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Sample records for plasma physics particle

  1. Plasma physics via particle simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Birdsall, C.K.

    1981-01-01

    Plasmas are studied by following the motion of many particles in applied and self fields, analytically, experimentally and computationally. Plasmas for magnetic fusion energy devices are very hot, nearly collisionless and magnetized, with scale lengths of many ion gyroradii and Debye lengths. The analytic studies of such plasmas are very difficult as the plasma is nonuniform, anisotropic and nonlinear. The experimental studies have become very expensive in time and money, as the size, density and temperature approach fusion reactor values. Computational studies using many particles and/or fluids have complemented both theories and experiments for many years and have progressed to fully three dimensional electromagnetic models, albeit with hours of running times on the fastest largest computers. Particle simulation methods are presented in some detail, showing particle advance from acceleration to velocity to position, followed by calculation of the fields from charge and current densities and then further particle advance, and so on. Limitations due to the time stepping and use of a spatial grid are given, to avoid inaccuracies and instabilities. Examples are given for an electrostatic program in one dimension of an orbit averaging program, and for a three dimensional electromagnetic program. Applications of particle simulations of plasmas in magnetic and inertial fusion devices continue to grow, as well as to plasmas and beams in peripheral devices, such as sources, accelerators, and converters. (orig.)

  2. Particle modeling of plasmas computational plasma physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dawson, J.M.

    1991-01-01

    Recently, through the development of supercomputers, a powerful new method for exploring plasmas has emerged; it is computer modeling of plasmas. Such modeling can duplicate many of the complex processes that go on in a plasma and allow scientists to understand what the important processes are. It helps scientists gain an intuition about this complex state of matter. It allows scientists and engineers to explore new ideas on how to use plasma before building costly experiments; it allows them to determine if they are on the right track. It can duplicate the operation of devices and thus reduce the need to build complex and expensive devices for research and development. This is an exciting new endeavor that is in its infancy, but which can play an important role in the scientific and technological competitiveness of the US. There are a wide range of plasma models that are in use. There are particle models, fluid models, hybrid particle fluid models. These can come in many forms, such as explicit models, implicit models, reduced dimensional models, electrostatic models, magnetostatic models, electromagnetic models, and almost an endless variety of other models. Here the author will only discuss particle models. He will give a few examples of the use of such models; these will be taken from work done by the Plasma Modeling Group at UCLA because he is most familiar with work. However, it only gives a small view of the wide range of work being done around the US, or for that matter around the world

  3. Energetic particle physics with applications in fusion and space plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheng, C.Z.

    1997-01-01

    Energetic particle physics is the study of the effects of energetic particles on collective electromagnetic (EM) instabilities and energetic particle transport in plasmas. Anomalously large energetic particle transport is often caused by low frequency MHD instabilities, which are driven by these energetic particles in the presence of a much denser background of thermal particles. The theory of collective energetic particle phenomena studies complex wave-particle interactions in which particle kinetic physics involving small spatial and fast temporal scales can strongly affect the MHD structure and long-time behavior of plasmas. The difficulty of modeling kinetic-MHD multiscale coupling processes stems from the disparate scales which are traditionally analyzed separately: the macroscale MHD phenomena are studied using the fluid MHD framework, while microscale kinetic phenomena are best described by complicated kinetic theories. The authors have developed a kinetic-MHD model that properly incorporates major particle kinetic effects into the MHD fluid description. For tokamak plasmas a nonvariational kinetic-MHD stability code, the NOVA-K code, has been successfully developed and applied to study problems such as the excitation of fishbone and Toroidal Alfven Eigenmodes (TAE) and the sawtooth stabilization by energetic ions in tokamaks. In space plasmas the authors have employed the kinetic-MHD model to study the energetic particle effects on the ballooning-mirror instability which explains the multisatellite observation of the stability and field-aligned structure of compressional Pc 5 waves in the magnetospheric ring current plasma

  4. Advances of dense plasma physics with particle accelerators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoffmann, D.H.H.; Blazevic, A.; Rosmej, O.N.; Spiller, P.; Tahir, N.A.; Weyrich, K. [Gesellschaft fur Schwerionenforschung, GSI-Darmstadt, Plasmaphysik, Darmstadt (Germany); Hoffmann, D.H.H.; Dafni, T.; Kuster, M.; Roth, M.; Udrea, S.; Varentsov, D. [DarmstadtTechnische Univ., Institut fur Kernphysik (Germany); Jacoby, J. [Frankfurt Univ., Institut fur Angewandte Physik (Germany); Zioutas, K. [European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN), Geneve (Switzerland); Patras Univ., Dept. of Physics (Greece); Sharkov, B.Y. [Institut for Theoretical and Experimental Physics ITEP, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2006-06-15

    High intensity particle beams from accelerators induce high energy density states in bulk matter. The SIS-18 heavy ion synchrotron at GSI (Darmstadt, Germany) now routinely delivers intense Uranium beams that deposit about 1 kJ/g of specific energy in solid matter, e.g. solid lead. Due to the specific nature of the ion-matter interaction a volume of matter is heated uniformly with low gradients of temperature and pressure in the initial phase, depending on the pulse structure of the beam with respect to space and time. The new accelerator complex FAIR (Facility for Antiproton and ion Research) at GSI as well as beams from the CERN large hadron collider (LHC) will vastly extend the accessible parameter range for high energy density states. One special piece of accelerator equipment a superconducting high field dipole magnet, developed for the LHC at CERN is now serving as a key instrument to diagnose the dense plasma of the sun interior plasma, thus providing an extremely interesting combination of accelerator physics, plasma physics and particle physics. (authors)

  5. Advances of dense plasma physics with particle accelerators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoffmann, D.H.H.; Blazevic, A.; Rosmej, O.N.; Spiller, P.; Tahir, N.A.; Weyrich, K.; Hoffmann, D.H.H.; Dafni, T.; Kuster, M.; Roth, M.; Udrea, S.; Varentsov, D.; Jacoby, J.; Zioutas, K.; Sharkov, B.Y.

    2006-01-01

    High intensity particle beams from accelerators induce high energy density states in bulk matter. The SIS-18 heavy ion synchrotron at GSI (Darmstadt, Germany) now routinely delivers intense Uranium beams that deposit about 1 kJ/g of specific energy in solid matter, e.g. solid lead. Due to the specific nature of the ion-matter interaction a volume of matter is heated uniformly with low gradients of temperature and pressure in the initial phase, depending on the pulse structure of the beam with respect to space and time. The new accelerator complex FAIR (Facility for Antiproton and ion Research) at GSI as well as beams from the CERN large hadron collider (LHC) will vastly extend the accessible parameter range for high energy density states. One special piece of accelerator equipment a superconducting high field dipole magnet, developed for the LHC at CERN is now serving as a key instrument to diagnose the dense plasma of the sun interior plasma, thus providing an extremely interesting combination of accelerator physics, plasma physics and particle physics. (authors)

  6. Plasma physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1979-01-01

    This report contains the papers delivered at the AEB - Natal University summer school on plasma physics held in Durban during January 1979. The following topics were discussed: Tokamak devices; MHD stability; trapped particles in tori; Tokamak results and experiments; operating regime of the AEB Tokamak; Tokamak equilibrium; high beta Tokamak equilibria; ideal Tokamak stability; resistive MHD instabilities; Tokamak diagnostics; Tokamak control and data acquisition; feedback control of Tokamaks; heating and refuelling; neutral beam injection; radio frequency heating; nonlinear drift wave induced plasma transport; toroidal plasma boundary layers; microinstabilities and injected beams and quasilinear theory of the ion acoustic instability

  7. Plasma physics

    CERN Document Server

    Cairns, R A

    1985-01-01

    This book is intended as an introduction to plasma physics at a level suitable for advanced undergraduates or beginning postgraduate students in physics, applied mathematics or astrophysics. The main prerequisite is a knowledge of electromagnetism and of the associated mathematics of vector calculus. SI units are used throughout. There is still a tendency amongst some plasma physics researchers to· cling to C.g.S. units, but it is the author's view that universal adoption of SI units, which have been the internationally agreed standard since 1960, is to be encouraged. After a short introductory chapter, the basic properties of a plasma con­ cerning particle orbits, fluid theory, Coulomb collisions and waves are set out in Chapters 2-5, with illustrations drawn from problems in nuclear fusion research and space physics. The emphasis is on the essential physics involved and (he theoretical and mathematical approach has been kept as simple and intuitive as possible. An attempt has been made to draw attention t...

  8. Theoretical Studies of Alfven Waves and Energetic Particle Physics in Fusion Plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Liu [Univ. of California, Irvine, CA (United States)

    2017-12-20

    This report summarizes major theoretical findings in the linear as well as nonlinear physics of Alfvén waves and energetic particles in magnetically confined fusion plasmas. On the linear physics, a variational formulation, based on the separation of singular and regular spatial scales, for drift-Alfvén instabilities excited by energetic particles is established. This variational formulation is then applied to derive the general fishbone-like dispersion relations corresponding to the various Alfvén eigenmodes and energetic-particle modes. It is further employed to explore in depth the low-frequency Alfvén eigenmodes and demonstrate the non-perturbative nature of the energetic particles. On the nonlinear physics, new novel findings are obtained on both the nonlinear wave-wave interactions and nonlinear wave-energetic particle interactions. It is demonstrated that both the energetic particles and the fine radial mode structures could qualitatively affect the nonlinear evolution of Alfvén eigenmodes. Meanwhile, a theoretical approach based on the Dyson equation is developed to treat self-consistently the nonlinear interactions between Alfvén waves and energetic particles, and is then applied to explain simulation results of energetic-particle modes. Relevant list of journal publications on the above findings is also included.

  9. Particle physics

    CERN Document Server

    Martin, Brian R

    2017-01-01

    An accessible and carefully structured introduction to Particle Physics, including important coverage of the Higgs Boson and recent progress in neutrino physics. Fourth edition of this successful title in the Manchester Physics series. Includes information on recent key discoveries including : An account of the discovery of exotic hadrons, beyond the simple quark model; Expanded treatments of neutrino physics and CP violation in B-decays; An updated account of ‘physics beyond the standard model’, including the interaction of particle physics with cosmology; Additional problems in all chapters, with solutions to selected problems available on the book’s website; Advanced material appears in optional starred sections.

  10. Plasma physics and engineering

    CERN Document Server

    Fridman, Alexander

    2011-01-01

    Part I: Fundamentals of Plasma Physics and Plasma ChemistryPlasma in Nature, in the Laboratory, and in IndustryOccurrence of Plasma: Natural and Man MadeGas DischargesPlasma Applications, Plasmas in IndustryPlasma Applications for Environmental ControlPlasma Applications in Energy ConversionPlasma Application for Material ProcessingBreakthrough Plasma Applications in Modern TechnologyElementary Processes of Charged Species in PlasmaElementary Charged Particles in Plasma and Their Elastic and Inelastic CollisionsIonization ProcessesMechanisms of Electron Losses: The Electron-Ion RecombinationEl

  11. From particles to plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van Dam, J.W.

    1989-01-01

    The title of this book, From Particles to Plasmas, has more than one meaning. First, it reflects how the scientific career of Marshall Rosenbluth has evolved, beginning in the field of elementary particle physics and extending into his major area of plasma physics. Secondly, it is meant to suggest the wide spectrum of subject matters addressed in the individual lectures, ranging from numerical simulation and space physics and accelerators to various subfields in the physics of plasmas. In the third place, the title is a reference to the way in which the theoretical description of plasmas is often constructed, namely starting from the motion of single particles and then incorporating collective effects. Most of the contributions in this book do concern various aspects of fusion plasma physics, which is the field in which most of Marshall Rosenbluth's scientific contributions have been and are being made. In this field his eminence and authority are indicated by the sobriquet pope of plasma physics that is often applied to him

  12. Particle physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kamal, Anwar

    2014-01-01

    Provides step-by-step derivations. Contains numerous tables and diagrams. Supports learning and teaching with numerous worked examples, questions and problems with answers. Sketches also the historical development of the subject. This textbook teaches particle physics very didactically. It supports learning and teaching with numerous worked examples, questions and problems with answers. Numerous tables and diagrams lead to a better understanding of the explanations. The content of the book covers all important topics of particle physics: Elementary particles are classified from the point of view of the four fundamental interactions. The nomenclature used in particle physics is explained. The discoveries and properties of known elementary particles and resonances are given. The particles considered are positrons, muon, pions, anti-protons, strange particles, neutrino and hadrons. The conservation laws governing the interactions of elementary particles are given. The concepts of parity, spin, charge conjugation, time reversal and gauge invariance are explained. The quark theory is introduced to explain the hadron structure and strong interactions. The solar neutrino problem is considered. Weak interactions are classified into various types, and the selection rules are stated. Non-conservation of parity and the universality of the weak interactions are discussed. Neutral and charged currents, discovery of W and Z bosons and the early universe form important topics of the electroweak interactions. The principles of high energy accelerators including colliders are elaborately explained. Additionally, in the book detectors used in nuclear and particle physics are described. This book is on the upper undergraduate level.

  13. Energetic Particle Physics In Fusion Research In Preparation For Burning Plasma Experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gorelenkov, Nikolai N [PPPL

    2013-06-01

    The area of energetic particle (EP) physics of fusion research has been actively and extensively researched in recent decades. The progress achieved in advancing and understanding EP physics has been substantial since the last comprehensive review on this topic by W.W. Heidbrink and G.J. Sadler [1]. That review coincided with the start of deuterium-tritium (DT) experiments on Tokamak Fusion Test reactor (TFTR) and full scale fusion alphas physics studies. Fusion research in recent years has been influenced by EP physics in many ways including the limitations imposed by the "sea" of Alfven eigenmodes (AE) in particular by the toroidicityinduced AEs (TAE) modes and reversed shear Alfven (RSAE). In present paper we attempt a broad review of EP physics progress in tokamaks and spherical tori since the first DT experiments on TFTR and JET (Joint European Torus) including helical/stellarator devices. Introductory discussions on basic ingredients of EP physics, i.e. particle orbits in STs, fundamental diagnostic techniques of EPs and instabilities, wave particle resonances and others are given to help understanding the advanced topics of EP physics. At the end we cover important and interesting physics issues toward the burning plasma experiments such as ITER (International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor).

  14. On the coupling of fields and particles in accelerator and plasma physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Geloni, Gianluca [European XFEL GmbH, Hamburg (Germany); Kocharyan, Vitali; Saldin, Evgeni [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany)

    2016-10-15

    In accelerator and plasma physics it is generally accepted that there is no need to solve the dynamical equations for particles motion in manifestly covariant form, that is by using the coordinate-independent proper time to parameterize particle world-lines in space-time. In other words, in order to describe the dynamical processes in the laboratory frame there is no need to use the laws of relativistic kinematics. It is sufficient to take into account the relativistic dependence of the particles momentum on the velocity in the second Newton's law. Therefore, the coupling of fields and particles is based, on the one hand, on the use of result from particle dynamics treated according to Newton's laws in terms of the relativistic three-momentum and, on the other hand, on the use of Maxwell's equations in standard form. In previous papers we argued that this is a misconception. The purpose of this paper is to describe in detail how to calculate the coupling between fields and particles in a correct way and how to develop a new algorithm for a particle tracking code in agreement with the use of Maxwell's equations in their standard form. Advanced textbooks on classical electrodynamics correctly tell us that Maxwell's equations in standard form in the laboratory frame and charged particles are coupled by introducing particles trajectories as projections of particles world-lines onto coordinates of the laboratory frame and by subsequently using the laboratory time to parameterize the trajectory curves. For the first time we showed a difference between conventional and covariant particle tracking results in the laboratory frame. This essential point has never received attention in the physical community. Only the solution of the dynamical equations in covariant form gives the correct coupling between field equations in standard form and particles trajectories in the laboratory frame. We conclude that previous theoretical and simulation results in

  15. On the coupling of fields and particles in accelerator and plasma physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Geloni, Gianluca; Kocharyan, Vitali; Saldin, Evgeni

    2016-10-01

    In accelerator and plasma physics it is generally accepted that there is no need to solve the dynamical equations for particles motion in manifestly covariant form, that is by using the coordinate-independent proper time to parameterize particle world-lines in space-time. In other words, in order to describe the dynamical processes in the laboratory frame there is no need to use the laws of relativistic kinematics. It is sufficient to take into account the relativistic dependence of the particles momentum on the velocity in the second Newton's law. Therefore, the coupling of fields and particles is based, on the one hand, on the use of result from particle dynamics treated according to Newton's laws in terms of the relativistic three-momentum and, on the other hand, on the use of Maxwell's equations in standard form. In previous papers we argued that this is a misconception. The purpose of this paper is to describe in detail how to calculate the coupling between fields and particles in a correct way and how to develop a new algorithm for a particle tracking code in agreement with the use of Maxwell's equations in their standard form. Advanced textbooks on classical electrodynamics correctly tell us that Maxwell's equations in standard form in the laboratory frame and charged particles are coupled by introducing particles trajectories as projections of particles world-lines onto coordinates of the laboratory frame and by subsequently using the laboratory time to parameterize the trajectory curves. For the first time we showed a difference between conventional and covariant particle tracking results in the laboratory frame. This essential point has never received attention in the physical community. Only the solution of the dynamical equations in covariant form gives the correct coupling between field equations in standard form and particles trajectories in the laboratory frame. We conclude that previous theoretical and simulation results in accelerator and plasma

  16. Fusion plasma physics

    CERN Document Server

    Stacey, Weston M

    2012-01-01

    This revised and enlarged second edition of the popular textbook and reference contains comprehensive treatments of both the established foundations of magnetic fusion plasma physics and of the newly developing areas of active research. It concludes with a look ahead to fusion power reactors of the future. The well-established topics of fusion plasma physics -- basic plasma phenomena, Coulomb scattering, drifts of charged particles in magnetic and electric fields, plasma confinement by magnetic fields, kinetic and fluid collective plasma theories, plasma equilibria and flux surface geometry, plasma waves and instabilities, classical and neoclassical transport, plasma-materials interactions, radiation, etc. -- are fully developed from first principles through to the computational models employed in modern plasma physics. The new and emerging topics of fusion plasma physics research -- fluctuation-driven plasma transport and gyrokinetic/gyrofluid computational methodology, the physics of the divertor, neutral ...

  17. Particle beams and plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hofmann, A.; Messerschmid, E.; Lawson, J.D.

    1976-01-01

    These lectures present a survey of some of the concepts of plasma physics and look at some situations familiar to particle-accelerator physicists from the point of view of a plasma physicist, with the intention of helping to link together the two fields. At the outset, basic plasma concepts are presented, including definitions of a plasma, characteristic parameters, magnetic pressure and confinement. This is followed by a brief discussion on plasma kinetic theory, non-equilibrium plasma, and the temperature of moving plasmas. Examples deal with beams in the CERN Intersecting Storage Rings as well as with non-steady beams in cyclic accelerators and microwave tubes. In the final chapters, time-varying systems are considered: waves in free space and the effect of cylinder bounds, wave motion in cold stationary plasmas, and waves in plasmas with well-defined streams. The treatment throughout is informal, with emphasis on the essential physical properties of continuous beams in accelerators and storage rings in relation to the corresponding problems in plasma physics and microwave tubes. (Author)

  18. Plasma physics

    CERN Document Server

    Drummond, James E

    1961-01-01

    A historic snapshot of the field of plasma physics, this fifty-year-old volume offers an edited collection of papers by pioneering experts in the field. In addition to assisting students in their understanding of the foundations of classical plasma physics, it provides a source of historic context for modern physicists. Highly successful upon its initial publication, this book was the standard text on plasma physics throughout the 1960s and 70s.Hailed by Science magazine as a ""well executed venture,"" the three-part treatment ranges from basic plasma theory to magnetohydrodynamics and microwa

  19. Physics of Neutralization of Intense Charged Particle Beam Pulses by a Background Plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaganovich, I.D.; Davidson, R.C.; Dorf, M.A.; Startsev, E.A.; Sefkow, A.B; Friedman, A.F.; Lee, E.P.

    2009-01-01

    Neutralization and focusing of intense charged particle beam pulses by a background plasma forms the basis for a wide range of applications to high energy accelerators and colliders, heavy ion fusion, and astrophysics. For example, for ballistic propagation of intense ion beam pulses, background plasma can be used to effectively neutralize the beam charge and current, so that the self-electric and self-magnetic fields do not affect the ballistic propagation of the beam. From the practical perspective of designing advanced plasma sources for beam neutralization, a robust theory should be able to predict the self-electric and self-magnetic fields during beam propagation through the background plasma. The major scaling relations for the self-electric and self-magnetic fields of intense ion charge bunches propagating through background plasma have been determined taking into account the effects of transients during beam entry into the plasma, the excitation of collective plasma waves, the effects of gas ionization, finite electron temperature, and applied solenoidal and dipole magnetic fields. Accounting for plasma production by gas ionization yields a larger self-magnetic field of the ion beam compared to the case without ionization, and a wake of current density and self-magnetic field perturbations is generated behind the beam pulse. A solenoidal magnetic field can be applied for controlling the beam propagation. Making use of theoretical models and advanced numerical simulations, it is shown that even a small applied magnetic field of about 100G can strongly affect the beam neutralization. It has also been demonstrated that in the presence of an applied magnetic field the ion beam pulse can excite large-amplitude whistler waves, thereby producing a complex structure of self-electric and self-magnetic fields. The presence of an applied solenoidal magnetic field may also cause a strong enhancement of the radial self-electric field of the beam pulse propagating

  20. Study on edge plasma physics and particle control in the Heliotron-E device

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mizuuchi, T; Obiki, T; Noda, N; Matsuura, H; Kondo, K; Akaishi, K; Motojima, O; Kaneko, H; Zushi, H; Takeiri, Y

    1989-04-01

    The edge plasma physics and the particle control under the intrinsic magnetic limiter configuration of a helical system have been studied with the Heliotron-E device, where currentless plasmas of T/sub e//le/1-2 keV, T/sub i//le/1 keV and anti n/sub e//le/2x10/sup 20//m/sup 3/ are produced by a combination of ECRH, NBI and/or ICRH. It is indicated that the separatrix region of the heliotron device is able to act as a divertor magnetic field. According to calculations of the magnetic field line in the edge region, the separatrix region has some different characteristics from the scrape-off layer in tokamak devices; the existence of a fine structure in the separatrix region and asymmetry of the region in toroidal and poloidal directions are observed. A localized pattern of the heat load on the first wall is experimentally observed. This agrees with the heat-load profile expected from the magnetic configuration and the distribution of the plasma in the edge region. A carbonization of the first wall is successfully applied to the Heliotron E device for reduction of metallic impurity contents. The heat load at the divertor trace decreased and that on the other part of the first wall increased in the high recycling conditions after the carbonization. (orig.).

  1. Computations in plasma physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cohen, B.I.; Killeen, J.

    1984-01-01

    A review of computer application in plasma physics is presented. Computer contribution to the investigation of magnetic and inertial confinement of a plasma and charged particle beam propagation is described. Typical utilization of computer for simulation and control of laboratory and cosmic experiments with a plasma and for data accumulation in these experiments is considered. Basic computational methods applied in plasma physics are discussed. Future trends of computer utilization in plasma reseaches are considered in terms of an increasing role of microprocessors and high-speed data plotters and the necessity of more powerful computer application

  2. Proton-driven plasma wakefield acceleration: a path to the future of high-energy particle physics

    CERN Document Server

    Assmann, R.; Bohl, T.; Bracco, C.; Buttenschon, B.; Butterworth, A.; Caldwell, A.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Cipiccia, S.; Feldbaumer, E.; Fonseca, R.A.; Goddard, B.; Gross, M.; Grulke, O.; Gschwendtner, E.; Holloway, J.; Huang, C.; Jaroszynski, D.; Jolly, S.; Kempkes, P.; Lopes, N.; Lotov, K.; Machacek, J.; Mandry, S.R.; McKenzie, J.W.; Meddahi, M.; Militsyn, B.L.; Moschuering, N.; Muggli, P.; Najmudin, Z.; Noakes, T.C.Q.; Norreys, P.A.; Oz, E.; Pardons, A.; Petrenko, A.; Pukhov, A.; Rieger, K.; Reimann, O.; Ruhl, H.; Shaposhnikova, E.; Silva, L.O.; Sosedkin, A.; Tarkeshian, R.; Trines, R.M.G.N.; Tuckmantel, T.; Vieira, J.; Vincke, H.; Wing, M.; Xia, G.

    2014-01-01

    New acceleration technology is mandatory for the future elucidation of fundamental particles and their interactions. A promising approach is to exploit the properties of plasmas. Past research has focused on creating large-amplitude plasma waves by injecting an intense laser pulse or an electron bunch into the plasma. However, the maximum energy gain of electrons accelerated in a single plasma stage is limited by the energy of the driver. Proton bunches are the most promising drivers of wakefields to accelerate electrons to the TeV energy scale in a single stage. An experimental program at CERN -- the AWAKE experiment -- has been launched to study in detail the important physical processes and to demonstrate the power of proton-driven plasma wakefield acceleration. Here we review the physical principles and some experimental considerations for a future proton-driven plasma wakefield accelerator.

  3. Proton-driven plasma wakefield acceleration: a path to the future of high-energy particle physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Assmann, R; Gross, M; Bingham, R; Holloway, J; Bohl, T; Bracco, C; Butterworth, A; Feldbaumer, E; Goddard, B; Gschwendtner, E; Buttenschön, B; Caldwell, A; Chattopadhyay, S; Cipiccia, S; Jaroszynski, D; Fonseca, R A; Grulke, O; Kempkes, P; Huang, C; Jolly, S

    2014-01-01

    New acceleration technology is mandatory for the future elucidation of fundamental particles and their interactions. A promising approach is to exploit the properties of plasmas. Past research has focused on creating large-amplitude plasma waves by injecting an intense laser pulse or an electron bunch into the plasma. However, the maximum energy gain of electrons accelerated in a single plasma stage is limited by the energy of the driver. Proton bunches are the most promising drivers of wakefields to accelerate electrons to the TeV energy scale in a single stage. An experimental program at CERN—the AWAKE experiment—has been launched to study in detail the important physical processes and to demonstrate the power of proton-driven plasma wakefield acceleration. Here we review the physical principles and some experimental considerations for a future proton-driven plasma wakefield accelerator. (paper)

  4. Fermilab | Particle Physics Division

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diversity Education Safety Sustainability and Environment Contact Science Science Particle Physics Neutrinos Scientific Computing Research & Development Key Discoveries Benefits of Particle Physics Particle Superconducting Test Accelerator LHC and Future Accelerators Accelerators for Science and Society Particle Physics

  5. Basic physics of Alfven instabilities driven by energetic particles in toroidally confined plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heidbrink, W. W.

    2008-01-01

    Superthermal energetic particles (EP) often drive shear Alfven waves unstable in magnetically confined plasmas. These instabilities constitute a fascinating nonlinear system where fluid and kinetic nonlinearities can appear on an equal footing. In addition to basic science, Alfven instabilities are of practical importance, as the expulsion of energetic particles can damage the walls of a confinement device. Because of rapid dispersion, shear Alfven waves that are part of the continuous spectrum are rarely destabilized. However, because the index of refraction is periodic in toroidally confined plasmas, gaps appear in the continuous spectrum. At spatial locations where the radial group velocity vanishes, weakly damped discrete modes appear in these gaps. These eigenmodes are of two types. One type is associated with frequency crossings of counterpropagating waves; the toroidal Alfven eigenmode is a prominent example. The second type is associated with an extremum of the continuous spectrum; the reversed shear Alfven eigenmode is an example of this type. In addition to these normal modes of the background plasma, when the energetic particle pressure is very large, energetic particle modes that adopt the frequency of the energetic particle population occur. Alfven instabilities of all three types occur in every toroidal magnetic confinement device with an intense energetic particle population. The energetic particles are most conveniently described by their constants of motion. Resonances occur between the orbital frequencies of the energetic particles and the wave phase velocity. If the wave resonance with the energetic particle population occurs where the gradient with respect to a constant of motion is inverted, the particles transfer energy to the wave, promoting instability. In a tokamak, the spatial gradient drive associated with inversion of the toroidal canonical angular momentum P ζ is most important. Once a mode is driven unstable, a wide variety of

  6. Particle Physics

    CERN Multimedia

    2005-01-01

    While biomedicine and geoscience use grids to bring together many different sub-disciplines, particle physicists use grid computing to increase computing power and storage resources, and to access and analyze vast amounts of data collected from detectors at the world's most powerful accelerators (1 page)

  7. Particle Physics Education Sites

    Science.gov (United States)

    back to home page Particle Physics Education Sites quick reference Education and Information - National Laboratory Education Programs - Women and Minorities in Physics - Other Physics Sites - Physics Alliance - Accelerators at National Laboratories icon Particle Physics Education and Information sites: top

  8. Fermilab | Science | Particle Physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Photos and videos Latest news For the media Particle Physics Neutrinos Fermilab and the LHC Dark matter initiatives Research and development Key discoveries Benefits of particle physics Particle Accelerators society Particle Physics 101 Science of matter, energy, space and time How particle physics discovery

  9. Computing in plasma physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nuehrenberg, J.

    1986-01-01

    These proceedings contain the articles presented at the named conference. These concern numerical methods for astrophysical plasmas, the numerical simulation of reversed-field pinch dynamics, methods for numerical simulation of ideal MHD stability of axisymmetric plasmas, calculations of the resistive internal m=1 mode in tokamaks, parallel computing and multitasking, particle simulation methods in plasma physics, 2-D Lagrangian studies of symmetry and stability of laser fusion targets, computing of rf heating and current drive in tokamaks, three-dimensional free boundary calculations using a spectral Green's function method, as well as the calculation of three-dimensional MHD equilibria with islands and stochastic regions. See hints under the relevant topics. (HSI)

  10. Plasma particle accelerators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dawson, J.M.

    1988-01-01

    The Superconducting Supercollider (SSC) will require an 87-kilometer accelerator ring to boost particles to 40 TeV. The SSC's size is due in part to the fact that its operating principle is the same one that has dominated accelerator design for 50 years: it guides particles by means of magnetic fields and propels them by strong electric fields. If one were to build an equally powerful but smaller accelerator, one would need to increase the strength of the guiding and propelling fields. Actually, however, conventional technology may not be able to provide significant increases in field strength. There are two reasons. First, the forces from magnetic fields are becoming greater than the structural forces that hold a magnetic material together; the magnets that produce these fields would themselves be torn apart. Second, the energy from electric fields is reaching the energies that bind electrons to atoms; it would tear electrons from nuclei in the accelerator's support structures. It is the electric field problem that plasma accelerators can overcome. Plasma particle accelerators are based on the principle that particles can be accelerated by the electric fields generated within a plasma. Because the plasma has already been ionized, plasma particle accelerators are not susceptible to electron dissociation. They can in theory sustain accelerating fields thousands of times stronger that conventional technologies. So far two methods for creating plasma waves for accelerators have been proposed and tested: the wakefield and the beat wave. Although promising electric fields have been produced, more research is necessary to determine whether plasma particle accelerators can compete with the existing accelerators. 7 figs

  11. Introduction to dusty plasma physics

    CERN Document Server

    Shukla, PK

    2001-01-01

    Introduction to Dusty Plasma Physics contains a detailed description of the occurrence of dusty plasmas in our Solar System, the Earth''s mesosphere, and in laboratory discharges. The book illustrates numerous mechanisms for charging dust particles and provides studies of the grain dynamics under the influence of forces that are common in dusty plasma environments.

  12. Plasma physics and fusion plasma electrodynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Bers, Abraham

    2016-01-01

    Plasma is a ubiquitous state of matter at high temperatures. The electrodynamics of plasmas encompasses a large number of applications, from understanding plasmas in space and the stars, to their use in processing semiconductors, and their role in controlled energy generation by nuclear fusion. This book covers collective and single particle dynamics of plasmas for fully ionized as well as partially ionized plasmas. Many aspects of plasma physics in current fusion energy generation research are addressed both in magnetic and inertial confinement plasmas. Linear and nonlinear dynamics in hydrodynamic and kinetic descriptions are offered, making both simple and complex aspects of the subject available in nearly every chapter. The approach of dividing the basic aspects of plasma physics as "linear, hydrodynamic descriptions" to be covered first because they are "easier", and postponing the "nonlinear and kinetic descriptions" for later because they are "difficult" is abandoned in this book. For teaching purpose...

  13. Basic plasma physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Galeev, A.A.; Sudan, R.N.

    1989-01-01

    Most of the chapters in this book are devoted to the theory of small amplitude perturbations which is the most well developed aspect of the subject. The remaining chapters are concerned with weak nonlinear waves, and collapse and self-focusing of Langmuir waves, two topics of widespread interest and application. A chapter on particle simulation has been included, as that numerical technique plays an essential role in the development an understanding of plasma physics

  14. TEACHING PHYSICS: Teaching particle physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanley, Phil

    2000-09-01

    Particle physics attracts many students who hear of news from CERN or elsewhere in the media. This article examines which current A-level syllabuses include which bits of particle physics and surveys the many different types of resource available to teachers and students.

  15. The division of plasma physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Evans, T.E.; Guilhem, D.; Klepper, C.C.

    1990-07-01

    The investigations presented in the 31th meeting on plasma physics were: the main results and observations during the ergodic divertor experiments in Tore Supra tokamak; the modifications of power scrape-off-length and power deposition during various configurations in Tore Supra plasmas; the results of pressure measurements and particle fluxes in the Tore Supra pump limiter

  16. Particle physics 2012. Highlights and annual report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fleischer, Manfred; Kasemann, Matthias; Medinnis, Michael

    2013-01-01

    The following topics are dealt with: Particle physics at DESY, the work of the Helmholtz alliance concerning the LHC and the ILC, bringing particle physics into people's mind, research at HERA, LHC, and the linear accelerators, plasma wakefield acceleration, astroparticle physics, theory of elementary particles, research projects and scientific infrastructure. (HSI)

  17. Physics of laser plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rubenchik, A.; Witkowski, S.

    1991-01-01

    This book provides a comprehensive review of laser fusion plasma physics and contains the most up-to-date information on high density plasma physics and radiation transport, useful for astrophysicists and high density physicists

  18. Fundamentals of Plasma Physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cargill, P J

    2007-01-01

    The widespread importance of plasmas in many areas of contemporary physics makes good textbooks in the field that are both introductory and comprehensive invaluable. This new book by Paul Bellen from CalTech by and large meets these goals. It covers the traditional textbook topics such as particle orbits, the derivation of the MHD equations from Vlasov theory, cold and warm plasma waves, Landau damping, as well as in the later chapters less common subjects such as magnetic helicity, nonlinear processes and dusty plasmas. The book is clearly written, neatly presented, and each chapter has a number of exercises or problems at their end. The author has also thankfully steered clear of the pitfall of filling the book with his own research results. The preface notes that the book is designed to provide an introduction to plasma physics for final year undergraduate and post-graduate students. However, it is difficult to see many physics undergraduates now at UK universities getting to grips with much of the content since their mathematics is not of a high enough standard. Students in Applied Mathematics departments would certainly fare better. An additional problem for the beginner is that some of the chapters do not lead the reader gently into a subject, but begin with quite advanced concepts. Being a multi-disciplinary subject, beginners tend to find plasma physics quite hard enough even when done simply. For postgraduate students these criticisms fade away and this book provides an excellent introduction. More senior researchers should also enjoy the book, especially Chapters 11-17 where more advanced topics are discussed. I found myself continually comparing the book with my favourite text for many years, 'The Physics of Plasmas' by T J M Boyd and J J Sanderson, reissued by Cambridge University Press in 2003. Researchers would want both books on their shelves, both for the different ways basic plasma physics is covered, and the diversity of more advanced topics. For

  19. Plasma physics an introduction

    CERN Document Server

    Fitzpatrick, Richard

    2014-01-01

    Plasma Physics: An Introduction is based on a series of university course lectures by a leading name in the field, and thoroughly covers the physics of the fourth state of matter. This book looks at non-relativistic, fully ionized, nondegenerate, quasi-neutral, and weakly coupled plasma. Intended for the student market, the text provides a concise and cohesive introduction to plasma physics theory, and offers a solid foundation for students wishing to take higher level courses in plasma physics.

  20. Concepts of particle physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gottfried, K.; Weisskopf, V.F.

    1984-01-01

    This volume elucidates basic and well-established concepts of particle physics for the autodidact who is curious about recent developments in fundamental physics. Elementary quantum mechanics is a background must. Contents, abridged: The evolution of the particle concept before the advent of quantum mechanics. Nonrelativistic quantum mechanics and atomic physics. Relativistic quantum theory. Nuclear phenomena. Subnuclear phenomena. Index

  1. Renormalization and plasma physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krommes, J.A.

    1980-02-01

    A review is given of modern theories of statistical dynamics as applied to problems in plasma physics. The derivation of consistent renormalized kinetic equations is discussed, first heuristically, later in terms of powerful functional techniques. The equations are illustrated with models of various degrees of idealization, including the exactly soluble stochastic oscillator, a prototype for several important applications. The direct-interaction approximation is described in detail. Applications discussed include test particle diffusion and the justification of quasilinear theory, convective cells, E vector x B vector turbulence, the renormalized dielectric function, phase space granulation, and stochastic magnetic fields

  2. Renormalization and plasma physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krommes, J.A.

    1980-02-01

    A review is given of modern theories of statistical dynamics as applied to problems in plasma physics. The derivation of consistent renormalized kinetic equations is discussed, first heuristically, later in terms of powerful functional techniques. The equations are illustrated with models of various degrees of idealization, including the exactly soluble stochastic oscillator, a prototype for several important applications. The direct-interaction approximation is described in detail. Applications discussed include test particle diffusion and the justification of quasilinear theory, convective cells, E vector x B vector turbulence, the renormalized dielectric function, phase space granulation, and stochastic magnetic fields.

  3. Particle physics experiments 1983

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stuart, G.W.

    1983-01-01

    The report describes work carried out in 1983 on experiments approved by the Particle Physics Experiments Selection Panel. The contents consist of unedited contributions from each experiment. (author)

  4. Particle Physics & Astrophysics (PPA)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Scientists at SLAC's Particle Physics and Astrophysics develop and utilize unique instruments from underground to outer space to explore the ultimate laws of nature...

  5. History of Particle Physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    back to history page Back Particle Physics Timeline For over two thousand years people have thought the Standard Model. We invite you to explore this history of particle physics with a focus on the : Quantum Theory 1964 - Present: The Modern View (the Standard Model) back to history page Back Sections of

  6. Astro-particle-physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salam, A.

    1985-09-01

    Opening remarks at the Fourth Marcel Grossman Meeting, 17-21 June 1985, in Rome, Italy, are reported. The meeting was concerned with the symbiosis of cosmology and particle physics. Numerous connections between work in particle physics and cosmology, in both experimental and theoretical areas, are pointed out

  7. Teaching particle physics

    CERN Document Server

    Hanley, P

    2000-01-01

    Particle physics attracts many students who hear of news from CERN or elsewhere in the media. This article examines which current A-level syllabuses include which bits of particle physics and surveys the many different types of resource available to teachers and students. (0 refs).

  8. Vol. 6: Plasma Physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sitenko, A.

    1993-01-01

    Problems of modern physics and the situation with physical research in Ukraine are considered. Programme of the conference includes scientific and general problems. Its proceeding are published in 6 volumes. The papers presented in this volume refer to plasma physics

  9. Contemporary plasma physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sodha, M.S.; Tewari, D.P.; Subbarao, D.

    1983-01-01

    The book consists of review articles on some selected contemporary aspects of plasma physics. The selected topics present a panoramic view of contemporary plasma physics and applications to fusion, space and MHD power generation. Basic non-linear plasma theory is also covered. The book is supposed to be useful for M.S./M.Sc. students specialising in plasma physics and for those beginning research work in plasma physics. It will also serve as a valuable reference book for more advanced research workers. (M.G.B.)

  10. Particle acceleration by plasma waves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Joshi, C.

    2006-01-01

    In an advanced particle accelerator particles are driven near by light velocity through ionized gas. Such plasma devices are compact, cost efficient and usable in many fields. Examples are given in detail. (GL)

  11. Cosmology and particle physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steigman, G [California Univ., Santa Barbara (USA). Inst. for Theoretical Physics; Bartol Research Foundation, Newark, Delaware (USA))

    1982-01-29

    The cosmic connections between physics on the very largest and very smallest scales are reviewed with an emphasis on the symbiotic relation between elementary particle physics and cosmology. After a review of the early Universe as a cosmic accelerator, various cosmological and astrophysical constraints on models of particle physics are outlined. To illustrate this approach to particle physics via cosmology, reference is made to several areas of current research: baryon non-conservation and baryon asymmetry; free quarks, heavy hadrons and other exotic relics; primordial nucleosynthesis and neutrino masses.

  12. 3D particle tracking velocimetry using dynamic discrete tomography for plasma physics applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moseev, Dmitry; Alpers, Andreas; Gritzmann, Peter

    2013-01-01

    tomography algorithm is efficient for data from two projection directions and exact. The non-uniqueness can be detected and tracked individually. The algorithm performance is proportional to N3 on average where N is the number of particles in the reconstruction. There is a room for further improvement...

  13. Theoretical Studies of Drift-Alfven and Energetic Particle Physics in Fusion Plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu Chen

    2005-07-06

    Nonlinear equations for the slow space-time evolution of the radial drift-wave envelope and zonal flow amplitude have been self-consistently derived for a model nonuniform tokamak equilibrium within the coherent four-wave drift wave-zonal flow modulation interaction model of Chen, Lin, and White [Phys. Plasmas 7, 3129 (2000)]. Solutions clearly demonstrate turbulence spreading due to nonlinearly dispersiveness and, consequently, the device-size dependence of the saturated wave intensities and transport coefficients.

  14. Plasma Physics An Introduction to Laboratory, Space, and Fusion Plasmas

    CERN Document Server

    Piel, Alexander

    2010-01-01

    Plasma Physics gives a comprehensive introduction to the basic processes in plasmas and demonstrates that the same fundamental concepts describe cold gas-discharge plasmas, space plasmas, and hot fusion plasmas. Starting from particle drifts in magnetic fields, the principles of magnetic confinement fusion are explained and compared with laser fusion. Collective processes are discussed in terms of plasma waves and instabilities. The concepts of plasma description by magnetohydrodynamics, kinetic theory, and particle simulation are stepwise introduced. Space charge effects in sheath regions, double layers and plasma diodes are given the necessary attention. The new fundamental mechanisms of dusty plasmas are explored and integrated into the framework of conventional plasmas. The book concludes with a brief introduction to plasma discharges. Written by an internationally renowned researcher in experimental plasma physics, the text keeps the mathematical apparatus simple and emphasizes the underlying concepts. T...

  15. First experience with particle-in-cell plasma physics code on ARM-based HPC systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sáez, Xavier; Soba, Alejandro; Sánchez, Edilberto; Mantsinen, Mervi; Mateo, Sergi; Cela, José M.; Castejón, Francisco

    2015-09-01

    In this work, we will explore the feasibility of porting a Particle-in-cell code (EUTERPE) to an ARM multi-core platform from the Mont-Blanc project. The used prototype is based on a system-on-chip Samsung Exynos 5 with an integrated GPU. It is the first prototype that could be used for High-Performance Computing (HPC), since it supports double precision and parallel programming languages.

  16. Introduction to Plasma Physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurnett, Donald A.; Bhattacharjee, Amitava

    2017-03-01

    Preface; 1. Introduction; 2. Characteristic parameters of a plasma; 3. Single particle motions; 4. Waves in a cold plasma; 5. Kinetic theory and the moment equations; 6. Magnetohydrodynamics; 7. MHD equilibria and stability; 8. Discontinuities and shock waves; 9. Electrostatic waves in a hot unmagnetized plasma; 10. Waves in a hot magnetized plasma; 11. Nonlinear effects; 12. Collisional processes; Appendix A. Symbols; Appendix B. Useful trigonometric identities; Appendix C. Vector differential operators; Appendix D. Vector calculus identities; Index.

  17. Dusty-Plasma Particle Accelerator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foster, John E.

    2005-01-01

    A dusty-plasma apparatus is being investigated as means of accelerating nanometer- and micrometer-sized particles. Applications for the dusty-plasma particle accelerators fall into two classes: Simulation of a variety of rapidly moving dust particles and micrometeoroids in outer-space environments that include micrometeoroid streams, comet tails, planetary rings, and nebulae and Deposition or implantation of nanoparticles on substrates for diverse industrial purposes that could include hardening, increasing thermal insulation, altering optical properties, and/or increasing permittivities of substrate materials. Relative to prior apparatuses used for similar applications, dusty-plasma particle accelerators offer such potential advantages as smaller size, lower cost, less complexity, and increased particle flux densities. A dusty-plasma particle accelerator exploits the fact that an isolated particle immersed in plasma acquires a net electric charge that depends on the relative mobilities of electrons and ions. Typically, a particle that is immersed in a low-temperature, partially ionized gas, wherein the average kinetic energy of electrons exceeds that of ions, causes the particle to become negatively charged. The particle can then be accelerated by applying an appropriate electric field. A dusty-plasma particle accelerator (see figure) includes a plasma source such as a radio-frequency induction discharge apparatus containing (1) a shallow cup with a biasable electrode to hold the particles to be accelerated and (2) a holder for the substrate on which the particles are to impinge. Depending on the specific design, a pair of electrostatic-acceleration grids between the substrate and discharge plasma can be used to both collimate and further accelerate particles exiting the particle holder. Once exposed to the discharge plasma, the particles in the cup quickly acquire a negative charge. Application of a negative voltage pulse to the biasable electrode results in the

  18. Electromagnetic ''particle-in-cell'' plasma simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Langdon, A.B.

    1985-01-01

    ''PIC'' simulation tracks particles through electromagnetic fields calculated self-consistently from the charge and current densities of the particles themselves, external sources, and boundaries. Already used extensively in plasma physics, such simulations have become useful in the design of accelerators and their r.f. sources. 5 refs

  19. Experimental plasma physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dreicer, H.; Banton, M.E.; Ingraham, J.C.; Wittman, F.; Wright, B.L.

    1976-01-01

    The Experimental Plasma Physics group's main efforts continue to be directed toward the understanding of the mechanisms of electromagnetic energy absorption in a plasma, and the resultant plasma heating and energy transport. The high-frequency spectrum of plasma waves parametrically excited by the microwave signal at high powers has been measured. The absorption of a small test microwave signal in a plasma made parametrically unstable by a separate high-power driver microwave signal was also studied

  20. Physics of Space Plasma Activity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cramer, N F

    2007-01-01

    This book provides a timely review of our present understanding of plasma phenomena in magnetized terrestrial and solar space plasmas. The author's emphasis is on the fluid and particle modeling and interpretation of observed active processes in space plasmas, i.e. 'the physical background of large plasma eruptions in space'. It is somewhat alarming for a plasma physicist to read that an emphasis on processes in spatially inhomogeneous plasmas means that the work '... excludes a considerable fraction of the available methods in space plasma physics, such as the theory of waves, instabilities and wave particle interactions on a homogeneous background', particularly in light of the fact that much of our knowledge of these plasmas is derived from observations of such waves. However, it is clear on reading the book that such a restriction is not a disadvantage, but allows the author to concentrate on the main theme of the book, namely the use of fluid and particle pictures to model the equilibrium and active states of space plasmas. There are many other books which cover the wave aspects of space plasmas, and would complement this book. The book's coverage is based on the extensive and profound research of the author and his colleagues in the area of fluid and particle modeling of space plasma structures. After an introduction to the physical setting of active plasmas, and a necessarily concise, but effective, discussion of the fluid and particle models to be used, the steady states of the magnetized plasmas of interest are treated, including the magnetosphere, solar plasmas and current sheets. Next the dynamics of unstable states is covered, including MHD and tearing instabilities, and nonlinear aspects, with a detailed discussion of magnetic reconnection. Finally, the models are applied to magnetospheric and solar observations. The book is attractively written and produced, and this reviewer managed to find a minimum number of errors. A particularly attractive

  1. Modern particle physics

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2079874

    2013-01-01

    Unique in its coverage of all aspects of modern particle physics, this textbook provides a clear connection between the theory and recent experimental results, including the discovery of the Higgs boson at CERN. It provides a comprehensive and self-contained description of the Standard Model of particle physics suitable for upper-level undergraduate students and graduate students studying experimental particle physics. Physical theory is introduced in a straightforward manner with full mathematical derivations throughout. Fully-worked examples enable students to link the mathematical theory to results from modern particle physics experiments. End-of-chapter exercises, graded by difficulty, provide students with a deeper understanding of the subject. Online resources available at www.cambridge.org/MPP feature password-protected fully-worked solutions to problems for instructors, numerical solutions and hints to the problems for students and PowerPoint slides and JPEGs of figures from the book

  2. First experience with particle-in-cell plasma physics code on ARM-based HPC systems

    OpenAIRE

    Sáez, Xavier; Soba, Alejandro; Sánchez, Edilberto; Mantsinen, Mervi; Mateo, Sergio; Cela, José M.; Castejón, Francisco

    2015-01-01

    In this work, we will explore the feasibility of porting a Particle-in-cell code (EUTERPE) to an ARM multi-core platform from the Mont-Blanc project. The used prototype is based on a system-on-chip Samsung Exynos 5 with an integrated GPU. It is the first prototype that could be used for High-Performance Computing (HPC), since it supports double precision and parallel programming languages. The research leading to these results has received funding from the European Com- munity's Seventh...

