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Sample records for plasma norepinephrine spillover

  1. Norepinephrine spillover from skeletal muscle during exercise in humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Savard, G K; Richter, Erik; Strange, S

    1989-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of increasing muscle mass involvement in dynamic exercise on both sympathetic nervous activation and local hemodynamic variables of individual active and inactive skeletal muscle groups. Six male subjects performed 15-min bouts of one...... in both legs. Arterial and venous plasma concentrations of norepinephrine (NE) and epinephrine were analyzed, and the calculated NE spillover was used as an index of sympathetic nervous activity to the limb. NE spillover increased gradually both in the resting, and to a larger extent in the exercising...... legs, with a steeper rise occurring approximately 70% VO2max. These increases were not associated with any significant changes in leg blood flow or leg vascular conductance at the exercise intensities examined. These results suggest that, as the total active muscle mass increases, the rise...

  2. Effects of renal sympathetic nerve radiofrequency ablation on norepinephrine spillover rate and sympathetic nerve activity in dogs with hypertension

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hang YU

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Objective  To evaluate the validity and explore the mechanism of renal sympathetic denervation (RSD in the treatment of dogs with hypertension reproduced by constriction of abdominal aorta. Methods  The hypertension model was reproduced by constriction of abdominal aorta in 20 adult healthy dogs. These dogs were then randomly divided into the treatment group and control group (10 each. Renal sympathetic nerve radiofrequency ablation was done in treatment group 1 month after modeling. The foreleg blood pressure, sympathetic activity and norepinephrine overflow rate of dogs in two groups were detected before modeling, and 1, 2 and 3 months after modeling, and the trend of the change was also observed. Results  One month after modeling, the systolic blood pressure (SBP, diastolic blood pressure (DBP and mean arterial blood pressure (MAP were elevated significantly in control group (146.7±21.0, 89.0±12.7 and 108.3±14.9mmHg compared with those before modeling (119.5±13.2, 76.5±7.8 and 90.9±8mmHg, P < 0.05. The renal sympathetic activity impulse and norepinephrine spillover rate were also enhanced significantly (P < 0.05. The renal sympathetic nerve activity obviously decreased in the treatment group after the operation, and then increased 2 months after the ablation. The norepinephrine spillover rate in treatment group increased significantly 1 month after modeling (P < 0.05, and decreased after ablation, and it lasted to the end of the experiment (P < 0.05. One and two months after ablation, the norepinephrine spillover rate was lower in treatment group than in control group (P < 0.05. Conclusion  Renal sympathetic nerve radiofrequency ablation significantly inhibits the elevation of norepinephrine spillover rate and sympathetic nerve activity in dogs with hypertension.

  3. Anxiety-induced plasma norepinephrine augmentation increases reactive oxygen species formation by monocytes in essential hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yasunari, Kenichi; Matsui, Tokuzo; Maeda, Kensaku; Nakamura, Munehiro; Watanabe, Takanori; Kiriike, Nobuo

    2006-06-01

    An association between anxiety and depression and increased blood pressure (BP) and cardiovascular disease risk has not been firmly established. We examined the hypothesis that anxiety and depression lead to increased plasma catecholamines and to production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) by mononuclear cells (MNC) in hypertensive individuals. We also studied the role of BP in this effect. In Protocol 1, a cross-sectional study was performed in 146 hypertensive patients to evaluate whether anxiety and depression affect BP and ROS formation by MNC through increasing plasma catecholamines. In Protocol 2, a 6-month randomized controlled trial using a subtherapeutic dose of the alpha(1)-adrenergic receptor antagonist doxazosin (1 mg/day) versus placebo in 86 patients with essential hypertension was performed to determine whether the increase in ROS formation by MNC was independent of BP. In Protocol 1, a significant relationship was observed between the following: trait anxiety and plasma norepinephrine (r = 0.32, P < .01); plasma norepinephrine and ROS formation by MNC (r = 0.36, P < .01); and plasma norepinephrine and systolic, diastolic, and mean BP (r = 0.17, P = .04; r = 0.26, P = .02; r = 0.23, P < .01, respectively). In Protocol 2, subtherapeutic doxazosin treatment (1 mg/day) had no significant effect on BP. However doxazosin significantly decreased ROS formation by MNC compared with placebo (P < .01). Trait anxiety may increase plasma norepinephrine and increase ROS formation by MNC independent of BP in hypertensive patients.

  4. Dietary supplement increases plasma norepinephrine, lipolysis, and metabolic rate in resistance trained men

    OpenAIRE

    Schilling Brian K; Hammond Kelley G; Fisher-Wellman Kelsey H; Bloomer Richard J; Weber Adrianna A; Cole Bradford J

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Correction to Richard J Bloomer, Kelsey H Fisher-Wellman, Kelley G Hammond, Brian K Schilling, Adrianna A Weber and Bradford J Cole: Dietary supplement increases plasma norepinephrine, lipolysis, and metabolic rate in resistance trained men. Journal of the International Society of Sports Nutrition 2009, 6: 4

  5. Dietary supplement increases plasma norepinephrine, lipolysis, and metabolic rate in resistance trained men

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schilling Brian K

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Correction to Richard J Bloomer, Kelsey H Fisher-Wellman, Kelley G Hammond, Brian K Schilling, Adrianna A Weber and Bradford J Cole: Dietary supplement increases plasma norepinephrine, lipolysis, and metabolic rate in resistance trained men. Journal of the International Society of Sports Nutrition 2009, 6: 4

  6. Plasma norepinephrine, blood pressure and heart rate response to graded change in body position.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiorica, V; Kem, D C

    1985-12-01

    In this study, 44 human subjects underwent either an orthostatic postural change (supine to stand, n = 17) or a graded change in body position (head-up) on a tilt-table (n = 27). No significant changes in systolic blood pressure or mean blood pressure were observed during either maneuver; significant increases, under both conditions, were observed in diastolic blood pressure and heart rate. Plasma norepinephrine concentrations after orthostatic position change increased significantly (supine 181 +/- 14 (S.E.M.) pg X ml-1; stand, 472 +/- 35 pg X ml-1, p less than 0.01). Plasma norepinephrine concentrations during graded postural change increased proportionately with increasing degrees of tilt (r = 0.76, p less than 0.01). A significant correlation between plasma norepinephrine and heart rate was observed during both positional change maneuvers (graded tilt-table, r = 0.80, p less than 0.01; orthostatic, r = 0.50, p less than 0.01). These results suggest that the degree of sympathetic nervous system activity for blood pressure regulation during graded postural change is appropriately reflected by plasma norepinephrine concentrations.

  7. Heart rate variability, overnight urinary norepinephrine, and plasma cholesterol in apparently healthy human adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thayer, Julian F; Fischer, Joachim E

    2013-01-20

    The aim of this study was to assess the relationship between autonomic nervous system activity as indexed by measures of heart rate variability and overnight urinary norepinephrine, and plasma cholesterol levels in a large sample of working adults. The study population comprised 611 apparently healthy employees of an airplane manufacturing plant in Southern Germany. Heart rate variability was calculated as beat-to-beat intervals over the course of one 24-hour weekday measured with an ambulatory ECG recorder. Overnight urine collection and blood samples were also obtained. We found an inverse association between indices of vagally-mediated heart rate variability and plasma levels of total cholesterol, low density lipoprotein (LDL), and the ratio of LDL to high density lipoprotein (HDL) that remained significant in multivariate models after controlling for relevant covariates including norepinephrine. Urinary norepinephrine was not significantly related to any measure of cholesterol in multivariate models. We report here for the first time, in a large sample of healthy human adults, evidence supporting the hypothesis of a clinically relevant inverse relationship between measures of plasma cholesterol and vagally-mediated heart rate variability after controlling for sympathetic nervous system activity. This suggests an important role for the vagal control of plasma cholesterol levels in cardiovascular disease. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Plasma norepinephrine in hypertensive rats reflects α2-adrenoceptor release control only when re-uptake is inhibited

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    Torill eBerg

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available α2 adrenoceptors (AR lower central sympathetic output and peripheral catecholamine release, thereby protecting against sympathetic hyperactivity and hypertension. Norepinephrine re-uptake transporter effectively (NET removes norepinephrine from the synapse. Overflow to plasma will therefore not reflect release. Here we tested if inhibition of re-uptake allowed presynaptic α2AR release-control to be reflected as differences in norepinephrine overflow in anesthetized hypertensive (SHR and normotensive (WKY rats. We also tested if α2AR modulated the experiment-induced epinephrine secretion, and a phenylephrine-induced, α1-adrenergic vasoconstriction. Blood pressure was recorded through a femoral artery catheter, and cardiac output by ascending aorta flow. After pre-treatment with NET inhibitor (desipramine, and/or α2AR antagonist (yohimbine, L-659,066 or agonist (clonidine, ST-91, we injected phenylephrine. Arterial blood was sampled 15 min later. Plasma catecholamine concentrations were not influenced by phenylephrine, and therefore reflected effects of pre-treatment. Desipramine and α2AR antagonist separately had little effect on norepinephrine overflow. Combined, they increased norepinephrine overflow, particularly in SHR. Clonidine, but not ST-91, reduced, and pertussis toxin increased norepinephrine overflow in SHR and epinephrine secretion in both strains. L-659,066+clonidine (central α2AR-stimulation normalized the high blood pressure, heart rate and vascular tension in SHR. α2AR antagonists reduced phenylephrine induced vasoconstriction equally in WKY and SHR. Conclusions: α2AAR inhibition increased norepinephrine overflow only when re-uptake was blocked, and then with particular efficacy in SHR, possibly due to their high sympathetic tone. α2AAR inhibited epinephrine secretion, particularly in SHR. α2AAR supported α1AR-induced vasoconstriction equally in the two strains. α2AR malfunctions were therefore not detected in SHR

  9. Age dependence of the levels of plasma norepinephrine, aldosterone, renin activity and urinary vanillylmandelic acid in normal and essential hypertensives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abd-Allah, Nadia M; Hassan, Fayeza H; Esmat, Amr Y; Hammad, Somaya A

    2004-01-01

    In the present study the upper reference limits (URLs) for resting plasma norepinephrine, epinephrine, serum aldosterone, plasma renin activity, aldosterone/renin activity ratio, as well as urinary vanillylmandelic acid in healthy Egyptian normotensive subjects over a range of ages (5-60 yr) were established. There was a significant age effect on plasma norepinephrine, UVMA, serum aldosterone and PRA, whereas a single URL for plasma epinephrine level is satisfactory. In uncomplicated untreated essential hypertensive subjects (5-60 yr), the average prevalence of elevation in the plasma norepinephrine, epinephrine and urinary vanillylmandelic acid above their corresponding URLs was 85.10, 62.15 and 83.20%, respectively. This suggests that elevation in plasma catecholamine concentrations is more likely a common consequence than playing a possible role in the pathogenesis of hypertension, supported by insignificant correlation coefficients between the plasma catecholamine levels and resting systolic and diastolic blood pressure values (SBP & DBP) in all hypertensive age groups. Primary hyperaldosteronism was not detected among the normokalemic essential hypertensives at any age using aldosterone/plasma renin activity ratio as a primary screening method. In the present study, 7 statistically significant positive coefficient correlations are reported for SBP or DBP values with UVMA levels in hypertensive children and adolescents, serum aldosterone in old hypertensives, and PRA in adult hypertensives.

  10. Aircraft noise exposure affects rat behavior, plasma norepinephrine levels, and cell morphology of the temporal lobe*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di, Guo-qing; Zhou, Bing; Li, Zheng-guang; Lin, Qi-li

    2011-01-01

    In order to investigate the physiological effects of airport noise exposure on organisms, in this study, we exposed Sprague-Dawley rats in soundproof chambers to previously recorded aircraft-related noise for 65 d. For comparison, we also used unexposed control rats. Noise was arranged according to aircraft flight schedules and was adjusted to its weighted equivalent continuous perceived noise levels (L WECPN) of 75 and 80 dB for the two experimental groups. We examined rat behaviors through an open field test and measured the concentrations of plasma norepinephrine (NE) by high performance liquid chromatography-fluorimetric detection (HPLC-FLD). We also examined the morphologies of neurons and synapses in the temporal lobe by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Our results showed that rats exposed to airport noise of 80 dB had significantly lower line crossing number (P<0.05) and significantly longer center area duration (P<0.05) than control animals. After 29 d of airport noise exposure, the concentration of plasma NE of exposed rats was significantly higher than that of the control group (P<0.05). We also determined that the neuron and synapsis of the temporal lobe of rats showed signs of damage after aircraft noise of 80 dB exposure for 65 d. In conclusion, exposing rats to long-term aircraft noise affects their behaviors, plasma NE levels, and cell morphology of the temporal lobe. PMID:22135145

  11. Aircraft noise exposure affects rat behavior, plasma norepinephrine levels, and cell morphology of the temporal lobe

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Guo-qing DI; Bing ZHOU; Zheng-guang; LI, Qi-li LIN

    2011-01-01

    In order to investigate the physiological effects of airport noise exposure on organisms,in this study,we exposed Sprague-Dawley rats in soundproof chambers to previously recorded aircraft-related noise for 65 d.For comparison,we also used unexposed control rats.Noise was arranged according to aircraft flight schedules and was adjusted to its weighted equivalent continuous perceived noise levels (LwEcPN) of 75 and 80 dB for the two experimental groups.We examined rat behaviors through an open field test and measured the concentrations of plasma norepinephrine (NE) by high performance liquid chromatography-fluorimetric detection (HPLC-FLD).We also examined the morphologies of neurons and synapses in the temporal lobe by transmission electron microscopy (TEM).Our results showed that rats exposed to airport noise of 80 dB had significantly lower line crossing number (P<0.05) and significantly longer center area duration (P<0.05) than control animals.After 29 d of airport noise exposure,the concentration of plasma NE of exposed rats was significantly higher than that of the control group (P<0.05).We also determined that the neuron and synapsis of the temporal lobe of rats showed signs of damage after aircraft noise of 80 dB exposure for 65 d.In conclusion,exposing rats to long-term aircraft noise affects their behaviors,plasma NE levels,and cell morphology of the temporal lobe.

  12. Dietary supplement increases plasma norepinephrine, lipolysis, and metabolic rate in resistance trained men

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schilling Brian K

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Dietary supplements targeting fat loss and increased thermogenesis are prevalent within the sport nutrition/weight loss market. While some isolated ingredients have been reported to be efficacious when used at high dosages, in particular in animal models and/or via intravenous delivery, little objective evidence is available pertaining to the efficacy of a finished product taken by human subjects in oral form. Moreover, many ingredients function as stimulants, leading to increased hemodynamic responses. The purpose of this investigation was to determine the effects of a finished dietary supplement on plasma catecholamine concentration, markers of lipolysis, metabolic rate, and hemodynamics. Methods Ten resistance trained men (age = 27 ± 4 yrs; BMI = 25 ± 3 kg· m-2; body fat = 9 ± 3%; mean ± SD ingested a dietary supplement (Meltdown®, Vital Pharmaceuticals or a placebo, in a random order, double blind cross-over design, with one week separating conditions. Fasting blood samples were collected before, and at 30, 60, and 90 minutes post ingestion and were assayed for epinephrine (EPI, norepinephrine (NE, glycerol, and free fatty acids (FFA. Area under the curve (AUC was calculated for all variables. Gas samples were collected from 30–60 minutes post ingestion for measurement of metabolic rate. Heart rate and blood pressure were recorded at all blood collection times. Results AUC was greater for the dietary supplement compared to the placebo for NE (1332 ± 128 pg·mL-1·90 min-1 vs. 1003 ± 133 pg·mL-1·90 min-1; p = 0.03, glycerol (44 ± 3 μg·mL-1·90 min-1 vs. 26 ± 2 μg·mL-1·90 min-1; p -1·90 min-1 vs. 0.88 ± 0.12 mmol·L-1·90 min-1; p = 0.0003. No difference between conditions was noted for EPI AUC (p > 0.05. For all variables, values were highest at 90 minutes post ingestion. Total kilocalorie expenditure during the 30 minute collection period was 29.6% greater (p = 0.02 for the dietary supplement (35 ± 3

  13. Electrochemical stimulation of plasma LH and hypothalamic norepinephrine concentrations at short- and long-term intervals after hypothalamic knife cuts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phelps, C P; Saporta, S

    1985-11-18

    Norepinephrine (NE) concentrations in several diencephalic locations were studied in female rats in conjunction with luteinizing hormone (LH) release after medial preoptic area (MPOA) stimulation at short (7 days) and longer time intervals after surgical interruption of anterior or anterolateral neural connections of mediobasal hypothalamus (MBH). Concentrations of diencephalic NE were altered in two general ways after brain surgery: (1) transient early postoperative increases in some regions which appeared unrelated to the type of surgery performed; and (2) other specific decreases in NE concentration which were related to the types of surgery performed and whether a particular ascending noradrenergic pathway was interrupted. At 180 days after surgery, these two types of change in NE concentrations were no longer present. Maximum increases in plasma LH concentrations observed after electrochemical stimulation of the MPOA at either 7 or 180 days after MBH deafferentation also varied according to: (1) the postoperative interval studied; and (2) the location of pathway interruption. Interruption of anterior MBH pathways showed only a transient (7 day interval) reduction in LH release after MPOA stimulation, whereas when both lateral and anterior pathways were severed, there was a more nearly permanent (180 day interval) disruption of LH release after stimulation. The results of these studies support the contention that anterolateral MBH neural connections may constitute a dynamic neural substrate contributing to a gradual improvement in neuroendocrine function observed after early surgical disconnections.

  14. Effects of renal sympathetic nerve radiofrequency ablation on norepinephrine spillover rate and sympathetic nerve activity in dogs with hypertension%肾交感神经射频消融术对高血压犬去甲肾上腺素溢出率及交感神经活性的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    余航; 杨成明; 李慧杰; 曾春雨; 方玉强; 何多芬; 张小群; 温春兰

    2012-01-01

    pressure (MAP) were elevated significantly in control group (146.7 ± 21.0, 89.0 ± 12.7 and 108.3 ± 14.9mmHg) compared with those before modeling (119.5 ± 13.2, 76.5 ± 7.8 and 90.9 ± 8mrnHg, P<0.05). The renal sympathetic activity impulse and norepinephrine spillover rate were also enhanced significantly (P<0.05). The renal sympathetic nerve activity obviously decreased in the treatment group after the operation, and then increased 2 months after the ablation. The norepinephrine spillover rate in treatment group increased significantly 1 month after modeling (P<0.05), and decreased after ablation, and it lasted to the end of the experiment (P<0.05). One and two months after ablation, the norepinephrine spillover rate was lower in treatment group than in control group (P<0.05). Conclusion Renal sympathetic nerve radiofrequency ablation significantly inhibits the elevation of norepinephrine spillover rate and sympathetic nerve activity in dogs with hypertension.

  15. Enhancing hydrogen spillover and storage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Ralph T.; Li, Yingwel; Lachawiec, Jr., Anthony J.

    2011-05-31

    Methods for enhancing hydrogen spillover and storage are disclosed. One embodiment of the method includes doping a hydrogen receptor with metal particles, and exposing the hydrogen receptor to ultrasonification as doping occurs. Another embodiment of the method includes doping a hydrogen receptor with metal particles, and exposing the doped hydrogen receptor to a plasma treatment.

  16. Enhancing hydrogen spillover and storage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Ralph T; Li, Yingwei; Lachawiec, Jr., Anthony J

    2013-02-12

    Methods for enhancing hydrogen spillover and storage are disclosed. One embodiment of the method includes doping a hydrogen receptor with metal particles, and exposing the hydrogen receptor to ultrasonication as doping occurs. Another embodiment of the method includes doping a hydrogen receptor with metal particles, and exposing the doped hydrogen receptor to a plasma treatment.

  17. Elevated blood plasma levels of epinephrine, norepinephrine, tyrosine hydroxylase, TGFβ1, and TNFα associated with high-altitude pulmonary edema in an Indian population

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandey, Priyanka; Ali, Zahara; Mohammad, Ghulam; Pasha, M A Qadar

    2016-01-01

    Biomarkers are essential to unravel the locked pathophysiology of any disease. This study investigated the role of biomarkers and their interactions with each other and with the clinical parameters to study the physiology of high-altitude pulmonary edema (HAPE) in HAPE-patients (HAPE-p) against adapted highlanders (HLs) and healthy sojourners, HAPE-controls (HAPE-c). For this, seven circulatory biomarkers, namely, epinephrine, norepinephrine, tyrosine hydroxylase, transforming growth factor beta 1, tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNFα), platelet-derived growth factor beta beta, and C-reactive protein (CRP), were measured in blood plasma of the three study groups. All the subjects were recruited at ~3,500 m, and clinical features such as arterial oxygen saturation (SaO2), body mass index, and mean arterial pressure were measured. Increased levels of epinephrine, norepinephrine, tyrosine hydroxylase, transforming growth factor-beta 1, and TNFα were observed in HAPE-p against the healthy groups, HAPE-c, and HLs (P0.01). Correlation analysis revealed a negative correlation between epinephrine and norepinephrine (P=4.6E−06) in HAPE-p and positive correlation in HAPE-c (P=0.004) and HLs (P=9.78E−07). A positive correlation was observed between TNFα and CRP (P=0.004) in HAPE-p and a negative correlation in HAPE-c (P=4.6E−06). SaO2 correlated negatively with platelet-derived growth factor beta beta (HAPE-p; P=0.05), norepinephrine (P=0.01), and TNFα (P=0.005) and positively with CRP (HAPE-c; P=0.02) and norepinephrine (HLs; P=0.04). Body mass index correlated negatively with epinephrine (HAPE-p; P=0.001) and positively with norepinephrine and tyrosine hydroxylase in HAPE-c (P0.70, P<0.05). The results clearly suggest that increased plasma levels of these circulatory biomarkers associated with HAPE. PMID:27540296

  18. Elevated blood plasma levels of epinephrine, norepinephrine, tyrosine hydroxylase, TGFβ1, and TNFα associated with high-altitude pulmonary edema in Indian population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pandey P

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Priyanka Pandey,1,2 Zahara Ali,1,2 Ghulam Mohammad,3 MA Qadar Pasha1,2 1Functional Genomics Unit, CSIR-Institute of Genomics and Integrative Biology, Delhi, 2Department of Biotechnology, Savitribai Phule Pune University, Pune, 3Department of Medicine, SNM Hospital, Ladakh, Jammu and Kashmir, India Abstract: Biomarkers are essential to unravel the locked pathophysiology of any disease. This study investigated the role of biomarkers and their interactions with each other and with the clinical parameters to study the physiology of high-altitude pulmonary edema (HAPE in HAPE-patients (HAPE-p against adapted highlanders (HLs and healthy sojourners, HAPE-controls (HAPE-c. For this, seven circulatory biomarkers, namely, epinephrine, norepinephrine, tyrosine hydroxylase, transforming growth factor beta 1, tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNFα, platelet-derived growth factor beta beta, and C-reactive protein (CRP, were measured in blood plasma of the three study groups. All the subjects were recruited at ~3,500 m, and clinical features such as arterial oxygen saturation (SaO2, body mass index, and mean arterial pressure were measured. Increased levels of epinephrine, norepinephrine, tyrosine hydroxylase, transforming growth factor-beta 1, and TNFα were observed in HAPE-p against the healthy groups, HAPE-c, and HLs (P<0.0001. CRP levels were decreased in HAPE-p against HAPE-c and HLs (P<0.0001. There was no significant difference or very marginal difference in the levels of these biomarkers in HAPE-c and HLs (P>0.01. Correlation analysis revealed a negative correlation between epinephrine and norepinephrine (P=4.6E-06 in HAPE-p and positive correlation in HAPE-c (P=0.004 and HLs (P=9.78E-07. A positive correlation was observed between TNFα and CRP (P=0.004 in HAPE-p and a negative correlation in HAPE-c (P=4.6E-06. SaO2 correlated negatively with platelet-derived growth factor beta beta (HAPE-p; P=0.05, norepinephrine (P=0.01, and TNFα (P=0.005 and

  19. Hydroxytyrosol increases norepinephrine transporter function in pheochromocytoma cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luzon-Toro, Berta [Institute of Parasitology and Biomedicine ' Lopez-Neyra' , Spanish National Research Council (CSIC), 18100 Granada (Spain); Geerlings, Arjan [Puleva Biotech, 18004 Granada (Spain); Hilfiker, Sabine [Institute of Parasitology and Biomedicine ' Lopez-Neyra' , Spanish National Research Council (CSIC), 18100 Granada (Spain)], E-mail: sabine.hilfiker@ipb.csic.es

    2008-10-15

    Introduction: The norepinephrine transporter is responsible for the intracellular uptake of {sup 131}I- iodometaiodobenzylguanidine ({sup 131}I-MIBG), which is used for the diagnostic localization and treatment of pheochromocytomas as well as other tumors such as neuroblastomas and carcinoids. This agent is variably delivered into tumor cells by the norepinephrine transporter, but few studies have shown treatments that work to increase norepinephrine transporter activity. The objective of the present study was to test the possible beneficial effects of hydroxytyrosol in enhancing norepinephrine transporter function, which may have implications for its combined use with {sup 131}I-MIBG in the diagnosis and treatment of pheochromocytomas. Methods: Rat pheochromocytoma PC12 cells were labeled with [{sup 3}H]-norepinephrine in the presence or absence of different concentrations of hydroxytyrosol, a naturally occurring compound with strong antioxidant properties, followed by measurements of uptake and release of radiolabeled norepinephrine. Results: Hydroxytyrosol pronouncedly increased norepinephrine transporter activity, with the rapid onset excluding effects on norepinephrine transporter expression levels. Concomitant with increased norepinephrine transporter activity, hydroxytyrosol caused a decrease of both spontaneous and evoked norepinephrine release, indicating that it affects pre-existing plasma membrane-associated norepinephrine transporter, rather than the incorporation of novel norepinephrine transporter molecules into the plasma membrane. Conclusion: Hydroxytyrosol potently enhances norepinephrine transporter activity in pheochromocytoma PC12 cells, suggesting that combinatorial therapy employing hydroxytyrosol may improve the effectiveness of {sup 131}I-MIBG as a diagnosis and treatment modality.

  20. Knowledge Spillovers and Economic Growth

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.J. van Stel (André); H.R. Nieuwenhuijsen

    2002-01-01

    textabstractThe importance of knowledge spillovers for achieving innovation and economic growth is widely recognized. It is not straightforward which type of spillovers is most effective: intra-sectoral spillovers or inter-sectoral spillovers. We investigate this controversy using a model of regiona

  1. Knowledge Spillovers and Economic Growth

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.J. van Stel (André); H.R. Nieuwenhuijsen

    2002-01-01

    textabstractThe importance of knowledge spillovers for achieving innovation and economic growth is widely recognized. It is not straightforward which type of spillovers is most effective: intra-sectoral spillovers or inter-sectoral spillovers. We investigate this controversy using a model of

  2. Norepinephrine kinetics during insulin-induced hypoglycemia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hilsted, J; Christensen, N J; Larsen, S

    1985-01-01

    Norepinephrine (NE) kinetics (plasma appearance rate, clearance, and forearm extraction) were measured during insulin-induced hypoglycemia in six healthy subjects. NE clearance did not change during hypoglycemia, indicating that the increase in plasma NE during hypoglycemia is due to an increased...

  3. FDI and Spillovers in China

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kokko, Ari; Taotao, Chen; Tingvall, Patrick Gustavsson

    2011-01-01

    Using a fixed effect variance decomposition model we estimate SUR models to analyse FDI spillovers from contagion and spillovers from competition on local firms in China. While the former type of spillover mainly depends on the degree of foreign presence, the latter kind is related to how foreign...... and local firms interact. The main conclusion is that FDI has been beneficial for the Chinese economy but that spillovers are not evenly distributed across firms and industries. Spillovers from contagion tend to exhibit an inverse U-shaped pattern with respect to the degree of foreign presence...

  4. Continuous infusion of tracer norepinephrine may miscalculate unidirectional nerve uptake of norepinephrine in humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henriksen, Jens Henrik; Christensen, N J; Ring-Larsen, H

    1989-01-01

    In order to evaluate uptake kinetics of norepinephrine (NE) in different tissues, a catheterization study was performed in control subjects (n = 6) and patients with enhanced sympathetic nervous activity (cirrhosis, n = 12) during constant intravenous infusion of L[3H]norepinephrine ([3H]NE) for 75...... minutes. In spite of a higher NE spillover from kidneys in patients compared with controls (82 vs. 49 ng/min, p less than 0.01), renal extraction ratios of [3H]NE were similar in the two groups (0.33 vs. 0.32, NS), and no significant change was observed during the time of infusion. In contrast, liver......-intestine extraction ratios of [3H]NE decreased significantly and equally with infusion time in patients (from 0.57 to 0.44, p less than 0.01) and controls (from 0.59 to 0.46, p less than 0.01). This was observed despite the fact that spillover of NE from this vascular bed was observed only in patients with cirrhosis...

  5. Changes of plasma norepinephrine and serum N-terminal pro-brain natriuretic peptide after exercise training predict survival in patients with heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rengo, Giuseppe; Pagano, Gennaro; Parisi, Valentina; Femminella, Grazia Daniela; de Lucia, Claudio; Liccardo, Daniela; Cannavo, Alessandro; Zincarelli, Carmela; Komici, Klara; Paolillo, Stefania; Fusco, Flavia; Koch, Walter J; Perrone Filardi, Pasquale; Ferrara, Nicola; Leosco, Dario

    2014-02-15

    Short-term changes of neurohormones can give important prognostic information in heart failure (HF) patients. In this study, we evaluate whether changes in plasma Norepinephrine (NE) and serum N-terminal pro-brain natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP) after exercise training predict cardiac mortality in HF patients. We enrolled 221 HF patients (mean age 72.5 ± 10.2 year) followed-up for a mean period of 27.64 ± 10.7 months. All pts underwent a 3-month exercise training. Before training, clinical examination, echocardiography, peak VO2 determination, and blood draw for NT-proBNP and NE measurements were performed. Primary end-point was cardiac related mortality. Eighty-six-nine percent of patients were in NYHA class III, mean left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) was 32.5 ± 10.4%, and mean peak VO2 was 12.36 ± 1.45 ml/kg/min. At baseline, mean NT-proBNP was 2111.4 ± 1145.6 pg/ml and mean NE was 641.8 ± 215.3 pg/ml. One hundred-one subjects died for cardiac causes. Training was associated with a significant increase of peak VO2 and LVEF, whereas NE, NT-proBNP, and heart rate decreased. Multiple Cox proportional hazards regression analysis was performed using delta% values (post vs pre-training) of LVEF, heart rate, NE, and NT-proBNP along with baseline covariates, revealing delta value of NE as the strongest predictor of cardiac mortality. Noteworthy, training reduced NT-proBNP in both survivor and non-survivor patients, while a lack of reduction of NE was observed in non survivors. In our HF population, short-term changes of NE after exercise training independently predicted long-term cardiac mortality. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Spillovers from Foreign Direct Investment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Meyer, Klaus E.; Sinani, Evis

    2005-01-01

    The extensive empirical literature analyzing productivity spillovers from foreign direct investment to local firms provides inconclusive results. Some studies find that foreign presence has a positive impact on the productivity of domestic firms, while others find no evidence or a negative effect...... for industrialized countries in the 1990s. Transition economies may experience spillovers, but these have been declining in recent years. Keywords: developing countries, transition economies, spillovers, foreign direct investment, technology transfer, meta-analysis...

  7. Productivity spillovers of organization capital

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chen, Wen; Inklaar, Robert

    Investments in organization capital increase productivity of not just the investing firm but could also spillover to other firms-similar to investments in research and development. Recent evidence at the industry and economy level suggests such spillovers could be important. In this paper, we fail

  8. Norepinephrine transporter variant A457P knock-in mice display key features of human postural orthostatic tachycardia syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jana K. Shirey-Rice

    2013-07-01

    Postural orthostatic tachycardia syndrome (POTS is a common autonomic disorder of largely unknown etiology that presents with sustained tachycardia on standing, syncope and elevated norepinephrine spillover. Some individuals with POTS experience anxiety, depression and cognitive dysfunction. Previously, we identified a mutation, A457P, in the norepinephrine (NE; also known as noradrenaline transporter (NET; encoded by SLC6A2 in POTS patients. NET is expressed at presynaptic sites in NE neurons and plays a crucial role in regulating NE signaling and homeostasis through NE reuptake into noradrenergic nerve terminals. Our in vitro studies demonstrate that A457P reduces both NET surface trafficking and NE transport and exerts a dominant-negative impact on wild-type NET proteins. Here we report the generation and characterization of NET A457P mice, demonstrating the ability of A457P to drive the POTS phenotype and behaviors that are consistent with reported comorbidities. Mice carrying one A457P allele (NET+/P exhibited reduced brain and sympathetic NE transport levels compared with wild-type (NET+/+ mice, whereas transport activity in mice carrying two A457P alleles (NETP/P was nearly abolished. NET+/P and NETP/P mice exhibited elevations in plasma and urine NE levels, reduced 3,4-dihydroxyphenylglycol (DHPG, and reduced DHPG:NE ratios, consistent with a decrease in sympathetic nerve terminal NE reuptake. Radiotelemetry in unanesthetized mice revealed tachycardia in NET+/P mice without a change in blood pressure or baroreceptor sensitivity, consistent with studies of human NET A457P carriers. NET+/P mice also demonstrated behavioral changes consistent with CNS NET dysfunction. Our findings support that NET dysfunction is sufficient to produce a POTS phenotype and introduces the first genetic model suitable for more detailed mechanistic studies of the disorder and its comorbidities.

  9. Norepinephrine transporter variant A457P knock-in mice display key features of human postural orthostatic tachycardia syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shirey-Rice, Jana K; Klar, Rebecca; Fentress, Hugh M; Redmon, Sarah N; Sabb, Tiffany R; Krueger, Jessica J; Wallace, Nathan M; Appalsamy, Martin; Finney, Charlene; Lonce, Suzanna; Diedrich, André; Hahn, Maureen K

    2013-07-01

    Postural orthostatic tachycardia syndrome (POTS) is a common autonomic disorder of largely unknown etiology that presents with sustained tachycardia on standing, syncope and elevated norepinephrine spillover. Some individuals with POTS experience anxiety, depression and cognitive dysfunction. Previously, we identified a mutation, A457P, in the norepinephrine (NE; also known as noradrenaline) transporter (NET; encoded by SLC6A2) in POTS patients. NET is expressed at presynaptic sites in NE neurons and plays a crucial role in regulating NE signaling and homeostasis through NE reuptake into noradrenergic nerve terminals. Our in vitro studies demonstrate that A457P reduces both NET surface trafficking and NE transport and exerts a dominant-negative impact on wild-type NET proteins. Here we report the generation and characterization of NET A457P mice, demonstrating the ability of A457P to drive the POTS phenotype and behaviors that are consistent with reported comorbidities. Mice carrying one A457P allele (NET(+/P)) exhibited reduced brain and sympathetic NE transport levels compared with wild-type (NET(+/+)) mice, whereas transport activity in mice carrying two A457P alleles (NET(P/P)) was nearly abolished. NET(+/P) and NET(P/P) mice exhibited elevations in plasma and urine NE levels, reduced 3,4-dihydroxyphenylglycol (DHPG), and reduced DHPG:NE ratios, consistent with a decrease in sympathetic nerve terminal NE reuptake. Radiotelemetry in unanesthetized mice revealed tachycardia in NET(+/P) mice without a change in blood pressure or baroreceptor sensitivity, consistent with studies of human NET A457P carriers. NET(+/P) mice also demonstrated behavioral changes consistent with CNS NET dysfunction. Our findings support that NET dysfunction is sufficient to produce a POTS phenotype and introduces the first genetic model suitable for more detailed mechanistic studies of the disorder and its comorbidities.

  10. Technology Spillover and Licensing Strategy of Patentee

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    The optimal license proportions with and without technology spillover are analyzed with a game-theoretical approach when a patent-holding firm licensed non-drastic process innovation to his incumbent rivals by means of a first price sealed bid auction. The optimal strategy is obtained through solving the game by backward induction. It is found that the range of optimal license proportion is narrower when there is spillover compared to the no spillover case.

  11. Financial stress spillovers in advanced economies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Apostolakis, G.; Papadopoulos, A.

    2014-01-01

    Financial stress co-movements are positively associated with crisis periods. Dynamic conditional correlations increase during periods of high uncertainty. The US is the dominant transmitter of financial stress spillovers. The total stress spillover index explains 19.9% of the forecast error variance

  12. Financial stress spillovers in advanced economies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Apostolakis, G.; Papadopoulos, A.

    2014-01-01

    Financial stress co-movements are positively associated with crisis periods. Dynamic conditional correlations increase during periods of high uncertainty. The US is the dominant transmitter of financial stress spillovers. The total stress spillover index explains 19.9% of the forecast error variance

  13. Volatility Spillover Effects in European Equity Markets

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Baele, L.

    2003-01-01

    This paper quantifies the magnitude and time-varying nature of volatility spillovers from the aggregate European (EU) and US market to 13 local European equity markets.I develop a shock spillover model that decomposes local unexpected returns into a country speciffic shock, a regional European shock

  14. Financial stress spillovers in advanced economies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Apostolakis, G.; Papadopoulos, A.

    2014-01-01

    Financial stress co-movements are positively associated with crisis periods. Dynamic conditional correlations increase during periods of high uncertainty. The US is the dominant transmitter of financial stress spillovers. The total stress spillover index explains 19.9% of the forecast error

  15. Changes of plasma epinephrine and norepinephrine in rabbits with firearm thoracic wounds%兔胸部火器伤后血浆肾上腺素和去甲肾上腺素的变化

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郭建军; 刘维永; 万秀琴

    2001-01-01

    Objective To investigate the changes of plasma epinephrine (E) and norepinephrine (NE) in rabbits with firearm thoracic wounds.  Methods  A total of 24 rabbits were divided into 3 groups randomly, the simple thoracic penetrating injury group (Group A, n = 8), the pseudo-injury group (Group B, n = 8)and the normal control group ( Group C, n = 8). The pressures of carotid artery and jugular vein were recorded by eight-road physiological recorder at 5 minutes before injury. And the concentrations of plasma E and NE were detected through high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) and electrochemical detection (ED) at 5 minutes, 30 minutes, 1 hour, 3 hours, 6 hours, 12 hours and 24 hours after injury in all the rabbits.  Results The concentrations of plasma E and NE in Group A were significantly higher than those of Group C (P0.05)。 (2)A组动、静脉压致伤瞬间( 2 ms内)升高,平均达伤前的1.8和6.8倍,迅即下降至伤前水平,随后缓慢下降,分别于伤后30, 5 min降至最低点(伤前的0.63和 0.25倍),之后缓慢回升,6,12 h接近伤前水平;B、C组动、静脉压比较,差异无统计学意义(P>0.05)。结论兔胸部火器伤后血浆中 E和NE均显著升高;二者浓度变化主要源自创伤后失血及组织损伤,且与伤情轻重关系密切,可作为胸部火器伤后早期伤情程度的判断标准。

  16. Knowledge spillovers through FDI and trade

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ali, Muhammad; Cantner, Uwe; Roy, Ipsita

    2016-01-01

    -relationship between knowledge spillovers from imports and inward FDI. Furthermore, human capital is added to the discussion as one of the appropriability factors for knowledge spillovers, with special focus on its quality-content, using journal publications and patent applications. Applying cointegration estimation...... considering quality-adjusted human capital, countries with better human capital are found to benefit not only from direct productivity effects, but also from absorption and transmission of international knowledge spillovers through imports and inward FDI. Finally, technological distance with the frontier does...

  17. Endogenous FDI Spillovers from Japan to Russia and China with Spillover-Prevention Costs

    OpenAIRE

    Matsubara, Kiyoshi

    2014-01-01

    This paper explores the role of FDI-spillover prevention costs in the strategic choice for a MNE of a developed country such as Japan about whether it perform FDI to an emerging economy such as Russia and China and about a degree of FDI spillovers that it allows. After discussing the exogenous spillover case in a duopoly model, this paper shows that with a quadratic prevention cost function, the MNE may choose a positive level of spillovers lower than the benchmark exogenous level, and also s...

  18. The Effect of Spillovers on R & D Level

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wang Yan; Li Chu-lin; Lu Jia-hua

    2003-01-01

    This paper emphasizes the effect of spillovers on R&D (Research and Development) level. When competing firms have spillovers to each other in R&D, cooperation will always increase firms' profits. Only if the positive spillover is large enough, the cooperative R&D level will be larger than the non-cooperative R&D level. The cooperative level will be smaller than the non-cooperative level if the positive spillover is small enough. However, the cooperative level is always smaller than the non-cooperative level while there're negative spillovers to each other. R&D levels are the function of the spillover and will change with the spillover. The changing regularity is related to the sign of spillover and to whether they're cooperative or not. Spillovers made by the competing firms are usually different. When spillovers are small enough, the larger the spillover obtained from the other, the smaller the firm will invest in R&D; inversely, when the spillover is large enough, the larger spillovers obtains from the other, the larger the firm will invest in R&D.

  19. Natural Resources and Spatial Spillovers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batbold, Dulguun

    Regions going through a natural resource boom tend to have higher average incomes and employment relative to the rest of the country. For policy analysis, a question that often needs to be answered is to what extent the economic growth in the extraction region spills over to neighboring areas. This thesis develops a detailed methodology for analyzing the economic effects of geographically localized shocks within the framework of a parsimonious spatial general equilibrium model, including various methods for estimating key parameters. This model-based approach is being offered as a complementary tool for applied researchers conducting economic impact analysis. Existing empirical methods such as input-output analysis or difference-in-difference estimation techniques are often not optimal for analyzing spatially correlated data, and this model-based methodology can be used to overcome their limitations. Another important advantage of this methodology is that it is computationally tractable and has a relatively low data requirement, which can make a particularly big difference in studying developing countries where data quality and availability can often be an insurmountable challenge. Following the exposition of the methodology, this thesis presents two separate applications, one involving a developed nation and the other a developing one. In the first case, the methodology is applied to analyze the economic impact of the shale energy boom that's been occurring in and around Bakken counties in western North Dakota and eastern Montana over the past decade. In the second case, the methodology is used to analyze the economic impact of the Oyu Tolgoi copper-gold mining project in the Southern Gobi region of Mongolia. A common conclusion that is drawn from the two applications mentioned above is that economic booms fueled by natural resource extracting industries are largely local and have limited spillover effects on neighboring regions.

  20. Technology transfers, foreign investment and productivity spillovers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Newman, Carol; Rand, John; Talbot, Theodore Purdendu

    2015-01-01

    This paper explores the relationship between foreign direct investment (FDI) and the productivity of host country domestic firms. We rely on a specially designed survey of over 4000 manufacturing firms in Vietnam, and separate out productivity gains along the supply chain (obtained through direct...... transfers of knowledge/technology between linked firms) from productivity effects through indirect FDI spillovers. In addition to identifying indirect vertical productivity spillovers from FDI, our results show that there are productivity gains associated with direct linkages between foreign......-owned and domestic firms along the supply chain not captured by commonly used measures of spillovers. This includes evidence of productivity gains through forward linkages for domestic firms which receive inputs from foreign-owned firms....

  1. Vertically Integrated Multinationals and Productivity Spillovers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clementi, Federico; Bergmann, Friedrich

    How does the activity of foreign multinationals affect the competitiveness of local companies in the host countries? Previous studies have identified the interactions of domestic firms with foreign clients as main mechanism of diffusion of knowledge. However, backward productivity spillovers...... are not automatic. In this paper, we study how these externalities are affected by the strategy of vertical integration of foreign multinationals. Our analysis, based on firm-level data of European manufacturing companies, shows that local firms perceive weaker backward spillovers if client foreign affiliates...... are vertically integrated in their industry. The spillovers that arise from the activity of companies that do not invest in the domestic firms’ industry are 2.6 to 5 times stronger than the ones than come from affiliates of multinationals that invest in the industry of local firms....

  2. Catalyst support effects on hydrogen spillover

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karim, Waiz; Spreafico, Clelia; Kleibert, Armin; Gobrecht, Jens; Vandevondele, Joost; Ekinci, Yasin; van Bokhoven, Jeroen A.

    2017-01-01

    Hydrogen spillover is the surface migration of activated hydrogen atoms from a metal catalyst particle, on which they are generated, onto the catalyst support. The phenomenon has been much studied and its occurrence on reducible supports such as titanium oxide is established, yet questions remain about whether hydrogen spillover can take place on nonreducible supports such as aluminium oxide. Here we use the enhanced precision of top-down nanofabrication to prepare controlled and precisely tunable model systems that allow us to quantify the efficiency and spatial extent of hydrogen spillover on both reducible and nonreducible supports. We place multiple pairs of iron oxide and platinum nanoparticles on titanium oxide and aluminium oxide supports, varying the distance between the pairs from zero to 45 nanometres with a precision of one nanometre. We then observe the extent of the reduction of the iron oxide particles by hydrogen atoms generated on the platinum using single-particle in situ X-ray absorption spectromicroscopy applied simultaneously to all particle pairs. The data, in conjunction with density functional theory calculations, reveal fast hydrogen spillover on titanium oxide that reduces remote iron oxide nanoparticles via coupled proton-electron transfer. In contrast, spillover on aluminium oxide is mediated by three-coordinated aluminium centres that also interact with water and that give rise to hydrogen mobility competing with hydrogen desorption; this results in hydrogen spillover about ten orders of magnitude slower than on titanium oxide and restricted to very short distances from the platinum particle. We anticipate that these observations will improve our understanding of hydrogen storage and catalytic reactions involving hydrogen, and that our approach to creating and probing model catalyst systems will provide opportunities for studying the origin of synergistic effects in supported catalysts that combine multiple functionalities.

  3. Knowledge spillover processes as complex networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konno, Tomohiko

    2016-11-01

    We introduce the model of knowledge spillover on networks. Knowledge spillover is a major source of economic growth; and is a representative externality in economic phenomena. We show that the model has the following four characteristics: (1) the long-run growth rate is not relevant to the mean degree, but is determined by the mean degree of the nearest neighbors; (2) the productivity level of a firm is proportional to the degree of the firm; (3) the long-run growth rate increases with the increasing heterogeneity of the network; and (4) of three representative networks, the largest growth rate is in scale-free networks and the least in regular networks.

  4. Noradrenaline spillover during exercise in active versus resting skeletal muscle in man

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Savard, G; Strange, S; Kiens, Bente

    1987-01-01

    Increases in plasma noradrenaline (NA) concentration occur during moderate to heavy exercise in man. This study was undertaken to examine the spillover of NA from both resting and contracting skeletal muscle during exercise. Six male subjects performed one-legged knee-extension so that all...... in the exercising leg than in the resting leg both during 50% and 100% leg exercise. These results suggest that contracting skeletal muscle may contribute to a larger extent than resting skeletal muscle to increasing the level of plasma NA during exercise. Contractile activity may influence the NA spillover from...... measurements could be made both in the exercising and in the resting leg. Subjects exercised for 10 min at each of 50% and 100% of the peak performance capacity of the leg. Leg blood flow was measured by thermodilution and blood samples were drawn for the determination of plasma NA and adrenaline, first...

  5. Manipulation of norepinephrine metabolism with yohimbine in the treatment of autonomic failure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biaggioni, I.; Robertson, R. M.; Robertson, D.

    1994-01-01

    It has been postulated that alpha 2-adrenergic receptors play a modulatory role in the regulation of blood pressure. Activation of alpha 2-receptors located in the central nervous system results in inhibition of sympathetic tone and decrease of blood pressure. This indeed may be the mechanism of action of central sympatholytic antihypertensives such as alpha-methyldopa. Presynaptic alpha 2-receptors also are found in adrenergic nerve terminals. These receptors act as a negative feedback mechanism by inhibiting the release of norepinephrine. The relevance of alpha 2-adrenergic receptors for blood pressure regulation can be explored with yohimbine, a selective antagonist of these receptors. Yohimbine increases blood pressure in resting normal volunteers. This effect is associated with an increase in both sympathetic nerve activity, reflecting an increase in central sympathetic outflow, and in norepinephrine spillover, reflecting potentiation of the release of norepinephrine from adrenergic nerve terminals. These actions, therefore, underscore the importance of alpha 2-adrenergic receptors for blood pressure regulation even under resting conditions. Patients with autonomic failure, even those with severe sympathetic deprivation, are hypersensitive to the pressor effects of yohimbine. This increased responsiveness can be explained by sensitization of adrenergic receptors, analogous to denervation supersensitivity, and by the lack of autonomic reflexes that would normally buffer any increase in blood pressure. Preliminary studies suggest that the effectiveness of yohimbine in autonomic failure can be enhanced with monoamine oxidase inhibitors. Used in combination, yohimbine increases norepinephrine release, whereas monoamine oxidase inhibitors inhibit its degradation. Therefore, yohimbine is not only a useful tool in the study of blood pressure regulation, but may offer a therapeutic option in autonomic dysfunction.

  6. Behavioral spillovers from freeriding in multilevel interactions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Thommes, K.; Vyrastekova, J.; Akkerman, A.

    2015-01-01

    We study multilevel interactions using experimental methods. Does the efficiency of a production team suffer from the freeriding behavior of some team members at the firm level? Can we identify behavioral spillovers affecting teams? We isolate common tasks that teams must complete – coordination and

  7. Spillovers among regional and international stock markets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huen, Tan Bee; Arsad, Zainudin; Chun, Ooi Po

    2014-07-01

    Realizing the greater risk by the increase in the level of financial market integration, this study investigates the dynamic of international and regional stock markets co-movement among Asian countries with the world leading market, the US. The data utilized in this study comprises of weekly closing prices for four stock indices, that consists of two developing markets (Malaysia and China) and two developed markets (Japan and the US), and encompasses the period from January 1996 to December 2012. Multivariate Generalized Autoregressive Conditional Heteroscedasticity (MGARCH) model with the BEKK parameterization is employed to investigate the mean and volatility spillover effects among the selected stock indices. The results show significant mean spillover not only from the larger developed markets to smaller developing markets but also from the smaller developing markets to larger developed markets. Volatility spillover between the developed markets is found to be smaller than that between the developing markets. Conditional correlations among the stock markets are found to increase over the sample period. The findings of significant mean and volatility spillovers are considered as bad news for international investors as it reduces the benefit from portfolio diversification but act as useful information for investors to be more aware in diversifying their investment or stock selection.

  8. Knowledge Spillovers and Entrepreneurs’ Export Orientation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    D. de Clercq (Dirk); S.J.A. Hessels (Jolanda); A.J. van Stel (André)

    2007-01-01

    textabstractWe draw on knowledge spillover literature to suggest that a country’s level of foreign direct investment (FDI) and international trade may influence the export orientation of its entrepreneurs, which in turn may relate to the country’s total level of entrepreneurial activity. Macro-level

  9. Vertically Integrated Multinationals and Productivity Spillovers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clementi, Federico; Bergmann, Friedrich

    How does the activity of foreign multinationals affect the competitiveness of local companies in the host countries? Previous studies have identified the interactions of domestic firms with foreign clients as main mechanism of diffusion of knowledge. However, backward productivity spillovers are ...

  10. DOPA, norepinephrine, and dopamine in rat tissues

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eldrup, E; Richter, Erik; Christensen, N J

    1989-01-01

    We studied the effect of unilateral sympathectomy on rat quadriceps and gastrocnemius muscle concentrations of endogenous dihydroxyphenylalanine (DOPA), dopamine (DA), and norepinephrine (NE) and assessed the relationships between these catecholamines in several rat tissues. Catecholamines were...

  11. Do Time-Varying Covariances, Volatility Comovement and Spillover Matter?

    OpenAIRE

    Lakshmi Balasubramanyan

    2005-01-01

    Financial markets and their respective assets are so intertwined; analyzing any single market in isolation ignores important information. We investigate whether time varying volatility comovement and spillover impact the true variance-covariance matrix under a time-varying correlation set up. Statistically significant volatility spillover and comovement between US, UK and Japan is found. To demonstrate the importance of modelling volatility comovement and spillover, we look at a simple portfo...

  12. GDP-spillovers in multi-country models

    OpenAIRE

    1998-01-01

    Spillovers resulting from fiscal and monetary policy are compared and analysed in small static, small dynamic and large dynamic multi-country models. To compare the size of the spillovers, we consider simulations in which GDP for a certain number of years is held one percent above base in the country where the shock originates. The results indicate that spillovers are large in size. An important transmission mechanism in the contribution to foreign GDP is found to be the foreign real interest...

  13. On spatial spillover in feedforward and feedback noise control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Antai; Bernstein, Dennis

    2017-03-01

    Active feedback noise control for rejecting broadband disturbances must contend with the Bode integral constraint, which implies that suppression over some frequency range gives rise to amplification over another range at the performance microphone. This is called spectral spillover. The present paper deals with spatial spillover, which refers to the amplification of noise at locations where no microphone is located. A spatial spillover function is defined, which is valid for both feedforward and feedback control with scalar and vector control inputs. This function is numerically analyzed and measured experimentally. Obstructions are introduced in the acoustic space to investigate their effect on spatial spillover.

  14. The Online Supplement to “International R&D Spillovers and other Unobserved Common Spillovers and Shocks”

    OpenAIRE

    Ruge-Leiva, Diego-Ivan

    2015-01-01

    This document provides a review of the literature on International R&D Spillovers and includes unit root test results, the additional results of static and dynamic models, plots of all series, Stata routines, and tables of the data collection on Gross Expenditure on R&D (GERD) as a percentage of GDP, as found in the study by Ruge-Leiva (2015) "International R&D Spillovers and other Unobserved Common Spillovers and Shocks.”

  15. Altered reward circuitry in the norepinephrine transporter knockout mouse.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joseph J Gallagher

    Full Text Available Synaptic levels of the monoamine neurotransmitters dopamine, serotonin, and norepinephrine are modulated by their respective plasma membrane transporters, albeit with a few exceptions. Monoamine transporters remove monoamines from the synaptic cleft and thus influence the degree and duration of signaling. Abnormal concentrations of these neuronal transmitters are implicated in a number of neurological and psychiatric disorders, including addiction, depression, and attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder. This work concentrates on the norepinephrine transporter (NET, using a battery of in vivo magnetic resonance imaging techniques and histological correlates to probe the effects of genetic deletion of the norepinephrine transporter on brain metabolism, anatomy and functional connectivity. MRS recorded in the striatum of NET knockout mice indicated a lower concentration of NAA that correlates with histological observations of subtle dysmorphisms in the striatum and internal capsule. As with DAT and SERT knockout mice, we detected minimal structural alterations in NET knockout mice by tensor-based morphometric analysis. In contrast, longitudinal imaging after stereotaxic prefrontal cortical injection of manganese, an established neuronal circuitry tracer, revealed that the reward circuit in the NET knockout mouse is biased toward anterior portions of the brain. This is similar to previous results observed for the dopamine transporter (DAT knockout mouse, but dissimilar from work with serotonin transporter (SERT knockout mice where Mn(2+ tracings extended to more posterior structures than in wildtype animals. These observations correlate with behavioral studies indicating that SERT knockout mice display anxiety-like phenotypes, while NET knockouts and to a lesser extent DAT knockout mice display antidepressant-like phenotypic features. Thus, the mainly anterior activity detected with manganese-enhanced MRI in the DAT and NET knockout mice is likely

  16. KCl stimulation increases norepinephrine transporter function in PC12 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandela, Prashant; Ordway, Gregory A

    2006-09-01

    The norepinephrine transporter (NET) plays a pivotal role in terminating noradrenergic signaling and conserving norepinephrine (NE) through the process of re-uptake. Recent evidence suggests a close association between NE release and regulation of NET function. The present study evaluated the relationship between release and uptake, and the cellular mechanisms that govern these processes. KCl stimulation of PC12 cells robustly increased [3H]NE uptake via the NET and simultaneously increased [3H]NE release. KCl-stimulated increases in uptake and release were dependent on Ca2+. Treatment of cells with phorbol-12-myristate-13-acetate (PMA) or okadaic acid decreased [3H]NE uptake but did not block KCl-stimulated increases in [3H]NE uptake. In contrast, PMA increased [3H]NE release and augmented KCl-stimulated release, while okadaic acid had no effects on release. Inhibition of Ca2+-activated signaling cascades with KN93 (a Ca2+ calmodulin-dependent kinase inhibitor), or ML7 and ML9 (myosin light chain kinase inhibitors), reduced [3H]NE uptake and blocked KCl-stimulated increases in uptake. In contrast, KN93, ML7 and ML9 had no effect on KCl-stimulated [3H]NE release. KCl-stimulated increases in [3H]NE uptake were independent of transporter trafficking to the plasma membrane. While increases in both NE release and uptake mediated by KCl stimulation require Ca2+, different intracellular mechanisms mediate these two events.

  17. Leisure Patterns among Retired Workers: Spillover or Compensatory Trends?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kremer, Yael; Harpaz, Itzhak

    1982-01-01

    Compared leisure behavior patterns after retirement with those of preretirement. Examined data within the context of the spillover and compensatory hypotheses, with retirement representing a nonwork sphere. Findings revealed a spillover effect, characterized by a high degree of passive, solitary leisure behavior both before and after retirement.…

  18. Behavioural Spillover in the Environmental Domain: An Intervention Study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lanzini, Pietro; Thøgersen, John

    2014-01-01

    This study tests hypotheses about behavioural spillover in the environmental domain as well as the impacts of monetary inducements and verbal praise on behavioural spillover by means of a field experiment. A sample of 194 students from a large university in Denmark were randomly allocated...... to a control group or to one of two experimental conditions where they were encouraged to purchase "green" products by means of either financial compensation and incentives or verbal encouragement and praise. Participants answered a baseline survey containing questions concerning a wide range...... behaviours over the six weeks, to identify instances of behavioural spillover from "green" purchase behaviour to other pro-environmental behaviours and to investigate if such spillover was affected by the nature of the intervention. The study revealed a positive spillover from "green" purchasing to other pro...

  19. Examining mean-volatility spillovers across national stock markets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vinodh Kesavaraj Natarajan

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The study of the stock market in a country and the understanding of the influence of stock market crashes within and across the markets has been the subject matter of many researches, academicians and analysts during recent times. In this study we investigate the mean-volatility spillover effects that happen across international stock markets. The study, by taking into consideration the stock market returns based on various indices, investigates the mean-volatility spillover effects using the GARCH in Mean model for the period January 2002 to December 2011. The GARCH-M model seeks to provide useful insights into how information is transmitted and disseminated across stock markets. In particular, the model examines the precise and separate measures of return spillovers and volatility spillovers. The analysis provides the evidence of strong mean and volatility spillover across some stock exchanges.

  20. β3-ADRENOCEPTORS INHIBIT STIMULATED NOREPINEPHRINE RELEASE IN SPONTANEOUSLY HYPERTENSIVE RATS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Torill eBerg

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Here, the influence of β3-adrenoceptors on catecholamine release in normotensive and spontaneously hypertensive rats was analysed. Blood pressure was recorded through a femoral artery catheter, and cardiac output by ascending aorta flow. Time from onset of flow to maximum rise in flow indicated inotropy. Total peripheral vascular resistance (TPR was calculated. Norepinephrine release was stimulated with tyramine, which allowed presynaptic release-control to be reflected as changes in the plasma norepinephrine concentration. β3-adrenoceptor agonist (BRL37344 reduced baseline vascular resistance, the tyramine-stimulated norepinephrine overflow and the positive inotropic response to tyramine in hypertensive but not normotensive rats. β3-adrenoceptor antagonist (SR59230A reduced tyramine-stimulated norepinephrine release in both strains and the secretion of epinephrine in hypertensive rats. SR59230A reduced tyramine-induced tachycardia in normotensive rats, and prevented down-regulation of the tyramine-induced rise in resistance in hypertensive rats. It was concluded that the contradicting results obtained by agonist versus antagonist, could be explained by their interaction with two different β-adrenoceptors: The BRL37344-dependent inhibition of stimulated norepinephrine release and positive inotropic response to tyramine was compatible with stimulation of β3-adrenoceptor coupling to inhibitory G-protein. This was observed only in hypertensive rats during stimulated, high levels of circulating catecholamines. The effect of BRL37344 on baseline vascular resistance was compatible with activation of β3-adrenoceptor coupling to endothelial nitric oxide synthase. The inhibitory effect of SR59230A on tyramine-stimulated norepinephrine release in both strains, the increased TPR-response to tyramine in hypertensive rats and tachycardia in normotensive rats may result from inhibition of the low-affinity-state β1-adrenoceptor, also known as the

  1. China's Economic Growth: International Spillovers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Vivek Arora; Athanasios Vamvakidis

    2011-01-01

    China's economic development since 1978 is one of the most significant events in recent history. Many aspects of this development have been extensively analyzed in the published literature. However, the implications of China 's growth for other countries have been relatively neglected. The present paper attempts to fill this gap in the literature. The paper first presents some facts on China's role in the world economy, and then measures the impact of China's growth on growth in the rest of the world in both the short term and the long term. Short-run estimates based on vector autoregression and error correction models suggest that spillover effects of China's growth have increased in recent decades, Long- term spillover effects, estimated through growth regressions based on panel data, are also significant and have extended in recent decades beyond Asia. The estimates are robust to the effects of global and regional shocks, changes in model specification, and sample period.

  2. Foreign Direct Investment and Technology Spillovers:Evidence from China’s manufacturing industry

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2011-01-01

    <正>FDI will cause technological advance in host industry by its spillover effects.The approaches of technology spillover include horizontal spillover and vertical spillover.Most scholars do research on the two kinds of spillover effects separately. Therefore,by using panel data and Malquist index of China’s manufactuting industry, this paper analyses the two spillover effects of FDI on China’s manufacturing industry in one frame in order to test scientifically the spillover effects of FDI on China’s manufacturing industry.

  3. Norepinephrine remains increased in the six-minute walking test after heart transplantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guilherme Veiga Guimarães

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: We sought to evaluate the neurohormonal activity in heart transplant recipients and compare it with that in heart failure patients and healthy subjects during rest and just after a 6-minute walking test. INTRODUCTION: Despite the improvements in quality of life and survival provided by heart transplantation, the neurohormonal profile is poorly described. METHODS: Twenty heart transplantation (18 men, 49±11 years and 8.5±3.3 years after transplantation, 11 heart failure (8 men, 43±10 years, and 7 healthy subjects (5 men 39±8 years were included in this study. Blood samples were collected immediately before and during the last minute of the exercise. RESULTS: During rest, patients' norepinephrine plasma level (659±225 pg/mL was higher in heart transplant recipients (463±167 pg/mL and heathy subjects (512±132, p<0.05. Heart transplant recipient's norepinephrine plasma level was not different than that of healthy subjects. Just after the 6-minute walking test, the heart transplant recipient's norepinephrine plasma level (1248±692 pg/mL was not different from that of heart failure patients (1174±653 pg/mL. Both these groups had a higher level than healthy subjects had (545±95 pg/mL, p<0.05. CONCLUSION: Neurohormonal activity remains increased after the 6-minute walking test after heart transplantation.

  4. A Framework for Including Family Health Spillovers in Economic Evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Janabi, Hareth; van Exel, Job; Brouwer, Werner; Coast, Joanna

    2016-02-01

    Health care interventions may affect the health of patients' family networks. It has been suggested that these "health spillovers" should be included in economic evaluation, but there is not a systematic method for doing this. In this article, we develop a framework for including health spillovers in economic evaluation. We focus on extra-welfarist economic evaluations where the objective is to maximize health benefits from a health care budget (the "health care perspective"). Our framework involves adapting the conventional cost-effectiveness decision rule to include 2 multiplier effects to internalize the spillover effects. These multiplier effects express the ratio of total health effects (for patients and their family networks) to patient health effects. One multiplier effect is specified for health benefit generated from providing a new intervention, one for health benefit displaced by funding this intervention. We show that using multiplier effects to internalize health spillovers could change the optimal funding decisions and generate additional health benefits to society.

  5. Return and Volatility Spillovers Among Asian Stock Markets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prashant Joshi

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available The study examines the return and volatility spillover among Asian stock markets in India, Hong Kong, Japan, China, Jakarta, and Korea using a six-variable asymmetric generalized autoregressive conditional heteroscedasticity–Baba, Engle, Kraft, and Kroner (GARCH-BEKK model during February 2, 2007, to February 29, 2010. The author finds evidence of bidirectional return, shock, and volatility spillover among most of the stock markets. The magnitude of volatility linkages is low indicating weak integration of Asian stock markets. The study finds that own volatility spillover is higher than cross-market spillover. The overall persistence of stock market volatility is highest for Japan (0.931 and lowest for China (0.824. The implication of weak integration is that investors will benefit from reduction of diversifiable risk.

  6. Spillover processes in the development of a sustainable consumption pattern

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thøgersen, John

    1999-01-01

    Hypotheses about possible mechanisms for spillover processes between pro-environmental behaviours are developed and tested by means of structural equation modelling. Data were collected by means of telephone interviews with a representative sample of Danish adults. Personal norms concerning...

  7. Spillover processes in the development of a sustainable consumption pattern

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thøgersen, John

    1998-01-01

    Hypotheses about possible mechanisms for spillover processes between pro-environmental behaviours are developed and tested by means of structural equation modelling. Data were collected by means of telephone interviews with a representative sample Danish adults. Personal norms concerning recycling...

