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Sample records for plasma physics principles

  1. Laser Plasma Physics - Forces and Nonlinear Principle

    CERN Document Server

    Hora, Heinrich

    2014-01-01

    This work is an electronic pre-publication of a book manuscript being under consideration in order to provide information to interested researchers about a review of mechanical forces in plasmas by electro-dynamic fields. Beginning with Kelvin's ponderomotive force of 1845 in electrostatics, the hydrodynamic force in a plasma is linked with quadratic force quantities of electric and magnetic fields. Hydrodynamics is interlinked with single particle motion of plasma particles electric field generation and double layers and sheaths due to properties of inhomogeneous plasmas. Consequences relate to laser driven particle acceleration and fusion energy. Beyond the very broad research field of fusion using nanosecond laser pulses based on thermodynamics, the new picosecond pulses of ultrahigh power opened a categorically different non-thermal interaction finally permitting proton-boron fusion with eliminating problems of nuclear radiation.

  2. Extreme Scale Computing for First-Principles Plasma Physics Research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, Choogn-Seock [Princeton University

    2011-10-12

    World superpowers are in the middle of the “Computnik” race. US Department of Energy (and National Nuclear Security Administration) wishes to launch exascale computer systems into the scientific (and national security) world by 2018. The objective is to solve important scientific problems and to predict the outcomes using the most fundamental scientific laws, which would not be possible otherwise. Being chosen into the next “frontier” group can be of great benefit to a scientific discipline. An extreme scale computer system requires different types of algorithms and programming philosophy from those we have been accustomed to. Only a handful of scientific codes are blessed to be capable of scalable usage of today’s largest computers in operation at petascale (using more than 100,000 cores concurrently). Fortunately, a few magnetic fusion codes are competing well in this race using the “first principles” gyrokinetic equations.These codes are beginning to study the fusion plasma dynamics in full-scale realistic diverted device geometry in natural nonlinear multiscale, including the large scale neoclassical and small scale turbulence physics, but excluding some ultra fast dynamics. In this talk, most of the above mentioned topics will be introduced at executive level. Representative properties of the extreme scale computers, modern programming exercises to take advantage of them, and different philosophies in the data flows and analyses will be presented. Examples of the multi-scale multi-physics scientific discoveries made possible by solving the gyrokinetic equations on extreme scale computers will be described. Future directions into “virtual tokamak experiments” will also be discussed.

  3. Fusion plasma physics

    CERN Document Server

    Stacey, Weston M

    2012-01-01

    This revised and enlarged second edition of the popular textbook and reference contains comprehensive treatments of both the established foundations of magnetic fusion plasma physics and of the newly developing areas of active research. It concludes with a look ahead to fusion power reactors of the future. The well-established topics of fusion plasma physics -- basic plasma phenomena, Coulomb scattering, drifts of charged particles in magnetic and electric fields, plasma confinement by magnetic fields, kinetic and fluid collective plasma theories, plasma equilibria and flux surface geometry, plasma waves and instabilities, classical and neoclassical transport, plasma-materials interactions, radiation, etc. -- are fully developed from first principles through to the computational models employed in modern plasma physics. The new and emerging topics of fusion plasma physics research -- fluctuation-driven plasma transport and gyrokinetic/gyrofluid computational methodology, the physics of the divertor, neutral ...

  4. Principles of modern physics

    CERN Document Server

    Saxena, A K

    2014-01-01

    Principles of Modern Physics, divided into twenty one chapters, begins with quantum ideas followed by discussions on special relativity, atomic structure, basic quantum mechanics, hydrogen atom (and Schrodinger equation) and periodic table, the three statistical distributions, X-rays, physics of solids, imperfections in crystals, magnetic properties of materials, superconductivity, Zeeman-, Stark- and Paschen Back- effects, Lasers, Nuclear physics (Yukawa's meson theory and various nuclear models), radioactivity and nuclear reactions, nuclear fission, fusion and plasma, particle accelerators and detectors, the universe, Elementary particles (classification, eight fold way and quark model, standard model and fundamental interactions), cosmic rays, deuteron problem in nuclear physics, and cathode ray oscilloscope. NEW TO THE FOURTH EDITION: The CO2 Laser Theory of magnetic moments on the basis of shell model Geological dating Laser Induced fusion and laser fusion reactor. Hawking radiation The cosmological red ...

  5. Plasma physics

    CERN Document Server

    Drummond, James E

    2013-01-01

    A historic snapshot of the field of plasma physics, this fifty-year-old volume offers an edited collection of papers by pioneering experts in the field. In addition to assisting students in their understanding of the foundations of classical plasma physics, it provides a source of historic context for modern physicists. Highly successful upon its initial publication, this book was the standard text on plasma physics throughout the 1960s and 70s.Hailed by Science magazine as a ""well executed venture,"" the three-part treatment ranges from basic plasma theory to magnetohydrodynamics and microwa

  6. Basic plasma physics

    CERN Document Server

    Ghosh, Basudev

    2014-01-01

    Basic Plasma Physics is designed to serve as an introductory compact textbook for advanced undergraduate, postgraduate and research students taking plasma physics as one of their subject of study for the first time. It covers the current syllabus of plasma physics offered by the most universities and technical institutions. The book requires no background in plasma physics but only elementary knowledge of basic physics and mathematics. Emphasis has been given on the analytical approach. Topics are developed from first principle so that the students can learn through self-study. One chapter has been devoted to describe some practical aspects of plasma physics. Each chapter contains a good number of solved and unsolved problems and a variety of review questions, mostly taken from recent examination papers. Some classroom experiments described in the book will surely help students as well as instructors.

  7. Plasma physics

    CERN Document Server

    Cairns, R A

    1985-01-01

    This book is intended as an introduction to plasma physics at a level suitable for advanced undergraduates or beginning postgraduate students in physics, applied mathematics or astrophysics. The main prerequisite is a knowledge of electromagnetism and of the associated mathematics of vector calculus. SI units are used throughout. There is still a tendency amongst some plasma physics researchers to· cling to C.g.S. units, but it is the author's view that universal adoption of SI units, which have been the internationally agreed standard since 1960, is to be encouraged. After a short introductory chapter, the basic properties of a plasma con­ cerning particle orbits, fluid theory, Coulomb collisions and waves are set out in Chapters 2-5, with illustrations drawn from problems in nuclear fusion research and space physics. The emphasis is on the essential physics involved and (he theoretical and mathematical approach has been kept as simple and intuitive as possible. An attempt has been made to draw attention t...

  8. Variational principles in physics

    CERN Document Server

    Basdevant, Jean-Louis

    2007-01-01

    Optimization under constraints is an essential part of everyday life. Indeed, we routinely solve problems by striking a balance between contradictory interests, individual desires and material contingencies. This notion of equilibrium was dear to thinkers of the enlightenment, as illustrated by Montesquieu’s famous formulation: "In all magistracies, the greatness of the power must be compensated by the brevity of the duration." Astonishingly, natural laws are guided by a similar principle. Variational principles have proven to be surprisingly fertile. For example, Fermat used variational methods to demonstrate that light follows the fastest route from one point to another, an idea which came to be known as Fermat’s principle, a cornerstone of geometrical optics. Variational Principles in Physics explains variational principles and charts their use throughout modern physics. The heart of the book is devoted to the analytical mechanics of Lagrange and Hamilton, the basic tools of any physicist. Prof. Basdev...

  9. Nonthermal plasma chemistry and physics

    CERN Document Server

    Meichsner, Jurgen; Schneider, Ralf; Wagner, Hans-Erich

    2013-01-01

    In addition to introducing the basics of plasma physics, Nonthermal Plasma Chemistry and Physics is a comprehensive presentation of recent developments in the rapidly growing field of nonthermal plasma chemistry. The book offers a detailed discussion of the fundamentals of plasma chemical reactions and modeling, nonthermal plasma sources, relevant diagnostic techniques, and selected applications.Elucidating interconnections and trends, the book focuses on basic principles and illustrations across a broad field of applications. Expert contributors address environmental aspects of plasma chemist

  10. Principles & practice of physics

    CERN Document Server

    Mazur, Eric; Dourmashkin, Peter A; Pedigo, Daryl; Bieniek, Ronald J

    2015-01-01

    Putting physics first Based on his storied research and teaching, Eric Mazur's Principles & Practice of Physics builds an understanding of physics that is both thorough and accessible. Unique organization and pedagogy allow you to develop a true conceptual understanding of physics alongside the quantitative skills needed in the course. *New learning architecture: The book is structured to help you learn physics in an organized way that encourages comprehension and reduces distraction.*Physics on a contemporary foundation: Traditional texts delay the introduction of ideas that we now see as unifying and foundational. This text builds physics on those unifying foundations, helping you to develop an understanding that is stronger, deeper, and fundamentally simpler.*Research-based instruction: This text uses a range of research-based instructional techniques to teach physics in the most effective manner possible. The result is a groundbreaking book that puts physics first, thereby making it more accessible to...

  11. The Framework of Plasma Physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cowley, Steven

    There have been relatively few good textbooks on plasma physics. Most become simple reference books that might be titled, “Plasma Physics Recipes.” Despite their utility such books do not make good textbooks. For teaching, one needs a book that shows how the basic results and models are part of a coherent whole. Richard Hazeltine and Francois Waelbroeck have written such a textbook: The Framework of Plasma PhysicsAn this book, plasma physics is developed carefully and logically from basic physics principles. The book is not, however, overly formal; physical arguments are used to reduce mathematical complexity.

  12. Plasma physics and engineering

    CERN Document Server

    Fridman, Alexander

    2011-01-01

    Part I: Fundamentals of Plasma Physics and Plasma ChemistryPlasma in Nature, in the Laboratory, and in IndustryOccurrence of Plasma: Natural and Man MadeGas DischargesPlasma Applications, Plasmas in IndustryPlasma Applications for Environmental ControlPlasma Applications in Energy ConversionPlasma Application for Material ProcessingBreakthrough Plasma Applications in Modern TechnologyElementary Processes of Charged Species in PlasmaElementary Charged Particles in Plasma and Their Elastic and Inelastic CollisionsIonization ProcessesMechanisms of Electron Losses: The Electron-Ion RecombinationEl

  13. Plasma physics an introduction

    CERN Document Server

    Fitzpatrick, Richard

    2014-01-01

    Plasma Physics: An Introduction is based on a series of university course lectures by a leading name in the field, and thoroughly covers the physics of the fourth state of matter. This book looks at non-relativistic, fully ionized, nondegenerate, quasi-neutral, and weakly coupled plasma. Intended for the student market, the text provides a concise and cohesive introduction to plasma physics theory, and offers a solid foundation for students wishing to take higher level courses in plasma physics.

  14. Reviews of plasma physics

    CERN Document Server

    2008-01-01

    "Reviews of Plasma Physics Volume 24," edited by V.D. Shafranov, presents two reviews from the cutting-edge of Russian plasma physics research. The first review by V.A. Rozhansky devoted to the mechanisms of transverse conductivity and generation of self-consistent electric fields in strongly ionized magnetized plasma. The second review by O.G. Bakunin considers numerous aspects of turbulent transport in plasma and fluids. This review is focused on scaling arguments for describing anomalous diffusion in the presence of complex structures. These topics are especially important for fusion plasma research, plasma astrophysics, discharge physics, and turbulence

  15. Reviews of plasma physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shafranov, Vitalii Dmitrievich (ed.); Bakunin, Oleg G. (comps.) [Rossijskij Nauchnyj Tsentr ' ' Kurchatovskij Inst.' ' , Moscow (Russian Federation). Nuclear Fusion Inst.; Rozhansky, V. [St. Petersburg State Polytechnical Univ. (Russian Federation)

    2008-07-01

    Reviews of Plasma Physics Volume 24, edited by V.D. Shafranov, presents two reviews from the cutting-edge of Russian plasma physics research. The first review by V.A. Rozhansky devoted to the mechanisms of transverse conductivity and generation of self-consistent electric fields in strongly ionized magnetized plasma. The second review by O.G. Bakunin considers numerous aspects of turbulent transport in plasma and fluids. This review is focused on scaling arguments for describing anomalous diffusion in the presence of complex structures. These topics are especially important for fusion plasma research, plasma astrophysics, discharge physics, and turbulence (orig.)

  16. Physical principles in chemoreception

    CERN Document Server

    Wiegel, Frederik W

    1991-01-01

    Is it not sheer foolishness to try to apply the methods of theoretical physics to biological structures? Physics flowered because it limited itself to the study of very simple systems; on the other hand, the essence of "living things" seems to have to do with the extreme intricacy of their structure. Is it a hopeless endeavour to attempt to bring the two together, or should one try nevertheless? Most of my colleagues in theoretical physics feel one should not waste one's time and stick to "the good old hydrogen atom", but some of them feel one should try anyhow. This minority point of view was shared by Bohr in the thirties, Schrödinger in the fourties, Delbrück in the fifties and sixties, PurceIl in the seventies, etc. The theory of chemoreception represents only a very small part of this immense scientific question. Its study was started by Delbriick and others in the fifties. I was introduced to these problems by Charles DeLisi, during a visit to the National Institutes of Health in the summer of 1980. D...

  17. Plasma Physics An Introduction to Laboratory, Space, and Fusion Plasmas

    CERN Document Server

    Piel, Alexander

    2010-01-01

    Plasma Physics gives a comprehensive introduction to the basic processes in plasmas and demonstrates that the same fundamental concepts describe cold gas-discharge plasmas, space plasmas, and hot fusion plasmas. Starting from particle drifts in magnetic fields, the principles of magnetic confinement fusion are explained and compared with laser fusion. Collective processes are discussed in terms of plasma waves and instabilities. The concepts of plasma description by magnetohydrodynamics, kinetic theory, and particle simulation are stepwise introduced. Space charge effects in sheath regions, double layers and plasma diodes are given the necessary attention. The new fundamental mechanisms of dusty plasmas are explored and integrated into the framework of conventional plasmas. The book concludes with a brief introduction to plasma discharges. Written by an internationally renowned researcher in experimental plasma physics, the text keeps the mathematical apparatus simple and emphasizes the underlying concepts. T...

  18. Nonlinear Physics of Plasmas

    CERN Document Server

    Kono, Mitsuo

    2010-01-01

    A nonlinearity is one of the most important notions in modern physics. A plasma is rich in nonlinearities and provides a variety of behaviors inherent to instabilities, coherent wave structures and turbulence. The book covers the basic concepts and mathematical methods, necessary to comprehend nonlinear problems widely encountered in contemporary plasmas, but also in other fields of physics and current research on self-organized structures and magnetized plasma turbulence. The analyses make use of strongly nonlinear models solved by analytical techniques backed by extensive simulations and available experiments. The text is written for senior undergraduates, graduate students, lecturers and researchers in laboratory, space and fusion plasmas.

  19. Physics of Plasmas

    CERN Document Server

    Woods, Leslie Colin

    2003-01-01

    A short, self-sufficient introduction to the physics of plasma for beginners as well as researchers in a number of fields. The author looks at the dynamics and stability of magnetoplasma and discusses wave and transport in this medium. He also looks at such applications as fusion research using magnetic confinement of Deuterium plasma, solar physics with its plasma loops reaching high into the corona, sunspots and solar wind, engineering applications to metallurgy, MHD direct generation of electricity, and railguns, finally touching on the relatively new and difficult subject of dusty plasmas.

  20. Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1990-01-01

    This report discusses the following topics: principal parameters achieved in experimental devices fiscal year 1990; tokamak fusion test reactor; compact ignition tokamak; Princeton beta experiment- modification; current drive experiment-upgrade; international collaboration; x-ray laser studies; spacecraft glow experiment; plasma processing: deposition and etching of thin films; theoretical studies; tokamak modeling; international thermonuclear experimental reactor; engineering department; project planning and safety office; quality assurance and reliability; technology transfer; administrative operations; PPPL patent invention disclosures for fiscal year 1990; graduate education; plasma physics; graduate education: plasma science and technology; science education program; and Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory reports fiscal year 1990.

  1. Physical Consequences of Mathematical Principles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Comay E.

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Physical consequences are derived from the following mathematical structures: the variational principle, Wigner’s classifications of the irreducible representations of the Poincar ́ e group and the duality invariance of the homogeneous Maxwell equations. The analysis is carried out within the validity domain of special relativity. Hierarchical re- lations between physical theories are used. Some new results are pointed out together with their comparison with experimental data. It is also predicted that a genuine Higgs particle will not be detected.

  2. Solar Physics - Plasma Physics Workshop

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baum, P. J.; Beckers, J. M.; Newman, C. E.; Priest, E. R.; Rosenberg, H.; Smith, D. F.; Sturrock, P. A.; Wentzel, D. G.

    1974-01-01

    A summary of the proceedings of a conference whose purpose was to explore plasma physics problems which arise in the study of solar physics is provided. Sessions were concerned with specific questions including the following: (1) whether the solar plasma is thermal or non-themal; (2) what spectroscopic data is required; (3) what types of magnetic field structures exist; (4) whether magnetohydrodynamic instabilities occur; (5) whether resistive or non-magnetohydrodynamic instabilities occur; (6) what mechanisms of particle acceleration have been proposed; and (7) what information is available concerning shock waves. Very few questions were answered categorically but, for each question, there was discussion concerning the observational evidence, theoretical analyses, and existing or potential laboratory and numerical experiments.

  3. Plasma physics an introduction to laboratory, space, and fusion plasmas

    CERN Document Server

    Piel, Alexander

    2017-01-01

    The enlarged new edition of this textbook provides a comprehensive introduction to the basic processes in plasmas and demonstrates that the same fundamental concepts describe cold gas-discharge plasmas, space plasmas, and hot fusion plasmas. Starting from particle drifts in magnetic fields, the principles of magnetic confinement fusion are explained and compared with laser fusion. Collective processes are discussed in terms of plasma waves and instabilities. The concepts of plasma description by magnetohydrodynamics, kinetic theory, and particle simulation are stepwise introduced. Space charge effects in sheath regions, double layers and plasma diodes are given the necessary attention. The novel fundamental mechanisms of dusty plasmas are explored and integrated into the framework of conventional plasmas. The book concludes with a concise description of modern plasma discharges. Written by an internationally renowned researcher in experimental plasma physics, the text keeps the mathematical apparatus simple a...

  4. Physical acoustics principles and methods

    CERN Document Server

    Mason, Warren P

    1964-01-01

    Physical Acoustics: Principles and Methods, Volume l-Part A focuses on high frequency sound waves in gases, liquids, and solids that have been proven as powerful tools in analyzing the molecular, defect, domain wall, and other types of motions. The selection first tackles wave propagation in fluids and normal solids and guided wave propagation in elongated cylinders and plates. Discussions focus on fundamentals of continuum mechanics; small-amplitude waves in a linear viscoelastic medium; representation of oscillations and waves; and special effects associated with guided elastic waves in plat

  5. Space plasma physics: I - Stationary processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasegawa, Akira; Sato, Tetsuya

    1989-01-01

    The physics of stationary processes in space plasmas is examined theoretically in an introduction intended for graduate students. The approach involves the extensive use of numerical simulations. Chapters are devoted to fundamental principles, small-amplitude waves, and the stationary solar plasma system; typical measurement data and simulation results are presented graphically.

  6. Solar flares. [plasma physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rust, D. M.

    1979-01-01

    The present paper deals with explosions in a magnetized solar plasma, known as flares, whose effects are seen throughout the electromagnetic spectrum, from gamma-rays through the visible and to the radio band. The diverse phenomena associated with flares are discussed, along with the physical mechanisms that have been advanced to explain them. The impact of solar flare research on the development of plasma physics and magnetohydrodynamics is noted. The rapid development of solar flare research during the past 20 years, owing to the availability of high-resolution images, detailed magnetic field measurements, and improved spectral data, is illustrated.

  7. Computations in Plasma Physics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Bruce I.; Killeen, John

    1983-01-01

    Discusses contributions of computers to research in magnetic and inertial-confinement fusion, charged-particle-beam propogation, and space sciences. Considers use in design/control of laboratory and spacecraft experiments and in data acquisition; and reviews major plasma computational methods and some of the important physics problems they…

  8. Fundamentals of plasma physics

    CERN Document Server

    Bittencourt, J A

    1986-01-01

    A general introduction designed to present a comprehensive, logical and unified treatment of the fundamentals of plasma physics based on statistical kinetic theory. Its clarity and completeness make it suitable for self-learning and self-paced courses. Problems are included.

  9. Theoretical plasma physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boozer, A. H.; Vahala, G. M.

    1992-05-01

    Work during the past year in the areas of classical and anomalous transport, three-dimensional equilibria, divertor physics, and diagnostic techniques using waves is reported. Although much work was done on classical transport, the validity of the guiding-center drift equations, which are the basis of much of the theory, has received little attention. The limitations of the drift approximation are being studied. Work on three-dimensional equilibria, which shows that quasi-helical symmetry is broken in third order in the inverse aspect ratio, on the modification of the current profile due to tearing modes was completed. This work is relevant to the maintenance of a steady-state tokamak by the bootstrap current. Divertor physics is a primary area that required development for ITER. One of the few methods by which the physics of the divertor can be modified or controlled is magnetic perturbations. The effect of magnetic perturbations on the divertor scrapeoff layer in collaboration with Hampton University is being studied. The evolution of magnetic field embedded in a moving plasma is a dynamics problem of potential importance. Renormalization techniques gave important insights first in the theory of phase transitions. The applications of these techniques has extended to many areas of physics, including turbulence in fluids and plasmas. Essentially no diagnostics for magnetic fluctuations inside a fusion-grade plasma exist. A collaborative program with Old Dominion University and the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory to develop such a diagnostic based on the conversion of electromagnetic waves from the ordinary to the extraordinary mode is underway.

  10. Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory:

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Phillips, C.A. (ed.)

    1986-01-01

    This paper discusses progress on experiments at the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory. The projects and areas discussed are: Principal Parameters Achieved in Experimental Devices, Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor, Princeton Large Torus, Princeton Beta Experiment, S-1 Spheromak, Current-Drive Experiment, X-ray Laser Studies, Theoretical Division, Tokamak Modeling, Spacecraft Glow Experiment, Compact Ignition Tokamak, Engineering Department, Project Planning and Safety Office, Quality Assurance and Reliability, and Administrative Operations.

  11. Action principle for Coulomb collisions in plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirvijoki, Eero

    2016-09-01

    An action principle for Coulomb collisions in plasmas is proposed. Although no natural Lagrangian exists for the Landau-Fokker-Planck equation, an Eulerian variational formulation is found considering the system of partial differential equations that couple the distribution function and the Rosenbluth-MacDonald-Judd potentials. Conservation laws are derived after generalizing the energy-momentum stress tensor for second order Lagrangians and, in the case of a test-particle population in a given plasma background, the action principle is shown to correspond to the Langevin equation for individual particles.

  12. Action principle for Coulomb collisions in plasmas

    CERN Document Server

    Hirvijoki, Eero

    2015-01-01

    In this letter we derive an action principle for Coulomb collisions in plasmas. Although no natural Lagrangian exists for the Landau-Fokker-Planck equation, an Eulerian variational formulation is found considering the system of partial differential equations that couple the distribution function and the Rosenbluth potentials. Exact conservation laws are derived after generalizing the energy-momentum stress tensor for second order Lagrangians and, in the case of a test-particle population in a given plasma background, the action principle is shown to correspond to the Langevin equation for individual particles. Being suitable for discretization, the presented action allows construction of variational integrators. Numerical implementation is left for a future study.

  13. Plasma pharmacy - physical plasma in pharmaceutical applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Woedtke, Th; Haertel, B; Weltmann, K-D; Lindequist, U

    2013-07-01

    During the last years the use of physical plasma for medical applications has grown rapidly. A multitude of findings about plasma-cell and plasma-tissue interactions and its possible use in therapy have been provided. One of the key findings of plasma medical basic research is that several biological effects do not result from direct plasma-cell or plasma-tissue interaction but are mediated by liquids. Above all, it was demonstrated that simple liquids like water or physiological saline, are antimicrobially active after treatment by atmospheric pressure plasma and that these effects are attributable to the generation of different low-molecular reactive species. Besides, it could be shown that plasma treatment leads to the stimulation of specific aspects of cell metabolism and to a transient and reversible increase of diffusion properties of biological barriers. All these results gave rise to think about another new and innovative field of medical plasma application. In contrast to plasma medicine, which means the direct use of plasmas on or in the living organism for direct therapeutic purposes, this field - as a specific field of medical plasma application - is called plasma pharmacy. Based on the present state of knowledge, most promising application fields of plasma pharmacy might be: plasma-based generation of biologically active liquids; plasma-based preparation, optimization, or stabilization of - mainly liquid - pharmaceutical preparations; support of drug transport across biological barriers; plasma-based stimulation of biotechnological processes.

  14. Plasma physics and fusion plasma electrodynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Bers, Abraham

    2016-01-01

    Plasma is a ubiquitous state of matter at high temperatures. The electrodynamics of plasmas encompasses a large number of applications, from understanding plasmas in space and the stars, to their use in processing semiconductors, and their role in controlled energy generation by nuclear fusion. This book covers collective and single particle dynamics of plasmas for fully ionized as well as partially ionized plasmas. Many aspects of plasma physics in current fusion energy generation research are addressed both in magnetic and inertial confinement plasmas. Linear and nonlinear dynamics in hydrodynamic and kinetic descriptions are offered, making both simple and complex aspects of the subject available in nearly every chapter. The approach of dividing the basic aspects of plasma physics as "linear, hydrodynamic descriptions" to be covered first because they are "easier", and postponing the "nonlinear and kinetic descriptions" for later because they are "difficult" is abandoned in this book. For teaching purpose...

  15. Welding arc plasma physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cain, Bruce L.

    1990-01-01

    The problems of weld quality control and weld process dependability continue to be relevant issues in modern metal welding technology. These become especially important for NASA missions which may require the assembly or repair of larger orbiting platforms using automatic welding techniques. To extend present welding technologies for such applications, NASA/MSFC's Materials and Processes Lab is developing physical models of the arc welding process with the goal of providing both a basis for improved design of weld control systems, and a better understanding of how arc welding variables influence final weld properties. The physics of the plasma arc discharge is reasonably well established in terms of transport processes occurring in the arc column itself, although recourse to sophisticated numerical treatments is normally required to obtain quantitative results. Unfortunately the rigor of these numerical computations often obscures the physics of the underlying model due to its inherent complexity. In contrast, this work has focused on a relatively simple physical model of the arc discharge to describe the gross features observed in welding arcs. Emphasis was placed of deriving analytic expressions for the voltage along the arc axis as a function of known or measurable arc parameters. The model retains the essential physics for a straight polarity, diffusion dominated free burning arc in argon, with major simplifications of collisionless sheaths and simple energy balances at the electrodes.

  16. Colloidal Plasmas : Basic physics of colloidal plasmas

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    C B Dwivedi

    2000-11-01

    Colloidal plasma is a distinct class of the impure plasmas with multispecies ionic composition. The distinction lies in the phase distribution of the impurity-ion species. The ability to tailor the electrostatic interactions between these colloidal particles provides a fertile ground for scientists to investigate the fundamental aspects of the Coulomb phase transition behavior. The present contribution will review the basic physics of the charging mechanism of the colloidal particles as well as the physics of the collective normal mode behavior of the general multi-ion species plasmas. Emphasis will be laid on the clarification of the prevailing confusing ideas about distinct qualities of the various acoustic modes, which are likely to exist in colloidal plasmas as well as in normal multi-ion species plasmas. Introductory ideas about the proposed physical models for the Coulomb phase transition in colloidal plasma will also be discussed.

  17. Principles and applications of nanomems physics

    CERN Document Server

    Santos, Hector

    2005-01-01

    ""Principles and Applications of NanoMEMS Physics"" presents the first unified exposition of the physical principles at the heart of NanoMEMS-based devices and applications. In particular, after beginning with a comprehensive presentation of the fundamentals and limitations of nanotechnology and MEMS fabrication techniques, the book addresses the physics germane to this dimensional regime, namely, quantum wave-particle phenomena, including, the manifestation of charge discreteness, quantized electrostatic actuation, and the Casimir effect, and quantum wave phenomena, including, quantized elect

  18. Variational integrators in plasma physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kraus, Michael

    2013-07-01

    To a large extent, research in plasma physics is concerned with the description and analysis of energy and momentum transfer between different scales and different kinds of waves. In the numerical modelling of such phenomena it appears to be crucial to describe the transfer processes preserving the underlying conservation laws in order to prevent physically spurious solutions. In this work, special numerical methods, so called variational integrators, are developed for several models of plasma physics. Special attention is given to conservation properties like conservation of energy and momentum. By design, variational integrators are applicable to all systems that have a Lagrangian formulation. Usually, equations of motion are derived by Hamilton's action principle and then discretised. In the application of the variational integrator theory, the order of these steps is reversed. At first, the Lagrangian and the accompanying variational principle are discretised, such that discrete equations of motion can be obtained directly by applying the discrete variational principle to the discrete Lagrangian. The advantage of this approach is that the resulting discretisation automatically retains the conservation properties of the continuous system. Following an overview of the geometric formulation of classical mechanics and field theory, which forms the basis of the variational integrator theory, variational integrators are introduced in a framework adapted to problems from plasma physics. The applicability of variational integrators is explored for several important models of plasma physics: particle dynamics (guiding centre dynamics), kinetic theory (the Vlasov-Poisson system) and fluid theory (magnetohydrodynamics). These systems, with the exception of guiding centre dynamics, do not possess a Lagrangian formulation to which the variational integrator methodology is directly applicable. Therefore the theory is extended by linking it to Ibragimov's theory of

  19. Nuclear physics principles and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Lilley, J S

    2001-01-01

    This title provides the latest information on nuclear physics. Based on a course entitled Applications of Nuclear Physics. Written from an experimental point of view this text is broadly divided into two parts, firstly a general introduction to Nuclear Physics and secondly its applications.* Includes chapters on practical examples and problems* Contains hints to solving problems which are included in the appendix* Avoids complex and extensive mathematical treatments* A modern approach to nuclear physics, covering the basic theory, but emphasising the many and important applicat

  20. Physical Education: Foundations, Practices, Principles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frost, Reuben B.

    This book offers a cross-section of the concepts and subject-matter areas which form the theoretical framework for physical education. Its stated purpose is to provide a source of information, insight, and inspiration to those who comtemplate physical education as a career. Chapters include the following: (a) "Education for a Better World;" (b)…

  1. BOOK REVIEW: Principles of Plasma Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osterheld, A. L.

    1998-08-01

    This book gives a comprehensive treatment of plasma spectroscopy, the quantitative study of line and continuous radiation from high temperature plasmas. This highly interdisciplinary field combines elements of atomic, plasma and statistical physics, and has wide application to simulations and diagnostics of laboratory and astrophysical plasmas. Plasma spectroscopy is naturally intertwined with magnetic and inertial fusion energy science. Radiative processes in plasmas are important in the design of fusion facilities, and can be used to diagnose and control conditions in fusion plasmas. In turn, fusion scientists and facilities have played a central role in developing plasma spectroscopy theory and applications. The book covers radiation from plasmas, spectral line broadening, atomic processes in plasmas and level kinetic models, radiative transfer and applications to spectroscopic plasma diagnostics. It is successful both as an introductory text and as a source book of theoretical and experimental research. The book presents a broad development of the theoretical foundations of these topics, and discusses the seminal papers and critical experiments. There is a strong emphasis on applications of plasma spectroscopy, primarily to plasma diagnostics and calculations of radiative cooling rates. Extensive references (current through the end of 1995) point readers to original material and detailed discussions of advanced topics. Of course, a single text cannot treat all aspects of plasma spectroscopy in depth. The strongest and most detailed section of the book is a long chapter on spectral line broadening. For me, the most significant omission is lack of a discussion of laser assisted transitions which can occur in plasmas produced by high intensity lasers. The book was intentionally written to be accessible to young researchers and graduate students. The level is roughly that of a graduate text. It assumes some familiarity with quantum mechanics and statistical

  2. Theoretical Plasma Physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vahala, George M. [College of William and Mary, Williamsburg, VA (United States)

    2013-12-31

    Lattice Boltzmann algorithms are a mesoscopic method to solve problems in nonlinear physics which are highly parallelized – unlike the direction solution of the original problem. These methods are applied to both fluid and magnetohydrodynamic turbulence. By introducing entropic constraints one can enforce the positive definiteness of the distribution functions and so be able to simulate fluids at high Reynolds numbers without numerical instabilities. By introducing a vector distribution function for the magnetic field one can enforce the divergence free condition on the magnetic field automatically, without the need of divergence cleaning as needed in most direct numerical solutions of the resistive magnetohydrodynamic equations. The principal reason for the high parallelization of lattice Boltzmann codes is that they consist of a kinetic collisional relaxation step (which is purely local) followed by a simple shift of the relaxed data to neighboring lattice sites. In large eddy simulations, the closure schemes are highly nonlocal – the most famous of these schemes is that due to Smagorinsky. Under a lattice Boltzmann representation the Smagorinsky closure is purely local – being simply a particular moment on the perturbed distribution fucntions. After nonlocal fluid moment models were discovered to represent Landau damping, it was found possible to model these fluid models using an appropriate lattice Boltzmann algorithm. The close to ideal parallelization of the lattice Boltzmann codes permitted us to be Gordon Bell finalists on using the Earth Simulation in Japan. We have also been involved in the radio frequency propagation of waves into a tokamak and into a spherical overdense tokamak plasma. Initially we investigated the use of a quasi-optical grill for the launching of lower hybrid waves into a tokamak. It was found that the conducting walls do not prevent the rods from being properly irradiated, the overloading of the quasi-optical grill is not severe

  3. Introduction to Plasma Physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurnett, Donald A.; Bhattacharjee, Amitava

    2017-03-01

    Preface; 1. Introduction; 2. Characteristic parameters of a plasma; 3. Single particle motions; 4. Waves in a cold plasma; 5. Kinetic theory and the moment equations; 6. Magnetohydrodynamics; 7. MHD equilibria and stability; 8. Discontinuities and shock waves; 9. Electrostatic waves in a hot unmagnetized plasma; 10. Waves in a hot magnetized plasma; 11. Nonlinear effects; 12. Collisional processes; Appendix A. Symbols; Appendix B. Useful trigonometric identities; Appendix C. Vector differential operators; Appendix D. Vector calculus identities; Index.

  4. Computational Methods in Plasma Physics

    CERN Document Server

    Jardin, Stephen

    2010-01-01

    Assuming no prior knowledge of plasma physics or numerical methods, Computational Methods in Plasma Physics covers the computational mathematics and techniques needed to simulate magnetically confined plasmas in modern magnetic fusion experiments and future magnetic fusion reactors. Largely self-contained, the text presents the basic concepts necessary for the numerical solution of partial differential equations. Along with discussing numerical stability and accuracy, the author explores many of the algorithms used today in enough depth so that readers can analyze their stability, efficiency,

  5. Vapourisers: Physical principles and classification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vithal Dhulkhed

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Vapourisers have evolved from rudimentary inhalers to the microprocessor controlled, temperature compensated and flow sensing devices, which are universal today. The improvements in the design was influenced by the development of potent inhalational anaesthetics, unique properties of some agents, a deeper understanding of their mechanism of action, inherent flaws in the older vapourisers, mechanical problems due to thymol deposition, factors influencing their output such as temperature and pressure variations. It is important to review the principles governing the design of the vapouriser to gain insight into their working. It is fascinating to know how some of the older vapourisers, popularly used in the past, functioned. The descendant of Oxford Miniature Vapourizer, the Triservice vapouriser is still a part of the military anaesthesia draw over equipment meant for field use whereas the Copper Kettle the first precision device is the fore-runner of the Tec 6 and Aladdin cassette vapouriser. Anaesthesia trainees if exposed to draw over techniques get a deeper understanding of equipment and improved skills for disaster situations. In the recent advanced versions of the vapouriser a central processing unit in the anaesthetic machine controls the operation by continuously monitoring and adjusting fresh gas flow through the vapouriser to maintain desired concentration of the vapour.

  6. Vapourisers: physical principles and classification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhulkhed, Vithal; Shetti, Akshaya; Naik, Shraddha; Dhulkhed, Pavan

    2013-09-01

    Vapourisers have evolved from rudimentary inhalers to the microprocessor controlled, temperature compensated and flow sensing devices, which are universal today. The improvements in the design was influenced by the development of potent inhalational anaesthetics, unique properties of some agents, a deeper understanding of their mechanism of action, inherent flaws in the older vapourisers, mechanical problems due to thymol deposition, factors influencing their output such as temperature and pressure variations. It is important to review the principles governing the design of the vapouriser to gain insight into their working. It is fascinating to know how some of the older vapourisers, popularly used in the past, functioned. The descendant of Oxford Miniature Vapourizer, the Triservice vapouriser is still a part of the military anaesthesia draw over equipment meant for field use whereas the Copper Kettle the first precision device is the fore-runner of the Tec 6 and Aladdin cassette vapouriser. Anaesthesia trainees if exposed to draw over techniques get a deeper understanding of equipment and improved skills for disaster situations. In the recent advanced versions of the vapouriser a central processing unit in the anaesthetic machine controls the operation by continuously monitoring and adjusting fresh gas flow through the vapouriser to maintain desired concentration of the vapour.

  7. Space plasma physics research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Comfort, Richard H.; Horwitz, James L.

    1993-01-01

    During the course of this grant, work was performed on a variety of topics and there were a number of significant accomplishments. A summary of these accomplishments is included. The topics studied include empirical model data base, data reduction for archiving, semikinetic modeling of low energy plasma in the inner terrestrial magnetosphere and ionosphere, O(+) outflows, equatorial plasma trough, and plasma wave ray-tracing studies. A list of publications and presentations which have resulted from this research is also included.

  8. The physical principles of rock magnetism

    CERN Document Server

    Stacey, Frank

    1974-01-01

    Developments in Solid Earth Geophysics 5: The Physical Principles of Rock Magnetism explores the physical principles of rock magnetism, with emphasis on the properties of finely divided magnetic materials. It discusses the origin and stability of rock magnetizations, the role of remanent magnetism in interpreting magnetic surveys, magnetic anisotropy as an indicator of rock fabric, and the relationship between piezomagnetic changes and seismic activity. Organized into 13 chapters, this volume discusses the properties of solids, magnetite and hematite grains, and rocks with magnetite grains

  9. Physical acoustics v.8 principles and methods

    CERN Document Server

    Mason, Warren P

    1971-01-01

    Physical Acoustics: Principles and Methods, Volume VIII discusses a number of themes on physical acoustics that are divided into seven chapters. Chapter 1 describes the principles and applications of a tool for investigating phonons in dielectric crystals, the spin phonon spectrometer. The next chapter discusses the use of ultrasound in investigating Landau quantum oscillations in the presence of a magnetic field and their relation to the strain dependence of the Fermi surface of metals. The third chapter focuses on the ultrasonic measurements that are made by pulsing methods with velo

  10. Controlled fusion and plasma physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-12-31

    This document presents the several speeches that took place during the 22nd European Physical Society conference on Controlled Fusion and Plasma Physics in Bournemouth, UK, between the 2nd and 7th July 1995. The talks deal with new experiments carried out on several tokamaks, particularly Tore Supra, concerning plasma confinement and fusion. Some information on specific fusion devices or tokamak devices is provided, as well as results of experiments concerning plasma instability. Separate abstracts were prepared for all the 31 papers in this volume. (TEC).

  11. Silicon solar cells: Physical metallurgy principles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mauk, Michael G.

    2003-05-01

    This article reviews the physical metallurgy aspects of silicon solar cells. The production of silicon solar cells relies on principles of thermochemical extractive metallurgy, phase equilibria, solidification, and kinetics. The issues related to these processes and their impact on solar cell performance and cost are discussed.

  12. Physical Principles for Scalable Neural Recording

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adam Henry Marblestone*

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Simultaneously measuring the activities of all neurons in a mammalian brain at millisecond resolution is a challenge beyond the limits of existing techniques in neuroscience. Entirely new approaches may be required, motivating an analysis of the fundamental physical constraints on the problem. We outline the physical principles governing brain activity mapping using optical, electrical,magnetic resonance, and molecular modalities of neural recording. Focusing on the mouse brain, we analyze the scalability of each method, concentrating on the limitations imposed by spatiotemporal resolution, energy dissipation, and volume displacement. We also study the physics of powering and communicating with microscale devices embedded in brain tissue.

  13. Topics in Plasma Physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vahala, Linda [Old Dominion Univ., Norfolk, VA (United States)

    2015-05-31

    During the period 1998-2013, research under the auspices of the Department of Energy was performed on RF waves in plasmas. This research was performed in close collaboration with Josef Preinhaelter, Jakub Urban, Vladimir Fuchs, Pavol Pavlo and Frantisek Zacek (Czech Academy of Sciences), Martin Valovic and Vladimir Shevchenko (Culham). This research is detailed and all 38 papers which were published by this team are cited.

  14. Variational Integrators in Plasma Physics

    CERN Document Server

    Kraus, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Variational integrators are a special kind of geometric discretisation methods applicable to any system of differential equations that obeys a Lagrangian formulation. In this thesis, variational integrators are developed for several important models of plasma physics: guiding centre dynamics (particle dynamics), the Vlasov-Poisson system (kinetic theory), and ideal magnetohydrodynamics (plasma fluid theory). Special attention is given to physical conservation laws like conservation of energy and momentum. Most systems in plasma physics do not possess a Lagrangian formulation to which the variational integrator methodology is directly applicable. Therefore the theory is extended towards nonvariational differential equations by linking it to Ibragimov's theory of integrating factors and adjoint equations. It allows us to find a Lagrangian for all ordinary and partial differential equations and systems thereof. Consequently, the applicability of variational integrators is extended to a much larger family of syst...

  15. Research in plasma physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    1973-01-01

    Three aspects of barium ion cloud dynamics are discussed. First, the effect of the ratio of ion cloud conductivity to background ionospheric conductivity on the motion of barium ion clouds is investigated and compared with observations of barium ion clouds. This study led to the suggestion that the conjugate ionosphere participates in the dynamics of barium ion clouds. Second, analytic work on the deformation of ion clouds is presented. Third, a linearized stability theory was extended to include the effect of the finite extent of an ion cloud, as well as the effect of the ratio of ion cloud to ionospheric conductivities. The stability properties of a plasma with contra-streaming ion beams parallel to a magnetic field are investigated. The results are interpreted in terms of parameters appropriate for collisionless shock waves. It is found that this particular instability can be operative only if the up-stream Alfven Mach number exceeds 5.5.

  16. Controlled fusion and plasma physics

    CERN Document Server

    Miyamoto, Kenro

    2006-01-01

    Resulting from ongoing, international research into fusion processes, the International Tokamak Experimental Reactor (ITER) is a major step in the quest for a new energy source.The first graduate-level text to cover the details of ITER, Controlled Fusion and Plasma Physics introduces various aspects and issues of recent fusion research activities through the shortest access path. The distinguished author breaks down the topic by first dealing with fusion and then concentrating on the more complex subject of plasma physics. The book begins with the basics of controlled fusion research, foll

  17. Space Plasma Physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, S. T.

    2000-01-01

    Dr. James L. Horwitz and R. Hugh Comfort's studies with the high altitude TIDE data have been progressing well. We concluded a study on the relationship of polar cap ion properties observed by TIDE near apogee with solar wind and IMF conditions. We found that in general H+ did not correlate as well as O+ with solar wind and IMF parameters. O+ density correlated(sub IMF), and Kp. At lower solar wind speeds, O+ density decreased with increasing latitude, but this trend was not observed at higher solar wind speeds. By comparing these results with results from other studies of O+ in different parts of the magnetosphere, we concluded that O+ ions often leave the ionosphere near the foot point of the cusp/cleft region, pass through the high-altitude polar cap lobes, and eventually arrive in the plasma sheet. We found that H+ outflows are a persistent feature of the polar cap and are not as dependent on the geophysical conditions; even classical polar wind models show H+ ions readily escaping owing to their low mass. Minor correlations with solar wind drivers were found; specifically, H+ density correlated best with IMF By, V(sub sw)B(sub IMF), and ESW(sub sw).

  18. Principles of Physics For Scientists and Engineers

    CERN Document Server

    Radi, Hafez A

    2013-01-01

    This textbook presents a basic course in physics to teach mechanics, mechanical properties of matter, thermal properties of matter, elementary thermodynamics, electrodynamics, electricity, magnetism, light and optics and sound. It includes simple mathematical approaches to each physical principle, and all examples and exercises are selected carefully to reinforce each chapter. In addition, answers to all exercises are included that should ultimately help solidify the concepts in the minds of the students and increase their confidence in the subject. Many boxed features are used to separate the examples from the text and to highlight some important physical outcomes and rules. The appendices are chosen in such a way that all basic simple conversion factors, basic rules and formulas, basic rules of differentiation and integration can be viewed quickly, helping student to understand the elementary mathematical steps used for solving the examples and exercises. Instructors teaching form this textbook will be able...

  19. Physics of electronic materials principles and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Rammer, Jørgen

    2017-01-01

    Adopting a uniquely pedagogical approach, this comprehensive textbook on the quantum mechanics of semiconductor materials and devices focuses on the materials, components and devices themselves whilst incorporating a substantial amount of fundamental physics related to condensed matter theory and quantum mechanics. Written primarily for advanced undergraduate students in physics and engineering, this book can also be used as a supporting text for introductory quantum mechanics courses, and will be of interest to anyone interested in how electronic devices function at a fundamental level. Complete with numerous exercises, and with all the necessary mathematics and physics included in appendices, this book guides the reader seamlessly through the principles of quantum mechanics and the quantum theory of metals and semiconductors, before describing in detail how devices are exploited within electric circuits and in the hardware of computers, for example as amplifiers, switches and transistors. Includes nume...

  20. Thermodynamics principles characterizing physical and chemical processes

    CERN Document Server

    Honig, Jurgen M

    1999-01-01

    This book provides a concise overview of thermodynamics, and is written in a manner which makes the difficult subject matter understandable. Thermodynamics is systematic in its presentation and covers many subjects that are generally not dealt with in competing books such as: Carathéodory''s approach to the Second Law, the general theory of phase transitions, the origin of phase diagrams, the treatment of matter subjected to a variety of external fields, and the subject of irreversible thermodynamics.The book provides a first-principles, postulational, self-contained description of physical and chemical processes. Designed both as a textbook and as a monograph, the book stresses the fundamental principles, the logical development of the subject matter, and the applications in a variety of disciplines. This revised edition is based on teaching experience in the classroom, and incorporates many exercises in varying degrees of sophistication. The stress laid on a didactic, logical presentation, and on the relat...

  1. The physical principles of the quantum theory

    CERN Document Server

    Heisenberg, Werner

    1949-01-01

    The contributions of few contemporary scientists have been as far reaching in their effects as those of Nobel Laureate Werner Heisenberg. His matrix theory is one of the bases of modern quantum mechanics, while his ""uncertainty principle"" has altered our whole philosophy of science.In this classic, based on lectures delivered at the University of Chicago, Heisenberg presents a complete physical picture of quantum theory. He covers not only his own contributions, but also those of Bohr, Dirac, Bose, de Broglie, Fermi, Einstein, Pauli, Schrodinger, Somerfield, Rupp, ·Wilson, Germer, and others

  2. Application of Steenbeck's minimum principle for three-dimensional modelling of DC arc plasma torches

    CERN Document Server

    Li He Ping; Chen, X

    2003-01-01

    In this paper, physical/mathematical models for the three-dimensional, quasi-steady modelling of the plasma flow and heat transfer inside a non-transferred DC arc plasma torch are described in detail. The Steenbeck's minimum principle (Finkelnburg W and Maecker H 1956 Electric arcs and thermal plasmas Encyclopedia of Physics vol XXII (Berlin: Springer)) is employed to determine the axial position of the anode arc-root at the anode surface. This principle postulates a minimum arc voltage for a given arc current, working gas flow rate, and torch configuration. The modelling results show that the temperature and flow fields inside the DC non-transferred arc plasma torch show significant three-dimensional features. The predicted anode arc-root attachment position and the arc shape by employing Steenbeck's minimum principle are reasonably consistent with experimental observations. The thermal efficiency and the torch power distribution are also calculated in this paper. The results show that the thermal efficiency...

  3. Limitation of computational resource as physical principle

    CERN Document Server

    Ozhigov, Y I

    2003-01-01

    Limitation of computational resources is considered as a universal principle that for simulation is as fundamental as physical laws are. It claims that all experimentally verifiable implications of physical laws can be simulated by the effective classical algorithms. It is demonstrated through a completely deterministic approach proposed for the simulation of biopolymers assembly. A state of molecule during its assembly is described in terms of the reduced density matrix permitting only limited tunneling. An assembly is treated as a sequence of elementary scatterings of simple molecules from the environment on the point of assembly. A decoherence is treated as a forced measurement of quantum state resulted from the shortage of computational resource. All results of measurements are determined by a choice from the limited number of special options of the nonphysical nature which stay unchanged till the completion of assembly; we do not use the random numbers generators. Observations of equal states during the ...

  4. Building physics from physical principles to international standards

    CERN Document Server

    Pinterić, Marko

    2017-01-01

    This textbook provides thorough coverage of the most important building physics phenomena: heat transfer, moisture, sound/acoustics, and illumination. Since the book is primarily aimed at engineers, it addresses professional issues with due pragmatism, and by including many practical examples and related ISO standards. Nevertheless, in order to guarantee full comprehension, it also explains the underlying physical principles and relates them to practical aspects in a simple and clear way. This is achieved with the aid of more than 100 figures and consistent cross-referencing of formulas and ideas. In addition, interrelationships between the different building physics phenomena are elucidated in a way that will enable readers to develop performance specifications that inform the design process. The book will primarily appeal to students of civil engineering and architecture, as well as to all practitioners in these areas who wish to broaden their fundamental understanding of topics in building physics.

  5. The Plasma Archipelago: Plasma Physics in the 1960s

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weisel, Gary J.

    2017-09-01

    With the foundation of the Division of Plasma Physics of the American Physical Society in April 1959, plasma physics was presented as the general study of ionized gases. This paper investigates the degree to which plasma physics, during its first decade, established a community of interrelated specialties, one that brought together work in gaseous electronics, astrophysics, controlled thermonuclear fusion, space science, and aerospace engineering. It finds that, in some regards, the plasma community was indeed greater than the sum of its parts and that its larger identity was sometimes glimpsed in inter-specialty work and studies of fundamental plasma behaviors. Nevertheless, the plasma specialties usually worked separately for two inter-related reasons: prejudices about what constituted "basic physics," both in the general physics community and within the plasma community itself; and a compartmentalized funding structure, in which each funding agency served different missions.

  6. Physics of the plasma universe

    CERN Document Server

    Peratt, Anthony L

    2015-01-01

    Today many scientists recognize plasma as the key element to understanding new observations in near-Earth, interplanetary, interstellar, and intergalactic space; in stars, galaxies, and clusters of galaxies, and throughout the observable universe. Physics of the Plasma Universe, 2nd Edition is an update of observations made across the entire cosmic electromagnetic spectrum over the two decades since the publication of the first edition. It addresses paradigm changing discoveries made by telescopes, planetary probes, satellites, and radio and space telescopes. The contents are the result of the author's 37 years research at Livermore and Los Alamos National Laboratories, and the U.S. Department of Energy. This book covers topics such as the large-scale structure and the filamentary universe; the formation of magnetic fields and galaxies, active galactic nuclei and quasars, the origin and abundance of light elements, star formation and the evolution of solar systems, and cosmic rays. Chapters 8 and 9 are based ...

  7. Plasma physics via computer simulation

    CERN Document Server

    Birdsall, CK

    2004-01-01

    PART 1: PRIMER Why attempting to do plasma physics via computer simulation using particles makes good sense Overall view of a one dimensional electrostatic program A one dimensional electrostatic program ES1 Introduction to the numerical methods used Projects for ES1 A 1d electromagnetic program EM1 Projects for EM1 PART 2: THEORY Effects of the spatial grid Effects of the finitw time ste Energy-conserving simulation models Multipole models Kinetic theory for fluctuations and noise; collisions Kinetic properties: theory, experience and heuristic estimates PART 3: PRACTIC

  8. Plasma physics and nuclear fusion research

    CERN Document Server

    Gill, Richard D

    1981-01-01

    Plasma Physics and Nuclear Fusion Research covers the theoretical and experimental aspects of plasma physics and nuclear fusion. The book starts by providing an overview and survey of plasma physics; the theory of the electrodynamics of deformable media and magnetohydrodynamics; and the particle orbit theory. The text also describes the plasma waves; the kinetic theory; the transport theory; and the MHD stability theory. Advanced theories such as microinstabilities, plasma turbulence, anomalous transport theory, and nonlinear laser plasma interaction theory are also considered. The book furthe

  9. Introduction to plasma physics with space, laboratory and astrophysical applications

    CERN Document Server

    Gurnett, Donald A

    2017-01-01

    Introducing basic principles of plasma physics and their applications to space, laboratory and astrophysical plasmas, this new edition provides updated material throughout. Topics covered include single-particle motions, kinetic theory, magnetohydrodynamics, small amplitude waves in hot and cold plasmas, and collisional effects. New additions include the ponderomotive force, tearing instabilities in resistive plasmas and the magnetorotational instability in accretion disks, charged particle acceleration by shocks, and a more in-depth look at nonlinear phenomena. A broad range of applications are explored: planetary magnetospheres and radiation belts, the confinement and stability of plasmas in fusion devices, the propagation of discontinuities and shock waves in the solar wind, and analysis of various types of plasma waves and instabilities that can occur in planetary magnetospheres and laboratory plasma devices. With step-by-step derivations and self-contained introductions to mathematical methods, this book...

  10. Physics Without Physics. The Power of Information-theoretical Principles

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Ariano, Giacomo Mauro

    2017-01-01

    David Finkelstein was very fond of the new information-theoretic paradigm of physics advocated by John Archibald Wheeler and Richard Feynman. Only recently, however, the paradigm has concretely shown its full power, with the derivation of quantum theory (Chiribella et al., Phys. Rev. A 84:012311, 2011; D'Ariano et al., 2017) and of free quantum field theory (D'Ariano and Perinotti, Phys. Rev. A 90:062106, 2014; Bisio et al., Phys. Rev. A 88:032301, 2013; Bisio et al., Ann. Phys. 354:244, 2015; Bisio et al., Ann. Phys. 368:177, 2016) from informational principles. The paradigm has opened for the first time the possibility of avoiding physical primitives in the axioms of the physical theory, allowing a re-foundation of the whole physics over logically solid grounds. In addition to such methodological value, the new information-theoretic derivation of quantum field theory is particularly interesting for establishing a theoretical framework for quantum gravity, with the idea of obtaining gravity itself as emergent from the quantum information processing, as also suggested by the role played by information in the holographic principle (Susskind, J. Math. Phys. 36:6377, 1995; Bousso, Rev. Mod. Phys. 74:825, 2002). In this paper I review how free quantum field theory is derived without using mechanical primitives, including space-time, special relativity, Hamiltonians, and quantization rules. The theory is simply provided by the simplest quantum algorithm encompassing a countable set of quantum systems whose network of interactions satisfies the three following simple principles: homogeneity, locality, and isotropy. The inherent discrete nature of the informational derivation leads to an extension of quantum field theory in terms of a quantum cellular automata and quantum walks. A simple heuristic argument sets the scale to the Planck one, and the currently observed regime where discreteness is not visible is the so-called "relativistic regime" of small wavevectors, which

  11. Physics Without Physics - The Power of Information-theoretical Principles

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Ariano, Giacomo Mauro

    2016-11-01

    David Finkelstein was very fond of the new information-theoretic paradigm of physics advocated by John Archibald Wheeler and Richard Feynman. Only recently, however, the paradigm has concretely shown its full power, with the derivation of quantum theory (Chiribella et al., Phys. Rev. A 84:012311, 2011; D'Ariano et al., 2017) and of free quantum field theory (D'Ariano and Perinotti, Phys. Rev. A 90:062106, 2014; Bisio et al., Phys. Rev. A 88:032301, 2013; Bisio et al., Ann. Phys. 354:244, 2015; Bisio et al., Ann. Phys. 368:177, 2016) from informational principles. The paradigm has opened for the first time the possibility of avoiding physical primitives in the axioms of the physical theory, allowing a re-foundation of the whole physics over logically solid grounds. In addition to such methodological value, the new information-theoretic derivation of quantum field theory is particularly interesting for establishing a theoretical framework for quantum gravity, with the idea of obtaining gravity itself as emergent from the quantum information processing, as also suggested by the role played by information in the holographic principle (Susskind, J. Math. Phys. 36:6377, 1995; Bousso, Rev. Mod. Phys. 74:825, 2002). In this paper I review how free quantum field theory is derived without using mechanical primitives, including space-time, special relativity, Hamiltonians, and quantization rules. The theory is simply provided by the simplest quantum algorithm encompassing a countable set of quantum systems whose network of interactions satisfies the three following simple principles: homogeneity, locality, and isotropy. The inherent discrete nature of the informational derivation leads to an extension of quantum field theory in terms of a quantum cellular automata and quantum walks. A simple heuristic argument sets the scale to the Planck one, and the currently observed regime where discreteness is not visible is the so-called "relativistic regime" of small wavevectors, which

  12. Principles of separation: indications and therapeutic targets for plasma exchange.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Mark E; Balogun, Rasheed A

    2014-01-01

    Extracorporeal "blood purification," mainly in the form of hemodialysis has been a major portion of the clinical activity of many nephrologists for the past 5 decades. A possibly older procedure, therapeutic plasma exchange, separates and then removes plasma as a method of removing pathogenic material from the patient. In contrast to hemodialysis, therapeutic plasma exchange preferentially removes biologic substances of high molecular weight such as autoantibodies or alloantibodies, antigen-antibody complexes, and Ig paraproteins. These molecular targets may be cleared through two alternative procedures: centrifugal separation and membrane separation. This review presents operational features of each procedure, with relevance to the nephrologist. Kinetics of removal of these plasma constituents are based on the principles of separation by the apheresis technique and by features specific to each molecular target, including their production and compartmentalization in the body. Molecular targets for common renal conditions requiring therapeutic plasma exchange are also discussed in detail.

  13. Plasma separation: physical separation at the molecular level

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gueroult, Renaud; Rax, Jean-Marcel; Fisch, Nathaniel J.

    2016-09-01

    Separation techniques are usually divided in two categories depending on the nature of the discriminating property: chemical or physical. Further to this difference, physical and chemical techniques differ in that chemical separation typically occurs at the molecular level, while physical separation techniques commonly operate at the macroscopic scale. Separation based on physical properties can in principle be realized at the molecular or even atomic scale by ionizing the mixture. This is in essence plasma based separation. Due to this fundamental difference, plasma based separation stands out from other separation techniques, and features unique properties. In particular, plasma separation allows separating different elements or chemical compounds based on physical properties. This could prove extremely valuable to separate macroscopically homogeneous mixtures made of substances of similar chemical formulation. Yet, the realization of plasma separation techniques' full potential requires identifying and controlling basic mechanisms in complex plasmas which exhibit suitable separation properties. In this paper, we uncover the potential of plasma separation for various applications, and identify the key physics mechanisms upon which hinges the development of these techniques.

  14. Report of the Plasma Physics Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-03-01

    Theoretical and experimental work in plasma physics is summarized. Technological and engineering aspects of plasma experiments in the SPICA, TORTUR 2, and RINGBOOG 2 reactors are discussed with emphasis on screw pinch, turbulent heating, and gas blankets. The free boundary equilibrium in high beta Tokamak plasma, wave dynamics, and transport problems were investigated.

  15. The physics of non-ideal plasma

    CERN Document Server

    Fortov, Vladimir E

    2000-01-01

    This book is devoted to the physical properties of nonideal plasma which is compressed so strongly that the effects of interparticle interactions govern the plasma behavior. The interest in this plasma was generated by the development of modern technologies and facilities whose operations were based on high densities of energy. In this volume, the methods of nonideal plasma generation and diagnostics are considered. The experimental results are given and the main theoretical models of nonideal plasma state are discussed. The problems of thermodynamics, electro-physics, optics and dynamic stabi

  16. Unifying physics of accelerators, lasers and plasma

    CERN Document Server

    Seryi, Andrei

    2015-01-01

    Unifying Physics of Accelerators, Lasers and Plasma introduces the physics of accelerators, lasers and plasma in tandem with the industrial methodology of inventiveness, a technique that teaches that similar problems and solutions appear again and again in seemingly dissimilar disciplines. This unique approach builds bridges and enhances connections between the three aforementioned areas of physics that are essential for developing the next generation of accelerators.

  17. Information content of systems as a physical principle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czekaj, L.; Horodecki, M.; Horodecki, P.; Horodecki, R.

    2017-02-01

    To explain the conceptual gap between classical and quantum and other, hypothetical descriptions of the world, several principles have been proposed. So far, all these principles have not explicitly included the uncertainty relation. Here we introduce an information content principle (ICP) which represents a constrained uncertainty principle. The principle, by taking into account the encoding and decoding properties of a single physical system, is capable of separation, both classicality and quanta from a number of potential physical theories, including hidden variable theories. The ICP, which is satisfied by both classical and quantum theory, states that the amount of nonredundant information which may be extracted from a given system is bounded by a perfectly decodable information content of the system. We show that ICP allows one to discriminate theories which do not allow for correlations stronger than Tsirelson's bound. We show also how to apply the principle to composite systems, ruling out some theories despite that their elementary constituents behave quantumly.

  18. A First-Principle Kinetic Theory of Meteor Plasma Formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dimant, Yakov; Oppenheim, Meers

    2015-11-01

    Every second millions of tiny meteoroids hit the Earth from space, vast majority too small to observe visually. However, radars detect the plasma they generate and use the collected data to characterize the incoming meteoroids and the atmosphere in which they disintegrate. This diagnostics requires a detailed quantitative understanding of formation of the meteor plasma. Fast-descending meteoroids become detectable to radars after they heat due to collisions with atmospheric molecules sufficiently and start ablating. The ablated material then collides into atmospheric molecules and forms plasma around the meteoroid. Reflection of radar pulses from this plasma produces a localized signal called a head echo. Using first principles, we have developed a consistent collisional kinetic theory of the near-meteoroid plasma. This theory shows that the meteoroid plasma develops over a length-scale close to the ion mean free path with a non-Maxwellian velocity distribution. The spatial distribution of the plasma density shows significant deviations from a Gaussian law usually employed in head-echo modeling. This analytical model will serve as a basis for more accurate quantitative interpretation of the head echo radar measurements. Work supported by NSF Grant 1244842.

