WorldWideScience

Sample records for plasma physics laser-plasma

  1. Physics considerations for laser-plasma linear colliders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schroeder, Carl; Esarey, Eric; Geddes, Cameron; Benedetti, Carlo; Leemans, Wim

    2010-06-11

    Physics considerations for a next-generation linear collider based on laser-plasma accelerators are discussed. The ultra-high accelerating gradient of a laser-plasma accelerator and short laser coupling distance between accelerator stages allows for a compact linac. Two regimes of laser-plasma acceleration are discussed. The highly nonlinear regime has the advantages of higher accelerating fields and uniform focusing forces, whereas the quasi-linear regime has the advantage of symmetric accelerating properties for electrons and positrons. Scaling of various accelerator and collider parameters with respect to plasma density and laser wavelength are derived. Reduction of beamstrahlung effects implies the use of ultra-short bunches of moderate charge. The total linac length scales inversely with the square root of the plasma density, whereas the total power scales proportional to the square root of the density. A 1 TeV center-of-mass collider based on stages using a plasma density of 10{sup 17} cm{sup -3} requires tens of J of laser energy per stage (using 1 {micro}m wavelength lasers) with tens of kHz repetition rate. Coulomb scattering and synchrotron radiation are examined and found not to significantly degrade beam quality. A photon collider based on laser-plasma accelerated beams is also considered. The requirements for the scattering laser energy are comparable to those of a single laser-plasma accelerator stage.

  2. Laser Plasma Physics - Forces and Nonlinear Principle

    CERN Document Server

    Hora, Heinrich

    2014-01-01

    This work is an electronic pre-publication of a book manuscript being under consideration in order to provide information to interested researchers about a review of mechanical forces in plasmas by electro-dynamic fields. Beginning with Kelvin's ponderomotive force of 1845 in electrostatics, the hydrodynamic force in a plasma is linked with quadratic force quantities of electric and magnetic fields. Hydrodynamics is interlinked with single particle motion of plasma particles electric field generation and double layers and sheaths due to properties of inhomogeneous plasmas. Consequences relate to laser driven particle acceleration and fusion energy. Beyond the very broad research field of fusion using nanosecond laser pulses based on thermodynamics, the new picosecond pulses of ultrahigh power opened a categorically different non-thermal interaction finally permitting proton-boron fusion with eliminating problems of nuclear radiation.

  3. 179th International School of Physics "Enrico Fermi" : Laser-Plasma Acceleration

    CERN Document Server

    Gizzi, L A; Faccini, R

    2012-01-01

    Impressive progress has been made in the field of laser-plasma acceleration in the last decade, with outstanding achievements from both experimental and theoretical viewpoints. Closely exploiting the development of ultra-intense, ultrashort pulse lasers, laser-plasma acceleration has developed rapidly, achieving accelerating gradients of the order of tens of GeV/m, and making the prospect of miniature accelerators a more realistic possibility. This book presents the lectures delivered at the Enrico Fermi International School of Physics and summer school: "Laser-Plasma Acceleration" , held in Varenna, Italy, in June 2011. The school provided an opportunity for young scientists to experience the best from the worlds of laser-plasma and accelerator physics, with intensive training and hands-on opportunities related to key aspects of laser-plasma acceleration. Subjects covered include: the secrets of lasers; the power of numerical simulations; beam dynamics; and the elusive world of laboratory plasmas. The object...

  4. Laser-plasma interaction physics for shock ignition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Goyon C.

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available In the shock ignition scheme, the ICF target is first compressed with a long (nanosecond pulse before creating a convergent shock with a short (∼100 ps pulse to ignite thermonuclear reactions. This short pulse is typically (∼2.1015–1016 W/cm2 above LPI (Laser Plasma Instabilities thresholds. The plasma is in a regime where the electron temperature is expected to be very high (2–4 keV and the laser coupling to the plasma is not well understood. Emulating LPI in the corona requires large and hot plasmas produced by high-energy lasers. We conducted experiments on the LIL (Ligne d'Integration Laser, 10 kJ at 3ω and the LULI2000 (0.4 kJ at 2ω facilities, to approach these conditions and study absorption and LPI produced by a high intensity beam in preformed plasmas. After introducing the main risks associated with the short pulse propagation, we present the latest experiment we conducted on LPI in relevant conditions for shock ignition.

  5. Laser-plasma interactions and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Neely, David; Bingham, Robert; Jaroszynski, Dino

    2013-01-01

    Laser-Plasma Interactions and Applications covers the fundamental and applied aspects of high power laser-plasma physics. With an internationally renowned team of authors, the book broadens the knowledge of young researchers working in high power laser-plasma science by providing them with a thorough pedagogical grounding in the interaction of laser radiation with matter, laser-plasma accelerators, and inertial confinement fusion. The text is organised such that the theoretical foundations of the subject are discussed first, in Part I. In Part II, topics in the area of high energy density physics are covered. Parts III and IV deal with the applications to inertial confinement fusion and as a driver of particle and radiation sources, respectively. Finally, Part V describes the principle diagnostic, targetry, and computational approaches used in the field. This book is designed to give students a thorough foundation in the fundamental physics of laser-plasma interactions. It will also provide readers with knowl...

  6. 60th Scottish Universities Summer School in Physics: 6th Laser-plasma interactions

    CERN Document Server

    Cairns, R A; Jaroszinski, D A

    2009-01-01

    Presents diagnostic methods, experimental techniques, and simulation tools used to study and model laser-plasma interactions. This book discusses the basic theory of the interaction of intense electromagnetic radiation fields with matter.

  7. A Hybrid Model for Multiscale Laser Plasma Simulations with Detailed Collisional Physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-11-29

    other provision of law, no person shall be subject to any penalty for failing to comply with a collection of information if it does not display a ...Briefing Charts 3. DATES COVERED (From - To) 02 November 2016 – 30 November 2016 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE A Hybrid Model for Multiscale Laser Plasma...Briefing Charts 15. SUBJECT TERMS N/ A 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: 17. LIMITATION OF ABSTRACT 18. NUMBER OF PAGES 19a. NAME OF RESPONSIBLE

  8. Laser plasma physics in shock ignition – transition from collisional to collisionless absorption

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Klimo O.

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Shock Ignition is considered as a relatively robust and efficient approach to inertial confinement fusion. A strong converging shock, which is used to ignite the fuel, is launched by a high power laser pulse with intensity in the range of 1015 − 1016 W/cm2 (at the wavelength of 351 nm. In the lower end of this intensity range the interaction is dominated by collisions while the parametric instabilities are playing a secondary role. This is manifested in a relatively weak reflectivity and efficient electron heating. The interaction is dominated by collective effects at the upper edge of the intensity range. The stimulated Brillouin and Raman scattering (SBS and SRS respectively take place in a less dense plasma and cavitation provides an efficient collisionless absorption mechanism. The transition from collisional to collisionless absorption in laser plasma interactions at higher intensities is studied here with the help of large scale one-dimensional Particle-in-Cell (PIC simulations. The relation between the collisional and collisionless processes is manifested in the energy spectrum of electrons transporting the absorbed laser energy and in the spectrum of the reflected laser light.

  9. Impulsive Synchronization of Laser Plasma System

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Yang; LIAO Xiao-Feng; LI Chuan-Dong; CHEN Guo

    2007-01-01

    The issue of impulsive synchronization of the coupled chaotic laser plasma system is investigated. A new framework for impulsive synchronization of such chaotic systems is presented, which makes the synchronization error system a linear impulsive control system. We derive some sufficient conditions for the synchronization of a laser plasma system via impulsive control with the varying impulsive intervals, which allows us to derive the impulsive synchronization law easily. To illustrate the effectiveness of the proposed results, two numerical examples are given.

  10. Laser-plasma interactions for fast ignition

    CERN Document Server

    Kemp, A J; Debayle, A; Johzaki, T; Mori, W B; Patel, P K; Sentoku, Y; Silva, L O

    2013-01-01

    In the electron-driven fast-ignition approach to inertial confinement fusion, petawatt laser pulses are required to generate MeV electrons that deposit several tens of kilojoules in the compressed core of an imploded DT shell. We review recent progress in the understanding of intense laser plasma interactions (LPI) relevant to fast ignition. Increases in computational and modeling capabilities, as well as algorithmic developments have led to enhancement in our ability to perform multi-dimensional particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations of LPI at relevant scales. We discuss the physics of the interaction in terms of laser absorption fraction, the laser-generated electron spectra, divergence, and their temporal evolution. Scaling with irradiation conditions such as laser intensity are considered, as well as the dependence on plasma parameters. Different numerical modeling approaches and configurations are addressed, providing an overview of the modeling capabilities and limitations. In addition, we discuss the compa...

  11. Laser-plasma-based linear collider using hollow plasma channels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schroeder, C.B., E-mail: CBSchroeder@lbl.gov; Benedetti, C.; Esarey, E.; Leemans, W.P.

    2016-09-01

    A linear electron–positron collider based on laser-plasma accelerators using hollow plasma channels is considered. Laser propagation and energy depletion in the hollow channel is discussed, as well as the overall efficiency of the laser-plasma accelerator. Example parameters are presented for a 1-TeV and 3-TeV center-of-mass collider based on laser-plasma accelerators.

  12. Thomson scattering from laser plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moody, J D; Alley, W E; De Groot, J S; Estabrook, K G; Glenzer, S H; Hammer, J H; Jadaud, J P; MacGowan, B J; Rozmus, W; Suter, L J; Williams, E A

    1999-01-12

    Thomson scattering has recently been introduced as a fundamental diagnostic of plasma conditions and basic physical processes in dense, inertial confinement fusion plasmas. Experiments at the Nova laser facility [E. M. Campbell et al., Laser Part. Beams 9, 209 (1991)] have demonstrated accurate temporally and spatially resolved characterization of densities, electron temperatures, and average ionization levels by simultaneously observing Thomson scattered light from ion acoustic and electron plasma (Langmuir) fluctuations. In addition, observations of fast and slow ion acous- tic waves in two-ion species plasmas have also allowed an independent measurement of the ion temperature. These results have motivated the application of Thomson scattering in closed-geometry inertial confinement fusion hohlraums to benchmark integrated radiation-hydrodynamic modeling of fusion plasmas. For this purpose a high energy 4{omega} probe laser was implemented recently allowing ultraviolet Thomson scattering at various locations in high-density gas-filled hohlraum plasmas. In partic- ular, the observation of steep electron temperature gradients indicates that electron thermal transport is inhibited in these gas-filled hohlraums. Hydrodynamic calcula- tions which include an exact treatment of large-scale magnetic fields are in agreement with these findings. Moreover, the Thomson scattering data clearly indicate axial stagnation in these hohlraums by showing a fast rise of the ion temperature. Its timing is in good agreement with calculations indicating that the stagnating plasma will not deteriorate the implosion of the fusion capsules in ignition experiments.

  13. Carbon Multicharged Ion Generation from Laser Plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balki, Oguzhan; Elsayed-Ali, Hani E.

    2014-10-01

    Multicharged ions (MCI) have potential uses in different areas such as microelectronics and medical physics. Carbon MCI therapy for cancer treatment is considered due to its localized energy delivery to hard-to-reach tumors at a minimal damage to surrounding tissues. We use a Q-switched Nd:YAG laser with 40 ns pulse width operated at 1064 nm to ablate a graphite target in ultrahigh vacuum. A time-of-flight energy analyzer followed by a Faraday cup is used to characterize the carbon MCI extracted from the laser plasma. The MCI charge state and energy distribution are obtained. With increase in the laser fluence, the ion charge states and ion energy are increased. Carbon MCI up to C+6 are observed along with carbon clusters. When an acceleration voltage is applied between the carbon target and a grounded mesh, ion extraction is observed to increase with the applied voltage. National Science Foundation.

  14. Laser Plasma Coupling for High Temperature Hohlraums

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kruer, W.

    1999-11-04

    Simple scaling models indicate that quite high radiation temperatures can be achieved in hohlraums driven with the National Ignition Facility. A scaling estimate for the radiation temperature versus pulse duration for different size NIF hohlraums is shown in Figure 1. Note that a radiation temperature of about 650 ev is projected for a so-called scale 1 hohlraum (length 2.6mm, diameter 1.6mm). With such high temperature hohlraums, for example, opacity experiments could be carried out using more relevant high Z materials rather than low Z surrogates. These projections of high temperature hohlraums are uncertain, since the scaling model does not allow for the very strongly-driven laser plasma coupling physics. Lasnex calculations have been carried out to estimate the plasma and irradiation conditions in a scale 1 hohlraum driven by NIF. Linear instability gains as high as exp(100) have been found for stimulated Brillouin scattering, and other laser-driven instabilities are also far above their thresholds. More understanding of the very strongly-driven coupling physics is clearly needed in order to more realistically assess and improve the prospects for high temperature hohlraums. Not surprisingly, this regime has been avoided for inertial fusion applications and so is relatively unexplored.

  15. New Basic Physics Derived from Laser Plasma Interaction (lirpp Vol. 10)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hora, Heinrich

    2016-10-01

    The following sections are included: * INTRODUCTION * VARIOUS PHENOMENA * COMPLETION OF THE EQUATION OF MOTION BY NONLINEAR FORCES * NONLINEAR PRINCIPLE * CONTAINMENT FORCE OF HADRONS IN NUCLEI AND PHASE TRANSITION INTO QUARK GLUON PLASMA * Acknowledgements * References

  16. A Hybrid Model for Multiscale Laser Plasma Simulations with Detailed Collisional Physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-06-23

    account for all processes of the collisional cascade during the relaxation of a hot plasma. To this end, the focus was in the development of (a) a...Collisional Radiative operator was necessary to accurately account for all processes of the collisional cascade during the relaxation of a hot plasma. To this...important to note that this is a code-to- code comparison and the validation of these simulations is an area of active research in the non-local

  17. Controlling Laser Plasma Instabilities Using Temporal Bandwidth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsung, Frank; Weaver, J.; Lehmberg, R.

    2016-10-01

    We are performing particle-in-cell simulations using the code OSIRIS to study the effects of laser plasma interactions in the presence of temporal bandwidth under conditions relevant to current and future experiments on the NIKE laser. Our simulations show that, for sufficiently large bandwidth (where the inverse bandwidth is comparable with the linear growth time), the saturation level, and the distribution of hot electrons, can be effected by the addition of temporal bandwidths (which can be accomplished in experiments using beam smoothing techniques such as ISI). We will quantify these effects and investigate higher dimensional effects such as laser speckles. This work is supported by DOE and NRL.

  18. Staging of laser-plasma accelerators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steinke, S., E-mail: ssteinke@lbl.gov; Tilborg, J. van; Benedetti, C.; Geddes, C. G. R.; Gonsalves, A. J.; Nakamura, K.; Schroeder, C. B.; Esarey, E. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Daniels, J. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Eindhoven University of Technology, PO Box 513, 5600MB Eindhoven (Netherlands); Swanson, K. K.; Shaw, B. H.; Leemans, W. P. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); University of California, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States)

    2016-05-15

    We present results of an experiment where two laser-plasma-accelerator stages are coupled at a short distance by a plasma mirror. Stable electron beams from the first stage were used to longitudinally probe the dark-current-free, quasi-linear wakefield excited by the laser of the second stage. Changing the arrival time of the electron beam with respect to the second stage laser pulse allowed reconstruction of the temporal wakefield structure, determination of the plasma density, and inference of the length of the electron beam. The first stage electron beam could be focused by an active plasma lens to a spot size smaller than the transverse wake size at the entrance of the second stage. This permitted electron beam trapping, verified by a 100 MeV energy gain.

  19. Summary Report of Working Group 1: Laser-Plasma Acceleration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Geddes, C.G.R.; Clayton, C.; Lu, W.; Thomas, A.G.R.

    2010-06-01

    Advances in and physics of the acceleration of particles using underdense plasma structures driven by lasers were the topics of presentations and discussions in Working Group 1 of the 2010 Advanced Accelerator Concepts Workshop. Such accelerators have demonstrated gradients several orders beyond conventional machines, with quasi-monoenergetic beams at MeV-GeV energies, making them attractive candidates for next generation accelerators. Workshop discussions included advances in control over injection and laser propagation to further improve beam quality and stability, detailed diagnostics and physics models of the acceleration process, radiation generation as a source and diagnostic, and technological tools and upcoming facilities to extend the reach of laser-plasma accelerators.

  20. Hydrogen atom in a Laser-Plasma

    CERN Document Server

    Falaye, Babatunde James; Liman, Muhammed S; Oyewumi, K J; Dong, Shi-Hai

    2016-01-01

    We scrutinize the behaviour of hydrogen atom's eigenvalues in a quantum plasma as it interacts with electric field directed along $\\theta=\\pi$ and exposed to linearly polarized intense laser field radiation. Using the Kramers-Henneberger (KH) unitary transformation, which is semiclassical counterpart of the Block-Nordsieck transformation in the quantized field formalism, the squared vector potential that appears in the equation of motion is eliminated and the resultant equation is expressed in KH frame. Within this frame, the resulting potential and the corresponding wavefunction have been expanded in Fourier series and using Ehlotzky's approximation, we obtain a laser-dressed potential to simulate intense laser field. By fitting the exponential-cosine-screened Coulomb potential into the laser-dressed potential, and then expanding it in Taylor series up to $\\mathcal{O}(r^4,\\alpha_0^9)$, we obtain the eigensolution (eigenvalues and wavefunction) of hydrogen atom in laser-plasma encircled by electric field, wit...

  1. Relativistic mirrors in laser plasmas (analytical methods)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bulanov, S. V.; Esirkepov, T. Zh; Kando, M.; Koga, J.

    2016-10-01

    Relativistic flying mirrors in plasmas are realized as thin dense electron (or electron-ion) layers accelerated by high-intensity electromagnetic waves to velocities close to the speed of light in vacuum. The reflection of an electromagnetic wave from the relativistic mirror results in its energy and frequency changing. In a counter-propagation configuration, the frequency of the reflected wave is multiplied by the factor proportional to the Lorentz factor squared. This scientific area promises the development of sources of ultrashort x-ray pulses in the attosecond range. The expected intensity will reach the level at which the effects predicted by nonlinear quantum electrodynamics start to play a key role. We present an overview of theoretical methods used to describe relativistic flying, accelerating, oscillating mirrors emerging in intense laser-plasma interactions.

  2. Plasma Injection Schemes for Laser-Plasma Accelerators

    OpenAIRE

    J. Faure

    2017-01-01

    Plasma injection schemes are crucial for producing high-quality electron beams in laser-plasma accelerators. This article introduces the general concepts of plasma injection. First, a Hamiltonian model for particle trapping and acceleration in plasma waves is introduced; ionization injection and colliding-pulse injection are described in the framework of this Hamiltonian model. We then proceed to consider injection in plasma density gradients.

  3. Effect of the laser wavelength: A long story of laser-plasma interaction physics for Inertial Confinement Fusion Teller Medal Lecture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Labaune, Christine

    2016-10-01

    Laser-driven Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) relies on the use of high-energy laser beams to compress and ignite a the1monuclear fuel with the ultimate goal of producing energy. Fusion is the holy grail of energy sources-combining abundant fuel with no greenhouse gas emissions, minimal waste products and a scale that can meet mankind's long-term energy demands. The quality and the efficiency of the coupling of the laser beams with the target are an essential step towards the success of laser fusion. A long-te1m program on laser-plasma interaction physics has been pursued to understand the propagation and the coupling of laser pulses in plasmas for a wide range of parameters.

  4. Effect of the laser wavelength: A long story of laser-plasma interaction physics for Inertial Confinement Fusion Teller Medal Lecture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Labaune Christine

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Laser-driven Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF relies on the use of high-energy laser beams to compress and ignite a thermonuclear fuel with the ultimate goal of producing energy. Fusion is the holy grail of energy sources–combining abundant fuel with no greenhouse gas emissions, minimal waste products and a scale that can meet mankind's long-term energy demands. The quality and the efficiency of the coupling of the laser beams with the target are an essential step towards the success of laser fusion. A long-term program on laser-plasma interaction physics has been pursued to understand the propagation and the coupling of laser pulses in plasmas for a wide range of parameters.

  5. Charge Diagnostics for Laser Plasma Accelerators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakamura, K.; Gonsalves, A. J.; Lin, C.; Sokollik, T.; Smith, A.; Rodgers, D.; Donahue, R.; Bryne, W.; Leemans, W. P.

    2010-06-01

    The electron energy dependence of a scintillating screen (Lanex Fast) was studied with sub-nanosecond electron beams ranging from 106 MeV to 1522 MeV at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Advanced Light Source (ALS) synchrotron booster accelerator. The sensitivity of the Lanex Fast decreased by 1percent per 100 MeV increase of the energy. The linear response of the screen against the charge was verified with charge density and intensity up to 160 pC/mm2 and 0.4 pC/ps/mm2, respectively. For electron beams from the laser plasma accelerator, a comprehensive study of charge diagnostics has been performed using a Lanex screen, an integrating current transformer, and an activation based measurement. The charge measured by each diagnostic was found to be within +/-10 percent.

  6. IR Laser Plasma Interaction with Glass

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rabia Qindeel

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The interaction of laser plasma with respect to glass surface is reported in this paper. A Q-switched Nd:YAG laser was used as ablation source. Glass material is utilized as target specimen. Aluminum plate is used as a rotating substrate. The dynamic expansion of the plasma was visualized by using CCD video camera and permanently recorded via image processing system. The exposed glass material was examined under photomicroscope and scanning electron microscope (SEM. The optical radiation from the plasma was observed by using spectrum analyzer. The results obtained show that the plasma is expanded linearly with laser energy. At low level energy symmetrical damage was found. Elongated hole is formed at high level energy. The progressive exposure on glass results in drilling process. The hole diameter is expanded non-linearly while the depth is increased linearly. The glass clusters were uniformly deposited on the aluminum substrate. The size of the glass clusters are in the range of nano and micro meter. The glass-plasma emitted radiation with majority lines of 390 and 450 nm.

  7. Summary Report of Working Group 6: Laser-Plasma Acceleration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leemans, Wim P.; Downer, Michael; Siders, Craig

    2006-07-01

    A summary is given of presentations and discussions in theLaser-Plasma Acceleration Working Group at the 2006 Advanced AcceleratorConcepts Workshop. Presentation highlights include: widespreadobservation of quasi-monoenergetic electrons; good agreement betweenmeasured and simulated beam properties; the first demonstration oflaser-plasma acceleration up to 1 GeV; single-shot visualization of laserwakefield structure; new methods for measuring<100 fs electronbunches; and new methods for "machining" laser-plasma acceleratorstructures. Discussion of future direction includes: developing a roadmapfor laser-plasma acceleration beyond 1 GeV; a debate over injection andguiding; benchmarking simulations with improved wake diagnostics;petawatt laser technology for future laser-plasmaaccelerators.

  8. Ptychographic measurements of ultrahigh-intensity laser-plasma interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leblanc, A.; Monchocé, S.; Bourassin-Bouchet, C.; Kahaly, S.; Quéré, F.

    2016-04-01

    The extreme intensities now delivered by femtosecond lasers make it possible to drive and control relativistic motion of charged particles with light, opening a path to compact particle accelerators and coherent X-ray sources. Accurately characterizing the dynamics of ultrahigh-intensity laser-plasma interactions as well as the resulting light and particle emissions is an essential step towards such achievements. This remains a considerable challenge, as the relevant scales typically range from picoseconds to attoseconds in time, and from micrometres to nanometres in space. In these experiments, owing to the extreme prevalent physical conditions, measurements can be performed only at macroscopic distances from the targets, yielding only partial information at these microscopic scales. This letter presents a major advance by applying the concepts of ptychography to such measurements, and thus retrieving microscopic information hardly accessible until now. This paves the way to a general approach for the metrology of extreme laser-plasma interactions on very small spatial and temporal scales.

  9. A Warm Fluid Model of Intense Laser-Plasma Interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarkenton, G. M.; Shadwick, B. A.; Esarey, E. H.; Leemans, W. P.

    2001-10-01

    Following up on our previous work on modeling intense laser-plasma interactions with cold fluids,(B.A.Shadwick, G. M. Tarkenton, E.H. Esarey, and W.P. Leemans, ``Fluid Modeling of Intense Laser-Plasma Interactions'', in Advanced Accelerator Concepts), P. Colestock and S. Kelley editors, AIP Conf. Proc. 569 (AIP, NY 2001), pg. 154. we are exploring warm fluid models. These models represent the next level in a hierarchy of complexity beyond the cold fluid approximation. With only a modest increase in computation effort, warm fluids incorporate effects that are relevant to a variety of technologically interesting cases. We present a derivation of the warm fluid from a kinetic (i.e. Vlasov) perspective and make a connection with the usual relativistic thermodynamic approach.(S. R. de Groot, W. A. van Leeuwen and Ch. G. van Weert, Relativistic Kinetic Theory: Principles and Applications), North-Holland (1980). We will provide examples where the warm fluids yield physics results not contained in the cold model and discuss experimental parameters where these effects are believed to be important.

  10. Laser-plasma interactions relevant to Inertial Confinement Fusion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wharton, K.B.

    1998-11-02

    Research into laser-driven inertial confinement fusion is now entering a critical juncture with the construction of the National Ignition Facility (NIF) at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). Many of the remaining unanswered questions concerning NIF involve interactions between lasers and plasmas. With the eventual goal of fusion power in mind, laser-plasma interactions relevant to laser fusion schemes is an important topic in need of further research. This work experimentally addresses some potential shortcuts and pitfalls on the road to laser-driven fusion power. Current plans on NIF have 192 laser beams directed into a small cylindrical cavity which will contain the fusion fuel; to accomplish this the beams must cross in the entrance holes, and this intersection will be in the presence of outward-flowing plasma. To investigate the physics involved, interactions of crossing laser beams in flowing plasmas are investigated with experiments on the Nova laser facility at LLNL. It was found that in a flowing plasma, energy is transferred between two crossing laser beams, and this may have deleterious consequences for energy balance and ignition in NIF. Possible solutions to this problem are presented. A recently-proposed alternative to standard laser-driven fusion, the ''fast ignitor'' concept, is also experimentally addressed in this dissertation. Many of the laser-plasma interactions necessary for the success of the fast ignitor have not previously been explored at the relevant laser intensities. Specifically, the transfer of high-intensity laser energy to electrons at solid-target interfaces is addressed. 20-30% conversion efficiencies into forward-propagated electrons were measured, along with an average electron energy that varied with the type of target material. The directionality of the electrons was also measured, revealing an apparent beaming of the highest energy electrons. This work was extended to various intensities and

  11. Particle acceleration by ultra-intense laser-plasma interactions

    CERN Document Server

    Nakajima, K

    2002-01-01

    The mechanism of particle acceleration by ultra-increase laser-plasma interaction is explained. Laser light can generate very high electric field by focusing with electromagnetic field matched phase with frequency. 1018 W/cm sup 2 laser light produce about 3 TV/m electric field. Many laser accelerators, which particle acceleration method satisfies phase matching particle and electric field, are proposed. In these accelerators, the Inverse Cherenkov Accelerator, Inverse FEL Accelerator and Laser-Plasma Accelerator are explained. Three laser-plasma acceleration mechanisms: Plasma Beat Wave Accelerator, Laser Wake-Field Accelerator (LWFA) and Self-Modulated LWFA, showed particle acceleration by experiments. By developing a high speed Z pinch capillary-plasma optical waveguide, 2.2 TW and 90 fs laser pulse could be propagated 2 cm at 40 mu m focusing radius in 1999. Dirac acceleration or ultra-relativistic ponderomotive acceleration mechanism can increase energy exponentially. (S.Y.)

  12. Intense terahertz radiation from relativistic laser-plasma interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, G. Q.; Li, Y. T.; Li, C.; Liu, H.; Zhang, Y. H.; Jiang, W. M.; Yuan, X. H.; Nilsen, J.; Ozaki, T.; Wang, W. M.; Sheng, Z. M.; Neely, D.; McKenna, P.; Zhang, J.

    2017-01-01

    The development of tabletop intense terahertz (THz) radiation sources is extremely important for THz science and applications. This paper presents our measurements of intense THz radiation from relativistic laser-plasma interactions under different experimental conditions. Several THz generation mechanisms have been proposed and investigated, including coherent transition radiation (CTR) emitted by fast electrons from the target rear surface, transient current radiation at the front of the target, and mode conversion from electron plasma waves (EPWs) to THz waves. The results indicate that relativistic laser plasma is a promising driver of intense THz radiation sources.

  13. Laser-plasma-based Space Radiation Reproduction in the Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hidding, B.; Karger, O.; Königstein, T.; Pretzler, G.; Manahan, G. G.; McKenna, P.; Gray, R.; Wilson, R.; Wiggins, S. M.; Welsh, G. H.; Beaton, A.; Delinikolas, P.; Jaroszynski, D. A.; Rosenzweig, J. B.; Karmakar, A.; Ferlet-Cavrois, V.; Costantino, A.; Muschitiello, M.; Daly, E.

    2017-01-01

    Space radiation is a great danger to electronics and astronauts onboard space vessels. The spectral flux of space electrons, protons and ions for example in the radiation belts is inherently broadband, but this is a feature hard to mimic with conventional radiation sources. Using laser-plasma-accelerators, we reproduced relativistic, broadband radiation belt flux in the laboratory, and used this man-made space radiation to test the radiation hardness of space electronics. Such close mimicking of space radiation in the lab builds on the inherent ability of laser-plasma-accelerators to directly produce broadband Maxwellian-type particle flux, akin to conditions in space. In combination with the established sources, utilisation of the growing number of ever more potent laser-plasma-accelerator facilities worldwide as complementary space radiation sources can help alleviate the shortage of available beamtime and may allow for development of advanced test procedures, paving the way towards higher reliability of space missions. PMID:28176862

  14. Laser-plasma-based Space Radiation Reproduction in the Laboratory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hidding, B; Karger, O; Königstein, T; Pretzler, G; Manahan, G G; McKenna, P; Gray, R; Wilson, R; Wiggins, S M; Welsh, G H; Beaton, A; Delinikolas, P; Jaroszynski, D A; Rosenzweig, J B; Karmakar, A; Ferlet-Cavrois, V; Costantino, A; Muschitiello, M; Daly, E

    2017-02-08

    Space radiation is a great danger to electronics and astronauts onboard space vessels. The spectral flux of space electrons, protons and ions for example in the radiation belts is inherently broadband, but this is a feature hard to mimic with conventional radiation sources. Using laser-plasma-accelerators, we reproduced relativistic, broadband radiation belt flux in the laboratory, and used this man-made space radiation to test the radiation hardness of space electronics. Such close mimicking of space radiation in the lab builds on the inherent ability of laser-plasma-accelerators to directly produce broadband Maxwellian-type particle flux, akin to conditions in space. In combination with the established sources, utilisation of the growing number of ever more potent laser-plasma-accelerator facilities worldwide as complementary space radiation sources can help alleviate the shortage of available beamtime and may allow for development of advanced test procedures, paving the way towards higher reliability of space missions.

  15. Ultra short electron beam bunches from a laser plasma cathode

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maekawa, Akira [Nuclear Professional School, University of Tokyo, 2-22 Shirakata-Shirane, Tokai, Naka, Ibaraki 319-1188 (Japan)]. E-mail: maekawa@nuclear.jp; Tsujii, Ryosuke [Nuclear Professional School, University of Tokyo, 2-22 Shirakata-Shirane, Tokai, Naka, Ibaraki 319-1188 (Japan); Kinoshita, Kennichi [Nuclear Professional School, University of Tokyo, 2-22 Shirakata-Shirane, Tokai, Naka, Ibaraki 319-1188 (Japan); Atsushi, Yamazaki [Nuclear Professional School, University of Tokyo, 2-22 Shirakata-Shirane, Tokai, Naka, Ibaraki 319-1188 (Japan); Kobayashi, Kazuyuki [Nuclear Professional School, University of Tokyo, 2-22 Shirakata-Shirane, Tokai, Naka, Ibaraki 319-1188 (Japan); Uesaka, Mitsuru [Nuclear Professional School, University of Tokyo, 2-22 Shirakata-Shirane, Tokai, Naka, Ibaraki 319-1188 (Japan); Shibata, Yukio [Nuclear Professional School, University of Tokyo, 2-22 Shirakata-Shirane, Tokai, Naka, Ibaraki 319-1188 (Japan); Kondo, Yasuhiro [Nuclear Professional School, University of Tokyo, 2-22 Shirakata-Shirane, Tokai, Naka, Ibaraki 319-1188 (Japan); Ohkubo, Takeru [Takasaki Advanced Radiation Research Institute, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, 1233 Watanuki-machi, Takasaki, Gunma (Japan); Hosokai, Tomonao [Tokyo Institute of Technology, 2-12-1 Ookayama, Meguro-ku, Tokyo (Japan); Zhidkov, Alexei [Central Research Institute of Electric Power Industry, 2-6-1 Nagasaka, Yokosuka, Kanagawa (Japan); Takahashi, Toshiharu [Kyoto University Research Reactor Institute, Asahiro-nishi2, Kumatori, Sennan, Osaka (Japan)

    2007-08-15

    The fluctuation of the electron bunch duration due to energy spectrum instability in a laser plasma cathode has been examined. Previous experiments clearly proved that a laser plasma cathode can generate ultrashort electron bunches with a bunch duration of 130 fs (FWHM) and a geometrical emittance 0.07{pi} mm mrad. The effect of temporal elongation of electron bunches due to their energy spread is estimated and the results are in good agreement with previous experiments. It is also clarified that the instability of the energy spectrum not only leads to a fluctuation of the bunch shape but also to a time-of-flight jitter, affecting possible future applications of a laser plasma cathode.

  16. Nonlinear laser-plasma interaction in magnetized liner inertial fusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geissel, Matthias; Awe, T. J.; Bliss, D. E.; Campbell, M. E.; Gomez, M. R.; Harding, E.; Harvey-Thompson, A. J.; Hansen, S. B.; Jennings, C.; Kimmel, M. W.; Knapp, P.; Lewis, S. M.; McBride, R. D.; Peterson, K.; Schollmeier, M.; Scoglietti, D. J.; Sefkow, A. B.; Shores, J. E.; Sinars, D. B.; Slutz, S. A.; Smith, I. C.; Speas, C. S.; Vesey, R. A.; Porter, J. L.

    2016-03-01

    Sandia National Laboratories is pursuing a variation of Magneto-Inertial Fusion called Magnetized Liner Inertial Fusion, or MagLIF. The MagLIF approach requires magnetization of the deuterium fuel, which is accomplished by an initial external B-Field and laser-driven pre-heat. While magnetization is crucial to the concept, it is challenging to couple sufficient energy to the fuel, since laser-plasma instabilities exist, and a compromise between laser spot size, laser entrance window thickness, and fuel density must be found. Nonlinear processes in laser plasma interaction, or laser-plasma instabilities (LPI), complicate the deposition of laser energy by enhanced absorption, backscatter, filamentation and beam-spray. Key LPI processes are determined, and mitigation methods are discussed. Results with and without improvement measures are presented.

  17. DEVICE FOR INVESTIGATION OF MAGNETRON AND PULSED-LASER PLASMA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. P. Burmakov

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Various modifications of complex pulsed laser and magnetron deposition thin-film structures unit are presented. They include joint and separate variants of layer deposition. Unit realizes the plasma parameters control and enhances the possibility of laser-plasma and magnetron methods of coatings deposition.

  18. Angular momentum evolution in laser-plasma accelerators

    CERN Document Server

    Thaury, C; Corde, S; Lehe, R; Bouteiller, M Le; Phuoc, K Ta; Davoine, X; Rax, J -M; Rousse, A; Malka, V

    2013-01-01

    The transverse properties of an electron beam are characterized by two quantities, the emittance which indicates the electron beam extend in the phase space and the angular momentum which allows for non-planar electron trajectories. Whereas the emittance of electron beams produced in laser- plasma accelerator has been measured in several experiments, their angular momentum has been scarcely studied. It was demonstrated that electrons in laser-plasma accelerator carry some angular momentum, but its origin was not established. Here we identify one source of angular momentum growth and we present experimental results showing that the angular momentum content evolves during the acceleration.

  19. Angular-momentum evolution in laser-plasma accelerators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thaury, C; Guillaume, E; Corde, S; Lehe, R; Le Bouteiller, M; Ta Phuoc, K; Davoine, X; Rax, J M; Rousse, A; Malka, V

    2013-09-27

    The transverse properties of an electron beam are characterized by two quantities, the emittance which indicates the electron beam extent in the phase space and the angular momentum which allows for nonplanar electron trajectories. Whereas the emittance of electron beams produced in a laser-plasma accelerator has been measured in several experiments, their angular momentum has been scarcely studied. It was demonstrated that electrons in a laser-plasma accelerator carry some angular momentum, but its origin was not established. Here we identify one source of angular-momentum growth and we present experimental results showing that the angular-momentum content evolves during the acceleration.

  20. Angular-Momentum Evolution in Laser-Plasma Accelerators

    CERN Document Server

    Thaury, C; Corde, S; Lehe, R; Le Bouteiller, M; Ta Phuoc, K; Davoine, X; Rax, J M; Rousse, A; Malka, V; 10.1103/PhysRevLett.111.135002

    2013-01-01

    The transverse properties of an electron beam are characterized by two quantities, the emittance which indicates the electron beam extent in the phase space and the angular momentum which allows for nonplanar electron trajectories. Whereas the emittance of electron beams produced in a laser-plasma accelerator has been measured in several experiments, their angular momentum has been scarcely studied. It was demonstrated that electrons in a laser-plasma accelerator carry some angular momentum, but its origin was not established. Here we identify one source of angular-momentum growth and we present experimental results showing that the angular-momentum content evolves during the acceleration.

  1. GPU-Accelerated PIC/MCC Simulation of Laser-Plasma Interaction Using BUMBLEBEE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Xiaolin; Huang, Tao; Chen, Wenlong; Wu, Huidong; Tang, Maowen; Li, Bin

    2015-11-01

    The research of laser-plasma interaction in its wide applications relies on the use of advanced numerical simulation tools to achieve high performance operation while reducing computational time and cost. BUMBLEBEE has been developed to be a fast simulation tool used in the research of laser-plasma interactions. BUMBLEBEE uses a 1D3V electromagnetic PIC/MCC algorithm that is accelerated by using high performance Graphics Processing Unit (GPU) hardware. BUMBLEBEE includes a friendly user-interface module and four physics simulators. The user-interface provides a powerful solid-modeling front end and graphical and computational post processing functionality. The solver of BUMBLEBEE has four modules for now, which are used to simulate the field ionization, electron collisional ionization, binary coulomb collision and laser-plasma interaction processes. The ionization characteristics of laser-neutral interaction and the generation of high-energy electrons have been analyzed by using BUMBLEBEE for validation.

  2. Optical diagnostics of femtosecond laser plasmas

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李玉同; 张杰; 陈黎明; 夏江帆; 腾浩; 赵理曾; 林景全; 李英骏; 魏志义; 王龙; 江文勉

    2001-01-01

    Optical diagnostics of evolution of plasmas produced by ultrashort laser pulses is carried out using a femtosecond probing beam. The time sequence of plasma shadowgrams and interferograms are obtained. The filamentation instability in high_density region induces the local density modification. Large_scale toroidal magnetic fields confine plasma expansion in the transverse direction, resulting in the formation of a plasma jet. The plasma expansion along the target normal direction is found to scale as 1 2.

  3. Laser Plasmas : Plasma dynamics from laser ablated solid lithium

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Debarati Bhattacharya

    2000-11-01

    Emission plasma plume generated by pulsed laser ablation of a lithium solid target by a ruby laser (694 nm, 20 ns, 3 J) was subjected to optical emission spectroscopy: time and space resolved optical emission was characterised as a function of distance from the target surface. Propagation of the plume was studied through ambient background of argon gas. Spectroscopic observations can, in general, be used to analyse plume structure with respect to an appropriate theoretical plasma model. The plume expansion dynamics in this case could be explained through a shock wave propagation model wherein, the experimental observations made were seen to fit well with the theoretical predictions. Spectral information derived from measurement of peak intensity and line width determined the parameters, electron temperature (e) and electron number density e, typically used to characterise laser produced plasma plume emission. These measurements were also used to validate the assumptions underlying the local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE) model, invoked for the high density laser plasma under study. Some interesting results pertaining to the analysis of plume structure and spatio-temporal behaviour of e and e along the plume length will be presented and discussed.

  4. Front surface structured targets for enhancing laser-plasma interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snyder, Joseph; George, Kevin; Ji, Liangliang; Yalamanchili, Sasir; Simonoff, Ethan; Cochran, Ginevra; Daskalova, Rebecca; Poole, Patrick; Willis, Christopher; Lewis, Nathan; Schumacher, Douglass

    2016-10-01

    We present recent progress made using front surface structured interfaces for enhancing ultrashort, relativistic laser-plasma interactions. Structured targets can increase laser absorption and enhance ion acceleration through a number of mechanisms such as direct laser acceleration and laser guiding. We detail experimental results obtained at the Scarlet laser facility on hollow, micron-scale plasma channels for enhancing electron acceleration. These targets show a greater than three times enhancement in the electron cutoff energy as well as an increased slope temperature for the electron distribution when compared to a flat interface. Using three-dimensional particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations, we have modeled the interaction to give insight into the physical processes responsible for the enhancement. Furthermore, we have used PIC simulations to design structures that are more advantageous for ion acceleration. Such targets necessitate advanced target fabrication methods and we describe techniques used to manufacture optimized structures, including vapor-liquid-solid growth, cryogenic etching, and 3D printing using two-photon-polymerization. This material is based upon work supported by the Air Force Office of Scientific Research under Award Number FA9550-14-1-0085.

  5. Laser-Plasma Acceleration with FLAME and ILIL Ultraintense Lasers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naveen Pathak

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available We report on the development of radiation and electron sources based on laser-plasma acceleration for biomedical and nuclear applications, using both the table top TW laser at ILIL and the 220 TW FLAME laser system at LNF. We use the ILIL laser to produce wakefield electrons in a self-focusing dominated regime in a mm scale gas-jet to generate large, uniform beams of MeV electrons for electron radiography and radiobiology applications. This acceleration regime is described in detail and key parameters are given to establish reproducible and reliable operation of this source. We use the FLAME laser to drive laser-plasma acceleration in a cm-scale gas target to obtain stable production of >100 MeV range electrons to drive a Thomson scattering ɣ-ray source for nuclear applications.

  6. Theory and simulation of laser plasma coupling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kruer, W.L.

    1979-08-09

    The theory and simulation of these coupling processes are considered. Particular emphasis is given to their nonlinear evolution. First a brief introduction to computer simulation of plasmas using particle codes is given. Then the absorption of light via the generation of plasma waves is considered, followed by a discussion of stimulated scattering of intense light. Finally these calculations are compared with experimental results.

  7. Fundamental Study of Nuclear Pumped Laser Plasmas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-12-23

    rate of up to 2pps. The plasma cell/gas- handling system obtains base pressures of 5xlO 8 Torr prior to high purity gas fill. The plasma cell is...synchronization problems, etc.). Due to the exceptional reproducibility of e-beam characteristics, todate , only prefire has caused data rejection. IV. Recent

  8. High Magnetic field generation for laser-plasma experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pollock, B B; Froula, D H; Davis, P F; Ross, J S; Fulkerson, S; Bower, J; Satariano, J; Price, D; Glenzer, S H

    2006-05-01

    An electromagnetic solenoid was developed to study the effect of magnetic fields on electron thermal transport in laser plasmas. The solenoid, which is driven by a pulsed power system suppling 30 kJ, achieves magnetic fields of 13 T. The field strength was measured on the solenoid axis with a magnetic probe and optical Zeeman splitting. The measurements agree well with analytical estimates. A method for optimizing the solenoid design to achieve magnetic fields exceeding 20 T is presented.

  9. Solitons in relativistic laser-plasma interactions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XIE Bai-song; DU Shu-cheng

    2007-01-01

    Single or/and multipeak solitons in plasma under relativistic electromagnetic field are reviewed.The incident electromagnetic field iS allowed to have a zero or/and nonzero initial constant amplitude.Some interesting numerical results are obtained that include a high-number multipeak laser pulse and single or/and low-number multipeak plasma wake structures.It is also shown that there exists a combination of soliton and oscillation waves for plasma wake field.Also,the electron density exhibits multi-caviton structure or the combination of caviton and oscillation.A complete eigenvalue spectrum of parameters is given wherein some higher peak numbers of multipeak electromagnetic solitons in the plasma are included.Moreover, some interesting scaling laws are presented for field energy via numerical approaches.Some implications of results are discussed.

  10. Optical diagnostics of femtosecond laser plasmas

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI; Yutong

    2001-01-01

    [1]Benattar, R., Popovics, C., Sigel, R., Polarized light interferometer for laser fusion studies, Rev. Sci. Instrum., 979, 50(2): 583.[2]Young, P. E., Hammer, J. H., Wilks, S. C. et al., Laser beam propagation and channel formation in underdense plasmas, Phys. Plasmas, 995, 2(7): 2825.[3]Zhang, P., He, J.T., Chen, D.B. et al., Effects of a prepulse on γ-ray radiation produced by a femtosecond laser with only mJ energy, Phys. Rev. E., 998, 57: R3746.[4]Stamper, J. A., Review on spontaneous magnetic fields in laser-produced plasmas: phenomena and measurements, Laser and Particle Beams, 99, 9(4): 84.[5]Stamper, J. A., McLean, E. A., Ripin, B. H., Studies of spontaneous magnetic fields in laser-produced plasmas by Faraday rotation, Phys. Rev. Lett., 978, 40(8): 77.[6]Raven, A., Willi, O., Rumsby, P. T., Megagauss magnetic field profiles in laser-produced plasmas, Phys. Rev. Lett., 978, 4(8): 554.[7]Burgess, M. D. J., Luther-Davis, B., Nugent, K. A., An experimental study of magnetic fields in plasmas created by high intensity one micron laser radiation, Phys. Fluids, 985, 28(7): 2286.[8]Borghesi, M., Mackinnon, A. J., Bell, A. R. et al., Megagauss magnetic field generation and plasma jet formation on solid targets irradiated by an ultraintense picosecond laser pulse, Phys. Rev. Lett., 998, 8(): 2.

  11. Laser-plasma booster for ion post acceleration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Satoh D.

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available A remarkable ion energy increase is demonstrated for post acceleration by a laser-plasma booster. An intense short-pulse laser generates a strong current by high-energy electrons accelerated, when this intense short-pulse laser illuminates a plasma target. The strong electric current creates a strong magnetic field along the high-energy electron current in plasma. During the increase phase in the magnetic field, a longitudinal inductive electric field is induced for the forward ion acceleration by the Faraday law. Our 2.5-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations demonstrate a remarkable increase in ion energy by several tens of MeV.

  12. Discrete Variational Approach for Modeling Laser-Plasma Interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reyes, J. Paxon; Shadwick, B. A.

    2014-10-01

    The traditional approach for fluid models of laser-plasma interactions begins by approximating fields and derivatives on a grid in space and time, leading to difference equations that are manipulated to create a time-advance algorithm. In contrast, by introducing the spatial discretization at the level of the action, the resulting Euler-Lagrange equations have particular differencing approximations that will exactly satisfy discrete versions of the relevant conservation laws. For example, applying a spatial discretization in the Lagrangian density leads to continuous-time, discrete-space equations and exact energy conservation regardless of the spatial grid resolution. We compare the results of two discrete variational methods using the variational principles from Chen and Sudan and Brizard. Since the fluid system conserves energy and momentum, the relative errors in these conserved quantities are well-motivated physically as figures of merit for a particular method. This work was supported by the U. S. Department of Energy under Contract No. DE-SC0008382 and by the National Science Foundation under Contract No. PHY-1104683.

  13. Photon Acceleration Based On Laser-Plasma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    One dimensional electron density perturbation is derived by using the cold fluid equation, Possion's equation and the conti nuity equation. The perturbation is generated by a driving laser pulse propagating through a plasma. The upshifting of the frequency of a trailing pulse induced by density perturbation is studied by using optical metric. The results show that it is possible that the photon will gain energy from the wakefield when assuming photon's number to be conserved, i.e., the photon will be accelerated.

  14. Mono Energetic Beams from Laser Plasma Interactions

    CERN Document Server

    Geddes, Cameron G; Esarey, Eric; Leemans, Wim; Nieter, Chet; Schröder, Carl B; Toth, Csaba; Van Tilborg, Jeroen

    2005-01-01

    A laser driven wakefield accelerator has been tuned to produce high energy electron bunches with low emittance and energy spread by extending the interaction length using a plasma channel. Wakefield accelerators support gradients thousands of times those achievable in RF accelerators, but short acceleration distance, limited by diffraction, has resulted in low energy beams with 100% electron energy spread. In the present experiments on the L’OASIS laser,* the relativistically intense drive pulse was guided over 10 diffraction ranges by a plasma channel. At a drive pulse power of 9 TW, electrons were trapped from the plasma and beams of percent energy spread containing >200pC charge above 80 MeV and with normalized emittance estimated at < 2 pi -mm-mrad were produced.** Data and simulations (VORPAL***) show the high quality bunch was formed when beam loading turned off injection after initial trapping, and when the particles were extracted as they dephased from the wake. Up to 4TW was g...

  15. Relativistic Mirrors in Laser Plasmas (Analytical Methods)

    CERN Document Server

    Bulanov, Sergei V; Kando, Masaki; Koga, James K

    2016-01-01

    Relativistic flying mirrors in plasmas are realized as thin dense electron (or electron-ion) layers accelerated by high-intensity electromagnetic waves to velocities close to the speed of light in vacuum. The reflection of an electromagnetic wave from the relativistic mirror results in its energy and frequency changing. In a counter-propagation configuration, the frequency of the reflected wave is multiplied by the factor proportional to the Lorentz factor squared. This scientific area promises the development of sources of ultrashort X-ray pulses in the attosecond range. The expected intensity will reach the level at which the effects predicted by nonlinear quantum electrodynamics start to play a key role.

  16. Investigation of electron heating in laser-plasma interaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A Parvazian

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available  In this paper, stimulated Raman scattering (SRS and electron heating in laser plasma propagating along the plasma fusion is investigated by particle-in cell simulation. Applying an external magnetic field to plasma, production of whistler waves and electron heating associated with whistler waves in the direction perpendicular to external magnetic field was observed in this simulation. The plasma waves with low phase velocities, generated in backward-SRS and dominateing initially in time and space, accelerated the backward electrons by trapping them. Then these electrons promoted to higher energies by the forward-SRS plasma waves with high phase velocities. This tow-stage electron acceleration is more efficient due to the coexistence of these two instabilities.

  17. Mapping the X-Ray Emission Region in a Laser-Plasma Accelerator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corde, S.; Thaury, C.; Phuoc, K. Ta; Lifschitz, A.; Lambert, G.; Faure, J.; Lundh, O.; Benveniste, E.; Ben-Ismail, A.; Arantchuk, L.; Marciniak, A.; Stordeur, A.; Brijesh, P.; Rousse, A.; Specka, A.; Malka, V.

    2011-11-01

    The x-ray emission in laser-plasma accelerators can be a powerful tool to understand the physics of relativistic laser-plasma interaction. It is shown here that the mapping of betatron x-ray radiation can be obtained from the x-ray beam profile when an aperture mask is positioned just beyond the end of the emission region. The influence of the plasma density on the position and the longitudinal profile of the x-ray emission is investigated and compared to particle-in-cell simulations. The measurement of the x-ray emission position and length provides insight on the dynamics of the interaction, including the electron self-injection region, possible multiple injection, and the role of the electron beam driven wakefield.

  18. Scaling and design of high-energy laser plasma electron acceleration

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Kazuhisa Nakajima; Hyung Taek Kim; Tae Moon Jeong; Chang Hee Nam

    2015-01-01

    Recently there has been great progress in laser-driven plasma-based accelerators by exploiting high-power lasers,where electron beams can be accelerated to multi-GeV energy in a centimeter-scale plasma due to the laser wakefield acceleration mechanism. While, to date, worldwide research on laser plasma accelerators has been focused on the creation of compact particle and radiation sources for basic sciences, medical and industrial applications, there is great interest in applications for high-energy physics and astrophysics, exploring unprecedented high-energy frontier phenomena. In this context, we present an overview of experimental achievements in laser plasma acceleration from the perspective of the production of GeV-level electron beams, and deduce the scaling formulas capable of predicting experimental results self-consistently, taking into account the propagation of a relativistic laser pulse through plasma and the accelerating field reduction due to beam loading. Finally, we present design examples for 10-GeV-level laser plasma acceleration, which is expected in near-term experiments by means of petawatt-class lasers.

  19. High-performance modeling of plasma-based acceleration and laser-plasma interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vay, Jean-Luc; Blaclard, Guillaume; Godfrey, Brendan; Kirchen, Manuel; Lee, Patrick; Lehe, Remi; Lobet, Mathieu; Vincenti, Henri

    2016-10-01

    Large-scale numerical simulations are essential to the design of plasma-based accelerators and laser-plasma interations for ultra-high intensity (UHI) physics. The electromagnetic Particle-In-Cell (PIC) approach is the method of choice for self-consistent simulations, as it is based on first principles, and captures all kinetic effects, and also scale favorably to many cores on supercomputers. The standard PIC algorithm relies on second-order finite-difference discretization of the Maxwell and Newton-Lorentz equations. We present here novel formulations, based on very high-order pseudo-spectral Maxwell solvers, which enable near-total elimination of the numerical Cherenkov instability and increased accuracy over the standard PIC method for standard laboratory frame and Lorentz boosted frame simulations. We also present the latest implementations in the PIC modules Warp-PICSAR and FBPIC on the Intel Xeon Phi and GPU architectures. Examples of applications will be given on the simulation of laser-plasma accelerators and high-harmonic generation with plasma mirrors. Work supported by US-DOE Contracts DE-AC02-05CH11231 and by the European Commission through the Marie Slowdoska-Curie fellowship PICSSAR Grant Number 624543. Used resources of NERSC.

  20. Nanoscale imaging using a compact laser plasma EUV source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wachulak, Przemyslaw; Bartnik, Andrzej; Fiedorowicz, Henryk; Kostecki, Jerzy; Jarocki, Roman; Szczurek, Miroslaw; Szczurek, Anna; Feigl, Torsten; Pina, Ladislav

    2012-05-01

    High resolution imaging methods and techniques are currently under development. One of them is an extreme ultraviolet (EUV) microscopy, based on Fresnel zone plates. In this paper a compact, high-repetition, laser-plasma EUV source, emitting quasi-monochromatic radiation at 13.8nm wavelength was used in a desktop EUV transmission microscopy with a spatial (half-pitch) resolution of 50nm. EUV microscopy images of objects with various thicknesses and the spatial resolution measurements using the knife-edge test are presented.

  1. Ultrafast Diagnostics for Electron Beams from Laser Plasma Accelerators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matlis, N. H.; Bakeman, M.; Geddes, C. G. R.; Gonsalves, T.; Lin, C.; Nakamura, K.; Osterhoff, J.; Plateau, G. R.; Schroeder, C. B.; Shiraishi, S.; Sokollik, T.; van Tilborg, J.; Toth, Cs.; Leemans, W. P.

    2010-06-01

    We present an overview of diagnostic techniques for measuring key parameters of electron bunches from Laser Plasma Accelerators (LPAs). The diagnostics presented here were chosen because they highlight the unique advantages (e.g., diverse forms of electromagnetic emission) and difficulties (e.g., shot-to-shot variability) associated with LPAs. Non destructiveness and high resolution (in space and time and energy) are key attributes that enable the formation of a comprehensive suite of simultaneous diagnostics which are necessary for the full characterization of the ultrashort, but highly-variable electron bunches from LPAs.

  2. Effects of Confined Laser Ablation on Laser Plasma Propulsion

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHENG Zhi-Yuan; ZHANG Jie; LU Xin; HAO Zuo-Qiang; XU Miao-Hua; WANG Zhao-Hua; WEI Zhi-Yi

    2005-01-01

    @@ We investigate the effects of confined laser ablation on laser plasma propulsion. Compared with planar ablation,the cavity ablation provides an effective way to obtain a large target momentum and a high coupling coefficient.When laser pukes are focused into a cavity with 1 mm diameter and 2mm depth, a high coupling coefficient is obtained. By using a glass layer to cover the cavity, the coupling coefficient is enhanced by 10 times. Meanwhile,it is found that with the increase of the target surface size, the target momentum presents a linear increase.

  3. Laser--plasma interaction in a theta-pinch geometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Armstrong, W.T.

    1978-06-01

    Prompt stimulated Brillouin scatter (SBS) is studied in an experiment wherein a high power, pulsed CO/sub 2/ laser irradiates an independently produced, theta-pinch plasma. SBS does not significantly affect laser heating of the plasma. Measurements of density profiles and temperature histories permitted examination of laser refraction, local heating and net absorption. Refractive containment of the CO/sub 2/ laser beam by an on-axis density minimum was observed at early times during the laser pulse. However, refractive containment was lost at late times due to the diffusive loss of the density minimum. Classical modeling of the expected heating required ''bleached'' absorption to account for the observed heating. A plasma absorptivity of approximately 46% was inferred from calorimetry measurements at 250 mtorr fill pressure. These results confirm that classical heating and refraction dominated the laser-plasma interaction.

  4. Concept of a Staged FEL Enabled by Fast Synchrotron Radiation Cooling of Laser-Plasma Accelerated Beam by Solenoidal Magnetic Fields in Plasma Bubble

    CERN Document Server

    Seryi, Andrei; Andreev, Alexander; Konoplev, Ivan

    2016-01-01

    A novel method for generating GigaGauss solenoidal field in laser-plasma bubble, using screw-shaped laser pulses, has been recently presented in arXiv:1604.01259 [physics.plasm-ph]. Such magnetic fields enable fast synchrotron radiation cooling of the beam emittance of laser-plasma accelerated leptons. This recent finding opens a novel approach for design of laser-plasma FELs or colliders, where the acceleration stages are interleaved with laser-plasma emittance cooling stages. In this concept paper we present an outline of how a staged plasma-acceleration FEL could look like and discuss further studies needed to investigate the feasibility of the concept in detail.

  5. Laser plasma interaction in rugby-shaped hohlraums

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masson-Laborde, P.-E.; Philippe, F.; Tassin, V.; Monteil, M.-C.; Gauthier, P.; Casner, A.; Depierreux, S.; Seytor, P.; Teychenne, D.; Loiseau, P.; Freymerie, P.

    2014-10-01

    Rugby shaped-hohlraum has proven to give high performance compared to a classical similar-diameter cylinder hohlraum. Due to this performance, this hohlraum has been chosen as baseline ignition target for the Laser MegaJoule (LMJ). Many experiments have therefore been performed during the last years on the Omega laser facility in order to study in details the rugby hohlraum. In this talk, we will discuss the interpretation of these experiments from the point of view of the laser plasma instability problem. Experimental comparisons have been done between rugby, cylinder and elliptical shape rugby hohlraums and we will discuss how the geometry differences will affect the evolution of laser plasma instabilities (LPI). The efficiency of laser smoothing techniques on these instabilities will also be discussed as well as gas filling effect. The experimental results will be compared with FCI2 hydroradiative calculations and linear postprocessing with Piranah. Experimental Raman and Brillouin spectrum, from which we can infer the location of the parametric instabilities, will be compared to simulated ones, and will give the possibility to compare LPI between the different hohlraum geometries.

  6. Demonstration of relativistic electron beam focusing by a laser-plasma lens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thaury, C; Guillaume, E; Döpp, A; Lehe, R; Lifschitz, A; Ta Phuoc, K; Gautier, J; Goddet, J-P; Tafzi, A; Flacco, A; Tissandier, F; Sebban, S; Rousse, A; Malka, V

    2015-04-16

    Laser-plasma technology promises a drastic reduction of the size of high-energy electron accelerators. It could make free-electron lasers available to a broad scientific community and push further the limits of electron accelerators for high-energy physics. Furthermore, the unique femtosecond nature of the source makes it a promising tool for the study of ultrafast phenomena. However, applications are hindered by the lack of suitable lens to transport this kind of high-current electron beams mainly due to their divergence. Here we show that this issue can be solved by using a laser-plasma lens in which the field gradients are five order of magnitude larger than in conventional optics. We demonstrate a reduction of the divergence by nearly a factor of three, which should allow for an efficient coupling of the beam with a conventional beam transport line.

  7. Demonstration of electron beam focusing by a laser-plasma lens

    CERN Document Server

    Thaury, Cédric; Döpp, Andreas; Lehe, Remi; Lifschitz, Agustin; Phuoc, Kim Ta; Gautier, Julien; Goddet, Jean-Philippe; Tafzi, Amar; Flacco, Alessandro; Tissandier, Fabien; Sebban, Stéphane; Rousse, Antoine; Malka, Victor

    2014-01-01

    Laser-plasma technology promises a drastic reduction of the size of high energy electron accelerators. It could make free electron lasers available to a broad scientific community, and push further the limits of electron accelerators for high energy physics. Furthermore the unique femtosecond nature of the source makes it a promising tool for the study of ultra-fast phenomena. However, applications are hindered by the lack of suitable lens to transport this kind of high-current electron beams, mainly due to their divergence. Here we show that this issue can be solved by using a laser-plasma lens, in which the field gradients are five order of magnitude larger than in conventional optics. We demonstrate a reduction of the divergence by nearly a factor of three, which should allow for an efficient coupling of the beam with a conventional beam transport line.

  8. Material measurement method based on femtosecond laser plasma shock wave

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Dong; Li, Zhongming

    2017-03-01

    The acoustic emission signal of laser plasma shock wave, which comes into being when femtosecond laser ablates pure Cu, Fe, and Al target material, has been detected by using the fiber Fabry-Perot (F-P) acoustic emission sensing probe. The spectrum characters of the acoustic emission signals for three kinds of materials have been analyzed and studied by using Fourier transform. The results show that the frequencies of the acoustic emission signals detected from the three kinds of materials are different. Meanwhile, the frequencies are almost identical for the same materials under different ablation energies and detection ranges. Certainly, the amplitudes of the spectral character of the three materials show a fixed pattern. The experimental results and methods suggest a potential application of the plasma shock wave on-line measurement based on the femtosecond laser ablating target by using the fiber F-P acoustic emission sensor probe.

  9. Interplay of Laser-Plasma Interactions and Inertial Fusion Hydrodynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strozzi, D. J.; Bailey, D. S.; Michel, P.; Divol, L.; Sepke, S. M.; Kerbel, G. D.; Thomas, C. A.; Ralph, J. E.; Moody, J. D.; Schneider, M. B.

    2017-01-01

    The effects of laser-plasma interactions (LPI) on the dynamics of inertial confinement fusion hohlraums are investigated via a new approach that self-consistently couples reduced LPI models into radiation-hydrodynamics numerical codes. The interplay between hydrodynamics and LPI—specifically stimulated Raman scatter and crossed-beam energy transfer (CBET)—mostly occurs via momentum and energy deposition into Langmuir and ion acoustic waves. This spatially redistributes energy coupling to the target, which affects the background plasma conditions and thus, modifies laser propagation. This model shows reduced CBET and significant laser energy depletion by Langmuir waves, which reduce the discrepancy between modeling and data from hohlraum experiments on wall x-ray emission and capsule implosion shape.

  10. Spectral and spatial structure of extreme ultraviolet radiation in laser plasma-wall interactions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kuznetsov, A. S.; Stuik, R.; F. Bijkerk,; Shevelko, A. P.

    2012-01-01

    Intense extreme ultraviolet (XUV) radiation was observed during the interaction of low-temperature laser plasmas and wall materials. Laser plasmas with electron temperature T-e similar to 40 eV were created on massive solid targets (CF2 and Al) by an excimer KrF laser (248 nm/0.5 J/13 ns/1 Hz). The

  11. Ion Acceleration by Laser Plasma Interaction from Cryogenic Microjets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Propp, Adrienne [Harvard Univ., Cambridge, MA (United States)

    2015-08-16

    Processes that occur in extreme conditions, such as in the center of stars and large planets, can be simulated in the laboratory using facilities such as SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory and the Jupiter Laser Facility (JLF) at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). These facilities allow scientists to investigate the properties of matter by observing their interactions with high-power lasers. Ion acceleration from laser plasma interaction is gaining greater attention today due to its widespread potential applications, including proton beam cancer therapy and fast ignition for energy production. Typically, ion acceleration is achieved by focusing a high power laser on thin foil targets through a mechanism called Target Normal Sheath Acceleration. However, this mechanism is not ideal for creating the high-energy proton beams needed for future applications. Based on research and recent experiments, we hypothesized that a pure liquid cryogenic jet would be an ideal target for exploring new regimes of ion acceleration. Furthermore, it would provide a continuous, pure target, unlike metal foils which are consumed in the interaction and easily contaminated. In an effort to test this hypothesis, we used the 527 nm split beam, frequency-doubled TITAN laser at JLF. Data from the cryogenic jets was limited due to the flow of current up the jet into the nozzle during the interaction, heating the jet and damaging the orifice. However, we achieved a pure proton beam with evidence of a monoenergetic feature. Furthermore, data from gold and carbon wires showed surprising and interesting results. Preliminary analysis of data from two ion emission diagnostics, Thomson parabola spectrometers (TPs) and radio chromic films (RCFs), suggests that shockwave acceleration occurred rather than target normal sheath acceleration, the standard mechanism of ion acceleration. Upon completion of the experiment at TITAN, I researched the possibility of transforming our liquid cryogenic

  12. High-order harmonic generation in laser plasma plumes

    CERN Document Server

    Ganeev, Rashid A

    2013-01-01

    This book represents the first comprehensive treatment of high-order harmonic generation in laser-produced plumes, covering the principles, past and present experimental status and important applications. It shows how this method of frequency conversion of laser radiation towards the extreme ultraviolet range matured over the course of multiple studies and demonstrated new approaches in the generation of strong coherent short-wavelength radiation for various applications. Significant discoveries and pioneering contributions of researchers in this field carried out in various laser scientific centers worldwide are included in this first attempt to describe the important findings in this area of nonlinear spectroscopy. "High-Order Harmonic Generation in Laser Plasma Plumes" is a self-contained and unified review of the most recent achievements in the field, such as the application of clusters (fullerenes, nanoparticles, nanotubes) for efficient harmonic generation of ultrashort laser pulses in cluster-containin...

  13. Tapered plasma channels to phase-lock accelerating and focusing forces in laser-plasma accelerators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rittershofer, W.; Schroeder, C.B.; Esarey, E.; Gruner, F.J.; Leemans, W.P.

    2010-05-17

    Tapered plasma channels are considered for controlling dephasing of a beam with respect to a plasma wave driven by a weakly-relativistic, short-pulse laser. Tapering allows for enhanced energy gain in a single laser plasma accelerator stage. Expressions are derived for the taper, or longitudinal plasma density variation, required to maintain a beam at a constant phase in the longitudinal and/or transverse fields of the plasma wave. In a plasma channel, the phase velocities of the longitudinal and transverse fields differ, and, hence, the required tapering differs. The length over which the tapered plasma density becomes singular is calculated. Linear plasma tapering as well as discontinuous plasma tapering, which moves beams to adjacent plasma wave buckets, are also considered. The energy gain of an accelerated electron in a tapered laser-plasma accelerator is calculated and the laser pulse length to optimize the energy gain is determined.