  3. Physical domains in plasma physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liboff, R.L.

    1987-01-01

    Do the plasma in the sun's core and the electron-conduction plasma in a semiconductor behave in the same way? This question is both fundamental and practical, for plasma physics plays a role in a vast area of natural phenomena and in many engineering devices. Understanding the cosmos, or designing a computer chip or a thermonuclear fusion reactor, requires first of all a realization of equations of motion that are appropriate to the particular problem. Similar physical differences occur in engineered structures. The plasmas in most thermonuclear fusion devices are basically like the plasma in the core of the sun: weakly coupled and classical - that is, obeying Newton's laws and Maxwell's equations. The conduction electrons in a semiconductor, on the other hand, obey the laws of quantum mechanics

  4. Plasma based charged-particle accelerators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bingham, R; Mendonca, J T; Shukla, P K

    2004-01-01

    Studies of charged-particle acceleration processes remain one of the most important areas of research in laboratory, space and astrophysical plasmas. In this paper, we present the underlying physics and the present status of high gradient and high energy plasma accelerators. We will focus on the acceleration of charged particles to relativistic energies by plasma waves that are created by intense laser and particle beams. The generation of relativistic plasma waves by intense lasers or electron beams in plasmas is important in the quest for producing ultra-high acceleration gradients for accelerators. With the development of compact short pulse high brightness lasers and electron positron beams, new areas of studies for laser/particle beam-matter interactions is opening up. A number of methods are being pursued vigorously to achieve ultra-high acceleration gradients. These include the plasma beat wave accelerator mechanism, which uses conventional long pulse (∼100 ps) modest intensity lasers (I ∼ 10 14 -10 16 W cm -2 ), the laser wakefield accelerator (LWFA), which uses the new breed of compact high brightness lasers ( 10 18 W cm -2 , the self-modulated LWFA concept, which combines elements of stimulated Raman forward scattering, and electron acceleration by nonlinear plasma waves excited by relativistic electron and positron bunches. In the ultra-high intensity regime, laser/particle beam-plasma interactions are highly nonlinear and relativistic, leading to new phenomena such as the plasma wakefield excitation for particle acceleration, relativistic self-focusing and guiding of laser beams, high-harmonic generation, acceleration of electrons, positrons, protons and photons. Fields greater than 1 GV cm -1 have been generated with particles being accelerated to 200 MeV over a distance of millimetre. Plasma wakefields driven by positron beams at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center facility have accelerated the tail of the positron beam. In the near future

  5. Particle physics experiments 1989

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bairstow, R.

    1990-01-01

    This report describes work carried out in 1989 on experiments approved by the Particle Physics Experiments Selection Panel of Rutherford Appleton Laboratory. The contents consist of unedited contributions from each experiment. (author)

  6. Particle physics experiments 1987

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stuart, G.W.

    1988-01-01

    This report describes work carried out in 1987 on experiments approved by the Particle Physics Experiments Selection Panel (United Kingdom). The contents consist of unedited contributions from each experiment. (author)

  7. Particle physics experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stuart, G.W.

    1986-01-01

    The report of the Rutherford Appleton Laboratory describes the work carried out in 1985 on experiments approved by the Particle Physics Experiments Selection Panel. The contents consist of unedited contributions from each experiment. (author)

  8. Particle physics experiments 1984

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stuart, G.

    1985-01-01

    The Rutherford Appleton laboratory report describes work carried out in 1984 on experiments approved by the Particle Physics selection panel. The contents consist of unedited contributions from each experiment. (author)

  9. RESEARCH IN PARTICLE PHYSICS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kearns, Edward [Boston Universiy

    2013-07-12

    This is the final report for the Department of Energy Grant to Principal Investigators in Experimental and Theoretical Particle Physics at Boston University. The research performed was in the Energy Frontier at the LHC, the Intensity Frontier at Super-Kamiokande and T2K, the Cosmic Frontier and detector R&D in dark matter detector development, and in particle theory.

  10. Introduction to particle physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zitoun, R.

    2000-01-01

    This book proposes an introduction to particle physics that requires only a high-school level mathematical knowledge. Elementary particles (leptons, quarks, bosons) are presented according to a modern view taking into account of their symmetries and interactions. The author shows how physicists have elaborated the standard model and what are its implications in cosmology. (J.S.)

  11. Particle physics and cosmology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Turner, M.S.; Schramm, D.N.

    1985-01-01

    During the past year, the research of the members of our group has spanned virtually all the topics at the interface of cosmology and particle physics: inflationary Universe scenarios, astrophysical and cosmological constraints on particle properties, ultra-high energy cosmic ray physics, quantum field theory in curved space-time, cosmology with extra dimensions, superstring cosmology, neutrino astronomy with large, underground detectors, and the formation of structure in the Universe

  12. Fermilab | Science | Particle Physics | Benefits of Particle Physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Photos and videos Latest news For the media Particle Physics Neutrinos Fermilab and the LHC Dark matter initiatives Research and development Key discoveries Benefits of particle physics Particle Accelerators society Particle Physics 101 Science of matter, energy, space and time How particle physics discovery

  13. Center for Gyrokinetic/MHD Hybrid Simulation of Energetic Particle Physics in Toroidal Plasmas (CSEPP). Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Yang

    2012-01-01

    At Colorado University-Boulder the primary task is to extend our gyrokinetic Particle-in-Cell simulation of tokamak micro-turbulence and transport to the area of energetic particle physics. We have implemented a gyrokinetic ion/massless fluid electron hybrid model in the global δf-PIC code GEM, and benchmarked the code with analytic results on the thermal ion radiative damping rate of Toroidal Alfven Eigenmodes (TAE) and with mode frequency and spatial structure from eigenmode analysis. We also performed nonlinear simulations of both a single-n mode (n is the toroidal mode number) and multiple-n modes, and in the case of single-n, benchmarked the code on the saturation amplitude vs. particle collision rate with analytical theory. Most simulations use the f method for both ions species, but we have explored the full-f method for energetic particles in cases where the burst amplitude of the excited instabilities is large as to cause significant re-distribution or loss of the energetic particles. We used the hybrid model to study the stability of high-n TAEs in ITER. Our simulations show that the most unstable modes in ITER lie in the rage of 10 α (0) = 0.7% for the fully shaped ITER equilibrium. We also carried nonlinear simulations of the most unstable n = 15 mode and found that the saturation amplitude for the nominal ITER discharge is too low to cause large redistribution or loss of alpha particles. To include kinetic electron effects in the hybrid model we have studied a kinetic electron closure scheme for the fluid electron model. The most important element of the closure scheme is a complete Ohm's law for the parallel electric field E || , derived by combining the quasi-neutrality condition, the Ampere's equation and the v || moment of the gyrokinetic equations. A discretization method for the closure scheme is studied in detail for a three-dimensional shear-less slab plasma. It is found that for long-wavelength shear Alfven waves the kinetic closure scheme

  14. Applied plasma physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1979-01-01

    Applied Plasma Physics is a major sub-organizational unit of the Magnetic Fusion Energy (MFE) Program. It includes Fusion Plasma Theory and Experimental Plasma Research. The Fusion Plasma Theory group has the responsibility for developing theoretical-computational models in the general areas of plasma properties, equilibrium, stability, transport, and atomic physics. This group has responsibility for giving guidance to the mirror experimental program. There is a formal division of the group into theory and computational; however, in this report the efforts of the two areas are not separated since many projects have contributions from members of both. Under the Experimental Plasma Research Program we are developing a neutral-beam source, the intense, pulsed ion-neutral source (IPINS), for the generation of a reversed-field configuration on 2XIIB. We are also studying the feasibility of using certain neutron-detection techniques as plasma diagnostics in the next generation of thermonuclear experiments

  15. Applied plasma physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1978-01-01

    Applied Plasma Physics is a major sub-organizational unit of the MFE Program. It includes Fusion Plasma Theory and Experimental Plasma Research. The Fusion Plasma Theory group has the responsibility for developing theoretical-computational models in the general areas of plasma properties, equilibrium, stability, transport, and atomic physics. This group has responsibility for giving guidance to the mirror experimental program. There is a formal division of the group into theory and computational; however, in this report the efforts of the two areas are not separated since many projects have contributions from members of both. Under the Experimental Plasma Research Program, we are developing the intense, pulsed neutral-beam source (IPINS) for the generation of a reversed-field configuration on 2XIIB. We are also studying the feasibility of utilizing certain neutron-detection techniques as plasma diagnostics in the next generation of thermonuclear experiments

  16. Particle physics and cosmology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kolb, E.W.

    1986-10-01

    This series of lectures is about the role of particle physics in physical processes that occurred in the very early stages of the bug gang. Of particular interest is the role of particle physics in determining the evolution of the early Universe, and the effect of particle physics on the present structure of the Universe. The use of the big bang as a laboratory for placing limits on new particle physics theories will also be discussed. Section 1 reviews the standard cosmology, including primordial nucleosynthesis. Section 2 reviews the decoupling of weakly interacting particles in the early Universe, and discusses neutrino cosmology and the resulting limits that may be placed on the mass and lifetime of massive neutrinos. Section 3 discusses the evolution of the vacuum through phase transitions in the early Universe and the formation of topological defects in the transitions. Section 4 covers recent work on the generation of the baryon asymmetry by baryon-number violating reactions in Grand Unified Theories, and mentions some recent work on baryon number violation effects at the electroweak transition. Section 5 is devoted to theories of cosmic inflation. Finally, Section 6 is a discussion of the role of extra spatial dimensions in the evolution of the early Universe. 78 refs., 32 figs., 6 tabs

  17. Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1990-01-01

    This report discusses the following topics: principal parameters achieved in experimental devices fiscal year 1990; tokamak fusion test reactor; compact ignition tokamak; Princeton beta experiment- modification; current drive experiment-upgrade; international collaboration; x-ray laser studies; spacecraft glow experiment; plasma processing: deposition and etching of thin films; theoretical studies; tokamak modeling; international thermonuclear experimental reactor; engineering department; project planning and safety office; quality assurance and reliability; technology transfer; administrative operations; PPPL patent invention disclosures for fiscal year 1990; graduate education; plasma physics; graduate education: plasma science and technology; science education program; and Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory reports fiscal year 1990.

  18. Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-01-01

    This report discusses the following topics: principal parameters achieved in experimental devices fiscal year 1990; tokamak fusion test reactor; compact ignition tokamak; Princeton beta experiment- modification; current drive experiment-upgrade; international collaboration; x-ray laser studies; spacecraft glow experiment; plasma processing: deposition and etching of thin films; theoretical studies; tokamak modeling; international thermonuclear experimental reactor; engineering department; project planning and safety office; quality assurance and reliability; technology transfer; administrative operations; PPPL patent invention disclosures for fiscal year 1990; graduate education; plasma physics; graduate education: plasma science and technology; science education program; and Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory reports fiscal year 1990

  19. Nonlinear Physics of Plasmas

    CERN Document Server

    Kono, Mitsuo

    2010-01-01

    A nonlinearity is one of the most important notions in modern physics. A plasma is rich in nonlinearities and provides a variety of behaviors inherent to instabilities, coherent wave structures and turbulence. The book covers the basic concepts and mathematical methods, necessary to comprehend nonlinear problems widely encountered in contemporary plasmas, but also in other fields of physics and current research on self-organized structures and magnetized plasma turbulence. The analyses make use of strongly nonlinear models solved by analytical techniques backed by extensive simulations and available experiments. The text is written for senior undergraduates, graduate students, lecturers and researchers in laboratory, space and fusion plasmas.

  20. Plasma physics an introduction to laboratory, space, and fusion plasmas

    CERN Document Server

    Piel, Alexander

    2017-01-01

    The enlarged new edition of this textbook provides a comprehensive introduction to the basic processes in plasmas and demonstrates that the same fundamental concepts describe cold gas-discharge plasmas, space plasmas, and hot fusion plasmas. Starting from particle drifts in magnetic fields, the principles of magnetic confinement fusion are explained and compared with laser fusion. Collective processes are discussed in terms of plasma waves and instabilities. The concepts of plasma description by magnetohydrodynamics, kinetic theory, and particle simulation are stepwise introduced. Space charge effects in sheath regions, double layers and plasma diodes are given the necessary attention. The novel fundamental mechanisms of dusty plasmas are explored and integrated into the framework of conventional plasmas. The book concludes with a concise description of modern plasma discharges. Written by an internationally renowned researcher in experimental plasma physics, the text keeps the mathematical apparatus simple a...

  1. Particle physics experiments 1986

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stuart, G.W.

    1987-01-01

    The paper presents research work carried out in 1986 on 52 elementary particle experiments approved by the Particle Physics Experiments Selection Panel. Most of the experiments were collaborative and involved research groups from different countries. About half of the experiments were conducted at CERN, the remaining experiments employed the accelerators: LAMPT, LEP, PETRA, SLAC, and HERA. The contents consist of unedited contributions from each experiment. (U.K.)

  2. Cosmology and particle physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barrow, J.D.

    1982-01-01

    A brief overview is given of recent work that integrates cosmology and particle physics. The observational data regarding the abundance of matter and radiation in the Universe is described. The manner in which the cosmological survival density of stable massive particles can be calculated is discussed along with the process of cosmological nucleosynthesis. Several applications of these general arguments are given with reference to the survival density of nucleons, neutrinos and unconfined fractionally charge particles. The use of nucleosynthesis to limit the number of lepton generations is described together with the implications of a small neutrino mass for the origin of galaxies and clusters. (Auth.)

  3. Particle physics and cosmology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Srednicki, M.

    1990-01-01

    At least eighty percent of the mass of the universe consists of some material which, unlike ordinary matter, neither emits nor absorbs light. This book collects key papers related to the discovery of this astonishing fact and its profound implications for astrophysics, cosmology, and the physics of elementary particles. The book focusses on the likely possibility that the dark matter is composed of an as yet undiscovered elementary particle, and examines the boundaries of our present knowledge of the properties such a particle must possess. (author). refs.; figs.; tabs

  4. Plasma physics and nuclear fusion research

    CERN Document Server

    Gill, Richard D

    1981-01-01

    Plasma Physics and Nuclear Fusion Research covers the theoretical and experimental aspects of plasma physics and nuclear fusion. The book starts by providing an overview and survey of plasma physics; the theory of the electrodynamics of deformable media and magnetohydrodynamics; and the particle orbit theory. The text also describes the plasma waves; the kinetic theory; the transport theory; and the MHD stability theory. Advanced theories such as microinstabilities, plasma turbulence, anomalous transport theory, and nonlinear laser plasma interaction theory are also considered. The book furthe

  5. Plasma technology for powder particles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kranz, E. (Technische Hochschule, Ilmenau (German Democratic Republic))

    1983-03-01

    A survey is given of principles and applications of plasma spraying and of powder transformation and generation in plasma considering spheroidization, grain size transformation, powder particle formation, powder reduction, and melting within the power range of 10/sup 3/ to 10/sup 7/ W. The products are applied in many industrial fields such as nuclear engineering, hard metal production, metallurgy, catalysis, and semiconductor techniques.

  6. Research in particle physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-08-01

    This proposal presents the research accomplishments and ongoing activities of Boston University researchers in high energy physics. Some changes have been made in the structure of the program from the previous arrangement of tasks. Task B, Accelerator Design Physics, is being submitted as a separate proposal for an independent grant; this will be consistent with the nature of the research and the source of funding. We are active in seven principal areas which will be discussed in this report: Colliding Beams - physics of e + e - and bar pp collisions; MACRO Experiment - search for magnetic monopoles and study of cosmic rays; Proton Decay - search for nucleon instability and study of neutrino interactions; Particle Theory - theoretical high energy particle physics, including two Outstanding Junior Investigator awards; Muon G-2 - measurement of the anomalous magnetic moment of the muon; SSCintcal - calorimetry for the GEM Experiment; and Muon detectors for the GEM Experiment

  7. Scattering of electromagnetic waves into plasma oscillations via plasma particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin, A.T.; Dawson, J.M.

    1975-01-01

    A plasma subjected to an intense electromagnetic wave can exhibit a large number of parametric instabilities. An interesting example which has received little attention is the decay of the electromagnetic wave into a plasma oscillation with the excess energy and momentum being carried off by electrons. This process has been simulated on a one-and-two-halves dimensional electromagnetic code. The incident electromagnetic wave had a frequency near the plasma frequency so that decay into a plasma oscillation and a backscattered electromagnetic wave was excluded. As expected, the threshold for this instability was very large , so it is unlikely that this instability is competitive in most laser plasmas. Nevertheless, the physical mechanism involved provides a means for absorption of laser light and acceleration of particles in a plasma containing large amplitude plasma oscillations

  8. Forecasting report. Particle physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The present status of particle and antiparticle physics is examined. As for electromagnetic interactions, the quantum electrodynamics theory is briefly reviewed and the various types of hadronic electromagnetic interactions classified. The theoretical approaches of strong interactions are outlined with hadron spectroscopy. Dynamical models and high energy phenomena are presented. The theoretical problems of weak interaction physics are examined with some experimental aspects. Experimental investigations of the hadron internal structure are briefly surveyed [fr

  9. Experimental studies of particle acceleration with ultra-intense lasers - Applications to nuclear physics experiments involving laser-produced plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Plaisir, C.

    2010-11-01

    For the last ten years, the Ultra High Intensity Lasers offer the opportunity to produce accelerated particle beams which contain more than 10 12 electrons, protons accelerated into a few ps. We have simulated and developed some diagnostics based on nuclear activation to characterize both the angular and the energy distributions of the particle beams produced with intense lasers. The characterization methods which are presented are illustrated by means of results obtained in different experiments. We would use the particle beams produced to excite nuclear state in a plasma environment. It can modify intrinsic characteristics of the nuclei such as the half-life of some isomeric states. To prepare this kind of experiments, we have measured the nuclear reaction cross section (gamma,n) to produce the isomeric state of the 84 Rb, which has an excitation energy of 463 keV, with the electron accelerator ELSA of CEA/DIF in Bruyeres-le-Chatel (France). (author)

  10. Particle physics and cosmology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ellis, J.; Nanopoulos, D.

    1983-01-01

    The authors describe the connection between cosmology and particle physics in an introductory way. In this connection the big bang theory and unified gauge models of strong, electromagnetic, and weak interactions are considered. Furthermore cosmological nucleosynthesis is discussed in this framework, and the problem of cosmic neutrinos is considered with special regards to its rest mass. (HSI).

  11. Particle physics experiments 1982

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rousseau, M.D.; Stuart, G.

    1983-01-01

    Work carried out in 1982 on 52 experiments approved by the Particle Physics Experiments Selection Panel is described. Each experiment is listed under title, collaboration, technique, accelerator, year of running, status and spokesman. Unedited contributions are given from each experiment. (U.K.)

  12. Particle physics experiments 1988

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bairstow, R.

    1989-01-01

    This report describes work carried out in 1988 on experiments approved by the Particle Physics Experiments Selection Panel. The contents consist of unedited contributions from each experiment. More than forty projects at different accelerators (SPS, ISIS, PETRA, LAMPF, LEP, HERA, BNL, ILL, LEAR) are listed. Different organisations collaborate on different projects. A brief progress report is given. References to published articles are given. (author)

  13. Particle physics experiments 1992

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roberts, B.A.

    1993-03-01

    The research programs described here were carried out in 1992 at Rutherford Appleton Laboratory and funded by the United Kingdom Science and Engineering Research Council. The area covered in these experiments is particle physics. Unedited contributions from over forty experimental programs are included. Experiments are listed according to their current status, the accelerator used and its years of operation. (UK)

  14. Elementary particles physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-01-01

    It is discussed the physics in Brazil in the next decade with regard to elementary particles and field theories. The situation of brazilian research institutes as well as its personnel is also presented. Some recommendations and financing of new projects are also considered. (A.C.A.S.)

  15. Atomic and plasma-material interaction data for fusion. V. 7, part B. Particle induced erosion of Be, C and W in fusion plasmas. Part B: Physical sputtering and radiation-enhanced sublimation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eckstein, W.; Stephens, J.A.; Clark, R.E.H.; Davis, J.W.; Haasz, A.A.; Vietzke, E.; Hirooka, Y.

    2001-01-01

    The present volume of Atomic and Plasma-Material Interaction Data for Fusion is devoted to a critical review of the physical sputtering and radiation enhanced sublimation (RES) behaviour of fusion plasma-facing materials, in particular carbon, beryllium and tungsten. The present volume is intended to provide fusion reactor designers a detailed survey and parameterization of existing, critically assessed data for the chemical erosion of plasma-facing materials by particle impact. The survey and data compilation is presented for a variety of materials containing the elements C, Be and W (including dopants in carbon materials) and impacting plasma species. The dependencies of physical sputtering and RES yields on the material temperature, incident projectile energy, and incident flux are considered. The main data compilation is presented as separate data sheets indicating the material, impacting plasma species, experimental conditions, and parameterizations in terms of analytic functions

  16. Nongyrotropic particle distributions in space plasmas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    U. Motschmann

    Full Text Available In nonstationary, strong inhomogeneous or open plasmas particle orbits are rather complicated. If the nonstationary time scale is smaller than the gyration period, if the inhomogeneity scale is smaller than the gyration radius, i.e. at magnetic plasma boundaries, or if the plasma has sources and sinks in phase space, then nongyrotropic distribution functions occur. The stability of such plasma configurations is studied in the framework of linear dispersion theory. In an open plasma nongyrotropy drives unstable waves parallel and perpendicular to the background magnetic field, whereas in the gyrotropic limit the plasma is stable. In nonstationary plasmas nongyrotropy drives perpendicular unstable waves only. Temporal modulation couples a seed mode with its side lobes and thus it renders unstable wave growth more difficult. As an example of an inhomogeneous plasma a magnetic halfspace is discussed. In a layer with thickness of the thermal proton gyroradius a nongyrotropic distribution is formed which may excite unstable parallel and perpendicular propagating waves.

    Key words. Interplanetary physics (plasma waves and turbulence · Ionosphere (plasma waves and instabilities · Magnetospheric physics (plasma waves and instabilities

  17. Nongyrotropic particle distributions in space plasmas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    U. Motschmann

    1999-05-01

    Full Text Available In nonstationary, strong inhomogeneous or open plasmas particle orbits are rather complicated. If the nonstationary time scale is smaller than the gyration period, if the inhomogeneity scale is smaller than the gyration radius, i.e. at magnetic plasma boundaries, or if the plasma has sources and sinks in phase space, then nongyrotropic distribution functions occur. The stability of such plasma configurations is studied in the framework of linear dispersion theory. In an open plasma nongyrotropy drives unstable waves parallel and perpendicular to the background magnetic field, whereas in the gyrotropic limit the plasma is stable. In nonstationary plasmas nongyrotropy drives perpendicular unstable waves only. Temporal modulation couples a seed mode with its side lobes and thus it renders unstable wave growth more difficult. As an example of an inhomogeneous plasma a magnetic halfspace is discussed. In a layer with thickness of the thermal proton gyroradius a nongyrotropic distribution is formed which may excite unstable parallel and perpendicular propagating waves.Key words. Interplanetary physics (plasma waves and turbulence · Ionosphere (plasma waves and instabilities · Magnetospheric physics (plasma waves and instabilities

  18. Overview of particle physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salam, A.

    1993-01-01

    This article presents an overview of the situation in particle physics and a prognosis of its future: ideas which have been tested or will soon be tested (standard model and the light Higgs particle), ideas whose time has not yet come (supersymmetry, supersymmetry and N=1 supergravity, right-left symmetry and preons, unification of gravity with other forces, anomaly-free supergravities, supersymmetry strings, string theory as the ''Theory of Everything'' (T.O.E.); passive and non accelerator experiments. 6 figs., 2 tabs

  19. International conference on plasma physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silin, V.P.; Sitenko, A.G.

    1985-01-01

    A brief report on the 6th International conference on plasma physics and on the 6th International Congress on plasma waves and plasma instabilities, which have taken place in summer 1984 in Losanne, is presented. Main items of the conference are enlightened, such as the general theory of a plasma, laboratory plasma, thermonuclear plasma, cosmic plasma and astrophysics

  20. Particle and nuclear physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ning, H.; Chong-shi, W.

    1986-01-01

    This book contains the proceedings of the September symposium. There are two parts to this book divided according to particle physics and nuclear physics. Some of the titles of the papers are as follows: Bifurcation and Dynamical Symmetry Breaking, Negative Binomial Distribution for the Multiplicity Distributions in e/sup +/e/sup -/ Annihilation, Variational Study of Lattice QCD, Rescaling for Kaon Structure Function, SDG Boson Model and its Application, The Pair-Aligned Intrinsic Wave Function in Single-j Configuration, and The Short Range Effective Interaction and the Spectra of Calcium Isotopes in (f-p) Space

  1. Lectures in particle physics

    CERN Document Server

    Green, Dan

    1994-01-01

    The aim of this book on particle physics is to present the theory in a simple way. The style and organization of the material is unique in that intuition is employed, not formal theory or the Monte Carlo method. This volume attempts to be more physical and less abstract than other texts without degenerating into a presentation of data without interpretation.This book is based on four courses of lectures conducted at Fermilab. It should prove very useful to advanced undergraduates and graduate students.

  2. Cosmology and particle physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salati, P.

    1986-01-01

    If the hot Big Bang model is correct, the very early universe provides us with a good laboratory to test our ideas on particle physics. The temperature and the density at that time are so high that each known particle must exist in chemical and in thermal equilibrium with the others. When the universe cools, the particles freeze out, leaving us today with a cosmic background. Such a kind of relic is of great interest because we can probe the Big Bang Model by studying the fossilized gas of a known particle. Conversely we can use that model to derive information about a hypothetical particle. Basically the freezing of a gas occurs a temperature T o and may be thermal or chemical. Studying the decoupling of a stable neutrino brings information on its mass: if the mass M ν lies in the forbidden range, the neutrino has to be unstable and its lifetime is constrained by cosmology. As for the G.U.T. Monopole, cosmology tells us that its present mass density is either to big or to small (1 monopole/observable universe) owing to a predicted flux far from the Parker Limit. Finally, the super red-giant star life time constrains the axion or the Higgs to be more massive than .2 MeV [fr

  3. Prospects of particle physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meyer-Berkhout, U.

    1986-01-01

    Remarkable progress has been achieved in the last two decades in the field of particle physics. From the insight gained by the many experimental data, physicists derive a framework picture of matter on the sub-nuclear level, consisting of fundamental components which interact with each other in a defined and quantitatively detectable manner. The data now available allowed a quantum field theory of strong interactions to be set up for the first time, and a unified theory of electromagnetic and weak interaction. Particle physicists today take particular interest in the problem of whether the strong interaction might fit into an extended unified theory. Such a grand unified theory would have a far-reaching impact on the conceptual models both of the cosmic and sub-nuclear dimensions, and possibly lead to observable effects in domains of energy and mass which will be opened up for experiments by the new accelerator generation underway. Current activities throughout the world for constructing or projecting the new high-energy particle accelerators are outlined in the article, together with the prospects expected by particle physicists, and a look back on the history and achievements of this field of science. (orig.) [de

  4. Numerical simulation in plasma physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Samarskii, A.A.

    1980-01-01

    Plasma physics is not only a field for development of physical theories and mathematical models but also an object of application of the computational experiment comprising analytical and numerical methods adapted for computers. The author considers only MHD plasma physics problems. Examples treated are dissipative structures in plasma; MHD model of solar dynamo; supernova explosion simulation; and plasma compression by a liner. (Auth.)

  5. Controlled fusion and plasma physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-07-01

    40 papers are presented at this 21. conference on controlled fusion and plasma physics (JET). Titles are: effects of sawtooth crashes on beams ions and fusion product tritons; beta limits in H-modes and VH-modes; impurity induced neutralization of MeV energy protons in JET plasmas; lost α particle diagnostic for high-yield D-T fusion plasmas; 15-MeV proton emission from ICRF-heated plasmas; pulse compression radar reflectometry for density measurements; gamma-ray emission profile measurements during ICRH discharges; the new JET phase ICRH array; simulation of triton burn-up; parametric dependencies of JET electron temperature profiles; detached divertor plasmas; excitation of global Alfven Eigenmodes by RF heating; mechanisms of toroidal rotation; effect of shear in the radial electric field on confinement; plasma transport properties at the L-H transition; numerical study of plasma detachment conditions in JET divertor plasmas; the SOL width and the MHD interchange instability; non linear magnetic reconnection in low collisionality plasmas; topology and slowing down of high energy ion orbits; sawtooth crashes at high beta; fusion performances and alpha heating in future JET D-T plasmas; a stable route to high-beta plasmas with non-monotonic q-profiles; theory of propagation of changes to confinement; spatial distribution of gamma emissivity and fast ions during ICRF heating; multi-camera soft X-ray diagnostic; radiation phenomena and particle fluxes in the X-event; local measurement of transport parameters for laser injected trace impurities; impurity transport of high performance discharges; negative snakes and negative shear; neural-network charge exchange analysis; ion temperature anisotropy in helium neutral beam fuelling; impurity line emission due to thermal charge exchange in edge plasmas; control of convection by fuelling and pumping; VH mode accessibility and global H-mode properties; ion cyclotron emission by spontaneous emission; LHCD/ICRH synergy

  6. Computational plasma physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Killeen, J.

    1975-08-01

    The behavior of a plasma confined by a magnetic field is simulated by a variety of numerical models. Some models used on a short time scale give detailed knowledge of the plasma on a microscopic scale, while other models used on much longer time scales compute macroscopic properties of the plasma dynamics. In the last two years there has been a substantial increase in the numerical modelling of fusion devices. The status of MHD, transport, equilibrium, stability, Vlasov, Fokker-Planck, and Hybrid codes is reviewed. These codes have already been essential in the design and understanding of low and high beta toroidal experiments and mirror systems. The design of the next generation of fusion experiments and fusion test reactors will require continual development of these numerical models in order to include the best available plasma physics description and also to increase the geometric complexity of the model. (auth)

  7. Experimental Particle Physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rosenfeld, Carl [Univ of South Carolina; Mishra, Sanjib R. [Univ of South Carolina; Petti, Roberto [Univ of South Carolina; Purohit, Milind V. [Univ of South Carolina

    2014-08-31

    The high energy physics group at the University of South Carolina, under the leadership of Profs. S.R. Mishra, R. Petti, M.V. Purohit, J.R. Wilson (co-PI's), and C. Rosenfeld (PI), engaged in studies in "Experimental Particle Physics." The group collaborated with similar groups at other universities and at national laboratories to conduct experimental studies of elementary particle properties. We utilized the particle accelerators at the Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (Fermilab) in Illinois, the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC) in California, and the European Center for Nuclear Research (CERN) in Switzerland. Mishra, Rosenfeld, and Petti worked predominantly on neutrino experiments. Experiments conducted in the last fifteen years that used cosmic rays and the core of the sun as a source of neutrinos showed conclusively that, contrary to the former conventional wisdom, the "flavor" of a neutrino is not immutable. A neutrino of flavor "e," "mu," or "tau," as determined from its provenance, may swap its identity with one of the other flavors -- in our jargon, they "oscillate." The oscillation phenomenon is extraordinarily difficult to study because neutrino interactions with our instruments are exceedingly rare -- they travel through the earth mostly unimpeded -- and because they must travel great distances before a substantial proportion have made the identity swap. Three of the experiments that we worked on, MINOS, NOvA, and LBNE utilize a beam of neutrinos from an accelerator at Fermilab to determine the parameters governing the oscillation. Two other experiments that we worked on, NOMAD and MIPP, provide measurements supportive of the oscillation experiments. Good measurements of the neutrino oscillation parameters may constitute a "low energy window" on related phenomena that are otherwise unobservable because they would occur only at energies way above the reach of conceivable accelerators. Purohit and Wilson participated in the Ba

  8. Fundamentals of plasma physics

    CERN Document Server

    Bittencourt, J A

    1986-01-01

    A general introduction designed to present a comprehensive, logical and unified treatment of the fundamentals of plasma physics based on statistical kinetic theory. Its clarity and completeness make it suitable for self-learning and self-paced courses. Problems are included.

  9. Elementary particle physics: Experimental

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lord, J.J.; Burnett, T.H.; Wilkes, R.J.

    1989-01-01

    We are carrying out a research program in high energy experimental particle physics. Studies of high energy hadronic interactions and leptoproduction processes continue using several experimental techniques. Progress has been made on the study of multiparticle production processes in nuclei. Ultra-high energy cosmic ray nucleus-nucleus interactions have been investigated by the Japanese American Cosmic Emulsion Experiment (JACEE) using balloon-borne emulsion chamber detectors. In the area of particle astrophysics, our studies of cosmic ray nuclear interactions have enabled use to make the world's most accurate determination of the comparison of the cosmic rays above 10 13 eV. We have only the detector that can observe interaction vertices and identify particles at energies up to 10**15 eV. Our observations are getting close to placing limits on the acceleration mechanisms postulated for pulsars in which the spin and magnetic moment axes are at different angles. In June, 1989 approval was given by NASA for our participation in the Space Station program. The SCINATT experiment will make use of emulsion chamber detectors, similar to the planned JACEE hybrid balloon flight detectors. These detector will permit precise determination of secondary particle charges, momenta and rapidities, and the accumulation of data will be at least a factor of 10 to 100 greater than in balloon experiments. Emulsion chamber techniques ate also employed in an experiment using accelerator heavy ion beams at CERN and Brookhaven National Laboratory to investigate particle production processes in central collisions of nuclei in the energy range 15 -- 200A GeV. Our study of hadroproduction in lepton interactions is continuing with approval of another 8 months run for deep inelastic muon scattering experiment E665 at Fermilab

  10. Acceleration of particles in plasmas

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2007-01-01

    The accelerating fields in radio-frequency accelerators are limited to roughly 100 MV/m due to material breakdown which occurs on the walls of the structure. In contrast, a plasma, being already ionized, can support electric fields in excess of 100 GV/m. Such high accelerating gradients hold the promise of compact particle accelerators. Plasma acceleration has been an emerging and fast growing field of research in the past two decades. In this series of lectures, we will review the principles of plasma acceleration. We will see how relativistic plasma waves can be excited using an ultra-intense laser or using a particle beam. We will see how these plasma waves can be used to accelerate electrons to high energy in short distances. Throughout the lectures, we will also review recent experimental results. Current laser-plasma experiments throughout the world have shown that monoenergetic electron beams from 100 MeV to 1 GeV can be obtained in distances ranging from the millimetre to the centimetre. Experiments a...

  11. Online Particle Physics Information

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kreitz, Patricia A

    2003-01-01

    This list describes a broad set of online resources that are of value to the particle physics community. It is prescreened and highly selective. It describes the scope, size, and organization of the resources so that efficient choices can be made amongst many sites which may appear similar. A resource is excluded if it provides information primarily of interest to only one institution. Because this list must be fixed in print, it is important to consult the updated version of this compilation which includes newly added resources and hypertext links to more complete information at: http://www.slac.stanford.edu/library/pdg/

  12. Online Particle Physics Information

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kreitz, Patricia A

    2003-04-24

    This list describes a broad set of online resources that are of value to the particle physics community. It is prescreened and highly selective. It describes the scope, size, and organization of the resources so that efficient choices can be made amongst many sites which may appear similar. A resource is excluded if it provides information primarily of interest to only one institution. Because this list must be fixed in print, it is important to consult the updated version of this compilation which includes newly added resources and hypertext links to more complete information at: http://www.slac.stanford.edu/library/pdg/.

  13. Particle physics in your pocket!

    CERN Multimedia

    Anaïs Schaeffer

    2012-01-01

    CERN physicists, take out your smartphones! Two new particle physics applications for Android phones have been developed by a physicist from the University of Bern: “Particle Properties” and “Particle Physics Booklet 2010”.   “When I'm on shift, I enjoy looking at the online event displays,” says Igor Kreslo from the Laboratory for High Energy Physics at the University of Bern, the physicist who has developed the two particle physics applications for Android. “Sometimes very beautiful events appear, with many different particles. I like to discuss these displays with my students, just to develop their ability to identify particles. We try to find out which particle is which and how it might decay… I think that's the best way to teach students the phenomenology of particle physics.” When scientists study particle physics, they require some vital information, such as the decay branching ...

  14. [Medium energy particle physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nefkens, B.M.K.

    1985-10-01

    Investigations currently carried out by the UCLA Particle Physics Research Group can be arranged into four programs: Pion-Nucleon Scattering; Tests of Charge Symmetry and Isospin Invariance; Light Nuclei (Strong Form Factors of 3 H, 3 He, 4 He; Detailed Balance in pd right reversible γ 3 H; Interaction Dynamics); and Search for the Rare Decay Μ + → e + + γ (MEGA). The general considerations which led to the choice of physics problems investigated by our group are given in the next section. We also outline the scope of the research being done which includes over a dozen experiments. The main body of this report details the research carried out in the past year, the status of various experiments, and new projects

  15. Experimental particle physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steinberg, R.I.; Lane, C.E.

    1992-09-01

    The goals of this research are the experimental testing of fundamental theories of physics beyond the standard model and the exploration of cosmic phenomena through the techniques of particle physics. We are working on the MACRO experiment, which employs a large-area underground detector to search fore grand unification magnetic monopoles and dark matter candidates and to study cosmic ray muons as well as low- and high-energy neutrinos; the Chooz experiment to search for reactor neutrino oscillations at a distance of 1 km from the source; a new proposal (the Perry experiment) to construct a one-kiloton liquid scintillator in the Fairport, Ohio underground facility IMB to study neutrino oscillations with a 13 km baseline; and development of technology for improved liquid scintillators and for very-low-background materials in support of the MACRO and Perry experiments and for new solar neutrino experiments

  16. Research in particle physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-09-01

    Research accomplishments and current activities of Boston University researchers in high energy physics are presented. Principal areas of activity include the following: detectors for studies of electron endash positron annihilation in colliding beams; advanced accelerator component design, including the superconducting beam inflector, electrostatic quadrupoles, and the ''electrostatic muon kicker''; the detector for the MACRO (Monopole, Astrophysics, and Cosmic Ray Observatory) experiment; neutrino astrophysics and the search for proton decay; theoretical particle physics (electroweak and flavor symmetry breaking, hadron collider phenomenology, cosmology and astrophysics, new field-theoretic models, nonperturbative investigations of quantum field theories, electroweak interactions); measurement of the anomalous magnetic moment of the muon; calorimetry for the GEM experiment; and muon detectors for the GEM experiment at the Superconducting Super Collider

  17. Frontiers of particle beam physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sessler, A.M.

    1989-11-01

    First, a review is given of various highly-developed techniques for particle handling which are, nevertheless, being vigorously advanced at the present time. These include soft superconductor radio frequency cavities, hard superconductor magnets, cooling rings for ions and anti-protons, and damping rings for electrons. Second, attention is focused upon novel devices for particle generation, acceleration, and focusing. These include relativistic klystrons and free electron laser power sources, binary power multipliers, photocathodes, switched-power linacs, plasma beat-wave accelerators, plasma wake-field accelerators, plasma lenses, plasma adiabatic focusers and plasma compensators. 12 refs

  18. Aspects of experimental particle physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McCubbin, N.A.

    1986-11-01

    The paper contains three lectures on Experimental Particle Physics which were given at the 16th British Universities Summer School for Theoretical and Elementary Particle Physics, Durham, 1986. The first lecture briefly reviews the physics which underpins all particle detectors, and the second lecture describes how this physics influences a modern detector. The last lecture is concerned with the topics of beams and computers, and includes the physics of stochastic cooling and the Halting theorem. (U.K.)

  19. Advanced computations in plasma physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tang, W.M.

    2002-01-01

    Scientific simulation in tandem with theory and experiment is an essential tool for understanding complex plasma behavior. In this paper we review recent progress and future directions for advanced simulations in magnetically confined plasmas with illustrative examples chosen from magnetic confinement research areas such as microturbulence, magnetohydrodynamics, magnetic reconnection, and others. Significant recent progress has been made in both particle and fluid simulations of fine-scale turbulence and large-scale dynamics, giving increasingly good agreement between experimental observations and computational modeling. This was made possible by innovative advances in analytic and computational methods for developing reduced descriptions of physics phenomena spanning widely disparate temporal and spatial scales together with access to powerful new computational resources. In particular, the fusion energy science community has made excellent progress in developing advanced codes for which computer run-time and problem size scale well with the number of processors on massively parallel machines (MPP's). A good example is the effective usage of the full power of multi-teraflop (multi-trillion floating point computations per second) MPP's to produce three-dimensional, general geometry, nonlinear particle simulations which have accelerated progress in understanding the nature of turbulence self-regulation by zonal flows. It should be emphasized that these calculations, which typically utilized billions of particles for thousands of time-steps, would not have been possible without access to powerful present generation MPP computers and the associated diagnostic and visualization capabilities. In general, results from advanced simulations provide great encouragement for being able to include increasingly realistic dynamics to enable deeper physics insights into plasmas in both natural and laboratory environments. The associated scientific excitement should serve to

  20. Magnetospheric plasma physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bingham, R.

    1989-09-01

    The discovery of the earth's radiation belts in 1957 by Van Allen marked the beginning of what is now known as magnetospheric physics. In this study of plasma physics in the magnetosphere, we shall take the magnetosphere to be that part of the earth's ionized atmosphere which is formed by the interaction of the solar wind with the earth's dipole-like magnetic field. It extends from approximately 100km above the earth's surface where the proton-neutral atom collision frequency is equal to the proton gyrofrequency to about ten earth radii (R E ∼ 6380km) in the sunward direction and to several hundred earth radii in the anti-sunward direction. The collision dominated region is called the ionosphere and is sometimes considered separate from the collisionless plasma region. In the ionosphere ion-neutral collisions are dominant and one may think of the ionosphere as a frictional boundary layer ∼ 1000km thick. Other planets are also considered. (author)

  1. Overview of particle physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salam, A.

    1986-02-01

    An overview of the situation of particle physics at the end of 1985 is given. It includes the following topics: ideas which have been tested or will soon be tested such as the standard model based on the symmetry group SUsub(C)(3)xSUsub(L)(2)xU(1), light Higgs and preons; theoretical ideas whose time has not yet come (basically because no accelerators are being constructed to test them) such as N=1 supersymmetry and N=1 supergravity right-handed weak currents, extended supergravities and superstring models; ideas for which non-accelerator and passive experiments have been mounted such as proton decay, nn-bar oscillations, neutrino masses and oscillations, monopoles and dark matter

  2. Charged particle acceleration with plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bravo O, A.

    1989-01-01

    Under certain conditions it is possible to create spatial charge waves (OCE) in a plasma (ionized gas) through some disturbance mechanism, the phenomenon produces electric fields of high intensity that are propagated at velocities near to a c. When charged particles are connected to such OCE they may be accelerated to very high energies in short distances. At present electric fields of approximately 10 7 V/cm have been observed. (Author). 4 refs

  3. Cosmology and particle physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Turner, M.S.

    1986-01-01

    Progress in cosmology has become linked to progress in elementary particle physics. In these six lectures, the author illustrates the two-way nature of the interplay between these fields by focusing on a few selected topics. In the next section the author reviews the standard cosmology, especially concentrating on primordial nucleosynthesis and discusses how the standard cosmology has been used to place constraints on the properties of various particles. Grand Unification makes two striking predictions: (i) B non-conservation; (ii) the existence of stable, superheavy magnetic monopoles. Both have had great cosmological impact. In the following section the author discusses baryogenesis, the very attractive scenario in which the B,C,CP violating interactions in GUTs provide a dynamical explanation for the predominance of matter over antimatter and the present baryon-to-photon ratio. Monopoles are a cosmological disaster and an astrophysicist's delight. In Section 4 discusses monopoles, cosmology, and astrophysics. In the fourth lecture the author discusses how a very early (t≤10/sup -34/ sec) phase transition associated with spontaneous symmetry breaking (SSB) has the potential to explain a handful of very fundamental cosmological facts, facts which can be accommodated by the standard cosmology, but which are not ''explained'' by it. The fifth lecture is devoted to a discussion of structure formation in the universe

  4. Particle physics---Experimental

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lord, J.J.; Boynton, P.E.; Burnett, T.H.; Wilkes, R.J.

    1991-01-01

    We are continuing a research program in particle astrophysics and high energy experimental particle physics. We have joined the DUMAND Collaboration, which is constructing a deep undersea astrophysical neutrino detector near Hawaii. Studies of high energy hadronic interactions using emulsion chamber techniques were also continued, using balloon flight exposures to ultra-high cosmic ray nuclei (JACEE) and accelerator beams. As members of the DUMAND Collaboration, we have responsibility for development a construction of critical components for the deep undersea neutrino detector facility. We have designed and developed the acoustical positioning system required to permit reconstruction of muon tracks with sufficient precision to meet the astrophysical goals of the experiment. In addition, we are making significant contributions to the design of the database and triggering system to be used. Work has been continuing in other aspects of the study of multiparticle production processes in nuclei. We are participants in a joint US/Japan program to study nuclear interactions at energies two orders of magnitude greater than those of existing accelerators, using balloon-borne emulsion chambers. On one of the flights we found two nuclear interactions of multiplicity over 1000 -- one with a multiplicity of over 2000 and pseudorapidity density ∼ 800 in the central region. At the statistical level of the JACEE experiment, the frequency of occurrence of such events is orders of magnitude too large. We have continued our ongoing program to study hadronic interactions in emulsions exposed to high energy accelerator beams

  5. Modern Elementary Particle Physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kane, Gordon

    2017-02-01

    1. Introduction; 2. Relativistic notation, Lagrangians, and interactions; 3. Gauge invariance; 4. Non-abelian gauge theories; 5. Dirac notation for spin; 6. The Standard Model Lagrangian; 7. The electroweak theory and quantum chromodynamics; 8. Masses and the Higgs mechanism; 9. Cross sections, decay widths, and lifetimes: W and Z decays; 10. Production and properties of W± and Zᴼ; 11. Measurement of electroweak and QCD parameters: the muon lifetime; 12. Accelerators - present and future; 13. Experiments and detectors; 14. Low energy and non-accelerator experiments; 15. Observation of the Higgs boson at the CERN LHC: is it the Higgs boson?; 16. Colliders and tests of the Standard Model: particles are pointlike; 17. Quarks and gluons, confinement and jets; 18. Hadrons, heavy quarks, and strong isospin invariance; 19. Coupling strengths depend on momentum transfer and on virtual particles; 20. Quark (and lepton) mixing angles; 21. CP violation; 22. Overview of physics beyond the Standard Model; 23. Grand unification; 24. Neutrino masses; 25. Dark matter; 26. Supersymmetry.

  6. Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory:

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Phillips, C.A. (ed.)

    1986-01-01

    This paper discusses progress on experiments at the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory. The projects and areas discussed are: Principal Parameters Achieved in Experimental Devices, Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor, Princeton Large Torus, Princeton Beta Experiment, S-1 Spheromak, Current-Drive Experiment, X-ray Laser Studies, Theoretical Division, Tokamak Modeling, Spacecraft Glow Experiment, Compact Ignition Tokamak, Engineering Department, Project Planning and Safety Office, Quality Assurance and Reliability, and Administrative Operations.

  7. Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory:

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Phillips, C.A.