  19. Plasma Physics of Extreme Astrophysical Environments

    CERN Document Server

    Uzdensky, Dmitri A

    2014-01-01

    Certain classes of astrophysical objects, namely magnetars and central engines of supernovae and gamma-ray bursts (GRBs), are characterized by extreme physical conditions not encountered elsewhere in the Universe. In particular, they possess magnetic fields that exceed the critical quantum field of 44 teragauss. Figuring out how these complex ultra-magnetized systems work requires understanding various plasma processes, both small-scale kinetic and large-scale magnetohydrodynamic (MHD). However, an ultra-strong magnetic field modifies the underlying physics to such an extent that many relevant plasma-physical problems call for building QED-based relativistic quantum plasma physics. In this review, after describing the extreme astrophysical systems of interest and identifying the key relevant plasma-physical problems, we survey the recent progress in the development of such a theory. We discuss how a super-critical field modifies the properties of vacuum and matter and outline the basic theoretical framework f...

  20. Plasma Cathode Electron Sources Physics, Technology, Applications

    CERN Document Server

    Oks, Efim

    2006-01-01

    This book fills the gap for a textbook describing this kind of electron beam source in a systematic and thorough manner: from physical processes of electron emission to examples of real plasma electron sources and their applications.

  1. Plasma Physics and Controlled Nuclear Fusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisch, N. J.

    2010-01-01

    Already while making his famous contributions in uncontrolled nuclear fusion for wartime uses, Edward Teller contemplated how the abundant energy release through nuclear fusion might serve peacetime uses as well. His legacy in controlled nuclear fusion, and the associated physics of plasmas, spans both magnetic and inertial confinement approaches. His contributions in plasma physics, both the intellectual and the administrative, continue to impact the field.

  2. Principles and Methods of Adapted Physical Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnheim, Daniel D.; And Others

    Programs in adapted physical education are presented preceded by a background of services for the handicapped, by the psychosocial implications of disability, and by the growth and development of the handicapped. Elements of conducting programs discussed are organization and administration, class organization, facilities, exercise programs…

  3. Developments in physical chemistry and basic principles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sohn, H.Y. (Univ. of Utah, UT (US))

    1992-04-01

    The metallurgical industry faces challenges in the development and production of new products in response to rapidly changing technologies that demand materials with widely different properties and increasingly stringent quality control. Such materials include semiconductors, ultrahigh-purity metals, chemical-vapor-deposited metallic films, high-performance intermetallics, metallic superconductors, and metal-based composites. In view of this, the author propounded the establishment of value-addition metallurgy as a subdiscipline of extractive and process metallurgy. Such a subdiscipline would cover the principles and practice involved in the production of these value-added advanced materials based on metals. In this respect, this annual review article now includes a section covering papers concerned with these topics.

  4. Plasma physics for controlled fusion

    CERN Document Server

    Miyamoto, Kenro

    2016-01-01

    This new edition presents the essential theoretical and analytical methods needed to understand the recent fusion research of tokamak and alternate approaches. The author describes magnetohydrodynamic and kinetic theories of cold and hot plasmas in detail. The book covers new important topics for fusion studies such as plasma transport by drift turbulence, which depend on the magnetic configuration and zonal flows. These are universal phenomena of microturbulence. They can modify the onset criterion for turbulent transport, instabilities driven by energetic particles as well as alpha particle generation and typical plasma models for computer simulation. The fusion research of tokamaks with various new versions of H modes are explained. The design concept of ITER, the international tokamak experimental reactor, is described for inductively driven operations as well as steady-state operations using non-inductive drives. Alternative approaches of reversed-field pinch and its relaxation process, stellator includi...

  5. Physical working principles of medical radar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aardal, Øyvind; Paichard, Yoann; Brovoll, Sverre; Berger, Tor; Lande, Tor Sverre; Hamran, Svein-Erik

    2013-04-01

    There has been research interest in using radar for contactless measurements of the human heartbeat for several years. While many systems have been demonstrated, not much attention have been given to the actual physical causes of why this work. The consensus seems to be that the radar senses small body movements correlated with heartbeats, but whether only the movements of the body surface or reflections from internal organs are also monitored have not been answered definitely. There has recently been proposed another theory that blood perfusion in the skin could be the main reason radars are able to detect heartbeats. In this paper, an experimental approach is given to determine the physical causes. The measurement results show that it is the body surface reflections that dominate radar measurements of human heartbeats.

  6. Plasmas applied atomic collision physics, v.2

    CERN Document Server

    Barnett, C F

    1984-01-01

    Applied Atomic Collision Physics, Volume 2: Plasmas covers topics on magnetically confined plasmas. The book starts by providing the history of fusion research and describing the various approaches in both magnetically and inertially confined plasmas. The text then gives a general discussion of the basic concepts and properties in confinement and heating of a plasma. The theory of atomic collisions that result in excited quantum states, particularly highly ionized impurity atoms; and diverse diagnostic topics such as emission spectra, laser scattering, electron cyclotron emission, particle bea

  7. Fundamental aspects of plasma chemical physics Thermodynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Capitelli, Mario; D'Angola, Antonio

    2012-01-01

    Fundamental Aspects of Plasma Chemical Physics - Thermodynamics develops basic and advanced concepts of plasma thermodynamics from both classical and statistical points of view. After a refreshment of classical thermodynamics applied to the dissociation and ionization regimes, the book invites the reader to discover the role of electronic excitation in affecting the properties of plasmas, a topic often overlooked by the thermal plasma community. Particular attention is devoted to the problem of the divergence of the partition function of atomic species and the state-to-state approach for calculating the partition function of diatomic and polyatomic molecules. The limit of ideal gas approximation is also discussed, by introducing Debye-Huckel and virial corrections. Throughout the book, worked examples are given in order to clarify concepts and mathematical approaches. This book is a first of a series of three books to be published by the authors on fundamental aspects of plasma chemical physics.  The next bo...

  8. Report on the solar physics-plasma physics workshop

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sturrock, P. A.; Baum, P. J.; Beckers, J. M.; Newman, C. E.; Priest, E. R.; Rosenberg, H.; Smith, D. F.; Wentzel, D. G.

    1976-01-01

    The paper summarizes discussions held between solar physicists and plasma physicists on the interface between solar and plasma physics, with emphasis placed on the question of what laboratory experiments, or computer experiments, could be pursued to test proposed mechanisms involved in solar phenomena. Major areas discussed include nonthermal plasma on the sun, spectroscopic data needed in solar plasma diagnostics, types of magnetic field structures in the sun's atmosphere, the possibility of MHD phenomena involved in solar eruptive phenomena, the role of non-MHD instabilities in energy release in solar flares, particle acceleration in solar flares, shock waves in the sun's atmosphere, and mechanisms of radio emission from the sun.

  9. PREFACE: 1982 International Conference on Plasma Physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilhelmsson, Hans

    1982-01-01

    Invited Papers: The Physics of Hot Plasmas During the last decade a dramatic evolution of plasma physics has occurred. Not only have gigantic fusion plasma machines been planned, and are now being built, and elaborate spaceships and antenna systems been constructed to explore remote parts of the cosmos; new observations have revealed fascinating structures in space, ranging from pulsar plasmas under extreme conditions in very strong magnetic fields to large-scale magnetic field and electric current systems in cosmic plasmas. X-rays from very distant sources as well as radio-waves from the plasma in the magnetosphere and in the Aurora have recently been studied with new observational techniques. Ingenious laboratory experiments are continuously being carried out to exploit new fundamental processes in plasmas. These are of great interest for the basic understanding of plasmas and also have immediate consequences for applications, like plasma heating and diagnostics. The theoretical description of new plasma phenomena, and of the plasma state in general poses challenging problems, particularly in situations where high concentration of energy is located in the plasmas. Nonlinear wave analysis and turbulence theory have accordingly been extensively developed to describe in particular the collective plasma phenomena. New concepts have been envisaged like plasma solitons, which may be thought of as excitations of local concentrations of longitudinal plasma waves which turn out to be particularly stable. More and more sophisticated structures of nonlinear nature are being revealed by means of high capacity computer facilities. Simulation experiments allow for studies of chaotic behaviour of plasma particles. Related fields of activity form new trends in the development of plasma theory. The programme of the 1982 International Conference on Plasma Physics, which was held in Göteborg, Sweden, stressed the role of the Physics of Hot Plasmas. Studies of such plasmas are

  10. Physics of quark-gluon plasma

    CERN Document Server

    Smilga, A V

    1997-01-01

    In this lecture, we give a brief review of what theorists now know, understand, or guess about static and kinetic properties of quark--gluon plasma. A particular attention is payed to the problem of physical observability, i.e. the physical meaningfulne ss of various characteristics of QGP discussed in the literature.

  11. Basic Studies in Plasma Physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-31

    close to a Maxwellian parametrized by a temperature T and mean velocity u which satisfy certain non -linear equations, which are the macroscopic equations...Simulations with Particle-to-Grid Methods 17 E. Microscopic-Shock Profiles: Exact Solution of a Non -Equilibrium System 18 IV. List of Publications...Investigator ABSTRACT An improved understanding of equilibrium and non -equilibrium properties of plasmas is central to many areas of basic science as

  12. Epitaxy physical principles and technical implementation

    CERN Document Server

    Herman, Marian A; Sitter, Helmut

    2004-01-01

    Epitaxy provides readers with a comprehensive treatment of the modern models and modifications of epitaxy, together with the relevant experimental and technological framework. This advanced textbook describes all important aspects of the epitaxial growth processes of solid films on crystalline substrates, including a section on heteroepitaxy. It covers and discusses in details the most important epitaxial growth techniques, which are currently widely used in basic research as well as in manufacturing processes of devices, namely solid-phase epitaxy, liquid-phase epitaxy, vapor-phase epitaxy, including metal-organic vapor-phase epitaxy and molecular-beam epitaxy. Epitaxy’s coverage of science and texhnology thin-film is intended to fill the need for a comprehensive reference and text examining the variety of problems related to the physical foundations and technical implementation of epitaxial crystallization. It is intended for undergraduate students, PhD students, research scientists, lecturers and practic...

  13. Epitaxy of Semiconductors Introduction to Physical Principles

    CERN Document Server

    Pohl, Udo W

    2013-01-01

    Introduction to Epitaxy provides the essential information for a comprehensive upper-level graduate course treating the crystalline growth of semiconductor heterostructures. Heteroepitaxy represents the basis of advanced electronic and optoelectronic devices today and is considered one of the top fields in materials research. The book covers the structural and electronic properties of strained epitaxial layers, the thermodynamics and kinetics of layer growth, and the description of the major growth techniques metalorganic vapor phase epitaxy, molecular beam epitaxy and liquid phase epitaxy. Cubic semiconductors, strain relaxation by misfit dislocations, strain and confinement effects on electronic states, surface structures and processes during nucleation and growth are treated in detail. The Introduction to Epitaxy requires only little knowledge on solid-state physics. Students of natural sciences, materials science and electrical engineering as well as their lecturers benefit from elementary introductions t...

  14. Solid State Physics Principles and Modern Applications

    CERN Document Server

    Quinn, John J

    2009-01-01

    Intended for a two semester advanced undergraduate or graduate course in Solid State Physics, this treatment offers modern coverage of the theory and related experiments, including the group theoretical approach to band structures, Moessbauer recoil free fraction, semi-classical electron theory, magnetoconductivity, electron self-energy and Landau theory of Fermi liquid, and both quantum and fractional quantum Hall effects. Integrated throughout are developments from the newest semiconductor devices, e.g. space charge layers, quantum wells and superlattices. The first half includes all material usually covered in the introductory course, but in greater depth than most introductory textbooks. The second half includes most of the important developments in solid-state researches of the past half century, addressing e.g. optical and electronic properties such as collective bulk and surface modes and spectral function of a quasiparticle, which is a basic concept for understanding LEED intensities, X ray fine struc...

  15. Structure and structure-preserving algorithms for plasma physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrison, P. J.

    2016-10-01

    Conventional simulation studies of plasma physics are based on numerically solving the underpinning differential (or integro-differential) equations. Usual algorithms in general do not preserve known geometric structure of the physical systems, such as the local energy-momentum conservation law, Casimir invariants, and the symplectic structure (Poincaré invariants). As a consequence, numerical errors may accumulate coherently with time and long-term simulation results may be unreliable. Recently, a series of geometric algorithms that preserve the geometric structures resulting from the Hamiltonian and action principle (HAP) form of theoretical models in plasma physics have been developed by several authors. The superiority of these geometric algorithms has been demonstrated with many test cases. For example, symplectic integrators for guiding-center dynamics have been constructed to preserve the noncanonical symplectic structures and bound the energy-momentum errors for all simulation time-steps; variational and symplectic algorithms have been discovered and successfully applied to the Vlasov-Maxwell system, MHD, and other magnetofluid equations as well. Hamiltonian truncations of the full Vlasov-Maxwell system have opened the field of discrete gyrokinetics and led to the GEMPIC algorithm. The vision that future numerical capabilities in plasma physics should be based on structure-preserving geometric algorithms will be presented. It will be argued that the geometric consequences of HAP form and resulting geometric algorithms suitable for plasma physics studies cannot be adapted from existing mathematical literature but, rather, need to be discovered and worked out by theoretical plasma physicists. The talk will review existing HAP structures of plasma physics for a variety of models, and how they have been adapted for numerical implementation. Supported by DOE DE-FG02-04ER-54742.

  16. The physics of forgetting: Landauer's erasure principle and information theory

    OpenAIRE

    Plenio, MB; Vitelli, V

    2001-01-01

    This article discusses the concept of information and its intimate relationship with physics. After an introduction of all the necessary quantum mechanical and information theoretical concepts we analyze Landauer's principle that states that the erasure of information is inevitably accompanied by the generation of heat. We employ this principle to rederive a number of results in classical and quantum information theory whose rigorous mathematical derivations are difficult. This demonstrates t...

  17. Progress in Anisotropic Plasma Physics

    CERN Document Server

    Romatschke, P; Romatschke, Paul; Strickland, Michael

    2004-01-01

    In 1959 Weibel demonstrated that when a QED plasma has a temperature anisotropy there exist unstable transverse magnetic excitations which grow exponentially fast. In this paper we will review how to determine the growth rates for these unstable modes in the weak-coupling and ultrarelativistic limits in which the collective behavior is describable in terms are so-called "hard-loops". We will show that in this limit QCD is subject to instabilities which are analogous to the Weibel instability in QED. The presence of such instabilities dominates the early time evolution of a highly anisotropic plasma; however, at longer times it is expected that these instabilities will saturate (condense). I will discuss how the presence of non-linear interactions between the gluons complicates the determination of the saturated state. In order to discuss this I present the generalization of the Braaten-Pisarski isotropic hard-thermal-loop effective action to a system with a temperature anisotropy in the parton distribution fu...

  18. Fundamental aspects of plasma chemical physics transport

    CERN Document Server

    Capitelli, Mario; Laricchiuta, Annarita

    2013-01-01

    Fundamental Aspects of Plasma Chemical Physics: Tranpsort develops basic and advanced concepts of plasma transport to the modern treatment of the Chapman-Enskog method for the solution of the Boltzmann transport equation. The book invites the reader to consider actual problems of the transport of thermal plasmas with particular attention to the derivation of diffusion- and viscosity-type transport cross sections, stressing the role of resonant charge-exchange processes in affecting the diffusion-type collision calculation of viscosity-type collision integrals. A wide range of topics is then discussed including (1) the effect of non-equilibrium vibrational distributions on the transport of vibrational energy, (2) the role of electronically excited states in the transport properties of thermal plasmas, (3) the dependence of transport properties on the multitude of Saha equations for multi-temperature plasmas, and (4) the effect of the magnetic field on transport properties. Throughout the book, worked examples ...

  19. Dusty plasma as a unique object of plasma physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norman, G. E.; Timofeev, A. V.

    2016-11-01

    The self-consistency and basic openness of dusty plasma, charge fluctuations, high dissipation and other features of dusty plasma system lead to the appearance of a number of unusual and unique properties of dusty plasma. “Anomalous” heating of dusty particles, anisotropy of temperatures and other features, parametric resonance, charge fluctuations and interaction potential are among these unique properties. Study is based on analytical approach and numerical simulation. Mechanisms of “anomalous” heating and energy transfer are proposed. Influence of charge fluctuations on the system properties is discussed. The self-consistent, many-particle, fluctuation and anisotropic interparticle interaction potential is studied for a significant range of gas temperature. These properties are interconnected and necessary for a full description of dusty plasmas physics.

  20. Space plasma physics stationary processes

    CERN Document Server

    Hasegawa, Akira

    1989-01-01

    During the 30 years of space exploration, important discoveries in the near-earth environment such as the Van Allen belts, the plasmapause, the magnetotail and the bow shock, to name a few, have been made. Coupling between the solar wind and the magnetosphere and energy transfer processes between them are being identified. Space physics is clearly approaching a new era, where the emphasis is being shifted from discoveries to understanding. One way of identifying the new direction may be found in the recent contribution of atmospheric science and oceanography to the development of fluid dynamics. Hydrodynamics is a branch of classical physics in which important discoveries have been made in the era of Rayleigh, Taylor, Kelvin and Helmholtz. However, recent progress in global measurements using man-made satellites and in large scale computer simulations carried out by scientists in the fields of atmospheric science and oceanography have created new activities in hydrodynamics and produced important new discover...

  1. Physics issues associated with low-beta plasma generators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borovsky, Joseph E.

    1992-01-01

    Kinetic aspects of MHD generators are explored by examining the propagation of dense, low-beta streams of plasma. Three situations are considered: the basic principles of plasma-stream propagation, the propagation of plasma streams into vacuum, and the propagation of plasma streams into ambient plasmas. These three situations are analogous to plasma generators, plasma generators with vacuum loads, and plasma generators with plasma loads. Kinetic (microphysics) aspects include oscillations of the generator plasma, the effects of diocotron instabilities, the acceleration of particles, the starvation of current systems, and plasma-wave production.

  2. Principle of limitation of physical quantities and cyclic universe

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HE GuoZhu

    2008-01-01

    A close study of Heisenberg uncertainty principles reveals many significant facts, and all four major physical quantities, energy, time, momentum and length, have both lower and upper limits. Now, many questions come up. What are these limits? Some answers may lead to the understanding of the development of our universe. What is the shortest limit of time? At the beginning of big bang, there exists a tre-mendously short time, the Planck time. This may be just the shortest time limit in our universe. The longest time limit might be the lifetime of our universe. The longest length might be the final diameter of our expanding universe. All these lead to a finite universe. Two more coupling formulae are formed for the other two pairs of physical quantities, mass and speed, thermal energy and temperature. These four physical quantities must also have limits. We already knew that speed has upper limit and temperature has lower limit. By these two formulae, Planck and Einstein equations are derived directly. Since most other physical quantities are somewhat related to these major physical quantities, it seems that there exists a principle of limitation of physical quantities. A quantitative sketch of big bang is described. It also shows that our universe will contract back to another big bang. The principle of limitation opens up some fields of investigation. It may bring nature back to the harmony and determined world described by classical physics.

  3. Plasma physics of extreme astrophysical environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uzdensky, Dmitri A; Rightley, Shane

    2014-03-01

    Among the incredibly diverse variety of astrophysical objects, there are some that are characterized by very extreme physical conditions not encountered anywhere else in the Universe. Of special interest are ultra-magnetized systems that possess magnetic fields exceeding the critical quantum field of about 44 TG. There are basically only two classes of such objects: magnetars, whose magnetic activity is manifested, e.g., via their very short but intense gamma-ray flares, and central engines of supernovae (SNe) and gamma-ray bursts (GRBs)--the most powerful explosions in the modern Universe. Figuring out how these complex systems work necessarily requires understanding various plasma processes, both small-scale kinetic and large-scale magnetohydrodynamic (MHD), that govern their behavior. However, the presence of an ultra-strong magnetic field modifies the underlying basic physics to such a great extent that relying on conventional, classical plasma physics is often not justified. Instead, plasma-physical problems relevant to these extreme astrophysical environments call for constructing relativistic quantum plasma (RQP) physics based on quantum electrodynamics (QED). In this review, after briefly describing the astrophysical systems of interest and identifying some of the key plasma-physical problems important to them, we survey the recent progress in the development of such a theory. We first discuss the ways in which the presence of a super-critical field modifies the properties of vacuum and matter and then outline the basic theoretical framework for describing both non-relativistic and RQPs. We then turn to some specific astrophysical applications of relativistic QED plasma physics relevant to magnetar magnetospheres and to central engines of core-collapse SNe and long GRBs. Specifically, we discuss the propagation of light through a magnetar magnetosphere; large-scale MHD processes driving magnetar activity and responsible for jet launching and propagation in

  4. Plasma physics of extreme astrophysical environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uzdensky, Dmitri A.; Rightley, Shane

    2014-03-01

    Among the incredibly diverse variety of astrophysical objects, there are some that are characterized by very extreme physical conditions not encountered anywhere else in the Universe. Of special interest are ultra-magnetized systems that possess magnetic fields exceeding the critical quantum field of about 44 TG. There are basically only two classes of such objects: magnetars, whose magnetic activity is manifested, e.g., via their very short but intense gamma-ray flares, and central engines of supernovae (SNe) and gamma-ray bursts (GRBs)—the most powerful explosions in the modern Universe. Figuring out how these complex systems work necessarily requires understanding various plasma processes, both small-scale kinetic and large-scale magnetohydrodynamic (MHD), that govern their behavior. However, the presence of an ultra-strong magnetic field modifies the underlying basic physics to such a great extent that relying on conventional, classical plasma physics is often not justified. Instead, plasma-physical problems relevant to these extreme astrophysical environments call for constructing relativistic quantum plasma (RQP) physics based on quantum electrodynamics (QED). In this review, after briefly describing the astrophysical systems of interest and identifying some of the key plasma-physical problems important to them, we survey the recent progress in the development of such a theory. We first discuss the ways in which the presence of a super-critical field modifies the properties of vacuum and matter and then outline the basic theoretical framework for describing both non-relativistic and RQPs. We then turn to some specific astrophysical applications of relativistic QED plasma physics relevant to magnetar magnetospheres and to central engines of core-collapse SNe and long GRBs. Specifically, we discuss the propagation of light through a magnetar magnetosphere; large-scale MHD processes driving magnetar activity and responsible for jet launching and propagation in

  5. Unit Invariance as a Unifying Principle of Physics

    CERN Document Server

    Shaukat, Abrar

    2010-01-01

    A basic principle of physics is the freedom to locally choose any unit system when describing physical quantities. Its implementation amounts to treating Weyl invariance as a fundamental symmetry of all physical theories. In this thesis, we study the consequences of this "unit invariance" principle and find that it is a unifying one. Unit invariance is achieved by introducing a gauge field called the scale, designed to measure how unit systems vary from point to point. In fact, by a uniform and simple Weyl invariant coupling of scale and matter fields, we unify massless, massive, and partially massless excitations. As a consequence, masses now dictate the response of physical quantities to changes of scale. This response is calibrated by certain "tractor Weyl weights". Reality of these weights yield Breitenlohner-Freedman stability bounds in anti de Sitter spaces. Another valuable outcome of our approach is a general mechanism for constructing conformally invariant theories. In particular, we provide direct d...

  6. Plasma Physics Approximations in Ares

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Managan, R. A.

    2015-01-08

    Lee & More derived analytic forms for the transport properties of a plasma. Many hydro-codes use their formulae for electrical and thermal conductivity. The coefficients are complex functions of Fermi-Dirac integrals, Fn( μ/θ ), the chemical potential, μ or ζ = ln(1+e μ/θ ), and the temperature, θ = kT. Since these formulae are expensive to compute, rational function approximations were fit to them. Approximations are also used to find the chemical potential, either μ or ζ . The fits use ζ as the independent variable instead of μ/θ . New fits are provided for Aα (ζ ),Aβ (ζ ), ζ, f(ζ ) = (1 + e-μ/θ)F1/2(μ/θ), F1/2'/F1/2, Fcα, and Fcβ. In each case the relative error of the fit is minimized since the functions can vary by many orders of magnitude. The new fits are designed to exactly preserve the limiting values in the non-degenerate and highly degenerate limits or as ζ→ 0 or ∞. The original fits due to Lee & More and George Zimmerman are presented for comparison.

  7. Physical Premium Principle: A New Way for Insurance Pricing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darooneh, Amir H.

    2005-03-01

    In our previous work we suggested a way for computing the non-life insurance premium. The probable surplus of the insurer company assumed to be distributed according to the canonical ensemble theory. The Esscher premium principle appeared as its special case. The difference between our method and traditional principles for premium calculation was shown by simulation. Here we construct a theoretical foundation for the main assumption in our method, in this respect we present a new (physical) definition for the economic equilibrium. This approach let us to apply the maximum entropy principle in the economic systems. We also extend our method to deal with the problem of premium calculation for correlated risk categories. Like the Buhlman economic premium principle our method considers the effect of the market on the premium but in a different way.

  8. Physical Premium Principle: A New Way for Insurance Pricing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amir H. Darooneh

    2005-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract: In our previous work we suggested a way for computing the non-life insurance premium. The probable surplus of the insurer company assumed to be distributed according to the canonical ensemble theory. The Esscher premium principle appeared as its special case. The difference between our method and traditional principles for premium calculation was shown by simulation. Here we construct a theoretical foundation for the main assumption in our method, in this respect we present a new (physical definition for the economic equilibrium. This approach let us to apply the maximum entropy principle in the economic systems. We also extend our method to deal with the problem of premium calculation for correlated risk categories. Like the Buhlman economic premium principle our method considers the effect of the market on the premium but in a different way.

  9. The beauty of physics patterns, principles, and perspectives

    CERN Document Server

    Rau, A R P

    2014-01-01

    The beauty of physics lies in its coherence in terms of a few fundamental concepts and principles. Even physicists have occasion to marvel at the overarching reach of basic principles and their ability to account for features stretching from the microscopic sub-atomic world to the cosmological expanses of the Universe. While mathematics is its natural language, physics is mostly about patterns, connections, and relations between objects and phenomena, and it is this aspect that is emphasized in this book. Since science tries to connect phenomena that at first sight appear widely different, while boiling them down to a small set of essential principles and laws, metaphor and analogy pervade our subject. Consider the pendulum, its swing from one extreme to the other often invoked in social or economic contexts. In molecular vibrations, such as in the CO2 molecule, the quantum motions of electrons and nuclei are metaphorically the pendulums. In electromagnetic radiation, including the visible light we observe, t...

  10. Physical principles for developing a synthetic lung surfactant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jaehnig, F. (Max-Planck-Institut fuer Biologie, Tuebingen (Germany, F.R.)); Obladen, M. (Tuebingen Univ. (Germany, F.R.). Kinderklinik)

    1984-01-01

    The physical principles for developing a synthetic lung surfactant to treat the respiratory distress syndrome are discussed. Requirements for the lipid composition and preparation of the synthetic surfactant are detailed, leading to the conclusion that a suspension of large unilamellar vesicles consisting of dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine and a small amount of unsaturated lipid is a promising choice.

  11. Teaching Energy Conservation as a Unifying Principle in Physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solbes, Jordi; Guisasola, Jenaro; Tarin, Francisco

    2009-01-01

    In this work we present the design and assessment of a teaching sequence aimed at introducing the principle of energy conservation at post-compulsory secondary school level (16-18 year olds). The proposal is based on the result of research into teaching-learning difficulties and on the analysis of the physics framework. Evidence is shown that this…

  12. Laboratory plasma physics experiments using merging supersonic plasma jets

    OpenAIRE

    Hsu, S C; Moser, A. L.; Merritt, E. C.; Adams, C. S.; Dunn, J. P.; Brockington, S.; Case, A; Gilmore, M.; Lynn, A. G.; Messer, S. J.; Witherspoon, F. D.

    2014-01-01

    We describe a laboratory plasma physics experiment at Los Alamos National Laboratory that uses two merging supersonic plasma jets formed and launched by pulsed-power-driven rail guns. The jets can be formed using any atomic species or mixture available in a compressed-gas bottle and have the following nominal initial parameters at the railgun nozzle exit: $n_e\\approx n_i \\sim 10^{16}$ cm$^{-3}$, $T_e \\approx T_i \\approx 1.4$ eV, $V_{\\rm jet}\\approx 30$-100 km/s, mean charge $\\bar{Z}\\approx 1$...

  13. Lunar Dust and Dusty Plasma Physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Thomas L.

    2009-01-01

    In the plasma and radiation environment of space, small dust grains from the Moon s surface can become charged. This has the consequence that their motion is determined by electromagnetic as well as gravitational forces. The result is a plasma-like condition known as "dusty plasmas" with the consequence that lunar dust can migrate and be transported by magnetic, electric, and gravitational fields into places where heavier, neutral debris cannot. Dust on the Moon can exhibit unusual behavior, being accelerated into orbit by electrostatic surface potentials as blow-off dust, or being swept away by moving magnetic fields like the solar wind as pick-up dust. Hence, lunar dust must necessarily be treated as a dusty plasma subject to the physics of magnetohydrodynamics (MHD). A review of this subject has been given before [1], but a synopsis will be presented here to make it more readily available for lunar scientists.

  14. Introduction to plasma physics and controlled fusion

    CERN Document Server

    Chen, Francis F

    1984-01-01

    This complete introduction to plasma physics and controlled fusion by one of the pioneering scientists in this expanding field offers both a simple and intuitive discussion of the basic concepts of this subject and an insight into the challenging problems of current research. In a wholly lucid manner the work covers single-particle motions, fluid equations for plasmas, wave motions, diffusion and resistivity, Landau damping, plasma instabilities and nonlinear problems. For students, this outstanding text offers a painless introduction to this important field; for teachers, a large collection of problems; and for researchers, a concise review of the fundamentals as well as original treatments of a number of topics never before explained so clearly. This revised edition contains new material on kinetic effects, including Bernstein waves and the plasma dispersion function, and on nonlinear wave equations and solitons.

  15. Introduction to plasma physics and controlled fusion

    CERN Document Server

    Chen, Francis F

    2016-01-01

    The third edition of this classic text presents a complete introduction to plasma physics and controlled fusion, written by one of the pioneering scientists in this expanding field.  It offers both a simple and intuitive discussion of the basic concepts of the subject matter and an insight into the challenging problems of current research. This outstanding text offers students a painless introduction to this important field; for teachers, a large collection of problems; and for researchers, a concise review of the fundamentals as well as original treatments of a number of topics never before explained so clearly.  In a wholly lucid manner the second edition covered charged-particle motions, plasmas as fluids, kinetic theory, and nonlinear effects.  For the third edition, two new chapters have been added to incorporate discussion of more recent advances in the field.  The new chapter 9 on Special Plasmas covers non-neutral plasmas, pure electron plasmas, solid and ultra-cold plasmas, pair-ion plasmas, d...

  16. Separation and sorting of cells in microsystems using physical principles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Gi-Hun; Kim, Sung-Hwan; Ahn, Kihoon; Lee, Sang-Hoon; Park, Joong Yull

    2016-01-01

    In the last decade, microfabrication techniques have been combined with microfluidics and applied to cell biology. Utilizing such new techniques, various cell studies have been performed for the research of stem cells, immune cells, cancer, neurons, etc. Among the various biological applications of microtechnology-based platforms, cell separation technology has been highly regarded in biological and clinical fields for sorting different types of cells, finding circulating tumor cells (CTCs), and blood cell separation, amongst other things. Many cell separation methods have been created using various physical principles. Representatively, these include hydrodynamic, acoustic, dielectrophoretic, magnetic, optical, and filtering methods. In this review, each of these methods will be introduced, and their physical principles and sample applications described. Each physical principle has its own advantages and disadvantages. The engineers who design the systems and the biologists who use them should understand the pros and cons of each method or principle, to broaden the use of microsystems for cell separation. Continuous development of microsystems for cell separation will lead to new opportunities for diagnosing CTCs and cancer metastasis, as well as other elements in the bloodstream.

  17. Theoretical and Experimental Beam Plasma Physics (TEBPP)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, B.

    1986-01-01

    The theoretical and experimental beam plasma physics (TEBPP) consists of a package of five instruments to measure electric and magnetic fields, plasma density and temperature, neutral density, photometric emissions, and energetic particle spectra during firings of the particle injector (SEPAC) electron beam. The package is developed on a maneuverable boom (or RMS) and is used to measure beam characteristics and induced perturbations field ( 10 m) and mid field ( 10 m to 100 m) along the electron beam. The TEBPP package will be designed to investigate induced oscillations and induced electromagnetic mode waves, neutral and ion density and temperature effects, and beam characteristics as a function of axial distance.

  18. The plasma physics of shock acceleration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Frank C.; Ellison, Donald C.

    1991-01-01

    The history and theory of shock acceleration is reviewed, paying particular attention to theories of parallel shocks which include the backreaction of accelerated particles on the shock structure. The work that computer simulations, both plasma and Monte Carlo, are playing in revealing how thermal ions interact with shocks and how particle acceleration appears to be an inevitable and necessary part of the basic plasma physics that governs collisionless shocks is discussed. Some of the outstanding problems that still confront theorists and observers in this field are described.

  19. PREFACE: 31st European Physical Society Conference on Plasma Physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dendy, Richard

    2004-12-01

    This special issue of Plasma Physics and Controlled Fusion comprises refereed papers contributed by invited speakers at the 31st European Physical Society Conference on Plasma Physics. The conference was jointly hosted by the Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, by the EURATOM/UKAEA Fusion Association and by Imperial College London, where it took place from 28 June to 2 July 2004. The overall agenda for this conference was set by the Board of the Plasma Physics Division of the European Physical Society, chaired by Friedrich Wagner (MPIPP, Garching) and his successor Jo Lister (CRPP, Lausanne). It built on developments in recent years, by further increasing the scientific diversity of the conference programme, whilst maintaining its depth and quality. A correspondingly diverse Programme Committee was set up, whose members are listed below. The final task of the Programme Committee has been the preparation of this special issue. In carrying out this work, as in preparing the scientific programme of the conference, the Programme Committee formed specialist subcommittees representing the different fields of plasma science. The chairmen of these subcommittees, in particular, accepted a very heavy workload on behalf of their respective research communities. It is a great pleasure to take this opportunity to thank: Emilia R Solano (CIEMAT, Madrid), magnetic confinement fusion; Jürgen Meyer-ter-Vehn (MPQ, Garching), laser-plasma interaction and beam plasma physics; and Jean-Luc Dorier (CRPP, Lausanne), dusty plasmas. The relatively few papers in astrophysical and basic plasma physics were co-ordinated by a small subcommittee which I led. Together with Peter Norreys (RAL, Chilton), we five constitute the editorial team for this special issue. The extensive refereeing load, compressed into a short time interval, was borne by the Programme Committee members and by many other experts, to whom this special issue owes much. We are also grateful to the Local Organizing Committee

  20. Principle of limitation of physical quantities and cyclic universe

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    A close study of Heisenberg uncertainty principles reveals many significant facts,and all four major physical quantities,energy,time,momentum and length,have both lower and upper limits.Now,many questions come up.What are these limits?Some answers may lead to the understanding of the development of our universe.What is the shortest limit of time?At the beginning of big bang,there exists a tre-mendously short time,the Planck time.This may be just the shortest time limit in our universe.The longest time limit might be the lifetime of our universe.The longest length might be the final diameter of our expanding universe.All these lead to a finite universe.Two more coupling formulae are formed for the other two pairs of physical quantities,mass and speed,thermal energy and temperature.These four physical quantities must also have limits.We already knew that speed has upper limit and temperature has lower limit.By these two formulae,Planck and Einstein equations are derived directly.Since most other physical quantities are somewhat related to these major physical quantities,it seems that there exists a principle of limitation of physical quantities.A quantitative sketch of big bang is described.It also shows that our universe will contract back to another big bang.The principle of limitation opens up some fields of investigation.It may bring nature back to the harmony and determined world described by classical physics.

  1. BOOK REVIEW: Controlled Fusion and Plasma Physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engelmann, F.

    2007-07-01

    This new book by Kenro Miyamoto provides an up-to-date overview of the status of fusion research and the important parts of the underlying plasma physics at a moment where, due to the start of ITER construction, an important step in fusion research has been made and many new research workers will enter the field. For them, and also for interested graduate students and physicists in other fields, the book provides a good introduction into fusion physics as, on the whole, the presentation of the material is quite appropriate for getting acquainted with the field on the basis of just general knowledge in physics. There is overlap with Miyamoto's earlier book Plasma Physics for Nuclear Fusion (MIT Press, Cambridge, USA, 1989) but only in a few sections on subjects which have not evolved since. The presentation is subdivided into two parts of about equal length. The first part, following a concise survey of the physics basis of thermonuclear fusion and of plasmas in general, covers the various magnetic configurations studied for plasma confinement (tokamak; reversed field pinch; stellarator; mirror-type geometries) and introduces the specific properties of plasmas in these devices. Plasma confinement in tokamaks is treated in particular detail, in compliance with the importance of this field in fusion research. This includes a review of the ITER concept and of the rationale for the choice of ITER's parameters. In the second part, selected topics in fusion plasma physics (macroscopic instabilities; propagation of waves; kinetic effects such as energy transfer between waves and particles including microscopic instabilities as well as plasma heating and current drive; transport phenomena induced by turbulence) are presented systematically. While the emphasis is on displaying the essential physics, deeper theoretical analysis is also provided here. Every chapter is complemented by a few related problems, but only partial hints for their solution are given. A selection of

  2. 15th International Congress on Plasma Physics & 13th Latin American Workshop on Plasma Physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soto, Leopoldo

    2014-05-01

    The International Advisory Committee of the 15th International Congress on Plasma Physics (ICPP 2010) and the International Advisory Committee of the 13th Latin American Workshop on Plasma Physics (LAWPP 2010), together agreed to carry out this combined meeting ICPP-LAWPP-2010 in Santiago de Chile, 8-13 August 2010, on occasion of the Bicentennial of Chilean Independence. The ICPP-LAWPP-2010 was organized by the Thermonuclear Plasma Department of the Chilean Nuclear Energy Commission (CCHEN) as part of the official program within the framework of the Chilean Bicentennial. The event was also a scientific and academic activity of the project ''Center for Research and Applications in Plasma Physics and Pulsed Power, P4'', supported by National Scientific and Technological Commission, CONICYT-Chile, under grant ACT-26. The International Congress on Plasma Physics was first held in Nagoya, in 1980, and followed by the Congresses: Gothenburg (1982), Lausanne (1984), Kiev (1987), New Delhi (1989), Innsbruck (1992), Foz do Iguacu (1994), Nagoya (1996), Prague (1998), Quebec City (2000), Sydney (2002), Nice (2004), Kiev (2006), and Fukuoka (2008). The purpose of the Congress is to discuss the recent progress and future views in plasma science, including fundamental plasma physics, fusion plasmas, astrophysical plasmas, and plasma applications, and so forth. The Latin American Workshop on Plasma Physics was first held in 1982 in Cambuquira, Brazil, followed by the Workshops: Medellín (1985), Santiago (1988), Buenos Aires (1990), Mexico City (1992), Foz do Iguacu (1994, also combined with ICPP), Caracas (1997), Tandil (1998), La Serena (2000), Sao Pedro (2003), Mexico City (2005), and Caracas (2007). The Latin American Workshop on Plasma Physics is a communication forum of the achievements of the plasma-physics regional community, fostering collaboration between plasma scientists within the region and elsewhere. The program of the ICPP-LAWPP-2010 included the topics

  3. Paradigm transition in cosmic plasma physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alfven, H.

    1982-01-01

    New discoveries in cosmic plasma physics are described, and their applications to solar, interstellar, galactic, and cosmological problems are discussed. The new discoveries include the existence of double layers in magnetized plasmas and in the low magnetosphere, and energy transfer by electric current in the auroral circuit. It is argued that solar flares and the solar wind-magnetosphere interaction should not be interpreted in terms of magnetic merging theories, and that electric current needs to be explicitly taken account of in understanding these phenomena. The filamentary structure of cosmic plasmas may be caused by electric currents in space, and the pinch effect may have a central role to play in the evolutionary history of interstellar clouds, stars, and solar systems. Space may have a cellular structure, with the cell walls formed by thin electric current layers. Annihilation may be the source of energy for quasars and the Hubble expansion, and the big bang cosmology may well be wrong.

  4. Fractal structures in nonlinear plasma physics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viana, R L; da Silva, E C; Kroetz, T; Caldas, I L; Roberto, M; Sanjuán, M A F

    2011-01-28

    Fractal structures appear in many situations related to the dynamics of conservative as well as dissipative dynamical systems, being a manifestation of chaotic behaviour. In open area-preserving discrete dynamical systems we can find fractal structures in the form of fractal boundaries, associated to escape basins, and even possessing the more general property of Wada. Such systems appear in certain applications in plasma physics, like the magnetic field line behaviour in tokamaks with ergodic limiters. The main purpose of this paper is to show how such fractal structures have observable consequences in terms of the transport properties in the plasma edge of tokamaks, some of which have been experimentally verified. We emphasize the role of the fractal structures in the understanding of mesoscale phenomena in plasmas, such as electromagnetic turbulence.

  5. Fundamental aspects of plasma chemical physics kinetics

    CERN Document Server

    Capitelli, Mario; Colonna, Gianpiero; Esposito, Fabrizio; Gorse, Claudine; Hassouni, Khaled; Laricchiuta, Annarita; Longo, Savino

    2016-01-01

    Describing non-equilibrium "cold" plasmas through a chemical physics approach, this book uses the state-to-state plasma kinetics, which considers each internal state as a new species with its own cross sections. Extended atomic and molecular master equations are coupled with Boltzmann and Monte Carlo methods to solve the electron energy distribution function. Selected examples in different applied fields, such as microelectronics, fusion, and aerospace, are presented and discussed including the self-consistent kinetics in RF parallel plate reactors, the optimization of negative ion sources and the expansion of high enthalpy flows through nozzles of different geometries. The book will cover the main aspects of the state-to-state kinetic approach for the description of nonequilibrium cold plasmas, illustrating the more recent achievements in the development of kinetic models including the self-consistent coupling of master equations and Boltzmann equation for electron dynamics. To give a complete portrayal, the...

  6. Physics of Tokamak Plasma Start-up

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mueller, Dennis

    2012-10-01

    This tutorial describes and reviews the state-of-art in tokamak plasma start-up and its importance to next step devices such as ITER, a Fusion Nuclear Science Facility and a Tokamak/ST demo. Tokamak plasma start-up includes breakdown of the initial gas, ramp-up of the plasma current to its final value and the control of plasma parameters during those phases. Tokamaks rely on an inductive component, typically a central solenoid, which has enabled attainment of high performance levels that has enabled the construction of the ITER device. Optimizing the inductive start-up phase continues to be an area of active research, especially in regards to achieving ITER scenarios. A new generation of superconducting tokamaks, EAST and KSTAR, experiments on DIII-D and operation with JET's ITER-like wall are contributing towards this effort. Inductive start-up relies on transformer action to generate a toroidal loop voltage and successful start-up is determined by gas breakdown, avalanche physics and plasma-wall interaction. The goal of achieving steady-sate tokamak operation has motivated interest in other methods for start-up that do not rely on the central solenoid. These include Coaxial Helicity Injection, outer poloidal field coil start-up, and point source helicity injection, which have achieved 200, 150 and 100 kA respectively of toroidal current on closed flux surfaces. Other methods including merging reconnection startup and Electron Bernstein Wave (EBW) plasma start-up are being studied on various devices. EBW start-up generates a directed electron channel due to wave particle interaction physics while the other methods mentioned rely on magnetic helicity injection and magnetic reconnection which are being modeled and understood using NIMROD code simulations.

  7. Low dimensional physics and gauge principles : Matinyan Festschrift

    CERN Document Server

    Klümper, Andreas; Sedrakyan, A G

    2013-01-01

    This is a collection of articles on fundamental physical principles and methods, the topics ranging from matrix models, random surfaces, quantum dots and rings, to black holes, cosmology and testing of the tiny effects predicted by General Relativity. Among the authors are Sir Roger Penrose and other well-known experts and the articles are addressed to graduate students and researchers. The volume is a Festschrift to a noted physicist and mentor Sergei Matinyan.

  8. Symbolic Vector Analysis in Plasma Physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qin, H.; Tang, W.M.; Rewoldt, G.

    1997-10-09

    Many problems in plasma physics involve substantial amounts of analytical vector calculation. The complexity usually originates from both the vector operations themselves and the choice of underlying coordinate system. A computer algebra package for symbolic vector analysis in general coordinate systems, General Vector Analysis (GVA), is developed using Mathematica. The modern viewpoint for 3D vector calculus, differential forms on 3-manifolds, is adopted to unify and systematize the vector calculus operations in general coordinate systems. This package will benefit physicists and applied mathematicians in their research where complicated vector analysis is required. It will not only save a huge amount of human brain-power and dramatically improve accuracy, but this package will also be an intelligent tool to assist researchers in finding the right approaches to their problems. Several applications of this symbolic vector analysis package to plasma physics are also given.

  9. Symbolic Vector Analysis in Plasma Physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qin, H.; Rewoldt, G.; Tang, W.M.

    1997-10-01

    Many problems in plasma physics involve substantial amounts of analytical vector calculation. The complexity usually originates from both the vector operations themselves and the choice of underlying coordinate system. A computer algebra package for symbolic vector analysis in general coordinate systems, GeneralVectorAnalysis (GVA), is developed using Mathematica. The modern viewpoint for 3D vector calculus, differential forms on 3-manifolds, is adopted to unify and systematize the vector calculus operations in general coordinate systems. This package will benefit physicists and applied mathematicians in their research where complicated vector analysis is required. It will not only save a huge amount of human brain-power and dramatically improve accuracy, but this package will also be an intelligent tool to assist researchers in finding the right approaches to their problems. Several applications of this symbolic vector analysis package to plasma physics are also given.

  10. Physics issues in long pulse plasma confinement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Itoh, Kimitaka; Toda, Shinichiro; Sanuki, Heiji [National Institute for Fusion Science, Toki, Gifu (Japan); Itoh, Sanae-I; Yagi, Masatoshi [Research Institute for Applied Mechanics, Kyushu University, Kasuga, Fukuoka (Japan); Fukuyama, Atsushi [Department of Nuclear Engineering, Kyoto University, Kyoto (Japan)

    2000-07-01

    Physics in the steady-state or long time discharge are illustrated from the view point of generic toroidal plasmas. Issues include physics process with very long time scale, dynamical phenomena of various time scales, transition nature under very slow temporal variations of parameters, statistical occurrence of transition and life time and identification of minimum circulating power. Nonlinear dependencies of transport properties of density, temperature, current, electric field and poloidal magnetic field cause self-organized dynamics. A picture of stationary oscillatory states is presented from a unified picture of nonlinear limit cycle dynamics. It is emphasized that the long time asymptotics are determined by the structure formation mechanisms. The sustainment needs a circulating power, and the circulating power in steady state plasma is also discussed. (author)

  11. First-principles Equations of State and Shock Hugoniots of First- and Second-Row Plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Driver, Kevin; Soubiran, Francois; Zhang, Shuai; Militzer, Burkhard

    A first-principles methodology for studying high energy density physics and warm dense matter is important for the stewardship of plasma science and guiding inertial confinement fusion experiments. In order to address this challenge, we have been developing the capability of path integral Monte Carlo (PIMC) for studying dense plasmas comprised of increasingly heavy elements, including nitrogen, oxygen, and neon. In recent work, we have extended PIMC methodology beyond the free-particle node approximation by implementing localized nodal surfaces capable of describing bound plasma states in second-row elements, such as silicon. We combine results from PIMC with results from density functional theory molecular dynamics (DFT-MD) calculations to produce a coherent equation of state that bridges the entire WDM regime. Analysis of pair-correlation functions and the electronic density of states reveals an evolving plasma structure and ionization process that is driven by temperature and pressure. We also compute shock Hugoniot curves for a wide range of initial densities, which generally reveal an increase in compression as the second and first shells are ionized. This work is funded by the NSF/DOE Partnership in Basic Plasma Science and Engineering (DE-SC0010517).

  12. Principles of physics from quantum field theory to classical mechanics

    CERN Document Server

    Jun, Ni

    2014-01-01

    This book starts from a set of common basic principles to establish the formalisms in all areas of fundamental physics, including quantum field theory, quantum mechanics, statistical mechanics, thermodynamics, general relativity, electromagnetic field, and classical mechanics. Instead of the traditional pedagogic way, the author arranges the subjects and formalisms in a logical-sequential way, i.e. all the formulas are derived from the formulas before them. The formalisms are also kept self-contained. Most of the required mathematical tools are also given in the appendices. Although this book covers all the disciplines of fundamental physics, the book is concise and can be treated as an integrated entity. This is consistent with the aphorism that simplicity is beauty, unification is beauty, and thus physics is beauty. The book may be used as an advanced textbook by graduate students. It is also suitable for physicists who wish to have an overview of fundamental physics. Readership: This is an advanced gradua...

  13. Mathematics for plasma physics; Mathematiques pour la physique des plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sentis, R. [CEA Bruyeres-le-Chatel, 91 (France)

    2011-01-15

    The plasma physics is in the heart of the research of the CEA-DAM. Using mathematics in this domain is necessary, particularly for a precise statement of the partial differential equations systems which are on the basis of the numerical simulations. Examples are given concerning hydrodynamics, models for the thermal conduction and laser-plasma interaction. For the bi-temperature compressible Euler model, the mathematical study of the problem has allowed us to understand why the role of the energy equations dealing with ions on one hand and electrons on the other hand are not identical despite the symmetrical appearance of the system. The mathematical study is also necessary to be sure of the existence and uniqueness of the solution

  14. EDITORIAL 37th European Physical Society Conference on Plasma Physics 37th European Physical Society Conference on Plasma Physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendonça, Tito; Hidalgo, Carlos

    2010-12-01

    Introduction We are very pleased to present this special issue of Plasma Physics and Controlled Fusion dedicated to another annual EPS Plasma Physics Division Conference. It contains the invited papers of the 37th Conference, which was held at the Helix Arts Centre of the Dublin City University Campus, in Dublin, Ireland, from 21 to 25 June 2010. It was locally organized by a team drawn from different Irish institutions, led by Dublin City University and Queen's University Belfast. This team was coordinated by Professor Miles Turner (DCU), with the help of Dr Deborah O'Connell (QUB) as Scientific Secretary, and Ms Samantha Fahy (DCU) as Submissions Secretary. It attracted a large number of delegates (nearly 750), coming from 37 countries. Our Irish hosts provided an excellent atmosphere for the conference and social programme, very helpful for promoting personal links between conference participants. The Conference hosted three satellite meetings, and two special evening sessions. The satellite meetings were the Third Workshop on Plasma for Environmental Issues, the International Workshop on the Role of Arcing and Hot Spots in Magnetic Fusion Devices, and the Workshop on Electric Fields, Turbulence and Self-Organization in Magnetic Plasmas. The aim of this annual EPS Conference is to bring together the different communities of plasma physicists, in order to stimulate cross-collaboration and to promote in an integrated way this area of science. As in previous Conferences, we tried to attract the more relevant researchers and to present the latest developments in plasma physics and related areas. The Programme Committee was divided into four sub-committees, representing the main areas of plasma science. These four areas were magnetic confinement fusion (MCF), still the dominant area of this Conference with the largest number of participants, beam plasma and inertial fusion (BPIF), low temperature plasmas (LTP), which attracted a significant and growing number of

  15. DEVELOPMENT OF MULTI-COORDINATE VOCABULARY, PLASMA PHYSICS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    LERNER, RITA G.

    DESCRIBED IS THE DEVELOPMENT OF A THESAURUS FOR THE FIELD OF PLASMA PHYSICS, SIMILAR TO THE ONE PREVIOUSLY DEVELOPED FOR CHEMICAL PHYSICS, FOR USE WITH COMPUTER-ORIENTED RETRIEVAL SYSTEMS. AN EXPERT IN THE FIELD OF PLASMA PHYSICS SELECTED TERMS IMPORTANT TO THE INFORMATION USER FROM THE PLASMA LITERATURE. THE HIERARCHY OF CLASSIFICATION UTILIZES…

  16. Statistical Physics Experiments Using Dusty Plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goree, John

    2016-10-01

    Compared to other areas of physics research, Statistical Physics is heavily dominated by theory, with comparatively little experiment. One reason for the lack of experiments is the impracticality of tracking of individual atoms and molecules within a substance. Thus, there is a need for a different kind of experimental system, one where individual particles not only move stochastically as they collide with one another, but also are large enough to allow tracking. A dusty plasma can meet this need. A dusty plasma is a partially ionized gas containing small particles of solid matter. These micron-size particles gain thousands of electronic charges by collecting more electrons than ions. Their motions are dominated by Coulomb collisions with neighboring particles. In this so-called strongly coupled plasma, the dust particles self-organize in much the same way as atoms in a liquid or solid. Unlike atoms, however, these particles are large and slow, so that they can be tracked easily by video microscopy. Advantages of dusty plasma for experimental statistical physics research include particle tracking, lack of frictional contact with solid surfaces, and avoidance of overdamped motion. Moreover, the motion of a collection of dust particles can mimic an equilibrium system with a Maxwellian velocity distribution, even though the dust particles themselves are not truly in thermal equilibrium. Nonequilibrium statistical physics can be studied by applying gradients, for example by imposing a shear flow. In this talk I will review some of our recent experiments with shear flow. First, we performed the first experimental test to verify the Fluctuation Theorem for a shear flow, showing that brief violations of the Second Law of Thermodynamics occur with the predicted probabilities, for a small system. Second, we discovered a skewness of a shear-stress distribution in a shear flow. This skewness is a phenomenon that likely has wide applicability in nonequilibrium steady states

  17. A plasma formulary for physics, technology, and astrophysics

    CERN Document Server

    Diver, Declan

    2011-01-01

    Plasma physics has matured rapidly as a discipline, and now touches on many different research areas, including manufacturing processes. This collection of fundamental formulae and definitions in plasma physics is vital to anyone with an interest in plasmas or ionized gases, whether in physics, astronomy or engineering.Both theorists and experimentalists will find this book useful, as it incorporates the latest results and findings.The text treats astrophysical plasmas, fusion plasmas, industrial plasmas and low temperature plasmas as aspects of the same discipline - a unique approach made pos

  18. Plasma Physics and Controlled Nuclear Fusion

    CERN Document Server

    Miyamoto, Kenro

    2005-01-01

    The primary objectives of this book are, firstly, to present the essential theoretical background needed to understand recent fusion research and, secondly, to describe the current status of fusion research for graduate students and senior undergraduates. It will also serve as a useful reference for scientists and engineers working in the related fields. In Part I, Plasma Physics, the author explains the basics of magneto-hydrodynamics and kinetic theory in a simple and compact way and, at the same time, covers important new topics for fusion studies such as the ballooning representation, instabilities driven by energetic particles and various plasma models for computer simulations. Part II, Controlled Nuclear Fusion, attempts to review the "big picture" in fusion research. All important phenomena and technologies are addressed, with a particular emphasis on the topics of most concern in current research.

  19. Nonthermal Plasma Synthesis of Nanocrystals: Fundamental Principles, Materials, and Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kortshagen, Uwe R; Sankaran, R Mohan; Pereira, Rui N; Girshick, Steven L; Wu, Jeslin J; Aydil, Eray S

    2016-09-28

    Nonthermal plasmas have emerged as a viable synthesis technique for nanocrystal materials. Inherently solvent and ligand-free, nonthermal plasmas offer the ability to synthesize high purity nanocrystals of materials that require high synthesis temperatures. The nonequilibrium environment in nonthermal plasmas has a number of attractive attributes: energetic surface reactions selectively heat the nanoparticles to temperatures that can strongly exceed the gas temperature; charging of nanoparticles through plasma electrons reduces or eliminates nanoparticle agglomeration; and the large difference between the chemical potentials of the gaseous growth species and the species bound to the nanoparticle surfaces facilitates nanocrystal doping. This paper reviews the state of the art in nonthermal plasma synthesis of nanocrystals. It discusses the fundamentals of nanocrystal formation in plasmas, reviews practical implementations of plasma reactors, surveys the materials that have been produced with nonthermal plasmas and surface chemistries that have been developed, and provides an overview of applications of plasma-synthesized nanocrystals.

  20. Physical properties of dense, low-temperature plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Redmer, Ronald

    1997-04-01

    Plasmas occur in a wide range of the density-temperature plane. The physical quantities can be expressed by Green's functions which are evaluated by means of standard quantum statistical methods. The influences of many-particle effects such as dynamic screening and self-energy, structure factor and local-field corrections, formation and decay of bound states, degeneracy and Pauli exclusion principle are studied. As a basic concept for partially ionized plasmas, a cluster decomposition is performed for the self-energy as well as for the polarization function. The general model of a partially ionized plasma interpolates between low-density, nonmetallic systems such as atomic vapors and high-density, conducting systems such as metals or fully ionized plasmas. The equations of state, including the location of the critical point and the shape of the coexistence curve, are determined for expanded alkali-atom and mercury fluids. The occurrence of a metal-nonmetal transition near the critical point of the liquid-vapor phase transition leads in these materials to characteristic deviations from the behavior of nonconducting fluids such as the inert gases. Therefore, a unified approach is needed to describe the drastic changes of the electronic properties as well as the variation of the physical properties with the density. Similar results are obtained for the hypothetical plasma phase transition in hydrogen plasma. The transport coefficients (electrical and thermal conductivity, thermopower) are studied within linear response theory given here in the formulation of Zubarev which is valid for arbitrary degeneracy and yields the transport coefficients for the limiting cases of nondegenerate, weakly coupled plasmas (Spitzer theory) as well as degenerate, strongly coupled plasmas (Ziman theory). This linear response method is applied to partially ionized systems such as dense, low-temperature plasmas. Here, the conductivity changes from nonmetallic values up to those typical for

  1. Physics of Collisional Plasmas Introduction to High-Frequency Discharges

    CERN Document Server

    Moisan, Michel

    2012-01-01

    The Physics of Collisional Plasmas deals with the plasma physics of interest to laboratory research and industrial applications, such as lighting, fabrication of microelectronics, destruction of greenhouse gases. Its emphasis is on explaining the physical mechanisms, rather than the detailed mathematical description and theoretical analysis. At the introductory level, it is important to convey the characteristic physical phenomena of plasmas, before addressing the ultimate formalism of kinetic theory, with its microscopic, statistical mechanics approach. To this aim, this text translates the physical phenomena into more tractable equations, using the hydrodynamic model; this considers the plasma as a fluid, in which the macroscopic physical parameters are the statistical averages of the microscopic (individual) parameters. This book is an introduction to the physics of collisional plasmas, as opposed to plasmas in space. It is intended for graduate students in physics and engineering . The first chapter intr...

  2. Physics of the quark - gluon plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2001-09-01

    This document gathers 31 contributions to the workshop on the physics of quark-gluon plasma that took place in Palaiseau in september 2001: 1) gamma production in heavy collisions, 2) BRAHMS, 3) experimental conference summary, 4) modelling relativistic nuclear collisions, 5) microscopic reaction dynamics at SPS and RHIC, 6) direct gamma and hard scattering at SPS, 7) soft physics at RHIC, 8) results from the STAR experiment, 9) quarkonia: experimental possibilities, 10) elliptic flow measurements with PHENIX, 11) charmonium production in p-A collisions, 12) anisotropic flow at the SPS and RHIC, 13) deciphering the space-time evolution of heavy ion collisions with correlation measurements, 14) 2-particle correlation at RHIC, 15) particle spectra at AGS, SPS and RHIC, 16) strangeness production in STAR, 17) strangeness production in Pb-Pb collisions at SPS, 18) heavy ion physics at CERN after 2000 and before LHC, 19) NEXUS guideline and theoretical consistency, 20) introduction to high p{sub T} physics at RHIC, 21) a novel quasiparticle description of the quark-gluon plasma, 22) dissociation of excited quarkonia states, 23) high-mass dimuon and B {yields} J/{psi} production in ultrarelativistic heavy ion collisions, 24) strange hyperon production in p + p and p + Pb interactions from NA49, 25) heavy quarkonium hadron cross-section, 26) a new method of flow analysis, 27) low mass dilepton production and chiral symmetry restoration, 28) classical initial conditions for nucleus-nucleus collisions, 29) numerical calculation of quenching weights, 30) strangeness enhancement energy dependence, and 31) heavy quarkonium dissociation.

  3. Testing Plasma Physics in the Ionosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papadopoulos, Konstantinos

    TESTING PLASMA PHYSICS IN THE IONOSPHERE K. Papadopoulos University of Maryland College Park, MD 20742 Ionospheric heaters supplemented by ground and space based diagnostic instruments, such as radars, optical cameras and photometers, HF/VLF/ELF/ULF receivers and magnetometers, radio beacons, riometers and ionosondes have for a long time being used to conduct plasma physics, geophysical and radio science investigations. The latest entry to ionospheric heating, the HF transmitter associated with the High Frequency Active Ionospheric Research Program (HAARP), was completed in February 2007. The transmitter consists of 180 antenna elements spanning 30.6 acres and can radiate 3.6 MW of HF power in the 2.8-10.0 MHz frequency range. With increasing frequency the beam-width varies from 15-5 degrees, corresponding to 20-30 dB gain and resulting in Effective Radiating Power (ERP) between .36 - 4.0 GW. The antenna can point to any direction in a cone of 30 degrees from the vertical, with a reposition time of 15 degrees in 15 microseconds resulting in super-luminous scanning speeds. The transmitter can synthesize essentially any desired waveform within the regulatory allowed bandwidth in linear and circular polarization. These capabilities far exceed those of previous ionospheric heaters and allow for new frontier research in plasma physics, geophysics and radio science. Following a brief discussion of the relationship of the new capabilities of the facility with thresholds of physical processes that could not be achieved previously, the presentation will discuss recent results in the areas of ULF/ELF/VLF generation and propagation and wave-particle interactions in the magnetosphere acquired with the completed facility. The presentation will conclude with a detailed discussion of possible frontier science experiments in the areas of Langmuir turbulence, parametric instabilities, electron acceleration, optical emissions and field aligned striations and duct generation, made

  4. Physics through the 1990s: Plasmas and fluids

    Science.gov (United States)

    1986-01-01

    The volume contains recommendations for programs in, and government support of, plasma and fluid physics. Four broad areas are covered: the physics of fluids, general plasma physics, fusion, and space and astrophysical plasmas. In the first section, the accomplishments of fluid physics and a detailed review of its sub-fields, such as combustion, non-Newtonian fluids, turbulence, aerodynamics, and geophysical fluid dynamics, are described. The general plasma physics section deals with the wide scope of the theoretical concepts involved in plasma research, and with the machines; intense beam systems, collective and laser-driven accelerators, and the associated diagnostics. The section on the fusion plasma research program examines confinement and heating systems, such as Tokamaks, magnetic mirrors, and inertial-confinement systems, and several others. Finally, theory and experiment in space and astrophysical plasma research is detailed, ranging from the laboratory to the solar system and beyond. A glossary is included.