  14. Quantum Cohesion Oscillation of Electron Ground State in Low Temperature Laser Plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Qingxun; Zhang, Ping; Dong, Lifang; Zhang, Kaixi

    1996-01-01

    The development of radically new technological and economically efficient methods for obtaining chemical products and for producing new materials with specific properties requires the study of physical and chemical processes proceeding at temperature of 10(exp 3) to 10(exp 4) K, temperature range of low temperature plasma. In our paper, by means of Wigner matrix of quantum statistical theory, a formula is derived for the energy of quantum coherent oscillation of electron ground state in laser plasma at low temperature. The collective behavior would be important in ion and ion-molecule reactions.

  15. Particle physicist's dreams about PetaelectronVolt laser plasma accelerators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vesztergombi, G. [KFKI-RMKI. 1525-H Budapest P.O.B. 49. (Hungary)

    2012-07-09

    Present day accelerators are working well in the multi TeV energy scale and one is expecting exciting results in the coming years. Conventional technologies, however, can offer only incremental (factor 2 or 3) increase in beam energies which does not follow the usual speed of progress in the frontiers of high energy physics. Laser plasma accelerators theoretically provide unique possibilities to achieve orders of magnitude increases entering the PetaelectronVolt (PeV) energy range. It will be discussed what kind of new perspectives could be opened for the physics at this new energy scale. What type of accelerators would be required?.

  16. Laser-PlasmaWakefield Acceleration with Higher Order Laser Modes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Geddes, C.G.R.; Cormier-Michel, E.; Esarey, E.; Schroeder, C.B.; Mullowney, P.; Paul, K.; Cary, J.R.; Leemans, W.P.

    2010-06-01

    Laser-plasma collider designs point to staging of multiple accelerator stages at the 10 GeV level, which are to be developed on the upcoming BELLA laser, while Thomson Gamma source designs use GeV stages, both requiring efficiency and low emittance. Design and scaling of stages operating in the quasi-linear regime to address these needs are presented using simulations in the VORPAL framework. In addition to allowing symmetric acceleration of electrons and positrons, which is important for colliders, this regime has the property that the plasma wakefield is proportional to the transverse gradient of the laser intensity profile. We demonstrate use of higher order laser modes to tailor the laser pulse and hence the transverse focusing forces in the plasma. In particular, we show that by using higher order laser modes, we can reduce the focusing fields and hence increase the matched electron beam radius, which is important to increased charge and efficiency, while keeping the low bunch emittance required for applications.

  17. The study of laser plasma plume radiation produced by laser ablation of silicon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Qingju

    2014-12-01

    In order to study the laser plasma plume radiation mechanisms induced by the interaction between Nd: YAG plused laser and silicon, the radiation model of silicon laser plasma plume is established. Laser plasma plume radiation includes atom characteristic lines, ion lines and continuous background. It can reflect the characteristics of laser plasma plume radiation, reveal the mechanism of laser ablation on silicon. Time-resolved measurment of laser plasma plume radiation produced by pulsed Nd: YAG laser ablation of silicon in different ambient gas is thoroughly studied. The experimental ambient gas are N2 and O2.The pulse width of Nd: YAG plused laser adopted in the experiment is 20ns, the pulse energy is 60mJ, the laser pulsing frequency is 10Hz, and the emitted laser wavelength is 1064nm, The silicon target purity is 99.99%, The target is rotating at a speed of 240r/min. The focusing area of the laser on the Si target has a diameter of around 0.8mm.The pressure of ambient gas is tunable between 13Pa and 101.3kPa in the induced chamber, the number of points used in averaging is 15. The experimental results show that the ambient gas has obvious enhancement effect on the radiation intensity of silicon laser plasma plume. With the increase of the ambient gas pressure, the silicon laser plasma plume radiation intensity will first be increased and then be decreased, and the ambient gas has an obvious compression effect on the scope of silicon laser plasma plume radiation. For the two different ambient gases, the maximum silicon laser plasma plume radiation intensity and maximum pressure for they are different, for oxygen at 35kPa, for nitrogen at 50kPa. The silicon laser plasma plume radiation intensity in oxygen is bigger than that in nitrogen.The main excition mechanisms of laser plasma plume radiation induced by Nd:YAG plused laser induced silicon is analyzed, The plused laser can makes part molecules in the ambient gas and silicon atoms ionized at the surface of

  18. Laser-Plasma Modeling Using PERSEUS Extended-MHD Simulation Code for HED Plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamlin, Nathaniel; Seyler, Charles

    2016-10-01

    We discuss the use of the PERSEUS extended-MHD simulation code for high-energy-density (HED) plasmas in modeling laser-plasma interactions in relativistic and nonrelativistic regimes. By formulating the fluid equations as a relaxation system in which the current is semi-implicitly time-advanced using the Generalized Ohm's Law, PERSEUS enables modeling of two-fluid phenomena in dense plasmas without the need to resolve the smallest electron length and time scales. For relativistic and nonrelativistic laser-target interactions, we have validated a cycle-averaged absorption (CAA) laser driver model against the direct approach of driving the electromagnetic fields. The CAA model refers to driving the radiation energy and flux rather than the fields, and using hyperbolic radiative transport, coupled to the plasma equations via energy source terms, to model absorption and propagation of the radiation. CAA has the advantage of not requiring adequate grid resolution of each laser wavelength, so that the system can span many wavelengths without requiring prohibitive CPU time. For several laser-target problems, we compare existing MHD results to extended-MHD results generated using PERSEUS with the CAA model, and examine effects arising from Hall physics. This work is supported by the National Nuclear Security Administration stewardship sciences academic program under Department of Energy cooperative agreements DE-FOA-0001153 and DE-NA0001836.

  19. Electron beam charge diagnostics for laser plasma accelerators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Nakamura

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available A comprehensive study of charge diagnostics is conducted to verify their validity for measuring electron beams produced by laser plasma accelerators (LPAs. First, a scintillating screen (Lanex was extensively studied using subnanosecond electron beams from the Advanced Light Source booster synchrotron, at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. The Lanex was cross calibrated with an integrating current transformer (ICT for up to the electron energy of 1.5 GeV, and the linear response of the screen was confirmed for charge density and intensity up to 160  pC/mm^{2} and 0.4  pC/(ps  mm^{2}, respectively. After the radio-frequency accelerator based cross calibration, a series of measurements was conducted using electron beams from an LPA. Cross calibrations were carried out using an activation-based measurement that is immune to electromagnetic pulse noise, ICT, and Lanex. The diagnostics agreed within ±8%, showing that they all can provide accurate charge measurements for LPAs.

  20. Electron Beam Charge Diagnostics for Laser Plasma Accelerators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakamura, Kei; Gonsalves, Anthony; Lin, Chen; Smith, Alan; Rodgers, David; Donahue, Rich; Byrne, Warren; Leemans, Wim

    2011-06-27

    A comprehensive study of charge diagnostics is conducted to verify their validity for measuring electron beams produced by laser plasma accelerators (LPAs). First, a scintillating screen (Lanex) was extensively studied using subnanosecond electron beams from the Advanced Light Source booster synchrotron, at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. The Lanex was cross calibrated with an integrating current transformer (ICT) for up to the electron energy of 1.5 GeV, and the linear response of the screen was confirmed for charge density and intensity up to 160 pC/mm{sup 2} and 0.4 pC/(ps mm{sup 2}), respectively. After the radio-frequency accelerator based cross calibration, a series of measurements was conducted using electron beams from an LPA. Cross calibrations were carried out using an activation-based measurement that is immune to electromagnetic pulse noise, ICT, and Lanex. The diagnostics agreed within {+-}8%, showing that they all can provide accurate charge measurements for LPAs.

  1. Probing electron acceleration and X-ray emission in laser-plasma accelerator

    CERN Document Server

    Thaury, C; Corde, S; Brijesh, P; Lambert, G; Mangles, S P D; Bloom, M S; Kneip, S; Malka, V

    2013-01-01

    While laser-plasma accelerators have demonstrated a strong potential in the acceleration of electrons up to giga-electronvolt energies, few experimental tools for studying the acceleration physics have been developed. In this paper, we demonstrate a method for probing the acceleration process. A second laser beam, propagating perpendicular to the main beam is focused in the gas jet few nanosecond before the main beam creates the accelerating plasma wave. This second beam is intense enough to ionize the gas and form a density depletion which will locally inhibit the acceleration. The position of the density depletion is scanned along the interaction length to probe the electron injection and acceleration, and the betatron X-ray emission. To illustrate the potential of the method, the variation of the injection position with the plasma density is studied.

  2. Laser Plasmas : Optical guiding of laser beam in nonuniform plasma

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Tarsem Singh Gill

    2000-11-01

    A plasma channel produced by a short ionising laser pulse is axially nonuniform resulting from the self-defocusing. Through such preformed plasma channel, when a delayed pulse propagates, the phenomena of diffraction, refraction and self-phase modulation come into play. We have solved the nonlinear parabolic partial differential equation governing the propagation characteristics for an approximate analytical solution using variational approach. Results are compared with the theoretical model of Liu and Tripathi (Phys. Plasmas 1, 3100 (1994)) based on paraxial ray approximation. Particular emphasis is on both beam width and longitudinal phase delay which are crucial to many applications.

  3. Modeling classical and quantum radiation from laser-plasma accelerators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Chen

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The development of models and the “Virtual Detector for Synchrotron Radiation” (vdsr code that accurately describe the production of synchrotron radiation are described. These models and code are valid in the classical and linear (single-scattering quantum regimes and are capable of describing radiation produced from laser-plasma accelerators (LPAs through a variety of mechanisms including betatron radiation, undulator radiation, and Thomson/Compton scattering. Previous models of classical synchrotron radiation, such as those typically used for undulator radiation, are inadequate in describing the radiation spectra from electrons undergoing small numbers of oscillations. This is due to an improper treatment of a mathematical evaluation at the end points of an integration that leads to an unphysical plateau in the radiation spectrum at high frequencies, the magnitude of which increases as the number of oscillation periods decreases. This is important for betatron radiation from LPAs, in which the betatron strength parameter is large but the number of betatron periods is small. The code vdsr allows the radiation to be calculated in this regime by full integration over each electron trajectory, including end-point effects, and this code is used to calculate betatron radiation for cases of experimental interest. Radiation from Thomson scattering and Compton scattering is also studied with vdsr. For Thomson scattering, radiation reaction is included by using the Sokolov method for the calculation of the electron dynamics. For Compton scattering, quantum recoil effects are considered in vdsr by using Monte Carlo methods. The quantum calculation has been benchmarked with the classical calculation in a classical regime.

  4. Laser Plasma Particle Accelerators: Large Fields for Smaller Facility Sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Geddes, Cameron G.R.; Cormier-Michel, Estelle; Esarey, Eric H.; Schroeder, Carl B.; Vay, Jean-Luc; Leemans, Wim P.; Bruhwiler, David L.; Cary, John R.; Cowan, Ben; Durant, Marc; Hamill, Paul; Messmer, Peter; Mullowney, Paul; Nieter, Chet; Paul, Kevin; Shasharina, Svetlana; Veitzer, Seth; Weber, Gunther; Rubel, Oliver; Ushizima, Daniela; Bethel, Wes; Wu, John

    2009-03-20

    Compared to conventional particle accelerators, plasmas can sustain accelerating fields that are thousands of times higher. To exploit this ability, massively parallel SciDAC particle simulations provide physical insight into the development of next-generation accelerators that use laser-driven plasma waves. These plasma-based accelerators offer a path to more compact, ultra-fast particle and radiation sources for probing the subatomic world, for studying new materials and new technologies, and for medical applications.

  5. Longitudinal instabilities affecting the moving critical layer laser-plasma ion accelerators

    CERN Document Server

    Sahai, Aakash Ajit

    2014-01-01

    In this work we analyze the longitudinal instabilities of propagating acceleration structures that are driven by a relativistically intense laser at the moving plasma critical layer [1]. These instabilities affect the energy-spectra of the accelerated ion-beams in propagating critical layer acceleration schemes [2][3]. Specifically, using analytical theory and PIC simulations we look into three fundamental physical processes and their interplay that are crucial to the understanding of energy spectral control by making the laser-plasma ion accelerators stable. The interacting processes are (i) Doppler-shifted ponderomotive bunching [1][4] (ii) potential quenching by beam-loading [2] and (iii) two-stream instabilities. These phenomenon have been observed in simulations analyzing these acceleration processes [5][6][7]. From the preliminary models and results we present in this work, we can infer measures by which these instabilities can be controlled [8] for improving the energy-spread of the beams.

  6. En Route: next-generation laser-plasma-based electron accelerators; En Route: Elektronenbeschleuniger der naechsten Generation auf Laser-Plasma-Basis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hidding, Bernhard

    2008-05-15

    Accelerating electrons to relativistic energies is of fundamental interest, especially in particle physics. Today's accelerator technology, however, is limited by the maximum electric fields which can be created. This thesis presents results on various mechanisms aiming at exploiting the fields in focussed laser pulses and plasma waves for electron acceleration, which can be orders of magnitude higher than with conventional accelerators. With relativistic, underdense laser-plasma-interaction, quasimonoenergetic electron bunches with energies up to {approx}50 MeV and normalized emittances of the order of 5mmmrad have been generated. This was achieved by focussing the {approx}80 fs, 1 J pulses of the JETI-laser at the FSU Jena to intensities of several 10{sup 19}W=cm{sup 2} into gas jets. The experimental observations could be explained via 'bubble acceleration', which is based on self-injection and acceleration of electrons in a highly nonlinear breaking plasma wave. For the rst time, this bubble acceleration was achieved explicitly in the self-modulated laser wakefield regime (SMLWFA). This quasimonoenergetic SMLWFA-regime stands out by relaxing dramatically the requirements on the driving laser pulse necessary to trigger bubble acceleration. This is due to self-modulation of the laser pulse in high-density gas jets, leading to ultrashort laser pulse fragments capable of initiating bubble acceleration. Electron bunches with durations

  7. Optical Probing of CO2 Laser-Plasma Interactions at Near Critical Density

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Chao

    The interaction of a high-power laser beam with plasma has been explored extensively in the context of laser-driven fusion, plasma-based acceleration of ions and electrons and high energy-density physics. One of the fundamental processes common to all these studies is the penetration of intense light into a dense matter through the hole boring effect and self-induced transparency. Light with a given wavelength lambda will be reflected once the electron density equals the critical electron plasma density nc = 1.1x 1021cm -3 /[lambda(mum)]2. The radiation pressure exerted on the critical density layer is characterized by the ponderomotive force of a focused laser pulse which scales with a laser intensity, I as Ilambda2 Wmum2/cm 2. At Ilambda2 ˜1017 Wmum2/cm2 and above, it becomes possible for the laser pulse not only to steepen the plasma profile but to push the overcritical plasma with ne > nc creating a cavity or a hole in the target. The phenomenon of hole boring, whereby a laser pulse propagates through a reduced density cavity to reach and push the critical density layer, is of importance in fast-ignition fusion because it may allow the laser pulse to deliver its energy closer to the compressed fuel where it can be converted into fast electrons that are needed to ignite a small portion of the fuel. The layer of plasma pushed by the radiation pressure can reflect and accelerate ions via the so called Hole Boring Radiation Pressure Acceleration mechanism. Also the density pile- up in combination with the strong electron heating at the critical density layer can facilitate the formation of a collisionless shock. This shock wave acceleration can produce high energy ion beams with a narrow energy spread. Numerous experiments have been carried out to study dynamics of laser plasma interaction indirectly using solid state targets that are opaque for 1?m laser. However, by using a longer wavelength CO2 laser, lambda = 10.6mum, the critical plasma density is decreased

  8. Tuning of betatron radiation in laser-plasma accelerators via multimodal laser propagation through capillary waveguides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curcio, A.; Giulietti, D.; Petrarca, M.

    2017-02-01

    The betatron radiation from laser-plasma accelerated electrons in dielectric capillary waveguides is investigated. The multimode laser propagation is responsible for a modulated plasma wakefield structure, which affects the electron transverse dynamics, therefore influencing the betatron radiation spectra. Such a phenomenon can be exploited to tune the energy spectrum of the betatron radiation by controlling the excitation of the capillary modes.

  9. Experimental studies of axial magnetic fields generated in ultrashort-pulse laser-plasma interaction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李玉同; 张杰; 陈黎明; 赵理曾; 夏江帆; 魏志义; 江文勉

    2000-01-01

    The quasistatic axial magnetic fields in plasmas produced by ultrashort laser pulses were measured by measuring the Faraday rotation angle of the backscattered emission. The spatial distribution of the axial magnetic field was obtained with a peak value as high as 170 Tesla. Theory suggests that the axial magnetic field is generated by dynamo effect in laser-plasma interaction.

  10. An imaging proton spectrometer for short-pulse laser plasma experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, H; Hazi, A; van Maren, R; Chen, S; Fuchs, J; Gauthier, M; Pape, S L; Rygg, J R; Shepherd, R

    2010-05-11

    Ultra intense short pulse laser pulses incident on solid targets can generate energetic protons. In additions to their potentially important applications such as in cancer treatments and proton fast ignition, these protons are essential to understand the complex physics of intense laser plasma interaction. To better characterize these laser-produced protons, we designed and constructed a novel, spatially imaging proton spectrometer that will not only measure proton energy distribution with high resolution, but also provide its angular characteristics. The information obtained from this spectrometer compliments those from commonly used diagnostics including radiochromic film packs, CR39 nuclear track detectors, and non-imaging magnetic spectrometers. The basic characterizations and sample data from this instrument are presented.

  11. Study of hot electrons generated from intense laser-plasma interaction employing Image Plate

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIANG WenXi; JIN Zhan; WEI ZhiYi; ZHAO Wei; LI YingJun; ZHANG Jie; LI YuTong; XU MiaoHua; YUAN XiaoHui; ZHENG ZhiYuan; ZHANG Yi; LIU Feng; WANG ZhaoHua; LI HanMing

    2008-01-01

    Image Plate (IP) is convenient to be used and very suitable for radiation detection because of its advantages such as wide dynamic range, high detective quantum efficiency, ultrahigh sensitivity and superior linearity. The function mechanism and characteristics of IP are introduced in this paper. IP was employed in the study of hot electrons generated from intense laser-plasma interaction. The angular distri-bution and energy spectrum of hot electrons were measured with IP in the experi-ments. The results demonstrate that IP is an effective radiation detector for the study of laser-plasma interaction.

  12. Study of hot electrons generated from intense laser-plasma interaction employing Image Plate

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    Image Plate (IP) is convenient to be used and very suitable for radiation detection because of its advantages such as wide dynamic range, high detective quantum efficiency, ultrahigh sensitivity and superior linearity. The function mechanism and characteristics of IP are introduced in this paper. IP was employed in the study of hot electrons generated from intense laser-plasma interaction. The angular distri- bution and energy spectrum of hot electrons were measured with IP in the experi- ments. The results demonstrate that IP is an effective radiation detector for the study of laser-plasma interaction.

  13. Transport and Non-Invasive Position Detection of Electron Beams from Laser-Plasma Accelerators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Osterhoff, Jens; Sokollik, Thomas; Nakamura, Kei; Bakeman, Michael; Weingartner, R; Gonsalves, Anthony; Shiraishi, Satomi; Lin, Chen; vanTilborg, Jeroen; Geddes, Cameron; Schroeder, Carl; Esarey, Eric; Toth, Csaba; DeSantis, Stefano; Byrd, John; Gruner, F; Leemans, Wim

    2011-07-20

    The controlled imaging and transport of ultra-relativistic electrons from laser-plasma accelerators is of crucial importance to further use of these beams, e.g. in high peak-brightness light sources. We present our plans to realize beam transport with miniature permanent quadrupole magnets from the electron source through our THUNDER undulator. Simulation results demonstrate the importance of beam imaging by investigating the generated XUV-photon flux. In addition, first experimental findings of utilizing cavity-based monitors for non-invasive beam-position measurements in a noisy electromagnetic laser-plasma environment are discussed.

  14. An ultracompact X-ray source based on a laser-plasma undulator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andriyash, I A; Lehe, R; Lifschitz, A; Thaury, C; Rax, J-M; Krushelnick, K; Malka, V

    2014-08-22

    The capability of plasmas to sustain ultrahigh electric fields has attracted considerable interest over the last decades and has given rise to laser-plasma engineering. Today, plasmas are commonly used for accelerating and collimating relativistic electrons, or to manipulate intense laser pulses. Here we propose an ultracompact plasma undulator that combines plasma technology and nanoengineering. When coupled with a laser-plasma accelerator, this undulator constitutes a millimetre-sized synchrotron radiation source of X-rays. The undulator consists of an array of nanowires, which are ionized by the laser pulse exiting from the accelerator. The strong charge-separation field, arising around the wires, efficiently wiggles the laser-accelerated electrons. We demonstrate that this system can produce bright, collimated and tunable beams of photons with 10-100 keV energies. This concept opens a path towards a new generation of compact synchrotron sources based on nanostructured plasmas.

  15. The development of laser-plasma interaction program LAP3D on thousands of processors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoyan Hu

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Modeling laser-plasma interaction (LPI processes in real-size experiments scale is recognized as a challenging task. For explorering the influence of various instabilities in LPI processes, a three-dimensional laser and plasma code (LAP3D has been developed, which includes filamentation, stimulated Brillouin backscattering (SBS, stimulated Raman backscattering (SRS, non-local heat transport and plasmas flow computation modules. In this program, a second-order upwind scheme is applied to solve the plasma equations which are represented by an Euler fluid model. Operator splitting method is used for solving the equations of the light wave propagation, where the Fast Fourier translation (FFT is applied to compute the diffraction operator and the coordinate translations is used to solve the acoustic wave equation. The coupled terms of the different physics processes are computed by the second-order interpolations algorithm. In order to simulate the LPI processes in massively parallel computers well, several parallel techniques are used, such as the coupled parallel algorithm of FFT and fluid numerical computation, the load balance algorithm, and the data transfer algorithm. Now the phenomena of filamentation, SBS and SRS have been studied in low-density plasma successfully with LAP3D. Scalability of the program is demonstrated with a parallel efficiency above 50% on about ten thousand of processors.

  16. Laser-Plasma Sources for Soft-X-Ray Projection Lithography

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    F. Bijkerk,; Shmaenok, L.; Vanhonk, A.; Bastiaensen, R.; Platonov, Y. Y.; Shevelko, A. P.; Mitrofanov, A. V.; Voss, F.; Desor, R.; Frowein, H.; Nikolaus, B.

    1994-01-01

    Results are reported concerning high-repetition-rate excimer lasers with average powers up to 415 W and their usage for generating laser-plasma soft X-ray sources. A conversion efficiency of laser light into monochromatized soft X-ray radiation of 0.7% at 13.5 nm (2% bandwidth) was achieved using an

  17. Laser-Plasma Sources for Soft-X-Ray Projection Lithography

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    F. Bijkerk,; Shmaenok, L.; Vanhonk, A.; Bastiaensen, R.; Platonov, Y. Y.; Shevelko, A. P.; Mitrofanov, A. V.; Voss, F.; Desor, R.; Frowein, H.; Nikolaus, B.

    1994-01-01

    Results are reported concerning high-repetition-rate excimer lasers with average powers up to 415 W and their usage for generating laser-plasma soft X-ray sources. A conversion efficiency of laser light into monochromatized soft X-ray radiation of 0.7% at 13.5 nm (2% bandwidth) was achieved using an

  18. Development of a gated optical multichannel analyser for laser-plasma spectroscopy

    OpenAIRE

    Corcoran, Richard

    1990-01-01

    An Optical Multichannel Analyser (OMA) has been developed for the detection of radiation from laser-produced plasmas (LPPs). The system is based on a gated image - intensified photodiode array (PDA) Software for the control of, and data acquisition from, the OMA system has been developed. A high resolution (10ns) delay generator was also designed and constructed to permit timeresolved. optical spectroscopy. The system has been tested and operated with a laser plasma source m...

  19. Similarity for ultra-relativistic laser plasmas and the optimal acceleration regime

    CERN Document Server

    Pukhov, A

    2005-01-01

    A similarity theory is developed for ultra-relativistic laser-plasmas. It is shown that the most fundamental S-similarity is valid for both under- and overdense plasmas. Optimal scalings for laser wake field electron acceleration are obtained heuristically. The strong message of the present work is that the bubble acceleration regime [see Pukhov, Meyer-ter-Vehn, Appl. Phys. B, 74, 355 (2002)] satisfies these optimal scalings.

  20. Wavefront-sensor-based electron density measurements for laser-plasma accelerators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Plateau, Guillaume; Matlis, Nicholas; Geddes, Cameron; Gonsalves, Anthony; Shiraishi, Satomi; Lin, Chen; van Mourik, Reinier; Leemans, Wim

    2010-02-20

    Characterization of the electron density in laser produced plasmas is presented using direct wavefront analysis of a probe laser beam. The performance of a laser-driven plasma-wakefield accelerator depends on the plasma wavelength, hence on the electron density. Density measurements using a conventional folded-wave interferometer and using a commercial wavefront sensor are compared for different regimes of the laser-plasma accelerator. It is shown that direct wavefront measurements agree with interferometric measurements and, because of the robustness of the compact commercial device, have greater phase sensitivity, straightforward analysis, improving shot-to-shot plasma-density diagnostics.

  1. Compact tunable Compton x-ray source from laser-plasma accelerator and plasma mirror

    CERN Document Server

    Tsai, Hai-En; Shaw, Joseph; Li, Zhengyan; Arefiev, Alexey V; Zhang, Xi; Zgadzaj, Rafal; Henderson, Watson; Khudik, V; Shvets, G; Downer, M C

    2014-01-01

    We present results of the first tunable Compton backscattering (CBS) x-ray source that is based on the easily aligned combination of a laser-plasma accelerator (LPA) and a plasma mirror (PM). The LPA is driven in the blowout regime by 30 TW, 30 fs laser pulses, and produces high-quality, tunable, quasi-monoenergetic electron beams. A thin plastic film near the gas jet exit efficiently retro-reflects the LPA driving pulse with relativistic intensity into oncoming electrons to produce $2\\times10^{7}$ CBS x-ray photons per shot with 10-20 mrad angular divergence and 50 % (FWHM) energy spread without detectable bremsstrahlung background. The x-ray central energy is tuned from 75 KeV to 200 KeV by tuning the LPA e-beam central energy. Particle-in-cell simulations of the LPA, the drive pulse/PM interaction and CBS agree well with measurements.

  2. Dynamics of electron bunches at the laser-plasma interaction in the bubble regime

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maslov, V. I.; Svystun, O. M.; Onishchenko, I. N.; Tkachenko, V. I.

    2016-09-01

    The multi-bunches self-injection, observed in laser-plasma accelerators in the bubble regime, affects the energy gain of electrons accelerated by laser wakefield. However, understanding of dynamics of the electron bunches formed at laser-plasma interaction may be challenging. We present here the results of fully relativistic electromagnetic particle-in-cell (PIC) simulation of laser wakefield acceleration driven by a short laser pulse in an underdense plasma. The trapping and acceleration of three witness electron bunches by the bubble-like structures were observed. It has been shown that with time the first two witness bunches turn into drivers and contribute to acceleration of the last witness bunch.

  3. Effect of the laser wavefront in a laser-plasma accelerator

    CERN Document Server

    Beaurepaire, B; Bocoum, M; Böhle, F; Jullien, A; Rousseau, J-P; Lefrou, T; Douillet, D; Iaquaniello, G; Lopez-Martens, R; Lifschitz, A; Faure, J

    2015-01-01

    A high repetition rate electron source was generated by tightly focusing kHz, few-mJ laser pulses into an underdense plasma. This high intensity laser-plasma interaction led to stable electron beams over several hours but with strikingly complex transverse distributions even for good quality laser focal spots. Analysis of the experimental data, along with results of PIC simulations demonstrate the role of the laser wavefront on the acceleration of electrons. Distortions of the laser wavefront cause spatial inhomogeneities in the out-of-focus laser distribution and consequently, the laser pulse drives an inhomogenous transverse wakefield whose focusing/defocusing properties affect the electron distribution. These findings explain the experimental results and suggest the possibility of controlling the electron spatial distribution in laser-plasma accelerators by tailoring the laser wavefront.

  4. Laser plasma acceleration of electrons with multi-PW laser beams in the frame of CILEX

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cros, B., E-mail: brigitte.cros@u-psud.fr [LPGP, CNRS and Université Paris Sud, Orsay (France); Paradkar, B.S. [LPGP, CNRS and Université Paris Sud, Orsay (France); Davoine, X. [CEA DAM DIF, Arpajon F-91297 (France); Chancé, A. [CEA IRFU-SACM, Gif-Sur-Yvette (France); Desforges, F.G. [LPGP, CNRS and Université Paris Sud, Orsay (France); Dobosz-Dufrénoy, S. [CEA DSM-IRAMIS-SPAM, Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Delerue, N. [LAL, CNRS and Universit Paris Sud, Orsay (France); Ju, J.; Audet, T.L.; Maynard, G. [LPGP, CNRS and Université Paris Sud, Orsay (France); Lobet, M.; Gremillet, L. [CEA DAM DIF, Arpajon F-91297 (France); Mora, P. [CPhT, CNRS and Ecole Polytechnique, Palaiseau (France); Schwindling, J.; Delferrière, O. [CEA IRFU-SACM, Gif-Sur-Yvette (France); Bruni, C.; Rimbault, C.; Vinatier, T. [LAL, CNRS and Universit Paris Sud, Orsay (France); Di Piazza, A. [Max-Planck-Institut für Kernphysik, Heidelberg (Germany); Grech, M. [LULI, Ecole Polytechnique, CNRS, CEA, UPMC, Palaiseau (France); and others

    2014-03-11

    Laser plasma acceleration of electrons has progressed along with advances in laser technology. It is thus expected that the development in the near-future of multi-PW-class laser and facilities will enable a vast range of scientific opportunities for laser plasma acceleration research. On one hand, high peak powers can be used to explore the extremely high intensity regime of laser wakefield acceleration, producing for example large amounts of electrons in the GeV range or generating high energy photons. On the other hand, the available laser energy can be used in the quasi-linear regime to create accelerating fields in large volumes of plasma and study controlled acceleration in a plasma stage of externally injected relativistic particles, either electrons or positrons. In the frame of the Centre Interdisciplinaire de la Lumière EXtrême (CILEX), the Apollon-10P laser will deliver two beams at the 1 PW and 10 PW levels, in ultra-short (>15fs) pulses, to a target area dedicated to electron acceleration studies, such as the exploration of the non-linear regimes predicted theoretically, or multi-stage laser plasma acceleration.

  5. Laser plasma acceleration of electrons with multi-PW laser beams in the frame of CILEX

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cros, B.; Paradkar, B. S.; Davoine, X.; Chancé, A.; Desforges, F. G.; Dobosz-Dufrénoy, S.; Delerue, N.; Ju, J.; Audet, T. L.; Maynard, G.; Lobet, M.; Gremillet, L.; Mora, P.; Schwindling, J.; Delferrière, O.; Bruni, C.; Rimbault, C.; Vinatier, T.; Di Piazza, A.; Grech, M.; Riconda, C.; Marquès, J. R.; Beck, A.; Specka, A.; Martin, Ph.; Monot, P.; Normand, D.; Mathieu, F.; Audebert, P.; Amiranoff, F.

    2014-03-01

    Laser plasma acceleration of electrons has progressed along with advances in laser technology. It is thus expected that the development in the near-future of multi-PW-class laser and facilities will enable a vast range of scientific opportunities for laser plasma acceleration research. On one hand, high peak powers can be used to explore the extremely high intensity regime of laser wakefield acceleration, producing for example large amounts of electrons in the GeV range or generating high energy photons. On the other hand, the available laser energy can be used in the quasi-linear regime to create accelerating fields in large volumes of plasma and study controlled acceleration in a plasma stage of externally injected relativistic particles, either electrons or positrons. In the frame of the Centre Interdisciplinaire de la Lumière EXtrême (CILEX), the Apollon-10P laser will deliver two beams at the 1 PW and 10 PW levels, in ultra-short (> 15 fs) pulses, to a target area dedicated to electron acceleration studies, such as the exploration of the non-linear regimes predicted theoretically, or multi-stage laser plasma acceleration.

  6. Hybrid Simulation of Laser-Plasma Interactions and Fast Electron Transport in Inhomogeneous Plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cohen, B I; Kemp, A; Divol, L

    2009-05-27

    A new framework is introduced for kinetic simulation of laser-plasma interactions in an inhomogenous plasma motivated by the goal of performing integrated kinetic simulations of fast-ignition laser fusion. The algorithm addresses the propagation and absorption of an intense electromagnetic wave in an ionized plasma leading to the generation and transport of an energetic electron component. The energetic electrons propagate farther into the plasma to much higher densities where Coulomb collisions become important. The high-density plasma supports an energetic electron current, return currents, self-consistent electric fields associated with maintaining quasi-neutrality, and self-consistent magnetic fields due to the currents. Collisions of the electrons and ions are calculated accurately to track the energetic electrons and model their interactions with the background plasma. Up to a density well above critical density, where the laser electromagnetic field is evanescent, Maxwell's equations are solved with a conventional particle-based, finite-difference scheme. In the higher-density plasma, Maxwell's equations are solved using an Ohm's law neglecting the inertia of the background electrons with the option of omitting the displacement current in Ampere's law. Particle equations of motion with binary collisions are solved for all electrons and ions throughout the system using weighted particles to resolve the density gradient efficiently. The algorithm is analyzed and demonstrated in simulation examples. The simulation scheme introduced here achieves significantly improved efficiencies.

  7. Applying Boundary Conditions Using a Time-Dependent Lagrangian for Modeling Laser-Plasma Interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reyes, Jonathan; Shadwick, B. A.

    2016-10-01

    Modeling the evolution of a short, intense laser pulse propagating through an underdense plasma is of particular interest in the physics of laser-plasma interactions. Numerical models are typically created by first discretizing the equations of motion and then imposing boundary conditions. Using the variational principle of Chen and Sudan, we spatially discretize the Lagrangian density to obtain discrete equations of motion and a discrete energy conservation law which is exactly satisfied regardless of the spatial grid resolution. Modifying the derived equations of motion (e.g., enforcing boundary conditions) generally ruins energy conservation. However, time-dependent terms can be added to the Lagrangian which force the equations of motion to have the desired boundary conditions. Although some foresight is needed to choose these time-dependent terms, this approach provides a mechanism for energy to exit the closed system while allowing the conservation law to account for the loss. An appropriate time discretization scheme is selected based on stability analysis and resolution requirements. We present results using this variational approach in a co-moving coordinate system and compare such results to those using traditional second-order methods. This work was supported by the U. S. Department of Energy under Contract No. DE-SC0008382 and by the National Science Foundation under Contract No. PHY- 1104683.

  8. Characteristic Features of the Formation of a Combined Magnetron-Laser Plasma in the Processes of Deposition of Film Coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burmakov, A. P.; Kuleshov, V. N.; Prokopchik, K. Yu.

    2016-09-01

    A block diagram of a facility for combined magnetron-laser deposition of coatings and of the systems of controlling and managing this process is considered. The results of analysis of the influence of the gas medium and of laser radiation parameters on the emission-optical properties of laser plasma are considered. The influence of the laser plasma on the electric characteristics of a magnetron discharge is analyzed. The formation of the laser plasma-initiated pulse arc discharge has been established and the influence of the laser radiation parameters on the electric characteristics of this discharge has been determined. The emission optical spectra of the magnetron discharge plasma and of erosion laser plasma are compared separately and in combination.

  9. Studies on the mechanisms of powerful terahertz radiations from laser plasmas

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Weimin Wang; Zhengming Sheng; Yutong Li; Liming Chen; Quanli Dong; Xin Lu; Jinglong Ma; Jie Zhang

    2011-01-01

    A survey on the mechanisms of powerful terahertz (THz) radiation from laser plasmas is presented. Firstly, an analytical model is described, showing that a transverse net current formed in a plasma can be converted into THz radiations at the plasma oscillation frequency. This theory is applied to explain THz generation in a gas driven by two-color laser pulses. It is also applied to THz generation in a tenuous plasma driven by a chirped laser pulse, a few-cycle laser pulse, a DC/AC bias electric field. These are well verified by particle-in-cell simulations, demonstrating that THz radiations produced in these approaches are nearly single-cycles and linear polarized. In the chirped laser scheme and the few-cycle laser scheme, THz radiations with the peak field strength of tens of MV/cm and the peak power of gigawatt can be achieved with the incident laser intensity less than 1017 W/cm2.%1.IntroductionTerahertz (THz) waves with the field strength up to MV/cm or beyond are demanded for broad applications,such as nonlinear THz spectroscopy,THz nonlinear physics in condensed matters and semiconductors,nonperturbative THz electro-optics,etc.[1,2].Such THz waves are usually obtained from accelerator-based sources,which are still limited by the bandwidth,waveform,and the availability to most users.Therefore,table-top powerful THz sources[3-9] based on laserplasma interactions or laser-gas interactions have been attracting significant attention recently.For example,strong THz radiations can be prodeced from the laser wakefield in inhomogeneous plasmas by linear mode conversion[4] or from the transition radiation at plasmavacuum boundaries using ultrashort electron bunches produced from laser wakefield acceleration[8].

  10. Parametric study of transport beam lines for electron beams accelerated by laser-plasma interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scisciò, M.; Lancia, L.; Migliorati, M.; Mostacci, A.; Palumbo, L.; Papaphilippou, Y.; Antici, P.

    2016-03-01

    In the last decade, laser-plasma acceleration of high-energy electrons has attracted strong attention in different fields. Electrons with maximum energies in the GeV range can be laser-accelerated within a few cm using multi-hundreds terawatt (TW) lasers, yielding to very high beam currents at the source (electron bunches with up to tens-hundreds of pC in a few fs). While initially the challenge was to increase the maximum achievable electron energy, today strong effort is put in the control and usability of these laser-generated beams that still lack of some features in order to be used for applications where currently conventional, radio-frequency (RF) based, electron beam lines represent the most common and efficient solution. Several improvements have been suggested for this purpose, some of them acting directly on the plasma source, some using beam shaping tools located downstream. Concerning the latter, several studies have suggested the use of conventional accelerator magnetic devices (such as quadrupoles and solenoids) as an easy implementable solution when the laser-plasma accelerated beam requires optimization. In this paper, we report on a parametric study related to the transport of electron beams accelerated by laser-plasma interaction, using conventional accelerator elements and tools. We focus on both, high energy electron beams in the GeV range, as produced on petawatt (PW) class laser systems, and on lower energy electron beams in the hundreds of MeV range, as nowadays routinely obtained on commercially available multi-hundred TW laser systems. For both scenarios, our study allows understanding what are the crucial parameters that enable laser-plasma accelerators to compete with conventional ones and allow for a beam transport. We show that suitable working points require a tradeoff-combination between low beam divergence and narrow energy spread.

  11. Parametric study of transport beam lines for electron beams accelerated by laser-plasma interaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scisciò, M.; Antici, P., E-mail: patrizio.antici@polytechnique.edu [INFN-RM1 and SBAI, Università di Roma “La Sapienza,” Via Scarpa 16, 00161 Roma (Italy); INRS-EMT, Université du Québec, 1650 Lionel Boulet, Varennes, Québec J3X 1S2 (Canada); Lancia, L.; Migliorati, M.; Mostacci, A.; Palumbo, L. [INFN-RM1 and SBAI, Università di Roma “La Sapienza,” Via Scarpa 16, 00161 Roma (Italy); Papaphilippou, Y. [CERN, CH 1211 Geneva 23 (Switzerland)

    2016-03-07

    In the last decade, laser-plasma acceleration of high-energy electrons has attracted strong attention in different fields. Electrons with maximum energies in the GeV range can be laser-accelerated within a few cm using multi-hundreds terawatt (TW) lasers, yielding to very high beam currents at the source (electron bunches with up to tens-hundreds of pC in a few fs). While initially the challenge was to increase the maximum achievable electron energy, today strong effort is put in the control and usability of these laser-generated beams that still lack of some features in order to be used for applications where currently conventional, radio-frequency (RF) based, electron beam lines represent the most common and efficient solution. Several improvements have been suggested for this purpose, some of them acting directly on the plasma source, some using beam shaping tools located downstream. Concerning the latter, several studies have suggested the use of conventional accelerator magnetic devices (such as quadrupoles and solenoids) as an easy implementable solution when the laser-plasma accelerated beam requires optimization. In this paper, we report on a parametric study related to the transport of electron beams accelerated by laser-plasma interaction, using conventional accelerator elements and tools. We focus on both, high energy electron beams in the GeV range, as produced on petawatt (PW) class laser systems, and on lower energy electron beams in the hundreds of MeV range, as nowadays routinely obtained on commercially available multi-hundred TW laser systems. For both scenarios, our study allows understanding what are the crucial parameters that enable laser-plasma accelerators to compete with conventional ones and allow for a beam transport. We show that suitable working points require a tradeoff-combination between low beam divergence and narrow energy spread.

  12. Broadband Single-Shot Electron Spectrometer for GeV-Class Laser Plasma Based Accelerators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakamura, K.; Wan, W.; Ybarrolaza, N.; Syversrud, D.; Wallig, J.; Leemans, W.P.

    2008-05-01

    Laser-plasma-based accelerators can provide electrons over a broad energy range and/or with large momentum spread. The electron beam energy distribution can be controlled via accurate control of laser and plasma properties, and beams with energies ranging from'0.5 to 1000 MeV have been observed. Measuring these energy distributions in a single shot requires the use of a diagnostic with large momentum acceptance and, ideally, sufficient resolution to accurately measure energy spread in the case of narrow energy spread. Such a broadband single-shot electron magnetic spectrometer for GeV-class laser-plasma-based accelerators has been developed at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. A detailed description of the hardware and the design concept is presented, as well as a performance evaluation of the spectrometer. The spectrometer covered electron beam energies raging from 0.01 to 1.1 GeV in a single shot, and enabled the simultaneous measurement of the laser properties at the exit of the accelerator through the use of a sufficiently large pole gap. Based on measured field maps and 3rd-order transport analysis, a few percent-level resolution and determination of the absolute energy were achieved over the entire energy range. Laser-plasma-based accelerator experiments demonstrated the capability of the spectrometer as a diagnostic and its suitability for such a broadband electron source.

  13. Exploring novel structures for manipulating relativistic laser-plasma interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Liangliang

    2016-10-01

    The prospect of realizing compact particle accelerators and x-ray sources based on high power lasers has gained numerous attention. Utilization of all the proposed schemes in the field requires the laser-matter-interaction process to be repeatable or moreover, controllable. This has been very challenging at ultra-high light intensities due to the pre-pulse issue and the limitation on target manufacturing. With recent development on pulse cleaning technique, such as XPW and the use of plasma mirror, we now propose a novel approach that leverages recent advancements in 3D nano-printing of materials and high contrast lasers to manipulate the laser-matter interactions on the micro-scales. The current 3D direct laser-writing (DLW) technique can produce repeatable structures with at a resolution as high as 100 nm. Based on 3D PIC simulations, we explored two typical structures, the micro-cylinder and micro-tube targets. The former serves to enhance and control laser-electron acceleration and the latter is dedicated to manipulate relativistic light intensity. First principle-of-proof experiments were carried out in the SCARLET laser facility and confirmed some of our predictions on enhancing direct laser acceleration of electrons and ion acceleration. We believe that the use of the micro-structured elements provides another degree of freedom in LPI and these new results will open new paths towards micro-engineering interaction process that will benefit high field science, laser-based proton therapy, near-QED physics, and relativistic nonlinear optics. This work is supported by the AFOSR Basic Research Initiative (FA9550-14-1-0085).

  14. Transition of the BELLA PW laser system towards a collaborative research facility in laser plasma science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toth, Csaba; Evans, Dave; Gonsalves, Anthony J.; Kirkpatrick, Mark; Magana, Art; Mannino, Greg; Mao, Hann-Shin; Nakamura, Kei; Riley, Joe R.; Steinke, Sven; Sipla, Tyler; Syversrud, Don; Ybarrolaza, Nathan; Leemans, Wim P.

    2017-03-01

    The advancement of Laser-Plasma Accelerators (LPA) requires systematic studies with ever increasing precision and reproducibility. A key component of such a research endeavor is a facility that provides reliable, well characterized laser sources, flexible target systems, and comprehensive diagnostics of the laser pulses, the interaction region, and the produced electron beams. The Berkeley Lab Laser Accelerator (BELLA), a PW laser facility, now routinely provides high quality focused laser pulses for high precision experiments. A description of the commissioning process, the layout of the laser systems, the major components of the laser and radiation protection systems, and a summary of early results are given. Further scientific plans and highlights of operational experience that serve as the basis for transition to a collaborative research facility in high-peak power laser-plasma interaction research are reviewed.

  15. Effect of solenoidal magnetic field on drifting laser plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Kazumasa; Okamura, Masahiro; Sekine, Megumi; Cushing, Eric; Jandovitz, Peter

    2013-04-01

    An ion source for accelerators requires to provide a stable waveform with a certain pulse length appropriate to the application. The pulse length of laser ion source is easy to control because it is expected to be proportional to plasma drifting distance. However, current density decay is proportional to the cube of the drifting distance, so large current loss will occur under unconfined drift. We investigated the stability and current decay of a Nd:YAG laser generated copper plasma confined by a solenoidal field using a Faraday cup to measure the current waveform. It was found that the plasma was unstable at certain magnetic field strengths, so a baffle was introduced to limit the plasma diameter at injection and improve the stability. Magnetic field, solenoid length, and plasma diameter were varied in order to find the conditions that minimize current decay and maximize stability.

  16. PIC simulations of the production of high-quality electron beams via laser-plasma interaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benedetti, C. [Department of Physics, University of Bologna and INFN/Bologna, Via Irnerio 46, 40126 Bologna (Italy)], E-mail: carlo.benedetti@bo.infn.it; Londrillo, P. [INAF, Osservatorio Astronomico di Bologna, Via Ranzani 1, 40127 Bologna (Italy); Petrillo, V.; Serafini, L. [INFN/Milano, Via Celoria 14, 10133 Milano (Italy); Sgattoni, A. [Department of Physics, University of Bologna and INFN/Bologna, Via Irnerio 46, 40126 Bologna (Italy); Tomassini, P. [INFN/Milano, Via Celoria 14, 10133 Milano (Italy); Turchetti, G. [Department of Physics, University of Bologna and INFN/Bologna, Via Irnerio 46, 40126 Bologna (Italy)

    2009-09-01

    We present some numerical studies and parameter scans performed with the electromagnetic, relativistic, fully self-consistent Particle-In-Cell (PIC) code ALaDyn (Acceleration by LAser and DYNamics of charged particles), concerning the generation of a low emittance, high charge and low momentum spread electron bunch from laser-plasma interaction in the Laser WakeField Acceleration (LWFA) regime, in view of achieving beam brightness of interest for FEL applications.

  17. Spectrograph complex for laser plasma X-ray radiation research in ISKRA-4, ISKRA-5 experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bessarab, A.V.; Bel`kov, S.A.; Zhidkov, N.V.; Tokarev, V.A. [VNIIEF Russian Federal Nuclear Center, Novgorod (Russian Federation)

    1994-12-31

    A spectrograph complex, developed for the ISKRA-4 and ISKRA-5 facilities, is described. The complex was developed to study continuous and line spectra in the 0.06-3 keV range. It comprises diffraction-grating, multilayer-mirror, and grazing-incidence crystal spectrographs. Recorded laser plasma X-ray spectra are compared with the ones predicted by the gas-dynamical theory. 9 refs., 2 figs.

  18. Afterglow-reabsorbed H/sub alpha/ line delay effect in an expanding laser plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Derzhiev, V.I.; Zhidkov, A.G.; Maiorov, S.A.; Yakovlenko, S.I.

    1987-11-28

    The absorption of H/sub ..cap alpha../ line radiation is shown to lead to delay and even to non-monotonic afterglowing if observed along the 'line' of the expanding laser plasma. This makes it possible to explain the emission character of the H/sub ..cap alpha../ line of the O VIII ion (lambda = 10.2 nm) in experiments with 'Novette' set-ups.

  19. Intense Cherenkov-type terahertz electromagnetic radiation from ultrafast laser-plasma interaction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hu Qiang-Lin; Liu Shi-Bing; Li Wei

    2008-01-01

    A Cherenkov-type terahertz electromagnetic radiation is revealed, which results efficiently from the collective effects in the time-domain of ultrafast pulsed electron current produced by ultrafast intense laser-plasma interaction.The emitted pulse waveform and spectrum, and the dependence of laser pulse parameters on the structure of the radiation field are investigated numerically. The condition of THz radiation generation in this regime and Cherenkov geometry of the radiation field are studied analytically.

  20. [Experimental investigation of laser plasma soft X-ray source with gas target].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ni, Qi-liang; Gong, Yan; Lin, Jing-quan; Chen, Bo; Cao, Jian-lin

    2003-02-01

    This paper describes a debris-free laser plasma soft X-ray source with a gas target, which has high operating frequency and can produce strong soft X-ray radiation. The valve of this light source is drived by a piezoelectrical ceramic whose operating frequency is up to 400 Hz. In comparison with laser plasma soft X-ray sources using metal target, the light source is debris-free. And it has higher operating frequency than gas target soft X-ray sources whose nozzle is controlled by a solenoid valve. A channel electron multiplier (CEM) operating in analog mode is used to detect the soft X-ray generated by the laser plasma source, and the CEM's output is fed to to a charge-sensitive preamplifier for further amplification purpose. Output charges from the CEM are proportional to the amplitude of the preamplifier's output voltage. Spectra of CO2, Xe and Kr at 8-14 nm wavelength which can be used for soft X-ray projection lithography are measured. The spectrum for CO2 consists of separate spectral lines originate mainly from the transitions in Li-like and Be-like ions. The Xe spectrum originating mainly from 4d-5f, 4d-4f, 4d-6p and 4d-5p transitions in multiply charged xenon ions. The spectrum for Kr consists of separate spectral lines and continuous broad spectra originating mainly from the transitions in Cu-, Ni-, Co- and Fe-like ions.

  1. Large amplitude electromagnetic solitons in intense laser plasma interaction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li Bai-Wen; Ishiguro S; Skoric M M

    2006-01-01

    This paper shows that the standing, backward- and forward-accelerated large amplitude relativistic electromagnetic solitons induced by intense laser pulse in long underdense collisionless homogeneous plasmas can be observed by particle simulations. In addition to the inhomogeneity of the plasma density, the acceleration of the solitons also depends upon not only the laser amplitude but also the plasma length. The electromagnetic frequency of the solitons is between about half and one of the unperturbed electron plasma frequency. The electrostatic field inside the soliton has a one-cycle structure in space, while the transverse electric and magnetic fields have half-cycle and one-cycle structure respectively.Analytical estimates for the existence of the solitons and their electromagnetic frequencies qualitatively coincide with our simulation results.

  2. Picosecond resolution soft x-ray laser plasma interferometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moon, S; Nilsen, J; Ng, A; Shlyaptsev, V; Dunn, J; Hunter, J; Keenan, R; Marconi, M; Filevich, J; Rocca, J; Smith, R

    2003-12-01

    We describe a soft x-ray laser interferometry technique that allows two-dimensional diagnosis of plasma electron density with picosecond time resolution. It consists of the combination of a robust high throughput amplitude division interferometer and a 14.7 nm transient inversion soft x-ray laser that produces {approx} 5 ps pulses. Due to its picosecond resolution and short wavelength scalability, this technique has potential for extending the high inherent precision of soft x-ray laser interferometry to the study of very dense plasmas of significant fundamental and practical interest, such as those investigated for inertial confined fusion. Results of its use in the diagnostics of dense large scale laser-created plasmas are presented.

  3. Filamentation instability in two counter-streaming laser plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Hui; Dong, Quan-Li; Yuan, Da-Wei; Liu, Xun; Hua, Neng; Qiao, Zhan-Feng; Zhu, Bao-Qiang; Zhu, Jian-Qiang; Jiang, Bo-Bin; Du, Kai; Tang, Yong-Jian; Zhao, Gang; Yuan, Xiao-Hui; Sheng, Zheng-Ming; Zhang, Jie

    2016-12-01

    The filamentation instability was observed in the interaction of two counter-streaming laser ablated plasma flows, which were supersonic, collisionless, and also closely relevant to astrophysical conditions. The plasma flows were created by irradiating a pair of oppositely standing plastic (CH) foils with 1ns-pulsed laser beams of total energy of 1.7 kJ in two laser spots. With characteristics diagnosed in experiments, the calculated features of Weibel-type filaments are in good agreement with measurements. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 11074297, 11674146, and 11220101002) and the National Basic Research Program of China (Grant No. 2013CBA01500.

  4. Holographic Imaging of Evolving Laser-Plasma Structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Downer, Michael [Univ. of Texas, Austin, TX (United States); Shvets, G. [Univ. of Texas, Austin, TX (United States)

    2014-07-31

    (3) Multi-Object-Plane Phase-Contrast Imaging (MOP-PCI). In MOP-PCI, we image FDT-like probes to the detector from multiple “object planes” --- like recording an event simultaneously with several cameras, some focused on nearby, others on distant, objects. To increase sensitivity, we exploit a phase-contrast imaging technique developed by Dutch Nobel laureate Fritz Zernike in the 1930s. Using MOP-PCI we recorded single-shot movies of laser pulse tracks through more than 10 cm of air. We plan to record images of meter-long tracks of electron bunches propagating through plasma in an experiment at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC). This will help SLAC scientists understand, optimize and scale small plasma-based particle accelerators that have applications in medicine, industry, materials science and high-energy physics.

  5. Temporary spectral analysis of a laser plasma of mineral coal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rebolledo, P.; Pacheco, P.; Sarmiento, R.; Cabanzo, R.; Mejía-Ospino, E.

    2013-11-01

    In this work we present results of the temporal spectral study of a plasma laser of mineral coal using the Laser-induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS) technique. The plasma was generated by focusing a laser beam of Nd:YAG laser emitting at 532 nm with energy per pulse of 35 mJ on coal target pellets. The plasma radiation was conducted by an optical fiber to the entrance slit of a spectrograph of 0.5 m, equipped with a 1200 and 2400 grooves/mm diffraction grating and an ICCD camera for registration with different delay times of the spectra in the spectral range from 250 nm to 900 nm. The temporal spectral analysis allowed the identification of the elements Al, Fe, Ca, Mg, K, and Si, and CN and C2 molecules present in natural coals. The characteristics of the spectral lines and bands were studied at different delay times obtaining the calculation of the evolution of electron temperature, electron density, and vibrational temperature of plasmas in the time. The delay times used were between 0.5 μs and 5 μs, calculating the electron temperature ranged between 5 000 K and 1 000 K.

  6. On very short and intense laser-plasma interactions

    CERN Document Server

    Fiore, Gaetano

    2016-01-01

    We briefly report on some results regarding the impact of very short and intense laser pulses on a cold, low-density plasma initially at rest, and the consequent acceleration of plasma electrons to relativistic energies. Locally and for short times the pulse can be described by a transverse plane electromagnetic travelling-wave and the motion of the electrons by a purely Magneto-Fluido-Dynamical (MFD) model with a very simple dependence on the transverse electromagnetic potential, while the ions can be regarded as at rest; the Lorentz-Maxwell and continuity equations are reduced to the Hamilton equations of a Hamiltonian system with 1 degree of freedom, in the case of a plasma with constant initial density, or a collection of such systems otherwise. We can thus describe both the well-known "wakefield" behind the pulse and the recently predicted "slingshot effect", i.e. the backward expulsion of high energy electrons just after the laser pulse has hit the surface of the plasma.

  7. Laser-plasma interactions in large gas-filled hohlraums

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Turner, R.E.; Powers, L.V.; Berger, R.L. [and others

    1996-06-01

    Indirect-drive targets planned for the National Ignition Facility (NIF) laser consist of spherical fuel capsules enclosed in cylindrical Au hohlraums. Laser beams, arranged in cylindrical rings, heat the inside of the Au wall to produce x rays that in turn heat and implode the capsule to produce fusion conditions in the fuel. Detailed calculations show that adequate implosion symmetry can be maintained by filling the hohlraum interior with low-density, low-Z gases. The plasma produced from the heated gas provides sufficient pressure to keep the radiating Au surface from expanding excessively. As the laser heats this gas, the gas becomes a relatively uniform plasma with small gradients in velocity and density. Such long-scale-length plasmas can be ideal mediums for stimulated Brillouin Scattering (SBS). SBS can reflect a large fraction of the incident laser light before it is absorbed by the hohlraum; therefore, it is undesirable in an inertial confinement fusion target. To examine the importance of SBS in NIF targets, the authors used Nova to measure SBS from hohlraums with plasma conditions similar to those predicted for high-gain NIF targets. The plasmas differ from the more familiar exploding foil or solid targets as follows: they are hot (3 keV); they have high electron densities (n{sub e}=10{sup 21}cm{sup {minus}3}); and they are nearly stationary, confined within an Au cylinder, and uniform over large distances (>2 mm). These hohlraums have <3% peak SBS backscatter for an interaction beam with intensities of 1-4 x 10{sup 15} W/cm{sup 2}, a laser wavelength of 0.351{micro}m, f/4 or f/8 focusing optics, and a variety of beam smoothing implementations. Based on these conditions the authors conclude that SBS does not appear to be a problem for NIF targets.

  8. Study of the laser-plasma acceleration of ion beams with enhanced quality: The effects of nanostructured targets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fazeli, Reza

    2017-06-01

    Production of high-quality ion beams by intense laser-plasma interactions represents a rapidly evolving field of interest. In this paper, a nanostructured target is proposed to generate laser-driven quasi-monoenergetic ion beams with considerably reduced energy spread and enhanced peak energy. Linearly polarized, 40-fs laser pulses of intensity 8.5 × 1020 W cm-2 were considered to irradiate simple carbon foil and nanostructured targets. The proposed target consists of a thin layer of relatively high-Z atom (Ti) with a depression on its back surface which is filled by a nanosize disc of a low-Z atom (C). Reliable and reproducible results of multi-parametric Particle-in-Cell simulations show that by using a composed nanostructured target with optimum physical properties, a quasi-monoenergetic ion beam can be generated with a narrow band energy spectrum peaking at energies higher than 20 MeV. In addition, the forward-accelerated beam of low-Z carbon ions exhibits a considerably reduced transverse emittance in comparison with the ion beam obtained in the condition of a simple foil. The proposed nanostructured target can efficiently contribute to the generation of high-quality ion beams which are critical in newly growing applications and physics of laser-plasma accelerators.

  9. Photon Acceleration of Laser-plasma Based on Compton Scattering

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HAO Dong-shan; XIE Hong-jun

    2006-01-01

    The one-dimensional electron density disturbance is studied by using the inelastic collision model of the relativity electron and photon group, the relativity theory, the momentum equation and the continuity equation, which is generated by a driving laser pulse and scattered laser pulse propagating through a tenuous plasma, and the electron density disturbance is closely associated with the incident laser and scattering laser. The electron plasma wave(EPW)is formed by the propagation of the electron density disturbance. Owing to the action of EPW, the increasing of the frequency of the photons in the incident laser pulses that there is a distance with the driving laser pulses is studied by using optical metric. The results show that it is possible that the photon will gain higher energy from the EPW when photon number is decreased and one-photon Compton scattering enters, the photon will be accelerated.

  10. Neutron Generation and Kinetic Energy of Expanding Laser Plasmas

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HUANG Yong-Sheng; WANG Nai-Yan; DUAN Xiao-Jiao; LAN Xiao-Fei; TAN Zhi-Xin; TANG Xiu-Zhang; HE Ye-Xi

    2007-01-01

    We investigate the kinetic energy of expanding plasma of a solid target heated by a ultra-short and ultra-intense laser pulse and the efficiency of energy coupling between the ultra-intense laser pulse and the solid target, in order to increase the utilization ratio of laser energy and to raise the neutron generation farther. Some new ideas about improving the energy utilization by head-on collisions between the expanding plasmas are proposed. The significance is the raise of generation of shorter duration neutron, of the order of picoseconds, which allows for an increase of energy resolution in time-of-flight experiments and also for the investigation of the dynamics of nuclear processes with high temporal resolution.

  11. Laser-plasma interactions in NIF-scale plasmas (HLP5 and HLP6)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    MacGowan, B.; Berger, R.; Fernandez, J. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)

    1996-06-01

    The understanding of laser-plasma interactions in ignition-scale inertial confinement fusion (ICF) hohlraum targets is important for the success of the proposed National Ignition Facility (NIF). The success of an indirect-drive ICF ignition experiment depends on the ability to predict and control the history and spatial distribution of the x-radiation produced by the laser beams that are absorbed by the inside of the hohlraum wall. Only by controlling the symmetry of this x-ray drive is it possible to obtain the implosion symmetry in the fusion pellet necessary for ignition. The larger hohlraums and longer time scales required for ignition-scale targets result in the presence of several millimeters of plasma (electron density n{sub e} {approximately} 0.1 n{sub c} {approximately} 10{sup 21} cm{sup {minus}3}), through which the 3{omega} (351-nm) laser beams must propagate before they are absorbed at the hohlraum wall. Hydrodynamic simulations show this plasma to be very uniform [density-gradient scalelength L{sub n} = n{sub e}(dn{sub e}/dx){sup {minus}1}{approximately} 2mm] and to exhibit low velocity gradients [velocity-gradient scale-length L{sub v} = c{sub s}(dv/dx){sup {minus}1} > 6 mm].

  12. Laser plasma jet driven microparticles for DNA/drug delivery.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viren Menezes

    Full Text Available This paper describes a microparticle delivery device that generates a plasma jet through laser ablation of a thin metal foil and uses the jet to accomplish particle delivery into soft living targets for transferring biological agents. Pure gold microparticles of 1 µm size were coated with a plasmid DNA, pIG121Hm, and were deposited as a thin layer on one surface of an aluminum foil. The laser (Nd:YAG, 1064 nm wavelength ablation of the foil generated a plasma jet that carried the DNA coated particles into the living onion cells. The particles could effectively penetrate the target cells and disseminate the DNA, effecting the transfection of the cells. Generation of the plasma jet on laser ablation of the foil and its role as a carrier of microparticles was visualized using a high-speed video camera, Shimadzu HPV-1, at a frame rate of 500 kfps (2 µs interframe interval in a shadowgraph optical set-up. The particle speed could be measured from the visualized images, which was about 770 m/s initially, increased to a magnitude of 1320 m/s, and after a quasi-steady state over a distance of 10 mm with an average magnitude of 1100 m/s, started declining, which typically is the trend of a high-speed, pulsed, compressible jet. Aluminum launch pad (for the particles was used in the present study to make the procedure cost-effective, whereas the guided, biocompatible launch pads made of gold, silver or titanium can be used in the device during the actual clinical operations. The particle delivery device has a potential to have a miniature form and can be an effective, hand-held drug/DNA delivery device for biological applications.

  13. Numerical simulation of filamentation in laser-plasma interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nicholas, D.J.; Sajjadi, S.G.

    1986-05-14

    Numerical studies of beam filamentation in laser-produced plasma are presented. This involves the numerical solution of the parabolic wave equation, known as the Schroedinger equation, coupled with the thermal transport equations for both ions and electrons, in two dimensions. The solution of the resulting equation with non-linear refractive index due to thermal and pondermotive forces, shows self-focusing and a variety of strong aberration effects. Intensity amplification at the final focus is found to be between one and two orders of magnitude greater than the initial beam intensity, governed in general by diffraction and aberration effects within the beam.

  14. Explosion of relativistic electron vortices in laser plasmas

    CERN Document Server

    Lezhnin, K V; Esirkepov, T Zh; Bulanov, S V; Gu, Y; Weber, S; Korn, G

    2016-01-01

    The interaction of high intensity laser radiation with underdense plasma may lead to the formation of electron vortices. Though being quasistationary on an electron timescales, these structures tend to expand on a proton timescale due to Coloumb repulsion of ions. Using a simple analytical model of a stationary vortex as initial condition, 2D PIC simulations are performed. A number of effects are observed such as vortex boundary field intensification, multistream instabilities at the vortex boundary, and bending of the vortex boundary with the subsequent transformation into smaller electron vortices.

  15. Mitigating the hosing instability in relativistic laser-plasma interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ceurvorst, L.; Ratan, N.; Levy, M. C.; Kasim, M. F.; Sadler, J.; Scott, R. H. H.; Trines, R. M. G. M.; Huang, T. W.; Skramic, M.; Vranic, M.; Silva, L. O.; Norreys, P. A.

    2016-05-01

    A new physical model of the hosing instability that includes relativistic laser pulses and moderate densities is presented and derives the density dependence of the hosing equation. This is tested against two-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations. These simulations further examine the feasibility of using multiple pulses to mitigate the hosing instability in a Nd:glass-type parameter space. An examination of the effects of planar versus cylindrical exponential density gradients on the hosing instability is also presented. The results show that strongly relativistic pulses and more planar geometries are capable of mitigating the hosing instability which is in line with the predictions of the physical model.

  16. Advanced Multifluid and Collisional-Radiative Models for Laser-Plasma Interaction (Briefing Charts)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-12-01

    direct control of computational cost in particle methods • Future Work: Test merge in non - Maxwellian laser plasma test case Control Merge & Split...shocks Current focus: Develop advanced multiscale  algorithms for plasma M&S  in highly  non ‐equilibrium  condition and with  collisional‐radiative kinetics...Radiative (CR) model • Non -equilibrium modeling of the atomic state distribution function (ASDF) – Detailed state-to-state model of atomic

  17. Dense monoenergetic proton beams from chirped laser-plasma interaction

    CERN Document Server

    Galow, Benjamin J; Liseykina, Tatyana V; Harman, Zoltan; Keitel, Christoph H

    2011-01-01

    Interaction of a frequency-chirped laser pulse with single protons and a hydrogen plasma cell is studied analytically and by means of particle-in-cell simulations, respectively. Feasibility of generating ultra-intense (10^7 particles per bunch) and phase-space collimated beams of protons (energy spread of about 1 %) is demonstrated. Phase synchronization of the protons and the laser field, guaranteed by the appropriate chirping of the laser pulse, allows the particles to gain sufficient kinetic energy (around 250 MeV) required for such applications as hadron cancer therapy, from state-of-the-art laser systems of intensities of the order of 10^21 W/cm^2.

  18. Modeling ultrafast shadowgraphy in laser-plasma interaction experiments

    CERN Document Server

    Siminos, E; Sävert, A; Cole, J M; Mangles, S P D; Kaluza, M C

    2015-01-01

    Ultrafast shadowgraphy is a new experimental technique that uses few cycle laser pulses to image density gradients in a rapidly evolving plasma. It enables structures that move at speeds close to the speed of light, such as laser driven wakes, to be visualized. Here we study the process of shadowgraphic image formation during the propagation of a few cycle probe pulse transversely through a laser-driven wake using three-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations. In order to construct synthetic shadowgrams a near-field snapshot of the ultrashort probe pulse is analyzed by means of Fourier optics, taking into account the effect of a typical imaging setup. By comparing synthetic and experimental shadowgrams we show that the generation of synthetic data is crucial for the correct interpretation of experiments. Moreover, we study the dependence of synthetic shadowgrams on various parameters such as the imaging system aperture, the position of the object plane and the probe pulse delay, duration and wavelength. Fina...

