WorldWideScience

Sample records for plasma luminescence feedback

  1. Ultrashort pulse laser microsurgery system with plasma luminescence feedback control

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, B.M.; Feit, M.D.; Rubenchik, A.M.; Gold, D.M.; Darrow, C.B.; Da Silva, L.B.

    1997-11-10

    Plasma luminescence spectroscopy was used for precise ablation of bone tissue during ultrashort pulse laser (USPL) micro-spinal surgery. Strong contrast of the luminescence spectra between bone marrow and spinal cord provided the real time feedback control so that only bone tissue can be selectively ablated while preserving the spinal cord.

  2. Monitoring Delamination of Plasma-Sprayed Thermal Barrier Coatings by Reflectance-Enhanced Luminescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eldridge, Jeffrey I.; Bencic, Timothy J.

    2006-01-01

    Highly scattering plasma-sprayed thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) present a challenge for optical diagnostic methods to monitor TBC delamination because scattering attenuates light transmitted through the TBC and usually degrades contrast between attached and delaminated regions of the TBC. This paper presents a new approach where reflectance-enhanced luminescence from a luminescent sublayer incorporated along the bottom of the TBC is used to identify regions of TBC delamination. Because of the higher survival rate of luminescence reflecting off the back surface of a delaminated TBC, the strong scattering exhibited by plasma-sprayed TBCs actually accentuates contrast between attached and delaminated regions by making it more likely that multiple reflections of luminescence off the back surface occur before exiting the top surface of the TBC. A freestanding coating containing sections designed to model an attached or delaminated TBC was prepared by depositing a luminescent Eu-doped or Er-doped yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) luminescent layer below a plasma-sprayed undoped YSZ layer and utilizing a NiCr backing layer to represent an attached substrate. For specimens with a Eu-doped YSZ luminescent sublayer, luminescence intensity maps showed excellent contrast between unbacked and NiCr-backed sections even at a plasma-sprayed overlayer thickness of 300 m. Discernable contrast between unbacked and NiCr-backed sections was not observed for specimens with a Er-doped YSZ luminescent sublayer because luminescence from Er impurities in the undoped YSZ layer overwhelmed luminescence originating form the Er-doped YSZ sublayer.

  3. Observation of Quartz Cathode-Luminescence in a Low Pressure Plasma Discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foster, John E.

    2004-01-01

    Intense, steady-state cathode-luminescence has been observed from exposure of quartz powder to a low pressure rf-excited argon plasma discharge. The emission spectra (400 to 850 nm) associated with the powder luminescence were documented as a function of bias voltage using a spectrometer. The emission was broad-band, essentially washing out the line spectra features of the argon plasma discharge.

  4. Feedback Control for Plasma Position on HL-2A Tokamak

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIBo; SONGXianming; LILi; LIULi; WANGMinghong; FANMingjie; CHENLiaoyuan; YAOLieying; YANGQingwei

    2003-01-01

    HL-2A is a tokamak with closed divertor. It had been built at the end of 2002 and began to discharge from then on. To further study plasma discharges in HL-2A, a feedback control system (FBCS) for plasma position bad been developed in 2003.

  5. Microseconds-scale magnetic actuators system for plasma feedback stabilization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kogan, K.; Be'ery, I.; Seemann, O.

    2016-10-01

    Many magnetic confinement machines use active feedback stabilization with magnetic actuators. We present a novel magnetic actuators system with a response time much faster than previous ones, making it capable of coping with the fast plasma instabilities. The system achieved a response time of 3 μs with maximal current of 500 A in a coil with inductance of 5.2 μH. The system is based on commercial solid-state switches and FPGA state machine, making it easily scalable to higher currents or higher inductivity.

  6. Luminescent, water-soluble silicon quantum dots via micro-plasma surface treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Jeslin J.; Kondeti, Vighneswara Siva Santosh Kumar; Bruggeman, Peter J.; Kortshagen, Uwe R.

    2016-03-01

    Silicon quantum dots (SiQDs), with their broad absorption, narrow and size-tunable emission, and potential biocompatibility are highly attractive materials in biological imaging applications. The inherent hydrophobicity and instability of hydrogen-terminated SiQDs are obstacles to their widespread implementation. In this work, we successfully produced highly luminescent, hydrophilic SiQDs with long-term stability in water using non-thermal plasma techniques. Hydrogen-terminated SiQDs were produced in a low-pressure plasma and subsequently treated in water using an atmospheric-pressure plasma jet for surface modification. Preliminary assessments of the chemical mechanism(s) involved in the creation of water-soluble SiQDs were performed using Fenton’s reaction and various plasma chemistries, suggesting both OH and O species play a key role in the oxidation of the SiQDs.

  7. Disruption avoidance through active magnetic feedback in tokamak plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paccagnella, Roberto; Zanca, Paolo; Yanovskiy, Vadim; Finotti, Claudio; Manduchi, Gabriele; Piron, Chiara; Carraro, Lorella; Franz, Paolo; RFX Team

    2014-10-01

    Disruptions avoidance and mitigation is a fundamental need for a fusion relevant tokamak. In this paper a new experimental approach for disruption avoidance using active magnetic feedback is presented. This scheme has been implemented and tested on the RFX-mod device operating as a circular tokamak. RFX-mod has a very complete system designed for active mode control that has been proved successful for the stabilization of the Resistive Wall Modes (RWMs). In particular the current driven 2/1 mode, unstable when the edge safety factor, qa, is around (or even less than) 2, has been shown to be fully and robustly stabilized. However, at values of qa (qa > 3), the control of the tearing 2/1 mode has been proved difficult. These results suggested the idea to prevent disruptions by suddenly lowering qa to values around 2 where the tearing 2/1 is converted to a RWM. Contrary to the universally accepted idea that the tokamaks should disrupt at low qa, we demonstrate that in presence of a well designed active control system, tokamak plasmas can be driven to low qa actively stabilized states avoiding plasma disruption with practically no loss of the plasma internal energy.

  8. Plasma synthesis and liquid-phase surface passivation of brightly luminescent Si nanocrystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mangolini, L. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Minnesota, 111 Church St. SE, Minneapolis, MN 55455 (United States); Jurbergs, D. [InnovaLight, Inc., 3303 Octavius Dr., Suite 104, Santa Clara, CA 95054 (United States); Rogojina, E. [InnovaLight, Inc., 3303 Octavius Dr., Suite 104, Santa Clara, CA 95054 (United States); Kortshagen, U. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Minnesota, 111 Church St. SE, Minneapolis, MN 55455 (United States)]. E-mail: uk@me.umn.edu

    2006-12-15

    While silicon's optical properties are improved at the nanoscale, they also become highly sensitive to the properties of the surfaces and interfaces of silicon nanostructures. For instance, while reported quantum yields for photoluminescence of silicon quantum dots covered by a native oxide are often in the few percent range, quantum yields as high as 30% have been found in quantum dots whose surfaces were passivated by covalently bonded organic molecules. In this paper, we describe an approach that is based on the gas phase synthesis of silicon quantum dots in a nonthermal plasma, and the subsequent organic surface passivation in the liquid phase. Nanocrystals are formed within a few milliseconds with a high mass yield in a nonthermal plasma. Various organic ligands such as octadecene, dodecence, and styrene are grafted onto the nanocrystal surfaces in a reaction known as hydrosilylation. Materials are characterized through transmission electron microscopy, atomic force microscopy, and fluorescence measurements. The particle size distributions are found to be relatively monodisperse and are well controllable through the plasma process parameters. Photoluminescence quantum yields as high as 60-70% have been achieved for particles luminescing in the red range of the visible spectrum.

  9. Upgrade of plasma density feedback control system in HT-7 tokamak

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHAO Da-Zheng; LUO Jia-Rong; LI Gang; JI Zhen-Shan; WANG Feng

    2004-01-01

    The HT-7 is a superconducting tokamak in China used to make researches on the controlled nuclear fusion as a national project for the fusion research. The plasma density feedback control subsystem is the one of the subsystems of the distributed control system in HT-7 tokamak (HT7DCS). The main function of the subsystem is to control the plasma density on real-time. For this reason, the real-time capability and good stability are the most significant factors, which will influence the control results. Since the former plasma density feedback control system (FPDFCS) based on Windows operation system could not fulfill such requirements well, a new subsystem has to be developed. The paper describes the upgrade of the plasma density feedback control system (UPDFCS), based on the dual operation system (Windows and Linux), in detail.

  10. Effect of Sulfur Acid Corrosion on the Luminescent Intensity of Plasma-Sprayed YAG:Ce Coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Weize; Zeng, Peng; Wang, Hehui; Yu, Jingye; Wu, Liangmin

    2016-12-01

    In order to monitor the corrosion condition of components, plasma-sprayed YAG:Ce coating was prepared for the detection, which could develop the application of plasma spraying. The effect of sulfuric acid corrosion on the microstructure, phase composition and luminescence intensity of coatings was studied. The powder was synthesized by the high-temperature solid-state method. Microstructure and phases were characterized through using SEM and XRD, respectively. Effect of immersion time in the acid was studied on the luminescence intensity. It was found that the phase composition of the powder was dominated by YAG (Y3Al5O12). More pores could be observed in coatings with the increase in immersion time. Sprayed coatings mainly included phases of YAG and YAP (YAlO3). The position of the XRD peaks of coatings was changing during the immersion. The luminescence intensity showed the fluctuation tendency with the immersion time, which related to the coating porosity, phase composition and the migration of the diffract peak.

  11. Deposition of silica protected luminescent layers of Eu:GdVO{sub 4} nanoparticles assisted by atmospheric pressure plasma jet

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moretti, Elisa, E-mail: elisa.moretti@unive.it [Dipartimento di Scienze Molecolari e Nanosistemi, Università Ca' Foscari Venezia, INSTM Venice Research Unit, Via Torino 155/B, 30172 Mestre, Venezia (Italy); Pizzol, Giorgia [Dipartimento di Scienze Molecolari e Nanosistemi, Università Ca' Foscari Venezia, INSTM Venice Research Unit, Via Torino 155/B, 30172 Mestre, Venezia (Italy); Fantin, Marina; Enrichi, Francesco; Scopece, Paolo [Nanofab-Veneto Nanotech, Via delle Industrie 5, 30175 Marghera, Venezia (Italy); Nuñez, Nuria O.; Ocaña, Manuel [Instituto de Ciencia de Materiales de Sevilla, CSIC-US, Americo Vespucio 49, 41092, Isla de la Cartuja, Sevilla (Spain); Benedetti, Alvise [Dipartimento di Scienze Molecolari e Nanosistemi, Università Ca' Foscari Venezia, INSTM Venice Research Unit, Via Torino 155/B, 30172 Mestre, Venezia (Italy); Polizzi, Stefano [Dipartimento di Scienze Molecolari e Nanosistemi, Università Ca' Foscari Venezia, INSTM Venice Research Unit, Via Torino 155/B, 30172 Mestre, Venezia (Italy); Centro di Microscopia Elettronica “Giovanni Stevanato”, Università Ca' Foscari Venezia, Via Torino 155/B, 30172 Mestre, Venezia (Italy)

    2016-01-01

    Eu:GdVO{sub 4} nanophosphors with an average size of 60 nm, synthesized by a facile solvothermal method, were deposited on monocrystalline silicon wafers by a spray-coating technique with artworks anti-counterfeiting applications in mind. Atmospheric pressure plasma jet (APPJ) was used to deposit a silica-based layer on top of the nanometric luminescent layer, in order to improve its adhesion to the substrate and to protect it from the environment. The nanophosphors were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Coating composition was investigated by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) and its morphology was characterized by scanning electron microscopy (FEG-SEM). The film thickness was evaluated by means of ellipsometry and adhesion was estimated by a peeling test. Luminescent properties of the nanophosphors deposited and fixed on silicon wafers were also measured. The whole layer resulted well-adhered to the silicon substrate, transparent and undetectable in the presence of visible light, but easily activated by UV light source. - Highlights: • Luminescent films were obtained by spray deposition of Eu:GdVO{sub 4} nanophosphors. • Plasma jet deposition of SiO{sub 2} fixed the nanophosphors on the substrate. • Optical properties of nanophosphors were preserved after deposition-fixing process. • Films well-adhered to the substrate, even after a scotch tape peeling test and a scratch test.

  12. Fast feedback control of plasma horizontal position by using DSP and IGBT inverter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Toyoda, Mitsuhiro; Kikuchi, Yusuke; Takamura, Shuichi [Nagoya Univ., Graduate School of Engineering, Nagoya, Aichi (Japan); Uesugi, Yoshihiko [Nagoya Univ., Center for Integrated Research in Science and Engineering, Nagoya, Aichi (Japan)

    2003-03-01

    To achieve high confinement properties of a tokamak plasma, it is necessary to control the plasma position, current profile, shape of magnetic surface etc. In addition to these, it has been found that a resistive wall mode (RWM) may limit the achievable plasma beta in present tokamak devices. Therefore, it is expected that an active feedback control using external coils is necessary to stabilize the RWM. A power supply for plasma control coils requires an accurate controllability and a fast response against such plasma disturbances. Recent development of high power and fast switching semiconductors, such as Insulated Gate Bipolar Transistor (IGBT) and MOSFET, improves the temporal response of power supply with a great extent. A small tokamak device, HYBTOK-II, is equipped with IGBT inverter power supplies for Joule and vertical field coils. In this paper a real-time feedback control of the plasma horizontal position has been employed with Digital Signal Processor (DSP). The experimental results on plasma response with such a feedback control have been compared with analysis of plasma column motion using transfer functions. (author)

  13. Optically- and thermally-stimulated luminescences of Ce-doped SiO2 glasses prepared by spark plasma sintering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okada, Go; Kasap, Safa; Yanagida, Takayuki

    2016-11-01

    Rare-earth doped phosphors have been used in many applications including radiation measurements. In the latter applications, the radiation photons are converted to light so that we can indirectly detect the radiation using a conventional photodetector. In this work, we have prepared and characterized a Ce-doped SiO2 glass for dosimeter applications. Unlike conventional techniques such as sol-gel synthesis, the sample was prepared by spark plasma sintering. Although the PL emission seems to be only from the Ce3+ ions in the structure, due to the X-ray induced luminescence, we have also observed optically-stimulated luminescence (OSL), and thermally-stimulated luminescence (TSL), owing to a pair of silylenes and a set of dioxasilirane and silylene in addition to Ce3+. We have measured the detector response vs irradiation dose for both the OSL and TSL. The detector response in both cases is linear over the dose range from at least 1 mGy to 2 Gy. Particularly, the sensitivity of TSL is so high that it should be considered to be a good candidate for practical applications.

  14. The Construction of Plasma Density Feedback Control System on J-TEXT Tokamak

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ke, Xin; Chen, Zhipeng; Ba, Weigang; Shu, Shuangbao; Gao, Li; Zhang, Ming; Zhuang, Ge

    2016-02-01

    The plasma density feedback control system (PDFCS) has been established on the Joint Texas Experimental Tokamak (J-TEXT) for meeting the need for an accurate plasma density in physical experiments. It consists of a density measurement subsystem, a feedback control subsystem and a gas puffing subsystem. According to the characteristic of the gas puffing system, a voltage amplitude control mode has been applied in the feedback control strategy, which is accomplished by the proportion, integral and differential (PID) controller. In this system, the quantity calibration of gas injection, adjusted responding to the change of the density signal, has been carried out. Some experimental results are shown and discussed. supported by the National Magnetic Confinement Fusion Science Program (Nos. 2014GB103001 and 2013GB106001) and National Natural Science Foundation of China (Nos. 11305070 and 11105028)

  15. Experimental Investigation of Active Feedback Control of Turbulent Transport in a Magnetized Plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gilmore, Mark Allen [University of New Mexico

    2013-07-07

    A new and unique basic plasma science laboratory device - the HelCat device (HELicon-CAThode) - has been constructed and is operating at the University of New Mexico. HelCat is a 4 m long, 0.5 m diameter device, with magnetic field up to 2.2 kG, that has two independent plasmas sources - an RF helicon source, and a thermionic cathode. These two sources, which can operate independently or simultaneously, are capable of producing plasmas with a wide range of parameters and turbulence characteristics, well suited to a variety of basic plasma physics experiments. An extensive set of plasma diagnostics is also operating. Experiments investigating the active feedback control of turbulent transport of particles and heat via electrode biasing to affect plasma ExB flows are underway, and ongoing.

  16. Dynamics and Feedback Control of Plasma Equilibrium Position in a Tokamak.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burenko, Oleg

    A brief history of the beginnings of nuclear fusion research involving toroidal closed-system magnetic plasma containment is presented. A tokamak machine is defined mathematically for the purposes of plasma equilibrium position perturbation analysis. The perturbation equations of a tokamak plasma equilibrium position are developed. Solution of the approximated perturbation equations is carried out. A unique, simple, and useful plasma displacement dynamics transfer function of a tokamak is developed. The dominant time constants of the dynamics transfer function are determined in a symbolic form. This symbolic form of the dynamics transfer function makes it possible to study the stability of a tokamak's plasma equilibrium position. Knowledge of the dynamics transfer function permits systematic syntheses of the required plasma displacement feedback control systems. The major parameters governing the plasma equilibrium position stability of a tokamak are shown to be (1) external magnetic field decay index, (2) transformer iron core effect, (3) plasma current, (4) radial rate-of-change inductance parameter, (5) vertical rate-of-change inductance parameter, and (6) vacuum vessel eddy-current time constant. An important and unique result is derived, showing that for a vacuum vessel eddy-current time constant exceeding a certain value the vertical plasma equilibrium position is stable, in spite of an intentional vertical instability design represented by a negative decay index. It is shown that a tokamak design having a theoretical set of positive decay index, negative radical rate-of-change inductance parameter, and positive vertical rate-of-change inductance parameter is expected to have a better plasma equilibrium position stability tolerance than a tokamak design having the same set with the signs reversed. The results of an actual hardware ISX-A tokamak plasma displacement feed-back control system design are presented. It is shown that a theoretical design computer

  17. Feedback.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richardson, Barbara K

    2004-12-01

    The emergency department provides a rich environment for diverse patient encounters, rapid clinical decision making, and opportunities to hone procedural skills. Well-prepared faculty can utilize this environment to teach residents and medical students and gain institutional recognition for their incomparable role and teamwork. Giving effective feedback is an essential skill for all teaching faculty. Feedback is ongoing appraisal of performance based on direct observation aimed at changing or sustaining a behavior. Tips from the literature and the author's experience are reviewed to provide formats for feedback, review of objectives, and elements of professionalism and how to deal with poorly performing students. Although the following examples pertain to medical student education, these techniques are applicable to the education of all adult learners, including residents and colleagues. Specific examples of redirection and reflection are offered, and pitfalls are reviewed. Suggestions for streamlining verbal and written feedback and obtaining feedback from others in a fast-paced environment are given. Ideas for further individual and group faculty development are presented.

  18. Optical boundary reconstruction of tokamak plasmas for feedback control of plasma position and shape

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hommen, G.; de M. Baar,; Nuij, P.; McArdle, G.; Akers, R.; Steinbuch, M.

    2010-01-01

    A new diagnostic is developed to reconstruct the plasma boundary using visible wavelength images. Exploiting the plasma's edge localized and toroidally symmetric emission profile, a new coordinate transform is presented to reconstruct the plasma boundary from a poloidal view image. The plasma b

  19. Solar Wind Access to Lunar Polar Craters: Feedback Between Surface Charging and Plasma Expansion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimmerman, M. I.; Farrell, W. M.; Stubbs, T. J.; Halekas, J. S.; Jackson, T. L.

    2011-01-01

    Determining the plasma environment within permanently shadowed lunar craters is critical to understanding local processes such as surface charging, electrostatic dust transport, volatile sequestration, and space weathering. In order to investigate the nature of this plasma environment, the first two-dimensional kinetic simulations of solar wind expansion into a lunar crater with a self-consistent plasma-surface interaction have been undertaken. The present results reveal how the plasma expansion into a crater couples with the electrically-charged lunar surface to produce a quasi-steady wake structure. In particular, there is a negative feedback between surface charging and ambipolar wake potential that allows an equilibrium to be achieved, with secondary electron emission strongly moderating the process. A range of secondary electron yields is explored, and two distinct limits are highlighted in which either surface charging or ambipoiar expansion is responsible for determining the overall wake structure.

  20. Feedback Control of Plasma Current and Horizontal Position in HT-7

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    There is a strong magnetic coupling between poloidal field coils of superconducting tokamak HT-7, especially between ohinic heating and vertical field coils. These coils are connected to individual power supply. The control system for the plasma current and horizontal position control has been designed and showed satisfactory results with the feedback control of multivariable feedforward-decoupling and var-parameter PID controller to simultaneously modulate power supplies. The design and analysis of the control system is presented.

  1. Luminescence Instrumentation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jain, Mayank; Bøtter-Jensen, Lars

    2014-01-01

    This chapter gives an introduction to instrumentation for stimulated luminescence studies, with special focus on luminescence dating using the natural dosimeters, quartz and feldspars. The chapter covers basic concepts in luminescence detection, and thermal and optical stimulation, and reference...

  2. Electron-beam irradiation effects on luminescence properties in subsurface regions of single-crystalline sapphires treated with and without hydrogen plasma exposures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Bo-Hyun [Department of Electrical Engineering, Graduate School of Engineering, Osaka University, 2-1 Yamada-oka, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan)]. E-mail: bhlee@daiyan.eei.eng.osaka-u.ac.jp; Ito, Toshimichi [Department of Electrical Engineering, Graduate School of Engineering, Osaka University, 2-1 Yamada-oka, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan)

    2007-10-15

    Electron irradiation effects on various insulating sapphires treated with and without hydrogen plasma have been investigated mainly by means of cathodoluminescence (CL) measurements. The samples examined included Be-diffusion-treated natural sapphire (BNS) and two types of synthetic sapphires grown by Verneuil and Czochralski methods. For all the samples examined, on one hand, their CL intensities of the F{sup +}-center-related emission peaked at {approx}3.8 eV rapidly increased with increasing the fluences of keV electrons, and were represented roughly by exponentially saturating curves. There occurred slight blue-shifts of the F{sup +}-center luminescence other than the intensity increases for some of the electron-irradiated specimens, suggesting possible presence of two components for the F{sup +}-center luminescence. On the other hand, a hydrogen plasma exposure to these sapphires resulted in sample-dependent changes in the optical property and in the beam-irradiation effect on the F{sup +}-center CL emission. Such variations were induced most strongly in the BNS sample, whose color changed from orange to pink due to substantial decreases in the absorbance after the hydrogen plasma treatment. Furthermore, the energy positions of both the Cr{sup 3+}-center luminescence peaked at {approx}1.8 eV and its satellite peaks were found to slightly shift for the untreated and H-plasma-treated BNS samples after the electron beam irradiations. Possible origins of these observations are discussed.

  3. Feedback Control of Flow Separation Using Plasma Actuator and FBG Sensor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takehiko Segawa

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A feedback control system for mitigating flow separation was developed by using a string-type dielectric-barrier-discharge (DBD plasma actuator and a fiber Bragg grating (FBG sensor. Tangential jets were induced from the string-type DBD plasma actuator, which was located at 5% chord from the leading edge of an NACA0024 airfoil. The FBG sensor was attached to the interior surface near the root of the cantilever beam modeled on the pressure surface of the airfoil. The strain at the cantilever root was reflected in the form of Bragg wavelengths (λB detected by the FBG sensor when the cantilever tip was vibrated by the flow near the trailing edge of the airfoil. It was found that calculating running standard deviations in the Bragg wavelength (λB′ detected by the sensor was valuable for judging flow separation in real time. The feedback control of flow separation on the NACA0024 airfoil was successfully demonstrated by setting λB′=0.0028 with periodic flow separations generated in a wind tunnel by oscillating a side wall of the test section with frequency fw=0.42 Hz. It was confirmed that the appearance probability of flow separation tends to decrease with a decrease in the duration for calculating λB′ and with an increase in the duration of jet injection.

  4. A method for calculating active feedback system to provide vertical position control of plasma in a tokamak

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Nizami Gasilov

    2007-04-01

    In designing tokamaks, the maintenance of vertical stability of plasma is one of the most important problems. Systems of the passive and active feedbacks are applied for this purpose. Role of the passive system consisting of a vacuum vessel and passive coils is to suppress fast MHD (magnetohydrodynamic) instabilities. The active feedback system is applied to control slow motions of plasma. The objective of the paper is to investigate two successive problems, solution of which allows to determine the possibility of controlling plasma motions. One of these is the problem of vertical stability under the assumption of ideal conductivity of plasma and passive stabilizing elements. The problem is solved analytically and on the basis of the obtained solution a criterion of MHD-stability is formulated. The other problem is connected with the control of plasma vertical position with active feedback system. Calculation of feedback control parameters is formulated as an optimization problem and an approximate method to solve the problem is suggested. Numerical simulations are performed with parameters of the T-15M tokamak in order to justify the suggested method.

  5. A novel design of feedback control system for plasma horizontal position in IR-T1 tokamak

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Naghidokht, A.; Khodabakhsh, R. [Department of physics, Urmia University, Urmia (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Salar Elahi, A., E-mail: Salari_phy@yahoo.com [Plasma Physics Research Center, Science and Research Branch, Islamic Azad University, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Ghoranneviss, M. [Plasma Physics Research Center, Science and Research Branch, Islamic Azad University, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2016-06-15

    Determination of accurate plasma horizontal position during plasma discharge is essential to transport it to a control system based on feedback. By using the plasma-circuits linearized model, Proportional Integral Derivative (PID) based controllers and a first order transfer function representing the power supply (PS) dynamics of vertical coil system for IR-T1 tokamak, we analyzed step feedback response of the overall system of IR-T1 tokamak and corresponding Bode diagrams for two cases with and without the plasma resistance and the eddy currents distribution. Also we did experiments for determination of plasma horizontal displacement in this tokamak. This work is done by four magnetic probes that are installed on the circular contour of the tokamak. This data used as input to the feedback controller to validate the performance of it. Results of feedback response analysis show that the controller has good performance. Due to approximations in the controller design, construction, installation and implementation of the controller is necessary and this is the purpose of our future works.

  6. Total oxidant-scavenging capacities of plasma from glycogen storage disease type Ia patients as measured by cyclic voltammetry, FRAP and luminescence techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koren, E; Lipkin, J; Klar, A; Hershkovitz, E; Ginsburg, I; Kohen, R

    2009-10-01

    It has been suggested that the very low incidence of atherosclerosis in glycogen storage disease type Ia (GSD Ia) subjects might be attributed to elevated levels of uric acid, one of the potent low molecular- weight antioxidants found in plasma. The present communication describes a use of two analytical methods-cyclic voltammetry and ferric reducing ability of plasma-and also two chemiluminescence methods to evaluate the total oxidant-scavenging capacities (TOSC) of plasma from GSD Ia patients. Our results verified the elevation of TOSC in GSD Ia patients and we propose the inclusion of luminescence and cyclic voltammetry assays as reliable methods for estimating TOSC in a variety of clinical disorders. Our findings with the cyclic voltammetry method add support to the assumption that the elevated uric acid levels might be the main contributor to plasma antioxidant capacity and possible protection against atherosclerosis.

  7. Luminescent Nanocrystalline Silicon Carbide Thin Film Deposited by Helicon Wave Plasma Enhanced Chemical Vapour Deposition

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LU Wan-bing; YU Wei; WU Li-ping; CUI Shuang-kui; FU Guang-sheng

    2006-01-01

    Hydrogenated nanocrystalline silicon carbide (SiC) thin films were deposited on the single-crystal silicon substrate using the helicon wave plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (HW-PECVD) technique. The influences of magnetic field and hydrogen dilution ratio on the structures of SiC thin film were investigated with the atomic force microscopy (AFM), the Fourier transform infrared absorption (FTIR) and the transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The results indicate that the high plasma activity of the helicon wave mode proves to be a key factor to grow crystalline SiC thin films at a relative low substrate temperature. Also, the decrease in the grain sizes from the level of microcrystalline to that of nanocrystalline can be achieved by increasing the hydrogen dilution ratios. Transmission electron microscopy measurements reveal that the size of most nanocrystals in the film deposited under the higher hydrogen dilution ratios is smaller than the doubled Bohr radius of 3C-SiC (approximately 5.4 nm), and the light emission measurements also show a strong blue photoluminescence at the room temperature, which is considered to be caused by the quantum confinement effect of small-sized SiC nanocrystals.

  8. GPUbased, Microsecond Latency, HectoChannel MIMO Feedback Control of Magnetically Confined Plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rath, Nikolaus

    Feedback control has become a crucial tool in the research on magnetic confinement of plasmas for achieving controlled nuclear fusion. This thesis presents a novel plasma feedback control system that, for the first time, employs a Graphics Processing Unit (GPU) for microsecond-latency, real-time control computations. This novel application area for GPU computing is opened up by a new system architecture that is optimized for low-latency computations on less than kilobyte sized data samples as they occur in typical plasma control algorithms. In contrast to traditional GPU computing approaches that target complex, high-throughput computations with massive amounts of data, the architecture presented in this thesis uses the GPU as the primary processing unit rather than as an auxiliary of the CPU, and data is transferred from A-D/D-A converters directly into GPU memory using peer-to-peer PCI Express transfers. The described design has been implemented in a new, GPU-based control system for the High-Beta Tokamak - Extended Pulse (HBT-EP) device. The system is built from commodity hardware and uses an NVIDIA GeForce GPU and D-TACQ A-D/D-A converters providing a total of 96 input and 64 output channels. The system is able to run with sampling periods down to 4 μs and latencies down to 8 μs. The GPU provides a total processing power of 1.5 x 1012 floating point operations per second. To illustrate the performance and versatility of both the general architecture and concrete implementation, a new control algorithm has been developed. The algorithm is designed for the control of multiple rotating magnetic perturbations in situations where the plasma equilibrium is not known exactly and features an adaptive system model: instead of requiring the rotation frequencies and growth rates embedded in the system model to be set a priori, the adaptive algorithm derives these parameters from the evolution of the perturbation amplitudes themselves. This results in non-linear control

  9. Feedback control of plasma density and heating power for steady state operation in LHD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kamio, Shuji, E-mail: kamio@nifs.ac.jp; Kasahara, Hiroshi; Seki, Tetsuo; Saito, Kenji; Seki, Ryosuke; Nomura, Goro; Mutoh, Takashi

    2015-12-15

    Highlights: • We upgraded a control system for steady state operation in LHD. • This system contains gas fueling system and ICRF power control system. • Automatic power boost system is also attached for stable operation. • As a result, we achieved the long pulse up to 48 min in the electron density of more than 1 × 10{sup 19} m{sup −3}. - Abstract: For steady state operation, the feedback control of plasma density and heating power system was developed in the Large Helical Device (LHD). In order to achieve a record of the long pulse discharge, stable plasma density and heating power are needed. This system contains the radio frequency (RF) heating power control, interlocks, gas fueling, automatic RF phase control, ion cyclotron range of frequency (ICRF) antenna position control, and graphical user interface (GUI). Using the density control system, the electron density was controlled to the target density and using the RF heating power control system, the RF power injection could be stable. As a result of using this system, we achieved the long pulse up to 48 min in the electron density of more than 1 × 10{sup 19} m{sup −3}. Further, the ICRF hardware experienced no critical accidents during the 17th LHD experiment campaign in 2013.

  10. Optical feedback signal for ultrashort laser pulse ablation of tissue

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, B.-M.; Feit, M.D.; Rubenchik, A.M.; Mammini, B.M.; Da Silva, L.B.

    1997-07-01

    An optical feedback system for controlled precise tissue ablation is discussed. Our setup includes an ultrashort pulse laser (USPL), and a diagnostic system using analysis of either tissue fluorescence or plasma emission luminescence. Current research is focused on discriminating hard and soft tissues such as bone and spinal cord during surgery using either technique. Our experimental observations exhibit considerable spectroscopic contrast between hard and soft tissue, and both techniques offer promise for a practical diagnostic system.

  11. Luminescence nanothermometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaque, Daniel; Vetrone, Fiorenzo

    2012-07-01

    The current status of luminescence nanothermometry is reviewed in detail. Based on the main parameters of luminescence including intensity, bandwidth, bandshape, polarization, spectral shift and lifetime, we initially describe and compare the different classes of luminescence nanothermometry. Subsequently, the various luminescent materials used in each case are discussed and the mechanisms at the root of the luminescence thermal sensitivity are described. The most important results obtained in each case are summarized and the advantages and disadvantages of these approaches are discussed.The current status of luminescence nanothermometry is reviewed in detail. Based on the main parameters of luminescence including intensity, bandwidth, bandshape, polarization, spectral shift and lifetime, we initially describe and compare the different classes of luminescence nanothermometry. Subsequently, the various luminescent materials used in each case are discussed and the mechanisms at the root of the luminescence thermal sensitivity are described. The most important results obtained in each case are summarized and the advantages and disadvantages of these approaches are discussed. This work was supported by the Universidad Autónoma de Madrid and Comunidad Autónoma de Madrid (Project S2009/MAT-1756), by the Spanish Ministerio de Educacion y Ciencia (MAT2010-16161) and by Caja Madrid Foundation.

  12. Detection of HO2 in an atmospheric pressure plasma jet using optical feedback cavity-enhanced absorption spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gianella, Michele; Reuter, Stephan; Lawry Aguila, Ana; Ritchie, Grant A. D.; van Helden, Jean-Pierre H.

    2016-11-01

    Cold non-equilibrium atmospheric pressure plasma jets are increasingly applied in material processing and plasma medicine. However, their small dimensions make diagnosing the fluxes of generated species a challenge. Here we report on the detection of the hydroperoxyl radical, HO2, in the effluent of a plasma jet by the use of optical feedback cavity-enhanced absorption spectroscopy. The spectrometer has a minimum detectable absorption coefficient {α }\\min of 2.25× {10}-10 cm-1 with a 100 second acquisition, equivalent to 5.5× {10}12 {{cm}}-3 of HO2 (under ideal conditions). Concentrations in the range of (3.1-7.8) × 1013 cm-3 were inferred in the 4 mm wide effluent of the plasma jet.

  13. Plasma density feedback control system in HL-2A tokamak%HL-2A等离子体密度反馈控制系统研制

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    高霄雁; 田培红; 崔成和; 蔡潇

    2012-01-01

    介绍了HL-2A等离子体密度反馈控制系统的设计和实现.从密度反馈控制系统的设计原理、硬件设计和软件设计几方面,论述了等离子体密度反馈系统在HL-2A装置上的实现.实验证明,该系统实现了维持稳定可靠的密度波形的要求.%The design of the plasma density feedback control system (PDFCS) is described. The design requirements of the feedback control system including hardware and software are proposed to approach the plasma density reference value and then a discussion of "how to realize the feedback control" is given. The experimental results show that the feedback control system satisfies the real-time and stable control.

  14. ECRH on ASDEX Upgrade - System Status, Feed-Back Control, Plasma Physics Results -

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Flamm J.

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available The ASDEX Upgrade (AUG ECRH system now delivers a total of 3.9 MW to the plasma at 140 GHz. Three new units are capable of 2-frequency operation and may heat the plasma alternatively with 2.1 MW at 105 GHz. The system is routinely used with X2, O2, and X3 schemes. For Bt = 3.2 T also an ITER-like O1-scheme can be run using 105 GHz. The new launchers are capable of fast poloidal movements necessary for real-time control of the location of power deposition. Here real-time control of NTMs is summarized, which requires a fast analysis of massive data streams (ECE and Mirnov correlation and extensive calculations (equilibria, ray-tracing. These were implemented at AUG using a modular concept of standardized real-time diagnostics. The new realtime capabilities have also been used during O2 heating to keep the first reflection of the non-absorbed beam fraction on the holographic reflector tile which ensures a well defined second pass of the beam through the central plasma. Sensors for the beam position are fast thermocouples at the edge of the reflector tile. The enhanced ECRH power was used for several physics studies related to the unique feature of pure electron heating without fueling and without momentum input. As an example the effect of the variation of the heating mix in moderately heated H-modes is demonstrated using the three available heating systems, i.e. ECRH, ICRH and NBI. Keeping the total input power constant, strong effects are seen on the rotation, but none on the pedestal parameters. Also global quantities as the stored energy are hardly modified. Still it is found that the central ion temperature drops as the ECRH fraction exceeds a certain threshold.

  15. Simultaneous feedback control of plasma rotation and stored energy on NSTX-U using neoclassical toroidal viscosity and neutral beam injection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goumiri, I. R.; Rowley, C. W.; Sabbagh, S. A.; Gates, D. A.; Boyer, M. D.; Gerhardt, S. P.; Kolemen, E.; Menard, J. E.

    2017-05-01

    A model-based feedback system is presented enabling the simultaneous control of the stored energy through βn and the toroidal rotation profile of the plasma in National Spherical Torus eXperiment Upgrade device. Actuation is obtained using the momentum from six injected neutral beams and the neoclassical toroidal viscosity generated by applying three-dimensional magnetic fields. Based on a model of the momentum diffusion and torque balance, a feedback controller is designed and tested in closed-loop simulations using TRANSP, a time dependent transport analysis code, in predictive mode. Promising results for the ongoing experimental implementation of controllers are obtained.

  16. Three-dimensional relativistic pair plasma reconnection with radiative feedback in the Crab Nebula

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cerutti, B. [Department of Astrophysical Sciences, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ 08544 (United States); Werner, G. R.; Uzdensky, D. A. [Center for Integrated Plasma Studies, Physics Department, University of Colorado, UCB 390, Boulder, CO 80309-0390 (United States); Begelman, M. C., E-mail: bcerutti@astro.princeton.edu, E-mail: greg.werner@colorado.edu, E-mail: uzdensky@colorado.edu, E-mail: mitch@jila.colorado.edu [JILA, University of Colorado and National Institute of Standards and Technology, UCB 440, Boulder, CO 80309-0440 (United States)

    2014-02-20

    The discovery of rapid synchrotron gamma-ray flares above 100 MeV from the Crab Nebula has attracted new interest in alternative particle acceleration mechanisms in pulsar wind nebulae. Diffuse shock-acceleration fails to explain the flares because particle acceleration and emission occur during a single or even sub-Larmor timescale. In this regime, the synchrotron energy losses induce a drag force on the particle motion that balances the electric acceleration and prevents the emission of synchrotron radiation above 160 MeV. Previous analytical studies and two-dimensional (2D) particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations indicate that relativistic reconnection is a viable mechanism to circumvent the above difficulties. The reconnection electric field localized at X-points linearly accelerates particles with little radiative energy losses. In this paper, we check whether this mechanism survives in three dimension (3D), using a set of large PIC simulations with radiation reaction force and with a guide field. In agreement with earlier works, we find that the relativistic drift kink instability deforms and then disrupts the layer, resulting in significant plasma heating but few non-thermal particles. A moderate guide field stabilizes the layer and enables particle acceleration. We report that 3D magnetic reconnection can accelerate particles above the standard radiation reaction limit, although the effect is less pronounced than in 2D with no guide field. We confirm that the highest-energy particles form compact bunches within magnetic flux ropes, and a beam tightly confined within the reconnection layer, which could result in the observed Crab flares when, by chance, the beam crosses our line of sight.

  17. Three-dimensional Relativistic Pair Plasma Reconnection with Radiative Feedback in the Crab Nebula

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerutti, B.; Werner, G. R.; Uzdensky, D. A.; Begelman, M. C.

    2014-02-01

    The discovery of rapid synchrotron gamma-ray flares above 100 MeV from the Crab Nebula has attracted new interest in alternative particle acceleration mechanisms in pulsar wind nebulae. Diffuse shock-acceleration fails to explain the flares because particle acceleration and emission occur during a single or even sub-Larmor timescale. In this regime, the synchrotron energy losses induce a drag force on the particle motion that balances the electric acceleration and prevents the emission of synchrotron radiation above 160 MeV. Previous analytical studies and two-dimensional (2D) particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations indicate that relativistic reconnection is a viable mechanism to circumvent the above difficulties. The reconnection electric field localized at X-points linearly accelerates particles with little radiative energy losses. In this paper, we check whether this mechanism survives in three dimension (3D), using a set of large PIC simulations with radiation reaction force and with a guide field. In agreement with earlier works, we find that the relativistic drift kink instability deforms and then disrupts the layer, resulting in significant plasma heating but few non-thermal particles. A moderate guide field stabilizes the layer and enables particle acceleration. We report that 3D magnetic reconnection can accelerate particles above the standard radiation reaction limit, although the effect is less pronounced than in 2D with no guide field. We confirm that the highest-energy particles form compact bunches within magnetic flux ropes, and a beam tightly confined within the reconnection layer, which could result in the observed Crab flares when, by chance, the beam crosses our line of sight.

  18. Fringe-jump corrected far infrared tangential interferometer/polarimeter for a real-time density feedback control system of NSTX plasmas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juhn, J-W; Lee, K C; Hwang, Y S; Domier, C W; Luhmann, N C; Leblanc, B P; Mueller, D; Gates, D A; Kaita, R

    2010-10-01

    The far infrared tangential interferometer/polarimeter (FIReTIP) of the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) has been set up to provide reliable electron density signals for a real-time density feedback control system. This work consists of two main parts: suppression of the fringe jumps that have been prohibiting the plasma density from use in the direct feedback to actuators and the conceptual design of a density feedback control system including the FIReTIP, control hardware, and software that takes advantage of the NSTX plasma control system (PCS). By investigating numerous shot data after July 2009 when the new electronics were installed, fringe jumps in the FIReTIP are well characterized, and consequently the suppressing algorithms are working properly as shown in comparisons with the Thomson scattering diagnostic. This approach is also applicable to signals taken at a 5 kHz sampling rate, which is a fundamental constraint imposed by the digitizers providing inputs to the PCS. The fringe jump correction algorithm, as well as safety and feedback modules, will be included as submodules either in the gas injection system category or a new category of density in the PCS.

  19. Feldspar, Infrared Stimulated Luminescence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jain, Mayank

    2014-01-01

    This entry primarily concerns the characteristics and the origins of infrared-stimulated luminescence in feldspars.......This entry primarily concerns the characteristics and the origins of infrared-stimulated luminescence in feldspars....

  20. Feedback control of current drive by using hybrid wave in tokamaks; Asservissement de la generation de courant par l`onde hybride dans un plasma de tokamak

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wijnands, T.J. [Association Euratom-CEA, Centre d`Etudes Nucleaires de Cadarache, 13 - Saint-Paul-lez-Durance (France). Dept. de Recherches sur la Fusion Controlee]|[CEA Centre d`Etudes de Cadarache, 13 - Saint-Paul-lez-Durance (France). Direction des Sciences de la Matiere

    1997-03-01

    This work is focussed on an important and recent development in present day Controlled Nuclear Fusion Research and Tokamaks. The aim is to optimise the energy confinement for a certain magnetic configuration by adapting the radial distribution of the current. Of particular interest are feedback control scenarios with stationary modifications of the current profile using current, driven by Lower Hybrid waves. A new feedback control system has been developed for Tore Supra and has made a large number of new operation scenarios possible. In one of the experiments described here, there is no energy exchange between the poloidal field system and the plasma, the current is controlled by the power of the Lower Hybrid waves while the launched wave spectrum is used to optimise the current profile shape and the energy confinement. (author) 151 refs.

  1. On the formation of sharp gradients in electron density resulting from an ice-plasma feedback instabilities in the polar summer mesosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yee, J.; Bahcivan, H.

    2014-12-01

    Polar Mesospheric Summer Echoes (PMSEs) have commonly been attributed to scattering from (1) volume-filled electron density turbulence and (2) extremely sharp (meter-scale) gradients in electron density. In-situ sounding rockets have measured both extended regions of turbulence as well as electron density ledges. Unlike the turbulence theory, which has been extensively studied, a theory on the formation of sharp edges has yet to be explored. In this study, we reconsider the study of Gumbel et al. [2002] on the influences of ice particles on the ion chemistry and propose a theory of ice-plasma feedback instability in order to explain the origin of sharp electron density gradients. A one-dimensional particle-in-cell simulation of a multi-constituent weakly-ionized plasma has been developed to capture the physics of proton-hydrates (H+[H20]n), ice, and plasma interactions on a spatial grid of approximately 25 m. The simulation captures (1) the development of the proton-hydrate chain starting at n=4 via Thomson's model and Natanson's recombination scheme, (2) the formation of ice nucleation on large cluster proton-hydrates (n > 73), (3) the attachment of electrons (and ions) to ice particles, and resulting depletion of the plasma density, which significantly accelerates the proton-hydrate chain and ionic nucleation of new ice particles, (4) and the development of an ice-plasma feedback instability whereby the repeated process of developing new ice particles leads to capture of even more electrons and further depletion of existing regions of lower plasma density. Since this feedback instability process is faster than typical aerosol diffusion rates in this region, existing gradients steepen to produce electron density ledges. Although ionic nucleation is not feasible as the major mesospheric nucleation process, it can become efficient locally, near the coldest parts of the mesosphere because the proton-hydrate chain development is extremely sensitive to ambient

  2. Audio Feedback -- Better Feedback?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voelkel, Susanne; Mello, Luciane V.

    2014-01-01

    National Student Survey (NSS) results show that many students are dissatisfied with the amount and quality of feedback they get for their work. This study reports on two case studies in which we tried to address these issues by introducing audio feedback to one undergraduate (UG) and one postgraduate (PG) class, respectively. In case study one…

  3. Monitoring Delamination of Thermal Barrier Coatings by Near-Infrared and Upconversion Luminescence Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eldridge, J. I.; Martin, R. E.; Singh, Jogender; Wolfe, Doug E.

    2008-01-01

    Previous work has demonstrated that TBC delamination can be monitored by incorporating a thin luminescent sublayer that produces greatly increased luminescence intensity from delaminated regions of the TBC. Initial efforts utilized visible-wavelength luminescence from either europium or erbium doped sublayers. This approach exhibited good sensitivity to delamination of electron-beam physical-vapor-deposited (EB-PVD) TBCs, but limited sensitivity to delamination of the more highly scattering plasma-sprayed TBCs due to stronger optical scattering and to interference by luminescence from rare-earth impurities. These difficulties have now been overcome by new strategies employing near-infrared (NIR) and upconversion luminescence imaging. NIR luminescence at 1550 nm was produced in an erbium plus ytterbium co-doped yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) luminescent sublayer using 980-nm excitation. Compared to visible-wavelength luminescence, these NIR emission and excitation wavelengths are much more weakly scattered by the TBC and therefore show much improved depth-probing capabilities. In addition, two-photon upconversion luminescence excitation at 980 nm wavelength produces luminescence emission at 562 nm with near-zero fluorescence background and exceptional contrast for delamination indication. The ability to detect TBC delamination produced by Rockwell indentation and by furnace cycling is demonstrated for both EB-PVD and plasma-sprayed TBCs. The relative strengths of the NIR and upconversion luminescence methods for monitoring TBC delamination are discussed.

  4. Supervisor Feedback.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayman, Marilyn J.

    1981-01-01

    Investigated the effectiveness of supervisor feedback in contributing to learning counseling skills. Counselor trainees (N=64) were assigned to supervisor feedback, no supervisor feedback, or control groups for three training sessions. Results indicated counseling skills were learned best by students with no supervisor feedback but self and peer…

  5. Luminescence techniques: Instrumentation and methods

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bøtter-Jensen, L.

    1997-01-01

    This paper describes techniques, instruments and methods used in luminescence dating and environmental dosimetry in many laboratories around the world. These techniques are based on two phenomena - thermally stimulated luminescence and optically stimulated luminescence. The most commonly used...... luminescence stimulation and detection techniques are reviewed and information is given on recent developments in instrument design and on the stale of the art in luminescence measurements and analysis. (C) 1998 Elsevier Science Ltd. All rights reserved....

  6. Spectral luminescence analysis of amniotic fluid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slobozhanina, Ekaterina I.; Kozlova, Nataly M.; Kasko, Leonid P.; Mamontova, Marina V.; Chernitsky, Eugene A.

    1997-12-01

    It is shown that the amniotic fluid has intensive ultra-violet luminescence caused by proteins. Along with it amniotic fluid radiated in the field of 380 - 650 nm with maxima at 430 - 450 nm and 520 - 560 nm. The first peak of luminescence ((lambda) exc equals 350 nm; (lambda) em equals 430 - 440 nm) is caused (most probably) by the presence in amniotic fluid of some hormones, NADH2 and NADPH2. A more long-wave component ((lambda) exc equals 460 nm; (lambda) em equals 520 - 560 nm) is most likely connected with the presence in amniotic fluid pigments (bilirubin connected with protein and other). It is shown that intensity and maximum of ultra-violet luminescence spectra of amniotic fluid in normality and at pathology are identical. However both emission spectra and excitation spectra of long-wave ((lambda) greater than 450 nm) luminescence of amniotic fluid from pregnant women with such prenatal abnormal developments of a fetus as anencephaly and spina bifida are too long-wave region in comparison with the norm. Results of research testify that spectral luminescent analysis of amniotic fluid can be used for screening of malformations of the neural tube. It is very difficult for a practical obstetrician to reveal pregnant women with a high risk of congenital malformations of the fetus. Apart from ultrasonic examination, cytogenetic examination of amniotic fluid and defumination of concentrations of alpha-fetoprotein and acetylcholin-esterases in the amniotic fluid and blood plasma are the most widely used diagnostic approaches. However, biochemical and cytogenetic diagnostic methods are time-consuming. In the present work spectral luminescence properties of the amniotic fluid are investigated to determine spectral parameters that can be used to reveal pregnant women with a high risk of congenital malformations of their offsprings.

  7. Advanced synchronous luminescence system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vo-Dinh, Tuan

    1997-01-01

    A method and apparatus for determining the condition of tissue or otherwise making chemical identifications includes exposing the sample to a light source, and using a synchronous luminescence system to produce a spectrum that can be analyzed for tissue condition.

