a simplified, hierarchical approach which models each level from the atomistic to the macroscopic scale. From quantum mechanics to fluid dynamics, this book systematically treats the broad scope of computer modeling and simulations, describing the fundamental theory behind each level of approximation. Berendsen evaluates each stage in relation to its applications giving the reader insight into the possibilities and limitations of the models. Practical guidance for applications and sample programs in Python are provided. With a strong emphasis on molecular models in chemistry and biochemistry, this book will be suitable for advanced undergraduate and graduate courses on molecular modeling and simulation within physics, biophysics, physical chemistry and materials science. It will also be a useful reference to all those working in the field. Additional resources for this title including solutions for instructors and programs are available online at www.cambridge.org/9780521835275. The first book to cover the wide range of modeling and simulations, from atomistic to the macroscopic scale, in a systematic fashion Providing a wealth of background material, it does not assume advanced knowledge and is eminently suitable for course use Contains practical examples and sample programs in Python

  2. The plasma physics of shock acceleration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Frank C.; Ellison, Donald C.

    1991-01-01

    The history and theory of shock acceleration is reviewed, paying particular attention to theories of parallel shocks which include the backreaction of accelerated particles on the shock structure. The work that computer simulations, both plasma and Monte Carlo, are playing in revealing how thermal ions interact with shocks and how particle acceleration appears to be an inevitable and necessary part of the basic plasma physics that governs collisionless shocks is discussed. Some of the outstanding problems that still confront theorists and observers in this field are described.

  3. Plasma Theory and Simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-12-31

    expan- sion of a warm plasma; launching and propagation and decay of very large amplitude waves (8GK, solitons, etc.); thermal barriers (really...25.373.1981. ION-10N TWO-STREAM IN THERMAL BARRIERS : Vincent-lhonal,U.C.Berkeley. We present stu- dies or the eleclroTatic ion-ion two-stream instability as

  4. Simulating plasma production from hypervelocity impacts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fletcher, Alex, E-mail: alexcf@stanford.edu; Close, Sigrid [Stanford University, Aeronautics and Astronautics, 496 Lomita Mall, Stanford, California 94305 (United States); Mathias, Donovan [NASA Ames Research Center, Bldg. 258, Moffett Field, California 94035 (United States)

    2015-09-15

    Hypervelocity particles, such as meteoroids and space debris, routinely impact spacecraft and are energetic enough to vaporize and ionize themselves and as well as a portion of the target material. The resulting plasma rapidly expands into the surrounding vacuum. While plasma measurements from hypervelocity impacts have been made using ground-based technologies such as light gas guns and Van de Graaff dust accelerators, some of the basic plasma properties vary significantly between experiments. There have been both ground-based and in-situ measurements of radio frequency (RF) emission from hypervelocity impacts, but the physical mechanism responsible and the possible connection to the impact-produced plasma are not well understood. Under certain conditions, the impact-produced plasma can have deleterious effects on spacecraft electronics by providing a new current path, triggering an electrostatic discharge, causing electromagnetic interference, or generating an electromagnetic pulse. Multi-physics simulations of plasma production from hypervelocity impacts are presented. These simulations incorporate elasticity and plasticity of the solid target, phase change and plasma formation, and non-ideal plasma physics due to the high density and low temperature of the plasma. A smoothed particle hydrodynamics method is used to perform a continuum dynamics simulation with these additional physics. By examining a series of hypervelocity impacts, basic properties of the impact produced plasma plume (density, temperature, expansion speed, charge state) are determined for impactor speeds between 10 and 72 km/s. For a large range of higher impact speeds (30–72 km/s), we find the temperature is unvarying at 2.5 eV. We also find that the plasma plume is weakly ionized for impact speeds less than 14 km/s and fully ionized for impact speeds greater than 20 km/s, independent of impactor mass. This is the same velocity threshold for the detection of RF emission in recent

  5. Plasma physics for controlled fusion

    CERN Document Server

    Miyamoto, Kenro

    2016-01-01

    This new edition presents the essential theoretical and analytical methods needed to understand the recent fusion research of tokamak and alternate approaches. The author describes magnetohydrodynamic and kinetic theories of cold and hot plasmas in detail. The book covers new important topics for fusion studies such as plasma transport by drift turbulence, which depend on the magnetic configuration and zonal flows. These are universal phenomena of microturbulence. They can modify the onset criterion for turbulent transport, instabilities driven by energetic particles as well as alpha particle generation and typical plasma models for computer simulation. The fusion research of tokamaks with various new versions of H modes are explained. The design concept of ITER, the international tokamak experimental reactor, is described for inductively driven operations as well as steady-state operations using non-inductive drives. Alternative approaches of reversed-field pinch and its relaxation process, stellator includi...

  6. Basic Studies in Plasma Physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-31

    close to a Maxwellian parametrized by a temperature T and mean velocity u which satisfy certain non -linear equations, which are the macroscopic equations...Simulations with Particle-to-Grid Methods 17 E. Microscopic-Shock Profiles: Exact Solution of a Non -Equilibrium System 18 IV. List of Publications...Investigator ABSTRACT An improved understanding of equilibrium and non -equilibrium properties of plasmas is central to many areas of basic science as

  7. Preface to advances in numerical simulation of plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, Scott E.; Chacon, Luis

    2016-10-01

    This Journal of Computational Physics Special Issue, titled "Advances in Numerical Simulation of Plasmas," presents a snapshot of the international state of the art in the field of computational plasma physics. The articles herein are a subset of the topics presented as invited talks at the 24th International Conference on the Numerical Simulation of Plasmas (ICNSP), August 12-14, 2015 in Golden, Colorado. The choice of papers was highly selective. The ICNSP is held every other year and is the premier scientific meeting in the field of computational plasma physics.

  8. The Plasma Archipelago: Plasma Physics in the 1960s

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weisel, Gary J.

    2017-09-01

    With the foundation of the Division of Plasma Physics of the American Physical Society in April 1959, plasma physics was presented as the general study of ionized gases. This paper investigates the degree to which plasma physics, during its first decade, established a community of interrelated specialties, one that brought together work in gaseous electronics, astrophysics, controlled thermonuclear fusion, space science, and aerospace engineering. It finds that, in some regards, the plasma community was indeed greater than the sum of its parts and that its larger identity was sometimes glimpsed in inter-specialty work and studies of fundamental plasma behaviors. Nevertheless, the plasma specialties usually worked separately for two inter-related reasons: prejudices about what constituted "basic physics," both in the general physics community and within the plasma community itself; and a compartmentalized funding structure, in which each funding agency served different missions.

  9. Physics of the plasma universe

    CERN Document Server

    Peratt, Anthony L

    2015-01-01

    Today many scientists recognize plasma as the key element to understanding new observations in near-Earth, interplanetary, interstellar, and intergalactic space; in stars, galaxies, and clusters of galaxies, and throughout the observable universe. Physics of the Plasma Universe, 2nd Edition is an update of observations made across the entire cosmic electromagnetic spectrum over the two decades since the publication of the first edition. It addresses paradigm changing discoveries made by telescopes, planetary probes, satellites, and radio and space telescopes. The contents are the result of the author's 37 years research at Livermore and Los Alamos National Laboratories, and the U.S. Department of Energy. This book covers topics such as the large-scale structure and the filamentary universe; the formation of magnetic fields and galaxies, active galactic nuclei and quasars, the origin and abundance of light elements, star formation and the evolution of solar systems, and cosmic rays. Chapters 8 and 9 are based ...

  10. Mathematics for plasma physics; Mathematiques pour la physique des plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sentis, R. [CEA Bruyeres-le-Chatel, 91 (France)

    2011-01-15

    The plasma physics is in the heart of the research of the CEA-DAM. Using mathematics in this domain is necessary, particularly for a precise statement of the partial differential equations systems which are on the basis of the numerical simulations. Examples are given concerning hydrodynamics, models for the thermal conduction and laser-plasma interaction. For the bi-temperature compressible Euler model, the mathematical study of the problem has allowed us to understand why the role of the energy equations dealing with ions on one hand and electrons on the other hand are not identical despite the symmetrical appearance of the system. The mathematical study is also necessary to be sure of the existence and uniqueness of the solution

  11. Plasma physics and nuclear fusion research

    CERN Document Server

    Gill, Richard D

    1981-01-01

    Plasma Physics and Nuclear Fusion Research covers the theoretical and experimental aspects of plasma physics and nuclear fusion. The book starts by providing an overview and survey of plasma physics; the theory of the electrodynamics of deformable media and magnetohydrodynamics; and the particle orbit theory. The text also describes the plasma waves; the kinetic theory; the transport theory; and the MHD stability theory. Advanced theories such as microinstabilities, plasma turbulence, anomalous transport theory, and nonlinear laser plasma interaction theory are also considered. The book furthe

  12. Plasma arc cutting technology: simulation and experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cantoro, G; Colombo, V; Concetti, A; Ghedini, E; Sanibondi, P; Zinzani, F; Rotundo, F [Department of Mechanical Engineering (D.I.E.M.) and Research Center for Applied Mathematics (C.I.R.A.M.), Alma Mater Studiorum-Universita di Bologna, Via Saragozza 8, 40123 Bologna (Italy); Dallavalle, S; Vancini, M, E-mail: emanuele.ghedini@unibo.it [Cebora S.p.A., Via Andrea Costa 24, 40057 Cadriano di Granarolo (Italy)

    2011-01-01

    Transferred arc plasma torches are widely used in industrial processes for cutting of metallic materials because of their ability to cut a wide range of metals with very high productivity. The process is characterized by a transferred electric arc established between an electrode inside the torch (the cathode) and another electrode, the metallic workpiece to be cut (the anode). In order to obtain a high quality cut and a high productivity, the plasma jet must be as collimated as possible and must have the higher achievable power density. Plasma modelling and numerical simulation can be very useful tools for the designing and optimizing these devices, but research is still in the making for finding a link between simulation of the plasma arc and a consistent prevision of cut quality. Numerical modelling of the behaviour of different types of transferred arc dual gas plasma torches can give an insight on the physical reasons for the industrial success of various design and process solutions that have appeared over the last years. Diagnostics based on high speed imaging and Schlieren photography can play an important role for investigating piercing, dross generation, pilot arcing and anode attachment location. Also, the behaviour of hafnium cathodes at high current levels at the beginning of their service life can been experimentally investigated, with the final aim of understanding the phenomena that take place during those initial piercing and cutting phases and optimizing the initial shape of the surface of the emissive insert exposed to plasma atmosphere.

  13. Plasma Theory and Simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1979-09-30

    mode In all of Davidson’s equations, there is a factor of /2- difference in vti due 2 to his definition of T.i =m v ti12. -3- 𔃺-1 10-2- 1 0- 10-51 0.3...v E.6 max N~ -10- 0.6 v x 0.4 -0.2 a -0.4 0 1.0 2.0 3.0 4.0 5.0 6.0 16 12 8 4 (b) -0.4 -0.2 Vph -0. -. 2 0.0 0.2 0.4 A vx FIG. 5 Simulation (many mode...Drift Instability", Phys. Fluids 21, 1017 (1978). l mj 12 0.6 . . . . . . vx A 0.4. -0.2 (a) -0.4x 0 10 2.0 3.0 4.0 5.0 6.0 16 12 8 4 (b) Vph -0.4 -0.2

  14. Physics of Tokamak Plasma Start-up

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mueller, Dennis

    2012-10-01

    This tutorial describes and reviews the state-of-art in tokamak plasma start-up and its importance to next step devices such as ITER, a Fusion Nuclear Science Facility and a Tokamak/ST demo. Tokamak plasma start-up includes breakdown of the initial gas, ramp-up of the plasma current to its final value and the control of plasma parameters during those phases. Tokamaks rely on an inductive component, typically a central solenoid, which has enabled attainment of high performance levels that has enabled the construction of the ITER device. Optimizing the inductive start-up phase continues to be an area of active research, especially in regards to achieving ITER scenarios. A new generation of superconducting tokamaks, EAST and KSTAR, experiments on DIII-D and operation with JET's ITER-like wall are contributing towards this effort. Inductive start-up relies on transformer action to generate a toroidal loop voltage and successful start-up is determined by gas breakdown, avalanche physics and plasma-wall interaction. The goal of achieving steady-sate tokamak operation has motivated interest in other methods for start-up that do not rely on the central solenoid. These include Coaxial Helicity Injection, outer poloidal field coil start-up, and point source helicity injection, which have achieved 200, 150 and 100 kA respectively of toroidal current on closed flux surfaces. Other methods including merging reconnection startup and Electron Bernstein Wave (EBW) plasma start-up are being studied on various devices. EBW start-up generates a directed electron channel due to wave particle interaction physics while the other methods mentioned rely on magnetic helicity injection and magnetic reconnection which are being modeled and understood using NIMROD code simulations.

  15. MHD simulations of Plasma Jets and Plasma-surface interactions in Coaxial Plasma Accelerators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subramaniam, Vivek; Raja, Laxminarayan

    2016-10-01

    Coaxial plasma accelerators belong to a class of electromagnetic acceleration devices which utilize a self-induced Lorentz force to accelerate magnetized thermal plasma to large velocities ( 40 Km/s). The plasma jet generated as a result, due to its high energy density, can be used to mimic the plasma-surface interactions at the walls of thermonuclear fusion reactors during an Edge Localized Mode (ELM) disruption event. We present the development of a Magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) simulation tool to describe the plasma acceleration and jet formation processes in coaxial plasma accelerators. The MHD model is used to study the plasma-surface impact interaction generated by the impingement of the jet on a target material plate. The study will characterize the extreme conditions generated on the target material surface by resolving the magnetized shock boundary layer interaction and the viscous/thermal diffusion effects. Additionally, since the plasma accelerator is operated in vacuum conditions, a novel plasma-vacuum interface tracking algorithm is developed to simulate the expansion of the high density plasma into a vacuum background in a physically consistent manner.

  16. Plasma Physics and Controlled Nuclear Fusion

    CERN Document Server

    Miyamoto, Kenro

    2005-01-01

    The primary objectives of this book are, firstly, to present the essential theoretical background needed to understand recent fusion research and, secondly, to describe the current status of fusion research for graduate students and senior undergraduates. It will also serve as a useful reference for scientists and engineers working in the related fields. In Part I, Plasma Physics, the author explains the basics of magneto-hydrodynamics and kinetic theory in a simple and compact way and, at the same time, covers important new topics for fusion studies such as the ballooning representation, instabilities driven by energetic particles and various plasma models for computer simulations. Part II, Controlled Nuclear Fusion, attempts to review the "big picture" in fusion research. All important phenomena and technologies are addressed, with a particular emphasis on the topics of most concern in current research.

  17. PlasmaPy: beginning a community developed Python package for plasma physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Nicholas A.; Huang, Yi-Min; PlasmaPy Collaboration

    2016-10-01

    In recent years, researchers in several disciplines have collaborated on community-developed open source Python packages such as Astropy, SunPy, and SpacePy. These packages provide core functionality, common frameworks for data analysis and visualization, and educational tools. We propose that our community begins the development of PlasmaPy: a new open source core Python package for plasma physics. PlasmaPy could include commonly used functions in plasma physics, easy-to-use plasma simulation codes, Grad-Shafranov solvers, eigenmode solvers, and tools to analyze both simulations and experiments. The development will include modern programming practices such as version control, embedding documentation in the code, unit tests, and avoiding premature optimization. We will describe early code development on PlasmaPy, and discuss plans moving forward. The success of PlasmaPy depends on active community involvement and a welcoming and inclusive environment, so anyone interested in joining this collaboration should contact the authors.

  18. Space plasma physics stationary processes

    CERN Document Server

    Hasegawa, Akira

    1989-01-01

    During the 30 years of space exploration, important discoveries in the near-earth environment such as the Van Allen belts, the plasmapause, the magnetotail and the bow shock, to name a few, have been made. Coupling between the solar wind and the magnetosphere and energy transfer processes between them are being identified. Space physics is clearly approaching a new era, where the emphasis is being shifted from discoveries to understanding. One way of identifying the new direction may be found in the recent contribution of atmospheric science and oceanography to the development of fluid dynamics. Hydrodynamics is a branch of classical physics in which important discoveries have been made in the era of Rayleigh, Taylor, Kelvin and Helmholtz. However, recent progress in global measurements using man-made satellites and in large scale computer simulations carried out by scientists in the fields of atmospheric science and oceanography have created new activities in hydrodynamics and produced important new discover...

  19. MONTE CARLO SIMULATION OF CHARGED PARTICLE IN AN ELECTRONEGATIVE PLASMA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L SETTAOUTI

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available Interest in radio frequency (rf discharges has grown tremendously in recent years due to their importance in microelectronic technologies. Especially interesting are the properties of discharges in electronegative gases which are most frequently used for technological applications. Monte Carlo simulation have become increasingly important as a simulation tool particularly in the area of plasma physics. In this work, we present some detailed properties of rf plasmas obtained by Monte Carlo simulation code, in SF6

  20. PHYSICAL SIMULATION & TEST

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Crew Station/Turret Motion Based Simulator (CS/TMBS) Test station simulates operational scenarios The CS/TMBS is a high-capacity six-degrees-of-freedom test device....

  1. Particle simulation of neoclassical transport in the plasma Edge

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, C.S. [Department of Physics, Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology (Korea); Ku, S. [Courant Institute of Mathematical Sciences, New York University, 251 Mercer Street, New York, NY (United States); Department of Physics, Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology (Korea)

    2006-09-15

    Particle-in-cell is a popular technique for a global five dimensional numerical simulation of the neoclassical plasma phenomena in a toroidal plasma. In this paper, we briefly review the physical and mathematical aspects of the modern neoclassical particle simulation methodology for a plasma edge simulation and present representative results recently obtained from XGC (X-point included Guiding Center) code. The strength and weakness in the modern neoclassical particle simulation techniques will also be discussed. (copyright 2006 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  2. Report of the Plasma Physics Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-03-01

    Theoretical and experimental work in plasma physics is summarized. Technological and engineering aspects of plasma experiments in the SPICA, TORTUR 2, and RINGBOOG 2 reactors are discussed with emphasis on screw pinch, turbulent heating, and gas blankets. The free boundary equilibrium in high beta Tokamak plasma, wave dynamics, and transport problems were investigated.

  3. The physics of non-ideal plasma

    CERN Document Server

    Fortov, Vladimir E

    2000-01-01

    This book is devoted to the physical properties of nonideal plasma which is compressed so strongly that the effects of interparticle interactions govern the plasma behavior. The interest in this plasma was generated by the development of modern technologies and facilities whose operations were based on high densities of energy. In this volume, the methods of nonideal plasma generation and diagnostics are considered. The experimental results are given and the main theoretical models of nonideal plasma state are discussed. The problems of thermodynamics, electro-physics, optics and dynamic stabi

  4. NIMROD Resistive Magnetohydrodynamic Simulations of Spheromak Physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hooper, E B; Cohen, B I; McLean, H S; Wood, R D; Romero-Talamas, C A; Sovinec, C R

    2007-12-11

    The physics of spheromak plasmas is addressed by time-dependent, three-dimensional, resistive magneto-hydrodynamic simulations with the NIMROD code. Included in some detail are the formation of a spheromak driven electrostatically by a coaxial plasma gun with a flux-conserver geometry and power systems that accurately model the Sustained Spheromak Physics Experiment (SSPX) (R. D. Wood, et al., Nucl. Fusion 45, 1582 (2005)). The controlled decay of the spheromak plasma over several milliseconds is also modeled as the programmable current and voltage relax, resulting in simulations of entire experimental pulses. Reconnection phenomena and the effects of current profile evolution on the growth of symmetry-breaking toroidal modes are diagnosed; these in turn affect the quality of magnetic surfaces and the energy confinement. The sensitivity of the simulation results address variations in both physical and numerical parameters, including spatial resolution. There are significant points of agreement between the simulations and the observed experimental behavior, e.g., in the evolution of the magnetics and the sensitivity of the energy confinement to the presence of symmetry-breaking magnetic fluctuations.

  5. Unifying physics of accelerators, lasers and plasma

    CERN Document Server

    Seryi, Andrei

    2015-01-01

    Unifying Physics of Accelerators, Lasers and Plasma introduces the physics of accelerators, lasers and plasma in tandem with the industrial methodology of inventiveness, a technique that teaches that similar problems and solutions appear again and again in seemingly dissimilar disciplines. This unique approach builds bridges and enhances connections between the three aforementioned areas of physics that are essential for developing the next generation of accelerators.

  6. PIC Simulation of plasma detachment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishiguro, Seiji; Pianpanit, Theerasarn; Hasegawa, Hiroki; Kanno, Ryutaro

    2014-10-01

    The detached plasma, which is caused by gas puffing, has been proposed and it is the most promising way to reduce the heat load to the divertor plate of fusion oriented devices. Dynamical and kinetic behavior of the detached plasma is unresolved. So we are developing particle-in-cell simulation model with atomic processes such as line radiation, ionization, charge-exchange collision and recombination. As a first step, we have performed PIC simulation with Monte Carlo collisions, where spatial and velocity space distributions of charged particles, self-consistent electric field, and atomic processes such as ionization and charge exchange are included. Temperature decrease and density increase in front of the target is observed and electric potential structure along the axis is created. This work is performed with the support and under the auspices of NIFS Collaboration Research programs (NIFS14KNXN279 and 8 NIFS13KNSS038) and the Research Cooperation Program on Hierarchy and Holism in Natural Sciences at the NINS.

  7. A treecode to simulate dust-plasma interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, D. M.; Holgate, J. T.

    2017-02-01

    The interaction of a small object with surrounding plasma is an area of plasma-physics research with a multitude of applications. This paper introduces the plasma octree code pot, a microscopic simulator of a spheroidal dust grain in a plasma. pot uses the Barnes-Hut treecode algorithm to perform N-body simulations of electrons and ions in the vicinity of a chargeable spheroid, employing also the Boris particle-motion integrator and Hutchinson’s reinjection algorithm from SCEPTIC; a description of the implementation of all three algorithms is provided. We present results from pot simulations of the charging of spheres in magnetised plasmas, and of spheroids in unmagnetized plasmas. The results call into question the validity of using the Boltzmann relation in hybrid PIC codes. Substantial portions of this paper are adapted from chapters 4 and 5 of the first author’s recent PhD dissertation.

  8. Plasma Physics of Extreme Astrophysical Environments

    CERN Document Server

    Uzdensky, Dmitri A

    2014-01-01

    Certain classes of astrophysical objects, namely magnetars and central engines of supernovae and gamma-ray bursts (GRBs), are characterized by extreme physical conditions not encountered elsewhere in the Universe. In particular, they possess magnetic fields that exceed the critical quantum field of 44 teragauss. Figuring out how these complex ultra-magnetized systems work requires understanding various plasma processes, both small-scale kinetic and large-scale magnetohydrodynamic (MHD). However, an ultra-strong magnetic field modifies the underlying physics to such an extent that many relevant plasma-physical problems call for building QED-based relativistic quantum plasma physics. In this review, after describing the extreme astrophysical systems of interest and identifying the key relevant plasma-physical problems, we survey the recent progress in the development of such a theory. We discuss how a super-critical field modifies the properties of vacuum and matter and outline the basic theoretical framework f...

  9. APS presents prizes in fluid dynamics and plasma physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1992-12-01

    This article reviews the presentation of the American Physical Society awards in fluid dynamics and plasma physics. The recipient of the plasma physics James Clerk Maxwell Prize was John M. Green for contributions to the theory of magnetohydrodynamics equilibria and ideal and resistive instabilities, for discovering the inverse scattering transform leading to soliton solutions of many nonlinear partial differential equations and for inventing the residue method of determining the transition to global chaos. The excellence in Plasma Physics Research Award was presented to Nathaniel A. Fisch for theoretical investigations of noninductive current generation in toroidally confined plasma. Wim Pieter Leemans received the Simon Ramo Award for experimental and simulational contributions to laser-plasma physics. William R. Sears was given the 1992 Fuid Dynamics Prize for contributions to the study of steady and unsteady aerodynamics, aeroacoustics, magnetoaerodynamics,and wind tunnel design. William C. Reynolds received the Otto Laporte Award for experimental, theoretical, and computational work in turbulence modeling and control and leadership in direct numerical simulation and large eddy simulation.

  10. Partnership for Edge Physics Simulation (EPSI)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schroder, Peter [California Inst. of Technology, Pasadena, CA (United States)

    2015-02-11

    We propose to develop advanced simulation codes, based upon an extreme parallelism, first principles kinetic approach, to address the challenges associated with the edge region of magnetically confined plasmas. This work is relevant to both existing magnetic fusion facilities and essential for next-generation burning plasma experiments, such as ITER where success is critically dependent upon H-mode operation achieving an edge pedestal of sufficient height for good core plasma performance without producing deleterious large scale edge localized instabilities. The plasma edge presents a well-known set of multi-physics, multi-scale problems involving complex 3D magnetic geometry. Perhaps the greatest computational challenge is the lack of scale separation – temporal scales for drift waves, Alfven waves, ELM dynamics for example have strong overlap. Similar overlap occurs on the spatial scales for the ion poloidal gyro-radius, drift wave and pedestal width. The traditional approach of separating fusion problems into weakly interacting spatial or temporal domains clearly breaks down in the edge. A full kinetic model (full-f model) must be solved to understand and predict the edge physics including non-equilibrium thermodynamic issues arising from the magnetic topology (the open field lines producing a spatially sensitive velocity hole), plasma wall interactions, neutral and atomic physics. The plan here is to model these phenomena within a comprehensive first principles set of equations without the need for the insurmountable multiple-codes coupling issues by building on the XGC1 code developed under the SciDAC Proto-FSP Center for Plasma Edge Simulation (CPES). This proposal includes the critical participants in the XGC1 development. We propose enhancing the capability of XGC1 by including all the important turbulence physics contained in kinetic ion and electron electromagnetic dynamics, by extending the PIC technology to incorporate several positive features found

  11. Plasma Cathode Electron Sources Physics, Technology, Applications

    CERN Document Server

    Oks, Efim

    2006-01-01

    This book fills the gap for a textbook describing this kind of electron beam source in a systematic and thorough manner: from physical processes of electron emission to examples of real plasma electron sources and their applications.

  12. Plasma Physics and Controlled Nuclear Fusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisch, N. J.

    2010-01-01

    Already while making his famous contributions in uncontrolled nuclear fusion for wartime uses, Edward Teller contemplated how the abundant energy release through nuclear fusion might serve peacetime uses as well. His legacy in controlled nuclear fusion, and the associated physics of plasmas, spans both magnetic and inertial confinement approaches. His contributions in plasma physics, both the intellectual and the administrative, continue to impact the field.

  13. Magnetohydrodynamic simulation study of plasma jets and plasma-surface contact in coaxial plasma accelerators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subramaniam, Vivek; Raja, Laxminarayan L.

    2017-06-01

    Recent experiments by Loebner et al. [IEEE Trans. Plasma Sci. 44, 1534 (2016)] studied the effect of a hypervelocity jet emanating from a coaxial plasma accelerator incident on target surfaces in an effort to mimic the transient loading created during edge localized mode disruption events in fusion plasmas. In this paper, we present a magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) numerical model to simulate plasma jet formation and plasma-surface contact in this coaxial plasma accelerator experiment. The MHD system of equations is spatially discretized using a cell-centered finite volume formulation. The temporal discretization is performed using a fully implicit backward Euler scheme and the resultant stiff system of nonlinear equations is solved using the Newton method. The numerical model is employed to obtain some key insights into the physical processes responsible for the generation of extreme stagnation conditions on the target surfaces. Simulations of the plume (without the target plate) are performed to isolate and study phenomena such as the magnetic pinch effect that is responsible for launching pressure pulses into the jet free stream. The simulations also yield insights into the incipient conditions responsible for producing the pinch, such as the formation of conductive channels. The jet-target impact studies indicate the existence of two distinct stages involved in the plasma-surface interaction. A fast transient stage characterized by a thin normal shock transitions into a pseudo-steady stage that exhibits an extended oblique shock structure. A quadratic scaling of the pinch and stagnation conditions with the total current discharged between the electrodes is in qualitative agreement with the results obtained in the experiments. This also illustrates the dominant contribution of the magnetic pressure term in determining the magnitude of the quantities of interest.

  14. Theory and simulation of laser plasma coupling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kruer, W.L.

    1979-08-09

    The theory and simulation of these coupling processes are considered. Particular emphasis is given to their nonlinear evolution. First a brief introduction to computer simulation of plasmas using particle codes is given. Then the absorption of light via the generation of plasma waves is considered, followed by a discussion of stimulated scattering of intense light. Finally these calculations are compared with experimental results.

  15. Plasmas applied atomic collision physics, v.2

    CERN Document Server

    Barnett, C F

    1984-01-01

    Applied Atomic Collision Physics, Volume 2: Plasmas covers topics on magnetically confined plasmas. The book starts by providing the history of fusion research and describing the various approaches in both magnetically and inertially confined plasmas. The text then gives a general discussion of the basic concepts and properties in confinement and heating of a plasma. The theory of atomic collisions that result in excited quantum states, particularly highly ionized impurity atoms; and diverse diagnostic topics such as emission spectra, laser scattering, electron cyclotron emission, particle bea

  16. Fundamental aspects of plasma chemical physics Thermodynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Capitelli, Mario; D'Angola, Antonio

    2012-01-01

    Fundamental Aspects of Plasma Chemical Physics - Thermodynamics develops basic and advanced concepts of plasma thermodynamics from both classical and statistical points of view. After a refreshment of classical thermodynamics applied to the dissociation and ionization regimes, the book invites the reader to discover the role of electronic excitation in affecting the properties of plasmas, a topic often overlooked by the thermal plasma community. Particular attention is devoted to the problem of the divergence of the partition function of atomic species and the state-to-state approach for calculating the partition function of diatomic and polyatomic molecules. The limit of ideal gas approximation is also discussed, by introducing Debye-Huckel and virial corrections. Throughout the book, worked examples are given in order to clarify concepts and mathematical approaches. This book is a first of a series of three books to be published by the authors on fundamental aspects of plasma chemical physics.  The next bo...

  17. A methodology for the rigorous verification of plasma simulation codes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riva, Fabio

    2016-10-01

    The methodology used to assess the reliability of numerical simulation codes constitutes the Verification and Validation (V&V) procedure. V&V is composed by two separate tasks: the verification, which is a mathematical issue targeted to assess that the physical model is correctly solved, and the validation, which determines the consistency of the code results, and therefore of the physical model, with experimental data. In the present talk we focus our attention on the verification, which in turn is composed by the code verification, targeted to assess that a physical model is correctly implemented in a simulation code, and the solution verification, that quantifies the numerical error affecting a simulation. Bridging the gap between plasma physics and other scientific domains, we introduced for the first time in our domain a rigorous methodology for the code verification, based on the method of manufactured solutions, as well as a solution verification based on the Richardson extrapolation. This methodology was applied to GBS, a three-dimensional fluid code based on a finite difference scheme, used to investigate the plasma turbulence in basic plasma physics experiments and in the tokamak scrape-off layer. Overcoming the difficulty of dealing with a numerical method intrinsically affected by statistical noise, we have now generalized the rigorous verification methodology to simulation codes based on the particle-in-cell algorithm, which are employed to solve Vlasov equation in the investigation of a number of plasma physics phenomena.

  18. Fusion programs in applied plasma physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1992-02-01

    The objectives of the theoretical science program are: To support the interpretation of present experiments and predict the outcome of future planned experiments; to improve on existing models and codes and validate against experimental results; and to conduct theoretical physics development of advanced concepts with applications for DIII-D and future devices. Major accomplishments in FY91 include the corroboration between theory and experiment on MHD behavior in the second stable regime of operation on DIII-D, and the frequency and mode structure of toroidal Alfven eigenmodes in high beta, shaped plasmas. We have made significant advances in the development of the gyro-Landau fluid approach to turbulence simulation which more accurately models kinetic drive and damping mechanisms. Several theoretical models to explain the bifurcation phenomenon in L- to H-mode transition were proposed providing the theoretical basis for future experimental verification. The capabilities of new rf codes have been upgraded in response to the expanding needs of the rf experiments. Codes are being employed to plan for a fully non-inductive current drive experiment in a high beta, enhanced confinement regime. GA's experimental effort in Applied Physics encompasses two advanced diagnostics essential for the operation of future fusion experiments: Alpha particle diagnostic, and current and density profile diagnostics. This paper discusses research in all these topics.

  19. Report on the solar physics-plasma physics workshop

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sturrock, P. A.; Baum, P. J.; Beckers, J. M.; Newman, C. E.; Priest, E. R.; Rosenberg, H.; Smith, D. F.; Wentzel, D. G.

    1976-01-01

    The paper summarizes discussions held between solar physicists and plasma physicists on the interface between solar and plasma physics, with emphasis placed on the question of what laboratory experiments, or computer experiments, could be pursued to test proposed mechanisms involved in solar phenomena. Major areas discussed include nonthermal plasma on the sun, spectroscopic data needed in solar plasma diagnostics, types of magnetic field structures in the sun's atmosphere, the possibility of MHD phenomena involved in solar eruptive phenomena, the role of non-MHD instabilities in energy release in solar flares, particle acceleration in solar flares, shock waves in the sun's atmosphere, and mechanisms of radio emission from the sun.

  20. Structure and structure-preserving algorithms for plasma physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrison, P. J.

    2016-10-01

    Conventional simulation studies of plasma physics are based on numerically solving the underpinning differential (or integro-differential) equations. Usual algorithms in general do not preserve known geometric structure of the physical systems, such as the local energy-momentum conservation law, Casimir invariants, and the symplectic structure (Poincaré invariants). As a consequence, numerical errors may accumulate coherently with time and long-term simulation results may be unreliable. Recently, a series of geometric algorithms that preserve the geometric structures resulting from the Hamiltonian and action principle (HAP) form of theoretical models in plasma physics have been developed by several authors. The superiority of these geometric algorithms has been demonstrated with many test cases. For example, symplectic integrators for guiding-center dynamics have been constructed to preserve the noncanonical symplectic structures and bound the energy-momentum errors for all simulation time-steps; variational and symplectic algorithms have been discovered and successfully applied to the Vlasov-Maxwell system, MHD, and other magnetofluid equations as well. Hamiltonian truncations of the full Vlasov-Maxwell system have opened the field of discrete gyrokinetics and led to the GEMPIC algorithm. The vision that future numerical capabilities in plasma physics should be based on structure-preserving geometric algorithms will be presented. It will be argued that the geometric consequences of HAP form and resulting geometric algorithms suitable for plasma physics studies cannot be adapted from existing mathematical literature but, rather, need to be discovered and worked out by theoretical plasma physicists. The talk will review existing HAP structures of plasma physics for a variety of models, and how they have been adapted for numerical implementation. Supported by DOE DE-FG02-04ER-54742.

  1. Physics of quark-gluon plasma

    CERN Document Server

    Smilga, A V

    1997-01-01

    In this lecture, we give a brief review of what theorists now know, understand, or guess about static and kinetic properties of quark--gluon plasma. A particular attention is payed to the problem of physical observability, i.e. the physical meaningfulne ss of various characteristics of QGP discussed in the literature.

  2. Quantum Simulations of Physics Problems

    CERN Document Server

    Somma, R D; Knill, E; Gubernatis, J; Somma, Rolando; Ortiz, Gerardo; Knill, Emanuel; Gubernatis, James

    2003-01-01

    If a large Quantum Computer (QC) existed today, what type of physical problems could we efficiently simulate on it that we could not simulate on a classical Turing machine? In this paper we argue that a QC could solve some relevant physical "questions" more efficiently. The existence of one-to-one mappings between different algebras of observables or between different Hilbert spaces allow us to represent and imitate any physical system by any other one (e.g., a bosonic system by a spin-1/2 system). We explain how these mappings can be performed showing quantum networks useful for the efficient evaluation of some physical properties, such as correlation functions and energy spectra.

  3. Multisymplectic Integration for Beam and Plasma Simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webb, Stephen; RadiaSoft, LLC Team

    2015-11-01

    Particle-in-cell methods are a standard tool for simulating charged particle systems such as fusion plasmas, intense beams, and laser- and beam-driven wakefield accelerators. Conventional methods have been successful in studying short-term dynamics, however numerical instabilities and artifacts such as grid heating make long-time simulations unreliable. A similar issue existed in single particle tracking for storage rings in the 1980s, which led to the development of symplectic algorithms. The essential insight that if the physical equations of motion derive from a least-action principle, then so too should the numerical equations of motion. The resulting update sequence preserves a symplectic 2-form, which is a strong constraint on the numerical solutions. The resulting algorithms are stable and accurate over very long simulation times. This same structure exists for field theories as well as single-particle dynamics. Such multisymplectic integrators have good stability properties and naturally encode conservation laws, making them ideal for simulations over many oscillations of the system. We present here a number of examples where multisymplectic algorithms have been used over very long time scales. This work was sponsored by the Air Force Office of Scientific Research, Young Investigator Program, under contract no. FA9550-15-C-0031. Distribution Statement A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited.

  4. High heat flux plasma generator for new divertor plasma simulator in Nagoya University

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Narita, S.; Ezumi, N.; Ohno, N.; Uesugi, Y.; Takamura, S. [Nagoya Univ. (Japan)

    1997-12-31

    A new divertor simulator called NAGDIS-II has been constructed in order to investigate edge plasma physics in fusion devices. Improved TP-D type plasma source, which consists of LaB{sub 6} cathode with a Mo hollow shield and external heating system, water-cooled intermediate electrode and anode was employed to make a high density plasma in the NAGDIS-II. The performance and reliability of the discharge system was confirmed by quantitatively measuring neutral pressure, heating efficiency and plasma parameters. (author)

  5. Progress in Anisotropic Plasma Physics

    CERN Document Server

    Romatschke, P; Romatschke, Paul; Strickland, Michael

    2004-01-01

    In 1959 Weibel demonstrated that when a QED plasma has a temperature anisotropy there exist unstable transverse magnetic excitations which grow exponentially fast. In this paper we will review how to determine the growth rates for these unstable modes in the weak-coupling and ultrarelativistic limits in which the collective behavior is describable in terms are so-called "hard-loops". We will show that in this limit QCD is subject to instabilities which are analogous to the Weibel instability in QED. The presence of such instabilities dominates the early time evolution of a highly anisotropic plasma; however, at longer times it is expected that these instabilities will saturate (condense). I will discuss how the presence of non-linear interactions between the gluons complicates the determination of the saturated state. In order to discuss this I present the generalization of the Braaten-Pisarski isotropic hard-thermal-loop effective action to a system with a temperature anisotropy in the parton distribution fu...

  6. Fundamental aspects of plasma chemical physics transport

    CERN Document Server

    Capitelli, Mario; Laricchiuta, Annarita

    2013-01-01

    Fundamental Aspects of Plasma Chemical Physics: Tranpsort develops basic and advanced concepts of plasma transport to the modern treatment of the Chapman-Enskog method for the solution of the Boltzmann transport equation. The book invites the reader to consider actual problems of the transport of thermal plasmas with particular attention to the derivation of diffusion- and viscosity-type transport cross sections, stressing the role of resonant charge-exchange processes in affecting the diffusion-type collision calculation of viscosity-type collision integrals. A wide range of topics is then discussed including (1) the effect of non-equilibrium vibrational distributions on the transport of vibrational energy, (2) the role of electronically excited states in the transport properties of thermal plasmas, (3) the dependence of transport properties on the multitude of Saha equations for multi-temperature plasmas, and (4) the effect of the magnetic field on transport properties. Throughout the book, worked examples ...

  7. Interface for Physics Simulation Engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damer, Bruce

    2007-01-01

    DSS-Prototyper is an open-source, realtime 3D virtual environment software that supports design simulation for the new Vision for Space Exploration (VSE). This is a simulation of NASA's proposed Robotic Lunar Exploration Program, second mission (RLEP2). It simulates the Lunar Surface Access Module (LSAM), which is designed to carry up to four astronauts to the lunar surface for durations of a week or longer. This simulation shows the virtual vehicle making approaches and landings on a variety of lunar terrains. The physics of the descent engine thrust vector, production of dust, and the dynamics of the suspension are all modeled in this set of simulations. The RLEP2 simulations are drivable (by keyboard or joystick) virtual rovers with controls for speed and motor torque, and can be articulated into higher or lower centers of gravity (depending on driving hazards) to enable drill placement. Gravity also can be set to lunar, terrestrial, or zero-g. This software has been used to support NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center in simulations of proposed vehicles for robotically exploring the lunar surface for water ice, and could be used to model all other aspects of the VSE from the Ares launch vehicles and Crew Exploration Vehicle (CEV) to the International Space Station (ISS). This simulator may be installed and operated on any Windows PC with an installed 3D graphics card.

  8. A multi-model plasma simulation of collisionless magnetic reconnection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Datta, I. A. M.; Shumlak, U.; Ho, A.; Miller, S. T.

    2016-10-01

    Collisionless magnetic reconnection is a process relevant to many areas of plasma physics in which energy stored in magnetic fields within highly conductive plasmas is rapidly converted to plasma energy. A full understanding of this phenomenon, however, is currently incomplete as models developed to date have difficulty explaining the fast reconnection rates often seen in nature, such as in the case of solar flares. Therefore, this behavior represents an area of much research in which various plasma models have been tested in order to understand the proper physics explaining the reconnection process. In this research, the WARPXM code developed at the University of Washington is used to study the problem using a hybrid multi-model simulation employing Hall-MHD and two-fluid plasma models. The simulation is performed on a decomposed domain where different plasma models are solved in different regions, depending on a trade-off between each model's physical accuracy and associated computational expense in each region. The code employs a discontinuous Galerkin (DG) finite element spatial discretization coupled with a Runge-Kutta scheme for time advancement and uses boundary conditions to couple the different plasma models. This work is supported by a Grant from the United States Air Force Office of Scientific Research.

  9. Plasma physics of extreme astrophysical environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uzdensky, Dmitri A; Rightley, Shane

    2014-03-01

    Among the incredibly diverse variety of astrophysical objects, there are some that are characterized by very extreme physical conditions not encountered anywhere else in the Universe. Of special interest are ultra-magnetized systems that possess magnetic fields exceeding the critical quantum field of about 44 TG. There are basically only two classes of such objects: magnetars, whose magnetic activity is manifested, e.g., via their very short but intense gamma-ray flares, and central engines of supernovae (SNe) and gamma-ray bursts (GRBs)--the most powerful explosions in the modern Universe. Figuring out how these complex systems work necessarily requires understanding various plasma processes, both small-scale kinetic and large-scale magnetohydrodynamic (MHD), that govern their behavior. However, the presence of an ultra-strong magnetic field modifies the underlying basic physics to such a great extent that relying on conventional, classical plasma physics is often not justified. Instead, plasma-physical problems relevant to these extreme astrophysical environments call for constructing relativistic quantum plasma (RQP) physics based on quantum electrodynamics (QED). In this review, after briefly describing the astrophysical systems of interest and identifying some of the key plasma-physical problems important to them, we survey the recent progress in the development of such a theory. We first discuss the ways in which the presence of a super-critical field modifies the properties of vacuum and matter and then outline the basic theoretical framework for describing both non-relativistic and RQPs. We then turn to some specific astrophysical applications of relativistic QED plasma physics relevant to magnetar magnetospheres and to central engines of core-collapse SNe and long GRBs. Specifically, we discuss the propagation of light through a magnetar magnetosphere; large-scale MHD processes driving magnetar activity and responsible for jet launching and propagation in

  10. Plasma physics of extreme astrophysical environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uzdensky, Dmitri A.; Rightley, Shane

    2014-03-01

    Among the incredibly diverse variety of astrophysical objects, there are some that are characterized by very extreme physical conditions not encountered anywhere else in the Universe. Of special interest are ultra-magnetized systems that possess magnetic fields exceeding the critical quantum field of about 44 TG. There are basically only two classes of such objects: magnetars, whose magnetic activity is manifested, e.g., via their very short but intense gamma-ray flares, and central engines of supernovae (SNe) and gamma-ray bursts (GRBs)—the most powerful explosions in the modern Universe. Figuring out how these complex systems work necessarily requires understanding various plasma processes, both small-scale kinetic and large-scale magnetohydrodynamic (MHD), that govern their behavior. However, the presence of an ultra-strong magnetic field modifies the underlying basic physics to such a great extent that relying on conventional, classical plasma physics is often not justified. Instead, plasma-physical problems relevant to these extreme astrophysical environments call for constructing relativistic quantum plasma (RQP) physics based on quantum electrodynamics (QED). In this review, after briefly describing the astrophysical systems of interest and identifying some of the key plasma-physical problems important to them, we survey the recent progress in the development of such a theory. We first discuss the ways in which the presence of a super-critical field modifies the properties of vacuum and matter and then outline the basic theoretical framework for describing both non-relativistic and RQPs. We then turn to some specific astrophysical applications of relativistic QED plasma physics relevant to magnetar magnetospheres and to central engines of core-collapse SNe and long GRBs. Specifically, we discuss the propagation of light through a magnetar magnetosphere; large-scale MHD processes driving magnetar activity and responsible for jet launching and propagation in

  11. Plasma Physics Approximations in Ares

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Managan, R. A.

    2015-01-08

    Lee & More derived analytic forms for the transport properties of a plasma. Many hydro-codes use their formulae for electrical and thermal conductivity. The coefficients are complex functions of Fermi-Dirac integrals, Fn( μ/θ ), the chemical potential, μ or ζ = ln(1+e μ/θ ), and the temperature, θ = kT. Since these formulae are expensive to compute, rational function approximations were fit to them. Approximations are also used to find the chemical potential, either μ or ζ . The fits use ζ as the independent variable instead of μ/θ . New fits are provided for Aα (ζ ),Aβ (ζ ), ζ, f(ζ ) = (1 + e-μ/θ)F1/2(μ/θ), F1/2'/F1/2, Fcα, and Fcβ. In each case the relative error of the fit is minimized since the functions can vary by many orders of magnitude. The new fits are designed to exactly preserve the limiting values in the non-degenerate and highly degenerate limits or as ζ→ 0 or ∞. The original fits due to Lee & More and George Zimmerman are presented for comparison.

  12. Laboratory plasma physics experiments using merging supersonic plasma jets

    OpenAIRE

    Hsu, S C; Moser, A. L.; Merritt, E. C.; Adams, C. S.; Dunn, J. P.; Brockington, S.; Case, A; Gilmore, M.; Lynn, A. G.; Messer, S. J.; Witherspoon, F. D.

    2014-01-01

    We describe a laboratory plasma physics experiment at Los Alamos National Laboratory that uses two merging supersonic plasma jets formed and launched by pulsed-power-driven rail guns. The jets can be formed using any atomic species or mixture available in a compressed-gas bottle and have the following nominal initial parameters at the railgun nozzle exit: $n_e\\approx n_i \\sim 10^{16}$ cm$^{-3}$, $T_e \\approx T_i \\approx 1.4$ eV, $V_{\\rm jet}\\approx 30$-100 km/s, mean charge $\\bar{Z}\\approx 1$...

  13. Hadron therapy physics and simulations

    CERN Document Server

    d’Ávila Nunes, Marcos

    2014-01-01

    This brief provides an in-depth overview of the physics of hadron therapy, ranging from the history to the latest contributions to the subject. It covers the mechanisms of protons and carbon ions at the molecular level (DNA breaks and proteins 53BP1 and RPA), the physics and mathematics of accelerators (Cyclotron and Synchrotron), microdosimetry measurements (with new results so far achieved), and Monte Carlo simulations in hadron therapy using FLUKA (CERN) and MCHIT (FIAS) software. The text also includes information about proton therapy centers and carbon ion centers (PTCOG), as well as a comparison and discussion of both techniques in treatment planning and radiation monitoring. This brief is suitable for newcomers to medical physics as well as seasoned specialists in radiation oncology.

  14. Lunar Dust and Dusty Plasma Physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Thomas L.

    2009-01-01

    In the plasma and radiation environment of space, small dust grains from the Moon s surface can become charged. This has the consequence that their motion is determined by electromagnetic as well as gravitational forces. The result is a plasma-like condition known as "dusty plasmas" with the consequence that lunar dust can migrate and be transported by magnetic, electric, and gravitational fields into places where heavier, neutral debris cannot. Dust on the Moon can exhibit unusual behavior, being accelerated into orbit by electrostatic surface potentials as blow-off dust, or being swept away by moving magnetic fields like the solar wind as pick-up dust. Hence, lunar dust must necessarily be treated as a dusty plasma subject to the physics of magnetohydrodynamics (MHD). A review of this subject has been given before [1], but a synopsis will be presented here to make it more readily available for lunar scientists.

  15. Introduction to plasma physics and controlled fusion

    CERN Document Server

    Chen, Francis F

    1984-01-01

    This complete introduction to plasma physics and controlled fusion by one of the pioneering scientists in this expanding field offers both a simple and intuitive discussion of the basic concepts of this subject and an insight into the challenging problems of current research. In a wholly lucid manner the work covers single-particle motions, fluid equations for plasmas, wave motions, diffusion and resistivity, Landau damping, plasma instabilities and nonlinear problems. For students, this outstanding text offers a painless introduction to this important field; for teachers, a large collection of problems; and for researchers, a concise review of the fundamentals as well as original treatments of a number of topics never before explained so clearly. This revised edition contains new material on kinetic effects, including Bernstein waves and the plasma dispersion function, and on nonlinear wave equations and solitons.

  16. Contribution to numerical simulation for fluid flow, electromagnetism and plasma physics; Contribution aux methodes numeriques pour la simulation d'ecoulements de fluides, d'electromagnetisme et de physique des plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salmon, St

    2008-07-01

    This work is made of 2 distinct parts. The first part is dedicated to 2 formulations of the Stokes's problem: a classical presentation in the (current, vortex) plane and a new one in the (vortex, speed, pressure) space with an extension for 3-dimensional calculations. The second part is dedicated to different solving of the Vlasov equations coupled with Maxwell equations: the semi-Lagrangian method and the finite element method. This system of equations drives the equilibrium and stability of magnetically confined fusion plasmas.

  17. Introduction to plasma physics and controlled fusion

    CERN Document Server

    Chen, Francis F

    2016-01-01

    The third edition of this classic text presents a complete introduction to plasma physics and controlled fusion, written by one of the pioneering scientists in this expanding field.  It offers both a simple and intuitive discussion of the basic concepts of the subject matter and an insight into the challenging problems of current research. This outstanding text offers students a painless introduction to this important field; for teachers, a large collection of problems; and for researchers, a concise review of the fundamentals as well as original treatments of a number of topics never before explained so clearly.  In a wholly lucid manner the second edition covered charged-particle motions, plasmas as fluids, kinetic theory, and nonlinear effects.  For the third edition, two new chapters have been added to incorporate discussion of more recent advances in the field.  The new chapter 9 on Special Plasmas covers non-neutral plasmas, pure electron plasmas, solid and ultra-cold plasmas, pair-ion plasmas, d...

  18. Simulation Tool for Dielectric Barrier Discharge Plasma Actuators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Likhanskii, Alexander

    2014-01-01

    Traditional approaches for active flow separation control using dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) plasma actuators are limited to relatively low speed flows and atmospheric conditions. This results in low feasibility of the DBDs for aerospace applications. For active flow control at turbine blades, fixed wings, and rotary wings and on hypersonic vehicles, DBD plasma actuators must perform at a wide range of conditions, including rarified flows and combustion mixtures. An efficient, comprehensive, physically based DBD simulation tool can optimize DBD plasma actuators for different operation conditions. Researchers are developing a DBD plasma actuator simulation tool for a wide range of ambient gas pressures. The tool will treat DBD using either kinetic, fluid, or hybrid models, depending on the DBD operational condition.

  19. Simulating the dynamics of complex plasmas

    CERN Document Server

    Schwabe, Mierk

    2014-01-01

    Complex plasmas are low-temperature plasmas that contain micrometer-size particles in addition to the neutral gas particles and the ions and electrons that make up the plasma. The microparticles interact strongly and display a wealth of collective effects. Here we report on linked numerical simulations that reproduce many of the experimental results of complex plasmas. We model a capacitively coupled plasma with a fluid code written for the commercial package comsol. The output of this model is used to calculate forces on microparticles. The microparticles are modeled using the molecular dynamics package lammps, which we extended to include the forces from the plasma. Using this method, we are able to reproduce void formation, the separation of particles of different sizes into layers, lane formation, vortex formation, and other effects.

  20. On Plasma Theory and Simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-09-26

    SHEATH REGION INCLUDING ION REFLECTION Lou Ann Schwager (Prof. C. K. Birdsall, Dr. I. Roth ) A low temperature plasma interacts with a collector plate...Hitchcock. Katz. Lankford. Nelson. Barnes. Borovsky. Forslund. Kwan. Sadowski Lindemuth. Mason . Mostrom. Nielson, Oliphant. Sgro. Thode Department of

  1. Theoretical and Experimental Beam Plasma Physics (TEBPP)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, B.

    1986-01-01

    The theoretical and experimental beam plasma physics (TEBPP) consists of a package of five instruments to measure electric and magnetic fields, plasma density and temperature, neutral density, photometric emissions, and energetic particle spectra during firings of the particle injector (SEPAC) electron beam. The package is developed on a maneuverable boom (or RMS) and is used to measure beam characteristics and induced perturbations field ( 10 m) and mid field ( 10 m to 100 m) along the electron beam. The TEBPP package will be designed to investigate induced oscillations and induced electromagnetic mode waves, neutral and ion density and temperature effects, and beam characteristics as a function of axial distance.

  2. PREFACE: 31st European Physical Society Conference on Plasma Physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dendy, Richard

    2004-12-01

    This special issue of Plasma Physics and Controlled Fusion comprises refereed papers contributed by invited speakers at the 31st European Physical Society Conference on Plasma Physics. The conference was jointly hosted by the Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, by the EURATOM/UKAEA Fusion Association and by Imperial College London, where it took place from 28 June to 2 July 2004. The overall agenda for this conference was set by the Board of the Plasma Physics Division of the European Physical Society, chaired by Friedrich Wagner (MPIPP, Garching) and his successor Jo Lister (CRPP, Lausanne). It built on developments in recent years, by further increasing the scientific diversity of the conference programme, whilst maintaining its depth and quality. A correspondingly diverse Programme Committee was set up, whose members are listed below. The final task of the Programme Committee has been the preparation of this special issue. In carrying out this work, as in preparing the scientific programme of the conference, the Programme Committee formed specialist subcommittees representing the different fields of plasma science. The chairmen of these subcommittees, in particular, accepted a very heavy workload on behalf of their respective research communities. It is a great pleasure to take this opportunity to thank: Emilia R Solano (CIEMAT, Madrid), magnetic confinement fusion; Jürgen Meyer-ter-Vehn (MPQ, Garching), laser-plasma interaction and beam plasma physics; and Jean-Luc Dorier (CRPP, Lausanne), dusty plasmas. The relatively few papers in astrophysical and basic plasma physics were co-ordinated by a small subcommittee which I led. Together with Peter Norreys (RAL, Chilton), we five constitute the editorial team for this special issue. The extensive refereeing load, compressed into a short time interval, was borne by the Programme Committee members and by many other experts, to whom this special issue owes much. We are also grateful to the Local Organizing Committee

  3. Simulating Magnetized Laboratory Plasmas with Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, Jeffrey N. [Univ. of California, Davis, CA (United States)

    2009-01-01

    The creation of plasmas in the laboratory continues to generate excitement in the physics community. Despite the best efforts of the intrepid plasma diagnostics community, the dynamics of these plasmas remains a difficult challenge to both the theorist and the experimentalist. This dissertation describes the simulation of strongly magnetized laboratory plasmas with Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics (SPH), a method born of astrophysics but gaining broad support in the engineering community. We describe the mathematical formulation that best characterizes a strongly magnetized plasma under our circumstances of interest, and we review the SPH method and its application to astrophysical plasmas based on research by Phillips [1], Buerve [2], and Price and Monaghan [3]. Some modifications and extensions to this method are necessary to simulate terrestrial plasmas, such as a treatment of magnetic diffusion based on work by Brookshaw [4] and by Atluri [5]; we describe these changes as we turn our attention toward laboratory experiments. Test problems that verify the method are provided throughout the discussion. Finally, we apply our method to the compression of a magnetized plasma performed by the Compact Toroid Injection eXperiment (CTIX) [6] and show that the experimental results support our computed predictions.