    1986-01-01

    This paper discusses progress on experiments at the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory. The projects and areas discussed are: Principal Parameters Achieved in Experimental Devices, Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor, Princeton Large Torus, Princeton Beta Experiment, S-1 Spheromak, Current-Drive Experiment, X-ray Laser Studies, Theoretical Division, Tokamak Modeling, Spacecraft Glow Experiment, Compact Ignition Tokamak, Engineering Department, Project Planning and Safety Office, Quality Assurance and Reliability, and Administrative Operations

  8. Theoretical plasma physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boozer, A.H.; Vahala, G.

    1989-08-01

    During the past year we have studied stellarator equilibria with quasi-helical symmetry and the relation between the trajectories of the exact and the drift Hamiltonian. The relation between these trajectories is particularly important to issue of α particle confinement in a reactor. Work has also been done on the bootstrap current in the absence of symmetry, the effects of tearing modes on the current profile in a tokamak, and models of plasma turbulence. In addition, considerable time was spent during the year by Allen Boozer chairing the task force on Alternate Transport as part of the DoE transport initiative

  9. Plasmas: from space to laboratory. 'Introduction to plasma physics' course

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Savoini, Philippe

    2011-01-01

    This course addresses the different basic concepts of plasma physics. After an introduction which addresses the plasma state, basic equations, the different theoretical approaches (orbitals, kinetic, multi-fluid, magnetohydrodynamics), and the different characteristic scales, waves are addressed and presented as a disordered electromagnetism: existence of plasma waves, generalities on waves, relationship of formal dispersion of plasmas, plasma without magnetic field (longitudinal, transverse, or low frequency wave), plasma with magnetic field (parallel, perpendicular, or arbitrary propagation). The next parts present various approaches: the particle-based approach (case of constant and uniform magnetic fields, case of non-uniform magnetic fields), the statistical approach (elements of kinetic theory, the collision phenomenon, the equilibrium state), and the fluid approach (fluid equations according to the multi-fluid theory, comparison with the particle-based approach, presentation of magnetohydrodynamics as the single-fluid model, validity of MHD)

  10. Blind Analysis in Particle Physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roodman, A

    2003-01-01

    A review of the blind analysis technique, as used in particle physics measurements, is presented. The history of blind analyses in physics is briefly discussed. Next the dangers of and the advantages of a blind analysis are described. Three distinct kinds of blind analysis in particle physics are presented in detail. Finally, the BABAR collaboration's experience with the blind analysis technique is discussed

  11. Plasma wall particle balance in Tore Supra

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grisolia, C.; Ghendrih, P.; Pegourie, B.; Grosman, A.

    1992-01-01

    A comprehensive study of the particle balance between the carbon wall and the plasma is presented. One finds that the effective particle content of the wall which governs the plasma equilibrium density departs from the deposited number of particles. This effect is dominant for the fully desaturated wall. A scaling law of the plasma density in terms of the wall effective particle content has been obtained. Moreover, the experimental data allows to estimate the plasma particle confinement time. Values ranging from 0.2 s to 0.5 s are found depending on the density. An analytical functional dependence of the particle confinement time is obtained

  12. Extraordinary Matter: Visualizing Space Plasmas and Particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbier, S. B.; Bartolone, L.; Christian, E.; Thieman, J.; Eastman, T.; Lewis, E.

    2011-09-01

    Atoms and sub-atomic particles play a crucial role in the dynamics of our universe, but these particles and the space plasmas comprised of them are often overlooked in popular scientific and educational resources. Although the concepts are pertinent to a wide range of topics, even the most basic particle and plasma physics principles are generally unfamiliar to non-scientists. Educators and public communicators need assistance in explaining these concepts that cannot be easily demonstrated in the everyday world. Active visuals are a highly effective aid to understanding, but resources of this type are currently few in number and difficult to find, and most do not provide suitable context for audience comprehension. To address this need, our team is developing an online multimedia reference library of animations, visualizations, interactivities, and videos resources - Extraordinary Matter: Visualizing Space Plasmas and Particles. The site targets grades 9-14 and the equivalent in informal education and public outreach. Each ready-to-use product will be accompanied by a supporting explanation at a reading level matching the educational level of the concept. It will also have information on relevant science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) educational standards, activities, lesson plans, related products, links, and suggested uses. These products are intended to stand alone, making them adaptable to the widest range of uses, including scientist presentations, museum displays, educational websites and CDs, teacher professional development, and classroom use. This project is funded by a NASA Education and Public Outreach in Earth and Space Science (EPOESS) grant.

  13. Particle physics and cosmology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schramm, D.N.; Turner, M.S.

    1982-06-01

    work is described in these areas: cosmological baryon production; cosmological production of free quarks and other exotic particle species; the quark-hadron transition in the early universe; astrophysical and cosmological constraints on particle properties; massive neutrinos; phase transitions in the early universe; and astrophysical implications of an axion-like particle

  14. Particle Physics and the Universe

    CERN Document Server

    Wess, Julius; 9th Adriatic Meeting

    2005-01-01

    The focus of the contributions contained in this proceedings is the interplay between cosmology, astroparticle physics and particle physics, both from the theoretical and experimental point of view. The Adriatic Meetings have traditionally been one of the very few physics conferences devoted to the most advanced status of science while aiming at a very broad participation of both young and experienced researchers with diverse backgrounds in particle physics.

  15. Online Particle Physics Information - Education Sites

    Science.gov (United States)

    SLAC Online Particle Physics Information Particle Data Group Particle Physics Education Sites General Sites Background Knowledge Physics Lessons & Activities Astronomy Lessons & Activities Ask -A-Scientist Experiments, Demos and Fun Physics History & Diversity Art in Physics General Sites

  16. Introduction to burning plasma physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Momota, Hiromu

    1982-01-01

    The free energy of fusion-produced charged particles, the critical plasma Q-value for the thermal instability, and the Cherenkov's emission are discussed. The free energy of fusion-produced charged particles is large even in DT burning plasma. The primary role of fusion-produced energetic charged particles is the heating of fuel plasma. If the charged particle heating is large, burning may be thermally unstable. A zero dimensional analysis shows that the critical plasma Q-values for this thermal instability are nearly 5 for DT burning plasma of 14 keV and 1.6 for D-He 3 burning plasma of 60 keV. These critical plasma Q-values are small as compared to that required for commercial reactors. Then, some methods of burning-control should be introduced to fusion plasma. Another feature of energetic charged particles may be Cherenkov's emission of various waves in fusion plasma. The relationship between this micro-instability and transport phenomena may be the important problem to be clarified. The fusion-produced energetic charged particles have large Larmor radii, and they may have effects on balooning mode instability. (Kato, T.)

  17. Basic physics of colloidal plasmas

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Plasma Physics Division, Institute of Advanced Study in Science and Technology, Khanapara, ..... tic wave) to form a random collection of the nonlinear wave grains (like ... [8] M S Sodha and S Guha, in Advances in plasma phyiscs edited by A ...

  18. Theoretical plasma physics. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vahala, G.; Tracy, E.

    1996-04-01

    During the past year, the authors have concentrated on (1) divertor physics, (2) thermo-lattice Boltzmann (TLBE) approach to turbulence, and (3) phase space techniques in gyro-resonance problems in collaboration with Dieter Sigmar (MIT), Sergei Krasheninnikov (MIT), Linda Vahala (ODU), Joseph Morrison (AS and M/NASA-Langley), Pavol Pavlo and Josef Preinhaelter (institute of Plasma Physics, Czech Academy of Sciences) and Allan Kaufman (LBL/U.C.Berkeley). Using a 2-equation compressible closure model with a 2D mean flow, the authors are investigating the effects of 3D neutral turbulence on reducing the heat load to the divertor plate by various toroidal cavity geometries. These studies are being extended to examine 3D mean flows. Thermal Lattice Boltzmann (TLBE) methods are being investigated to handle 3D turbulent flows in nontrivial geometries. It is planned to couple the TLBE collisional regime to the weakly collisional regime and so be able to tackle divertor physics. In the application of phase space techniques to minority-ion RF heating, resonance heating is treated as a multi-stage process. A generalization of the Case-van Kampen analysis is presented for multi-dimensional non-uniform plasmas. Effects such as particle trapping and the ray propagation dynamics in tokamak geometry can now be handled using Weyl calculus

  19. Particle physics instrumentation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Riegler, W.

    2011-01-01

    This report summarizes a series of three lectures aimed at giving an overview of basic particle detection principles, the interaction of particles with matter, the application of these principles in modern detector systems, as well techniques to read out detector signals in high-rate experiments. (author)

  20. Cooperative particle motion in complex (dusty) plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhdanov, Sergey; Morfill, Gregor

    2014-05-01

    Strongly coupled complex (dusty) plasmas give us a unique opportunity to go beyond the limits of continuous media and study various generic processes occurring in liquids or solids at the kinetic level. A particularly interesting and challenging topic is to study dynamic cooperativity at local and intermediate scales. As an important element of self-organization, cooperative particle motion is present in many physical, astrophysical and biological systems. As a rule, cooperative dynamics, bringing to life 'abnormal' effects like enhanced diffusion, self-dragging, or self-propelling of particles, hold aspects of 'strange' kinetics. The synergy effects are also important. Such kind of cooperative behavior was evidenced for string-like formations of colloidal rods, dynamics of mono- and di-vacancies in 2d colloidal crystals. Externally manipulated 'dust molecules' and self-assembled strings in driven 3d particle clusters were other noticeable examples. There is a certain advantage to experiment with complex plasmas merely because these systems are easy to manipulate in a controllable way. We report on the first direct observation of microparticle cooperative movements occurring under natural conditions in a 2d complex plasma.

  1. Physics of partially ionized plasmas

    CERN Document Server

    Krishan, Vinod

    2016-01-01

    Plasma is one of the four fundamental states of matter; the other three being solid, liquid and gas. Several components, such as molecular clouds, diffuse interstellar gas, the solar atmosphere, the Earth's ionosphere and laboratory plasmas, including fusion plasmas, constitute the partially ionized plasmas. This book discusses different aspects of partially ionized plasmas including multi-fluid description, equilibrium and types of waves. The discussion goes on to cover the reionization phase of the universe, along with a brief description of high discharge plasmas, tokomak plasmas and laser plasmas. Various elastic and inelastic collisions amongst the three particle species are also presented. In addition, the author demonstrates the novelty of partially ionized plasmas using many examples; for instance, in partially ionized plasma the magnetic induction is subjected to the ambipolar diffusion and the Hall effect, as well as the usual resistive dissipation. Also included is an observation of kinematic dynam...

  2. Plasmas applied atomic collision physics, v.2

    CERN Document Server

    Barnett, C F

    1984-01-01

    Applied Atomic Collision Physics, Volume 2: Plasmas covers topics on magnetically confined plasmas. The book starts by providing the history of fusion research and describing the various approaches in both magnetically and inertially confined plasmas. The text then gives a general discussion of the basic concepts and properties in confinement and heating of a plasma. The theory of atomic collisions that result in excited quantum states, particularly highly ionized impurity atoms; and diverse diagnostic topics such as emission spectra, laser scattering, electron cyclotron emission, particle bea

  3. Elementary particle physics in early physics education

    CERN Document Server

    Wiener, Gerfried

    2017-01-01

    Current physics education research is faced with the important question of how best to introduce elementary particle physics in the classroom early on. Therefore, a learning unit on the subatomic structure of matter was developed, which aims to introduce 12-year-olds to elementary particles and fundamental interactions. This unit was iteratively evaluated and developed by means of a design-based research project with grade-6 students. In addition, dedicated professional development programmes were set up to instruct high school teachers about the learning unit and enable them to investigate its didactical feasibility. Overall, the doctoral research project led to successful results and showed the topic of elementary particle physics to be a viable candidate for introducing modern physics in the classroom. Furthermore, thanks to the design-based research methodology, the respective findings have implications for both physics education and physics education research, which will be presented during the PhD defen...

  4. What's Next for Particle Physics?

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Martin

    2017-10-01

    Following the discovery of the Higgs boson in 2012, particle physics has entered its most exciting and crucial period for over 50 years. In this book, I first summarise our current understanding of particle physics, and why this knowledge is almost certainly incomplete. We will then see that the Large Hadron Collider provides the means to search for the next theory of particle physics by performing precise measurements of the Higgs boson, and by looking directly for particles that can solve current cosmic mysteries such as the nature of dark matter. Finally, I will anticipate the next decade of particle physics by placing the Large Hadron Collider within the wider context of other experiments. The results expected over the next ten years promise to transform our understanding of what the Universe is made of and how it came to be.

  5. Physics of plasma-wall interactions in controlled fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Post, D.E.; Behrisch, R.

    1984-01-01

    In the areas of plasma physics, atomic physics, surface physics, bulk material properties and fusion experiments and theory, the following topics are presented: the plasma sheath; plasma flow in the sheath and presheath of a scrape-off layer; probes for plasma edge diagnostics in magnetic confinement fusion devices; atomic and molecular collisions in the plasma boundary; physical sputtering of solids at ion bombardment; chemical sputtering and radiation enhanced sublimation of carbon; ion backscattering from solid surfaces; implantation, retention and release of hydrogen isotopes; surface erosion by electrical arcs; electron emission from solid surfaces;l properties of materials; plasma transport near material boundaries; plasma models for impurity control experiments; neutral particle transport; particle confinement and control in existing tokamaks; limiters and divertor plates; advanced limiters; divertor tokamak experiments; plasma wall interactions in heated plasmas; plasma-wall interactions in tandem mirror machines; and impurity control systems for reactor experiments

  6. Physical processes in relativistic plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Svensson, R.

    1984-01-01

    The continuum emission in many active galactic nuclei (AGNs) extend to 100 keV and beyond (e.g. Rothschild et al. 1983). In thermal models of the continuum emission this implies temperatures above 10 9 K or kT of order mc 2 . In such a plasma the electrons are at least mildly relativistic and furthermore the particles and the photons are energetic enough to produce electron-positron pairs. The physics of such hot plasmas has only recently been studied in any detail and here we review the results of those studies. Significant electron-positron pair production may also occur in non-thermal models of the continuum emission if the optical depth to photon-photon pair production is greater than unity. We review the few results obtained regarding this interesting but not very well studied possibility. First, however, we briefly discuss the processes taking place in relativistic plasmas and the standard models for the continuum emission from AGNs. We then summarize the effects pair production have on these models and the observational implications of the presence of electron-positron pairs. (orig./WL)

  7. Edge plasma physical investigations of tokamak plasmas in CRIP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bakos, J.; Ignacz, P.; Koltai, L.; Paszti, F.; Petravich, G.; Szigeti, J.; Zoletnik, S.

    1988-01-01

    The results of the measurements performed in the field of thermonuclear high temperature plasma physics in CRIP (Hungary) are summarized. In the field of the edge plasma physics solid probes were used to test the external zone of plasma edges, and atom beams and balls were used to investigate both the external and internal zones. The plasma density distribution was measured by laser blow-off technics, using Na atoms, which are evaporated by laser pulses. The excitation of Na atom ball by tokamak plasma gives information on the status of the plasma edge. The toroidal asymmetry of particle transport in tokamak plasma was measured by erosion probes. The evaporated and transported impurities were collected on an other part of the plasma edge and were analyzed by SIMS and Rutherford backscattering. The interactions in plasma near the limiter were investigated by a special limiter with implemented probes. Recycling and charge exchange processes were measured. Disruption phenomena of tokamak plasma were analyzed and a special kind of disruptions, 'soft disruptions' and the related preliminary perturbations were discovered. (D.Gy.) 10 figs

  8. An introduction to boundary plasma physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shimizu, Katsuhiro; Takizuka, Tomonori

    2004-01-01

    History of tokamak experiments is briefly reviewed with a special focus on divertors. Two-point divertor model, which calculates plasma parameters up-stream and at the divertor plate for a given condition of particle flux and heat flux, is explained. The model is applied to ITER to discuss the heat flux onto the target plate. The important issues of divertor physics related to recycling, remote radiative cooling, detached plasma and MARFE are also introduced. (author)

  9. Thermonuclear Tokamak plasmas in the presence of fusion alpha particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anderson, D.; Hamnen, H.; Lisak, M.

    1988-01-01

    In this overview, we have focused on several results of the thermonuclear plasma research pertaining to the alpha particle physics and diagnostics in a fusion tokamak plasma. As regards the discussion of alpha particle effects, two distinct classes of phenomena have been distinguished: the simpler class containing phenomena exhibited by individual alpha particles under the influence of bulk plasma properties and, the more complex class including collective effects which become important for increasing alpha particle density. We have also discussed several possibilities to investigate alpha particle effects by simulation experiments using an equivalent population of highly energetic ions in the plasma. Generally, we find that the present theoretical knowledge on the role of fusion alpha particles in a fusion tokamak plasma is incomplete. There are still uncertainties and partial lack of quantitative results in this area. Consequently, further theoretical work and, as far a possible, simulation experiments are needed to improve the situation. Concerning the alpha particle diagnostics, the various diagnostic techniques and the status of their development have been discussed in two different contexts: the escaping alpha particles and the confined alpha particles in the fusion plasma. A general conclusion is that many of the different diagnostic methods for alpha particle measurements require further major development. (authors)

  10. Notes on elementary particle physics

    CERN Document Server

    Muirhead, William Hugh

    1972-01-01

    Notes of Elementary Particle Physics is a seven-chapter text that conveys the ideas on the state of elementary particle physics. This book emerged from an introductory course of 30 lectures on the subject given to first-year graduate students at the University of Liverpool. The opening chapter deals with pertinent terminologies in elementary particle physics. The succeeding three chapters cover the concepts of transition amplitudes, probabilities, relativistic wave equations and fields, and the interaction amplitude. The discussion then shifts to tests of electromagnetic interactions, particul

  11. Particle accelerator physics

    CERN Document Server

    Wiedemann, Helmut

    2015-01-01

    This book by Helmut Wiedemann is a well-established, classic text, providing an in-depth and comprehensive introduction to the field of high-energy particle acceleration and beam dynamics. The present 4th edition has been significantly revised, updated and expanded. The newly conceived Part I is an elementary introduction to the subject matter for undergraduate students. Part II gathers the basic tools in preparation of a more advanced treatment, summarizing the essentials of electrostatics and electrodynamics as well as of particle dynamics in electromagnetic fields. Part III is an extensive primer in beam dynamics, followed, in Part IV, by an introduction and description of the main beam parameters and including a new chapter on beam emittance and lattice design. Part V is devoted to the treatment of perturbations in beam dynamics. Part VI then discusses the details of charged particle acceleration. Parts VII and VIII introduce the more advanced topics of coupled beam dynamics and describe very intense bea...

  12. Dark matter and particle physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peskin, Michael E.

    2007-01-01

    Astrophysicists now know that 80% of the matter in the universe is 'dark matter', composed of neutral and weakly interacting elementary particles that are not part of the Standard Model of particle physics. I will summarize the evidence for dark matter. I will explain why I expect dark matter particles to be produced at the CERN LHC. We will then need to characterize the new weakly interacting particles and demonstrate that they the same particles that are found in the cosmos. I will describe how this might be done. (author)

  13. Powder Particle Penetration into Steam-argon Plasma Jet and its Relation with Particle Parameters

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Chumak, Oleksiy; Kopecký, Vladimír; Konrád, Miloš; Hrabovský, Milan; Kavka, Tetyana

    2004-01-01

    Roč. 54, suppl. C (2004), C931-C936 ISSN 0011-4626. [Symposium on Plasma Physics and Technology /21st/. Praha, 14.06.2004-17.06.2004] R&D Projects: GA AV ČR KSK2043105 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z2043910 Keywords : plasma sprazing, torch with hybrid stabilization, particle temperature Subject RIV: BL - Plasma and Gas Discharge Physics Impact factor: 0.292, year: 2004

  14. Plasma physics studies in Singapore

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jones, R.

    1982-01-01

    We briefly outline the plasma physics research program being conducted in the Department of Physics of the National University of Singapore. The work places particular emphasis on open system end plugging, ion source development, and anomalous transport studies. (author)

  15. Nuclear and particle physics 1993

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    MacGregor, I.J.D.; Doyle, A.T.

    1993-01-01

    This item documents the International Conference on Nuclear and Particle Physics held at the University of Glasgow, UK, from 30th March to 1st April 1993. It was organised by the Department of Physics and Astronomy at Glasgow University on behalf of the Nuclear and Particle Physics Division of the Institute of Physics. The scientific programme covered many areas of current interest in nuclear and particle physics. Particle physics topics included up to the minute reports on the physics currently coming from CERN'S Low Energy Antiproton Ring (LEAR), Hadron-Elektron-Ring Analage (HERA) and Large Electron-Positron Storage Rings (LEP), and reviews of quantum chromodynamics (QCD) lattice gauge theory. Looking to the future the programme covered the search for the Higgs boson and a review of physics experiments planned for the new generation of accelerators at Large Hadron Collider (LHC) and Superconducting Supercollider (SSC). The conference coincided with the final closure of the world class Nuclear Structure Facility at Daresbury and marked the transition of United Kingdom (UK) nuclear physics research into a new era of international collaboration. Several talks described new international collaborative research programmes in nuclear physics initiated by UK scientists. The conference also heard of new areas of nuclear physics which will in future be opened up by high energy continuous beam electron accelerators and by radioactive ion beam accelerators. (author)

  16. Pulsed power magnet technology for laser particle acceleration and laser plasma physics - a survey of developments at Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kroll, Florian; Joost, Martin [Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf (Germany); TU Dresden (Germany); Burris-Mog, Trevor; Herrmannsdoerfer, Thomas; Kraft, Stephan; Masood, Umar; Schlenvoigt, Hans-Peter; Sobiella, Manfred; Wustmann, Bernd; Zherlitsyn, Sergei; Cowan, Thomas; Schramm, Ulrich [Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf (Germany)

    2013-07-01

    Since the mid-1950s, pulsed high-field magnets have become a common, versatile research tool with application mostly in solid state physics and material research. Recently developed pulsed power magnet technology, specifically designed to meet the demands of laser acceleration and laser plasma experiments, open up new research opportunities: We present a pulsed air core solenoid (up to 20 T) for effective collection and focusing of laser accelerated particles. It could function as a crucial part of a compact, laser-based ion source (pursued by the LIGHT collaboration) or of beam guidance systems. Furthermore, the poster shows a split pair coil, utterly compact and with optical access in between the coil pairs and on axis, to study laser-driven plasma expansion under high magnetic fields (30 T). To power such devices, portable capacitor-based pulse generators have been developed at Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf. We present first results of the functional testing of our third-generation pulse generator. Looking forward, we outline a concept for a medical gantry based on pulsed high field beam optics.

  17. High-temperature plasma physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Furth, H.P.

    1988-03-01

    Both magnetic and inertial confinement research are entering the plasma parameter range of fusion reactor interest. This paper reviews the individual and common technical problems of these two approaches to the generation of thermonuclear plasmas, and describes some related applications of high-temperature plasma physics

  18. Plasma Physics Applied (New Book)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grabbe, Crockett

    2007-03-01

    0.5cm Plasma physics applications are one of the most rapidly growing fields in engineering & applied science today. The last decade alone has seen the rapid emergence of new applications such as dusty plasmas in the semiconductor and microchip industries, and plasma TVs. In addition, this last decade saw the achievement of the 50-year Lawson breakeven condition for fusion. With new discoveries in space plasma physics and applications to spacecraft for worldwide communication and space weather, as well as new applications being discovered, this diversity is always expanding. The new book Plasma Physics Applied reviews developments in several of these areas. Chapter 1 reviews the content and its authors, and is followed by a more comprehensive review of plasma physics applications in general in Chapter 2. Plasma applications in combustion and environmental uses are presented in Chapter 3. Lightning effects in planetary magnetospheres and potential application are described in Chapter 4. The area of dusty plasmas in both industrial and space plasmas and their applications are reviewed in Chapter 5. The particular area of Coulomb clusters in dusty plasmas is presented in Chapter 6. The variety of approaches to plasma confinement in magnetic devices for fusion are laid out in Chapter 7. Finally, an overview of plasma accelerator developments and their applications are presented in Chapter 8.

  19. Controlled fusion and plasma physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bickerton, R.J.

    1991-01-01

    On JET results were presented on additional heating power, on a recently discovered regime of enhanced pellet performance (PEP), on low-density H-mode plasma confinement with hot ions, bounds on very high electric currents by material limiters, the first experiments on lower hybrid current drive, on the L-H transition threshold dependence on the direction of the gradient-B drift, and on alpha-particle physics issues. The TFTR presentations focused on transport. Particle loss ramifications of the toroidal Alfven eigenmodes were found to be small, while their threshold of excitation is lower than theoretically predicted. On DIII-D a scaling study of transport with gyroradius as the only variable was reported, with approximately Bohm scaling emerging; but the effective heat diffusivity scaling could not be established due to profile consistency effects. While beta-limit investigations with DIII-D generally confirm the ideal, MHD limit found by Troyon, evidence of a reduction of the accessible range for the internal inductance with the safety factor seems to favour current-density control in a steady-state D-T burner. Onset of strongly sheared poloidal rotation in a thin layer during the L-H mode transition was experimentally shown, while a new, so-called VH (''very high'') confinement mode was discovered by boronization of the wall. The JT-90 tokamak has recently been upgraded to JT-60-U. Presentations by the ASDEX team summarized the lack of agreement with theory of L-mode confinement. With TEXTOR, an improved mode (I-mode) of confinement was found by boronization. Finally, reviews are included on the status of impurity transport and helium removal in tokamaks, on stellarators, alternative magnetic confinement systems, inertial confinement, and non-fusion plasma physics. 2 tabs

  20. Fusion programs in Applied Plasma Physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-07-01

    The Applied Plasma Physics (APP) program at General Atomics (GA) described here includes four major elements: (a) Applied Plasma Physics Theory Program, (b) Alpha Particle Diagnostic, (c) Edge and Current Density Diagnostic, and (d) Fusion User Service Center (USC). The objective of the APP theoretical plasma physics research at GA is to support the DIII-D and other tokamak experiments and to significantly advance our ability to design a commercially-attractive fusion reactor. We categorize our efforts in three areas: magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) equilibria and stability; plasma transport with emphasis on H-mode, divertor, and boundary physics; and radio frequency (rf). The objective of the APP alpha particle diagnostic is to develop diagnostics of fast confined alpha particles using the interactions with the ablation cloud surrounding injected pellets and to develop diagnostic systems for reacting and ignited plasmas. The objective of the APP edge and current density diagnostic is to first develop a lithium beam diagnostic system for edge fluctuation studies on the Texas Experimental Tokamak (TEXT). The objective of the Fusion USC is to continue to provide maintenance and programming support to computer users in the GA fusion community. The detailed progress of each separate program covered in this report period is described in the following sections

  1. Theoretical Plasma Physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vahala, George M. [College of William and Mary, Williamsburg, VA (United States)

    2013-12-31

    Lattice Boltzmann algorithms are a mesoscopic method to solve problems in nonlinear physics which are highly parallelized – unlike the direction solution of the original problem. These methods are applied to both fluid and magnetohydrodynamic turbulence. By introducing entropic constraints one can enforce the positive definiteness of the distribution functions and so be able to simulate fluids at high Reynolds numbers without numerical instabilities. By introducing a vector distribution function for the magnetic field one can enforce the divergence free condition on the magnetic field automatically, without the need of divergence cleaning as needed in most direct numerical solutions of the resistive magnetohydrodynamic equations. The principal reason for the high parallelization of lattice Boltzmann codes is that they consist of a kinetic collisional relaxation step (which is purely local) followed by a simple shift of the relaxed data to neighboring lattice sites. In large eddy simulations, the closure schemes are highly nonlocal – the most famous of these schemes is that due to Smagorinsky. Under a lattice Boltzmann representation the Smagorinsky closure is purely local – being simply a particular moment on the perturbed distribution fucntions. After nonlocal fluid moment models were discovered to represent Landau damping, it was found possible to model these fluid models using an appropriate lattice Boltzmann algorithm. The close to ideal parallelization of the lattice Boltzmann codes permitted us to be Gordon Bell finalists on using the Earth Simulation in Japan. We have also been involved in the radio frequency propagation of waves into a tokamak and into a spherical overdense tokamak plasma. Initially we investigated the use of a quasi-optical grill for the launching of lower hybrid waves into a tokamak. It was found that the conducting walls do not prevent the rods from being properly irradiated, the overloading of the quasi-optical grill is not severe

  2. Particle Physics and Programming Languages

    OpenAIRE

    Watts, Gordon

    2017-01-01

    A SeaLang meetup - a presentation discussing various programming languages used in particle physics, from pushing common modern languages a bit past where they should be pushed, to an embedded DSL, to some full blown ones written.

  3. Particle physics. Themes and challenges

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Quigg, C. [Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory, Batavia, IL (United States)

    1996-12-31

    It is an introductory talk to the Second Rencontres du Vietnam. This lecture is devoted to seven themes that express the essence of our understanding - and our possibilities on particle physics. (K.A.) 19 refs.

  4. Particle physics and gauge theories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morel, A.

    1985-01-01

    These notes are intended to help readers not familiar with particle physics in entering the domain of gauge field theory applied to the so-called standard model of strong and electroweak interactions. The introduction is considerably enlarged in order to give non specialists a general overview of present days ''elementary'' particle physics. The Glashow-Salam-Weinberg model is then treated, with the details which its unquestioned successes deserve, most probably for a long time. Finally SU(5) is presented as a prototype of these developments of particle physics which aim at a unification of all forces. Although its intrinsic theoretical difficulties and the non-observation of a sizable proton decay rate do not qualify this model as a realistic one, it has many of the properties expected from a ''good'' unified theory. In particular, it allows one to study interesting connections between particle physics and cosmology. 35 refs.

  5. Variational integrators in plasma physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kraus, Michael

    2013-07-01

    To a large extent, research in plasma physics is concerned with the description and analysis of energy and momentum transfer between different scales and different kinds of waves. In the numerical modelling of such phenomena it appears to be crucial to describe the transfer processes preserving the underlying conservation laws in order to prevent physically spurious solutions. In this work, special numerical methods, so called variational integrators, are developed for several models of plasma physics. Special attention is given to conservation properties like conservation of energy and momentum. By design, variational integrators are applicable to all systems that have a Lagrangian formulation. Usually, equations of motion are derived by Hamilton's action principle and then discretised. In the application of the variational integrator theory, the order of these steps is reversed. At first, the Lagrangian and the accompanying variational principle are discretised, such that discrete equations of motion can be obtained directly by applying the discrete variational principle to the discrete Lagrangian. The advantage of this approach is that the resulting discretisation automatically retains the conservation properties of the continuous system. Following an overview of the geometric formulation of classical mechanics and field theory, which forms the basis of the variational integrator theory, variational integrators are introduced in a framework adapted to problems from plasma physics. The applicability of variational integrators is explored for several important models of plasma physics: particle dynamics (guiding centre dynamics), kinetic theory (the Vlasov-Poisson system) and fluid theory (magnetohydrodynamics). These systems, with the exception of guiding centre dynamics, do not possess a Lagrangian formulation to which the variational integrator methodology is directly applicable. Therefore the theory is extended by linking it to Ibragimov's theory of

  6. Variational integrators in plasma physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kraus, Michael

    2013-01-01

    To a large extent, research in plasma physics is concerned with the description and analysis of energy and momentum transfer between different scales and different kinds of waves. In the numerical modelling of such phenomena it appears to be crucial to describe the transfer processes preserving the underlying conservation laws in order to prevent physically spurious solutions. In this work, special numerical methods, so called variational integrators, are developed for several models of plasma physics. Special attention is given to conservation properties like conservation of energy and momentum. By design, variational integrators are applicable to all systems that have a Lagrangian formulation. Usually, equations of motion are derived by Hamilton's action principle and then discretised. In the application of the variational integrator theory, the order of these steps is reversed. At first, the Lagrangian and the accompanying variational principle are discretised, such that discrete equations of motion can be obtained directly by applying the discrete variational principle to the discrete Lagrangian. The advantage of this approach is that the resulting discretisation automatically retains the conservation properties of the continuous system. Following an overview of the geometric formulation of classical mechanics and field theory, which forms the basis of the variational integrator theory, variational integrators are introduced in a framework adapted to problems from plasma physics. The applicability of variational integrators is explored for several important models of plasma physics: particle dynamics (guiding centre dynamics), kinetic theory (the Vlasov-Poisson system) and fluid theory (magnetohydrodynamics). These systems, with the exception of guiding centre dynamics, do not possess a Lagrangian formulation to which the variational integrator methodology is directly applicable. Therefore the theory is extended by linking it to Ibragimov's theory of

  7. The ABCs of particle physics

    CERN Document Server

    Biron, Lauren

    2016-01-01

    For lovers of rhymes and anthropomorphic Higgs bosons, Symmetry presents its first published board book, The ABCs of Particle Physics. Use it as an illustrated guide to basic particle- and astrophysics terms, or read it to your infant at bedtime, if you don’t mind their first word being “quark.”

  8. Forecasting report. Particle physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The present status of nuclear physics is examined. The various nuclear models, and theories for nuclear structure, nuclear reactions and nucleon-nucleon forces between free nucleons and nucleon inside nuclei are briefly presented. A new future towards exotic and superheavy nuclei is outlined, with nuclear macrophysics, and complex excitations. Nuclear physics connections with other fields and society are also examined and the tools of the physicists briefly surveyed [fr

  9. Computational Methods in Plasma Physics

    CERN Document Server

    Jardin, Stephen

    2010-01-01

    Assuming no prior knowledge of plasma physics or numerical methods, Computational Methods in Plasma Physics covers the computational mathematics and techniques needed to simulate magnetically confined plasmas in modern magnetic fusion experiments and future magnetic fusion reactors. Largely self-contained, the text presents the basic concepts necessary for the numerical solution of partial differential equations. Along with discussing numerical stability and accuracy, the author explores many of the algorithms used today in enough depth so that readers can analyze their stability, efficiency,

  10. Plasma analog of particle-pair production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsidulko, Yu.A.; Berk, H.L.

    1996-09-01

    It is shown that the plasma axial shear flow instability satisfies the Klein-Gordon equation. The plasma instability is then shown to be analogous to spontaneous particle-pair production when a potential energy is present that is greater than twice the particle rest mass energy. Stability criteria can be inferred based on field theoretical conservation laws

  11. Introduction to Particle Physics course

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva HR-RFA

    2006-01-01

    These lectures are an introduction to the ideas of particle physics, aimed at students and teachers with little or on knowledge of the subject. They form a broad basis that will be developed in more detail by the subsequent lecturers in the school. These four lectures are meant to present an overview of particle physics based on its historical evolution over the past century. It will be shown how concepts have evolved following progress in instrumentation and in theoretical ideas, from atoms to the elementary particles and their interactions, as they are known today.

  12. Hard sell for particle physics?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brown, Julian.

    1994-01-01

    With particle physics experimental research becoming ever more expensive, the author considers whether the cost of such research is worthwhile. As costs escalated on the Superconducting Supercollider, the project has now been terminated. Particle physicists must now look for commercial imperatives to justify their work. Many of the important spin-offs from particle physics research are described in order to justify the subject's continued funding, albeit at very high levels, where funds might otherwise be directed to more mundane but very necessary causes such as health care or education. (UK)

  13. Cosmology and particle physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Turner, M.S.

    1985-01-01

    The author reviews the standard cosmology, focusing on primordial nucleosynthesis, and discusses how the standard cosmology has been used to place constraints on the properties of various particles. Baryogenesis is examined in which the B, C, CP violating interactions in GUTs provide a dynamical explanation for the predominance of matter over antimatter and the present baryon-to-baryon ratio. Monoposes, cosmology and astrophysics are reviewed. The author also discusses supersymmetry/supergravity and cosmology, superstrings and cosmology in extra dimensions, and axions, astrophics, and cosmology

  14. Theoretical particle physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-01-01

    This report discusses the following topics: Heavy Quark Physics; Chiral Perturbation Theory; Skyrmions; Large-N Limit; Weak Scale Baryogenesis; Supersymmetry; Rare Decays; Technicolor; Chiral Lattice Fermions; Pauli-Villars Regulator and the Higgs Mass Bound; Higgs and Yukawa Interactions; Gauge Fixing; and Quantum Beables

  15. Particle physics experiments, 1991

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roberts, B.A.

    1992-01-01

    Data taking for this experiment was completed in December 1983. The samples include approximately 19,000 (ν) and 11,000 (ν-bar) charged current events. These constitute the largest data set of interactions on free protons. Work published to date includes studies of inclusive structure functions and final state properties, exclusive final states, neutral current cross sections and production of strange and charmed particles. During the past year results have been published on the production of f 2 (1270) and ν 0 (770) mesons in ρp and ρ-barp charged current interactions. In the case of the f 2 this represents the first observation of such production. It is found that the multiplicities are 0.047±0.017 in ρp and 0.17±0.018 in ρ-barp. The f 2 mesons are mostly produced at large hadronic invariant mass W and in the forward hemisphere. The production of ν 0 mesons can be observed with high statistics in both ρp and ρ-barp interactions and the differential cross section studied. The observations are compared with LUND Monte Carlo predictions, which are generally found to be too high. However qualitative features of the data are reproduced. Work continues on a precise determination of the neutral current/charged current ratio, on the study of charged and neutral current structure functions and on the production of strange particles. (author)

  16. VOA: a 2-d plasma physics code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eltgroth, P.G.

    1975-12-01

    A 2-dimensional relativistic plasma physics code was written and tested. The non-thermal components of the particle distribution functions are represented by expansion into moments in momentum space. These moments are computed directly from numerical equations. Currently three species are included - electrons, ions and ''beam electrons''. The computer code runs on either the 7600 or STAR machines at LLL. Both the physics and the operation of the code are discussed

  17. Theoretical particle physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-01-01

    This report discusses the following topics: heavy quark physics; Chiral Perturbation theory; Skyrmions; quarkonia and nuclear matter; parity violating nuclear matrix elements; how precisely can one determine M U /M D ; weak scale baryogenesis; constraints of baryogenesis form neutrino masses; majorons, double beta decay, supernova 1987A; rare decays; chiral lattice fermions; Pauli-Villars regulator and the Higgs mass bound; and Higgs and Yukawa interactions

  18. 2001 Summer school on particle physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Masiero, A.; Senjanovic, G.; Smirnov, A.Yu.; Thompson, G.

    2002-01-01

    The aim of this school was to give a panoramic view on the field of particle physics with its achievements and problems, successes and failures. The standard model of the electroweak and strong interactions is in perfect shape. Physics of the standard model and its precision tests have been extensively discussed during the school. What is next? Do we have a 'standard model' of physics beyond the standard model? In this connection the status of low scale supersymmetry, supersymmetric Grand Unification and various flavor symmetries has been presented. Discovery of neutrino masses and mixing is probably the first experimental manifestation of new physics. Do we have a viable alternative of the (TeV scale) SUSY and GUT? Models with large, or infinite, or wrapped extra dimensions, the bulk-brane scenarios (widely discussed in series of lectures) may give some answers to this question. Is non-commutative field theory relevant for particle physics? Are the tools we have at hand enough to solve problems of particle physics? Is something fundamentally important missed in our approaches? These, and many other questions, were among the hot topics of the school. In this volume we publish four courses of lectures given by leading experts in the fields which represent two main areas of the research mentioned above: Physics of the standard model and Physics beyond the standard model. Both basic and advanced topics are presented in the lectures on nonperturbative QCD and quark-gluon plasma. First results from heavy ion collider RHIC are discussed. Important recent progress in particle physics is related to operation of the B-factories. This subject is covered in lectures on B-physics and CP-violation. Physics beyond the standard model is represented by lectures on Grand Unification with emphasis on explanation of fermion masses, in particular neutrino masses and mixing, and on predictions for proton decay. Another course is devoted to the fascinating subject: physics of non

  19. 2001 Summer school on particle physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Masiero, A [SISSA, International School for Advanced Studies, Trieste (Italy); Senjanovic, G; Smirnov, A Yu; Thompson, G [Abdus Salam ICTP, Trieste (Italy)

    2002-09-15

    The aim of this school was to give a panoramic view on the field of particle physics with its achievements and problems, successes and failures. The standard model of the electroweak and strong interactions is in perfect shape. Physics of the standard model and its precision tests have been extensively discussed during the school. What is next? Do we have a 'standard model' of physics beyond the standard model? In this connection the status of low scale supersymmetry, supersymmetric Grand Unification and various flavor symmetries has been presented. Discovery of neutrino masses and mixing is probably the first experimental manifestation of new physics. Do we have a viable alternative of the (TeV scale) SUSY and GUT? Models with large, or infinite, or wrapped extra dimensions, the bulk-brane scenarios (widely discussed in series of lectures) may give some answers to this question. Is non-commutative field theory relevant for particle physics? Are the tools we have at hand enough to solve problems of particle physics? Is something fundamentally important missed in our approaches? These, and many other questions, were among the hot topics of the school. In this volume we publish four courses of lectures given by leading experts in the fields which represent two main areas of the research mentioned above: Physics of the standard model and Physics beyond the standard model. Both basic and advanced topics are presented in the lectures on nonperturbative QCD and quark-gluon plasma. First results from heavy ion collider RHIC are discussed. Important recent progress in particle physics is related to operation of the B-factories. This subject is covered in lectures on B-physics and CP-violation. Physics beyond the standard model is represented by lectures on Grand Unification with emphasis on explanation of fermion masses, in particular neutrino masses and mixing, and on predictions for proton decay. Another course is devoted to the fascinating subject: physics of non

  20. Dark matter and particle physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Masiero, A [SISSA-ISAS, Trieste (Italy) and INFN, Sezione di Trieste (Italy); Pascoli, S [SISSA-ISAS, Trieste (Italy) and INFN, Sezione di Trieste (Italy)

    2001-11-15

    Dark matter constitutes a key-problem at the interface between Particle Physics, Astrophysics and Cosmology. Indeed, the observational facts which have been accumulated in the last years on dark matter point to the existence of an amount of non-baryonic dark matter. Since the Standard Model of Particle Physics does not possess any candidate for such non-baryonic dark matter, this problem constitutes a major indication for new Physics beyond the Standard Model. We analyze the most important candidates for non-baryonic dark matter in the context of extensions of the Standard Model (in particular supersymmetric models). The recent hints for the presence of a large amount of unclustered 'vacuum' energy (cosmological constant?) is discussed from the Astrophysical and Particle Physics perspective. (author)

  1. Plasma simulation studies using multilevel physics models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, W.; Belova, E.V.; Fu, G.Y.; Tang, X.Z.; Strauss, H.R.; Sugiyama, L.E.

    1999-01-01

    The question of how to proceed toward ever more realistic plasma simulation studies using ever increasing computing power is addressed. The answer presented here is the M3D (Multilevel 3D) project, which has developed a code package with a hierarchy of physics levels that resolve increasingly complete subsets of phase-spaces and are thus increasingly more realistic. The rationale for the multilevel physics models is given. Each physics level is described and examples of its application are given. The existing physics levels are fluid models (3D configuration space), namely magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) and two-fluids; and hybrid models, namely gyrokinetic-energetic-particle/MHD (5D energetic particle phase-space), gyrokinetic-particle-ion/fluid-electron (5D ion phase-space), and full-kinetic-particle-ion/fluid-electron level (6D ion phase-space). Resolving electron phase-space (5D or 6D) remains a future project. Phase-space-fluid models are not used in favor of δf particle models. A practical and accurate nonlinear fluid closure for noncollisional plasmas seems not likely in the near future. copyright 1999 American Institute of Physics

  2. Event generators in particle physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sjostrand, Torbjorn

    1994-01-01

    This presentation gives an introduction to the topic of event generators in particle physics . The emphasis is on the physics aspects that have to be considered in the construction of a generator, and what lessons we have learned from comparisons with data. A brief survey of existing generators is also included. As illustration, a few topics of current interest are covered in a bit more detail: QCD uncertainties in W mass determinations and γp/γγ physics. (author)

  3. Summer School on Particle Physics

    CERN Document Server

    2015-01-01

    The goal of the school is to give a detailed overview of particle physics and cover the most important areas where significant progress has been achieved recently. This year the school will cover both the energy and the intensity frontiers, with lectures covering the physics relevant for the next LHC run, future hadron colliders, direct and indirect probes of dark sectors and early universe physics.

  4. Summer School on Particle Physics

    CERN Document Server

    2013-01-01

    The goal of the school is to give a detailed overview of particle physics and cover the most important and perspective areas where significant progress has been achieved recently. In 2013, the main focus will be on the LHC results, their interpretation and implications for Physics Beyond the Standard model. Lectures will also cover progress in neutrino physics, dark matter searches and the study of cosmic radiation.

  5. The Multiverse and Particle Physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donoghue, John F.

    2016-10-01

    The possibility of fundamental theories with very many ground states, each with different physical parameters, changes the way that we approach the major questions of particle physics. Most importantly, it raises the possibility that these different parameters could be realized in different domains in the larger universe. In this review, I survey the motivations for the multiverse and the impact of the idea of the multiverse on the search for new physics beyond the Standard Model.

  6. Elementary particle physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Izen, J.M.

    1994-01-01

    Much of the work was connected with experimental measurements made at the Beijing Spectrometer operating at √s = 4.03 GeV. The effort has now moved to investigating the physics derived from the √s = 4.03 GeV data, including D s production, absolute D s branching fractions (hadronic, leptonic, and inclusive semileptonic), D*D and D*D* production, absolute D hadronic branching fractions, D* branching fractions, and an upper limit on the ν τ mass. 2 figs., 11 refs

  7. Elementary particle physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kenyon, I.R.

    1987-01-01

    Intended for undergraduate and postgraduate students the book concentrates on the 'standard model' and the gauge symmetries. Leptons, quarks and forces are introduced at the beginning, followed by experimental techniques which have found them. Gauge theories are dealt with in order of increasing complexity - quantum electrodynamics and the gauge principle, symmetries and conservation laws, colour and quantum chromodynamics, the V - A theory of weak interactions and electroweak unification. Attention is then focussed on the hadrons. Deep inelastic scattering of hadrons is explained first, then hadron spectroscopy and then hadron interactions. Current developments beyond the Standard model - grand unification, supersymmetry, cosmology and gravitation -are discussed in the final chapter. The appendices cover kinematic, cross-section and decay-rate formulae, Breit-Wigner resonances, some Clebsch-Gordan coefficient tables, a table of particle properties, exercises and answers, and the Dirac equation. There is also an appendix on calculating scattering amplitudes for fermion + fermion going to fermion + fermion. A list of references is given. (U.K.)

  8. Plasma Physics. Lectures Presented at the Seminar on Plasma Physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1965-01-01

    The International Seminar on Plasma Physics held in Trieste during 5- 1 October 1964 was the first major activity of the International Atomic Energy Agency's new International Centre for Theoretical Physics. In bringing together plasma physicists belonging to three distinct schools, the American, West European and the Soviet schools, the Seminar provided a unique opportunity for extended contacts between physicists in this field. It is hoped that these Proceedings will be of permanent value in the literature of the subject

  9. Plasma Physics. Lectures Presented at the Seminar on Plasma Physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1965-06-15

    The International Seminar on Plasma Physics held in Trieste during 5- 1 October 1964 was the first major activity of the International Atomic Energy Agency's new International Centre for Theoretical Physics. In bringing together plasma physicists belonging to three distinct schools, the American, West European and the Soviet schools, the Seminar provided a unique opportunity for extended contacts between physicists in this field. It is hoped that these Proceedings will be of permanent value in the literature of the subject.

  10. Fusion Plasma Physics and ITER - An Introduction (2/4)

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2011-01-01

    The second lecture will explore some of the key physics phenomena which govern the behaviour of magnetic fusion plasmas and which have been the subject of intense research during the past 50 years: plasma confinement, magnetohydrodynamic stability and plasma-wall interactions encompass the major areas of plasma physics which must be understood to assemble an overall description of fusion plasma behaviour. In addition, as fusion plasmas approach the “burning plasma” regime, where internal heating due to fusion products dominates other forms of heating, the physics of the interaction between the α-particles produced by D-T fusion reactions and the thermal “background” plasma becomes significant. This lecture will also introduce the basic physics of fusion plasma production, plasma heating and current drive, and plasma measurements (“diagnostics”).

  11. The relaxation of plasmas with dust particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chutov, Yu.I.; Kravchenko, A.Yu.; Schram, P.P.J.M.

    1997-01-01

    Various parameters of relaxing plasmas with dust particles including the electron and ion energy distributions function are numerically simulated at various parameters of the dust particles using the PIC method and taking into account the dynamics of the dust particle charge without the assumption about the equilibrium of electrons and ions. Coulomb collisions are taken into account in the framework of the method of stochastic differential equations. The relaxation of bounded plasma clouds expanding into a vacuum as well as the relaxation of a uniform plasma, in which dust particles appear at some initial time, are investigated. The obtained results show that the relaxation of plasmas can be accompanied by a deviation of the ion distribution function from equilibrium as well as a change of the mean energy of electrons and ions because of the dependence of the collection of electrons and ions by dust particles on their energy. (author)

  12. Plasma simulation studies using multilevel physics models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, W.; Belova, E.V.; Fu, G.Y.

    2000-01-01

    The question of how to proceed toward ever more realistic plasma simulation studies using ever increasing computing power is addressed. The answer presented here is the M3D (Multilevel 3D) project, which has developed a code package with a hierarchy of physics levels that resolve increasingly complete subsets of phase-spaces and are thus increasingly more realistic. The rationale for the multilevel physics models is given. Each physics level is described and examples of its application are given. The existing physics levels are fluid models (3D configuration space), namely magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) and two-fluids; and hybrid models, namely gyrokinetic-energetic-particle/MHD (5D energetic particle phase-space), gyrokinetic-particle-ion/fluid-electron (5D ion phase-space), and full-kinetic-particle-ion/fluid-electron level (6D ion phase-space). Resolving electron phase-space (5D or 6D) remains a future project. Phase-space-fluid models are not used in favor of delta f particle models. A practical and accurate nonlinear fluid closure for noncollisional plasmas seems not likely in the near future

  13. Ultraviolet extensions of particle physics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berthier, Laure Gaëlle

    The discovery of the Higgs boson in 2012 at the Large Hadron Collider completed the Standard Model field content. Many questions though remain unanswered by the Standard Model triggering a search for new physics. New physics could manifest itself at the Large Hadron Collider by the discovery of new...... particles. However, the lack of new resonances might suggest that these new particles are still out of reach which leaves us with few options. Two possibilities are explored in this thesis. The first is to study precision measurements which might indicate new physics as small deviations from the Standard...... are expressed as power series with missing higher order terms. We also show how to connect ultraviolet models of new physics to the Standard Model effective field theory and calculate bounds on them using the Standard Model effective field theory fit results. Finally, we study a nonrelativistic ultraviolet...