  8. Structured luminescence conversion layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berben, Dirk; Antoniadis, Homer; Jermann, Frank; Krummacher, Benjamin Claus; Von Malm, Norwin; Zachau, Martin

    2012-12-11

    An apparatus device such as a light source is disclosed which has an OLED device and a structured luminescence conversion layer deposited on the substrate or transparent electrode of said OLED device and on the exterior of said OLED device. The structured luminescence conversion layer contains regions such as color-changing and non-color-changing regions with particular shapes arranged in a particular pattern.

  9. Lightweight Portable Plasma Medical Device - Plasma Engineering Research Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-12-01

    research associates. The PI and the research team have published over 10 journal articles and over 50 conference proceedings and over 50 symposiums...reflections. Optical interference filters with center wavelength at 5322 or 632.82 nm are used in front of the ICCD to suppress the plasma self- luminescence ...wavelength at 532 ± 2 nm was used in front of the ICCD to suppress the plasma jet self- luminescence . The shadow of the laser induced plasma falls onto

  10. Luminescence from Porous Silicon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Gupta

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available Recent observations of photoluminescene (PL and electroluminescence (EL from poroussilicon (PS have prompted many theoretical and experimental studies. Bulk crystalline Si is anindirect band gap material in which .recombination is dominated by non-radiative processes.Therefore, it cannot be used as light-emitting component in Si circuits. PS is a new material formed byanodisation ofsingle crystal Si wafers in hydro fluoric (liF solution. Luminescence from this materialis being explored for technological applications all over the world. The mechanism of luminescence isstill not well-understood. Several models have been proposed but still the facts about the strong lightemission at room temperature are unknown. This paper presents a review of the fabrication process andstudies on luminescent properties of PS. A hybrid model based on quantum confinement of carriers inthe nanometer size Si crystallites having a large number of surface states is suggested to explain theobserved properties.

  11. CCD Luminescence Camera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janesick, James R.; Elliott, Tom

    1987-01-01

    New diagnostic tool used to understand performance and failures of microelectronic devices. Microscope integrated to low-noise charge-coupled-device (CCD) camera to produce new instrument for analyzing performance and failures of microelectronics devices that emit infrared light during operation. CCD camera also used to indentify very clearly parts that have failed where luminescence typically found.

  12. Silicon: electrochemistry and luminescence

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kooij, Ernst Stefan

    1997-01-01

    The electrochemistry of crystalline and porous silicon and the luminescence from porous silicon has been studied. One chapter deals with a model for the anodic dissolution of silicon in HF solution. In following chapters both the electrochemistry and various ways of generating visible luminescenc

  13. Silicon: electrochemistry and luminescence

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kooij, Ernst Stefan

    1997-01-01

    The electrochemistry of crystalline and porous silicon and the luminescence from porous silicon has been studied. One chapter deals with a model for the anodic dissolution of silicon in HF solution. In following chapters both the electrochemistry and various ways of generating visible

  14. Silicon: electrochemistry and luminescence

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kooij, Ernst Stefan

    2001-01-01

    The electrochemistry of crystalline and porous silicon and the luminescence from porous silicon has been studied. One chapter deals with a model for the anodic dissolution of silicon in HF solution. In following chapters both the electrochemistry and various ways of generating visible luminescenc

  15. Formativ Feedback

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hyldahl, Kirsten Kofod

    Denne bog undersøger, hvordan lærere kan anvende feedback til at forbedre undervisningen i klasselokalet. I denne sammenhæng har John Hattie, professor ved Melbourne Universitet, udviklet en model for feedback, hvilken er baseret på synteser af meta-analyser. I 2009 udgav han bogen "Visible...

  16. Luminescence dating of Netherlands’ sediments

    OpenAIRE

    Wallinga, J.; Davids, F.; Dijkmans, J.W.A.

    2007-01-01

    Over the last decades luminescence dating techniques have been developed that allow earth scientists to determine the time of deposition of sediments. In this contribution we review: 1) the development of the methodology; 2) tests of the reliability of luminescence dating on Netherlands’ sediments; and 3) geological applications of the method in the Netherlands. Our review shows that optically stimulated luminescence dating of quartz grains using the single aliquot regenerative dose method yi...

  17. Luminescent properties of aluminum hydride

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baraban, A.P.; Gabis, I.E.; Dmitriev, V.A. [Saint-Petersburg State University, Department of Physics, Saint-Petersburg 198504 (Russian Federation); Dobrotvorskii, M.A., E-mail: mstislavd@gmail.com [Saint-Petersburg State University, Department of Physics, Saint-Petersburg 198504 (Russian Federation); Kuznetsov, V.G. [Saint-Petersburg State University, Department of Physics, Saint-Petersburg 198504 (Russian Federation); Matveeva, O.P. [National Mineral Resources University, Saint Petersburg 199106 (Russian Federation); Titov, S.A. [Petersburg State University of Railway Transport, Saint-Petersburg 190031 (Russian Federation); Voyt, A.P.; Elets, D.I. [Saint-Petersburg State University, Department of Physics, Saint-Petersburg 198504 (Russian Federation)

    2015-10-15

    We studied cathodoluminescence and photoluminescence of α-AlH{sub 3}– a likely candidate for use as possible hydrogen carrier in hydrogen-fueled vehicles. Luminescence properties of original α-AlH{sub 3} and α-AlH{sub 3} irradiated with ultraviolet were compared. The latter procedure leads to activation of thermal decomposition of α-AlH{sub 3} and thus has a practical implementation. We showed that the original and UV-modified aluminum hydride contain luminescence centers ‐ structural defects of the same type, presumably hydrogen vacancies, characterized by a single set of characteristic bands of radiation. The observed luminescence is the result of radiative intracenter relaxation of the luminescence center (hydrogen vacancy) excited by electrons or photons, and its intensity is defined by the concentration of vacancies, and the area of their possible excitation. UV-activation of the dehydrogenation process of aluminum hydride leads to changes in the spatial distribution of the luminescence centers. For short times of exposure their concentration increases mainly in the surface regions of the crystals. At high exposures, this process extends to the bulk of the aluminum hydride and ends with a decrease in concentration of luminescence centers in the surface region. - Highlights: • Aluminum hydride contains hydrogen vacancies which serve as luminescence centers. • The luminescence is the result of radiative relaxation of excited centers. • Hydride UV-irradiation alters distribution and concentration of luminescence centers.

  18. New luminescent materials and filters for Luminescent Solar Concentrators

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Boer, D.K.G.; Ronda, C.R.; Keur, W.C.; Meijerink, A.

    2012-01-01

    In a Luminescent Solar Concentrator (LSC), short-wavelength light isconverted by a luminescent material into long-wavelength light, which is guided towards a photovoltaic cell. In principle, an LSC allows for high concentration, but in practice this is prevented by lossmechanisms like limited sunlig

  19. Feedback and Incentives

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eriksson, Tor Viking; Poulsen, Anders; Villeval, Marie Claire

    2009-01-01

    This paper experimentally investigates the impact of different pay schemes and relative performance feedback policies on employee effort. We explore three feedback rules: no feedback on relative performance, feedback given halfway through the production period, and continuously updated feedback. ...

  20. Luminescence dating of Netherland's sediments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wallinga, J.; Davids, F.; Dijkmans, J.W.A.

    2007-01-01

    Over the last decades luminescence dating techniques have been developed that allow earth scientists to determine the time of deposition of sediments. In this contribution we revity: 1) the development of the methodology, 2) tests of the reliability of luminescence dating on Netherlands' sediments;

  1. Power dependence of upconversion luminescence

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pollnau, Markus; Güdel, H.U.

    Spectroscopic data are of essential value for understanding the excitation mechanisms in luminescent and laser materials. Special attention has been devoted to the investigation of upconversion-induced luminescence, partly because of the availability of near-infrared pump sources for the excitation

  2. A luminescent nisin biosensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Immonen, Nina; Karp, Matti

    2006-02-01

    Nisin is a lantibiotic, an antibacterial peptide produced by certain Lactococcus lactis strains that kills or inhibits the growth of other bacteria. Nisin is widely used as a food preservative, and its long-time use suggests that it can be generally regarded as safe. We have developed a method for determining the amount of nisin in food samples that is based on luminescent biosensor bacteria. Bacterial luciferase operon luxABCDE was inserted into plasmid pNZ8048, and the construct was transformed by electroporation into Lc. lactis strain NZ9800, whose ability to produce nisin has been erased by deletion of the gene nisA. The operon luxABCDE has been modified to be functional in gram-positive bacteria to confer a bioluminescent phenotype without the requirement of adding an exogenous substrate. In the plasmid pNZ8048, the operon was placed under control of the nisin-inducible nisA promoter. The chromosomal nisRK genes of Lc. lactis NZ9800 allow it to sense nisin in the environment and relay this signal via signal transduction proteins NisK and NisR to initiate transcription from nisA promoter. In the case of our sensor bacteria, this leads to production of luciferase and, thus, luminescence that can be directly measured from living bacteria. Luminescence can be detected as early as within minutes of induction. The nisin assay described here provides a detection limit in the sub-picogram level per ml, and a linear area between 1 - 1000 pg/ml. The sensitivity of this assay exceeds the performance of all previously published methods.

  3. Stored Luminescence Computed Tomography

    CERN Document Server

    Cong, Wenxiang; Wang, Ge

    2013-01-01

    The phosphor nanoparticles made of doped semiconductors, pre-excited by well-collimated X-ray radiation, were recently reported for their light emission upon NIR light stimulation. The characteristics of X-ray energy storage and NIR stimulated emission is highly desirable to design targeting probes and improve molecular and cellular imaging. Here we propose stored luminescence computed tomography (SLCT), perform realistic numerical simulation, and demonstrate a much-improved spatial resolution in a preclinical research context. The future opportunities are also discussed along this direction.

  4. Luminescent macrocyclic lanthanide complexes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raymond, Kenneth N [Berkeley, CA; Corneillie, Todd M [Campbell, CA; Xu, Jide [Berkeley, CA

    2012-05-08

    The present invention provides a novel class of macrocyclic compounds as well as complexes formed between a metal (e.g., lanthanide) ion and the compounds of the invention. Preferred complexes exhibit high stability as well as high quantum yields of lanthanide ion luminescence in aqueous media without the need for secondary activating agents. Preferred compounds incorporate hydroxy-isophthalamide moieties within their macrocyclic structure and are characterized by surprisingly low, non-specific binding to a variety of polypeptides such as antibodies and proteins as well as high kinetic stability. These characteristics distinguish them from known, open-structured ligands.

  5. Eu2+ activated persistent luminescent materials

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dutczak, D.A.

    2013-01-01

    This thesis deals with luminescence and persistent luminescence of Eu2+ activated materials and aims at unraveling the mechanism behind the persistent luminescence, in particular the role of Dy3+ in the physical process leading to persistent luminescence. The second aim of this thesis is the

  6. Eu2+ activated persistent luminescent materials

    OpenAIRE

    Dutczak, D.A.

    2013-01-01

    This thesis deals with luminescence and persistent luminescence of Eu2+ activated materials and aims at unraveling the mechanism behind the persistent luminescence, in particular the role of Dy3+ in the physical process leading to persistent luminescence. The second aim of this thesis is the preparation and characterization of persistent luminescence phosphors emitting at different colors, especially yellow and red, where there is a need for better afterglow materials. A range of aluminates, ...

  7. Luminescence decay of porous silicon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, X.; Uttamchandani, D.; Sander, D.; O'Donnell, K. P.

    1993-04-01

    The luminescence decay pattern of porous silicon samples prepared by electrochemical etching is characterised experimentally by a non-exponential profile, a strong dependence on temperature and an absence of spectral diffusion. We describe this luminescence as carrier-dopping-assisted recombination. Following the correlation function approach to non-dispersive transport developed by Scher and co-workers [Physics Today 41 (1991) 26], we suggest a simple derivation of analytical functions which accurately describes the anomalous luminescence decay of porous silicon, and show that this model includes exponential and Kohlrausch [Pogg. Ann. Phys. 119 (1863) 352] (stretched-exponential) relaxations as special cases.

  8. Temperature lags of luminescence measurements in a commercial luminescence reader

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kitis, George [Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Nuclear Physics Laboratory, 54124 Thessaloniki (Greece); Kiyak, Nafiye G. [ISIK University, Faculty of Science and Arts, Physics Department, Sile, 34980 Istanbul (Turkey); Polymeris, George S., E-mail: gspolymeris@ankara.edu.tr [Ankara University, Institute of Nuclear Sciences, Beşevler, 06100 Ankara (Turkey)

    2015-09-15

    The temperature recorded in thermoluminescence and optically stimulated luminescence equipments is not the temperature of the sample but that of the heating element on which the thermocouple is attached. Depending upon the rate of heating, a temperature difference appears between the samples and the heating element, termed as temperature lag, which could have serious effects on the curve shapes and trapping parameters. In the present work the temperature lag effect is studied in a newly developed luminescence equipment measuring both thermoluminescence and optically stimulated luminescence. It is found that the temperature lag could be large for heating rates above 2 K/s and it is strongly dependent upon the sample holder. A simple approximation method is proposed in order to both predict as well as correct for temperature lag effects in luminescence measurements.

  9. Luminescent and Non-Luminescent Solar Concentrators: Challenges andd Progress

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Boer, D.K.G.

    2012-01-01

    Luminescent concentrators would allow for high concentration if losses by reabsorption and escape could be minimized. We present new phosphors and filters that facilitate this. Another type of lightguide-based concentrators, diffraction-based, is discussed as well.

  10. Luminescent and Non-Luminescent Solar Concentrators: Challenges andd Progress

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Boer, D.K.G.

    2012-01-01

    Luminescent concentrators would allow for high concentration if losses by reabsorption and escape could be minimized. We present new phosphors and filters that facilitate this. Another type of lightguide-based concentrators, diffraction-based, is discussed as well.

  11. Feedback effect on flute dynamics in a mirror machine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Be'Ery, Ilan; Seemann, Omri

    2015-11-01

    Active feedback techniques may stabilize the flute instability in mirror traps and make them viable candidates for fusion machines. A fast feedback with optical sensors and electrical actuators was implemented in a table-top mirror machine and used to study several aspects of feedback stabilization. For a cold, dense plasma the feedback reduces dramatically the flute amplitude of the first two mode. For higher temperature plasma, a significant increase of plasma density due to feedback stabilization is also demonstrated. The effect of changing feedback gain and phase has some interesting feature such as asymmetry with respect to positive and negative phase shifts and non-monotonic dependence of flute amplitude on feedback gain. These effects are explained using simplified analytic model of the flute and feedback.

  12. Luminescent hyperbolic metasurfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smalley, J. S. T.; Vallini, F.; Montoya, S. A.; Ferrari, L.; Shahin, S.; Riley, C. T.; Kanté, B.; Fullerton, E. E.; Liu, Z.; Fainman, Y.

    2017-01-01

    When engineered on scales much smaller than the operating wavelength, metal-semiconductor nanostructures exhibit properties unobtainable in nature. Namely, a uniaxial optical metamaterial described by a hyperbolic dispersion relation can simultaneously behave as a reflective metal and an absorptive or emissive semiconductor for electromagnetic waves with orthogonal linear polarization states. Using an unconventional multilayer architecture, we demonstrate luminescent hyperbolic metasurfaces, wherein distributed semiconducting quantum wells display extreme absorption and emission polarization anisotropy. Through normally incident micro-photoluminescence measurements, we observe absorption anisotropies greater than a factor of 10 and degree-of-linear polarization of emission >0.9. We observe the modification of emission spectra and, by incorporating wavelength-scale gratings, show a controlled reduction of polarization anisotropy. We verify hyperbolic dispersion with numerical simulations that model the metasurface as a composite nanoscale structure and according to the effective medium approximation. Finally, we experimentally demonstrate >350% emission intensity enhancement relative to the bare semiconducting quantum wells.

  13. Lanthanide-based luminescence biolabelling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sy, Mohamadou; Nonat, Aline; Hildebrandt, Niko; Charbonnière, Loïc J

    2016-04-14

    Luminescent lanthanide complexes display unrivalled spectroscopic properties, which place them in a special category in the luminescent toolbox. Their long-lived line-like emission spectra are the cornerstones of numerous analytical applications ranging from ultrasensitive homogeneous fluoroimmunoassays to the study of molecular interactions in living cells with multiplexed microscopy. However, achieving such minor miracles is a result of years of synthetic efforts and spectroscopic studies to understand and gather all the necessary requirements for the labels to be efficient. This feature article intends to survey these criteria and to discuss some of the most important examples reported in the literature, before explaining in detail some of the applications of luminescent lanthanide labels to bioanalysis and luminescence microscopy. Finally, the emphasis will be put on some recent applications that hold great potential for future biosensing.

  14. Detrimental nonlocality in luminescence measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pluska, Mariusz; Czerwinski, Andrzej

    2017-08-01

    Luminescence studies are used to investigate the local properties of various light-emitting materials. A critical issue of these studies is presented that the signals often lack all advantages of luminescence-studies of high locality, and may originate from an extended spatial region of even a few millimeters in size or the whole sample, i.e., places other than intended for investigation. This is a key problem for research and development in photonics. Due to this nonlocality, information indicating defects, irregularities, nonuniformities and inhomogeneities is lost. The issue refers to typical structures with a strong built-in electric field. Such fields exist intentionally in most photonic structures and occur unintentionally in many other materials investigated by applied physics. We reveal [using test samples prepared with focused ion beam (FIB) on an AlGaAs/GaAs laser heterostructure with an InGaAs quantum well (QW)] that nonlocality increases at low temperatures. This is contrary to the widely expected outcome, as low-temperature luminescence measurements are usually assumed to be free from disturbances. We explain many effects observed due to nonlocality in luminescence studies and prove that separation of the investigated area by focused ion beam milling is a practical solution enabling truly local luminescence measurements. All conclusions drawn using the example of cathodoluminescence are useful for other luminescence techniques.

  15. Estimation of luminescence lifetime in frequency domain

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhang Fu-Jun; Xu Zheng; Zhao Su-Ling; Lou Zhi-Dong; Yang Sheng-Yi; Xu Xu-Rong

    2006-01-01

    Absorption is the origin of luminescence. But it must be noticed that the lifetime of luminescence might reversely influence the rate of absorption. In this paper, it is reported that the luminescence intensity of copper and manganese changes with the driving frequency at constant voltage. The variation of luminescent intensity depends only on the lifetime of luminescence but not on the type of quenching or other factors. Generally the rate of absorption is dominantly determined by the material property and the lifetime of luminescence centres, the absorption of shorter lifetime centre will be larger than that of the longer lifetime centre at the same excited condition.

  16. Instant luminescence chronologies? High resolution luminescence profiles using a portable luminescence reader

    OpenAIRE

    Bateman, M. D.; Stein, S.; Ashurst, R.A.; Selby, K.

    2015-01-01

    Establishing a robust chronology is fundamental to most palaeoenvironmental studies. However, the number and positioning of dated points is critical. Using a portable luminescence reader, it is possible to rapidly generate high resolution down core relative age profiles. Profiles of portable luminescence data from two coastal dunes were evaluated and compared with the results of particle size analysis, stratigraphy, and an independent historical chronology. Results show that, even in young sa...

  17. Development of a reciprocating probe servomotor control system with real-time feedback on plasma position for the Alcator C-Mod tokamak

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunner, D.; Kuang, A. Q.; Labombard, B.; Burke, W.

    2015-11-01

    Reciprocating probe drives are one of the diagnostic workhorses in the boundary of magnetic confinement fusion experiments. The probe is scanned into an exponentially increasing heat flux, which demands a prompt and precise turn around to maintain probe integrity. A new linear servomotor controlled reciprocating drive utilizing a commercial linear servomotor and drive controller has been developed for the Alcator C-Mod tokamak. The quick response of the controller (able to apply an impulse of 50A in about 1ms) along with real-time plasma measurements from a Mirror Langmuir Probe (MLP) allows for real-time control of the probe trajectory based on plasma conditions at the probe tip. Since the primary concern for probe operation is overheating, an analog circuit has been created that computes the surface temperature of the probe from the MLP measurements. The probe can be programmed to scan into the plasma at various times and then turns around when the computed surface temperature reaches a set threshold, maximizing the scan depth into the plasma while avoiding excessive heating. Design, integration, and first measurements with this new system will be presented. This work was supported by U.S. Department of Energy award DE-FC02-99ER54512, using Alcator C-Mod, A DOE SC User Facility.

  18. Composition, structure, magnetic and luminescent properties of EuFeO{sub 3}/TiO{sub 2}/Ti composites fabricated by combination of plasma electrolytic oxidation and extraction pyrolysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rudnev, V.S., E-mail: rudnevvs@ich.dvo.ru [Institute of Chemistry, Far-Eastern Branch, Russian Academy of Sciences, 159, Prosp. 100-letya Vladivostoka, Vladivostok 690022 (Russian Federation); Far-Eastern Federal University, 8, Sukhanova Str., Vladivostok 690950 (Russian Federation); Steblevskaya, N.I.; Kilin, K.N.; Medkov, M.A.; Tkachenko, I.A.; Belobeletskaya, M.V.; Adigamova, M.V.; Lukiyanchuk, I.V.; Nedozorov, P.M. [Institute of Chemistry, Far-Eastern Branch, Russian Academy of Sciences, 159, Prosp. 100-letya Vladivostoka, Vladivostok 690022 (Russian Federation); Yanushkevich, K.I. [Scientific-Practical Materials Research Centre of the Belarus National Academy of Sciences, 17, P. Brovki Str., Minsk 22072 (Belarus)

    2015-10-25

    Layered oxide coatings containing europium ferrite multiferroic have been synthesized on titanium plates. With the presence of EuFeO{sub 3}, the composite acquires weak ferromagnetic properties: the coercive force attains 45–78 Oe in the temperature range 3–340 K. The magnetic properties of EuFeO{sub 3}/TiO{sub 2}/Ti composites are different from those of nanosized EuFeO{sub 3} powder obtained by extraction pyrolysis. It has been established that EuFeO{sub 3}/TiO{sub 2}/Ti composites have luminescence properties characteristic of inorganic materials with europium ions. The obtained data assume that the deposited layer containing EuFeO{sub 3} can have a complex structure: both oxidized and reduced elements may be present in its composition. - Highlights: • EuFeO{sub 3} multiferroic was deposited on TiO{sub 2}/Ti by extraction pyrolysis. • The layer deposited contains reduced and oxidized elements (Fe, Eu). • Magnetic properties of the composites differ from those of nanosized EuFeO{sub 3} powder. • The luminescent properties of EuFeO{sub 3}/TiO{sub 2}/Ti composites are typical of Eu{sup 3+}.

  19. Turning on the Light: Lessons from Luminescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Hara, Patricia B.; Engelson, Carol; St. Peter, Wayne

    2005-01-01

    Some of the processes by which light is emitted without a simultaneous change in temperature are discussed and is classified as luminescence or cold light. Luminescent processes include triboluminescence, fluorescence, phosphorescence, chemiluminescence, and bioluminescence.

  20. Luminescence sensitivity changes in quartz

    CERN Document Server

    Wintle, A G

    1999-01-01

    In the luminescence dating of sedimentary or heated quartz, some heat treatment is usually applied to the sample immediately prior to the measurement of the optically stimulated luminescence. In this paper we report experiments on a 30,000-year-old sedimentary quartz, in which we use the luminescence response to a test dose to monitor the changes in sensitivity that are caused by holding the quartz at temperatures from 160 to 280 deg. C for times from 10 s to 22 h. For an optically bleached sample, the monitoring is by both optically stimulated luminescence and the 110 deg. C TL peak; both luminescence signals are shown to have the same sensitisation (i.e. activation energy) characteristics. For natural or laboratory irradiated samples only the 110 deg. C TL peak can be used; sensitivity increases of up to a factor of 1.3 and 3 are observed for the natural and laboratory irradiated aliquots, respectively. Up to four exponential components are used to deconvolve the sensitivity change data; the dominant compon...

  1. Method of measuring luminescence of a material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Steven D.

    2015-12-15

    A method of measuring luminescence of a material is disclosed. The method includes applying a light source to excite an exposed material. The method also includes amplifying an emission signal of the material. The method further includes measuring a luminescent emission at a fixed time window of about 10 picoseconds to about 10 nanoseconds. The luminescence may be radio photoluminescence (RPL) or optically stimulated luminescence (OSL).

  2. Self absorption in luminescent solar concentrators

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Krumer, Z.

    2014-01-01

    Luminescent solar concentrators are photovoltaic devices made of thin transparent material, in which luminescent particles are dispersed. The incident light enters the device through its large facets and is subsequently absorbed by the luminescent particles, which re-emit it whilst changing its dire

  3. A luminescent nanocrystal stress gauge

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Charina; Koski, Kristie; Olson, Andrew; Alivisatos, Paul

    2010-10-25

    Microscale mechanical forces can determine important outcomes ranging from the site of material fracture to stem cell fate. However, local stresses in a vast majority of systems cannot be measured due to the limitations of current techniques. In this work, we present the design and implementation of the CdSe/CdS core/shell tetrapod nanocrystal, a local stress sensor with bright luminescence readout. We calibrate the tetrapod luminescence response to stress, and use the luminescence signal to report the spatial distribution of local stresses in single polyester fibers under uniaxial strain. The bright stress-dependent emission of the tetrapod, its nanoscale size, and its colloidal nature provide a unique tool that may be incorporated into a variety of micromechanical systems including materials and biological samples to quantify local stresses with high spatial resolution.

  4. Micro-modulated luminescence tomography

    CERN Document Server

    Cong, Wenxiang; Wang, Chao; Wang, Ge

    2013-01-01

    Imaging depth of optical microscopy has been fundamentally limited to millimeter or sub-millimeter due to light scattering. X-ray microscopy can resolve spatial details of few microns deeply inside a sample but the contrast resolution is still inadequate to depict heterogeneous features at cellular or sub-cellular levels. To enhance and enrich biological contrast at large imaging depth, various nanoparticles are introduced and become essential to basic research and molecular medicine. Nanoparticles can be functionalized as imaging probes, similar to fluorescent and bioluminescent proteins. LiGa5O8:Cr3+ nanoparticles were recently synthesized to facilitate luminescence energy storage with x-ray pre-excitation and the subsequently stimulated luminescence emission by visible/near-infrared (NIR) light. In this paper, we suggest a micro-modulated luminescence tomography (MLT) approach to quantify a nanophosphor distribution in a thick biological sample with high resolution. Our numerical simulation studies demonst...

  5. Quantitative luminescence imaging system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batishko, C. R.; Stahl, K. A.; Fecht, B. A.

    The goal of the Measurement of Chemiluminescence project is to develop and deliver a suite of imaging radiometric instruments for measuring spatial distributions of chemiluminescence. Envisioned deliverables include instruments working at the microscopic, macroscopic, and life-sized scales. Both laboratory and field portable instruments are envisioned. The project also includes development of phantoms as enclosures for the diazoluminomelanin (DALM) chemiluminescent chemistry. A suite of either phantoms in a variety of typical poses, or phantoms that could be adjusted to a variety of poses, is envisioned. These are to include small mammals (rats), mid-sized mammals (monkeys), and human body parts. A complete human phantom that can be posed is a long-term goal of the development. Taken together, the chemistry and instrumentation provide a means for imaging rf dosimetry based on chemiluminescence induced by the heat resulting from rf energy absorption. The first delivered instrument, the Quantitative Luminescence Imaging System (QLIS), resulted in a patent, and an R&D Magazine 1991 R&D 100 award, recognizing it as one of the 100 most significant technological developments of 1991. The current status of the project is that three systems have been delivered, several related studies have been conducted, two preliminary human hand phantoms have been delivered, system upgrades have been implemented, and calibrations have been maintained. Current development includes sensitivity improvements to the microscope-based system; extension of the large-scale (potentially life-sized targets) system to field portable applications; extension of the 2-D large-scale system to 3-D measurement; imminent delivery of a more refined human hand phantom and a rat phantom; rf, thermal and imaging subsystem integration; and continued calibration and upgrade support.

  6. Luminescent materials and their applications

    CERN Document Server

    Virk, Hardev Singh

    2015-01-01

    It is pertinent to note that Luminescence phenomenon has once again occupied a central stage with the announcement of Nobel Prize in October 2014 to three Japanese scientists. The discovery of Galium Nitride proved to be a revolutionary step forward in creation of Blue LEDs. With the advent of LED lamps we now have more long-lasting and more efficient alternatives to older light sources. The Volume under reference consists of 9 Chapters, written by experts in the area of Luminescent Materials. First 5 Chapters are contributed as Review Papers and the last 4 are based on Research Papers.Chapter

  7. Ion beam induced luminescence characterisation of CVD diamond films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bettiol, A.A.; Gonon, P.; Jamieson, D.N. [Melbourne Univ., Parkville, VIC (Australia). School of Physics

    1996-12-31

    The characterisation of the band structure properties of materials and devices by ion microprobe techniques has been made possible at the Melbourne MeV ion microprobe facility with the development of Ion Beam Induced Luminescence (IBIL). A number of diamond films grown by Microwave Plasma Chemical Vapour Deposition (MPCVD) on silicon substrates are analysed. A preliminary study of the luminescence properties of these samples has revealed information not previously obtainable via traditional microprobe techniques. The optical effects of incorporating dopants during the deposition process is determined using IBIL. The presence of trace element impurities introduced during growth is examined by Particle Induced X-ray Emission (PIXE), and a measurement of the film thickness is made using Rutherford Backscattering Spectrometry (RBS). 7 refs., 2 figs.

  8. Multicolored luminescent CdS nanocrystals

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    The observation of efficient blue, green, orange and red luminescence from CdS nanocrystals made by using a reverse micelle method was reported. The blue luminescence about 480 nm is attributed to the radiative recombination of electron-hole pairs.The red luminescence around 650 nm is due to the radiative recombination of the exciton trapped in the nanocrystal surface defect states. The combination of different portion of band-edge emission and surface trap state emission results in green and orange luminescence for the nanocrystals. The CdS nanocrystals with efficient multicolored luminescence may find potential application in full color displays and biolabelings.

  9. Advances in luminescence instrument systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bøtter-Jensen, L.; Bulur, E.; Duller, G.A.T.

    2000-01-01

    We report on recent advances in the development of luminescence measurement systems and techniques at Riso. These include: (1) optical stimulation units based on new-generation powerful blue light (470 nm) emitting diodes providing up to 28 mW/cm(2) for OSL measurements; (2) an infrared (830 nm...

  10. Controlling plasmon-enhanced luminescence

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mertens, H.

    2007-01-01

    Plasmons are collective oscillations of the free electrons in a metal or an ionized gas. Plasmons dominate the optical properties of noble-metal nanoparticles, which enables a variety of applications. This thesis focuses on plasmon-enhanced luminescence of silicon quantum dots (Si QDs) and optically

  11. New Opportunities for Lanthanide Luminescence

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jean-Claude G. Bünzli; Steve Comby; Anne-Sophie Chauvin; Caroline D. B. Vandevyver

    2007-01-01

    Trivalent lanthanide ions display fascinating optical properties. The discovery of the corresponding elements and their first industrial uses were intimately linked to their optical properties. This relationship has been kept alive until today when many high-technology applications of lanthanide-containing materials such as energy-saving lighting devices, displays, optical fibers and amplifiers, lasers, responsive luminescent stains for biomedical analyses and in cellulo sensing and imaging, heavily rely on the brilliant and pure-color emission of lanthanide ions. In this review we first outlined the basics of lanthanide luminescence with emphasis on f-f transitions, the sensitization mechanisms, and the assessment of the luminescence efficiency of lanthanide-containing emissive molecular edifices. Emphasis was then put on two fast developing aspects of lanthanide luminescence: materials for telecommunications and light emitting diodes, and biomedical imaging and sensing. Recent advances in NIR-emitting materials for plastic amplifiers and waveguides were described, together with the main solutions brought by researchers to minimize non-radiative deactivation of excited states. The demonstration in 1999 that erbium tris(8-hydroxyquinolinate) displayed a bright green emission suitable for organic light emitting diodes (OLEDs) was followed by realizing that in OLEDs, 25% of the excitation energy leads to singlet states and 75% to triplet states. Since lanthanide ions are good triplet quenchers, they now also play a key role in the development of these lighting devices. Luminescence analyses of biological molecules are among the most sensitive analytical techniques known. The long lifetime of the lanthanide excited states allows time-resolved spectroscopy to be used, suppressing the sample autofluorescence and reaching very low detection limits. Not only visible lanthanide sensors are now ubiquitously provided in medical diagnosis and in cell imaging, but the

  12. Intense red-emitting Y4Al2O9:Eu3+ phosphor with short decay time and high color purity for advanced plasma display panel

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Yadav, Ravishanker; Khan, Atif F; Yadav, Ashish; Chander, Harish; Haranath, Divi; Gupta, Bipin Kr; Shanker, Virendra; Chawla, Santa

    2009-01-01

    ...) excitations has been developed for application in next generation plasma display panels (PDPs). The developed phosphor has better luminescence efficiency, colour purity and shorter decay time than commercial...

  13. Luminescent Solar Concentrators – a low cost photovoltaics alternative

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sark, W.G.J.H.M. van

    2013-01-01

    The development and current status of luminescent solar concentrators is reviewed. These solar concentrators generally consist of transparent polymer sheets doped with luminescent species; presently mainly organic dye molecules are used as luminescent species, however semiconductor nanocrystals are

  14. Luminescent Solar Concentrators – a low cost photovoltaics alternative

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sark, W.G.J.H.M. van

    2013-01-01

    The development and current status of luminescent solar concentrators is reviewed. These solar concentrators generally consist of transparent polymer sheets doped with luminescent species; presently mainly organic dye molecules are used as luminescent species, however semiconductor nanocrystals

  15. Investigation into scanning tunnelling luminescence microscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Manson-Smith, S K

    2001-01-01

    This work reports on the development of a scanning tunnelling luminescence (STL) microscope and its application to the study of Ill-nitride semiconductor materials used in the production of light emitting devices. STL microscopy is a technique which uses the high resolution topographic imaging capabilities of the scanning tunnelling microscope (STM) to generate high resolution luminescence images. The STM tunnelling current acts as a highly localised source of electrons (or holes) which generates luminescence in certain materials. Light generated at the STM tunnelling junction is collected concurrently with the height variation of the tunnelling probe as it is scanned across a sample surface, producing simultaneous topographic and luminescence images. Due to the very localised excitation source, high resolution luminescence images can be obtained. Spectroscopic resolution can be obtained by using filters. Additionally, the variation of luminescence intensity with tunnel current and with bias voltage can provi...

  16. Developments in luminescence measurement techniques

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Kristina Jørkov; Bøtter-Jensen, L.; Denby, Phil M.

    2006-01-01

    We report on our continuing investigation and development of new measurement facilities for use in irradiation, optical stimulation and luminescence signal detection; these facilities have potential application to all forms of luminescence-based retrospective dosimetry, and are particularly...... intended for use with the Riso TL/OSL reader. We have investigated the potential of new more powerful blue (455 nm) and green (530nm) LEDs, and of gated counting combined with pulsed stimulation light techniques using conventional LEDs. Measurement of time-resolved OSL has resulted in a method of real......; both types are very stable and reproducible. Other recent developments include the modification of a Riso reader to measure both thermally and optically stimulated electrons (TSE and OSE) from granular or chip phosphors. (c) 2006 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved....

  17. Application of luminescence techniques in retrospective dosimetry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bøtter-Jensen, L.; Jungner, H.

    1999-01-01

    Luminescence signals measured from minerals within bricks or ceramic samples can provide information about the absorbed radiation dose. This feature has for several years been used in dating archaeological and geological samples and recently luminescence techniques have been intensively used far...... retrospective assessment of accident doses received by the population after a nuclear accident. The development of new luminescence techniques after the Chernobyl accident has considerably improved the sensitivity and precision in the evaluation of accident doses. This paper reviews the development work...

  18. Handbook of luminescent semiconductor materials

    CERN Document Server

    Bergman, Leah

    2011-01-01

    Photoluminescence spectroscopy is an important approach for examining the optical interactions in semiconductors and optical devices with the goal of gaining insight into material properties. With contributions from researchers at the forefront of this field, Handbook of Luminescent Semiconductor Materials explores the use of this technique to study semiconductor materials in a variety of applications, including solid-state lighting, solar energy conversion, optical devices, and biological imaging. After introducing basic semiconductor theory and photoluminescence principles, the book focuses

  19. Formation of luminescent emitters by intense laser radiation in transparent media

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martynovich, E F; Kuznetsov, A V; Kirpichnikov, A V; Pestryakov, Efim V; Bagayev, Sergei N

    2013-05-31

    The formation of luminescent colour centres in the LiF crystal under the action of femtosecond pulses of the first harmonic of a Ti : sapphire laser is experimentally studied. The experiments were carried out at low- and high-aperture focusing of radiation. The effect of both single pulses and multi-pulse trains on the crystals was studied. Channelling of laser radiation in the waveguides, induced by the filaments of the first pulses, is found. The multiphoton mechanism of interband absorption is confirmed. The optimal conditions of laser impact for designing luminescent emitters in the LiF crystal are determined. (interaction of laser radiation with matter. laser plasma)

  20. Luminescence properties of a Fibonacci photonic quasicrystal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Passias, V; Valappil, N V; Shi, Z; Deych, L; Lisyansky, A A; Menon, V M

    2009-04-13

    An active one-dimensional Fibonacci photonic quasi-crystal is realized via spin coating. Luminescence properties of an organic dye embedded in the quasi-crystal are studied experimentally and compared to theoretical simulations. The luminescence occurs via the pseudo-bandedge mode and follows the dispersion properties of the Fibonacci crystal. Time resolved luminescence measurement of the active structure shows faster spontaneous emission rate, indicating the effect of the large photon densities available at the bandedge due to the presence of critically localized states. The experimental results are in good agreement with the theoretical calculations for steady-state luminescence spectra.

  1. Eu2+ luminescence in strontium aluminates

    OpenAIRE

    Dutczak, D.; Juestel, T.; Ronda, C.; Meijerink, A.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/075044986

    2015-01-01

    The luminescence properties of Eu2+ doped strontium aluminates are reported and reviewed for a variety of aluminates, viz. SrAl12O19, SrAl4O7, Sr4Al14O25, SrAl2O4 and Sr3Al2O6. The aim of the research is to investigate the role of local coordination and covalency of the aluminate host lattice, related to the Sr/Al ratio, on the optical properties of the Eu2+ ion. The UV and VUV excited luminescence spectra as well as luminescence decay curves were recorded to characterize the luminescence pro...

  2. Photon Luminescence of the Moon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, T.L.; Lee, K.T.

    2009-01-01

    Luminescence is typically described as light emitted by objects at low temperatures, induced by chemical reactions, electrical energy, atomic interactions, or acoustical and mechanical stress. An example is photoluminescence created when photons (electromagnetic radiation) strike a substance and are absorbed, resulting in the emission of a resonant fluorescent or phosphorescent albedo. In planetary science, there exists X-ray fluorescence induced by sunlight absorbed by a regolith a property used to measure some of the chemical composition of the Moon s surface during the Apollo program. However, there exists an equally important phenomenon in planetary science which will be designated here as photon luminescence. It is not conventional photoluminescence because the incoming radiation that strikes the planetary surface is not photons but rather cosmic rays (CRs). Nevertheless, the result is the same: the generation of a photon albedo. In particular, Galactic CRs (GCRs) and solar energetic particles (SEPs) both induce a photon albedo that radiates from the surface of the Moon. Other particle albedos are generated as well, most of which are hazardous (e.g. neutrons). The photon luminescence or albedo of the lunar surface induced by GCRs and SEPs will be derived here, demonstrating that the Moon literally glows in the dark (when there is no sunlight or Earthshine). This extends earlier work on the same subject [1-4]. A side-by-side comparison of these two albedos and related mitigation measures will also be discussed.

  3. Solid-matrix luminescence analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hurtubise, R.J.

    1993-01-15

    Several interactions with lumiphors adsorbed on filter paper were elucidated from experiments with moisture, modulus and heavy-atom salts. The data were interpreted using static and dynamic quenching models, heavy-atom theory, and a theory related to the modulus of paper. With cyclodextrin-salt matrices, it was shown that 10% [alpha]-cyclodextrin/NaCl was very effective for obtaining strong room-temperature fluorescence and moderate room-temperature phosphorescence from adsorbed stereoisomeric tetrols. Extensive photophysical information was obtained for the four tetrols on 10% [alpha]-cyclodextrin/NaCl. The photophysical information acquired was used to develop a method for characterizing two of the tetrols. Work with model compounds adsorbed on deuterated sodium acetate showed that C-H vibrations in the undeuterated sodium acetate were not responsible for the deactivation of the excited triplet state in the model phosphors investigated. A considerable amount of solution luminescence and solid-matrix luminescence data were compared. The most important finding was that in several cases the room-temperature solid-matrix luminescence quantum yields were greater than the solution low-temperature quantum yield values.

  4. Fault Tolerant Feedback Control

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stoustrup, Jakob; Niemann, H.

    2001-01-01

    An architecture for fault tolerant feedback controllers based on the Youla parameterization is suggested. It is shown that the Youla parameterization will give a residual vector directly in connection with the fault diagnosis part of the fault tolerant feedback controller. It turns out...... that there is a separation be-tween the feedback controller and the fault tolerant part. The closed loop feedback properties are handled by the nominal feedback controller and the fault tolerant part is handled by the design of the Youla parameter. The design of the fault tolerant part will not affect the design...... of the nominal feedback con-troller....

  5. Scintillation and storage luminescence properties of MgF2 transparent ceramics doped with Ce3+

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, Fumiya; Kato, Takumi; Okada, Go; Kawaguchi, Noriaki; Fukuda, Kentaro; Yanagida, Takayuki

    2017-10-01

    In this paper, we report basic optical properties and scintillation and storage luminescence properties of MgF2:Ce transparent ceramics with different doping concentrations of Ce (0.01, 0.1 and 1%) synthesized by spark plasma sintering (SPS). In scintillation, thermally-stimulated luminescence (TSL) and optically-stimulated luminescence (OSL), the dominant emissions were due to the 5d-4f transitions of Ce3+ which appeared in the near-UV region peaking around 320 and 360 nm. The scintillation was evaluated by X-ray irradiation while OSL was observed under 540 nm stimulation. In particular, the TSL sensitivity was high and showed a good linearity from 0.1 mGy to 1000 mGy.

  6. Luminescence of thermally altered human skeletal remains

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Krap, Tristan; Nota, Kevin; Wilk, Leah; van de Goot, Frank; Ruijter, Jan; Duijst, Wilma; Oostra, Roelof Jan

    2017-01-01

    Literature on luminescent properties of thermally altered human remains is scarce and contradictory. Therefore, the luminescence of heated bone was systemically reinvestigated. A heating experiment was conducted on fresh human bone, in two different media, and cremated human remains were recovered

  7. Violet stimulated luminescence: geo- or thermochronometer?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ankjærgaard, Christina; Guralnik, Benny; Porat, N.

    2015-01-01

    The method of quartz optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) dating is widely used, but generally limited to the past ~0.1 million years (Ma) due to early saturation of the desired signal. Violet stimulated luminescence (VSL) of quartz has previously been shown as a promising alternative...

  8. Receptor-Targeted Luminescent Silver Bionanoparticles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bunschoten, Anton; Chin, Patrick T.K.; Buckle, Tessa; Linden, van der Marte; Barendregt, Arjan; Verheijen, Marcel A.; Leeuwen, van Fijs W.B.

    2016-01-01

    Luminescent Ag nanoclusters (Ag-NC) provide the next generation in bionanoparticles, wherein the luminescence (650 nm) and large Stokes shift of these inorganic nanoclusters are favorable for biological imaging. By combining these characteristics with those of human serum albumin (HSA; a protein

  9. Spectral Characterization of a Novel Luminescent Organogel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waguespack, Yan; White, Shawn R.

    2007-01-01

    The spectroscopic-based luminescence experiments were designed to expose the students to various concepts of single-triplet excited states, electron spin, vibrational relaxation, fluorescence-phosphorescence lifetimes and quenching. The students were able to learn about luminescence spectra of the gel and have the experience of synthesizing a…

  10. Receptor-Targeted Luminescent Silver Bionanoparticles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bunschoten, Anton; Chin, Patrick T.K.; Buckle, Tessa; Linden, van der Marte; Barendregt, Arjan; Verheijen, Marcel A.; Leeuwen, van Fijs W.B.

    2016-01-01

    Luminescent Ag nanoclusters (Ag-NC) provide the next generation in bionanoparticles, wherein the luminescence (650 nm) and large Stokes shift of these inorganic nanoclusters are favorable for biological imaging. By combining these characteristics with those of human serum albumin (HSA; a protein

  11. Violet stimulated luminescence: geo- or thermochronometer?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ankjærgaard, Christina; Guralnik, Benny; Porat, N.;

    2015-01-01

    The method of quartz optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) dating is widely used, but generally limited to the past ~0.1 million years (Ma) due to early saturation of the desired signal. Violet stimulated luminescence (VSL) of quartz has previously been shown as a promising alternative...

  12. Time-resolved luminescence from quartz

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chithambo, M.L.; Ankjærgaard, C.; Pagonis, V.

    2016-01-01

    Time-resolved optical stimulation of luminescence has become established as a key method for measurement of optically stimulated luminescence from quartz, feldspar and α-Al2O3:C, all materials of interest in dosimetry. The aim of time-resolved optical stimulation is to separ

  13. Kinetics of infrared stimulated luminescence from feldspars

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jain, Mayank; Sohbati, Reza; Guralnik, Benny;

    2015-01-01

    thermal and optical, of the infrared stimulated luminescence signal from feldspar. Based on the application of this model, it is concluded that different infra-red stimulated luminescence emissions (UV, blue, yellow and far-red) follow the same kinetics, and, therefore, involve participation of the same...

  14. Rateless feedback codes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Jesper Hemming; Koike-Akino, Toshiaki; Orlik, Philip

    2012-01-01

    This paper proposes a concept called rateless feedback coding. We redesign the existing LT and Raptor codes, by introducing new degree distributions for the case when a few feedback opportunities are available. We show that incorporating feedback to LT codes can significantly decrease both...... the coding overhead and the encoding/decoding complexity. Moreover, we show that, at the price of a slight increase in the coding overhead, linear complexity is achieved with Raptor feedback coding....

  15. Preventing Feedback Fizzle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brookhart, Susan M.

    2012-01-01

    Feedback is certainly about saying or writing helpful, learning-focused comments. But that is only part of it. What happens beforehand? What happens afterward? Feedback that is helpful and learning-focused fits into a context. Before a teacher gives feedback, students need to know the learning target so they have a purpose for using the feedback…

  16. Developing Sustainable Feedback Practices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carless, David; Salter, Diane; Yang, Min; Lam, Joy

    2011-01-01

    Feedback is central to the development of student learning, but within the constraints of modularized learning in higher education it is increasingly difficult to handle effectively. This article makes a case for sustainable feedback as a contribution to the reconceptualization of feedback processes. The data derive from the Student Assessment and…

  17. Luminescence of thermally altered human skeletal remains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krap, Tristan; Nota, Kevin; Wilk, Leah S; van de Goot, Franklin R W; Ruijter, Jan M; Duijst, Wilma; Oostra, Roelof-Jan

    2017-07-01

    Literature on luminescent properties of thermally altered human remains is scarce and contradictory. Therefore, the luminescence of heated bone was systemically reinvestigated. A heating experiment was conducted on fresh human bone, in two different media, and cremated human remains were recovered from a modern crematory. Luminescence was excited with light sources within the range of 350 to 560 nm. The excitation light was filtered out by using different long pass filters, and the luminescence was analysed by means of a scoring method. The results show that temperature, duration and surrounding medium determine the observed emission intensity and bandwidth. It is concluded that the luminescent characteristic of bone can be useful for identifying thermally altered human remains in a difficult context as well as yield information on the perimortem and postmortem events.

  18. Thermal quenching of luminescence processes in feldspars

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poolton, N.R.J.; Bøtter-Jensen, L.; Duller, G.A.T.

    1995-01-01

    The technique of optically stimulated luminescence has important uses in the dose evaluation of irradiated feldspars. The luminescence process involves the eviction of electrons from donor traps, charge transfer through the conduction band, and recombination at acceptor sites; each...... of these processes is, in general, thermally dependent, and leads either to enhancement or quenching of the luminescence with increasing temperature. Previous studies have measured the combined thermal activation characteristics of all three processes, and show a strong dependence on stimulation energy....... In this article, an initial attempt is made to isolate only the recombination part of the luminescence cycle, and determine its thermal characteristics separately. A Variety of luminescence transitions are examined in a range of both alkali and plagioclase feldspars; three distinct emission types are identified...

  19. Metal plasmon enhanced europium complex luminescence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu Feng [Department of Chemistry, Queen' s University, 90 Bader Lane, Kingston, Ontario, K7L 3N6 (Canada); Aldea, Gabriela [Department of Chemistry, Queen' s University, 90 Bader Lane, Kingston, Ontario, K7L 3N6 (Canada); Petru Poni Institute of Macromolecular Chemistry Iasi, Aleea Grigore Ghica Voda 41A, 700487 Iasi (Romania); Nunzi, Jean-Michel, E-mail: nunzijm@queensu.c [Department of Chemistry, Queen' s University, 90 Bader Lane, Kingston, Ontario, K7L 3N6 (Canada)

    2010-01-15

    The plasmon enhanced luminescence of a rare-earth complex Tris(6, 6, 7, 7, 8, 8, 8-heptafluoro-2, 2-dimethyl-3, 5-octanedionato) europium (Eu(fod){sub 3}) was investigated. A polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) thin film was successfully adopted as a spacer to separate the Eu complex from the silver island film (SIF), and five-fold enhancement of the radiative decay rate of the Eu complex on SIF was demonstrated based on the luminescence intensity and lifetime measurement. Investigation of the distance dependent luminescence indicates that 7 nm is an optimal distance for SIF enhanced Eu luminescence. Plasmon enhanced rare-earth luminescence based on an organic film spacer would find potential applications in plasmon enhanced organic light emitting diode (OLED) devices.