  4. BOOK REVIEW: Controlled Fusion and Plasma Physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engelmann, F.

    2007-07-01

    This new book by Kenro Miyamoto provides an up-to-date overview of the status of fusion research and the important parts of the underlying plasma physics at a moment where, due to the start of ITER construction, an important step in fusion research has been made and many new research workers will enter the field. For them, and also for interested graduate students and physicists in other fields, the book provides a good introduction into fusion physics as, on the whole, the presentation of the material is quite appropriate for getting acquainted with the field on the basis of just general knowledge in physics. There is overlap with Miyamoto's earlier book Plasma Physics for Nuclear Fusion (MIT Press, Cambridge, USA, 1989) but only in a few sections on subjects which have not evolved since. The presentation is subdivided into two parts of about equal length. The first part, following a concise survey of the physics basis of thermonuclear fusion and of plasmas in general, covers the various magnetic configurations studied for plasma confinement (tokamak; reversed field pinch; stellarator; mirror-type geometries) and introduces the specific properties of plasmas in these devices. Plasma confinement in tokamaks is treated in particular detail, in compliance with the importance of this field in fusion research. This includes a review of the ITER concept and of the rationale for the choice of ITER's parameters. In the second part, selected topics in fusion plasma physics (macroscopic instabilities; propagation of waves; kinetic effects such as energy transfer between waves and particles including microscopic instabilities as well as plasma heating and current drive; transport phenomena induced by turbulence) are presented systematically. While the emphasis is on displaying the essential physics, deeper theoretical analysis is also provided here. Every chapter is complemented by a few related problems, but only partial hints for their solution are given. A selection of

  5. Plasma crystals: experiments and simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piel, A.

    2017-01-01

    Dusty plasmas are a well accessible system to study crystallization of charged-particle systems at room temperature. The large mass compared to atomic particles dramatically slows down the particle velocities. The high transparency of the system allows to trace simultaneously the motion of all particles with quasi-atomic resolution. After a brief overview, the progress in this field is exemplified by studies of spherical three-dimensional plasma crystals, the so-called Yukawa balls. The static structure and eigenmodes are explained in simple terms. It is shown that shielding modifies the expansion of a Yukawa ball from a self-similar explosion to a continuous ablation process that starts at the surface. The experimental progress with three-dimensional diagnostics and laser heating and sophisticated methods for visualising the order inside the shell structure are described. Together with quantifying the diffusion coefficient these investigations reveal the details of the solid-liquid phase transition. Besides thermodynamic aspects, the liquid phase of dusty plasmas also gives access to hydrodynamic phenomena at the individual particle scale.

  6. 15th International Congress on Plasma Physics & 13th Latin American Workshop on Plasma Physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soto, Leopoldo

    2014-05-01

    The International Advisory Committee of the 15th International Congress on Plasma Physics (ICPP 2010) and the International Advisory Committee of the 13th Latin American Workshop on Plasma Physics (LAWPP 2010), together agreed to carry out this combined meeting ICPP-LAWPP-2010 in Santiago de Chile, 8-13 August 2010, on occasion of the Bicentennial of Chilean Independence. The ICPP-LAWPP-2010 was organized by the Thermonuclear Plasma Department of the Chilean Nuclear Energy Commission (CCHEN) as part of the official program within the framework of the Chilean Bicentennial. The event was also a scientific and academic activity of the project ''Center for Research and Applications in Plasma Physics and Pulsed Power, P4'', supported by National Scientific and Technological Commission, CONICYT-Chile, under grant ACT-26. The International Congress on Plasma Physics was first held in Nagoya, in 1980, and followed by the Congresses: Gothenburg (1982), Lausanne (1984), Kiev (1987), New Delhi (1989), Innsbruck (1992), Foz do Iguacu (1994), Nagoya (1996), Prague (1998), Quebec City (2000), Sydney (2002), Nice (2004), Kiev (2006), and Fukuoka (2008). The purpose of the Congress is to discuss the recent progress and future views in plasma science, including fundamental plasma physics, fusion plasmas, astrophysical plasmas, and plasma applications, and so forth. The Latin American Workshop on Plasma Physics was first held in 1982 in Cambuquira, Brazil, followed by the Workshops: Medellín (1985), Santiago (1988), Buenos Aires (1990), Mexico City (1992), Foz do Iguacu (1994, also combined with ICPP), Caracas (1997), Tandil (1998), La Serena (2000), Sao Pedro (2003), Mexico City (2005), and Caracas (2007). The Latin American Workshop on Plasma Physics is a communication forum of the achievements of the plasma-physics regional community, fostering collaboration between plasma scientists within the region and elsewhere. The program of the ICPP-LAWPP-2010 included the topics

  7. Simulation of the Physics of Flight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lane, W. Brian

    2013-01-01

    Computer simulations continue to prove to be a valuable tool in physics education. Based on the needs of an Aviation Physics course, we developed the PHYSics of FLIght Simulator (PhysFliS), which numerically solves Newton's second law for an airplane in flight based on standard aerodynamics relationships. The simulation can be used to pique…

  8. Simulation of the Physics of Flight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lane, W. Brian

    2013-01-01

    Computer simulations continue to prove to be a valuable tool in physics education. Based on the needs of an Aviation Physics course, we developed the PHYSics of FLIght Simulator (PhysFliS), which numerically solves Newton's second law for an airplane in flight based on standard aerodynamics relationships. The simulation can be used to pique…

  9. Paradigm transition in cosmic plasma physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alfven, H.

    1982-01-01

    New discoveries in cosmic plasma physics are described, and their applications to solar, interstellar, galactic, and cosmological problems are discussed. The new discoveries include the existence of double layers in magnetized plasmas and in the low magnetosphere, and energy transfer by electric current in the auroral circuit. It is argued that solar flares and the solar wind-magnetosphere interaction should not be interpreted in terms of magnetic merging theories, and that electric current needs to be explicitly taken account of in understanding these phenomena. The filamentary structure of cosmic plasmas may be caused by electric currents in space, and the pinch effect may have a central role to play in the evolutionary history of interstellar clouds, stars, and solar systems. Space may have a cellular structure, with the cell walls formed by thin electric current layers. Annihilation may be the source of energy for quasars and the Hubble expansion, and the big bang cosmology may well be wrong.

  10. Fractal structures in nonlinear plasma physics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viana, R L; da Silva, E C; Kroetz, T; Caldas, I L; Roberto, M; Sanjuán, M A F

    2011-01-28

    Fractal structures appear in many situations related to the dynamics of conservative as well as dissipative dynamical systems, being a manifestation of chaotic behaviour. In open area-preserving discrete dynamical systems we can find fractal structures in the form of fractal boundaries, associated to escape basins, and even possessing the more general property of Wada. Such systems appear in certain applications in plasma physics, like the magnetic field line behaviour in tokamaks with ergodic limiters. The main purpose of this paper is to show how such fractal structures have observable consequences in terms of the transport properties in the plasma edge of tokamaks, some of which have been experimentally verified. We emphasize the role of the fractal structures in the understanding of mesoscale phenomena in plasmas, such as electromagnetic turbulence.

  11. Fundamental aspects of plasma chemical physics kinetics

    CERN Document Server

    Capitelli, Mario; Colonna, Gianpiero; Esposito, Fabrizio; Gorse, Claudine; Hassouni, Khaled; Laricchiuta, Annarita; Longo, Savino

    2016-01-01

    Describing non-equilibrium "cold" plasmas through a chemical physics approach, this book uses the state-to-state plasma kinetics, which considers each internal state as a new species with its own cross sections. Extended atomic and molecular master equations are coupled with Boltzmann and Monte Carlo methods to solve the electron energy distribution function. Selected examples in different applied fields, such as microelectronics, fusion, and aerospace, are presented and discussed including the self-consistent kinetics in RF parallel plate reactors, the optimization of negative ion sources and the expansion of high enthalpy flows through nozzles of different geometries. The book will cover the main aspects of the state-to-state kinetic approach for the description of nonequilibrium cold plasmas, illustrating the more recent achievements in the development of kinetic models including the self-consistent coupling of master equations and Boltzmann equation for electron dynamics. To give a complete portrayal, the...

  12. Symbolic Vector Analysis in Plasma Physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qin, H.; Tang, W.M.; Rewoldt, G.

    1997-10-09

    Many problems in plasma physics involve substantial amounts of analytical vector calculation. The complexity usually originates from both the vector operations themselves and the choice of underlying coordinate system. A computer algebra package for symbolic vector analysis in general coordinate systems, General Vector Analysis (GVA), is developed using Mathematica. The modern viewpoint for 3D vector calculus, differential forms on 3-manifolds, is adopted to unify and systematize the vector calculus operations in general coordinate systems. This package will benefit physicists and applied mathematicians in their research where complicated vector analysis is required. It will not only save a huge amount of human brain-power and dramatically improve accuracy, but this package will also be an intelligent tool to assist researchers in finding the right approaches to their problems. Several applications of this symbolic vector analysis package to plasma physics are also given.

  13. Symbolic Vector Analysis in Plasma Physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qin, H.; Rewoldt, G.; Tang, W.M.

    1997-10-01

    Many problems in plasma physics involve substantial amounts of analytical vector calculation. The complexity usually originates from both the vector operations themselves and the choice of underlying coordinate system. A computer algebra package for symbolic vector analysis in general coordinate systems, GeneralVectorAnalysis (GVA), is developed using Mathematica. The modern viewpoint for 3D vector calculus, differential forms on 3-manifolds, is adopted to unify and systematize the vector calculus operations in general coordinate systems. This package will benefit physicists and applied mathematicians in their research where complicated vector analysis is required. It will not only save a huge amount of human brain-power and dramatically improve accuracy, but this package will also be an intelligent tool to assist researchers in finding the right approaches to their problems. Several applications of this symbolic vector analysis package to plasma physics are also given.

  14. Physics issues in long pulse plasma confinement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Itoh, Kimitaka; Toda, Shinichiro; Sanuki, Heiji [National Institute for Fusion Science, Toki, Gifu (Japan); Itoh, Sanae-I; Yagi, Masatoshi [Research Institute for Applied Mechanics, Kyushu University, Kasuga, Fukuoka (Japan); Fukuyama, Atsushi [Department of Nuclear Engineering, Kyoto University, Kyoto (Japan)

    2000-07-01

    Physics in the steady-state or long time discharge are illustrated from the view point of generic toroidal plasmas. Issues include physics process with very long time scale, dynamical phenomena of various time scales, transition nature under very slow temporal variations of parameters, statistical occurrence of transition and life time and identification of minimum circulating power. Nonlinear dependencies of transport properties of density, temperature, current, electric field and poloidal magnetic field cause self-organized dynamics. A picture of stationary oscillatory states is presented from a unified picture of nonlinear limit cycle dynamics. It is emphasized that the long time asymptotics are determined by the structure formation mechanisms. The sustainment needs a circulating power, and the circulating power in steady state plasma is also discussed. (author)

  15. Computational Simulation of High Energy Density Plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-10-30

    the imploding liner. The PFS depends on a lithium barrier foil slowing the advance of deuterium up the coaxial gun to the corner. There the plasma ...the coaxial gun section, and Figure 4 shows the physical state of the plasma just prior to pinch. Figure 5 shows neutron yield reaching 1014 in this...details the channel geometry between the center cylinder and coaxial gas gun . The deuterium injection starts when the pressure of the deuterium gas in

  16. The role of magnetohydrodynamics in heliospheric space plasma physics research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dryer, Murray; Smith, Zdenka Kopal; Wu, Shi Tsan

    1988-01-01

    Magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) is a fairly recent extension of the field of fluid mechanics. While much remains to be done, it has successfully been applied to the contemporary field of heliospheric space plasma research to evaluate the 'macroscopic picture' of some vital topics via the use of conducting fluid equations and numerical modeling and simulations. Some representative examples from solar and interplanetary physics are described to demonstrate that the continuum approach to global problems (while keeping in mind the assumptions and limitations therein) can be very successful in providing insight and large scale interpretations of otherwise intractable problems in space physics.

  17. Computer simulation of complexity in plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hayashi, Takaya; Sato, Tetsuya [National Inst. for Fusion Science, Toki, Gifu (Japan)

    1998-08-01

    By making a comprehensive comparative study of many self-organizing phenomena occurring in magnetohydrodynamics and kinetic plasmas, we came up with a hypothetical grand view of self-organization. This assertion is confirmed by a recent computer simulation for a broader science field, specifically, the structure formation of short polymer chains, where the nature of the interaction is completely different from that of plasmas. It is found that the formation of the global orientation order proceeds stepwise. (author)

  18. Theory and Simulations of Solar System Plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldstein, Melvyn L.

    2011-01-01

    "Theory and simulations of solar system plasmas" aims to highlight results from microscopic to global scales, achieved by theoretical investigations and numerical simulations of the plasma dynamics in the solar system. The theoretical approach must allow evidencing the universality of the phenomena being considered, whatever the region is where their role is studied; at the Sun, in the solar corona, in the interplanetary space or in planetary magnetospheres. All possible theoretical issues concerning plasma dynamics are welcome, especially those using numerical models and simulations, since these tools are mandatory whenever analytical treatments fail, in particular when complex nonlinear phenomena are at work. Comparative studies for ongoing missions like Cassini, Cluster, Demeter, Stereo, Wind, SDO, Hinode, as well as those preparing future missions and proposals, like, e.g., MMS and Solar Orbiter, are especially encouraged.

  19. EDITORIAL 37th European Physical Society Conference on Plasma Physics 37th European Physical Society Conference on Plasma Physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendonça, Tito; Hidalgo, Carlos

    2010-12-01

    Introduction We are very pleased to present this special issue of Plasma Physics and Controlled Fusion dedicated to another annual EPS Plasma Physics Division Conference. It contains the invited papers of the 37th Conference, which was held at the Helix Arts Centre of the Dublin City University Campus, in Dublin, Ireland, from 21 to 25 June 2010. It was locally organized by a team drawn from different Irish institutions, led by Dublin City University and Queen's University Belfast. This team was coordinated by Professor Miles Turner (DCU), with the help of Dr Deborah O'Connell (QUB) as Scientific Secretary, and Ms Samantha Fahy (DCU) as Submissions Secretary. It attracted a large number of delegates (nearly 750), coming from 37 countries. Our Irish hosts provided an excellent atmosphere for the conference and social programme, very helpful for promoting personal links between conference participants. The Conference hosted three satellite meetings, and two special evening sessions. The satellite meetings were the Third Workshop on Plasma for Environmental Issues, the International Workshop on the Role of Arcing and Hot Spots in Magnetic Fusion Devices, and the Workshop on Electric Fields, Turbulence and Self-Organization in Magnetic Plasmas. The aim of this annual EPS Conference is to bring together the different communities of plasma physicists, in order to stimulate cross-collaboration and to promote in an integrated way this area of science. As in previous Conferences, we tried to attract the more relevant researchers and to present the latest developments in plasma physics and related areas. The Programme Committee was divided into four sub-committees, representing the main areas of plasma science. These four areas were magnetic confinement fusion (MCF), still the dominant area of this Conference with the largest number of participants, beam plasma and inertial fusion (BPIF), low temperature plasmas (LTP), which attracted a significant and growing number of

  20. DEVELOPMENT OF MULTI-COORDINATE VOCABULARY, PLASMA PHYSICS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    LERNER, RITA G.

    DESCRIBED IS THE DEVELOPMENT OF A THESAURUS FOR THE FIELD OF PLASMA PHYSICS, SIMILAR TO THE ONE PREVIOUSLY DEVELOPED FOR CHEMICAL PHYSICS, FOR USE WITH COMPUTER-ORIENTED RETRIEVAL SYSTEMS. AN EXPERT IN THE FIELD OF PLASMA PHYSICS SELECTED TERMS IMPORTANT TO THE INFORMATION USER FROM THE PLASMA LITERATURE. THE HIERARCHY OF CLASSIFICATION UTILIZES…

  1. plasmaFoam: An OpenFOAM framework for computational plasma physics and chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venkattraman, Ayyaswamy; Verma, Abhishek Kumar

    2016-09-01

    As emphasized in the 2012 Roadmap for low temperature plasmas (LTP), scientific computing has emerged as an essential tool for the investigation and prediction of the fundamental physical and chemical processes associated with these systems. While several in-house and commercial codes exist, with each having its own advantages and disadvantages, a common framework that can be developed by researchers from all over the world will likely accelerate the impact of computational studies on advances in low-temperature plasma physics and chemistry. In this regard, we present a finite volume computational toolbox to perform high-fidelity simulations of LTP systems. This framework, primarily based on the OpenFOAM solver suite, allows us to enhance our understanding of multiscale plasma phenomenon by performing massively parallel, three-dimensional simulations on unstructured meshes using well-established high performance computing tools that are widely used in the computational fluid dynamics community. In this talk, we will present preliminary results obtained using the OpenFOAM-based solver suite with benchmark three-dimensional simulations of microplasma devices including both dielectric and plasma regions. We will also discuss the future outlook for the solver suite.

  2. Relaunch of the Interactive Plasma Physics Educational Experience (IPPEX)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dominguez, A.; Rusaitis, L.; Zwicker, A.; Stotler, D. P.

    2015-11-01

    In the late 1990's PPPL's Science Education Department developed an innovative online site called the Interactive Plasma Physics Educational Experience (IPPEX). It featured (among other modules) two Java based applications which simulated tokamak physics: A steady state tokamak (SST) and a time dependent tokamak (TDT). The physics underlying the SST and the TDT are based on the ASPECT code which is a global power balance code developed to evaluate the performance of fusion reactor designs. We have relaunched the IPPEX site with updated modules and functionalities: The site itself is now dynamic on all platforms. The graphic design of the site has been modified to current standards. The virtual tokamak programming has been redone in Javascript, taking advantage of the speed and compactness of the code. The GUI of the tokamak has been completely redesigned, including more intuitive representations of changes in the plasma, e.g., particles moving along magnetic field lines. The use of GPU accelerated computation provides accurate and smooth visual representations of the plasma. We will present the current version of IPPEX as well near term plans of incorporating real time NSTX-U data into the simulation.

  3. Simulating strongly coupled plasmas at low temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bussmann, M.; Schramm, U.; Habs, D.

    2006-10-01

    Realistic molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of the particle dynamics in strongly coupled plasmas require the computation of the mutual Coulomb-force for each pair of charged particles if a correct treatment of long range correlations is required. For plasmas with N > 104 particles this requires a tremendous number of computational steps which can only be addressed using efficient parallel algorithms adopted to modern super-computers. We present a new versatile MD simulation code which can simulate the non-relativistic mutual Coulomb-interaction of a large number of charged particles in arbitrary external field configurations. A demanding application is the simulation of the complete dynamics of in-trap stopping of highly charged ions in a laser cooled plasma of N = 105 24Mg+ ions. We demonstrate that the simulation is capable of delivering results on stopping times and plasma dynamics under realistic conditions. The results suggest that this stopping scheme can compete with in-trap electron cooling and might be an alternative approach for delivering ultra cold highly charged ions for future trap-based experiments aiming for precision mass measurements of stable and radioactive nuclei.

  4. Statistical Physics Experiments Using Dusty Plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goree, John

    2016-10-01

    Compared to other areas of physics research, Statistical Physics is heavily dominated by theory, with comparatively little experiment. One reason for the lack of experiments is the impracticality of tracking of individual atoms and molecules within a substance. Thus, there is a need for a different kind of experimental system, one where individual particles not only move stochastically as they collide with one another, but also are large enough to allow tracking. A dusty plasma can meet this need. A dusty plasma is a partially ionized gas containing small particles of solid matter. These micron-size particles gain thousands of electronic charges by collecting more electrons than ions. Their motions are dominated by Coulomb collisions with neighboring particles. In this so-called strongly coupled plasma, the dust particles self-organize in much the same way as atoms in a liquid or solid. Unlike atoms, however, these particles are large and slow, so that they can be tracked easily by video microscopy. Advantages of dusty plasma for experimental statistical physics research include particle tracking, lack of frictional contact with solid surfaces, and avoidance of overdamped motion. Moreover, the motion of a collection of dust particles can mimic an equilibrium system with a Maxwellian velocity distribution, even though the dust particles themselves are not truly in thermal equilibrium. Nonequilibrium statistical physics can be studied by applying gradients, for example by imposing a shear flow. In this talk I will review some of our recent experiments with shear flow. First, we performed the first experimental test to verify the Fluctuation Theorem for a shear flow, showing that brief violations of the Second Law of Thermodynamics occur with the predicted probabilities, for a small system. Second, we discovered a skewness of a shear-stress distribution in a shear flow. This skewness is a phenomenon that likely has wide applicability in nonequilibrium steady states

  5. A plasma formulary for physics, technology, and astrophysics

    CERN Document Server

    Diver, Declan

    2011-01-01

    Plasma physics has matured rapidly as a discipline, and now touches on many different research areas, including manufacturing processes. This collection of fundamental formulae and definitions in plasma physics is vital to anyone with an interest in plasmas or ionized gases, whether in physics, astronomy or engineering.Both theorists and experimentalists will find this book useful, as it incorporates the latest results and findings.The text treats astrophysical plasmas, fusion plasmas, industrial plasmas and low temperature plasmas as aspects of the same discipline - a unique approach made pos

  6. Simulations of Galaxy Cluster Collisions with a Dark Plasma Component

    CERN Document Server

    Sepp, Tiit; Heikinheimo, Matti; Hektor, Andi; Raidal, Martti; Spethmann, Christian; Tempel, Elmo; Veermäe, Hardi

    2016-01-01

    We present the results of N-body/smoothed particle hydrodynamics simulations of galaxy cluster collisions with a two component model of dark matter, which is assumed to consist of a predominant non-interacting dark matter component and a 20 percent mass fraction of dark plasma. Dark plasma is an intriguing form of interacting dark matter with an effective fluid-like behavior, which is well motivated by various theoretical particle physics models. We find that by choosing suitable simulation parameters, the observed distributions of dark matter in both the Bullet Cluster (1E 0657-558) and Abell 520 (MS 0451.5+0250) can be qualitatively reproduced. In particular, it is found that dark plasma forms an isolated mass clump in the Abell 520 system which cannot be explained by traditional models of dark matter, but has been detected in weak lensing observations.

  7. Plasma Simulation in the Multiphysics Object Oriented Simulation Environment MOOSE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shannon, Steven; Lindsay, Alex; Graves, David; Icenhour, Casey; Peterson, David; White, Scott

    2016-09-01

    MOOSE is an open source multiphysics solver developed by Idaho National Laboratory that is primarily used for the simulation of fission reactor systems; the framework is also well suited for the simulation of plasma systems given the development of appropriate modules not currently developed in the framework such as electromagnetic solvers, Boltzmann solvers, etc. It is structured for user development of application specific modules and is intended for both workstation level and high performance massively parallel environments. We have begun the development of plasma modules in the MOOSE environment and carried out preliminary simulation of the plasma/liquid interface to elucidate coupling mechanisms between these states using a fully coupled multiphysics model; these results agree well with PIC simulation of the same system and show strong response of plasma parameters with respect to electron reflection at the liquid surface. These results will be presented along with an overview of MOOSE and ongoing module development to extend capabilities to a broader set of research challenges in low temperature plasmas, with particular focus on RF and pulsed RF driven systems.

  8. Particle physics: Quantum simulation of fundamental physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zohar, Erez

    2016-06-01

    Gauge theories underpin the standard model of particle physics, but are difficult to study using conventional computational methods. An experimental quantum system opens up fresh avenues of investigation. See Letter p.516

  9. Plasma boundaries at Mars: a 3-D simulation study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Bößwetter

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available The interaction of the solar wind with the ionosphere of planet Mars is studied using a three-dimensional hybrid model. Mars has only a weak intrinsic magnetic field, and consequently its ionosphere is directly affected by the solar wind. The gyroradii of the solar wind protons are in the range of several hundred kilometers and therefore comparable with the characteristic scales of the interaction region. Different boundaries emerge from the interaction of the solar wind with the continuously produced ionospheric heavy-ion plasma, which could be identified as a bow shock (BS, ion composition boundary (ICB and magnetic pile up boundary (MPB, where the latter both turn out to coincide. The simulation results regarding the shape and position of these boundaries are in good agreement with the measurements made by Phobos-2 and MGS spacecraft. It is shown that the positions of these boundaries depend essentially on the ionospheric production rate, the solar wind ram pressure, and the often unconsidered electron temperature of the ionospheric heavy ion plasma. Other consequences are rays of planetary plasma in the tail and heavy ion plasma clouds, which are stripped off from the dayside ICB region by some instability.

    Key words. Magnetospheric physics (solar wind interactions with unmagnetized bodies – Space plasma physics (discontinuities; numerical simulation studies

  10. Stereoscopic Visualization of Plasma Simulation Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Samuel; Cardenas, Rosa; Kim, Charlson; Parker, Scott

    2000-10-01

    Large-scale three-dimensional simulation of realistic fusion and space plasmas generates massive amounts of raw numerical data. Scientific visualization is an important tool in the analysis of this data. Stereoscopic projection is a visualization technique allowing data to be presented spacialy with visual separation clues to indicate the relative depth of the data. This allows researchers to be able to see three-dimensional structures that are not easily shown in purely two-dimensional representations. We have implemented a low cost stereo projection system running from a linux based intel cluster. This system is used to display images created with the visualization package IBM Open Data Explorer (Open-DX). We will present results of our use of this technology in the study of various plasma phenomenon including the complex spacial nature of magnetic fields embedded in simulated spheromak plasma.

  11. Spectral Methods in Numerical Plasma Simulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Coutsias, E.A.; Hansen, F.R.; Huld, T.;

    1989-01-01

    An introduction is given to the use of spectral methods in numerical plasma simulation. As examples of the use of spectral methods, solutions to the two-dimensional Euler equations in both a simple, doubly periodic region, and on an annulus will be shown. In the first case, the solution is expanded...

  12. Hermes: Global plasma edge fluid turbulence simulations

    CERN Document Server

    Dudson, Ben

    2016-01-01

    The transport of heat and particles in the relatively collisional edge regions of magnetically confined plasmas is a scientifically challenging and technologically important problem. Understanding and predicting this transport requires the self-consistent evolution of plasma fluctuations, global profiles and flows, but the numerical tools capable of doing this in realistic (diverted) geometry are only now being developed. Here a 5-field reduced 2-fluid plasma model for the study of instabilities and turbulence in magnetised plasmas is presented, built on the BOUT++ framework. This cold ion model allows the evolution of global profiles, electric fields and flows on transport timescales, with flux-driven cross-field transport determined self-consistently by electromagnetic turbulence. Developments in the model formulation and numerical implementation are described, and simulations are performed in poloidally limited and diverted tokamak configurations.

  13. Physics of Collisional Plasmas Introduction to High-Frequency Discharges

    CERN Document Server

    Moisan, Michel

    2012-01-01

    The Physics of Collisional Plasmas deals with the plasma physics of interest to laboratory research and industrial applications, such as lighting, fabrication of microelectronics, destruction of greenhouse gases. Its emphasis is on explaining the physical mechanisms, rather than the detailed mathematical description and theoretical analysis. At the introductory level, it is important to convey the characteristic physical phenomena of plasmas, before addressing the ultimate formalism of kinetic theory, with its microscopic, statistical mechanics approach. To this aim, this text translates the physical phenomena into more tractable equations, using the hydrodynamic model; this considers the plasma as a fluid, in which the macroscopic physical parameters are the statistical averages of the microscopic (individual) parameters. This book is an introduction to the physics of collisional plasmas, as opposed to plasmas in space. It is intended for graduate students in physics and engineering . The first chapter intr...

  14. Hybrid Simulations of Pluto's Plasma Interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feyerabend, M.; Simon, S.; Motschmann, U.; Liuzzo, L.

    2016-12-01

    We study the interaction between Pluto and the solar wind at the time of the New Horizons (NH) flyby by applying a hybrid (kinetic ions, fluid electrons) simulation model. The use of a hybrid model is necessary since the gyroradii of the involved ion species are more than an order of magnitude larger than the obstacle to the solar wind and thus, Pluto's interaction region displays considerable asymmetries. We investigate the three-dimensional structure and extension of the various plasma signatures seen along the NH trajectory. Especially, we will constrain possible asymmetries in the shape of Pluto's bow shock, plasma tail and Plutopause (i.e., the boundary between the solar wind and the population of plutogenic ions) which may arise from the large ion gyroradii. Starting from the upstream solar wind parameters measured by NH, we investigate the dependency of these plasma signatures on the density of Pluto's ionosphere and on the solar wind ram pressure. We also include Pluto's largest moon Charon into the simulation model and study the simultaneous interaction between both bodies and the solar wind. Data from NH suggest that Charon mainly acts as a plasma absorber without an appreciable atmosphere. For various relative positions of Pluto and Charon, we investigate the deformation of Charon's wake when exposed to the inhomogeneous plasma flow in the Pluto interaction region, as well as a possible feedback of Charon on the structure of Pluto's induced magnetosphere.

  15. Simulation study of the plasma brake effect

    CERN Document Server

    Janhunen, Pekka

    2014-01-01

    The plasma brake is a thin negatively biased tether which has been proposed as an efficient concept for deorbiting satellites and debris objects from low Earth orbit. We simulate the interaction with the ionospheric plasma ram flow with the plasma brake tether by a high performance electrostatic particle in cell code to evaluate the thrust. The tether is assumed to be perpendicular to the flow. We perform runs for different tether voltage, magnetic field orientation and plasma ion mass. We show that a simple analytical thrust formula reproduces most of the simulation results well. The interaction with the tether and the plasma flow is laminar when the magnetic field is perpendicular to the tether and the flow. If the magnetic field is parallel to the tether, the behaviour is unstable and thrust is reduced by a modest factor. The case when the magnetic field is aligned with the flow can also be unstable, but does not result in notable thrust reduction. We also fix an error in an earlier reference. According to...

  16. Nonlinear PIC Simulations for Nonneutral Plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lapenta, Giovanni; Luca Delzanno, Gian; Finn, John M.

    2002-11-01

    We present nonlinear simulations of the low frequency dynamics of electrons in a Malmberg-Penning trap, including compressional and thermal effects [1,2]. First, we consider a 2D model where we assume the effective plasma length constant in time. In this framework, we further neglect the thermal effect on the velocity field, and show with the PIC code KANDINSKY that Penning traps could be used to perform geophysical fluid dynamics experiments [3]. We also observe that, due to the presence of the nonlinear m=1 instability, the initially hollow density profile becomes peaked, as in the experiments. Then, we show 2D results including thermal effects. In this case, the development of the m=1 instability is slowed since the equilibrium plasma length profile is closer to the integrable profile, namely the length profile for which there are no discrete unstable modes [4]. Finally, we present simulations of the 3D fluiddynamics model of Ref. [2]. In particular, we investigate the evolution of a m=1 perturbation for different electron temperatures, when compressional and thermal effects are included. [1] J.M. Finn, D. del-Castillo-Negrete, D.C. Barnes,Phys. Plasmas, 6, 3744, 1999. [2] G.G.M. Coppa, A. D'Angola, G.L. Delzanno, G. Lapenta, Phys. Plasmas, 8, 1133, 2001. [3] G.L. Delzanno, J.M. Finn, G. Lapenta, "Nonlinear Phase of the Compressional m=1 Diocotron Instability: Saturation and Analogy with Geophysical Fluid Dynamics", submitted to Phys. Plasmas. [4] G.L. Delzanno, V.I. Pariev, J.M. Finn, G. Lapenta, "Stability Analysis of Hollow Electron Columns Including Compression and Thermal Effects: Integrability Condition and Numerical Simulations", submitted to Phys. Plasmas.

  17. Physics of the quark - gluon plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2001-09-01

    This document gathers 31 contributions to the workshop on the physics of quark-gluon plasma that took place in Palaiseau in september 2001: 1) gamma production in heavy collisions, 2) BRAHMS, 3) experimental conference summary, 4) modelling relativistic nuclear collisions, 5) microscopic reaction dynamics at SPS and RHIC, 6) direct gamma and hard scattering at SPS, 7) soft physics at RHIC, 8) results from the STAR experiment, 9) quarkonia: experimental possibilities, 10) elliptic flow measurements with PHENIX, 11) charmonium production in p-A collisions, 12) anisotropic flow at the SPS and RHIC, 13) deciphering the space-time evolution of heavy ion collisions with correlation measurements, 14) 2-particle correlation at RHIC, 15) particle spectra at AGS, SPS and RHIC, 16) strangeness production in STAR, 17) strangeness production in Pb-Pb collisions at SPS, 18) heavy ion physics at CERN after 2000 and before LHC, 19) NEXUS guideline and theoretical consistency, 20) introduction to high p{sub T} physics at RHIC, 21) a novel quasiparticle description of the quark-gluon plasma, 22) dissociation of excited quarkonia states, 23) high-mass dimuon and B {yields} J/{psi} production in ultrarelativistic heavy ion collisions, 24) strange hyperon production in p + p and p + Pb interactions from NA49, 25) heavy quarkonium hadron cross-section, 26) a new method of flow analysis, 27) low mass dilepton production and chiral symmetry restoration, 28) classical initial conditions for nucleus-nucleus collisions, 29) numerical calculation of quenching weights, 30) strangeness enhancement energy dependence, and 31) heavy quarkonium dissociation.

  18. Plasma physics for controlled fusion. 2. ed.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miyamoto, Kenro

    2016-08-01

    This new edition presents the essential theoretical and analytical methods needed to understand the recent fusion research of tokamak and alternate approaches. The author describes magnetohydrodynamic and kinetic theories of cold and hot plasmas in detail. The book covers new important topics for fusion studies such as plasma transport by drift turbulence, which depend on the magnetic configuration and zonal flows. These are universal phenomena of microturbulence. They can modify the onset criterion for turbulent transport, instabilities driven by energetic particles as well as alpha particle generation and typical plasma models for computer simulation. The fusion research of tokamaks with various new versions of H modes are explained. The design concept of ITER, the international tokamak experimental reactor, is described for inductively driven operations as well as steady-state operations using non-inductive drives. Alternative approaches of reversed-field pinch and its relaxation process, stellator including quasi-symmetric system, open-end system of tandem mirror and inertial confinement are also explained. Newly added and updated topics in this second edition include zonal flows, various versions of H modes, and steady-state operations of tokamak, the design concept of ITER, the relaxation process of RFP, quasi-symmetric stellator, and tandem mirror. The book addresses graduate students and researchers in the field of controlled fusion.

  19. Physical Assessment Education Using Various Simulators

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Tokunaga, Jin; Takamura, Norito; Ogata, Kenji; Setoguchi, Nao; Sato, Keizo

    2016-01-01

    .... Pharmaceutical education has developed using patient simulators in bedside training, seminars in hospital pharmacies, and physical assessment practice at the Kyushu University of Health and Welfare...

  20. M3D project for simulation studies of plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, W.; Belova, E.V.; Fu, G.Y. [Princeton Univ., NJ (United States). Plasma Physics Lab.; Strauss, H.R. [New York Univ., NY (United States); Sugiyama, L.E. [Massachusetts Inst. of Tech., Cambridge, MA (United States)

    1998-12-31

    The M3D (Multi-level 3D) project carries out simulation studies of plasmas of various regimes using multi-levels of physics, geometry, and mesh schemes in one code package. This paper and papers by Strauss, Sugiyama, and Belova in this workshop describe the project, and present examples of current applications. The currently available physics models of the M3D project are MHD, two-fluids, gyrokinetic hot particle/MHD hybrid, and gyrokinetic particle ion/two-fluid hybrid models. The code can be run with both structured and unstructured meshes.

  1. Simulations for Plasma and Laser Acceleration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vay, Jean-Luc; Lehe, Rémi

    Computer simulations have had a profound impact on the design and understanding of past and present plasma acceleration experiments, and will be a key component for turning plasma accelerators from a promising technology into a mainstream scientific tool. In this article, we present an overview of the numerical techniques used with the most popular approaches to model plasma-based accelerators: electromagnetic particle-in-cell, quasistatic and ponderomotive guiding center. The material that is presented is intended to serve as an introduction to the basics of those approaches, and to advances (some of them very recent) that have pushed the state of the art, such as the optimal Lorentz-boosted frame, advanced laser envelope solvers and the elimination of numerical Cherenkov instability. The particle-in-cell method, which has broader interest and is more standardized, is presented in more depth. Additional topics that are cross-cutting, such as azimuthal Fourier decomposition or filtering, are also discussed, as well as potential challenges and remedies in the initialization of simulations and output of data. Examples of simulations using the techniques that are presented have been left out of this article for conciseness, and because simulation results are best understood when presented together, and contrasted with theoretical and/or experimental results, as in other articles of this volume.

  2. Multigrid Particle-in-cell Simulations of Plasma Microturbulence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    J.L.V. Lewandowski

    2003-06-17

    A new scheme to accurately retain kinetic electron effects in particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations for the case of electrostatic drift waves is presented. The splitting scheme, which is based on exact separation between adiabatic and on adiabatic electron responses, is shown to yield more accurate linear growth rates than the standard df scheme. The linear and nonlinear elliptic problems that arise in the splitting scheme are solved using a multi-grid solver. The multi-grid particle-in-cell approach offers an attractive path, both from the physics and numerical points of view, to simulate kinetic electron dynamics in global toroidal plasmas.

  3. Testing Plasma Physics in the Ionosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papadopoulos, Konstantinos

    TESTING PLASMA PHYSICS IN THE IONOSPHERE K. Papadopoulos University of Maryland College Park, MD 20742 Ionospheric heaters supplemented by ground and space based diagnostic instruments, such as radars, optical cameras and photometers, HF/VLF/ELF/ULF receivers and magnetometers, radio beacons, riometers and ionosondes have for a long time being used to conduct plasma physics, geophysical and radio science investigations. The latest entry to ionospheric heating, the HF transmitter associated with the High Frequency Active Ionospheric Research Program (HAARP), was completed in February 2007. The transmitter consists of 180 antenna elements spanning 30.6 acres and can radiate 3.6 MW of HF power in the 2.8-10.0 MHz frequency range. With increasing frequency the beam-width varies from 15-5 degrees, corresponding to 20-30 dB gain and resulting in Effective Radiating Power (ERP) between .36 - 4.0 GW. The antenna can point to any direction in a cone of 30 degrees from the vertical, with a reposition time of 15 degrees in 15 microseconds resulting in super-luminous scanning speeds. The transmitter can synthesize essentially any desired waveform within the regulatory allowed bandwidth in linear and circular polarization. These capabilities far exceed those of previous ionospheric heaters and allow for new frontier research in plasma physics, geophysics and radio science. Following a brief discussion of the relationship of the new capabilities of the facility with thresholds of physical processes that could not be achieved previously, the presentation will discuss recent results in the areas of ULF/ELF/VLF generation and propagation and wave-particle interactions in the magnetosphere acquired with the completed facility. The presentation will conclude with a detailed discussion of possible frontier science experiments in the areas of Langmuir turbulence, parametric instabilities, electron acceleration, optical emissions and field aligned striations and duct generation, made

  4. Multi-physics CFD simulations in engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Makoto

    2013-08-01

    Nowadays Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) software is adopted as a design and analysis tool in a great number of engineering fields. We can say that single-physics CFD has been sufficiently matured in the practical point of view. The main target of existing CFD software is single-phase flows such as water and air. However, many multi-physics problems exist in engineering. Most of them consist of flow and other physics, and the interactions between different physics are very important. Obviously, multi-physics phenomena are critical in developing machines and processes. A multi-physics phenomenon seems to be very complex, and it is so difficult to be predicted by adding other physics to flow phenomenon. Therefore, multi-physics CFD techniques are still under research and development. This would be caused from the facts that processing speed of current computers is not fast enough for conducting a multi-physics simulation, and furthermore physical models except for flow physics have not been suitably established. Therefore, in near future, we have to develop various physical models and efficient CFD techniques, in order to success multi-physics simulations in engineering. In the present paper, I will describe the present states of multi-physics CFD simulations, and then show some numerical results such as ice accretion and electro-chemical machining process of a three-dimensional compressor blade which were obtained in my laboratory. Multi-physics CFD simulations would be a key technology in near future.

  5. Method for simulating discontinuous physical systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baty, Roy S.; Vaughn, Mark R.

    2001-01-01

    The mathematical foundations of conventional numerical simulation of physical systems provide no consistent description of the behavior of such systems when subjected to discontinuous physical influences. As a result, the numerical simulation of such problems requires ad hoc encoding of specific experimental results in order to address the behavior of such discontinuous physical systems. In the present invention, these foundations are replaced by a new combination of generalized function theory and nonstandard analysis. The result is a class of new approaches to the numerical simulation of physical systems which allows the accurate and well-behaved simulation of discontinuous and other difficult physical systems, as well as simpler physical systems. Applications of this new class of numerical simulation techniques to process control, robotics, and apparatus design are outlined.

  6. Molecular dynamics simulations of magnetized dusty plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piel, Alexander; Reichstein, Torben; Wilms, Jochen

    2012-10-01

    The combination of the electric field that confines a dust cloud with a static magnetic field generally leads to a rotation of the dust cloud. In weak magnetic fields, the Hall component of the ion flow exerts a drag force that sets the dust in rotation. We have performed detailed molecular-dynamics simulations of the dynamics of torus-shaped dust clouds in anodic plasmas. The stationary flow [1] is characterized by a shell structure in the laminar dust flow and by the spontaneous formation of a shear-flow around a stationary vortex. Here we present new results on dynamic phenomena, among them fluctuations due to a Kelvin-Helmholtz instability in the shear-flow. The simulations are compared with experimental results. [4pt] [1] T. Reichstein, A. Piel, Phys. Plasmas 18, 083705 (2011)

  7. Physics through the 1990s: Plasmas and fluids

    Science.gov (United States)

    1986-01-01

    The volume contains recommendations for programs in, and government support of, plasma and fluid physics. Four broad areas are covered: the physics of fluids, general plasma physics, fusion, and space and astrophysical plasmas. In the first section, the accomplishments of fluid physics and a detailed review of its sub-fields, such as combustion, non-Newtonian fluids, turbulence, aerodynamics, and geophysical fluid dynamics, are described. The general plasma physics section deals with the wide scope of the theoretical concepts involved in plasma research, and with the machines; intense beam systems, collective and laser-driven accelerators, and the associated diagnostics. The section on the fusion plasma research program examines confinement and heating systems, such as Tokamaks, magnetic mirrors, and inertial-confinement systems, and several others. Finally, theory and experiment in space and astrophysical plasma research is detailed, ranging from the laboratory to the solar system and beyond. A glossary is included.

  8. The Integrated Plasma Simulator: A Flexible Python Framework for Coupled Multiphysics Simulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Foley, Samantha S [ORNL; Elwasif, Wael R [ORNL; Bernholdt, David E [ORNL

    2011-11-01

    High-fidelity coupled multiphysics simulations are an increasingly important aspect of computational science. In many domains, however, there has been very limited experience with simulations of this sort, therefore research in coupled multiphysics often requires computational frameworks with significant flexibility to respond to the changing directions of the physics and mathematics. This paper presents the Integrated Plasma Simulator (IPS), a framework designed for loosely coupled simulations of fusion plasmas. The IPS provides users with a simple component architecture into which a wide range of existing plasma physics codes can be inserted as components. Simulations can take advantage of multiple levels of parallelism supported in the IPS, and can be controlled by a high-level ``driver'' component, or by other coordination mechanisms, such as an asynchronous event service. We describe the requirements and design of the framework, and how they were implemented in the Python language. We also illustrate the flexibility of the framework by providing examples of different types of simulations that utilize various features of the IPS.

  9. Accelerated simulation methods for plasma kinetics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caflisch, Russel

    2016-11-01

    Collisional kinetics is a multiscale phenomenon due to the disparity between the continuum (fluid) and the collisional (particle) length scales. This paper describes a class of simulation methods for gases and plasmas, and acceleration techniques for improving their speed and accuracy. Starting from the Landau-Fokker-Planck equation for plasmas, the focus will be on a binary collision model that is solved using a Direct Simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) method. Acceleration of this method is achieved by coupling the particle method to a continuum fluid description. The velocity distribution function f is represented as a combination of a Maxwellian M (the thermal component) and a set of discrete particles fp (the kinetic component). For systems that are close to (local) equilibrium, this reduces the number N of simulated particles that are required to represent f for a given level of accuracy. We present two methods for exploiting this representation. In the first method, equilibration of particles in fp, as well as disequilibration of particles from M, due to the collision process, is represented by a thermalization/dethermalization step that employs an entropy criterion. Efficiency of the representation is greatly increased by inclusion of particles with negative weights. This significantly complicates the simulation, but the second method is a tractable approach for negatively weighted particles. The accelerated simulation method is compared with standard PIC-DSMC method for both spatially homogeneous problems such as a bump-on-tail and inhomogeneous problems such as nonlinear Landau damping.

  10. Integrated Plasma Simulation of Lower Hybrid Current Drive in Tokamaks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonoli, P. T.; Wright, J. C.; Harvey, R. W.; Batchelor, D. B.; Berry, L. A.; Kessel, C. E.; Jardin, S. C.

    2012-03-01

    It has been shown in Alcator C-Mod that the onset time for sawteeth can be delayed significantly (up to 0.5 s) relative to ohmically heated plasmas, through the injection of off-axis LH current drive power [1]. We are simulating these experiments using the Integrated Plasma Simulator (IPS) [2], where the driven LH current density profiles are computed using a ray tracing component (GENRAY) and Fokker Planck code (CQL3D) [3] that are run in a tightly coupled time advance. The background plasma is evolved using the TSC transport code with the Porcelli sawtooth model [4]. Predictions of the driven LH current profiles will be compared with simpler ``reduced'' models for LHCD such as the LSC code which is implemented in TSC and which is also invoked within the IPS. [4pt] [1] C. E. Kessel et al, Bull. of the Am. Phys. Soc. 53, Poster PP6.00074 (2008). [0pt] [2] D. Batchelor et al, Journal of Physics: Conf. Series 125, 012039 (2008). [0pt] [3] R. W. Harvey and M. G. McCoy, Proc. of the IAEA Tech. Comm. Meeting on Simulation and Modeling of Therm. Plasmas, Montreal, Canada (1992). [0pt] [4] S. C. Jardin et al, J. Comp. Phys. 66, 481 (1986).

  11. Discrete photon implementation for plasma simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fierro, Andrew, E-mail: andrew.s.fierro@ieee.org; Stephens, Jacob; Beeson, Sterling; Dickens, James; Neuber, Andreas [Center for Pulsed Power and Power Electronics, Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Texas Tech University, Lubbock, Texas 79409 (United States)

    2016-01-15

    The self-produced light emission from pulsed plasma discharges and its impact on plasma development are challenging to characterize through simulation and modeling, chiefly due to the large number of radiating species and limited computer memory. Often, photo-processes, such as photo-ionization or photo-emission of electrons, are implemented through over-simplifying approximations or neglected altogether. Here, a method applicable to plasma simulations is implemented in a Particle-in-Cell /Monte Carlo Collision model, which is capable of discretely tracking photons and their corresponding wavelengths. Combined with the appropriate cross sections or quantum yields, a wavelength dependent model for photo-ionization or photo-emission may be implemented. Additionally, by resolving the wavelengths of each photon, an emission spectrum for a region of interest may be generated. Simulations for a pure nitrogen environment reveal that the calculated emission profile of the second positive system agrees well with the experimental spectrum of a pulsed, nanosecond discharge in the same spectral region.

  12. Asymptotic-Preserving methods and multiscale models for plasma physics

    CERN Document Server

    Degond, Pierre

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of the present paper is to provide an overview of Asymptotic-Preserving methods for multiscale plasma simulations by addressing three singular perturbation problems. First, the quasi-neutral limit of fluid and kinetic models is investigated in the framework of non magnetized as well as magnetized plasmas. Second, the drift limit for fluid descriptions of thermal plasmas under large magnetic fields is addressed. Finally efficient numerical resolutions of anisotropic elliptic or diffusion equations arising in magnetized plasma simulation are reviewed.

  13. Nonlinear instability in simulations of Large Plasma Device turbulence

    CERN Document Server

    Friedman, B; Umansky, M V; Schaffner, D; Joseph, I

    2013-01-01

    Several simulations of turbulence in the Large Plasma Device (LAPD) [W. Gekelman et al., Rev. Sci. Inst. 62, 2875 (1991)] are energetically analyzed and compared with each other and with the experiment. The simulations use the same model, but different axial boundary conditions. They employ either periodic, zero-value, zero-derivative, or sheath axial boundaries. The linear stability physics is different between the scenarios because the various boundary conditions allow the drift wave instability to access different axial structures, and the sheath boundary simulation contains a conducting wall mode instability which is just as unstable as the drift waves. Nevertheless, the turbulence in all the simulations is relatively similar because it is primarily driven by a robust nonlinear instability that is the same for all cases. The nonlinear instability preferentially drives $k_\\parallel = 0$ potential energy fluctuations, which then three-wave couple to $k_\\parallel \

  14. The Earth's ionosphere plasma physics and electrodynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Kelley, Michael C

    2007-01-01

    Although interesting in its own right, due to the ever-increasing use of satellites for communication and navigation, weather in the ionosphere is of great concern. Every such system uses trans-ionospheric propagation of radio waves, waves which must traverse the commonly turbulent ionosphere. Understanding this turbulence and predicting it are one of the major goals of the National Space Weather program. Acquiring such a prediction capability will rest on understanding the very topics of this book, the plasma physics and electrodynamics of the system. Fully updated to reflect advances in the field in the 20 years since the first edition published Explores the buffeting of the ionosphere from above by the sun and from below by the lower atmosphere Unique text appropriate both as a reference and for coursework.

  15. Physical tests for random numbers in simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vattulainen, I.; Ala-Nissila, T.; Kankaala, K.

    1994-11-01

    We propose three physical tests to measure correlations in random numbers used in Monte Carlo simulations. The first test uses autocorrelation times of certain physical quantities when the Ising model is simulated with the Wolff algorithm. The second test is based on random walks, and the third on blocks of n successive numbers. We apply the tests to show that recent errors in high precision Ising simulations using generalized feedback shift register algorithms are due to short range correlations in random number sequences.

  16. Multi-physics/scale simulations using particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koumoutsakos, Petros

    2006-03-01

    Particle simulations of continuum and discrete phenomena can be formulated by following the motion of interacting particles that carry the physical properties of the systems that is being approximated (continuum) or modeled (discrete) by the particles. We identify the common computational characteristics of particle methods and emphasize their key properties that enable the formulation of a novel, systematic framework for multiscale simulations, that can be applicable to the simulation of diverse physical problems. We present novel multiresolution particle methods for continuum (fluid/solid) simulations, using adaptive mesh refinement and wavelets, by relaxing the grid-free character of particle methods and discuss the coupling of scales in continuum-atomistic flow simulations.

  17. Physical processes associated with current collection by plasma contactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katz, Ira; Davis, Victoria A.

    1990-01-01

    Recent flight data confirms laboratory observations that the release of neutral gas increases plasma sheath currents. Plasma contactors are devices which release a partially ionized gas in order to enhance the current flow between a spacecraft and the space plasma. Ionization of the expellant gas and the formation of a double layer between the anode plasma and the space plasma are the dominant physical processes. A theory is presented of the interaction between the contactor plasma and the background plasma. The conditions for formation of a double layer between the two plasmas are derived. Double layer formation is shown to be a consequence of the nonlinear response of the plasmas to changes in potential. Numerical calculations based upon this model are compared with laboratory measurements of current collection by hollow cathode-based plasma contactors.

  18. Plasma physics abstracts, 1 January - 31 December, 1986

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurnett, D. A.; Dangelo, N.; Goertz, C. K.

    1987-01-01

    Topics addressed include: ion-cyclotron waves; plasma waves; solar wind lithium releases; bow shock; Pi2 wave bursts; auroral kilometric radiation; ion energization; magnetic field corrections; electric fields; magnetospheric processes; electron acceleration; inner heliosphere; nightside auroral zone; computerized simulation; plasma wave turbulence; and magnetohydrodynamic waves in plasma sheets.

  19. Simulations with Conventional and Gas Puff Plasma Focus Devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shan, Bing; Liu, Mahe; Lee, Paul; Lee, Sing

    2000-10-01

    An energy consistent plasma focus model is improved by considering the plasma ionization states based on the corona equilibrium. This provides the model with the capability of calculating the plasma dynamics and states for different gases in plasma focus. The model is employed to simulate the behavior of the NX2 plasma focus, with both neon and argon gases. The results show that much lower pressure is required to work with argon for x-ray. The model has also been modified to describe a gas-puff plasma focus based on a measured pressure distribution profile. The simulation result reveals that the gas-puff scheme is more efficient in plasma heating and can improve the stability of the plasma column. By comparing with the published results, agreements have been obtained between the computations and experiments of both machines in the major points regarding plasma dynamics, plasma column stability and appearances, plasma temperatures, and x-ray radiation properties.

  20. 179th International School of Physics "Enrico Fermi" : Laser-Plasma Acceleration

    CERN Document Server

    Gizzi, L A; Faccini, R

    2012-01-01

    Impressive progress has been made in the field of laser-plasma acceleration in the last decade, with outstanding achievements from both experimental and theoretical viewpoints. Closely exploiting the development of ultra-intense, ultrashort pulse lasers, laser-plasma acceleration has developed rapidly, achieving accelerating gradients of the order of tens of GeV/m, and making the prospect of miniature accelerators a more realistic possibility. This book presents the lectures delivered at the Enrico Fermi International School of Physics and summer school: "Laser-Plasma Acceleration" , held in Varenna, Italy, in June 2011. The school provided an opportunity for young scientists to experience the best from the worlds of laser-plasma and accelerator physics, with intensive training and hands-on opportunities related to key aspects of laser-plasma acceleration. Subjects covered include: the secrets of lasers; the power of numerical simulations; beam dynamics; and the elusive world of laboratory plasmas. The object...

  1. Kinetic Simulations of Dense Plasma Focus Breakdown

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, A.; Higginson, D. P.; Jiang, S.; Link, A.; Povilus, A.; Sears, J.; Bennett, N.; Rose, D. V.; Welch, D. R.

    2015-11-01

    A dense plasma focus (DPF) device is a type of plasma gun that drives current through a set of coaxial electrodes to assemble gas inside the device and then implode that gas on axis to form a Z-pinch. This implosion drives hydrodynamic and kinetic instabilities that generate strong electric fields, which produces a short intense pulse of x-rays, high-energy (>100 keV) electrons and ions, and (in deuterium gas) neutrons. A strong factor in pinch performance is the initial breakdown and ionization of the gas along the insulator surface separating the two electrodes. The smoothness and isotropy of this ionized sheath are imprinted on the current sheath that travels along the electrodes, thus making it an important portion of the DPF to both understand and optimize. Here we use kinetic simulations in the Particle-in-cell code LSP to model the breakdown. Simulations are initiated with neutral gas and the breakdown modeled self-consistently as driven by a charged capacitor system. We also investigate novel geometries for the insulator and electrodes to attempt to control the electric field profile. The initial ionization fraction of gas is explored computationally to gauge possible advantages of pre-ionization which could be created experimentally via lasers or a glow-discharge. Prepared by LLNL under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  2. Planetary plasma data analysis and 3D visualisation at the French Plasma Physics Data Centre

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gangloff, Michel; Génot, Vincent; Cecconi, Baptiste; Andre, Nicolas; Budnik, Elena; Bouchemit, Myriam; Jourdane, Nathanaël; Dufourg, Nicolas; Beigbeider, Laurent; Toniutti, Jean-Philippe; Durand, Joelle

    2016-10-01

    The CDPP (the French plasma physics data center http://cdpp.eu/) is engaged for nearly two decades in the archiving and dissemination of plasma data products from space missions and ground-based observatories. Besides these activities, the CDPP developed services like AMDA (http://amda.cdpp.eu/) and 3DView (http://3dview.cdpp.eu/). AMDA enables in depth analysis of a large amount of data through dedicated functionalities such as: visualisation, data mining, cataloguing. 3DView provides immersive visualisations in planetary environments: spacecraft position and attitude, ephemerides. Magnetic field models (Cain, Tsyganenko), visualisation of cubes, 2D cuts as well as spectra or time series along spacecraft trajectories are possible in 3Dview. Both tools provide a joint access to outputs of simulations (MHD or Hybrid models) in planetary sciences as well as planetary plasma observational data (from AMDA, CDAWeb, Cluster Science Archive, ...). Some of these developments were funded by the EU IMPEx project, and some of the more recent ones are done in the frame of Europlanet 2020 RI project. The role of CDPP in the analysis and visualisation of planetary data and mission support increased after a collaboration with the NASA/PDS which resulted in the access in AMDA to several planetary datasets like those of GALILEO, MESSENGER, MAVEN, etc. In 2014, AMDA was chosen as the quicklook visualisation tool for the Rosetta Plasma Consortium through a collaboration with Imperial College, London. This presentation will include several use cases demonstrating recent and new capabilities of the tools.