  8. SPILLOVER EFFECTS OF TOURISM POLICYCHANGES ON HOSPITALITY INDUSTRIES

    OpenAIRE

    Chun-Ming Chien; Cheng-Yih Hong; Jian-Fa Li

    2014-01-01

    This study aimed at using the industry-related spillover model to examine the spillover effects of the change in tourism policy and employed the induced employment model and the gross-induced added value model to measure the employment income, gross added value, and employment creation. Our results showed evidence that the consumption of Chinese tourists visiting Taiwan has brought a substantial impact on the hospitality and restaurant industries. In addition, the economy of scale created in ...

  9. Learning from Prices, Liquidity Spillovers, and Market Segmentation

    OpenAIRE

    Giovanni Cespa; Thierry Focault

    2011-01-01

    We describe a new mechanism that explains the transmission of liquidity shocks from one security to another ("liquidity spillovers"). Dealers use prices of other securities as a source of information. As prices of less liquid securities convey less precise information, a drop in liquidity for one security raises the uncertainty for dealers in other securities, thereby affecting their liquidity. The direction of liquidity spillovers is positive if the fraction of dealers with price information...

  10. Supply Chain Fragmentation and Spillovers from Foreign Direct Investment

    OpenAIRE

    Lenaerts, K.; B. MERLEVEDE

    2012-01-01

    The literature on FDI spillovers to domestic firm productivity increasingly points to supply chain linkages with multinational firms as the main channel for positive effects. To determine local and multinational firms' relative position in the supply chain, the literature relies on input-output tables. For a panel of Romanian firms we show that the level of industry aggregation in these tables and the commonly applied definitions for vertical spillovers bear an important impact on results. Th...

  11. When is spillover from marine reserves likely to benefit fisheries?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buxton, Colin D; Hartmann, Klaas; Kearney, Robert; Gardner, Caleb

    2014-01-01

    The net movement of individuals from marine reserves (also known as no-take marine protected areas) to the remaining fishing grounds is known as spillover and is frequently used to promote reserves to fishers on the grounds that it will benefit fisheries. Here we consider how mismanaged a fishery must be before spillover from a reserve is able to provide a net benefit for a fishery. For our model fishery, density of the species being harvested becomes higher in the reserve than in the fished area but the reduction in the density and yield of the fished area was such that the net effect of the closure was negative, except when the fishery was mismanaged. The extent to which effort had to exceed traditional management targets before reserves led to a spillover benefit varied with rates of growth and movement of the model species. In general, for well-managed fisheries, the loss of yield from the use of reserves was less for species with greater movement and slower growth. The spillover benefit became more pronounced with increasing mis-management of the stocks remaining available to the fishery. This model-based result is consistent with the literature of field-based research where a spillover benefit from reserves has only been detected when the fishery is highly depleted, often where traditional fisheries management controls are absent. We conclude that reserves in jurisdictions with well-managed fisheries are unlikely to provide a net spillover benefit.

  12. Understanding Work-Family Spillover in Hotel Managers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawson, Katie M; Davis, Kelly D; Crouter, Ann C; O'Neill, John W

    2013-06-01

    The present study examined the experience of work-family spillover among 586 hotel managers (HMs) working in 50 full-service hotels throughout the U.S. Work-family spillover occurs when behaviors, moods, stresses, and emotions from work spill over into family. We first investigated which hotel managers were more likely to experience spillover and stressful work conditions based on their life circumstances (gender, parental status, age, decision-making latitude at work). Second, we investigated which work conditions (hours worked per week, organizational time expectations, emotional labor, and permeable boundaries) predicted more work-family spillover. Women, employees without children at home, and younger adults experienced the highest levels of negative work-family spillover. Work conditions, particularly organizational time expectations, put HMs at risk for experiencing more negative and less positive work-family spillover. The results provide evidence that modifying certain work conditions in the hotel industry may be helpful in improving the quality of HMs' jobs and retention.

  13. Understanding Work-Family Spillover in Hotel Managers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawson, Katie M.; Davis, Kelly D.; Crouter, Ann C.; O’Neill, John W.

    2013-01-01

    The present study examined the experience of work-family spillover among 586 hotel managers (HMs) working in 50 full-service hotels throughout the U.S. Work-family spillover occurs when behaviors, moods, stresses, and emotions from work spill over into family. We first investigated which hotel managers were more likely to experience spillover and stressful work conditions based on their life circumstances (gender, parental status, age, decision-making latitude at work). Second, we investigated which work conditions (hours worked per week, organizational time expectations, emotional labor, and permeable boundaries) predicted more work-family spillover. Women, employees without children at home, and younger adults experienced the highest levels of negative work-family spillover. Work conditions, particularly organizational time expectations, put HMs at risk for experiencing more negative and less positive work-family spillover. The results provide evidence that modifying certain work conditions in the hotel industry may be helpful in improving the quality of HMs’ jobs and retention. PMID:23888092

  14. β1-blockers lower norepinephrine release by inhibiting presynaptic, facilitating β1-adrenoceptors in normotensive and hypertensive rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Torill eBerg

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Peripheral norepinephrine release is facilitated by presynaptic β-adrenoceptors (AR, believed to involve the β2-subtype exclusively. However, β1-selective blockers are the most commonly used β-blockers in hypertension. Here I tested the hypothesis that β1AR may function as presynaptic, release-facilitating auto-receptors. Since β1AR-blockers are injected during myocardial infarction, their influence on the cardiovascular response to acute norepinephrine release was also studied. By a newly established method, using tyramine-stimulated release through the norepinephrine transporter (NET, presynaptic control of catecholamine release was studied in normotensive and spontaneously hypertensive rats. β1AR-selective antagonists (CGP20712A, atenolol, metoprolol reduced norepinephrine overflow to plasma equally efficient as β2AR-selective (ICI-118551 and β1+2AR (nadolol antagonists in both strains. Neither antagonist lowered epinephrine secretion. Atenolol, which does not cross the blood-brain barrier, reduced norepinephrine overflow after adrenalectomy, adrenalectomy+ganglion blockade, losartan or nephrectomy. Atenolol and metoprolol reduced resting cardiac work load. During tyramine-stimulated norepinephrine release, they had little effect on work load, and increased the transient rise in total peripheral vascular resistance, particularly atenolol when combined with losartan. In conclusion, β1AR, like β2AR, stimulated norepinephrine but not epinephrine release, independent of adrenal catecholamines, ganglion transmission, or renal renin release/angiotensin AT1-receptor activation. β1AR therefore functioned as a peripheral, presynaptic, facilitating auto-receptor. Like tyramine, hypoxia may induce NET-mediated release. Augmented tyramine-induced vasoconstriction, as observed after injection of β1AR-blocker, particularly atenolol combined with losartan, may hamper organ perfusion, and may have clinical relevance in hypoxic conditions such as

  15. Spillover Effects of the Russian Economy: Regional Specificity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena Anatolyevna Fedorova

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of the study is to evaluate the strength and direction of the distribution of the foreign direct investments (FDI in regional economy. The subject matter of the research is FDI to the regions of Russia. The subject of the study is relevant as it makes possible to estimate the long-term consequences from the restrictions of the West countries (in connection with sanctions against the inflow of the foreign capital to the regions of the Russian Federation. The study is based on the following hypotheses: 1. Russian regional economy has horizontal (distribution of effects from FDI within an industry and vertical spillover effects (distribution according to a technological chain, from product suppliers to product consumers. Vertical effects are more important and have greater amplitude than horizontal effects. An industry competition is one of the causes of negative horizontal spillover effect, and the scale of the company is the reason of positive horizontal spillover effect. 2. FDI generates the positive regional spillover effects on the productivity of domestic firms in the Russian economy. 3. Regional industry specificity influences the sign and magnitude of spillovers from FDI. 4. Time sensitivity is revealed for horizontal spillovers, so the regional effects may change the direction. As an empirical basis of the study, the statements of 23567 Russian companies with FDI and 25354 Russian enterprises without FDI for the 5 years were used. The methodology of the research is the calculation of spillover effects, Cobb-Douglas production function and panel data regression. The study has found, that the direct vertical spillover effects are almost absent. That means that industrial consumers do not notice the effect of inward FDI. At the same time, the converse effect related to the product suppliers is positive, but as the direct effect, it is not more important in any group of regions then the horizontal effect. The Russian economy has a

  16. Hydrogen Storage at Ambient Temperature by the Spillover Mechanism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang , Ralph T.

    2011-02-04

    The goal of this project was to develop new nanostructured sorbent materials, using the hydrogen spillover mechanism that could meet the DOE 2010 system targets for on-board vehicle hydrogen storage. Hydrogen spillover may be broadly defined as the transport (i.e., via surface diffusion) of dissociated hydrogen adsorbed or formed on a first surface onto another surface. The first surface is typically a metal (that dissociates H2) and the second surface is typically the support on which the metal is doped. Hydrogen spillover is a well documented phenomenon in the catalysis literature, and has been known in the catalysis community for over four decades, although it is still not well understood.1, 2 Much evidence has been shown in the literature on its roles played in catalytic reactions. Very little has been studied on hydrogen storage by spillover at ambient temperature. However, it is also known to occur at such temperature, e.g., direct evidence has been shown for spillover on commercial fuel-cell, highly dispersed Pt/C, Ru/C and PtRu/C catalysts by inelastic neutron scattering.3 To exploit spillover for storage, among the key questions are whether spillover is reversible at ambient temperature and if the adsorption (refill) and desorption rates at ambient temperature are fast enough for automotive applications. In this project, we explored new sorbents by using a transition metal (e.g., Pt, Ru, Pd and Ni) as the H2 dissociation source and sorbents as the hydrogen receptor. The receptors included superactivated carbons (AX-21 and Maxsorb), metal organic frameworks (MOFs) and zeolites. Different metal doping methods have been used successfully to achieve high metal dispersion thereby allowing significant spillover enhancements, as well as a bridging technique used for bridging to MOFs. Among the metals tested, Pt is the hardest to achieve high metal dispersion (and consequently spillover) while Ru is the easiest to disperse. By properly dispersing Pt on

  17. Hydrogen Storage at Ambient Temperature by the Spillover Mechanism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang , Ralph T.

    2011-02-04

    The goal of this project was to develop new nanostructured sorbent materials, using the hydrogen spillover mechanism that could meet the DOE 2010 system targets for on-board vehicle hydrogen storage. Hydrogen spillover may be broadly defined as the transport (i.e., via surface diffusion) of dissociated hydrogen adsorbed or formed on a first surface onto another surface. The first surface is typically a metal (that dissociates H2) and the second surface is typically the support on which the metal is doped. Hydrogen spillover is a well documented phenomenon in the catalysis literature, and has been known in the catalysis community for over four decades, although it is still not well understood.1, 2 Much evidence has been shown in the literature on its roles played in catalytic reactions. Very little has been studied on hydrogen storage by spillover at ambient temperature. However, it is also known to occur at such temperature, e.g., direct evidence has been shown for spillover on commercial fuel-cell, highly dispersed Pt/C, Ru/C and PtRu/C catalysts by inelastic neutron scattering.3 To exploit spillover for storage, among the key questions are whether spillover is reversible at ambient temperature and if the adsorption (refill) and desorption rates at ambient temperature are fast enough for automotive applications. In this project, we explored new sorbents by using a transition metal (e.g., Pt, Ru, Pd and Ni) as the H2 dissociation source and sorbents as the hydrogen receptor. The receptors included superactivated carbons (AX-21 and Maxsorb), metal organic frameworks (MOFs) and zeolites. Different metal doping methods have been used successfully to achieve high metal dispersion thereby allowing significant spillover enhancements, as well as a bridging technique used for bridging to MOFs. Among the metals tested, Pt is the hardest to achieve high metal dispersion (and consequently spillover) while Ru is the easiest to disperse. By properly dispersing Pt on

  18. Impaired glucose-induced thermogenesis and arterial norepinephrine response persist after weight reduction in obese humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Astrup, A; Andersen, T; Christensen, N J;

    1990-01-01

    A reduced thermic response and an impaired activation of the sympathetic nervous system (SNS) has been reported after oral glucose in human obesity. It is, however, not known whether the reduced SNS activity returns to normal along with weight reduction. The thermic effect of glucose was lower...... in eight obese patients than in matched control subjects (1.7% vs 9.2%, p less than 0.002). The increase in arterial norepinephrine after glucose was also blunted in the obese patients. After a 30-kg weight loss their glucose and lipid profiles were markedly improved but the thermic effect of glucose...... was still lower than that of the control subjects (4.2%, p less than 0.001). The glucose-induced arterial norepinephrine response remained diminished in the reduced obese patients whereas the changes in plasma epinephrine were similar in all three groups. The results suggest that a defective SNS may...

  19. Team-level flexibility, work-home spillover, and health behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moen, Phyllis; Fan, Wen; Kelly, Erin L

    2013-05-01

    Drawing on two waves of survey data conducted six months apart in 2006, this study examined the impacts of a team-level flexibility initiative (ROWE--results only work environment) on changes in the work-home spillover and health behavior of employees at the Midwest headquarters of a large U.S. corporation. Using cluster analysis, we identified three distinct baseline spillover constellations: employees with high negative spillover, high positive spillover, and low overall spillover. Within-team spillover measures were highly intercorrelated, suggesting that work teams as well as individuals have identifiable patterns of spillover. Multilevel analyses showed ROWE reduced individual- and team-level negative work-home spillover but not positive work-home spillover or spillover from home-to-work. ROWE also promoted employees' health behaviors: increasing the odds of quitting smoking, decreasing smoking frequency, and promoting perceptions of adequate time for healthy meals. Trends suggest that ROWE also decreased the odds of excessive drinking and improved sleep adequacy and exercise frequency. Some health behavior effects were mediated via reduced individual-level negative work-home spillover (exercise frequency, adequate time for sleep) and reduced team-level negative work-home spillover (smoking frequency, exercise frequency, and adequate time for sleep). While we found no moderating effects of gender, ROWE especially improved the exercise frequency of singles and reduced the smoking frequency of employees with low overall spillover at baseline.

  20. Spillover effects of oil price shocks across stock markets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Zhan Jian; Sek, Siok Kun

    2014-12-01

    Oil price shock can impose detrimental effects to an economy. In this study, we empirically study the spillover effects of oil price shock on determining volatilities of stock markets across the main oil importing and oil producing countries. In particular, we are interested to compare the relative impact of oil price shock on the volatilities of stock markets and how each stock market reacts to oil price shock for oil importing and oil producing countries. We focus the study in four main oil importer and four oil producers respectively using the daily data starting from January 2009 to December 2013. The multivariate GARCH(1,1) model is applied for the purpose of this study. The results of the study suggest that there exist spillover effect between crude oil price and stock returns for all the countries. The short run persistency of spillover effect in oil-exporting countries is lower than oil-importing countries but the long run persistency of spillover effect in oil-exporting countries is higher than oil-importing countries. In general the short run persistency is smaller and the long run persistency is very high. The results hold for volatility of oil price and stock returns and also spillover volatility in all countries.

  1. Volatility Spillovers in Capesize Forward Freight Agreement Markets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoxing Gong

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper is to investigate spillovers in the Capesize forward freight agreements (FFAs markets before and after the global financial crisis. The paper chooses four Capesize voyage routes FFAs (C3, C4, C5, and C7, two time-charter routes FFAs (BCIT/C average, BPI T/C average, and spot rates as research subjects, covering the periods 3 January 2006 to 24 December 2015. This paper applies Volatility Spillover Multivariate Stochastic Volatility (VS-MSV model to analyze volatility spillover effects and estimates the parameters via software of Bayesian inference using Gibbs Sampling (BUGS, the deviance information criterion (DIC used for goodness-of-fit model. The results suggest that there are volatility spillover effects in certain Capesize FFAs routes, and the effects from spot rates to FFAs take place before crisis, yet they are bilateral after crisis. With the development of shipping markets, the correlations between FFAs and spot rate are enhanced, and it seems that the effects depend on market information and traders’ behavior. So practitioners could make decisions according to the spillovers.

  2. Trade, Foreign Direct Investment and R&D Spillovers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaehwa Lee

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available The paper examines the evidence of R & D spillovers through trade and foreign direct investment at the industrial sectoral level. Specifically, it focuses on the appropriate measure of foreign R&D stocks embodied in imports, and proposes an alternative measure to the traditional measure. With a new measure of foreign technology, this paper then empirically distinguishes between R&D spillovers from import volume and from import variety. Panel estimations with fixed effects use a data set comprised of eight sectors in the manufacturing industry of thirteen OECD countries from 1981 to 1999. This empirical work at disaggregated level has shown the evidence to generally support the role of manufacturing imports in the international diffusion of technology. In particular, the results imply that the impact of import variety proves stronger and more significant in investigating trade-related R&D spillovers. The evidence indicates the variety effect dominates the volume effect, and hence import variety proves more important in explaining trade-related technological diffusion. This paper also investigates R&D spillovers occurring simultaneously through trade and non-trade (i.e., FDI channels, Empirical results provide no strong evidence on R&D spillovers through FDI, although FDI is often considered as an important channel for technological diffusion. The evidence implies that the effect of trade channel dominates that of the FDI channel and finds that FDI only weakly affects domestic productivity.

  3. What turns knowledge into innovative products? The role of entrepreneurship and knowledge spillovers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Block, Joern H.; Thurik, Roy; Zhou, Haibo

    2013-01-01

    The knowledge spillover theory of entrepreneurship seeks to explain the fundamentals and consequences of entrepreneurship with respect to economic performance. This paper uses the knowledge spillover theory to explain different innovation outcomes. We hypothesize that a high rate of entrepreneurship

  4. Observed Punishment Spillover Effects: A Laboratory Investigation of Behavior in a Social Dilemma.

    OpenAIRE

    David L. Dickinson; E. Glenn Dutcher; Rodet, Cortney S.

    2013-01-01

    Punishment has been shown to be an effective reinforcement mechanism. Intentional or not, punishment will likely generate spillover effects that extend beyond one’s immediate decision environment, and these spillovers are not as well understood. We seek to understand these secondary spillover effects in a controlled lab setting using a standard social dilemma: the voluntary contributions mechanism. We find that spillovers occur when others observe punishment outside their own social dilemma. ...

  5. Punishment History and Spillover Effects: A Laboratory Investigation of Behavior in a Social Dilemma

    OpenAIRE

    David L. Dickinson; E. Glenn Dutcher; Rodet, Cortney S.

    2011-01-01

    Punishment has been shown to be an effective reinforcement mechanism. Intentional or not, punishment will likely generate spillover effects that extend beyond one’s immediate decision environment, and these spillovers are not as well understood. We seek to understand these secondary spillover effects in a controlled lab setting using a standard social dilemma: the voluntary contributions mechanism game. We find that spillovers from punishment lead to either more or less cooperative behavior d...

  6. Spillover Effects of Early-Life Medical Interventions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Breining, Sanni Nørgaard; Daysal, N. Meltem; Simonsen, Marianne;

    2015-01-01

    substantial positive spillovers on all our measures of academic achievement. Our estimates suggest that siblings of focal children who were slightly below the VLBW cutoff have higher 9th grade language and math test scores, as well as higher probability of enrolling in a high school by age 19. Our results......We investigate the spillover effects of early-life medical treatments on the siblings of treated children. We use a regression discontinuity design that exploits changes in medical treatments across the very low birth weight (VLBW) cutoff. Using administrative data from Denmark, we first confirm...... the findings in the previous literature that children who are slightly below the VLBW cutoff have better short- and long-term health, and higher math test scores in 9th grade. We next investigate spillover effects on siblings and find no evidence of an impact on their health outcomes. However, we find...

  7. Road infrastructure, spatial spillover and county economic growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Zhenhua; Luo, Shuang

    2017-09-01

    This paper analyzes the spatial spillover effect of road infrastructure on the economic growth of poverty-stricken counties, based on the spatial Durbin model, by using the panel data of 37 poor counties in Hunan province from 2006 to 2015. The results showed that there is a significant spatial dependence of economic growth in Poor Counties. Road infrastructure has a positive impact on economic growth, and the results will be overestimated without considering spatial factors. Considering the spatial factors, the road infrastructure will promote the economic growth of the surrounding areas through the spillover effect, but the spillover effect is restricted by the distance factor. Capital investment is the biggest factor of economic growth in poor counties, followed by urbanization, labor force and regional openness.

  8. Volatility Spillover pada Pasar Saham Indonesia, Cina, dan India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Martin

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Globalization and advanced information technology easing us for obtaining information from global stock markets. With that condition, volatility in domestic capital market could be affected by volatility from global stock markets. The effect would have greater impact if the capital markets are located in same region. That concern will be answered in this research, about volatility spillover in Indonesia, China, and India capital market. This research using daily return data from each country indices from January 1, 2006 until April 20, 2010 applying econometric model GARCH (1,1. The result showing us that there is bidirectional volatility spillover between Indonesia and India. Meanwhile, there is only single way volatility spillover between Indonesia and China. 

  9. Volatility Spillover pada Pasar Saham Indonesia, Cina, dan India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Surya Mulyadi

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Globalization and advanced information technology easing us for obtaining information from global stock markets. With that condition, volatility in domestic capital market could be affected by volatility from global stock markets. The effect would have greater impact if the capital markets are located in same region. That concern will be answered in this research, about volatility spillover in Indonesia, China, and India capital market. This research using daily return data from each country indices from January 1, 2006 until April 20, 2010 applying econometric model GARCH (1,1. The result showing us that there is bidirectional volatility spillover between Indonesia and India. Meanwhile, there is only single way volatility spillover between Indonesia and China.

  10. Vertical spillovers from multinational enterprises: Does technological gap matter?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pittiglio Rosanna

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Foreign direct investment (FDI from Multinational enterprises (MNEs can augment the productivity of domestic firms insofar as knowledge “spills over” from foreign investors to local producers. The capacity of local companies to exploit knowledge from MNEs can be affected by the technology gap between foreign and local enterprises at both horizontal (in the same industry and vertical (in different industries level. Whereas most of the empirical literature has focused exclusively on the analysis of horizontal and backward spillovers (i.e. between MNEs and local suppliers, the present paper also examines the relationship between FDI-related spillovers and technological gap in the Italian manufacturing sector at forward level (i.e. between MNEs and local buyers. Results suggest that at both intra-industry and forward level, the technological gap is of considerable importance for the spillover effect, particularly in the case of low-medium gap.

  11. Spillover effects of a community-managed marine reserve.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isabel Marques da Silva

    Full Text Available The value of no-take marine reserves as fisheries-management tools is controversial, particularly in high-poverty areas where human populations depend heavily on fish as a source of protein. Spillover, the net export of adult fish, is one mechanism by which no-take marine reserves may have a positive influence on adjacent fisheries. Spillover can contribute to poverty alleviation, although its effect is modulated by the number of fishermen and fishing intensity. In this study, we quantify the effects of a community-managed marine reserve in a high poverty area of Northern Mozambique. For this purpose, underwater visual censuses of reef fish were undertaken at three different times: 3 years before (2003, at the time of establishment (2006 and 6 years after the marine reserve establishment (2012. The survey locations were chosen inside, outside and on the border of the marine reserve. Benthic cover composition was quantified at the same sites in 2006 and 2012. After the reserve establishment, fish sizes were also estimated. Regression tree models show that the distance from the border and the time after reserve establishment were the variables with the strongest effect on fish abundance. The extent and direction of the spillover depends on trophic group and fish size. Poisson Generalized Linear Models show that, prior to the reserve establishment, the survey sites did not differ but, after 6 years, the abundance of all fish inside the reserve has increased and caused spillover of herbivorous fish. Spillover was detected 1 km beyond the limit of the reserve for small herbivorous fishes. Six years after the establishment of a community-managed reserve, the fish assemblages have changed dramatically inside the reserve, and spillover is benefitting fish assemblages outside the reserve.

  12. Glibenclamide dose response in patients with septic shock: effects on norepinephrine requirements, cardiopulmonary performance, and global oxygen transport.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morelli, Andrea; Lange, Matthias; Ertmer, Christian; Broeking, Katrin; Van Aken, Hugo; Orecchioni, Alessandra; Rocco, Monica; Bachetoni, Alessandra; Traber, Daniel L; Landoni, Giovanni; Pietropaoli, Paolo; Westphal, Martin

    2007-11-01

    Adenosine triphosphate-sensitive potassium channels are important regulators of arterial vascular smooth muscle tone and are implicated in the pathophysiology of catecholamine tachyphylaxis in septic shock. The present study was designed as a prospective, randomized, double-blinded, clinical pilot study to determine whether different doses of glibenclamide have any effects on norepinephrine requirements, cardiopulmonary hemodynamics, and global oxygen transport in patients with septic shock. We enrolled 30 patients with septic shock requiring invasive hemodynamic monitoring and norepinephrine infusion of 0.5 microg.kg-1.min-1 or greater to maintain MAP between 65 and 75 mmHg. In addition to standard therapy, patients were randomized to receive either 10, 20, or 30 mg of enteral glibenclamide. Systemic hemodynamics, global oxygen transport including arterial lactate concentrations, gas exchange, plasma glucose concentrations, and electrolytes were determined at baseline and after 3, 6, and 12 h after administration of the study drug. Glibenclamide decreased plasma glucose concentrations in a dose-dependent manner but failed to reduce norepinephrine requirements. None of the doses had any effects on cardiopulmonary hemodynamics, global oxygen transport, gas exchange, or electrolytes. These data suggest that oral glibenclamide in doses from 10 to 30 mg fails to counteract arterial hypotension and thus to reduce norepinephrine requirements in catecholamine-dependent human septic shock.

  13. Technology transfers, foreign investment and productivity spillovers: evidence from Vietnam

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Newman, Carol; Rand, John; Talbot, Theodore Purdendu

    FDI through vertical linkages along the supply chain. Our results suggest that domestic firms experience more productivity spillovers through forward linkages from foreign-input suppliers to domestic input users than through backward linkages from foreign customers to domestic producers of inputs......This paper provides new evidence on the relationship between foreign direct investment (FDI) and the productivity of domestic firms. Using a specially designed survey on a sample of over 7,500 manufacturing firms in Vietnam we uncover some of the mechanisms that explain productivity spillovers from...

  14. Parasite zoonoses and wildlife: One Health, spillover and human activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, R C Andrew

    2013-11-01

    This review examines parasite zoonoses and wildlife in the context of the One Health triad that encompasses humans, domestic animals, wildlife and the changing ecosystems in which they live. Human (anthropogenic) activities influence the flow of all parasite infections within the One Health triad and the nature and impact of resulting spillover events are examined. Examples of spillover from wildlife to humans and/or domestic animals, and vice versa, are discussed, as well as emerging issues, particularly the need for parasite surveillance of wildlife populations. Emphasis is given to Trypanosoma cruzi and related species in Australian wildlife, Trichinella, Echinococcus, Giardia, Baylisascaris, Toxoplasma and Leishmania.

  15. Intended R&D Knowledge Spillover - Strategy for Innovation Leadership

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Harryson, Sigvald; Søberg, Peder Veng

    2009-01-01

    , inhibit companies striving for innovation leadership. In our enquiry into R&D knowledge spillover effects on innovation, we develop case studies from Fastcar and Bigpack. The resulting theoretical framework, built on selected networking and knowledge creation theories, is illustrated through the two case...... studies and useful for further analysis of positive R&D knowledge spillover effects. By proactively facilitating knowledge sharing with relevant parts of the surrounding environment, the company enables itself to feed knowledge into its surrounding environment - thereby developing the innovation potential...

  16. Technology transfers, foreign investment and productivity spillovers: evidence from Vietnam

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Newman, Carol; Rand, John; Talbot, Theodore Purdendu

    This paper provides new evidence on the relationship between foreign direct investment (FDI) and the productivity of domestic firms. Using a specially designed survey on a sample of over 7,500 manufacturing firms in Vietnam we uncover some of the mechanisms that explain productivity spillovers from....... Productivity externalities from upstream sectors are associated with joint venture foreign investors while downstream sectors experience direct technology transfers from upstream wholly foreign owned investors. Spillovers from FDI through backward linkages are also detected but only when competition from...

  17. Volatility-Spillover E ffects in European Bond Markets

    OpenAIRE

    Christiansen, Charlotte

    2003-01-01

    We analyze volatility spillover from the US and aggregate European bond markets into individual European bond markets using a GARCH volatility-spillover model. We find strong statistical evidence of volatility-spillover e ffects from both the US and Europe into the individual bond markets.For the EMU countries,the US volatility-spillover effects are rather weak whereas the European volatility-spillover effects are strong.The opposite applies to the non-EMU countries.Pure local volatility e ffect...

  18. Norepinephrine-induced diuresis in chronically ethanol-treated rats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pohorecky, L.A. (Rutgers Univ., Piscataway, NJ (USA))

    1989-01-01

    Previous research from this laboratory indicated that noradrenergic mechanisms might mediate ethanol diuresis. Experiments described here examined changes in sensitivity of noradrenergic mechanisms in animals chronically treated with ethanol. Norepinephrine hydrochloride (0-12 ug intracerebroventricularly) produced dose-dependent diuresis in control and ethanol treated rats on the first day of treatment. Tolerance to ethanol diuresis was present after 10 day of ethanol treatment. Lack of responsiveness to norepinephrine-induced diuresis was evident only on the 20th day of treatment in both the ethanol and dextrin-maltose groups of rats. These results indicate a temporal dissociation between the tolerance to ethanol-induced and norepinephrine-induced diuresis and suggest that norepinephrine may not play a primary role in the development of tolerance to the diuretic action of ethanol.

  19. Do farmers internalise environmental spillovers of pesticides in production?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Skevas, T.; Stefanou, S.E.; Oude Lansink, A.G.J.M.

    2013-01-01

    Pesticides are used in agriculture to protect crops from pests and diseases, with indiscriminate pesticide use having several adverse effects on the environment and human health. An important question is whether the environmental spillovers of pesticides also affect the farmers’ production environme

  20. Volatility Spillovers from the Chinese Stock Market to Economic Neighbours

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    D.E. Allen (David); M.J. McAleer (Michael); R. Amram (Ron)

    2011-01-01

    textabstractThis paper examines whether there is evidence of spillovers of volatility from the Chinese stock market to its neighbours and trading partners, including Australia, Hong Kong, Singapore, Japan and USA. China’s increasing integration into the global market may have important

  1. Analysis of Spillover Effect in Cooperative Knowledge Innovation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Cui-juan; XUAN Guo-liang

    2006-01-01

    The paper supposes knowledge innovation as process innovation, revises AJ model and makes Oligopolistic Markets Model of two stages. It compares profit and social welfare between firms in the condition of cooperation and non-cooperation. It draws the conclusion that cooperative knowledge innovation can get much more benefit because of spillover effect of knowledge.

  2. FDI spillovers, absorptive capacities and human capital development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Narula, Rajneesh; Marin, Anabel

    2003-01-01

    It is nowadays generally accepted that inward foreign direct investment (FDI) is crucialas a source of technological spillovers. One of the objectives of this paper is to review theevidence on the quantity and quality of human capital employed by domestic and foreignfirms. We examine whether spil...

  3. Controlling a spillover pathway with the molecular cork effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcinkowski, Matthew D; Jewell, April D; Stamatakis, Michail; Boucher, Matthew B; Lewis, Emily A; Murphy, Colin J; Kyriakou, Georgios; Sykes, E Charles H

    2013-06-01

    Spillover of reactants from one active site to another is important in heterogeneous catalysis and has recently been shown to enhance hydrogen storage in a variety of materials. The spillover of hydrogen is notoriously hard to detect or control. We report herein that the hydrogen spillover pathway on a Pd/Cu alloy can be controlled by reversible adsorption of a spectator molecule. Pd atoms in the Cu surface serve as hydrogen dissociation sites from which H atoms can spillover onto surrounding Cu regions. Selective adsorption of CO at these atomic Pd sites is shown to either prevent the uptake of hydrogen on, or inhibit its desorption from, the surface. In this way, the hydrogen coverage on the whole surface can be controlled by molecular adsorption at a minority site, which we term a 'molecular cork' effect. We show that the molecular cork effect is present during a surface catalysed hydrogenation reaction and illustrate how it can be used as a method for controlling uptake and release of hydrogen in a model storage system.

  4. Modelling Volatility Spillovers for Bio-ethanol, Sugarcane and Corn

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    C-L. Chang (Chia-Lin); M.J. McAleer (Michael); Y-A. Wang (Yu-Ann)

    2016-01-01

    textabstractThe recent and rapidly growing interest in biofuel as a green energy source has raised concerns about its impact on the prices, returns and volatility of related agricultural commodities. Analyzing the spillover effects on agricultural commodities and biofuel helps commodity suppliers

  5. Blood Is Thicker: Moral Spillover Effects Based on Kinship

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uhlmann, Eric Luis; Zhu, Luke; Pizarro, David A.; Bloom, Paul

    2012-01-01

    Three empirical studies document the intuitive spillover of moral taint from a person who engages in immoral acts to another individual who is related by ties of blood kinship. In Study 1, participants were more likely to recommend that the biological grandchild of a wrongdoer, compared to a non-biological grandchild, help the descendants of his…

  6. University Knowledge Spillovers & Regional Start-up Rates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hellerstedt, Karin; Wennberg, Karl; Frederiksen, Lars

    2014-01-01

    This chapter investigates how regional start-up rates in the knowledge-intensive services and high-tech industries are influenced by knowledge spillovers from both universities and firm-based R&D activities. Integrating insights from economic geography and organizational ecology into the literatu...

  7. Domestic Plant Productivity and Incremental Spillovers from Foreign Direct Investment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    C. Altomonte (Carlo); H.P.G. Pennings (Enrico)

    2009-01-01

    textabstractWe develop a simple test to assess whether horizontal spillover effects from multinational to domestic firms are endogenous to the market structure generated by the incremental entry of the same multinationals. In particular, we analyze the performance of a panel of 10,650 firms operatin

  8. Technological spillovers and industrial growth in Chinese regions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wang, L.; Meijers, H.H.M.; Szirmai, A.

    2013-01-01

    This paper focuses on the role of interregional technology spillovers in the process of industrial growth in Chinese regions in the period 1990-2005. Inflows of FDI increased rapidly from 1990 till 1998, slowing down thereafter. Domestic R&D investment accelerated after 1998. Regional industrial gro

  9. Volatility Spillovers from the Chinese Stock Market to Economic Neighbours

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    D.E. Allen (David); M.J. McAleer (Michael); R. Amram (Ron)

    2011-01-01

    textabstractThis paper examines whether there is evidence of spillovers of volatility from the Chinese stock market to its neighbours and trading partners, including Australia, Hong Kong, Singapore, Japan and USA. China’s increasing integration into the global market may have important consequences

  10. Modelling Volatility Spillovers for Bio-ethanol, Sugarcane and Corn

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    C-L. Chang (Chia-Lin); M.J. McAleer (Michael); Y-A. Wang (Yu-Ann)

    2016-01-01

    textabstractThe recent and rapidly growing interest in biofuel as a green energy source has raised concerns about its impact on the prices, returns and volatility of related agricultural commodities. Analyzing the spillover effects on agricultural commodities and biofuel helps commodity suppliers he

  11. Volatility Spillovers from Australia's Major Trading Partners across the GFC

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    D.E. Allen (David); M.J. McAleer (Michael); R.J. Powell (Robert); A.K. Singh (Abhay)

    2014-01-01

    markdownabstract__Abstract__ This paper features an analysis of volatility spillover effects from Australia's major trading partners, namely, China, Japan, Korea and the United States, for a period running from 12th September 2002 to 9th September 2012. This captures the impact of the Global Financ

  12. Spillover in the Academy: Marriage Stability and Faculty Evaluations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ludlow, Larry H.; Alvarez-Salvat, Rose M.

    2001-01-01

    Studied the spillover between family and work by examining the link between marital status and work performance across marriage, divorce, and remarriage. A polynomial regression model was fit to the data from 78 evaluations of an individual professor, and a cubic curve through the 3 periods was statistically significant. (SLD)

  13. Knowledge spillovers from FDI: Towards a general framework

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vaal, A. de; Smeets, R.A.L.M.

    2005-01-01

    This paper develops a conceptual framework that allows for a consistent and coherent treatment of knowledge spillovers from FDI. In this framework, three aspects play a crucial role. First, FDI is a general notion that actually comprises a host of different investment types. Second, the number

  14. Technological spillovers and industrial growth in Chinese regions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wang, L.; Meijers, H.H.M.; Szirmai, A.

    2013-01-01

    This paper focuses on the role of interregional technology spillovers in the process of industrial growth in Chinese regions in the period 1990-2005. Inflows of FDI increased rapidly from 1990 till 1998, slowing down thereafter. Domestic R&D investment accelerated after 1998. Regional industrial

  15. Bank/sovereign Risk Spillovers in the European Debt Crisis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Bruyckere, V.; Gerhardt, M.; Schepens, G.

    2012-01-01

    Abstract: This paper investigates contagion between bank risk and sovereign risk in Europe over the period 2006-2011. Since this period covers various stages of the banking and sovereign crisis, it offers a fertile ground to analyze bank/sovereign risk spillovers. We define contagion as excess

  16. NREL Advances Spillover Materials for Hydrogen Storage (Fact Sheet)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2010-12-01

    This fact sheet describes NREL's accomplishments in advancing spillover materials for hydrogen storage and improving the reproducible synthesis, long-term durability, and material costs of hydrogen storage materials. Work was performed by NREL's Chemical and Materials Science Center.

  17. Do farmers internalise environmental spillovers of pesticides in production?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Skevas, T.; Stefanou, S.E.; Oude Lansink, A.G.J.M.

    2013-01-01

    Pesticides are used in agriculture to protect crops from pests and diseases, with indiscriminate pesticide use having several adverse effects on the environment and human health. An important question is whether the environmental spillovers of pesticides also affect the farmers’ production

  18. Spillover Effects of Early-Life Medical Interventions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Breining, Sanni Nørgaard; Daysal, N. Meltem; Simonsen, Marianne

    2015-01-01

    substantial positive spillovers on all our measures of academic achievement. Our estimates suggest that siblings of focal children who were slightly below the VLBW cutoff have higher 9th grade language and math test scores, as well as higher probability of enrolling in a high school by age 19. Our results...

  19. Spillover of Fatty acids during dietary fat storage in type 2 diabetes: relationship to body fat depots and effects of weight loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almandoz, Jaime P; Singh, Ekta; Howell, Lisa A; Grothe, Karen; Vlazny, Danielle T; Smailovic, Almira; Irving, Brian A; Nelson, Robert H; Miles, John M

    2013-06-01

    Spillover of lipoprotein lipase-generated fatty acids from chylomicrons into the plasma free fatty acid (FFA) pool is an important source of FFA and reflects inefficiency in dietary fat storage. We measured spillover in 13 people with type 2 diabetes using infusions of a [(3)H]triolein-labeled lipid emulsion and [U-(13)C]oleate during continuous feeding, before and after weight loss. Body fat was measured with dual energy X-ray absorptiometry and computed tomography. Participants lost ∼14% of body weight. There was an ∼38% decrease in meal-suppressed FFA concentration (P fat (r = -0.79, P = 0.001) and a positive correlation with the trunk-to-leg fat ratio (R = 0.56, P = 0.047). These correlations disappeared after weight loss. Baseline leg fat (R = -0.61, P = 0.027) but not trunk fat (R = -0.27, P = 0.38) negatively predicted decreases in spillover with weight loss. These results indicate that spillover, a measure of inefficiency in dietary fat storage, is inversely associated with lower body fat in type 2 diabetes.

  20. Norepinephrine and Epinephrine Enhanced the Infectivity of Enterovirus 71.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-Ting Liao

    Full Text Available Enterovirus 71 (EV71 infections may be associated with neurological complications, including brainstem encephalitis (BE. Severe EV71 BE may be complicated with autonomic nervous system (ANS dysregulation and/or pulmonary edema (PE. ANS dysregulation is related to the overactivation of the sympathetic nervous system, which results from catecholamine release.The aims of this study were to explore the effects of catecholamines on severe EV71 infection and to investigate the changes in the percentages of EV71-infected cells, virus titer, and cytokine production on the involvement of catecholamines.Plasma levels of norepinephrine (NE and epinephrine (EP in EV71-infected patients were measured using an enzyme-linked immunoassay. The expression of adrenergic receptors (ADRs on RD, A549, SK-N-SH, THP-1, Jurkat and human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (hPBMCs were detected using flow cytometry. The percentages of EV71-infected cells, virus titer, and cytokine production were investigated after treatment with NE and EP.The plasma levels of NE and EP were significantly higher in EV71-infected patients with ANS dysregulation and PE than in controls. Both α1A- and β2-ADRs were expressed on A549, RD, SK-N-SH, HL-60, THP-1, Jurkat cells and hPBMCs. NE treatment elevated the percentages of EV71-infected cells to 62.9% and 22.7% in THP-1 and Jurkat cells, respectively. Via treatment with EP, the percentages of EV71-infected cells were increased to 64.6% and 26.9% in THP-1 and Jurkat cells. The percentage of EV71-infected cells increased upon NE or EP treatment while the α- and β-blockers reduced the percentages of EV71-infected cells with NE or EP treatment. At least two-fold increase in virus titer was observed in EV71-infected A549, SK-N-SH and hPBMCs after treatment with NE or EP. IL-6 production was enhanced in EV71-infected hPBMCs at a concentration of 102 pg/mL NE.The plasma levels of NE and EP elevated in EV71-infected patients with ANS

  1. The role of norepinephrine and insulin resistance in an early stage of hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penesova, Adela; Radikova, Zofia; Cizmarova, Eva; Kvetnanský, Richard; Blazicek, Pavel; Vlcek, Miroslav; Koska, Juraj; Vigas, Milan

    2008-12-01

    The interrelationship between activity of sympathetic nervous system and metabolic risk factors in youth with hypertension (HT) has been poorly studied. The aim of our present study was to assess the interrelationship between metabolic risk factors, such as insulin resistance, concentration of plasminogen activator inhibitor (PAI)-1, and catecholamines in an early stage of HT onset. An oral glucose tolerance test was performed in 17 young males with early-diagnosed nontreated HT grade 1 and 16 gender-, age-, and BMI-matched normotensive controls. Concentrations of glucose, insulin, epinephrine, norepinephrine, PAI-1, and plasma renin activity (PRA) were determined in venous plasma. Insulin sensitivity indices (ISIs) proposed by Cederholm, Matsuda, and Gutt were calculated. HT had higher baseline levels of norepinephrine, insulin (P= 0.02), and PAI-1 (P= 0.04). ISIs were lower in HT subjects (P < 0.001). Baseline concentrations of epinephrine were negatively associated with HDL cholesterol (r=-0.415, P= 0.02), ISI Matsuda (r=-0.361, P= 0.04), ISI Cederholm (r=-0.354, P= 0.04), and ISI Gutt (r=-0.429, P= 0.01), and positively with PRA (r= 0.609, P < 0.0001). Positive association was found between baseline concentrations of norepinephrine and PAI-1 (r= 0.418, P= 0.02). The sympathetic overactivity, which occurs in the early stage of HT may contribute to reduced insulin sensitivity even in young patients and intensify the undesirable development of metabolic cardiovascular risk factors and progress of the disease.

  2. Desvenlafaxine succinate: A new serotonin and norepinephrine reuptake inhibitor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deecher, Darlene C; Beyer, Chad E; Johnston, Grace; Bray, Jenifer; Shah, S; Abou-Gharbia, M; Andree, Terrance H

    2006-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to characterize a new chemical entity, desvenlafaxine succinate (DVS). DVS is a novel salt form of the isolated major active metabolite of venlafaxine. Competitive radioligand binding assays were performed using cells expressing either the human serotonin (5-HT) transporter (hSERT) or norepinephrine (NE) transporter (hNET) with K(i) values for DVS of 40.2 +/- 1.6 and 558.4 +/- 121.6 nM, respectively. DVS showed weak binding affinity (62% inhibition at 100 microM) at the human dopamine (DA) transporter. Inhibition of [3H]5-HT or [3H]NE uptake by DVS for the hSERT or hNET produced IC50 values of 47.3 +/- 19.4 and 531.3 +/- 113.0 nM, respectively. DVS (10 microM), examined at a large number of nontransporter targets, showed no significant activity. DVS (30 mg/kg orally) rapidly penetrated the male rat brain and hypothalamus. DVS (30 mg/kg orally) significantly increased extracellular NE levels compared with baseline in the male rat hypothalamus but had no effect on DA levels using microdialysis. To mimic chronic selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor treatment and to block the inhibitory 5-HT(1A) autoreceptors, a 5-HT(1A) antagonist, N-[2-[4-(2-methoxyphenyl)-1-piperazinyl]ethyl]-N-2-pyridinylcyclo hexanecarboxamide maleate salt (WAY-100635) (0.3 mg/kg s.c.), was administered with DVS (30 mg/kg orally). 5-HT increased 78% compared with baseline with no additional increase in NE or DA levels. In conclusion, DVS is a new 5-HT and NE reuptake inhibitor in vitro and in vivo that demonstrates good brain-to-plasma ratios, suggesting utility in a variety of central nervous system-related disorders.

  3. Learning from Prices, Liquidity Spillovers, and Market Segmentation

    OpenAIRE

    Giovanni Cespa; Thierry Focault

    2011-01-01

    We describe a new mechanism that explains the transmission of liquidity shocks from one security to another (“liquidity spillovers”). Dealers use prices of other securities as a source of information. As prices of less liquid securities convey less precise information, a drop in liquidity for one security raises the uncertainty for dealers in other securities, thereby affecting their liquidity. The direction of liquidity spillovers is positive if the fraction of dealers with price information...

  4. Ballroom Music Spillover into a Beluga Whale Aquarium Exhibit

    OpenAIRE

    Scheifele, Peter M.; John Greer Clark; Kristine Sonstrom; Huikwan Kim; Gopu Potty; Miller, James H.; Eric Gaglione

    2012-01-01

    It is not uncommon for modern aquaria to be built with special entertainment areas. There are no known measurements of sound spillover from such entertainment areas into underwater animal exhibits. Entertainment organizations typically prefer to play music for events at 95 and 100 dBA in a ballroom at Georgia Aquarium. Concern over the potential effects of the music and noise on animals in adjacent exhibits inspired an initial project to monitor and compare sound levels in the adjacent underw...

  5. Volatility spillover in Indonesia, USA, and Japan capital market

    OpenAIRE

    Mulyadi, Martin Surya

    2009-01-01

    Globalization and advanced information technology easing us for obtaining information from global stock markets. With that condition, volatility in domestic capital market could be affected by volatility from global stock markets. That concern will be answered in this research, about volatility spillover in Indonesia, USA, and Japan capital market. This research using daily return data from each country indices from January 2004 until December 2008 employing econometric model GARCH (1,1). ...

  6. Integration of Capital, Commodity and Currency Markets: A Study on Volatility Spillover

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suhail Palakkod

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The volatility spillover tells about the extent of the integration between different markets. In this study an effort has been made to analyse the integration and interrelationship among the capital market, currency market and commodity market in India through the volatility spillover frame work by using AR (1-GARCH (1,1 approach. This study differentiates from the earlier studies by including all three segments of the markets. The study found out that the volatility spillover from currency markets and commodity markets to capital markets. Likewise the volatility spillover from capital market to currency markets and there is no spillover from commodity market to currency markets. In case of commodity market there is no evidence of volatility spillover

  7. Capturing volatility and its spillover in South Asian countries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruchika Gahlota

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper intends to study volatility and its spillover among South Asian Countries through use of Granger causality test. Using the daily closing prices of major index of each country in South Asia, the Granger causality and C GARCH M models asses the impact of recession on the nature of volatility by decomposing the long period into two sub periods. The study finds significant bidirectional causality between Stock market of U.S. and India for both short terms as well as for long term which is not disturbed by recession. But the recession has changed causal relation among other countries. The recession has created higher shock impact on the permanent component of the volatility of stock market of all South Asian countries. It is also observed that volatility of all South Asian countries is of long term nature. In addition, the observed spillover effects are unstable over time in the sense that the spillover changed its nature after beginning of recession.

  8. An association study between the norepinephrine transporter gene and depression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buttenschøn, Henriette N; Jacobsen, Iben S; Grynderup, Matias B;

    2013-01-01

    A2 for solute carrier 6 family member 2). The gene is responsible for the reuptake of norepinephrine and dopamine into presynaptic nerve terminals and the norepinephrine system appears to play an important role in depression. We therefore analyzed genetic variants within SLC6A2 for association......A potential approach for identification of candidate genes for depression is characterization of chromosomal rearrangements. Through analysis of a chromosome translocation in an individual with recurrent depression, we identified a potential candidate gene: the norepinephrine transporter (NET; SLC6...... with depression in 408 affected and 559 control individuals from Denmark. After quality control of the genotypes, 31 of 45 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were left for analyses. One SNP showed a nominal association with depression but did not survive correction for multiple testing. The results from our...

  9. INTERNATIONAL TRANSMISSION OF STOCK RETURNS: MEAN AND VOLATILITY SPILLOVER EFFECTS IN INDONESIA AND MALAYSIA

    OpenAIRE

    Trang Nha Le; Makoto Kakinaka

    2010-01-01

    This paper examines the mean return and volatility spillover effects from the three influential stock markets of the US, Japan, and China to the two emerging stock markets of Indonesia and Malaysia over the sample period from 2005 to 2007. By analyzing GARCH models, we verify that there are significant mean spillover effects from the three major markets to the two emerging markets. The magnitude of the mean spillover from the US market is the most significant compared to the Japanese and Chin...

  10. Inter-Regional Volatility Spillovers Between Emerging Capital Markets: Evidence From Turkey And Brazil

    OpenAIRE

    Tasdemir, Murat; Yalama, Abdullah

    2010-01-01

    This study investigates volatility spillovers between two stock markets, Turkish and Brazilian, located in different regions of the world. Using a misspecification robust causality-in-variance test, we found strong evidence supporting volatility spillovers from Istanbul Stock Exchange (ISE) to São Paulo Stock Exchange (BOVESPA). The results imply that financial crises may change the size and the direction of volatility spillovers between markets.

  11. Conditional Autoregregressive Range (CARR) Based Volatility Spillover Index For the Eurozone Markets

    OpenAIRE

    Bayraci, Selcuk; Demiralay, Sercan

    2013-01-01

    : We examine the volatility spillovers among major Eurozone countries employing the Diebold and Yilmaz (2012) model with time-varying conditional ranges generated from conditional autoregressive range (CARR) model of Chou (2005). The empirical findings, based on a data set covering a fifteen year period (1998-2013), suggest a total volatility spillover index in a very high degree. 74.9% of total volatility in the Eurozone markets is attributed to spillover effects from other markets. Moreover...

  12. Price Volatility Spillover in Agricultural Markets: An Examination of U.S. Catfish Markets

    OpenAIRE

    Buguk, Cumhur; Hudson, Darren; Hanson, Terrill R.

    2003-01-01

    Price volatility spillovers in the U.S. catfish supply chain are analyzed based on monthly price data from 1980 through 2000 for catfish feed, its ingredients, and farm- and wholesale-level catfish. The exponential generalized autoregressive conditional heteroskedasticity (EGARCH) model was used to test univariate volatility spillovers for prices in the supply chain. Strong price volatility spillover from feeding material (corn, soybeans, menhaden) to catfish feed and farm- and wholesale-leve...

  13. Productivity Spillovers From Foreign Direct Investment: Evidence From UK Industry Level Panel Data

    OpenAIRE

    2000-01-01

    This paper examines intra-industry productivity spillovers from foreign direct investment (FDI) in the UK manufacturing sector. The empirical analysis uses panel data for 48 UK industries over the period 1991 – 1995. A major contribution is empirical evidence on spillover effects in situations where the host country is developed. The results indicate that the very presence of FDI has a positive spillover impact on the productivity of UK-owned firms. The analysis also shows that the extent to ...

  14. Norepinephrine Regulates Condylar Bone Loss via Comorbid Factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiao, K; Niu, L; Xu, X; Liu, Y; Li, X; Tay, F R; Wang, M

    2015-06-01

    Degenerative changes of condylar subchondral bone occur frequently in temporomandibular disorders. Although psychologic stresses and occlusal abnormalities have been implicated in temporomandibular disorder, it is not known if these risks represent synergistic comorbid factors that are involved in condylar subchondral bone degradation that is regulated by the sympathetic nervous system. In the present study, chronic immobilization stress (CIS), chemical sympathectomy, and unilateral anterior crossbite (UAC) were sequentially applied in a murine model. Norepinephrine contents in the subjects' serum and condylar subchondral bone were detected by ELISA; bone and cartilage remodeling parameters and related gene expression in the subchondral bone were examined. Subchondral bone loss and increased subchondral bone norepinephrine level were observed in the CIS and UAC groups. These groups exhibited decreased bone mineral density, volume fraction, and bone formation rate; decreased expressions of osterix, collagen I, and osteocalcin; but increased trabecular separation, osteoclast number and surface, and RANKL expression. Combined CIS + UAC produced more severe subchondral bone loss, higher bone norepinephrine level, and decreased chondrocyte density and cartilage thickness when compared to CIS or UAC alone. Sympathectomy simultaneously prevented subchondral bone loss and decreased bone norepinephrine level in all experimental subgroups when compared to the vehicle-treated counterparts. Norepinephrine also decreased mRNA expression of osterix, collagen I, and osteocalcin by mesenchymal stem cells at 7 and 14 d of stimulation and increased the expression of RANKL and RANKL/OPG ratio by mesenchymal stem cells at 2 h. In conclusion, CIS and UAC synergistically promote condylar subchondral bone loss and cartilage degradation; such processes are partially regulated by norepinephrine within subchondral bone.

  15. Study on Return and Volatility Spillover Effects among Stock, CDS, and Foreign Exchange Markets in Korea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taly I

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The key objective of this study is to investigate the return and volatility spillover effects among stock market, credit default swap (CDS market and foreign exchange market for three countries: Korea, the US and Japan. Using the trivariate VAR BEKK GARCH (1,1 model, the study finds that there are significant return and volatility spillover effects between the Korean CDS market and the Korean stock market. In addition, the return spillover effects from foreign exchange markets and the US stock market to the Korean stock market, and the volatility spillover effect from the Japanese stock market to the Korean stock market are both significant.

  16. Knowledge spillover and high-tech industry cluster: A literature review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qian, Shen

    2017-04-01

    Knowledge spillover is one of the incentive forces for companies using more expenditure on R&D to shape cluster. This paper summarizes and reviews academic research literature from three aspects, of which contain the connotation of knowledge spillover in high-tech industry cluster, conduction mode of knowledge spillover effect in high-tech industry and explain factors of knowledge spillover effect. This paper devotes by assembling anterior divergent tributaries of works to assist in illuminating on this prosperous research area, based on previous research, and finally it notes that future research needs to pay attention to several aspects.

  17. Spillover Volatilitas Pasar Saham Indonesia dan Singapura Periode 2001-2005

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lestano Lestano

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Using an Autoregressive model combined with a univariate Exponential GARCH model for constructing a volatility spillover model, we investigate asymmetric effect and volatility persistence effect in Indonesia and Singapore stock market, and the effect of volatility spillover from Singapore stock market considered as one of Asian financial activity center to Indonesia stock market during the post Asian financial crisis period. The study reveals that the degree of volatility persistence slightly increases as we include the spillover effect from Singapura as one extra variable in the variance equation. We also find that strong evidence of volatility spillover effect from Singapore to Indonesia stock market. Abstract in Bahasa Indonesia: Autoregressive model yang dikombinasikan dengan univariate Exponential GARCH model digunakan untuk mengkonstruksi model spillover volatilitas, tulisan ini mengkaji asymmetric effect dan efek persistensi volatilitas pasar saham di Indonesia dan Singapura, dan efek spillover volatilitas dari pasar saham Singapura, yang dipertimbangkan sebagai salah satu pusat kegiatan keuangan Asia, ke pasar saham Indonesia selama periode setelah krisis keuangan Asia. Studi ini mengungkapkan bahwa tingkat persistensi volatilitas meningkat saat spillover effect dari Singapura dimasukan sebagai variabel tambahan ke dalam persamaan variance. Temuan empiris lain adalah terdapat fakta kuat keberadaan efek spillover volatilitas dari pasar saham Singapura ke Indonesia.   Kata kunci: Spillover volatilitas, asymmetric effect, leverage effect, exponential GARCH, pasar saham, Indonesia, Singapura

  18. Features of spillover networks in international financial markets: Evidence from the G20 countries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xueyong; An, Haizhong; Li, Huajiao; Chen, Zhihua; Feng, Sida; Wen, Shaobo

    2017-08-01

    The objective of this study is to investigate volatility spillover transmission systematically in stock markets across the G20 countries. To achieve this objective, we combined GARCH-BEKK model with complex network theory using the linkages of spillovers. GARCH-BEKK model was used to capture volatility spillover between stock markets. Then, an information spillover network was built. The data encompass the main stock indexes from 19 individual countries in the G20. To consider the dynamic spillover, the full data set was divided into several sub-periods. The main contribution of this paper is considering the volatility spillover relationships as the edges of a complex network, which can capture the propagation path of volatility spillovers. The results indicate that the volatility spillovers among the stock markets of the G20 countries constitute a holistic associated network, another finding is that Korea acts a role of largest sender in long-term, while Brazil is the largest long-term recipient in the G20 spillover network.

  19. Cutaneous vasoconstriction affects near-infrared spectroscopy determined cerebral oxygen saturation during administration of norepinephrine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Niels Henrik Breiner; Secher, Niels H; Siebenmann, Christoph

    2012-01-01

    Perioperative optimization of spatially resolved near-infrared spectroscopy determined cerebral frontal lobe oxygenation (scO2) may reduce postoperative morbidity. Norepinephrine is routinely administered to maintain cerebral perfusion pressure and, thereby, cerebral blood flow, but norepinephrine...

  20. Norepinephrine transporter blocker atomoxetine increases salivary alpha amylase

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Warren, C.M.; van den Brink, R.L.; Nieuwenhuis, S.; Bosch, J.A.

    It has been suggested that central norepinephrine (NE) activity may be inferred from increases in salivary alpha-amylase (SAA), but data in favor of this proposition are limited. We administered 40mg of atomoxetine, a selective NE transporter blocker that increases central NE levels, to 24 healthy

  1. Epigenomic changes associated with impaired norepinephrine transporter function in postural tachycardia syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Abdul Waheed; Corcoran, Susan J; Esler, Murray; El-Osta, Assam

    2017-03-01

    The postural tachycardia syndrome (POTS) is characterised clinically by symptoms of light-headedness, palpitations, fatigue and exercise intolerance occurring with standing and relieved by lying down. Symptoms occur in association with an inappropriate rise in heart rate in the absence of a fall in blood pressure with the assumption of standing. The pathophysiology of POTS is complicated and poorly understood. Plasma norepinephrine (NE) is often elevated in patients with POTS, resulting in consideration of dysfunction of the norepinephrine transporter (NET) encoded by SLC6A2 gene. Whilst some studies have implicated a defect in the SLC6A2 gene, the cause of reduced SLC6A2 expression and function remains unclear. The search to explain the molecular mechanism of NET dysfunction has focused on genetic variation in the SLC6A2 gene and remains inconclusive. More recent studies show epigenetic mechanisms implicated in the regulation of SLC6A2 expression. In this article, we discuss the epigenetic mechanisms involved in SLC6A2 repression and highlight the potential therapeutic application of targeting these mechanisms in POTS.

  2. Curcumin promotes browning of white adipose tissue in a norepinephrine-dependent way.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shan; Wang, Xiuchao; Ye, Zichen; Xu, Chengming; Zhang, Ming; Ruan, Banjun; Wei, Ming; Jiang, Yinghao; Zhang, Ying; Wang, Li; Lei, Xiaoying; Lu, Zifan

    2015-10-16

    Brown adipose tissue converts energy from food into heat via the mitochondrial uncoupling protein UCP1, defending against cold. In some conditions, inducible 'brown-like' adipocytes, also known as beige adipocytes, can develop within white adipose tissue (WAT). These beige adipocytes have characteristics similar to classical brown adipocytes and thus can burn lipids to produce heat. In the current study, we demonstrated that curcumin (50 or 100 mg/kg/day) decreased bodyweight and fat mass without affecting food intake in mice. We further demonstrated that curcumin improves cold tolerance in mice. This effect was possibly mediated by the emergence of beige adipocytes and the increase of thermogenic gene expression and mitochondrial biogenesis in inguinal WAT. In addition, curcumin promotes β3AR gene expression in inguinal WAT and elevates the levels of plasma norepinephrine, a hormone that can induce WAT browning. Taken together, our data suggest that curcumin can potentially prevent obesity by inducing browning of inguinal WAT via the norepinephrine-β3AR pathway.

  3. Norepinephrine inhibits the migratory activity of pancreatic cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stock, Anna-Maria; Powe, Desmond G; Hahn, Stephan A; Troost, Gabriele; Niggemann, Bernd; Zänker, Kurt S; Entschladen, Frank

    2013-07-15

    We have shown previously that norepinephrine induces migratory activity of tumour cells from breast, colon and prostate tissue via activation of beta-2 adrenergic receptors. Consequently, this effect can be inhibited pharmacologically by clinically established beta-blockers. Tumour cell migration is a prerequisite for metastasis formation, and accordingly we and others have shown that breast cancer patients, which take beta-blockers due to hypertension, have reduced metastasis formation and increased survival probability as compared to patients without hypertension or using other anti-hypertensive medication. Unlike the aforementioned tumour cells, pancreatic cancer cells show a reduced migratory activity upon norepinephrine treatment. By means of our three-dimensional, collagen-based cell migration assay, we have investigated the signal transduction pathways involved in this phenomenon. We have found that this conflicting effect of norepinephrine on pancreatic cancer cells is due to an imbalanced activation of the two pathways that usually mediate a pro-migratory effect of norepinephrine in other tumour cell types. Firstly, the inhibitory effect results from activation of a pathway which causes a strong increase of the secondary cell signalling molecule, cAMP. In addition, activation of phospholipase C gamma and the downstream protein kinase C alpha were shown to be already activated in pancreatic cancer cells and cannot be further activated by norepinephrine. We hypothesize that this constitutive activation of the phospholipase C gamma pathway is due to a cross-talk with receptor tyrosine kinase signalling, and this might also deliver an explanation for the unusual high spontaneous migratory activity of pancreatic cancer cells. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Trade policy in markets with collusion : The case of North-South R&D spillovers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boone, J.; Žigić, K.

    2015-01-01

    It is well known that unilateral R&D spillovers hamper domestic firms׳ incentives to invest in innovations and thus have likely adverse effects for domestic welfare. However, when tacit collusion between foreign and domestic firms is likely, R&D spillovers may encourage monopoly pricing and therefor

  5. What Turns Knowledge into Innovative Products? The Role of Entrepreneurship and Knowledge Spillovers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.H. Block (Jörn); A.R. Thurik (Roy); H. Zhou (Haibo)

    2009-01-01

    textabstractThe knowledge spillover theory of entrepreneurship seeks to explain the fundamentals and consequences of entrepreneurship with respect to economic performance. This paper uses the knowledge spillover theory to explain different innovation outcomes. We hypothesize that a high rate of

  6. Daily Life Mechanisms of Stress Spillover among Early Adolescents Experiencing Academic Difficulty

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salamon, Reda; Johnson, Elizabeth I.; Swendsen, Joel

    2011-01-01

    Research has suggested that academic stress may "spillover" into other life domains and have negative psychological or social consequences for children and adolescents outside of school settings, but relatively few investigations have examined mediators and moderators of spillover. The current study explored the mediating role of state affect and…

  7. Volatility spillovers in US crude oil, ethanol, and corn futures markets

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Trujillo Barrera, A.A.; Mallory, M.; Garcia, P.

    2012-01-01

    This article analyzes recent volatility spillovers in the United States from crude oil using futures prices. Crude oil spillovers to both corn and ethanol markets are somewhat similar in timing and magnitude, but moderately stronger to the ethanol market. The shares of corn and ethanol price variabi

  8. Volatility spillovers in US crude oil, ethanol, and corn futures markets

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Trujillo Barrera, A.A.; Mallory, M.; Garcia, P.

    2012-01-01

    This article analyzes recent volatility spillovers in the United States from crude oil using futures prices. Crude oil spillovers to both corn and ethanol markets are somewhat similar in timing and magnitude, but moderately stronger to the ethanol market. The shares of corn and ethanol price

  9. Trade policy in markets with collusion : The case of North-South R&D spillovers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boone, J.; Žigić, K.