  20. Luminescence of carbon nanotube bulbs

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI ChuanGang; WU DeHai; WANG KunLin; WEI JinQuan; WEI BingQing; ZHU HongWei; WANG ZhiCheng; LUO JianBin; LIU WenJin; ZHENG MingXin

    2007-01-01

    Carbon nanotube (CNT) bulbs made of decimeter-scale double-walled carbon nanotube (DWCNT) strands and films were fabricated and their luminescence properties, including the lighting efficiency, voltage-current relation and thermal stability were investigated. The results show that the DWCNT bulb has a comparable spectrum of visible light with tungsten bulb and its average efficiency is 40% higher than that of a tungsten filament at the same temperature (1400-2300 K). The nanotube filaments show both resistance and thermal stability over a large temperature region. No obvious damage was found for a nanotube bulb illuminating at 2300 K for more than 24 hours in vacuum.

  1. Quantum feedback channels

    CERN Document Server

    Bowen, G

    2002-01-01

    In classical information theory the capacity of a noisy communication channel cannot be increased by the use of feedback. In quantum information theory the no-cloning theorem means that noiseless copying and feedback of quantum information cannot be achieved. In this paper, quantum feedback is defined as the unlimited use of a noiseless quantum channel from receiver to sender. Given such quantum feedback, it is shown to provide no increase in the entanglement-assisted capacities of a noisy quantum channel, in direct analogy to the classical case. It is also shown that in various cases of non-assisted capacities, feedback can increase the capacity of many quantum channels.

  2. Situated Formative Feedback

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lukassen, Niels Bech; Wahl, Christian; Sorensen, Elsebeth Korsgaard

    2016-01-01

    This study addresses the conceptual challenge of providing students with good quality feedback to enhance student learning in an online community of practice (COP). The aim of the study is to identify feedback mechanisms in a virtual learning environment (VLE) and to create a full formative...... feedback episode (FFE) through an online dialogue. The paper argues that dialogue is crucial for student learning and that feedback is not only something the teacher gives to the student. Viewing good quality feedback as social, situated, formative, emphasis is put on the establishment of dialogue. We...... refer to this type of feedback as, Situated Formative Feedback (SFF). As a basis for exploring, identifying and discussing relevant aspects of SFF the paper analyses qualitative data from a Moodle dialogue. Data are embedded in the qualitative analytic program Nvivo and are analysed with a system...

  3. Feedback and Incentives

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eriksson, Tor Viking; Poulsen, Anders; Villeval, Marie Claire

    2009-01-01

    This paper experimentally investigates the impact of different pay schemes and relative performance feedback policies on employee effort. We explore three feedback rules: no feedback on relative performance, feedback given halfway through the production period, and continuously updated feedback. We...... use two pay schemes, a piece rate and a tournament. We find that overall feedback does not improve performance. In contrast to the piece-rate pay scheme there is some evidence of positive peer effects in tournaments since the underdogs almost never quit the competition even when lagging significantly...... behind, and front runners do not slack off. But in both pay schemes relative performance feedback reduces the quality of the low performers' work; we refer to this as a "negative quality peer effect"....

  4. Functional silk: colored and luminescent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tansil, Natalia C; Koh, Leng Duei; Han, Ming-Yong

    2012-03-15

    Silkworm silk is among the most widely used natural fibers for textile and biomedical applications due to its extraordinary mechanical properties and superior biocompatibility. A number of physical and chemical processes have also been developed to reconstruct silk into various forms or to artificially produce silk-like materials. In addition to the direct use and the delicate replication of silk's natural structure and properties, there is a growing interest to introduce more new functionalities into silk while maintaining its advantageous intrinsic properties. In this review we assess various methods and their merits to produce functional silk, specifically those with color and luminescence, through post-processing steps as well as biological approaches. There is a highlight on intrinsically colored and luminescent silk produced directly from silkworms for a wide range of applications, and a discussion on the suitable molecular properties for being incorporated effectively into silk while it is being produced in the silk gland. With these understanding, a new generation of silk containing various functional materials (e.g., drugs, antibiotics and stimuli-sensitive dyes) would be produced for novel applications such as cancer therapy with controlled release feature, wound dressing with monitoring/sensing feature, tissue engineering scaffolds with antibacterial, anticoagulant or anti-inflammatory feature, and many others.

  5. Solid-surface luminescence analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hurtubise, R.J.

    1991-01-01

    We have characterized several interactions that are very important in solid-matrix luminescence. With silica gel chromatoplates and filter paper, simple equations were derived for calculating the individual contributions to the percent decrease in luminescence due to either moisture or to a quenching gas. For sodium acetate as a solid matrix and p-aminobenzoate as a model compound, it was concluded that p-aminobenzoate was incorporated into the crystal structure of sodium acetate, and the triplet energy was lost be skeletal vibrations in sodium acetate. Also, with the same system is was shown that p-aminobenzoate did not undergo rotational relaxation, and thus rotational processes did not contribute to the deactivation of the triplet state. Several results were obtained from model compounds adsorbed on filter paper under different temperature and humidity conditions and with a variety of heavy atoms present. Fundamental photophysical equations were used in calculating several basic parameters that revealed information on rate processes and how the absorbed energy was distributed in an adsorbed lumiphor. The most important advancement with filter paper was the development of equations that relate phosphorescence parameters of adsorbed phosphors to the Young's modulus of filter paper. These equations are based on a fundamental theory that relates the hydrogen-bonding network of paper to the modulus of paper.

  6. Upconversion luminescence in Yb 3+-doped yttrium aluminum garnets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Xiaodong; Zhao, Zhiwei; Song, Pingxin; Jiang, Benxue; Zhou, Guoqing; Xu, Jun; Deng, Peizhen; Bourdet, Gilbert; Christophe Chanteloup, Jean; Zou, Ji-Ping; Fulop, Annabelle

    2005-03-01

    In this paper, we present results on upconversion luminescence performed on Yb 3+-doped yttrium aluminum garnets under 940 nm excitation. The upconversion luminescence was ascribed to Yb 3+ cooperative luminescence and the presence of rare earth impurity ions. The cooperative luminescence spectra as a function of Yb concentration were measured and the emission intensity variation with Yb concentration was discussed. Yb 3+ energy migration quenched the cooperative luminescence of Yb:YAG crystals with doping level over 15 at%.

  7. Coordination of the arc regulatory system and pheromone-mediated positive feedback in controlling the Vibrio fischeri lux operon.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alecia N Septer

    Full Text Available Bacterial pheromone signaling is often governed both by environmentally responsive regulators and by positive feedback. This regulatory combination has the potential to coordinate a group response among distinct subpopulations that perceive key environmental stimuli differently. We have explored the interplay between an environmentally responsive regulator and pheromone-mediated positive feedback in intercellular signaling by Vibrio fischeri ES114, a bioluminescent bacterium that colonizes the squid Euprymna scolopes. Bioluminescence in ES114 is controlled in part by N-(3-oxohexanoyl-L-homoserine lactone (3OC6, a pheromone produced by LuxI that together with LuxR activates transcription of the luxICDABEG operon, initiating a positive feedback loop and inducing luminescence. The lux operon is also regulated by environmentally responsive regulators, including the redox-responsive ArcA/ArcB system, which directly represses lux in culture. Here we show that inactivating arcA leads to increased 3OC6 accumulation to initiate positive feedback. In the absence of positive feedback, arcA-mediated control of luminescence was only ∼2-fold, but luxI-dependent positive feedback contributed more than 100 fold to the net induction of luminescence in the arcA mutant. Consistent with this overriding importance of positive feedback, 3OC6 produced by the arcA mutant induced luminescence in nearby wild-type cells, overcoming their ArcA repression of lux. Similarly, we found that artificially inducing ArcA could effectively repress luminescence before, but not after, positive feedback was initiated. Finally, we show that 3OC6 produced by a subpopulation of symbiotic cells can induce luminescence in other cells co-colonizing the host. Our results suggest that even transient loss of ArcA-mediated regulation in a sub-population of cells can induce luminescence in a wider community. Moreover, they indicate that 3OC6 can communicate information about both cell density

  8. Detecting Thermal Barrier Coating Delamination Using Visible and Near-Infrared Luminescence from Erbium-Doped Sublayers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eldridge, J. I.; Bencic, T. J.; Martin, R. E.; Singh, J.; Wolfe, D. E.

    2007-01-01

    Nondestructive diagnostic tools are needed to monitor early stages of delamination progression in thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) because the risk of delamination induced coating failure will compromise engine performance and safety. Previous work has demonstrated that for TBCs composed of yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ), luminescence from a buried europium-doped sublayer can be utilized to identify the location of TBC delamination from the substantially higher luminescence intensity observed from the delaminated regions of the TBC. Luminescence measurements from buried europium-doped layers depend on sufficient transmittance of the 532 nm excitation and 606 nm emission wavelengths through the attenuating undoped YSZ overlayer to produce easily detected luminescence. In the present work, improved delamination indication is demonstrated using erbium-doped YSZ sublayers. For visible-wavelength luminescence, the erbium-doped sublayer offers the advantage of a very strong excitation peak at 517 nm that can be conveniently excited a 514 nm Ar ion laser. More importantly, the erbium-doped sublayer also produces near-infrared luminescence at 1550 nm that is effectively excited by a 980 nm laser diode. Both the 980 nm excitation and the 1550 nm emission are transmitted through the TBC with much less attenuation than visible wavelengths and therefore show great promise for delamination monitoring through thicker or more highly scattering TBCs. The application of this approach for both electron beam physical vapor deposited (EB-PVD) and plasma-sprayed TBCs is discussed.

  9. Luminescence Properties of a Fibonacci Photonic Quasicrystal

    CERN Document Server

    Passias, Vasilios; Shi, Zhou; Deych, Lev; Lisyansky, Alexander; Menon, Vinod M

    2008-01-01

    We report the realization of an active one-dimensional Fibonacci photonic quasi-crystal via spin coating. Manipulation of the luminescence properties of an organic dye embedded in the quasi-crystal is presented and compared to theoretical simulations. The luminescence occurs via the pseudo-bandedge mode and follows the dispersion properties of the Fibonacci crystal. Time resolved luminescence measurement of the active structure shows faster spontaneous emission rate, indicating the effect of the large photon densities available at the bandedge due to the presence of critically localized states. The experimental results are in excellent agreement with the theoretical calculations.

  10. RF feedback for KEKB

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ezura, Eizi; Yoshimoto, Shin-ichi; Akai, Kazunori [National Lab. for High Energy Physics, Tsukuba, Ibaraki (Japan)

    1996-08-01

    This paper describes the present status of the RF feedback development for the KEK B-Factory (KEKB). A preliminary experiment concerning the RF feedback using a parallel comb-filter was performed through a choke-mode cavity and a klystron. The RF feedback has been tested using the beam of the TRISTAN Main Ring, and has proved to be effective in damping the beam instability. (author)

  11. Neural cryptography with feedback

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruttor, Andreas; Kinzel, Wolfgang; Shacham, Lanir; Kanter, Ido

    2004-04-01

    Neural cryptography is based on a competition between attractive and repulsive stochastic forces. A feedback mechanism is added to neural cryptography which increases the repulsive forces. Using numerical simulations and an analytic approach, the probability of a successful attack is calculated for different model parameters. Scaling laws are derived which show that feedback improves the security of the system. In addition, a network with feedback generates a pseudorandom bit sequence which can be used to encrypt and decrypt a secret message.

  12. Neural cryptography with feedback.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruttor, Andreas; Kinzel, Wolfgang; Shacham, Lanir; Kanter, Ido

    2004-04-01

    Neural cryptography is based on a competition between attractive and repulsive stochastic forces. A feedback mechanism is added to neural cryptography which increases the repulsive forces. Using numerical simulations and an analytic approach, the probability of a successful attack is calculated for different model parameters. Scaling laws are derived which show that feedback improves the security of the system. In addition, a network with feedback generates a pseudorandom bit sequence which can be used to encrypt and decrypt a secret message.

  13. Nanocrystals for luminescent solar concentrators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradshaw, Liam R; Knowles, Kathryn E; McDowall, Stephen; Gamelin, Daniel R

    2015-02-11

    Luminescent solar concentrators (LSCs) harvest sunlight over large areas and concentrate this energy onto photovoltaics or for other uses by transporting photons through macroscopic waveguides. Although attractive for lowering solar energy costs, LSCs remain severely limited by luminophore reabsorption losses. Here, we report a quantitative comparison of four types of nanocrystal (NC) phosphors recently proposed to minimize reabsorption in large-scale LSCs: two nanocrystal heterostructures and two doped nanocrystals. Experimental and numerical analyses both show that even the small core absorption of the leading NC heterostructures causes major reabsorption losses at relatively short transport lengths. Doped NCs outperform the heterostructures substantially in this critical property. A new LSC phosphor is introduced, nanocrystalline Cd(1-x)Cu(x)Se, that outperforms all other leading NCs by a significant margin in both small- and large-scale LSCs under full-spectrum conditions.

  14. Policy Feedback System (PFS)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Social Security Administration — The Policy Feedback System (PFS) is a web application developed by the Office of Disability Policy Management Information (ODPMI) team that gathers empirical data...

  15. Luminescent Lariat Aza-Crown Ether

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Burkhard König

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Lariat ethers are interesting recognition motifs in supramolecular chemistry. The synthesis of a luminescent lariat ether with triglycol chain by azide–alkyne (Huisgen cycloaddition is presented.

  16. Luminescence properties of uranyl-acetate species

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brinkmann, Hannes; Moll, Henry [Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf e.V., Dresden (Germany). Inst. of Resource Ecology; Stumpf, Thorsten [Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf e.V., Dresden (Germany). Biogeochemistry

    2017-06-01

    Time-resolved laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy (TRLFS) was applied to characterize uranium(VI)- acetate species based on their luminescence properties. In contrast to previous interpretations, no indications were detected for the existence of the 1: 3 complex.

  17. Optically stimulated luminescence dating of rock surfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sohbati, Reza

    There are many examples of rock surfaces, rock art and stone structures whose ages are of great importance to the understanding of various phenomena in geology, climatology and archaeology. Optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) dating is a well-established chronological tool that has successfully...... of rock surfaces is successfully tested by application to two different quartz-rich rock types (sandstone and quartzite). Together with the measurement of infrared stimulated luminescence (IRSL) signals as a function of depth into the surface of different granites it is clear that both OSL and IRSL can....... Based on the studies of residual luminescence as a function of depth into a rock surface discussed above, a model is developed that relates this increase in residual luminescence to the exposure time. The model is then further developed using the quartz OSL signal from buried quartzite cobbles...

  18. Application of luminescence techniques in retrospective dosimetry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bøtter-Jensen, L.; Jungner, H.

    1999-01-01

    Luminescence signals measured from minerals within bricks or ceramic samples can provide information about the absorbed radiation dose. This feature has for several years been used in dating archaeological and geological samples and recently luminescence techniques have been intensively used far...... retrospective assessment of accident doses received by the population after a nuclear accident. The development of new luminescence techniques after the Chernobyl accident has considerably improved the sensitivity and precision in the evaluation of accident doses. This paper reviews the development work......, especially on optically stimulated luminescence methods for retrospective assessment of accident doses carried out at Riso National Laboratory in collaboration with the University of Helsinki as part bf a joint European Union research project. We demonstrate that doses lower than 100 mGy can be measured from...

  19. Orbital surveys of solar stimulated luminescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hemphill, W. R.; Theisen, A. F.; Tyson, R. M.; Granata, J. S.

    The Fraunhofer line discriminator (FLD) is an electro-optical device for imaging natural and manmade materials which have been stimulated to luminesce by the sun. An airborne FLD has been used to detect geochemically stressed vegetation, drought-stressed agricultural crops, industrial and residential pollution effluents, marine oil seeps, phosphate rock, uranium-bearing sandstone, and bioluminescent ocean plankton. Three-dimensional perspective plots of excitation and emission spectra, measured with a laboratory spectrometer, graphically depict similarities and differences in luminescence properties between sample materials. The laboratory data also include luminescence intensities at six Fraunhofer lines in the visible and near-infrared regions of the electromagnetic spectrum. Both the airborne and laboratory data suggest the feasibility of delineating and monitoring at least some of these luminescing materials from orbital altitude, such as a test flight aboard the Space Shuttle using an improved third-generation FLD.

  20. Calibration beads containing luminescent lanthanide ion complexes

    Science.gov (United States)

    The reliability of lanthanide luminescence measurements, by both flow cytometry and digital microscopy, will be enhanced by the availability of narrow-band emitting lanthanide calibration beads. These beads can also be used to characterize spectrographic instruments, including mi...

  1. Feedback Loop Gains and Feedback Behavior (1996)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kampmann, Christian Erik

    2012-01-01

    Linking feedback loops and system behavior is part of the foundation of system dynamics, yet the lack of formal tools has so far prevented a systematic application of the concept, except for very simple systems. Having such tools at their disposal would be a great help to analysts in understanding...... large, complicated simulation models. The paper applies tools from graph theory formally linking individual feedback loop strengths to the system eigenvalues. The significance of a link or a loop gain and an eigenvalue can be expressed in the eigenvalue elasticity, i.e., the relative change...... of an eigenvalue resulting from a relative change in the gain. The elasticities of individual links and loops may be found through simple matrix operations on the linearized system. Even though the number of feedback loops can grow rapidly with system size, reaching astronomical proportions even for modest systems...

  2. Spectral Luminescent Properties of the Glycine Molecule in a Gas Discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    General, A. A.; Migovich, M. I.; Kelman, V. A.; Zhmenyak, Yu. V.; Zvenigorodsky, V. V.

    2016-01-01

    We have experimentally studied the luminescence spectra of glycine powder in the plasma of a repetitively pulsed longitudinal discharge in argon-glycine and helium-glycine mixtures. We have identified the main fragments of the glycine molecule emitting in the 200-1000 nm region. The emitting molecules due to fragmentation of glycine and dissociation of the carboxyl (-COOH) and amino (-NH2) groups are nitrogen, carbon monoxide, and cyanogen molecules.

  3. Luminescence basic concepts, applications and instrumentation

    CERN Document Server

    Virk, Hardev Singh

    2014-01-01

    The word luminescence was first used by a German physicist, Eilhardt Wiedemann, in 1888. He also classified luminescence into six kinds according to the method of excitation. No better basis of classification is available today. He recognized photoluminescence, thermoluminescence, electroluminescence, crystalloluminescence, triboluminescence, and chemiluminescence. The designations are obvious, characterized by the prefix. This Volume consists of 9 Chapters, including 8 Review Papers and one Case Study. The first two papers are based on OLEDs. Organic light emitting diodes (OLEDs) have been th

  4. Plasmon-enhanced optically stimulated luminescence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guidelli, E. J.; Baffa, O. [Universidade de Sao Paulo, Faculdade de Filosofia, Ciencias e Letras de Ribeirao Preto, Departamento de Fisica, Av. Bandeirantes 3900, 14040-901 Ribeirao Preto, Sao Paulo (Brazil); Ramos, A. P., E-mail: ederguidelli@gmail.com [Universidade de Sao Paulo, Faculdade de Filosofia, Ciencias e Letras de Ribeirao Preto, Departamento de Quimica, Av. Bandeirantes 3900, 14040-901 Ribeirao Preto, Sao Paulo (Brazil)

    2015-10-15

    Full text: Optically Stimulated Luminescence dosimeters (OSLD) have been largely used for personal, medical, and industrial radiation dosimetry. Developing highly sensitive and small-sized radiation detectors and dosimeters is essential for improving spatial resolution and consequently diagnosis quality and treatment efficacy in the case of applications in radiodiagnosis and radiation therapy, for instance. Conventional methods to improve the OSLD sensitivity consist of doping and co-doping the host materials with atoms of other elements, thereby increasing the amount of trapping and/or luminescent centers. Our group is researching on the use of the plasmon properties of noble metal nanoparticles to increase OSL intensity. Upon incidence of a light beam with appropriate resonant wavelengths, the oscillation of the free electrons at the nanoparticle surface originates the Localized Surface Plasmons (LSP) and the consequent plasmon resonance band. The interaction between the LSP and the surrounding luminescent material leads to new optical properties largely employed for enhancing several luminescent processes. Here we will show our results regarding the use of LSP to increase OSLD sensitivity. The interaction between the traps/luminescent centers and the plasmons depends on the distance between them, on the plasmon resonance band intensity and position, as well as on the surrounding medium. Therefore, the plasmon-enhanced luminescence is a promising tool to develop more sensitive and miniaturized OSLD. (Author)

  5. Single Bubble SonoLuminescence of Particles model

    CERN Document Server

    Maiga, Mahamadou Adama

    2012-01-01

    The Single Bubble SonoLuminescence is a phenomenon where the vapor bubble trapped in a liquid collapse by emitting of a light. It is very known that the temperature inside the bubble depends on the radius, during the collapse, the temperature can reach thousands of Kelvins and that the light would be emitted by radiation of the ionized gas inside the bubble. So, studies show that in certain cases neither an imploding shock nor a plasma has been observed and the temperature is not high enough to explain the spectrum observed. The Single Bubble SonoLuminescence remains a subject of study. For this study we consider the bubble as a box where the free particles (particularly electrons) stemming from the molecules dissociation, are are trapped and confined within the bubble. The confinement allows the particles to acquire some energy during the collapse which they lose in the form of light and also to be considered to bind to the bubble as an electron is bound to the nucleus in an atom. So, with regard to the bubb...

  6. Feedback og interpersonel kommunikation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dindler, Camilla

    2016-01-01

    Som interpersonel kommunikationsform handler feedback om at observere, mærke og italesætte det, som handler om relationen mellem samtaleparterne mere end om samtaleemnet. Her er fokus på, hvad der siges og hvordan der kommunikeres sammen. Feedback er her ikke en korrigerende tilbagemelding til...

  7. "Feedback" For Instructioal Television.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schramm, Wilbur

    A number of different methods have been used by instructional television (ITV) projects to obtain audience feedback, and some of these are now being used in the ITV system in El Salvador. We know that pretesting programs on a representative sample can bring considerable gains in learning. Another feedback source can be a classroom of pupils in the…

  8. An activatable, polarity dependent, dual-luminescent imaging agent with a long luminescence lifetime.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rood, Marcus T M; Oikonomou, Maria; Buckle, Tessa; Raspe, Marcel; Urano, Yasuteru; Jalink, Kees; Velders, Aldrik H; van Leeuwen, Fijs W B

    2014-09-04

    In this proof-of-concept study, a new activatable imaging agent based on two luminophores and two different quenching mechanisms is reported. Both partial and total activation of the luminescence signal can be achieved, either in solution or in vitro. Bond cleavage makes the compound suitable for luminescence lifetime imaging.

  9. A thermo-responsive supramolecular organogel: dual luminescence properties and luminescence conversion induced by Cd(2+).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Xinxian; Zhang, Jinjin; Tang, Ning; Wu, Jincai

    2014-12-14

    A simple dual luminescent acylhydrazone-functionalized benzimidazole derivative (L) was blended with ethylene glycol affording a thermo-responsive green-light-emitting supramolecular gel (G-gel). This G-gel can convert to a blue-light-emitting gel (B-gel) by strongly increasing the luminescence of the benzimidazole moiety upon addition of one equivalent of Cd(2+).

  10. Feedback i matematik

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sortkær, Bent

    2017-01-01

    Feedback bliver i litteraturen igen og igen fremhævet som et af de mest effektive midler til at fremme elevers præstationer i skolen (Hartberg, Dobson, & Gran, 2012; Hattie & Timperley, 2007; Wiliam, 2015). Dette på trods af, at flere forskere påpeger, at feedback ikke altid er læringsfremmende...... (Hattie & Gan, 2011), og nogle endda viser, at feedback kan have en negativ virkning i forhold til præstationer (Kluger & DeNisi, 1996). Artiklen vil undersøge disse tilsyneladende modstridende resultater ved at stille spørgsmålet: Under hvilke forudsætninger virker feedback i matematik læringsfremmende......? Dette gøres ved at dykke ned i forskningslitteraturen omhandlende feedback ud fra en række temaer for på den måde at besvare ovenstående spørgsmål....

  11. Feedback and Incentives:

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eriksson, Tor Viking; Poulsen, Anders; Villeval, Marie-Claire

    This paper experimentally investigates the impact of different pay and relative performance information policies on employee effort. We explore three information policies: No feedback about relative performance, feedback given halfway through the production period, and continuously updated feedback....... The pay schemes are a piece rate payment scheme and a winner-takes-all tournament. We find that, regardless of the pay scheme used, feedback does not improve performance. There are no significant peer effects in the piece-rate pay scheme. In contrast, in the tournament scheme we find some evidence...... of positive peer effects since the underdogs almost never quit the competition even when lagging significantly behind, and frontrunners do not slack off. Moreover, in both pay schemes information feedback reduces the quality of the low performers' work....

  12. Situated Formative Feedback

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lukassen, Niels Bech; Wahl, Christian; Sorensen, Elsebeth Korsgaard

    2016-01-01

    feedback episode (FFE) through an online dialogue. The paper argues that dialogue is crucial for student learning and that feedback is not only something the teacher gives to the student. Viewing good quality feedback as social, situated, formative, emphasis is put on the establishment of dialogue. We...... refer to this type of feedback as, Situated Formative Feedback (SFF). As a basis for exploring, identifying and discussing relevant aspects of SFF the paper analyses qualitative data from a Moodle dialogue. Data are embedded in the qualitative analytic program Nvivo and are analysed with a system...... theoretical textual analysis method. Asynchronous written dialogue from an online master’s course at Aalborg University forms the empirical basis of the study. The findings suggests in general that students play an essential role in SFF and that students and educators are equal in the COP, but holds different...

  13. Feedback valence affects auditory perceptual learning independently of feedback probability

    OpenAIRE

    Amitay, S.; Moore, D. R.; Molloy, K.; Halliday, L. F.

    2015-01-01

    Previous studies have suggested that negative feedback is more effective in driving learning than positive feedback. We investigated the effect on learning of providing varying amounts of negative and positive feedback while listeners attempted to discriminate between three identical tones; an impossible task that nevertheless produces robust learning. Four feedback conditions were compared during training: 90% positive feedback or 10% negative feedback informed the participants that they wer...

  14. Feedback som tredjeordensiagttagelse

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ane Qvortrup

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Feedback tilskrives stor betydning for læring, men trods intensiv forskning på området synes det svært at fange, hvori feedbacks særlige potentiale består. I forsøgene på at gøre dette knyttes an til en række faktorer eller parametre, der fremhæves som centrale. En af disse faktorer er tid, hvor der kredses om forskellen mellem umiddelbar og forsinket feedback samt om fordele og ulemper ved hver af de to. I denne artikel knyttes der an til en forståelse af feedback som tredjeordensiagttagelse, og der sættes herfra fokus på, hvordan man i en praktisk undervisningssituation kan imødekomme tidsfaktoren knyttet til feedback. Med udgangspunkt i et undervisningsforløb på bachelorniveau, hvor der er arbejdet systematisk med feedback understøttet af Wikis, belyses det, hvordan et sådant arbejde synes at have potentiale for understøttelse af såvel læring som undervisning. En sådan teoretisk reflekteret belysning kan udgøre et refleksionsprogram for fremtidig planlægning af og løbende refleksion over undervisning.     The article investigates the effect of feedback on learning. Feedback has been shown to be one of the most powerful influences on achievement in education. But, in spite of much research on the matter, there is no agreement on how the special potential of feedback can be described, and consequently no agreement on what is good and bad feedback. This article sets out to rectify this omission by seeking a new theoretical framework that is sensitive to the complexity of the impact of feedback. The author propose a system theoretical frame and through its use identifies significant didactical issues. Although feedback is described as an internal, system-relative construction, when seen through a system theoretical lens different teaching environments create diverse conditions for feedback constructions. The final section of the paper explores this idea in relation to wikis.

  15. Feedback som tredjeordensiagttagelse

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ane Qvortrup

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Feedback tilskrives stor betydning for læring, men trods intensiv forskning på området synes det svært at fange, hvori feedbacks særlige potentiale består. I forsøgene på at gøre dette knyttes an til en række faktorer eller parametre, der fremhæves som centrale. En af disse faktorer er tid, hvor der kredses om forskellen mellem umiddelbar og forsinket feedback samt om fordele og ulemper ved hver af de to. I denne artikel knyttes der an til en forståelse af feedback som tredjeordensiagttagelse, og der sættes herfra fokus på, hvordan man i en praktisk undervisningssituation kan imødekomme tidsfaktoren knyttet til feedback. Med udgangspunkt i et undervisningsforløb på bachelorniveau, hvor der er arbejdet systematisk med feedback understøttet af Wikis, belyses det, hvordan et sådant arbejde synes at have potentiale for understøttelse af såvel læring som undervisning. En sådan teoretisk reflekteret belysning kan udgøre et refleksionsprogram for fremtidig planlægning af og løbende refleksion over undervisning.  The article investigates the effect of feedback on learning. Feedback has been shown to be one of the most powerful influences on achievement in education. But, in spite of much research on the matter, there is no agreement on how the special potential of feedback can be described, and consequently no agreement on what is good and bad feedback. This article sets out to rectify this omission by seeking a new theoretical framework that is sensitive to the complexity of the impact of feedback. The author propose a system theoretical frame and through its use identifies significant didactical issues. Although feedback is described as an internal, system-relative construction, when seen through a system theoretical lens different teaching environments create diverse conditions for feedback constructions. The final section of the paper explores this idea in relation to wikis.

  16. Luminescence Dating Work From The Heidelberg Group: A Key Technology In Geoarchaeology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, G. A.; Kadereit, A.

    Geoarchaeology is a growing discipline in archaeological science. It aims at the natural environment as context of past human societies and at the interaction between both, the environment and man as part of a joint ecosystem. This topic is also of considerable concern of present societies. Like other historic sciences, geoarchaeology requires accurate chronologies. Since one deals in geoarchaeology predominantly with sediments and rocks, luminescence methods play a key role. This is demonstrated in two case studies from Phlious in southern Greece and Nasca in southern Peru. The results show clearly climatically triggered social developments and feedbacks to the environment.

  17. Strategies for effective feedback.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kritek, Patricia A

    2015-04-01

    Provision of regular feedback to trainees on clinical performance by supervising providers is increasingly recognized as an essential component of undergraduate and graduate health sciences education; however, many individuals have not been formally trained in this pedagogical skill. At the bedside or in the clinic, effective performance feedback can be accomplished by following four key steps. Begin by setting expectations that incorporate the trainee's personal goals and external objectives. Delineate how and when you will provide feedback to the learner. Next, directly observe the trainee's performance. This can be challenging while engaged on a busy clinical service, but a focus on discrete activities or interactions (e.g., family meeting, intravascular volume assessment using bedside ultrasound, or obtaining informed consent) is helpful. The third step is to plan and prioritize the feedback session. Feedback is most effective when given in a timely fashion and delivered in a safe environment. Limit the issues addressed because learners often disengage if confronted with too many deficiencies. Finally, when delivering feedback, begin by listening to the trainee's self-evaluation and then take a balanced approach. Describe in detail what the trainee does well and discuss opportunities for improvement with emphasis on specific, modifiable behaviors. The feedback loop is completed with a plan for follow-up reassessment. Through the use of these relatively simple practices, both the trainee and teacher can have a more productive learning experience.

  18. Luminescence dating at Rose cottage cave: a progress report

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Woodborne, S

    1997-10-01

    Full Text Available Deal with infrared-stimulated luminescence and thermoluminescence dates from Rose Cottage Cave in South Africa. Discrepancy between luminescence and radiocarbon dates; Concentration of radioactive elements in sediments before and after leaching...

  19. Feedback og motivation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjerresgaard, Helle

    2016-01-01

    Feedback til elever, som enten er gået midlertidigt i stå eller i værste tilfælde oplever sig selv magtesløse, skal hjælpe dem til at etablere en tro på, at de kan øve indflydelse på og være betydningsfulde for deres omgivelser. Feedback sættes ofte i forbindelse med ’læring’. I denne artikel...... påvirket af en målrettet, individuel feedback – eller manglen på samme....

  20. Europium enabled luminescent nanoparticles for biomedical applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Syamchand, S.S., E-mail: syamchand.ss@gmail.com; Sony, G., E-mail: emailtosony@gmail.com

    2015-09-15

    Lanthanide based nanoparticles are receiving great attention ought to their excellent luminescent and magnetic properties and find challenging biomedical applications. Among the luminescent lanthanide NPs, europium based NPs (Eu-NPs) are better candidates for immunoassay and imaging applications. The Eu-NPs have an edge over quantum dots (QDs) by means of their stable luminescence, long fluorescence lifetime, sharp emission peaks with narrow band width, lack of blinking and biocompatibility. This review surveys the synthesis and properties of a variety of Eu-NPs consolidated from different research articles, for their applications in medicine and biology. The exquisite luminescent properties of Eu-NPs are explored for developing biomedical applications such as immunoassay and bioimaging including multimodal imaging. The biomedical applications of Eu-NPs are mostly diagnostic in nature and mainly focus on various key analytes present in biological systems. The luminescent properties of europium enabled NPs are influenced by a number of factors such as the site symmetry, the metal nanoparticles, metal ions, quantum dots, surfactants, morphology of Eu-NPs, crystal defect, phenomena like antenna effect and physical parameters like temperature. Through this review we explore and assimilate all the factors which affect the luminescence in Eu-NPs and coil a new thread of parameters that control the luminescence in Eu-NPs, which would provide further insight in developing Eu-based nanoprobes for future biomedical prospects. - Highlights: • The review describes 14 major factors that influence the luminescence properties of europium enabled luminescent nanoparticles (Eu-NPs). • Surveys different types of europium containing nanoparticles that have been reported for their biomedical applications. • Eu-NPs are conveniently divided into four different categories, based on the type of the substrates involved. The four categories are (1) virgin Eu-substrate based NPs; (2

  1. Interperson variability but intraperson stability of baseline plasma cortisol concentrations, and its relation to feedback sensitivity of the hypothalamo-pituitary-adrenal axis to a low dose of dexamethasone in elderly individuals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huizenga, NATM; Koper, JW; De Lange, P; Pols, HAP; Stolk, RP; Grobbee, DE; De Jong, FH; Lamberts, SWJ

    1998-01-01

    In the present study, we investigated whether the negative feedback action of glucocorticoids (GCs) on the hypothdamo-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis changes with age. We performed a 1-mg dexamethasone (DEX) suppression test in 216 healthy elderly individuals. To investigate individual variability of f

  2. Luminescence kinetics of phosphors after excitation by electron beam

    OpenAIRE

    Ваганов, Виталий; Полисадова, Елена Фёдоровна; Мархабаева, А. А.

    2016-01-01

    The luminescence decay of industrial phosphors based on yttrium-aluminum garnet has beeninvestigated at the excitation by an electron beam. The ratio of slow and fast component amplitude in the kinetics of luminescence decay was estimated. It is shown that the luminescence decay time depends on the composition of the phosphor. The luminescence decay time can be used for analysis of the phosphors, to determine their quality.

  3. Progress in phosphors and filters for luminescent solar concentrators

    OpenAIRE

    De Boer, D.K.G.; Broer, D. J.; Debije, M.G.; Keur, W.; Meijerink, A.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/075044986; Ronda, R.C.; Verbunt, P.P.C.

    2012-01-01

    Luminescent solar concentrators would allow for high concentration if losses by reabsorption and escape could be minimized. We introduce a phosphor with close-to-optimal luminescent properties and hardly any reabsorption. A problem for use in a luminescent concentrator is the large scattering of this material; we discuss possible solutions for this. Furthermore, the use of broad-band cholesteric filters to prevent escape of luminescent radiation from this phosphor is investigated both experim...

  4. NAIP 2015 Imagery Feedback

    Data.gov (United States)

    Farm Service Agency, Department of Agriculture — The NAIP 2015 Imagery Feedback web application allows users to make comments and observations about the quality of the 2015 National Agriculture Imagery Program...

  5. NAIP 2014 Imagery Feedback

    Data.gov (United States)

    Farm Service Agency, Department of Agriculture — The NAIP 2014 Imagery Feedback map allows users to make comments and observations about the quality of the 2014 National Agriculture Imagery Program (NAIP)...

  6. Feedback in analog circuits

    CERN Document Server

    Ochoa, Agustin

    2016-01-01

    This book describes a consistent and direct methodology to the analysis and design of analog circuits with particular application to circuits containing feedback. The analysis and design of circuits containing feedback is generally presented by either following a series of examples where each circuit is simplified through the use of insight or experience (someone else’s), or a complete nodal-matrix analysis generating lots of algebra. Neither of these approaches leads to gaining insight into the design process easily. The author develops a systematic approach to circuit analysis, the Driving Point Impedance and Signal Flow Graphs (DPI/SFG) method that does not require a-priori insight to the circuit being considered and results in factored analysis supporting the design function. This approach enables designers to account fully for loading and the bi-directional nature of elements both in the feedback path and in the amplifier itself, properties many times assumed negligible and ignored. Feedback circuits a...

  7. Time-resolved luminescence spectra of porous Si

    OpenAIRE

    Miyoshi, Tadaki; Lee, Kyu-Seok; Aoyagi, Yoshinobu

    1992-01-01

    Time-resolved luminescence spectra of porous Si were measured under an N_2 laser excitation. The luminescence shows a nonexponential decay with an initial time constant of less than 5 ns and more than 200 ns for the secondary decay. The luminescence is considered to be associated with localized states, which are probably conduction and valence sublevels in Si microstructures.

  8. Progress in phosphors and filters for luminescent solar concentrators

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Boer, D.K.G.; Broer, D.J.; Debije, M.G.; Keur, W.; Meijerink, A.; Ronda, R.C.; Verbunt, P.P.C.

    2012-01-01

    Luminescent solar concentrators would allow for high concentration if losses by reabsorption and escape could be minimized. We introduce a phosphor with close-to-optimal luminescent properties and hardly any reabsorption. A problem for use in a luminescent concentrator is the large scattering of

  9. Progress in phosphors and filters for luminescent solar concentrators

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Boer, D.K.G.; Broer, D.J.; Debije, M.G.; Keur, W.C.; Meijerink, A.; Ronda, C.R.; Verbunt, P.P.C.

    2012-01-01

    Luminescent solar concentrators would allow for high concentration if losses by reabsorption and escape could be minimized. We introducea phosphor with close-to-optimal luminescent properties and hardlyany reabsorption. A problem for use in a luminescent concentrator isthe large scattering of this

  10. Progress in phosphors and filters for luminescent solar concentrators

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Boer, D.K.G.; Broer, D.J.; Debije, M.G.; Keur, W.C.; Meijerink, A.; Ronda, C.R.; Verbunt, P.P.C.

    2012-01-01

    Luminescent solar concentrators would allow for high concentration if losses by reabsorption and escape could be minimized. We introducea phosphor with close-to-optimal luminescent properties and hardlyany reabsorption. A problem for use in a luminescent concentrator isthe large scattering of this m

  11. Feedback and rewards, part II: formal and informal feedback reviews.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harolds, Jay

    2013-02-01

    There are 2 major classes of feedback. One class of feedback consists of the informal, numerous conversations between various people in the organization regarding the performance, behavior, and goals of an individual. Another class of feedback consists of formal reviews held once or twice a year between a supervisor and an individual. This article discusses both types of feedback.

  12. Comparisons of Vibrio fischeri, Photobacterium phosphoreum, and recombinant luminescent using Escherichia coli as BOD measurement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Chiu-Yu; Kuo, Jong-Tar; Lin, Yu-Cheng; Liao, Yi-Ru; Chung, Ying-Chien

    2010-01-01

    To shorten the time needed to measure biochemical oxygen demand (BOD) in water samples and to provide a rapid feedback of the real condition of water quality, we tested and evaluated the validity and reliability of luminescent bacteria Vibrio fischeri, Photobacterium phosphoreum, and recombinant Escherichia coli as potential indicators of BOD in the domestic wastewaters. The results indicate that the luminescence intensities of these strains are dependent on temperature, pH, and BOD concentration. In comparison to the standard BOD(5) method, the time needed for BOD measurement can be shortened by 90, 120, and 150 min when V. fischeri, P. phosphoreum, and recombinant E. coli, respectively, are used. Recombinant E. coli can be adapted to measure BOD in domestic wastewater containing a wide range of BOD concentrations, V. fischeri is not suitable for measuring diluted wastewater, and P. phosphoreum has only a limited application in measuring concentrated wastewater. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report in which V. fischeri, P. phosphoreum, and recombinant luminescent E. coli are compared in terms of their potential in BOD measurement systems.

  13. Luminescence engineering in plasmonic meta-surfaces

    CERN Document Server

    Roy, Tapashree; Zheludev, Nikolay I

    2016-01-01

    Photoluminescence is a phenomenon of significant interest due to its wide range of technological applications in plasmonics, nanolasers, spasers, lasing spasers, loss compensation and gain in metamaterials, and luminescent media. Nanostructured materials are known to have very different luminescence characteristics to bulk samples or planar films. Here we show that by engineering a nanostructured meta-surface, we can choose the position of photoluminescence absorption and emission lines of thin gold films. The nanostructuring also aids to strong enhancement of the emission from gold, by a factor of 76 in our experiments. This enhancement is determined by the relative position of the engineered absorption and emission lines to the exciting laser wavelength and the intrinsic properties of the constituent material. These luminescence-engineered materials combined with a resonant material, as in the lasing spaser, or with the power of reconfigurable metamaterials promise huge potential as tunable nanoscale light ...

  14. Luminescence properties of dilute bismide systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Breddermann, B., E-mail: benjamin.breddermann@physik.uni-marburg.de [Faculty of Physics, Philipps-Universität Marburg, 35032 Marburg (Germany); Bäumner, A.; Koch, S.W.; Ludewig, P.; Stolz, W.; Volz, K. [Faculty of Physics, Philipps-Universität Marburg, 35032 Marburg (Germany); Hader, J.; Moloney, J.V. [Nonlinear Control Strategies Inc, 3542 N. Geronimo Ave., Tucson, AZ 85705 (United States); Broderick, C.A.; O' Reilly, E.P. [Tyndall National Institute, Lee Maltings, Dyke Parade, Cork (Ireland); Department of Physics, University College Cork, Cork (Ireland)

    2014-10-15

    Systematic photoluminescence measurements on a series of GaBi{sub x}As{sub 1−x} samples are analyzed theoretically using a fully microscopic approach. Based on sp{sup 3}s{sup ⁎} tight-binding calculations, an effective k·p model is set up and used to compute the band structure and dipole matrix elements for the experimentally investigated samples. With this input, the photoluminescence spectra are calculated using a systematic microscopic approach based on the semiconductor luminescence equations. The detailed theory-experiment comparison allows us to quantitatively characterize the experimental structures and to extract important sample parameters. - Highlights: • Measurement of photoluminescence spectra of a home grown series of dilute bismides. • Fully microscopic calculation of luminescence spectra from detailed band structure. • Quantitative experiment-theory comparison of luminescence spectra. • Thorough understanding of optoelectronic properties of dilute bismide material system. • Promising perspectives for the development of new device applications.

  15. Luminescent iridium complexes for detection of molybdate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castillo, Carmen E; Davies, David L; Klair, Anne-K Duhme; Singh, Kuldip; Singh, Shalini

    2012-01-14

    Reactions of [Ir(C^N)(2)Cl](2) [HC^N = 2-(3-R-phenyl)pyridine, 2-(3-R-phenylpyrazole) R = H, Me] with Me(2)-phencat give luminescent complexes [Ir(C^N)(2)(Me(2)-phencat)][PF(6)] (Me(2)-2a, b, c)[PF(6)]. Deprotection of the methoxy groups with BBr(3) is problematic as simultaneous bromination of the cyclometallated phenyl groups occurs. However, deprotection of Me(2)-phencat with BBr(3) followed by complexation with [Ir(C^N)(2)Cl](2) gives luminescent complexes [Ir(C^N)(2)(H(2)-phencat)][PF(6)] (H(2)-3a, c)[PF(6)], which are luminescent sensors for molybdate.

  16. The basis for cosmic ray feedback: Written on the wind.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zweibel, Ellen G

    2017-05-01

    Star formation and supermassive black hole growth in galaxies appear to be self-limiting. The mechanisms for self-regulation are known as feedback. Cosmic rays, the relativistic particle component of interstellar and intergalactic plasma, are among the agents of feedback. Because cosmic rays are virtually collisionless in the plasma environments of interest, their interaction with the ambient medium is primarily mediated by large scale magnetic fields and kinetic scale plasma waves. Because kinetic scales are much smaller than global scales, this interaction is most conveniently described by fluid models. In this paper, I discuss the kinetic theory and the classical theory of cosmic ray hydrodynamics (CCRH) which follows from assuming cosmic rays interact only with self-excited waves. I generalize CCRH to generalized cosmic ray hydrodynamics, which accommodates interactions with extrinsic turbulence, present examples of cosmic ray feedback, and assess where progress is needed.

  17. Optically stimulated luminescence in retrospective dosimetry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bøtter-Jensen, L.; Murray, A.S.

    2002-01-01

    Since the beginning of the 1990s the exploration of optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) in retrospective accident dosimetry has driven an intensive investigation and development programme at Riso into measurement facilities and techniques. This paper reviews some of the outcomes of this progr......Since the beginning of the 1990s the exploration of optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) in retrospective accident dosimetry has driven an intensive investigation and development programme at Riso into measurement facilities and techniques. This paper reviews some of the outcomes...

  18. Feedback and rewards, Part I: Introduction to effective feedback.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harolds, Jay A

    2013-01-01

    This series of articles discusses conversations regarding feedback. Feedback can include input from numerous sources, including one's supervisor, peers, subordinates, suppliers, customers, patients, and/or society members. Effective feedback is very important to the operation of any organization and to the growth of the individual. However, feedback done poorly does not appear to be rare and can be highly destructive to all. A variety of tips on how to do feedback well are included in this article.

  19. Synthesis and Characterization of Terbium-Trimesic Acid Luminescent Complex in Polyvinylpyrrolidone Matrix

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    Tb(Ⅲ)-trimesic acid (TMA) luminescent complexes were synthesized in the polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP) matrix. The elemental analysis, inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectroscopy (ICP-AES) and fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) indicated that its chemical constitution is PVP/Tb(MTA)·4H2O. The XRD patterns showed that the complex is a new kind of crystal. The TEM image indicates that the complex is rod shaped. The rod diameter is about 200 nm, and the length ranges from hundred of nanometer to a few micrometers. In addition, the dispersity is better. TG-DTA curves indicate that the complex is thermally stable before 463 ℃. Photoluminescence analysis indicates that the complex emits Tb3+ characteristic luminescence under ultraviolet excitation.

  20. Feedback: Now with Physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hopkins, Philip F.; Quataert, Eliot; Faucher-Giguere, Claude-Andre; Keres, Dusan; Wetzel, Andrew R.; Murray, Norman W.

    2017-01-01

    The most fundamental unsolved problems in galaxy formation revolve around "feedback" from massive stars and black holes. In the last few years, a new generation of theoretical models have emerged which combine new numerical methods and physics in an attempt to realistically model the diverse physics of the interstellar medium, star formation, and feedback from super-massive black holes and massive stars (winds, jets, SNe, and radiation). These mechanisms lead to 'self-regulated' galaxy and star formation, in which global correlations such as the Schmidt-Kennicutt law, the inefficiency of star formation, and the stellar mass function -- emerge naturally. Within galaxies, feedback regulates the structure of the interstellar medium, and many observed properties of the ISM, star formation, and galaxies can be understood as a fundamental consequence of super-sonic turbulence in a rapidly cooling, self-gravitating medium. But feedback also produces galactic super-winds that can dramatically alter the cosmological evolution of galaxies, change the nature of dark matter cores and ‘cusps’, and re-structure the circum-galactic and inter-galactic medium. These winds depend non-linearly on multiple feedback mechanisms in a way that explains why they have been so difficult to model in previous "sub-grid" approaches. This resolves long-standing problems in understanding even apparently "simple" galaxy properties like the mass-metallicity relation. Finally, I'll discuss where feedback fails, and where either additional, exotic physics, or new, previously-dismissed feedback mechanisms, may be needed to explain observations.

  1. Progress in phosphors and filters for luminescent solar concentrators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Boer, Dick K G; Broer, Dirk J; Debije, Michael G; Keur, Wilco; Meijerink, Andries; Ronda, Cees R; Verbunt, Paul P C

    2012-05-07

    Luminescent solar concentrators would allow for high concentration if losses by reabsorption and escape could be minimized. We introduce a phosphor with close-to-optimal luminescent properties and hardly any reabsorption. A problem for use in a luminescent concentrator is the large scattering of this material; we discuss possible solutions for this. Furthermore, the use of broad-band cholesteric filters to prevent escape of luminescent radiation from this phosphor is investigated both experimentally and using simulations. Simulations are also used to predict the ultimate performance of luminescent concentrators.

  2. Feedback control of quantum system

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DONG Dao-yi; CHEN Zong-hai; ZHANG Chen-bin; CHEN Chun-lin

    2006-01-01

    Feedback is a significant strategy for the control of quantum system.Information acquisition is the greatest difficulty in quantum feedback applications.After discussing several basic methods for information acquisition,we review three kinds of quantum feedback control strategies:quantum feedback control with measurement,coherent quantum feedback,and quantum feedback control based on cloning and recognition.The first feedback strategy can effectively acquire information,but it destroys the coherence in feedback loop.On the contrary,coherent quantum feedback does not destroy the coherence,but the capability of information acquisition is limited.However,the third feedback scheme gives a compromise between information acquisition and measurement disturbance.