  3. Numerical simulation study on density dependence of plasma detachment in simulated gas divertor experiments of the TPD-I device

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ohno, N. [Nagoya Univ. (Japan). Dept. of Energy Eng. and Sci.; Mori, S. [Nagoya Univ. (Japan). Dept. of Energy Eng. and Sci.; Ezumi, N. [Nagoya Univ. (Japan). Dept. of Energy Eng. and Sci.; Takagi, M. [Nagoya Univ. (Japan). Dept. of Energy Eng. and Sci.; Takamura, S. [Nagoya Univ. (Japan). Dept. of Energy Eng. and Sci.; Suzuki, H. [National Inst. for Fusion Science, Nagoya (Japan)

    1996-08-01

    It is one of the most critical requirements to reduce the heat load to the divertor plate in the next generation fusion devices such as ITER, intended to have a long pulse or a steady state operation. Dynamic gas target divertor as well as high recycling divertor is one of the most important candidates for ITER. Recently a detached plasma has been observed in experimental fusion devices. Knowledge of the basic physics of the plasma detachment is required for any application of the gas target and high recycling divertor to the next generation experimental reactors. Linear plasma divertor simulators with high heat flux plasmas are used to investigate the plasma detachment because its good accessibility for comprehensive measurements and simple geometry leads a deeper understanding of the plasma detachment by comparing between simulation predictions and the experimental results. (orig.)

  4. MHD Simulations of the Plasma Flow in the Magnetic Nozzle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, T. E. R.; Keidar, M.; Sankaran, K.; olzin, K. A.

    2013-01-01

    The magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) flow of plasma through a magnetic nozzle is simulated by solving the governing equations for the plasma flow in the presence of an static magnetic field representing the applied nozzle. This work will numerically investigate the flow and behavior of the plasma as the inlet plasma conditions and magnetic nozzle field strength are varied. The MHD simulations are useful for addressing issues such as plasma detachment and to can be used to gain insight into the physical processes present in plasma flows found in thrusters that use magnetic nozzles. In the model, the MHD equations for a plasma, with separate temperatures calculated for the electrons and ions, are integrated over a finite cell volume with flux through each face computed for each of the conserved variables (mass, momentum, magnetic flux, energy) [1]. Stokes theorem is used to convert the area integrals over the faces of each cell into line integrals around the boundaries of each face. The state of the plasma is described using models of the ionization level, ratio of specific heats, thermal conductivity, and plasma resistivity. Anisotropies in current conduction due to Hall effect are included, and the system is closed using a real-gas equation of state to describe the relationship between the plasma density, temperature, and pressure.A separate magnetostatic solver is used to calculate the applied magnetic field, which is assumed constant for these calculations. The total magnetic field is obtained through superposition of the solution for the applied magnetic field and the self-consistently computed induced magnetic fields that arise as the flowing plasma reacts to the presence of the applied field. A solution for the applied magnetic field is represented in Fig. 1 (from Ref. [2]), exhibiting the classic converging-diverging field pattern. Previous research was able to demonstrate effects such as back-emf at a super-Alfvenic flow, which significantly alters the shape of the

  5. Physical tests for random numbers in simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vattulainen, I.; Ala-Nissila, T.; Kankaala, K. (Research Institute for Theoretical Physics, P.O. Box 9 (Siltavuorenpenger 20 C), FIN-00014 University of Helsinki (Finland) Department of Electrical Engineering, Tampere University of Technology, P.O. Box 692, FIN-3310, Tampere (Finland) Center for Scientific Computing, P.O. Box 405, FIN-02101 Espoo (Finland))

    1994-11-07

    We propose three physical tests to measure correlations in random numbers used in Monte Carlo simulations. The first test uses autocorrelation times of certain physical quantities when the Ising model is simulated with the Wolff algorithm. The second test is based on random walks, and the third on blocks of [ital n] successive numbers. We apply the tests to show that recent errors in high precision Ising simulations using generalized feedback shift register algorithms are due to short range correlations in random number sequences.

  6. Transport Physics in Reversed Shear Plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Levinton, F.M.; Batha, S.H. [Fusion Physics and Technology, Inc., Torrance, CA (United States); Beer, M.A.; Bell, M.G.; Budny, R.V.; Efthimion, P.C.; Mazzucato, E.; Nazikian, R.; Park, H.K.; Ramsey, A.T.; Schmidt, G.L.; Scott, S.D.; Synakowski, E.J.; Taylor, G.; Von Goeler, S.; Zarnstorff, M.C. [Princeton University, NJ (United States). Plasma Physics Laboratory; Bush, C.E. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1997-12-31

    Reversed magnetic shear is considered a good candidate for improving the tokamak concept because it has the potential to stabilize MHD instabilities and reduce particle and energy transport. With reduced transport the high pressure gradient would generate a strong off-axis bootstrap current and could sustain a hollow current density profile. Such a combination of favorable conditions could lead to an attractive steady-state tokamak configuration. Indeed, a new tokamak confinement regime with reversed magnetic shear has been observed on the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) where the particle, momentum, and ion thermal diffusivities drop precipitously, by over an order of magnitude. The particle diffusivity drops to the neoclassical level and the ion thermal diffusivity drops to much less than the neoclassical value in the region with reversed shear. This enhanced reversed shear (ERS) confinement mode is characterized by an abrupt transition with a large rate of rise of the density in the reversed shear region during neutral beam injection, resulting in nearly a factor of three increase in the central density to 1.2 X 10(exp 20) cube m. At the same time the density fluctuation level in the reversed shear region dramatically decreases. The ion and electron temperatures, which are about 20 keV and 7 keV respectively, change little during the ERS mode. The transport and transition into and out of the ERS mode have been studied on TFTR with plasma currents in the range 0.9-2.2 MA, with a toroidal magnetic field of 2.7-4.6 T, and the radius of the q(r) minimum, q{sub min}, has been varied from r/a = 0.35 to 0.55. Toroidal field and co/counter neutral beam injection toroidal rotation variations have been used to elucidate the underlying physics of the transition mechanism and power threshold of the ERS mode.

  7. Magnetohydrodynamic simulation of the inverse-pinch plasma discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esaulov, A.; Bauer, B. S.; Lindemuth, I. R.; Makhin, V.; Presura, R.; Ryutov, D. D.; Sheehey, P. T.; Siemon, R. E.; Sotnikov, V. I.

    2004-04-01

    A wall confined plasma in an inverse-pinch configuration holds potential as a plasma target for Magnetized Target Fusion (MTF) as well as a simple geometry to study wall-confined plasma. An experiment is planned to study the inverse-pinch configuration using the Zebra Z pinch [B. S. Bauer et al., AIP Conference Proceedings Vol. 409 (American Institute of Physics, Melville, 1997), p. 153] of the Nevada Terawatt Facility at the University of Nevada, Reno (UNR). The dynamics of the discharge formation have been analyzed using analytic models and numerical methods. Strong heating occurs by thermalization of directed energy when an outward moving current sheet (the inverse pinch effect) collides with the outer wall of the experimental chamber. Two-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic simulations show Rayleigh-Taylor and Richtmyer-Meshkov like modes of instability, as expected because of the shock acceleration during plasma formation phase. The instabilities are not disruptive, but give rise to a mild level of turbulence. The conclusion from this work is that an interesting experiment relevant to wall confinement for MTF could be done using existing equipment at UNR.

  8. Simulating industrial plasma reactors - A fresh perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohr, Sebastian; Rahimi, Sara; Tennyson, Jonathan; Ansell, Oliver; Patel, Jash

    2016-09-01

    A key goal of the presented research project PowerBase is to produce new integration schemes which enable the manufacturability of 3D integrated power smart systems with high precision TSV etched features. The necessary high aspect ratio etch is performed via the BOSCH process. Investigations in industrial research are often use trial and improvement experimental methods. Simulations provide an alternative way to study the influence of external parameters on the final product, whilst also giving insights into the physical processes. This presentation investigates the process of simulating an industrial ICP reactor used over high power (up to 2x5 kW) and pressure (up to 200 mTorr) ranges, analysing the specific procedures to achieve a compromise between physical correctness and computational speed, while testing commonly made assumptions. This includes, for example, the effect of different physical models and the inclusion of different gas phase and surface reactions with the aim of accurately predicting the dependence of surface rates and profiles on external parameters in SF6 and C4F8 discharges. This project has received funding from the Electronic Component Systems for European Leadership Joint Undertaking under Grant Agreement No. 662133 PowerBase.

  9. Geometric perturbation theory and plasma physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Omohundro, S.M.

    1985-04-04

    Modern differential geometric techniques are used to unify the physical asymptotics underlying mechanics, wave theory and statistical mechanics. The approach gives new insights into the structure of physical theories and is suited to the needs of modern large-scale computer simulation and symbol manipulation systems. A coordinate-free formulation of non-singular perturbation theory is given, from which a new Hamiltonian perturbation structure is derived and related to the unperturbed structure. The theory of perturbations in the presence of symmetry is developed, and the method of averaging is related to reduction by a circle group action. The pseudo-forces and magnetic Poisson bracket terms due to reduction are given a natural asymptotic interpretation. Similar terms due to changing reference frames are related to the method of variation of parameters, which is also given a Hamiltonian formulation. These methods are used to answer a question about nearly periodic systems. The answer leads to a new secular perturbation theory that contains no ad hoc elements. Eikonal wave theory is given a Hamiltonian formulation that generalizes Whitham's Lagrangian approach. The evolution of wave action density on ray phase space is given a Hamiltonian structure using a Lie-Poisson bracket. The relationship between dissipative and Hamiltonian systems is discussed. A new type of attractor is defined which attracts both forward and backward in time and is shown to occur in infinite-dimensional Hamiltonian systems with dissipative behavior. The theory of Smale horseshoes is applied to gyromotion in the neighborhood of a magnetic field reversal and the phenomenon of reinsertion in area-preserving horseshoes is introduced. The central limit theorem is proved by renormalization group techniques. A natural symplectic structure for thermodynamics is shown to arise asymptotically from the maximum entropy formalism.

  10. Flow Simulation and Optimization of Plasma Reactors for Coal Gasification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Chunjun; Zhang, Yingzi; Ma, Tengcai

    2003-10-01

    This paper reports a 3-d numerical simulation system to analyze the complicated flow in plasma reactors for coal gasification, which involve complex chemical reaction, two-phase flow and plasma effect. On the basis of analytic results, the distribution of the density, temperature and components' concentration are obtained and a different plasma reactor configuration is proposed to optimize the flow parameters. The numerical simulation results show an improved conversion ratio of the coal gasification. Different kinds of chemical reaction models are used to simulate the complex flow inside the reactor. It can be concluded that the numerical simulation system can be very useful for the design and optimization of the plasma reactor.

  11. Dynacore Final Report , Plasma Physics prototype

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lourens, W.

    2001-01-01

    The generation and behaviour of plasma in a fusion device and its interaction with sur-rounding materials is studied by observing several phenomena that will accompany a plasma discharge. These phenomena are recorded by means of so called Diagnostics. These are instruments that comprise complex elec

  12. Space plasma physics results from Spacelab 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burch, J. L.

    1985-01-01

    The Spacelab 1 payload carried several instrument systems which together investigated a number of space plasma phenomena. These experiments used the Space Shuttle Orbiter as a platform for making controlled particle-beam, plasma and neutral gas inputs to the ionosphere and magnetosphere and for observing the outputs produced. Spacelab 1 space-plasma investigations included the Space Experiments with Particle Accelerators (SEPAC), Phenomena Induced by Charged Particle Beams (PICPAB), Atmospheric Emissions Photometric Imaging (AEPI) and the Low Energy Electron Spectrometer and Magnetometer. Among the major phenomena investigated both singly and jointly by these experiments are vehicle charging and neutralization, beam-plasma and wave-particle interactions, anomalous ionization phenomena produced by neutral-gas and plasma injections and several phenomena induced by modulated particle beam injections.

  13. Magnetized plasma jets in experiment and simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schrafel, Peter; Greenly, John; Gourdain, Pierre; Seyler, Charles; Blesener, Kate; Kusse, Bruce

    2013-10-01

    This research focuses on the initial ablation phase of a thing (20 micron) Al foil driven on the 1 MA-in-100 ns COBRA through a 5 mm diameter cathode in a radial configuration. In these experiments, ablated surface plasma (ASP) on the top of the foil and a strongly collimated axial plasma jet can be observed developing midway through current-rise. Our goal is to establish the relationship between the ASP and the jet. These jets are of interest for their potential relevance to astrophysical phenomena. An independently pulsed 200 μF capacitor bank with a Helmholtz coil pair allows for the imposition of a slow (150 μs) and strong (~1 T) axial magnetic field on the experiment. Application of this field eliminates significant azimuthal asymmetry in extreme ultraviolet emission of the ASP. This asymmetry is likely a current filamentation instability. Laser-backlit shadowgraphy and interferometry confirm that the jet-hollowing is correlated with the application of the axial magnetic field. Visible spectroscopic measurements show a doppler shift consistent with an azimuthal velocity in the ASP caused by the applied B-field. Computational simulations with the XMHD code PERSEUS qualitatively agree with the experimental results.

  14. Plasma Physics Issues in Advanced Simulation Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1983-11-01

    niri if(rinF(j).le.r) soto 20 * if(ifit(J).&9.0) bth(i)=finpij-l)+(finip(j)-finp(j-l)) * *(r- rinp (j-1) )/ ( rinp (i) -rigp(j-i)) soto 25 20 continue 25...continue I.C***** do 30 il,ninp i f it i) =0 rinpr(i)inO. 30 fingp(i)=0. read(5,*) firip * re’ad(5,*) rir- read(5,*) if: if( rinp (1).ne.0 so*.o 500 do...continue do 55 j=l,np r=Fphysrd ( i do 50 J1l,iri i f(r irip0 ) .l1e. r) soto 50 * *(r-rinF (j- ) ) /( rinp U)-rinF (j-i)) if ( if it U) .R . 1) rho( i ) firp

  15. Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics for the Simulation of Laser Produced Plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffith, Alec; Holladay, Tyler; Murillo, Michael S.

    2016-10-01

    To address the design and interpretation of experiments at next generation light sources such as at the SLAC LCLS and the LANL proposed MaRIE a simulation of the laser produced plasma targets has been developed. Smoothed particle hydrodynamics is used to capture the full experimental time and length scales, large degrees of deformation, and the experimental environment's open boundary conditions. Additionally the model incorporates plasma transport with thermal conduction, the electric potential, and a two species model of the electrons and ions. The electron and ion particle representations in SPH allow for time dependent ionization and recombination while addressing the disparate masses of the two species. To gain computational speedup our simulation takes advantage of parallelism, and to reduce computational cost we have explored using data structures such as the linked cell list and octree as well as algorithmic techniques such as the fast mutipole method. We will discuss the results of simulating several possible experimental configurations using our model. This work was supported by the Los Alamos National Laboratory computational physics workshop.

  16. A Physics Exploratory Experiment on Plasma Liner Formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thio, Y. C. Francis; Knapp, Charles E.; Kirkpatrick, Ronald C.; Siemon, Richard E.; Turchi, Peter

    2002-01-01

    Momentum flux for imploding a target plasma in magnetized target fusion (MTF) may be delivered by an array of plasma guns launching plasma jets that would merge to form an imploding plasma shell (liner). In this paper, we examine what would be a worthwhile experiment to do in order to explore the dynamics of merging plasma jets to form a plasma liner as a first step in establishing an experimental database for plasma-jets driven magnetized target fusion (PJETS-MTF). Using past experience in fusion energy research as a model, we envisage a four-phase program to advance the art of PJETS-MTF to fusion breakeven Q is approximately 1). The experiment (PLX (Plasma Liner Physics Exploratory Experiment)) described in this paper serves as Phase I of this four-phase program. The logic underlying the selection of the experimental parameters is presented. The experiment consists of using twelve plasma guns arranged in a circle, launching plasma jets towards the center of a vacuum chamber. The velocity of the plasma jets chosen is 200 km/s, and each jet is to carry a mass of 0.2 mg - 0.4 mg. A candidate plasma accelerator for launching these jets consists of a coaxial plasma gun of the Marshall type.

  17. Regular physical activity influences plasma ghrelin concentration in adolescent girls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jürimäe, Jaak; Cicchella, Antonio; Jürimäe, Toivo; Lätt, Evelin; Haljaste, Kaja; Purge, Pritt; Hamra, Jena; von Duvillard, Serge P

    2007-10-01

    We examined the effect of regular physical activity on plasma ghrelin concentration after onset of puberty in girls. In addition, we also examined the association of fasting plasma ghrelin concentration with various plasma biochemical, body composition, and aerobic capacity variables in healthy adolescent girls. Fifty healthy schoolgirls ages 11 to 16 yr were divided either into a physically active (N = 25) or a physically inactive (N = 25) group. The physically active group consisted of swimmers who had trained on an average of 6.2 +/- 2.0 h.wk(-1) for the last 2 yr, whereas the inclusion criterion for the physically inactive group was the participation in physical education classes only. The subjects were matched for age (+/- 1 yr) and body mass index (BMI; +/- 2 kg.m(-2)). Maturation I group (14 matched pairs) included pubertal stages 2 and 3, and maturation II group (11 matched pairs) included pubertal stages 4 and 5. Physically active girls had significantly higher (P ghrelin levels than the physically inactive girls (maturation I: 1152.1 +/- 312.9 vs 877.7 +/- 114.8 pg.mL(-1); maturation II: 1084.0 +/- 252.5 vs 793.4 +/- 164.9 pg.mL(-1)). Plasma ghrelin concentration was negatively related to percent body fat, fat mass, peak oxygen consumption per kilogram of body mass, leptin, estradiol, insulin, and insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I) (r > -0.298; P ghrelin concentration using the variables that were significantly associated with ghrelin concentration demonstrated that plasma IGF-I was the most important predictor of plasma ghrelin concentration (beta = -0.396; P = 0.008). Regular physical activity influences plasma ghrelin concentrations in girls with different pubertal maturation levels. Plasma IGF-I concentration seems to be the main determinant of circulating ghrelin in healthy, normal-weight adolescent girls.

  18. Electronics Research Laboratory, Plasma Theory and Simulation Group annual progress report, January 1, 1989--December 31, 1989

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Birdsall, C.K.

    1989-12-31

    This is a brief progress report, covering our research in general plasma theory and simulation, plasma-wall physics theory and simulation, and code development. Reports written in this period are included with this mailing. A publications list plus abstracts for two major meetings are included.

  19. The Physics of the Roller Coaster: Learning Physics through Simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hannum, Wallace

    2001-01-01

    This instructional design blends a structured learning environment (the physics lesson) with an engaging, playful, simulated environment (roller coaster construction), putting into operation ideas from both cognitive and constructivist theories. Two instructional models are used: a general design model for creating instruction and a lesson design…

  20. The Physics of the Roller Coaster: Learning Physics through Simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hannum, Wallace

    2001-01-01

    This instructional design blends a structured learning environment (the physics lesson) with an engaging, playful, simulated environment (roller coaster construction), putting into operation ideas from both cognitive and constructivist theories. Two instructional models are used: a general design model for creating instruction and a lesson design…

  1. Laser Plasma Physics - Forces and Nonlinear Principle

    CERN Document Server

    Hora, Heinrich

    2014-01-01

    This work is an electronic pre-publication of a book manuscript being under consideration in order to provide information to interested researchers about a review of mechanical forces in plasmas by electro-dynamic fields. Beginning with Kelvin's ponderomotive force of 1845 in electrostatics, the hydrodynamic force in a plasma is linked with quadratic force quantities of electric and magnetic fields. Hydrodynamics is interlinked with single particle motion of plasma particles electric field generation and double layers and sheaths due to properties of inhomogeneous plasmas. Consequences relate to laser driven particle acceleration and fusion energy. Beyond the very broad research field of fusion using nanosecond laser pulses based on thermodynamics, the new picosecond pulses of ultrahigh power opened a categorically different non-thermal interaction finally permitting proton-boron fusion with eliminating problems of nuclear radiation.

  2. Fundamentals of plasma physics and controlled fusion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miyamoto, Kenro

    2000-10-01

    The present lecture note was written to fill a gap between text books for undergraduates and specific review articles written by specialists for their young colleagues. The note may be divided in three parts. The first part is on basic characteristics of a plasma in a magnetic field. The second part describes plasma confinement and heating with an emphasis on magnetohydrodynamic instabilities. In addition, propagation of plasma waves, plasma heating by electromagnetic waves are given. The third part is devoted to various specific concepts of nuclear fusion. Emphases are placed on toroidal devices, especially on tokamak devices and stellarators. One might feel heavy mathematics glimpsing the present note, especially in the part treating magnetohydrodynamic instabilities. (author)

  3. Physics of collapses in toroidal helical plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Itoh, Kimitaka [National Inst. for Fusion Science, Toki, Gifu (Japan); Itoh, Sanae; Fukuyama, Atsushi; Yagi, Masatoshi

    1998-12-31

    Theoretical model for the collapse events in toroidal helical plasmas with magnetic hill is presented. There exists a turbulent-turbulent transition at a critical pressure gradient, leading to a sudden increase of the anomalous transport. When the magnetic shear is low, the nonlinear excitation of the global mode is possible. This model explains an abrupt growth of the perturbations, i.e., the trigger phenomena. Achievable limit of the plasma beta value is discussed. (author)

  4. Advanced plasma flow simulations of cathodic-arc and ferroelectric plasma sources for neutralized drift compression experiments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adam B. Sefkow

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Large-space-scale and long-time-scale plasma flow simulations are executed in order to study the spatial and temporal evolution of plasma parameters for two types of plasma sources used in the neutralized drift compression experiment (NDCX. The results help assess the charge neutralization conditions for ion beam compression experiments and can be employed in more sophisticated simulations, which previously neglected the dynamical evolution of the plasma. Three-dimensional simulations of a filtered cathodic-arc plasma source show the coupling efficiency of the plasma flow from the source to the drift region depends on geometrical factors. The nonuniform magnetic topology complicates the well-known general analytical considerations for evaluating guiding-center drifts, and particle-in-cell simulations provide a self-consistent evaluation of the physics in an otherwise challenging scenario. Plasma flow profiles of a ferroelectric plasma source demonstrate that the densities required for longitudinal compression experiments involving ion beams are provided over the drift length, and are in good agreement with measurements. Simulations involving azimuthally asymmetric plasma creation conditions show that symmetric profiles are nevertheless achieved at the time of peak on-axis plasma density. Also, the ferroelectric plasma expands upstream on the thermal expansion time scale, and therefore avoids the possibility of penetration into the acceleration gap and transport sections, where partial neutralization would increase the beam emittance. Future experiments on NDCX will investigate the transverse focusing of an axially compressing intense charge bunch to a sub-mm spot size with coincident focal planes using a strong final-focus solenoid. In order to fill a multi-tesla solenoid with the necessary high-density plasma for beam charge neutralization, the simulations predict that supersonically injected plasma from the low-field region will penetrate and

  5. Simulating magnetised plasma with the versatile advection code

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Keppens, R.; Toth, G.; Palma, J. M. L.; Dongarra, J.; Hernandez, V.

    1999-01-01

    Matter in the universe mainly consists of plasma. The dynamics of plasmas is controlled by magnetic fields. To simulate the evolution of magnetised plasma, we solve the equations of magnetohydrodynamics using the Versatile Advection Code (VAC). To demonstrate the versatility of VAC, we present calcu

  6. Simulating magnetised plasma with the versatile advection code

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Keppens, R.; Toth, G.; Palma, J. M. L.; Dongarra, J.; Hernandez, V.

    1999-01-01

    Matter in the universe mainly consists of plasma. The dynamics of plasmas is controlled by magnetic fields. To simulate the evolution of magnetised plasma, we solve the equations of magnetohydrodynamics using the Versatile Advection Code (VAC). To demonstrate the versatility of VAC, we present

  7. Physics-Based Simulator for NEO Exploration Analysis & Simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balaram, J.; Cameron, J.; Jain, A.; Kline, H.; Lim, C.; Mazhar, H.; Myint, S.; Nayar, H.; Patton, R.; Pomerantz, M.; hide

    2011-01-01

    As part of the Space Exploration Analysis and Simulation (SEAS) task, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) is using physics-based simulations at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) to explore potential surface and near-surface mission operations at Near Earth Objects (NEOs). The simulator is under development at JPL and can be used to provide detailed analysis of various surface and near-surface NEO robotic and human exploration concepts. In this paper we describe the SEAS simulator and provide examples of recent mission systems and operations concepts investigated using the simulation. We also present related analysis work and tools developed for both the SEAS task as well as general modeling, analysis and simulation capabilites for asteroid/small-body objects.

  8. Physics-Based Simulator for NEO Exploration Analysis & Simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balaram, J.; Cameron, J.; Jain, A.; Kline, H.; Lim, C.; Mazhar, H.; Myint, S.; Nayar, H.; Patton, R.; Pomerantz, M.; Quadrelli, M.; Shakkotai, P.; Tso, K.

    2011-01-01

    As part of the Space Exploration Analysis and Simulation (SEAS) task, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) is using physics-based simulations at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) to explore potential surface and near-surface mission operations at Near Earth Objects (NEOs). The simulator is under development at JPL and can be used to provide detailed analysis of various surface and near-surface NEO robotic and human exploration concepts. In this paper we describe the SEAS simulator and provide examples of recent mission systems and operations concepts investigated using the simulation. We also present related analysis work and tools developed for both the SEAS task as well as general modeling, analysis and simulation capabilites for asteroid/small-body objects.

  9. Plasma Jet Simulations Using a Generalized Ohm's Law

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebersohn, Frans; Shebalin, John V.; Girimaji, Sharath S.

    2012-01-01

    Plasma jets are important physical phenomena in astrophysics and plasma propulsion devices. A currently proposed dual jet plasma propulsion device to be used for ISS experiments strongly resembles a coronal loop and further draws a parallel between these physical systems [1]. To study plasma jets we use numerical methods that solve the compressible MHD equations using the generalized Ohm s law [2]. Here, we will discuss the crucial underlying physics of these systems along with the numerical procedures we utilize to study them. Recent results from our numerical experiments will be presented and discussed.

  10. Software and Physics Simulation at Belle II

    CERN Document Server

    Kim, Doris Yangsoo

    2015-01-01

    The Belle II experiment at the SuperKEKB collider in Tsukuba, Japan, will start physics data taking in 2018. It is planned to accumulate an e+ e- collision data set of 50 /ab, about 50 times larger than that of the earlier Belle experiment. The software library for the new detector will use GEANT4 for Monte Carlo simulation and is an entirely new software and reconstruction system based on modern computing tools. Examples of physics simulation including beam background overlays will be described.

  11. Laser-Plasma Modeling Using PERSEUS Extended-MHD Simulation Code for HED Plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamlin, Nathaniel; Seyler, Charles

    2016-10-01

    We discuss the use of the PERSEUS extended-MHD simulation code for high-energy-density (HED) plasmas in modeling laser-plasma interactions in relativistic and nonrelativistic regimes. By formulating the fluid equations as a relaxation system in which the current is semi-implicitly time-advanced using the Generalized Ohm's Law, PERSEUS enables modeling of two-fluid phenomena in dense plasmas without the need to resolve the smallest electron length and time scales. For relativistic and nonrelativistic laser-target interactions, we have validated a cycle-averaged absorption (CAA) laser driver model against the direct approach of driving the electromagnetic fields. The CAA model refers to driving the radiation energy and flux rather than the fields, and using hyperbolic radiative transport, coupled to the plasma equations via energy source terms, to model absorption and propagation of the radiation. CAA has the advantage of not requiring adequate grid resolution of each laser wavelength, so that the system can span many wavelengths without requiring prohibitive CPU time. For several laser-target problems, we compare existing MHD results to extended-MHD results generated using PERSEUS with the CAA model, and examine effects arising from Hall physics. This work is supported by the National Nuclear Security Administration stewardship sciences academic program under Department of Energy cooperative agreements DE-FOA-0001153 and DE-NA0001836.

  12. Town Meeting on Plasma Physics at the National Science Foundation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-11-01

    We invite you to the Town Meeting on the role of the National Science Foundation (NSF) in supporting basic and applied research in Plasma Physics in the U.S. The overarching goal of NSF is to promote the progress of science and to enable training of the next generation of scientists and engineers at US colleges and universities. In this context, the role of the NSF Physics Division in leading the nearly 20 year old NSF/DOE Partnership in Basic Plasma Science and Engineering serves as an example of the long history of NSF support for basic plasma physics research. Yet, the NSF interest in maintaining a healthy university research base in plasma sciences extends across the Foundation. A total of five NSF Divisions are participating in the most recent Partnership solicitation, and a host of other multi-disciplinary and core programs provide opportunities for scientists to perform research on applications of plasma physics to Space & Solar Physics, Astrophysics, Accelerator Science, Material Science, Plasma Medicine, and many sub-disciplines within Engineering. This Town Meeting will provide a chance to discuss the full range of relevant NSF funding opportunities, and to begin a conversation on the present and future role of NSF in stewarding basic plasma science and engineering research at US colleges and universities. We would like to particularly encourage early career scientists and graduate students to participate in this Town Meeting, though everyone is invited to join what we hope to be a lively discussion.

  13. Plasma Physics Issues in Gas Discharge Laser Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-12-01

    WL-TR-92-2087 PLASMA PHYSICS ISSUES IN GAS DISCHARGE LASER DEVELOPMENT AD-A257 735 ALAN GARSCADDEN MARK J. KUSNER J. GARY EDEN WL/POOC-3 WRIGHT...LASERS INFRARED MOLECULAR jAS LASERS UNCLASSIFIED UNCLASSIFIED UNCLASSIFIED UL Plasma Physics Issues in Gas Discharge Laser Development Alan Garscadden...the close coupling between body of work was not generally useful in laser development . vibrationally excited nitrogen and CO or CO2 . In fact. the First

  14. Applications of Symmetry Methods to the Theory of Plasma Physics

    OpenAIRE

    Giampaolo Cicogna; Francesco Ceccherini; Francesco Pegoraro

    2006-01-01

    The theory of plasma physics offers a number of nontrivial examples of partial differential equations, which can be successfully treated with symmetry methods. We propose three different examples which may illustrate the reciprocal advantage of this "interaction" between plasma physics and symmetry techniques. The examples include, in particular, the complete symmetry analysis of system of two PDE's, with the determination of some conditional and partial symmetries, the construction of group-...

  15. Introduction to plasma physics with space, laboratory and astrophysical applications

    CERN Document Server

    Gurnett, Donald A

    2017-01-01

    Introducing basic principles of plasma physics and their applications to space, laboratory and astrophysical plasmas, this new edition provides updated material throughout. Topics covered include single-particle motions, kinetic theory, magnetohydrodynamics, small amplitude waves in hot and cold plasmas, and collisional effects. New additions include the ponderomotive force, tearing instabilities in resistive plasmas and the magnetorotational instability in accretion disks, charged particle acceleration by shocks, and a more in-depth look at nonlinear phenomena. A broad range of applications are explored: planetary magnetospheres and radiation belts, the confinement and stability of plasmas in fusion devices, the propagation of discontinuities and shock waves in the solar wind, and analysis of various types of plasma waves and instabilities that can occur in planetary magnetospheres and laboratory plasma devices. With step-by-step derivations and self-contained introductions to mathematical methods, this book...

  16. Three-dimensional global fluid simulations of cylindrical magnetized plasmas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Naulin, Volker; Windisch, T.; Grulke, O.

    2008-01-01

    . Thus, it is possible to assess the reproductive and predictive capabilities of plasma simulations in unprecedented detail. Here, three-dimensional global fluid simulations of a cylindrical magnetized plasma are presented. This plasma is characterized by the existence of spatially localized sources...... and sinks. The traditional scale separation paradigm is not applied in the simulation model to account for the important evolution of the background profiles due to the dynamics of turbulent fluctuations. Furthermore, the fluid modeling of sheath boundary conditions, which determine the plasma conditions...

  17. Simulation of laser interaction with ablative plasma and hydrodynamic behavior of laser supported plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tong Huifeng; Yuan Hong [Institute of Fluid Physics, Chinese Academy of Engineering Physics, P.O. Box 919-101, Mianyang, Sichuan 621900 (China); Tang Zhiping [CAS Key Laboratory for Mechanical Behavior and Design of Materials, Department of Mechanics and Mechanical Engineering, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei 230026 (China)

    2013-01-28

    When an intense laser beam irradiates on a solid target, ambient air ionizes and becomes plasma, while part of the target rises in temperature, melts, vaporizes, ionizes, and yet becomes plasma. A general Godunov finite difference scheme WENO (Weighted Essentially Non-Oscillatory Scheme) with fifth-order accuracy is used to simulate 2-dimensional axis symmetrical laser-supported plasma flow field in the process of laser ablation. The model of the calculation of ionization degree of plasma and the interaction between laser beam and plasma are considered in the simulation. The numerical simulations obtain the profiles of temperature, density, and velocity at different times which show the evolvement of the ablative plasma. The simulated results show that the laser energy is strongly absorbed by plasma on target surface and that the velocity of laser supported detonation (LSD) wave is half of the ideal LSD value derived from Chapman-Jouguet detonation theory.

  18. Plasma separation: physical separation at the molecular level

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gueroult, Renaud; Rax, Jean-Marcel; Fisch, Nathaniel J.

    2016-09-01

    Separation techniques are usually divided in two categories depending on the nature of the discriminating property: chemical or physical. Further to this difference, physical and chemical techniques differ in that chemical separation typically occurs at the molecular level, while physical separation techniques commonly operate at the macroscopic scale. Separation based on physical properties can in principle be realized at the molecular or even atomic scale by ionizing the mixture. This is in essence plasma based separation. Due to this fundamental difference, plasma based separation stands out from other separation techniques, and features unique properties. In particular, plasma separation allows separating different elements or chemical compounds based on physical properties. This could prove extremely valuable to separate macroscopically homogeneous mixtures made of substances of similar chemical formulation. Yet, the realization of plasma separation techniques' full potential requires identifying and controlling basic mechanisms in complex plasmas which exhibit suitable separation properties. In this paper, we uncover the potential of plasma separation for various applications, and identify the key physics mechanisms upon which hinges the development of these techniques.

  19. Lattice-Boltzmann simulation of laser interaction with weakly ionized helium plasmas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Huayu; Ki, Hyungson

    2010-07-01

    This paper presents a lattice Boltzmann method for laser interaction with weakly ionized plasmas considering electron impact ionization and three-body recombination. To simulate with physical properties of plasmas, the authors' previous work on the rescaling of variables is employed and the electromagnetic fields are calculated from the Maxwell equations by using the finite-difference time-domain method. To calculate temperature fields, energy equations are derived separately from the Boltzmann equations. In this way, we attempt to solve the full governing equations for plasma dynamics. With the developed model, the continuous-wave CO2 laser interaction with helium is simulated successfully.

  20. Physical Characterization of Florida International University Simulants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    HANSEN, ERICHK.

    2004-08-19

    Florida International University shipped Laponite, clay (bentonite and kaolin blend), and Quality Assurance Requirements Document AZ-101 simulants to the Savannah River Technology Center for physical characterization and to report the results. The objectives of the task were to measure the physical properties of the fluids provided by FIU and to report the results. The physical properties were measured using the approved River Protection Project Waste Treatment Plant characterization procedure [Ref. 1]. This task was conducted in response to the work outlined in CCN066794 [Ref. 2], authored by Gary Smith and William Graves of RPP-WTP.

  1. Numerical Simulation of Plasma Antenna with FDTD Method

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIANG Chao; XU Yue-Min; WANG Zhi-Jiang

    2008-01-01

    We adopt cylindrical-coordinate FDTD algorithm to simulate and analyse a 0.4-m-long column configuration plasma antenna. FDTD method is useful for solving electromagnetic problems, especially when wave characteristics and plasma properties are self-consistently related to each other. Focus on the frequency from 75 MHz to 400 MHz, the input impedance and radiation efficiency of plasma antennas are computed. Numerical results show that, different from copper antenna, the characteristics of plasma antenna vary simultaneously with plasma frequency and collision frequency. The property can be used to construct dynamically reconfigurable antenna.The investigation is meaningful and instructional for the optimization of plasma antenna design.

  2. Computer simulation in physics and engineering

    CERN Document Server

    Steinhauser, Martin Oliver

    2013-01-01

    This work is a needed reference for widely used techniques and methods of computer simulation in physics and other disciplines, such as materials science. The work conveys both: the theoretical foundations of computer simulation as well as applications and "tricks of the trade", that often are scattered across various papers. Thus it will meet a need and fill a gap for every scientist who needs computer simulations for his/her task at hand. In addition to being a reference, case studies and exercises for use as course reading are included.

  3. Physical simulation of urban rainfall infiltration

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Jie; ZENG Bing; WANG Yan-xia; SHEN Lei

    2008-01-01

    To meet the demand of urban rainwater integrated management, we designed and complemented a physical simulation experimental system of urban rainfall infiltration regulation parameters. We discuss the feasibility of quantitative regulations of urban underlying surface rainfall infiltration conditions and a practical application of a simulated experimental system. In a comprehensive analysis of the composition of an effective rainwater harvesting system and selection of water storage material, we simulated the major parameters of an experimental area rainfall, soil moisture and water storage capacity by providing an effective regulation of the experimental area runoff coefficient, obtained from basic data.

  4. PREFACE: Third International Workshop & Summer School on Plasma Physics 2008

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benova, E.; Dias, F. M.; Lebedev, Yu

    2010-01-01

    The Third International Workshop & Summer School on Plasma Physics (IWSSPP'08) organized by St Kliment Ohridsky University of Sofia, with co-organizers TCPA Foundation, Association EURATOM/IRNRE, The Union of the Physicists in Bulgaria, and the Bulgarian Academy of Sciences was held in Kiten, Bulgaria, at the Black Sea Coast, from 30 June to 5 July 2008. A Special Session on Plasmas for Environmental Issues was co-organised by the Institute of Plasmas and Nuclear Fusion, Lisbon, Portugal and the Laboratory of Plasmas and Energy Conversion, University of Toulouse, France. That puts the beginning of a series in Workshops on Plasmas for Environmental Issues, now as a satellite meeting of the European Physical Society Conference on Plasma Physics. As the previous issues of this scientific meeting (IWSSPP'05, J. Phys.: Conf. Series 44 (2006) and IWSSPP'06, J. Phys.: Conf. Series 63 (2007)), its aim was to stimulate the creation and support of a new generation of young scientists for further development of plasma physics fundamentals and applications, as well as to ensure an interdisciplinary exchange of views and initiate possible collaborations by bringing together scientists from various branches of plasma physics. This volume of Journal of Physics: Conference Series includes 38 papers (invited lectures, contributed talks and posters) devoted to various branches of plasma physics, among them fusion plasma and materials, dc and microwave discharge modelling, transport phenomena in gas discharge plasmas, plasma diagnostics, cross sections and rate constants of elementary processes, material processing, plasma-chemistry and technology. Some of them have been presented by internationally known and recognized specialists in their fields; others are MSc or PhD students' first steps in science. In both cases, we believe they will raise readers' interest. We would like to thank the members of both the International Advisory Committee and the Local Organizing Committee, the

  5. Hybrid molecular dynamics simulation for plasma induced damage analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsukuma, Masaaki

    2016-09-01

    In order to enable further device size reduction (also known as Moore's law) and improved power performance, the semiconductor industry is introducing new materials and device structures into the semiconductor fabrication process. Materials now include III-V compounds, germanium, cobalt, ruthenium, hafnium, and others. The device structure in both memory and logic has been evolving from planar to three dimensional (3D). One such device is the FinFET, where the transistor gate is a vertical fin made either of silicon, silicon-germanium or germanium. These changes have brought renewed interests in the structural damages caused by energetic ion bombardment of the fin sidewalls which are exposed to the ion flux from the plasma during the fin-strip off step. Better control of the physical damage of the 3D devices requires a better understanding of the damage formation mechanisms on such new materials and structures. In this study, the damage formation processes by ion bombardment have been simulated for Si and Ge substrate by Quantum Mechanics/Molecular Mechanics (QM/MM) hybrid simulations and compared to the results from the classical molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. In our QM/MM simulations, the highly reactive region in which the structural damage is created is simulated with the Density Functional based Tight Binding (DFTB) method and the region remote from the primary region is simulated using classical MD with the Stillinger-Weber and Moliere potentials. The learn on the fly method is also used to reduce the computational load. Hence our QM/MM simulation is much faster than the full QC-MD simulations and the original QM/MM simulations. The amorphous layers profile simulated with QM/MM have obvious differences in their thickness for silicon and germanium substrate. The profile of damaged structure in the germanium substrate is characterized by a deeper tail then in silicon. These traits are also observed in the results from the mass selected ion beam

  6. Physics and Dynamics of Current Sheets in Pulsed Plasma Thrusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-11-02

    pulsed plasma thruster. A simple experiment would involve measuring the impulse bit of a coaxial gas-fed pulsed plasma thruster operated in both positive...Princeton, NJ, 2002. [2] J. Marshal. Performance of a hydromagnetic plasma gun . The Physics of Fluids, 3(1):134–135, January-February 1960. [3] R.G. Jahn...Jahn and K.E. Clark. A large dielecteic vacuum facility. AIAA Jour- nal, 1966. [16] L.C. Burkhardt and R.H. Lovberg. Current sheet in a coaxial plasma

  7. PREFACE: First International Workshop and Summer School on Plasma Physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benova, Evgenia; Zhelyazkov, Ivan; Atanassov, Vladimir

    2006-07-01

    The First International Workshop and Summer School on Plasma Physics (IWSSPP'05) organized by The Faculty of Physics, University of Sofia and the Foundation `Theoretical and Computational Physics and Astrophysics' was dedicated to the World Year of Physics 2005 and held in Kiten, Bulgaria, on the Black Sea Coast, from 8--12 June 2005. The aim of the workshop was to bring together scientists from various branches of plasma physics in order to ensure an interdisciplinary exchange of views and initiate possible collaborations. Another important task was to stimulate the creation and support of a new generation of young scientists for the further development of plasma physics fundamentals and applications. This volume of Journal of Physics: Conference Series includes 31 papers (invited lectures, contributed talks and posters) devoted to various branches of plasma physics, among them fusion research, kinetics and transport phenomena in gas discharge plasmas, MHD waves and instabilities in the solar atmosphere, dc and microwave discharge modelling, plasma diagnostics, cross sections and rate constants of elementary processes, material processing, plasma-chemistry and technology. Some of them have been presented by internationally known and recognized specialists in their fields; others are Masters or PhD students' first steps in science. In both cases, we believe they will stimulate readers' interest. We would like to thank the members of both the International Advisory Committee and the Local Organizing Committee. We greatly appreciate the financial support from the sponsors: the Department for Language Teaching and International Students at Sofia University, Dr Ivan Bogorov Publishing house, and Artgraph2 Publishing house. We would like to express our gratitude to the invited lecturers who were willing to pay the participation fee. In this way, in addition to the intellectual support they provided by means of their excellent lectures, they also supported the school

  8. Reaction-diffusion problems in the physics of hot plasmas

    CERN Document Server

    Wilhelmsson, H

    2000-01-01

    The physics of hot plasmas is of great importance for describing many phenomena in the universe and is fundamental for the prospect of future fusion energy production on Earth. Nontrivial results of nonlinear electromagnetic effects in plasmas include the self-organization and self-formation in the plasma of structures compact in time and space. These are the consequences of competing processes of nonlinear interactions and can be best described using reaction-diffusion equations. Reaction-Diffusion Problems in the Physics of Hot Plasmas is focused on paradigmatic problems of a reaction-diffusion type met in many branches of science, concerning in particular the nonlinear interaction of electromagnetic fields with plasmas.

  9. Plasma Drifts in the Intermediate Magnetosphere: Simulation Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyon, J.; Zhang, B.

    2016-12-01

    One of the outstanding questions about the inner magnetosphere dynamics is how the ring current is populated. It is not clear how much is due to a general injection over longer time and spatial scales and how much due to more bursty events. One of the major uncertainties is the behavior of the plasma in the intermediate magnetosphere: the region where the magnetosphere changes from being tail-like to one where the dipole field dominates. This is also the region where physically the plasma behavior changes from MHD-like in the tail to one dominated by particle drifts in the inner magnetosphere. No of the current simulation models self-consistently handle the region where drifts are important but not dominant. We have recently developed a version of the multi-fluid LFM code that can self-consistently handle this situation. The drifts are modeled in a fashion similar to the Rice Convection Model in that a number of energy "channels" are explicitly simulated. However, the method is not limited to the "slow flow" region and both diamagnetic and inertial drifts are included. We present results from a number of idealized cases of the global magnetosphere interacting with a southward turning of the IMF. We discuss the relative importance of general convection and bursty flows to the transport of particles and energy across this region.

  10. Physics of High Temperature, Dense Plasmas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-01-01

    34Investigation of the High-Energy Acceleration Mode in the Coaxial Gun," Phys. Fluids, Suppl., S28, (1964). I. 9. Dattner, A. and Eninger J...34Studies of a Coaxial Plasma Gun," Phys. Fluids, Suppl., S41, (1964). II. 10. Wilcox, J. M., Pugh, E., Dattner, A. and Eninger , J., "Experimental Study of

  11. Research in Pulsed Power Plasma Physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-11-01

    constraints will preclude the use of channels with much with a Tesla coil. Nor is uniformity improved by the use of larger wall radii. a 3 kA prepulse. Driving...Oliphant. 12C. Bruno, J. Delvaux. A. Nicolas . and M. Roche, IEEE Trans. Plasma and P. F. Ottinger. App!. Phys. Lett. 45. 1043 (1984).ISci. PS-IS, 686

  12. Physical properties of erupting plasma associated with coronal mass ejections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, J.; Raymond, J. C.; Reeves, K. K.; Moon, Y.; Kim, K.

    2013-12-01

    We investigate the physical properties (temperature, density, and mass) of erupting plasma observed in X-rays and EUV, which are all associated with coronal mass ejections observed by SOHO/LASCO. The erupting plasmas are observed as absorption or emission features in the low corona. The absorption feature provides a lower limit to the cold mass while the emission feature provides an upper limit to the mass of observed plasma in X-ray and EUV. We compare the mass constraints for each temperature response and find that the mass estimates in EUV and XRT are smaller than the total mass in the coronagraph. Several events were observed by a few passbands in the X-rays, which allows us to determine the temperature of the eruptive plasma using a filter ratio method. The temperature of one event is estimated at about 8.6 MK near the top of the erupting plasma. This measurement is possibly an average temperature for higher temperature plasma because the XRT is more sensitive at higher temperatures. In addition, a few events show that the absorption features of a prominence or a loop change to emission features with the beginning of their eruptions in all EUV wavelengths of SDO/AIA, which indicates the heating of the plasma. By estimating the physical properties of the erupting plasmas, we discuss the heating of the plasmas associated with coronal mass ejections in the low corona.

  13. PREFACE: Second International Workshop & Summer School on Plasma Physics 2006

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benova, Evgeniya; Atanassov, Vladimir

    2007-04-01

    The Second International Workshop & Summer School on Plasma Physics (IWSSPP'06) organized by St. Kliment Ohridsky University of Sofia, The Union of the Physicists in Bulgaria, the Bulgarian Academy of Sciences and the Bulgarian Nuclear Society, was held in Kiten, Bulgaria, on the Black Sea Coast, from 3-9 July 2006. As with the first of these scientific meetings (IWSSPP'05 Journal of Physics: Conference Series 44 (2006)), its aim was to stimulate the creation and support of a new generation of young scientists for further development of plasma physics fundamentals and applications, as well as to ensure an interdisciplinary exchange of views and initiate possible collaborations by bringing together scientists from various branches of plasma physics. This volume of Journal of Physics: Conference Series includes 33 papers (invited lectures, contributed talks and posters) devoted to various branches of plasma physics, among them fusion plasma research, dc and microwave discharge modelling, transport phenomena in gas discharge plasmas, plasma diagnostics, cross sections and rate constants of elementary processes, material processing, plasma-chemistry and technology. Some of these papers were presented by internationally known and recognized specialists in their fields; others are MSc or PhD students' first steps in science. In both cases, we believe they will raise readers' interest. We would like to thank the members of both the International Advisory Committee and the Local Organizing Committee, the participants who sent their manuscripts and passed through the (sometimes heavy and troublesome) refereeing and editing procedure and our referees for their patience and considerable effort to improve the manuscripts. We greatly appreciate the financial support from the sponsors: the Department for Language Teaching and International Students at the University of Sofia and Natsionalna Elektricheska Kompania EAD. We would like to express our gratitude to the invited

  14. Plasma physics and environmental perturbation laboratory. Volume 1: Executive summary

    Science.gov (United States)

    1973-01-01

    Space physics and plasma physics experiments that can be performed from the space shuttle were identified. Potential experiment concepts were analyzed to derive requirements for a spaceborne experiment facility. The laboratory, known as the Plasma Physics and Environmental Perturbation Laboratory consists of a 33-foot pallet of instruments connected to a 25-foot pressurized control module. Two 50-meter booms, two subsatellites, a high power transmitter, a multipurpose accelerator array, a set of deployable canisters, and a gimbaled instrument platform are the primary systems deployed from the pallet. The pressurized module contains all the control and display equipment required to conduct the experiments, and life support and power subsystems.

  15. Simulating Physical Phenomena by Quantum Networks

    CERN Document Server

    Somma, R D; Gubernatis, J E; Knill, E H; Laflamme, R

    2002-01-01

    Physical systems, characterized by an ensemble of interacting elementary constituents, can be represented and studied by different algebras of observables or operators. For example, a fully polarized electronic system can be investigated by means of the algebra generated by the usual fermionic creation and annihilation operators, or by using the algebra of Pauli (spin-1/2) operators. The correspondence between the two algebras is given by the Jordan-Wigner isomorphism. As we previously noted similar one-to-one mappings enable one to represent any physical system in a quantum computer. In this paper we evolve and exploit this fundamental concept in quantum information processing to simulate generic physical phenomena by quantum networks. We give quantum circuits useful for the efficient evaluation of the physical properties (e.g, spectrum of observables or relevant correlation functions) of an arbitrary system with Hamiltonian $H$.

  16. Plasma physics analysis of SERT-2 operation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaufman, H. R.

    1980-01-01

    An analysis of the major plasma processes involved in the SERT 2 spacecraft experiments was conducted to aid in the interpretation of recent data. A plume penetration model was developed for neutralization electron conduction to the ion beam and showed qualitative agreement with flight data. In the SERT 2 configuration conduction of neutralization electrons between thrusters was experimentally demonstrated in space. The analysis of this configuration suggests that the relative orientation of the two magnetic fields was an important factor in the observed results. Specifically, the opposed field orientation appeared to provide a high conductivity channel between thrusters and a barrier to the ambient low energy electrons in space. The SERT 2 neutralizer currents with negative neutralizer biases were up to about twice the theoretical prediction for electron collection by the ground screen. An explanation for the higher experimental values was a possible conductive path from the neutralizer plume to a nearby part of the ground screen. Plasma probe measurements of SERT 2 gave the clearest indication of plasma electron temperature, with normal operation being near 5 eV and discharge only operation near 2 eV.

  17. Direct simulation Monte Carlo schemes for Coulomb interactions in plasmas

    CERN Document Server

    Dimarco, Giacomo; Pareschi, Lorenzo

    2010-01-01

    We consider the development of Monte Carlo schemes for molecules with Coulomb interactions. We generalize the classic algorithms of Bird and Nanbu-Babovsky for rarefied gas dynamics to the Coulomb case thanks to the approximation introduced by Bobylev and Nanbu (Theory of collision algorithms for gases and plasmas based on the Boltzmann equation and the Landau-Fokker-Planck equation, Physical Review E, Vol. 61, 2000). Thus, instead of considering the original Boltzmann collision operator, the schemes are constructed through the use of an approximated Boltzmann operator. With the above choice larger time steps are possible in simulations; moreover the expensive acceptance-rejection procedure for collisions is avoided and every particle collides. Error analysis and comparisons with the original Bobylev-Nanbu (BN) scheme are performed. The numerical results show agreement with the theoretical convergence rate of the approximated Boltzmann operator and the better performance of Bird-type schemes with respect to t...

  18. Flow Simulation and Optimization of Plasma Reactors for Coal Gasification

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    冀春俊; 张英姿; 马腾才

    2003-01-01

    This paper reports a 3-d numerical simulation system to analyze the complicatedflow in plasma reactors for coal gasification, which involve complex chemical reaction, two-phaseflow and plasma effect. On the basis of analytic results, the distribution of the density, tempera-ture and components' concentration are obtained and a different plasma reactor configuration isproposed to optimize the flow parameters. The numerical simulation results show an improvedconversion ratio of the coal gasification. Different kinds of chemical reaction models are used tosimulate the complex flow inside the reactor. It can be concluded that the numerical simulationsystem can be very useful for the design and optimization of the plasma reactor.

  19. Guest investigator program study: Physics of equatorial plasma bubbles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsunoda, Roland T.

    1994-01-01

    Plasma bubbles are large-scale (10 to 100 km) depletions in plasma density found in the night-time equatorial ionosphere. Their formation has been found to entail the upward transport of plasma over hundreds of kilometers in altitude, suggesting that bubbles play significant roles in the physics of many of the diverse and unique features found in the low-latitude ionosphere. In the simplest scenario, plasma bubbles appear first as perturbations in the bottomside F layer, which is linearly unstable to the gravitationally driven Rayleigh-Taylor instability. Once initiated, bubbles develop upward through the peak of the F layer into its topside (sometimes to altitudes in excess of 1000 km), a behavior predicted by the nonlinear form of the same instability. While good general agreement has been found between theory and observations, little is known about the detailed physics associated with plasma bubbles. Our research activity centered around two topics: the shape of plasma bubbles and associated electric fields, and the day-to-day variability in the occurrence of plasma bubbles. The first topic was pursued because of a divergence in view regarding the nonlinear physics associated with plasma bubble development. While the development of perturbations in isodensity contours in the bottomside F layer into plasma bubbles is well accepted, some believed bubbles to be cylinder-like closed regions of depleted plasma density that floated upward leaving a turbulent wake behind them (e.g., Woodman and LaHoz, 1976; Ott, 1978; Kelley and Ott, 1978). Our results, summarized in a paper submitted to the Journal of Geophysical Research, consisted of incoherent scatter radar measurements that showed unambiguously that the depleted region is wedgelike and not cylinderlike, and a case study and modeling of SM-D electric field instrument (EFI) measurements that showed that the absence of electric-field perturbations outside the plasma-depleted region is a distinct signature of wedge

  20. Numerical Simulation of Ultrafast Laser Pulse Propagation in Tenuous Plasmas:Envelope Evolving and Modulation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Hong-Yu; XIE Bai-Song

    2006-01-01

    We propose an effective and useful numerical simulation scheme for the investigation of the ultra-fast laser pulses in tenuous plasmas. The accuracy of the method is tested by numerical examples. We check some special examples to investigate the laser envelope evolving and modulation in plasmas. Asymmetric two-peak modulation structure is found and its underlying physics is analyzed. The advantages and shortages of the method are also discussed.

  1. Morphology of Gas Release in Physical Simulants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Daniel, Richard C.; Burns, Carolyn A.; Crawford, Amanda D.; Hylden, Laura R.; Bryan, Samuel A.; MacFarlan, Paul J.; Gauglitz, Phillip A.

    2014-07-03

    This report documents testing activities conducted as part of the Deep Sludge Gas Release Event Project (DSGREP). The testing described in this report focused on evaluating the potential retention and release mechanisms of hydrogen bubbles in underground radioactive waste storage tanks at Hanford. The goal of the testing was to evaluate the rate, extent, and morphology of gas release events in simulant materials. Previous, undocumented scoping tests have evidenced dramatically different gas release behavior from simulants with similar physical properties. Specifically, previous gas release tests have evaluated the extent of release of 30 Pa kaolin and 30 Pa bentonite clay slurries. While both materials are clays and both have equivalent material shear strength using a shear vane, it was found that upon stirring, gas was released immediately and completely from bentonite clay slurry while little if any gas was released from the kaolin slurry. The motivation for the current work is to replicate these tests in a controlled quality test environment and to evaluate the release behavior for another simulant used in DSGREP testing. Three simulant materials were evaluated: 1) a 30 Pa kaolin clay slurry, 2) a 30 Pa bentonite clay slurry, and 3) Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) Simulant (a simulant designed to support DSGREP RT instability testing. Entrained gas was generated in these simulant materials using two methods: 1) application of vacuum over about a 1-minute period to nucleate dissolved gas within the simulant and 2) addition of hydrogen peroxide to generate gas by peroxide decomposition in the simulants over about a 16-hour period. Bubble release was effected by vibrating the test material using an external vibrating table. When testing with hydrogen peroxide, gas release was also accomplished by stirring of the simulant.