  19. Effect of an energy reservoir on the atmospheric propagation of laser-plasma filaments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eisenmann, Shmuel; Peñano, Joseph; Sprangle, Phillip; Zigler, Arie

    2008-04-18

    The ability to select and stabilize a single filament during propagation of an ultrashort, high-intensity laser pulse in air makes it possible to examine the longitudinal structure of the plasma channel left in its wake. We present the first detailed measurements and numerical 3-D simulations of the longitudinal plasma density variation in a laser-plasma filament after it passes through an iris that blocks the surrounding energy reservoir. Since no compensation is available from the surrounding background energy, filament propagation is terminated after a few centimeters. For this experiment, simulations indicate that filament propagation is terminated by plasma defocusing and ionization loss, which reduces the pulse power below the effective self-focusing power. With no blockage, a plasma filament length of over a few meters was observed.

  20. Compact ring-based X-ray source with on-orbit and on-energy laser-plasma injection

    CERN Document Server

    Turner, Marlene; Edelen, Auralee; Gerity, James; Lajoie, Andrew; Lawler, Gerard; Lishilin, Osip; Moon, Kookjin; Sahai, Aakash Ajit; Seryi, Andrei; Shih, Kai; Zerbe, Brandon

    2016-01-01

    We report here the results of a one week long investigation into the conceptual design of an X-ray source based on a compact ring with on-orbit and on-energy laser-plasma accelerator. We performed these studies during the June 2016 USPAS class "Physics of Accelerators, Lasers, and Plasma..." applying the art of inventiveness TRIZ. We describe three versions of the light source with the constraints of the electron beam with energy $1\\,\\rm{GeV}$ or $3\\,\\rm{GeV}$ and a magnetic lattice design being normal conducting (only for the $1\\,\\rm{GeV}$ beam) or superconducting (for either beam). The electron beam recirculates in the ring, to increase the effective photon flux. We describe the design choices, present relevant parameters, and describe insights into such machines.

  1. Generation of laser plasma bunches with a high efficiency of energy concentration for laboratory simulation of collisionless shock waves in magnetised cosmic plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zakharov, Yu P.; Ponomarenko, A. G.; Tishchenko, V. N.; Antonov, V. M.; Melekhov, A. V.; Posukh, V. G.; Prokopov, P. A.; Terekhin, V. A.

    2016-05-01

    We present the results of first experiments on the formation of collisionless shock waves (CSWs) in background plasma by injecting laser plasma bunches transverse to the magnetic field (as a piston) with a maximum energy up to 100 J per unit of solid angle and with a high enough degree of ion magnetisation. With this aim in view, on a unique KI-1 facility at the Institute of Laser Physics, Siberian Branch of the Russian Academy of Sciences (ILP), a plastic (polyethylene) target irradiated by a CO2 laser in the most energy-efficient regime (near the plasma formation threshold) and a highly ionised hydrogen plasma with a high concentration in a large volume (not less than 1 m3) have been employed. As a result of model experiments performed on the basis of a model of collisionless interaction of plasma flows, developed at the VNIIEF and being adequate to the problem under consideration, not only an intensive, background-induced, deceleration of a super-Alfven laser plasma flow, but also the formation in that flow of a strong perturbation having the properties of a subcritical CSW and propagating transverse to the magnetic field, have been first registered in the laboratory conditions.

  2. Investigation of relativistic laser-plasmas using nuclear diagnostics; Untersuchung relativistischer Laserplasmen mittels nukleardiagnostischer Verfahren

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guenther, Marc M.

    2011-01-19

    The present work explores with the development of a novel nuclear diagnostic method for the investigation of the electron dynamics in relativistic laser-plasma interactions. An additional aim of this work was the determination of the real laser peak intensity via the interaction of an intense laser short-pulse with a solid target. The nuclear diagnostics is based on a photo-neutron disintegration nuclear activation method. The main constituent of the nuclear diagnostic are novel pseudoalloic activation targets as a kind of calorimeter to measure the high-energy bremsstrahlung produced by relativistic electrons. The targets are composed of several stable isotopes with different ({gamma},xn)-reaction thresholds. The activated nuclides were identified via the characteristic gamma-ray decay spectrum by using high-resolution gamma spectroscopy after the laser irradiation. Via the gamma spectroscopy the ({gamma},xn)-reaction yields were determined. The high-energy bremsstrahlung spectrum has been deconvolved using a novel analysis method based on a modified Penfold-Leiss method. This facilitates the reconstruction of the spectrum of bremsstrahlung photons without any anticipated fit procedures. Furthermore, the characterization of the corresponding bremsstrahlung electrons in the interaction zone is accessible immediately. The consolidated findings about the properties of the relativistic electrons were used to determine the real peak intensity at the laser-plasma interaction zone. In the context of this work, experiments were performed at three different laser facilities. First Experiments were carried out at the 100 TW laser facility at Laboratoire pour l'Utilisation des Lasers Intense (LULI) in France and supplementary at the Vulcan laser facility at Rutherford Appleton Laboratory (RAL) in United Kingdom. The main part of the activation experiments were performed at the PHELIX laser facility (Petawatt High Energy Laser for heavy Ion EXperiments) at GSI

  3. Enhanced electron yield from a laser-plasma accelerator using high-Z gas jet targets

    CERN Document Server

    Mirzaie, Mohammad; Li, Song; Sokollik, Thomas; He, Fei; Cheng, Ya; Sheng, Zhengming; Zhang, Jie

    2014-01-01

    An investigation of the multi-hundred MeV electron beam yield (charge) form helium, nitrogen, neon and argon gas jet plasmas in a laser-plasma wakefield acceleration experiment was carried out. The charge measurement has been made via imaging the electron beam intensity profile on a fluorescent screen into a 14-bit charge coupled device (CCD) which was cross-calibrated with nondestructive electronics-based method. Within given laser and plasma parameters, we found that laser-driven low Z- gas jet targets generate high-quality and well-collimated electron beams with reasonable yields at the level of 10-100 pC. On the other hand, filamentary electron beams which were observed from high-Z gas jets at higher densities reached much higher yield. Evidences for cluster formation were clearly observed in high-Z gases, especially in the argon gas jet target where we received the highest yield of ~ 3 nC

  4. On the Observation of Jitter Radiation in Solid-Density Laser-Plasma Laboratory Experiments

    CERN Document Server

    Keenan, Brett D

    2015-01-01

    Plasmas created by high-intensity lasers are often subject to the formation of kinetic-streaming instabilities, such as the Weibel instability, which lead to the spontaneous generation of high-amplitude, tangled magnetic fields. These fields typically exist on small spatial scales, i.e. "sub-Larmor scales". Radiation from charged particles moving through small-scale electromagnetic (EM) turbulence, known as jitter radiation, has spectral characteristics distinct from both synchrotron and cyclotron radiation, and it carries valuable information on the statistical properties of the EM field structure and evolution. Consequently, jitter radiation from laser-produced plasmas may offer insight into the underlying electromagnetic turbulence. Here we investigate the prospects for, and demonstrate the feasibility of, such direct radiative diagnostics for mildly relativistic, solid-density laser plasmas produced in lab experiments.

  5. Laser-plasma interactions with a Fourier-Bessel Particle-in-Cell method

    CERN Document Server

    Andriyash, Igor A; Lifschitz, Agustin

    2016-01-01

    A new spectral particle-in-cell (PIC) method for plasma modeling is presented and discussed. In the proposed scheme, the Fourier-Bessel transform is used to translate the Maxwell equations to the quasi-cylindrical spectral domain. In this domain, the equations are solved analytically in time, and the spatial derivatives are approximated with high accuracy. In contrast to the finite-difference time domain (FDTD) methods that are commonly used in PIC, the developed method does not produce numerical dispersion, and does not involve grid staggering for the electric and magnetic fields. These features are especially valuable in modeling the wakefield acceleration of particles in plasmas. The proposed algorithm is implemented in the code PLARES-PIC, and the test simulations of laser plasma interactions are compared to the ones done with the quasi-cylindrical FDTD PIC code CALDER-CIRC.

  6. Effects of CSR Generated from Upstream Bends in a Laser Plasma Storage Ring

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mitchell, C.; Qiang, J.; Venturini, M.

    2013-08-28

    The recent proposal [1] of a Laser Plasma Storage Ring (LPSR) envisions the use of a laser-plasma (LP) acceleration module to inject an electron beam into a compact 500 MeV storage ring. Electron bunches generated by LP methods are naturally very short (tens of femtoseconds), presenting peak currents on the order of 10 kA or higher. Of obvious concern is the impact of collective effects and in particular Coherent Synchrotron Radiation (CSR) on the beam dynamics in the storage ring. Available simulation codes (e.g. Elegant [2]) usually include transient CSR effects but neglect the contribution of radiation emitted from trailing magnets. In a compact storage ring, with dipole magnets close to each other, cross talking between different magnets could in principle be important.In this note we investigate this effect for the proposed LPSR and show that, in fact, this effect is relatively small. However our analysis also indicates that CSR effects in general would be quite strong and deserve a a careful study.

  7. Effects of CSR Generated from Upstream Bends in a Laser Plasma Storage Ring

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mitchell, C.; Qiang, J.; Venturini, M.

    2013-08-28

    The recent proposal [1] of a Laser Plasma Storage Ring (LPSR) envisions the use of a laser-plasma (LP) acceleration module to inject an electron beam into a compact 500 MeV storage ring. Electron bunches generated by LP methods are naturally very short (tens of femtoseconds), presenting peak currents on the order of 10 kA or higher. Of obvious concern is the impact of collective effects and in particular Coherent Synchrotron Radiation (CSR) on the beam dynamics in the storage ring. Available simulation codes (e.g. Elegant [2]) usually include transient CSR effects but neglect the contribution of radiation emitted from trailing magnets. In a compact storage ring, with dipole magnets close to each other, cross talking between different magnets could in principle be important.In this note we investigate this effect for the proposed LPSR and show that, in fact, this effect is relatively small. However our analysis also indicates that CSR effects in general would be quite strong and deserve a a careful study.

  8. Transport line for a multi-staged laser-plasma acceleration: DACTOMUS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chancé, Antoine; Delferrière, Olivier; Schwindling, Jérôme; Bruni, Christelle; Delerue, Nicolas; Specka, Arnd; Cros, Brgitte; Maynard, Gillies; Paradkar, Bhooshan S.; Mora, Patrick

    2014-03-01

    Laser-plasma acceleration is one of the most promising techniques to reach very high acceleration gradients up to a few hundreds of GeV/m. In order to push this acceleration scheme in the domain of the very high energies, the CILEX project was launched with the laser APOLLON. One of the main topics of this project is to study multi-staged acceleration. It consists in generating and pre-accelerating electrons in a first laser-plasma stage, to transport them up to a second stage where the electrons are accelerated again thanks to another laser pulse. The DACTOMUS project, based on a collaboration CEA-IRFU, CEA-IRAMIS, LAL, LPGP, LULI and LLR, aims at the study and realization of such a transfer line between these two stages. Firstly, a prototype will be developed and tested by the groups of CEA-IRAMIS-SPAM, LPGP, and LULI on the UHI100 facility (CEA-SPAM). This collaboration must enable to realize the first acceleration stage. For the transport line prototype, the main difficulties are to realize a very compact and energy accepting line with diagnostics to characterize the electron beam. We will present here the optics of this line, its performances and the inserted diagnostics.

  9. Transport line for a multi-staged laser-plasma acceleration: DACTOMUS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chancé, Antoine, E-mail: antoine.chance@cea.fr [CEA, IRFU, SACM, Centre de Saclay, F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Delferrière, Olivier; Schwindling, Jérôme [CEA, IRFU, SACM, Centre de Saclay, F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Bruni, Christelle; Delerue, Nicolas [LAL, UMR9607, CNRS and Université Paris Sud, Orsay (France); Specka, Arnd [LLR, UMR7638, CNRS and Ecole Polytechnique, Palaiseau (France); Cros, Brgitte; Maynard, Gillies; Paradkar, Bhooshan S. [LPGP, UMR8578, CNRS and Université Paris Sud, Orsay (France); Mora, Patrick [CPhT, UMR7644, CNRS and Ecole Polytechnique, Palaiseau (France)

    2014-03-11

    Laser-plasma acceleration is one of the most promising techniques to reach very high acceleration gradients up to a few hundreds of GeV/m. In order to push this acceleration scheme in the domain of the very high energies, the CILEX project was launched with the laser APOLLON. One of the main topics of this project is to study multi-staged acceleration. It consists in generating and pre-accelerating electrons in a first laser-plasma stage, to transport them up to a second stage where the electrons are accelerated again thanks to another laser pulse. The DACTOMUS project, based on a collaboration CEA-IRFU, CEA-IRAMIS, LAL, LPGP, LULI and LLR, aims at the study and realization of such a transfer line between these two stages. Firstly, a prototype will be developed and tested by the groups of CEA-IRAMIS-SPAM, LPGP, and LULI on the UHI100 facility (CEA-SPAM). This collaboration must enable to realize the first acceleration stage. For the transport line prototype, the main difficulties are to realize a very compact and energy accepting line with diagnostics to characterize the electron beam. We will present here the optics of this line, its performances and the inserted diagnostics.

  10. Enhancement of the maximum proton energy by funnel-geometry target in laser-plasma interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Peng; Fan, Dapeng; Li, Yuxiao

    2016-09-01

    Enhancement of the maximum proton energy using a funnel-geometry target is demonstrated through particle simulations of laser-plasma interactions. When an intense short-pulse laser illuminate a thin foil target, the foil electrons are pushed by the laser ponderomotive force, and then form an electron cloud at the target rear surface. The electron cloud generates a strong electrostatic field, which accelerates the protons to high energies. If there is a hole in the rear of target, the shape of the electron cloud and the distribution of the protons will be affected by the protuberant part of the hole. In this paper, a funnel-geometry target is proposed to improve the maximum proton energy. Using particle-in-cell 2-dimensional simulations, the transverse electric field generated by the side wall of four different holes are calculated, and protons inside holes are restricted to specific shapes by these field. In the funnel-geometry target, more protons are restricted near the center of the longitudinal accelerating electric field, thus protons experiencing longer accelerating time and distance in the sheath field compared with that in a traditional cylinder hole target. Accordingly, more and higher energy protons are produced from the funnel-geometry target. The maximum proton energy is improved by about 4 MeV compared with a traditional cylinder-shaped hole target. The funnel-geometry target serves as a new method to improve the maximum proton energy in laser-plasma interactions.

  11. Laser-plasma sourced, temperature dependent, VUV spectrophotometer using dispersive analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    French, R. H.

    1990-04-01

    We have developed a vacuum ultraviolet spectrophotometer with wide energy and temperature range coverage, utilizing a laser-plasma light source (LPLS), CO2-laser sample heating and time-resolved dispersive analysis. Reflection and transmission spectra can be taken from 1.7 to 40eV (31-700nm) on samples at 15-1800K with a time resolution of 20-400ns. These capabilities permit the study of the temperature dependence of the electronic structure, encompassing the effects of thermal lattice expansion and electron-phonon interaction, and changes in the electronic structure associated with equilibrium and metastable phase transitions and stress relaxation. The LPLS utilizes a samarium laser-plasma created by a Q-switched Nd:YAG laser (500mJ/pulse) to produce high brightness, stable, continuum radiation. The spectrophotometer is of a single beam design using calibrated iridium reference mirrors. White light is imaged off the sample in to the entrance slit of a l-m polychromator. The resolution is 0.1 to 0.3nm. The dispersed light is incident on a focal plane phosphor, fiber-optic-coupled to an image-intensified reticon detector. For spectroscopy between 300 and 1800K, the samples are heated in situ with a 150 Watt CO2 laser. The signal to noise ratio in the VUV, for samples at 1800 K, is excellent. From 300 K to 15 K samples are cooled using a He cryostat.

  12. Two decades of progress in understanding and control of laser plasma instabilities in indirect drive inertial fusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montgomery, David S.

    2016-05-01

    Our understanding of laser-plasma instability (LPI) physics has improved dramatically over the past two decades through advancements in experimental techniques, diagnostics, and theoretical and modeling approaches. We have progressed from single-beam experiments—ns pulses with ˜kJ energy incident on hundred-micron-scale target plasmas with ˜keV electron temperatures—to ones involving nearly 2 MJ energy in 192 beams onto multi-mm-scale plasmas with temperatures ˜4 keV. At the same time, we have also been able to use smaller-scale laser facilities to substantially improve our understanding of LPI physics and evaluate novel approaches to their control. These efforts have led to a change in paradigm for LPI research, ushering in an era of engineering LPI to accomplish specific objectives, from tuning capsule implosion symmetry to fixing nonlinear saturation of LPI processes at acceptable levels to enable the exploration of high energy density physics in novel plasma regimes. A tutorial is provided that reviews the progress in the field from the vantage of the foundational LPI experimental results. The pedagogical framework of the simplest models of LPI will be employed, but attention will also be paid to settings where more sophisticated models are needed to understand the observations. Prospects for the application of our improved understanding for inertial fusion (both indirect- and direct-drive) and other applications will also be discussed.

  13. Compact X-ray Free Electron Laser from a Laser-plasma Accelerator using a Transverse Gradient Undulator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, Zhirong; Ding, Yuantao; /SLAC; Schroeder, Carl B.; /LBL, Berkeley

    2012-09-13

    Compact laser-plasma accelerators can produce high energy electron beams with low emittance, high peak current but a rather large energy spread. The large energy spread hinders the potential applications for coherent FEL radiation generation. In this paper, we discuss a method to compensate the effects of beam energy spread by introducing a transverse field variation into the FEL undulator. Such a transverse gradient undulator together with a properly dispersed beam can greatly reduce the effects of electron energy spread and jitter on FEL performance. We present theoretical analysis and numerical simulations for SASE and seeded extreme ultraviolet and soft x-ray FELs based on laser plasma accelerators.

  14. Laser-plasma interaction in the context of inertial fusion: experiments and modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Labaune, C.; Lewis, K.; Bandulet, H.; Depierreux, S.; Hüller, S.; Masson-Laborde, P. E.; Pesme, D.; Loiseau, P.

    2007-08-01

    Many nonlinear processes may affect the laser beam propagation and the laser energy deposition in the underdense plasma surrounding the pellet. These processes, associated with anomalous and nonlinear absorption mechanisms, are fundamental issues in the context of Inertial Confinement Fusion. The work presented in this article refers to laser-plasma interaction experiments which were conducted under well-controlled conditions, and to their theoretical and numerical modeling. Thanks to important diagnostics improvements, the plasma and laser parameters were sufficiently characterized in these experiments to make it possible to carry out numerical simulations modeling the laser plasma interaction in which the hydrodynamics conditions were very close to the experimental ones. Two sets of experiments were carried out with the LULI 2000 and the six beam LULI laser facilities. In the first series of experiments, the interaction between two single hot spots was studied as a function of their distance, intensity and light polarization. In the second series, the intensity distribution of stimulated Brillouin scattering (SBS) inside the plasma was studied by means of a new temporally resolved imaging system. Two-dimensional (2D) simulations were carried out with our code Harmony2D in order to model these experiments. For both series of experiments, the numerical results show a very good agreement with the experimental ones for what concerns the main SBS features, namely the spatial and temporal behavior of the SBS-driven acoustic waves, as well as the average SBS reflectivities. Thus, these well diagnosed experiments, carried out with well defined conditions, make it possible to benchmark our theoretical and numerical modelings and, hence, to improve our predictive capabilities for future experiments.

  15. Effect of Laser-Plasma Interactions on Inertial Confinement Fusion Hohlraum Dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Strozzi, D J; Michel, P; Divol, L; Sepke, S M; Kerbel, G D; Thomas, C A; Ralph, J E; Moody, J D; Schneider, M B

    2016-01-01

    The effects of laser-plasma interactions (LPI) on the dynamics of inertial confinement fusion hohlraums is investigated via a new approach that self-consistently couples reduced LPI models into radiation-hydrodynamics numerical codes. The interplay between hydrodynamics and LPI - specifically stimulated Raman scattering (SRS) and crossed-beam energy transfer (CBET) - mostly occurs via momentum and energy deposition into Langmuir and ion acoustic waves. This spatially redistributes energy coupling to the target, which affects the background plasma conditions and thus modifies the laser propagation. This model shows a reduction of CBET, and significant laser energy depletion by Langmuir waves, which reduce the discrepancy between modeling and data from hohlraum experiments on wall x-ray emission and capsule implosion shape.

  16. Observation of longitudinal and transverse self-injections in laser-plasma accelerators

    CERN Document Server

    Corde, S; Lifschitz, A; Lambert, G; Phuoc, K Ta; Davoine, X; Lehe, R; Douillet, D; Rousse, A; Malka, V

    2013-01-01

    Laser-plasma accelerators can produce high quality electron beams, up to giga-electronvolts in energy, from a centimeter scale device. The properties of the electron beams and the accelerator stability are largely determined by the injection stage of electrons into the accelerator. The simplest mechanism of injection is self-injection, in which the wakefield is strong enough to trap cold plasma electrons into the laser wake. The main drawback of this method is its lack of shot-to-shot stability. Here we present experimental and numerical results that demonstrate the existence of two different self-injection mechanisms. Transverse self-injection is shown to lead to low stability and poor quality electron beams, because of a strong dependence on the intensity profile of the laser pulse. In contrast, longitudinal injection, which is unambiguously observed for the first time, is shown to lead to much more stable acceleration and higher quality electron beams.

  17. Observation of longitudinal and transverse self-injections in laser-plasma accelerators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corde, S; Thaury, C; Lifschitz, A; Lambert, G; Ta Phuoc, K; Davoine, X; Lehe, R; Douillet, D; Rousse, A; Malka, V

    2013-01-01

    Laser-plasma accelerators can produce high-quality electron beams, up to giga electronvolts in energy, from a centimetre scale device. The properties of the electron beams and the accelerator stability are largely determined by the injection stage of electrons into the accelerator. The simplest mechanism of injection is self-injection, in which the wakefield is strong enough to trap cold plasma electrons into the laser wake. The main drawback of this method is its lack of shot-to-shot stability. Here we present experimental and numerical results that demonstrate the existence of two different self-injection mechanisms. Transverse self-injection is shown to lead to low stability and poor-quality electron beams, because of a strong dependence on the intensity profile of the laser pulse. In contrast, longitudinal injection, which is unambiguously observed for the first time, is shown to lead to much more stable acceleration and higher-quality electron beams.

  18. Influence of air pressure on mechanical effect of laser plasma shock wave

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhang Yu-Zhu; Wang Guang-An; Zhu Jin-Rong; Shen Zhong-Hua; Ni Xiao-Wu; Lu Jian

    2007-01-01

    The influence of air pressure on mechanical effect of laser plasma shock wave in a vacuum chamber produced by a Nd:YAG laser has been studied. The laser pulses with pulse width of 10ns and pulse energy of about 320mJ at 1.06μm wavelength is focused on the aluminium target mounted on a ballistic pendulum, and the air pressure in the chamber changes from 2.8 × 103 to 1.01×105pa. The experimental results show that the impulse coupling coefficient changes as the air pressure and the distance of the target from focus change. The mechanical effects of the plasma shock wave on the target are analysed at different distances from focus and the air pressure.

  19. Backreflection diagnostics for ultra-intense laser plasma experiments based on frequency resolved optical gating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, F.; Hornung, J.; Schmidt, C.; Eckhardt, M.; Roth, M.; Stöhlker, T.; Bagnoud, V.

    2017-02-01

    We report on the development and implementation of a time resolved backscatter diagnostics for high power laser plasma experiments at the petawatt-class laser facility PHELIX. Pulses that are backscattered or reflected from overcritical plasmas are characterized spectrally and temporally resolved using a specially designed second harmonic generation frequency resolved optical gating system. The diagnostics meets the requirements made by typical experiments, i.e., a spectral bandwidth of more than 30 nm with sub-nanometer resolution and a temporal window of 10 ps with 50 fs temporal resolution. The diagnostics is permanently installed at the PHELIX target area and can be used to study effects such as laser-hole boring or relativistic self-phase-modulation which are important features of laser-driven particle acceleration experiments.

  20. New developments in energy transfer and transport studies in relativistic laser-plasma interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norreys, P. A.; Green, J. S.; Lancaster, K. L.; Robinson, A. P. L.; Scott, R. H. H.; Perez, F.; Schlenvoight, H.-P.; Baton, S.; Hulin, S.; Vauzour, B.; Santos, J. J.; Adams, D. J.; Markey, K.; Ramakrishna, B.; Zepf, M.; Quinn, M. N.; Yuan, X. H.; McKenna, P.; Schreiber, J.; Davies, J. R.; Higginson, D. P.; Beg, F. N.; Chen, C.; Ma, T.; Patel, P.

    2010-12-01

    Two critical issues related to the success of fast ignition inertial fusion have been vigorously investigated in a co-ordinated campaign in the European Union and the United States. These are the divergence of the fast electron beam generated in intense, PW laser-plasma interactions and the fast electron energy transport with the use of high intensity contrast ratio laser pulses. Proof is presented that resistivity gradient-induced magnetic fields can guide fast electrons over significant distances in (initially) cold metallic targets. Comparison of experiments undertaken in both France and the United States suggests that an important factor in obtaining efficient coupling into dense plasma is the irradiation with high intensity contrast ratio laser pulses, rather than the colour of the laser pulse itself.

  1. Brilliant GeV electron beam with narrow energy spread generated by a laser plasma accelerator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Ronghao; Lu, Haiyang; Shou, Yinren; Lin, Chen; Zhuo, Hongbin; Chen, Chia-erh; Yan, Xueqing

    2016-09-01

    The production of GeV electron beam with narrow energy spread and high brightness is investigated using particle-in-cell simulations. A controlled electron injection scheme and a method for phase-space manipulation in a laser plasma accelerator are found to be essential. The injection is triggered by the evolution of two copropagating laser pulses near a sharp vacuum-plasma transition. The collection volume is well confined and the injected bunch is isolated in phase space. By tuning the parameters of the laser pulses, the parameters of the injected electron bunch, such as the bunch length, energy spread, emittance and charge, can be adjusted. Manipulating the phase-space rotation with the rephasing technique, the injected electron bunch can be accelerated to GeV level while keeping relative energy spread below 0.5% and transverse emittance below 1.0 μ m . The results present a very promising way to drive coherent x-ray sources.

  2. High density ultrashort relativistic positron beam generation by laser-plasma interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Y. J.; Klimo, O.; Weber, S.; Korn, G.

    2016-11-01

    A mechanism of high energy and high density positron beam creation is proposed in ultra-relativistic laser-plasma interaction. Longitudinal electron self-injection into a strong laser field occurs in order to maintain the balance between the ponderomotive potential and the electrostatic potential. The injected electrons are trapped and form a regular layer structure. The radiation reaction and photon emission provide an additional force to confine the electrons in the laser pulse. The threshold density to initiate the longitudinal electron self-injection is obtained from analytical model and agrees with the kinetic simulations. The injected electrons generate γ-photons which counter-propagate into the laser pulse. Via the Breit-Wheeler process, well collimated positron bunches in the GeV range are generated of the order of the critical plasma density and the total charge is about nano-Coulomb. The above mechanisms are demonstrated by particle-in-cell simulations and single electron dynamics.

  3. Influence of air pressure on mechanical effect of laser plasma shock wave

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yu-Zhu; Wang, Guang-An; Zhu, Jin-Rong; Shen, Zhong-Hua; Ni, Xiao-Wu; Lu, Jian

    2007-09-01

    The influence of air pressure on mechanical effect of laser plasma shock wave in a vacuum chamber produced by a Nd:YAG laser has been studied. The laser pulses with pulse width of 10ns and pulse energy of about 320mJ at 1.06μm wavelength is focused on the aluminium target mounted on a ballistic pendulum, and the air pressure in the chamber changes from 2.8 × 103 to 1.01 × 105Pa. The experimental results show that the impulse coupling coefficient changes as the air pressure and the distance of the target from focus change. The mechanical effects of the plasma shock wave on the target are analysed at different distances from focus and the air pressure.

  4. Narrow bandwidth Thomson photon source development using Laser-Plasma Accelerators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geddes, C. G. R.; van Tilborg, J.; Tsai, H.-E.; Toth, Cs.; Vay, J.-L.; Lehe, R.; Schroeder, C. B.; Esarey, E.; Rykovanov, S. G.; Grote, D. P.; Friedman, A.; Leemans, W. P.

    2016-10-01

    Compact, high-quality photon sources at MeV energies are being developed based on Laser-Plasma Accelerators (LPAs). An independent scattering laser with controlled pulse shaping in frequency and amplitude can be used together with laser guiding to realize high photon yield and narrow bandwidth. Simulations are presented on production of controllable narrow bandwidth sources using the beam and plasma capabilities of LPAs. Recent experiments and simulations demonstrate controllable LPAs in the energy range appropriate to MeV Thomson sources. Design of experiments and laser capabilities to combine these elements will be presented, towards a compact photon source system. A dedicated facility under construction will be described. Work supported by US DOE NNSA DNN R&D and by Sc. HEP under contract DE-AC02-05CH11231.

  5. Specular Reflectivity and Hot-Electron Generation in High-Contrast Relativistic Laser-Plasma Interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kemp, Gregory Elijah [The Ohio State Univ., Columbus, OH (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Ultra-intense laser (> 1018 W/cm2) interactions with matter are capable of producing relativistic electrons which have a variety of applications in state-of-the-art scientific and medical research conducted at universities and national laboratories across the world. Control of various aspects of these hot-electron distributions is highly desired to optimize a particular outcome. Hot-electron generation in low-contrast interactions, where significant amounts of under-dense pre-plasma are present, can be plagued by highly non-linear relativistic laser-plasma instabilities and quasi-static magnetic field generation, often resulting in less than desirable and predictable electron source characteristics. High-contrast interactions offer more controlled interactions but often at the cost of overall lower coupling and increased sensitivity to initial target conditions. An experiment studying the differences in hot-electron generation between high and low-contrast pulse interactions with solid density targets was performed on the Titan laser platform at the Jupiter Laser Facility at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory in Livermore, CA. To date, these hot-electrons generated in the laboratory are not directly observable at the source of the interaction. Instead, indirect studies are performed using state-of-the-art simulations, constrained by the various experimental measurements. These measurements, more-often-than-not, rely on secondary processes generated by the transport of these electrons through the solid density materials which can susceptible to a variety instabilities and target material/geometry effects. Although often neglected in these types of studies, the specularly reflected light can provide invaluable insight as it is directly influenced by the interaction. In this thesis, I address the use of (personally obtained) experimental specular reflectivity measurements to indirectly study hot-electron generation in the context of high-contrast, relativistic

  6. Ion Acceleration by Laser Plasma Interaction from Cryogenic Micro Jets - Oral Presentation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Propp, Adrienne [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States)

    2015-08-25

    Processes that occur in extreme conditions, such as in the center of stars and large planets, can be simulated in the laboratory using facilities such as SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory and the Jupiter Laser Facility (JLF) at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). These facilities allow scientists to investigate the properties of matter by observing their interactions with high power lasers. Ion acceleration from laser plasma interaction is gaining greater attention today due to its widespread potential applications, including proton beam cancer therapy and fast ignition for energy production. Typically, ion acceleration is achieved by focusing a high power laser on thin foil targets through a mechanism called Target Normal Sheath Acceleration. Based on research and recent experiments, we hypothesized that a pure liquid cryogenic jet would be an ideal target for this type of interaction, capable of producing the highest proton energies possible with today’s laser technologies. Furthermore, it would provide a continuous, pure target, unlike metal foils which are consumed in the interaction and easily contaminated. In an effort to test this hypothesis and investigate new, potentially more efficient mechanisms of ion acceleration, we used the 527 nm split beam, frequency-doubled TITAN laser at JLF. Data from the cryogenic jets was limited due to the flow of current up the jet into the nozzle during the interaction, heating the jet and damaging the orifice. However, we acheived a pure proton beam with an indiciation of a monoenergetic feature. Furthermore, data from gold and carbon wires showed surprising and interesting results. Preliminary analysis of data from two ion emission diagnostics, Thomson parabola spectrometers (TPs) and radio chromic films (RCFs), suggests that shockwave acceleration occurred rather than target normal sheath acceleration, the standard mechanism of ion acceleration. Upon completion of the experiment at TITAN, I researched the

  7. Direct imaging of the dynamics of a laser-plasma accelerator operating in the bubble-regime

    CERN Document Server

    Sävert, A; Schnell, M; Cole, J M; Nicolai, M; Reuter, M; Schwab, M B; Möller, M; Poder, K; Jäckel, O; Paulus, G G; Spielmann, C; Najmudin, Z; Kaluza, M C

    2014-01-01

    Laser-plasma accelerators operating in the bubble-regime generate quasi-monoenergetic multi-gigaelectronvolt electron beams with femtosecond duration and micrometre size. These beams are produced by accelerating in laser-driven plasma waves in only centimetre distances. Hence they have the potential to be compact alternatives to conventional accelerators. However, since the plasma wave moves at ultra-relativistic speed making detailed observation extremely difficult, most of our current understanding has been gained from high-performance computer simulations. Here, we present experimental results from an ultra-fast optical imaging technique visualising for the first time the non-linear dynamics in a laser-plasma accelerator. By freezing the relativistic motion of the plasma wave, our measurements reveal insight of unprecedented detail. In particular, we observe the plasma wave's non-linear formation, breaking, and transformation into a single bubble for the first time. Understanding the acceleration dynamics ...

  8. Bounds for a domain containing all compact invariant sets of the system describing the laser-plasma interaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Starkov, Konstantin E. [CITEDI-IPN, Avenue del Parque 1310, Mesa de Otay, Tijuana, BC (Mexico)], E-mail: konst@citedi.mx

    2009-02-28

    In this paper we consider the localization problem of compact invariant sets of the system describing the laser-plasma interaction. We establish that this system has an ellipsoidal localization for simple restrictions imposed on its parameters. Then we improve this localization by applying other localizing functions. In addition, we give sufficient conditions under which the origin is the unique compact invariant set.

  9. Subtarget Effect on Laser Plasma Generated by Transversely Excited Atmospheric CO2 Laser at Atmospheric Gas Pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kagawa, Kiichiro; Lie, Tjung Jie; Hedwig, Rinda; Abdulmajid, Syahrun Nur; Suliyanti, Maria Margaretha; Kurniawan, Hendrik

    2000-05-01

    An experimental study has been carried out on the dynamical process taking place in the laser plasma generated by Transversely Excited Atmospheric CO2 laser (100 mJ, 50 ns) irradiation of a soft sample at surrounding helium pressure of 1 atm. It is shown that the presence of a copper subtarget behind the soft sample is crucial in raising the gushing speed of the atoms to the level adequate for the generation of shock wave laser plasma even at atmospheric pressure. It is also found that the time profiles of spatially integrated emission intensity of the target’s atoms and gas atoms exhibit a characteristic dynamical process that consists of successive excitation and cooling stages even at such a high pressure, which is typical of shock wave laser plasma. It is therefore suggested that the generation of the laser plasma at atmospheric pressure is more likely due to the shock wave mechanism than to the widely known breakdown mechanism. Initial spectrochemical analysis of water from the blow off of a boiler system was also carried out, showing a detection limit of as low as 5 ppm for calcium.

  10. Stereolithography based method of creating custom gas density profile targets for high intensity laser-plasma experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jolly, S W; He, Z; McGuffey, C; Schumaker, W; Krushelnick, K; Thomas, A G R

    2012-07-01

    Laser based stereolithography methods are shown to be useful for production of gas targets for high intensity laser-plasma interaction experiments. A cylindrically symmetric nozzle with an opening of approximately 100 μm and a periodic attachment of variable periodicity are outlined in detail with associated density profile characterization. Both components are durable within the limits of relevant experiments.

  11. An ultrashort pulse ultra-violet radiation undulator source driven by a laser plasma wakefield accelerator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anania, M. P. [SUPA, Department of Physics, University of Strathclyde, Glasgow G4 0NG (United Kingdom); INFN, Laboratori Nazionali di Frascati, I-00044 Frascati (Italy); Brunetti, E.; Wiggins, S. M.; Grant, D. W.; Welsh, G. H.; Issac, R. C.; Cipiccia, S.; Shanks, R. P.; Manahan, G. G.; Aniculaesei, C.; Jaroszynski, D. A., E-mail: d.a.jaroszynski@strath.ac.uk [SUPA, Department of Physics, University of Strathclyde, Glasgow G4 0NG (United Kingdom); Geer, S. B. van der; Loos, M. J. de [Pulsar Physics, Burghstraat 47, 5614 BC Eindhoven (Netherlands); Poole, M. W.; Shepherd, B. J. A.; Clarke, J. A. [ASTeC, STFC, Daresbury Laboratory, Warrington WA4 4AD (United Kingdom); Gillespie, W. A. [SUPA, School of Engineering, Physics and Mathematics, University of Dundee, Dundee DD1 4HN (United Kingdom); MacLeod, A. M. [School of Computing and Creative Technologies, University of Abertay Dundee, Dundee DD1 1HG (United Kingdom)

    2014-06-30

    Narrow band undulator radiation tuneable over the wavelength range of 150–260 nm has been produced by short electron bunches from a 2 mm long laser plasma wakefield accelerator based on a 20 TW femtosecond laser system. The number of photons measured is up to 9 × 10{sup 6} per shot for a 100 period undulator, with a mean peak brilliance of 1 × 10{sup 18} photons/s/mrad{sup 2}/mm{sup 2}/0.1% bandwidth. Simulations estimate that the driving electron bunch r.m.s. duration is as short as 3 fs when the electron beam has energy of 120–130 MeV with the radiation pulse duration in the range of 50–100 fs.

  12. Concept of a laser-plasma based electron source for sub-10 fs electron diffraction

    CERN Document Server

    Faure, J; Beaurepaire, B; Gallé, G; Vernier, A; Lifschitz, A

    2015-01-01

    We propose a new concept of an electron source for ultrafast electron diffraction with sub-10~fs temporal resolution. Electrons are generated in a laser-plasma accelerator, able to deliver femtosecond electron bunches at 5 MeV energy with kHz repetition rate. The possibility of producing this electron source is demonstrated using Particle-In-Cell simulations. We then use particle tracking simulations to show that this electron beam can be transported and manipulated in a realistic beamline, in order to reach parameters suitable for electron diffraction. The beamline consists of realistic static magnetic optics and introduces no temporal jitter. We demonstrate numerically that electron bunches with 5~fs duration and containing 1.5~fC per bunch can be produced, with a transverse coherence length exceeding 2~nm, as required for electron diffraction.

  13. GeV Electron Beams from a Capillary Discharge Guided Laser Plasma Accelerator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakamura, Kei; Gonsalves, Anthony; Panasenko, Dmitriy; Lin, Chen; Toth, Csaba; Geddes, Cameron; Schroeder, Carl; Esarey, Eric; Leemans, Wim

    2010-07-08

    Laser plasma acceleration (LPA) up to 1 GeV has been realized at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory by using a capillary discharge waveguide. In this paper, the capillary discharge guided LPA system including a broadband single-shot electron spectrometer is described. The spectrometer was designed specifically for LPA experiments and has amomentumacceptance of 0.01 - 1.1 GeV/c with a percent level resolution. Experiments using a 33 mm long, 300 mu m diameter capillary demonstrated the generation of high energy electron beams up to 1 GeV. By de-tuning discharge delay from optimum guiding performance, selftrapping and acceleration were found to be stabilized producing 460 MeV electron beams.

  14. A desktop extreme ultraviolet microscope based on a compact laser-plasma light source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wachulak, P. W.; Torrisi, A.; Bartnik, A.; Węgrzyński, Ł.; Fok, T.; Fiedorowicz, H.

    2017-01-01

    A compact, desktop size microscope, based on laser-plasma source and equipped with reflective condenser and diffractive Fresnel zone plate objective, operating in the extreme ultraviolet (EUV) region at the wavelength of 13.8 nm, was developed. The microscope is capable of capturing magnified images of objects with 95-nm full-pitch spatial resolution (48 nm 25-75% KE) and exposure time as low as a few seconds, combining reasonable acquisition conditions with stand-alone desktop footprint. Such EUV microscope can be regarded as a complementary imaging tool to already existing, well-established ones. Details about the microscope, characterization, resolution estimation and real sample images are presented and discussed.

  15. Athermal Annealing of Semiconductors Using Shock Waves Generated by a Laser-Plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, R. P.; Grun, J.; Mignogna, R.; Donnelly, D. W.; Covington, B.

    2004-07-01

    We are investigating an annealing technique in which shock or sound waves generated by a laser-plasma are used to anneal a semiconductor. The athermal annealing (AA) process occurs very rapidly, which results in almost no diffusion of. dopants. A HeNe laser is used to measure the reflectivity of the silicon as a function of time. Measurements show that the annealing occurs in 1.8 μsec, which is the acoustic time scale for waves to propagate from the focus through the AA region. A knife-edge technique is employed to study acoustic waves in the sample by measuring the deflection of the probe beam. Initial results for aluminum samples irradiated at modest laser intensities (200 mJ, 50 nsec) show well-defined surface acoustic waves. However, both silicon and GaAs have more complicated structure which resemble Lamb (plate) waves.

  16. Time-resolved measurements with streaked diffraction patterns from electrons generated in laser plasma wakefield

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Zhaohan; Nees, John; Hou, Bixue; Krushelnick, Karl; Thomas, Alec; Beaurepaire, Benoît; Malka, Victor; Faure, Jérôme

    2013-10-01

    Femtosecond bunches of electrons with relativistic to ultra-relativistic energies can be robustly produced in laser plasma wakefield accelerators (LWFA). Scaling the electron energy down to sub-relativistic and MeV level using a millijoule laser system will make such electron source a promising candidate for ultrafast electron diffraction (UED) applications due to the intrinsic short bunch duration and perfect synchronization with the optical pump. Recent results of electron diffraction from a single crystal gold foil, using LWFA electrons driven by 8-mJ, 35-fs laser pulses at 500 Hz, will be presented. The accelerated electrons were collimated with a solenoid magnetic lens. By applying a small-angle tilt to the magnetic lens, the diffraction pattern can be streaked such that the temporal evolution is separated spatially on the detector screen after propagation. The observable time window and achievable temporal resolution are studied in pump-probe measurements of photo-induced heating on the gold foil.

  17. High Power Laser-Plasma Interaction under a Strong Magnetic Field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sano, Takayoshi; Tanaka, Yuki; Yamaguchi, Tomohito; Murakami, Masakatsu; Iwata, Natsumi; Hata, Masayasu; Mima, Kunioki

    2016-10-01

    We investigate laser-plasma interactions under a strong magnetic field by one-dimensional Particle-in-Cell (PIC) simulations. A simple setup is considered in our analysis, in which a thin foil is irradiated by a right-handed circularly polarized laser. A uniform magnetic field is assumed in the direction of the laser propagation. Then the whistler wave can penetrate the overdense plasma when the external field is larger than the critical field strength Bc =meω0 / e . In this situation, key parameters of the system are the plasma density and the size of the external field. We performed various models in the density-field strength diagram, which is actually the so-called CMA diagram, to evaluate the efficiency of the energy conversion from the laser to plasma and the reflectivity and transmittance of the laser. It is found that there are two important processes in the interaction between the whistler wave and overdense plasma, which are the cyclotron resonance of relativistic electrons and the parametric (Brillouin) instability. Because of the high temperature of electrons, ions can be accelerated dramatically by a large sheath field at the target surface.

  18. Frequency-Domain Tomography for Single-shot, Ultrafast Imaging of Evolving Laser-Plasma Accelerators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhengyan; Zgadzaj, Rafal; Wang, Xiaoming; Downer, Michael

    2011-10-01

    Intense laser pulses propagating through plasma create plasma wakefields that often evolve significantly, e.g. by expanding and contracting. However, such dynamics are known in detail only through intensive simulations. Laboratory visualization of evolving plasma wakes in the ``bubble'' regime is important for optimizing and scaling laser-plasma accelerators. Recently snap-shots of quasi-static wakes were recorded using frequency-domain holography (FDH). To visualize the wake's evolution, we have generalized FDH to frequency-domain tomography (FDT), which uses multiple probes propagating at different angles with respect to the pump pulse. Each probe records a phase streak, imprinting a partial record of the evolution of pump-created structures. We then topographically reconstruct the full evolution from all phase streaks. To prove the concept, a prototype experiment visualizing nonlinear index evolution in glass is demonstrated. Four probes propagating at 0, 0.6, 2, 14 degrees to the index ``bubble'' are angularly and temporally multiplexed to a single spectrometer to achieve cost-effective FDT. From these four phase streaks, an FDT algorithm analogous to conventional CT yields a single-shot movie of the pump's self-focusing dynamics.

  19. Plasma wakefield excitation by incoherent laser pulses: a path towards high-average power laser-plasma accelerators

    CERN Document Server

    Benedetti, C; Esarey, E; Leemans, W P

    2014-01-01

    In a laser plasma accelerator (LPA), a short and intense laser pulse propagating in a plasma drives a wakefield (a plasma wave with a relativistic phase velocity) that can sustain extremely large electric fields, enabling compact accelerating structures. Potential LPA applications include compact radiation sources and high energy linear colliders. We propose and study plasma wave excitation by an incoherent combination of a large number of low energy laser pulses (i.e., without constraining the pulse phases). We show that, in spite of the incoherent nature of electromagnetic fields within the volume occupied by the pulses, the excited wakefield is regular and its amplitude is comparable or equal to that obtained using a single, coherent pulse with the same energy. These results provide a path to the next generation of LPA-based applications, where incoherently combined multiple pulses may enable high repetition rate, high average power LPAs.

  20. Recent results from experimental studies on laser-plasma coupling in a shock ignition relevant regime

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koester, P.; Antonelli, L.; Atzeni, S.; Badziak, J.; Baffigi, F.; Batani, D.; Cecchetti, C. A.; Chodukowski, T.; Consoli, F.; Cristoforetti, G.; De Angelis, R.; Folpini, G.; Gizzi, L. A.; Kalinowska, Z.; Krousky, E.; Kucharik, M.; Labate, L.; Levato, T.; Liska, R.; Malka, G.; Maheut, Y.; Marocchino, A.; Nicolai, P.; O'Dell, T.; Parys, P.; Pisarczyk, T.; Raczka, P.; Renner, O.; Rhee, Y. J.; Ribeyre, X.; Richetta, M.; Rosinski, M.; Ryc, L.; Skala, J.; Schiavi, A.; Schurtz, G.; Smid, M.; Spindloe, C.; Ullschmied, J.; Wolowski, J.; Zaras, A.

    2013-12-01

    Shock ignition (SI) is an appealing approach in the inertial confinement scenario for the ignition and burn of a pre-compressed fusion pellet. In this scheme, a strong converging shock is launched by laser irradiation at an intensity Iλ2 > 1015 W cm-2 µm2 at the end of the compression phase. In this intensity regime, laser-plasma interactions are characterized by the onset of a variety of instabilities, including stimulated Raman scattering, Brillouin scattering and the two plasmon decay, accompanied by the generation of a population of fast electrons. The effect of the fast electrons on the efficiency of the shock wave production is investigated in a series of dedicated experiments at the Prague Asterix Laser Facility (PALS). We study the laser-plasma coupling in a SI relevant regime in a planar geometry by creating an extended preformed plasma with a laser beam at ˜7 × 1013 W cm-2 (250 ps, 1315 nm). A strong shock is launched by irradiation with a second laser beam at intensities in the range 1015-1016 W cm-2 (250 ps, 438 nm) at various delays with respect to the first beam. The pre-plasma is characterized using x-ray spectroscopy, ion diagnostics and interferometry. Spectroscopy and calorimetry of the backscattered radiation is performed in the spectral range 250-850 nm, including (3/2)ω, ω and ω/2 emission. The fast electron production is characterized through spectroscopy and imaging of the Kα emission. Information on the shock pressure is obtained using shock breakout chronometry and measurements of the craters produced by the shock in a massive target. Preliminary results show that the backscattered energy is in the range 3-15%, mainly due to backscattered light at the laser wavelength (438 nm), which increases with increasing the delay between the two laser beams. The values of the peak shock pressures inferred from the shock breakout times are lower than expected from 2D numerical simulations. The same simulations reveal that the 2D effects play a

  1. Investigation of fast-ion generation in a laser plasma according to X-ray line radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basov, N. G.; Maksimchuk, A. M.; Mikhailov, Iu. A.; Rode, A. V.; Getz, K.

    1987-04-01

    The profile of the 1s2-1s2p resonance line of the P XIV phosphorous ion is studied in order to derive the energy spectrum and indicatrix of fast ions in a laser plasma. The energetic and angular characteristics of fast ions are examined. The spectrum and indicatrix are analyzed using a model in which it is assumed that the ions are accelerated as a result of the self-focusing of laser radiation in the plasma corona.

  2. Laser-Plasma Interactions on NIKE and the Fusion Test Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, Lee; Weaver, James

    2008-11-01

    Recent proposed designs for a Fusion Test Facility (FTF) (Obenchain et al., Phys. Plasmas 13 056320 (2006)) for direct-drive ICF targets for energy applications involve high implosion velocities combined with higher laser irradiances. The use of high irradiances increases the likelihood of deleterious laser plasma instabilities (LPI) but the proposed use of a 248 nm KrF laser to drive these targets is expected to minimize the LPI risk. We examine, using simulation results from NRL's FAST hydrocode, the proposed operational regimes of the FTF in relation to the thresholds for the SRS, SBS, and 2-plasmon instabilities. Simulations are also used to help design and interpret ongoing experiments being conducted at NRL's NIKE facility for the purpose of generating and studying LPI. Target geometries and laser pulseshapes were devised in order to create plasma conditions with long scalelengths and low electron temperatures that allow the growth of parametric instabilities. These simulations include the effects of finite beam angles through the use of raytracing.

  3. Design of an Experiment to Observe Laser-Plasma Interactions on NIKE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, L.; Weaver, J.; Manheimer, W.; Zalesak, S.; Schmitt, A.; Fyfe, D.; Afeyan, B.; Charbonneau-Lefort, M.

    2007-11-01

    Recent proposed designs (Obenschain et al., Phys. Plasmas 13 056320 (2006)) for direct-drive ICF targets for energy applications involve high implosion velocities combined with higher laser irradiances. The use of high irradiances increases the likelihood of deleterious laser plasma instabilities (LPI) that may lead, for example, to the generation of fast electrons. The proposed use of a 248 nm KrF laser to drive these targets is expected to minimize LPI; this is being studied by experiments at NRL's NIKE facility. We used a modification of the FAST code that models laser pulses with arbitrary spatial and temporal profiles to assist in designing these experiments. The goal is to design targets and pulseshapes to create plasma conditions that will produce sufficient growth of LPI to be observable on NIKE. Using, for example, a cryogenic DT target that is heated by a brief pulse and allowed to expand freely before interacting with a second, high-intensity pulse, allows the development of long scalelengths at low electron temperatures and leads to a predicted 20-efold growth in two-plasmon amplitude.

  4. Effects of radiation damping in extreme ultra-intense laser-plasma interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandit, Rishi; Sentoku, Yasuhiko

    2011-10-01

    Effects of the radiation damping in the interaction of extremely intense laser (>1022 W/cm2) with overdense plasma are studied via a relativistic collisional particle-in-cell simulation, PICLS1D. We had derived the Landau-Lifshitz equation, which is the first order term of the Lorentz-Dirac equation, and also derived the second order term as the first time and implemented in the code. The code had been tested in a single particle motion at the extreme intensity laser. It was found that the first order damping term is reasonable up to the intensity 1022 W/cm2, but the second oder term becomes not negligible and comparable to the first order term beyond 1023 W/cm2. The radiation damping model was introduced to a one- dimensional particle-in-cell code (PIC), and tested in the laser - plasma interaction at extreme intensity. The strong damping of hot electrons in high energy tail was demonstrated in PIC simulations. Hot electrons generated by such extreme-intense laser lights on the plasma get the relativistic energy with gamma factor >100, and lose energy strongly by emitting radiation. The second order term becomes comparable to the first order term when the laser intensity >1023 W/cm2. US DOE DE-PS02-08ER08-16 and DE-FC02-04ER54789.

  5. Advanced beam dynamics and diagnostics concepts for laser-plasma accelerators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dornmair, Irene

    2017-05-15

    Laser-Plasma Accelerators (LPAs) combine a multitude of unique features, which makes them very attractive as drivers for next generation brilliant light sources including compact X-ray free-electron lasers. They provide high accelerating gradients, thereby drastically shrinking the accelerator size, while at the same time the produced electron bunches are intrinsically as short as a few femtoseconds and carry high peak currents. LPA are subject of very active research, yet, the field currently faces the challenge of improving the beam quality, and achieving stable and well-controlled injection and acceleration. This thesis tackles this issue from three different sides. A novellongitudinal phase space diagnostics is proposed that employs the strong fields present in plasma wakefields to streak ultrashort electron bunches. This allows for a temporal resolution down to the attosecond range, enabling direct determination to the current profile and the slice energy spread, both crucial quantities for the performance of free-electron lasers. Furthermore, adiabatic matching sections at the plasma-vacuum boundary are investigated. These can drastically reduce the beam divergence and thereby relax the constraints on the subsequent beam optics. For externally injected beams, the matching sections could even provide the key technology that permits emittance conservation by increasing the matched beam size to a level achievable with currently available magnetic optics. Finally, a new method is studied that allows to modify the wakefield shape. To this end, the plasma density is periodically modulated. One possible application can be to remove the linearly correlated energy spread, or chirp, from the accelerated bunch, which is suspected of being responsible for the main part of the often large energy spread of plasma accelerated beams.

  6. Plasmoid ejection and secondary current sheet generation from magnetic reconnection in laser-plasma interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Quan-Li; Wang, Shou-Jun; Lu, Quan-Ming; Huang, Can; Yuan, Da-Wei; Liu, Xun; Lin, Xiao-Xuan; Li, Yu-Tong; Wei, Hui-Gang; Zhong, Jia-Yong; Shi, Jian-Rong; Jiang, Shao-En; Ding, Yong-Kun; Jiang, Bo-Bin; Du, Kai; He, Xian-Tu; Yu, M Y; Liu, C S; Wang, Shui; Tang, Yong-Jian; Zhu, Jian-Qiang; Zhao, Gang; Sheng, Zheng-Ming; Zhang, Jie

    2012-05-25

    Reconnection of the self-generated magnetic fields in laser-plasma interaction was first investigated experimentally by Nilson et al. [Phys. Rev. Lett. 97, 255001 (2006)] by shining two laser pulses a distance apart on a solid target layer. An elongated current sheet (CS) was observed in the plasma between the two laser spots. In order to more closely model magnetotail reconnection, here two side-by-side thin target layers, instead of a single one, are used. It is found that at one end of the elongated CS a fanlike electron outflow region including three well-collimated electron jets appears. The (>1 MeV) tail of the jet energy distribution exhibits a power-law scaling. The enhanced electron acceleration is attributed to the intense inductive electric field in the narrow electron dominated reconnection region, as well as additional acceleration as they are trapped inside the rapidly moving plasmoid formed in and ejected from the CS. The ejection also induces a secondary CS.

  7. Target dependent femtosecond laser plasma implantation dynamics in enabling silica for high density erbium doping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandrappan, Jayakrishnan; Murray, Matthew; Kakkar, Tarun; Petrik, Peter; Agocs, Emil; Zolnai, Zsolt; Steenson, D. P.; Jha, Animesh; Jose, Gin

    2015-09-01

    Chemical dissimilarity of tellurium oxide with silica glass increases phase separation and crystallization tendency when mixed and melted for making a glass. We report a novel technique for incorporating an Er3+-doped tellurite glass composition into silica substrates through a femtosecond (fs) laser generated plasma assisted process. The engineered material consequently exhibits the spectroscopic properties of Er3+-ions, which are unachievable in pure silica and implies this as an ideal material for integrated photonics platforms. Formation of a well-defined metastable and homogeneous glass structure with Er3+-ions in a silica network, modified with tellurite has been characterized using high-resolution cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM). The chemical and structural analyses using HRTEM, Rutherford backscattering spectrometry (RBS) and laser excitation techniques, confirm that such fs-laser plasma implanted glasses may be engineered for significantly higher concentration of Er3+-ions without clustering, validated by the record high lifetime-density product 0.96 × 1019 s.cm-3. Characterization of planar optical layers and photoluminescence emission spectra were undertaken to determine their thickness, refractive indices and photoluminescence properties, as a function of Er3+ concentration via different target glasses. The increased Er3+ content in the target glass enhance the refractive index and photoluminescence intensity of the modified silica layer whilst the lifetime and thickness decrease.

  8. Studies of bandwidth dependence of laser plasma instabilities driven by the Nike laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weaver, J.; Kehne, D.; Obenschain, S.; Serlin, V.; Schmitt, A. J.; Oh, J.; Lehmberg, R. H.; Brown, C. M.; Seely, J.; Feldman, U.

    2012-10-01

    Experiments at the Nike laser facility of the Naval Research Laboratory are exploring the influence of laser bandwidth on laser plasma instabilities (LPI) driven by a deep ultraviolet pump (248 nm) that incorporates beam smoothing by induced spatial incoherence (ISI). In early ISI studies with longer wavelength Nd:glass lasers (1054 nm and 527 nm),footnotetextObenschain, PRL 62(1989);Mostovych, PRL 62(1987);Peyser, Phys. Fluids B 3(1991). stimulated Raman scattering, stimulated Brillouin scattering, and the two plasmon decay instability were reduced when wide bandwidth ISI (δν/ν˜0.03-0.19%) pulses irradiated targets at moderate to high intensities (10^14-10^15 W/cm^2). The current studies will compare the emission signatures of LPI from planar CH targets during Nike operation at large bandwidth (δν˜1THz) to observations for narrower bandwidth operation (δν˜0.1-0.3THz). These studies will help clarify the relative importance of the short wavelength and wide bandwidth to the increased LPI intensity thresholds observed at Nike. New pulse shapes are being used to generate plasmas with larger electron density scale-lengths that are closer to conditions during pellet implosions for direct drive inertial confinement fusion.

  9. Laser-plasma EUV source dedicated for surface processing of polymers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bartnik, A., E-mail: abartnik@wat.edu.pl [Institute of Optoelectronics, Military University of Technology, 2 Kaliskiego Street, 00-908 Warsaw (Poland); Fiedorowicz, H.; Jarocki, R.; Kostecki, J.; Szczurek, M.; Wachulak, P.W. [Institute of Optoelectronics, Military University of Technology, 2 Kaliskiego Street, 00-908 Warsaw (Poland)

    2011-08-11

    In this work, a 10 Hz laser-plasma extreme ultraviolet (EUV) source built for surface processing of polymers is presented. The source is based on a double-stream gas puff target created in a vacuum chamber synchronously with the pumping laser pulse. The target is formed by pulsed injection of Kr, Xe or a KrXe gas mixture into a hollow stream of helium. The EUV radiation is focused using a grazing incidence gold-plated ellipsoidal collector. Spectrum of the reflected radiation consists of a narrow feature with intensity maximum at 10-11 nm wavelength and a long-wavelength spectral tail up to 70 nm. The exact spectral distribution depends on a gas applied for plasma creation. To avoid strong absorption of the EUV radiation in a residual gas present in the chamber during the source operation a two step differential pumping system was employed. The system allows for polymer processing under relatively high vacuum conditions (10{sup -5} mbar) or in a reactive gas atmosphere. Polymer samples can be irradiated in a focal plane of the EUV collector or at some distance downstream the focal plane. This way fluence of the EUV beam at the polymer surface can be regulated.

  10. Brilliant GeV electron beam with narrow energy spread generated by a laser plasma accelerator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ronghao Hu

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The production of GeV electron beam with narrow energy spread and high brightness is investigated using particle-in-cell simulations. A controlled electron injection scheme and a method for phase-space manipulation in a laser plasma accelerator are found to be essential. The injection is triggered by the evolution of two copropagating laser pulses near a sharp vacuum-plasma transition. The collection volume is well confined and the injected bunch is isolated in phase space. By tuning the parameters of the laser pulses, the parameters of the injected electron bunch, such as the bunch length, energy spread, emittance and charge, can be adjusted. Manipulating the phase-space rotation with the rephasing technique, the injected electron bunch can be accelerated to GeV level while keeping relative energy spread below 0.5% and transverse emittance below 1.0  μm. The results present a very promising way to drive coherent x-ray sources.

  11. Brilliant petawatt gamma-ray pulse generation in quantum electrodynamic laser-plasma interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, H. X.; Qiao, B.; Huang, T. W.; Xu, Z.; Zhou, C. T.; Gu, Y. Q.; Yan, X. Q.; Zepf, M.; He, X. T.

    2017-03-01

    We show a new resonance acceleration scheme for generating ultradense relativistic electron bunches in helical motions and hence emitting brilliant vortical γ-ray pulses in the quantum electrodynamic (QED) regime of circularly-polarized (CP) laser-plasma interactions. Here the combined effects of the radiation reaction recoil force and the self-generated magnetic fields result in not only trapping of a great amount of electrons in laser-produced plasma channel, but also significant broadening of the resonance bandwidth between laser frequency and that of electron betatron oscillation in the channel, which eventually leads to formation of the ultradense electron bunch under resonant helical motion in CP laser fields. Three-dimensional PIC simulations show that a brilliant γ-ray pulse with unprecedented power of 6.7 PW and peak brightness of 1025 photons/s/mm2/mrad2/0.1% BW (at 15 MeV) is emitted at laser intensity of 1.9 × 1023 W/cm2.

  12. Three-Dimensional Modeling of Laser-Plasma Interactions Near the Quarter-Critical Density in Plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, H.; Maximov, A. V.; Yan, R.; Ren, C.; Li, J.; Myatt, J. F.

    2015-11-01

    Three dimensional particle-in-cell simulations have been performed in the plasma region near quarter-critical density for the parameters typical for direct-drive inertial confinement fusion experiments. The laser-plasma instabilities of two-plasmon decay (TPD), stimulated Raman scattering (SRS), and stimulated Brillouin scattering have been identified in the time evolution of different electric- and magnetic-field components. A good agreement between the simulation results and the theories of TPD and SRS has been observed. In the nonlinear saturation regime, the field intensities and the fast-electron distributions are compared for plane-wave and speckled laser beams. The effects of collisions are studied. This material is based upon work supported by the Department of Energy National Nuclear Security Administration under Award Number DE-NA0001944.

  13. Compact x-ray free-electron laser from a laser-plasma accelerator using a transverse-gradient undulator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Zhirong; Ding, Yuantao; Schroeder, Carl B

    2012-11-16

    Compact laser-plasma accelerators can produce high energy electron beams with low emittance, high peak current but a rather large energy spread. The large energy spread hinders the potential applications for coherent free-electron laser (FEL) radiation generation. We discuss a method to compensate the effects of beam energy spread by introducing a transverse field variation into the FEL undulator. Such a transverse gradient undulator together with a properly dispersed beam can greatly reduce the effects of electron energy spread and jitter on FEL performance. We present theoretical analysis and numerical simulations for self-amplified spontaneous emission and seeded extreme ultraviolet and soft x-ray FELs based on laser plasma accelerators.

  14. Influences of Uncaptured Electron on Energy Conversion of Photon Compton Scattering in High Power Laser-plasma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHENG Jing-hua; HAO Xiao-fei; HAO Dong-shan

    2004-01-01

    Using the single particle theory and the non-flexibility collision model of electron and photon, the influence of the uncaptured electrons on the energy conversion efficiency of multi-photon nonlinear Compton scattering in the extra stationary laser-plasma is investigated. It shows that in extra stationary laser-plasma,the uncaptured electrons make the Δω of the scattering frequency of the multi-photon Compton fall down with the increases of the incident radiation electron speed,the materials of the incident collision of electron and photon, and the number of the photons which work with the electrons at the same time. Under the modulation of the uncaptured electrons to the laser field, the energy conversion efficiency between electrons and photons will fall down with the increase of the electron incident radiation speed, using the low-power electrons for incident source, the loss can be efficiently reduced.

  15. Human dermis separation via ultra-short pulsed laser plasma-mediated ablation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang Huan; Guo Zhixiong, E-mail: guo@jove.rutgers.ed [Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, Rutgers, State University of New Jersey, Piscataway, NJ 08854 (United States)

    2009-08-21

    In vitro layer separation of human dermal tissues via laser plasma-mediated ablation was successfully conducted for the first time. The ablation of wet dermis was generated using a 900 fs ultra-short pulsed laser with the wavelength centred at 1552 nm. The ablation and separation results were imaged and measured by scanning electron microscopy. The dermis ablation threshold was determined as 9.65 {+-} 1.21 J cm{sup -2} and the incubation factor was found as 0.46 {+-} 0.03. Histological examinations were performed to find proper laser parameters for dermis ablation and separation with minimal thermal damage. No thermal damage was found in the single line ablation results when the pulse overlap rate was not over 5 pulses {mu}m{sup -1}. Even in the multi-line ablation, thermal damage was insignificant and the lateral damage zone was generally within 5 {mu}m in the results with 100 continuously repeated line scans. The separation of a whole piece of wet dermal tissue into two thin layers was presented. Several separation tests with different layer thicknesses from 200 to 600 {mu}m were completed. The unevenness of the separated layers was generally under 10%. The cohesion and morphology of the separated tissue layers were not altered.

  16. Bunch decompression for laser-plasma driven free-electron laser demonstration schemes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Seggebrock

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available X-ray free-electron lasers (FELs require a very high electron beam quality in terms of emittance and energy spread. Since 2004 high quality electrons produced by laser-wakefield accelerators have been demonstrated, but the electron quality up to now did not allow the operation of a compact x-ray FEL using these electrons. Maier et al. [Phys. Rev. X 2, 031019 (2012PRXHAE2160-330810.1103/PhysRevX.2.031019] suggested a concept for a proof-of-principle experiment allowing FEL operation in the vacuum ultraviolet range based on an optimized undulator and bunch decompression using electron bunches from a laser-plasma accelerator as currently available. In this paper we discuss in more detail how a chicane can be used as a bunch stretcher instead of a bunch compressor to allow the operation of a laser-wakefield accelerator driven FEL using currently available electrons. A scaling characterizing the impact of bunch decompression on the gain length is derived and the feasibility of the concept is tested numerically in a demanding scenario.

  17. Development of a Multi-GeV spectrometer for laser-plasma experiment at FLAME

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valente, P.; Anelli, F.; Bacci, A.; Batani, D.; Bellaveglia, M.; Benocci, R.; Benedetti, C.; Cacciotti, L.; Cecchetti, C. A.; Clozza, A.; Cultrera, L.; Di Pirro, G.; Drenska, N.; Faccini, R.; Ferrario, M.; Filippetto, D.; Fioravanti, S.; Gallo, A.; Gamucci, A.; Gatti, G.; Ghigo, A.; Giulietti, A.; Giulietti, D.; Gizzi, L. A.; Koester, P.; Labate, L.; Levato, T.; Lollo, V.; Londrillo, P.; Martellotti, S.; Pace, E.; Pathak, N.; Rossi, A.; Tani, F.; Serafini, L.; Turchetti, G.; Vaccarezza, C.

    2011-10-01

    The advance in laser-plasma acceleration techniques pushes the regime of the resulting accelerated particles to higher energies and intensities. In particular, the upcoming experiments with the 250 TW laser at the FLAME facility of the INFN Laboratori Nazionali di Frascati, will enter the GeV regime with more than 100 pC of electrons. At the current status of understanding of the acceleration mechanism, relatively large angular and energy spreads are expected. There is therefore the need for developing a device capable to measure the energy of electrons over three orders of magnitude (few MeV to few GeV), with still unknown angular divergences. Within the PlasmonX experiment at FLAME, a spectrometer is being constructed to perform these measurements. It is made of an electro-magnet and a screen made of scintillating fibers for the measurement of the trajectories of the particles. The large range of operation, the huge number of particles and the need to focus the divergence, present challenges in the design and construction of such a device. We present the design considerations for this spectrometer that lead to the use of scintillating fibers, multichannel photo-multipliers and a multiplexing electronics, a combination which is innovative in the field. We also present the experimental results obtained with a high intensity electron beam performed on a prototype at the LNF beam test facility.