  3. Global climate feedbacks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Manowitz, B.

    1990-10-01

    The important physical, chemical, and biological events that affect global climate change occur on a mesoscale -- requiring high spatial resolution for their analysis. The Department of Energy has formulated two major initiatives under the US Global Change Program: ARM (Atmospheric Radiation Measurements), and CHAMMP (Computer Hardware Advanced Mathematics and Model Physics). ARM is designed to use ground and air-craft based observations to document profiles of atmospheric composition, clouds, and radiative fluxes. With research and models of important physical processes, ARM will delineate the relationships between trace gases, aerosol and cloud structure, and radiative transfer in the atmosphere, and will improve the parameterization of global circulation models. The present GCMs do not model important feedbacks, including those from clouds, oceans, and land processes. The purpose of this workshop is to identify such potential feedbacks, to evaluate the uncertainties in the feedback processes (and, if possible, to parameterize the feedback processes so that they can be treated in a GCM), and to recommend research programs that will reduce the uncertainties in important feedback processes. Individual reports are processed separately for the data bases.

  4. Enhancing and quenching luminescence with gold nanoparticle films: the influence of substrate on the luminescent properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    José Guidelli, Eder; Ramos, Ana Paula; Baffa, Oswaldo

    2016-01-01

    Gold nanoparticle (AuNP) films were sputtered over glass and aluminum substrates to enhance optically stimulated luminescence (OSL), a luminescent technique employed for radiation detection, from x-ray irradiated NaCl nanocrystals. The AuNP films deposited over glass led to enhanced-OSL emission, whereas the AuNP films deposited on aluminum substrates quenched the OSL emission. The enhanced-OSL intensity is proportional to the optical density of the film's plasmon resonance band at the stimulation wavelength. For the case of the AuNP/aluminum films, the luminescence quenching diminishes, and OSL intensity partially recovers upon increasing the distance between the AuNPs and the aluminum substrates, and between the luminescent nanocrystals and the AuNP films. These results suggest that plasmonic interactions between the emitter nanocrystals, the localized surface plasmons (LSP) of the AuNPs, and the substrate are responsible for the OSL enhancement and quenching. In this sense, the substrate dictates whether LSP relaxation occurs by radiative or non-radiative transisitions, leading to enhanced or quenched OSL, respectively. Therefore, besides showing that AuNP films can enhance and/or tune the sensitivity of luminescent radiation detectors, and demonstrating OSL as a new technique to investigate mechanisms of plasmon-enhanced luminescence, these results bring insights on how substrates strongly modify the optical properties of AuNP films.

  5. Structural changes and relaxations monitored by luminescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Y; Yang, B; Townsend, P D

    2013-01-01

    Luminescence data have often been used to study imperfections and to characterize lattice distortions because the signals are sensitive to changes of structure and composition. Previous studies have included intentionally added probe ions such as rare earth ions to sense distortions in local crystal fields caused by modified structural environments. An under-exploited extension of this approach was to use luminescence to monitor crystalline phase changes. A current overview of this new and powerful technique shows that continuous scanning of the sample temperatures immediately offered at least three types of signatures for phase transitions. Because of high sensitivity, luminescence signals were equally responsive to structural changes from inclusions and nanoparticles. These coupled to the host material via long-range interactions and modified the host signals. Two frequently observed examples that are normally overlooked are from nanoparticle inclusions of water and CO2. Examples also indicated that phase transitions were detected in more diverse materials such as superconductors and fullerenes. Finally, luminescence studies have shown that in some crystalline examples, high dose ion implantation of surface layers could induce relaxations and/or structural changes of the entire underlying bulk material. This was an unexpected result and therefore such a possibility has not previously been explored. However, the implications for ion implication are significant and could be far more general than the examples mentioned here.

  6. Thermal History Using Microparticle Trap Luminescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-01

    34 2008 IEEE/ LEOS Optical MEMS and Nanophotonics Conference, Freiburg Germany, August 2008, pp. 64- 65. 3. J. R. Hazelton, E. G. Yukihara, M. W. Blair...A.J.J. , Prokic, M. and Brouwer , J.C., 2006. Optically and thermally stimulated luminescence characteristics of MgO:Tb3+. Radiat. Prot. Dosim. 119

  7. Probing luminescence centers in Na rich feldspar

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Prasad, Amit Kumar; Lapp, Torben; Kook, Myung Ho;

    2016-01-01

    our understanding of the luminescence mechanisms and recombination sites, in a sample of Na rich plagioclase feldspar (oligoclase). Both the UV and violet–blue emissions show resonant excitations arising from a distribution of energy levels. We propose, contrary to the general understanding...

  8. Optically stimulated luminescence techniques in retrospective dosimetry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bøtter-Jensen, L.; Murray, A.S.

    2001-01-01

    Optically stimulated luminescence signals from natural quartz and feldspar are now used routinely in dating geological and archaeological materials. More recently they have also been employed in accident dosimetry, i.e. the retrospective assessment of doses received as a result of a nuclear...

  9. Dehydration-induced luminescence in clay minerals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coyne, L. M.; Lahav, N.; Lawless, J. G.

    1981-01-01

    Reports of triboluminescent phenomena in organic crystalline materials prompted a search for related processes in clay minerals. The reported extensive mechanical distortion produced on freezing and drying of montmorillonite was particularly interesting because of studies of condensation reactions in a wet/dry cycled reaction sequence. The discovery of an unusual luminescent process in several clay minerals is reported and its characteristics are described.

  10. Optically stimulated luminescence dating of young sediments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, A.T.; Murray, A.S.

    2009-01-01

    Optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) dating of young (< 1000 years) sediments is used increasingly in a wide variety of late-Holocene studies as a mean of establishing contemporary sedimentation rates or the timing of sediment deposition. This paper provides a summary of the basic principles o...

  11. Modeling Light Propagation in Luminescent Media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahin, Derya

    This study presents physical, computational and analytical modeling approaches for light propagation in luminescent random media. Two different approaches are used, namely (i) a statistical approach: Monte-Carlo simulations for photon transport and (ii) a deterministic approach: radiative transport theory. Both approaches account accurately for the multiple absorption and reemission of light at different wavelengths and for anisotropic luminescence. The deterministic approach is a generalization of radiative transport theory for solving inelastic scattering problems in random media. We use the radiative transport theory to study light propagation in luminescent media. Based on this theory, we also study the optically thick medium. Using perturbation methods, a corrected diffusion approximation with asymptotically accurate boundary conditions and a boundary layer solution are derived. The accuracy and the efficacy of this approach is verified for a plane-parallel slab problem. In particular, we apply these two approaches (MC and radiative transport theory) to model light propagation in semiconductor-based luminescent solar concentrators (LSCs). The computational results for both approaches are compared with each other and found to agree. The results of this dissertation present practical and reliable techniques to use for solving forward/inverse inelastic scattering problems arising in various research areas such as optics, biomedical engineering, nuclear engineering, solar science and material science.

  12. Probing luminescence from nonspherical bubble collapse

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ohl, Claus-Dieter

    2002-01-01

    The luminescence from single laser produced cavitation bubbles for varying degrees of asphericity is investigated temporally, spatially, and spectrally. The degree of asphericity is controlled with an adjustable rigid boundary near the bubble. Temporally, single and multiple light emission events ha

  13. Luminescence from Erbium Oxide Grown on Silicon

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-01-01

    H9.14 Luminescence from erbium oxide grown on silicon E. Nogales’, B. Mrndez , J.Piqueras’, R.Plugaru2 , J. A. Garcfa3 and T. J. Tate4 ’ Universidad ... Complutense de Madrid, Dpto. Ffsica de Materiales, 28040 Madrid, Spain.2Inst. of Microtechnology, Bucharest, Romania.3Universidad del Pais Vasco, Dpto

  14. TUNE FEEDBACK AT RHIC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    CAMERON,P.; CERNIGLIA,P.; CONNOLLY,R.; CUPOLO,J.; DAWSON,W.C.; DEGEN,C.; DELLAPENNA,A.; DELONG,J.; DREES,A.; HUHN,A.; KESSELMAN,M.; MARUSIC,A.; OERTER,B.; MEAD,J.; SCHULTHEISS,C.; SIKORA,R.; VAN ZEIJTS,J.

    2001-06-18

    Preliminary phase-locked loop betatron tune measurement results were obtained during RHIC 2000 with a resonant Beam Position Monitor. These results suggested the possibility of incorporating PLL tune measurement into a tune feedback system for RHIC 2001. Tune feedback is useful in a superconducting accelerator, where the machine cycle time is long and inefficient acceleration due to resonance crossing is not comfortably tolerated. This is particularly true with the higher beam intensities planned for RHIC 2001. We present descriptions of a PLL tune measurement system implemented in the DSP/FPGA environment of a RHIC BPM electronics module and the feedback system into which the measurement is incorporated to regulate tune. In addition, we present results from the commissioning of this system during RHIC 2001.

  15. Climate forcings and feedbacks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, James

    1993-01-01

    Global temperature has increased significantly during the past century. Understanding the causes of observed global temperature change is impossible in the absence of adequate monitoring of changes in global climate forcings and radiative feedbacks. Climate forcings are changes imposed on the planet's energy balance, such as change of incoming sunlight or a human-induced change of surface properties due to deforestation. Radiative feedbacks are radiative changes induced by climate change, such as alteration of cloud properties or the extent of sea ice. Monitoring of global climate forcings and feedbacks, if sufficiently precise and long-term, can provide a very strong constraint on interpretation of observed temperature change. Such monitoring is essential to eliminate uncertainties about the relative importance of various climate change mechanisms including tropospheric sulfate aerosols from burning of coal and oil smoke from slash and burn agriculture, changes of solar irradiance changes of several greenhouse gases, and many other mechanisms. The considerable variability of observed temperature, together with evidence that a substantial portion of this variability is unforced indicates that observations of climate forcings and feedbacks must be continued for decades. Since the climate system responds to the time integral of the forcing, a further requirement is that the observations be carried out continuously. However, precise observations of forcings and feedbacks will also be able to provide valuable conclusions on shorter time scales. For example, knowledge of the climate forcing by increasing CFC's relative to the forcing by changing ozone is important to policymakers, as is information on the forcing by CO2 relative to the forcing by sulfate aerosols. It will also be possible to obtain valuable tests of climate models on short time scales, if there is precise monitoring of all forcings and feedbacks during and after events such as a large volcanic eruption

  16. Feedback i undervisningen

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kirkegaard, Preben Olund

    2015-01-01

    undervisningsdifferentiering, feedback på læreprocesser, formativ og summativ evaluering, observationer og analyse af undervisning samt lærernes teamsamarbejde herom. Praktikken udgør et særligt læringsrum i læreruddannelsen. Samspillet mellem studerende, praktiklærere og undervisere giver den studerende en unik mulighed...

  17. Plant–soil feedbacks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cortois, Roeland; Schröder-Georgi, Thomas; Weigelt, Alexandra; Putten, van der Wim H.; Deyn, De Gerlinde B.

    2016-01-01

    1. Plant–soil feedback (PSF), plant trait and functional group concepts advanced our understanding of plant community dynamics, but how they are interlinked is poorly known.
    2. To test how plant functional groups (FGs: graminoids, small herbs, tall herbs, legumes) and plant traits relate to PSF,

  18. Signatures of AGN feedback

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wylezalek, Dominika; Zakamska, Nadia L.; MaNGA-GMOS Team

    2017-01-01

    Feedback from actively accreting SMBHs (Active Galactic Nuclei, AGN) is now widely considered to be the main driver in regulating the growth of massive galaxies. Observational proof for this scenario has, however, been hard to come by. Many attempts at finding a conclusive observational proof that AGN may be able to quench star formation and regulate the host galaxies' growth have shown that this problem is highly complex.I will present results from several projects that focus on understanding the power, reach and impact of feedback processes exerted by AGN. I will describe recent efforts in our group of relating feedback signatures to the specific star formation rate in their host galaxies, where our results are consistent with the AGN having a `negative' impact through feedback on the galaxies' star formation history (Wylezalek+2016a,b). Furthermore, I will show that powerful AGN-driven winds can be easily hidden and not be apparent in the integrated spectrum of the galaxy. This implies that large IFU surveys, such as the SDSS-IV MaNGA survey, might uncover many previously unknown AGN and outflows that are potentially very relevant for understanding the role of AGN in galaxy evolution (Wylezalek+2016c)!

  19. Feedback and Prior Achievement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyman, Cynthia; Tobias, Sigmund

    The hypothesis that feedback in programmed instruction is an important variable in the learning of novel, but not familiar, content was investigated. A linear, constructed response program dealing with the Sabbath rituals in the synagogue was chosen due to wide variability in student familiarity with this topic. Subjects were randomly assigned to…

  20. Review of Assessment Feedback

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jinrui; De Luca, Rosemary

    2014-01-01

    This article reviews 37 empirical studies, selected from 363 articles and 20 journals, on assessment feedback published between 2000 and 2011. The reviewed articles, many of which came out of studies in the UK and Australia, reflect the most current issues and developments in the area of assessing disciplinary writing. The article aims to outline…

  1. Determination of amlodipine using terbium-sensitized luminescence in the presence of europium(III) as a co-luminescence reagent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Kindy, Salma M Z; Al-Snedi, Abdalla; Suliman, Fakhr Eldin O; Al-Lawati, Haidar A J

    2014-09-01

    A sensitive time-resolved luminescence method for the determination of amlodipine (AM) in methanol and in aqueous solution is described. The method is based on the luminescence sensitization of terbium (Tb(3+) ) by formation of a ternary complex with AM in the presence of tri-n-octylphosphine oxide (TOPO) as co-ligand, dodecylbenzenesulfate as surfactant and europium ion as a co-luminescence reagent. The signal for Tb-AM-TOPO is monitored at λex  = 242 nm and λem  = 550 nm. Optimum conditions for the formation of the complex in aqueous system were 0.015 m Tris (hydroxylmethyl) amino methane buffer, pH 9.0, TOPO (1.0 × 10(-4) m), Eu(3+) (2.0 × 10(-7) m), dodecylbenzenesulfate (0.14%) and 6.0 × 10(-5) m of Tb(3+) , which allows the determination of 10-50 ppb of AM with a limit of detection of 1.2 ppb. The relative standard deviations of the method range between 0.1 and 0.2% indicated excellent reproducibility of the method. The proposed method was successfully applied for the assay of AM in pharmaceutical formulations and in plasma samples. Average recoveries of 98.5 ± 0.2% and 95.2 ± 0.2% were obtained for AM in tablet and plasma samples respectively.

  2. Feedback controlled hybrid fast ferrite tuners

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Remsen, D.B.; Phelps, D.A.; deGrassie, J.S.; Cary, W.P.; Pinsker, R.I.; Moeller, C.P. [General Atomics, San Diego, CA (United States); Arnold, W.; Martin, S.; Pivit, E. [ANT-Bosch, Backnang (Germany)

    1993-09-01

    A low power ANT-Bosch fast ferrite tuner (FFT) was successfully tested into (1) the lumped circuit equivalent of an antenna strap with dynamic plasma loading, and (2) a plasma loaded antenna strap in DIII-D. When the FFT accessible mismatch range was phase-shifted to encompass the plasma-induced variation in reflection coefficient, the 50 {Omega} source was matched (to within the desired 1.4 : 1 voltage standing wave ratio). The time required to achieve this match (i.e., the response time) was typically a few hundred milliseconds, mostly due to a relatively slow network analyzer-computer system. The response time for the active components of the FFT was 10 to 20 msec, or much faster than the present state-of-the-art for dynamic stub tuners. Future FFT tests are planned, that will utilize the DIII-D computer (capable of submillisecond feedback control), as well as several upgrades to the active control circuit, to produce a FFT feedback control system with a response time approaching 1 msec.

  3. Online feedback op schriftelijk werk: betere feedback in minder tijd.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Berg, B.A.M.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/288125797; van der Hulst, M.E.

    2015-01-01

    Feedback is a powerful teaching technic to raise students’ performance, provided that the feedback is informative on how to improve, is given in a timely manner and students have the opportunity to act upon it. Therefore, many institutions want their students to receive feedback on their performance

  4. Online feedback op schriftelijk werk: betere feedback in minder tijd.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Berg, B.A.M.; van der Hulst, M.E.

    2015-01-01

    Feedback is a powerful teaching technic to raise students’ performance, provided that the feedback is informative on how to improve, is given in a timely manner and students have the opportunity to act upon it. Therefore, many institutions want their students to receive feedback on their performance

  5. Luminescence chronology of a second millenium BCE settlement near Porbandar on the Gujarat coast, India

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Gaur, A.S.; Thomas, P.J.; Vora, K.H.; Sundaresh

    ) and optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) dating of two potshards. The obtained luminescence ages are found to be in agreement with other archaeological findings. The implications of the luminescence ages on the maritime history of the area and the cultural...

  6. Luminescence of Au(I)-thiolate complex affected by solvent

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Lina; Cao, Yuanjie; Chen, Juan; Sun, Zhihu; Yao, Tao; Jiang, Yong; Wei, Shiqiang

    2017-08-01

    This work presents a study on the correlation between luminescence property of Au(I)-SR (SR: thiolate) complexes and solvent polarity. Luminescent [Au15(SR)14-16]+ complexes were synthesized in the weakly polar solvent of toluene, while the non-luminescent [Au7(SR)6]+ species were obtained by the same synthesis method in the polar solvent of ethanol. The dependence of luminescence intensity on the mixed solvent with various toluene/ethanol ratios was also explored. It is proposed that the luminescence of Au(I)-SR complexes originates from the aggregation of the bilayer supramolecular structures induced by the weakly polar solvent. This aggregation strengthens the intra and intercomplex aurophilic Au(I)···Au(I) interactions and subsequently enhances the luminescence intensity of the complexes.

  7. Recent progress in biomedical applications of persistent luminescence nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jie; Ma, Qinqin; Wang, Yingqian; Shen, Haijing; Yuan, Quan

    2017-05-18

    Persistent luminescence nanoparticles (PLNPs) are an emerging group of promising luminescent materials that can remain luminescent after the excitation ceases. In the past decade, PLNPs with intriguing optical properties have been developed and their applications in biomedicine have been widely studied. Due to the ultra-long decay time of persistent luminescence, autofluorescence interference in biosensing and bioimaging can be efficiently eliminated. Moreover, PLNPs can remain luminescent for hours, making them valuable in bio-tracing. Also, persistent luminescence imaging can guide cancer therapy with a high signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and superior sensitivity. Briefly, PLNPs are demonstrated to be a newly-emerging class of functional materials with unprecedented advantages in biomedicine. In this review, we summarized recent advances in the preparation of PLNPs and the applications of PLNPs in biosensing, bioimaging and cancer therapy.

  8. Luminescence studies on europium-strontium phthalate system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Limin; Zhao, Ying; Su, Yunlan; Wu, Jinguang

    2002-11-01

    New lanthanide luminescence materials were prepared. The main component lanthanide chelates generally need a relatively high content of rare earth. Inorganic luminescence materials only need low rare earth concentration using doped method. Similarly, lanthanide chelates can be added to complex matrix by doped method. In this way, low rare earth concentration emission was successful in the lanthanide chelates system as well. The influence of europium ion concentration on luminescence intensities was discussed. When the europium ion weight in the complex is only about 0.6%, the sample exhibits good luminescence properties. The fluorescence, Fourier transform infrared spectra, micro-Raman and electron spin resonance spectra of the samples were measured. And a possible luminescence mechanism was suggested by the inorganic doped mechanism and the luminescence of lanthanide complexes together.

  9. Phosphate modulated luminescence in lanthanum vanadate nanorods- Catechin, polyphenolic ligand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamilmani, Vairapperumal; Nair, Balachandran Unni; Sreeram, Kalarical Janardhanan

    2017-08-01

    Rare earth orthovanadates and phosphates offer a very high opportunity for fabrication of nanoscale devices that exploit their luminescence properties. Optimization of luminescence by way of modulation of size, shape, structure, and morphology has been an area of study for several researchers. There has been a debate as to whether doped orthophosphate or orthovanadate is better luminescent material as both are chemically similar. It has been reported earlier that catechin hydrate can play the role of a structure director and thus influence the luminescence properties of orthovanadates. In this work, a catechin modulated the synthesis of Eu-doped lanthanum orthophosphate by phosphate substitution into vanadate host lattice is reported. A mechanistic understanding of the luminescence changes in LaMO4 has been proposed. During the substitution of V with P, catechin modulates the structure between 1D nanorods and nanowires. The host crystal structure, shape, and size influence the luminescence properties in doped LaMO4.

  10. Simulations of cosmic ray feedback by AGN in galaxy clusters

    CERN Document Server

    Sijacki, D; Springel, V; Ensslin, T A

    2008-01-01

    We investigate a numerical model for AGN feedback where for the first time a relativistic particle population in AGN-inflated bubbles is followed within a full cosmological context. In our high-resolution simulations of galaxy cluster formation, we assume that BH accretion is accompanied by energy feedback that occurs in two different modes, depending on the accretion rate itself. Unlike in previous work, we inject a non-thermal particle population of relativistic protons into the AGN bubbles, instead of adopting a purely thermal heating. We then follow the subsequent evolution of the cosmic ray (CR) plasma inside the bubbles, considering both its hydrodynamical interactions and dissipation processes relevant for the CR population. Due to the different buoyancy of relativistic plasma and the comparatively long CR dissipation timescale we find substantial changes in the evolution of clusters as a result of CR feedback. In particular, the non-thermal population can provide significant pressure support in centra...

  11. Engaging Students with Audio Feedback

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cann, Alan

    2014-01-01

    Students express widespread dissatisfaction with academic feedback. Teaching staff perceive a frequent lack of student engagement with written feedback, much of which goes uncollected or unread. Published evidence shows that audio feedback is highly acceptable to students but is underused. This paper explores methods to produce and deliver audio…

  12. New luminescence measurement facilities in retrospective dosimetry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lapp, Torben; Jain, Mayank; Thomsen, Kristina Jørkov

    2012-01-01

    thermoelectrically cooled NIR sensitive PMT (detection window peak at 855 nm, FWHM 27 nm). Software and electronics have been modified to allow standard TL and OSL measurements in the same sequence as RL measurements. Together with a new bleaching source based on a high-power UV LED (395 nm; 700 mW/cm2......This paper gives a review of recent developments in luminescence measurement facilities on the Risø TL/OSL reader including radio-luminescence (RL), exo-electron and violet stimulation attachments, and a method for characterising and if necessary correcting for beta irradiation source non......-uniformity.We first describe improvements to the existing RL option to allow near infra-red detection (NIR) during irradiation by the built-in 90Sr/90Y beta source. The RL optical signal is collected by a liquid light guide through an F34-901 interference filter and detection is based on a dedicated...

  13. Luminescence properties of a nanoporous freshwater diatom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goswami, Bondita; Choudhury, Amarjyoti; Buragohain, Alak K

    2012-01-01

    Freshwater diatom frustules show special optical properties. In this paper we observed luminescence properties of the freshwater diatom Cyclotella meneghiniana. To confirm the morphological properties we present scanning electron microscopy (SEM) images. X-ray diffraction (XRD) studies were carried out to visualize the structural properties of the frustules, confirming that silica present in diatom frustules crystallizes in an α-quartz structure. Study of the optical properties of the silica frustules of diatoms using ultra-violet-visible (UV-vis) spectroscopy and photoluminescence spectroscopy confirmed that the diatom C. meneghiniana shows luminescence in the blue region of the electromagnetic spectrum when irradiated with UV light. This property of diatoms can be exploited to obtain many applications in day-to-day life. Also, using time-resolved photoluminescence spectroscopy (TRPL) it was confirmed that this species of diatom shows bi-exponential decay.

  14. Optically stimulated luminescence dating of rock surfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sohbati, Reza

    There are many examples of rock surfaces, rock art and stone structures whose ages are of great importance to the understanding of various phenomena in geology, climatology and archaeology. Optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) dating is a well-established chronological tool that has successfully...... determined the depositional age of a wide variety of fine-grained sediments, from several years to several hundred thousands of years. However, there is no routine OSL dating method applicable to larger clasts such as cobbles, boulders and other rock surfaces. Here the application of quartz OSL to the dating...... of rock surfaces is successfully tested by application to two different quartz-rich rock types (sandstone and quartzite). Together with the measurement of infrared stimulated luminescence (IRSL) signals as a function of depth into the surface of different granites it is clear that both OSL and IRSL can...

  15. Anomalous enhancement of nanodiamond luminescence upon heating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khomich, A. A.; Kudryavtsev, O. S.; Dolenko, T. A.; Shiryaev, A. A.; Fisenko, A. V.; Konov, V. I.; Vlasov, I. I.

    2017-02-01

    Characteristic photoluminescence (PL) of nanodiamonds (ND) of different origin (detonation, HPHT, extracted from meteorite) was studied in situ at high temperatures in the range 20-450 °C. Luminescence was excited using 473 nm laser and recorded in the range 500-800 nm. In contrast to decrease of point defect PL in bulk diamond with temperature, we found that the ND luminescence related to ND surface defects increases almost an order of magnitude upon heating to 200-250 °C. The observed effect reveals that water adsorbed on ND surfaces efficiently quenches PL; water desorption on heating leads to dramatic increase of the radiative de-excitation.

  16. Materials for luminescent greenhouse solar collectors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levitt, J A; Weber, W H

    1977-10-01

    Luminescent greenhouse solar collectors are potentially useful for concentrating sunlight onto photovoltaic power cells. Measurements of the performance of small-scale collectors made of two commercially available materials (Owens-Illinois ED2 neodymium-doped laser glass and rhodamine 6G-doped plastic) are presented. The results are encouraging, but they indicate a need for further spectral sensitization and for reduced matrix loss coefficient. The measurements with monochromatic illumination agree with the predictions of a mathematical model developed to take account of reemission following the absorption of luminescence. Under solar illumination, the model predicts photon flux concentrations of about 15 for optimized full-scale collectors made of the materials studied and concentrations of 110 for reasonably improved glass.

  17. Modeling and simulation of luminescence detection platforms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salama, Khaled; Eltoukhy, Helmy; Hassibi, Arjang; El-Gamal, Abbas

    2004-06-15

    Motivated by the design of an integrated CMOS-based detection platform, a simulation model for CCD and CMOS imager-based luminescence detection systems is developed. The model comprises four parts. The first portion models the process of photon flux generation from luminescence probes using ATP-based and luciferase label-based assay kinetics. An optics simulator is then used to compute the incident photon flux on the imaging plane for a given photon flux and system geometry. Subsequently, the output image is computed using a detailed imaging sensor model that accounts for photodetector spectral response, dark current, conversion gain, and various noise sources. Finally, signal processing algorithms are applied to the image to enhance detection reliability and hence increase the overall system throughput. To validate the model, simulation results are compared to experimental results obtained from a CCD-based system that was built to emulate the integrated CMOS-based platform.

  18. Luminescent lanthanide chelates and methods of use

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selvin, Paul R.; Hearst, John

    1997-01-01

    The invention provides lanthanide chelates capable of intense luminescence. The celates comprise a lanthanide chelator covalently joined to a coumarin-like or quinolone-like sensitizer. Exemplary sensitzers include 2- or 4-quinolones, 2- or 4-coumarins, or derivatives thereof e.g. carbostyril 124 (7-amino-4-methyl-2-quinolone), coumarin 120 (7-amino-4-methyl-2-coumarin), coumarin 124 (7-amino-4-(trifluoromethyl)-2-coumarin), aminomethyltrimethylpsoralen, etc. The chelates form high affinity complexes with lanthanides, such as terbium or europium, through chelator groups, such as DTPA. The chelates may be coupled to a wide variety of compounds to create specific labels, probes, diagnostic and/or therapeutic reagents, etc. The chelates find particular use in resonance energy transfer between chelate-lanthanide complexes and another luminescent agent, often a fluorescent non-metal based resonance energy acceptor. The methods provide useful information about the structure, conformation, relative location and/or interactions of macromolecules.

  19. Luminescence from Tube-Arrest Bubbles in Pure Glycerin

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈岐岱; 王龙

    2004-01-01

    Single transient cavitation bubble with luminescence has been generated in pure glycerin by using the ‘tube arrest'method. The analyses of high-speed photograph and light emission data suggest that the light emission would be a single bubble sonoluminescence. The luminescence pulse width is observed to wry from sub-nanosecond to about 30 ns. The width and intensity of luminescence pulses increases with the height of the liquid column height and decreases with the liquid temperature.

  20. Uranyl(VI) luminescence spectroscopy at elevated temperatures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steudtner, Robin; Franzen, Carola; Brendler, Vinzenz [Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf e.V., Dresden (Germany). Div. Surface Processes; Haubitz, Toni [Brandenburg Univ. of Technology, Cottbus-Senftenberg (Germany)

    2016-07-01

    We studied the influence of temperature and ionic strength on the luminescence characteristics (band position, decay time and intensity) of the free uranyl ion (UO{sub 2}{sup 2+}) in acidic aqueous solution. Under the chosen conditions an increasing temperature reduced both intensity and luminescence decay time of the UO{sub 2}{sup 2+} luminescence, but the individual U(VI) emission bands did not change.

  1. Luminescence spectra and kinetics of disordered solid solutions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klochikhin, A.; Reznitsky, A.; Permogorov, S.;

    1999-01-01

    We have studied both theoretically and experimentally the luminescence spectra and kinetics of crystalline, disordered solid solutions after pulsed excitation. First, we present the model calculations of the steady-state luminescence band shape caused by recombination of excitons localized in the......-time limit at excitation below the exciton mobility edge. At excitation by photons with higher energies the diffusion of electrons can account for the observed behavior of the luminescence. [S0163-1829(99)11419-X]....

  2. Improving the quality of written feedback using written feedback.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartlett, Maggie; Crossley, James; McKinley, Robert

    2017-01-01

    Educational feedback is amongst the most powerful of all learning interventions. (1) Can we measure the quality of written educational feedback with acceptable metrics? (2) Based on such a measure, does a quality improvement (QI) intervention improve the quality of feedback? We developed a QI instrument to measure the quality of written feedback and applied it to written feedback provided to medical students following workplace assessments. We evaluated the measurement characteristics of the QI score using generalisability theory. In an uncontrolled intervention, QI profiles were fed back to GP tutors and pre and post intervention scores compared. A single assessor scoring 6 feedback summaries can discriminate between practices with a reliability of 0.82.The quality of feedback rose for two years after the introduction of the QI instrument and stabilised in the third year. The estimated annual cost to provide this feedback is £12 per practice. Interpretation and recommendations: It is relatively straightforward and inexpensive to measure the quality of written feedback with good reliability. The QI process appears to improve the quality of written feedback. We recommend routine use of a QI process to improve the quality of educational feedback.

  3. Positive feedback promotes oscillations in negative feedback loops.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bharath Ananthasubramaniam

    Full Text Available A simple three-component negative feedback loop is a recurring motif in biochemical oscillators. This motif oscillates as it has the three necessary ingredients for oscillations: a three-step delay, negative feedback, and nonlinearity in the loop. However, to oscillate, this motif under the common Goodwin formulation requires a high degree of cooperativity (a measure of nonlinearity in the feedback that is biologically "unlikely." Moreover, this recurring negative feedback motif is commonly observed augmented by positive feedback interactions. Here we show that these positive feedback interactions promote oscillation at lower degrees of cooperativity, and we can thus unify several common kinetic mechanisms that facilitate oscillations, such as self-activation and Michaelis-Menten degradation. The positive feedback loops are most beneficial when acting on the shortest lived component, where they function by balancing the lifetimes of the different components. The benefits of multiple positive feedback interactions are cumulative for a majority of situations considered, when benefits are measured by the reduction in the cooperativity required to oscillate. These positive feedback motifs also allow oscillations with longer periods than that determined by the lifetimes of the components alone. We can therefore conjecture that these positive feedback loops have evolved to facilitate oscillations at lower, kinetically achievable, degrees of cooperativity. Finally, we discuss the implications of our conclusions on the mammalian molecular clock, a system modeled extensively based on the three-component negative feedback loop.

  4. Broadband luminescence in liquid-solid transition

    CERN Document Server

    Achilov, M F; Trunilina, O V

    2002-01-01

    Broadband luminescence (BBL) intensity behavior in liquid-solid transition in polyethyleneglycol-600 has been established. Oscillation of BBL intensity observed in liquid-polycrystal transition are not found to observed in liquid-amorphous solid transition. It is shown that application of the theory of electron state tails to interpretation of BBL spectral properties in liquids demands restriction. BBL spectroscopy may be applied for optimization of preparation of polymers with determined properties. (author)

  5. Thermally stimulated luminescence of urine salts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bordun, O.; Drobchak, O.

    2008-05-01

    The thermally stimulated luminescence (TSL) of normal and pathological urine was studied. The presence of pathological salts leads to extinguishing of TSL intensity and to the appearance of additional stripes with maxima nearly 118 and 205K, except of characteristic stripes with the maxima nearly 173 and 260K. TSL stripes depend on urine constituents. The comparison of TSL intensity of normal and pathological urine is carried out and energies of thermal activation are determined for most intensive TSL stripes.

  6. Intrinsic luminescence of alkali silicate glasses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arbuzov, V.I.; Grabovskis, V.Y.; Tolstoi, M.N.; Vitol, I.K.

    1986-09-01

    This study obtains additional information on L centers and their role in electron excitation and intrinsic luminescence of a whole series. (Li, Na, K, Rb, and Cs) of alkali silicate glasses. The authors compare the features of the interaction with radiation of specimens of glass and crystal of a similar chemical composition, since silicates of alkali metals can be obtained in both the glassy and crystalline states.

  7. Eu2+ luminescence in strontium aluminates

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dutczak, D.; Juestel, T.; Ronda, C.; Meijerink, A.

    2015-01-01

    The luminescence properties of Eu2+ doped strontium aluminates are reported and reviewed for a variety of aluminates, viz. SrAl12O19, SrAl4O7, Sr4Al14O25, SrAl2O4 and Sr3Al2O6. The aim of the research is to investigate the role of local coordination and covalency of the aluminate host lattice,

  8. Liquid Contact Luminescence from Semiconductor Laser Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    1997-01-09

    Luminescence - Diagnostic As a diagnostic tool, LCL can provide much useful information about the quality of the epitaxial wafer prior to laser fabrication . In...diagnostic tool, LCL can provide a variety of useful information about the quality of the epitaxial wafer prior to laser fabrication . Temporal...the quality of the epitaxial laser wafer prior to laser fabrication . It is a quick, inexpensive, and non- destructive process that measures a variety

  9. Exciton luminescence in BaFCl crystal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Radzhabov, E

    1998-05-01

    The luminescence spectra and decay characteristics of both 5.45 and 3.4 eV bands in BaFCl oxygen-free crystals were investigated at 5-300 K temperature range using vacuum ultraviolet excitation as well as X-ray excitation. The similarities with excitons in alkali halides allow us to consider both excitons in BaFCl as on-center excitons and strong off-center excitons.

  10. Spectral converters and luminescent solar concentrators

    CERN Document Server

    Scudo, Petra F; Fusco, Roberto

    2009-01-01

    In this paper we present a comprehensive theoretical description of molecular spectral converters in the specific context of Luminescent Solar Concentrators (LSCs). The theoretical model is an extension to a three-level system interacting with a solar radiation bath of the standard quantum theory of atomic radiative processes. We derive the equilibrium equations of the conversion process and provide specific examples of application of this principle to the development of solar concentration devices.

  11. Eu2+ luminescence in strontium aluminates

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dutczak, D.; Juestel, T.; Ronda, C.; Meijerink, A.

    2015-01-01

    The luminescence properties of Eu2+ doped strontium aluminates are reported and reviewed for a variety of aluminates, viz. SrAl12O19, SrAl4O7, Sr4Al14O25, SrAl2O4 and Sr3Al2O6. The aim of the research is to investigate the role of local coordination and covalency of the aluminate host lattice, relat

  12. Luminescence of erbium ions in tellurite glasses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Savikin, Alexander P.; Grishin, Igor A.; Sharkov, Valery V.; Budruev, Andrei V., E-mail: budruev@gmail.com

    2013-11-15

    Optical characteristics of new generation of tellurite glasses having high stability against crystallization have been studied. As the initial reagents for the glasses synthesis on the base of tellurium oxide (TeO{sub 2}) there were used such oxides as WO{sub 3}, MoO{sub 3}, La{sub 2}O{sub 3}, Li{sub 2}CO{sub 3}, ZnO—Bi{sub 2}O{sub 2}CO{sub 3} and active components such as high purity Er{sub 2}O{sub 3}, Yb{sub 2}O{sub 3}, ErF{sub 3} and YbF{sub 3}. Intensities of luminescence at 1.53 µm of the erbium ions were determined after excitation at 975 nm. Experimental data obtained have shown the possibility to use the studied glasses doped by Er{sup 3+} and Yb{sup 3+} as active elements for fiber and integrated optics. - Graphical abstract: In contrast to the case of ZBLAN glass the TeO{sub 2}–WO{sub 3} (Er{sup 3+}) glass has bright intensity of luminescence at 1.53 µm for erbium ions that should be caused by excitation at 975 nm. Experimental data obtained have shown the possibility to use the studied glasses doped by Er{sup 3+} and Yb{sup 3+} as active elements for fiber and integrated optics. Display Omitted - Highlights: • We examined changes in growth of luminescence in doubly-doped tellurite glasses. • We found that luminescence grows in two orders by using Er{sup 3+} and Yb{sup 3+} at 1.53 μm. • We see possibility to use those glasses as active elements for integrated optics.

  13. Cerenkov luminescence imaging of medical isotopes

    OpenAIRE

    Ruggiero, Alessandro; Holland, Jason P.; Lewis, Jason S.; Grimm, Jan

    2010-01-01

    The development of novel multimodality imaging agents and techniques represents the current frontier of research in the field of medical imaging science. However, the combination of nuclear tomography with optical techniques has yet to be established. Here, we report the use of the inherent optical emissions from the decay of radiopharmaceuticals for Cerenkov luminescence imaging (CLI) of tumors in vivo and correlate the results with those obtained from concordant immuno-PET studies.

  14. Regenerative feedback resonant circuit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, A. Mark; Kelly, James F.; McCloy, John S.; McMakin, Douglas L.

    2014-09-02

    A regenerative feedback resonant circuit for measuring a transient response in a loop is disclosed. The circuit includes an amplifier for generating a signal in the loop. The circuit further includes a resonator having a resonant cavity and a material located within the cavity. The signal sent into the resonator produces a resonant frequency. A variation of the resonant frequency due to perturbations in electromagnetic properties of the material is measured.

  15. Luminescent probes for optical in vivo imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Texier, Isabelle; Josserand, Veronique; Garanger, Elisabeth; Razkin, Jesus; Jin, Zhaohui; Dumy, Pascal; Favrot, Marie; Boturyn, Didier; Coll, Jean-Luc

    2005-04-01

    Going along with instrumental development for small animal fluorescence in vivo imaging, we are developing molecular fluorescent probes, especially for tumor targeting. Several criteria have to be taken into account for the optimization of the luminescent label. It should be adapted to the in vivo imaging optical conditions : red-shifted absorption and emission, limited overlap between absorption and emission for a good signal filtering, optimized luminescence quantum yield, limited photo-bleaching. Moreover, the whole probe should fulfill the biological requirements for in vivo labeling : adapted blood-time circulation, biological conditions compatibility, low toxicity. We here demonstrate the ability of the imaging fluorescence set-up developed in LETI to image the bio-distribution of molecular probes on short times after injection. Targeting with Cy5 labeled holo-transferrin of subcutaneous TS/Apc (angiogenic murine breast carcinoma model) or IGROV1 (human ovarian cancer) tumors was achieved. Differences in the kinetics of the protein uptake by the tumors were evidenced. IGROV1 internal metastatic nodes implanted in the peritoneal cavity could be detected in nude mice. However, targeted metastatic nodes in lung cancer could only be imaged after dissection of the mouse. These results validate our fluorescence imaging set-up and the use of Cy5 as a luminescent label. New fluorescent probes based on this dye and a molecular delivery template (the RAFT molecule) can thus be envisioned.

  16. Ion beam induced luminescence of materials

    CERN Document Server

    Brooks, R

    2001-01-01

    luminescence dead zone at the domain walls. Neodymium-yttrium-aluminium garnet (Nd:YAG) was examined and the spectra measured as a function of temperature to show the evolution of intensity of the narrow line emission from the Nd rare earth. Shifts and changes in the intrinsic UV band in the YAG material were also apparent. Thin films of alumina grown on silica on a silicon substrate, along with some that contained copper nanoclusters were also examined. TRIM software was used to model the rate of excitation within the different layers of the material for the various implant energies and to identify the source of the luminescence profile observed in each case. Evidence of thin film interference fringes was apparent in the spectra by fringe patterns modulated onto the luminescence signal as a function of wavelength and film thickness. Analysis of an alkali feldspar material using IBL, and combined with work done using RL and CL experiments, showed a shift towards lower wavelengths of the main red/IR band with ...

  17. Feedback on Feedback: Eliciting Learners' Responses to Written Feedback through Student-Generated Screencasts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández-Toro, María; Furnborough, Concha

    2014-01-01

    Despite the potential benefits of assignment feedback, learners often fail to use it effectively. This study examines the ways in which adult distance learners engage with written feedback on one of their assignments. Participants were 10 undergraduates studying Spanish at the Open University, UK. Their responses to feedback were elicited by means…

  18. Feedback on Feedback: Eliciting Learners' Responses to Written Feedback through Student-Generated Screencasts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández-Toro, María; Furnborough, Concha

    2014-01-01

    Despite the potential benefits of assignment feedback, learners often fail to use it effectively. This study examines the ways in which adult distance learners engage with written feedback on one of their assignments. Participants were 10 undergraduates studying Spanish at the Open University, UK. Their responses to feedback were elicited by means…

  19. Feedback på arbejdspladser

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holdt Christensen, Peter

    Feedback på arbejdspladser er vigtig. Men feedback er også et populært begreb mange taler med om uden dog at vide sig helt sikker på hvad det er. Formålet med denne bog er at bidrage til en bedre forståelse af hvad feedback er, hvordan det fungerer og dermed hvordan arbejdspladser bedst muligt bør...... understøtte feedback. Med udgangspunkt i forskningen identificeres centrale udfordringer ved feedback, bl.a. hvorfor det kan være svært at give præcis feedback, hvordan forholdet mellem lederen og den ansatte påvirker den feedback der gives, og hvad der kendetegner en feedback kultur. Bogen er skrevet til...... undervisere og studerende på videregående uddannelser samt praktikere der ønsker en systematisk og forskningsbaseret forståelse af feedback på arbejdspladser. Bogen er således ikke en kogebog til bedre feedback, men en analyse og diskussion af hvad forskningen ved om feedback, og bidrager med inspiration og...

  20. Luminescence behaviour of beryl (aquamarine variety) from Turkey

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kat Latin-Small-Letter-Dotless-I , M.I.; Tueremis, M.; Keskin, I.C.; Tastekin, B.; Kibar, R.; Cetin, A. [Celal Bayar University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences, Physics Department, 45140 Manisa (Turkey); Can, N., E-mail: cannurdogan@yahoo.com [Celal Bayar University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences, Physics Department, 45140 Manisa (Turkey)

    2012-10-15

    Natural blue-green beryl from Turkey has been investigated using scanning electron microscopy-energy-dispersive spectroscopy (SEM-EDS), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and Cathodoluminescence (CL). Beryl has the chemical formula Be{sub 3}Al{sub 2}Si{sub 6}O{sub 18} and is hexagonal with space group P6/mcc. Chemical analyses of the beryl sample utilised inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectroscopy (ICP-AES) for major oxides and trace elements. It shows that the beryl sample is rich in Cs (531 ppm) and contains low concentrations of transition-metal ions, in total 2.29 wt.% Fe, 269 ppm Mn, V<5 ppm and Cr 20 ppm. Ideas on the origin of the green colour of this mineral are presented. The CL spectrum of the bulk sample display intense broad band emission from {approx}360 to {approx}800 nm. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Natural blue-green beryl from Turkey were investigated by SEM-EDS, XRD, CL. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Luminescence behaviour of Natural blue-green beryl. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The samples exhibit an intense broad band emission from {approx}360 to {approx}800 nm.

  1. Active feedback stabilization of multimode flute instability in a mirror trap

    Science.gov (United States)

    Be'ery, I.; Seemann, O.; Fisher, A.

    2014-07-01

    The flute instability in a table-top mirror machine has been stabilized by a feedback system consisting of optical sensors, a digital signal processor and charge-injecting electrodes. The use of multiple sensors and actuators enable the feedback to simultaneously stabilize two modes of the fast-growing, slowly rotating flute instability. Step function response and magnetohydrodynamic spectroscopy indicate a smooth frequency response and an inherent delayed response of the plasma drift due to the sheath resistivity. The measured feedback power is very small relative to the heating power of the plasma.

  2. The Endogenous Feedback Network

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Augustenborg, Claudia Carrara

    2010-01-01

    proposals, it will first be considered the extents of their reciprocal compatibility, tentatively shaping an integrated, theoretical profile of consciousness. A new theory, the Endogenous Feedback Network (EFN) will consequently be introduced which, beside being able to accommodate the main tenets...... of the reviewed theories, appears able to compensate for the explanatory gaps they leave behind. The EFN proposes consciousness as the phenomenon emerging from a distinct network of neural paths broadcasting the neural changes associated to any mental process. It additionally argues for the need to include a 5th...

  3. Portfolio, refleksion og feedback

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ane Qvortrup

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Denne leder definerer indledningsvist begrebet portfolio og gør rede for anvendelsesmuligheder i en uddannelseskontekst. Dernæst behandles portfoliometodens kvalitet og effekt for læring og undervisning og de centrale begreber refleksion, progression og feedback præsenteres og diskuteres. Herefter listes teknologier, der understøtter portfolioens opbygning og brug og implikationerne forbundet med valg af teknologi diskuteres kort. Afslutningsvist præsenteres temanummerets 5 artikler, der endvidere er inddraget undervejs i lederen som eksemplificering af de præsenterede begreber og teknologier.

  4. Precipitation-Regulated Feedback

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voit, Mark

    2016-07-01

    Star formation in the central galaxies of galaxy clusters appears to be fueled by precipitation of cold clouds out of hot circumgalactic gas via thermal instability. I will present both observational and theoretical support for the precipitation mode in large galaxies and discuss how it can be implemented in cosmological simulations of galaxy evolution. Galaxy cluster cores are unique laboratories for studying the astrophysics of thermal instability and may be teaching us valuable lessons about how feedback works in galaxies spanning the entire mass spectrum.

  5. Models of AGN feedback

    CERN Document Server

    Combes, F

    2014-01-01

    The physical processes responsible of sweeping up the surrounding gas in the host galaxy of an AGN, and able in some circumstances to expel it from the galaxy, are not yet well known. The various mechanisms are briefly reviewed: quasar or radio modes, either momentum-conserving outflows, energy-conserving outflows, or intermediate. They are confronted to observations, to know whether they can explain the M-sigma relation, quench the star formation or whether they can also provide some positive feedback and how the black hole accretion history is related to that of star formation.

  6. Radiation induced luminescence processes in c-BN

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Trinkler, L.; Berzina, B.; Benabdesselam, M.

    2004-01-01

    Spectral properties of cubic boron nitride have been studied using methods of photoluminescence (PL), X-ray excited luminescence (XL), thermoluminescence (TL) and optically stimulated luminescence. It is found that emission of cubic boron nitride is presented by 4 subbands, their relative yield...

  7. Electroluminescent apparatus having a structured luminescence conversion layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krummacher, Benjamin Claus [Sunnyvale, CA

    2008-09-02

    An apparatus such as a light source is disclosed which has an OLED device and a structured luminescence conversion layer disposed on the substrate or transparent electrode of said OLED device and on the exterior of said OLED device. The structured luminescence conversion layer contains color-changing and non-color-changing regions arranged in a particular pattern.

  8. Luminescence imaging using radionuclides: a potential application in molecular imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Jeong Chan [Department of Molecular Medicine, School of Medicine, Kyungpook National University, Daegu 700-422 (Korea, Republic of); Il An, Gwang [Molecular Imaging Research Center, Korea Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences, Seoul 139-706 (Korea, Republic of); Park, Se-Il [Department of Molecular Medicine, School of Medicine, Kyungpook National University, Daegu 700-422 (Korea, Republic of); Oh, Jungmin [Korea Basic Science Institute Chuncheon Center, Gangwon-do 200-701 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Hong Joo [Department of Physics and Energy Science, Kyungpook National University, Daegu 702-710 (Korea, Republic of); Su Ha, Yeong; Wang, Eun Kyung [Department of Molecular Medicine, School of Medicine, Kyungpook National University, Daegu 700-422 (Korea, Republic of); Min Kim, Kyeong; Kim, Jung Young [Molecular Imaging Research Center, Korea Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences, Seoul 139-706 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Jaetae [Department of Nuclear Medicine, School of Medicine, Kyungpook National University, Daegu 700-422 (Korea, Republic of); Welch, Michael J. [Department of Radiology, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO 63110 (United States); Yoo, Jeongsoo, E-mail: yooj@knu.ac.k [Department of Molecular Medicine, School of Medicine, Kyungpook National University, Daegu 700-422 (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-04-15

    Introduction: Nuclear and optical imaging are complementary in many aspects and there would be many advantages when optical imaging probes are prepared using radionuclides rather than classic fluorophores, and when nuclear and optical dual images are obtained using single imaging probe. Methods: The luminescence intensities of various radionuclides having different decay modes have been assayed using luminescence imaging and in vitro luminometer. Radioiodinated Herceptin was injected into a tumor-bearing mouse, and luminescence and microPET images were obtained. The plant dipped in [{sup 32}P]phosphate solution was scanned in luminescence mode. Radio-TLC plate was also imaged in the same imaging mode. Results: Radionuclides emitting high energy {beta}{sup +}/{beta}{sup -} particles showed higher luminescence signals. NIH3T6.7 tumors were detected in both optical and nuclear imaging. The uptake of [{sup 32}P]phosphate in plant was easily followed by luminescence imaging. Radio-TLC plate was visualized and radiochemical purity was quantified using luminescence imaging. Conclusion: Many radionuclides with high energetic {beta}{sup +} or {beta}{sup -} particles during decay were found to be imaged in luminescence mode due mainly to Cerenkov radiation. 'Cerenkov imaging' provides a new optical imaging platform and an invaluable bridge between optical and nuclear imaging. New optical imaging probes could be easily prepared using well-established radioiodination methods. Cerenkov imaging will have more applications in the research field of plant science and autoradiography.