  2. Plasma-Powder Feedstock Interaction During Plasma Spray-Physical Vapor Deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anwaar, Aleem; Wei, Lianglinag; Guo, Hongbo; Zhang, Baopeng

    2017-02-01

    Plasma spray-physical vapor deposition is a new process developed to produce coatings from the vapor phase. To achieve deposition from the vapor phase, the plasma-feedstock interaction inside the plasma torch, i.e., from the powder injection point to the nozzle exit, is critical. In this work, the plasma characteristics and the momentum and heat transfer between the plasma and powder feedstock at different torch input power levels were investigated theoretically to optimize the net plasma torch power, among other important factors such as the plasma gas composition, powder feed rate, and carrier gas. The plasma characteristics were calculated using the CEA2 code, and the plasma-feedstock interaction was studied inside the torch nozzle at low-pressure (20-25 kPa) conditions. A particle dynamics model was introduced to compute the particle velocity, coupled with Xi Chen's drag model for nonevaporating particles. The results show that the energy transferred to the particles and the coating morphology are greatly influenced by the plasma gas characteristics and the particle dynamics inside the nozzle. The heat transfer between the plasma gas and feedstock material increased with the net torch power up to an optimum at 64 kW, at which a maximum of 3.4% of the available plasma energy was absorbed by the feedstock powder. Experimental results using agglomerated 7-8 wt.% yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) powder as feedstock material confirmed the theoretical predictions.

  3. Plasma-Powder Feedstock Interaction During Plasma Spray-Physical Vapor Deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anwaar, Aleem; Wei, Lianglinag; Guo, Hongbo; Zhang, Baopeng

    2017-01-01

    Plasma spray-physical vapor deposition is a new process developed to produce coatings from the vapor phase. To achieve deposition from the vapor phase, the plasma-feedstock interaction inside the plasma torch, i.e., from the powder injection point to the nozzle exit, is critical. In this work, the plasma characteristics and the momentum and heat transfer between the plasma and powder feedstock at different torch input power levels were investigated theoretically to optimize the net plasma torch power, among other important factors such as the plasma gas composition, powder feed rate, and carrier gas. The plasma characteristics were calculated using the CEA2 code, and the plasma-feedstock interaction was studied inside the torch nozzle at low-pressure (20-25 kPa) conditions. A particle dynamics model was introduced to compute the particle velocity, coupled with Xi Chen's drag model for nonevaporating particles. The results show that the energy transferred to the particles and the coating morphology are greatly influenced by the plasma gas characteristics and the particle dynamics inside the nozzle. The heat transfer between the plasma gas and feedstock material increased with the net torch power up to an optimum at 64 kW, at which a maximum of 3.4% of the available plasma energy was absorbed by the feedstock powder. Experimental results using agglomerated 7-8 wt.% yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) powder as feedstock material confirmed the theoretical predictions.

  4. Computerized tomographic imaging for space plasma physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yuhong; Coplan, Michael A.; Moore, John H.; Berenstein, Carlos A.

    1990-01-01

    The measurement of plasma electron velocity distribution functions as a problem in imaging and image reconstruction is considered. A model instrument that measures the integral of the distribution function along lines in velocity space is presented. This allows the use of the powerful mathematical and numerical methods that have recently been so successful in other areas of imaging. It is found that this approach leads to classes of instruments that are qualitatively different from contemporary designs. An investigation of different methods of reconstruction of the distribution function from integral measurements reveals that the mathematical tools appropriate to one particular imaging problem may be very different from those required to deal with another.

  5. Two-fluid biasing simulations of the large plasma device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisher, Dustin M.; Rogers, Barrett N.

    2017-02-01

    External biasing of the Large Plasma Device (LAPD) and its impact on plasma flows and turbulence are explored for the first time in 3D simulations using the Global Braginskii Solver code. Without external biasing, the LAPD plasma spontaneously rotates in the ion diamagnetic direction. The application of a positive bias increases the plasma rotation in the simulations, which show the emergence of a coherent Kelvin Helmholtz (KH) mode outside of the cathode edge with poloidal mode number m ≃6 . Negative biasing reduces the rotation in the simulations, which exhibit KH turbulence modestly weaker than but otherwise similar to unbiased simulations. Biasing either way, but especially positively, forces the plasma potential inside the cathode edge to a spatially constant, KH-stable profile, leading to a more quiescent core plasma than the unbiased case. A moderate increase in plasma confinement and an associated steepening of the profiles are seen in the biasing runs. The simulations thus show that the application of external biasing can improve confinement while also driving a Kelvin-Helmholtz instability. Ion-neutral collisions have only a weak effect in the biased or unbiased simulations.

  6. Simulation of plasma turbulence in scrape-off layer conditions: the GBS code, simulation results and code validation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ricci, P.; Halpern, F. D.; Jolliet, S.; Loizu, J.; Mosetto, A.; Fasoli, A.; Furno, I.; Theiler, C.

    2012-12-01

    Based on the drift-reduced Braginskii equations, the Global Braginskii Solver, GBS, is able to model the scrape-off layer (SOL) plasma turbulence in terms of the interplay between the plasma outflow from the tokamak core, the turbulent transport, and the losses at the vessel. Model equations, the GBS numerical algorithm, and GBS simulation results are described. GBS has been first developed to model turbulence in basic plasma physics devices, such as linear and simple magnetized toroidal devices, which contain some of the main elements of SOL turbulence in a simplified setting. In this paper we summarize the findings obtained from the simulation carried out in these configurations and we report the first simulations of SOL turbulence. We also discuss the validation project that has been carried out together with the GBS development.

  7. Plasma physics of accreting neutron stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, Pranab; Lamb, Frederick K.

    1991-01-01

    Plasma concepts and phenomena that are needed to understand X- and gamma-ray sources are discussed. The capture of material from the wind or from the atmosphere or envelope of a binary companion star is described and the resulting types of accretion flows discussed. The reasons for the formation of a magnetosphere around the neutron star are explained. The qualitative features of the magnetospheres of accreting neutron stars are then described and compared with the qualitative features of the geomagnetosphere. The conditions for stable flow and for angular and linear momentum conservation are explained in the context of accretion by magnetic neutron stars and applied to obtain rough estimates of the scale of the magnetosphere. Accretion from Keplerian disks is then considered in some detail. The radial structure of geometrically thin disk flows, the interaction of disk flows with the neutron star magnetosphere, and models of steady accretion from Keplerian disks are described. Accretion torques and the resulting changes in the spin frequencies of rotating neutron stars are considered. The predicted behavior is then compared with observations of accretion-powered pulsars. Magnetospheric processes that may accelerate particles to very high energies, producing GeV and, perhaps, TeV gamma-rays are discussed. Finally, the mechanisms that decelerate and eventually stop accreting plasma at the surfaces of strongly magnetic neutron stars are described.

  8. Physics Methods for the Simulation of Photoionisation

    CERN Document Server

    Basaglia, Tullio; Han, Min Cheol; Hoff, Gabriela; Kim, Chan Hyeong; Kim, Han Sung; Pia, Maria Grazia; Saracco, Paolo

    2013-01-01

    Several physics methods for the simulation of the photoelectric effect are quantitatively evaluated with respect to a large collection of experimental data retrieved from the literature. They include theoretical and empirical calculations of total and partial cross sections, and calculations of the photoelectron angular distribution. Some of these models are currently implemented in general purpose Monte Carlo systems; some have been implemented and evaluated for possible use in Monte Carlo particle transport for the first time in this study.

  9. Reactive programming of simulations in physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boussinot, Frédéric; Monasse, Bernard; Susini, Jean-Ferdy

    2015-04-01

    We consider the Reactive Programming (RP) approach to simulate physical systems. The choice of RP is motivated by the fact that RP genuinely offers logical parallelism, instantaneously broadcast events, and dynamic creation/destruction of parallel components and events. To illustrate our approach, we consider the implementation of a system of Molecular Dynamics, in the context of Java with the Java3D library for 3D visualization.

  10. Reactive Programming of Simulations in Physics

    CERN Document Server

    Boussinot, Frédéric; Susini, Jean-Ferdy

    2014-01-01

    We consider the Reactive Programming (RP) approach to simulate physical systems. The choice of RP is motivated by the fact that RP genuinely offers logical parallelism, instantaneously broadcast events, and dynamic creation/destruction of parallel components and events. To illustrate our approach, we consider the implementation of a system of Molecular Dynamics, in the context of Java with the Java3D library for 3D visualisation.

  11. Simulation of laser-driven plasma beat-wave propagation in collisional weakly relativistic plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaur, Maninder; Nandan Gupta, Devki

    2016-11-01

    The process of interaction of lasers beating in a plasma has been explored by virtue of particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations in the presence of electron-ion collisions. A plasma beat wave is resonantly excited by ponderomotive force by two relatively long laser pulses of different frequencies. The amplitude of the plasma wave become maximum, when the difference in the frequencies is equal to the plasma frequency. We propose to demonstrate the energy transfer between the laser beat wave and the plasma wave in the presence of electron-ion collision in nearly relativistic regime with 2D-PIC simulations. The relativistic effect and electron-ion collision both affect the energy transfer between the interacting waves. The finding of simulation results shows that there is a considerable decay in the plasma wave and the field energy over time in the presence of electron-ion collisions.

  12. Relativistic modeling capabilities in PERSEUS extended MHD simulation code for HED plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hamlin, Nathaniel D., E-mail: nh322@cornell.edu [438 Rhodes Hall, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY, 14853 (United States); Seyler, Charles E., E-mail: ces7@cornell.edu [Cornell University, Ithaca, NY, 14853 (United States)

    2014-12-15

    We discuss the incorporation of relativistic modeling capabilities into the PERSEUS extended MHD simulation code for high-energy-density (HED) plasmas, and present the latest hybrid X-pinch simulation results. The use of fully relativistic equations enables the model to remain self-consistent in simulations of such relativistic phenomena as X-pinches and laser-plasma interactions. By suitable formulation of the relativistic generalized Ohm’s law as an evolution equation, we have reduced the recovery of primitive variables, a major technical challenge in relativistic codes, to a straightforward algebraic computation. Our code recovers expected results in the non-relativistic limit, and reveals new physics in the modeling of electron beam acceleration following an X-pinch. Through the use of a relaxation scheme, relativistic PERSEUS is able to handle nine orders of magnitude in density variation, making it the first fluid code, to our knowledge, that can simulate relativistic HED plasmas.

  13. GPU-Accelerated PIC/MCC Simulation of Laser-Plasma Interaction Using BUMBLEBEE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Xiaolin; Huang, Tao; Chen, Wenlong; Wu, Huidong; Tang, Maowen; Li, Bin

    2015-11-01

    The research of laser-plasma interaction in its wide applications relies on the use of advanced numerical simulation tools to achieve high performance operation while reducing computational time and cost. BUMBLEBEE has been developed to be a fast simulation tool used in the research of laser-plasma interactions. BUMBLEBEE uses a 1D3V electromagnetic PIC/MCC algorithm that is accelerated by using high performance Graphics Processing Unit (GPU) hardware. BUMBLEBEE includes a friendly user-interface module and four physics simulators. The user-interface provides a powerful solid-modeling front end and graphical and computational post processing functionality. The solver of BUMBLEBEE has four modules for now, which are used to simulate the field ionization, electron collisional ionization, binary coulomb collision and laser-plasma interaction processes. The ionization characteristics of laser-neutral interaction and the generation of high-energy electrons have been analyzed by using BUMBLEBEE for validation.

  14. Flow simulation and optimization of plasma reactors for coal gasification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ji, C.J.; Zhang, Y.Z.; Ma, T.C. [Dalian University of Technology, Dalian (China). Power Engineering Dept.

    2003-10-01

    This paper reports a 3-D numerical simulation system to analyze the complicated flow in plasma reactors for coal gasification, which involve complex chemical reaction, two-phase flow and plasma effect. On the basis of analytic results, the distribution of the density, temperature and components' concentration are obtained and a different plasma reactor configuration is proposed to optimize the flow parameters. The numerical simulation results show an improved conversion ratio of the coal gasification. Different kinds of chemical reaction models are used to simulate the complex flow inside the reactor. It can be concluded that the numerical simulation system can be very useful for the design and optimization of the plasma reactor.

  15. Modelling of dusty plasma properties by computer simulation methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baimbetov, F B [IETP, Al Farabi Kazakh National University, 96a, Tole bi St, Almaty 050012 (Kazakhstan); Ramazanov, T S [IETP, Al Farabi Kazakh National University, 96a, Tole bi St, Almaty 050012 (Kazakhstan); Dzhumagulova, K N [IETP, Al Farabi Kazakh National University, 96a, Tole bi St, Almaty 050012 (Kazakhstan); Kadyrsizov, E R [Institute for High Energy Densities of RAS, Izhorskaya 13/19, Moscow 125412 (Russian Federation); Petrov, O F [IETP, Al Farabi Kazakh National University, 96a, Tole bi St, Almaty 050012 (Kazakhstan); Gavrikov, A V [IETP, Al Farabi Kazakh National University, 96a, Tole bi St, Almaty 050012 (Kazakhstan)

    2006-04-28

    Computer simulation of dusty plasma properties is performed. The radial distribution functions, the diffusion coefficient are calculated on the basis of the Langevin dynamics. A comparison with the experimental data is made.

  16. Monte Carlo simulation of electron beam air plasma characteristics

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Deng Yong-Feng; Han Xian-Wei; Tan Chang

    2009-01-01

    A high-energy electron beam generator is used to generate a plasma in atmosphere. Based on a Monte Carlo toolkit named GEANT4,a model including complete physics processes is established to simulate the passage of the electron beam in air. Based on the model,the characteristics of the electron beam air plasma are calculated. The energy distribution of beam electrons (BEs) indicates that high-energy electrons almost reside in the centre region of the beam,but low-energy electrons always live in the fringe area. The energy deposition is calculated in two cases,i.e.,with and without secondary electrons (SEs). Analysis indicates that the energy deposition of Ses accounts for a large part of the total energy deposition. The results of the energy spectrum show that the electrons in the inlet layer of the low-pressure chamber (LPC) are monoenergetic,but the energy spectrum of the electrons in the outlet layer is not pure. The SEs are largely generated at the outlet of the LPC. Moreover,both the energy distribution of Bes and the magnitude of the density of SEs are closely related to the pressure of LPC. Thus,a conclusion is drawn that a low magnitude of LPC pressure is helpful for reducing the energy loss in the LPC and also useful for greatly increasing the secondary electron density in dense air.

  17. Applications of Symmetry Methods to the Theory of Plasma Physics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giampaolo Cicogna

    2006-02-01

    Full Text Available The theory of plasma physics offers a number of nontrivial examples of partial differential equations, which can be successfully treated with symmetry methods. We propose three different examples which may illustrate the reciprocal advantage of this "interaction" between plasma physics and symmetry techniques. The examples include, in particular, the complete symmetry analysis of system of two PDE's, with the determination of some conditional and partial symmetries, the construction of group-invariant solutions, and the symmetry classification of a nonlinear PDE.

  18. Development Of Sputtering Models For Fluids-Based Plasma Simulation Codes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veitzer, Seth; Beckwith, Kristian; Stoltz, Peter

    2015-09-01

    Rf-driven plasma devices such as ion sources and plasma processing devices for many industrial and research applications benefit from detailed numerical modeling. Simulation of these devices using explicit PIC codes is difficult due to inherent separations of time and spatial scales. One alternative type of model is fluid-based codes coupled with electromagnetics, that are applicable to modeling higher-density plasmas in the time domain, but can relax time step requirements. To accurately model plasma-surface processes, such as physical sputtering and secondary electron emission, kinetic particle models have been developed, where particles are emitted from a material surface due to plasma ion bombardment. In fluid models plasma properties are defined on a cell-by-cell basis, and distributions for individual particle properties are assumed. This adds a complexity to surface process modeling, which we describe here. We describe the implementation of sputtering models into the hydrodynamic plasma simulation code USim, as well as methods to improve the accuracy of fluids-based simulation of plasmas-surface interactions by better modeling of heat fluxes. This work was performed under the auspices of the Department of Energy, Office of Basic Energy Sciences Award #DE-SC0009585.

  19. Simulation of Flow Around Cylinder Actuated by DBD Plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yuling; Gao, Chao; Wu, Bin; Hu, Xu

    2016-07-01

    The electric-static body force model is obtained by solving Maxwell's electromagnetic equations. Based on the electro-static model, numerical modeling of flow around a cylinder with a dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) plasma effect is also presented. The flow streamlines between the numerical simulation and the particle image velocimetry (PIV) experiment are consistent. According to the numerical simulation, DBD plasma can reduce the drag coefficient and change the vortex shedding frequencies of flow around the cylinder.

  20. Simulations of Plasma-Liner Formation and Implosion for the PLX- α Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samulyak, Roman; Cassibry, Jason; Schillo, Kevin; Shih, Wen; Yates, Kevin; Hsu, Scott; PLX-Alpha Collaboration

    2016-10-01

    Detailed numerical studies of the propagation and merger of high-Mach-number plasma jets and the formation and implosion of plasma liners have been performed using the FronTier and SPH codes enhanced with radiation, physical diffusion, and plasma-EOS models. These simulations support the Plasma Liner Experiment-ALPHA (PLX- α) project (see S. Hsu's talk in this session). Simulations predict properties of plasma liners, in particular 4 π-averaged liner density, ram pressure, and Mach number, the degree of non-uniformity, strength of primary and secondary shock waves, and scalings with the number of plasma jets, initial jet parameters, and other input data. In addition to direct analysis of liner states, simulations also provide synthetic data for direct comparison to experimental data from a multi-chord interferometer and survey and high-resolution spectrometers. Code verification and comparisons as well as predictions for the first series of PLX- α experiments with 6 and 7 jets will be presented. Verified against experimental data, both codes will be used for predictive simulations of plasma liners for PLX- α experiments and potential scaled-up future experiments. Supported by the ARPA-E ALPHA program.

  1. PREFACE: VII Brazilian Meeting on Simulational Physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plascak, Joao Antonio; Rosas, Alexandres

    2014-03-01

    This special issue includes invited and selected articles of the VIIth Brazilian Meeting on Simulational Physics (BMSP), held in João Pessoa, Paraíba, Brazil, from the 5th to 10th August, 2013. This is the seventh such meeting, and the first one to have contributed papers published in the Journal of Physics: Conference Series. The previous meetings in the BMSP series took place in the mountains of Minas Gerais and in the region of the Brazilian Pantanal. Now, for the first time, the Meeting was held in the pleasant shores of João Pessoa, the capital of the Paraíba state. The VIIth BMSP brought together more than 50 researchers from all over the world for a vibrant and productive period. As in the previous meetings, the talks and posters highlighted recent advances in applications, algorithms, and implementations of computer simulation methods for the study of condensed matter, materials, out of equilibrium, quantum and biologically motivated systems. We are sure that this meeting series will continue to provide a valuable venue for people working in simulational physics to exchange ideas and discuss the state of art of this always expanding field. We are very glad to realize this special issue, and are most appreciative to the editors of the Journal of Physics: Conference Series for making this publication possible. We are grateful for the outstanding work of the João Pessoa team, for the financial support of the Brazilian agencies CNPq, CAPES, FAPESQ, and of the Federal Universities UFPB and UFMG. At last, but not least, we would like to acknowledge all of the authors of this special issue for their contributions. João Antonio Plascak Alexandre Rosas Guest Editors Conference photograph

  2. Physics of Phase Space Matching for Staging Plasma and Traditional Accelerator Components Using Longitudinally Tailored Plasma Profiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, X L; Hua, J F; Wu, Y P; Zhang, C J; Li, F; Wan, Y; Pai, C-H; Lu, W; An, W; Yu, P; Hogan, M J; Joshi, C; Mori, W B

    2016-03-25

    Phase space matching between two plasma-based accelerator (PBA) stages and between a PBA and a traditional accelerator component is a critical issue for emittance preservation. The drastic differences of the transverse focusing strengths as the beam propagates between stages and components may lead to a catastrophic emittance growth even when there is a small energy spread. We propose using the linear focusing forces from nonlinear wakes in longitudinally tailored plasma density profiles to control phase space matching between sections with negligible emittance growth. Several profiles are considered and theoretical analysis and particle-in-cell simulations show how these structures may work in four different scenarios. Good agreement between theory and simulation is obtained, and it is found that the adiabatic approximation misses important physics even for long profiles.

  3. Plasma Physics Research at an Undergraduate Institution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Padalino, Stephen

    2007-11-01

    Undergraduate research experiences have motivated many physics majors to continue their studies at the graduate level. The Department of Physics and Astronomy at SUNY Geneseo, a primarily undergraduate institution, recognizes this simple reality and is committed to ensuring research opportunities are available to interested majors beginning as early as their freshman year. Every year for more than a decade, as many as two dozen students and 8 faculty members have worked on projects related to high energy density physics and inertial confinement fusion during the summer months and the academic year. By working with their research sponsors, it has been possible to identify an impressive number of projects suitable for an institution such as Geneseo. These projects tend to be hands-on and require teamwork and innovation to be successful. They also take advantage of in-house capabilities such as the 2 MV tandem pelletron accelerator, a scanning electron microscope, a duoplasmatron ion deposition system and a 64 processor computing cluster. The end products of their efforts are utilized at the sponsoring facilities in support of nationally recognized programs. In this talk, I will discuss a number of these projects and point out what made them attractive and appropriate for an institution like Geneseo, the direct and indirect benefits of the research opportunities for the students and faculty, and how the national programs benefited from the cost-effective use of undergraduate research. In addition, I will discuss the importance of exposure for both students and faculty mentors to the larger scientific community through posters presentations at annual meetings such as the DPP and DNP. Finally, I will address the need for even greater research opportunities for undergraduate students in the future and the importance of establishing longer ``educational pipelines'' to satisfy the ever growing need for top-tier scientists and engineers in industry, academia and the

  4. A Toroidally Symmetric Plasma Simulation code for design of position and shape control on tokamak plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takase, Haruhiko [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Naka, Ibaraki (Japan). Naka Fusion Research Establishment; Senda, Ikuo

    1999-04-01

    A Toroidally Symmetric Plasma Simulation (TSPS) code has been developed for investigating the position and shape control on tokamak plasmas. The analyses of three-dimensional eddy currents on the conducting components around the plasma and the two-dimensional magneto-hydrodynamic (MHD) equilibrium are taken into account in this code. The code can analyze the plasma position and shape control during the minor disruption in which the deformation of plasma is not negligible. Using the ITER (International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor) parameters, some examples of calculations are shown in this paper. (author)

  5. Physics considerations for laser-plasma linear colliders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schroeder, Carl; Esarey, Eric; Geddes, Cameron; Benedetti, Carlo; Leemans, Wim

    2010-06-11

    Physics considerations for a next-generation linear collider based on laser-plasma accelerators are discussed. The ultra-high accelerating gradient of a laser-plasma accelerator and short laser coupling distance between accelerator stages allows for a compact linac. Two regimes of laser-plasma acceleration are discussed. The highly nonlinear regime has the advantages of higher accelerating fields and uniform focusing forces, whereas the quasi-linear regime has the advantage of symmetric accelerating properties for electrons and positrons. Scaling of various accelerator and collider parameters with respect to plasma density and laser wavelength are derived. Reduction of beamstrahlung effects implies the use of ultra-short bunches of moderate charge. The total linac length scales inversely with the square root of the plasma density, whereas the total power scales proportional to the square root of the density. A 1 TeV center-of-mass collider based on stages using a plasma density of 10{sup 17} cm{sup -3} requires tens of J of laser energy per stage (using 1 {micro}m wavelength lasers) with tens of kHz repetition rate. Coulomb scattering and synchrotron radiation are examined and found not to significantly degrade beam quality. A photon collider based on laser-plasma accelerated beams is also considered. The requirements for the scattering laser energy are comparable to those of a single laser-plasma accelerator stage.

  6. Physics of liquid and crystalline plasmas: Future perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morfill, G. E.

    It has been shown that under certain conditions "complex plasmas" (plasma containing ions, electrons and charged microspheres) may undergo spontaneous phase changes to become liquid and crystalline, without recombination of the charge components. Hence these systems may be regarded as new plasma states "condensed plasmas". The ordering forces are mainly electrostatic, but dipolar effects, anisotropic pressure due shielding, ion flow focussing etc. may all play a role, too. Complex plasmas are of great interest from a fundamental research point of view because the individual particles of one plasma component (the charged microspheres) can be visualised and hence the plasma can be studied at the kinetic level. Also, the relevant time scales (e.g. 1/plasma frequency) are of order 0.1 sec, the plasma processes occur practically in "slow motion". We will discuss some physical processes (e.g. wave propagation, shocks, phase transitions) of these systems and outline the potential of the research for the understanding of strongly coupled systems. Technologically, it is expected that colloidal plasmas will also become very important, because both plasma technology and colloid technology are widely developed already. In this overview first the basic forces between the particles are discussed, then the phase transitions, the lattice structures and results from active experiments will be presented. Finally the future perspectives will be discussed, from the scientific potential point of view and the experimental approaches in the laboratory and in space. Experiments under microgravity conditions are of great importance, because the microspheres are 10's of billions times heavier than the ions.

  7. Influences on ionization fraction in an inductively coupled ionized physical vapor deposition device plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juliano, Daniel R.; Ruzic, David N.; Allain, Monica M. C.; Hayden, Douglas B.

    2002-01-01

    A computer simulation was created to model the transport of sputtered atoms through an ionized physical vapor deposition (IPVD) system. The simulation combines Monte Carlo and fluid methods to track the metal atoms that are emitted from the target, interact with the IPVD plasma, and are eventually deposited somewhere in the system. Ground-state neutral, excited, and ionized metal atoms are tracked. The simulation requires plasma conditions to be specified by the user. Langmuir probe measurements were used to determine these parameters in an experimental system in order to compare simulation results with experiment. The primary product of the simulation is a prediction of the ionization fraction of the sputtered atom flux at the substrate under various conditions. This quantity was experimentally measured and the results compared to the simulation. Experiment and simulation differ significantly. It is hypothesized that heating of the background gas due to the intense sputtered atom flux at the target is primarily responsible for this difference. Heating of the background gas is not accounted for in the simulation. Difficulties in accurately measuring plasma parameters, especially electron temperature, are also significant.

  8. Physics of High Performance Dueterium-Tritium Plasmas in TFTR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McGuire, K. M.; White, R.; Wieland, R. M.; Williams, M.; Wilson, J. R.; Wong, K. L.; Wurden, G. A.; Batha, S.; Lamarche, P.; LeBlanc, B.; Levinton, F. M.; Beer, M.; Bell, M. G.; Bell, R. E.; Belov, A.; Fredrickson, E. D.; Fu, G. Y.; Furth, H. P.; Gorelenkov, N. N.; Krasilnikov, A. V.; Meade, D. M.; Medley, S. S.; Mika, R.; Mikkelsen, D. R.; Mirnov, S. V.; Schilling, G.; Schivell, J.; Schmidt, G. L.; Scott, S. D.; Semenov, I.; Berk, H.; Bernabei, S.; Bitter, M.; Breizman, B.; Dorland, W.; Phillips, P.; Bretz, N. L.; Budny, R.; Bush, C.E.; Grek, B.; Grisham, L. R.; Hammett, G. W.; Herrmann, H. W.; Herrmann, M.; Hill, K. W.; Hogan, G. R.; Hosea, J. C.

    1996-01-01

    During the past two years, deuterium-tritium (D-T) plasmas in the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) have been used to study fusion power production,isotope effects associated with tritium fueling, and alpha-particle physics in several operational regimes. The peak fusion power has been increased to 10.7 MW in the supershot mode through the use of increased plasma current and toroidal magnetic field and extensive lithium wall conditioning. The high-internal-inductance (high -li) regime in TFTR has been extended in plasma current and has achieved 8.7 MW of fusion power. Studies of the effects of tritium on confinement have now been carried out in ohmic, NBI- and ICRF-heated L-mode and reversed-shear plasmas. In general, there is an enhancement in confinement time in D-T plasmas which is most pronounced in supershot and high-li discharges, weaker in L-mode plasmas with NBI and ICRF heating and smaller still in ohmic plasmas. In reversed-shear discharges with sufficient deuterium-NBI heating power, internal transport barriers have been observed to form, leading to enhanced confinement. Large decreases in the ion heat conductivity and particle transport are inferred within the transport barrier.It appears that higher heating power is required to trigger the formation of a transport barrier with D-T NBI and the isotope effect on energy confinement is nearly absent in these enhanced reverse-shear plasmas. Many alpha-particle physics issues have been studied in the various operating regimes including confinement of the alpha particles, their redistribution by sawteeth, and their loss due to MHD instabilities with low toroidal mode numbers. In weak-shear plasmas, alpha-particle destabilization of a toroidal Alfven eigenmode has been observed.

  9. Physics of high performance deuterium-tritium plasmas in TFTR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McGuire, K.M. [Princeton Univ., NJ (United States). Princeton Plasma Physics Lab.; Barnes, C.W. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Batha, S. [Fusion Physics and Technology, Torrance, CA (United States)] [and others

    1996-11-01

    During the past two years, deuterium-tritium (D-T) plasmas in the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) have been used to study fusion power production, isotope effects associated with tritium fueling, and alpha-particle physics in several operational regimes. The peak fusion power has been increased to 10.7 MW in the supershot mode through the use of increased plasma current and toroidal magnetic field and extensive lithium wall conditioning. The high-internal-inductance (high-I{sub i}) regime in TFTR has been extended in plasma current and has achieved 8.7 MW of fusion power. Studies of the effects of tritium on confinement have now been carried out in ohmic, NBI- and ICRF- heated L-mode and reversed-shear plasmas. In general, there is an enhancement in confinement time in D-T plasmas which is most pronounced in supershot and high-I{sub i} discharges, weaker in L-mode plasmas with NBI and ICRF heating and smaller still in ohmic plasmas. In reversed-shear discharges with sufficient deuterium-NBI heating power, internal transport barriers have been observed to form, leading to enhanced confinement. Large decreases in the ion heat conductivity and particle transport are inferred within the transport barrier. It appears that higher heating power is required to trigger the formation of a transport barrier with D-T NBI and the isotope effect on energy confinement is nearly absent in these enhanced reverse-shear plasmas. Many alpha-particle physics issues have been studied in the various operating regimes including confinement of the alpha particles, their redistribution by sawteeth, and their loss due to MHD instabilities with low toroidal mode numbers. In weak-shear plasmas, alpha-particle destabilization of a toroidal Alfven eigenmode has been observed.

  10. New Outreach Initiatives at the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zwicker, Andrew; Dominguez, Arturo; Greco, Shannon; Ortiz, Deedee; Delooper, John

    2015-11-01

    In FY15, PPPL concentrated its efforts on a portfolio of outreach activities centered around plasma science and fusion energy that have the potential to reach a large audience and have a significant and measurable impact. The overall goal of these outreach activities is to expose the public (within New Jersey, the US and the world) to the Department of Energy's scientific endeavors and specifically to PPPL's research regarding fusion and plasma science. The projects include several new activities along with upgrades to existing ones. The new activities include the development of outreach demos for the plasma physics community and the upgrade of the Internet Plasma Physics Experience (IPPEX). Our first plasma demo is a low cost DC glow discharge, suitable for tours as well as for student laboratories (plasma breakdown, spectroscopy, probes). This has been field tested in a variety of classes and events. The upgrade to the IPPEX web site includes a new template and a new interactive virtual tokamak. Future work on IPPEX will provide users limited access to data from NSTX-U. Finally, our Young Women's Conference was expanded and improved. These and other new outreach activities will be presented.

  11. PIC Simulation of RF Plasma Sheath Formation and Initial Validation of Optical Diagnostics using HPC Resources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Icenhour, Casey; Exum, Ashe; Martin, Elijah; Green, David; Smithe, David; Shannon, Steven

    2014-10-01

    The coupling of experiment and simulation to elucidate near field physics above ICRF antennae presents challenges on both the experimental and computational side. In order to analyze this region, a new optical diagnostic utilizing active and passive spectroscopy is used to determine the structure of the electric fields within the sheath region. Parallel and perpendicular magnetic fields with respect to the sheath electric field have been presented. This work focuses on the validation of these measurements utilizing the Particle-in-Cell (PIC) simulation method in conjunction with High Performance Computing (HPC) resources on the Titan supercomputer at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). Plasma parameters of interest include electron density, electron temperature, plasma potentials, and RF plasma sheath voltages and thicknesses. The plasma is modeled utilizing the VSim plasma simulation tool, developed by the Tech-X Corporation. The implementation used here is a two-dimensional electromagnetic model of the experimental setup. The overall goal of this study is to develop models for complex RF plasma systems and to help outline the physics of RF sheath formation and subsequent power loss on ICRF antennas in systems such as ITER. This work is carried out with the support of Oak Ridge National Laboratory and the Tech-X Corporation.

  12. Numerical simulation and experimental progress on plasma window

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, S. Z.; Zhu, K.; Huang, S.; Lu, Y. R.; Shi, B. L.

    2016-11-01

    In this paper, a numerical 2D FLUENT-based magneto-hydrodynamic simulation on 3mm plasma window using argon, taken as a windowless vacuum device, was developed. The gas inlet, arc creation and developing and plasma expansion segments are all contained in this model. In the axis-symmetry cathode structure, a set of parameters including pressure, temperature, velocity and current distribution were obtained and discussed. The fluid dynamics of plasma in cavities with different shapes was researched. Corresponding experiments was carried out and the result agrees well to the numerical simulation. The validity of sealing ability of plasma window has been verified. Relevant further research upon deuteron gas as neutron production target is to be continued, considering larger diameter plasma window experimentally and numerically.

  13. Simulation of beam-induced plasma in gas-filled rf cavities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Kwangmin; Samulyak, Roman; Yonehara, Katsuya; Freemire, Ben

    2017-03-01

    Processes occurring in a radio-frequency (rf) cavity, filled with high pressure gas and interacting with proton beams, have been studied via advanced numerical simulations. Simulations support the experimental program on the hydrogen gas-filled rf cavity in the Mucool Test Area (MTA) at Fermilab, and broader research on the design of muon cooling devices. space, a 3D electromagnetic particle-in-cell (EM-PIC) code with atomic physics support, was used in simulation studies. Plasma dynamics in the rf cavity, including the process of neutral gas ionization by proton beams, plasma loading of the rf cavity, and atomic processes in plasma such as electron-ion and ion-ion recombination and electron attachment to dopant molecules, have been studied. Through comparison with experiments in the MTA, simulations quantified several uncertain values of plasma properties such as effective recombination rates and the attachment time of electrons to dopant molecules. Simulations have achieved very good agreement with experiments on plasma loading and related processes. The experimentally validated code space is capable of predictive simulations of muon cooling devices.

  14. PANDORA, a new facility for interdisciplinary in-plasma physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mascali, D.; Musumarra, A.; Leone, F.; Romano, F. P.; Galatà, A.; Gammino, S.; Massimi, C.

    2017-07-01

    PANDORA, Plasmas for Astrophysics, Nuclear Decays Observation and Radiation for Archaeometry, is planned as a new facility based on a state-of-the-art plasma trap confining energetic plasma for performing interdisciplinary research in the fields of Nuclear Astrophysics, Astrophysics, Plasma Physics and Applications in Material Science and Archaeometry: the plasmas become the environment for measuring, for the first time, nuclear decay rates in stellar-like condition (such as 7Be decay and beta-decay involved in s-process nucleosynthesis), especially as a function of the ionization state of the plasma ions. These studies will give important contributions for addressing several astrophysical issues in both stellar and primordial nucleosynthesis environment ( e.g., determination of solar neutrino flux and 7Li Cosmological Problem), moreover the confined energetic plasma will be a unique light source for high-performance stellar spectroscopy measurements in the visible, UV and X-ray domains, offering advancements in observational astronomy. As to magnetic fields, the experimental validation of theoretical first- and second-order Landé factors will drive the layout of next-generation polarimetric units for the high-resolution spectrograph of the future giant telescopes. In PANDORA new plasma heating methods will be explored, that will push forward the ion beam output, in terms of extracted intensity and charge states. More, advanced and optimized injection methods of ions in an ECR plasma will be experimented, with the aim to optimize its capture efficiency. This will be applied to the ECR-based Charge Breeding technique, that will improve the performances of the SPES ISOL-facility at Laboratori Nazionali di Legnaro-INFN. Finally, PANDORA will be suitable for energy conversion, making the plasma a source of high-intensity electromagnetic radiation, for applications in material science and archaeometry.

  15. High-fidelity plasma codes for burn physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cooley, James [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Graziani, Frank [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Marinak, Marty [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Murillo, Michael [Michigan State Univ., East Lansing, MI (United States)

    2016-10-19

    Accurate predictions of equation of state (EOS), ionic and electronic transport properties are of critical importance for high-energy-density plasma science. Transport coefficients inform radiation-hydrodynamic codes and impact diagnostic interpretation, which in turn impacts our understanding of the development of instabilities, the overall energy balance of burning plasmas, and the efficacy of self-heating from charged-particle stopping. Important processes include thermal and electrical conduction, electron-ion coupling, inter-diffusion, ion viscosity, and charged particle stopping. However, uncertainties in these coefficients are not well established. Fundamental plasma science codes, also called high-fidelity plasma codes, are a relatively recent computational tool that augments both experimental data and theoretical foundations of transport coefficients. This paper addresses the current status of HFPC codes and their future development, and the potential impact they play in improving the predictive capability of the multi-physics hydrodynamic codes used in HED design.

  16. High-fidelity plasma codes for burn physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cooley, James [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Graziani, Frank [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Marinak, Marty [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Murillo, Michael [Michigan State Univ., East Lansing, MI (United States)

    2016-10-19

    Accurate predictions of equation of state (EOS), ionic and electronic transport properties are of critical importance for high-energy-density plasma science. Transport coefficients inform radiationhydrodynamic codes and impact diagnostic interpretation, which in turn impacts our understanding of the development of instabilities, the overall energy balance of burning plasmas, and the efficacy of selfheating from charged-particle stopping. Important processes include thermal and electrical conduction, electron-ion coupling, inter-diffusion, ion viscosity, and charged particle stopping. However, uncertainties in these coefficients are not well established. Fundamental plasma science codes, also called high-fidelity plasma codes are a relatively recent computational tool that augments both experimental data and theoretical foundations of transport coefficients. This paper addresses the current status of HFPC codes and their future development, and the potential impact they play in improving the predictive capability of the multi-physics hydrodynamic codes used in HED design.

  17. Study of Plasma Liner Driven Magnetized Target Fusion Via Advanced Simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Samulyak, Roman V. [State Univ. of New York (SUNY), Stony Brook, NY (United States); Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Parks, Paul [General Atomics, San Diego, CA (United States)

    2013-08-31

    The feasibility of the plasma liner driven Magnetized Target Fusion (MTF) via terascale numerical simulations will be assessed. In the MTF concept, a plasma liner, formed by merging of a number (60 or more) of radial, highly supersonic plasma jets, implodes on the target in the form of two compact plasma toroids, and compresses it to conditions of the fusion ignition. By avoiding major difficulties associated with both the traditional laser driven inertial confinement fusion and solid liner driven MTF, the plasma liner driven MTF potentially provides a low-cost and fast R&D path towards the demonstration of practical fusion energy. High fidelity numerical simulations of full nonlinear models associated with the plasma liner MTF using state-of-art numerical algorithms and terascale computing are necessary in order to resolve uncertainties and provide guidance for future experiments. At Stony Brook University, we have developed unique computational capabilities that ideally suite the MTF problem. The FronTier code, developed in collaboration with BNL and LANL under DOE funding including SciDAC for the simulation of 3D multi-material hydro and MHD flows, has beenbenchmarked and used for fundamental and engineering problems in energy science applications. We have performed 3D simulations of converging supersonic plasma jets, their merger and the formation of the plasma liner, and a study of the corresponding oblique shock problem. We have studied the implosion of the plasma liner on the magnetized plasma target by resolving Rayleigh-Taylor instabilities in 2D and 3D and other relevant physics and estimate thermodynamic conditions of the target at the moment of maximum compression and the hydrodynamic efficiency of the method.

  18. Physics of collisionless shocks - theory and simulation

    CERN Document Server

    Novo, A Stockem; Fonseca, R A; Silva, L O

    2015-01-01

    Collisionless shocks occur in various fields of physics. In the context of space and astrophysics they have been investigated for many decades. However, a thorough understanding of shock formation and particle acceleration is still missing. Collisionless shocks can be distinguished into electromagnetic and electrostatic shocks. Electromagnetic shocks are of importance mainly in astrophysical environments and they are mediated by the Weibel or filamentation instability. In such shocks, charged particles gain energy by diffusive shock acceleration. Electrostatic shocks are characterized by a strong electrostatic field, which leads to electron trapping. Ions are accelerated by reflection from the electrostatic potential. Shock formation and particle acceleration will be discussed in theory and simulations.

  19. Polymerization by plasma: surface treatment and plasma simulation; Polimerizacion por plasma: tratamiento superficial y simulacion del plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morales C, J

    2001-07-01

    One of the general objectives that are developed by the group of polymers semiconductors in the laboratory of polymers of the UAM-Iztapalapa is to study the surface treatment for plasma of different materials. Framed in this general objective, in this work three lines of investigation have been developed, independent one of other that converge in the general objective. The first one tries about the modeling one and evaluation of the microscopic parameters of operation of the polymerization reactor. The second are continuation of the study of conductive polymers synthesized by plasma and the third are an application of the treatment for plasma on natural fibers. In the first one it lines it is carried out the characterization and simulation of the parameters of operation of the polymerization reactor for plasma. They are determined the microscopic parameters of operation of the reactor experimentally like they are the electronic temperature, the potential of the plasma and the density average of electrons using for it an electrostatic Langmuir probe. In the simulation, starting from the Boltzmann transport equation it thinks about the flowing pattern and the electronic temperature, the ions density is obtained and of electrons. The data are compared obtained experimentally with the results of the simulation. In second line a study is presented about the influence of the temperature on the electric conductivity of thin films doped with iodine, of poly aniline (P An/I) and poly pyrrole (P Py/I). The films underwent heating-cooling cycles. The conductivity of P An/I and P Py/I in function of the temperature it is discussed based on the Arrhenius model, showing that it dominates the model of homogeneous conductivity. It is also synthesized a polymer bi-layer of these two elements and a copolymer random poly aniline-poly pyrrole, of the first one it the behavior of its conductivity discusses with the temperature and of the second, the conductivity is discussed in

  20. Simulations for plasma spectroscopy based on UTA theory

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1999-01-01

    The unresolved transition array(UTA) simulation with configurationaverage approximation is used to calculate the spectral properties ofplasmas involving complex ions. This method is used to simulate thetransmission of X-rays through aluminum plasma and niobium plasmarespectively. The results are compared with experiments and other results ofadvanced models and good agreements are obtained.

  1. Simulation of plasma discharge in liquids: A detailed two-phase fluid approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charchi Aghdam, Ali; Farouk, Tanvir; Reacting Systems; Advanced Energy Research Laboratory Team

    2015-09-01

    Plasma discharge in liquids has gained great attention recently due to its applications in biomedical engineering, fuel processing, and water treatment and so on. Despite the tremendous interest, a comprehensive understanding of the underlying physics still remains limited. In the current work, an attempt is made to present a mathematical multi-physics model to describe the discharge of plasma in liquids. An in-house modeling platform is developed for simulating plasma formation in multiphase fluids. The model resolves a detailed two-phase fluid including viscous effects, surface tension, gravitational forces and electrical body force. All the governing equations are solved for gas and liquid phases. Electric field and charged species equations along with the plasma reaction kinetics are solved to get the charge distribution in the different phases as well as at the gas-liquid interface to obtain the electric body force acting at the interface. By coupling the above sub-models, a comprehensive multi-physics model for plasma discharge in liquids is constructed which is able to capture several physical aspects of the phenomena especially the role of the bubble, its motion and distortion on plasma characteristics.

  2. Simulations of a beam-driven plasma antenna in the regime of plasma transparency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timofeev, I. V.; Berendeev, E. A.; Dudnikova, G. I.

    2017-09-01

    In this paper, the theoretically predicted possibility to increase the efficiency of electromagnetic radiation generated by a thin beam-plasma system in the regime of oblique emission, when a plasma column becomes transparent to radiation near the plasma frequency, is investigated using particle-in-cell simulations. If a finite-size plasma column has a longitudinal density modulation, such a system is able to radiate electromagnetic waves as a dipole antenna. This radiation mechanism is based on the conversion of an electron beam-driven potential plasma wave on the periodic perturbation of plasma density. In this case, the frequency of radiated waves appears to be slightly lower than the plasma frequency. That is why their fields enable the penetration into the plasma only to the skin-depth. This case is realized when the period of density modulation coincides with the wavelength of the most unstable beam-driven mode, and the produced radiation escapes from the plasma in the purely transverse direction. In the recent theoretical paper [I. V. Timofeev et al. Phys. Plasmas 23, 083119 (2016)], however, it has been found that the magnetized plasma can be transparent to this radiation at certain emission angles. It means that the beam-to-radiation power conversion can be highly efficient even in a relatively thick plasma since not only boundary layers but also the whole plasma volume can be involved in the generation of electromagnetic waves. Simulations of steady-state beam injection into a pre-modulated plasma channel confirm the existence of this effect and show limits of validity for the simplified theoretical model.

  3. The upgraded Large Plasma Device, a machine for studying frontier basic plasma physics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gekelman, W; Pribyl, P; Lucky, Z; Drandell, M; Leneman, D; Maggs, J; Vincena, S; Van Compernolle, B; Tripathi, S K P; Morales, G; Carter, T A; Wang, Y; DeHaas, T

    2016-02-01

    In 1991 a manuscript describing an instrument for studying magnetized plasmas was published in this journal. The Large Plasma Device (LAPD) was upgraded in 2001 and has become a national user facility for the study of basic plasma physics. The upgrade as well as diagnostics introduced since then has significantly changed the capabilities of the device. All references to the machine still quote the original RSI paper, which at this time is not appropriate. In this work, the properties of the updated LAPD are presented. The strategy of the machine construction, the available diagnostics, the parameters available for experiments, as well as illustrations of several experiments are presented here.

  4. Arc plasma devices: Evolving mechanical design from numerical simulation

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    S Ghorui; A K Das

    2013-04-01

    Wide ranges of technological applications involve arc plasma devices as the primary plasma source for processing work. Recent findings exhibit the existence of appreciable thermal non-equilibrium in these so-called thermal plasma devices. Commercially available magnetohydrodynamic codes are not capable of handling such systems due to unavailability of non-equilibrium thermodynamic and transport property data and self-consistent models. A recipe for obtaining mechanical design of arc plasma devices from numerical simulation incorporating two-temperature thermal non-equilibrium model is presented in this article with reference to the plasma of the mixture of molecular gases like nitrogen and oxygen. Such systems are technologically important as they correspond to the plasma devices operating with air, oxygen plasma torches in cutting industries and plasma devices using nitrogen as shielding gas. Temperature field, associated fluid dynamics and electrical characteristics of a plasma torch are computed in a systematic manner to evaluate the performance of a conceived design using a two-fluid CFD model coupled with a two-temperature thermodynamic and transport property code. Important effects of different nozzle designs and plasma gases obtained from the formalism are discussed. Non-equilibrium thermo-dynamic properties are computed using modified two-temperature Saha equations and transport properties are computed using standard Chapman–Enskog approach.

  5. Plasma simulator for rotating astrophysical objects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. E. Nakamura

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available Estamos desarrollando un simulador de plasmas astrof sicos con rotaci on, que consiste de m odulos manejados por un c odigo tridimensional magnetohidrodin amico. Los m odulos que hemos dise~nado incluyen difusi on magn etica, conducci on t ermica, enfriamiento radiativo y autogravedad. Estamos desarrollando m odulos para hacer la visualizaci on. El c odigo est a paralelizado y optimizado para computadoras vectorizadas y paralelas.

  6. PLASMA ENERGETIC PARTICLES SIMULATION CENTER (PEPSC)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berk, Herbert L.

    2014-05-23

    The main effort of the Texas group was to develop theoretical and simplified numerical models to understand chirping phenomena often seen for Alfven and geodesic acoustic waves in experimental plasmas such as D-III-D, NSTX and JET. Its main numerical effort was to modify the AEGIS code, which was originally developed as an eigenvalue solver. To apply to the chirping problem this code has to be able to treat the linear response to the continuum and the response of the plasma to external drive or to an internal drive that comes from the formation of phase space chirping structures. The theoretical underpinning of this investigation still needed to be more fully developed to understand how to best formulate the theoretical problem. Considerable progress was made on this front by B.N. Breizman and his collaborators and a new reduced model was developed by H. L. Berk and his PhD student, G. Wang which can be uses as simplified model to describe chirping in a large aspect ratio tokamak. This final report will concentrate on these two directions that were developed as well as results that were found in the work with the AEGIS code and in the progress in developing a novel quasi-linear formulation for a description of Alfvenic modes destabilized by energetic particles, such as alpha particles in a burning plasma.

  7. A linear dispersion relation for the hybrid kinetic-ion/fluid-electron model of plasma physics

    CERN Document Server

    Told, Daniel; Astfalk, Patrick; Jenko, Frank

    2016-01-01

    A dispersion relation for a commonly used hybrid model of plasma physics is developed, which combines fully kinetic ions and a massless-electron fluid description. Although this model and variations of it have been used to describe plasma phenomena for about 40 years, to date there exists no general dispersion relation to describe the linear wave physics contained in the model. Previous efforts along these lines are extended here to retain arbitrary wave propagation angles, temperature anisotropy effects, as well as additional terms in the generalized Ohm's law which determines the electric field. A numerical solver for the dispersion relation is developed, and linear wave physics is benchmarked against solutions of a full Vlasov-Maxwell dispersion relation solver. This work opens the door to a more accurate interpretation of existing and future wave and turbulence simulations using this type of hybrid model.

  8. PIC simulation of electron acceleration in an underdense plasma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S Darvish Molla

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available One of the interesting Laser-Plasma phenomena, when the laser power is high and ultra intense, is the generation of large amplitude plasma waves (Wakefield and electron acceleration. An intense electromagnetic laser pulse can create plasma oscillations through the action of the nonlinear pondermotive force. electrons trapped in the wake can be accelerated to high energies, more than 1 TW. Of the wide variety of methods for generating a regular electric field in plasmas with strong laser radiation, the most attractive one at the present time is the scheme of the Laser Wake Field Accelerator (LWFA. In this method, a strong Langmuir wave is excited in the plasma. In such a wave, electrons are trapped and can acquire relativistic energies, accelerated to high energies. In this paper the PIC simulation of wakefield generation and electron acceleration in an underdense plasma with a short ultra intense laser pulse is discussed. 2D electromagnetic PIC code is written by FORTRAN 90, are developed, and the propagation of different electromagnetic waves in vacuum and plasma is shown. Next, the accuracy of implementation of 2D electromagnetic code is verified, making it relativistic and simulating the generating of wakefield and electron acceleration in an underdense plasma. It is shown that when a symmetric electromagnetic pulse passes through the plasma, the longitudinal field generated in plasma, at the back of the pulse, is weaker than the one due to an asymmetric electromagnetic pulse, and thus the electrons acquire less energy. About the asymmetric pulse, when front part of the pulse has smaller time rise than the back part of the pulse, a stronger wakefield generates, in plasma, at the back of the pulse, and consequently the electrons acquire more energy. In an inverse case, when the rise time of the back part of the pulse is bigger in comparison with that of the back part, a weaker wakefield generates and this leads to the fact that the electrons

  9. Hybrid Simulation of Laser-Plasma Interactions and Fast Electron Transport in Inhomogeneous Plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cohen, B I; Kemp, A; Divol, L

    2009-05-27

    A new framework is introduced for kinetic simulation of laser-plasma interactions in an inhomogenous plasma motivated by the goal of performing integrated kinetic simulations of fast-ignition laser fusion. The algorithm addresses the propagation and absorption of an intense electromagnetic wave in an ionized plasma leading to the generation and transport of an energetic electron component. The energetic electrons propagate farther into the plasma to much higher densities where Coulomb collisions become important. The high-density plasma supports an energetic electron current, return currents, self-consistent electric fields associated with maintaining quasi-neutrality, and self-consistent magnetic fields due to the currents. Collisions of the electrons and ions are calculated accurately to track the energetic electrons and model their interactions with the background plasma. Up to a density well above critical density, where the laser electromagnetic field is evanescent, Maxwell's equations are solved with a conventional particle-based, finite-difference scheme. In the higher-density plasma, Maxwell's equations are solved using an Ohm's law neglecting the inertia of the background electrons with the option of omitting the displacement current in Ampere's law. Particle equations of motion with binary collisions are solved for all electrons and ions throughout the system using weighted particles to resolve the density gradient efficiently. The algorithm is analyzed and demonstrated in simulation examples. The simulation scheme introduced here achieves significantly improved efficiencies.

  10. Guiding-center models for edge plasmas and numerical simulations of isolated plasma filaments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Jens

    The work presented in this thesis falls into two categories: development of reduced dynamical models applicable to edge turbulence in magnetically confined fusion plasmas and numerical simulations of isolated plasma filaments in the scrape-off layer region investigating the influence of finite...... models are presented that overcome some of the difficulties associated with the development of reduced dynamical models applicable to the edge. Second order guiding-center coordinates are derived using the phasespace Lie transform method. Using a variational principle the corresponding Vlasov......-Maxwell equations in a more tractable form, which could be relevant for direct numerical simulations of edge plasma turbulence. Finally, an investigation of the influence of finite Larmor radius effects on the radial transport of isolated plasma filaments (blobs) in the scrape-off region of fusion plasmas...

  11. Interaction physics of multipicosecond Petawatt laser pulses with overdense plasma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kemp, A J; Divol, L

    2012-11-09

    We study the interaction of intense petawatt laser pulses with overdense plasma over several picoseconds, using two- and three-dimensional kinetic particle simulations. Sustained irradiation with non-diffraction-limited pulses at relativistic intensities yields conditions that differ qualitatively from what is experimentally available today. Nonlinear saturation of laser-driven density perturbations at the target surface causes recurrent emissions of plasma, which stabilize the surface and keep absorption continuously high. This dynamics leads to the acceleration of three distinct groups of electrons up to energies many times the laser ponderomotive potential. We discuss their energy distribution for applications like the fast-ignition approach to inertial confinement fusion.

  12. Plasma and Ion Assistance in Physical Vapor Deposition: AHistorical Perspective

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anders, Andre

    2007-02-28

    Deposition of films using plasma or plasma-assist can betraced back surprisingly far, namely to the 18th century for arcs and tothe 19th century for sputtering. However, only since the 1960s thecoatings community considered other processes than evaporation for largescale commercial use. Ion Plating was perhaps the first importantprocess, introducing vapor ionization and substrate bias to generate abeam of ions arriving on the surface of the growing film. Ratherindependently, cathodic arc deposition was established as an energeticcondensation process, first in the former Soviet Union in the 1970s, andin the 1980s in the Western Hemisphere. About a dozen various ion-basedcoating technologies evolved in the last decades, all characterized byspecific plasma or ion generation processes. Gridded and gridless ionsources were taken from space propulsion and applied to thin filmdeposition. Modeling and simulation have helped to make plasma and ionseffects to be reasonably well understood. Yet--due to the complex, oftennon-linear and non-equilibrium nature of plasma and surfaceinteractions--there is still a place for the experience plasma"sourcerer."

  13. A treecode to simulate dust-plasma interactions

    CERN Document Server

    Thomas, D M

    2016-01-01

    The complex interaction of a small object with its surrounding plasma is an area of significant research with applications in a multitude of astrophysical, atmospheric, industrial and fusion plasmas. The computational study of these interactions has been dominated by macroscopic particle-in-cell (PIC) codes. This paper introduces a microscopic simulator of a spherical dust grain in a plasma, the plasma octree code pot, which uses the Barnes-Hut treecode algorithm to perform $N$-body simulations of electrons and ions in the vicinity of a spherical object. It also employs the Boris particle-motion integrator and Hutchinson's reinjection algorithm from SCEPTIC; a description of all three algorithms, and their implementation, is provided. Test results confirm the successful implementation of the treecode method and question the assumptions made by hybrid PIC codes.