  5. Toward a first-principles integrated simulation of tokamak edge plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, C S; Ku, S; Park, G; Strauss, H [New York University, New York, NY 10012 (United States); Klasky, S; Podhorszki, N; Barreto, R; Azevedo, E D' [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN 37381 (United States); Cummings, J [California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Samtaney, R [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton, NJ 08543 (United States); Shoshani, A [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Sugiyama, L [Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States); Keyes, D; Adams, M [Columbia University, New York NY 10027 (United States); Parker, S; Chen, Y [University of Colorado at Boulder, Boulder, CO 80309 (United States); Abbasi, H [Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA 30332 (United States); Bateman, G [Lehigh University, Bethlehem, PA 18015 (United States); Bennett, K; Docan, C [Rutgers University, New Brunswick, NJ 08901 (United States)], E-mail: cschang@cims.nyu.edu, E-mail: klasky@ornl.gov (and others)

    2008-07-15

    Performance of the ITER is anticipated to be highly sensitive to the edge plasma condition. The edge pedestal in ITER needs to be predicted from an integrated simulation of the necessary first-principles, multi-scale physics codes. The mission of the SciDAC Fusion Simulation Project (FSP) Prototype Center for Plasma Edge Simulation (CPES) is to deliver such a code integration framework by (1) building new kinetic codes XGC0 and XGC1, which can simulate the edge pedestal buildup; (2) using and improving the existing MHD codes ELITE, M3D-OMP, M3D-MPP and NIMROD, for study of large-scale edge instabilities called Edge Localized Modes (ELMs); and (3) integrating the codes into a framework using cutting-edge computer science technology. Collaborative effort among physics, computer science, and applied mathematics within CPES has created the first working version of the End-to-end Framework for Fusion Integrated Simulation (EFFIS), which can be used to study the pedestal-ELM cycles.

  6. The Earth's ionosphere plasma physics and electrodynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Kelley, Michael C

    2007-01-01

    Although interesting in its own right, due to the ever-increasing use of satellites for communication and navigation, weather in the ionosphere is of great concern. Every such system uses trans-ionospheric propagation of radio waves, waves which must traverse the commonly turbulent ionosphere. Understanding this turbulence and predicting it are one of the major goals of the National Space Weather program. Acquiring such a prediction capability will rest on understanding the very topics of this book, the plasma physics and electrodynamics of the system. Fully updated to reflect advances in the field in the 20 years since the first edition published Explores the buffeting of the ionosphere from above by the sun and from below by the lower atmosphere Unique text appropriate both as a reference and for coursework.

  7. Fullurene-oxygen-iodine laser (FOIL): physical principles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danilov, Oleg B.; Belousova, Inna M.; Mak, Artur A.; Belousov, Vlidilen P.; Grenishin, A. S.; Kiselev, V. M.; Krys'ko, A. V.; Murav'eva, T. D.; Ponomarev, Alexander N.; Sosnov, Eugene N.

    2005-03-01

    The paper considers the physical principles of developing the fullerene - oxygen - iodine laser (FOIL) with optical (sunlight in particular) pumping. Kinetic scheme of such a laser is considered. It is shown that the utmost efficiency of FOIL may exceed 40% of the energy, absorbed by fullerenes. Presented are the experimental results of singlet oxygen generation in liquid media (solutions and suspensions) and in solid-state structures, containing either fullerenes or fullerene-like nanopartickles (FNP). In experiment was shown the possibility of the singlet oxygen transfer to the gaseous phase by means of organizing of the solution (suspension) the boiling as well as of the gasodynamic wave of desorption from the solid-state structures, containing fullerenes or FNP. We present the preliminary experimental results of pulsed generation in optically pumped FOIL with the use of primary photodissociation of iodide for preparation of the atomic iodine in the generation zone. In the experiments on FOIL generation was implemented the principle of spectral separation of optical pumping.

  8. Fullerene-oxygen-iodine laser (FOIL): physical principles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danilov, Oleg B.; Belousova, Inna M.; Mak, Artur A.; Belousov, Vlidilen P.; Grenishin, A. S.; Kiselev, V. M.; Krys'ko, A. V.; Murav'eva, T. D.; Ponomarev, Alexander N.; Sosnov, Eugene N.

    2004-09-01

    The paper considers the physical principles of developing the fullerene-oxygen-iodine laser (FOIL) with optical (sunlight in particular) pumping. Kinetic scheme of such a laser is considered. It is shown that the utmost efficiency of FOIL may exceed 40% of the energy, absorbed by fullerenes. Presented are the experimental results of singlet oxygen generation in liquid media (solutions and suspensions) and in solid-state structures, containing either fullerenes or fullerene-like nanoparticles (FNP). In experiment was shown the possibility of the singlet oxygen transfer to the gaseous phase by means of organizing of the solution (suspension) the boiling as well as of the gasodynamic wave of desorption from the solid-state structures, containing fullerenes or FNP. We present the preliminary experimental results of pulsed generation in optically pumped FOIL with the use of primary photodissociation of iodide for preparation of the atomic iodine in the generation zone. In the experiments on FOIL generation was implemented the principle of spectral separation of optical pumping.

  9. Physical principles of membrane remodelling during cell mechanoadaptation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kosmalska, Anita Joanna; Casares, Laura; Elosegui-Artola, Alberto; Thottacherry, Joseph Jose; Moreno-Vicente, Roberto; González-Tarragó, Víctor; del Pozo, Miguel Ángel; Mayor, Satyajit; Arroyo, Marino; Navajas, Daniel; Trepat, Xavier; Gauthier, Nils C; Roca-Cusachs, Pere

    2015-06-15

    Biological processes in any physiological environment involve changes in cell shape, which must be accommodated by their physical envelope--the bilayer membrane. However, the fundamental biophysical principles by which the cell membrane allows for and responds to shape changes remain unclear. Here we show that the 3D remodelling of the membrane in response to a broad diversity of physiological perturbations can be explained by a purely mechanical process. This process is passive, local, almost instantaneous, before any active remodelling and generates different types of membrane invaginations that can repeatedly store and release large fractions of the cell membrane. We further demonstrate that the shape of those invaginations is determined by the minimum elastic and adhesive energy required to store both membrane area and liquid volume at the cell-substrate interface. Once formed, cells reabsorb the invaginations through an active process with duration of the order of minutes.

  10. Comparison of Principles of Technology and Traditional Physics Secondary Students' Scores on a Physics Examination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Beacher Bert

    1990-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate comparatively the performance of students enrolled in principles of technology and traditional physics classes in Alabama on a physics examination. The subjects included 226 students enrolled in the first year of the principles of technology course at eight pilot school systems in Alabama during the 1988 -89 year as well as 251 students enrolled in randomly selected, intact physics classes from the same school systems. Data were collected utilizing demographic questionnaires developed by the researcher and a physics examination developed by a jury of Auburn University physics professors. Six graduate assistants, including the researcher, administered the examination and the demographic questionnaires in the school systems. Data pertaining to the students' standardized scores were obtained from school counselors. The data were statistically analyzed by a multivariate analysis of variance (MANOVA) test and by a multivariate analysis of partial variance model. Results from the statistical analyses indicate that no significant difference in the two groups of students exist after adjustment for pre-existing differences and selected student and teacher variables. Significant interactions between course and both mathematics and science scores exists. While the physics students' scores were above the grand mean for both mathematics and science and the principles of technology students' scores were below the mean in both cases, the interactions indicate that the relationship between the scores on mathematics and science and course vary more than would be expected by chance for the two groups of students. The most significant conclusion was that the principles of technology course appears to be academically sound and may be the kind of course to successfully bridge the gap between academics and vocational education for a large segment of students.

  11. Fusion programs in applied plasma physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1992-02-01

    The objectives of the theoretical science program are: To support the interpretation of present experiments and predict the outcome of future planned experiments; to improve on existing models and codes and validate against experimental results; and to conduct theoretical physics development of advanced concepts with applications for DIII-D and future devices. Major accomplishments in FY91 include the corroboration between theory and experiment on MHD behavior in the second stable regime of operation on DIII-D, and the frequency and mode structure of toroidal Alfven eigenmodes in high beta, shaped plasmas. We have made significant advances in the development of the gyro-Landau fluid approach to turbulence simulation which more accurately models kinetic drive and damping mechanisms. Several theoretical models to explain the bifurcation phenomenon in L- to H-mode transition were proposed providing the theoretical basis for future experimental verification. The capabilities of new rf codes have been upgraded in response to the expanding needs of the rf experiments. Codes are being employed to plan for a fully non-inductive current drive experiment in a high beta, enhanced confinement regime. GA's experimental effort in Applied Physics encompasses two advanced diagnostics essential for the operation of future fusion experiments: Alpha particle diagnostic, and current and density profile diagnostics. This paper discusses research in all these topics.

  12. The quantum beat the physical principles of atomic clocks

    CERN Document Server

    Major, F G

    1998-01-01

    One of the indicators of the level of technological development of a society has been, throughout history, the precision of clocks it was able to build. This book examines the physical principles underlying the workings of clocks--from the earliest mechanical clocks to the present-day sophisticated clocks based on the properties of individual atoms. Intended for non-specialists with some knowledge of physics or engineering,the book treats the material in a broad intuitive manner, with a minimum of mathematical formalism. The presentation covers a broad range of salient topics relevant to the measurement of frequency and time intervals. The main focus is on electronic time-keeping: clocks based on quartz crystal oscillators and, at greater length, atomic clocks based on quantum resonance in rubidium, cesium, and hydrogen atoms, and, more recently, mercury ions. The book treats the revolutionary changes that the optical laser has wrought on atomic standards through laser cooling and optical pumping, and it disc...

  13. Physics of Deformed Special Relativity: Relativity Principle revisited

    CERN Document Server

    Girelli, F; Girelli, Florian; Livine, Etera R.

    2004-01-01

    In many different ways, Deformed Special Relativity (DSR) has been argued to provide an effective limit of quantum gravity in almost-flat regime. Some experiments will soon be able to test some low energy effects of quantum gravity, and DSR is a very promising candidate to describe these latter. Unfortunately DSR is up to now plagued by many conceptual problems (in particular how it describes macroscopic objects) which forbids a definitive physical interpretation and clear predictions. Here we propose a consistent framework to interpret DSR. We extend the principle of relativity: the same way that Special Relativity showed us that the definition of a reference frame requires to specify its speed, we show that DSR implies that we must also take into account its mass. We further advocate a 5-dimensional point of view on DSR physics and the extension of the kinematical symmetry from the Poincare group to the Poincare-de Sitter group (ISO(4,1)). This leads us to introduce the concept of a pentamomentum and to tak...

  14. Physical processes associated with current collection by plasma contactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katz, Ira; Davis, Victoria A.

    1990-01-01

    Recent flight data confirms laboratory observations that the release of neutral gas increases plasma sheath currents. Plasma contactors are devices which release a partially ionized gas in order to enhance the current flow between a spacecraft and the space plasma. Ionization of the expellant gas and the formation of a double layer between the anode plasma and the space plasma are the dominant physical processes. A theory is presented of the interaction between the contactor plasma and the background plasma. The conditions for formation of a double layer between the two plasmas are derived. Double layer formation is shown to be a consequence of the nonlinear response of the plasmas to changes in potential. Numerical calculations based upon this model are compared with laboratory measurements of current collection by hollow cathode-based plasma contactors.

  15. Ultra-high energy physics and standard basic principles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gonzalez-Mestres Luis

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available It has not yet been elucidated whether the observed flux suppression for ultra-high energy cosmic rays (UHECR at energies above ≃ 4 x 1019 eV is a signature of the Greisen-Zatsepin-Kuzmin (GZK cutoff or a consequence of other phenomena. In both cases, violations of the standard fundamental principles of Physics can be present and play a significant role. They can in particular modify cosmic-ray interactions, propagation or acceleration at very high energy. Thus, in a long-term program, UHECR data can hopefully be used to test relativity, quantum mechanics, energy and momentum conservation, vacuum properties... as well as the elementariness of standard particles. Data on cosmic rays at energies ≃ 1020 eV may also be sensitive to new physics generated well beyond Planck scale. A typical example is provided by the search for possible signatures of a Lorentz symmetry violation (LSV associated to a privileged local reference frame (the "vacuum rest frame", VRF. If a VRF exists, the internal structure of standard particles at ultra-high energy can undergo substantial modifications. Similarly, the conventional particle symmetries may cease to be valid at such energies instead of heading to a grand unification and the structure of vacuum may no longer be governed by standard quantum field theory. Then, the question whether the notion of Planck scale still makes sense clearly becomes relevant and the very grounds of Cosmology can undergo essential modifications. UHECR studies naturally interact with the interpretation of WMAP and Planck observations. Recent Planck data analyses tend to confirm the possible existence of a privileged space direction. If the observed phenomenon turns out to be a signature of the spinorial space-time (SST we suggested in 1996-97, then conventional Particle Physics may correspond to the local properties of standard matter at low enough energy and large enough distances. This would clearly strengthen the cosmological

  16. Plasma physics and controlled fusion research during half a century

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lehnert, Bo

    2001-06-01

    A review is given on the historical development of research on plasma physics and controlled fusion. The potentialities are outlined for fusion of light atomic nuclei, with respect to the available energy resources and the environmental properties. Various approaches in the research on controlled fusion are further described, as well as the present state of investigation and future perspectives, being based on the use of a hot plasma in a fusion reactor. Special reference is given to the part of this work which has been conducted in Sweden, merely to identify its place within the general historical development. Considerable progress has been made in fusion research during the last decades. Temperatures above the limit for ignition of self-sustained fusion reactions, i.e. at more than hundred million degrees, have been reached in large experiments and under conditions where the fusion power generation is comparable to the power losses. An energy producing fusion reactor could in principle be realized already today, but it would not become technically and economically efficient when being based on the present state of art. Future international research has therefore to be conducted along broad lines, with necessary ingredients of basic investigations and new ideas.

  17. BOOK REVIEW: Fundamentals of Plasma Physics and Controlled Fusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brambilla, Marco

    1998-04-01

    Professor Kenro Miyamoto, already well known for his textbook Plasma Physics for Nuclear Fusion (MIT Press, Cambridge, MA, 1976; revised edition 1989), has now published a new book entitled Fundamentals of Plasma Physics and Controlled Fusion (Iwanami Book Service Center, Tokyo, 1997). To a large extent, the new book is a somewhat shortened and well reorganized version of its predecessor. The style, concise and matter of fact, clearly shows the origin of the text in lectures given by the author to graduate students. As announced by the title, the book is divided into two parts: the first part (about 250 pages) is a general introduction to the physics of plasmas, while the second, somewhat shorter, part (about 150 pages), is devoted to a description of the most important experimental approaches to achieving controlled thermonuclear fusion. Even in the first part, moreover, the choice of subjects is consistently oriented towards the needs of fusion research. Thus, the introduction to the behaviour of charged particles (particle motion, collisions, etc.) and to the collective description of plasmas is quite short, although the reader will get a flavour of all the most important topics and will find a number of examples chosen for their relevance to fusion applications (only the presentation of the Vlasov equation, in the second section of Chapter 4, might be criticized as so concise as to be almost misleading, since the difference between microscopic and macroscopic fields is not even mentioned). Considerably more space is devoted to the magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) description of equilibrium and stability. This part includes the solution of the Grad-Shafranov equation for circular tokamaks, a brief discussion of Pfirsch-Schlüter, neoclassical and anomalous diffusion, and two relatively long chapters on the most important ideal and resistive MHD instabilities of toroidal plasmas; drift and ion temperature gradient driven instabilities are also briefly presented. The

  18. First Principles Investigation of Hydrogen Physical Adsorption on Graphynes' layers

    CERN Document Server

    Bartolomei, Massimiliano; Giorgi, Giacomo

    2015-01-01

    Graphynes are 2D porous structures deriving from graphene featuring triangular and regularly distributed subnanometer pores, which may be exploited to host small gaseous species. First principles adsorption energies of molecular hydrogen (H2) on graphene, graphdiyne and graphtriyne molecular prototypes are obtained at the MP2C level of theory. First, a single layer is investigated and it is found that graphynes are more suited than graphene for H2 physical adsorption since they provide larger binding energies at equilibrium distances much closer to the 2D plane. In particular, for graphtriyne a flat minimum located right in the geometric center of the pore is identified. A novel graphite composed of graphtriyne stacked sheets is then proposed and an estimation of its 3D arrangement is obtained at the DFT level of theory. In contrast to pristine graphite this new carbon material allow both H2 intercalation and out-of-plane diffusion by exploiting the larger volume provided by its nanopores. Related H2 binding ...

  19. Physical principles of filamentous protein self-assembly kinetics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michaels, Thomas C. T.; Liu, Lucie X.; Meisl, Georg; Knowles, Tuomas P. J.

    2017-04-01

    The polymerization of proteins and peptides into filamentous supramolecular structures is an elementary form of self-organization of key importance to the functioning biological systems, as in the case of actin biofilaments that compose the cellular cytoskeleton. Aberrant filamentous protein self-assembly, however, is associated with undesired effects and severe clinical disorders, such as Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s diseases, which, at the molecular level, are associated with the formation of certain forms of filamentous protein aggregates known as amyloids. Moreover, due to their unique physicochemical properties, protein filaments are finding extensive applications as biomaterials for nanotechnology. With all these different factors at play, the field of filamentous protein self-assembly has experienced tremendous activity in recent years. A key question in this area has been to elucidate the microscopic mechanisms through which filamentous aggregates emerge from dispersed proteins with the goal of uncovering the underlying physical principles. With the latest developments in the mathematical modeling of protein aggregation kinetics as well as the improvement of the available experimental techniques it is now possible to tackle many of these complex systems and carry out detailed analyses of the underlying microscopic steps involved in protein filament formation. In this paper, we review some classical and modern kinetic theories of protein filament formation, highlighting their use as a general strategy for quantifying the molecular-level mechanisms and transition states involved in these processes.

  20. Transport Physics in Reversed Shear Plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Levinton, F.M.; Batha, S.H. [Fusion Physics and Technology, Inc., Torrance, CA (United States); Beer, M.A.; Bell, M.G.; Budny, R.V.; Efthimion, P.C.; Mazzucato, E.; Nazikian, R.; Park, H.K.; Ramsey, A.T.; Schmidt, G.L.; Scott, S.D.; Synakowski, E.J.; Taylor, G.; Von Goeler, S.; Zarnstorff, M.C. [Princeton University, NJ (United States). Plasma Physics Laboratory; Bush, C.E. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1997-12-31

    Reversed magnetic shear is considered a good candidate for improving the tokamak concept because it has the potential to stabilize MHD instabilities and reduce particle and energy transport. With reduced transport the high pressure gradient would generate a strong off-axis bootstrap current and could sustain a hollow current density profile. Such a combination of favorable conditions could lead to an attractive steady-state tokamak configuration. Indeed, a new tokamak confinement regime with reversed magnetic shear has been observed on the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) where the particle, momentum, and ion thermal diffusivities drop precipitously, by over an order of magnitude. The particle diffusivity drops to the neoclassical level and the ion thermal diffusivity drops to much less than the neoclassical value in the region with reversed shear. This enhanced reversed shear (ERS) confinement mode is characterized by an abrupt transition with a large rate of rise of the density in the reversed shear region during neutral beam injection, resulting in nearly a factor of three increase in the central density to 1.2 X 10(exp 20) cube m. At the same time the density fluctuation level in the reversed shear region dramatically decreases. The ion and electron temperatures, which are about 20 keV and 7 keV respectively, change little during the ERS mode. The transport and transition into and out of the ERS mode have been studied on TFTR with plasma currents in the range 0.9-2.2 MA, with a toroidal magnetic field of 2.7-4.6 T, and the radius of the q(r) minimum, q{sub min}, has been varied from r/a = 0.35 to 0.55. Toroidal field and co/counter neutral beam injection toroidal rotation variations have been used to elucidate the underlying physics of the transition mechanism and power threshold of the ERS mode.

  1. BIOMECHANICAL PRINCIPLES PHYSICAL REHABILITATION OF CHILDREN WITH CEREBRAL PALSY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. D. Korshunov

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim. We studied the basic biomechanical principles of physical rehabilitation of children with cerebral palsy.Materials and methods. Methods of Motion Tracking and electromyography investigated the biomechanical characteristics of gait in children with cerebral palsy. It is shown that the main differences between dynamic stereotype walk pediatric patients is to delay moving forward center of gravity and the disorganization of the lower limb movements (especially knee in the vertical plane. Prevailing flexion - leading position of the lower extremities during locomotion cycle associated with limitation of motion in the hip joint, offset by an increase swinging body, weakening activity in the rear shock phase and its sharp increase in the fourth phase. Changes in the structure of the movement of the shoulder girdle and upper extremities can be considered as compensatory. Characteristically excessive involvement in the locomotion of the calf muscles and the rectus muscles of the back, with the central mechanisms gipersinhronizatsii activity of motor units are the primary mechanism for adaptation in a group of children that are capable of self-locomotion.Results. As a result of the research it shows that in motor rehabilitation of children with cerebral palsy should include the following elements: exercise to maintain the body balance when performing arm movements, exercises for coordination of hand movements, including motor brushes, exercises to increase mobility in the hip joints and in the back, exercises designed to exercise the calf muscles, the front thigh muscles and the rectus muscles of the back, massage to relieve hyper calf muscles. 

  2. Dynacore Final Report , Plasma Physics prototype

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lourens, W.

    2001-01-01

    The generation and behaviour of plasma in a fusion device and its interaction with sur-rounding materials is studied by observing several phenomena that will accompany a plasma discharge. These phenomena are recorded by means of so called Diagnostics. These are instruments that comprise complex elec

  3. Space plasma physics results from Spacelab 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burch, J. L.

    1985-01-01

    The Spacelab 1 payload carried several instrument systems which together investigated a number of space plasma phenomena. These experiments used the Space Shuttle Orbiter as a platform for making controlled particle-beam, plasma and neutral gas inputs to the ionosphere and magnetosphere and for observing the outputs produced. Spacelab 1 space-plasma investigations included the Space Experiments with Particle Accelerators (SEPAC), Phenomena Induced by Charged Particle Beams (PICPAB), Atmospheric Emissions Photometric Imaging (AEPI) and the Low Energy Electron Spectrometer and Magnetometer. Among the major phenomena investigated both singly and jointly by these experiments are vehicle charging and neutralization, beam-plasma and wave-particle interactions, anomalous ionization phenomena produced by neutral-gas and plasma injections and several phenomena induced by modulated particle beam injections.

  4. The Fundamental Principles of Existence and the Origin of Physical Laws

    CERN Document Server

    Grandpierre, A

    2002-01-01

    In this essay the ontological structure of reality is explored. The question of reducibility of biology to physics is considered in the context of their ultimate principles. It is shown that biology is an ontologically autonomous science and is based on its own, independent ultimate principle that is independent from that of physics. In the next step it is shown that self-consciousness represents a separate realm with its own, ontologically autonomous, ultimate principle. Understanding that reality is based on ultimate principles, a new possibility arises to interpret the origin of physical laws.

  5. The Fundamental Principles of the Universe and the Origin of Physical Laws

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grandpierre, Attila

    In this essay the ontological structure of reality is explored. The question of reducibility of biology to physics is considered in the context of their ultimate principles. It is shown that biology is an ontologically autonomous science and is based on its own, independent ultimate principle that is independent from that of physics. In the next step it is shown that self-consciousness represents a separate realm with its own, ontologically autonomous, ultimate principle. Understanding that reality is based on ultimate principles, a new possibility arises to interpret the origin of physical laws.

  6. A Physics Exploratory Experiment on Plasma Liner Formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thio, Y. C. Francis; Knapp, Charles E.; Kirkpatrick, Ronald C.; Siemon, Richard E.; Turchi, Peter

    2002-01-01

    Momentum flux for imploding a target plasma in magnetized target fusion (MTF) may be delivered by an array of plasma guns launching plasma jets that would merge to form an imploding plasma shell (liner). In this paper, we examine what would be a worthwhile experiment to do in order to explore the dynamics of merging plasma jets to form a plasma liner as a first step in establishing an experimental database for plasma-jets driven magnetized target fusion (PJETS-MTF). Using past experience in fusion energy research as a model, we envisage a four-phase program to advance the art of PJETS-MTF to fusion breakeven Q is approximately 1). The experiment (PLX (Plasma Liner Physics Exploratory Experiment)) described in this paper serves as Phase I of this four-phase program. The logic underlying the selection of the experimental parameters is presented. The experiment consists of using twelve plasma guns arranged in a circle, launching plasma jets towards the center of a vacuum chamber. The velocity of the plasma jets chosen is 200 km/s, and each jet is to carry a mass of 0.2 mg - 0.4 mg. A candidate plasma accelerator for launching these jets consists of a coaxial plasma gun of the Marshall type.

  7. Regular physical activity influences plasma ghrelin concentration in adolescent girls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jürimäe, Jaak; Cicchella, Antonio; Jürimäe, Toivo; Lätt, Evelin; Haljaste, Kaja; Purge, Pritt; Hamra, Jena; von Duvillard, Serge P

    2007-10-01

    We examined the effect of regular physical activity on plasma ghrelin concentration after onset of puberty in girls. In addition, we also examined the association of fasting plasma ghrelin concentration with various plasma biochemical, body composition, and aerobic capacity variables in healthy adolescent girls. Fifty healthy schoolgirls ages 11 to 16 yr were divided either into a physically active (N = 25) or a physically inactive (N = 25) group. The physically active group consisted of swimmers who had trained on an average of 6.2 +/- 2.0 h.wk(-1) for the last 2 yr, whereas the inclusion criterion for the physically inactive group was the participation in physical education classes only. The subjects were matched for age (+/- 1 yr) and body mass index (BMI; +/- 2 kg.m(-2)). Maturation I group (14 matched pairs) included pubertal stages 2 and 3, and maturation II group (11 matched pairs) included pubertal stages 4 and 5. Physically active girls had significantly higher (P ghrelin levels than the physically inactive girls (maturation I: 1152.1 +/- 312.9 vs 877.7 +/- 114.8 pg.mL(-1); maturation II: 1084.0 +/- 252.5 vs 793.4 +/- 164.9 pg.mL(-1)). Plasma ghrelin concentration was negatively related to percent body fat, fat mass, peak oxygen consumption per kilogram of body mass, leptin, estradiol, insulin, and insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I) (r > -0.298; P ghrelin concentration using the variables that were significantly associated with ghrelin concentration demonstrated that plasma IGF-I was the most important predictor of plasma ghrelin concentration (beta = -0.396; P = 0.008). Regular physical activity influences plasma ghrelin concentrations in girls with different pubertal maturation levels. Plasma IGF-I concentration seems to be the main determinant of circulating ghrelin in healthy, normal-weight adolescent girls.

  8. Fundamentals of plasma physics and controlled fusion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miyamoto, Kenro

    2000-10-01

    The present lecture note was written to fill a gap between text books for undergraduates and specific review articles written by specialists for their young colleagues. The note may be divided in three parts. The first part is on basic characteristics of a plasma in a magnetic field. The second part describes plasma confinement and heating with an emphasis on magnetohydrodynamic instabilities. In addition, propagation of plasma waves, plasma heating by electromagnetic waves are given. The third part is devoted to various specific concepts of nuclear fusion. Emphases are placed on toroidal devices, especially on tokamak devices and stellarators. One might feel heavy mathematics glimpsing the present note, especially in the part treating magnetohydrodynamic instabilities. (author)

  9. Physics of collapses in toroidal helical plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Itoh, Kimitaka [National Inst. for Fusion Science, Toki, Gifu (Japan); Itoh, Sanae; Fukuyama, Atsushi; Yagi, Masatoshi

    1998-12-31

    Theoretical model for the collapse events in toroidal helical plasmas with magnetic hill is presented. There exists a turbulent-turbulent transition at a critical pressure gradient, leading to a sudden increase of the anomalous transport. When the magnetic shear is low, the nonlinear excitation of the global mode is possible. This model explains an abrupt growth of the perturbations, i.e., the trigger phenomena. Achievable limit of the plasma beta value is discussed. (author)

  10. Test of the Equivalence Principle from K Physics

    CERN Document Server

    Hambye, T; Sarkar, U

    1996-01-01

    A violation of the equivalence principle (VEP) in the Kaon system can, in principle, induce oscillations between $K^\\circ$ and $\\overline{K^\\circ}$ in a manner that need not violate CPT conservation. We show that such a CPT-conserved VEP mechanism could be clearly tested experimentally through the energy dependence of the $K_L-K_S$ mass difference and discuss constraints imposed by present experiments.

  11. Town Meeting on Plasma Physics at the National Science Foundation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-11-01

    We invite you to the Town Meeting on the role of the National Science Foundation (NSF) in supporting basic and applied research in Plasma Physics in the U.S. The overarching goal of NSF is to promote the progress of science and to enable training of the next generation of scientists and engineers at US colleges and universities. In this context, the role of the NSF Physics Division in leading the nearly 20 year old NSF/DOE Partnership in Basic Plasma Science and Engineering serves as an example of the long history of NSF support for basic plasma physics research. Yet, the NSF interest in maintaining a healthy university research base in plasma sciences extends across the Foundation. A total of five NSF Divisions are participating in the most recent Partnership solicitation, and a host of other multi-disciplinary and core programs provide opportunities for scientists to perform research on applications of plasma physics to Space & Solar Physics, Astrophysics, Accelerator Science, Material Science, Plasma Medicine, and many sub-disciplines within Engineering. This Town Meeting will provide a chance to discuss the full range of relevant NSF funding opportunities, and to begin a conversation on the present and future role of NSF in stewarding basic plasma science and engineering research at US colleges and universities. We would like to particularly encourage early career scientists and graduate students to participate in this Town Meeting, though everyone is invited to join what we hope to be a lively discussion.

  12. Plasma Physics Issues in Gas Discharge Laser Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-12-01

    WL-TR-92-2087 PLASMA PHYSICS ISSUES IN GAS DISCHARGE LASER DEVELOPMENT AD-A257 735 ALAN GARSCADDEN MARK J. KUSNER J. GARY EDEN WL/POOC-3 WRIGHT...LASERS INFRARED MOLECULAR jAS LASERS UNCLASSIFIED UNCLASSIFIED UNCLASSIFIED UL Plasma Physics Issues in Gas Discharge Laser Development Alan Garscadden...the close coupling between body of work was not generally useful in laser development . vibrationally excited nitrogen and CO or CO2 . In fact. the First

  13. Applications of Symmetry Methods to the Theory of Plasma Physics

    OpenAIRE

    Giampaolo Cicogna; Francesco Ceccherini; Francesco Pegoraro

    2006-01-01

    The theory of plasma physics offers a number of nontrivial examples of partial differential equations, which can be successfully treated with symmetry methods. We propose three different examples which may illustrate the reciprocal advantage of this "interaction" between plasma physics and symmetry techniques. The examples include, in particular, the complete symmetry analysis of system of two PDE's, with the determination of some conditional and partial symmetries, the construction of group-...

  14. PlasmaPy: beginning a community developed Python package for plasma physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Nicholas A.; Huang, Yi-Min; PlasmaPy Collaboration

    2016-10-01

    In recent years, researchers in several disciplines have collaborated on community-developed open source Python packages such as Astropy, SunPy, and SpacePy. These packages provide core functionality, common frameworks for data analysis and visualization, and educational tools. We propose that our community begins the development of PlasmaPy: a new open source core Python package for plasma physics. PlasmaPy could include commonly used functions in plasma physics, easy-to-use plasma simulation codes, Grad-Shafranov solvers, eigenmode solvers, and tools to analyze both simulations and experiments. The development will include modern programming practices such as version control, embedding documentation in the code, unit tests, and avoiding premature optimization. We will describe early code development on PlasmaPy, and discuss plans moving forward. The success of PlasmaPy depends on active community involvement and a welcoming and inclusive environment, so anyone interested in joining this collaboration should contact the authors.

  15. The First Principle Formula of the Relativistic Heat Conductivity of Coulomb Electronic Plasmas

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    TIAN Chu-Shun; ZHANG Chi; LU Quan-Kang

    2001-01-01

    Making use of the relativistic BBGKY technique,the relativistic generalization of Landau collision integral is obtained.Furthermore,we calculate the relativistic hydrodynamic modes up to the second order in the hydrodynamic wave number.Combining Résibois' method,we present the first principle formula of the relativistic heat conductivity of Coulomb electronic plasmas for low-order corrections.

  16. Malaysian Secondary Physics Teachers' Perceptions towards the Teaching and Learning of Archimedes' Principle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salleh, Khalijah Mohd; Abdullah, Abu Bakar Bin

    2008-05-01

    An explorative study was carried out to confirm Malaysian Physics teachers' perception that Archimedes' principle is a difficult topic for secondary level students. The interview method was used for data collection. The study sample was made of nine national secondary schools teachers from Miri, Sarawak. The data was analysed qualitatively using the Atlas-ti version 5.2 software. The findings of the study showed that i) Archimedes' principle as compared to Bernoulli's and Pascal's is the most difficult principle of hydrodynamics for students, ii) more time was given in the teaching and learning (TL) of Archimedes principle compared to the other two principles, iii) the major TL problems include conceptual understanding, application of physics principles and ideas, and lack of mathematical skills. These findings implicate the need to develop corresponding instructional materials and learning kits that can assist students' understanding of Archimedes' principle.

  17. Monte Carlo simulations for plasma physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Okamoto, M.; Murakami, S.; Nakajima, N.; Wang, W.X. [National Inst. for Fusion Science, Toki, Gifu (Japan)

    2000-07-01

    Plasma behaviours are very complicated and the analyses are generally difficult. However, when the collisional processes play an important role in the plasma behaviour, the Monte Carlo method is often employed as a useful tool. For examples, in neutral particle injection heating (NBI heating), electron or ion cyclotron heating, and alpha heating, Coulomb collisions slow down high energetic particles and pitch angle scatter them. These processes are often studied by the Monte Carlo technique and good agreements can be obtained with the experimental results. Recently, Monte Carlo Method has been developed to study fast particle transports associated with heating and generating the radial electric field. Further it is applied to investigating the neoclassical transport in the plasma with steep gradients of density and temperatures which is beyong the conventional neoclassical theory. In this report, we briefly summarize the researches done by the present authors utilizing the Monte Carlo method. (author)

  18. PREFACE: Third International Workshop & Summer School on Plasma Physics 2008

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benova, E.; Dias, F. M.; Lebedev, Yu

    2010-01-01

    The Third International Workshop & Summer School on Plasma Physics (IWSSPP'08) organized by St Kliment Ohridsky University of Sofia, with co-organizers TCPA Foundation, Association EURATOM/IRNRE, The Union of the Physicists in Bulgaria, and the Bulgarian Academy of Sciences was held in Kiten, Bulgaria, at the Black Sea Coast, from 30 June to 5 July 2008. A Special Session on Plasmas for Environmental Issues was co-organised by the Institute of Plasmas and Nuclear Fusion, Lisbon, Portugal and the Laboratory of Plasmas and Energy Conversion, University of Toulouse, France. That puts the beginning of a series in Workshops on Plasmas for Environmental Issues, now as a satellite meeting of the European Physical Society Conference on Plasma Physics. As the previous issues of this scientific meeting (IWSSPP'05, J. Phys.: Conf. Series 44 (2006) and IWSSPP'06, J. Phys.: Conf. Series 63 (2007)), its aim was to stimulate the creation and support of a new generation of young scientists for further development of plasma physics fundamentals and applications, as well as to ensure an interdisciplinary exchange of views and initiate possible collaborations by bringing together scientists from various branches of plasma physics. This volume of Journal of Physics: Conference Series includes 38 papers (invited lectures, contributed talks and posters) devoted to various branches of plasma physics, among them fusion plasma and materials, dc and microwave discharge modelling, transport phenomena in gas discharge plasmas, plasma diagnostics, cross sections and rate constants of elementary processes, material processing, plasma-chemistry and technology. Some of them have been presented by internationally known and recognized specialists in their fields; others are MSc or PhD students' first steps in science. In both cases, we believe they will raise readers' interest. We would like to thank the members of both the International Advisory Committee and the Local Organizing Committee, the

  19. Principles and Methods of Adapted Physical Education and Recreation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnheim, Daniel D.; And Others

    This text is designed for the elementary and secondary school physical educator and the recreation specialist in adapted physical education and, more specifically, as a text for college courses in adapted and corrective physical education and therapeutic recreation. The text is divided into four major divisions: scope, key teaching and therapy…

  20. Physics and Dynamics of Current Sheets in Pulsed Plasma Thrusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-11-02

    pulsed plasma thruster. A simple experiment would involve measuring the impulse bit of a coaxial gas-fed pulsed plasma thruster operated in both positive...Princeton, NJ, 2002. [2] J. Marshal. Performance of a hydromagnetic plasma gun . The Physics of Fluids, 3(1):134–135, January-February 1960. [3] R.G. Jahn...Jahn and K.E. Clark. A large dielecteic vacuum facility. AIAA Jour- nal, 1966. [16] L.C. Burkhardt and R.H. Lovberg. Current sheet in a coaxial plasma

  1. PREFACE: First International Workshop and Summer School on Plasma Physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benova, Evgenia; Zhelyazkov, Ivan; Atanassov, Vladimir

    2006-07-01

    The First International Workshop and Summer School on Plasma Physics (IWSSPP'05) organized by The Faculty of Physics, University of Sofia and the Foundation `Theoretical and Computational Physics and Astrophysics' was dedicated to the World Year of Physics 2005 and held in Kiten, Bulgaria, on the Black Sea Coast, from 8--12 June 2005. The aim of the workshop was to bring together scientists from various branches of plasma physics in order to ensure an interdisciplinary exchange of views and initiate possible collaborations. Another important task was to stimulate the creation and support of a new generation of young scientists for the further development of plasma physics fundamentals and applications. This volume of Journal of Physics: Conference Series includes 31 papers (invited lectures, contributed talks and posters) devoted to various branches of plasma physics, among them fusion research, kinetics and transport phenomena in gas discharge plasmas, MHD waves and instabilities in the solar atmosphere, dc and microwave discharge modelling, plasma diagnostics, cross sections and rate constants of elementary processes, material processing, plasma-chemistry and technology. Some of them have been presented by internationally known and recognized specialists in their fields; others are Masters or PhD students' first steps in science. In both cases, we believe they will stimulate readers' interest. We would like to thank the members of both the International Advisory Committee and the Local Organizing Committee. We greatly appreciate the financial support from the sponsors: the Department for Language Teaching and International Students at Sofia University, Dr Ivan Bogorov Publishing house, and Artgraph2 Publishing house. We would like to express our gratitude to the invited lecturers who were willing to pay the participation fee. In this way, in addition to the intellectual support they provided by means of their excellent lectures, they also supported the school

  2. Reaction-diffusion problems in the physics of hot plasmas

    CERN Document Server

    Wilhelmsson, H

    2000-01-01

    The physics of hot plasmas is of great importance for describing many phenomena in the universe and is fundamental for the prospect of future fusion energy production on Earth. Nontrivial results of nonlinear electromagnetic effects in plasmas include the self-organization and self-formation in the plasma of structures compact in time and space. These are the consequences of competing processes of nonlinear interactions and can be best described using reaction-diffusion equations. Reaction-Diffusion Problems in the Physics of Hot Plasmas is focused on paradigmatic problems of a reaction-diffusion type met in many branches of science, concerning in particular the nonlinear interaction of electromagnetic fields with plasmas.

  3. Physics of High Temperature, Dense Plasmas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-01-01

    34Investigation of the High-Energy Acceleration Mode in the Coaxial Gun," Phys. Fluids, Suppl., S28, (1964). I. 9. Dattner, A. and Eninger J...34Studies of a Coaxial Plasma Gun," Phys. Fluids, Suppl., S41, (1964). II. 10. Wilcox, J. M., Pugh, E., Dattner, A. and Eninger , J., "Experimental Study of

  4. Research in Pulsed Power Plasma Physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-11-01

    constraints will preclude the use of channels with much with a Tesla coil. Nor is uniformity improved by the use of larger wall radii. a 3 kA prepulse. Driving...Oliphant. 12C. Bruno, J. Delvaux. A. Nicolas . and M. Roche, IEEE Trans. Plasma and P. F. Ottinger. App!. Phys. Lett. 45. 1043 (1984).ISci. PS-IS, 686

  5. Physical properties of erupting plasma associated with coronal mass ejections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, J.; Raymond, J. C.; Reeves, K. K.; Moon, Y.; Kim, K.

    2013-12-01

    We investigate the physical properties (temperature, density, and mass) of erupting plasma observed in X-rays and EUV, which are all associated with coronal mass ejections observed by SOHO/LASCO. The erupting plasmas are observed as absorption or emission features in the low corona. The absorption feature provides a lower limit to the cold mass while the emission feature provides an upper limit to the mass of observed plasma in X-ray and EUV. We compare the mass constraints for each temperature response and find that the mass estimates in EUV and XRT are smaller than the total mass in the coronagraph. Several events were observed by a few passbands in the X-rays, which allows us to determine the temperature of the eruptive plasma using a filter ratio method. The temperature of one event is estimated at about 8.6 MK near the top of the erupting plasma. This measurement is possibly an average temperature for higher temperature plasma because the XRT is more sensitive at higher temperatures. In addition, a few events show that the absorption features of a prominence or a loop change to emission features with the beginning of their eruptions in all EUV wavelengths of SDO/AIA, which indicates the heating of the plasma. By estimating the physical properties of the erupting plasmas, we discuss the heating of the plasmas associated with coronal mass ejections in the low corona.

  6. Proton-driven plasma wakefield acceleration: a path to the future of high-energy particle physics

    CERN Document Server

    Assmann, R; Bohl, T; Bracco, C; Buttenschön, B; Butterworth, A; Caldwell, A; Chattopadhyay, S; Cipiccia, S; Feldbaumer, E; Fonseca, R A; Goddard, B; Gross, M; Grulke, O; Gschwendtner, E; Holloway, J; Huang, C; Jaroszynski, D; Jolly, S; Kempkes, P; Lopes, N; Lotov, K; Machacek, J; Mandry, S R; McKenzie, J W; Meddahi, M; Militsyn, B L; Moschuering, N; Muggli, P; Najmudin, Z; Noakes, T C Q; Norreys, P A; Öz, E; Pardons, A; Petrenko, A; Pukhov, A; Rieger, K; Reimann, O; Ruhl, H; Shaposhnikova, E; Silva, L O; Sosedkin, A; Tarkeshian, R; Trines, R M G N; Tückmantel, T; Vieira, J; Vincke, H; Wing, M; Xia G , G

    2014-01-01

    New acceleration technology is mandatory for the future elucidation of fundamental particles and their interactions. A promising approach is to exploit the properties of plasmas. Past research has focused on creating large-amplitude plasma waves by injecting an intense laser pulse or an electron bunch into the plasma. However, the maximum energy gain of electrons accelerated in a single plasma stage is limited by the energy of the driver. Proton bunches are the most promising drivers of wakefields to accelerate electrons to the TeV energy scale in a single stage. An experimental program at CERN { the AWAKE experiment { has been launched to study in detail the important physical processes and to demonstrate the power of proton-driven plasma wakefield acceleration. Here we review the physical principles and some experimental considerations for a future proton-driven plasma wakefield accelerator.

  7. Proton-driven plasma wakefield acceleration: a path to the future of high-energy particle physics

    CERN Document Server

    Assmann, R; Bohl, T; Bracco, C; Buttenschon, B; Butterworth, A; Caldwell, A; Chattopadhyay, S; Cipiccia, S; Feldbaumer, E; Fonseca, R A; Goddard, B; Gross, M; Grulke, O; Gschwendtner, E; Holloway, J; Huang, C; Jaroszynski, D; Jolly, S; Kempkes, P; Lopes, N; Lotov, K; Machacek, J; Mandry, S R; McKenzie, J W; Meddahi, M; Militsyn, B L; Moschuering, N; Muggli, P; Najmudin, Z; Noakes, T C Q; Norreys, P A; Oz, E; Pardons, A; Petrenko, A; Pukhov, A; Rieger, K; Reimann, O; Ruhl, H; Shaposhnikova, E; Silva, L O; Sosedkin, A; Tarkeshian, R; Trines, R M G N; Tuckmantel, T; Vieira, J; Vincke, H; Wing, M; Xia, G

    2014-01-01

    New acceleration technology is mandatory for the future elucidation of fundamental particles and their interactions. A promising approach is to exploit the properties of plasmas. Past research has focused on creating large-amplitude plasma waves by injecting an intense laser pulse or an electron bunch into the plasma. However, the maximum energy gain of electrons accelerated in a single plasma stage is limited by the energy of the driver. Proton bunches are the most promising drivers of wakefields to accelerate electrons to the TeV energy scale in a single stage. An experimental program at CERN -- the AWAKE experiment -- has been launched to study in detail the important physical processes and to demonstrate the power of proton-driven plasma wakefield acceleration. Here we review the physical principles and some experimental considerations for a future proton-driven plasma wakefield accelerator.

  8. Principle of relativity in physics and in epistemology

    CERN Document Server

    Ni, G

    2004-01-01

    The conceptual evolution of principle of relativity in the theory of special relativity is discussed in detail. It is intimately related to a series of difficulties in quantum mechanics,relativistic quantum mechanics and quantum field theory as well as to new predictions about antigravity and tachyonic neutrinos etc.

  9. PREFACE: Second International Workshop & Summer School on Plasma Physics 2006

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benova, Evgeniya; Atanassov, Vladimir

    2007-04-01

    The Second International Workshop & Summer School on Plasma Physics (IWSSPP'06) organized by St. Kliment Ohridsky University of Sofia, The Union of the Physicists in Bulgaria, the Bulgarian Academy of Sciences and the Bulgarian Nuclear Society, was held in Kiten, Bulgaria, on the Black Sea Coast, from 3-9 July 2006. As with the first of these scientific meetings (IWSSPP'05 Journal of Physics: Conference Series 44 (2006)), its aim was to stimulate the creation and support of a new generation of young scientists for further development of plasma physics fundamentals and applications, as well as to ensure an interdisciplinary exchange of views and initiate possible collaborations by bringing together scientists from various branches of plasma physics. This volume of Journal of Physics: Conference Series includes 33 papers (invited lectures, contributed talks and posters) devoted to various branches of plasma physics, among them fusion plasma research, dc and microwave discharge modelling, transport phenomena in gas discharge plasmas, plasma diagnostics, cross sections and rate constants of elementary processes, material processing, plasma-chemistry and technology. Some of these papers were presented by internationally known and recognized specialists in their fields; others are MSc or PhD students' first steps in science. In both cases, we believe they will raise readers' interest. We would like to thank the members of both the International Advisory Committee and the Local Organizing Committee, the participants who sent their manuscripts and passed through the (sometimes heavy and troublesome) refereeing and editing procedure and our referees for their patience and considerable effort to improve the manuscripts. We greatly appreciate the financial support from the sponsors: the Department for Language Teaching and International Students at the University of Sofia and Natsionalna Elektricheska Kompania EAD. We would like to express our gratitude to the invited

  10. Plasma physics and environmental perturbation laboratory. Volume 1: Executive summary

    Science.gov (United States)

    1973-01-01

    Space physics and plasma physics experiments that can be performed from the space shuttle were identified. Potential experiment concepts were analyzed to derive requirements for a spaceborne experiment facility. The laboratory, known as the Plasma Physics and Environmental Perturbation Laboratory consists of a 33-foot pallet of instruments connected to a 25-foot pressurized control module. Two 50-meter booms, two subsatellites, a high power transmitter, a multipurpose accelerator array, a set of deployable canisters, and a gimbaled instrument platform are the primary systems deployed from the pallet. The pressurized module contains all the control and display equipment required to conduct the experiments, and life support and power subsystems.

  11. Plasma physics analysis of SERT-2 operation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaufman, H. R.

    1980-01-01

    An analysis of the major plasma processes involved in the SERT 2 spacecraft experiments was conducted to aid in the interpretation of recent data. A plume penetration model was developed for neutralization electron conduction to the ion beam and showed qualitative agreement with flight data. In the SERT 2 configuration conduction of neutralization electrons between thrusters was experimentally demonstrated in space. The analysis of this configuration suggests that the relative orientation of the two magnetic fields was an important factor in the observed results. Specifically, the opposed field orientation appeared to provide a high conductivity channel between thrusters and a barrier to the ambient low energy electrons in space. The SERT 2 neutralizer currents with negative neutralizer biases were up to about twice the theoretical prediction for electron collection by the ground screen. An explanation for the higher experimental values was a possible conductive path from the neutralizer plume to a nearby part of the ground screen. Plasma probe measurements of SERT 2 gave the clearest indication of plasma electron temperature, with normal operation being near 5 eV and discharge only operation near 2 eV.

  12. Plasma physics for controlled fusion. 2. ed.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miyamoto, Kenro

    2016-08-01

    This new edition presents the essential theoretical and analytical methods needed to understand the recent fusion research of tokamak and alternate approaches. The author describes magnetohydrodynamic and kinetic theories of cold and hot plasmas in detail. The book covers new important topics for fusion studies such as plasma transport by drift turbulence, which depend on the magnetic configuration and zonal flows. These are universal phenomena of microturbulence. They can modify the onset criterion for turbulent transport, instabilities driven by energetic particles as well as alpha particle generation and typical plasma models for computer simulation. The fusion research of tokamaks with various new versions of H modes are explained. The design concept of ITER, the international tokamak experimental reactor, is described for inductively driven operations as well as steady-state operations using non-inductive drives. Alternative approaches of reversed-field pinch and its relaxation process, stellator including quasi-symmetric system, open-end system of tandem mirror and inertial confinement are also explained. Newly added and updated topics in this second edition include zonal flows, various versions of H modes, and steady-state operations of tokamak, the design concept of ITER, the relaxation process of RFP, quasi-symmetric stellator, and tandem mirror. The book addresses graduate students and researchers in the field of controlled fusion.

  13. Guest investigator program study: Physics of equatorial plasma bubbles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsunoda, Roland T.

    1994-01-01

    Plasma bubbles are large-scale (10 to 100 km) depletions in plasma density found in the night-time equatorial ionosphere. Their formation has been found to entail the upward transport of plasma over hundreds of kilometers in altitude, suggesting that bubbles play significant roles in the physics of many of the diverse and unique features found in the low-latitude ionosphere. In the simplest scenario, plasma bubbles appear first as perturbations in the bottomside F layer, which is linearly unstable to the gravitationally driven Rayleigh-Taylor instability. Once initiated, bubbles develop upward through the peak of the F layer into its topside (sometimes to altitudes in excess of 1000 km), a behavior predicted by the nonlinear form of the same instability. While good general agreement has been found between theory and observations, little is known about the detailed physics associated with plasma bubbles. Our research activity centered around two topics: the shape of plasma bubbles and associated electric fields, and the day-to-day variability in the occurrence of plasma bubbles. The first topic was pursued because of a divergence in view regarding the nonlinear physics associated with plasma bubble development. While the development of perturbations in isodensity contours in the bottomside F layer into plasma bubbles is well accepted, some believed bubbles to be cylinder-like closed regions of depleted plasma density that floated upward leaving a turbulent wake behind them (e.g., Woodman and LaHoz, 1976; Ott, 1978; Kelley and Ott, 1978). Our results, summarized in a paper submitted to the Journal of Geophysical Research, consisted of incoherent scatter radar measurements that showed unambiguously that the depleted region is wedgelike and not cylinderlike, and a case study and modeling of SM-D electric field instrument (EFI) measurements that showed that the absence of electric-field perturbations outside the plasma-depleted region is a distinct signature of wedge

  14. APS presents prizes in fluid dynamics and plasma physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1992-12-01

    This article reviews the presentation of the American Physical Society awards in fluid dynamics and plasma physics. The recipient of the plasma physics James Clerk Maxwell Prize was John M. Green for contributions to the theory of magnetohydrodynamics equilibria and ideal and resistive instabilities, for discovering the inverse scattering transform leading to soliton solutions of many nonlinear partial differential equations and for inventing the residue method of determining the transition to global chaos. The excellence in Plasma Physics Research Award was presented to Nathaniel A. Fisch for theoretical investigations of noninductive current generation in toroidally confined plasma. Wim Pieter Leemans received the Simon Ramo Award for experimental and simulational contributions to laser-plasma physics. William R. Sears was given the 1992 Fuid Dynamics Prize for contributions to the study of steady and unsteady aerodynamics, aeroacoustics, magnetoaerodynamics,and wind tunnel design. William C. Reynolds received the Otto Laporte Award for experimental, theoretical, and computational work in turbulence modeling and control and leadership in direct numerical simulation and large eddy simulation.

  15. Plasma-Powder Feedstock Interaction During Plasma Spray-Physical Vapor Deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anwaar, Aleem; Wei, Lianglinag; Guo, Hongbo; Zhang, Baopeng

    2017-02-01

    Plasma spray-physical vapor deposition is a new process developed to produce coatings from the vapor phase. To achieve deposition from the vapor phase, the plasma-feedstock interaction inside the plasma torch, i.e., from the powder injection point to the nozzle exit, is critical. In this work, the plasma characteristics and the momentum and heat transfer between the plasma and powder feedstock at different torch input power levels were investigated theoretically to optimize the net plasma torch power, among other important factors such as the plasma gas composition, powder feed rate, and carrier gas. The plasma characteristics were calculated using the CEA2 code, and the plasma-feedstock interaction was studied inside the torch nozzle at low-pressure (20-25 kPa) conditions. A particle dynamics model was introduced to compute the particle velocity, coupled with Xi Chen's drag model for nonevaporating particles. The results show that the energy transferred to the particles and the coating morphology are greatly influenced by the plasma gas characteristics and the particle dynamics inside the nozzle. The heat transfer between the plasma gas and feedstock material increased with the net torch power up to an optimum at 64 kW, at which a maximum of 3.4% of the available plasma energy was absorbed by the feedstock powder. Experimental results using agglomerated 7-8 wt.% yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) powder as feedstock material confirmed the theoretical predictions.

  16. Plasma-Powder Feedstock Interaction During Plasma Spray-Physical Vapor Deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anwaar, Aleem; Wei, Lianglinag; Guo, Hongbo; Zhang, Baopeng

    2017-01-01

    Plasma spray-physical vapor deposition is a new process developed to produce coatings from the vapor phase. To achieve deposition from the vapor phase, the plasma-feedstock interaction inside the plasma torch, i.e., from the powder injection point to the nozzle exit, is critical. In this work, the plasma characteristics and the momentum and heat transfer between the plasma and powder feedstock at different torch input power levels were investigated theoretically to optimize the net plasma torch power, among other important factors such as the plasma gas composition, powder feed rate, and carrier gas. The plasma characteristics were calculated using the CEA2 code, and the plasma-feedstock interaction was studied inside the torch nozzle at low-pressure (20-25 kPa) conditions. A particle dynamics model was introduced to compute the particle velocity, coupled with Xi Chen's drag model for nonevaporating particles. The results show that the energy transferred to the particles and the coating morphology are greatly influenced by the plasma gas characteristics and the particle dynamics inside the nozzle. The heat transfer between the plasma gas and feedstock material increased with the net torch power up to an optimum at 64 kW, at which a maximum of 3.4% of the available plasma energy was absorbed by the feedstock powder. Experimental results using agglomerated 7-8 wt.% yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) powder as feedstock material confirmed the theoretical predictions.

  17. Computerized tomographic imaging for space plasma physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yuhong; Coplan, Michael A.; Moore, John H.; Berenstein, Carlos A.

    1990-01-01

    The measurement of plasma electron velocity distribution functions as a problem in imaging and image reconstruction is considered. A model instrument that measures the integral of the distribution function along lines in velocity space is presented. This allows the use of the powerful mathematical and numerical methods that have recently been so successful in other areas of imaging. It is found that this approach leads to classes of instruments that are qualitatively different from contemporary designs. An investigation of different methods of reconstruction of the distribution function from integral measurements reveals that the mathematical tools appropriate to one particular imaging problem may be very different from those required to deal with another.

  18. Dimensionally Democratic Calculus and Principles of Polydimensional Physics

    CERN Document Server

    Pezzaglia, W M

    1999-01-01

    A solution to the 50 year old problem of a spinning particle in curved space has been recently derived using an extension of Clifford calculus in which each geometric element has its own coordinate. This leads us to propose that all the laws of physics should obey new polydimensional metaprinciples, for which Clifford algebra is the natural language of expression, just as tensors were for general relativity. Specifically, phenomena and physical laws should be invariant under local automorphism transformations which reshuffle the physical geometry. This leads to a new generalized unified basis for classical mechanics, which includes string theory, membrane theory and the hypergravity formulation of Crawford[J. Math. Phys., {\\bf 35}, 2701-2718 (1994)]. Most important is that the broad themes presented can be exploited by nearly everyone in the field as a framework to generalize both the Clifford calculus and multivector physics.

  19. Generalized Tellegen Principle and Physical Correctness of System Representations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vaclav Cerny

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available The paper deals with a new problem of physical correctness detection in the area of strictly causal system representations. The proposed approach to the problem solution is based on generalization of Tellegen's theorem well known from electrical engineering. Consequently, mathematically as well as physically correct results are obtained. Some known and often used system representation structures are discussed from the developed point of view as an addition.

  20. The Principle of Plasma Boundary Identification on HL-2A Tokamak

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李强; 宋显明; 罗萃文; 袁保山; 毛苏英; 樊明杰; 刘莉

    2004-01-01

    Plasma boundary identification is a basic task for studies on equilibrium and confinement in a divertor tokamak. With the progress on the experiments after engineering experiments,the boundary identification becomes an important issue for HL-2A. In order to satisfy the requirements of preciseness, simplified measurements and quickness, the filament current method instead of solving the equilibrium equations is used to identify plasma boundary on HL-2A. The involved principle, mathematics and the progresses, which have been made with this method, are given.

  1. Plasma physics of accreting neutron stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, Pranab; Lamb, Frederick K.

    1991-01-01

    Plasma concepts and phenomena that are needed to understand X- and gamma-ray sources are discussed. The capture of material from the wind or from the atmosphere or envelope of a binary companion star is described and the resulting types of accretion flows discussed. The reasons for the formation of a magnetosphere around the neutron star are explained. The qualitative features of the magnetospheres of accreting neutron stars are then described and compared with the qualitative features of the geomagnetosphere. The conditions for stable flow and for angular and linear momentum conservation are explained in the context of accretion by magnetic neutron stars and applied to obtain rough estimates of the scale of the magnetosphere. Accretion from Keplerian disks is then considered in some detail. The radial structure of geometrically thin disk flows, the interaction of disk flows with the neutron star magnetosphere, and models of steady accretion from Keplerian disks are described. Accretion torques and the resulting changes in the spin frequencies of rotating neutron stars are considered. The predicted behavior is then compared with observations of accretion-powered pulsars. Magnetospheric processes that may accelerate particles to very high energies, producing GeV and, perhaps, TeV gamma-rays are discussed. Finally, the mechanisms that decelerate and eventually stop accreting plasma at the surfaces of strongly magnetic neutron stars are described.

  2. Polymer electrolyte fuel cells physical principles of materials and operation

    CERN Document Server

    Eikerling, Michael

    2014-01-01

    The book provides a systematic and profound account of scientific challenges in fuel cell research. The introductory chapters bring readers up to date on the urgency and implications of the global energy challenge, the prospects of electrochemical energy conversion technologies, and the thermodynamic and electrochemical principles underlying the operation of polymer electrolyte fuel cells. The book then presents the scientific challenges in fuel cell research as a systematic account of distinct components, length scales, physicochemical processes, and scientific disciplines. The main part of t

  3. The conceptual principles of the functioning of the methodical system of physical training of agricultural students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gryban G.P.

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available The paper considers the conceptual principles of the functioning of the methodical system of physical training of agrarian university students. The author is the first to develop the methodology of creating the model of the methodical system of physical training, to specify its components (aim, content, methods, means and organizational forms of training, as well as the ways of their functioning in the physical training process. The author also determines the principles, specificities, the process of projecting and reforming the methodical system of physical training of agricultural students.

  4. Emergent physics on Mach's principle and the rotating vacuum

    CERN Document Server

    Jannes, G

    2015-01-01

    Mach's principle applied to rotation can be correct if one takes into account the rotation of the quantum vacuum together with the Universe. Whether one can detect the rotation of the vacuum or not depends on its properties. If the vacuum is fully relativistic at all scales, Mach's principle should work and one cannot distinguish the rotation: in the rotating Universe+vacuum, the co-rotating bucket will have a flat surface (not concave). However, if there are "quantum gravity" effects which violate Lorentz invariance at high energy, then the rotation will become observable. This is demonstrated by analogy in condensed-matter systems, which consist of two subsystems: superfluid background (analog of vacuum) and "relativistic" excitations (analog of matter). For the low-energy (long-wavelength) observer the rotation of the vacuum is not observable. In the rotating frame, the "relativistic" quasiparticles feel the background as a Minkowski vacuum, i.e. they do not feel the rotation. Mach's idea of the relativity...

  5. Test of Special Relativity and Equivalence principle from K Physics

    CERN Document Server

    Hambye, T; Sarkar, U

    1998-01-01

    A violation of Local Lorentz Invariance (VLI) and hence the special theory of relativity or a violation of equivalence principle (VEP) in the Kaon system can, in principle, induce oscillations between $K^0$ and $\\bar{K}^0$. We construct a general formulation in which simultaneous pairwise diagonalization of mass, momemtum, weak or gravitational eigenstates is not assumed. %and the maximum attainable %velocities of the velocity eigenstates are different. We discuss this problem in a general way and point out that, as expected, the VEP and VLI contributions are indistinguishable. We then insist on the fact that VEP or VLI can occur even when CPT is conserved. A possible CP violation of the superweak type induced by VEP or VLI is introduced and discussed. We show that the general VEP mechanism (or the VLI mechanism, but not both simultaneously), with or without conserved CPT, could be clearly tested experimentally through the energy dependence of the $K_L-K_S$ mass difference and of $\\eta_{+-}$, calculated.