  9. Anomalous propagation of luminescence through bulk n-InP

    CERN Document Server

    Luryi, Serge; Subashiev, Arsen; Chen, Zhichao

    2010-01-01

    Implementation of a semiconductor as a scintillator with a lattice-matched surface photo-diode for radiation detection requires efficient luminescence collection. Low and heavily doped bulk n-InP has been studied to optimize luminescence transmission via photon recycling.

  10. Effects of Preparation on Luminescent Characterization of Porous Silicon

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    Porous silicon samples are prepared by pulse electrochemical-etching and DC electrochemical-etching. The effects of different preparation methods on luminescent characterization of porous silicon are investigated. Compared with DC electrochemical-etching, pulse electrochemical-etching produces the porous silicon characterized by a more even surface, a stronger luminescence and a PL blue shift to a certain degree.

  11. Polarization-independent filters for luminescent solar concentrators

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Boer, D.K.G.; Lin, C.W.; Giesbers, M.P.; Cornelissen, H.J.; Debije, M.G.; Verbunt, P.P.C.; Broer, D.J.

    2011-01-01

    The efficiency of Luminescent Solar Concentrators could be greatly enhanced by the use of wavelength-selective filters, since they reduce the amount of luminescent light lost. To accomplish this, polarization-independent filters have been made by combining layers of cholesteric liquid crystals,

  12. Luminescent Processes Elucidated by Simple Experiments on ZnS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwankner, R.; And Others

    1981-01-01

    Describes some impurity-related optical properties of semiconductors, with special emphasis on the luminescence of zinc sulfide (ZnS). Presents and interprets five experiments using a ZnS screen, ultraviolet lamp, transparent Dewar liquid nitrogen, and a helium/neon gas base. Includes application of luminescence measurements to archaeology. (SK)

  13. Measurement of solid-state optical refrigeration by two-band differential luminescence thermometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hehlen, Markus P [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Epstein, Richard I [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Patterson, Wendy M [UNM; Sheik - Bahae, Mansoor [UNM; Seletskiy, D V [UNM

    2009-01-01

    We present a non-contact spectroscopic teclmique for the measurement of laser-induced temperature changes in solids. Two-band differential luminescence thermometry (TBDLT) achieves a sensitivity of {approx}7 mK and enables precise measurement of the net quantum efficiency of optical refrigerator materials. TBDLT detects internal temperature changes by decoupling surface and bulk heating effects via time-resolved luminescence spectroscopy. Several Yb{sup 3+}-doped fluorozirconate (ZBLANI) glasses fabricated from precursors of varying purity and by different processes are analyzed in detail. A net quantum efficiency of 97.39% at 238 K (at a pump wavelength of 1020.5 nm) is found for a ZBLANI:1%Yb{sup 3+} laser-cooling sample produced from metal fluoride precursors that were purified by chelate-assisted solvent extraction and dried in hydrofluoric gas. In comparison, a ZBLANI:1%Yb{sup 3+} sample produced from commercial-grade metal fluoride precursors showed pronounced laser-induced heating that is indicative of a substantially higher impurity concentration. TBDLT enables rapid and sensitive benchmarking of laser-cooling materials and provides critical feedback to the development and optimization of high-performance optical cryocooler materials.

  14. Haptic gas pedal feedback.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulder, M; Mulder, M; van Paassen, M M; Abbink, D A

    2008-11-01

    Active driver support systems either automate a control task or present warnings to drivers when their safety is seriously degraded. In a novel approach, utilising neither automation nor discrete warnings, a haptic gas pedal (accelerator) interface was developed that continuously presents car-following support information, keeping the driver in the loop. This interface was tested in a fixed-base driving simulator. Twenty-one drivers between the ages of 24 and 30 years participated in a driving experiment to investigate the effects of haptic gas pedal feedback on car-following behaviour. Results of the experiment indicate that when haptic feedback was presented to the drivers, some improvement in car-following performance was achieved, while control activity decreased. Further research is needed to investigate the effectiveness of the system in more varied driving conditions. Haptics is an under-used modality in the application of human support interfaces, which usually draw on vision or hearing. This study demonstrates how haptics can be used to create an effective driver support interface.

  15. Photostimulated luminescence properties of Eu2+ -doped barium aluminate phosphor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Quanlong; Qiu, Guangyu; Xu, Xuhui; Qiu, Jianbei; Yu, Xue

    2015-03-01

    An intense green photostimulated luminescence in BaAl2 O4 :Eu(2+) phosphor was prepared. The thermoluminescence results indicate that there are at least three types of traps (T1 , T2 , T3 ) with different trap depths in BaAl2 O4 :Eu(2+) phosphor according to the bands located at 327, 361 and 555 K, respectively, which are closely associated with the phosphor's long persistent luminescence and photostimulated luminescence properties. In addition, as a novel optical read-out form, a photostimulated persistent luminescence signal can be repeatedly obtained in BaAl2 O4 :Eu(2+) phosphor. This shows that re-trapping of the electron released from a deep trap plays an important role in photostimulated persistent luminescence.

  16. On the relationship between luminescence excitation spectra and feldspar mineralogy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poolton, N.R.J.; Bøtter-Jensen, L.; Johnsen, O.

    1996-01-01

    Feldspar minerals can be used as naturally occurring radiation dosemeters, with dose assessment commonly using luminescence techniques. Since many feldspars contain radioactive K-40, knowledge of the mineralogy of the luminescent samples being measured is of high importance. Most feldspars contain...... more than trace amounts of highly luminescent Fe3+ impurities, and this article examines the relationship between features of the luminescence excitation spectrum of this ion with sample mineralogy. It is demonstrated that there is a near linear correspondence between the plagioclase feldspar...... groups. The results are compared with properties of the excitation spectra dose-dependent optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) in order to compare the chemical environment of the OSL donor defect, and the isolated Fe3+ centres....

  17. Visible luminescence of dysprosium ions in oxyhalide lead borate glasses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pisarska, Joanna; Żur, Lidia; Pisarski, Wojciech A.

    2011-08-01

    Visible luminescence of Dy 3+ ions in oxyhalide lead borate glasses was examined. Luminescence spectra show two intense bands at 480 nm and 573 nm due to 4F 9/2 → 6H 15/2 (blue) and 4F 9/2 → 6H 13/2 (yellow) transitions of Dy 3+. Luminescence decays from 4F 9/2 state and yellow-to-blue luminescence intensity ratios (Y/B) were analysed with PbX 2 (X = F, Cl) content. An introduction of PbX 2 to the borate glass results in the increasing of 4F 9/2 lifetime and the decreasing of yellow-to-blue luminescence intensity ratio, which is due to reduction of covalency between Dy 3+ and O 2-/X - ions.

  18. Emotional feedback for mobile devices

    CERN Document Server

    Seebode, Julia

    2015-01-01

    This book investigates the functional adequacy as well as the affective impression made by feedback messages on mobile devices. It presents an easily adoptable experimental setup to examine context effects on various feedback messages, and applies it to auditory, tactile and auditory-tactile feedback messages. This approach provides insights into the relationship between the affective impression and functional applicability of these messages as well as an understanding of the influence of unimodal components on the perception of multimodal feedback messages. The developed paradigm can also be extended to investigate other aspects of context and used to investigate feedback messages in modalities other than those presented. The book uses questionnaires implemented on a Smartphone, which can easily be adopted for field studies to broaden the scope even wider. Finally, the book offers guidelines for the design of system feedback.

  19. Spectroscopic characteristic of conical bubble luminescence

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chen Qi-Dai; Fu Li-Min; Ai Xi-Cheng; Zhang Jian-Ping; Wang Long

    2005-01-01

    The conical bubble sonoluminescence (CBSL) from the collapse of the bubble was observed in an improved Utube apparatus. The emitted light energy of a single CBSL flash was measured to be ~ 1.4mJ. The pulse width was about 100μs. The spectra of luminescence were continuum superimposed with the spectral bands from the excitedstate C2, CN and CH. The CBSL provides a link between the light emission of the single-bubble and the multi-bubble sonoluminescence (SBSL and MBSL).

  20. Luminescent solar concentrators with fiber geometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edelenbosch, Oreane Y; Fisher, Martyn; Patrignani, Luca; van Sark, Wilfried G J H M; Chatten, Amanda J

    2013-05-01

    The potential of a fibre luminescent solar concentrator has been explored by means of both analytical and ray-tracing techniques. Coated fibres have been found to be more efficient than homogeneously doped fibres, at low absorption. For practical fibres concentration is predicted to be linear with fibre length. A 1 m long, radius 1 mm, fibre LSC doped with Lumogen Red 305 is predicted to concentrate the AM1.5 g spectrum up to 1100 nm at normal incidence by ~35 x. The collection efficiency under diffuse and direct irradiance in London has been analysed showing that, even under clear sky conditions, in winter the diffuse contribution equals the direct.

  1. Polyethylene terephthalate thin films; a luminescence study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carmona-Téllez, S.; Alarcón-Flores, G.; Meza-Rocha, A.; Zaleta-Alejandre, E.; Aguilar-Futis, M.; Murrieta S, H.; Falcony, C.

    2015-04-01

    Polyethylene Terephthalate (PET) films doped with Rare Earths (RE3+) have been deposited on glass by spray pyrolysis technique at 240 °C, using recycled PET and (RE3+) chlorides as precursors. Cerium, terbium, dysprosium and europium were used as dopants materials, these dopants normally produce luminescent emissions at 450, 545, 573 and 612 nm respectively; the doped films also have light emissions at blue, green, yellow and red respectively. All RE3+ characteristic emissions were observed at naked eyes. Every deposited films show a high transmission in the visible range (close 80% T), films surfaces are pretty soft and homogeneous. Films thickness is around 3 μm.

  2. Near-Field Enhanced Negative Luminescent Refrigeration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Kaifeng; Santhanam, Parthiban; Fan, Shanhui

    2016-08-01

    We consider a near-field enhanced negative luminescent refrigeration system made of a polar material supporting surface-phonon polariton resonances and a narrow-band-gap semiconductor under a reverse bias. We show that in the near-field regime, such a device yields significant cooling power density and a high efficiency close to the Carnot limit. In addition, the performance of our system still persists even in the presence of strong nonidealities such as Auger recombination and sub-band-gap thermal radiation from free carriers.

  3. Eu(2+) luminescence in strontium aluminates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dutczak, D; Jüstel, T; Ronda, C; Meijerink, A

    2015-06-21

    The luminescence properties of Eu(2+) doped strontium aluminates are reported and reviewed for a variety of aluminates, viz. SrAl12O19, SrAl4O7, Sr4Al14O25, SrAl2O4 and Sr3Al2O6. The aim of the research is to investigate the role of local coordination and covalency of the aluminate host lattice, related to the Sr/Al ratio, on the optical properties of the Eu(2+) ion. The UV and VUV excited luminescence spectra as well as luminescence decay curves were recorded to characterize the luminescence properties of the investigated aluminates. The emission of Eu(2+) ions varies over a wide spectral range, from ultraviolet (UV) to red, for the series of aluminates. The variation in emission color can be related to the crystal-field splitting of the 5d levels and the covalent interaction with the surrounding oxygen anions. In the least covalent material, viz. SrAl12O19:Eu(2+), narrow line emission due to the (6)P7/2-(8)S7/2 transition occurs at 4 K, indicating that the 4f(6)5d excited state is situated above the (6)P7/2(4f(7)) excited state around 360 nm. The most alkaline material, viz. Sr3Al2O6:Eu(2+) is the most covalent host and exhibits several d-f emission bands in the yellow to red spectral range due to the Eu(2+) ions located on different crystallographic Sr(2+) sites. The Eu(2+) emission spectra in the other aluminates confirm the trend that with increasing Sr/Al ratio the Eu(2+) emission shifts to longer wavelengths. Interesting differences are observed for the Eu(2+) from different crystallographic sites which cannot always be related with apparent differences in the first oxygen coordination sphere. The discussion gives insight into how in a similar class of materials, strontium aluminates, the emission color of Eu(2+) can be tuned over a wide spectral region.

  4. Chemically engineered persistent luminescence nanoprobes for bioimaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lécuyer, Thomas; Teston, Eliott; Ramirez-Garcia, Gonzalo; Maldiney, Thomas; Viana, Bruno; Seguin, Johanne; Mignet, Nathalie; Scherman, Daniel; Richard, Cyrille

    2016-01-01

    Imaging nanoprobes are a group of nanosized agents developed for providing improved contrast for bioimaging. Among various imaging probes, optical sensors capable of following biological events or progresses at the cellular and molecular levels are actually actively developed for early detection, accurate diagnosis, and monitoring of the treatment of diseases. The optical activities of nanoprobes can be tuned on demand by chemists by engineering their composition, size and surface nature. This review will focus on researches devoted to the conception of nanoprobes with particular optical properties, called persistent luminescence, and their use as new powerful bioimaging agents in preclinical assays. PMID:27877248

  5. Research Update: Luminescence in lead halide perovskites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ajay Ram Srimath Kandada

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Efficiency and dynamics of radiative recombination of carriers are crucial figures of merit for optoelectronic materials. Following the recent success of lead halide perovskites in efficient photovoltaic and light emitting technologies, here we review some of the noted literature on the luminescence of this emerging class of materials. After outlining the theoretical formalism that is currently used to explain the carrier recombination dynamics, we review a few significant works which use photoluminescence as a tool to understand and optimize the operation of perovskite based optoelectronic devices.

  6. Ion beam luminescence of Nd:YAG

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khanlary, M. [Science and Technology, Pevensey Building, University of Sussex, Brighton BN1 9QH (United Kingdom); Department of Physics, Imam Khomeini International University, Qazvin, Iran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Hole, D.E. [Science and Technology, Pevensey Building, University of Sussex, Brighton BN1 9QH (United Kingdom); Townsend, P.D. [Science and Technology, Pevensey Building, University of Sussex, Brighton BN1 9QH (United Kingdom)]. E-mail: p.d.townsend@sussex.ac.uk

    2005-01-01

    Luminescence recorded during ion beam implantation of Nd:YAG has proved valuable in sensing structural and local crystal field changes caused by waveguide fabrication in this laser material. The relative line intensities from Nd are sensitive to excitation rate and so the spectra differ strongly between H{sup +} and H2+ excitation, with further changes in the examples using He{sup +} and N{sup +} ions. The overall intensities are reduced at lower temperatures, as well as showing variations in relative line patterns. Some suggestions of component lines and weak broad bands are offered in terms of trace rare earth and other impurities.

  7. Optically Stimulated Luminescence Fundamentals and Applications

    CERN Document Server

    McKeever, Stephen

    2011-01-01

    The book discusses advanced modern applications of optically stimulated luminescence including the appropriate fundamentals of the process. It features major chapters on the use of OSL in space radiation dosimetry, medical physics, personnel dosimetry, security, solid-state physics and other related applications. In each case, the underlying theory is discussed on an as-needed basis for a complete understanding of the phenomena, but with an emphasis of the practical applications of the technique. After an introductory chapter, Chapters 2 to 6 cover basic theory and practical aspects, personal

  8. Research Update: Luminescence in lead halide perovskites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srimath Kandada, Ajay Ram; Petrozza, Annamaria

    2016-09-01

    Efficiency and dynamics of radiative recombination of carriers are crucial figures of merit for optoelectronic materials. Following the recent success of lead halide perovskites in efficient photovoltaic and light emitting technologies, here we review some of the noted literature on the luminescence of this emerging class of materials. After outlining the theoretical formalism that is currently used to explain the carrier recombination dynamics, we review a few significant works which use photoluminescence as a tool to understand and optimize the operation of perovskite based optoelectronic devices.

  9. Do students profit from feedback?

    OpenAIRE

    Arild Raaheim

    2006-01-01

    Undergraduate students in psychology were given the opportunity to exchange the traditional exam with portfolio assessment. The students received written feedback, by way of a standard feedback form, on two of the three essays of the portfolio. To investigate whether students attend to and act on the feedback, a comparison was made between unofficial marks on the first draft of the first essay and the official marks on the full portfolio at the end of the semester. With approximately 20% of t...

  10. Luminescence at the end of the tunnelling - Investigating charge transfer mechanisms and luminescence dating methods for feldspar minerals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kars, R.H.

    2014-01-01

    This thesis comprises analyses of mineral physics with an application in geology and archeology. The thesis contributes to the development of feldspar luminescence dating methods in order to extend the applicable age range of feldspar luminescence dating in the Quaternary (last 2.6 Ma). The research

  11. FEEDBACK REALIZATION OF HAMILTONIAN SYSTEMS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHENG Daizhan; XI Zairong

    2002-01-01

    This paper investigates the relationship between state feedback and Hamiltonian realizatiou. First, it is proved that a completely controllable linear system always has a state feedback state equation Hamiltonian realization. Necessary and sufficient conditions are obtained for it to have a Hamiltonian realization with natural outpnt. Then some conditions for an affine nonlinear system to have a Hamiltonian realization arc given.For generalized outputs, the conditions of the feedback, keeping Hamiltonian, are discussed. Finally, the admissible feedback controls for generalized Hamiltonian systems are considered.

  12. FEEDBACK REALIZATION OF HAMILTONIAN SYSTEMS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHENGDaizhan; XIZairong

    2002-01-01

    This paper investigates the relationship between state feedback and Hamiltonican realization.Firest,it is proved that a completely controllable linear system always has a state feedback state equation Hamiltonian realization.Necessary and sufficient conditions are obtained for it to have a Hamiltonian realization with natural output.Then some conditions for an affine nonlinear system to have a Hamiltonian realization are given.some conditions for an affine nonlinear system to have a Hamiltonian realization are given.For generalized outputs,the conditions of the feedback,keeping Hamiltonian,are discussed.Finally,the admissible feedback controls for generalized Hamiltonian systems are considered.

  13. Feedback strategies for wireless communication

    CERN Document Server

    Ozbek, Berna

    2014-01-01

    This book explores the different strategies regarding the feedback information for wireless communication systems. The text analyzes the impact of quantization and correlation of channel state information (CSI) on the system performance. The authors show the effect of the reduced and limited feedback information and gives an overview about the feedback strategies in the standards. This volume presents theoretical analysis as well as practical algorithms for the required feedback information at the base stations to perform adaptive resource allocation efficiently and mitigate interference coming from other cells.

  14. Synthesis and Characterization of Eu4(PMA)3(phen)0.75·7H2O Ternary Luminescent Complex

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    Eu(Ⅲ)-Pyromellitic acid[PMA]-1,10-phenanthroline (phen) ternary luminescent complex was prepared in ethanol and water mixed solvent. The elemental analysis, inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectroscopy (ICP-AES) fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) indicates that its chemical constitution is Eu4(PMA)3(phen)0.75·7H2O. TG-DTA curves indicated that the complex is heat stable at the temperature of 430 ℃. The XRD patterns showed that the complex is a new crystal different from the two ligands' structures. SEM image indicates that the complex is in block shape and disperses well. Photoluminescence (PL) analysis indicates that the complex emits Eu3+ characteristic luminescence under ultraviolet excitation.

  15. Glucocorticoid feedback resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Kloet, E R; Vreugdenhil, E; Oitzl, M S; Joëls, M

    1997-01-01

    Glucocorticoid feedback resistance can be inherited or locally acquired. The implications of these two forms of resistance for disease are strikingly different. The inherited form is characterized by enhanced adrenocortical function and hypercorticism to compensate for a generalized deficit in the glucocorticoid receptor gene, but these individuals lack symptoms of Cushing's syndrome. By contrast, resistance acquired at the level of the hypothalamic corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH) neurons is linked to hypercorticism, which is not compensatory but overexposes the rest of the body and the brain to glucocorticoids. This cell-specific glucocorticoid resistance can be acquired by genetically predisposed individuals failing to cope with (early) life events and causes enhanced vulnerability to disease-specific actions of glucocorticoids. (c) 1997, Elsevier Science Inc. (Trends Endocrinol Metab 1997; 8:26-33).

  16. KEKB bunch feedback systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tobiyama, M.; Kikutani, E. [National Lab. for High Energy Physics, Tsukuba, Ibaraki (Japan)

    1996-08-01

    Design and the present status of the bunch by bunch feedback systems for KEKB rings are shown. The detection of the bunch oscillation are made with the phase detection for longitudinal plane, the AM/PM method for transverse plane. Two GHz component of the bunch signal which is extracted with an analog FIR filter is used for the detection. Hardware two-tap FIR filter systems to shift the phase of the oscillation by 90deg will be used for the longitudinal signal processing. The same system will be used with no filtering but with only digital delay for transverse system. The candidate for the kicker and the required maximum power are also estimated. (author)

  17. A laser feedback interferometer with an oscillating feedback mirror

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wang Zhi-Guo; Wang Fei; Xiao Guang-Zong

    2012-01-01

    A method is proposed to solve the problem of direction discrimination for laser feedback interferometers.By vibrating the feedback mirror with a small-amplitude and high-frequency sine wave,laser intensity is modulated accordingly.The modulation amplitude can be extracted using a phase sensitive detector (PSD).When the feedback mirror moves,the PSD output shows a quasi-sine waveform similar to a laser intensity interference fringe but with a phase difference of approximately ±π/2.If the movement direction of the feedback mirror changes,the phase difference sign reverses.Therefore,the laser feedback interferometer offers a potential application in displacement measurement with a resolution of 1/8 wavelength and in-time direction discrimination.Without using optical components such as polarization beam splitters and wave plates,the interferometer is very simple,easy to align,and less costly.

  18. Luminescent DNA- and agar-based membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leones, R; Fernandes, M; Ferreira, R A S; Cesarino, I; Lima, J F; Carlos, L D; Bermudez, V de Zea; Magon, C J; Donoso, J P; Silva, M M; Pawlicka, A

    2014-09-01

    Luminescent materials containing europium ions are investigated for different optical applications. They can be obtained using bio-macromolecules, which are promising alternatives to synthetic polymers based on the decreasing oil resources. This paper describes studies of the DNA- and Agar-europium triflate luminescent membranes and its potential technological applications are expanded to electroluminescent devices. Polarized optical microscopy demonstrated that the samples are birefringent with submicrometer anisotropy. The X-ray diffraction analysis revealed predominantly amorphous nature of the samples and the atomic force microscopy images showed a roughness of the membranes of 409.0 and 136.1 nm for the samples of DNA10Eu and Agar1.11Eu, respectively. The electron paramagnetic resonance spectra of the DNA(n)Eu membranes with the principal lines at g ≈ 2.0 and g ≈ 4.8 confirmed uniform distribution of rare earth ions in a disordered matrix. Moreover, these strong and narrow resonance lines for the samples of DNA(n)Eu when compared to the Agar(n)Eu suggested a presence of paramagnetic radicals arising from the DNA matrix. The emission spectra suggested that the Eu3+ ions occupy a single local environment in both matrices and the excitation spectra monitored around the Eu emission lines pointed out that the Eu3+ ions in the Agar host were mainly excited via the broad band component rather than by direct intra-4f(6) excitation, whereas the opposite case occurred for the DNA-based sample.

  19. Novel luminescent nanoparticles for DNA detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Ling; Yang, Zhihua; Zhang, Yi; Zhu, Yanyu; Wang, Lun; Wang, Leyu

    2010-05-01

    Highly luminescent LaF 3:Ce 3+/Tb 3+ nanocrystals were successfully prepared and surface functionalized via Layer-by-Layer technology. These as-prepared nanocrystals are highly resistant to photobleaching and pretty dispersible in aqueous solution. Due to the efficient luminescence quenching of the nanocrystals by nucleic acids, a facile fluorescence quenching method was developed for the detection of trace amount of nucleic acids. Under optimal conditions, the fluorescence intensity was proportional to the DNA concentration over the range of 0.60-25.0 μg mL -1 for calf thymus DNA (ct-DNA) and 0.60-30.0 μg mL -1 for herring sperm DNA (hs-DNA), respectively. The corresponding detection limit is 0.21 μg mL -1 for ct-DNA and 0.31 μg mL -1 for hs-DNA, respectively. The results indicated that the reported method is simple and rapid with wide linear range. Also, the recovery and relative standard deviation of this method are reasonable and satisfactory.

  20. Biological Activities of a Thai Luminescent Mushroom

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiraporn BURAKORN

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Wild fruit bodies of luminescent mushrooms were collected from wood stumps over a period covering August to October 2011 in the Kosumpisai forest, Mahasarakham province, in the Northeast of Thailand. A study of the morphological and genetic characteristics of the luminescent mushroom suggested that it was Neonothopanus nimbi KS. The fruiting bodies and mycelium of Neonothopanus nimbi KS were assayed for their antimicrobial activities, antifungal activity, inhibitory activity against avian influenza H5N1 neuraminidase (NA, and anticancer activity, using organic solvent extracts. The results showed that only the methanol extract of mycelia was effective against Bacillus sphaericus, with the widest inhibition zone of 11.66±2.71 mm, but this was not effective against the other 3 bacteria (Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Serratia marcescens, and Escherichia coli. On the other hand, all of the fruit body extracts were inactive against all four bacteria. The ethylacetate extract of mycelia inhibited the NCI-H187 small lung cancer cell line, KB oral cavity cancer cell line, and the MCF7 breast cancer cell line, including Magnaporthe grisea and Curvularia lunata. The methanol extract of mycelia inhibited the KB oral cavity cell cancer cell line, Magnaporthe grisea, and Curvularia lunata at 96.66, 95.32 and 95.41 %, respectively. The results imply that polar extracts of mycelia are a resource of bioactive compounds, whereas extracts of fruit bodies have less inhibitory activity against cancer, phytopathogenic-fungi and H5N1 neuraminidase.

  1. Decreasing luminescence lifetime of evaporating phosphorescent droplets

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Voort, D. D.; Dam, N. J.; Sweep, A. M.; Kunnen, R. P. J.; van Heijst, G. J. F.; Clercx, H. J. H.; van de Water, W.

    2016-12-01

    Laser-induced phosphorescence has been used extensively to study spray dynamics. It is important to understand the influence of droplet evaporation in the interpretation of such measurements, as it increases luminescence quenching. By suspending a single evaporating n-heptane droplet in an acoustic levitator, the properties of lanthanide-complex europium-thenoyltrifluoroacetone-trioctylphosphine oxide (Eu-TTA-TOPO) phosphorescence are determined through high-speed imaging. A decrease was found in the measured phosphorescence decay coefficient (780 → 200 μs) with decreasing droplet volumes (10-9 → 10-11 m3) corresponding to increasing concentrations (10-4 → 10-2 M). This decrease continues up to the point of shell-formation at supersaturated concentrations. The diminished luminescence is shown not to be attributable to triplet-triplet annihilation, quenching between excited triplet-state molecules. Instead, the pure exponential decays found in the measurements show that a non-phosphorescent quencher, such as free TTA/TOPO, can be attributable to this decay. The concentration dependence of the phosphorescence lifetime can therefore be used as a diagnostic of evaporation in sprays.

  2. Rotation in a reversed field pinch with active feedback stabilization of resistive wall modes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cecconello, M.; Menmuir, S.; Brunsell, P. R.; Kuldkepp, M.

    2006-09-01

    Active feedback stabilization of multiple resistive wall modes (RWMs) has been successfully proven in the EXTRAP T2R reversed field pinch. One of the features of plasma discharges operated with active feedback stabilization, in addition to the prolongation of the plasma discharge, is the sustainment of the plasma rotation. Sustained rotation is observed both for the internally resonant tearing modes (TMs) and the intrinsic impurity oxygen ions. Good quantitative agreement between the toroidal rotation velocities of both is found: the toroidal rotation is characterized by an acceleration phase followed, after one wall time, by a deceleration phase that is slower than in standard discharges. The TMs and the impurity ions rotate in the same poloidal direction with also similar velocities. Poloidal and toroidal velocities have comparable amplitudes and a simple model of their radial profile reproduces the main features of the helical angular phase velocity. RWMs feedback does not qualitatively change the TMs behaviour and typical phenomena such as the dynamo and the 'slinky' are still observed. The improved sustainment of the plasma and TMs rotation occurs also when feedback only acts on internally non-resonant RWMs. This may be due to an indirect positive effect, through non-linear coupling between TMs and RWMs, of feedback on the TMs or to a reduced plasma-wall interaction affecting the plasma flow rotation. Electromagnetic torque calculations show that with active feedback stabilization the TMs amplitude remains well below the locking threshold condition for a thick shell. Finally, it is suggested that active feedback stabilization of RWMs and current profile control techniques can be employed simultaneously thus improving both the plasma duration and its confinement properties.

  3. Effect of oxygen concentration on singlet oxygen luminescence detection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Longchao; Lin, Lisheng; Li, Yirong; Lin, Huiyun; Qiu, Zhihai [MOE Key Laboratory of OptoElectronic Science and Technology for Medicine, Fujian Provincial Key Laboratory for Photonics Technology, Fujian Normal University, Fuzhou 350007 (China); Gu, Ying [Department of Laser Medicine, Chinese PLA General Hospital, Beijing 100853 (China); Li, Buhong, E-mail: bhli@fjnu.edu.cn [MOE Key Laboratory of OptoElectronic Science and Technology for Medicine, Fujian Provincial Key Laboratory for Photonics Technology, Fujian Normal University, Fuzhou 350007 (China)

    2014-08-01

    Singlet oxygen ({sup 1}O{sub 2}) is a major phototoxic component in photodynamic therapy (PDT) and its generation is dependent on the availability of tissue oxygen. To examine the effect of oxygen concentration on {sup 1}O{sub 2} detection, two hydrophilic photosensitizer (PS), rose bengal (RB) and meso-metra (N-methyl-4-pyridyl) porphine tetra tosylate (TMPyP) were used as model PS. Irradiation was carried out using 523 nm under hypoxic (2%, 13%), normoxic (21%) and hyperoxic (65%) conditions. The spectral and spatial resolved {sup 1}O{sub 2} luminescence was measured by near-infrared (NIR) photomultiplier tube (PMT) and camera, respectively. Upon the irradiation, the emission signal mainly consisted of background scattering light, PS fluorescence and phosphorescence, and {sup 1}O{sub 2} luminescence. The PS phosphorescence was evidently dependent on the oxygen concentration and PS type, which resulted in the change of emission profile of {sup 1}O{sub 2} luminescence. This change was further demonstrated on {sup 1}O{sub 2} luminescence image. The present study suggests that the low oxygen concentration could affect {sup 1}O{sub 2} luminescence detection. - Highlights: • Both spectral and spatial resolved {sup 1}O{sub 2} luminescence measurements were performed. • Effect of oxygen concentration on {sup 1}O{sub 2} generation was quantitatively evaluated. • Low oxygen concentration could affect {sup 1}O{sub 2} luminescence detection.

  4. Fast feedback in classroom practice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Emmett, K.M.; Klaassen, K.; Eijkelhof, H.

    2009-01-01

    In this article we describe one application of the fast feedback method (see Berg 2003 Aust. Sci. Teach. J. 28–34) in secondary mechanics education. Two teachers tried out a particular sequence twice, in consecutive years, once with and once without the use of fast feedback. We found the method to b

  5. Feedback on household electricity consumption

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grønhøj, Alice; Thøgersen, John

    2011-01-01

    consumption, we evaluate the effects of giving households detailed feedback about their electricity consumption on a small liquid crystal display (LCD) screen. Twenty Danish households participated in the study over a 5-month period. A new feedback system was developed in a user-involved innovation process...

  6. Designing feedback: multimodality and specificity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ludden, Geke Dina Simone; Sugiyama, Kazuo

    2013-01-01

    Now that many of us carry around devices that are equipped with sensors (e.g., smartphones with accelerometers) we can use these sensors to measure behavior. The data thus captured can be used to give someone feedback about this behavior. These feedback mechanisms are often used in so called smart

  7. Haptic feedback helps bipedal coordination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roelofsen, Eefje G J; Bosga, Jurjen; Rosenbaum, David A; Nijhuis-van der Sanden, Maria W G; Hullegie, Wim; van Cingel, Robert; Meulenbroek, Ruud G J

    2016-10-01

    The present study investigated whether special haptic or visual feedback would facilitate the coordination of in-phase, cyclical feet movements of different amplitudes. Seventeen healthy participants sat with their feet on sliding panels that were moved externally over the same or different amplitudes. The participants were asked to generate simultaneous knee flexion-extension movements, or to let their feet be dragged, resulting in reference foot displacements of 150 mm and experimental foot displacements of 150, 120, or 90 mm. Four types of feedback were given: (1) special haptic feedback, involving actively following the motions of the sliders manipulated by two confederates, (2) haptic feedback resulting from passive motion, (3) veridical visual feedback, and (4) enhanced visual feedback. Both with respect to amplitude assimilation effects, correlations and standard deviation of relative phase, the results showed that enhanced visual feedback did not facilitate bipedal independence, but haptic feedback with active movement did. Implications of the findings for movement rehabilitation contexts are discussed.

  8. Feedback traps for virtual potentials

    CERN Document Server

    Gavrilov, Momčilo

    2016-01-01

    Feedback traps are tools for trapping and manipulating single charged objects, such as molecules in solution. An alternative to optical tweezers and other single-molecule techniques, they use feedback to counteract the Brownian motion of a molecule of interest. The trap first acquires information about a molecule's position and then applies an electric feedback force to move the molecule. Since electric forces are stronger than optical forces at small scales, feedback traps are the best way to trap single molecules without "touching" them. Feedback traps can do more than trap molecules: They can also subject a target object to forces that are calculated to be the gradient of a desired potential function U(x). If the feedback loop is fast enough, it creates a virtual potential whose dynamics will be very close to those of a particle in an actual potential U(x). But because the dynamics are entirely a result of the feedback loop--absent the feedback, there is only an object diffusing in a fluid--we are free to ...

  9. Fast Feedback in Classroom Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emmett, Katrina; Klaassen, Kees; Eijkelhof, Harrie

    2009-01-01

    In this article we describe one application of the fast feedback method (see Berg 2003 "Aust. Sci. Teach. J." 28-34) in secondary mechanics education. Two teachers tried out a particular sequence twice, in consecutive years, once with and once without the use of fast feedback. We found the method to be successful, and the data that we obtained…

  10. Understanding Feedback: A Learning Theory Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thurlings, Marieke; Vermeulen, Marjan; Bastiaens, Theo; Stijnen, Sjef

    2013-01-01

    This article aims to review literature on feedback to teachers. Because research has hardly focused on feedback among teachers, the review's scope also includes feedback in classrooms. The review proposes that the effectiveness of feedback and feedback processes depend on the learning theory adhered to. Findings show that regardless of the…

  11. The Sound of Feedback in Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savin-Baden, Maggi

    2010-01-01

    Whilst there is considerable literature on feedback for students and on the use of audio feedback, literature in the area of podcasting assignment feedback (PAF) remains sparse. Partly, this may be due to a lack of clarity about what counts as feedback, the way in which feedback is located pedagogically and the relationship between feedback…

  12. Luminescence imaging of water during alpha particle irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamamoto, Seiichi, E-mail: s-yama@met.nagoya-u.ac.jp [Radiological and Medical Laboratory Sciences, Nagoya University Graduate School of Medicine (Japan); Komori, Masataka; Koyama, Shuji [Radiological and Medical Laboratory Sciences, Nagoya University Graduate School of Medicine (Japan); Toshito, Toshiyuki [Department of Proton Therapy Physics, Nagoya Proton Therapy Center, Nagoya City West Medical Center (Japan)

    2016-05-21

    The luminescence imaging of water using the alpha particle irradiation of several MeV energy range is thought to be impossible because this alpha particle energy is far below the Cerenkov-light threshold and the secondary electrons produced in this energy range do not emit Cerenkov-light. Contrary to this consensus, we found that the luminescence imaging of water was possible with 5.5 MeV alpha particle irradiation. We placed a 2 MBq of {sup 241}Am alpha source in water, and luminescence images of the source were conducted with a high-sensitivity, cooled charge-coupled device (CCD) camera. We also carried out such imaging of the alpha source in three different conditions to compare the photon productions with that of water, in air, with a plastic scintillator, and an acrylic plate. The luminescence imaging of water was observed from 10 to 20 s acquisition, and the intensity was linearly increased with time. The intensity of the luminescence with the alpha irradiation of water was 0.05% of that with the plastic scintillator, 4% with air, and 15% with the acrylic plate. The resolution of the luminescence image of water was better than 0.25 mm FWHM. Alpha particles of 5.5 MeV energy emit luminescence in water. Although the intensity of the luminescence was smaller than that in air, it was clearly observable. The luminescence of water with alpha particles would be a new method for alpha particle detection and distribution measurements in water.

  13. Feedback systems for linear colliders

    CERN Document Server

    Hendrickson, L; Himel, Thomas M; Minty, Michiko G; Phinney, N; Raimondi, Pantaleo; Raubenheimer, T O; Shoaee, H; Tenenbaum, P G

    1999-01-01

    Feedback systems are essential for stable operation of a linear collider, providing a cost-effective method for relaxing tight tolerances. In the Stanford Linear Collider (SLC), feedback controls beam parameters such as trajectory, energy, and intensity throughout the accelerator. A novel dithering optimization system which adjusts final focus parameters to maximize luminosity contributed to achieving record performance in the 1997-98 run. Performance limitations of the steering feedback have been investigated, and improvements have been made. For the Next Linear Collider (NLC), extensive feedback systems are planned as an intregal part of the design. Feedback requiremetns for JLC (the Japanese Linear Collider) are essentially identical to NLC; some of the TESLA requirements are similar but there are significant differences. For NLC, algorithms which incorporate improvements upon the SLC implementation are being prototyped. Specialized systems for the damping rings, rf and interaction point will operate at hi...

  14. Multi-bunch feedback systems

    CERN Document Server

    Lonza, M

    2008-01-01

    Coupled-bunch instabilities excited by the interaction of the particle beam with its surroundings can seriously limit the performance of circular particle accelerators. These instabilities can be cured by the use of active feedback systems based on sensors capable of detecting the unwanted beam motion and actuators that apply the feedback correction to the beam. The advances in electronic technology now allow the implementation of feedback loops using programmable digital systems. Besides important advantages in terms of flexibility and reproducibility, digital systems open the way to the use of novel diagnostic tools and additional features. The lecture will first introduce coupled-bunch instabilities analysing the equation of motion of charged particles and the different modes of oscillation of a multi-bunch beam, showing how they can be observed and measured. Different types of feedbacks systems will then be presented as examples of real implementations that belong to the history of multi-bunch feedback sy...

  15. Multi-bunch Feedback Systems

    CERN Document Server

    Lonza, M.

    2014-12-19

    Coupled-bunch instabilities excited by the interaction of the particle beam with its surroundings can seriously limit the performance of circular particle accelerators. These instabilities can be cured by the use of active feedback systems based on sensors capable of detecting the unwanted beam motion and actuators that apply the feedback correction to the beam. Advances in electronic technology now allow the implementation of feedback loops using programmable digital systems. Besides important advantages in terms of flexibility and reproducibility, digital systems open the way to the use of novel diagnostic tools and additional features. We first introduce coupled-bunch instabilities, analysing the equation of motion of charged particles and the different modes of oscillation of a multi-bunch beam, showing how they can be observed and measured. Different types of feedback systems will then be presented as examples of real implementations that belong to the history of multi-bunch feedback systems. The main co...

  16. Na-rich feldspar as a luminescence dosimeter in infrared stimulated luminescence (IRSL) dating

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sohbati, Reza; Murray, Andrew; Jain, Mayank;

    2013-01-01

    on geological origin and erosion history, but the dosimetry of K-rich feldspar grains extracted from rocks is complicated because the internal dose rate is very dependent on the original feldspar grain size. The in situ grain size information is lost during the crushing process used to separate the grains...... are in agreement with the expected age control, raising the possibility that this signal originates mainly from K-rich feldspar contamination in our Na-rich fractions, and thus is not so useful in the luminescence dating of rock surfaces. On the other hand, the pIRIR290 fading-corrected ages based on the yellow......One of the challenges in dating rock surfaces is the choice of the luminescence mineral. Although quartz is the preferred dosimeter in sediment dating, it is often not sufficiently sensitive when extracted from solid rocks. The intensity of signals from feldspars tends to be much less dependent...

  17. Fast Diagnosis of Gonorrhea Witth Enhanced Luminescence Enzyme Immunoassay

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHENG Heyi(郑和义); CAO Jingjiang(曹经江); SHAO Yanglin(邵燕玲)

    2002-01-01

    Objective:To evaluate the value of enhanced luminescence enzyme immunoassay in the diagnosis of Neisseria gonorrhea(NG) infection.Methods: Anti-catalase antibody for Neisseria gonorrheae combined with enhanced luminescence enzyme immunoassay were used to test for N. Gonorrhea.Results: A minimum of 1x104/CFU of GC in genital tract secretions or urine could be detected with the technique of luminescence enzyme immunoassay.Conclusion : The enhanced luninescence enzyme immunoassay has the advantage of high sensitivity and specificity for diagnosing NG from genitourinary tract secretion and urine.

  18. Luminescent Solar Concentrators--a review of recent results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Sark, Wilfried G J H M; Barnham, Keith W J; Slooff, Lenneke H; Chatten, Amanda J; Büchtemann, Andreas; Meyer, Andreas; McCormack, Sarah J; Koole, Rolf; Farrell, Daniel J; Bose, Rahul; Bende, Evert E; Burgers, Antonius R; Budel, Tristram; Quilitz, Jana; Kennedy, Manus; Meyer, Toby; Donegá, C De Mello; Meijerink, Andries; Vanmaekelbergh, Daniel

    2008-12-22

    Luminescent solar concentrators (LSCs) generally consist of transparent polymer sheets doped with luminescent species. Incident sunlight is absorbed by the luminescent species and emitted with high quantum efficiency, such that emitted light is trapped in the sheet and travels to the edges where it can be collected by solar cells. LSCs offer potentially lower cost per Wp. This paper reviews results mainly obtained within the framework of the Full-spectrum project. Two modeling approaches are presented, i.e., a thermodynamic and a ray-trace one, as well as experimental results, with a focus on LSC stability.

  19. Luminescent Solar Concentrators. A review of recent results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van Sark, Wilfried G.J.H.M. [Copernicus Institute of Sustainable Development and Innovation, Utrecht University, Utrecht (Netherlands); Barnham, K.W.J.; Chatten, A.J.; Farrell, D.J.; Bose, R. [Department of Physics, Imperial College London, South Kensington Campus, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom); Slooff, L.H.; Bende, E.E.; Burgers, A.R.; Budel, T. [ECN Solar Energy, P.O. Box 1, 1755 ZG Petten (Netherlands); Buechtemann, A.; Quilitz, J. [Fraunhofer Institute for Applied Polymer Research IAP, Geiselbergstrasse 69, 14476 Potsdam (Germany); Meyer, A.; Meyer, T. [Solaronix SA, Rue de l' Ouriette 129, 1170 Aubonne (Switzerland); McCormack, S.J.; Kennedy, M. [Focas Institute, School of Physics, Dublin Institute of Technology, Kevin St, Dublin 8 (Ireland); Koole, R.; De Mello Donega, C.; Meijerink, C.; Vanmaekelbergh, D. [Chemistry of Condensed Matter, Debye Institute for Nanomaterials Science, Utrecht University, Heidelberglaan 2, 3584 CS Utrecht (Netherlands)

    2008-12-15

    Luminescent solar concentrators (LSCs) generally consist of transparent polymer sheets doped with luminescent species. Incident sunlight is absorbed by the luminescent species and emitted with high quantum efficiency, such that emitted light is trapped in the sheet and travels to the edges where it can be collected by solar cells. LSCs offer potentially lower cost per Wp. This paper reviews results mainly obtained within the framework of the Fullspectrum project. Two modeling approaches are presented, i.e., a thermodynamic and a ray-trace one, as well as experimental results, with a focus on LSC stability.

  20. Luminescence from potassium feldspars stimulated by infrared and green light

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Duller, G.A.T.; Bøtter-Jensen, L.

    1993-01-01

    A series of experiments are reported which investigate stimulated luminescence from potassium feldspar. The aim is to provide a basic phenomenological description of the response of the material to stimulation by heat, infrared radiation (875 DELTA 80 nm) and a green light wavelength band from 5 15...... to 560 nm. Two conclusions are drawn: firstly it is suggested that the majority of the trapped charge responsible for the infrared stimulated luminescence signal does not give rise to a thermoluminescence signal, and secondly that a large traction of the two optically stimulated luminescence signals...

  1. Yellow luminescence of gallium nitride generated by carbon defect complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demchenko, D O; Diallo, I C; Reshchikov, M A

    2013-02-22

    We demonstrate that yellow luminescence often observed in both carbon-doped and pristine GaN is the result of electronic transitions via the C(N)-O(N) complex. In contrast to common isolated defects, the C(N)-O(N) complex is energetically favorable, and its calculated optical properties, such as absorption and emission energies, a zero phonon line, and the thermodynamic transition level, all show excellent agreement with measured luminescence data. Thus, by combining hybrid density functional theory and experimental measurements, we propose a solution to a long-standing problem of the GaN yellow luminescence.

  2. Luminescence of Speleothems in Italian Gypsum Caves: Preliminary Report

    CERN Document Server

    Shopov, Yavor Y; Forti, Paolo

    2009-01-01

    The luminescence of 3 speleothem samples from the Acquafredda karst system and 1 from the Novella Cave (Gessi Bolognesi Natural Park, Italy) has been recorded using excitation by impulse Xe- lamp. All these carbonate speleothems are believed to be formed only from active CO2 from the air, because the bedrock of the cave consist of gypsum and does not contain carbonates. The obtained photos of luminescence record the climate changes during the speleothem growth. U/Th and 14C dating proved that studied speleothems started to grow since about 5,000 years ago. The detailed analyses of the luminescence records is still in progress.

  3. Control of luminescence from lantern shark (Etmopterus spinax) photophores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Claes, Julien M; Mallefet, Jérôme

    2011-05-01

    The velvet belly lantern shark (Etmopterus spinax) is a common deep-sea shark that has been used, in the recent years, as a model for experimental studies on physiological control of shark luminescence. These studies demonstrated that, unlike any other luminous organism, the luminescence of this shark was under a dual control of hormones and neurotransmitters (or neuromodulators). This paper, by making a short review of histological and pharmacological results from these studies, aims to propose a first model of luminescence control in E. spinax.

  4. Ligand sensitized luminescence of uranyl by benzoic acid in acetonitrile medium: a new luminescent uranyl benzoate specie.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Satendra; Maji, S; Joseph, M; Sankaran, K

    2015-03-05

    Benzoic acid (BA) is shown to sensitize and enhance the luminescence of uranyl ion in acetonitrile medium. Luminescence spectra and especially UV-Vis spectroscopy studies reveal the formation of tri benzoate complex of uranyl i.e. [UO2(C6H5COO)3](-) which is highly luminescent. In particular, three sharp bands at 431, 443, 461nm of absorption spectra provides evidence for tri benzoate specie of uranyl in acetonitrile medium. The luminescence lifetime of uranyl in this complex is 68μs which is much more compared to the lifetime of uncomplexed uranyl (20μs) in acetonitrile medium. In contrary to aqueous medium where uranyl benzoate forms 1:1 and 1:2 species, spectroscopic data reveal formation of 1:3 complex in acetonitrile medium. Addition of water to acetonitrile results in decrease of luminescence intensity of this specie and the luminescence features implode at 20% (v/v) of water content. For the first time, to the best of our knowledge, the existence of [UO2(C6H5COO)3](-) specie in acetonitrile is reported. Mechanism of luminescence enhancement is discussed. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Ligand sensitized luminescence of uranyl by benzoic acid in acetonitrile medium: A new luminescent uranyl benzoate specie

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Satendra; Maji, S.; Joseph, M.; Sankaran, K.

    2015-03-01

    Benzoic acid (BA) is shown to sensitize and enhance the luminescence of uranyl ion in acetonitrile medium. Luminescence spectra and especially UV-Vis spectroscopy studies reveal the formation of tri benzoate complex of uranyl i.e. [UO2(C6H5COO)3]- which is highly luminescent. In particular, three sharp bands at 431, 443, 461 nm of absorption spectra provides evidence for tri benzoate specie of uranyl in acetonitrile medium. The luminescence lifetime of uranyl in this complex is 68 μs which is much more compared to the lifetime of uncomplexed uranyl (20 μs) in acetonitrile medium. In contrary to aqueous medium where uranyl benzoate forms 1:1 and 1:2 species, spectroscopic data reveal formation of 1:3 complex in acetonitrile medium. Addition of water to acetonitrile results in decrease of luminescence intensity of this specie and the luminescence features implode at 20% (v/v) of water content. For the first time, to the best of our knowledge, the existence of [UO2(C6H5COO)3]- specie in acetonitrile is reported. Mechanism of luminescence enhancement is discussed.

  6. Feedback control of sound

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rafaely, Boaz

    This thesis is concerned with the development an application of feedback control techniques for active sound control. Both fixed and adaptive controllers are considered. The controller design problem for active sound control is formulated as a constrained optimisation problem with an H2 performance objective, of minimising the variance of the control error, and H2 and H∞ design constraints involving control power output, disturbance enhancement, and robust stability. An Internal Model Controller with an FIR control filter is assumed. Conventional H2 design methods for feedback controllers are studied first. Although such controllers can satisfy the design constraints by employing effort terms in the quadratic cost function, they do not achieve the best possible performance, and when adapted using LMS-based algorithms, they suffer from instabilities if the plant response varies significantly. Improved H2/H∞ design methods for fixed and adaptive controllers are then developed, which achieve the best H2 performance under the design constraints, offer an improved stability when made adaptive, and in general outperform the conventional H2 controllers. The H2/H∞ design problems employ convex programming to ensure a unique solution. The Sequential Quadratic Programming methods is used for the off-line design of fixed controllers, and penalty and barrier function methods, together with frequency domain LMS-based algorithms are employed in the H2/H∞ adaptive controllers. The controllers studied and developed here were applied to three active sound control systems: a noise-reducing headset, an active headrest, and a sound radiating panel. The emphasis was put on developing control strategies that improve system performance. First, a high performance controller for the noise-reducing headset was implemented in real-time, which combines analogue and adaptive digital controllers, and can thus reject disturbances which has both broad-band and periodic components. Then

  7. RWM Feedback Stabilization with the New Internal Coil (I-Coil)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okabayashi, M.; Chance, M. S.; Bialek, J.; Garofalo, A. M.; Navratil, G. A.; Reimerdes, H.; Chu, M. S.; Jackson, G. L.; Jensen, T. H.; La Haye, R. J.; Scoville, J. T.; Strait, E. J.; Jayakumar, R. J.; Edgell, D. H.