  14. Parallel pic plasma simulation through particle decomposition techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Briguglio, S.; Vlad, G. [ENEA, Centro Ricerche Casaccia, Rome (Italy). Dipt. Energia; Di Martino, B. [Wien Univ. (Austria). Inst. for Software Tecnology and Parallel Systems]|[Naples, Univ. `Federico II` (Italy). Dipt. di Informatica e Sistemistica

    1998-02-01

    Particle-in-cell (PIC) codes are among the major candidates to yield a satisfactory description of the detail of kinetic effects, such as the resonant wave-particle interaction, relevant in determining the transport mechanism in magnetically confined plasmas. A significant improvement of the simulation performance of such codes con be expected from parallelization, e.g., by distributing the particle population among several parallel processors. Parallelization of a hybrid magnetohydrodynamic-gyrokinetic code has been accomplished within the High Performance Fortran (HPF) framework, and tested on the IBM SP2 parallel system, using a `particle decomposition` technique. The adopted technique requires a moderate effort in porting the code in parallel form and results in intrinsic load balancing and modest inter processor communication. The performance tests obtained confirm the hypothesis of high effectiveness of the strategy, if targeted towards moderately parallel architectures. Optimal use of resources is also discussed with reference to a specific physics problem. [Italiano] I codici Particle-in-cell (PIC) sono considerati tra i piu` promettenti candidati per ottenere una descrizione soddisfacente e dettagliata degli effetti cinetici, quali per esempio l`interazione risonante particella-onda, rilevanti nel determinare i meccanismi di trasporto che interessano il confinamento del plasma. Un significativo miglioramento delle prestazioni della simulazione puo` essere ottenuto distribuendo la popolazione di particelle tra diversi processori in parallelo. La parallelizzazione di un codice ibrido MHD-girocinetico e` stata effettuata, in ambiente HPF, utilizzando la tecnica di `decomposizione per particelle`, ed e` stata provata sul sistema parallelo IBM SP2. La tecnica adottata richiede uno sforzo moderato per la trasformazione del codice in versione parallela, permette un intrinseco bilanciamento tra i processori del carico di lavoro e necessita di una modesta

  15. Inductively coupled radio frequency methane plasma simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bera, K.; Farouk, B.; Vitello, P.

    2001-05-01

    A self-consistent two-dimensional radio frequency inductively coupled glow discharge model has been developed in cylindrical coordinates using a fluid model. The objective of the study is to provide insight into charged species dynamics and investigate their effects on plasma process for a methane discharge. The model includes continuity and energy equations for electrons and continuity, momentum and energy equations for positive and negative ions. An electromagnetic model that considers the electric field due to the space charge within the plasma and due to inductive power coupling is also incorporated. For an inductively coupled methane discharge we expect to find higher fluxes of ions and radicals to the cathode, and hence a higher deposition/etch rate for a high-density plasma. The independent control of ion energy to the cathode in an inductively coupled discharge will facilitate control on film deposition/etch rate and uniformity on the wafer. Swarm data as a function of the electron energy are provided as input to the model. The model predicts the electron density, ion density and their fluxes and energies to the cathode. The radical and neutral densities in the discharge are calculated using a gas phase chemistry model. The diamond-like-carbon thin-film deposition/etch rate is predicted using a surface chemistry model. The gas phase chemistry model considers the diffusion of radicals and neutrals along with creation and loss terms. The surface deposition/etching process involves adsorption-desorption, adsorption layer reaction, ion stitching, direct ion incorporation and carbon sputtering.

  16. Magnetized laboratory plasma jets: Experiment and simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schrafel, Peter; Bell, Kate; Greenly, John; Seyler, Charles; Kusse, Bruce

    2015-01-01

    Experiments involving radial foils on a 1 M A , 100 n s current driver can be used to study the ablation of thin foils and liners, produce extreme conditions relevant to laboratory astrophysics, and aid in computational code validation. This research focuses on the initial ablation phase of a 20 μ m Al foil (8111 alloy), in a radial configuration, driven by Cornell University's COBRA pulsed power generator. In these experiments ablated surface plasma (ASP) on the top side of the foil and a strongly collimated axial plasma jet are observed developing midway through the current rise. With experimental and computational results this work gives a detailed description of the role of the ASP in the formation of the plasma jet with and without an applied axial magnetic field. This ˜1 T field is applied by a Helmholtz-coil pair driven by a slow, 150 μ s current pulse and penetrates the load hardware before arrival of the COBRA pulse. Several effects of the applied magnetic field are observed: (1) without the field extreme-ultraviolet emission from the ASP shows considerable azimuthal asymmetry while with the field the ASP develops azimuthal motion that reduces this asymmetry, (2) this azimuthal motion slows the development of the jet when the field is applied, and (3) with the magnetic field the jet becomes less collimated and has a density minimum (hollowing) on the axis. PERSEUS, an XMHD code, has qualitatively and quantitatively reproduced all these experimental observations. The differences between this XMHD and an MHD code without a Hall current and inertial effects are discussed. In addition the PERSEUS results describe effects we were not able to resolve experimentally and suggest a line of future experiments with better diagnostics.

  17. Prediction of plasma simulation data with the Gaussian process method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Preuss, R.; Toussaint, U. von, E-mail: udo.v.toussaint@ipp.mpg.de [Max-Planck-Institute for Plasma Physics, EURATOM Association, 85748 Garching (Germany)

    2014-12-05

    The simulation of plasma-wall interactions of fusion plasmas is extremely costly in computer power and time - the running time for a single parameter setting is easily in the order of weeks or months. We propose to exploit the already gathered results in order to predict the outcome for parametric studies within the high dimensional parameter space. For this we utilize Gaussian processes within the Bayesian framework and perform validation with one and two dimensional test cases from which we learn how to assess the outcome. Finally, the newly implemented method is applied to simulated data from the scrape-off layer of a fusion plasma. Uncertainties of the predictions are provided which point the way to parameter settings of further (expensive) simulations.

  18. Physical properties of dense, low-temperature plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Redmer, Ronald

    1997-04-01

    Plasmas occur in a wide range of the density-temperature plane. The physical quantities can be expressed by Green's functions which are evaluated by means of standard quantum statistical methods. The influences of many-particle effects such as dynamic screening and self-energy, structure factor and local-field corrections, formation and decay of bound states, degeneracy and Pauli exclusion principle are studied. As a basic concept for partially ionized plasmas, a cluster decomposition is performed for the self-energy as well as for the polarization function. The general model of a partially ionized plasma interpolates between low-density, nonmetallic systems such as atomic vapors and high-density, conducting systems such as metals or fully ionized plasmas. The equations of state, including the location of the critical point and the shape of the coexistence curve, are determined for expanded alkali-atom and mercury fluids. The occurrence of a metal-nonmetal transition near the critical point of the liquid-vapor phase transition leads in these materials to characteristic deviations from the behavior of nonconducting fluids such as the inert gases. Therefore, a unified approach is needed to describe the drastic changes of the electronic properties as well as the variation of the physical properties with the density. Similar results are obtained for the hypothetical plasma phase transition in hydrogen plasma. The transport coefficients (electrical and thermal conductivity, thermopower) are studied within linear response theory given here in the formulation of Zubarev which is valid for arbitrary degeneracy and yields the transport coefficients for the limiting cases of nondegenerate, weakly coupled plasmas (Spitzer theory) as well as degenerate, strongly coupled plasmas (Ziman theory). This linear response method is applied to partially ionized systems such as dense, low-temperature plasmas. Here, the conductivity changes from nonmetallic values up to those typical for

  19. Quasiparticle lifetimes and infrared physics in QED and QCD plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blaizot, J.P. [CEA-Saclay, Gif-sur-Yvette (France)

    1997-09-22

    The perturbative calculation of the lifetime of fermion excitations in a QED plasma at high temperature is plagued with infrared divergences which are not eliminated by the screening corrections. The physical processes responsible for these divergences are the collisions involving the exchange of longwavelength, quasistatic, magnetic photons, which are not screened by plasma effects. The leading divergences can be resummed in a non-perturbative treatment based on a generalization of the Bloch-Nordsieck model at finite temperature. The resulting expression of the fermion propagator is free of infrared problems, and exhibits a non-exponential damping at large times: S{sub R}(t) {approx} exp(-{alpha}T t ln{omega}{sub p}t), where {omega}{sub p} = eT/3 is the plasma frequency and {alpha} = e{sup 2}/4{pi}.

  20. Fast Magnetic Reconnection: Bridging Laboratory and Space Plasma Physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bhattacharjee, Amitava [University New Hampshire- Durham

    2012-02-16

    Recent developments in experimental and theoretical studies of magnetic reconnection hold promise for providing solutions to outstanding problems in laboratory and space plasma physics. Examples include sawtooth crashes in tokamaks, substorms in the Earth’s Magnetosphere, eruptive solar flares, and more recently, fast reconnection in laser-produced high energy density plasmas. In each of these examples, a common and long-standing challenge has been to explain why fast reconnection proceeds rapidly from a relatively quiescent state. In this talk, we demonstrate the advantages of viewing these problems and their solutions from a common perspective. We focus on some recent, surprising discoveries regarding the role of secondary plasmoid instabilities of thin current sheets. Nonlinearly, these instabilities lead to fast reconnection rates that are very weakly dependent on the Lundquist number of the plasma.

  1. Comparisons of dense-plasma-focus kinetic simulations with experimental measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmidt, A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Link, A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Welch, D. [Voss Scientific, Inc., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Ellsworth, J. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Falabella, S. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Tang, V. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2014-06-01

    Dense-plasma-focus (DPF) Z-pinch devices are sources of copious high-energy electrons and ions, x rays, and neutrons. The mechanisms through which these physically simple devices generate such high-energy beams in a relatively short distance are not fully understood and past optimization efforts of these devices have been largely empirical. Previously we reported on fully kinetic simulations of a DPF and compared them with hybrid and fluid simulations of the same device. Here we present detailed comparisons between fully kinetic simulations and experimental data on a 1.2 kJ DPF with two electrode geometries, including neutron yield and ion beam energy distributions. A more intensive third calculation is presented which examines the effects of a fully detailed pulsed power driver model. We also compare simulated electromagnetic fluctuations with direct measurement of radiofrequency electromagnetic fluctuations in a DPF plasma. These comparisons indicate that the fully kinetic model captures the essential physics of these plasmas with high fidelity, and provide further evidence that anomalous resistivity in the plasma arises due to a kinetic instability near the lower hybrid frequency.

  2. Gyrokinetic simulations predict anomalous poloidal rotation in tokamak plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dif-Pradalier, Guilhem; Grandgirard, Virginie; Sarazin, Yanick; Garbet, Xavier; Ghendrih, Phillippe; Angelino, Paolo

    2008-11-01

    First-principle based collisionless gyrokinetic theory consensually provides today's deepest insight on turbulence-related problems in plasma physics. Conversely, neoclassical theory describes the effects of binary Coulomb collisions in a toroidal and inhomogeneous magnetic geometry and its consequences on particle trapping. The interplay between turbulence and collisions is a subject of great current focus for first-principle modeling since recent evidences have started to emphasise its relevance for the onset and the control of enhanced confinement regimes in the next-generation devices like Iter. A finite differences Fokker-Planck ion-ion collision operator is implemented in the full-f and global GYSELA code and has been thoroughly benchmarked in neoclassical regimes. Two types of simulations are compared, either purely neoclassical or turbulent including neoclassical effects. In each case, three different values of collisionality in the banana regime are investigated. Preliminary results show an enhancement of about 30% of the poloidal rotation of the main ions (Z=1) in the turbulent regime as compared to its neoclassical value. In all cases the radial force balance equation is satisfied within a few percent. Most of this increase comes from the radial electric field.

  3. Load management strategy for Particle-In-Cell simulations in high energy physics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beck, Arnaud; Frederiksen, Jacob Trier; Derouillat, Julien

    2016-01-01

    In the wake of the intense effort made for the experimental CILEX project, numerical simulation campaigns have been carried out in order to finalize the design of the facility and to identify optimal laser and plasma parameters. These simulations bring, of course, important insight into the funda...... towards a modern, accurate high-performance PIC code for high energy physics....... into the fundamental physics at play. As a by-product, they also characterize the quality of our theoretical and numerical models. By comparing the results given by different codes, it is possible to point out algorithmic limitations both in terms of physical accuracy and computational performances. In this paper we...

  4. Plasma simulations of emission line regions in high energy environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richardson, Chris T.

    This dissertation focuses on understanding two different, but in each case extreme, astrophysical environments: the Crab Nebula and emission line galaxies. These relatively local objects are well constrained by observations and are test cases of phenomena seen at high-z where detailed observations are rare. The tool used to study these objects is the plasma simulation code known as Cloudy. The introduction provides a brief summary of relevant physical concepts in nebular astrophysics and presents the basic features and assumptions of Cloudy. The first object investigated with Cloudy, the Crab Nebula, is a nearby supernova remnant that previously has been subject to photoionization modeling to reproduce the ionized emission seen in the nebula's filamentary structure. However, there are still several unanswered questions: (1) What excites the H2 emitting gas? (2) How much mass is in the molecular component? (3) How did the H2 form? (4) What is nature of the dust grains? A large suite of observations including long slit optical and NIR spectra over ionized, neutral and molecular gas in addition to HST and NIR ground based images constrain a particularly bright region of H2 emission, Knot 51, which exhibits a high excitation temperature of ˜3000 K. Simulations of K51 revealed that only a trace amount of H2 is needed to reproduce the observed emission and that H2 forms through an uncommon nebular process known as associative detachment. The final chapters of this dissertation focus on interpreting the narrow line region (NLR) in low-z emission line galaxies selected by a novel technique known as mean field independent component analysis (MFICA). A mixture of starlight and radiation from an AGN excites the gas present in galaxies. MFICA separates galaxies over a wide range of ionization into subsets of pure AGN and pure star forming galaxies allowing simulations to reveal the properties responsible for their observed variation in ionization. Emission line ratios can

  5. Association of plasma 25-hydroxyvitamin D with physical performance in physically active children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bezrati, Ikram; Hammami, Raouf; Ben Fradj, Mohamed Kacem; Martone, Domenico; Padulo, Johnny; Feki, Moncef; Chaouachi, Anis; Kaabachi, Naziha

    2016-11-01

    Vitamin D is thought to regulate skeletal muscle function and boost physical performance. The aim of this study was to assess the relationship between vitamin D and physical performance in physically active children. This cross-sectional study included 125 children who practice football as a leisure activity. Plasma 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25-OHD) was assessed using a chemiluminescence immunoassay method. Vitamin D inadequacy was defined as 25-OHD D inadequacy may limit exercise performance. Further research should verify whether correction of vitamin D deficiency enhances physical performance.

  6. AETHER: A simulation platform for inductively coupled plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Turkoz, Emre, E-mail: emre.turkoz@boun.edu.tr; Celik, Murat

    2015-04-01

    An in-house code is developed to simulate the inductively coupled plasma (ICP). The model comprises the fluid, electromagnetic and transformer submodels. Fluid equations are solved to evaluate the plasma flow parameters, including the plasma and neutral densities, ion and neutral velocities, electron flux, electron temperature, and electric potential. The model relies on the ambipolar approximation and offers the evaluation of plasma parameters without solving the sheath region. The electromagnetic model handles the calculation of the electric and magnetic fields using the magnetic vector potential. The transformer model captures the effect of the matching circuit utilized in laboratory experiments for RF power deposition. The continuity and momentum equations are solved using finite volume method. The energy, electric potential, and magnetic vector potential equations are solved using finite difference method. The resulting linear systems of equations are solved with iterative solvers including Jacobi and GMRES. The code is written using the C++ programming language, it works in parallel and has graphical user interface. The model is applied to study ICP characteristics of a plasma confined within a cylindrical chamber with dielectric walls for two different power deposition cases. The results obtained from the developed model are verified using the plasma module of COMSOL Multiphysics. The model is also applied to a plasma source configuration, and it is demonstrated that there is an overall increase in the plasma potential when current is extracted from ICP with a biased wall electrode.

  7. High-Density Plasma Reactors: Simulations for Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hash, David B.; Meyyappan, Meyya; Arnold, James O. (Technical Monitor)

    1998-01-01

    The development of improved and more efficient plasma reactors is a costly process for the semiconductor industry. Until five years ago, the Industry made most of its advancements through a trial and error approach. More recently, the role of computational modeling in the design process has increased. Both conventional computational fluid dynamics (CFD) techniques like Navier-Stokes solvers as well as particle simulation methods are used to model plasma reactor flowfields. However, since high-density plasma reactors generally operate at low gas pressures on the order of 1 to 10 mTorr, a particle simulation may be necessary because of the failure of CFD techniques to model rarefaction effects. The direct simulation Monte Carlo method is the most widely accepted and employed particle simulation tool and has previously been used to investigate plasma reactor flowfields. A plasma DSMC code is currently under development at NASA Ames Research Center with its foundation as the object-oriented parallel Cornell DSMC code, MONACO. The present investigation is a follow up of a neutral flow investigation of the effects of process parameters as well as reactor design on etch rate and etch rate uniformity. The previous work concentrated on silicon etch of a chlorine flow in a configuration typical of electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) or helical resonator type reactors. The effects of the plasma on the dissociation chemistry were modeled by making assumptions about the electron temperature and number density. The electrons or ions themselves were not simulated.The present work extends these results by simulating the charged species.The electromagnetic fields are calculated such that power deposition is modeled self-consistently. Electron impact reactions are modeled along with mechanisms for charge exchange. An bipolar diffusion assumption is made whereby electrons remain tied to the ions. However, the velocities of tile electrons are allowed to be modified during collisions

  8. Plasma Shape and Current Control Simulation of HT-7U Tokamak

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吴斌; 张澄

    2003-01-01

    This paper describes the discharge simulation of HT-7U tokamak plasma equilibriumand plasma current by solving MHD equations and surface average transport equations using anequilibrium evolution code. The simulated result shows the evolution of plasma parameter versustime .The simulated result can play an important role in the design of the plasma equilibrium andcontrol system of a tokamak.

  9. Magnetic null points in kinetic simulations of space plasmas

    OpenAIRE

    Olshevsky, Vyacheslav; Deca, Jan; Divin, Andrey; Peng, Ivy Bo; Markidis, Stefano; Innocenti, Maria Elena; Cazzola, Emanuele; Lapenta, Giovanni

    2015-01-01

    We present a systematic attempt to study magnetic null points and the associated magnetic energy conversion in kinetic Particle-in-Cell simulations of various plasma configurations. We address three-dimensional simulations performed with the semi-implicit kinetic electromagnetic code iPic3D in different setups: variations of a Harris current sheet, dipolar and quadrupolar magnetospheres interacting with the solar wind; and a relaxing turbulent configuration with multiple null points. Spiral n...

  10. Integrated Plasma Simulation of Ion Cyclotron and Lower Hybrid Range of Frequencies Actuators in Tokamaks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonoli, P. T.; Shiraiwa, S.; Wright, J. C.; Harvey, R. W.; Batchelor, D. B.; Berry, L. A.; Chen, Jin; Poli, F.; Kessel, C. E.; Jardin, S. C.

    2012-10-01

    Recent upgrades to the ion cyclotron RF (ICRF) and lower hybrid RF (LHRF) components of the Integrated Plasma Simulator [1] have made it possible to simulate LH current drive in the presence of ICRF minority heating and mode conversion electron heating. The background plasma is evolved in these simulations using the TSC transport code [2]. The driven LH current density profiles are computed using advanced ray tracing (GENRAY) and Fokker Planck (CQL3D) [3] components and predictions from GENRAY/CQL3D are compared with a ``reduced'' model for LHCD (the LSC [4] code). The ICRF TORIC solver is used for minority heating with a simplified (bi-Maxwellian) model for the non-thermal ion tail. Simulation results will be presented for LHCD in the presence of ICRF heating in Alcator C-Mod. [4pt] [1] D. Batchelor et al, Journal of Physics: Conf. Series 125, 012039 (2008).[0pt] [2] S. C. Jardin et al, J. Comp. Phys. 66, 481 (1986).[0pt] [3] R. W. Harvey and M. G. McCoy, Proc. of the IAEA Tech. Comm. Meeting on Simulation and Modeling of Therm. Plasmas, Montreal, Canada (1992).[0pt] [4] D. Ignat et al, Nucl. Fus. 34, 837 (1994).[0pt] [5] M. Brambilla, Plasma Phys. and Cont. Fusion 41,1 (1999).

  11. Development of high energy pulsed plasma simulator for plasma-lithium trench experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Soonwook

    To simulate detrimental events in a tokamak and provide a test-stand for a liquid lithium infused trench (LiMIT) device, a pulsed plasma source utilizing a theta pinch in conjunction with a coaxial plasma accelerator has been developed. An overall objective of the project is to develop a compact device that can produce 100 MW/m2 to 1 GW/m2 of plasma heat flux (a typical heat flux level in a major fusion device) in ~ 100 mus (≤ 0.1 MJ/m2) for a liquid lithium plasma facing component research. The existing theta pinch device, DEVeX, was built and operated for study on lithium vapor shielding effect. However, a typical plasma energy of 3 - 4 kJ/m2 is too low to study an interaction of plasma and plasma facing components in fusion devices. No or little preionized plasma, ringing of magnetic field, collisions of high energy particles with background gas have been reported as the main issues. Therefore, DEVeX is reconfigured to mitigate these issues. The new device is mainly composed of a plasma gun for a preionization source, a theta pinch for heating, and guiding magnets for a better plasma transportation. Each component will be driven by capacitor banks and controlled by high voltage / current switches. Several diagnostics including triple Langmuir probe, calorimeter, optical emission measurement, Rogowski coil, flux loop, and fast ionization gauge are used to characterize the new device. A coaxial plasma gun is manufactured and installed in the previous theta pinch chamber. The plasma gun is equipped with 500 uF capacitor and a gas puff valve. The increase of the plasma velocity with the plasma gun capacitor voltage is consistent with the theoretical predictions and the velocity is located between the snowplow model and the weak - coupling limit. Plasma energies measured with the calorimeter ranges from 0.02 - 0.065 MJ/m2 and increases with the voltage at the capacitor bank. A cross-check between the plasma energy measured with the calorimeter and the triple probe

  12. Plasma flow reactor for steady state monitoring of physical and chemical processes at high temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koroglu, Batikan; Mehl, Marco; Armstrong, Michael R.; Crowhurst, Jonathan C.; Weisz, David G.; Zaug, Joseph M.; Dai, Zurong; Radousky, Harry B.; Chernov, Alex; Ramon, Erick; Stavrou, Elissaios; Knight, Kim; Fabris, Andrea L.; Cappelli, Mark A.; Rose, Timothy P.

    2017-09-01

    We present the development of a steady state plasma flow reactor to investigate gas phase physical and chemical processes that occur at high temperature (1000 reactor consists of a glass tube that is attached to an inductively coupled argon plasma generator via an adaptor (ring flow injector). We have modeled the system using computational fluid dynamics simulations that are bounded by measured temperatures. In situ line-of-sight optical emission and absorption spectroscopy have been used to determine the structures and concentrations of molecules formed during rapid cooling of reactants after they pass through the plasma. Emission spectroscopy also enables us to determine the temperatures at which these dynamic processes occur. A sample collection probe inserted from the open end of the reactor is used to collect condensed materials and analyze them ex situ using electron microscopy. The preliminary results of two separate investigations involving the condensation of metal oxides and chemical kinetics of high-temperature gas reactions are discussed.

  13. Rotating structures in low temperature magnetized plasmas - Insight from particle simulations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean-Pierre eBoeuf

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The EXB configuration of various low temperature plasma devices is often responsible for the formation of rotating structures and instabilities leading to anomalous electron transport across the magnetic field. In these devices, electrons are strongly magnetized while ions are weakly or not magnetized and this leads to specific physical phenomena that are not present in fusion plasmas where both electrons and ions are strongly magnetized. In this paper we describe basic phenomena involving rotating plasma structures in simple configurations of low temperature EXB plasma devices on the basis of PIC-MCC (Particle-In-Cell Monte Carlo Collisions simulations. We focus on three examples: rotating electron vortices and rotating spokes in cylindrical magnetrons, and azimuthal electron-cyclotron drift instability in Hall thrusters. The simulations are not intended to give definite answers to the many physics issues related to low temperature EXB plasma devices but are used to illustrate and discuss some of the basic questions that need further studies.

  14. HIDENEK: An implicit particle simulation of kinetic-MHD phenomena in three-dimensional plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Motohiko

    1993-05-01

    An advanced 'kinetic-MHD' simulation method and its applications to plasma physics are given in this lecture. This method is quite stable for studying strong nonlinear, kinetic processes associated with large space-scale, low-frequency electromagnetic phenomena of plasmas. A full set of the Maxwell equations, and the Newton-Lorentz equations of motion for particle ions and guiding-center electrons are adopted. In order to retain only the low-frquency waves and instabilities, implicit particle-field equations are derived. The present implicit-particle method is proved to reproduce the MHD eigenmodes such as Alfven, magnetosonic and kinetic Alfven waves in a thermally near-equilibrium plasma. In the second part of the lecture, several physics applications are shown. These include not only the growth of the instabilities of beam ions against the background plasmas and helical link of the current, but they also demonstrate nonlinear results such as pitch-angle scattering of the ions. Recent progress in the simulation of the Kelvin-Helmholtz instability is also presented with a special emphasis on the mixing of the plasma particles.

  15. 3-D Simulations of Plasma Wakefield Acceleration with Non-Idealized Plasmas and Beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deng, S.; Katsouleas, T.; Lee, S.; Muggli, P.; /Southern California U.; Mori, W.B.; Hemker, R.; Ren, C.; Huang, C.; Dodd, E.; Blue, B.E.; Clayton, C.E.; Joshi, C.; Wang,; /UCLA; Decker, F.J.; Hogan, M.J.; Iverson, R.H.; O' Connell, C.; Raimondi, P.; Walz, D.; /SLAC

    2005-09-27

    3-D Particle-in-cell OSIRIS simulations of the current E-162 Plasma Wakefield Accelerator Experiment are presented in which a number of non-ideal conditions are modeled simultaneously. These include tilts on the beam in both planes, asymmetric beam emittance, beam energy spread and plasma inhomogeneities both longitudinally and transverse to the beam axis. The relative importance of the non-ideal conditions is discussed and a worst case estimate of the effect of these on energy gain is obtained. The simulation output is then propagated through the downstream optics, drift spaces and apertures leading to the experimental diagnostics to provide insight into the differences between actual beam conditions and what is measured. The work represents a milestone in the level of detail of simulation comparisons to plasma experiments.

  16. Simulations of Stimulated Raman Scattering in Low-Density Plasmas

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CAO Lihua; CHANG Tieqiang; LIU Zhanjun; ZHENG Chunyang

    2007-01-01

    Stimulated Raman scattering(SRS)in a low-density plasma slab is investigated by particle-in-cell(PIC)simulations.The backward stimulated Raman scattering(B-SRS)dominates initially and erodes the head of the pump wave,while the forward stimulated Raman scattering (F-SRS)subsequently develops and is located at the rear part of the slab.Two-stage electron acceleration may be more efficient due to the coexistence of these two instabilities.The B-SRS plasma wave with low phase velocities can accelerate the background electrons which may be further boosted to higher energies by the F-SRS plasma wave with high phase velocities.The simulations show that the peaks of the main components in both the frequency and wave number spectra occur at the positions estimated from the phase-matching conditions.

  17. A simulation study of a controlled tokamak plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujii, N.; Niwa, Y.

    1980-03-01

    A tokamak circuit theory, including results of numerical simulation studies, is applied to a control system synthesized for a Joule heated tokamak plasma. The treatment is similar to that of Ogata and Ninomiya (1979) except that in this case a quadrupole field coil current is considered coexisting with image induced on a vacuum chamber.

  18. Simulation of density measurements in plasma wakefields using photo acceleration

    CERN Document Server

    Kasim, Muhammad Firmansyah; Ceurvorst, Luke; Sadler, James; Burrows, Philip N; Trines, Raoul; Holloway, James; Wing, Matthew; Bingham, Robert; Norreys, Peter

    2015-01-01

    One obstacle in plasma accelerator development is the limitation of techniques to diagnose and measure plasma wakefield parameters. In this paper, we present a novel concept for the density measurement of a plasma wakefield using photon acceleration, supported by extensive particle in cell simulations of a laser pulse that copropagates with a wakefield. The technique can provide the perturbed electron density profile in the laser’s reference frame, averaged over the propagation length, to be accurate within 10%. We discuss the limitations that affect the measurement: small frequency changes, photon trapping, laser displacement, stimulated Raman scattering, and laser beam divergence. By considering these processes, one can determine the optimal parameters of the laser pulse and its propagation length. This new technique allows a characterization of the density perturbation within a plasma wakefield accelerator.

  19. Simulation of Plasma Jet Merger and Liner Formation within the PLX- α Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samulyak, Roman; Chen, Hsin-Chiang; Shih, Wen; Hsu, Scott

    2015-11-01

    Detailed numerical studies of the propagation and merger of high Mach number argon plasma jets and the formation of plasma liners have been performed using the newly developed method of Lagrangian particles (LP). The LP method significantly improves accuracy and mathematical rigor of common particle-based numerical methods such as smooth particle hydrodynamics while preserving their main advantages compared to grid-based methods. A brief overview of the LP method will be presented. The Lagrangian particle code implements main relevant physics models such as an equation of state for argon undergoing atomic physics transformation, radiation losses in thin optical limit, and heat conduction. Simulations of the merger of two plasma jets are compared with experimental data from past PLX experiments. Simulations quantify the effect of oblique shock waves, ionization, and radiation processes on the jet merger process. Results of preliminary simulations of future PLX- alpha experiments involving the ~ π / 2 -solid-angle plasma-liner configuration with 9 guns will also be presented. Partially supported by ARPA-E's ALPHA program.

  20. Divertor plasma physics experiments on the DIII-D tokamak

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mahdavi, M.A.; Allen, S.L.; Evans, T.E. [and others

    1996-10-01

    In this paper we present an overview of the results and conclusions of our most recent divertor physics and development work. Using an array of new divertor diagnostics we have measured the plasma parameters over the entire divertor volume and gained new insights into several divertor physics issues. We present direct experimental evidence for momentum loss along the field lines, large heat convection, and copious volume recombination during detachment. These observations are supported by improved UEDGE modeling incorporating impurity radiation. We have demonstrated divertor exhaust enrichment of neon and argon by action of a forced scrape off layer (SOL) flow and demonstrated divertor pumping as a substitute for conventional wall conditioning. We have observed a divertor radiation zone with a parallel extent that is an order of magnitude larger than that estimated from a 1-D conduction limited model of plasma at coronal equilibrium. Using density profile control by divertor pumping and pellet injection we have attained H-mode confinement at densities above the Greenwald limit. Erosion rates of several candidate ITER plasma facing materials are measured and compared with predictions of a numerical model.

  1. Promoting Plasma Physics as a Career: A Generational Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, James

    2005-10-01

    A paradigm shift is occurring in education physics programs. Educators are shifting from the traditional teaching focus to concentrate on student learning. Students are unaware of physics as a career, plasma physics or the job opportunities afforded to them with a physics degree. The physics profession needs to promote itself to the younger generations, or specifically the millennial generation (Born in the 1980's-2000's). Learning styles preferred by ``Millennials'' include a technological environment that promotes learning through active task performance rather than passive attendance at lectures. Millennials respond well to anything experiential and will be motivated by opportunities for creativity and challenging learning environments. The open-ended access to information, the ability to tailor learning paths, and continuous and instantaneous performance assessment offer flexibility in the design of curricula as well as in the method of delivery. Educators need to understand the millennial generation, appeal to their motivations and offer a learning environment designed for their learning style. This poster suggests promoting a physics career by focusing on generational learning styles and preferences.

  2. Simulation of polyatomic discharges for thin film deposition processes in low-pressure plasma reactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bera, Kallol

    Comprehensive multi-dimensional self-consistent numerical fluid models for radio-frequency capacitively and inductively coupled methane discharges were developed to predict diamond-like-carbon thin film deposition/etching rate on the wafer. A numerical model of glow discharge provides insight on the physical phenomena in the discharge leading to better understanding and design of the reactor. The developed discharge models included detailed discharge physics, gas-phase chemistry and surface chemistry modeling. To understand the basic discharge phenomena, one- dimensional radio frequency capacitively coupled Ar plasma was simulated using a fluid model. The model was modified for methane plasma to predict the profiles of the plasma variables. The model was then extended to two- dimensional cylindrical coordinates to capture the effects of asymmetry of the reactor on the plasma variables. The necessary dc bias for the discharge was predicted such that the cycle-averaged current to the powered electrode was zero. A discharge chemistry model was also developed to predict various radical and neutral densities in the plasma, and their fluxes to the cathode. The species fluxes are used to predict film deposition rate and the properties of the deposited film. The model predictions of plasma density, self-generated de bias, cathode current and plasma potential compared well with the experimental results. A high density plasma with inductive coupling at low pressure was also considered. Separate rf bias and dc bias are applied to the substrate holder to modulate the ion energy. The present model simulates electron, ion and neutral transport, including detailed discharge and surface chemistry. The model has been implemented for methane discharge to obtain deposition/etching of thin carbon film on the wafer. To the author's knowledge, this is the first attempt to simulate capacitively and inductively coupled plasmas self-consistently for a depositing gas under the operating

  3. Exploring Space Physics Concepts Using Simulation Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gross, N. A.

    2008-05-01

    The Center for Integrated Space Weather Modeling (CISM), a Science and Technology Center (STC) funded by the National Science Foundation, has the goal of developing a suite of integrated physics based computer models of the space environment that can follow the evolution of a space weather event from the Sun to the Earth. In addition to the research goals, CISM is also committed to training the next generation of space weather professionals who are imbued with a system view of space weather. This view should include an understanding of both helio-spheric and geo-space phenomena. To this end, CISM offers a yearly Space Weather Summer School targeted to first year graduate students, although advanced undergraduates and space weather professionals have also attended. This summer school uses a number of innovative pedagogical techniques including devoting each afternoon to a computer lab exercise that use results from research quality simulations and visualization techniques, along with ground based and satellite data to explore concepts introduced during the morning lectures. These labs are suitable for use in wide variety educational settings from formal classroom instruction to outreach programs. The goal of this poster is to outline the goals and content of the lab materials so that instructors may evaluate their potential use in the classroom or other settings.

  4. Incorporating Haptic Feedback in Simulation for Learning Physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Insook; Black, John B.

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effectiveness of a haptic augmented simulation in learning physics. The results indicate that haptic augmented simulations, both the force and kinesthetic and the purely kinesthetic simulations, were more effective than the equivalent non-haptic simulation in providing perceptual experiences and…

  5. Simulations of Damping of Trapped Particle Asymmetry Modes in Non-Neutral Plasma Columns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mason, Grant W.; Spencer, Ross L.

    2002-11-01

    Kabantsev et al.(A. A. Kabantsev, C. F. Driscoll, T. J. Hilsabeck, T. M. O'Neil and J. H.Yu, in Non-Neutral Plasma Physics IV), AIP Conference Proceedings 606, 2001, pp. 277-286 have reported experimental observations and theory for trapped particle asymmetry modes on cylindrical electron columns. In particular, the m=1; k_z=odd mode exhibits strong damping from an unknown mechanism that is conjectured by Kabantsev et al. to be either diffusive mixing of trapped and untrapped populations of particles or spatial Landau damping. We have observed similar damping within a 3-dimensional particle-in-cell simulation. The simulation model does not include diffusive mixing. Spatial Landau damping is also ruled out because the mode frequencies in the simulation intersect the rotation frequency curve outside the plasma. We describe efforts to isolate the mechanism of the damping.

  6. Extended dielectric relaxation scheme for fluid transport simulations of high density plasma discharges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, Deuk-Chul; Song, Mi-Young; Yoon, Jung-Sik

    2014-10-01

    It is well known that the dielectric relaxation scheme (DRS) can efficiently overcome the limitation on the simulation time step for fluid transport simulations of high density plasma discharges. By imitating a realistic and physical shielding process of electric field perturbation, the DRS overcomes the dielectric limitation on time step. However, the electric field was obtained with assuming the drift-diffusion approximation. Although the drift-diffusion expressions are good approximations for both the electrons and ions at high pressure, the inertial term cannot be neglected in the ion momentum equation for low pressure. Therefore, in this work, we developed the extended DRS by introducing an effective electric field. To compare the extended DRS with the previous method, two-dimensional fluid simulations for inductively coupled plasma discharges were performed. This work was supported by the Industrial Strategic Technology Development Program (10041637, Development of Dry Etch System for 10 nm class SADP Process) funded by the Ministry of Knowledge Economy (MKE, Korea).

  7. Numerical simulation of primary cluster formation in silane plasmas

    CERN Document Server

    Gupta, N; Kroesen, G

    2003-01-01

    The usage of low-cost silicon-based solar cells is limited by their tendency to degrade on prolonged exposure to sunlight. Current research has indicated that the inclusion of nano-particles in the plasma-deposited film enhances its efficiency considerably. It is therefore essential to identify the plasma operating conditions such that nano-particles are formed and deposited in the film. The early stages of cluster formation, nucleation and coagulation are still open to experimental and theoretical investigation. In this paper, a simulation of the first stage of particle formation in capacitively coupled radio-frequency discharges in SiH sub 4 is attempted. A molecular dynamics based model has been set up to simulate one of the principal reaction pathways in cluster formation. This simulation model appears to produce valid and meaningful trends. Further studies are planned to explore the effect of other parameters and alternate pathways.

  8. Numerical simulation of primary cluster formation in silane plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Nandini; Stoffels, W. W.; Kroesen, G. M. W.

    2003-04-01

    The usage of low-cost silicon-based solar cells is limited by their tendency to degrade on prolonged exposure to sunlight. Current research has indicated that the inclusion of nano-particles in the plasma-deposited film enhances its efficiency considerably. It is therefore essential to identify the plasma operating conditions such that nano-particles are formed and deposited in the film. The early stages of cluster formation, nucleation and coagulation are still open to experimental and theoretical investigation. In this paper, a simulation of the first stage of particle formation in capacitively coupled radio-frequency discharges in SiH4 is attempted. A molecular dynamics based model has been set up to simulate one of the principal reaction pathways in cluster formation. This simulation model appears to produce valid and meaningful trends. Further studies are planned to explore the effect of other parameters and alternate pathways.

  9. Plasma transport simulation modeling for helical confinement systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamazaki, K.; Amano, T.

    1991-08-01

    New empirical and theoretical transport models for helical confinement systems are developed based on the neoclassical transport theory including the effect of radial electric field and multi-helicity magnetic components, and the drift wave turbulence transport for electrostatic and electromagnetic modes, or the anomalous semi-empirical transport. These electron thermal diffusivities are compared with CHS (Compact Helical System) experimental data, which indicates that the central transport coefficient of the ECH plasma agrees with the neoclassical axi-symmetric value and the transport outside the half radius is anomalous. On the other hand, the transport of NBI-heated plasmas is anomalous in the whole plasma region. This anomaly is not explained by the electrostatic drift wave turbulence models in these flat-density-profile discharges. For the detailed prediction of plasma parameters in LHD (Large Helical Device), 3-D(dimensional) equilibrium/1-D transport simulations including empirical or drift wave turbulence models are carried out, which suggests that the global confinement time of LHD is determined mainly by the electron anomalous transport near the plasma edge region rather than the helical ripple transport in the core region. Even if the ripple loss can be eliminated, the increase of the global confinement is 10%. However, the rise in the central ion temperature is more than 20%. If the anomalous loss can be reduced to the half level of the present scaling, like so-called `H-mode` of the tokamak discharge, the neoclassical ripple loss through the ion channel becomes important even in the plasma core. The 5% radial inward shift of the plasma column with respect to the major radius is effective for improving plasma confinement and raising more than 50% of the fusion product by reducing this neoclassical asymmetric ion transport loss and increasing 10% in the plasma radius. (author).

  10. NASA/Marshall Space Flight Center's Contributions to Space Plasma Physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adrian, M. L.; Six, N. Frank (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Since the mid-l970's, the Space Plasma Physics Group at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center has contributed critical instrumentation to numerous satellite and sounding rocket missions exploring the plasmas of near-Earth space. This talk will review major discoveries in Earth's ionosphere, plasmasphere, and magnetosphere directly attributable to the researchers of the Space Plasma Physics Group and the significance of these discoveries to the field of plasma physics.

  11. A novel flexible field-aligned coordinate system for tokamak edge plasma simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leddy, J.; Dudson, B.; Romanelli, M.; Shanahan, B.; Walkden, N.

    2017-03-01

    Tokamak plasmas are confined by a magnetic field that limits the particle and heat transport perpendicular to the field. Parallel to the field the ionised particles can move freely, so to obtain confinement the field lines are ;closed; (i.e. form closed surfaces of constant poloidal flux) in the core of a tokamak. Towards, the edge, however, the field lines intersect physical surfaces, leading to interaction between neutral and ionised particles, and the potential melting of the material surface. Simulation of this interaction is important for predicting the performance and lifetime of future tokamak devices such as ITER. Field-aligned coordinates are commonly used in the simulation of tokamak plasmas due to the geometry and magnetic topology of the system. However, these coordinates are limited in the geometry they allow in the poloidal plane due to orthogonality requirements. A novel 3D coordinate system is proposed herein that relaxes this constraint so that any arbitrary, smoothly varying geometry can be matched in the poloidal plane while maintaining a field-aligned coordinate. This system is implemented in BOUT++ and tested for accuracy using the method of manufactured solutions. A MAST edge cross-section is simulated using a fluid plasma model and the results show expected behaviour for density, temperature, and velocity. Finally, simulations of an isolated divertor leg are conducted with and without neutrals to demonstrate the ion-neutral interaction near the divertor plate and the corresponding beneficial decrease in plasma temperature.

  12. PREFACE: 14th Latin American Workshop on Plasma Physics (LAWPP 2011)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bilbao, Luis; Minotti, Fernando; Kelly, Hector

    2012-06-01

    These proceedings present the written contributions from participants of the Latin American Workshop on Plasma Physics (LAWPP), which was held in Mar del Plata, Argentina, on 20-25 November 2011. This was the 14th session of the series of LAWPP biennial meetings, which started in 1982. The five-day scientific program of LAWPP 2011 consisted of 32 talks and various poster sessions, with the participation of 135 researchers from Argentina, Brazil, Canada, Chile, Colombia, Mexico, Puerto Rico, USA, Venezuela, as well as others from Europe and Asia. In addition, a School on Plasma Physics and a Workshop on Industrial Applications of Plasma Technology (AITP) were organized together with the main meeting. The five-day School held in the week previous to the meeting was intended for young scientists starting their research in Plasma Physics. On the other hand, the objective of the AITP Workshop was to enhance regional academic and industrial cooperation in the field of plasma assisted surface technology. Topics addressed at LAWPP 2011 included space plasmas, dusty plasmas, nuclear fusion, non-thermal plasmas, basic plasma processes, plasma simulation and industrial plasma applications. This variety of subjects is reflected in these proceedings, which the editors hope will result in enjoyable and fruitful reading for those interested in Plasma Physics. It is a pleasure to thank the Institutions that sponsored the meeting, as well as all the participants and collaborators for making this meeting possible. The Editors Luis Bilbao, Fernando Minotti and Hector Kelly LAWPP participants Participants of the 14th Latin American Workshop on Plasma Physics, 20-25 November 2011, Mar del Plata, Argentina International Scientific Committee Carlos Alejaldre, Spain María Virginia Alves, Brazil Ibere Caldas, Brazil Luis Felipe Delgado-Aparicio, Peru Mayo Villagrán, Mexico Kohnosuke Sato, Japan Héctor Kelly, Argentina Edberto Leal-Quirós, Puerto Rico George Morales, USA Julio Puerta

  13. Plasma environment of Titan: a 3-D hybrid simulation study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Simon

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available Titan possesses a dense atmosphere, consisting mainly of molecular nitrogen. Titan's orbit is located within the Saturnian magnetosphere most of the time, where the corotating plasma flow is super-Alfvénic, yet subsonic and submagnetosonic. Since Titan does not possess a significant intrinsic magnetic field, the incident plasma interacts directly with the atmosphere and ionosphere. Due to the characteristic length scales of the interaction region being comparable to the ion gyroradii in the vicinity of Titan, magnetohydrodynamic models can only offer a rough description of Titan's interaction with the corotating magnetospheric plasma flow. For this reason, Titan's plasma environment has been studied by using a 3-D hybrid simulation code, treating the electrons as a massless, charge-neutralizing fluid, whereas a completely kinetic approach is used to cover ion dynamics. The calculations are performed on a curvilinear simulation grid which is adapted to the spherical geometry of the obstacle. In the model, Titan's dayside ionosphere is mainly generated by solar UV radiation; hence, the local ion production rate depends on the solar zenith angle. Because the Titan interaction features the possibility of having the densest ionosphere located on a face not aligned with the ram flow of the magnetospheric plasma, a variety of different scenarios can be studied. The simulations show the formation of a strong magnetic draping pattern and an extended pick-up region, being highly asymmetric with respect to the direction of the convective electric field. In general, the mechanism giving rise to these structures exhibits similarities to the interaction of the ionospheres of Mars and Venus with the supersonic solar wind. The simulation results are in agreement with data from recent Cassini flybys.

  14. Kinetic simulations of ladder climbing by electron plasma waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hara, Kentaro; Barth, Ido; Kaminski, Erez; Dodin, I. Y.; Fisch, N. J.

    2017-05-01

    The energy of plasma waves can be moved up and down the spectrum using chirped modulations of plasma parameters, which can be driven by external fields. Depending on whether the wave spectrum is discrete (bounded plasma) or continuous (boundless plasma), this phenomenon is called ladder climbing (LC) or autoresonant acceleration of plasmons. It was first proposed by Barth et al. [Phys. Rev. Lett. 115, 075001 (2015), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.115.075001] based on a linear fluid model. In this paper, LC of electron plasma waves is investigated using fully nonlinear Vlasov-Poisson simulations of collisionless bounded plasma. It is shown that, in agreement with the basic theory, plasmons survive substantial transformations of the spectrum and are destroyed only when their wave numbers become large enough to trigger Landau damping. Since nonlinear effects decrease the damping rate, LC is even more efficient when practiced on structures like quasiperiodic Bernstein-Greene-Kruskal (BGK) waves rather than on Langmuir waves per se.

  15. Simulation of plasma filled hemispherical cavity as dielectric resonator antenna

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trenchev, G.; Kissóvski, Zh

    2016-10-01

    Plasma antennas are becoming an increasingly interesting research topic because of their uncommon characteristics. They are highly configurable, can be turned on and off rapidly, and exhibit lower thermal noise compared to metal antennas. In recent years, research has been conducted on cylindrical plasma columns sustained by DC, RF or microwave field, and their application as leaky wave antennas or as regular monopole antennas. Dielectric resonator antennas (DRA) with high dielectric permittivity are known for their small size and excellent operating characteristics for modern mobile communications (WiMAX, LTE). Hemispherical dielectric resonator antennas are characterized by simple shape, high radiation efficiency and wide bandwidth. Hemispherical DRA with a low density weakly ionized plasma as dielectric material will combine the positive features of plasma and dielectric antennas, and is particularly interesting, as antennas of this type have not been studied yet. The hemispherical plasma antenna is simulated with Ansoft HFSS in the microwave S-band. Obtained radiation pattern and bandwidth show the advantages of hemispherical plasma antennas for future communication technology.

  16. Guiding-center models for edge plasmas and numerical simulations of isolated plasma filaments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Madsen, Jens

    2010-09-15

    The work presented in this thesis falls into two categories: development of reduced dynamical models applicable to edge turbulence in magnetically confined fusion plasmas and numerical simulations of isolated plasma filaments in the scrape-off layer region investigating the influence of finite Larmor radius effects on the radial plasma transport. The coexistence of low-frequency fluctuations, having length scales comparable to the ion gyroradius, steep pressure gradients and strong E x B flows in the edge region of fusion plasmas violates the standard gyrokinetic ordering. In this thesis two models are presented that overcome some of the difficulties associated with the development of reduced dynamical models applicable to the edge. Second order guiding-center coordinates are derived using the phasespace Lie transform method. Using a variational principle the corresponding Vlasov-Maxwell equations expressed in guiding-center coordinates are derived including a local energy theorem. The second order terms describe lowest order finite Larmor radius effects. This set of equations might be relevant for edge plasmas due to the capability of capturing strong E x B flows and lowest order finite Larmor radius effects self-consistently. Next, an extension of the existing gyrokinetic formalism with strong flows is presented. In this work the background electric fields is dynamical, whereas earlier contributions did only incorporate a stationary electric field. In an ordering relevant for edge plasma turbulence, fully electromagnetic second order gyrokinetic coordinates and the corresponding gyrokinetic Vlasov-Maxwell equations are derived, including a local energy theorem. By taking the polarization and magnetization densities in the drift kinetic limit, we present the gyrokinetic Vlasov-Maxwell equations in a more tractable form, which could be relevant for direct numerical simulations of edge plasma turbulence. Finally, an investigation of the influence of finite Larmor

  17. Contributions of plasma physics to chaos and nonlinear dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Escande, D. F.

    2016-11-01

    This topical review focusses on the contributions of plasma physics to chaos and nonlinear dynamics bringing new methods which are or can be used in other scientific domains. It starts with the development of the theory of Hamiltonian chaos, and then deals with order or quasi order, for instance adiabatic and soliton theories. It ends with a shorter account of dissipative and high dimensional Hamiltonian dynamics, and of quantum chaos. Most of these contributions are a spin-off of the research on thermonuclear fusion by magnetic confinement, which started in the fifties. Their presentation is both exhaustive and compact. [15 April 2016

  18. ITER-EDA physics design requirements and plasma performance assessments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Uckan, N.A.; Galambos, J. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Wesley, J.; Boucher, D.; Perkins, F.; Post, D.; Putvinski, S. [ITER San Diego Joint Work Site, CA (United States)

    1996-07-01

    Physics design guidelines, plasma performance estimates, and sensitivity of performance to changes in physics assumptions are presented for the ITER-EDA Interim Design. The overall ITER device parameters have been derived from the performance goals using physics guidelines based on the physics R&D results. The ITER-EDA design has a single-null divertor configuration (divertor at the bottom) with a nominal plasma current of 21 MA, magnetic field of 5.68 T, major and minor radius of 8.14 m and 2.8 m, and a plasma elongation (at the 95% flux surface) of {approximately}1.6 that produces a nominal fusion power of {approximately}1.5 GW for an ignited burn pulse length of {ge}1000 s. The assessments have shown that ignition at 1.5 GW of fusion power can be sustained in ITER for 1000 s given present extrapolations of H-mode confinement ({tau}{sub E} = 0.85 {times} {tau}{sub ITER93H}), helium exhaust ({tau}*{sub He}/{tau}{sub E} = 10), representative plasma impurities (n{sub Be}/n{sub e} = 2%), and beta limit [{beta}{sub N} = {beta}(%)/(I/aB) {le} 2.5]. The provision of 100 MW of auxiliary power, necessary to access to H-mode during the approach to ignition, provides for the possibility of driven burn operations at Q = 15. This enables ITER to fulfill its mission of fusion power ({approximately} 1--1.5 GW) and fluence ({approximately}1 MWa/m{sup 2}) goals if confinement, impurity levels, or operational (density, beta) limits prove to be less favorable than present projections. The power threshold for H-L transition, confinement uncertainties, and operational limits (Greenwald density limit and beta limit) are potential performance limiting issues. Improvement of the helium exhaust ({tau}*{sub He}/{tau}{sub E} {le} 5) and potential operation in reverse-shear mode significantly improve ITER performance.

  19. Computer Simulation Studies in Condensed-Matter Physics XVII

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landau, D. P.; Lewis, S. P.; Schüttler, H.-B.

    This status report features the most recent developments in the field, spanning a wide range of topical areas in the computer simulation of condensed matter/materials physics. Both established and new topics are included, ranging from the statistical mechanics of classical magnetic spin models to electronic structure calculations, quantum simulations, and simulations of soft condensed matter. The book presents new physical results as well as novel methods of simulation and data analysis. Highlights of this volume include various aspects of non-equilibrium statistical mechanics, studies of properties of real materials using both classical model simulations and electronic structure calculations, and the use of computer simulations in teaching.

  20. Ideal magnetohydrodynamic simulations of unmagnetized dense plasma jet injection into a hot strongly magnetized plasma

    CERN Document Server

    Liu, Wei

    2010-01-01

    We present results from three-dimensional ideal magnetohydrodynamic simulations of unmagnetized dense plasma jet injection into a hot strongly magnetized plasma, with the aim of providing insight into core fueling of a tokamak with parameters relevant for ITER (International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor) and NSTX (National Spherical Torus Experiment). Unmagnetized jet injection is similar to compact toroid injection but with higher possible injection density and total mass, as well as a potentially smaller footprint for the injector hardware. Our simulation results show that the unmagnetized dense jet is quickly magnetized upon injection. The penetration depth of the jet into the tokamak plasma is mostly dependent on the jet's initial kinetic energy while the jet's magnetic field determines its interior evolution. A key requirement for spatially precise fueling is for the jet's slowing-down time to be less than the time for the perturbed tokamak magnetic flux to relax due to magnetic reconnection. Thus ...

  1. Two-dimensional simulations of nonlinear beam-plasma interaction in isotropic and magnetized plasmas

    CERN Document Server

    Timofeev, I V

    2012-01-01

    Nonlinear interaction of a low density electron beam with a uniform plasma is studied using two-dimensional particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations. We focus on formation of coherent phase space structures in the case, when a wide two-dimensional wave spectrum is driven unstable, and we also study how nonlinear evolution of these structures is affected by the external magnetic field. In the case of isotropic plasma, nonlinear buildup of filamentation modes due to the combined effects of two-stream and oblique instabilities is found to exist and growth mechanisms of secondary instabilities destroying the BGK--type nonlinear wave are identified. In the weak magnetic field, the energy of beam-excited plasma waves at the nonlinear stage of beam-plasma interaction goes predominantly to the short-wavelength upper-hybrid waves propagating parallel to the magnetic field, whereas in the strong magnetic field the spectral energy is transferred to the electrostatic whistlers with oblique propagation.

  2. Physics issues associated with low-beta plasma generators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borovsky, Joseph E.

    1992-01-01

    Kinetic aspects of MHD generators are explored by examining the propagation of dense, low-beta streams of plasma. Three situations are considered: the basic principles of plasma-stream propagation, the propagation of plasma streams into vacuum, and the propagation of plasma streams into ambient plasmas. These three situations are analogous to plasma generators, plasma generators with vacuum loads, and plasma generators with plasma loads. Kinetic (microphysics) aspects include oscillations of the generator plasma, the effects of diocotron instabilities, the acceleration of particles, the starvation of current systems, and plasma-wave production.

  3. Exploration of Plasma Jets Approach to High Energy Density Physics. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Chiping [Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2013-08-26

    High-energy-density laboratory plasma (HEDLP) physics is an emerging, important area of research in plasma physics, nuclear physics, astrophysics, and particle acceleration. While the HEDLP regime occurs at extreme conditions which are often found naturally in space but not on the earth, it may be accessible by colliding high intensity plasmas such as high-energy-density plasma jets, plasmoids or compact toroids from plasma guns. The physics of plasma jets is investigated in the context of high energy density laboratory plasma research. This report summarizes results of theoretical and computational investigation of a plasma jet undergoing adiabatic compression and adiabatic expansion. A root-mean-squared (rms) envelope theory of plasma jets is developed. Comparison between theory and experiment is made. Good agreement between theory and experiment is found.

  4. Physical Models and Virtual Reality Simulators in Otolaryngology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Javia, Luv; Sardesai, Maya G

    2017-07-14

    The increasing role of simulation in the medical education of future otolaryngologists has followed suit with other surgical disciplines. Simulators make it possible for the resident to explore and learn in a safe and less stressful environment. The various subspecialties in otolaryngology use physical simulators and virtual-reality simulators. Although physical simulators allow the operator to make direct contact with its components, virtual-reality simulators allow the operator to interact with an environment that is computer generated. This article gives an overview of the various types of physical simulators and virtual-reality simulators used in otolaryngology that have been reported in the literature. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Brief Introduction to the Foundation of CAI Shidong Award for Plasma Physics

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SHENG Zhengming

    2010-01-01

    @@ The late Academician Professor CAI Shidong was an outstanding plasma physicist who had made seminal contributions in both fundamental plasma theories and controlled thermonuclear fusion energy research.Professor CAI was also one of the pioneers in China's plasma physics research.In 1973,Professor CAI decided to leave U.S.and return to China in order to help pushing forward plasma physics research in China.Professor CAI formed a research group consisting of young scientists and carried out high-level works in this important physics discipline.He worked tirelessly,set examples by his own deeds,and made outstanding contributions in plasma physics research,educating younger generations of plasma physicists,as well as establishing collaborations with plasma scientists in other Asian-African developing nations.In short,Professor CAI devoted the best years of his life to China's plasma physics research.