    It is well known that unilateral R&D spillovers hamper domestic firms׳ incentives to invest in innovations and thus have likely adverse effects for domestic welfare. However, when tacit collusion between foreign and domestic firms is likely, R&D spillovers may encourage monopoly pricing and

  10. What Turns Knowledge into Innovative Products? The Role of Entrepreneurship and Knowledge Spillovers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.H. Block (Jörn); A.R. Thurik (Roy); H. Zhou (Haibo)

    2009-01-01

    textabstractThe knowledge spillover theory of entrepreneurship seeks to explain the fundamentals and consequences of entrepreneurship with respect to economic performance. This paper uses the knowledge spillover theory to explain different innovation outcomes. We hypothesize that a high rate of entr

  11. What turns knowledge into innovative products? The role of entrepreneurship and knowledge spillovers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.H. Block (Jörn); A.R. Thurik (Roy); H. Zhou (Hui)

    2013-01-01

    textabstractThe knowledge spillover theory of entrepreneurship seeks to explain the fundamentals and consequences of entrepreneurship with respect to economic performance. This paper uses the knowledge spillover theory to explain different innovation outcomes. We hypothesize that a high rate of entr

  12. What turns knowledge into innovative products? The role of entrepreneurship and knowledge spillovers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.H. Block (Jörn); A.R. Thurik (Roy); H. Zhou (Hui)

    2013-01-01

    textabstractThe knowledge spillover theory of entrepreneurship seeks to explain the fundamentals and consequences of entrepreneurship with respect to economic performance. This paper uses the knowledge spillover theory to explain different innovation outcomes. We hypothesize that a high rate of entr

  13. What Turns Knowledge into Innovative Products? The Role of Entrepreneurship and Knowledge Spillovers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.H. Block (Jörn); A.R. Thurik (Roy); H. Zhou (Haibo)

    2009-01-01

    textabstractThe knowledge spillover theory of entrepreneurship seeks to explain the fundamentals and consequences of entrepreneurship with respect to economic performance. This paper uses the knowledge spillover theory to explain different innovation outcomes. We hypothesize that a high rate of entr

  14. Intensity of Price and Volatility Spillover Effects in Asia-Pacific Basin Equity Markets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sazali Abidin

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper investigates the intensity of price and volatility spillover effects in five major stock markets within the Asia Pacific basin region with a particular emphasis in the spillover effects between Australia and China. VAR(5 model is used for measuring the return spillover while AR/VAR model with exogenous variables is employed for measuring the effects of same day returns on return spillover. .In modelling the volatility spillover, we employ AR/GARCH model which also incorporates the same day effects. Results of both return and volatility spillover provide evidence that there are significant spillover effects across different markets in the Asia-Pacific region and as well as between Australia and China. This study also provides support to the view that a market is most affected by other markets that opens/closes just before it. The main contribution of this paper is the confirmation of spillover effects between markets in the region, in particular, the interdependence between Australia and China which may have evolved only recently and thus have received relatively little research attention to date.

  15. Volatility Spillover and Multivariate Volatility Impulse Response Analysis of GFC News Events

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    D.E. Allen (David); M.J. McAleer (Michael); R.J. Powell (Robert); A.K. Singh (Abhay)

    2016-01-01

    textabstractThis paper applies two measures to assess spillovers across markets: the Diebold Yilmaz (2012) Spillover Index and the Hafner and Herwartz (2006) analysis of multivariate GARCH models using volatility impulse response analysis. We use two sets of data, daily realized volatility estimates

  16. Volatility spillovers in US crude oil, ethanol, and corn futures markets

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Trujillo Barrera, A.A.; Mallory, M.; Garcia, P.

    2012-01-01

    This article analyzes recent volatility spillovers in the United States from crude oil using futures prices. Crude oil spillovers to both corn and ethanol markets are somewhat similar in timing and magnitude, but moderately stronger to the ethanol market. The shares of corn and ethanol price variabi

  17. Positive and negative spillover from work to home : The role of organizational culture and supportive arrangements

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sok, J.; Blomme, R.J.; Tromp, D.M.

    2014-01-01

    For today's managers, striking a sound work−home balance is an important matter. In this paper we investigate the relationship between organizational culture and work-to-home spillover. Two types of organizational culture, supportive and innovative, were compared with regard to work-to-home spillove

  18. Daily Life Mechanisms of Stress Spillover among Early Adolescents Experiencing Academic Difficulty

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salamon, Reda; Johnson, Elizabeth I.; Swendsen, Joel

    2011-01-01

    Research has suggested that academic stress may "spillover" into other life domains and have negative psychological or social consequences for children and adolescents outside of school settings, but relatively few investigations have examined mediators and moderators of spillover. The current study explored the mediating role of state…

  19. Theoretical analysis of hydrogen spillover mechanism on carbon nanotubes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosalba eJuarez Mosqueda

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The spillover mechanism of molecular hydrogen on carbon nanotubes in the presence of catalytically active platinum clusters was critically and systematically investigated by using density-functional theory. Our simulation model includes a Pt4 cluster for the catalyst nanoparticle and curved and planar circumcoronene for two exemplary single-walled carbon nanotubes (CNT, the (10,10 CNT and one of large diameter, respectively. Our results show that the H2 molecule dissociates spontaneously on the Pt4 cluster. However, the dissociated H atoms have to overcome a barrier of more than 2 eV to migrate from the catalyst to the CNT, even if the Pt4 cluster is at full saturation with six adsorbed and dissociated hydrogen molecules. Previous investigations have shown that the mobility of hydrogen atoms on the CNT surface is hindered by a barrier. We find that instead the Pt4 catalyst may move along the outer surface of the CNT with activation energy of only 0.16 eV, and that this effect offers the possibility of full hydrogenation of the CNT. Thus, although we have not found a low-energy pathway to spillover onto the CNT, we suggest, based on our calculations and calculated data reported in the literature, that in the hydrogen-spillover process the observed saturation of the CNT at hydrogen background pressure occurs through mobile Pt nanoclusters, which move on the substrate more easily than the substrate-chemisorbed hydrogens, and deposit or reattach hydrogens in the process. Initial hydrogenation of the carbon substrate, however, is thermodynamically unfavoured, suggesting that defects should play a significant role.

  20. Palladium based nanomaterials for enhanced hydrogen spillover and storage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suresh K. Konda

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Hydrogen storage remains one of the most challenging prerequisites to overcome toward the realization of a hydrogen based economy. The use of hydrogen as an energy carrier for fuel cell applications has been limited by the lack of safe and effective hydrogen storage materials. Palladium has high affinity for hydrogen sorption and has been extensively studied, both in the gas phase and under electrochemical conditions. In this review, recent advancements are highlighted and discussed in regard to palladium based nanomaterials for hydrogen storage, as well as the effects of hydrogen spillover on various adsorbents including carbons, metal organic frameworks, covalent organic frameworks, and other nanomaterials.

  1. GDP Growth and the Interdependency of Volatility Spillovers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin O’Brien

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper examines the dynamics of cross-country GDP volatility transmission and their conditional correlations. We use quarterly data (1961-2008 for Australia, Canada, the UK and the US to construct and estimate a multivariate generalised autoregressive conditional heteroskedasticity (MGARCH model. According to the results from the mean growth equations, we identified significant cross-country GDP growth spillover among these countries. Furthermore, the growth volatility between the US and Canada indicates the highest conditional correlation. As expected, we also found that the shock influences are mainly exerted by the larger economies onto the smaller economies.

  2. Nanostructure and hydrogen spillover of bridged metal-organic frameworks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsao, Cheng-Si; Yu, Ming-Sheng; Wang, Cheng-Yu; Liao, Pin-Yen; Chen, Hsin-Lung; Jeng, U-Ser; Tzeng, Yi-Ren; Chung, Tsui-Yun; Wu, Hsiu-Chu

    2009-02-04

    The metal-organic frameworks (MOF) with low and medium specific surface areas (SSA) were shown to be able to adsorb hydrogen via bridged spillover at room temperature (RT) up to an amount of full coverage of hydrogen in the MOF. Anomalous small-angle X-ray scattering was employed to investigate the key relationship between the structures and storage properties of the involved materials. It was found that the tunable imperfect lattice defects and the 3D pore network in the MOF crystal are the most critical structures for RT hydrogen uptake rather than the known micropores in the crystal, SSA, and Pt catalyst structure.

  3. Noradrenaline release and the pathophysiology of primary human hypertension

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Esler, M.; Jennings, G.; Lambert, G.

    1989-03-01

    Measurements of the overflow of norepinephrine to plasma from individual organs (using radiotracer methodology) were used to delineate the pattern of sympathetic nervous system activation present in primary human hypertension. Mean total norepinephrine (NE) spillover in hypertensive patients was 418 ng/min, 42% (124 ng/min) higher than in subjects with normal blood pressure (BP)(P less than .05). Norepinephrine spillover among hypertensive patients was a function of age, only being elevated in patients under 40 years of age. Half of the excess in total norepinephrine release in hypertensive patients was accounted for by increased cardiorenal spillover. Mean renal norepinephrine spillover was 120 ng/min, compared with 69 ng/min in healthy subjects (P less than .02). Renal spillover was highest in younger patients. Corresponding cardiac norepinephrine spillover values were 12.6 ng/min and 5.1 ng/min (P less than .01). The balance of the excess total norepinephrine spillover comes from undetermined sites, but not the lungs or hepatomesenteric circulation. These measurements of regional norepinephrine overflow suggest that sympathetic nervous outflow to the kidneys and heart is selectively activated in early hypertension. 21 references.

  4. Norepinephrine as a Potential Aggravator of Symptomatic Cerebral Vasospasm: Two Cases and Argument for Milrinone Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. A. Zeiler

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. During hypertensive therapy for post-subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH symptomatic vasospasm, norepinephrine is commonly used to reach target blood pressures. Concerns over aggravation of vasospasm with norepinephrine exist. Objective. To describe norepinephrine temporally related deterioration in neurological examination of two post-SAH patients in vasospasm. Methods. We retrospectively reviewed two charts of patients with delayed cerebral ischemia (DCI post-SAH who deteriorated with norepinephrine infusions. Results. We identified two patients with DCI post-SAH who deteriorated during hypertensive therapy with norepinephrine. The first, a 43-year-old male presented to hospital with DCI, failed MABP directed therapy with rapid deterioration in exam with high dose norepinephrine and MABP of 140–150 mm Hg. His exam improved on continuous milrinone and discontinuation of norepinephrine. The second, a 39-year-old female who developed DCI on postbleed day 8 responded to milrinone therapy upfront. During further deterioration and after angioplasty, norepinephrine was utilized to drive MABP to 130–140 mm Hg. Progressive deterioration in examination occurred after angioplasty as norepinephrine doses escalated. After discontinuation of norepinephrine and continuation of milrinone, function dramatically returned but not to baseline. Conclusions. The potential exists for worsening of DCI post-SAH with hypertensive therapy directed by norepinephrine. A potential role exists for vasodilation and inotropic directed therapy with milrinone in the setting of DCI post-SAH.

  5. Volatility spillovers and the role of leading financial centres

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giulio Ciffarelli

    2001-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper investigates volatility spillovers between eleven equity markets located in Europe, Asia, Latin America and the US from July 1992 to July 1999. The absolute value of stock returns is adopted as volatility index. The VAR methodology--duly adjusted in order to account for differences in market trading times--is used to examinevolatility dependencies across the Asian crisis and to simulate the way local volatilityresponds to a shock in another market using impulse response and variance decomposition analyses. These techniques are implemented on VAR residuals previously filtered with GARCH(1,1 models, as the inference requires normal iid residuals. The evidence suggests that the US market plays a crucial role in transferring news, and arole that varies over time, growing in Asia and declining in Europe. Moreover, there is evidence of discernible differences in the pattern of volatility transmission during the crisis as the dimension and number of volatility spillovers increases--a clear symptom of contagion across markets.

  6. Structural Dynamics Model Updating with Positive Definiteness and No Spillover

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yongxin Yuan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Model updating is a common method to improve the correlation between structural dynamics models and measured data. In conducting the updating, it is desirable to match only the measured spectral data without tampering with the other unmeasured and unknown eigeninformation in the original model (if so, the model is said to be updated with no spillover and to maintain the positive definiteness of the coefficient matrices. In this paper, an efficient numerical method for updating mass and stiffness matrices simultaneously is presented. The method first updates the modal frequencies. Then, a method is presented to construct a transformation matrix and this matrix is used to correct the analytical eigenvectors so that the updated model is compatible with the measurement of the eigenvectors. The method can preserve both no spillover and the symmetric positive definiteness of the mass and stiffness matrices. The method is computationally efficient as neither iteration nor numerical optimization is required. The numerical example shows that the presented method is quite accurate and efficient.

  7. Spillovers of health education at school on parents' physical activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berniell, Lucila; de la Mata, Dolores; Valdés, Nieves

    2013-09-01

    This paper exploits state health education (HED) reforms as quasi-natural experiments to estimate the causal impact of HED received by children on their parents' physical activity. We use data from the Panel Study of Income Dynamics for the period 1999-2005 merged with data on state HED reforms from the National Association of State Boards of Education Health Policy Database and the 2000 and 2006 School Health Policies and Programs Study. To identify the spillover effects of HED requirements on parents' behavior, we use several methodologies (triple differences, changes in changes, and difference in differences) in which we allow for different types of treatments. We find a positive effect of HED reforms at the elementary school on the probability of parents doing light physical activity. Introducing major changes in HED increases the probability of fathers engaging in physical activity by between 6.3 and 13.7 percentage points, whereas on average, this probability for mothers does not seem to be affected. We analyze several heterogeneous impacts of the HED reforms to unveil the mechanisms behind these spillovers. We find evidence consistent with hypotheses such as gender specialization of parents in childcare activities or information sharing between children and parents.

  8. Topology optimization of embedded piezoelectric actuators considering control spillover effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonçalves, Juliano F.; De Leon, Daniel M.; Perondi, Eduardo A.

    2017-02-01

    This article addresses the problem of active structural vibration control by means of embedded piezoelectric actuators. The topology optimization method using the solid isotropic material with penalization (SIMP) approach is employed in this work to find the optimum design of actuators taken into account the control spillover effects. A coupled finite element model of the structure is derived assuming a two-phase material and this structural model is written into the state-space representation. The proposed optimization formulation aims to determine the distribution of piezoelectric material which maximizes the controllability for a given vibration mode. The undesirable effects of the feedback control on the residual modes are limited by including a spillover constraint term containing the residual controllability Gramian eigenvalues. The optimization of the shape and placement of the conventionally embedded piezoelectric actuators are performed using a Sequential Linear Programming (SLP) algorithm. Numerical examples are presented considering the control of the bending vibration modes for a cantilever and a fixed beam. A Linear-Quadratic Regulator (LQR) is synthesized for each case of controlled structure in order to compare the influence of the additional constraint.

  9. [Adrenergic innervation and norepinephrine content in postnatal rat uterus].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Itoh, M

    1983-03-01

    Using fluorescent histochemical method and high performance liquid chromatography with electrochemical detector, we investigated adrenergic innervation and norepinephrine content in the rat uterus in the process of the growth. The adrenergic nerve terminals in the rat uterus developed with age and reached to adult level at 7 weeks of age after birth, although the short adrenergic ganglionic cells and small intense fluorescent cells were present even at birth. Norepinephrine content per organ also increased with age and reached to adult level at 10 weeks of age after birth, while NE content per gram wet tissue weight had a peak in 3-day-old rat uterus. These morphological and biochemical data revealed that the sympathetic nervous system in rat uterus matures in 7 to 10 weeks after birth, while the short adrenergic nervous system is accomplished in earlier stage. The maturation of adrenergic innervation in the uterus was considerably later than in the other organs of rat and developed with the sexual maturation.

  10. Norepinephrine and octopamine: linking stress and immune function across phyla

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SA Adamo

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available In species from three widely divergent phyla (Arthropoda, Mollusca and Chordata tyrosine derivatives (norepinephrine or octopamine mediate a response to acute stress. Part of this response is a change in immune function that results in a decrease in resistance to pathogens. This decrease in disease resistance appears maladaptive. However, if the connections between norepinephrine/octopamine and immune function were maladaptive, they should have been selected against. None of the four commonly proposed adaptive explanations for acute stress-induced changes in immune function fit the available data for species from all three phyla. However, this result is probably due to the lack of information about acute stress-induced immunosuppression in invertebrates and a lack of ecologically valid studies in vertebrates. Understanding why immune function and disease resistance changes during acute stress will require greater comparative study.

  11. Beta blockers, norepinephrine, and cancer: an epidemiological viewpoint

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    Paul J FitzgeraldThe Zanvyl Krieger Mind/Brain Institute, Solomon H Snyder Department of Neuroscience, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD, USAAbstract: There is growing evidence that the neurotransmitter norepinephrine (NE) and its sister molecule epinephrine (EPI) (adrenaline) affect some types of cancer. Several recent epidemiological studies have shown that chronic use of beta blocking drugs (which antagonize NE/EPI receptors) results in lower recurrence, progression, or mortality of ...

  12. Teratogenic effects of mescaline, epinephrine, and norepinephrine in the hamster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirsch, K S; Fritz, H I

    1981-06-01

    Mescaline was administered orally at doses of 16 and 32 mg/kg on the seventh through tenth days of gestation to pregnant cream-strain hamsters. This treatment resulted in a dose-dependent effect on reproductive success and skeletal ossification. The effect of mescaline on reproductive success included an increased number of resorptions resulting in a decreased litter size. The 32 mg/kg dose of mescaline caused 48.8% resorptions, while 16 mg/kg and control animals had 12.0% and 6.4% resorptions, respectively. Litter size was decreased from 12.0 pups in controls to 10.3 (16 mg/kg) and 6.5 (32 mg/kg) pups per litter in treated groups. No gross abnormalities were observed at necropsy; there was, however, a dose-dependent increased delay in the ossification of the skull, sternum, and metatarsals. Both epinephrine and norepinephrine caused a decrease in reproductive success when administered at 500 micrograms/kg. Epinephrine appeared to cause a trend toward preimplantation wastage as indicated by an increased corpora lutea to implantation site ratio (from 1.3-1.9). Norepinephrine, however, caused an increased number of resorptions (29.1% in controls). Both norepinephrine and epinephrine produced similar delays in ossification.

  13. Mechanisms of immune regulation by norepinephrine and cholera toxin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Campbell, K.S.

    1988-01-01

    Norepinephrine has previously been demonstrated by this laboratory to potentiate the in vitro T-dependent antibody response through the stimulation of {beta}-adrenergic receptors. The role of {beta}-adrenergic receptor subtypes in norepinephrine-induced potentiation of the antibody responses was examined with selective {beta}-adrenergic antagonists. The antagonists were metoprolol ({beta}{sub 1}-selective), ICI 118-551 ({beta}{sub 2}-selective), and propranolol ({beta}-non-selective). Both propranolol and ICI 118-551 blocked norepinephrine-induced potentiation of the antibody response, but metoprolol was ineffective. Receptor binding competition of antagonists with the radioligant, ({sup 3}H)CGP-12177 was examined and results were analyzed with the computer program, LIGAND. Competition by ICI 118-551 identified 75% {beta}{sub 2}- and 25% {beta}{sub 1}-adrenergic receptors on splenic mononuclear cells. Enriched T lymphocytes exhibited 75% {beta}{sub 2}-adrenergic receptors, while enriched B lymphocytes contained 90% {beta}{sub 2}-adrenergic receptors as identified by ICI 118-551. Greater than twice as many total receptors were identified on B lymphocytes than T lymphocytes. A T cell lymphoma contained about 60% {beta}{sub 2}-receptors, while 100% were {beta}{sub 2} receptors on a B cell lymphoma, as assessed by ICI 118-551. Results support a heterogeneous {beta}-adrenergic receptor population on T lymphocytes and a more homogeneous {beta}{sub 2}-population on B lymphocytes.

  14. Climate Induced Spillover and Implications for U.S. Security.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tidwell, Vincent C. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Naugle, Asmeret Bier [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Backus, George A. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Lott, Kathryn Marie [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Keller, Elizabeth [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Kobos, Peter H. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Villa, Daniel [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2015-11-01

    Developing nations incur a greater risk to climate change than the developed world due to poorly managed human/natural resources, unreliable infrastructure and brittle governing/economic institutions. These vulnerabilities often give rise to a climate induced “domino effect” of reduced natural resource production-leading to economic hardship, social unrest, and humanitarian crises. Integral to this cascading set of events is increased human migration, leading to the “spillover” of impacts to adjoining areas with even broader impact on global markets and security. Given the complexity of factors influencing human migration and the resultant spill-over effect, quantitative tools are needed to aid policy analysis. Toward this need, a series of migration models were developed along with a system dynamics model of the spillover effect. The migration decision models were structured according to two interacting paths, one that captured long-term “chronic” impacts related to protracted deteriorating quality of life and a second focused on short-term “acute” impacts of disaster and/or conflict. Chronic migration dynamics were modeled for two different cases; one that looked only at emigration but at a national level for the entire world; and a second that looked at both emigration and immigration but focused on a single nation. Model parameterization for each of the migration models was accomplished through regression analysis using decadal data spanning the period 1960-2010. A similar approach was taken with acute migration dynamics except regression analysis utilized annual data sets limited to a shorter time horizon (2001-2013). The system dynamics spillover model was organized around two broad modules, one simulating the decision dynamics of migration and a second module that treats the changing environmental conditions that influence the migration decision. The environmental module informs the migration decision, endogenously simulating interactions

  15. Country Risk Volatility Spillovers of Emerging Oil Economies: An Application to Russia and Kazakhstan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Xiaolei; He, Wan; Li, Jianping

    The emerging oil economies (EOEs) of geographical proximity, are usually impacted by some common risk factors which may make the interaction of their country risk closely related. This paper focuses on the interaction of country risk between EOEs by investigating the volatility spillovers of country risk. Taking Russia and Kazakhstan for example, a multivariate conditional volatility model is used to capture the dynamic spillovers of country risk. Empirical results show that there are significant bidirectional spillover effects with the asymmetrical volatility between Russia and Kazakhstan.

  16. Effect of technology innovation and spillovers on the carbon intensity of human well-being.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Jifang; Yuan, Jianhong

    2016-01-01

    In order to enhance sustainability, it is necessary to reduce the carbon intensity of human well-being (CIWB). In this paper, we analyze the impact of technology innovation and spillovers on CIWB using panel data of 30 provinces in China from 2005 to 2010. We find that increasing research and development (R&D) intensity and interregional R&D spillovers can decrease CIWB; R&D intensity has a nonlinear effect on CIWB without incorporating interregional R&D spillovers; economic development has positive effect on CIWB, while manufacturing has negative effect on CIWB.

  17. On Advertising Games and Spillover in Service Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lei Xu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Motivated by the industry cases, we model the advertising competition between the dominant service provider and small service providers in one service market, where the dominant service provider has a major market share and the other small service providers share the remainder of market equally. Based on this setting, we discuss three advertising game models, that is, cooperative game, Boxed Pig game, and Prisoner’s game, derive the conditions for different advertising games, and characterize their equilibria. To be specific, it is found that the advertising spillover and the number of the small service providers directly determines the advertising game equilibria, while other market parameters, to some extent, can affect the results of the advertising game equilibria. According to our theoretical findings, some management insights and suggestions are given from both the academic and practical perspectives.

  18. Ballroom Music Spillover into a Beluga Whale Aquarium Exhibit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter M. Scheifele

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available It is not uncommon for modern aquaria to be built with special entertainment areas. There are no known measurements of sound spillover from such entertainment areas into underwater animal exhibits. Entertainment organizations typically prefer to play music for events at 95 and 100 dBA in a ballroom at Georgia Aquarium. Concern over the potential effects of the music and noise on animals in adjacent exhibits inspired an initial project to monitor and compare sound levels in the adjacent underwater exhibits against the typical in-air sound levels of the ballroom. Measured underwater noise levels were compared to modeled levels based on finite element analysis and plane wave transmission loss calculations through the acrylic viewing window. Results were compared with the model to determine how, if at all, the ambient noise level in the Cold Water Quest exhibit changed as a result of music played in the ballroom.

  19. Liquidity spillover in international stock markets through distinct time scales.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Righi, Marcelo Brutti; Vieira, Kelmara Mendes

    2014-01-01

    This paper identifies liquidity spillovers through different time scales based on a wavelet multiscaling method. We decompose daily data from U.S., British, Brazilian and Hong Kong stock markets indices in order to calculate the scale correlation between their illiquidities. The sample is divided in order to consider non-crisis, sub-prime crisis and Eurozone crisis. We find that there are changes in correlations of distinct scales and different periods. Association in finest scales is smaller than in coarse scales. There is a rise on associations in periods of crisis. In frequencies, there is predominance for significant distinctions involving the coarsest scale, while for crises periods there is predominance for distinctions on the finest scale.

  20. Risks of Brucella abortus spillover in the Greater Yellowstone area.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schumaker, B

    2013-04-01

    Recurrent spillover of Brucella abortus from wildlife reservoirs to domestic cattle in the Greater Yellowstone Area (GYA) has prevented the United States from completely eradicating bovine brucellosis. Risks to cattle are a function of the size and location of wildlife and livestock populations, the degree and nature of spatio-temporal interactions between the various hosts, the level of disease in wildlife, and the susceptibility of livestock herds. While the brucellosis prevalence in wild, free-ranging GYA bison (Bison bison) is high, current management actions have successfully limited contact between bison and cattle. Under current management practices, the risks to cattle in the GYA are predominantly from wild elk (Cervus elaphus). Intra- and inter-species transmission events, while uncommon, are nevertheless crucial for the maintenance of brucellosis in the GYA. Future management actions should focus on decreasing elk herd densities and group sizes and on understanding the behavioural and environmental drivers that result in co-mingling that makes transmission possible.

  1. The influence of volatility spill-overs and market beta on portfolio construction

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    André Heymans; Wayne Peter Brewer

    2015-01-01

    .... Using intraday stock returns from five top-40 listed stocks on the JSE between July 2008 and April 2010, volatility spill-over effects were estimated with a residual- based test (aggregate shock [AS] model) framework...

  2. Do countries catch cold when trading partners sneeze? Evidence from spillovers in the Baltics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kingsley I. Obiora

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available How do countries respond to shocks from their major trading partners? This paper addresses the question in the context of the observed shifts in trade linkages between the Baltic countries and their major trading partners. Vector autoregression (VAR models were used to examine the magnitude and sources of growth spillovers to the Baltics from key trading partners, as well as shocks from the real effective exchange rate (REER.Our results show there are significant cross-country spillovers to the Baltics, with spillovers from the EU outweighing those from Russia. Shocks to the REER generally depress growth in the Baltics, and this effect rises over time. We also find that financial and trade linkages are the dominant transmission channels of spillovers to the region, which explains the current realization of downside risks to the Baltics from the global slowdown. In general, therefore, these results suggest that the Baltics are susceptible to shocks from their key trading partners.

  3. Information Spillover, Profit Opportunities, and Return Deviations Analysis: The Case of Cross-Listed BHP Billiton

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Roger Su; Ronghua Yi; Keith Hooper; Amitabh Dutta

    2013-01-01

      This paper examines (1) whether a cross-listed company spillover effect starts from an earlier time zone market to a later time zone market, whether investors can find profit opportunities from cross-listed share trading, and (2...

  4. Spillover Effects of International Strategic Alliance in Banking Industry of China: Perspectives from Chinese Firms

    OpenAIRE

    Hou, Yuxuan

    2014-01-01

    This research examines the spillover effects of international strategic alliances in China’s banking industry for Chinese domestic banks. Through adopting spillover effects theory in explaining the positive and negative effects leaking from foreign investors in international strategic alliances, the study enables us to compare the internal and external effects depending on different factors, as Chinese state owned national banks and local banks as well as the country of origin. All of the ana...

  5. To Share or Not to Share: Does Local Participation Matter for Spillovers from Foreign Direct Investment?

    OpenAIRE

    Smarzynska Javorcik, Beata; Spatareanu, Mariana

    2008-01-01

    This study hypothesizes that the ownership structure in foreign investment projects affects the extent of vertical and horizontal spillovers from foreign direct investment (FDI) for two reasons. First, affiliates with joint domestic and foreign ownership may face lower costs of finding local suppliers of intermediates and thus may be more likely to engage in local sourcing than wholly owned foreign subsidiaries. This in turn may lead to higher productivity spillovers to local producers in the...

  6. Does pathogen spillover from commercially reared bumble bees threaten wild pollinators?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael C Otterstatter

    Full Text Available The conservation of insect pollinators is drawing attention because of reported declines in bee species and the 'ecosystem services' they provide. This issue has been brought to a head by recent devastating losses of honey bees throughout North America (so called, 'Colony Collapse Disorder'; yet, we still have little understanding of the cause(s of bee declines. Wild bumble bees (Bombus spp. have also suffered serious declines and circumstantial evidence suggests that pathogen 'spillover' from commercially reared bumble bees, which are used extensively to pollinate greenhouse crops, is a possible cause. We constructed a spatially explicit model of pathogen spillover in bumble bees and, using laboratory experiments and the literature, estimated parameter values for the spillover of Crithidia bombi, a destructive pathogen commonly found in commercial Bombus. We also monitored wild bumble bee populations near greenhouses for evidence of pathogen spillover, and compared the fit of our model to patterns of C. bombi infection observed in the field. Our model predicts that, during the first three months of spillover, transmission from commercial hives would infect up to 20% of wild bumble bees within 2 km of the greenhouse. However, a travelling wave of disease is predicted to form suddenly, infecting up to 35-100% of wild Bombus, and spread away from the greenhouse at a rate of 2 km/wk. In the field, although we did not observe a large epizootic wave of infection, the prevalences of C. bombi near greenhouses were consistent with our model. Indeed, we found that spillover has allowed C. bombi to invade several wild bumble bee species near greenhouses. Given the available evidence, it is likely that pathogen spillover from commercial bees is contributing to the ongoing decline of wild Bombus in North America. Improved management of domestic bees, for example by reducing their parasite loads and their overlap with wild congeners, could diminish or even

  7. The influence of volatility spill-overs and market beta on portfolio construction

    OpenAIRE

    André Heymans; Wayne Peter Brewer

    2015-01-01

    This study adds to Modern Portfolio Theory (MPT) by providing an additional measure to market beta in constructing a more efficient investment portfolio. The additional measure analyses the volatility spill-over effects among stocks within the same portfolio. Using intraday stock returns from five top-40 listed stocks on the JSE between July 2008 and April 2010, volatility spill-over effects were estimated with a residual- based test (aggregate shock [AS] model) framework. It is shown that wh...

  8. Foreign direct investment spillovers: what can we learn from portuguese data?

    OpenAIRE

    2000-01-01

    This paper investigates the impact of foreign direct investment on the productivity performance of domestic firms in Portugal. The data comprise nine manufacturing sectors for the period 1992-95. Relatively to previous studies, model specification is improved by taking into consideration several aspects: the influence of the “technological gap” on spill-overs diffusion and the choice of its most appropriate interval; sectoral variation in the coefficients of the spill-overs effect; identifica...

  9. Strategic R&D location by multinational firms: Spillovers, technology sourcing, and competition.

    OpenAIRE

    BELDERBOS Rene; Lykoianni, E; Veugelers, Reinhilde

    2005-01-01

    We analyze strategic interaction in R&D internationalization decisions by two multinational firms competing both abroad and in their home markets and examine different incentives for foreign R&D faced by technology leaders and technology laggards. The model takes into account the impact of local inter-firm R&D spillovers, (non-costless) international intra-firm transfer of knowledge, and the notion that internal R&D increases the effectiveness of incoming spillovers. Greater efficiency of int...

  10. What Turns Knowledge into Innovative Products? The Role of Entrepreneurship and Knowledge Spillovers

    OpenAIRE

    Block, Jörn; Thurik, Roy; Zhou, Haibo

    2009-01-01

    textabstractThe knowledge spillover theory of entrepreneurship seeks to explain the fundamentals and consequences of entrepreneurship with respect to economic performance. This paper uses the knowledge spillover theory to explain different innovation outcomes. We hypothesize that a high rate of entrepreneurship facilitates the process of turning knowledge into new-to-the-market innovation but has no effect on the relationship between knowledge and new-to-the-firm innovation. Our results using...

  11. Neuromodulatory influence of norepinephrine during developmental experience-dependent plasticity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golovin, Randall M; Ward, Nicholas J

    2016-07-01

    Critical periods represent phases of development during which neuronal circuits and their responses can be readily shaped by stimuli. Experience-dependent plasticity that occurs within these critical periods can be influenced in many ways; however, Shepard et al. (J Neurosci 35: 2432-2437, 2015) recently singled out norepinephrine as an essential driver of this plasticity within the auditory cortex. This work provides novel insight into the mechanisms of critical period plasticity and challenges previous conceptions that a functional redundancy exists between noradrenergic and cholinergic influences on cortical plasticity.

  12. American export control, technology spillover and innovation of Chinese pharmaceutical Industry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hui, Jiang

    2017-05-01

    This paper was aimed to analyze whether the U.S. strict export control to China affects the technological innovation of Chinese pharmaceutical industry. This paper selected the data of technological innovation and the expenditure of high and new technology adoption in China's pharmaceutical industry from 1995 to 2014, created panel regression model to study the impact of export controls on technology spillovers and the impact of technology spillovers on innovation capacity. The results show that US export control has a significant impact on technology spillovers, but foreign technology spillovers have no significant impact on the innovation of Chinese pharmaceutical industry. Although the US export control prevented foreign technology spillovers to China, but indirectly stimulated the domestic technology spillovers to pharmaceutical manufacturing industry in China. Statistical analysis show that the correlation coefficient between innovation capacity and expenditure for high technology adoption is not significant, but the expenditure of purchasing domestic technical is essential to pharmaceutical innovation. This study shows that US export control indirectly, not directly, affected the technological innovation of China's pharmaceutical industry, affected the allocation of innovative resources, but failed to prevent the technological progress and competitiveness improvement of Chinese pharmaceutical industry.

  13. Bioartificial Therapy of Sepsis: Changes of Norepinephrine-Dosage in Patients and Influence on Dynamic and Cell Based Liver Tests during Extracorporeal Treatments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Sauer

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. Granulocyte transfusions have been used to treat immune cell dysfunction in sepsis. A granulocyte bioreactor for the extracorporeal treatment of sepsis was tested in a prospective clinical study focusing on the dosage of norepinephrine in patients and influence on dynamic and cell based liver tests during extracorporeal therapies. Methods and Patients. Ten patients with severe sepsis were treated twice within 72 h with the system containing granulocytes from healthy donors. Survival, physiologic parameters, extended hemodynamic measurement, and the indocyanine green plasma disappearance rate (PDR were monitored. Plasma of patients before and after extracorporeal treatments were tested with a cell based biosensor for analysis of hepatotoxicity. Results. The observed mortality rate was 50% during stay in hospital. During the treatments, the norepinephrine-dosage could be significantly reduced while mean arterial pressure was stable. In the cell based analysis of hepatotoxicity, the viability and function of sensor-cells increased significantly during extracorporeal treatment in all patients and the PDR-values increased significantly between day 1 and day 7 only in survivors. Conclusion. The extracorporeal treatment with donor granulocytes showed promising effects on dosage of norepinephrine in patients, liver cell function, and viability in a cell based biosensor. Further studies with this approach are encouraged.

  14. Pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic profiles of the novel serotonin and norepinephrine reuptake inhibitor desvenlafaxine succinate in ovariectomized Sprague-Dawley rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alfinito, Peter D; Huselton, Christine; Chen, Xiaohong; Deecher, Darlene C

    2006-07-07

    Desvenlafaxine succinate (DVS) is a novel serotonin (5-HT) and norepinephrine (NE) reuptake inhibitor (SNRI) that is currently in clinical development for the treatment of major depressive disorder and vasomotor symptoms associated with menopause. Previous studies have documented the pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic profiles of DVS in male rats. Similar studies, however, have not been performed in ovariectomized (OVX) rats, a model that mimics the loss of ovarian hormones that occurs at menopause. The goal of the present study, therefore, was to characterize the pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic properties of DVS in OVX rats. Desvenlafaxine levels peaked in plasma, brain (total brain minus hypothalamus) and hypothalamus at concentrations of 7.0, 10.8 and 9.5 microM (assuming 1 g = 1 ml), respectively, 30 min post-dosing DVS (30 mg/kg, oral). The apparent terminal half-lives of desvenlafaxine in plasma, brain and hypothalamus were 3.0, 2.1 and 2.5 h, respectively. Based on AUC(0-last), brain to plasma and hypothalamus to plasma ratios were 1.7 and 1.3, respectively. Microdialysis experiments in the medial preoptic area of the hypothalamus showed that DVS (30 mg/kg, s.c.), in the presence of WAY-100635 (5-HT(1A) antagonist), increased 5-HT levels 225% at 1 h post-dosing. Norepinephrine levels increased 44% at 3 h post-dosing while dopamine levels were unchanged. Thus, in OVX rats, DVS has good pharmacokinetic properties, rapid brain penetration, excellent brain penetrability and selectively increases 5-HT and NE levels in the hypothalamus. This work supports the notion that DVS could have utility for treating disorders in menopausal women in which changes in 5-HT and/or NE have been implicated.

  15. FDI and the technological spillover effects: a comparative analysis on the Yangtze River Delta and the Pearl River Delta

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Xin; ZHENG Yun

    2006-01-01

    This article calculates the technological spillover effects of foreign direct investment (FDI) in the Yangtze River Delta and the Pearl River Delta through Panel Data, and analyzes the influence on the technological spillover effects of the following factors in these two different areas: human capital, the opening up, R&D and the source of FDI. It makes the conclusion that FDI in different areas has different technological spillover effects and the local governments should make different policies accordingly so as to gain more obvious technology spillover effects.

  16. Estimating a marriage matching model with spillover effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choo, Eugene; Siow, Aloysius

    2006-08-01

    We use marriage matching functions to study how marital patterns change when population supplies change. Specifically, we use a behavioral marriage matching function with spillover effects to rationalize marriage and cohabitation behavior in contemporary Canada. The model can estimate a couple's systematic gains to marriage and cohabitation relative to remaining single. These gains are invariant to changes in population supplies. Instead, changes in population supplies redistribute these gains between a couple. Although the model is behavioral, it is nonparametric. It can fit any observed cross-sectional marriage matching distribution. We use the estimated model to quantify the impacts of gender differences in mortality rates and the baby boom on observed marital behavior in Canada. The higher mortality rate of men makes men scarcer than women. We show that the scarceness of men modestly reduced the welfare of women and increased the welfare of men in the marriage market. On the other hand, the baby boom increased older men's net gains to entering the marriage market and lowered middle-aged women's net gains.

  17. The brain norepinephrine system, stress and cardiovascular vulnerability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, Susan K; Valentino, Rita J

    2017-03-01

    Chronic exposure to psychosocial stress has adverse effects on cardiovascular health, however the stress-sensitive neurocircuitry involved remains to be elucidated. The anatomical and physiological characteristics of the locus coeruleus (LC)-norepinephrine (NE) system position it to contribute to stress-induced cardiovascular disease. This review focuses on cardiovascular dysfunction produced by social stress and a major theme highlighted is that differences in coping strategy determine individual differences in social stress-induced cardiovascular vulnerability. The establishment of different coping strategies and cardiovascular vulnerability during repeated social stress has recently been shown to parallel a unique plasticity in LC afferent regulation, resulting in either excitatory or inhibitory input to the LC. This contrasting regulation of the LC would translate to differences in cardiovascular regulation and may serve as the basis for individual differences in the cardiopathological consequences of social stress. The advances described suggest new directions for developing treatments and/or strategies for decreasing stress-induced cardiovascular vulnerability.

  18. Selective serotonin-norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors-induced Takotsubo cardiomyopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rahul Vasudev

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: Takotsubo translates to "octopus pot" in Japanese. Takotsubo cardiomyopathy (TTC is characterized by a transient regional systolic dysfunction of the left ventricle. Catecholamine excess is the one most studied and favored theories explaining the pathophysiology of TTC. Case Report: We present the case of a 52-year-old Hispanic female admitted for venlafaxine-induced TTC with a review literature on all the cases of Serotonin-norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors (SNRI-associated TTC published so far. Conclusion: SNRI inhibit the reuptake of catecholamines into the presynaptic neuron, resulting in a net gain in the concentration of epinephrine and serotonin in the neuronal synapses and causing iatrogenic catecholamine excess, ultimately leading to TTC.

  19. Guidelines for Homology Modeling of Dopamine, Norepinephrine, and Serotonin Transporters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haddad, Yazan; Heger, Zbynek; Adam, Vojtech

    2016-11-16

    The human dopamine, norepinephrine, and serotonin transporters (hDAT, hNET, and hSERT) are carriers of neurotransmitters and targets for many drugs. Pioneering works in the past three years to elucidate experimental models of the Drosophila dDAT and human hSERT structures will rapidly impact the field of neuroscience. Here, we evaluated automated homology-based human models of these transporters, employing systematic physics-based, knowledge-based, and empirical-based check. Modeling guidelines were conveyed with attention to the central binding site (S1), secondary binding site (S2), and the extracellular loops EL2 and EL4. Application of new experimental models (dDAT and hSERT) will improve the accuracy of homology models, previously utilizing prokaryotic leucine transporter (LeuT) structure, and provide better predictions of ligand interactions, which is required for understanding of cellular mechanisms and for development of novel therapeutics.

  20. Modification of proteins by norepinephrine is important for vascular contraction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kyle B Johnson

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Norepinephrine (NE is thought to mediate its effects through G-protein coupled receptors. However, previous studies have shown that norepinephrine and another primary amine, serotonin, also have the ability to exert effects in a receptor-independent manner. We hypothesized that the enzyme transglutaminase II (TG II has the ability modify proteins with NE and that this modification is physiologically relevant. As our model we used rat aortic and vena cava tissues, two tissues that depend on NE to modulate vascular tone. Immunohistochemical and immunocytochemical staining showed that NE and TG II are present in smooth muscle cells of these tissues. Western analysis shows aorta and vena cava homogenate proteins are recognized by an anti-NE antibody. NE and α-actin colocalize in cultured aorta and vena cava smooth muscle cells. Freshly dissociated smooth muscle cells from these vessels were able to take up NE-biotin. In isolated tissue baths, inhibition of TG II with cystamine (0.5 mM completely abolished NE-induced contraction in the aorta but only attenuated the receptor-independent contractant KCl (max contraction to 100 mM KCl in cystamine treated = 88.8 ± 7.5% of vehicle treated, p<0.05. In the vena cava, contraction to NE was abolished with 0.1 mM cystamine and KCl contraction was attenuated (max contraction to 100 mM KCl in cystamine treated = 54.8 ± 21.2% of vehicle treated, p<0.05. Taken together, these results show that vascular smooth muscle cells take up and utilize NE for the modification of proteins, and that this modification may play an important role in vascular contraction.

  1. Pressure gap and electrode artefacts in the electrochemically induced oxygen spillover on Pt/YSZ electrodes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Toghan, Arafat; Roesken, Liz; Imbihl, Ronald [Institut fuer Physikalische Chemie und Elektrochemie, Leibniz-Universitaet Hannover, Callinstr. 3 - 3a, D-30167 Hannover (Germany); Haevecker, Michael; Knop-Gericke, Axel [Fritz-Haber-Institut, Max-Planck-Gesellschaft, Faradayweg 4-6, D-14195 Berlin (Germany)

    2011-07-01

    Mechanistically, the electrochemical promotion of catalytic reactions (EPOC) on Pt/YSZ (yttrium stabilized zirconia) catalysts has been shown to be due to the spillover of oxygen from the solid electrolyte onto the Pt surface. This spillover has been studied on Pt/YSZ catalysts with photoemission electron microscope (PEEM) and with a differentially pumped x-ray photoelectron spectrometer (XPS) allowing to conduct in situ studies up to 1 mbar. PEEM revealed that upon electrochemical pumping not only the expected darkening of the Pt electrodes can be observed which is due to spillover oxygen but that also bright spots develop. These bright spots were attributed to metallic zirconium formed as electrically disconnected parts of the Pt electrode assume a negative potential thus causing a local reduction of zirconia. With XPS the main goal was to study whether a second special spillover species develops upon electrochemical pumping at high pressure which is different from chemisorbed oxygen. This special spillover species has been postulated by Vayenas et al. and was supposedly responsible for the non-Faradaic nature of EPOC. Up to now even at p=0.2 mbar only chemisorbed oxygen was detected.

  2. Contribution of depressed reuptake to the depletion of norepinephrine from rat heart and spleen during endotoxin shock

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pardini, B.J.; Jones, S.B.; Filkins, J.P.

    1982-01-01

    Norepinephrine content (microgram/g) was depressed in hearts and spleens of fasted male Holtzman rats treated intravenously with Salmonella enteritidis lipopolysaccharide (14-17 mg/kg). To investigate the mechanism of norepinephrine depletion during endotoxicosis, in vivo norepinephrine reuptake was evaluated in control and severely shocked rats using the incorporation of /sup 3/H-norepinephrine into hearts and spleens. Incorporation of /sup 3/H-norepinephrine into spleens of endotoxic rats was reduced 88%. In contrast, cardiac tissue incorporation of /sup 3/H-norepinephrine was not significantly impaired. In vitro analysis of total norepinephrine retained in cardiac and splenic tissue slices incubated with /sup 3/H-norepinephrine yielded results consistent with in vivo experiments: Splenic norepinephrine reuptake was significantly decreased on the order of 50% in preparations from endotoxic rats, while myocardial norepinephrine reuptake was the same in both groups. The results indicate that depression of norepinephrine reuptake is a mechanism of norepinephrine depletion in spleens but not hearts of endotoxic rats.

  3. Network effect of knowledge spillover: Scale-free networks stimulate R&D activities and accelerate economic growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konno, Tomohiko

    2016-09-01

    We study how knowledge spillover networks affect research and development (R&D) activities and economic growth. For this purpose, we extend a Schumpeterian growth model to the one on networks that depict the knowledge spillover relationships of R&D. We show that scale-free networks stimulate R&D activities and accelerate economic growth.

  4. Hypothalamic Norepinephrine Mediates Acupunctural Effects on Hypothalamic-Pituitary-Adrenal Axis During Ethanol Withdrawal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Zheng Lin; Kim, Sang Chan; Zhang, Jie; Liu, Hong Feng; Lee, Bong Hyo; Jang, Eun Young; Lee, Chul Won; Cho, Il Je; An, Won G; Yang, Chae Ha; Kim, Young Woo; Zhao, Rong Jie; Wu, Yi Yan

    2016-02-01

    A previous study demonstrated that acupuncture at ST36 (Zu-San-Li) attenuates ethanol withdrawal (EW)-induced hyperactivation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis in rats. The current study investigated the involvement of hypothalamic norepinephrine (NE) in that process. Rats were intraperitoneally treated with 3 g/kg/d of ethanol or saline for 28 days. After 24 hours of EW, acupuncture was applied to rats at bilateral ST36 points or at nonacupoints (tail) for 1 minute. A high-performance liquid chromatography analysis showed that EW significantly increased both the NE and the 3-methoxy-4-hydroxy-phenylglycol (MHPG) levels in the hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus (PVN). Western blot analysis also revealed that EW markedly elevated the phosphorylation rates of tyrosine hydroxylase (TH), but spared TH protein expression in the PVN. However, acupuncture at ST36, but not at nonacupoints, greatly inhibited the increase in the hypothalamic NE, MHPG, and phosphorylation rates of TH. Additionally, postacupuncture infusion of NE into the PVN significantly attenuated the inhibitory effects of acupuncture at ST36 on the oversecretion of plasma corticosterone during EW. These results suggest that acupuncture at ST36 inhibits EW-induced hyperactivation of the hypothalamic NEergic system to produce therapeutic effects on the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis.

  5. Increase in norepinephrine-induced formation of phosphatidic acid in rat vas deferens after denervation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takenawa, T; Masaki, T; Goto, K

    1983-01-01

    Surgical denervation of rat vas deferens causes supersensitivity in that the tissue sensitivity and the maximum response to a variety of agonists increase. To understand the molecular mechanism of supersensitivity in smooth muscle, norepinephrine(NE)-induced alteration in phospholipid metabolism was studied using control and denervated vasa deferentia. When the tissue was stimulated by NE, only [32P]Pi incorporation into phosphatidic acid(PA) was increased in proportion to the increase in NE concentration without any significant effect on that into other phospholipids. This PA labeling was significantly accelerated by denervation. In the denervated tissue, PA labeling was stimulated by lower concentrations of NE and the maximum response to NE was increased compared to the control. The breakdown of phosphatidylinositol 4-monophosphate(DPI) and phosphatidylinositol 4,5-diphosphate (TPI) was also accelerated by NE. But the influence of denervation on this NE-induced DPI and TPI was not marked. Therefore, it is likely that denervation clearly enhanced NE-induced PA labeling without an appreciable effect on that of the other phospholipids. Furthermore, the absolute amount of PA was also increased by NE, and this increase was exaggerated by denervation. Considering that PA can behave as a Ca2+ ionophore in the plasma membrane, these results suggest that the stimulated accumulation of PA plays an important role in receptor-linked supersensitivity in smooth muscle.

  6. Spillover of fish naïveté from marine reserves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Januchowski-Hartley, Fraser A; Graham, Nicholas A J; Cinner, Joshua E; Russ, Garry R

    2013-02-01

    Spillover of adult fish biomass is an expected benefit from no-take marine reserves to adjacent fisheries. Here, we show fisher-naïve behaviour in reef fishes also spills over from marine reserves, potentially increasing access to fishery benefits by making fishes more susceptible to spearguns. The distance at which two targeted families of fishes began to flee a potential fisher [flight initiation distance (FID)] was lower inside reserves than in fished areas, and this reduction extended outside reserve boundaries. Reduced FID persisted further outside reserves than increases in fish biomass. This finding could help increase stakeholder support for marine reserves and improve current models of spillover by informing estimates for spatial changes in catchability. Behavioural changes of fish could help explain differences between underwater visual census and catch data in quantifying the spatial extent of spillover from marine reserves, and should be considered in the management of adjacent fisheries.

  7. Isotope tracer study of hydrogen spillover on carbon-based adsorbents for hydrogen storage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lachawiec, Anthony J; Yang, Ralph T

    2008-06-17

    A composite material comprising platinum nanoparticles supported on molecular sieve templated carbon was synthesized and found to adsorb 1.35 wt % hydrogen at 298 K and 100 atm. The isosteric heat of adsorption for the material at low coverage was approximately 14 kJ/mol, and it approached a value of 10.6 kJ/mol as coverage increased for pressures at and above 1 atm. The increase in capacity is attributed to spillover, which is observed with the use of isotopic tracer TPD. IRMOF-8 bridged to Pt/C, a material known to exhibit hydrogen spillover at room temperature, was also studied with the hydrogen-deuterium scrambling reaction for comparison. The isotherms were reversible. For desorption, sequential doses of H2 and D2 at room temperature and subsequent TPD yield product distributions that are strong indicators of the surface diffusion controlled reverse spillover process.

  8. Cardiopulmonary effects of dobutamine and norepinephrine infusion in healthy anesthetized alpacas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vincent, Caitlin J; Hawley, Alexander T; Rozanski, Elizabeth A; Lascola, Kara M; Bedenice, Daniela

    2009-10-01

    To characterize the cardiopulmonary effects of dobutamine and norepinephrine infusion in isoflurane-anesthetized healthy alpacas. 8 adult alpacas. Initial baseline cardiovascular, respiratory, and metabolic variables were obtained 30 minutes after induction of isoflurane anesthesia in 8 alpacas (3 females and 5 sexually intact males). Four treatments (dobutamine at 4 and 8 microg/kg/min and norepinephrine at 0.3 and 1 microg/kg/min) were administered in random order via constant rate infusion over 15 minutes, followed by repeat measurements of cardiopulmonary values and a 20-minute washout period. Subsequent baseline and posttreatment measurements were similarly repeated until both drugs and dosages were administered to each animal. Baseline data in awake alpacas were obtained 18 to 24 hours following recovery from anesthesia. Both dobutamine and norepinephrine significantly increased cardiac index and arterial blood pressure from baseline values. Similar increases in hemoglobin concentration, oxygen content, and oxygen delivery were observed following administration of each drug at either dosage. Only dobutamine, however, reduced relative oxygen consumption while improving overall tissue oxygenation. Furthermore, heart rate was selectively enhanced by dobutamine and systemic vascular resistance by norepinephrine. Norepinephrine infusion resulted in dose-dependent changes in cardiopulmonary variables. Results indicated that both dobutamine and norepinephrine were appropriate choices to improve cardiac index, mean arterial pressure, and overall oxygen delivery in alpacas with isoflurane-induced hypotension. Careful titration by use of low infusion rates of dobutamine and norepinephrine is recommended to avoid potential arrhythmogenic effects and excessive vasoconstriction, respectively.

  9. EL EFECTO SPILLOVER: IMPACTO SOCIAL DE LA INVESTIGACIÓN Y DESARROLLO UNIVERSITARIO

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    CAROLINA DELGADO

    Full Text Available La función de la universidad pública en términos de investigación y desarrollo gira en torno a procesos de consolidación y socialización del conocimiento. La Universidad no apropia todos los beneficios resultantes de sus procesos investigativos, sino que estos se trasladan a terceros en forma de externalidades positivas, fenómeno denominado Spillover. El objetivo del trabajo fue determinar si el efecto spillover se produce al interior de una universidad pública, utilizando un enfoque metodológico mixto, integrando elementos de la investigación modo 1, fuentes documentales, para establecer las variables y la Modelación lógica del sistema I&D de la universidad y la elaboración de perfiles de efecto Spillover; y del modo 2, panel de expertos, para la construcción de la matriz del efecto spillover de la I&D universitaria. Los resultados indican que: i en la universidad se presentan las tres categorias de efecto spillovers(conocimiento, red, mercado y se presenta el efecto combinado a través de la propiedad intelectual; ii los articulos y libros de investigación publicados en bases de datos como Scienti podrían ser importantes mecanismos de transmisión de externalidades positivas. iii Los productos de investigacion que producen docentes durante su formación postgradual son un importante canal de difusión de Spillovers de conocimiento.

  10. Finding a pareto-optimal solution for multi-region models subject to capital trade and spillover externalities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leimbach, Marian [Potsdam-Institut fuer Klimafolgenforschung e.V., Potsdam (Germany); Eisenack, Klaus [Oldenburg Univ. (Germany). Dept. of Economics and Statistics

    2008-11-15

    In this paper we present an algorithm that deals with trade interactions within a multi-region model. In contrast to traditional approaches this algorithm is able to handle spillover externalities. Technological spillovers are expected to foster the diffusion of new technologies, which helps to lower the cost of climate change mitigation. We focus on technological spillovers which are due to capital trade. The algorithm of finding a pareto-optimal solution in an intertemporal framework is embedded in a decomposed optimization process. The paper analyzes convergence and equilibrium properties of this algorithm. In the final part of the paper, we apply the algorithm to investigate possible impacts of technological spillovers. While benefits of technological spillovers are significant for the capital-importing region, benefits for the capital-exporting region depend on the type of regional disparities and the resulting specialization and terms-of-trade effects. (orig.)

  11. Balancing the Trade-off Between Learning Prospects and Spillover Risks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Perri, Alessandra; Andersson, Ulf; Nell, Phillip Christopher;

    2013-01-01

    This paper investigates local vertical linkages of foreign subsidiaries and the dual role of such linkages as conduits for learning as well as potential channels for spillovers to competitors. On the basis of data from 97 subsidiaries, we analyze the quality of such linkages under varying levels...... of competition and subsidiary capabilities. Our theoretical development and the results from the analysis document a far more complex and dynamic relationship between levels of competition and MNCs’ local participation in knowledge intensive activities, i.e. learning and spillovers, than previous studies do. We...

  12. The Spillover Effects of Affirmative Action on Competitiveness and Unethical Behavior

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Banerjee, Ritwik; Gupta, Nabanita Datta; Villeval, Marie Claire

    We conduct an artefactual field experiment to examine various spillover effects of Affirmative Action policies in the context of castes in India. We test a) if individuals who compete in the presence of Affirmative Action policies remain competitive in the same proportion after the policy has been...... frequently a tournament payment scheme. However, we find no spillover effect on confidence and competitiveness once Affirmative Action is withdrawn: any lower caste’s gain in competitiveness due to the policy is then entirely wiped out. Furthermore, the strong existing bias of the dominant caste against...

  13. Asymmetric volatility spillovers between stock market and real activity: Evidence from the UK and the US

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kanas Angelos

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper examines the short-run dynamic relationships between stock market and real activity, within a country, for the UK and the US. The Cross Correlation Function testing procedure is applied to test for causality in mean and in variance between the stock market and the real economic sector. Besides variance causation, volatility spillover effects are examined through the multivariate specification form of the Exponential GARCH model. There is evidence of significant reciprocal volatility spillovers between the two sectors within a country, implying stronger interdependencies in the UK rather than in the US and asymmetric behavior only in the case of the UK.

  14. The Effect of Corporate Strategy and Organizational Design on the Spillover Effects of FDI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William L. Casey, Jr.

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available An important debate in the economics literature focuses on the role of foreign direct investment (FDI in supporting the growth and development of the lesser developed countries (LDCs globally. The ability of LDCs to capture the positive spillovers of FDI inflows depends in part on the organizational structures and corporate strategies of investing multinational enterprises (MNEs relating to the establishment of operating subsidiaries in host countries. Investment promotion policies and practices in LDCs should be formulated with the objective of capturing the positive spillovers arising from the organizational characteristics of MNEs.

  15. Price Discovery and Asymmetric Volatility Spillovers in Indian Spot-Futures Gold Markets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Srinivasan

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available This study attempts to examine the price discovery process and volatility spillovers in Goldfutures and spot markets of National Commodity Derivatives Exchange (NCDEX by employingJohansen’s Vector Error Correction Model (VECM and the Bivariate ECM-EGARCH(1,1model. The empirical result confirms that the spot market of Gold plays a dominant role andserves as effective price discovery vehicle. Besides the study results show that the spillovers ofcertain information take place from spot market to futures market and the spot market of goldhave the capability to expose the all new information through the channel of its new innovation.

  16. Sequencing R&D Decisions in a Two-Period Duopoly with Spillovers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Amir, Madjid; Amir, Rabah; Jin, Jim

    2000-01-01

    We compare simultaneous versus sequential moves in R&D decisions within an asymmetric R&D/Cournot model with linear demand (for differentiated products), general R&D costs, and spillovers. Simultaneous play and sequential play (with and without a specified leader) can emerge as appropriate...... formulations, depending on the ratios of spillover rate over demand cross-slope, but not on R&D efficiency. When at least one ratio is above 1/2, a sequential solution mitigates competition and leads to higher profits for each firm, and to higher social welfare. When uniquely specified, the stronger firm...

  17. 机采血小板冲红原因研究%Study of the reasons of red blood cell spillover in thrombocytapheresis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    周雪年

    2015-01-01

    Objective To study the reasons of red blood cell spillover in thrombocytapheresis by MCS+type blood cell separator.Methods15 blood donors with red blood cell spillover were selected as the observation group,while 20 blood donors without red blood cell spillover were selected as the control group in synchronization of our blood center. To analyze the reasons of red blood cell spillover and to compare the blood cell count of RBC,Hb,Hct,MCV,MCH and MCHC and etc between the two groups. Results It was found by detection that,the various blood cell counts were lower in observation group than which in control group,the differences was statically significant(P<0.05).It was found by statistics the reasons of red blood cell spillover were that,the various blood cell counts of MCV,MCH and MCHC were lower in 11 blood donors than normal persons,there were 2 cases in psychentonia and 2 cases in fat blood. Conclusion The red blood cell spillover which caused by much reasons could influence the platelet quality and delay the rescue of patients.To select the qualified blood donors through the plasma-derived,the physical examination,the chemical examination and the acquisition in each link,to remissive and reduce the incidence,to improve the platelet quality,in order to guarantee the transfusion safety.%目的:探讨MCS型血细胞分离机采集血小板冲红的原因。方法选取15例机采血小板发生冲红现象的献血者,将其作为观察组,选取20例同期于我站献血未冲红的献血者作为对照组,对比两组患者的血细胞计数,包括RBC、Hb、Hct、MCV、MCH及MCHC等,并分析导致冲红现象出现的原因。结果经检测发现观察组的各项血细胞计数检测指标均明显低于对照组,组间比较差异有统计学意义(P<0.05);经统计发现引发冲红的原因:献血者血细胞计数MCV、MCH及MCHC低于正常人11例,献血者精神紧张2例,以及脂肪血2例。结论冲红现象的出现会

  18. Changes in postnatal norepinephrine alter alpha-2 adrenergic receptor development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanders, J D; Happe, H K; Bylund, D B; Murrin, L C

    2011-09-29

    Alpha-2 adrenergic receptors (A2AR) regulate multiple brain functions and are enriched in developing brain. Studies demonstrate norepinephrine (NE) plays a role in regulating brain maturation, suggesting it is important in A2AR development. To investigate this we employed models of NE absence and excess during brain development. For decreases in NE we used N-(2-chloroethyl)-N-ethyl-2-bromobenzylamine hydrochloride (DSP4), a specific noradrenergic neurotoxin. Increased noradrenergic terminal density was produced by methylazoxymethanol acetate (MAM) treatment. A2AR density was assayed with [(3)H]RX821002 autoradiography. DSP4 lesions on postnatal day (PND) 3 produce A2AR decreases in many regions by PND 5. A2AR recover to control levels by PND 15 and 25 and there is no further change in total receptor density. We also assayed A2AR in brains lesioned with DSP4 on PND 13, 23, 33 and 43 and harvested 22 days post-lesion. A2AR levels remain similar to control at each of these time points. We examined A2AR functionality and high affinity state with epinephrine-stimulated [(35)S]GTPγS and [(125)I]p-iodoclonidine autoradiography, respectively. On PND 25, control animals and animals lesioned with DSP4 on PND 3 have similar levels of [(35)S]GTPγS incorporation and no change in high affinity state. This is in contrast to increases in A2AR high affinity state produced by DSP4 lesions of mature brain. We next investigated A2AR response to increases in norepinephrine levels produced by MAM. In contrast to DSP4 lesions, increasing NE results in a large increase in A2AR. Animals treated with MAM on gestational day 14 had cortical [(3)H]RX821002 binding 100-200% greater than controls on PND 25, 35, 45, 55 and 65. These data indicate that NE regulation of A2AR differs in developing and mature brain and support the idea that NE regulates A2AR development and this has long term effects on A2AR function.

  19. Norepinephrine-induced nerve growth factor depletion causes cardiac sympathetic denervation in severe heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimura, Kensuke; Kanazawa, Hideaki; Ieda, Masaki; Kawaguchi-Manabe, Haruko; Miyake, Yoshiko; Yagi, Takashi; Arai, Takahide; Sano, Motoaki; Fukuda, Keiichi

    2010-08-25

    In severe congestive heart failure (CHF), sympathetic overactivity correlates with the exacerbation of cardiac performance. To test the hypothesis that the cardiac sympathetic nerve density dramatically changes with the acceleration of circulating norepinephrine (NE) concentration, we investigated the temporal association of nerve growth factor (NGF) expression in the heart and cardiac sympathetic nerve density during the development of CHF in the continuous NE-infused rats. The animals were analyzed at 0-, 1-, 3-, 7-, 14-, and 28-day after implantation of osmotic pump at a rate of 0.05 mg/kg/hr. The cardiac performance was temporally facilitated in NE-exposed rats at 3-day in accordance with the sympathetic hyper-innervation induced by the augmentation of NGF mRNA expression in the heart. In NE-treated rats, left ventricular end-diastolic pressure was significantly increased after 7-day and marked left ventricular hypertrophy and systemic fluid retention were observed at 28-day. CHF-induced sympathetic overactivity further increased plasma NE concentration in NE-treated rats and finally reached to 16.1+/-5.6 ng/ml at 28-day (control level was 0.39+/-0.1 ng/ml, pcardiac performance. The cardiac sympathetic fiber loss was also confirmed in NE-exposed DBH (dopamine beta-hydroxylase)-Cre/Floxed-EGFP (enhanced green fluorescent protein) mice with severe CHF, in which sympathetic nerve could be traced by EGFP. Our results suggest that the cardiac sympathetic nerve density is strictly regulated by the NGF expression in the heart and long-exposure of high plasma NE concentration caused myocardial NGF reduction, following sympathetic fiber loss in severe CHF animals.

  20. Rent Spillovers or Knowledge Spillovers?--A Literature Review.%租金外溢还是知识外溢?--一个文献综述

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王林; 张增强

    2013-01-01

      构建权重矩阵来衡量研发外溢是最常用的衡量间接研发资本的方式,常用的是基于贸易额、专利信息和投入产出信息等来构建权重矩阵,但其中存在较多争议的是基于专利信息所构建的权重矩阵。通过对有关文献进行梳理,以及其所对应的衡量方式进行综述,发现以往对研发外溢的衡量主要侧重于宏观层面,如国家或行业层面,但对企业研发外溢的衡量较少,因此,对企业研发外溢的衡量是后续研究的主要侧重面。%Construction of weight matrix to measure R & D spillovers is the most commonly used measure of indirect development capital approach, is used to construct the weight matrix based on trade, patent information and input and output information, but the more controversial is the weight matrix construction based on Patent Information.. Through carries on the literature review, and measure the corresponding were reviewed, found in the past to measure R & D spillovers mainly focus on the macro level, such as the national level or industry to industry, but less on the measure of R & D spillovers, therefore, to measure the enterprise R & D spillovers is the follow-up research focuses mainly on the surface.

  1. Norepinephrine transporter expression is inversely associated with glycaemic indices: a pilot study in metabolically diverse persons with overweight and obesity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, L.; Corcoran, S. J.; Esler, M. D.; Phillips, S. E.; Sari, C. I.; Grima, M. T.; Karapanagiotidis, S.; Wong, C. Y.; Eikelis, N.; Mariani, J. A.; Kobayashi, D.; Dixon, J. B.; Lambert, G. W.; Lambert, E. A.