  6. Principles of Equivalence Their Role in Gravitation Physics and Experiments that Test Them

    CERN Document Server

    Haugan, Mark P; Haugan, Mark P.

    2001-01-01

    Modern formulations of equivalence principles provide the foundation for an efficient approach to understanding and organizing the structural features of gravitation field theories. Since theories' predictions reflect differences in their structures, principles of equivalence also support an efficient experimental strategy for testing gravitation theories and for exploring the range of conceivable gravitation physics. These principles focus attention squarely on empirical consequences of the fundamental structural differences that distinguish one gravitation theory from another. Interestingly, the variety of such consequences makes it possible to design and perform experiments that test equivalence principles stringently but do so in markedly different ways than the most familiar experimental tests.

  7. Heisenberg uncertainty principle and economic analogues of basic physical quantities

    CERN Document Server

    Soloviev, Vladimir

    2011-01-01

    From positions, attained by modern theoretical physics in understanding of the universe bases, the methodological and philosophical analysis of fundamental physical concepts and their formal and informal connections with the real economic measurings is carried out. Procedures for heterogeneous economic time determination, normalized economic coordinates and economic mass are offered, based on the analysis of time series, the concept of economic Plank's constant has been proposed. The theory has been approved on the real economic dynamic's time series, including stock indices, Forex and spot prices, the achieved results are open for discussion.

  8. Fundamentals of many-body physics principles and methods

    CERN Document Server

    Nolting, Wolfgang

    2009-01-01

    This textbook addresses the special physics of many-particle systems, especially those dominated by correlation effects. It develops modern methods to treat such systems and demonstrates their application through numerous appropriate exercises, mainly from the field of solid state physics. The book is written in a tutorial style appropriate for those who want to learn many-body theory and eventually to use this to do research work in this field. The exercises, together with full solutions for evaluating one's performance, help to deepen understanding of the main aspects of many-particle systems.

  9. Applications of Symmetry Methods to the Theory of Plasma Physics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giampaolo Cicogna

    2006-02-01

    Full Text Available The theory of plasma physics offers a number of nontrivial examples of partial differential equations, which can be successfully treated with symmetry methods. We propose three different examples which may illustrate the reciprocal advantage of this "interaction" between plasma physics and symmetry techniques. The examples include, in particular, the complete symmetry analysis of system of two PDE's, with the determination of some conditional and partial symmetries, the construction of group-invariant solutions, and the symmetry classification of a nonlinear PDE.

  10. Using spatial principles to optimize distributed computing for enabling the physical science discoveries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Chaowei; Wu, Huayi; Huang, Qunying; Li, Zhenlong; Li, Jing

    2011-04-05

    Contemporary physical science studies rely on the effective analyses of geographically dispersed spatial data and simulations of physical phenomena. Single computers and generic high-end computing are not sufficient to process the data for complex physical science analysis and simulations, which can be successfully supported only through distributed computing, best optimized through the application of spatial principles. Spatial computing, the computing aspect of a spatial cyberinfrastructure, refers to a computing paradigm that utilizes spatial principles to optimize distributed computers to catalyze advancements in the physical sciences. Spatial principles govern the interactions between scientific parameters across space and time by providing the spatial connections and constraints to drive the progression of the phenomena. Therefore, spatial computing studies could better position us to leverage spatial principles in simulating physical phenomena and, by extension, advance the physical sciences. Using geospatial science as an example, this paper illustrates through three research examples how spatial computing could (i) enable data intensive science with efficient data/services search, access, and utilization, (ii) facilitate physical science studies with enabling high-performance computing capabilities, and (iii) empower scientists with multidimensional visualization tools to understand observations and simulations. The research examples demonstrate that spatial computing is of critical importance to design computing methods to catalyze physical science studies with better data access, phenomena simulation, and analytical visualization. We envision that spatial computing will become a core technology that drives fundamental physical science advancements in the 21st century.

  11. Fusion plasma physics during half a century

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lehnert, Bo

    1999-08-01

    A review is given on the potentialities of fusion energy with respect to energy production and related environmental problems, the various approaches to controlled thermonuclear fusion, the main problem areas of research, the historical development, the present state of investigations, and future perspectives. This article also presents a personal memorandum of the author. Thereby special reference will be given to part of the research conducted at the Royal Institute of Technology in Stockholm, merely to identify its place within the general historical development. Considerable progress has been made in fusion research during the last decades. In large tokamak experiments temperatures above the ignition limit of about 10{sup 8} K have been reached under break-even conditions where the fusion power generation is comparable to the energy loss. A power producing fusion reactor could in principle be realized already today, but it would not become technically and economically efficient. The future international research programme has therefore to be conducted along broad lines, with necessary ingredients of basis research and new ideas, and also within lines of magnetic confinement being alternative to that of tokamaks.

  12. Plasma Physics Research at an Undergraduate Institution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Padalino, Stephen

    2007-11-01

    Undergraduate research experiences have motivated many physics majors to continue their studies at the graduate level. The Department of Physics and Astronomy at SUNY Geneseo, a primarily undergraduate institution, recognizes this simple reality and is committed to ensuring research opportunities are available to interested majors beginning as early as their freshman year. Every year for more than a decade, as many as two dozen students and 8 faculty members have worked on projects related to high energy density physics and inertial confinement fusion during the summer months and the academic year. By working with their research sponsors, it has been possible to identify an impressive number of projects suitable for an institution such as Geneseo. These projects tend to be hands-on and require teamwork and innovation to be successful. They also take advantage of in-house capabilities such as the 2 MV tandem pelletron accelerator, a scanning electron microscope, a duoplasmatron ion deposition system and a 64 processor computing cluster. The end products of their efforts are utilized at the sponsoring facilities in support of nationally recognized programs. In this talk, I will discuss a number of these projects and point out what made them attractive and appropriate for an institution like Geneseo, the direct and indirect benefits of the research opportunities for the students and faculty, and how the national programs benefited from the cost-effective use of undergraduate research. In addition, I will discuss the importance of exposure for both students and faculty mentors to the larger scientific community through posters presentations at annual meetings such as the DPP and DNP. Finally, I will address the need for even greater research opportunities for undergraduate students in the future and the importance of establishing longer ``educational pipelines'' to satisfy the ever growing need for top-tier scientists and engineers in industry, academia and the

  13. Physics considerations for laser-plasma linear colliders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schroeder, Carl; Esarey, Eric; Geddes, Cameron; Benedetti, Carlo; Leemans, Wim

    2010-06-11

    Physics considerations for a next-generation linear collider based on laser-plasma accelerators are discussed. The ultra-high accelerating gradient of a laser-plasma accelerator and short laser coupling distance between accelerator stages allows for a compact linac. Two regimes of laser-plasma acceleration are discussed. The highly nonlinear regime has the advantages of higher accelerating fields and uniform focusing forces, whereas the quasi-linear regime has the advantage of symmetric accelerating properties for electrons and positrons. Scaling of various accelerator and collider parameters with respect to plasma density and laser wavelength are derived. Reduction of beamstrahlung effects implies the use of ultra-short bunches of moderate charge. The total linac length scales inversely with the square root of the plasma density, whereas the total power scales proportional to the square root of the density. A 1 TeV center-of-mass collider based on stages using a plasma density of 10{sup 17} cm{sup -3} requires tens of J of laser energy per stage (using 1 {micro}m wavelength lasers) with tens of kHz repetition rate. Coulomb scattering and synchrotron radiation are examined and found not to significantly degrade beam quality. A photon collider based on laser-plasma accelerated beams is also considered. The requirements for the scattering laser energy are comparable to those of a single laser-plasma accelerator stage.

  14. Physics of liquid and crystalline plasmas: Future perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morfill, G. E.

    It has been shown that under certain conditions "complex plasmas" (plasma containing ions, electrons and charged microspheres) may undergo spontaneous phase changes to become liquid and crystalline, without recombination of the charge components. Hence these systems may be regarded as new plasma states "condensed plasmas". The ordering forces are mainly electrostatic, but dipolar effects, anisotropic pressure due shielding, ion flow focussing etc. may all play a role, too. Complex plasmas are of great interest from a fundamental research point of view because the individual particles of one plasma component (the charged microspheres) can be visualised and hence the plasma can be studied at the kinetic level. Also, the relevant time scales (e.g. 1/plasma frequency) are of order 0.1 sec, the plasma processes occur practically in "slow motion". We will discuss some physical processes (e.g. wave propagation, shocks, phase transitions) of these systems and outline the potential of the research for the understanding of strongly coupled systems. Technologically, it is expected that colloidal plasmas will also become very important, because both plasma technology and colloid technology are widely developed already. In this overview first the basic forces between the particles are discussed, then the phase transitions, the lattice structures and results from active experiments will be presented. Finally the future perspectives will be discussed, from the scientific potential point of view and the experimental approaches in the laboratory and in space. Experiments under microgravity conditions are of great importance, because the microspheres are 10's of billions times heavier than the ions.

  15. Extended First-Principles Molecular Dynamics Method From Cold Materials to Hot Dense Plasmas

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, Shen; Kang, Wei; Zhang, Ping; He, Xian-Tu

    2016-01-01

    An extended first-principles molecular dynamics (FPMD) method based on Kohn-Sham scheme is proposed to elevate the temperature limit of the FPMD method in the calculation of dense plasmas. The extended method treats the wave functions of high energy electrons as plane waves analytically, and thus expands the application of the FPMD method to the region of hot dense plasmas without suffering from the formidable computational costs. In addition, the extended method inherits the high accuracy of the Kohn-Sham scheme and keeps the information of elec- tronic structures. This gives an edge to the extended method in the calculation of the lowering of ionization potential, X-ray absorption/emission spectra, opacity, and high-Z dense plasmas, which are of particular interest to astrophysics, inertial confinement fusion engineering, and laboratory astrophysics.

  16. Inorganic Scintillators for Detector Systems Physical Principles and Crystal Engineering

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2068219; Gektin, Alexander; Korzhik, Mikhail; Pédrini, Christian

    2006-01-01

    The development of new scintillators as components of modern detector systems is increasingly defined by the end user's needs. This book provides an introduction to this emerging topic at the interface of physics and materials sciences, with emphasis on bulk inorganic scintillators. After surveying the end user's needs in a vast range of applications, ranging from astrophysics to industrial R & D, the authors move on to review scintillating mechanisms and the properties of the most important materials used. A chapter on crystal engineering and examples of recent developments in the field of high-energy physics and medical imaging introduce the reader to the practical aspects. This book will benefit researchers and scientists working in academic and industrial R & D related to the development of scintillators.

  17. Inorganic scintillators for detector systems physical principles and crystal engineering

    CERN Document Server

    Lecoq, Paul; Korzhik, Mikhail

    2017-01-01

    This second edition features new chapters highlighting advances in our understanding of the behavior and properties of scintillators, and the discovery of new families of materials with light yield and excellent energy resolution very close to the theoretical limit. The book focuses on the discovery of next-generation scintillation materials and on a deeper understanding of fundamental processes. Such novel materials with high light yield as well as significant advances in crystal engineering offer exciting new perspectives. Most promising is the application of scintillators for precise time tagging of events, at the level of 100 ps or higher, heralding a new era in medical applications and particle physics. Since the discovery of the Higgs Boson with a clear signature in the lead tungstate scintillating blocks of the CMS Electromagnetic Calorimeter detector, the current trend in particle physics is toward very high luminosity colliders, in which timing performance will ultimately be essential to mitigating...

  18. Physics of High Performance Dueterium-Tritium Plasmas in TFTR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McGuire, K. M.; White, R.; Wieland, R. M.; Williams, M.; Wilson, J. R.; Wong, K. L.; Wurden, G. A.; Batha, S.; Lamarche, P.; LeBlanc, B.; Levinton, F. M.; Beer, M.; Bell, M. G.; Bell, R. E.; Belov, A.; Fredrickson, E. D.; Fu, G. Y.; Furth, H. P.; Gorelenkov, N. N.; Krasilnikov, A. V.; Meade, D. M.; Medley, S. S.; Mika, R.; Mikkelsen, D. R.; Mirnov, S. V.; Schilling, G.; Schivell, J.; Schmidt, G. L.; Scott, S. D.; Semenov, I.; Berk, H.; Bernabei, S.; Bitter, M.; Breizman, B.; Dorland, W.; Phillips, P.; Bretz, N. L.; Budny, R.; Bush, C.E.; Grek, B.; Grisham, L. R.; Hammett, G. W.; Herrmann, H. W.; Herrmann, M.; Hill, K. W.; Hogan, G. R.; Hosea, J. C.

    1996-01-01

    During the past two years, deuterium-tritium (D-T) plasmas in the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) have been used to study fusion power production,isotope effects associated with tritium fueling, and alpha-particle physics in several operational regimes. The peak fusion power has been increased to 10.7 MW in the supershot mode through the use of increased plasma current and toroidal magnetic field and extensive lithium wall conditioning. The high-internal-inductance (high -li) regime in TFTR has been extended in plasma current and has achieved 8.7 MW of fusion power. Studies of the effects of tritium on confinement have now been carried out in ohmic, NBI- and ICRF-heated L-mode and reversed-shear plasmas. In general, there is an enhancement in confinement time in D-T plasmas which is most pronounced in supershot and high-li discharges, weaker in L-mode plasmas with NBI and ICRF heating and smaller still in ohmic plasmas. In reversed-shear discharges with sufficient deuterium-NBI heating power, internal transport barriers have been observed to form, leading to enhanced confinement. Large decreases in the ion heat conductivity and particle transport are inferred within the transport barrier.It appears that higher heating power is required to trigger the formation of a transport barrier with D-T NBI and the isotope effect on energy confinement is nearly absent in these enhanced reverse-shear plasmas. Many alpha-particle physics issues have been studied in the various operating regimes including confinement of the alpha particles, their redistribution by sawteeth, and their loss due to MHD instabilities with low toroidal mode numbers. In weak-shear plasmas, alpha-particle destabilization of a toroidal Alfven eigenmode has been observed.

  19. Physics of high performance deuterium-tritium plasmas in TFTR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McGuire, K.M. [Princeton Univ., NJ (United States). Princeton Plasma Physics Lab.; Barnes, C.W. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Batha, S. [Fusion Physics and Technology, Torrance, CA (United States)] [and others

    1996-11-01

    During the past two years, deuterium-tritium (D-T) plasmas in the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) have been used to study fusion power production, isotope effects associated with tritium fueling, and alpha-particle physics in several operational regimes. The peak fusion power has been increased to 10.7 MW in the supershot mode through the use of increased plasma current and toroidal magnetic field and extensive lithium wall conditioning. The high-internal-inductance (high-I{sub i}) regime in TFTR has been extended in plasma current and has achieved 8.7 MW of fusion power. Studies of the effects of tritium on confinement have now been carried out in ohmic, NBI- and ICRF- heated L-mode and reversed-shear plasmas. In general, there is an enhancement in confinement time in D-T plasmas which is most pronounced in supershot and high-I{sub i} discharges, weaker in L-mode plasmas with NBI and ICRF heating and smaller still in ohmic plasmas. In reversed-shear discharges with sufficient deuterium-NBI heating power, internal transport barriers have been observed to form, leading to enhanced confinement. Large decreases in the ion heat conductivity and particle transport are inferred within the transport barrier. It appears that higher heating power is required to trigger the formation of a transport barrier with D-T NBI and the isotope effect on energy confinement is nearly absent in these enhanced reverse-shear plasmas. Many alpha-particle physics issues have been studied in the various operating regimes including confinement of the alpha particles, their redistribution by sawteeth, and their loss due to MHD instabilities with low toroidal mode numbers. In weak-shear plasmas, alpha-particle destabilization of a toroidal Alfven eigenmode has been observed.

  20. Clinical and Biological Principles of Cold Atmospheric Plasma Application in Skin Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gay-Mimbrera, Jesús; García, Maria Carmen; Isla-Tejera, Beatriz; Rodero-Serrano, Antonio; García-Nieto, Antonio Vélez; Ruano, Juan

    2016-06-01

    Plasma-based electrosurgical devices have long been employed for tissue coagulation, cutting, desiccation, and cauterizing. Despite their clinical benefits, these technologies involve tissue heating and their effects are primarily heat-mediated. Recently, there have been significant developments in cold atmospheric pressure plasma (CAP) science and engineering. New sources of CAP with well-controlled temperatures below 40 °C have been designed, permitting safe plasma application on animal and human bodies. In the last decade, a new innovative field, often referred to as plasma medicine, which combines plasma physics, life science, and clinical medicine has emerged. This field aims to exploit effects of mild plasma by controlling the interactions between plasma components (and other secondary species that can be formed from these components) with specific structural elements and functionalities of living cells. Recent studies showed that CAP can exert beneficial effects when applied selectively in certain pathologies with minimal toxicity to normal tissues. The rapid increase in new investigations and development of various devices for CAP application suggest early adoption of cold plasma as a new tool in the biomedical field. This review explores the latest major achievements in the field, focusing on the biological effects, mechanisms of action, and clinical evidence of CAP applications in areas such as skin disinfection, tissue regeneration, chronic wounds, and cancer treatment. This information may serve as a foundation for the design of future clinical trials to assess the efficacy and safety of CAP as an adjuvant therapy for skin cancer.

  1. Variational Principles and Methods in Theoretical Physics and Chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nesbet, Robert K.

    2005-07-01

    Preface; Part I. Classical Mathematics and Physics: 1. History of variational theory; 2. Classical mechanics; 3. Applied mathematics; Part II. Bound States in Quantum Mechanics: 4. Time-independent quantum mechanics; 5. Independent-electron models; 6. Time-dependent theory and linear response; Part III. Continuum States and Scattering Theory: 7. Multiple scattering theory for molecules and solids; 8. Variational methods for continuum states; 9. Electron-impact rovibrational excitation of molecules; Part IV. Field Theories: 10. Relativistic Lagrangian theories.

  2. Geometric perturbation theory and plasma physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Omohundro, S.M.

    1985-04-04

    Modern differential geometric techniques are used to unify the physical asymptotics underlying mechanics, wave theory and statistical mechanics. The approach gives new insights into the structure of physical theories and is suited to the needs of modern large-scale computer simulation and symbol manipulation systems. A coordinate-free formulation of non-singular perturbation theory is given, from which a new Hamiltonian perturbation structure is derived and related to the unperturbed structure. The theory of perturbations in the presence of symmetry is developed, and the method of averaging is related to reduction by a circle group action. The pseudo-forces and magnetic Poisson bracket terms due to reduction are given a natural asymptotic interpretation. Similar terms due to changing reference frames are related to the method of variation of parameters, which is also given a Hamiltonian formulation. These methods are used to answer a question about nearly periodic systems. The answer leads to a new secular perturbation theory that contains no ad hoc elements. Eikonal wave theory is given a Hamiltonian formulation that generalizes Whitham's Lagrangian approach. The evolution of wave action density on ray phase space is given a Hamiltonian structure using a Lie-Poisson bracket. The relationship between dissipative and Hamiltonian systems is discussed. A new type of attractor is defined which attracts both forward and backward in time and is shown to occur in infinite-dimensional Hamiltonian systems with dissipative behavior. The theory of Smale horseshoes is applied to gyromotion in the neighborhood of a magnetic field reversal and the phenomenon of reinsertion in area-preserving horseshoes is introduced. The central limit theorem is proved by renormalization group techniques. A natural symplectic structure for thermodynamics is shown to arise asymptotically from the maximum entropy formalism.

  3. New Outreach Initiatives at the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zwicker, Andrew; Dominguez, Arturo; Greco, Shannon; Ortiz, Deedee; Delooper, John

    2015-11-01

    In FY15, PPPL concentrated its efforts on a portfolio of outreach activities centered around plasma science and fusion energy that have the potential to reach a large audience and have a significant and measurable impact. The overall goal of these outreach activities is to expose the public (within New Jersey, the US and the world) to the Department of Energy's scientific endeavors and specifically to PPPL's research regarding fusion and plasma science. The projects include several new activities along with upgrades to existing ones. The new activities include the development of outreach demos for the plasma physics community and the upgrade of the Internet Plasma Physics Experience (IPPEX). Our first plasma demo is a low cost DC glow discharge, suitable for tours as well as for student laboratories (plasma breakdown, spectroscopy, probes). This has been field tested in a variety of classes and events. The upgrade to the IPPEX web site includes a new template and a new interactive virtual tokamak. Future work on IPPEX will provide users limited access to data from NSTX-U. Finally, our Young Women's Conference was expanded and improved. These and other new outreach activities will be presented.

  4. Physical anthropology: the search for general processes and principles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lasker, G W

    1970-02-01

    Physical anthropology consists of two interdependent types of study: (1) the biological history of man and (2) general biological processes in man (such as mechanisms of evolution and growth). Popular interest may focus on the former, the fascinating story of the origin of man and of specific people, but the latter affords physical anthropology potential practical value in respect to medicine, dentistry, public health, and population policy. The study of general processes is the study of human beings in particular situations, not for what we can learn about these particular populations but for the sake of generalization about mankind anywhere in comparable situations. This is, of course, the purpose of experimental science in general, but in anthropology the method is usually comparative. Long ago the study of the growth of the two sexes and of children in different countries was started on a comparative basis as was the study of the so-called secular change in adult stature. By 1911 Franz Boas had compared the changes in stature and head form of children of several different immigrant groups in the United States. There have since been comparative studies of the amount and distribution of body fat (but not yet adequate comparative measurements of the relation of tissue components to diet and to diseases). Demographic patterns, inbreeding, outbreeding, and their effects are other general problems. The Human Adaptability Project of the International Biological Program promises studies of human response to heat, cold, altitude, and other conditions on a wide international basis. If supported, these could turn physical anthropology's search in a useful direction. The functional biology of people of even out-of-the-way communities will be compared with each other. These studies can yield general statements concerning human response to types of ecological situation including such sociocultural conditions as those of hunting-gathering tribes and urban slums.

  5. PANDORA, a new facility for interdisciplinary in-plasma physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mascali, D.; Musumarra, A.; Leone, F.; Romano, F. P.; Galatà, A.; Gammino, S.; Massimi, C.

    2017-07-01

    PANDORA, Plasmas for Astrophysics, Nuclear Decays Observation and Radiation for Archaeometry, is planned as a new facility based on a state-of-the-art plasma trap confining energetic plasma for performing interdisciplinary research in the fields of Nuclear Astrophysics, Astrophysics, Plasma Physics and Applications in Material Science and Archaeometry: the plasmas become the environment for measuring, for the first time, nuclear decay rates in stellar-like condition (such as 7Be decay and beta-decay involved in s-process nucleosynthesis), especially as a function of the ionization state of the plasma ions. These studies will give important contributions for addressing several astrophysical issues in both stellar and primordial nucleosynthesis environment ( e.g., determination of solar neutrino flux and 7Li Cosmological Problem), moreover the confined energetic plasma will be a unique light source for high-performance stellar spectroscopy measurements in the visible, UV and X-ray domains, offering advancements in observational astronomy. As to magnetic fields, the experimental validation of theoretical first- and second-order Landé factors will drive the layout of next-generation polarimetric units for the high-resolution spectrograph of the future giant telescopes. In PANDORA new plasma heating methods will be explored, that will push forward the ion beam output, in terms of extracted intensity and charge states. More, advanced and optimized injection methods of ions in an ECR plasma will be experimented, with the aim to optimize its capture efficiency. This will be applied to the ECR-based Charge Breeding technique, that will improve the performances of the SPES ISOL-facility at Laboratori Nazionali di Legnaro-INFN. Finally, PANDORA will be suitable for energy conversion, making the plasma a source of high-intensity electromagnetic radiation, for applications in material science and archaeometry.

  6. High-fidelity plasma codes for burn physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cooley, James [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Graziani, Frank [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Marinak, Marty [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Murillo, Michael [Michigan State Univ., East Lansing, MI (United States)

    2016-10-19

    Accurate predictions of equation of state (EOS), ionic and electronic transport properties are of critical importance for high-energy-density plasma science. Transport coefficients inform radiation-hydrodynamic codes and impact diagnostic interpretation, which in turn impacts our understanding of the development of instabilities, the overall energy balance of burning plasmas, and the efficacy of self-heating from charged-particle stopping. Important processes include thermal and electrical conduction, electron-ion coupling, inter-diffusion, ion viscosity, and charged particle stopping. However, uncertainties in these coefficients are not well established. Fundamental plasma science codes, also called high-fidelity plasma codes, are a relatively recent computational tool that augments both experimental data and theoretical foundations of transport coefficients. This paper addresses the current status of HFPC codes and their future development, and the potential impact they play in improving the predictive capability of the multi-physics hydrodynamic codes used in HED design.

  7. High-fidelity plasma codes for burn physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cooley, James [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Graziani, Frank [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Marinak, Marty [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Murillo, Michael [Michigan State Univ., East Lansing, MI (United States)

    2016-10-19

    Accurate predictions of equation of state (EOS), ionic and electronic transport properties are of critical importance for high-energy-density plasma science. Transport coefficients inform radiationhydrodynamic codes and impact diagnostic interpretation, which in turn impacts our understanding of the development of instabilities, the overall energy balance of burning plasmas, and the efficacy of selfheating from charged-particle stopping. Important processes include thermal and electrical conduction, electron-ion coupling, inter-diffusion, ion viscosity, and charged particle stopping. However, uncertainties in these coefficients are not well established. Fundamental plasma science codes, also called high-fidelity plasma codes are a relatively recent computational tool that augments both experimental data and theoretical foundations of transport coefficients. This paper addresses the current status of HFPC codes and their future development, and the potential impact they play in improving the predictive capability of the multi-physics hydrodynamic codes used in HED design.

  8. Laser physics from principles to practical work in the lab

    CERN Document Server

    Eichhorn, Marc

    2014-01-01

    This textbook originates from a lecture course in laser physics at the Karlsruhe School of Optics and Photonics at the Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT). A main goal in the conception of this textbook was to describe the fundamentals of lasers in a uniform and especially lab-oriented notation and formulation as well as many currently well-known laser types, becoming more and more important in the future. It closes a gap between the measureable spectroscopic quantities and the whole theoretical description and modeling. This textbook contains not only the fundamentals and the context of laser physics in a mathematical and methodical approach important for university-level studies. It allows simultaneously, owing to its conception and its modern notation, to directly implement and use the learned matter in the practical lab work. It is presented in a format suitable for everybody who wants not only to understand the fundamentals of lasers but also use modern lasers or even develop and make laser setups. T...

  9. Unified first principles description from warm dense matter to ideal ionized gas plasma: electron-ion collisions induced friction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Jiayu; Hou, Yong; Yuan, Jianmin

    2010-06-18

    Electron-ion interactions are central to numerous phenomena in the warm dense matter (WDM) regime and at higher temperature. The electron-ion collisions induced friction at high temperature is introduced in the procedure of ab initio molecular dynamics using the Langevin equation based on density functional theory. In this framework, as a test for Fe and H up to 1000 eV, the equation of state and the transition of electronic structures of the materials with very wide density and temperature can be described, which covers a full range of WDM up to high energy density physics. A unified first principles description from condensed matter to ideal ionized gas plasma is constructed.

  10. New progress in the principle of nonequilibrium statistical physics

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    In recent years,a new fundamental equation of nonequilibrium statistical physics was proposed in place of the Liouville equation. That is the anomalous Langevin equation in G space or its equivalent Liouville diffusion equa-tion of time-reversal asymmetry. This equation reflects that the form of motion of particles in statistical thermodynamic systems has the drift-diffusion duality and the law of motion of statistical thermodynamics is stochastic in essence,but does not obey the Newton equation of motion,though it is also constrained by dynamics. The stochastic diffusion of the particles is the microscopic origin of macroscopic irreversi-bility. Starting from this equation,the BBGKY diffusion equation hierarchy was presented,the hydrodynamic equa-tions,such as the generalized Navier-Stokes equation,the mass drift-diffusion equation and the thermal conductivity equation have been derived succinctly. The unified descrip-tion of all three level equations of microscopic,kinetic and hydrodynamic was completed. Furthermore,a nonlinear evolution equation of Gibbs and Boltzmann nonequilibrium entropy density was constructed,and the existence of entro-py diffusion was predicted. The evolution equation shows that the change of nonequilibrium entropy density originates together from drift,diffusion and source production. Entro-py production is manifestations of the law of entropy in-crease. Entropy diffusion governs the approach to equilib-rium. All these derivations and results are unified and rigor-ous from the new fundamental equation without adding any extra assumption. In this review,an overview on the above main ideas,methods and results is given,and the interna-tional new progress in related problems of nonequilibrium statistical physics is summarized.

  11. Stability theory of a confined toroidal plasma. Part II. Modified energy principle and growth rate. Technical summary report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laurence, P.; Shen, M.C.

    1982-03-01

    Based upon the existence and uniqueness of a solution to the linearized Lundquist equations established previously, the modified energy principle for the sigma-stability of a confined toroidal plasma is rigorously justified. A variational principle is developed to find the infimum of sigma, and an estimate for the maximum growth rate is obtained. The results are also extended to a diffuse pinch and a multiple tori plasma.

  12. Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory Annual Site Environmental Report for Calendar Year 1998

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    V. Finley

    2000-03-06

    The results of the 1998 environmental surveillance and monitoring program for the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL) are presented and discussed. The purpose of this report is to provide the US Department of Energy and the public with information on the level of radioactive and non-radioactive pollutants, if any, that are added to the environment as a result of PPPL's operations. The report also summarizes environmental initiatives, assessments, and programs that were undertaken in 1998. One significant initiative is the Integrated Safety Management (ISM) program that embraces environment, safety, and health principles as one.

  13. The upgraded Large Plasma Device, a machine for studying frontier basic plasma physics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gekelman, W; Pribyl, P; Lucky, Z; Drandell, M; Leneman, D; Maggs, J; Vincena, S; Van Compernolle, B; Tripathi, S K P; Morales, G; Carter, T A; Wang, Y; DeHaas, T

    2016-02-01

    In 1991 a manuscript describing an instrument for studying magnetized plasmas was published in this journal. The Large Plasma Device (LAPD) was upgraded in 2001 and has become a national user facility for the study of basic plasma physics. The upgrade as well as diagnostics introduced since then has significantly changed the capabilities of the device. All references to the machine still quote the original RSI paper, which at this time is not appropriate. In this work, the properties of the updated LAPD are presented. The strategy of the machine construction, the available diagnostics, the parameters available for experiments, as well as illustrations of several experiments are presented here.

  14. The fundamental principles of the physical protection, the group of six point of view

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Claeys, M.; Carnas, L.; Robeyns, G. [Federal Agency for Nuclear Control (Belgium); Rommevaux, G. [Controle des Matieres Nucleaires, CMN (France); Venot, R. [CEA Fontenay-aux-Roses, 92 (France). Inst. de Protection et de Surete Nucleaire; Fechner, J.B. [Federal Ministry for the Environment, Nature Conservation and Nuclear Safety (Germany); Hagemann, A. [Gesellschaft fuer Anlagen- und Reaktorsicherheit (GRS) mbH, Cologne (Germany); Fontaneda Gonzalez, A. [Nuclear Energy Div., Directorate General of Energy, Policy and Mines Ministry of Economy (Spain); Gimenez Gonzalez, S. [Nuclear Safety Council (Spain); Isaksson, S.G. [Swedish Nuclear Power Inspectorate (Sweden); Wager, K. [Dept. of Trade and Industry (United Kingdom); Price, C. [Office for Civil Nuclear Security (United Kingdom)

    2001-07-01

    This paper presents the joint experience of the Group of Six in the field of physical protection against the theft or unauthorized removal of nuclear material and against the sabotage of nuclear material and nuclear facilities, which emerged from the joint discussion. Several fundamental principles stem from this experience. Of course the particular terms and conditions of the implementation of these principles are specific to each country. (authors)

  15. Views on “Principle of limitation of physical quantities and cyclic universe”

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents an analysis of a paper entitled "Principle of limitation of physical quantities and cyclic universe" and proposes different results for some formulae from that report.In addition,this paper shows that the principle of limits coupling may lead to an approximation of current theories(i.e.,quantum theory and relativistic theory),which have interesting correlations with the Plank formula and the special theory of relativity.

  16. Quantum Physics Principles and Communication in the Acute Healthcare Setting: A Pilot Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helgeson, Heidi L; Peyerl, Colleen Kraft; Solheim-Witt, Marit

    This pilot study explores whether clinician awareness of quantum physics principles could facilitate open communication between patients and providers. In the spirit of action research, this study was conceptualized with a holistic view of human health, using a mixed method design of grounded theory as an emergent method. Instrumentation includes surveys and a focus group discussion with twelve registered nurses working in an acute care hospital setting. Findings document that the preliminary core phenomenon, energy as information, influences communication in the healthcare environment. Key emergent themes include awareness, language, validation, open communication, strategies, coherence, incoherence and power. Research participants indicate that quantum physics principles provide a language and conceptual framework for improving their awareness of communication and interactions in the healthcare environment. Implications of this pilot study support the feasibility of future research and education on awareness of quantum physics principles in other clinical settings. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. The Quark-Gluon Plasma Equation of State and the Generalized Uncertainty Principle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. I. Abou-Salem

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The quark-gluon plasma (QGP equation of state within a minimal length scenario or Generalized Uncertainty Principle (GUP is studied. The Generalized Uncertainty Principle is implemented on deriving the thermodynamics of ideal QGP at a vanishing chemical potential. We find a significant effect for the GUP term. The main features of QCD lattice results were quantitatively achieved in case of nf=0, nf=2, and nf=2+1 flavors for the energy density, the pressure, and the interaction measure. The exciting point is the large value of bag pressure especially in case of nf=2+1 flavor which reflects the strong correlation between quarks in this bag which is already expected. One can notice that the asymptotic behavior which is characterized by Stephan-Boltzmann limit would be satisfied.

  18. Two universal physical principles shape the power-law statistics of real-world networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorimer, Tom; Gomez, Florian; Stoop, Ruedi

    2015-07-23

    The study of complex networks has pursued an understanding of macroscopic behaviour by focusing on power-laws in microscopic observables. Here, we uncover two universal fundamental physical principles that are at the basis of complex network generation. These principles together predict the generic emergence of deviations from ideal power laws, which were previously discussed away by reference to the thermodynamic limit. Our approach proposes a paradigm shift in the physics of complex networks, toward the use of power-law deviations to infer meso-scale structure from macroscopic observations.

  19. Quasiparticle lifetimes and infrared physics in QED and QCD plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blaizot, J.P. [CEA-Saclay, Gif-sur-Yvette (France)

    1997-09-22

    The perturbative calculation of the lifetime of fermion excitations in a QED plasma at high temperature is plagued with infrared divergences which are not eliminated by the screening corrections. The physical processes responsible for these divergences are the collisions involving the exchange of longwavelength, quasistatic, magnetic photons, which are not screened by plasma effects. The leading divergences can be resummed in a non-perturbative treatment based on a generalization of the Bloch-Nordsieck model at finite temperature. The resulting expression of the fermion propagator is free of infrared problems, and exhibits a non-exponential damping at large times: S{sub R}(t) {approx} exp(-{alpha}T t ln{omega}{sub p}t), where {omega}{sub p} = eT/3 is the plasma frequency and {alpha} = e{sup 2}/4{pi}.

  20. Fast Magnetic Reconnection: Bridging Laboratory and Space Plasma Physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bhattacharjee, Amitava [University New Hampshire- Durham

    2012-02-16

    Recent developments in experimental and theoretical studies of magnetic reconnection hold promise for providing solutions to outstanding problems in laboratory and space plasma physics. Examples include sawtooth crashes in tokamaks, substorms in the Earth’s Magnetosphere, eruptive solar flares, and more recently, fast reconnection in laser-produced high energy density plasmas. In each of these examples, a common and long-standing challenge has been to explain why fast reconnection proceeds rapidly from a relatively quiescent state. In this talk, we demonstrate the advantages of viewing these problems and their solutions from a common perspective. We focus on some recent, surprising discoveries regarding the role of secondary plasmoid instabilities of thin current sheets. Nonlinearly, these instabilities lead to fast reconnection rates that are very weakly dependent on the Lundquist number of the plasma.

  1. The role of magnetohydrodynamics in heliospheric space plasma physics research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dryer, Murray; Smith, Zdenka Kopal; Wu, Shi Tsan

    1988-01-01

    Magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) is a fairly recent extension of the field of fluid mechanics. While much remains to be done, it has successfully been applied to the contemporary field of heliospheric space plasma research to evaluate the 'macroscopic picture' of some vital topics via the use of conducting fluid equations and numerical modeling and simulations. Some representative examples from solar and interplanetary physics are described to demonstrate that the continuum approach to global problems (while keeping in mind the assumptions and limitations therein) can be very successful in providing insight and large scale interpretations of otherwise intractable problems in space physics.

  2. Relaunch of the Interactive Plasma Physics Educational Experience (IPPEX)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dominguez, A.; Rusaitis, L.; Zwicker, A.; Stotler, D. P.

    2015-11-01

    In the late 1990's PPPL's Science Education Department developed an innovative online site called the Interactive Plasma Physics Educational Experience (IPPEX). It featured (among other modules) two Java based applications which simulated tokamak physics: A steady state tokamak (SST) and a time dependent tokamak (TDT). The physics underlying the SST and the TDT are based on the ASPECT code which is a global power balance code developed to evaluate the performance of fusion reactor designs. We have relaunched the IPPEX site with updated modules and functionalities: The site itself is now dynamic on all platforms. The graphic design of the site has been modified to current standards. The virtual tokamak programming has been redone in Javascript, taking advantage of the speed and compactness of the code. The GUI of the tokamak has been completely redesigned, including more intuitive representations of changes in the plasma, e.g., particles moving along magnetic field lines. The use of GPU accelerated computation provides accurate and smooth visual representations of the plasma. We will present the current version of IPPEX as well near term plans of incorporating real time NSTX-U data into the simulation.

  3. Association of plasma 25-hydroxyvitamin D with physical performance in physically active children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bezrati, Ikram; Hammami, Raouf; Ben Fradj, Mohamed Kacem; Martone, Domenico; Padulo, Johnny; Feki, Moncef; Chaouachi, Anis; Kaabachi, Naziha

    2016-11-01

    Vitamin D is thought to regulate skeletal muscle function and boost physical performance. The aim of this study was to assess the relationship between vitamin D and physical performance in physically active children. This cross-sectional study included 125 children who practice football as a leisure activity. Plasma 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25-OHD) was assessed using a chemiluminescence immunoassay method. Vitamin D inadequacy was defined as 25-OHD D inadequacy may limit exercise performance. Further research should verify whether correction of vitamin D deficiency enhances physical performance.

  4. POOLkits: Applying Object Oriented Principles from Software Engineering to Physics Object Oriented Learning -- Preliminary Concepts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kassebaum, Thomas; Aubrecht, Gordon

    2012-04-01

    Object-oriented development depends upon the creation of generic pieces that can be built into more complex parts. In physics, we begin teaching basic principles and then develop more complex systems, a fertile environment to develop learning objects. Each learning object consists of observable quantities, such as the physical properties of a block of wood, and operators that act on the object, such as force. Additionally, each object can also include an assessment operator that evaluates the impact of the learning object on student comprehension. The physics object-oriented learning kits (POOLkits) will be developed to enhance student understanding of physics concepts, as well as, build a framework for developing a software object based on the physics concept. A POOLkit can be extended, similar to the concept of extending classes in object-oriented programming, as physics knowledge expands. The expectation for these POOLkits would be to provide physics students with a solid foundation in the first principles to be able to derive more complex formulae and have the understanding of the process with a secondary benefit of enhancing the object-oriented programming capabilities of physics students.

  5. Extending the Extreme Physical Information to Universal Cognitive Models via a Confident Information First Principle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaozhao Zhao

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The principle of extreme physical information (EPI can be used to derive many known laws and distributions in theoretical physics by extremizing the physical information loss K, i.e., the difference between the observed Fisher information I and the intrinsic information bound J of the physical phenomenon being measured. However, for complex cognitive systems of high dimensionality (e.g., human language processing and image recognition, the information bound J could be excessively larger than I (J ≫ I, due to insufficient observation, which would lead to serious over-fitting problems in the derivation of cognitive models. Moreover, there is a lack of an established exact invariance principle that gives rise to the bound information in universal cognitive systems. This limits the direct application of EPI. To narrow down the gap between I and J, in this paper, we propose a confident-information-first (CIF principle to lower the information bound J by preserving confident parameters and ruling out unreliable or noisy parameters in the probability density function being measured. The confidence of each parameter can be assessed by its contribution to the expected Fisher information distance between the physical phenomenon and its observations. In addition, given a specific parametric representation, this contribution can often be directly assessed by the Fisher information, which establishes a connection with the inverse variance of any unbiased estimate for the parameter via the Cramér–Rao bound. We then consider the dimensionality reduction in the parameter spaces of binary multivariate distributions. We show that the single-layer Boltzmann machine without hidden units (SBM can be derived using the CIF principle. An illustrative experiment is conducted to show how the CIF principle improves the density estimation performance.

  6. Divertor plasma physics experiments on the DIII-D tokamak

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mahdavi, M.A.; Allen, S.L.; Evans, T.E. [and others

    1996-10-01

    In this paper we present an overview of the results and conclusions of our most recent divertor physics and development work. Using an array of new divertor diagnostics we have measured the plasma parameters over the entire divertor volume and gained new insights into several divertor physics issues. We present direct experimental evidence for momentum loss along the field lines, large heat convection, and copious volume recombination during detachment. These observations are supported by improved UEDGE modeling incorporating impurity radiation. We have demonstrated divertor exhaust enrichment of neon and argon by action of a forced scrape off layer (SOL) flow and demonstrated divertor pumping as a substitute for conventional wall conditioning. We have observed a divertor radiation zone with a parallel extent that is an order of magnitude larger than that estimated from a 1-D conduction limited model of plasma at coronal equilibrium. Using density profile control by divertor pumping and pellet injection we have attained H-mode confinement at densities above the Greenwald limit. Erosion rates of several candidate ITER plasma facing materials are measured and compared with predictions of a numerical model.

  7. Promoting Plasma Physics as a Career: A Generational Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, James

    2005-10-01

    A paradigm shift is occurring in education physics programs. Educators are shifting from the traditional teaching focus to concentrate on student learning. Students are unaware of physics as a career, plasma physics or the job opportunities afforded to them with a physics degree. The physics profession needs to promote itself to the younger generations, or specifically the millennial generation (Born in the 1980's-2000's). Learning styles preferred by ``Millennials'' include a technological environment that promotes learning through active task performance rather than passive attendance at lectures. Millennials respond well to anything experiential and will be motivated by opportunities for creativity and challenging learning environments. The open-ended access to information, the ability to tailor learning paths, and continuous and instantaneous performance assessment offer flexibility in the design of curricula as well as in the method of delivery. Educators need to understand the millennial generation, appeal to their motivations and offer a learning environment designed for their learning style. This poster suggests promoting a physics career by focusing on generational learning styles and preferences.

  8. The contribution of the giraffe to hemodynamic knowledge: a unified physical principle for the circulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Recordati, G

    1999-09-01

    Hemodynamics stands on three main physical principles: the hydrostatic pressure, firstly described by Stevino, the viscous flow pressure, described by Poiseuille and the total hydraulic energy, or Bernoulli's equation. However, neither of these physical principles gives a comprehensive description of the single pressure measurement in the cardiovascular system. Hence, all these principles should be used together to fully describe the physical forces acting in the circulation of blood. Experiments that measured the hydrostatic pressure in the jugular vein of the giraffe have shown that a few guidelines need to be followed to measure it correctly. Following these guidelines, it can be seen that hydrostatic and viscous flow pressures are strictly related to one another, and that this relationship is described in mathematical terms. In addition, it has been shown that hydrostatic and viscous pressures should be included in Bernoulli's principle, to give the combined Bernoulli-Poiseuille equation. This unified principle is helpful not only to measure correctly the pressure with a catheter connected to a pressure transducer, but also to give to the pressure measured in a patient with the mercury manometer, a strong connection with the description of the pressure as a physical force acting inside the circulation. In addition it provides a comprehensive view of the cardiovascular system as a closed hydrodynamic system, in which the heart is a pump, that does not normally work to overcome the force of gravity. The question at this point is: are there any pathophysiological conditions in which the heart needs to be confronted with the sudden appearance of the force of gravity inside the cardiovascular system?

  9. Programmable physical parameter optimization for particle plasma simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ragan-Kelley, Benjamin; Verboncoeur, John; Lin, Ming-Chieh

    2012-10-01

    We have developed a scheme for interactive and programmable optimization of physical parameters for plasma simulations. The simulation code Object-Oriented Plasma Device 1-D (OOPD1) has been adapted to a Python interface, allowing sophisticated user or program interaction with simulations, and detailed numerical analysis via numpy. Because the analysis/diagnostic interface is the same as the input mechanism (the Python programming language), it is straightforward to optimize simulation parameters based on analysis of previous runs and automate the optimization process using a user-determined scheme and criteria. An example use case of the Child-Langmuir space charge limit in bipolar flow is demonstrated, where the beam current is iterated upon by measuring the relationship of the measured current and the injected current.

  10. Stationary distribution functions for ohmic Tokamak-plasmas in the weak-collisional transport regime by MaxEnt principle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sonnino, Giorgio; Peeters, Philippe; Sonnino, Alberto; Nardone, Pasquale; Steinbrecher, György

    2015-01-01

    In previous works, we derived stationary density distribution functions (DDF) where the local equilibrium is determined by imposing the maximum entropy (MaxEnt) principle, under the scale invariance restrictions, and the minimum entropy production theorem. In this paper we demonstrate that it is possible to reobtain these DDF solely from the MaxEnt principle subject to suitable scale invariant restrictions in all the variables. For the sake of concreteness, we analyse the example of ohmic, fully ionized, tokamak-plasmas, in the weak-collisional transport regime. In this case we show that it is possible to reinterpret the stationary distribution function in terms of the Prigogine distribution function where the logarithm of the DDF is directly linked to the entropy production of the plasma. This leads to the suggestive idea that also the stationary neoclassical distribution functions, for magnetically confined plasmas in the collisional transport regimes, may be derived solely by the MaxEnt principle.

  11. plasmaFoam: An OpenFOAM framework for computational plasma physics and chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venkattraman, Ayyaswamy; Verma, Abhishek Kumar

    2016-09-01

    As emphasized in the 2012 Roadmap for low temperature plasmas (LTP), scientific computing has emerged as an essential tool for the investigation and prediction of the fundamental physical and chemical processes associated with these systems. While several in-house and commercial codes exist, with each having its own advantages and disadvantages, a common framework that can be developed by researchers from all over the world will likely accelerate the impact of computational studies on advances in low-temperature plasma physics and chemistry. In this regard, we present a finite volume computational toolbox to perform high-fidelity simulations of LTP systems. This framework, primarily based on the OpenFOAM solver suite, allows us to enhance our understanding of multiscale plasma phenomenon by performing massively parallel, three-dimensional simulations on unstructured meshes using well-established high performance computing tools that are widely used in the computational fluid dynamics community. In this talk, we will present preliminary results obtained using the OpenFOAM-based solver suite with benchmark three-dimensional simulations of microplasma devices including both dielectric and plasma regions. We will also discuss the future outlook for the solver suite.

  12. NASA/Marshall Space Flight Center's Contributions to Space Plasma Physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adrian, M. L.; Six, N. Frank (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Since the mid-l970's, the Space Plasma Physics Group at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center has contributed critical instrumentation to numerous satellite and sounding rocket missions exploring the plasmas of near-Earth space. This talk will review major discoveries in Earth's ionosphere, plasmasphere, and magnetosphere directly attributable to the researchers of the Space Plasma Physics Group and the significance of these discoveries to the field of plasma physics.

  13. Laboratory Experiments in Physics for Modern Astronomy With Comprehensive Development of the Physical Principles

    CERN Document Server

    Golden, Leslie

    2013-01-01

    This book presents experiments which will teach physics relevant to astronomy. The astronomer, as instructor, frequently faces this need when his college or university has no astronomy department and any astronomy course is taught in the physics department. The physicist, as instructor, will find this intellectually appealing when faced with teaching an introductory astronomy course. From these experiments, the student will acquire important analytical tools, learn physics appropriate to astronomy, and experience instrument calibration and the direct gathering and analysis of data. Experiments that can be performed in one laboratory session as well as semester-long observation projects are included. This textbook is aimed at undergraduate astronomy students.

  14. Contributions of plasma physics to chaos and nonlinear dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Escande, D. F.

    2016-11-01

    This topical review focusses on the contributions of plasma physics to chaos and nonlinear dynamics bringing new methods which are or can be used in other scientific domains. It starts with the development of the theory of Hamiltonian chaos, and then deals with order or quasi order, for instance adiabatic and soliton theories. It ends with a shorter account of dissipative and high dimensional Hamiltonian dynamics, and of quantum chaos. Most of these contributions are a spin-off of the research on thermonuclear fusion by magnetic confinement, which started in the fifties. Their presentation is both exhaustive and compact. [15 April 2016

  15. ITER-EDA physics design requirements and plasma performance assessments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Uckan, N.A.; Galambos, J. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Wesley, J.; Boucher, D.; Perkins, F.; Post, D.; Putvinski, S. [ITER San Diego Joint Work Site, CA (United States)

    1996-07-01

    Physics design guidelines, plasma performance estimates, and sensitivity of performance to changes in physics assumptions are presented for the ITER-EDA Interim Design. The overall ITER device parameters have been derived from the performance goals using physics guidelines based on the physics R&D results. The ITER-EDA design has a single-null divertor configuration (divertor at the bottom) with a nominal plasma current of 21 MA, magnetic field of 5.68 T, major and minor radius of 8.14 m and 2.8 m, and a plasma elongation (at the 95% flux surface) of {approximately}1.6 that produces a nominal fusion power of {approximately}1.5 GW for an ignited burn pulse length of {ge}1000 s. The assessments have shown that ignition at 1.5 GW of fusion power can be sustained in ITER for 1000 s given present extrapolations of H-mode confinement ({tau}{sub E} = 0.85 {times} {tau}{sub ITER93H}), helium exhaust ({tau}*{sub He}/{tau}{sub E} = 10), representative plasma impurities (n{sub Be}/n{sub e} = 2%), and beta limit [{beta}{sub N} = {beta}(%)/(I/aB) {le} 2.5]. The provision of 100 MW of auxiliary power, necessary to access to H-mode during the approach to ignition, provides for the possibility of driven burn operations at Q = 15. This enables ITER to fulfill its mission of fusion power ({approximately} 1--1.5 GW) and fluence ({approximately}1 MWa/m{sup 2}) goals if confinement, impurity levels, or operational (density, beta) limits prove to be less favorable than present projections. The power threshold for H-L transition, confinement uncertainties, and operational limits (Greenwald density limit and beta limit) are potential performance limiting issues. Improvement of the helium exhaust ({tau}*{sub He}/{tau}{sub E} {le} 5) and potential operation in reverse-shear mode significantly improve ITER performance.

  16. Differentiation with stratification: a principle of theoretical physics in the tradition of the memory art

    CERN Document Server

    Pombo, Claudia

    2015-01-01

    The Art of Memory started with Aristotle's questions on memory. During its long evolution, it had important contributions from alchemist, was transformed by Ramon Llull and apparently ended with Giordano Bruno, who was considered the best known representative of this art. This tradition did not disappear, but lives in the formulations of our modern scientific theories. From its initial form as a method of keeping information via associations, it became a principle of classification and structuring of knowledge. This principle, which we here name {\\it differentiation with stratification}, is a structural design behind classical mechanics. Integrating two different traditions of science in one structure, this physical theory became the modern paradigm of science. In this paper, we show that this principle can also be formulated as a set of questions. This is done via an analysis of theories, based on the epistemology of observational realism. A combination of Rudolph Carnap's concept of theory as a system of ob...

  17. Exploration of Plasma Jets Approach to High Energy Density Physics. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Chiping [Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2013-08-26

    High-energy-density laboratory plasma (HEDLP) physics is an emerging, important area of research in plasma physics, nuclear physics, astrophysics, and particle acceleration. While the HEDLP regime occurs at extreme conditions which are often found naturally in space but not on the earth, it may be accessible by colliding high intensity plasmas such as high-energy-density plasma jets, plasmoids or compact toroids from plasma guns. The physics of plasma jets is investigated in the context of high energy density laboratory plasma research. This report summarizes results of theoretical and computational investigation of a plasma jet undergoing adiabatic compression and adiabatic expansion. A root-mean-squared (rms) envelope theory of plasma jets is developed. Comparison between theory and experiment is made. Good agreement between theory and experiment is found.

  18. Brief Introduction to the Foundation of CAI Shidong Award for Plasma Physics

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SHENG Zhengming

    2010-01-01

    @@ The late Academician Professor CAI Shidong was an outstanding plasma physicist who had made seminal contributions in both fundamental plasma theories and controlled thermonuclear fusion energy research.Professor CAI was also one of the pioneers in China's plasma physics research.In 1973,Professor CAI decided to leave U.S.and return to China in order to help pushing forward plasma physics research in China.Professor CAI formed a research group consisting of young scientists and carried out high-level works in this important physics discipline.He worked tirelessly,set examples by his own deeds,and made outstanding contributions in plasma physics research,educating younger generations of plasma physicists,as well as establishing collaborations with plasma scientists in other Asian-African developing nations.In short,Professor CAI devoted the best years of his life to China's plasma physics research.

  19. Principles of using Cold Atmospheric Plasma Stimulated Media for Cancer Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Dayun; Talbot, Annie; Nourmohammadi, Niki; Cheng, Xiaoqian; Canady, Jerome; Sherman, Jonathan; Keidar, Michael

    2015-12-01

    To date, the significant anti-cancer capacity of cold atmospheric plasma (CAP) on dozens of cancer cell lines has been demonstrated in vitro and in mice models. Conventionally, CAP was directly applied to irradiate cancer cells or tumor tissue. Over past three years, the CAP irradiated media was also found to kill cancer cells as effectively as the direct CAP treatment. As a novel strategy, using the CAP stimulated (CAPs) media has become a promising anti-cancer tool. In this study, we demonstrated several principles to optimize the anti-cancer capacity of the CAPs media on glioblastoma cells and breast cancer cells. Specifically, using larger wells on a multi-well plate, smaller gaps between the plasma source and the media, and smaller media volume enabled us to obtain a stronger anti-cancer CAPs media composition without increasing the treatment time. Furthermore, cysteine was the main target of effective reactive species in the CAPs media. Glioblastoma cells were more resistant to the CAPs media than breast cancer cells. Glioblastoma cells consumed the effective reactive species faster than breast cancer cells did. In contrast to nitric oxide, hydrogen peroxide was more likely to be the effective reactive species.

  20. Plasma physics and the 2013-2022 decadal survey in solar and space physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Daniel N.

    2016-11-01

    The U.S. National Academies established in 2011 a steering committee to develop a comprehensive strategy for solar and space physics research. This updated and extended the first (2003) solar and space physics decadal survey. The latest decadal study implemented a 2008 Congressional directive to NASA for the fields of solar and space physics, but also addressed research in other federal agencies. The new survey broadly canvassed the fields of research to determine the current state of the discipline, identified the most important open scientific questions, and proposed the measurements and means to obtain them so as to advance the state of knowledge during the years 2013-2022. Research in this field has sought to understand: dynamical behaviour of the Sun and its heliosphere; properties of the space environments of the Earth and other solar system bodies; multiscale interaction between solar system plasmas and the interstellar medium; and energy transport throughout the solar system and its impact on the Earth and other solar system bodies. Research in solar and space plasma processes using observation, theory, laboratory studies, and numerical models has offered the prospect of understanding this interconnected system well enough to develop a predictive capability for operational support of civil and military space systems. We here describe the recommendations and strategic plans laid out in the 2013-2022 decadal survey as they relate to measurement capabilities and plasma physical research. We assess progress to date. We also identify further steps to achieve the Survey goals with an emphasis on plasma physical aspects of the program.

  1. Application of basic principles of physics to head and neck MR angiography: troubleshooting for artifacts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandey, Shilpa; Hakky, Michael; Kwak, Ellie; Jara, Hernan; Geyer, Carl A; Erbay, Sami H

    2013-05-01

    Neurovascular imaging studies are routinely used for the assessment of headaches and changes in mental status, stroke workup, and evaluation of the arteriovenous structures of the head and neck. These imaging studies are being performed with greater frequency as the aging population continues to increase. Magnetic resonance (MR) angiographic imaging techniques are helpful in this setting. However, mastering these techniques requires an in-depth understanding of the basic principles of physics, complex flow patterns, and the correlation of MR angiographic findings with conventional MR imaging findings. More than one imaging technique may be used to solve difficult cases, with each technique contributing unique information. Unfortunately, incorporating findings obtained with multiple imaging modalities may add to the diagnostic challenge. To ensure diagnostic accuracy, it is essential that the radiologist carefully evaluate the details provided by these modalities in light of basic physics principles, the fundamentals of various imaging techniques, and common neurovascular imaging pitfalls.

  2. Fusion Plasma Physics and ITER - An Introduction (1/4)

    CERN Document Server

    CERN. Geneva

    2011-01-01

    In November 2006, ministers representing the world’s major fusion research communities signed the agreement formally establishing the international project ITER. Sited at Cadarache in France, the project involves China, the European Union (including Switzerland), India, Japan, the Russian Federation, South Korea and the United States. ITER is a critical step in the development of fusion energy: its role is to confirm the feasibility of exploiting magnetic confinement fusion for the production of energy for peaceful purposes by providing an integrated demonstration of the physics and technology required for a fusion power plant. The ITER tokamak is designed to study the “burning plasma” regime in deuterium-tritium (D-T) plasmas by achieving a fusion amplification factor, Q (the ratio of fusion output power to plasma heating input power), of 10 for several hundreds of seconds with a nominal fusion power output of 500MW. It is also intended to allow the study of steady-state plasma operation at Q≥5 by me...

  3. Soft X-ray measurements in magnetic fusion plasma physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Botrugno, A.; Gabellieri, L.; Mazon, D.; Pacella, D.; Romano, A.

    2010-11-01

    Soft X-ray diagnostic systems and their successful application in the field of magnetic fusion plasma physics are discussed. Radiation with wavelength in the region of Soft X-Ray (1-30 keV) is largely produced by high temperature plasmas, carrying important information on many processes during a plasma discharge. Soft X-ray diagnostics are largely used in various fusion devices all over the world. These diagnostic systems are able to obtain information on electron temperature, electron density, impurity transport, Magneto Hydro Dynamic instabilities. We will discuss the SXR diagnostic installed on FTU in Frascati (Italy) and on Tore Supra in Cadarache (France), with special emphasis on diagnostic performances. Moreover, we will discuss the two different inversion methods for tomographic reconstruction used in Frascati and in Cadarache, the first one is relied on a guessed topology of iso-emissivity surfaces, the second one on regularization techniques, like minimum Fisher or maximum entropy. Finally, a new and very fast 2D imaging system with energy discrimination and high time resolution will be summarized as an alternative approach of SXR detection system.

  4. FROM THE HISTORY OF PHYSICS: Tricentenary of Isaac Newton's "Mathematical Principles of Natural Philosophy"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ginzburg, Vitalii L.

    1987-01-01

    The first edition of Newton's "Philosophiae Naturalis Principia Mathematica" was published in 1687. The present paper is dedicated to the tricentenary of this event, which is important not just in the history of physics, but of science generally. After the Introduction, the paper continues with the following Sections: Before Newton, Principia, Principia and the method of principles, The nature of gravitation, Critique of Newtonian mechanics and its subsequent development, On Newton, Concluding remarks.

  5. Earth's magnetosphere - Global problems in magnetospheric plasma physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roederer, J. G.

    1979-01-01

    Magnetospheric physics is presently in a transition from the exploratory stage to one in which satellite missions and ground-based observations are planned with the specific object of achieving a global understanding and self-consistent quantitative description of the cause-and-effect relationship among the principal dynamic processes involved. Measurements turn to lower and lower energies and to higher ion mass species, in order to encompass the entire particle population, and to a broader range of the frequency spectrum of magnetic and electric field variations. In the present paper, the current status of our knowledge on magnetospheric plasma physics is reviewed, with particular reference of such fundamental advances as the discovery of layers of streaming plasma in the magnetosphere beneath its boundary surface, the identification of the terrestrial magnetosphere as a celestial source of kilometric radiation and relativistic particles, the identification of parallel electric field regions within the magnetosphere and their role in auroral particle acceleration, and the discovery of large fluxes of energetic heavy ions trapped in the magnetosphere.

  6. Space plasma physics at the Applied Physics Laboratory over the past half-century

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potemra, Thomas A.

    1992-01-01

    An overview is given of space-plasma experiments conducted at the Applied Physics Laboratory (APL) at Johns Hopkins University including observational campaigns and the instrumentation developed. Specific space-plasma experiments discussed include the study of the radiation environment in the Van Allen radiation belt with solid-state proton detectors. Also described are the 5E-1 satellites which acquired particle and magnetic-field data from earth orbit. The Triad satellite and its magnetometer system were developed for high-resolution studies of the earth's magnetic field, and APL contributions to NASA's Interplanetary Monitoring Platforms are listed. The review mentions the International Ultraviolet Explorer, the Atmosphere Explorer mission, and the Active Magnetic Particle Tracer Explorers mission. Other recent programs reviewed include a high-latitude satellite, contributions to the Voyager mission, and radar studies of space plasmas.