  6. Plasma physics and the 2013-2022 decadal survey in solar and space physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Daniel N.

    2016-11-01

    The U.S. National Academies established in 2011 a steering committee to develop a comprehensive strategy for solar and space physics research. This updated and extended the first (2003) solar and space physics decadal survey. The latest decadal study implemented a 2008 Congressional directive to NASA for the fields of solar and space physics, but also addressed research in other federal agencies. The new survey broadly canvassed the fields of research to determine the current state of the discipline, identified the most important open scientific questions, and proposed the measurements and means to obtain them so as to advance the state of knowledge during the years 2013-2022. Research in this field has sought to understand: dynamical behaviour of the Sun and its heliosphere; properties of the space environments of the Earth and other solar system bodies; multiscale interaction between solar system plasmas and the interstellar medium; and energy transport throughout the solar system and its impact on the Earth and other solar system bodies. Research in solar and space plasma processes using observation, theory, laboratory studies, and numerical models has offered the prospect of understanding this interconnected system well enough to develop a predictive capability for operational support of civil and military space systems. We here describe the recommendations and strategic plans laid out in the 2013-2022 decadal survey as they relate to measurement capabilities and plasma physical research. We assess progress to date. We also identify further steps to achieve the Survey goals with an emphasis on plasma physical aspects of the program.

  7. Plasma transport in a simulated magnetic-divertor configuration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Strawitch, C. M.

    1981-03-01

    The transport properties of plasma on magnetic field lines that intersect a conducting plate are studied experimentally in the Wisconsin internal ring D.C. machine. The magnetic geometry is intended to simulate certain aspects of plasma phenomena that may take place in a tokamak divertor. It is found by a variety of measurements that the cross field transport is non-ambipolar; this may have important implications in heat loading considerations in tokamak divertors. The undesirable effects of nonambipolar flow make it preferable to be able to eliminate it. However, we find that though the non-ambipolarity may be reduced, it is difficult to eliminate entirely. The plasma flow velocity parallel to the magnetic field is found to be near the ion acoustic velocity in all cases. The experimental density and electron temperature profiles are compared to the solutions to a one dimensional transport model that is commonly used in divertor theory.

  8. Fusion Plasma Physics and ITER - An Introduction (1/4)

    CERN Document Server

    CERN. Geneva

    2011-01-01

    In November 2006, ministers representing the world’s major fusion research communities signed the agreement formally establishing the international project ITER. Sited at Cadarache in France, the project involves China, the European Union (including Switzerland), India, Japan, the Russian Federation, South Korea and the United States. ITER is a critical step in the development of fusion energy: its role is to confirm the feasibility of exploiting magnetic confinement fusion for the production of energy for peaceful purposes by providing an integrated demonstration of the physics and technology required for a fusion power plant. The ITER tokamak is designed to study the “burning plasma” regime in deuterium-tritium (D-T) plasmas by achieving a fusion amplification factor, Q (the ratio of fusion output power to plasma heating input power), of 10 for several hundreds of seconds with a nominal fusion power output of 500MW. It is also intended to allow the study of steady-state plasma operation at Q≥5 by me...

  9. Soft X-ray measurements in magnetic fusion plasma physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Botrugno, A.; Gabellieri, L.; Mazon, D.; Pacella, D.; Romano, A.

    2010-11-01

    Soft X-ray diagnostic systems and their successful application in the field of magnetic fusion plasma physics are discussed. Radiation with wavelength in the region of Soft X-Ray (1-30 keV) is largely produced by high temperature plasmas, carrying important information on many processes during a plasma discharge. Soft X-ray diagnostics are largely used in various fusion devices all over the world. These diagnostic systems are able to obtain information on electron temperature, electron density, impurity transport, Magneto Hydro Dynamic instabilities. We will discuss the SXR diagnostic installed on FTU in Frascati (Italy) and on Tore Supra in Cadarache (France), with special emphasis on diagnostic performances. Moreover, we will discuss the two different inversion methods for tomographic reconstruction used in Frascati and in Cadarache, the first one is relied on a guessed topology of iso-emissivity surfaces, the second one on regularization techniques, like minimum Fisher or maximum entropy. Finally, a new and very fast 2D imaging system with energy discrimination and high time resolution will be summarized as an alternative approach of SXR detection system.

  10. Minimally-Invasive Gene Transfection by Chemical and Physical Interaction of Atmospheric Pressure Plasma Flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaneko, Toshiro

    2014-10-01

    Non-equilibrium atmospheric pressure plasma irradiated to the living-cell is investigated for medical applications such as gene transfection, which is expected to play an important role in molecular biology, gene therapy, and creation of induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells. However, the conventional gene transfection using the plasma has some problems that the cell viability is low and the genes cannot be transferred into some specific lipid cells, which is attributed to the unknown mechanism of the gene transfection using the plasma. Therefore, the time-controlled atmospheric pressure plasma flow is generated and irradiated to the living-cell suspended solution for clarifying the transfection mechanism toward developing highly-efficient and minimally- invasive gene transfection system. In this experiment, fluorescent dye YOYO-1 is used as the simulated gene and LIVE/DEAD Stain is simultaneously used for cell viability assay. By the fluorescence image, the transfection efficiency is calculated as the ratio of the number of transferred and surviving cells to total cell count. It is clarified that the transfection efficiency is significantly increased by the short-time (cell viability (>90%). This result indicates that the physical effects such as the electric field caused by the charged particles arriving at the surface of the cell membrane, and chemical effects associated with plasma-activated products in solution act synergistically to enhance the cell-membrane transport with low-damage. This work was supported by JSPS KAKENHI Grant Number 24108004.

  11. Earth's magnetosphere - Global problems in magnetospheric plasma physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roederer, J. G.

    1979-01-01

    Magnetospheric physics is presently in a transition from the exploratory stage to one in which satellite missions and ground-based observations are planned with the specific object of achieving a global understanding and self-consistent quantitative description of the cause-and-effect relationship among the principal dynamic processes involved. Measurements turn to lower and lower energies and to higher ion mass species, in order to encompass the entire particle population, and to a broader range of the frequency spectrum of magnetic and electric field variations. In the present paper, the current status of our knowledge on magnetospheric plasma physics is reviewed, with particular reference of such fundamental advances as the discovery of layers of streaming plasma in the magnetosphere beneath its boundary surface, the identification of the terrestrial magnetosphere as a celestial source of kilometric radiation and relativistic particles, the identification of parallel electric field regions within the magnetosphere and their role in auroral particle acceleration, and the discovery of large fluxes of energetic heavy ions trapped in the magnetosphere.

  12. The Challenge of Incorporating Charged Dust in the Physics of Flowing Plasma Interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Y.; Russell, C. T.; Ma, Y.; Lai, H.; Jian, L.; Toth, G.

    2013-12-01

    The presence of two oppositely charged species with very different mass ratios leads to interesting physical processes and difficult numerical simulations. The reconnection problem is a classic example of this principle with a proton-electron mass ratio of 1836, but it is not the only example. Increasingly we are discovering situations in which heavy, electrically charged dust particles are major players in a plasma interaction. The mass of a 1mm dust particle is about 2000 proton masses and of a 10 mm dust particle about 2 million proton masses. One example comes from planetary magnetospheres. Charged dust pervades Enceladus' southern plume. The saturnian magnetospheric plasma flows through this dusty plume interacting with the charged dust and ionized plume gas. Multiple wakes are seen downstream. The flow is diverted in one direction. The field aligned-current systems are elsewhere. How can these two wake features be understood? Next we have an example from the solar wind. When asteroids collide in a disruptive collision, the solar wind strips the nano-scale charged dust from the debris forming a dusty plasma cloud that may be over 106km in extent and containing over 100 million kg of dust accelerated to the solar wind speed. How does this occur, especially as rapidly as it appears to happen? In this paper we illustrate a start on understanding these phenomena using multifluid MHD simulations but these simulations are only part of the answer to this complex problem that needs attention from a broader range of the community.

  13. Toward a first-principles integrated simulation of tokamak edge plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, C S [New York University; Klasky, Scott A [ORNL; Cummings, Julian [California Institute of Technology, Pasadena; Samtaney, Ravi [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL); Shoshani, A. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL); Sugiyama, L. [Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT); Keyes, David E [Columbia University; Ku, Seung-Hoe [New York University; Park, G. [New York University; Parker, Scott [University of Colorado, Boulder; Podhorszki, Norbert [ORNL; Strauss, H. [New York University; Abbasi, H. [Georgia Institute of Technology; Adams, Mark [Columbia University; Tchoua, Roselyne B [ORNL; Bateman, Glenn [Lehigh University, Bethlehem, PA; Bennett, K. [Rutgers University; Chen, Yang [University of Colorado, Boulder; D' Azevedo, Eduardo [ORNL; Docan, Ciprian [Rutgers University; Ethier, Stephane [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL); Feibush, E. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL); Greengard, Leslie [New York University; Hahm, Taik Soo [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL); Hinton, Fred [University of California, San Diego; Jin, Chen [ORNL; Khan, A. [University of Utah; Kritz, Arnold [Lehigh University, Bethlehem, PA; Krstic, Predrag S [ORNL; Lao, T. [Columbia University; Lee, Wei-Li [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL); Lin, Zhihong [University of California, Irvine; Lofstead, J. [Georgia Institute of Technology; Mouallem, P. A. [North Carolina State University; Nagappan, M. [North Carolina State University; Pankin, A. [Lehigh University, Bethlehem, PA; Parashar, Manish [Rutgers University; Pindzola, Michael S. [Auburn University, Auburn, Alabama; Reinhold, Carlos O [ORNL; Schultz, David Robert [ORNL; Schwan, Karsten [Georgia Institute of Technology; Silver, D. [Rutgers University; Sim, A. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL); Stotler, D. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL); Vouk, M. A. [North Carolina State University; Wolf, M. [Georgia Institute of Technology; Weitzner, Harold [New York University; Worley, Patrick H [ORNL; Xiao, Y. [University of California, Irvine; Yoon, E. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL); Zorin, Denis [New York University

    2008-01-01

    Performance of the ITER is anticipated to be highly sensitive to the edge plasma condition. The edge pedestal in ITER needs to be predicted from an integrated simulation of the necessary firstprinciples, multi-scale physics codes. The mission of the SciDAC Fusion Simulation Project (FSP) Prototype Center for Plasma Edge Simulation (CPES) is to deliver such a code integration framework by (1) building new kinetic codes XGC0 and XGC1, which can simulate the edge pedestal buildup; (2) using and improving the existing MHD codes ELITE, M3D-OMP, M3D-MPP and NIMROD, for study of large-scale edge instabilities called Edge Localized Modes (ELMs); and (3) integrating the codes into a framework using cutting-edge computer science technology. Collaborative effort among physics, computer science, and applied mathematics within CPES has created the first working version of the End-to-end Framework for Fusion Integrated Simulation (EFFIS), which can be used to study the pedestal-ELM cycles.

  14. Toward a first-principles integrated simulation of tokamak edge plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, C S; Ku, S; Park, G; Strauss, H [New York University, New York, NY 10012 (United States); Klasky, S; Podhorszki, N; Barreto, R; Azevedo, E D' [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN 37381 (United States); Cummings, J [California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Samtaney, R [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton, NJ 08543 (United States); Shoshani, A [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Sugiyama, L [Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States); Keyes, D; Adams, M [Columbia University, New York NY 10027 (United States); Parker, S; Chen, Y [University of Colorado at Boulder, Boulder, CO 80309 (United States); Abbasi, H [Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA 30332 (United States); Bateman, G [Lehigh University, Bethlehem, PA 18015 (United States); Bennett, K; Docan, C [Rutgers University, New Brunswick, NJ 08901 (United States)], E-mail: cschang@cims.nyu.edu, E-mail: klasky@ornl.gov (and others)

    2008-07-15

    Performance of the ITER is anticipated to be highly sensitive to the edge plasma condition. The edge pedestal in ITER needs to be predicted from an integrated simulation of the necessary first-principles, multi-scale physics codes. The mission of the SciDAC Fusion Simulation Project (FSP) Prototype Center for Plasma Edge Simulation (CPES) is to deliver such a code integration framework by (1) building new kinetic codes XGC0 and XGC1, which can simulate the edge pedestal buildup; (2) using and improving the existing MHD codes ELITE, M3D-OMP, M3D-MPP and NIMROD, for study of large-scale edge instabilities called Edge Localized Modes (ELMs); and (3) integrating the codes into a framework using cutting-edge computer science technology. Collaborative effort among physics, computer science, and applied mathematics within CPES has created the first working version of the End-to-end Framework for Fusion Integrated Simulation (EFFIS), which can be used to study the pedestal-ELM cycles.

  15. Magnetic shield for turbomolecular pump of the Magnetized Plasma Linear Experimental device at Saha Institute of Nuclear Physics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biswas, Subir; Chattopadhyay, Monobir; Pal, Rabindranath

    2011-01-01

    The turbo molecular pump of the Magnetized Plasma Linear Experimental device is protected from damage by a magnetic shield. As the pump runs continuously in a magnetic field environment during a plasma physics experiment, it may get damaged owing to eddy current effect. For design and testing of the shield, first we simulate in details various aspects of magnetic shield layouts using a readily available field design code. The performance of the shield made from two half cylinders of soft iron material, is experimentally observed to agree very well with the simulation results.

  16. Plasma Theory and Simulation Group Annual Progress Report for 1991

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-12-31

    experimental run. " results in a form to be compared with laboratory experiments. PDCX include the electromagnetics, atomic physics and chemical reactions...beam formation analitically : i) the resistance of the (low-density) to the final, high-density cylindrical wall can be approximated by the regime...related to the presence of sub-micron dust contamination in plasma aided processing. The dust particles are produced by chemical and mechanical means. In

  17. Space plasma physics at the Applied Physics Laboratory over the past half-century

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potemra, Thomas A.

    1992-01-01

    An overview is given of space-plasma experiments conducted at the Applied Physics Laboratory (APL) at Johns Hopkins University including observational campaigns and the instrumentation developed. Specific space-plasma experiments discussed include the study of the radiation environment in the Van Allen radiation belt with solid-state proton detectors. Also described are the 5E-1 satellites which acquired particle and magnetic-field data from earth orbit. The Triad satellite and its magnetometer system were developed for high-resolution studies of the earth's magnetic field, and APL contributions to NASA's Interplanetary Monitoring Platforms are listed. The review mentions the International Ultraviolet Explorer, the Atmosphere Explorer mission, and the Active Magnetic Particle Tracer Explorers mission. Other recent programs reviewed include a high-latitude satellite, contributions to the Voyager mission, and radar studies of space plasmas.

  18. Numerical simulation of charging of an absorbing sphere in collisionless plasmas: asymptotics and trapped particle dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiselyov, Alexander; Dolgonosov, Maxim; Krasovsky, Victor

    It is very important to determine the form of trapped particle distribution function in the problem of plasma disturbance by a spherical absorbing body. There are two ways of solving this problem: stability analysis of the physical system or examination of initial value problem. In this work the second method has been chosen. The physical system under consideration can be described by Poisson-Vlasov equations. In the initial moment of time the absorbing sphere appears in collisionless plasma. Distribution functions for electrons and ions are assumed to be monoenergetic at the start. The aim of the study is to observe plasma dynamics at long times and to determine the steady state of the plasma. Numerical simulation is based on PIC ("particles-in-cell") method. Spherical symmetry of the problem is widely employed to simplify model and reduce calculation count. It allows to treat charged particle dynamics as a motion with one degree of freedom, while the problem as a whole remains three-dimensional. This gives an opportunity to use moderate computational resources. A massively parallel code using GPGPU and OpenCL technologies has been developed, as well as auxiliary utilities for testing, result processing and representation. As a result, spatial and temporal plasma characteristics near absorbing sphere have been obtained. Formation of trapped ion bunch in the vicinity of the sphere has been observed on the phase plane while approaching equilibrium state.

  19. Hybrid-structure atomic models for HED laboratory plasma diagnostics and simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, Stephanie

    2010-03-01

    While theoretical atomic physics calculations are well developed for isolated atoms and have been thoroughly benchmarked against low-density laboratory sources such as electron beam ion traps and tokamak plasmas, the high energy density (HED) regime offers significant challenges for atomic physics and spectroscopic modeling. High plasma densities lead to collective effects such as continuum lowering, line broadening, and significant populations in multiply excited atomic states. These effects change the plasma equation of state and the character of emission and absorption spectra and must be accounted for in order to accurately simulate radiative transfer in and apply spectroscopic diagnostics to HED plasmas. Modeling complex mid- and high-Z ions in the HED regime is a particular challenge because exponential growth in accessible configuration space overwhelms the reduction of the Rydberg levels through continuum lowering. This talk will discuss one approach to generating a tractable spectroscopic-quality atomic kinetics model and describe its application to HED laboratory plasmas produced on Sandia's Z facility. [4pt] Sandia is a multi-program laboratory operated by Sandia Corporation, a Lockheed Martin Company, for the United States Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  20. Gyrokinetic Particle Simulation of Compressible Electromagnetic Turbulence in High-β Plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin, Zhihong

    2014-03-13

    Supported by this award, the PI and his research group at the University of California, Irvine (UCI) have carried out computational and theoretical studies of instability, turbulence, and transport in laboratory and space plasmas. Several massively parallel, gyrokinetic particle simulation codes have been developed to study electromagnetic turbulence in space and laboratory plasmas. In space plasma projects, the simulation codes have been successfully applied to study the spectral cascade and plasma heating in kinetic Alfven wave turbulence, the linear and nonlinear properties of compressible modes including mirror instability and drift compressional mode, and the stability of the current sheet instabilities with finite guide field in the context of collisionless magnetic reconnection. The research results have been published in 25 journal papers and presented at many national and international conferences. Reprints of publications, source codes, and other research-related information are also available to general public on the PI’s webpage (http://phoenix.ps.uci.edu/zlin/). Two PhD theses in space plasma physics are highlighted in this report.

  1. BOOK REVIEW: Fundamentals of Plasma Physics and Controlled Fusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brambilla, Marco

    1998-04-01

    Professor Kenro Miyamoto, already well known for his textbook Plasma Physics for Nuclear Fusion (MIT Press, Cambridge, MA, 1976; revised edition 1989), has now published a new book entitled Fundamentals of Plasma Physics and Controlled Fusion (Iwanami Book Service Center, Tokyo, 1997). To a large extent, the new book is a somewhat shortened and well reorganized version of its predecessor. The style, concise and matter of fact, clearly shows the origin of the text in lectures given by the author to graduate students. As announced by the title, the book is divided into two parts: the first part (about 250 pages) is a general introduction to the physics of plasmas, while the second, somewhat shorter, part (about 150 pages), is devoted to a description of the most important experimental approaches to achieving controlled thermonuclear fusion. Even in the first part, moreover, the choice of subjects is consistently oriented towards the needs of fusion research. Thus, the introduction to the behaviour of charged particles (particle motion, collisions, etc.) and to the collective description of plasmas is quite short, although the reader will get a flavour of all the most important topics and will find a number of examples chosen for their relevance to fusion applications (only the presentation of the Vlasov equation, in the second section of Chapter 4, might be criticized as so concise as to be almost misleading, since the difference between microscopic and macroscopic fields is not even mentioned). Considerably more space is devoted to the magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) description of equilibrium and stability. This part includes the solution of the Grad-Shafranov equation for circular tokamaks, a brief discussion of Pfirsch-Schlüter, neoclassical and anomalous diffusion, and two relatively long chapters on the most important ideal and resistive MHD instabilities of toroidal plasmas; drift and ion temperature gradient driven instabilities are also briefly presented. The

  2. Examining the interaction of Europa with the Jovian magnetosphere using eruptive and multifluid plasma dynamic simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paty, C. S.; Dufek, J.; Payan, A. P.

    2015-12-01

    Jupiter's icy moon Europa provides a unique laboratory for understanding the physics of moon-magnetosphere interactions. Europa possesses a conductive subsurface ocean, the interaction of which with the locally varying Jovian magnetic field is expressed by the observed inductive response. This icy moon also boasts a dynamic exosphere as well as eruptive plumes, which interact with the Jovian plasma as expressed via ultraviolet aurora. We investigate a broad range of parameter space related to the interaction of this icy moon with the rapidly rotating magnetosphere of Jupiter, systematically working through and quantifying various physical effects using a multifluid plasma dynamic modeling framework. Aside from induction and interactions with the exosphere, we will also present preliminary result from incorporating a neutral plume generated by an eruptive simulation. We run conduit simulations to get at neutral gas and particle injection velocities, which are in turn used as a source for the plasma dynamic simulations. We then investigate the distribution of neutrals, ions, and charged grains as a function of altitude.

  3. Magnetic stochasticity in gyrokinetic simulations of plasma microturbulence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nevins, W M; Wang, E; Candy, J

    2010-02-12

    Analysis of the magnetic field structure from electromagnetic simulations of tokamak ion temperature gradient turbulence demonstrates that the magnetic field can be stochastic even at very low plasma pressure. The degree of magnetic stochasticity is quantified by evaluating the magnetic diffusion coefficient. We find that the magnetic stochasticity fails to produce a dramatic increase in the electron heat conductivity because the magnetic diffusion coefficient remains small.

  4. Kinetic simulation study of one dimensional collisional bounded plasma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1999-01-01

    A self-consistent kinetic simulation study ofone dimensional collisional bounded plasma is presented.The formation of stable sheath potential is investigated.It is found that mass ratio of electron and ion not onlyaffects the level of sheath potential, but also affectsthe ion temperature of system. It is clarified that the effects of secondaryemission electron on both the total potential dropand the temperature are not important.

  5. Introduction to Gyrokinetic Theory with Applications in Magnetic Confinement Research in Plasma Physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    W.M. Tang

    2005-01-03

    The present lecture provides an introduction to the subject of gyrokinetic theory with applications in the area of magnetic confinement research in plasma physics--the research arena from which this formalism was originally developed. It was presented as a component of the ''Short Course in Kinetic Theory within the Thematic Program in Partial Differential Equations'' held at the Fields Institute for Research in Mathematical Science (24 March 2004). This lecture also discusses the connection between the gyrokinetic formalism and powerful modern numerical simulations. Indeed, simulation, which provides a natural bridge between theory and experiment, is an essential modern tool for understanding complex plasma behavior. Progress has been stimulated in particular by the exponential growth of computer speed along with significant improvements in computer technology. The advances in both particle and fluid simulations of fine-scale turbulence and large-scale dynamics have produced increasingly good agreement between experimental observations and computational modeling. This was enabled by two key factors: (i) innovative advances in analytic and computational methods for developing reduced descriptions of physics phenomena spanning widely disparate temporal and spatial scales and (ii) access to powerful new computational resources.

  6. Developing iPad-Based Physics Simulations That Can Help People Learn Newtonian Physics Concepts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Young-Jin

    2015-01-01

    The aims of this study are: (1) to develop iPad-based computer simulations called iSimPhysics that can help people learn Newtonian physics concepts; and (2) to assess its educational benefits and pedagogical usefulness. To facilitate learning, iSimPhysics visualizes abstract physics concepts, and allows for conducting a series of computer…

  7. Developing iPad-Based Physics Simulations That Can Help People Learn Newtonian Physics Concepts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Young-Jin

    2015-01-01

    The aims of this study are: (1) to develop iPad-based computer simulations called iSimPhysics that can help people learn Newtonian physics concepts; and (2) to assess its educational benefits and pedagogical usefulness. To facilitate learning, iSimPhysics visualizes abstract physics concepts, and allows for conducting a series of computer…

  8. Geant4 electromagnetic physics: improving simulation performance and accuracy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivanchenko, V. N.; Incerti, S.; Allison, J.; Bagulya, A.; Brown, J. M. C.; Champion, C.; Elles, S.; Francis, Z.; Grichine, V.; Ivantchenko, A.; Jacquemier, J.; Karamitros, M.; Maire, M.; Mantero, A.; Pandola, L.; Raine, M.; Reis, M. A.; Santin, G.; Sawkey, D.; Schaelicke, A.; Schenk, M.; Taborda, A.; Urban, L.; Yamashita, T.

    2014-06-01

    The most recent upgrades of the electromagnetic (EM) physics "standard" and "low energy" sub-libraries of the general purpose Geant4 Monte Carlo simulation toolkit are described. These upgrades are relevant to different application domains including high energy physics, medical physics and space science. Validation results are presented and discussed.

  9. Simulation of current generation in a 3-D plasma model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsung, F.S.; Dawson, J.M. [Univ. of California, Los Angeles, CA (United States)

    1996-12-31

    Two wires carrying current in the same direction will attract each other, and two wires carrying current in the opposite direction will repel each other. Now, consider a test charge in a plasma. If the test charge carries current parallel to the plasma, then it will be pulled toward the plasma core, and if the test charge carries current anti-parallel to the plasma, then it will be pushed to the edge. The electromagnetic coupling between the plasma and a test charge (i.e., the A{sub {parallel}} {circ} v{sub {parallel}} term in the test charge`s Hamiltonian) breaks the symmetry in the parallel direction, and gives rise to a diffusion coefficient which is dependent on the particle`s parallel velocity. This is the basis for the {open_quotes}preferential loss{close_quotes} mechanism described in the work by Nunan et al. In our previous 2+{1/2}D work, in both cylindrical and toroidal geometries, showed that if the plasma column is centrally fueled, then an initial current increases steadily. The results in straight, cylindrical plasmas showed that self generated parallel current arises without trapped particle or neoclassical diffusion, as assumed by the bootstrap theory. It suggests that the fundamental mechanism seems to be the conservation of particles canonical momenta in the direction of the ignorable coordinate. We have extended the simulation to 3D to verify the model put forth. A scalable 3D EM-PIC code, with a localized field-solver, has been implemented to run on a large class of parallel computers. On the 512-node SP2 at Cornell Theory Center, we have benchmarked the 2+{1/2}D calculations using 32 grids in the previously ignored direction, and a 100-fold increase in the number of particles. Our preliminary results show good agreements between the 2+{1/2}D and the 3D calculations. We will present our 3D results at the meeting.

  10. The expansion of a plasma into a vacuum - Basic phenomena and processes and applications to space plasma physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, K. H., Jr.; Stone, N. H.; Samir, U.

    1983-01-01

    In this review attention is called to basic phenomena and physical processes involved in the expansion of a plasma into a vacuum, or the expansion of a plasma into a more tenuous plasma, in particular the fact that upon the expansion, ions are accelerated and reach energies well above their thermal energy. Also, in the process of the expansion a rarefaction wave propagates into the ambient plasma, an ion front moves into the expansion volume, and discontinuities in plasma parameters occur. The physical processes which cause the above phenomena are discussed, and their possible application is suggested for the case of the distribution of ions and electrons (hence plasma potential and electric fields) in the wake region behind artificial and natural obstacles moving supersonically in a rarefied space plasma. To illustrate this, some in situ results are reexamined. Directions for future work in this area via the utilization of the Space Shuttle and laboratory work are also mentioned.

  11. Vlasov Simulation of Electrostatic Solitary Structures in Multi-Component Plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umeda, Takayuki; Ashour-Abdalla, Maha; Pickett, Jolene S.; Goldstein, Melvyn L.

    2012-01-01

    Electrostatic solitary structures have been observed in the Earth's magnetosheath by the Cluster spacecraft. Recent theoretical work has suggested that these solitary structures are modeled by electron acoustic solitary waves existing in a four-component plasma system consisting of core electrons, two counter-streaming electron beams, and one species of background ions. In this paper, the excitation of electron acoustic waves and the formation of solitary structures are studied by means of a one-dimensional electrostatic Vlasov simulation. The present result first shows that either electron acoustic solitary waves with negative potential or electron phase-space holes with positive potential are excited in four-component plasma systems. However, these electrostatic solitary structures have longer duration times and higher wave amplitudes than the solitary structures observed in the magnetosheath. The result indicates that a high-speed and small free energy source may be needed as a fifth component. An additional simulation of a five-component plasma consisting of a stable four-component plasma and a weak electron beam shows the generation of small and fast electron phase-space holes by the bump-on-tail instability. The physical properties of the small and fast electron phase-space holes are very similar to those obtained by the previous theoretical analysis. The amplitude and duration time of solitary structures in the simulation are also in agreement with the Cluster observation.

  12. Numerical Simulations of Low Pressure Inductively Coupled Plasmas in Geometrically Complex Reactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Ben; Wu, Hanming; Krishnan, Anantha

    1996-10-01

    A two-dimensional fluid model has been developed for simulation of low pressure inductively coupled plasma (ICP) reactors. The model obtains solutions for the plasma density, electron temperature, and electric field for the given operating conditions. The physical phenomena and processes such as ambipolar diffusion, thermal diffusion, quasi-neutrality, ionization, inductive Joule heating, and excitations are considered in the model. A significant feature of the model is its capability of handling complex geometries that are often encountered in industrial reactors. Complex reactor geometries are modeled by a body-fitted-coordinate (BFC) formulation. A series of numerical experiments have been conducted using the model to study effects of various parameters such as chamber pressure, size of the wafer, position of the inductive coil, and the power input into the plasma. Different reactor geometries such as the GEC ICP reference cell and the belljar reactor have been simulated. The results of the parametric experiments are presented to show certain systematic trends in performance parameters such as uniformity and processing rates. The ICP model has been coupled to a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) code (capable of 3D simulations) that obtains the flow and pressure distribution inside the chamber. The ICP model will use pressure predictions (from the CFD model) to compute the local ionization rates. Chemical source/sink terms from the plasma dissociation model will be used by the CFD code to account for local reactant depletion effects.

  13. Integrated Plasma Simulation of Lower Hybrid Current Drive Modification of Sawtooth in Alcator C-Mod

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonoli, P. T.; Hubbard, A. E.; Schmidt, A. E.; Wright, J. C.; Kessel, C. E.; Batchelor, D. B.; Berry, L. A.; Harvey, R. W.

    2010-11-01

    Experiments were performed in Alcator C-Mod, where the onset time for sawteeth was delayed significantly (up to 0.5 s) relative to ohmically heated plasmas, through injection of off-axis LH current drive power [1]. In this poster we discuss simulations of these experiments using the Integrated Plasma Simulator (IPS) [2], through which driven current density profiles and hard x-ray spectra are computed using a ray tracing code (GENRAY) and Fokker Planck code (CQL3D) [3], that are executed repeatedly in time. The background plasma is evolved in these simulations using the TSC transport code with the Porcelli sawtooth model [4]. [4pt] [1] C. E. Kessel et al, Bull. of the Am. Phys. Soc. 53, Poster PP6.00074 (2008). [0pt] [2] D. Batchelor et al, Journal of Physics: Conf. Series 125, 012039 (2008). [0pt] [3] R. W. Harvey and M. G. McCoy, Proc. of the IAEA Tech. Comm. Mtg. on Sim. and Mod. of Therm. Plasmas, Montreal, Canada (1992). [0pt] [4] S. C. Jardin et al, Journal Comp. Phys. 66, 481 (1986).

  14. Simulation on change of generic satellite radar cross section via artificially created plasma sprays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Shen Shou Max; Chuang, Yu-Chou

    2016-06-01

    Recent advancements in antisatellite missile technologies have proven the effectiveness of such attacks, and the vulnerability of satellites in such exercises inspires a new paradigm in RF Stealth techniques suitable for satellites. In this paper we examine the possibility of using artificially created plasma sprays on the surface of the satellite’s main body to alter its radar cross section (RCS). First, we briefly review past research related to RF Stealth using plasma. Next, we discuss the physics between electromagnetic waves and plasma, and the RCS number game in RF Stealth design. A comparison of RCS in a generic satellite and a more complicated model is made to illustrate the effect of the RCS number game, and its meaning for a simulation model. We also run a comparison between finite-difference-time-domain (FDTD) and multilevel fast multipole method (MLFMM) codes, and find the RCS results are very close. We then compare the RCS of the generic satellite and the plasma-covered satellite. The incident radar wave is a differentiated Gaussian monopulse, with 3 dB bandwidth between 1.2 GHz and 4 GHz, and we simulate three kinds of plasma density, with a characteristic plasma frequency ω P  =  0.1, 1, and 10 GHz. The electron-neutral collision frequency ν en is set at 0.01 GHz. We found the RCS of plasma-covered satellite is not necessarily smaller than the originally satellite. When ω P is 0.1 GHz, the plasma spray behaves like a dielectric, and there is minor reduction in the RCS. When ω P is 1 GHz, the X-Y cut RCS increases. When ω P is 10 GHz, the plasma behaves more like a metal to the radar wave, and stronger RCS dependency to frequency appears. Therefore, to use plasma as an RCS adjustment tool requires careful fine-tuning of plasma density and shape, in order to achieve the so-called plasma stealth effect.

  15. Phase space structures in gyrokinetic simulations of fusion plasma turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghendrih, Philippe; Norscini, Claudia; Cartier-Michaud, Thomas; Dif-Pradalier, Guilhem; Abiteboul, Jérémie; Dong, Yue; Garbet, Xavier; Gürcan, Ozgür; Hennequin, Pascale; Grandgirard, Virginie; Latu, Guillaume; Morel, Pierre; Sarazin, Yanick; Storelli, Alexandre; Vermare, Laure

    2014-10-01

    Gyrokinetic simulations of fusion plasmas give extensive information in 5D on turbulence and transport. This paper highlights a few of these challenging physics in global, flux driven simulations using experimental inputs from Tore Supra shot TS45511. The electrostatic gyrokinetic code GYSELA is used for these simulations. The 3D structure of avalanches indicates that these structures propagate radially at localised toroidal angles and then expand along the field line at sound speed to form the filaments. Analysing the poloidal mode structure of the potential fluctuations (at a given toroidal location), one finds that the low modes m = 0 and m = 1 exhibit a global structure; the magnitude of the m = 0 mode is much larger than that of the m = 1 mode. The shear layers of the corrugation structures are thus found to be dominated by the m = 0 contribution, that are comparable to that of the zonal flows. This global mode seems to localise the m = 2 mode but has little effect on the localisation of the higher mode numbers. However when analysing the pulsation of the latter modes one finds that all modes exhibit a similar phase velocity, comparable to the local zonal flow velocity. The consequent dispersion like relation between the modes pulsation and the mode numbers provides a means to measure the zonal flow. Temperature fluctuations and the turbulent heat flux are localised between the corrugation structures. Temperature fluctuations are found to exhibit two scales, small fluctuations that are localised by the corrugation shear layers, and appear to bounce back and forth radially, and large fluctuations, also readily observed on the flux, which are associated to the disruption of the corrugations. The radial ballistic velocity of both avalanche events if of the order of 0.5ρ∗c0 where ρ∗ = ρ0/a, a being the tokamak minor radius and ρ0 being the characteristic Larmor radius, ρ0 = c0/Ω0. c0 is the reference ion thermal velocity and Ω0 = qiB0/mi the reference

  16. A novel flexible field-aligned coordinate system for tokamak edge plasma simulation

    CERN Document Server

    Leddy, Jarrod; Romanelli, Michele; Shanahan, Brendan; Walkden, Nick

    2016-01-01

    Tokamak plasmas are confined by a magnetic field that limits the particle and heat transport perpendicular to the field. Parallel to the field the ionised particles can move freely, so to obtain confinement the field lines are "closed" (ie. form closed surfaces of constant poloidal flux) in the core of a tokamak. Towards, the edge, however, the field lines begin to intersect physical surfaces, leading to interaction between neutral and ionised particles, and the potential melting of the material surface. Simulation of this interaction is important for predicting the performance and lifetime of future tokamak devices such as ITER. Field-aligned coordinates are commonly used in the simulation of tokamak plasmas due to the geometry and magnetic topology of the system. However, these coordinates are limited in the geometry they allow in the poloidal plane due to orthogonality requirements. A novel 3D coordinate system is proposed herein that relaxes this constraint so that any arbitrary, smoothly varying geometry...

  17. A prospect at 11th international Toki conference. Plasma physics, quo vadis?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Itoh, Kimitaka

    2001-01-01

    A prospect of plasma physics at the turn of next century is discussed. The theme of this conference identifies the future direction of the research related with plasmas. Main issue is the potential and structure formation in plasmas; More specifically, structures which are realized through the interaction of electromagnetic fields, in particular that with electric fields, in non-equilibrium state. An emphasis is made to clarify the fundamental physics aspects of the plasma physics in fusion research as well as that in the basic research of plasmas. The plasma physics will give an important contribution to the solution of the historical enigma, i.e., all things flow. Having an impact on human recognition of nature and showing a beauty in a law, the plasma physics/science will demonstrate to be a leading science in the 21st century. (author)

  18. 2D simulations of hohlraum targets for laser-plasma experiments and ion stopping measurement in hot plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Basko, M.M. [Gesellschaft fuer Schwerionenforschung mbH, Darmstadt (Germany). ExtreMe Matter Institute EMMI; Maruhn, J.; Tauschwitz, Anna [Frankfurt Univ. (Germany); Novikov, V.G.; Grushin, A.S. [Keldysh Institute of Applied Mathematics, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2011-12-15

    An attractive way to create uniform plasma states at high temperatures and densities is by using hohlraums - cavities with heavy-metal walls that are either directly or indirectly heated by intense laser pulses to x-ray temperatures of tens and hundreds electron volts. A sample material, whose plasma state is to be studied, can be placed inside such a hohlraum (usually in the form of a low-density foam) and uniformly heated to a high temperature. In this case a high-Z hohlraum enclosure serves a double purpose: it prevents the hot plasma from rapid disassembly due to hydrodynamic expansion and, at the same time, suppresses its rapid radiative cooling by providing high diffusive resistivity for X-rays. Of course, both the inertial and the thermal confinement of high-temperature plasmas can be achieved only for a limited period of time - on the order of nanoseconds for millimeter-scale hohlraums. Some time ago such hohlraum targets were proposed for measurements of the stopping power of hot dense plasmas for fast ions at GSI (Darmstadt). Theoretical modeling of hohlraum targets has always been a challenging task for computational physics because it should combine multidimensional hydrodynamic simulations with the solution of the spectral transfer equation for thermal radiation. In this work we report on our latest progress in this direction, namely, we present the results of 2D (two-dimensional) simulations with a newly developed radiation-hydrodynamics code RALEF-2D of two types of the hohlraum targets proposed for experiments on the PHELIX laser at GSI. The first configuration is a simple spherical hohlraum with gold walls and empty interior, which has two holes - one for laser beam entrance, and the other for diagnostics. The hohlraums of this type have already been used in several experimental sessions with the NHELIX and PHELIX lasers at GSI. The second type is a two-chamber cylindrical hohlraum with a characteristic {omega}-shaped cross-section of the enclosure

  19. James Clerk Maxwell Prize for Plasma Physics Talk: On Nonlinear Physics of Shear Alfv'en Waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Liu

    2012-10-01

    Shear Alfv'en Waves (SAW) are electromagnetic oscillations prevalent in laboratory and nature magnetized plasmas. Due to its anisotropic propagation property, it is well known that the linear wave propagation and dispersiveness of SAW are fundamentally affected by plasma nonuniformities and magnetic field geometries; for example, the existence of continuous spectrum, spectral gaps, and discrete eigenmodes in toroidal plasmas. This talk will discuss the crucial roles that nonuniformity and geometry could also play in the physics of nonlinear SAW interactions. More specifically, the focus will be on the Alfv'enic state and its breaking up by finite compressibility, non-ideal kinetic effects, and geometry. In the case of compressibility, finite ion-Larmor-radius effects are shown to qualitatively and quantitatively modify the three-wave parametric decays via the ion-sound perturbations. In the case of geometry, the spontaneous excitation of zonal structures by toroidal Alfv'en eigenmodes is investigated; demonstrating that, for realistic tokamak geometries, zonal current dominates over zonal flow. [4pt] Present address: Institute for Fusion Theory and Simulation, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou, China.

  20. SciDAC - Center for Plasma Edge Simulation - Project Summary

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parker, Scott [Univ. of Colorado, Boulder, CO (United States)

    2014-11-03

    Final Technical Report: Center for Plasma Edge Simulation (CPES) Principal Investigator: Scott Parker, University of Colorado, Boulder Description/Abstract First-principle simulations of edge pedestal micro-turbulence are performed with the global gyrokinetic turbulence code GEM for both low and high confinement tokamak plasmas. The high confinement plasmas show a larger growth rate, but nonlinearly a lower particle and heat flux. Numerical profiles are obtained from the XGC0 neoclassical code. XGC0/GEM code coupling is implemented under the EFFIS (“End-to-end Framework for Fusion Integrated Simulation”) framework. Investigations are underway to clearly identify the micro-instabilities in the edge pedestal using global and flux-tube gyrokinetic simulation with realistic experimental high confinement profiles. We use both experimental profiles and those obtained using the EFFIS XGC0/GEM coupled code framework. We find there are three types of instabilities at the edge: a low-n, high frequency electron mode, a high-n, low frequency ion mode, and possibly an ion mode like kinetic ballooning mode (KBM). Investigations are under way for the effects of the radial electric field. Finally, we have been investigating how plasmas dominated by ion-temperature gradient (ITG) driven turbulence, how cold Deuterium and Tritium ions near the edge will naturally pinch radially inward towards the core. We call this mechanism “natural fueling.” It is due to the quasi-neutral heat flux dominated nature of the turbulence and still applies when trapped and passing kinetic electron effects are included. To understand this mechanism, examine the situation where the electrons are adiabatic, and there is an ion heat flux. In such a case, lower energy particles move inward and higher energy particles move outward. If a trace amount of cold particles are added, they will move inward.

  1. Magnetic Null Points in Kinetic Simulations of Space Plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olshevsky, Vyacheslav; Deca, Jan; Divin, Andrey; Peng, Ivy Bo; Markidis, Stefano; Innocenti, Maria Elena; Cazzola, Emanuele; Lapenta, Giovanni

    2016-03-01

    We present a systematic attempt to study magnetic null points and the associated magnetic energy conversion in kinetic particle-in-cell simulations of various plasma configurations. We address three-dimensional simulations performed with the semi-implicit kinetic electromagnetic code iPic3D in different setups: variations of a Harris current sheet, dipolar and quadrupolar magnetospheres interacting with the solar wind, and a relaxing turbulent configuration with multiple null points. Spiral nulls are more likely created in space plasmas: in all our simulations except lunar magnetic anomaly (LMA) and quadrupolar mini-magnetosphere the number of spiral nulls prevails over the number of radial nulls by a factor of 3-9. We show that often magnetic nulls do not indicate the regions of intensive energy dissipation. Energy dissipation events caused by topological bifurcations at radial nulls are rather rare and short-lived. The so-called X-lines formed by the radial nulls in the Harris current sheet and LMA simulations are rather stable and do not exhibit any energy dissipation. Energy dissipation is more powerful in the vicinity of spiral nulls enclosed by magnetic flux ropes with strong currents at their axes (their cross sections resemble 2D magnetic islands). These null lines reminiscent of Z-pinches efficiently dissipate magnetic energy due to secondary instabilities such as the two-stream or kinking instability, accompanied by changes in magnetic topology. Current enhancements accompanied by spiral nulls may signal magnetic energy conversion sites in the observational data.

  2. Magnetohydrodynamic simulation of reconnection in turbulent astrophysical plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Widmer, Fabien

    2016-07-19

    Turbulence is ubiquitous at large-Reynolds-number astrophysical plasmas like in the Solar corona. In such environments, the turbulence is thought to enhance the energy conversion rate by magnetic reconnection above the classical model predictions. Since turbulence cannot be simulated together with the large scale behaviour of the plasma, magnetic reconnection is studied through the average properties of turbulence. A Reynolds-averaged turbulence model is explored in which turbulence is self-sustained and -generated by the large scales (mean-) field inhomogeneities. Employing that model, the influence of turbulence is investigated by large-scale MHD numerical simulations solving evolution equations of the energy and cross-helicity of the turbulence together with the MHD equations. Magnetic reconnection is found to be either rapidly enhanced or suppressed by turbulence depending on the turbulence timescale. If the turbulence timescale is self-consistently calculated, reconnection is always strongly enhanced. Since the solar corona bears strong guide magnetic fields perpendicular to the reconnecting magnetic fields, the influences of a strong guide field on turbulent reconnection is separately investigated. A slow down of reconnection, obtained in the presence of a finite guide field, can be understood by a finite residual helicity working against the enhancement of reconnection by the turbulence. The influence of turbulence on magnetic reconnection is further studied by means of high resolution simulations of plasmoid-unstable current sheets. These simulations revealed the importance of turbulence for reaching fast reconnection.

  3. Overview of Space Station attached payloads in the areas of solar physics, solar terrestrial physics, and plasma processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, W. T.; Kropp, J.; Taylor, W. W. L.

    1986-01-01

    This paper outlines the currently planned utilization of the Space Station to perform investigations in solar physics, solar terrestrial physics, and plasma physics. The investigations and instrumentation planned for the Solar Terrestrial Observatory (STO) and its associated Space Station accommodation requirements are discussed as well as the planned placement of the STO instruments and typical operational scenarios. In the area of plasma physics, some preliminary plans for scientific investigations and for the accommodation of a plasma physics facility attached to the Space Station are outlined. These preliminary experiment concepts use the space environment around the Space Station as an unconfined plasma laboratory. In solar physics, the initial instrument complement and associated accommodation requirements of the Advanced Solar Observatory are described. The planned evolutionary development of this observatory is outlined, making use of the Space Station capabilities for servicing and instrument reconfiguration.

  4. Ferrous friction stir weld physical simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norton, Seth Jason

    2006-04-01

    Traditional fusion welding processes have several drawbacks associated with the melting and solidification of metal. Weld defects associated with the solidification of molten metal may act as initiation sites for cracks. Segregation of alloying elements during solidification may cause local changes in resistance to corrosion. The high amount of heat required to produce the molten metal in the weld can produce distortion from the intended position on cooling. The heat from the electric arc commonly used to melt metal in fusion welds may also produce metal fumes which are a potential health hazard. Friction stir welding is one application which has the potential to make full thickness welds in a single pass, while eliminating fume, reducing distortion, and eliminating solidification defects. Currently the friction stir welding process is used in the aerospace industry on aluminum alloys. Interest in the process by industries which rely on iron and its alloys for structural material is increasing. While friction stir welding has been shown to be feasible with iron alloys, the understanding of friction stir welding process effects on these materials is in its infancy. This project was aimed to better that understanding by developing a procedure for physical simulation of friction stir welding. Friction stir weld material tracer experiments utilizing stainless steel markers were conducted with plates of ingot iron and HSLA-65. Markers of 0.0625" diameter 308 stainless steel worked well for tracing the end position of material moved by the friction stir welding tool. The markers did not produce measurable increases in the loading of the tool in the direction of travel. Markers composed of 0.25" diameter 304 stainless steel did not perform as well as the smaller markers and produced increased loads on the friction stir welding tool. The smaller markers showed that material is moved in a curved path around the tool and deposited behind the tool. Material near the surface

  5. Dynamic Control of Microwave Plasma Sources for Material Processing by Using Hyper-Simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yasaka, Yasuyoshi; Tsuji, Akihiro

    2010-11-01

    Uniformity of etching or deposition over a wafer is one of the key features for plasma processing with large-size wafers. The uniformity can be measured as a result of a process, and correction or improvement of the uniformity is made by changing device parameters such as power levels, gas flow rates, timings, and so on. Evaluation and control are, however, not combined or unified as a problem of plasma physics. They are assigned as the input and output of a black box of empirical transfer function obtained by expert systems or neural networks. We are going to establish a novel control system based on physics, in which a fluid simulation is used to obtain a power deposition profile necessary to produce the two-dimensional density distribution of desire. A control system of a microwave slot antenna then changes power distribution dynamically according to the output of the simulation. It should be noted that this simulation has inputs and outputs opposite to conventional ones, which, we call hyper-simulation, is one of the novel features of the control system.

  6. Two-fluid electromagnetic simulations of plasma-jet acceleration with detailed equation-of-state

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thoma, C.; Welch, D. R.; Clark, R. E.; Bruner, N. [Voss Scientific, LLC, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87108 (United States); MacFarlane, J. J.; Golovkin, I. E. [Prism Computational Sciences, Inc., Madison, Wisconsin 53711 (United States)

    2011-10-15

    We describe a new particle-based two-fluid fully electromagnetic algorithm suitable for modeling high density (n{sub i} {approx} 10{sup 17} cm{sup -3}) and high Mach number laboratory plasma jets. In this parameter regime, traditional particle-in-cell (PIC) techniques are challenging due to electron timescale and lengthscale constraints. In this new approach, an implicit field solve allows the use of large timesteps while an Eulerian particle remap procedure allows simulations to be run with very few particles per cell. Hall physics and charge separation effects are included self-consistently. A detailed equation of state (EOS) model is used to evolve the ion charge state and introduce non-ideal gas behavior. Electron cooling due to radiation emission is included in the model as well. We demonstrate the use of these new algorithms in 1D and 2D Cartesian simulations of railgun (parallel plate) jet accelerators using He and Ar gases. The inclusion of EOS and radiation physics reduces the electron temperature, resulting in higher calculated jet Mach numbers in the simulations. We also introduce a surface physics model for jet accelerators in which a frictional drag along the walls leads to axial spreading of the emerging jet. The simulations demonstrate that high Mach number jets can be produced by railgun accelerators for a variety of applications, including high energy density physics experiments.

  7. Fully kinetic simulations of megajoule-scale dense plasma focus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmidt, A.; Link, A.; Tang, V.; Halvorson, C.; May, M. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore California 94550 (United States); Welch, D. [Voss Scientific, LLC, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87108 (United States); Meehan, B. T.; Hagen, E. C. [National Security Technologies, LLC, Las Vegas, Nevada 89030 (United States)

    2014-10-15

    Dense plasma focus (DPF) Z-pinch devices are sources of copious high energy electrons and ions, x-rays, and neutrons. Megajoule-scale DPFs can generate 10{sup 12} neutrons per pulse in deuterium gas through a combination of thermonuclear and beam-target fusion. However, the details of the neutron production are not fully understood and past optimization efforts of these devices have been largely empirical. Previously, we reported on the first fully kinetic simulations of a kilojoule-scale DPF and demonstrated that both kinetic ions and kinetic electrons are needed to reproduce experimentally observed features, such as charged-particle beam formation and anomalous resistivity. Here, we present the first fully kinetic simulation of a MegaJoule DPF, with predicted ion and neutron spectra, neutron anisotropy, neutron spot size, and time history of neutron production. The total yield predicted by the simulation is in agreement with measured values, validating the kinetic model in a second energy regime.

  8. Three-Dimensional Simulation of Plasma Jet and Particle Groups in Plasma Spraying

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    FAN Qun-bo; WANG Lu; WANG Fu-chi

    2008-01-01

    The temperature field, velocity field, as well as species distribution in three-dimensional space are successfully calculated by establishing three-dimensional geometry model and solving plasma jet-substrate interaction equations, optimized particle trajecory models, as well as particle-particle heat transfer equations in three-dimensionalal space. Under typical working conditions, the flying trajectories and distribution of ZrO2 ceramic particles and Ni metal particles are also simulated. Results show that, the plasma jet becomes wider near the substrate, and the stochastic trajectory model is preferable to simulate the turbulent diffusion effect of particles. In addition, Ni metal particles penetrate relatively more deeply than ZrO2 ceramic particles due to larger density.

  9. Plasma physics and controlled fusion research during half a century

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lehnert, Bo

    2001-06-01

    A review is given on the historical development of research on plasma physics and controlled fusion. The potentialities are outlined for fusion of light atomic nuclei, with respect to the available energy resources and the environmental properties. Various approaches in the research on controlled fusion are further described, as well as the present state of investigation and future perspectives, being based on the use of a hot plasma in a fusion reactor. Special reference is given to the part of this work which has been conducted in Sweden, merely to identify its place within the general historical development. Considerable progress has been made in fusion research during the last decades. Temperatures above the limit for ignition of self-sustained fusion reactions, i.e. at more than hundred million degrees, have been reached in large experiments and under conditions where the fusion power generation is comparable to the power losses. An energy producing fusion reactor could in principle be realized already today, but it would not become technically and economically efficient when being based on the present state of art. Future international research has therefore to be conducted along broad lines, with necessary ingredients of basic investigations and new ideas.

  10. The technology of Plasma Spray Physical Vapour Deposition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Góral

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The deposition of thermal barrier coatings is currently the most effective means of protecting the surface of aircraft engine turbine blades from the impact of aggressive environment of combustion gases. The new technologies of TBC depositions are required.Design/methodology/approach: The essential properties of the PS-PVD process have been outlined, as well as recent literature references. In addition, the influence of a set process condition on the properties of the deposited coatings has been described.Findings: The new plasma-spraying PS-PVD method is a promising technology for the deposition of modern thermal barrier coatings on aircraft engine turbine blades.Research limitations/implications: The constant progress of engine operating temperatures and increasing pollution restrictions determine the intensive development of heat-resistant coatings, which is directed to new deposition technologies and coating materials.Practical implications: The article presents a new technology of thermal barrier coating deposition - LPPS Thin Film and Plasma Spray - Physical Vapour Deposition.Originality/value: The completely new technologies was described in article.

  11. Shearing Box Simulations of the MRI in a Collisionless Plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sharma, Prateek; Hammett, Gregory, W.; Quataert, Eliot; Stone, James, M.

    2005-08-31

    We describe local shearing box simulations of turbulence driven by the magnetorotational instability (MRI) in a collisionless plasma. Collisionless effects may be important in radiatively inefficient accretion flows, such as near the black hole in the Galactic Center. The MHD version of ZEUS is modified to evolve an anisotropic pressure tensor. A fluid closure approximation is used to calculate heat conduction along magnetic field lines. The anisotropic pressure tensor provides a qualitatively new mechanism for transporting angular momentum in accretion flows (in addition to the Maxwell and Reynolds stresses). We estimate limits on the pressure anisotropy due to pitch angle scattering by kinetic instabilities. Such instabilities provide an effective ''collision'' rate in a collisionless plasma and lead to more MHD-like dynamics. We find that the MRI leads to efficient growth of the magnetic field in a collisionless plasma, with saturation amplitudes comparable to those in MHD. In the saturated state, the anisotropic stress is comparable to the Maxwell stress, implying that the rate of angular momentum transport may be moderately enhanced in a collisionless plasma.

  12. Monte Carlo simulations of ionization potential depression in dense plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stransky, M., E-mail: stransky@fzu.cz [Department of Radiation and Chemical Physics, Institute of Physics ASCR, Na Slovance 2, 182 21 Prague 8 (Czech Republic)

    2016-01-15

    A particle-particle grand canonical Monte Carlo model with Coulomb pair potential interaction was used to simulate modification of ionization potentials by electrostatic microfields. The Barnes-Hut tree algorithm [J. Barnes and P. Hut, Nature 324, 446 (1986)] was used to speed up calculations of electric potential. Atomic levels were approximated to be independent of the microfields as was assumed in the original paper by Ecker and Kröll [Phys. Fluids 6, 62 (1963)]; however, the available levels were limited by the corresponding mean inter-particle distance. The code was tested on hydrogen and dense aluminum plasmas. The amount of depression was up to 50% higher in the Debye-Hückel regime for hydrogen plasmas, in the high density limit, reasonable agreement was found with the Ecker-Kröll model for hydrogen plasmas and with the Stewart-Pyatt model [J. Stewart and K. Pyatt, Jr., Astrophys. J. 144, 1203 (1966)] for aluminum plasmas. Our 3D code is an improvement over the spherically symmetric simplifications of the Ecker-Kröll and Stewart-Pyatt models and is also not limited to high atomic numbers as is the underlying Thomas-Fermi model used in the Stewart-Pyatt model.

  13. Formation and Acceleration Physics on Plasma Injector 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howard, Stephen

    2012-10-01

    Plasma Injector 1 (PI-1) is a two stage coaxial Marshal gun with conical accelerator electrodes, similar in shape to the MARAUDER device, with power input of the same topology as the RACE device. The goal of PI-1 research is to produce a self-confined compact toroid with high-flux (200 mWb), high-density (3x10^16 cm-3) and moderate initial temperature (100 eV) to be used as the target plasma in a MTF reactor. PI-1 is 5 meters long and 1.9 m in diameter at the expansion region where a high aspect ratio (4.4) spheromak is formed with a minimum lambda of 9 m-1. The acceleration stage is 4 m long and tapers to an outer diameter of 40 cm. The capacitor banks store 0.5 MJ for formation and 1.13 MJ for acceleration. Power is delivered via 62 independently controlled switch modules. Several geometries for formation bias field, inner electrodes and target chamber have been tested, and trends in accelerator efficiency and target lifetime have been observed. Thomson scattering and ion Doppler spectroscopy show significant heating (>100 eV) as the CT is compressed in the conical accelerator. B-dot probes show magnetic field structure consistent with Grad-Shafranov models and MHD simulations, and CT axial length depends strongly on the lambda profile.