  18. Acoustic measurement method in investigation of optical phenomena in a modulated CO II laser plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wojaczek, Dorota A.; Plinski, Edward F.; Rosinski, Lukasz; Trawinski, Robert

    2007-02-01

    The paper describes the results of investigations of optical phenomena on an RF excited slab-waveguide CO II laser. The experiments are performed in two optical arrangements: two-mirror resonator and three-mirror one. The main purpose of the experiments is to check possibilities to observe the optical phenomena using a microphone. The laser plasma is modulated with a self-mixing signal in the three-mirror resonator. The response of the microphone is observed and analyzed. Detection of the laser signature phenomenon with the microphone is experimentally considered. The experiments are done at cw regime of the laser. The investigations are performed at pulse operation of the laser, as well. The response of the microphone is analyzed. It is checked how the laser pulse is reconstructed at a profile of the microphone signal. The output laser pulse with a mapped laser signature in the laser pulse profile is compared to the microphone signal shape. The presence of the laser signature at the acoustic signal is investigated.

  19. STUDIES OF A FREE ELECTRON LASER DRIVEN BY A LASER-PLASMA ACCELERATOR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Montgomery, A.; Schroeder, C.; Fawley, W.

    2008-01-01

    A free electron laser (FEL) uses an undulator, a set of alternating magnets producing a periodic magnetic fi eld, to stimulate emission of coherent radiation from a relativistic electron beam. The Lasers, Optical Accelerator Systems Integrated Studies (LOASIS) group at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) will use an innovative laserplasma wakefi eld accelerator to produce an electron beam to drive a proposed FEL. In order to optimize the FEL performance, the dependence on electron beam and undulator parameters must be understood. Numerical modeling of the FEL using the simulation code GINGER predicts the experimental results for given input parameters. Among the parameters studied were electron beam energy spread, emittance, and mismatch with the undulator focusing. Vacuum-chamber wakefi elds were also simulated to study their effect on FEL performance. Energy spread was found to be the most infl uential factor, with output FEL radiation power sharply decreasing for relative energy spreads greater than 0.33%. Vacuum chamber wakefi elds and beam mismatch had little effect on the simulated LOASIS FEL at the currents considered. This study concludes that continued improvement of the laser-plasma wakefi eld accelerator electron beam will allow the LOASIS FEL to operate in an optimal regime, producing high-quality XUV and x-ray pulses.

  20. STUDIES OF A FREE ELECTRON LASER DRIVEN BY A LASER-PLASMA ACCELERATOR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Montgomery, A.; Schroeder, C.; Fawley, W.

    2008-01-01

    A free electron laser (FEL) uses an undulator, a set of alternating magnets producing a periodic magnetic fi eld, to stimulate emission of coherent radiation from a relativistic electron beam. The Lasers, Optical Accelerator Systems Integrated Studies (LOASIS) group at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) will use an innovative laserplasma wakefi eld accelerator to produce an electron beam to drive a proposed FEL. In order to optimize the FEL performance, the dependence on electron beam and undulator parameters must be understood. Numerical modeling of the FEL using the simulation code GINGER predicts the experimental results for given input parameters. Among the parameters studied were electron beam energy spread, emittance, and mismatch with the undulator focusing. Vacuum-chamber wakefi elds were also simulated to study their effect on FEL performance. Energy spread was found to be the most infl uential factor, with output FEL radiation power sharply decreasing for relative energy spreads greater than 0.33%. Vacuum chamber wakefi elds and beam mismatch had little effect on the simulated LOASIS FEL at the currents considered. This study concludes that continued improvement of the laser-plasma wakefi eld accelerator electron beam will allow the LOASIS FEL to operate in an optimal regime, producing high-quality XUV and x-ray pulses.

  1. Bandwidth Dependence of Laser Plasma Instabilities Driven by the Nike KrF Laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weaver, J. L.; Oh, J.; Seely, J.; Kehne, D.; Brown, C. M.; Obenschain, S.; Serlin, V.; Schmitt, A. J.; Phillips, L.; Lehmberg, R. H.; McLean, E.; Manka, C.; Feldman, U.

    2011-10-01

    The Nike krypton-fluoride (KrF) laser at the Naval Research Laboratory operates in the deep UV (248 nm) and employs beam smoothing by induced spatial incoherence (ISI). In the first ISI studies at longer wavelengths (1054 nm and 527 nm) [Obenschain, PRL 62, 768(1989);Mostovych, PRL, 59, 1193(1987); Peyser, Phys. Fluids B 3, 1479(1991)], stimulated Raman scattering, stimulated Brillouin scattering, and the two plasmon decay instability were reduced when wide bandwidth ISI (δν / ν ~ 0.03-0.19%) pulses irradiated targets at moderate to high intensities (1014-1015W/cm2) . Recent Nike work showed that the threshold for quarter critical instabilities increased with the expected wavelength scaling, without accounting for the large bandwidth (δν ~ 1-3 THz). New experiments will compare laser plasma instabilities (LPI) driven by narrower bandwidth pulses to those observed with the standard operation. The bandwidth of KrF lasers can be reduced by adding narrow filters (etalons or gratings) in the initial stages of the laser. This talk will discuss the method used to narrow the output spectrum of Nike, the laser performance for this new operating mode, and target observations of LPI in planar CH targets. Work supported by DoE/NNSA.

  2. Laser plasma interaction on rugby hohlraum on the Omega Laser Facility: Comparisons between cylinder, rugby, and elliptical hohlraums

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masson-Laborde, P. E.; Monteil, M. C.; Tassin, V.; Philippe, F.; Gauthier, P.; Casner, A.; Depierreux, S.; Neuville, C.; Villette, B.; Laffite, S.; Seytor, P.; Fremerye, P.; Seka, W.; Teychenné, D.; Debayle, A.; Marion, D.; Loiseau, P.; Casanova, M.

    2016-02-01

    Gas-filled rugby-shaped hohlraums have demonstrated high performances compared to a classical similar diameter cylinder hohlraum with a nearly 40% increase of x-ray drive, 10% higher measured peak drive temperature, and an increase in neutron production. Experimental comparisons have been done between rugby, cylinder, and elliptical hohlraums. The impact of these geometry differences on the laser plasma instabilities is examined. Using comparisons with hydrodynamic simulations carried out with the code FCI2 and postprocessed by Piranah, we have been able to reproduce the stimulated Raman and Brillouin scattering spectrum of the different beams. Using a methodology based on a statistical analysis for the gain calculations, we show that the behavior of the laser plasma instabilities in rugby hohlraums can be reproduced. The efficiency of laser smoothing techniques to mitigate these instabilities are discussed, and we show that while rugby hohlraums exhibit more laser plasma instabilities than cylinder hohlraum, the latter can be mitigated in the case of an elliptical hohlraum.

  3. Laser-plasmas in the relativistic-transparency regime: Science and applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández, Juan C.; Cort Gautier, D.; Huang, Chengkung; Palaniyappan, Sasikumar; Albright, Brian J.; Bang, Woosuk; Dyer, Gilliss; Favalli, Andrea; Hunter, James F.; Mendez, Jacob; Roth, Markus; Swinhoe, Martyn; Bradley, Paul A.; Deppert, Oliver; Espy, Michelle; Falk, Katerina; Guler, Nevzat; Hamilton, Christopher; Hegelich, Bjorn Manuel; Henzlova, Daniela; Ianakiev, Kiril D.; Iliev, Metodi; Johnson, Randall P.; Kleinschmidt, Annika; Losko, Adrian S.; McCary, Edward; Mocko, Michal; Nelson, Ronald O.; Roycroft, Rebecca; Santiago Cordoba, Miguel A.; Schanz, Victor A.; Schaumann, Gabriel; Schmidt, Derek W.; Sefkow, Adam; Shimada, Tsutomu; Taddeucci, Terry N.; Tebartz, Alexandra; Vogel, Sven C.; Vold, Erik; Wurden, Glen A.; Yin, Lin

    2017-05-01

    Laser-plasma interactions in the novel regime of relativistically induced transparency (RIT) have been harnessed to generate intense ion beams efficiently with average energies exceeding 10 MeV/nucleon (>100 MeV for protons) at "table-top" scales in experiments at the LANL Trident Laser. By further optimization of the laser and target, the RIT regime has been extended into a self-organized plasma mode. This mode yields an ion beam with much narrower energy spread while maintaining high ion energy and conversion efficiency. This mode involves self-generation of persistent high magnetic fields (˜104 T, according to particle-in-cell simulations of the experiments) at the rear-side of the plasma. These magnetic fields trap the laser-heated multi-MeV electrons, which generate a high localized electrostatic field (˜0.1 T V/m). After the laser exits the plasma, this electric field acts on a highly structured ion-beam distribution in phase space to reduce the energy spread, thus separating acceleration and energy-spread reduction. Thus, ion beams with narrow energy peaks at up to 18 MeV/nucleon are generated reproducibly with high efficiency (≈5%). The experimental demonstration has been done with 0.12 PW, high-contrast, 0.6 ps Gaussian 1.053 μm laser pulses irradiating planar foils up to 250 nm thick at 2-8 × 1020 W/cm2. These ion beams with co-propagating electrons have been used on Trident for uniform volumetric isochoric heating to generate and study warm-dense matter at high densities. These beam plasmas have been directed also at a thick Ta disk to generate a directed, intense point-like Bremsstrahlung source of photons peaked at ˜2 MeV and used it for point projection radiography of thick high density objects. In addition, prior work on the intense neutron beam driven by an intense deuterium beam generated in the RIT regime has been extended. Neutron spectral control by means of a flexible converter-disk design has been demonstrated, and the neutron beam has

  4. Plasma physics and nuclear fusion research

    CERN Document Server

    Gill, Richard D

    1981-01-01

    Plasma Physics and Nuclear Fusion Research covers the theoretical and experimental aspects of plasma physics and nuclear fusion. The book starts by providing an overview and survey of plasma physics; the theory of the electrodynamics of deformable media and magnetohydrodynamics; and the particle orbit theory. The text also describes the plasma waves; the kinetic theory; the transport theory; and the MHD stability theory. Advanced theories such as microinstabilities, plasma turbulence, anomalous transport theory, and nonlinear laser plasma interaction theory are also considered. The book furthe

  5. Laser plasma ion implantation and deposition of platinum for SiC-based hydrogen detector fabrication

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fominski, V. Yu., E-mail: vyfominskij@mephi.ru [National Research Nuclear University MEPhI, Kashirskoe sh., 31, Moscow 115409 (Russian Federation); Grigoriev, S.N. [Moscow State University of Technology STANKIN, Vadkovskii per., 3a, Moscow 127005 (Russian Federation); Romanov, R.I. [National Research Nuclear University MEPhI, Kashirskoe sh., 31, Moscow 115409 (Russian Federation); Gnedovets, A.G. [Baikov Institute of Metallurgy and Materials Science, Russian Academy of Sciences, Leninsky Prospect 49, Moscow 119991 (Russian Federation); Chernykh, P.N. [Lomonosov Moscow State University Scobeltsyn Institute of Nuclear Physics, 1(2) Leninskie Gory, GSP-1, Moscow 119991 (Russian Federation)

    2013-10-15

    Highlights: •Pt ion implantation and film deposition were carried out using pulsed laser plume. •Experimental diagnostics and modeling of Pt ion implantation in SiC were performed. •Mechanism of Pt depth distribution in SiC substrate was determined. •Layered structure of Pt on Pt-doped SiC crystal was used to detect hydrogen at 500 °C. •The response of sensor to hydrogen was pronounced and stable after long-term tests. -- Abstract: A pulsed plasma plume obtained by pulsed laser irradiation of a Pt target was used to fabricate a hydrogen sensor on a 6H–SiC single crystal by means of ion implantation followed by thin film deposition. To realize the ion implantation, high voltage pulses with positive polarity were applied to the Pt target when the laser plasma expanded from the target to the SiC substrate. Experimental diagnostics of pulsed ion beams extracted from laser-produced plasma were performed and the structure of the SiC crystal after high-temperature (500 °C) ion implantation was studied by Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy of {sup 4}He{sup +} ions. At the same time, a one-dimensional model of the plasma movement in a pulsed electric field was developed and simulations were carried out using the particle-in-cell method. Modeling allowed determination of the ion energy distribution depending on the delay time of the high voltage pulse after the laser pulse. The calculated energy distribution of Pt ions was used to predict the depth profile of implanted Pt ions in the SiC substrate. The predicted profile agreed sufficiently well with the experimentally measured depth distribution of Pt in the SiC substrate. To characterize the fabricated SiC sensor, the current flow through a barrier structure was studied. The volt–ampere characteristics of the structure were measured in air and in a mixture of air and hydrogen (2%) at a temperature of 500 °C. The characteristic value of the change in voltage exceeded 2 V at the bias current of 1 mA when

  6. Microfabrication of through holes in polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) sheets using a laser plasma EUV source (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makimura, Tetsuya; Urai, Hikari; Niino, Hiroyuki

    2017-03-01

    Polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) is a material used for cell culture substrates / bio-chips and micro total analysis systems / lab-on-chips due to its flexibility, chemical / thermo-dynamic stability, bio-compatibility, transparency and moldability. For further development, it is inevitable to develop a technique to fabricate precise three dimensional structures on micrometer-scale at high aspect ratio. In the previous works, we reported a technique for high-quality micromachining of PDMS without chemical modification, by means of photo direct machining using laser plasma EUV sources. In the present work, we have investigated fabrication of through holes. The EUV radiations around 10 nm were generated by irradiation of Ta targets with Nd:YAG laser light (10 ns, 500 mJ/pulse). The generated EUV radiations were focused using an ellipsoidal mirror. It has a narrower incident angle than those in the previous works in order to form a EUV beam with higher directivity, so that higher aspect structures can be fabricated. The focused EUV beam was incident on PDMS sheets with a thickness of 15 micrometers, through holes in a contact mask placed on top of them. Using a contact mask with holes with a diameter of three micrometers, complete through holes with a diameter of two micrometers are fabricated in the PDMS sheet. Using a contact mask with two micrometer holes, however, ablation holes almost reaches to the back side of the PDMS sheet. The fabricated structures can be explained in terms of geometrical optics. Thus, we have developed a technique for micromachining of PDMS sheets at high aspect ratios.

  7. Time-resolved absolute measurements by electro-optic effect of giant electromagnetic pulses due to laser-plasma interaction in nanosecond regime

    Science.gov (United States)

    Consoli, F.; de Angelis, R.; Duvillaret, L.; Andreoli, P. L.; Cipriani, M.; Cristofari, G.; di Giorgio, G.; Ingenito, F.; Verona, C.

    2016-06-01

    We describe the first electro-optical absolute measurements of electromagnetic pulses (EMPs) generated by laser-plasma interaction in nanosecond regime. Laser intensities are inertial-confinement-fusion (ICF) relevant and wavelength is 1054 nm. These are the first direct EMP amplitude measurements with the detector rather close and in direct view of the plasma. A maximum field of 261 kV/m was measured, two orders of magnitude higher than previous measurements by conductive probes on nanosecond regime lasers with much higher energy. The analysis of measurements and of particle-in-cell simulations indicates that signals match the emission of charged particles detected in the same experiment, and suggests that anisotropic particle emission from target, X-ray photoionization and charge implantation on surfaces directly exposed to plasma, could be important EMP contributions. Significant information achieved on EMP features and sources is crucial for future plants of laser-plasma acceleration and inertial-confinement-fusion and for the use as effective plasma diagnostics. It also opens to remarkable applications of laser-plasma interaction as intense source of RF-microwaves for studies on materials and devices, EMP-radiation-hardening and electromagnetic compatibility. The demonstrated extreme effectivity of electric-fields detection in laser-plasma context by electro-optic effect, leads to great potential for characterization of laser-plasma interaction and generated Terahertz radiation.

  8. Performance Optimization of a High-Repetition-Rate KrF Laser Plasma X-Ray Source for Microlithography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bukerk, F; Louis, E; Turcu, E C; Tallents, G J; Batani, D

    1992-01-01

    In order to develop a high-intensity laser plasma x-ray source appropriate for industrial application of x-ray lithography, experiments have been carried out using a high-repetition-rate (up to 40 Hz) excimer laser (249 nm, 300 mJ) with a power density of 2 × 1013 W/ cm2 in the laser focus. In this study emphasis is given to remedying specific problems inherent in operating the laser plasma x-ray source at high repetition rates and in its prolonged operation. Two different methods of minimizing the production of target debris are investigated. First, the use of helium as a quenching gas results in a reduction of the amount of atomic debris particles by more than two orders of magnitude with negligible x-ray absorption. Second, a tape target as opposed to a solid target reduces the production of larger debris particles by a further factor of 100. Remaining debris is stopped by an aluminized plastic or beryllium filter used to avoid exposure of the resist by plasma ultraviolet radiation. The x-ray source has been used to image x-ray transmission mask structures down to 0.3 μm onto general purpose x-ray photo-resist. Results have been analyzed with SEM. The x-ray emission spectrum of the repetitive laser plasmas created from an iron target has been recorded and the conversion efficiency of the laser light into x-rays that contribute to exposure of the resist was measured to be 0.3% over 2π sr.

  9. Kilohertz sources of hard x rays and fast ions with femtosecond laser plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thoss, A.; Richardson, M.; Korn, G.; Faubel, M.; Stiel, H.; Vogt, U.; Elsaesser, T.

    2003-01-01

    We demonstrate a new, stable, kilohertz femtosecond laser plasma source of hard-x-ray continuum and Kα emission that uses a microscopic liquid jet target that is continuous and debris free. Plasmas produced by ultrashort (50-fs) intense laser pulses from a fine (10-30-μm diameter) liquid Ga jet emit bright 9.3- and 10.3-keV Kα and Kβ lines superimposed on a multikilovolt bremmstrahlung continuum. Kilohertz femtosecond x-ray sources will find many applications in time-resolved x-ray diffraction and microscopy studies. As high-intensity lasers become more compact and operate at increasingly high repetition-rates, they require a target configuration that is both repeatable from shot to shot and debris free. Our target provides a pristine, unperturbed filament surface at rates >100 kHz. A number of liquid metal targets are considered. We show the hard-x-ray spectrum described above. The source was generated by a 50-fs-duration, 1-kHz, 2-W, high-intensity Ti:sapphire laser. Using the same technology, we also generate forward-going sub-mega-electron-volt (sub-MeV) protons from a 10-μm liquid water target at 1-kHz repetition rates. Kilohertz sources of high-energy ions will find many applications in time-resolved particle interaction studies and will lead to efficient generation of short-lived isotopes for use in nuclear medicine and other applications. The protons were detected with CR-39 track detectors in both the forward and the backward directions up to energies of ~500 keV. As the intensity of compact high-repetition-rate lasers sources increases, we can expect improvements in the energy, conversion efficiency, and directionality to occur. The effect of these developments is discussed. As compact, high-repetition-rate femtosecond laser technology reaches focused intensities of ~1019 W/cm2, many new applications of high-repetition-rate hard-x-ray and MeV ion sources will become practical.

  10. Modeling Laser-Plasma Interactions at Direct-Drive Ignition-Relevant Plasma Conditions at the National Ignition Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solodov, A. A.; Rosenberg, M. J.; Myatt, J. F.; Epstein, R.; Seka, W.; Hohenberger, M.; Short, R. W.; Shaw, J. G.; Regan, S. P.; Froula, D. H.; Radha, P. B.; Bates, J. W.; Schmitt, A. J.; Michel, P.; Moody, J. D.; Ralph, J. E.; Turnbull, D. P.; Barrios, M. A.

    2016-10-01

    Laser-plasma interaction instabilities, such as two-plasmon decay (TPD) and stimulated Raman scattering (SRS), can be detrimental for direct-drive inertial confinement fusion because of target preheat by generated high-energy electrons. The radiation-hydrodynamics code DRACO has been used to design planar-target experiments that generate plasma and interaction conditions relevant to direct-drive-ignition designs (IL 1015 W / cm 2 , Te > 3 KeV density gradient scale lengths of Ln 600 μm) . The hot-electron temperature of 40to50keV and the fraction of laser energy converted to hot electrons of 0.5to were inferred based on comparing the simulated and experimentally observed x-ray emission when the laser intensity at the quarter-critical surface increased from 6 to 15 ×1014 W / cm 2 . The measured SRS energy was sufficient to explain the observed total energy in hot electrons. Implications for ignition-scale direct-drive experiments and hot-electron preheat mitigation using mid- Z ablators will be discussed. This material is based upon work supported by the Department of Energy National Nuclear Security Administration under Award Number DE-NA0001944.

  11. Plasma scale-length effects on electron energy spectra in high-irradiance laser plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Culfa, O.; Tallents, G. J.; Rossall, A. K.; Wagenaars, E.; Ridgers, C. P.; Murphy, C. D.; Dance, R. J.; Gray, R. J.; McKenna, P.; Brown, C. D. R.; James, S. F.; Hoarty, D. J.; Booth, N.; Robinson, A. P. L.; Lancaster, K. L.; Pikuz, S. A.; Faenov, A. Ya.; Kampfer, T.; Schulze, K. S.; Uschmann, I.; Woolsey, N. C.

    2016-04-01

    An analysis of an electron spectrometer used to characterize fast electrons generated by ultraintense (1020W cm-2 ) laser interaction with a preformed plasma of scale length measured by shadowgraphy is presented. The effects of fringing magnetic fields on the electron spectral measurements and the accuracy of density scale-length measurements are evaluated. 2D EPOCH PIC code simulations are found to be in agreement with measurements of the electron energy spectra showing that laser filamentation in plasma preformed by a prepulse is important with longer plasma scale lengths (>8 μ m ).

  12. LASER PLASMA AND LASER APPLICATIONS: Plasma transparency in laser absorption waves in metal capillaries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anisimov, V. N.; Kozolupenko, A. P.; Sebrant, A. Yu

    1988-12-01

    An experimental investigation was made of the plasma transparency to heating radiation in capillaries when absorption waves propagated in these capillaries as a result of interaction with a CO2 laser pulse of 5-μs duration. When the length of the capillary was in excess of 20 mm, total absorption of the radiation by the plasma was observed at air pressures of 1-100 kPa. When the capillary length was 12 mm, a partial recovery of the transparency took place. A comparison was made with the dynamics and recovery of the plasma transparency when breakdown of air took place near the free surface.

  13. kHz femtosecond laser-plasma hard X-ray and fast ion source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thoss, A.; Korn, G.; Richardson, M. C.; Faubel, M.; Stiel, H.; Voigt, U.; Siders, C. W.; Elsaesser, T.

    2002-04-01

    We describe the first demonstration of a new stable, kHz femtosecond laser-plasma source of hard x-ray continuum and Kα emission using a thin liquid metallic jet target. kHz femtosecond x-ray sources will find many applications in time-resolved x-ray diffraction and microscopy studies. As high intensity lasers become more compact and operate at increasingly high repetition-rates, they require a target configuration that is both repeatable from shot-to-shot and is debris-free. We have solved this requirement with the use of a fine (10-30 μm diameter) liquid metal jet target that provides a pristine, unperturbed filament surface at rates >100 kHz. A number of liquid metal targets are considered. We will show hard x-ray spectra recorded from liquid Ga targets that show the generation of the 9.3 keV and 10.3 keV, Kα and Kβ lines superimposed on a multi-keV Bremsstrahlung continuum. This source was generated by a 50fs duration, 1 kHz, 2W, high intensity Ti:Sapphire laser. We will discuss the extension of this source to higher powers and higher repetition rates, providing harder x-ray emission, with the incorporation of pulse-shaping and other techniques to enhance the x-ray conversion efficiency. Using the same liquid target technology, we have also demonstrated the generation of forward-going sub-MeV protons from a 10 μm liquid water target at 1 kHz repetition rates. kHz sources of high energy ions will find many applications in time-resolved particle interaction studies, as well as lead to the efficient generation of short-lived isotopes for use in nuclear medicine and other applications. The protons were detected with CR-39 track detectors both in the forward and backward directions up to energies of ~500 keV. As the intensity of compact high repetition-rate lasers sources increase, we can expect improvements in the energy, conversion efficiency and directionality to occur. The impact of these developments on a number of fields will be discussed. As compact

  14. Laser-plasma accelerator and femtosecond photon sources-based ultrafast radiation chemistry and biophysics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gauduel, Y. A.

    2017-02-01

    The initial distribution of energy deposition triggered by the interaction of ionizing radiations (far UV and X rays, electron, proton and accelerated ions) with molecular targets or integrated biological systems is often decisive for the spatio-temporal behavior of radiation effects that take place on several orders of magnitude. This contribution deals with an interdisciplinary approach that concerns cutting-edge advances on primary radiation events, considering the potentialities of innovating strategies based on ultrafast laser science, from femtosecond photon sources to laser-driven relativistic particles acceleration. Recent advances of powerful TW laser sources (~ 1019 Wcm‑2) and laser-plasma interactions providing ultrashort relativistic particle beams in the energy domain 2.5–150 MeV open exciting opportunities for the development of high-energy radiation femtochemistry (HERF). Early radiation damages being dependent on the survival probability of secondary electrons and radial distribution of short-lived radicals inside ionization clusters, a thorough knowledge of these processes involves the real-time probing of primary events in the temporal range 10‑14–10‑11 s. In the framework of a closed synergy between low-energy radiation femtochemistry (LERF) and the emerging domain of HERF, the paper focuses on early phenomena that occur in the prethermal regime of low-energy secondary electrons, considering very short-lived quantum effects in aqueous environments. A high dose-rate delivered by femtosecond electron beam (~ 1011–1013 Gy s‑1) can be used to investigate early radiation processes in native ionization tracks, down to 10‑12 s and 10‑9 m. We explain how this breakthrough favours the innovating development of real-time nanodosimetry in biologically relevant environments and open new perspectives for spatio-temporal radiation biophysics. The emerging domain of HERF would provide guidance for understanding the specific bioeffects of

  15. Laser Plasmas : Multiple charge states of titanium ions in laser produced plasma

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    M Shukla; S Bandhyopadhyay; V N Rai; A V Kilpio; H C Pant

    2000-11-01

    An intense laser radiation (1012 to 1014 W/cm-2) focused on the solid target creates a hot (≥ 1 keV) and dense plasma having high ionization state. The multiple charged ions with high current densities produced during laser matter interaction have potential application in accelerators as an ion source. This paper presents generation and detection of highly stripped titanium ions (Ti) in laser produced plasma. An Nd:glass laser (KAMETRON) delivering 50 J energy ( = 0.53 m) in 2.5 ns was focused onto a titanium target to produce plasma. This plasma was allowed to drift across a space of ∼ 3 m through a diagnostic hole in the focusing mirror before ions are finally detected with the help of electrostatic ion analyzer. Maximum current density was detected for the charge states of +16 and +17 of Ti ions for laser intensity of ∼ 1014 W/cm-2.

  16. Plasma physics

    CERN Document Server

    Drummond, James E

    2013-01-01

    A historic snapshot of the field of plasma physics, this fifty-year-old volume offers an edited collection of papers by pioneering experts in the field. In addition to assisting students in their understanding of the foundations of classical plasma physics, it provides a source of historic context for modern physicists. Highly successful upon its initial publication, this book was the standard text on plasma physics throughout the 1960s and 70s.Hailed by Science magazine as a ""well executed venture,"" the three-part treatment ranges from basic plasma theory to magnetohydrodynamics and microwa

  17. Generation of attosecond electron bunches in a laser-plasma accelerator using a plasma density upramp

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weikum, M.K., E-mail: maria.weikum@desy.de [Deutsches Elektronensynchrotron (DESY), Bdg. 30b, Notkestr. 85, 22607 Hamburg (Germany); Department of Physics, University of Strathclyde, G4 0NG Glasgow (United Kingdom); Li, F.Y. [Department of Physics, University of Strathclyde, G4 0NG Glasgow (United Kingdom); Assmann, R.W. [Deutsches Elektronensynchrotron (DESY), Bdg. 30b, Notkestr. 85, 22607 Hamburg (Germany); Sheng, Z.M. [Department of Physics, University of Strathclyde, G4 0NG Glasgow (United Kingdom); Laboratory for Laser Plasmas and Department of Physics and Astronomy, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai 200240 (China); Jaroszynski, D. [Department of Physics, University of Strathclyde, G4 0NG Glasgow (United Kingdom)

    2016-09-01

    Attosecond electron bunches and attosecond radiation pulses enable the study of ultrafast dynamics of matter in an unprecedented regime. In this paper, the suitability for the experimental realization of a novel scheme producing sub-femtosecond duration electron bunches from laser-wakefield acceleration in plasma with self-injection in a plasma upramp profile has been investigated. While it has previously been predicted that this requires laser power above a few hundred terawatts typically, here we show that the scheme can be extended with reduced driving laser powers down to tens of terawatts, generating accelerated electron pulses with minimum length of around 166 attoseconds and picocoulombs charge. Using particle-in-cell simulations and theoretical models, the evolution of the accelerated electron bunch within the plasma as well as simple scalings of the bunch properties with initial laser and plasma parameters are presented. - Highlights: • LWFA with an upramp density profile can trap and accelerate sub-fs electron beams. • A reduction of the necessary threshold laser intensity by a factor 4 is presented. • Electron properties are tuned by varying initial laser and plasma parameters. • Simulations predict electron bunch lengths below 200 attoseconds with pC charge. • Strong bunch evolution effects and a large energy spread still need to be improved.

  18. Laser Plasmas : Density oscillations in laser produced plasma decelerated by external magnetic field

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    V N Rai; M Shukla; H C Pant

    2000-11-01

    This paper presents the dynamics as well as the stability of laser produced plasma expanding across the magnetic field. Observation of some high frequency fluctuations superimposed on ion saturation current along with structuring in the pin hole images of x-ray emitting plasma plume indicate the presence of instability in the plasma. Two type of slope in the variation of x-ray emission with laser intensity in the absence and presence of magnetic field shows appearance of different threshold intensity of laser corresponding to each magnetic field at which this instability or density fluctuation sets on. This instability has been identified as a large Larmor radius instability instead of classical Rayleigh-Taylor (R-T) instability.

  19. Laser plasma simulations of the generation processes of Alfven and collisionless shock waves in space plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prokopov, P. A.; Zakharov, Yu P.; Tishchenko, V. N.; Shaikhislamov, I. F.; Boyarintsev, E. L.; Melekhov, A. V.; Ponomarenko, A. G.; Posukh, V. G.; Terekhin, V. A.

    2016-11-01

    Generation of Alfven waves propagating along external magnetic field B0 and Collisionless Shock Waves propagating across B0 are studied in experiments with laser- produced plasma and magnetized background plasma. The collisionless interaction of interpenetrating plasma flows takes place through a so-called Magnetic Laminar Mechanism (MLM) or Larmor Coupling. At the edge of diamagnetic cavity LP-ions produce induction electric field Eφ which accelerates BP-ions while LP-ions rotate in opposite direction. The ions movement generates sheared azimuthal magnetic field Bφ which could launches torsional Alfven wave. In previous experiments at KI-1 large scale facility a generation of strong perturbations propagating across B0 with magnetosonic speed has been studied at a moderate value of interaction parameter δ∼0.3. In the present work we report on experiments at conditions of 5∼R2 and large Alfven-Mach number MA∼10 in which strong transverse perturbations traveling at a scale of ∼1 m in background plasma at a density of ∼3*1013 cm-3 is observed. At the same conditions but smaller MA ∼ 2 a generation, the structure and dynamic of Alfven wave with wavelength ∼0.5 m propagating along fields B0∼100÷500 G for a distance of ∼2.5 m is studied.

  20. Radiation from particles moving in small-scale magnetic fields created in solid-density laser-plasma laboratory experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keenan, Brett D., E-mail: bdkeenan@ku.edu; Medvedev, Mikhail V. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Kansas, Lawrence, Kansas 66045 (United States)

    2015-11-15

    Plasmas created by high-intensity lasers are often subject to the formation of kinetic-streaming instabilities, such as the Weibel instability, which lead to the spontaneous generation of high-amplitude, tangled magnetic fields. These fields typically exist on small spatial scales, i.e., “sub-Larmor scales.” Radiation from charged particles moving through small-scale electromagnetic (EM) turbulence has spectral characteristics distinct from both synchrotron and cyclotron radiation, and it carries valuable information on the statistical properties of the EM field structure and evolution. Consequently, this radiation from laser-produced plasmas may offer insight into the underlying electromagnetic turbulence. Here, we investigate the prospects for, and demonstrate the feasibility of, such direct radiative diagnostics for mildly relativistic, solid-density laser plasmas produced in lab experiments.

  1. Automated detection and analysis of particle beams in laser-plasma accelerator simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ushizima, Daniela Mayumi; Geddes, C.G.; Cormier-Michel, E.; Bethel, E. Wes; Jacobsen, J.; Prabhat, ,; R.ubel, O.; Weber, G,; Hamann, B.

    2010-05-21

    Numerical simulations of laser-plasma wakefield (particle) accelerators model the acceleration of electrons trapped in plasma oscillations (wakes) left behind when an intense laser pulse propagates through the plasma. The goal of these simulations is to better understand the process involved in plasma wake generation and how electrons are trapped and accelerated by the wake. Understanding of such accelerators, and their development, offer high accelerating gradients, potentially reducing size and cost of new accelerators. One operating regime of interest is where a trapped subset of electrons loads the wake and forms an isolated group of accelerated particles with low spread in momentum and position, desirable characteristics for many applications. The electrons trapped in the wake may be accelerated to high energies, the plasma gradient in the wake reaching up to a gigaelectronvolt per centimeter. High-energy electron accelerators power intense X-ray radiation to terahertz sources, and are used in many applications including medical radiotherapy and imaging. To extract information from the simulation about the quality of the beam, a typical approach is to examine plots of the entire dataset, visually determining the adequate parameters necessary to select a subset of particles, which is then further analyzed. This procedure requires laborious examination of massive data sets over many time steps using several plots, a routine that is unfeasible for large data collections. Demand for automated analysis is growing along with the volume and size of simulations. Current 2D LWFA simulation datasets are typically between 1GB and 100GB in size, but simulations in 3D are of the order of TBs. The increase in the number of datasets and dataset sizes leads to a need for automatic routines to recognize particle patterns as particle bunches (beam of electrons) for subsequent analysis. Because of the growth in dataset size, the application of machine learning techniques for

  2. Progress on laser plasma accelerator development using transverselyand longitudinally shaped plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leemans, Wim P.; Esarey, E.; Geddes, C.G.R.; Toth, Cs.; Schroeder, C.B.; Nakamura, K.; Gonsalves, A.J.; Panasenko, D.; Cormier-Michel, E.; Plateau, G.R.; Lin, C.; Bruhwiler, D.L.; Cary, J.R.

    2009-03-31

    A summary of progress at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory is given on: (1) experiments on down-ramp injection; (2) experiments on acceleration in capillary discharge plasma channels; and (3) simulations of a staged laser wakefield accelerator (LWFA). Control of trapping in a LWFA using plasma density down-ramps produced electron bunches with absolute longitudinal and transverse momentum spreads more than ten times lower than in previous experiments (0.17 and 0.02 MeV Ic FWHM, respectively) and with central momenta of 0.76 +- 0.02 MeV Ic, stable over a week of operation. Experiments were also carried out using a 40 TW laser interacting with a hydrogen-filled capillary discharge waveguide. For a 15 mm long, 200 mu m diameter capillary, quasi-monoenergetic bunches up to 300 MeV were observed. By detuning discharge delay from optimum guiding performance, self-trapping was found to be stabilized. For a 33 mm long, 300 mu m capillary, a parameter regime with high energy bunches, up to 1 Ge V, was found. In this regime, peak electron energy was correlated with the amount of trapped charge. Simulations show that bunches produced on a down-ramn and iniected into a channel-guided LWFA can produce stable beams with 0.2 MeV Ic-class momentum spread at high energies.

  3. Generation of tens-of-MeV photons by compton backscatter from laser-plasma-accelerated GeV electrons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaw, J. M.; Bernstein, A. C.; Hannasch, A.; LaBerge, M.; Chang, Y.-Y.; Weichman, K.; Welch, J.; Zgadzaj, R.; Henderson, W.; Tsai, H.-E.; Fazel, N.; Wang, X.; Wagner, C.; Donovan, M.; Dyer, G.; Gaul, E.; Gordon, J.; Martinez, M.; Spinks, M.; Toncian, T.; Ditmire, T.; Downer, M. C.

    2017-03-01

    Previous work has demonstrated the use of a plasma mirror (PM), after a laser-plasma accelerator (LPA), for generating Compton γ-rays by retro-reflecting the spent laser pulse into the just-accelerated electrons. Here, we investigate the use of a PM to stimulate Compton backscatter (CBS) by retro-reflecting a spent pulse from the Texas Petawatt (TPW) laser after it has driven a cm-scale, GeV LPA. A comparative analysis between the electron and CBS pointing and divergence reveals strong agreement, from shot-to-shot, suggesting a reliable, non-invasive extension for GeV-beam metrology. Our observations confirm the self-aligning PM method is scalable to GeV LPAs, while also suggesting a technique with unique advantages and a robustness that can potentially be exploited for investigations of nonlinear Compton backscatter from ultralow divergence, GeV electrons using the Texas Petawatt Laser.

  4. Laser-Plasma Interaction Near the Quarter-Critical Density in Direct-Drive Inertial Confinement Fusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maximov, A. V.; Wen, H.; Myatt, J. F.; Short, R. W.; Ren, C.

    2016-10-01

    The laser-plasma interaction (LPI) near the quarter-critical density in direct-drive inertial confinement fusion (ICF) plasmas strongly influences the coupling of laser energy to the target and the generation of fast electrons capable of preheating the target fuel. The full modeling of LPI near the quarter-critical density includes the interplay between two-plasmon decay and stimulated Raman scattering instabilities as well as ion-acoustic perturbations. The results of the kinetic particle-in-cell simulations are in agreement with the simulation results from the fluid-type code. The fast-electron flux and the ω/2 half-omega light spectra are calculated for the parameters relevant to direct-drive ICF experiments on the OMEGA Laser System and at the National Ignition Facility. This material is based upon work supported by the Department of Energy National Nuclear Security Administration under Award Number DE-NA0001944.

  5. Role of spectroscopic diagnostics in studying nanosecond laser-plasma interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burger, Miloš; Pantić, Dragan; Nikolić, Zoran; Djeniže, Stevan

    2017-05-01

    We studied the impact of varying the intensity of Nd:YAG nanosecond 1.06 μm laser radiation on the morphology and internal structure of copper plasma plumes were examined. Standard diagnostic techniques used to deduce axial distributions of electron density and temperature revealed effects of a pronounced plasma screening regime. Methods of fast imaging spectroscopy are used to examine the transition from weak- to high-screening plasma, applying irradiance on the order of 109 W cm-2 in helium atmosphere. Behavior of both ionized and neutral species was observed up to 1 μs after the laser pulse. Showing significant differences with an increase of laser irradiance, the change in plasma propagation mechanisms is attributed to internal shockwave dynamics within the plasma plume. Implications of observed behavior to plasma uniformity can affect diagnostics, and are relevant to both modeling and applications. Contribution to the Topical Issue "Physics of Ionized Gases (SPIG 2016)", edited by Goran Poparic, Bratislav Obradovic, Dragana Maric and Aleksandar Milosavljevic.

  6. EFFECTS OF LASER RADIATION ON MATTER. LASER PLASMA: Thresholds of surface plasma formation by the interaction of laser pulses with a metal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borets-Pervak, I. Yu; Vorob'ev, V. S.

    1995-04-01

    An analysis is made of a model of the formation of a surface laser plasma which takes account of the heating and vaporisation of thermally insulated surface microdefects. This model is used in an interpretation of experiments in which such a plasma has been formed by irradiation of a titanium target with microsecond CO2 laser pulses. A comparison with the experimental breakdown intensities is used to calculate the average sizes of microdefects and their concentration: the results are in agreement with the published data. The dependence of the delay time of plasma formation on the total energy in a laser pulse is calculated.

  7. Efficient Modeling of Laser-Plasma Accelerators with INF&RNO

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benedetti, C.; Schroeder, C. B.; Esarey, E.; Geddes, C. G. R.; Leemans, W. P.

    2010-06-01

    The numerical modeling code INF&RNO (INtegrated Fluid& paRticle simulatioN cOde, pronounced"inferno") is presented. INF&RNO is an efficient 2D cylindrical code to model the interaction of a short laser pulse with an underdense plasma. The code is based on an envelope model for the laser while either a PIC or a fluid description can be used for the plasma. The effect of the laser pulse on the plasma is modeled with the time-averaged poderomotive force. These and other features allow for a speedup of 2-4 orders of magnitude compared to standard full PIC simulations while still retaining physical fidelity. The code has been benchmarked against analytical solutions and 3D PIC simulations and here a set of validation tests together with a discussion of the performances are presented.

  8. Efficient Modeling of Laser-Plasma Accelerators with INF&RNO

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benedetti, C.; Schroeder, C. B.; Esarey, E.; Geddes, C. G. R.; Leemans, W. P.

    2010-11-01

    The numerical modeling code INF&RNO (INtegrated Fluid & paRticle simulatioN cOde, pronounced "inferno") is presented. INF&RNO is an efficient 2D cylindrical code to model the interaction of a short laser pulse with an underdense plasma. The code is based on an envelope model for the laser while either a PIC or a fluid description can be used for the plasma. The effect of the laser pulse on the plasma is modeled with the time-averaged poderomotive force. These and other features allow for a speedup of 2-4 orders of magnitude compared to standard full PIC simulations while still retaining physical fidelity. The code has been benchmarked against analytical solutions and 3D PIC simulations and here a set of validation tests together with a discussion of the performances are presented.

  9. 激光等离子体相互作用中Weibel不稳定性%Weibel instabilities in ultraintense laser-plasma interaction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    阿不都热苏力; 帕尔哈提; 王倩

    2012-01-01

    The paper studies Weibel instabilities in ultra intense laser-plasma interactions and its mechanism by using relati-vistic particle-in-cell method, and gives linear dispersion relations, saturated magnetic fields and anisotropy parameters of Weibel instabilities. It is found that the presence of Weibel instabilities in ultraintense laser-plasma interactions makes the self-generated magnetic field saturate, and then the saturated magnetic field causes the anisotropy of particle velocity distribution along the laser propagation direction. The linear and non-linear saturation processes of Weibel instabilities are also discussed. These results may be important for understanding the static magnetic field generation and fast electron propagation in the fast ignition physics.%利用粒子模拟法对超强激光与等离子体相互作用中产生的Weibel不稳定性及其产生机制进行了详细的研究.给出不稳定性的线性色散关系和饱和磁场与各向异性参数之间的函数关系,发现Weibel不稳定性的存在使超强激光在等离子体中激发的自生磁场饱和,饱和自生磁场的存在使粒子速度分布在激光传播方向上表现出各向异性.讨论了Weibel不稳定性的线性和非线性饱和过程,对更好地理解快点火物理中自生磁场的产生、快电子输运等过程有重要意义.

  10. Time-resolved X-ray diffraction with accelerator- and laser-plasma-based X-ray sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nicoul, Matthieu

    2010-09-01

    Femtosecond X-ray pulses are a powerful tool to investigate atomic motions triggered by femtosecond pump pulses. This thesis is dedicated to the production of such pulses and their use in optical pump - X-ray probe measurement. This thesis describes the laser-plasma-based sources available at the University of Duisburg-Essen. Part of it consists of the description of the design, built-up and characterization of a new ''modular'' X-ray source dedicated to optimize the X-ray flux onto the sample under investigation. The acoustic wave generation in femtosecond optically excited semiconductor (gallium arsenide) and metal (gold) was performed using the sources of the University of Duisburg-Essen. The physical answer of the material was modeled by a simple strain model for the semiconductor, pressure model for the metal, in order to gain information on the interplay of the electronic and thermal pressures rising after excitation. Whereas no reliable information could be obtain in gallium arsenide (principally due to the use of a bulk), the model for gold achieved very good agreement, providing useful information. The relaxation time of the electron to lattice energy was found to be (5.0{+-}0.3) ps, and the ratio of the Grueneisen parameters was found to be {gamma}{sub e} / {gamma}{sub i} = (0.5{+-}0.1). This thesis also describes the Sub-Picosecond Pulse Source (SPPS) which existed at the (formally) Stanford Linear Accelerator Center, an accelerator-based X-ray source, and two measurements performed with it. The first one is the detailed investigation of the phonon softening of the A{sub 1g} mode launch in bismuth upon fluence excitation. Detailed information concerning the new equilibrium position and phonon frequency were obtained over extended laser pump fluences. The second measurement concerned the study of the liquid phase dynamics in a newly formed liquid phase following ultrafast melting in indium antimonide. The formation of the liquid phase

  11. A final report to the Laboratory Directed Research and Development committee on Project 93-ERP-075: ``X-ray laser propagation and coherence: Diagnosing fast-evolving, high-density laser plasmas using X-ray lasers``

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wan, A.S.; Cauble, R.; Da Silva, L.B.; Libby, S.B.; Moreno, J.C.

    1996-02-01

    This report summarizes the major accomplishments of this three-year Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) Exploratory Research Project (ERP) entitled ``X-ray Laser Propagation and Coherence: Diagnosing Fast-evolving, High-density Laser Plasmas Using X-ray Lasers,`` tracking code 93-ERP-075. The most significant accomplishment of this project is the demonstration of a new laser plasma diagnostic: a soft x-ray Mach-Zehnder interferometer using a neonlike yttrium x-ray laser at 155 {angstrom} as the probe source. Detailed comparisons of absolute two-dimensional electron density profiles obtained from soft x-ray laser interferograms and profiles obtained from radiation hydrodynamics codes, such as LASNEX, will allow us to validate and benchmark complex numerical models used to study the physics of laser-plasma interactions. Thus the development of soft x-ray interferometry technique provides a mechanism to probe the deficiencies of the numerical models and is an important tool for, the high-energy density physics and science-based stockpile stewardship programs. The authors have used the soft x-ray interferometer to study a number of high-density, fast evolving, laser-produced plasmas, such as the dynamics of exploding foils and colliding plasmas. They are pursuing the application of the soft x-ray interferometer to study ICF-relevant plasmas, such as capsules and hohlraums, on the Nova 10-beam facility. They have also studied the development of enhanced-coherence, shorter-pulse-duration, and high-brightness x-ray lasers. The utilization of improved x-ray laser sources can ultimately enable them to obtain three-dimensional holographic images of laser-produced plasmas.

  12. Droplet-based, high-brightness extreme ultraviolet laser plasma source for metrology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vinokhodov, A. Yu.; Krivokorytov, M. S.; Sidelnikov, Yu. V.; Krivtsun, V. M.; Medvedev, V. V.; Koshelev, K. N.

    2016-10-01

    We report on the development of a high brightness source of extreme ultraviolet radiation (EUV) with a working wavelength of 13.5 nm. The source is based on a laser-produced plasma driven by pulsed radiation of a Nd:YAG laser system. Liquid droplets of Sn-In eutectic alloy were used as the source fuel. The droplets were created by a droplet generator operating in the jet break-up regime. The EUV emission properties of the plasma, including the emission spectrum, time profile, and conversion efficiency of laser radiation into useful 13.5 nm photons, have been characterized. Using the shadowgraphy technique, we demonstrated the production of corpuscular debris by the plasma source and the influence of the plasma on the neighboring droplet targets. The high-frequency laser operation was simulated by usage of the dual pulse regime. Based on the experimental results, we discuss the physical phenomena that could affect the source operation at high repetition rates. Finally, we estimate that an average source brightness of 1.2 kW/mm2 sr is feasible at a high repetition rate.

  13. Development of low-energy x-ray fluorescence micro-distribution analysis using a laser plasma x-ray source and multilayer optics?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stuik, R.; Shmaenok, L. A.; Fledderus, H.; Andreev, S. S.; Shamov, E. A.; Zuev, S. Y.; Salashchenko, N. N.; F. Bijkerk,

    1999-01-01

    A new technique is presented for low-energy X-ray fluorescence micro-distribution analysis of low-Z elements at micrometer spatial resolutions. The technique is based on the use of a laser plasma X-ray source and spherically curved multilayer optics. A large collimator is used to focus the light fro

  14. Sub-70 nm resolution tabletop microscopy at 13.8 nm using a compact laser-plasma EUV source.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wachulak, Przemyslaw W; Bartnik, Andrzej; Fiedorowicz, Henryk

    2010-07-15

    We report the first (to our knowledge) demonstration of a tabletop, extreme UV (EUV) transmission microscope at 13.8 nm wavelength with a spatial (half-pitch) resolution of 69 nm. In the experiment, a compact laser-plasma EUV source based on a gas puff target is applied to illuminate an object. A multilayer ellipsoidal mirror is used to focus quasi-monochromatic EUV radiation onto the object, while a Fresnel zone plate objective forms the image. The experiment and the spatial resolution measurements, based on a knife-edge test, are described. The results might be useful for the realization of a compact high-resolution tabletop imaging systems for actinic defect characterization.

  15. An X-ray Imaging System for Hard-to-Reach Facility Diagnosis Using Femtosecond Laser-Plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oishi, Yuji; Nayuki, Takuya; Nakajima, Chikahito; Fujii, Takashi; Zhidkov, Alexei; Nemoto, Koshichi

    2010-04-01

    For hard-to-reach facility diagnosis, a radiographic testing system that consists of a compact laser-plasma X-ray (LPX) generator and a compact X-ray imaging sensor is shown to be competitive to that based on the isotope imaging. A 1-mm-thick CsI charge-coupled device (CCD) sensor supplied with a cooling system was developed to tolerate a long X-ray exposition. Even without optimization of X-ray yield from a Ta thin film irradiated by 230 mJ, 70 fs laser pulses, clear X-ray images of a SUS304 pipe (outer diameter 34 mm with 4.5 mm thickness) with an elbow were produced.

  16. Evolution of Electron Phase Orbits of Multi-photon Nonlinear Compton Scattering in High Power Laser-plasma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HAO Dong-shan; L(U) Jian

    2005-01-01

    The evolution of the electron phase orbits based on the multi-photon nonlinear Compton scattering with the high power laser-plasma is discussed by using Kroll-Morton-Rosenbluth theory. The random evolution of the un-captured electron phase orbits from periodicity to non-periodicity is found after the energy has been exchanged between the electron and photons. With the increase of the absorbed photon number n by an electron,this evolution will be more and more intense, while which is rapidly decreased with the enhancement of the collision non-flexibility ξ and their initial speeds of the electrons and photons, but this evolution is lower than that in the high power laser field. When the electrons are captured by the laser field, the evolution is finished, and the electrons will stably transport,and the photons don't provide the energy for these electrons any more.

  17. X-ray spectroscopic technique for energetic electron transport studies in short-pulse laser/plasma interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tutt, T.E.

    1994-12-01

    When a solid target is irradiated by a laser beam, the material is locally heated to a high temperature and a plasma forms. The interaction of the laser with plasma can produce energetic electrons. By observing the behavior of these {open_quotes}hot{close_quotes} electrons, we hope to obtain a better understanding of Laser/Plasma Interactions. In this work we employ a layered-fluorescer technique to study the transport, and therefore the energetics, of the electrons. The plasma forms on a thin foil of metallic Pd which is bonded to thin layer of metallic Sn. Electrons formed from the plasma penetrate first the Pd and then the Sn. In both layers the energetic electrons promote inner (K) shell ionization of the metallic atoms which leads to the emission of characteristic K{sub {alpha}} x-rays of the fluorescers. By recording the x-ray spectrum emitted by the two foils, we can estimate the energy-dependent range of the electrons and their numbers.

  18. Comparing Particle-in-Cell QED Models for High-Intensity Laser-Plasma Interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luedtke, Scott V.; Labun, Lance A.; Hegelich, Björn Manuel

    2016-10-01

    High-intensity lasers, such as the Texas Petawatt, are pushing into new regimes of laser-matter interaction, requiring continuing improvement and inclusion of new physics effects in computer simulations. Experiments at the Texas Petawatt are reaching intensity regimes where new physics-quantum electrodynamics (QED) corrections to otherwise classical plasma dynamics-becomes important. We have two particle-in-cell (PIC) codes with different QED implementations. We review the theory of photon emission in QED-strong fields, and cover the differing PIC implementations. We show predictions from the two codes and compare with ongoing experiments. This work was supported by NNSA cooperative agreement DE-NA0002008, the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency's PULSE program (12-63-PULSE-FP014) and the Air Force Office of Scientific Research (FA9550-14-1-0045). HPC resources provided by TACC.

  19. Prepulse-induced shock waves in the gas jet target of a laser plasma EUV radiation source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garbaruk, A. V.; Gritskevich, M. S.; Kalmykov, S. G.; Mozharov, A. M.; Sasin, M. E.

    2017-01-01

    In experiments with a laser-plasma EUV-radiation source, the main IR Nd:YAG laser pulse was preceded by that of a UV KrF excimer laser. Dramatic modulations of EUV plasma emissivity have been observed at long interpulse times, from hundreds of nanoseconds up to microseconds. To discover the nature of these prepulse-produced long-living perturbations of the target, a fluid dynamics numerical simulation of the Xe gas jet has been carried out. The prepulse has been found to generate a quasi-spherical shock wave with a thin dense front layer and a vast rarefied inside area. In the course of time, the front expands and simultaneously drifts downstream along with the gas. Depending on the interpulse time, the IR laser beam either intersects the dense layer or propagates within the rarefied gas cavity whereby the above-mentioned variations in the plasma emission can be explained. The possibilities of making use of the discovered phenomena to enhance the observed EUV plasma brightness are discussed.

  20. Plasma physics

    CERN Document Server

    Cairns, R A

    1985-01-01

    This book is intended as an introduction to plasma physics at a level suitable for advanced undergraduates or beginning postgraduate students in physics, applied mathematics or astrophysics. The main prerequisite is a knowledge of electromagnetism and of the associated mathematics of vector calculus. SI units are used throughout. There is still a tendency amongst some plasma physics researchers to· cling to C.g.S. units, but it is the author's view that universal adoption of SI units, which have been the internationally agreed standard since 1960, is to be encouraged. After a short introductory chapter, the basic properties of a plasma con­ cerning particle orbits, fluid theory, Coulomb collisions and waves are set out in Chapters 2-5, with illustrations drawn from problems in nuclear fusion research and space physics. The emphasis is on the essential physics involved and (he theoretical and mathematical approach has been kept as simple and intuitive as possible. An attempt has been made to draw attention t...

  1. A new criterion to describe crossed-beam energy transfer in laser-plasma interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trines, R.; Schmitz, H.; Alves, E. P.; Fiuza, F.; Vieira, J.; Silva, L. O.; Bingham, R.

    2016-10-01

    Crossed-beam energy transfer (CBET) between laser beams in underdense plasma is ubiquitous in both direct-drive and indirect-drive inertial confinement fusion. To understand the impact of this process on the final shape of the laser beams involved, as well as their imprint on either hohlraum walls or target surface, a detailed spatial and temporal description of the crossing beams is needed. We have developed an analytical model and derived new criteria describing both the spatial structure and temporal evolution of the beams after crossing. Numerical simulations have been carried out justifying the analytical model and confirming the criteria. The impact of our results on present and future multi-beam experiments in laser fusion and high-energy-density physics, in particular the ``bursty'' nature of beams predicted to occur in NIF experiments, will be discussed.

  2. Hybrid-PIC modeling of laser-plasma interactions and hot electron generation in gold hohlraum walls

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thoma, C.; Welch, D. R.; Clark, R. E.; Rose, D. V.; Golovkin, I. E.

    2017-06-01

    The walls of the hohlraum used in experiments at the national ignition facility are heated by laser beams with intensities ˜ 10 15 W/cm2, a wavelength of ˜ 1 / 3 μm, and pulse lengths on the order of a ns, with collisional absorption believed to be the primary heating mechanism. X-rays generated by the hot ablated plasma at the gold walls are then used to implode a target in the hohlraum interior. In addition to the collisional absorption of laser energy at the walls, non-linear laser-plasma interactions (LPI), such as stimulated Raman scattering and two plasmon decay, are believed to generate a population of supra-thermal electrons which, if present in the hohlraum, can have a deleterious effect on target implosion. We describe results of hohlraum modeling using a hybrid particle-in-cell code. To enable this work, new particle-based algorithms for a multiple-ion magneto-hydrodynamic (MHD) treatment, and a particle-based ray-tracing model were developed. The use of such hybrid methods relaxes the requirement to resolve the laser wavelength, and allows for relatively large-scale hohlraum simulations with a reasonable number of cells. But the non-linear effects which are believed to be the cause of hot electron generation can only be captured by fully kinetic simulations with good resolution of the laser wavelength. For this reason, we employ a two-tiered approach to hohlraum modeling. Large-scale simulations of the collisional absorption process can be conducted using the fast quasi-neutral MHD algorithm with fluid particle species. From these simulations, we can observe the time evolution of the hohlraum walls and characterize the density and temperature profiles. From these results, we can transition to smaller-scale highly resolved simulations using traditional kinetic particle-in-cell methods, from which we can fully model all of the non-linear laser-plasma interactions, as well as assess the details of the electron distribution function. We find that vacuum

  3. Transmutation prospect of long-lived nuclear waste induced by high-charge electron beam from laser plasma accelerator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, X. L.; Xu, Z. Y.; Luo, W.; Lu, H. Y.; Zhu, Z. C.; Yan, X. Q.

    2017-09-01

    Photo-transmutation of long-lived nuclear waste induced by a high-charge relativistic electron beam (e-beam) from a laser plasma accelerator is demonstrated. A collimated relativistic e-beam with a high charge of approximately 100 nC is produced from high-intensity laser interaction with near-critical-density (NCD) plasma. Such e-beam impinges on a high-Z convertor and then radiates energetic bremsstrahlung photons with flux approaching 1011 per laser shot. Taking a long-lived radionuclide 126Sn as an example, the resulting transmutation reaction yield is the order of 109 per laser shot, which is two orders of magnitude higher than obtained from previous studies. It is found that at lower densities, a tightly focused laser irradiating relatively longer NCD plasmas can effectively enhance the transmutation efficiency. Furthermore, the photo-transmutation is generalized by considering mixed-nuclide waste samples, which suggests that the laser-accelerated high-charge e-beam could be an efficient tool to transmute long-lived nuclear waste.

  4. Hard X-ray and Particle Beams Research on 1.7 MA Z-pinch and Laser Plasma Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shrestha, Ishor; Kantsyrev, Victor; Safronova, Alla; Esaulov, Andrey; Nishio, Mineyuki; Shlyaptseva, Veronica; Keim, Steven; Weller, Michael; Stafford, Austin; Petkov, Emil; Schultz, Kimberly; Cooper, Matthew; PPDL Team

    2013-10-01

    Studies of hard x-ray (HXR) emission, electron and ion beam generation in z-pinch and laser plasmas are important for Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) and development of HXR sources from K-shell and L-shell radiation. The characteristics of HXR and particle beams produced by implosions of planar wire arrays, nested and single cylindrical wire arrays, and X-pinches were analyzed on 100 ns UNR Zebra generator with current up to 1.7 MA. In addition, the comparison of characteristics of HXR and electron beams on Zebra and 350 fs UNR Leopard laser experiments with foils has been performed. The diagnostics include Faraday cups, HXR diodes, different x-ray spectrometers and imaging systems, and ion mass spectrometer using the technique of Thomson parabola. Future work on HXRs and particle beams in HED plasmas is discussed. This work was supported by the DOE/NNSA Cooperative agreement DE-NA0001984 and in part by DE-FC52-06NA27616. This work was also supported by the Defense Threat Reduction Agency, Basic Research Award # HDTRA1-13-1-0033, to University of Nevada, Reno.

  5. Planar Laser-Plasma Interaction Experiments at Direct-Drive Ignition-Relevant Scale Lengths at the National Ignition Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenberg, M. J.; Solodov, A. A.; Seka, W.; Myatt, J. F.; Regan, S. P.; Hohenberger, M.; Epstein, R.; Froula, D. H.; Radha, P. B.; Michel, P. A.; Moody, J. D.; Masse, L.; Goyon, C.; Turnbull, D. P.; Barrios, M. A.; Bates, J. W.; Schmitt, A. J.

    2016-10-01

    The first experiments at the National Ignition Facility to probe laser-plasma interactions and the hot electron production at scale lengths relevant to direct-drive ignition are reported. The irradiation on one side of planar CH foils generated a plasma at the quarter-critical surface with predicted density scale lengths of Ln 600 μm, measured electron temperatures of Te 3.5 to 4.0 keV, and overlapped laser intensities of I 6 to 15 ×1014W/cm2. Optical emission from stimulated Raman scattering (SRS) and at ω/2 are correlated with the time-dependent hard x-ray signal. The fraction of laser energy converted to hot electrons increased from 0.5 % to 2.3 % as the laser intensity increased from 6 to 15 ×1014W/cm2, while the hot electron temperature was nearly constant around 40 to 50 keV. Only a sharp red-shifted feature is observed around ω/2, and both refracted and sidescattered SRS are detected, suggesting that multibeam SRS contributes to, and may even dominate, hot-electron production. These results imply a diminished presence of two-plasmon decay relative to SRS at these conditions, which has implications for hot-electron preheat mitigation strategies for direct-drive ignition. This work is supported by the DOE NNSA under Award Number DE-NA0001944.

  6. Photometric study of single-shot energy-dispersive X-ray diffraction at a laser plasma facility

    CERN Document Server

    Hoidn, O R

    2013-01-01

    The low repetition rates and possible shot-to-shot variations in laser-plasma studies place a high value on single-shot diagnostics. For example, white-beam scattering methods based on broadband backlighter x-ray sources are used to determine changes in the structure of laser-shocked crystalline materials by the evolution of coincidences of reciprocal lattice vectors and kinematically-allowed momentum transfers. Here, we demonstrate that white-beam techniques can be extended to strongly-disordered dense plasma and warm dense matter (WDM) systems where reciprocal space is only weakly structured and spectroscopic detection is consequently needed to determine the static structure factor and thus the ion-ion radial distribution function. Specifically, we report a photometric study of energy-dispersive diffraction (ED-XRD) for structural measurement of high energy density systems at large-scale laser facilities such as OMEGA and the National Ignition Facility. We find that structural information can be obtained in...

  7. Diagnostics of Femtosecond Laser-Plasmas Using Fundamental and Second Harmonic Emission

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHAO Li-Zeng; ZHANG Ping; FENG Bao-Hua; WEI Zhi-Yi; ZHANG Jie

    2000-01-01

    By observing the fundamental and second harmonic emission from a plasma produced by a 150 fs, 5 mJ laser at 800nm, the electron temperature, the expansion speed and the scalelength of the plasma have been diagnosed. Moreover the polarization of the fundamental and second harmonic emission has been studied. This could be a useful diagnostic for modulation at the critical surface of the plasma.

  8. Proceedings of the first JAERI-Kansai international workshop on ultrashort-pulse ultrahigh-power lasers and simulation for laser-plasma interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-03-01

    Records of the First JAERI-Kansai International Workshop, which focused on the subject of `Ultrashort-Pulse Ultrahigh-Power Lasers and Simulation for Laser-Plasma Interactions`, are contained in this issue. The First JAERI-Kansai International Workshop was held as Joint ICFA/JAERI-Kansai International Workshop `97 with International Committee for Future Accelerators (ICFA). This report consists of 24 contributed papers. (J.P.N.)

  9. Photo-transmutation of long-lived radionuclide 135Cs by laser-plasma driven electron source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, X.-L.; Tan, Z.-Y.; Luo, W.; Zhu, Z.-C.; Wang, X.-D.; Song, Y.-M.

    2016-09-01

    Relativistic electrons, accelerated by the laser ponderomotive force, can be focused onto a high-Z convertor to generate high-brightness beams of gamma-rays, which in turn can be used to induce photonuclear reactions. In this work, the possibility of photo-transmutation of long-lived radionuclide Cs-135 by laser-plasma driven electron source has been demonstrated through Geant4 simulations. High energy electron generation, bremsstrahlung and photonuclear reaction have been observed at four different laser intensities of 10^{20} W/cm^2, 5 times 10^{20} W/cm^2, 10^{21} W/cm^2 and 5 times 10^{21} W/cm^2, respectively. It was shown that the laser intensity and the target geometry have strong effect on the transmutation reaction yield. At different laser intensities the recommended target sizes were found to obtain the maximum reaction yield. The remarkable feature of this work is to evaluate the optimal laser intensity to produce maximum reaction yield of 10^8 per Joule in laser pulse energy, which is 10^{21} W/cm^2. Our study suggests photo-transmutation driven by laser-based electron source as a promising approach for experimental research into transmutation reactions, with potential applications to nuclear waste management.

  10. Extreme ultraviolet and soft X-ray imaging with compact, table top laser plasma EUV and SXR sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wachulak, P. W.; Bartnik, A.; Kostecki, J.; Wegrzynski, L.; Fok, T.; Jarocki, R.; Szczurek, M.; Fiedorowicz, H.

    2015-12-01

    We present a few examples of imaging experiments, which were possible using a compact laser-plasma extreme ultraviolet (EUV) and soft X-ray (SXR) source, based on a double stream gas puff target. This debris-free source was used in full-field EUV imaging to obtain magnified images of test samples, ZnO nanofibers and images of the membranes coated with salt crystals. The source was also employed for SXR microscopy in the "water-window" spectral range using grazing incidence Wolter type-I objective to image test samples and to perform the initial studies of biological objects. Gas puff target EUV source, spectrally tuned for 13.5 nm wavelength with multilayer mirror and thin film filters, was also used in variety of shadowgraphy experiments to study the density of newly developed modulated density gas puff targets. Finally, the source was also employed in EUV tomography experiments of low density objects with the goal to measure and optimize the density of the targets dedicated to high harmonic generation.

  11. Photo-transmutation of long-lived radionuclide Cs-135 by laser-plasma driven electron source

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, X L; Zhu, Z C; Wang, X D; Song, Y M

    2016-01-01

    Relativistic electrons, accelerated by the laser ponderomotive force, can be focused onto a high-Z convertor to generate high-brightness beams of gamma-rays, which in turn can be used to induce photonuclear reactions. In this work, the possibility of photo-transmutation of long-lived radionuclide Cs-135 by laser-plasma driven electron source has been demonstrated through Geant4 simulations. High energy electron generation, bremsstrahlung and photonuclear reaction have been observed at four different laser intensities of 10^{20} W/cm^2, 5 times 10^{20} W/cm^2, 10^{21} W/cm^2 and 5 times 10^{21} W/cm^2, respectively. It was shown that the laser intensity and the target geometry have strong effect on the transmutation reaction yield. At different laser intensities the recommended target sizes were found to obtain the maximum reaction yield. The remarkable feature of this work is to evaluate the optimal laser intensity to produce maximum reaction yield of 10^8 per Joule in laser pulse energy, which is 10^{21} W/c...

  12. Diagnostics of recombining laser plasma parameters based on He-like ion resonance lines intensity ratios

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryazantsev, S. N.; Skobelev, I. Yu; Faenov, A. Ya; Pikuz, T. A.; Grum-Grzhimailo, A. N.; Pikuz, S. A.