    2016-01-01

    Summary Objective The objective of this study was to examine the cross‐sectional relationship between the expression of norepinephrine transporter (NET), the protein responsible for neuronal uptake‐1, and indices of glycaemia and hyperinsulinaemia, in overweight and obese individuals. Methods Thirteen non‐medicated, non‐smoking subjects, aged 58 ± 1 years (mean ± standard error of the mean), body mass index (BMI) 31.4 ± 1.0 kg m−2, with wide‐ranging plasma glucose and haemoglobin A1c (HbA1c, range 5.1% to 6.5%) participated. They underwent forearm vein biopsy to access sympathetic nerves for the quantification of NET by Western blot, oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT), euglycaemic hyperinsulinaemic clamp, echocardiography and assessments of whole‐body norepinephrine kinetics and muscle sympathetic nerve activity. Results Norepinephrine transporter expression was inversely associated with fasting plasma glucose (r = −0.62, P = 0.02), glucose area under the curve during OGTT (AUC0–120, r = −0.65, P = 0.02) and HbA1c (r = −0.67, P = 0.01), and positively associated with steady‐state glucose utilization during euglycaemic clamp (r = 0.58, P = 0.04). Moreover, NET expression was inversely related to left ventricular posterior wall dimensions (r = −0.64, P = 0.02) and heart rate (r = −0.55, P = 0.05). Indices of hyperinsulinaemia were not associated with NET expression. In stepwise linear regression analysis adjusted for age, body mass index and blood pressure, HbA1c was an independent inverse predictor of NET expression, explaining 45% of its variance. Conclusions Hyperglycaemia is associated with reduced peripheral NET expression. Further studies are required to identify the direction of causality.

  2. Flying-fox roost disturbance and Hendra virus spillover risk.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Edson

    Full Text Available Bats of the genus Pteropus (flying-foxes are the natural host of Hendra virus (HeV which periodically causes fatal disease in horses and humans in Australia. The increased urban presence of flying-foxes often provokes negative community sentiments because of reduced social amenity and concerns of HeV exposure risk, and has resulted in calls for the dispersal of urban flying-fox roosts. However, it has been hypothesised that disturbance of urban roosts may result in a stress-mediated increase in HeV infection in flying-foxes, and an increased spillover risk. We sought to examine the impact of roost modification and dispersal on HeV infection dynamics and cortisol concentration dynamics in flying-foxes. The data were analysed in generalised linear mixed models using restricted maximum likelihood (REML. The difference in mean HeV prevalence in samples collected before (4.9%, during (4.7% and after (3.4% roost disturbance was small and non-significant (P = 0.440. Similarly, the difference in mean urine specific gravity-corrected urinary cortisol concentrations was small and non-significant (before = 22.71 ng/mL, during = 27.17, after = 18.39 (P= 0.550. We did find an underlying association between cortisol concentration and season, and cortisol concentration and region, suggesting that other (plausibly biological or environmental variables play a role in cortisol concentration dynamics. The effect of roost disturbance on cortisol concentration approached statistical significance for region, suggesting that the relationship is not fixed, and plausibly reflecting the nature and timing of disturbance. We also found a small positive statistical association between HeV excretion status and urinary cortisol concentration. Finally, we found that the level of flying-fox distress associated with roost disturbance reflected the nature and timing of the activity, highlighting the need for a 'best practice' approach to dispersal or roost modification activities

  3. Flying-Fox Roost Disturbance and Hendra Virus Spillover Risk

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edson, Daniel; Field, Hume; McMichael, Lee; Jordan, David; Kung, Nina; Mayer, David; Smith, Craig

    2015-01-01

    Bats of the genus Pteropus (flying-foxes) are the natural host of Hendra virus (HeV) which periodically causes fatal disease in horses and humans in Australia. The increased urban presence of flying-foxes often provokes negative community sentiments because of reduced social amenity and concerns of HeV exposure risk, and has resulted in calls for the dispersal of urban flying-fox roosts. However, it has been hypothesised that disturbance of urban roosts may result in a stress-mediated increase in HeV infection in flying-foxes, and an increased spillover risk. We sought to examine the impact of roost modification and dispersal on HeV infection dynamics and cortisol concentration dynamics in flying-foxes. The data were analysed in generalised linear mixed models using restricted maximum likelihood (REML). The difference in mean HeV prevalence in samples collected before (4.9%), during (4.7%) and after (3.4%) roost disturbance was small and non-significant (P = 0.440). Similarly, the difference in mean urine specific gravity-corrected urinary cortisol concentrations was small and non-significant (before = 22.71 ng/mL, during = 27.17, after = 18.39) (P= 0.550). We did find an underlying association between cortisol concentration and season, and cortisol concentration and region, suggesting that other (plausibly biological or environmental) variables play a role in cortisol concentration dynamics. The effect of roost disturbance on cortisol concentration approached statistical significance for region, suggesting that the relationship is not fixed, and plausibly reflecting the nature and timing of disturbance. We also found a small positive statistical association between HeV excretion status and urinary cortisol concentration. Finally, we found that the level of flying-fox distress associated with roost disturbance reflected the nature and timing of the activity, highlighting the need for a ‘best practice’ approach to dispersal or roost modification activities. The

  4. Analysis the Impact of Technology Spillovers on Total Factor Productivity of Agricultural Sector in Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mostafa Baniasadi

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The growth of agricultural production and natural resources are from primary objectives of any political system, because this section has a vital role in providing food security. According to the production theories, production growth will come from two sources; more use of production factors within the framework of existing technologies and second, with using more advanced and more efficient production methods and effective use of production factors. In fact, the second one is tied to the concept of productivity. New and efficient technologies are the most important factor for productivity growth. Technology was enhanced through internal and external sources. External sources include spillover technology from developed countries into another country. Empirical evidence on the impact of spillover technology on productivity growth of indigenous producer is vague. One perspective proposes that FDI, technology transferred from developed countries has positive effects on developing countries and another perspective is against it. This paper explores the role of technological spillover on total factor productivity (TFP growth in agricultural sectors of Iran uses time series data during 1971-2011. Materials and Methods: In this study, Kendrick model was used to calculate total factor productivity. After calculating productivity, affective factors on it, were examined through ARDL model. The aim of this study is examination of technology spillover on the productivity of agricultural sectors. The degree of technology diffusion grows with increase in technology distance between the hosts and the foreign countries. The greater the technology distance, the more difficult it becomes for developing countries to boost independent innovation. To calculate the index of technology spillover, commercial partners should be considered that are more advanced in science and technology than Iran. For this purpose, commercial partners in this study are

  5. Beta blockers, norepinephrine, and cancer: an epidemiological viewpoint

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fitzgerald PJ

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Paul J FitzgeraldThe Zanvyl Krieger Mind/Brain Institute, Solomon H Snyder Department of Neuroscience, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD, USAAbstract: There is growing evidence that the neurotransmitter norepinephrine (NE and its sister molecule epinephrine (EPI (adrenaline affect some types of cancer. Several recent epidemiological studies have shown that chronic use of beta blocking drugs (which antagonize NE/EPI receptors results in lower recurrence, progression, or mortality of breast cancer and malignant melanoma. Preclinical studies have shown that manipulation of the levels or receptors of NE and EPI with drugs affects experimentally induced cancers. Psychological stress may play an etiological role in some cases of cancer (which has been shown epidemiologically, and this could be partly mediated by NE and EPI released by the sympathetic nervous system as part of the body’s “fight or flight” response. A less well-appreciated phenomenon is that the genetic tone of NE/EPI may play a role in cancer. NE and EPI may affect cancer by interacting with molecular pathways already implicated in abnormal cellular replication, such as the P38/MAPK pathway, or via oxidative stress. NE/EPI-based drugs other than beta blockers also may prevent or treat various types of cancer, as may cholinesterase inhibitors that inhibit the sympathetic nervous system, which could be tested epidemiologically.Keywords: clonidine, guanfacine, aspirin, acetylcholine, epinephrine, adrenaline, sympathetic nervous system, parasympathetic nervous system, inflammation

  6. Intermedin inhibits norepinephrine-inducedcontraction of ratseminal vesicle

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    P F Wong; M P L Cheung; WS O; F Tang

    2014-01-01

    Objective:To study the effect of inter medin(IMD) on smooth muscle of rat seminal vesicles including the specific receptors and the signal pathways involved.Methods:The contraction of the seminal vesicle in response to norepinephrine(NE) andADM2/IMD was studied by the organ bath method.The effects of antagonists for calcitonin gene related peptide(CGRP), adrenomedullin(ADM) andIMD receptors, and inhibitors of nitric oxide synthase, [L-NG-NitroarginineMethylEster,L-NAME) and cAMP-dependent protein kinase(PKA),KT5720] were also investigated.The first overshoot, amplitude, frequency and basal tone were measured. Results:There is no significant effect ofIMD on the initial overshoot, frequency and the basal tone in the seminal vesicle contraction.Only the amplitude of the contraction induced byNE was inhibited byIMD.TheIMD inhibitory actions on amplitude were completely blocked by hADM22-52 andL-NAME, but not by hCGRP8-37 orKT5720.Furthermore, the action was diminished byIMD17-47.Conclusion:The results demonstrated that the inhibitory action ofIMD onNE-induced seminal vesicle contraction was mediated via theADM receptor(s) and the nitric oxide production pathway, partially by theIMD receptor, but not by theCGRP receptor and the cAMP-PKA pathway.

  7. Orienting of attention, pupil size, and the norepinephrine system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabay, Shai; Pertzov, Yoni; Henik, Avishai

    2011-01-01

    This research examined a novel suggestion regarding the involvement of the locus coeruleus-norepinephrine (LC-NE) system in orienting reflexive (exogenous) attention. A common procedure for studying exogenous orienting of attention is Posner's cuing task. Importantly, one can manipulate the required level of target processing by changing task requirements, which, in turn, can elicit a different time course of inhibition of return (IOR). An easy task (responding to target location) produces earlier onset IOR, whereas a demanding task (responding to target identity) produces later onset IOR. Aston-Jones and Cohen (Annual Review of Neuroscience, 28, 403-450, 2005) presented a theory suggesting two different modes of LC activity: tonic and phasic. Accordingly, we suggest that in the more demanding task, the LC-NE system is activated in phasic mode, and in the easier task, it is activated in tonic mode. This, in turn, influences the appearance of IOR. We examined this suggestion by measuring participants' pupil size, which has been demonstrated to correlate with the LC-NE system, while they performed cuing tasks. We found a response-locked phasic dilation of the pupil in the discrimination task, as compared with the localization task, which may reflect different firing modes of the LC-NE system during the two tasks. We also demonstrated a correlation between pupil size at the time of cue presentation and magnitude of IOR.

  8. Epinephrine in the heart: uptake and release, but no facilitation of norepinephrine release

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Th.W. Lameris (Thomas); P.A. de Zeeuw (Sandra); D.J.G.M. Duncker (Dirk); W. Tietge; G. Alberts; F. Boomsma (Frans); P.D. Verdouw (Pieter); A.H. van den Meiracker (Anton)

    2002-01-01

    textabstractBACKGROUND: Several studies have suggested that epinephrine augments the release of norepinephrine from sympathetic nerve terminals through stimulation of presynaptic receptors, but evidence pertaining to this mechanism in the heart is scarce and conflicting. Using the

  9. Exogenous angiotensin II does not facilitate norepinephrine release in the heart

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Th.W. Lameris (Thomas); P.A. de Zeeuw (Sandra); D.J.G.M. Duncker (Dirk); G. Alberts; F. Boomsma (Frans); P.D. Verdouw (Pieter); A.H. van den Meiracker (Anton)

    2002-01-01

    textabstractStudies on the effect of angiotensin II on norepinephrine release from sympathetic nerve terminals through stimulation of presynaptic angiotensin II type 1 receptors are equivocal. Furthermore, evidence that angiotensin II activates the cardiac sympathetic nervous syste

  10. Treatment for Sleep Problems in Children with Autism and Caregiver Spillover Effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tilford, J. Mick; Payakachat, Nalin; Kuhlthau, Karen A.; Pyne, Jeffrey M.; Kovacs, Erica; Bellando, Jayne; Williams, D. Keith; Brouwer, Werner B. F.; Frye, Richard E.

    2015-01-01

    Sleep problems in children with autism spectrum disorders (ASD) are under-recognized and under-treated. Identifying treatment value accounting for health effects on family members (spillovers) could improve the perceived cost-effectiveness of interventions to improve child sleep habits. A prospective cohort study (N = 224) was conducted with…

  11. Conditional Correlations and Volatility Spillovers Between Crude Oil and Stock Index Returns

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    R. Tansuchat (Roengchai); C-L. Chang (Chia-Lin); M.J. McAleer (Michael)

    2010-01-01

    textabstractThis paper investigates the conditional correlations and volatility spillovers between crude oil returns and stock index returns. Daily returns from 2 January 1998 to 4 November 2009 of the crude oil spot, forward and futures prices from the WTI and Brent markets, and the FTSE100, NYSE,

  12. A plant-level analysis of the spill-over effects of the German Energiewende

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mulder, Machiel; Scholtens, Bert

    2016-01-01

    In order to analyse international effects of national energy policies, we investigate the spill-over effects of the German Energiewende on the Dutch power market, which is closely connected to the German market. We estimate the impact of the German supply of wind and solar electricity on the Dutch d

  13. Modelling Volatility Spillovers for Bio-ethanol, Sugarcane and Corn Spot and Futures Prices

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    C-L. Chang (Chia-Lin); M.J. McAleer (Michael); Y-A. Wang (Yu-Ann)

    2016-01-01

    textabstractThe recent and rapidly growing interest in biofuel as a green energy source has raised concerns about its impact on the prices, returns and volatility of related agricultural commodities. Analyzing the spillover effects on agricultural commodities and biofuel helps commodity suppliers

  14. A Value-Added Study of Teacher Spillover Effects across Four Core Subjects in Middle Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Kun

    2015-01-01

    This study examined the existence, magnitude, and impact of teacher spillover effects (TSEs) across teachers of four subject areas (i.e., mathematics, English language arts [ELA], science, and social studies) on student achievement in each of the four subjects at the middle school level. The author conducted a series of value-added (VA) analyses,…

  15. Spillover Effects in Environmental Behaviors, across Time and Context: A Review and Research Agenda

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nilsson, Andreas; Bergquist, Magnus; Schultz, Wesley P.

    2017-01-01

    When implementing environmental education and interventions to promote one pro-environmental behavior, it is seldom asked if and how non-target pro-environmental behaviors are affected. The spillover effect proposes that engaging in one behavior affects the probability of engagement or disengaging in a second behavior. Therefore, the positive…

  16. Decision and coordination of low-carbon supply chain considering technological spillover and environmental awareness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Lang; Wang, Chuanxu; Li, Hui

    2017-06-08

    We focus on the impacts of technological spillovers and environmental awareness in a two-echelon supply chain with one-single supplier and one-single manufacturer to reduce carbon emission. In this supply chain, carbon abatement investment becomes one of key factors of cutting costs and improving profits, which is reducing production costs in the components and products-the investment from players in supply chain. On the basis of optimality theory, the centralized and decentralized models are respectively established to investigate the optimal decisions and profits. Further, setting the players' profits of the decentralized scenario as the disagreement points, we propose a bargaining-coordination contract through revenue-cost sharing to enhance the performance. Finally, by theoretical comparison and numerical analysis, the results show that: (i) The optimal profits of players and supply chain improve as technological spillovers and environmental awareness increase, and the profits of them in the bargaining-coordination contract are higher than that in the decentralized scenario; (ii) Technological spillovers between the players amplify the impact of "free-ride" behavior, in which the supplier always incentives the manufacturer to improve carbon emission intensity, but the cooperation will achieves and the profits will improve only when technological spillovers and environmental awareness are great; (iii) The contract can effectively achieve coordinated supply chain, and improve carbon abatement investment.

  17. What Turns Knowledge into Innovative Products? The Role of Entrepreneurship and Knowledge Spillovers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhou, Haibo; Block, Joern; Thurik, A. Roy

    2010-01-01

    The knowledge spillover theory of entrepreneurship seeks to explain the sources of entrepreneurship and its consequences with regard to economic performance. This paper extends the theory and links it to innovation performance. We propose that a high rate of entrepreneurship facilitates the process

  18. Longitudinal Associations between Maternal Work Stress, Negative Work-Family Spillover, and Depressive Symptoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodman, W. Benjamin; Crouter, Ann C.

    2009-01-01

    The current study examined associations over an 18-month period between maternal work stressors, negative work-family spillover, and depressive symptoms in a sample of 414 employed mothers with young children living in six predominantly nonmetropolitan counties in the Eastern United States. Results from a one-group mediation model showed that a…

  19. Examining the Constructs of Work-to-Family Enrichment and Positive Spillover

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masuda, Aline D.; McNall, Laurel A.; Allen, Tammy D.; Nicklin, Jessica M.

    2012-01-01

    This paper reports three studies examining construct validity evidence for two recently developed measures of the positive side of the work-family interface: work-to-family positive spillover (WFPS; Hanson, Hammer, & Colton, 2006) and work-to-family enrichment (WFE; Carlson, Kacmar, Wayne, & Grzywacz, 2006). Using confirmatory factor analysis, the…

  20. A plant-level analysis of the spill-over effects of the German Energiewende

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mulder, Machiel; Scholtens, Bert

    2016-01-01

    In order to analyse international effects of national energy policies, we investigate the spill-over effects of the German Energiewende on the Dutch power market, which is closely connected to the German market. We estimate the impact of the German supply of wind and solar electricity on the Dutch

  1. Economic analysis of pesticide use and environmental spillovers under a dynamic production environment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Skevas, T.

    2012-01-01

    Pesticides are used in agriculture to protect crops from pests and diseases, with indiscriminate pesticide use having several adverse effects on the environment. In an era of an increasing public awareness on pesticides’ environmental spillovers, the EU is trying to update its pesticide policy by

  2. Interdependence and spillovers : is firm performance affected by others' innovation activities?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Faria, Pedro; Lima, Francisco

    2012-01-01

    The creation of new knowledge is a case in which agents' behaviour can affect the performance of other actors positively, given that new knowledge creates positive externalities in the market. In this context, we investigate the existence of performance spillovers associated with innovation activiti

  3. Is Small Beautiful? Size Effects of Volatility Spillovers for Firm Performance and Exchange Rates in Tourism

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    C-L. Chang (Chia-Lin); H-K. Hsu (Hui-Kuang); M.J. McAleer (Michael)

    2012-01-01

    textabstractThis paper examines the size effects of volatility spillovers for firm performance and exchange rates with asymmetry in the Taiwan tourism industry. The analysis is based on two conditional multivariate models, BEKK-AGARCH and VARMA-AGARCH, in the volatility specification. Daily data fro

  4. Volatility Spillovers Between Energy and Agricultural Markets: A Critical Appraisal of Theory and Practice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    C-L. Chang (Chia-Lin); Y. Li (Y); M.J. McAleer (Michael)

    2015-01-01

    markdownabstract__Abstract__ Energy and agricultural commodities and markets have been examined extensively, albeit separately, for a number of years. In the energy literature, the returns, volatility and volatility spillovers (namely, the delayed effect of a returns shock in one asset on the subse

  5. Is Small Beautiful? Size Effects of Volatility Spillovers for Firm Performance and Exchange Rates in Tourism

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    C-L. Chang (Chia-Lin); H-K. Hsu (Hui-Kuang); M.J. McAleer (Michael)

    2013-01-01

    textabstractThis paper examines the size effects of volatility spillovers for firm performance and exchange rates with asymmetry in the Taiwan tourism industry. The analysis is based on two conditional multivariate models, BEKK-AGARCH and VARMA-AGARCH, in the volatility specification. Daily data fro

  6. Volatility Spillovers for Spot, Futures, and ETF Prices in Energy and Agriculture

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    C-L. Chang (Chia-Lin); C-P. Liu (Chia-Ping); M.J. McAleer (Michael)

    2016-01-01

    textabstractThe agricultural and energy industries are closely related, both biologically and financially. The paper discusses the relationship and the interactions on price and volatility, with special focus on the covolatility spillover effects for these two industries. The interaction and covolat

  7. An empirical study on information spillover effects between the Chinese copper futures market and spot market

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiangli; Cheng, Siwei; Wang, Shouyang; Hong, Yongmiao; Li, Yi

    2008-02-01

    This study employs a parametric approach based on TGARCH and GARCH models to estimate the VaR of the copper futures market and spot market in China. Considering the short selling mechanism in the futures market, the paper introduces two new notions: upside VaR and extreme upside risk spillover. And downside VaR and upside VaR are examined by using the above approach. Also, we use Kupiec’s [P.H. Kupiec, Techniques for verifying the accuracy of risk measurement models, Journal of Derivatives 3 (1995) 73-84] backtest to test the power of our approaches. In addition, we investigate information spillover effects between the futures market and the spot market by employing a linear Granger causality test, and Granger causality tests in mean, volatility and risk respectively. Moreover, we also investigate the relationship between the futures market and the spot market by using a test based on a kernel function. Empirical results indicate that there exist significant two-way spillovers between the futures market and the spot market, and the spillovers from the futures market to the spot market are much more striking.

  8. SPILLOVER EFFECTS OF THE SUB-PRIME MORTGAGE CRISIS TO THE ASIAN STOCK MARKETS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Esta Lestari

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available AbstractThis paper aims to analyze the effects of the sub-prime mortgage crisis on several Asian stock markets. An Exponential Generalized Autoregressive Conditional Heteroscedasticity (EGARCH model is employed to provide an empirical evidence of the direct spillover. The indirect effect is measured through the spillover effects from the increased volatility in the U.S. stock markets to the Asian stock markets. The results showed that the market integration occurs within Asian stock markets. Meanwhile the asymmetric effects are evident for all the Asian countries stock markets, indicating that financial markets in Asia are suffered more from negative news (shocks lead to more volatilities compared to positive news. Keywords: Stock market, sub-prime mortgage crisis, volatility, spillover effectJEL classification numbers: C22, F36, G15AbstrakPaper ini bertujuan untuk menganalisis pengaruh krisis sub-prime mortgage pada beberapa pasar saham Asia. Model Exponential Generalized Autoregressive Conditional Heteroscedasticity (EGARCH digunakan untuk mendapatkan bukti empiris dari kenaikan volatilitas dalam pasar saham Amerika pada pasar-pasar saham Asia. Hasil analisis memperlihatkan bahwa integrasi pasar terjadi di dalam pasar saham Asia. Sementara itu, pengaruh asimetris terbukti terjadi di pasar-pasar saham Asia, mengindikasikan bahwa pasar-pasar keuangan di Asia menderita lebih parah sebagai akibat dari kejutan negatif dibandingkan dengan dampak dari kejutan positif.Kata kunci: Pasar saham, krisis sub-prime mortgage, volatilitas, pengaruh spillover JEL classification numbers: C22, F36, G15

  9. Modelling Volatility Spillovers for Bio-ethanol, Sugarcane and Corn Spot and Futures Prices

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    C-L. Chang (Chia-Lin); M.J. McAleer (Michael); Y-A. Wang (Yu-Ann)

    2016-01-01

    textabstractThe recent and rapidly growing interest in biofuel as a green energy source has raised concerns about its impact on the prices, returns and volatility of related agricultural commodities. Analyzing the spillover effects on agricultural commodities and biofuel helps commodity suppliers he

  10. Volatility Spillovers between Energy and Agricultural Markets: A Critical Appraisal of Theory and Practice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    C-L. Chang (Chia-Lin); Y. Li (Y); M.J. McAleer (Michael)

    2015-01-01

    markdownabstract__Abstract__ Energy and agricultural commodities and markets have been examined extensively, albeit separately, for a number of years. In the energy literature, the returns, volatility and volatility spillovers (namely, the delayed effect of a returns shock in one asset on the subse

  11. First Principles Simulations of Hydrogen Storage via Spillover in MOF-5

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siegel, Donald

    2010-03-01

    Metal organic frameworks (MOF) have attracted considerable attention as hydrogen storage materials due to their high surface areas and ability to adsorb large quantities of hydrogen by weight (˜12 wt. % at 100bar). However, as a consequence of the weak H2-MOF bonding interaction (˜5 kJ/mol H2), this uptake occurs only at cryogenic temperatures; at room temperature, gravimetric capacities do not exceed ˜0.5 wt. %. As an ideal storage system would operate under ambient conditions, renewed interest in these materials has been sparked by recent experiments demonstrating RT uptake of ˜4 wt. % via the so-called ``spillover'' mechanism [JACS 128, 8136 (2006)]. In contrast to the conventional mechanism of MOF-based storage, where molecular H2 bonds directly to the MOF, spillover employs a hydrogen dissociation catalyst to generate atomic hydrogen (H), presumably resulting in stronger H-MOF bonding. Recent computational studies of spillover have reported conflicting results regarding the nature of this interaction. In an effort to resolve these ambiguities and clarify the thermodynamics of MOF-based spillover, DFT calculations are used to evaluate binding energies for several H adsorption configurations on MOF-5. Importantly, our calculations avoid the cluster approximation to the MOF geometry--a source of significant uncertainty in previous studies--and account for finite-temperature contributions to the free energy of adsorption.

  12. Chemical bridges for enhancing hydrogen storage by spillover and methods for forming the same

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Ralph T.; Li, Yingwei; Qi, Gongshin; Lachawiec, Jr., Anthony J.

    2012-12-25

    A composition for hydrogen storage includes a source of hydrogen atoms, a receptor, and a chemical bridge formed between the source and the receptor. The chemical bridge is formed from a precursor material. The receptor is adapted to receive hydrogen spillover from the source.

  13. Spillover but no spillback of two invasive parasitic copepods from invasive Pacific oysters (

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Goedknegt, M.A.; Schuster, A.-K.; Buschbaum, C.; Gergs, R.; Jung, A.; Luttikhuizen, P.C.; Van der Meer, J.; Troost, K.; Wegner, K.M.; Thieltges, D.W.

    2017-01-01

    Invasive species can cause indirect effects on native biota by modifying parasite-host interactions and disease occurrence in native species. This study investigated the role of the invasive Pacific oyster (Crassostrea gigas) in potential spillover (co-introduced parasites infect native hosts) and s

  14. Is Small Beautiful? Size Effects of Volatility Spillovers for Firm Performance and Exchange Rates in Tourism

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    C-L. Chang (Chia-Lin); H-K. Hsu (Hui-Kuang); M.J. McAleer (Michael)

    2012-01-01

    textabstractThis paper examines the size effects of volatility spillovers for firm performance and exchange rates with asymmetry in the Taiwan tourism industry. The analysis is based on two conditional multivariate models, BEKK-AGARCH and VARMA-AGARCH, in the volatility specification. Daily data

  15. Is Small Beautiful? Size Effects of Volatility Spillovers for Firm Performance and Exchange Rates in Tourism

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    C-L. Chang (Chia-Lin); H-K. Hsu (Hui-Kuang); M.J. McAleer (Michael)

    2013-01-01

    textabstractThis paper examines the size effects of volatility spillovers for firm performance and exchange rates with asymmetry in the Taiwan tourism industry. The analysis is based on two conditional multivariate models, BEKK-AGARCH and VARMA-AGARCH, in the volatility specification. Daily data

  16. The influence of volatility spill-overs and market beta on portfolio construction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    André Heymans

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available This study adds to Modern Portfolio Theory (MPT by providing an additional measure to market beta in constructing a more efficient investment portfolio. The additional measure analyses the volatility spill-over effects among stocks within the same portfolio. Using intraday stock returns from five top-40 listed stocks on the JSE between July 2008 and April 2010, volatility spill-over effects were estimated with a residual- based test (aggregate shock [AS] model framework. It is shown that when a particular stock attracted fewer volatility spill-over effects from the other stocks in the portfolio, the overall portfolio volatility decreased as well. In most cases market beta showcased similar results. Therefore, in order to construct a more efficient risk- adjusted portfolio, one requires both a portfolio that has a unit correlation with the market (beta-based, and stocks that showcase the least amount of volatility spill-over effects amongst one another. These results might assist portfolio managers to construct lower mean variance portfolios.

  17. Conditional Correlations and Volatility Spillovers Between Crude Oil and Stock Index Returns

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    R. Tansuchat (Roengchai); C-L. Chang (Chia-Lin); M.J. McAleer (Michael)

    2010-01-01

    textabstractThis paper investigates the conditional correlations and volatility spillovers between crude oil returns and stock index returns. Daily returns from 2 January 1998 to 4 November 2009 of the crude oil spot, forward and futures prices from the WTI and Brent markets, and the FTSE100, NYSE,

  18. Sectoral Productivity Growth and R&D Spillovers in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nahuis, R.; Tang, P.J.G.

    1999-01-01

    This paper assesses empirically whether R&D spillovers are important and whether they originate from domestic or foreign activities. Data for eleven sectors are used to explain the impact on total factor productivity of R&D by the sector itself, by other Dutch sectors and by foreign sectors. We find

  19. Sleep problems for children with autism and caregiver spillover effects : Implications for cost-effectiveness analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.M. Tilford (John Mick); N. Payakachat (Nalin); K.A. Kuhlthau (Karen); J.M. Pyne (Jeffrey); E. Kovacs (Erica); W.B.F. Brouwer (Werner); R.E. Frye (Richard)

    2015-01-01

    markdownabstractSleep problems in children with autism spectrum disorders (ASD) are under-recognized and under-treated. Identifying treatment value accounting for health effects on family members (spillovers) could improve the perceived cost-effectiveness of interventions to improve child sleep habi

  20. Join the club : knowledge spillovers and the influence of social networks on firm performance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boshuizen, Johannes

    2009-01-01

    Social networks are frequently claimed to provide advantages to firms, but rarely has this been empirically demonstrated. It is generally assumed that networks benefit not only individual firms, but also the regional economy as a whole. Localized knowledge spillovers are seen as the basis of these g

  1. Longitudinal Associations between Maternal Work Stress, Negative Work-Family Spillover, and Depressive Symptoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodman, W. Benjamin; Crouter, Ann C.

    2009-01-01

    The current study examined associations over an 18-month period between maternal work stressors, negative work-family spillover, and depressive symptoms in a sample of 414 employed mothers with young children living in six predominantly nonmetropolitan counties in the Eastern United States. Results from a one-group mediation model showed that a…

  2. Impact of shock requiring norepinephrine on the accuracy and reliability of subcutaneous continuous glucose monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holzinger, Ulrike; Warszawska, Joanna; Kitzberger, Reinhard; Herkner, Harald; Metnitz, Philipp G H; Madl, Christian

    2009-08-01

    To evaluate the impact of circulatory shock requiring norepinephrine therapy on the accuracy and reliability of a subcutaneous continuous glucose monitoring system (CGMS) in critically ill patients. A prospective, validation study of a medical intensive care unit at a university hospital was carried out. Continuous glucose monitoring was performed subcutaneously in 50 consecutive patients on intensive insulin therapy (IIT), who were assessed according to the a priori strata of circulatory shock requiring norepinephrine therapy or not. A total of 736 pairs of sensor glucose (SG)/blood glucose (BG) values were analysed (502 without and 234 with norepinephrine therapy). For all values, repeated measures Bland-Altman analysis showed a mean difference of 0.08 mmol/l (limits of agreement: -1.26 and 1.43 mmol/l). Circulatory shock requiring norepinephrine therapy did not influence the relation of arterial BG with SG in a multivariable random effects linear regression analysis. The covariates norepinephrine dose, body mass index (BMI), glucose level and severity of illness also had no influence. Insulin titration grid analysis showed that 98.6% of the data points were in the acceptable treatment zone. No data were in the life-threatening zone. Circulatory shock requiring norepinephrine therapy, as well as other covariates, had no influence on the accuracy and reliability of the CGMS in critically ill patients.

  3. Agricultural intensification exacerbates spillover effects on soil biogeochemistry in adjacent forest remnants.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raphael K Didham

    Full Text Available Land-use intensification is a central element in proposed strategies to address global food security. One rationale for accepting the negative consequences of land-use intensification for farmland biodiversity is that it could 'spare' further expansion of agriculture into remaining natural habitats. However, in many regions of the world the only natural habitats that can be spared are fragments within landscapes dominated by agriculture. Therefore, land-sparing arguments hinge on land-use intensification having low spillover effects into adjacent protected areas, otherwise net conservation gains will diminish with increasing intensification. We test, for the first time, whether the degree of spillover from farmland into adjacent natural habitats scales in magnitude with increasing land-use intensity. We identified a continuous land-use intensity gradient across pastoral farming systems in New Zealand (based on 13 components of farmer input and soil biogeochemistry variables, and measured cumulative off-site spillover effects of fertilisers and livestock on soil biogeochemistry in 21 adjacent forest remnants. Ten of 11 measured soil properties differed significantly between remnants and intact-forest reference sites, for both fenced and unfenced remnants, at both edge and interior. For seven variables, the magnitude of effects scaled significantly with magnitude of surrounding land-use intensity, through complex interactions with fencing and edge effects. In particular, total C, total N, δ15N, total P and heavy-metal contaminants of phosphate fertilizers (Cd and U increased significantly within remnants in response to increasing land-use intensity, and these effects were exacerbated in unfenced relative to fenced remnants. This suggests movement of livestock into surrounding natural habitats is a significant component of agricultural spillover, but pervasive changes in soil biogeochemistry still occur through nutrient spillover channels alone

  4. Study on Spatial Spillover Effects of Infrastructures Investment: A Case Study on Cities along Shanghai-Kunming Railway Line

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2012-01-01

    Using the economic development of regions and cities along the Shanghai-Kunming railway line as an example, the paper carries out an empirical study on the spatial spillover effects of infrastructure investment in China. It has been found that the infrastructure investment along Shang-Kunming line not only produces positive spatial spillover effects, such as promoting the region’s transportation capacity, expanding trading volume, adjusting industrial structure, and facilitating economic development, but also leads to certain negative spatial spillover effects like unbalanced flow of production elements among the region, and unbalanced economic growth.

  5. Norepinephrine stimulates mobilization of endothelial progenitor cells after limb ischemia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qijun Jiang

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: During several pathological processes such as cancer progression, thermal injury, wound healing and hindlimb ischemia, the mobilization of endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs mobilization was enhanced with an increase of sympathetic nerve activity and norepinephrine (NE secretion, yet the cellular and molecular mechanisms involved in the effects of NE on EPCs has less been investigated. METHODS AND RESULTS: EPCs from BMs, peripheral circulation and spleens, the VEGF concentration in BM, skeletal muscle, peripheral circulation and spleen and angiogenesis in ischemic gastrocnemius were quantified in mice with hindlimbs ischemia. Systemic treatment of NE significantly increased EPCs number in BM, peripheral circulation and spleen, VEGF concentration in BM and skeletal muscle and angiogenesis in ischemic gastrocnemius in mice with hind limb ischemia, but did not affair VEGF concentration in peripheral circulation and spleen. EPCs isolated from healthy adults were cultured with NE in vitro to evaluate proliferation potential, migration capacity and phosphorylations of Akt and eNOS signal moleculars. Treatment of NE induced a significant increase in number of EPCs in the S-phase in a dose-dependent manner, as well as migrative activity of EPCs in vitro (p<0.05. The co-treatment of Phentolamine, I127, LY294002 and L-NAME with NE blocked the effects of NE on EPCs proliferation and migration. Treatment with NE significantly increased phosphorylation of Akt and eNOS of EPCs. Addition of phentolamine and I127 attenuated the activation of Akt/eNOS pathway, but metoprolol could not. Pretreatment of mice with either Phentolamine or I127 significantly attenuated the effects of NE on EPCs in vivo, VEGF concentration in BM, skeletal muscle and angiogenesis in ischemic gastrocnemius, but Metoprolol did not. CONCLUSION: These results unravel that sympathetic nervous system regulate EPCs mobilization and their pro-angiogenic capacity via α adrenoceptor

  6. Spillover Phenomena and Its Striking Impacts in Electrocatalysis for Hydrogen and Oxygen Electrode Reactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Georgios D. Papakonstantinou

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The core subject of the present paper represents the interrelated spillover (effusion phenomena both of the primary oxide and the H-adatoms, their theory and practice, causes, appearances and consequences, and evidences of existence, their specific properties, and their alterpolar equilibria and kinetic behavior, structural, and resulting catalytic, and double layer charging features. The aim is to introduce electron conductive and d-d interactive individual and composite (mixed valence hypo-d-oxide compounds, of increased altervalent capacity, or their suboxides (Magnéli phases, as the interactive catalytic supports and therefrom provide (i the strong metal-support interaction (SMSI catalytic effect and (ii dynamic spillover interactive transfer of primary oxides (M-OH and free effusional H-adatoms for further electrode reactions and thereby advance the overall electrocatalytic activity. Since hypo-d-oxides feature the exchange membrane properties, the higher the altervalent capacity, the higher the spillover effect. In fact, altervalent hypo-d-oxides impose spontaneous dissociative adsorption of water molecules and then spontaneously pronounced membrane spillover transferring properties instantaneously resulting with corresponding bronze type (Pt/HxWO3 under cathodic and/or its hydrated state (Pt/W(OH6, responsible for Pt-OH effusion, under anodic polarization, this way establishing instantaneous reversibly revertible alterpolar bronze features (Pt/H0.35WO3⇔ Pt/W(OH6 and substantially advanced electrocatalytic properties of these composite interactive electrocatalysts. Such nanostructured-type electrocatalysts, even of mixed-valence hypo-d-oxide structures (Pt/H0.35WO3/TiO2/C, Pt/HxNbO3/TiO2/C, have for the first time been synthesized by the sol-gel methods and shown rather high stability, electron conductivity, and nonexchanged initial pure monobronze spillover and catalytic properties. Such a unique electrocatalytic system, as the

  7. Phenomena and significance of intermediate spillover in electrocatalysis of oxygen and hydrogen electrode reactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jakšić Jelena M.

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Altervalent hypo-d-oxides of transition metal series impose spontaneous dissociative adsorption of water molecules and pronounced membrane spillover transferring properties instantaneously resulting with corresponding bronze type (Pt/HxWO3 under cathodic, and/or its hydrated state (Pt/W(OH6 responsible for the primary oxide (Pt-OH effusion, under anodic polarization, this way establishing instantaneous reversibly revertible alterpolar bronze features (Pt/H0.35WO3 Pt/W(OH6, and substantially advanced electrocatalytic properties of these composite interactive electrocatalysts. As the consequence, the new striking and unpredictable prospects both in law and medium temperature proton exchange membrane fuell cell (L&MT PEMFC and water electrolysis (WE have been opened by the interactive supported individual (Pt, Pd, Ni or prevailing hyper-d-electronic nanostructured intermetallic phase clusters (WPt3, NbPt3, HfPd3, ZrNi3, grafted upon and within high altervalent capacity hypo-d-oxides (WO3, Nb2O5, Ta2O5, TiO2 and their proper mixed valence compounds, to create a novel type of alterpolar interchangeable composite electrocatalysts for hydrogen and oxygen electrode reactions. Whereas in aqueous media Pt (Pt/C features either chemisorbed catalytic surface properties of H-adatoms (Pt-H, or surface oxide (Pt=O, missing any effusion of other interacting species, new generation and selection of composite and interactive strong metal-support interaction (SMSI electrocatalysts in condensed wet state primarily characterizes interchangeable extremely fast reversible spillover of either H-adatoms, or the primary oxides (Pt-OH, Au-OH, or the invertible bronze type behavior of these significant interactive electrocatalytic ingredients. Such nanostructured type electrocatalysts, even of mixed hypo-d-oxide structure (Pt/H0.35WO3/TiO2/C, Pt/HxNbO3/TiO2/C, have for the first time been synthesized by the sol-gel methods and shown rather high stability, electron

  8. Interaction Between Brain Histamine and Serotonin, Norepinephrine, and Dopamine Systems: In Vivo Microdialysis and Electrophysiology Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flik, Gunnar; Folgering, Joost H A; Cremers, Thomas I H F; Westerink, Ben H C; Dremencov, Eliyahu

    2015-06-01

    Brain monoamines (serotonin, norepinephrine, dopamine, and histamine) play an important role in emotions, cognition, and pathophysiology and treatment of mental disorders. The interactions between serotonin, norepinephrine, and dopamine were studied in numerous works; however, histamine system received less attention. The aim of this study was to investigate the interactions between histamine and other monoamines, using in vivo microdialysis and electrophysiology. It was found that the inverse agonist of histamine-3 receptors, thioperamide, increased the firing activity of dopamine neurons in the ventral tegmental area. Selective agonist of histamine-3 receptors, immepip, reversed thiperamide-induced stimulation of firing activity of dopamine neurons. The firing rates of serotonin and norpeinephrine neurons were not attenuated by immepip or thioperamide. Thioperamide robustly and significantly increased extracellular concentrations of serotonin, norepinephrine, and dopamine in the rat prefrontal cortex and slightly increased norepinephrine and dopamine levels in the tuberomammillary nucleus of the hypothalamus. It can be concluded that histamine stimulates serotonin, norepinephrine, and dopamine transmission in the brain. Modulation of firing of dopamine neurons is a key element in functional interactions between histamine and other monoamines. Antagonists of histamine-3 receptors, because of their potential ability to stimulate monoamine neurotransmission, might be beneficial in the treatment of mental disorders.

  9. Norepinephrine transporter function and desipramine: residual drug effects versus short-term regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ordway, Gregory A; Jia, Weihong; Li, Jing; Zhu, Meng-Yang; Mandela, Prashant; Pan, Jun

    2005-04-30

    Previous research has shown that exposure of norepinephrine transporter (NET)-expressing cells to desipramine (DMI) downregulates the norepinephrine transporter, although changes in the several transporter parameters do not demonstrate the same time course. Exposures to desipramine for effects of residual desipramine on norepinephrine transporter binding and uptake were re-evaluated following exposures of PC12 cells to desipramine using different methods to remove residual drug. Using a method that minimizes residual drug, exposure of intact PC12 cells to desipramine for 4h had no effect on uptake capacity or [(3)H]nisoxetine binding to the norepinephrine transporter, while exposures for > or =16 h reduced uptake capacity. Desipramine-induced reductions in binding to the transporter required >24 h or greater periods of desipramine exposure. This study confirms that uptake capacity of the norepinephrine transporter is reduced earlier than changes in radioligand binding, but with a different time course than originally shown. Special pre-incubation procedures are required to abolish effects of residual transporter inhibitor when studying inhibitor-induced transporter regulation.

  10. The environmental actions of firms: examining the role of spillovers, networks and absorptive capacity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albornoz, Facundo; Cole, Matthew A; Elliott, Robert J R; Ercolani, Marco G

    2014-12-15

    In the light of climate uncertainty and growing concern for the natural environment, an increasingly important aspect of global business is the environmental behaviour of firms. In this paper we consider the factors that influence firms' environmental actions (EAs). Our study of Argentinean firms concentrates on measures of environmental spillovers, informal and formal networks and absorptive capacity by testing four related hypotheses. We find that foreign-owned firms, large firms and those with a greater capacity to assimilate new environmental technologies are more likely to adopt EAs. We also show that formal and informal networks aid the adoption of EAs in the presence of traditional firm-level spillovers. Finally, we show that foreign-owned firms have different motives to domestic firms for undertaking EAs.

  11. VOLATILITY SPILLOVER EFFECTS IN THE EXTRA VIRGIN OLIVE OIL MARKETS OF THE MEDITERRANEAN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dimitrios Panagiotou

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study is to assess the existence and magnitude of volatility spillovers between the extra virgin olive oil markets of Italy, Spain and Greece. These three Mediterranean countries are responsible for 95% of olive oil production within the European Union and they account for more than 50% of olive oil exports worldwide. In order to measure the degree of volatility transmission between these countries we estimate a vector error correction model along with the BEKK parameterization of a Multivariate Generalized Conditional Autoregressive Heteroskedasticity (M-GARCH model. The empirical results reveal the presence of ARCH and GARCH effects suggesting this way the existence of volatility spillovers between the extra virgin olive oil markets of Italy, Greece and Spain. ARCH effects are the biggest in magnitude for the market between Spain and Italy. GARCH effects are the biggest in magnitude for the market between Greece and Italy.

  12. Landscape connectivity promotes plant biodiversity spillover into non-target habitats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brudvig, Lars A; Damschen, Ellen I; Tewksbury, Joshua J; Haddad, Nick M; Levey, Douglas J

    2009-06-09

    Conservation efforts typically focus on maximizing biodiversity in protected areas. The space available for reserves is limited, however, and conservation efforts must increasingly consider how management of protected areas can promote biodiversity beyond reserve borders. Habitat corridors are considered an important feature of reserves because they facilitate movement of organisms between patches, thereby increasing species richness in those patches. Here we demonstrate that by increasing species richness inside target patches, corridors additionally benefit biodiversity in surrounding non-target habitat, a biodiversity "spillover" effect. Working in the world's largest corridor experiment, we show that increased richness extends for approximately 30% of the width of the 1-ha connected patches, resulting in 10-18% more vascular plant species around patches of target habitat connected by corridors than around unconnected but otherwise equivalent patches of habitat. Furthermore, corridor-enhanced spillover into non-target habitat can be predicted by a simple plant life-history trait: seed dispersal mode. Species richness of animal-dispersed plants in non-target habitat increased in response to connectivity provided by corridors, whereas species richness of wind-dispersed plants was unaffected by connectivity and increased in response to changes in patch shape--higher edge-to-interior ratio--created by corridors. Corridors promoted biodiversity spillover for native species of the threatened longleaf pine ecosystem being restored in our experiment, but not for exotic species. By extending economically driven spillover concepts from marine fisheries and crop pollination systems, we show how reconnecting landscapes amplifies biodiversity conservation both within and beyond reserve borders.

  13. Dynamic Correlation Analysis of Financial Spillover to Asian and Latin American Markets in Global Financial Turmoil

    OpenAIRE

    Matthew S. Yiu; Wai-Yip Alex Ho; Lu Jin

    2010-01-01

    This paper investigates the spillover of financial crises by studying the dynamics of correlation between eleven Asian and six Latin American stock markets vis-¨¤-vis the US stock market. A regional factor that drives common movements of stock markets in each region is identified for the period from 1993 to early 2009. We then estimate the time-varying volatility correlation between the regional factor and the US stock market by an asymmetric dynamic conditional correlation model. We find tha...

  14. The spillover of money market turbulence to FX swap and cross-currency swap markets

    OpenAIRE

    Naohiko Baba; Frank Packer; Teppei Nagano

    2008-01-01

    We analyse the spillover of the turmoil in money markets in the second half of 2007 to FX swap and long-term cross-currency basis swap markets. We find that the use of swap markets to overcome US dollar funding shortages by non-US financial institutions resulted in marked deviations from covered interest parity conditions and the impairment of liquidity in these markets.

  15. Psychological Capital and Performance: The Mediating Role of Work Family Spillover and Psychological Well-Being

    OpenAIRE

    Sema Polatcı; Asuman Akdoğan

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate the relationship between psychological capital and performance and to identify work family spillover and psychological well-being as a mediator of the effects of psychological capital on performance. Data was gathered from 361 white-collar employees from different occupations. The results based on Structural Equation Modeling reveal that psychological capital plays an important role in providing employees to have high performance. The results also i...

  16. Computational modeling suggests distinct, location-specific function of norepinephrine in olfactory bulb and piriform cortex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Licurgo ede Almeida

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Noradrenergic modulation from the locus coerulus is often associated with the regulation of sensory signal-to-noise ratio. In the olfactory system, noradrenergic modulation affects both bulbar and cortical processing, and has been show to modulate the detection of low concentration stimuli. We here implemented a computational model of the olfactory bulb and piriform cortex, based on known experimental results, to explore how noradrenergic modulation in the olfactory bulb and piriform cortex interact to regulate odor processing. We show that as predicted by behavioral experiments in our lab, norepinephrine can play a critical role in modulating the detection and associative learning of very low odor concentrations. Our simulations show that bulbar norepinephrine serves to pre-process odor representations to facilitate cortical learning, but not recall. We observe the typical non-uniform dose – response functions described for norepinephrine modulation and show that these are imposed mainly by bulbar, but not cortical processing.

  17. Computational modeling suggests distinct, location-specific function of norepinephrine in olfactory bulb and piriform cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Almeida, Licurgo; Reiner, Seungdo J; Ennis, Matthew; Linster, Christiane

    2015-01-01

    Noradrenergic modulation from the locus coerulus is often associated with the regulation of sensory signal-to-noise ratio. In the olfactory system, noradrenergic modulation affects both bulbar and cortical processing, and has been shown to modulate the detection of low concentration stimuli. We here implemented a computational model of the olfactory bulb and piriform cortex, based on known experimental results, to explore how noradrenergic modulation in the olfactory bulb and piriform cortex interact to regulate odor processing. We show that as predicted by behavioral experiments in our lab, norepinephrine can play a critical role in modulating the detection and associative learning of very low odor concentrations. Our simulations show that bulbar norepinephrine serves to pre-process odor representations to facilitate cortical learning, but not recall. We observe the typical non-uniform dose-response functions described for norepinephrine modulation and show that these are imposed mainly by bulbar, but not cortical processing.

  18. Is cerebral oxygenation negatively affected by infusion of norepinephrine in healthy subjects?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brassard, P.; Seifert, T.; Secher, Niels H.

    2009-01-01

    )) and internal jugular venous oxygen saturation (Sjv(O2)), middle cerebral artery mean flow velocity (MCA Vmean), cardiac output (CO), and arterial partial pressure for carbon dioxide (Pa(CO2)) were evaluated. RESULTS: MAP increased from 88 (79-101) [median (range)] to 115 (98-128) mm Hg with increasing doses......BACKGROUND: Vasopressor agents are commonly used to increase mean arterial pressure (MAP) in order to secure a pressure gradient to perfuse vital organs. The influence of norepinephrine on cerebral oxygenation is not clear. The aim of this study was to evaluate the impact of the infusion...... of norepinephrine on cerebral oxygenation in healthy subjects. METHODS: Three doses of norepinephrine (0.05, 0.1, and 0.15 microg kg(-1) min(-1) for 20 min each) were infused in nine healthy subjects [six males; 26 (6) yr, mean (SD)]. MAP, cerebral oxygenation characterized by frontal lobe oxygenation (Sc(O2...

  19. Study on spillover effect of copper futures between LME and SHFE using wavelet multiresolution analysis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Research on information spillover effects between financial markets remains active in the economic community. A Granger-type model has recently been used to investigate the spillover between London Metal Exchange (LME) and Shanghai Futures Exchange (SHFE), however, possible correlation between the future price and return on different time scales have been ignored. In this paper, wavelet multiresolution decomposition is used to investigate the spillover effects of copper future returns between the two markets. The daily return time series are decomposed on 2n (n=1, ..., 6) frequency bands through wavelet multiresolution analysis. The correlation between the two markets is studied with decomposed data. It is shown that high frequency detail components represent much more energy than low-frequency smooth components. The relation between copper future daily returns in LME and that in SHFE are different on different time scales. The fluctuations of the copper future daily returns in LME have large effect on that in SHFE in 32-day scale, but small effect in high frequency scales. It also has evidence that strong effects exist between LME and SHFE for monthly responses of the copper futures but not for daily responses.

  20. Returns and volatility spillover between Asian equity markets: A wavelet approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kumar Anoop S.

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available We analyse return and volatility spillover across select Asian equity markets using wavelet multiple correlation and cross-correlation. For the purpose of analysis, daily return data is taken from equity markets, viz. Bombay Stock Exchange SENSEX, Tokyo Stock Exchange NIKKEI 225, Hong Kong Shanghai Index (HSI, Amman Equity Index, Korea Composite Stock Price Index (KOSPI, and Singapore Strait Time Index (STI, from 03/01/2000 to 31/12/2013. The results show that the Asian markets are co-integrated in the long run. Further, it is found that a significant part of each market’s volatility pattern at intraweek scale can be largely explained by own shocks, but in the long run the volatility dynamics of the market changes as the extent of the spillover increases. From the wavelet multiple cross-correlation values, two developed markets, the STI and the HSI, are identified as potential leaders or followers among the group. From the analysis it is found that the volatility spillover across the studied markets is relatively low at the high frequency, implying that there is possibility of diversification at a daily to intraweek scale. The discrepancies between the markets vanish in the long run; hence a long-term diversification strategy is best avoided.

  1. Stress spillover in early marriage: the role of self-regulatory depletion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buck, April A; Neff, Lisa A

    2012-10-01

    Stressful experiences external to a marriage (e.g., work stress, finances) are often associated with poor relationship functioning and lowered marital satisfaction, a phenomenon called stress spillover. To date, however, little attention has been devoted to understanding the specific mechanisms through which stress may lead to maladaptive relationship patterns. Drawing from theories of self-regulatory depletion, it was predicted that coping with external stress is an effortful process that consumes spouses' regulatory resources, leaving spouses with less energy to effectively respond to their relationship issues. The current study relied on a sample of newly married couples to examine whether self-regulatory depletion may account for the link between external stress and relationship well-being. Couples were asked to complete a 14-day daily diary that assessed their daily stress, their state of self-regulatory depletion, their marital behaviors, and their daily marital appraisals. Within-person analyses revealed that, on average, couples experienced stress spillover, such that on days when their stress was higher than usual they reported enacting more negative behaviors toward their partner and endorsed less positive appraisals of the relationship. Further analyses confirmed that self-regulatory depletion accounted for a majority of these spillover effects. These findings suggest that even happy couples may find it difficult to engage in adaptive relationship processes under conditions of stress.

  2. A Method of Signal Timing Optimization for Spillover Dissipation in Urban Street Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dongfang Ma

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The precise identification and quick dissipation of spillovers are critically important in a traffic control system, especially when heavy congestion occurs. This paper first presents a calculation method for the occupancy per cycle under different traffic conditions and identifies the threshold of occupancy that characterizes the formation of spillovers. Then, capacity adjustments are determined for the incoming and outgoing streams of bottleneck links, with the aim of dissipating the queue to a permissible length within a given period of time, and optimization schemes are defined to calculate splits for the upstream and downstream intersections. Finally, taking average vehicular delay, outputs per cycle, and maximum queue length on the bottleneck link as the evaluation indices, the method of dissipating spillovers proposed in this paper is evaluated using a VISSIM simulation. The results show that the maximum queue length on the bottleneck link and the average vehicular delay at the upstream and downstream intersections decrease significantly under the new signal control plan; meanwhile, the new control schemes have little influence on the outputs of the two intersections per cycle.

  3. Spillover of interpersonal conflicts from work into nonwork: A daily diary study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez-Corts, Inés; Demerouti, Evangelia; Bakker, Arnold B; Boz, Marina

    2015-07-01

    [Correction Notice: An Erratum for this article was reported in Vol 20(3) of Journal of Occupational Health Psychology (see record 2015-15847-001). There was a misspelling in the figures. The legends for Figure 1 and Figure 2 should read "High Daily Resilience".] This study among a heterogeneous sample of employees expands the Job-Demands (JD-R) theory by examining how interpersonal conflicts at work-task and relationship conflict-spillover into the nonwork domain on a daily basis. We hypothesized that daily personal resources can buffer the daily negative spillover of interpersonal conflicts from work into the nonwork domain. A total of 113 employees (n = 565 occasions) filled in a daily diary questionnaire in the evening before bedtime over 5 consecutive working days. Results of multilevel analysis showed that the presence of daily personal resources is essential to buffer the spillover of interpersonal conflict at work to the nonwork domain. Specifically, on days that employees were not very optimistic or resilient, interpersonal conflicts resulted in higher strain-based work-life conflict experiences. These findings contribute to the JD-R theory and show how the unfavorable effects of daily interpersonal conflicts in the work domain may be avoided in the nonwork domain through enhancing personal resources. We discuss the implications for theory and practice. (PsycINFO Database Record

  4. Does FDI promote regional development? Evidence from local and regional productivity spillovers in Greece

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vassilis MONASTIRIOTIS

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Studies on the productivity spillovers of FDI have concentrated on the nationalsectoral level. As a result, little is known about the impact of FDI on absolute and relative regional economic performance. In this paper we examine this issue by relying on a unique dataset of over 20,000 Greek firms for the period 2002-2006 covering all sectors of economic activity. We examine the spatial distribution of foreign-owned firms in the country and analyse the effect that their presence – at the local, regional and national levels – has on the productivity of domestic firms. We find strong evidence suggesting that foreignowned firms self-select into regions and sectors of high productivity. Net of this selection effect, the impact of foreign presence on domestic productivity is negative – although at the very local level some positive spillover effects are identifiable. The bulk of the effects concentrate in non-manufacturing activities, high-tech sectors, and medium-sized high-productivity firms. Importantly, this effect is not constant across space however. Productivity spillovers tend to be negative in the regions hosting the main urban areas in the country but positive in smaller and more peripheral regions. In this way, despite the tendency of FDI to concentrate in a limited number of areas within the country – those of the highest level of development – the externalities that FDI activity generates to the local economies appear to be of a rather equilibrating character.

  5. Characteristics of the norepinephrine-stimulated phosphatidylinositol turnover in rat pineal cell dispersions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hauser, G.; Smith, T.L.

    1981-10-01

    Dispersed rat pineal cells can be used for the study of the phosphatidylinositol effect. The response to ( - )-norepinephrine of the incorporation of 32Pi into phospholipids is linear with time and cell concentration, stereospecific, and mediated through alpha-1-adrenergic receptors. Na+ in the incubation medium is obligatory for labeling of phosphatidylinositol and phosphatidylcholine by 32P. In the absence of K+, incorporation of 32P is drastically lowered and no stimulation by norepinephrine occurs. Rb+ can replace K+. Omission of Ca2+ or substitution with Sr2+ preferentially lowers incorporation of radioactivity into phosphatidylcholine. Mg2+ is not required for basal or stimulated labeling.

  6. Comparison of Nonshivering Thermogenesis Induced by Norepinephrine Stress in Tree Shrews

    OpenAIRE

    Wan-long Zhu; Di Zhang; Jia Zheng; Lin ZHang; Jin-hu Liu; Jin Cheng; Zheng-kun Wang

    2013-01-01

    Nonshivering thermogenesis (NST)is an important thermogenic mechanism for small mammals. Quantitative measurement of NST is usually stimulated by injection of norepinephrine. The injection dosage of norepinephrine (NE) is critical for eliciting the maximum NST. Three empirical equations of NE dosages were often referenced in previous studies: (1) NE (mg / kg)= 2.53W-0.4; (2) NE(mg/kg) = 3.3W-0.458 and (3) NE(mg/kg)= 6.6W-0.458. In the present study , we used tree shrews (Tupaia bel...

  7. Characteristics of hydrogen storage by spillover on Pt-doped carbon and catalyst-bridged metal organic framework.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stuckert, Nicholas R; Wang, Lifeng; Yang, Ralph T

    2010-07-20

    Metal dispersion is a crucially important factor for hydrogen spillover storage on metal/carbon materials. For Pt on carbon (Pt/C), dispersion into nearly 2 nm clusters or nanoparticles is necessary to facilitate spillover. On an effective Pt/C spillover sorbent, temperature-programmed desorption (TPD) results reveal the highest hydrogen signal is from the high-energy Pt edges, steps or (110) surfaces, even though the (111) faces are more abundant. Previous theoretical studies showed the high-energy sites (including the 110 face) are by far the most preferred for effective splitting of hydrogen. These are in significantly smaller fractions for larger particles, and thus the larger particles are less efficient. In addition, the rate-limiting step for spillover on effective Pt/C is identified by the susceptibility to isotopic differences, first-order behavior and isolation from catalyzed H(2)/HD/D(2) equilibrium measurements; we conclude it is the spillover step or surface diffusion. We extended our analysis to a review of our previous work, spillover on metal organic frameworks (MOFs). This has been achieved by bridging a commercial H(2) dissociation catalyst (Pt/C) to MOFs, large enhancement factors (up to 8) were observed. Unlike Pt/C sorbents, sample-to-sample consistency in storage capacity on the bridged MOF samples is difficult to achieve. Inconsistency in the enhancements by spillover is shown; however, significant enhancement factors are still observed when samples are prepared and activated properly. Common pitfalls (and their consequences) in sample preparation for both Pt/C and bridged MOFs are discussed in detail.

  8. Norepinephrine Triggers Metaplasticity of LTP by Increasing Translation of Specific mRNAs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maity, Sabyasachi; Rah, Sean; Sonenberg, Nahum; Gkogkas, Christos G.; Nguyen, Peter V.

    2015-01-01

    Norepinephrine (NE) is a key modulator of synaptic plasticity in the hippocampus, a brain structure crucially involved in memory formation. NE boosts synaptic plasticity mostly through initiation of signaling cascades downstream from beta (ß)-adrenergic receptors (ß-ARs). Previous studies demonstrated that a ß-adrenergic receptor agonist,…

  9. Norepinephrine uptake by hypothalamic tissue from the rat related to feeding

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gugten, J. van der; Slangen, J.L.

    1957-01-01

    Norepinephrine (NE) uptake by rat hypothalamus in vitro was studied in relation to food intake. Significant daily variations in NE uptake were observed in caudal hypothalamus from freely feeding rats. A maximal elevation occurred at the beginning of the night when food intake is also increasing to a

  10. Role of norepinephrine in the regulation of rapid eye movement sleep

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Birendra N Mallick; Sudipta Majumdar; Mohd Faisal; Vikas Yadav; Vibha Madan; Dinesh Pal

    2002-09-01

    Sleep and wakefulness are instinctive behaviours that are present across the animal species. Rapid eye movement (REM) sleep is a unique biological phenomenon expressed during sleep. It evolved about 300 million years ago and is noticed in the more evolved animal species. Although it has been objectively identified in its present characteristic form about half a century ago, the mechanics of how REM is generated, and what happens upon its loss are not known. Nevertheless, extensive research has shown that norepinephrine plays a crucial role in its regulation. The present knowledge that has been reviewed in this manuscript suggests that neurons in the brain stem are responsible for controlling this state and presence of excess norepinephrine in the brain does not allow its generation. Furthermore, REM sleep loss increases levels of norepinephrine in the brain that affects several factors including an increase in Na-K ATPase activity. It has been argued that such increased norepinephrine is ultimately responsible for REM sleep deprivation, associated disturbances in at least some of the physiological conditions leading to alteration in behavioural expression and settling into pathological conditions.

  11. Increasing arterial blood pressure with norepinephrine does not improve microcirculatory blood flow: a prospective study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A. Dubin; M.O. Pozo; C.A. Casabella; F.,Jr Pálizas; G. Murias; M.C. Moseinco; V.S. Kanoore Edul; F. Pálizas; E. Estenssoro; C. Ince

    2009-01-01

    Introduction Our goal was to assess the effects of titration of a norepinephrine infusion to increasing levels of mean arterial pressure (MAP) on sublingual microcirculation. Methods Twenty septic shock patients were prospectively studied in two teaching intensive care units. The patients were mecha

  12. Lack of effect of norepinephrine on cranial haemodynamics and headache in healthy volunteers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindholt, M; Petersen, K A; Tvedskov, J F

    2009-01-01

    Stress is a provoking factor for both tension-type headache and migraine attacks. In the present single-blind study, we investigated if stress induced by norepinephrine (NE) could elicit delayed headache in 10 healthy subjects and recorded the cranial arterial responses. NE at a dose of 0.025 mic...

  13. The norepinephrine transporter gene is a candidate gene for panic disorder

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buttenschøn, H N; Kristensen, A S; Buch, H N

    2011-01-01

    Panic disorder (PD) is an anxiety disorder characterized by recurrent panic attacks with a lifetime prevalence of 4.7%. Genetic factors are known to contribute to the development of the disorder. Several lines of evidence point towards a major role of the norepinephrine system in the pathogenesis...

  14. Intrahippocampal Infusions of Anisomycin Produce Amnesia: Contribution of Increased Release of Norepinephrine, Dopamine, and Acetylcholine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Zhenghan; Gold, Paul E.

    2009-01-01

    Intra-amygdala injections of anisomycin produce large increases in the release of norepinephrine (NE), dopamine (DA), and serotonin in the amygdala. Pretreatment with intra-amygdala injections of the beta-adrenergic receptor antagonist propranolol attenuates anisomycin-induced amnesia without reversing the inhibition of protein synthesis, and…

  15. Intrahippocampal Infusions of Anisomycin Produce Amnesia: Contribution of Increased Release of Norepinephrine, Dopamine, and Acetylcholine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Zhenghan; Gold, Paul E.

    2009-01-01

    Intra-amygdala injections of anisomycin produce large increases in the release of norepinephrine (NE), dopamine (DA), and serotonin in the amygdala. Pretreatment with intra-amygdala injections of the beta-adrenergic receptor antagonist propranolol attenuates anisomycin-induced amnesia without reversing the inhibition of protein synthesis, and…

  16. Fluctuating Estrogen and Progesterone Receptor Expression in Brainstem Norepinephrine Neurons through the Rat Estrous Cycle

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haywood, S.A.; Simonian, S.X.; Beek, van der E.M.; Bicknell, R.J.; Herbison, A.E.