  14. Research in theoretical particle physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McKay, D.W.; Munczek, H.; Ralston, J.

    1992-05-01

    This report discusses the following topics in high energy physics: dynamical symmetry breaking and Schwinger-Dyson equation; consistency bound on the minimal model Higgs mass; tests of physics beyond the standard model; particle astrophysics; the interface between perturbative and non-perturbative QCD; cosmology; anisotropy in quantum networks and integer quantum hall behavior; anomalous color transparency; quantum treatment of solitons; color transparency; quantum stabilization of skyrmions; and casimir effect

  15. Controlled fusion and plasma physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-01-01

    This document presents the several speeches that took place during the 22nd European Physical Society conference on Controlled Fusion and Plasma Physics in Bournemouth, UK, between the 2nd and 7th July 1995. The talks deal with new experiments carried out on several tokamaks, particularly Tore Supra, concerning plasma confinement and fusion. Some information on specific fusion devices or tokamak devices is provided, as well as results of experiments concerning plasma instability. Separate abstracts were prepared for all the 31 papers in this volume. (TEC)

  16. Controlled fusion and plasma physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-12-31

    This document presents the several speeches that took place during the 22nd European Physical Society conference on Controlled Fusion and Plasma Physics in Bournemouth, UK, between the 2nd and 7th July 1995. The talks deal with new experiments carried out on several tokamaks, particularly Tore Supra, concerning plasma confinement and fusion. Some information on specific fusion devices or tokamak devices is provided, as well as results of experiments concerning plasma instability. Separate abstracts were prepared for all the 31 papers in this volume. (TEC).

  17. Controlled fusion and plasma physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-12-31

    This document presents the several speeches that took place during the 22nd European Physical Society conference on Controlled Fusion and Plasma Physics in Bournemouth, UK, between the 2nd and 7th July 1995. The talks deal with new experiments carried out on several tokamaks, particularly Tore Supra, concerning plasma confinement and fusion. Some information on specific fusion devices or tokamak devices is provided, as well as results of experiments concerning plasma instability. Separate abstracts were prepared for all the 31 papers in this volume. (TEC).

  18. Particle physics using nuclear targets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferbel, T.

    1978-01-01

    The use of nuclear targets in particle physics is discussed and some recent results obtained in studies of hadronic interactions on nuclei summarized. In particular experimental findings on inclusive production and on coherent dissociation of mesons and baryons at high energies are presented. 41 references

  19. Research in elementary particle physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-01-01

    Experimental and theoretical work on high energy physics is reviewed. Included are preparations to study high-energy electron-proton interactions at HERA, light-cone QCD, decays of charm and beauty particles, neutrino oscillation, electron-positron interactions at CLEO II, detector development, and astrophysics and cosmology

  20. Topics in elementary particle physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dugan, M.J.

    1985-01-01

    Topics in elementary particle physics are discussed. Models with N = 2 supersymmetry are constructed. The CP violation properties of a class of N = 1 supergravity models are analyzed. The structure of a composite Higgs model is investigated. The implications of a 17 keV neutrino are considered

  1. Summer School on Particle Physics

    CERN Document Server

    2017-01-01

    The goal of the school is to give a detailed overview of particle physics from the basics of Standard Model phenomenology to the most important areas where significant progress has been achieved recently. This year the school will cover both the energy and the intensity frontiers, including lectures on experimental techniques for small scale experiments and on formal developments in quantum field theory.

  2. The Future of Particle Physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bjorken, James

    2000-06-15

    After a very brief review of twentieth century elementary particle physics, prospects for the next century are discussed. First and most important are technological limits of opportunities; next, the future experimental program, and finally the status of the theory, in particular its limitations as well as its opportunities.

  3. Studies in theoretical particle physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaplan, D.B.

    1992-01-01

    This report focuses on research on three distinct areas of particle physics: Chiral Fermions on the Lattice; Weak Scale Baryogenesis; analysis of parity violating nuclear forces, and other an attempt to render the electric dipole moment of the neutron immune from quantum gravity corrections

  4. Industrial impact of particle physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anon.

    1986-11-15

    The aim of particle physics is to advance Man's knowledge of the structure of the Universe around him. However attention is turning increasingly to links between the Laboratory and the growth area of high technology. What is the natural timescale for 'spinoff'? Can it be accelerated?.

  5. Cryogenic detectors for particle physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gonzalez-Mestres, L.; Perret-Gallix, D.

    1988-11-01

    A comprehensive introduction to cryogenic detector developments for particle physics is presented, covering conventional detectors cooled to low temperature (scintillators and semiconductors), superconductive and thermal sensitive devices, as well as the basics of cold electronics. After giving a critical overview of current work, we elaborate on possible new ways for further improvements and briefly evaluate the feasibility of the main proposed applications

  6. Plasma physics and instabilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lashmore-Davies, C.N.

    1981-01-01

    These lectures procide an introduction to the theory of plasmas and their instabilities. Starting from the Bogoliubov, Born, Green, Kirkwood, and Yvon (BBGKY) hierarchy of kinetic equations, the additional concept of self-consistent fields leads to the fundamental Vlasov equation and hence to the warm two-fluid model and the one-fluid MHD, or cold, model. The properties of small-amplitude waves in magnetized (and unmagnetized) plasmas, and the instabilities to which they give rise, are described in some detail, and a complete chapter is devoted to Landau damping. The linear theory of plasma instabilities is illustrated by the current-driven electrostatic kind, with descriptions of the Penrose criterion and the energy principle of ideal MHD. There is a brief account of the application of feedback control. The non-linear theory is represented by three examples: quasi-linear velocity-space instabilities, three-wave instabilities, and the stability of an arbitrarily largeamplitude wave in a plasma. (orig.)

  7. Transport, chaos and plasma physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benkadda, S.; Doveil, F.; Elskens, Y.

    1993-01-01

    This workshop made it possible to gather for the first time plasma physicists, dynamical systems physicists and mathematicians, around a general theme focusing on the characterisation of chaotic transport. The participations have been divided into 4 topics: - dynamical systems and microscopic models of chaotic transport, - magnetic fluctuations and transport in tokamaks, - drift wave turbulence, self-organisation and intermittency, and - Wave-particle interactions

  8. A research Program in Elementary Particle Physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sobel, Henry; Molzon, William; Lankford, Andrew; Taffard, Anyes; Whiteson, Daniel; Kirkby, David

    2013-07-25

    Work is reported in: Neutrino Physics, Cosmic Rays and Elementary Particles; Particle Physics and Charged Lepton Flavor Violation; Research in Collider Physics; Dark Energy Studies with BOSS and LSST.

  9. Topics in Plasma Physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vahala, Linda [Old Dominion Univ., Norfolk, VA (United States)

    2015-05-31

    During the period 1998-2013, research under the auspices of the Department of Energy was performed on RF waves in plasmas. This research was performed in close collaboration with Josef Preinhaelter, Jakub Urban, Vladimir Fuchs, Pavol Pavlo and Frantisek Zacek (Czech Academy of Sciences), Martin Valovic and Vladimir Shevchenko (Culham). This research is detailed and all 38 papers which were published by this team are cited.

  10. Research in elementary particle physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bland, R.W.; Greensite, J.

    1992-01-01

    Task A of this contract supports research in elementary particle physics using cryogenic particle detectors. We have developed superconducting aluminum tunnel-junction detectors sensitive to a variety of particle signals, and with potential application to a number of particle-physics problems. We have extended our range of technologies through a collaboration with Simon Labov, on niobium tri-layer junctions, and Jean-Paul Maneval, on high-T c superconducting bolometers. We have new data on response to low-energy X-rays and to alpha-particle signals from large-volume detectors. The theoretical work under this contract (Task B) is a continued investigation of nonperturbative aspects of quantum gravity. A Monte Carlo calculation is proposed for Euclidian quantum gravity, based on the ''fifth-time action'' stabilization procedure. Results from the last year include a set of seven papers, summarized below, addressing various aspects of nonperturbative quantum gravity and QCD. Among the issues- addressed is the so-called ''problem of time'' in canonical quantum gravity

  11. Plasma physics for controlled fusion

    CERN Document Server

    Miyamoto, Kenro

    2016-01-01

    This new edition presents the essential theoretical and analytical methods needed to understand the recent fusion research of tokamak and alternate approaches. The author describes magnetohydrodynamic and kinetic theories of cold and hot plasmas in detail. The book covers new important topics for fusion studies such as plasma transport by drift turbulence, which depend on the magnetic configuration and zonal flows. These are universal phenomena of microturbulence. They can modify the onset criterion for turbulent transport, instabilities driven by energetic particles as well as alpha particle generation and typical plasma models for computer simulation. The fusion research of tokamaks with various new versions of H modes are explained. The design concept of ITER, the international tokamak experimental reactor, is described for inductively driven operations as well as steady-state operations using non-inductive drives. Alternative approaches of reversed-field pinch and its relaxation process, stellator includi...

  12. Fusion programs in applied plasma physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-07-01

    This report summarizes the progress made in theoretical and experimental research funded by US Department of Energy Grant No. DE-FG03-92ER54150, during the period July 11, 1992 through May 31, 1993. Four main tasks are reported: applied plasma physics theory, alpha particle diagnostic, edge and current density diagnostic, and plasma rotation drive. The report also discusses the research plans for the theory and experimental programs for the next grant year. Reports and publications supported by the grant during this period are listed in the final section

  13. Introduction to plasma physics and controlled fusion

    CERN Document Server

    Chen, Francis F

    1984-01-01

    This complete introduction to plasma physics and controlled fusion by one of the pioneering scientists in this expanding field offers both a simple and intuitive discussion of the basic concepts of this subject and an insight into the challenging problems of current research. In a wholly lucid manner the work covers single-particle motions, fluid equations for plasmas, wave motions, diffusion and resistivity, Landau damping, plasma instabilities and nonlinear problems. For students, this outstanding text offers a painless introduction to this important field; for teachers, a large collection of problems; and for researchers, a concise review of the fundamentals as well as original treatments of a number of topics never before explained so clearly. This revised edition contains new material on kinetic effects, including Bernstein waves and the plasma dispersion function, and on nonlinear wave equations and solitons.

  14. Particle acceleration in near critical density plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gu, Y.J.; Kong, Q.; Kawata, S.; Izumiyama, T.; Nagashima, T.

    2013-01-01

    Charged particle acceleration schemes driven by ultra intense laser and near critical density plasma interactions are presented. They include electron acceleration in a plasma channel, ion acceleration by the Coulomb explosion and high energy electron beam driven ion acceleration. It is found that under the near critical density plasma both ions and electrons are accelerated with a high acceleration gradient. The electron beam containing a large charge quantity is accelerated well with 23 GeV/cm. The collimated ion bunch reaches 1 GeV. The investigations and discussions are based on 2.5D PIC (particle-in-cell) simulations. (author)

  15. Particle Physics, 2nd Edition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, B. R.; Shaw, G.

    1998-01-01

    Particle Physics, Second Edition is a concise and lucid account of the fundamental constituents of matter. The standard model of particle physics is developed carefully and systematically, without heavy mathematical formalism, to make this stimulating subject accessible to undergraduate students. Throughout, the emphasis is on the interpretation of experimental data in terms of the basic properties of quarks and leptons, and extensive use is made of symmetry principles and Feynman diagrams, which are introduced early in the book. The Second Edition brings the book fully up to date, including the discovery of the top quark and the search for the Higgs boson. A final short chapter is devoted to the continuing search for new physics beyond the standard model. Particle Physics, Second Edition features: * A carefully structured and written text to help students understand this exciting and demanding subject. * Many worked examples and problems to aid student learning. Hints for solving the problems are given in an Appendix. * Optional "starred" sections and appendices, containing more specialised and advanced material for the more ambitious reader.

  16. Modelling of neutral particle transport in divertor plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kakizuka, Tomonori; Shimizu, Katsuhiro

    1995-01-01

    An outline of the modelling of neutral particle transport in the diverter plasma was described in the paper. The characteristic properties of divertor plasma were largely affected by interaction between neutral particles and divertor plasma. Accordingly, the behavior of neutral particle should be investigated quantitatively. Moreover, plasma and neutral gas should be traced consistently in the plasma simulation. There are Monte Carlo modelling and the neutral gas fluid modelling as the transport modelling. The former need long calculation time, but it is able to make the physical process modelling. A ultra-large parallel computer is good for the former. In spite of proposing some kinds of models, the latter has not been established. At the view point of reducing calculation time, a work station is good for the simulation of the latter, although some physical problems have not been solved. On the Monte Carlo method particle modelling, reducing the calculation time and introducing the interaction of particles are important subjects to develop 'the evolutional Monte Carlo Method'. To reduce the calculation time, two new methods: 'Implicit Monte Carlo method' and 'Free-and Diffusive-Motion Hybrid Monte-Carlo method' have been developing. (S.Y.)

  17. Nonlinear aspects of quantum plasma physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shukla, Padma K; Eliasson, B

    2010-01-01

    Dense quantum plasmas are ubiquitous in planetary interiors and in compact astrophysical objects (e.g., the interior of white dwarf stars, in magnetars, etc.), in semiconductors and micromechanical systems, as well as in the next-generation intense laser-solid density plasma interaction experiments and in quantum X-ray free-electron lasers. In contrast to classical plasmas, quantum plasmas have extremely high plasma number densities and low temperatures. Quantum plasmas are composed of electrons, positrons and holes, which are degenerate. Positrons (holes) have the same (slightly different) mass as electrons, but opposite charge. The degenerate charged particles (electrons, positrons, and holes) obey the Fermi-Dirac statistics. In quantum plasmas, there are new forces associated with (i) quantum statistical electron and positron pressures, (ii) electron and positron tunneling through the Bohm potential, and (iii) electron and positron angular momentum spin. Inclusion of these quantum forces allows the existence of very high-frequency dispersive electrostatic and electromagnetic waves (e.g., in the hard X-ray and gamma-ray regimes) with extremely short wavelengths. In this review paper, we present theoretical backgrounds for some important nonlinear aspects of wave-wave and wave-electron interactions in dense quantum plasmas. Specifically, we focus on nonlinear electrostatic electron and ion plasma waves, novel aspects of three-dimensional quantum electron fluid turbulence, as well as nonlinearly coupled intense electromagnetic waves and localized plasma wave structures. Also discussed are the phase-space kinetic structures and mechanisms that can generate quasistationary magnetic fields in dense quantum plasmas. The influence of the external magnetic field and the electron angular momentum spin on the electromagnetic wave dynamics is discussed. Finally, future perspectives of the nonlinear quantum plasma physics are highlighted. (reviews of topical problems)

  18. Plasma physics for controlled fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miyamoto, K.

    2010-01-01

    The primary objective of this lecture note is to present the theories and experiments of plasma physics for recent activities of controlled fusion research for graduate and senior undergraduate students. Chapters 1-6 describe the basic knowledge of plasma and magnetohydrodynamics (MHD). MHD instabilities limit the beta ratio (ratio of plasma pressure to magnetic pressure) of confined plasma. Chapters 7-9 provide the kinetic theory of hot plasma and discuss the wave heating and non-inductive current drive. The dispersion relation derived by the kinetic theory are used to discuss plasma waves and perturbed modes. Landau damping is the essential mechanism of plasma heating and the stabilization of perturbation. Landau inverse damping brings the amplification of waves and the destabilization of perturbed modes. Chapter 10 explains the plasma transport due to turbulence, which is the most important and challenging subject for plasma confinement. Theories and simulations including subject of zonal flow are introduced. Chapters 11, 12 and 13 describe the recent activities of tokamak including ITER as well as spherical tokamak, reversed field pinch (RFP) and stellarator including quasi-symmetric configurations. Emphasis has been given to tokamak research since it made the most remarkable progress and the construction phase of 'International Tokamak Experimental Reactor' called ITER has already started. (author)

  19. Computer simulation of phenomena in plasma via particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alves, M.V.; Bittencourt, J.A.

    1988-06-01

    The method of plasma computer simulation via particles has become an efficient tool to investigate the time and spatial evolution of various physical phenomena in plasmas. This method is based on the study of the individual plasma particle motions interacting with one another and with the externally applied fields. Although fairly simple, it allows a non-linear analysis of complex plasma physical phenomena and to obtain diagnostics even for regions of the system where experimental measurements would be difficult to make. In this report, a general view of the electrostatic one-dimensional computer code ES1, originally developed by A. Bruce Langdon, is presented. The main mathematical artifice in this code is the use of a spatial grid in which various plasma particles are represented by ''superparticles'', using a given shape function. The principal characteristics of the model, the approximations made and the mathematical methods used to solve the equations involved, are described. The specification of the input parameters which characterize the system, the initial conditions and the graphic diagnostics which can be utilized, are also described. Results are presented illustrating graphically the behavior of the plasma oscillations, the two-stream instability and the beam-plasma instability. (author) [pt

  20. The unknowns in particles physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spiro, M.

    1996-01-01

    The author presents the historical quest of particles since Democrite's time. Some particles are very difficult to identify as for instance neutrinos and antiparticles. Nine anti-hydrogen atoms have just being manufactured in the CERN. This successful result is the last episode of a long history. This achievement is the first step in the elaboration of antimatter too. The enigma of the antimatter created at the universe dawn is perennial. Why is the universe made of matter and not of antimatter? Is there any slight difference in the physical law of antimatter and matter? That's why the study of antimatter is so important. The question of the missing mass of our galaxy leads to another quest: the Higgs's particles. The graviton is another target. That could lead to the unification theory, may be another proof of the unreasonable efficiency of mathematics. (O.M.). 2 figs

  1. Non-accelerator particle physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steinberg, R.I.

    1990-01-01

    The goals of this research are the experimental testing of fundamental theories of physics such as grand unification and the exploration of cosmic phenomena through the techniques of particle physics. We are currently engaged in construction of the MACRO detector, an Italian-American collaborative research instrument with a total particle acceptance of 10,000 m 2 sr, which will perform a sensitive search for magnetic monopoles using excitation-ionization methods. Other major objective of the MACRO experiment are to search for astrophysical high energy neutrinos expected to be emitted by such objects as Vela X-1, LMC X-4 and SN-1987A and to search for low energy neutrino bursts from gravitational stellar collapse. We are also working on BOREX, a liquid scintillation solar neutrino experiment and GRANDE, a proposed very large area surface detector for astrophysical neutrinos, and on the development of new techniques for liquid scintillation detection

  2. Instrumentation in elementary particle physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fabjan, C W [European Organization for Nuclear Research, Geneva (Switzerland); Pilcher, J E [Chicago Univ., IL (United States); eds.

    1988-01-01

    The first International Committee for Future Accelerators Instrumentation School was held at the International Centre for Theoretical Physics, Trieste, Italy from 8 to 19 June 1987. The School was attended by 74 students of whom 45 were from developing countries, 10 lecturers and 9 laboratory instructors. The next generation of elementary particle physics experiments would depend vitally on new ideas in instrumentation. This is a field where creativity and imagination play a major role and large budgets are not a prerequisite. One of the unique features was the presentation of four laboratory experiments using modern techniques and instrumentation. Refs, figs and tabs.

  3. Instrumentation in elementary particle physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fabjan, C.W.; Pilcher, J.E.

    1988-01-01

    The first International Committee for Future Accelerators Instrumentation School was held at the International Centre for Theoretical Physics, Trieste, Italy from 8 to 19 June 1987. The School was attended by 74 students of whom 45 were from developing countries, 10 lecturers and 9 laboratory instructors. The next generation of elementary particle physics experiments would depend vitally on new ideas in instrumentation. This is a field where creativity and imagination play a major role and large budgets are not a prerequisite. One of the unique features was the presentation of four laboratory experiments using modern techniques and instrumentation. Refs, figs and tabs

  4. Nuclear physics with polarized particles

    CERN Document Server

    Paetz gen Schieck, Hans

    2012-01-01

    The measurement of spin-polarization observables in reactions of nuclei and particles is of great utility and advantage when the effects of single-spin sub-states are to be investigated. Indeed, the unpolarized differential cross-section encompasses the averaging over the spin states of the particles, and thus loses details of the interaction process. This introductory text combines, in a single volume, course-based lecture notes on spin physics and on polarized-ion sources with the aim of providing a concise yet self-contained starting point for newcomers to the field, as well as for lecturers in search of suitable material for their courses and seminars. A significant part of the book is devoted to introducing the formal theory-a description of polarization and of nuclear reactions with polarized particles. The remainder of the text describes the physical basis of methods and devices necessary to perform experiments with polarized particles and to measure polarization and polarization effects in nuclear rea...

  5. Supersymmetry in Elementary Particle Physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peskin, Michael E.; /SLAC

    2008-02-05

    These lectures give a general introduction to supersymmetry, emphasizing its application to models of elementary particle physics at the 100 GeV energy scale. I discuss the following topics: the construction of supersymmetric Lagrangians with scalars, fermions, and gauge bosons, the structure and mass spectrum of the Minimal Supersymmetric Standard Model (MSSM), the measurement of the parameters of the MSSM at high-energy colliders, and the solutions that the MSSM gives to the problems of electroweak symmetry breaking and dark matter.

  6. Plasma eigenmodes and particle acceleration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rowland, H.L.; Papadopoulos, K.; Tanaka, M.

    1983-01-01

    Recent simulations have revealed that for low initial ion beam velocities (νsub(d)<3νsub(ti)), the modified two stream instability leads to the formation of superthermal electron tails instead of the bulk heating seen for higher initial νsub(d). This tail formation arises from a nonadiabatic change in the normal modes of the plasma due to strong heating of the ions by the instability. In another example a change in the normal modes is shown to lead to ion heating when the low frequency normal modes of a plasma change from nonlinear eigenmodes (i.e., cavitons) to linear ion-acoustic waves. (author)

  7. Geneva University - Particle Physics Seminars

    CERN Multimedia

    Université de Genève

    2010-01-01

    GENEVA UNIVERSITY École de physique Département de physique nucléaire et corspusculaire 24, quai Ernest-Ansermet 1211 GENÈVE 4 Tél. (022) 379 62 73 Fax: (022) 379 69 92 Wednesday 13 October 2010 PARTICLE PHYSICS SEMINAR at 17.00 hrs – Stückelberg Auditorium Exotic hadrons, Light Higgs and Dark Forces at BABAR Dr. Bertrand Echenard / California Institute of Technology From spectroscopy to search new physics, B-factories have explored many exciting topics besides establishing CP-violation in B decays. We will review recent results on spectroscopy, exotic hadrons and search for light Higgs. Current searches for dark forces and GeV-scale dark matter particles will also be discussed. Information : http://dpnc.unige.ch/seminaire/annonce.html Organizer : G. Pasztor Wednesday 20 October 2010 PARTICLE PHYSICS SEMINAR at 17.00 hrs – Stückelberg Auditorium The MINOS Experiment, Results and Future Plans Pro...

  8. Physics options in the plasma code VOA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eltgroth, P.G.

    1976-06-01

    A two dimensional relativistic plasma physics code has been modified to accomodate general electromagnetic boundary conditions and various approximations of basic physics. The code can treat internal conductors and insulators, imposed electromagnetic fields, the effects of external circuitry and non-equilibrium starting conditions. Particle dynamics options include a full microscopic treatment, fully relaxed electrons, a low frequency electron approximation and a combination of approximations for specified zones. Electromagnetic options include the full wave treatment, an electrostatic approximation and two varieties of magnetohydrodynamic approximations in specified zones

  9. Introduction to plasma physics and controlled fusion

    CERN Document Server

    Chen, Francis F

    2016-01-01

    The third edition of this classic text presents a complete introduction to plasma physics and controlled fusion, written by one of the pioneering scientists in this expanding field.  It offers both a simple and intuitive discussion of the basic concepts of the subject matter and an insight into the challenging problems of current research. This outstanding text offers students a painless introduction to this important field; for teachers, a large collection of problems; and for researchers, a concise review of the fundamentals as well as original treatments of a number of topics never before explained so clearly.  In a wholly lucid manner the second edition covered charged-particle motions, plasmas as fluids, kinetic theory, and nonlinear effects.  For the third edition, two new chapters have been added to incorporate discussion of more recent advances in the field.  The new chapter 9 on Special Plasmas covers non-neutral plasmas, pure electron plasmas, solid and ultra-cold plasmas, pair-ion plasmas, d...

  10. Electrostatic plasma lens for focusing negatively charged particle beams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goncharov, A A; Dobrovolskiy, A M; Dunets, S M; Litovko, I V; Gushenets, V I; Oks, E M

    2012-02-01

    We describe the current status of ongoing research and development of the electrostatic plasma lens for focusing and manipulating intense negatively charged particle beams, electrons, and negative ions. The physical principle of this kind of plasma lens is based on magnetic isolation electrons providing creation of a dynamical positive space charge cloud in shortly restricted volume propagating beam. Here, the new results of experimental investigations and computer simulations of wide-aperture, intense electron beam focusing by plasma lens with positive space charge cloud produced due to the cylindrical anode layer accelerator creating a positive ion stream towards an axis system is presented.

  11. Experimental techniques in nuclear and particle physics

    CERN Document Server

    Tavernier, Stefaan

    2009-01-01

    The book is based on a course in nuclear and particle physics that the author has taught over many years to physics students, students in nuclear engineering and students in biomedical engineering. It provides the basic understanding that any student or researcher using such instruments and techniques should have about the subject. After an introduction to the structure of matter at the subatomic scale, it covers the experimental aspects of nuclear and particle physics. Ideally complementing a theoretically-oriented textbook on nuclear physics and/or particle physics, it introduces the reader to the different techniques used in nuclear and particle physics to accelerate particles and to measurement techniques (detectors) in nuclear and particle physics. The main subjects treated are: interactions of subatomic particles in matter; particle accelerators; basics of different types of detectors; and nuclear electronics. The book will be of interest to undergraduates, graduates and researchers in both particle and...

  12. Cavitational micro-particles: plasma formation mechanisms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bica, Ioan

    2005-01-01

    Cavitational micro-particles are a class to which the micro-spheres, the micro-tubes and the octopus-shaped micro-particles belong. The cavitational micro-particles (micro-spheres, micro-tubes and octopus-shaped micro-particles) at an environmental pressure. The micro-spheres, the micro-tubes and the ligaments of the octopus-shaped micro-particles are produced in the argon plasma and are formed of vapors with low values of the molar concentration in comparison with the molar density of the gas and vapor mixture, the first one on the unstable and the last two on the stable movement of the vapors. The ligaments of the octopus-shaped micro-particles are open at the top for well-chosen values of the sub-cooling of the vapor and gas cylinders. The nitrogen in the air favors the formation of pores in the wall of the micro-spheres. In this paper we present the cavitational micro-particles, their production in the plasma and some mechanisms for their formation in the plasma. (author)

  13. Implicit particle simulation of electromagnetic plasma phenomena

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kamimura, T.; Montalvo, E.; Barnes, D.C.; Leboeuf, J.N.; Tajima, T.

    1986-11-01

    A direct method for the implicit particle simulation of electromagnetic phenomena in magnetized, multi-dimensional plasmas is developed. The method is second-order accurate for ωΔt < 1, with ω a characteristic frequency and time step Δt. Direct time integration of the implicit equations with simplified space differencing allows the consistent inclusion of finite particle size. Decentered time differencing of the Lorentz force permits the efficient simulation of strongly magnetized plasmas. A Fourier-space iterative technique for solving the implicit field corrector equation, based on the separation of plasma responses perpendicular and parallel to the magnetic field and longitudinal and transverse to the wavevector, is described. Wave propagation properties in a uniform plasma are in excellent agreement with theoretical expectations. Applications to collisionless tearing and coalescence instabilities further demonstrate the usefulness of the algorithm. (author)

  14. Final Report: Particle Physics Research Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karchin, Paul E. [Wayne State Univ., Detroit, MI (United States). Department of Physics and Astronomy; Harr, Robert F. [Wayne State Univ., Detroit, MI (United States). Department of Physics and Astronomy; Mattson, Mark. E. [Wayne State Univ., Detroit, MI (United States). Department of Physics and Astronomy

    2011-09-01

    We describe recent progress in accelerator-based experiments in high-energy particle physics and progress in theoretical investigations in particle physics. We also describe future plans in these areas.

  15. Fundamental physics in particle traps

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quint, Wolfgang; Vogel, Manuel

    2014-01-01

    The individual topics are covered by leading experts in the respective fields of research. Provides readers with present theory and experiments in this field. A useful reference for researchers. This volume provides detailed insight into the field of precision spectroscopy and fundamental physics with particles confined in traps. It comprises experiments with electrons and positrons, protons and antiprotons, antimatter and highly charged ions, together with corresponding theoretical background. Such investigations represent stringent tests of quantum electrodynamics and the Standard model, antiparticle and antimatter research, test of fundamental symmetries, constants, and their possible variations with time and space. They are key to various aspects within metrology such as mass measurements and time standards, as well as promising to further developments in quantum information processing. The reader obtains a valuable source of information suited for beginners and experts with an interest in fundamental studies using particle traps.

  16. Geneva University - Particle Physics seminar

    CERN Multimedia

    Université de Genève

    2011-01-01

    UNIVERSITE DE GENEVE Ecole de physique Département de physique nucléaire et corspusculaire 24, quai Ernest-Ansermet 1211 Geneva 4 Tel. (022) 379 62 73 Fax (022) 379 69 92 Wednesday 8 June 2011 PARTICLE PHYSICS SEMINAR at 17.00 hrs – Stückelberg Auditorium A Novel Experiment for the Search muon -> eee Prof. Andre Schoening, University of Heidelberg The absence of lepton-flavor changing processes, like the non-observation of the radiative decay mu -> e gamma, has been a miracle since the dawn of the Standard Model of Particle Physics and lead to the introduction of the concept of lepton family numbers. Several experiments in the last decade have shown clear evidence for neutrino oscillations. The neutrino mixing angles measured are known to be large. However, the discovery of lepton flavor violating (LFV) effects in the charged lepton sector is yet owing. After motivating the search for LFV in general I will discuss the physics potential of a search m...

  17. A collision model in plasma particle simulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ma Yanyun; Chang Wenwei; Yin Yan; Yue Zongwu; Cao Lihua; Liu Daqing

    2000-01-01

    In order to offset the collisional effects reduced by using finite-size particles, β particle clouds are used in particle simulation codes (β is the ratio of charge or mass of modeling particles to real ones). The method of impulse approximation (strait line orbit approximation) is used to analyze the scattering cross section of β particle clouds plasmas. The authors can obtain the relation of the value of a and β and scattering cross section (a is the radius of β particle cloud). By using this relation the authors can determine the value of a and β so that the collisional effects of the modeling system is correspondent with the real one. The authors can also adjust the values of a and β so that the authors can enhance or reduce the collisional effects fictitiously. The results of simulation are in good agreement with the theoretical ones

  18. Research in Elementary Particle Physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    White, Andrew Paul [Univ. of Texas, Arlington, TX (United States); De, Kaushik [Univ. of Texas, Arlington, TX (United States); Brandt, Andrew [Univ. of Texas, Arlington, TX (United States); Yu, Jaehoon [Univ. of Texas, Arlington, TX (United States); Farbin, Amir [Univ. of Texas, Arlington, TX (United States)

    2015-02-02

    This report details the accomplishments and research results for the High Energy Physics Group at the University of Texas at Arlington at the Energy and Intensity Frontiers. For the Energy Frontier we have made fundamental contributions in the search for supersymmetric particles, proposed to explain the stabilization of the mass of the Higgs Boson – the agent giving mass to all known particles. We have also made major contributions to the search for additional Higgs Bosons and to the planning for future searches. This work has been carried out in the context of the ATLAS Experiment at CERN (European Nuclear Research Laboratory) and for which we have made major contributions to computing and data distribution and processing, and have worked to calibrate the detector and prepare upgraded electronics for the future. Our other contribution to the Energy Frontier has been to the International Linear Collider (ILC) project, potentially hosted by Japan, and to the Silicon Detector Concept (SiD) in particular. We have lead the development of the SiD Concept and have worked on a new form of precise energy measurement for particles from the high energy collisions of electrons and positrons at the ILC. For the Intensity Frontier, we have worked to develop the concept of Long Baseline Neutrino Experiment(s) (LBNE) at the Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory. Our contributions to detector development, neutrino beam studies, particle identification, software development will facilitate future studies of the oscillation of one type of neutrino into other type(s), establish the order of the neutrino masses, and, through an innovative new idea, allow us to create a beam of dark matter particles.

  19. SLAC Library - Online Particle Physics Information

    Science.gov (United States)

    Online Particle Physics Information Compiled by Revised: April, 201 7 This annotated list provides a highly selective set of online resources that are useful to the particle physics community. It & Reports Particle Physics Journals & Reviews Online Journals and Tables of Contents Journal

  20. Relevance of plasma science to particle accelerators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Herrmannsfeldt, W.B.

    1998-01-01

    In following the theme of this Symposium, ''Plasma Science and Its Applications,'' the authors may be suggesting to some readers that the other applications of Plasma Science somehow justify the existence of a field traditionally devoted to fusion energy. In fact, they do not believe that plasma science can or should be justified for its spin-off contributions. Nevertheless, the unity of science would be seriously threatened by a precipitous decline in the support for plasma science. It is that unity which repeatedly has been verified as one looks for how advances in one field are crucial to several other seemingly fundamentally different fields. Thus it is in this case, as a representative of the community of Particle Accelerator Scientists, that they show four significant areas in which the methods and the results of plasma science have been applied to Accelerator Science. They have deliberately skipped plasma ion sources which are perhaps the most obvious application of plasmas to accelerators. Two of their four examples are cases in which the computational methods of plasma science have been adopted, and two are examples in which the plasmas themselves are employed. One of each category are now actively in use and the other one in each category is being used to develop or design new devices

  1. Non-accelerator particle physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steinberg, R.I.; Lane, C.E.

    1991-08-01

    The goals of this research were the experimental testing of fundamental theories of physics such as grand unification and the exploration of cosmic phenomena through the techniques of particle physics. We have worked on the MACRO experiment, which is employing a large area underground detector to search for grand unification magnetic monopoles and dark matter candidates and to study cosmic ray muons as well as low and high energy neutrinos; the νIMB project, which seeks to refurbish and upgrade the IMB water Cerenkov detector to perform an improved proton decay search together with a long baseline reactor neutrino oscillation experiments using a one kiloton liquid scintillator (the Perry experiment); and development of technology for improved liquid scintillators and for very low background materials in support of the MACRO and Perry experiments and for new solar neutrino experiments

  2. Non-accelerator particle physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steinberg, R.I.; Lane, C.E.

    1991-09-01

    The goals of this research are the experimental testing of fundamental theories of physics such as grand unification and the exploration of cosmic phenomena through the techniques of particle physics. We are working on the MACRO experiment, which employs a large area underground detector to search for grand unification magnetic monopoles and dark matter candidates and to study cosmic ray muons as well as low and high energy neutrinos: the νIMB project, which seeks to refurbish and upgrade the IMB water Cerenkov detector to perform an improved proton decay search together with a long baseline reactor neutrino oscillation experiment using a kiloton liquid scintillator (the Perry experiment); and development of technology for improved liquid scintillators and for very low background materials in support of the MACRO and Perry experiments and for new solar neutrino experiments. 21 refs., 19 figs., 6 tabs

  3. Progress report : Plasma Physics Section

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iyyengar, S.K.; Rohatgi, V.K.

    1975-08-01

    The activities of the plasma physics section of the Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, India over the last five years (1970-75) are reported. The R and D programme of the section has been divided into four cells mainly i.e., (i) Thermal plasma (ii) Relativistic Electron Beam (iii) Energetics and (iv) Electron beam technology. The salient features of the development activities carried out in these cells are outlined. In the Thermal plasma group, considerable research work has been done in (a) fundamental plasma studies, (b) industrial plasma technology and (c) open cycle MHD power generation project. The relativistic electron beam group is engaged in improving the technology to realize high power lasers, and pulsed thermonuclear fusion. The energetics programme is oriented to develop high voltage d.c. generators and pulse generators. The electron beam techniques developed here are routinely used for melting refractory and reactive metals. The technical know-how of the welding machines developed has been transfered to industries. Equipment developed by this section, such as, (1) electron beam furnace, (2) plasma cutting torch, (3) impulse magnet charger etc. are listed. (A.K.)

  4. Collisionless shocks in space plasmas structure and accelerated particles

    CERN Document Server

    Burgess, David

    2015-01-01

    Shock waves are an important feature of solar system plasmas, from the solar corona out to the edge of the heliosphere. This engaging introduction to collisionless shocks in space plasmas presents a comprehensive review of the physics governing different types of shocks and processes of particle acceleration, from fundamental principles to current research. Motivated by observations of planetary bow shocks, interplanetary shocks and the solar wind termination shock, it emphasises the physical theory underlying these shock waves. Readers will develop an understanding of the complex interplay between particle dynamics and the electric and magnetic fields that explains the observations of in situ spacecraft. Written by renowned experts in the field, this up-to-date text is the ideal companion for both graduate students new to heliospheric physics and researchers in astrophysics who wish to apply the lessons of solar system shocks to different astrophysical environments.

  5. Intersections between particle and nuclear physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bunce, G.M.

    1988-01-01

    This report contains papers from an AIP conference on the intersections between particle and nuclear physics. Some of the general topics covered are: Accelerator physics; Antiproton physics; Electron and muon physics; Hadron scattering; Hadron spectroscopy; Meson and lepton decays; Neutrino physics; Nonaccelerator and astrophysics; Relativistic heavy-ion physics; and Spin physics. There are 166 papers that will be processed separately

  6. FPGA fault tolerance in particle physics experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gebelein, Jano; Engel, Heiko; Kebschull, Udo [Kirchhoff-Institute for Physics, Heidelberg University (Germany)

    2010-07-01

    The behavior of matter in physically extreme conditions is in focus of many high-energy-physics experiments. For this purpose, high energy charged particles (ions) are collided with each other and energy- or baryon densities are created similar to those at the beginning of the universe or to those which can be found in the center of neutron stars. In both cases a plasma of quarks and gluons (QGP) is present, which immediately decomposes to hadrons within a short period of time. At this process, particles are formed, which allow statements about the beginning of the universe when captured by large detectors, but which also lead to the massive occurance of hardware failures within the detector's electronic devices. This contribution is about methods to mitigate radiation susceptibility for Field Programmable Gate Arrays (FPGA), enabling them to be used within particle detector systems to directly gain valid data in the readout chain or to be used as detector-control-system.

  7. The Framework of Plasma Physics

    CERN Document Server

    Hazeltine, Richard D

    2004-01-01

    Plasma physics is a necessary part of our understanding of stellar and galactic structure. It determines the magnetospheric environment of the earth and other planets; it forms the research frontier in such areas as nuclear fusion, advanced accelerators, and high power lasers; and its applications to various industrial processes (such as computer chip manufacture) are rapidly increasing. It is thus a subject with a long list of scientific and technological applications. This book provides the scientific background for understanding such applications, but it emphasizes something else: the intrinsic scientific interest of the plasma state. It attempts to develop an understanding of this state, and of plasma behavior, as thoroughly and systematically as possible. The book was written with the graduate student in mind, but most of the material would also fit into an upper-level undergraduate course.

  8. Plasma formulary for physics, astronomy, and technology

    CERN Document Server

    Diver, Declan

    2013-01-01

    This collection of fundamental formulae, up-to-date references and definitions in plasma physics is vital to anyone with an interest in plasmas or ionized gases, whether in physics, astronomy or engineering. Both theorists and experimentalists will find this book useful, as it incorporates the latest results and findings, with extended coverage of fusion plasma, plasma in stellar winds, reaction rates, engineering plasma and many other topics. The text is also unique in treating astrophysical plasmas, fusion plasmas, industrial plasmas and low temperature plasmas as aspects of the same discipline.

  9. Particle physics with cold neutrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dubbers, D.

    1991-01-01

    Slow neutrons are used in a large number of experiments to study the physics of particles and their fundamental interactions. Some of these experiments search for manifestations of ''new physics'' like baryon- or lepton-number nonconservation, time reversal nonconservation, new particles, right-handed currents, nonzero neutron charge, nonlinear terms in the Schrodinger equation, exotic e + e - states, and others. Other slow neutron experiments test the present Standard Model. The parity nonconserving weak neutron-nucleon interaction is studied in a variety of experiments. Free neutron beta decay gives precise values for the weak vector and axialvector coupling constants, which allow precise tests of basic symmetries like the conservation of the weak vector current, the unitarity of the weak quark mixing matrix, SU(3) flavour symmetry, and right-handed currents. Neutron beta decay data are further needed to calculate weak cross-sections, for applications, in big bang cosmology, in astrophysics, in solar physics and the solar neutrino problem, and in such mundane things as neutrino detection efficiencies in neutrino oscillation or proton decay experiments. Neutron-nucleon, neutron-nucleus and neutron-electron scattering lengths are determined in high precision experiments, which use methods like neutron interferometry or neutron gravity spectrometry. The experiments give information on quantities like the neutron charge radius or the neutron electric polarizability. Precision measurements of other fundamental constants lead to a better, model-independent value of the fine structure constant. Finally, the fundamental experiments on quantum mechanics, like spinor 4π -rotation, Berry's phase, dressed neutrons, Aharanov - Casher effect, or gravitational effects on the neutron's phase will be briefly discussed. (author)

  10. Physical Origin of Elementary Particle Masses

    OpenAIRE

    Hansson, Johan

    2014-01-01

    In contemporary particle physics, the masses of fundamental particles are incalculable constants, being supplied by experimental values. Inspired by observation of the empirical particle mass spectrum, and their corresponding physical interaction couplings, we propose that the masses of elementary particles arise solely due to the self-interaction of the fields associated with the charges of a particle. A first application of this idea is seen to yield correct order of magnitude predictions f...

  11. Developments in plasma physics and controlled fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thompson, W.B.

    1980-01-01

    Some developments in plasma physics over the past twenty years are considered from the theoretical physics standpoint under the headings; oscillations, waves and instabilities, plasma turbulence, basic kinetic theory, and developments in fusion. (UK)

  12. BOOK REVIEW: Fundamentals of Plasma Physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cargill, P. J.

    2007-02-01

    The widespread importance of plasmas in many areas of contemporary physics makes good textbooks in the field that are both introductory and comprehensive invaluable. This new book by Paul Bellen from CalTech by and large meets these goals. It covers the traditional textbook topics such as particle orbits, the derivation of the MHD equations from Vlasov theory, cold and warm plasma waves, Landau damping, as well as in the later chapters less common subjects such as magnetic helicity, nonlinear processes and dusty plasmas. The book is clearly written, neatly presented, and each chapter has a number of exercises or problems at their end. The author has also thankfully steered clear of the pitfall of filling the book with his own research results. The preface notes that the book is designed to provide an introduction to plasma physics for final year undergraduate and post-graduate students. However, it is difficult to see many physics undergraduates now at UK universities getting to grips with much of the content since their mathematics is not of a high enough standard. Students in Applied Mathematics departments would certainly fare better. An additional problem for the beginner is that some of the chapters do not lead the reader gently into a subject, but begin with quite advanced concepts. Being a multi-disciplinary subject, beginners tend to find plasma physics quite hard enough even when done simply. For postgraduate students these criticisms fade away and this book provides an excellent introduction. More senior researchers should also enjoy the book, especially Chapters 11-17 where more advanced topics are discussed. I found myself continually comparing the book with my favourite text for many years, `The Physics of Plasmas' by T J M Boyd and J J Sanderson, reissued by Cambridge University Press in 2003. Researchers would want both books on their shelves, both for the different ways basic plasma physics is covered, and the diversity of more advanced topics. For

  13. Elementary particle physics with atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wieman, C.E.

    1993-01-01

    One of the unique aspects of atomic physics is the capacity to make measurements with extraordinarily high precision. In suitably chosen systems, precision measurements can reveal information about fundamental interactions in nature that is not available from other sources. Although elementary particle physics is often perceived as synonymous with open-quotes high energyclose quotes and open-quotes high cost,close quotes atomic physics has played, and can continue to play, a significant role in this area. A few illustrative examples of this include (1) the measurement of the Lamb shift in hydrogen and its, influence on the modern development of quantum field theory, (2) the severe limits placed on possible time reversal violating interactions by atomic (and neutron) searches for electric dipole moments, and (3) the measurement (and closely related atomic theory) of parity, nonconservation in atoms. This latter work has provides a precise confirmation of the Standard Model of the weak, electromagnetic, and strong interactions, and is a uniquely sensitive test for the validity of a variety of alternative models that have been put forth. I will also discuss some of the joys and frustrations of doggedly pursuing the open-quotes ultimateclose quotes measurement of ridiculously tiny effects

  14. Studies of Particle Wake Potentials in Plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellis, Ian; Graziani, Frank; Glosli, James; Strozzi, David; Surh, Michael; Richards, David; Decyk, Viktor; Mori, Warren

    2011-10-01

    Fast Ignition studies require a detailed understanding of electron scattering, stopping, and energy deposition in plasmas with variable values for the number of particles within a Debye sphere. Presently there is disagreement in the literature concerning the proper description of these processes. Developing and validating proper descriptions requires studying the processes using first-principle electrostatic simulations and possibly including magnetic fields. We are using the particle-particle particle-mesh (PPPM) code ddcMD and the particle-in-cell (PIC) code BEPS to perform these simulations. As a starting point in our study, we examine the wake of a particle passing through a plasma in 3D electrostatic simulations performed with ddcMD and with BEPS using various cell sizes. In this poster, we compare the wakes we observe in these simulations with each other and predictions from Vlasov theory. Prepared by LLNL under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344 and by UCLA under Grant DE-FG52-09NA29552.

  15. BOOK REVIEW: Controlled Fusion and Plasma Physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engelmann, F.

    2007-07-01

    This new book by Kenro Miyamoto provides an up-to-date overview of the status of fusion research and the important parts of the underlying plasma physics at a moment where, due to the start of ITER construction, an important step in fusion research has been made and many new research workers will enter the field. For them, and also for interested graduate students and physicists in other fields, the book provides a good introduction into fusion physics as, on the whole, the presentation of the material is quite appropriate for getting acquainted with the field on the basis of just general knowledge in physics. There is overlap with Miyamoto's earlier book Plasma Physics for Nuclear Fusion (MIT Press, Cambridge, USA, 1989) but only in a few sections on subjects which have not evolved since. The presentation is subdivided into two parts of about equal length. The first part, following a concise survey of the physics basis of thermonuclear fusion and of plasmas in general, covers the various magnetic configurations studied for plasma confinement (tokamak; reversed field pinch; stellarator; mirror-type geometries) and introduces the specific properties of plasmas in these devices. Plasma confinement in tokamaks is treated in particular detail, in compliance with the importance of this field in fusion research. This includes a review of the ITER concept and of the rationale for the choice of ITER's parameters. In the second part, selected topics in fusion plasma physics (macroscopic instabilities; propagation of waves; kinetic effects such as energy transfer between waves and particles including microscopic instabilities as well as plasma heating and current drive; transport phenomena induced by turbulence) are presented systematically. While the emphasis is on displaying the essential physics, deeper theoretical analysis is also provided here. Every chapter is complemented by a few related problems, but only partial hints for their solution are given. A selection of

  16. Particle physics and cosmology, Task C

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Turner, M.S.

    1993-05-01

    The research has spanned many topics at the boundary of particle physics and cosmology. The major focus has been in the general areas of inflationary cosmology, cosmological phase transitions, astrophysical constraints to particle physics theories, and dark matter/structure formation as it relates to particle physics. Some attention is given to axion physics. Narrative summaries of the research of the individual group members are given, followed by a list of publications

  17. Information retrieval in particle physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oyanagi, Yoshio

    1983-01-01

    Various information retrieval systems for elementary particle physics are introduced. Scientific information has been distributed in the form of books, periodicals or preprints. Some periodicals include the abstracts of information only. Recently, computer systems, by which the information retrieval can be easily done, have been developed. The construction of networks connecting various computer systems is in progress. It is possible to call the data base of Rutherford Laboratory from a telephone terminal of Laurence Berkeley Laboratory. The access to the Network by British Science Research Council can be made from DESY or CERN. The examples of on-line information retrieval in Japan are presented. Some of the periodicals of secondary information and data books are also introduced. (Kato, T.)