    2016-11-01

    While the plasma created by powerful laser expands from the target surface it becomes overcooled, i.e. recombining one. Improving of diagnostic methods applicable for such plasma is rather important problem in laboratory astrophysics nowadays because laser produced jets are fully scalable to young stellar objects. Such scaling is possible because of the plasma hydrodynamic equations invariance under some transformations. In this paper it is shown that relative intensities of the resonance transitions in He-like ions can be used to measure the parameters of recombining plasma. Intensity of the spectral lines corresponding to these transitions is sensitive to the density in the range of 1016-1020 cm-3 while the temperature ranges from 10 to 100 eV for ions with nuclear charge Zn ∼ 10. Calculations were carried out for F VIII ion and allowed to determine parameters of plasma jets created by nanosecond laser system ELFIE (Ecole Polytechnique, France) for astrophysical phenomenon modelling. Obtained dependencies are quite universal and can be used for any recombining plasma containing He-like fluorine ions.

  13. Lifetime Calculations on Collector Optics from Laser Plasma Extreme Ultraviolet Sources with Minimum Mass

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WU Tao; WANG Xin-Bing

    2011-01-01

    An ion flux and its kinetic energy spectrum are obtained using a self similar spherically symmetric fluid model of expansion of a collisionless plasma into vacuum. According to the ion flux and energy distribution, the collector optical lifetime is estimated by knowledge of the sputtering yield of conventional Mo/Si multilayer coatings for the CO2 and Nd:YAG pulsed-laser produced plasmas based on the minimum mass tin droplet target without debris mitigation. The results show that the longer wavelength of the CO2 laser produced plasma light source is more suitable for extreme ultraviolet lithography than Nd:YAG laser in respect of fast ion debris induced sputtering damage to the collector mirror.%@@ An ion flux and its kinetic energy spectrum are obtained using a self similar spherically symmetric fluid model of expansion of a collisionless plasma into vacuum.According to the ion flux and energy distribution,the collector optical lifetime is estimated by knowledge of the sputtering yield of conventional Mo/Si multilayer coatings for the CO2 and Nd:YAG pulsed-laser produced plasmas based on the minimum mass tin droplet target without debris mitigation.The results show that the longer wavelength of the CO2 laser produced plasma light source is more suitable for extreme ultraviolet lithography than Nd:YAG laser in respect of fast ion debris induced sputtering damage to the collector mirror.

  14. DOE-HEP Final Report for 2013-2016: Studies of plasma wakefields for high repetition-rate plasma collider, and Theoretical study of laser-plasma proton and ion acceleration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Katsouleas, Thomas C. [Duke Univ., Durham, NC (United States). Dept. of Electrical and Computer Engineering; Sahai, Aakash A. [Imperial College, London (United Kingdom). Dept. of Physics

    2016-08-08

    There were two goals for this funded project: 1. Studies of plasma wakefields for high repetition-rate plasma collider, and 2. Theoretical study of laser-plasma proton and ion acceleration. For goal 1, an analytical model was developed to determine the ion-motion resulting from the interaction of non-linear “blow-out” wakefields excited by beam-plasma and laser-plasma interactions. This is key to understanding the state of the plasma at timescales of 1 picosecond to a few 10s of picoseconds behind the driver-energy pulse. More information can be found in the document. For goal 2, we analytically and computationally analyzed the longitudinal instabilities of the laser-plasma interactions at the critical layer. Specifically, the process of “Doppler-shifted Ponderomotive bunching” is significant to eliminate the very high-energy spread and understand the importance of chirping the laser pulse frequency. We intend to publish the results of the mixing process in 2-D. We intend to publish Chirp-induced transparency. More information can be found in the document.

  15. Generation of fast highly charged ions in laser-plasma interaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wolowski, J [Institute of Plasma Physics and Laser Microfusion, Warsaw (Poland); Badziak, J [Institute of Plasma Physics and Laser Microfusion, Warsaw (Poland); Boody, F P [Ion Light Technologies GmbH, Bad Abbach (Germany); Czarnecka, A [Institute of Plasma Physics and Laser Microfusion, Warsaw (Poland); Gammino, S [INFN-Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, Catania (Italy); Jablonski, S [Institute of Plasma Physics and Laser Microfusion, Warsaw (Poland); Krasa, J [Institute of Physics, ASCR (Czech Republic); Laska, L [Institute of Physics, ASCR (Czech Republic); Parys, P [Institute of Plasma Physics and Laser Microfusion, Warsaw (Poland); Rohlena, K [Institute of Physics, ASCR (Czech Republic); Rosinski, M [Institute of Plasma Physics and Laser Microfusion, Warsaw (Poland); Ryc, L [Institute of Plasma Physics and Laser Microfusion, Warsaw (Poland); Torrisi, L [INFN-Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, Catania (Italy); Ullschmied, J [IPALS Research Centre ASCR, Prague (Czech Republic)

    2006-12-15

    The nonthermal and nonlinear coupling of strong laser light wave with plasma transfers a part of laser energy into hot electrons and fast ions. The efficiency of these effects depends on the characteristics of a laser pulse, target properties and irradiation geometry. The reported studies were performed with the use of a high-power and high-energy iodine PALS laser system (energy up to 1 kJ in a 0.4 ns pulse at wavelength of 1315 nm and energy up to 250 J at wavelength of 438 nm). The properties of the laser-produced ion streams were determined with the use of ion diagnostics based on the time-of-flight method. The characteristics of x-rays were measured using various semiconductor detectors. The main ion stream characteristics as well as the ion acceleration processes in plasmas of different Z numbers were studied in dependence on laser pulse parameters. The parameters of a fast ion group depend evidently on Z number of the ions. The influence of the electron density scale length on fast ion generation was investigated using a low intensity laser pre-pulses to generate preformed plasmas (pre-plasmas) with which the main laser pulse interacted. The obtained results suggest that ion acceleration processes were most effective at a specific electron density gradient scale length of pre-plasma determined by the pre-pulse parameters.

  16. Laser-plasma electron accelerator for all-optical inverse Compton X-ray source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koyama, K. [University of Tokyo, 2-22 Shirakata shirane, Tokai-mura, Naka-gun, Ibaraki 319-1188 (Japan)], E-mail: koyama@nuclear.jp; Yamazaki, A.; Maekawa, A.; Uesaka, M. [University of Tokyo, 2-22 Shirakata shirane, Tokai-mura, Naka-gun, Ibaraki 319-1188 (Japan); Hosokai, T. [Tokyo Institute of Technology, 4259 Nagatsuda-cho, Midori-ku, Yokohama 226-8503 (Japan); Miyashita, M. [Tokyo University of Science, 2641 Yamazaki, Noda, Chiba 278-8510 (Japan); Masuda, S.; Miura, E. [AIST, Tsukuba-central-2, 1-1-1 Umezono, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8568 (Japan)

    2009-09-01

    Inverse Compton scattering has been gaining attention as a process for the generation of X/{gamma}-ray, since it produces tunable X/{gamma}-ray pulses with a small cone angle of radiation. A table-top tunable Compton X/{gamma}-ray source would be realized by replacing a radio frequency (rf) linac with a laser wakefield accelerator (LWFA), which is one of the advanced accelerators. An empirical scaling law for the LWFA in the self-injection mode showed that the energy gain was inversely proportional to the plasma density. In order to effectively employ the LWFA as a Compton X/{gamma}-ray source, its stability must be improved. For this purpose, we are developing techniques for the injection of initial electrons by a localized wavebreaking at the density ramp of a plasma. The pointing stability and acceleration efficiency of the electron beam were significantly improved by applying an axial magnetic field to the plasma channel.

  17. Ultra-intense laser-plasma interaction toward Weibel-mediated collisionless shocks formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grassi, Anna; Grech, M.; Amiranoff, F.; Macchi, A.; Riconda, C.

    2016-10-01

    The rapid developments in laser technology will soon offer the opportunity to study in the laboratory the processes driving Weibel-mediated collisionless shocks, typical of various astrophysical scenarii. The interaction of an ultra-intense laser with an overdense plasma has been identified as the preferential configuration. Yet, the experimental requirements still need to be properly investigated. High performance computing simulations are a necessary tool for this study. In this work, we present a series of kinetic simulations performed with the PIC code SMILEI, varying the laser and plasma parameters. In particular, we will study the effect of the laser polarisation and plasma density to obtain the best conditions for the creation of a collisionless shock. The role of the electrons heated at the interaction surface and of particles accelerated via the Hole Boring (laser-piston) mechanism on the generation of the current filamentation instability and the subsequent shock front formation will be highlighted.

  18. Short-time X-ray diffraction with an efficient-optimized, high repetition-rate laser-plasma X-ray-source; Kurzzeit-Roentgenbeugung mit Hilfe einer Effizienz-optimierten, hochrepetierenden Laser-Plasma-Roentgenquelle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaehle, Stephan

    2009-04-23

    This thesis deals with the production and application of ultrashort X-ray pulses. In the beginning different possibilities for the production of X-ray pulses with pulse durations of below one picosecond are presented, whereby the main topic lies on the so called laser-plasma X-ray sources with high repetition rate. In this case ultrashort laser pulses are focused on a metal, so that in the focus intensities of above 10{sup 16} W/cm{sup 2} dominate. In the ideal case in such way ultrafast electrons are produced, which are responsible for line radiation. In these experiments titanium K{sub {alpha}} radiation is produced, thes photons possess an energy of 4.51 keV. For the efficient production of line radiation here the Ti:Sa laser is optimized in view of the laser energy and the pulse shape and the influence of the different parameters on the K{sub {alpha}} production systematically studied. The influences of laser intensity, system-conditioned pre-pulses and of phase modulation are checked. It turns out that beside the increasement of the K{sub {alpha}} radiation by a suited laser intensity a reduction of the X-ray background radiation is of deciding importance for the obtaining of clear diffraction images. This background radiation is mainly composed of bremsstrahlung. It can be suppressed by the avoidance of intrinsic pre-pulses and by means of 2nd-order phase modulation. By means of optical excitation and X-ray exploration experiments the production of acoustic waves after ultrashort optical excitation in a 150 nm thick Ge(111) film on Si(111) is studied. These acoustic waves are driven by thermal (in this time scale time-independent) and electronic (time dependent) pressure amounts. As essential results it turns out that the relative amount of the electronic pressure increases with decreasing excitation density. [German] Diese Arbeit befasst sich mit der Erzeugung und Anwendung ultrakurzer Roentgenimpulse. Zu Beginn werden verschiedene Moeglichkeiten zur

  19. Laser Plasmas : Effect of rippled laser beam on excitation of ion acoustic wave

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Nareshpal Singh Saini; Tarsem Singh Gill

    2000-11-01

    Growth of a radially symmetrical ripple, superimposed on a Gaussian laser beam in collisional unmagnetised plasma is investigated. From numerical computation, it is observed that self-focusing of main beam as well as ripple determine the growth dynamics of ripple with the distance of propagation. The effect of growing ripple on excitation of ion acoustic wave (IAW) has also been studied

  20. 2D simulations of hohlraum targets for laser-plasma experiments and ion stopping measurement in hot plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Basko, M.M. [Gesellschaft fuer Schwerionenforschung mbH, Darmstadt (Germany). ExtreMe Matter Institute EMMI; Maruhn, J.; Tauschwitz, Anna [Frankfurt Univ. (Germany); Novikov, V.G.; Grushin, A.S. [Keldysh Institute of Applied Mathematics, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2011-12-15

    An attractive way to create uniform plasma states at high temperatures and densities is by using hohlraums - cavities with heavy-metal walls that are either directly or indirectly heated by intense laser pulses to x-ray temperatures of tens and hundreds electron volts. A sample material, whose plasma state is to be studied, can be placed inside such a hohlraum (usually in the form of a low-density foam) and uniformly heated to a high temperature. In this case a high-Z hohlraum enclosure serves a double purpose: it prevents the hot plasma from rapid disassembly due to hydrodynamic expansion and, at the same time, suppresses its rapid radiative cooling by providing high diffusive resistivity for X-rays. Of course, both the inertial and the thermal confinement of high-temperature plasmas can be achieved only for a limited period of time - on the order of nanoseconds for millimeter-scale hohlraums. Some time ago such hohlraum targets were proposed for measurements of the stopping power of hot dense plasmas for fast ions at GSI (Darmstadt). Theoretical modeling of hohlraum targets has always been a challenging task for computational physics because it should combine multidimensional hydrodynamic simulations with the solution of the spectral transfer equation for thermal radiation. In this work we report on our latest progress in this direction, namely, we present the results of 2D (two-dimensional) simulations with a newly developed radiation-hydrodynamics code RALEF-2D of two types of the hohlraum targets proposed for experiments on the PHELIX laser at GSI. The first configuration is a simple spherical hohlraum with gold walls and empty interior, which has two holes - one for laser beam entrance, and the other for diagnostics. The hohlraums of this type have already been used in several experimental sessions with the NHELIX and PHELIX lasers at GSI. The second type is a two-chamber cylindrical hohlraum with a characteristic {omega}-shaped cross-section of the enclosure

  1. A compact tunable polarized X-ray source based on laser-plasma helical undulators

    CERN Document Server

    Luo, Ji; Zeng, Ming; Vieira, Jorge; Yu, Lu-Le; Weng, Su-Ming; Silva, Luis O; Jaroszynski, Dino A; Sheng, Zheng-Ming; Zhang, Jie

    2016-01-01

    Laser wakefield accelerators have great potential as the basis for next generation compact radiation sources because their accelerating gradients are three orders of magnitude larger than traditional accelerators. However, X-ray radiation from such devices still lacks of tunability, especially the intensity and polarization distribution. Here we propose a tunable polarized radiation source from a helical plasma undulator based on plasma channel guided wakefield accelerator. When a laser pulse is initially incident with a skew angle relative to the channel axis, the laser and accelerated electrons experience collective spiral motions, which leads to elliptically polarized synchrotron-like radiation with flexible tunability on radiation intensity, spectra and polarization. We demonstrate that a radiation source with millimeter size and peak brilliance of $2\\times10^{19} photons/s/mm^{2}/mrad^{2}/0.1%$ bandwidth can be made with moderate laser and electron beam parameters. This brilliance is comparable with the ...

  2. Functional impairment with minimal macular damage in femtosecond laser plasma injury: case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristina Freitas

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available A 26 years old female patient was examined twenty-four hours after observing laser-induced plasma formation in a process of nanoparticle production complaining of bilateral central scotoma. The ophthalmologic evaluation included dilated fundus observation, fluorescein angiography, and optical coherence tomography (OCT. In the first assessment, visual acuity was 20/20 in the right eye and 20/25 in the left eye. Ophthalmologic evaluation revealed colour changes in the macular region of both eyes. Optical coherence tomography showed a central interruption of the photoreceptor layer in both eyes and fluorescein angiography was normal. In subsequent appointments acuity was always 20/20 in both eyes. Abnormal optical coherence tomography findings disappeared in less than 5 months, but subjective complaints of scotoma in the left eye remained. Extra care must be taken in this type of experiment by, for example, reducing the time that the retina is directly exposed to the plasma radiation.

  3. Deposition and sputtering yields on EUV collector mirror from Laser Plasma Extreme Ultraviolet Sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu Tao [Wuhan National Laboratory for Optoelectronics, School of Optoelectronic Science and Engineering, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430074 (China); Rao Zhiming [Depart of Computer Science, Jiangxi University of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Nanchang 330004, Jiangxi (China); Wang Shifang, E-mail: flatime@163.com [School of Physics and Electric Information, Hubei University of Education 1 Nanhuan Road, Wuhan East High-Tech. Zone, Wuhan 430205, Hubei (China)

    2011-02-01

    Based on the self-similar solution of gas dynamic equations, spherical expansion of the highly ionized plasma with limited mass into a vacuum is investigated for the droplet target laser-produced plasma extreme ultraviolet (LPP-EUV) sources. Using partially numerical and partially analytical technology, the velocity, the temperature and the density profiles in the plume versus ionization degree, adiabatic index and initial conditions are presented. Furthermore, the spatial thickness variations of the deposited substrate witness and ion sputtering yields for Ru, Mo, and Si under Sn ion bombardment are theoretically calculated, which can be useful to enable LPP-EUV sources suppliers to estimate collector lifetime and improve debris mitigation systems.

  4. Submicron focusing of XUV radiation from a laser plasma source using a multilayer Laue lens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reese, M.; Schäfer, B.; Großmann, P.; Bayer, A.; Mann, K.; Liese, T.; Krebs, H. U.

    2011-01-01

    The focusing properties of a one-dimensional multilayer Laue lens (MLL) were investigated using monochromatic soft X-ray radiation from a table-top, laser-produced plasma source. The MLL was fabricated by a focused ion beam (FIB) structuring of pulsed laser deposited ZrO2/Ti multilayers. This novel method offers the potential to overcome limitations encountered in electron lithographic processes. Utilizing this multilayer Laue lens, a line focus of XUV radiation from a laser-induced plasma in a nitrogen gas puff target could be generated. The evaluated focal length is close to the designed value of 220 μm for the measurement wavelength of 2.88 nm. Divergence angle and beam waist diameter are measured by a moving knife edge and a far-field experiment, determining all relevant second-order moments based beam parameters. The waist diameter has been found to be approximately 370 nm (FWHM).

  5. A 7 T Pulsed Magnetic Field Generator for Magnetized Laser Plasma Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Guangyue; Liang, Yihan; Song, Falun; Yuan, Peng; Wang, Yulin; Zhao, Bin; Zheng, Jian

    2015-02-01

    A pulsed magnetic field generator was developed to study the effect of a magnetic field on the evolution of a laser-generated plasma. A 40 kV pulsed power system delivered a fast (~230 ns), 55 kA current pulse into a single-turn coil surrounding the laser target, using a capacitor bank of 200 nF, a laser-triggered switch and a low-impedance strip transmission line. A one-dimensional uniform 7 T pulsed magnetic field was created using a Helmholtz coil pair with a 6 mm diameter. The pulsed magnetic field was controlled to take effect synchronously with a nanosecond heating laser beam, a femtosecond probing laser beam and an optical Intensified Charge Coupled Device (ICCD) detector. The preliminary experiments demonstrate bifurcation and focusing of plasma expansion in a transverse magnetic field.

  6. High quality electron bunch generation with CO2-laser plasma accelerator

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, L G; Xu, J C; Ji, L L; Zhang, X M; Wang, W P; Zhao, X Y; Yi, L Q; Yu, Y H; Shi, Y; Xu, T J; Xu, Z Z

    2014-01-01

    CO2 laser-driven electron acceleration is demonstrated with particle-in-cell simulation in low-density plasma. An intense CO2 laser pulse with long wavelength excites wakefield. The bubble behind it has a broad space to sustain a large amount of electrons before reaching its charge saturation limit. A transversely propagating inject pulse is used to induce and control the ambient electron injection. The accelerated electron bunch with total charge up to 10 nC and the average charge per energy interval of more than 0.6 nC/MeV are obtained. Plasma-based electron acceleration driven by intense CO2 laser provides a new potential way to generate high-charge electron bunch with low energy spread, which has broad applications, especially for X-ray generation by table-top FEL and bremsstrahlung.

  7. Development and Characterization of a High Magnetic Field Solenoid for Laser Plasma Experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pollock, B B; Froula, D H; Davis, P F; Ross, J S; Divol, L; Fulkerson, S; Satariano, J; Price, D; Bower, J; Edwards, J; Town, R; Glenzer, S H; Offenberger, A A; Tynan, G R; James, A N

    2006-05-05

    An electromagnetic solenoid was developed to study the quenching of nonlocal heat transport in laser-produced gas-jet plasmas by high external magnetic fields. The solenoid, which is driven by a pulsed power system supplying 30 kJ, achieves fields exceeding 10 T. Temporally resolved measurements of the electron temperature profile transverse to a high power laser beam were obtained using Thomson Scattering. A method for optimizing the solenoid design based on the available stored energy is presented.

  8. Target Surface Area Effects on Hot Electron Dynamics from High Intensity Laser-Plasma Interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-08-19

    amuch higher peak current of hot electronswhich induced current in parallel wires through strong electric andmagneticfield growth . In theHERCULES shots...interaction. This was consistent with an induced current resulting from the growth and decay of a magnetic field of the form ( ) ( )»B t r I t r...Alternatively, direct current would be expected to scale exponentially , while an expanding plasma could be expected to scale as r1 2. It is of interest to note

  9. Functional impairment with minimal macular damage in femtosecond laser plasma injury: case report

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    A 26 years old female patient was examined twenty-four hours after observing laser-induced plasma formation in a process of nanoparticle production complaining of bilateral central scotoma. The ophthalmologic evaluation included dilated fundus observation, fluorescein angiography, and optical coherence tomography (OCT). In the first assessment, visual acuity was 20/20 in the right eye and 20/25 in the left eye. Ophthalmologic evaluation revealed colour changes in the macular region of both ey...

  10. The role of the gas/plasma plume and self-focusing in a gas-filled capillary discharge waveguide for high-power laser-plasma applications

    CERN Document Server

    Ciocarlan, C.; Islam, M. R.; Ersfeld, B.; Abuazoum, S.; Wilson, R.; Aniculaesei, C.; Welsh, G. H.; Vieux, G.; Jaroszynski, D. A.; 10.1063/1.4822333

    2013-01-01

    The role of the gas/plasma plume at the entrance of a gas-filled capillary discharge plasma waveguide in increasing the laser intensity has been investigated. Distinction is made between neutral gas and hot plasma plumes that, respectively, develop before and after discharge breakdown. Time-averaged measurements show that the on-axis plasma density of a fully expanded plasma plume over this region is similar to that inside the waveguide. Above the critical power, relativistic and ponderomotive selffocusing lead to an increase in the intensity, which can be nearly a factor of 2 compared with the case without a plume. When used as a laser plasma wakefield accelerator, the enhancement of intensity can lead to prompt electron injection very close to the entrance of the waveguide. Self-focusing occurs within two Rayleigh lengths of the waveguide entrance plane in the region, where the laser beam is converging. Analytical theory and numerical simulations show that, for a density of 3.01018 cm3, the peak normalized...

  11. Extreme ultraviolet interferometry of laser plasma material between the critical and ablation surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gartside, L. M. R.; Tallents, G. J.; Rossall, A. K.; Wagenaars, E.; Whittaker, D. S.; Kozlová, M.; Nejdl, J.; Sawicka, M.; Polan, J.; Kalal, M.; Rus, B.

    2011-06-01

    Interferometric probing using an extreme ultraviolet (EUV) laser has measured both transmission and phase information through laser-irradiated plastic (parylene-N C 8H 8) targets (thickness 350 nm). Unusually, the probe beam is incident longitudinally in approximately the same direction as the incident optical laser. Agreement of the experimental interferometry results has been obtained with two-dimensional radiation hydrodynamic code (h2d) simulations of EUV (21.2 nm) probe transmissions and phase shifts. We show that the transmission of the EUV probe beam provides a measure of the rate of target ablation, as ablated plasma becomes close to transparent when the photon energy is less than the ionization energy of the predominate ion species. Here C 3+ ions with ionization energy 64.5 eV are transparent, while lower carbon ionization stages, present in the unablated target and close to the ablation surface, absorb the 58.5 eV photons. Similarly, we show that refractive indices η below the solid parylene-N ( ηsolid = 0.946) and expected plasma values are produced in the warm dense plasma created by laser irradiation due to bound-free absorption in C +.

  12. Generation of intense circularly polarized attosecond light bursts from relativistic laser plasmas

    CERN Document Server

    Ma, Guangjin; Yu, M Y; Shen, Baifei; Veisz, Laszlo

    2016-01-01

    We have investigated the polarization of attosecond light bursts generated by nanobunches of electrons from relativistic few-cycle laser pulse interaction with the surface of overdense plasmas. Particle-in-cell simulation shows that the polarization state of the generated attosecond burst depends on the incident-pulse polarization, duration, carrier envelope phase, as well as the plasma scale length. Through laser and plasma parameter control, without compromise of generation efficiency, a linearly polarized laser pulse with azimuth $\\theta^i=10^\\circ$ can generate an elliptically polarized attosecond burst with azimuth $|\\theta^r_{\\rm atto}|\\approx61^\\circ$ and ellipticity $\\sigma^r_{\\rm atto}\\approx0.27$; while an elliptically polarized laser pulse with $\\sigma^i\\approx0.36$ can generate an almost circularly polarized attosecond burst with $\\sigma^r_{\\rm atto}\\approx0.95$. The results propose a new way to a table-top circularly polarized XUV source as a probe with attosecond scale time resolution for many a...

  13. 3D MHD Simulations of Laser Plasma Guiding in Curved Magnetic Field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roupassov, S.; Rankin, R.; Tsui, Y.; Capjack, C.; Fedosejevs, R.

    1999-11-01

    The guiding and confinement of laser produced plasma in a curved magnetic field has been investigated numerically. These studies were motivated by experiments on pulsed laser deposition of diamond-like films [1] in which a 1kG magnetic field in a curved solenoid geometry was utilized to steer a carbon plasma around a curved trajectory and thus to separate it from unwanted macroparticles produced by the laser ablation. The purpose of the modeling was to characterize the plasma dynamics during the propagation through the magnetic guide field and to investigate the effect of different magnetic field configurations. A 3D curvilinear ADI code developed on the basis of an existing Cartesian code [2] was employed to simulate the underlying resistive one-fluid MHD model. Issues such as large regions of low background density and nonreflective boundary conditions were addressed. Results of the simulations in a curved guide field will be presented and compared to experimental results. [1] Y.Y. Tsui, D. Vick and R. Fedosejevs, Appl. Phys. Lett. 70 (15), pp. 1953-57, 1997. [2] R. Rankin, and I. Voronkov, in "High Performance Computing Systems and Applications", pp. 59-69, Kluwer AP, 1998.

  14. Exotic dense matter states pumped by relativistic laser plasma in the radiation dominant regime

    CERN Document Server

    Colgan, J; Jr.,; Faenov, A Ya; Pikuz, S A; Wagenaars, E; Booth, N; Brown, C R D; Culfa, O; Dance, R J; Evans, R G; Gray, R J; Hoarty, D J; Kaempfer, T; Lancaster, K L; McKenna, P; Rossall, A L; Skobelev, I Yu; Schulze, K S; Uschmann, I; Zhidkov, A G; Woolsey, N C

    2012-01-01

    The properties of high energy density plasma are under increasing scrutiny in recent years due to their importance to our understanding of stellar interiors, the cores of giant planets$^{1}$, and the properties of hot plasma in inertial confinement fusion devices$^2$. When matter is heated by X-rays, electrons in the inner shells are ionized before the valence electrons. Ionization from the inside out creates atoms or ions with empty internal electron shells, which are known as hollow atoms (or ions)$^{3,4,5}$. Recent advances in free-electron laser (FEL) technology$^{6,7,8,9}$ have made possible the creation of condensed matter consisting predominantly of hollow atoms. In this Letter, we demonstrate that such exotic states of matter, which are very far from equilibrium, can also be formed by more conventional optical laser technology when the laser intensity approaches the radiation dominant regime$^{10}$. Such photon-dominated systems are relevant to studies of photoionized plasmas found in active galactic ...

  15. Gain dynamics measurement in injection-seeded soft x-ray laser plasma amplifiers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yong; Wang, S.; Li, L.; Oliva, E.; Thuy Le, T. T.; Ros, D.; Berrill, M.; Dunn, J.; Zeitoun, Ph.; Yin, L.; Luther, B.; Rocca, J. J.

    2013-10-01

    Herein we report the first measurement of the gain dynamics in a soft x-ray plasma amplifier seeded by high harmonic pulses. A sequence of two time-delayed spatially-overlapping high harmonic pulses was injected into a λ = 18.9 nm Ni-like Mo plasma amplifier to measure the regeneration of the population inversion that follows the gain depletion caused by the amplification of the first seed pulse. Collisional excitation is observed to re-establish population inversion depleted during the amplification of the seed pulse in about ~1.75 ps. The measured gain-recovery time is compared to model simulations to gain insight on the population inversion mechanisms that create the transient gain in these amplifiers. This result supports the concept of a soft x-ray laser amplification scheme based on the continuous extraction of energy from a soft x-ray plasma-based amplifier by an stretched seed pulse has the potential to generate ultra-intense fully phase-coherent soft x-ray laser pulses. Work supported by AMOS program, Office of Basic Energy Sciences of the US DoE, and the NSF ERC Program with equipment developed under NSF Award MRI-ARRA 09-561, and by LASERLAB3-INREX European project and SHYLAX plus CIBORG RTRA `Triangle de la Physique.'

  16. Laser-driven electron beamlines generated by coupling laser-plasma sources with conventional transport systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Antici, P. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare (INFN), Laboratori Nazionali di Frascati, Via E. Fermi, 40, 00044 Frascati (Italy); SAPIENZA, University of Rome, Dip. SBAI, Via A. Scarpa 14, 00161 Rome (Italy); INFN - Sezione di Roma, c/o Dipartimento di Fisica - SAPIENZA, University of Rome, P.le Aldo Moro, 2 - 00185 Rome (Italy); Bacci, A.; Chiadroni, E.; Ferrario, M.; Rossi, A. R. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare (INFN), Laboratori Nazionali di Frascati, Via E. Fermi, 40, 00044 Frascati (Italy); Benedetti, C. [University of Bologna and INFN - Bologna (Italy); Lancia, L.; Migliorati, M.; Mostacci, A.; Palumbo, L. [SAPIENZA, University of Rome, Dip. SBAI, Via A. Scarpa 14, 00161 Rome (Italy); INFN - Sezione di Roma, c/o Dipartimento di Fisica - SAPIENZA, University of Rome, P.le Aldo Moro, 2 - 00185 Rome (Italy); Serafini, L. [INFN-Milan and Department of Physics, University of Milan, Via Celoria 16, 20133 Milan (Italy)

    2012-08-15

    Laser-driven electron beamlines are receiving increasing interest from the particle accelerator community. In particular, the high initial energy, low emittance, and high beam current of the plasma based electron source potentially allow generating much more compact and bright particle accelerators than what conventional accelerator technology can achieve. Using laser-generated particles as injectors for generating beamlines could significantly reduce the size and cost of accelerator facilities. Unfortunately, several features of laser-based particle beams need still to be improved before considering them for particle beamlines and thus enable the use of plasma-driven accelerators for the multiple applications of traditional accelerators. Besides working on the plasma source itself, a promising approach to shape the laser-generated beams is coupling them with conventional accelerator elements in order to benefit from both a versatile electron source and a controllable beam. In this paper, we perform start-to-end simulations to generate laser-driven beamlines using conventional accelerator codes and methodologies. Starting with laser-generated electrons that can be obtained with established multi-hundred TW laser systems, we compare different options to capture and transport the beams. This is performed with the aim of providing beamlines suitable for potential applications, such as free electron lasers. In our approach, we have analyzed which parameters are critical at the source and from there evaluated different ways to overcome these issues using conventional accelerator elements and methods. We show that electron driven beamlines are potentially feasible, but exploiting their full potential requires extensive improvement of the source parameters or innovative technological devices for their transport and capture.

  17. Laser-driven electron beamlines generated by coupling laser-plasma sources with conventional transport systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antici, P.; Bacci, A.; Benedetti, C.; Chiadroni, E.; Ferrario, M.; Rossi, A. R.; Lancia, L.; Migliorati, M.; Mostacci, A.; Palumbo, L.; Serafini, L.

    2012-08-01

    Laser-driven electron beamlines are receiving increasing interest from the particle accelerator community. In particular, the high initial energy, low emittance, and high beam current of the plasma based electron source potentially allow generating much more compact and bright particle accelerators than what conventional accelerator technology can achieve. Using laser-generated particles as injectors for generating beamlines could significantly reduce the size and cost of accelerator facilities. Unfortunately, several features of laser-based particle beams need still to be improved before considering them for particle beamlines and thus enable the use of plasma-driven accelerators for the multiple applications of traditional accelerators. Besides working on the plasma source itself, a promising approach to shape the laser-generated beams is coupling them with conventional accelerator elements in order to benefit from both a versatile electron source and a controllable beam. In this paper, we perform start-to-end simulations to generate laser-driven beamlines using conventional accelerator codes and methodologies. Starting with laser-generated electrons that can be obtained with established multi-hundred TW laser systems, we compare different options to capture and transport the beams. This is performed with the aim of providing beamlines suitable for potential applications, such as free electron lasers. In our approach, we have analyzed which parameters are critical at the source and from there evaluated different ways to overcome these issues using conventional accelerator elements and methods. We show that electron driven beamlines are potentially feasible, but exploiting their full potential requires extensive improvement of the source parameters or innovative technological devices for their transport and capture.

  18. Laser plasma x-ray source for ultrafast time-resolved x-ray absorption spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miaja-Avila, L; O'Neil, G C; Uhlig, J; Cromer, C L; Dowell, M L; Jimenez, R; Hoover, A S; Silverman, K L; Ullom, J N

    2015-03-01

    We describe a laser-driven x-ray plasma source designed for ultrafast x-ray absorption spectroscopy. The source is comprised of a 1 kHz, 20 W, femtosecond pulsed infrared laser and a water target. We present the x-ray spectra as a function of laser energy and pulse duration. Additionally, we investigate the plasma temperature and photon flux as we vary the laser energy. We obtain a 75 μm FWHM x-ray spot size, containing ∼10(6) photons/s, by focusing the produced x-rays with a polycapillary optic. Since the acquisition of x-ray absorption spectra requires the averaging of measurements from >10(7) laser pulses, we also present data on the source stability, including single pulse measurements of the x-ray yield and the x-ray spectral shape. In single pulse measurements, the x-ray flux has a measured standard deviation of 8%, where the laser pointing is the main cause of variability. Further, we show that the variability in x-ray spectral shape from single pulses is low, thus justifying the combining of x-rays obtained from different laser pulses into a single spectrum. Finally, we show a static x-ray absorption spectrum of a ferrioxalate solution as detected by a microcalorimeter array. Altogether, our results demonstrate that this water-jet based plasma source is a suitable candidate for laboratory-based time-resolved x-ray absorption spectroscopy experiments.

  19. Laser plasma x-ray source for ultrafast time-resolved x-ray absorption spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Miaja-Avila

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available We describe a laser-driven x-ray plasma source designed for ultrafast x-ray absorption spectroscopy. The source is comprised of a 1 kHz, 20 W, femtosecond pulsed infrared laser and a water target. We present the x-ray spectra as a function of laser energy and pulse duration. Additionally, we investigate the plasma temperature and photon flux as we vary the laser energy. We obtain a 75 μm FWHM x-ray spot size, containing ∼106 photons/s, by focusing the produced x-rays with a polycapillary optic. Since the acquisition of x-ray absorption spectra requires the averaging of measurements from >107 laser pulses, we also present data on the source stability, including single pulse measurements of the x-ray yield and the x-ray spectral shape. In single pulse measurements, the x-ray flux has a measured standard deviation of 8%, where the laser pointing is the main cause of variability. Further, we show that the variability in x-ray spectral shape from single pulses is low, thus justifying the combining of x-rays obtained from different laser pulses into a single spectrum. Finally, we show a static x-ray absorption spectrum of a ferrioxalate solution as detected by a microcalorimeter array. Altogether, our results demonstrate that this water-jet based plasma source is a suitable candidate for laboratory-based time-resolved x-ray absorption spectroscopy experiments.

  20. Compact Cryogenic Source of Periodic Hydrogen and Argon Droplet Beams for Intense Laser-Plasma Generation

    CERN Document Server

    Fraga, R A Costa; Kühnel, M; Hochhaus, D C; Schottelius, A; Polz, J; Kaluza, M C; Neumayer, P; Grisenti, R E

    2011-01-01

    We present a cryogenic source of periodic streams of micrometer-sized hydrogen (H2) and argon (Ar) droplets as ideal mass-limited target systems for fundamental intense laser-driven plasma applications. The highly compact design combined with a high temporal and spatial droplet stability makes our injector ideally suited for experiments using state-of-the-art low-repetition rate high-power lasers, in which a precise synchronization between the laser pulses and the droplets is mandatory. We demonstrate this explicitly by irradiating Ar droplets with pulses from a Petawatt laser.

  1. Compact cryogenic source of periodic hydrogen and argon droplet beams for relativistic laser-plasma generation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fraga, R. A. Costa; Kalinin, A.; Kuehnel, M.; Schottelius, A. [Institut fuer Kernphysik, J. W. Goethe-Universitaet, Max-von-Laue-Str. 1, 60438 Frankfurt am Main (Germany); Hochhaus, D. C.; Neumayer, P. [EMMI Extreme Matter Institute and Research Division, GSI Helmholtzzentrum fuer Schwerionenforschung, Planckstr. 1, 64291 Darmstadt (Germany); FIAS Frankfurt Institute for Advanced Studies, J. W. Goethe-Universitaet, Ruth-Moufang-Str. 1, 60438 Frankfurt am Main (Germany); Polz, J. [Institut fuer Optik und Quantenelektronik, Max-Wien-Platz 1, 07743 Jena (Germany); Kaluza, M. C. [Institut fuer Optik und Quantenelektronik, Max-Wien-Platz 1, 07743 Jena (Germany); Helmholtz-Institut Jena, Froebelstieg 3, 07743 Jena (Germany); Grisenti, R. E. [Institut fuer Kernphysik, J. W. Goethe-Universitaet, Max-von-Laue-Str. 1, 60438 Frankfurt am Main (Germany); GSI Helmholtzzentrum fuer Schwerionenforschung, Planckstr. 1, 64291 Darmstadt (Germany)

    2012-02-15

    We present a cryogenic source of periodic streams of micrometer-sized hydrogen and argon droplets as ideal mass-limited target systems for fundamental intense laser-driven plasma applications. The highly compact design combined with a high temporal and spatial droplet stability makes our injector ideally suited for experiments using state-of-the-art high-power lasers in which a precise synchronization between the laser pulses and the droplets is mandatory. We show this by irradiating argon droplets with multi-terawatt pulses.

  2. Study of 2 and 3/2 harmonics in ultrashort high-intensity laser plasma interaction

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    V Arora; P A Naik; J A Chakera; R A Khan; P D Gupta

    2010-12-01

    An experimental study is presented on measurements of optical spectrum of the laser light scattered from solid surface irradiated by Ti:sapphire laser pulses up to an intensity of 1.2 × 1018 W cm-2. The spectrum has well-defined peaks at wavelengths corresponding to 2 and 3/2 radiations. The spectral features vary with the laser intensity and show blue-shift with increasing laser intensity. At a constant laser fluence, the spectrum is red-shifted with increasing laser pulse duration. The observed results are explained in terms of the density scale length variation of the plasma and laser chirp.

  3. Laser plasma wakefield acceleration gain enhancement by means of accelerating Bessel pulses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, S.; Parola, A.; Di Trapani, P.; Jedrkiewicz, O.

    2017-06-01

    In this paper, we propose an approach to enhance the electron energy gain in standard laser-driven plasma wakefield accelerators, using accelerating Bessel pulses with tunable group velocity so to avoid electron dephasing. We use in the numerical simulations a one-dimensional theoretical model in the linear regime, taking advantage of the "diffraction-free" properties of the localized Bessel beam and thus neglecting transverse effects during the acceleration process. With a multistage tailoring approach, we show a gain enhancement of more than 100 with electron energies that may reach the GeV range over distances shorter than 1 m.

  4. High-Power γ-Ray Flash Generation in Ultraintense Laser-Plasma Interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, Tatsufumi; Koga, James K.; Esirkepov, Timur Zh.; Kando, Masaki; Korn, Georg; Bulanov, Sergei V.

    2012-05-01

    When high-intensity laser interaction with matter enters the regime of dominated radiation reaction, the radiation losses open the way for producing short pulse high-power γ-ray flashes. The γ-ray pulse duration and divergence are determined by the laser pulse amplitude and by the plasma target density scale length. On the basis of theoretical analysis and particle-in-cell simulations with the radiation friction force incorporated, optimal conditions for generating a γ-ray flash with a tailored overcritical density target are found.

  5. Influence of Surface Radius Curvature on Laser Plasma Propulsion with Ablation Water Propellant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Tian; Zheng, Zhiyuan; Zhang, Siqi; Tang, Weichong; Xiao, Ke; Liang, Wenfei; Gao, Lu; Gao, Hua

    2016-10-01

    The surface shape of liquid water is well controlled during nanosecond pulse laser ablation plasma propulsion. In this study, we measured the effect of the shape on the coupling coefficient and the specific impulse. We found that the coupling coefficient and specific impulse could be optimized by varying the surface convexity. Based on the analysis of the surface radius curvature, we demonstrate that the convex surface changes the laser focal positions to achieve high efficiency. supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China (No. 10905049) and Fundamental Research Funds for the Central Universities of China (Nos. 53200859165, 2562010050)

  6. Three electron beams from a laser-plasma wakefield accelerator and the energy apportioning question.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, X; Brunetti, E; Gil, D Reboredo; Welsh, G H; Li, F Y; Cipiccia, S; Ersfeld, B; Grant, D W; Grant, P A; Islam, M R; Tooley, M P; Vieux, G; Wiggins, S M; Sheng, Z M; Jaroszynski, D A

    2017-03-10

    Laser-wakefield accelerators are compact devices capable of delivering ultra-short electron bunches with pC-level charge and MeV-GeV energy by exploiting the ultra-high electric fields arising from the interaction of intense laser pulses with plasma. We show experimentally and through numerical simulations that a high-energy electron beam is produced simultaneously with two stable lower-energy beams that are ejected in oblique and counter-propagating directions, typically carrying off 5-10% of the initial laser energy. A MeV, 10s nC oblique beam is ejected in a 30°-60° hollow cone, which is filled with more energetic electrons determined by the injection dynamics. A nC-level, 100s keV backward-directed beam is mainly produced at the leading edge of the plasma column. We discuss the apportioning of absorbed laser energy amongst the three beams. Knowledge of the distribution of laser energy and electron beam charge, which determine the overall efficiency, is important for various applications of laser-wakefield accelerators, including the development of staged high-energy accelerators.

  7. EUV and debris characteristics of a laser-plasma tin-dioxide colloidal target

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubodera, Shoichi; Kaku, Masanori; Touge, Shunsuke; Katto, Masahito

    2008-10-01

    Characteristics of extreme ultraviolet (EUV) and debris emissions as well as debris reduction have been investigated for a laser-produced plasma (LPP) EUV source by using a colloidal/liquid jet target containing tin dioxide nanoparticles and tin chloride. The amount of deposited debris on a silicon witness plate was determined by a total laser energy irradiated onto a target. Double-pulse laser irradiation was effective for improving the EUV conversion efficiency as a result of plasma regulation. It was, however, not effective for reducing the deposited debris from a colloidal target with nanoparticles. In situ low-temperature heating of the witness plate was effective to reduce the amount of deposited debris. Room-temperature photon processing using an incoherent vacuum ultraviolet excimer lamp at 126 nm deoxidized a deposited tin oxide layer. In addition to these active debris reduction methods, the use of a tin chloride liquid target at a certain concentration passively reduced the amount of deposited debris as a result of production of chlorine atoms that sputtered and/or etched deposition. The EUV CE of more than 1% was observed from a tin chloride target by using double-pulse laser irradiation.

  8. Three electron beams from a laser-plasma wakefield accelerator and the energy apportioning question

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, X.; Brunetti, E.; Gil, D. Reboredo; Welsh, G. H.; Li, F. Y.; Cipiccia, S.; Ersfeld, B.; Grant, D. W.; Grant, P. A.; Islam, M. R.; Tooley, M. P.; Vieux, G.; Wiggins, S. M.; Sheng, Z. M.; Jaroszynski, D. A.

    2017-01-01

    Laser-wakefield accelerators are compact devices capable of delivering ultra-short electron bunches with pC-level charge and MeV-GeV energy by exploiting the ultra-high electric fields arising from the interaction of intense laser pulses with plasma. We show experimentally and through numerical simulations that a high-energy electron beam is produced simultaneously with two stable lower-energy beams that are ejected in oblique and counter-propagating directions, typically carrying off 5–10% of the initial laser energy. A MeV, 10s nC oblique beam is ejected in a 30°–60° hollow cone, which is filled with more energetic electrons determined by the injection dynamics. A nC-level, 100s keV backward-directed beam is mainly produced at the leading edge of the plasma column. We discuss the apportioning of absorbed laser energy amongst the three beams. Knowledge of the distribution of laser energy and electron beam charge, which determine the overall efficiency, is important for various applications of laser-wakefield accelerators, including the development of staged high-energy accelerators. PMID:28281679

  9. Extraction of high-intensity ion beams from a laser plasma by a pulsed spherical diode

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoshiyuki Oguri

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available High-current Cu^{+} ion beams were extracted from a laser-produced plasma using a pulsed high-voltage multiaperture diode driven by an induction cavity. The amplitude and the duration of the extraction voltage were 130 kV and 450 ns, respectively. During the extraction, explosive beam divergence due to the strong space-charge force was suppressed by the focusing action of the gap between concentric hemispheres. Modulation of the extracted beam flux due to the plasma prefill in the gap has been eliminated by using a biased control grid put on the anode holes. By means of this extraction scheme we obtained a rectangular beam pulse with a rise time as short as ≈100  ns. The beam current behind the cathode was limited to ≈0.1   A, owing to space-charge effects, as well as to poor geometrical transmission through the cathode sphere. From the measurement of the extracted beam current density distribution along the beam axis and the beam profile measurement, we found a beam waist slightly downstream of the spherical center of the diode structure. The measured beam behavior was consistent with numerical results obtained via a 3D particle code. No serious degradation of the beam emittance was observed for the grid-controlled extraction scheme.

  10. Three electron beams from a laser-plasma wakefield accelerator and the energy apportioning question

    CERN Document Server

    Yang, X; Reboredo Gil, David; Welsh, Gregor H; Li, Y.F; Cipiccia, Silvia; Ersfeld, Bernhard; Grant, D. W; Grant, P. A; Islam, Muhammad; Tooley, M.B; Vieux, Gregory; Wiggins, Sally; Sheng, Zheng-Ming; Jaroszynski, Dino

    2017-01-01

    Laser-wakefield accelerators are compact devices capable of delivering ultra-short electron bunches with pC-level charge and MeV-GeV energy by exploiting the ultra-high electric fields arising from the interaction of intense laser pulses with plasma. We show experimentally and through numerical simulations that a high-energy electron beam is produced simultaneously with two stable lowerenergy beams that are ejected in oblique and counter-propagating directions, typically carrying off 5–10% of the initial laser energy. A MeV, 10s nC oblique beam is ejected in a 30°–60° hollow cone, which is filled with more energetic electrons determined by the injection dynamics. A nC-level, 100s keV backward-directed beam is mainly produced at the leading edge of the plasma column. We discuss the apportioning of absorbed laser energy amongst the three beams. Knowledge of the distribution of laser energy and electron beam charge, which determine the overall efficiency, is important for various applications of laser-wake...

  11. Development of X-ray Emission Computed Tomography for Laser-Plasma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shao'En, Jiang; Zhongli, Liu; Nan, Li; Zhijian, Zheng; Dao'Yuan, Tang; Yongkun, Ding; Xin, Hu

    1996-11-01

    A computed tomography (CT) technique has been developed to diagnose laser produced plasma using X-ray emission. The three dimensional X-ray distribution was reconstructed by using a multiplicate algebraic reconstruction technique (MART) from five pinhole camera images obtained along different sight directions. A three dimensional reconstruction program (CT3D) has been worked out, the accuracy of which reaches 92% and 86%, without and with noise (S/N-10), respectively. The experimental data, obtained from the ICF on the ``Xinguang-II'' facilities (λ = 0.35 μm, EL = 100J, τ = 700ps), are processed by using the CT3D program and good reconstruction results have been obtained.

  12. 3D printing of gas jet nozzles for laser-plasma accelerators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Döpp, A.; Guillaume, E.; Thaury, C.; Gautier, J.; Ta Phuoc, K.; Malka, V.

    2016-07-01

    Recent results on laser wakefield acceleration in tailored plasma channels have underlined the importance of controlling the density profile of the gas target. In particular, it was reported that the appropriate density tailoring can result in improved injection, acceleration, and collimation of laser-accelerated electron beams. To achieve such profiles, innovative target designs are required. For this purpose, we have reviewed the usage of additive layer manufacturing, commonly known as 3D printing, in order to produce gas jet nozzles. Notably we have compared the performance of two industry standard techniques, namely, selective laser sintering (SLS) and stereolithography (SLA). Furthermore we have used the common fused deposition modeling to reproduce basic gas jet designs and used SLA and SLS for more sophisticated nozzle designs. The nozzles are characterized interferometrically and used for electron acceleration experiments with the Salle Jaune terawatt laser at Laboratoire d'Optique Appliquée.

  13. 3D printing of gas jet nozzles for laser-plasma accelerators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Döpp, A.; Guillaume, E.; Thaury, C.; Gautier, J.; Ta Phuoc, K.; Malka, V. [LOA, ENSTA ParisTech, CNRS, École Polytechnique, Université Paris-Saclay, 828 Boulevard des Maréchaux, 91762 Palaiseau Cedex (France)

    2016-07-15

    Recent results on laser wakefield acceleration in tailored plasma channels have underlined the importance of controlling the density profile of the gas target. In particular, it was reported that the appropriate density tailoring can result in improved injection, acceleration, and collimation of laser-accelerated electron beams. To achieve such profiles, innovative target designs are required. For this purpose, we have reviewed the usage of additive layer manufacturing, commonly known as 3D printing, in order to produce gas jet nozzles. Notably we have compared the performance of two industry standard techniques, namely, selective laser sintering (SLS) and stereolithography (SLA). Furthermore we have used the common fused deposition modeling to reproduce basic gas jet designs and used SLA and SLS for more sophisticated nozzle designs. The nozzles are characterized interferometrically and used for electron acceleration experiments with the SALLE JAUNE terawatt laser at Laboratoire d’Optique Appliquée.

  14. 3D printing of gas jet nozzles for laser-plasma accelerators

    CERN Document Server

    Döpp, A; Thaury, C; Gautier, J; Phuoc, K Ta; Malka, V

    2016-01-01

    Recent results on laser wakefield acceleration in tailored plasma channels have underlined the importance of controlling the density profile of the gas target. In particular it was reported that appropriate density tailoring can result in improved injection, acceleration and collimation of laser-accelerated electron beams. To achieve such profiles innovative target designs are required. For this purpose we have reviewed the usage of additive layer manufacturing, commonly known as 3D printing, in order to produce gas jet nozzles. Notably we have compared the performance of two industry standard techniques, namely selective laser sintering (SLS) and stereolithography (SLA). Furthermore we have used the common fused deposition modeling (FDM) to reproduce basic gas jet designs and used SLA and SLS for more sophisticated nozzle designs. The nozzles are characterized interferometrically and used for electron acceleration experiments with the Salle Jaune terawatt laser at Laboratoire d'Optique Appliqu\\'ee.

  15. Process of commutation of a vacuum electric-discharge gap by laser plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davydov, S. G., E-mail: asvi@mail.ru; Dolgov, A. N.; Kozlovskaya, T. I.; Revazov, V. O.; Seleznev, V. P.; Yakubov, R. Kh. [Dukhov All-Russian Research Institute of Automatics (Russian Federation)

    2016-01-15

    The temporal parameters of a process of vacuum gap commutation under exposure to a nanosecond pulse of laser radiation incident on the cathode has been studied depending on the radiation energy. Based on the experiment data, it is suggested that a glow discharge is initially ignited in electrode erosion products under exposure to the laser pulse, which due to development of the ionization-overheating instability undergoes the contraction of current channel and transits to an arc discharge. With the radiation energy exceeding a threshold value, the radiation (incident on the cathode) accelerates directly the instability development and the glow discharge transition to the arc discharge due to the radiation absorption in the discharge plasma.

  16. Compact beam transport system for free-electron lasers driven by a laser plasma accelerator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Tao; Zhang, Tong; Wang, Dong; Huang, Zhirong

    2017-02-01

    Utilizing laser-driven plasma accelerators (LPAs) as a high-quality electron beam source is a promising approach to significantly downsize the x-ray free-electron laser (XFEL) facility. A multi-GeV LPA beam can be generated in several-centimeter acceleration distance, with a high peak current and a low transverse emittance, which will considerably benefit a compact FEL design. However, the large initial angular divergence and energy spread make it challenging to transport the beam and realize FEL radiation. In this paper, a novel design of beam transport system is proposed to maintain the superior features of the LPA beam and a transverse gradient undulator (TGU) is also adopted as an effective energy spread compensator to generate high-brilliance FEL radiation. Theoretical analysis and numerical simulations are presented based on a demonstration experiment with an electron energy of 380 MeV and a radiation wavelength of 30 nm.

  17. Target optimization for desired X-ray spectra produced by laser plasma accelerated electrons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lobok, Maxim; Brantov, Andrey; Bychenkov, Valery

    2016-10-01

    Different regimes of electron acceleration from low-density targets are investigated using three-dimensional numerical simulations. Multiple spatial target density profiles were examined, including laser pre-pulse modified targets. The size of the plasma corona is shown to be one of the main parameters characterizing the temperature and number of hot electrons, which determine the yield of X-ray radiation and its hardness. The generation of X-ray radiation by laser accelerated electrons, which impact the converter target located behind the laser target, was studied. The X-ray spectra were computed using Monte-Carlo simulations. This work was partially supported by the Russian Foundation for Basic Research 16-02-00088-a.

  18. Calibration Of A KrF Laser-Plasma Source For X-Ray Microscopy Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turcu, I. C. E.; O'Neill, F.; Zammit, U.; Al-Hadithi, Y.; Eason, R. W.; Rogayski, A. M.; Hills, C. P. B.; Michette, A. G.

    1988-02-01

    Plasma X-ray sources for biological microscopy in the water-window have been produced by focusing tige 200 3, 50 ns Sprit q KrF laser onto carbon targets at irradiance between 2.2 x 10" W/cm4 and 3.7 x 10i3W/cm. Absolute measurements of X-ray production have been made using a calibrated, vacuum X-ray diode detector. A peak conversion efficiency . 10% is measured from KrF laseri)Tight tcto wate-window X-rays at 280 eV < hv < 530 eV for a target irradiance . 1 x x 10 W/cm'. Some measurements with gold and tungsten targets give conversion efficiencies 2$25% at a similar laser irradiance.

  19. Control of Laser Plasma Based Accelerators up to 1 GeV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakamura, Kei [Univ. of Tokyo (Japan); Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2007-12-01

    This dissertation documents the development of a broadband electron spectrometer (ESM) for GeV class Laser Wakefield Accelerators (LWFA), the production of high quality GeV electron beams (e-beams) for the first time in a LWFA by using a capillary discharge guide (CDG), and a statistical analysis of CDG-LWFAs. An ESM specialized for CDG-LWFAs with an unprecedented wide momentum acceptance, from 0.01 to 1.1 GeV in a single shot, has been developed. Simultaneous measurement of e-beam spectra and output laser properties as well as a large angular acceptance (> ± 10 mrad) were realized by employing a slitless scheme. A scintillating screen (LANEX Fast back, LANEX-FB)--camera system allowed faster than 1 Hz operation and evaluation of the spatial properties of e-beams. The design provided sufficient resolution for the whole range of the ESM (below 5% for beams with 2 mrad divergence). The calibration between light yield from LANEX-FB and total charge, and a study on the electron energy dependence (0.071 to 1.23 GeV) of LANEX-FB were performed at the Advanced light source (ALS), Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL). Using this calibration data, the developed ESM provided a charge measurement as well. The production of high quality electron beams up to 1 GeV from a centimeter-scale accelerator was demonstrated. The experiment used a 310 μm diameter gas-filled capillary discharge waveguide that channeled relativistically-intense laser pulses (42 TW, 4.5 x 1018 W/cm2) over 3.3 centimeters of sufficiently low density (≃ 4.3 x 1018/cm3) plasma. Also demonstrated was stable self-injection and acceleration at a beam energy of ≃ 0.5 GeV by using a 225 μm diameter capillary. Relativistically-intense laser pulses (12 TW, 1.3 x 1018W/cm2) were guided over 3.3 centimeters of low density (≃ 3.5 x 1018/cm3) plasma in this experiment. A statistical analysis of the CDG

  20. High quality electron bunch generation with CO2-laser-plasma interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Lingang; Shen, Baifei; Xu, Jiancai; Ji, Liangliang; Zhang, Xiaomei; Wang, Wenpeng; Zhao, Xueyan; Yi, Longqing; Yu, Yahong; Shi, Yin; Xu, Tongjun; Xu, Zhizhan

    2015-02-01

    CO2 laser-driven electron acceleration in low-density plasma is demonstrated using particle-in-cell simulation. An intense CO2 laser pulse of long wavelength excites a wake bubble that has a large elongated volume for accelerating a large number of electrons before reaching the charge saturation limit. A transversely injected laser pulse is used to induce and control the electron injection. It is found that an electron bunch with total charge up to 10 nC and absolute energy spread less than 16 MeV can be obtained. As a result, the charge per energy interval of the bunch reaches up to 0.6 nC/MeV. Intense CO2-laser based electron acceleration can provide a new direction for generating highly charged electron bunches with low energy spread, which is of much current interest, especially for table-top X-ray generation.

  1. Spectrochemical analysis of powdered biological samples using transversely excited atmospheric carbon dioxide laser plasma excitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zivkovic, Sanja; Momcilovic, Milos; Staicu, Angela; Mutic, Jelena; Trtica, Milan; Savovic, Jelena

    2017-02-01

    The aim of this study was to develop a simple laser induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) method for quantitative elemental analysis of powdered biological materials based on laboratory prepared calibration samples. The analysis was done using ungated single pulse LIBS in ambient air at atmospheric pressure. Transversely-Excited Atmospheric pressure (TEA) CO2 laser was used as an energy source for plasma generation on samples. The material used for the analysis was a blue-green alga Spirulina, widely used in food and pharmaceutical industries and also in a few biotechnological applications. To demonstrate the analytical potential of this particular LIBS system the obtained spectra were compared to the spectra obtained using a commercial LIBS system based on pulsed Nd:YAG laser. A single sample of known concentration was used to estimate detection limits for Ba, Ca, Fe, Mg, Mn, Si and Sr and compare detection power of these two LIBS systems. TEA CO2 laser based LIBS was also applied for quantitative analysis of the elements in powder Spirulina samples. Analytical curves for Ba, Fe, Mg, Mn and Sr were constructed using laboratory produced matrix-matched calibration samples. Inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectroscopy (ICP-OES) was used as the reference technique for elemental quantification, and reasonably well agreement between ICP and LIBS data was obtained. Results confirm that, in respect to its sensitivity and precision, TEA CO2 laser based LIBS can be successfully applied for quantitative analysis of macro and micro-elements in algal samples. The fact that nearly all classes of materials can be prepared as powders implies that the proposed method could be easily extended to a quantitative analysis of different kinds of materials, organic, biological or inorganic.

  2. Four-color laser irradiation system for laser-plasma interaction experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pennington, D.M.; Henesian, M.A.; Wilcox, R.B. [and others

    1996-06-01

    Since 1986, optical smoothing of the laser irradiance on targets for Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) has gained increasing attention. Optical smoothing can significantly reduce wavefront aberrations that produce nonuniformities in the energy distribution of the focal spot. Hot spots in the laser irradiance can induce local self focusing of the light, producing filamentation of the plasma. Filamentation can have detrimental consequences on the hydrodynamics of an ICF plasma, and can affect the growth of parametric instabilities, as well as add to the complexity of the study of such instabilities as stimulated Brillouin scattering (SBS) and stimulated Raman scattering (SRS). As experiments approach and exceed breakeven (i.e., where driver energy = fusion yield), the likelihood of significant excitation of these processes increases. As a result, the authors are including a scheme for implementing optical-beam smoothing for target experiments in the baseline design for the proposed next-generation ICF facility--the National Ignition Facility (NIF). To verify the efficacy of this design for the suppression of parametric instabilites in NIF-like indirect-drive targets, the authors successfully modified a Nova beamline to simulate the proposed NIF conditions. In this article, they discuss the laser science associated with a four-color target campaign on Nova to test the effect of f-number (ratio of focal length to beam diameter) and temporal smoothing on the scaling of SBS with a four-segment interaction beam using NIF-like parameters. The results of the target series associated with the four-color configuration are discussed elsewhere.

  3. Debris-free laser plasma sources for EUVL based on gas jets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kubiak, G.D.; O`Connell, D.; Krenz, K.D.

    1996-03-01

    EUV sources for EUVL must not only be bright for throughput, they must also be debris-free to increase condenser longevity. Many schemes to achieve bright, clean sources for EUVL have been studied, including mass-limited targets, cryogenic targets, electric discharges, and electron-beam pumped vapor. Several of these sources show promise, with varying degrees of brightness, debris reduction, and system complexity. We have studied pulsed gas jets, which we find to be relatively simple, debris-free sources when used under appropriate conditions. Under transverse, 1.06 {mu}m irradiation of the jet at incident laser intensities in the range of 10{sup 11}-10{sup 12} Watts/cm{sup 2}, the conversion efficiency into 2{pi} steradians is in the range of 0.3-0.4%, or approximately half the value exhibited by solid Au or W targets under similar conditions. Source sizes in the range of 350 {mu}m x 400 {mu}m can be achieved, as shown in Fig. 2, depending sensitively on both laser and gas jet parameters. One issue that must be overcome in the use of gas jet targets is the requirement that the laser-irradiated plasma be located as far from the jet nozzle as possible to avoid debris generation while maintaining adequate EUV conversion. We will describe conditions under which these criteria are met. Measurements of the reflectance lifetimes of multilayer-coated mirrors placed near the plasma source under these conditions will also be presented. The potential for scaling such sources up to meet the requirements of a commercial EUVL system will be discussed.

  4. Laser-Plasma Interactions in Drive Campaign targets on the National Ignition Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinkel, D. E.; Callahan, D. A.; Moody, J. D.; Amendt, P. A.; Lasinski, B. F.; MacGowan, B. J.; Meeker, D.; Michel, P. A.; Ralph, J.; Rosen, M. D.; Ross, J. S.; Schneider, M. B.; Storm, E.; Strozzi, D. J.; Williams, E. A.

    2016-03-01

    The Drive campaign [D A Callahan et al., this conference] on the National Ignition Facility (NIF) laser [E. I. Moses, R. N. Boyd, B. A. Remington, C. J. Keane, R. Al-Ayat, Phys. Plasmas 16, 041006 (2009)] has the focused goal of understanding and optimizing the hohlraum for ignition. Both the temperature and symmetry of the radiation drive depend on laser and hohlraum characteristics. The drive temperature depends on the coupling of laser energy to the hohlraum, and the symmetry of the drive depends on beam-to-beam interactions that result in energy transfer [P. A. Michel, S. H. Glenzer, L. Divol, et al, Phys. Plasmas 17, 056305 (2010).] within the hohlraum. To this end, hohlraums are being fielded where shape (rugby vs. cylindrical hohlraums), gas fill composition (neopentane at room temperature vs. cryogenic helium), and gas fill density (increase of ∼ 150%) are independently changed. Cylindrical hohlraums with higher gas fill density show improved inner beam propagation, as should rugby hohlraums, because of the larger radius over the capsule (7 mm vs. 5.75 mm in a cylindrical hohlraum). Energy coupling improves in room temperature neopentane targets, as well as in hohlraums at higher gas fill density. In addition cross-beam energy transfer is being addressed directly by using targets that mock up one end of a hohlraum, but allow observation of the laser beam uniformity after energy transfer. Ideas such as splitting quads into “doublets” by re-pointing the right and left half of quads are also being pursued. LPI results of the Drive campaign will be summarized, and analyses of future directions presented.

  5. MULTI-fs - A computer code for laser-plasma interaction in the femtosecond regime

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramis, R.; Eidmann, K.; Meyer-ter-Vehn, J.; Hüller, S.

    2012-03-01

    The code MULTI-fs is a numerical tool devoted to the study of the interaction of ultrashort sub-picosecond laser pulses with matter in the intensity range from 10 11 to 10 17 W cm -2. Hydrodynamics is solved in one-dimensional geometry together with laser energy deposition and transport by thermal conduction and radiation. In contrast to long nanosecond pulses, short pulses generate steep gradient plasmas with typical scale lengths in the order of the laser wavelength and smaller. Under these conditions, Maxwell's equations are solved explicitly to obtain the light field. Concerning laser absorption, two different models for the electron-ion collision frequency are implemented to cover the regime of warm dense matter between high-temperature plasma and solid matter and also interaction with short-wave-length (VUV) light. MULTI-fs code is based on the MULTI radiation-hydrodynamic code [R. Ramis, R. Schmalz, J. Meyer-ter-Vehn, Comp. Phys. Comm. 49 (1988) 475] and most of the original features for the treatment of radiation are maintained. Program summaryProgram title: MULTI-fs Catalogue identifier: AEKT_v1_0 Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/AEKT_v1_0.html Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen's University, Belfast, N. Ireland Licensing provisions: Standard CPC licence, http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/licence/licence.html No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 49 598 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 443 771 Distribution format: tar.gz Programming language: FORTRAN Computer: PC (32 bits and 64 bits architecture) Operating system: Linux/Unix RAM: 1.6 MiB Classification: 19.13, 21.2 Subprograms used: Cat Id: AECV_v1_0; Title: MULTI2D; Reference: CPC 180 (2009) 977 Nature of problem: One-dimensional interaction of intense ultrashort (sub-picosecond) and ultraintense (up to 10 17 W cm -2) laser beams with matter. Solution method: The hydrodynamic motion coupled to laser propagation and

  6. Electron Generation and Transport in Intense Relativistic Laser-Plasma Interactions Relevant to Fast Ignition ICF

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ma, Tammy Yee Wing [Univ. of California, San Diego, CA (United States)

    2010-01-01

    The reentrant cone approach to Fast Ignition, an advanced Inertial Confinement Fusion scheme, remains one of the most attractive because of the potential to efficiently collect and guide the laser light into the cone tip and direct energetic electrons into the high density core of the fuel. However, in the presence of a preformed plasma, the laser energy is largely absorbed before it can reach the cone tip. Full scale fast ignition laser systems are envisioned to have prepulses ranging between 100 mJ to 1 J. A few of the imperative issues facing fast ignition, then, are the conversion efficiency with which the laser light is converted to hot electrons, the subsequent transport characteristics of those electrons, and requirements for maximum allowable prepulse this may put on the laser system. This dissertation examines the laser-to-fast electron conversion efficiency scaling with prepulse for cone-guided fast ignition. Work in developing an extreme ultraviolet imager diagnostic for the temperature measurements of electron-heated targets, as well as the validation of the use of a thin wire for simultaneous determination of electron number density and electron temperature will be discussed.

  7. Particle-in-Cell Laser-Plasma Simulation on Xeon Phi Coprocessors

    CERN Document Server

    Surmin, I A; Efimenko, E S; Gonoskov, A A; Korzhimanov, A V; Meyerov, I B

    2015-01-01

    This paper concerns development of a high-performance implementation of the Particle-in-Cell method for plasma simulation on Intel Xeon Phi coprocessors. We discuss suitability of the method for Xeon Phi architecture and present our experience of porting and optimization of the existing parallel Particle-in-Cell code PICADOR. Direct porting with no code modification gives performance on Xeon Phi close to 8-core CPU on a benchmark problem with 50 particles per cell. We demonstrate step-by-step application of optimization techniques such as improving data locality, enhancing parallelization efficiency and vectorization that leads to 3.75 x speedup on CPU and 7.5 x on Xeon Phi. The optimized version achieves 18.8 ns per particle update on Intel Xeon E5-2660 CPU and 9.3 ns per particle update on Intel Xeon Phi 5110P. On a real problem of laser ion acceleration in targets with surface grating that requires a large number of macroparticles per cell the speedup of Xeon Phi compared to CPU is 1.6 x.