  7. Toward a first-principles integrated simulation of tokamak edge plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, C S [New York University; Klasky, Scott A [ORNL; Cummings, Julian [California Institute of Technology, Pasadena; Samtaney, Ravi [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL); Shoshani, A. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL); Sugiyama, L. [Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT); Keyes, David E [Columbia University; Ku, Seung-Hoe [New York University; Park, G. [New York University; Parker, Scott [University of Colorado, Boulder; Podhorszki, Norbert [ORNL; Strauss, H. [New York University; Abbasi, H. [Georgia Institute of Technology; Adams, Mark [Columbia University; Tchoua, Roselyne B [ORNL; Bateman, Glenn [Lehigh University, Bethlehem, PA; Bennett, K. [Rutgers University; Chen, Yang [University of Colorado, Boulder; D' Azevedo, Eduardo [ORNL; Docan, Ciprian [Rutgers University; Ethier, Stephane [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL); Feibush, E. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL); Greengard, Leslie [New York University; Hahm, Taik Soo [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL); Hinton, Fred [University of California, San Diego; Jin, Chen [ORNL; Khan, A. [University of Utah; Kritz, Arnold [Lehigh University, Bethlehem, PA; Krstic, Predrag S [ORNL; Lao, T. [Columbia University; Lee, Wei-Li [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL); Lin, Zhihong [University of California, Irvine; Lofstead, J. [Georgia Institute of Technology; Mouallem, P. A. [North Carolina State University; Nagappan, M. [North Carolina State University; Pankin, A. [Lehigh University, Bethlehem, PA; Parashar, Manish [Rutgers University; Pindzola, Michael S. [Auburn University, Auburn, Alabama; Reinhold, Carlos O [ORNL; Schultz, David Robert [ORNL; Schwan, Karsten [Georgia Institute of Technology; Silver, D. [Rutgers University; Sim, A. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL); Stotler, D. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL); Vouk, M. A. [North Carolina State University; Wolf, M. [Georgia Institute of Technology; Weitzner, Harold [New York University; Worley, Patrick H [ORNL; Xiao, Y. [University of California, Irvine; Yoon, E. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL); Zorin, Denis [New York University

    2008-01-01

    Performance of the ITER is anticipated to be highly sensitive to the edge plasma condition. The edge pedestal in ITER needs to be predicted from an integrated simulation of the necessary firstprinciples, multi-scale physics codes. The mission of the SciDAC Fusion Simulation Project (FSP) Prototype Center for Plasma Edge Simulation (CPES) is to deliver such a code integration framework by (1) building new kinetic codes XGC0 and XGC1, which can simulate the edge pedestal buildup; (2) using and improving the existing MHD codes ELITE, M3D-OMP, M3D-MPP and NIMROD, for study of large-scale edge instabilities called Edge Localized Modes (ELMs); and (3) integrating the codes into a framework using cutting-edge computer science technology. Collaborative effort among physics, computer science, and applied mathematics within CPES has created the first working version of the End-to-end Framework for Fusion Integrated Simulation (EFFIS), which can be used to study the pedestal-ELM cycles.

  8. The expansion of a plasma into a vacuum - Basic phenomena and processes and applications to space plasma physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, K. H., Jr.; Stone, N. H.; Samir, U.

    1983-01-01

    In this review attention is called to basic phenomena and physical processes involved in the expansion of a plasma into a vacuum, or the expansion of a plasma into a more tenuous plasma, in particular the fact that upon the expansion, ions are accelerated and reach energies well above their thermal energy. Also, in the process of the expansion a rarefaction wave propagates into the ambient plasma, an ion front moves into the expansion volume, and discontinuities in plasma parameters occur. The physical processes which cause the above phenomena are discussed, and their possible application is suggested for the case of the distribution of ions and electrons (hence plasma potential and electric fields) in the wake region behind artificial and natural obstacles moving supersonically in a rarefied space plasma. To illustrate this, some in situ results are reexamined. Directions for future work in this area via the utilization of the Space Shuttle and laboratory work are also mentioned.

  9. Planetary plasma data analysis and 3D visualisation at the French Plasma Physics Data Centre

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gangloff, Michel; Génot, Vincent; Cecconi, Baptiste; Andre, Nicolas; Budnik, Elena; Bouchemit, Myriam; Jourdane, Nathanaël; Dufourg, Nicolas; Beigbeider, Laurent; Toniutti, Jean-Philippe; Durand, Joelle

    2016-10-01

    The CDPP (the French plasma physics data center http://cdpp.eu/) is engaged for nearly two decades in the archiving and dissemination of plasma data products from space missions and ground-based observatories. Besides these activities, the CDPP developed services like AMDA (http://amda.cdpp.eu/) and 3DView (http://3dview.cdpp.eu/). AMDA enables in depth analysis of a large amount of data through dedicated functionalities such as: visualisation, data mining, cataloguing. 3DView provides immersive visualisations in planetary environments: spacecraft position and attitude, ephemerides. Magnetic field models (Cain, Tsyganenko), visualisation of cubes, 2D cuts as well as spectra or time series along spacecraft trajectories are possible in 3Dview. Both tools provide a joint access to outputs of simulations (MHD or Hybrid models) in planetary sciences as well as planetary plasma observational data (from AMDA, CDAWeb, Cluster Science Archive, ...). Some of these developments were funded by the EU IMPEx project, and some of the more recent ones are done in the frame of Europlanet 2020 RI project. The role of CDPP in the analysis and visualisation of planetary data and mission support increased after a collaboration with the NASA/PDS which resulted in the access in AMDA to several planetary datasets like those of GALILEO, MESSENGER, MAVEN, etc. In 2014, AMDA was chosen as the quicklook visualisation tool for the Rosetta Plasma Consortium through a collaboration with Imperial College, London. This presentation will include several use cases demonstrating recent and new capabilities of the tools.

  10. Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory Annual Site Environmental Report for Calendar Year 1999

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Virginia Finley

    2001-04-20

    The results of the 1999 environmental surveillance and monitoring program for the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL) are presented and discussed. The purpose of this report is to provide the U.S. Department of Energy and the public with information on the level of radioactive and non-radioactive pollutants (if any) that are added to the environment as a result of PPPL's operations. The report also summarizes environmental initiatives, assessments, and programs that were undertaken in 1999. The Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory has engaged in fusion energy research since 1951. The long-range goal of the U.S. Magnetic Fusion Energy Research Program is to create innovations to make fusion power a practical reality--an alternative energy source. 1999 marked the first year of National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) operations and Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) dismantlement and deconstruction activities. A collaboration among fourteen national laboratories, universities, and research institutions, the NSTX is a major element in the U.S. Fusion Energy Sciences Program. It has been designed to test the physics principles of spherical torus (ST) plasmas. The ST concept could play an important role in the development of smaller, more economical fusion reactors. With its completion within budget and ahead of its target schedule, NSTX first plasma occurred on February 12, 1999. The 1999 performance of the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory was rated ''outstanding'' by the U.S. Department of Energy in the Laboratory Appraisal report issued early in 2000. The report cited the Laboratory's consistently excellent scientific and technological achievements, its successful management practices, and included high marks in a host of other areas including environmental management, employee health and safety, human resources administration, science education, and communications. Groundwater investigations continued under a voluntary

  11. The Challenge of Incorporating Charged Dust in the Physics of Flowing Plasma Interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Y.; Russell, C. T.; Ma, Y.; Lai, H.; Jian, L.; Toth, G.

    2013-12-01

    The presence of two oppositely charged species with very different mass ratios leads to interesting physical processes and difficult numerical simulations. The reconnection problem is a classic example of this principle with a proton-electron mass ratio of 1836, but it is not the only example. Increasingly we are discovering situations in which heavy, electrically charged dust particles are major players in a plasma interaction. The mass of a 1mm dust particle is about 2000 proton masses and of a 10 mm dust particle about 2 million proton masses. One example comes from planetary magnetospheres. Charged dust pervades Enceladus' southern plume. The saturnian magnetospheric plasma flows through this dusty plume interacting with the charged dust and ionized plume gas. Multiple wakes are seen downstream. The flow is diverted in one direction. The field aligned-current systems are elsewhere. How can these two wake features be understood? Next we have an example from the solar wind. When asteroids collide in a disruptive collision, the solar wind strips the nano-scale charged dust from the debris forming a dusty plasma cloud that may be over 106km in extent and containing over 100 million kg of dust accelerated to the solar wind speed. How does this occur, especially as rapidly as it appears to happen? In this paper we illustrate a start on understanding these phenomena using multifluid MHD simulations but these simulations are only part of the answer to this complex problem that needs attention from a broader range of the community.

  12. A prospect at 11th international Toki conference. Plasma physics, quo vadis?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Itoh, Kimitaka

    2001-01-01

    A prospect of plasma physics at the turn of next century is discussed. The theme of this conference identifies the future direction of the research related with plasmas. Main issue is the potential and structure formation in plasmas; More specifically, structures which are realized through the interaction of electromagnetic fields, in particular that with electric fields, in non-equilibrium state. An emphasis is made to clarify the fundamental physics aspects of the plasma physics in fusion research as well as that in the basic research of plasmas. The plasma physics will give an important contribution to the solution of the historical enigma, i.e., all things flow. Having an impact on human recognition of nature and showing a beauty in a law, the plasma physics/science will demonstrate to be a leading science in the 21st century. (author)

  13. New Basic Physics Derived from Laser Plasma Interaction (lirpp Vol. 10)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hora, Heinrich

    2016-10-01

    The following sections are included: * INTRODUCTION * VARIOUS PHENOMENA * COMPLETION OF THE EQUATION OF MOTION BY NONLINEAR FORCES * NONLINEAR PRINCIPLE * CONTAINMENT FORCE OF HADRONS IN NUCLEI AND PHASE TRANSITION INTO QUARK GLUON PLASMA * Acknowledgements * References

  14. New: Variational principle-exact solutions and conservation laws for modified ion-acoustic shock waves and double layers with electron degenerate in plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    EL-Kalaawy, O. H.

    2017-03-01

    The nonlinear propagation of modified ion acoustic shock waves and double layers in a relativistic degenerate plasma is considered. This plasma system is proposed for containing inertial viscous positive and negative ion fluids, relativistic electron fluids, and negatively charged immobile heavy ions. The basic set of fluid equations is reduced to modified Burgers (MB) and further modified Burgers (FMB) or (Gardner) or Mamun and Zobaer (M-Z) equations by using the reductive perturbation method. The basic features of these shocks obtained from this analysis are observed to be significantly different from those obtained from the standard Burgers equation. By introducing two special functions and He's semi-inverse method, a variational principle and conservation laws for the Gardner (FmB) equation are obtained. A set of new exact solutions for the Gardner (FmB) equation are obtained by the auto-Bäcklund transformations. Finally, we will study the physical meanings of solutions.

  15. Overview of Space Station attached payloads in the areas of solar physics, solar terrestrial physics, and plasma processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, W. T.; Kropp, J.; Taylor, W. W. L.

    1986-01-01

    This paper outlines the currently planned utilization of the Space Station to perform investigations in solar physics, solar terrestrial physics, and plasma physics. The investigations and instrumentation planned for the Solar Terrestrial Observatory (STO) and its associated Space Station accommodation requirements are discussed as well as the planned placement of the STO instruments and typical operational scenarios. In the area of plasma physics, some preliminary plans for scientific investigations and for the accommodation of a plasma physics facility attached to the Space Station are outlined. These preliminary experiment concepts use the space environment around the Space Station as an unconfined plasma laboratory. In solar physics, the initial instrument complement and associated accommodation requirements of the Advanced Solar Observatory are described. The planned evolutionary development of this observatory is outlined, making use of the Space Station capabilities for servicing and instrument reconfiguration.

  16. The use of cold plasma generators in medicine

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Kolomiiets R.O; Nikitchuk T.M; Hrek O.V

    2017-01-01

    Cold plasma treatment of wounds is a modern area of therapeutic medicine. We describe the physical mechanisms of cold plasma, the principles of therapeutic effects and design of two common types of cold plasma generators for medical use...

  17. The technology of Plasma Spray Physical Vapour Deposition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Góral

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The deposition of thermal barrier coatings is currently the most effective means of protecting the surface of aircraft engine turbine blades from the impact of aggressive environment of combustion gases. The new technologies of TBC depositions are required.Design/methodology/approach: The essential properties of the PS-PVD process have been outlined, as well as recent literature references. In addition, the influence of a set process condition on the properties of the deposited coatings has been described.Findings: The new plasma-spraying PS-PVD method is a promising technology for the deposition of modern thermal barrier coatings on aircraft engine turbine blades.Research limitations/implications: The constant progress of engine operating temperatures and increasing pollution restrictions determine the intensive development of heat-resistant coatings, which is directed to new deposition technologies and coating materials.Practical implications: The article presents a new technology of thermal barrier coating deposition - LPPS Thin Film and Plasma Spray - Physical Vapour Deposition.Originality/value: The completely new technologies was described in article.

  18. Counting on Beauty: The role of aesthetic, ethical, and physical universal principles for interstellar communication

    CERN Document Server

    Lemarchand, Guillermo A

    2008-01-01

    SETI researchers believe that the basic principles of our science and the science of extraterrestrial beings should be fundamentally the same, and we should be able to communicate with them by referring to those things we share, such as the principles of mathematics, physics, and chemistry (a similar cognitive map of nature). This view assumes that there is only one way to conceptualize the laws of nature. Consequently, mathematics and the language of nature should be universal. In this essay, we discuss the epistemological bases of the last assumptions. We describe all the hypotheses behind the universality of the laws of nature and the restrictions that any technology should have to establish contact with other galactic technological civilization. We introduce some discussions about the limitations of homocentric views. We discuss about the possible use of aesthetic cognitive universals as well as ethical ones in the design of interstellar messages. We discuss the role of symmetry as a universal cognitive m...

  19. Wave-particle duality and uncertainty principle: Phenomenographic categories of description of tertiary physics students' depictions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayene, Mengesha; Kriek, Jeanne; Damtie, Baylie

    2011-12-01

    Quantum mechanics is often thought to be a difficult subject to understand, not only in the complexity of its mathematics but also in its conceptual foundation. In this paper we emphasize students’ depictions of the uncertainty principle and wave-particle duality of quantum events, phenomena that could serve as a foundation in building an understanding of quantum mechanics. A phenomenographic study was carried out to categorize a picture of students’ descriptions of these key quantum concepts. Data for this study were obtained from a semistructured in-depth interview conducted with undergraduate physics students (N=25) from Bahir Dar, Ethiopia. The phenomenographic data analysis revealed that it is possible to construct three qualitatively different categories to map students’ depictions of the concept wave-particle duality, namely, (1) classical description, (2) mixed classical-quantum description, and (3) quasiquantum description. Similarly, it is proposed that students’ depictions of the concept uncertainty can be described with four different categories of description, which are (1) uncertainty as an extrinsic property of measurement, (2) uncertainty principle as measurement error or uncertainty, (3) uncertainty as measurement disturbance, and (4) uncertainty as a quantum mechanics uncertainty principle. Overall, we found students are more likely to prefer a classical picture of interpretations of quantum mechanics. However, few students in the quasiquantum category applied typical wave phenomena such as interference and diffraction that cannot be explained within the framework classical physics for depicting the wavelike properties of quantum entities. Despite inhospitable conceptions of the uncertainty principle and wave- and particlelike properties of quantum entities in our investigation, the findings presented in this paper are highly consistent with those reported in previous studies. New findings and some implications for instruction and the

  20. Wave-particle duality and uncertainty principle: Phenomenographic categories of description of tertiary physics students’ depictions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mengesha Ayene1

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Quantum mechanics is often thought to be a difficult subject to understand, not only in the complexity of its mathematics but also in its conceptual foundation. In this paper we emphasize students’ depictions of the uncertainty principle and wave-particle duality of quantum events, phenomena that could serve as a foundation in building an understanding of quantum mechanics. A phenomenographic study was carried out to categorize a picture of students’ descriptions of these key quantum concepts. Data for this study were obtained from a semistructured in-depth interview conducted with undergraduate physics students (N=25 from Bahir Dar, Ethiopia. The phenomenographic data analysis revealed that it is possible to construct three qualitatively different categories to map students’ depictions of the concept wave-particle duality, namely, (1 classical description, (2 mixed classical-quantum description, and (3 quasiquantum description. Similarly, it is proposed that students’ depictions of the concept uncertainty can be described with four different categories of description, which are (1 uncertainty as an extrinsic property of measurement, (2 uncertainty principle as measurement error or uncertainty, (3 uncertainty as measurement disturbance, and (4 uncertainty as a quantum mechanics uncertainty principle. Overall, we found students are more likely to prefer a classical picture of interpretations of quantum mechanics. However, few students in the quasiquantum category applied typical wave phenomena such as interference and diffraction that cannot be explained within the framework classical physics for depicting the wavelike properties of quantum entities. Despite inhospitable conceptions of the uncertainty principle and wave- and particlelike properties of quantum entities in our investigation, the findings presented in this paper are highly consistent with those reported in previous studies. New findings and some implications for instruction

  1. First-principle description of collisional gyrokinetic turbulence in tokamak plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dif-Pradalier, G

    2008-10-15

    This dissertation starts in chapter 1 with a comprehensive introduction to nuclear fusion, its basic physics, goals and means. It especially defines the concept of a fusion plasma and some of its essential physical properties. The following chapter 2 discusses some fundamental concepts of statistical physics. It introduces the kinetic and the fluid frameworks, compares them and highlights their respective strengths and limitations. The end of the chapter is dedicated to the fluid theory. It presents two new sets of closure relations for fluid equations which retain important pieces of physics, relevant in the weakly collisional tokamak regimes: collective resonances which lead to Landau damping and entropy production. Nonetheless, since the evolution of the turbulence is intrinsically nonlinear and deeply influenced by velocity space effects, a kinetic collisional description is most relevant. First focusing on the kinetic aspect, chapter 3 introduces the so-called gyrokinetic framework along with the numerical solver - the GYSELA code - which will be used throughout this dissertation. Very generically, code solving is an initial value problem. The impact on turbulent nonlinear evolution of out of equilibrium initial conditions is discussed while studying transient flows, self-organizing dynamics and memory effects due to initial conditions. This dissertation introduces an operational definition, now of routine use in the GYSELA code, for the initial state and concludes on the special importance of the accurate calculation of the radial electric field. The GYSELA framework is further extended in chapter 4 to describe Coulomb collisions. The implementation of a collision operator acting on the full distribution function is presented. Its successful confrontation to collisional theory (neoclassical theory) is also shown. GYSELA is now part of the few gyrokinetic codes which can self-consistently address the interplay between turbulence and collisions. While

  2. EDITORIAL: The Third Nordic Symposium on Plasma Physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pecseli, Hans; Trulsen, Jan

    2006-02-01

    The Third Nordic Symposium on Plasma Physics was organized at Lysebu, Oslo, Norway on 4 7 October 2004, under the auspices of the Norwegian Centre for Advanced Study (CAS). The arrangement was preceded by two similar meetings organized at the Risø National Laboratory in Denmark by one of us (HP): Nonlinear Waves in Plasmas, 13 16 August 1985, and The Second Nordic Symposium on Nonlinear Phenomena in Plasmas and Related Topics, 8 12 August 1988. The proceedings from these two previous meetings were published as Physica Scripta Reprint Series No. 2, and RS 16 (with a few copies still being available). The idea of `Nordic' in the title of this latest meeting was interpreted somewhat liberally, by including also scientific organizations in northern Germany, where a collaboration facing Nordic countries comes naturally, and indeed has solid historical roots pointing also to ongoing activities. We hope that this series of meetings can continue, suggesting that the interval should be kept to a minimum of three years to ensure that all participants present new results. (We hope not to have to wait 16 years until next time, though!) The aim of our meetings is to stimulate collaboration among plasma physicists by creating a forum where the participants can exchange ideas and seek inspiration under relaxed conditions. We have the distinct impression that the meeting was very successful in this respect. Many Nordic institutes have widespread international collaborations, and we were happy to welcome also foreign representatives for some of these activities. Altogether 28 contributed talks were presented by 30 participants. The abstracts of all talks were distributed at the meeting. The present proceedings cover a selection of the contributions. One participant had to cancel, but the contribution is included in these proceedings. All the papers have been refereed according to the usual standards of the journal We, the organizers, thank CAS for the generous financial support

  3. High-energy cosmic rays and tests of basic principles of Physics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gonzalez-Mestres L.

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available With the present understanding of data, the observed flux suppression for ultra-high energy cosmic rays (UHECR at energies above 4.1019 eV can be a signature of the Greisen-Zatsepin-Kuzmin (GZK cutoff or be related to a similar mechanism. But it may also correspond, for instance, to the maximum energies available at the relevant sources. In both cases, violations of special relativity modifying cosmic-ray propagation or acceleration at very high energy can potentially play a role. Other violations of fundamental principles of standard particle physics (quantum mechanics, energy and momentum conservation, vacuum homogeneity and “static” properties, effective space dimensions, quark confinement… can also be relevant at these energies. In particular, UHECR data would in principle allow to set bounds on Lorentz symmetry violation (LSV in patterns incorporating a privileged local reference frame (the “vacuum rest frame”, VRF. But the precise analysis is far from trivial, and other effects can also be present. The effective parameters can be related to Planckscale physics, or even to physics beyond Planck scale, as well as to the dynamics and effective symmetries of LSV for nucleons, quarks, leptons and the photon. LSV can also be at the origin of GZK-like effects. In the presence of a VRF, and contrary to a “grand unification” view, LSV and other violations of standard principles can modify the internal structure of particles at very high energy and conventional symmetries may cease to be valid at energies close to the Planck scale. We present an updated discussion of these topics, including experimental prospects, new potentialities for high-energy cosmic ray phenomenology and the possible link with unconventional pre-Big Bang scenarios, superbradyon (superluminal preon patterns… The subject of a possible superluminal propagation of neutrinos at accelerator energies is also dealt with.

  4. High school physical educators' and sport coaches' knowledge of resistance training principles and methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGladrey, Brian W; Hannon, James C; Faigenbaum, Avery D; Shultz, Barry B; Shaw, Janet M

    2014-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the level of knowledge that current and preservice high school (HS) physical educators and sport coaches possess regarding the principles and methods involved in youth resistance training (RT) and to determine if that knowledge was acceptable based on a predetermined criterion (passing score). A panel of 10 experts in RT or sport pedagogy used a Delphi technique to create a 90-question assessment (examination) that was administered to 287 HS physical educators and sport coaches and 140 university physical education teacher education (PETE) students. An analysis of the results revealed that neither group demonstrated the minimal knowledge necessary to design, implement, and supervise RT programs based on a passing score of 75%: HS physical educators/coaches, mean = 59.30, SD = 14.30, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 57.64-60.96], t(286) = -18.61, p = 0.000; university PETE students, mean = 56.61, SD = 16.59, 95% CI = 53.84-59.38, t(139) = -13.12, p = 0.000. The pass rate for physical educators and sport coaches was 14.3% and for university PETE students it was 20.7%. The results of this study indicate that both current and preservice physical educators and sport coaches need additional education and training specific to the design and implementation of RT programs for HS students. Given that school districts typically require their educators attend in-service training programs, it may be advisable to develop an in-service program that allows both current and preservice HS physical educators and sport coaches to earn an RT certification that specifically addresses the unique physical and psychosocial needs of school-aged youth.

  5. Toroidal current profile control during low confinement mode plasma discharges in DIII-D via first-principles-driven model-based robust control synthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barton, Justin E.; Boyer, Mark D.; Shi, Wenyu; Schuster, Eugenio; Luce, Tim C.; Ferron, John R.; Walker, Michael L.; Humphreys, David A.; Penaflor, Ben G.; Johnson, Robert D.

    2012-12-01

    In order for ITER to be capable of operating in advanced tokamak operating regimes, characterized by a high fusion gain, good plasma confinement, magnetohydrodynamic stability and a non-inductively driven plasma current, for extended periods of time, several challenging plasma control problems still need to be solved. Setting up a suitable toroidal current density profile in the tokamak is key for one possible advanced operating scenario characterized by non-inductive sustainment of the plasma current. At the DIII-D tokamak, the goal is to create the desired current profile during the ramp-up and early flat-top phases of the plasma discharge and then actively maintain this target profile for the remainder of the discharge. The evolution in time of the toroidal current profile in tokamaks is related to the evolution of the poloidal magnetic flux profile, which is modelled in normalized cylindrical coordinates using a first-principles, nonlinear, dynamic partial differential equation (PDE) referred to as the magnetic diffusion equation. The magnetic diffusion equation is combined with empirical correlations developed from physical observations and experimental data from DIII-D for the electron temperature, the plasma resistivity and the non-inductive current drive to develop a simplified, control-oriented, nonlinear, dynamic PDE model of the poloidal flux profile evolution valid for low confinement mode discharges. In this work, we synthesize a robust feedback controller to reject disturbances and track a desired reference trajectory of the poloidal magnetic flux gradient profile by employing the control-oriented model of the system. A singular value decomposition of the static gain matrix of the plant model is utilized to identify the most relevant control channels and is combined with the dynamic response of system around a given operating trajectory to design the feedback controller. A general framework for real-time feedforward + feedback control of magnetic and

  6. A new principle of synthetic cascade utilization of chemical energy and physical energy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JIN; Hongguang; HONG; Hui; WANG; Baoqun; HAN; Wei; LIN; Rum

    2005-01-01

    We propose a new principle of the cascade utilization of both chemical energy and physical energy in energy systems with the integration of chemical processes and thermal cycles. Particularly, a general equation of energy levels of substance, Gibbs free energy of chemical reaction and physical energy is explicitly founded. On the basis of this equation, a chemical-looping combustion and an indirect combustion are investigated. Furthermore, a mechanism of energy release, with the combination of decreasing the energy level of Gibbs free energy and upgrading the energy level of low or middle- temperature thermal energy, is clarified. The promising results obtained here establish a theoretical basis for the further investigation of multi-function systems in which energy and the environment are compatible, and create a new approach to improve the performance of traditional thermal cycles.

  7. Differentiation with Stratification: A Principle of Theoretical Physics in the Tradition of the Memory Art

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pombo, Claudia

    2015-10-01

    The art of memory started with Aristotle's questions on memory. During its long evolution, it had important contributions from alchemists, was transformed by Ramon Llull and apparently ended with Giordano Bruno, who was considered the best known representative of this art. This tradition did not disappear, but lives in the formulations of our modern scientific theories. From its initial form as a method of keeping information via associations, it became a principle of classification and structuring of knowledge. This principle, which we here name differentiation with stratification, is a structural design behind classical mechanics. Integrating two different traditions of science in one structure, this physical theory became the modern paradigm of science. In this paper, we show that this principle can also be formulated as a set of questions. This is done via an analysis of theories, based on the epistemology of observational realism. A combination of Rudolph Carnap's concept of theory as a system of observational and theoretical languages, with a criterion for separating observational languages, based on analytical psychology, shapes this epistemology. The `nuclear' role of the observational laws and the differentiations from these nucleus, reproducing the general cases of phenomena, reveals the memory art's heritage in the theories. Here in this paper we argue that this design is also present in special relativity and in quantum mechanics.

  8. Principles Supporting the Perceptional Teaching of Physics: A ``Practical Teaching Philosophy''

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurki-Suonio, Kaarle

    2011-03-01

    This article sketches a framework of ideas developed in the context of decades of physics teacher-education that was entitled the "perceptional approach". Individual learning and the scientific enterprise are interpreted as different manifestations of the same process aimed at understanding the natural and social worlds. The process is understood to possess the basic nature of perception, where empirical meanings are first born and then conceptualised. The accumulation of perceived gestalts in the "structure of the mind" leads to structural perception and the generation of conceptual hierarchies, which form a general principle for the expansion of our understanding. The process undergoes hierarchical development from early sensory perception to individual learning and finally to science. The process is discussed in terms of a three-process dynamic. Scientific and technological processes are driven by the interaction of the mind and nature. They are embedded in the social process due to the interaction of individual minds. These sub-processes are defined by their aims: The scientific process affects the mind and aims at understanding; the technological process affects nature and aims at human well-being; and the social process aims at mutual agreement and cooperation. In hierarchical development the interaction of nature and the mind gets structured into a "methodical cycle" by procedures involving conscious activities. Its intuitive nature is preserved due to subordination of the procedures to empirical meanings. In physics, two dimensions of hierarchical development are distinguished: Unification development gives rise to a generalisation hierarchy of concepts; Quantification development transfers the empirical meanings to quantities, laws and theories representing successive hierarchical levels of quantitative concepts. Consequences for physics teaching are discussed in principle, and in the light of examples and experiences from physics teacher education.

  9. Principles of creation of complex physical rehabilitation program for children after cochlear implantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zastavna O.M.

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: to elucidate main principles of complex physical rehabilitation program for senior pre-school age children after cochlear implantation. Material: 40 hard hearing children of senior pre-school (main group were tested. Main group №1 consisted of hard hearing children (10 boys and 11 girls, who did not underwent cochlear implantation and learned by program of pre-school educational establishment for hard-hearing children. Main group №2 consisted of 19 children after cochlear implantation, registered at oral-aural specialists (10 boys and 9 girls. For them the author’s program of physical rehabilitation was worked out. Comparison group consisted of 40 children with normal hearing (18 boys and 22 girls. Effectiveness of the worked out program was assessed by parameters of physical and psycho-motor condition, by children’s physical qualities. Results: the offered program of children’s physical rehabilitation was developed on the base of assessment of physical and psycho-motor condition, physical fitness. The program is of complex character and includes the following elements: domestic habilitation, kinetisotherapy methodic (morning hygienic exercises, Yoga for children, health related training complex, fit-ball training, breathing and articulation exercises, massage (general, speech therapy massage, hardening. Conclusions: Complex character of the worked out program implies diverse influence on different disorders in children’s organisms. All these are realized against the background of main etiological factor of these changes (deafness removal. Such approach results in improvement of children’s condition, their quicker socialization and possibility to study in comprehensive school in due time.

  10. Understanding Solar Coronal Heating through Atomic and Plasma Physics Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savin, Daniel Wolf; Arthanayaka, Thusitha; Bose, Sayak; Hahn, Michael; Beiersdorfer, Peter; Brown, Gregory V.; Gekelman, Walter; Vincena, Steve

    2017-08-01

    Recent solar observations suggest that the Sun's corona is heated by Alfven waves that dissipate at unexpectedly low heights in the corona. These observations raise a number of questions. Among them are the problems of accurately quantifying the energy flux of the waves and that of describing the physical mechanism that leads to the wave damping. We are performing laboratory experiments to address both of these issues.The energy flux depends on the electron density, which can be measured spectroscopically. However, spectroscopic density diagnostics have large uncertainties, because they depend sensitively on atomic collisional excitation, de-excitation, and radiative transition rates for multiple atomic levels. Essentially all of these data come from theory and have not been experimentally validated. We are conducting laboratory experiments using the electron beam ion trap (EBIT) at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory that will provide accurate empirical calibrations for spectroscopic density diagnostics and which will also help to guide theoretical calculations.The observed rapid wave dissipation is likely due to inhomogeneities in the plasma that drive flows and currents at small length scales where energy can be more efficiently dissipated. This may take place through gradients in the Alfvén speed along the magnetic field, which causes wave reflection and generates turbulence. Alternatively, gradients in the Alfvén speed across the field can lead to dissipation through phase-mixing. Using the Large Plasma Device (LAPD) at the University of California Los Angeles, we are studying both of these dissipation mechanisms in the laboratory in order to understand their potential roles in coronal heating.

  11. Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory Annual Site Environmental Report for Calendar Year 2000

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Virginia L. Finley

    2002-04-22

    The results of the 2000 environmental surveillance and monitoring program for the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL) are presented and discussed. The purpose of this report is to provide the U.S. Department of Energy and the public with information on the level of radioactive and nonradioactive pollutants (if any) that are added to the environment as a result of PPPL's operations. The report also summarizes environmental initiatives, assessments, and programs that were undertaken in 2000. The Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory has engaged in fusion energy research since 1951. The long-range goal of the U.S. Magnetic Fusion Energy Research Program is to create innovations to make fusion power a practical reality -- an alternative energy source. The year 2000 marked the second year of National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) operations and Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) dismantlement and deconstruction activities. A collaboration among fourteen national laboratories, universities, and research institutions, the NSTX is a major element in the U.S. Fusion Energy Sciences Program. It has been designed to test the physics principles of spherical torus (ST) plasmas. The ST concept could play an important role in the development of smaller, more economical fusion power plants. With its completion within budget and ahead of its target schedule, NSTX first plasma occurred on February 12, 1999. In 2000, PPPL's radiological environmental monitoring program measured tritium in the air at on-site and off-site sampling stations. PPPL is capable of detecting small changes in the ambient levels of tritium by using highly sensitive monitors. The operation of an in-stack monitor located on D-site is a requirement of the National Emission Standard for Hazardous Air Pollutants (NESHAPs) regulations with limits set by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). Also included in PPPL's radiological environmental monitoring program, are precipitation, surface

  12. Investigation of the blood behaviour and vascular diseases by using mathematical physic principles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yardimci, Ahmet; Simsek, Buket

    2017-07-01

    In this paper we prepare a short survey for using of mathematical physic principles in blood flow and vascular diseases researches. The study of the behavior of blood flow in the blood vessels provides understanding on connection between flow and the development of dieseases such as atherosclerosis, thrombosis, aneurysms etc. and how the flow dynamics is changed under these conditions. Blood flow phenomena are often too complex that it would be possible to describe them entirely analytically, although simple models, such as Poiseuille model, can still provide some insight into blood flow. Blood is not an "ideal fluid" and energy is lost as flowing blood overcomes resistance. Resistance to blood flow is a function of viscosity, vessel radius, and vessel length. So, mathematical Physic principles are useful tools for blood flow research studies. Blood flow is a function of pressure gradient and resistance and resistance to flow can be estimates using Poiseuille's law. Reynold's number can be used to determine whether flow is laminar or turbulent.

  13. Asymptotic-Preserving methods and multiscale models for plasma physics

    CERN Document Server

    Degond, Pierre

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of the present paper is to provide an overview of Asymptotic-Preserving methods for multiscale plasma simulations by addressing three singular perturbation problems. First, the quasi-neutral limit of fluid and kinetic models is investigated in the framework of non magnetized as well as magnetized plasmas. Second, the drift limit for fluid descriptions of thermal plasmas under large magnetic fields is addressed. Finally efficient numerical resolutions of anisotropic elliptic or diffusion equations arising in magnetized plasma simulation are reviewed.

  14. Experimental and theoretical research in applied plasma physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Porkolab, M.

    1992-01-01

    This report discusses research in the following areas: fusion theory and computations; theory of thermonuclear plasmas; user service center; high poloidal beta studies on PBX-M; fast ECE fluctuation diagnostic for balloning mode studies; x-ray imaging diagnostic; millimeter/submillimeter-wave fusion ion diagnostics; small scale turbulence and nonlinear dynamics in plasmas; plasma turbulence and transport; phase contrast interferometer diagnostic for long wavelength fluctuations in DIII-D; and charged and neutral fusion production for fusio plasmas.

  15. Predicting Zonal Flows -- A Comprehensive Reynolds-Stress Response-Functional from First-Principles-Plasma-Turbulence Computations

    CERN Document Server

    Guertler, Niels

    2011-01-01

    Turbulence driven zonal flows play an important role in fusion devices since they improve plasma confinement by limiting the level of anomalous transport. Current theories mostly focus on flow excitation but do not self-consistently describe the nearly stationary zonal flow turbulence equilibrium state. First-principles two-fluid turbulence studies are used to construct a Reynolds stress response functional from observations in turbulent states. This permits, for the first time, a reliable charting of zonal flow turbulence equilibria.

  16. Assessment of Capabilities for First-Principles Simulation of Spacecraft Electric Propulsion Systems and Plasma Spacecraft Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-04-29

    other provision of law , no person shall be subject to any penalty for failing to comply with a collection of information if it does not display a...Briefing Charts 3. DATES COVERED (From - To) 05 April 2016 – 29 April 2016 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Assessment of Capabilities for First- Principles ...Simulation of Spacecraft Electric Propulsion Systems and Plasma Spacecraft Environment 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT

  17. Plasma physics abstracts, 1 January - 31 December, 1986

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurnett, D. A.; Dangelo, N.; Goertz, C. K.

    1987-01-01

    Topics addressed include: ion-cyclotron waves; plasma waves; solar wind lithium releases; bow shock; Pi2 wave bursts; auroral kilometric radiation; ion energization; magnetic field corrections; electric fields; magnetospheric processes; electron acceleration; inner heliosphere; nightside auroral zone; computerized simulation; plasma wave turbulence; and magnetohydrodynamic waves in plasma sheets.

  18. PREFACE: First International Workshop on Nonequilibrium Processes in Plasma Physics and Studies of Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrović, Z. Lj; Malović, G.; Tasić, M.; Nikitović, Ž.

    2007-06-01

    not only by the need to further understand the fundamental principles but with an eye towards applications. Consequently in addition to furthering the cause of physics, we strive to improve increasingly complex technologies or develop new technologies. The non-equilibrium nature of plasmas that are the subject of our studies allows us to control properties that are critical and to design optimum conditions for these varied applications. We hope that this volume will serve as a useful source of information for experienced researchers, as a textbook for postgraduate students and as a reminder, for all who attended the workshop, of the wonderful time (http://www.euj07.phy.bg.ac.yu/index.php?page=p04) we had on top of the mountain Kopaonik, even though we were subjected to freezing temperatures in the middle of summer. Organization of this workshop was supported by INCO EU FP6 026328 project (Reinforcing Experimental Center for Non-equilibrium studies with Application in Nano-technologies, Etching of Integrated Circuits and Environmental Research), by the Ministry of Science and Environment of Serbia (project 141025) and also, to a great extend, by the individual funding of the participants some of whom traveled from remote continents in order to participate. Z Lj Petrović, G Malović, M Tasić and Ž Nikitović Editors

  19. Physical-Chemical Characterization of Nanodispersed Powders Produced by a Plasma-Chemical Technique

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    M. GEORGIEVA; G. VISSOKOV; Iv. GRANCHAROV

    2007-01-01

    This article presents a review on the physical-chemical properties and characteristics of plasma-chemically produced nanodispersed powders (NDP), such as metals, oxides, nitrides, carbides, and catalysts. The plasma-chemical preparation of the powders was carried out in thermal plasma (TP) created by means of high-current electric arcs, plasma jets, high-frequency (HF) discharges, etc. We also discuss certain properties and characteristics of the NDPs, which are determined largely by the conditions of preparation.

  20. Physics and optimization of plasma startup in the RFP

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, W.; Chapman, B. E.; Ding, W. X.; Lin, L.; Almagri, A. F.; Anderson, J. K.; Den Hartog, D. J.; Duff, J.; Ko, J.; Kumar, S. T. A.; Morton, L.; Munaretto, S.; Parke, E.; Reusch, J. A.; Sarff, J. S.; Waksman, J.; Brower, D. L.; Liu, W.

    2015-05-01

    In the tokamak and reversed-field pinch (RFP), inductively driven toroidal plasma current provides the confining poloidal magnetic field and ohmic heating power, but the magnitude and/or duration of this current is limited by the available flux swing in the poloidal field transformer. A portion of this flux is consumed during startup as the current is initiated and ramped to its final target value, and considerable effort has been devoted to understanding startup and minimizing the amount of flux consumed. Flux consumption can be reduced during startup in the RFP by increasing the toroidal magnetic field, Bti, applied to initiate the discharge, but the underlying physics is not yet entirely understood. Toward increasing this understanding, we have for the first time in the RFP employed advanced, non-invasive diagnostics on the Madison Symmetric Torus to measure the evolution of current, magnetic field, and kinetic profiles during startup. Flux consumption during startup is dominantly inductive, but we find that the inductive flux consumption drops as Bti increases. The resistive consumption of flux, while relatively small, apparently increases with Bti due to a smaller electron temperature. However, the ion temperature increases with Bti, exceeding the electron temperature and thus reflecting non-collisional heating. Magnetic fluctuations also increase with Bti, corresponding primarily to low-n modes that emerge sequentially as the safety factor profile evolves from tokamak-like to that of the RFP.

  1. Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory FY2003 Annual Highlights

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Editors: Carol A. Phillips; Anthony R. DeMeo

    2004-08-23

    The Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory FY2003 Annual Highlights report provides a summary of the activities at the Laboratory for the fiscal year--1 October 2002 through 30 September 2003. The report includes the Laboratory's Mission and Vision Statements, a message ''From the Director,'' summaries of the research and engineering activities by project, and sections on Technology Transfer, the Graduate and Science Education Programs, Awards and Honors garnered by the Laboratory and the employees, and the Year in Pictures. There is also a listing of the Laboratory's publications for the year and a section of the abbreviations, acronyms, and symbols used throughout the report. In the PDF document, links have been created from the Table of Contents to each section. You can also return to the Table of Contents from the beginning page of each section. The PPPL Highlights for fiscal year 2003 is also available in hardcopy format. To obtain a copy e-mail Publications and Reports at: pub-reports@pppl.gov. Be sure to include your complete mailing address

  2. Perspective: The physics, diagnostics, and applications of atmospheric pressure low temperature plasma sources used in plasma medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laroussi, M.; Lu, X.; Keidar, M.

    2017-07-01

    Low temperature plasmas have been used in various plasma processing applications for several decades. But it is only in the last thirty years or so that sources generating such plasmas at atmospheric pressure in reliable and stable ways have become more prevalent. First, in the late 1980s, the dielectric barrier discharge was used to generate relatively large volume diffuse plasmas at atmospheric pressure. Then, in the early 2000s, plasma jets that can launch cold plasma plumes in ambient air were developed. Extensive experimental and modeling work was carried out on both methods and much of the physics governing such sources was elucidated. Starting in the mid-1990s, low temperature plasma discharges have been used as sources of chemically reactive species that can be transported to interact with biological media, cells, and tissues and induce impactful biological effects. However, many of the biochemical pathways whereby plasma affects cells remain not well understood. This situation is changing rather quickly because the field, known today as "plasma medicine," has experienced exponential growth in the last few years thanks to a global research community that engaged in fundamental and applied research involving the use of cold plasma for the inactivation of bacteria, dental applications, wound healing, and the destruction of cancer cells/tumors. In this perspective, the authors first review the physics as well as the diagnostics of the principal plasma sources used in plasma medicine. Then, brief descriptions of their biomedical applications are presented. To conclude, the authors' personal assessment of the present status and future outlook of the field is given.

  3. 'Plasma Camp': A Different Approach to Professional Development for Physics Teachers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andrew Post-Zwicker and Nicholas R. Guilbert

    1998-12-01

    The Plasma Physics and Fusion Energy Institute ('Plasma Camp') was inaugurated in 1998 as a way to address two areas of concern in the professional development of high-school physics teachers: involving teachers in the theory and methods of a current area of research in physics and connecting the research experience back into the classroom. The Institute, run jointly by a scientist and a teacher, immersed high-school teachers from across the country in laboratory investigations and in pedagogical projects for two weeks at Princeton University's Plasma Physics Laboratory. The goals, structure, and initial outcomes of the Institute are discussed.

  4. Investigating and improving introductory physics students’ understanding of the electric field and superposition principle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jing; Singh, Chandralekha

    2017-09-01

    We discuss an investigation of the difficulties that students in a university introductory physics course have with the electric field and superposition principle and how that research was used as a guide in the development and evaluation of a research-validated tutorial on these topics to help students learn these concepts better. The tutorial uses a guided enquiry-based approach to learning and involved an iterative process of development and evaluation. During its development, we obtained feedback both from physics instructors who regularly teach introductory physics in which these concepts are taught and from students for whom the tutorial is intended. The iterative process continued and the feedback was incorporated in the later versions of the tutorial until the researchers were satisfied with the performance of a diverse group of introductory physics students on the post-test after they worked on the tutorial in an individual one-on-one interview situation. Then the final version of the tutorial was administered in several sections of the university physics course after traditional instruction in relevant concepts. We discuss the performance of students in individual interviews and on the pre-test administered before the tutorial (but after traditional lecture-based instruction) and on the post-test administered after the tutorial. We also compare student performance in sections of the class in which students worked on the tutorial with other similar sections of the class in which students only learned via traditional instruction. We find that students performed significantly better in the sections of the class in which the tutorial was used compared to when students learned the material via only lecture-based instruction.

  5. Generalised phase kick-back: the structure of computational algorithms from physical principles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Ciarán M.; Selby, John H.

    2016-03-01

    The advent of quantum computing has challenged classical conceptions of which problems are efficiently solvable in our physical world. This motivates the general study of how physical principles bound computational power. In this paper we show that some of the essential machinery of quantum computation—namely reversible controlled transformations and the phase kick-back mechanism—exist in any operational-defined theory with a consistent notion of information. These results provide the tools for an exploration of the physics underpinning the structure of computational algorithms. We investigate the relationship between interference behaviour and computational power, demonstrating that non-trivial interference behaviour is a general resource for post-classical computation. In proving the above, we connect higher-order interference to the existence of post-quantum particle types, potentially providing a novel experimental test for higher-order interference. Finally, we conjecture that theories with post-quantum interference—the higher-order interference of Sorkin—can solve problems intractable even on a quantum computer.

  6. First-Principles, Physically Motivated Force Field for the Ionic Liquid [BMIM][BF4].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Eunsong; McDaniel, Jesse G; Schmidt, J R; Yethiraj, Arun

    2014-08-07

    Molecular simulations play an important role in establishing structure-property relations in complex fluids such as room-temperature ionic liquids. Classical force fields are the starting point when large systems or long times are of interest. These force fields must be not only accurate but also transferable. In this work, we report a physically motivated force field for the ionic liquid 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium tetrafluoroborate ([BMIM][BF4]) based on symmetry-adapted perturbation theory. The predictions (from molecular dynamics simulations) of the liquid density, enthalpy of vaporization, diffusion coefficients, viscosity, and conductivity are in excellent agreement with experiment, with no adjustable parameters. The explicit energy decomposition inherent in the force field enables a quantitative analysis of the important physical interactions in these systems. We find that polarization is crucial and there is little evidence of charge transfer. We also argue that the often used procedure of scaling down charges in molecular simulations of ionic liquids is unphysical for [BMIM][BF4]. Because all intermolecular interactions in the force field are parametrized from first-principles, we anticipate good transferability to other ionic liquid systems and physical conditions.

  7. Tech-X Corporation releases simulation code for solving complex problems in plasma physics : VORPAL code provides a robust environment for simulating plasma processes in high-energy physics, IC fabrications and material processing applications

    CERN Multimedia

    2005-01-01

    Tech-X Corporation releases simulation code for solving complex problems in plasma physics : VORPAL code provides a robust environment for simulating plasma processes in high-energy physics, IC fabrications and material processing applications

  8. Physics-Based Computational Algorithm for the Multi-Fluid Plasma Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-06-30

    Riemann solver for the two-fluid plasma model. Journal of Computational Physics , 187(2):620–638, 2003. [23] Jeffrey P. Freidberg. Ideal...Computational Physics , 141(2):199–224, 1998. [52] P. L. Roe. Approximate Riemann solvers, parameter vectors and difference schemes. Journal of...AFRL-OSR-VA-TR-2014-0310 PHYSICS -BASED COMPUTATIONAL ALGORITHM FOR THE MULTIFLUID PLASMA MODEL Uri Shumlak UNIVERSITY OF WASHINGTON Final Report 10

  9. Applications of the principle of maximum entropy: from physics to ecology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banavar, Jayanth R; Maritan, Amos; Volkov, Igor

    2010-02-17

    There are numerous situations in physics and other disciplines which can be described at different levels of detail in terms of probability distributions. Such descriptions arise either intrinsically as in quantum mechanics, or because of the vast amount of details necessary for a complete description as, for example, in Brownian motion and in many-body systems. We show that an application of the principle of maximum entropy for estimating the underlying probability distribution can depend on the variables used for describing the system. The choice of characterization of the system carries with it implicit assumptions about fundamental attributes such as whether the system is classical or quantum mechanical or equivalently whether the individuals are distinguishable or indistinguishable. We show that the correct procedure entails the maximization of the relative entropy subject to known constraints and, additionally, requires knowledge of the behavior of the system in the absence of these constraints. We present an application of the principle of maximum entropy to understanding species diversity in ecology and introduce a new statistical ensemble corresponding to the distribution of a variable population of individuals into a set of species not defined a priori.

  10. First-Principles Computer Simulations of Dense Plasmas and Application to the Interiors of Giant Planets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Militzer, Burkhard

    2013-06-01

    This presentation will review three recent applications of first-principles computer simulation techniques to study matter at extreme temperature-pressure conditions that are of relevance to astrophysics. First we report a recent methodological advance in all-electron path integral Monte Carlo (PIMC) that allowed us to extend this method beyond hydrogen and helium to elements with core electrons [1]. We combine results from PIMC and with density functional molecular dynamics (DFT-MD) simulations and derive a coherent equation of state (EOS) for water and carbon plasmas in the regime from 1-50 Mbar and 104-109 K that can be compared to laboratory shock wave experiments. Second we apply DFT-MD simulations to characterize superionic water in the interiors of Uranus and Neptune. By adopting a thermodynamic integration technique, we derive the Gibbs free energy in order to demonstrate the existence of a phase transformation from body-centered cubic to face-centered cubic superionic water [2]. Finally we again use DFT-MD to study the interiors of gas giant planets. We determine the EOS for hydrogen-helium mixtures spanning density-temperature conditions in the deep interiors of giant planets, 0.2-9.0 g/cc and 1000-80000 K [3]. We compare the simulation results with the semi-analytical EOS model by Saumon and Chabrier. We present a revision to the mass-radius relationship which makes the hottest exoplanets increase in radius by ~0.2 Jupiter radii at fixed entropy and for masses greater than 0.5 Jupiter masses. This change is large enough to have possible implications for some discrepant inflated giant exoplanets. We conclude by demonstrating that all materials in the cores of giant planets, ices, MgO, SiO2, and iron, will all dissolve into metallic hydrogen. This implies the cores of Jupiter and Saturn have been at least partially eroded. [1] K. P. Driver, B. Militzer, Phys. Rev. Lett. 108 (2012) 115502. [2] H. F. Wilson, M. L. Wong, B. Militzer, http://arxiv.org/abs/1211

  11. Role of magnetospheric plasma physics for understanding cosmic phenomena

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Indra M. L.

    Cosmic phenomena occur in the remote regions of space where in situ observations are not possible. For a proper understanding of these phenomena, laboratory experiments are essential, but in situ observations of magnetospheric plasma provide an even better background to test various hypothesis of cosmic interest. This is because the ionospheric-magnetospheric plasma and the solar wind are the only cosmic plasmas accessible to extensive in situ observations and experiments.

  12. Physical limitations in ferromagnetic inductively coupled plasma sources

    CERN Document Server

    Bliokh, Yury P; Slutsker, Yakov Z

    2012-01-01

    The Ferromagnetic Inductively Coupled Plasma (FICP) source, which is a version of the common inductively coupled plasma sources, has a number of well known advantages such as high efficiency, high level of ionization, low minimal gas pressure, very low required driver frequency, and even a possibility to be driven by single current pulses. We present an experimental study of such an FICP source which showed that above a certain value of the driving pulse power the properties of this device changed rather drastically. Namely, the plasma became non-stationary and non-uniform contrary to the stationary and uniform plasmas typical for this kind of plasma sources. In this case the plasma appeared as a narrow dense spike which was short compared to the driving pulse. The local plasma density could exceed the neutral atoms density by a few orders of magnitude. When that happened, the afterglow plasma decay time after the end of the pulse was long compared to an ordinary case with no plasma spike. Experiments were pe...

  13. Princeton University, Plasma Physics Laboratory annual report, October 1, 1988--September 30, 1989

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1989-01-01

    This report contains discussions on the following topics: principal parameters achieved in experimental devices (FY89); tokamak fusion test reactor; compact ignition tokamak; princeton beta experiment- modification; current drive experiment; international collaboration; x-ray laser studies; spacecraft glow experiment; plasma deposition and etching of thin films; theoretical studies; tokamak modeling; international thermonuclear experimental reactor; engineering department; project planning and safety office; quality assurance and reliability; technology transfer; administrative operations; PPPL patent invention disclosures for (FY89); graduate education: plasma physics; graduate education: plasma science and technology; and Princeton Plasmas Physics Laboratory Reports (FY89).

  14. Princeton University, Plasma Physics Laboratory annual report, October 1, 1988--September 30, 1989

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1989-12-31

    This report contains discussions on the following topics: principal parameters achieved in experimental devices (FY89); tokamak fusion test reactor; compact ignition tokamak; princeton beta experiment- modification; current drive experiment; international collaboration; x-ray laser studies; spacecraft glow experiment; plasma deposition and etching of thin films; theoretical studies; tokamak modeling; international thermonuclear experimental reactor; engineering department; project planning and safety office; quality assurance and reliability; technology transfer; administrative operations; PPPL patent invention disclosures for (FY89); graduate education: plasma physics; graduate education: plasma science and technology; and Princeton Plasmas Physics Laboratory Reports (FY89).

  15. Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory. Annual report, October 1, 1989--September 30, 1990

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1990-12-31

    This report discusses the following topics: principal parameters achieved in experimental devices fiscal year 1990; tokamak fusion test reactor; compact ignition tokamak; Princeton beta experiment- modification; current drive experiment-upgrade; international collaboration; x-ray laser studies; spacecraft glow experiment; plasma processing: deposition and etching of thin films; theoretical studies; tokamak modeling; international thermonuclear experimental reactor; engineering department; project planning and safety office; quality assurance and reliability; technology transfer; administrative operations; PPPL patent invention disclosures for fiscal year 1990; graduate education; plasma physics; graduate education: plasma science and technology; science education program; and Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory reports fiscal year 1990.

  16. Novel Prospects for Plasma Spray-Physical Vapor Deposition of Columnar Thermal Barrier Coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anwaar, Aleem; Wei, Lianglinag; Guo, Qian; Zhang, Baopeng; Guo, Hongbo

    2017-09-01

    Plasma spray-physical vapor deposition (PS-PVD) is an emerging coating technique that can produce columnar thermal barrier coatings from vapor phase. Feedstock treatment at the start of its trajectory in the plasma torch nozzle is important for such vapor-phase deposition. This study describes the effects of the plasma composition (Ar/He) on the plasma characteristics, plasma-particle interaction, and particle dynamics at different points spatially distributed inside the plasma torch nozzle. The results of calculations show that increasing the fraction of argon in the plasma gas mixture enhances the momentum and heat flow between the plasma and injected feedstock. For the plasma gas combination of 45Ar/45He, the total enthalpy transferred to a representative powder particle inside the plasma torch nozzle is highest ( 9828 kJ/kg). Moreover, due to the properties of the plasma, the contribution of the cylindrical throat, i.e., from the feed injection point (FIP) to the start of divergence (SOD), to the total transferred energy is 69%. The carrier gas flow for different plasma gas mixtures was also investigated by optical emission spectroscopy (OES) measurements of zirconium emissions. Yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) coating microstructures were produced when using selected plasma gas compositions and corresponding carrier gas flows; structural morphologies were found to be in good agreement with OES and theoretical predictions. Quasicolumnar microstructure was obtained with porosity of 15% when applying the plasma composition of 45Ar/45He.

  17. Physical investigation of a quad confinement plasma source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knoll, Aaron; Lucca Fabris, Andrea; Young, Christopher; Cappelli, Mark

    2016-10-01

    Quad magnetic confinement plasma sources are novel magnetized DC discharges suitable for applications in a broad range of fields, particularly space propulsion, plasma etching and deposition. These sources contain a square discharge channel with magnetic cusps at the four lateral walls, enhancing plasma confinement and electron residence time inside the device. The magnetic field topology is manipulated using four independent electromagnets on each edge of the channel, tuning the properties of the generated plasma. We characterize the plasma ejected from the quad confinement sources using a combination of traditional electrostatic probes and non-intrusive laser-based diagnostics. Measurements show a strong ion acceleration layer located 8 cm downstream of the exit plane, beyond the extent of the magnetic field. The ion velocity field is investigated with different magnetic configurations, demonstrating how ion trajectories may be manipulated. C.Y. acknowledges support from the DOE NSSA Stewardship Science Graduate Fellowship under contract DE-FC52-08NA28752.

  18. Princeton University Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton, New Jersey. Annual report, October 1, 1990--September 30, 1991

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1991-12-31

    This report discusses the following topics: Principal parameters of experimental devices; Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor; Burning Plasma Experiment; Princeton Beta Experiment-Modification; Current Drive Experiment-Upgrade; International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor; International Collaboration; X-Ray Laser Studies; Hyperthermal Atomic Beam Source; Pure Electron Plasma Experiments; Plasma Processing: Deposition and Etching of Thin Films; Theoretical Studies; Tokamak Modeling; Engineering Department; Environment, Safety, and Health and Quality Assurance; Technology Transfer; Office of Human Resources and Administration; PPPL Patent Invention Disclosures; Office of Resource Management; Graduate Education: Plasma Physics; Graduate Education: Program in Plasma Science and Technology; and Science Education Program.

  19. Physics-electrical hybrid model for real time impedance matching and remote plasma characterization in RF plasma sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sudhir, Dass; Bandyopadhyay, M.; Chakraborty, A.

    2016-02-01

    Plasma characterization and impedance matching are an integral part of any radio frequency (RF) based plasma source. In long pulse operation, particularly in high power operation where plasma load may vary due to different reasons (e.g. pressure and power), online tuning of impedance matching circuit and remote plasma density estimation are very useful. In some cases, due to remote interfaces, radio activation and, due to maintenance issues, power probes are not allowed to be incorporated in the ion source design for plasma characterization. Therefore, for characterization and impedance matching, more remote schemes are envisaged. Two such schemes by the same authors are suggested in these regards, which are based on air core transformer model of inductive coupled plasma (ICP) [M. Bandyopadhyay et al., Nucl. Fusion 55, 033017 (2015); D. Sudhir et al., Rev. Sci. Instrum. 85, 013510 (2014)]. However, the influence of the RF field interaction with the plasma to determine its impedance, a physics code HELIC [D. Arnush, Phys. Plasmas 7, 3042 (2000)] is coupled with the transformer model. This model can be useful for both types of RF sources, i.e., ICP and helicon sources.

  20. Physics-electrical hybrid model for real time impedance matching and remote plasma characterization in RF plasma sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sudhir, Dass, E-mail: dass.sudhir@iter-india.org; Bandyopadhyay, M.; Chakraborty, A. [ITER-India, Institute for Plasma Research, A-29 GIDC, Sec-25, Gandhinagar, 382016 Gujarat (India)

    2016-02-15

    Plasma characterization and impedance matching are an integral part of any radio frequency (RF) based plasma source. In long pulse operation, particularly in high power operation where plasma load may vary due to different reasons (e.g. pressure and power), online tuning of impedance matching circuit and remote plasma density estimation are very useful. In some cases, due to remote interfaces, radio activation and, due to maintenance issues, power probes are not allowed to be incorporated in the ion source design for plasma characterization. Therefore, for characterization and impedance matching, more remote schemes are envisaged. Two such schemes by the same authors are suggested in these regards, which are based on air core transformer model of inductive coupled plasma (ICP) [M. Bandyopadhyay et al., Nucl. Fusion 55, 033017 (2015); D. Sudhir et al., Rev. Sci. Instrum. 85, 013510 (2014)]. However, the influence of the RF field interaction with the plasma to determine its impedance, a physics code HELIC [D. Arnush, Phys. Plasmas 7, 3042 (2000)] is coupled with the transformer model. This model can be useful for both types of RF sources, i.e., ICP and helicon sources.

  1. Physics-electrical hybrid model for real time impedance matching and remote plasma characterization in RF plasma sources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sudhir, Dass; Bandyopadhyay, M; Chakraborty, A

    2016-02-01

    Plasma characterization and impedance matching are an integral part of any radio frequency (RF) based plasma source. In long pulse operation, particularly in high power operation where plasma load may vary due to different reasons (e.g. pressure and power), online tuning of impedance matching circuit and remote plasma density estimation are very useful. In some cases, due to remote interfaces, radio activation and, due to maintenance issues, power probes are not allowed to be incorporated in the ion source design for plasma characterization. Therefore, for characterization and impedance matching, more remote schemes are envisaged. Two such schemes by the same authors are suggested in these regards, which are based on air core transformer model of inductive coupled plasma (ICP) [M. Bandyopadhyay et al., Nucl. Fusion 55, 033017 (2015); D. Sudhir et al., Rev. Sci. Instrum. 85, 013510 (2014)]. However, the influence of the RF field interaction with the plasma to determine its impedance, a physics code HELIC [D. Arnush, Phys. Plasmas 7, 3042 (2000)] is coupled with the transformer model. This model can be useful for both types of RF sources, i.e., ICP and helicon sources.

  2. What is the mathematical meaning of Steenbeck's principle of minimum power in gas discharge physics?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benilov, M S [Departamento de Fisica, Universidade da Madeira, Largo do MunicIpio, 9000 Funchal (Portugal); Naidis, G V [Joint Institute for High Temperatures of the Russian Academy of Sciences, Izhorskaya 13/19, Moscow 125412 (Russian Federation)

    2010-05-05

    It is shown that Steenbeck's principle of minimum power, or voltage, for discharges with fixed current is not a corollary of the principle of minimum entropy production, in contrast to what is frequently assumed; besides, the latter principle itself does not provide a reasonable approximation in gas discharge physics. Similarly, Steenbeck's principle is not a corollary of mathematical models of gas discharges. Hence, this principle contradicts the mathematical models. A methodically correct evaluation of the error caused by the use of Steenbeck's principle requires a comparison of a solution obtained with the use of this principle with an exact solution to the same problem, rather than with experimental results or results deemed reasonable from the point of view of common sense. Such a comparison is performed for two examples from the theory of a cylindrical arc column. The examples show that the error incurred by the usage of Steenbeck's principle is uncontrollable and may be unacceptably high.

  3. 179th International School of Physics "Enrico Fermi" : Laser-Plasma Acceleration

    CERN Document Server

    Gizzi, L A; Faccini, R

    2012-01-01

    Impressive progress has been made in the field of laser-plasma acceleration in the last decade, with outstanding achievements from both experimental and theoretical viewpoints. Closely exploiting the development of ultra-intense, ultrashort pulse lasers, laser-plasma acceleration has developed rapidly, achieving accelerating gradients of the order of tens of GeV/m, and making the prospect of miniature accelerators a more realistic possibility. This book presents the lectures delivered at the Enrico Fermi International School of Physics and summer school: "Laser-Plasma Acceleration" , held in Varenna, Italy, in June 2011. The school provided an opportunity for young scientists to experience the best from the worlds of laser-plasma and accelerator physics, with intensive training and hands-on opportunities related to key aspects of laser-plasma acceleration. Subjects covered include: the secrets of lasers; the power of numerical simulations; beam dynamics; and the elusive world of laboratory plasmas. The object...