    1999-01-01

    Norepinephrine (NE) neurons within the nucleus tractus solitarii (NTS; A2 neurons) and ventrolateral medulla (A1 neurons) represent gonadal steroid-dependent components of several neural networks regulating reproduction. Previous studies have shown that both A1 and A2 neurons express estrogen recept

  17. Improvement of social adaptation in depression with serotonin and norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mike Briley

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Mike Briley, Chantal MoretNeuroBiz Consulting and Communication, Castres, FranceAbstract: Depression is a disabling condition resulting in significant impairment in social functioning, involving the patient’s family, friends, work colleagues, and society at large. Although both psychologic and pharmacologic treatments generally improve many depressive symptoms, they do not always result in significant improvement in social functioning. The importance of recovery of social functioning in depressed patients is now widely appreciated, and studies are beginning to include it in evaluations of therapeutic efficacy. Among the various social adjustment evaluation rating scales, the Social Adaptation Self-Evaluation Scale, a social motivation and behavior scale, has been found to be simple to use and sensitive to change. Using this scale, the selective norepinephrine reuptake inhibitor, reboxetine, has been shown to be significantly more effective in improving social functioning than the selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor, fluoxetine. These findings are consistent with the notion that improvement in social adaptation involves functions depending primarily on noradrenergic neurotransmission. This hypothesis suggests that the serotonin and norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors, venlafaxine, duloxetine, and milnacipran, could be particularly helpful in improving social functioning. Preliminary studies with the serotonin and norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors suggest that they significantly improve social functioning. Comparative studies with selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors on the effects on social functioning should be encouraged.Keywords: Social Adaptation Self-Evaluation Scale, social functioning, depression, serotonin and norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors, noradrenergic neurotransmission

  18. Norepinephrine drives persistent activity in prefrontal cortex via synergistic α1 and α2 adrenoceptors.

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    Zizhen Zhang

    Full Text Available Optimal norepinephrine levels in the prefrontal cortex (PFC increase delay-related firing and enhance working memory, whereas stress-related or pathologically high levels of norepinephrine are believed to inhibit working memory via α1 adrenoceptors. However, it has been shown that activation of Gq-coupled and phospholipase C-linked receptors can induce persistent firing, a cellular correlate of working memory, in cortical pyramidal neurons. Therefore, despite its importance in stress and cognition, the exact role of norepinephrine in modulating PFC activity remains elusive. Using electrophysiology and optogenetics, we report here that norepinephrine induces persistent firing in pyramidal neurons of the PFC independent of recurrent fast synaptic excitation. This persistent excitatory effect involves presynaptic α1 adrenoceptors facilitating glutamate release and subsequent activation of postsynaptic mGluR5 receptors, and is enhanced by postsynaptic α2 adrenoceptors inhibiting HCN channel activity. Activation of α2 adrenoceptors or inhibition of HCN channels also enhances cholinergic persistent responses in pyramidal neurons, providing a mechanism of crosstalk between noradrenergic and cholinergic inputs. The present study describes a novel cellular basis for the noradrenergic control of cortical information processing and supports a synergistic combination of intrinsic and network mechanisms for the expression of mnemonic properties in pyramidal neurons.

  19. Fluctuating Estrogen and Progesterone Receptor Expression in Brainstem Norepinephrine Neurons through the Rat Estrous Cycle

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haywood, S.A.; Simonian, S.X.; Beek, van der E.M.; Bicknell, R.J.; Herbison, A.E.

    1999-01-01

    Norepinephrine (NE) neurons within the nucleus tractus solitarii (NTS; A2 neurons) and ventrolateral medulla (A1 neurons) represent gonadal steroid-dependent components of several neural networks regulating reproduction. Previous studies have shown that both A1 and A2 neurons express estrogen

  20. Cardioprotection Afforded by Norepinephrine-mediated Postconditioning in Isolated Rat Hearts

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xinhua Huang; Dai Li; Yishuai Zhang; Nianshen Li; Benmei Chen; Jun Peng; Yuanjian Li

    2008-01-01

    Objectives Previous studies have demonstrated that endogenous norepinephrine (NE) plays an important role in the mediation of ischemic preconditioning. The present study is designed to determine whether NE is also involved in medi-ation of the protective effects of postconditioning. Methods The rat hearts were rapidly excised under anesthesia and attached to a Langendorff apparatus via the aorta for retrograde perfusion with Krebs-Henseleit buffer solution. All hearts were subjected to 30 min of left coronary artery occlusion followed by 60 rain of reperfusion, except the control group. Animals were randomly divided into 5 groups as follows: ① control group, the hearts were underwent same procedures without ischemic insult; ② ischemia reperfusion group, the left coronary artery was occluded for 30 min and followed by 60 min of reperfusion;③ ischemic postconditioning (Ipost) group, immediately at the onset of reperfusion, the heart was initiated with 1 min of full coronary flow, followed by 1 min of re-occlusion, repeated for a total of three cycles; ④ Ipost plus prazosin group, the heart was perfused with prazosin for 10 min before ischemia; ⑤ Ipost plus reserpine group, a single dose of reserpine was administered by I.m. Injection, 24 hours before the experiment. Coronary flow was measured by timed collection of coronary effluent and sample of coronary effluent at 5 rain of reperfusion were collected for the measurement of ereatine kinase (CK). Infarct size and risk area were determined at the end of experiments. Results 30 rain of ischemia and followed by 60 min of reperfusion caused a significant decrease in cardiac function and a significant increase in CK release and infarct size. Postconditioning with three cycles of 1-min ischemia and 1-min reperfusion markedly improved cardiac function and reduced CK release and infarct size. However,the cardioprotection afforded by postconditioning was abolished by prazosin (10-6M), a selective α1 adrenergic

  1. Comparison of norepinephrine and dopamine in the management of septic shock using impedance cardiography

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    Mathur Sharad

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Vasoconstrictors are one of the therapeutic modalities in the treatment of septic shock. In the present study, we have compared the effects of dopamine and norepinephrine in the treatment of septic shock with pre-defined end-points and continuous non-invasive cardiac output monitoring using impedance cardiography. Design: Randomized controlled trial. Settings: Sixteen-bedded mixed intensive care unit of a tertiary care teaching institution. Materials and Methods: The study included 50 consecutive patients presenting with septic shock and divided randomly into two groups with 25 patients in each group. Group I patients were treated with dopamine and those in Group II were treated with norepinephrine. They were optimized with fluid resuscitation upto CVP>10 cm of H 2 O, packed red cells transfusion upto hematocrit> 30, oxygenation and ventilation upto PaO 2 >60 mmHg before the inotropes were started. The goal of therapy was to achieve and maintain for six hours, all of the following: (1 SBP> 90 mm Hg, (2 SVRI> 1100 dynes.s/cm 5 m 2 , (3 Cardiac Index> 4.0L/min/m 2 , (4 IDO 2 > 550 ml/min/m 2 and (5 IVO 2 > 150 ml/min/m 2 . Measurements: The demographic data, baseline parameters and post-treatment parameters were statistically analyzed by using t-test. Results: The post-treatment parameters were statistically significant showing the superiority of norepinephrine over dopamine in optimization of hemodynamics and patient survival. Significant improvement in systolic blood pressure, heart rate, cardiac index, SVRI, IVO 2 and urine output were found in norepinephrine group than the dopamine group. Dopamine showed a response in 10 out of 25 patients up to a maximum dose of 25 mcg/kg/min while with norepinephrine, 19 patients responded up to a maximum dose of 2.5 mcg/kg/min The hemodynamic parameters were preserved in norepinephrine group with better preservation of organ perfusion and oxygen utilization with maintenance of splanchnic and

  2. Stock markets volatility spillovers during financial crises: A DCC-MGARCH with skewed-t density approach

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    Dahiru A. Bala

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper investigates stock returns volatility spillovers in emerging and developed markets (DMs using multivariate-GARCH (MGARCH models and their variants. In addition, we analyse the impacts of global financial crisis (2007–2009 on stock market volatility interactions and modify the BEKK-MGARCH-type models by including financial crisis dummies to assess their impact on volatilities and spillovers. Major findings reveal that correlations among emerging markets (EMs are lower compared with correlations among DMs and increase during financial crises. Furthermore, we detect evidence of volatility spillovers and observe that own-volatility spillovers are higher than cross-volatility spillovers for EMs suggesting that shocks have not been substantially transmitted among EMs compared to DMs. We also find significant asymmetric behaviour in DMs while weak evidence is detected for EMs. Finally, the DCC-with-skewed-t density model provided improved diagnostics compared to other models partly due to its taking into account fat tails and skewed features often present in financial returns.

  3. Protein acylation in the inhibition of insulin secretion by norepinephrine, somatostatin, galanin, and PGE2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Haiying; Straub, Susanne G; Sharp, Geoffrey W G

    2003-08-01

    The major physiological inhibitors of insulin secretion, norepinephrine, somatostatin, galanin, and prostaglandin E2, act via specific receptors that activate pertussis toxin (PTX)-sensitive G proteins. Four inhibitory mechanisms are known: 1) activation of ATP-sensitive K channels and repolarization of the beta-cell; 2) inhibition of L-type Ca2+ channels; 3) decreased activity of adenylyl cyclase; and 4) inhibition of exocytosis at a "distal" site in stimulus-secretion coupling. We have examined the underlying mechanisms of inhibition at this distal site. In rat pancreatic islets, 2-bromopalmitate, cerulenin, and polyunsaturated fatty acids, all of which suppress protein acyltransferase activity, blocked the distal inhibitory effects of norepinephrine in a concentration-dependent manner. In contrast, control compounds such as palmitate, 16-hydroxypalmitate, and etomoxir, which do not block protein acylation, had no effect. Furthermore, 2-bromopalmitate also blocked the distal inhibitory actions of somatostatin, galanin, and prostaglandin E2. Importantly, neither 2-bromopalmitate nor cerulenin affected the action of norepinephrine to decrease cAMP production. We also examined the effects of norepinephrine, 2-bromopalmitate, and cerulenin on palmitate metabolism. Palmitate oxidation and its incorporation into lipids seemed not to contribute to the effects of 2-bromopalmitate and cerulenin on norepinephrine action. These data suggest that protein acylation mediates the distal inhibitory effect on insulin secretion. We propose that the inhibitors of insulin secretion, acting via PTX-sensitive G proteins, activate a specific protein acyltransferase, causing the acylation of a protein or proteins critical to exocytosis. This particular acylation and subsequent disruption of the essential and precise interactions involved in core complex formation would block exocytosis.

  4. Predicting spillover risk to non-target plants pre-release: Bikasha collaris a potential biological control agent of Chinese tallowtree (Triadica sebifera)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quarantine host range tests accurately predict direct risk of biological control agents to non-target species. However, a well-known indirect effect of biological control of weeds releases is spillover damage to non-target species. Spillover damage may occur when the population of agents achieves ou...

  5. Estimating the Impact and Spillover Effect of Climate Change on Crop Yield in Northern Ghana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Botchway, E.

    2016-12-01

    In tropical regions of the world human-induced climate change is likely to impact negatively on crop yields. To investigate the impact of climate change and its spillover effect on mean and variance of crop yields in northern Ghana, the Just and Pope stochastic production function and the Spatial Durbin model were adopted. Surprisingly, the results suggest that both precipitation and average temperature have positive effects on mean crop yield during the wet season. Wet season average temperature has a significant spillover effect in the region, whereas precipitation during the wet season has only one significant spillover effect on maize yield. Wet season precipitation does not have a strong significant effect on crop yield despite the rainfed nature of agriculture in the region. Thus, even if there are losers and winners as a result of future climate change at the regional level, future crop yield would largely depend on future technological development in agriculture, which may improve yields over time despite the changing climate. We argue, therefore, that technical improvement in farm management such as improved seeds and fertilizers, conservation tillage and better pest control, may have a more significant role in increasing observed crop productivity levels over time. So investigating the relative importance of non-climatic factors on crop yield may shed more light on where appropriate interventions can help in improving crop yields. Climate change, also, needs to be urgently assessed at the level of the household, so that poor and vulnerable people dependent on agriculture can be appropriately targeted in research and development activities whose object is poverty alleviation.

  6. Scale dependency in effectiveness, isolation, and social-ecological spillover of protected areas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ament, Judith M; Cumming, Graeme S

    2016-08-01

    Protected areas are considered vital for the conservation of biodiversity. Given their central role in many conservation strategies, it is important to know whether they adequately protect biodiversity within their boundaries; whether they are becoming more isolated from other natural areas over time; and whether they play a role in facilitating or reducing land-cover change in their surroundings. We used matching methods and national and local analyses of land-cover change to evaluate the combined effectiveness (i.e., avoided natural-cover loss), isolation (i.e., changes in adjacent areas), and spillover effects (i.e., impacts on adjacent areas) of 19 national parks in South Africa from 2000 to 2009. All parks had either similar or lower rates of natural-cover loss than matched control samples. On a national level, mean net loss of natural cover and mean net gain of cultivation cover decreased with distance from park boundary, but there was considerable variation in trends around individual parks, providing evidence for both increased isolation and buffering of protected areas. Fourteen parks had significant positive spillover and reduced natural-cover loss in their surroundings, whereas five parks experienced elevated levels of natural-cover loss. Conclusions about social-ecological spillover effects from protected areas depended heavily on the measures of land-cover change used and the scale at which the results were aggregated. Our findings emphasize the need for high-resolution data when assessing spatially explicit phenomena such as land-cover change and challenge the usefulness of large-scale (coarse grain, broad extent) studies for understanding social-ecological dynamics around protected areas.

  7. Climate, Energy, Water, Land and the Spill-Over Effect (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tidwell, V. C.; Backus, G.; Bier, A.; Brune, N.; Brown, T. J.

    2013-12-01

    Developing nations incur a greater risk to climate stress than the developed world due to poorly managed natural resources, unreliable infrastructure and brittle governing/economic institutions. When fragile states are stressed these vulnerabilities are often manifest in a 'domino effect' of reduced natural resource production-leading to economic hardship-followed by desperate emigration, social unrest, and humanitarian crises. The impact is not limited to a single nation or region but 'spills over' to adjoining areas with even broader impact on global markets and security. Toward this problem we are developing a model of climate aggravated spill-over that couples social, economic, infrastructure and resource dynamics and constraints. The model integrates system dynamics and agent based simulation to identify regions vulnerable to the spill-over effect and to explore potential mitigating and/or adaptive measures. At the heart of the analysis is human migration which is modeled by combining aspects of the Protection Motivation Theory and Theory of Planned Behavior within the mechanistic framework of Fick's first law of diffusion. Agents in the current model are distinguished at the country level by country of residence, country of origin, gender, education/skill, age, and rural/urban roots. The model of the environment in which the agents operate endogenously simulates economy, labor, population, disease, violence, energy, water, and food sectors. Various climate scenarios distinguished by differences in temperature, precipitation and extreme events, are simulated over a 50 year time horizon. Results allow exploration of the nexus between climate change, resource provisioning, especially energy, water and land, and the resultant adaptive response of the impacted population. Current modeling efforts are focused on the developing nations of West Africa. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly

  8. INTERACTIVE SUPPORTED ELECTROCATALYSTS AND SPILLOVER EFFECT IN ELECTROCATALYSIS FOR HYDROGEN AND OXYGEN ELECTRODE REACTIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    NEDELJKO V. KRSTAJIĆ

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the present paper has been to introduce the electron conductive and d-d-interactive individual and composite hypo-d-oxides of the increased altervalent capacity, or their suboxides (Magneli phases, as catalytic supports and therefrom provide: (i The Strong Metal-Support Interaction (SMSI effect, and (ii the Dynamic spillover interactive transfer of primary oxides (M-OH for further electrode reactions, and thereby advance the overall electrocatalytic activity. The d-band has been pointed out as the bonding, adsorptive and catalytic orbital. In the same context, the phenomenon and significance of the d-d-correlations both in heterogeneous catalysis and electrocatalysis are displayed and inferred. Since hypo-d-oxides feature the exchange membrane properties, the higher the altervalent capacity, the higher the spillover effect. Potentiodynamic experiments have shown that the reversible peak of the primary oxide growth on Pt, Ru and Au supported upon hypo-d-oxides and suboxides becomes distinctly increased in the charge capacity and shifts to remarkably more negative potential values, so that it starts even within the range of H-adatoms desorption, while its reduction extends until and merge with the UPD of hydrogen atoms. With wet tungstenia doped titania supported Pt catalyst in membrane cells these peaks dramatically increase in their charge capacity and reversibly become shrunk with a decreased moisture content in the feeding inert gas mixture, and vice versa. Such distinct potentiodynamic scans, in conjunction with some broaden complementary kinetic electrocatalytic improvements rising from the same hypo-d-oxide and/or suboxide interactive support effects, have been proved to be the best and comparable experimental evidence for the spillover effect of primary oxides.

  9. Sympathetic re-innervation after heart transplantation: dual-isotope neurotransmitter scintigraphy, norepinephrine content and historical examination

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guertner, C. [Univ. Hospital Frankfurt am Main (Germany). Dept. of Nuclear Medicine; Krause, B.J. [Univ. Hospital Frankfurt am Main (Germany). Dept. of Nuclear Medicine; Klepzig, H. Jr. [Univ. Hospital Frankfurt am Main (Germany). Dept. of Cardiology; Herrmann, G. [Univ. Hospital Frankfurt am Main (Germany). Dept. of Pathology; Lelbach, S. [Univ. Hospital Frankfurt am Main (Germany). Dept. of Nuclear Medicine; Vockert, E.K. [Biocenter Niederursel, Frankfurt am Main (Germany). Dept. of Pharmacology; Hartmann, A. [Univ. Hospital Frankfurt am Main (Germany). Dept. of Cardiology; Maul, F.D. [Univ. Hospital Frankfurt am Main (Germany). Dept. of Nuclear Medicine; Kranert, T.W. [Univ. Hospital Frankfurt am Main (Germany). Dept. of Nuclear Medicine; Mutschler, E. [Biocenter Niederursel, Frankfurt am Main (Germany). Dept. of Pharmacology; Huebner, K. [Univ. Hospital Frankfurt am Main (Germany). Dept. of Pathology; Hoer, G. [Univ. Hospital Frankfurt am Main (Germany). Dept. of Nuclear Medicine

    1995-05-01

    Cardiac transplantation entails surgical disruption of the sympathetic nerve fibres from their somata, resulting in sympathetic denervation. In order to investigate the occurrence of sympathetic re-innervation, neurotransmitter scintigraphy using the norepinephrine analogue iodine-123 metaiodobenzylguanidine (MIBG) was performed in 15 patients 2-69 months after transplantation. In addition, norepinephrine content and immunohistochemical reactions of antibodies to Schwann cell-associated S100 protein, to neuron-specific enolase (NSE) and to norepinephrine were examined in 34 endomyocardial biopsies of 29 patients 1-88 months after transplantation. Anterobasal {sup 123}I-MIBG uptake indicating partial sympathetic re-innervation could be shown in 40% of the scintigraphically investigated patients 37-69 months after transplantation. In immunohistochemical studies 83% of the patients investigated 1-72 Months after transplantation showed nerve fibres in their biopsies but not positive reaction to norepinephrine. Significant norepinephrine content indicating re-innervation could not be detected in any biopsy. It was concluded that in spite of the lack of norepinephrine content there seemed to be immunohistological and scintigraphic evidence of sympathetic re-innervation. An explanation for this contradictory finding may be the reduced or missing norepinephrine storage ability compared to the restored uptake ability of regenerated sympathetic nerve fibres. (orig.)

  10. SPILLOVER EFFECTS OF U.S. FEDERAL RESERVE’S RECENT QUANTITATIVE EASING ON CANADIAN COMMODITY PRICES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sayed Saghaian

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study, we evaluate the spillover effects of the recent U.S. Federal Reserve’s purchase of longterm assets (quantitative easing on prices of Canadian commodities. The first large-scale asset purchases happened after the Great Recession, at the end of 2008, and the second purchases were in November of 2010. Since the U.S. is a large country, those policies have international spillover effects, particularly on Canada, a major economic partner. The commodities included in this analysis are Canadian livestock (cattle, hogs, and poultry, cereal grains (corn, soybeans, and wheat, softs (sugar, coffee, and cocoa, and energy (crude oil and natural gas. Using historical decomposition graphs, we find significant spillover effects on the Canadian commodity prices under investigation in the immediate neighborhood (seven-month horizon of the large-scale asset purchases, especially the second round of quantitative easing.

  11. Oil-Price Volatility and Macroeconomic Spillovers in Central and Eastern Europe: Evidence from a Multivariate GARCH Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hegerty Scott W.

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Recent commodity price declines have added to worldwide macroeconomic risk, which has had serious effects on both commodity exporters and manufacturers that use oil and raw materials. These effects have been keenly felt in Central and Eastern Europe—particularly in Russia, but also in European Union member states. This study tests for spillovers among commodity-price and macroeconomic volatility by applying a VAR(1-MGARCH model to monthly time series for eight CEE countries. Overall, we find that oil prices do indeed have effects throughout the region, as do spillovers among exchange rates, inflation, interest rates, and output, but that they differ from country to country—particularly when different degrees of transition and integration are considered. While oil prices have a limited impact on the currencies of Russia and Ukraine, they do make a much larger contribution to the two countries’ macroeconomic volatility than do spillovers among the other macroeconomic variables.

  12. The Spillover Effect of Technological Progress Based on Two Sector Model: An Empirical Study of Chinese Manufacturing Sector

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sun Xiao-hua

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available As the technology has the nature of public good, industrial technology innovation activities have positive externalities on related sectors. Two-sector model is built to identify and calculate the spillover effects of technological progress. Specifically, the industry is divided into two sectors, and technological progress in one sector is added to the production function of the other to research the relationship between technological progress in one sector and output growth of the other. Panel data constituted by time-series from 2000 to 2007 and cross-section data of 31 provinces in Chinese manufacturing sectors is used for empirical testing. The conclusion is drawn that there are very significant spillover effects from the technological progress in equipment manufacturing sector on non-equipment manufacturing sector. The estimated results of different divisions prove that the production efficiency of equipment manufacturing sector and equipment updating speed of non-equipment manufacturing sector influence the spillover effects.

  13. Pedophilia is accompanied by increased plasma concentrations of catecholamines, in particular epinephrine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maes, M; De Vos, N; Van Hunsel, F; Van West, D; Westenberg, H; Cosyns, P; Neels, H

    2001-08-05

    Plasma epinephrine and norepinephrine concentrations were measured in pedophiles and normal men both in placebo conditions and after administration of meta-chlorophenylpiperazine (mCPP), a post-synaptic 5-HT2 receptor agonist. The plasma concentrations of catecholamines, in particular epinephrine, were significantly increased in pedophiles. It is concluded that pedophiles may have an increased activity of the sympathoadrenal system.

  14. Integrated and Consistent Active Control Formulation and Piezotransducer Position Optimization of Plate Structures considering Spillover Effects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mojtaba Biglar

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This study addresses new formulation for active vibration control of plates by optimal locations of attached piezotransducers. Free vibrations are solved by Rayleigh-Ritz and transient by assumed modes methods. Optimal orientations of patches are determined by spatial controllability/observability, as well as residual modes to reduce spillover. These criteria are used to achieve optimal fitness function defined for genetic algorithm to find optimal locations. To control vibrations, negative velocity feedback control is designed. Results indicate that, by locating piezopatches at optimal positions, depreciation rate increases and amplitudes of vibrations reduce effectively. The effect of number of piezodevices is analyzed.

  15. Hydrogen spillover on DV (555-777) graphene – vanadium cluster system: First principles study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumar, E. Mathan, E-mail: ranjit.t@res.srmuniv.ac.in, E-mail: mathanranjitha@gmail.com; Thapa, Ranjit, E-mail: ranjit.t@res.srmuniv.ac.in, E-mail: mathanranjitha@gmail.com [SRM Research Institute, SRM University, Kattankulathur, Tamil Nadu - 603203 (India); P, Sabarikirishwaran [Department of Physics and Nanotechnology, SRM University, Kattankulathur, Tamil Nadu - 603203 (India)

    2015-06-24

    Using dispersion corrected density functional theory (DFT+D), the interaction of Vanadium adatom and cluster with divacancy (555-777) defective graphene sheet has been studied elaborately. We explore the prospect of hydrogen storage on V{sub 4} cluster adsorbed divacancy graphene system. It has been observed that V{sub 4} cluster (acting as a catalyst) can dissociate the H{sub 2} molecule into H atoms with very low barrier energy. We introduce the spillover of the atomic hydrogen throughout the surface via external mediator gallane (GaH{sub 3}) to form a hydrogenated system.

  16. In vivo comparison of norepinephrine and dopamine release in rat brain by simultaneous measurements with fast-scan cyclic voltammetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jinwoo; Takmakov, Pavel; Wightman, R Mark

    2011-12-01

    Brain norepinephrine and dopamine regulate a variety of critical behaviors such as stress, learning, memory, and drug addiction. In this study, we demonstrate differences in the regulation of in vivo neurotransmission for dopamine in the anterior nucleus accumbens (NAc) and norepinephrine in the ventral bed nucleus of the stria terminalis (vBNST) of the anesthetized rat. Release of the two catecholamines was measured simultaneously using fast-scan cyclic voltammetry at two different carbon-fiber microelectrodes, each implanted in the brain region of interest. Simultaneous dopamine and norepinephrine release was evoked by electrical stimulation of a region where the ventral noradrenergic bundle, the pathway of noradrenergic neurons, courses through the ventral tegmental area/substantia nigra, the origin of dopaminergic cell bodies. The release and uptake of norepinephrine in the vBNST were both significantly slower than for dopamine in the NAc. Pharmacological manipulations in the same animal demonstrated that the two catecholamines are differently regulated. The combination of a dopamine autoreceptor antagonist and amphetamine significantly increased basal extracellular dopamine whereas a norepinephrine autoreceptor antagonist and amphetamine did not change basal norepinephrine concentration. α-Methyl-p-tyrosine, a tyrosine hydroxylase inhibitor, decreased electrically evoked dopamine release faster than norepinephrine. The dual-microelectrode fast-scan cyclic voltammetry technique along with anatomical and pharmacological evidence confirms that dopamine in the NAc and norepinephrine in the vBNST can be monitored selectively and simultaneously in the same animal. The high temporal and spatial resolution of the technique enabled us to examine differences in the dynamics of extracellular norepinephrine and dopamine concurrently in two different limbic structures.

  17. Binge-Like Eating Attenuates Nisoxetine Feeding Suppression, Stress Activation, and Brain Norepinephrine Activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bello, Nicholas T.; Yeh, Chung-Yang; Verpeut, Jessica L.; Walters, Amy L.

    2014-01-01

    Stress is often associated with binge eating. A critical component of the control of stress is the central norepinephrine system. We investigated how dietary-induced binge eating alters central norepinephrine and related behaviors. Young male Sprague Dawley rats received calorie deprivation (24 h) and /or intermittent sweetened fat (vegetable shortening with sucrose; 30 min) twice a week for 10 weeks. The groups were Restrict Binge (calorie deprivation/sweetened fat), Binge (sweetened fat), Restrict (calorie deprivation), and Naive (no calorie deprivation/no sweetened fat). Dietary-induced binge eating was demonstrated by Restrict Binge and Binge, which showed an escalation in 30-min intake over time. Feeding suppression following nisoxetine (3 mg/kg; IP), a selective norepinephrine reuptake inhibitor, was not evident in Restrict Binge (Restrict Binge: 107±13, Binge: 52±9, Restrict: 80±8, Naive: 59±13% of saline injection at 1 h). In subsequent experiments with Restrict Binge and Naive, Restrict Binge had reduced corticosterone (Restrict Binge: 266±25; Naive: 494±36 ng/ml) and less feeding suppression (Restrict Binge: 81±12, Naive: 50±11% of non-restraint intake at 30 min) following restraint stress (1 h). Dietary-induced binge eating in Restrict Binge was not altered by a dorsal noradrenergic bundle lesion caused by N-(2-chloroethyl)-N-ethyl-2-bromobenzylamine (DSP4), but frontal cortex norepinephrine was positively correlated with the average 30-min intake post-lesion (0.69; p<0.01). In a separate set of animals, single-unit in vivo electrophysiological recording of locus coeruleus–norepinephrine neural activity demonstrated reduced sensory-evoked response as a consequence of the Restrict Binge schedule (Restrict Binge: 8.1±0.67, Naive: 11.9±1.09 Hz). These results, which suggest that a consequence of dietary-induced binge eating is to attenuate the responsiveness of the brain norepinephrine system, will further our understanding of how highly

  18. Binge-like eating attenuates nisoxetine feeding suppression, stress activation, and brain norepinephrine activity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicholas T Bello

    Full Text Available Stress is often associated with binge eating. A critical component of the control of stress is the central norepinephrine system. We investigated how dietary-induced binge eating alters central norepinephrine and related behaviors. Young male Sprague Dawley rats received calorie deprivation (24 h and /or intermittent sweetened fat (vegetable shortening with sucrose; 30 min twice a week for 10 weeks. The groups were Restrict Binge (calorie deprivation/sweetened fat, Binge (sweetened fat, Restrict (calorie deprivation, and Naive (no calorie deprivation/no sweetened fat. Dietary-induced binge eating was demonstrated by Restrict Binge and Binge, which showed an escalation in 30-min intake over time. Feeding suppression following nisoxetine (3 mg/kg; IP, a selective norepinephrine reuptake inhibitor, was not evident in Restrict Binge (Restrict Binge: 107±13, Binge: 52±9, Restrict: 80±8, Naive: 59±13% of saline injection at 1 h. In subsequent experiments with Restrict Binge and Naive, Restrict Binge had reduced corticosterone (Restrict Binge: 266±25; Naive: 494±36 ng/ml and less feeding suppression (Restrict Binge: 81±12, Naive: 50±11% of non-restraint intake at 30 min following restraint stress (1 h. Dietary-induced binge eating in Restrict Binge was not altered by a dorsal noradrenergic bundle lesion caused by N-(2-chloroethyl-N-ethyl-2-bromobenzylamine (DSP4, but frontal cortex norepinephrine was positively correlated with the average 30-min intake post-lesion (0.69; p<0.01. In a separate set of animals, single-unit in vivo electrophysiological recording of locus coeruleus-norepinephrine neural activity demonstrated reduced sensory-evoked response as a consequence of the Restrict Binge schedule (Restrict Binge: 8.1±0.67, Naive: 11.9±1.09 Hz. These results, which suggest that a consequence of dietary-induced binge eating is to attenuate the responsiveness of the brain norepinephrine system, will further our understanding of how highly

  19. Rural hospital ownership: medical service provision, market mix, and spillover effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horwitz, Jill R; Nichols, Austin

    2011-10-01

    To test whether nonprofit, for-profit, or government hospital ownership affects medical service provision in rural hospital markets, either directly or through the spillover effects of ownership mix. Data are from the American Hospital Association, U.S. Census, CMS Healthcare Cost Report Information System and Prospective Payment System Minimum Data File, and primary data collection for geographic coordinates. The sample includes all nonfederal, general medical, and surgical hospitals located outside of metropolitan statistical areas and within the continental United States from 1988 to 2005. We estimate multivariate regression models to examine the effects of (1) hospital ownership and (2) hospital ownership mix within rural hospital markets on profitable versus unprofitable medical service offerings. Rural nonprofit hospitals are more likely than for-profit hospitals to offer unprofitable services, many of which are underprovided services. Nonprofits respond less than for-profits to changes in service profitability. Nonprofits with more for-profit competitors offer more profitable services and fewer unprofitable services than those with fewer for-profit competitors. Rural hospital ownership affects medical service provision at the hospital and market levels. Nonprofit hospital regulation should reflect both the direct and spillover effects of ownership. © Health Research and Educational Trust.

  20. Do External or Internal Technology Spillovers Have a Stronger Influence on Innovation Efficiency in China?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xionghe Qin

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available In this study, we bridge an important gap in the literature by comparing the extent to which external technology spillovers, as indicated by foreign direct investment (FDI, and internal technology spillovers, as indicated by university-institute-industry cooperation (UIC, influence innovation efficiency in China. We divide the innovation process into two sequential stages, namely the knowledge creation and technology commercialization stages, and employ a network data envelopment analysis approach to measure innovation efficiency at each stage. The spatial analysis of the distribution of knowledge creation efficiency and technology commercialization efficiency reveals the heterogeneity of innovation efficiency at the provincial level. Then, a panel data regression is used to analyze the effect of FDI and UIC on innovation efficiency at each stage, using data from 2009 to 2015 for 30 provinces in China. By comparing FDI with UIC, we find that FDI has a higher coefficient and stronger significance level at the knowledge creation stage, while only industry-institute linkages exhibit a stronger association with innovation efficiency at the technology commercialization stage.

  1. Vortices determine the dynamics of biodiversity in cyclical interactions with protection spillovers

    CERN Document Server

    Szolnoki, Attila

    2015-01-01

    If rock beats scissors and scissors beat paper, one might assume that rock beats paper too. But this is not the case for intransitive relationships that make up the famous rock-paper-scissors game. However, the sole presence of paper might prevent rock from beating scissors, simply because paper beats rock. This is the blueprint for the rock-paper-scissors game with protection spillovers, which has recently been introduced as a new paradigm for biodiversity in well-mixed microbial populations. Here we study the game in structured populations, demonstrating that protection spillovers give rise to spatial patterns that are impossible to observe in the classical rock-paper-scissors game. We show that the spatiotemporal dynamics of the system is determined by the density of stable vortices, which may ultimately transform to frozen states, to propagating waves, or to target waves with reversed propagation direction, depending further on the degree and type of randomness in the interactions among the species. If vo...

  2. Recognizing "me" benefits "we": Investigating the positive spillover effects of formal individual recognition in teams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ning; Zheng, Xiaoming; Harris, T Brad; Liu, Xin; Kirkman, Bradley L

    2016-07-01

    Many organizations use formal recognition programs (e.g., "employee of the month") as a way to publically acknowledge an individual employee's outstanding performance and motivate continued high performance. However, it remains unclear whether emphasizing individual achievement in a team context is beneficial or detrimental for recipients' teammates and, by extension, the team as a whole. Drawing on a social influence perspective, we examine potential spillover effects of individual formal recognition programs in teams. We hypothesize that a single team member's recognition will produce positive spillover effects on other team members' performance, as well as overall team performance, via social influence processes, especially when the award recipient is located in a central position in a team. Findings from 2 lab experiments of 24 teams and 40 teams (Study 1 and Study 2, respectively) and a field experiment of 52 manufacturing teams (Study 3) reveal that formally recognizing a team member leads to positive changes in her/his teammates' individual and collective performance. Thus, formal social recognition programs can potentially provide a motivational effect beyond individual recipients. (PsycINFO Database Record

  3. Analyzing and forecasting volatility spillovers, asymmetries and hedging in major oil markets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, Chia-Lin [Department of Applied Economics National Chung Hsing University Taichung, 250 Kuo Kuang Road, National Chung Hsing University Taichung 402 (China); McAleer, Michael [Econometric Institute, Erasmus School of Economics, Erasmus University Rotterdam (Netherlands); Tinbergen Institute (Netherlands); Tansuchat, Roengchai [Faculty of Economics, Maejo University (Thailand)

    2010-11-15

    Crude oil price volatility has been analyzed extensively for organized spot, forward and futures markets for well over a decade, and is crucial for forecasting volatility and Value-at-Risk (VaR). There are four major benchmarks in the international oil market, namely West Texas Intermediate (USA), Brent (North Sea), Dubai/Oman (Middle East), and Tapis (Asia-Pacific), which are likely to be highly correlated. This paper analyses the volatility spillover and asymmetric effects across and within the four markets, using three multivariate GARCH models, namely the constant conditional correlation (CCC), vector ARMA-GARCH (VARMA-GARCH) and vector ARMA-asymmetric GARCH (VARMA-AGARCH) models. A rolling window approach is used to forecast the 1-day ahead conditional correlations. The paper presents evidence of volatility spillovers and asymmetric effects on the conditional variances for most pairs of series. In addition, the forecast conditional correlations between pairs of crude oil returns have both positive and negative trends. Moreover, the optimal hedge ratios and optimal portfolio weights of crude oil across different assets and market portfolios are evaluated in order to provide important policy implications for risk management in crude oil markets. (author)

  4. Return and Volatility Spillovers across Equity Markets in Mainland China, Hong Kong and the United States

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hassan Mohammadi

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Examinations of the dynamics of daily returns and volatility in stock markets of the U.S., Hong Kong and mainland China (Shanghai and Shenzhen over 2 January 2001 to 8 February 2013 suggest: (1 evidence of unidirectional return spillovers from the U.S. to the other three markets; but no spillover between Hong Kong and either of the two mainland China markets; (2 evidence of unidirectional ARCH and GARCH effects from the U.S. to the other three markets; (3 correlations of returns vary across markets, with the highest correlation of 93.5% between the two Chinese markets, medium correlation of 30% between mainland China and Hong Kong markets and low correlations of 6.4% and 7.2% between the U.S. and China’s two markets; thus, international investors may benefit by allocating their assets in China’s markets; (4 the patterns of dynamic conditional correlations from the DCC model suggest an increase in correlation between China and other stock markets since the most recent financial crisis of 2007.

  5. A spillover analysis of shocks from US, UK and China on African financial markets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giorgia Giovannetti

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Emerging African financial markets have been recently put forward as an interesting and profitable alternative to diversify risk for international investors. At the same time, they became more integrated with developed financial markets, so that, despite claims that Africa would be sheltered by outside shocks because at the margin of the globalization process, they have been hit by the 2008–09 crisis. This paper analyses the relationships among mature financial markets (US and UK, China, some South Saharan African emerging markets (Botswana, Kenya, Nigeria and South Africa and two North African countries (Egypt and Tunisia over the period 2005–2012, focusing on the role of financial markets’ volatility. We study, with the help of a Multiplicative Error fully inter-dependent model (MEM, the dynamics of the financial market volatility (risk, and the interactions with other markets. We present impulse-response functions with a time dependent profile to describe how a volatility shock from one market may propagate to other markets, increasing the fragility of African infant financial markets. Finally, we summarise the role of different markets in propagating risk in the area using a synthetic index (Volatility Spillover Balance that distinguishes between volatility “creators” and “absorbers”. Our results show that South Africa and US shocks significantly affect African financial markets, and China has recently become more interconnected. Furthermore, while US, Kenya and Tunisia are “net creators” of volatility spillovers, South Africa and China turn out to be net “absorbers”.

  6. 2'-Substitution of cocaine selectively enhances dopamine and norepinephrine transporter binding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seale, T W; Avor, K; Singh, S; Hall, N; Chan, H M; Basmadjian, G P

    1997-11-10

    Few studies have characterized the effect of substituents at the 2'-position of cocaine on transporter binding potency and selectivity. We synthesized 2'-OH-, 2'-F- and 2'-acetoxy-cocaines and compared their binding potencies for rat dopamine, norepinephrine and 5-hydroxytryptamine transporters to cocaine, 3'-OH-, 4'-OH-, 2'-OH,4'-I-cocaine derivatives, and to the transporter selective ligands WIN 35,428, nisoxetine and paroxetine. Unlike most substitutions, 2'-OH- and 2'-acetoxy-groups increased cocaine's binding potency for the dopamine transporter (10- and 4-fold, respectively). These substituents also enhanced binding to the norepinephrine transporter (52- and 35-fold, respectively) but had less effect on 5-hydroxytryptamine transporter binding. 2'-Hydroxylation also enhanced binding of 4'-I cocaine, an analog with low DA binding potency. The ability of 2'-substituents to substantially increase cocaine binding potency and to alter selectivity for brain transporters indicates the potential importance of the 2'-position in transporter binding.

  7. Prostacyclin effects on the blood pressure responses to norepinephrine in rats treated with aspirin or indomethacin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carmignani, M; Marchetti, P; Caprino, L

    1980-01-01

    The atherosclerotic condition is associated with a reduction of PGI2 synthesis; moreover, in the presence of elevated serum cholesterol levels, pressor responses to norepinephrine are potentiated. In order to verify if a complete inhibition of PGI2 production affects the vascular reactivity, it was assayed two cycloxygenase inhibitors (lysine acetylsalicylate and indomethacin) in rats. The two drugs significantly potentiated the blood pressure responses to norepinephrine, and completely inhibited PGI2-like substances production by arterial rings. The prostacyclin infusion (15 ng/kg/min, i.v.) completely reversed such potentiation, without any major modification in the basal blood pressure values. These results show that PGI2 production is responsible for vascular tone modulation and may partially explain the altered vascular reactivity in the atherosclerotic condition.

  8. Testing whether drugs that weaken norepinephrine signaling prevent or treat various types of cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul J Fitzgerald

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Paul J FitzgeraldThe Zanvyl Krieger Mind/Brain Institute, Solomon H. Snyder, Department of Neuroscience, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD, USAAbstract: Recently, I put forth the hypothesis that the signaling molecule, norepinephrine (NE, is an etiological factor in a number of types of cancer. In this brief commentary, I summarize evidence that NE plays a role in cancer and describe details involved in testing the hypothesis in humans through epidemiological investigation of existing medical records of persons who have taken pharmaceutical drugs that affect NE. If NE plays an etiological role in cancers of a number of organs, then taking a single pharmaceutical drug (such as clonidine, prazosin, or propranolol that weakens NE signaling systemically, may simultaneously prevent or treat many different types of cancer, and this may represent a breakthrough in pharmaceutical prevention and possibly treatment of cancer.Keywords: norepinephrine, acetylcholine, cancer, clonidine, prazosin, propranolol

  9. Analytical Strategies for the Determination of Norepinephrine Reuptake Inhibitors in Pharmaceutical Formulations and Biological Fluids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saka, Cafer

    2016-01-01

    Norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors (NRIs) are a class of antidepressant drugs that act as reuptake inhibitors for the neurotransmitters norepinephrine and epinephrine. The present review provides an account of analytical methods published in recent years for the determination of NRI drugs. NRIs are atomoxetine, reboxetine, viloxazine and maprotiline. NRIs with less activity at other sites are mazindol, bupropion, tapentadol, and teniloxazine. This review focuses on the analytical methods including chromatographic, spectrophotometric, electroanalytical, and electrophoresis techniques for NRI analysis from pharmaceutical formulations and biological samples. Among all of the published methods, liquid chromatography with UV-vis or MS-MS detection is the most popular technique. The most the common sample preparation techniques in the analytical methods for NRIs include liquid-liquid extraction and solid-phase extraction. Besides the analytical methods for single components, some of the simultaneous determinations are also included in this review.

  10. Social Isolation is associated with Elevated Tumor Norepinephrine in Ovarian Carcinoma Patients

    OpenAIRE

    Lutgendorf, Susan K.; DeGeest, Koen; Dahmoush, Laila; Farley, Donna; Penedo, Frank; Bender, David; Goodheart, Michael; Buekers, Thomas E.; Mendez, Luis; Krueger, Gina; Clevenger, Lauren; Lubaroff, David M.; Anil K Sood; Cole, Steve W.

    2010-01-01

    Noradrenergic pathways have been implicated in growth and progression of ovarian cancer. Intratumoral norepinephrine (NE) has been shown to increase with stress in an animal cancer model, but little is known regarding how tumor NE varies with disease stage and with biobehavioral factors in ovarian cancer patients. This study examined relationships between pre-surgical measures of social support, depressed mood, perceived stress, anxiety, tumor histology and tumor catecholamine (NE and epineph...

  11. Cortical serotonin and norepinephrine denervation in parkinsonism: Preferential loss of the beaded serotonin innervation

    OpenAIRE

    2009-01-01

    Parkinson’s Disease (PD) is marked by prominent motor symptoms that reflect striatal dopamine insufficiency. However, non-motor symptoms, including depression, are common in PD. These changes have been suggested to reflect pathological involvement of non-dopaminergic systems. We examined regional changes in serotonin and norepinephrine systems in mice treated with two different 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP) treatment paradigms and that survived for 3 or 16 weeks after th...

  12. Stereoselective Actions of Methylenedioxypyrovalerone (MDPV) To Inhibit Dopamine and Norepinephrine Transporters and Facilitate Intracranial Self-Stimulation in Rats

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Kolanos, R; Partilla, J S; Baumann, M H; Hutsell, B A; Banks, M L; Negus, S S; Glennon, R A

    2015-01-01

    ...) and norepinephrine (NET) that produces a constellation of abuse-related behavioral effects. MDPV possesses a chiral center, and the abused formulation of the drug is a racemic mixture, but no data are available on the pharmacology of its isomers...

  13. Reference intervals and variation for urinary epinephrine, norepinephrine and cortisol in healthy men and women in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Åse Marie; Garde, A H; Christensen, J M

    2001-01-01

    Reference intervals for urinary epinephrine, norepinephrine and cortisol in 120 healthy individuals performing their routine work were established according to the International Union of Pure and Applied Chemistry (IUPAC) and the International Federation of Clinical Chemistry and Laboratory...

  14. Changes in evolution of free epinephrine, norepinephrine, and vanillylmandelic acid in the urine of rabbits during late pregnancy and parturition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parvez, S; Parvez, H

    1976-02-01

    The present study describes evolutionary changes in urinary excretion of epinephrine, norepinephrine, and vanillylmandelic acid during pregnancy and parturition. Both the catecholamines and their metabolite were determined in 24 hour urine samples of rabbits from day 13 of pregnancy. During 13 and 28 days of gestation, urinary excretion of epinephrine was at its lowest value. As compared to normal rabbits, an increase of 135 per cent in epinephrine excretion during day 30 of pregnancy was observed. Norepinephrine excretion reached its maximum level during day 13 but constant declines occurred afterward. Contrary to epinephine, urinary excretion of norepinephrine was at the highest value days 23 and 30 of pregnancy. After day 19 vanillylmandelic acid declined continuously up to day 30. During parturition vanillymandelic acid and norepinephrine excretion returned to the control values but epinephrine remained slightly higher. These alterations in catecholamine urinary excretion have been suggested as a consequence of modified endocrine and sympathetic activity.

  15. Orexin A promotes histamine, but not norepinephrine or serotonin, release in frontal cortex of mice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zong-yuan HONG; Zhi-li HUANG; Wei-min QU; Naomi EGUCHI

    2005-01-01

    Aim: To investigate the effects of orexin A on release of histamine, norepinephrine, and serotonin in the frontal cortex of mice. Methods: Samples for measuring histamine, norepinephrine, and serotonin contents were collected by in vivo microdialysis of the frontal cortex of anesthetized mice. The histamine,noradrenaline, and serotonin content in dialysates were measured by HPLC techniques. Results: Intracrebroventricular injection of orexin A at doses of 12.5, 50, and 200 pmol per mouse promoted histamine release from the frontal cortex in a dose-dependent manner. At the highest dose given, 200 pmol, orexin A significantly induced histamine release, with the maximal magnitude being 230% over the mean basal release. The enhanced histamine release was sustained for 140 min, and then gradually returned to the basal level. However, no change in nore pinephrine or serotonin release was observed under application of the same dose of orexin A. Conclusion: These results suggest that the arousal effect of orexin A is mainly mediated by histamine, not by norepinephrine or serotonin.

  16. Cardiovascular alterations after injection of 2% lidocaine with norepinephrine 1:50,000 (xylestesin) in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faraco, Fatima Neves; Armonia, Paschoal Laercio; Malamed, Stanley F

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of the present study is to determine the cardiovascular effects produced by intravascular injection of 2% lidocaine with 20 microg/mL of norepinephrine on systolic, diastolic, and mean arterial pressures and heart rate of rats at the following times: control period, during the injection (first 15 seconds), during the first minute, and at the end of 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 10, 15, 20, 25, and 30 minutes after drug administration. The study was performed on 13 male Wistar rats with weights between 200 grams and 220 grams that were awake during the recording of these parameters. The dose administered was proportional to 1 cartridge of local anesthetic (1.8 mL) in an average-size human, which is equivalent to 0.51 mg/kg of lidocaine hydrochloride and 0.51 microg/kg of norepinephrine hydrochloride. The average time of injection was 15.7 seconds. The results of this study showed significant increases in systolic, diastolic, and mean arterial pressure and a noticeable decrease in heart rate. The greatest variation occurred in the systolic blood pressure. The greatest alterations occurred during injection and within the first minute following administration of the anesthetic solution. We would anticipate these changes in the parameters analyzed to be clinically significant. Thus, dentists using 2% lidocaine with norepinephrine 20 mug/mL should be very careful to avoid intravascular injection.

  17. The influence of age on dorsal hand vein responsiveness to norepinephrine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, S A; Alexieva, S; Carruthers, S G

    1986-09-01

    The influence of age on the responsiveness of dorsal hand vein alpha-receptors to local infusions of norepinephrine was investigated by the use of a novel technique, the linear variable differential transformer. Studies were conducted in two groups of healthy subjects, 26 elderly individuals (14 men and 12 women) 60 to 78 years old and 32 young individuals (24 men and eight women) 16 to 29 years old. There was wide interindividual variation in responsiveness to norepinephrine within both groups of subjects. The dose of norepinephrine required to produce 50% venoconstriction in the elderly ranged from 1.5 to 300 ng/min (geometric mean 24.0 ng/min). The dose required to produce 50% venoconstriction in younger individuals ranged from 1.6 to 360 ng/min (geometric mean 23.8 ng/min). These results suggest that there is no systematic influence of age on dorsal hand vein alpha-receptor responsiveness. A power calculation demonstrates a very small likelihood of a type II error.

  18. Dopamine and norepinephrine depletion in ring doves fed DDE, dieldrin, and Aroclor 1254

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heinz, G.H.; Hill, E.F.; Contrera, J.F.

    1980-01-01

    The levels of dopamine and norepinephrine were measured in one-half of the brain of ring doves fed a control diet or a diet containing 2, 20, or 200 ppm DDE; 1, 4, or 16 ppm dieldrin; or 1, 10, or 100 ppm Aroclor 1254. Levels of DDE, dieldrin, or Aroclor 1254 were determined in the other half of each brain. The intermediate and high levels of each chemical caused depletions in both neurotransmitters, and brain residues of each chemical were negatively correlated with levels of neurotransmitters. The highest concentrations of DDE, dieldrin, and Aroclor 1254 depressed averages of dopamine to 42.4, 41.4, and 45.2% of the control level and norepinephrine to 61.6, 62.0, and 56.9% of controls, respectively. Depletions of dopamine and norepinephrine could result in abnormal behavior of contaminated birds in the wild, and the detection of such depletions could become an important tool in assessing contaminant-induced behavioral aberrations in birds.

  19. Stimulatory effects of neuronally released norepinephrine on renin release in vitro

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matsumura, Yasuo; Kawazoe, Shinka; Ichihara, Toshio; Shinyama, Hiroshi; Kageyama, Masaaki; Morimoto, Shiro (Osaka Univ. of Pharmaceutical Sciences (Japan))

    1988-10-01

    Extracellular high potassium inhibits renin release in vitro by increasing calcium concentrations in the juxtaglomerular cells. The authors found that the decreased response of renin release from rat kidney cortical slices in high potassium solution changed to a strikingly increased one in the presence of nifedipine at doses over 10{sup {minus}6} M. They then examined the stimulatory effect of extracellular high potassium in the presence of nifedipine on renin release. The enhancement of release was significantly suppressed either by propranolol or by metoprolol but not by prazosin. High potassium plus nifedipine-induced increase in renin release was markedly attenuated by renal denervation. The enhancing effect was not observed when the slices were incubated in calcium-free medium. Divalent cations such as Cd{sup 2+}, Co{sup 2+}, and Mn{sup 2+} blocked this enhancement in a concentration-dependent manner. High potassium elicited an increase in {sup 3}H efflux from the slices preloaded with ({sup 3}H)-norepinephrine. The increasing effect was not influenced by nifedipine but was abolished by the removal of extracellular calcium or by the addition of divalent cations. These observations suggest to us that the high potassium plus nifedipine-induced increase in renin release from the slices is mediated by norepinephrine derived from renal sympathetic nerves and that this neuronally released norepinephrine stimulates renin release via activation of {beta}-adrenoceptors.

  20. Cardiovascular Alterations After Injection of 2% Lidocaine With Norepinephrine 1:50,000 (Xylestesin) in Rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faraco, Fatima Neves; Armonia, Paschoal Laercio; Malamed, Stanley F

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of the present study is to determine the cardiovascular effects produced by intravascular injection of 2% lidocaine with 20 μg/mL of norepinephrine on systolic, diastolic, and mean arterial pressures and heart rate of rats at the following times: control period, during the injection (first 15 seconds), during the first minute, and at the end of 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 10, 15, 20, 25, and 30 minutes after drug administration. The study was performed on 13 male Wistar rats with weights between 200 grams and 220 grams that were awake during the recording of these parameters. The dose administered was proportional to 1 cartridge of local anesthetic (1.8 mL) in an average-size human, which is equivalent to 0.51 mg/kg of lidocaine hydrochloride and 0.51 μg/kg of norepinephrine hydrochloride. The average time of injection was 15.7 seconds. The results of this study showed significant increases in systolic, diastolic, and mean arterial pressure and a noticeable decrease in heart rate. The greatest variation occurred in the systolic blood pressure. The greatest alterations occurred during injection and within the first minute following administration of the anesthetic solution. We would anticipate these changes in the parameters analyzed to be clinically significant. Thus, dentists using 2% lidocaine with norepinephrine 20 μg/mL should be very careful to avoid intravascular injection. PMID:17579502

  1. Norepinephrine causes epigenetic repression of PKCε gene in rodent hearts by activating Nox1-dependent reactive oxygen species production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, Fuxia; Xiao, Daliao; Zhang, Lubo

    2012-07-01

    Heart disease is the leading cause of death in the United States. Recent studies demonstrate that fetal programming of PKCε gene repression results in ischemia-sensitive phenotype in the heart. The present study tests the hypothesis that increased norepinephrine causes epigenetic repression of PKCε gene in the heart via Nox1-dependent reactive oxygen species (ROS) production. Prolonged norepinephrine treatment increased ROS production in fetal rat hearts and embryonic ventricular myocyte H9c2 cells via a selective increase in Nox1 expression. Norepinephrine-induced ROS resulted in an increase in PKCε promoter methylation at Egr-1 and Sp-1 binding sites, leading to PKCε gene repression. N-acetylcysteine, diphenyleneiodonium, and apocynin blocked norepinephrine-induced ROS production and the promoter methylation, and also restored PKCε mRNA and protein to control levels in vivo in fetal hearts and in vitro in embryonic myocyte cells. Accordingly, norepinephrine-induced ROS production, promoter methylation, and PKCε gene repression were completely abrogated by knockdown of Nox1 in cardiomyocytes. These findings provide evidence of a novel interaction between elevated norepinephrine and epigenetic repression of PKCε gene in the heart mediated by Nox1-dependent oxidative stress and suggest new insights of molecular mechanisms linking the heightened sympathetic activity to aberrant cardioprotection and increased ischemic vulnerability in the heart.

  2. FDI technology spillover and threshold effect of the technology gap: regional differences in the Chinese industrial sector.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hui; Liu, Huifang; Cao, Zhiyong; Wang, Bowen

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents a new perspective that there is a double-threshold effect in terms of the technology gap existing in the foreign direct investment (FDI) technology spillover process in different regional Chinese industrial sectors. In this paper, a double-threshold regression model was established to examine the relation between the threshold effect of the technology gap and technology spillover. Based on the provincial panel data of Chinese industrial sectors from 2000 to 2011, the empirical results reveal that there are two threshold values, which are 1.254 and 2.163, in terms of the technology gap in the industrial sector in eastern China. There are also two threshold values in both the central and western industrial sector, which are 1.516, 2.694 and 1.635, 2.714, respectively. The technology spillover is a decreasing function of the technology gap in both the eastern and western industrial sectors, but a concave curve function of the technology gap is in the central industrial sectors. Furthermore, the FDI technology spillover has increased gradually in recent years. Based on the empirical results, suggestions were proposed to elucidate the introduction of the FDI and the improvement in the industrial added value in different regions of China.

  3. Spillover but no spillback of two invasive parasitic copepods from invasive Pacific oysters (Crassostrea gigas) to native bivalve hosts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Goedknegt, M.A.; Schuster, Anne Karin; Buschbaum, Christian; Gergs, René; Jung, A.S.; Luttikhuizen, Pieternella C.; Meer, van der Jaap; Troost, Karin; Wegner, K.M.; Thieltges, David W.

    2016-01-01

    Invasive species can cause indirect effects on native biota by modifying parasite-host interactions and disease occurrence in native species. This study investigated the role of the invasive Pacific oyster (Crassostrea gigas) in potential spillover (co-introduced parasites infect native hosts) an

  4. The Effect of Globalization in an Endogenous Growth Model with Heterogeneous Firms and Endogenous International Spillovers: Note

    OpenAIRE

    Katsufumi Fukuda

    2013-01-01

    This paper shows that globalization increases (decreases) the growth rate if and only if the beachhead cost for the domestic market is strictly higher (lower) than that for the foreign market in a endogenous growth model with firm heterogeneity, international trade, and endogenous international spillover under specified necessary and sufficient conditions for exporting firms being more productive than non-exporting firms.

  5. Pesticide use, environmental spillovers and efficiency: A nonparametric risk-adjusted efficiency approach applied to Dutch arable farming

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Skevas, T.; Stefanou, S.E.; Oude Lansink, A.G.J.M.

    2014-01-01

    Pesticides are widely used by crop producers in developed countries to combat risk associated with pests and diseases. However, their indiscriminate use can lead to various environmental spillovers that may alter the agricultural production environment thus contributing to production risk. This

  6. Fluid loading and norepinephrine infusion mask the left ventricular preload decrease induced by pleural effusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wemmelund, Kristian Borup; Ringgård, Viktor Kromann; Vistisen, Simon Tilma; Hyldebrandt, Janus Adler; Sloth, Erik; Juhl-Olsen, Peter

    2017-09-11

    Pleural effusion (PLE) may lead to low blood pressure and reduced cardiac output. Low blood pressure and reduced cardiac output are often treated with fluid loading and vasopressors. This study aimed to determine the impact of fluid loading and norepinephrine infusion on physiologic determinants of cardiac function obtained by ultrasonography during PLE. In this randomised, blinded, controlled laboratory study, 30 piglets (21.9 ± 1.3 kg) had bilateral PLE (75 mL/kg) induced. Subsequently, the piglets were randomised to intervention as follows: fluid loading (80 mL/kg/h for 1.5 h, n = 12), norepinephrine infusion (0.01, 0.03, 0.05, 0.1, 0.2 and 0.3 μg/kg/min (15 min each, n = 12)) or control (n = 6). Main outcome was left ventricular preload measured as left ventricular end-diastolic area. Secondary endpoints included contractility and afterload as well as global measures of circulation. All endpoints were assessed with echocardiography and invasive pressure-flow measurements. PLE decreased left ventricular end-diastolic area, mean arterial pressure and cardiac output (p values  0.05) to baseline. Left ventricular contractility increased with norepinephrine infusion (p = 0.002), but was not affected by fluid loading (p = 0.903). Afterload increased in both active groups (p values > 0.001). Overall, inferior vena cava distensibility remained unchanged during intervention (p values ≥ 0.085). Evacuation of PLE caused numerical increases in left ventricular end-diastolic area, but only significantly so in controls (p = 0.006). PLE significantly reduced left ventricular preload. Both fluid and norepinephrine treatment reverted this effect and normalised global haemodynamic parameters. Inferior vena cava distensibility remained unchanged. The haemodynamic significance of PLE may be underestimated during fluid or norepinephrine administration, potentially masking the presence of PLE.

  7. The evolution of spillover effects between oil and stock markets across multi-scales using a wavelet-based GARCH-BEKK model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xueyong; An, Haizhong; Huang, Shupei; Wen, Shaobo

    2017-01-01

    Aiming to investigate the evolution of mean and volatility spillovers between oil and stock markets in the time and frequency dimensions, we employed WTI crude oil prices, the S&P 500 (USA) index and the MICEX index (Russia) for the period Jan. 2003-Dec. 2014 as sample data. We first applied a wavelet-based GARCH-BEKK method to examine the spillover features in frequency dimension. To consider the evolution of spillover effects in time dimension at multiple-scales, we then divided the full sample period into three sub-periods, pre-crisis period, crisis period, and post-crisis period. The results indicate that spillover effects vary across wavelet scales in terms of strength and direction. By analysis the time-varying linkage, we found the different evolution features of spillover effects between the Oil-US stock market and Oil-Russia stock market. The spillover relationship between oil and US stock market is shifting to short-term while the spillover relationship between oil and Russia stock market is changing to all time scales. That result implies that the linkage between oil and US stock market is weakening in the long-term, and the linkage between oil and Russia stock market is getting close in all time scales. This may explain the phenomenon that the US stock index and the Russia stock index showed the opposite trend with the falling of oil price in the post-crisis period.

  8. Export spillovers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Choquette, Eliane; Meinen, Philipp

    2015-01-01

    -industry linkages. We do so by exploiting a unique data set covering the universe of manufacturing firms in Denmark for the period 1995–2006 which combines transaction-level export data, firm accounting data, employer–employee linked data and information from yearly input–output tables. We corroborate...

  9. Dog ownership, abundance and potential for bat-borne rabies spillover in Chile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Astorga, F; Escobar, L E; Poo-Muñoz, D A; Medina-Vogel, G

    2015-03-01

    Rabies is a viral infectious disease that affects all mammals, including humans. Factors associated with the incidence of rabies include the presence and density of susceptible hosts and potential reservoirs. Currently, Chile is declared free of canine-related rabies, but there is an overpopulation of dogs within the country and an emergence of rabies in bats. Our objectives are to determine potential areas for bat-borne rabies spillover into dog populations expressed as a risk map, and to explore some key features of dog ownership, abundance, and management in Chile. For the risk map, our variables included a dog density surface (dog/km(2)) and a distribution model of bat-borne rabies presence. From literature review, we obtained dog data from 112 municipalities, which represent 33% of the total municipalities (339). At country level, based on previous studies the median human per dog ratio was 4.8, with 64% of houses containing at least one dog, and a median of 0.9 dog per house. We estimate a national median of 5.3 dog/km(2), and a median of 3680 dogs by municipality, from which we estimate a total population of 3.5×10(6) owned dogs. The antirabies vaccination presented a median of 21% of dogs by municipality, and 29% are unrestricted to some degree. Human per dog ratio have a significant (but weak) negative association with human density. Unrestricted dogs have a negative association with human density and income, and a positive association with the number of dogs per house. Considering dog density by municipality, and areas of potential bat-borne rabies occurrence, we found that 163 (∼48%) of Chilean municipalities are at risk of rabies spillover from bats to dogs. Risk areas are concentrated in urban settlements, including Santiago, Chile's capital. To validate the risk map, we included cases of rabies in dogs from the last 27 years; all fell within high-risk areas of our map, confirming the assertive risk prediction. Our results suggest that the use of

  10. Hospital ownership and medical services: market mix, spillover effects, and nonprofit objectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horwitz, Jill R; Nichols, Austin

    2009-09-01

    Hospitals operate in markets with varied demographic, competitive, and ownership characteristics, yet research on ownership tends to examine hospitals in isolation. Here we examine three hospital ownership types -- nonprofit, for-profit, and government -- and their spillover effects. We estimate the effects of for-profit market share in two ways, on the provision of medical services and on operating margins at the three types of hospitals. We find that nonprofit hospitals' medical service provision systematically varies by market mix. We find no significant effect of market mix on the operating margins of nonprofit hospitals, but find that for-profit hospitals have higher margins in markets with more for-profits. These results fit best with theories in which hospitals maximize their own output.

  11. Decomposing Fees paid to Audit Firms-Assessing Knowledge Spillovers and Independence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holm, Claus

    argument holds for tax services provided and other services provided, but not for the provision of audit-related services. We also consider the implication of new regulation of the provision of non-audit services in EU countries. From the perspective of maintaining independence, there will be no apparent...... conflict with continued allowance to provide audit-related services. Prohibiting most tax services and a wide array of other services could have detrimental effect on potential knowledge spillover benefits, while our findings also suggest that the potential for economic bonding could be constrained.......We extend prior studies (e.g., Whisenant et al., 2003; Krishnan and Yu, 2011; Chan et al., 2012) by explicitly utilizing a stringent decomposition of total fee paid for audit services and other services in a sample of listed non-financial Danish companies. When controlling for the joint...

  12. Financial stress in emerging markets: Patterns, real effects, and cross-country spillovers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mikhail Stolbov

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available We extend the conventional approach to the construction of financial stress indices (FSI for emerging economies proposed by Balakrishnan et al. (2011. Based on the principal component analysis, our index accounts for developments in the residential real estate market, adopts distinctive indicators for the banking sector and sovereign debt risks, covering the period from February 2008 to September 2015 for 14 emerging economies. The FSIs accurately capture the periods of impaired financial intermediation. The hierarchical cluster analysis identifies five country groups, revealing similarities in the national structures of financial stress. We find an adverse impact of financial stress on economic activity in 9 countries. A Bayesian VAR model is also specified to test for cross-country spillovers of financial stress.

  13. Physical aggression, compromised social support, and 10-year marital outcomes: Testing a relational spillover model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sullivan, Kieran T; Pasch, Lauri A; Lawrence, Erika; Bradbury, Thomas N

    2015-12-01

    The purpose of the present study was to test a relational spillover model of physical aggression whereby physical aggression affects marital outcomes due to its effects on how spouses ask for and provide support to one another. Newlywed couples (n = 172) reported levels of physical aggression over the past year and engaged in interactions designed to elicit social support; marital adjustment, and stability were assessed periodically over the first 10 years of marriage. Multilevel modeling revealed that negative support behavior mediated the relationship between physical aggression and 10-year marital adjustment levels whereas positive support behavior mediated the relationship between physical aggression and divorce status. These findings emphasize the need to look beyond conflict when explaining how aggression affects relationships and when working with couples with a history of physical aggression who are seeking to improve their relationships.

  14. Spillover Effects of Drug Safety Warnings on Preventive Health Care Use

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Daysal, N. Meltem; Orsini, Chiara

    2015-01-01

    We examine how new medical information on drug safety impacts preventive health care use. We exploit the release of the findings of the Women’s Health Initiative Study (WHIS) – the largest randomized controlled trial of women’s health – which demonstrated in 2002 the health risks associated...... comparing changes in preventive care use among 60 to 69 year-old women (who have high rates of HRT use) with the change among women aged 75 and above (who have much lower rates of HRT use). Using data from the Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System for the period 1998–2007, we find that women aged 60...... with the long-term use of hormone replacement therapy (HRT). We first show that, after the release of the WHIS findings, HRT use dropped sharply among post-menopausal women. We then estimate the spillover effects of the WHIS findings on preventive care by means of a difference-in-differences methodology...