  18. Particle identification for beauty physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ludlam, T.

    1987-01-01

    We look briefly at the requirements for particle identification for possible beauty experiments at the Tevatron, both in the fixed target and the collider mode. Techniques presently in use in high energy physics experiments, and under development, should make sensitive experiments feasible. However, in all cases the present state of the art must be advanced to meet the necessary requirements for segmentation andor rate capability. The most fundamentally difficult challenges appear to be the efficient tagging of soft electrons (for the collider experiment) and the need to handle interaction rates up to /approximately/ 10 9 HZ in the fixed target mode. In both cases we can find ''in principle'' demonstrations that the requirements can be met. We have considered only the most basic prooperties of detectors, however, and the real answers will come from careful studies of details. 20 refs., 10 figs

  19. The dialogue between particle physics and cosmology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sadoulet, B.

    1988-04-01

    In the last decade, a very close relationship has developed between particle physics and cosmology. The purpose of these lectures is to introduce particle physicists to the many scientific connections between the two fields. Before entering into the discussion of specific topics, it will first be shown that particle physics and cosmology are completely interdependent. 173 refs., 35 figs., 5 tabs.

  20. The dialogue between particle physics and cosmology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sadoulet, B.

    1988-04-01

    In the last decade, a very close relationship has developed between particle physics and cosmology. The purpose of these lectures is to introduce particle physicists to the many scientific connections between the two fields. Before entering into the discussion of specific topics, it will first be shown that particle physics and cosmology are completely interdependent. 173 refs., 35 figs., 5 tabs

  1. Superconducting magnets advanced in particle physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamamoto, Akira

    2000-01-01

    Superconducting magnet technology for particle detectors has been advanced to provide large-scale magnetic fields in particle physics experiments. The technology has been progressed to meet physics goals and the detector requirement of having maximum magnetic field with minimum material and space. This paper includes an overview of the advances of particle detector magnets and discusses key technologies

  2. Introduction to plasma physics with space, laboratory and astrophysical applications

    CERN Document Server

    Gurnett, Donald A

    2017-01-01

    Introducing basic principles of plasma physics and their applications to space, laboratory and astrophysical plasmas, this new edition provides updated material throughout. Topics covered include single-particle motions, kinetic theory, magnetohydrodynamics, small amplitude waves in hot and cold plasmas, and collisional effects. New additions include the ponderomotive force, tearing instabilities in resistive plasmas and the magnetorotational instability in accretion disks, charged particle acceleration by shocks, and a more in-depth look at nonlinear phenomena. A broad range of applications are explored: planetary magnetospheres and radiation belts, the confinement and stability of plasmas in fusion devices, the propagation of discontinuities and shock waves in the solar wind, and analysis of various types of plasma waves and instabilities that can occur in planetary magnetospheres and laboratory plasma devices. With step-by-step derivations and self-contained introductions to mathematical methods, this book...

  3. Physics of plasma etching and plasma deposition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schram, D.C.; Hoog, de F.J.; Bisschops, T.J.; Kroesen, G.M.W.; Howorka, F.; Lindinger, W.; Maerk, T.D.

    1986-01-01

    The kinetics and mechanism of the title processes are discussed on the basis of a model in which the plasma-surface system is subdivided into 5 regions: (I) plasma prodn., (II) plasma flow plus radicals, (III) gas adsorbed layer, (IV) modified surface, and (V) undisturbed solid (or liq.) state.

  4. The Plasma Archipelago: Plasma Physics in the 1960s

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weisel, Gary J.

    2017-09-01

    With the foundation of the Division of Plasma Physics of the American Physical Society in April 1959, plasma physics was presented as the general study of ionized gases. This paper investigates the degree to which plasma physics, during its first decade, established a community of interrelated specialties, one that brought together work in gaseous electronics, astrophysics, controlled thermonuclear fusion, space science, and aerospace engineering. It finds that, in some regards, the plasma community was indeed greater than the sum of its parts and that its larger identity was sometimes glimpsed in inter-specialty work and studies of fundamental plasma behaviors. Nevertheless, the plasma specialties usually worked separately for two inter-related reasons: prejudices about what constituted "basic physics," both in the general physics community and within the plasma community itself; and a compartmentalized funding structure, in which each funding agency served different missions.

  5. Interaction of plasma vortices with resonant particles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jovanovic, D.; Pécseli, Hans; Juul Rasmussen, J.

    1990-01-01

    Kinetic effects associated with the electron motion along magnetic field lines in low‐beta plasmas are studied. Using the gyrokinetic description of electrons, a kinetic analog of the reduced magnetohydrodynamic equations is derived, and it is shown that in the strongly nonlinear regime...... particles. The evolution equations indicate the possibility of excitation of plasma vortices by electron beams....... they possess localized solutions in the form of dipolar vortices, which can efficiently interact with resonant electrons. In the adiabatic limit, evolution equations are derived for the vortex parameters, describing exchange of the energy, enstrophy, and of the Poynting vector between the vortex and resonant...

  6. Plasma memories associated to a particle detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Comby, G.; Mangeot, Ph.

    1978-01-01

    The realization of a localized and persisting memory of a detected particle which can be easily read out offers new possibilities for the detection of events with high multiplicity. The association of the plasma memory to a spark chamber allows the test of the principles of memorization and read-out. By means of one gap of plasma memories, one can read out without ambiguity the coordinates of a large number of memories. This device can be adapted to other types of detectors and also to larger geometries. (Auth.)

  7. Determination of particle concentrations in multitemperature plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Richley, E.; Tuma, D.T.

    1982-01-01

    The use of the multitemperature Saha equation (MSE) of Prigogine 1 and Patapov 2 for calculating particle concentrations in plasmas is shown to be an invalid procedure. Errors greater than one order of magnitude in the electron density in high-pressure argon and nitrogen electric arc plasmas can be easily incurred by using the multitemperature Saha equation. The alternative kinetic method for calculating concentrations is shown to be based on firm concepts. Simpliying procedures and computational techniques for calculating concentrations with the kinetic method are illustrated with examples

  8. Metastable states of plasma particles close to a charged surface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shavlov, A. V., E-mail: shavlov@ikz.ru [The Institute of the Earth Cryosphere, RAS Siberian branch, 625000, P.O. 1230, Tyumen (Russian Federation); Tyumen State Oil and Gas University, 38, Volodarskogo St., 625000, Tyumen (Russian Federation); Dzhumandzhi, V. A. [The Institute of the Earth Cryosphere, RAS Siberian branch, 625000, P.O. 1230, Tyumen (Russian Federation)

    2015-09-15

    The free energy of the plasma particles and the charged surface that form an electroneutral system is calculated on the basis of the Poisson-Boltzmann equation. It is shown that, owing to correlation of light plasma particles near the charged surface and close to heavy particles of high charge, there can be metastable states in plasma. The corresponding phase charts of metastable states of the separate components of plasma, and plasma as a whole, are constructed. These charts depend on temperature, the charge magnitude, the size of the particles, and the share of the charge of the light carriers out of the total charge of the plasma particles.

  9. The role of alpha particles in magnetically confined fusion plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lisak, M.; Wilhelmsson, H.

    1986-01-01

    Recent progress in the confinement of hot plasmas in magnetic fusion experiments throughout the world has intensified interest and research in the physics of D-T burning plasmas especially in the wide range of unresolved theoretical as well as experimental questions associated with the role of alpha particles in such devices. In order to review the state-of-the- art in this field, and to identify new issues and problems for further research, the Symposium on the Role of Alpha Particles in Magnetically Confined Fusion Plasmas was held from 24 to 26 June 1986 at Aspenaesgaarden near Goeteborg, Sweden. About 25 leading experts from nine countries attended the Symposium and gave invited talks. The major part of the programme was devoted to alpha-particle effects in tokamaks but some aspects of open systems were also discussed. The possibilities of obtaining ignition in JET and TFTR as well as physics issues for the compact ignition experiments were considered in particular. A special session was devoted to the diagnostics of alpha particles and other fusion products. In this report are summarised some of the highlights of the symposium. (authors)

  10. Visualization of plasma collision phenomenon by particle based rendering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamamoto, Takeshi; Takagishi, Hironori; Hasegawa, Kyoko; Nakata, Susumu; Tanaka, Satoshi; Tanaka, Kazuo

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, we visualize plasma collision phenomenon based on XYT-space (space and time) volume data for supporting research in plasma physics. We create 3D volume data in the XYT-space by piling up a time series of XY-plane photo images taken in experiment. As a result, we can visualize as one still image all the time behavior of the plasma plume. Besides, we adopt 'fused' visualization based on particle based rendering technique. Using that technique, we can easily fuse volume rendering different materials, and compare physics of different elements in flexible ways. In addition, we propose the method to generate pseudo-3D images from pictures shoot by ICCD of two perspectives on the upper and side. (author)

  11. Experimental techniques in nuclear and particle physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tavernier, Stefaan

    2010-01-01

    The book is based on a course in nuclear and particle physics that the author has taught over many years to physics students, students in nuclear engineering and students in biomedical engineering. It provides the basic understanding that any student or researcher using such instruments and techniques should have about the subject. After an introduction to the structure of matter at the subatomic scale, it covers the experimental aspects of nuclear and particle physics. Ideally complementing a theoretically-oriented textbook on nuclear physics and/or particle physics, it introduces the reader to the different techniques used in nuclear and particle physics to accelerate particles and to measurement techniques (detectors) in nuclear and particle physics. The main subjects treated are: interactions of subatomic particles in matter; particle accelerators; basics of different types of detectors; and nuclear electronics. The book will be of interest to undergraduates, graduates and researchers in both particle and nuclear physics. For the physicists it is a good introduction to all experimental aspects of nuclear and particle physics. Nuclear engineers will appreciate the nuclear measurement techniques, while biomedical engineers can learn about measuring ionising radiation, the use of accelerators for radiotherapy. What's more, worked examples, end-of-chapter exercises, and appendices with key constants, properties and relationships supplement the textual material. (orig.)

  12. Annual report of the Particle Physics Committee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1977-01-01

    The Annual Report for the period 1 August 1975 to 31 July 1976 of the Particle Physics Committee of the Nuclear Physics Board, under the (United Kingdom) Science Research Council, is presented. Details are given of particle physics grants and laboratory agreements. (U.K.)

  13. Energy related applications of elementary particle physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rafelski, J.

    1991-01-01

    The current research position is summarized, and what could be done in the future to clarify issues which were opened up by the research is indicated. Following on the discussion of the viability of catalyzed fusion, there is presented along with the key experimental results, a short account of the physics surrounding the subject. This is followed by a discussion of key research topics addressed. In consequence of the progress made, it appears that the feasibility of a small-scale fusion based on catalyzed reactions rests on either the remote chance that a yet undiscovered ultraheavy negatively charged elementary particle exists in Nature, or on the possible technical realization of a system based on muon-catalyzed fusion (MuCF) in high-density degenerate hydrogen plasma (density 1000 LHD, temperature O(100 eV)). The lattter is considered to have practical promise

  14. Plasma flow driven by fusion-generated alpha particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ikuta, Kazunari.

    1978-05-01

    The confinement of fusion-generated alpha particles will affect the transports of the background plasma particles by the momentum transfer from the energetic alphas. The ions tend to migrate towards the center of plasma (i.e. fuel injection) and electrons towards the plasma periphery. This means the existence of a mechanism which enable to pump out the ashes in the fuel plasma because of the momentum conservation of whole plasma particles. (author)

  15. Physics of the plasma universe

    CERN Document Server

    Peratt, Anthony L

    2015-01-01

    Today many scientists recognize plasma as the key element to understanding new observations in near-Earth, interplanetary, interstellar, and intergalactic space; in stars, galaxies, and clusters of galaxies, and throughout the observable universe. Physics of the Plasma Universe, 2nd Edition is an update of observations made across the entire cosmic electromagnetic spectrum over the two decades since the publication of the first edition. It addresses paradigm changing discoveries made by telescopes, planetary probes, satellites, and radio and space telescopes. The contents are the result of the author's 37 years research at Livermore and Los Alamos National Laboratories, and the U.S. Department of Energy. This book covers topics such as the large-scale structure and the filamentary universe; the formation of magnetic fields and galaxies, active galactic nuclei and quasars, the origin and abundance of light elements, star formation and the evolution of solar systems, and cosmic rays. Chapters 8 and 9 are based ...

  16. Plasma physics in noninertial frames

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thyagaraja, A.; McClements, K. G.

    2009-01-01

    Equations describing the nonrelativistic motion of a charged particle in an arbitrary noninertial reference frame are derived from the relativistically invariant form of the particle action. It is shown that the equations of motion can be written in the same form in inertial and noninertial frames, with the effective electric and magnetic fields in the latter modified by inertial effects associated with centrifugal and Coriolis accelerations. These modifications depend on the particle charge-to-mass ratio, and also the vorticity, specific kinetic energy, and compressibility of the frame flow. The Newton-Lorentz, Vlasov, and Fokker-Planck equations in such a frame are derived. Reduced models such as gyrokinetic, drift-kinetic, and fluid equations are then derivable from these equations in the appropriate limits, using standard averaging procedures. The results are applied to tokamak plasmas rotating about the machine symmetry axis with a nonrelativistic but otherwise arbitrary toroidal flow velocity. Astrophysical applications of the analysis are also possible since the power of the action principle is such that it can be used to describe relativistic flows in curved spacetime.

  17. Elementary particle physics---Experimental

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lord, J.J.; Burnett, T.H.; Wilkes, R.J.

    1990-01-01

    We are continuing a research program in high energy experimental particle physics and particle astrophysics. Studies of high energy hadronic interactions were performed using several techniques, in addition, a high energy leptoproduction experiment was continued at the Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory. We are participants in a joint US/Japan program to study nuclear interactions at energies two orders of magnitude greater than those of existing accelerators. The data are being collected with ballon-borne emulsion chambers. The properties of nuclear interactions at these high energies will reveal whether new production mechanisms come into play due to the high nuclear densities and temperatures obtained. We carried out closely related studies of hadronic interactions in emulsions exposed to high energy accelerator beams. We are members of a large international collaboration which has exposed emulsion chamber detectors to beams of 32 S and 16 O with energy 60 and 200 GeV/n at CERN and 15 GeV/n at Brookhaven National Laboratory. The primary objectives of this program are to determine the existence and properties of the hypothesized quark-gluon phase of matter, and its possible relation to a variety of anomalous observations. Studies of leptoproduction processes at high energies involve two separate experiments, one using the Tevatron 500 GeV muon beam and the other exploring the >TeV regime. We are participants in Fermilab experiment E665 employing a comprehensive counter/streamer chamber detector system. During the past year we joined the DUMAND Collaboration, and have been assigned responsibility for development and construction of critical components for the deep undersea neutrino detector facility, to be deployed in 1991. In addition, we are making significant contributions to the design of the triggering system to be used

  18. Simulating Magnetized Laboratory Plasmas with Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, Jeffrey N. [Univ. of California, Davis, CA (United States)

    2009-01-01

    The creation of plasmas in the laboratory continues to generate excitement in the physics community. Despite the best efforts of the intrepid plasma diagnostics community, the dynamics of these plasmas remains a difficult challenge to both the theorist and the experimentalist. This dissertation describes the simulation of strongly magnetized laboratory plasmas with Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics (SPH), a method born of astrophysics but gaining broad support in the engineering community. We describe the mathematical formulation that best characterizes a strongly magnetized plasma under our circumstances of interest, and we review the SPH method and its application to astrophysical plasmas based on research by Phillips [1], Buerve [2], and Price and Monaghan [3]. Some modifications and extensions to this method are necessary to simulate terrestrial plasmas, such as a treatment of magnetic diffusion based on work by Brookshaw [4] and by Atluri [5]; we describe these changes as we turn our attention toward laboratory experiments. Test problems that verify the method are provided throughout the discussion. Finally, we apply our method to the compression of a magnetized plasma performed by the Compact Toroid Injection eXperiment (CTIX) [6] and show that the experimental results support our computed predictions.

  19. Scaling laws for particle growth in plasma reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lemons, D.S.; Keinigs, R.K.; Winske, D.; Jones, M.E.

    1996-01-01

    We quantify a model which incorporates observed features of contaminant particle growth in plasma processing reactors. According to the model, large open-quote open-quote predator close-quote close-quote particles grow by adsorbing smaller, typically neutral, open-quote open-quote prey close-quote close-quote protoparticles. The latter are supplied by an assumed constant mass injection of contaminant material. Scaling laws and quantitative predictions compare favorably with published experimental results. copyright 1996 American Institute of Physics

  20. Matter and Interactions: a particle physics perspective

    OpenAIRE

    Organtini, Giovanni

    2011-01-01

    In classical mechanics matter and fields are completely separated. Matter interacts with fields. For particle physicists this is not the case. Both matter and fields are represented by particles. Fundamental interactions are mediated by particles exchanged between matter particles. In this paper we explain why particle physicists believe in such a picture, introducing the technique of Feynman diagrams starting from very basic and popular analogies with classical mechanics, making the physics ...

  1. Particle tracking from image sequences of complex plasma crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hadziavdic, Vedad; Melandsoe, Frank; Hanssen, Alfred

    2006-01-01

    In order to gather information about the physics of the complex plasma crystals from the experimental data, particles have to be tracked through a sequence of images. An application of the Kalman filter for that purpose is presented, using a one-dimensional approximation of the particle dynamics as a model for the filter. It is shown that Kalman filter is capable of tracking dust particles even with high levels of measurement noise. An inherent part of the Kalman filter, the innovation process, can be used to estimate values of the physical system parameters from the experimental data. The method is shown to be able to estimate the characteristic oscillation frequency from noisy data

  2. Modification of Plasma Solitons by Resonant Particles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Karpman, Vladimir; Lynov, Jens-Peter; Michelsen, Poul

    1980-01-01

    A consistent theory of plasma soliton interaction with resonant particles is developed. A simple derivation of a perturbed Korteweg–de Vries equation with the interaction term is presented. It is shown how the known limit cases (such as Ott–Sudan’s, etc.) can be derived from the general equations...... Korteweg–de Vries equation. Laboratory measurements carried out in a strongly magnetized, plasma‐filled waveguide and results from particle simulation are interpreted in terms of the analytical results.......A consistent theory of plasma soliton interaction with resonant particles is developed. A simple derivation of a perturbed Korteweg–de Vries equation with the interaction term is presented. It is shown how the known limit cases (such as Ott–Sudan’s, etc.) can be derived from the general equations...... and what their regions of applicability are. Some effects caused by the soliton‐particle interaction (amplitude change‐rate, tail formation, etc.) are analyzed by means of a recently developed perturbation method. The analytical results are compared with a direct numerical integration of the perturbed...

  3. Paradigm transition in cosmic plasma physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alfven, H.

    1982-01-01

    In situ measurements in the magnetospheres together with general advancement in plasma physics are now necessitating introduction of a number of effects that have been recently discovered or earlier neglected. Examples are: electric double layers (like in the lower magnetosphere); thin current layer (like in the magnetopause) giving space a cellular structure; current produced filaments (e.g., in prominences, solar corona and interstellar clouds). Further it is important to use the electric current (particle) description and to study the whole circuit in which the current flows. The pinch effect cannot be neglected as is now usually done. The critical velocity phenomenon is essential, for example for the band structure of solar system. Theory of dusty plasmas is important. The result is a change in so many theories in cosmic plasma physics that it is appropriate to speak of an introduction of a new paradigm. This should be based on empirical knowledge from magnetospheric and laboratory investigations. Its application to astrophysics in general, including cosmology, will necessarily lead to a revision of, e.g., the present theories of the formation of stars, planets and satellites. It is doubtful whether the big bang cosmology will survive. (Auth.)

  4. Paradigm transition in cosmic plasma physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alfven, H.

    1982-06-01

    In situ measurements in the magnetospheres together with general advancement in plasma physics are now necessitating introduction of a number of effects that have been recently discovered or earlier neglected. Examples are: 1) Electric double layers (like in the lower magnetosphere) 2) Thin current layer (like in the magnetopause) giving space a cellular structure. 3) Current produced filaments (e.g. in prominences, solar corona and interstellar clouds). 4) Further it is important to use the electric current (particle) description and to study the whole circuit in which the current flows. 5) The pinch effect cannot be neglected as is now usually done. 6) The critical velocity phenomenon is essential, for example for the band structure of solar systems. 7) Theory of dusty plasmas is important. The result is a change in so many theories in cosmic plasma physics that it is appropriate to speak of an introduction of a new paradigm. This should be based on empirical knowledge from magnetospheric and laboratory investigations. Its application to astrophysics in general, including cosmology, will necessarily lead to a revision of e.g. the present theories of the formation of stars, planets and satellites. It is doubtful whether the big bang cosmology will survive. (Author)

  5. Parallel pic plasma simulation through particle decomposition techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Briguglio, S.; Vlad, G.; Di Martino, B.; Naples, Univ. 'Federico II'

    1998-02-01

    Particle-in-cell (PIC) codes are among the major candidates to yield a satisfactory description of the detail of kinetic effects, such as the resonant wave-particle interaction, relevant in determining the transport mechanism in magnetically confined plasmas. A significant improvement of the simulation performance of such codes con be expected from parallelization, e.g., by distributing the particle population among several parallel processors. Parallelization of a hybrid magnetohydrodynamic-gyrokinetic code has been accomplished within the High Performance Fortran (HPF) framework, and tested on the IBM SP2 parallel system, using a 'particle decomposition' technique. The adopted technique requires a moderate effort in porting the code in parallel form and results in intrinsic load balancing and modest inter processor communication. The performance tests obtained confirm the hypothesis of high effectiveness of the strategy, if targeted towards moderately parallel architectures. Optimal use of resources is also discussed with reference to a specific physics problem [it

  6. Studies in theoretical particle physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaplan, D.B.

    1991-01-01

    This proposal focuses on research on three distinct areas of particle physics: (1) Nonperturbative QCD. I tend to continue work on analytic modelling of nonperturbative effects in the strong interactions. I have been investigating the theoretical connection between the nonrelativistic quark model and QCD. The primary motivation has been to understand the experimental observation of nonzero matrix elements involving current strange quarks in ordinary matter -- which in the quark model has no strange quark component. This has led to my present work on understanding constituent (quark model) quarks as collective excitations of QCD degrees of freedom. (2) Weak Scale Baryogenesis. A continuation of work on baryogenesis in the early universe from weak interactions. In particular, an investigation of baryogenesis occurring during the weak phase transition through anomalous baryon violating processes in the standard model of weak interactions. (3) Flavor and Compositeness. Further investigation of a new mechanism that I recently discovered for dynamical mass generation for fermions, which naturally leads to a family hierarchy structure. A discussion of recent past work is found in the next section, followed by an outline of the proposed research. A recent publication from each of these three areas is attached to this proposal

  7. Particle physics and inflationary cosmology

    CERN Document Server

    Linde, Andrei D

    1990-01-01

    This is the LaTeX version of my book "Particle Physics and Inflationary Cosmology'' (Harwood, Chur, Switzerland, 1990). I decided to put it to hep-th, to make it easily available. Many things happened during the 15 years since the time when it was written. In particular, we have learned a lot about the high temperature behavior in the electroweak theory and about baryogenesis. A discovery of the acceleration of the universe has changed the way we are thinking about the problem of the vacuum energy: Instead of trying to explain why it is zero, we are trying to understand why it is anomalously small. Recent cosmological observations have shown that the universe is flat, or almost exactly flat, and confirmed many other predictions of inflationary theory. Many new versions of this theory have been developed, including hybrid inflation and inflationary models based on string theory. There was a substantial progress in the theory of reheating of the universe after inflation, and in the theory of eternal inflation. ...

  8. Pop-up particle physics

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN Bulletin

    2010-01-01

    You may remember noticing a pop-up Big Bang on your way to Restaurant No. 1 last November, as part of the Library’s book fair. This was just one page from a rather original project to make a pop-up book about particle physics. The book – Voyage to the Heart of Matter, the ATLAS experiment at CERN - will be launched in the USA and Canada, in a new silver edition.   The book proved a popular Christmas gift in the UK when it was released last November - copies on sale there sold out in under two months. The new print run will go on sale in Australia and the UK, in addition to Canada and the US. It will be launched to the press during the week of the New York book fair and will befollowed by a public event at the New York Academy of Sciences on 25 May. You can purchase a copy at the ATLAS secretariat, the Library or the Building 33 shop for 30CHF. For more information about the launch event, see http://www.nyas.org/ATLAS.

  9. Physics of the quark - gluon plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2001-09-01

    This document gathers 31 contributions to the workshop on the physics of quark-gluon plasma that took place in Palaiseau in september 2001: 1) gamma production in heavy collisions, 2) BRAHMS, 3) experimental conference summary, 4) modelling relativistic nuclear collisions, 5) microscopic reaction dynamics at SPS and RHIC, 6) direct gamma and hard scattering at SPS, 7) soft physics at RHIC, 8) results from the STAR experiment, 9) quarkonia: experimental possibilities, 10) elliptic flow measurements with PHENIX, 11) charmonium production in p-A collisions, 12) anisotropic flow at the SPS and RHIC, 13) deciphering the space-time evolution of heavy ion collisions with correlation measurements, 14) 2-particle correlation at RHIC, 15) particle spectra at AGS, SPS and RHIC, 16) strangeness production in STAR, 17) strangeness production in Pb-Pb collisions at SPS, 18) heavy ion physics at CERN after 2000 and before LHC, 19) NEXUS guideline and theoretical consistency, 20) introduction to high p T physics at RHIC, 21) a novel quasiparticle description of the quark-gluon plasma, 22) dissociation of excited quarkonia states, 23) high-mass dimuon and B → J/Ψ production in ultrarelativistic heavy ion collisions, 24) strange hyperon production in p + p and p + Pb interactions from NA49, 25) heavy quarkonium hadron cross-section, 26) a new method of flow analysis, 27) low mass dilepton production and chiral symmetry restoration, 28) classical initial conditions for nucleus-nucleus collisions, 29) numerical calculation of quenching weights, 30) strangeness enhancement energy dependence, and 31) heavy quarkonium dissociation

  10. Physics of the quark - gluon plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2001-09-01

    This document gathers 31 contributions to the workshop on the physics of quark-gluon plasma that took place in Palaiseau in september 2001: 1) gamma production in heavy collisions, 2) BRAHMS, 3) experimental conference summary, 4) modelling relativistic nuclear collisions, 5) microscopic reaction dynamics at SPS and RHIC, 6) direct gamma and hard scattering at SPS, 7) soft physics at RHIC, 8) results from the STAR experiment, 9) quarkonia: experimental possibilities, 10) elliptic flow measurements with PHENIX, 11) charmonium production in p-A collisions, 12) anisotropic flow at the SPS and RHIC, 13) deciphering the space-time evolution of heavy ion collisions with correlation measurements, 14) 2-particle correlation at RHIC, 15) particle spectra at AGS, SPS and RHIC, 16) strangeness production in STAR, 17) strangeness production in Pb-Pb collisions at SPS, 18) heavy ion physics at CERN after 2000 and before LHC, 19) NEXUS guideline and theoretical consistency, 20) introduction to high p{sub T} physics at RHIC, 21) a novel quasiparticle description of the quark-gluon plasma, 22) dissociation of excited quarkonia states, 23) high-mass dimuon and B {yields} J/{psi} production in ultrarelativistic heavy ion collisions, 24) strange hyperon production in p + p and p + Pb interactions from NA49, 25) heavy quarkonium hadron cross-section, 26) a new method of flow analysis, 27) low mass dilepton production and chiral symmetry restoration, 28) classical initial conditions for nucleus-nucleus collisions, 29) numerical calculation of quenching weights, 30) strangeness enhancement energy dependence, and 31) heavy quarkonium dissociation.

  11. Particle transport in JET and TCV-H mode plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maslov, M.

    2009-10-01

    Understanding particle transport physics is of great importance for magnetically confined plasma devices and for the development of thermonuclear fusion power for energy production. From the beginnings of fusion research, more than half a century ago, the problem of heat transport in tokamaks attracted the attention of researchers, but the particle transport phenomena were largely neglected until fairly recently. As tokamak physics advanced to its present level, the physics community realized that there are many hurdles to the development of fusion power beyond the energy confinement. Particle transport is one of the outstanding issues. The aim of this thesis work is to study the anomalous (turbulence driven) particle transport in tokamaks on the basis of experiments on two different devices: JET (Joint European Torus) and TCV (Tokamak à Configuration Variable). In particular the physics of particle inward convection (pinch), which causes formation of peaked density profiles, is addressed in this work. Density profile peaking has a direct, favorable effect on fusion power in a reactor, we therefore also propose an extrapolation to the international experimental reactor ITER, which is currently under construction. To complete the thesis research, a comprehensive experimental database was created on the basis of data collected on JET and TCV during the duration of the thesis. Improvements of the density profile measurements techniques and careful analysis of the experimental data allowed us to derive the dependencies of density profile shape on the relevant plasma parameters. These improved techniques also allowed us to dispel any doubts that had been voiced about previous results. The major conclusions from previous work on JET and other tokamaks were generally confirmed, with some minor supplements. The main novelty of the thesis resides in systematic tests of the predictions of linear gyrokinetic simulations of the ITG (Ion Temperature Gradient) mode against the

  12. Plasma-surface interactions under high heat and particle fluxes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Temmerman, G.; Bystrov, K.; Liu, F.; Liu, W.; Morgan, T.; Tanyeli, I.; van den Berg, M.; Xu, H.; Zielinski, J.

    2013-01-01

    The plasma-surface interactions expected in the divertor of a future fusion reactor are characterized by extreme heat and particle fluxes interacting with the plasma-facing surfaces. Powerful linear plasma generators are used to reproduce the expected plasma conditions and allow plasma-surface

  13. arXiv Particle Physics Instrumentation

    CERN Document Server

    Wingerter-Seez, I.

    This reports summarizes the three lectures on particle physics instrumentation given during the AEPSHEP school in November 2014 at Puri-India. The lectures were intended to give an overview of the interaction of particles with matter and basic particle detection principles in the context of large detector systems like the Large Hadron Collider.

  14. PLASMA ENERGETIC PARTICLES SIMULATION CENTER (PEPSC)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berk, Herbert L.

    2014-05-23

    The main effort of the Texas group was to develop theoretical and simplified numerical models to understand chirping phenomena often seen for Alfven and geodesic acoustic waves in experimental plasmas such as D-III-D, NSTX and JET. Its main numerical effort was to modify the AEGIS code, which was originally developed as an eigenvalue solver. To apply to the chirping problem this code has to be able to treat the linear response to the continuum and the response of the plasma to external drive or to an internal drive that comes from the formation of phase space chirping structures. The theoretical underpinning of this investigation still needed to be more fully developed to understand how to best formulate the theoretical problem. Considerable progress was made on this front by B.N. Breizman and his collaborators and a new reduced model was developed by H. L. Berk and his PhD student, G. Wang which can be uses as simplified model to describe chirping in a large aspect ratio tokamak. This final report will concentrate on these two directions that were developed as well as results that were found in the work with the AEGIS code and in the progress in developing a novel quasi-linear formulation for a description of Alfvenic modes destabilized by energetic particles, such as alpha particles in a burning plasma.

  15. Topics in elementary particle physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Xiang

    The author of this thesis discusses two topics in elementary particle physics: n-ary algebras and their applications to M-theory (Part I), and functional evolution and Renormalization Group flows (Part II). In part I, Lie algebra is extended to four different n-ary algebraic structure: generalized Lie algebra, Filippov algebra, Nambu algebra and Nambu-Poisson tensor; though there are still many other n-ary algebras. A natural property of Generalized Lie algebras — the Bremner identity, is studied, and proved with a totally different method from its original version. We extend Bremner identity to n-bracket cases, where n is an arbitrary odd integer. Filippov algebras do not focus on associativity, and are defined by the Fundamental identity. We add associativity to Filippov algebras, and give examples of how to construct Filippov algebras from su(2), bosonic oscillator, Virasoro algebra. We try to include fermionic charges into the ternary Virasoro-Witt algebra, but the attempt fails because fermionic charges keep generating new charges that make the algebra not closed. We also study the Bremner identity restriction on Nambu algebras and Nambu-Poisson tensors. So far, the only example 3-algebra being used in physics is the BLG model with 3-algebra A4, describing two M2-branes interactions. Its extension with Nambu algebra, BLG-NB model, is believed to describe infinite M2-branes condensation. Also, there is another propose for M2-brane interactions, the ABJM model, which is constructed by ordinary Lie algebra. We compare the symmetry properties between them, and discuss the possible approaches to include these three models into a grand unification theory. In Part II, we give an approximate solution for Schroeder's equations, based on series and conjugation methods. We use the logistic map as an example, and demonstrate that this approximate solution converges to known analytical solutions around the fixed point, around which the approximate solution is constructed

  16. Physical processes in hot cosmic plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fabian, A.G.; Giovannelli, F.

    1990-01-01

    The interpretation of many high energy astrophysical phenomena relies on a detailed knowledge of radiation and transport processes in hot plasmas. The understanding of these plasma properties is one of the aims of terrestrial plasma physics. While the microscopic properties of astrophysical plasmas can hardly be determined experimentally, laboratory plasmas are more easily accessible to experimental techniques, but transient phenomena and the interaction of the plasma with boundaries often make the interpretation of measurements cumbersome. This book contains the talks given at the NATO Advanced Research Workshop on astro- and plasma-physics in Vulcano, Sicily, May 29-June 2, 1989. The book focuses on three main areas: radiation transport processes in hot (astrophysical and laboratory) plasmas; magnetic fields; their generation, reconnection and their effects on plasma transport properties; relativistic and ultra-high density plasmas

  17. Quarked!--Adventures in Particle Physics Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacDonald, Teresa; Bean, Alice

    2009-01-01

    Particle physics is a subject that can send shivers down the spines of students and educators alike--with visions of long mathematical equations and inscrutable ideas. This perception, along with a full curriculum, often leaves this topic the road less traveled until the latter years of school. Particle physics, including quarks, is typically not…

  18. From particle physics to medical applications

    CERN Document Server

    Dosanjh, Manjit

    2017-01-01

    CERN is the world's largest particle physics research laboratory. Since it was established in 1954, it has made an outstanding contribution to our understanding of the fundamental particles and their interactions, and also to the technologies needed to analyse their properties and behaviour. The experimental challenges have pushed the performance of particle accelerators and detectors to the limits of our technical capabilities, and these groundbreaking technologies can also have a significant impact in applications beyond particle physics. In particular, the detectors developed for particle physics have led to improved techniques for medical imaging, while accelerator technologies lie at the heart of the irradiation methods that are widely used for treating cancer. Indeed, many important diagnostic and therapeutic techniques used by healthcare professionals are based either on basic physics principles or the technologies developed to carry out physics research. Ever since the discovery of x-rays by Roentgen...

  19. Auxiliary plasma heating and fueling models for use in particle simulation codes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Procassini, R.J.; Cohen, B.I.

    1989-01-01

    Computational models of a radiofrequency (RF) heating system and neutral-beam injector are presented. These physics packages, when incorporated into a particle simulation code allow one to simulate the auxiliary heating and fueling of fusion plasmas. The RF-heating package is based upon a quasilinear diffusion equation which describes the slow evolution of the heated particle distribution. The neutral-beam injector package models the charge exchange and impact ionization processes which transfer energy and particles from the beam to the background plasma. Particle simulations of an RF-heated and a neutral-beam-heated simple-mirror plasma are presented. 8 refs., 5 figs

  20. The plasma physics of plasma processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shohet, L.

    1991-01-01

    Plasma processing is used for producing new materials with unusual and superior properties, for developing new chemical compounds and processes, for machining, and for altering and refining materials and surfaces. It has direct applications to semiconductor fabrication, materials synthesis, welding, lighting, polymers, anti-corrosion coatings, machine tools, metallurgy, electrical and electronics devices, hazardous waste removal, high performance ceramics, and many other items in both high-technology and the more traditional industries. Plasma processing takes on a wide variety of apparently different forms in industry, but the techniques share many common characteristics and problems. Control of the generation and flux of ions, electrons and free radicals in the plasma and their incidence on a surface is vital. Diagnostics, sensors, modeling techniques, and associated statistical methods are needed. However, without an in-depth understanding of the variety of phenomena taking place and their application to the industrial environment, advances in this technology, and its efficient use, will occur at a diminishing rate

  1. Energetic particle instabilities in fusion plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sharapov, S.E.; Alper, B.; Challis, C.D.; Gryaznevich, M.P.; Kiptily, V.G.; Voitsekhovich, I.; Berk, H.L.; Breizman, B.N.; Borba, D.N.; Nabais, F.; Classen, I.G.J.; Edlund, E.M.; Fredrickson, E.D.; Fu, G.Y.; Ghantous, K.; Gorelenkov, N.N.; Kramer, G.J.; Nazikian, R.; Podesta, M.; White, R.B.; Eriksson, J.; Hellesen, C.; Fasoli, A.; Garcia-Munoz, M.; Lauber, P.; Thun, C. Perez von; Gassner, T.; Goloborodko, V.; Schoepf, K.; Yavorskij, V.; Hacquin, S.; Heidbrink, W.W.; Lilley, M.K.; Lisak, M.; Nyqvist, R.; Osakabe, M.; Todo, Y.; Toi, K.; Pinches, S.D.; Porkolab, M.; Shinohara, Koji; Van Zeeland, M.A.

    2012-11-01

    Remarkable progress has been made in diagnosing energetic particle instabilities on present-day machines and in establishing a theoretical framework for describing them. This overview describes the much improved diagnostics of Alfvén instabilities and modelling tools developed world-wide, and discusses progress in interpreting the observed phenomena. A multi-machine comparison is presented giving information on the performance of both diagnostics and modelling tools for different plasma conditions outlining expectations for ITER based on our present knowledge. (author)

  2. [The mission of Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-01-01

    This report discusses the following about Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory: its mission; requirements and guidance documents for the QA program; architecture; assessment organization; and specific management issues

  3. EDITORIAL 37th European Physical Society Conference on Plasma Physics 37th European Physical Society Conference on Plasma Physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendonça, Tito; Hidalgo, Carlos

    2010-12-01

    . In this way the EPS PPD seeks to reinforce excellence in science. The Plasma Physics Hannes Alfvén Prize 2010 The Hannes Alfvén Prize is awarded to Allen Boozer (Professor, Columbia University) and Jürgen Nührenberg (Professor, Max-Planck-Institut für Plasmaphysik and Greifswald University) for the formulation and practical application of criteria allowing stellarators to have good fast-particle and neoclassical energy confinement. Photo of Boozer and Nuhrenberg Jürgen Nührenberg (left) and Allen Boozer. The tokamak and the stellarator are two major candidate concepts for magnetically confining fusion plasmas. They were both conceived in the early 1950s, but the tokamak developed more rapidly because of its intrinsically favourable confinement properties. Indeed, the stellarator seemed fundamentally unable to confine energy and collisionless alpha-particle orbits well enough for a fusion reactor. In the 1980s, however, Allen Boozer and Jürgen Nührenberg developed methods for tailoring stellarator magnetic fields so as to guarantee confinement comparable to that in tokamaks. Allen Boozer introduced a set of magnetic coordinates, now named after him, in which the description of three-dimensionally shaped magnetic fields is particularly simple. He went on to show that if the magnetic field strength |B| is symmetric in these coordinates (so-called quasisymmetry) then the guiding-centre orbits and the neoclassical confinement properties are equivalent to those in a tokamak. In pioneering calculations a few years later, Jürgen Nührenberg showed that such magnetic fields can indeed be realized in practice, as can other configurations which have equally good confinement without being quasisymmetric. There is an unexpected vastness of configurational possibilities for toroidal plasma confinement, where the limit is likely to be set by turbulence rather than neoclassical losses. In addition, quasisymmetry should facilitate the development of strongly sheared

  4. Physics of high performance deuterium-tritium plasmas in TFTR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McGuire, K.M.; Batha, S.

    1996-11-01

    During the past two years, deuterium-tritium (D-T) plasmas in the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) have been used to study fusion power production, isotope effects associated with tritium fueling, and alpha-particle physics in several operational regimes. The peak fusion power has been increased to 10.7 MW in the supershot mode through the use of increased plasma current and toroidal magnetic field and extensive lithium wall conditioning. The high-internal-inductance (high-I i ) regime in TFTR has been extended in plasma current and has achieved 8.7 MW of fusion power. Studies of the effects of tritium on confinement have now been carried out in ohmic, NBI- and ICRF- heated L-mode and reversed-shear plasmas. In general, there is an enhancement in confinement time in D-T plasmas which is most pronounced in supershot and high-I i discharges, weaker in L-mode plasmas with NBI and ICRF heating and smaller still in ohmic plasmas. In reversed-shear discharges with sufficient deuterium-NBI heating power, internal transport barriers have been observed to form, leading to enhanced confinement. Large decreases in the ion heat conductivity and particle transport are inferred within the transport barrier. It appears that higher heating power is required to trigger the formation of a transport barrier with D-T NBI and the isotope effect on energy confinement is nearly absent in these enhanced reverse-shear plasmas. Many alpha-particle physics issues have been studied in the various operating regimes including confinement of the alpha particles, their redistribution by sawteeth, and their loss due to MHD instabilities with low toroidal mode numbers. In weak-shear plasmas, alpha-particle destabilization of a toroidal Alfven eigenmode has been observed

  5. Physics and application of plasmas based on pulsed power technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hotta, Eiki; Ozaki, Tetsuo

    2012-04-01

    The papers presented at the symposium on 'Physics and Application of Plasmas Based on Pulsed Power Technology' held on December 21-22, 2010 at National Institute of Fusion Science are collected. The papers in this proceeding reflect the current status and progress in the experimental and theoretical researches on high power particle beams and high energy density plasmas produced by pulsed power technology. (author)

  6. Advanced Accelerators: Particle, Photon and Plasma Wave Interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Williams, Ronald L. [Florida A & M University, Tallahassee, FL (United States)

    2017-06-29

    The overall objective of this project was to study the acceleration of electrons to very high energies over very short distances based on trapping slowly moving electrons in the fast moving potential wells of large amplitude plasma waves, which have relativistic phase velocities. These relativistic plasma waves, or wakefields, are the basis of table-top accelerators that have been shown to accelerate electrons to the same high energies as kilometer-length linear particle colliders operating using traditional decades-old acceleration techniques. The accelerating electrostatic fields of the relativistic plasma wave accelerators can be as large as GigaVolts/meter, and our goal was to study techniques for remotely measuring these large fields by injecting low energy probe electron beams across the plasma wave and measuring the beam’s deflection. Our method of study was via computer simulations, and these results suggested that the deflection of the probe electron beam was directly proportional to the amplitude of the plasma wave. This is the basis of a proposed diagnostic technique, and numerous studies were performed to determine the effects of changing the electron beam, plasma wave and laser beam parameters. Further simulation studies included copropagating laser beams with the relativistic plasma waves. New interesting results came out of these studies including the prediction that very small scale electron beam bunching occurs, and an anomalous line focusing of the electron beam occurs under certain conditions. These studies were summarized in the dissertation of a graduate student who obtained the Ph.D. in physics. This past research program has motivated ideas for further research to corroborate these results using particle-in-cell simulation tools which will help design a test-of-concept experiment in our laboratory and a scaled up version for testing at a major wakefield accelerator facility.

  7. Proceedings of the 1. Brazilian Congress on Plasma Physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-01-01

    The 1. Brazilian Congress on Plasma Physics proceedings presents technical papers on magnetohydrodynamics, plasma diagnostic, plasma waves, plasma impurities, plasma instabilities, and astrophysics plasma. (L.C.J.A.)

  8. Astro particle physics view on supersymmetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fornengo, N.

    2010-01-01

    The particle physics interpretation of the missing-mass, or dark-matter, problem of cosmological and astrophysical nature is going to be posed under deep scrutiny in the next years. From the particle physics side, accelerator physics will deeply test theoretical ideas of new physics beyond the Standard Model, where a particle physics candidate to dark matter is often naturally obtained. From the astrophysical side, many probes are already providing a great deal of independent information on the signals which can be produced by the galactic or extra-galactic dark matter. The ultimate hope is in fact to be able to disentangle a dark matter signal from the various sources of backgrounds and to extract a coherent picture of new physics from the accelerator physics, astrophysics and cosmology side. A very ambitious and far-reaching project, indeed.

  9. Plasma physics and controlled nuclear fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sato, Tetsuya

    1993-05-01

    The report contains the proceedings of a conference on plasma physics. A fraction of topics included MHD instabilities, magnetic confinement and plasma heating in the field of fusion plasmas, in 8 papers falling in the INIS scope have been abstracted and indexed for the INIS database. (K.A.)

  10. Electroweak properties of particle physics. Volume 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aleksan, R.; Ellis, N.; Falvard, A.; Fayard, L.; Frere, J.M.; Kuehn, J.H.; Le Yaouanc, A.; Roudeau, P.; Wormser, G.

    1991-01-01

    The 23th GIf school was held at Ecole Polytechnique, Palaiseau, France from 16 to 20 September 1991. The subject was large: Electroweak properties of heavy quarks. The second part has been devoted to B physics at hadron machines, search for Top, Charm particle physics and Quarkonium physics

  11. From Particle Physics to Medical Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dosanjh, Manjit

    2017-06-01

    CERN is the world's largest particle physics research laboratory. Since it was established in 1954, it has made an outstanding contribution to our understanding of the fundamental particles and their interactions, and also to the technologies needed to analyse their properties and behaviour. The experimental challenges have pushed the performance of particle accelerators and detectors to the limits of our technical capabilities, and these groundbreaking technologies can also have a significant impact in applications beyond particle physics. In particular, the detectors developed for particle physics have led to improved techniques for medical imaging, while accelerator technologies lie at the heart of the irradiation methods that are widely used for treating cancer. Indeed, many important diagnostic and therapeutic techniques used by healthcare professionals are based either on basic physics principles or the technologies developed to carry out physics research. Ever since the discovery of x-rays by Roentgen in 1895, physics has been instrumental in the development of technologies in the biomedical domain, including the use of ionizing radiation for medical imaging and therapy. Some key examples that are explored in detail in this book include scanners based on positron emission tomography, as well as radiation therapy for cancer treatment. Even the collaborative model of particle physics is proving to be effective in catalysing multidisciplinary research for medical applications, ensuring that pioneering physics research is exploited for the benefit of all.

  12. Meetings on Particle Physics - Abstracts and Slides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hirsch, M.; Machado, P.; Bertuzzo, E.; Villanova del Moral, A.; Wingerter, A.; Lellouch, L.; Garron, N.; Portelli, A.; Vulvert, G.; Zerwas, D.; Djouadi, A.; Drieu la Rochelle, G.; Fairbairn, M.; Le Boulc'h, Q.; Dumont, B.; Da Silva, J.; Brax, P.; Weiland, C.; Gelis, F.; Mehtar-Tani, Y.; Epelbaum, T.; Meunier, E.; Dudas, E.; Jezo, T.; Urbano, A.; Smith, C.; Machet, B.; Nezri, E.; Salam, G.; Kosnik, N.; Greynat, D.; Petrov, K.

    2014-01-01

    RPP (Meetings on Particle Physics) annual meetings are aimed at gathering the theoretical particle physicists' community, providing the participants with the opportunity not only to present their research topics, but also to make contact with the latest developments in adjacent fields. RPP-2012 will have a few review talks on topics such as flavors, Higgs bosons, astro-particle physics and cosmology, heavy ions, physics beyond the standard model, and quantum chromodynamics. This document gathers the slides of the presentations, a few presentations are accompanied by an abstract.

  13. [Elementary particle physics. Annual report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Izen, J.M.; Lou, X.

    1998-01-01

    The BABAR construction phase is ending and first data is expected during May, 1999. During construction, UTD has developed analysis framework software, contributed to the BABAR Physics Book, assembled a first rate computing facility, and pioneered Internet-based video techniques for the collaboration. The authors are now defining the physics goals, and are participating in the formation physics analysis groups. They are starting to use their computing facility for BABAR production jobs

  14. The physics of non-ideal plasma

    CERN Document Server

    Fortov, Vladimir E

    2000-01-01

    This book is devoted to the physical properties of nonideal plasma which is compressed so strongly that the effects of interparticle interactions govern the plasma behavior. The interest in this plasma was generated by the development of modern technologies and facilities whose operations were based on high densities of energy. In this volume, the methods of nonideal plasma generation and diagnostics are considered. The experimental results are given and the main theoretical models of nonideal plasma state are discussed. The problems of thermodynamics, electro-physics, optics and dynamic stabi

  15. Exotic smoothness and particle physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sladkowski, J.

    1996-01-01

    Short introduction to exotic differential structures on manifolds is given. The possible physical context of this mathematical curiosity is discussed. The topic is very interesting although speculative. (author)

  16. Plasma Physics at the National Science Foundation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lukin, Vyacheslav

    2017-10-01

    The Town Meeting on Plasma Physics at the National Science Foundation will provide an opportunity for Q&A about the variety of NSF programs and solicitations relevant to a broad cross-section of the academic plasma science community, from graduating college seniors to senior leaders in the field, and from plasma astrophysics to basic physics to plasma engineering communities. We will discuss recent NSF-hosted events, research awards, and multi-agency partnerships aimed at enabling the progress of science in plasma science and engineering. Future outlook for plasma physics and broader plasma science support at NSF, with an emphasis on how you can help NSF to help the community, will be speculated upon within the uncertainty of the federal budgeting process.