  4. From plasma immersion ion implantation to deposition: A historical perspective on principles and trends

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anders, Andre

    2001-06-14

    Plasma immersion techniques of surface modification are known under a myriad of names. The family of techniques reaches from pure plasma ion implantation, to ion implantation and deposition hybrid modes, to modes that are essentially plasma film deposition with substrate bias. In the most general sense, all plasma immersion techniques have in common that the surface of a substrate (target) is exposed to plasma and that relatively high substrate bias is applied. The bias is usually pulsed. In this review, the roots of immersion techniques are explored, some going back to the 1800s, followed by a discussion of the groundbreaking works of Adler and Conrad in the 1980s. In the 1990s, plasma immersion techniques matured in theoretical understanding, scaling, and the range of applications. First commercial facilities are now operational. Various immersion concepts are compiled and explained in this review. While gas (often nitrogen) ion implantation dominated the early years, film-forming immersion techniques and semiconductor processing gained importance. In the 1980s and 1990s we have seen exponential growth of the field but signs of slowdown are clear since 1998. Nevertheless, plasma immersion techniques have found, and will continue to have, an important place among surface modification techniques.

  5. Two-dimensional models as testing ground for principles and concepts of local quantum physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schroer, Bert

    2006-02-01

    In the past two-dimensional models of QFT have served as theoretical laboratories for testing new concepts under mathematically controllable condition. In more recent times low-dimensional models (e.g., chiral models, factorizing models) often have been treated by special recipes in a way which sometimes led to a loss of unity of QFT. In the present work, I try to counteract this apartheid tendency by reviewing past results within the setting of the general principles of QFT. To this I add two new ideas: (1) a modular interpretation of the chiral model Diff( S)-covariance with a close connection to the recently formulated local covariance principle for QFT in curved spacetime and (2) a derivation of the chiral model temperature duality from a suitable operator formulation of the angular Wick rotation (in analogy to the Nelson-Symanzik duality in the Ostertwalder-Schrader setting) for rational chiral theories. The SL (2, Z) modular Verlinde relation is a special case of this thermal duality and (within the family of rational models) the matrix S appearing in the thermal duality relation becomes identified with the statistics character matrix S. The relevant angular "Euclideanization" is done in the setting of the Tomita-Takesaki modular formalism of operator algebras. I find it appropriate to dedicate this work to the memory of J.A. Swieca with whom I shared the interest in two-dimensional models as a testing ground for QFT for more than one decade. This is a significantly extended version of an "Encyclopedia of Mathematical Physics" contribution hep-th/0502125.

  6. Two-dimensional models as testing ground for principles and concepts of local quantum physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schroer, Bert [FU Berlin (Germany). Institut fuer Theoretische Physik

    2005-04-15

    In the past two-dimensional models of QFT have served as theoretical laboratories for testing new concepts under mathematically controllable condition. In more recent times low-dimensional models (e.g. chiral models, factoring models) often have been treated by special recipes in a way which sometimes led to a loss of unity of QFT. In the present work I try to counteract this apartheid tendency by reviewing past results within the setting of the general principles of QFT. To this I add two new ideas: (1) a modular interpretation of the chiral model Diff(S)-covariance with a close connection to the recently formulated local covariance principle for QFT in curved spacetime and (2) a derivation of the chiral model temperature duality from a suitable operator formulation of the angular Wick rotation (in analogy to the Nelson-Symanzik duality in the Ostertwalder-Schrader setting) for rational chiral theories. The SL(2,Z) modular Verlinde relation is a special case of this thermal duality and (within the family of rational models) the matrix S appearing in the thermal duality relation becomes identified with the statistics character matrix S. The relevant angular 'Euclideanization' is done in the setting of the Tomita-Takesaki modular formalism of operator algebras. I find it appropriate to dedicate this work to the memory of J. A. Swieca with whom I shared the interest in two-dimensional models as a testing ground for QFT for more than one decade. This is a significantly extended version of an 'Encyclopedia of Mathematical Physics' contribution hep-th/0502125. (author)

  7. Some problems of pulsar physics. [magnetospheric plasma model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arons, J.

    1979-01-01

    The theories of particle acceleration along polar field lines are reviewed, and the total energization of the charge separated plasma is summarized, when pair creation is absent. The application of these theories and plasma supply to pulsars is discussed, with attention given to the total amount of electron-positron plasma created and its momentum distribution. Various aspects of radiation emission and transport are analyzed, based on a polar current flow model with pair creation, and the phenomenon of marching subpulses is considered. The coronation beaming and the relativistically expanding current sheet models for pulsar emission are also outlined, and the paper concludes with a brief discussion of the relation between the theories of polar flow with pair plasma and the problem of the energization of the Crab Nebula.

  8. The Conception of Thermonuclear Reactor on the Principle of Gravitational Confinement of Dense High-temperature Plasma

    CERN Document Server

    Fisenko, Stanislav

    2010-01-01

    The work of Fisenko S. I., & Fisenko I. S. (2009). The old and new concepts of physics, 6 (4), 495, shows the key fact of the existence of gravitational radiation as a radiation of the same level as electromagnetic. The obtained results strictly correspond to the framework of relativistic theory of gravitation and quantum mechanics. The given work contributes into further elaboration of the findings considering their application to dense high-temperature plasma of multiple-charge ions. This is due to quantitative character of electron gravitational emission spectrum such that amplification of gravitational emission may take place only in multiple-charge ion high-temperature plasma.

  9. Plasma and Ion Assistance in Physical Vapor Deposition: AHistorical Perspective

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anders, Andre

    2007-02-28

    Deposition of films using plasma or plasma-assist can betraced back surprisingly far, namely to the 18th century for arcs and tothe 19th century for sputtering. However, only since the 1960s thecoatings community considered other processes than evaporation for largescale commercial use. Ion Plating was perhaps the first importantprocess, introducing vapor ionization and substrate bias to generate abeam of ions arriving on the surface of the growing film. Ratherindependently, cathodic arc deposition was established as an energeticcondensation process, first in the former Soviet Union in the 1970s, andin the 1980s in the Western Hemisphere. About a dozen various ion-basedcoating technologies evolved in the last decades, all characterized byspecific plasma or ion generation processes. Gridded and gridless ionsources were taken from space propulsion and applied to thin filmdeposition. Modeling and simulation have helped to make plasma and ionseffects to be reasonably well understood. Yet--due to the complex, oftennon-linear and non-equilibrium nature of plasma and surfaceinteractions--there is still a place for the experience plasma"sourcerer."

  10. EDITORIAL: Invited papers from the 15th International Congress on Plasma Physics combined with the 13th Latin American Workshop on Plasma Physics Invited papers from the 15th International Congress on Plasma Physics combined with the 13th Latin American Workshop on Plasma Physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soto, Leopoldo

    2011-07-01

    The International Advisory Committee of the 15th International Congress on Plasma Physics (ICPP 2010) and the International Advisory Committee of the 13th Latin American Workshop on Plasma Physics (LAWPP 2010) both agreed to hold this combined meeting ICPP-LAWPP-2010 in Santiago de Chile, 8-13 August 2010, considering the celebration of the Bicentennial of Chilean Independence. ICPP-LAWPP-2010 was organized by the Thermonuclear Plasma Department of the Chilean Nuclear Energy Commission (CCHEN) as part of its official program, within the framework of the Chilean Bicentennial activities. This event was also a scientific and academic activity of the project `Center for Research and Applications in Plasma Physics and Pulsed Power, P4', supported by the National Scientific and Technological Commission, CONICYT-Chile, under grant ACT-26. The International Congress on Plasma Physics was first held in Nagoya in 1980, and was followed by: Gothenburg (1982), Lausanne (1984), Kiev (1987), New Delhi (1989), Innsbruck (1992), Foz do Iguacu (1994), Nagoya (1996), Prague (1998), Quebec City (2000), Sydney (2002), Nice (2004), Kiev (2006) and Fukuoka (2008). The purpose of the Congress is to discuss recent progress and outlooks in plasma science, covering fundamental plasma physics, fusion plasmas, astrophysical plasmas, plasma applications, etc. The Latin American Workshop on Plasma Physics was first held in 1982 in Cambuquira, Brazil, followed by: Medellín (1985), Santiago (1988), Buenos Aires (1990), Mexico City (1992), Foz do Iguacu (1994, also combined with ICPP), Caracas (1997), Tandil (1998), La Serena (2000), Sao Pedro (2003), Mexico City (2005) and Caracas (2007). The purpose of the Latin American Workshop on Plasma Physics is to provide a forum in which the achievements of the Latin American plasma physics communities can be displayed, as well as to foster collaboration between plasma scientists within the region and elsewhere. The Program of ICPP-LAWPP-2010 included

  11. Working group report: Heavy-ion physics and quark-gluon plasma

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Munshi G Mustafa; Sudhir Raniwala; T Awes; B Rai; R S Bhalerao; J G Contreras; R V Gavai; S K Ghosh; P Jaikumar; G C Mishra; A P Mishra; H Mishra; B Mohanty; J Nayak; J-Y Ollitrault; S C Phatak; L Ramello; R Ray; P K Sahu; A M Srivastava; D K Srivastava; V K Tiwari

    2006-11-01

    This is the report of Heavy Ion Physics and Quark-Gluon Plasma at WHEPP-09 which was part of Working Group-4. Discussion and work on some aspects of quark-gluon plasma believed to have created in heavy-ion collisions and in early Universe are reported.

  12. Contributed papers presented at the 24. EPS conference on controlled fusion and plasma physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-06-01

    In the report thirteen papers are compiled which were presented by members of the Centre de Recherches en Physique des Plasma, Lausanne, at the 24th EPS conference on controlled fusion and plasma physics. They mainly deal with problems of the confinement and are based on studies performed in the TCV tokamak. figs., tabs., refs.

  13. Physical activity affects plasma coenzyme Q10 levels differently in young and old humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Pozo-Cruz, Jesús; Rodríguez-Bies, Elisabet; Ballesteros-Simarro, Manuel; Navas-Enamorado, Ignacio; Tung, Bui Thanh; Navas, Plácido; López-Lluch, Guillermo

    2014-04-01

    Coenzyme Q (Q) is a key lipidic compound for cell bioenergetics and membrane antioxidant activities. It has been shown that also has a central role in the prevention of oxidation of plasma lipoproteins. Q has been associated with the prevention of cholesterol oxidation and several aging-related diseases. However, to date no clear data on the levels of plasma Q during aging are available. We have measured the levels of plasmatic Q10 and cholesterol in young and old individuals showing different degrees of physical activity. Our results indicate that plasma Q10 levels in old people are higher that the levels found in young people. Our analysis also indicates that there is no a relationship between the degree of physical activity and Q10 levels when the general population is studied. However, very interestingly, we have found a different tendency between Q10 levels and physical activity depending on the age of individuals. In young people, higher activity correlates with lower Q10 levels in plasma whereas in older adults this ratio changes and higher activity is related to higher plasma Q10 levels and higher Q10/Chol ratios. Higher Q10 levels in plasma are related to lower lipoperoxidation and oxidized LDL levels in elderly people. Our results highlight the importance of life habits in the analysis of Q10 in plasma and indicate that the practice of physical activity at old age can improve antioxidant capacity in plasma and help to prevent cardiovascular diseases.

  14. Principles of fuel ion ratio measurements in fusion plasmas by collective Thomson scattering

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stejner Pedersen, Morten; Nielsen, Stefan Kragh; Bindslev, Henrik;

    2011-01-01

    ratio. Measurements of the fuel ion ratio will be important for plasma control and machine protection in future experiments with burning fusion plasmas. Here we examine the theoretical basis for fuel ion ratio measurements by CTS. We show that the sensitivity to plasma composition is enhanced......For certain scattering geometries collective Thomson scattering (CTS) measurements are sensitive to the composition of magnetically confined fusion plasmas. CTS therefore holds the potential to become a new diagnostic for measurements of the fuel ion ratio—i.e. the tritium to deuterium density...... by the signatures of ion cyclotron motion and ion Bernstein waves which appear for scattering geometries with resolved wave vectors near perpendicular to the magnetic field. We investigate the origin and properties of these features in CTS spectra and give estimates of their relative importance for fuel ion ratio...

  15. Research in space science and technology. [including X-ray astronomy and interplanetary plasma physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beckley, L. E.

    1977-01-01

    Progress in various space flight research programs is reported. Emphasis is placed on X-ray astronomy and interplanetary plasma physics. Topics covered include: infrared astronomy, long base line interferometry, geological spectroscopy, space life science experiments, atmospheric physics, and space based materials and structures research. Analysis of galactic and extra-galactic X-ray data from the Small Astronomy Satellite (SAS-3) and HEAO-A and interplanetary plasma data for Mariner 10, Explorers 47 and 50, and Solrad is discussed.

  16. Overview of Inertial Electrostatic Confinement Plasma Physics Research at the University of Wisconsin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santarius, John; Emmert, Gilbert; Kulcinski, Gerald; Bonomo, Richard; Alderson, Eric; Becerra, Gabriel; Garrison, Lauren; Hall, Karla; McEvoy, Aaron; Michalak, Matthew; Schuff, Craig

    2012-10-01

    In inertial-electrostatic confinement (IEC) fusion devices, a voltage difference between nearly transparent electrodes accelerates ions to fusion-relevant velocities, typically in spherical geometry. University of Wisconsin IEC research has produced ˜10^8 steady-state and ˜10^10 pulsed DD neutrons per second, plus ˜10^8 D^3He protons per second [1]. The neutrons have been used to detect highly enriched uranium (HEU) and C-4 explosives; the protons have produced radioisotopes for positron emission tomography at proof-of-principle levels [1]. A new 300 kV, 200 mA power supply will begin operation in 2012, which should increase fusion reaction rates. Presently, the investigation of IEC plasma physics issues at the University of Wisconsin comprises: (1) theoretical analysis of ion and neutral flow through atomic or molecular gases; (2) negative-ion production; (3) fusion of DD, D^3He, and ^3He^3He; (4) converging ion beams; and (5) ion-surface interactions. Diagnostic development includes: (a) charged fusion product Doppler-shift and time-of-flight; (b) movable Faraday cup; and (c) double Langmuir probe.[4pt] [1] G.L. Kulcinski, et al., Fusion Science and Technology 56, 493, (2009).

  17. Laser-plasma interaction physics for shock ignition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Goyon C.

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available In the shock ignition scheme, the ICF target is first compressed with a long (nanosecond pulse before creating a convergent shock with a short (∼100 ps pulse to ignite thermonuclear reactions. This short pulse is typically (∼2.1015–1016 W/cm2 above LPI (Laser Plasma Instabilities thresholds. The plasma is in a regime where the electron temperature is expected to be very high (2–4 keV and the laser coupling to the plasma is not well understood. Emulating LPI in the corona requires large and hot plasmas produced by high-energy lasers. We conducted experiments on the LIL (Ligne d'Integration Laser, 10 kJ at 3ω and the LULI2000 (0.4 kJ at 2ω facilities, to approach these conditions and study absorption and LPI produced by a high intensity beam in preformed plasmas. After introducing the main risks associated with the short pulse propagation, we present the latest experiment we conducted on LPI in relevant conditions for shock ignition.

  18. JINA Workshop Nuclear Physics in Hot Dense Dynamic Plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kritcher, A L; Cerjan, C; Landen, O; Libby, S; Chen, M; Wilson, B; Knauer, J; Mcnabb, D; Caggiano, J; Bleauel, D; Weideking, M; Kozhuharov, C; Brandau, C; Stoehlker, T; Meot, V; Gosselin, G; Morel, P; Schneider, D; Bernstein, L A

    2011-03-07

    Measuring NEET and NEEC is relevant for probing stellar cross-sections and testing atomic models in hot plasmas. Using NEEC and NEET we can excite nuclear levels in laboratory plasmas: (1) NIF: Measure effect of excited nuclear levels on (n,{gamma}) cross-sections, 60% and never been measured; (2) Omega, Test cross-sections for creating these excited levels via NEEC and NEET. Will allow us to test models that estimate resonance overlap of atomic states with the nucleus: (1) Average Atom model (AA) (CEA&LLNL), single average wave-function potential; (2) Super Transition Array (STA) model (LLNL), More realistic individual configuration potentials NEET experimental data is scarce and not in a plasma environment, NEEC has not yet been observed.

  19. The principle and physical models of novel jetting dispenser with giant magnetostrictive and a magnifier.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, C; Li, J H; Duan, J A; Deng, G L

    2015-01-01

    In order to develop jetting technologies of glue in LED and microelectronics packaging, giant-magnetostrictive-material (GMM) is firstly applied to increase jetting response, and a new magnifying device including a lever and a flexible hinge is designed to improve jetting characteristics. Physical models of the jetting system are derived from the magnifying structure and working principle, which involves circuit model, electro-magneto-displacement model, dynamic model and fluid-solid coupling model. The system model is established by combining mathematical models with Matlab-Simulink. The effectiveness of the GMM-based dispenser is confirmed by simulation and experiments. The jetting frequency significantly increases to 250 Hz, and dynamic behaviors jetting needle are evaluated that the velocity and displacement of the jetting needle reaches to 320 mm•s-1 and 0.11 mm respectively. With the increasing of the filling pressure or the amplitude of the current, the dot size will become larger. The dot size and working frequency can be easily adjusted.

  20. The principle and physical models of novel jetting dispenser with giant magnetostrictive and a magnifier

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, C.; Li, J. H.; Duan, J. A.; Deng, G. L.

    2015-12-01

    In order to develop jetting technologies of glue in LED and microelectronics packaging, giant-magnetostrictive-material (GMM) is firstly applied to increase jetting response, and a new magnifying device including a lever and a flexible hinge is designed to improve jetting characteristics. Physical models of the jetting system are derived from the magnifying structure and working principle, which involves circuit model, electro-magneto-displacement model, dynamic model and fluid-solid coupling model. The system model is established by combining mathematical models with Matlab-Simulink. The effectiveness of the GMM-based dispenser is confirmed by simulation and experiments. The jetting frequency significantly increases to 250 Hz, and dynamic behaviors jetting needle are evaluated that the velocity and displacement of the jetting needle reaches to 320 mm•s-1 and 0.11 mm respectively. With the increasing of the filling pressure or the amplitude of the current, the dot size will become larger. The dot size and working frequency can be easily adjusted.

  1. Physical principles of fluid-mediated insect attachment - Shouldn't insects slip?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dirks, Jan-Henning

    2014-01-01

    Insects use either hairy or smooth adhesive pads to safely adhere to various kinds of surfaces. Although the two types of adhesive pads are morphologically different, they both form contact with the substrate via a thin layer of adhesive fluid. To model adhesion and friction forces generated by insect footpads often a simple "wet adhesion" model is used, in which two flat undeformable substrates are separated by a continuous layer of fluid. This review summarizes the key physical and tribological principles that determine the adhesion and friction in such a model. Interestingly, such a simple wet-adhesion model falls short in explaining several features of insect adhesion. For example, it cannot predict the observed high static friction forces of the insects, which enable them to cling to vertical smooth substrates without sliding. When taking a closer look at the "classic" attachment model, one can see that it is based on several simplifications, such as rigid surfaces or continuous layers of Newtonian fluids. Recent experiments show that these assumptions are not valid in many cases of insect adhesion. Future tribological models for insect adhesion thus need to incorporate deformable adhesive pads, non-Newtonian properties of the adhesive fluid and/or partially "dry" or solid-like contact between the pad and the substrate.

  2. The principle and physical models of novel jetting dispenser with giant magnetostrictive and a magnifier

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, C.; Li, J.H.; Duan, J.A.; Deng, G.L.

    2015-01-01

    In order to develop jetting technologies of glue in LED and microelectronics packaging, giant-magnetostrictive-material (GMM) is firstly applied to increase jetting response, and a new magnifying device including a lever and a flexible hinge is designed to improve jetting characteristics. Physical models of the jetting system are derived from the magnifying structure and working principle, which involves circuit model, electro-magneto-displacement model, dynamic model and fluid-solid coupling model. The system model is established by combining mathematical models with Matlab-Simulink. The effectiveness of the GMM-based dispenser is confirmed by simulation and experiments. The jetting frequency significantly increases to 250 Hz, and dynamic behaviors jetting needle are evaluated that the velocity and displacement of the jetting needle reaches to 320 mm•s-1 and 0.11 mm respectively. With the increasing of the filling pressure or the amplitude of the current, the dot size will become larger. The dot size and working frequency can be easily adjusted. PMID:26670008

  3. Humanoid infers Archimedes' principle: understanding physical relations and object affordances through cumulative learning experiences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhat, Ajaz Ahmad; Mohan, Vishwanathan; Sandini, Giulio; Morasso, Pietro

    2016-07-01

    Emerging studies indicate that several species such as corvids, apes and children solve 'The Crow and the Pitcher' task (from Aesop's Fables) in diverse conditions. Hidden beneath this fascinating paradigm is a fundamental question: by cumulatively interacting with different objects, how can an agent abstract the underlying cause-effect relations to predict and creatively exploit potential affordances of novel objects in the context of sought goals? Re-enacting this Aesop's Fable task on a humanoid within an open-ended 'learning-prediction-abstraction' loop, we address this problem and (i) present a brain-guided neural framework that emulates rapid one-shot encoding of ongoing experiences into a long-term memory and (ii) propose four task-agnostic learning rules (elimination, growth, uncertainty and status quo) that correlate predictions from remembered past experiences with the unfolding present situation to gradually abstract the underlying causal relations. Driven by the proposed architecture, the ensuing robot behaviours illustrated causal learning and anticipation similar to natural agents. Results further demonstrate that by cumulatively interacting with few objects, the predictions of the robot in case of novel objects converge close to the physical law, i.e. the Archimedes principle: this being independent of both the objects explored during learning and the order of their cumulative exploration.

  4. Efficiencies and Physical Principles of Various Solar Energy Conversion Processes Leading to the Photolysis of Water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bergene, T.

    1995-12-31

    In the application of solar energy, hydrogen is likely to be used as an energy carrier and a storage medium. Production of molecular hydrogen and oxygen from water requires energy input, which may come from solar energy in various ways. This thesis begins with a literature survey of the different conversion processes and the efficiencies, which is an introduction to a series of enclosed papers. These papers are: (1) Trapping of Minority Charge Carriers at Irradiated Semiconductor/Electrolyte Heterojunctions, (2) Model Calculations on Flat-Plate Solar Heat Collector With Integrated Solar Cells, and (3) Efficiencies and Physical Principles of Photolysis of Water By Microalgae. In the papers, The qualitative features of the ``illumination-current``-characteristic curve are deduced. The hypothesis is that trapping originates in some specific cases because of confinement, which leads to charge injections into energy states above that corresponding to the band edge. The quantitative features of certain hybrid photovoltaic/thermal configuration are deduced. An analysis of the theoretical and realizable efficiencies of the photolysis of water by micro algae is given. 151 refs., 18 figs., 1 table

  5. Interaction physics of multipicosecond Petawatt laser pulses with overdense plasma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kemp, A J; Divol, L

    2012-11-09

    We study the interaction of intense petawatt laser pulses with overdense plasma over several picoseconds, using two- and three-dimensional kinetic particle simulations. Sustained irradiation with non-diffraction-limited pulses at relativistic intensities yields conditions that differ qualitatively from what is experimentally available today. Nonlinear saturation of laser-driven density perturbations at the target surface causes recurrent emissions of plasma, which stabilize the surface and keep absorption continuously high. This dynamics leads to the acceleration of three distinct groups of electrons up to energies many times the laser ponderomotive potential. We discuss their energy distribution for applications like the fast-ignition approach to inertial confinement fusion.

  6. TEBPP: Theoretical and Experimental study of Beam-Plasma-Physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, H. R.; Bernstein, W.; Linson, L. M.; Papadopoulos, K.; Kellogg, P. J.; Szuszczewicz, E. P.; Hallinan, T. J.; Leinbach, H.

    1980-01-01

    The interaction of an electron beam (0 to 10 keV, 0 to 1.5 Amp) with the plasma and neutral atmospheres at 200 to 400 km altitude is studied with emphasis on applications to near Earth and cosmical plasmas. The interaction occurs in four space time regions: (1) near electron gun, beam coming into equilibrium with medium; (2) equilibrium propagation in ionosphere; (3) ahead of beam pulse, temporal and spatial precursors; (4) behind a beam pulse. While region 2 is of the greatest interest, it is essential to study Region 1 because it determines the characteristics of the beam as it enters 2 through 4.

  7. Analysis of Physics Processes in the AC Plasma Torch Discharge under High Pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Safronov, A. A.; Vasilieva, O. B.; Dudnik, J. D.; E Kuznetsov, V.; Kuchina, J. A.; Shiryaev, V. N.; Pavlov, A. V.

    2017-04-01

    The paper is devoted to investigation of electrophysical processes in the electric discharge generated by a three-phase AC plasma torch when using a high pressure inert working gas. AC plasma torch design with end electrodes intended for work on inert gases at pressures up to 81 bar is studied. Current-voltage characteristics for different gas flow rates and pressures are presented. Physical processes characteristics of the arising voltage ripples which depend on various working parameters of the plasma torch have been investigated. Arc burning processes in the electric discharge chamber of the three-phase AC plasma torch at various working parameters were photographed.

  8. Examining the Effects of Oxygen Plasma on Physical and Dyeing Properties of Some Cellulose Fibers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dilara KOCAK

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Cotton, Agava Americana and artichoke fibers were treated with plasma with oxygen gas in Diener Vacuum Plasma for 1, 3 and 5 minutes, with 40 kHz low frequency and at 0.3 mbar pressure. After the plasma treatment, fibers' weight loss %, tensile strength, elongation, fiber diameter, surface topography (SEM, colour changes, and light and washing fastness properties were investigated. A positive increase was observed for mechanical and fastness properties after 5 min plasma treatment. The effects of plasma treatments on dyeing properties of fibers were studied. Dyeing properties of plasma treated fibers were improved after 3 min. treatment. SEM results were also proved the improved physical properties and colour changes due to the rough surface structure.DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.5755/j01.ms.22.3.9368

  9. Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory Annual Site Environmental Report for Calendar Year 2001

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Virginia L. Finley

    2004-04-07

    The purpose of this report is to provide the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and the public with information on the level of radioactive and nonradioactive pollutants (if any) that are added to the environment as a result of the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory's (PPPL) operations. The results of the 2001 environmental surveillance and monitoring program for PPPL are presented and discussed. The report also summarizes environmental initiatives, assessments, and programs that were undertaken in 2001. PPPL has engaged in fusion energy research since 1951. The vision of the Laboratory is to create innovations to make fusion power a practical reality--a clean, alternative energy source. The Year 2001 marked the third year of National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) operations and Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) dismantlement and deconstruction activities. A collaboration among fourteen national laboratories, universities, and research institutions, the NSTX is a major element in the U.S. Fusion Energy Sciences Program. It has been designed to test the physics principles of spherical torus (ST) plasmas. The ST concept could play an important role in the development of smaller, more economical fusion reactors. In 2001, PPPL's radiological environmental monitoring program measured tritium in the air at on- and off-site sampling stations. PPPL is capable of detecting small changes in the ambient levels of tritium by using highly sensitive monitors. The operation of an in-stack monitor located on D-site is a requirement of the National Emission Standard for Hazardous Air Pollutants (NESHAPs) regulations; also included in PPPL's radiological environmental monitoring program, are water monitoring--precipitation, ground-, surface-, and waste-waters. PPPL's radiological monitoring program characterized the ambient, background levels of tritium in the environment and from the D-site stack; the data are presented in this report. Groundwater monitoring

  10. The physics of plasma injection events. [during magnetospheric substorms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kivelson, M. G.; Kaye, S. M.; Southwood, D. J.

    1980-01-01

    In this paper, plasma injection is defined as an increase of particle flux in a detector of finite bandwidth. Injection can result from dynamic processes or from spacecraft penetration of a quasi-static spatial structure produced by a steady magnetospheric convection pattern. ATS-5 particle spectrograms are found to provide examples of plasma injection events of both sorts. Dynamic injection occurs both with and without local magnetic signatures. For events not associated with clear local magnetic signatures, convection theory with a steady or a time-varying uniform electric field can account for the energy dispersion of injected particles with energy less than 50 keV. The paper concludes with a discussion of the way in which the convection boundaries are related to the substorm injection boundary of Mauk and McIlwain. Several alternative expressions for the local time and K(p) dependence of the injection boundary are given.

  11. Drift waves and chaos in a LAPTAG plasma physics experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gekelman, Walter; Pribyl, Patrick; Birge-Lee, Henry; Wise, Joe; Katz, Cami; Wolman, Ben; Baker, Bob; Marmie, Ken; Patankar, Vedang; Bridges, Gabriel; Buckley-Bonanno, Samuel; Buckley, Susan; Ge, Andrew; Thomas, Sam

    2016-02-01

    In a project involving an alliance between universities and high schools, a magnetized plasma column with a steep pressure gradient was established in an experimental device. A two-dimensional probe measured fluctuations in the plasma column in a plane transverse to the background magnetic field. Correlation techniques determined that the fluctuations were that of electrostatic drift waves. The time series data were used to generate the Bandt-Pompe entropy and Jensen-Shannon complexity for the data. These quantities, when plotted against one another, revealed that a combination of drift waves and other background fluctuations were a deterministically chaotic system. Our analysis can be used to tell the difference between deterministic chaos and random noise, making it a potentially useful technique in nonlinear dynamics.

  12. Physics of Collisionless Shocks Space Plasma Shock Waves

    CERN Document Server

    Balogh, André

    2013-01-01

    The present book provides a contemporary systematic treatment of shock waves in high-temperature collisionless plasmas as are encountered in near Earth space and in Astrophysics. It consists of two parts. Part I develops the complete theory of shocks in dilute hot plasmas under the assumption of absence of collisions among the charged particles when the interaction is mediated solely by the self-consistent electromagnetic fields. Such shocks are naturally magnetised implying that the magnetic field plays an important role in their evolution and dynamics. This part treats both subcritical shocks, which dissipate flow energy by generating anomalous resistance or viscosity, and supercritical shocks. The main emphasis is, however, on super-critical shocks where the anomalous dissipation is insufficient to retard the upstream flow. These shocks, depending on the direction of the upstream magnetic field, are distinguished as quasi-perpendicular and quasi-parallel shocks which exhibit different behaviours, reflecti...

  13. Energy Efficient Transient: Plasma Ignition: Physics and Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-08-30

    Wang from the University of Southern California on modeling the TPI-assisted combustion. The ethylene data taken on the PDE is intended to assist this...production of said species will assist in the development of a model for transient plasma ignition greatly. The plan for a two week experiment is to...Back-Lighted Thyratron ," 27th International Power Modulator Conference 2006, Washington, D.C., 14-18 May 2006. P.I. - Martin A. Gundersen "Energy

  14. Innovative research of plasma physics for life sciences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boonyawan, D.

    2017-06-01

    In medicine, cold atmospheric plasma (CAP) for the medical treatment is a new field in plasma application, called plasma medicine. CAP contains mix of excited atoms and molecules, UV photons, charged particles as well as reactive oxygen species (ROS) and reactive nitrogen species (RNS). Typical species in air-CAPs are O3, OH, NxOx, and HNOx. The current developments in this field have fuelled the hope that CAP could be an interesting new therapeutic approach in the treatment of cancer. CAP apparently demonstrated effect on cancer cell apoptosis which did not induce cell necrosis or disruption. Moreover, CAP seemed to be selective for cancer cells since it was more effective in tumor cells than in normal non-neoplastic cells. In bioscience, dentistry and veterinary medicine : Since CAP, is delivered at room temperature, which results in less damaging effects on living tissue, while still has the efficiency in disinfection and sterilization. Recent studies proved that it is able to inactivate gram-negative and gram-positive bacteria, fungi, virus, spore, various parasites, and foreign organisms or pathogens without harming tissue. Moreover, cold plasma has been used effectively in medical field such as dental use, inducing apoptosis of malignant cells, stopping bleeding, promoting wound healing and tissue regeneration. Sericin hydrolysates, originating from silkworm is found support cell proliferation, expand cell adhesion and increase cell yield. The covalent linkage between a bioactive protein molecule and polystyrene dish surface via a carbon intermediate layer can slow down the release rate of protein compound into the phosphate buffer saline (PBS) solution. We found that a-C films and a-C:N2 films show good attachment of human bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (hBM-MSCs). All of carbon modified-Polystyrene(PS) dishes revealed the less release rate of sericin molecules into PBS solution than PS control.

  15. The contribution of Nikola Tesla to plasma physics and current status of plasmas that he studied

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petrović Zoran Lj.

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available One of the main Interests in science of Nikola Tesla were gas discharges plasmas, their application in lighting and in production of ozone as well as their role in conduction of electricity through the atmosphere. In particular Tesla is well known as the first person to produce rf plasmas. Such plasmas in the present day constitute the main technology required to produce integrated circuits (IC and have been essential in the revolution that resulted from IC technologies. In addition Tesla participated in studies of arcs especially arcs used as a source of light, corona discharges required to induce plasma chemical reactions and produce ozone and was involved in various aspects of gas breakdown and gaseous dielectrics. His ideas, level of his understanding and current status of these fields are discussed in this review.

  16. PREFACE: 4th International Workshop & Summer School on Plasma Physics 2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-06-01

    Fourth International Workshop & Summer School on Plasma Physics 2010 The Fourth International Workshop & Summer School on Plasma Physics (IWSSPP'10) is organized by St. Kliment Ohridsky University of Sofia, with co-organizers TCPA Foundation, Association EURATOM/IRNRE, The Union of the Physicists in Bulgaria, and the Bulgarian Academy of Sciences. It was held in Kiten, Bulgaria, at the Black Sea Coast, from July 5 to July 10, 2010. The scientific programme covers the topics Fusion Plasma and Materials; Plasma Modeling and Fundamentals; Plasma Sources, Diagnostics and Technology. As the previous issues of this scientific meeting (IWSSPP'05, J. Phys.: Conf. Series 44 (2006) and IWSSPP'06, J. Phys.: Conf. Series 63 (2007), IWSSPP'08, J. Phys.: Conf. Series 207 (2010), its aim was to stimulate the creation and support of a new generation of young scientists for further development of plasma physics fundamentals and applications, as well as to ensure an interdisciplinary exchange of views and initiate possible collaborations by bringing together scientists from various branches of plasma physics. This volume of Journal of Physics: Conference Series includes 34 papers (invited lectures, contributed talks and posters) devoted to various branches of plasma physics, among them fusion plasma and materials, dc and microwave discharge modelling, transport phenomena in gas discharge plasmas, plasma diagnostics, cross sections and rate constants of elementary processes, material processing, plasma-chemistry and technology. Some of them have been presented by internationally known and recognized specialists in their fields; others are MSc or PhD students' first steps in science. In both cases, we believe they will raise readers' interest. We would like to thank the members of both the International Advisory Committee and the Local Organizing Committee, the participants who sent their manuscripts and passed through the (sometimes heavy and troublesome) refereeing and editing

  17. EDITORIAL: Invited review and topical lectures from the 13th International Congress on Plasma Physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zagorodny, A.; Kocherga, O.

    2007-05-01

    The 13th International Congress on Plasma Physics (ICPP 2006) was organized, on behalf of the International Advisory Committee of the ICPP series, by the National Academy of Sciences of Ukraine and the Bogolyubov Institute for Theoretical Physics (BITP) and held in Kiev, Ukraine, 22 26 May 2006. The Congress Program included the topics: fundamental problems of plasma physics; fusion plasmas; plasmas in astrophysics and space physics; plasmas in applications and technologies; complex plasmas. A total of 305 delegates from 30 countries took part in the Congress. The program included 9 invited review lectures, 32 invited topical and 313 contributed papers (60 of which were selected for oral presentation). The Congress Program was the responsibility of the International Program Committee: Anatoly Zagorodny (Chairman) Bogolyubov Institute for Theoretical Physics, Ukraine Olha Kocherga (Scientific Secretary) Bogolyubov Institute for Theoretical Physics, Ukraine Boris Breizman The University of Texas at Austin, USA Iver Cairns School of Physics, University of Sydney, Australia Tatiana Davydova Institute for Nuclear Research, Ukraine Tony Donne FOM-Institute for Plasma Physics, Rijnhuizen, The Netherlands Nikolai S Erokhin Space Research Institute of RAS, Russia Xavier Garbet CEA, France Valery Godyak OSRAM SYLVANIA, USA Katsumi Ida National Institute for Fusion Science, Japan Alexander Kingsep Russian Research Centre `Kurchatov Institute', Russia E P Kruglyakov Budker Institute of Nuclear Physics, Russia Gregor Morfill Max-Planck-Institut für extraterrestrische Physik, Germany Osamu Motojima National Institute for Fusion Science, Japan Jef Ongena ERM-KMS, Brussels and EFDA-JET, UK Konstantyn Shamrai Institute for Nuclear Research, Ukraine Raghvendra Singh Institute for Plasma Research, India Konstantyn Stepanov Kharkiv Institute of Physics and Technology, Ukraine Masayoshi Tanaka National Institute for Fusion Science, Japan Nodar Tsintsadze Physics Institute, Georgia The

  18. Redox Stimulation of Human THP-1 Monocytes in Response to Cold Physical Plasma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sander Bekeschus

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In plasma medicine, cold physical plasma delivers a delicate mixture of reactive components to cells and tissues. Recent studies suggested a beneficial role of cold plasma in wound healing. Yet, the biological processes related to the redox modulation via plasma are not fully understood. We here used the monocytic cell line THP-1 as a model to test their response to cold plasma in vitro. Intriguingly, short term plasma treatment stimulated cell growth. Longer exposure only modestly compromised cell viability but apparently supported the growth of cells that were enlarged in size and that showed enhanced metabolic activity. A significantly increased mitochondrial content in plasma treated cells supported this notion. On THP-1 cell proteome level, we identified an increase of protein translation with key regulatory proteins being involved in redox regulation (hypoxia inducible factor 2α, differentiation (retinoic acid signaling and interferon inducible factors, and cell growth (Yin Yang 1. Regulation of inflammation is a key element in many chronic diseases, and we found a significantly increased expression of the anti-inflammatory heme oxygenase 1 (HMOX1 and of the neutrophil attractant chemokine interleukin-8 (IL-8. Together, these results foster the view that cold physical plasma modulates the redox balance and inflammatory processes in wound related cells.

  19. The common extremalities in biology and physics maximum energy dissipation principle in chemistry, biology, physics and evolution

    CERN Document Server

    Moroz, Adam

    2011-01-01

    This book is the first unified systemic description of dissipative phenomena, taking place in biology, and non-dissipative (conservative) phenomena, which is more relevant to physics. Fully updated and revised, this new edition extends our understanding of nonlinear phenomena in biology and physics from the extreme / optimal perspective. The first book to provide understanding of physical phenomena from a biological perspective and biological phenomena from a physical perspectiveDiscusses emerging fields and analysisProvides examples

  20. Quantitative detection of codeine in human plasma using surface-enhanced Raman scattering via adaptation of the isotopic labelling principle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subaihi, Abdu; Muhamadali, Howbeer; Mutter, Shaun T; Blanch, Ewan; Ellis, David I; Goodacre, Royston

    2017-03-27

    In this study surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) combined with the isotopic labelling (IL) principle has been used for the quantification of codeine spiked into both water and human plasma. Multivariate statistical approaches were employed for the analysis of these SERS spectral data, particularly partial least squares regression (PLSR) which was used to generate models using the full SERS spectral data for quantification of codeine with, and without, an internal isotopic labelled standard. The PLSR models provided accurate codeine quantification in water and human plasma with high prediction accuracy (Q(2)). In addition, the employment of codeine-d6 as the internal standard further improved the accuracy of the model, by increasing the Q(2) from 0.89 to 0.94 and decreasing the low root-mean-square error of predictions (RMSEP) from 11.36 to 8.44. Using the peak area at 1281 cm(-1) assigned to C-N stretching, C-H wagging and ring breathing, the limit of detection was calculated in both water and human plasma to be 0.7 μM (209.55 ng mL(-1)) and 1.39 μM (416.12 ng mL(-1)), respectively. Due to a lack of definitive codeine vibrational assignments, density functional theory (DFT) calculations have also been used to assign the spectral bands with their corresponding vibrational modes, which were in excellent agreement with our experimental Raman and SERS findings. Thus, we have successfully demonstrated the application of SERS with isotope labelling for the absolute quantification of codeine in human plasma for the first time with a high degree of accuracy and reproducibility. The use of the IL principle which employs an isotopolog (that is to say, a molecule which is only different by the substitution of atoms by isotopes) improves quantification and reproducibility because the competition of the codeine and codeine-d6 for the metal surface used for SERS is equal and this will offset any difference in the number of particles under analysis or any fluctuations in

  1. Observing the Plasma-Physical Processes of Pulsar Radio Emission with Arecibo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rankin, Joanna M.

    2017-01-01

    With their enormous densities and fields, neutron stars entail some of the most exotic physics in the cosmos. Similarly, the physical mechanisms of pulsar radio emission are no less exotic, and we are only now beginning to understand them. The talk will provide an introduction to the phenomenology of radio pulsar emission and focus on those aspects of the exquisite Arecibo observations that bear on their challenging emission physics.The commonalities of the radio beamforms of most slow pulsars (and some millisecond pulsars) argue strongly that their magnetic fields have a nearly dipolar structure at the height of their radio emission regions. These heights can often be determined by aberration/retardation analyses. Similarly, measurement of the orientation of the polarized radio emission with respect to the emitting magnetic field facilitates identification of the physical(X/O) emission modes and study of the plasma coupling to the electromagnetic radiation.While the physics of primary plasma generation above the pulsar polar cap is only beginning to be understood, it is clear that the radio pulsars we see are able to generate copious amounts of electron-positron plasma in their emission regions. Within the nearly dipolar field structure of these emission regions, the plasma density is near to that of the Goldreich-Julian model, and so the physical conditions in these regions can be accurately estimated.These conditions show that the plasma frequencies in the emission regions are much higher than the frequency of the emitted radiation, such that the plasma couples most easily to the extraordinary mode as observed. Therefore, the only surviving emission mechanism is curvature radiation from charged solitons, produced by the two-stream instability. Such soliton emission has probably been observed directly in the Crab pulsar; however, a physical theory of charged soliton radiation does not yet exist.

  2. Physics of hot hadronic matter and quark-gluon plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shuryak, E.V.

    1990-07-01

    This Introductory talk contains a brief review of the current status of theoretical and experimental activities related to physics of superdense matter. In particular, we discuss latest lattice results on the phase transition, recent progress in chiral symmetry physics based on the theory of interacting instantons, new in the theory of QGP and of hot hadronic matter, mean p{sub t} and collective flow, the shape of p{sub t} distribution, strangeness production, J/{psi} suppression and {phi} enhancement, two puzzles connected with soft pion and soft photon enhancements, and some other ultrasoft'' phenomena. 56 refs., 6 figs.

  3. Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory annual report, October 1, 1991--September 30, 1992

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1992-12-31

    This report discusses the following topics: Principal parameters achieved in experimental devices for fiscal year 1992; tokamak fusion test reactor; princeton beta experiment-modification; current drive experiment-upgrade; tokamak physics experiment/steady-state advanced tokamak; international thermonuclear experimental reactor; international collaboration; x-ray laser studies; plasma processing: Deposition and etching of thin films; pure electron plasma experiments; theoretical studies; tokamak modeling; high-field magnet project; engineering department; environment, safety, and health and quality assurance; technology transfer; office of human resources and administration; PPPL invention disclosures for fiscal year 1992; office of resource management; graduate education: plasma physics; graduate education: program in plasma science and technology; and science education program.

  4. Physics and chemistry of plasma-assisted combustion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Starikovskiy, Andrey

    2015-08-13

    There are several mechanisms that affect a gas when using discharge plasma to initiate combustion or to stabilize a flame. There are two thermal mechanisms-the homogeneous and inhomogeneous heating of the gas due to 'hot' atom thermalization and vibrational and electronic energy relaxation. The homogeneous heating causes the acceleration of the chemical reactions. The inhomogeneous heating generates flow perturbations, which promote increased turbulence and mixing. Non-thermal mechanisms include the ionic wind effect (the momentum transfer from an electric field to the gas due to the space charge), ion and electron drift (which can lead to additional fluxes of active radicals in the gradient flows in the electric field) and the excitation, dissociation and ionization of the gas by e-impact, which leads to non-equilibrium radical production and changes the kinetic mechanisms of ignition and combustion. These mechanisms, either together or separately, can provide additional combustion control which is necessary for ultra-lean flames, high-speed flows, cold low-pressure conditions of high-altitude gas turbine engine relight, detonation initiation in pulsed detonation engines and distributed ignition control in homogeneous charge-compression ignition engines, among others. Despite the lack of knowledge in mechanism details, non-equilibrium plasma demonstrates great potential for controlling ultra-lean, ultra-fast, low-temperature flames and is extremely promising technology for a very wide range of applications.

  5. Formation and Acceleration Physics on Plasma Injector 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howard, Stephen

    2012-10-01

    Plasma Injector 1 (PI-1) is a two stage coaxial Marshal gun with conical accelerator electrodes, similar in shape to the MARAUDER device, with power input of the same topology as the RACE device. The goal of PI-1 research is to produce a self-confined compact toroid with high-flux (200 mWb), high-density (3x10^16 cm-3) and moderate initial temperature (100 eV) to be used as the target plasma in a MTF reactor. PI-1 is 5 meters long and 1.9 m in diameter at the expansion region where a high aspect ratio (4.4) spheromak is formed with a minimum lambda of 9 m-1. The acceleration stage is 4 m long and tapers to an outer diameter of 40 cm. The capacitor banks store 0.5 MJ for formation and 1.13 MJ for acceleration. Power is delivered via 62 independently controlled switch modules. Several geometries for formation bias field, inner electrodes and target chamber have been tested, and trends in accelerator efficiency and target lifetime have been observed. Thomson scattering and ion Doppler spectroscopy show significant heating (>100 eV) as the CT is compressed in the conical accelerator. B-dot probes show magnetic field structure consistent with Grad-Shafranov models and MHD simulations, and CT axial length depends strongly on the lambda profile.

  6. Study of Anti-Hydrogen and Plasma Physics 4.Observation of Antiproton Beams and Nonneutral Plasmas

    CERN Document Server

    Hori, Masaki; Fujiwara, Makoto; Kuroda, Naofumi

    2004-01-01

    Diagnostics of antiproton beams and nonneutral plasmas are described in this chapter. Parallel plate secondary electron emission detectors are used to non-destructively observe the beam position and intensity without loss. Plastic scintillation tracking detectors are useful in determining the position of annihilations of antiprotons in the trap. Three-dimensional imaging of antiprotons in a Penning trap is discussed. The unique capability of antimatter particle imaging has allowed the observation of the spatial distribution of particle loss in a trap. Radial loss is localized to small spots, strongly breaking the azimuthal symmetry expected for an ideal trap. By observing electrostatic eigen-modes of nonneutral plasmas trapped in the Multi-ring electrode trap, the non-destructive measurement of plasma parameters is performed.

  7. Contributions to 28th European physical society conference on controlled fusion and plasma physics (Madeira Tecnopolo, Funchal, Portugal, 18-22 June 2001) from LHD experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2001-07-01

    The LHD experimental group has presented nineteen papers at the 28th European Physical Society Conference on Controlled Fusion and Plasma Physics (Madeira Tecnopolo, Funchal, Portugal, 18-22 June 2001). The contributed papers are collected in this report. (author)

  8. Paradigm Changes in High Temperature Plasma Physics Research and Implications for ITER

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hyeon K. Park

    2008-02-22

    Significant high temperature plasma research in both the magnetic and inertial confinement regimes led to the official launching of the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) project which is aimed at challenging controlled fusion power for human kind. In particular, such an endeavor originated from the fruitful research outcomes from the world wide magnetic confinement devices (primarily based on the Tokamak approach) mainly in advanced countries (US, EU, and Japan). In recent years, all new steady state capable Tokamak devices are operated and/or constructed in Asian countries and incidentally, the majority of the ITER consortium consists of Asian countries. This provides an opportunity to revisit the unresolved essential physics issues and/or extend the understanding of the transient physics to the required steady state operation so that ITER can benefit from these efforts. The core physics of a magnetically confined hot plasma has two essential components; plasma stability and cross-field energy transport physics. Complete understanding of these two areas is critical for the successful operation of ITER and perhaps, Demo reactor construction. In order to have stable high beta plasmas with a sufficiently long confinement time, the physics of an abrupt disruption and sudden deterioration of the energy transport must be understood and conquered. Physics issues associated with transient harmful MHD behavior and turbulence based energy transport are extremely complicated and theoretical understanding needs a clear validation and verification with a new research approach such as a multi-dimensional visualization.

  9. Reference distribution functions for magnetically confined plasmas from the minimum entropy production theorem and the MaxEnt principle, subject to the scale-invariant restrictions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sonnino, Giorgio, E-mail: gsonnino@ulb.ac.be [Université Libre de Bruxelles (U.L.B.), Department of Physics, Campus de la Plaine Code Postal 231 - Boulevard du Triomphe, 1050 Brussels (Belgium); Cardinali, Alessandro [EURATOM-ENEA Fusion Association, Via E. Fermi 45, C.P. 65-00044 Frascati, Rome (Italy); Steinbrecher, Gyorgy [EURATOM-MEdC Fusion Association, Physics Faculty, University of Craiova, Str. A.I. Cuza 13, 200585 Craiova (Romania); Peeters, Philippe [Université Libre de Bruxelles (U.L.B.), Department of Physics, Campus de la Plaine Code Postal 231 - Boulevard du Triomphe, 1050 Brussels (Belgium); Sonnino, Alberto [Université Catholique de Louvain (UCL), Ecole Polytechnique de Louvain (EPL), Rue Archimède, 1 bte L6.11.01, 1348 Louvain-la-Neuve (Belgium); Nardone, Pasquale [Université Libre de Bruxelles (U.L.B.), Department of Physics, Campus de la Plaine Code Postal 231 - Boulevard du Triomphe, 1050 Brussels (Belgium)

    2013-12-09

    We derive the expression of the reference distribution function for magnetically confined plasmas far from the thermodynamic equilibrium. The local equilibrium state is fixed by imposing the minimum entropy production theorem and the maximum entropy (MaxEnt) principle, subject to scale invariance restrictions. After a short time, the plasma reaches a state close to the local equilibrium. This state is referred to as the reference state. The aim of this Letter is to determine the reference distribution function (RDF) when the local equilibrium state is defined by the above mentioned principles. We prove that the RDF is the stationary solution of a generic family of stochastic processes corresponding to an universal Landau-type equation with white parametric noise. As an example of application, we consider a simple, fully ionized, magnetically confined plasmas, with auxiliary Ohmic heating. The free parameters are linked to the transport coefficients of the magnetically confined plasmas, by the kinetic theory.

  10. Recent advances in numerical simulation of space-plasma-physics problems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birmingham, T. J.

    1983-01-01

    Computer simulations have become an increasingly popular, important and insightful tool for studying space plasmas. This review describes MHD and particle simulations, both of which treat the plasma and the electromagnetic field in which it moves in a self consistent fashion but on drastically different spatial and temporal scales. The complementary roles of simulation, observations and theory are stressed. Several examples of simulations being carried out in the area of magnetospheric plasma physics are described to illustrate the power, potential and limitations of the approach.

  11. Physics and applications of high energy density plasmas. Extreme state driven by pulsed electromagnetic energy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Horioka, Kazuhiko (ed.)

    2002-06-01

    The papers presented at the symposium on ''Physics and application of high energy density plasmas, held December 20-21, 2001 at NIFS'' are collected in this proceedings. The topics covered in the meeting include dense z-pinches, plasma focus, intense charged particle beams, intense radiation sources, discharge pumped X-ray lasers, their diagnostics, and applications of them. The papers reflect the present status and trends in the research field of high energy density plasmas. (author)

  12. Quark-gluon plasma: Status of heavy ion physics

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    R V Gavai

    2000-07-01

    Lattice quantum chromodynamics (QCD), defined on a discrete space–time lattice, leads to a spectacular non-perturbative prediction of a new state of matter, called quark-gluon plasma (QGP), at sufficiently high temperatures or equivalently large energy densities. The experimental programs of CERN, Geneva and BNL, New York of relativistic heavy ion collisions are expected to produce such energy densities, thereby providing us a chance to test the above prediction. After a brief introduction of the necessary theoretical concepts, I will present a critical review of the experimental results already obtained by the various experiments in order to examine whether QGP has already been observed by them.

  13. The MaPLE device of Saha Institute of Nuclear Physics: construction and its plasma aspects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pal, Rabindranath; Biswas, Subir; Basu, Subhasis; Chattopadhyay, Monobir; Basu, Debjyoti; Chaudhuri, Manis; Chowdhuri, Manis

    2010-07-01

    The Magnetized Plasma Linear Experimental (MaPLE) device is a low cost laboratory plasma device at Saha Institute of Nuclear Physics fabricated in-house with the primary aim of studying basic plasma physics phenomena such as plasma instabilities, wave propagation, and their nonlinear behavior in magnetized plasma regime in a controlled manner. The machine is specially designed to be a versatile laboratory device that can provide a number of magnetic and electric scenario to facilitate such studies. A total of 36 number of 20-turn magnet coils, designed such as to allow easy handling, is capable of producing a uniform, dc magnetic field of about 0.35 T inside the plasma chamber of diameter 0.30 m. Support structure of the coils is planned in an innovative way facilitating straightforward fabrication and easy positioning of the coils. Further special feature lies in the arrangement of the spacers between the coils that can be maneuvered rather easily to create different magnetic configurations. Various methods of plasma production can be suitably utilized according to the experimental needs at either end of the vacuum vessel. In the present paper, characteristics of a steady state plasma generated by electron cyclotron resonance method using 2.45 GHz microwave power are presented. Scans using simple probe drives revealed that a uniform and long plasma column having electron density approximately 3-5x10(10) cm(-3) and temperature approximately 7-10 eV, is formed in the center of the plasma chamber which is suitable for wave launching experiments.

  14. Physics of laser fusion. Vol. I. Theory of the coronal plasma in laser-fusion targets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Max, C.E.

    1981-12-01

    This monograph deals with the physics of the coronal region in laser fusion targets. The corona consists of hot plasma which has been evaporated from the initially solid target during laser heating. It is in the corona that the laser light is absorbed by the target, and the resulting thermal energy is conducted toward cold high-density regions, where ablation occurs. The topics to be discussed are theoretical mechanisms for laser light absorption and reflection, hot-electron production, and the physics of heat conduction in laser-produced plasmas. An accompanying monograph by H. Ahlstrom (Vol.II) reviews the facilities, diagnostics, and data from recent laser fusion experiments.

  15. Atomic physics of shocked plasma in winds of massive stars

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leutenegger, Maurice A.; Cohen, David H.; Owocki, Stanley P. [NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); CRESST/UMBC (United States); Swarthmore College, Swarthmore, PA 19081 (United States); Bartol Research Institute, University of Delaware, Newark, DE 19716 (United States)

    2012-05-25

    High resolution diffraction grating spectra of X-ray emission from massive stars obtained with Chandra and XMM-Newton have revolutionized our understanding of their powerful, radiation-driven winds. Emission line shapes and line ratios provide diagnostics on a number of key wind parameters. Modeling of resolved emission line velocity profiles allows us to derive independent constraints on stellar mass-loss rates, leading to downward revisions of a factor of a few from previous measurements. Line ratios in He-like ions strongly constrain the spatial distribution of Xray emitting plasma, confirming the expectations of radiation hydrodynamic simulations that X-ray emission begins moderately close to the stellar surface and extends throughout the wind. Some outstanding questions remain, including the possibility of large optical depths in resonance lines, which is hinted at by differences in line shapes of resonance and intercombination lines from the same ion. Resonance scattering leads to nontrivial radiative transfer effects, and modeling it allows us to place constraints on shock size, density, and velocity structure.

  16. Atomic Physics of Shocked Plasma in Winds of Massive Stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leutenegger, Maurice A.; Cohen, David H.; Owocki, Stanley P.

    2012-01-01

    High resolution diffraction grating spectra of X-ray emission from massive stars obtained with Chandra and XMM-Newton have revolutionized our understanding of their powerful, radiation-driven winds. Emission line shapes and line ratios provide diagnostics on a number of key wind parameters. Modeling of resolved emission line velocity profiles allows us to derive independent constraints on stellar mass-loss rates, leading to downward revisions of a factor of a few from previous measurements. Line ratios in He-like ions strongly constrain the spatial distribution of Xray emitting plasma, confirming the expectations of radiation hydrodynamic simulations that X-ray emission begins moderately close to the stellar surface and extends throughout the wind. Some outstanding questions remain, including the possibility of large optical depths in resonance lines, which is hinted at by differences in line shapes of resonance and intercombination lines from the same ion. Resonance scattering leads to nontrivial radiative transfer effects, and modeling it allows us to place constraints on shock size, density, and velocity structure

  17. Dynamics of magnetically trapped particles foundations of the physics of radiation belts and space plasmas

    CERN Document Server

    Roederer, Juan G

    2014-01-01

    This book is a new edition of Roederer’s classic Dynamics of Geomagnetically Trapped Radiation, updated and considerably expanded. The main objective is to describe the dynamic properties of magnetically trapped particles in planetary radiation belts and plasmas and explain the physical processes involved from the theoretical point of view. The approach is to examine in detail the orbital and adiabatic motion of individual particles in typical configurations of magnetic and electric fields in the magnetosphere and, from there, derive basic features of the particles’ collective “macroscopic” behavior in general planetary environments. Emphasis is not on the “what” but on the “why” of particle phenomena in near-earth space, providing a solid and clear understanding of the principal basic physical mechanisms and dynamic processes involved. The book will also serve as an introduction to general space plasma physics, with abundant basic examples to illustrate and explain the physical origin of diff...

  18. Scientific study in solar and plasma physics relative to rocket and balloon projects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, S. T.

    1993-01-01

    The goals of this research are to provide scientific and technical capabilities in the areas of solar and plasma physics contained in research programs and instrumentation development relative to current rocket and balloon projects; to develop flight instrumentation design, flight hardware, and flight program objectives and participate in peer reviews as appropriate; and to participate in solar-terrestrial physics modeling studies and analysis of flight data and provide theoretical investigations as required by these studies.

  19. Physics of Phase Space Matching for Staging Plasma and Traditional Accelerator Components Using Longitudinally Tailored Plasma Profiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, X L; Hua, J F; Wu, Y P; Zhang, C J; Li, F; Wan, Y; Pai, C-H; Lu, W; An, W; Yu, P; Hogan, M J; Joshi, C; Mori, W B

    2016-03-25

    Phase space matching between two plasma-based accelerator (PBA) stages and between a PBA and a traditional accelerator component is a critical issue for emittance preservation. The drastic differences of the transverse focusing strengths as the beam propagates between stages and components may lead to a catastrophic emittance growth even when there is a small energy spread. We propose using the linear focusing forces from nonlinear wakes in longitudinally tailored plasma density profiles to control phase space matching between sections with negligible emittance growth. Several profiles are considered and theoretical analysis and particle-in-cell simulations show how these structures may work in four different scenarios. Good agreement between theory and simulation is obtained, and it is found that the adiabatic approximation misses important physics even for long profiles.

  20. PREFACE: 30th EPS Conference on Controlled Fusion and Plasma Physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koch, R.; Lebedev, S.

    2003-12-01

    The 30th EPS Conference on Controlled Fusion and Plasma Physics took place in St Petersburg, Russian Federation, on 7th--11th July 2003. It was jointly organized by the Ioffe Physico-Technical Institute, the St Petersburg State Polytechnical University and Technical University Applied Physics Ltd, on behalf of the Plasma Physics Division of the European Physical Society (EPS). The members of the local organizing committee were drawn from these institutions: B Kuteev, Chair, Polytechnical University S Lebedev, Vice-Chair, Ioffe Institute A Lebedev, Scientific Secretary, Ioffe Institute V Bakharev, TUAP Ltd V Grigor'yants, Ioffe Institute V Sergeev, Polytechnical University N Zhubr, Ioffe Institute Over the years, the annual conference of the Plasma Physics Division of the European Physical Society has widened its scope. Contributions to the present conference covered widely diversified fields of plasma physics, ranging from magnetic and inertial fusion to low temperature plasmas. Plasma sizes under investigation ranged from tiny to astronomical. The topics covered during the conference were distributed over the following categories: tokamaks, stellarators, high intensity laser produced plasmas and inertial confinement, alternative magnetic confinement, plasma edge physics, plasma heating and current drive, diagnostics, basic plasma physics, astrophysical and geophysical plasmas and low temperature plasmas. The scientific programme and paper selection were the responsibility of the Programme Committee appointed by the Board of the EPS Plasma Physics Division. The committee was composed of: R Koch, Chairman, ERM/KMS Brussels, Belgium E Ascasibar, CIEMAT Madrid, Spain S Atzeni, Università di Roma, Italy G Bonhomme, LPMI Nancy, France C Chiuderi, Università di Firenze, Italy B Kuteev, St Petersburg State Polytechnical,University, Russian Federation M Mauel, Contact person APS-DPP, Columbia University New York, USA R A Pitts, EPFL/CRPP Lausanne, Switzerland R Salomaa

  1. Wave-Particle Duality and Uncertainty Principle: Phenomenographic Categories of Description of Tertiary Physics Students' Depictions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayene, Mengesha; Kriek, Jeanne; Damtie, Baylie

    2011-01-01

    Quantum mechanics is often thought to be a difficult subject to understand, not only in the complexity of its mathematics but also in its conceptual foundation. In this paper we emphasize students' depictions of the uncertainty principle and wave-particle duality of quantum events, phenomena that could serve as a foundation in building an…

  2. PREFACE: Plasma Physics by Laser and Applications 2013 Conference (PPLA2013)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nassisi, V.; Giulietti, D.; Torrisi, L.; Delle Side, D.