  14. Plasma simulation in a hybrid ion electric propulsion system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jugroot, Manish; Christou, Alex

    2015-04-01

    An exciting possibility for the next generation of satellite technology is the microsatellite. These satellites, ranging from 10-500 kg, can offer advantages in cost, reduced risk, and increased functionality for a variety of missions. For station keeping and control of these satellites, a suitable compact and high efficiency thruster is required. Electrostatic propulsion provides a promising solution for microsatellite thrust due to their high specific impulse. The rare gas propellant is ionized into plasma and generates a beam of high speed ions by electrostatic processes. A concept explored in this work is a hybrid combination of dc ion engines and hall thrusters to overcome space-charge and lifetime limitations of current ion thruster technologies. A multiphysics space and time-dependent formulation was used to investigate and understand the underlying physical phenomena. Several regions and time scales of the plasma have been observed and will be discussed.

  15. 3D MHD disruptions simulations of tokamaks plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paccagnella, Roberto; Strauss, Hank; Breslau, Joshua

    2008-11-01

    Tokamaks Vertical Displacement Events (VDEs) and disruptions simulations in toroidal geometry by means of a single fluid visco-resistive magneto-hydro-dynamic (MHD) model are presented in this paper. The plasma model, implemented in the M3D code [1], is completed with the presence of a 2D homogeneous wall with finite resistivity. This allows the study of the relatively slowly growing magneto-hydro-dynamical perturbation, the resistive wall mode (RWM), which is, in this work, the main drive of the disruptions. Amplitudes and asymmetries of the halo currents pattern at the wall are also calculated and comparisons with tokamak experimental databases and predictions for ITER are given. [1] W. Park, E.V. Belova, G.Y. Fu, X.Z. Tang, H.R. Strauss, L.E. Sugiyama, Phys. Plasmas 6 (1999) 1796.

  16. Preface to Special Topic: Advances in Radio Frequency Physics in Fusion Plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuccillo, Angelo A.; Phillips, Cynthia K.; Ceccuzzi, Silvio

    2014-06-01

    It has long been recognized that auxiliary plasma heating will be required to achieve the high temperature, high density conditions within a magnetically confined plasma in which a fusion "burn" may be sustained by copious fusion reactions. Consequently, the application of radio and microwave frequency electromagnetic waves to magnetically confined plasma, commonly referred to as RF, has been a major part of the program almost since its inception in the 1950s. These RF waves provide heating, current drive, plasma profile control, and Magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) stabilization. Fusion experiments employ electromagnetic radiation in a wide range of frequencies, from tens of MHz to hundreds of GHz. The fusion devices containing the plasma are typically tori, axisymmetric or non, in which the equilibrium magnetic fields are composed of a strong toroidal magnetic field generated by external coils, and a poloidal field created, at least in the symmetric configurations, by currents flowing in the plasma. The waves are excited in the peripheral regions of the plasma, by specially designed launching structures, and subsequently propagate into the core regions, where resonant wave-plasma interactions produce localized heating or other modification of the local equilibrium profiles. Experimental studies coupled with the development of theoretical models and advanced simulation codes over the past 40+ years have led to an unprecedented understanding of the physics of RF heating and current drive in the core of magnetic fusion devices. Nevertheless, there are serious gaps in our knowledge base that continue to have a negative impact on the success of ongoing experiments and that must be resolved as the program progresses to the next generation devices and ultimately to "demo" and "fusion power plant." A serious gap, at least in the ion cyclotron (IC) range of frequencies and partially in the lower hybrid frequency ranges, is the difficulty in coupling large amount of power to the

  17. PHYSICAL SIMULATION OF CONTINUOUS ROLL CASTING PROCESS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    L.H. Zhan; J. Zhong; X.Q. Li; M.H. Huang

    2005-01-01

    A series of simulating experimental studies on the rheological behavior and its influential factors of aluminum alloy in continuous roll-casting process have been explored in this paper with a Gleeble-1500 Thermal-Mechanical Simulation Tester and a set of special clamp system. Relevant rheological rules in the process of coupling transient solidification and continuous deformation of roll-casting conditions are obtained. Experimental results indicate that four different characteristic stages exist in the whole rheological process, and relative constitutive models suitable for the given conditions of continuous roll casting process have been established through multivariable linear regression analysis of the experimental data.

  18. EDITORIAL: The Third Nordic Symposium on Plasma Physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pecseli, Hans; Trulsen, Jan

    2006-02-01

    The Third Nordic Symposium on Plasma Physics was organized at Lysebu, Oslo, Norway on 4 7 October 2004, under the auspices of the Norwegian Centre for Advanced Study (CAS). The arrangement was preceded by two similar meetings organized at the Risø National Laboratory in Denmark by one of us (HP): Nonlinear Waves in Plasmas, 13 16 August 1985, and The Second Nordic Symposium on Nonlinear Phenomena in Plasmas and Related Topics, 8 12 August 1988. The proceedings from these two previous meetings were published as Physica Scripta Reprint Series No. 2, and RS 16 (with a few copies still being available). The idea of `Nordic' in the title of this latest meeting was interpreted somewhat liberally, by including also scientific organizations in northern Germany, where a collaboration facing Nordic countries comes naturally, and indeed has solid historical roots pointing also to ongoing activities. We hope that this series of meetings can continue, suggesting that the interval should be kept to a minimum of three years to ensure that all participants present new results. (We hope not to have to wait 16 years until next time, though!) The aim of our meetings is to stimulate collaboration among plasma physicists by creating a forum where the participants can exchange ideas and seek inspiration under relaxed conditions. We have the distinct impression that the meeting was very successful in this respect. Many Nordic institutes have widespread international collaborations, and we were happy to welcome also foreign representatives for some of these activities. Altogether 28 contributed talks were presented by 30 participants. The abstracts of all talks were distributed at the meeting. The present proceedings cover a selection of the contributions. One participant had to cancel, but the contribution is included in these proceedings. All the papers have been refereed according to the usual standards of the journal We, the organizers, thank CAS for the generous financial support

  19. Radiation-Hydrodynamic Simulation of Experiments With Intense Lasers Generating Collisionless Interpenetrating Plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grosskopf, Michael; Drake, R.; Kuranz, C.; Park, H.; Kugland, N.; Pollaine, S.; Ross, J.; Remington, B.; Spitkovsky, A.; Gargate, L.; Gregori, G.; Bell, A.; Murphy, C.; Meinecke, J.; Reville, B.; Sakawa, Y.; Kuramitsu, Y.; Takabe, H.; Froula, D.; Fiksel, G.; Miniati, F.; Koenig, M.; Ravasio, A.; Liang, E.; Woolsey, N.

    2012-05-01

    Collisionless shocks, shocks generated by plasma wave interactions in regions where the collisional mean-free-path for ions is long compared to the length scale for instabilities that generate magnetic fields, are found in many astrophysical systems such as supernova remnants and planetary bow shocks. Generating conditions to investigate collisionless shock physics is difficult to achieve in a laboratory setting; however, high-energy-density physics facilities have made this a possibility. Experiments whose goal is to investigate the production and growth of magnetic fields in collisionless shocks in laboratory-scale systems are being carried out on intense lasers, several of which are measuring the plasma properties and magnetic field strength in counter-streaming, collisionless flows generated by laser ablation. This poster reports radiation-hydrodynamic simulations using the CRASH code to model the ablative flow of plasma generated in order to assess potential designs, as well as infer properties of collected data from previous experiments. This work is funded by the Predictive Sciences Academic Alliances Program in NNSA-ASC via grant DEFC52- 08NA28616, by the NNSA-DS and SC-OFES Joint Program in High-Energy-Density Laboratory Plasmas, grant number DE-FG52-09NA29548, and by the National Laser User Facility Program, grant number DE-NA0000850.

  20. Description and simulation of physics of Resistive Plate Chambers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Français, V.

    2016-05-01

    Monte-Carlo simulation of physical processes is an important tool for detector development as it allows to predict signal pulse amplitude and timing, time resolution, efficiency ... Yet despite the fact they are very common, full simulations for RPC-like detector are not widespread and often incomplete. They are often based on mathematical distributions that are not suited for this particular modelisation and over-simplify or neglect some important physical processes. We describe the main physical processes occurring inside a RPC when a charged particle goes through (ionisation, electron drift and multiplication, signal induction ...) through the Riegler-Lippmann-Veenhof model together with a still-in-development simulation. This is a full, fast and multi-threaded Monte-Carlo modelisation of the main physical processes using existing and well tested libraries and framework (such as the Garfield++ framework and the GNU Scientific Library). It is developed in the hope to be a basic ground for future RPC simulation developments.

  1. Modeling Physics with Easy Java Simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christian, Wolfgang; Esquembre, Francisco

    2007-01-01

    Modeling has been shown to correct weaknesses of traditional instruction by engaging students in the design of physical models to describe, explain, and predict phenomena. Although the modeling method can be used without computers, the use of computers allows students to study problems that are difficult and time consuming, to visualize their…

  2. Magnetic null points in kinetic simulations of space plasmas

    CERN Document Server

    Olshevsky, Vyacheslav; Divin, Andrey; Peng, Ivy Bo; Markidis, Stefano; Innocenti, Maria Elena; Cazzola, Emanuele; Lapenta, Giovanni

    2015-01-01

    We present a systematic attempt to study magnetic null points and the associated magnetic energy conversion in kinetic Particle-in-Cell simulations of various plasma configurations. We address three-dimensional simulations performed with the semi-implicit kinetic electromagnetic code iPic3D in different setups: variations of a Harris current sheet, dipolar and quadrupolar magnetospheres interacting with the solar wind; and a relaxing turbulent configuration with multiple null points. Spiral nulls are more likely created in space plasmas: in all our simulations except lunar magnetic anomaly and quadrupolar mini-magnetosphere the number of spiral nulls prevails over the number of radial nulls by a factor of 3-9. We show that often magnetic nulls do not indicate the regions of intensive energy dissipation. Energy dissipation events caused by topological bifurcations at radial nulls are rather rare and short-lived. The so-called X-lines formed by the radial nulls in the Harris current sheet and lunar magnetic ano...

  3. Simulation of the Partially Ionized Negative Hydrogen Plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Averkin, Sergey; Gatsonis, Nikolaos; Olson, Lynn

    2012-10-01

    A High Pressure Discharge Negative Ion Source (HPDNIS) operating on hydrogen is been under investigation. The Negative Ion Production (NIP) section of the HPDNIS attaches to the 10-100 Torr RF-discharge chamber with a micronozzle and ends with a grid that extracts the negative ion beam. The partially ionized and reacting plasma flow in the NIP section is simulated using an unstructured three-dimensional Direct Simulation Monte Carlo (U3DSMC) code. The NIP section contains a low-pressure plasma that includes H2, vibrationally-rotationally excited H2^*, negative hydrogen atoms H^-, and electrons. Primary reactions in the NIP section are dissociate attachment, H2^*+e->H^0+H^-and electron collisional detachment, e+H^-->H+2e. The U3DSMC computational domain includes the entrance to the NIP nozzle and the extraction grid at the exit. The flow parameters at the entrance are based on conditions in the RF-discharge chamber and are implemented in U3DSMC using a Kinetic-Moment subsonic boundary conditions method. Neutral--neutral, ion-neutral, Coulomb collisions and charge-neutralizing collisions are implemented in U3DSMC using the no time counter method, electron-molecule collisions are treated by the constant timestep method. Simulations cover the regime of operation of the HPDNIS and examine the flow characteristics inside the NIP section.

  4. SciDAC-Center for Plasma Edge Simulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, Choong Seock

    2012-06-04

    The SciDAC ProtoFSP Center for Plasma Edge Simulation (CPES) [http://www.cims.nyu.edu/cpes/] was awarded to New York University, Courant Institute of Mathematical Sciences in FY 2006. C.S. Chang was the institutional and national project PI. It's mission was 1) to build kinetic simulation code applicable to tokamak edge region including magnetic divertor geometry, 2) to build a computer science framework which can integrate the kinetic code with MHD/fluid codes in multiscale, 3) to conduct scientific research using the developed tools. CPES has built two such edge kinetic codes XGC0 and XGC1, which are still the only working kinetic edge plasma codes capable of including the diverted magnetic field geometry. CPES has also built the code coupling framework EFFIS (End-to-end Framework for Fusion Integrated Simulation), which incubated and used the Adios (www.olcf.ornl.gov/center-projects/adios/) and eSiMon (http://www.olcf.ornl.gov/center-projects/esimmon/) technologies, together with the Kepler technology.

  5. Simulation of 2D Kinetic Effects in Plasmas using the Grid Based Continuum Code LOKI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banks, Jeffrey; Berger, Richard; Chapman, Tom; Brunner, Stephan

    2016-10-01

    Kinetic simulation of multi-dimensional plasma waves through direct discretization of the Vlasov equation is a useful tool to study many physical interactions and is particularly attractive for situations where minimal fluctuation levels are desired, for instance, when measuring growth rates of plasma wave instabilities. However, direct discretization of phase space can be computationally expensive, and as a result there are few examples of published results using Vlasov codes in more than a single configuration space dimension. In an effort to fill this gap we have developed the Eulerian-based kinetic code LOKI that evolves the Vlasov-Poisson system in 2+2-dimensional phase space. The code is designed to reduce the cost of phase-space computation by using fully 4th order accurate conservative finite differencing, while retaining excellent parallel scalability that efficiently uses large scale computing resources. In this poster I will discuss the algorithms used in the code as well as some aspects of their parallel implementation using MPI. I will also overview simulation results of basic plasma wave instabilities relevant to laser plasma interaction, which have been obtained using the code.

  6. Molecular dynamics simulation analysis of ion irradiation effects on plasma-liquid interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minagawa, Yudai; Shirai, Naoki; Uchida, Satoshi; Tochikubo, Fumiyoshi

    2013-09-01

    Nonthermal atmospheric plasmas are used in a wide range of fields because the high-density plasma can be easily irradiated to various substances such as solid, liquid, biological object and so on. On the other hand, the mechanisms of physical and chemical phenomena at the plasma-liquid interface are not well understood yet. To investigate the effects of ion impact from plasma on water surface, we analyzed behavior of liquid water by classical molecular dynamics simulation. Simulation system consists of an irradiation particle in gas phase and 2000 water molecules in liquid phase. O+ ion with 10 eV or 100 eV was impinged on the water surface. Ion impact induced increasing water temperature and ejection of water molecules. The averaged number of evaporated water molecules by ion impact is 0.6 molecules at 10 eV and 7.0 molecules at 100 eV. The maximum ion penetration depth was 1.14 nm at 10 eV and 2.75 nm at 100 eV. Ion entering into water disturbs the stable hydrogen bonding configurations between water molecules and gives energy to water molecules. Some water molecules rotated and moved by ion interaction impact on other water molecules one after another. When the water molecule near the surface received strongly repulsive force, it released into gas phase. This work was supported financially in part by a Grant-in-Aid for Scientific Research on Innovation Areas (No21110007) from MEXT, Japan.

  7. Physics Educators as Designers of Simulation using Easy Java Simulation (Ejs) Part 2*

    CERN Document Server

    Wee, Loo Kang

    2012-01-01

    To deepen do-it-yourself (DIY) technology in the physics classroom, we seek to highlight the Open Source Physics (OSP) community of educators that engage, enable and empower teachers as learners so that we create DIY technology tools-simulation for inquiry learning. We learn through Web 2 online collaborative means to develop simulations together with reputable physicists through the open source digital library. By examining the open source codes of the simulation through the Easy Java Simulation (EJS) toolkit, we are able make sense of the physics from the computational models created by practicing physicists. We will share newer (2010-present) simulations that we have remixed from existing library of simulations models into suitable learning environments for inquiry of physics. We hope other teachers would find these simulations useful and remix them that suit their own context and contribute back to benefit all humankind, becoming citizens for the world. Abstract Footnotes: website prior to the meeting htt...

  8. TEACHING PHYSICS: Visual Basic science simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, J. G.

    2000-01-01

    We are exploring the use of science simulation/modelling programs for teaching a variety of science concepts across the age range. The programs have been converted from the original RMBasic thanks to technological advances in equipment. We find that the programs complement practical work and allow in-depth analysis using multi-tasking with other programs.

  9. Effect of basic physical parameters to control plasma meniscus and beam halo formation in negative ion sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miyamoto, K. [Naruto University of Education, 748 Nakashima, Takashima, Naruto-cho, Naruto-shi, Tokushima 772-8502 (Japan); Okuda, S.; Nishioka, S.; Hatayama, A. [Faculty of Science and Technology, Keio University, 3-14-1 Hiyoshi, Kohoku-ku, Yokohama 223-8522 (Japan)

    2013-09-14

    Our previous study shows that the curvature of the plasma meniscus causes the beam halo in the negative ion sources: the negative ions extracted from the periphery of the meniscus are over-focused in the extractor due to the electrostatic lens effect, and consequently become the beam halo. In this article, the detail physics of the plasma meniscus and beam halo formation is investigated with two-dimensional particle-in-cell simulation. It is shown that the basic physical parameters such as the H{sup −} extraction voltage and the effective electron confinement time significantly affect the formation of the plasma meniscus and the resultant beam halo since the penetration of electric field for negative ion extraction depends on these physical parameters. Especially, the electron confinement time depends on the characteristic time of electron escape along the magnetic field as well as the characteristic time of electron diffusion across the magnetic field. The plasma meniscus penetrates deeply into the source plasma region when the effective electron confinement time is short. In this case, the curvature of the plasma meniscus becomes large, and consequently the fraction of the beam halo increases.

  10. An introduction to computer simulation methods applications to physical systems

    CERN Document Server

    Gould, Harvey; Christian, Wolfgang

    2007-01-01

    Now in its third edition, this book teaches physical concepts using computer simulations. The text incorporates object-oriented programming techniques and encourages readers to develop good programming habits in the context of doing physics. Designed for readers at all levels , An Introduction to Computer Simulation Methods uses Java, currently the most popular programming language. Introduction, Tools for Doing Simulations, Simulating Particle Motion, Oscillatory Systems, Few-Body Problems: The Motion of the Planets, The Chaotic Motion of Dynamical Systems, Random Processes, The Dynamics of Many Particle Systems, Normal Modes and Waves, Electrodynamics, Numerical and Monte Carlo Methods, Percolation, Fractals and Kinetic Growth Models, Complex Systems, Monte Carlo Simulations of Thermal Systems, Quantum Systems, Visualization and Rigid Body Dynamics, Seeing in Special and General Relativity, Epilogue: The Unity of Physics For all readers interested in developing programming habits in the context of doing phy...

  11. Large-Eddy Simulations of Plasma Flow Control on a GOE735 Wind Turbine Airfoil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czulak, Alexander; Franck, Jennifer

    2015-11-01

    Active flow control using plasma actuation was studied for the GOE735 airfoil and compared to non-actuated baseline cases using numerical simulations. This investigation considers two-dimensional simulations at a Reynolds number of 1,000 using direct numerical simulation (DNS) as well as three-dimensional simulations at a Reynolds number of 50,000 and 100,000 using large-eddy simulation (LES). Plasma actuation is applied in terms of a source term within the boundary layer close to the airfoil surface. Angles of attack of 0°, 5° and 15° were considered, and control is shown to be effective at increasing the lift coefficient, decreasing the drag coefficient and reducing the root mean squared deviation of both lift and drag. An analysis of the flow physics reveals that the actuated cases delay the point of separation, reduce the wake width and diminish the size and strength of the shed vortices. For this particular airfoil, there are significant differences in Reynolds number in terms of the baseline flow, control effectiveness and performance factors such as lift and drag.

  12. Fully three-dimensional simulation and modeling of a dense plasma focus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meehan, B. T.; Niederhaus, J. H. J.

    2014-10-01

    A dense plasma focus (DPF) is a pulsed-power machine that electromagnetically accelerates and cylindrically compresses a shocked plasma in a Z-pinch. The pinch results in a brief (~ 100 ns) pulse of X-rays, and, for some working gases, also a pulse of neutrons. A great deal of experimental research has been done into the physics of DPF reactions, and there exist mathematical models describing its behavior during the different time phases of the reaction. Two of the phases, known as the inverse pinch and the rundown, are approximately governed by magnetohydrodynamics, and there are a number of well-established codes for simulating these phases in two dimensions or in three dimensions under the assumption of axial symmetry. There has been little success, however, in developing fully three-dimensional simulations. In this work we present three-dimensional simulations of DPF reactions and demonstrate that three-dimensional simulations predict qualitatively and quantitatively different behavior than their two-dimensional counterparts. One of the most important quantities to predict is the time duration between the formation of the gas shock and Z-pinch, and the three-dimensional simulations more faithfully represent experimental results for this time duration and are essential for accurate prediction of future experiments.

  13. Simulating cosmic ray physics on a moving mesh

    CERN Document Server

    ,

    2016-01-01

    We discuss new methods to integrate the cosmic ray (CR) evolution equations coupled to magneto-hydrodynamics (MHD) on an unstructured moving mesh, as realised in the massively parallel AREPO code for cosmological simulations. We account for diffusive shock acceleration of CRs at resolved shocks and at supernova remnants in the interstellar medium (ISM), and follow the advective CR transport within the magnetised plasma, as well as anisotropic diffusive transport of CRs along the local magnetic field. CR losses are included in terms of Coulomb and hadronic interactions with the thermal plasma. We demonstrate the accuracy of our formalism for CR acceleration at shocks through simulations of plane-parallel shock tubes that are compared to newly derived exact solutions of the Riemann shock tube problem with CR acceleration. We find that the increased compressibility of the post-shock plasma due to the produced CRs decreases the shock speed. However, CR acceleration at spherically expanding blast waves does not si...

  14. Simulation of cold atmospheric plasma component composition and particle densities in air

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirsanov, Gennady; Chirtsov, Alexander; Kudryavtsev, Anatoliy

    2015-11-01

    Recently discharges in air at atmospheric pressure were the subject of numerous studies. Of particular interest are the cold streams of air plasma, which contains large amounts of chemically active species. It is their action can be decisive in the interaction with living tissues. Therefore, in addition to its physical properties, it is important to know the component composition and particle densities. The goal was to develop a numerical model of atmospheric pressure glow microdischarge in air with the definition of the component composition of plasma. To achieve this goal the task was divided into two sub-tasks, in the first simulated microdischarge atmospheric pressure in air using a simplified set of plasma chemical reactions in order to obtain the basic characteristics of the discharge, which are the initial approximations in the problem of the calculation of the densities with detailed plasma chemistry, including 53 spices and over 600 chemical reactions. As a result of the model was created, which can be adapted for calculating the component composition of plasma of various sources. Calculate the density of particles in the glow microdischarges and dynamics of their change in time.

  15. Simulations of the spectrum from a photoionized Si plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lihua, Bao; Zeqing, Wu; Bin, Duan; Yongkun, Ding; Jun, Yan

    2011-02-01

    In order to interpret the spectrum of a photoionized Si plasma, we calculate the level populations and emissions using a collisional-radiative equilibrium model with detailed atomic data. In our calculations, levels with principal quantum number up to 9 are included and the electron impact processes are also taken into account. The peak around 1855 eV, which is not reproduced in the previous simulation, is obvious in the present results. Spectra analyzing shows that this peak mainly comes from the intercombination line of He-like Si. Our calculations indicate that the electron impact processes enhance this intercombination line about once, although the electron temperature is pretty low.

  16. Magnetospheric Plasma Physics : the Impact of Jim Dungey’s Research

    CERN Document Server

    Southwood, David; Mitton, Simon

    2015-01-01

    This book makes good background reading for much of modern magnetospheric physics. Its origin was a Festspiel for Professor Jim Dungey, former professor in the Physics Department at Imperial College on the occasion of his 90th birthday, 30 January 2013. Remarkably, although he retired 30 years ago, his pioneering and, often, maverick work in the 50’s through to the 70’s on solar terrestrial physics is probably more widely appreciated today than when he retired. Dungey was a theoretical plasma physicist. The book covers how his reconnection model of the magnetosphere evolved to become the standard model of solar-terrestrial coupling. Dungey’s open magnetosphere model now underpins a holistic picture explaining not only the magnetic and plasma structure of the magnetosphere, but also its dynamics which can be monitored in real time. The book also shows how modern day simulation of solar terrestrial coupling can reproduce the real time evolution of the solar terrestrial system in ways undreamt of in 1961 w...

  17. Parallel 3-D numerical simulation of dielectric barrier discharge plasma actuators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houba, Tomas

    Dielectric barrier discharge plasma actuators have shown promise in a range of applications including flow control, sterilization and ozone generation. Developing numerical models of plasma actuators is of great importance, because a high-fidelity parallel numerical model allows new design configurations to be tested rapidly. Additionally, it provides a better understanding of the plasma actuator physics which is useful for further innovation. The physics of plasma actuators is studied numerically. A loosely coupled approach is utilized for the coupling of the plasma to the neutral fluid. The state of the art in numerical plasma modeling is advanced by the development of a parallel, three-dimensional, first-principles model with detailed air chemistry. The model incorporates 7 charged species and 18 reactions, along with a solution of the electron energy equation. To the author's knowledge, a parallel three-dimensional model of a gas discharge with a detailed air chemistry model and the solution of electron energy is unique. Three representative geometries are studied using the gas discharge model. The discharge of gas between two parallel electrodes is used to validate the air chemistry model developed for the gas discharge code. The gas discharge model is then applied to the discharge produced by placing a dc powered wire and grounded plate electrodes in a channel. Finally, a three-dimensional simulation of gas discharge produced by electrodes placed inside a riblet is carried out. The body force calculated with the gas discharge model is loosely coupled with a fluid model to predict the induced flow inside the riblet.

  18. Physics of Neutralization of Intense Charged Particle Beam Pulses by a Background Plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaganovich, I.D.; Davidson, R.C.; Dorf, M.A.; Startsev, E.A.; Sefkow, A.B; Friedman, A.F.; Lee, E.P.

    2009-09-03

    Neutralization and focusing of intense charged particle beam pulses by a background plasma forms the basis for a wide range of applications to high energy accelerators and colliders, heavy ion fusion, and astrophysics. For example, for ballistic propagation of intense ion beam pulses, background plasma can be used to effectively neutralize the beam charge and current, so that the self-electric and self-magnetic fields do not affect the ballistic propagation of the beam. From the practical perspective of designing advanced plasma sources for beam neutralization, a robust theory should be able to predict the self-electric and self-magnetic fields during beam propagation through the background plasma. The major scaling relations for the self-electric and self-magnetic fields of intense ion charge bunches propagating through background plasma have been determined taking into account the effects of transients during beam entry into the plasma, the excitation of collective plasma waves, the effects of gas ionization, finite electron temperature, and applied solenoidal and dipole magnetic fields. Accounting for plasma production by gas ionization yields a larger self-magnetic field of the ion beam compared to the case without ionization, and a wake of current density and self-magnetic field perturbations is generated behind the beam pulse. A solenoidal magnetic field can be applied for controlling the beam propagation. Making use of theoretical models and advanced numerical simulations, it is shown that even a small applied magnetic field of about 100G can strongly affect the beam neutralization. It has also been demonstrated that in the presence of an applied magnetic field the ion beam pulse can excite large-amplitude whistler waves, thereby producing a complex structure of self-electric and self-magnetic fields. The presence of an applied solenoidal magnetic field may also cause a strong enhancement of the radial self-electric field of the beam pulse propagating

  19. Physically based simulation of Buddha Glory

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Shiguang; WANG Zhangye; GONG Zheng; WANG Changbo; PENG Qunsheng

    2006-01-01

    This paper proposes a novel method of photorealistic simulation of Buddha Glory, a natural phenomenon of great visual beauty which can be observed in the area of famous Buddhism Holy Lands in China. This phenomenon is mainly caused by back-scattering of water droplets in fog or cloud. To simulate the glory, we first calculate the spectral scatter intensity of glory rings using Mie scattering theory. We then present a new shadow model to determine the deformed shape of the head and body of "Buddha" within the glory ring.The affect of atmospheric parameters such as the solar elevation angles, the density and size of water droplet in fog or cloud on the shape and color of Buddha Glory is also calculated. For rendering, we adopt the method of path scattering integral to generate the whole attenuated scene of Buddha Glory. Compared with the photographs of real Buddha Glory displays, our synthetic results are quite satisfactory.

  20. Electrical Storm Simulation to Improve the Learning Physics Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez Muñoz, Miriam; Jiménez Rodríguez, María Lourdes; Gutiérrez de Mesa, José Antonio

    2013-01-01

    This work is part of a research project whose main objective is to understand the impact that the use of Information and Communication Technology (ICT) has on the teaching and learning process on the subject of Physics. We will show that, with the use of a storm simulator, physics students improve their learning process on one hand they understand…

  1. A tribute to Oscar Buneman -- Pioneer of plasma simulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buneman, R.; Barker, R.J. (Air Force Office of Scientific Research, Washington, DC (United States)); Peratt, A.L. (Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)); Brecht, S.H. (Berkeley Research Associates, Inc., CA (United States)); Langdon, A.B. (Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States). X-Division); Lewis, H.R. (Dartmouth College, Hanover, NH (United States). Dept. of Physics and Astronomy)

    1994-02-01

    Highlights are presented from among the many contributions made by Oscar Buneman to the science, engineering, and mathematics communities. Emphasis is placed not only on ''what'' this pioneer of computational plasma physics contributed but, of equal importance, on ''how'' he made his contributions. Therein lies the difference between technical competence and scientific greatness. The picture which emerges illustrates the open-mindedness, enthusiasm, intellectual/physical stamina, imagination, intellectual integrity, interdisciplinary curiosity, and deep humanity that made this individual unique. As a gentleman and a scholar, he had mastered the art of making cold technical facts ''come to life.'' Oscar Buneman died peacefully at his home near Stanford University on Sunday, January 24th, 1993. The profound influence he has had on many of his colleagues guarantees his immortality.

  2. Metamodelling Approach and Software Tools for Physical Modelling and Simulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vitaliy Mezhuyev

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available In computer science, metamodelling approach becomes more and more popular for the purpose of software systems development. In this paper, we discuss applicability of the metamodelling approach for development of software tools for physical modelling and simulation.To define a metamodel for physical modelling the analysis of physical models will be done. The result of such the analyses will show the invariant physical structures, we propose to use as the basic abstractions of the physical metamodel. It is a system of geometrical objects, allowing to build a spatial structure of physical models and to set a distribution of physical properties. For such geometry of distributed physical properties, the different mathematical methods can be applied. To prove the proposed metamodelling approach, we consider the developed prototypes of software tools.

  3. Understanding Solar Coronal Heating through Atomic and Plasma Physics Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savin, Daniel Wolf; Arthanayaka, Thusitha; Bose, Sayak; Hahn, Michael; Beiersdorfer, Peter; Brown, Gregory V.; Gekelman, Walter; Vincena, Steve

    2017-08-01

    Recent solar observations suggest that the Sun's corona is heated by Alfven waves that dissipate at unexpectedly low heights in the corona. These observations raise a number of questions. Among them are the problems of accurately quantifying the energy flux of the waves and that of describing the physical mechanism that leads to the wave damping. We are performing laboratory experiments to address both of these issues.The energy flux depends on the electron density, which can be measured spectroscopically. However, spectroscopic density diagnostics have large uncertainties, because they depend sensitively on atomic collisional excitation, de-excitation, and radiative transition rates for multiple atomic levels. Essentially all of these data come from theory and have not been experimentally validated. We are conducting laboratory experiments using the electron beam ion trap (EBIT) at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory that will provide accurate empirical calibrations for spectroscopic density diagnostics and which will also help to guide theoretical calculations.The observed rapid wave dissipation is likely due to inhomogeneities in the plasma that drive flows and currents at small length scales where energy can be more efficiently dissipated. This may take place through gradients in the Alfvén speed along the magnetic field, which causes wave reflection and generates turbulence. Alternatively, gradients in the Alfvén speed across the field can lead to dissipation through phase-mixing. Using the Large Plasma Device (LAPD) at the University of California Los Angeles, we are studying both of these dissipation mechanisms in the laboratory in order to understand their potential roles in coronal heating.

  4. Low-temperature plasma simulations with the LSP PIC code

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlsson, Johan; Khrabrov, Alex; Kaganovich, Igor; Keating, David; Selezneva, Svetlana; Sommerer, Timothy

    2014-10-01

    The LSP (Large-Scale Plasma) PIC-MCC code has been used to simulate several low-temperature plasma configurations, including a gas switch for high-power AC/DC conversion, a glow discharge and a Hall thruster. Simulation results will be presented with an emphasis on code comparison and validation against experiment. High-voltage, direct-current (HVDC) power transmission is becoming more common as it can reduce construction costs and power losses. Solid-state power-electronics devices are presently used, but it has been proposed that gas switches could become a compact, less costly, alternative. A gas-switch conversion device would be based on a glow discharge, with a magnetically insulated cold cathode. Its operation is similar to that of a sputtering magnetron, but with much higher pressure (0.1 to 0.3 Torr) in order to achieve high current density. We have performed 1D (axial) and 2D (axial/radial) simulations of such a gas switch using LSP. The 1D results were compared with results from the EDIPIC code. To test and compare the collision models used by the LSP and EDIPIC codes in more detail, a validation exercise was performed for the cathode fall of a glow discharge. We will also present some 2D (radial/azimuthal) LSP simulations of a Hall thruster. The information, data, or work presented herein was funded in part by the Advanced Research Projects Agency-Energy (ARPA-E), U.S. Department of Energy, under Award Number DE-AR0000298.

  5. MAGNETIC NULL POINTS IN KINETIC SIMULATIONS OF SPACE PLASMAS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Olshevsky, Vyacheslav; Innocenti, Maria Elena; Cazzola, Emanuele; Lapenta, Giovanni [Centre for Mathematical Plasma Astrophysics (CmPA), KU Leuven (Belgium); Deca, Jan [Laboratory for Atmospheric and Space Physics (LASP), University of Colorado Boulder, Boulder, CO (United States); Divin, Andrey [St. Petersburg State University, St. Petersburg (Russian Federation); Peng, Ivy Bo; Markidis, Stefano, E-mail: sya@mao.kiev.ua [High Performance Computing and Visualization (HPCViz), KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Stockholm (Sweden)

    2016-03-01

    We present a systematic attempt to study magnetic null points and the associated magnetic energy conversion in kinetic particle-in-cell simulations of various plasma configurations. We address three-dimensional simulations performed with the semi-implicit kinetic electromagnetic code iPic3D in different setups: variations of a Harris current sheet, dipolar and quadrupolar magnetospheres interacting with the solar wind, and a relaxing turbulent configuration with multiple null points. Spiral nulls are more likely created in space plasmas: in all our simulations except lunar magnetic anomaly (LMA) and quadrupolar mini-magnetosphere the number of spiral nulls prevails over the number of radial nulls by a factor of 3–9. We show that often magnetic nulls do not indicate the regions of intensive energy dissipation. Energy dissipation events caused by topological bifurcations at radial nulls are rather rare and short-lived. The so-called X-lines formed by the radial nulls in the Harris current sheet and LMA simulations are rather stable and do not exhibit any energy dissipation. Energy dissipation is more powerful in the vicinity of spiral nulls enclosed by magnetic flux ropes with strong currents at their axes (their cross sections resemble 2D magnetic islands). These null lines reminiscent of Z-pinches efficiently dissipate magnetic energy due to secondary instabilities such as the two-stream or kinking instability, accompanied by changes in magnetic topology. Current enhancements accompanied by spiral nulls may signal magnetic energy conversion sites in the observational data.

  6. Modeling and Simulation for Nanoparticle Plasma Jet Diagnostic Probe for Runaway Electron Beam-Plasma Interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogatu, I. N.; Galkin, S. A.

    2016-10-01

    The C60 nanoparticle plasma jet (NPPJ) rapid injection into a tokamak major disruption is followed by C60 gradual fragmentation along plasma-traversing path. The result is abundant C ion concentration in the core plasma enhancing the potential to probe and diagnose the runaway electrons (REs) during different phases of their dynamics. A C60/C NPPJ of 75 mg, high-density (>1023 m-3) , hyper-velocity (>4 km/s), and uniquely fast response-to-delivery time ( 1 ms) has been demonstrated on a test bed. It can rapidly and deeply deliver enough mass to increase electron density to 2.4x1021 m-3, 60 times larger than typical DIII-D pre-disruption value. We will present the results of our on-going work on: 1) self-consistent model for RE current density evolution (by Dreicer mechanism and ``avalanche'') focused on the effect of fast and deep deposition of C ions, 2) improvement of single C60q+ fragmenting ion penetration model through tokamak B(R)-field and post-TQ plasma, and 3) simulation of C60q+ PJ penetration through the DIII-D characteristic 2 T B-field to the RE beam central location by using the Hybrid Electro-Magnetic 2D code (HEM-2D. Work supported by US DOE DE-SC0015776 Grant.

  7. Simulation of Dual-Electrode Capacitively Coupled Plasma Discharges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Yijia; Ji, Linhong; Cheng, Jia

    2016-12-01

    Dual-electrode capacitively coupled plasma discharges are investigated here to lower the non-uniformity of plasma density. The dual-electrode structure proposed by Jung splits the electrode region and increases the flexibility of fine tuning non-uniformity. Different RF voltages, frequencies, phase-shifts and electrode areas are simulated and the influences are discussed. RF voltage and electrode area have a non-monotonic effect on non-uniformity, while frequency has a monotonic effect. Phase-shift has a cyclical influence on non-uniformity. A special combination of 224 V voltage and 11% area ratio with 10 MHz lowers the non-uniformity of the original set (200 V voltage and 0% area ratio with 10 MHz) by 46.5%. The position of the plasma density peak at the probe line has been tracked and properly tuning the phase-shift can obtain the same trace as tuning frequency or voltage. supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China (No. 51405261)

  8. Simulation of coal pyrolysis in plasma jet by CPD model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tian, Y.; Xie, K.; Zhu, S.; Fletcher, T.H. [Taiyuan University of Technology, Taiyuan (China). State Key Lab. of C1 Chemistry and Technology

    2001-12-01

    Reaction of coal in a plasma jet is complex and extremely rapid, and acetylene and carbon monoxide are the main products in the pyrolysis gas. Coal pyrolysis is assumed as the first step reaction when coal is injected into hot plasma jet with initial average temperature of 3700 K. Chemical percolation devolatalization (CPD) is employed first to simulate this procedure in mechanism. The calculation results indicate coal pyrolysis rate in plasma jet is very fast and the retention time of coal staying in reactor is only several milliseconds. Comparing the calculation with experiment result, it was concluded that the CPD agree with the experiment well when the coal feed rate is larger than about 2.0 g s{sup -1}. As the coal feed rate was increased, the average temperature of coal particle during staying in reactor was reduced and the residual time became long, but it was not found that the residual time influenced the coal conversion evidently. 15 refs., 6 figs., 3 tabs.

  9. Integrated Physics Advances in Simulation of Wave Interactions with Extended MHD Phenomena

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Batchelor, Donald B [ORNL; D' Azevedo, Eduardo [ORNL; Bateman, Glenn [Lehigh University, Bethlehem, PA; Bernholdt, David E [ORNL; Berry, Lee A [ORNL; Bonoli, P. [Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT); Bramley, R [Indiana University; Breslau, J. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL); Chance, M. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL); Chen, J. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL); Choi, M. [General Atomics; Elwasif, Wael R [ORNL; Fu, GuoYong [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL); Harvey, R. W. [CompX, Del Mar, CA; Houlberg, Wayne A [ORNL; Jaeger, Erwin Frederick [ORNL; Jardin, S. C. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL); Keyes, David E [Columbia University; Klasky, Scott A [ORNL; Kruger, Scott [Tech-X Corporation; Ku, Long-Poe [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL); McCune, Douglas [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL); Schissel, D. [General Atomics; Schnack, D. [University of Wisconsin; Wright, J. C. [Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT)

    2007-06-01

    The broad scientific objectives of the SWIM (Simulation of Wave Interaction with MHD) project are: (A) To improve our understanding of interactions that both RF wave and particle sources have on extended-MHD phenomena, and to substantially improve our capability for predicting and optimizing the performance of burning plasmas in devices such as ITER: and (B) To develop an integrated computational system for treating multi-physics phenomena with the required flexibility and extensibility to serve as a prototype for the Fusion Simulation Project (FSP).

  10. Integrated physics advances in simulation of wave interactions with extended MHD phenomena

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Batchelor, D B [ORNL (United States); D' Azevedo, E [ORNL (United States); Bateman, G [Lehigh (United States)] (and others)

    2007-07-15

    The broad scientific objectives of the SWIM (Simulation of Wave Interaction with MHD) project are: (A) To improve our understanding of interactions that both RF wave and particle sources have on extended-MHD phenomena, and to substantially improve our capability for predicting and optimizing the performance of burning plasmas in devices such as ITER: and (B) To develop an integrated computational system for treating multi-physics phenomena with the required flexibility and extensibility to serve as a prototype for the Fusion Simulation Project (FSP)

  11. APPLICATION OF INTERACTIVE ONLINE SIMULATIONS IN THE PHYSICS LABORATORY ACTIVITIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nina P. Dementievska

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Physics teachers should have professional competences, aimed at the use of online technologies associated with physical experiments. Lack of teaching materials for teachers in Ukrainian language leads to the use of virtual laboratories and computer simulations by traditional methods of education, not by the latest innovative modern educational technology, which may limit their use and greatly reduce their effectiveness. Ukrainian teaching literature has practically no information about the assessment of competencies, research skills of students for the laboratory activities. The aim of the article is to describe some components of instructional design for the Web site with simulations in school physical experiments and their evaluation.

  12. Learning-focuses in physics simulation learning situations

    CERN Document Server

    Ingerman, A; Marshall, D; Ingerman, Ake; Linder, Cedric; Marshall, Delia

    2004-01-01

    This is a report on a qualitative study of students' learning where a physics computer simulation session is used to supplement lectures on the topic. Drawing on phenomenography as the analytical framework, the students' learning-focuses were analysed. The result is a description of four distinctly different learning-focuses that emerged when the students involved in the study interacted with the computer simulations. These learning-focuses were then analysed in terms of the level of interaction, the nature of physics knowledge and views of learning experienced by the students. These results were then used to identify advantages and disadvantages of learning through interaction with simulations.

  13. PIC Simulation of Relativistic Electromagnetic Plasma Expansion with Radiation Damping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noguchi, Koichi; Liang, Edison; Wilks, Scott

    2004-11-01

    One of the unsolved problems in astrophysics is the acceleration of nonthermal high-energy particles. Nonthermal radiation is observed from pulsars, blazers, gamma-ray bursts and black holes. Recently, a new mechanism of relativistic nonthermal particle acceleration, called the Diamagnetic Relativistic Pulse Accelerator(DRPA), discovered using multi-dimensional Particle-in-Cell(PIC) simulations. When a plasma-loaded electromagnetic pulse expands relativistically, the self-induced drift current creates ponderomotive trap, which drags only the fast particles in the trap and leave slow ones behind. Here we study the effect of radiation on an electron-positron plasma accelerated by the DRPA, by introducing the radiation force in our 2D PIC code. In the radiation case, particles are accelerated by the EM pulse but decelerated by the radiation reaction simultaneously, whereas particles are accelerated indefinitely in the non-radiation case. We find that even with the radiation dumping the DRPA mechanism remains robust and particles are accelerated to over γ>100. After the simulation reaches the quasi-equilibrium state, kinetic energy becomes constant, and field energy is converted to radiation using particles as the transfer agent. We will also produce sample light waves of the radiation output.

  14. Description and simulation of physics of Resistive Plate Chambers

    CERN Document Server

    Français, Vincent

    2016-01-01

    Monte-Carlo simulation of physical processes is an important tool for detector development as it allows to predict signal pulse amplitude and timing, time resolution, efficiency ... Yet despite the fact they are very common, full simulations for RPC-like detector are not widespread and often incomplete. They are often based on mathematical distributions that are not suited for this particular modelisation and over-simplify or neglect some important physical processes. We describe the main physical processes occurring inside a RPC when a charged particle goes through (ionisation, electron drift and multiplication, signal induction ...) through the Riegler-Lippmann-Veenhof model together with a still-in-development simulation. This is a full, fast and multi-threaded Monte-Carlo modelisation of the main physical processes using existing and well tested libraries and framework (such as the Garfield++ framework and the GNU Scientific Library). It is developed in the hope to be a basic ground for future RPC simulat...

  15. Monte Carlo Simulation in Statistical Physics An Introduction

    CERN Document Server

    Binder, Kurt

    2010-01-01

    Monte Carlo Simulation in Statistical Physics deals with the computer simulation of many-body systems in condensed-matter physics and related fields of physics, chemistry and beyond, to traffic flows, stock market fluctuations, etc.). Using random numbers generated by a computer, probability distributions are calculated, allowing the estimation of the thermodynamic properties of various systems. This book describes the theoretical background to several variants of these Monte Carlo methods and gives a systematic presentation from which newcomers can learn to perform such simulations and to analyze their results. The fifth edition covers Classical as well as Quantum Monte Carlo methods. Furthermore a new chapter on the sampling of free-energy landscapes has been added. To help students in their work a special web server has been installed to host programs and discussion groups (http://wwwcp.tphys.uni-heidelberg.de). Prof. Binder was awarded the Berni J. Alder CECAM Award for Computational Physics 2001 as well ...

  16. Load management strategy for Particle-In-Cell simulations in high energy physics

    CERN Document Server

    Beck, Arnaud; Derouillat, Julien

    2015-01-01

    In the wake of the intense effort made for the experimental CILEX project, numerical simulation campaigns have been carried out in order to finalize the design of the facility and to identify optimal laser and plasma parameters. These simulations bring, of course, important insight into the fundamental physics at play. As a by-product, they also characterize the quality of our theoretical and numerical models. By comparing the results given by different codes, it is possible to point out algorithmic limitations both in terms of physical accuracy and computational performances. In this paper we illustrate some of these limitations in the context of electron laser wakefield acceleration (LWFA). The main limitation we identify in state-of-the-art Particle-In-Cell (PIC) codes is computational load imbalance. We propose an innovative algorithm to deal with this specific issue as well as milestones towards a modern, accurate high-performance PIC code for high energy physics.

  17. Experimental and theoretical research in applied plasma physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Porkolab, M.

    1992-01-01

    This report discusses research in the following areas: fusion theory and computations; theory of thermonuclear plasmas; user service center; high poloidal beta studies on PBX-M; fast ECE fluctuation diagnostic for balloning mode studies; x-ray imaging diagnostic; millimeter/submillimeter-wave fusion ion diagnostics; small scale turbulence and nonlinear dynamics in plasmas; plasma turbulence and transport; phase contrast interferometer diagnostic for long wavelength fluctuations in DIII-D; and charged and neutral fusion production for fusio plasmas.

  18. Turbulence in collisionless plasmas: statistical analysis from numerical simulations with pressure anisotropy

    CERN Document Server

    Kowal, Grzegorz; Lazarian, A

    2010-01-01

    In the past years we have experienced an increasing interest in understanding of the physical properties of collisionless plasmas, mostly because of the large number of astrophysical environments, e.g. the intracluster medium (ICM), containing magnetic fields which are strong enough to be coupled with the ionized gas and characterized by densities sufficiently low to prevent the pressure isotropization with respect to the magnetic line direction. Under these conditions a new class of kinetic instabilities arises, such as firehose and mirror ones, which were extensively studied in the literature. Their role in the turbulence evolution and cascade process in the presence of pressure anisotropy, however, is still unclear. In this work we present the first statistical analysis of turbulence in collisionless plasmas using three dimensional double isothermal magnetohydrodynamical with the Chew-Goldberger-Low closure (CGL-MHD) numerical simulations. We study models with different initial conditions to account for th...

  19. Hybrid electrodynamics and kinetics simulation for electromagnetic wave propagation in weakly ionized hydrogen plasmas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Qiang; Chen, Bin

    2012-10-01

    In this paper, a hybrid electrodynamics and kinetics numerical model based on the finite-difference time-domain method and lattice Boltzmann method is presented for electromagnetic wave propagation in weakly ionized hydrogen plasmas. In this framework, the multicomponent Bhatnagar-Gross-Krook collision model considering both elastic and Coulomb collisions and the multicomponent force model based on the Guo model are introduced, which supply a hyperfine description on the interaction between electromagnetic wave and weakly ionized plasma. Cubic spline interpolation and mean filtering technique are separately introduced to solve the multiscalar problem and enhance the physical quantities, which are polluted by numerical noise. Several simulations have been implemented to validate our model. The numerical results are consistent with a simplified analytical model, which demonstrates that this model can obtain satisfying numerical solutions successfully.

  20. Extreme Scale Computing for First-Principles Plasma Physics Research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, Choogn-Seock [Princeton University

    2011-10-12

    World superpowers are in the middle of the “Computnik” race. US Department of Energy (and National Nuclear Security Administration) wishes to launch exascale computer systems into the scientific (and national security) world by 2018. The objective is to solve important scientific problems and to predict the outcomes using the most fundamental scientific laws, which would not be possible otherwise. Being chosen into the next “frontier” group can be of great benefit to a scientific discipline. An extreme scale computer system requires different types of algorithms and programming philosophy from those we have been accustomed to. Only a handful of scientific codes are blessed to be capable of scalable usage of today’s largest computers in operation at petascale (using more than 100,000 cores concurrently). Fortunately, a few magnetic fusion codes are competing well in this race using the “first principles” gyrokinetic equations.These codes are beginning to study the fusion plasma dynamics in full-scale realistic diverted device geometry in natural nonlinear multiscale, including the large scale neoclassical and small scale turbulence physics, but excluding some ultra fast dynamics. In this talk, most of the above mentioned topics will be introduced at executive level. Representative properties of the extreme scale computers, modern programming exercises to take advantage of them, and different philosophies in the data flows and analyses will be presented. Examples of the multi-scale multi-physics scientific discoveries made possible by solving the gyrokinetic equations on extreme scale computers will be described. Future directions into “virtual tokamak experiments” will also be discussed.

  1. APPLICATION OF INTERACTIVE ONLINE SIMULATIONS FOR DEMONSTRATION EXPERIMENT IN PHYSICS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nina P. Dementievska

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Development of modern school physics experiment is related to the extensive use of ICT not only for data processing and visualization. Interactive computer simulation for processes and phenomena, developed by scientists and methodologists by the site Phet, helps to improve the physical demonstration experiment with the support of modern pedagogical technologies that change the traditional procedure to form students' understanding of the processes and phenomena, active cognitive activity. To study the influence of methods to integrate interactive computer simulations for better understanding the students' physical processes, phenomena and laws of the international community, teachers and Ukrainian scientists and teachers of physics have been involved. The aim of the article is to introduce the research results in the development and testing of individual components of educational technology in performing a physical experiment in secondary school.

  2. Fully Three-dimensional Simulation and Modeling of a Dense Plasma Focus

    CERN Document Server

    Meehan, B T

    2014-01-01

    A Dense Plasma Focus (DPF) is a pulsed-power machine that electromagnetically accelerates and cylindrically compresses a shocked plasma in a Z-pinch. The pinch results in a brief (about 100 nanosecond) pulse of X-rays, and, for some working gases, also a pulse of neutrons. A great deal of experimental research has been done into the physics of DPF reactions, and there exist mathematical models describing its behavior during the different time phases of the reaction. Two of the phases, known as the inverse pinch and the rundown, are approximately governed by magnetohydrodynamics, and there are a number of well-established codes for simulating these phases in two dimensions or in three dimensions under the assumption of axial symmetry. There has been little success, however, in developing fully three-dimensional simulations. In this work we present three-dimensional simulations of DPF reactions and demonstrate that 3D simulations predict qualitatively and quantitatively different behavior than their 2D counterp...

  3. Calculation of 2-temperature plasma thermo-physical properties considering condensed phases: application to CO2-CH4 plasma: part 1. Composition and thermodynamic properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yi; Chen, Zhexin; Rong, Mingzhe; Cressault, Yann; Yang, Fei; Niu, Chunping; Sun, Hao

    2016-10-01

    As the first part of this series of papers, a new calculation method for composition and thermodynamic properties of 2-temperature plasma considering condensed species under local chemical equilibrium (LCE) and local phase equilibrium assumption is presented. The 2-T mass action law and chemical potential are used to determine the composition of multiphase system. The thermo-physical properties of CO2-CH4 mixture, which may be a possible substitution for SF6, are calculated by this method as an example. The influence of condensed graphite, non-LTE effect, mixture ratio and pressure on the thermo-physical properties has been discussed. The results will serve as reliable reference data for computational simulation of CO2-CH4 plasmas.

  4. Physical-Chemical Characterization of Nanodispersed Powders Produced by a Plasma-Chemical Technique

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    M. GEORGIEVA; G. VISSOKOV; Iv. GRANCHAROV

    2007-01-01

    This article presents a review on the physical-chemical properties and characteristics of plasma-chemically produced nanodispersed powders (NDP), such as metals, oxides, nitrides, carbides, and catalysts. The plasma-chemical preparation of the powders was carried out in thermal plasma (TP) created by means of high-current electric arcs, plasma jets, high-frequency (HF) discharges, etc. We also discuss certain properties and characteristics of the NDPs, which are determined largely by the conditions of preparation.

  5. Physics and optimization of plasma startup in the RFP

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, W.; Chapman, B. E.; Ding, W. X.; Lin, L.; Almagri, A. F.; Anderson, J. K.; Den Hartog, D. J.; Duff, J.; Ko, J.; Kumar, S. T. A.; Morton, L.; Munaretto, S.; Parke, E.; Reusch, J. A.; Sarff, J. S.; Waksman, J.; Brower, D. L.; Liu, W.

    2015-05-01

    In the tokamak and reversed-field pinch (RFP), inductively driven toroidal plasma current provides the confining poloidal magnetic field and ohmic heating power, but the magnitude and/or duration of this current is limited by the available flux swing in the poloidal field transformer. A portion of this flux is consumed during startup as the current is initiated and ramped to its final target value, and considerable effort has been devoted to understanding startup and minimizing the amount of flux consumed. Flux consumption can be reduced during startup in the RFP by increasing the toroidal magnetic field, Bti, applied to initiate the discharge, but the underlying physics is not yet entirely understood. Toward increasing this understanding, we have for the first time in the RFP employed advanced, non-invasive diagnostics on the Madison Symmetric Torus to measure the evolution of current, magnetic field, and kinetic profiles during startup. Flux consumption during startup is dominantly inductive, but we find that the inductive flux consumption drops as Bti increases. The resistive consumption of flux, while relatively small, apparently increases with Bti due to a smaller electron temperature. However, the ion temperature increases with Bti, exceeding the electron temperature and thus reflecting non-collisional heating. Magnetic fluctuations also increase with Bti, corresponding primarily to low-n modes that emerge sequentially as the safety factor profile evolves from tokamak-like to that of the RFP.

  6. Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory FY2003 Annual Highlights

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Editors: Carol A. Phillips; Anthony R. DeMeo

    2004-08-23

    The Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory FY2003 Annual Highlights report provides a summary of the activities at the Laboratory for the fiscal year--1 October 2002 through 30 September 2003. The report includes the Laboratory's Mission and Vision Statements, a message ''From the Director,'' summaries of the research and engineering activities by project, and sections on Technology Transfer, the Graduate and Science Education Programs, Awards and Honors garnered by the Laboratory and the employees, and the Year in Pictures. There is also a listing of the Laboratory's publications for the year and a section of the abbreviations, acronyms, and symbols used throughout the report. In the PDF document, links have been created from the Table of Contents to each section. You can also return to the Table of Contents from the beginning page of each section. The PPPL Highlights for fiscal year 2003 is also available in hardcopy format. To obtain a copy e-mail Publications and Reports at: pub-reports@pppl.gov. Be sure to include your complete mailing address

  7. Perspective: The physics, diagnostics, and applications of atmospheric pressure low temperature plasma sources used in plasma medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laroussi, M.; Lu, X.; Keidar, M.