  8. Laser Plasma Instability (LPI) Driven Light Scattering Measurements with Nike KrF Laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, J.; Weaver, J. L.; Kehne, D. M.; Obenschain, S. P.; McLean, E. A.; Lehmberg, R. H.

    2008-11-01

    With the short wavelength (248 nm), large bandwidth (1˜2 THz), and ISI beam smoothing, Nike KrF laser is expected to have higher LPI thresholds than observed at other laser facilities. Previous measurements using the Nike laser [J. L. Weaver et al, Phys. Plasmas 14, 056316 (2007)] showed no LPI evidence from CH targets up to I˜2x10^15 W/cm^2. For further experiments to detect LPI excitation, Nike capabilities have been extended to achieve higher laser intensities by tighter beam focusing and higher power pulses. This talk will present results of a recent LPI experiment with the extended Nike capabilities focusing on light emission data in spectral ranges relevant to the Raman (SRS) and Two-Plasmon Decay (TPD) instabilities. The primary diagnostics were time-resolved spectrometers with an absolute-intensity-calibrated photodiode array in (0.4˜0.8)φ0 and a streak camera near 0.5φ0. The measurements were conducted at laser intensities of 10^15˜10^16 W/cm^2 on planar targets of CH solids and RF foams.

  9. Brilliant radiation sources by laser-plasma accelerators and optical undulators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Debus, Alexander

    2012-09-06

    This thesis investigates the use of high-power lasers for synchrotron radiation sources with high brilliance, from the EUV to the hard X-ray spectral range. Hereby lasers accelerate electrons by laser-wakefield acceleration (LWFA), act as optical undulators, or both. Experimental evidence shows for the first time that LWFA electron bunches are shorter than the driving laser and have a length scale comparable to the plasma wavelength. Furthermore, a first proof of principle experiment demonstrates that LWFA electrons can be exploited to generate undulator radiation. Building upon these experimental findings, as well as extensive numerical simulations of Thomson scattering, the theoretical foundations of a novel interaction geometry for laser-matter interaction are developed. This new method is very general and when tailored towards relativistically moving targets not being limited by the focusability (Rayleigh length) of the laser, while it does not require a waveguide. In a theoretical investigation of Thomson scattering, the optical analogue of undulator radiation, the limits of Thomson sources in scaling towards higher peak brilliances are highlighted. This leads to a novel method for generating brilliant, highly tunable X-ray sources, which is highly energy efficient by circumventing the laser Rayleigh limit through a novel traveling-wave Thomson scattering (TWTS) geometry. This new method suggests increases in X-ray photon yields of 2-3 orders of magnitudes using existing lasers and a way towards efficient, optical undulators to drive a free-electron laser. The results presented here extend far beyond the scope of this work. The possibility to use lasers as particle accelerators, as well as optical undulators, leads to very compact and energy efficient synchrotron sources. The resulting monoenergetic radiation of high brilliance in a range from extreme ultraviolet (EUV) to hard X-ray radiation is of fundamental importance for basic research, medical

  10. Suppression of Instabilities and Stochastic Pulsation at Laser-Plasma Interaction by Beam Smoothing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frederick Osman

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available The key problem of direct drive laser fusion is the appearance of parametric instabilities, stochastic pulsation, self-focusing (filamentation and other anomalies. During the long years studies, the empirical and intuitively developed methods for smoothing of the laser beam were rather successful but a transparent understanding of the physics has still to be found. The first theory how the instabilities are reduced by smoothing was given recently by using PIG simulation while the suppression of the 10-picosecond stochastic pulsation by broadband laser beams was analyzed by the genuine two fluid models. A synoptic evaluation of these results is presented here where the correlation between the instabilities with the pulsation is evident. This opens new ways for direct drive laser fusion with the fundamental red laser light avoiding expensive and because of crystal defects - unsolved problems with higher harmonic production.

  11. Investigating high speed phenomena in laser plasma interactions using dilation x-ray imager (invited).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagel, S R; Hilsabeck, T J; Bell, P M; Bradley, D K; Ayers, M J; Piston, K; Felker, B; Kilkenny, J D; Chung, T; Sammuli, B; Hares, J D; Dymoke-Bradshaw, A K L

    2014-11-01

    The DIlation X-ray Imager (DIXI) is a new, high-speed x-ray framing camera at the National Ignition Facility (NIF) sensitive to x-rays in the range of ≈2-17 keV. DIXI uses the pulse-dilation technique to achieve a temporal resolution of less than 10 ps, a ≈10× improvement over conventional framing cameras currently employed on the NIF (≈100 ps resolution), and otherwise only attainable with 1D streaked imaging. The pulse-dilation technique utilizes a voltage ramp to impart a velocity gradient on the signal-bearing electrons. The temporal response, spatial resolution, and x-ray sensitivity of DIXI are characterized with a short x-ray impulse generated using the COMET laser facility at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. At the NIF a pinhole array at 10 cm from target chamber center (tcc) projects images onto the photocathode situated outside the NIF chamber wall with a magnification of ≈64×. DIXI will provide important capabilities for warm-dense-matter physics, high-energy-density science, and inertial confinement fusion, adding important capabilities to temporally resolve hot-spot formation, x-ray emission, fuel motion, and mix levels in the hot-spot at neutron yields of up to 10(17). We present characterization data as well as first results on electron-transport phenomena in buried-layer foil experiments.

  12. Investigating high speed phenomena in laser plasma interactions using dilation x-ray imager (invited)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nagel, S. R., E-mail: nagel7@llnl.gov; Bell, P. M.; Bradley, D. K.; Ayers, M. J.; Piston, K.; Felker, B. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, 7000 East Avenue, Livermore, California 94550 (United States); Hilsabeck, T. J.; Kilkenny, J. D.; Chung, T.; Sammuli, B. [General Atomics, P.O. Box 85608, San Diego, California 92186-5608 (United States); Hares, J. D.; Dymoke-Bradshaw, A. K. L. [Kentech Instruments Ltd., Wallingford, Oxfordshire OX10 (United Kingdom)

    2014-11-15

    The DIlation X-ray Imager (DIXI) is a new, high-speed x-ray framing camera at the National Ignition Facility (NIF) sensitive to x-rays in the range of ≈2–17 keV. DIXI uses the pulse-dilation technique to achieve a temporal resolution of less than 10 ps, a ≈10× improvement over conventional framing cameras currently employed on the NIF (≈100 ps resolution), and otherwise only attainable with 1D streaked imaging. The pulse-dilation technique utilizes a voltage ramp to impart a velocity gradient on the signal-bearing electrons. The temporal response, spatial resolution, and x-ray sensitivity of DIXI are characterized with a short x-ray impulse generated using the COMET laser facility at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. At the NIF a pinhole array at 10 cm from target chamber center (tcc) projects images onto the photocathode situated outside the NIF chamber wall with a magnification of ≈64×. DIXI will provide important capabilities for warm-dense-matter physics, high-energy-density science, and inertial confinement fusion, adding important capabilities to temporally resolve hot-spot formation, x-ray emission, fuel motion, and mix levels in the hot-spot at neutron yields of up to 10{sup 17}. We present characterization data as well as first results on electron-transport phenomena in buried-layer foil experiments.

  13. Efficient quasi-monoenergetic ion beams up to 18 MeV/nucleon via self-generated plasma fields in relativistic laser plasmas

    CERN Document Server

    Palaniyappan, Sasi; Gautier, Donald C; Hamilton, Christopher E; Santiago, Miguel A; Kreuzer, Christian; Shah, Rahul C; Fernandez, Juan C

    2015-01-01

    Table-top laser-plasma ion accelerators seldom achieve narrow energy spreads, and never without serious compromises in efficiency, particle yield, etc. Using massive computer simulations, we identify a self-organizing scheme that exploits persisting self-generated plasma electric (~TV/m) and magnetic (~10${}^{4}$ Tesla) fields to reduce the ion energy spread after the laser exits the plasma - separating the ion acceleration from the energy spread reduction. Consistent with the scheme, we experimentally demonstrate aluminum and carbon ion beams with narrow spectral peaks at energies up to 310 MeV (11.5 MeV/nucleon) and 220 MeV (18.3 MeV/nucleon), respectively, with high conversion efficiency (~5%, i.e., 4J out of 80J laser). This is achieved with 0.12 PW high-contrast Gaussian laser pulses irradiating planar foils with optimal thicknesses of up to 250 nm that scale with laser intensity. When increasing the focused laser intensity fourfold (by reducing the focusing optic f/number twofold), the spectral-peak ene...

  14. Plasma wakefields driven by an incoherent combination of laser pulses: a path towards high-average power laser-plasma accelerators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benedetti, C.; Schroeder, C.B.; Esarey, E.; Leemans, W.P.

    2014-05-01

    he wakefield generated in a plasma by incoherently combining a large number of low energy laser pulses (i.e.,without constraining the pulse phases) is studied analytically and by means of fully-self-consistent particle-in-cell simulations. The structure of the wakefield has been characterized and its amplitude compared with the amplitude of the wake generated by a single (coherent) laser pulse. We show that, in spite of the incoherent nature of the wakefield within the volume occupied by the laser pulses, behind this region the structure of the wakefield can be regular with an amplitude comparable or equal to that obtained from a single pulse with the same energy. Wake generation requires that the incoherent structure in the laser energy density produced by the combined pulses exists on a time scale short compared to the plasma period. Incoherent combination of multiple laser pulses may enable a technologically simpler path to high-repetition rate, high-average power laser-plasma accelerators and associated applications.

  15. INTERACTION OF LASER RADIATION WITH MATTER. LASER PLASMA: Composition and dynamics of an erosion plasma produced by microsecond laser pulses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anisimov, V. N.; Grishina, V. G.; Derkach, O. N.; Sebrant, A. Yu; Stepanova, M. A.

    1995-08-01

    The ion and energy compositions were determined and the dynamics was studied of an erosion plume formed by microsecond CO2 laser pulses incident on a graphite target. The ionic emission lines were used to find the electron density and temperature of the plasma on the target surface. The temperature of the plasma source did not change throughout the line emission time (4 μs). At the plasma recombination stage the lines of the C II, C III, and C IV ions were accompanied by bands of the C2 molecule near the target surface and also near the surface of an substrate when a plasma flow interacted with it. Ways were found for controlling the plume expansion anisotropy and for producing plasma flows with controlled parameters by selection of the conditions during formation of a quasisteady erosion plasma flow.

  16. Slowing of Magnetic Reconnection Concurrent with Weakening Plasma Inflows and Increasing Collisionality in Strongly Driven Laser-Plasma Experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenberg, M J; Li, C K; Fox, W; Zylstra, A B; Stoeckl, C; Séguin, F H; Frenje, J A; Petrasso, R D

    2015-05-22

    An evolution of magnetic reconnection behavior, from fast jets to the slowing of reconnection and the establishment of a stable current sheet, has been observed in strongly driven, β≲20 laser-produced plasma experiments. This process has been inferred to occur alongside a slowing of plasma inflows carrying the oppositely directed magnetic fields as well as the evolution of plasma conditions from collisionless to collisional. High-resolution proton radiography has revealed unprecedented detail of the forced interaction of magnetic fields and super-Alfvénic electron jets (V_{jet}∼20V_{A}) ejected from the reconnection region, indicating that two-fluid or collisionless magnetic reconnection occurs early in time. The absence of jets and the persistence of strong, stable magnetic fields at late times indicates that the reconnection process slows down, while plasma flows stagnate and plasma conditions evolve to a cooler, denser, more collisional state. These results demonstrate that powerful initial plasma flows are not sufficient to force a complete reconnection of magnetic fields, even in the strongly driven regime.

  17. Measurements of Electron Density Profiles of Plasmas Produced by Nike KrF Laser for Laser Plasma Instability (LPI) Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Jaechul; Weaver, J. L.; Obenschain, S. P.; Schmitt, A. J.; Kehne, D. M.; Karasik, M.; Chan, L.-Y.; Serlin, V.; Phillips, L.

    2013-10-01

    Knowing spatial profiles of electron density (ne) in the underdense coronal region (n Nike LPI experiment, a side-on grid imaging refractometer (GIR) was deployed for measuring the underdense plasma profiles. Plasmas were produced from flat CH targets illuminated by Nike KrF laser with total energies up to 1 kJ of 0.5 ~ 1 nsec FWHM pulses. The GIR resolved ne up to 3 ×1021 /cm3 in space taking 2D snapshot images of probe laser (λ = 263 nm, Δt = 10 ps) beamlets (50 μm spacing) refracted by the plasma at a selected time during the laser illumination. The individual beamlet transmittances were also measured for Te estimation. Time-resolved spectrometers with an absolute-intensity-calibrated photodiode array and a streak camera simultaneously detected light emission from the plasma in spectral ranges relevant to Raman (SRS) and two plasmon decay instabilities. The measured spatial profiles are compared with simulation results from the FAST3D radiation hydrocode and their effects on the LPI observations are investigated. Work supported by DoE/NNSA and performed at Naval Research Laboratory.

  18. Plasma physics and engineering

    CERN Document Server

    Fridman, Alexander

    2011-01-01

    Part I: Fundamentals of Plasma Physics and Plasma ChemistryPlasma in Nature, in the Laboratory, and in IndustryOccurrence of Plasma: Natural and Man MadeGas DischargesPlasma Applications, Plasmas in IndustryPlasma Applications for Environmental ControlPlasma Applications in Energy ConversionPlasma Application for Material ProcessingBreakthrough Plasma Applications in Modern TechnologyElementary Processes of Charged Species in PlasmaElementary Charged Particles in Plasma and Their Elastic and Inelastic CollisionsIonization ProcessesMechanisms of Electron Losses: The Electron-Ion RecombinationEl

  19. Laser Plasmas : Lie-optic matrix algorithm for computer simulation of paraxial self-focusing in a plasma

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    D Subbarao; R Uma; Kamal Goyal; Sanjeev Goyal; Karuna Batra

    2000-11-01

    Propagation algorithm for computer simulation of stationary paraxial self-focusing laser beam in a medium with saturating nonlinearity is given in Lie-optic form. Accordingly, a very natural piece-wise continuous Lie transformation that reduces to a restricted Lorentz group of the beam results. It gives rise to a matrix method for self-focusing beam propagation that is constructed and implemented. Although the results use plasma nonlinearities of saturable type, and a gaussian initial beam, these results are applicable for other media like linear optical fibers and to more general situations.

  20. Measurement of Laser Plasma Instability (LPI) Driven Light Scattering from Plasmas Produced by Nike KrF Laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Jaechul; Weaver, J. L.; Phillips, L.; Obenschain, S. P.; Schmitt, A. J.; Kehne, D. M.; Serlin, V.; Lehmberg, R. H.; McLean, E. A.; Manka, C. K.

    2010-11-01

    With short wavelength (248 nm), large bandwidth (1˜3 THz), and ISI beam smoothing, Nike KrF laser provides unique research opportunities and potential for direct-drive inertial confinement fusion. Previous Nike experiments observed two plasmon decay (TPD) driven signals from CH plasmas at the laser intensities above ˜2x10^15 W/cm^2 with total laser energies up to 1 kJ of ˜350 ps FWHM pulses. We have performed a further experiment with longer laser pulses (0.5˜4.0 ns FWHM) and will present combined results of the experiments focusing on light emission data in spectral ranges relevant to the Raman (SRS) and TPD instabilities. Time- or space-resolved spectral features of TPD were detected at different viewing angles and the absolute intensity calibrated spectra of thermal background were used to obtain blackbody temperatures in the plasma corona. The wave vector distribution in k-space of the participating TPD plasmons will be also discussed. These results show promise for the proposed direct-drive designs.

  1. Mathematics for plasma physics; Mathematiques pour la physique des plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sentis, R. [CEA Bruyeres-le-Chatel, 91 (France)

    2011-01-15

    The plasma physics is in the heart of the research of the CEA-DAM. Using mathematics in this domain is necessary, particularly for a precise statement of the partial differential equations systems which are on the basis of the numerical simulations. Examples are given concerning hydrodynamics, models for the thermal conduction and laser-plasma interaction. For the bi-temperature compressible Euler model, the mathematical study of the problem has allowed us to understand why the role of the energy equations dealing with ions on one hand and electrons on the other hand are not identical despite the symmetrical appearance of the system. The mathematical study is also necessary to be sure of the existence and uniqueness of the solution

  2. Electron acceleration and generation of high-brilliance x-ray radiation in kilojoule, subpicosecond laser-plasma interactions

    OpenAIRE

    Ferri, J.; Davoine, X.; S. Y. Kalmykov; Lifschitz, A.

    2016-01-01

    Petawatt, picosecond laser pulses offer rich opportunities in generating synchrotron x-rays. This paper concentrates on the regimes accessible with the PETAL laser, which is a part of the Laser Megajoule (LMJ) facility. We explore two physically distinct scenarios through Particle-in-Cell simulations. The first one realizes in a dense plasma, such that the period of electron Langmuir oscillations is much shorter than the pulse duration. Hallmarks of this regime are longitudinal breakup (“self...

  3. Fusion plasma physics

    CERN Document Server

    Stacey, Weston M

    2012-01-01

    This revised and enlarged second edition of the popular textbook and reference contains comprehensive treatments of both the established foundations of magnetic fusion plasma physics and of the newly developing areas of active research. It concludes with a look ahead to fusion power reactors of the future. The well-established topics of fusion plasma physics -- basic plasma phenomena, Coulomb scattering, drifts of charged particles in magnetic and electric fields, plasma confinement by magnetic fields, kinetic and fluid collective plasma theories, plasma equilibria and flux surface geometry, plasma waves and instabilities, classical and neoclassical transport, plasma-materials interactions, radiation, etc. -- are fully developed from first principles through to the computational models employed in modern plasma physics. The new and emerging topics of fusion plasma physics research -- fluctuation-driven plasma transport and gyrokinetic/gyrofluid computational methodology, the physics of the divertor, neutral ...

  4. Plasma physics an introduction

    CERN Document Server

    Fitzpatrick, Richard

    2014-01-01

    Plasma Physics: An Introduction is based on a series of university course lectures by a leading name in the field, and thoroughly covers the physics of the fourth state of matter. This book looks at non-relativistic, fully ionized, nondegenerate, quasi-neutral, and weakly coupled plasma. Intended for the student market, the text provides a concise and cohesive introduction to plasma physics theory, and offers a solid foundation for students wishing to take higher level courses in plasma physics.

  5. Improving the energy-extraction efficiency of laser-plasma accelerator driven free-electron laser using transverse-gradient undulator with focusing optics and longitudinal tapering

    CERN Document Server

    Zhou, G; Wu, J; Zhang, T

    2016-01-01

    It is reported that [Z. Huang et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 109, 204801 (2012)], high-gain free-electron laser (FEL) can be generated by transverse-dispersed electron beams from laser-plasma accelerators (LPAs) using transverse-gradient undulator (TGU) assuming an ideal constant dispersion function without focusing optics. The constant dispersion function keeps electrons beyond the resonant energy bandwidth still being on resonant with the FEL radiation. Instead, in this paper, the case with focusing optics in an LPA-driven FEL using TGU is numerically studied, in which the dispersion function should be monotonously decreasing along the undulator. Even though the FEL resonance is not always satisfied for off-energy electrons in this case, through subtly optimizing the initial dispersion and focusing parameters, it is feasible to achieve a similar radiation power to the case assuming an ideal constant dispersion function without focusing optics, and meanwhile, to attain a good transverse coherence. Moreover, higher...

  6. High-brightness laser plasma soft X-ray source using a double-stream gas puff target irradiated with the Prague Asterix Laser System (PALS)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fiedorowicz, H.; Bartnik, A.; Juha, L.; Jungwirth, K.; Kralikova, B.; Krasa, J.; Kubat, P.; Pfeifer, M.; Pina, L.; Prchal, P.; Rohlena, K.; Skala, J.; Ullschmied, J.; Horvath, M.; Wawer, J

    2004-01-14

    High brightness laser plasma soft X-ray source based on a recently developed double-stream gas puff target irradiated with 0.5 ns laser pulses with energies up to 700 J from the Prague Asterix Laser System (PALS) is presented. The gas puff target was created by pulsed injection of xenon into a hollow stream of helium using an electromagnetic valve system with the double-nozzle setup. Soft X-ray emission was measured using the transmission grating spectrograph coupled to a CCD camera and the calibrated silicon photodiodes. The absolute soft X-ray production was determined to be 160 J for 540 J of laser energy, giving the soft X-ray conversion efficiency of about 30%. The source has been used in initial experiments on soft X-ray ablation of organic polymers and elemental solids.

  7. Recent advancements in the "water-window" microscopy with laser-plasma SXR source based on a double stream gas-puff target

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wachulak, P. W.

    2016-09-01

    An overview of our recent developments, regarding "water-window" soft X-ray (SXR) microscopy based on a laser-plasma double stream gas puff target sources is presented. The work, presented herein, describes two approaches to SXR microscopy. The first one is a low spatial resolution, achromatic SXR microscopy, employing Wolter type-I objective. The second one is a nanometer spatial resolution SXR microscopy, with the use of a Fresnel zone plate objective, for imaging various objects with quasimonochromatic light, emitted from a double stream gas puff target based short wavelength source. The developments regarding both systems are presented, as well as the possible applications, for which the SXR microscope was already employed. Such compact, table-top size, laboratory type microscopy setups may be employed in the near future for complementary-like studies to other, often used, microscopy techniques.

  8. Laser Plasmas : Lie-optics, geometrical phase and nonlinear dynamics of self-focusing and soliton evolution in a plasma

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    D Subbarao; R Uma; H Singh; Kamal Goyal; Sanjeev Goyal; Ravinder Kumar

    2000-11-01

    It is useful to state propagation laws for a self-focusing laser beam or a soliton in grouptheoretical form to be called Lie-optical form for being able to predict self-focusing dynamics conveniently and amongst other things, the geometrical phase. It is shown that the propagation of the gaussian laser beam is governed by a rotation group in a non-absorbing medium and by the Lorentz group in an absorbing medium if the additional symmetry of paraxial propagation is imposed on the laser beam. This latter symmetry, however, needs care in its implementation because the electromagnetic wave of the laser sees a different refractive index profile than the laboratory observer in this approximation. It is explained how to estimate this non-Taylor paraxial power series approximation. The group theoretical laws so-stated are used to predict the geometrical or Berry phase of the laser beam by a technique developed by one of us elsewhere. The group-theoretical Lie-optic (or ABCD) laws are also useful in predicting the laser behavior in a more complex optical arrangement like in a laser cavity etc. The nonlinear dynamical consequences of these laws for long distance (or time) predictions are also dealt with. Ergodic dynamics of an ensemble of laser beams on the torus during absorptionless self-focusing is discussed in this context. From the point of view of new physics concepts, we introduce a stroboscopic invariant torus and a stroboscopic generating function in classical mechanics that is useful for long-distance predictions of absorptionless self-focusing.

  9. Reviews of plasma physics

    CERN Document Server

    2008-01-01

    "Reviews of Plasma Physics Volume 24," edited by V.D. Shafranov, presents two reviews from the cutting-edge of Russian plasma physics research. The first review by V.A. Rozhansky devoted to the mechanisms of transverse conductivity and generation of self-consistent electric fields in strongly ionized magnetized plasma. The second review by O.G. Bakunin considers numerous aspects of turbulent transport in plasma and fluids. This review is focused on scaling arguments for describing anomalous diffusion in the presence of complex structures. These topics are especially important for fusion plasma research, plasma astrophysics, discharge physics, and turbulence

  10. Reviews of plasma physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shafranov, Vitalii Dmitrievich (ed.); Bakunin, Oleg G. (comps.) [Rossijskij Nauchnyj Tsentr ' ' Kurchatovskij Inst.' ' , Moscow (Russian Federation). Nuclear Fusion Inst.; Rozhansky, V. [St. Petersburg State Polytechnical Univ. (Russian Federation)

    2008-07-01

    Reviews of Plasma Physics Volume 24, edited by V.D. Shafranov, presents two reviews from the cutting-edge of Russian plasma physics research. The first review by V.A. Rozhansky devoted to the mechanisms of transverse conductivity and generation of self-consistent electric fields in strongly ionized magnetized plasma. The second review by O.G. Bakunin considers numerous aspects of turbulent transport in plasma and fluids. This review is focused on scaling arguments for describing anomalous diffusion in the presence of complex structures. These topics are especially important for fusion plasma research, plasma astrophysics, discharge physics, and turbulence (orig.)

  11. Electron acceleration and generation of high-brilliance x-ray radiation in kilojoule, subpicosecond laser-plasma interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferri, J.; Davoine, X.; Kalmykov, S. Y.; Lifschitz, A.

    2016-10-01

    Petawatt, picosecond laser pulses offer rich opportunities in generating synchrotron x-rays. This paper concentrates on the regimes accessible with the PETAL laser, which is a part of the Laser Megajoule (LMJ) facility. We explore two physically distinct scenarios through Particle-in-Cell simulations. The first one realizes in a dense plasma, such that the period of electron Langmuir oscillations is much shorter than the pulse duration. Hallmarks of this regime are longitudinal breakup ("self-modulation") of the picosecond-scale laser pulse and excitation of a rapidly evolving broken plasma wake. It is found that electron beams with a charge of several tens of nC can be obtained, with a quasi-Maxwellian energy distribution extending to a few-GeV level. In the second scenario, at lower plasma densities, the pulse is shorter than the electron plasma period. The pulse blows out plasma electrons, creating a single accelerating cavity, while injection on the density downramp creates a nC quasi-monoenergetic electron bunch within the cavity. This bunch accelerates without degradation beyond 1 GeV. The x-ray sources in the self-modulated regime offer a high number of photons (˜1 012) with the slowly decaying energy spectra extending beyond 60 keV. In turn, quasimonoenergetic character of the electron beam in the blowout regime results in the synchrotron-like spectra with the critical energy around 10 MeV and a number of photons >1 09 . Yet, much smaller source duration and transverse size increase the x-ray brilliance by more than an order of magnitude against the self-modulated case, also favoring high spatial and temporal resolution in x-ray imaging. In all explored cases, accelerated electrons emit synchrotron x-rays of high brilliance, B >1 020 photons /s /mm2/mrad2/0.1 %BW . Synchrotron sources driven by picosecond kilojoule lasers may thus find an application in x-ray diagnostics on such facilities such as the LMJ or National Ignition Facility (NIF).

  12. Electron acceleration and generation of high-brilliance x-ray radiation in kilojoule, subpicosecond laser-plasma interactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Ferri

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Petawatt, picosecond laser pulses offer rich opportunities in generating synchrotron x-rays. This paper concentrates on the regimes accessible with the PETAL laser, which is a part of the Laser Megajoule (LMJ facility. We explore two physically distinct scenarios through Particle-in-Cell simulations. The first one realizes in a dense plasma, such that the period of electron Langmuir oscillations is much shorter than the pulse duration. Hallmarks of this regime are longitudinal breakup (“self-modulation” of the picosecond-scale laser pulse and excitation of a rapidly evolving broken plasma wake. It is found that electron beams with a charge of several tens of nC can be obtained, with a quasi-Maxwellian energy distribution extending to a few-GeV level. In the second scenario, at lower plasma densities, the pulse is shorter than the electron plasma period. The pulse blows out plasma electrons, creating a single accelerating cavity, while injection on the density downramp creates a nC quasi-monoenergetic electron bunch within the cavity. This bunch accelerates without degradation beyond 1 GeV. The x-ray sources in the self-modulated regime offer a high number of photons (∼10^{12} with the slowly decaying energy spectra extending beyond 60 keV. In turn, quasimonoenergetic character of the electron beam in the blowout regime results in the synchrotron-like spectra with the critical energy around 10 MeV and a number of photons >10^{9}. Yet, much smaller source duration and transverse size increase the x-ray brilliance by more than an order of magnitude against the self-modulated case, also favoring high spatial and temporal resolution in x-ray imaging. In all explored cases, accelerated electrons emit synchrotron x-rays of high brilliance, B>10^{20}  photons/s/mm^{2}/mrad^{2}/0.1%BW. Synchrotron sources driven by picosecond kilojoule lasers may thus find an application in x-ray diagnostics on such facilities such as the LMJ or National

  13. Extending laser plasma accelerators into the mid-IR spectral domain with a next-generation ultra-fast CO2 laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pogorelsky, I. V.; Babzien, M.; Ben-Zvi, I.; Polyanskiy, M. N.; Skaritka, J.; Tresca, O.; Dover, N. P.; Najmudin, Z.; Lu, W.; Cook, N.; Ting, A.; Chen, Y.-H.

    2016-03-01

    Expanding the scope of relativistic plasma research to wavelengths longer than the λ/≈   0.8-1.1 μm range covered by conventional mode-locked solid-state lasers would offer attractive opportunities due to the quadratic scaling of the ponderomotive electron energy and critical plasma density with λ. Answering this quest, a next-generation mid-IR laser project is being advanced at the BNL ATF as a part of the user facility upgrade. We discuss the technical approach to this conceptually new 100 TW, 100 fs, λ  =   9-11 μm CO2 laser BESTIA (Brookhaven Experimental Supra-Terawatt Infrared at ATF) that encompasses several innovations applied for the first time to molecular gas lasers. BESTIA will enable new regimes of laser plasma accelerators. One example is shock-wave ion acceleration (SWA) from gas jets. We review ongoing efforts to achieve stable, monoenergetic proton acceleration by dynamically shaping the plasma density profile from a hydrogen gas target with laser-produced blast waves. At its full power, 100 TW BESTIA promises to achieve proton beams at an energy exceeding 200 MeV. In addition to ion acceleration in over-critical plasma, the ultra-intense mid-IR BESTIA will open up new opportunities in driving wakefields in tenuous plasmas, expanding the landscape of laser wakefield accelerator (LWFA) studies into the unexplored long-wavelength spectral domain. Simple wavelength scaling suggests that a 100 TW CO2 laser beam will be capable of efficiently generating plasma ‘bubbles’ a thousand times greater in volume compared with a near-IR solid state laser of an equivalent power. Combined with a femtosecond electron linac available at the ATF, this wavelength scaling will facilitate the study of external seeding and staging of LWFAs.

  14. 激光-等离子体相互作用过程中光子加速的研究%Photon acceleration in laser-plasma interaction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    买买提艾力·巴克; 艾尔肯·扎克尔; 沙依甫加马力·达吾来提

    2011-01-01

    为了研究激光一等离子体相互作用过程中的光子加速(光子频率上移),采用数值模拟方法进行了理论计算和数值计算验证,取得了光子加速的重要计算机模拟结果.结果表明,等离子体激光相互作用过程中的光子频率上移与所用的激光脉冲形式和脉冲宽度有关,存在最佳脉冲宽度和脉冲上升宽度,还存在等离子体电子密度上限.这一结果对进一步研究激光等离子体粒子加速有帮助.%The results of numerical calculation of photon acceleration ( photon frequency up shift) in the plasma wakefield driven by asymmetric laser pulses were presented.It is found that the maximum frequency up shift of the accelerated photons depends on the pulse shape and pulse width.There is an optimum pulse width and pulse rising width.There also exists an upper limit on plasma electron density to get the maximum photon frequency up shift.This will be helpful for further study about laser-plasma particle acceleration mechanism.

  15. Basic plasma physics

    CERN Document Server

    Ghosh, Basudev

    2014-01-01

    Basic Plasma Physics is designed to serve as an introductory compact textbook for advanced undergraduate, postgraduate and research students taking plasma physics as one of their subject of study for the first time. It covers the current syllabus of plasma physics offered by the most universities and technical institutions. The book requires no background in plasma physics but only elementary knowledge of basic physics and mathematics. Emphasis has been given on the analytical approach. Topics are developed from first principle so that the students can learn through self-study. One chapter has been devoted to describe some practical aspects of plasma physics. Each chapter contains a good number of solved and unsolved problems and a variety of review questions, mostly taken from recent examination papers. Some classroom experiments described in the book will surely help students as well as instructors.

  16. Experimental demonstration of low laser-plasma instabilities in gas-filled spherical hohlraums at laser injection angle designed for ignition target

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lan, Ke; Li, Zhichao; Xie, Xufei; Chen, Yao-Hua; Zheng, Chunyang; Zhai, Chuanlei; Hao, Liang; Yang, Dong; Huo, Wen Yi; Ren, Guoli; Peng, Xiaoshi; Xu, Tao; Li, Yulong; Li, Sanwei; Yang, Zhiwen; Guo, Liang; Hou, Lifei; Liu, Yonggang; Wei, Huiyue; Liu, Xiangming; Cha, Weiyi; Jiang, Xiaohua; Mei, Yu; Li, Yukun; Deng, Keli; Yuan, Zheng; Zhan, Xiayu; Zhang, Haijun; Jiang, Baibin; Zhang, Wei; Deng, Xuewei; Liu, Jie; Du, Kai; Ding, Yongkun; Wei, Xiaofeng; Zheng, Wanguo; Chen, Xiaodong; Campbell, E. M.; He, Xian-Tu

    2017-03-01

    Octahedral spherical hohlraums with a single laser ring at an injection angle of 55∘ are attractive concepts for laser indirect drive due to the potential for achieving the x-ray drive symmetry required for high convergence implosions. Laser-plasma instabilities, however, are a concern given the long laser propagation path in such hohlraums. Significant stimulated Raman scattering has been observed in cylindrical hohlraums with similar laser propagation paths during the ignition campaign on the National Ignition Facility (NIF). In this Rapid Communication, experiments demonstrating low levels of laser-driven plasma instability (LPI) in spherical hohlraums with a laser injection angle of 55∘ are reported and compared to that observed with cylindrical hohlraums with injection angles of 28 .5∘ and 55∘, similar to that of the NIF. Significant LPI is observed with the laser injection of 28 .5∘ in the cylindrical hohlraum where the propagation path is similar to the 55∘ injection angle for the spherical hohlraum. The experiments are performed on the SGIII laser facility with a total 0.35 -μ m incident energy of 93 kJ in a 3 nsec pulse. These experiments demonstrate the role of hohlraum geometry in LPI and demonstrate the need for systematic experiments for choosing the optimal configuration for ignition studies with indirect drive inertial confinement fusion.

  17. Laser-Plasma Instability Control Using TPulse fixed vs Imax fixed Spike Trains of Uneven Duration and Delay: The Path to Green ICF Using STUD Pulses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afeyan, Bedros; Hüller, Stefan; Meezan, Nathan; Hammer, Jim; Heebner, John

    2016-10-01

    We have studied the behavior of laser-plasma instabilities (LPI) as a function of seed noise (varied over seven orders of magnitude) and Rosenbluth gain exponent at the average intensity (varied over a decade) for structured laser beams with and without STUD pulse mitigation. We will show that for each section of the NIF ICF pulse, there are preferred configurations of STUD pulses, whether they be fixed duration of fixed peak intensity, so that maximum use is made of STUD pulse flexibility for LPI control. The duty cycle, hot spot scrambling rate, and cutting a hot spot into pieces (by switching the lasers on and off on the ps time scale), are the three main tools. We explore a variety of phase transitions in reflectivity behavior and in the amplification profile of plasma perturbations. We compare cases where amplification bursts are reinforced coherently or are healed, lead to brush fires or are tamed. The STUD pulse program is best suited for Green light implementation since Green offers higher bandwidth, more energy, and higher damage thresholds. We plan to test these ideas on the Jupiter Laser Facility at LLNL at the pair of 200J lasers level next. Work supported by a Grant from the DOE NNSA-FES Joint Program on HEDP and by LLNL.

  18. Experimental demonstration of low laser-plasma instabilities in gas-filled spherical hohlraums at laser injection angle designed for ignition target.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lan, Ke; Li, Zhichao; Xie, Xufei; Chen, Yao-Hua; Zheng, Chunyang; Zhai, Chuanlei; Hao, Liang; Yang, Dong; Huo, Wen Yi; Ren, Guoli; Peng, Xiaoshi; Xu, Tao; Li, Yulong; Li, Sanwei; Yang, Zhiwen; Guo, Liang; Hou, Lifei; Liu, Yonggang; Wei, Huiyue; Liu, Xiangming; Cha, Weiyi; Jiang, Xiaohua; Mei, Yu; Li, Yukun; Deng, Keli; Yuan, Zheng; Zhan, Xiayu; Zhang, Haijun; Jiang, Baibin; Zhang, Wei; Deng, Xuewei; Liu, Jie; Du, Kai; Ding, Yongkun; Wei, Xiaofeng; Zheng, Wanguo; Chen, Xiaodong; Campbell, E M; He, Xian-Tu

    2017-03-01

    Octahedral spherical hohlraums with a single laser ring at an injection angle of 55^{∘} are attractive concepts for laser indirect drive due to the potential for achieving the x-ray drive symmetry required for high convergence implosions. Laser-plasma instabilities, however, are a concern given the long laser propagation path in such hohlraums. Significant stimulated Raman scattering has been observed in cylindrical hohlraums with similar laser propagation paths during the ignition campaign on the National Ignition Facility (NIF). In this Rapid Communication, experiments demonstrating low levels of laser-driven plasma instability (LPI) in spherical hohlraums with a laser injection angle of 55^{∘} are reported and compared to that observed with cylindrical hohlraums with injection angles of 28.5^{∘} and 55^{∘}, similar to that of the NIF. Significant LPI is observed with the laser injection of 28.5^{∘} in the cylindrical hohlraum where the propagation path is similar to the 55^{∘} injection angle for the spherical hohlraum. The experiments are performed on the SGIII laser facility with a total 0.35-μm incident energy of 93 kJ in a 3 nsec pulse. These experiments demonstrate the role of hohlraum geometry in LPI and demonstrate the need for systematic experiments for choosing the optimal configuration for ignition studies with indirect drive inertial confinement fusion.

  19. 激光等离子体微推进技术的研究进展%Research progress in micro-laser plasma propulsion

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    叶继飞; 洪延姬; 王广宇; 李南雷

    2011-01-01

    为了加快激光等离子体微推进技术(μLPP)在航天领域的应用,介绍了该项技术近10年的发展状况。讨论了激光等离子体微推进技术发展过程中衍生出的各种工作模式,并简略分析了不同工作模式的优缺点。着重介绍了靶特性对激光微推进性能的影响,包括靶材的选择、靶的结构、靶材掺杂,以及靶物相特性等。针对该项技术的最终发展目标是研制微小卫星姿轨控的激光等离子体微推力器(μLPT),介绍并分析了美国Phipps小组开展的激光微推力器的研制工作。最后,指出了激光等离子体微推进技术目前存在的一些问题,并展望了它的发展前景。%To achieve the applications of micro-Laser Plasma Propulsion(μLPP) to aerospace fields,the development of the μLPP technologies during 10 years was introduced.The different working modes for the μLPP were discussed and their advantages and disadvantages were analyzed briefly.The effects of laser micro ablation of a target on μLPP properties were also introduced,which involves the state of target,structure of target,doped target,and the liquid target.For the purpose of the micro satellite orbit and posture control,the micro-Laser Plasma Thrusters(μLPTs) developed by Phipps group in America were analyzed.Finally,the shortcomings in the research were pointed out and the further development of μLPP technology was given.

  20. Laser-plasma interactions from thin tapes for high-energy electron accelerators and seeding compact FELs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaw, Brian Henry

    This thesis comprises a detailed investigation of the physics of using a plasma mirror (PM) from a tape by reflecting ultrashort pulses from a laser-triggered surface plasma. The tapes used in the characterization of the PM are VHS and computer data storage tape. The tapes are 6.6 m (computer storage tape) and 15 m (VHS) thick. Each tape is 0.5 inches wide, and 10s of meters of tape are spooled using a tape drive; providing thousands of shots on a single reel of tape. The amount of reflected energy of the PM was studied for different input intensities. The fluence was varied by translating the focus of the laser upstream and downstream of the tape, which changed the spot size on the tape surface and hence changed the fluence. This study measured reflectances from both sides of the two tapes, and for input light of both s and p-polarizations. Lastly, an analytic model was developed to understand the reflectance as a function of fluence for each tape material and polarization. Another application that benefits from the advancements of LPA technology is an LPAbased FEL. By sending a high quality electron bunch through an undulator (a periodic structure of positive and negative magnetic poles), the electrons oscillate transversely to the propagation axis and produce radiation. The 1.5 m THUNDER undulator at the BELLA Center has been commissioned using electron beams of 400MeV beams with broad energy spread (35%). To produce a coherent LPA-based FEL, the beam quality would need to improve to sub-percent level energy spread. A seed source could be used to help induce bunching of the electron beam within the undulator. This thesis described the experimental investigation of the physics of using solid-based surface high-harmonic generation (SHHG) from a thin tape as a possible seed source for an FEL. A thin tape placed within centimeters of the undulator's entrance could act as a harmonic generating source, while simultaneously transmitting an electron beam. This removes

  1. Nonlinear Physics of Plasmas

    CERN Document Server

    Kono, Mitsuo

    2010-01-01

    A nonlinearity is one of the most important notions in modern physics. A plasma is rich in nonlinearities and provides a variety of behaviors inherent to instabilities, coherent wave structures and turbulence. The book covers the basic concepts and mathematical methods, necessary to comprehend nonlinear problems widely encountered in contemporary plasmas, but also in other fields of physics and current research on self-organized structures and magnetized plasma turbulence. The analyses make use of strongly nonlinear models solved by analytical techniques backed by extensive simulations and available experiments. The text is written for senior undergraduates, graduate students, lecturers and researchers in laboratory, space and fusion plasmas.

  2. Physics of Plasmas

    CERN Document Server

    Woods, Leslie Colin

    2003-01-01

    A short, self-sufficient introduction to the physics of plasma for beginners as well as researchers in a number of fields. The author looks at the dynamics and stability of magnetoplasma and discusses wave and transport in this medium. He also looks at such applications as fusion research using magnetic confinement of Deuterium plasma, solar physics with its plasma loops reaching high into the corona, sunspots and solar wind, engineering applications to metallurgy, MHD direct generation of electricity, and railguns, finally touching on the relatively new and difficult subject of dusty plasmas.

  3. Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1990-01-01

    This report discusses the following topics: principal parameters achieved in experimental devices fiscal year 1990; tokamak fusion test reactor; compact ignition tokamak; Princeton beta experiment- modification; current drive experiment-upgrade; international collaboration; x-ray laser studies; spacecraft glow experiment; plasma processing: deposition and etching of thin films; theoretical studies; tokamak modeling; international thermonuclear experimental reactor; engineering department; project planning and safety office; quality assurance and reliability; technology transfer; administrative operations; PPPL patent invention disclosures for fiscal year 1990; graduate education; plasma physics; graduate education: plasma science and technology; science education program; and Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory reports fiscal year 1990.

  4. Atmospheric pressure operation of a repetitive KrF laser-plasma x-ray source at hv = 1.1 keV

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turcu, I. C. Edmond; O'Neill, Fergus; Tallents, Gregory J.; Hannon, T.; Batani, Dimitri; Giulietti, Antonio; Wharton, C. W.; Meldrum, R. A.

    1990-08-01

    A repetitively pulsed (5Hz) KrF laser-based X-ray source producing photons at i-ru 1.1 keV (copper, L-shell) from a copper coated rotating target has been used to study soft X-ray induced DNA damage effects in Chinese hamster cells. The source was computer controlled for accurate delivery to the biological material of pre-set doses. DNA damage was induced by exposures lasting 7s for V79 cells and 40s for AA8 cells. To minimise the debris from the laser-plasma source and for convenient handling of biological specimens, the target chamber contained helium at 1 atmosphere with a slow flow. The X-ray yield of the source decreased by only at most 10-20% compared to vacuum operation and a further 16% of X-rays were absorbed in helium between target and the biological material placed outside the target chamber behind a beryllium filter. The measured spectral and spatial distribution of the copper X-ray emission was found to be largely independent of the ambient helium pressure. The time resolved X-ray signal lasted for only 3 ns starting at the beginning of the 2lns laser pulse and its shape was independent of helium pressure in the target chamber.

  5. Spectroscopy Methods and Applications of the Tor Vergata Laser-Plasma Facility Driven by GW-Level Laser System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Francucci

    2011-01-01

    GW, tabletop, multistage Nd:YAG/Glass laser system, delivering infrared (IR pulses with nanosecond width and 1064 nm wavelength (TEM00 mode. Its applications are discussed providing: wide analysis of IR → soft X-ray conversion efficiency (1.3–1.55 keV; measures and modeling of line emission in soft X-ray spectra, such as those from zinc plasma near Ne-like Zn XXI and from barium plasma near Ni-like Ba XXIX. Particular attention is devoted to high-n dielectronic Rydberg satellites for finding a useful diagnostic tool for plasma conditions. Dependence of plasma spectra on laser parameters is shown. Finally, microradiography applications are presented for thin biological samples. Images permit to visualize specific structures and detect bioaccumulation sites due to contamination from pollutants.

  6. Superhot-X-ray and -electron transport in high-intensity CO2-laser-plasma interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enright, G. D.; Burnett, N. H.

    1985-12-01

    A comprehensive investigation of the high-energy (70-400-keV) X-ray emission from CO2 laser-produced plasmas at intensities up to 3 x 10 to the 14th W/sq cm has revealed the presence of a 'superhot' component. The intensity of this component scales very strongly with incident laser intensity. It is expected that for intensities greater than about 5 x 10 to the 15th W/sq cm energy balance in CO2-laser-produced plasmas would be dominated by the energetic electrons responsible for this high-energy X-ray emission.

  7. The generation of Biermann battery fields in laser-plasma interactions and the interplay with the Weibel instability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoeffler, Kevin

    2015-11-01

    Recent experiments with intense lasers are probing the dynamics of self-generated large scale magnetic fields with unprecedented detail. In these scenarios the Biermann battery effect is critical to understand the field dynamics but a multi-dimensional detailed study of this mechanism was not present yet in the literature. Moreover, the interplay between the Biermann battery effect and plasma micro instabilities and the evolution of plasma turbulence is still unknown. In this work, particle-in-cell simulations are used to investigate the formation of magnetic fields, B, in plasmas with perpendicular electron density and temperature gradients. For system sizes, L, comparable to the ion skin depth, di, it is shown that β ~di / L , consistent with the Biermann battery effect. However, for large L /di , it is found that the Weibel instability (due to electron temperature anisotropy) supersedes the Biermann battery as the main producer of B. The Weibel-produced fields saturate at a finite amplitude (plasma β ~ 1), independent of L. The magnetic energy spectra below the electron Larmor radius scale are well fitted by power law with slope - 16 / 3 , as predicted in.The relevance of these results for several ongoing experiments is also discussed.

  8. Solar Physics - Plasma Physics Workshop

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baum, P. J.; Beckers, J. M.; Newman, C. E.; Priest, E. R.; Rosenberg, H.; Smith, D. F.; Sturrock, P. A.; Wentzel, D. G.

    1974-01-01

    A summary of the proceedings of a conference whose purpose was to explore plasma physics problems which arise in the study of solar physics is provided. Sessions were concerned with specific questions including the following: (1) whether the solar plasma is thermal or non-themal; (2) what spectroscopic data is required; (3) what types of magnetic field structures exist; (4) whether magnetohydrodynamic instabilities occur; (5) whether resistive or non-magnetohydrodynamic instabilities occur; (6) what mechanisms of particle acceleration have been proposed; and (7) what information is available concerning shock waves. Very few questions were answered categorically but, for each question, there was discussion concerning the observational evidence, theoretical analyses, and existing or potential laboratory and numerical experiments.

  9. Optimal control of laser plasma instabilities using Spike Trains of Uneven Duration and Delay (STUD pulses) for ICF and IFE

    CERN Document Server

    Afeyan, Bedros

    2012-01-01

    An adaptive method of controlling parametric instabilities in laser produced plasmas is proposed. It involves fast temporal modulation of a laser pulse on the fastest instability's amplification time scale, adapting to changing and unknown plasma conditions. These pulses are comprised of on and off sequences having at least one or two orders of magnitude contrast between them. Such laser illumination profiles are called STUD pulses for Spike Trains of Uneven Duration and Delay. The STUD pulse program includes scrambling the speckle patterns spatially in between the laser spikes. The off times allow damping of driven waves. The scrambling of the hot spots allows tens of damping times to elapse before hot spot locations experience recurring high intensity spikes. Damping in the meantime will have healed the scars of past growth. Another unique feature of STUD pulses on crossing beams is that their temporal profiles can be interlaced or staggered, and their interactions thus controlled with an on-off switch and ...

  10. Optimal control of laser plasma instabilities using Spike Trains of Uneven Duration and Delay (STUD pulses) for ICF and IFE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afeyan, Bedros; Hüller, Stefan

    2013-11-01

    An adaptive method of controlling parametric instabilities in laser produced plasmas is proposed. It involves fast temporal modulation of a laser pulse on the fastest instability's amplification time scale, adapting to changing and unknown plasma conditions. These pulses are comprised of on and off sequences having at least one or two orders of magnitude contrast between them. Such laser illumination profiles are called STUD pulses for Spike Trains of Uneven Duration and Delay. The STUD pulse program includes scrambling the speckle patterns spatially in between the laser spikes. The off times allow damping of driven waves. The scrambling of the hot spots allows tens of damping times to elapse before hot spot locations experience recurring high intensity spikes. Damping in the meantime will have healed the scars of past growth. Another unique feature of STUD pulses on crossing beams is that their temporal profiles can be interlaced or staggered, and their interactions thus controlled with an on-off switch and a dimmer.

  11. Laser Plasma Instability (LPI) Driven Light Scattering Measurements with 44 beam-lines of Nike KrF Laser^*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, J.; Weaver, J. L.; Kehne, D. M.; Phillips, L. S.; Obenschain, S. P.; Serlin, V.; McLean, E. A.; Lehmberg, R. H.; Manka, C. K.

    2009-11-01

    With short wavelength (248 nm), large bandwidth (˜1 THz), and ISI beam smoothing, Nike KrF laser provides unique opportunities of LPI research for direct-drive inertial confinement fusion. Previous experiments at intensities (10^15˜10^16 W/cm^2) exceeded two-plasmon decay (TPD) instability threshold using 12 beam-lines of Nike laser.^a,b For further experiments to study LPI excitation in bigger plasma volumes, 44 Nike main beams have been used to produce plasmas with total laser energies up to 1 kJ of ˜350 psec FWHM pulses. This talk will present results of the recent LPI experiment focusing on light emission data in spectral ranges relevant to the Raman (SRS) and TPD instabilities. The primary diagnostics were time-resolved spectrometers with an absolute-intensity-calibrated photodiode array in (0.4˜0.8)φ0 and a streak camera near 0.5φ0. Blackbody temperature and expansion speed measurements of the plasmas were also made. The experiment was conducted at laser intensities of (1˜4)x10^15 W/cm^2 on solid planar CH targets. ^a J. L. Weaver, et al, NO4.14, APS DPP (2008) ^b J. Oh, et al, NO4.15, APS DPP (2008) * Work supported by DoE/NNSA and performed at Naval Research Laboratory.

  12. Optimal Control of Laser-Plasma Instabilities Using Spike Trains of Uneven Duration and Delay: STUD Pulses

    CERN Document Server

    Afeyan, Bedros

    2013-01-01

    Adaptive methods of laser irradiation of plasmas are proposed consisting of deterministic, `on-off' amplitude modulations in time, and intermittently changing speckle-patterns. These laser pulses consist of a series of picosecond time-scale spikes in a spike train of uneven duration and delay (STUD pulses), in contrast to hydrodynamic-time-scale modulated, multi-nanosecond pulses for laser fusion. Properly designed STUD pulses minimize backscatter and tame any absorptive parametric instability for a given set of plasma conditions, by adjusting the modulation periods, duty cycles and spatial hot-spot-distribution scrambling-rates of the spikes. Traditional methods of beam conditioning are subsumed or surpassed by STUD pulses. In addition, STUD pulses allow an advance in the control of instabilities driven by spatially overlapped laser beams by allowing the spikes of crossing beams to be temporally staggered. When the intensity peaks of one fall within the nulls of its crossing beam, it allows an on-off switch ...

  13. Customizable electron beams from optically controlled laser plasma acceleration for γ-ray sources based on inverse Thomson scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalmykov, S. Y.; Davoine, X.; Ghebregziabher, I.; Shadwick, B. A.

    2016-09-01

    Laser wakefield acceleration of electrons in the blowout regime can be controlled by tailoring the laser pulse phase and the plasma target. The 100 nm-scale bandwidth and negative frequency chirp of the optical driver compensate for the nonlinear frequency red-shift imparted by wakefield excitation. This mitigates pulse self-steepening and suppresses continuous injection. The plasma channel suppresses diffraction of the pulse leading edge, further reducing self-steepening, making injection even quieter. Besides, the channel destabilizes the pulse tail confined within the accelerator cavity (the electron density "bubble"), causing oscillations in the bubble size. The resulting periodic injection generates background-free comb-like beams - sequences of synchronized, low phase-space volume bunches. Controlling the number of bunches, their energy, and energy spacing by varying the channel radius and the pulse length (as permitted by the large bandwidth) enables the design of a tunable, all-optical source of polychromatic, pulsed γ-rays using the mechanism of inverse Thomson scattering. Such source may radiate ~107 quasi-monochromatic 10 MeV-scale photons per shot into a microsteradian-scale observation angle. The photon energy is distributed among several distinct bands, each having sub-25% energy spread dictated by the mrad-scale divergence of electron beam.

  14. EUV and debris characteristics of a laser-plasma tin dioxide nano-particle colloidal jet target

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaku, Masanori; Suetake, Sumihiro; Senba, Yusuke; Katto, Masahito; Kubodera, Shoichi

    2008-03-01

    Debris characteristics and its reduction have been investigated for a laser-produced plasma (LPP) extreme ultraviolet (EUV) source using a colloidal jet target containing tin dioxide nano-particles. Dominant deposited debris on a witness plate was found to have a form of oxidized tin (SnO x) originated from nano-particles. Quantitative debris amounts were determined by total laser energy irradiated onto a target, not by laser irradiation modes, such as single or double pulse irradiation. In-situ low-temperature (100°C) heating of a plate was effective to reduce the deposited debris amount, since colloidal debris was easily vaporized by the heat. Another approach to remove the deposited debris was roomtemperature photon processing using incoherent vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) emission at 126 nm. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) analysis has shown that the deposited SnOx debris layer was deoxidized by the 126 nm VUV photon energy.

  15. Detailed analysis of hollow ions spectra from dense matter pumped by X-ray emission of relativistic laser plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hansen, S. B., E-mail: sbhanse@sandia.gov, E-mail: anatolyf@hotmail.com [Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87123 (United States); Colgan, J.; Abdallah, J. [Theoretical Division, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States); Faenov, A. Ya., E-mail: sbhanse@sandia.gov, E-mail: anatolyf@hotmail.com [Joint Institute for High Temperatures, Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow 125412 (Russian Federation); Quantum Beam Science Directorate, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Kyoto 619-0215 (Japan); Pikuz, S. A.; Skobelev, I. Yu. [Joint Institute for High Temperatures, Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow 125412 (Russian Federation); Wagenaars, E.; Culfa, O.; Dance, R. J.; Tallents, G. J.; Rossall, A. K.; Woolsey, N. C. [York Plasma Institute, Department of Physics, University of York, York YO10 5DD (United Kingdom); Booth, N.; Lancaster, K. L. [Central Laser Facility, STFC Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Didcot OX11 0QX (United Kingdom); Evans, R. G. [Department of Physics, Imperial College, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom); Gray, R. J.; McKenna, P. [SUPA, Department of Physics, University of Strathclyde, Glasgow G4 ONG (United Kingdom); Kaempfer, T.; Schulze, K. S. [Helmholtzinstitut Jena, Jena D-07743 (Germany); Uschmann, I. [Helmholtzinstitut Jena, Jena D-07743 (Germany); Institut für Optik und Quantenelektronic, Friedrich-Schiller-Universität Jena, Max-Wien Platz 1, Jena, D-07743 (Germany); and others

    2014-03-15

    X-ray emission from hollow ions offers new diagnostic opportunities for dense, strongly coupled plasma. We present extended modeling of the x-ray emission spectrum reported by Colgan et al. [Phys. Rev. Lett. 110, 125001 (2013)] based on two collisional-radiative codes: the hybrid-structure Spectroscopic Collisional-Radiative Atomic Model (SCRAM) and the mixed-unresolved transition arrays (MUTA) ATOMIC model. We show that both accuracy and completeness in the modeled energy level structure are critical for reliable diagnostics, investigate how emission changes with different treatments of ionization potential depression, and discuss two approaches to handling the extensive structure required for hollow-ion models with many multiply excited configurations.

  16. Simple runtime high energy photon emission for ultra relativistic laser-plasma interaction in a PIC-code

    CERN Document Server

    Wallin, Erik; Marklund, Mattias

    2014-01-01

    We model the emission of high energy photons due to relativistic particles in a plasma interacting with a super-intense laser. This is done in a particle-in-cell code where the high frequency radiation normally cannot be resolved, due to the unattainable demands it would place on the time and space resolution. A simple expression for the synchrotron radiation spectra is used together with a Monte-Carlo method for the emittance. We extend to previous work by accounting acceleration due to arbitrary fields, considering the particles to be in instantaneous circular motion due to an effective magnetic field. Furthermore we implement noise reduction techniques and present estimations of the validity of the method. Finally we perform a rigorous comparison to the mechanism of radiation reaction, with the emitted energy very well in agreement with the radiation reaction loss.

  17. Betatron x-rays from laser plasma accelerators: a new probe for warm dense matter at LCLS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albert, Felicie

    2016-10-01

    Betatron x-ray radiation, driven by electrons from laser-wakefield acceleration, has unique properties to probe high energy density (HED) plasmas and warm dense matter. Betatron radiation is produced when relativistic electrons oscillate in the plasma wake of a laser pulse. Its properties are similar to those of synchrotron radiation, with a 1000 fold shorter pulse. This presentation will focus on the experimental challenges and results related to the development of betatron radiation for x-ray absorption spectroscopy of HED matter at large-scale laser facilities. A detailed presentation of the source mechanisms and characteristics in the blowout regime of laser-wakefield acceleration will be followed by a description of recent experiments performed at the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS). At LCLS, we have recently commissioned the betatron x-ray source driven by the MEC short pulse laser (1 J, 40 fs). The source is used as a probe for investigating the X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) spectrum at the K- or L-edge of iron and silicon oxide driven to a warm dense matter state (temperature of a few eV and solid densities). The driver is either LCLS itself or an optical laser. These experiments demonstrate the capability to study the electron-ion equilibration mechanisms in warm dense matter with sub-picosecond resolution. This work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344, and supported by the Laboratory Directed research and development program under tracking codes 13-LW-076, 16-ERD-041 and by the Office of Fusion Energy Sciences under SCW1476 and SCW1569.

  18. Solar flares. [plasma physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rust, D. M.

    1979-01-01

    The present paper deals with explosions in a magnetized solar plasma, known as flares, whose effects are seen throughout the electromagnetic spectrum, from gamma-rays through the visible and to the radio band. The diverse phenomena associated with flares are discussed, along with the physical mechanisms that have been advanced to explain them. The impact of solar flare research on the development of plasma physics and magnetohydrodynamics is noted. The rapid development of solar flare research during the past 20 years, owing to the availability of high-resolution images, detailed magnetic field measurements, and improved spectral data, is illustrated.

  19. Studying of Laser Plasma Physics Related With Fast Ignition of ICF

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Fast ignition(FI) concept of ICF is one of the most attractive application of high intensity ultrashort laser. The UV light has some advantages for applying to fast ignition, the first, as the I λ2 scaling law of hot electron temperature, at the FI required intensity(1020 W/cm2), the long wavelength light will generate >10 MeV electron that can not deposit energy efficiently in the fuel region. Meanwhile the UV light can just generate the electron with the required energy of 1 MeV.

  20. Generation of bright attosecond x-ray pulse trains via Thomson scattering from laser-plasma accelerators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, W; Yu, T P; Chen, M; Song, Y M; Zhu, Z C; Ma, Y Y; Zhuo, H B

    2014-12-29

    Generation of attosecond x-ray pulse attracts more and more attention within the advanced light source user community due to its potentially wide applications. Here we propose an all-optical scheme to generate bright, attosecond hard x-ray pulse trains by Thomson backscattering of similarly structured electron beams produced in a vacuum channel by a tightly focused laser pulse. Design parameters for a proof-of-concept experiment are presented and demonstrated by using a particle-in-cell code and a four-dimensional laser-Compton scattering simulation code to model both the laser-based electron acceleration and Thomson scattering processes. Trains of 200 attosecond duration hard x-ray pulses holding stable longitudinal spacing with photon energies approaching 50 keV and maximum achievable peak brightness up to 1020 photons/s/mm2/mrad2/0.1%BW for each micro-bunch are observed. The suggested physical scheme for attosecond x-ray pulse trains generation may directly access the fastest time scales relevant to electron dynamics in atoms, molecules and materials.

  1. 激光等离子体诱导聚甲基硅氧烷的结构重组%Structural Recombination of Polymethylsilicone Induced by Laser Plasma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    周异男; 黄荣彬; 陈立华; 于腊佳; 谢素原; 郑兰荪

    2001-01-01

    A special synthetic reaction has been developed, in which vapor of the reactant interacts with the high temperature plasma generated by laser ablating a graphite target. By selecting chained methylsilicone as reactant, a series of methylsilsesquioxanes products with various structural configurations have been obtained. Among them, two products, which were separated by sublimation in high vacuum and recrystalization, were characterized by X-ray crystal diffraction as (CH3SiO1.5)n(n = 8, 10). Both of them are found to have three-dimensional cage structure. In addition, other products with double ring structure were detected by GC-MS analysis. The results demonstrate the potential application of the synthetic reaction. In the reaction described in this article, resulting from the collision and energy-transfer of the laser plasma, chain structure of the reactant dissociated and recombined to give the cage and ring structure of the products.%将脉冲激光束在惰性气氛中溅射石墨产生的等离子体,与一维链状聚甲基硅氧烷的蒸气束流反应,在产物中通过真空升华和重结晶分离出了两种单晶,经X射线衍射测定为具有(CH3SiO1.5)n(n=8,10)组成的硅氧烷,它们均具有多面体的三维笼状构型.通过色-质联用还检测到其它硅氧烷化合物,其中某些产物已表征为二维多环的构型.反应结果表明,经由激光等离子体的碰撞和能量传递,反应物的链状结构发生解离和进-步反应,经结构重组形成了多种不同组成和构型的产物.

  2. Computations in Plasma Physics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Bruce I.; Killeen, John

    1983-01-01

    Discusses contributions of computers to research in magnetic and inertial-confinement fusion, charged-particle-beam propogation, and space sciences. Considers use in design/control of laboratory and spacecraft experiments and in data acquisition; and reviews major plasma computational methods and some of the important physics problems they…

  3. Fundamentals of plasma physics

    CERN Document Server

    Bittencourt, J A

    1986-01-01

    A general introduction designed to present a comprehensive, logical and unified treatment of the fundamentals of plasma physics based on statistical kinetic theory. Its clarity and completeness make it suitable for self-learning and self-paced courses. Problems are included.

  4. Relativistically Induced Transparency Acceleration (RITA) - laser-plasma accelerated quasi-monoenergetic GeV ion-beams with existing lasers?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahai, Aakash A.

    2013-10-01

    Laser-plasma ion accelerators have the potential to produce beams with unprecedented characteristics of ultra-short bunch lengths (100s of fs) and high bunch-charge (1010 particles) over acceleration length of about 100 microns. However, creating and controlling mono-energetic bunches while accelerating to high-energies has been a challenge. If high-energy mono-energetic beams can be demonstrated with minimal post-processing, laser (ω0)-plasma (ωpe) ion accelerators may be used in a wide-range of applications such as cancer hadron-therapy, medical isotope production, neutron generation, radiography and high-energy density science. Here we demonstrate using analysis and simulations that using relativistic intensity laser-pulses and heavy-ion (Mi ×me) targets doped with a proton (or light-ion) species (mp ×me) of trace density (at least an order of magnitude below the cold critical density) we can scale up the energy of quasi-mono-energetically accelerated proton (or light-ion) beams while controlling their energy, charge and energy spectrum. This is achieved by controlling the laser propagation into an overdense (ω0 <ωpeγ = 1) increasing plasma density gradient by incrementally inducing relativistic electron quiver and thereby rendering them transparent to the laser while the heavy-ions are immobile. Ions do not directly interact with ultra-short laser that is much shorter in duration than their characteristic time-scale (τp <<√{mp} /ω0 <<√{Mi} /ω0). For a rising laser intensity envelope, increasing relativistic quiver controls laser propagation beyond the cold critical density. For increasing plasma density (ωpe2 (x)), laser penetrates into higher density and is shielded, stopped and reflected where ωpe2 (x) / γ (x , t) =ω02 . In addition to the laser quivering the electrons, it also ponderomotively drives (Fp 1/γ∇za2) them forward longitudinally, creating a constriction of snowplowed e-s. The resulting longitudinal e--displacement from laser

  5. PREFACE: 31st European Physical Society Conference on Plasma Physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dendy, Richard

    2004-12-01

    This special issue of Plasma Physics and Controlled Fusion comprises refereed papers contributed by invited speakers at the 31st European Physical Society Conference on Plasma Physics. The conference was jointly hosted by the Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, by the EURATOM/UKAEA Fusion Association and by Imperial College London, where it took place from 28 June to 2 July 2004. The overall agenda for this conference was set by the Board of the Plasma Physics Division of the European Physical Society, chaired by Friedrich Wagner (MPIPP, Garching) and his successor Jo Lister (CRPP, Lausanne). It built on developments in recent years, by further increasing the scientific diversity of the conference programme, whilst maintaining its depth and quality. A correspondingly diverse Programme Committee was set up, whose members are listed below. The final task of the Programme Committee has been the preparation of this special issue. In carrying out this work, as in preparing the scientific programme of the conference, the Programme Committee formed specialist subcommittees representing the different fields of plasma science. The chairmen of these subcommittees, in particular, accepted a very heavy workload on behalf of their respective research communities. It is a great pleasure to take this opportunity to thank: Emilia R Solano (CIEMAT, Madrid), magnetic confinement fusion; Jürgen Meyer-ter-Vehn (MPQ, Garching), laser-plasma interaction and beam plasma physics; and Jean-Luc Dorier (CRPP, Lausanne), dusty plasmas. The relatively few papers in astrophysical and basic plasma physics were co-ordinated by a small subcommittee which I led. Together with Peter Norreys (RAL, Chilton), we five constitute the editorial team for this special issue. The extensive refereeing load, compressed into a short time interval, was borne by the Programme Committee members and by many other experts, to whom this special issue owes much. We are also grateful to the Local Organizing Committee

  6. Theoretical plasma physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boozer, A. H.; Vahala, G. M.

    1992-05-01

    Work during the past year in the areas of classical and anomalous transport, three-dimensional equilibria, divertor physics, and diagnostic techniques using waves is reported. Although much work was done on classical transport, the validity of the guiding-center drift equations, which are the basis of much of the theory, has received little attention. The limitations of the drift approximation are being studied. Work on three-dimensional equilibria, which shows that quasi-helical symmetry is broken in third order in the inverse aspect ratio, on the modification of the current profile due to tearing modes was completed. This work is relevant to the maintenance of a steady-state tokamak by the bootstrap current. Divertor physics is a primary area that required development for ITER. One of the few methods by which the physics of the divertor can be modified or controlled is magnetic perturbations. The effect of magnetic perturbations on the divertor scrapeoff layer in collaboration with Hampton University is being studied. The evolution of magnetic field embedded in a moving plasma is a dynamics problem of potential importance. Renormalization techniques gave important insights first in the theory of phase transitions. The applications of these techniques has extended to many areas of physics, including turbulence in fluids and plasmas. Essentially no diagnostics for magnetic fluctuations inside a fusion-grade plasma exist. A collaborative program with Old Dominion University and the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory to develop such a diagnostic based on the conversion of electromagnetic waves from the ordinary to the extraordinary mode is underway.