    2014-04-01

    The ''Plasma Physics by Laser and Applications'' Conference (PPLA 2013) is a biennial meeting in which the National teams involved in Laser-Plasma Interaction at high intensities communicate their late results comparing with the colleagues from the most important European Laser Facilities. The sixth appointment has been organized in Lecce, Italy, from 2 to 4 October 2013 at the Rector Palace of the University of Salento. Surprising results obtained by laser-matter interaction at high intensities, as well as, non-equilibrium plasma generation, laser-plasma acceleration and related secondary sources, diagnostic methodologies and applications based on lasers and plasma pulses have transferred to researchers the enthusiasm to perform experiments ad maiora. The plasma generated by powerful laser pulses produces high kinetic particles and energetic photons that may be employed in different fields, from medicine to microelectronics, from engineering to nuclear fusion, from chemistry to environment. A relevant interest concerns the understanding of the fundamental physical phenomena, the employed lasers, plasma diagnostics and their consequent applications. For this reason we need continuous updates, meetings and expertise exchanges in this field in order to follow the evolution and disclose information, that has been done this year in Lecce, discussing and comparing the experiences gained in various international laboratories. The conference duration, although limited to just 3 days, permitted to highlight important aspects of the research in the aforementioned fields, giving discussion opportunities about the activities of researchers of high international prestige. The program consisted of 10 invited talks, 17 oral talks and 17 poster contributions for a total of 44 communications. The presented themes covered different areas and, far from being exhaustive gave updates, stimulating useful scientific discussions. The Organizers belong to three Italian Universities

  3. When the uncertainty principle goes up to 11 or how to explain quantum physics with heavy metal

    CERN Document Server

    Moriarty, Philip

    2018-01-01

    There are deep and fascinating links between heavy metal and quantum physics. No, there are. Really. While teaching at the University of Nottingham, physicist Philip Moriarty noticed something odd--a surprising number of his students were heavily into metal music. Colleagues, too: a Venn diagram of physicists and metal fans would show a shocking amount of overlap. What's more, it turns out that heavy metal music is uniquely well-suited to explaining quantum principles. In When the Uncertainty Principle Goes Up to Eleven, Moriarty explains the mysteries of the universe's inner workings via drum beats and feedback: You'll discover how the Heisenberg uncertainty principle comes into play with every chugging guitar riff, what wave interference has to do with Iron Maiden, and why metalheads in mosh pits behave just like molecules in a gas. If you're a metal fan trying to grasp the complexities of quantum physics, a quantum physicist baffled by heavy metal, or just someone who'd like to know how the fundamental sci...

  4. Evolution of large-sclae plasma structures in comets: Kinematics and physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandt, John C.

    1988-01-01

    Disconnection Events are the dramatic part of the periodic morphology involving the separation of the entire plasma tail from the head region of the comet and the growth of a new plasma. The coordinated observations of Comet Halley recorded approximately 30 DEs during the 7 months of plasma activity; 19 of these are obvious. The plasma physics of these events were approached via a detailed, kinematic investigation of specific DEs and the solar-wind environment associated with it. As the detailed investigations are completed, researchers should be able to answer the question of a single or multiple mechanism(s) for DEs and determine which mechanism(s) are important. At present, the mechanism of sunward magnetic reconnection caused by interplanetary sector boundary crossing in consistent with the data available.

  5. Relationship between physical activity and plasma fibrinogen concentrations in adults without chronic diseases.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manuel A Gomez-Marcos

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To analyze the relationship between regular physical activity, as assessed by accelerometer and 7-day physical activity recall (PAR, and plasma fibrinogen concentrations. METHODS: A cross-sectional study in a previously established cohort of healthy subjects was performed. This study analyzed 1284 subjects who were included in the EVIDENT study (mean age 55.0±13.6 years; 60.90% women. Fibrinogen concentrations were measured in blood plasma. Physical activity was assessed with a 7-day PAR (metabolic equivalents (METs/hour/week and GT3X ActiGraph accelerometer (counts/minute for 7 days. RESULTS: Physical exercise, which was evaluated with both an accelerometer (Median: 237.28 counts/minute and 7-day PAR (Median: 8 METs/hour/week. Physical activity was negatively correlated with plasma fibrinogen concentrations, which was evaluated by counts/min (r = -0.100; p<0.001 and METs/hour/week (r = -0.162; p<0.001. In a multiple linear regression analysis, fibrinogen concentrations of the subjects who performed more physical activity (third tertile of count/minute and METs/hour/week respect to subjects who performed less (first tertile, maintained statistical significance after adjustments for age and others confounders (β = -0.03; p = 0.046 and β = -0.06; p<0.001, respectively. CONCLUSIONS: Physical activity, as assessed by accelerometer and 7-day PAR, was negatively associated with plasma fibrinogen concentrations. This relation is maintained in subjects who performed more exercise even after adjusting for age and other confounders.

  6. Study of Local Reconnection Physics in a Laboratory Plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hantao Ji; Troy Carter; Scott Hsu; Masaaki Yamada

    2001-06-11

    A short review of physics results obtained in the Magnetic Reconnection Experiment (MRX) is given with an emphasis on the local features of magnetic reconnection in a controlled environment. Stable two-dimensional current sheets are formed and sustained by induction using two internal coils. The observed reconnection rates are found to be quantitatively consistent with a generalized Sweet-Parker model which incorporates compressibility, unbalanced upstream-downstream pressure, and the effective resistivity. The latter is significantly enhanced over its classical values in the low collisionality regime. Strong local ion heating is measured by an optical probe during the reconnection process, and at least half of the increased ion energy must be due to nonclassical processes, consistent with the resistivity enhancement. Characteristics of high-frequency electrostatic and electromagnetic fluctuations detected in the current sheet suggest presence of the lower-hybrid-drift-like waves with significant magnetic components. The detailed structures of the current sheet are measured and compared with Harris theory and two-fluid theory.

  7. Temperature and Electron Density Determination on Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS) Plasmas: A Physical Chemistry Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Najarian, Maya L.; Chinni, Rosemarie C.

    2013-01-01

    This laboratory is designed for physical chemistry students to gain experience using laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) in understanding plasma diagnostics. LIBS uses a high-powered laser that is focused on the sample causing a plasma to form. The emission of this plasma is then spectrally resolved and detected. Temperature and electron…

  8. Temperature and Electron Density Determination on Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS) Plasmas: A Physical Chemistry Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Najarian, Maya L.; Chinni, Rosemarie C.

    2013-01-01

    This laboratory is designed for physical chemistry students to gain experience using laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) in understanding plasma diagnostics. LIBS uses a high-powered laser that is focused on the sample causing a plasma to form. The emission of this plasma is then spectrally resolved and detected. Temperature and electron…

  9. NATO Advanced Study Institute entitled Physics of Plasma-Wall Interactions in Controlled Fusion

    CERN Document Server

    Behrisch, R; Physics of plasma-wall interactions in controlled fusion

    1986-01-01

    Controlled thermonuclear fusion is one of the possible candidates for long term energy sources which will be indispensable for our highly technological society. However, the physics and technology of controlled fusion are extremely complex and still require a great deal of research and development before fusion can be a practical energy source. For producing energy via controlled fusion a deuterium-tritium gas has to be heated to temperatures of a few 100 Million °c corres­ ponding to about 10 keV. For net energy gain, this hot plasma has to be confined at a certain density for a certain time One pro­ mising scheme to confine such a plasma is the use of i~tense mag­ netic fields. However, the plasma diffuses out of the confining magnetic surfaces and impinges on the surrounding vessel walls which isolate the plasma from the surrounding air. Because of this plasma wall interaction, particles from the plasma are lost to the walls by implantation and are partially reemitted into the plasma. In addition, wall...

  10. The physical Church-Turing thesis and the principles of quantum theory

    CERN Document Server

    Arrighi, Pablo

    2011-01-01

    Notoriously, quantum computation shatters complexity theory, but is innocuous to computability theory. Yet several works have shown how quantum theory as it stands could breach the physical Church-Turing thesis. We draw a clear line as to when this is the case, in a way that is inspired by Gandy. Gandy formulates postulates about physics, such as homogeneity of space and time, bounded density and velocity of information --- and proves that the physical Church-Turing thesis is a consequence of these postulates. We provide a quantum version of the theorem. Thus this approach exhibits a formal non-trivial interplay between theoretical physics symmetries and computability assumptions.

  11. EDITORIAL: The Fifth International Workshop and Summer School on Plasma Physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-04-01

    , Russia, the US, China, South Korea and India (as of March 2006). It will take several years to accomplish this important task. There is no doubt that the success depends not only on funding but also on enthusiastic people willing to contribute with their skills and knowledge. Young scientists and engineers must be enrolled to the programme and trained in various disciplines of fusion science and technology. There are various education schemes and work programmes. Organization of summer schools on fusion-related plasma physics is an important part of the training process. Several schools are organized annually or every second year in Europe. Fusion-related science is so vast that it is impossible to cover all topics during an event lasting for one or two weeks. Therefore, each school has its distinctive features and focuses on a selected group of issues to be addressed in depth. This also applies to the Workshop and Summer School on Plasma Physics in Kudowa Zdrój (Poland) that, has been organised annually since 2001. It was initiated by Dr Marek Scholz with the help of his colleagues from the Institute of Plasma Physics and Laser Microfusion (IPPLM) in Warsaw. The idea was to create a forum for students mainly from Eastern Europe to learn and discuss subjects in general plasma physics and dense magnetized media, predominantly in plasma focus devices. Over the years the school has matured and created a clear profile. A unique feature has always been to accommodate in the programme not only tutorials delivered by invited senior scientists but also presentations prepared by the students. In June 2005 the 5th Workshop and Summer School on Plasma Physics was held under the heading 'Towards Fusion Energy: Plasma Physics, Diagnostics, Applications'. There were 59 participants, including 44 students, coming from plasma physics and material research laboratories in 17 countries: Belgium, Czech Republic, France, Germany, Georgia, Iran, Italy, Lithuania, Poland, Romania, Russia

  12. EDITORIAL: Stability and nonlinear dynamics of plasmas: A symposium celebrating Professor Robert Dewar's accomplishments in plasma physics Stability and nonlinear dynamics of plasmas: A symposium celebrating Professor Robert Dewar's accomplishments in plasma physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattacharjee, Amitava

    2012-01-01

    To celebrate Professor Robert Dewar's 65th birthday, a Symposium was held on 31 October 2009 in Atlanta, Georgia, just before the 51st Annual Meeting of the Division of Plasma Physics of the American Physical Society. The Symposium was attended by many of Bob's colleagues, friends, postdoctoral colleagues and students (present and former). Boyd Blackwell, Anthony Cooper, Chris Hegna, Stuart Hudson, John Krommes, Alexander Pletzer, Ellen Zweibel, and I gave talks that covered various aspects of Bob's wide-ranging scholarship, and his leadership in the Australian and the US fusion program. At the Symposium, Bob gave an insightful talk, published in this issue as a paper with D Leykam. This paper makes available for the first time unpublished results from Bob's M Sc Thesis on a general method for calculating the potential around a `dressed' test particle in an isotropic and collisionless plasma. The paper is interesting not only because it provides a glimpse of the type of elegant applied mathematics that we have come to associate with Bob, but also because he discusses some leitmotifs in his intellectual evolution since the time he was a graduate student at the University of Melbourne and Princeton University. Through his early encounter with quantum field theory, Bob appreciated the power of Lagrangian and Hamiltonian formalisms, which he used with great effectiveness in nonlinear dynamics and plasma physics. A question that animates much of his work is one that underlies the `dressed' particle problem: if one is given a Hamiltonian with an unperturbed (or `bare') part and an interaction part, how is one to obtain a canonical transformation to `the oscillation centre' thatwould reduce the interaction part to an irreducible residual part while incorporating the rest in a renormalized zeroth-order Hamiltonian? One summer in Princeton, I worked with Bob on a possible variational formulation for this problem, and failed. I was daunted enough by my failure that I turned

  13. PREFACE: 14th Latin American Workshop on Plasma Physics (LAWPP 2011)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bilbao, Luis; Minotti, Fernando; Kelly, Hector

    2012-06-01

    These proceedings present the written contributions from participants of the Latin American Workshop on Plasma Physics (LAWPP), which was held in Mar del Plata, Argentina, on 20-25 November 2011. This was the 14th session of the series of LAWPP biennial meetings, which started in 1982. The five-day scientific program of LAWPP 2011 consisted of 32 talks and various poster sessions, with the participation of 135 researchers from Argentina, Brazil, Canada, Chile, Colombia, Mexico, Puerto Rico, USA, Venezuela, as well as others from Europe and Asia. In addition, a School on Plasma Physics and a Workshop on Industrial Applications of Plasma Technology (AITP) were organized together with the main meeting. The five-day School held in the week previous to the meeting was intended for young scientists starting their research in Plasma Physics. On the other hand, the objective of the AITP Workshop was to enhance regional academic and industrial cooperation in the field of plasma assisted surface technology. Topics addressed at LAWPP 2011 included space plasmas, dusty plasmas, nuclear fusion, non-thermal plasmas, basic plasma processes, plasma simulation and industrial plasma applications. This variety of subjects is reflected in these proceedings, which the editors hope will result in enjoyable and fruitful reading for those interested in Plasma Physics. It is a pleasure to thank the Institutions that sponsored the meeting, as well as all the participants and collaborators for making this meeting possible. The Editors Luis Bilbao, Fernando Minotti and Hector Kelly LAWPP participants Participants of the 14th Latin American Workshop on Plasma Physics, 20-25 November 2011, Mar del Plata, Argentina International Scientific Committee Carlos Alejaldre, Spain María Virginia Alves, Brazil Ibere Caldas, Brazil Luis Felipe Delgado-Aparicio, Peru Mayo Villagrán, Mexico Kohnosuke Sato, Japan Héctor Kelly, Argentina Edberto Leal-Quirós, Puerto Rico George Morales, USA Julio Puerta

  14. Is Turing's Thesis the Consequence of a More General Physical Principle?

    CERN Document Server

    Szudzik, Matthew P

    2012-01-01

    We discuss historical attempts to formulate a physical hypothesis from which Turing's thesis may be derived, and also discuss some related attempts to establish the computability of mathematical models in physics. We show that these attempts are all related to a single, unified hypothesis.

  15. Physics of Plasmas in Thermonuclear Regimes. Proceedings of the 1979 Workshop, International School of Plasma Physics, Varenna, Italy, 27 August - 8 September 1979. Volume 3

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coppi, B.; Sadowski, W. [eds.

    1979-08-27

    The workshop was run concurrently with the International School of Plasma Physics and was organized as a sequence of afternoon meetings concerning a set of topics that correspond to the individual chapters of these proceedings. The workshop consisted of both individual presentations and moderated discussions among the participants. A selected group of topics that were found to deserve a more in-depth analysis, such as the question of anomalous particle transport and the theory of collective modes induced by alpha-particles were discussed in separate Working Groups.

  16. A linear dispersion relation for the hybrid kinetic-ion/fluid-electron model of plasma physics

    CERN Document Server

    Told, Daniel; Astfalk, Patrick; Jenko, Frank

    2016-01-01

    A dispersion relation for a commonly used hybrid model of plasma physics is developed, which combines fully kinetic ions and a massless-electron fluid description. Although this model and variations of it have been used to describe plasma phenomena for about 40 years, to date there exists no general dispersion relation to describe the linear wave physics contained in the model. Previous efforts along these lines are extended here to retain arbitrary wave propagation angles, temperature anisotropy effects, as well as additional terms in the generalized Ohm's law which determines the electric field. A numerical solver for the dispersion relation is developed, and linear wave physics is benchmarked against solutions of a full Vlasov-Maxwell dispersion relation solver. This work opens the door to a more accurate interpretation of existing and future wave and turbulence simulations using this type of hybrid model.

  17. Two-dimensional models as testing ground for principles and concepts of local quantum physics

    CERN Document Server

    Schrör, B

    2005-01-01

    In the past two-dimensional models of QFT have served as theoretical laboratories for testing new concepts under mathematically controllable condition. In more recent times low-dimensional models (e.g. chiral models, factorizing models) often have been treated by special recipes in a way which sometimes led to a loss of unity of QFT. In the present work I try to counteract this apartheid tendency by reviewing past results within the setting of the general principles of QFT. To this I add two new ideas: a derivation of the chiral model temperature duality from a suitable operator formulation of the angular Wick rotation (in analogy to the Nelson-Symanzik duality in the Ostertwalder-Schrader setting) and a modular interpretation of the chiral model Diff(S)-covariance with a close connection to the recently formulated local covariance principle for QFT in curved spacetime. As a special case of the thermal duality, the SL(2,Z) modular Verlinde relation is thus a consequence of the principles of thermal QFT togeth...

  18. High-energy cosmic rays and tests of basic principles of Physics. Looking at the Planck scale and beyond

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez-Mestres, L.

    2014-04-01

    With the present understanding of data, the observed flux suppression for ultra-high energy cosmic rays (UHECR) at energies above 4.1019 eV can be a signature of the Greisen-Zatsepin-Kuzmin (GZK) cutoff or be related to a similar mechanism. But it may also correspond, for instance, to the maximum energies available at the relevant sources. In both cases, violations of special relativity modifying cosmic-ray propagation or acceleration at very high energy can potentially play a role. Other violations of fundamental principles of standard particle physics (quantum mechanics, energy and momentum conservation, vacuum homogeneity and "static" properties, effective space dimensions, quark confinement…) can also be relevant at these energies. In particular, UHECR data would in principle allow to set bounds on Lorentz symmetry violation (LSV) in patterns incorporating a privileged local reference frame (the "vacuum rest frame", VRF). But the precise analysis is far from trivial, and other effects can also be present. The effective parameters can be related to Planckscale physics, or even to physics beyond Planck scale, as well as to the dynamics and effective symmetries of LSV for nucleons, quarks, leptons and the photon. LSV can also be at the origin of GZK-like effects. In the presence of a VRF, and contrary to a "grand unification" view, LSV and other violations of standard principles can modify the internal structure of particles at very high energy and conventional symmetries may cease to be valid at energies close to the Planck scale. We present an updated discussion of these topics, including experimental prospects, new potentialities for high-energy cosmic ray phenomenology and the possible link with unconventional pre-Big Bang scenarios, superbradyon (superluminal preon) patterns… The subject of a possible superluminal propagation of neutrinos at accelerator energies is also dealt with.

  19. An Economic Research Inspired by the Fundamental Principles of the Quantum Physics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iurie BADAR

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available At the beginning of the XX-th century, after a glorious history of about two centuries, the Newton’s classical physics enters into a great conceptual crisis, marked by the famous findings, which have subsequently represented the fundamentals of the quantum theory. They have thrown out the visions of the classical physics on the main laws of Universe development, the role of the human being and of knowledge in its functioning. Therefore, the quantum theory, confusing the traditional picture of its origin and evolution, gave birth to multiple conceptual issues related not only to physics, but disposing of obvious philosophical, ontological, cognitive and, more recently, economic aspects...

  20. Formation and Physical Properties of h-BN Atomic Layers: A First-Principles Density-Functional Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoshitaka Fujimoto

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN atomic layers have attracted much attention as a potential device material for future nanoelectronics, optoelectronics, and spintronics applications. This review aims to describe the recent works of the first-principles density-functional study on h-BN layers. We show physical properties induced by introduction of various kinds of defects in h-BN layers. We further discuss the relationship among the defect size, the strain, and the magnetic as well as the electronic properties.

  1. AINSE Plasma Science and Technology Conference and Elizabeth and Frederick White Workshop on Fundamental Problems in the Physics of Magnetically Confined Plasmas: Conference handbook

    Science.gov (United States)

    The handbook contains abstracts of papers and posters presented at the conference. The main topics relate to plasma physics and fusion, plasma processing and uses as well as specific fusion devices and experiments. Eighty-four out of ninety-two presentations were considered to be in the INIS subject scope and have been separately indexed.

  2. Fusion programs in applied plasma physics. Technical progress report, July 11, 1992--May 31, 1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-07-01

    This report summarizes the progress made in theoretical and experimental research funded by US Department of Energy Grant No. DE-FG03-92ER54150, during the period July 11, 1992 through May 31, 1993. Four main tasks are reported: applied plasma physics theory, alpha particle diagnostic, edge and current density diagnostic, and plasma rotation drive. The report also discusses the research plans for the theory and experimental programs for the next grant year. Reports and publications supported by the grant during this period are listed in the final section.

  3. Principles of Physical Layer Security in Multiuser Wireless Networks: A Survey

    OpenAIRE

    Mukherjee, Amitav; Fakoorian, S. A. A.; Huang, Jing; Swindlehurst, A. Lee

    2010-01-01

    This paper provides a comprehensive review of the domain of physical layer security in multiuser wireless networks. The essential premise of physical-layer security is to enable the exchange of confidential messages over a wireless medium in the presence of unauthorized eavesdroppers without relying on higher-layer encryption. This can be achieved primarily in two ways: without the need for a secret key by intelligently designing transmit coding strategies, or by exploiting the wireless commu...

  4. On the use, by Einstein, of the principle of dimensional homogeneity, in three problems of the physics of solids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    CARNEIRO FERNANDO L. LOBO B.

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available Einstein, in 1911, published an article on the application of the principle of dimensional homogeneity to three problems of the physics of solids: the characteristic frequency of the atomic nets of crystalline solids as a function of their moduli of compressibility or of their melting points, and the thermal conductivity of crystalline insulators. Recognizing that the physical dimensions of temperature are not the same as those of energy and heat, Einstein had recourse to the artifice of replace that physical parameter by its product by the Boltzmann constant, so obtaining correct results. But nowadays, with the new basic quantities "Thermodynamic Temperature theta (unit- Kelvin'', "Electric Current I (unit Ampère'' and "Amount of Substance MOL (unit-mole'', incorporated to the SI International System of Units, in 1960 and 1971, the same results are obtained in a more direct and coherent way. At the time of Einstein's article only three basic physical quantities were considered - length L, mass M, and time T. He ignored the pi theorem of dimensional analysis diffused by Buckingham three years later, and obtained the "pi numbers'' by trial and error. In the present paper is presented a revisitation of the article of Einstein, conducted by the modern methodology of dimensional analysis and theory of physical similitude.

  5. First-principles investigations of the physical properties of RCd (R=Ce, La, Pr, Nd)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Long Jianping, E-mail: jianpinglong@cdut.cn [College of Materials and Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Chengdu University of Technology, Chengdu 610059 (China)

    2012-12-15

    The crystal structural, electronic, elastic and the thermodynamic properties of RCd are investigated by using the first-principles plane-wave pseudopotential density function theory within the generalized gradient approximation (GGA). The calculated equilibrium lattice parameters for RCd are in good agreement with the available experimental data. Furthermore, the optical properties, namely the dielectric function, refractive index and electron energy loss are reported for radiation up to 30 eV. Finally, the elastic properties, the bulk modulus and the Debye temperature of RCd are given for reference.

  6. Foundations & principles of distributed manufacturing elements of manufacturing networks, cyber-physical production systems and smart automation

    CERN Document Server

    Kühnle, Hermann

    2015-01-01

    The book presents a coherent description of distributed manufacturing, providing a solid base for further research on the subject as well as smart implementations in companies. It provides a guide for those researching and working in a range of fields, such as smart manufacturing, cloud computing, RFID tracking, distributed automation, cyber physical production and global design anywhere, manufacture anywhere solutions. Foundations & Principles of Distributed Manufacturing anticipates future advances in the fields of embedded systems, the Internet of Things and cyber physical systems, outlining how adopting these innovations could rapidly bring about improvements in key performance indicators, which could in turn generate competition pressure by rendering successful business models obsolete. In laying the groundwork for powerful theoretical models, high standards for the homogeneity and soundness of the suggested setups are applied. The book especially elaborates on the upcoming competition in online manu...

  7. The strange physics of low frequency mirror mode turbulence in the high temperature plasma of the magnetosheath

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. A. Treumann

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Mirror mode turbulence is the lowest frequency perpendicular magnetic excitation in magnetized plasma proposed already about half a century ago by Rudakov and Sagdeev (1958 and Chandrasekhar et al. (1958 from fluid theory. Its experimental verification required a relatively long time. It was early recognized that mirror modes for being excited require a transverse pressure (or temperature anisotropy. In principle mirror modes are some version of slow mode waves. Fluid theory, however, does not give a correct physical picture of the mirror mode. The linear infinitesimally small amplitude physics is described correctly only by including the full kinetic theory and is modified by existing spatial gradients of the plasma parameters which attribute a small finite frequency to the mode. In addition, the mode is propagating only very slowly in plasma such that convective transport is the main cause of flow in it. As the lowest frequency mode it can be expected that mirror modes serve as one of the dominant energy inputs into plasma. This is however true only when the mode grows to large amplitude leaving the linear stage. At such low frequencies, on the other hand, quasilinear theory does not apply as a valid saturation mechanism. Probably the dominant processes are related to the generation of gradients in the plasma which serve as the cause of drift modes thus transferring energy to shorter wavelength propagating waves of higher nonzero frequency. This kind of theory has not yet been developed as it has not yet been understood why mirror modes in spite of their slow growth rate usually are of very large amplitudes indeed of the order of |B/B0|2~O(1. It is thus highly reasonable to assume that mirror modes are instrumental for the development of stationary turbulence in high temperature plasma. Moreover, since the magnetic field in mirror turbulence forms extended though slightly oblique magnetic bottles, low parallel energy particles can be trapped

  8. Solid-State Physics An Introduction to Principles of Materials Science

    CERN Document Server

    Ibach, Harald

    2009-01-01

    This new edition of the popular introduction to solid-state physics provides a comprehensive overview on basic theoretical and experimental concepts of material science. Additional sections emphasize current topics in solid-state physics. Notably, sections on important devices, aspects of non-periodic structures of matter, phase transitions, defects, superconductors and nanostructures have been added, the chapters presenting semi- and superconductivity had been completly updated. Students will benefit significantly from solving the exercises given at the end of each chapter. This book is intended for university students in physics, engineering and electrical engineering. This edition has been carefully revised, updated, and enlarged. Among the key recent developments incorporated throughout GMR (giant magneto resistance), thin-film magnetic properties, magnetic hysteresis and domain walls, quantum transport, metamaterials, and preparation techniques for nanostructures. From a review of the original edition �...

  9. The physics of degradation in engineered materials and devices fundamentals and principles

    CERN Document Server

    Swingler, Jonathan

    2015-01-01

    Degradation is apparent in all things and is fundamental to both manufactured and natural objects. It is often described by the second law of thermodynamics, where entropy, a measure of disorder, tends to increase with time in a closed system. Things age! This concise reference work brings together experts and key players engaged in the physics of degradation to present the background science, current thinking and developments in understanding, and gives a detailed account of emerging issues across a selection of engineering applications. The work has been put together to equip the upper level undergraduate student, postgraduate student, as well as the professional engineer and scientist, in the importance of physics of degradation. The aim of The Physics of Degradation in Engineered Materials and Devices is to bridge the gap between published textbooks on the fundamental science of degradation phenomena and published research on the engineering science of actual fabricated materials and devices. A history o...

  10. Spacelab 1 - Scientific objectives, life sciences, space plasma physics, astronomy and solar physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chappell, C. R.

    1985-01-01

    A general overview of the accomplishments of the Spacelab 1 complement to the Shuttle mission of Nov. 28, 1983, is presented. Consideration is given to scientific results in the fields of life sciences, materials sciences, atmospheric physics, and earth observations. A table is given which lists the scientific objectives and the percentage of objectives accomplished in each field.

  11. Global problems in magnetospheric plasma physics and prospects for their solution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roederer, J. G.

    1977-01-01

    Selected problems in magnetospheric plasma physics are critically reviewed. The discussion is restricted to questions that are 'global' in nature (i.e., involve the magnetosphere as a whole) and that are beyond the stage of systematic survey or isolated study requirements. Only low-energy particle aspects are discussed. The article focuses on the following subjects: (1) the effect of the interplanetary magnetic field on the topography, topology, and stability of the magnetospheric boundary; (2) solar-wind plasma entry into the magnetosphere; (3) plasma storage and release mechanisms in the magnetospheric tail; and (4) magnetic-field-aligned currents and magnetosphere-ionosphere interactions. A brief discussion of the prospects for the solution of these problems during and after the International Magnetospheric Study is given.

  12. Integrated physics analysis of plasma start-up scenario of helical reactor FFHR-d1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goto, T.; Miyazawa, J.; Sakamoto, R.; Seki, R.; Suzuki, C.; Yokoyama, M.; Satake, S.; Sagara, A.; The FFHR Design Group

    2015-06-01

    1D physics analysis of the plasma start-up scenario of the large helical device (LHD)-type helical reactor FFHR-d1 was conducted. The time evolution of the plasma profile is calculated using a simple model based on the LHD experimental observations. A detailed assessment of the magnetohydrodynamic equilibrium and neo-classical energy loss was conducted using the integrated transport analysis code TASK3D. The robust controllability of the fusion power was confirmed by feedback control of the pellet fuelling and a simple staged variation of the external heating power with a small number of simple diagnostics (line-averaged electron density, edge electron density and fusion power). A baseline operation control scenario (plasma start-up and steady-state sustainment) of the FFHR-d1 reactor for both self-ignition and sub-ignition operation modes was demonstrated.

  13. Spectroscopy and atomic physics of highly ionized Cr, Fe, and Ni for tokamak plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feldman, U.; Doschek, G. A.; Cheng, C.-C.; Bhatia, A. K.

    1980-01-01

    The paper considers the spectroscopy and atomic physics for some highly ionized Cr, Fe, and Ni ions produced in tokamak plasmas. Forbidden and intersystem wavelengths for Cr and Ni ions are extrapolated and interpolated using the known wavelengths for Fe lines identified in solar-flare plasmas. Tables of transition probabilities for the B I, C I, N I, O I, and F I isoelectronic sequences are presented, and collision strengths and transition probabilities for Cr, Fe, and Ni ions of the Be I sequence are given. Similarities of tokamak and solar spectra are discussed, and it is shown how the atomic data presented may be used to determine ion abundances and electron densities in low-density plasmas.

  14. Plasma flow reactor for steady state monitoring of physical and chemical processes at high temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koroglu, Batikan; Mehl, Marco; Armstrong, Michael R.; Crowhurst, Jonathan C.; Weisz, David G.; Zaug, Joseph M.; Dai, Zurong; Radousky, Harry B.; Chernov, Alex; Ramon, Erick; Stavrou, Elissaios; Knight, Kim; Fabris, Andrea L.; Cappelli, Mark A.; Rose, Timothy P.

    2017-09-01

    We present the development of a steady state plasma flow reactor to investigate gas phase physical and chemical processes that occur at high temperature (1000 reactor consists of a glass tube that is attached to an inductively coupled argon plasma generator via an adaptor (ring flow injector). We have modeled the system using computational fluid dynamics simulations that are bounded by measured temperatures. In situ line-of-sight optical emission and absorption spectroscopy have been used to determine the structures and concentrations of molecules formed during rapid cooling of reactants after they pass through the plasma. Emission spectroscopy also enables us to determine the temperatures at which these dynamic processes occur. A sample collection probe inserted from the open end of the reactor is used to collect condensed materials and analyze them ex situ using electron microscopy. The preliminary results of two separate investigations involving the condensation of metal oxides and chemical kinetics of high-temperature gas reactions are discussed.

  15. Classical Methods of Statistics With Applications in Fusion-Oriented Plasma Physics

    CERN Document Server

    Kardaun, Otto J W F

    2005-01-01

    Classical Methods of Statistics is a blend of theory and practical statistical methods written for graduate students and researchers interested in applications to plasma physics and its experimental aspects. It can also fruitfully be used by students majoring in probability theory and statistics. In the first part, the mathematical framework and some of the history of the subject are described. Many exercises help readers to understand the underlying concepts. In the second part, two case studies are presented exemplifying discriminant analysis and multivariate profile analysis. The introductions of these case studies outline contextual magnetic plasma fusion research. In the third part, an overview of statistical software is given and, in particular, SAS and S-PLUS are discussed. In the last chapter, several datasets with guided exercises, predominantly from the ASDEX Upgrade tokamak, are included and their physical background is concisely described. The book concludes with a list of essential keyword transl...

  16. Principles Supporting the Perceptional Teaching of Physics: A "Practical Teaching Philosophy"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurki-Suonio, Kaarle

    2011-01-01

    This article sketches a framework of ideas developed in the context of decades of physics teacher-education that was entitled the "perceptional approach". Individual learning and the scientific enterprise are interpreted as different manifestations of the same process aimed at understanding the natural and social worlds. The process is understood…

  17. Principles of astrophysics using gravity and stellar physics to explore the cosmos

    CERN Document Server

    Keeton, Charles

    2014-01-01

    This book gives a survey of astrophysics at the advanced undergraduate level.  It originates from a two-semester course sequence at Rutgers University that is meant to appeal not only to astrophysics students but also more broadly to physics and engineering students.  The organization is driven more by physics than by astronomy; in other words, topics are first developed in physics and then applied to astronomical systems that can be investigated, rather than the other way around. The first half of the book focuses on gravity.  Gravity is the dominant force in many astronomical systems, so a tremendous amount can be learned by studying gravity, motion and mass.  The theme in this part of the book, as well as throughout astrophysics, is using motion to investigate mass.  The goal of Chapters 2-11 is to develop a progressively richer understanding of gravity as it applies to objects ranging from planets and moons to galaxies and the universe as a whole. The second half uses other aspects of physics to addr...

  18. Resonator with Ultrahigh Length Stability as a Probe for Equivalence-Principle-Violating Physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiens, E.; Nevsky, A. Yu.; Schiller, S.

    2016-12-01

    In order to investigate the long-term dimensional stability of matter, we have operated an optical resonator fabricated from crystalline silicon at 1.5 K continuously for over one year and repeatedly compared its resonance frequency fres with the frequency of a GPS-monitored hydrogen maser. After allowing for an initial settling time, over a 163-day interval we found a mean fractional drift magnitude |fres-1d fres/d t |speed of light and we measure it with respect to the atomic unit of time. Thus the bound rules out, to first order, a hypothetical differential effect of the Universe's expansion on rulers and atomic clocks. We also constrain a hypothetical violation of the principle of local position invariance for resonator-based clocks and derive bounds for the strength of space-time fluctuations.

  19. [Introduction to magnetic resonance for clinical use. Physical principles and instrumentation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canese, R; Podo, F

    1994-01-01

    The recent technological developments in nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) have made it possible to extend the use of this methodology to the formation of body images (MRI), as well as to the in vivo detection of metabolites in tissues and organs, by means of localized magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS). After presenting a brief semi-classical introduction to the NMR phenomenon, this article illustrates the principles of MRI, starting from phase encoding to the most commonly used pulse sequences. The main techniques of localized MRS are then introduced, with particular attention to their major advantages and limitations. The last session is devoted to the schematic description of a system for magnetic resonance imaging and spectroscopy.

  20. James Clerk Maxwell Prize for Plasma Physics Talk: On Nonlinear Physics of Shear Alfv'en Waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Liu

    2012-10-01

    Shear Alfv'en Waves (SAW) are electromagnetic oscillations prevalent in laboratory and nature magnetized plasmas. Due to its anisotropic propagation property, it is well known that the linear wave propagation and dispersiveness of SAW are fundamentally affected by plasma nonuniformities and magnetic field geometries; for example, the existence of continuous spectrum, spectral gaps, and discrete eigenmodes in toroidal plasmas. This talk will discuss the crucial roles that nonuniformity and geometry could also play in the physics of nonlinear SAW interactions. More specifically, the focus will be on the Alfv'enic state and its breaking up by finite compressibility, non-ideal kinetic effects, and geometry. In the case of compressibility, finite ion-Larmor-radius effects are shown to qualitatively and quantitatively modify the three-wave parametric decays via the ion-sound perturbations. In the case of geometry, the spontaneous excitation of zonal structures by toroidal Alfv'en eigenmodes is investigated; demonstrating that, for realistic tokamak geometries, zonal current dominates over zonal flow. [4pt] Present address: Institute for Fusion Theory and Simulation, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou, China.

  1. Plasma Spray-Physical Vapor Deposition (PS-PVD) of Ceramics for Protective Coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harder, Bryan J.; Zhu, Dongming

    2011-01-01

    In order to generate advanced multilayer thermal and environmental protection systems, a new deposition process is needed to bridge the gap between conventional plasma spray, which produces relatively thick coatings on the order of 125-250 microns, and conventional vapor phase processes such as electron beam physical vapor deposition (EB-PVD) which are limited by relatively slow deposition rates, high investment costs, and coating material vapor pressure requirements. The use of Plasma Spray - Physical Vapor Deposition (PS-PVD) processing fills this gap and allows thin (coatings of less than 100 microns to be generated with the flexibility to tailor microstructures by changing processing conditions. Coatings of yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) were applied to NiCrAlY bond coated superalloy substrates using the PS-PVD coater at NASA Glenn Research Center. A design-of-experiments was used to examine the effects of process variables (Ar/He plasma gas ratio, the total plasma gas flow, and the torch current) on chamber pressure and torch power. Coating thickness, phase and microstructure were evaluated for each set of deposition conditions. Low chamber pressures and high power were shown to increase coating thickness and create columnar-like structures. Likewise, high chamber pressures and low power had lower growth rates, but resulted in flatter, more homogeneous layers

  2. Fusion research principles

    CERN Document Server

    Dolan, Thomas James

    2013-01-01

    Fusion Research, Volume I: Principles provides a general description of the methods and problems of fusion research. The book contains three main parts: Principles, Experiments, and Technology. The Principles part describes the conditions necessary for a fusion reaction, as well as the fundamentals of plasma confinement, heating, and diagnostics. The Experiments part details about forty plasma confinement schemes and experiments. The last part explores various engineering problems associated with reactor design, vacuum and magnet systems, materials, plasma purity, fueling, blankets, neutronics

  3. Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory Annual Site Environmental Report for Calendar Years 2002 and 2003

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Virginia L. Finley, Editor

    2004-12-22

    This report provides the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and the public with information on the level of radioactive and non-radioactive pollutants (if any) that are added to the environment as a result of Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory's (PPPL) operations. The results of the 2002 and 2003 environmental surveillance and monitoring program for PPPL are presented and discussed. The report also summarizes environmental initiatives, assessments, and programs that were undertaken in 2002 and 2003.

  4. Study of higher excited states of some polyatomic molecules relevant for plasma physics and environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marinkovic, B P, E-mail: bratislav.marinkovic@phy.bg.ac.y [Institute of Physics, Belgrade 11080, Pregrevica 118 (Serbia) and College for Electrical Engineering and Computing, Belgrade 11010, Vojvode Stepe 283 (Serbia)

    2009-04-01

    Studies of higher excited states of some polyatomic molecules relevant for plasma physics and environment have been presented. Spectra of chlorofluorocarbons are discussed together with their influence on ozone layer depletion and global warming. Tetrahydrofuran molecule was studied by photoabsorption and electron energy loss spectroscopy while the states are assigned following extensive ab initio calculations. Nitrous oxide and hydrogen sulphide spectra are discussed in terms of identifying valence and Rydberg character of excited states.

  5. TELEMATICS APPLICATIONS REMOT: Interfaces and Adaptations of the Plasma Physics Demonstrator

    OpenAIRE

    Kemmerling, G.; Van der Meer, E.

    1997-01-01

    In document D6.2, a textual description of the soft- and hardware components of the plasma physics demonstrator as well as a definition of remote and local site was given. In order to couple these components to a complete teleoperation system, interfaces between them have to be defined and existing soft- and hardware have to be adapted. This task will be described in this document.

  6. Energetic Particle Physics In Fusion Research In Preparation For Burning Plasma Experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gorelenkov, Nikolai N [PPPL

    2013-06-01

    The area of energetic particle (EP) physics of fusion research has been actively and extensively researched in recent decades. The progress achieved in advancing and understanding EP physics has been substantial since the last comprehensive review on this topic by W.W. Heidbrink and G.J. Sadler [1]. That review coincided with the start of deuterium-tritium (DT) experiments on Tokamak Fusion Test reactor (TFTR) and full scale fusion alphas physics studies. Fusion research in recent years has been influenced by EP physics in many ways including the limitations imposed by the "sea" of Alfven eigenmodes (AE) in particular by the toroidicityinduced AEs (TAE) modes and reversed shear Alfven (RSAE). In present paper we attempt a broad review of EP physics progress in tokamaks and spherical tori since the first DT experiments on TFTR and JET (Joint European Torus) including helical/stellarator devices. Introductory discussions on basic ingredients of EP physics, i.e. particle orbits in STs, fundamental diagnostic techniques of EPs and instabilities, wave particle resonances and others are given to help understanding the advanced topics of EP physics. At the end we cover important and interesting physics issues toward the burning plasma experiments such as ITER (International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor).

  7. Preface to Special Topic: Advances in Radio Frequency Physics in Fusion Plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuccillo, Angelo A.; Phillips, Cynthia K.; Ceccuzzi, Silvio

    2014-06-01

    It has long been recognized that auxiliary plasma heating will be required to achieve the high temperature, high density conditions within a magnetically confined plasma in which a fusion "burn" may be sustained by copious fusion reactions. Consequently, the application of radio and microwave frequency electromagnetic waves to magnetically confined plasma, commonly referred to as RF, has been a major part of the program almost since its inception in the 1950s. These RF waves provide heating, current drive, plasma profile control, and Magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) stabilization. Fusion experiments employ electromagnetic radiation in a wide range of frequencies, from tens of MHz to hundreds of GHz. The fusion devices containing the plasma are typically tori, axisymmetric or non, in which the equilibrium magnetic fields are composed of a strong toroidal magnetic field generated by external coils, and a poloidal field created, at least in the symmetric configurations, by currents flowing in the plasma. The waves are excited in the peripheral regions of the plasma, by specially designed launching structures, and subsequently propagate into the core regions, where resonant wave-plasma interactions produce localized heating or other modification of the local equilibrium profiles. Experimental studies coupled with the development of theoretical models and advanced simulation codes over the past 40+ years have led to an unprecedented understanding of the physics of RF heating and current drive in the core of magnetic fusion devices. Nevertheless, there are serious gaps in our knowledge base that continue to have a negative impact on the success of ongoing experiments and that must be resolved as the program progresses to the next generation devices and ultimately to "demo" and "fusion power plant." A serious gap, at least in the ion cyclotron (IC) range of frequencies and partially in the lower hybrid frequency ranges, is the difficulty in coupling large amount of power to the

  8. Minimally-Invasive Gene Transfection by Chemical and Physical Interaction of Atmospheric Pressure Plasma Flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaneko, Toshiro

    2014-10-01

    Non-equilibrium atmospheric pressure plasma irradiated to the living-cell is investigated for medical applications such as gene transfection, which is expected to play an important role in molecular biology, gene therapy, and creation of induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells. However, the conventional gene transfection using the plasma has some problems that the cell viability is low and the genes cannot be transferred into some specific lipid cells, which is attributed to the unknown mechanism of the gene transfection using the plasma. Therefore, the time-controlled atmospheric pressure plasma flow is generated and irradiated to the living-cell suspended solution for clarifying the transfection mechanism toward developing highly-efficient and minimally- invasive gene transfection system. In this experiment, fluorescent dye YOYO-1 is used as the simulated gene and LIVE/DEAD Stain is simultaneously used for cell viability assay. By the fluorescence image, the transfection efficiency is calculated as the ratio of the number of transferred and surviving cells to total cell count. It is clarified that the transfection efficiency is significantly increased by the short-time (cell viability (>90%). This result indicates that the physical effects such as the electric field caused by the charged particles arriving at the surface of the cell membrane, and chemical effects associated with plasma-activated products in solution act synergistically to enhance the cell-membrane transport with low-damage. This work was supported by JSPS KAKENHI Grant Number 24108004.

  9. Order-of-magnitude physics of neutron stars. Estimating their properties from first principles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reisenegger, Andreas; Zepeda, Felipe S. [Pontificia Universidad Catolica de Chile, Instituto de Astrofisica, Facultad de Fisica, Macul (Chile)

    2016-03-15

    We use basic physics and simple mathematics accessible to advanced undergraduate students to estimate the main properties of neutron stars. We set the stage and introduce relevant concepts by discussing the properties of ''everyday'' matter on Earth, degenerate Fermi gases, white dwarfs, and scaling relations of stellar properties with polytropic equations of state. Then, we discuss various physical ingredients relevant for neutron stars and how they can be combined in order to obtain a couple of different simple estimates of their maximum mass, beyond which they would collapse, turning into black holes. Finally, we use the basic structural parameters of neutron stars to briefly discuss their rotational and electromagnetic properties. (orig.)

  10. X-ray phase sensitive imaging methods: basic physical principles and potential medical applications

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Guang-Hong; Zambelli, Joseph; Bevins, Nicholas; Qi, Zhihua; Li, Ke

    2010-01-01

    Phase sensitive imaging theoretically allows for a drastic reduction in x-ray dose while simultaneously achieving comparable or better spatial and contrast resolution compared to traditional x-ray absorption based imaging. Several techniques exist to extract the phase information from an x-ray signal, including x-ray interferometry, diffraction enhanced imaging, in-line holography, coded aperture x-ray imaging, and grating-based interferometry. The physics of each method is reviewed, along wi...

  11. Associations among objectively measured physical activity, fasting plasma homocysteine concentration, and MTHFR C677T genotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murakami, Haruka; Iemitsu, Motoyuki; Sanada, Kiyoshi; Gando, Yuko; Ohmori, Yumi; Kawakami, Ryoko; Sasaki, Satoshi; Tabata, Izumi; Miyachi, Motohiko

    2011-12-01

    Elevated fasting plasma homocysteine (Hcy) level is a vascular disease risk factor. Plasma Hcy is affected by 5,10-methylenetetrahydofolate reductase (MTHFR) genotype and dietary folate intake. This cross-sectional study in 434 Japanese adults examined the associations among objectively measured physical activity (PA), plasma Hcy adjusting for dietary folate intake, and MTHFR C677T genotype. Daily PA was measured by triaxial accelerometry and all subjects completed a questionnaire about their dietary habits. Plasma Hcy and MTHFR C677T genotype were determined. Plasma Hcy in subjects with the TT genotype was significantly higher than in those with CC or CT genotype (p < 0.001). Plasma Hcy was significantly different between ≥ 200 (7.6 ± 0.2 nmol/mL) and <200 µg/day (8.3 ± 0.3 nmol/mL) folate intake groups (p = 0.003). There were no differences in plasma Hcy adjusting for age, sex, and folate intake between groups according to PA category in all subjects. However, there were significant interactions between time spent in light PA (p = 0.003), vigorous PA (p = 0.001), or inactivity (p = 0.004), and MTHFR genotype. In only the TT genotype, shorter time spent in light PA was associated with higher plasma Hcy than a longer time spent in light PA (11.5 ± 3.3 nmol/mL vs. 8.5 ± 3.3 nmol/mL, p < 0.001), and longer time spent in vigorous PA and inactivity were associated with higher plasma Hcy (11.8 ± 3.3 nmol/mL vs. 8.4 ± 3.2 nmol/mL, 11.6 ± 3.3 nmol/mL vs. 8.4 ± 3.3 nmol/mL, respectively, p < 0.001). In conclusion, light and vigorous PA were associated with plasma Hcy only in the TT genotype, but there were no such associations in all genotypes.

  12. The Numerical Tokamak Project (NTP) simulation of turbulent transport in the core plasma: A grand challenge in plasma physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-12-01

    The long-range goal of the Numerical Tokamak Project (NTP) is the reliable prediction of tokamak performance using physics-based numerical tools describing tokamak physics. The NTP is accomplishing the development of the most advanced particle and extended fluid model`s on massively parallel processing (MPP) environments as part of a multi-institutional, multi-disciplinary numerical study of tokamak core fluctuations. The NTP is a continuing focus of the Office of Fusion Energy`s theory and computation program. Near-term HPCC work concentrates on developing a predictive numerical description of the core plasma transport in tokamaks driven by low-frequency collective fluctuations. This work addresses one of the greatest intellectual challenges to our understanding of the physics of tokamak performance and needs the most advanced computational resources to progress. We are conducting detailed comparisons of kinetic and fluid numerical models of tokamak turbulence. These comparisons are stimulating the improvement of each and the development of hybrid models which embody aspects of both. The combination of emerging massively parallel processing hardware and algorithmic improvements will result in an estimated 10**2--10**6 performance increase. Development of information processing and visualization tools is accelerating our comparison of computational models to one another, to experimental data, and to analytical theory, providing a bootstrap effect in our understanding of the target physics. The measure of success is the degree to which the experimentally observed scaling of fluctuation-driven transport may be predicted numerically. The NTP is advancing the HPCC Initiative through its state-of-the-art computational work. We are pushing the capability of high performance computing through our efforts which are strongly leveraged by OFE support.

  13. Mimimal Length Uncertainty Principle and the Transplanckian Problem of Black Hole Physics

    CERN Document Server

    Brout, R; Lubo, M; Spindel, P; Gabriel, Cl.; Spindel, Ph.

    1999-01-01

    The minimal length uncertainty principle of Kempf, Mangano and Mann (KMM), as derived from a mutilated quantum commutator between coordinate and momentum, is applied to describe the modes and wave packets of Hawking particles evaporated from a black hole. The transplanckian problem is successfully confronted in that the Hawking particle no longer hugs the horizon at arbitrarily close distances. Rather the mode of Schwarzschild frequency $\\omega$ deviates from the conventional trajectory when the coordinate $r$ is given by $| r - 2M|\\simeq \\beta_H \\omega / 2 \\pi$ in units of the non local distance legislated into the uncertainty relation. Wave packets straddle the horizon and spread out to fill the whole non local region. The charge carried by the packet (in the sense of the amount of "stuff" carried by the Klein--Gordon field) is not conserved in the non--local region and rapidly decreases to zero as time decreases. Read in the forward temporal direction, the non--local region thus is the seat of production o...

  14. From physical principles to relativistic classical Hamiltonian and Lagrangian particle mechanics

    CERN Document Server

    Carcassi, Gabriele

    2015-01-01

    We show that classical particle mechanics (Hamiltonian and Lagrangian consistent with relativistic electromagnetism) can be derived from three fundamental assumptions: infinite reducibility, deterministic and reversible evolution, and kinematic equivalence. The core idea is that deterministic and reversible systems preserve the cardinality of a set of states, which puts considerable constraints on the equations of motion. This perspective links different concepts from different branches of math and physics (e.g. cardinality of a set, cotangent bundle for phase space, Hamiltonian flow, locally Minkowskian space-time manifold), providing new insights. The derivation strives to use definitions and mathematical concepts compatible with future extensions to field theories and quantum mechanics.

  15. From Random Walks to Brownian Motion, from Diffusion to Entropy: Statistical Principles in Introductory Physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reeves, Mark

    2014-03-01

    Entropy changes underlie the physics that dominates biological interactions. Indeed, introductory biology courses often begin with an exploration of the qualities of water that are important to living systems. However, one idea that is not explicitly addressed in most introductory physics or biology textbooks is dominant contribution of the entropy in driving important biological processes towards equilibrium. From diffusion to cell-membrane formation, to electrostatic binding in protein folding, to the functioning of nerve cells, entropic effects often act to counterbalance deterministic forces such as electrostatic attraction and in so doing, allow for effective molecular signaling. A small group of biology, biophysics and computer science faculty have worked together for the past five years to develop curricular modules (based on SCALEUP pedagogy) that enable students to create models of stochastic and deterministic processes. Our students are first-year engineering and science students in the calculus-based physics course and they are not expected to know biology beyond the high-school level. In our class, they learn to reduce seemingly complex biological processes and structures to be described by tractable models that include deterministic processes and simple probabilistic inference. The students test these models in simulations and in laboratory experiments that are biologically relevant. The students are challenged to bridge the gap between statistical parameterization of their data (mean and standard deviation) and simple model-building by inference. This allows the students to quantitatively describe realistic cellular processes such as diffusion, ionic transport, and ligand-receptor binding. Moreover, the students confront ``random'' forces and traditional forces in problems, simulations, and in laboratory exploration throughout the year-long course as they move from traditional kinematics through thermodynamics to electrostatic interactions. This talk

  16. Principle of Maximum Entanglement Entropy and Local Physics of Strongly Correlated Materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lanatà, Nicola [Rutgers University; Strand, Hugo U. R. [University of Gothenburg; Yao, Yongxin [Ames Laboratory; Kotliar, Gabriel [Rutgers University

    2014-07-01

    We argue that, because of quantum entanglement, the local physics of strongly correlated materials at zero temperature is described in a very good approximation by a simple generalized Gibbs distribution, which depends on a relatively small number of local quantum thermodynamical potentials. We demonstrate that our statement is exact in certain limits and present numerical calculations of the iron compounds FeSe and FeTe and of the elemental cerium by employing the Gutzwiller approximation that strongly support our theory in general.

  17. Plasma-based ion implantation and deposition: A review of physics,technology, and applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pelletier, Jacques; Anders, Andre

    2005-05-16

    After pioneering work in the 1980s, plasma-based ion implantation (PBII) and plasma-based ion implantation and deposition (PBIID) can now be considered mature technologies for surface modification and thin film deposition. This review starts by looking at the historical development and recalling the basic ideas of PBII. Advantages and disadvantages are compared to conventional ion beam implantation and physical vapor deposition for PBII and PBIID, respectively, followed by a summary of the physics of sheath dynamics, plasma and pulse specifications, plasma diagnostics, and process modeling. The review moves on to technology considerations for plasma sources and process reactors. PBII surface modification and PBIID coatings are applied in a wide range of situations. They include the by-now traditional tribological applications of reducing wear and corrosion through the formation of hard, tough, smooth, low-friction and chemically inert phases and coatings, e.g. for engine components. PBII has become viable for the formation of shallow junctions and other applications in microelectronics. More recently, the rapidly growing field of biomaterial synthesis makes used of PBII&D to produce surgical implants, bio- and blood-compatible surfaces and coatings, etc. With limitations, also non-conducting materials such as plastic sheets can be treated. The major interest in PBII processing originates from its flexibility in ion energy (from a few eV up to about 100 keV), and the capability to efficiently treat, or deposit on, large areas, and (within limits) to process non-flat, three-dimensional workpieces, including forming and modifying metastable phases and nanostructures. We use the acronym PBII&D when referring to both implantation and deposition, while PBIID implies that deposition is part of the process.

  18. Some physics and chemistry of Coblation® electrosurgical plasma devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stalder, Kenneth R.; Ryan, Thomas P.; Woloszko, Jean

    2013-02-01

    Electrosurgical devices employing plasmas to ablate, cut and otherwise treat tissues have been in widespread use for decades. Following d'Arsonval's 19th century work on the neuromuscular response from high-frequency excitation of tissue, Doyen treated skin blemishes with a spark-gap generator in 1909. In the late 1920's, physician Harvey Cushing and Harvard physicist William Bovie developed an electrosurgical device and power source that eventually became a standard of care for cutting, coagulating, desiccating, or fulgurating tissue. Beginning in the 1990's a new class of low-voltage electrosurgical devices employing electricallyconducting saline fluids were developed by ArthroCare Corp. These modern Coblation® devices are now widely used in many different surgical procedures, including those in arthroscopic surgery, otorhinolaryngology, spine surgery, urology, gynecological surgery, and others. This paper summarizes some of the research we have been doing over the last decade to elucidate the physics and chemistry underlying Coblation® electrosurgical devices. Electrical-, thermal-, fluid-, chemicaland plasma-physics all play important roles in these devices and give rise to a rich variety of observations. Experimental techniques employed include optical and mass spectroscopy, fast optical imaging, and electrical voltage and current measurements. Many of the features occur on fast time scales and small spatial scales, making laboratory measurements difficult, so coupled-physics, finite-element-modeling can also be employed to glean more information than has been acquired thus far through physical observation.

  19. Novel Infrared Coherent Sources and Techniques for Spectroscopic Test of Fundamental Physics Principles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pastor, P. Cancio; Galli, I.; Giusfredi, G.; Mazzotti, D.; De Natale, P.

    2013-06-01

    Recent achievements in high sensitivity and precision molecular spectroscopy in the mid-IR open new perspectives for experiments looking for possible violations of the basic postulates in quantum mechanics or quantum electro-dynamics in simple molecular systems. A new generation of hybrid infrared sources, including a direct link to optical frequency comb synthesizers (OFCSs) is under development. They provide metrological frequency precision and sensitivities that have achieved record levels of tens of parts-per-quadrillion when appropriate spectroscopic techniques are implemented. Such very recent developments will be reviewed. An example of possible application to the test of fundamental principles is attacking the symmetrization postulate (SP). Actually, the requirement of symmetry of the wave function under exchange of identical particles has a striking demonstration in the spectra of molecules including identical nuclei. The basic idea of the spectroscopic tests is to search with extremely high sensitivity for (weak) molecular lines involving the forbidden states. Since the early test of SP violation in bosonic particles, ^{12}C^{16}O_2 molecule has been considered a playground system. An upper limit of 10^{-11} to such violation was measured more than one decade ago by our group. The recent developed spectroscopic technique^{d,e} measured a minimum detected CO_2 gas pressures, in a 1-Hz bandwidth, of a few tens of femtobar, which could improve the previous test by more than two orders of magnitude. Progress in high sensitivity spectroscopic measurements in view of new violation tests will be reviewed, to investigate molecules with two and also three identical nuclei, like SO_3 and NH_3. I. Galli et al., Opt. Lett. 35, 3616 (2010). I. Ricciardi et al., Opt. Express 20, 9178 (2012). S. Borri, et al., Opt. Lett. 37, 1011 (2012). G. Giusfredi et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 104, 110801(2010). I. Galli et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 107, 270802 (2011). D. Mazzotti et al

  20. Structural determination and physical properties of 4d transitional metal diborides by first-principles calculations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ying, Chun; Zhao, Erjun; Lin, Lin; Hou, Qingyu

    2014-10-01

    The structural determination, thermodynamic, mechanical, dynamic and electronic properties of 4d transitional metal diborides MB2 (M = Y-Ag) are systematically investigated by first-principles within the density functional theory (DFT). For each diboride, five structures are considered, i.e. AlB2-, ReB2-, OsB2-, MoB2- and WB2-type structures. The calculated lattice parameters are in good agreement with the previously theoretical and experimental studies. The formation enthalpy increases from YB2 to AgB2 in AlB2-type structure (similar to MoB2- and WB2-type). While the formation enthalpy decreases from YB2 to MoB2, reached minimum value to TcB2, and then increases gradually in ReB2-type structure (similar to OsB2-type), which is consistent with the results of the calculated density of states. The structural stability of these materials relates mainly on electronegative of metals, boron structure and bond characters. Among the considered structures, TcB2-ReB2 (TcB2-ReB2 represents TcB2 in ReB2-type structure, the same hereinafter) has the largest shear modulus (248 GPa), and is the hardest compound. The number of electrons transferred from metals to boron atoms and the calculated densities of states (DOS) indicate that each diboride is a complex mixture of metallic, ionic and covalent characteristics. Trends are discussed.

  1. A Greatly Under-Appreciated Fundamental Principle of Physical Organic Chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cox, Robin A.

    2011-01-01

    If a species does not have a finite lifetime in the reaction medium, it cannot be a mechanistic intermediate. This principle was first enunciated by Jencks, as the concept of an enforced mechanism. For instance, neither primary nor secondary carbocations have long enough lifetimes to exist in an aqueous medium, so SN1 reactions involving these substrates are not possible, and an SN2 mechanism is enforced. Only tertiary carbocations and those stabilized by resonance (benzyl cations, acylium ions) are stable enough to be reaction intermediates. More importantly, it is now known that neither H3O+ nor HO− exist as such in dilute aqueous solution. Several recent high-level calculations on large proton clusters are unable to localize the positive charge; it is found to be simply “on the cluster” as a whole. The lifetime of any ionized water species is exceedingly short, a few molecular vibrations at most; the best experimental study, using modern IR instrumentation, has the most probable hydrated proton structure as H13O6+, but only an estimated quarter of the protons are present even in this form at any given instant. Thanks to the Grotthuss mechanism of chain transfer along hydrogen bonds, in reality a proton or a hydroxide ion is simply instantly available anywhere it is needed for reaction. Important mechanistic consequences result. Any charged oxygen species (e.g., a tetrahedral intermediate) is also not going to exist long enough to be a reaction intermediate, unless the charge is stabilized in some way, usually by resonance. General acid catalysis is the rule in reactions in concentrated aqueous acids. The Grotthuss mechanism also means that reactions involving neutral water are favored; the solvent is already highly structured, so the entropy involved in bringing several solvent molecules to the reaction center is unimportant. Examples are given. PMID:22272074

  2. A Greatly Under-Appreciated Fundamental Principle of Physical Organic Chemistry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robin A. Cox

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available If a species does not have a finite lifetime in the reaction medium, it cannot be a mechanistic intermediate. This principle was first enunciated by Jencks, as the concept of an enforced mechanism. For instance, neither primary nor secondary carbocations have long enough lifetimes to exist in an aqueous medium, so SN1 reactions involving these substrates are not possible, and an SN2 mechanism is enforced. Only tertiary carbocations and those stabilized by resonance (benzyl cations, acylium ions are stable enough to be reaction intermediates. More importantly, it is now known that neither H3O+ nor HO– exist as such in dilute aqueous solution. Several recent high-level calculations on large proton clusters are unable to localize the positive charge; it is found to be simply “on the cluster” as a whole. The lifetime of any ionized water species is exceedingly short, a few molecular vibrations at most; the best experimental study, using modern IR instrumentation, has the most probable hydrated proton structure as H13O6+, but only an estimated quarter of the protons are present even in this form at any given instant. Thanks to the Grotthuss mechanism of chain transfer along hydrogen bonds, in reality a proton or a hydroxide ion is simply instantly available anywhere it is needed for reaction. Important mechanistic consequences result. Any charged oxygen species (e.g., a tetrahedral intermediate is also not going to exist long enough to be a reaction intermediate, unless the charge is stabilized in some way, usually by resonance. General acid catalysis is the rule in reactions in concentrated aqueous acids. The Grotthuss mechanism also means that reactions involving neutral water are favored; the solvent is already highly structured, so the entropy involved in bringing several solvent molecules to the reaction center is unimportant. Examples are given.

  3. Physics of Neutralization of Intense Charged Particle Beam Pulses by a Background Plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaganovich, I.D.; Davidson, R.C.; Dorf, M.A.; Startsev, E.A.; Sefkow, A.B; Friedman, A.F.; Lee, E.P.

    2009-09-03

    through the background plasma. If controlled, this physical effect can be used for optimized beam transport over long distances.