    2003-10-01

    RWM stabilization by rotational viscosity has been observed as a quite robust approach for achieving the stable n=1 kink plasma beta up to ideal wall limit. For less rotation configurations, such as expected in burning plasma, it is highly desirable to establish the same level of robust RWM stabilizing system. VALEN code predicts that newly installed I-coil with upgraded digital control system can provide RWM stabilization up to the ideal wall beta limit using direct feedback even without plasma rotation. A major advantage of new system is the adjustability of poloidal m-component to the plasma eigen mode. To demonstrate the effectiveness of direct feedback stabilization in the highly rotating NBI heated plasma, the plasma rotation was reduced either by resonant n=1 braking or non-resonant n=3 braking. It was found that the feedback can sustain the plasma above no-wall limit even when the rotation outside q>2 was reduced to nearly zero. Issues related to the feedback performance improvement will be discussed.

  8. Giving Feedback: Development of Scales for the Mum Effect, Discomfort Giving Feedback, and Feedback Medium Preference

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cox, Susie S.; Marler, Laura E.; Simmering, Marcia J.; Totten, Jeff W.

    2011-01-01

    Research in organizational behavior and human resources promotes the view that it is critical for managers to provide accurate feedback to employees, yet little research addresses rater tendencies (i.e., the "mum effect") and attitudes that influence how performance feedback is given. Because technology has changed the nature of communication in…

  9. Luminescence and the light emitting diode the basics and technology of leds and the luminescence properties of the materials

    CERN Document Server

    Williams, E W; Pamplin, BR

    2013-01-01

    Luminescence and the Light Emitting Diode: The Basics and Technology of LEDS and the Luminescence Properties of the Materials focuses on the basic physics and technology of light emitting diodes (LEDS) and pn junction lasers as well as their luminescence properties. Optical processes in semiconductors and the useful devices which can be made are discussed. Comprised of 10 chapters, this book begins with an introduction to the crystal structure and growth, as well as the optical and electrical properties of LED materials. The detailed fabrication of the LED is then considered, along with the lu

  10. Styrket feedback gennem studerendes selvevaluering

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Lars Bo

    2016-01-01

    Studerende er ofte utilfredse med såvel kvaliteten som kvantiteten af feedback på skriftligt arbejde. Ligeledes kan det som underviser være svært at afgive feedback, der tager udgangspunkt i de studerendes respektive læringssituationer, hvis man ikke har andet afsæt end opgavetekster. Denne artikel...... beskriver derfor to eksperimenter med brug af selvevaluering som kvalificerende mellemled i ekstern feedback på skriveøvelser. Eksperimenternes formål er at styrke den formative læring ved skriftligt arbejde. I det første eksperiment bestod feedbacken af underviser-feedback, mens det andet eksperiment...... indebar peer-feedback og fælles feedback. I begge tilfælde blev selvevalueringen foretaget med udgangspunkt i en kriteriebaseret retteguide. Eksperimenterne medførte, at den eksterne feedback blev målrettet og kvalificeret i forhold til den enkelte studerende, mens selve skriveprocessen mod forventning...

  11. Active feedback stabilization of flute instability in a mirror trap

    Science.gov (United States)

    Be'Ery, Ilan; Seemann, Omri; Fruchtman, Amnon; Fisher, Amnon; Ron, Amiram

    2013-10-01

    The flute instability in a table-top mirror machine has been stabilized by a feedback system consisting of optical probes, digital signal processor, and needle electrodes. The total response time of the system is 5 μs, which is considerably faster than the typical flute growth time. Simulation and a dynamic model of the plasma's response to the needle actuators were tested against cyclic bias experiments. The plasma density is increased by the stabilization by a factor of two and is limited by other decay processes.

  12. Biosensing with Luminescent Semiconductor Quantum Dots

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hedi Mattoussi

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available Luminescent semiconductor nanocrystals or quantum dots (QDs are a recentlydeveloped class of nanomaterial whose unique photophysical properties are helping tocreate a new generation of robust fluorescent biosensors. QD properties of interest forbiosensing include high quantum yields, broad absorption spectra coupled to narrow sizetunablephotoluminescent emissions and exceptional resistance to both photobleaching andchemical degradation. In this review, we examine the progress in adapting QDs for severalpredominantly in vitro biosensing applications including use in immunoassays, asgeneralized probes, in nucleic acid detection and fluorescence resonance energy transfer(FRET - based sensing. We also describe several important considerations when workingwith QDs mainly centered on the choice of material(s and appropriate strategies forattaching biomolecules to the QDs.

  13. Luminescent solar concentrator improvement by stimulated emission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaysir, Md Rejvi; Fleming, Simon; MacQueen, Rowan W.; Schmidt, Timothy W.; Argyros, Alexander

    2015-12-01

    Luminescent solar concentrators (LSCs) offer the prospect of reducing the cost of solar energy, and are a promising candidate for building integrated photovoltaic (PV) structures. However, the realization of commercially viable efficiency of LSCs is currently hindered by reabsorption losses. In this work, a method is introduced for reducing reabsorption as well as improving directional emission in LSCs by using stimulated emission. Light from a seed laser (potentially an inexpensive laser diode) passes through the entire length of the LSC panel, modifying the emission spectrum of excited dye molecules such that it is spectrally narrower, at wavelengths that minimize reabsorption, and directed by the seed laser towards a small target PV cell. A mathematical model of such a system is presented which identifies different physical parameters responsible for the power conversion efficiency and gives the net effective output power.

  14. Luminescent solar concentrators utilizing stimulated emission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaysir, Md Rejvi; Fleming, Simon; MacQueen, Rowan W; Schmidt, Timothy W; Argyros, Alexander

    2016-03-21

    Luminescent solar concentrators (LSCs) are an emerging technology that aims primarily to reduce the cost of solar energy, with great potential for building integrated photovoltaic (PV) structures. However, realizing LSCs with commercially viable efficiency is currently hindered by reabsorption losses. Here, we introduce an approach to reducing reabsorption as well as improving directional emission in LSCs by using stimulated emission. Light from a seed laser (potentially an inexpensive laser diode) passes through the entire area of the LSC panel, modifying the emission spectrum of excited dye molecules such that it is spectrally narrower, at wavelengths that minimize reabsorption to allow net gain in the system, and directed towards a small PV cell. A mathematical model, taking into account thermodynamic considerations, of such a system is presented which identifies key parameters and allows evaluation in terms of net effective output power.

  15. Luminescence in crosslinked polyethylene at elevated temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bamji, S. S.; Bulinski, A. T.; Suzuki, H.; Matsuki, M.; Iwata, Z.

    1993-10-01

    Electrical treeing is often responsible for the breakdown of insulating materials used in power apparatus such as high-voltage transformers, cables, and capacitors. Insulation, such as crosslinked polyethylene (XLPE), used in underground high-voltage cables usually operates at temperatures above ambient. This paper describes the characteristics of luminescence, emitted prior to electrical tree inception, at a crosslinked polyethylene-semiconducting material (XLPE-semicon) interface held above room temperature. Use of a sensitive light detection system showed that XLPE subjected to elevated temperatures emits luminescence even without voltage application. This light was attributed to thermoluminescence which decreased with the decrease in the concentration of the crosslinking by-products present in the polymer. The spectra of thermoluminescence were only in the visible range. On the other hand, electroluminescence occurred when the XLPE-semicon interface was held above room temperature and subjected to high electric stress. This light did not depend on the concentration of the crosslinking by-products and the spectra of electroluminescence were in the visible and the ultraviolet ranges. It is proposed that XLPE-semicon interface held at elevated temperature and subjected to long-term voltage application initially emits both thermoluminescence and electroluminescence. As the crosslinking by-products exude out of the polymer, thermoluminescence decreases with time and ultimately ceases, but electroluminescence occurs as long as the voltage is applied to the polymer. Although the intensity of electroluminescence emitted at high temperature was lower than that emitted at ambient, sufficient ultraviolet radiation was emitted. The ultraviolet radiation could photodegrade the polymer and lead to electrical tree inception.

  16. Detection of biological aerosols by luminescence techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stopa, Peter J.; Tieman, Darlene; Coon, Phillip A.; Paterno, Dorothea A.; Milton, Maurice M.

    1999-12-01

    Luciferin-Luciferase (L-L) luminescence techniques were used to successfully measure adenosine triphosphate (ATP) (pg/ml) in concentrated aerosol samples containing either vegetative bacterial cells or spores. Aerosols were collected with wet and dry sampling devices. Evaluation for the presence of total bio-mass from bacterial and non-bacterial sources of ATP was achieved by suspending the collected aerosol samples in phosphate buffered saline (PBS), pipeting a 50-(mu) l aliquot of the PBS suspension into a FiltravetteTM, and then adding bacterial releasing agent (BRA). The sample was then reacted with L-L, and the resulting Relative Luminescence Units (RLU's), indicative of ATP from all sources, were measured. Bacterial cells were enumerated with the additional application of a wash with somatic cell releasing agent (SRA) to remove any interferences and non-bacterial sources of ATP prior to BRA application. This step removes interfering substances and non-bacterial sources of ATP. For spore analysis, an equi-volume sample of the PBS suspension was added to an equi-volume of trypticase soy broth (TSB), incubated at 37 C for 15 minutes, and processed using methods identical to bacterial cell analysis. Using these technique we were able to detect Bacillus subtilin variation niger, formerly known as Bacillus globigii (BG), in aerosol samples at concentrations greater than or equal to 105 colony forming units (CFU) per ml. Results of field and chamber trials show that one can detect the presence of bacterial and non-bacterial sources of ATP. One can also differentiate spore and vegetative bacterial cells. These techniques may be appropriate to situations where the measurement of bacterial aerosols is needed.

  17. Evaluation of defects in cuprous oxide through exciton luminescence imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frazer, Laszlo, E-mail: jl@laszlofrazer.com [Department of Physics, Northwestern University, 2145 Sheridan Road, Evanston, IL 60208 (United States); Lenferink, Erik J. [Department of Physics, Northwestern University, 2145 Sheridan Road, Evanston, IL 60208 (United States); Chang, Kelvin B. [Department of Chemistry, Northwestern University, 2145 Sheridan Road, Evanston, IL 60208 (United States); Poeppelmeier, Kenneth R. [Department of Chemistry, Northwestern University, 2145 Sheridan Road, Evanston, IL 60208 (United States); Chemical Sciences and Engineering Division, Argonne National Laboratory, 9700 South Cass Avenue, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States); Stern, Nathaniel P. [Department of Physics, Northwestern University, 2145 Sheridan Road, Evanston, IL 60208 (United States); Ketterson, John B. [Department of Physics, Northwestern University, 2145 Sheridan Road, Evanston, IL 60208 (United States); Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, Northwestern University, 2145 Sheridan Road, Evanston, IL 60208 (United States)

    2015-03-15

    The various decay mechanisms of excitons in cuprous oxide (Cu{sub 2}O) are highly sensitive to defects which can relax selection rules. Here we report cryogenic hyperspectral imaging of exciton luminescence from cuprous oxide crystals grown via the floating zone method showing that the samples have few defects. Some locations, however, show strain splitting of the 1s orthoexciton triplet polariton luminescence. Strain is reduced by annealing. In addition, annealing causes annihilation of oxygen and copper vacancies, which leads to a negative correlation between luminescence of unlike vacancies. - Highlights: • We use luminescence to observe defects in high quality cuprous oxide crystals. • Strain is reduced by annealing. • Annealing causes annihilation of oxygen and copper vacancies.

  18. Luminescence imaging of polymer solar cells: visualization of progressing degradation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seeland, Marco; Roesch, Roland; Hoppe, Harald [Institute of Physics, Ilmenau University of Technology, Ilmenau (Germany)

    2011-07-01

    We apply luminescence imaging as tool for the non-destructive visualization of degradation processes within bulk heterojunction polymer solar cells. The imaging technique is based on luminescence detection with a highly sensitive silicon-ccd camera and is able to visualize the with time advancing degradation patterns of polymer solar cells. The devices investigated have been aged under defined conditions and were characterized periodically with current-voltage-sweeps. This allows determining the time evolution of the photovoltaic parameters and - in combination with the luminescence images - understanding differences in the observed degradation behaviour. The versatile usability of the method is demonstrated in a correlation between local reduction of lateral luminescence and a fast decrease of the short-circuit-current due to the loss of active area. Differences in the degradation of photovoltaic parameters under varied aging conditions are discussed.

  19. Thermo-optical properties of optically stimulated luminescence in feldspars

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poolton, N.R.J.; Bøtter-Jensen, L.; Johnsen, O.

    1995-01-01

    Optically stimulated luminescence processes in feldspars are subject to competing thermal enhancement and quenching processes: this article describes the thermal enhancement effects for orthoclase, albite and plagioclase feldspars. It is demonstrated that certain lattice vibrational modes can...

  20. Household and workplace chemicals as retrospective luminescence dosemeters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Kristina Jørkov; Bøtter-Jensen, L.; Murray, A.S.

    2002-01-01

    , there are Other potential unheated crystalline materials found in the domestic and industrial environment which may also act as retrospective dosemeters, and may be considerably more sensitive. We have Surveyed the thermoluminescent and optically stimulated luminescent (OSL) characteristics of several...

  1. Luminescence method for the determination of lorazepam in tablets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anelchyk, Ganna; Aleksandrova, Darya; Malzev, Georgii; Leonenko, Inna; Yegorova, Alla

    2010-01-01

    New terbium complex of 7-chloro-5-(2-chlorophenyl)-3-hydroxy-1,2-dihydro-3H- 1,4-benzdiazepin-2-one (lorazepam, L), which is highly luminescent and do not require luminescence enhancers, is reported. The luminescence intensity of the Tb-L complex was enhanced by the addition of Tergitol 7 in water solution. The Tb-L-Tergitol 7 complex with a components ratio 1:1:2 was proposed to be used as the analytical form for the luminescence determination of drug--lorazepam. The calibration curve is linear in the 0.05-20.0 pg/mL range of lorazepam (LOD is 0.016 microg/mL). This method was applied for the determination of lorazepam in dosage form--tablets "Apo-lorazepam"--2.5 mg.

  2. Optically stimulated luminescence dating at Rose Cottage Cave

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Pienaar, M

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Six Optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) dates are compared with stratigraphically associated C-14 dates from Rose Cottage Cave. The OSL dates overlap the accepted C-14 chronology except for one sample that overestimates the expected age...

  3. The luminescence of titanite (CaTiSiO5)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Blasse, G.; Dirksen, G.J.; Tanaka, I.; Kojima, H.

    1988-01-01

    The luminescence of CaTiSiO5 crystals is reported. The emission band has its maximum at 520 nm. The results are discussed in connection with titanium compounds containing comparable titanate polyhedra.

  4. NIR emitting ytterbium chelates for colourless luminescent solar concentrators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanguineti, Alessandro; Monguzzi, Angelo; Vaccaro, Gianfranco; Meinardi, Franco; Ronchi, Elisabetta; Moret, Massimo; Cosentino, Ugo; Moro, Giorgio; Simonutti, Roberto; Mauri, Michele; Tubino, Riccardo; Beverina, Luca

    2012-05-14

    A new oxyiminopyrazole-based ytterbium chelate enables NIR emission upon UV excitation in colorless single layer luminescent solar concentrators for building integrated photovoltaics. This journal is © the Owner Societies 2012

  5. Enhancing the efficiency of luminescent solar concentrators (LSCs)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Assadi, M. Khalaji; Hanaei, H.; Mohamed, Norani Muti; Saidur, R.; Bakhoda, Shokoufeh; Bashiri, Robabeh; Moayedfar, M.

    2016-09-01

    Recent developments in the endeavor to enhance the efficiency of luminescent solar concentrators (LSCs) are presented in this paper along with an analysis of LSC devices. In recent years, several experimental and numerical research works have been carried out to improve the performance of LSCs in different ways. LSCs date back to the 1970s and comprise an extremely interesting notion of solar cells for various reasons. First, LSCs are cost-competitive and function in diffuse light, and as such, it is not necessary to use expensive solar tracking devices. Second, luminescence facilitates the cells to gather only cold light, which results in higher PV efficiency. LSCs generally consist of transparent polymer sheets doped with luminescent species. The luminescent species absorb incident sunlight and emit it with high quantum efficiency, such that the emitted light is trapped in the sheet and travels to the edges where the solar cells can collect it.

  6. Terbium-doped heavy metal glasses for green luminescence

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    L.Zur; J. Pisarska; W.A. Pisarski

    2011-01-01

    Compositional-dependent heavy metal lead borate glasses doped with Tb3+ ior were investigated.Green luminescence related to main 5D4→7F5 (543 nm) transition was registered under excitation of 5D3 state of Tb3+ ions.Based on excitation and luminescence measurements,several spectroscopic parameters for Tb3+ ions were examined as a function of heavy metal PbO content.Luminescence decay analysis indicated that the 5D4 luminescence lifetime of Tb3+ reduced from 2.83 to 1.42 ms,when PbO:B2O3 ratio was changed from 1:1 to 4:1.

  7. Bioactive luminescent transition-metal complexes for biomedical applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Dik-Lung; He, Hong-Zhang; Leung, Ka-Ho; Chan, Daniel Shiu-Hin; Leung, Chung-Hang

    2013-07-22

    The serendipitous discovery of the anticancer drug cisplatin cemented medicinal inorganic chemistry as an independent discipline in the 1960s. Luminescent metal complexes have subsequently been widely applied for sensing, bio-imaging, and in organic light-emitting diode applications. Transition-metal complexes possess a variety of advantages that make them suitable as therapeutics and as luminescent probes for biomolecules. It is thus highly desirable to develop new luminescent metal complexes that either interact with DNA through different binding modes or target alternative cellular machinery such as proteins as well as to provide a more effective means of monitoring disease progression. In this Review, we highlight recent examples of biologically active luminescent metal complexes that can target and probe a specific biomolecule, and offer insights into the future potential of these compounds for the investigation and treatment of human diseases.

  8. Renewable energy: Better luminescent solar panels in prospect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Debije, Michael

    2015-03-01

    Devices known as luminescent solar concentrators could find use as renewable-energy generators, but have so far been plagued by a major light-reabsorption effect. A new study offers a promising route to tackling this problem.

  9. Balanced bridge feedback control system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lurie, Boris J. (Inventor)

    1990-01-01

    In a system having a driver, a motor, and a mechanical plant, a multiloop feedback control apparatus for controlling the movement and/or positioning of a mechanical plant, the control apparatus has a first local bridge feedback loop for feeding back a signal representative of a selected ratio of voltage and current at the output driver, and a second bridge feedback loop for feeding back a signal representative of a selected ratio of force and velocity at the output of the motor. The control apparatus may further include an outer loop for feeding back a signal representing the angular velocity and/or position of the mechanical plant.

  10. Plasma turbulence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Horton, W. [Univ. of Texas, Austin, TX (United States). Inst. for Fusion Studies; Hu, G. [Globalstar LP, San Jose, CA (United States)

    1998-07-01

    The origin of plasma turbulence from currents and spatial gradients in plasmas is described and shown to lead to the dominant transport mechanism in many plasma regimes. A wide variety of turbulent transport mechanism exists in plasmas. In this survey the authors summarize some of the universally observed plasma transport rates.

  11. Feedback mechanism for smart nozzles and nebulizers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montaser, Akbar [Potomac, MD; Jorabchi, Kaveh [Arlington, VA; Kahen, Kaveh [Kleinburg, CA

    2009-01-27

    Nozzles and nebulizers able to produce aerosol with optimum and reproducible quality based on feedback information obtained using laser imaging techniques. Two laser-based imaging techniques based on particle image velocimetry (PTV) and optical patternation map and contrast size and velocity distributions for indirect and direct pneumatic nebulizations in plasma spectrometry. Two pulses from thin laser sheet with known time difference illuminate droplets flow field. Charge coupled device (CCL)) captures scattering of laser light from droplets, providing two instantaneous particle images. Pointwise cross-correlation of corresponding images yields two-dimensional velocity map of aerosol velocity field. For droplet size distribution studies, solution is doped with fluorescent dye and both laser induced florescence (LIF) and Mie scattering images are captured simultaneously by two CCDs with the same field of view. Ratio of LIF/Mie images provides relative droplet size information, then scaled by point calibration method via phase Doppler particle analyzer.

  12. Introducing an R package for luminescence dating analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Kreutzer, Sebastian; Schmidt, Christoph; Fuchs, Margret C.; Dietze, Michael; Fischer, Manfred; Fuchs, Markus

    2012-01-01

    For routine luminescence dating applications the commonly used Risø readers are bundled with analysis software, such as Viewer or Analyst. These software solutions are appropriate for most of the regular dating and publication jobs, and enable assessment of luminescence characteristics and provide basic statistical data treatment. However, for further statistical analysis and data treatments, this software may reach its limits. In such cases, open programmi...

  13. Environmental analysis based on luminescence in organized supramolecular systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santana Rodriguez, J.J.; Betancort Rodriguez, J.R. [University of Las Palmas de G.C., Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Marine Sciences, Las Palmas (Spain); Halko, R. [Comenius University, Department of Analytical Chemistry, Faculty of Natural Sciences, Bratislava (Slovakia); Aaron, J.J. [Universite Paris 7-Denis Diderot, ITODYS, Paris (France)

    2006-06-15

    The use of organized supramolecular systems - including micellar media and cyclodextrin inclusion complexes - combined with luminescence techniques in the study and determination of compounds and elements of environmental interest from 1990 to 2005 is reviewed. Analyses of environmental samples performed using fluorescence, photochemically induced fluorescence and phosphorescence spectroscopy as well as liquid chromatography, capillary electrophoresis and flow injection with luminescence detection in the presence of these organized media are described in detail. (orig.)

  14. A luminescence enhancement approach through Si/O nanostructure

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    An Si/O patterned shell array was fabricated by a technique utilizing nanosphere self assembly and reactive pressure pulsed laser deposition.The nanostructure produced by this technique enhanced the luminescence intensity by a factor of three compared with that of a flat film.The amount of enhance-ment observed coincided well with the expected enhancement by simulation.The technique in this paper provided a flexible,designable and compatible approach to luminescence enhancement.

  15. Non-self-absorbing materials for Luminescent Solar Concentrators (LSC)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saraidarov, T.; Levchenko, V.; Grabowska, A.; Borowicz, P.; Reisfeld, R.

    2010-05-01

    The diheptyl-bipyridyl-diol, as a non-self-absorbing fluorescent compound characterized by a large separation between absorption and fluorescence bands, has been incorporated in polyvinyl-butyral film. Steady state luminescence and lifetime were measured. An increase of luminescence intensity by about 34% in the presence of silver nanoparticles was observed. No appreciable changes were found in the corresponding lifetimes. The system is proposed as a potential candidate for increasing the LSC efficiency.

  16. LUMINESCENCE OF CADMIUM SULFIDE QUANTUM DOTS IN FLUOROPHOSPHATE GLASSES

    OpenAIRE

    Z. O. Lipatova; E. V. Kolobkova; V. A. Aseev

    2015-01-01

    Cadmium sulfide quantum dots are perspective materials in optics, medicine, biology and optoelectronics. Fluorophosphate glasses, doped with cadmium sulfide quantum dots, were examined in the paper. Heat treatment led to the formation of quantum dots with diameters equal to 2.8 nm, 3.0 nm and 3.8 nm. In view of such changes in the quantum dots size the fundamental absorption edge shift and the luminescence band are being displaced to the long wavelengths. Luminescence lifetime has been fou...

  17. Luminescence from cavitation bubbles deformed in uniform pressure gradients

    OpenAIRE

    Supponen, Outi; Obreschkow, Danail; Kobel, Philippe; Farhat, Mohamed

    2017-01-01

    Presented here are observations that demonstrate how the deformation of millimetric cavitation bubbles by a uniform pressure gradient quenches single collapse luminescence. Our innovative measurement system captures a broad luminescence spectrum (wavelength range 300-900 nm) from the individual collapses of laser-induced bubbles in water. By varying the bubble size, driving pressure and the perceived gravity level aboard parabolic flights, we probed the limit from aspherical to highly spheric...

  18. Luminescent molecular rods - transition-metal alkynyl complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yam, Vivian Wing-Wah; Wong, Keith Man-Chung

    2005-01-01

    A number of transition-metal complexes have been reported to exhibit rich luminescence, usually originating from phosphorescence. Such luminescence properties of the triplet excited state with a large Stoke's shift, long lifetime, high luminescence quantum yield as well as lower excitation energy, are envisaged to serve as an ideal candidate in the area of potential applications for chemosensors, dye-sensitized solar cells, flat panel displays, optics, new materials and biological sciences. Organic alkynes (poly-ynes), with extended or conjugatedπ-systems and rigid structure with linear geometry, have become a significant research area due to their novel electronic and physical properties and their potential applications in nanotechnology. Owing to the presence of unsaturated sp-hybridized carbon atoms, the alkynyl unit can serve as a versatile building block in the construction of alkynyl transition-metal complexes, not only throughσ-bonding but also viaπ-bonding interactions. By incorporation of linear alkynyl groups into luminescent transition-metal complexes, the alkynyl moiety with goodσ-donor,π-donor andπ-acceptor abilities is envisaged to tune or perturb the emission behaviors, including emission energy (color), intensity and lifetime by its role as an auxiliary ligand as well as to govern the emission origin from its direct involvement. This review summarizes recent efforts on the synthesis of luminescent rod-like alkynyl complexes with different classes of transition metals and details the effects of the introduction of alkynyl groups on the luminescence properties of the complexes.

  19. Luminescence from cavitation bubbles deformed in uniform pressure gradients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Supponen, Outi; Obreschkow, Danail; Kobel, Philippe; Farhat, Mohamed

    2017-09-01

    Presented here are observations that demonstrate how the deformation of millimetric cavitation bubbles by a uniform pressure gradient quenches single-collapse luminescence. Our innovative measurement system captures a broad luminescence spectrum (wavelength range, 300-900 nm) from the individual collapses of laser-induced bubbles in water. By varying the bubble size, driving pressure, and perceived gravity level aboard parabolic flights, we probed the limit from aspherical to highly spherical bubble collapses. Luminescence was detected for bubbles of maximum radii within the previously uncovered range, R0=1.5 -6 mm, for laser-induced bubbles. The relative luminescence energy was found to rapidly decrease as a function of the bubble asymmetry quantified by the anisotropy parameter ζ , which is the dimensionless equivalent of the Kelvin impulse. As established previously, ζ also dictates the characteristic parameters of bubble-driven microjets. The threshold of ζ beyond which no luminescence is observed in our experiment closely coincides with the threshold where the microjets visibly pierce the bubble and drive a vapor jet during the rebound. The individual fitted blackbody temperatures range between Tlum=7000 and Tlum=11 500 K but do not show any clear trend as a function of ζ . Time-resolved measurements using a high-speed photodetector disclose multiple luminescence events at each bubble collapse. The averaged full width at half-maximum of the pulse is found to scale with R0 and to range between 10 and 20 ns.

  20. Feedback Control of Rotor Overspeed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Churchill, G. B.

    1984-01-01

    Feedback system for automatically governing helicopter rotor speed promises to lessen pilot's workload, enhance maneuverability, and protect airframe. With suitable modifications, concept applied to control speed of electrical generators, automotive engines and other machinery.

  1. NAIP 2015 Imagery Feedback Map

    Data.gov (United States)

    Farm Service Agency, Department of Agriculture — The NAIP 2015 Imagery Feedback map allows users to make comments and observations about the quality of the 2015 National Agriculture Imagery Program (NAIP)...

  2. Do students profit from feedback?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arild Raaheim

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Undergraduate students in psychology were given the opportunity to exchange the traditional exam with portfolio assessment. The students received written feedback, by way of a standard feedback form, on two of the three essays of the portfolio. To investigate whether students attend to and act on the feedback, a comparison was made between unofficial marks on the first draft of the first essay and the official marks on the full portfolio at the end of the semester. With approximately 20% of the first drafts being unacceptable in the end only 1.6% of the portfolios failed to reach the level of acceptance. The result is taken to indicate that the students did indeed attend to and profit from the written feedback.

  3. Full Static Output Feedback Equivalence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aristotle G. Yannakoudakis

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We present a constructive solution to the problem of full output feedback equivalence, of linear, minimal, time-invariant systems. The equivalence relation on the set of systems is transformed to another on the set of invertible block Bezout/Hankel matrices using the isotropy subgroups of the full state feedback group and the full output injection group. The transformation achieving equivalence is calculated solving linear systems of equations. We give a polynomial version of the results proving that two systems are full output feedback equivalent, if and only if they have the same family of generalized Bezoutians. We present a new set of output feedback invariant polynomials that generalize the breakaway polynomial of scalar systems.

  4. Free standing luminescent silicon quantum dots: evidence of quantum confinement and defect related transitions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ray, Mallar [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Bengal Engineering and Science University, Shibpur, Howrah: 711103, West Bengal (India); Hossain, Syed Minhaz [Department of Physics, Bengal Engineering and Science University, Shibpur, Howrah: 711103, West Bengal (India); Klie, Robert F [Department of Physics, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, IL 60607 (United States); Banerjee, Koushik; Ghosh, Siddhartha, E-mail: mray@matsc.becs.ac.in [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, 60607 (United States)

    2010-12-17

    We report the synthesis of luminescent, free standing silicon quantum dots by dry and wet etching of silicon and silicon oxide core/shell nanostructures, which are synthesized by controlled oxidation of mechanically milled silicon. Dry and wet etching performed with CF{sub 4} plasma and aqueous HF, respectively, result in the removal of the thick oxide shell of the core/shell nanostructures and affect an additional step of size reduction. HF etch is capable of producing isolated, spherical quantum dots of silicon with dimensions {approx} 2 nm. However, the etching processes introduce unsaturated bonds at the surface of the nanocrystals which are subsequently passivated by oxygen on exposure to ambient atmosphere. The photoluminescence spectra of the colloidal suspensions of these nanocrystals are characterized by double peaks and excitation dependent shift of emission energy. Comparison of the structural, absorption and luminescence characteristics of the samples provides evidence for two competing transition processes-quantum confinement induced widened band gap related transitions and oxide associated interface state mediated transitions. The results enable us to experimentally distinguish between the contributions of the two different transition mechanisms, which has hitherto been a challenging problem.

  5. Delayed luminescence of luminol initiated by a membrane-bound peroxidase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikariyama, Y; Suzuki, S; Aizawa, M

    1981-09-01

    The luminescense of the luminol-H2O2 system was initiated by either free or membrane-bound horseradish peroxideae (HRP). The instantaneous luminescene decayed rapidly and was followed by the delayed luminescence in the presence of excess luminol. The delayed luminescence was characterized by a chain reaction, in which luminescence intensity increased exponentially. Membrane-bound HRP demonstrated that the delayed luminescence took place even in the absence of HRP if the instantaneous luminescence was initiated by HRP. A mechanism for the nonenzymatic luminescence is proposed and discussed.

  6. Collective irrationality and positive feedback.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stamatios C Nicolis

    Full Text Available Recent experiments on ants and slime moulds have assessed the degree to which they make rational decisions when presented with a number of alternative food sources or shelter. Ants and slime moulds are just two examples of a wide range of species and biological processes that use positive feedback mechanisms to reach decisions. Here we use a generic, experimentally validated model of positive feedback between group members to show that the probability of taking the best of options depends crucially on the strength of feedback. We show how the probability of choosing the best option can be maximized by applying an optimal feedback strength. Importantly, this optimal value depends on the number of options, so that when we change the number of options the preference of the group changes, producing apparent "irrationalities". We thus reinterpret the idea that collectives show "rational" or "irrational" preferences as being a necessary consequence of the use of positive feedback. We argue that positive feedback is a heuristic which often produces fast and accurate group decision-making, but is always susceptible to apparent irrationality when studied under particular experimental conditions.

  7. Innovation in healthcare team feedback.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plaza, Christine; Beard, Leslie; Fonzo, Anthony Di; Tommaso, Michael Di; Mujawaz, Yaman; Serra-Julia, Marcel; Morra, Dante

    2011-01-01

    Healthcare delivery is evolving from individual, autonomous practice to collaborative team practice. However, barriers such as professional autonomy, time constraints and the perception of error as failure preclude learning behaviours that can facilitate organizational learning and improvement. Although experimentation, engaging in questions and feedback, discussing errors and reflecting on results can facilitate learning and promote effective performance, the cultural barriers within healthcare can prevent or inhibit this type of behaviour among teams. At the University Health Network's Centre for Innovation in Complex Care, we realize the need for a tool that facilitates learning behaviour and is sensitive to the risk-averse nature of the clinical environment. The vehicle for the Team Feedback Tool is a web-based application called Rypple (www.rypple.com), which allows team members to provide anonymous, rapid-fire feedback on team processes and performance. Rypple facilitates communication, elicits feedback and provokes discussion. The process enables follow-up face-to-face team discussions and encourages teams to create actionable solutions for incremental changes to enhance team health and performance. The Team Feedback Tool was implemented and piloted in general internal medicine at the University Health Network's Toronto General Hospital from early May 2009 to July 2009 to address the issues of teamwork and learning behaviour in the clinical environment. This article explores the opportunities and barriers associated with the implementation of the Team Feedback Tool.

  8. Plasma harmonics

    CERN Document Server

    Ganeev, Rashid A

    2014-01-01

    Preface; Why plasma harmonics? A very brief introduction Early stage of plasma harmonic studies - hopes and frustrations New developments in plasma harmonics studies: first successes Improvements of plasma harmonics; Theoretical basics of plasma harmonics; Basics of HHG Harmonic generation in fullerenes using few-cycle pulsesVarious approaches for description of observed peculiarities of resonant enhancement of a single harmonic in laser plasmaTwo-colour pump resonance-induced enhancement of odd and even harmonics from a tin plasmaCalculations of single harmonic generation from Mn plasma;Low-o

  9. Ligand-assisted fabrication, structure, and luminescence properties of Fe:ZnSe quantum dots

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xie, Ruishi, E-mail: rxie@foxmail.com; Zhang, Xingquan; Liu, Haifeng

    2014-03-15

    Highlights: • A green route is developed for synthesis of water-soluble and fluorescent Fe:ZnSe quantum dots. • Tunable luminescence intensity can be realized with different ligand-to-Zn molar ratios. • The obtained quantum dots are in the so-called “quantum confinement regime”. -- Abstract: Here, we report a synthetic route for highly emissive Fe:ZnSe quantum dots in aqueous media using the mercaptoacetic acid ligand as stabilizing agent. The structural, morphological, componential, and optical properties of the resulting quantum dots were explored by the X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy, energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, photoluminescence and UV–visible absorption spectroscopies. The average crystallite size was calculated to be about ca., 4.0 nm using the Scherrer equation, which correlates well with the value obtained from the transmission electron microscopy analysis. The obtained water-soluble Fe:ZnSe quantum dots in the so-called “quantum confinement regime” are spherical shaped, possess the cubic sphalerite crystal structure, and exhibit tunable luminescence properties. The presence of mercaptoacetic acid on the surface of Fe:ZnSe quantum dots was confirmed by the Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy measurements. As the ligand/Zn molar ratio increases from 1.3 to 2.8, there is little shift in the absorption peak of the Fe:ZnSe sample, indicating that the particle size of the obtained quantum dots is not changed during the synthetic process. The photoluminescence quantum yield of the as-prepared water-soluble Fe:ZnSe quantum dots can be up to 39%. The molar ratio of ligand-to-Zn plays a crucial role in determining the final luminescence properties of the resulting quantum dots, and the maximum PL intensity appears as the ligand-to-Zn molar ratio is 2.2. In addition, the underlying mechanism for

  10. Density increase due to active feedback in mirror machine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seemann, Omri; Be'Ery, Ilan

    2014-10-01

    Mirror machines are one of the schemes for future fusion systems. Its main drawbacks are the flute instability and being open ended which results in plasma losses. A feedback system is used to stabilize the flute instability in a table top mirror machine with a continuous plasma source and RF heating. Under certain source density and temperature conditions, although the plasma was stabilized, plasma density increase was not measured. After decreasing the source density and increasing the temperature, Plasma density increase was achieved. It is theorized that these results are due to transition of the plasma main loss mechanism from collision dominated to instability dominated. In the former, the main density loss is through diffusion and In the latter, it is through flute instability which drives the plasma to the edge of the vacuum chamber. Future research directions are discussed for a planned machine which should achieve higher temperatures and better diagnostic capabilities. The research will focus on magnetic actuators and passive RF stabilization.

  11. Feedback traps for virtual potentials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gavrilov, Momčilo; Bechhoefer, John

    2017-03-01

    Feedback traps are tools for trapping and manipulating single charged objects, such as molecules in solution. An alternative to optical tweezers and other single-molecule techniques, they use feedback to counteract the Brownian motion of a molecule of interest. The trap first acquires information about a molecule's position and then applies an electric feedback force to move the molecule. Since electric forces are stronger than optical forces at small scales, feedback traps are the best way to trap single molecules without `touching' them (e.g. by putting them in a small box or attaching them to a tether). Feedback traps can do more than trap molecules: they can also subject a target object to forces that are calculated to be the gradient of a desired potential function U(x). If the feedback loop is fast enough, it creates a virtual potential whose dynamics will be very close to those of a particle in an actual potential U(x). But because the dynamics are entirely a result of the feedback loop-absent the feedback, there is only an object diffusing in a fluid-we are free to specify and then manipulate in time an arbitrary potential U(x,t). Here, we review recent applications of feedback traps to studies on the fundamental connections between information and thermodynamics, a topic where feedback plays an even more fundamental role. We discuss how recursive maximum-likelihood techniques allow continuous calibration, to compensate for drifts in experiments that last for days. We consider ways to estimate work and heat, using them to measure fluctuating energies to a precision of ±0.03 kT over these long experiments. Finally, we compare work and heat measurements of the costs of information erasure, the Landauer limit of kT ln 2 per bit of information erased. We argue that, when you want to know the average heat transferred to a bath in a long protocol, you should measure instead the average work and then infer the heat using the first law of thermodynamics. This

  12. Luminescence dating of ancient Darhad basin, Mongolia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheul Kim, Jin; Yi, Sangheon; Lim, Jaesoo; Kim, Ju-Yong

    2016-04-01

    . Thus, age control on existing 14C ages from this site is limited, chronological interpretation based on the 14C ages is still incomplete in Hodon outcrop sediments. OSL (Optically Stimulated Luminescence) is an alternative method for dating to overcome the problems associated with 14C methods. OSL has been extensively used for dating arctic sediments (Thomas et al., 2006; more). Previous optical ages on Darhad paleolake sediments obtained using IRSL (Infrared-stimulated luminescence) on feldspars (Gillespie et al., 2008; Batbaatar et al., 2009). Feldspar has much brighter luminescence than quartz, while the OSL signal of feldspars bleaches at least one order of magnitude slower than the OSL signal of quartz (Godfrey-Smith et al., 1988; Huntly and Lamothe, 2001; Mauz and Bungenstock, 2007; Kim et al., 2012). In glaciofluvial, glaciolacustrine environments, inadequate bleaching of the OSL signal is known to be a potential problem of burial ages (Thomas et al., 2006). OSL dating of permafrost deposits may also involve uncertainty about the inhomogeneous radiation field surrounding the dosimeter and the absorption of ionizing energy alternately by water and ice in a not-constant pore volume (Haeberli et al., 2003). In this study, we test the applicability of quartz OSL dating for the uppermost paleolake sediments in the Hodon outcrop of the Darhad basin. The OSL results were systematically compared with additional radiocarbon ages from wood fragments to conclude the reliability of the OSL dates and to construct intensive chronology for Late-Pleistocene Darhad paleolake. To evaluate the time of recent expansion of the paleolake, the northern piedmont (Talyn outcrop) of the basin was dated by OSL.

  13. RF heating optimization on Tore Supra using feedback control of infrared measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moreau, Ph. [Euratom-CEA Association, CEA/DSM/Departement de Recherches sur la Fusion Controlee, CEA-Cadarache, 13108 St. Paul lez Durance (France)], E-mail: philippe.jacques.moreau@cea.fr; Barana, O.; Bremond, S.; Colas, L.; Ekedahl, A.; Saint-Laurent, F.; Balorin, C.; Caulier, G.; Desgranges, C.; Guilhem, D.; Jouve, M.; Kazarian, F.; Lombard, G.; Millon, L.; Mitteau, R.; Mollard, P.; Roche, H.; Travere, J.M. [Euratom-CEA Association, CEA/DSM/Departement de Recherches sur la Fusion Controlee, CEA-Cadarache, 13108 St. Paul lez Durance (France)

    2007-10-15

    Using the Tore Supra infrared thermography diagnostics, a new real time feedback control has been successfully implemented to maximize additional RF power while preventing plasma facing components (PFCs) from overheating and damage. As a first step, a thermography feedback control has been used to detect and extinguish electric arcs on lower hybrid current drive (LHCD) launchers. Secondly, heating sources on PFCs have been identified highlighting the role of the power from each ion cyclotron resonance heating (ICRH) antenna and LHCD launcher and the interactions between them. A new feedback control algorithm was developed to control the additional power. The real time feedback control of PFC temperatures which makes part of an integrated feedback controller, is a reliable tool routinely used as a basic protection system. Furthermore, it has proven its capability to operate in parallel with other control schemes such as the current profile control.

  14. Feedback as Real-Time Constructions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keiding, Tina Bering; Qvortrup, Ane

    2014-01-01

    This article offers a re-description of feedback and the significance of time in feedback constructions based on systems theory. It describes feedback as internal, real-time constructions in a learning system. From this perspective, feedback is neither immediate nor delayed, but occurs in the very moment it takes place. This article argues for a…

  15. A Comparison of Peer and Tutor Feedback

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamer, John; Purchase, Helen; Luxton-Reilly, Andrew; Denny, Paul

    2015-01-01

    We report on a study comparing peer feedback with feedback written by tutors on a large, undergraduate software engineering programming class. Feedback generated by peers is generally held to be of lower quality to feedback from experienced tutors, and this study sought to explore the extent and nature of this difference. We looked at how…

  16. Feedback i den laegelige postgraduate uddannelse

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rubak, Sune; Ipsen, Merete; Sørensen, Jette

    2008-01-01

    . Feedback is essential in medical education and has great implications for the educational climate. It has been shown that a common language regarding the principles of feedback has a sustained effect on quality and frequency of feedback. Further research is needed on feedback and educational climate...

  17. Feedback as Real-Time Constructions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keiding, Tina Bering; Qvortrup, Ane

    2014-01-01

    This article offers a re-description of feedback and the significance of time in feedback constructions based on systems theory. It describes feedback as internal, real-time constructions in a learning system. From this perspective, feedback is neither immediate nor delayed, but occurs in the very moment it takes place. This article argues for a…

  18. Identifying Mentors' Observations for Providing Feedback

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hudson, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Mentors' feedback can assist preservice teachers' development; yet feedback tends to be variable from one mentor to the next. What do mentors observe for providing feedback? In this study, 24 mentors observed a final-year preservice teacher through a professionally video-recorded lesson and provided written notes for feedback. They observed the…

  19. Multimedia as a Means to Enhance Feedback

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsutsui, Michio

    2004-01-01

    Interactive feedback, the most common feedback method for oral performance, cannot be used in activities that do not allow for instructor-student interaction, such as speeches and presentations, where feedback should occur after the performance. The conventional ways of providing post-performance or delayed feedback, however, are neither efficient…

  20. Pulsed feedback defers cellular differentiation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joe H Levine

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Environmental signals induce diverse cellular differentiation programs. In certain systems, cells defer differentiation for extended time periods after the signal appears, proliferating through multiple rounds of cell division before committing to a new fate. How can cells set a deferral time much longer than the cell cycle? Here we study Bacillus subtilis cells that respond to sudden nutrient limitation with multiple rounds of growth and division before differentiating into spores. A well-characterized genetic circuit controls the concentration and phosphorylation of the master regulator Spo0A, which rises to a critical concentration to initiate sporulation. However, it remains unclear how this circuit enables cells to defer sporulation for multiple cell cycles. Using quantitative time-lapse fluorescence microscopy of Spo0A dynamics in individual cells, we observed pulses of Spo0A phosphorylation at a characteristic cell cycle phase. Pulse amplitudes grew systematically and cell-autonomously over multiple cell cycles leading up to sporulation. This pulse growth required a key positive feedback loop involving the sporulation kinases, without which the deferral of sporulation became ultrasensitive to kinase expression. Thus, deferral is controlled by a pulsed positive feedback loop in which kinase expression is activated by pulses of Spo0A phosphorylation. This pulsed positive feedback architecture provides a more robust mechanism for setting deferral times than constitutive kinase expression. Finally, using mathematical modeling, we show how pulsing and time delays together enable "polyphasic" positive feedback, in which different parts of a feedback loop are active at different times. Polyphasic feedback can enable more accurate tuning of long deferral times. Together, these results suggest that Bacillus subtilis uses a pulsed positive feedback loop to implement a "timer" that operates over timescales much longer than a cell cycle.

  1. Control of luminescence from pygmy shark (Squaliolus aliae) photophores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Claes, Julien M; Ho, Hsuan-Ching; Mallefet, Jérôme

    2012-05-15

    The smalleye pygmy shark (Squaliolus aliae) is a dwarf pelagic shark from the Dalatiidae family that harbours thousands of tiny photophores. In this work, we studied the organisation and physiological control of these photogenic organs. Results show that they are mainly situated on the ventral side of the shark, forming a homogeneous ventral photogenic area that appears well suited for counterillumination, a well-known camouflage technique of pelagic organisms. Isolated ventral skin patches containing photophores did not respond to classical neurotransmitters and nitric oxide but produced light after melatonin (MT) application. Prolactin and α-melanocyte-stimulating hormone inhibited this hormonally induced luminescence as well as the spontaneous luminescence from the photogenic tissue. The action of MT seems to be mediated by binding to the MT(2) receptor subtype, as the MT(2) receptor agonist 4P-PDOT inhibited the luminescence induced by this hormone. Binding to this receptor probably decreases the intracellular cAMP concentration because forskolin inhibited spontaneous and MT-induced luminescence. In addition, a GABA inhibitory tonus seems to be present in the photogenic tissue as well, as GABA inhibited MT-induced luminescence and the application of bicuculline provoked luminescence from S. aliae photophores. Similarly to what has been found in Etmopteridae, the other luminous shark family, the main target of the luminescence control appears to be the melanophores covering the photocytes. Results suggest that bioluminescence first appeared in Dalatiidae when they adopted a pelagic style at the Cretaceous/Tertiary boundary, and was modified by Etmopteridae when they started to colonize deep-water niches and rely on this light for intraspecific behaviours.

  2. ABCDEFG IS - the principle of constructive feedback.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattarai, M

    2007-01-01

    Feedback is an integral part of any learning experience. Constructive feedback is a powerful instrument and facilitates the learner's professional and personal development. "ABCDEFG IS", a mnemonic for the principles of constructive feedback, stands for Amount of the information, Benefit of the trainees, Change behaviour, Descriptive language, Environment, Focused, Group check, Interpretation check, and Sharing information. The eight important steps of feedback are: Ensure prior information, Collect data, Make appropriate meeting arrangement, Begin by encouraging self assessment by the trainee, Highlight areas where the trainee is doing well, Give feedback, Handle reaction maintaining the dignity and Plan actions. Communication and reflection also share many of the principles and steps of constructive feedback and giving regular feedback, thus, helps to improve communication and reflection. The feedback provider would be able to provide genuine feedback by following the appropriate steps and principles of constructive feedback and realize how important and rewarding its role is in teaching learning activities.

  3. Rare Earth Luminescence in Phosphogypsum Waste Produced From Phosphate Ore Processing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ines Hammas Nasri

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Luminescence properties of rare earth elements (Eu3+, Sm3+ and Ce3+ were investigated in phosphogypsum waste produced from the phosphoric acid manufacture. The presence of these elements was already confirmed after analysis of the phosphogypsum sample by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry, which showed total rare earths content about 350 ppm. The principal aim of this work is to use the photoluminescence technique for identifying 4f ions by the mutual relationship between excitation and emission spectra.  The obtained spectra may be used then as reliable references for monitoring rare earth elements during their extraction from phosphogypsum, any time that the inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry is inapplicable.To find the most convenient conditions for observing Eu3+ emissions, a powder of calcium sulfate doped with europium (CaSO4: Eu (1% was synthesized. After comparison with the emission and excitation spectra of the synthetic gypsum, it was pointed out that excitation of the phosphogypsum selectively at 466 nm is the most suitable for observing Eu3+ emissions. These latter were obtained at around 556 nm and 603 nm.  Based on literature data, Sm3+ and Ce3+ emissions in the phosphogypsum were identified. Sm3+ lines were obtained at 567 nm and 602 nm after a selective excitation at the 4G5/2-6H7/2 transition (404 nm. Whereas cerium luminescence was only observed after calcination of the phosphogypsum sample at 900°C. Ce3+ emissions were obtained at around 305 nm and 326 nm after excitation of the calcined phosphogypsum at 254 nm. The effect of phosphogypsum impurities on the lifetime of rare earths emissions was also discussed.