  17. Proceedings of the Second Conference on Nuclear and Particle Physics (NUPPAC-99)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Comsan, M N.H.; Hanna, K M [Nuclear Research Center, Atomic Energy Authority, Cairo (Egypt)

    2000-11-15

    The publication's has been set up as a book of the conference of nuclear and particle physics, it consists of the following chapters (1) high energy physics; (2) nuclear scattering and reaction; (3) nuclear models and spectroscopy; (3) neutron and reactor physics; (4) plasma and fusion physics; (5) applied nuclear physics; (6) related topics.

  18. Proceedings of the Second Conference on Nuclear and Particle Physics (NUPPAC-99)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Comsan, M.N.H.; Hanna, K.M.

    2000-11-01

    The publication's has been set up as a book of the conference of nuclear and particle physics, it consists of the following chapters (1) high energy physics; (2) nuclear scattering and reaction; (3) nuclear models and spectroscopy; (3) neutron and reactor physics; (4) plasma and fusion physics; (5) applied nuclear physics; (6) related topics

  19. Industrial impact of particle physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1987-01-01

    Papers represented at the conference in Bristol devoted to the interrelation of high-energy physics and industry are reviewed in short. Most of speakers confirmed that technologies developd for high-energy physics and mastered with companies are quickly widely adopted industry and other areas of science and technology

  20. Charged particle acceleration in nonuniform plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bulanov, S.V.; Naumova, N.M.; Pegoraro, F.

    1996-11-01

    The high-gradient electron acceleration schemes that have been demonstrated using LWFA appear promising for the development of plasma-based laser accelerators into practical devices. However, a question still exists: how to avoid the wake field deterioration and the loss of the phase synchronism between the plasma wave and the electrons that prevent them from being accelerated up to the theoretical limit. In order to obtain the highest possible values of the wake electric field one must use as intense laser pulses as possible i.e., pulses with dimensionless amplitudes a much-gt 1. Pulses that have a dimensionless amplitude larger than one tend to be subject to a host of instabilities, such as relativistic self-focusing, self modulation and stimulated Raman scattering, that affect their propagation in the plasma. Such processes could be beneficial, in so far as they increase the pulse energy density, enhance the wake field generation, and provide the mechanism for transporting the laser radiation over several Rayleigh lengths without diffraction spreading. However, it is still far from certain that these processes can be exploited in a controlled form and can lead to regular, stationary wake fields. It is known that, in order to create good quality wake fields, it would be preferable to use laser pulses with steep fronts of order λ p . The present paper aims at analyzing the influence of the laser pulse shape and of the plasma nonuniformity on the charged particle acceleration. This study is based on the results obtained with one dimensional PIC simulations

  1. Particle physics prospects: August '81

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okun, L.B.

    1981-01-01

    The author gives a review about symmetry breaking induced by scalar bosons. In this connection he discusses the electroweak symmetry breaking due to the Higgs mechanism, the CP-violation, and technicolor. Finally, he considers the connection between these particles and supersymmetry. (HSI)

  2. Plasma physics aspects of ETF/INTOR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peng, Y.K.M.; Rutherford, P.R.; Schmidt, J.A.; Cohn, D.R.; Miller, R.L.

    1980-01-01

    In order to achieve their principle technical objectives, the Engineering Test Facility (ETF) and the International Tokomak Reactor (INTOR) will require an ignited (or near ignited) plasma, sustained for pulse lengths of at least 100 secs at a high enough plasma pressure to provide a neutron wall loading of at least 1.3 MW/m 2 . The ignited plasma will have to be substantially free of impurities. Our current understanding of major plasma physics characters is summarized

  3. Reminiscences a journey through particle physics

    CERN Document Server

    Melissinos, Adrian

    2013-01-01

    A personal recount in areas of particle physics and related fields as a research physicist for over 50 years, Adrian Melissinos' insights into the ways that general research was carried out, as well as the evolution of particle physics from 1958 to 2008 will prove valuable to science history enthusiasts, as well as particle physicists. Be it conventional accelerator experiments, the use of microwave techniques in search of cosmic axions, or taking advantage of high power lasers to observe light-by-light scattering, the excitement of searching for something new in the face of failures and then successes is enriching, and the collaboration with gifted and outstanding colleagues and students proves insightful. A hybrid of personal reminiscences and a professional journey, readers get to relive the joy and excitement of researching and teaching in small groups during those early years while gaining a partial historical perspective of particle physics since 1958 - all in "Reminiscences: A Journey through Particle ...

  4. Review of Particle Physics, 2014-2015

    CERN Document Server

    Olive, K A; Amsler, C; Antonelli, M; Arguin, J-F; Asner, D M; Baer, H; Band, H R; Barnett, R M; Basaglia, T; Bauer, C W; Beatty, J J; Belousov, V I; Beringer, J; Bernardi, G; Bethke, S; Bichsel, H; Biebel, O; Blucher, E; Blusk, S; Brooijmans, G; Buchmueller, O; Burkert, V; Bychkov, M A; Cahn, R N; Carena, M; Ceccucci, A; Cerri, A; Chakraborty, D; Chen, M-C; Chivukula, R S; Copic, K; Cowan, G; Dahl, O; D'Ambrosio, G; Damour, T; de Florian, D; de Gouvea, A; DeGrand, T; de Jong, P; Dissertori, G; Dobrescu, B A; Doser, M; Drees, M; Dreiner, H K; Edwards, D A; Eidelman, S; Erler, J; Ezhela, V V; Fetscher, W; Fields, B D; Foster, B; Freitas, A; Gaisser, T K; Gallagher, H; Garren, L; Gerber, H-J; Gerbier, G; Gershon, T; Gherghetta, T; Golwala, S; Goodman, M; Grab, C; Gritsan, A V; Grojen, C; Groom, D E; Grunewald, M; Gurtu, A; Gutsche, T; Haber, H E; Hagiwara, K; Hanhart, C; Hashimoto, S; Hayato, Y; Hayes, K G; Heffner, M; Heltsley, B; Hernandez-Rey, J J; Hikasa, K; Hocker, A; Holder, J; Holtkamp, A; Huston, J; Jackson, J D; Johnson, K F; Junk, T; Kado, M; Karlen, D; Katz, U F; Klein, S R; Klempt, E; Kowalewski, R V; Krauss, F; Kreps, M; Krusche, B; Kuyanov, Yu V; Kwon, Y; Lahav, O; Laiho, J; Langacker, P; Liddle, A; Ligeti, Z; Lin, C-J; Liss, T M; Littenberg, L; Lugovsky, K S; Lugovsky, S B; Maltoni, F; Mannel, T; Manohar, A V; Marciano, W J; Martin, A D; Masoni, A; Matthews, J; Milstead, D; Molaro, P; Munig, K; Moortgat, F; Mortonson, M J; Murayama, H; Nakamura, K; Narain, M; Nason, P; Navas, S; Neubert, M; Nevski, P; Nir, Y; Pape, L; Parsons, J; Patrignani, C; Peacock, J A; Pennington, M; Petcov, S T; Piepke, A; Pomarol, A; Quadt, A; Raby, S; Rademacker, J; Raffelt, G; Ratcliff, B N; Richardson, P; Ringwald, A; Roesler, S; Rolli, S; Romaniouk, A; Rosenberg, L J; Rosner, J L; Rybka, G; Sachrajda, C T; Sakai, Y; Salam, G P; Sarkar, S; Sauli, F; Schneider, O; Scholberg, K; Scott, D; Sharma, V; Sharpe, S R; Silari, M; Sjostrand, T; Skands, P; Smith, J G; Smoot, G F; Spanier, S; Spieler, H; Spiering, C; Stahl, A; Stanev, T; Stone, S L; Sumiyoshi, T; Syphers, M J; Takahashi, F; Tanabashi, M; Terning, J; Tiator, L; Titov, M; Tkachenko, N P; Tornqvist, N A; Tovey, D; Valencia, G; Venanzoni, G; Vincter, M G; Vogel, P; Vogt, A; Wakely, S P; Walkowiak, W; Walter, C W; Ward, D R; Weiglein, G; Weinberg, D H; Weinberg, E J; White, M; Wiencke, L R; Wohl, C G; Wolfenstein, L; Womersley, J; Woody, C L; Workman, R L; Yamamoto, A; Yao, W-M; Zeller, G P; Zenin, O V; Zhang, J; Zhu, R-Y; Zimmermann, F; Zyla, P A; Harper, G; Lugovsky, V.S; Schaffner, P

    2014-01-01

    The Review summarizes much of particle physics and cosmology. Using data from previous editions, plus 3,283 new measurements from 899 papers, we list, evaluate, and average measured properties of gauge bosons and the recently discovered Higgs boson, leptons, quarks, mesons, and baryons. We summarize searches for hypothetical particles such as heavy neutrinos, supersymmetric and technicolor particles, axions, dark photons, etc. All the particle properties and search limits are listed in Summary Tables. We also give numerous tables, figures, formulae, and reviews of topics such as Supersymmetry, Extra Dimensions, Particle Detectors, Probability, and Statistics. Among the 112 reviews are many that are new or heavily revised including those on: Dark Energy, Higgs Boson Physics, Electroweak Model, Neutrino Cross Section Measurements, Monte Carlo Neutrino Generators, Top Quark, Dark Matter, Dynamical Electroweak Symmetry Breaking, Accelerator Physics of Colliders, High-Energy Collider Parameters, Big Bang Nucleosyn...

  5. Hopf algebra structures in particle physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weinzierl, Stefan

    2004-01-01

    In the recent years, Hopf algebras have been introduced to describe certain combinatorial properties of quantum field theories. I give a basic introduction to these algebras and review some occurrences in particle physics. (orig.)

  6. REDUCE in elementary particle physics. Quantum electrodynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grozin, A.G.

    1990-01-01

    This preprint is the second part of the problem book on using REDUCE for calculations of cross sections and decay probabilities in elementary particle physics. It contains examples of calculations in quantum electrodynamics. 5 refs

  7. Multiple time-scale methods in particle simulations of plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cohen, B.I.

    1985-01-01

    This paper surveys recent advances in the application of multiple time-scale methods to particle simulation of collective phenomena in plasmas. These methods dramatically improve the efficiency of simulating low-frequency kinetic behavior by allowing the use of a large timestep, while retaining accuracy. The numerical schemes surveyed provide selective damping of unwanted high-frequency waves and preserve numerical stability in a variety of physics models: electrostatic, magneto-inductive, Darwin and fully electromagnetic. The paper reviews hybrid simulation models, the implicitmoment-equation method, the direct implicit method, orbit averaging, and subcycling

  8. Particle simulation of a two-dimensional electrostatic plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Patel, K.

    1989-01-01

    Computer simulation is a growing field of research and plasma physics is one of the important areas where it is being applied today. This report describes the particle method of simulating a two-dimensional electrostatic plasma. The methods used to discretise the plasma equations and integrate the equations of motion are outlined. The algorithm used in building a simulation program is described. The program is applied to simulating the Two-stream Instability occurring within an infinite plasma. The results of the simulation are presented. The growth rate of the instability as simulated is in excellent agreement with the growth rate as calculated using linear theory. Diagnostic techniques used in interpreting the data generated by the simulation program are discussed. A comparison of the computing environment of the ND and PC from a user's viewpoint is presented. It is observed that the PC is an acceptable computing tool for certain (non-trivial) physics problems, and that more extensive use of its computing power should be made. (author). 5 figs

  9. Future directions in nuclear and particle physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vogt, E.

    1988-09-01

    With the advent of the standard model of quarks, leptons and unified forces one has achieved an understanding of the wealth of data in particle physics and provided a new basis for the understanding of nuclei and hadrons. In particle physics one now seeks to improve the standard model and to go beyond it. In nuclear physics one enquires about the role of quarks and gluons in the dynamics of strongly interacting systems. To answer these new questions an impressive network of large accelerator facilities, including CEBAF, is under construction or in the proposal stage. A global view of this network and its physics is given. (Author) (3 figs.)

  10. Research in elementary particle physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kirsch, L.E.; Schnitzer, H.J.; Bensinger, J.R.; Blocker, C.A.

    1992-01-01

    This report discusses research in the following areas of high energy physics: B meson mixing; CDF response to low energy jets; jet scaling behavior; search for pair produced leptoquarks at CDF; SSC program; quantum field theory; and neural networks. (LSP)

  11. Medium energy elementary particle physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-01-01

    This report discusses the following topics: muon beam development at LAMPF; muon physics; a new precision measurement of the muon g-2 value; measurement of the spin-dependent structure functions of the neutron and proton; and meson factories

  12. Research program in particle physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sudarshan, E.C.G.; Dicus, D.A.; Ritchie, J.L.; Lang, K.

    1992-07-01

    This report discusses the following topics: Quantum Gravity and Mathematical Physics; Phenomenology; Quantum Mechanics and Quantum Field Theory; Status of BNL Expt. 791; BNL Expt. 791; BNL Expt. 888; and SSC Activities

  13. An introductory course of particle physics

    CERN Document Server

    Pal, Palash B

    2014-01-01

    For graduate students unfamiliar with particle physics, this text teaches the basic techniques and fundamental theories related to the subject. It gives them the competence to work out various properties of fundamental particles, such as scattering cross-section and lifetime. The book also gives a lucid summary of the main ideas involved. Figure slides are available upon qualifying course adoption.

  14. Introduction to the elementary particle physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shellard, R.C.

    1982-03-01

    An introduction is given to the subject of elementary particle physics. Several particle properties are discussed and some models are shown. This introduction covers the theoretical as well as the experimental aspects including a topic on detectors. (L.C.) [pt

  15. Nuclear physics with strange particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dover, C.B.

    1988-01-01

    Recent progress in the understanding of strange particle interactions with nuclear systems is reviewed. We discuss the relative merits of various reactions such as (K - , π/sup +-/), (π + , K + ), or (γ, K + ) for hypernuclear production. The structure of /sub Λ/ 13 C is analyzed in some detail, in order to illustrate the role of the ΛN residual interaction and approximate dynamical symmetries in hypernuclear structure. Recent results on the single particle states of a Λ in heavy systems, as revealed by (π + , K + ) reaction studies, are used to extract information on the density dependence and effective mass which characterize the Λ-nucleus mean field. Finally, we develop the idea the K + -nucleus scattering at low energies is sensitive to the subtle ''swelling'' effects for nucleons bound in nuclei. 64 refs., 13 figs

  16. Quarks and gluons in nuclear and particle physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van Hove, L.

    1988-01-01

    This paper provides a broad overview of strong interactions, or nuclear forces, as ones understanding has expanded over the past 25 years. The major particles and models are briefly touched upon. The author expands upon the field theories which have evolved to explain the experimental work, and the present model of quarks and gluons which form the components of hadrons. The standard model has been very successful in explaining much of the newly acquired experimental data. But the property of confinement, where the partons, (quarks and gluons), are not observed seperately has precluded observation of these particles. He touches on the manifestation of these particles in high energy physics, where they model the observed particles and resonances, and are responsible for the production of hadronic jets. However in nuclear physics, one does not need to postulate the existance of these particles to explain the properties of nuclei, until one deals with interaction energies in the range of GeV. The author then touches on the area of ultra-relativistic nuclear physics, where the partons must play a role in the effects which are observed. In particular he discusses deep inelastic lepton scattering on nuclei, the Drell-Yan process in nuclei, and ultra-relativistic nuclear collisions. Finally he gives a brief discussion of the quark-gluon plasma, which is postulated to form during very high energy collisions, manifesting itself as a brief deconfinement of the partons into an equilibrium plasma

  17. "Strong interaction" for particle physics laboratories

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    A new Web site pooling the communications resources of particle physics centres all over the world has just been launched. The official launching of the new particle physics website Interactions.org during the Lepton-Proton 2003 Conference at the American laboratory Fermilab was accompanied by music and a flurry of balloons. On the initiative of Fermilab, the site was created by a collaboration of communication teams from over fifteen of the world's particle physics laboratories, including KEK, SLAC, INFN, JINR and, of course, CERN, who pooled their efforts to develop the new tool. The spectacular launching of the new particle physics website Interactions.org at Fermilab on 12 August 2003. A real gateway to particle physics, the site not only contains all the latest news from the laboratories but also offers images, graphics and a video/animation link. In addition, it provides information about scientific policies, links to the universities, a very useful detailed glossary of particle physics and astrophysic...

  18. Plasma-particle interaction effects in induction plasma modelling under dense loading conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Proulx, P.; Mostaghimi, J.; Boulos, M.

    1983-07-01

    The injection of solid particles or aerosol droplets in the fire-ball of an inductively coupled plasma can substantially perturb the plasma and even quench it under high loading conditions. This can be mainly attributed to the local cooling of the plasma by the particles or their vapour cloud, combined with the possible change of the thermodynamic and transport properties of the plasma in the presence of the particle vapour. This paper reports the state-of-the-art in the mathematical modelling of the induction plasma. A particle-in-cell model is used in order to combine the continuum approach for the calculation of the flow, temperature and concentration fields in the plasma, with the stochastic single particle approach, for the calculation of the particle trajectories and temperature histories. Results are given for an argon induction plasma under atmospheric pressure in which fine copper particles are centrally injected in the coil region of the discharge

  19. Fly ash particles spheroidization using low temperature plasma energy

    OpenAIRE

    Shekhovtsov, V. V.; Volokitin, O. G.; Vitske, Rudolf Evaldovich; Kondratyuk, Alexey Alekseevich

    2016-01-01

    The paper presents the investigations on producing spherical particles 65-110 [mu]m in size using the energy of low temperature plasma (LTP). These particles are based on flow ash produced by the thermal power plant in Seversk, Tomsk region, Russia. The obtained spherical particles have no defects and are characterized by a smooth exterior surface. The test bench is designed to produce these particles. With due regard for plasma temperature field distribution, it is shown that the transition ...

  20. Very high plasma switches. Basic plasma physics and switch technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doucet, H.J.; Roche, M.; Buzzi, J.M.

    1988-01-01

    A review of some high power switches recently developed for very high power technology is made with a special attention to the aspects of plasma physics involved in the mechanisms, which determine the limits of the possible switching parameters

  1. High-fidelity plasma codes for burn physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cooley, James [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Graziani, Frank [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Marinak, Marty [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Murillo, Michael [Michigan State Univ., East Lansing, MI (United States)

    2016-10-19

    Accurate predictions of equation of state (EOS), ionic and electronic transport properties are of critical importance for high-energy-density plasma science. Transport coefficients inform radiation-hydrodynamic codes and impact diagnostic interpretation, which in turn impacts our understanding of the development of instabilities, the overall energy balance of burning plasmas, and the efficacy of self-heating from charged-particle stopping. Important processes include thermal and electrical conduction, electron-ion coupling, inter-diffusion, ion viscosity, and charged particle stopping. However, uncertainties in these coefficients are not well established. Fundamental plasma science codes, also called high-fidelity plasma codes, are a relatively recent computational tool that augments both experimental data and theoretical foundations of transport coefficients. This paper addresses the current status of HFPC codes and their future development, and the potential impact they play in improving the predictive capability of the multi-physics hydrodynamic codes used in HED design.

  2. Introducing particle physics a graphic guide

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2071677

    2013-01-01

    What really happens at the most fundamental levels of nature? Introducing Particle Physics explores the very frontiers of our knowledge, even showing how particle physicists are now using theory and experiment to probe our very concept of what is real. From the earliest history of the atomic theory through to supersymmetry, micro-black holes, dark matter, the Higgs boson, and the possibly mythical graviton, practising physicist and CERN contributor Tom Whyntie gives us a mind-expanding tour of cutting-edge science. Featuring brilliant illustrations from Oliver Pugh, Introducing Particle Physics is a unique tour through the most astonishing and challenging science being undertaken today.

  3. Summer Workshop on Particle Physics

    CERN Document Server

    Chamseddine, A H; Nath, Pran

    1984-01-01

    These lectures give an elementary introduction to the important recent developments of the applications of N=1 supergravity to the construction of unified models of elementary particle interactions. Topics covered include couplings of supergravity with matter, spontaneous symmetry breaking and the super-higgs effect, construction of supergravity unified models, and the phenomenon of SU(2) x U(1) electroweak-symmetry breaking by supergravity. Experimental consequences of N-1 supergravity unified theory, in particular, the possible supersymmetric decays of the W ± and Z 0 bosons, are also discus

  4. Plasma polymer-functionalized silica particles for heavy metals removal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akhavan, Behnam; Jarvis, Karyn; Majewski, Peter

    2015-02-25

    Highly negatively charged particles were fabricated via an innovative plasma-assisted approach for the removal of heavy metal ions. Thiophene plasma polymerization was used to deposit sulfur-rich films onto silica particles followed by the introduction of oxidized sulfur functionalities, such as sulfonate and sulfonic acid, via water-plasma treatments. Surface chemistry analyses were conducted by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectroscopy. Electrokinetic measurements quantified the zeta potentials and isoelectric points (IEPs) of modified particles and indicated significant decreases of zeta potentials and IEPs upon plasma modification of particles. Plasma polymerized thiophene-coated particles treated with water plasma for 10 min exhibited an IEP of less than 3.5. The effectiveness of developed surfaces in the adsorption of heavy metal ions was demonstrated through copper (Cu) and zinc (Zn) removal experiments. The removal of metal ions was examined through changing initial pH of solution, removal time, and mass of particles. Increasing the water plasma treatment time to 20 min significantly increased the metal removal efficiency (MRE) of modified particles, whereas further increasing the plasma treatment time reduced the MRE due to the influence of an ablation mechanism. The developed particulate surfaces were capable of removing more than 96.7% of both Cu and Zn ions in 1 h. The combination of plasma polymerization and oxidative plasma treatment is an effective method for the fabrication of new adsorbents for the removal of heavy metals.

  5. New particles and two-photon physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schrempp, F.

    1985-01-01

    In a first part, I review the general theoretical arguments leading to new physics and new particles beyond the Standard Model, either in terms of supersymmetry or compositeness. Speculations about new particles expected within these schemes are then discussed in the light of recent anomalous events from the panti p collider and from PETRA. In a second part, I specifically try to evaluate the potential of γγ and epsilonγ collisions at PETRA/PEP and LEP energies with respect to new particle searches. Some interesting possibilities, including searches for spinless composite bosons, non-standard enhanced Higgs particles, scalar electrons (e) and γγ ->'nothing' emerge. (orig.)

  6. Visualizing Space Plasmas and Particles: Extraordinary Matter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbier, B.; Bartolone, L. M.; Christian, E. R.; Eastman, T. E.; Lewis, E.; Thieman, J. R.

    2010-12-01

    A recent survey of museum visitors documented some startling misconceptions at a very basic level. Even in this "science attentive" group, one quarter of the respondents believed that an atom would explode if it lost an electron, one sixth said it would become a new atom or element, and one fifth said they had no idea what would happen. Only one fourth of the respondents indicated they were familiar with plasma as a state of matter. Current resources on these topics are few in number and/or are difficult to locate, and they rarely provide suitable context at a level understandable to high school students and educators or to the interested public. In response to this and other evidence of common misunderstandings of simple particle and plasma science, our team of space scientists and education specialists has embarked upon the development of "Extraordinary Matter: Visualizing Space Plasmas and Particles", an online NASA multimedia library. It is designed to assist formal and informal educators and scientists with explaining concepts that cannot be easily demonstrated in the everyday world. The newly released site, with a target audience equivalent to grades 9-14, includes both existing products, reviewed by our team for quality, and new products we have developed. Addition of products to our site is in large part determined by the results of our front-end evaluation to determine the specific needs, gaps, and priorities of potential audiences. Each ready-to-use product is accompanied by a supporting explanation at a reading level matching the educational level of the concept, along with educational standards addressed, and links to other associated resources. Some will include related educational activities. Products are intended to stand alone, making them adaptable to the widest range of uses, either individually or as a custom-selected group. Uses may include, for example, scientist presentations, museum displays, teacher professional development, and classroom

  7. Particle melting and particle/plasma interactions in DC and RF plasmas: a modeling study. (Volumes I and II)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wei, D.Y.C.

    1987-01-01

    Integral process models were developed to predict particle melting in both DC and RF plasmas. Specifically, a numerical model has been developed to predict the temperature history of particles injected in a low pressure DC plasma jet. The temperature and velocity fields of the plasma jet are predicted as a free jet by solving the parabolized Navier-Stokes equations using a spatial marching scheme. Correction factors were introduced to take into account non continuum effects encountered in the low pressure environment. The plasma jet profiles as well as the particle/plasma interactions under different jet pressure ratios (from underexpanded to overexpanded) were investigated. The flow and temperature fields in the RF plasma torch are calculated using the axisymmetric Navier-Stokes equations based on the primitive variables, along with pseudo two-dimensional electromagnetic field equations. Particle trajectories and heat transfer characteristics in both DC and RF plasmas are calculated using predicted plasma jet profiles. Particle melting efficiencies in both DC and RF plasmas are evaluated and compared using model alloy systems. Based on the theoretical considerations, an alternative route of plasma spraying process (hybrid plasma spraying process) is proposed. An evaluation of particle melting in hybrid plasma jets had indicated that further improvement in deposit properties could be made

  8. Data acquisition in nuclear and particle physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Renk, B.

    1993-01-01

    An introduction to the methodics of the measurement data acquisition in nuclear and particle physics for students of physics as well as experimental physicists and engineers in research and industry. The contents are: Obtaining of measurement data, digitizing and triggers, memories and microprocessors, bus systems, communication and networks, and examples for data acquisition systems

  9. Physics through the 1990s: Elementary-particle physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kirk, W.T.

    1986-01-01

    This report on elementary-particle physics is part of an overall survey of physics carried out for the National Academy of Sciences by the National Research Council. The panel that wrote this report had three goals. The first goal was to explain the nature of elementary-particle physics and to describe how research is carried out in this field. The second goal was to summarize our present knowledge of the elementary particles and the fundamental forces. The third goal was to consider the future course of elementary-particle physics research and to propose a program for this research in the United States. All of these goals are covered in this report

  10. On some common problems in particle physics and nuclei physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vinh Mau, R.

    1976-01-01

    Results of recent studies on the use of a nuclear potential derived from the present knowledge in particle physics, in nuclei and systems composed by nucleon-antinucleon pairs, are presented and discussed

  11. Gauge theories in particle physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aitchison, I.J.R.; Hey, A.J.G.

    1982-01-01

    The first theory, quantum electrodynamics (QED) is known to give a successful account of electromagnetic interactions. Weak and strong interactions are described by gauge theories which are generalisations of QED. The electro-weak gauge theory of Glashow Salam and Weinberg unites electromagnetic and weak interactions. Quantum chromodynamics (QCD) is the gauge theory of strong interactions. This approach to these theories, designed for the non-specialist, is based on a straightforward generalisation of non-relativistic quantum-mechanical perturbation theory to the relativistic case, leading to an intuitive introduction to Feynman graphs. Spontaneously broken-or 'hidden'-symmetries are given particular attention, with the physics of hidden gauge invariance and the role of the vacuum (essential to the unified theories) being illustrated by an extended but elementary discussion of the non-relativistic example of superconductivity. Throughout, emphasis is placed both on realistic calculations and on physical understanding. (author)

  12. Where is particle physics going?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellis, John

    2017-12-01

    The answer to the question in the title is: in search of new physics beyond the Standard Model, for which there are many motivations, including the likely instability of the electroweak vacuum, dark matter, the origin of matter, the masses of neutrinos, the naturalness of the hierarchy of mass scales, cosmological inflation and the search for quantum gravity. So far, however, there are no clear indications about the theoretical solutions to these problems, nor the experimental strategies to resolve them. It makes sense now to prepare various projects for possible future accelerators, so as to be ready for decisions when the physics outlook becomes clearer. Paraphrasing George Harrison, “If you don’t yet know where you’re going, any road may take you there.”

  13. Research on elementary particle physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holloway, L.E.; O'Halloran, T.A.

    1992-05-01

    This report describes the activities of the University of Illinois Experimental High Energy Physics Group. The physicists in the University of Illinois High Energy Physics Group are engaged in a wide variety of experiments at current and future accelerator laboratories. These include: (1) The CDF experiment at the Fermilab Tevetron p bar p collider. (2) Design and developmental work for the SDC group at SSCL. (3) Experiments at the wide band photon beam at Fermilab. (4) The SLD experiment at SLAC and design studies for a τ-charm factor. (5) CP violation experiments at Fermilab. (6) The HiRes cosmic ray experiment at Dugway Proving Grounds, Utah. (7) Computational facilities. (8) Electronics systems development

  14. Particle Physics at the LHC Start

    CERN Document Server

    Altarelli, Guido

    2011-01-01

    I present a concise review of the major issues and challenges in particle physics at the start of the LHC era. After a brief overview of the Standard Model and of QCD, I will focus on the electroweak symmetry breaking problem which plays a central role in particle physics today. The Higgs sector of the minimal Standard Model is so far just a mere conjecture that needs to be verified or discarded by the LHC. Probably the reality is more complicated. I will summarize the motivation for new physics that should accompany or even replace the Higgs discovery and a number of its possible forms that could be revealed by the LHC.

  15. Electrostatic plasma simulation by Particle-In-Cell method using ANACONDA package

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blandón, J S; Grisales, J P; Riascos, H

    2017-01-01

    Electrostatic plasma is the most representative and basic case in plasma physics field. One of its main characteristics is its ideal behavior, since it is assumed be in thermal equilibrium state. Through this assumption, it is possible to study various complex phenomena such as plasma oscillations, waves, instabilities or damping. Likewise, computational simulation of this specific plasma is the first step to analyze physics mechanisms on plasmas, which are not at equilibrium state, and hence plasma is not ideal. Particle-In-Cell (PIC) method is widely used because of its precision for this kind of cases. This work, presents PIC method implementation to simulate electrostatic plasma by Python, using ANACONDA packages. The code has been corroborated comparing previous theoretical results for three specific phenomena in cold plasmas: oscillations, Two-Stream instability (TSI) and Landau Damping(LD). Finally, parameters and results are discussed. (paper)

  16. International Conference on Particle Physics and Astrophysics

    CERN Document Server

    2015-01-01

    The International Conference on Particle Physics and Astrophysics (ICPPA-2015) will be held in Moscow, Russia, from October 5 to 10, 2015. The conference is organized by Center of Basic Research and Particle Physics of National Research Nuclear University “MEPhI”. The aim of the Conference is to promote contacts between scientists and development of new ideas in fundamental research. Therefore we will bring together experts and young scientists working on experimental and theoretical aspects of nuclear, particle, astroparticle physics and cosmology. ICPPA-2015, aims to present the most recent results in astrophysics and collider physics and reports from the main experiments currently taking data. The working languages of the conference are English and Russian.

  17. Current status of elementary particle physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okun', L.B.

    1998-01-01

    A brief review is given of the state-of-the art in elementary particle physics based on the talk of the same title given on January 22, 1998, at the seminar marking the 90th birth anniversary of L.D. Landau. (The seminar was hosted by the P.L. Kapitza Institute for Physical Problems in cooperation with the L.D. Landau Institute for Theoretical Physics)

  18. Elementary particle physics at the University of Florida

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-01-01

    This report discusses research in the following areas: theoretical elementary particle physics; experimental elementary particle physics; axion project; SSC detector development; and computer acquisition. (LSP)

  19. Elementary particle physics at the University of Florida

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1991-12-01

    This report discusses research in the following areas: theoretical elementary particle physics; experimental elementary particle physics; axion project; SSC detector development; and computer acquisition. (LSP).

  20. Proceeding of the Sixth Nuclear and Particle Physics Conference (NUPPAC-2007)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2008-11-01

    The publication has been set up as proceedings of the Nuclear and Particle Physics conference, the conference contains of the following subjects: High Energy Physics; Nuclear Scattering and Reactions; Nuclear Structure and Spectroscopy; Nuclear and Reactor Physics; Relativistic and Quantum Physics; Plasma and magneto hydro Dynamics; Computation and Simulation and Radiation Measurement and Dosimetry. This conference consists of 642 pages., figs., tabs., refs

  1. Fusion programs in applied plasma physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-02-01

    The objectives of the theoretical science program are: To support the interpretation of present experiments and predict the outcome of future planned experiments; to improve on existing models and codes and validate against experimental results; and to conduct theoretical physics development of advanced concepts with applications for DIII-D and future devices. Major accomplishments in FY91 include the corroboration between theory and experiment on MHD behavior in the second stable regime of operation on DIII-D, and the frequency and mode structure of toroidal Alfven eigenmodes in high beta, shaped plasmas. We have made significant advances in the development of the gyro-Landau fluid approach to turbulence simulation which more accurately models kinetic drive and damping mechanisms. Several theoretical models to explain the bifurcation phenomenon in L- to H-mode transition were proposed providing the theoretical basis for future experimental verification. The capabilities of new rf codes have been upgraded in response to the expanding needs of the rf experiments. Codes are being employed to plan for a fully non-inductive current drive experiment in a high beta, enhanced confinement regime. GA's experimental effort in Applied Physics encompasses two advanced diagnostics essential for the operation of future fusion experiments: Alpha particle diagnostic, and current and density profile diagnostics. This paper discusses research in all these topics

  2. Department of Plasma Physics and Technology: Overview

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sadowski, M.

    2001-01-01

    Full text: In 2000 the research activity in the Dept. P-V was concentrated upon studies in the field of high-temperature plasma physics, nuclear fusion, and plasma technology. The main topics were as follows: l. Analysis of selected problems of plasma theory, 2. Investigation of phenomena in high-current pulse discharges of the Plasma-Focus (PF) and Z-Pinch type, 3. Development of the selected methods and equipment for plasma diagnostics, 4. Research on technology of experimental facilities for basic studies and applications, 5. Studies of the modification of material surfaces by means of pulse plasma-ion streams. In a frame of theoretical studies the numerical modeling was continued for discharges in coaxial plasma accelerators. The second theoretical aim was the description of some elementary atomic processes in the quasi- classical approach. A paper on the electron scattering on the atoms and molecules was published. In the quasi- classical model, the electron spin was taken into account and trajectories of 2 electrons in the helium atom were analyzed. In the frame of experimental studies, various phenomena were investigated in PF and Z-Pinch systems. The emission of pulse electron beams and ions as well as polarized X-rays were investigated in the MAFA-PF facility. New data about polarization of selected X-ray lines were obtained (2 papers at conferences and 2 publications). Ion emission measurements performed in small-scale PF-devices at INFIP and IFAS (Argentina), and in the Micro-Capillary device at Ecole Politechnique (France), were elaborated (5 papers at conferences and 2 publications). New measurements were also performed in the Capillary Z-Pinch device at IPP in Prague. With partial support of a US research contract, studies of the optimization of a neutron yield were performed in the PF-360 facility with special cryogenic targets (made of h eavy ice'' layers) or deuterium-gas targets (10 presentations at conferences, 2 reports for EOARD, and 7 papers

  3. The EPFL Plasma Physics Research Centre

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2001-01-01

    The Plasma Physics Research Centre (CRPP) is a non-departmental unit of the EPFL, and currently employs about 130 people, about 105 on the EPFL site and the rest at the Paul Scherrer Institute, PSI, in Villigen, Switzerland. The CRPP is a National Competence Centre in the field of Plasma Physics. In addition to plasma physics teaching, its missions are primarily the pursuit of scientific research in the field of controlled fusion within the framework of the EURATOM-Swiss Confederation Association and the development of its expertise as well as technology transfer in the field of materials research. As the body responsible for all scientific work on controlled fusion in Switzerland, the CRPP plays a national role of international significance. This document of 6 pages presents the explanation of the Plasma Physics Research Centre' activities (CRPP). (author)

  4. Monte Carlo simulations for plasma physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okamoto, M.; Murakami, S.; Nakajima, N.; Wang, W.X.

    2000-07-01

    Plasma behaviours are very complicated and the analyses are generally difficult. However, when the collisional processes play an important role in the plasma behaviour, the Monte Carlo method is often employed as a useful tool. For examples, in neutral particle injection heating (NBI heating), electron or ion cyclotron heating, and alpha heating, Coulomb collisions slow down high energetic particles and pitch angle scatter them. These processes are often studied by the Monte Carlo technique and good agreements can be obtained with the experimental results. Recently, Monte Carlo Method has been developed to study fast particle transports associated with heating and generating the radial electric field. Further it is applied to investigating the neoclassical transport in the plasma with steep gradients of density and temperatures which is beyong the conventional neoclassical theory. In this report, we briefly summarize the researches done by the present authors utilizing the Monte Carlo method. (author)

  5. An EDDY/particle-in-cell simulation of erosion of plasma facing walls bombarded by a collisional plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inai, Kensuke; Ohya, Kaoru

    2011-01-01

    To investigate the erosion of a plasma-facing wall intersecting an oblique magnetic field, we performed a kinetic particle-in-cell (PIC) simulation of magnetized plasma, in which collision processes between charged and neutral particles were taken into account. Sheath formation and local physical quantities, such as the incident angle and energy distributions of plasma ions at the wall, were examined at a plasma density of 10 18 m -3 , a temperature of 10 eV, and a magnetic field strength of 5 T. The erosion rate of a carbon wall was calculated using the ion-solid interaction code EDDY. At a high neutral density (>10 20 m -3 ), the impact energy of the ions dropped below the threshold for physical sputtering, so that the sputtering yield was drastically decreased and wall erosion was strongly suppressed. Sputter erosion was also suppressed when the angle of the magnetic field with respect to the surface normal was sufficiently large. (author)

  6. Correcting for particle size effects on plasma actuator particle image velocimetry measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masati, A.; Sedwick, R. J.

    2018-01-01

    Particle image velocimetry (PIV) is often used to characterize plasma actuator flow, but particle charging effects are rarely taken into account. A parametric study was conducted to determine the effects of particle size on the velocity results of plasma actuator PIV experiments. Results showed that smaller particles more closely match air flow velocities than larger particles. The measurement uncertainty was quantified by deconvolving the particle image diameter from the correlation diameter. The true air velocity was calculated by linearly extrapolating to the zero-size particle diameter.

  7. Applications of Particle Accelerators in Medical Physics

    OpenAIRE

    Cuttone, G

    2008-01-01

    Particle accelerators are often associated to high energy or nuclear physics. As well pointed out in literature [1] if we kindly analyse the number of installation worldwide we can easily note that about 50% is mainly devoted to medical applications (radiotherapy, medical radioisotopes production, biomedical research). Particle accelerators are also playing an important indirect role considering the improvement of the technical features of medical diagnostic. In fact the use of radionuclide f...

  8. Topics in particle physics phenomenology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pantaleone, J.T.

    1985-01-01

    This thesis consists of topics in field theory. In part A: (Chapter 1) A short review of heavy-quark physics, (Chapter 2) Spin-dependent forces in heavy-quark systems, (Chapter 3) Bound state effects in the Upsilon → γ + resonance, and in part B, The compatibility of free fractional charge and Dirac magnetic monopoles. In Chapter 2, using the results of the fourth-order quark-antiquark interactions in perturbative QCD, we show that the spin-dependent potentials in the formalism of Eichten and Feinberg and Gromes have to be generalized to include the quark mass dependence. The recently observed hyperfine and fine structure splittings in the J/psi and Upsilon systems are found to agree with the purely perturbative QCD results for the scale parameter Λ/sub MS/ = 0.30 +/- 0.06 GeV. With this value for Λ/sub MS/ we give some predictions on the T and toponium spectroscopies. In Chapter 3 we study the effect of b anti b bound state dynamics on the reaction Upsilon → γ + resonance. We argue from the results that the recently discovered sigma (8320) must have a scalar, rather than a pseudoscalar, coupling to the b quark

  9. Flavor Democracy in Particle Physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sultansoy, Saleh

    2007-01-01

    The flavor democracy hypothesis (or, in other words, democratic mass matrix approach) was introduced in seventies taking in mind three Standard Model (SM) families. Later, this idea was disfavored by the large value of the t-quark mass. In nineties the hypothesis was revisited assuming that extra SM families exist. According to flavor democracy the fourth SM family should exist and there are serious arguments disfavoring the fifth SM family. The fourth SM family quarks lead to essential enhancement of the Higgs boson production cross-section at hadron colliders and the Tevatron can discover the Higgs boson before the LHC, if it mass is between 140 and 200 GeV. Then, one can handle 'massless' Dirac neutrinos without see-saw mechanism. Concerning BSM physics, flavor democracy leads to several consequences: tanβ ≅ mt/mb ≅ 40 if there are three MSSM families; super-partner of the right-handed neutrino can be the LSP; relatively light E(6)-inspired isosinglet quark etc. Finally, flavor democracy may give opportunity to handle ''massless'' composite objects within preonic models

  10. Foundations of nuclear and particle physics

    CERN Document Server

    Donnelly, T William; Holstein, Barry R; Milner, Richard G; Surrow, Bernd

    2017-01-01

    This textbook brings together nuclear and particle physics, presenting a balanced overview of both fields as well as the interplay between the two. The theoretical as well as the experimental foundations are covered, providing students with a deep understanding of the subject. In-chapter exercises ranging from basic experimental to sophisticated theoretical questions provide an important tool for students to solidify their knowledge. Suitable for upper undergraduate courses in nuclear and particle physics as well as more advanced courses, the book includes road maps guiding instructors on tailoring the content to their course. Online resources including color figures, tables, and a solutions manual complete the teaching package. This textbook will be essential for students preparing for further study or a career in the field who require a solid grasp of both nuclear and particle physics.

  11. Review of Particle Physics, 2012-2013

    CERN Document Server

    Beringer, J; Barnett, R M; Copic, K; Dahl, O; Groom, D E; Lin, C J; Lys, J; Murayama, H; Wohl, C G; Yao, W M; Zyla, P A; Amsler, C; Antonelli, M; Asner, D M; Baer, H; Band, H R; Basaglia, T; Bauer, C W; Beatty, J J; Belousov, V I; Bergren, E; Bernardi, G; Bertl, W; Bethke, S; Bichsel, H; Biebel, O; Blucher, E; Blusk, S; Brooijmans, G; Buchmueller, O; Cahn, R N; Carena, M; Ceccucci, A; Chakraborty, D; Chen, M C; Chivukula, R S; Cowan, G; D'Ambrosio, G; Damour, T; de Florian, D; de Gouvea, A; DeGrand, T; de Jong, P; Dissertori, G; Dobrescu, B; Doser, M; Drees, M; Edwards, D A; Eidelman, S; Erler, J; Ezhela, V V; Fetscher, W; Fields, B D; Foster, B; Gaisser, T K; Garren, L; Gerber, H J; Gerbier, G; Gherghetta, T; Golwala, S; Goodman, M; Grab, C; Gritsan, A V; Grivaz, J F; Grunewald, M; Gurtu, A; Gutsche, T; Haber, H E; Hagiwara, K; Hagmann, C; Hanhart, C; Hashimoto, S; Hayes, K G; Heffner, M; Heltsley, B; Hernandez-Rey, J J; Hikasa, K; Hocker, A; Holder, J; Holtkamp, A; Huston, J; Jackson, J D; Johnson, K F; Junk, T; Karlen, D; Kirkby, D; Klein, S R; Klempt, E; Kowalewski, R V; Krauss, F; Kreps, M; Krusche, B; Kuyanov, Yu.V; Kwon, Y; Lahav, O; Laiho, J; Langacker, P; Liddle, A; Ligeti, Z; Liss, T M; Littenberg, L; Lugovsky, K S; Lugovsky, S B; Mannel, T; Manohar, A V; Marciano, W J; Martin, A D; Masoni, A; Matthews, J; Milstead, D; Miquel, R; Monig, K; Moortgat, F; Nakamura, K; Narain, M; Nason, P; Navas, S; Neubert, M; Nevski, P; Nir, Y; Olive, K A; Pape, L; Parsons, J; Patrignani, C; Peacock, J A; Petcov, S T; Piepke, A; Pomarol, A; Punzi, G; Quadt, A; Raby, S; Raffelt, G; Ratcliff, B N; Richardson, P; Roesler, S; Rolli, S; Romaniouk, A; Rosenberg, L J; Rosner, J L; Sachrajda, C T; Sakai, Y; Salam, G P; Sarkar, S; Sauli, F; Schneider, O; Scholberg, K; Scott, D; Seligman, W G; Shaevitz, M H; Sharpe, S R; Silari, M; Sjostrand, T; Skands, P; Smith, J G; Smoot, G F; Spanier, S; Spieler, H; Stahl, A; Stanev, T; Stone, S L; Sumiyoshi, T; Syphers, M J; Takahashi, F; Tanabashi, M; Terning, J; Titov, M; Tkachenko, N P; Tornqvist, N A; Tovey, D; Valencia, G; van Bibber, K; Venanzoni, G; Vincter, M G; Vogel, P; Vogt, A; Walkowiak, W; Walter, C W; Ward, D R; Watari, T; Weiglein, G; Weinberg, E J; Wiencke, L R; Wolfenstein, L; Womersley, J; Woody, C L; Workman, R L; Yamamoto, A; Zeller, G P; Zenin, O V; Zhang, J; Zhu, R Y; Harper, G; Lugovsky, V S; Schaffner, P

    2012-01-01

    This biennial Review summarizes much of particle physics. Using data from previous editions, plus 2658 new measurements from 644 papers, we list, evaluate, and average measured properties of gauge bosons, leptons, quarks, mesons, and baryons. We summarize searches for hypothetical particles such as Higgs bosons, heavy neutrinos, and supersymmetric particles. All the particle properties and search limits are listed in Summary Tables. We also give numerous tables, figures, formulae, and reviews of topics such as the Standard Model, particle detectors, probability, and statistics. Among the 112 reviews are many that are new or heavily revised including those on Heavy-Quark and Soft-Collinear Effective Theory, Neutrino Cross Section Measurements, Monte Carlo Event Generators, Lattice QCD, Heavy Quarkonium Spectroscopy, Top Quark, Dark Matter, Vcb & Vub, Quantum Chromodynamics, High-Energy Collider Parameters, Astrophysical Constants, Cosmological Parameters, and Dark Matter.

  12. Hybrid computer modelling in plasma physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hromadka, J; Ibehej, T; Hrach, R

    2016-01-01

    Our contribution is devoted to development of hybrid modelling techniques. We investigate sheath structures in the vicinity of solids immersed in low temperature argon plasma of different pressures by means of particle and fluid computer models. We discuss the differences in results obtained by these methods and try to propose a way to improve the results of fluid models in the low pressure area. There is a possibility to employ Chapman-Enskog method to find appropriate closure relations of fluid equations in a case when particle distribution function is not Maxwellian. We try to follow this way to enhance fluid model and to use it in hybrid plasma model further. (paper)

  13. The CMS Masterclass and Particle Physics Outreach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cecire, Kenneth [Notre Dame U.; Bardeen, Marjorie [Fermilab; McCauley, Thomas [Notre Dame U.

    2014-01-01

    The CMS Masterclass enables high school students to analyse authentic CMS data. Students can draw conclusions on key ratios and particle masses by combining their analyses. In particular, they can use the ratio of W^+ to W^- candidates to probe the structure of the proton, they can find the mass of the Z boson, and they can identify additional particles including, tentatively, the Higgs boson. In the United States, masterclasses are part of QuarkNet, a long-term program that enables students and teachers to use cosmic ray and particle physics data for learning with an emphasis on data from CMS.

  14. Particle physics in the LHC era

    CERN Document Server

    Barr, Giles; Walczak, Roman; Weidberg, Tony

    2016-01-01

    This text gives an introduction to particle physics at a level accessible to advanced undergraduate students. It is based on lectures given to 4th year physics students over a number of years, and reflects the feedback from the students. The aim is to explain the theoretical and experimental basis of the Standard Model (SM) of Particle Physics with the simplest mathematical treatment possible. All the experimental discoveries that led to the understanding of the SM relied on particle detectors and most of them required advanced particle accelerators. A unique feature of this book is that it gives a serious introduction to the fundamental accelerator and detector physics, which is currently only available in advanced graduate textbooks. The mathematical tools that are required such as group theory are covered in one chapter. A modern treatment of the Dirac equation is given in which the free particle Dirac equation is seen as being equivalent to the Lorentz transformation. The idea of generating the SM interac...

  15. The interface of mathematics and particle physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Quillen, D.G.; Segal, G.B.; Tsousheung Tsun (Oxford Univ. (UK). Mathematical Inst.) (eds.)