  4. Study on the effects of physical plasma on in-vitro cultivates cells; Untersuchungen zum Einfluss von physikalischem Plasma auf in vitro kultivierte Zellen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Strassenburg, Susanne

    2014-03-15

    This study focused on the interactions of non thermal atmospheric pressure plasma on in vitro cultured keratinocytes (HaCaT keratinocytes) and melanoma cells (MV3). Three different plasma sources were used: a plasma jet (kINPen 09), a surface DBD (dielectric barrier discharge) and a volume DBD. For analyzing basic effects of plasma on cells, influence of physical plasma on viability, on DNA and on induction of ROS were investigated. Following assays were used: -- Viability: - neutral red uptake assay, cell counting (number of viable cells, cell integrity) - BrdU assay (proliferation) - Annexin V and propidium iodide staining, flow cytometry (induction of apoptosis), -- DNA: - alkaline comet assay (detection of DNA damage) - staining of DNA with propidium iodide, flow cytometry (cell cycle analysis), -- ROS: - H2DCFDA assay, flow cytometry (detection of ROS-positive cells). In addition to the effects which where induced by the plasma sources, the influence of the plasma treatment regime (direct, indirect and direct with medium exchange), the working gas (argon, air) and the surrounding liquids (cell culture medium: RPMI, IMDM; buffer solutions: HBSS, PBS) on the extent of the plasma cell effects were investigated. All plasma sources induced treatment time-dependent effects in HaCaT keratinocytes and melanoma cells (MV3): - loss of viable cells and reduced proliferation - induction of apoptosis after the longest treatment times - DNA damage 1 h after plasma treatment, 24 h after plasma treatment DNA damage was present only after the longest treatment times, evidence for DNA damage repair - due to accumulation of cells in G2/M phase, cell count in G1 phase (24 h) is lower - increase of ROS-positive cells 1 h and 24 h after plasma treatment. It was shown that cells which were cultured in RPMI showed stronger effects (stronger loss of viability and more DNA damage) than cells which were cultured in IMDM. Also plasma-treated buffer solutions (HBSS, PBS) induced DNA

  5. Predicting crystal structures and physical properties of novel superhard p-BN under pressure via first-principles investigation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Long, Jianping, E-mail: longjianping@cdut.cn [College of Materials and Chemistry & Chemical Engineering, Chengdu University of Technology, Chengdu 610059 (China); Shu, Chaozhu [The Mineral Resources Chemistry Key Laboratory of Sichuan Higher Education Institutions, Chengdu University of Technology, Chengdu 610059 (China); Yang, Lijun; Yang, Mei [College of Materials and Chemistry & Chemical Engineering, Chengdu University of Technology, Chengdu 610059 (China)

    2015-09-25

    Graphical abstract: The minimum thermal conductivity as a function of pressure for p-BN. - Highlights: • First-principles calculations were carried out to investigate the physical properties of novel superhard p-BN under pressure. • The calculated Vicker’s hardness of p-BN was 55.4 GPa, which indicates that it is a superhard material. • The elastic constants, polycrystalline modulus and Debye temperature under pressure are obtained. • A new modified Clarke-type equation is used to calculate the minimum thermal conductivity. - Abstract: The first-principles calculations were carried out to investigate the electronic structure, elastic, hardness and thermodynamics properties of novel superhard p-BN under pressure. The calculated lattice parameters are in good agreement with previous theoretical results. The band structure, the density of states and the partial density of states are analyzed, which reveals the insulator character of p-BN. In addition, the elastic constants, polycrystalline modulus and Debye temperature under pressure are also successfully obtained. It is observed that the p-BN should be classified as brittle materials and possesses elastically anisotropic. The calculated Vicker’s hardness of p-BN was 55.4 GPa, which indicates that it is a superhard material. According to the calculated polycrystalline modulus, a new modified Clarke-type equation is used to calculate the minimum thermal conductivity. This work provides a useful guide for designing novel borides materials having excellent mechanical performance.

  6. Wavelets-Computational Aspects of Sterian Realistic Approach to Uncertainty Principle in High Energy Physics: A Transient Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristian Toma

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This study presents wavelets-computational aspects of Sterian-realistic approach to uncertainty principle in high energy physics. According to this approach, one cannot make a device for the simultaneous measuring of the canonical conjugate variables in reciprocal Fourier spaces. However, such aspects regarding the use of conjugate Fourier spaces can be also noticed in quantum field theory, where the position representation of a quantum wave is replaced by momentum representation before computing the interaction in a certain point of space, at a certain moment of time. For this reason, certain properties regarding the switch from one representation to another in these conjugate Fourier spaces should be established. It is shown that the best results can be obtained using wavelets aspects and support macroscopic functions for computing (i wave-train nonlinear relativistic transformation, (ii reflection/refraction with a constant shift, (iii diffraction considered as interaction with a null phase shift without annihilation of associated wave, (iv deflection by external electromagnetic fields without phase loss, and (v annihilation of associated wave-train through fast and spatially extended phenomena according to uncertainty principle.

  7. REALIZATION OF THE PRINCIPLE OF INTEGRATION OF EDUCATIONAL FIELDS IN PRESCHOOL EDUCATIONAL INSTITUTIONS AS PART OF IMPLEMENTATION OF THE FEDERAL STATE EDUCATIONAL STANDARD, BY THE EXAMPLE PHYSICAL EDUCATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elsa Ilkhamovna Gamirova

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The article considers the principle of integration of physical culture in educational programs of preschool educational institutions, as part of the federal state educational standards, with the aim to improve the quality of preschool education, to ensure equal opportunities for all children, to preserve the unity of educational space. Integration of physical culture in the educational areas, which include socio-communicative, cognitive, lingual, artistic-aesthetic and physical development is implemented at different levels: value, substantial and procedural.

  8. The Development of Enterprise Systems based on Cyber- Physical Systems Principles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ioan Ştefan Sacală

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Research in the area of Cyber-Physical Systems (CPS and Internet of Things (IoT become, in the last 3 years a priority for both research entities and companies. Implementing Enterprise Systems based on the two paradigms is focused on merging real and virtual objects and thus deals with an increased degree of complexity. The aim of the present paper is to discuss an Enterprise Architecture and a Framework based on the integration of CPS and IoT technologies within Enterprise Systems. An important aspect is related to process mining implemented in two focus areas: the ability to generate business processes from data acquired from sensors and the ability to integrate sensor acquired data with existing business processes.

  9. The complex itinerary of Leibniz’s planetary theory physical convictions, metaphysical principles and Keplerian inspiration

    CERN Document Server

    Bussotti, Paolo

    2015-01-01

    This book presents new insights into Leibniz’s research on planetary theory and his system of pre-established harmony. Although some aspects of this theory have been explored in the literature, others are less well known. In particular, the book offers new contributions on the connection between the planetary theory and the theory of gravitation. It also provides an in-depth discussion of Kepler’s influence on Leibniz’s planetary theory and, more generally, on Leibniz’s concept of pre-established harmony. Three initial chapters presenting the mathematical and physical details of Leibniz’s works provide a frame of reference. The book then goes on to discuss research on Leibniz’s conception of gravity and the connection between Leibniz and Kepler. .

  10. On mathematical and physical principles of transformations of the coherent radar backscatter matrix

    CERN Document Server

    Bebbington, David

    2013-01-01

    The congruential rule advanced by Graves for polarization basis transformation of the radar backscatter matrix is now often misinterpreted as an example of consimilarity transformation. However, consimilarity transformations imply a physically unrealistic antilinear time-reversal operation. This is just one of the approaches found in literature to the description of transformations where the role of conjugation has been misunderstood. In this paper, the different approaches are examined in particular in respect to the role of conjugation. In order to justify and correctly derive the congruential rule for polarization basis transformation and properly place the role of conjugation, the origin of the problem is traced back to the derivation of the antenna hight from the transmitted field. In fact, careful consideration of the role played by the Green's dyadic operator relating the antenna height to the transmitted field shows that, under general unitary basis transformation, it is not justified to assume a scal...

  11. Influence of sedentary versus physically active conditions on regulation of plasma renin activity and vasopressin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mueller, Patrick J

    2008-09-01

    Physical inactivity is an independent risk factor for cardiovascular disease. Sedentary animals compared to physically active controls exhibit enhanced sympathoexcitatory responses, including arterial baroreflex-mediated sympathoexcitation. Hypotension-induced sympathoexcitation is also associated with the release of vasoactive hormones. We hypothesized that sedentary conditions may enhance release of the vasoactive hormones AVP and ANG II. To test this hypothesis, the humoral response to hypotension was examined in conscious rats after 9-12 wk of sedentary conditions or "normally active" conditions. Normally active conditions were produced by allowing rats access to running wheels in their home cages. Running distance peaked after 4 wk (4.5 +/- 0.7 km/day), and the total distance run after 9 wk was 174 +/- 23 km (n = 25). Similar levels of hypotension were induced in conscious sedentary or physically active animals with the arterial vasodilator, diazoxide (25 mg/kg iv). Control experiments used a saline injection of equivalent volume. Plasma samples were collected and assayed for plasma AVP concentration and plasma renin activity (PRA). Sedentary conditions significantly enhanced resting and hypotension-induced PRA relative to normal physical activity. In contrast, resting and hypotension-induced AVP levels were not statistically different between groups. These data suggest that baroreflex-mediated activation of the renin-angiotensin system, but not AVP secretion, is enhanced by sedentary conditions. We speculate that augmented activation of the renin-angiotensin system may be related to enhanced sympathetic outflow observed in sedentary animals and may contribute to increased risk of cardiovascular disease in the sedentary population.

  12. Modeling physical chemistry of the Io plasma torus in two dimensions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Copper, M.; Delamere, P. A.; Overcast-Howe, K.

    2016-07-01

    Periodicities in the Io plasma illustrate the rich complexity of magnetosphere-ionosphere coupling in space plasmas. The confounding System IV period (slower than the rotation of Jupiter's magnetic field ≡ System III) remains a mystery of the torus. Common to both System III and IV are modulations of the superthermal electron population. The small fraction (<1%) of hot electrons plays a vital role in torus physical and chemical properties, modulating the abundance and temperature of ion species. Building on previous models of torus physical chemistry, we have developed a two-dimensional model that includes azimuthal and radial transport (diffusion equation) while averaging chemical processes in latitude. This paper presents initial results of the model, demonstrating the role of hot electrons in forming a single-peaked torus structure. The effect of azimuthal shear is investigated as plasma is transported radially outward, showing how the torus properties evolve during transport from a chemically dominated regime (inner torus) to a transport dominated regime (outer torus). Surprisingly, we find that hot electron populations influence torus properties at all radial distances. While many of our results are preliminary, suggestions for future modeling experiments are suggested to provide additional insight into the origin of the ubiquitous superthermal electrons.

  13. STUDENT AWARD FINALIST: Plasma Acid: A Chemically and Physically Metastable Substance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shainsky, Natalie; Dobrynin, Danil; Ercan, Utku; Joshi, Suresh; Brooks, Ari; Ji, Haifeng; Fridman, Gregory; Cho, Young; Fridman, Alexander; Friedman, Gennady

    2011-10-01

    Non-thermal atmospheric pressure dielectric barrier discharge applied to the surface of a liquid creates a chemically and physically metastable substance. The properties and lifetime of the substance depend on the treatment conditions such as gas atmosphere and liquid medium used, treatment dose, and other parameters. When deionized water is used, the metastable substance becomes a strong oxidizer. We show that direct exposure of deionized water to neutral and charged species produced in plasma creates a strong oxidizer and acidic substance in this water which, for the lack of a better term, we termed plasma acid. Plasma acid can remain stable for relatively long time and its oxidizing power may be linked to the significant lowering of its pH. We report experiments that demonstrate plasma acid's metastability. We also show that observed pH of as low as 2.0 cannot be completely accounted for by the production of nitric acid; and that the conjugate base derived from superoxide is at least partly responsible for both, lowering of the pH and increase in the oxidizing power of the solution.

  14. Evaporation of Droplets in Plasma Spray-Physical Vapor Deposition Based on Energy Compensation Between Self-Cooling and Plasma Heat Transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Mei-Jun; Zhang, Meng; Zhang, Qiang; Yang, Guan-Jun; Li, Cheng-Xin; Li, Chang-Jiu

    2017-08-01

    In the plasma spray-physical vapor deposition process (PS-PVD), there is no obvious heating to the feedstock powders due to the free molecular flow condition of the open plasma jet. However, this is in contrast to recent experiments in which the molten droplets are transformed into vapor atoms in the open plasma jet. In this work, to better understand the heating process of feedstock powders in the open plasma jet of PS-PVD, an evaporation model of molten ZrO2 is established by examining the heat and mass transfer process of molten ZrO2. The results reveal that the heat flux in PS-PVD open plasma jet (about 106 W/m2) is smaller than that in the plasma torch nozzle (about 108 W/m2). However, the flying distance of molten ZrO2 in the open plasma jet is much longer than that in the plasma torch nozzle, so the heating in the open plasma jet cannot be ignored. The results of the evaporation model show that the molten ZrO2 can be partly evaporated by self-cooling, whereas the molten ZrO2 with a diameter heat transfer.

  15. Examining the physical principles behind the motion of moist air: Which expressions are sound?

    CERN Document Server

    Makarieva, A M; Nefiodov, A V; Sheil, D; Nobre, A D; Bunyard, P; Li, B -L

    2013-01-01

    The physical equations determining the motion of moist atmospheric air in the presence of condensation remain controversial. Two distinct formulations have been proposed, published and cited. The equation of Bannon [2002, J. Atmos. Sci. 59: 1967--1982] includes a term for a "reactive motion" that arises when water vapor condenses and droplets begin to fall; according to this term the remaining gas moves upwards so as to conserve momentum. In the equation of Ooyama[2001, J. Atmos. Sci. 58: 2073--2102] the reactive motion term is absent. Both equations contain a term for condensate loading, but in the formulation of Ooyama [2001] there are two additional terms. In some modern nonhydrostatic models of moist atmospheric circulation, however, formulations have been mixed. Here we examine the contrasting equations for the motion of moist air. We discuss inconsistencies in the application of Newton's second and third laws to an air and condensate mixture. We show that the concept of reactive motion in this context i...

  16. Status of Plasma Physics Techniques for the Deposition of Tribological Coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spalvins, T.

    1984-01-01

    The plasma physics deposition techniques of sputtering and ion-plating are reviewed. Their characteristics and potentials are discussed in terms of synthesis or deposition of tribological coatings. Since the glow discharge or plasma generated in the conventional sputtering and ion-plating techniques has a low ionization efficiency, rapid advances have been made in equipment design to further increase the ionization efficiency. The enhanced ionization favorably affects the nucleation and growth sequence of the coating. This leads to improved adherence and coherence, higher density, favorable morphological growth, and reduced internal stresses in the coatings. As a result, desirable coating characteristics can be precision tailored. Tribological coating characteristics of sputtered solid film lubricants such as MoS2, ion-plated soft gold and lead metallic films, and sputtered and ion-plated wear-resistant refractory compound films such as nitrides and carbides are discussed.

  17. Magnetospheric Plasma Physics : the Impact of Jim Dungey’s Research

    CERN Document Server

    Southwood, David; Mitton, Simon

    2015-01-01

    This book makes good background reading for much of modern magnetospheric physics. Its origin was a Festspiel for Professor Jim Dungey, former professor in the Physics Department at Imperial College on the occasion of his 90th birthday, 30 January 2013. Remarkably, although he retired 30 years ago, his pioneering and, often, maverick work in the 50’s through to the 70’s on solar terrestrial physics is probably more widely appreciated today than when he retired. Dungey was a theoretical plasma physicist. The book covers how his reconnection model of the magnetosphere evolved to become the standard model of solar-terrestrial coupling. Dungey’s open magnetosphere model now underpins a holistic picture explaining not only the magnetic and plasma structure of the magnetosphere, but also its dynamics which can be monitored in real time. The book also shows how modern day simulation of solar terrestrial coupling can reproduce the real time evolution of the solar terrestrial system in ways undreamt of in 1961 w...

  18. pypk - A Python extension module to handle chemical kinetics in plasma physics modeling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available PLASMAKIN is a package to handle physical and chemical data used in plasma physics modeling and to compute gas-phase and gas-surface kinetics data: particle production and loss rates, photon emission spectra and energy exchange rates. A large number of species properties and reaction types are supported, namely: gas or electron temperature dependent collision rate coefficients, vibrational and cascade levels, evaluation of branching ratios, superelastic and other reverse processes, three-body collisions, radiation imprisonment and photoelectric emission. Support of non-standard rate coefficient functions can be handled by a user-supplied shared library.

    The main block of the PLASMAKIN package is a Fortran module that can be included in an user's program or compiled as a shared library, libpk. pypk is a new addition to the package and provides access to libpk from Python programs. It is build on top of the ctypes foreign function library module and is prepared to work with several Fortran compilers. However pypk is more than a wrapper and provides its own classes and functions taking advantage of Python language characteristics. Integration with Python tools allows substantial productivity gains on program development and insight on plasma physics problems.

  19. Objectively measured sedentary behavior, physical activity, and plasma lipids in overweight and obese children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cliff, Dylan P; Okely, Anthony D; Burrows, Tracy L; Jones, Rachel A; Morgan, Philip J; Collins, Clare E; Baur, Louise A

    2013-02-01

    This study examines the associations between objectively measured sedentary behavior, light physical activity (LPA), and moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (MVPA), and plasma lipids in overweight and obese children. Cross-sectional analyses were conducted among 126 children aged 5.5-9.9 years. Sedentary behavior, LPA, and MVPA were assessed using accelerometry. Fasting blood samples were analyzed for plasma lipids (high-density lipoprotein cholesterol [HDL-C], low-density lipoprotein cholesterol [LDL-C], total cholesterol [TC], and triglycerides [TG]). MVPA was not related to plasma lipids (P > 0.05). Independent of age, sex, energy intake, and waist circumference z-score, sedentary behavior and LPA were associated with HDL-C (β = -0.23, 95% CI -0.42 to -0.04, P = 0.020; β = 0.20, 95% CI 0.14 to 0.39, P = 0.036, respectively). The strength of the associations remained after additionally adjusting for MVPA (sedentary behavior: β = -0.22, 95% CI -0.44 to 0.006, P = 0.056; LPA: β = 0.19, 95% CI -0.005 to 0.38, P = 0.056, respectively). Substituting at least LPA for sedentary time may contribute to the development of healthy HDL-C levels among overweight and obese children, independent of their adiposity. Comprehensive prevention and treatment strategies to improve plasma HDL-C among overweight and obese children should target reductions in total sedentary time and promote the benefits of LPA, in addition to promoting healthy levels of adiposity, healthy dietary behaviors, and MVPA. Copyright © 2012 The Obesity Society.

  20. Exact Solutions of the Gardner Equation and their Applications to the Different Physical Plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daghan, D.; Donmez, O.

    2016-06-01

    Traveling wave solution of the Gardner equation is studied analytically by using the two dependent ( G '/ G,1/ G)-expansion and (1/ G ')-expansion methods and direct integration. The exact solutions of the Gardner equations are obtained. Our analytic solutions are applied to the unmagnetized four-component and dusty plasma systems consisting of hot protons and electrons to investigate dynamical features of the solitons and shock waves produced in these systems. A wide variety of parameters of the plasma is used, and the basic features of the Gardner solitons that are beyond the existing study in literature are found. It is observed that the analytic solutions from ( G '/ G,1/ G)-expansion and (1/ G ')-expansion methods only produce shock waves but the solitary waves are found from the analytic solutions derived from the direct integration. It is also noted that the superhot electrons and relative mass density of the electrons significantly effect the soliton's amplitude, width, and position. We have also numerically proved that the combination of every value of nomalized density μ 1 or temperature ratio σ 1 with the other sets of plasma parameters creates a region where the solutions have similar physical properties. The time-dependent behavior of the soliton is also studied, and a periodic motion of soliton along the phase variable η is found during the evolution. The investigations and the limits presented in this study may be helpful for studying and understanding the nonlinear properties of the solitary and shock waves seen in various physical and astrophysical plasma systems.

  1. Effect of pubertal development and physical activity on plasma ghrelin concentration in boys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jürimäe, J; Cicchella, A; Tillmann, V; Lätt, E; Haljaste, K; Purge, P; Pomerants, T; Jürimäe, T

    2009-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to assess the influence of regular physical activity on plasma ghrelin concentration in pre-pubertal and pubertal boys. In addition, the impact of ghrelin concentration on bone mineral density (BMD) was examined. In total, 56 healthy schoolboys aged between 10 and 16 yr were divided into the swimming (no.=28) and the control (no.=28) groups. The subjects were matched by age and body mass index (BMI), generating 9 matched pairs in pubertal group I (Tanner stage 1), 11 pairs in group II (Tanner stages 2 and 3), and 8 pairs in group III (Tanner stages 4 and 5). Swimmers in pubertal groups II and III had significantly (both pghrelin levels than the controls (group II: 1126.8+/-406.0 vs 868.3+/-411.2 pg/ml; group III: 1105.5+/-337.5 vs 850.8+/-306.0 pg/ml, respectively), whereas no difference was seen in the pubertal group I (1230.8+/-386.0 vs 1272.7+/-424.4 pg/ml). Ghrelin was the most important hormonal determinant for total BMD and lumbar apparent volumetric BMD (BMAD) (R2=27.2% and R2=19.8%, respectively) in swimmers, whereas in control boys, plasma IGF-I was the most important hormonal predictor accounting for 41.8% of the variability of total BMD and 20.4% of the variability of lumbar BMAD. In conclusion, ghrelin concentration decreased during puberty in physically inactive boys, while in regularly physically active boys it remained relatively unchanged. Ghrelin appears to be an important hormonal predictor for BMD in physically active boys, while BMD is mostly determined by IGF-I in physically inactive boys.

  2. Research on Design Principles of Virtual Reality Physical Education Courseware%浅谈虚拟现实体育教学课件的设计原则

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    贺昆; 郭良志; 朱红花; 叶晓兰

    2011-01-01

    采用文献资料法、归纳演绎法,对虚拟现实体育课件的设计原则进行了研究。根据建构主义理论、运动技能形成理论,结合虚拟现实技术的特点,提出了设计虚拟现实体育课件的原则,即以学为中心,以意义建构为目的的原则;教育性和真实性原则;设置强大、实用的交互功能的原则;强调利用各种资源来支持“学”的原则;正确、真实、清晰、全面地展示技术动作的原则。%This paperstudies the virtual reality physical education courseware with induction and deduction me - theds as well as literature review. According to the constructivism theory and the theory of motor skill formation, the author put forwards the principles of virtual reality physical education courseware. These principles include learningcentered principle aiming at the construction of meaning; education and authenticity principle; the practical interactive principle, the principle of employing all kinds of resources to support learning; the principle of displaying skilled movements correctly, truly, clearly and completely.

  3. Magnetic diagnostics: general principles and the problem of reconstruction of plasma current and pressure profiles in toroidal systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pustovitov, V.D.

    2000-04-01

    The restrictions of the magnetic diagnostics are discussed. Being related to the integral nature of the measurable quantities, they follow from the fundamental laws of electromagnetism. A series of particular examples demonstrating the strength of these restrictions is given and analyzed. A general rule is emphasized that the information obtained from external magnetic measurements is obviously insufficient for the reliable evaluation of plasma current and pressure profiles in tokamaks or in stellarators. The underlying reason is that outside the plasma the own field of the equilibrium plasma currents is determined by the boundary conditions on the plasma surface only. (author)

  4. Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL) annual site environmental report for calendar year 1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Finley, V.L.; Wiezcorek, M.A.

    1995-01-01

    This report gives the results of the environmental activities and monitoring programs at the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL) for CY93. The report is prepared to provide the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and the public with information on the level of radioactive and non-radioactive pollutants, if any, added to the environment as a result of PPPL operations, as well as environmental initiatives, assessments, and programs that were undertaken in 1993. The objective of the Annual Site Environmental Report is to document evidence that DOE facility environmental protection programs adequately protect the environment and the public health. The Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory has engaged in fusion energy research since 1951. The long-range goal of the U.S. Magnetic Fusion Energy Research Program is to develop and demonstrate the practical application of fusion power as an alternate energy source. In 1993, PPPL had both of its two large tokamak devices in operation; the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) and the Princeton Beta Experiment-Modification (PBX-M). PBX-M completed its modifications and upgrades and resumed operation in November 1991. TFTR began the deuterium-tritium (D-T) experiments in December 1993 and set new records by producing over six million watts of energy. The engineering design phase of the Tokamak Physics Experiment (TPX), which replaced the cancelled Burning Plasma Experiment in 1992 as PPPL`s next machine, began in 1993 with the planned start up set for the year 2001. In 1993, the Environmental Assessment (EA) for the TFRR Shutdown and Removal (S&R) and TPX was prepared for submittal to the regulatory agencies.

  5. Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL) annual site environmental report for calendar year 1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Finley, V.L.; Wiezcorek, M.A.

    1995-01-01

    This report gives the results of the environmental activities and monitoring programs at the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL) for CY93. The report is prepared to provide the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and the public with information on the level of radioactive and non-radioactive pollutants, if any, added to the environment as a result of PPPL operations, as well as environmental initiatives, assessments, and programs that were undertaken in 1993. The objective of the Annual Site Environmental Report is to document evidence that DOE facility environmental protection programs adequately protect the environment and the public health. The Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory has engaged in fusion energy research since 1951. The long-range goal of the U.S. Magnetic Fusion Energy Research Program is to develop and demonstrate the practical application of fusion power as an alternate energy source. In 1993, PPPL had both of its two large tokamak devices in operation; the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) and the Princeton Beta Experiment-Modification (PBX-M). PBX-M completed its modifications and upgrades and resumed operation in November 1991. TFTR began the deuterium-tritium (D-T) experiments in December 1993 and set new records by producing over six million watts of energy. The engineering design phase of the Tokamak Physics Experiment (TPX), which replaced the cancelled Burning Plasma Experiment in 1992 as PPPL`s next machine, began in 1993 with the planned start up set for the year 2001. In 1993, the Environmental Assessment (EA) for the TFRR Shutdown and Removal (S&R) and TPX was prepared for submittal to the regulatory agencies.

  6. Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL) annual site environmental report for calendar year 1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Finley, V.L.; Wieczorek, M.A. [eds.

    1996-02-01

    This report gives the results of the environmental activities and monitoring programs at the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL) for CY94. The report is prepared to provide the US Department of Energy (DOE) and the public with information on the level of radioactive and nonradioactive pollutants, if any, added to the environment as a result of PPPL operations, as well as environmental initiatives, assessments, and programs that were undertaken in 1994. The objective of the Annual Site Environmental Report is to document evidence that PPPL`s environmental protection programs adequately protect the environment and the public health. The Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory has engaged in fusion energy research since 195 1. The long-range goal of the US Magnetic Fusion Energy Research Program is to develop and demonstrate the practical application of fusion power as an alternate energy source. In 1994, PPPL had one of its two large tokamak devices in operation-the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR). The Princeton Beta Experiment-Modification or PBX-M completed its modifications and upgrades and resumed operation in November 1991 and operated periodically during 1992 and 1993; it did not operate in 1994 for funding reasons. In December 1993, TFTR began conducting the deuterium-tritium (D-T) experiments and set new records by producing over ten @on watts of energy in 1994. The engineering design phase of the Tokamak Physics Experiment (T?X), which replaced the cancelled Burning Plasma Experiment in 1992 as PPPL`s next machine, began in 1993 with the planned start up set for the year 2001. In December 1994, the Environmental Assessment (EA) for the TFTR Shutdown and Removal (S&R) and TPX was submitted to the regulatory agencies, and a finding of no significant impact (FONSI) was issued by DOE for these projects.

  7. Computational Plasma Physics at the Bleeding Edge: Simulating Kinetic Turbulence Dynamics in Fusion Energy Sciences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, William

    2013-04-01

    Advanced computing is generally recognized to be an increasingly vital tool for accelerating progress in scientific research in the 21st Century. The imperative is to translate the combination of the rapid advances in super-computing power together with the emergence of effective new algorithms and computational methodologies to help enable corresponding increases in the physics fidelity and the performance of the scientific codes used to model complex physical systems. If properly validated against experimental measurements and verified with mathematical tests and computational benchmarks, these codes can provide more reliable predictive capability for the behavior of complex systems, including fusion energy relevant high temperature plasmas. The magnetic fusion energy research community has made excellent progress in developing advanced codes for which computer run-time and problem size scale very well with the number of processors on massively parallel supercomputers. A good example is the effective usage of the full power of modern leadership class computational platforms from the terascale to the petascale and beyond to produce nonlinear particle-in-cell simulations which have accelerated progress in understanding the nature of plasma turbulence in magnetically-confined high temperature plasmas. Illustrative results provide great encouragement for being able to include increasingly realistic dynamics in extreme-scale computing campaigns to enable predictive simulations with unprecedented physics fidelity. Some illustrative examples will be presented of the algorithmic progress from the magnetic fusion energy sciences area in dealing with low memory per core extreme scale computing challenges for the current top 3 supercomputers worldwide. These include advanced CPU systems (such as the IBM-Blue-Gene-Q system and the Fujitsu K Machine) as well as the GPU-CPU hybrid system (Titan).

  8. Electron-ion relaxation in a dense plasma. [supernovae core physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Littleton, J. E.; Buchler, J.-R.

    1974-01-01

    The microscopic physics of the thermonuclear runaway in highly degenerate carbon-oxygen cores is investigated to determine if and how a detonation wave is generated. An expression for the electron-ion relaxation time is derived under the assumption of large degeneracy and extreme relativity of the electrons in a two-temperature plasma. Since the nuclear burning time proves to be several orders of magnitude shorter than the relaxation time, it is concluded that in studying the structure of the detonation wave the electrons and ions must be treated as separate fluids.

  9. The physics of positively biased conductors surrounded by dielectrics in contact with a plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hastings, Daniel E.; Chang, Patrick

    1989-01-01

    The physics of a positively biased conductor surrounded by dielectrics in contact with plasma is investigated. It is shown that because of the presence of secondary emission from the surrounding dielectrics, the voltage of the surfaces near the conductor has three solutions. The high- and low-voltage solutions are stable, while the intermediate-voltage solution is unstable. This theory is applied to explain the snapover effect observed on high-voltage solar arrays that involve the use of highly biased surfaces in contact with the space environment.

  10. Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL) annual site environmental report for Calendar Year 1992

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Finley, V.L.; Wieczorek, M.A.

    1994-03-01

    This report gives the results of the environmental activities and monitoring programs at the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL) for CY92. The report is prepared to provide the US Department of Energy (DOE) and the public with information on the level of radioactive and nonradioactive pollutants, if any, added to the environment as a result of PPPL operations, as well as environmental initiatives, assessments, and programs. The objective of the Annual Site Environmental Report is to document evidence that DOE facility environmental protection programs adequately protect the environment and the public health.

  11. Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL) annual site environmental report for calendar year 1991

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Finley, V.L.; Stencel, J.R.

    1992-11-01

    This report gives the results of the environmental activities and monitoring programs at the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL) for CY91. The report is prepared to provide the US Department of Energy (DOE) and the public with information on the level of radioactive and nonradioactive pollutants, if any, added to the environment as a result of PPPL operations, as well as environmental initiatives, assessments, and programs. The objective of the Annual Site Environmental Report is to document evidence that DOE facility environmental protection programs adequately protect the environment and the public health.

  12. Physical, mechanical, and tribological properties of quasicrystalline Al-Cu-Fe coatings prepared by plasma spraying

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lepeshev, A. A.; Rozhkova, E. A.; Karpov, I. V.; Ushakov, A. V.; Fedorov, L. Yu.

    2013-12-01

    The physical, mechanical, and tribological properties of quasicrystalline coatings based on the Al65Cu23Fe12 alloy prepared by plasma spraying have been investigated. The specific features of the phase formation due to the competitive interactions of the icosahedral ψ and cubic β phases have been elucidated. A correlation between the microhardness and the content of the icosahedral phase in the coating has been determined. The decisive role of the quasicrystalline phase in the formation of high tribological characteristics of the coatings has been revealed and tested.

  13. Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL) annual site environmental report for calendar year 1991

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Finley, V.L.; Stencel, J.R.

    1992-11-01

    This report gives the results of the environmental activities and monitoring programs at the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL) for CY91. The report is prepared to provide the US Department of Energy (DOE) and the public with information on the level of radioactive and nonradioactive pollutants, if any, added to the environment as a result of PPPL operations, as well as environmental initiatives, assessments, and programs. The objective of the Annual Site Environmental Report is to document evidence that DOE facility environmental protection programs adequately protect the environment and the public health.

  14. Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL) annual site environmental report for Calendar Year 1992

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Finley, V.L.; Wieczorek, M.A.

    1994-03-01

    This report gives the results of the environmental activities and monitoring programs at the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL) for CY92. The report is prepared to provide the US Department of Energy (DOE) and the public with information on the level of radioactive and nonradioactive pollutants, if any, added to the environment as a result of PPPL operations, as well as environmental initiatives, assessments, and programs. The objective of the Annual Site Environmental Report is to document evidence that DOE facility environmental protection programs adequately protect the environment and the public health.

  15. PREFACE: XII Latin American workshop on plasma physics (17-21 September 2007, Caracas, Venezuela)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puerta, Julio

    2008-10-01

    Some years ago a group of Latin American physicists took the initiative to consult about the viability of organizing a meeting on plasma physics for researchers and students of the region. The result was that it was not only a good idea, but a necessity in order to show and share everyone's work, and to keep updated on latest advances and technologies on plasma physics. It was decided that for new researchers as well as students of Physics, it would prove to be the best way to keep them posted on such matters. This was the birth of a series of meetings known as Latin American workshops on plasma physics that take place every two years in a different Latin American country. In Venezuela we have had the opportunity to organize two editions of this interesting and important reunion of physicists. The first of these Latin American workshops on plasma physics was held in Cambuquira (Brazil) in 1982. After organizing the first six editions of the workshop, the VII LAWPP meeting was realized in Caracas in January 1997. It was designed with a structure similar to the first edition. It developed in two stages, a first week devoted to short courses with lecturers in different fields of plasma physics and a second week for contributed and invited presentations. Participants from sixteen different countries were present, half of them from this continent and the other half from overseas, demonstrating the international character of this meeting. There have been four more editions of the workshop and once again, we have had the opportunity to organize this latest edition of the series: the XII Latin American workshop on plasma physics, which took place in Caracas, Venezuela from the 17th to the 21st of September 2007. The structure was modified, because contributed and review papers were together during the first stage, with short courses realized during the second one, called mini-courses, and given by several high level contributors such as José Boedo, Leopoldo Soto, Claude

  16. FY93 Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory. Annual report, October 1, 1992--September 30, 1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1995-02-01

    This is the annual report from the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory for the period October 1, 1992 to September 30, 1993. The report describes work done on TFTR during the year, as well as preparatory to beginning of D-T operations. Design work is ongoing on the Tokamak Physics Experiment (TPX) which is to test very long pulse operations of tokamak type devices. PBX has come back on line with additional ion-Bernstein power and lower-hybrid current drive. The theoretical program is also described, as well as other small scale programs, and the growing effort in collaboration on international design projects on ITER and future collaborations at a larger scale.

  17. Analytical approximations for a conservative nonlinear singular oscillator in plasma physics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Mirzabeigy

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available A modified variational approach and the coupled homotopy perturbation method with variational formulation are exerted to obtain periodic solutions of a conservative nonlinear singular oscillator in plasma physics. The frequency–amplitude relations for the oscillator which the restoring force is inversely proportional to the dependent variable are achieved analytically. The approximate frequency obtained using the coupled method is more accurate than the modified variational approach and ones obtained using other approximate methods and the discrepancy between the approximate frequency using this coupled method and the exact one is lower than 0.31% for the whole range of values of oscillation amplitude. The coupled method provides a very good accuracy and is a promising technique to a lot of practical engineering and physical problems.

  18. Photon Physics and Plasma Research, WILGA 2012; EuCARD Sessions

    CERN Document Server

    Romaniuk, R S

    2012-01-01

    Wilga Sessions on HEP experiments, astroparticle physica and accelerator technology were organized under the umbrella of the EU FP7 Project EuCARD – European Coordination for Accelerator Research and Development. This paper is the third part (out of five) of the research survey of WILGA Symposium work, May 2012 Edition, concerned with Photon Physics and Plasma Research. It presents a digest of chosen technical work results shown by young researchers from different technical universities from this country during the Jubilee XXXth SPIE-IEEE Wilga 2012, May Edition, symposium on Photonics and Web Engineering. Topical tracks of the symposium embraced, among others, nanomaterials and nanotechnologies for photonics, sensory and nonlinear optical fibers, object oriented design of hardware, photonic metrology, optoelectronics and photonics applications, photonics-electronics co-design, optoelectronic and electronic systems for astronomy and high energy physics experiments, JET tokamak and pi-of-the sky experiments ...

  19. An exercise-based physical therapy program for patients with patellar tendinopathy after platelet-rich plasma injection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Ark, Mathijs; van den Akker-Scheek, Inge; Meijer, L.T.B.; Zwerver, Hans

    Objectives: To describe a post platelet-rich plasma (PRP) injection, exercise-based physical therapy program, investigate feasibility and report the first results of patellar tendinopathy patients treated with PRP injection combined with the physical therapy program. Study Design: Case-series.

  20. An exercise-based physical therapy program for patients with patellar tendinopathy after platelet-rich plasma injection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Ark, Mathijs; van den Akker-Scheek, Inge; Meijer, L.T.B.; Zwerver, Hans

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: To describe a post platelet-rich plasma (PRP) injection, exercise-based physical therapy program, investigate feasibility and report the first results of patellar tendinopathy patients treated with PRP injection combined with the physical therapy program. Study Design: Case-series. Setti

  1. DEGRO practical guidelines for radiotherapy of non-malignant disorders. Part I: physical principles, radiobiological mechanisms, and radiogenic risk

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reichl, Berthold [Hospital Weiden, Department of Radiotherapy and Radiation Oncology, Weiden (Germany); Block, Andreas [Hospital Dortmund, Institute for Medical Radiation Physics and Radiation Protection, Dortmund (Germany); Schaefer, Ulrich [Lippe Hospital, Dept. of Radiotherapy, Lemgo (Germany); Bert, Christoph; Mueller, Reinhold [University Hospitals Erlangen, Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Erlangen (Germany); Jung, Horst [University Hospital Hamburg-Eppendorf, Dept. of Radiotherapy and Radiation Oncology, Hamburg (Germany); Roedel, Franz [University Hospital Goethe-University, Dept. of Radiotherapy and Oncology, Frankfurt am Main (Germany); Collaboration: the German Cooperative Group on Radiotherapy for Benign Diseases (GCG-BD)

    2015-09-15

    Synopsis of the introductory paragraph of the DEGRO consensus S2e-guideline recommendations for the radiotherapy of benign disorders, including physical principles, radiobiological mechanisms, and radiogenic risk. This work is based on the S2e-guideline recommendations published November 14, 2013. The basic principles of radiation physics and treatment delivery, evaluation of putative underlying radiobiological mechanisms, and the assessment of genetic and cancer risk following low-dose irradiation will be presented. Radiation therapy of benign diseases is performed according to similar physical principles as those governing treatment of malignant diseases in radiation oncology, using the same techniques and workflows. These methods comprise usage of orthovoltage X-ray units, gamma irradiation facilities, linear accelerators (LINACs), and brachytherapy. Experimental in vitro and in vivo models recently confirmed the clinically observed anti-inflammatory effect of low-dose X-irradiation, and implicated a multitude of radiobiological mechanisms. These include modulation of different immunological pathways, as well as the activities of endothelial cells, mono- and polymorphonuclear leukocytes, and macrophages. The use of effective dose for radiogenic risk assessment and the corresponding tumor incidence rate of 5.5 %/Sv are currently controversially discussed. Some authors argue that the risk of radiation-induced cancers should be estimated on the basis of epidemiological data. However, such data are rarely available at present and associated with high variability. Current radiobiological studies clearly demonstrate a therapeutic effectiveness of radiation therapy used to treat benign diseases and implicate various molecular mechanisms. Radiogenic risks should be taken into account when applying radiation treatment for benign diseases. (orig.) [German] Zusammenfassung des einfuehrenden Kapitels der DEGRO-S2e-Leitlinie zur Strahlentherapie gutartiger Erkrankungen

  2. An Overview of Science Education and Outreach Activities at the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    J. DeLooper; A. DeMeo; P. Lucas; A. Post-Zwicker; C. Phillips; C. Ritter; J. Morgan; P. Wieser; A. Percival; E. Starkman; G. Czechowicz

    2000-11-07

    The U. S. Department of Energy's Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL) has an energetic science education program and outreach effort. This overview describes the components of the programs and evaluates the changes that have occurred in this effort during the last several years. Efforts have been expanded to reach more students, as well as the public in general. The primary goal is to inform the public regarding the fusion and plasma research at PPPL and to excite students so that they can appreciate science and technology. A student's interest in science can be raised by tours, summer research experiences, in-classroom presentations, plasma expos, teacher workshops and web-based materials. The ultimate result of this effort is a better-informed public, as well as an increase in the number of women and minorities who choose science as a vocation. Measuring the results is difficult, but current metrics are reviewed. The science education and outreach programs are supported by a de dicated core group of individuals and supplemented by other members of the PPPL staff and consultants who perform various outreach and educational activities.

  3. Influences on ionization fraction in an inductively coupled ionized physical vapor deposition device plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juliano, Daniel R.; Ruzic, David N.; Allain, Monica M. C.; Hayden, Douglas B.

    2002-01-01

    A computer simulation was created to model the transport of sputtered atoms through an ionized physical vapor deposition (IPVD) system. The simulation combines Monte Carlo and fluid methods to track the metal atoms that are emitted from the target, interact with the IPVD plasma, and are eventually deposited somewhere in the system. Ground-state neutral, excited, and ionized metal atoms are tracked. The simulation requires plasma conditions to be specified by the user. Langmuir probe measurements were used to determine these parameters in an experimental system in order to compare simulation results with experiment. The primary product of the simulation is a prediction of the ionization fraction of the sputtered atom flux at the substrate under various conditions. This quantity was experimentally measured and the results compared to the simulation. Experiment and simulation differ significantly. It is hypothesized that heating of the background gas due to the intense sputtered atom flux at the target is primarily responsible for this difference. Heating of the background gas is not accounted for in the simulation. Difficulties in accurately measuring plasma parameters, especially electron temperature, are also significant.

  4. Plasma glucose, insulin and catecholamine responses to a Wingate test in physically active women and men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vincent, Sophie; Berthon, Phanélie; Zouhal, Hassane; Moussa, Elie; Catheline, Michel; Bentué-Ferrer, Danièle; Gratas-Delamarche, Arlette

    2004-01-01

    The influence of gender on the glucose response to exercise remains contradictory. Moreover, to our knowledge, the glucoregulatory responses to anaerobic sprint exercise have only been studied in male subjects. Hence, the aim of the present study was to compare glucoregulatory metabolic (glucose and lactate) and hormonal (insulin, catecholamines and estradiol only in women) responses to a 30-s Wingate test, in physically active students. Eight women [19.8 (0.7) years] and eight men [22.0 (0.6) years] participated in a 30-s Wingate test on a bicycle ergometer. Plasma glucose, insulin, and catecholamine concentrations were determined at rest, at the end of both the warm-up and the exercise period and during the recovery (5, 10, 20, and 30 min). Results showed that the plasma glucose increase in response to a 30-s Wingate test was significantly higher in women than in men [0.99 (0.15) versus 0.33 (0.20) mmol l(-1) respectively, Pwomen than in men [14.7 (2.9) versus 2.3 (1.9) pmol l(-1) respectively, P<0.05]. However, there was no gender difference concerning the catecholamine response. The study indicates a gender-related difference in post-exercise plasma glucose and insulin responses after a supramaximal exercise.

  5. Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory Annual Site Environmental Report for Calendar Year 1997

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Finley, V.L. and Levine, J.D.

    1999-01-10

    The results of the 1997 environmental surveillance and monitoring program for the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL) are presented and discussed. The purpose of this report is to provide the U.S. Department of Energy and the public with information on the level of radioactive and non-radioactive pollutants, if any, that are added to the environment as a result of PPPL's operations. During Calendar Year 1997, PPPL's Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) completed fifteen years of fusion experiments begun in 1982. Over the course of three and half years of deuterium-tritium (D-T) plasma experiments, PPPL set a world record of 10.7 million watts of controlled fusion power, more than 700 tritium shots pulsed into the reactor vessel generating more than 5.6 x 1020 neutron and 1.6 gigajoules of fusion energy and researchers studied plasma science experimental data, which included "enhanced reverse shear techniques." As TFTR was completing its historic operations, PPPL participated with the Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Columbia University, and the University of Washington (Seattle) in a collaboration effort to design the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX). This next device, NSTX, is located in the former TFTR Hot Cell on D site, and it is designed to be a smaller and more economical torus fusion reactor. Construction of this device began in late 1997, and first plasma in scheduled for early 1999. For 1997, the U.S. Department of Energy in its Laboratory Appraisal report rated the overall performance of Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory as "excellent." The report cited the Laboratory's consistently excellent scientific and technological achievements and its successful management practices, which included high marks for environmental management, employee health and safety, human resources administration, science education, and communications. Groundwater investigations continued under a voluntary agreement with the New Jersey

  6. Principle and Design of Plasma Antennas%等离子体天线原理与设计

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吴戈旻; 梁志伟

    2012-01-01

    The advantage of radar stealth,dynamic reconfiguration and ultra wide bandwidth brings great prospect of military applications on multifunction radar and electronic countermeasure.Plasma antennas include plasma column dielectric antenna and plasma mirror antenna.The design of plasma column antenna system is realized based on the propagation characteristics of surface wave in plasma.And the design of plasma mirror antenna system is realized based on the microwave reflection characteristics on plasma.The detailed analysis of fundamental theory and configuration of plasma antennas provides helpful theoretical and technological preparations for the further application on plasma antenna.%等离子体天线因具有隐身、动态重构、超宽带等优点,可广泛应用于多功能雷达、电子对抗等军事技术领域.等离子体天线主要包括等离子体柱形电介质天线和反射面天线2种形式.基于表面波在等离子体中的传播特性,给出了柱形等离子体天线系统设计;基于等离子体反射电磁波特性,给出了反射面等离子体天线系统设计,为等离子体天线技术趋于实用化提供了必要的理论及技术准备.

  7. Rossby vortices, spiral structures, solitons astrophysics and plasma physics in shallow water experiments

    CERN Document Server

    Nezlin, Mikhail V

    1993-01-01

    This book can be looked upon in more ways than one. On the one hand, it describes strikingly interesting and lucid hydrodynamic experiments done in the style of the "good old days" when the physicist needed little more than a piece of string and some sealing wax. On the other hand, it demonstrates how a profound physical analogy can help to get a synoptic view on a broad range of nonlinear phenomena involving self-organization of vortical structures in planetary atmo­ spheres and oceans, in galaxies and in plasmas. In particular, this approach has elucidated the nature and the mechanism of such grand phenomena as the Great of galaxies. A number of our Red Spot vortex on Jupiter and the spiral arms predictions concerning the dynamics of spiral galaxies are now being confirmed by astronomical observations stimulated by our experiments. This book is based on the material most of which was accumulated during 1981-88 in close cooperation with our colleagues, experimenters from the Plasma Physics Department of the...

  8. Introduction to Gyrokinetic Theory with Applications in Magnetic Confinement Research in Plasma Physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    W.M. Tang

    2005-01-03

    The present lecture provides an introduction to the subject of gyrokinetic theory with applications in the area of magnetic confinement research in plasma physics--the research arena from which this formalism was originally developed. It was presented as a component of the ''Short Course in Kinetic Theory within the Thematic Program in Partial Differential Equations'' held at the Fields Institute for Research in Mathematical Science (24 March 2004). This lecture also discusses the connection between the gyrokinetic formalism and powerful modern numerical simulations. Indeed, simulation, which provides a natural bridge between theory and experiment, is an essential modern tool for understanding complex plasma behavior. Progress has been stimulated in particular by the exponential growth of computer speed along with significant improvements in computer technology. The advances in both particle and fluid simulations of fine-scale turbulence and large-scale dynamics have produced increasingly good agreement between experimental observations and computational modeling. This was enabled by two key factors: (i) innovative advances in analytic and computational methods for developing reduced descriptions of physics phenomena spanning widely disparate temporal and spatial scales and (ii) access to powerful new computational resources.

  9. Ignitor Plasma Physics Performance in the H-Regime at Various Parameters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Detragiache, P.; Coppi, B.

    2010-11-01

    The plasma physics performance of Ignitor at full (BT = 13 T, Ip = 10 MA) as well as at reduced parameters (BT = 8 T, Ip = 5 MA) in the high confinement mode (H-regime) is assessed using global 0-D modelling. At full parameters, high-Q operation is possible if the heating power (a combination of Ohmic, α and limited ICRF power) is above the threshold value Pthr for H-regime confinement. Different scaling expressions for Pthr yield significantly different results when used with Ignitor parameters. Even with the most pessimistic among the proposed scalingsootnotetextY. R. Martin et al., Journal of Physics: Conference Series, 123, 012033 (2008). the access to H-regime confinement is possible for Ignitor at full field when the ICRH system is operated at the highest frequency and the generated power is less than at lower frequencies. At reduced parameters, the lower Pthr and the augmented ICRF power available (about 10 MW) facilitate access to H-regime confinement, while the plasma performance remains respectable.

  10. The physical properties of cubic plasma-enhanced atomic layer deposition TaN films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, H.; Lavoie, C.; Copel, M.; Narayanan, V.; Park, D.-G.; Rossnagel, S. M.

    2004-05-01

    Plasma-enhanced atomic layer deposition (PE-ALD) is a promising technique to produce high quality metal and nitride thin films at low growth temperature. In this study, very thin (<10 nm) low resistivity (350 μΩ cm) cubic TaN Cu diffusion barrier were deposited by PE-ALD from TaCl5 and a plasma of both hydrogen and nitrogen. The physical properties of TaN thin films including microstructure, conformality, roughness, and thermal stability were investigated by various analytical techniques including x-ray diffraction, medium energy ion scattering, and transmission electron microscopy. The Cu diffusion barrier properties of PE-ALD TaN thin films were studied using synchrotron x-ray diffraction, optical scattering, and sheet resistance measurements during thermal annealing of the test structures. The barrier failure temperatures were obtained as a function of film thickness and compared with those of PE-ALD Ta, physical vapor deposition (PVD) Ta, and PVD TaN. A diffusion kinetics analysis showed that the microstructure of the barrier materials is one of the most critical factors for Cu diffusion barrier performance.

  11. Physical fitness and plasma leptin in women with recent gestational diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gar, C; Rottenkolber, M; Grallert, H; Banning, F; Freibothe, I; Sacco, V; Wichmann, C; Reif, S; Potzel, A; Dauber, V; Schendell, C; Sommer, N N; Wolfarth, B; Seissler, J; Lechner, A; Ferrari, U

    2017-01-01

    Low physical fitness (PF) is a risk factor for type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2D). Women with a history of gestational diabetes (GDM) are at risk for T2D at a young age, but the role of PF in this population is not clear. PF has also been found to correlate inversely with plasma leptin in previous studies. Here, we examine whether women who had GDM have lower PF than women after a normoglycemic pregnancy and, second, whether PF is associated with plasma leptin, independently of body fat mass. Cross-sectional analysis of 236 participants in the PPSDiab Study (cohort study of women 3-16 months after delivery, 152 after gestational diabetes (pGDM), 84 after normoglycemic pregnancy (control subjects); consecutively recruited 2011-16); medical history, physical examination with bioelectrical impedance analysis (BIA), whole body magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) (n = 154), 5-point oral glucose tolerance test, cardiopulmonary exercise testing, clinical chemistry including fasting plasma leptin; statistical analysis with Mann-Whitney U and t -test, Spearman correlation coefficient, multiple linear regression. Women pGDM had lower maximally achieved oxygen uptake (VO2peak/kg: 25.7(21.3-29.9) vs. 30.0(26.6-34.1)ml/min/kg; total VO2peak: 1733(1552-2005) vs. 1970(1767-2238)ml/min; pfit than control subjects. Low PF may therefore contribute to the risk for T2D after GDM. This should be tested in intervention studies. Low PF also associated with increased leptin levels-independently of body fat. PF may therefore influence leptin levels and signaling. This hypothesis requires further investigation.

  12. Physical activity opposes the age-related increase in skeletal muscle and plasma endothelin-1 levels and normalizes plasma endothelin-1 levels in individuals with essential hypertension

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nyberg, Michael Permin; Mortensen, Stefan Peter; Hellsten, Ylva

    2013-01-01

    AIMS: Endothelin-1 has potent constrictor and proliferative activity in vascular smooth muscle, and essential hypertension and aging are associated with increased endothelin-1-mediated vasoconstrictor tone. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of physical activity, hypertension...... performed lifelong physical activity had similar plasma and muscle endothelin-1 levels as the young controls and had higher ET(A) receptor levels. CONCLUSION: Our findings suggest that aerobic exercise training opposes the age-related increase in skeletal muscle and plasma endothelin-1 levels and normalizes...... plasma endothelin-1 levels in individuals with essential hypertension. This effect may explain some of the beneficial effects of training on the cardiovascular system in older and hypertensive subjects....

  13. Single channel atmospheric pressure transporting plasma and plasma stream demultiplexing: physical characterization and application to E. coli bacteria inactivation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valinataj Omran, A.; Sohbatzadeh, F.; Siadati, S. N.; Hosseinzadeh Colagar, A.; Akishev, Y.; Arefi-Khonsari, F.

    2017-08-01

    In this article, we developed transporting plasma sources that operate at atmospheric pressure. The effect of electrode configuration on plasma transporting was investigated. In order to increase the transporting plasma cross-section, we converted a plasma stream into four plasma channels by a cylindrical housing. Electron excitation and rotational temperatures were estimated using optical emission spectroscopy. Furthermore, the electrical and temporal characteristics of the plasma, discharge power and charge deposition on the target were investigated. The propagation characteristics of single and multi-channel transporting plasma were compared with the same cross-sectional area. Two configurations for multi-channels were designed for this purpose. Escherichia coli bacteria were exposed to the single and multi-channel transporting discharge for different time durations. After exposure, the results indicated that the inactivation zones were significantly increased by a multi-channel transporting plasma. Finally, E. coli inactivation by those plasma apparatuses was compared with that of several standard antimicrobial test discs such as Gentamicin, Tetracycline, Amoxicillin and Cefixime.

  14. The plasma physics of thermal conduction in the intracluster medium of galaxy clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reynolds, Christopher

    Most of the baryons in a galaxy cluster reside in a hot (10-100 million K) and tenuous gaseous atmosphere confined by the gravitational potential of the cluster's dark matter halo. Understanding the microphysics of this intracluster medium (ICM), particularly the transport processes such as thermal conduction and viscosity, is important to any understanding of the thermodynamic state of ICM atmospheres. For example, the current paradigm is that radiative losses in the ICM core are offset by energy from a central jetted active galactic nucleus (AGN), preventing a cooling catastrophe in the cluster core. However, the mechanism by which the jet-injected energy is thermalized in the ICM is highly uncertain - the dissipation of waves or turbulence by thermal conduction or plasma viscosity is a leading contender. A knowledge of thermal conduction in the ICM is also important for any attempts to understand the global temperature profiles of clusters, with consequences for e.g. cosmological studies based on observations of the SunyaevZeldovich (SZ) effect. The basic physics of thermal conduction in the ICM is very poorly understood, however, leading to a huge uncertainty in the relevant coefficients. The ICM resides in a poorly studied regime of plasma physics - it is a highly magnetized (gyroradii path), high-beta (thermal pressure >> magnetic pressure), and weakly collisional (mean-free path only moderately less than global scale lengths) plasma. Thermal conduction will be strongly suppressed perpendicular to magnetic fields lines. But even along field lines, the growth of small scale and fast kinetic instabilities may strongly suppress thermal conduction. Hence the usual assumption, that conduction along the field has its classical Spitzer value, has a shaky theoretical basis and may well be wildly inaccurate. In this proposal, we use analytical theory and computer models to explore thermal conduction in ICM-like plasmas. Recently, we have found that a strong heat

  15. Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory Annual Site Environmental Report for Calendar Year 1996

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    J.D. Levine; V.L. Finley

    1998-03-01

    The results of the 1996 environmental surveillance and monitoring program for the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL) are presented and discussed. The purpose of this report is to provide the US Department of Energy and the public with information on the level of radioactive and nonradioactive pollutants, if any, that are added to the environment as a result of PPPL's operations. During Calendar Year 1996, PPPL's Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) continued to conduct fusion experiments. Having set a world record on November 2, 1994, by achieving approximately 10.7 million watts of controlled fusion power during the deuterium-tritium (D-T) plasma experiments, researchers turned their attention to studying plasma science experiments, which included ''enhanced reverse shear techniques.'' Since November 1993, more than 700 tritium-fueled experiments were conducted, which generated more than 4 x 10(superscript 20) neutrons and 1.4 gigajoules of fusion energy. In 1996, the overall performance of Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory was rated ''excellent'' by the US Department of Energy in the Laboratory Appraisal report issued in early 1997. The report cited the Laboratory's consistently excellent scientific and technological achievements and its successful management practices, which included high marks for environmental management, employee health and safety, human resources administration, science education, and communications. Groundwater investigations continued under a voluntary agreement with the New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection. PPPL monitored for the presence of nonradiological contaminants, mainly volatile organic compounds (components of degreasing solvents) and petroleum hydrocarbons (past leaks of releases of diesel fuel from underground storage tanks). Also, PPPL's radiological monitoring program characterized the ambient, background levels of tritium in the environment and

  16. Effect of basic physical parameters to control plasma meniscus and beam halo formation in negative ion sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miyamoto, K. [Naruto University of Education, 748 Nakashima, Takashima, Naruto-cho, Naruto-shi, Tokushima 772-8502 (Japan); Okuda, S.; Nishioka, S.; Hatayama, A. [Faculty of Science and Technology, Keio University, 3-14-1 Hiyoshi, Kohoku-ku, Yokohama 223-8522 (Japan)

    2013-09-14

    Our previous study shows that the curvature of the plasma meniscus causes the beam halo in the negative ion sources: the negative ions extracted from the periphery of the meniscus are over-focused in the extractor due to the electrostatic lens effect, and consequently become the beam halo. In this article, the detail physics of the plasma meniscus and beam halo formation is investigated with two-dimensional particle-in-cell simulation. It is shown that the basic physical parameters such as the H{sup −} extraction voltage and the effective electron confinement time significantly affect the formation of the plasma meniscus and the resultant beam halo since the penetration of electric field for negative ion extraction depends on these physical parameters. Especially, the electron confinement time depends on the characteristic time of electron escape along the magnetic field as well as the characteristic time of electron diffusion across the magnetic field. The plasma meniscus penetrates deeply into the source plasma region when the effective electron confinement time is short. In this case, the curvature of the plasma meniscus becomes large, and consequently the fraction of the beam halo increases.

  17. Variational principles

    CERN Document Server

    Moiseiwitsch, B L

    2004-01-01

    This graduate-level text's primary objective is to demonstrate the expression of the equations of the various branches of mathematical physics in the succinct and elegant form of variational principles (and thereby illuminate their interrelationship). Its related intentions are to show how variational principles may be employed to determine the discrete eigenvalues for stationary state problems and to illustrate how to find the values of quantities (such as the phase shifts) that arise in the theory of scattering. Chapter-by-chapter treatment consists of analytical dynamics; optics, wave mecha

  18. ECRH on ASDEX Upgrade - System Status, Feed-Back Control, Plasma Physics Results -

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Flamm J.

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available The ASDEX Upgrade (AUG ECRH system now delivers a total of 3.9 MW to the plasma at 140 GHz. Three new units are capable of 2-frequency operation and may heat the plasma alternatively with 2.1 MW at 105 GHz. The system is routinely used with X2, O2, and X3 schemes. For Bt = 3.2 T also an ITER-like O1-scheme can be run using 105 GHz. The new launchers are capable of fast poloidal movements necessary for real-time control of the location of power deposition. Here real-time control of NTMs is summarized, which requires a fast analysis of massive data streams (ECE and Mirnov correlation and extensive calculations (equilibria, ray-tracing. These were implemented at AUG using a modular concept of standardized real-time diagnostics. The new realtime capabilities have also been used during O2 heating to keep the first reflection of the non-absorbed beam fraction on the holographic reflector tile which ensures a well defined second pass of the beam through the central plasma. Sensors for the beam position are fast thermocouples at the edge of the reflector tile. The enhanced ECRH power was used for several physics studies related to the unique feature of pure electron heating without fueling and without momentum input. As an example the effect of the variation of the heating mix in moderately heated H-modes is demonstrated using the three available heating systems, i.e. ECRH, ICRH and NBI. Keeping the total input power constant, strong effects are seen on the rotation, but none on the pedestal parameters. Also global quantities as the stored energy are hardly modified. Still it is found that the central ion temperature drops as the ECRH fraction exceeds a certain threshold.

  19. Plasma physics and environmental perturbation laboratory. [magnetospheric experiments from space shuttle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogl, J. L.

    1973-01-01

    Current work aimed at identifying the active magnetospheric experiments that can be performed from the Space Shuttle, and designing a laboratory to carry out these experiments is described. The laboratory, known as the PPEPL (Plasma Physics and Environmental Perturbation Laboratory) consists of 35-ft pallet of instruments connected to a 25-ft pressurized control module. The systems deployed from the pallet are two 50-m booms, two subsatellites, a high-power transmitter, a multipurpose accelerator, a set of deployable canisters, and a gimbaled instrument platform. Missions are planned to last seven days, during which two scientists will carry out experiments from within the pressurized module. The type of experiments to be performed are outlined.

  20. Analytical solitons for Langmuir waves in plasma physics with cubic nonlinearity and perturbations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou, Qin [Wuhan Donghu Univ. (China). School of Electronics and Information Engineering; Mirzazadeh, M. [Guilan Univ. (Iran, Islamic Republic of). Dept. of Engineering Sciences

    2016-07-01

    We presented an analytical study on dynamics of solitons for Langmuir waves in plasma physics. The mathematical model is given by the perturbed nonlinear Schroedinger equation with full nonlinearity and Kerr law nonlinearity. There are three techniques of integrability were employed to extract exact solutions along with the integrability conditions. The topological 1-soliton solutions, singular 1-soliton solutions, and plane wave solution were reported by Ricatti equation expansion approach and then the bright 1-soliton solution, singular 1-soliton solution, periodic singular solutions, and plane wave solution were derived with the help of trial solution method. Finally, based on the G'/G-expansion scheme, we obtained the hyperbolic function travelling wave solution, trigonometric function travelling wave solution, and plane wave solution.