  15. Intraday volatility spillovers between spot and futures indices: Evidence from the Korean stock market

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Sang Hoon; Cheong, Chongcheul; Yoon, Seong-Min

    2013-04-01

    This study provides empirical evidence of the relationship between spot and futures markets in Korea. In particular, the study focuses on the volatility spillover relationship between spot and futures markets by using three high-frequency (10 min, 30 min, and 1 h time-scales) intraday data sets of KOSPI 200 spot and futures contracts. The results indicate a strong bi-directional causal relationship between futures and spot markets, suggesting that return volatility in the spot market can influence that in the futures market and vice versa. Thus, the results indicate that new information is reflected in futures and spot markets simultaneously. This bi-directional causal relationship provides market participants with important guidance on understanding the intraday information transmission between the two markets. Thus, on a given trading day, there may be sudden and sharp increases or decreases in return volatility in the Korean stock market as a result of positive feedback and synchronization of spot and futures markets.

  16. Competitive spillovers across non-profit and for-profit nursing homes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grabowski, David C; Hirth, Richard A

    2003-01-01

    The importance of non-profit institutions in the health care sector has generated a vast empirical literature examining quality differences between non-profit and for-profit nursing homes. Recent theoretical work has emphasized that much of this empirical literature is flawed in that previous studies rely solely on dummy variables to capture the effects of ownership rather than accounting for the share of non-profit nursing homes in the market. This analysis considers whether competitive spillovers from non-profits lead to higher quality in for-profit nursing homes. Using instrumental variables to account for the potential endogeneity of non-profit market share, this study finds that an increase in non-profit market share improves for-profit and overall nursing home quality. These findings are consistent with the hypothesis that non-profits serve as a quality signal for uninformed nursing home consumers.

  17. Speculation and volatility spillover in the crude oil and agricultural commodity markets: A Bayesian analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Du Xiaodong, E-mail: xdu23@wisc.ed [Department of Agricultural and Applied Economics, University of Wisconsin-Madison, WI (United States); Yu, Cindy L., E-mail: cindyyu@iastate.ed [Department of Statistics, Iowa State University, IA (United States); Hayes, Dermot J., E-mail: dhayes@iastate.ed [Department of Economics and Department of Finance, Iowa State University, IA (United States)

    2011-05-15

    This paper assesses factors that potentially influence the volatility of crude oil prices and the possible linkage between this volatility and agricultural commodity markets. Stochastic volatility models are applied to weekly crude oil, corn, and wheat futures prices from November 1998 to January 2009. Model parameters are estimated using Bayesian Markov Chain Monte Carlo methods. Speculation, scalping, and petroleum inventories are found to be important in explaining the volatility of crude oil prices. Several properties of crude oil price dynamics are established, including mean-reversion, an asymmetry between returns and volatility, volatility clustering, and infrequent compound jumps. We find evidence of volatility spillover among crude oil, corn, and wheat markets after the fall of 2006. This can be largely explained by tightened interdependence between crude oil and these commodity markets induced by ethanol production.

  18. Empirical research on the international spillover effects of U.S. monetary policy and their impacts

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吴宏; 刘威

    2009-01-01

    Empirical research has shown that there were international spillover effects from the U.S. monetary policy to output level, net exports and price levels of each country, and the impact on prices in each country was of synchronous effect. The structural impulse response analysis showed that U.S. monetary policy could improve U.S. income and payment without damaging U.S. economic growth, but the shocks negatively affected the economic growth in the rest of the world. Hence, it’s important to pay close attention to the moral risks of U.S. monetary policy to evade the global shocks caused by the "benefit-itself-at-the-expense-of-others" polices of the American government. Besides these findings, U.S. monetary policy shocks strongly affect China’s trade surplus fluctuations. Based on this, we propose that the approaches of balancing China’s current account could be explored efficiently from the perspective of monetary policy.

  19. SPILLOVER EFFECT PEREKONOMIAN PROVINSI DKI JAKARTA DAN SUMATERA SELATAN TERHADAP PERTUMBUHAN EKONOMI PROVINSI LAMPUNG

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I Wayan Suparta

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available This study was based on 23-year period time series data from 1983 to 2005. An OLS method was applied to test the hypothesis that economic variables such as private investments, local government spending, prices of domestic goods, prices of goods and income of the adjacent regions (Jakarta and South Sumatera Province have effects on the economic growth of Lampung Province. The results of this study show that the independent economic variables have significant effects on the economic growth of Lampung Province. It is found that the interregional linkage is important. A comparison of the two neighbor provinces shows that the linkage of Lampung’s economy with Jakarta’s economy is relatively stronger than that with South Sumatera Province. The implication of this study is that the provincial and local governments of Lampung as well as the people of Lampung should make better use of the spatial spillover effect of DKI Jakarta and South Sumatera Province.

  20. Investigation of the climatic and environmental context of Hendra virus spillover events 1994-2010.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosemary McFarlane

    Full Text Available Hendra virus is a recently emerged bat-borne zoonotic agent with high lethality in horses and humans in Australia. This is a rare disease and the determinants of bat to horse transmission, including the factors that bring these hosts together at critical times, are poorly understood. In this cross-disciplinary study climatic and vegetation primary productivity variables are compared for the dispersed and heterogenic 1994-2010 outbreak sites. The significant occurrence of spillover events within the dry season (p =  0.013, 95% CI (0.57-0.98 suggests seasonal forcing of transmission across species, or seasonal forcing of virus excretion by the reservoir host. We explore the evidence for both. Preliminary investigations of the spatial determinants of Hendra disease locations are also presented. We find that postal areas in the Australian state of Queensland in which pteropid fruit bat (flying fox roosts occur are approximately forty times more likely (OR = 40.5, (95% CI (5.16, 317.52 to be the location of Hendra spillover events. This appears to be independent of density of horses at these locations. We consider issues of scale of host resource use, land use change and limitations of existing data that challenge analysis and limit further conclusive outcomes. This investigation of a broad range of potential climatic and environmental influences provides a good base for future investigations. Further understanding of cross-species Hendra virus transmission requires better understanding of flying fox resource use in the urban-rural landscape.

  1. A Unified Framework for the Infection Dynamics of Zoonotic Spillover and Spread.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giovanni Lo Iacono

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available A considerable amount of disease is transmitted from animals to humans and many of these zoonoses are neglected tropical diseases. As outbreaks of SARS, avian influenza and Ebola have demonstrated, however, zoonotic diseases are serious threats to global public health and are not just problems confined to remote regions. There are two fundamental, and poorly studied, stages of zoonotic disease emergence: 'spillover', i.e. transmission of pathogens from animals to humans, and 'stuttering transmission', i.e. when limited human-to-human infections occur, leading to self-limiting chains of transmission. We developed a transparent, theoretical framework, based on a generalization of Poisson processes with memory of past human infections, that unifies these stages. Once we have quantified pathogen dynamics in the reservoir, with some knowledge of the mechanism of contact, the approach provides a tool to estimate the likelihood of spillover events. Comparisons with independent agent-based models demonstrates the ability of the framework to correctly estimate the relative contributions of human-to-human vs animal transmission. As an illustrative example, we applied our model to Lassa fever, a rodent-borne, viral haemorrhagic disease common in West Africa, for which data on human outbreaks were available. The approach developed here is general and applicable to a range of zoonoses. This kind of methodology is of crucial importance for the scientific, medical and public health communities working at the interface between animal and human diseases to assess the risk associated with the disease and to plan intervention and appropriate control measures. The Lassa case study revealed important knowledge gaps, and opportunities, arising from limited knowledge of the temporal patterns in reporting, abundance of and infection prevalence in, the host reservoir.

  2. A Unified Framework for the Infection Dynamics of Zoonotic Spillover and Spread.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lo Iacono, Giovanni; Cunningham, Andrew A; Fichet-Calvet, Elisabeth; Garry, Robert F; Grant, Donald S; Leach, Melissa; Moses, Lina M; Nichols, Gordon; Schieffelin, John S; Shaffer, Jeffrey G; Webb, Colleen T; Wood, James L N

    2016-09-01

    A considerable amount of disease is transmitted from animals to humans and many of these zoonoses are neglected tropical diseases. As outbreaks of SARS, avian influenza and Ebola have demonstrated, however, zoonotic diseases are serious threats to global public health and are not just problems confined to remote regions. There are two fundamental, and poorly studied, stages of zoonotic disease emergence: 'spillover', i.e. transmission of pathogens from animals to humans, and 'stuttering transmission', i.e. when limited human-to-human infections occur, leading to self-limiting chains of transmission. We developed a transparent, theoretical framework, based on a generalization of Poisson processes with memory of past human infections, that unifies these stages. Once we have quantified pathogen dynamics in the reservoir, with some knowledge of the mechanism of contact, the approach provides a tool to estimate the likelihood of spillover events. Comparisons with independent agent-based models demonstrates the ability of the framework to correctly estimate the relative contributions of human-to-human vs animal transmission. As an illustrative example, we applied our model to Lassa fever, a rodent-borne, viral haemorrhagic disease common in West Africa, for which data on human outbreaks were available. The approach developed here is general and applicable to a range of zoonoses. This kind of methodology is of crucial importance for the scientific, medical and public health communities working at the interface between animal and human diseases to assess the risk associated with the disease and to plan intervention and appropriate control measures. The Lassa case study revealed important knowledge gaps, and opportunities, arising from limited knowledge of the temporal patterns in reporting, abundance of and infection prevalence in, the host reservoir.

  3. Comparative study of dopamine and norepinephrine in the management of septic shock

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Avinash Agrawal

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The objective was to compare the ability of norepinephrine and dopamine in reversing the hemodynamic and metabolic abnormalities of septic shock using Edwards Vigileo Monitor with Flotrac Sensor. Design: Prospective randomized control study. Methods: Fifty consecutive patients presenting with hyperdynamic septic shock who fulfilled the inclusion criteria were randomly allocated to either group I or group II. The goal of therapy was to achieve and maintain for 6 hours, all of the following - systolic blood pressure (SBP >90 mmHg, systemic vascular resistance index (SVRI >1800 dynes.s/cm 5 m 2 ,cardiac index (CI >4.0 lt/min/m 2 , index of oxygen delivery >550 ml/min/m 2 , index of oxygen uptake >150 ml/min/m 2 . The patients in group I were started on dopamine infusion at 10 μg/kg/min which was increased by 2.5 μg/kg/min, every 15 minutes till the goals were achieved. The patients in group II received norepinephrine infusion started at a dose of 0.5 μg/kg/min with a dose increment of 0.25 μg/kg/min, every 15 minutes till the goals were achieved. Results: Post-treatment heart rate showed an increase in the mean value in group I patients and a decrease in group II patients. The post-treatment mean SBP and SVRI in group II was significantly higher than that in group I. Patients in group I showed a significantly higher increase in post-treatment CI and index of oxygen delivery compared to patients in group II. Nineteen out of 25 patients responded to the treatment in group II while only 10 out of 25 responded in group I. Conclusion: Norepinephrine was more useful in reversing the hemodynamic and metabolic abnormalities of hyperdynamic septic shock compared to dopamine.

  4. Effect of severe acidosis on vasoactive effects of epinephrine and norepinephrine in human distal mammary artery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vidal, Charles; Grassin-Delyle, Stanislas; Devillier, Philippe; Naline, Emmanuel; Lansac, Emmanuel; Ménasché, Philippe; Faisy, Christophe

    2014-05-01

    Acidosis is a very common pathologic process in perioperative management. However, how to correct severe acidosis to improve the efficacy of vasoconstrictors in hemodynamically unstable patients is still debated. The present study investigated whether severe extracellular acidosis influences the vasoactive properties of vasoconstrictors on human isolated arteries. Segments of intact distal internal mammary arteries were removed from 41 patients undergoing artery bypass grafting. The arterial rings were washed in Krebs-Henseleit solution and suspended in an organ bath. The rings were set at a pretension equivalent of 100 mm Hg, and the relaxation response to 10 μM acetylcholine was verified. Concentration-response curves for epinephrine, norepinephrine, methoxamine (α1A/D-adrenoceptor agonist), phenylephrine (equipotent agonist of α1A/B-adrenoceptors), and clonidine (α2-adrenoceptor agonist) were achieved under control conditions (pH 7.40) and under acidic conditions by substitution of the Krebs-Henseleit solution with a modified solution. Decreasing the pH from 7.40 to 7.20, 7.0, or 6.80 did not significantly alter the potency and efficacy of epinephrine and norepinephrine, although the standardized effect size was sometimes large. Severe acidosis (pH 6.80) did not significantly change the potency and efficacy of phenylephrine and clonidine, although it increased the efficacy and potency of methoxamine (P acidosis did not impair the vasoactive properties of epinephrine and norepinephrine in human medium-size arteries until pH 6.80. The results of the present study also suggest that acidosis might potentiate arterial responsiveness to vasoconstrictors, mostly by way of the α1D-adrenoceptor. Copyright © 2014 The American Association for Thoracic Surgery. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Negative feedback regulation of Homer 1a on norepinephrine-dependent cardiac hypertrophy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chiarello, Carmelina; Bortoloso, Elena; Carpi, Andrea; Furlan, Sandra; Volpe, Pompeo, E-mail: pompeo.volpe@unipd.it

    2013-07-15

    Homers are scaffolding proteins that modulate diverse cell functions being able to assemble signalling complexes. In this study, the presence, sub-cellular distribution and function of Homer 1 was investigated. Homer 1a and Homer 1b/c are constitutively expressed in cardiac muscle of both mouse and rat and in HL-1 cells, a cardiac cell line. As judged by confocal immunofluorescence microscopy, Homer 1a displays sarcomeric and peri-nuclear localization. In cardiomyocytes and cultured HL-1 cells, the hypertrophic agonist norepinephrine (NE) induces α{sub 1}-adrenergic specific Homer 1a over-expression, with a two-to-three-fold increase within 1 h, and no up-regulation of Homer 1b/c, as judged by Western blot and qPCR. In HL-1 cells, plasmid-driven over-expression of Homer 1a partially antagonizes activation of ERK phosphorylation and ANF up-regulation, two well-established, early markers of hypertrophy. At the morphometric level, NE-induced increase of cell size is likewise and partially counteracted by exogenous Homer 1a. Under the same experimental conditions, Homer 1b/c does not have any effect on ANF up-regulation nor on cell hypertrophy. Thus, Homer 1a up-regulation is associated to early stages of cardiac hypertrophy and appears to play a negative feedback regulation on molecular transducers of hypertrophy. -- Highlights: • Homer 1a is constitutively expressed in cardiac tissue. • In HL-1 cells, norepinephrine activates signaling pathways leading to hypertrophy. • Homer 1a up-regulation is an early event of norepinephrine-induced hypertrophy. • Homer 1a plays a negative feedback regulation modulating pathological hypertrophy. • Over-expression of Homer 1a per se does not induce hypertrophy.

  6. Combined Norepinephrine / Serotonergic Reuptake Inhibition: Effects on Maternal Behavior, Aggression and Oxytocin in the Rat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizabeth Thomas Cox

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Few systematic studies exist on the effects of chronic reuptake of monoamine neurotransmitter systems during pregnancy on the regulation of maternal behavior, although many drugs act primarily through one or more of these systems. Previous studies examining fluoxetine and amfonelic acid treatment during gestation on subsequent maternal behavior in rodents indicated significant alterations in postpartum maternal care, aggression and oxytocin levels. In this study, we extended our studies to include chronic gestational treatment with desipramine or amitriptyline to examine differential effects of reuptake inhibition of norepinephrine and combined noradrenergic and serotonergic systems on maternal behavior, aggression, and oxytocin system changes. METHODS: Pregnant Sprague-Dawley rats were treated throughout gestation with saline or one of three doses of either desipramine, which has a high affinity for the norepinephrine monoamine transporter, or amitriptyline, an agent with high affinity for both the norepinephrine and serotonin monoamine transporters. Maternal behavior and postpartum aggression were assessed on postpartum days one and six respectively. Oxytocin levels were measured in relevant brain regions on postpartum day seven. Predictions were that amitriptyline would decrease maternal behavior and increase aggression relative to desipramine, particularly at higher doses. Amygdaloidal oxytocin was expected to decrease with increased aggression. RESULTS: Amitriptyline and desiprimine differentially reduced maternal behavior, and at higher doses reduced aggressive behavior. Hippocampal oxytocin levels were lower after treatment with either drug but were not correlated with specific behavioral effects. These results, in combination with previous findings following gestational treatment with other selective neurotransmitter reuptake inhibitors, highlight the diverse effects of multiple monoamine systems thought to be involved in

  7. Determination of catecholamines in plasma by HPLC and amperometric detection. Comparison with a radioenzymatic method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauersfeld, W; Ratge, D; Knoll, E; Wisser, H

    1986-03-01

    The determination of norepinephrine and epinephrine in plasma by HPLC with amperometric detection was modified, giving detection limits of 25 ng/l for norepinephrine and epinephrine, respectively, using 1 ml plasma. In order to achieve this sensitivity, it was necessary to minimize the background noise by modification of instrumentation and specimen handling. Particularly important was the extra purification of the reagents, the application of micro-bore HPLC, the enzymatic cleavage of uric acid and temperature control of the amperometric cell and the amplifier. Comparison of the present method with the radioenzymatic determination of catecholamines resulted in coefficients of correlation of r = 0.924 and 0.919 for norepinephrine and epinephrine, resp. (n = 38). The concentrations of the 38 different samples used for the comparison were in the physiological range.

  8. Leptin Modulates Norepinephrine-Mediated Melatonin Synthesis in Cultured Rat Pineal Gland

    OpenAIRE

    Rodrigo Antonio Peliciari-Garcia; Jéssica Andrade-Silva; José Cipolla-Neto; Carla Roberta de Oliveira Carvalho

    2013-01-01

    Pineal melatonin synthesis can be modulated by many peptides, including insulin. Because melatonin appears to alter leptin synthesis, in this work we aimed to investigate whether leptin would have a role on norepinephrine- (NE-)mediated melatonin synthesis in cultured rat pineal glands. According to our data, cultured rat pineal glands express leptin receptor isoform b (Ob-Rb). Pineal expression of Ob-Rb mRNA was also observed in vivo. Administration of leptin (1 nM) associated with NE (1 µM)...

  9. Evaluation of the analgesic effects of ammoxetine, a novel potent serotonin and norepinephrine reuptake inhibitor

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Ting-Ting; Xue, Rui; Zhu, Lei; Li, Juan; Fan, Qiong-yin; Zhong, Bo-hua; Li, Yun-Feng; Ye, Cai-ying; Zhang, You-zhi

    2016-01-01

    Aim: The selective serotonin (5-HT) and norepinephrine (NE) reuptake inhibitors (SNRIs) are commonly used for the treatment of neuropathic pain and fibromyalgia. Ammoxetine ((±)-3-(benzo[d] [1,3]dioxol-4-yloxy)-N-methyl-3-(thiophen-2-yl)propan-1-amine) has been identified as a novel potent SNRI. In this study, we evaluated the acute analgesic properties of ammoxetine in different animal models of pain, and examined the involvement of monoamines in its analgesic actions. Methods: The analgesic...

  10. The modulatory effect of substance P on rat pineal norepinephrine release and melatonin secretion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mukda, Sujira; Ebadi, Manuchair; Govitrapong, Piyarat

    2009-01-01

    Secretion of melatonin by the mammalian pineal gland is primarily regulated by the release of norepinephrine (NE) from sympathetic nerve terminals that originate from the superior cervical ganglia. Peptidergic nerves that originate in the perikarya located in the sensory trigeminal ganglia also...... or melatonin secretion in rat pineal organ cultures. However, in the presence of NE, substance P inhibited the NE-induced increase in AANAT activity and melatonin secretion. This is the first time that a function for substance P in the mammalian pineal gland has been demonstrated....

  11. Plasma and urine catecholamine levels in cosmonauts during long-term stay on Space Station Salyut-7

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kvetn̆anský, R.; Davydova, N. A.; Noskov, V. B.; Vigas̆, M.; Popova, I. A.; Us̆akov, A. C.; Macho, L.; Grigoriev, A. I.

    The activity of the sympathetic adrenal system in cosmonauts exposed to a stay in space lasting for about half a year has so far been studied only by measuring catecholamine levels in plasma and urine samples taken before space flight and after landing. The device "Plasma 01", specially designed for collecting and processing venous blood from subjects during space flight on board the station Salyut-7 rendered it possible for the first time to collect and freeze samples of blood from cosmonauts in the course of a long-term 237-day space flight. A physician-cosmonaut collected samples of blood and urine from two cosmonauts over the period of days 217-219 of their stay in space. The samples were transported to Earth frozen. As indicators of the sympathetic adrenal system activity, plasma and urine concentrations of epinephrine and norepinephrine as well as urine levels of the catecholamine metabolites metanephrine, normetanephrine, and vanillylmandelic acid were determined before, during and after space flight. On days 217-219 of space flight plasma epinephrine and norepinephrine levels were slightly increased, yet not substantially different from normal. During stress situations plasma norepinephrine and epinephrine levels usually exhibit a manifold increase. On days 217-219 of space flight norepinephrine and epinephrine levels in urine were comparable with pre-flight values and the levels of their metabolites were even significantly decreased. All the parameters studied, particularly plasma norepinephrine as well as urine norepinephrine, normetanephrine, and vanillylmandelic acid, reached the highest values 8 days after landing. The results obtained suggest that, in the period of days 217-219 of the cosmonauts' stay in space in the state of weightlessness, the sympathetic adrenal system is either not activated at all or there is but a slight activation induced by specific activities of the cosmonauts, whereas in the process of re-adaptation after space flight on

  12. Measuring Regional Spillovers in Long- and Short-Run Models of Total Factor Productivity, Trade, and FDI

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mitze, Timo Friedel

    2014-01-01

    throughout the analysis. Finally, summing over the four variables to get a direct and indirect net effect of internationalization activity, the author finds that the direct effect is always positive, while the indirect net effect is positive in the short run but slightly negative in the long-run equation....... spatial specification. For the long-run cointegration equation, the empirical results hint at export- and FDI-led growth. Additionally, outward FDI activity shows to have positive spatial spillover effects among German regions, while the spatial patterns of import and inward FDI activity indicate...... substitution effects of interregional input–output linkages in favor of international ones over the sample period 1976–2008. In the short run, TFP growth is predominantly affected by changes in exports, inward and outward FDI stocks, where the latter variable also provokes positive spillovers. The author...

  13. Levomilnacipran (Fetzima): A New Serotonin-Norepinephrine Reuptake Inhibitor for the Treatment of Major Depressive Disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saraceni, Megan M; Venci, Jineane V; Gandhi, Mona A

    2014-08-01

    In July 2013, the US Food and Drug Administration approved levomilnacipran extended release (ER; Fetzima), a serotonin-norepinephrine reuptake inhibitor, for the treatment of adults with major depressive disorder. Levomilnacipran is an active enantiomer of the racemic drug milnacipran that is currently approved in the United States for the treatment of fibromyalgia. This article provides an overview of the mechanism of action, pharmacokinetic properties, clinical efficacy, safety, and tolerability of levomilnacipran ER. Relevant information was identified through a search of databases using the key word levomilnacipran. Additional information was obtained from fda.gov, by a review of the reference lists of identified articles, and from posters and abstracts from scientific meetings. Levomilnacipran ER, dosed once daily, is generally well tolerated and has demonstrated favorable effects compared to placebo in clinical trials of patients with major depressive disorder. The increased potency for norepinephrine reuptake inhibition is a characteristic that may represent a novel contribution for levomilnacipran. Additional studies comparing levomilnacipran ER to other commonly prescribed antidepressants are needed to further evaluate its place in therapy.

  14. Synergistic regulation of glutamatergic transmission by serotonin and norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors in prefrontal cortical neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuen, Eunice Y; Qin, Luye; Wei, Jing; Liu, Wenhua; Liu, Aiyi; Yan, Zhen

    2014-09-05

    The monoamine system in the prefrontal cortex has been implicated in various mental disorders and has been the major target of anxiolytics and antidepressants. Clinical studies show that serotonin and norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors (SNRIs) produce better therapeutic effects than single selective reuptake inhibitors, but the underlying mechanisms are largely unknown. Here, we found that low dose SNRIs, by acting on 5-HT(1A) and α2-adrenergic receptors, synergistically reduced AMPA receptor (AMPAR)-mediated excitatory postsynaptic currents and AMPAR surface expression in prefrontal cortex pyramidal neurons via a mechanism involving Rab5/dynamin-mediated endocytosis of AMPARs. The synergistic effect of SNRIs on AMPARs was blocked by inhibition of activator of G protein signaling 3, a G protein modulator that prevents reassociation of G(i) protein α subunit and prolongs the βγ-mediated signaling pathway. Moreover, the depression of AMPAR-mediated excitatory postsynaptic currents by SNRIs required p38 kinase activity, which was increased by 5-HT(1A) and α2-adrenergic receptor co-activation in an activator of G protein signaling 3-dependent manner. These results have revealed a potential mechanism for the synergy between the serotonin and norepinephrine systems in the regulation of glutamatergic transmission in cortical neurons.

  15. The Promotion of Human Neural Stem Cells Adhesion Using Bioinspired Poly(norepinephrine Nanoscale Coating

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Minah Park

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The establishment of versatile biomaterial interfaces that can facilitate cellular adhesion is crucial for elucidating the cellular processes that occur on biomaterial surfaces. Furthermore, biomaterial interfaces can provide physical or chemical cues that are capable of stimulating cellular behaviors by regulating intracellular signaling cascades. Herein, a method of creating a biomimetic functional biointerface was introduced to enhance human neural stem cell (hNSC adhesion. The hNSC-compatible biointerface was prepared by the oxidative polymerization of the neurotransmitter norepinephrine, which generates a nanoscale organic thin layer, termed poly(norepinephrine (pNE. Due to its adhesive property, pNE resulted in an adherent layer on various substrates, and pNE-coated biointerfaces provided a highly favorable microenvironment for hNSCs, with no observed cytotoxicity. Only a 2-hour incubation of hNSCs was required to firmly attach the stem cells, regardless of the type of substrate. Importantly, the adhesive properties of pNE interfaces led to micropatterns of cellular attachment, thereby demonstrating the ability of the interface to organize the stem cells. This highly facile surface-modification method using a biomimetic pNE thin layer can be applied to a number of suitable materials that were previously not compatible with hNSC technology.

  16. Insulin modulates norepinephrine-mediated melatonin synthesis in cultured rat pineal gland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, Rodrigo Antonio Peliciari; Afeche, Solange Castro; Scialfa, Julieta Helena; do Amaral, Fernanda Gaspar; dos Santos, Sabrina Heloísa José; Lima, Fabio Bessa; Young, Martin Elliot; Cipolla-Neto, José

    2008-01-02

    The mammalian pineal gland synthesizes melatonin in a circadian manner, peaking during the dark phase. This synthesis is primarily regulated by sympathetic innervations via noradrenergic fibers, but is also modulated by many peptidergic and hormonal systems. A growing number of studies reveal a complex role for melatonin in influencing various physiological processes, including modulation of insulin secretion and action. In contrast, a role for insulin as a modulator of melatonin synthesis has not been investigated previously. The aim of the current study was to determine whether insulin modulates norepinephrine (NE)-mediated melatonin synthesis. The results demonstrate that insulin (10(- 8)M) potentiated norepinephrine-mediated melatonin synthesis and tryptophan hydroxylase (TPOH) activity in ex vivo incubated pineal glands. When ex vivo incubated pineal glands were synchronized (12h NE-stimulation, followed by 12h incubation in the absence of NE), insulin potentiated NE-mediated melatonin synthesis and arylalkylamine-N-acetyltransferase (AANAT) activity. Insulin did not affect the activity of hydroxyindole-O-methyltranferase (HIOMT), nor the gene expression of tpoh, aanat, or hiomt, under any of the conditions investigated. We conclude that insulin potentiates NE-mediated melatonin synthesis in cultured rat pineal gland, potentially through post-transcriptional events.

  17. Comparison of Nonshivering Thermogenesis Induced by Norepinephrine Stress in Tree Shrews

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wan-long Zhu

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Nonshivering thermogenesis (NSTis an important thermogenic mechanism for small mammals. Quantitative measurement of NST is usually stimulated by injection of norepinephrine. The injection dosage of norepinephrine (NE is critical for eliciting the maximum NST. Three empirical equations of NE dosages were often referenced in previous studies: (1 NE (mg / kg= 2.53W-0.4; (2 NE(mg/kg = 3.3W-0.458 and (3 NE(mg/kg= 6.6W-0.458. In the present study , we used tree shrews (Tupaia belangeri as experiment subjects to test the effects of the three dosages of NE on NST. Results showed that all the three dosages of NE could induce the maximum NST for T. belangeri. No significant differences were found in NST among groups and the NST was respectively 2.63±0.12 (formula 1, 2.66±0. 11 (formula 2 and 2.78±0.15 (formula 3. However, when injected with NE dosage from formula 3, the increase of body temperatures was significantly higher than the other two NE dosages (increased 1.5±0. 1 oC (formula 3, 0.8±0. 2 oC (formula 2, and 0.6±0. 1 oC (formula 1, respectively. In order to prevent the death because of hyperthermia, formula 1 or 2 is recommended to be used.

  18. Saturated norepinephrine transporter occupancy by atomoxetine relevant to clinical doses: a rhesus monkey study with (S,S)-[{sup 18}F]FMeNER-D{sub 2}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takano, Akihiro; Gulyas, Balazs; Varrone, Andrea; Halldin, Christer [Karolinska Institutet, Department of Clinical Neuroscience, Psychiatry Section, Stockholm (Sweden); Maguire, Ralph Paul [Pfizer Global Research and Development, New London, CT (United States); Novartis Institutes for BioMedical Research, Basel (Switzerland)

    2009-08-15

    In a previous PET study on norepinephrine transporter (NET) occupancy in the nonhuman primate brain, the relationship between NET occupancy and atomoxetine plasma concentration, and occupancies among different brain regions, were not demonstrated adequately. It may therefore be difficult to translate the results to the clinical situations. In the present study, the detailed change of NET occupancy was investigated among a wider range of doses in a more advanced manner. Two rhesus monkeys were examined using a high-resolution PET system with (S,S)-[{sup 18}F]FMeNER-D{sub 2} under baseline conditions and after steady-state infusion of different doses of atomoxetine (0.003 to 0.12 mg/kg per hour). NET occupancy of the thalamus, brainstem and anterior cingulate cortex was calculated using BP{sub ND} obtained with the simplified reference tissue model. NET occupancy increased regionally and uniformly as the plasma concentration of atomoxetine increased. The estimated Kd value (the amount to occupy 50% of NET) in the thalamus was 16 ng/ml. The results indicate that clinical doses of atomoxetine would occupy NET almost completely. (orig.)

  19. Influence of systemically given placebo, trapidil and isosorbide dinitrate on norepinephrine-evoked hand vein constriction in healthy subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sziegoleit, Werner; Dannenberg, Katrin; Konschak, Ariana; Lautenschläger, Christine; Presek, Peter

    2007-01-01

    Since trapidil (CAS 15421-84-8) is able to dilate human hand veins after local intravenous administration, four studies were carried out in healthy male volunteers using the dorsal hand vein compliance technique to test the influence of common systemic single doses of trapidil (200 mg orally, 100 mg intravenously) and isosorbide dinitrate (CAS 87-33-2, 20 mg orally) on norepinephrine (CAS 51-41-2)-evoked hand vein constriction in comparison with oral placebo. Oral placebo and oral trapidil were studied in a randomized double-blind cross-over design in 10 subjects aged 20 to 30 years, and oral isosorbide dinitrate and intravenous trapidil, in a randomized open cross-over design in 8 subjects aged 22 to 29 years. In the three similar studies with oral medications dose-response curves for venoconstriction by locally infused norepinephrine were established before and 1 h, 2 h and 3 h after oral medication and ED50 values of norepinephrine were calculated. The control dose-response curves and ED50 values of norepinephrine did not differ significantly. After oral placebo administration the dose-response curves of norepinephrine did not change significantly, but the ED50 of norepinephrine increased 3 h after placebo (from 12.1 to 31.7 ng/ min), indicating a lessening in norepinephrine effect at this time. After oral trapidil application the dose-response curves of norepinephrine shifted to the left compared with the pre-treatment curve (significantly 2 h after trapidil) and the corresponding curves after placebo with a significant decrease in the ED50 of norepinephrine 3 h after trapidil compared with placebo (from 31.7 to 12.6 ng/ min). After oral isosorbide dinitrate administration the dose-response curves of norepinephrine did not differ significantly from the pre-treatment curve, but they shifted to the left compared with the corresponding curves after placebo (significantly 3 h after isosorbide dinitrate). The ED50 of norephinephrine decreased significantly 2 h after

  20. Sandwiching it in: spillover of work onto food choices and family roles in low- and moderate-income urban households.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devine, Carol M; Connors, Margaret M; Sobal, Jeffery; Bisogni, Carole A

    2003-02-01

    Lower status jobs, high workloads and lack of control at work have been associated with less healthful diets, but the ways through which work is connected to food choices are not well understood. This analysis was an examination of workers' experience of the relationship of their jobs to their food choices. Fifty-one multi-ethnic, urban, low- and moderate-income adults living in Upstate New York in 1995 participated in a qualitative interview study of fruit and vegetable choices and discussed employment and food choices. The workers who participated in this study described a dynamic relationship between work and food choices that they experienced in the context of their other roles and values. These workers presented a relationship that was characterized by positive and negative spillover between their jobs and their ability to fulfill family roles and promote personal health, linked by a spectrum of food choice strategies. Participants' narratives fit into three different domains: characterizations of work and their resources for food choice, strategies used to manage food choices within the constraints of work, and affect related to the negative and positive spillover of these strategies on family roles and on personal food choices. Characterizations of work as demanding and limiting or demanding and manageable differentiated participants who experienced their food choice strategies as a source of guilt and dissatisfaction (negative spillover) from those who experienced food choices as a source of pride and satisfaction (positive spillover). Ideals and values related to food choice and health were balanced against other values for family closeness and nurturing and personal achievement. Some participants found work unproblematic. These findings direct attention to a broad conceptualization of the relationship of work to food choices in which the demands and resources of the work role are viewed as they spill over into the social and temporal context of other

  1. WHAT CONNECTIONS BETWEEN MARITAL CONFLICT AND PARENTING QUALITY? EVIDENCE FROM PARENT’S GENDER IN SPILLOVER EFFECTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Loredana Benedetto

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The spillover hypothesis posits that negative emotions and behavioral patterns in marital conflicts influence parenting quality and children’s adjustment, through increasing of harsh and incoherent discipline and diminished involvement and affection. Moreover conflicts focused on childrearing issues are particularly distressing for children with often show emotional and behavioral problems. The aim of the study was to explore gender differences in the links between marital conflicts (destructive and constructive tactics, childrearing disagreement and parent-child relationships, in order to verify if there are different pathways for fathers and mothers in spillover effects.   Method. 110 parents (children aged 6-12 years completed the Styles of Conflict Scale (marital conflict style, the Parent Problem Checklist (disagreements about childrearing, the Alabama Parenting Questionnaire (parenting practices, and the Parenting Stress Index. Results. The links between conflict tactics and parenting practices change in function of parent’s gender. Mothers refer more frequent childrearing disagreements and increasing in punishment; furthermore - in line with the spillover hypothesis - attack and violence tactics are associated negatively with positive parenting (involvement and warmth. For fathers compromise, avoidance and attack correlate positively with effective parenting (more involvement, affection and consistency disciplinary. Conclusions. A spillover effect, that is, an extension of marital tensions in the relationship with their children with reduced quality of parenting, seems to manifest only for women. These findings, if confirmed by other studies, would be relevant from an clinical point of view to understand how paternal and maternal parenting mediate the effects of the marital disharmony on children’s adjustment.

  2. The spillover effect of disclosure rules and materiality thresholds:Evidence from profit warnings issued in Hong Kong market

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Rencheng; Wang; Yao; Zhang

    2011-01-01

    Dual-listed firms simultaneously follow the relevant rules in their home country and in their cross-listed country.In contrast,other firms only listed in the cross-listed country are only subject to the local regulations.Previous literature has found evidence that cross-listing can improve firms’ information transparency because of more stringent listing rules in the cross-listed country.The existing research,however,has not paid enough attention to the potential influence of dual-listed firms and their home country institutional factors(e.g.unique disclosure policies) on other firms only listed in the cross-listed country(i.e.spillover effect).In the Hong Kong market,Chinese dual-listed firms are under the mandatory profit warning regulation of mainland China,but other firms listed only in Hong Kong only need to follow the voluntary disclosure rule of the Hong Kong Stock Exchange.Such a setting provides us with the opportunity to investigate a spillover effect,i.e.whether these Chinese dual-listed firms influence their peers only listed in Hong Kong to release profit warnings.We find that firms only listed in Hong Kong are more likely to issue profit warnings if their Chinese dual-listed peers have also issued warnings.We further find that this spillover effect increases with the market capitalization of Chinese duallisted firms and increases with the market share of these firms before they dominate the industry.Lastly,due to an underlying duty to disclose material information in Hong Kong,the spillover effect is weaker for firms with large earnings surprises.

  3. Lipid Emulsions Enhance the Norepinephrine-Mediated Reversal of Local Anesthetic-Induced Vasodilation at Toxic Doses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Soo Hee; Sung, Hui-Jin; Ok, Seong-Ho; Yu, Jongsun; Choi, Mun-Jeoung; Lim, Jin Soo

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Intravenous lipid emulsions have been used to treat the systemic toxicity of local anesthetics. The goal of this in vitro study was to examine the effects of lipid emulsions on the norepinephrine-mediated reversal of vasodilation induced by high doses of levobupivacaine, ropivacaine, and mepivacaine in isolated endothelium-denuded rat aorta, and to determine whether such effects are associated with the lipid solubility of local anesthetics. Materials and Methods The effects of lipid emulsions (0.30, 0.49, 1.40, and 2.61%) on norepinephrine concentration-responses in high-dose local anesthetic (6×10-4 M levobupivacaine, 2×10-3 M ropivacaine, and 7×10-3 M mepivacaine)-induced vasodilation of isolated aorta precontracted with 60 mM KCl were assessed. The effects of lipid emulsions on local anesthetic- and diltiazem-induced vasodilation in isolated aorta precontracted with phenylephrine were also assessed. Results Lipid emulsions (0.30%) enhanced norepinephrine-induced contraction in levobupivacaine-induced vasodilation, whereas 1.40 and 2.61% lipid emulsions enhanced norepinephrine-induced contraction in both ropivacaine- and mepivacaine-induced vasodilation, respectively. Lipid emulsions (0.20, 0.49 and 1.40%) inhibited vasodilation induced by levobupivacaine and ropivacaine, whereas 1.40 and 2.61% lipid emulsions slightly attenuated mepivacaine (3×10-3 M)-induced vasodilation. In addition, lipid emulsions attenuated diltiazem-induced vasodilation. Lipid emulsions enhanced norepinephrine-induced contraction in endothelium-denuded aorta without pretreatment with local anesthetics. Conclusion Taken together, these results suggest that lipid emulsions enhance the norepinephrine-mediated reversal of local anesthetic-induced vasodilation at toxic anesthetic doses and inhibit local anesthetic-induced vasodilation in a manner correlated with the lipid solubility of a particular local anesthetic. PMID:24142661

  4. Differential susceptibility in spillover between interparental conflict and maternal parenting practices: evidence for OXTR and 5-HTT genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sturge-Apple, Melissa L; Cicchetti, Dante; Davies, Patrick T; Suor, Jennifer H

    2012-06-01

    Guided by the affective spillover hypothesis and the differential susceptibility to environmental influence frameworks, the present study examined how associations between interparental conflict and mothers' parenting practices were moderated by serotonin transporter (5-HTT) and oxytocin receptor (OXTR) genes. A sample of 201 mothers and their 2-year old child participated in a laboratory-based research assessment. Results supported differential susceptibility hypotheses within spillover frameworks. With respect to OXTR rs53576, mothers with the GG genotype showed greater differential maternal sensitivity across varying levels of interparental conflict. Mothers with one or two copies of the 5-HTTLPR S allele demonstrated differential susceptibility for both sensitive and harsh/punitive caregiving behaviors. Finally, analyses examined whether maternal depressive symptoms and emotional closeness to their child mediated the moderating effects. Findings suggest that maternal emotional closeness with their child indirectly linked OXTR with maternal sensitivity. The results highlight how molecular genetics may explain heterogeneity in spillover models with differential implications for specific parenting behaviors. Implications for clinicians and therapists working with maritally distressed parents are discussed.

  5. Measuring spill-over effects of foreign markets on the JSE before, during and after international financial crises

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andre Heymans

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available There is a large body of research that proves the co-movement of international stock markets over time. This co-movement manifests through various instruments ranging from stocks and bonds, to soft commodities and can be visualised as returns and volatility spill-over effects. During the most recent financial crisis, it was once again highlighted that no market is immune to spill-over effects from other international markets. By employing an aggregate-shock (AS model, returns and volatility spill-over effects of the Hang Seng, London, Paris, Frankfurt and New York stock markets to the JSE are confirmed. The findings also confirm the JSE All share index is directly affected through contagion by the returns of the economic area where the crisis originates. However, the results further confirm that South Africa has progressed in shielding its stock market against financial crises in recent times. These findings hold important implications for stock portfolio managers in South Africa.

  6. Positive Emotional Effects of Leisure in Green Spaces in Alleviating Work–Family Spillover in Working Mothers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Po-Ju Chang

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Studies have shown that family and work spillover affects well-being and that leisure activities can alleviate the negative effects of work-related stress on health. However, few studies have focused on investigating the effects of specific leisure activities among specific populations. To examine whether leisure activities in green spaces can promote individual recovery processes and alleviate the effects of work and family spillover on positive emotions, this study applied the effort-recovery model to a population of working mothers. Through online and paper questionnaires, sample data were collected from 221 working mothers in Taiwan. Structural equation modeling was used to test the experimental hypothesis, and mediation analysis was used to determine whether leisure in green spaces is a mediating factor. The results indicated that leisure in green spaces is a mediator of the relationship of negative work and family spillover with positive emotions. In addition, strolls and park visits were found to provide greater psychological benefits to working mothers, compared with picnics.

  7. Role of hormonal factors in plasma K alterations in acute respiratory and metabolic alkalosis in dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, H; Hishida, A; Ohishi, K; Kimura, M; Honda, N

    1990-02-01

    Studies were performed on previously nephrectomized dogs to examine roles of hormonal factors in plasma potassium alterations in acute alkalosis. Respiratory and metabolic alkalosis were induced by hyperventilation and intravenous NaHCO3 or tris(hydroxymethyl)aminomethane (Tris) infusion, respectively. Respiratory and NaHCO3-induced alkalosis provoked decreases in plasma potassium from the control value of 5.12 +/- 0.68 (SE) to 4.21 +/- 0.55 meq/l (P less than 0.01) and from 4.65 +/- 0.26 to 3.91 +/- 0.16 meq/l (P less than 0.01) within 180 min, respectively. In contrast, Tris-induced alkalosis elicited an increase in plasma potassium from the control value of 4.56 +/- 0.30 to 5.31 +/- 0.30 meq/l (P less than 0.01). Hypokalemia in respiratory alkalosis was associated with a decrease in the plasma norepinephrine concentration from the control level of 377 +/- 104 to 155 +/- 41 pg/ml (P less than 0.05) but not with changes in plasma levels of epinephrine, insulin, glucagon, cortisol, and aldosterone. However, this hypokalemia was not affected by phentolamine. Also, somatostatin did not modify the hypokalemic response. NaHCO3-induced hypokalemia was associated with a decline in the plasma aldosterone and norepinephrine concentrations. The decline in plasma norepinephrine in NaHCO3-induced alkalosis followed the decrease in plasma potassium. In Tris-induced alkalosis, plasma insulin increased but norepinephrine decreased. The findings do not suggest fundamental roles of the hormonal factors in the plasma potassium alterations in bilaterally nephrectomized dogs with acute alkalosis.

  8. Effect of Early Vasopressin vs Norepinephrine on Kidney Failure in Patients With Septic Shock: The VANISH Randomized Clinical Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, Anthony C; Mason, Alexina J; Thirunavukkarasu, Neeraja; Perkins, Gavin D; Cecconi, Maurizio; Cepkova, Magda; Pogson, David G; Aya, Hollmann D; Anjum, Aisha; Frazier, Gregory J; Santhakumaran, Shalini; Ashby, Deborah; Brett, Stephen J

    2016-08-02

    Norepinephrine is currently recommended as the first-line vasopressor in septic shock; however, early vasopressin use has been proposed as an alternative. To compare the effect of early vasopressin vs norepinephrine on kidney failure in patients with septic shock. A factorial (2×2), double-blind, randomized clinical trial conducted in 18 general adult intensive care units in the United Kingdom between February 2013 and May 2015, enrolling adult patients who had septic shock requiring vasopressors despite fluid resuscitation within a maximum of 6 hours after the onset of shock. Patients were randomly allocated to vasopressin (titrated up to 0.06 U/min) and hydrocortisone (n = 101), vasopressin and placebo (n = 104), norepinephrine and hydrocortisone (n = 101), or norepinephrine and placebo (n = 103). The primary outcome was kidney failure-free days during the 28-day period after randomization, measured as (1) the proportion of patients who never developed kidney failure and (2) median number of days alive and free of kidney failure for patients who did not survive, who experienced kidney failure, or both. Rates of renal replacement therapy, mortality, and serious adverse events were secondary outcomes. A total of 409 patients (median age, 66 years; men, 58.2%) were included in the study, with a median time to study drug administration of 3.5 hours after diagnosis of shock. The number of survivors who never developed kidney failure was 94 of 165 patients (57.0%) in the vasopressin group and 93 of 157 patients (59.2%) in the norepinephrine group (difference, -2.3% [95% CI, -13.0% to 8.5%]). The median number of kidney failure-free days for patients who did not survive, who experienced kidney failure, or both was 9 days (interquartile range [IQR], 1 to -24) in the vasopressin group and 13 days (IQR, 1 to -25) in the norepinephrine group (difference, -4 days [95% CI, -11 to 5]). There was less use of renal replacement therapy in the vasopressin group

  9. Norepinephrine in low to moderate doses may not increase luminal concentrations of L-lactate in the gut in patients with septic shock

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ibsen, M; Jørgensen, V L; Perner, A

    2007-01-01

    To investigate the effect of different doses of norepinephrine (noradrenaline) on luminal concentrations of L-lactate in the rectum and stomach in patients with fluid-resuscitated septic shock.......To investigate the effect of different doses of norepinephrine (noradrenaline) on luminal concentrations of L-lactate in the rectum and stomach in patients with fluid-resuscitated septic shock....

  10. Norepinephrine in low to moderate doses may not increase luminal concentrations of L-lactate in the gut in patients with septic shock

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ibsen, M; Jørgensen, V L; Perner, A

    2007-01-01

    To investigate the effect of different doses of norepinephrine (noradrenaline) on luminal concentrations of L-lactate in the rectum and stomach in patients with fluid-resuscitated septic shock.......To investigate the effect of different doses of norepinephrine (noradrenaline) on luminal concentrations of L-lactate in the rectum and stomach in patients with fluid-resuscitated septic shock....

  11. Spillover of Newcastle disease viruses from poultry to wild birds in Guangdong province, southern China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiang, Bin; Han, Lujie; Gao, Pei; You, Renrong; Wang, Fumin; Xiao, Jiajie; Liao, Ming; Kang, Yinfeng; Ren, Tao

    2017-09-19

    Despite intensive vaccination programs in many countries, including China, Newcastle disease has been reported sporadically and is still a significant threat to the poultry industry in China. Newcastle disease virus (NDV) is infectious for at least 250 bird species, but the role of wild birds in virus epidemiology remains largely unknown. Fourteen NDV isolates were obtained from 2040 samples collected from wild birds or the environment in Guangdong province, southern China, from 2013 to 2015. The isolation rate was the highest in the period of wintering and lowest during the periods of spring migration, nesting, and postnesting. A maximum clade credibility phylogenetic analysis revealed that at least four genotypes circulate in southern China: three class II genotypes (II, VI, and IX) and one class I (1b). We also demonstrated that most isolates from wild birds were highly similar to isolates from poultry, and two isolates were linked to viruses from wild birds in northern China. These data suggested that wild birds could disseminate NDV and poultry-derived viruses may spillover to wild birds. Accordingly, vaccine development and poultry management strategies should be considered to prevent future NDV outbreaks, particularly given the strength of the poultry industry in developing countries, such as China. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  12. Government Resource Subsidy and its Spillover Effects: Evidence from the Excessive Oil Consumption in China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rattaphon Wuthisatian

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The paper aims at analyzing the consecutive consequences of government resource subsidies in a particular industry, which can lead to the excessive oil consumption by other sectors and end users. To fully illustrate the investigation, we use the subsidies in Chinese steel production as a case study and a beginning point to develop theoretical and empirical models to examine the spillover effects, going from steel industry to a rapidly increase of overall country’s oil consumption. The theoretical model applies the market equilibrium concept to demonstrate a relationship among three economic sectors; steel industry, automobile, and households. Particularly, the government subsidies in Chinese steel production will enable the steel firms to obtain resource inputs at the lower price, making the output price of steels cheaper than the market price. As steel is a required input in automobile industry, this cheaper price of steels will induce the automotive firms to increase their production capacity, producing more cars and selling them at the cheaper price, which eventually results in the excessive usage of oil and gasoline by individuals. Using the data during the period of 1980-2012, the empirical analysis involves OLS regression and cointegration test to approve the validity of the theoretical model, which emphasizes on the strong relationship between Chinese oil consumption and steel production.

  13. Response Asymmetry in Spillover Volatility: An Empirical Study in the Indonesia and Singapore Stock Market

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siti Saadah

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Normal 0 false false false EN-US X-NONE X-NONE Following the blueprint of the ASEAN integration 2015, the integration of the financial markets in this region will increase. This study investigates the existence of a volatility spillover from the Singaporean stock market into Indonesia, including its transmission pattern. Singapore, as an advanced country in the ASEAN region, has played an important role as the information leader in the market of this region, so that it is very possible that the shocks in the Singapore’s stock market will be transmitted to another stock market in this region. Using TGARCH (1,1 model specification regarding the data of the daily return of the Indonesia market index (IHSG for the period of January 2008 – August 2012, it is observed that the shock that took place in the Singapore stock market is immediately transmitted to the Indonesia stock market with two important asymmetric patterns. The transmission of the shock from the Singapore stock exchange becomes stronger when this market (1 experiences a negative return, and (2 is in the bearish phase.  Normal 0 false false false EN-US X-NONE X-NONE Calculation of hydrogen storage capacity of metal-organic and covalent-organic frameworks by spillover

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suri, Mayur; Dornfeld, Matthew; Ganz, Eric

    2009-11-01

    We have used accurate ab initio quantum chemistry calculations together with a simple model to study the hydrogen storage capacity of metal-organic and covalent-organic frameworks by spillover. Recent experiments by Tsao et al. [J. Am. Chem. Soc. 131, 1404 (2009)] {based on an earlier work by Li and Yang [J. Am. Chem. Soc. 128, 8136 (2006)]} have found that IRMOF-8 with bridged Pt catalysts can reversibly store up to 4.7 wt % of hydrogen at room temperature and 100 bar. We have calculated the binding energy for multiple H atoms on model molecules. By counting active storage sites, we predict a saturation excess storage density at room temperature of 5.0 wt % for IRMOF-8. We also predict storage densities of 4.5 wt % for IRMOF-1, 5.4 wt % for MOF-177, 4.5 wt % for COF-1, and 5.7 wt % for IRMOF-15 and IRMOF-16. This suggests that the current experimental H storage results for IRMOF-8 are well optimized. However, for other materials such as MOF-177 and COF-1, the experimental results are not yet optimized, and significantly more H can be stored on these materials. We also find that significant strain will result from shrinkage of the linker molecules as H atoms are loaded onto the crystals.

  14. Significantly enhanced hydrogen storage in metal-organic frameworks via spillover.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yingwei; Yang, Ralph T

    2006-01-25

    The utilization of hydrogen in fuel-cell powered vehicles is limited by the lack of a safe and effective system for hydrogen storage. At the present time, there is no viable storage technology capable of meeting the DOE targets. Porous metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) are novel and potential candidates for hydrogen storage. Until now it is still not possible to achieve any significant hydrogen storage capacity in MOFs at ambient temperature. Here, we report, for the first time, significant amounts of hydrogen storage in MOF-5 and IRMOF-8 at ambient temperature by using a very simple technique via hydrogen dissociation and spillover. Thus, hydrogen uptakes for MOF-5 and IRMOF-8 can be enhanced by a factor of 3.3 and 3.1, respectively (to nearly 2 wt % at 10 MPa and 298 K). Furthermore, the isotherms are totally reversible. These findings suggest that our technique is suitable for hydrogen storage in a variety of MOF materials because of their similar structures as MOF-5 and IRMOF-8.

  15. Workplace surface acting and marital partner discontent: Anxiety and exhaustion spillover mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krannitz, Morgan A; Grandey, Alicia A; Liu, Songqi; Almeida, David A

    2015-07-01

    Surface acting (i.e., faking and suppressing emotions at work) is repeatedly linked to employee negative moods and emotional exhaustion, but the consequences may also go beyond work boundaries. We provide a unique theoretical integration of these 2 emotional labor consequences with 2 work-to-family conflict mechanisms, mood spillover and resource drain, to explain why surface acting is likely to create marital partner discontent (i.e., partner's perceived work-to-family conflict and desire for the employee to quit). A survey of 197 hotel managers and their marital partners supported that managers' surface acting was directly related to their partner wanting them to quit, and indirectly to partner's perception of work-to-family conflict via exhaustion consistent with the resource drain mechanism. Anxiety from surface acting had an indirect mediating effect on marital partner discontent through exhaustion. Importantly, controlling for dispositional negativity and job demands did not weaken these effects. Implications for theory and future research integrating work-family and emotional labor are discussed.

  16. Avian trichomonosis in spotted owls (Strix occidentalis): Indication of opportunistic spillover from prey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogers, Krysta H; Girard, Yvette A; Woods, Leslie; Johnson, Christine K

    2016-12-01

    Avian trichomonosis, caused by the flagellated protozoan parasite Trichomonas gallinae, has variable pathogenicity among bird species ranging from asymptomatic infections to severe disease periodically manifesting in epidemic mortality. Traditionally, columbids are identified as highly susceptible to infection with occasional spillover into raptors that prey on infected birds. We identified avian trichomonosis in two dead California spotted owls (Strix occidentalis occidentalis) and three dead northern spotted owls (S. o. caurina) in California during 2011-2015; infection was confirmed in four owls by PCR. Pathologic lesions associated with trichomonosis in the owls included caseonecrotic lesions of the upper palate accompanied by oropharyngitis, cellulitis, myositis, and/or sinusitis. Spotted owls are known to mainly feed on small mammals; therefore, the source of infection as well as the significance of the disease in spotted owls is unclear. These owl trichomonosis cases coincided temporally and spatially with three trichomonosis epidemics in band-tailed pigeons (Patagioenas fasciata monilis). The same parasite, T. gallinae subtype A2, was isolated from the spotted owls and band-tailed pigeons, suggesting the owls became infected when opportunistically feeding on pigeons during mortality events. Avian trichomonosis is an important factor in the decline of the Pacific Coast band-tailed pigeon population with near-annual mortality events during the last 10 years and could have conservation implications for raptor species at risk, particularly those that are facing multiple threats.

  17. Avian trichomonosis in spotted owls (Strix occidentalis: Indication of opportunistic spillover from prey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krysta H. Rogers

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Avian trichomonosis, caused by the flagellated protozoan parasite Trichomonas gallinae, has variable pathogenicity among bird species ranging from asymptomatic infections to severe disease periodically manifesting in epidemic mortality. Traditionally, columbids are identified as highly susceptible to infection with occasional spillover into raptors that prey on infected birds. We identified avian trichomonosis in two dead California spotted owls (Strix occidentalis occidentalis and three dead northern spotted owls (S. o. caurina in California during 2011–2015; infection was confirmed in four owls by PCR. Pathologic lesions associated with trichomonosis in the owls included caseonecrotic lesions of the upper palate accompanied by oropharyngitis, cellulitis, myositis, and/or sinusitis. Spotted owls are known to mainly feed on small mammals; therefore, the source of infection as well as the significance of the disease in spotted owls is unclear. These owl trichomonosis cases coincided temporally and spatially with three trichomonosis epidemics in band-tailed pigeons (Patagioenas fasciata monilis. The same parasite, T. gallinae subtype A2, was isolated from the spotted owls and band-tailed pigeons, suggesting the owls became infected when opportunistically feeding on pigeons during mortality events. Avian trichomonosis is an important factor in the decline of the Pacific Coast band-tailed pigeon population with near-annual mortality events during the last 10 years and could have conservation implications for raptor species at risk, particularly those that are facing multiple threats.

  18. Daily positive spillover and crossover from mothers' work to youth health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawson, Katie M; Davis, Kelly D; McHale, Susan M; Hammer, Leslie B; Buxton, Orfeu M

    2014-12-01

    Prior research shows that employees' work experiences can "spill over" into their family lives and "cross over" to affect family members. Expanding on studies that emphasize negative implications of work for family life, this study examined positive work-to-family spillover and positive and negative crossover between mothers and their children. Participants were 174 mothers in the extended care (nursing home) industry and their children (ages 9-17), both of whom completed daily diaries on the same 8 consecutive evenings. On each workday, mothers reported whether they had a positive experience at work, youth reported on their mothers' positive and negative mood after work, and youth rated their own mental (positive and negative affect) and physical health (physical health symptoms, sleep quality, sleep duration). Results of 2-level models showed that mothers' positive mood after work, on average, was directly related to youth reports of more positive affect, better sleep quality, and longer sleep duration. In addition, mothers with more positive work experiences, on average, displayed less negative mood after work, and in turn, adolescents reported less negative affect and fewer physical health symptoms. Results are discussed in terms of daily family system dynamics.

  19. Insulation for daydreams: a role for tonic norepinephrine in the facilitation of internally guided thought.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonathan Smallwood

    Full Text Available Although consciousness can be brought to bear on both perceptual and internally generated information, little is known about how these different cognitive modes are coordinated. Here we show that between-participant variance in thoughts unrelated to the task being performed (known as task unrelated thought, TUT is associated with longer response times (RT when target presentation occurs during periods when baseline Pupil Diameter (PD is increased. As behavioral interference due to high baseline PD can reflect increased tonic activity in the norepinephrine system (NE, these results might implicate high tonic NE activity in the facilitation of TUTs. Based on these findings, it is hypothesised that high tonic mode NE leads to a generalised de-amplification of task relevant information that prioritses internally generated thought and insulates it from the potentially disruptive events taking place in the external environment.

  1. Norepinephrine transporter (NET) is expressed in cardiac sympathetic ganglia of adult rat

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    The sympathetic nervous system plays a cardinal role in regulating cardiac function through releasing the neurotransmitter norepinephrine (NE). In comparison with central nervous system, the molecular mechanism of NE uptake in myocardium is not clear. In present study, we proved that in rat the CNS type of NE transporter (NET) was also expressed in middle cervical-stellate ganglion complex (MC-SG complex) which is considered to control the activity of heart, but not expressed in myocardium. The results also showed that NET expression level in right ganglion was significantly higher than in the left, rendering the greater capacity of NE uptake in right ventricle, a fact which may contribute to the maintenance of right ventricular function under pathologic state.

  2. Muscle interstitial ATP and norepinephrine concentrations in the human leg during exercise and ATP infusion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mortensen, Stefan P.; Gonzalez-Alonso, Jose; Nielsen, Jens Jung

    2009-01-01

    ATP has been proposed to play multiple roles in local skeletal muscle blood flow regulation by inducing vasodilation and modulating sympathetic vasoconstrictor activity, but the mechanism remain unclear. Here we evaluated the effects of arterial ATP infusion and exercise on limb muscle interstitial...... ATP and NE concentrations to gain insight into the interstitial and intravascular mechanisms by which ATP causes muscle vasodilation and sympatholysis. Leg hemodynamics and muscle interstitial nucleotide and norepinephrine (NE) concentrations were measured during: 1) femoral arterial ATP infusion (0.......42+/-0.04 and 2.26+/-0.52 mumol/min; mean+/-SEM) and 2) one-leg knee-extensor exercise (18+/-0 and 37+/-2W) in 10 healthy, male subjects. Arterial ATP infusion and exercise increased leg blood flow (LBF) in the experimental leg from ~0.3 L/min at baseline to 4.2+/-0.3 and 4.6+/-0.5 L/min, respectively, whereas...

  3. Norepinephrine transporter function and tolerance to hypergravitational stress: A pilot study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schroeder, Christoph; Strempel, Sebastian; Boese, Andrea; Hemmersbach, Ruth; Tank, Jens; Luft, Friedrich C.; Jordan, Jens

    Pharmacological norepinephrine transporter (NET) inhibition improves orthostatic tolerance on a tilt table while increasing heart rate. We tested the cardiovascular response to NET inhibition during a graded human centrifuge run in seven healthy men. g-Load was increased in 0.5 g steps with 3 g maximal g-load. On two separate days, patients were tested after selective NET inhibition with reboxetine or with placebo in a double-blind, randomized, crossover fashion. Resting diastolic blood pressure increased moderately with NET inhibition. Resting heart rate was profoundly increased by NET inhibition. NET inhibition augmented the heart rate response while attenuating the increase in blood pressure during hypergravitation. NET inhibition could be tested for its potential to improve cardiovascular g-tolerance.

  4. Stress, genotype and norepinephrine in the prediction of mouse behavior using reinforcement learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luksys, Gediminas; Gerstner, Wulfram; Sandi, Carmen

    2009-09-01

    Individual behavioral performance during learning is known to be affected by modulatory factors, such as stress and motivation, and by genetic predispositions that influence sensitivity to these factors. Despite numerous studies, no integrative framework is available that could predict how a given animal would perform a certain learning task in a realistic situation. We found that a simple reinforcement learning model can predict mouse behavior in a hole-box conditioning task if model metaparameters are dynamically controlled on the basis of the mouse's genotype and phenotype, stress conditions, recent performance feedback and pharmacological manipulations of adrenergic alpha-2 receptors. We find that stress and motivation affect behavioral performance by altering the exploration-exploitation balance in a genotype-dependent manner. Our results also provide computational insights into how an inverted U-shape relation between stress/arousal/norepinephrine levels and behavioral performance could be explained through changes in task performance accuracy and future reward discounting.

  5. Mechanisms of Depressor Effect of Norepinephrine Injected into Subnucleus Commissuriu of Nucleus Solitarius Tractus in Rabbits

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Yi; SONG Yuanlong; GAO Linlin; LUO Hongyan; LIU Shenghong; YI Zhengrong; LI Ai; HU Xinwu; LIU Changjin; TANG Ming; LIU Lieju

    2005-01-01

    Summary: This experiment aimed to investigate the effect of adrenergic system in the subnucleus commissuriu of nucleus solitrius tractus (CNTS) on renal nerve discharges. Norepinephrine (NE) was microinjected into the CNTS of rabbits and mean arterial blood pressure (MAP) and renal nerve discharges (FRND) were synchronously recorded. The results indicated that (1) microinjection of norepinephine into the CNTS of rabbit could significantly attenuate the frequency of renal nerve discharge, and at the same time decrease markedly the mean arterial pressure. (2) Microinjection of 0.3 nmol yohimbin into CNTS had no significant influence on FRND and MAP, but could attenuate and even reverse the effects of NE on FRND and MAP. These results suggest that microinjection of NE into CNTS may activate the alpha-adrenorecptor located in CNTS and secondarily produce a depressor effect by attenuating the activity of peripheral sympathetic nervous system.

  6. Blood ketone response to norepinephrine-induced free fatty acid in diabetes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blackard, W.G.; Omori, Yoshiaki

    1963-04-18

    During 90-minute norepinephrine infusions, blood free fatty acid and ketone responses of Japanese nondiabetic and diabetic subjects were determined. Nonobese diabetic subjects with and without fasting hyperglycemia demonstrated significantly greater blood ketone elevations than nondiabetics. An inverse correlation between obesity and blood ketone response to nonrepinephrine was observed in diabetics. This correlation could not be attributed to varying degrees of fasting hyperglycemia or free fatty acid elevation. Nonobese diabetics with mild fasting hyperglycemia (90 to 150 mg%) exhibited an unexpected greater increase in blood ketones than nonobese diabetics with moderate fasting hyperglycemia (150 to 250 mg%). Differences in free fatty acid elevations were not responsible for this apparent paradox. The magnitude of the hyperketonemic response, though dependent on free fatty elevation, seemed more sensitive to the degree of obesity and the fasting blood glucose level. Fractional ketone body measurements attributed the blood ketone elevations predominantly to ..beta..-hydroxybutyric acid increases. 43 references, 6 figures, 1 table.

  7. Norepinephrine and cardiovascular responses to maximal exercise in Parkinson's disease on and off medication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DiFrancisco-Donoghue, Joanne; Elokda, Ahmed; Lamberg, Eric M; Bono, Nancy; Werner, William G

    2009-09-15

    The aim of this experiment is to understand how Parkinson's disease (PD) medication affects the autonomic responses of individuals during an acute exercise stress test. Fourteen people with PD and fifteen healthy individuals age-matched between 50 and 80 years performed a modified Bruce protocol. Subjects with PD performed the test once off medication (PD-off) and then 1 week later on medication (PD-on). Heart rate (HR), blood pressure (BP), VO(2), and norepinephrine (NE) levels were taken at rest and at peak exercise. At peak exercise HR, BP, and NE values for the PD-on and PD-off group were all significantly lower than healthy controls, regardless of whether subjects were on their medication. Autonomic abnormalities during exercise in this population appear to be disease manifested and not impacted by medications used to treat PD. We can assume, both on and off medication, this population will show markedly lower BP, HR, and NE responses.