    2017-07-01

    Low temperature plasmas have been used in various plasma processing applications for several decades. But it is only in the last thirty years or so that sources generating such plasmas at atmospheric pressure in reliable and stable ways have become more prevalent. First, in the late 1980s, the dielectric barrier discharge was used to generate relatively large volume diffuse plasmas at atmospheric pressure. Then, in the early 2000s, plasma jets that can launch cold plasma plumes in ambient air were developed. Extensive experimental and modeling work was carried out on both methods and much of the physics governing such sources was elucidated. Starting in the mid-1990s, low temperature plasma discharges have been used as sources of chemically reactive species that can be transported to interact with biological media, cells, and tissues and induce impactful biological effects. However, many of the biochemical pathways whereby plasma affects cells remain not well understood. This situation is changing rather quickly because the field, known today as "plasma medicine," has experienced exponential growth in the last few years thanks to a global research community that engaged in fundamental and applied research involving the use of cold plasma for the inactivation of bacteria, dental applications, wound healing, and the destruction of cancer cells/tumors. In this perspective, the authors first review the physics as well as the diagnostics of the principal plasma sources used in plasma medicine. Then, brief descriptions of their biomedical applications are presented. To conclude, the authors' personal assessment of the present status and future outlook of the field is given.

  8. Development of a Renormalization Group Approach to Multi-Scale Plasma Physics Computation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-28

    with important kinetic non - Maxwellian particle distributions. These plasmas exhibit a range of length and time scales, making accurate simulation a...the plasmas ’ phase space for accurate reproduction of natural phenomena. These four goals offer an interlocking plan of attack to reach a full...anisotropic bimodal intermittent turbulence in space plasmas ” Phys. Plasmas . 11 (2004) 1287-1299.] to describe phenomena such as the scaling of the

  9. Atomic physics of shocked plasma in winds of massive stars

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leutenegger, Maurice A.; Cohen, David H.; Owocki, Stanley P. [NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); CRESST/UMBC (United States); Swarthmore College, Swarthmore, PA 19081 (United States); Bartol Research Institute, University of Delaware, Newark, DE 19716 (United States)

    2012-05-25

    High resolution diffraction grating spectra of X-ray emission from massive stars obtained with Chandra and XMM-Newton have revolutionized our understanding of their powerful, radiation-driven winds. Emission line shapes and line ratios provide diagnostics on a number of key wind parameters. Modeling of resolved emission line velocity profiles allows us to derive independent constraints on stellar mass-loss rates, leading to downward revisions of a factor of a few from previous measurements. Line ratios in He-like ions strongly constrain the spatial distribution of Xray emitting plasma, confirming the expectations of radiation hydrodynamic simulations that X-ray emission begins moderately close to the stellar surface and extends throughout the wind. Some outstanding questions remain, including the possibility of large optical depths in resonance lines, which is hinted at by differences in line shapes of resonance and intercombination lines from the same ion. Resonance scattering leads to nontrivial radiative transfer effects, and modeling it allows us to place constraints on shock size, density, and velocity structure.

  10. Atomic Physics of Shocked Plasma in Winds of Massive Stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leutenegger, Maurice A.; Cohen, David H.; Owocki, Stanley P.

    2012-01-01

    High resolution diffraction grating spectra of X-ray emission from massive stars obtained with Chandra and XMM-Newton have revolutionized our understanding of their powerful, radiation-driven winds. Emission line shapes and line ratios provide diagnostics on a number of key wind parameters. Modeling of resolved emission line velocity profiles allows us to derive independent constraints on stellar mass-loss rates, leading to downward revisions of a factor of a few from previous measurements. Line ratios in He-like ions strongly constrain the spatial distribution of Xray emitting plasma, confirming the expectations of radiation hydrodynamic simulations that X-ray emission begins moderately close to the stellar surface and extends throughout the wind. Some outstanding questions remain, including the possibility of large optical depths in resonance lines, which is hinted at by differences in line shapes of resonance and intercombination lines from the same ion. Resonance scattering leads to nontrivial radiative transfer effects, and modeling it allows us to place constraints on shock size, density, and velocity structure

  11. 'Plasma Camp': A Different Approach to Professional Development for Physics Teachers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andrew Post-Zwicker and Nicholas R. Guilbert

    1998-12-01

    The Plasma Physics and Fusion Energy Institute ('Plasma Camp') was inaugurated in 1998 as a way to address two areas of concern in the professional development of high-school physics teachers: involving teachers in the theory and methods of a current area of research in physics and connecting the research experience back into the classroom. The Institute, run jointly by a scientist and a teacher, immersed high-school teachers from across the country in laboratory investigations and in pedagogical projects for two weeks at Princeton University's Plasma Physics Laboratory. The goals, structure, and initial outcomes of the Institute are discussed.

  12. Physical simulation of glacier motion modes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. P. Epifanov

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Modes of «dry friction» at glacier-bedrock interface (ice sliding and flow were simulated under uniform compression with different combinations of mechanical and thermodynamic factors. Effect of ice structure in the intermediate layer was considered in terms of strength of ice adhesion to complex-shaped substrate for typical cases: at frictional contact of ice frozen to the walls of the cylindrical matrix; when ice was pressing-through a confusor (with contraction ratio = 30; extruding the ice in a plastic state through a pipe. For these tests, а collapsible matrix was used. It consists of three sections: the feed cylinder, the convergent channel (confuser and the forming pipe. Changes of ice during severe plastic deformation were monitored by acoustic emission in the range from 10 Hz to 25 kHz. Relationship between the size of moving structural elements, their natural resonant frequency, density and acoustic capacitance was applied. A theoretical model was verified. Correlation of amplitude-frequency spectra of acoustic emission at the frictional contact with the acoustic spectrum of natural oscillations of the glaciers from distant sources was confirmed. The results can be applied to remote sensing studies of ice movement modes at the glacier bedrock.

  13. Physics Educators as Designers of Simulation using Easy Java Simulation (Ejs)

    CERN Document Server

    Wee, Loo Kang

    2012-01-01

    To deepen the professional practice of physics educators, I seek to highlight the Open Source Physics (OSP) and Easy Java Simulation (Ejs or EJS) community of educators that engage, enable and empower teachers as learners so that we can be leaders in our teaching practice. I learned through Web 2 online collaborative means to develop simulations together with reputable physicists through the open source digital library. By examining the open source codes of the simulation through the Ejs toolkit, I was able to examine and make sense of the physics from the computational models created by practicing physicists. I will share some of the simulations that I have remixed from existing library of simulations models into suitable learning environments for inquiry of physics. http://www.phy.ntnu.edu.tw/ntnujava/index.php?board=28.0

  14. Interplay between plasma turbulence and particle injection in 3D global simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tamain, P.; Baudoin, C.; Ciraolo, G.; Futtersack, R.; Ghendrih, P.; Nace, N. [Association Euratom-CEA, Institut de Recherche sur la Fusion Magnetique, CEA Cadarache, St. Paul-lez-Durance (France); Bufferand, H.; Carbajal, L.; Marandet, Y. [Aix-Marseille Universite, CNRS, PIIM, UMR 7345, Marseille (France); Colin, C.; Galassi, D.; Schwander, F.; Serre, E. [Aix-Marseille Universite, CNRS, Ecole Centrale Marseille, M2P2, Marseille (France)

    2016-08-15

    The impact of a 3D localized particle source on the edge plasma in 3D global turbulence simulations is investigated using the TOKAM3X fluid code. Results apply to advanced fueling methods such as Supersonic Molecular Beam Injection (SMBI) or pellets injection. The fueling source is imposed as a volumetric particle source in the simulations so that the physics leading to the ionization of particles and its localization are not taken into account. As already observed in experiments, the localized particle source strongly perturbs both turbulence and the large scale organization of the edge plasma. The localized increase of the pressure generated by the source drives sonic parallel flows in the plasma, leading to a poloidal redistribution of the particles on the time scale of the source duration. However, the particle deposition also drives localized transverse pressure gradients which impacts the stability of the plasma with respect to interchange processes. The resulting radial transport occurs on a sufficiently fast time scale to compete with the parallel redistribution of particles, leading to immediate radial losses of a significant proportion of the injected particles. Low Field Side (LFS) and High Field Side (HFS) injections exhibit different dynamics due to their interaction with curvature. In particular, HFS particle deposition drives an inward flux leading to differences in the particle deposition efficiency (higher for HFS than LFS). These results demonstrate the importance of taking into account plasma transport in a self-consistent manner when investigating fueling methods. (copyright 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  15. SpectralPlasmaSolver: a Spectral Code for Multiscale Simulations of Collisionless, Magnetized Plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vencels, Juris; Delzanno, Gian Luca; Manzini, Gianmarco; Markidis, Stefano; Peng, Ivy Bo; Roytershteyn, Vadim

    2016-05-01

    We present the design and implementation of a spectral code, called SpectralPlasmaSolver (SPS), for the solution of the multi-dimensional Vlasov-Maxwell equations. The method is based on a Hermite-Fourier decomposition of the particle distribution function. The code is written in Fortran and uses the PETSc library for solving the non-linear equations and preconditioning and the FFTW library for the convolutions. SPS is parallelized for shared- memory machines using OpenMP. As a verification example, we discuss simulations of the two-dimensional Orszag-Tang vortex problem and successfully compare them against a fully kinetic Particle-In-Cell simulation. An assessment of the performance of the code is presented, showing a significant improvement in the code running-time achieved by preconditioning, while strong scaling tests show a factor of 10 speed-up using 16 threads.

  16. A Kinetic Vlasov Model for Plasma Simulation Using Discontinuous Galerkin Method on Many-Core Architectures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reddell, Noah

    Advances are reported in the three pillars of computational science achieving a new capability for understanding dynamic plasma phenomena outside of local thermodynamic equilibrium. A continuum kinetic model for plasma based on the Vlasov-Maxwell system for multiple particle species is developed. Consideration is added for boundary conditions in a truncated velocity domain and supporting wall interactions. A scheme to scale the velocity domain for multiple particle species with different temperatures and particle mass while sharing one computational mesh is described. A method for assessing the degree to which the kinetic solution differs from a Maxwell-Boltzmann distribution is introduced and tested on a thoroughly studied test case. The discontinuous Galerkin numerical method is extended for efficient solution of hyperbolic conservation laws in five or more particle phase-space dimensions using tensor-product hypercube elements with arbitrary polynomial order. A scheme for velocity moment integration is integrated as required for coupling between the plasma species and electromagnetic waves. A new high performance simulation code WARPM is developed to efficiently implement the model and numerical method on emerging many-core supercomputing architectures. WARPM uses the OpenCL programming model for computational kernels and task parallelism to overlap computation with communication. WARPM single-node performance and parallel scaling efficiency are analyzed with bottlenecks identified guiding future directions for the implementation. The plasma modeling capability is validated against physical problems with analytic solutions and well established benchmark problems.

  17. Physics-Based Computational Algorithm for the Multi-Fluid Plasma Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-06-30

    Riemann solver for the two-fluid plasma model. Journal of Computational Physics , 187(2):620–638, 2003. [23] Jeffrey P. Freidberg. Ideal...Computational Physics , 141(2):199–224, 1998. [52] P. L. Roe. Approximate Riemann solvers, parameter vectors and difference schemes. Journal of...AFRL-OSR-VA-TR-2014-0310 PHYSICS -BASED COMPUTATIONAL ALGORITHM FOR THE MULTIFLUID PLASMA MODEL Uri Shumlak UNIVERSITY OF WASHINGTON Final Report 10

  18. Aacsfi-PSC. Advanced accelerator concepts for strong field interaction simulated with the Plasma-Simulation-Code

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ruhl, Hartmut [Munich Univ. (Germany). Chair for Computational and Plasma Physics

    2016-11-01

    Since the installation of SuperMUC phase 2 the 9216 nodes of phase 1 are more easily available for large scale runs allowing for the thin foil and AWAKE simulations. Besides phase 2 could be used in parallel for high throughput of the ion acceleration simulations. Challenging to our project were the full-volume checkpoints required by PIC that strained the I/O-subsystem of SuperMUC to its limits. New approaches considered for the next generation system, like burst buffers could overcome this bottleneck. Additionally, as the FDTD solver in PIC is strongly bandwidth bound, PSC will benefit profoundly from high-bandwidth memory (HBM) that most likely will be available in future HPC machines. This will be of great advantage as in 2018 phase II of AWAKE should begin, with a longer plasma channel further increasing the need for additional computing resources. Last but not least, it is expected that our methods used in plasma physics (many body interaction with radiation) will be more and more adapted for medical diagnostics and treatments. For this research field we expect centimeter sized volumes with necessary resolutions of tens of micro meters resulting in boxes of >10{sup 12} voxels (100-200 TB) on a regular basis. In consequence the demand for computing time and especially for data storage and data handling capacities will also increase significantly.

  19. THREE-DIMENSIONAL WEB-BASED PHYSICS SIMULATION APPLICATION FOR PHYSICS LEARNING TOOL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William Salim

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this research is to present a multimedia application for doing simulation in Physics. The application is a web based simulator that implementing HTML5, WebGL, and JavaScript. The objects and the environment will be in three dimensional views. This application is hoped will become the substitute for practicum activity. The current development is the application only covers Newtonian mechanics. Questionnaire and literature study is used as the data collecting method. While Waterfall Method used as the design method. The result is Three-DimensionalPhysics Simulator as online web application. Three-Dimensionaldesign and mentor-mentee relationship is the key features of this application. The conclusion made is Three-DimensionalPhysics Simulator already fulfilled in both design and functionality according to user. This application also helps them to understand Newtonian mechanics by simulation. Improvements are needed, because this application only covers Newtonian Mechanics. There is a lot possibility in the future that this simulation can also covers other Physics topic, such as optic, energy, or electricity.Keywords: Simulation, Physic, Learning Tool, HTML5, WebGL

  20. Effects of Boundary Conditions on Near Field Plasma Plume Simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyd, Iain

    2004-11-01

    The successful development of various types of electric propulsion devices is providing the need for accurate assessment of integration effects generated by the interaction of the plasma plumes of these thrusters with the host spacecraft. Assessment of spacecraft interaction effects in ground based laboratory facilities is inadequate due to the technical difficulties involved in accurately recreating the near vacuum ambient conditions experienced in space. This situation therefore places a heavy demand on computational modeling of plasma plume phenomena. Recently (Boyd and Yim, Journal of Applied Physics, Vol. 95, 2004, pp. 4575-5484) a hybrid model of the near field of the plume of a Hall thruster was reported in which the heavy species are modeled using particles and the electrons are modeled using a detailed fluid description. The present study continues the model development and assessment by considering the sensitivity of computed results to different types of boundary conditions that must be formulated for the thruster exit, for the cathode exit, for the thruster walls, and for the plume far field. The model is assessed through comparison of its predictions with several sets of experimental data measured in the plume of the BHT-200 Hall thruster.

  1. Physics-related epistemic uncertainties in proton depth dose simulation

    CERN Document Server

    Pia, Maria Grazia; Lechner, Anton; Quintieri, Lina; Saracco, Paolo

    2010-01-01

    A set of physics models and parameters pertaining to the simulation of proton energy deposition in matter are evaluated in the energy range up to approximately 65 MeV, based on their implementations in the Geant4 toolkit. The analysis assesses several features of the models and the impact of their associated epistemic uncertainties, i.e. uncertainties due to lack of knowledge, on the simulation results. Possible systematic effects deriving from uncertainties of this kind are highlighted; their relevance in relation to the application environment and different experimental requirements are discussed, with emphasis on the simulation of radiotherapy set-ups. By documenting quantitatively the features of a wide set of simulation models and the related intrinsic uncertainties affecting the simulation results, this analysis provides guidance regarding the use of the concerned simulation tools in experimental applications; it also provides indications for further experimental measurements addressing the sources of s...

  2. Role of magnetospheric plasma physics for understanding cosmic phenomena

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Indra M. L.

    Cosmic phenomena occur in the remote regions of space where in situ observations are not possible. For a proper understanding of these phenomena, laboratory experiments are essential, but in situ observations of magnetospheric plasma provide an even better background to test various hypothesis of cosmic interest. This is because the ionospheric-magnetospheric plasma and the solar wind are the only cosmic plasmas accessible to extensive in situ observations and experiments.

  3. Coulomb Collision for Plasma Simulations: Modelling and Numerical Methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geiser, Juergen

    2016-09-01

    We are motivated to model weakly ionized Plasma applications. The modeling problem is based on an incorporated explicit velocity-dependent small-angle Coulomb collision terms into a Fokker-Planck equation. Such a collision is done with so called test and field particles, which are scattered stochastically based on a Langevin equation. Based on such different model approaches, means the transport part is done with kinetic equations, while the collision part is done via the Langevin equations, we present a splitting of these models. Such a splitting allow us to combine different modeling parts. For the transport part, we can apply particle models and solve them with particle methods, e.g., PIC, while for the collision part, we can apply the explicit Coulomb collision model, e.g., with fast stochastic differential equation solvers. Additional, we also apply multiscale approaches for the different parts of the transport part, e.g., different time-scales of an explicit electric field, and model-order reduction approaches. We present first numerical results for particle simulations with the deterministic-stochastic splitting schemes. Such ideas can be applied to sputtering problems or plasma applications with dominant Coulomb collisions.

  4. Physical limitations in ferromagnetic inductively coupled plasma sources

    CERN Document Server

    Bliokh, Yury P; Slutsker, Yakov Z

    2012-01-01

    The Ferromagnetic Inductively Coupled Plasma (FICP) source, which is a version of the common inductively coupled plasma sources, has a number of well known advantages such as high efficiency, high level of ionization, low minimal gas pressure, very low required driver frequency, and even a possibility to be driven by single current pulses. We present an experimental study of such an FICP source which showed that above a certain value of the driving pulse power the properties of this device changed rather drastically. Namely, the plasma became non-stationary and non-uniform contrary to the stationary and uniform plasmas typical for this kind of plasma sources. In this case the plasma appeared as a narrow dense spike which was short compared to the driving pulse. The local plasma density could exceed the neutral atoms density by a few orders of magnitude. When that happened, the afterglow plasma decay time after the end of the pulse was long compared to an ordinary case with no plasma spike. Experiments were pe...

  5. Numerical simulation to study the transient self focusing of laser beam in plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sharma, R. P.; Hussain, Saba, E-mail: sabahussain44@yahoo.com; Gaur, Nidhi [Centre for Energy Studies, Indian Institute of Technology Delhi, New Delhi 110016 (India)

    2015-02-15

    In this paper, we present the numerical simulation for the coupled system of equations governing the dynamics of laser and Ion Acoustic Wave (IAW) in a collisionless plasma, when the coupling between the waves is through ponderomotive non-linearity. The nonlinear evolution of the laser beam is studied when the pump laser is perturbed by a periodic perturbation. By changing the perturbation wave number, we have studied its effect on the nonlinear evolution pattern of laser beam. In order to have a physical insight into the nonlinear dynamics of laser beam evolution in time and space, we have studied the laser and IAW spectra containing spatial harmonics. The magnitude of these harmonics changes with time and leads to time dependent localization of laser beam in spatial domain. The nonlinear dynamics of this localization is investigated in detail by using simulation and a semi-analytical model.

  6. Simulations Of Laser Cooling In An Ultracold Neutral Plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langin, Thomas; Strickler, Trevor; Pohl, Thomas; Vrinceanu, Daniel; Killian, Thomas

    2016-05-01

    Ultracold neutral plasmas (UNPs) generated by photoionization of laser-cooled, magneto-optically trapped neutral gases, are useful systems for studying strongly coupled plasmas. Coupling is parameterized by Γi, the ratio of the average nearest neighbor Coulomb interaction energy to the ion kinetic energy. For typical UNPs, Γi is currently limited to ~ 3 . For alkaline earth ions, higher Γi can be achieved by laser-cooling. Using Molecular Dynamics and a quantum trajectories approach, we have simulated laser-cooling of Sr+ ions interacting through a Yukawa potential. The simulations include re-pumping from two long-lived D-states, and are conducted at experimentally achievable parameters (density n = 2 e+14 m-3, size σ0 = 4 mm, Te = 19 K). Laser-cooling is shown to both reduce the temperature by a factor of 2 over relevant timescales (tens of μ s) and slow the electron thermal-pressure driven radial expansion of the UNP. We also discuss the unique aspects of laser-cooling in a highly collisional system; in particular, the effect of collisions on dark state formation due to the coupling of the P3/2 state to both the S1/2 (via the cooling transition) and the D5/2 (via a re-pump transition) states. Supported by NSF and DoE, the Air Force Office of Scientific Research, the NDSEG Program, and NIH NCRR S10RR02950, an IBM SUR Award in partnership with CISCO, Qlogic and Adaptive Computing.

  7. Physics validation of detector simulation tools for LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Beringer, J

    2004-01-01

    Extensive studies aimed at validating the physics processes built into the detector simulation tools Geant4 and Fluka are in progress within all Large Hadron Collider (LHC) experiments, within the collaborations developing these tools, and within the LHC Computing Grid (LCG) Simulation Physics Validation Project, which has become the primary forum for these activities. This work includes detailed comparisons with test beam data, as well as benchmark studies of simple geometries and materials with single incident particles of various energies for which experimental data is available. We give an overview of these validation activities with emphasis on the latest results.

  8. Numerical instability due to relativistic plasma drift in EM-PIC simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Xinlu; Yu, Peicheng; Martins, Samual F.; Tsung, Frank S.; Decyk, Viktor K.; Vieira, Jorge; Fonseca, Ricardo A.; Lu, Wei; Silva, Luis O.; Mori, Warren B.

    2013-11-01

    The numerical instability observed in electromagnetic particle-in-cell (EM-PIC) simulations with a plasma drifting with relativistic velocities is studied using both theory and computer simulations. We derive the numerical dispersion relation for a cold plasma drifting with a relativistic velocity, and find an instability attributed to the intersection between beam resonances and the electromagnetic modes in the drifting plasma. The intersection can occur in the fundamental Brillouin zones when EM waves with phase velocities less than the speed of light exist, and from aliasing beam resonances and aliasing EM modes. The unstable modes are neither purely transverse nor longitudinal. The characteristic patterns of the instability in Fourier space for various simulation setups and Maxwell equation solvers are explored by solving the corresponding numerical dispersion relations. Furthermore, based upon these characteristic patterns, we derive an asymptotic expression for the instability growth rate. The asymptotic expression greatly speeds up the calculation of the instability growth rate and makes the parameter scans for minimal growth rate feasible even for full three dimensions. The results are compared against simulation results, and good agreements are found. These results can be used as a guide to develop possible approaches to mitigate the instability. We examine the use of a spectral solver and show that such a solver when combined with a low pass filter with a cutoff value of |k→| essentially eliminates the instability while not modifying modes of physical interest. The use of a spectral solver also provides minimal errors to electromagnetic modes in the lowest Brillouin zones.

  9. Physical Simulation of Investment Casting of Complex Shape Parts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahimian, Mehdi; Milenkovic, Srdjan; Maestro, Laura; De Azua, Aitor Eguidazu Ruiz; Sabirov, Ilchat

    2015-05-01

    Development of investment casting process has been a challenge for manufacturers of complex shape parts. Numerous experimental casting trials are typically carried out to determine the optimum casting parameters for fabrication of high-quality products. In this work, it is demonstrated that physical simulation of investment casting can successfully predict microstructure and hardness in as-cast complex shape parts. The physical simulation tool consists of a thermal model and melting/solidification experiments in thermo-mechanical simulator. The thermal model is employed to predict local cooling rate during solidification at each point of a casting. Melting/solidification experiments are carried out under controlled cooling rates estimated by the thermal model. Microstructural and mechanical characterization of the solidified specimens is performed; the obtained results predict the local microstructure and mechanical properties of the casting. This concept is applied to investment casting of complex shape nozzle guide vanes from Mar-M247 Ni-based superalloy. Experimental casting trials are performed and the outcomes of physical simulation tool are validated against experimental results. It is shown that phase composition, secondary dendrite arm spacing, grain size, γ/ γ' eutectic size and volume fraction, size and shape of carbide particles, and local microhardness can be predicted at each point of the casting via physical simulation.

  10. Real-time 3-D hybrid simulation of Titan's plasma interaction during a solar wind excursion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Simon

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available The plasma environment of Saturn's largest satellite Titan is known to be highly variable. Since Titan's orbit is located within the outer magnetosphere of Saturn, the moon can leave the region dominated by the magnetic field of its parent body in times of high solar wind dynamic pressure and interact with the thermalized magnetosheath plasma or even with the unshocked solar wind. By applying a three-dimensional hybrid simulation code (kinetic description of ions, fluid electrons, we study in real-time the transition that Titan's plasma environment undergoes when the moon leaves Saturn's magnetosphere and enters the supermagnetosonic solar wind. In the simulation, the transition between both plasma regimes is mimicked by a reversal of the magnetic field direction as well as a change in the composition and temperature of the impinging plasma flow. When the satellite enters the solar wind, the magnetic draping pattern in its vicinity is reconfigured due to reconnection, with the characteristic time scale of this process being determined by the convection of the field lines in the undisturbed plasma flow at the flanks of the interaction region. The build-up of a bow shock ahead of Titan takes place on a typical time scale of a few minutes as well. We also analyze the erosion of the newly formed shock front upstream of Titan that commences when the moon re-enters the submagnetosonic plasma regime of Saturn's magnetosphere. Although the model presented here is far from governing the full complexity of Titan's plasma interaction during a solar wind excursion, the simulation provides important insights into general plasma-physical processes associated with such a disruptive change of the upstream flow conditions.

  11. ALEGRA-HEDP Multi-Dimensional Simulations of Z-pinch Related Physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garasi, Christopher J.

    2003-10-01

    The marriage of experimental diagnostics and computer simulations continues to enhance our understanding of the physics and dynamics associated with current-driven wire arrays. Early models that assumed the formation of an unstable, cylindrical shell of plasma due to wire merger have been replaced with a more complex picture involving wire material ablating non-uniformly along the wires, creating plasma pre-fill interior to the array before the bulk of the array collapses due to magnetic forces. Non-uniform wire ablation leads to wire breakup, which provides a mechanism for some wire material to be left behind as the bulk of the array stagnates onto the pre-fill. Once the bulk of the material has stagnated, electrical current can then shift back to the material left behind and cause it to stagnate onto the already collapsed bulk array mass. These complex effects impact the total radiation output from the wire array which is very important to application of that radiation for inertial confinement fusion. A detailed understanding of the formation and evolution of wire array perturbations is needed, especially for those which are three-dimensional in nature. Sandia National Laboratories has developed a multi-physics research code tailored to simulate high energy density physics (HEDP) environments. ALEGRA-HEDP has begun to simulate the evolution of wire arrays and has produced the highest fidelity, two-dimensional simulations of wire-array precursor ablation to date. Our three-dimensional code capability now provides us with the ability to solve for the magnetic field and current density distribution associated with the wire array and the evolution of three-dimensional effects seen experimentally. The insight obtained from these multi-dimensional simulations of wire arrays will be presented and specific simulations will be compared to experimental data.

  12. Princeton University, Plasma Physics Laboratory annual report, October 1, 1988--September 30, 1989

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1989-01-01

    This report contains discussions on the following topics: principal parameters achieved in experimental devices (FY89); tokamak fusion test reactor; compact ignition tokamak; princeton beta experiment- modification; current drive experiment; international collaboration; x-ray laser studies; spacecraft glow experiment; plasma deposition and etching of thin films; theoretical studies; tokamak modeling; international thermonuclear experimental reactor; engineering department; project planning and safety office; quality assurance and reliability; technology transfer; administrative operations; PPPL patent invention disclosures for (FY89); graduate education: plasma physics; graduate education: plasma science and technology; and Princeton Plasmas Physics Laboratory Reports (FY89).

  13. Princeton University, Plasma Physics Laboratory annual report, October 1, 1988--September 30, 1989

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1989-12-31

    This report contains discussions on the following topics: principal parameters achieved in experimental devices (FY89); tokamak fusion test reactor; compact ignition tokamak; princeton beta experiment- modification; current drive experiment; international collaboration; x-ray laser studies; spacecraft glow experiment; plasma deposition and etching of thin films; theoretical studies; tokamak modeling; international thermonuclear experimental reactor; engineering department; project planning and safety office; quality assurance and reliability; technology transfer; administrative operations; PPPL patent invention disclosures for (FY89); graduate education: plasma physics; graduate education: plasma science and technology; and Princeton Plasmas Physics Laboratory Reports (FY89).

  14. Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory. Annual report, October 1, 1989--September 30, 1990

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1990-12-31

    This report discusses the following topics: principal parameters achieved in experimental devices fiscal year 1990; tokamak fusion test reactor; compact ignition tokamak; Princeton beta experiment- modification; current drive experiment-upgrade; international collaboration; x-ray laser studies; spacecraft glow experiment; plasma processing: deposition and etching of thin films; theoretical studies; tokamak modeling; international thermonuclear experimental reactor; engineering department; project planning and safety office; quality assurance and reliability; technology transfer; administrative operations; PPPL patent invention disclosures for fiscal year 1990; graduate education; plasma physics; graduate education: plasma science and technology; science education program; and Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory reports fiscal year 1990.

  15. Global Simulations of Dynamo and Magnetorotational Instability in Madison Plasma Experiments and Astrophysical Disks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ebrahimi, Fatima [Univ. of New Hampshire, Durham, NH (United States)

    2014-07-31

    Large-scale magnetic fields have been observed in widely different types of astrophysical objects. These magnetic fields are believed to be caused by the so-called dynamo effect. Could a large-scale magnetic field grow out of turbulence (i.e. the alpha dynamo effect)? How could the topological properties and the complexity of magnetic field as a global quantity, the so called magnetic helicity, be important in the dynamo effect? In addition to understanding the dynamo mechanism in astrophysical accretion disks, anomalous angular momentum transport has also been a longstanding problem in accretion disks and laboratory plasmas. To investigate both dynamo and momentum transport, we have performed both numerical modeling of laboratory experiments that are intended to simulate nature and modeling of configurations with direct relevance to astrophysical disks. Our simulations use fluid approximations (Magnetohydrodynamics - MHD model), where plasma is treated as a single fluid, or two fluids, in the presence of electromagnetic forces. Our major physics objective is to study the possibility of magnetic field generation (so called MRI small-scale and large-scale dynamos) and its role in Magneto-rotational Instability (MRI) saturation through nonlinear simulations in both MHD and Hall regimes.

  16. Novel Prospects for Plasma Spray-Physical Vapor Deposition of Columnar Thermal Barrier Coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anwaar, Aleem; Wei, Lianglinag; Guo, Qian; Zhang, Baopeng; Guo, Hongbo

    2017-09-01

    Plasma spray-physical vapor deposition (PS-PVD) is an emerging coating technique that can produce columnar thermal barrier coatings from vapor phase. Feedstock treatment at the start of its trajectory in the plasma torch nozzle is important for such vapor-phase deposition. This study describes the effects of the plasma composition (Ar/He) on the plasma characteristics, plasma-particle interaction, and particle dynamics at different points spatially distributed inside the plasma torch nozzle. The results of calculations show that increasing the fraction of argon in the plasma gas mixture enhances the momentum and heat flow between the plasma and injected feedstock. For the plasma gas combination of 45Ar/45He, the total enthalpy transferred to a representative powder particle inside the plasma torch nozzle is highest ( 9828 kJ/kg). Moreover, due to the properties of the plasma, the contribution of the cylindrical throat, i.e., from the feed injection point (FIP) to the start of divergence (SOD), to the total transferred energy is 69%. The carrier gas flow for different plasma gas mixtures was also investigated by optical emission spectroscopy (OES) measurements of zirconium emissions. Yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) coating microstructures were produced when using selected plasma gas compositions and corresponding carrier gas flows; structural morphologies were found to be in good agreement with OES and theoretical predictions. Quasicolumnar microstructure was obtained with porosity of 15% when applying the plasma composition of 45Ar/45He.

  17. Particle based plasma simulation for an ion engine discharge chamber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahalingam, Sudhakar

    Design of the next generation of ion engines can benefit from detailed computer simulations of the plasma in the discharge chamber. In this work a complete particle based approach has been taken to model the discharge chamber plasma. This is the first time that simplifying continuum assumptions on the particle motion have not been made in a discharge chamber model. Because of the long mean free paths of the particles in the discharge chamber continuum models are questionable. The PIC-MCC model developed in this work tracks following particles: neutrals, singly charged ions, doubly charged ions, secondary electrons, and primary electrons. The trajectories of these particles are determined using the Newton-Lorentz's equation of motion including the effects of magnetic and electric fields. Particle collisions are determined using an MCC statistical technique. A large number of collision processes and particle wall interactions are included in the model. The magnetic fields produced by the permanent magnets are determined using Maxwell's equations. The electric fields are determined using an approximate input electric field coupled with a dynamic determination of the electric fields caused by the charged particles. In this work inclusion of the dynamic electric field calculation is made possible by using an inflated plasma permittivity value in the Poisson solver. This allows dynamic electric field calculation with minimal computational requirements in terms of both computer memory and run time. In addition, a number of other numerical procedures such as parallel processing have been implemented to shorten the computational time. The primary results are those modeling the discharge chamber of NASA's NSTAR ion engine at its full operating power. Convergence of numerical results such as total number of particles inside the discharge chamber, average energy of the plasma particles, discharge current, beam current and beam efficiency are obtained. Steady state results for

  18. Physical investigation of a quad confinement plasma source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knoll, Aaron; Lucca Fabris, Andrea; Young, Christopher; Cappelli, Mark

    2016-10-01

    Quad magnetic confinement plasma sources are novel magnetized DC discharges suitable for applications in a broad range of fields, particularly space propulsion, plasma etching and deposition. These sources contain a square discharge channel with magnetic cusps at the four lateral walls, enhancing plasma confinement and electron residence time inside the device. The magnetic field topology is manipulated using four independent electromagnets on each edge of the channel, tuning the properties of the generated plasma. We characterize the plasma ejected from the quad confinement sources using a combination of traditional electrostatic probes and non-intrusive laser-based diagnostics. Measurements show a strong ion acceleration layer located 8 cm downstream of the exit plane, beyond the extent of the magnetic field. The ion velocity field is investigated with different magnetic configurations, demonstrating how ion trajectories may be manipulated. C.Y. acknowledges support from the DOE NSSA Stewardship Science Graduate Fellowship under contract DE-FC52-08NA28752.

  19. Princeton University Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton, New Jersey. Annual report, October 1, 1990--September 30, 1991

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1991-12-31

    This report discusses the following topics: Principal parameters of experimental devices; Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor; Burning Plasma Experiment; Princeton Beta Experiment-Modification; Current Drive Experiment-Upgrade; International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor; International Collaboration; X-Ray Laser Studies; Hyperthermal Atomic Beam Source; Pure Electron Plasma Experiments; Plasma Processing: Deposition and Etching of Thin Films; Theoretical Studies; Tokamak Modeling; Engineering Department; Environment, Safety, and Health and Quality Assurance; Technology Transfer; Office of Human Resources and Administration; PPPL Patent Invention Disclosures; Office of Resource Management; Graduate Education: Plasma Physics; Graduate Education: Program in Plasma Science and Technology; and Science Education Program.

  20. Theoretical analysis and numerical simulation of the impulse delivering from laser-produced plasma to solid target

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yang Yan-Nan; Yang Bo; Zhu Jin-Rong; Shen Zhong-Hua; Lu Jian; Ni Xiao-Wu

    2008-01-01

    A plasma is produced in air by using a high-intensity Q-switch Nd:YAG pulsed laser to irradiate a solid target,and the impulses delivering from the plasma to the target are measured at different laser power densities. Analysing the formation process of laser plasma and the laser supported detonation wave (LSDW) and using fluid mechanics theory and Pirri's methods, an approximately theoretical solution of the impulse delivering from the plasma to the target under our experimental condition is found. Furthermore, according to the formation time of plasma and the variation of pressure in plasma in a non-equilibrium state, a physical model of the interaction between the pulse laser and the solid target is developed. The plasma evolutions with time during and after the laser pulse irradiating the target are simulated numerically by using a three-dimensional difference scheme. And the numerical solutions of the impulse delivering from the plasma to the target are obtained. A comparison among the theoretical, numerical and experimental results and their analyses are performed. The experimental results are explained reasonably. The consistency between numerical results and experimental results implies that the numerical calculation model used in this paper can well describe the mechanical action of the laser on the target.

  1. Simulation of the Physical Performance of Optical Packet Switching Nodes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王春华; 李力; 等

    2002-01-01

    A graphical and visual simulation system for the study of optical packet switching(OPS)nodes is accomplished.With the simulation system,the effect on physical performance-bit error rate(BER)due to a variety of factors such as the crosstalk parameters of OPS nodes,number of cascaded OPS nodes,length of optical output buffer,traffic load and fluctuation of amplitude of optical signals are evaluated.Reliability of the simulation system is proved by the analytical results obtained in all the above cases.

  2. Implementations of mesh refinement schemes for particle-in-cell plasma simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vay, J.-L.; Colella, P.; Friedman, A.; Grote, D.P.; McCorquodale, P.; Serafini, D.B.

    2003-10-20

    Plasma simulations are often rendered challenging by the disparity of scales in time and in space which must be resolved. When these disparities are in distinctive zones of the simulation region, a method which has proven to be effective in other areas (e.g. fluid dynamics simulations) is the mesh refinement technique. We briefly discuss the challenges posed by coupling this technique with plasma Particle-In-Cell simulations and present two implementations in more detail, with examples.

  3. Simulation of beam-induced plasma for the mitigation of beam-beam effects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ma, J.; Wang, G.; Samulyak, R.; Yu, K.; Litvinenko, V.

    2015-05-03

    One of the main challenges in the increase of luminosity of circular colliders is the control of the beam-beam effect. In the process of exploring beam-beam mitigation methods using plasma, we evaluated the possibility of plasma generation via ionization of neutral gas by proton beams, and performed highly resolved simulations of the beam-plasma interaction using SPACE, a 3D electromagnetic particle-in-cell code. The process of plasma generation is modelled using experimentally measured cross-section coefficients and a plasma recombination model that takes into account the presence of neutral gas and beam-induced electromagnetic fields. Numerically simulated plasma oscillations are consistent with theoretical analysis. In the beam-plasma interaction process, high-density neutral gas reduces the mean free path of plasma electrons and their acceleration. A numerical model for the drift speed as a limit of plasma electron velocity was developed. Simulations demonstrate a significant reduction of the beam electric field in the presence of plasma. Preliminary simulations using fully-ionized plasma have also been performed and compared with the case of beam-induced plasma.

  4. Numerical simulations of Hall-effect plasma accelerators on a magnetic-field-aligned mesh

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikellides, Ioannis G.; Katz, Ira

    2012-10-01

    The ionized gas in Hall-effect plasma accelerators spans a wide range of spatial and temporal scales, and exhibits diverse physics some of which remain elusive even after decades of research. Inside the acceleration channel a quasiradial applied magnetic field impedes the current of electrons perpendicular to it in favor of a significant component in the E×B direction. Ions are unmagnetized and, arguably, of wide collisional mean free paths. Collisions between the atomic species are rare. This paper reports on a computational approach that solves numerically the 2D axisymmetric vector form of Ohm's law with no assumptions regarding the resistance to classical electron transport in the parallel relative to the perpendicular direction. The numerical challenges related to the large disparity of the transport coefficients in the two directions are met by solving the equations on a computational mesh that is aligned with the applied magnetic field. This approach allows for a large physical domain that extends more than five times the thruster channel length in the axial direction and encompasses the cathode boundary where the lines of force can become nonisothermal. It also allows for the self-consistent solution of the plasma conservation laws near the anode boundary, and for simulations in accelerators with complex magnetic field topologies. Ions are treated as an isothermal, cold (relative to the electrons) fluid, accounting for the ion drag in the momentum equation due to ion-neutral (charge-exchange) and ion-ion collisions. The density of the atomic species is determined using an algorithm that eliminates the statistical noise associated with discrete-particle methods. Numerical simulations are presented that illustrate the impact of the above-mentioned features on our understanding of the plasma in these accelerators.

  5. Theory and Numerical Simulation of Plasma-wall Interactions in Electric Propulsion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikellides, Ioannis

    2016-10-01

    Electric propulsion (EP) can be an enabling technology for many science missions considered by NASA because it can produce high exhaust velocities, which allow for less propellant mass compared to typical chemical systems. Over the last decade two EP technologies have emerged as primary candidates for several proposed science missions, mainly due to their superior performance and proven record in space flight: the Ion and Hall thrusters. As NASA looks ahead to increasingly ambitious science goals, missions demand higher endurance from the propulsion system. So, by contrast to the early years of development of these thrusters, when the focus was on performance, considerable focus today is shifting towards extending their service life. Considering all potentially life-limiting mechanisms in Ion and Hall thrusters two are of primary concern: (a) the erosion of the acceleration channel in Hall thrusters and (b) the erosion of the hollow cathode. The plasma physics leading to material wear in these devices are uniquely challenging. For example, soon after the propellant is introduced into the hollow cathode it becomes partially ionized as it traverses a region of electron emission. Electron emission involves highly non-linear boundary conditions. Also, the sheath size is typically many times smaller than the characteristic physical scale of the device, yet energy gained by ions through the sheath must be accounted for in the erosion calculations. The plasma-material interactions in Hall thruster channels pose similar challenges that are further exacerbated by the presence of a strong applied magnetic field. In this presentation several complexities associated with plasma-wall interactions in EP will be discussed and numerical simulation results of key plasma properties in two examples, Hall thrusters and hollow cathodes, will be presented.

  6. Route complexity and simulated physical ageing negatively influence wayfinding

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zijlstra, Emma; Hagedoorn, Mariet; Krijnen, Wim P.; Schans, van der Cornelis; Mobach, Mark P.

    The aim of this age-simulation field experiment was to assess the influence of route complexity and physical ageing on wayfinding. Seventy-five people (aged 18-28) performed a total of 108 wayfinding tasks (i.e., 42 participants performed two wayfinding tasks and 33 performed one wayfinding task),

  7. Visible Light Communication Physical Layer Design for Jist Simulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomaš Boris

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Current advances in computer networking consider using visible light spectrum to encode and decode digital data. This approach is relatively non expensive. However, designing appropriate MAC or any other upper layer protocol for Visible Light Communication (VLC requires appropriate hardware. This paper proposes and implements such hardware simulation (physical layer that is compatible with existing network stack.

  8. LTE Physical Layer DL Simulator & PSS Detection Algorithm Evaluation Using the LTE DL Simulator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    PVND Prasad

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available TheLTE PHY simulator will be able to implement all the processes of physical layer in less time and more accuracy.The simulator presented here can be done for any bandwidth, channel models and modulation schemes. This paper presents synchronizing algorithm withdownsampledsynchronizing signals and shows the results on several channels.

  9. A Variational Formulation of Macro-Particle Algorithms for Kinetic Plasma Simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shadwick, B. A.

    2013-10-01

    Macro-particle based simulations methods are in widespread use in plasma physics; their computational efficiency and intuitive nature are largely responsible for their longevity. In the main, these algorithms are formulated by approximating the continuous equations of motion. For systems governed by a variational principle (such as collisionless plasmas), approximations of the equations of motion is known to introduce anomalous behavior, especially in system invariants. We present a variational formulation of particle algorithms for plasma simulation based on a reduction of the distribution function onto a finite collection of macro-particles. As in the usual Particle-In-Cell (PIC) formulation, these macro-particles have a definite momentum and are spatially extended. The primary advantage of this approach is the preservation of the link between symmetries and conservation laws. For example, nothing in the reduction introduces explicit time dependence to the system and, therefore, the continuous-time equations of motion exactly conserve energy; thus, these models are free of grid-heating. In addition, the variational formulation allows for constructing models of arbitrary spatial and temporal order. In contrast, the overall accuracy of the usual PIC algorithm is at most second due to the nature of the force interpolation between the gridded field quantities and the (continuous) particle position. Again in contrast to the usual PIC algorithm, here the macro-particle shape is arbitrary; the spatial extent is completely decoupled from both the grid-size and the ``smoothness'' of the shape; smoother particle shapes are not necessarily larger. For simplicity, we restrict our discussion to one-dimensional, non-relativistic, un-magnetized, electrostatic plasmas. We comment on the extension to the electromagnetic case. Supported by the US DoE under contract numbers DE-FG02-08ER55000 and DE-SC0008382.

  10. A mathematical model and simulation results of plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition of silicon nitride films

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Konakov, S.A.; Krzhizhanovskaya, V.V.

    2015-01-01

    We developed a mathematical model of Plasma Enhanced Chemical Vapor Deposition (PECVD) of silicon nitride thin films from SiH4-NH3-N2-Ar mixture, an important application in modern materials science. Our multiphysics model describes gas dynamics, chemical physics, plasma physics and electrodynamics.

  11. Coupled neoclassical-magnetohydrodynamic simulations of axisymmetric plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyons, Brendan C.

    2014-10-01

    Neoclassical effects (e.g., the bootstrap current and neoclassical toroidal viscosity [NTV]) have a profound impact on many magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) instabilities, including tearing modes, edge-localized modes (ELMs), and resistive wall modes. High-fidelity simulations of such phenomena require a multiphysics code that self-consistently couples the kinetic and fluid models. We present the first results of the DK4D code, a dynamic drift-kinetic equation (DKE) solver being developed for this application. In this study, DK4D solves a set of time-dependent, axisymmetric DKEs for the non-Maxwellian part of the electron and ion distribution functions (fNM) with linearized Fokker-Planck-Landau collision operators. The plasma is formally assumed to be in the low- to finite-collisionality regimes. The form of the DKEs used were derived in a Chapman-Enskog-like fashion, ensuring that fNM carries no density, momentum, or temperature. Rather, these quantities are contained within the background Maxwellian and are evolved by an appropriate set of extended MHD equations. We will discuss computational methods used and benchmarks to other neoclassical models and codes. Furthermore, DK4D has been coupled to a reduced, transport-timescale MHD code, allowing for self-consistent simulations of the dynamic formation of the ohmic and bootstrap currents. Several applications of this hybrid code will be presented, including an ELM-like pressure collapse. We will also discuss plans for coupling to the spatially three-dimensional, extended MHD code M3D-C1 and generalizing to nonaxisymmetric geometries, with the goal of performing self-consistent hybrid simulations of tokamak instabilities and calculations of NTV torque. This work supported by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) under Grant Numbers DE-FC02-08ER54969 and DE-AC02-09CH11466.

  12. Physics-electrical hybrid model for real time impedance matching and remote plasma characterization in RF plasma sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sudhir, Dass; Bandyopadhyay, M.; Chakraborty, A.

    2016-02-01

    Plasma characterization and impedance matching are an integral part of any radio frequency (RF) based plasma source. In long pulse operation, particularly in high power operation where plasma load may vary due to different reasons (e.g. pressure and power), online tuning of impedance matching circuit and remote plasma density estimation are very useful. In some cases, due to remote interfaces, radio activation and, due to maintenance issues, power probes are not allowed to be incorporated in the ion source design for plasma characterization. Therefore, for characterization and impedance matching, more remote schemes are envisaged. Two such schemes by the same authors are suggested in these regards, which are based on air core transformer model of inductive coupled plasma (ICP) [M. Bandyopadhyay et al., Nucl. Fusion 55, 033017 (2015); D. Sudhir et al., Rev. Sci. Instrum. 85, 013510 (2014)]. However, the influence of the RF field interaction with the plasma to determine its impedance, a physics code HELIC [D. Arnush, Phys. Plasmas 7, 3042 (2000)] is coupled with the transformer model. This model can be useful for both types of RF sources, i.e., ICP and helicon sources.

  13. Physics-electrical hybrid model for real time impedance matching and remote plasma characterization in RF plasma sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sudhir, Dass, E-mail: dass.sudhir@iter-india.org; Bandyopadhyay, M.; Chakraborty, A. [ITER-India, Institute for Plasma Research, A-29 GIDC, Sec-25, Gandhinagar, 382016 Gujarat (India)

    2016-02-15

    Plasma characterization and impedance matching are an integral part of any radio frequency (RF) based plasma source. In long pulse operation, particularly in high power operation where plasma load may vary due to different reasons (e.g. pressure and power), online tuning of impedance matching circuit and remote plasma density estimation are very useful. In some cases, due to remote interfaces, radio activation and, due to maintenance issues, power probes are not allowed to be incorporated in the ion source design for plasma characterization. Therefore, for characterization and impedance matching, more remote schemes are envisaged. Two such schemes by the same authors are suggested in these regards, which are based on air core transformer model of inductive coupled plasma (ICP) [M. Bandyopadhyay et al., Nucl. Fusion 55, 033017 (2015); D. Sudhir et al., Rev. Sci. Instrum. 85, 013510 (2014)]. However, the influence of the RF field interaction with the plasma to determine its impedance, a physics code HELIC [D. Arnush, Phys. Plasmas 7, 3042 (2000)] is coupled with the transformer model. This model can be useful for both types of RF sources, i.e., ICP and helicon sources.

  14. Physics-electrical hybrid model for real time impedance matching and remote plasma characterization in RF plasma sources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sudhir, Dass; Bandyopadhyay, M; Chakraborty, A

    2016-02-01

    Plasma characterization and impedance matching are an integral part of any radio frequency (RF) based plasma source. In long pulse operation, particularly in high power operation where plasma load may vary due to different reasons (e.g. pressure and power), online tuning of impedance matching circuit and remote plasma density estimation are very useful. In some cases, due to remote interfaces, radio activation and, due to maintenance issues, power probes are not allowed to be incorporated in the ion source design for plasma characterization. Therefore, for characterization and impedance matching, more remote schemes are envisaged. Two such schemes by the same authors are suggested in these regards, which are based on air core transformer model of inductive coupled plasma (ICP) [M. Bandyopadhyay et al., Nucl. Fusion 55, 033017 (2015); D. Sudhir et al., Rev. Sci. Instrum. 85, 013510 (2014)]. However, the influence of the RF field interaction with the plasma to determine its impedance, a physics code HELIC [D. Arnush, Phys. Plasmas 7, 3042 (2000)] is coupled with the transformer model. This model can be useful for both types of RF sources, i.e., ICP and helicon sources.

  15. Hygrothermal Numerical Simulation Tools Applied to Building Physics

    CERN Document Server

    Delgado, João M P Q; Ramos, Nuno M M; Freitas, Vasco Peixoto

    2013-01-01

    This book presents a critical review on the development and application of hygrothermal analysis methods to simulate the coupled transport processes of Heat, Air, and Moisture (HAM) transfer for one or multidimensional cases. During the past few decades there has been relevant development in this field of study and an increase in the professional use of tools that simulate some of the physical phenomena that are involved in Heat, Air and Moisture conditions in building components or elements. Although there is a significant amount of hygrothermal models referred in the literature, the vast majority of them are not easily available to the public outside the institutions where they were developed, which restricts the analysis of this book to only 14 hygrothermal modelling tools. The special features of this book are (a) a state-of-the-art of numerical simulation tools applied to building physics, (b) the boundary conditions importance, (c) the material properties, namely, experimental methods for the measuremen...

  16. Computational physics simulation of classical and quantum systems

    CERN Document Server

    Scherer, Philipp O J

    2017-01-01

    This textbook presents basic numerical methods and applies them to a large variety of physical models in multiple computer experiments. Classical algorithms and more recent methods are explained. Partial differential equations are treated generally comparing important methods, and equations of motion are solved by a large number of simple as well as more sophisticated methods. Several modern algorithms for quantum wavepacket motion are compared. The first part of the book discusses the basic numerical methods, while the second part simulates classical and quantum systems. Simple but non-trivial examples from a broad range of physical topics offer readers insights into the numerical treatment but also the simulated problems. Rotational motion is studied in detail, as are simple quantum systems. A two-level system in an external field demonstrates elementary principles from quantum optics and simulation of a quantum bit. Principles of molecular dynamics are shown. Modern bounda ry element methods are presented ...

  17. Some problems of pulsar physics. [magnetospheric plasma model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arons, J.

    1979-01-01

    The theories of particle acceleration along polar field lines are reviewed, and the total energization of the charge separated plasma is summarized, when pair creation is absent. The application of these theories and plasma supply to pulsars is discussed, with attention given to the total amount of electron-positron plasma created and its momentum distribution. Various aspects of radiation emission and transport are analyzed, based on a polar current flow model with pair creation, and the phenomenon of marching subpulses is considered. The coronation beaming and the relativistically expanding current sheet models for pulsar emission are also outlined, and the paper concludes with a brief discussion of the relation between the theories of polar flow with pair plasma and the problem of the energization of the Crab Nebula.

  18. Learning from physics-based earthquake simulators: a minimal approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Artale Harris, Pietro; Marzocchi, Warner; Melini, Daniele

    2017-04-01

    Physics-based earthquake simulators are aimed to generate synthetic seismic catalogs of arbitrary length, accounting for fault interaction, elastic rebound, realistic fault networks, and some simple earthquake nucleation process like rate and state friction. Through comparison of synthetic and real catalogs seismologists can get insights on the earthquake occurrence process. Moreover earthquake simulators can be used to to infer some aspects of the statistical behavior of earthquakes within the simulated region, by analyzing timescales not accessible through observations. The develoment of earthquake simulators is commonly led by the approach "the more physics, the better", pushing seismologists to go towards simulators more earth-like. However, despite the immediate attractiveness, we argue that this kind of approach makes more and more difficult to understand which physical parameters are really relevant to describe the features of the seismic catalog at which we are interested. For this reason, here we take an opposite minimal approach and analyze the behavior of a purposely simple earthquake simulator applied to a set of California faults. The idea is that a simple model may be more informative than a complex one for some specific scientific objectives, because it is more understandable. The model has three main components: the first one is a realistic tectonic setting, i.e., a fault dataset of California; the other two components are quantitative laws for earthquake generation on each single fault, and the Coulomb Failure Function for modeling fault interaction. The final goal of this work is twofold. On one hand, we aim to identify the minimum set of physical ingredients that can satisfactorily reproduce the features of the real seismic catalog, such as short-term seismic cluster, and to investigate on the hypothetical long-term behavior, and faults synchronization. On the other hand, we want to investigate the limits of predictability of the model itself.

  19. Numerical Simulations of Collisionless Shock Formation in Merging Plasma Jet Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-01

    experiment [5], which uses counter-propagating hydrogen plasma jets formed and launched by plasma railguns [11] mounted on opposite sides of a...hydrogen plasma jet propagating from the railgun nozzle to the center of the chamber in order to connect the plasma jet parameters at the railgun exit...the jet at the railgun exit and center of the chamber (z = 0 cm) are given in Table 1. So this simulation determines the approximate parameter regime

  20. EDITORIAL: Invited papers from the 15th International Congress on Plasma Physics combined with the 13th Latin American Workshop on Plasma Physics Invited papers from the 15th International Congress on Plasma Physics combined with the 13th Latin American Workshop on Plasma Physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soto, Leopoldo

    2011-07-01

    The International Advisory Committee of the 15th International Congress on Plasma Physics (ICPP 2010) and the International Advisory Committee of the 13th Latin American Workshop on Plasma Physics (LAWPP 2010) both agreed to hold this combined meeting ICPP-LAWPP-2010 in Santiago de Chile, 8-13 August 2010, considering the celebration of the Bicentennial of Chilean Independence. ICPP-LAWPP-2010 was organized by the Thermonuclear Plasma Department of the Chilean Nuclear Energy Commission (CCHEN) as part of its official program, within the framework of the Chilean Bicentennial activities. This event was also a scientific and academic activity of the project `Center for Research and Applications in Plasma Physics and Pulsed Power, P4', supported by the National Scientific and Technological Commission, CONICYT-Chile, under grant ACT-26. The International Congress on Plasma Physics was first held in Nagoya in 1980, and was followed by: Gothenburg (1982), Lausanne (1984), Kiev (1987), New Delhi (1989), Innsbruck (1992), Foz do Iguacu (1994), Nagoya (1996), Prague (1998), Quebec City (2000), Sydney (2002), Nice (2004), Kiev (2006) and Fukuoka (2008). The purpose of the Congress is to discuss recent progress and outlooks in plasma science, covering fundamental plasma physics, fusion plasmas, astrophysical plasmas, plasma applications, etc. The Latin American Workshop on Plasma Physics was first held in 1982 in Cambuquira, Brazil, followed by: Medellín (1985), Santiago (1988), Buenos Aires (1990), Mexico City (1992), Foz do Iguacu (1994, also combined with ICPP), Caracas (1997), Tandil (1998), La Serena (2000), Sao Pedro (2003), Mexico City (2005) and Caracas (2007). The purpose of the Latin American Workshop on Plasma Physics is to provide a forum in which the achievements of the Latin American plasma physics communities can be displayed, as well as to foster collaboration between plasma scientists within the region and elsewhere. The Program of ICPP-LAWPP-2010 included