  7. Nonthermal plasma chemistry and physics

    CERN Document Server

    Meichsner, Jurgen; Schneider, Ralf; Wagner, Hans-Erich

    2013-01-01

    In addition to introducing the basics of plasma physics, Nonthermal Plasma Chemistry and Physics is a comprehensive presentation of recent developments in the rapidly growing field of nonthermal plasma chemistry. The book offers a detailed discussion of the fundamentals of plasma chemical reactions and modeling, nonthermal plasma sources, relevant diagnostic techniques, and selected applications.Elucidating interconnections and trends, the book focuses on basic principles and illustrations across a broad field of applications. Expert contributors address environmental aspects of plasma chemist

  8. APS presents prizes in fluid dynamics and plasma physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1992-12-01

    This article reviews the presentation of the American Physical Society awards in fluid dynamics and plasma physics. The recipient of the plasma physics James Clerk Maxwell Prize was John M. Green for contributions to the theory of magnetohydrodynamics equilibria and ideal and resistive instabilities, for discovering the inverse scattering transform leading to soliton solutions of many nonlinear partial differential equations and for inventing the residue method of determining the transition to global chaos. The excellence in Plasma Physics Research Award was presented to Nathaniel A. Fisch for theoretical investigations of noninductive current generation in toroidally confined plasma. Wim Pieter Leemans received the Simon Ramo Award for experimental and simulational contributions to laser-plasma physics. William R. Sears was given the 1992 Fuid Dynamics Prize for contributions to the study of steady and unsteady aerodynamics, aeroacoustics, magnetoaerodynamics,and wind tunnel design. William C. Reynolds received the Otto Laporte Award for experimental, theoretical, and computational work in turbulence modeling and control and leadership in direct numerical simulation and large eddy simulation.

  9. Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory:

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Phillips, C.A. (ed.)

    1986-01-01

    This paper discusses progress on experiments at the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory. The projects and areas discussed are: Principal Parameters Achieved in Experimental Devices, Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor, Princeton Large Torus, Princeton Beta Experiment, S-1 Spheromak, Current-Drive Experiment, X-ray Laser Studies, Theoretical Division, Tokamak Modeling, Spacecraft Glow Experiment, Compact Ignition Tokamak, Engineering Department, Project Planning and Safety Office, Quality Assurance and Reliability, and Administrative Operations.

  10. Plasma pharmacy - physical plasma in pharmaceutical applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Woedtke, Th; Haertel, B; Weltmann, K-D; Lindequist, U

    2013-07-01

    During the last years the use of physical plasma for medical applications has grown rapidly. A multitude of findings about plasma-cell and plasma-tissue interactions and its possible use in therapy have been provided. One of the key findings of plasma medical basic research is that several biological effects do not result from direct plasma-cell or plasma-tissue interaction but are mediated by liquids. Above all, it was demonstrated that simple liquids like water or physiological saline, are antimicrobially active after treatment by atmospheric pressure plasma and that these effects are attributable to the generation of different low-molecular reactive species. Besides, it could be shown that plasma treatment leads to the stimulation of specific aspects of cell metabolism and to a transient and reversible increase of diffusion properties of biological barriers. All these results gave rise to think about another new and innovative field of medical plasma application. In contrast to plasma medicine, which means the direct use of plasmas on or in the living organism for direct therapeutic purposes, this field - as a specific field of medical plasma application - is called plasma pharmacy. Based on the present state of knowledge, most promising application fields of plasma pharmacy might be: plasma-based generation of biologically active liquids; plasma-based preparation, optimization, or stabilization of - mainly liquid - pharmaceutical preparations; support of drug transport across biological barriers; plasma-based stimulation of biotechnological processes.

  11. Plasma physics and fusion plasma electrodynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Bers, Abraham

    2016-01-01

    Plasma is a ubiquitous state of matter at high temperatures. The electrodynamics of plasmas encompasses a large number of applications, from understanding plasmas in space and the stars, to their use in processing semiconductors, and their role in controlled energy generation by nuclear fusion. This book covers collective and single particle dynamics of plasmas for fully ionized as well as partially ionized plasmas. Many aspects of plasma physics in current fusion energy generation research are addressed both in magnetic and inertial confinement plasmas. Linear and nonlinear dynamics in hydrodynamic and kinetic descriptions are offered, making both simple and complex aspects of the subject available in nearly every chapter. The approach of dividing the basic aspects of plasma physics as "linear, hydrodynamic descriptions" to be covered first because they are "easier", and postponing the "nonlinear and kinetic descriptions" for later because they are "difficult" is abandoned in this book. For teaching purpose...

  12. Experimental studies of X-UV rays by a laser plasma: X-UV strioscopy by means of multilayer mirrors; Etude experimentale de la refraction X-UV par un plasma laser: strioscopie X-UV a l`aide de miroirs multicouches

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lutrin, F

    1996-05-20

    This thesis studies a new instrument -from its conception to the measures interpretation- that analyses electronic density gradient in the super critical transportation area of a laser plasma (0,35 {mu}m). This device, so-called of X-UV Schlieren, is based on the refraction property of a probe beam by an index gradient. Its specificity is the use of the X-UV emission at 13 nm (92 eV) of another laser plasma as X-UV probe. The conception and characterization of this instrument are defined thanks to both the emissivity and reflectivity properties of laser plasmas and the reflectivity properties of multilayers. Within this report are presented strioscopy images, spatially and spectrally resolved of an aluminium plasma from a 3.10{sup 12} W/cm{sup 2} laser flux, probed by a 13 nm wavelength. The device has to be closely aligned so as to obtain good contrast and good spatial resolution. For the first time, the refraction of a X-UV probe beam by a laser plasma is displayed. The experiments show that this refraction is all the more obvious for a gold probe plasma of energy 105 J and an aluminium probed plasma of energy 1 J. According to our plasma hydrodynamic simulation, the detected refraction corresponds to an electronic density gradient of 6,5.10{sup 25} electrons/cm{sup 4} in the two first microns of the sur-critical area. To study the parameters dependence of this gradient in the sur-critical area, several solutions for improving the instrument are produced. (author) 168 refs.

  13. Welding arc plasma physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cain, Bruce L.

    1990-01-01

    The problems of weld quality control and weld process dependability continue to be relevant issues in modern metal welding technology. These become especially important for NASA missions which may require the assembly or repair of larger orbiting platforms using automatic welding techniques. To extend present welding technologies for such applications, NASA/MSFC's Materials and Processes Lab is developing physical models of the arc welding process with the goal of providing both a basis for improved design of weld control systems, and a better understanding of how arc welding variables influence final weld properties. The physics of the plasma arc discharge is reasonably well established in terms of transport processes occurring in the arc column itself, although recourse to sophisticated numerical treatments is normally required to obtain quantitative results. Unfortunately the rigor of these numerical computations often obscures the physics of the underlying model due to its inherent complexity. In contrast, this work has focused on a relatively simple physical model of the arc discharge to describe the gross features observed in welding arcs. Emphasis was placed of deriving analytic expressions for the voltage along the arc axis as a function of known or measurable arc parameters. The model retains the essential physics for a straight polarity, diffusion dominated free burning arc in argon, with major simplifications of collisionless sheaths and simple energy balances at the electrodes.

  14. The Framework of Plasma Physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cowley, Steven

    There have been relatively few good textbooks on plasma physics. Most become simple reference books that might be titled, “Plasma Physics Recipes.” Despite their utility such books do not make good textbooks. For teaching, one needs a book that shows how the basic results and models are part of a coherent whole. Richard Hazeltine and Francois Waelbroeck have written such a textbook: The Framework of Plasma PhysicsAn this book, plasma physics is developed carefully and logically from basic physics principles. The book is not, however, overly formal; physical arguments are used to reduce mathematical complexity.

  15. Colloidal Plasmas : Basic physics of colloidal plasmas

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    C B Dwivedi

    2000-11-01

    Colloidal plasma is a distinct class of the impure plasmas with multispecies ionic composition. The distinction lies in the phase distribution of the impurity-ion species. The ability to tailor the electrostatic interactions between these colloidal particles provides a fertile ground for scientists to investigate the fundamental aspects of the Coulomb phase transition behavior. The present contribution will review the basic physics of the charging mechanism of the colloidal particles as well as the physics of the collective normal mode behavior of the general multi-ion species plasmas. Emphasis will be laid on the clarification of the prevailing confusing ideas about distinct qualities of the various acoustic modes, which are likely to exist in colloidal plasmas as well as in normal multi-ion species plasmas. Introductory ideas about the proposed physical models for the Coulomb phase transition in colloidal plasma will also be discussed.

  16. Characterization of Electron Temperature and Density Profiles of Plasmas Produced by Nike KrF Laser for Laser Plasma Instability (LPI) Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Jaechul; Weaver, J. L.; Phillips, L.; Obenschain, S. P.; Schmitt, A. J.; Kehne, D. M.; Chan, L.-Y.; Serlin, V.

    2011-10-01

    Previous experiments with Nike KrF laser (λ = 248 nm , Δν ~ 1 THz) observed LPI signatures near quarter critical density (nc / 4) in CH plasmas, however, detailed measurement of the temperature (Te) and density (ne) profiles was missing. The current Nike LPI campaign will perform experimental determination of the plasma profiles. A side-on grid imaging refractometer (GIR) is the main diagnostic to resolve Te and ne in space taking 2D snapshots of probe laser (λ = 266 nm , Δt = 8 psec) beamlets (50 μm spacing) refracted by the plasma at laser peak time. Ray tracing of the beamlets through hydrodynamically simulated (FASTRAD3D) plasma profiles estimates the refractometer may access densities up to ~ 0 . 2nc . With the measured Te and ne profiles in the plasma corona, we will discuss analysis of light data radiated from the plasmas in spectral ranges relevant to two plasmon decay and convective Raman instabilities. Validity of the (Te ,ne) data will also be discussed for the thermal transport study. Work supported by DoE/NNSA and ONR and performed at NRL.

  17. Measurements of Electron Temperature and Density Profiles of Plasmas Produced by Nike KrF Laser for Laser Plasma Instability (LPI) Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Jaechul; Weaver, J. L.; Obenschain, S. P.; Schmitt, A. J.; Kehne, D. M.; Karasik, M.; Chan, L.-Y.; Serlin, V.; Phillips, L.

    2012-10-01

    ExperimentsfootnotetextJ. Oh, et al, GO5.4, APS DPP (2010).^,footnotetextJ. L. Weaver, et al, GO5.3, APS DPP (2010). using Nike KrF laser observed LPI signatures from CH plasmas at the laser intensities above ˜1x10^15 W/cm^2. Knowing spatial profiles of temperature (Te) and density (ne) in the underdense coronal region (0 Nike LPI experiment, a side-on grid imaging refractometer (GIR)footnotetextR. S. Craxton, et al, Phys. Fluids B 5, 4419 (1993). is being deployed for measuring the underdense plasma profiles. The GIR will resolve Te and ne in space taking a 2D snapshot of probe laser (λ= 263 nm, δt = 10 psec) beamlets (50μm spacing) refracted by the plasma at a selected time during the laser illumination. Time-resolved spectrometers with an absolute-intensity-calibrated photodiode array and a streak camera will simultaneously monitor light emission from the plasma in spectral ranges relevant to Raman (SRS) and two plasmon decay (TDP) instabilities. The experimental study of effects of the plasma profiles on the LPI initiation will be presented.

  18. Measurements of electron density and temperature profiles in plasma produced by Nike KrF laser for laser plasma instability research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Jaechul; Weaver, J. L.; Karasik, M.; Chan, L. Y.

    2015-08-01

    A grid image refractometer (GIR) has been implemented at the Nike krypton fluoride laser facility of the Naval Research Laboratory. This instrument simultaneously measures propagation angles and transmissions of UV probe rays (λ = 263 nm, Δt = 10 ps) refracted through plasma. We report results of the first Nike-GIR measurement on a CH plasma produced by the Nike laser pulse (˜1 ns FWHM) with the intensity of 1.1 × 1015 W/cm2. The measured angles and transmissions were processed to construct spatial profiles of electron density (ne) and temperature (Te) in the underdense coronal region of the plasma. Using an inversion algorithm developed for the strongly refracted rays, the deployed GIR system probed electron densities up to 4 × 1021 cm-3 with the density scale length of 120 μm along the plasma symmetry axis. The resulting ne and Te profiles are verified to be self-consistent with the measured quantities of the refracted probe light.

  19. Generation and pointing stabilization of multi-GeV electron beams from a laser plasma accelerator driven in a pre-formed plasma waveguide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gonsalves, A. J.; Nakamura, K.; Daniels, J.; Mao, H.-S.; Benedetti, C.; Schroeder, C. B.; Tóth, Cs.; Tilborg, J. van; Vay, J.-L.; Geddes, C. G. R.; Esarey, E. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Mittelberger, D. E.; Bulanov, S. S.; Leemans, W. P., E-mail: WPLeemans@lbl.gov [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Department of Physics, University of California, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States)

    2015-05-15

    Laser pulses with peak power 0.3 PW were used to generate electron beams with energy >4 GeV within a 9 cm-long capillary discharge waveguide operated with a plasma density of ≈7×10{sup 17} cm{sup −3}. Simulations showed that the super-Gaussian near-field laser profile that is typical of high-power femtosecond laser systems reduces the efficacy of guiding in parabolic plasma channels compared with the Gaussian laser pulses that are typically simulated. In the experiments, this was mitigated by increasing the plasma density and hence the contribution of self-guiding. This allowed for the generation of multi-GeV electron beams, but these had angular fluctuation ≳2 mrad rms. Mitigation of capillary damage and more accurate alignment allowed for stable beams to be produced with energy 2.7±0.1 GeV. The pointing fluctuation was 0.6 mrad rms, which was less than the beam divergence of ≲1 mrad full-width-half-maximum.

  20. Measurements of Laser Plasma Instability (LPI) and Electron Density/Temperature Profiles in Plasmas Produced by the Nike KrF Laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Jaechul; Weaver, J. L.; Serlin, V.; Obenschain, S. P.

    2016-10-01

    We will present results of simultaneous measurements of LPI-driven light scattering and density/temperature profiles in CH plasmas produced by the Nike krypton fluoride laser (λ = 248 nm). The primary diagnostics for the LPI measurement are time-resolved spectrometers with absolute intensity calibration in spectral ranges relevant to the optical detection of stimulated Raman scattering or two plasmon decay. The spectrometers are capable of monitoring signal intensity relative to thermal background radiation from plasma providing a useful way to analyze LPI initiation. For further understanding of LPI processes, the recently implemented grid image refractometer (Nike-GIR)a is used to measure the coronal plasma profiles. In this experiment, Nike-GIR is equipped with a 5th harmonic probe laser (λ = 213 nm) in attempt to probe into a high density region over the previous peak density with λ = 263 nm probe light ( 4 ×1021 cm-3). The LPI behaviors will be discussed with the measured data sets. Work supported by DoE/NNSA.

  1. Formation of Hypermetallic Molecule LiZnO+ from Laser Plasma%激光等离子体中超金属氧化物离子LiZnO+的产生

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    傅正文; 曾宪康; 张谊华; 秦启宗; 陈宏; 黄荣彬; 郑兰荪

    2001-01-01

    By 355 nm laser ablating a composite target prepared from metallic lithium and ZnO in high vaccum, a new hypermetallic oxide LiZnO+ ion, which consists of two heterometal atoms and oxygen atom, was observed by using a time-of-flight mass spectrometer for the first time. The time-of-flight positive ion mass spectra at different delay time between the accelerated electric field and laser pulse are investigated. It shows that the formation of LiOZn+ depends on the delay time, and the hypervalent ion LiOZn+ is observed obviously at the delay time from 7.5 to 17.5 μs. These results suggest that the ion-molecular reaction between the ablated Li+ ions and ZnO in the laser plasma should be responsible for the formation of hypermetallic LiZ nO+.

  2. 15th International Congress on Plasma Physics & 13th Latin American Workshop on Plasma Physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soto, Leopoldo

    2014-05-01

    : Fundamentals of Plasma Physics, Fusion Plasmas, Plasmas in Astrophysics and Space Physics, Plasma Applications and Technologies, Complex Plasmas, High Energy Density Plasmas, Quantum Plasmas, Laser-Plasma Interaction and among others. A total of 180 delegates from 34 different countries took part in the ICPP-LAWPP-2010. Sixty delegates received economical assistance from the local organized committee, thanks to the support of the International Union for Pure and Applied Physics (IUPAP) and the Chilean Nuclear Energy Commission (CCHEN). The ICPP-LAWPP-2010 Program was elaborated by the following Program Committee: Carlos Alejaldre, ITER Maria Virginia Alves, Brazil Julio Herrera, Mexico Günter Mank, IAEA George Morales, USA Padma Kant Shukla, Germany Guido Van Oost, Belgium Leopoldo Soto, Chile (Chairman) This Program Committee was formed by selected members from the International Advisory Committee of the ICPP and by selected members from the International Advisory Committee of the LAWPP. In particular, Plenary Lectures and Invited Topical Lectures were selected by the Program Committee from a list of nominated presentations by the International Advisory Committees of both ICPP and LAWPP. Also, the classification of oral and poster presentations was elaborated by the Program Committee. The congress included: 15 invited plenary talks, 33 invited topical talks, 45 oral contributions, and 160 poster contributions. A major part of the plenary and topical lectures were published in a special issue of the Plasma Physics and Controlled Fusion, IOP Publishing (Plasma Phys. Control Fusion Volume 53, Number 7, July 2011: http://iopscience.iop.org/0741-3335/53/7). The papers were refereed according to the standards of the journal Plasma Physics and Controlled Fusion. An large number of the participants sent their contributions articles to this volume of Journal of Physics: Conference Series, IOP Publishing. The articles received were reviewed by the local organizing committee and by

  3. Theoretical Plasma Physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vahala, George M. [College of William and Mary, Williamsburg, VA (United States)

    2013-12-31

    Lattice Boltzmann algorithms are a mesoscopic method to solve problems in nonlinear physics which are highly parallelized – unlike the direction solution of the original problem. These methods are applied to both fluid and magnetohydrodynamic turbulence. By introducing entropic constraints one can enforce the positive definiteness of the distribution functions and so be able to simulate fluids at high Reynolds numbers without numerical instabilities. By introducing a vector distribution function for the magnetic field one can enforce the divergence free condition on the magnetic field automatically, without the need of divergence cleaning as needed in most direct numerical solutions of the resistive magnetohydrodynamic equations. The principal reason for the high parallelization of lattice Boltzmann codes is that they consist of a kinetic collisional relaxation step (which is purely local) followed by a simple shift of the relaxed data to neighboring lattice sites. In large eddy simulations, the closure schemes are highly nonlocal – the most famous of these schemes is that due to Smagorinsky. Under a lattice Boltzmann representation the Smagorinsky closure is purely local – being simply a particular moment on the perturbed distribution fucntions. After nonlocal fluid moment models were discovered to represent Landau damping, it was found possible to model these fluid models using an appropriate lattice Boltzmann algorithm. The close to ideal parallelization of the lattice Boltzmann codes permitted us to be Gordon Bell finalists on using the Earth Simulation in Japan. We have also been involved in the radio frequency propagation of waves into a tokamak and into a spherical overdense tokamak plasma. Initially we investigated the use of a quasi-optical grill for the launching of lower hybrid waves into a tokamak. It was found that the conducting walls do not prevent the rods from being properly irradiated, the overloading of the quasi-optical grill is not severe

  4. Introduction to Plasma Physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurnett, Donald A.; Bhattacharjee, Amitava

    2017-03-01

    Preface; 1. Introduction; 2. Characteristic parameters of a plasma; 3. Single particle motions; 4. Waves in a cold plasma; 5. Kinetic theory and the moment equations; 6. Magnetohydrodynamics; 7. MHD equilibria and stability; 8. Discontinuities and shock waves; 9. Electrostatic waves in a hot unmagnetized plasma; 10. Waves in a hot magnetized plasma; 11. Nonlinear effects; 12. Collisional processes; Appendix A. Symbols; Appendix B. Useful trigonometric identities; Appendix C. Vector differential operators; Appendix D. Vector calculus identities; Index.

  5. Computational Methods in Plasma Physics

    CERN Document Server

    Jardin, Stephen

    2010-01-01

    Assuming no prior knowledge of plasma physics or numerical methods, Computational Methods in Plasma Physics covers the computational mathematics and techniques needed to simulate magnetically confined plasmas in modern magnetic fusion experiments and future magnetic fusion reactors. Largely self-contained, the text presents the basic concepts necessary for the numerical solution of partial differential equations. Along with discussing numerical stability and accuracy, the author explores many of the algorithms used today in enough depth so that readers can analyze their stability, efficiency,

  6. Space plasma physics research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Comfort, Richard H.; Horwitz, James L.

    1993-01-01

    During the course of this grant, work was performed on a variety of topics and there were a number of significant accomplishments. A summary of these accomplishments is included. The topics studied include empirical model data base, data reduction for archiving, semikinetic modeling of low energy plasma in the inner terrestrial magnetosphere and ionosphere, O(+) outflows, equatorial plasma trough, and plasma wave ray-tracing studies. A list of publications and presentations which have resulted from this research is also included.

  7. High energy density physics with intense ion and laser beams. Annual report 2003

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weyrich, K. (comp.)

    2004-07-01

    The following topics are dealt with: Laser plasma physics, plasma spectroscopy, beam interaction experiments, atomic and radiation physics, pulsed power applications, beam transport and accelerator research and development, properties of dense plasma, instabilities in beam-plasma interaction, beam transport in dense plasmas, short-pulse laser-matter interaction. (HSI)

  8. Controlled fusion and plasma physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-12-31

    This document presents the several speeches that took place during the 22nd European Physical Society conference on Controlled Fusion and Plasma Physics in Bournemouth, UK, between the 2nd and 7th July 1995. The talks deal with new experiments carried out on several tokamaks, particularly Tore Supra, concerning plasma confinement and fusion. Some information on specific fusion devices or tokamak devices is provided, as well as results of experiments concerning plasma instability. Separate abstracts were prepared for all the 31 papers in this volume. (TEC).

  9. Formation of a fine-dispersed liquid-metal target under the action of femto- and picosecond laser pulses for a laser-plasma radiation source in the extreme ultraviolet range

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vinokhodov, A Yu; Krivokorytov, M S [EUV Labs, Ltd., Troitsk, Moscow (Russian Federation); Koshelev, K N; Krivtsun, V M; Sidelnikov, Yu V; Medvedev, V V; Kompanets, V O; Melnikov, A A; Chekalin, S V [Institute of Spectroscopy, Russian Academy of Sciences, Troitsk, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2016-01-31

    We report the results of studying the dynamics of deformation and fragmentation of liquid-metal droplets under the action of ultrashort laser pulses. The experiments have been performed to optimise the shape of the droplet target used in extreme ultraviolet (EUV) radiation sources based on the laser-produced plasma using the pre-pulse technology. The pre-pulse is generated by a system incorporating a master Ti : sapphire oscillator and a regenerative amplifier, allowing one to vary the pulse duration from 50 fs to 50 ps. The power density of laser radiation at the droplet target, averaged over the pulse duration and spatial coordinates, has reached 3 × 10{sup 15} W cm{sup -2}. The production of liquid-metal droplets has been implemented by means of a droplet generator based on a nozzle with a ring piezoceramic actuator. The droplet material is the eutectic indium – tin alloy. The droplet generator could operate in the droplet and jet regime with a maximal rate of stable operation 5 and 150 kHz, respectively. The spatial stability of droplet position σ = 1% – 2% of its diameter is achieved. The size of the droplets varied within 30 – 70 μm, their velocity was 2 – 8 m s{sup -1} depending on the operation regime. (interaction of laser radiation with matter. laser plasma)

  10. Electricity effect detection of laser plasma with a metal probe%利用金属外探针探测激光等离子体的电学效应

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    纪运景; 卞保民; 陆建; 王春勇

    2009-01-01

    The form mechanism and evolution role of electrical signal induced by the laser plasma effect were investigated with a tiny metal probe during Nd: YAG high-power pulse laser ablation on copper in air. And the effect of distance from probe to ablaten point on the electrical signal was tested through experiment. The experimental results show that the signal distribution is closely dependent on the detection distance. The distribution of signal wave is positive-negative double peak in close detection distance (3 mm). In addition, the peak value of the signal can be gained from the probe distance as follows: I_a ∝d~(-2) . It is considered that the electrical signal is formed of high-speed electrons and ions arriving to probe from laser plasma after analyzing the signal. And the variety relation between peak value of signal and probe distance is explained reasonably.%利用Nd:YAG脉冲激光烧蚀Cu靶,实验研究了空气中激光等离子体电学效应在金属探针上产生的电信号的形成机制与演变规律,对探针与烧蚀点之间的距离对电信号的影响进行了测试.结果表明:信号结构与探测距离密切相关,探针距离较近时(3 mm),则仅表现为负脉冲单峰结构,且信号幅值与探针距离之间满足I_a∝ d~(-2).对该信号进行详细分析后得出:从等离子体区域出射的高速电子和离子到达探针是信号形成的主要机制,并对信号幅值随探针距离的变化关系进行了合理解释.

  11. Topics in Plasma Physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vahala, Linda [Old Dominion Univ., Norfolk, VA (United States)

    2015-05-31

    During the period 1998-2013, research under the auspices of the Department of Energy was performed on RF waves in plasmas. This research was performed in close collaboration with Josef Preinhaelter, Jakub Urban, Vladimir Fuchs, Pavol Pavlo and Frantisek Zacek (Czech Academy of Sciences), Martin Valovic and Vladimir Shevchenko (Culham). This research is detailed and all 38 papers which were published by this team are cited.

  12. Variational Integrators in Plasma Physics

    CERN Document Server

    Kraus, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Variational integrators are a special kind of geometric discretisation methods applicable to any system of differential equations that obeys a Lagrangian formulation. In this thesis, variational integrators are developed for several important models of plasma physics: guiding centre dynamics (particle dynamics), the Vlasov-Poisson system (kinetic theory), and ideal magnetohydrodynamics (plasma fluid theory). Special attention is given to physical conservation laws like conservation of energy and momentum. Most systems in plasma physics do not possess a Lagrangian formulation to which the variational integrator methodology is directly applicable. Therefore the theory is extended towards nonvariational differential equations by linking it to Ibragimov's theory of integrating factors and adjoint equations. It allows us to find a Lagrangian for all ordinary and partial differential equations and systems thereof. Consequently, the applicability of variational integrators is extended to a much larger family of syst...

  13. Research in plasma physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    1973-01-01

    Three aspects of barium ion cloud dynamics are discussed. First, the effect of the ratio of ion cloud conductivity to background ionospheric conductivity on the motion of barium ion clouds is investigated and compared with observations of barium ion clouds. This study led to the suggestion that the conjugate ionosphere participates in the dynamics of barium ion clouds. Second, analytic work on the deformation of ion clouds is presented. Third, a linearized stability theory was extended to include the effect of the finite extent of an ion cloud, as well as the effect of the ratio of ion cloud to ionospheric conductivities. The stability properties of a plasma with contra-streaming ion beams parallel to a magnetic field are investigated. The results are interpreted in terms of parameters appropriate for collisionless shock waves. It is found that this particular instability can be operative only if the up-stream Alfven Mach number exceeds 5.5.

  14. Controlled fusion and plasma physics

    CERN Document Server

    Miyamoto, Kenro

    2006-01-01

    Resulting from ongoing, international research into fusion processes, the International Tokamak Experimental Reactor (ITER) is a major step in the quest for a new energy source.The first graduate-level text to cover the details of ITER, Controlled Fusion and Plasma Physics introduces various aspects and issues of recent fusion research activities through the shortest access path. The distinguished author breaks down the topic by first dealing with fusion and then concentrating on the more complex subject of plasma physics. The book begins with the basics of controlled fusion research, foll

  15. Space Plasma Physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, S. T.

    2000-01-01

    Dr. James L. Horwitz and R. Hugh Comfort's studies with the high altitude TIDE data have been progressing well. We concluded a study on the relationship of polar cap ion properties observed by TIDE near apogee with solar wind and IMF conditions. We found that in general H+ did not correlate as well as O+ with solar wind and IMF parameters. O+ density correlated(sub IMF), and Kp. At lower solar wind speeds, O+ density decreased with increasing latitude, but this trend was not observed at higher solar wind speeds. By comparing these results with results from other studies of O+ in different parts of the magnetosphere, we concluded that O+ ions often leave the ionosphere near the foot point of the cusp/cleft region, pass through the high-altitude polar cap lobes, and eventually arrive in the plasma sheet. We found that H+ outflows are a persistent feature of the polar cap and are not as dependent on the geophysical conditions; even classical polar wind models show H+ ions readily escaping owing to their low mass. Minor correlations with solar wind drivers were found; specifically, H+ density correlated best with IMF By, V(sub sw)B(sub IMF), and ESW(sub sw).

  16. EDITORIAL 37th European Physical Society Conference on Plasma Physics 37th European Physical Society Conference on Plasma Physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendonça, Tito; Hidalgo, Carlos

    2010-12-01

    gyrokinetic code that could modify the characteristics of the turbulence. Emeric Falize and Bérénice Loupias for their investigation of similarities between laser-induced plasmas and astrophysical systems and for the description of a set of diagnostics for laser plasmas aimed at demonstrating the possible astrophysics character of plasma jets in laser-induced plasma formation. Peter Manz for his comprehensive analysis of turbulence in magnetized plasmas, exploring the interplay between flows, electric fields and fluctuations. Itoh Project Prize in Plasma Turbulence 2010 Professor Sanae Itoh from Kyushu University continued to sponsor the Itoh Project Prize in Plasma Turbulence. The 2010 prize was awarded to G Birkenmeier (Stuttgart University). IOP Poster Prize winners in Dublin, 2010. The Institute of Physics (IOP) has once again provided encouragement for young physiscs with the IOP Poster Prize. Caroline Wilkinson presented the awards this year to three candidates: Mattia Albergante (EPFL, Lausanne), Clelia Pagano (Trinity College Dublin) and Marija Vranic (Instituto Superior Tecnico, Lisbon). Proceedings of 37th EPS Conference on Plasma Physics As previously mentioned, this special issue contains the invited papers of the 37th Conference, held in 2010. The complete proceedings are available online at http://ocs.ciemat.es/EPS2010PAP/html/ This site is also accessible from the conference website at http://www.eps2010.com/ (under `Contributions'). The Local Organizing Committee has also prepared a CD with a copy of the proceedings, identical to the online proceedings. This CD is stored at the offices of the European Physical Society as a backup, and as a master copy to make additional copies in case anyone should require one.

  17. Low-Cost Real-Time Gas Monitoring Using a Laser Plasma Induced by a Third Harmonic Q-Switched Nd-YAG Laser

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Syahrun Nur Abdulmadjid

    2005-11-01

    Full Text Available A gas plasma induced by a third harmonic Nd-YAG laser with relatively low pulsed energy (about 10 mJ has favorable characteristics for gas analysis due to its low background characteristics, nevertheless a high power fundamental Nd-YAG laser (100-200 mJ is widely used for laser gas breakdown spectroscopy. The air plasma can be used as a low-cost real-time gas monitoring system such that it can be used to detect the local absolute humidity, while a helium plasma can be used for gas analysis with a high level of sensitivity. A new technique using a helium plasma to improve laser ablation emission spectroscopy is proposed. Namely, the third harmonic Nd-YAG laser is focused at a point located some distance from the target in the 1-atm helium surrounding gas. By using this method, the ablated vapor from the target is excited through helium atoms in a metastable state in the helium plasma.

  18. Marshall N. Rosenbluth Outstanding Doctoral Thesis Award Talk: The Ultrafast Nonlinear Response of Air Molecules and its Effect on Femtosecond Laser Plasma Filaments in Atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yu-Hsin

    2012-10-01

    When exceeding the critical power Pcr, an intense laser pulse propagating in a gas collapses into one or multiple ``filaments,'' which can extend meters in length with weakly ionized plasma and local intensity ˜ 10^13 W/cm^2 radially confined in a diameter of < 100 μm [1]. While it has been generally accepted the nonlinear self-focusing of the laser pulse leading to beam collapse is stabilized by plasma generation [2], neither the field-induced nonlinearity nor the plasma generation had been directly measured. This uncertainty has given rise to recent controversy about whether plasma generation does indeed counteract the positive nonlinearity [3, 4]. For even a basic understanding of femtosecond filamentation and for applications, the focusing and defocusing mechanisms---nonlinear self-focusing and ionization---must be understood. By employing a single-shot, time-resolved technique based on spectral interferometry [5] to study the constituents of air, it is found that the rotational responses in O2 and N2 are the dominant nonlinear effect in filamentary propagation when the laser pulse duration is longer than ˜ 100fs. Furthermore, we find that the instantaneous nonlinearity scales linearly up to the ionization threshold [6], eliminating any possibility of an ionization-free negative stabilization [3] of filamentation. This is confirmed by space-resolved electron density measurements in meter-long filaments produced with different pulse durations, using optical interferometry with a grazing-incidence, ps-delayed probe [7].[4pt] [1] A. Braun et al., Opt. Lett. 20, 73 (1995).[0pt] [2] A. Couairon and A. Mysyrowicz, Phys. Rep. 441, 47 (2007).[0pt] [3] V. Loriot et al., Opt. Express 17, 13429 (2009).[0pt] [4] P. B'ejot et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 104, 103903 (2010).[0pt] [5] Y.-H. Chen et al., Opt. Express 15, 7458 (2007); Opt. Express 15, 11341 (2007).[0pt] [6] J. K. Wahlstrand et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 107, 103901 (2011).[0pt] [7] Y.-H. Chen et al., Phys. Rev. Lett

  19. 一维动理学数值模拟激光与等离子体的相互作用%Study of laser plasma interactions using one-dimensional particle-in-cell co de in kinetic regime

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    邹长林; 叶文华; 卢新培

    2014-01-01

    利用一维(1D3V)、显式、全电磁、相对论粒子模拟代码研究动理学范畴内激光与等离子体相互作用中的受激拉曼散射,给出了粒子代码的控制方程及其数值离散的详细方案。研究表明:动理学效应在受激拉曼散射不稳定性中十分重要;时间平均的反射率在阈值强度处跃升,在更高的激光强度处达到饱和;受激拉曼背向散射周期性地在次皮秒内爆发,离子效应延迟背向拉曼散射的发生;电子俘获导致了背向拉曼散射出现爆发;Langmuir波的非线性频移使得背向散射达到饱和。%Stimulated Raman scatting (SRS), which is one of the parametric processes of laser-plasma interactions, is examined by an explicit, electromagnetic, relativistic kinetic particle-in-cell code in one dimension. The code algorithm and implementation details are discussed. It is found that kinetic effects are important to SRS instability. Time-averaged reflectivity onsets at threshold intensity, and saturates at higher intensity. Backward SRS bursts in sub-picosecond, periodically. Kinetic ions initially delay the growth of SRS. Electron trapping results in the SRS bursts. The saturation of SRS results from the nonlinear frequency shift of Langmuir wave. Work is underway to add binary Coulomb collision to parallelize it, and to extend the code to 2D3V.

  20. 激光等离子体相互作用中自生磁场及其空间演化%Spatial Evolution of Electron Beam Instability in the Ultraintense Laser-Plasma Interaction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    帕尔哈提·吐尼亚孜; 阿不都热苏力; 阿布都外力

    2013-01-01

    利用粒子模拟程序,模拟研究了超强激光与等离子体相互作用中的电子束流不稳定性的产生机制,得到了不稳定性所激发的自生磁场的线性增长率与各向异性参数之间的函数关系.观察到了激光与等离子体相互作用时产生的饱和自生磁场在表面领域上的演化过程,发现沿x方向出现的电流比较大时,饱和自生的磁场在z方向的发展比较快,临界面附近较大,但随着深度的增加,逐渐以指数形式减少.%Generation mechanism of electron beam instability in the ultraintense laser-plasma interactions is studied using electromagnetic relativistic particle-in-cell program simulation.Functional relationship between liner growth rate of spontaneous magnetic excited by electron beam instability and anisotropic parameters is provided.The saturated magnetic field in the skin on the field is observed.When the electric current in the x direction is larger,the magnetic field in z direction is stronger than other directions,and all the values get their maximum near the critical area and decrease exponentially with depth becoming larger.

  1. PREFACE: Plasma Physics by Laser and Applications 2013 Conference (PPLA2013)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nassisi, V.; Giulietti, D.; Torrisi, L.; Delle Side, D.

    2014-04-01

    The ''Plasma Physics by Laser and Applications'' Conference (PPLA 2013) is a biennial meeting in which the National teams involved in Laser-Plasma Interaction at high intensities communicate their late results comparing with the colleagues from the most important European Laser Facilities. The sixth appointment has been organized in Lecce, Italy, from 2 to 4 October 2013 at the Rector Palace of the University of Salento. Surprising results obtained by laser-matter interaction at high intensities, as well as, non-equilibrium plasma generation, laser-plasma acceleration and related secondary sources, diagnostic methodologies and applications based on lasers and plasma pulses have transferred to researchers the enthusiasm to perform experiments ad maiora. The plasma generated by powerful laser pulses produces high kinetic particles and energetic photons that may be employed in different fields, from medicine to microelectronics, from engineering to nuclear fusion, from chemistry to environment. A relevant interest concerns the understanding of the fundamental physical phenomena, the employed lasers, plasma diagnostics and their consequent applications. For this reason we need continuous updates, meetings and expertise exchanges in this field in order to follow the evolution and disclose information, that has been done this year in Lecce, discussing and comparing the experiences gained in various international laboratories. The conference duration, although limited to just 3 days, permitted to highlight important aspects of the research in the aforementioned fields, giving discussion opportunities about the activities of researchers of high international prestige. The program consisted of 10 invited talks, 17 oral talks and 17 poster contributions for a total of 44 communications. The presented themes covered different areas and, far from being exhaustive gave updates, stimulating useful scientific discussions. The Organizers belong to three Italian Universities

  2. 'Water window' compact, table-top laser plasma soft X-ray sources based on a gas puff target

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wachulak, P.W., E-mail: wachulak@gmail.co [Institute of Optoelectronics, Military University of Technology, ul. gen. S. Kaliskiego 2, 00-908 Warsaw (Poland); Bartnik, A.; Fiedorowicz, H.; Rudawski, P.; Jarocki, R.; Kostecki, J.; Szczurek, M. [Institute of Optoelectronics, Military University of Technology, ul. gen. S. Kaliskiego 2, 00-908 Warsaw (Poland)

    2010-05-15

    We have developed compact, high repetition, table-top soft-X-ray sources, based on a gas puff target, emitting in 'water window' spectral range at lambda = 2.88 nm from nitrogen gas target or, in 2-4 nm range of wavelengths, from argon gas target. Double stream gas puff target was pumped optically by commercial Nd:YAG laser, energy 0.74 J, pulse time duration 4 ns. Spatial distribution of laser-produced plasma was imaged using a pinhole camera. Using transmission grating spectrometer, argon and nitrogen emission spectra were obtained, showing strong emission in the 'water window' spectral range. Using AXUV100 detector the flux measurements of the soft-X-ray pulses were carried out and are presented. These debris free sources are table-top alternative for free electron lasers and synchrotron installations. They can be successfully employed in microscopy, spectroscopy and metrology experiments among others.

  3. INTERACTION OF LASER RADIATION WITH MATTER. LASER PLASMA: Structure of flows due to interaction of CO2 laser pulse pairs with a target in air

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakeev, A. A.; Nikolashina, L. I.; Potashkin, M. N.; Prokopenko, N. V.

    1991-06-01

    An analysis is made of two pulses from an electric-discharge CO2 laser, of 6-12 μs duration and separated in time, incident on a target surrounded by air of normal density. The main attention is concentrated on breakdown of air by the second pulse at a boundary separating the "cold gas" and the plasma generated by the first pulse ("hot gas"). A gasdynamic system of waves is then generated. It consists of an absorption wave traveling along the cold gas opposite to the laser radiation and a wave propagating along the hot gas toward the target. The best agreement between the theory and experiment is obtained employing a model in which an absorption wave travels along the hot gas in an overcompressed detonation regime. The density of the radiation flux needed to maintain such a wave is 20-30% of the average density of the laser radiation flux carried by the second pulse.

  4. Plasma Physics An Introduction to Laboratory, Space, and Fusion Plasmas

    CERN Document Server

    Piel, Alexander

    2010-01-01

    Plasma Physics gives a comprehensive introduction to the basic processes in plasmas and demonstrates that the same fundamental concepts describe cold gas-discharge plasmas, space plasmas, and hot fusion plasmas. Starting from particle drifts in magnetic fields, the principles of magnetic confinement fusion are explained and compared with laser fusion. Collective processes are discussed in terms of plasma waves and instabilities. The concepts of plasma description by magnetohydrodynamics, kinetic theory, and particle simulation are stepwise introduced. Space charge effects in sheath regions, double layers and plasma diodes are given the necessary attention. The new fundamental mechanisms of dusty plasmas are explored and integrated into the framework of conventional plasmas. The book concludes with a brief introduction to plasma discharges. Written by an internationally renowned researcher in experimental plasma physics, the text keeps the mathematical apparatus simple and emphasizes the underlying concepts. T...

  5. Method for characterization of a spherically bent crystal for K.alpha. X-ray imaging of laser plasmas using a focusing monochromator geometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kugland, Nathan; Doeppner, Tilo; Glenzer, Siegfried; Constantin, Carmen; Niemann, Chris; Neumayer, Paul

    2015-04-07

    A method is provided for characterizing spectrometric properties (e.g., peak reflectivity, reflection curve width, and Bragg angle offset) of the K.alpha. emission line reflected narrowly off angle of the direct reflection of a bent crystal and in particular of a spherically bent quartz 200 crystal by analyzing the off-angle x-ray emission from a stronger emission line reflected at angles far from normal incidence. The bent quartz crystal can therefore accurately image argon K.alpha. x-rays at near-normal incidence (Bragg angle of approximately 81 degrees). The method is useful for in-situ calibration of instruments employing the crystal as a grating by first operating the crystal as a high throughput focusing monochromator on the Rowland circle at angles far from normal incidence (Bragg angle approximately 68 degrees) to make a reflection curve with the He-like x-rays such as the He-.alpha. emission line observed from a laser-excited plasma.

  6. Laser Shock Processing of Metallic Materials: Coupling of Laser-Plasma Interaction and Material Behaviour Models for the Assessment of Key Process Issues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ocaña, J. L.; Morales, M.; Molpeceres, C.; Porro, J. A.

    2010-10-01

    Profiting by the increasing availability of laser sources delivering intensities above 109 W/cm2 with pulse energies in the range of several Joules and pulse widths in the range of nanoseconds, laser shock processing (LSP) is consolidating as an effective technology for the improvement of surface mechanical and corrosion resistance properties of metals. The main advantage of the laser shock processing technique consists on its capability of inducing a relatively deep compression residual stresses field into metallic alloy pieces allowing an improved mechanical behaviour, explicitly, the life improvement of the treated specimens against wear, crack growth and stress corrosion cracking. Although significant work from the experimental side has been contributed to explore the optimum conditions of application of the treatments and to assess their ultimate capability to provide enhanced mechanical behaviour to work-pieces of typical materials, only limited attempts have been developed in the way of full comprehension and predictive assessment of the characteristic physical processes and material transformations with a specific consideration of real material properties. In the present paper, a review on the physical issues dominating the development of LSP processes from a high intensity laser-matter interaction point of view is presented along with the theoretical and computational methods developed by the authors for their predictive assessment and practical results at laboratory scale on the application of the technique to different materials.

  7. The Plasma Archipelago: Plasma Physics in the 1960s

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weisel, Gary J.

    2017-09-01

    With the foundation of the Division of Plasma Physics of the American Physical Society in April 1959, plasma physics was presented as the general study of ionized gases. This paper investigates the degree to which plasma physics, during its first decade, established a community of interrelated specialties, one that brought together work in gaseous electronics, astrophysics, controlled thermonuclear fusion, space science, and aerospace engineering. It finds that, in some regards, the plasma community was indeed greater than the sum of its parts and that its larger identity was sometimes glimpsed in inter-specialty work and studies of fundamental plasma behaviors. Nevertheless, the plasma specialties usually worked separately for two inter-related reasons: prejudices about what constituted "basic physics," both in the general physics community and within the plasma community itself; and a compartmentalized funding structure, in which each funding agency served different missions.

  8. Physics of the plasma universe

    CERN Document Server

    Peratt, Anthony L

    2015-01-01

    Today many scientists recognize plasma as the key element to understanding new observations in near-Earth, interplanetary, interstellar, and intergalactic space; in stars, galaxies, and clusters of galaxies, and throughout the observable universe. Physics of the Plasma Universe, 2nd Edition is an update of observations made across the entire cosmic electromagnetic spectrum over the two decades since the publication of the first edition. It addresses paradigm changing discoveries made by telescopes, planetary probes, satellites, and radio and space telescopes. The contents are the result of the author's 37 years research at Livermore and Los Alamos National Laboratories, and the U.S. Department of Energy. This book covers topics such as the large-scale structure and the filamentary universe; the formation of magnetic fields and galaxies, active galactic nuclei and quasars, the origin and abundance of light elements, star formation and the evolution of solar systems, and cosmic rays. Chapters 8 and 9 are based ...

  9. Toward Extrapolating Two-Dimensional High-intensity Laser-Plasma Ion Acceleration Particle-in-Cell Simulations to Three Dimensions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stark, D. J.; Yin, L.; Albright, B. J.; Guo, F.

    2016-10-01

    A PIC study of laser-ion acceleration via relativistic induced transparency points to how 2D-S (laser polarization in the simulation plane) and -P (out-of-plane) simulations may capture different physics characterizing these systems, visible in their entirety in (often cost-prohibitive) 3D simulations. The electron momentum anisotropy induced in the target by the laser pulse is dramatically different in the two 2D cases, manifesting in differences in polarization shift, electric field strength, density threshold for onset of relativistic induced transparency, and target expansion timescales. In particular, a trajectory analysis of individual electrons and ions may allow one to delineate the role of the fields and modes responsible for ion acceleration. With this information, we consider how 2D simulations might be used to develop, in some respects, a fully 3D understanding of the system. Work performed under the auspices of the U.S. DOE by the LANS, LLC, Los Alamos National Laboratory under Contract No. DE-AC52-06NA25396. Funding provided by the Los Alamos National Laboratory Directed Research and Development Program.

  10. Plasma physics via computer simulation

    CERN Document Server

    Birdsall, CK

    2004-01-01

    PART 1: PRIMER Why attempting to do plasma physics via computer simulation using particles makes good sense Overall view of a one dimensional electrostatic program A one dimensional electrostatic program ES1 Introduction to the numerical methods used Projects for ES1 A 1d electromagnetic program EM1 Projects for EM1 PART 2: THEORY Effects of the spatial grid Effects of the finitw time ste Energy-conserving simulation models Multipole models Kinetic theory for fluctuations and noise; collisions Kinetic properties: theory, experience and heuristic estimates PART 3: PRACTIC

  11. Plasma physics an introduction to laboratory, space, and fusion plasmas

    CERN Document Server

    Piel, Alexander

    2017-01-01

    The enlarged new edition of this textbook provides a comprehensive introduction to the basic processes in plasmas and demonstrates that the same fundamental concepts describe cold gas-discharge plasmas, space plasmas, and hot fusion plasmas. Starting from particle drifts in magnetic fields, the principles of magnetic confinement fusion are explained and compared with laser fusion. Collective processes are discussed in terms of plasma waves and instabilities. The concepts of plasma description by magnetohydrodynamics, kinetic theory, and particle simulation are stepwise introduced. Space charge effects in sheath regions, double layers and plasma diodes are given the necessary attention. The novel fundamental mechanisms of dusty plasmas are explored and integrated into the framework of conventional plasmas. The book concludes with a concise description of modern plasma discharges. Written by an internationally renowned researcher in experimental plasma physics, the text keeps the mathematical apparatus simple a...

  12. Neutron Source from Laser Plasma Acceleration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiao, Xuejing; Shaw, Joseph; McCary, Eddie; Downer, Mike; Hegelich, Bjorn

    2016-10-01

    Laser driven electron beams and ion beams were utilized to produce neutron sources via different mechanism. On the Texas Petawatt laser, deuterized plastic, gold and DLC foil targets of varying thickness were shot with 150 J , 150 fs laser pulses at a peak intensity of 2 ×1021W /cm2 . Ions were accelerated by either target normal sheath acceleration or Breakout Afterburner acceleration. Neutrons were produced via the 9Be(d,n) and 9Be(p,n) reactions when accelerated ions impinged on a Beryllium converter as well as by deuteron breakup reactions. We observed 2 ×1010 neutron per shot in average, corresponding to 5 ×1018n /s . The efficiencies for different targets are comparable. In another experiment, 38fs , 0.3 J UT3 laser pulse interacted with mixed gas target. Electrons with energy 40MeV were produced via laser wakefield acceleration. Neutron flux of 2 ×106 per shot was generated through bremsstrahlung and subsequent photoneutron reactions on a Copper converter.

  13. Microengineering laser plasma interactions at relativistic intensities

    CERN Document Server

    Jiang, S; Audesirk, H; George, K M; Snyder, J; Krygier, A; Lewis, N S; Schumacher, D W; Pukhov, A; Freeman, R R; Akli, K U

    2015-01-01

    We report on the first successful proof-of-principle experiment to manipulate laser-matter interactions on the microscale using highly ordered Si microwire arrays. The interaction of a high contrast short pulse laser with a flat target via periodic Si microwires yields a substantial enhancement in both total and cut-off energies of the produced electron beam. The self generated electric and magnetic fields behave as an electromagnetic lens that confines and guides electrons between the microwires as they acquire relativistic energies via direct laser acceleration (DLA).

  14. Microengineering Laser Plasma Interactions at Relativistic Intensities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, S; Ji, L L; Audesirk, H; George, K M; Snyder, J; Krygier, A; Poole, P; Willis, C; Daskalova, R; Chowdhury, E; Lewis, N S; Schumacher, D W; Pukhov, A; Freeman, R R; Akli, K U

    2016-02-26

    We report on the first successful proof-of-principle experiment to manipulate laser-matter interactions on microscales using highly ordered Si microwire arrays. The interaction of a high-contrast short-pulse laser with a flat target via periodic Si microwires yields a substantial enhancement in both the total and cutoff energies of the produced electron beam. The self-generated electric and magnetic fields behave as an electromagnetic lens that confines and guides electrons between the microwires as they acquire relativistic energies via direct laser acceleration.

  15. Microengineering laser plasma interactions at relativistic intensities

    OpenAIRE

    S. Jiang; Ji,L.L.; Audesirk, H.; George, K M; Snyder, J.; Krygier, A.; Lewis, N. S.; Schumacher, D. W.; Pukhov, A.; Freeman, R. R.; Akli, K. U.

    2015-01-01

    We report on the first successful proof-of-principle experiment to manipulate laser-matter interactions on the microscale using highly ordered Si microwire arrays. The interaction of a high contrast short pulse laser with a flat target via periodic Si microwires yields a substantial enhancement in both total and cut-off energies of the produced electron beam. The self generated electric and magnetic fields behave as an electromagnetic lens that confines and guides electrons between the microw...

  16. Variational integrators in plasma physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kraus, Michael

    2013-07-01

    To a large extent, research in plasma physics is concerned with the description and analysis of energy and momentum transfer between different scales and different kinds of waves. In the numerical modelling of such phenomena it appears to be crucial to describe the transfer processes preserving the underlying conservation laws in order to prevent physically spurious solutions. In this work, special numerical methods, so called variational integrators, are developed for several models of plasma physics. Special attention is given to conservation properties like conservation of energy and momentum. By design, variational integrators are applicable to all systems that have a Lagrangian formulation. Usually, equations of motion are derived by Hamilton's action principle and then discretised. In the application of the variational integrator theory, the order of these steps is reversed. At first, the Lagrangian and the accompanying variational principle are discretised, such that discrete equations of motion can be obtained directly by applying the discrete variational principle to the discrete Lagrangian. The advantage of this approach is that the resulting discretisation automatically retains the conservation properties of the continuous system. Following an overview of the geometric formulation of classical mechanics and field theory, which forms the basis of the variational integrator theory, variational integrators are introduced in a framework adapted to problems from plasma physics. The applicability of variational integrators is explored for several important models of plasma physics: particle dynamics (guiding centre dynamics), kinetic theory (the Vlasov-Poisson system) and fluid theory (magnetohydrodynamics). These systems, with the exception of guiding centre dynamics, do not possess a Lagrangian formulation to which the variational integrator methodology is directly applicable. Therefore the theory is extended by linking it to Ibragimov's theory of

  17. Theoretical and numerical simulation of the saturation of the stimulated Raman scattering instability that occurs in laser-plasma interaction; Modelisation theorique et numerique de la saturation de l'instabilite de diffusion Raman stimulee se developpant dans l'interaction laser-plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fouquet, T

    2007-01-15

    In this work we present 2 important results. First, for a relatively moderate laser lighting (I*{lambda}{sup 2} {approx_equal} 10{sup 14} W{mu}m{sup 2}/cm{sup 2}), cavitation appears in Langmuir decay instability (LDI) whenever the plasma wavelength is above a certain limit. Secondly, in the case of an inhomogeneous plasma there is an increase of the Raman reflectivity in presence of LDI for a plasma density profile that was initially smooth. This work is divided into 5 chapters. The first chapter is dedicated to parametric instabilities especially Raman instability and Langmuir decay instability. The equations that govern these instabilities as well as their numerical solutions are presented in the second chapter. The third chapter deals with the case of a mono-dimensional plasma with homogenous density. The saturation of the Raman instability in a mono-dimensional plasma with inhomogeneous density is studied in the fourth chapter. The last chapter is dedicated to bi-dimensional simulations for various types of laser beams.

  18. Influences of Compton scattering on the properties of laser plasma channel antenna%Compton散射对激光等离子体通道天线特性的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    禹定臣; 郝东山

    2015-01-01

    应用多光子非线性Compton散射模型和数值计算方法,研究了激光等离子体通道天线传播和辐射特性,结果表明:随通道周围介质损耗和传输模式阶数的增大,传输模式THnm衰减常数明显增大.这是因散射使通道内外电场和磁场增强,粒子间碰撞频率增大,电场使更多分子电离而吸收更多能量的缘故.随模式阶数增大,电性有耗介质使相移常数明显减小.这是因散射使高阶模式可能存在被耦合电场俘获的缘故.等离子体耦合频率为0.7附近,衰减常数随频率增大而剧烈增大.这是因散射使介质分子发生二、三阶电离,更多电子被耦合电场急剧加速的缘故.随天线长度增加,天线辐射方向图主瓣和副瓣数量、宽度和最大辐射方向发生明显变化.这是因散射使天线频率增大,辐射波长变短,粒子电离几率增大,辐射波能量和频率成分增大的缘故.%By using the model of multi - photon nonlinear Compton scattering and the numerical computing means, the properties of the propagation and radiation of laser plasma channel antenna are studied. The results show that the attenuation constant of the propagation model THnm is clearly increased along the increases of the dielectric loss near the channel and the propagation model step number. The causes are that the electric field and magnetic field in and outside the channel are increased by Compton scattering, the collision frequency between the particle and particle is increased, and even more energies are absorbed by the even molecules ionized by Compton scattering. The phase moving constant is clearly decreased by the electric loss dielectric along the in-creasing model step number. This is dus to the possibility on the capture of the high step model by the coupling electric field. Near 0. 7 coupling plasma frequency, the attenuation constant is acutely increased along the in-creasing frequency

  19. Report of the Plasma Physics Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-03-01

    Theoretical and experimental work in plasma physics is summarized. Technological and engineering aspects of plasma experiments in the SPICA, TORTUR 2, and RINGBOOG 2 reactors are discussed with emphasis on screw pinch, turbulent heating, and gas blankets. The free boundary equilibrium in high beta Tokamak plasma, wave dynamics, and transport problems were investigated.

  20. The physics of non-ideal plasma

    CERN Document Server

    Fortov, Vladimir E

    2000-01-01

    This book is devoted to the physical properties of nonideal plasma which is compressed so strongly that the effects of interparticle interactions govern the plasma behavior. The interest in this plasma was generated by the development of modern technologies and facilities whose operations were based on high densities of energy. In this volume, the methods of nonideal plasma generation and diagnostics are considered. The experimental results are given and the main theoretical models of nonideal plasma state are discussed. The problems of thermodynamics, electro-physics, optics and dynamic stabi

  1. Unifying physics of accelerators, lasers and plasma

    CERN Document Server

    Seryi, Andrei

    2015-01-01

    Unifying Physics of Accelerators, Lasers and Plasma introduces the physics of accelerators, lasers and plasma in tandem with the industrial methodology of inventiveness, a technique that teaches that similar problems and solutions appear again and again in seemingly dissimilar disciplines. This unique approach builds bridges and enhances connections between the three aforementioned areas of physics that are essential for developing the next generation of accelerators.

  2. Plasma Physics of Extreme Astrophysical Environments

    CERN Document Server

    Uzdensky, Dmitri A

    2014-01-01

    Certain classes of astrophysical objects, namely magnetars and central engines of supernovae and gamma-ray bursts (GRBs), are characterized by extreme physical conditions not encountered elsewhere in the Universe. In particular, they possess magnetic fields that exceed the critical quantum field of 44 teragauss. Figuring out how these complex ultra-magnetized systems work requires understanding various plasma processes, both small-scale kinetic and large-scale magnetohydrodynamic (MHD). However, an ultra-strong magnetic field modifies the underlying physics to such an extent that many relevant plasma-physical problems call for building QED-based relativistic quantum plasma physics. In this review, after describing the extreme astrophysical systems of interest and identifying the key relevant plasma-physical problems, we survey the recent progress in the development of such a theory. We discuss how a super-critical field modifies the properties of vacuum and matter and outline the basic theoretical framework f...

  3. EFFECTS OF LASER RADIATION ON MATTER. LASER PLASMA: Characteristics of the evolution of a plasma formed by cw and pulse-periodic CO2 laser radiation in various gases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanevskiĭ, M. F.; Stepanova, M. A.

    1990-06-01

    An investigation was made of the interaction between high-power cw and pulse-periodic CO2 laser radiation and a low-threshold optical breakdown plasma near a metal surface. Characteristics of the breakdown plasma were studied as a function of the experimental conditions. A qualitative analysis was made of the results using a simple one-dimensional model for laser combustion waves.

  4. Plasma Cathode Electron Sources Physics, Technology, Applications

    CERN Document Server

    Oks, Efim

    2006-01-01

    This book fills the gap for a textbook describing this kind of electron beam source in a systematic and thorough manner: from physical processes of electron emission to examples of real plasma electron sources and their applications.

  5. Space plasma physics: I - Stationary processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasegawa, Akira; Sato, Tetsuya

    1989-01-01

    The physics of stationary processes in space plasmas is examined theoretically in an introduction intended for graduate students. The approach involves the extensive use of numerical simulations. Chapters are devoted to fundamental principles, small-amplitude waves, and the stationary solar plasma system; typical measurement data and simulation results are presented graphically.

  6. Plasma Physics and Controlled Nuclear Fusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisch, N. J.

    2010-01-01

    Already while making his famous contributions in uncontrolled nuclear fusion for wartime uses, Edward Teller contemplated how the abundant energy release through nuclear fusion might serve peacetime uses as well. His legacy in controlled nuclear fusion, and the associated physics of plasmas, spans both magnetic and inertial confinement approaches. His contributions in plasma physics, both the intellectual and the administrative, continue to impact the field.

  7. Plasma physics for controlled fusion

    CERN Document Server

    Miyamoto, Kenro

    2016-01-01

    This new edition presents the essential theoretical and analytical methods needed to understand the recent fusion research of tokamak and alternate approaches. The author describes magnetohydrodynamic and kinetic theories of cold and hot plasmas in detail. The book covers new important topics for fusion studies such as plasma transport by drift turbulence, which depend on the magnetic configuration and zonal flows. These are universal phenomena of microturbulence. They can modify the onset criterion for turbulent transport, instabilities driven by energetic particles as well as alpha particle generation and typical plasma models for computer simulation. The fusion research of tokamaks with various new versions of H modes are explained. The design concept of ITER, the international tokamak experimental reactor, is described for inductively driven operations as well as steady-state operations using non-inductive drives. Alternative approaches of reversed-field pinch and its relaxation process, stellator includi...

  8. Plasmas applied atomic collision physics, v.2

    CERN Document Server

    Barnett, C F

    1984-01-01

    Applied Atomic Collision Physics, Volume 2: Plasmas covers topics on magnetically confined plasmas. The book starts by providing the history of fusion research and describing the various approaches in both magnetically and inertially confined plasmas. The text then gives a general discussion of the basic concepts and properties in confinement and heating of a plasma. The theory of atomic collisions that result in excited quantum states, particularly highly ionized impurity atoms; and diverse diagnostic topics such as emission spectra, laser scattering, electron cyclotron emission, particle bea

  9. Experimental studies and modeling of X-Rays multilayer mirrors damages under high X-Ray flux generated by a laser-plasma experiment; Etude experimentale et modelisation de l`endommagement des miroirs multicouches X soumis a de hauts flux de rayonnement X dans le cadre de l`experience plasma-laser

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Le Guern, F

    1996-05-24

    We have been able with this work to point out characterize X-Rays multilayers mirrors damages. We have designed two experimental set-up which have been installed in the HELIOTROPE experimental chamber of the OCTAL facility located at the CEA in Limeil-Valenton. We have demonstrated that X-Rays multilayer mirrors properties were drastically modified by X-Rays emitted by a golden laser plasma. We have, more precisely, introduced the damage speed concept to quantify the expansion of the multilayer mirror period. We have been able to classify different multilayer mirrors in function of their resistance to damage and we have demonstrated that a silicate layer deposited on a mirror allowed to increase his resistance to damage. In a second part we have developed a simulation tool in order to simulate the X-Rays multilayer mirrors optical properties modifications. We have therefore coupled a thermo-mechanic code with an optical program. The results of the simulations are in a rather good agreement with the experiments and can be used to predict, before experiments, the multilayer mirror behavior under X-Rays irradiation. (author) 55 refs.

  10. Fundamental aspects of plasma chemical physics Thermodynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Capitelli, Mario; D'Angola, Antonio

    2012-01-01

    Fundamental Aspects of Plasma Chemical Physics - Thermodynamics develops basic and advanced concepts of plasma thermodynamics from both classical and statistical points of view. After a refreshment of classical thermodynamics applied to the dissociation and ionization regimes, the book invites the reader to discover the role of electronic excitation in affecting the properties of plasmas, a topic often overlooked by the thermal plasma community. Particular attention is devoted to the problem of the divergence of the partition function of atomic species and the state-to-state approach for calculating the partition function of diatomic and polyatomic molecules. The limit of ideal gas approximation is also discussed, by introducing Debye-Huckel and virial corrections. Throughout the book, worked examples are given in order to clarify concepts and mathematical approaches. This book is a first of a series of three books to be published by the authors on fundamental aspects of plasma chemical physics.  The next bo...

  11. Report on the solar physics-plasma physics workshop

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sturrock, P. A.; Baum, P. J.; Beckers, J. M.; Newman, C. E.; Priest, E. R.; Rosenberg, H.; Smith, D. F.; Wentzel, D. G.

    1976-01-01

    The paper summarizes discussions held between solar physicists and plasma physicists on the interface between solar and plasma physics, with emphasis placed on the question of what laboratory experiments, or computer experiments, could be pursued to test proposed mechanisms involved in solar phenomena. Major areas discussed include nonthermal plasma on the sun, spectroscopic data needed in solar plasma diagnostics, types of magnetic field structures in the sun's atmosphere, the possibility of MHD phenomena involved in solar eruptive phenomena, the role of non-MHD instabilities in energy release in solar flares, particle acceleration in solar flares, shock waves in the sun's atmosphere, and mechanisms of radio emission from the sun.

  12. PREFACE: 1982 International Conference on Plasma Physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilhelmsson, Hans

    1982-01-01

    Invited Papers: The Physics of Hot Plasmas During the last decade a dramatic evolution of plasma physics has occurred. Not only have gigantic fusion plasma machines been planned, and are now being built, and elaborate spaceships and antenna systems been constructed to explore remote parts of the cosmos; new observations have revealed fascinating structures in space, ranging from pulsar plasmas under extreme conditions in very strong magnetic fields to large-scale magnetic field and electric current systems in cosmic plasmas. X-rays from very distant sources as well as radio-waves from the plasma in the magnetosphere and in the Aurora have recently been studied with new observational techniques. Ingenious laboratory experiments are continuously being carried out to exploit new fundamental processes in plasmas. These are of great interest for the basic understanding of plasmas and also have immediate consequences for applications, like plasma heating and diagnostics. The theoretical description of new plasma phenomena, and of the plasma state in general poses challenging problems, particularly in situations where high concentration of energy is located in the plasmas. Nonlinear wave analysis and turbulence theory have accordingly been extensively developed to describe in particular the collective plasma phenomena. New concepts have been envisaged like plasma solitons, which may be thought of as excitations of local concentrations of longitudinal plasma waves which turn out to be particularly stable. More and more sophisticated structures of nonlinear nature are being revealed by means of high capacity computer facilities. Simulation experiments allow for studies of chaotic behaviour of plasma particles. Related fields of activity form new trends in the development of plasma theory. The programme of the 1982 International Conference on Plasma Physics, which was held in Göteborg, Sweden, stressed the role of the Physics of Hot Plasmas. Studies of such plasmas are

  13. Physics of quark-gluon plasma

    CERN Document Server

    Smilga, A V

    1997-01-01

    In this lecture, we give a brief review of what theorists now know, understand, or guess about static and kinetic properties of quark--gluon plasma. A particular attention is payed to the problem of physical observability, i.e. the physical meaningfulne ss of various characteristics of QGP discussed in the literature.

  14. Basic Studies in Plasma Physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-31

    close to a Maxwellian parametrized by a temperature T and mean velocity u which satisfy certain non -linear equations, which are the macroscopic equations...Simulations with Particle-to-Grid Methods 17 E. Microscopic-Shock Profiles: Exact Solution of a Non -Equilibrium System 18 IV. List of Publications...Investigator ABSTRACT An improved understanding of equilibrium and non -equilibrium properties of plasmas is central to many areas of basic science as

  15. Progress in Anisotropic Plasma Physics

    CERN Document Server

    Romatschke, P; Romatschke, Paul; Strickland, Michael

    2004-01-01

    In 1959 Weibel demonstrated that when a QED plasma has a temperature anisotropy there exist unstable transverse magnetic excitations which grow exponentially fast. In this paper we will review how to determine the growth rates for these unstable modes in the weak-coupling and ultrarelativistic limits in which the collective behavior is describable in terms are so-called "hard-loops". We will show that in this limit QCD is subject to instabilities which are analogous to the Weibel instability in QED. The presence of such instabilities dominates the early time evolution of a highly anisotropic plasma; however, at longer times it is expected that these instabilities will saturate (condense). I will discuss how the presence of non-linear interactions between the gluons complicates the determination of the saturated state. In order to discuss this I present the generalization of the Braaten-Pisarski isotropic hard-thermal-loop effective action to a system with a temperature anisotropy in the parton distribution fu...