    1990-01-01

    This collection of papers is based on the proceedings of a conference organized by the Institute of Mathematics and its Applications on the Interface of Mathematics and Particle Physics held at Oxford University in September 1988. There are twenty-five papers, all of which are indexed separately. Many contribute to the search for an understanding of how gravity can be unified with other interactions in one field theory. String and twistor theories are important in this search and many of the papers refer to strings, superstrings or twistor. All the papers seek a physical interpretation of theories and elementary particles. (author).

  16. Plasma particle drifts due to traveling waves with cyclotron frequencies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hatakeyama, Rikizo; Sato, Naoyuki; Sato, Noriyoshi

    1991-01-01

    A particle orbit theory yields that traveling waves with cyclotron frequencies give rise to charged particle drifts perpendicular both to the wave propagation and external magnetic field lines. The result is applicable to particle-flux control of magnetized plasmas. (author)

  17. Cosmic Plasmas, Physics 418 Lecture 1: Elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thyagaraja, A.

    2002-01-01

    Definition of a plasma; distinction from neutral gas. Debye length, plasma parameter; concept of shielding and quasi neutrality. Two types of description: particle kinetic vs continuum. Self-consistent field concept. Continuum equations for a neutral (ideal) gas. Continuum equations of motion for an ideal, quasi neutral plasma. These Lecture Notes are intended to provide a self-contained account of the material. Some topics are included for completeness and may be omitted on a first reading. They are so indicated, where appropriate. (author)

  18. Fundamental aspects of plasma chemical physics Thermodynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Capitelli, Mario; D'Angola, Antonio

    2012-01-01

    Fundamental Aspects of Plasma Chemical Physics - Thermodynamics develops basic and advanced concepts of plasma thermodynamics from both classical and statistical points of view. After a refreshment of classical thermodynamics applied to the dissociation and ionization regimes, the book invites the reader to discover the role of electronic excitation in affecting the properties of plasmas, a topic often overlooked by the thermal plasma community. Particular attention is devoted to the problem of the divergence of the partition function of atomic species and the state-to-state approach for calculating the partition function of diatomic and polyatomic molecules. The limit of ideal gas approximation is also discussed, by introducing Debye-Huckel and virial corrections. Throughout the book, worked examples are given in order to clarify concepts and mathematical approaches. This book is a first of a series of three books to be published by the authors on fundamental aspects of plasma chemical physics.  The next bo...

  19. Abstracts of the 23rd European physical society conference on controlled fusion and plasma physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goutych, I F; Gresillon, D; Sitenko, A G

    1997-12-31

    This document contains the abstracts of the invited and contributed papers presented at 23 EPS conference on controlled fusion and plasma physics. The main contents are: tokamaks, stellarators; alternative magnetic confinement; plasma edge physics; plasma heating and current drive; plasma diagnostics; basic collisionless plasma physics; high intensity laser produced plasmas and inertial confinement; low-temperature plasmas.

  20. Abstracts of the 23rd European physical society conference on controlled fusion and plasma physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goutych, I.F.; Gresillon, D.; Sitenko, A.G.

    1996-01-01

    This document contains the abstracts of the invited and contributed papers presented at 23 EPS conference on controlled fusion and plasma physics. The main contents are: tokamaks, stellarators; alternative magnetic confinement; plasma edge physics; plasma heating and current drive; plasma diagnostics; basic collisionless plasma physics; high intensity laser produced plasmas and inertial confinement; low-temperature plasmas

  1. Exploration of Plasma Jets Approach to High Energy Density Physics. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Chiping [Massachusetts Inst. of Technology (MIT), Cambridge, MA (United States)

    2013-08-26

    High-energy-density laboratory plasma (HEDLP) physics is an emerging, important area of research in plasma physics, nuclear physics, astrophysics, and particle acceleration. While the HEDLP regime occurs at extreme conditions which are often found naturally in space but not on the earth, it may be accessible by colliding high intensity plasmas such as high-energy-density plasma jets, plasmoids or compact toroids from plasma guns. The physics of plasma jets is investigated in the context of high energy density laboratory plasma research. This report summarizes results of theoretical and computational investigation of a plasma jet undergoing adiabatic compression and adiabatic expansion. A root-mean-squared (rms) envelope theory of plasma jets is developed. Comparison between theory and experiment is made. Good agreement between theory and experiment is found.

  2. Particle Physics Outreach to Secondary Education

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bardeen, Marjorie G.; /Fermilab; Johansson, K.Erik; /Stockholm U.; Young, M.Jean

    2011-11-21

    This review summarizes exemplary secondary education and outreach programs of the particle physics community. We examine programs from the following areas: research experiences, high-energy physics data for students, informal learning for students, instructional resources, and professional development. We report findings about these programs' impact on students and teachers and provide suggestions for practices that create effective programs from those findings. We also include some methods for assessing programs.

  3. Particle Physics Outreach to Secondary Education

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bardeen, Marjorie G.; Johansson, K. Erik; Young, M. Jean

    2011-01-01

    This review summarizes exemplary secondary education and outreach programs of the particle physics community. We examine programs from the following areas: research experiences, high-energy physics data for students, informal learning for students, instructional resources, and professional development. We report findings about these programs' impact on students and teachers and provide suggestions for practices that create effective programs from those findings. We also include some methods for assessing programs.

  4. High energy particle physics in the United Kingdom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1985-06-01

    The paper reviews the U.K. participation in High Energy Particle Physics (HEPP) research. The funding of science in Higher Education and the Research Councils; high energy particle physics; relevance of particle physics to science and technology; particle physics in the U.K.; CERN; and the opportunity cost of HEPP within the science budget; are all discussed. (U.K.)

  5. Particle porosity at plasma are spraying of metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petrunichev, V.A.; Koroleva, E.B.; Pushilin, N.P.

    1985-01-01

    Quantitative dependences of porosity and character of pore distribution in particles of different materials on particle size and composition of atmosphere in a working chamber are studied experimentally as applied to the process of plasma wire sputtering. Wires 1.2 mm in diameter made of tungsten, molybdenum, Kh20N80 alloy, and zirconium served as sputtering materials. It is shown that pore size and character of their distribution in particles of powders obtained by the method of plasma wire sputtering are dependent on sizes of forming particles and determined by conditions of their cooling. Intensive porosity formation is characteristic of wire sputtering in argon plasma with nitrogen additions, but there are critical values of nitrogen concentration in plasma, above which intensive porosity formation in forming particles stops

  6. Particle balance in diverted plasmas in TEXT-U

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rowan, W.L.; Bengtson, R.D.; Bonnin, X.; Edmonds, P.H.; Hurwitz, P.D.; Solano, E.R.; Tsui, H.Y.W.; Uglum, J.R.; Wootton, A.J.

    1995-01-01

    Tokamak plasmas in an open divertor configuration with the X-point at the inner equator were compared with plasmas limited by an inner toroidal belt. This paper describes and compares the particle balance in these two types of discharge. The plasma parameters n e (r), φ(r), T e (r), n e , and φ were measured in the scrape-off layer and in the plasma periphery at one poloidal location and mapped onto the rest of the plasma by assuming constancy on flux surfaces. Emission from neutral hydrogen was measured throughout the plasma. The particle source and then the global particle confinement were inferred from these measurements using a 3-D neutral transport simulation. The SOL profiles are significantly steeper in the diverted discharge. Both the source measurements and estimates from the SOL profiles indicate significantly better confinement in the diverted discharge. ((orig.))

  7. Particle Physics in the LHC Era

    CERN Document Server

    Bunk, Don

    During the past 100 years experimental particle physicists have collected an impressive amount of data. Theorists have also come to understand this data extremely well. It was in the first half of the 20th century the efforts of the early pioneers of quantum mechanics laid the ground work for this understanding: quantum field theory. Through the tireless efforts of researchers during the later half of the 20th century many ideas came together to form what we now call the Standard Model (SM) of particle physics. Finally, it was through the ideas of the renormalization group and effective field theory that the understanding of how the SM fits into a larger framework of particle physics was crystallized. In the past four years the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) has made more precise measurements than ever before. Currently the SM of particle physics is known to have excellent agreement with these measurements. As a result of this agreement with data, the SM continues to play such a central role in modern particle p...

  8. Facts and mysteries in elementary particle physics

    CERN Document Server

    Veltman, Martinus J G

    2018-01-01

    This book provides a comprehensive overview of modern particle physics accessible to anyone with a true passion for wanting to know how the universe works. We are introduced to the known particles of the world we live in. An elegant explanation of quantum mechanics and relativity paves the way for an understanding of the laws that govern particle physics. These laws are put into action in the world of accelerators, colliders and detectors found at institutions such as CERN and Fermilab that are in the forefront of technical innovation. Real world and theory meet using Feynman diagrams to solve the problems of infinities and deduce the need for the Higgs boson. Facts and Mysteries in Elementary Particle Physics offers an incredible insight from an eyewitness and participant in some of the greatest discoveries in 20th century science. From Einstein's theory of relativity to the spectacular discovery of the Higgs particle, this book will fascinate and educate anyone interested in the world of quarks, leptons an...

  9. Dust particle formation in silane plasmas

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sorokin, M.

    2005-01-01

    Dust can be found anywhere: in the kitchen, in the car, in space… Not surprisingly we also see dust in commercial and laboratory plasmas. Dust can be introduced in the plasma, but it can also grow there by itself. In the microelectronics industry, contamination of the processing plasma by dust is an

  10. LHCb in the International Particle Physics Masterclasses

    CERN Document Server

    Couturier, Ben

    2016-01-01

    The Large Hadron Collider Beauty (LHCb) Experiment joined the International Particle Physics Masterclass programme in 2013. The experiment proposed the measurement of the D0 meson lifetime, using real data gathered at the Large Hadron Collider in 2012. We describe the exercise as well as the lessons learned during this first participation in the International Masterclass programme.

  11. Particle physics data system at IHEP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alekhin, S.I.; Grudtsin, S.N.; Demidov, N.G.; Ezhela, V.V.

    1981-01-01

    This note presents the description of information search and retrieval facilities supplied by the Berkeley Database Management System - BDMS V2.2 implemented for ICL-1906A computers at IHEP. The system is used for creation and maintenance of archieve Particle Physics Data Bases [ru

  12. Visions: The coming revolutions in particle physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chris Quigg

    2002-04-11

    Wonderful opportunities await particle physics over the next decade, with the coming of the Large Hadron Collider to explore the 1-TeV scale (extending efforts at LEP and the Tevatron to unravel the nature of electroweak symmetry breaking) and many initiatives to develop the understanding of the problem of identity and the dimensionality of spacetime.

  13. Constraints on particle physics from cosmology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schramm, D.N.; Charlton, J.C.

    1986-01-01

    Cosmology and particle physics have become symbiotic in their relationship. In the past, developments in physics have been used to explain astrophysics problems. Recently, cosmology also has been able to place constraints on particle properties and these constraints can be tested by experiment. Thus, the flow of information at the interface of particle physics and cosmology is no longer just one-way. (Astronomy is no longer a parasite of physics.) Many examples of the interchange are described in this review. The timeline of cosmology is rapidly filling in as later events find their explanations in earlier events. In this review, the authors mention what is known about each epoch and show how it might constrain the particle models. Since a great deal of effort is devoted currently to the study of the dark matter problem, special emphasis will be placed on this issue. This study of dark matter and galaxy formation will allow us to draw upon much of what was discussed in earlier epochs. This review draws heavily on a previous review by the authors

  14. Concepts and models in particle physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paty, M.

    1977-01-01

    The knowledge of Elementary Particle Physics is characterized by an object and a purpose which are both highly theoretical. This assessment is shown and analysed by some examples taken in recent achievements in the field. It is also tried to attempt an enonciation of some criteria of the reality for concepts and objects in this matter [fr

  15. PSI nuclear and particle physics newsletter 1990

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frosch, R.; Furrer, F.

    1991-01-01

    This newsletter contains reports on nuclear and particle physics supported by the F1 division of PSI. Groups were invited to present new preliminary or final results obtained in 1990. As ususal, the contributions were not referred. They should be quoted after consultation with the authors only. (author) figs., tabs., refs

  16. Theoretical Studies in Elementary Particle Physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Collins, John C.; Roiban, Radu S

    2013-04-01

    This final report summarizes work at Penn State University from June 1, 1990 to April 30, 2012. The work was in theoretical elementary particle physics. Many new results in perturbative QCD, in string theory, and in related areas were obtained, with a substantial impact on the experimental program.

  17. Particle physics-astrophysics working group

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cronin, J.W.; Kolb, E.W.

    1989-01-01

    The working group met each afternoon and listened to mini-symposia on a broad range of subjects covering all aspects of particle physics---astrophysics both theoretical and experimental. This paper reports that as a result, a number of papers which follow were commissioned to reflect the present status and future prospects of the field

  18. Particle physics and the LEP project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roussarie, A.

    1985-01-01

    A very didactic chronological account of the last 20 years of elementary particle physics is presented. After some recall on matter constituents and interactions between these constituents, some details are given on researches which will be made in LEP, the e + -e - collider [fr

  19. Inflation, large scale structure and particle physics

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Logo of the Indian Academy of Sciences ... Hybrid inflation; Higgs scalar field; structure formation; curvation. ... We then discuss a particle physics model of supersymmetric hybrid inflation at the intermediate scale in which ... May 2018. Home · Volumes & Issues · Special Issues · Forthcoming Articles · Search · Editorial Board ...

  20. A Vision of Nuclear and Particle Physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Montgomery, Hugh E. [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF), Newport News, VA (United States)

    2016-08-01

    This paper will consist of a selected, personal view of some of the issues associated with the intersections of nuclear and particle physics. As well as touching on the recent developments we will attempt to look at how those aspects of the subject might evolve over the next few years.

  1. Phenomenal result for Durham in particle physics

    CERN Multimedia

    2000-01-01

    The University of Durham has beaten ten rivals to house a new 12 million pound institute for particle physics phenomenology. The institute will be supported for a minimum of ten years by PPARC and the university. Its first director will be Professor James Stirling (2 paragraphs).

  2. REDUCE system in elementary particle physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grozin, A.G.

    1990-01-01

    This preprint is the first part of the problem book on using REDUCE for calculations of cross sections and decay probabilities in elementary particle physics. It contains the review of the necessary formulae and examples of using REDUCE for calculations with vectors and Dirac matrices. 5 refs.; 11 figs

  3. Selected exercises in particle and nuclear physics

    CERN Document Server

    Bianchini, Lorenzo

    2018-01-01

    This book presents more than 300 exercises, with guided solutions, on topics that span both the experimental and the theoretical aspects of particle physics. The exercises are organized by subject, covering kinematics, interactions of particles with matter, particle detectors, hadrons and resonances, electroweak interactions and flavor physics, statistics and data analysis, and accelerators and beam dynamics. Some 200 of the exercises, including 50 in multiple-choice format, derive from exams set by the Italian National Institute for Nuclear Research (INFN) over the past decade to select its scientific staff of experimental researchers. The remainder comprise problems taken from the undergraduate classes at ETH Zurich or inspired by classic textbooks. Whenever appropriate, in-depth information is provided on the source of the problem, and readers will also benefit from the inclusion of bibliographic details and short dissertations on particular topics. This book is an ideal complement to textbooks on experime...

  4. Current Experiments in Particle Physics (September 1996)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Galic, H.; Lehar, F.; Klyukhin, V.I.; Ryabov, Yu.G.; Bilak, S.V.; Illarionova, N.S.; Khachaturov, B.A.; Strokovsky, E.A.; Hoffman, C.M.; Kettle, P.-R.; Olin, A.; Armstrong, F.E.

    1996-09-01

    This report contains summaries of current and recent experiments in Particle Physics. Included are experiments at BEPC (Beijing), BNL, CEBAF, CERN, CESR, DESY, FNAL, Frascati, ITEP (Moscow), JINR (Dubna), KEK, LAMPF, Novosibirsk, PNPI (St. Petersburg), PSI, Saclay, Serpukhov, SLAC, and TRIUMF, and also several proton decay and solar neutrino experiments. Excluded are experiments that finished taking data before 1991. Instructions are given for the World Wide Web (WWW) searching of the computer database (maintained under the SLAC-SPIRES system) that contains the summaries. This report contains full summaries of 180 approved current and recent experiments in elementary particle physics. The focus of the report is on selected experiments which directly contribute to our better understanding of elementary particles and their properties such as masses, widths or lifetimes, and branching fractions.

  5. Department of Plasma Physics and Technology - Overview

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rabinski, M.

    2008-01-01

    Full text: The activities of the Department in 2007 continued previous studies in the following fields of plasma physics, controlled nuclear fusion and plasma technology of surface engineering: · Studies of physical phenomena in pulsed discharges in the Plasma-Focus (PF) and RPI-IBIS facilities; · Development of selected methods for high-temperature plasma diagnostics; · Research on plasma technologies; · Selected problems of plasma theory and computational modelling. As for the experimental studies particular attention was paid to the analysis of the correlation of X-ray pulses with pulsed electron beams and other corpuscular emissions from different Plasma-Focus (PF) facilities. A collisional-radiative model, taking into account the Stark effect and strong electric fields in the so called '' hot- spot '' regions of a pinch, was applied in those analyses. The main aim of these studies was to identify the physical phenomena responsible for the emission during the PF-type discharges. The emitted protons were also measured with nuclear track detectors. The measurements made it possible to obtain images of the regions, where the D-D fusion reactions occurred, as well as to determine the angular distribution of the emitted protons. Pulsed plasma streams were also investigated by means of time-resolved optical spectroscopy and corpuscular diagnostics. In a frame of the EURATOM program, efforts were devoted to the development of diagnostic methods for tokamak-type facilities. Such studies include the design and construction of the 4-channel Cherenkov-type detection system for the TORE-SUPRA tokamak at CEA-Cadarache. In the meantime in order to collect some experience a new measuring head was especially prepared for experiments within small facilities. Other fusion- oriented efforts are connected with the application of the solid-state nuclear track detectors for investigation of protons from tokamak plasma and high-energy beams emitted from laser produced plasmas

  6. Particle physics 2009: licence to smile

    CERN Multimedia

    2009-01-01

    Julie Peasley is the keeper of a very unusual zoo, a colourful set of hand-made plushies that represent the particles of the Standard Model and beyond. Her passion for physics and her art degree combine to give particles their personalities. She visited CERN on 25 May and met the CERNois in the library. Scientists consider that they have ‘seen’ a particle when their detectors send an electronic signal and a spot appears on their computer screen. The American artist Julie Peasley has gone much further than that and has started sewing toys so that we can not just ‘see’ what particles look like but even play with them! "When I started," says Julie, "my plushies weren’t smiling, they were just a face. Later on, I realised that I wanted them to all be happy and to appear like they are having fun. Except for the neutron, which insists on remaining ne...

  7. Plasma focusing and diagnosis of high energy particle beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Pisin.

    1990-09-01

    Various novel concepts of focusing and diagnosis of high energy charged particle beams, based on the interaction between the relativistic particle beam and the plasma, are reviewed. This includes overdense thin plasma lenses, and (underdense) adiabatic plasma lens, and two beam size monitor concepts. In addition, we introduce another mechanism for measuring flat beams based on the impulse received by heavy ions in an underdense plasma. Theoretical investigations show promise of focusing and diagnosing beams down to sizes where conventional methods are not possible to provide. 21 refs

  8. Physics and applications of plasmas produced by pulsed power technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ozaki, Tetsuo; Katsuki, Sunao

    2013-10-01

    The papers presented at the symposium on 'Physics and Applications of Plasmas Produced by Pulsed Power Technology' held on March 27-28, 2012 at the National Institute for Fusion Science are collected in these proceedings. The papers in these proceedings reflect the current status and progress in the experimental and theoretical research on high power particle beams and high energy density plasmas produced by pulsed power technology. This issue is the collection of 22 papers presented at the entitled meeting. Ten of the presented papers are indexed individually. (J.P.N.)

  9. PlasmaPy: initial development of a Python package for plasma physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Nicholas; Leonard, Andrew J.; Stańczak, Dominik; Haggerty, Colby C.; Parashar, Tulasi N.; Huang, Yu-Min; PlasmaPy Community

    2017-10-01

    We report on initial development of PlasmaPy: an open source community-driven Python package for plasma physics. PlasmaPy seeks to provide core functionality that is needed for the formation of a fully open source Python ecosystem for plasma physics. PlasmaPy prioritizes code readability, consistency, and maintainability while using best practices for scientific computing such as version control, continuous integration testing, embedding documentation in code, and code review. We discuss our current and planned capabilities, including features presently under development. The development roadmap includes features such as fluid and particle simulation capabilities, a Grad-Shafranov solver, a dispersion relation solver, atomic data retrieval methods, and tools to analyze simulations and experiments. We describe several ways to contribute to PlasmaPy. PlasmaPy has a code of conduct and is being developed under a BSD license, with a version 0.1 release planned for 2018. The success of PlasmaPy depends on active community involvement, so anyone interested in contributing to this project should contact the authors. This work was partially supported by the U.S. Department of Energy.

  10. Current experiments in elementary particle physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wohl, C.G.; Armstrong, F.E., Oyanagi, Y.; Dodder, D.C.; Ryabov, Yu.G.; Frosch, R.; Olin, A.; Lehar, F.; Moskalev, A.N.; Barkov, B.P.

    1987-03-01

    This report contains summaries of 720 recent and current experiments in elementary particle physics (experiments that finished taking data before 1980 are excluded). Included are experiments at Brookhaven, CERN, CESR, DESY, Fermilab, Moscow Institute of Theoretical and Experimental Physics, Tokyo Institute of Nuclear Studies, KEK, LAMPF, Leningrad Nuclear Physics Institute, Saclay, Serpukhov, SIN, SLAC, and TRIUMF, and also experiments on proton decay. Instructions are given for searching online the computer database (maintained under the SLAC/SPIRES system) that contains the summaries. Properties of the fixed-target beams at most of the laboratories are summarized.

  11. Current experiments in elementary particle physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wohl, C.G.; Armstrong, F.E.; Oyanagi, Y.; Dodder, D.C.; Ryabov, Yu.G.; Frosch, R.; Olin, A.; Lehar, F.; Moskalev, A.N.; Barkov, B.P.

    1987-03-01

    This report contains summaries of 720 recent and current experiments in elementary particle physics (experiments that finished taking data before 1980 are excluded). Included are experiments at Brookhaven, CERN, CESR, DESY, Fermilab, Moscow Institute of Theoretical and Experimental Physics, Tokyo Institute of Nuclear Studies, KEK, LAMPF, Leningrad Nuclear Physics Institute, Saclay, Serpukhov, SIN, SLAC, and TRIUMF, and also experiments on proton decay. Instructions are given for searching online the computer database (maintained under the SLAC/SPIRES system) that contains the summaries. Properties of the fixed-target beams at most of the laboratories are summarized

  12. Implementing particle-in-cell plasma simulation code on the BBN TC2000

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sturtevant, J.E.; Maccabe, A.B.

    1990-01-01

    The BBN TC2000 is a multiple instruction, multiple data (MIMD) machine that combines a physically distributed memory with a logically shared memory programming environment using the unique Butterfly switch. Particle-In-Cell (PIC) plasma simulations model the interaction of charged particles with electric and magnetic fields. This paper describes the implementation of both a 1-D electrostatic and a 2 1/2-D electromagnetic PIC (particle-in-cell) plasma simulation code on a BBN TC2000. Performance is compared to implementations of the same code on the shared memory Sequent Balance and distributed memory Intel iPSC hypercube

  13. Department of Plasma Physics and Technology - Overview

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sadowski, M.J.

    2006-01-01

    In 2005 research activities in Department P-V were concentrated on the continuation of previous studies in the field of plasma physics and CNF, but new investigations were also undertaken, particularly in the field of plasma technology. The main tasks were as follows: 1. Studies of physical phenomena in pulsed discharges producing dense magnetized plasma; 2. Development of methods and tools for high-temperature plasma diagnostics; 3. Research in the field of plasma technologies. As to the first task, particular attention was paid to studies of X-ray pulses and pulsed electron beams, by means of different diagnostic techniques. Measurements of the polarization of the selected X-ray spectral lines and their correlation with pulsed e-beams were performed in the MAJA-PF facility. Taking into account microscopic irreproducibility of so-called 'hot-spots', particular efforts were devoted to the correlation of the X-ray emission from a single hot-spot with corresponding non-thermal electron pulses. Some observations of X-rays were performed also at the PF-1000 facility at IPPLM in Warsaw. Other studies concerned the correlation of fast-neutron pulses with X-rays and other corpuscular emissions. Results of experimental studies carried out in the IPJ-IPPLM collaboration were analyzed and summarized. New measurements, carried out in the MAJA-PF facility, determined the temporal correlation of X-rays pulses, fusion-neutrons, fast electron beams and high-energy ion beams. Other efforts concerned studies of fast (ripple-born) electrons in tokamaks. An analysis of the capability of special Cerenkov-type detectors (based on diamond-crystal radiators) was performed, and measuring heads for the CASTOR and TORE-SUPRA facilities have been designed. Concerning the development of plasma diagnostic techniques, characteristics of PM-355 nuclear track detectors were analyzed and the calibrated detectors (with appropriate absorption filters) were used for measurements of fast (> 3 Me

  14. Particle accelerator physics and technology for high energy density physics research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoffmann, D.H.H.; Blazevic, A.; Rosmej, O.N.; Spiller, P.; Tahir, N.A.; Weyrich, K. [Gesellschaft fur Schwerionenforschung, GSI-Darmstadt, Plasmaphysik, Darmstadt (Germany); Hoffmann, D.H.H.; Dafni, T.; Kuster, M.; Ni, P.; Roth, M.; Udrea, S.; Varentsov, D. [Darmstadt Univ., Institut fur Kernphysik, Technische Schlobgartenstr. 9 (Germany); Jacoby, J. [Frankfurt Univ., Institut fur Angewandte Physik (Germany); Kain, V.; Schmidt, R.; Zioutas, K. [European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN), Geneve (Switzerland); Zioutas, K. [Patras Univ., Dept. of Physics (Greece); Mintsev, V.; Fortov, V.E. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Institute of Problems of Chemical Physics, Chernogolovka (Russian Federation); Sharkov, B.Y. [Institut for Theoretical and Experimental Physics ITEP, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2007-08-15

    Interaction phenomena of intense ion- and laser radiation with matter have a large range of application in different fields of science, extending from basic research of plasma properties to applications in energy science, especially in inertial fusion. The heavy ion synchrotron at GSI now routinely delivers intense uranium beams that deposit about 1 kJ/g of specific energy in solid matter, e.g. solid lead. Our simulations show that the new accelerator complex FAIR (Facility for Antiproton and Ion Research) at GSI as well as beams from the CERN large hadron collider (LHC) will vastly extend the accessible parameter range for high energy density states. A natural example of hot dense plasma is provided by our neighbouring star the sun, and allows a deep insight into the physics of fusion, the properties of matter at high energy density, and is moreover an excellent laboratory for astro-particle physics. As such the sun's interior plasma can even be used to probe the existence of novel particles and dark matter candidates. We present an overview on recent results and developments of dense plasma physics addressed with heavy ion and laser beams combined with accelerator- and nuclear physics technology. (authors)

  15. Winter School on Physics with Trapped Charged Particles - Abstracts and slides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pedersen, T.S.; Thompson, R.C.; Madsen, N.; Champenois, C.; Anderegg, F.; Fajans, J.; Knoop, M.; Scott Hangst, J.; Hilico, L.; Ulmer, S.; Blaum, K.; Drewsen, M.; Roos, C.; Schmidt, P.

    2016-01-01

    This winter school covered various topics of the physics of trapped charged particles. Lectures covered basic trap physics and recent developments in Penning traps, Paul traps..., collective behavior and non-neutral plasmas, as well as applications for fundamental physics, laser cooling, precision spectroscopy and quantum information. This document gathers a booklet of abstracts and the available slides of the presentations

  16. Particle Physics Committee annual report 1976-77, particle physics grants and laboratory agreements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1977-01-01

    The Annual Report for the period 1 August 1976 to 31 July 1977 of the Particel Physics Committee of the Nuclear Physics Board, under the (United Kingdom) Science Research Council, is presented. Details are given of particle physics grants and laboratory agreements. (U.K.)

  17. Semiconductor detectors in nuclear and particle physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rehak, P.; Gatti, E.

    1995-01-01

    Semiconductor detectors for elementary particle physics and nuclear physics in the energy range above 1 GeV are briefly reviewed. In these two fields semiconductor detectors are used mainly for the precise position sensing. In a typical experiment, the position of a fast charged particle crossing a relatively thin semiconductor detector is measured. The position resolution achievable by semiconductor detectors is compared with the resolution achievable by gas filled position sensing detectors. Semiconductor detectors are divided into two groups; (i) classical semiconductor diode detectors and (ii) semiconductor memory detectors. Principles of the signal formation and the signal read-out for both groups of detectors are described. New developments of silicon detectors of both groups are reported. copyright 1995 American Institute of Physics

  18. Nuclear and Particle Physics, Astrophysics and Cosmology : T-2 : LANL

    Science.gov (United States)

    linked in Search T-2, Nuclear and Particle Physics, Astrophysics and Cosmology T-2 Home T Division Focus Areas Nuclear Information Service Nuclear Physics Particle Physics Astrophysics Cosmology CONTACTS Group fundamental and applied theoretical research in applied and fundamental nuclear physics, particle physics

  19. Particle Simulation of Pulsed Plasma Thruster Plumes

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Boyd, Ian

    2002-01-01

    .... Our modeling had made progress in al aspects of simulating these complex devices including Teflon ablation, plasma formation, electro-magnetic acceleration, plume expansion, and particulate transport...

  20. Millimetre waves and plasma physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brand, G.F.

    1999-01-01

    Full text: This talk is a review of the plasma-related presentations at the 23rd International Conference on Infrared and Millimeter Waves held at the University of Essex, Colchester, UK 7-11 September 1998. Of most relevance to fusion is the development of high-power sources for electron cyclotron resonance heating and current drive. The requirements for ITER are a total of 50 MW at 170 GHz. The state of the art is illustrated by (a) high-power gyrotrons that deliver 1 MW for 1 s at 170 GHz, and (b) a free-electron maser that has generated millimetre waves for the first time, 730 kW at 200 GHz. A number of papers describe new technologies that allow high powers to be achieved; internal mode converters to convert the whispering-gallery mode generated in the gyrotron cavity into a gaussian beam, depressed collectors to raise the efficiency from 1/3 to better than 1/2, CVD diamond output windows and coaxial gyrotrons with improved mode purity. Other papers describe transmission lines and steerable mirrors. Several papers deal with millimetre-wave plasma diagnostics for fusion such as electron cyclotron emission measurements and reflectometry. (author)

  1. Fundamental aspects of plasma chemical physics transport

    CERN Document Server

    Capitelli, Mario; Laricchiuta, Annarita

    2013-01-01

    Fundamental Aspects of Plasma Chemical Physics: Tranpsort develops basic and advanced concepts of plasma transport to the modern treatment of the Chapman-Enskog method for the solution of the Boltzmann transport equation. The book invites the reader to consider actual problems of the transport of thermal plasmas with particular attention to the derivation of diffusion- and viscosity-type transport cross sections, stressing the role of resonant charge-exchange processes in affecting the diffusion-type collision calculation of viscosity-type collision integrals. A wide range of topics is then discussed including (1) the effect of non-equilibrium vibrational distributions on the transport of vibrational energy, (2) the role of electronically excited states in the transport properties of thermal plasmas, (3) the dependence of transport properties on the multitude of Saha equations for multi-temperature plasmas, and (4) the effect of the magnetic field on transport properties. Throughout the book, worked examples ...

  2. An historian's interest in particle physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heilbron, J.L.

    1989-01-01

    This paper considers the sociological and historical implications of early particle physics. The author explains the nature of historical research and its application to scientific developments and the limitations of personal recollections as research tools. Taking the Bevatron as an example, the paper asks a number of questions about the reasons it was built and why and who benefitted from its use. The article finishes by questioning the relevance of prizes to scientific research and considers the language that particle physicists have adopted in their work from the Greek derivations to the quark types, asking whether physicists' view of themselves has changed and been reflected in their use of language. (UK)

  3. Particle identification methods in High Energy Physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Va' Vra, J.

    2000-01-27

    This paper deals with two major particle identification methods: dE/dx and Cherenkov detection. In the first method, the authors systematically compare existing dE/dx data with various predictions available in the literature, such as the Particle Data group recommendation, and judge the overall consistency. To my knowledge, such comparison was not done yet in a published form for the gaseous detectors used in High-Energy physics. As far as the second method, there are two major Cherenkov light detection techniques: the threshold and the Ring imaging methods. The authors discuss the recent trend in these techniques.

  4. Elementary particles and physics interaction unification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leite-Lopes, J.

    1985-01-01

    Quantum theory and relativity theory are fundamental of relativistic quantum mechanics, quantum field theory, which is the base of elementary particle physics, gauge field theory and basic force unification models. After a short introduction of relativistic equations of the main fields, the free scalar field, the free vector field, the free electromagnetic field and the free spinor field, and of elementary particles and basic interactions, gauge invariance and electromagnetic gauge field are detailed. Then the presentation of internal degrees of freedom, especially isospin, introduces gauge field theory of Yang-Mills. At last weak interactions and strong interactions are presented and lead to grand unification theory in conclusion [fr

  5. Recent advances in elementary particle physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zepeda, D.A.

    1985-01-01

    A brief review of recent successful results in elementary particle physics, as well as of those problems which may be dealt with in the present of near future is presented. A description of elementary particles and their interactions as they are presently conceived is given. The standard model of electroweak interactions is discussed in detail and the relevance of the recent discovery of the intermediate bosons W + and Z is analized. Finally, the weak features of the standard model and the theories which solve these problems are pointed out. (author)

  6. Particle physics prospects for the KAON factory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bryman, D.

    1989-05-01

    The Kaon Factory at TRIUMF will produce beams of kaons, antiprotons, neutrinos and other particles with a hundred-fold increase in intensity over existing machines in the 30 GeV region. This will make possible new high precision experiments designed to test current ideas as well as high sensitivity measurements which could potentially reveal new effects. A sample of particle physics experiments involving rare kaon decays, CP and T violation studies, neutrino properties and reactions and light quark spectroscopy which might take advantage of the new opportunities presented by the Kaon Factory is discussed

  7. Plasma Physics Network Newsletter. No. 3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-02-01

    This issue of the Newsletter contains a report on the First South-North International Workshop on Fusion Theory, Tipaza, Algeria, 17-20 September, 1990; a report in the issuance of the ''Buenos Aires Memorandum'' generated during the IV Latin American Workshop on Plasma Physics, Argentina, July 1990, and containing a proposal that the IFRC establish a ''Steering Committee on North-South Collaboration in Controlled Nuclear Fusion and Plasma Physics Research''; the announcement that the 14th International Conference on Plasma Physics and Controlled Nuclear Fusion will be held in Wuerzburg, Germany, September 30 - October 7, 1992; a list of IAEA technical committee meetings for 1991; an item on ITER news; an article ''Long-Term Physics R and D Planning (for ITER)'' by F. Engelmann; in the planned sequence of ''Reports on National Fusion Programmes'' contributions on the Chinese and Yugoslav programmes; finally, the titles and contacts for two other newsletters of potential interest, i.e., the AAAPT (Asian African Association for Plasma Training) Newsletter, and the IPG (International Physics Group-a sub-unit of the American Physical Society) Newsletter

  8. Plasma Physics Network Newsletter, no. 5

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-08-01

    The fifth Plasma Physics Network Newsletter (IAEA, Vienna, Aug. 1992) includes the following topics: (1) the availability of a list of the members of the Third World Plasma Research Network (TWPRN); (2) the announcement of the fourteenth IAEA International Conference on Plasma Physics and Controlled Nuclear Fusion Research to be held in Wuerzburg, Germany, from 30 Sep. to 7 Oct. 1992; (3) the announcement of a Technical Committee Meeting on research using small tokamaks, organized by the IAEA as a satellite meeting to the aforementioned fusion conference; (4) IAEA Fellowships and Scientific Visits for the use of workers in developing member states, and for which plasma researchers are encouraged to apply through Dr. D. Banner, Head, Physics Section, IAEA, P.O. Box 100, A-1400 Vienna, Austria; (5) the initiation in 1993 of a new Coordinated Research Programme (CRP) on 'Development of Software for Numerical Simulation and Data Processing in Fusion Energy Research', as well as a proposed CRP on 'Fusion Research in Developing Countries using Middle- and Small-Scale Plasma Devices'; (6) support from the International Centre for Theoretical Physics (ICTP) for meetings held in Third World countries; (7) a report by W. Usada on Fusion Research in Indonesia; (8) News on ITER; (9) the Technical Committee Meeting planned 8-12 Sep. 1992, Canada, on Tokamak Plasma Biasing; (10) software made available for the study of tokamak transport; (11) the electronic mail address of the TWPRN; (12) the FAX, e-mail, and postal address for contributions to this plasma physics network newsletter.

  9. Plasma physics network newsletter. No. 5

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-08-01

    The fifth Plasma Physics Network Newsletter (IAEA, Vienna, August 1992) includes the following topics: (i) the availability of a list of the members of the Third World Plasma Research Network (TWPRN); (ii) the announcement of the fourteenth IAEA International Conference on Plasma Physics and Controlled Nuclear Fusion Research to be held in Wuerzburg, Germany, from September 30 to October 7, 1992; (iii) the announcement of a Technical Committee Meeting on research using small tokamaks, organized by the IAEA as a satellite meeting to the aforementioned fusion conference; (iv) IAEA Fellowships and Scientific Visits for the use of workers in developing member states, and for which plasma researchers are encouraged to apply through Dr. D. Banner, Head, Physics Section, IAEA, P.O. Box 100, A-1400 Vienna, Austria; (v) the initiation in 1993 of a new Coordinated Research Programme (CRP) on ''Development of Software for Numerical Simulation and Data Processing in Fusion Energy Research'', as well as a proposed CRP on ''Fusion Research in Developing Countries using Middle- and Small-Scale Plasma Devices''; (vi) support from the International Centre for Theoretical Physics (ICTP) for meetings held in Third World countries; (vii) a report by W. Usada on Fusion Research in Indonesia; (viii) News on ITER; (ix) the Technical Committee Meeting planned September 8-12, 1992, Canada, on Tokamak Plasma Biasing; (x) software made available for the study of tokamak transport; (xi) the electronic mail address of the TWPRN; (xii) and the FAX, e-mail and postal address for contributions to this plasma physics network newsletter (FAX: (43-1)-234564)

  10. Introduction to the study of particle accelerators. Atomic, nuclear and high energy physics for engineers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Warnecke, R.R.

    1975-01-01

    This book is destined for engineers taking part in the design building and running of nuclear physics and high-energy physics particle accelerators. It starts with some notions on the theory of relativity, analytical and statistical mechanics and quantum mechanics. An outline of the properties of atomic nuclei, the collision theory and the elements of gaseous plasma physics is followed by a discussion on elementary particles: characteristic parameters, properties, interactions, classification [fr

  11. Discrete particle noise in particle-in-cell simulations of plasma microturbulence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nevins, W.M.; Hammett, G.W.; Dimits, A.M.; Dorland, W.; Shumaker, D.E.

    2005-01-01

    Recent gyrokinetic simulations of electron temperature gradient (ETG) turbulence with the global particle-in-cell (PIC) code GTC [Z. Lin et al., Proceedings of the 20th Fusion Energy Conference, Vilamoura, Portugal, 2004 (IAEA, Vienna, 2005)] yielded different results from earlier flux-tube continuum code simulations [F. Jenko and W. Dorland, Phys. Rev. Lett. 89, 225001 (2002)] despite similar plasma parameters. Differences between the simulation results were attributed to insufficient phase-space resolution and novel physics associated with global simulation models. The results of the global PIC code are reproduced here using the flux-tube PIC code PG3EQ [A. M. Dimits et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 77, 71 (1996)], thereby eliminating global effects as the cause of the discrepancy. The late-time decay of the ETG turbulence and the steady-state heat transport observed in these PIC simulations are shown to result from discrete particle noise. Discrete particle noise is a numerical artifact, so both these PG3EQ simulations and, by inference, the GTC simulations that they reproduced have little to say about steady-state ETG turbulence and the associated anomalous heat transport. In the course of this work several diagnostics are developed to retrospectively test whether a particular PIC simulation is dominated by discrete particle noise

  12. Solitary Model of the Charge Particle Transport in Collisionless Plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simonchik, L.V.; Trukhachev, F.M.

    2006-01-01

    The one-dimensional MHD solitary model of charged particle transport in plasma is developed. It is shown that self-consistent electric field of ion-acoustic solitons can displace charged particles in space, which can be a reason of local electric current generation. The displacement amount is order of a few Debye lengths. It is shown that the current associated with soliton cascade has pulsating nature with DC component. Methods of built theory verification in dusty plasma are proposed

  13. Computational plasma physics and supercomputers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Killeen, J.; McNamara, B.

    1984-09-01

    The Supercomputers of the 80's are introduced. They are 10 to 100 times more powerful than today's machines. The range of physics modeling in the fusion program is outlined. New machine architecture will influence particular codes, but parallel processing poses new coding difficulties. Increasing realism in simulations will require better numerics and more elaborate mathematics

  14. Introduction to particle and astroparticle physics multimessenger astronomy and its particle physics foundations

    CERN Document Server

    De Angelis, Alessandro

    2018-01-01

    This book introduces particle physics, astrophysics and cosmology. Starting from an experimental perspective, it provides a unified view of these fields that reflects the very rapid advances being made. This new edition has a number of improvements and has been updated to describe the recent discovery of gravitational waves and astrophysical neutrinos, which started the new era of multimessenger astrophysics; it also includes new results on the Higgs particle. Astroparticle and particle physics share a common problem: we still don’t have a description of the main ingredients of the Universe from the point of view of its energy budget. Addressing these fascinating issues, and offering a balanced introduction to particle and astroparticle physics that requires only a basic understanding of quantum and classical physics, this book is a valuable resource, particularly for advanced undergraduate students and for those embarking on graduate courses. It includes exercises that offer readers practical insights. It ...

  15. Charge neutrality of fine particle (dusty) plasmas and fine particle cloud under gravity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Totsuji, Hiroo, E-mail: totsuji-09@t.okadai.jp

    2017-03-11

    The enhancement of the charge neutrality due to the existence of fine particles is shown to occur generally under microgravity and in one-dimensional structures under gravity. As an application of the latter, the size and position of fine particle clouds relative to surrounding plasmas are determined under gravity. - Highlights: • In fine particle (dusty) plasmas, the charge neutrality is much enhanced by the existence of fine particles. • The enhancement of charge neutrality generally occurs under microgravity and gravity. • Structure of fine particle clouds under gravity is determined by applying the enhanced charge neutrality.

  16. Modification of Plasma Solitons by Resonant Particles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Karpman, Vladimir; Lynov, Jens-Peter; Michelsen, Poul

    1979-01-01

    Experimental and numerical results are compared with new theoretical results describing soliton propagation and deformation in a strongly magnetized, plasma-loaded waveguide.......Experimental and numerical results are compared with new theoretical results describing soliton propagation and deformation in a strongly magnetized, plasma-loaded waveguide....

  17. Some problems of high-energy elementary particle physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Isaev, P.S.

    1995-01-01

    The problems of high-energy elementary particle physics are discussed. It is pointed out that the modern theory of elementary-particle physics has no solutions of some large physical problems: origin of the mass, electric charge, identity of particle masses, change of the mass of elementary particles in time and others. 7 refs

  18. Plasma-parameter measurements using neutral-particle-beam attenuation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Foote, J.H.; Molvik, A.W.; Turner, W.C.

    1982-01-01

    Intense and energetic neutral-particle-beam injection used for fueling or heating magnetically confined, controlled-fusion experimental plasmas can also provide diagnostic measurements of the plasmas. The attenuation of an atomic beam (mainly from charge-exchange and ionization interactions) when passing through a plasma gives the plasma line density. Orthogonal arrays of highly collimated detectors of the secondary-electron-emission type have been used in magnetic-mirror experiments to measure neutral-beam attenuation along chords through the plasma volume at different radial and axial positions. The radial array is used to infer the radial plasma-density profile; the axial array, to infer the axial plasma-density profile and the ion angular distribution at the plasma midplane

  19. Current experiments in particle physics - particle data group

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Galic, H. [Stanford Univ., CA (United States). Stanford Linear Accelerator Center; Lehar, F. [Centre d`Etudes Nucleaires de Saclay, Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Kettle, P.R. [Paul Scherrer Institute, Villigen (Switzerland)] [and others

    1996-09-01

    This report contains summaries of current and recent experiments in Particle Physics. Included are experiments at BEPC (Beijing), BNL, CEBAF, CERN, CESR, DESY, FNAL, Frascati, ITEP (Moscow), JINR (Dubna), KEK, LAMPF, Novosibirsk, PNPI (St. Petersburg), PSI, Saclay, Serpukhov, SLAC, and TRIUMF, and also several proton decay and solar neutrino experiments. Excluded are experiments that finished taking data before 1991. Instructions are given for the World Wide Web (WWW) searching of the computer database (maintained under the SLAC-SPIRES system) that contains the summaries.

  20. Current experiments in particle physics - particle data group

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Galic, H.; Kettle, P.R.

    1996-09-01

    This report contains summaries of current and recent experiments in Particle Physics. Included are experiments at BEPC (Beijing), BNL, CEBAF, CERN, CESR, DESY, FNAL, Frascati, ITEP (Moscow), JINR (Dubna), KEK, LAMPF, Novosibirsk, PNPI (St. Petersburg), PSI, Saclay, Serpukhov, SLAC, and TRIUMF, and also several proton decay and solar neutrino experiments. Excluded are experiments that finished taking data before 1991. Instructions are given for the World Wide Web (WWW) searching of the computer database (maintained under the SLAC-SPIRES system) that contains the summaries

  1. Charge of a macroscopic particle in a plasma sheath

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Samarian, A.A.; Vladimirov, S.V.

    2003-01-01

    Charging of a macroscopic body levitating in a rf plasma sheath is studied experimentally and theoretically. The nonlinear charge vs size dependence is obtained. The observed nonlinearity is explained on the basis of an approach taking into account different plasma conditions for the levitation positions of different particles. The importance of suprathermal electrons' contribution to the charging process is demonstrated

  2. Space plasma physics stationary processes

    CERN Document Server

    Hasegawa, Akira

    1989-01-01

    During the 30 years of space exploration, important discoveries in the near-earth environment such as the Van Allen belts, the plasmapause, the magnetotail and the bow shock, to name a few, have been made. Coupling between the solar wind and the magnetosphere and energy transfer processes between them are being identified. Space physics is clearly approaching a new era, where the emphasis is being shifted from discoveries to understanding. One way of identifying the new direction may be found in the recent contribution of atmospheric science and oceanography to the development of fluid dynamics. Hydrodynamics is a branch of classical physics in which important discoveries have been made in the era of Rayleigh, Taylor, Kelvin and Helmholtz. However, recent progress in global measurements using man-made satellites and in large scale computer simulations carried out by scientists in the fields of atmospheric science and oceanography have created new activities in hydrodynamics and produced important new discover...

  3. Applications of Particle Accelerators in Medical Physics

    CERN Document Server

    Cuttone, G

    2008-01-01

    Particle accelerators are often associated to high energy or nuclear physics. As well pointed out in literature [1] if we kindly analyse the number of installation worldwide we can easily note that about 50% is mainly devoted to medical applications (radiotherapy, medical radioisotopes production, biomedical research). Particle accelerators are also playing an important indirect role considering the improvement of the technical features of medical diagnostic. In fact the use of radionuclide for advanced medical imaging is strongly increasing either in conventional radiography (CT and MRI) and also in nuclear medicine for Spect an PET imaging. In this paper role of particle accelerators for medical applications will be presented together with the main solutions applied.

  4. Calorimetry energy measurement in particle physics

    CERN Document Server

    Wigmans, Richard

    2017-01-01

    Particle physics is the science that pursues the age-old quest for the innermost structure of matter and the fundamental interactions between its constituents. Modern experiments in this field rely increasingly on calorimetry, a detection technique in which the particles of interest are absorbed in the detector. Calorimeters are very intricate instruments. Their performance characteristics depend on subtle, sometimes counter-intuitive design details. This book, written by one of the world's foremost experts, is the first comprehensive text on this topic. It provides a fundamental and systematic introduction to calorimetry. It describes the state of the art in terms of both the fundamental understanding of calorimetric particle detection, and the actual detectors that have been or are being built and operated in experiments. The last chapter discusses landmark scientific discoveries in which calorimetry has played an important role. This book summarizes and puts into perspective the work described in some 900...

  5. The ideas of particle physics. 2. ed.

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coughlan, G.D.; Dodd, J.E.