  4. Dusty plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fortov, Vladimir E; Khrapak, Aleksei G; Molotkov, Vladimir I; Petrov, Oleg F [Institute for High Energy Densities, Associated Institute for High Temperatures, Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow (Russian Federation); Khrapak, Sergei A [Max-Planck-Institut fur Extraterrestrische Physik, Garching (Germany)

    2004-05-31

    The properties of dusty plasmas - low-temperature plasmas containing charged macroparticles - are considered. The most important elementary processes in dusty plasmas and the forces acting on dust particles are investigated. The results of experimental and theoretical investigations of different states of strongly nonideal dusty plasmas - crystal-like, liquid-like, gas-like - are summarized. Waves and oscillations in dusty plasmas, as well as their damping and instability mechanisms, are studied. Some results on dusty plasma investigated under microgravity conditions are presented. New directions of experimental research and potential applications of dusty plasmas are discussed. (reviews of topical problems)

  5. A Study on Direct Feedback and Indirect Feedback in Graduate Students ’Writing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张志国

    2014-01-01

    Feedback plays a central role in writing development. However correcting students’writing is one of the most time-consuming tasks for our senior English teachers. By conducting a survey of direct feedback and indirect feedback in students writ⁃ing the author tries to test the influence of direct feedback and indirect feedback in graduates ’writing.

  6. Roles of Eu2+, Dy3+ Ions in Persistent Luminescence of Strontium Aluminates Phosphors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    L(U) Xingdong; ZHONG Minjuan; WANG Renqin

    2008-01-01

    The polycrystalline Eu2+ and Dy3+ co-doped strontium aluminates SrAl2O4: Eu2+,Dy3+ with different compositions were prepared by solid state reactions. The UV-excited photoluminescence, persistent luminescence and thermo-luminescence were studied and compared. Results show that the doped Eu2+ ion in SrAl2O4: Eu2+, Dy3+phosphors works as not only the UV-excited luminescent center but also the persistent luminescent center. The doped Dy3+ ion can hardly yield any luminescence under UV-excitation, but effectively enhance the persistent luminescence and thermo-luminescence of SrAl2O4: Eu2+. Dy3+ co-doping can help form electron traps with appropriate depth due to its suitable electro-negativity, and increase the density and depth of electron traps. Based on above observations, a persistent luminescence mechanism, electron transfer model, is proposed and illustrated.

  7. A REVIEW OF APPLICATIONS OF LUMINESCENCE TO MONITORING OF CHEMICAL CONTAMINANTS IN THE ENVIRONMENT

    Science.gov (United States)

    The recent analytical literature on the application of luminescence techniques to the measurement of various classes of environmentally significant chemicals has been reviewed. Luminescent spectroscopy based methods are compared to other current techniques. Also, examples of rece...

  8. Gated Luminescence Imaging of Silicon Nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joo, Jinmyoung; Liu, Xiangyou; Kotamraju, Venkata Ramana; Ruoslahti, Erkki; Nam, Yoonkey; Sailor, Michael J.

    2016-01-01

    The luminescence lifetime of nanocrystalline silicon is typically on the order of microseconds, significantly longer than the nanosecond lifetimes exhibited by fluorescent molecules naturally present in cells and tissues. Time-gated imaging, where the image is acquired at a time after termination of an excitation pulse, allows discrimination of a silicon nanoparticle probe from these endogenous signals. Because of the microsecond time scale for silicon emission, time-gated imaging is relatively simple to implement for this biocompatible and nontoxic probe. Here a time-gated system with ~10 ns resolution is described, using an intensified CCD camera and pulsed LED or laser excitation sources. The method is demonstrated by tracking the fate of mesoporous silicon nanoparticles containing the tumor-targeting peptide iRGD, administered by retro-orbital injection into live mice. Imaging of such systemically administered nanoparticles in vivo is particularly challenging because of the low concentration of probe in the targeted tissues and relatively high background signals from tissue autofluorescence. Contrast improvements of >100-fold (relative to steady-state imaging) is demonstrated in the targeted tissues. PMID:26034817

  9. Luminescent Solar Concentrators in the Algal Industry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hellier, Katie; Corrado, Carley; Carter, Sue; Detweiler, Angela; Bebout, Leslie

    2013-03-01

    Today's industry for renewable energy sources and highly efficient energy management systems is rapidly increasing. Development of increased efficiency Luminescent Solar Concentrators (LSCs) has brought about new applications for commercial interests, including greenhouses for agricultural crops. This project is taking first steps to explore the potential of LSCs to enhance production and reduce costs for algae and cyanobacteria used in biofuels and nutraceuticals. This pilot phase uses LSC filtered light for algal growth trials in greenhouses and laboratory experiments, creating specific wavelength combinations to determine effects of discrete solar light regimes on algal growth and the reduction of heating and water loss in the system. Enhancing the optimal spectra for specific algae will not only increase production, but has the potential to lessen contamination of large scale production due to competition from other algae and bacteria. Providing LSC filtered light will reduce evaporation and heating in regions with limited water supply, while the increased energy output from photovoltaic cells will reduce costs of heating and mixing cultures, thus creating a more efficient and cost effective production system.

  10. Grassy Silica Nanoribbons and Strong Blue Luminescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shengping; Xie, Shuang; Huang, Guowei; Guo, Hongxuan; Cho, Yujin; Chen, Jun; Fujita, Daisuke; Xu, Mingsheng

    2016-09-01

    Silicon dioxide (SiO2) is one of the key materials in many modern technological applications such as in metal oxide semiconductor transistors, photovoltaic solar cells, pollution removal, and biomedicine. We report the accidental discovery of free-standing grassy silica nanoribbons directly grown on SiO2/Si platform which is commonly used for field-effect transistors fabrication without other precursor. We investigate the formation mechanism of this novel silica nanostructure that has not been previously documented. The silica nanoribbons are flexible and can be manipulated by electron-beam. The silica nanoribbons exhibit strong blue emission at about 467 nm, together with UV and red emissions as investigated by cathodoluminescence technique. The origins of the luminescence are attributed to various defects in the silica nanoribbons; and the intensity change of the blue emission and green emission at about 550 nm is discussed in the frame of the defect density. Our study may lead to rational design of the new silica-based materials for a wide range of applications.

  11. Grassy Silica Nanoribbons and Strong Blue Luminescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shengping; Xie, Shuang; Huang, Guowei; Guo, Hongxuan; Cho, Yujin; Chen, Jun; Fujita, Daisuke; Xu, Mingsheng

    2016-01-01

    Silicon dioxide (SiO2) is one of the key materials in many modern technological applications such as in metal oxide semiconductor transistors, photovoltaic solar cells, pollution removal, and biomedicine. We report the accidental discovery of free-standing grassy silica nanoribbons directly grown on SiO2/Si platform which is commonly used for field-effect transistors fabrication without other precursor. We investigate the formation mechanism of this novel silica nanostructure that has not been previously documented. The silica nanoribbons are flexible and can be manipulated by electron-beam. The silica nanoribbons exhibit strong blue emission at about 467 nm, together with UV and red emissions as investigated by cathodoluminescence technique. The origins of the luminescence are attributed to various defects in the silica nanoribbons; and the intensity change of the blue emission and green emission at about 550 nm is discussed in the frame of the defect density. Our study may lead to rational design of the new silica-based materials for a wide range of applications. PMID:27666663

  12. User guide for luminescence sampling in archaeological and geological contexts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Michelle S.; Gray, Harrison J.; Johnson, Jack A.; Rittenour, Tammy M.; Feathers, James K.; Mahan, Shannon

    2015-01-01

    Luminescence dating provides a direct age estimate of the time of last exposure of quartz or feldspar minerals to light or heat and has been successfully applied to deposits, rock surfaces, and fired materials in a number of archaeological and geological settings. Sampling strategies are diverse and can be customized depending on local circumstances, although all sediment samples need to include a light-safe sample and material for dose-rate determination. The accuracy and precision of luminescence dating results are directly related to the type and quality of the material sampled and sample collection methods in the field. Selection of target material for dating should include considerations of adequacy of resetting of the luminescence signal (optical and thermal bleaching), the ability to characterize the radioactive environment surrounding the sample (dose rate), and the lack of evidence for post-depositional mixing (bioturbation in soils and sediment). Sample strategies for collection of samples from sedimentary settings and fired materials are discussed. This paper should be used as a guide for luminescence sampling and is meant to provide essential background information on how to properly collect samples and on the types of materials suitable for luminescence dating.

  13. Study of the luminescence properties of a natural amazonite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Correcher, V., E-mail: v.correcher@ciemat.es [CIEMAT, Av. Complutense 22, Madrid 28040 (Spain); Garcia-Guinea, J. [Museo Nacional de Ciencias Naturales, CSIC, C/Jose Gutierrez Abascal 2, Madrid 28006 (Spain)

    2011-09-15

    Most gemstones, being natural materials (silicates, carbonates, phosphates, etc.), exhibit luminescence emission. This property could be potentially employed for personal dosimetry in the case of radiation accident or radiological terrorism where conventional monitoring has not been established. We, herein, report on the thermoluminescence (TL), radioluminescence (RL) and infra-red stimulated luminescence (IRSL) response of a well-characterised natural amazonite (KAlSi{sub 3}O{sub 8}) that, due to its bright blue-green colour when polished, is used as a gemstone. The luminescence emission wavelengths, intensities and thermal kinetics of the amazonite luminescence curves reveal that the ultraviolet band measured on amazonite aliquots is similar to other common K-rich feldspars. On this basis, one can conclude (i) association between twinning and the UV-blue TL emission can be related to structural defects located in the twin-domain boundaries where ionic alkali-self-diffusion, irreversible water losses and irreversible dehydroxylation processes can be involved. (ii) Amazonite exhibits a complex structure with several planar defects (twinning and exsolution interphases which can hold hydroxyl groups, water molecules, etc.) and point defects (impurities, Na, Pb, Mn, etc.) that can act as luminescence centres, and in fact, green and red emissions are respectively associated with the presence of Mn and Fe impurities. Finally, (iv) the thermal stability tests performed on the TL emission of the amazonite confirm a continuum in the trap distribution, i.e. progressive changes in the glow curve shape, intensity and temperature position of the maximum peak.

  14. Luminescent Solar Concentrators – a low cost photovoltaics alternative

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    van Sark W.G.J.H.M.

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Luminescent solar concentrators (LSCs are being developed as a potentially low cost-per-Wp photovoltaic device, suited for applications especially in the built environment. LSCs generally consist of transparent polymer sheets doped with luminescent species, either organic dye molecules or semiconductor nanocrystals. Direct and diffuse incident sunlight is absorbed by the luminescent species and emitted at redshifted wavelengths with high quantum efficiency. Optimum design ensures that a large fraction of emitted light is trapped in the sheet, which travels to the edges where it can be collected by one or more mono- or bifacial solar cells, with minimum losses due to absorption in the sheet and re-absorption by the luminescent species. Today’s record efficieny is 7%, however, 10-15% is within reach. Optimized luminescent solar concentrators potentially offer lower cost per unit of power compared to conventional solar cells. Moreover, LSCs have an increased conversion efficiency for overcast and cloudy sky conditions, having a large fraction of diffuse irradiation, which is blueshifted compared to clear sky conditions. As diffuse irradiation conditions are omnipresent throughout mid- and northern-European countries, annual performance of LSCs is expected to be better in terms of kWh/Wp compared to conventional PV.

  15. Occurrence and Expression of Luminescence in Vibrio cholerae▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grim, Christopher J.; Taviani, Elisa; Alam, Munirul; Huq, Anwar; Sack, R. Bradley; Colwell, Rita R.

    2008-01-01

    Several species of the genus Vibrio, including Vibrio cholerae, are bioluminescent or contain bioluminescent strains. Previous studies have reported that only 10% of V. cholerae strains are luminescent. Analysis of 224 isolates of non-O1/non-O139 V. cholerae collected from Chesapeake Bay, MD, revealed that 52% (116/224) were luminescent when an improved assay method was employed and 58% (130/224) of isolates harbored the luxA gene. In contrast, 334 non-O1/non-O139 V. cholerae strains isolated from two rural provinces in Bangladesh yielded only 21 (6.3%) luminescent and 35 (10.5%) luxA+ isolates. An additional 270 clinical and environmental isolates of V. cholerae serogroups O1 and O139 were tested, and none were luminescent or harbored luxA. These results indicate that bioluminescence may be a trait specific for non-O1/non-O139 V. cholerae strains that frequently occur in certain environments. Luminescence expression patterns of V. cholerae were also investigated, and isolates could be grouped based on expression level. Several strains with defective expression of the lux operon, including natural K variants, were identified. PMID:18065611

  16. Zero-reabsorption doped-nanocrystal luminescent solar concentrators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erickson, Christian S; Bradshaw, Liam R; McDowall, Stephen; Gilbertson, John D; Gamelin, Daniel R; Patrick, David L

    2014-04-22

    Optical concentration can lower the cost of solar energy conversion by reducing photovoltaic cell area and increasing photovoltaic efficiency. Luminescent solar concentrators offer an attractive approach to combined spectral and spatial concentration of both specular and diffuse light without tracking, but they have been plagued by luminophore self-absorption losses when employed on practical size scales. Here, we introduce doped semiconductor nanocrystals as a new class of phosphors for use in luminescent solar concentrators. In proof-of-concept experiments, visibly transparent, ultraviolet-selective luminescent solar concentrators have been prepared using colloidal Mn(2+)-doped ZnSe nanocrystals that show no luminescence reabsorption. Optical quantum efficiencies of 37% are measured, yielding a maximum projected energy concentration of ∼6× and flux gain for a-Si photovoltaics of 15.6 in the large-area limit, for the first time bounded not by luminophore self-absorption but by the transparency of the waveguide itself. Future directions in the use of colloidal doped nanocrystals as robust, processable spectrum-shifting phosphors for luminescent solar concentration on the large scales required for practical application of this technology are discussed.

  17. Controlling the visible luminescence in hydrothermal ZnO

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lem, Laurent L.C.; Phillips, Matthew R.; Ton-That, Cuong, E-mail: Cuong.Ton-That@uts.edu.au

    2014-10-15

    Cathodoluminescence spectra have been measured in hydrothermal and hydrogen-doped ZnO at different excitation densities and temperatures to investigate the emission efficiencies of near-band-edge (NBE), green and yellow luminescence bands. The NBE intensity depends linearly on the electron beam excitation as expected for excitonic recombination character. The intensities of the green and yellow bands are highly dependent not only on the excitation density but also on temperature. At high excitation densities ZnO exhibits dominant green emission at room temperature; the intensity of the green band can be further controlled by doping ZnO with hydrogen, which passivates green luminescence centers. Conversely at small excitation densities (< 0.1 nA) and low temperatures the visible luminescence from ZnO is predominantly yellow due to the abundance of Li in hydrothermal ZnO. The results are explained by differences in the recombination kinetics and the relative concentrations of the green and yellow centers, and illustrate that single-color emission can be achieved in ZnO by adjusting the excitation power and temperature. - Highlights: • Hydrothermal ZnO crystals are analyzed by cathodoluminescence spectroscopy. • Intensities of luminescence bands are highly dependent on excitation density. • Visible luminescence is influenced by temperature and hydrogen dopants. • Emission efficiencies are explained by recombination kinetics of defects.

  18. Mechanoresponsive Luminescent Molecular Assemblies: An Emerging Class of Materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sagara, Yoshimitsu; Yamane, Shogo; Mitani, Masato; Weder, Christoph; Kato, Takashi

    2016-02-10

    The possibility to change the molecular assembled structures of organic and organometallic materials through mechanical stimulation is emerging as a general and powerful concept for the design of functional materials. In particular, the photophysical properties such as photoluminescence color, quantum yield, and emission lifetime of organic and organometallic fluorophores can significantly depend on the molecular packing, enabling the development of molecular materials with mechanoresponsive luminescence characteristics. Indeed, an increasing number of studies have shown in recent years that mechanical force can be utilized to change the molecular arrangement, and thereby the optical response, of luminescent molecular assemblies of π-conjugated organic or organometallic molecules. Here, the development of such mechanoresponsive luminescent (MRL) molecular assemblies consisting of organic or organometallic molecules is reviewed and emerging trends in this research field are summarized. After a brief introduction of mechanoresponsive luminescence observed in molecular assemblies, the concept of "luminescent molecular domino" is introduced, before molecular materials that show turn-on/off of photoluminescence in response to mechanical stimulation are reviewed. Mechanically stimulated multicolor changes and water-soluble MRL materials are also highlighted and approaches that combine the concept of MRL molecular assemblies with other materials types are presented in the last part of this progress report.

  19. Luminescent Colloidal Semiconductor Nanocrystals Containing Copper: Synthesis, Photophysics, and Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knowles, Kathryn E; Hartstein, Kimberly H; Kilburn, Troy B; Marchioro, Arianna; Nelson, Heidi D; Whitham, Patrick J; Gamelin, Daniel R

    2016-09-28

    Copper-doped semiconductors are classic phosphor materials that have been used in a variety of applications for many decades. Colloidal copper-doped semiconductor nanocrystals have recently attracted a great deal of interest because they combine the solution processability and spectral tunability of colloidal nanocrystals with the unique photoluminescence properties of copper-doped semiconductor phosphors. Although ternary and quaternary semiconductors containing copper, such as CuInS2 and Cu2ZnSnS4, have been studied primarily in the context of their photovoltaic applications, when synthesized as colloidal nanocrystals, these materials have photoluminescence properties that are remarkably similar to those of copper-doped semiconductor nanocrystals. This review focuses on the luminescent properties of colloidal copper-doped, copper-based, and related copper-containing semiconductor nanocrystals. Fundamental investigations into the luminescence of copper-containing colloidal nanocrystals are reviewed in the context of the well-established luminescence mechanisms of bulk copper-doped semiconductors and copper(I) molecular coordination complexes. The use of colloidal copper-containing nanocrystals in applications that take advantage of their luminescent properties, such as bioimaging, solid-state lighting, and luminescent solar concentrators, is also discussed.

  20. Sensory feedback in interlimb coordination

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gervasio, Sabata; Voigt, Michael; Kersting, Uwe G.

    2017-01-01

    direct communication between the two sides without the need for the involvement of higher centers. These may also exist in humans since sensory feedback elicited by tibial nerve stimulation on one side (ipsilateral) can affect the muscles activation in the opposite side (contralateral), provoking short......-latency crossed responses (SLCRs). The current study investigated whether contralateral afferent feedback contributes to the mechanism controlling the SLCR in human gastrocnemius muscle. Surface electromyogram, kinematic and kinetic data were recorded from subjects during normal walking and hybrid walking (with.......04). Moreover, estimated spindle secondary afferent and Golgi tendon organ activity were significantly different (P ≤ 0.01) when opposite responses have been observed, that is during normal (facilitation) and hybrid walking (inhibition) conditions. Contralateral sensory feedback, specifically spindle secondary...

  1. Linear feedback controls the essentials

    CERN Document Server

    Haidekker, Mark A

    2013-01-01

    The design of control systems is at the very core of engineering. Feedback controls are ubiquitous, ranging from simple room thermostats to airplane engine control. Helping to make sense of this wide-ranging field, this book provides a new approach by keeping a tight focus on the essentials with a limited, yet consistent set of examples. Analysis and design methods are explained in terms of theory and practice. The book covers classical, linear feedback controls, and linear approximations are used when needed. In parallel, the book covers time-discrete (digital) control systems and juxtapos

  2. Online bioimpedance feedback for in vivo electroporated tissues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medrano, J.; Rey, J. I.; Connolly, R. J.; Anderson, A.; Jaroszeski, M.; Gitlin, R.

    2010-04-01

    Electroporation in vivo is a biotechnology method that uses short-duration high intensity electric fields to enhance plasma membrane permeability in living cells in order to facilitate the uptake of drugs, DNA, genes and proteins into the cytoplasm. The degree of permeability is related to the tissue's bioimpedance; hence, accurate impedance evaluation throughout electroporation treatment is essential to 1) avoid over-treating tissues resulting in excessive cell death and 2) under-treating tissues resulting in poor permeability. Cell viability and membrane permeability is based on a number of factors, including: time elapsed after electroporation, electroporation pulse amplitude, tissue type, and so on; thus, efficient feedback protocols must minimize delays between treatment and impedance readings. Current methods of bioimpedance feedback are often cumbersome and impedance analysis devices can be expensive, bulky, and immobile. Emerging technologies facilitate economical methods, fast protocols, and portability to realize bioimpedance measurement and feedback online (i.e. realtime). Consequently, this research uses automation software, logic-biased protocols, an inexpensive commercially available impedance analyzer microchip, and a custom-built hexagonal electrode probe to measure dynamic bioimpedance changes. This work demonstrates how this novel system measures tissue bioimpedance instantly and efficiently before and after electroporation. Additionally this system allows for the comparison of electrode geometries as well as electric field' magnitudes and distributions. Follow up work will pursue the optimization of plasma membrane permeability for several tissue/cell types.

  3. Water-Triggered Luminescent "Nano-bombs" Based on Supra-(Carbon Nanodots)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lou, Q.; Qu, S.; Jing, P.; Ji, W.; Li, D.; Cao, J.; Zhang, H.; Liu, L.; Zhao, J.; Shen, D.

    2015-01-01

    Novel luminescent "nano-bombs" based on a self-assembled system of carbon-nanodots, termed supra-CDs, are developed. The luminescence of these luminescent "nano-bombs" depends strongly on water contact; they show weak emission in toluene and decompose in contact with water, resulting in strong

  4. Modelling of optically stimulated luminescence of zircon : assessment of the suitability for dating

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Turkin, A.A.; Vainshtein, D.I.; Hartog, H.W. den

    2006-01-01

    The mineral zircon, ZrSiO4, is a candidate material for optical dating because it exhibits luminescence after exposure to natural radioactivity. The kinetic model of zircon thermally stimulated luminescence proposed before has been modified and used to investigate optically Stimulated luminescence (

  5. Violet stimulated luminescence dating of quartz from Luochuan (Chinese loess plateau)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ankjærgaard, C.; Guralnik, B.; Buylaert, J.P.; Reimann, T.; Yi, S.W.; Wallinga, J.

    2016-01-01

    Luminescence dating at the Luochuan loess type (China) section is at present limited to ∼0.1 Ma using quartz blue light stimulated luminescence (BLSL), but can be extended back in time to ∼0.5 Ma by resorting to the more developmental post-infrared infrared stimulated luminescence (post-IR IRSL)

  6. ENERGY-TRANSFER PROCESSES INVOLVING DIFFERENT LUMINESCENCE-CENTERS IN BAF2CE

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    VISSER, R; DORENBOS, P; VANEIJK, CWE; MEIJERINK, A; BLASSE, G; DENHARTOG, HW

    1993-01-01

    The luminescence of cerium-doped barium fluoride crystals has been investigated as a function of wavelength and time. For excitation uv light, x-rays and gamma rays were used. The well known cross luminescence (CL) near 200 nm and self-trapped exciton luminescence (STE) near 300 nm, which are due to

  7. Development of a novel europium complex-based luminescent probe for time-gated luminescence imaging of hypochlorous acid in living samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiangli; Guo, Lianying; Song, Bo; Tang, Zhixin; Yuan, Jingli

    2017-03-01

    Luminescent lanthanide complexes are key reagents used in the time-gated luminescence bioassay technique, but functional lanthanide complexes that can act as luminescent probes for specifically responding to analytes are very limited. In this work, we designed and synthesized a novel Eu3+ complex-based luminescence probe for hypochlorous acid (HOCl), NPPTTA-Eu3+, by using terpyridine polyacid-Eu3+, dinitrophenyl, and hydrazine as luminophore, quencher and HOCl-recognizer moieties, respectively. In the absence of HOCl, the probe is non-luminescent due to the strong luminescence quenching of the dinitrophenyl group in the complex. However, upon reaction with HOCl, the dinitrophenyl moiety is rapidly cleaved from the probe, which affords a strongly luminescent Eu3+ complex CPTTA-Eu3+, accompanied by a ∼900-fold luminescence enhancement with a long luminescence lifetime of 1.41 ms. This unique luminescence response of NPPTTA-Eu3+ to HOCl allowed NPPTTA-Eu3+ to be conveniently used as a probe for highly selective and sensitive detection of HOCl under the time-gated luminescence mode. In addition, by loading NPPTTA-Eu3+ into RAW 264.7 macrophage cells and Daphnia magna, the generation of endogenous HOCl in RAW 264.7 cells and the uptake of exogenous HOCl by Daphnia magna were successfully imaged on a true-color time-gated luminescence microscope. The results demonstrated the practical applicability of NPPTTA-Eu3+ as an efficient probe for time-gated luminescence imaging of HOCl in living cells and organisms.

  8. Pair creation and plasma oscillations.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prozorkevich, A. V.; Vinnik, D. V.; Schmidt, S. M.; Hecht, M. B.; Roberts, C. D.

    2000-12-15

    We describe aspects of particle creation in strong fields using a quantum kinetic equation with a relaxation-time approximation to the collision term. The strong electric background field is determined by solving Maxwell's equation in tandem with the Vlasov equation. Plasma oscillations appear as a result of feedback between the background field and the field generated by the particles produced. The plasma frequency depends on the strength of the initial background fields and the collision frequency, and is sensitive to the necessary momentum-dependence of dressed-parton masses.

  9. Activatable Multifunctional Persistent Luminescence Nanoparticle/Copper Sulfide Nanoprobe for in Vivo Luminescence Imaging-Guided Photothermal Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Li-Jian; Sun, Shao-Kai; Wang, Yong; Yang, Cheng-Xiong; Wu, Shu-Qi; Yan, Xiu-Ping

    2016-12-07

    Multifunctional nanoprobes that provide diagnosis and treatment features have attracted great interest in precision medicine. Near-infrared (NIR) persistent luminescence nanoparticles (PLNPs) are optimal materials due to no in situ excitation needed, deep tissue penetration, and high signal-to-noise ratio, while activatable optical probes can further enhance signal-to-noise ratio for the signal turn-on nature. Here, we show the design of an activatable multifunctional PLNP/copper sulfide (CuS)-based nanoprobe for luminescence imaging-guided photothermal therapy in vivo. Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs)-specific peptide substrate (H2N-GPLGVRGC-SH) was used to connect PLNP and CuS to build a MMP activatable system. The nanoprobe not only possesses ultralow-background for in vivo luminescence imaging due to the absence of autofluorescence and optical activatable nature but also offers effective photothermal therapy from CuS nanoparticles. Further bioconjugation of c(RGDyK) enables the nanoprobe for cancer-targeted luminescence imaging-guided photothermal therapy. The good biocompatibility and the multiple functions of highly sensitive tumor-targeting luminescence imaging and effective photothermal therapy make the nanoprobe promising for theranostic application.

  10. Enhanced luminescence in Er-doped Si nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoang, Tuan; Mantey, Kevin; Nayfeh, Munir

    2010-03-01

    We have studied the effect of Er ions on the luminescence of the 1-nm and 2.9-nm Si particles in solution. Under UV illumination, the 1-nm and 2.9-nm Si particles are known to have broadband luminescence in the blue and red region, respectively. We observed an enhancement in the luminescence of the particles with increasing concentration of Er ions. We discuss the result in terms of doping of the nanoparticles with Er ions. Preliminary DFT calculation shows that the ion can form a stable state just inside the particle. In this state, the electric field of the Er ion changes the bond length of the dimers, which are believed to be responsible for the optical activity of the particles.

  11. Applications of quantum dots with upconverting luminescence in bioimaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yunyun; Liang, Hong

    2014-06-05

    Quantum dots (QDs) have attracted great attention in recent years due to their promising applications in bioimaging. Compared with traditional ultraviolet excitation of QDs, near-infrared laser (NIR) excitation has many advantages, such as being less harmful, little blinking effects, zero autofluorescence and deep penetration in tissue. Composing QDs with upconverting properties is promising to enable NIR excitation. This article provides a review of QDs with upconverting luminescence and their applications in bioimaging. Based on the mechanisms of luminescence, discussion will be divided into four groups: nanoheterostructures/mixtures of QDs and upconverting nanoparticles, graphene quantum dots, lanthanide-doped QDs, and double QDs. The content includes synthetic routes, upconverting luminescence properties, and their applications in bioimaging.

  12. Stimulated luminescence emission from localized recombination in randomly distributed defects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jain, Mayank; Guralnik, Benny; Andersen, Martin Thalbitzer

    2012-01-01

    We present a new kinetic model describing localized electronic recombination through the excited state of the donor (d) to an acceptor (a) centre in luminescent materials. In contrast to the existing models based on the localized transition model (LTM) of Halperin and Braner (1960 Phys. Rev. 117...... that evolves only in the temporal domain. An excellent agreement is observed between thermally and optically stimulated luminescence (TL and OSL) results produced from the two models. In comparison to the first-order kinetic behaviour of the LTM of Halperin and Braner (1960 Phys. Rev. 117 408–15), our model...... results in a highly asymmetric TL peak; this peak can be understood to derive from a continuum of several first-order TL peaks. Our model also shows an extended power law behaviour for OSL (or prompt luminescence), which is expected from localized recombination mechanisms in materials with random...

  13. Luminescence sensitivity changes in quartz as a result of annealing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bøtter-Jensen, L.; Agersnap Larsen, N.; Mejdahl, V.

    1995-01-01

    Retrospective dosimetry using optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) on quartz extracted from (for example) bricks needs to account for strong OSL sensitivity changes that are known to occur depending on the previous thermal treatment of the sample. Non-heated quartz exhibits OSL orders of magni......Retrospective dosimetry using optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) on quartz extracted from (for example) bricks needs to account for strong OSL sensitivity changes that are known to occur depending on the previous thermal treatment of the sample. Non-heated quartz exhibits OSL orders...... of magnitude less per unit radiation than that for heated material. The reason these temperature-induced sensitivity changes occur in quartz is presently not well understood. This phenomenon is also seen in the related area of luminescence dating in which sedimentary quartz and quartz from heated...

  14. Ion beam induced luminescence analysis of painting pigments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Quaranta, A. [Universita di Trento, Dipartimento di Ingegneria dei Materiali e, delle Tecnologie Inustriali (DIMTI), via Mesiano 77, I-38050 Povo, Trento (Italy); Laboratori Nazionali di Legnaro - INFN, Via Universita 2, I-35020, Legnaro, Padova (Italy); E-mail: quaranta@ing.unitn.it; Salomon, J. [Centre de Recherche et de Restauration des Musees de France, CNRS UMR 171, rue des Pyramides, 75041 Paris Cedex 01 (France); Dran, J.C. [Centre de Recherche et de Restauration des Musees de France, CNRS UMR 171, rue des Pyramides, 75041 Paris Cedex 01 (France); Tonezzer, M. [Universita di Trento, Dipartimento di Ingegneria dei Materiali e, delle Tecnologie Inustriali (DIMTI), via Mesiano 77, I-38050 Povo, Trento (Italy); Laboratori Nazionali di Legnaro - INFN, Via Universita 2, I-35020, Legnaro, Padova (Italy); Della Mea, G. [Universita di Trento, Dipartimento di Ingegneria dei Materiali e, delle Tecnologie Inustriali (DIMTI), via Mesiano 77, I-38050 Povo, Trento (Italy); Laboratori Nazionali di Legnaro - INFN, Via Universita 2, I-35020, Legnaro, Padova (Italy)

    2007-01-15

    Ion beam induced luminescence (IBIL) has been exploited for the first time in the analysis of inorganic painting pigments. The elemental constituents of the different compounds have been determined by particle induced X-ray emission (PIXE). The acquisition time of each spectrum ranges from 100 ms to a few seconds, depending on the luminescence intensity. The luminescence features are fingerprints of the different compounds, thus identifying the provenience of pigments of the same nominal composition. Organic varnish layers do not affect the IBIL features, allowing the identification of pigments, like lapis-lazuli, whose identification with PIXE is hindered by the varnish. IBIL proved to be a technique complementary to PIXE in the archeometry and cultural heritage analysis fields.

  15. Electric Field Oriented Nanostructured Organic Thin Films with Polarized Luminescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karbovnyk, I D; Olenych, I; Kukhta, I N; Lugovskii, A; Sasnouski, G; Chutora, T; Luchechko, A P; Khalakhan, I; Kukhta, A

    2017-12-01

    The effect of the external electric field of 10(5) V/m on the ordering of two luminescent liquid crystalline molecules (1-pentyl-2(/),3(/)-difluoro-3(///)-methyl-4(////)-octyl-p-quinguephenyl and 9,10-Bis (4-pentylphenylethynyl)antracene) during thermal vacuum deposition is studied. The morphology, electrical conductivity, optical absorption, luminescence spectra, and polarization are presented and analyzed. All data show the formation of ordered films. The polarization degree is 60% for 1-pentyl-2(/),3(/)-difluoro-3(///)-methyl-4(////)-octyl-p-quinguephenyl oriented films and 28% for 9,10-Bis (4-pentylphenylethynyl)antracene. The lower value of M2 luminescence polarization can be explained by the absence of dipole moment in this molecule.

  16. Lanthanide-doped luminescent nanomaterials from fundamentals to bioapplications

    CERN Document Server

    Chen, Xueyuan; Tu, Datao

    2014-01-01

    Lanthanide-Doped Luminescent Nanomaterials reviews the latest advances in the development of lanthanide-doped luminescent inorganic nanoparticles for potential bioapplications. This book covers the chemical and physical fundamentals of these nanoparticles, such as the controlled synthesis methodology, surface modification chemistry, optical physics, and their promising applications in diverse bioassays, with an emphasis on heterogeneous and homogeneous in-vitro biodetection of tumor biomarkers. This book is intended for those readers who are interested in systematically understanding the materials design strategy, optical behavior of lanthanide ions, and practical bioapplications of lanthanide nanoparticles. It primarily focuses on the interdisciplinary frontiers in chemistry, physics and biological aspects of luminescent nanomaterials. All chapters were written by scientists active in this field and for a broad audience, providing both beginners and advanced researchers with comprehensive information on the ...

  17. LUMINESCENCE OF CADMIUM SULFIDE QUANTUM DOTS IN FLUOROPHOSPHATE GLASSES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z. O. Lipatova

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Cadmium sulfide quantum dots are perspective materials in optics, medicine, biology and optoelectronics. Fluorophosphate glasses, doped with cadmium sulfide quantum dots, were examined in the paper. Heat treatment led to the formation of quantum dots with diameters equal to 2.8 nm, 3.0 nm and 3.8 nm. In view of such changes in the quantum dots size the fundamental absorption edge shift and the luminescence band are being displaced to the long wavelengths. Luminescence lifetime has been found to be dependent on the registration wavelength in the range from 450 to 700 nm. Obtained fluorophosphate glasses with CdS quantum dots can find their application as fluorescent materials with intensive luminescence band and long excited-state natural lifetime.

  18. Nanophosphor aluminum oxide: Luminescence response of a potential dosimetric material

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blair, Michael W., E-mail: mblair@lanl.go [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM (United States); Jacobsohn, Luiz G. [Center for Optical Materials Science and Engineering Technologies, and the School of Materials Science and Engineering, Clemson University, Anderson, SC 29625 (United States); Tornga, Stephanie C. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM (United States); Ugurlu, Ozan [Characterization Facility, Institute of Technology, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN 55455 (United States); Bennett, Bryan L. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM (United States); Yukihara, Eduardo G. [Department of Physics, Oklahoma State University, Stillwater, OK (United States); Muenchausen, Ross E. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2010-05-15

    This work reports on the investigation of the radiation dosimetry properties of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} nanopowders. Samples were produced by solution combustion synthesis using three different organic fuels to check for the effect of synthesis conditions on the properties of interest. Luminescence characteristics were studied by thermoluminescence and optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) techniques. We found that samples produced using urea have characteristics similar to bulk Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}:C and may be suitable for personal dosimetry, while samples produced using glycine and hexamethylenetetramine (HMT) may be more suitable for applications where fast OSL decay is advantageous. While these results are promising and warrant further investigation, much has to be done to overcome the greatly decreased luminescence intensity of the nanomaterials as compared to bulk Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}:C.

  19. Luminescence from wide band gap materials and their applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shinde, S. L.; Senapati, S.; Nanda, K. K.

    2015-03-01

    We demonstrate ZnO and In2O3 microcrystals as an optical probe for wide range thermometry. Both ZnO and In2O3 microcrystals exhibit a monotonic decrease in luminescence intensities with increase in temperature. The variation has been explored to develop a thermometer in a wide temperature range. We also demonstrate enhanced brightness from broad-luminescent-wide band gap materials when sensitized with low band gap CdTe quantum dots. Wide band gap materials act as acceptors, while CdTe act as donors. One of the major implications is the designing of weak-luminescent-wide-band gap materials as bright white light emitting phosphors that can convert the ultraviolet into visible light. Invited talk at the 7th International Workshop on Advanced Materials Science and Nanotechnology IWAMSN2014, 2-6 November, 2014, Ha Long, Vietnam.

  20. Enhancement of quantum dot luminescence in all-dielectric metamaterial

    CERN Document Server

    Khardikov, Vyacheslav V

    2012-01-01

    We propose a simple design of all-dielectric silicon-based planar metamaterial manifested an extremely sharp resonant reflection and transmission in the wavelength of about 1550 nm due to both low dissipative losses and involving a trapped mode operating method. The quality factor of the resonance exceeds in tens times the quality factor of resonances in known plasmonic structures. The designed metamaterial is envisioned for aggregating with a pumped active medium to achieve an enhancement of luminescence and to produce an all-dielectric analog of a "lasing spaser". We report that an essential enhancement (more than 500 times) of luminescence of layer contained pumped quantum dots may be achieved by using the designed metamaterial. This value exceeds manyfold the known luminescence enhancement by plasmonic planar metamaterials.

  1. Influence of Feedback Levels on Polarized Optical Feedback Characteristics in Zeeman-Birefringence Dual Frequency Lasers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MAO Wei; ZHANG Shu-Lian; ZHOU Lu-Fei; LIU Xiao-Yan; WANG Ming-Ming

    2007-01-01

    The influence of Feedback levels on the intensity and polarization properties of polarized optical feedback in a Zeeman-birefringence dual frequency laser is systematically investigated. By changing the feedback power ratio, different feedback levels are obtained. Three distinct regimes of polarized optical feedback effects are found and defined as regimes Ⅰ, Ⅱand Ⅲ. The feedback level boundaries among the regimes are acquired experimentally. The theoretical analysis is presented to be in good agreement with the experimental results.

  2. The Effect of Feedback Style on Feedback Seeking Behaviors: an Examination of Perceived Competence

    OpenAIRE

    Stimpson, Emily Carol

    1999-01-01

    Research in the area of feedback seeking behaviors (Ashford & Cummings, 1983) has failed to examine the impact of a supervisorâ s feedback style on a subordinateâ s subsequent feedback seeking. This is an important area for investigation due to the positive relationship between feedback seeking and performance. Deci and Ryanâ s cognitive evaluation theory suggests that intrinsic motivation may be an important mediator between feedback style and FSB in that feedback ...

  3. Plasma waves

    CERN Document Server

    Swanson, DG

    1989-01-01

    Plasma Waves discusses the basic development and equations for the many aspects of plasma waves. The book is organized into two major parts, examining both linear and nonlinear plasma waves in the eight chapters it encompasses. After briefly discussing the properties and applications of plasma wave, the book goes on examining the wave types in a cold, magnetized plasma and the general forms of the dispersion relation that characterize the waves and label the various types of solutions. Chapters 3 and 4 analyze the acoustic phenomena through the fluid model of plasma and the kinetic effects. Th

  4. Plasma astrophysics

    CERN Document Server

    Kaplan, S A; ter Haar, D

    2013-01-01

    Plasma Astrophysics is a translation from the Russian language; the topics discussed are based on lectures given by V.N. Tsytovich at several universities. The book describes the physics of the various phenomena and their mathematical formulation connected with plasma astrophysics. This book also explains the theory of the interaction of fast particles plasma, their radiation activities, as well as the plasma behavior when exposed to a very strong magnetic field. The text describes the nature of collective plasma processes and of plasma turbulence. One author explains the method of elementary

  5. Defect luminescence in CaF{sub 2} nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Antonyak, O.T., E-mail: o.antonyak@gmail.com [Ivan Franko National University of Lviv, 8 Kyryla i Mefodiya Street, 79005 Lviv (Ukraine); Vistovskyy, V.V.; Zhyshkovych, A.V. [Ivan Franko National University of Lviv, 8 Kyryla i Mefodiya Street, 79005 Lviv (Ukraine); Kravchuk, I.M. [Lviv Politechnic National University, 12 S. Bandery Street, 79000 Lviv (Ukraine)

    2015-11-15

    The stationary X-ray excited luminescence (XEL) spectra at 80 and 294 K as well as the thermally stimulated luminescence (TSL) in the 80–320 K range of the CaF{sub 2} nanoparticles with various grain sizes (20–60 nm) were studied. Similarly to the earlier studied single CaF{sub 2} crystals, specific bands were revealed both for XEL and for TSL of the radiation defects. XEL spectra of the CaF{sub 2} nanoparticles contain emission bands in the 240–500 nm region caused by excitonic-like excitations localized at the radiation defects of the CaF{sub 2} lattice as well as recombination luminescence band at 560 nm. TSL integral curves of CaF{sub 2} nanoparticles contain peaks that correspond to the delocalization of the hole centers and to their recombination with F-centers and with electronic centers of the cationic sublattice. Activation energies of delocalization processes of the hole centers were determined. It was established that the light output of both XEL and TSL of the CaF{sub 2} nanoparticles increases with an increase of size of nanoparticles in the region of 20–50 nm. - Highlights: • X-ray excited and the thermo stimulated luminescence of CaF{sub 2} nanoparticles were studied. • The specific luminescence bands of the radiation defects were revealed. • Activation energies of delocalization processes of the hole centers were determined. • The dependence of the luminescence output on nanoparticle grain size were established.

  6. Cherenkov luminescence measurements with digital silicon photomultipliers: a feasibility study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciarrocchi, Esther; Belcari, Nicola; Guerra, Alberto Del; Cherry, Simon R; Lehnert, Adrienne; Hunter, William C J; McDougald, Wendy; Miyaoka, Robert S; Kinahan, Paul E

    2015-12-01

    A feasibility study was done to assess the capability of digital silicon photomultipliers to measure the Cherenkov luminescence emitted by a β source. Cherenkov luminescence imaging (CLI) is possible with a charge coupled device (CCD) based technology, but a stand-alone technique for quantitative activity measurements based on Cherenkov luminescence has not yet been developed. Silicon photomultipliers (SiPMs) are photon counting devices with a fast impulse response and can potentially be used to quantify β-emitting radiotracer distributions by CLI. In this study, a Philips digital photon counting (PDPC) silicon photomultiplier detector was evaluated for measuring Cherenkov luminescence. The PDPC detector is a matrix of avalanche photodiodes, which were read one at a time in a dark count map (DCM) measurement mode (much like a CCD). This reduces the device active area but allows the information from a single avalanche photodiode to be preserved, which is not possible with analog SiPMs. An algorithm to reject the noisiest photodiodes and to correct the measured count rate for the dark current was developed. The results show that, in DCM mode and at (10-13) °C, the PDPC has a dynamic response to different levels of Cherenkov luminescence emitted by a β source and transmitted through an opaque medium. This suggests the potential for this approach to provide quantitative activity measurements. Interestingly, the potential use of the PDPC in DCM mode for direct imaging of Cherenkov luminescence, as a opposed to a scalar measurement device, was also apparent. We showed that a PDPC tile in DCM mode is able to detect and image a β source through its Cherenkov radiation emission. The detector's dynamic response to different levels of radiation suggests its potential quantitative capabilities, and the DCM mode allows imaging with a better spatial resolution than the conventional event-triggered mode. Finally, the same acquisition procedure and data processing could be

  7. Ion irradiation effect of alumina and its luminescence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aoki, Yasushi; Yamamoto, Shunya; Naramoto, Hiroshi [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Takasaki, Gunma (Japan). Takasaki Radiation Chemistry Research Establishment; My, N.T.

    1997-03-01

    The luminescence spectra of single crystalline alpha-alumina and ruby which has 0.02% of Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} as a impurity, induced by 200 keV He{sup +} and Ar{sup +} irradiation were measured at room temperature as a function of irradiation dose. The analysis of the measured spectra showed the existence of three main luminescence features in the wavelength region of 250 to 350 nm, namely anionic color centers, F-center at 411 nm and F{sup +}-center at 330 nm and a band observed around 315 nm. As alpha-alumina was irradiated with He{sup +}, F-center and F{sup +}-center luminescence grew and decayed, but the behaviors of those were different from each other. It seems that a concentration quenching occurred on the F-center luminescence in the dose range above 1x10{sup 14} He/cm{sup 2}. Furthermore, F-center luminescence was strongly suppressed in ruby, compared with that in alumina. On the other hand, the luminescence band around 315 nm appeared only in the early stage of irradiation and did not show its growth part. The dose dependent behavior was similar to that of Cr{sup 3+} emission at 695 nm (R-line) in ruby in both cases of He{sup +} and Ar{sup +} irradiation. Based on the experimental results mentioned above, the processes of defect formation and excitation in alumina in the early stage of ion irradiation will be discussed. (author)

  8. Latest developments in silica fibre luminescence dosimetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bradley, D. A.; Abdul S, S. F.; Jafari, S. M.; Alanazi, A. [University of Surrey, Department of Physics, GU2 7XH Guildford, Surrey (United Kingdom); Amouzad M, G. [University of Malaya, Faculty of Engineering, Department of Electrical Engineering, Integrated Lightwave Research Group, 50603 Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia); Addul R, H. A.; Mizanur R, A. K. M.; Zubair, H. T.; Begum, M.; Yusoff, Z.; Omar, N. Y. M. [Multimedia University, Faculty of Engineering, 2010 Cyberjaya, Selangor (Malaysia); Maah, M. J. [University of Malaya, Department of Chemistry, 50603 Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia); Collin, S. [National Physical Laboratory, Hampton Road, Teddington, TW11 OLW Middlesex (United Kingdom); Mat-Sharif, K. A.; Muhd-Yassin, S. Z.; Zulkifli, M. I., E-mail: d.a.bradley@surrey.ac.uk [Telekom Malaysia Research and Development Sdn Bhd., 63000 Cyberjaya, Selangor (Malaysia)

    2015-10-15

    Full text: Using tailor made sub-mm diameter doped-silica fibres, we are carrying out luminescence dosimetry studies for a range of situations, including thermoluminescence (Tl)investigations on a liquid alpha source formed of {sup 223}RaCl (the basis of the Bayer Health care product Xofigo), the Tl response to a 62 MeV proton source and Tl response to irradiation from an {sup 241}Am-Be neutron source. In regard to the former, in accord with the intrinsic high linear energy transfer (Let) and short path length (<100 um) of the α-particles in calcified tissue, the product is in part intended as a bone-seeking radionuclide for treatment of metastatic cancer, offering high specificity and efficacy. The Tl yield of Ge-doped SiO{sub 2} fibres has been investigated including for photonic crystal fibre un collapsed, flat fibres and single mode fibres, these systems offering many advantages over conventional passive dosimetry types. In particular, one can mention comparable and even superior sensitivity, an effective atomic number Z{sub eff} of the silica dosimetric material close to that of bone, and the glassy nature of the fibres offering the additional advantage of being able to place such dosimeters directly into liquid environments. Finally we review the use of our tailor made fibres for on-line radioluminescence measurements of radiotherapy beams. The outcome from these various lines of research is expected to inform development of doped fiber radiation dosimeters of versatile utility, ranging from clinical applications through to industrial studies and environmental evaluations. (Author)

  9. Luminescence characterization of a sodium rich feldspar

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Correcher, V.; Sanchez M, L. [CIEMAT, Av. Complutense 22, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Garcia G, J. [MNCN-CSIC, c/ J. Gutierrez Abascal 2, Madrid 28006 (Spain); Rivera, T. [CICATA-IPN, Av. Legaria 694, 11500 Mexico D.F. (Mexico)

    2006-07-01

    This paper reports on the radioluminescence (RL) and thermoluminescence (TL) properties of a sodium rich feldspar ((Na,K)[AlSi{sub 3}O{sub 8}]) with a mean molecular composition of orthoclase (Or) and albite (Ab) of Or{sub 1}Ab{sub 99}. Despite the complexity of the luminescence signals of the sample, it is possible to determine six different emission bands at about 300, 380, 420, 460, 550 and 680 nm. The 300 nm emission can be associated to structural defects related to the recombination process in which the Na{sup +} ion diffusion-limited is involved. The UV-blue emission band at (i) 380 nm is characteristic of mineral phases containing SiO{sub 4} tetrahedral and could be related to intrinsic defects in the lattice, (ii) the 420 nm band could be associated to the presence of Cu (II) ions placed next to the hole traps or the recombination on a centre formed from a hole-oxygen atom adjacent to two Al atoms (Al-O-Al) and (iii) the 460 nm waveband could be due to the presence of Ti{sup 4+}. The green and red emissions are respectively associated to the presence of Mn{sup 2+} and Fe{sup 3+} ions. The ratio between the relative intensities, peaked at 290 (the more intense waveband) and 550 nm is about 10:1 in both TL and RL; this fact indicates that the efficiency of recombination centres does no changes regardless on the type of the process. (Author)

  10. On interconnections, control, and feedback

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Willems, JC

    1997-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to study interconnections and control of dynamical systems in a behavioral context. We start with an extensive physical example which serves to illustrate that the familiar input-output feedback loop structure is not as universal as we have been taught to believe, This l

  11. Fishualization: a group feedback display

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schavemaker, J.G.M.; Boertjes, E.M.; Koldijk, S.J.; Wiertz, L.; Verberne, S.; Sappelli, M.; Kaptein, A.M.

    2014-01-01

    In this contribution1 we present a novel psychological intervention that maps human computer activity to a group feedback device on the basis of a combination of various types of unobtrusive, low-level sensors. The goal is to enable employees to gain insights into their working habits, to reduce str

  12. On interconnections, control, and feedback

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Willems, JC

    The purpose of this paper is to study interconnections and control of dynamical systems in a behavioral context. We start with an extensive physical example which serves to illustrate that the familiar input-output feedback loop structure is not as universal as we have been taught to believe, This

  13. Feedback: How to Teach How.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krovar, Susan K.; And Others

    1992-01-01

    To give definitive feedback, physical education teachers must be able to teach basic kinesiological and mechanical principles of movement and how they apply to specific sports skills. The article includes a chart with common kinesiological and mechanical principles applied to particular movements. Appropriate teaching cues are noted. (SM)

  14. Feedback, Incentives and Peer Effects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eriksson, Tor Viking; Poulsen, Anders; Villeval, Marie Claire

    effects in the piece-rate pay scheme. In both pay schemes, interim feedback generates negative quality peer effects on the less able performers. We find however evidence of positive peer effects in the tournament scheme since the underdogs almost never quit the competition even when lagging significantly...