  16. Fundamental aspects of plasma chemical physics transport

    CERN Document Server

    Capitelli, Mario; Laricchiuta, Annarita

    2013-01-01

    Fundamental Aspects of Plasma Chemical Physics: Tranpsort develops basic and advanced concepts of plasma transport to the modern treatment of the Chapman-Enskog method for the solution of the Boltzmann transport equation. The book invites the reader to consider actual problems of the transport of thermal plasmas with particular attention to the derivation of diffusion- and viscosity-type transport cross sections, stressing the role of resonant charge-exchange processes in affecting the diffusion-type collision calculation of viscosity-type collision integrals. A wide range of topics is then discussed including (1) the effect of non-equilibrium vibrational distributions on the transport of vibrational energy, (2) the role of electronically excited states in the transport properties of thermal plasmas, (3) the dependence of transport properties on the multitude of Saha equations for multi-temperature plasmas, and (4) the effect of the magnetic field on transport properties. Throughout the book, worked examples ...

  17. Dusty plasma as a unique object of plasma physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norman, G. E.; Timofeev, A. V.

    2016-11-01

    The self-consistency and basic openness of dusty plasma, charge fluctuations, high dissipation and other features of dusty plasma system lead to the appearance of a number of unusual and unique properties of dusty plasma. “Anomalous” heating of dusty particles, anisotropy of temperatures and other features, parametric resonance, charge fluctuations and interaction potential are among these unique properties. Study is based on analytical approach and numerical simulation. Mechanisms of “anomalous” heating and energy transfer are proposed. Influence of charge fluctuations on the system properties is discussed. The self-consistent, many-particle, fluctuation and anisotropic interparticle interaction potential is studied for a significant range of gas temperature. These properties are interconnected and necessary for a full description of dusty plasmas physics.

  18. Space plasma physics stationary processes

    CERN Document Server

    Hasegawa, Akira

    1989-01-01

    During the 30 years of space exploration, important discoveries in the near-earth environment such as the Van Allen belts, the plasmapause, the magnetotail and the bow shock, to name a few, have been made. Coupling between the solar wind and the magnetosphere and energy transfer processes between them are being identified. Space physics is clearly approaching a new era, where the emphasis is being shifted from discoveries to understanding. One way of identifying the new direction may be found in the recent contribution of atmospheric science and oceanography to the development of fluid dynamics. Hydrodynamics is a branch of classical physics in which important discoveries have been made in the era of Rayleigh, Taylor, Kelvin and Helmholtz. However, recent progress in global measurements using man-made satellites and in large scale computer simulations carried out by scientists in the fields of atmospheric science and oceanography have created new activities in hydrodynamics and produced important new discover...

  19. Plasma physics of extreme astrophysical environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uzdensky, Dmitri A; Rightley, Shane

    2014-03-01

    Among the incredibly diverse variety of astrophysical objects, there are some that are characterized by very extreme physical conditions not encountered anywhere else in the Universe. Of special interest are ultra-magnetized systems that possess magnetic fields exceeding the critical quantum field of about 44 TG. There are basically only two classes of such objects: magnetars, whose magnetic activity is manifested, e.g., via their very short but intense gamma-ray flares, and central engines of supernovae (SNe) and gamma-ray bursts (GRBs)--the most powerful explosions in the modern Universe. Figuring out how these complex systems work necessarily requires understanding various plasma processes, both small-scale kinetic and large-scale magnetohydrodynamic (MHD), that govern their behavior. However, the presence of an ultra-strong magnetic field modifies the underlying basic physics to such a great extent that relying on conventional, classical plasma physics is often not justified. Instead, plasma-physical problems relevant to these extreme astrophysical environments call for constructing relativistic quantum plasma (RQP) physics based on quantum electrodynamics (QED). In this review, after briefly describing the astrophysical systems of interest and identifying some of the key plasma-physical problems important to them, we survey the recent progress in the development of such a theory. We first discuss the ways in which the presence of a super-critical field modifies the properties of vacuum and matter and then outline the basic theoretical framework for describing both non-relativistic and RQPs. We then turn to some specific astrophysical applications of relativistic QED plasma physics relevant to magnetar magnetospheres and to central engines of core-collapse SNe and long GRBs. Specifically, we discuss the propagation of light through a magnetar magnetosphere; large-scale MHD processes driving magnetar activity and responsible for jet launching and propagation in

  20. Plasma physics of extreme astrophysical environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uzdensky, Dmitri A.; Rightley, Shane

    2014-03-01

    Among the incredibly diverse variety of astrophysical objects, there are some that are characterized by very extreme physical conditions not encountered anywhere else in the Universe. Of special interest are ultra-magnetized systems that possess magnetic fields exceeding the critical quantum field of about 44 TG. There are basically only two classes of such objects: magnetars, whose magnetic activity is manifested, e.g., via their very short but intense gamma-ray flares, and central engines of supernovae (SNe) and gamma-ray bursts (GRBs)—the most powerful explosions in the modern Universe. Figuring out how these complex systems work necessarily requires understanding various plasma processes, both small-scale kinetic and large-scale magnetohydrodynamic (MHD), that govern their behavior. However, the presence of an ultra-strong magnetic field modifies the underlying basic physics to such a great extent that relying on conventional, classical plasma physics is often not justified. Instead, plasma-physical problems relevant to these extreme astrophysical environments call for constructing relativistic quantum plasma (RQP) physics based on quantum electrodynamics (QED). In this review, after briefly describing the astrophysical systems of interest and identifying some of the key plasma-physical problems important to them, we survey the recent progress in the development of such a theory. We first discuss the ways in which the presence of a super-critical field modifies the properties of vacuum and matter and then outline the basic theoretical framework for describing both non-relativistic and RQPs. We then turn to some specific astrophysical applications of relativistic QED plasma physics relevant to magnetar magnetospheres and to central engines of core-collapse SNe and long GRBs. Specifically, we discuss the propagation of light through a magnetar magnetosphere; large-scale MHD processes driving magnetar activity and responsible for jet launching and propagation in

  1. Plasma Physics Approximations in Ares

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Managan, R. A.

    2015-01-08

    Lee & More derived analytic forms for the transport properties of a plasma. Many hydro-codes use their formulae for electrical and thermal conductivity. The coefficients are complex functions of Fermi-Dirac integrals, Fn( μ/θ ), the chemical potential, μ or ζ = ln(1+e μ/θ ), and the temperature, θ = kT. Since these formulae are expensive to compute, rational function approximations were fit to them. Approximations are also used to find the chemical potential, either μ or ζ . The fits use ζ as the independent variable instead of μ/θ . New fits are provided for Aα (ζ ),Aβ (ζ ), ζ, f(ζ ) = (1 + e-μ/θ)F1/2(μ/θ), F1/2'/F1/2, Fcα, and Fcβ. In each case the relative error of the fit is minimized since the functions can vary by many orders of magnitude. The new fits are designed to exactly preserve the limiting values in the non-degenerate and highly degenerate limits or as ζ→ 0 or ∞. The original fits due to Lee & More and George Zimmerman are presented for comparison.

  2. EDITORIAL: Invited papers from the 15th International Congress on Plasma Physics combined with the 13th Latin American Workshop on Plasma Physics Invited papers from the 15th International Congress on Plasma Physics combined with the 13th Latin American Workshop on Plasma Physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soto, Leopoldo

    2011-07-01

    , amongst others, the following topics: fundamentals of plasma physics, fusion plasmas, plasmas in astrophysics and space physics, plasma applications and technologies, complex plasmas, high energy density plasmas, quantum plasmas and laser-plasma interaction. A total of 180 delegates from 34 different countries took part in ICPP-LAWPP-2010, and 60 delegates received financial assistance from the Local Organizing Committee, thanks to the support granted by the International Union for Pure and Applied Physics (IUPAP) and by CCHEN. The ICPP-LAWPP-2010 Program was established by the following Program Committee: • Carlos Alejaldre, ITER • Maria Virginia Alves, Brazil • Julio Herrera, Mexico • Günter Mank, IAEA • George Morales, USA • Padma Kant Shukla, Germany • Guido Van Oost, Belgium • Leopoldo Soto, Chile (Chairman) This Program Committee was formed of selected members from the International Advisory Committee of the ICPP and from the International Advisory Committee of the LAWPP (http://www.icpp-lawpp-2010.cl/page/committees.php). In particular, plenary lectures and invited topical lectures were selected by the Program Committee from a list of nominated lectures presented by the International Advisory Committees of both ICPP and LAWPP. Also, the classification of oral and poster presentations was established by the Program Committee. The Congress included 15 invited plenary talks, 33 invited topical talks, 45 oral contributions, and 160 poster contributions. Most of the plenary and topical lectures are published in this special issue of Plasma Physics and Controlled Fusion. The papers were refereed according to the usual standards of the journal. Prior to ICPP-LAWPP 2010, an important activity usually associated with the Latin American Workshop on Plasma Physics took place. This activity was the LAWPP School on Plasma Physics, which was open to participants from all over the world, providing basic training to students and young researchers. The School was

  3. Laboratory plasma physics experiments using merging supersonic plasma jets

    OpenAIRE

    Hsu, S C; Moser, A. L.; Merritt, E. C.; Adams, C. S.; Dunn, J. P.; Brockington, S.; Case, A; Gilmore, M.; Lynn, A. G.; Messer, S. J.; Witherspoon, F. D.

    2014-01-01

    We describe a laboratory plasma physics experiment at Los Alamos National Laboratory that uses two merging supersonic plasma jets formed and launched by pulsed-power-driven rail guns. The jets can be formed using any atomic species or mixture available in a compressed-gas bottle and have the following nominal initial parameters at the railgun nozzle exit: $n_e\\approx n_i \\sim 10^{16}$ cm$^{-3}$, $T_e \\approx T_i \\approx 1.4$ eV, $V_{\\rm jet}\\approx 30$-100 km/s, mean charge $\\bar{Z}\\approx 1$...

  4. Lunar Dust and Dusty Plasma Physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Thomas L.

    2009-01-01

    In the plasma and radiation environment of space, small dust grains from the Moon s surface can become charged. This has the consequence that their motion is determined by electromagnetic as well as gravitational forces. The result is a plasma-like condition known as "dusty plasmas" with the consequence that lunar dust can migrate and be transported by magnetic, electric, and gravitational fields into places where heavier, neutral debris cannot. Dust on the Moon can exhibit unusual behavior, being accelerated into orbit by electrostatic surface potentials as blow-off dust, or being swept away by moving magnetic fields like the solar wind as pick-up dust. Hence, lunar dust must necessarily be treated as a dusty plasma subject to the physics of magnetohydrodynamics (MHD). A review of this subject has been given before [1], but a synopsis will be presented here to make it more readily available for lunar scientists.

  5. Introduction to plasma physics and controlled fusion

    CERN Document Server

    Chen, Francis F

    1984-01-01

    This complete introduction to plasma physics and controlled fusion by one of the pioneering scientists in this expanding field offers both a simple and intuitive discussion of the basic concepts of this subject and an insight into the challenging problems of current research. In a wholly lucid manner the work covers single-particle motions, fluid equations for plasmas, wave motions, diffusion and resistivity, Landau damping, plasma instabilities and nonlinear problems. For students, this outstanding text offers a painless introduction to this important field; for teachers, a large collection of problems; and for researchers, a concise review of the fundamentals as well as original treatments of a number of topics never before explained so clearly. This revised edition contains new material on kinetic effects, including Bernstein waves and the plasma dispersion function, and on nonlinear wave equations and solitons.

  6. Introduction to plasma physics and controlled fusion

    CERN Document Server

    Chen, Francis F

    2016-01-01

    The third edition of this classic text presents a complete introduction to plasma physics and controlled fusion, written by one of the pioneering scientists in this expanding field.  It offers both a simple and intuitive discussion of the basic concepts of the subject matter and an insight into the challenging problems of current research. This outstanding text offers students a painless introduction to this important field; for teachers, a large collection of problems; and for researchers, a concise review of the fundamentals as well as original treatments of a number of topics never before explained so clearly.  In a wholly lucid manner the second edition covered charged-particle motions, plasmas as fluids, kinetic theory, and nonlinear effects.  For the third edition, two new chapters have been added to incorporate discussion of more recent advances in the field.  The new chapter 9 on Special Plasmas covers non-neutral plasmas, pure electron plasmas, solid and ultra-cold plasmas, pair-ion plasmas, d...

  7. Theoretical and Experimental Beam Plasma Physics (TEBPP)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, B.

    1986-01-01

    The theoretical and experimental beam plasma physics (TEBPP) consists of a package of five instruments to measure electric and magnetic fields, plasma density and temperature, neutral density, photometric emissions, and energetic particle spectra during firings of the particle injector (SEPAC) electron beam. The package is developed on a maneuverable boom (or RMS) and is used to measure beam characteristics and induced perturbations field ( 10 m) and mid field ( 10 m to 100 m) along the electron beam. The TEBPP package will be designed to investigate induced oscillations and induced electromagnetic mode waves, neutral and ion density and temperature effects, and beam characteristics as a function of axial distance.

  8. The plasma physics of shock acceleration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Frank C.; Ellison, Donald C.

    1991-01-01

    The history and theory of shock acceleration is reviewed, paying particular attention to theories of parallel shocks which include the backreaction of accelerated particles on the shock structure. The work that computer simulations, both plasma and Monte Carlo, are playing in revealing how thermal ions interact with shocks and how particle acceleration appears to be an inevitable and necessary part of the basic plasma physics that governs collisionless shocks is discussed. Some of the outstanding problems that still confront theorists and observers in this field are described.

  9. BOOK REVIEW: Controlled Fusion and Plasma Physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engelmann, F.

    2007-07-01

    This new book by Kenro Miyamoto provides an up-to-date overview of the status of fusion research and the important parts of the underlying plasma physics at a moment where, due to the start of ITER construction, an important step in fusion research has been made and many new research workers will enter the field. For them, and also for interested graduate students and physicists in other fields, the book provides a good introduction into fusion physics as, on the whole, the presentation of the material is quite appropriate for getting acquainted with the field on the basis of just general knowledge in physics. There is overlap with Miyamoto's earlier book Plasma Physics for Nuclear Fusion (MIT Press, Cambridge, USA, 1989) but only in a few sections on subjects which have not evolved since. The presentation is subdivided into two parts of about equal length. The first part, following a concise survey of the physics basis of thermonuclear fusion and of plasmas in general, covers the various magnetic configurations studied for plasma confinement (tokamak; reversed field pinch; stellarator; mirror-type geometries) and introduces the specific properties of plasmas in these devices. Plasma confinement in tokamaks is treated in particular detail, in compliance with the importance of this field in fusion research. This includes a review of the ITER concept and of the rationale for the choice of ITER's parameters. In the second part, selected topics in fusion plasma physics (macroscopic instabilities; propagation of waves; kinetic effects such as energy transfer between waves and particles including microscopic instabilities as well as plasma heating and current drive; transport phenomena induced by turbulence) are presented systematically. While the emphasis is on displaying the essential physics, deeper theoretical analysis is also provided here. Every chapter is complemented by a few related problems, but only partial hints for their solution are given. A selection of

  10. Paradigm transition in cosmic plasma physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alfven, H.

    1982-01-01

    New discoveries in cosmic plasma physics are described, and their applications to solar, interstellar, galactic, and cosmological problems are discussed. The new discoveries include the existence of double layers in magnetized plasmas and in the low magnetosphere, and energy transfer by electric current in the auroral circuit. It is argued that solar flares and the solar wind-magnetosphere interaction should not be interpreted in terms of magnetic merging theories, and that electric current needs to be explicitly taken account of in understanding these phenomena. The filamentary structure of cosmic plasmas may be caused by electric currents in space, and the pinch effect may have a central role to play in the evolutionary history of interstellar clouds, stars, and solar systems. Space may have a cellular structure, with the cell walls formed by thin electric current layers. Annihilation may be the source of energy for quasars and the Hubble expansion, and the big bang cosmology may well be wrong.

  11. Fractal structures in nonlinear plasma physics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viana, R L; da Silva, E C; Kroetz, T; Caldas, I L; Roberto, M; Sanjuán, M A F

    2011-01-28

    Fractal structures appear in many situations related to the dynamics of conservative as well as dissipative dynamical systems, being a manifestation of chaotic behaviour. In open area-preserving discrete dynamical systems we can find fractal structures in the form of fractal boundaries, associated to escape basins, and even possessing the more general property of Wada. Such systems appear in certain applications in plasma physics, like the magnetic field line behaviour in tokamaks with ergodic limiters. The main purpose of this paper is to show how such fractal structures have observable consequences in terms of the transport properties in the plasma edge of tokamaks, some of which have been experimentally verified. We emphasize the role of the fractal structures in the understanding of mesoscale phenomena in plasmas, such as electromagnetic turbulence.

  12. Fundamental aspects of plasma chemical physics kinetics

    CERN Document Server

    Capitelli, Mario; Colonna, Gianpiero; Esposito, Fabrizio; Gorse, Claudine; Hassouni, Khaled; Laricchiuta, Annarita; Longo, Savino

    2016-01-01

    Describing non-equilibrium "cold" plasmas through a chemical physics approach, this book uses the state-to-state plasma kinetics, which considers each internal state as a new species with its own cross sections. Extended atomic and molecular master equations are coupled with Boltzmann and Monte Carlo methods to solve the electron energy distribution function. Selected examples in different applied fields, such as microelectronics, fusion, and aerospace, are presented and discussed including the self-consistent kinetics in RF parallel plate reactors, the optimization of negative ion sources and the expansion of high enthalpy flows through nozzles of different geometries. The book will cover the main aspects of the state-to-state kinetic approach for the description of nonequilibrium cold plasmas, illustrating the more recent achievements in the development of kinetic models including the self-consistent coupling of master equations and Boltzmann equation for electron dynamics. To give a complete portrayal, the...

  13. Physics of Tokamak Plasma Start-up

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mueller, Dennis

    2012-10-01

    This tutorial describes and reviews the state-of-art in tokamak plasma start-up and its importance to next step devices such as ITER, a Fusion Nuclear Science Facility and a Tokamak/ST demo. Tokamak plasma start-up includes breakdown of the initial gas, ramp-up of the plasma current to its final value and the control of plasma parameters during those phases. Tokamaks rely on an inductive component, typically a central solenoid, which has enabled attainment of high performance levels that has enabled the construction of the ITER device. Optimizing the inductive start-up phase continues to be an area of active research, especially in regards to achieving ITER scenarios. A new generation of superconducting tokamaks, EAST and KSTAR, experiments on DIII-D and operation with JET's ITER-like wall are contributing towards this effort. Inductive start-up relies on transformer action to generate a toroidal loop voltage and successful start-up is determined by gas breakdown, avalanche physics and plasma-wall interaction. The goal of achieving steady-sate tokamak operation has motivated interest in other methods for start-up that do not rely on the central solenoid. These include Coaxial Helicity Injection, outer poloidal field coil start-up, and point source helicity injection, which have achieved 200, 150 and 100 kA respectively of toroidal current on closed flux surfaces. Other methods including merging reconnection startup and Electron Bernstein Wave (EBW) plasma start-up are being studied on various devices. EBW start-up generates a directed electron channel due to wave particle interaction physics while the other methods mentioned rely on magnetic helicity injection and magnetic reconnection which are being modeled and understood using NIMROD code simulations.

  14. Symbolic Vector Analysis in Plasma Physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qin, H.; Tang, W.M.; Rewoldt, G.

    1997-10-09

    Many problems in plasma physics involve substantial amounts of analytical vector calculation. The complexity usually originates from both the vector operations themselves and the choice of underlying coordinate system. A computer algebra package for symbolic vector analysis in general coordinate systems, General Vector Analysis (GVA), is developed using Mathematica. The modern viewpoint for 3D vector calculus, differential forms on 3-manifolds, is adopted to unify and systematize the vector calculus operations in general coordinate systems. This package will benefit physicists and applied mathematicians in their research where complicated vector analysis is required. It will not only save a huge amount of human brain-power and dramatically improve accuracy, but this package will also be an intelligent tool to assist researchers in finding the right approaches to their problems. Several applications of this symbolic vector analysis package to plasma physics are also given.

  15. Symbolic Vector Analysis in Plasma Physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qin, H.; Rewoldt, G.; Tang, W.M.

    1997-10-01

    Many problems in plasma physics involve substantial amounts of analytical vector calculation. The complexity usually originates from both the vector operations themselves and the choice of underlying coordinate system. A computer algebra package for symbolic vector analysis in general coordinate systems, GeneralVectorAnalysis (GVA), is developed using Mathematica. The modern viewpoint for 3D vector calculus, differential forms on 3-manifolds, is adopted to unify and systematize the vector calculus operations in general coordinate systems. This package will benefit physicists and applied mathematicians in their research where complicated vector analysis is required. It will not only save a huge amount of human brain-power and dramatically improve accuracy, but this package will also be an intelligent tool to assist researchers in finding the right approaches to their problems. Several applications of this symbolic vector analysis package to plasma physics are also given.

  16. Physics issues in long pulse plasma confinement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Itoh, Kimitaka; Toda, Shinichiro; Sanuki, Heiji [National Institute for Fusion Science, Toki, Gifu (Japan); Itoh, Sanae-I; Yagi, Masatoshi [Research Institute for Applied Mechanics, Kyushu University, Kasuga, Fukuoka (Japan); Fukuyama, Atsushi [Department of Nuclear Engineering, Kyoto University, Kyoto (Japan)

    2000-07-01

    Physics in the steady-state or long time discharge are illustrated from the view point of generic toroidal plasmas. Issues include physics process with very long time scale, dynamical phenomena of various time scales, transition nature under very slow temporal variations of parameters, statistical occurrence of transition and life time and identification of minimum circulating power. Nonlinear dependencies of transport properties of density, temperature, current, electric field and poloidal magnetic field cause self-organized dynamics. A picture of stationary oscillatory states is presented from a unified picture of nonlinear limit cycle dynamics. It is emphasized that the long time asymptotics are determined by the structure formation mechanisms. The sustainment needs a circulating power, and the circulating power in steady state plasma is also discussed. (author)

  17. DEVELOPMENT OF MULTI-COORDINATE VOCABULARY, PLASMA PHYSICS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    LERNER, RITA G.

    DESCRIBED IS THE DEVELOPMENT OF A THESAURUS FOR THE FIELD OF PLASMA PHYSICS, SIMILAR TO THE ONE PREVIOUSLY DEVELOPED FOR CHEMICAL PHYSICS, FOR USE WITH COMPUTER-ORIENTED RETRIEVAL SYSTEMS. AN EXPERT IN THE FIELD OF PLASMA PHYSICS SELECTED TERMS IMPORTANT TO THE INFORMATION USER FROM THE PLASMA LITERATURE. THE HIERARCHY OF CLASSIFICATION UTILIZES…

  18. Statistical Physics Experiments Using Dusty Plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goree, John

    2016-10-01

    Compared to other areas of physics research, Statistical Physics is heavily dominated by theory, with comparatively little experiment. One reason for the lack of experiments is the impracticality of tracking of individual atoms and molecules within a substance. Thus, there is a need for a different kind of experimental system, one where individual particles not only move stochastically as they collide with one another, but also are large enough to allow tracking. A dusty plasma can meet this need. A dusty plasma is a partially ionized gas containing small particles of solid matter. These micron-size particles gain thousands of electronic charges by collecting more electrons than ions. Their motions are dominated by Coulomb collisions with neighboring particles. In this so-called strongly coupled plasma, the dust particles self-organize in much the same way as atoms in a liquid or solid. Unlike atoms, however, these particles are large and slow, so that they can be tracked easily by video microscopy. Advantages of dusty plasma for experimental statistical physics research include particle tracking, lack of frictional contact with solid surfaces, and avoidance of overdamped motion. Moreover, the motion of a collection of dust particles can mimic an equilibrium system with a Maxwellian velocity distribution, even though the dust particles themselves are not truly in thermal equilibrium. Nonequilibrium statistical physics can be studied by applying gradients, for example by imposing a shear flow. In this talk I will review some of our recent experiments with shear flow. First, we performed the first experimental test to verify the Fluctuation Theorem for a shear flow, showing that brief violations of the Second Law of Thermodynamics occur with the predicted probabilities, for a small system. Second, we discovered a skewness of a shear-stress distribution in a shear flow. This skewness is a phenomenon that likely has wide applicability in nonequilibrium steady states

  19. A plasma formulary for physics, technology, and astrophysics

    CERN Document Server

    Diver, Declan

    2011-01-01

    Plasma physics has matured rapidly as a discipline, and now touches on many different research areas, including manufacturing processes. This collection of fundamental formulae and definitions in plasma physics is vital to anyone with an interest in plasmas or ionized gases, whether in physics, astronomy or engineering.Both theorists and experimentalists will find this book useful, as it incorporates the latest results and findings.The text treats astrophysical plasmas, fusion plasmas, industrial plasmas and low temperature plasmas as aspects of the same discipline - a unique approach made pos

  20. Plasma Physics and Controlled Nuclear Fusion

    CERN Document Server

    Miyamoto, Kenro

    2005-01-01

    The primary objectives of this book are, firstly, to present the essential theoretical background needed to understand recent fusion research and, secondly, to describe the current status of fusion research for graduate students and senior undergraduates. It will also serve as a useful reference for scientists and engineers working in the related fields. In Part I, Plasma Physics, the author explains the basics of magneto-hydrodynamics and kinetic theory in a simple and compact way and, at the same time, covers important new topics for fusion studies such as the ballooning representation, instabilities driven by energetic particles and various plasma models for computer simulations. Part II, Controlled Nuclear Fusion, attempts to review the "big picture" in fusion research. All important phenomena and technologies are addressed, with a particular emphasis on the topics of most concern in current research.

  1. Physics of Collisional Plasmas Introduction to High-Frequency Discharges

    CERN Document Server

    Moisan, Michel

    2012-01-01

    The Physics of Collisional Plasmas deals with the plasma physics of interest to laboratory research and industrial applications, such as lighting, fabrication of microelectronics, destruction of greenhouse gases. Its emphasis is on explaining the physical mechanisms, rather than the detailed mathematical description and theoretical analysis. At the introductory level, it is important to convey the characteristic physical phenomena of plasmas, before addressing the ultimate formalism of kinetic theory, with its microscopic, statistical mechanics approach. To this aim, this text translates the physical phenomena into more tractable equations, using the hydrodynamic model; this considers the plasma as a fluid, in which the macroscopic physical parameters are the statistical averages of the microscopic (individual) parameters. This book is an introduction to the physics of collisional plasmas, as opposed to plasmas in space. It is intended for graduate students in physics and engineering . The first chapter intr...

  2. Physics of the quark - gluon plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2001-09-01

    This document gathers 31 contributions to the workshop on the physics of quark-gluon plasma that took place in Palaiseau in september 2001: 1) gamma production in heavy collisions, 2) BRAHMS, 3) experimental conference summary, 4) modelling relativistic nuclear collisions, 5) microscopic reaction dynamics at SPS and RHIC, 6) direct gamma and hard scattering at SPS, 7) soft physics at RHIC, 8) results from the STAR experiment, 9) quarkonia: experimental possibilities, 10) elliptic flow measurements with PHENIX, 11) charmonium production in p-A collisions, 12) anisotropic flow at the SPS and RHIC, 13) deciphering the space-time evolution of heavy ion collisions with correlation measurements, 14) 2-particle correlation at RHIC, 15) particle spectra at AGS, SPS and RHIC, 16) strangeness production in STAR, 17) strangeness production in Pb-Pb collisions at SPS, 18) heavy ion physics at CERN after 2000 and before LHC, 19) NEXUS guideline and theoretical consistency, 20) introduction to high p{sub T} physics at RHIC, 21) a novel quasiparticle description of the quark-gluon plasma, 22) dissociation of excited quarkonia states, 23) high-mass dimuon and B {yields} J/{psi} production in ultrarelativistic heavy ion collisions, 24) strange hyperon production in p + p and p + Pb interactions from NA49, 25) heavy quarkonium hadron cross-section, 26) a new method of flow analysis, 27) low mass dilepton production and chiral symmetry restoration, 28) classical initial conditions for nucleus-nucleus collisions, 29) numerical calculation of quenching weights, 30) strangeness enhancement energy dependence, and 31) heavy quarkonium dissociation.

  3. Testing Plasma Physics in the Ionosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papadopoulos, Konstantinos

    TESTING PLASMA PHYSICS IN THE IONOSPHERE K. Papadopoulos University of Maryland College Park, MD 20742 Ionospheric heaters supplemented by ground and space based diagnostic instruments, such as radars, optical cameras and photometers, HF/VLF/ELF/ULF receivers and magnetometers, radio beacons, riometers and ionosondes have for a long time being used to conduct plasma physics, geophysical and radio science investigations. The latest entry to ionospheric heating, the HF transmitter associated with the High Frequency Active Ionospheric Research Program (HAARP), was completed in February 2007. The transmitter consists of 180 antenna elements spanning 30.6 acres and can radiate 3.6 MW of HF power in the 2.8-10.0 MHz frequency range. With increasing frequency the beam-width varies from 15-5 degrees, corresponding to 20-30 dB gain and resulting in Effective Radiating Power (ERP) between .36 - 4.0 GW. The antenna can point to any direction in a cone of 30 degrees from the vertical, with a reposition time of 15 degrees in 15 microseconds resulting in super-luminous scanning speeds. The transmitter can synthesize essentially any desired waveform within the regulatory allowed bandwidth in linear and circular polarization. These capabilities far exceed those of previous ionospheric heaters and allow for new frontier research in plasma physics, geophysics and radio science. Following a brief discussion of the relationship of the new capabilities of the facility with thresholds of physical processes that could not be achieved previously, the presentation will discuss recent results in the areas of ULF/ELF/VLF generation and propagation and wave-particle interactions in the magnetosphere acquired with the completed facility. The presentation will conclude with a detailed discussion of possible frontier science experiments in the areas of Langmuir turbulence, parametric instabilities, electron acceleration, optical emissions and field aligned striations and duct generation, made

  4. Physics through the 1990s: Plasmas and fluids

    Science.gov (United States)

    1986-01-01

    The volume contains recommendations for programs in, and government support of, plasma and fluid physics. Four broad areas are covered: the physics of fluids, general plasma physics, fusion, and space and astrophysical plasmas. In the first section, the accomplishments of fluid physics and a detailed review of its sub-fields, such as combustion, non-Newtonian fluids, turbulence, aerodynamics, and geophysical fluid dynamics, are described. The general plasma physics section deals with the wide scope of the theoretical concepts involved in plasma research, and with the machines; intense beam systems, collective and laser-driven accelerators, and the associated diagnostics. The section on the fusion plasma research program examines confinement and heating systems, such as Tokamaks, magnetic mirrors, and inertial-confinement systems, and several others. Finally, theory and experiment in space and astrophysical plasma research is detailed, ranging from the laboratory to the solar system and beyond. A glossary is included.

  5. The Earth's ionosphere plasma physics and electrodynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Kelley, Michael C

    2007-01-01

    Although interesting in its own right, due to the ever-increasing use of satellites for communication and navigation, weather in the ionosphere is of great concern. Every such system uses trans-ionospheric propagation of radio waves, waves which must traverse the commonly turbulent ionosphere. Understanding this turbulence and predicting it are one of the major goals of the National Space Weather program. Acquiring such a prediction capability will rest on understanding the very topics of this book, the plasma physics and electrodynamics of the system. Fully updated to reflect advances in the field in the 20 years since the first edition published Explores the buffeting of the ionosphere from above by the sun and from below by the lower atmosphere Unique text appropriate both as a reference and for coursework.

  6. High Temperature Plasmas Theory and Mathematical Tools for Laser and Fusion Plasmas

    CERN Document Server

    Spatschek, Karl-Heinz

    2012-01-01

    Filling the gap for a treatment of the subject as an advanced course in theoretical physics with a huge potential for future applications, this monograph discusses aspects of these applications and provides theoretical methods and tools for their investigation. Throughout this coherent and up-to-date work the main emphasis is on classical plasmas at high-temperatures, drawing on the experienced author's specialist background. As such, it covers the key areas of magnetic fusion plasma, laser-plasma-interaction and astrophysical plasmas, while also including nonlinear waves and phenomena.

  7. Fusion programs in applied plasma physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1992-02-01

    The objectives of the theoretical science program are: To support the interpretation of present experiments and predict the outcome of future planned experiments; to improve on existing models and codes and validate against experimental results; and to conduct theoretical physics development of advanced concepts with applications for DIII-D and future devices. Major accomplishments in FY91 include the corroboration between theory and experiment on MHD behavior in the second stable regime of operation on DIII-D, and the frequency and mode structure of toroidal Alfven eigenmodes in high beta, shaped plasmas. We have made significant advances in the development of the gyro-Landau fluid approach to turbulence simulation which more accurately models kinetic drive and damping mechanisms. Several theoretical models to explain the bifurcation phenomenon in L- to H-mode transition were proposed providing the theoretical basis for future experimental verification. The capabilities of new rf codes have been upgraded in response to the expanding needs of the rf experiments. Codes are being employed to plan for a fully non-inductive current drive experiment in a high beta, enhanced confinement regime. GA's experimental effort in Applied Physics encompasses two advanced diagnostics essential for the operation of future fusion experiments: Alpha particle diagnostic, and current and density profile diagnostics. This paper discusses research in all these topics.

  8. Physical processes associated with current collection by plasma contactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katz, Ira; Davis, Victoria A.

    1990-01-01

    Recent flight data confirms laboratory observations that the release of neutral gas increases plasma sheath currents. Plasma contactors are devices which release a partially ionized gas in order to enhance the current flow between a spacecraft and the space plasma. Ionization of the expellant gas and the formation of a double layer between the anode plasma and the space plasma are the dominant physical processes. A theory is presented of the interaction between the contactor plasma and the background plasma. The conditions for formation of a double layer between the two plasmas are derived. Double layer formation is shown to be a consequence of the nonlinear response of the plasmas to changes in potential. Numerical calculations based upon this model are compared with laboratory measurements of current collection by hollow cathode-based plasma contactors.

  9. Direct acceleration of electrons by a CO2 laser in a curved plasma waveguide

    OpenAIRE

    Longqing Yi; Alexander Pukhov; Baifei Shen

    2016-01-01

    Laser plasma interaction with micro-engineered targets at relativistic intensities has been greatly promoted by recent progress in the high contrast lasers and the manufacture of advanced micro- and nano-structures. This opens new possibilities for the physics of laser-matter interaction. Here we propose a novel approach that leverages the advantages of high-pressure CO$_{2}$ laser, laser-waveguide interaction, as well as micro-engineered plasma structure to accelerate electrons to peak energ...

  10. Transport Physics in Reversed Shear Plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Levinton, F.M.; Batha, S.H. [Fusion Physics and Technology, Inc., Torrance, CA (United States); Beer, M.A.; Bell, M.G.; Budny, R.V.; Efthimion, P.C.; Mazzucato, E.; Nazikian, R.; Park, H.K.; Ramsey, A.T.; Schmidt, G.L.; Scott, S.D.; Synakowski, E.J.; Taylor, G.; Von Goeler, S.; Zarnstorff, M.C. [Princeton University, NJ (United States). Plasma Physics Laboratory; Bush, C.E. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1997-12-31

    Reversed magnetic shear is considered a good candidate for improving the tokamak concept because it has the potential to stabilize MHD instabilities and reduce particle and energy transport. With reduced transport the high pressure gradient would generate a strong off-axis bootstrap current and could sustain a hollow current density profile. Such a combination of favorable conditions could lead to an attractive steady-state tokamak configuration. Indeed, a new tokamak confinement regime with reversed magnetic shear has been observed on the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) where the particle, momentum, and ion thermal diffusivities drop precipitously, by over an order of magnitude. The particle diffusivity drops to the neoclassical level and the ion thermal diffusivity drops to much less than the neoclassical value in the region with reversed shear. This enhanced reversed shear (ERS) confinement mode is characterized by an abrupt transition with a large rate of rise of the density in the reversed shear region during neutral beam injection, resulting in nearly a factor of three increase in the central density to 1.2 X 10(exp 20) cube m. At the same time the density fluctuation level in the reversed shear region dramatically decreases. The ion and electron temperatures, which are about 20 keV and 7 keV respectively, change little during the ERS mode. The transport and transition into and out of the ERS mode have been studied on TFTR with plasma currents in the range 0.9-2.2 MA, with a toroidal magnetic field of 2.7-4.6 T, and the radius of the q(r) minimum, q{sub min}, has been varied from r/a = 0.35 to 0.55. Toroidal field and co/counter neutral beam injection toroidal rotation variations have been used to elucidate the underlying physics of the transition mechanism and power threshold of the ERS mode.

  11. Dynacore Final Report , Plasma Physics prototype

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lourens, W.

    2001-01-01

    The generation and behaviour of plasma in a fusion device and its interaction with sur-rounding materials is studied by observing several phenomena that will accompany a plasma discharge. These phenomena are recorded by means of so called Diagnostics. These are instruments that comprise complex elec

  12. Space plasma physics results from Spacelab 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burch, J. L.

    1985-01-01

    The Spacelab 1 payload carried several instrument systems which together investigated a number of space plasma phenomena. These experiments used the Space Shuttle Orbiter as a platform for making controlled particle-beam, plasma and neutral gas inputs to the ionosphere and magnetosphere and for observing the outputs produced. Spacelab 1 space-plasma investigations included the Space Experiments with Particle Accelerators (SEPAC), Phenomena Induced by Charged Particle Beams (PICPAB), Atmospheric Emissions Photometric Imaging (AEPI) and the Low Energy Electron Spectrometer and Magnetometer. Among the major phenomena investigated both singly and jointly by these experiments are vehicle charging and neutralization, beam-plasma and wave-particle interactions, anomalous ionization phenomena produced by neutral-gas and plasma injections and several phenomena induced by modulated particle beam injections.

  13. Measuring electron-positron annihilation radiation from laser plasma interactionsa)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Hui; Tommasini, R.; Seely, J.; Szabo, C. I.; Feldman, U.; Pereira, N.; Gregori, G.; Falk, K.; Mithen, J.; Murphy, C. D.

    2012-10-01

    We investigated various diagnostic techniques to measure the 511 keV annihilation radiations. These include step-wedge filters, transmission crystal spectroscopy, single-hit CCD detectors, and streaked scintillating detection. While none of the diagnostics recorded conclusive results, the step-wedge filter that is sensitive to the energy range between 100 keV and 700 keV shows a signal around 500 keV that is clearly departing from a pure Bremsstrahlung spectrum and that we ascribe to annihilation radiation.

  14. Mitigating Particle Integration Error in Relativistic Laser-Plasma Simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higuera, Adam; Weichmann, Kathleen; Cowan, Benjamin; Cary, John

    2016-10-01

    In particle-in-cell simulations of laser wakefield accelerators with a0 greater than unity, errors in particle trajectories produce incorrect beam charges and energies, predicting performance not realized in experiments such as the Texas Petawatt Laser. In order to avoid these errors, the simulation time step must resolve a time scale smaller than the laser period by a factor of a0. If the Yee scheme advances the fields with this time step, the laser wavelength must be over-resolved by a factor of a0 to avoid dispersion errors. Here is presented and demonstrated with Vorpal simulations, a new electromagnetic algorithm, building on previous work, correcting Yee dispersion for arbitrary sub-CFL time steps, reducing simulation times by a0.

  15. Thomson parabola ion analyzer for laser-plasma studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slater, D C

    1978-10-01

    A compact, flexible design for a parallel-fields ion analyzer is presented. Accurate ion velocity and charge state measurements can be obtained over a wide range without the need for calibration sources. Etchable cellulose-nitrate foil is used to record individual ion tracks.

  16. Optical transverse injection in laser-plasma acceleration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehe, R; Lifschitz, A F; Davoine, X; Thaury, C; Malka, V

    2013-08-23

    Laser-wakefield acceleration constitutes a promising technology for future electron accelerators. A crucial step in such an accelerator is the injection of electrons into the wakefield, which will largely determine the properties of the extracted beam. We present here a new paradigm of colliding-pulse injection, which allows us to generate high-quality electron bunches having both a very low emittance (0.17 mm·mrad) and a low energy spread (2%), while retaining a high charge (~100 pC) and a short duration (3 fs). In this paradigm, the pulse collision provokes a transient expansion of the accelerating bubble, which then leads to transverse electron injection. This mechanism contrasts with previously observed optical injection mechanisms, which were essentially longitudinal. We also specify the range of parameters in which this new type of injection occurs and show that it is within reach of existing high-intensity laser facilities.

  17. Laser plasma accelerator driven by a super-Gaussian pulse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ostermayr, Tobias; Petrovics, Stefan; Iqbal, Khalid; Klier, Constantin; Ruhl, Hartmut; Nakajima, Kazuhisa; Deng, Aihua; Zhang, Xiaomei; Shen, Baifei; Liu, Jiansheng; Li, Ruxin; Xu, Zhizhan; Tajima, Toshiki; Tajima

    2012-08-01

    A laser wakefield accelerator (LWFA) with a weak focusing force is considered to seek improved beam quality in LWFA. We employ super-Gaussian laser pulses to generate the wakefield and study the behavior of the electron beam dynamics and synchrotron radiation arising from the transverse betatron oscillations through analysis and computation. We note that the super-Gaussian wakefields radically reduce the betatron oscillations and make the electron orbits mainly ballistic over a single stage. This feature permits to obtain small emittance and thus high luminosity, while still benefitting from the low-density operation of LWFA (Nakajima et al. 2011 Phys. Rev. ST Accel. Beams 14, 091301), such as the reduced radiation loss, less number of stages, less beam instabilities, and less required wall plug power than in higher density regimes.

  18. Energy limitation of laser-plasma electron accelerators

    CERN Document Server

    Cardenas, D E; Xu, J; Hofmann, L; Buck, A; Schmid, K; Sears, C M S; Rivas, D E; Shen, B; Veisz, L

    2015-01-01

    We report on systematic and high-precision measurements of dephasing, an effect that fundamentally limits the performance of laser wakefield accelerators. Utilizing shock-front injection, a technique providing stable, tunable and high-quality electron bunches, acceleration and deceleration of few-MeV quasi-monoenergetic beams were measured with sub-5-fs and 8-fs laser pulses. Typical density dependent electron energy evolution with 65-300 micrometers dephasing length and 6-20 MeV peak energy was observed and is well described with a simple model.

  19. Dense monoenergetic proton beams from chirped laser-plasma interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galow, Benjamin J; Salamin, Yousef I; Liseykina, Tatyana V; Harman, Zoltán; Keitel, Christoph H

    2011-10-28

    Interaction of a frequency-chirped laser pulse with single protons and a hydrogen gas target is studied analytically and by means of particle-in-cell simulations, respectively. The feasibility of generating ultraintense (10(7) particles per bunch) and phase-space collimated beams of protons (energy spread of about 1%) is demonstrated. Phase synchronization of the protons and the laser field, guaranteed by the appropriate chirping of the laser pulse, allows the particles to gain sufficient kinetic energy (around 250 MeV) required for such applications as hadron cancer therapy, from state-of-the-art laser systems of intensities of the order of 10(21) W/cm(2).

  20. Laser-plasma interactions and implosion symmetry in rugby hohlraums

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michel, Pierre; Berger, R. L.; Lasinski, B. F.; Ross, J. S.; Divol, L.; Williams, E. A.; Meeker, D.; Langdon, B. A.; Park, H.; Amendt, P.

    2011-10-01

    Cross-beam energy transfer is studied in the context of ``rugby''-hohlraum experiments at the Omega laser facility in FY11, in preparation for future NIF experiments. The transfer acts in opposite direction between rugby and cylinder hohlraums due to the different beam pointing geometries and flow patterns. Its interaction with backscatter is also different as both happen in similar regions inside rugby hohlraums. We will analyze the effects of non-linearities and temporal beam smoothing on energy transfer using the code pF3d. Calculations will be compared to experiments at Omega; analysis of future rugby hohlraum experiments on NIF will also be presented. This work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  1. Electromagnetic (EM) Wave Attachment to Laser Plasma Filaments

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-05-01

    having a time harmonic dependence of e’(A*-«t)_ [This derivation follows those found in Jackson (ref. 24) or Pozar (ref. 17) and many other E&M...approach used by Pozar in his microwave engineering text (ref. 17) will be used. Begin with the power equation for a TEM transmission line p = p0e~ az P...111; 2001. 17. Pozar , David M.; Microwave Engineering, Second Edition, Wiley. 18. Lewellen, J.W.; Noonan, J.; Phys. Rev. Special Topics

  2. Spatial characteristics of Kα radiation from weakly relativistic laser plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eder, D. C.; Pretzler, G.; Fill, E.; Eidmann, K.; Saemann, A.

    The spatial dependence of Kα emission generated from laser-produced hot electrons is investigated experimentally and theoretically. In addition, the conversion efficiency of Kα production as a function of laser intensity is measured and compared with modeling results. We use the terawatt Ti:sapphire laser at MPQ and vary the peak intensity from 1015 to 1018 W/cm2 with a pulse duration of 200 fs. A solid Cu target is placed at various positions in the laser focus, which allows one to vary the intensity but keep the total energy on the target constant. When the target is near best focus, the FWHM of the Kα emission, measured using a knife-edge, is considerably larger than the FWHM of the laser intensity. In measuring the efficiency of Kα production using the fundamental wavelength of the laser, a clear maximum of Kα emission is observed at a position away from best focus, where the peak intensity is down by more than an order of magnitude from the value at best focus. When the second harmonic of the laser is used, the Kα emission is peaked near best focus. The Kα emission from layer targets is used to obtain an estimate of the temperature of the hot electrons. Modeling of Kα production, using a Monte Carlo electron/photon transport code, shows the relationship between incident electron energy and the emitted Kα emission. Efficient Kα generation from the low-intensity wings of the laser pulse contributes to the large spot size of the Kα emission. The lower electron temperatures that are expected for the second harmonic explain the differences in the location of maximum Kα emission for the two wavelengths. We discuss the use of Kα emission in photoionizing inner-shell electrons with the goal of achieving X-ray lasing at short wavelengths.

  3. A Novel Source of Mesoscopic Particles for Laser Plasma Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-12-16

    05/2016 DISTRIBUTION A: Distribution approved for public release. AF Office Of Scientific Research (AFOSR)/ IOA Arlington, Virginia 22203 Air Force...particles is obtained (gas pulsing is essential to maintain the vacuum level). To visualise the particles, a shadowgraph based imag- ing set up was

  4. Measuring electron-positron annihilation radiation from laser plasma interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Hui; Tommasini, R. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94551 (United States); Seely, J.; Szabo, C. I.; Feldman, U.; Pereira, N. [Artep Inc., Ellicott City, Maryland 21042 (United States); Gregori, G.; Falk, K.; Mithen, J.; Murphy, C. D. [Clarendon Laboratory, University of Oxford, Oxford OX1 3PU (United Kingdom)

    2012-10-15

    We investigated various diagnostic techniques to measure the 511 keV annihilation radiations. These include step-wedge filters, transmission crystal spectroscopy, single-hit CCD detectors, and streaked scintillating detection. While none of the diagnostics recorded conclusive results, the step-wedge filter that is sensitive to the energy range between 100 keV and 700 keV shows a signal around 500 keV that is clearly departing from a pure Bremsstrahlung spectrum and that we ascribe to annihilation radiation.

  5. Dense monoenergetic proton beams from chirped laser-plasma interaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Galow, Benjamin J.; Keitel, Christoph H. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Kernphysik, Saupfercheckweg 1, Heidelberg (Germany); Salamin, Yousef I. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Kernphysik, Saupfercheckweg 1, Heidelberg (Germany); Department of Physics, American University of Sharjah, POB 26666, Sharjah (United Arab Emirates); Liseykina, Tatyana V. [Institut fuer Physik, Universitaet Rostock, 18051 Rostock (Germany); Harman, Zoltan [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Kernphysik, Saupfercheckweg 1, Heidelberg (Germany); ExtreMe Matter Institute EMMI, Planckstrasse 1, 64291 Darmstadt (Germany)

    2012-07-01

    Interaction of a frequency-chirped laser pulse with single protons and a hydrogen gas target is studied analytically and by means of particle-in-cell simulations, respectively. Feasibility of generating ultra-intense (10{sup 7} particles per bunch) and phase-space collimated beams of protons (energy spread of about 1%) is demonstrated. Phase synchronization of the protons and the laser field, guaranteed by the appropriate chirping of the laser pulse, allows the particles to gain sufficient kinetic energy (around 250 MeV) required for such applications as hadron cancer therapy, from state-of-the-art laser systems of intensities of the order of 10{sup 21} W/cm{sup 2}.

  6. Dense monoenergetic proton beams from chirped laser-plasma interaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Jianxing; Galow, Benjamin J.; Keitel, Christoph H. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Kernphysik, Saupfercheckweg 1, Heidelberg (Germany); Salamin, Yousef I. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Kernphysik, Saupfercheckweg 1, Heidelberg (Germany); Department of Physics, American University of Sharjah, POB 26666, Sharjah (United Arab Emirates); Harman, Zoltan [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Kernphysik, Saupfercheckweg 1, Heidelberg (Germany); ExtreMe Matter Institute EMMI, Planckstrasse 1, 64291 Darmstadt (Germany)

    2013-07-01

    Interactions of linearly and radially polarized frequency-chirped laser pulses with single protons and hydrogen gas targets are studied analytically and by means of particle-in-cell simulations, respectively. The feasibility of generating ultra-intense (10{sup 7} particles per bunch) and phase-space collimated beams of protons is demonstrated. Phase synchronization of the protons and the laser field, guaranteed by the appropriate chirping of the laser pulse, allows the particles to gain sufficient kinetic energy (around 250 MeV) required for such applications as hadron cancer therapy, from state-of-the-art laser systems of intensities of the order of 10{sup 21} W/cm{sup 2}.

  7. Holographic Imaging of Evolving Laser-Plasma Structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Downer, Michael [Univ. of Texas, Austin, TX (United States); Shvets, G. [Univ. of Texas, Austin, TX (United States)

    2014-07-31

    In the 1870s, English photographer Eadweard Muybridge captured motion pictures within one cycle of a horse’s gallop, which settled a hotly debated question of his time by showing that the horse became temporarily airborne. In the 1940s, Manhattan project photographer Berlin Brixner captured a nuclear blast at a million frames per second, and resolved a dispute about the explosion’s shape and speed. In this project, we developed methods to capture detailed motion pictures of evolving, light-velocity objects created by a laser pulse propagating through matter. These objects include electron density waves used to accelerate charged particles, laser-induced refractive index changes used for micromachining, and ionization tracks used for atmospheric chemical analysis, guide star creation and ranging. Our “movies”, like Muybridge’s and Brixner’s, are obtained in one shot, since the laser-created objects of interest are insufficiently repeatable for accurate stroboscopic imaging. Our high-speed photographs have begun to resolve controversies about how laser-created objects form and evolve, questions that previously could be addressed only by intensive computer simulations based on estimated initial conditions. Resolving such questions helps develop better tabletop particle accelerators, atmospheric ranging devices and many other applications of laser-matter interactions. Our photographic methods all begin by splitting one or more “probe” pulses from the laser pulse that creates the light-speed object. A probe illuminates the object and obtains information about its structure without altering it. We developed three single-shot visualization methods that differ in how the probes interact with the object of interest or are recorded. (1) Frequency-Domain Holography (FDH). In FDH, there are 2 probes, like “object” and “reference” beams in conventional holography. Our “object” probe surrounds the light-speed object, like a fleas swarming around a sprinting animal. The object modifies the probe, imprinting information about its structure. Meanwhile, our “reference” probe co-propagates ahead of the object, free of its influence. After the interaction, object and reference combine to record a hologram. For technical reasons, our recording device is a spectrometer (a frequency-measuring device), hence the name “frequency-domain” holography. We read the hologram electronically to obtain a “snapshot” of the object’s average structure as it transits the medium. Our published work shows numerous snapshots of electron density waves (“laser wakes”) in ionized gas (“plasma”), analogous to a water wake behind a boat. Such waves are the basis of tabletop particle accelerators, in which charged particles surf on the light-speed wave, gaining energy. Comparing our snapshots to computer simulations deepens understanding of laser wakes. FDH takes snapshots of objects that are quasi-static --- i.e. like Muybridge’s horse standing still on a treadmill. If the object changes shape, FDH images blur, as when a subject moves while a camera shutter is open. Many laser-generated objects of interest do evolve as they propagate. To overcome this limit of FDH, we developed .... (2) Frequency-Domain Tomography (FDT). In FDT, 5 to 10 probe pulses are fired simultaneously across the object’s path at different angles, like a crossfire of bullets. The object imprints a “streaked” record of its evolution on each probe, which we record as in FDH, then recover a multi-frame “movie” of the object’s evolving structure using algorithms of computerized tomography. When propagation distance exceeds a few millimeters, reconstructed FDT images distort. This is because the lenses that image probes to detector have limited depth of field, like cameras that cannot focus simultaneously on both nearby and distant objects. But some laser-generated objects of interest propagate over meters. For these applications we developed … (3) Multi-Object-Plane Phase-Contrast Imaging (MOP-PCI). In MOP-PCI, we image FDT-like prob

  8. Dynamics of Molecular Emission Features from Nanosecond, Femtosecond Laser and Filament Ablation Plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harilal, Sivanandan S.; Yeak, J.; Brumfield, Brian E.; Suter, Jonathan D.; Phillips, Mark C.

    2016-06-15

    The evolutionary paths of molecular species and nanoparticles in laser ablation plumes are not well understood due to the complexity of numerous physical processes that occur simultaneously in a transient laser-plasma system. It is well known that the emission features of ions, atoms, molecules and nanoparticles in a laser ablation plume strongly depend on the laser irradiation conditions. In this letter we report the temporal emission features of AlO molecules in plasmas generated using a nanosecond laser, a femtosecond laser and filaments generated from a femtosecond laser. Our results show that, at a fixed laser energy, the persistence of AlO is found to be highest and lowest in ns and filament laser plasmas respectively while molecular species are formed at early times for both ultrashort pulse (fs and filament) generated plasmas. Analysis of the AlO emission band features show that the vibrational temperature of AlO decays rapidly in filament assisted laser ablation plumes.

  9. A Physics Exploratory Experiment on Plasma Liner Formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thio, Y. C. Francis; Knapp, Charles E.; Kirkpatrick, Ronald C.; Siemon, Richard E.; Turchi, Peter

    2002-01-01

    Momentum flux for imploding a target plasma in magnetized target fusion (MTF) may be delivered by an array of plasma guns launching plasma jets that would merge to form an imploding plasma shell (liner). In this paper, we examine what would be a worthwhile experiment to do in order to explore the dynamics of merging plasma jets to form a plasma liner as a first step in establishing an experimental database for plasma-jets driven magnetized target fusion (PJETS-MTF). Using past experience in fusion energy research as a model, we envisage a four-phase program to advance the art of PJETS-MTF to fusion breakeven Q is approximately 1). The experiment (PLX (Plasma Liner Physics Exploratory Experiment)) described in this paper serves as Phase I of this four-phase program. The logic underlying the selection of the experimental parameters is presented. The experiment consists of using twelve plasma guns arranged in a circle, launching plasma jets towards the center of a vacuum chamber. The velocity of the plasma jets chosen is 200 km/s, and each jet is to carry a mass of 0.2 mg - 0.4 mg. A candidate plasma accelerator for launching these jets consists of a coaxial plasma gun of the Marshall type.

  10. Regular physical activity influences plasma ghrelin concentration in adolescent girls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jürimäe, Jaak; Cicchella, Antonio; Jürimäe, Toivo; Lätt, Evelin; Haljaste, Kaja; Purge, Pritt; Hamra, Jena; von Duvillard, Serge P

    2007-10-01

    We examined the effect of regular physical activity on plasma ghrelin concentration after onset of puberty in girls. In addition, we also examined the association of fasting plasma ghrelin concentration with various plasma biochemical, body composition, and aerobic capacity variables in healthy adolescent girls. Fifty healthy schoolgirls ages 11 to 16 yr were divided either into a physically active (N = 25) or a physically inactive (N = 25) group. The physically active group consisted of swimmers who had trained on an average of 6.2 +/- 2.0 h.wk(-1) for the last 2 yr, whereas the inclusion criterion for the physically inactive group was the participation in physical education classes only. The subjects were matched for age (+/- 1 yr) and body mass index (BMI; +/- 2 kg.m(-2)). Maturation I group (14 matched pairs) included pubertal stages 2 and 3, and maturation II group (11 matched pairs) included pubertal stages 4 and 5. Physically active girls had significantly higher (P ghrelin levels than the physically inactive girls (maturation I: 1152.1 +/- 312.9 vs 877.7 +/- 114.8 pg.mL(-1); maturation II: 1084.0 +/- 252.5 vs 793.4 +/- 164.9 pg.mL(-1)). Plasma ghrelin concentration was negatively related to percent body fat, fat mass, peak oxygen consumption per kilogram of body mass, leptin, estradiol, insulin, and insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I) (r > -0.298; P ghrelin concentration using the variables that were significantly associated with ghrelin concentration demonstrated that plasma IGF-I was the most important predictor of plasma ghrelin concentration (beta = -0.396; P = 0.008). Regular physical activity influences plasma ghrelin concentrations in girls with different pubertal maturation levels. Plasma IGF-I concentration seems to be the main determinant of circulating ghrelin in healthy, normal-weight adolescent girls.

  11. Fundamentals of plasma physics and controlled fusion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miyamoto, Kenro

    2000-10-01

    The present lecture note was written to fill a gap between text books for undergraduates and specific review articles written by specialists for their young colleagues. The note may be divided in three parts. The first part is on basic characteristics of a plasma in a magnetic field. The second part describes plasma confinement and heating with an emphasis on magnetohydrodynamic instabilities. In addition, propagation of plasma waves, plasma heating by electromagnetic waves are given. The third part is devoted to various specific concepts of nuclear fusion. Emphases are placed on toroidal devices, especially on tokamak devices and stellarators. One might feel heavy mathematics glimpsing the present note, especially in the part treating magnetohydrodynamic instabilities. (author)

  12. Physics of collapses in toroidal helical plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Itoh, Kimitaka [National Inst. for Fusion Science, Toki, Gifu (Japan); Itoh, Sanae; Fukuyama, Atsushi; Yagi, Masatoshi

    1998-12-31

    Theoretical model for the collapse events in toroidal helical plasmas with magnetic hill is presented. There exists a turbulent-turbulent transition at a critical pressure gradient, leading to a sudden increase of the anomalous transport. When the magnetic shear is low, the nonlinear excitation of the global mode is possible. This model explains an abrupt growth of the perturbations, i.e., the trigger phenomena. Achievable limit of the plasma beta value is discussed. (author)

  13. Town Meeting on Plasma Physics at the National Science Foundation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-11-01

    We invite you to the Town Meeting on the role of the National Science Foundation (NSF) in supporting basic and applied research in Plasma Physics in the U.S. The overarching goal of NSF is to promote the progress of science and to enable training of the next generation of scientists and engineers at US colleges and universities. In this context, the role of the NSF Physics Division in leading the nearly 20 year old NSF/DOE Partnership in Basic Plasma Science and Engineering serves as an example of the long history of NSF support for basic plasma physics research. Yet, the NSF interest in maintaining a healthy university research base in plasma sciences extends across the Foundation. A total of five NSF Divisions are participating in the most recent Partnership solicitation, and a host of other multi-disciplinary and core programs provide opportunities for scientists to perform research on applications of plasma physics to Space & Solar Physics, Astrophysics, Accelerator Science, Material Science, Plasma Medicine, and many sub-disciplines within Engineering. This Town Meeting will provide a chance to discuss the full range of relevant NSF funding opportunities, and to begin a conversation on the present and future role of NSF in stewarding basic plasma science and engineering research at US colleges and universities. We would like to particularly encourage early career scientists and graduate students to participate in this Town Meeting, though everyone is invited to join what we hope to be a lively discussion.

  14. Plasma Physics Issues in Gas Discharge Laser Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-12-01

    WL-TR-92-2087 PLASMA PHYSICS ISSUES IN GAS DISCHARGE LASER DEVELOPMENT AD-A257 735 ALAN GARSCADDEN MARK J. KUSNER J. GARY EDEN WL/POOC-3 WRIGHT...LASERS INFRARED MOLECULAR jAS LASERS UNCLASSIFIED UNCLASSIFIED UNCLASSIFIED UL Plasma Physics Issues in Gas Discharge Laser Development Alan Garscadden...the close coupling between body of work was not generally useful in laser development . vibrationally excited nitrogen and CO or CO2 . In fact. the First

  15. Applications of Symmetry Methods to the Theory of Plasma Physics

    OpenAIRE

    Giampaolo Cicogna; Francesco Ceccherini; Francesco Pegoraro

    2006-01-01

    The theory of plasma physics offers a number of nontrivial examples of partial differential equations, which can be successfully treated with symmetry methods. We propose three different examples which may illustrate the reciprocal advantage of this "interaction" between plasma physics and symmetry techniques. The examples include, in particular, the complete symmetry analysis of system of two PDE's, with the determination of some conditional and partial symmetries, the construction of group-...

  16. Introduction to plasma physics with space, laboratory and astrophysical applications

    CERN Document Server

    Gurnett, Donald A

    2017-01-01

    Introducing basic principles of plasma physics and their applications to space, laboratory and astrophysical plasmas, this new edition provides updated material throughout. Topics covered include single-particle motions, kinetic theory, magnetohydrodynamics, small amplitude waves in hot and cold plasmas, and collisional effects. New additions include the ponderomotive force, tearing instabilities in resistive plasmas and the magnetorotational instability in accretion disks, charged particle acceleration by shocks, and a more in-depth look at nonlinear phenomena. A broad range of applications are explored: planetary magnetospheres and radiation belts, the confinement and stability of plasmas in fusion devices, the propagation of discontinuities and shock waves in the solar wind, and analysis of various types of plasma waves and instabilities that can occur in planetary magnetospheres and laboratory plasma devices. With step-by-step derivations and self-contained introductions to mathematical methods, this book...

  17. PlasmaPy: beginning a community developed Python package for plasma physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Nicholas A.; Huang, Yi-Min; PlasmaPy Collaboration

    2016-10-01

    In recent years, researchers in several disciplines have collaborated on community-developed open source Python packages such as Astropy, SunPy, and SpacePy. These packages provide core functionality, common frameworks for data analysis and visualization, and educational tools. We propose that our community begins the development of PlasmaPy: a new open source core Python package for plasma physics. PlasmaPy could include commonly used functions in plasma physics, easy-to-use plasma simulation codes, Grad-Shafranov solvers, eigenmode solvers, and tools to analyze both simulations and experiments. The development will include modern programming practices such as version control, embedding documentation in the code, unit tests, and avoiding premature optimization. We will describe early code development on PlasmaPy, and discuss plans moving forward. The success of PlasmaPy depends on active community involvement and a welcoming and inclusive environment, so anyone interested in joining this collaboration should contact the authors.

  18. Plasma separation: physical separation at the molecular level

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gueroult, Renaud; Rax, Jean-Marcel; Fisch, Nathaniel J.

    2016-09-01

    Separation techniques are usually divided in two categories depending on the nature of the discriminating property: chemical or physical. Further to this difference, physical and chemical techniques differ in that chemical separation typically occurs at the molecular level, while physical separation techniques commonly operate at the macroscopic scale. Separation based on physical properties can in principle be realized at the molecular or even atomic scale by ionizing the mixture. This is in essence plasma based separation. Due to this fundamental difference, plasma based separation stands out from other separation techniques, and features unique properties. In particular, plasma separation allows separating different elements or chemical compounds based on physical properties. This could prove extremely valuable to separate macroscopically homogeneous mixtures made of substances of similar chemical formulation. Yet, the realization of plasma separation techniques' full potential requires identifying and controlling basic mechanisms in complex plasmas which exhibit suitable separation properties. In this paper, we uncover the potential of plasma separation for various applications, and identify the key physics mechanisms upon which hinges the development of these techniques.

  19. Monte Carlo simulations for plasma physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Okamoto, M.; Murakami, S.; Nakajima, N.; Wang, W.X. [National Inst. for Fusion Science, Toki, Gifu (Japan)

    2000-07-01

    Plasma behaviours are very complicated and the analyses are generally difficult. However, when the collisional processes play an important role in the plasma behaviour, the Monte Carlo method is often employed as a useful tool. For examples, in neutral particle injection heating (NBI heating), electron or ion cyclotron heating, and alpha heating, Coulomb collisions slow down high energetic particles and pitch angle scatter them. These processes are often studied by the Monte Carlo technique and good agreements can be obtained with the experimental results. Recently, Monte Carlo Method has been developed to study fast particle transports associated with heating and generating the radial electric field. Further it is applied to investigating the neoclassical transport in the plasma with steep gradients of density and temperatures which is beyong the conventional neoclassical theory. In this report, we briefly summarize the researches done by the present authors utilizing the Monte Carlo method. (author)

  20. PREFACE: Third International Workshop & Summer School on Plasma Physics 2008

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benova, E.; Dias, F. M.; Lebedev, Yu

    2010-01-01

    The Third International Workshop & Summer School on Plasma Physics (IWSSPP'08) organized by St Kliment Ohridsky University of Sofia, with co-organizers TCPA Foundation, Association EURATOM/IRNRE, The Union of the Physicists in Bulgaria, and the Bulgarian Academy of Sciences was held in Kiten, Bulgaria, at the Black Sea Coast, from 30 June to 5 July 2008. A Special Session on Plasmas for Environmental Issues was co-organised by the Institute of Plasmas and Nuclear Fusion, Lisbon, Portugal and the Laboratory of Plasmas and Energy Conversion, University of Toulouse, France. That puts the beginning of a series in Workshops on Plasmas for Environmental Issues, now as a satellite meeting of the European Physical Society Conference on Plasma Physics. As the previous issues of this scientific meeting (IWSSPP'05, J. Phys.: Conf. Series 44 (2006) and IWSSPP'06, J. Phys.: Conf. Series 63 (2007)), its aim was to stimulate the creation and support of a new generation of young scientists for further development of plasma physics fundamentals and applications, as well as to ensure an interdisciplinary exchange of views and initiate possible collaborations by bringing together scientists from various branches of plasma physics. This volume of Journal of Physics: Conference Series includes 38 papers (invited lectures, contributed talks and posters) devoted to various branches of plasma physics, among them fusion plasma and materials, dc and microwave discharge modelling, transport phenomena in gas discharge plasmas, plasma diagnostics, cross sections and rate constants of elementary processes, material processing, plasma-chemistry and technology. Some of them have been presented by internationally known and recognized specialists in their fields; others are MSc or PhD students' first steps in science. In both cases, we believe they will raise readers' interest. We would like to thank the members of both the International Advisory Committee and the Local Organizing Committee, the