  8. Insulation for daydreams: a role for tonic norepinephrine in the facilitation of internally guided thought.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smallwood, Jonathan; Brown, Kevin S; Baird, Benjamin; Mrazek, Michael D; Franklin, Michael S; Schooler, Jonathan W

    2012-01-01

    Although consciousness can be brought to bear on both perceptual and internally generated information, little is known about how these different cognitive modes are coordinated. Here we show that between-participant variance in thoughts unrelated to the task being performed (known as task unrelated thought, TUT) is associated with longer response times (RT) when target presentation occurs during periods when baseline Pupil Diameter (PD) is increased. As behavioral interference due to high baseline PD can reflect increased tonic activity in the norepinephrine system (NE), these results might implicate high tonic NE activity in the facilitation of TUTs. Based on these findings, it is hypothesised that high tonic mode NE leads to a generalised de-amplification of task relevant information that prioritses internally generated thought and insulates it from the potentially disruptive events taking place in the external environment.

  9. Differential association of traits of fear and anxiety with norepinephrine- and dark-induced pupil reactivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, T L; Depue, R A

    1999-10-01

    The relation between fear and anxiety remains unclear, though psychometric data strongly suggest they are independent emotional systems. Because central norepinephrine (NE) projection systems are at the core of models of both fear and anxiety, the present experiment explored whether this independence extends to NE functioning. Two different aspects of NE functioning were assessed in a healthy young adult sample (N = 18): pupillary reactivity to (a) a specific NE alpha-1 agonist challenge to assess receptor reactivity and (b) a darkness challenge to assess contributions of central NE. Pupillary reactivity to the former was strongly and specifically related to A. Tellegen's (1982) Multidimensional Personality Questionnaire (MPQ) Harm Avoidance scale (i.e., trait fear), whereas the latter was strongly and specifically related to MPQ Negative Emotionality (i.e., trait anxiety). Implications for conceptualizing fear and anxiety as emotional systems are discussed.

  10. Expressions of cardiac sympathetic norepinephrine transporter and β1-adrenergic receptor decreased in aged rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    He LI; Xiao-qing MA; Fan YE; Jing ZHANG; Xin ZHOU; Zhi-hong WANG; Yu-ming LI; Guo-yuan ZHANG

    2009-01-01

    Evidence suggests that the deterioration of communication between the sympathetic nervous system and cardiovas-cular system always accompanies the aging of human and animals. Cardiac sympathetic norepinephrine (NE) transporter (NET) on presynaptic membrane is a predominant component to eliminate released NE in the synaptic cleff and maintains the sensitivity of the β-adrenergic receptor (β-AR). In the present study, we investigated NET and β1-AR mRNA levels and sympathetic nerve density in cardiac sympathetic ganglion and leff ventricular myocardium in 2- and 16-month-old rats with Northern blot analysis and immunohistochemistry. The expression levels of NET mRNA, NET protein and β1-AR mRNA in the ganglia or myocardia of 16-month-old rats were markedly reduced by 67%, 26%, and 43%, respectively, in comparison with those in 2-month-old rats. Our results also show that aging induces a strong decrease of the catecholaminergic nerve fiber density.

  11. Influence of calcium on the inotropic actions of hyperosmotic agents, norepinephrine, paired electrical stimulation, and treppe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willerson, J T; Crie, J S; Adcock, R C; Templeton, G H; Wildenthal, K

    1974-10-01

    To analyze the interaction of calcium ion concentration with hypertonic agents and with other inotropic interventions, isolated right ventricular cat papillary muscles were studied under isometric conditions in Krebs-Ringer bicarbonate solution. Extracellular calcium concentrations were varied between 2.5 and 11.0 mM. Maximal inotropic effects occurred between 5 and 8.0 mM calcium and further elevation to 11.0 mM was without additional influence. The effect of hyperosmotic sucrose and mannitol on papillary muscle performance was compared with that of 10(-6) M norepinephrine at calcium concentrations of 2.5 and 10.0 mM and with paired electrical stimulation in 10.0 mM calcium. Both norepinephrine and the hyperosmotic agents produced significant increases in developed tension and in the maximal rate of tension rise (dT/dt) in Krebs-Ringer in 2.5 and 4.0 mM calcium. In 10 mM calcium norepinephrine increased developed tension and dT/dt, but sucrose and mannitol caused no change or small reductions in both. Paired electrical stimulation, like hyperosmolality, caused no increase in dT/dt in 10 mM calcium. The presence of a potent pharmacological inhibitor of systolic calcium transfer across the cell membrane (D600, 10(-6) M) reduced developed tension and dT/dt by 76+/-2.7 and 74+/-2.0%, respectively, and prevented and in fact reversed the expected increase in dT/dt associated with an increase in rate of stimulation (treppe). However, hypertonic mannitol and paired pacing persisted in causing marked increases in developed tension and dT/dt even in the presence of D600, suggesting that their inotropic effects are not dependent on increased intracellular transfer of calcium during systole through cell membrane channels in which D600 acts as a competitive inhibitor. The results of these studies suggest that apparent functional saturation of intracellular calcium receptor sites eliminates any additional inotropic effect of hyperosmolality or paired pacing. The data are

  12. Importance of calcium in the inotropic effect of hyperosomotic agents, norepinephrine, paired electrical stimulation, and treppe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willerson, J T; Crie, J S; Adcock, R C; Templeton, G H; Wildenthal, K

    1975-01-01

    The data obtained from these studies demonstrate that the inotropic effect of hyperosmolar mannitol and sucrose and of paired electrical stimulation is critically influenced by extracellular calcium concentration. The inotropic effect of norepinephrine is not prevented by maximal functional extracellular calcium concentrations. Inhibition of systolic calcium flux at the cell membrane by D600 does not prevent the inotropic effect of hyperosmolar mannitol or of paired electrical stimulation but it does prevent the inotropic effect of hyperosmolar intropic effect of treppe. Thus, intracellular calcium regulation appears to be of major importance in the inotropic effect in isolated cardiac muscle of mannitol and paired pacing while systolic calcium flux at the cell membrane appears to be of major importance in the inotropic effect of treppe.

  13. Norepinephrine turnover in heart and spleen of 7-, 22-, and 34 C-acclimated hamsters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, S. B.; Musacchia, X. J.

    1976-01-01

    The relationship of norepinephrine (NE) concentration and endogenous turnover rates in both myocardial and spleen tissues in the golden hamster is examined as a function of chronic exposure to either high or low ambient temperatures. Changes in myocardial and spleen NE turnover values are discussed in terms of functional alterations in sympathetic nerve activity and the importance of such changes in temperature acclimation. It is found that acclimation of hamsters to 7 C for 7-10 weeks results in decreased myocardial NE concentration and an apparent increase in myocardial NE turnover. In contrast, exposure to 34 C for 6-8 weeks results in increased myocardial NE concentration and an apparent decrease in NE turnover in both myocardial and spleen tissues. The implication of altered NE synthesis is that sympathetic nerve activity is reduced with heat acclimation and is enhanced with cold acclimation.

  14. Dezocine exhibits antihypersensitivity activities in neuropathy through spinal μ-opioid receptor activation and norepinephrine reuptake inhibition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yong-Xiang; Mao, Xiao-Fang; Li, Teng-Fei; Gong, Nian; Zhang, Ma-Zhong

    2017-01-01

    Dezocine is the number one opioid painkiller prescribed and sold in China, occupying 44% of the nation’s opioid analgesics market today and far ahead of the gold-standard morphine. We discovered the mechanisms underlying dezocine antihypersensitivity activity and assessed their implications to antihypersensitivity tolerance. Dezocine, given subcutaneously in spinal nerve-ligated neuropathic rats, time- and dose-dependently produced mechanical antiallodynia and thermal antihyperalgesia, significantly increased ipsilateral spinal norepinephrine and serotonin levels, and induced less antiallodynic tolerance than morphine. Its mechanical antiallodynia was partially (40% or 60%) and completely (100%) attenuated by spinal μ-opioid receptor (MOR) antagonism or norepinephrine depletion/α2-adrenoceptor antagonism and combined antagonism of MORs and α2-adenoceptors, respectively. In contrast, antagonism of spinal κ-opioid receptors (KORs) and δ-opioid receptors (DORs) or depletion of spinal serotonin did not significantly alter dezocine antiallodynia. In addition, dezocine-delayed antiallodynic tolerance was accelerated by spinal norepinephrine depletion/α2-adenoceptor antagonism. Thus dezocine produces antihypersensitivity activity through spinal MOR activation and norepinephrine reuptake inhibition (NRI), but apparently not through spinal KOR and DOR activation, serotonin reuptake inhibition or other mechanisms. Our findings reclassify dezocine as the first analgesic of the recently proposed MOR-NRI, and reveal its potential as an alternative to as well as concurrent use with morphine in treating pain. PMID:28230181

  15. The norepinephrine transporter gene is associated with the retardation symptoms of major depressive disorder in the Han Chinese population

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xinrong Li; Ning Sun; Yong Xu; Yanfang Wang; Suping Li; Qiaorong Du; Juyi Peng; Jinxiu Luo; Kerang Zhang

    2012-01-01

    The norepinephrine transporter plays an important role in the pathophysiology and pharmacological treatment of major depressive disorder. Consequently, the norepinephrine transporter gene is an attractive candidate in major depressive disorder research. In the present study, we evaluated the depression symptoms of subjects with major depressive disorder, who were all from the North of China and of Han Chinese origin, using the Hamilton Depression Scale. We examined the relationship between two single nucleotide polymorphisms in the norepinephrine transporter, rs2242446 and rs5569, and the retardation symptoms of major depressive disorder using quantitative trait testing with the UNPHASED program. rs5569 was associated with depressed mood, and the GG genotype may be a risk factor for this; rs2242446 was associated with work and interest, and the TT genotype may be a risk factor for loss of interest. Our findings suggest that rs2242446 and rs5569 in the norepinephrine transporter gene are associated with the retardation symptoms of depression in the Han Chinese population.

  16. The norepinephrine transporter gene is associated with the retardation symptoms of major depressive disorder in the Han Chinese population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xinrong; Sun, Ning; Xu, Yong; Wang, Yanfang; Li, Suping; Du, Qiaorong; Peng, Juyi; Luo, Jinxiu; Zhang, Kerang

    2012-09-05

    The norepinephrine transporter plays an important role in the pathophysiology and pharmacological treatment of major depressive disorder. Consequently, the norepinephrine transporter gene is an attractive candidate in major depressive disorder research. In the present study, we evaluated the depression symptoms of subjects with major depressive disorder, who were all from the North of China and of Han Chinese origin, using the Hamilton Depression Scale. We examined the relationship between two single nucleotide polymorphisms in the norepinephrine transporter, rs2242446 and rs5569, and the retardation symptoms of major depressive disorder using quantitative trait testing with the UNPHASED program. rs5569 was associated with depressed mood, and the GG genotype may be a risk factor for this; rs2242446 was associated with work and interest, and the TT genotype may be a risk factor for loss of interest. Our findings suggest that rs2242446 and rs5569 in the norepinephrine transporter gene are associated with the retardation symptoms of depression in the Han Chinese population.

  17. Effects of low-dose dopamine on renal and systemic hemodynamics during incremental norepinephrine infusion in healthy volunteers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoogenberg, K; Smit, AJ; Girbes, ARJ

    1998-01-01

    Objectives: To assess the effects of low-dose dopamine on norepinephrine induced renal and systemic vasoconstriction in normotensive healthy subjects. Design: On separate days, either a low-dose dopamine (4 mu g/kg/min) or a placebo (5% glucose) infusion was added in a single, blinded, randomized or

  18. Sevoflurane and propofol anaesthesia differentially modulate the effects of epinephrine and norepinephrine on microcirculatory gastric mucosal oxygenation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schwarte, L. A.; Schwartges, I.; Schober, P.; Scheeren, T. W. L.; Fournell, A.; Picker, O.

    2010-01-01

    Adequate gastrointestinal mucosal oxygenation is regarded to be crucial in the prevention and therapy of critical illness. Epinephrine and norepinephrine are used for perioperative haemodynamic support. However, their per se effects on gastromucosal haemoglobin oxygenation (mu HbO(2)) remain unclear

  19. Norepinephrine release in the rat pineal gland : The input from the biological clock measured by in vivo microdialysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Drijfhout, WJ; vanderLinde, AG; Kooi, SE; Grol, CJ; Westerink, BHC

    1996-01-01

    The sympathetic innervation of the rat pineal gland was investigated, measuring the norepinephrine (NE) release by on-line in vivo microdialysis, NE was assayed using an HPLC method with precolumn derivatization and fluorescence detection. Its high sensitivity and reliability made it very suitable t

  20. Urinary norepinephrine and epinephrine excretion rates are heritable, but not associated with office and ambulatory blood pressure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bosker, Fokko J.; Wu, Ting; Gladkevich, Anatoliy; Ge, Dongliang; Treiber, Frank A.; Snieder, Harold

    2012-01-01

    Genetic and environmental contributions to urinary excretion rates of norepinephrine (UNEV) and epinephrine (UEV) and their association with blood pressure (BP) were investigated in 91 African American (mean age, 17.3 +/- 2.6 years) and 101 European American (mean age, 18.7 +/- 3.4 years) mono- and

  1. Sevoflurane and propofol anaesthesia differentially modulate the effects of epinephrine and norepinephrine on microcirculatory gastric mucosal oxygenation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schwarte, L. A.; Schwartges, I.; Schober, P.; Scheeren, T. W. L.; Fournell, A.; Picker, O.

    2010-01-01

    Background: Adequate gastrointestinal mucosal oxygenation is regarded to be crucial in the prevention and therapy of critical illness. Epinephrine and norepinephrine are used for perioperative haemodynamic support. However, their per se effects on gastromucosal haemoglobin oxygenation (mu HbO(2)) re

  2. Stress-related hormone norepinephrine induces interleukin-6 expression in GES-1 cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, R.; Lin, Q.; Gao, H.B.; Zhang, P. [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Cell Biology, School of Medicine, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai, China, Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Cell Biology, School of Medicine, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai (China)

    2014-02-17

    In the current literature, there is evidence that psychological factors can affect the incidence and progression of some cancers. Interleukin 6 (IL-6) is known to be elevated in individuals experiencing chronic stress and is also involved in oncogenesis and cancer progression. However, the precise mechanism of IL-6 induction by the stress-related hormone norepinephrine (NE) is not clear, and, furthermore, there are no reports about the effect of NE on IL-6 expression in gastric epithelial cells. In this study, we examined the effect of NE on IL-6 expression in immortalized human gastric epithelial cells (GES-1 cells). Using real-time PCR and enzyme-linked immunoassay, we demonstrated that NE can induce IL-6 mRNA and protein expression in GES-1 cells. The induction is through the β-adrenergic receptor-cAMP-protein kinase A pathway and mainly at the transcriptional level. Progressive 5′-deletions and site-directed mutagenesis of the parental construct show that, although activating-protein-1 (AP-1), cAMP-responsive element binding protein (CREB), CCAAT-enhancer binding protein-β (C/EBP-β), and nuclear factor κ-light-chain-enhancer of activated B cells (NF-κB) binding sites are all required in the basal transcription of IL-6, only AP-1 and CREB binding sites in the IL-6 promoter are required in NE-induced IL-6 expression. The results suggest that chronic stress may increase IL-6 secretion of human gastric epithelial cells, at least in part, by the stress-associated hormone norepinephrine, and provides basic data on stress and gastric cancer progression.

  3. Isolating the Norepinephrine Pathway Comparing Lithium in Bipolar Patients to SSRIs in Depressive Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andy R. Eugene

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The purpose of this investigatory neuroimaging analysis was done to better understand the pharmacodynamics of Lithium by isolating the norepinephrine pathway in the brain. To accomplish this, we compared patients with Bipolar Disorder treated with Lithium to patients diagnosed with Major Depression or Depressive Disorder who are treated with Selective Serotonin Reuptake Inhibitors (SSRIs.Methodology: We used Standardized Low Resolution Brain Electrotomography to calculate the whole brain, voxel-by-voxel, unpaired t-tests Statistical non-Parametric Maps. For our first electrophysiological neuroimaging investigation, we compared 46 patients (average age = 34 ± 16.5 diagnosed with Bipolar Affective Disorder to three patient groups all diagnosed with Major Depression or Depressive Episode. The first is with 48 patients diagnosed with Major Depression or Depressive Episode (average age = 49 ± 12.9, the second to 16 male depressive patients (average age = 45 ± 15.1, and the final comparison to 32 depressive females (average age = 50 ± 11.7.Results: The results of sLORETA three-dimensional statistical non-parametric maps illustrated that Lithium influenced an increase in neurotransmission in the right Superior TemporalGyrus (t=1.403, p=0.00780, Fusiform Gyrus (t=1.26, and Parahippocampal Gyrus (t=1.29.Moreover, an increased in neuronal function was found was also identified at the Cingulate Gyrus(t=1.06, p=0.01200.Conclusion: We are proposing a translational clinical biological marker for patients diagnosed with Bipolar Disorder to guide physicians during the course of Lithium therapy and have identified neuroanatomical structures influenced by norepinephrine.

  4. Analysis of epinephrine, norepinephrine, and dopamine in urine samples of hospital patients by micellar liquid chromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García Ferrer, Daniel; García García, Aurelio; Peris-Vicente, Juan; Gimeno-Adelantado, José Vicente; Esteve-Romero, Josep

    2015-12-01

    An analytical method based on micellar liquid chromatography was developed to determine the concentration of three catecholamines (epinephrine, norepinephrine, and dopamine) in urine. The detection of these compounds in urine can be useful to diagnose several diseases, related to stress and sympathoadrenal system dysfunction, using a non-invasive collection procedure. The sample pretreatment was a simple dilution in a micellar solution, filtration, and direct injection, thus avoiding time-consuming and tedious extraction steps. Therefore, there is no need to use an internal standard. The three catecholamines were eluted using a C18 column and a mobile phase of 0.055 M sodium dodecyl sulfate-1.5% methanol buffered at pH 3.8 running at 1.5 mL/min under isocratic mode in less than 25 min. The detection was performed by amperometry applying a constant potential of +0.5 V. The procedure was validated following the guidelines of the European Medicines Agency in terms of the following: calibration range (0.09-5 μg/mL), linearity (r(2) > 0.9995), limit of detection (0.02 μg/mL), within- and between-run accuracy (-6.5 to +8.4%) and precision (<10.2%), dilution integrity, matrix effect, robustness (<8.4), and stability. The obtained values were below those required by the guide. The method was rapid, easy-to-handle, eco-friendly, and safe and provides reliable quantitative data, and is thus useful for routine analysis. The procedure was applied to the analysis of epinephrine, norepinephrine, and dopamine in urine samples from patients of a local hospital.

  5. Norepinephrine and dopamine increase motility, biofilm formation and virulence of Vibrio harveyi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qian eYang

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Vibrio harveyi is one of the major pathogens of aquatic organisms, affecting both vertebrates and invertebrates, and causes important losses in the aquaculture industry. In order to develop novel methods to control disease caused by this pathogen, we need to obtain a better understanding of pathogenicity mechanisms. Sensing of catecholamines increases both growth and production of virulence-related factors in pathogens of terrestrial animals and humans. However, at this moment, knowledge on the impact of catecholamines on the virulence of pathogens of aquatic organisms is lacking. In the present study, we report that in V. harveyi, norepinephrine and dopamine increased growth in serum-supplemented medium, siderophore production, swimming motility and expression of genes involved in flagellar motility, biofilm formation, and exopolysaccharide production. Consistent with this, pretreatment of V. harveyi with catecholamines prior to inoculation into the rearing water resulted in significantly decreased survival of gnotobiotic brine shrimp larvae, when compared to larvae challenged with untreated V. harveyi. Further, norepinephrine-induced effects could be neutralized by α-adrenergic antagonists or by the bacterial catecholamine receptor antagonist LED209, but not by β-adrenergic or dopaminergic antagonists. Dopamine-induced effects could be neutralized by dopaminergic antagonists or LED209, but not by adrenergic antagonists. Together, our results indicate that catecholamine sensing increases the success of transmission of V. harveyi and that interfering with catecholamine sensing might be an interesting strategy to control vibriosis in aquaculture. We hypothesise that upon tissue and/or hemocyte damage during infection, pathogens come into contact with elevated catecholamine levels, and that this stimulates the expression of virulence factors that are required to colonize a new host.

  6. Improved preclinical cardiovascular therapeutic indices with long-term inhibition of norepinephrine reuptake using reboxetine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fossa, Anthony A., E-mail: anthony.fossa@icardiac.com [Department of Global Safety Pharmacology, Department of Pharmacokinetics, Dynamics and Metabolism, and Neuroscience, Pfizer Global Research and Development Eastern Point Road, Groton, CT 06340 (United States); Wisialowski, Todd A. [Department of Global Safety Pharmacology, Department of Pharmacokinetics, Dynamics and Metabolism, and Neuroscience, Pfizer Global Research and Development Eastern Point Road, Groton, CT 06340 (United States); Cremers, Thomas; Hart, Marieke van der [Brains On-Line B.V., University of Groningen, Antonius Deusinglaan 1, 9713 AV Groningen (Netherlands); Tseng, Elaine; Deng, Shibing; Rollema, Hans; Wang, Ellen Q. [Department of Global Safety Pharmacology, Department of Pharmacokinetics, Dynamics and Metabolism, and Neuroscience, Pfizer Global Research and Development Eastern Point Road, Groton, CT 06340 (United States)

    2012-11-01

    Norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors (NRIs) acutely increase norepinephrine (NE) levels, but therapeutic antidepressant activity is only observed after weeks of treatment because central NE levels progressively increase during continued drug exposure. Similarly, while NRIs acutely increase blood pressure (BP) and heart rate (HR) due to enhanced sympathetic neurotransmission, chronic treatment changes the responsiveness of the central noradrenergic system and suppresses these effects via autonomic regulation. To better understand the relationship between NE increases and cardiovascular safety, we investigated acute and chronic effects of the NRI reboxetine on central NE release and on BP and HR and electrical alternans, a measure of arrhythmia liability, in guinea pigs. NE release was assessed by microdialysis in medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) and hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus (PVN); BP and HR were measured by telemetry. Animals were treated for 28 days with 15 mg/kg/day of reboxetine or vehicle via an osmotic minipump and then challenged with acute intravenous doses of reboxetine. Animals chronically treated with reboxetine had 2-fold higher extracellular basal NE levels in mPFC and PVN compared to basal levels after chronic vehicle treatment. BP was significantly increased after the first day of treatment, and gradually returned to vehicle levels by day 21. These data indicate that chronic NRI treatment may lead to an increase in central NE levels and a concomitant reduction in BP based on exposure–response curves compared to vehicle treatment, suggesting a larger separation between preclinical estimates of efficacy vs. safety compared to acute NRI treatment. -- Highlights: ► Acute RBX produces blood pressure increases acutely that decrease with chronic RBX ► Chronic RBX increases brain NE levels, a preclinical surrogate of improved efficacy ► Short-term screening of NRI often underestimates the chronic therapeutic index ► Chronic cardiovascular

  7. Benzodiazepines: rat pinealocyte binding sites and augmentation of norepinephrine-stimulated N-acetyltransferase activity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matthew, E.; Parfitt, A.G.; Sugden, D.; Engelhardt, D.L.; Zimmerman, E.A.; Klein, D.C.

    1984-02-01

    Studies of (/sup 3/H)diazepam binding to intact rat pineal cells were carried out in tissue culture preparations. The binding was saturable, reversible and proportional to the number of cells used. Scatchard analysis resulted in a linear plot (Kd . 23 nM, maximum binding sites (Bmax) . 1.56 pmol/mg of protein for cells in monolayer culture; Kd . 7 nM, Bmax . 1.3 pmol/mg of protein for cells in suspension culture). Inhibition constants (Ki) for clonazepam (500 nM), flunitrazepam (38 nM) and Ro-5-4864 (5 nM) indicated that the binding sites were probably of the ''peripheral'' type. In addition, the effects of diazepam on norepinephrine-stimulated N-acetyltransferase (NAT) activity were studied in organ culture and dissociated cell culture. Diazepam (10-50 microM) both prolonged and increased the magnitude of the norepinephrine-induced increase in NAT activity but did not affect the initial rate of rise of enzyme activity. The effect was dose-dependent and was also seen with clonazepam, flunitrazepam and Ro-5-4864, but not with Ro-15-1788. Diazepam, by itself, at these concentrations, had no effect on NAT, but enzyme activity was increased by higher concentrations (0.1-1 mM). Although a relationship between the (/sup 3/H)diazepam binding sites described here and the effect of benzodiazepines on NAT cannot be established from these studies, the data suggest that the benzodiazepines may alter melatonin levels through their action on NAT.

  8. Desvenlafaxine: a new serotonin-norepinephrine reuptake inhibitor for the treatment of adults with major depressive disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perry, Richard; Cassagnol, Manouchkathe

    2009-06-01

    Desvenlafaxine succinate, a serotonin-norepinephrine reuptake inhibitor (SNRI), was approved by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) in February 2008 for the treatment of adult patients with major depressive disorder (MDD). Desvenlafaxine is the third SNRI approved by the FDA for this indication. This article reviews the available information for desvenlafaxine, focusing on its pharmacodynamics, pharmacokinetics, clinical efficacy, and safety profile. A comprehensive search of MEDLINE (1950-March 2009), International Pharmaceutical Abstracts (1970-March 2009), ISI Web of Knowledge (1996-March 2009), and EMBASE (1974-March 2009) was conducted using the terms desvenlafaxine, O-desmethylvenlafaxine, and Pristiq. Reference lists of articles were reviewed for other relevant publications. Abstracts of unpublished clinical studies presented at the American Psychiatric Association annual meetings (2004-2008) were included in the review; also included were data from the FDA and the European Medicines Agency Web sites. After oral administration, desvenlafaxine reaches T(max) in 7 to 8 hours and is slowly eliminated, with t((1/2)) values of 9 to 15 hours. With once-daily dosing, steady-state plasma concentrations are achieved within 4 to 5 days. Alternate-day dosing should be implemented in patients with severe renal impairment (creatinine clearance, desvenlafaxine have been conducted but only 8 were published. These 8 clinical studies evaluated oral desvenlafaxine 50 to 400 mg/d using randomized controlled trials for the treatment of MDD in adult outpatients. Significantly greater efficacy in the reduction of depressive symptoms was found in patients taking desvenlafaxine 50 mg/d (P 50 mg/d. Preliminary data support desvenlafaxine's efficacy and tolerability in the treatment of menopause-associated vasomotor symptoms. Desvenlafaxine was generally well tolerated in clinical trials; the most common adverse events were nausea, suicidal ideation, and changes in blood

  9. Animal models of depression in dopamine, serotonin, and norepinephrine transporter knockout mice: prominent effects of dopamine transporter deletions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perona, Maria T G; Waters, Shonna; Hall, Frank Scott; Sora, Ichiro; Lesch, Klaus-Peter; Murphy, Dennis L; Caron, Marc; Uhl, George R

    2008-09-01

    Antidepressant drugs produce therapeutic actions and many of their side effects via blockade of the plasma membrane transporters for serotonin (SERT/SLC6A2), norepinephrine (NET/SLC6A1), and dopamine (DAT/SLC6A3). Many antidepressants block several of these transporters; some are more selective. Mouse gene knockouts of these transporters provide interesting models for possible effects of chronic antidepressant treatments. To examine the role of monoamine transporters in models of depression DAT, NET, and SERT knockout (KO) mice and wild-type littermates were studied in the forced swim test (FST), the tail suspension test, and for sucrose consumption. To dissociate general activity from potential antidepressant effects three types of behavior were assessed in the FST: immobility, climbing, and swimming. In confirmation of earlier reports, both DAT KO and NET KO mice exhibited less immobility than wild-type littermates whereas SERT KO mice did not. Effects of DAT deletion were not simply because of hyperactivity, as decreased immobility was observed in DAT+/- mice that were not hyperactive as well as in DAT-/- mice that displayed profound hyperactivity. Climbing was increased, whereas swimming was almost eliminated in DAT-/- mice, and a modest but similar effect was seen in NET KO mice, which showed a modest decrease in locomotor activity. Combined increases in climbing and decreases in immobility are characteristic of FST results in antidepressant animal models, whereas selective effects on swimming are associated with the effects of stimulant drugs. Therefore, an effect on climbing is thought to more specifically reflect antidepressant effects, as has been observed in several other proposed animal models of reduced depressive phenotypes. A similar profile was observed in the tail suspension test, where DAT, NET, and SERT knockouts were all found to reduce immobility, but much greater effects were observed in DAT KO mice. However, to further determine whether these

  10. Pentobarbital effects on plasma catecholamines: temperature, heart rate, and blood pressure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baum, D; Halter, J B; Taborsky, G J; Porte, D

    1985-01-01

    The effects of intravenous pentobarbital were studied in dogs. Plasma pentobarbital concentrations were inversely related to epinephrine and norepinephrine concentrations. Plasma catecholamines appeared fully suppressed at pentobarbital levels greater than 25-30 micrograms/ml. Furthermore, pentobarbital levels were negatively related to rectal temperature, heart rate, and mean blood pressure. The methods of pentobarbital administration influenced plasma pentobarbital as well as epinephrine and norepinephrine levels, temperature, heart rate, and blood pressure. These observations suggest the possibility that pentobarbital inhibits the sympathetic nervous system, which in turn may affect temperature, heart rate, and blood pressure. Because pentobarbital anesthesia affects plasma catecholamine concentrations, the regimen used in animal models requires consideration when interpreting data potentially influenced by the sympathetic nervous system.

  11. Renal sympathetic denervation for treatment of patients with heart failure: summary of the available evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nammas, Wail; Koistinen, Juhani; Paana, Tuomas; Karjalainen, Pasi P

    2017-02-10

    Heart failure syndrome results from compensatory mechanisms that operate to restore - back to normal - the systemic perfusion pressure. Sympathetic overactivity plays a pivotal role in heart failure; norepinephrine contributes to maintenance of the systemic blood pressure and increasing preload. Cardiac norepinephrine spillover increases in patients with heart failure; norepinephrine exerts direct toxicity on cardiac myocytes resulting in a decrease of synthetic activity and/or viability. Importantly, cardiac norepinephrine spillover is a powerful predictor of mortality in patients with moderate to severe HF. This provided the rationale for trials that demonstrated survival benefit associated with the use of beta adrenergic blockers in heart failure with reduced ejection fraction. Nevertheless, the MOXCON trial demonstrated that rapid uptitration of moxonidine (inhibitor of central sympathetic outflow) in patients with heart failure was associated with excess mortality and morbidity, despite reduction of plasma norepinephrine. Interestingly, renal norepinephrine spillover was the only independent predictor of adverse outcome in patients with heart failure, in multivariable analysis. Recently, renal sympathetic denervation has emerged as a novel approach for control of blood pressure in patients with treatment-resistant hypertension. This article summarizes the available evidence for the effect of renal sympathetic denervation in the setting of heart failure. Key messages Experimental studies supported a beneficial effect of renal sympathetic denervation in heart failure with reduced ejection fraction. Clinical studies demonstrated improvement of symptoms, and left ventricular function. In heart failure and preserved ejection fraction, renal sympathetic denervation is associated with improvement of surrogate endpoints.

  12. Effects of surgical stress and insulin on cardiovascular function and norepinephrine kinetics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, N J; Hilsted, J; Hegedüs, Laszlo

    1984-01-01

    on cardiovascular function and plasma NE kinetics that are unrelated to the counterregulatory response to decrements in plasma glucose concentration. Insulin may both induce antagonism to the action of NE and increase the release of NE from sympathetic nerves. Intravenous insulin decreases the plasma volume...

  13. A Unified Framework for the Infection Dynamics of Zoonotic Spillover and Spread

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cunningham, Andrew A.; Fichet-Calvet, Elisabeth; Garry, Robert F.; Grant, Donald S.; Leach, Melissa; Moses, Lina M.; Nichols, Gordon; Schieffelin, John S.; Shaffer, Jeffrey G.; Webb, Colleen T.; Wood, James L. N.

    2016-01-01

    A considerable amount of disease is transmitted from animals to humans and many of these zoonoses are neglected tropical diseases. As outbreaks of SARS, avian influenza and Ebola have demonstrated, however, zoonotic diseases are serious threats to global public health and are not just problems confined to remote regions. There are two fundamental, and poorly studied, stages of zoonotic disease emergence: ‘spillover’, i.e. transmission of pathogens from animals to humans, and ‘stuttering transmission’, i.e. when limited human-to-human infections occur, leading to self-limiting chains of transmission. We developed a transparent, theoretical framework, based on a generalization of Poisson processes with memory of past human infections, that unifies these stages. Once we have quantified pathogen dynamics in the reservoir, with some knowledge of the mechanism of contact, the approach provides a tool to estimate the likelihood of spillover events. Comparisons with independent agent-based models demonstrates the ability of the framework to correctly estimate the relative contributions of human-to-human vs animal transmission. As an illustrative example, we applied our model to Lassa fever, a rodent-borne, viral haemorrhagic disease common in West Africa, for which data on human outbreaks were available. The approach developed here is general and applicable to a range of zoonoses. This kind of methodology is of crucial importance for the scientific, medical and public health communities working at the interface between animal and human diseases to assess the risk associated with the disease and to plan intervention and appropriate control measures. The Lassa case study revealed important knowledge gaps, and opportunities, arising from limited knowledge of the temporal patterns in reporting, abundance of and infection prevalence in, the host reservoir. PMID:27588425

  14. Chlamydial infections in wildlife-conservation threats and/or reservoirs of 'spill-over' infections?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burnard, Delaney; Polkinghorne, Adam

    2016-11-30

    Members of the order Chlamydiales are biphasic intracellular pathogens known to cause disease in both humans and animals. As we learn more about the genetic diversity of this group of pathogens, evidence is growing that these bacteria infect a broader range of animal hosts than previously thought. Over 400 host species are now documented globally with the majority of these being wild animals. Given the impact of chlamydial infections on humans and domesticated animals, the identification of members of the order Chlamydiales in wildlife raises significant questions over a) their impact on animal health and b) the relationships to those strains also found in humans and domestic animals. In some species such as the iconic marsupial, the koala, the conservation impact is known with chlamydial infections associated with debilitating disease, however, in general, little is known about the pathogenic potential of Chlamydiae infecting most wildlife hosts. Accumulating evidence suggests contact with wild animals is a risk factor for infections in domestic animals and/or humans. Beyond the well-recognised zoonotic pathogen, Chlamydia psittaci, a range of studies have now reported traditional pathogens in the family Chlamydiaceae such as Chlamydia pecorum, Chlamydia suis, Chlamydia pneumoniae and Chlamydia abortus in wild animals. The spectre of cross-host transmission 'spill-over' and 'spill-back' in the epidemiology of infections is of potential concern, however, comprehensive epidemiological studies are lacking for most of these. Accurate evaluation of the significance of chlamydial infections in wildlife is otherwise hampered by i) the cross-sectional nature of most impact studies, ii) a lack of standardised diagnostic approaches, iii) limited study sizes, and iv) biases associated with opportunistic sampling.

  15. Brucella melitensis in France: persistence in wildlife and probable spillover from Alpine ibex to domestic animals.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Virginie Mick

    Full Text Available Bovine brucellosis is a major zoonosis, mainly caused by Brucella abortus, more rarely by Brucella melitensis. France has been bovine brucellosis officially-free since 2005 with no cases reported in domestic/wild ruminants since 2003. In 2012, bovine and autochthonous human cases due to B. melitensis biovar 3 (Bmel3 occurred in the French Alps. Epidemiological investigations implemented in wild and domestic ruminants evidenced a high seroprevalence (>45% in Alpine ibex (Capra ibex; no cases were disclosed in other domestic or wild ruminants, except for one isolated case in a chamois (Rupicapra rupicapra. These results raised the question of a possible persistence/emergence of Brucella in wildlife. The purpose of this study was to assess genetic relationships among the Bmel3 strains historically isolated in humans, domestic and wild ruminants in Southeastern France, over two decades, by the MLVA-panel2B assay, and to propose a possible explanation for the origin of the recent bovine and human infections. Indeed, this genotyping strategy proved to be efficient for this microepidemiological investigation using an interpretation cut-off established for a fine-scale setting. The isolates, from the 2012 domestic/human outbreak harbored an identical genotype, confirming a recent and direct contamination from cattle to human. Interestingly, they clustered not only with isolates from wildlife in 2012, but also with local historical domestic isolates, in particular with the 1999 last bovine case in the same massif. Altogether, our results suggest that the recent bovine outbreak could have originated from the Alpine ibex population. This is the first report of a B. melitensis spillover from wildlife to domestic ruminants and the sustainability of the infection in Alpine ibex. However, this wild population, reintroduced in the 1970s in an almost closed massif, might be considered as a semi-domestic free-ranging herd. Anthropogenic factors could therefore

  16. Health-promoting behaviors through pregnancy, maternity leave, and return to work: effects of role spillover and other correlates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grace, Sherry L; Williams, Alysha; Stewart, Donna E; Franche, Renée-Louise

    2006-01-01

    Women's health-promoting behavior changes and their correlates across the transition to motherhood and return to work are insufficiently understood. The purpose of this study was to describe and compare women's health-promoting behaviors, particularly physical activity (PA), across these transitions. A prospective, observational design was employed to assess 243 female healthcare workers from 3 sites with regard to health-promoting behaviors, and their demographic (e.g., age, parity) and psychosocial (i.e., work-family role spillover) correlates. Forty-two participants were recruited while pregnant and re-assessed during maternity leave and upon return to work, and compared to 201 non-pregnant participants. No significant changes in health-promoting behaviors were observed from pregnancy through the postpartum. Pregnant participants reported better nutrition than comparison participants (p=.001), and were more likely to check their pulse when exercising (p=.004). During pregnancy, health-promoting behaviors were related to parental status, with first-time mothers engaging in more positive behaviors. Correlates of PA during maternity leave and return to work included family income and exercise history. Positive family-to-work spillover was significantly greater among pregnant women than among comparison participants (p<.001), and positive work-to-family spillover was related to greater PA upon return to work (p<.01). This study reveals little variability in health-promoting behaviors from the prenatal to the postpartum period. Both demographic and psychosocial factors have effects on health-promoting behaviors, and we must look to these correlates to promote increased PA.

  17. Quantum-Spillover Enhanced Surface-Plasmonic Absorption at the Interface of Silver and High-Index Dielectrics

    CERN Document Server

    Jin, Dafei; Neuhauser, Daniel; von Cube, Felix; Yang, Yingyi; Sachan, Ritesh; Luk, Ting S; Bell, David C; Fang, Nicholas X

    2015-01-01

    We demonstrate an unexpectedly strong surface-plasmonic absorption at the interface of silver and high-index dielectrics. We show, from first-principles, that due to the lowered metal-to-dielectric work-function at such interface, conduction electrons display a drastic quantum spillover, causing the interfacial electron-hole pair production to become the predominant dissipation channel. The theoretical prediction is supported experimentally by the electron-energy loss spectroscopy and ultraviolet-visible spectrophotometry. This finding can be of fundamental importance in understanding and designing quantum nano-plasmonic devices, which utilize metal-high-index contacts.

  18. Sympathetic nervous activity and renal and systemic hemodynamics in cirrhosis: plasma norepinephrine concentration, hepatic extraction, and renal release

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ring-Larsen, H; Hesse, B; Henriksen, Jens Henrik Sahl

    1982-01-01

    Systemic and renal neurovascular reactivity was investigated in eight patients with cirrhosis and in eight control subjects with fatty liver during postural changes. In the supine position, mean renal blood flow averaged 1.51 and 2.97 ml per gm per min in patients and controls, respectively (p less...... 60 degrees head-up tilt, the increase in NE was similar in both groups. In another 10 patients with cirrhosis in recumbency, the splanchnic arterial-hepatic venous extraction of NE averaged 0.43 (p less than 0.01), and the hepatic clearance of NE averaged 315 ml per min which is of the same order...... be responsible for renal vasoconstriction in these patients. However, systemic and renal neurovascular reactivity seems to be maintained even at an advanced stage of the disease....

  19. Sex differences in hypothalamic-mediated tonic norepinephrine release for thermal hyperalgesia in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, M; Banerjee, T; Jeong, Y; Holden, J E

    2016-06-02

    Neuropathic pain is treated using serotonin norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors with mixed results. Pain facilitation mediated by α1-adrenoceptors may be involved, but whether norepinephrine (NE) is tonically released is unclear. The aim of this study was to determine whether NE is tonically released from A7 cells following chronic constriction injury (CCI), and if the lateral hypothalamus (LH) plays a role in this release in male and female rats with nociceptive and neuropathic pain types. Neuropathic groups received left CCI while nociceptive groups remained naïve to injury. Fourteen days later, rats were given intrathecal infusion of either the α1-adrenoceptor antagonist WB4101, the α2-adrenoceptor antagonist yohimbine (74 μg), or normal saline for control. Paw withdrawal latency (PWL) from a thermal stimulus was measured. The generalized estimated equation method was used for statistical analysis. Nociceptive rats given WB4101 had a PWL significantly longer than saline control (7.89 ± 0.63 vs. 5.87 ± 0.52 s), while the PWL of neuropathic rats given WB4101 was 13.20 ± 0.52 s compared to 6.78 ± 0.52 s for the saline control rats. Yohimbine had no significant effect. Microinjection of cobalt chloride (CoCl) in the A7 catecholamine cell group to prevent synaptic transmission blocked the effect of WB4101 in all groups, supporting the notion that spinally descending A7 cells tonically release NE that contributes to α1-mediated nociceptive facilitation. Microinjection of CoCl into the left LH blocked the effect of WB4101 in nociceptive and neuropathic male rats, but had no effect in female rats of either pain type, suggesting differential innervation. These findings indicate that tonic release of NE acts at pronociceptive α1-adrenoceptors, that this effect is greater in rats with nerve damage, and that, while NE comes primarily from the A7 cell group, LH innervation of the A7 cell group is different between the sexes.

  20. Response of Vibrio cholerae to the Catecholamine Hormones Epinephrine and Norepinephrine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halang, Petra; Toulouse, Charlotte; Geißel, Bernadette; Michel, Bernd; Flauger, Birgit; Müller, Manuel; Voegele, Ralf T; Stefanski, Volker; Steuber, Julia

    2015-12-01

    In Escherichia coli or Salmonella enterica, the stress-associated mammalian hormones epinephrine (E) and norepinephrine (NE) trigger a signaling cascade by interacting with the QseC sensor protein. Here we show that Vibrio cholerae, the causative agent of cholera, exhibits a specific response to E and NE. These catecholates (0.1 mM) enhanced the growth and swimming motility of V. cholerae strain O395 on soft agar in a medium containing calf serum, which simulated the environment within the host. During growth, the hormones were converted to degradation products, including adrenochrome formed by autooxidation with O2 or superoxide. In E. coli, the QseC sensor kinase, which detects the autoinducer AI-3, also senses E or NE. The genome of V. cholerae O395 comprises an open reading frame coding for a putative protein with 29% identity to E. coli QseC. Quantitative reverse transcriptase PCR (qRT-PCR) experiments revealed increased transcript levels of the qseC-like gene and of pomB, a gene encoding a structural component of the flagellar motor complex, under the influence of E or NE. Phentolamine blocks the response of E. coli QseC to E or NE. A V. cholerae mutant devoid of the qseC-like gene retained the phentolamine-sensitive motility in the presence of E, whereas NE-stimulated motility was no longer inhibited by phentolamine. Our study demonstrates that V. cholerae senses the stress hormones E and NE. A sensor related to the histidine kinase QseC from E. coli is identified and is proposed to participate in the sensing of NE. Vibrio cholerae is a Gram-negative bacterium that may cause cholera, a severe illness with high mortality due to acute dehydration caused by diarrhea and vomiting. Pathogenic V. cholerae strains possess virulence factors like the cholera toxin (CTX) and the toxin-coregulated pilus (TCP) produced in response to signals provided by the host. In pathogenic enterobacteria, the stress-associated hormones epinephrine (E) and norepinephrine (NE) of the

  1. Plasma prolactin, renin and catecholamines in young normotensive and borderline hypertensive subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saito, I; Takeshita, E; Saruta, T; Nagano, S; Sekihara, T

    1984-02-01

    It has been reported that patients with essential hypertension have high plasma prolactin levels and suggested that reduced central dopaminergic activity may be a factor in the pathogenesis of essential hypertension. This study examines the influence of posture on plasma prolactin, plasma catecholamines, plasma renin activity, blood pressure and heart rate in 24 patients with borderline hypertension (age 19 +/- 1 years) and 20 normotensive subjects matched for age and body mass index. Supine plasma prolactin levels were similar in both groups [borderline hypertension, 11.3 +/- 0.7 ng/ml; normotensive, 10.7 +/- 0.8 ng/ml (mean +/- s.e.m.)] and no increase in plasma prolactin was observed after 10 min standing in both groups. Normotensive and borderline hypertensive subjects had similar values for supine and upright plasma renin activity and plasma norepinephrine. There were no significant correlations between supine plasma prolactin and supine blood pressure, supine plasma renin activity or plasma norepinephrine when data from both normotensive and borderline hypertensive subjects were combined. These results may provide indirect evidence against the occurrence of reduced central dopaminergic activity in borderline hypertension.

  2. B and C types natriuretic peptides modify norepinephrine uptake and release in the rat adrenal medulla.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vatta, M S; Presas, M F; Bianciotti, L G; Rodriguez-Fermepin, M; Ambros, R; Fernandez, B E

    1997-01-01

    We have previously reported that atrial natriuretic factor (ANF) modulates adrenomedullar norepinephrine (NE) metabolism. On this basis, the aim of the present work was to study the effects of B and C types natriuretic peptides (BNP and CNP) on the uptake, intracellular distribution and release of 3H-NE. Experiments were carried out in rat adrenal medulla slices incubated "in vitro." Results showed that 100 nM of both, CNP and BNP, enhanced total and neuronal NE uptake. Both peptides (100 nM) caused a rapid increase in NE uptake during the first minute, which was sustained for 60 min. NE intracellular distribution was only modified by CNP (100 nM), which increased the granular fraction and decreased the cytosolic pool. On the other hand, spontaneous as well as evoked (KCl) NE release, was decreased by BNP and CNP (50 and 100 nM for spontaneous release and 1, 10, 50 and 100 nM for evoked output). The present results suggest that BNP and CNP may regulate catecholamine secretion and modulate adrenomedullary biological actions mediated by catecholamines, such as blood arterial pressure, smooth muscle tone, and metabolic activities.

  3. Impact of methylene blue in addition to norepinephrine on the intestinal microcirculation in experimental septic shock.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nantais, Jordan; Dumbarton, Tristan C; Farah, Nizam; Maxan, Alexander; Zhou, Juan; Minor, Samuel; Lehmann, Christian

    2014-01-01

    Methylene blue (MB) has been used with some success as a treatment for the vasoplegia of vasopressor-refractory septic shock. The putative mechanism of action of MB is the inhibition of endothelial nitric oxide within the microvasculature and improved responsiveness to endogenous catecholamines (norepinephrine (NE)). However, to date, no study has demonstrated the microcirculatory effect of methylene blue in septic shock. The objective of this randomized, controlled, animal study was to show, in an experimentally-induced, septic shock model in rats, the effects of MB and NE on global hemodynamics and the microcirculation. Mean arterial pressure (MAP) was drastically reduced following bacterial endotoxin (lipopolysaccharide, LPS) administration in animals not receiving vasopressors. Only the combination of NE + MB restored MAP to control levels by the end of the three hour experiment. Intravital microscopy of the microcirculation was performed in the terminal ileum in order to examine functional capillary density in intestinal muscle layers and the mucosa, as well as leukocyte activation in venules (rolling, adhesion to the endothelium). Untreated LPS animals showed a significant increase in leukocyte adhesion and a decrease in capillary perfusion in the intestinal microcirculation. In groups receiving NE or NE+MB, we observed a significant decrease in leukocyte adhesion and improved functional capillary density, indicating that microvasculature function was improved. This study suggests that methylene blue may be able to improve hemodynamics while preserving microvascular function in septic shock.

  4. Recurrent hypoglycemia increases anxiety and amygdala norepinephrine release during subsequent hypoglycemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ewan eMcNay

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Recurrent hypoglycemia (RH is a common and debilitating side effect of therapy in patients with both type 1 and, increasingly, type 2 diabetes. Previous studies in rats have shown marked effects of RH on subsequent hippocampal behavioral, metabolic, and synaptic processes. In addition to impaired memory, patients experiencing RH report alterations in cognitive processes that include mood and anxiety, suggesting that RH may also affect amygdala function. We tested the impact of RH on amygdala function using an elevated plus-maze test of anxiety together with in vivo amygdala microdialysis for norepinephrine (NEp, a widely used marker of basolateral amygdala cognitive processes. In contrast to findings in the hippocampus and pre-frontal cortex, neither RH nor acute hypoglycemia alone significantly affected plus-maze performance or NEp release. However, animals tested when hypoglycemic who had previously experienced RH had elevated amygdala NEp during plus-maze testing, accompanied by increased anxiety (i.e. less time spent in the open arms of the plus-maze. The results show that RH has widespread effects on subsequent brain function, which vary by neural system.

  5. Electrochemistry of norepinephrine on carbon-coated nickel magnetic nanoparticles modified electrode and analytical applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bian, Chunli; Zeng, Qingxiang; Xiong, Huayu; Zhang, Xiuhua; Wang, Shengfu

    2010-08-01

    A carbon-coated nickel magnetic nanoparticles modified glassy carbon electrode (C-Ni/GCE) was fabricated. The carbon-coated nickel magnetic nanoparticles were characterized with transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The electrochemical behaviors of norepinephrine (NE) were investigated on the modified electrode by cyclic voltammetry (CV) and differential pulse voltammetry (DPV). The carbon-coated nickel magnetic nanoparticles showed excellent electrocatalytic activity for the electrochemical redox of NE. NE exhibited two couples of well-defined redox peaks on C-Ni/GCE over the potential range from -0.4 to 0.8V in phosphate buffer solution (PBS) (pH=7.0). The redox mechanism for NE was proposed. DPV response of NE on the C-Ni/GCE showed that the catalytic oxidative peak current was linear with the square root concentration of NE in the range of 2.0 x 10(-7) to 8.0 x 10(-5)M, with a detection limit of 6.0 x 10(-8)M. The C-Ni/GCE showed good sensitivity, selectivity and stability for the determination of NE.

  6. Mutations in the dopamine beta-hydroxylase gene are associated with human norepinephrine deficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Chun-Hyung; Zabetian, Cyrus P.; Cubells, Joseph F.; Cho, Sonhae; Biaggioni, Italo; Cohen, Bruce M.; Robertson, David; Kim, Kwang-Soo

    2002-01-01

    Norepinephrine (NE), a key neurotransmitter of the central and peripheral nervous systems, is synthesized by dopamine beta-hydroxylase (DBH) that catalyzes oxidation of dopamine (DA) to NE. NE deficiency is a congenital disorder of unknown etiology, in which affected patients suffer profound autonomic failure. Biochemical features of the syndrome include undetectable tissue and circulating levels of NE and epinephrine, elevated levels of DA, and undetectable levels of DBH. Here, we report identification of seven novel variants including four potentially pathogenic mutations in the human DBH gene (OMIM 223360) from analysis of two unrelated patients and their families. Both patients are compound heterozygotes for variants affecting expression of DBH protein. Each carries one copy of a T-->C transversion in the splice donor site of DBH intron 1, creating a premature stop codon. In patient 1, there is a missense mutation in DBH exon 2. Patient 2 carries missense mutations in exons 1 and 6 residing in cis. We propose that NE deficiency is an autosomal recessive disorder resulting from heterogeneous molecular lesions at DBH. Copyright 2002 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  7. Norepinephrine versus dopamine and their interaction in modulating synaptic function in the prefrontal cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xing, Bo; Li, Yan-Chun; Gao, Wen-Jun

    2016-06-15

    Among the neuromodulators that regulate prefrontal cortical circuit function, the catecholamine transmitters norepinephrine (NE) and dopamine (DA) stand out as powerful players in working memory and attention. Perturbation of either NE or DA signaling is implicated in the pathogenesis of several neuropsychiatric disorders, including attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), schizophrenia, and drug addiction. Although the precise mechanisms employed by NE and DA to cooperatively control prefrontal functions are not fully understood, emerging research indicates that both transmitters regulate electrical and biochemical aspects of neuronal function by modulating convergent ionic and synaptic signaling in the prefrontal cortex (PFC). This review summarizes previous studies that investigated the effects of both NE and DA on excitatory and inhibitory transmissions in the prefrontal cortical circuitry. Specifically, we focus on the functional interaction between NE and DA in prefrontal cortical local circuitry, synaptic integration, signaling pathways, and receptor properties. Although it is clear that both NE and DA innervate the PFC extensively and modulate synaptic function by activating distinctly different receptor subtypes and signaling pathways, it remains unclear how these two systems coordinate their actions to optimize PFC function for appropriate behavior. Throughout this review, we provide perspectives and highlight several critical topics for future studies. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled SI: Noradrenergic System. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Boosting Norepinephrine Transmission Triggers Flexible Reconfiguration of Brain Networks at Rest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guedj, Carole; Monfardini, Elisabetta; Reynaud, Amélie J; Farnè, Alessandro; Meunier, Martine; Hadj-Bouziane, Fadila

    2016-09-06

    The locus coeruleus-norepinephrine (LC-NE) system is thought to act as a reset signal allowing brain network reorganization in response to salient information in the environment. However, no direct evidence of NE-dependent whole-brain reorganization has ever been described. We used resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging in monkeys to investigate the impact of NE-reuptake inhibition on whole-brain connectivity patterns. We found that boosting NE transmission changes functional connectivity between and within resting-state networks. It modulated the functional connectivity pattern of a brainstem network including the LC region and interactions between associative and sensory-motor networks as well as within sensory-motor networks. Among the observed changes, those involving the fronto-parietal attention network exhibited a unique pattern of uncoupling with other sensory-motor networks and correlation switching from negative to positive with the brainstem network that included the LC nucleus. These findings provide the first empirical evidence of NE-dependent large-scale brain network reorganization and further demonstrate that the fronto-parietal attention network represents a central feature within this reorganization. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  9. Leptin modulates norepinephrine-mediated melatonin synthesis in cultured rat pineal gland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peliciari-Garcia, Rodrigo Antonio; Andrade-Silva, Jéssica; Cipolla-Neto, José; Carvalho, Carla Roberta de Oliveira

    2013-01-01

    Pineal melatonin synthesis can be modulated by many peptides, including insulin. Because melatonin appears to alter leptin synthesis, in this work we aimed to investigate whether leptin would have a role on norepinephrine- (NE-)mediated melatonin synthesis in cultured rat pineal glands. According to our data, cultured rat pineal glands express leptin receptor isoform b (Ob-Rb). Pineal expression of Ob-Rb mRNA was also observed in vivo. Administration of leptin (1 nM) associated with NE ( 1 µM) reduced melatonin content as well as arylalkylamine-N-acetyl transferase (AANAT) activity and expression in cultured pineal glands. Leptin treatment per se induced the expression of STAT3 in cultured pineal glands, but STAT3 does not participate in the leptin modulation of NE-mediated pineal melatonin synthesis. In addition, the expression of inducible cAMP early repressor (ICER) was further induced by leptin challenge when associated with NE. In conclusion, leptin inhibition of pineal melatonin synthesis appears to be mediated by a reduction in AANAT activity and expression as well as by increased expression of Icer mRNA. Peptidergic signaling within the pineal gland appears to be one of the most important signals which modulates melatonin synthesis; leptin, as a member of this system, is not an exception.

  10. Leptin Modulates Norepinephrine-Mediated Melatonin Synthesis in Cultured Rat Pineal Gland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodrigo Antonio Peliciari-Garcia

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Pineal melatonin synthesis can be modulated by many peptides, including insulin. Because melatonin appears to alter leptin synthesis, in this work we aimed to investigate whether leptin would have a role on norepinephrine- (NE-mediated melatonin synthesis in cultured rat pineal glands. According to our data, cultured rat pineal glands express leptin receptor isoform b (Ob-Rb. Pineal expression of Ob-Rb mRNA was also observed in vivo. Administration of leptin (1 nM associated with NE (1 µM reduced melatonin content as well as arylalkylamine-N-acetyl transferase (AANAT activity and expression in cultured pineal glands. Leptin treatment per se induced the expression of STAT3 in cultured pineal glands, but STAT3 does not participate in the leptin modulation of NE-mediated pineal melatonin synthesis. In addition, the expression of inducible cAMP early repressor (ICER was further induced by leptin challenge when associated with NE. In conclusion, leptin inhibition of pineal melatonin synthesis appears to be mediated by a reduction in AANAT activity and expression as well as by increased expression of Icer mRNA. Peptidergic signaling within the pineal gland appears to be one of the most important signals which modulates melatonin synthesis; leptin, as a member of this system, is not an exception.

  11. Effect of Uptake-one inhibitors on the uptake of norepinephrine and metaiodobenzylguanidine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tobes, M.C.; Jaques, S. Jr.; Wieland, D.M.; Sisson, J.C.

    1985-08-01

    The mechanisms underlying the uptake of the radiopharmaceutical metaiodobenzylguanidine (MIBG) and the catecholamine norepinephrine (NE) were studied using cultured bovine adrenomedullary cells as an in vitro model system. Sodium-dependent and sodium-independent uptake systems have been identified and characterized for both MIBG and NE. The sodium-dependent uptake of Ne and MIBG was inhibited by the selective Uptake-one inhibitors, desmethylimipramine (DMI) and cocaine, whereas the sodium-independent uptake for NE and MIBG was much less sensitive to inhibition by these agents. The sodium-dependent uptake system fulfills the criteria for the neuronal Uptake-one system, and the sodium-independent uptake system fulfills the criteria for a passive diffusion mechanism. Arterial concentrations proximal to the dog adrenal were very small suggesting that the sodium-dependent (Uptake-one) system is predominant in vivo. Consistent with the in vitro observations, the in vivo uptake of MIBG and NE into dog adrenal medullae was effectively blocked by pretreatment with DMI or cocaine. Therefore, iodine-131 MIBG scintigraphy of the adrenal appears to reflect uptake by way of the Uptake-one system.

  12. Desvenlafaxine succinate identifies novel antagonist binding determinants in the human norepinephrine transporter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mason, John N; Deecher, Darlene C; Richmond, Rhonda L; Stack, Gary; Mahaney, Paige E; Trybulski, Eugene; Winneker, Richard C; Blakely, Randy D

    2007-11-01

    Desvenlafaxine succinate (DVS) is a recently introduced antagonist of the human norepinephrine and serotonin transporters (hNET and hSERT, respectively), currently in clinical development for use in the treatment of major depressive disorder and vasomotor symptoms associated with menopause. Initial evaluation of the pharmacological properties of DVS (J Pharmacol Exp Ther 318:657-665, 2006) revealed significantly reduced potency for the hNET expressed in membranes compared with whole cells when competing for [(3)H]nisoxetine (NIS) binding. Using hNET in transfected human embryonic kidney-293 cells, this difference in potency for DVS at sites labeled by [(3)H]NIS was found to distinguish DVS, the DVS analog rac-(1-[1-(3-chloro-phenyl)-2-(4-methylpiperazin-1-yl)-ethyl]cyclohexanol (WY-46824), methylphenidate, and the cocaine analog 3beta-(4-iodophenyl)tropane-2beta-carboxylic acid methyl ester (RTI-55) from other hNET antagonists, such as NIS, mazindol, tricyclic antidepressants, and cocaine. These differences seem not to arise from preparation-specific perturbations of ligand intrinsic affinity or antagonist-specific surface trafficking but rather from protein conformational alterations that perturb the relationships between distinct hNET binding sites. In an initial search for molecular features that differentially define antagonist binding determinants, we document that Val148 in hNET transmembrane domain 3 selectively disrupts NIS binding but not that of DVS.

  13. Cortical serotonin and norepinephrine denervation in parkinsonism: preferential loss of the beaded serotonin innervation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nayyar, Tultul; Bubser, Michael; Ferguson, Marcus C; Neely, M Diana; Shawn Goodwin, J; Montine, Thomas J; Deutch, Ariel Y; Ansah, Twum A

    2009-07-01

    Parkinson's Disease (PD) is marked by prominent motor symptoms that reflect striatal dopamine insufficiency. However, non-motor symptoms, including depression, are common in PD. It has been suggested that these changes reflect pathological involvement of non-dopaminergic systems. We examined regional changes in serotonin (5-HT) and norepinephrine (NE) systems in mice treated with two different 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP) treatment paradigms, at survival times of 3 or 16 weeks after the last MPTP injection. MPTP caused a decrease in striatal dopamine concentration, the magnitude of which depended on the treatment regimen and survival interval after MPTP treatment. There was significant involvement of other subcortical areas receiving a dopamine innervation, but no consistent changes in 5-HT or NE levels in subcortical sites. In contrast, we observed an enduring decrease in 5-HT and NE concentrations in both the somatosensory cortex and medial prefrontal cortex (PFC). Immunohistochemical studies also revealed a decrease in the density of PFC NE and 5-HT axons. The decrease in the cortical serotonergic innervation preferentially involved the thick beaded but not smooth fine 5-HT axons. Similar changes in the 5-HT innervation of post-mortem samples of the PFC from idiopathic PD cases were seen. Our findings point to a major loss of the 5-HT and NE innervations of the cortex in MPTP-induced parkinsonism, and suggest that loss of the beaded cortical 5-HT innervation is associated with a predisposition to the development of depression in PD.

  14. Molecular cloning and structural analysis of human norepinephrine transporter gene(NETHG)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GUOLIHE; LIHUAZHU; 等

    1995-01-01

    A cDNA molecule encoding a major part of the human Norepinephrine transporter(hNET) was synthesized by means of Polymerase Chain Reaction(PCR) technique and used as a probe for selecting the human genomic NET gene.A positive clone harbouring the whole gene was obtained from a human lymphocyte genomic library through utilizing the “genomic walking” technique.The clone,designated as phNET,harbours a DNA fragment of about 59 kd in length inserted into BamH I site in cosmid pWE15.The genomic clone contains 14 exons encoding all amino acid residues in the protein.A single exon encodes a distinct transmembrane domain,except for transmembrane domain 10 and 11,which are encoded by part of two exons respectively,and exon 12,which encodes part of domain 11 and all of domain 12.These results imply that there is a close relationship between exon splicing of a gene and structureal domains of the protein,as is the case for the human γ-aminobutyric acid transporter(hGAT) and a number of other membrane proteins.

  15. Mechanistic insight into the norepinephrine-induced fibrosis in systemic sclerosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uehara, Akihito; Motegi, Sei-ichiro; Yamada, Kazuya; Uchiyama, Akihiko; Perera, Buddhini; Toki, Sayaka; Ogino, Sachiko; Yokoyama, Yoko; Takeuchi, Yuko; Ishikawa, Osamu

    2016-01-01

    Raynaud’s phenomenon is frequently observed in systemic sclerosis (SSc) patients, and cold- or stress-induced norepinephrine (NE) has been speculated to be associated with vasoconstriction. Objective was to elucidate the role of NE in fibrosis in SSc. IL-6 is a potent stimulator of collagen production in fibroblasts. NE enhanced IL-6 production and proliferation more significantly in SSc fibroblasts than in normal fibroblasts. Furthermore, the production of IL-6 and phosphorylation of p38 in SSc fibroblasts was enhanced by adrenergic receptor (AR)β agonist, isoproterenol, but not ARα agonist, oxymetazoline. ARβ blocker, propranolol, inhibited NE-induced IL-6 production and phosphorylation of p38 in SSc fibroblasts. NE-induced IL-6 was significantly inhibited by p38 inhibitor, SB203580, suggesting that NE-induced phosphorylation of p38 via ARβ enhances IL-6 production in SSc fibroblasts. NE-induced phosphorylation of ERK1/2 via ARα inhibited IL-6 production in SSc fibroblasts. Combined treatment with NE and endothelin-1 resulted in an additive increase in IL-6 production in SSc fibroblasts. NE-induced IL-6/IL-6 receptor trans-signaling increased the production of collagen type I in SSc fibroblasts, and both propranolol and SB203580 inhibited NE-induced collagen production. These results suggest that cold exposure and/or emotional stress-induced NE might contribute to the skin fibrosis via potentiation of IL-6 production from fibroblasts in SSc. PMID:27650973

  16. Cerebrospinal fluid norepinephrine and cognition in subjects across the adult age span.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lucy Y; Murphy, Richard R; Hanscom, Brett; Li, Ge; Millard, Steven P; Petrie, Eric C; Galasko, Douglas R; Sikkema, Carl; Raskind, Murray A; Wilkinson, Charles W; Peskind, Elaine R

    2013-10-01

    Adequate central nervous system noradrenergic activity enhances cognition, but excessive noradrenergic activity may have adverse effects on cognition. Previous studies have also demonstrated that noradrenergic activity is higher in older than younger adults. We aimed to determine relationships between cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) norepinephrine (NE) concentration and cognitive performance by using data from a CSF bank that includes samples from 258 cognitively normal participants aged 21-100 years. After adjusting for age, gender, education, and ethnicity, higher CSF NE levels (units of 100 pg/mL) are associated with poorer performance on tests of attention, processing speed, and executive function (Trail Making A: regression coefficient 1.5, standard error [SE] 0.77, p = 0.046; Trail Making B: regression coefficient 5.0, SE 2.2, p = 0.024; Stroop Word-Color Interference task: regression coefficient 6.1, SE 2.0, p = 0.003). Findings are consistent with the earlier literature relating excess noradrenergic activity with cognitive impairment.