    1991-01-01

    Our main concern in writing this book has been to communicate the central ideas and concepts of elementary particle physics. We have attempted to present a comprehensive overview of the subject at a level which carries the reader beyond the simplifications and generalisations necessary in popular science books. Matter consists of just two types of elementary particles: quarks and leptons. These are the fundamental building blocks of the material world. The theory describing the microscopic behaviour of these particles has, over the past decade or so, become known as the 'standard model', providing as it does an accurate account of the force of electromagnetism, the weak nuclear force (responsible for radioactive decay), and the strong nuclear force (which holds atomic nuclei together). The standard model has been remarkably successful; all experimental tests have verified the detailed predictions of the theory. (author)

  6. Department of Plasma Physics and Technology - Overview

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sadowski, M.

    1997-01-01

    In 1996 the main activities of Department P-5 (until December 1996 known as the Department of Thermonuclear Research) were concentrated on 5 topics: 1. Selected problems of plasma theory, 2. Studies of phenomena within high-current plasma concentrators, 3. Development of plasma diagnostic methods, 4. Studies in the field of fusion technology, 5. Research on new plasma-ion technologies. Theoretical studies mainly concerned elementary processes occurring within a plasma, and particularly those within near-electrode regions of microwave discharges as well as those within near-wall layers (SOL) of tokamaks. We also developed computational packages for parameter identification and modelling of physical phenomena in pulse plasma coaxial accelerators. Experimental studies were concentrated on the generation of a dense magnetized plasma in different high-current PF (Plasma Focus) facilities and small Z-Pinch devices. We carried out investigations of X-rays, relativistic electron beams (REBs), accelerated primary ions, and fast products of fusion reactions for deuterium discharges. Research on plasma diagnostics comprised the development of methods and equipment for studies of X-ray emission, pulsed electron beams, and fast ions, using special Cherenkov-type detectors of electrons and solid-state nuclear track detectors (SSNTDs) of ions. New diagnostic techniques were developed. Studies in the field of fusion technology concerned the design, construction, and testing of different high-voltage pulse generators. We also developed special opto-electronic systems for control and data transmission. Research on plasma-ion technology concentrated on the generation of pulsed high-power plasma-ion streams and their applications for the surface modification of semiconductors, pure metals and alloys. The material engineering studies were carried out in close collaboration with our P-9 Department and other domestic and foreign research centers

  7. Particle-in-cell simulations of Hall plasma thrusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miranda, Rodrigo; Ferreira, Jose Leonardo; Martins, Alexandre

    2016-07-01

    Hall plasma thrusters can be modelled using particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations. In these simulations, the plasma is described by a set of equations which represent a coupled system of charged particles and electromagnetic fields. The fields are computed using a spatial grid (i.e., a discretization in space), whereas the particles can move continuously in space. Briefly, the particle and fields dynamics are computed as follows. First, forces due to electric and magnetic fields are employed to calculate the velocities and positions of particles. Next, the velocities and positions of particles are used to compute the charge and current densities at discrete positions in space. Finally, these densities are used to solve the electromagnetic field equations in the grid, which are interpolated at the position of the particles to obtain the acting forces, and restart this cycle. We will present numerical simulations using software for PIC simulations to study turbulence, wave and instabilities that arise in Hall plasma thrusters. We have sucessfully reproduced a numerical simulation of a SPT-100 Hall thruster using a two-dimensional (2D) model. In addition, we are developing a 2D model of a cylindrical Hall thruster. The results of these simulations will contribute to improve the performance of plasma thrusters to be used in Cubesats satellites currenty in development at the Plasma Laboratory at University of Brasília.

  8. Modern particle physics event generation with WHIZARD

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reuter, J.; Bach, F.; Chokoufe, B.; Kilian, W.; Sekulla, M.; Ohl, T.; Weiss, C.; Siegen Univ.

    2014-01-01

    We describe the multi-purpose Monte-Carlo event generator WHIZARD for the simulation of high-energy particle physics experiments. Besides the presentation of the general features of the program like SM physics, BSM physics, and QCD effects, special emphasis is given to the support of the most accurate simulation of the collider environments at hadron colliders and especially at future linear lepton colliders. On the more technical side, the very recent code refactoring towards a completely object-oriented software package to improve maintainability, flexibility and code development are discussed. Finally, we present ongoing work and future plans regarding higher-order corrections, more general model support including the setup to search for new physics in vector boson scattering at the LHC, as well as several lines of performance improvements.

  9. Particle physics today, tomorrow and beyond

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellis, John

    2018-01-01

    The most important discovery in particle physics in recent years was that of the Higgs boson, and much effort is continuing to measure its properties, which agree obstinately with the Standard Model, so far. However, there are many reasons to expect physics beyond the Standard Model, motivated by the stability of the electroweak vacuum, the existence of dark matter and the origin of the visible matter in the Universe, neutrino physics, the hierarchy of mass scales in physics, cosmological inflation and the need for a quantum theory for gravity. Most of these issues are being addressed by the experiments during Run 2 of the LHC, and supersymmetry could help resolve many of them. In addition to the prospects for the LHC, I also review briefly those for direct searches for dark matter and possible future colliders.

  10. Modern Particle Physics Event Generation with WHIZARD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reuter, J.; Bach, F.; Chokoufé, B.; Kilian, W.; Ohl, T.; Sekulla, M.; Weiss, C.

    2015-05-01

    We describe the multi-purpose Monte-Carlo event generator WHIZARD for the simulation of high-energy particle physics experiments. Besides the presentation of the general features of the program like SM physics, BSM physics, and QCD effects, special emphasis will be given to the support of the most accurate simulation of the collider environments at hadron colliders and especially at future linear lepton colliders. On the more technical side, the very recent code refactoring towards a completely object-oriented software package to improve maintainability, flexibility and code development will be discussed. Finally, we present ongoing work and future plans regarding higher-order corrections, more general model support including the setup to search for new physics in vector boson scattering at the LHC, as well as several lines of performance improvements.

  11. Modern Particle Physics Event Generation with WHIZARD

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reuter, J; Bach, F; Chokoufé, B; Weiss, C; Kilian, W; Sekulla, M; Ohl, T

    2015-01-01

    We describe the multi-purpose Monte-Carlo event generator WHIZARD for the simulation of high-energy particle physics experiments. Besides the presentation of the general features of the program like SM physics, BSM physics, and QCD effects, special emphasis will be given to the support of the most accurate simulation of the collider environments at hadron colliders and especially at future linear lepton colliders. On the more technical side, the very recent code refactoring towards a completely object-oriented software package to improve maintainability, flexibility and code development will be discussed. Finally, we present ongoing work and future plans regarding higher-order corrections, more general model support including the setup to search for new physics in vector boson scattering at the LHC, as well as several lines of performance improvements. (paper)

  12. Advanced analysis methods in particle physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bhat, Pushpalatha C.; /Fermilab

    2010-10-01

    Each generation of high energy physics experiments is grander in scale than the previous - more powerful, more complex and more demanding in terms of data handling and analysis. The spectacular performance of the Tevatron and the beginning of operations of the Large Hadron Collider, have placed us at the threshold of a new era in particle physics. The discovery of the Higgs boson or another agent of electroweak symmetry breaking and evidence of new physics may be just around the corner. The greatest challenge in these pursuits is to extract the extremely rare signals, if any, from huge backgrounds arising from known physics processes. The use of advanced analysis techniques is crucial in achieving this goal. In this review, I discuss the concepts of optimal analysis, some important advanced analysis methods and a few examples. The judicious use of these advanced methods should enable new discoveries and produce results with better precision, robustness and clarity.

  13. A survey of dusty plasma physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shukla, P.K.

    2001-01-01

    Two omnipresent ingredients of the Universe are plasmas and charged dust. The interplay between these two has opened up a new and fascinating research area, that of dusty plasmas, which are ubiquitous in different parts of our solar system, namely planetary rings, circumsolar dust rings, the interplanetary medium, cometary comae and tails, as well as in interstellar molecular clouds, etc. Dusty plasmas also occur in noctilucent clouds in the arctic troposphere and mesosphere, cloud-to-ground lightening in thunderstorms containing smoke-contaminated air over the United States, in the flame of a humble candle, as well as in microelectronic processing devices, in low-temperature laboratory discharges, and in tokamaks. Dusty plasma physics has appeared as one of the most rapidly growing fields of science, besides the field of the Bose-Einstein condensate, as demonstrated by the number of published papers in scientific journals and conference proceedings. In fact, it is a truly interdisciplinary science because it has many potential applications in astrophysics (viz. in understanding the formation of dust clusters and structures, instabilities of interstellar molecular clouds and star formation, decoupling of magnetic fields from plasmas, etc.) as well as in the planetary magnetospheres of our solar system [viz. Saturn (particularly, the physics of spokes and braids in the B and F rings), Jupiter, Uranus, Neptune, and Mars] and in strongly coupled laboratory dusty plasmas. Since a dusty plasma system involves the charging and dynamics of massive charged dust grains, it can be characterized as a complex plasma system providing new physics insights. In this paper, the basic physics of dusty plasmas as well as numerous collective processes are discussed. The focus will be on theoretical and experimental observations of charging processes, waves and instabilities, associated forces, the dynamics of rotating and elongated dust grains, and some nonlinear structures (such as

  14. ICPP: Introduction to Dusty Plasma Physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kant Shukla, Padma

    2000-10-01

    Two omnipresent ingredients of the Universe are plasmas and charged dust. The interplay between these two has opened up a new and fascinating research area, that of dusty plasmas, which are ubiquitous in in different parts of our solar system, namely planetary rings, circumsolar dust rings, interplanetary medium, cometary comae and tails, interstellar molecular clouds, etc. Dusty plasmas also occur in noctilucent clouds in the arctic troposphere and mesosphere, cloud-to-ground lightening in thunderstorms containing smoke-contaminated air over the US, in the flame of humble candle, as well as in microelectronics and in low-temperature laboratory discharges. In the latter, charged dust grains are strongly correlated. Dusty plasma physics has appeared as one of the most rapidly growing field of science, besides the field of the Bose-Einstein condensate, as demonstrated by the number of published papers in scientific journals and conference proceedings. In fact, it is a truly interdisciplinary science because it has many potential applications in astrophysics (viz. in understanding the formation of dust clusters and structures, instabilities of interstellar molecular clouds and star formation, decoupling of magnetic fields from plasmas, etc.) as well as in the planetary magnetospheres of our solar system [viz. the Saturn (particularly, the physics of spokes and braids in B and F rings), Jupiter, Uranus, Neptune, and Mars] and in strongly coupled laboratory dusty plasmas. Since dusty plasma system involves the charging and the dynamics of extremely massive charged dust particulates, it can be characterized as a complex plasma system with new physics insights. In this talk, I shall describe the basic physics of dusty plasmas and present the status of numerous collective processes that are relevant to space research and laboratory experiments. The focus will be on theoretical and experimental observations of novel waves and instabilities, various forces, and some

  15. A survey of dusty plasma physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shukla, P. K.

    2001-05-01

    Two omnipresent ingredients of the Universe are plasmas and charged dust. The interplay between these two has opened up a new and fascinating research area, that of dusty plasmas, which are ubiquitous in different parts of our solar system, namely planetary rings, circumsolar dust rings, the interplanetary medium, cometary comae and tails, as well as in interstellar molecular clouds, etc. Dusty plasmas also occur in noctilucent clouds in the arctic troposphere and mesosphere, cloud-to-ground lightening in thunderstorms containing smoke-contaminated air over the United States, in the flame of a humble candle, as well as in microelectronic processing devices, in low-temperature laboratory discharges, and in tokamaks. Dusty plasma physics has appeared as one of the most rapidly growing fields of science, besides the field of the Bose-Einstein condensate, as demonstrated by the number of published papers in scientific journals and conference proceedings. In fact, it is a truly interdisciplinary science because it has many potential applications in astrophysics (viz. in understanding the formation of dust clusters and structures, instabilities of interstellar molecular clouds and star formation, decoupling of magnetic fields from plasmas, etc.) as well as in the planetary magnetospheres of our solar system [viz. Saturn (particularly, the physics of spokes and braids in the B and F rings), Jupiter, Uranus, Neptune, and Mars] and in strongly coupled laboratory dusty plasmas. Since a dusty plasma system involves the charging and dynamics of massive charged dust grains, it can be characterized as a complex plasma system providing new physics insights. In this paper, the basic physics of dusty plasmas as well as numerous collective processes are discussed. The focus will be on theoretical and experimental observations of charging processes, waves and instabilities, associated forces, the dynamics of rotating and elongated dust grains, and some nonlinear structures (such as

  16. Semiconductor detectors in nuclear and particle physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rehak, P.; Gatti, E.

    1992-01-01

    Semiconductor detectors for elementary particle physics and nuclear physics in the energy range above 1 GeV are briefly reviewed. In these two fields semiconductor detectors are used mainly for the precise position sensing. In a typical experiment, the position of a fast charged particle crossing a relatively thin semiconductor detector is measured. The position resolution achievable by semiconductor detectors is compared with the resolution achievable by gas filled position sensing detectors. Semiconductor detectors are divided into two groups: Classical semiconductor diode detectors and semiconductor memory detectors. Principles of the signal formation and the signal read-out for both groups of detectors are described. New developments of silicon detectors of both groups are reported

  17. Electronic Instrumentations for High Energy Particle Physics and Neutrino Physics

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(INSPIRE)INSPIRE-00452332

    The present dissertation describes design, qualification and operation of several electronic instrumentations for High Energy Particle Physics experiments (LHCb) and Neutrino Physics experiments (CUORE and CUPID). Starting from 2019, the LHCb experiment at the LHC accelerator will be upgraded to operate at higher luminosity and several of its detectors will be redesigned. The RICH detector will require a completely new optoelectronic readout system. The development of such system has already reached an advanced phase, and several tests at particle beam facilities allowed to qualify the performance of the entire system. In order to achieve a higher stability and a better power supply regulation for the front-end chip, a rad-hard low dropout linear regulator, named ALDO, has been developed. Design strategies, performance tests and results from the irradiation campaign are presented. In the Neutrino Physics field, large-scale bolometric detectors, like those adopted by CUORE and its future upgrade CUPID, offer u...

  18. Plasma Physics Network Newsletter. No. 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-08-01

    This is the first issue of a quarterly newsletter published by the International Atomic Energy Agency in order to provide news of potential interest of fusion scientists in developing countries. According to the foreword to this first issue, the purpose of the newsletter, as well as the organization called ''Third World Network'', is to ''start the process of unifying the developing country fusion community into some type of cohesive entity and to bring the efforts of the developing countries in the plasma physics research area to the attention of the world fusion community at large''. Furthermore, this first issue contains information about (i) Nuclear Fusion Research in Argentina, (ii) Chinese Fusion Efforts, (iii) Plasma and Fusion Physics in Egypt, (iv) Fusion Research in India, (v) Fusion Research in the Republic of Korea, (vi) Fusion Programmes in Malaysia, (vi) the Agency's Fusion Programme, (vii) a proposal for a workshop on computational plasma physics, sponsored by the Third World Plasma Research Network, (viii) the announcement of the formation of the ''Asian African Association for Plasma Training'', - for the promotion of the initiation/strengthening of plasma research, especially experimental, in developing countries in Asia and Africa, as well as the cooperation and sharing of technology among plasma physicists in the developing countries in the region; (ix) a communication entitled ''Fusion Research in ''Small'' Countries'', I.R. Jones, School of Physical Sciences, The Flinders University of South Australia, Bedford Park, Australia, on the desirability of the pursuit of fusion research in ''small'' countries, i.e., those countries that do not have a national fusion research programme; (x) and, finally, a newsletter on the ITER project

  19. High-Latitude Space Plasma Physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hultqvist, B.; Hagfors, T.

    1983-01-01

    This book constitutes the proceedings of the Nobel Symposium No. 54 on High Latitude Magnetospheric/Ionospheric Plasma Physics. The main purpose of the symposium was to prepare for the European research effort in space plasma physics in the mid-1980's, in which two major constituents are the European Incoherent Scatter Association (EISCAT) facilities and the Swedish satellite Viking. The physics of the high-latitude ionosphere and how this part of near space is affected by the properties of the solar wind and the interplanetary magnetic field are explored. A detailed discussion is provided on high-latitude magnetospheric physics at altitudes of 1-2 earth radii, the main focus of the Viking project. Specific topics considered include the role of the auroral ionosphere in magnetospheric substorms, the low altitude cleft, ionospheric modification and stimulated emissions, plasma physics on auroral field lines, solar wind-magnetosphere energy coupling, cold plasma distribution above a few thousand kilometers at high latitudes, hot electrons in and above the auroral ionosphere, the correlation of auroral kilometric radiation with visual auroras and with Birkeland currents, electrostatic waves in the topside ionosphere, solitary waves and double layers, and an Alfven wave model of auroral arcs

  20. Proceedings of the Fifth Nuclear and Particle Physics Conference (NUPPAC-2005)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Comsan, M.N.H.; Hanna, K.M.

    2006-08-01

    The publication's has been set up as a book of the conference of nuclear and particle physics, it consists of the following chapters (1) Plenary, Invited, Keynote Talks; (2) high energy physics; (3) nuclear scattering and reaction; (4) Relativistic and Quantum Physics; (5) neutron and reactor physics; (6) Nuclear Structure and Spectroscopy; (7) Detectors and Instrumentation; (8) computer codes and Simulation; (9) Radiation Measurements and Dosimetry; (10) Plasma and Fusion Physics

  1. Current experiments in elementary particle physics. Revised

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Galic, H. [Stanford Univ., CA (United States). Stanford Linear Accelerator Center; Wohl, C.G.; Armstrong, B. [Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States); Dodder, D.C. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Klyukhin, V.I.; Ryabov, Yu.G. [Inst. for High Energy Physics, Serpukhov (Russian Federation); Illarionova, N.S. [Inst. of Theoretical and Experimental Physics, Moscow (Russian Federation); Lehar, F. [CEN Saclay, Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Oyanagi, Y. [Univ. of Tokyo (Japan). Faculty of Sciences; Olin, A. [TRIUMF, Vancouver, BC (Canada); Frosch, R. [Paul Scherrer Inst., Villigen (Switzerland)

    1992-06-01

    This report contains summaries of 584 current and recent experiments in elementary particle physics. Experiments that finished taking data before 1986 are excluded. Included are experiments at Brookhaven, CERN, CESR, DESY, Fermilab, Tokyo Institute of Nuclear Studies, Moscow Institute of Theoretical and Experimental Physics, KEK, LAMPF, Novosibirsk, Paul Scherrer Institut (PSI), Saclay, Serpukhov, SLAC, SSCL, and TRIUMF, and also several underground and underwater experiments. Instructions are given for remote searching of the computer database (maintained under the SLAC/SPIRES system) that contains the summaries.

  2. Elementary particle physics in a nutshell

    CERN Document Server

    Tully, Christopher C

    2011-01-01

    The new experiments underway at the Large Hadron Collider at CERN in Switzerland may significantly change our understanding of elementary particle physics and, indeed, the universe. This textbook provides a cutting-edge introduction to the field, preparing first-year graduate students and advanced undergraduates to understand and work in LHC physics at the dawn of what promises to be an era of experimental and theoretical breakthroughs. Christopher Tully, an active participant in the work at the LHC, explains some of the most recent experiments in the field. But this book, which emerged fr

  3. Particle physics software aids space and medicine

    CERN Document Server

    Pia, M G

    2002-01-01

    Geant4 is a showcase example of technology transfer from particle physics to other fields such as space and medical science. Geant4 was first used for space applications by ESA in 1999, when ESA and NASA each launched an X-ray telescope. Geant4's extended set of physics models, which handle both electromagnetic and hadronic interactions, can be used to address a range of medical applications from conventional photon-beam radiotherapy to brachytherapy (using radioactive sources), hadron therapy and boron neutron capture therapy. The tools for describing geometries, materials and electromagnetic fields can precisely model diverse real-life configurations.

  4. Current experiments in elementary particle physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wohl, C.G.; Armstrong, F.E.; Trippe, T.G.; Yost, G.P. (Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (USA)); Oyanagi, Y. (Tsukuba Univ., Ibaraki (Japan)); Dodder, D.C. (Los Alamos National Lab., NM (USA)); Ryabov, Yu.G.; Slabospitsky, S.R. (Gosudarstvennyj Komitet po Ispol' zovaniyu Atomnoj Ehnergii SSSR, Serpukhov (USSR). Inst. Fiziki Vysokikh Ehnergij); Frosch, R. (Swiss Inst. for Nuclear Research, Villigen (Switzerla

    1989-09-01

    This report contains summaries of 736 current and recent experiments in elementary particle physics (experiments that finished taking data before 1982 are excluded). Included are experiments at Brookhaven, CERN, CESR, DESY, Fermilab, Tokyo Institute of Nuclear Studies, Moscow Institute of Theoretical and Experimental Physics, Joint Institute for Nuclear Research (Dubna), KEK, LAMPF, Novosibirsk, PSI/SIN, Saclay, Serpukhov, SLAC, and TRIUMF, and also several underground experiments. Also given are instructions for searching online the computer database (maintained under the SLAC/SPIRES system) that contains the summaries. Properties of the fixed-target beams at most of the laboratories are summarized.

  5. Current experiments in elementary particle physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wohl, C.G.; Armstrong, F.E.; Trippe, T.G.; Yost, G.P.; Oyanagi, Y.; Dodder, D.C.; Ryabov, Yu.G.; Slabospitsky, S.R.; Olin, A.; Klumov, I.A.

    1989-09-01

    This report contains summaries of 736 current and recent experiments in elementary particle physics (experiments that finished taking data before 1982 are excluded). Included are experiments at Brookhaven, CERN, CESR, DESY, Fermilab, Tokyo Institute of Nuclear Studies, Moscow Institute of Theoretical and Experimental Physics, Joint Institute for Nuclear Research (Dubna), KEK, LAMPF, Novosibirsk, PSI/SIN, Saclay, Serpukhov, SLAC, and TRIUMF, and also several underground experiments. Also given are instructions for searching online the computer database (maintained under the SLAC/SPIRES system) that contains the summaries. Properties of the fixed-target beams at most of the laboratories are summarized

  6. Current experiments in elementary particle physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Galic, H.; Dodder, D.C.; Klyukhin, V.I.; Ryabov, Yu.G.; Illarionova, N.S.; Lehar, F.; Oyanagi, Y.; Frosch, R.

    1992-06-01

    This report contains summaries of 584 current and recent experiments in elementary particle physics. Experiments that finished taking data before 1986 are excluded. Included are experiments at Brookhaven, CERN, CESR, DESY, Fermilab, Tokyo Institute of Nuclear Studies, Moscow Institute of Theoretical and Experimental Physics, KEK, LAMPF, Novosibirsk, Paul Scherrer Institut (PSI), Saclay, Serpukhov, SLAC, SSCL, and TRIUMF, and also several underground and underwater experiments. Instructions are given for remote searching of the computer database (maintained under the SLAC/SPIRES system) that contains the summaries

  7. PSI nuclear and particle physics newsletter 1989

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frosch, R.; Furrer, F.

    1990-01-01

    The present newsletter contains reports on nuclear and particle physics supported by the F1 division of PSI. Groups were invited to present new preliminary or final results obtained in 1989. As usual there has been no refereeing. The contributions must not be quoted without previous consultation with the authors. Spokespersons are indicated by superscripts 'S' following their names in the headings of the contributions. (author) 85 figs., 10 tabs., 307 refs

  8. Current experiments in elementary particle physics. Revision

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Galic, H.; Armstrong, F.E.; von Przewoski, B.

    1994-08-01

    This report contains summaries of 568 current and recent experiments in elementary particle physics. Experiments that finished taking data before 1988 are excluded. Included are experiments at BEPC (Beijing), BNL, CEBAF, CERN, CESR, DESY, FNAL, INS (Tokyo), ITEP (Moscow), IUCF (Bloomington), KEK, LAMPF, Novosibirsk, PNPI (St. Petersburg), PSI, Saclay, Serpukhov, SLAC, and TRIUMF, and also several underground and underwater experiments. Instructions are given for remote searching of the computer database (maintained under the SLAC/SPIRES system) that contains the summaries

  9. Refined holonomic summation algorithms in particle physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bluemlein, Johannes [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Zeuthen (Germany); Round, Mark; Schneider, Carsten [Johannes Kepler Univ., Linz (Austria). Research Inst. for Symbolic Computation (RISC)

    2017-06-15

    An improved multi-summation approach is introduced and discussed that enables one to simultaneously handle indefinite nested sums and products in the setting of difference rings and holonomic sequences. Relevant mathematics is reviewed and the underlying advanced difference ring machinery is elaborated upon. The flexibility of this new toolbox contributed substantially to evaluating complicated multi-sums coming from particle physics. Illustrative examples of the functionality of the new software package RhoSum are given.

  10. The cosmology/particle physics interface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olive, K.A.; Schramm, D.N.

    1985-01-01

    The paper reviews the interface between elementary particle physics and cosmology; and concentrates on inflation and the dark matter problem. Inflationary models of the Universe are examined, including phase transitions and supergravity. The three classes of dark matter problems discussed are: dynamical halos, galaxy formation and clustering, and the Ω=1 of inflation. Possible solutions to the cosmological dark matter problems are considered. (U.K.)

  11. PSI nuclear and particle physics newsletter 1988

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frosch, R.; Furrer, F.

    1989-01-01

    The present Newsletter contains reports on nuclear and particle physics supported by the F1 division of PSI. Groups were invited to present new preliminary or final results obtained in 1989. As usual there has been no refereeing. The contributions must not be quoted without previous consultation with the authors. Spokespersons are indicated by superscripts 'S' following their names in the headings of the contributions. (author) 65 figs., 9 tabs., 189 refs

  12. Current experiments in elementary-particle physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wohl, C.G.; Armstrong, F.E.; Rittenberg, A.

    1983-03-01

    Microfiche are included which contain summaries of 479 experiments in elementary particle physics. Experiments are included at the following laboratories: Brookhaven (BNL); CERN; CESR; DESY; Fermilab (FNAL); Institute for Nuclear Studies (INS); KEK; LAMPF; Serpukhov (SERP); SIN; SLAC; and TRIUMF. Also, summaries of proton decay experiments are included. A list of experiments and titles is included; and a beam-target-momentum index and a spokesperson index are given. Properties of beams at the facilities are tabulated

  13. Particle physics experiments at high energy colliders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hauptman, John

    2011-01-01

    Written by one of the detector developers for the International Linear Collider, this is the first textbook for graduate students dedicated to the complexities and the simplicities of high energy collider detectors. It is intended as a specialized reference for a standard course in particle physics, and as a principal text for a special topics course focused on large collider experiments. Equally useful as a general guide for physicists designing big detectors. (orig.)

  14. Probability and statistics in particle physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frodesen, A.G.; Skjeggestad, O.

    1979-01-01

    Probability theory is entered into at an elementary level and given a simple and detailed exposition. The material on statistics has been organised with an eye to the experimental physicist's practical need, which is likely to be statistical methods for estimation or decision-making. The book is intended for graduate students and research workers in experimental high energy and elementary particle physics, and numerous examples from these fields are presented. (JIW)

  15. Refined holonomic summation algorithms in particle physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bluemlein, Johannes; Round, Mark; Schneider, Carsten

    2017-06-01

    An improved multi-summation approach is introduced and discussed that enables one to simultaneously handle indefinite nested sums and products in the setting of difference rings and holonomic sequences. Relevant mathematics is reviewed and the underlying advanced difference ring machinery is elaborated upon. The flexibility of this new toolbox contributed substantially to evaluating complicated multi-sums coming from particle physics. Illustrative examples of the functionality of the new software package RhoSum are given.

  16. DETECTORS USED IN PARTICLE PHYSICS RESEARCH

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Melissines, A. C.

    1963-10-15

    Detectors used in particle physics are discussed, and their specific properties are compared. With the pictorial'' devices are included nuclear emulsions, cloud and bubble chambers, and spark chambers. Included in the digital'' devices are counters, e.g., the Geiger counter, scintillation counters, solid-state detectors, Cherenkov counters, and spark counters. Sensitivity, resolving power, time resolutions, saturation level, and energy detection are discussed. (R.E.U.)

  17. Current experiments in elementary particle physics. Revision

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Galic, H. [Stanford Linear Accelerator Center, Menlo Park, CA (United States); Armstrong, F.E. [Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States); von Przewoski, B. [Indiana Univ. Cyclotron Facility, Bloomington, IN (United States)] [and others

    1994-08-01

    This report contains summaries of 568 current and recent experiments in elementary particle physics. Experiments that finished taking data before 1988 are excluded. Included are experiments at BEPC (Beijing), BNL, CEBAF, CERN, CESR, DESY, FNAL, INS (Tokyo), ITEP (Moscow), IUCF (Bloomington), KEK, LAMPF, Novosibirsk, PNPI (St. Petersburg), PSI, Saclay, Serpukhov, SLAC, and TRIUMF, and also several underground and underwater experiments. Instructions are given for remote searching of the computer database (maintained under the SLAC/SPIRES system) that contains the summaries.

  18. Department of Plasma Physics and Material Engineering - Overview

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rabinski, M.

    2010-01-01

    Full text: In 2010 the activities of the Department continued previous studies in the following fields of plasma physics, controlled nuclear fusion and plasma engineering: · · Development of selected methods for high-temperature plasma diagnostics; · Studies of physical phenomena in pulsed discharges in the Plasma-Focus (PF), RPI-IBIS, and Impulse Plasma Deposition (IPD) facilities; · Research on plasma technologies; · Selected problems of plasma theory and computational modeling. In the frame of the EURATOM program, efforts were devoted to the development of diagnostics methods for tokamak-type facilities. In 2010 Cherenkov detectors were applied in the ISTTOK and TORE SUPRA facilities to detect energetic electrons (of energy > 60 keV), to determine their spatial and temporal behavior and to estimate their energy spectra. Attention was also paid to measurements of hard X rays emitted from ISTTOK and to their correlations with run-away electrons. The new data on fast electrons, collected within the TORE-SUPRA machine in 2010, confirmed the appearance of intense electron streams (possible ripple-born and runaway ones), which have a similar character to the electron signals recorded by means of other diagnostic techniques. Other fusion-oriented efforts are connected with the application of solid-state nuclear track detectors to detect fast alpha particles in tokamak experiments. As for experimental studies, particular attention was paid to the investigation of fast ion- and electron-beams emitted from high-current plasma discharges in PF and RPI facilities. Ion streams from discharges were studied by means of nuclear track detector, corpuscular diagnostic techniques, and particularly of a miniature Thompson-type mass-spectrometer. A field of research activity was related to plasma technology. Efforts were undertaken to improve the ultra-high vacuum (UHV) deposition of thin superconducting layers, e.g. pure niobium film on the surface of copper resonant cavities

  19. A study on the particle melting by plasma spraying

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jung, In Ha; Ji, C. G.; Bae, S. O.; Yoon, J. H.; Kwon, H. I.

    2001-12-01

    As a preliminary study for fabricating a thick and dense free standing type deposit, powder melting studies were carried out. Various morphologies and sizes of powder having the same chemical compositions were applied in particle melting experiments with varying systematic parameters. Through the study of powder melting by inductively coupled plasma, we can conclude as followings: Argon-hydrogen plasma gas with a higher plasma power gave good quality of splats and shown a higher density with a higher build-up rate. Reproducibility of the experiments appeared in the range of 99%. Degree of particle melting and its density just before impinging played a predominant role in the density of a deposit. Chamber pressure has an effect on degree of deformation of the splats, i.e. on the particle momentum. Completely melted particle showed a high deformation appearance. Build-up rate had a relation with a fraction of the fully melted particle, and this also closely associates with productivity and economical efficiency. For increasing the fraction of the fully melted particle, either increasing the power or limiting the particle size was recommended. Mean pore size and its distribution of a deposit seemed to have a relation with a viscosity of the melted powder, i.e. particle temperature, and also with a chamber pressure and spraying distances. Particle temperature may be governed by a plasma power, plasma gas property, probe position, and spraying distance in the present experimental range. Some results might be appeared with mutual interactions of the effects, for example, particle residence time and momentum with chamber pressure, particle temperature with chamber pressure, spraying distance and its size

  20. A study on the particle melting by plasma spraying

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jung, In Ha; Ji, C. G.; Bae, S. O.; Yoon, J. H.; Kwon, H. I

    2001-12-01

    As a preliminary study for fabricating a thick and dense free standing type deposit, powder melting studies were carried out. Various morphologies and sizes of powder having the same chemical compositions were applied in particle melting experiments with varying systematic parameters. Through the study of powder melting by inductively coupled plasma, we can conclude as followings: Argon-hydrogen plasma gas with a higher plasma power gave good quality of splats and shown a higher density with a higher build-up rate. Reproducibility of the experiments appeared in the range of 99%. Degree of particle melting and its density just before impinging played a predominant role in the density of a deposit. Chamber pressure has an effect on degree of deformation of the splats, i.e. on the particle momentum. Completely melted particle showed a high deformation appearance. Build-up rate had a relation with a fraction of the fully melted particle, and this also closely associates with productivity and economical efficiency. For increasing the fraction of the fully melted particle, either increasing the power or limiting the particle size was recommended. Mean pore size and its distribution of a deposit seemed to have a relation with a viscosity of the melted powder, i.e. particle temperature, and also with a chamber pressure and spraying distances. Particle temperature may be governed by a plasma power, plasma gas property, probe position, and spraying distance in the present experimental range. Some results might be appeared with mutual interactions of the effects, for example, particle residence time and momentum with chamber pressure, particle temperature with chamber pressure, spraying distance and its size.

  1. Plasma Physics Approximations in Ares

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Managan, R. A.

    2015-01-01

    Lee & More derived analytic forms for the transport properties of a plasma. Many hydro-codes use their formulae for electrical and thermal conductivity. The coefficients are complex functions of Fermi-Dirac integrals, Fn( μ/θ ), the chemical potential, μ or ζ = ln(1+e μ/θ ), and the temperature, θ = kT. Since these formulae are expensive to compute, rational function approximations were fit to them. Approximations are also used to find the chemical potential, either μ or ζ . The fits use ζ as the independent variable instead of μ/θ . New fits are provided for A α (ζ ),A β (ζ ), ζ, f(ζ ) = (1 + e -μ/θ )F 1/2 (μ/θ), F 1/2 '/F 1/2 , F c α , and F c β . In each case the relative error of the fit is minimized since the functions can vary by many orders of magnitude. The new fits are designed to exactly preserve the limiting values in the non-degenerate and highly degenerate limits or as ζ→ 0 or ∞. The original fits due to Lee & More and George Zimmerman are presented for comparison.

  2. Regular and stochastic particle motion in plasma dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaufman, A.N.

    1979-08-01

    A Hamiltonian formalism is presented for the study of charged-particle trajectories in the self-consistent field of the particles. The intention is to develop a general approach to plasma dynamics. Transformations of phase-space variables are used to separate out the regular, adiabatic motion from the irregular, stochastic trajectories. Several new techniques are included in this presentation

  3. Charting the Course for Elementary Particle Physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richter, B.

    2007-02-16

    "It was the best of times; it was the worst of times" is the way Dickens begins the Tale of Two Cities. The line is appropriate to our time in particle physics. It is the best of times because we are in the midst of a revolution in understanding, the third to occur during my career. It is the worst of times because accelerator facilities are shutting down before new ones are opening, restricting the opportunity for experiments, and because of great uncertainty about future funding. My task today is to give you a view of the most important opportunities for our field under a scenario that is constrained by a tight budget. It is a time when we cannot afford the merely good, but must give first priority to the really important. The defining theme of particle physics is to learn what the universe is made of and how it all works. This definition spans the full range of size from the largest things to the smallest things. This particle physics revolution has its origins in experiments that look at both.

  4. Charting the Course for Elementary Particle Physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Richter, Burton

    2007-01-01

    ''It was the best of times; it was the worst of times'' is the way Dickens begins the Tale of Two Cities. The line is appropriate to our time in particle physics. It is the best of times because we are in the midst of a revolution in understanding, the third to occur during my career. It is the worst of times because accelerator facilities are shutting down before new ones are opening, restricting the opportunity for experiments, and because of great uncertainty about future funding. My task today is to give you a view of the most important opportunities for our field under a scenario that is constrained by a tight budget. It is a time when we cannot afford the merely good, but must give first priority to the really important. The defining theme of particle physics is to learn what the universe is made of and how it all works. This definition spans the full range of size from the largest things to the smallest things. This particle physics revolution has its origins in experiments that look at both

  5. The measurement of single particle temperature in plasma sprays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fincke, J.R.; Swank, W.D.; Bolsaitis, P.P.; Elliott, J.F.

    1990-01-01

    A measurement technique for simultaneously obtaining the size, velocity, temperature, and relative number density of particles entrained in high temperature flow fields is described. In determining the particle temperature from a two-color pyrometery technique, assumptions about the relative spectral emissivity of the particle are required. For situations in which the particle surface undergoes chemical reactions the assumption of grey body behavior is shown to introduce large Temperature measurement uncertainties. Results from isolated, laser heated, single particle measurements and in-flight data from the plasma spraying of WC-Co are presented. 10 refs., 5 figs

  6. Recasting particle physics by entangling physics, history and philosophy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bertozzi, Eugenio; Levrini, Olivia

    2015-01-01

    The paper presents the design process we followed to recast particle physics so as to make it conceptually relevant for secondary school students. In this design process, the concept of symmetry was assumed as core-idea because of its structural and foundational role in particle physics, its crosscutting character and its epistemological and philosophical value. The first draft of the materials was tested in a pilot-study which involved 19 students of a regular class (grade 13) of an Italian school. The data analysis showed that the students were in their 'regime of competence' for grasping subtle nuances of the materials and for providing important hints for revising them. In particular, students’ reactions brought into light the need of clarifying the 'foundational' character that symmetry attained in twentieth-century physics. The delicate step of re-thinking the materials required the researchers to articulate the complex relationship between researches on physics teaching, history and philosophy of physics. This analytic phase resulted in a version of the materials which implies the students to be guided to grasp the meaning of symmetry as normative principle in twentieth-century physics, throughout the exploration of the different meanings assumed by symmetry over time. The whole process led also to the production of an essential, on-line version, of the materials targeted to a wider audience.

  7. Destabilizing effect of alpha particles in a Maxwellian plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, M.Y.

    1976-01-01

    Various plasma waves which are possibly excited by MeV alphas have been investigated. For a delta birth distribution it is found that: a) The right-circularly polarized Alfven wave can be excited. Its growth rate is linearly proportional to the α-particle density. b) The drift Alfven wave is stable against α-particles. c) For a uniform temperature, the plasma wave spectrum changes from three branches with n/sub α/ = 0 to four branches for n/sub α/ not equal to 0 case. d) α-particles can destabilize the ion drift acoustic wave even with uniform temperature. However, the ion acoustic wave appears to be stable against fusion products in a fusion grade plasma. e) If their effect on the background plasma spectrum is neglected, α-particles can excite the electromagnetic cyclotron wave in a range of harmonics (band structure). The growth rate is proportional to the square root of α-particle density. f) If the effect of α-particle on the plasma spectrum is included, we find that electromagnetic cyclotron wave is stable

  8. Extended standard vector analysis for plasma physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wimmel, H.K.

    1982-02-01

    Standard vector analysis in 3-dimensional space, as found in most tables and textbooks, is complemented by a number of basic formulas that seem to be largely unknown, but are important in themselves and for some plasma physics applications, as is shown by several examples. (orig.)

  9. Anomalous particle pinch for collisionless plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Terry, P.W.

    1989-01-01

    The particle transport arising from the convection of nonadiabatic electron density by ion temperature gradient driven turbulence is examined when trapped electrons collide less often than a bounce period. In the lower temperature end of this regime, trapped electrons are collisional and the particle flux is outward (in the direction of the gradients). When the trapped electrons are collisionless, there is a temperature threshold above which the electron temperature gradient driven particle flux changes sign and becomes inward. The magnitude of the nonadiabatic electron contribution to the growth rate is found to be potentially of the same order as the ion contribution. 11 refs

  10. A perspective on the contributions of Ronald C. Davidson to plasma physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wurtele, Jonathan S.

    2016-10-01

    Starting in the 1960s and continuing for half a century, Ronald C. Davidson made fundamental theoretical contributions to a wide range of areas of pure and applied plasma physics. Davidson was one of the founders of nonneutral plasma physics and a pioneer in developing and applying kinetic theory and nonlinear stability theorems to collective interaction processes and nonlinear dynamics of nonneutral plasmas and intense charged particle beams. His textbooks on nonneutral plasmas are the classic references for the field and educated generations of graduate students. Davidson was a strong advocate for applying the ideas of plasma theory to develop techniques that benefit other branches of science. For example, one of the major derivative fields enabled by nonneutral plasmas is the study of antimatter plasmas and the synthesis of antihydrogen. This talk will review a few highlights of Ronald Davidson's impact on plasma physics and related fields of science.

  11. Research in Particle Physics at the Santa Cruz Institute for Particle Physics, 2000-2003

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abraham Seiden

    2003-01-01

    The Santa Cruz Institute for Particle Physics is an Organized Research Unit within the University of California system. This is a special structure allowing a focused emphasis on research and includes special commitments for space and personnel from the Santa Cruz campus. The Institute serves to consolidate the research in experimental and theoretical particle physics on campus. This report covers four separate experimental projects. The projects are the BaBar experiment, the ATLAS experiment, the GLAST space satellite, and work toward a Linear Collider and its detector. Research in High Energy Physics (last final report for period 1996-2000)

  12. Transport and trapping of dust particles in a potential well created by inductively coupled diffused plasmas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choudhary, Mangilal; Mukherjee, S; Bandyopadhyay, P

    2016-05-01

    A versatile linear dusty (complex) plasma device is designed to study the transport and dynamical behavior of dust particles in a large volume. Diffused inductively coupled plasma is generated in the background of argon gas. A novel technique is used to introduce the dust particles in the main plasma by striking a secondary direct current glow discharge. These dust particles are found to get trapped in an electrostatic potential well, which is formed due to the combination of the ambipolar electric field caused by diffusive plasma and the field produced by the charged glass wall of the vacuum chamber. According to the requirements, the volume of the dust cloud can be controlled very precisely by tuning the plasma and discharge parameters. The present device can be used to address the underlying physics behind the transport of dust particles, self-excited dust acoustic waves, and instabilities. The detailed design of this device, plasma production and characterization, trapping and transport of the dust particle, and some of the preliminary experimental results are presented.

  13. Using Field-Particle Correlations to Diagnose the Collisionless Damping of Plasma Turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howes, Gregory; Klein, Kristropher

    2016-10-01

    Plasma turbulence occurs ubiquitously throughout the heliosphere, yet our understanding of how turbulence governs energy transport and plasma heating remains incomplete, constituting a grand challenge problem in heliophysics. In weakly collisional heliospheric plasmas, such as the solar corona and solar wind, damping of the turbulent fluctuations occurs due to collisionless interactions between the electromagnetic fields and the individual plasma particles. A particular challenge in diagnosing this energy transfer is that spacecraft measurements are typically limited to a single point in space. Here we present an innovative field-particle correlation technique that can be used with single-point measurements to estimate the energization of the plasma particles due to the damping of the electromagnetic fields, providing vital new information about this how energy transfer is distributed as a function of particle velocity. This technique has the promise to transform our ability to diagnose the kinetic plasma physical mechanisms responsible for not only the damping of turbulence, but also the energy conversion in both collisionless magnetic reconnection and particle acceleration. The work has been supported by NSF CAREER Award AGS-1054061, NSF AGS-1331355, and DOE DE-SC0014599.

  14. Plasma jet acceleration of dust particles to hypervelocities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ticos, C. M.; Wang, Zhehui; Wurden, G. A.; Kline, J. L.; Montgomery, D. S.

    2008-01-01

    A convenient method to accelerate simultaneously hundreds of micron-size dust particles to a few km/s over a distance of about 1 m is based on plasma drag. Plasma jets which can deliver sufficient momentum to the dust particles need to have speeds of at least several tens of km/s, densities of the order of 10 22 m -3 or higher, and low temperature ∼1 eV, in order to prevent dust destruction. An experimental demonstration of dust particles acceleration to hypervelocities by plasma produced in a coaxial gun is presented here. The plasma flow speed is deduced from photodiode signals while the plasma density is measured by streaked spectroscopy. As a result of the interaction with the plasma jet, the dust grains are also heated to high temperatures and emit visible light. A hypervelocity dust shower is imaged in situ with a high speed video camera at some distance from the coaxial gun, where light emission from the plasma flow is less intense. The bright traces of the flying microparticles are used to infer their speed and acceleration by employing the time-of-flight technique. A simple model for plasma drag which accounts for ion collection on the grain surface gives predictions for dust accelerations which are in good agreement with the experimental observations.

  15. Single-particle behaviour in plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McNamara, B.

    1978-01-01

    This paper discusses essentially the motion of charged particles in electromagnetic fields. Difficult methods of averaging are explained and applied to calculation of constants of motion. The breakdown of these constants and its consequences on fusion is analyzed

  16. Electron cooling and elementary particle physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Budker, G.I.; Skrinskij, A.N.

    1978-01-01

    This review is devoted to a new method in experimental physics - the electron cooling. This method opens possibilities in storing the intense and highly monochromatic beams of heavy particles and allows to carry out a wide series of experiments of a high luminocity and resolution. The method is based on the beam cooling by an accompanying flux of electrons. The cooling is due to Coulomb collisions of the beam particles with electrons. In the first part the theoretical aspects of the method are considered shortly. The layout of the NAP-M installation with electron cooling and results of successful experiments on cooling the proton beam are given. In the second part the new possibilities are discussed which appear due to application of electron cooling: storing the intense antiproton beams and realization of the proton - antiproton colliding beams, carrying out experiments with the super fine targets in storage rings, experiments with particles and antiparticles at ultimately low energies, storing the polarized antiprotons and other particles, production of antiatoms, antideuton storing, experiments with ion beams

  17. Diagnosing collisionless energy transfer using field-particle correlations: Vlasov-Poisson plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howes, Gregory G.; Klein, Kristopher G.; Li, Tak Chu

    2017-02-01

    Turbulence plays a key role in the conversion of the energy of large-scale fields and flows to plasma heat, impacting the macroscopic evolution of the heliosphere and other astrophysical plasma systems. Although we have long been able to make direct spacecraft measurements of all aspects of the electromagnetic field and plasma fluctuations in near-Earth space, our understanding of the physical mechanisms responsible for the damping of the turbulent fluctuations in heliospheric plasmas remains incomplete. Here we propose an innovative field-particle correlation technique that can be used to measure directly the secular energy transfer from fields to particles associated with collisionless damping of the turbulent fluctuations. Furthermore, this novel procedure yields information about the collisionless energy transfer as a function of particle velocity, providing vital new information that can help to identify the dominant collisionless mechanism governing the damping of the turbulent fluctuations. Kinetic plasma theory is used to devise the appropriate correlation to diagnose Landau damping, and the field-particle correlation technique is thoroughly illustrated using the simplified case of the Landau damping of Langmuir waves in a 1D-1V (one dimension in physical space and one dimension in velocity space) Vlasov-Poisson plasma. Generalizations necessary to apply the field-particle correlation technique to diagnose the collisionless damping of turbulent fluctuations in the solar wind are discussed, highlighting several caveats. This novel field-particle correlation technique is intended to be used as a primary analysis tool for measurements from current, upcoming and proposed spacecraft missions that are focused on the kinetic microphysics of weakly collisional heliospheric plasmas, including the Magnetospheric Multiscale (MMS), Solar Probe Plus, Solar Orbiter and Turbulence Heating ObserveR (THOR) missions.

  18. World's particle physics laboratories join to create new communication resource

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    "The worldwide particle physics community today (August 12) launched Interactions.org, a new global, Web-based resource developed to provide news, high-quality imagery, video and other tools for communicating the science of particle physics" (1 page).

  19. Particle physics: a new course for schools and colleges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Swinbank, Elizabeth

    1992-01-01

    Some questions relating to the introduction of particle physics into post-GCSE courses are considered. A new project that is producing teacher and student materials to support teaching particle physics at this level is described. (author)

  20. Summary of the particle physics and technology working group

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stephan Lammel et al. email = crathbun@fnal.gov

    2002-01-01

    Progress in particle physics has been tightly related to technological advances during the past half century. Progress in technologies has been driven in many cases by the needs of particle physics. Often, these advances have benefited fields beyond particle physics: other scientific fields, medicine, industrial development, and even found commercial applications. The particle physics and technology working group of Snowmass 2001 reviewed leading-edge technologies recently developed or in the need of development for particle physics. The group has identified key areas where technological advances are vital for progress in the field, areas of opportunities where particle physics may play a principle role in fostering progress, and areas where advances in other fields may directly benefit particle physics. The group has also surveyed the technologies specifically developed or enhanced by research in particle physics that benefit other fields and/or society at large