  17. Individual differences in the locus coeruleus-norepinephrine system: Relevance to stress-induced cardiovascular vulnerability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, Christopher S; Valentino, Rita J; Wood, Susan K

    2017-04-01

    Repeated exposure to psychosocial stress is a robust sympathomimetic stressor and as such has adverse effects on cardiovascular health. While the neurocircuitry involved remains unclear, the physiological and anatomical characteristics of the locus coeruleus (LC)-norepinephrine (NE) system suggest that it is poised to contribute to stress-induced cardiovascular vulnerability. A major theme throughout is to review studies that shed light on the role that the LC may play in individual differences in vulnerability to social stress-induced cardiovascular dysfunction. Recent findings are discussed that support a unique plasticity in afferent regulation of the LC, resulting in either excitatory or inhibitory input to the LC during establishment of different stress coping strategies. This contrasting regulation of the LC by either afferent regulation, or distinct differences in stress-induced neuroinflammation would translate to differences in cardiovascular regulation and may serve as the basis for individual differences in the cardiopathological consequences of social stress. The goal of this review is to highlight recent developments in the interplay between the LC-NE and cardiovascular systems during repeated stress in an effort to advance therapeutic treatments for the development of stress-induced cardiovascular vulnerability.

  18. High-performance liquid chromatographic assay of free norepinephrine, epinephrine, dopamine, vanillylmandelic acid and homovanillic acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerlo, E; Malfait, R

    1985-09-13

    A procedure is described for the concurrent assay of free norepinephrine, epinephrine, dopamine, vanillylmandelic acid and homovanillic acid in physiological fluids using high-performance liquid chromatography with electrochemical detection. The column packing is an octadecyl-bonded silica. A single mobile phase containing 1-octanesulphonate is used for the assay of catecholamines and for the assay of the acidic metabolites. An efficient sample preparation scheme is presented for the isolation of the catecholamines and their acidic metabolites from the same sample aliquot. Catecholamines are extracted by ion exchange on small columns and adsorption on alumina, using dihydroxybenzylamine as an internal standard. Vanillylmandelic acid and homovanillic acid are recovered from the combined loading and washing effluents of the ion-exchange column by a solvent extraction procedure. Recovery of catecholamines averages 67%. The limit of detection for individual catecholamines is ca. 30 pg. Recoveries of vanillylmandelic acid and homovanillic acid average 77% and 87%, respectively. The use of the same mobile phase for the concurrent assay of catecholamines and their acidic metabolites considerably increases the throughput of samples in the chromatographic system by eliminating the time-consuming column-equilibration periods.

  19. Macro-level pedestrian and bicycle crash analysis: Incorporating spatial spillover effects in dual state count models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Qing; Lee, Jaeyoung; Eluru, Naveen; Abdel-Aty, Mohamed

    2016-08-01

    This study attempts to explore the viability of dual-state models (i.e., zero-inflated and hurdle models) for traffic analysis zones (TAZs) based pedestrian and bicycle crash frequency analysis. Additionally, spatial spillover effects are explored in the models by employing exogenous variables from neighboring zones. The dual-state models such as zero-inflated negative binomial and hurdle negative binomial models (with and without spatial effects) are compared with the conventional single-state model (i.e., negative binomial). The model comparison for pedestrian and bicycle crashes revealed that the models that considered observed spatial effects perform better than the models that did not consider the observed spatial effects. Across the models with spatial spillover effects, the dual-state models especially zero-inflated negative binomial model offered better performance compared to single-state models. Moreover, the model results clearly highlighted the importance of various traffic, roadway, and sociodemographic characteristics of the TAZ as well as neighboring TAZs on pedestrian and bicycle crash frequency.

  20. A framework for the study of zoonotic disease emergence and its drivers: spillover of bat pathogens as a case study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, James L. N.; Leach, Melissa; Waldman, Linda; MacGregor, Hayley; Fooks, Anthony R.; Jones, Kate E.; Restif, Olivier; Dechmann, Dina; Hayman, David T. S.; Baker, Kate S.; Peel, Alison J.; Kamins, Alexandra O.; Fahr, Jakob; Ntiamoa-Baidu, Yaa; Suu-Ire, Richard; Breiman, Robert F.; Epstein, Jonathan H.; Field, Hume E.; Cunningham, Andrew A.

    2012-01-01

    Many serious emerging zoonotic infections have recently arisen from bats, including Ebola, Marburg, SARS-coronavirus, Hendra, Nipah, and a number of rabies and rabies-related viruses, consistent with the overall observation that wildlife are an important source of emerging zoonoses for the human population. Mechanisms underlying the recognized association between ecosystem health and human health remain poorly understood and responding appropriately to the ecological, social and economic conditions that facilitate disease emergence and transmission represents a substantial societal challenge. In the context of disease emergence from wildlife, wildlife and habitat should be conserved, which in turn will preserve vital ecosystem structure and function, which has broader implications for human wellbeing and environmental sustainability, while simultaneously minimizing the spillover of pathogens from wild animals into human beings. In this review, we propose a novel framework for the holistic and interdisciplinary investigation of zoonotic disease emergence and its drivers, using the spillover of bat pathogens as a case study. This study has been developed to gain a detailed interdisciplinary understanding, and it combines cutting-edge perspectives from both natural and social sciences, linked to policy impacts on public health, land use and conservation. PMID:22966143

  1. Measuring Regional Spillovers in Long- and Short-Run Models of Total Factor Productivity, Trade, and FDI

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mitze, Timo Friedel

    2014-01-01

    This article applies the novel concept of global panel cointegration to analyze the role played by trade and foreign direct investment (FDI) activity in driving regional total factor productivity (TFP). Using West German state-level data for the period 1976–2008, the approach allows us to ident......This article applies the novel concept of global panel cointegration to analyze the role played by trade and foreign direct investment (FDI) activity in driving regional total factor productivity (TFP). Using West German state-level data for the period 1976–2008, the approach allows us...... to identify the magnitude of direct trade and FDI effects as well as spatial spillovers from these variables. The author finds that the inclusion of spatial lags significantly improves the fit of the empirical model and allows us to strongly reject the null of no cointegration among the variables in the full...... spatial specification. For the long-run cointegration equation, the empirical results hint at export- and FDI-led growth. Additionally, outward FDI activity shows to have positive spatial spillover effects among German regions, while the spatial patterns of import and inward FDI activity indicate...

  2. Photosynthesis in Chondrus crispus: the contribution of energy spill-over in the regulation of excitonic flux.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kowalczyk, Nathalie; Rappaport, Fabrice; Boyen, Catherine; Wollman, Francis-André; Collén, Jonas; Joliot, Pierre

    2013-07-01

    Chondrus crispus is a species of red algae that grows on rocks from the middle intertidal into the subtidal zones of the North Atlantic coasts. As such, it has to cope with strongly variable abiotic conditions. Here we studied the response of the photosynthetic apparatus of this red alga to illumination. We found that, as previously described in the case of the unicellular alga Rhodella violacea (E. Delphin et al., Plant Physiol. 118 (1998) 103-113), a single multi-turnover saturating pulse of light is sufficient to induce a strong quenching of fluorescence. To elucidate the mechanisms underlying this fluorescence quenching, we combined room temperature and 77K fluorescence measurements with absorption spectroscopy to monitor the redox state of the different electron carriers in the chain. In addition, we studied the dependence of these various observables upon the excitation wavelength. This led us to identify energy spill-over from Photosystem II to Photosystem I rather than a qE-type non-photochemical quenching as the major source of fluorescence quenching that develops upon a series of 200ms pulses of saturating light results, in line with the conclusion of Ley and Butler (Biochim. Biophys. Acta 592 (1980) 349-363) from their studies of the unicellular red alga Porphyridium cruentum. In addition, we show that the onset of this spill-over is triggered by the reduction of the plastoquinone pool.

  3. Stereoselective Actions of Methylenedioxypyrovalerone (MDPV) To Inhibit Dopamine and Norepinephrine Transporters and Facilitate Intracranial Self-Stimulation in Rats

    OpenAIRE

    Kolanos, R; Partilla, J. S.; Baumann, M. H.; Hutsell, B. A.; Banks, M. L.; Negus, S. S.; Glennon, R. A.

    2015-01-01

    The designer stimulant methylenedioxypyrovalerone (MDPV) is a potent reuptake inhibitor at transporters for dopamine (DAT) and norepinephrine (NET) that produces a constellation of abuse-related behavioral effects. MDPV possesses a chiral center, and the abused formulation of the drug is a racemic mixture, but no data are available on the pharmacology of its isomers. Here, the individual optical isomers of MDPV were prepared and examined with respect to their neurochemical actions on neurotra...

  4. Spillover effects of community uninsurance on awareness, treatment, and control of hypertension among insured adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Escarce, José J; Edgington, Sarah E; Roan Gresenz, Carole

    2014-07-01

    Although studies have shown that a high rate of uninsurance in a community reduces access to and satisfaction with health care among the insured population, little is known about whether the community uninsurance rate also affects quality of care and clinical outcomes among the insured. To assess the spillover effects of the rate of uninsurance in a community on the awareness, treatment, and control of hypertension, a chronic condition responsible for substantial morbidity and mortality in the United States, among insured adults. NHANES III (1988-1994) and the 1999-2010 NHANES were linked to data from the Current Population Survey, Area Resource File, and InterStudy Competitive Edge. Multivariate probit regression models used 2 alternative estimation approaches: (1) maximum likelihood estimation, and (2) 2-stage residual inclusion estimation, an instrumental variables method. Six dichotomous outcomes included: awareness among all subjects with hypertension; treatment among all subjects with hypertension and among subjects who were aware of their condition; and control among all subjects with hypertension, among subjects who were aware of their condition, and among subjects receiving treatment. A 10 percentage point increase in the community uninsurance rate reduced the probability of receiving antihypertensive medications by 4.2 percentage points among insured hypertensive adults and by 5.5 percentage points among insured hypertensive adults who were aware of their hypertension. A 10 percentage point increase in the community uninsurance rate also resulted in a 6.8 percentage point decline in the probability of blood pressure control among insured hypertensive adults who were aware of their condition. Nationally, the Affordable Care Act is expected to reduce the number of uninsured by >30 million by 2016, although changes will be experienced by communities to a greater or lesser extent depending on the existing numbers and characteristics of the uninsured in the

  5. Voltammetric determination of norepinephrine in the presence of acetaminophen using a novel ionic liquid/multiwall carbon nanotubes paste electrode

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salmanpour, Sadegh [Department of Chemistry, Sari Branch, Islamic Azad University, Sari (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Tavana, Toktam [Department of Chemistry, Qaemshahr Branch, Islamic Azad University, Qaemshahr (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Pahlavan, Ali [Department of Physics, Science and Research Branch, Islamic Azad University, Mazandaran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Khalilzadeh, Mohammad A., E-mail: khalilzadeh73@yahoo.com [Department of Chemistry, Science and Research Branch, Islamic Azad University, Mazandaran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Ensafi, Ali A. [Department of Chemistry, Isfahan University of Technology, Isfahan (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Karimi-Maleh, Hassan, E-mail: h.karimi.maleh@gmail.com [Department of Chemistry, Science and Research Branch, Islamic Azad University, Mazandaran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Beitollahi, Hadi [Environment Department, Research Institute of Environmental Sciences, International Center for Science, High Technology and Environmental Sciences, Kerman (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Kowsari, Elaheh [Department of Chemistry, Amirkabir University of Technology, No. 424, Hafez Avenue, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Zareyee, Daryoush [Department of Chemistry, Qaemshahr Branch, Islamic Azad University, Qaemshahr (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2012-10-01

    A novel multiwall carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) modified carbon ionic liquid electrode (CILE) was fabricated and used to investigate the electrochemical behavior of norepinephrine (NP). MWCNTs/CILE was prepared by mixing hydrophilic ionic liquid, 1-methyl-3-butylimidazolium bromide (MBIDZBr), with graphite powder, MWCNTs, and liquid paraffin. The fabricated MWCNTs/CILE showed great electrocatalytic ability to the oxidation of NE. The electron transfer coefficient, diffusion coefficient, and charge transfer resistant (R{sub ct}) of NE at the modified electrode were calculated. Differential pulse voltammetry of NE at the modified electrode exhibited two linear dynamic ranges with slopes of 0.0841 and 0.0231 {mu}A/{mu}M in the concentration ranges of 0.3 to 30.0 {mu}M and 30.0 to 450.0 {mu}M, respectively. The detection limit (3{sigma}) of 0.09 {mu}M NP was achieved. This modified electrode exhibited a good ability for well separated oxidation peaks of NE and acetaminophen (AC) in a buffer solution, pH 7.0. The proposed sensor was successfully applied for the determination of NE in human urine, pharmaceutical, and serum samples. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Electrochemical behavior of norepinephrine study using carbon ionic liquid electrode Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer This sensor resolved the overlap response of norepinephrine and acetaminophen. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer This sensor is also used for the determination of above compounds in real samples.

  6. Relative contributions of norepinephrine and serotonin transporters to antinociceptive synergy between monoamine reuptake inhibitors and morphine in the rat formalin model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fei Shen

    Full Text Available Multimodal analgesia is designed to optimize pain relief by coadministering drugs with distinct mechanisms of action or by combining multiple pharmacologies within a single molecule. In clinical settings, combinations of monoamine reuptake inhibitors and opioid receptor agonists have been explored and one currently available analgesic, tapentadol, functions as both a µ-opioid receptor agonist and a norepinephrine transporter inhibitor. However, it is unclear whether the combination of selective norepinephrine reuptake inhibition and µ-receptor agonism achieves an optimal antinociceptive synergy. In this study, we assessed the pharmacodynamic interactions between morphine and monoamine reuptake inhibitors that possess different affinities and selectivities for norepinephrine and serotonin transporters. Using the rat formalin model, in conjunction with measurements of ex vivo transporter occupancy, we show that neither the norepinephrine-selective inhibitor, esreboxetine, nor the serotonin-selective reuptake inhibitor, fluoxetine, produce antinociceptive synergy with morphine. Atomoxetine, a monoamine reuptake inhibitor that achieves higher levels of norepinephrine than serotonin transporter occupancy, exhibited robust antinociceptive synergy with morphine. Similarly, a fixed-dose combination of esreboxetine and fluoxetine which achieves comparable levels of transporter occupancy potentiated the antinociceptive response to morphine. By contrast, duloxetine, a monoamine reuptake inhibitor that achieves higher serotonin than norepinephrine transporter occupancy, failed to potentiate the antinociceptive response to morphine. However, when duloxetine was coadministered with the 5-HT3 receptor antagonist, ondansetron, potentiation of the antinociceptive response to morphine was revealed. These results support the notion that inhibition of both serotonin and norepinephrine transporters is required for monoamine reuptake inhibitor and opioid

  7. Effects of Continuous Posittive Airway Pressure therapy on the Concentrations of Norepinephrine in Exhaled breath condensate and Blood of patients with obstructive sleep apnea/hypopnea syndrome%正压通气治疗对OSAHS患者EBC和血清中去甲肾上腺素水平的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨猛; 陶一江; 陈建荣; 朱杰; 姚苏梅

    2013-01-01

    目的 探讨auto-CPAP治疗对OSAHS患者交感神经兴奋性的影响.方法 根据PSG确诊的42例OSAHS患者,随机分为治疗组和对照组,对治疗组进行auto-CPAP治疗,对所有患者采取常规治疗,测定治疗组及对照组治疗前后EBC和血清中的NE.结果 (1)治疗组患者EBC和血清中NE治疗前高于治疗后(P0.05);(3)OSAHS患者EBC和血清中NE水平与AHI呈正相关关系,与LPSO2、MPSO2呈负相关关系(P<0.01).结论 OSAHS患者常伴有交感神经兴奋性的增强,并且可以通过auto-CPAP治疗得以改善.%Objective To investigate the effect of auto-CPAP therapy on the sympathetic nerve activation in patients with obstructive sleep apnea/hypopnea syndrome ( OSAHS ). Methods 42 patients with OSAHS diagnosed by polysomnograpgy monitoring were randomly allocated to the active group ( n = 22 ) or the control group ( n = 20 ) respectively. The active group received the treatment of auto-CPAP and all of the subjects received general treatment. Norepinephrine levels in EBC and plasma were measured by enzyme linked im-munosorbent assay ( ELISA ) before and after 3 months. Results ( 1 ) The concentrations of norepinephrine in EBC and plasma in the active group before treatment were higher than the after;( 2 ) Before and after the treatment,there was no statistical difference of the concentrations of norepinephrine in EBC and plasma in the control group;( 3 ) Norepinephrine levels in plasma and EBC were positively related with apnea hypoventilation index( AHI), and were inversely related with the lowest blood oxygen saturation( LSPO2 ) and average blood oxygen saturation( MSPO2 ). Conclusion OSAHS patients often accompanied by higher sympathetic nerve activation and can be improved by auto-CPAP treatment.

  8. Blood pressure and plasma catecholamines in acute and prolonged hypoxia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kanstrup, I L; Poulsen, T D; Hansen, J M

    1999-01-01

    and 5 days after rapid, passive transport to high altitude (4,559 m). Acute mountain sickness scores ranged from 5 to 16 (maximal attainable score: 20) on the first day but were reduced to 0-8 by the fifth day. Systolic blood pressure, heart rate, and plasma epinephrine increased on day 1 at altitude...... compared with sea level but declined again on day 5, whereas diastolic and mean blood pressures continued to rise in parallel with plasma norepinephrine. With local cooling, an increased vasoactive response was seen on the fifth day at altitude. Very high pressures were obtained, and the pressure elevation...

  9. Arterial pressure allows monitoring the changes in cardiac output induced by volume expansion but not by norepinephrine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monnet, Xavier; Letierce, Alexia; Hamzaoui, Olfa; Chemla, Denis; Anguel, Nadia; Osman, David; Richard, Christian; Teboul, Jean-Louis

    2011-06-01

    To evaluate to which extent the systemic arterial pulse pressure could be used as a surrogate of cardiac output for assessing the effects of a fluid challenge and of norepinephrine. Observational study. Medical intensive care unit. Patients with an acute circulatory failure who received a fluid challenge (228 patients, group 1) or in whom norepinephrine was introduced or increased (145 patients, group 2). We measured the systolic, diastolic, and mean arterial pressure, pulse pressure, and the transpulmonary thermodilution cardiac output before and after the therapeutic interventions. In group 1, the fluid challenge significantly increased cardiac output by 24% ± 25%. It significantly increased cardiac output by ≥15% (+35% ± 27%) in 142 patients ("responders"). The fluid-induced changes in cardiac output were correlated with the changes in pulse pressure (r = .56, p arterial pressure (r = .55, p arterial pressure (r = .37, p arterial pressure (r = .52, p pressure were significantly related to changes in stroke volume (multiple r = .52) and to age (r = .12). A fluid-induced increase in pulse pressure of ≥17% allowed detecting a fluid-induced increase in cardiac output of ≥15% with a sensitivity of 65[56-72]% and a specificity of 85[76-92]%. The area under the receiver operating characteristic curves for the fluid-induced changes in mean arterial pressure and in diastolic arterial pressure was significantly lower than for pulse pressure. In group 2, the introduction/increase of norepinephrine significantly increased cardiac output by 14% ± 18%. The changes in cardiac output induced by the introduction/increase in the dose of norepinephrine were correlated with the changes in pulse pressure and systolic arterial pressure (r = .21 and .29, respectively, p = .001) but to a significantly lesser extent than in group 1. Pulse pressure and systolic arterial pressure could be used for detecting the fluid-induced changes in cardiac output, in spite of a significant

  10. The Role of the Five Factor Model of Personality in the Perceptions of Negative and Positive Forms of Work-Nonwork Spillover: A Meta-Analytic Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michel, Jesse S.; Clark, Malissa A.; Jaramillo, David

    2011-01-01

    The present meta-analysis examines the relationships between the Five Factor Model (FFM) of personality and negative and positive forms of work-nonwork spillover (e.g., work-family conflict and facilitation). Results, based on aggregated correlations drawn from 66 studies and 72 independent samples (Total N = 28,127), reveal that the FFM is…

  11. On the risk of extinction of a wild plant species through spillover of a biological control agent: analysis of an ecosystem compartment model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chalak-Haghighi, M.; Hemerik, L.; Werf, van der W.; Ierland, van E.C.

    2008-01-01

    Invasive plant species can be controlled by introducing one or more of their natural enemies (herbivores) from their native range; however such introduction entails the risk that the introduced natural enemy will attack indigenous plant species in the area of introduction. The effect of spillover of

  12. On the risk of extinction of a wild plant species through spillover of a biological control agent: Analysis of an ecosystem compartment model.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chalak, M.; Hemerik, L.; Werf, van der W.; Ruijs, A.; Ierland, van E.C.

    2010-01-01

    Invasive plant species can be controlled by introducing natural enemies (insect herbivores) from their native range. However, such introduction entails the risk that the introduced herbivores attack indigenous plant species in the area of introduction. Here, we study the effect of spillover of a her

  13. Quantitative chemical exchange saturation transfer (qCEST) MRI--RF spillover effect-corrected omega plot for simultaneous determination of labile proton fraction ratio and exchange rate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Phillip Zhe; Wang, Yu; Dai, ZhuoZhi; Xiao, Gang; Wu, Renhua

    2014-01-01

    Chemical exchange saturation transfer (CEST) MRI is sensitive to dilute proteins and peptides as well as microenvironmental properties. However, the complexity of the CEST MRI effect, which varies with the labile proton content, exchange rate and experimental conditions, underscores the need for developing quantitative CEST (qCEST) analysis. Towards this goal, it has been shown that omega plot is capable of quantifying paramagnetic CEST MRI. However, the use of the omega plot is somewhat limited for diamagnetic CEST (DIACEST) MRI because it is more susceptible to direct radio frequency (RF) saturation (spillover) owing to the relatively small chemical shift. Recently, it has been found that, for dilute DIACEST agents that undergo slow to intermediate chemical exchange, the spillover effect varies little with the labile proton ratio and exchange rate. Therefore, we postulated that the omega plot analysis can be improved if RF spillover effect could be estimated and taken into account. Specifically, simulation showed that both labile proton ratio and exchange rate derived using the spillover effect-corrected omega plot were in good agreement with simulated values. In addition, the modified omega plot was confirmed experimentally, and we showed that the derived labile proton ratio increased linearly with creatine concentration (p exchange rate (p = 0.32). In summary, our study extends the conventional omega plot for quantitative analysis of DIACEST MRI.

  14. Social and Spill-Over Benefits as Motivating Factors to Investment in Formal Education in Africa: A Reflection around Ghanaian, Kenyan and Rwandan Contexts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ampofo, S. Y.; Bizimana, B.; Ndayambaje, I.; Karongo, V.; Lawrence, K. Lyn; Orodho, J. A.

    2015-01-01

    This study examined the social and spill-over benefits as motivating factors to investment in formal education in selected countries in Africa. The paper had three objectives, namely) to profile the key statistics of formal schooling; ii) examine the formal education and iii) link national goals of education with expectations in Ghana, Kenya and…

  15. Effects of electro-acupuncture on brain tissue norepinephrine contents in a morphine withdrawal anxiety mouse model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qizhi Zhou; Yuxing Liu; Xuguang Liu; Jiaolu Wei; Yong Tang; Junmei Wu; Yi Pu

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Following morphine withdrawal, anxiety is associated with abnormal norepinephrine content change. However, increasing blood lactic acid content can induce anxiety or panic in patients with anxiety disorder or endogenous opioid peptide functional disorder. OBJECTIVE: This study was designed to observe the effects of electro-acupuncture, at the "Sanyinjiao" point (SP 6), on brain tissue norepinephrine and blood lactic acid content in anxiety-model mice after morphine withdrawal.DESIGN: A randomized controlled animal experiment. SETTING: This study was performed in the Laboratory of Acupuncture, Electro-acupuncture & Tuina College, Chengdu University of Traditional Chinese Medicine, from June to September 2001.MATERIALS: A total of 50 healthy Kunming male mice were provided by the Laboratory Animal Center of Chengdu University of Traditional Chinese Medicine. The protocol was performed in accordance with ethical guidelines stated in the Guide for the use and care of laboratory animals, approved by the Committee on the Care and Use of Laboratory Animals of the Institute of Laboratory Animal Resources Commission on Life Sciences, National Research Council, China (1985). Experimental reagents and equipment used were as follows: morphine hydrochloride (Lot No. 930503, Shenyang No.1 Pharmaceutical Factory, China), norepinephrine (Sigma Chemical Company, USA), fluorospectrophotometer (RF-510, Shimadzu Corporation, Japan), Han electro-acupuncture apparatus (WQ 1002, No. zun (91)-227270-588, Beijing Anlong Photoelectricity-Technique Company, China), and T-maze (self-made). METHODS: A total of 50 mice were randomly divided into 5 groups, with 10 mice in each group: blank control, T-maze, model, model + electro-acupuncture, and electro-acupuncture groups. Establishment of anxiety model after morphine withdrawal: the mouse hot plate assay was used to detect the activity of morphine. The median effective dose of morphine, 2.95 mg/kg, was defined as the base. Mice were

  16. Neurotensin releases norepinephrine differentially from perfused hypothalamus of sated and fasted rat

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, T.F.; Rezvani, A.H.; Hepler, J.R.; Myers, R.D.

    1987-01-01

    The central injection of neurotensin (NT) has been reported to attenuate the intake of food in the fasted animal. To determine whether endogenous norepinephrine (NE) is involved in the satiating effect of NT, the in vivo activity of NE in circumscribed sites in the hypothalamus of the unanesthetized rat was examined. Bilateral guide tubes for push-pull perfusion were implanted stereotaxically to rest permanently above one of several intended sites of perfusion, which included the paraventricular nucleus (PVN), ventromedial nucleus (VMN), and the lateral hypothalamic (LH) area. After endogenous stores of NE at a specific hypothalamic locus were radiolabeled by microinjection of 0.02-0.5 ..mu..Ci of (/sup 3/H)NE, an artificial cerebrospinal fluid was perfused at the site at a rate of 20 ..mu..l/min over successive intervals of 5.0 min. When 0.05 or 0.1 ..mu..g/..mu..l NT was added to the perfusate, the peptide served either to enhance or educe the local release of NE at 50% of the sites of perfusion. In these experiments, the circumscribed effect of NT on the characteristics of catecholamine efflux depended entirely on the state of hunger or satiety of the rat. That is, when NT was perfused in the fully satiated rat, NE release was augmented within the PVn or VMN; conversely, NE release was inhibited in the LH. in the animal fasted for 18-22 h, NT exerted an opposite effect on the activity of NE within the same anatomical loci in that the efflux of NE was enhanced in the LH but attenuated or unaffected in the PVN or VMN. Taken together, these observations provide experimental support for the view-point that NT could act as a neuromodulator of the activity of hypothalamic noradrenergic neurons that are thought to play a functional role in the regulation of food intake.

  17. Curcumin suppresses gelatinase B mediated norepinephrine induced stress in H9c2 cardiomyocytes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shrey Kohli

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Extracellular matrix (ECM remodeling facilitates biomechanical signals in response to abnormal physiological conditions. This process is witnessed as one of the major effects of the stress imposed by catecholamines, such as epinephrine and norepinephrine (NE, on cardiac muscle cells. Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs are the key proteases involved in degradation of the ECM in heart. OBJECTIVES: The present study focuses on studying the effect of curcumin on Gelatinase B (MMP-9, an ECM remodeling regulatory enzyme, in NE-induced cardiac stress. Curcumin, a bioactive polyphenol found in the spice turmeric, has been studied for its multi-fold beneficial properties. This study focuses on investigating the role of curcumin as a cardio-protectant. METHODS: H9c2 cardiomyocytes were subjected to NE and curcumin treatments to study the response in stress conditions. Effect on total collagen content was studied using Picrosirus red staining. Gelatinase B activity was assessed through Gel-Diffusion Assay and Zymographic techniques. RT-PCR, Western Blotting and Immunocytochemistry were performed to study effect on expression of gelatinase B. Further, the effect of curcumin on the localization of NF-κB, known to regulate gelatinase B, was also examined. RESULTS: Curcumin suppressed the increase in the total collagen content under hypertrophic stress and was found to inhibit the in-gel and in-situ gelatinolytic activity of gelatinase B. Moreover, it was found to suppress the mRNA and protein expression of gelatinase B. CONCLUSIONS: The study provides an evidence for an overall inhibitory effect of curcumin on Gelatinase B in NE-induced hypertrophic stress in H9c2 cardiomyocytes which may contribute in the prevention of ECM remodeling.

  18. B and C types natriuretic peptides modulate norepinephrine uptake and release in the rat hypothalamus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vatta, M S; Presas, M; Bianciotti, L G; Zarrabeitia, V; Fernández, B E

    1996-09-16

    We previously reported that atrial natriuretic factor (ANF) regulates catecholamine metabolism in the central nervous system. ANF, B and C types natriuretic peptides (BNP and CNP) also play a regulatory role in body fluid homeostasis, cardiovascular activity and hormonal and neuro-hormonal secretions. The aim of the present work was to investigate BNP and CNP effects on the uptake and release of norepinephrine (NE) in rat hypothalamic slices incubated in vitro. Results showed that BNP (100 nM) and CNP (1, 10 and 100 nM) enhanced total and neuronal [3H]NE uptake but did not modify non-neuronal uptake. BNP (100 nM) and CNP (1 nM) caused a rapid increase in NE uptake (1 min), which was sustained for 60 min. BNP (100 nM) did not modify the intracellular distribution of NE; however, 1 nM CNP increased the granular store and decreased the cytosolic pool of NE. BNP (100 nM) and CNP (1, 10 and 100 nM), diminished spontaneous NE release. In addition, BNP (1, 10, 100 nM) and CNP (1, 10 and 100 pM, as well as 1, 10 and 100 nM) reduced NE output induced by 25 mM KCl. These results suggest that BNP and CNP may be involved in the regulation of several central as well as peripheral physiological functions through the modulation of noradrenergic neurotransmission at the presynaptic neuronal level. Present results provide evidence to consider CNP as the brain natriuretic peptide since physiological concentrations of this peptide (pM) diminished NE evoked release.

  19. The norepinephrine system and its relevance for multi-component behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mückschel, Moritz; Gohil, Krutika; Ziemssen, Tjalf; Beste, Christian

    2017-02-01

    The ability to execute several actions in a specific temporal order to achieve an overarching goal, a process often termed action cascading or multi-component behavior, is essential for everyday life requirements. We are only at the beginning to understand the neurobiological mechanisms important for these cognitive processes. However, it is likely that the locus coeruleus-norepinephrine (LC-NE) system may be of importance. In the current study we examine the relevance of the LC-NE system for action cascading processes using a system neurophysiological approach combining high-density EEG recordings and source localization to analyze event-related potentials (ERPs) with recordings of pupil diameter as a proximate of LC-NE system activity. N=25 healthy participants performed an action cascading stop-change paradigm. Integrating ERPs and pupil diameter using Pearson correlations, the results show that the LC-NE system is important for processes related to multi-component behavior. However, the LC-NE system does not seem to be important during the time period of response selection processes during multi-component behavior (reflected in the P3) as well as during perceptual and attentional selection (P1 and N1 ERPs). Rather, it seems that the neurophysiological processes in the fore period of a possibly upcoming imperative stimulus to initiate multi-component behavior are correlated with the LC-NE system. It seems that the LC-NE system facilitates responses to task-relevant processes and supports task-related decision and response selection processes by preparing cognitive control processes in case these are required during multi-component behavior rather than modulating these processes once they are operating. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. A kinetic study of the ouabain-induced efflux of norepinephrine from the dog saphenous vein

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Monteiro, J.G. (Laboratorio de Farmacologia, Faculdade de Medicina, Porto (Portugal))

    1991-07-01

    Dog saphenous vein strips were incubated with (3H)norepinephrine ((3H)NE), 1.4 microM, after inhibition of the NE-metabolizing enzymes and extraneuronal uptake, and superfused for up to 290 min. From the 70th min onwards the strips were exposed to 10 microM ouabain, some of them being subject to electrical stimulation from the 140th min onwards. Other strips were exposed to either 1, 10 or 100 microM ouabain from the 70th min onwards. The spontaneous efflux of (3H)NE had a long half-time (156 min), and over 90% of the (3H)NE accumulated did not participate in efflux (bound fraction). Ouabain, 10 microM, induced a pronounced increase of the rate of efflux of (3H)NE, which was delayed in its onset and reached a maximum at t = 135 min of superfusion. Increasing the concentration of ouabain decreased both the delay to the beginning of the overflow and the time to maximum efflux and increased the maximum rate of efflux. In Ca(++)-free medium (during the superfusion period), the maximum rate of efflux was lower than in Ca(++)-containing medium, but was attained earlier. The bound fraction amounted to 22% when the efflux was induced by 10 microM ouabain in Ca(++)-containing medium, a value unnaffected by electrical stimulation but reduced markedly by omitting calcium. The results support the view that the efflux of (3H)NE induced by ouabain is delayed and that it is both carrier-mediated and due to exocytosis.

  1. Dynamic arterial elastance predicts mean arterial pressure decrease associated with decreasing norepinephrine dosage in septic shock.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guinot, Pierre-Grégoire; Bernard, Eugénie; Levrard, Mélanie; Dupont, Hervé; Lorne, Emmanuel

    2015-01-19

    Gradual reduction of the dosage of norepinephrine (NE) in patients with septic shock is usually left to the physician's discretion. No hemodynamic indicator predictive of the possibility of decreasing the NE dosage is currently available at the bedside. The respiratory pulse pressure variation/respiratory stroke volume variation (dynamic arterial elastance (Eadyn)) ratio has been proposed as an indicator of vascular tone. The purpose of this study was to determine whether Eadyn can be used to predict the decrease in arterial pressure when decreasing the NE dosage in resuscitated sepsis patients. A prospective study was carried out in a university hospital intensive care unit. All consecutive patients with septic shock monitored by PICCO2 for whom the intensive care physician planned to decrease the NE dosage were enrolled. Measurements of hemodynamic and PICCO2 variables were obtained before/after decreasing the NE dosage. Responders were defined by a >15% decrease in mean arterial pressure (MAP). In total, 35 patients were included. MAP decreased by >15% after decreasing the NE dosage in 37% of patients (n = 13). Clinical characteristics appeared to be similar between responders and nonresponders. Eadyn was lower in responders than in nonresponders (0.75 (0.69 to 0.85) versus 1 (0. 83 to 1.22), P decrease in arterial pressure, with an area under the receiver-operating characteristic curve of 0.87 (95% confidence interval (95% CI): 0.72 to 0.96; P decrease in arterial pressure in response to NE dose reduction. Eadyn may constitute an easy-to-use functional approach to arterial-tone assessment, which may be helpful to identify patients likely to benefit from NE dose reduction.

  2. Norepinephrine activates dopamine D4 receptors in the rat lateral habenula.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Root, David H; Hoffman, Alexander F; Good, Cameron H; Zhang, Shiliang; Gigante, Eduardo; Lupica, Carl R; Morales, Marisela

    2015-02-25

    The lateral habenula (LHb) is involved in reward and aversion and is reciprocally connected with dopamine (DA)-containing brain regions, including the ventral tegmental area (VTA). We used a multidisciplinary approach to examine the properties of DA afferents to the LHb in the rat. We find that >90% of VTA tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) neurons projecting to the LHb lack vesicular monoamine transporter 2 (VMAT2) mRNA, and there is little coexpression of TH and VMAT2 protein in this mesohabenular pathway. Consistent with this, electrical stimulation of LHb did not evoke DA-like signals, assessed with fast-scan cyclic voltammetry. However, electrophysiological currents that were inhibited by L741,742, a DA-D4-receptor antagonist, were observed in LHb neurons when DA uptake or degradation was blocked. To prevent DA activation of D4 receptors, we repeated this experiment in LHb slices from DA-depleted rats. However, this did not disrupt D4 receptor activation initiated by the dopamine transporter inhibitor, GBR12935. As the LHb is also targeted by noradrenergic afferents, we examined whether GBR12935 activation of DA-D4 receptors occurred in slices depleted of norepinephrine (NE). Unlike DA, NE depletion prevented the activation of DA-D4 receptors. Moreover, direct application of NE elicited currents in LHb neurons that were blocked by L741,742, and GBR12935 was found to be a more effective blocker of NE uptake than the NE-selective transport inhibitor nisoxetine. These findings demonstrate that NE is released in the rat LHb under basal conditions and that it activates DA-D4 receptors. Therefore, NE may be an important regulator of LHb function.

  3. Insulin and norepinephrine regulate ghrelin secretion from a rat primary stomach cell culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gagnon, Jeffrey; Anini, Younes

    2012-08-01

    Ghrelin is a peptide hormone primarily produced in the previously unidentified X/A endocrine cells of the stomach. Extensive studies have focused on the effects of ghrelin on growth hormone release and appetite regulation. However, the mechanisms regulating ghrelin secretion are less understood. In the present study, we developed a primary culture of newborn rat stomach cells to investigate the mechanisms regulating ghrelin synthesis and secretion. We demonstrated that this cell preparation secretes ghrelin in a regulated manner through the increase of cAMP, intracellular calcium, and activation of protein kinase C. Norepinephrine (NE) (0.1-10 μm) stimulated ghrelin secretion through the β1-adrenergic receptor via increased cAMP and protein kinase A activity, whereas acetylcholine had no effect. Because circulating ghrelin levels were previously shown to be inversely correlated with insulin levels, we investigated the effect of insulin on ghrelin secretion. We first demonstrated that ghrelin cells express the insulin receptor α- and β-subunits. Next, we determined that insulin (1-10 nm) inhibited both basal and NE-stimulated ghrelin secretion, caused an increase in phosphorylated serine-threonine kinase (AKT) and a reduction in intracellular cAMP, but did not alter proghrelin mRNA levels. The inhibitory effect of insulin was blocked by inhibiting phospho-inositol-3 kinase and AKT but not MAPK. Higher dose insulin (100 nm) did not suppress ghrelin secretion, which prompted the investigation of cellular insulin resistance by pretreating the cells with 100 nm insulin for 24 h. This caused a reduction in insulin receptor expression and prevented the insulin-mediated AKT activation and the suppression of ghrelin secretion with no impact on NE-stimulated ghrelin secretion. Our findings highlight the role of the sympathetic nervous system, insulin, and insulin resistance in the regulation of ghrelin secretion.

  4. Role of calcium and EPAC in norepinephrine-induced ghrelin secretion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mani, Bharath K; Chuang, Jen-Chieh; Kjalarsdottir, Lilja; Sakata, Ichiro; Walker, Angela K; Kuperman, Anna; Osborne-Lawrence, Sherri; Repa, Joyce J; Zigman, Jeffrey M

    2014-01-01

    Ghrelin is an orexigenic hormone secreted principally from a distinct population of gastric endocrine cells. Molecular mechanisms regulating ghrelin secretion are mostly unknown. Recently, norepinephrine (NE) was shown to enhance ghrelin release by binding to β1-adrenergic receptors on ghrelin cells. Here, we use an immortalized stomach-derived ghrelin cell line to further characterize the intracellular signaling pathways involved in NE-induced ghrelin secretion, with a focus on the roles of Ca(2+) and cAMP. Several voltage-gated Ca(2+) channel (VGCC) family members were found by quantitative PCR to be expressed by ghrelin cells. Nifedipine, a selective L-type VGCC blocker, suppressed both basal and NE-stimulated ghrelin secretion. NE induced elevation of cytosolic Ca(2+) levels both in the presence and absence of extracellular Ca(2+). Ca(2+)-sensing synaptotagmins Syt7 and Syt9 were also highly expressed in ghrelin cell lines, suggesting that they too help mediate ghrelin secretion. Raising cAMP with the phosphodiesterase inhibitor 3-isobutyl-1-methylxanthine also stimulated ghrelin secretion, although such a cAMP-mediated effect likely does not involve protein kinase A, given the absence of a modulatory response to a highly selective protein kinase A inhibitor. However, pharmacological inhibition of another target of cAMP, exchange protein-activated by cAMP (EPAC), did attenuate both basal and NE-induced ghrelin secretion, whereas an EPAC agonist enhanced basal ghrelin secretion. We conclude that constitutive ghrelin secretion is primarily regulated by Ca(2+) influx through L-type VGCCs and that NE stimulates ghrelin secretion predominantly through release of intracellular Ca(2+). Furthermore, cAMP and its downstream activation of EPAC are required for the normal ghrelin secretory response to NE.

  5. Curcumin Suppresses Gelatinase B Mediated Norepinephrine Induced Stress in H9c2 Cardiomyocytes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohli, Shrey; Chhabra, Aastha; Jaiswal, Astha; Rustagi, Yashika; Sharma, Manish; Rani, Vibha

    2013-01-01

    Background Extracellular matrix (ECM) remodeling facilitates biomechanical signals in response to abnormal physiological conditions. This process is witnessed as one of the major effects of the stress imposed by catecholamines, such as epinephrine and norepinephrine (NE), on cardiac muscle cells. Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) are the key proteases involved in degradation of the ECM in heart. Objectives The present study focuses on studying the effect of curcumin on Gelatinase B (MMP-9), an ECM remodeling regulatory enzyme, in NE-induced cardiac stress. Curcumin, a bioactive polyphenol found in the spice turmeric, has been studied for its multi-fold beneficial properties. This study focuses on investigating the role of curcumin as a cardio-protectant. Methods H9c2 cardiomyocytes were subjected to NE and curcumin treatments to study the response in stress conditions. Effect on total collagen content was studied using Picrosirus red staining. Gelatinase B activity was assessed through Gel-Diffusion Assay and Zymographic techniques. RT-PCR, Western Blotting and Immunocytochemistry were performed to study effect on expression of gelatinase B. Further, the effect of curcumin on the localization of NF-κB, known to regulate gelatinase B, was also examined. Results Curcumin suppressed the increase in the total collagen content under hypertrophic stress and was found to inhibit the in-gel and in-situ gelatinolytic activity of gelatinase B. Moreover, it was found to suppress the mRNA and protein expression of gelatinase B. Conclusions The study provides an evidence for an overall inhibitory effect of curcumin on Gelatinase B in NE-induced hypertrophic stress in H9c2 cardiomyocytes which may contribute in the prevention of ECM remodeling. PMID:24116115

  6. Significance of matrix metalloproteinases in norepinephrine-induced remodelling of rat hearts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Briest, Wilfried; Hölzl, Alexander; Rassler, Beate; Deten, Alexander; Baba, Hideo A; Zimmer, Heinz-Gerd

    2003-02-01

    Norepinephrine (NE) induced hypertrophy and remodelling of the extracellular matrix (ECM) in the left ventricle (LV) of the rat heart with resulting fibrosis. However, there was no increased collagen deposition in the right ventricle (RV). To test the hypothesis that lack of RV fibrosis is the result of elevated cleavage of collagens we inhibited the activity of matrix metalloproteinases (MMP) by doxycycline (Doxy) and then measured function and collagen metabolism in the RV as compared to the LV. Female Sprague-Dawley rats were treated with 30 mg/kg per day doxycycline alone or in combination with i.v. infusion of NE (0.1 mg/kg per h). The activity of MMP-2 was increased both in the LV and RV after 3 days of NE infusion and reduced after concomitant doxycycline treatment which also caused inhibition when given alone. After 14 days of NE infusion in combination with doxycycline there was an additional increase in the NE-induced elevation of collagen accumulation in the LV (interstitial collagen fraction: NE-Doxy 1.797%, PDoxy: 36.4 mmHg) and RV dP/dt(max) (NE: 5500 mmHg/s, PDoxy: 2550 mmHg/s). Also in the NE-stimulated LV, the doxycycline-induced collagen accumulation was associated with reduced LV dP/dt(max) (NE-Doxy: 13169 mmHg/s; NE: 18849 mmHg/s, P<0.05). MMP inhibition leads to myocardial stiffness with negative functional consequences for the RV and LV in NE-treated rat hearts.

  7. Modulatory effect of endothelin-1 and -3 on neuronal norepinephrine release in the rat posterior hypothalamus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Nunzio, Andrea S; Legaz, Guillermina; Rodano, Valeria; Bianciotti, Liliana G; Vatta, Marcelo S

    2004-04-15

    Based upon the existence of high density of ET-receptors on catecholaminergic neurons of the hypothalamus, we studied the effects of endothelin-1 (ET-1) and endothelin-3 (ET-3) on neuronal norepinephrine (NE) release in the rat posterior hypothalamus. The intracellular pathways and receptors involved were also investigated. Neuronal NE release was enhanced by ET-1 and ET-3 (10 etaM). The selective antagonists of subtype A and B ET receptors (ETA, ETB) (100 etaM BQ-610 and 100 etaM BQ-788, respectively) abolished the increase induced by ET-1 but not by ET-3. The PLC inhibitor, U73122 (10 microM), abolished ET-1 and ET-3 response. GF-109203X (100 etaM) (PKC inhibitor) blocked the increase in NE release produced by ET-3 and partially blocked ET-1 response. The inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate-induced calcium release inhibitor, 42 microM 2-APB, inhibited the stimulatory effect induced by ET-3 but not by ET-1. The PKA inhibitor, 500 etaM H-89, blocked the increase in neuronal NE release evoked by ET-1 but not by ET-3. Our results showed that ET-1 as well as ET-3 displayed an excitatory neuromodulatory effect on neuronal NE release in the rat posterior hypothalamus. ET-1 through an atypical ETA or ETB receptor activated the PLC/PKC signalling pathway as well as the cAMP pathway, whereas ET-3 through a non-ETA/non-ETB receptor activated the phosphoinositide pathway. Both ETs would enhance the sympathoexcitatory response elicited by the posterior hypothalamus and thus participate in cardiovascular regulation.

  8. Reserpine-induced reduction in norepinephrine transporter function requires catecholamine storage vesicles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandela, Prashant; Chandley, Michelle; Xu, Yao-Yu; Zhu, Meng-Yang; Ordway, Gregory A

    2010-01-01

    Treatment of rats with reserpine, an inhibitor of the vesicular monoamine transporter (VMAT), depletes norepinephrine (NE) and regulates NE transporter (NET) expression. The present study examined the molecular mechanisms involved in regulation of the NET by reserpine using cultured cells. Exposure of rat PC12 cells to reserpine for a period as short as 5min decreased [(3)H]NE uptake capacity, an effect characterized by a robust decrease in the V(max) of the transport of [(3)H]NE. As expected, reserpine did not displace the binding of [(3)H]nisoxetine from the NET in membrane homogenates. The potency of reserpine for reducing [(3)H]NE uptake was dramatically lower in SK-N-SH cells that have reduced storage capacity for catecholamines. Reserpine had no effect on [(3)H]NE uptake in HEK-293 cells transfected with the rat NET (293-hNET), cells that lack catecholamine storage vesicles. NET regulation by reserpine was independent of trafficking of the NET from the cell surface. Pre-exposure of cells to inhibitors of several intracellular signaling cascades known to regulate the NET, including Ca(2+)/Ca(2+)-calmodulin dependent kinase and protein kinases A, C and G, did not affect the ability of reserpine to reduce [(3)H]NE uptake. Treatment of PC12 cells with the catecholamine depleting agent, alpha-methyl-p-tyrosine, increased [(3)H]NE uptake and eliminated the inhibitory effects of reserpine on [(3)H]NE uptake. Reserpine non-competitively inhibits NET activity through a Ca(2+)-independent process that requires catecholamine storage vesicles, revealing a novel pharmacological method to modify NET function. Further characterization of the molecular nature of reserpine's action could lead to the development of alternative therapeutic strategies for treating disorders known to be benefitted by treatment with traditional competitive NET inhibitors.

  9. Una aproximación a la identificación, medición y generación de los spillovers recíprocos*

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henry Caicedo Asprilla

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available En este documento se examina la literatura sobre los spillovers recíprocos, con el fin de contribuir a la comprensión que tienen estas externalidades en la organización industrial, la localización de las firmas multinacionales y la aglomeración de empresas. Pese a que la captura y representación de esta clase de externalidades ha sido objeto de críticas, aquí se recogen algunos trabajos que muestran la naturaleza e importancia de los spillovers recíprocos. Se aplicó el método bibliométrico de análisis de citas usando la base de datos Google Scholar. Se evidencia que los spillovers recíprocos se manifiestan a través de las citas de patentes, movilidad de la mano de obra entre empresas, el aprendizaje de formas de organización y producción, el compartimiento de canales de distribución, etc. De igual manera se muestra que los spillovers recíprocos surgen gracias a la configuración de redes entre las multinacionales y los actores de la región de llegada. Se concluye que si bien los spillovers recíprocos son difíciles de capturar y de medir, es posible seguir el rastro a este tipo de externalidades cuando el análisis se realiza en función del proceso de transferencia de tecnología

  10. Do Sustainable Stocks Offer Diversification Benefits for Conventional Portfolios? An Empirical Analysis of Risk Spillovers and Dynamic Correlations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehmet Balcilar

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper explores the potential diversification benefits of socially responsible investments for conventional stock portfolios by examining the risk spillovers and dynamic correlations between conventional and sustainability stock indexes from a number of regions. We observe significant unidirectional volatility transmissions from conventional to sustainable equities, suggesting that the criteria applied for socially responsible investments do not necessarily shield these securities from common market shocks. While significant dynamic correlations are observed between sustainable and conventional stocks, particularly in Europe, the analysis of both in- and out-of-sample dynamic portfolios suggests that supplementing conventional stock portfolios with sustainable counterparts improves the risk/return profile of stock portfolios in all regions. The findings overall suggest that sustainable investments can indeed provide diversification gains for conventional stock portfolios globally.

  11. Increased plasma dopamine in patients presenting with the pseudopheochromocytoma quandary: retrospective analysis of 10 years' experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuchel, O

    1998-10-01

    A retrospective analysis was made to determine alternative diagnoses in patients with predominantly hypertensive episodes who were suspected of having pheochromocytoma but in whom this diagnosis was eliminated. Analysis of a random university hospital population referred over a period of 10 years. Episodic clinical presentations of pheochromocytoma symptoms combined with a comparison of baseline and episodic radioenzymatically determined levels of plasma free norepinephrine and epinephrine were examined, together with prospective levels of plasma free and sulfated dopamine. Out of 63 patients presenting with episodes of palpitations, headaches, flushing, sweating and hyperventilation (associated with hypertension in 49 patients, with hypotension in six patients and with alternating hyper- and hypotension in eight patients), 14 were diagnosed as having idiopathic hypovolemia, nine as having mastocytosis, nine as having an adrenal tumor, four as having neurogenic hypertension and one each with cocaine abuse and reninoma. Both baseline and symptomatic levels of plasma free norepinephrine and epinephrine remained within physiological limits (exceeding them moderately in baroreceptor dysfunction only), but all subgroups had a mean episodic increase over baseline in plasma dopamine sulfate (mean+/-SEM 16.7+/-5.9 to 53.2+/-19 pmol/ml; P pheochromocytoma in hemodynamic instability and frequent flushing formed a heterogeneous group, with plasma norepinephrine and epinephrine usually within physiological limits but an overall mean threefold increase in dopamine sulfate concentrations. With the various diagnoses of idiopathic hypovolemia, mastocytosis, neurogenic, secondary hypertension and cocaine abuse eliminated as a cause of pheochromocytoma-like symptoms, at least half of these patients still had unexplained, predominantly emotionally or proprioreceptive stimulation-provoked, bouts of hypertension. Sympathetic arousal dominated by an increase in dopamine sulfate without

  12. Individual- and Organization-Level Work-to-Family Spillover Are Uniquely Associated with Hotel Managers' Work Exhaustion and Satisfaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Soomi; Davis, Kelly D; Neuendorf, Claudia; Grandey, Alicia; Lam, Chun Bun; Almeida, David M

    2016-01-01

    Building on the Conservation of Resources theory, this paper examined the unique and interactive associations of negative and positive work-to-family spillover (NWFS and PWFS, respectively) at the individual and organizational level with hotel managers' work exhaustion and satisfaction, beyond job demands and supervisors' leadership style. Guided by the levels of analysis framework, we first tested the unique associations of NWFS and PWFS with emotional exhaustion and job satisfaction at the individual level (571 hotel managers), beyond job demands supervisors' leadership style. Second, using multilevel modeling, we tested the climate effects of NWFS and PWFS on emotional exhaustion and job satisfaction aggregated at the organizational level (41 hotels). Third, we examined the role of the organizational climate of PWFS in the associations of individual-level NWFS with emotional exhaustion and job satisfaction. Beyond the effects of psychological job demands and supervisor's transformational leadership, at the individual level, hotel managers who experienced higher NWFS than other managers reported more exhaustion and lower job satisfaction, whereas those with higher PWFS reported less exhaustion and higher satisfaction. At the organizational level, working in hotels where the average level of NWFS was higher than other hotels was associated with feeling more exhaustion of the individual members; working in hotels with higher PWFS was associated with feeling less exhaustion. The negative link between individual-level NWFS and job satisfaction was buffered when organization-level PWFS was higher, compared to when it was lower. This study moves beyond a focus on traditional job characteristics, toward considering individual and organizational experiences in the work-family interface as unique predictors of work exhaustion and satisfaction. Strengths of the study include illuminating organizational work-family climate effects such that coworkers' shared experiences of

  13. Green tea catechins enhance norepinephrine-induced lipolysis via a protein kinase A-dependent pathway in adipocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Shu; Osaki, Noriko; Shimotoyodome, Akira

    2015-05-22

    Green tea catechins have been shown to attenuate obesity in animals and humans. The catechins activate adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK), and thereby increase fatty acid oxidation in liver and skeletal muscles. Green tea catechins have also been shown to reduce body fat in humans. However, the effect of the catechins on lipolysis in adipose tissue has not been fully understood. The aim of this study was to clarify the effect of green tea catechins on lipolysis in adipocytes and to elucidate the underlying mechanism. Differentiated mouse adipocyte cell line (3T3-L1) was stimulated with green tea catechins in the presence or absence of norepinephrine. Glycerol and free fatty acids in the media were measured. Phosphorylation of hormone-sensitive lipase (HSL) was determined by Western blotting, and the mRNA expression levels of HSL, adipose triglyceride lipase (ATGL), and perilipin were determined by quantitative RT-PCR. The cells were treated with inhibitors of protein kinase A (PKA), protein kinase C (PKC), protein kinase G (PKG), or mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) to determine the responsible pathway. Treatment of 3T3-L1 adipocytes with green tea catechins increased the level of glycerol and free fatty acids released into the media in the presence, but not absence, of norepinephrine, and increased the level of phosphorylated HSL in the cells. The catechins also increased mRNA and protein levels of HSL and ATGL. PKA inhibitor (H89) attenuated the catechin-induced increase in glycerol release and HSL phosphorylation. The results demonstrate that green tea catechins enhance lipolysis in the presence of norepinephrine via a PKA-dependent pathway in 3T3-L1 adipocytes, providing a potential mechanism by which green tea catechins could reduce body fat.

  14. Selective binding of 2-[{sup 125}I]iodo-nisoxetine to norepinephrine transporters in the brain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kung, M.-P.; Choi, Seok-Rye; Hou, Catherine; Zhuang, Z.-P.; Foulon, Catherine; Kung, Hank F. E-mail: kunghf@sunmac.spect.upenn.edu

    2004-07-01

    A radioiodinated ligand, (R)-N-methyl-(2-[{sup 125}I]iodo-phenoxy)-3-phenylpropylamine, [{sup 125}I]2-INXT, targeting norepinephrine transporters (NET), was successfully prepared. A no-carrier-added product, [{sup 125}I]2-INXT, displayed a saturable binding with a high affinity (K{sub d}=0.06 nM) in the homogenates prepared from rat cortical tissues as well as from LLC-PK{sub 1} cells expressing NET. A relatively low number of binding sties (B{sub max}=55 fmol/mg protein) measured with [{sup 125}I]2-INXT in rat cortical homogenates is consistent with the value reported for a known NET ligand, [{sup 3}H]nisoxetine. Competition studies with various compounds on [{sup 125}I]2-INXT binding clearly confirmed the pharmacological specificity and selectivity for NET binding sites. Following a tail-vein injection of [{sup 125}I]2-INXT in rats, a good initial brain uptake was observed (0.56% dose at 2 min) followed by a slow washout from the brain (0.2% remained at 3 hours post-injection). The hypothalamus (a NET-rich region) to striatum (a region devoid of NET) ratio was 1.5 at 3 hours post-i.v. injection. Pretreatment of rats with nisoxetine significantly inhibited the uptake of [{sup 125}I]2-INXT (70-100% inhibition) in locus coeruleus, hypothalamus and raphe nuclei, regions known to have a high density of NET; whereas escitalopram, a serotonin transporter ligand, did not show a similar effect. Ex vivo autoradiography of rat brain sections of [{sup 125}I]2-INXT (at 3 hours after an i.v. injection) displayed an excellent regional brain localization pattern corroborated to the specific NET distribution in the brain. The specific brain localization was significantly reduced by a dose of nisoxetine pretreatment. Taken together, the data suggest that [{sup 123}I]2-INXT may be useful for mapping NET binding sites in the brain.

  15. Locus Ceruleus Norepinephrine Release: A Central Regulator of CNS Spatio-Temporal Activation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atzori, Marco; Cuevas-Olguin, Roberto; Esquivel-Rendon, Eric; Garcia-Oscos, Francisco; Salgado-Delgado, Roberto C; Saderi, Nadia; Miranda-Morales, Marcela; Treviño, Mario; Pineda, Juan C; Salgado, Humberto

    2016-01-01

    Norepinephrine (NE) is synthesized in the Locus Coeruleus (LC) of the brainstem, from where it is released by axonal varicosities throughout the brain via volume transmission. A wealth of data from clinics and from animal models indicates that this catecholamine coordinates the activity of the central nervous system (CNS) and of the whole organism by modulating cell function in a vast number of brain areas in a coordinated manner. The ubiquity of NE receptors, the daunting number of cerebral areas regulated by the catecholamine, as well as the variety of cellular effects and of their timescales have contributed so far to defeat the attempts to integrate central adrenergic function into a unitary and coherent framework. Since three main families of NE receptors are represented-in order of decreasing affinity for the catecholamine-by: α2 adrenoceptors (α2Rs, high affinity), α1 adrenoceptors (α1Rs, intermediate affinity), and β adrenoceptors (βRs, low affinity), on a pharmacological basis, and on the ground of recent studies on cellular and systemic central noradrenergic effects, we propose that an increase in LC tonic activity promotes the emergence of four global states covering the whole spectrum of brain activation: (1) sleep: virtual absence of NE, (2) quiet wake: activation of α2Rs, (3) active wake/physiological stress: activation of α2- and α1-Rs, (4) distress: activation of α2-, α1-, and β-Rs. We postulate that excess intensity and/or duration of states (3) and (4) may lead to maladaptive plasticity, causing-in turn-a variety of neuropsychiatric illnesses including depression, schizophrenic psychoses, anxiety disorders, and attention deficit. The interplay between tonic and phasic LC activity identified in the LC in relationship with behavioral response is of critical importance in defining the short- and long-term biological mechanisms associated with the basic states postulated for the CNS. While the model has the potential to explain a large

  16. Synthesis and carbon-11 labeling of (R)- and (S)-thionisoxetine, norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors, potential radioligands for positron emission tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Azzurra Filannino, Maria [Institute of Molecular Bioimaging and Physiology, CNR, University of Milano-Bicocca, San Raffaele Scientific Institute, Via Olgettina 60, 20132 Milan (Italy); Matarrese, Mario [Institute of Molecular Bioimaging and Physiology, CNR, University of Milano-Bicocca, San Raffaele Scientific Institute, Via Olgettina 60, 20132 Milan (Italy)], E-mail: matarrese.mario@hsr.it; Turolla, Elia Anna; Masiello, Valeria; Moresco, Rosa Maria; Todde, Sergio; Verza, Elisa [Institute of Molecular Bioimaging and Physiology, CNR, University of Milano-Bicocca, San Raffaele Scientific Institute, Via Olgettina 60, 20132 Milan (Italy); Magni, Fulvio [University of Milano-Bicocca, DIMESAB, via Cadore 48, 20052 Monza (Italy); Cattaneo, Angela; Bachi, Angela [Institute of Molecular Bioimaging and Physiology, CNR, University of Milano-Bicocca, San Raffaele Scientific Institute, Via Olgettina 60, 20132 Milan (Italy); Kienle, Marzia Galli [University of Milano-Bicocca, DIMESAB, via Cadore 48, 20052 Monza (Italy); Fazio, Ferruccio [Institute of Molecular Bioimaging and Physiology, CNR, University of Milano-Bicocca, San Raffaele Scientific Institute, Via Olgettina 60, 20132 Milan (Italy)

    2007-11-15

    Standards and des-methyl precursors of (R)- and (S)-thionisoxetine, potent and selective norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors, were synthesized and radiolabeled with carbon-11. Both enantiomers of the N-methyl-3-(2-thiomethylphenoxy)-3-phenylpropanamine and the 3-(2-thiomethylphenoxy)-3-phenylpropylamine were obtained via multi-step syntheses, while the radiosyntheses were carried out using [{sup 11}C]CH{sub 3}I. The radiochemical yields were 26%, decay corrected and the specific radioactivity ranging from 2 to 3 Ci/{mu}mol. The HPLC analyses were performed using a chiral column: during the radiolabeling, no racemization occurred and the isomers were synthesized with high enantiomeric purity.

  17. [Hormone content of the blood plasma of rats after a flight on the Kosmos-1129 biosatellite].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tigranian, R A; Kalita, N F; Macho, L; Kvetnanský, R

    1985-01-01

    The concentration of ACTH, insulin, glucagon, glucose, epinephrine, norepinephrine, thyrotrophic hormone, thyroxine, and triiodothyronine was measured in plasma of the rats flown for 18.5 days on Cosmos-1129. As a result of the flight, the concentration of insulin, thyrotrophic hormone, and triiodothyronine increased and that of thyroxine decreased. It is suggested that the above changes have been induced by an acute stress associated with biosatellite reentry and touchdown.

  18. EFFECTS OF IBOPAMINE ON EXERCISE-INDUCED INCREASE IN NOREPINEPHRINE IN NORMAL MEN

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    GIRBES, ARJ; VANVELDHUISEN, DJ; GREVINK, RG; SMIT, AJ; REITSMA, WD

    1992-01-01

    The effects of 100 mg ibopamine, an orally active aselective dopamine (DA) agonist, on plasma catecholamines was evaluated in 8 healthy men during sympathetic stimulation by graded exercise in a single-blind, placebo-controlled cross-over study. The exercise consisted of progressive cycling activity

  19. EFFECTS OF IBOPAMINE ON EXERCISE-INDUCED INCREASE IN NOREPINEPHRINE IN NORMAL MEN

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    GIRBES, ARJ; VANVELDHUISEN, DJ; GREVINK, RG; SMIT, AJ; REITSMA, WD

    The effects of 100 mg ibopamine, an orally active aselective dopamine (DA) agonist, on plasma catecholamines was evaluated in 8 healthy men during sympathetic stimulation by graded exercise in a single-blind, placebo-controlled cross-over study. The exercise consisted of progressive cycling activity

  20. In vivo assessment of [{sup 11}C]MRB as a prospective PET ligand for imaging the norepinephrine transporter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Severance, Alin J. [New York State Psychiatric Institute, Division of Brain Imaging, Department of Neuroscience, New York, NY (United States); Milak, Matthew S.; Dileep Kumar, J.S.; Arango, Victoria; Parsey, Ramin V. [Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons, Department of Psychiatry, New York, NY (United States); New York State Psychiatric Institute, Division of Brain Imaging, Department of Neuroscience, New York, NY (United States); Prabhakaran, Jaya; Majo, Vattoly J. [Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons, Department of Psychiatry, New York, NY (United States); Simpson, Norman R.; Van Heertum, Ronald L. [Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons, Department of Radiology, New York, NY (United States); Mann, J.J. [Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons, Department of Psychiatry, New York, NY (United States); Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons, Department of Radiology, New York, NY (United States); New York State Psychiatric Institute, Division of Brain Imaging, Department of Neuroscience, New York, NY (United States)

    2007-05-15

    Antagonism of norepinephrine reuptake is now an important pharmacological strategy in the treatment of anxiety and depressive disorders, and many antidepressants have substantial potential occupancy of the norepinephrine transporter (NET) at recommended dosages. Despite the importance of understanding this transporter's role in psychiatric disease and treatment, a suitable radioligand for studying NET has been slow to emerge. (S,S)-Methylreboxetine (MRB) is among the more promising ligands recently adapted for positron emission tomography (PET), and the present study aimed to evaluate its potential for use in higher primates. Affinities for various brain targets were determined in vitro. PET studies were conducted in baboon under both test-retest and blocking conditions using 1 mg/kg nisoxetine. MRB has sixfold higher affinity for NET than the serotonin transporter, and negligible affinity for other sites. PET studies in baboons showed little regional heterogeneity in binding and were minimally affected by pretreatment with the NET antagonist nisoxetine. Despite improvement over previous ligands for imaging NET in vivo, the low signal to noise ratio indicates [{sup 11}C]MRB lacks sensitivity and reliability as a PET radiotracer in humans. (orig.)