  15. LFSC - Linac Feedback Simulation Code

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ivanov, Valentin; /Fermilab

    2008-05-01

    The computer program LFSC (Feedback Simulation Code>) is a numerical tool for simulation beam based feedback in high performance linacs. The code LFSC is based on the earlier version developed by a collective of authors at SLAC (L.Hendrickson, R. McEwen, T. Himel, H. Shoaee, S. Shah, P. Emma, P. Schultz) during 1990-2005. That code was successively used in simulation of SLC, TESLA, CLIC and NLC projects. It can simulate as pulse-to-pulse feedback on timescale corresponding to 5-100 Hz, as slower feedbacks, operating in the 0.1-1 Hz range in the Main Linac and Beam Delivery System. The code LFSC is running under Matlab for MS Windows operating system. It contains about 30,000 lines of source code in more than 260 subroutines. The code uses the LIAR ('Linear Accelerator Research code') for particle tracking under ground motion and technical noise perturbations. It uses the Guinea Pig code to simulate the luminosity performance. A set of input files includes the lattice description (XSIF format), and plane text files with numerical parameters, wake fields, ground motion data etc. The Matlab environment provides a flexible system for graphical output.

  16. Environmental Feedback and Spatial Conditioning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Foged, Isak Worre; Poulsen, Esben Skouboe

    2010-01-01

    with structural integrity, where thermal energy flow through the prototype, to be understood as a membrane, can be controlled and the visual transparancy altered. The work shows performance based feedback systems and physical prototype models driven by information streaming, screening and application....

  17. Structural and luminescent properties of electron-irradiated silicon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sobolev, N. A.; Aruev, P. N.; Kalyadin, A. E.; Shek, E. I.; Zabrodskiy, V. V.; Loshachenko, A. S.; Shtel`makh, K. F.; Vdovin, V. I.; Xiang, Luelue; Yang, Deren

    2014-02-01

    Structural defects induced by electron irradiation of p-Cz-Si wafers were identified. The influence of the annealing conditions in a chlorine-containing atmosphere on the structural and luminescent properties of the samples was examined. Light-emitting diodes based on electron-irradiated and high-temperature-annealed wafers were fabricated by a vapour-phase epitaxy technique and their luminescence properties were studied. A high-intensity dislocation-related D1 line was observed at 1.6 μm in the room-temperature electroluminescence spectrum.

  18. Luminescence dating of Late Quaternary sediments from East Greenland

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mejdahl, V.; Funder, Svend Visby

    1994-01-01

    Luminescence dating based on K-feldspars and using both TL and OSL methods have been performed on 94 sediment samples from East Greenland. The ages go back more than 380 ka, but are mainly from the last interglaciation and the subsequent period and include both shallow-marine/coastal-fluvial and ......Luminescence dating based on K-feldspars and using both TL and OSL methods have been performed on 94 sediment samples from East Greenland. The ages go back more than 380 ka, but are mainly from the last interglaciation and the subsequent period and include both shallow...

  19. Defect luminescence of ordered perovskites A2BWO6

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bode, J.H.G.; Oosterhout, A.B. van

    1975-01-01

    This paper describes luminescence spectra of ordered perovskites of the type A2BWO6. The compounds A2MgWO6 show two different emission bands. From the Raman spectra of Ba2MgWO6 and Ba2CaWO6 and from luminescence experiments on Ba2Na0.8W1.2O6 and Ba2Ca0.95Na0.04W1.01 it is concluded that there is a s

  20. Recent Progress on Nanoscale Rare Earth Luminescent Materials

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    1 Results The size of nanoscale rare earth luminescent materials is often smaller than that of the excitement or emission wavelength,and it has amazing surface state density. Therefore,it shows a lot of new luminescent phenomena such as the shift of CTS,the broadening of emission peaks,the variation of fluorescent lifetimes and quantum efficiency,and the increase of quenching concentration.It is not only of academic interest but also of technological importance for advanced phosphor applications to rese...

  1. Visible luminescence from triethanolamine-modified zinc oxide nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karak, N.; Barik, P.; Kundu, T. K.

    2013-06-01

    We report sol-gel synthesis of ZnO NPs in support of Triethanolamine (TEA) molecules. The particle sizes lie in the range of 23 nm - 43 nm. The blue-shift in absorption spectra for all powders is attributed to the quantum confinement effect. ZnO nanopowder annealed at higher temperature shows an enhanced visible luminescence. In comparison, ZnO specimens having large grain size which are prepared without using TEA do not show any emission with significant intensity. An energy band diagram of nanostructured ZnO specimens explains the luminescence results.

  2. Structural and luminescent properties of electron-irradiated silicon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sobolev, N. A.; Loshachenko, A. S. [Ioffe Physical-Technical Institute, 194021 St. Petersburg, Russia and Fok Institute of Physics, St. Petersburg State University, 198504 St. Petersburg (Russian Federation); Aruev, P. N.; Kalyadin, A. E.; Shek, E. I.; Zabrodskiy, V. V. [Ioffe Physical-Technical Institute, 194021 St. Petersburg (Russian Federation); Shtel' makh, K. F. [Ioffe Physical-Technical Institute, 194021 St. Petersburg, Russia and St. Petersburg State Technical University, 195251 St. Petersburg (Russian Federation); Vdovin, V. I. [Rzhanov Institute of Semiconductor Physics, 630090 Novosibirsk (Russian Federation); Xiang, Luelue; Yang, Deren [State Key Laboratory of Silicon Materials and Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Zhejiang University, 310027 Hangzhou (China)

    2014-02-21

    Structural defects induced by electron irradiation of p-Cz-Si wafers were identified. The influence of the annealing conditions in a chlorine-containing atmosphere on the structural and luminescent properties of the samples was examined. Light-emitting diodes based on electron-irradiated and high-temperature-annealed wafers were fabricated by a vapour-phase epitaxy technique and their luminescence properties were studied. A high-intensity dislocation-related D1 line was observed at 1.6 μm in the room-temperature electroluminescence spectrum.

  3. Luminescent properties of fluorophosphate glasses with molecular cadmium selenide clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolobkova, E. V.; Kukushkin, D. S.; Nikonorov, N. V.; Sidorov, A. I.; Shakhverdov, T. A.

    2015-02-01

    It is experimentally shown that, prior to the formation of CdSe quantum dots in fluorophosphate glasses with cadmium and selenium ions in the process of synthesis, subnanosized molecular clusters (CdSe) n are formed, which exhibit luminescence in the visible spectral region upon UV excitation. Heat treatment of the glasses increases the size of molecular clusters and makes their optical properties closer to the optical properties of CdSe semiconductor quantum dots. An increase in the sample temperature from 20 to 250°C leads to reversible thermal quenching of the luminescence.

  4. Luminescence dating of Late Quaternary sediments from East Greenland

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mejdahl, V.; Funder, Svend Visby

    1994-01-01

    Luminescence dating based on K-feldspars and using both TL and OSL methods have been performed on 94 sediment samples from East Greenland. The ages go back more than 380 ka, but are mainly from the last interglaciation and the subsequent period and include both shallow-marine/coastal-fluvial and ......Luminescence dating based on K-feldspars and using both TL and OSL methods have been performed on 94 sediment samples from East Greenland. The ages go back more than 380 ka, but are mainly from the last interglaciation and the subsequent period and include both shallow...

  5. Defect luminescence of ordered perovskites A2BWO6

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bode, J.H.G.; Oosterhout, A.B. van

    This paper describes luminescence spectra of ordered perovskites of the type A2BWO6. The compounds A2MgWO6 show two different emission bands. From the Raman spectra of Ba2MgWO6 and Ba2CaWO6 and from luminescence experiments on Ba2Na0.8W1.2O6 and Ba2Ca0.95Na0.04W1.01 it is concluded that there is a

  6. LUMINESCENT PROPERTIES OF SILICATE GLASSES WITH CERIUM IONS AND ANTIMONY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. M. Klykova

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The paper deals with the results of an experimental study of luminescence excitation spectra and luminescence of silicate glasses containing cerium ions and antimony. The aim of this work was to study the features of the luminescence and the effect of UV irradiation and heat treatment on luminescence and the state of cerium ions and antimony in glass. We investigated glass system Na2O-ZnO-Al2O3-SiO2-NaF-NaBr with additives CeO2 and Sb2O3. Synthesis was carried out in platinum crucibles in the air at 14500C. The samples were polished glass plates with a thickness of 0.5-1 mm. UV irradiation was carried out with a mercury lamp having a wide range of radiation in the spectral range 240-390 nm. It was conducted in a Nabertherm muffle furnaces. Luminescence spectra and excitation spectra were measured using a spectrofluorimeter MPF-44A (PerkinElmer at the room temperature. Measured luminescence spectra were corrected in view of the spectral sensitivity of the photodetector for spectrofluorimeter. Adjustment of the excitation spectra for the spectral dependence of the intensity of the excitation source was not carried out. During the experiments it was found that in silicate glasses Sb3+ ions can exist in two energy states, which corresponds to a different environment with oxygen ions. Heat treatment of these glasses in an oxidizing atmosphere leads to an increase in ion concentration of Sb3+ ions with a greater amount of oxygen in the environment. In glasses containing antimony and cerium ions, ultraviolet irradiation causes a change in the valence of cerium ions and antimony, which is accompanied by luminescence quenching. Subsequent heat treatment of glass leads to the inverse processes and restore luminescence excitation spectra. The study of fluorescent properties of silicate glasses with cerium and antimony ions led to the conclusion of the practical significance of this work. Promising multifunctional materials can be created on the basis of

  7. Luminescent properties of diamond single crystals of pyramidal shape

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alekseev, A. M.; Tuyakova, F. T.; Obraztsova, E. A.; Korostylev, E. V.; Klinov, D. V.; Prusakov, K. A.; Malykhin, S. A.; Ismagilov, R. R.; Obraztsov, A. N.

    2016-11-01

    The luminescence properties of needle-like crystals of diamond, obtained by selective oxidation of textured polycrystalline diamond films, are studied. Diamond films were grown by chemical vapor deposition from a methane-hydrogen mixture activated by a DC discharge. The spectra of photo- and cathodoluminescence and the spatial distribution of the intensity of radiation at different wavelengths are obtained for individual needle-like crystals. Based on the spectral characteristics, conclusions are made about the presence of optically active defects containing nitrogen and silicon impurities in their structure, as well as the significant effect of structural defects on their luminescence spectra.

  8. Luminescence behavior of Dy 3+ ions in lead borate glasses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pisarska, Joanna

    2009-10-01

    Dy-doped lead borate glasses were studied. The luminescence spectra showed two characteristic bands at 480 and 573 nm due to 4F 9/2- 6H 15/2 (blue) and 4F 9/2- 6H 13/2 (yellow) transitions of Dy 3+. The yellow/blue luminescence of trivalent dysprosium was analyzed as a function of the B 2O 3/PbO ratios, the activator (Dy 3+) and the PbX 2 (X = F, Cl, Br) content.

  9. Physico-chemical characterizations of Cr doped persistent luminescence nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lecuyer, T.; Teston, E.; Maldiney, T.; Scherman, D.; Richard, C.

    2016-03-01

    Persistent luminescence nanoparticles have recently been proposed as innovative optical probes for small animal in vivo imaging. The main advantage of such probes is their ability to emit light for a long time after the end of their excitation, allowing in vivo imaging with low background. This work reports new information on the physico-chemical characterizations of Cr doped ZnGa2O4 nanoprobes in terms of synthetic procedure, luminescence properties as well as colloidal stabilities in different aqueous media and over the time.

  10. Acute tryptophan depletion attenuates brain-heart coupling following external feedback

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erik M Mueller

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available External and internal performance feedback triggers neural and visceral modulations such as reactions in the medial prefrontal cortex and insulae or changes of heart period (HP. The functional coupling of neural and cardiac responses following feedback (cortico-cardiac connectivity is not well understood. While linear time-lagged within-subjects correlations of single-trial EEG and HP (cardio-electroencephalographic covariance-tracing, CECT indicate a robust negative coupling of EEG magnitude 300 ms after presentation of an external feedback stimulus with subsequent alterations of heart period (the so-called N300H phenomenon, the neurotransmitter systems underlying feedback-evoked cortico-cardiac connectivity are largely unknown. Because it has been shown that acute tryptophan depletion (ATD, attenuating brain serotonin (5-HT, decreases cardiac but not neural correlates of feedback processing, we hypothesized that 5-HT may be involved in feedback-evoked cortico-cardiac connectivity. In a placebo-controlled double-blind crossover design, twelve healthy participants received a tryptophan-free amino-acid drink at one session and a balanced amino-acid control-drink on another and twice performed a time-estimation task with feedback presented after each trial. N300H magnitude and plasma tryptophan levels were assessed. Results indicated a robust N300H after the control drink, which was significantly attenuated following ATD. Moreover, plasma tryptophan levels during the control session were correlated with N300H amplitude such that individuals with lower tryptophan levels showed reduced N300H. Together, these findings indicate that 5-HT is important for feedback-induced covariation of cortical and cardiac activity. Because individual differences in anxiety have previously been linked to 5-HT, cortico-cardiac coupling and feedback processing, the present findings may be particularly relevant for futures studies linking 5-HT to anxiety.

  11. Investigation of defect luminescence from multicrystalline Si wafer solar cells using X-ray fluorescence and luminescence imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peloso, Matthew P. [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, National University of Singapore (Singapore); Palina, Natalie; Hidayat, Hidayat; Hoex, Bram [Solar Energy Research Institute of Singapore (SERIS), National University of Singapore (Singapore); Banas, Krzysztof; Banas, Agnieszka; Breese, Mark B.H. [Singapore Synchrotron Light Source, National University of Singapore (Singapore); Aberle, Armin G. [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, National University of Singapore (Singapore); Solar Energy Research Institute of Singapore (SERIS), National University of Singapore (Singapore)

    2012-12-15

    Multicrystalline silicon wafer solar cells reveal performance- reducing defects by luminescence. X-ray fluorescence spectra are used to investigate the elemental constituents from regions of solar cells yielding reverse-bias or sub-bandgap luminescence from defects. It is found that a higher concentration of metals is present in regions yielding reverse-bias electroluminescence than in regions yielding sub-bandgap electroluminescence. This suggests, dislocations do not create strong breakdown currents in the absence of impurity precipitates. (a) Topographies of sub-bandgap (red) and reverse-bias (blue) luminescence from defects in a multicrystalline Si wafer solar cell. (b) Their distinct X-ray spectra indicate highest concentrations of metals in the blue regions. (copyright 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  12. Mechanical AGN Feedback: Controlling the Thermodynamical Evolution of Elliptical Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Gaspari, M; Temi, P

    2012-01-01

    A fundamental gap in the current understanding of galaxies concerns the thermodynamical evolution of the ordinary, baryonic matter. On one side, radiative emission drastically decreases the thermal energy content of the interstellar plasma (ISM), inducing a slow cooling flow toward the centre. On the other side, the active galactic nucleus (AGN) struggles to prevent the runaway cooling catastrophe, injecting huge amount of energy in the ISM. The present study intends to deeply investigate the role of mechanical AGN feedback in (isolated or massive) elliptical galaxies, extending and completing the mass range of tested cosmic environments. Our previously successful feedback models, in galaxy clusters and groups, demonstrated that AGN outflows, self-regulated by cold gas accretion, are able to properly quench the cooling flow, without destroying the cool core. Via 3D hydrodynamic simulations (FLASH 3.3), including also stellar evolution, we show that massive mechanical AGN outflows can indeed solve the cooling ...

  13. Global desertification: Drivers and feedbacks

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Odorico, Paolo; Bhattachan, Abinash; Davis, Kyle F.; Ravi, Sujith; Runyan, Christiane W.

    2013-01-01

    Desertification is a change in soil properties, vegetation or climate, which results in a persistent loss of ecosystem services that are fundamental to sustaining life. Desertification affects large dryland areas around the world and is a major cause of stress in human societies. Here we review recent research on the drivers, feedbacks, and impacts of desertification. A multidisciplinary approach to understanding the drivers and feedbacks of global desertification is motivated by our increasing need to improve global food production and to sustainably manage ecosystems in the context of climate change. Classic desertification theories look at this process as a transition between stable states in bistable ecosystem dynamics. Climate change (i.e., aridification) and land use dynamics are the major drivers of an ecosystem shift to a “desertified” (or “degraded”) state. This shift is typically sustained by positive feedbacks, which stabilize the system in the new state. Desertification feedbacks may involve land degradation processes (e.g., nutrient loss or salinization), changes in rainfall regime resulting from land-atmosphere interactions (e.g., precipitation recycling, dust emissions), or changes in plant community composition (e.g., shrub encroachment, decrease in vegetation cover). We analyze each of these feedback mechanisms and discuss their possible enhancement by interactions with socio-economic drivers. Large scale effects of desertification include the emigration of “environmental refugees” displaced from degraded areas, climatic changes, and the alteration of global biogeochemical cycles resulting from the emission and long-range transport of fine mineral dust. Recent research has identified some possible early warning signs of desertification, which can be used as indicators of resilience loss and imminent shift to desert-like conditions. We conclude with a brief discussion on some desertification control strategies implemented in different

  14. Feedback as real-time constructions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Keiding, Tina Bering; Qvortrup, Ane

    2014-01-01

    This article offers a re-description of feedback and the significance of time in feedback constructions based on systems theory. It describes feedback as internal, real-time constructions in a learning system. From this perspective, feedback is neither immediate nor delayed, but occurs in the very...... instant it takes place. This article argues for a clear distinction between the timing of communicative events, such as responses that are provided as help for feedback constructions, and the feedback construction itself as an event in a psychic system. Although feedback is described as an internal......, system-relative construction, different teaching environments offer diverse conditions for feedback constructions. The final section of this article explores this idea with the help of examples from both synchronous oral interaction and asynchronous text-based interaction mediated by digital media....

  15. Evaluative Feedback: Perspectives on Media Effects

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Watts, Stephanie A

    2007-01-01

    .... No feedback effectiveness differences were found between media conditions, although determinants of feedback effectiveness differed significantly depending on the medium. These results are generally consistent with the theoretical model.

  16. Digital Detection and feedback Fluxgate Magnetometer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Piil-Henriksen, J.; Merayo, José M.G.; Nielsen, Otto V;

    1996-01-01

    A new full Earth's field dynamic feedback fluxgate magnetometer is described. It is based entirely on digital signal processing and digital feedback control, thereby replacing the classical second harmonic tuned analogue electronics by processor algorithms. Discrete mathematical cross...

  17. Design and synthesis of a new terbium complex-based luminescent probe for time-resolved luminescence sensing of zinc ions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Zhiqiang; Xiao, Yunna; Song, Bo; Yuan, Jingli

    2014-09-01

    Luminescent probes/chemosensors based on lanthanide complexes have shown great potentials in various bioassays due to their unique long-lived luminescence property for eliminating short-lived autofluorescence with time-resolved detection mode. In this work, we designed and synthesized a new dual-chelating ligand {4'-[N,N-bis(2-picolyl)amino]methylene-2,2':6',2'-terpyridine-6,6'-diyl} bis(methylenenitrilo) tetrakis(acetic acid) (BPTTA), and investigated the performance of its Tb(3+) complex (BPTTA-Tb(3+)) for the time-resolved luminescence sensing of Zn(2+) ions in aqueous media. Weakly luminescent BPTTA-Tb(3+) can rapidly react with Zn(2+) ions to display remarkable luminescence enhancement with high sensitivity and selectivity, and such luminescence response can be realized repeatedly. Laudably, the dose-dependent luminescence enhancement shows a good linear response to the concentration of Zn(2+) ions with a detection limit of 4.1 nM. To examine the utility of the new probe for detecting intracellular Zn(2+) ions, the performance of BPTTA-Tb(3+) in the time-resolved luminescence imaging of Zn(2+) ions in living HeLa cells was investigated. The results demonstrated the applicability of BPTTA-Tb(3+) as a probe for the time-resolved luminescence sensing of intracellular Zn(2+) ions.

  18. Ytterbium-porphyrins as a new class of the luminescent labels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsvirko, M [Institute of Chemistry and Environmental Protection, Jan Dlugosz University, 13/15 Armii Krajowej Av., Czestochowa (Poland); Korovin, Yu [A.V.Bogatsky Physico-Chemical Institute of the National Academy of Sciences of Ukraine, 86 Lustdorfskaya doroga, 65080 Odessa, Ukraine (Ukraine); Rusakova, N [A.V.Bogatsky Physico-Chemical Institute of the National Academy of Sciences of Ukraine, 86 Lustdorfskaya doroga, 65080 Odessa, Ukraine (Ukraine)

    2007-08-15

    New complexes of ytterbium with asymmetric porphyrins containing substituents in {beta}-positions and hydrophobic meso-(monophenyl-p-oxypropyl)triphenylporphyrin (OPP) were obtained and characterized by elemental analysis, IR, UV-Vis absorption and luminescence spectroscopy. Electronic absorption, luminescence and luminescence excitation spectra of these complexes were studied at 295 K in DMF solutions and in the water-lecithin medium. The 4f-luminescence of ytterbium-porphyrins in the near infrared (IR) spectral region ({lambda}{sub max} = 980 nm) is observed under excitation in Soret band (400-430 nm). The effect of substituent in porphyrin macroring on the 4f-luminescent properties was also investigated. The conjugates of these compounds with protein molecules - bovine serum albumin (BSA) were investigated as well. These compounds are interesting at the initial stage of diagnostics of tumor tissues as IR-luminescent probes due to their spectral-luminescent characteristics and some biochemical properties.

  19. Low temperature synthesis of silicon quantum dots with plasma chemistry control in dual frequency non-thermal plasmas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahu, Bibhuti Bhusan; Yin, Yongyi; Han, Jeon Geon; Shiratani, Masaharu

    2016-06-21

    The advanced materials process by non-thermal plasmas with a high plasma density allows the synthesis of small-to-big sized Si quantum dots by combining low-temperature deposition with superior crystalline quality in the background of an amorphous hydrogenated silicon nitride matrix. Here, we make quantum dot thin films in a reactive mixture of ammonia/silane/hydrogen utilizing dual-frequency capacitively coupled plasmas with high atomic hydrogen and nitrogen radical densities. Systematic data analysis using different film and plasma characterization tools reveals that the quantum dots with different sizes exhibit size dependent film properties, which are sensitively dependent on plasma characteristics. These films exhibit intense photoluminescence in the visible range with violet to orange colors and with narrow to broad widths (∼0.3-0.9 eV). The observed luminescence behavior can come from the quantum confinement effect, quasi-direct band-to-band recombination, and variation of atomic hydrogen and nitrogen radicals in the film growth network. The high luminescence yields in the visible range of the spectrum and size-tunable low-temperature synthesis with plasma and radical control make these quantum dot films good candidates for light emitting applications.

  20. Cerenkov luminescence imaging of medical isotopes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruggiero, Alessandro; Holland, Jason P; Lewis, Jason S; Grimm, Jan

    2010-07-01

    The development of novel multimodality imaging agents and techniques represents the current frontier of research in the field of medical imaging science. However, the combination of nuclear tomography with optical techniques has yet to be established. Here, we report the use of the inherent optical emissions from the decay of radiopharmaceuticals for Cerenkov luminescence imaging (CLI) of tumors in vivo and correlate the results with those obtained from concordant immuno-PET studies. In vitro phantom studies were used to validate the visible light emission observed from a range of radionuclides including the positron emitters (18)F, (64)Cu, (89)Zr, and (124)I; beta-emitter (131)I; and alpha-particle emitter (225)Ac for potential use in CLI. The novel radiolabeled monoclonal antibody (89)Zr-desferrioxamine B [DFO]-J591 for immuno-PET of prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA) expression was used to coregister and correlate the CLI signal observed with the immuno-PET images and biodistribution studies. Phantom studies confirmed that Cerenkov radiation can be observed from a range of positron-, beta-, and alpha-emitting radionuclides using standard optical imaging devices. The change in light emission intensity versus time was concordant with radionuclide decay and was also found to correlate linearly with both the activity concentration and the measured PET signal (percentage injected dose per gram). In vivo studies conducted in male severe combined immune deficient mice bearing PSMA-positive, subcutaneous LNCaP tumors demonstrated that tumor-specific uptake of (89)Zr-DFO-J591 could be visualized by both immuno-PET and CLI. Optical and immuno-PET signal intensities were found to increase over time from 24 to 96 h, and biodistribution studies were found to correlate well with both imaging modalities. These studies represent the first, to our knowledge, quantitative assessment of CLI for measuring radiotracer uptake in vivo. Many radionuclides common to both nuclear

  1. Simulation of feedback instability in the coupled magnetosphere-ionosphere system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasegawa, Hiroki; Ohno, Nobuaki; Sato, Tetsuya

    2010-08-01

    Quiet auroral arcs formation has been investigated theoretically and numerically in a self-consistent dynamic way. By using a three-dimensional magneto-hydro-dynamics simulation of a dipole magnetosphere-ionosphere coupling system, it is shown that multiple longitudinally striated structures of the ionospheric plasma density and the field-aligned current are formed, resulting from nonlinear feedback instability. The areas where these structures appear are consistent with the prediction by the integrated feedback theory that includes the effects of the spatially non-uniform electric field and non-uniform plasma density. Effects of the difference of the field line lengths between the ionosphere and the magnetospheric equator over the auroral latitudes are also discussed on the feedback instability.

  2. CAS course on Plasma Wake Acceleration

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN Accelerator School

    2015-01-01

    The CERN Accelerator School (CAS) recently organised a specialised course on Plasma Wake Acceleration, held at CERN, Geneva, Switzerland, from 23 to 29 November 2014.    Following a number of introductory lectures on laser and plasma physics, as well as an overview of conventional accelerators and their limitations, the course covered a large number of aspects of plasma wake acceleration schemes: the creation of plasma by high power lasers or particle beams, a description of the plasma creation process through simulations and the characteristics of the accelerated particle beams, including results of the latest achievements. Lectures on beam diagnostics, the applications of plasma accelerated beams, and topical seminars completed the programme.  The course was very successful, with 109 students of 26 nationalities attending; most participants coming from European counties, but also from the US, Israel, India, South Korea, Russia and Ukraine. Feedback from the participants was...

  3. Feedback options in nonlinear numerical finance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hugger, Jens; Mashayekhi, Sima

    2012-01-01

    Feedback options are options where information about the trading of the underlying asset is fed back into the pricing model. This results in nonlinear pricing models. A survey of the literature about feedback options in finance is presented. The pricing model for the full feedback option...

  4. The Art of Giving Online Feedback

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leibold, Nancyruth; Schwarz, Laura Marie

    2015-01-01

    The cultivation of providing online feedback that is positive, effective, and enhances the learning experience is a valuable educator skill. Acquisition of the art of providing feedback is through education, practice, and faculty development. This article provides information about the best practices for delivering online feedback to learners. An…

  5. The Effects of Feedback as Interpersonal Reciprocities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levenstein, Joseph; And Others

    1977-01-01

    Tests the hypothesis that a response to a given feedback statement will be its reciprocal. In Phase 1, a pool of feedback statements was written and scaled along dimensions of power (dominance-submission) and affect (affection-hostility). In Phase 2, these statements were used as the basis for giving feedback and replying to it. (Author)

  6. Simple Optoelectronic Feedback in Microwave Oscillators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maleki, Lute; Iltchenko, Vladimir

    2009-01-01

    A proposed method of stabilizing microwave and millimeter-wave oscillators calls for the use of feedback in optoelectronic delay lines characterized by high values of the resonance quality factor (Q). The method would extend the applicability of optoelectronic feedback beyond the previously reported class of optoelectronic oscillators that comprise two-port electronic amplifiers in closed loops with high-Q feedback circuits.

  7. Frequent external focus feedback enhances motor learning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriele eWulf

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available The present study examined the hypothesis that feedback inducing an external focus of attention enhances motor learning if it is provided frequently (i.e., 100% rather than less frequently. Children (10-12 year olds practiced a soccer throw-in task and were provided feedback about movement form. The feedback statements, provided either after every (100% or every third (33% practice trial, were similar in content but induced either an internal focus (body-movement related or external focus (movement-effect related. The results demonstrated that learning of the movement form was enhanced by external-focus feedback after every trial (100% relative to external-focus feedback after every third trial (33% or internal-focus feedback (100%, 33%, as demonstrated by immediate and delayed transfer tests without feedback. There was no difference between the two internal-focus feedback groups. These findings indicate that the attentional focus induced by feedback is an important factor in determining the effectiveness of different feedback frequencies. We argue that the informational properties of feedback cannot sufficiently account for these and related findings, and suggest that the attentional role of feedback be given greater consideration in future studies.

  8. Why Receiving Feedback Collides with Self Determination

    Science.gov (United States)

    ten Cate, Olle Th. J.

    2013-01-01

    Providing feedback to trainees in clinical settings is considered important for development and acquisition of skill. Despite recommendations how to provide feedback that have appeared in the literature, research shows that its effectiveness is often disappointing. To understand why receiving feedback is more difficult than it appears, this paper…

  9. Effectiveness of Feedback in First Year Physics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bearden, Ian; Voigt, Karen A; Mathiasen, Helle

    How can we provide better and more effective feedback to our students? How can we encourage students to use feedback effectively? We will present results of a study of first year physics students addressing these questions and comparing the effectiveness of written and screencast feedback....

  10. Force feedback and basic laparoscopic skills

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chmarra, M.K.; Dankelman, J.; Van den Dobbelsteen, J.J.; Jansen, F.W.

    2008-01-01

    Background - Not much is known about the exact role offorce feedback in laparoscopy. This study aimed to determine whether force feedback influences movements of instruments during training in laparoscopic tasks and whether force feedback is required for training in basic laparoscopic force applicat

  11. Feedback Sandwiches Affect Perceptions but Not Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parkes, Jay; Abercrombie, Sara; McCarty, Teresita

    2013-01-01

    The feedback sandwich technique-make positive comments; provide critique; end with positive comments-is commonly recommended to feedback givers despite scant evidence of its efficacy. These two studies (N = 20; N = 350) of written peer feedback with third-year medical students on clinical patient note-writing assignments indicate that students…

  12. The Courage to Seek Authentic Feedback

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiggins, Alexis

    2011-01-01

    Educators assess students' work and behavior every day. They are professional feedback-givers, dispensing grades, advice, support, and red ink. They believe in the power of feedback to communicate what students are doing well and how they can do better. However, some teachers shy away from opportunities for feedback on their own work. Some don't…

  13. A Typology of Written Corrective Feedback Types

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellis, Rod

    2009-01-01

    As a basis for a systematic approach to investigating the effects of written corrective feedback, this article presents a typology of the different types available to teachers and researchers. The typology distinguishes two sets of options relating to (1) strategies for providing feedback (for example, direct, indirect, or metalinguistic feedback)…

  14. Self-Appraisal Based upon Supervisory Feedback.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steel, Robert P.; Ovalle, Nestor K.

    1984-01-01

    Compared self-appraisals with instructions referencing supervisory feedback with conventional self-appraisals with personnel from a large institution (N=401) and two samples of military personnel (N=117). Results showed that Feedback Based Self Appraisals exhibited more agreement with superior ratings, and degree of feedback available moderated…

  15. Neuronal networks: enhanced feedback feeds forward.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calabrese, Ronald L

    2012-09-25

    Modulatory projection neurons gate neuronal networks, such as those comprising motor central pattern generators; in turn, they receive feedback from the networks they gate. A recent study has shown that, in the crab stomatogastric ganglion, this feedback is also subject to modulation: the enhanced feedback feeds forward through the projection neurons to modify circuit output.

  16. Towards multi-exponential analysis in optically stimulated luminescence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ankjærgaard, Christina; Jain, Mayank; Hansen, Per Christian

    2010-01-01

    Optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) data from quartz can follow different mathematical forms depending on the stimulation mode. These data can be described in terms of different multi-exponential models and can be numerically fitted using several well-known methods. Here we make a comparative...

  17. Assessing the potential for luminescence dating of basalts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsukamoto, S.; Duller, G.A.T.; Wintle, A.G.; Muhs, D.

    2011-01-01

    The possibility of dating basalt using luminescence was tested on four samples with independent age control from Cima volcanic field, California, with the ultimate aim of assessing whether the technique could be used to date sediments on the surface of Mars. Previous analysis of these samples had demonstrated that the infrared stimulated luminescence (IRSL) signal is most suitable for dating as it showed the lowest fading rate among various luminescence signals. In this study, changes in equivalent dose as a function of preheat are described. The ages for the two youngest Cima samples agree with the independent ages based on cosmogenic nuclide measurements (12.0 ?? 0.8 ka). In the two older samples (dated to 320 and 580 ka by K-Ar), the luminescence behaviour is more complex and the form of the IRSL decay curve is seen to vary with dose. Mathematical fitting is used to isolate two components and their intensities are used to produce dose response curves. The slower component yields a larger equivalent dose. However, even using this component and after correction for fading, the ages obtained for the older samples are younger than the K-Ar ages. ?? 2010 Elsevier B.V.

  18. Luminescence from potassium feldspars stimulated by infrared and green light

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Duller, G.A.T.; Bøtter-Jensen, L.

    1993-01-01

    A series of experiments are reported which investigate stimulated luminescence from potassium feldspar. The aim is to provide a basic phenomenological description of the response of the material to stimulation by heat, infrared radiation (875 DELTA 80 nm) and a green light wavelength band from 5 15...

  19. Fiber-coupled Luminescence Dosimetry in Therapeutic and Diagnostic Radiology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Claus Erik

    2011-01-01

    Fiber-coupled luminescence dosimetry is an emerging technology with several potentially attractive features of relevance for uses in therapeutic and diagnostic radiology: direct water equivalence (i.e. no significant perturbation of the radiation field in a water phantom or a patient), sub...

  20. Luminescence behavior and Raman characterization of jade from Turkey

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tuncer Arslanlar, Y. [Physics Department, Faculty of Arts and Sciences, Celal Bayar University, 45140 Muradiye-Manisa (Turkey); Garcia-Guinea, J. [Museo Nacional Ciencias Naturales, Jose Gutierrez Abascal 2, Madrid 28006 (Spain); Kibar, R.; Cetin, A.; Ayvacikli, M. [Physics Department, Faculty of Arts and Sciences, Celal Bayar University, 45140 Muradiye-Manisa (Turkey); Can, N., E-mail: cannurdogan@yahoo.com [Physics Department, Faculty of Arts and Sciences, Celal Bayar University, 45140 Muradiye-Manisa (Turkey)

    2011-09-15

    Results are presented for the cathodoluminescence (CL), radioluminescence (RL) and thermoluminescence (TL) of jade from Turkey. Jade samples show broad band luminescence from green to red, which, using lifetime-resolved CL, reveals seven overlapping emissions, of which two are dominant. Green emission obtained using spatially resolved CL was associated with Mn{sup 2+} and emission bands centered near at 480 and 530 nm were attributed to {sup 3}P{sub 0}-{sup 3}H{sub 4} and {sup 1}D{sub 2}-{sup 3}H{sub 4} transitions of Pr{sup 3+}, respectively. Different shifts of the peak-wavelengths for 326 and 565 nm were observed with varying jade compositions. The incorporation of the larger K ion causes non-linear variations of the cell dimensions and therefore changes in the Fe---O band distance. We suggest that stress of the jade structure can be linked to the luminescence emission at 326 nm. Raman spectra have also been recorded in order to provide an unequivocal identification of the type of jade. The mechanism for the luminescence of the jade is considered. - Highlights: >Jade spectrum displays numerous broad bands at room and low temperatures. >Different luminescence centers contribute to the overall signal. >The Raman spectra and associated vibrational assignments are reported for jadeite. >The TL sensitivity varies depending on the treatment of the samples.

  1. Electronic displays using optically pumped luminescent semiconductor nanocrystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiss, Shimon; Schlamp, Michael C.; Alivisatos, A. Paul

    2011-09-27

    A multicolor electronic display is based on an array of luminescent semiconductor nanocrystals. Nanocrystals which emit light of different colors are grouped into pixels. The nanocrystals are optically pumped to produce a multicolor display. Different sized nanocrystals are used to produce the different colors. A variety of pixel addressing systems can be used.

  2. Characterization of UV written waveguides with luminescence microscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svalgaard, Mikael; Harpøth, Anders; Rosbirk, Tue

    2005-01-01

    Luminescence microscopy is used to measure the refractive index profile and molecular defect distribution of UV written waveguides with a spatial resolution of ~0.4 mm and high signal-to-noise ratio. The measurements reveal comlex waveguide formation dynamics with significant topological changes...

  3. Measuring Luminescence Lifetime With Help of a DSP

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danielson, J. D. S.

    2009-01-01

    An instrument for measuring the lifetime of luminescence (fluorescence or phosphorescence) includes a digital signal processor (DSP) as the primary means of control, generation of excitation signals, and analysis of response signals. The DSP hardware in the present instrument makes it possible to switch among a variety of operating modes by making changes in software only.

  4. Lanthanide-doped luminescent nanomaterials. From fundamentals to bioapplications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Xueyuan; Tu, Datao; Liu, Yongsheng [Chinese Academy of Sciences, Fuzhou (China). Fujian Inst. of Research on the Structure of Matter

    2014-07-01

    Covers the frontiers in chemistry, physics and bioapplications of lanthanide-doped luminescent nanomaterials. Presents new insights into the optical behaviors of lanthanide in nanomaterials. Systematically reviews in-vitro biodetection and bioimaging based on lanthanide-doped inorganic nanocrystals. Lanthanide-Doped Luminescent Nanomaterials reviews the latest advances in the development of lanthanide-doped luminescent inorganic nanoparticles for potential bioapplications. This book covers the chemical and physical fundamentals of these nanoparticles, such as the controlled synthesis methodology, surface modification chemistry, optical physics, and their promising applications in diverse bioassays, with an emphasis on heterogeneous and homogeneous in-vitro biodetection of tumor biomarkers. This book is intended for those readers who are interested in systematically understanding the materials design strategy, optical behavior of lanthanide ions, and practical bioapplications of lanthanide nanoparticles. It primarily focuses on the interdisciplinary frontiers in chemistry, physics and biological aspects of luminescent nanomaterials. All chapters were written by scientists active in this field and for a broad audience, providing both beginners and advanced researchers with comprehensive information on the subject.

  5. Luminescence properties of porcelain ceramics relevant to restrospective radiation dosimetry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bøtter-Jensen, L.; Markey, B.G.; Poolton, N.R.J.

    1996-01-01

    . This appears to arise from the fact that OSL is potentially stimulated in a variety of component phases of the ceramic, and these phases vary from sample to sample. This article reports an initial attempt at characterising the luminescence properties of widely available porcelain wares manufactured under...

  6. Progress on Study of Luminescence of Rare Earth Organic Chelates

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨燕生; 安保礼; 龚孟濂; 史华红; 雷衡毅; 孟建新

    2002-01-01

    Based on the investigation of the luminescence of a series of rare earth organic chelates, some relationships between luminescence and the structure of the chelates were proposed: the intensity of sensitized luminescence of central lanthanide ions(Ln3+) in a rare earth organic chelate depends on (1)the suitability of the energy gap between the excited triplet energy level of the ligands and the lowest excited energy level of Ln3+ ions; (2)the rigidity and planarity of the structure of the chelate molecule; (3)the existence of a suitable secondary ligand which may increase rigidity and the stability of the chelate molecule; and (4) the existence of a suitable π-conjugated system in the chelate molecule. According to the above relationships, 25 novel organic ligands were designed and synthesized, and their lanthanide chelates were prepared. Investigation of the photoluminescence for the new chelates shows that some of the chelates are strongly luminescent, and are applied to fluoroimmunoassay for determination of human immunoglobulin(IgG), to preparation of fluorescent plastics, and to determination of growth hormone for plants. Two novel spectroscopy-probe techniques for structure of coordination compounds and biological molecules were proposed and developed based on vibronic spectroscopy of Tb3+ complexes and fluorescence of Ce3+.

  7. Doping the dots: doped quantum dots for luminescent solar concentrators

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eilers, J.J.

    2015-01-01

    In this thesis, synthesis methods for luminescent organically capped colloidal ZnSe QDs of different sizes, ranging from 4.0 to 7.5 nm are reported. These QDs are analyzed using TEM, absorption spectroscopy, photoluminescence measurements and temperature dependent photoluminescence decay measurement

  8. The luminescence properties of MgUO4

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jong, K.P. de; Krol, D.M.; Blasse, G.

    1979-01-01

    The luminescence of MgUO4 has been investigated. Emission and excitation spectra as well as the decay time and the quantum efficiency of the emission were measured at 4.2 K. The temperature dependence of the emission spectrum and the emission intensity was studied. The results show that in MgUO4 the

  9. On the luminescence of bis (triphenylphosphine) phenanthroline copper (I)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Blasse, G.; McMillin, D.R.

    1980-01-01

    The luminescence spectra and decay tunes of the emission of the [Cu(PPh3)2(phen)]+ ion have been measured down to liquid helium temperature. The long decay time at low temperatures is interpreted in terms of the triplet level of the charge- transfer state.

  10. Optically stimulated luminescence dosimetry using natural and synthetic materials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bøtter-Jensen, L.; McKeever, S.W.S.

    1996-01-01

    The application of optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) for use in radiation dosimetry is reviewed. A broad description is given of OSL techniques developed at Riso National Laboratory and at Oklahoma State University, and recent collaborative investigations on the properties of a variety...

  11. The photophysics of luminescence in multilayered organic nanofibers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tavares, Luciana; Quochi, Francesco; Simbrunner, Clemens

    Multilayered crystalline nanofibers are exemplary model system for the study of exciton dynamics and lasing in organic materials due to their well-defined morphology, high luminescence efficiencies, and color tunability. The multi-layered nanofibers are composed of alternating layers of two...

  12. Time-resolved luminescence from feldspars: New insight into fading

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tsukamoto, S.; Denby, P.M.; Murray, A.S.

    2006-01-01

    Time-resolved infrared optically stimulated luminescence (IR-OSL) signals of K- and Na-feldspar samples extracted from sediments were measured in UV, blue and red detection windows, using a fast photon counter and pulsed IR stimulation (lambda = 875 nm). We observe that the relative contribution...

  13. Polyphenylene Dendrimers with Perylene Diimide as a Luminescent Core

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Herrmann, Andreas; Weil, Tanja; Sinigersky, Veselin; Wiesler, Uwe-Martin; Vosch, Tom; Hofkens, Johan; Schryver, Frans C. De; Müllen, Klaus

    2001-01-01

    A novel synthesis is presented of a fourfold ethynyl-substituted perylene diimide dye 4, which acts as a core molecule for the buildup of polyphenylene dendrimers. Around the luminescent core 4, a first-generation (5), a second-generation (6), and a third-generation (7) polyphenylene dendritic envir

  14. Luminescent 1-hydroxy-2-pyridinone chelates of lanthanides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raymond, Kenneth N.; Xu, Jide; Moore, Evan G.; Werner, Eric J.

    2017-01-31

    The present invention provides luminescent complexes between a lanthanide ion and an organic ligand which contains 1,2-hydroxypyridinone units. The complexes of the invention are stable in aqueous solutions and are useful as molecular probes, for example in medical diagnostics and bioanalytical assay systems. The invention also provides methods of using the complexes of the invention.

  15. Static and dynamic quenching of luminescent species in polymer media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartmann, P; Leiner, M J; Lippitsch, M E

    1994-12-01

    A method developed for quantitative determination of static and dynamic contributions to luminescence quenching is applied to Ru(II) complexes in polymer matrices (silica gel and polystyrene), quenched by oxygen. This method is based on both intensity and lifetime quenching experiments. The curvature of intensity Stern-Volmer plots is related to the results.

  16. Luminescence of nanocrystalline ZnSe:Mn2+

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Suyver, J.F.; Wuister, S.F.; Kelly, J.J.; Meijerink, A.

    2000-01-01

    The luminescence properties of nanocrystalline ZnSe:Mn^(2+) prepared via an inorganic chemical synthesis are described. Photoluminescence spectra show distinct ZnSe and Mn^(2+) related emissions, both of which are excited via the ZnSe host lattice. The Mn^(2+) emission wavelength and the

  17. Doping the dots: doped quantum dots for luminescent solar concentrators

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eilers, J.J.

    2015-01-01

    In this thesis, synthesis methods for luminescent organically capped colloidal ZnSe QDs of different sizes, ranging from 4.0 to 7.5 nm are reported. These QDs are analyzed using TEM, absorption spectroscopy, photoluminescence measurements and temperature dependent photoluminescence decay

  18. Electronic displays using optically pumped luminescent semiconductor nanocrystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiss, Shimon; Schlam, Michael C; Alivisatos, A. Paul

    2014-03-25

    A multicolor electronic display is based on an array of luminescent semiconductor nanocrystals. Nanocrystals which emit tight of different colors are grouped into pixels. The nanocrystals are optically pumped to produce a multicolor display. Different sized nanocrystals are used to produce the different colors. A variety of pixel addressing systems can be used.

  19. Oxygen Luminescence Centers in LiF-MeO Crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lisitsyna, L. A.; Suleimen, R. N.

    2017-08-01

    Spectral-kinetic parameters of luminescence of LiF crystals doped with various polyvalent metal oxides (Li, Ti, Fe, W, U) were studied in the temperature range of 100-300 K and the absorbed doses range of 0-105 Gy. A model for describing polyvalent activation cation role in the processes of radiation energy dissipation in the crystal volume is suggested.

  20. Progress in chemical luminescence-based biosensors: A critical review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roda, Aldo; Mirasoli, Mara; Michelini, Elisa; Di Fusco, Massimo; Zangheri, Martina; Cevenini, Luca; Roda, Barbara; Simoni, Patrizia

    2016-02-15

    Biosensors are a very active research field. They have the potential to lead to low-cost, rapid, sensitive, reproducible, and miniaturized bioanalytical devices, which exploit the high binding avidity and selectivity of biospecific binding molecules together with highly sensitive detection principles. Of the optical biosensors, those based on chemical luminescence detection (including chemiluminescence, bioluminescence, electrogenerated chemiluminescence, and thermochemiluminescence) are particularly attractive, due to their high-to-signal ratio and the simplicity of the required measurement equipment. Several biosensors based on chemical luminescence have been described for quantitative, and in some cases multiplex, analysis of organic molecules (such as hormones, drugs, pollutants), proteins, and nucleic acids. These exploit a variety of miniaturized analytical formats, such as microfluidics, microarrays, paper-based analytical devices, and whole-cell biosensors. Nevertheless, despite the high analytical performances described in the literature, the field of chemical luminescence biosensors has yet to demonstrate commercial success. This review presents the main recent advances in the field and discusses the approaches, challenges, and open issues, with the aim of stimulating a broader interest in developing chemical luminescence biosensors and improving their commercial exploitation.

  1. Optically stimulated luminescence dosimetry using natural and synthetic materials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bøtter-Jensen, L.; McKeever, S.W.S.

    1996-01-01

    The application of optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) for use in radiation dosimetry is reviewed. A broad description is given of OSL techniques developed at Riso National Laboratory and at Oklahoma State University, and recent collaborative investigations on the properties of a variety of n......, and unseparated materials such as bricks and porcelain items....

  2. Quantifying self-absorption losses in luminescent solar concentrators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ten Kate, Otmar M; Hooning, Koen M; van der Kolk, Erik

    2014-08-10

    Analytical equations quantifying self-absorption losses in circular luminescent solar concentrators (LSCs) are presented that can easily be solved numerically by commercial math software packages. With the quantum efficiency, the absorption and emission spectra of a luminescent material, the LSC dimensions, and the refractive index as the only input parameters, the model gives an accurate account of the decrease of LSC efficiency due to self-absorption as a function of LSC radius, thickness, and luminescence quantum efficiency. Results give insight into how many times light is reabsorbed and reemitted, the red shift of the emission spectrum, and on how multiple reabsorptions and reemissions are distributed over the LSC. As an example case the equations were solved for a circular LSC containing a Lumogen F Red 305 dye with 80% luminescence quantum efficiency, and it follows that for an LSC with a 50 cm radius the self-absorption reduces the number of photons reaching the LSC edge by a factor of four compared to the case when there would be no self-absorption. The equations can just as well be solved for any material for which the optical properties are known like type I and type II quantum dots.

  3. High Stokes shift perylene dyes for luminescent solar concentrators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanguineti, Alessandro; Sassi, Mauro; Turrisi, Riccardo; Ruffo, Riccardo; Vaccaro, Gianfranco; Meinardi, Francesco; Beverina, Luca

    2013-02-25

    Highly efficient plastic based single layer Luminescent Solar Concentrators (LSCs) require the design of luminophores having complete spectral separation between absorption and emission spectra (large Stokes shift). We describe the design, synthesis and characterization of a new perylene dye possessing Stokes shift as high as 300 meV, fluorescent quantum yield in the LSC slab of 70% and high chemical and photochemical stability.

  4. Luminescence in Sulfides: A Rich History and a Bright Future

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philippe F. Smet

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Sulfide-based luminescent materials have attracted a lot of attention for a wide range of photo-, cathodo- and electroluminescent applications. Upon doping with Ce3+ and Eu2+, the luminescence can be varied over the entire visible region by appropriately choosing the composition of the sulfide host. Main application areas are flat panel displays based on thin film electroluminescence, field emission displays and ZnS-based powder electroluminescence for backlights. For these applications, special attention is given to BaAl2S4:Eu, ZnS:Mn and ZnS:Cu. Recently, sulfide materials have regained interest due to their ability (in contrast to oxide materials to provide a broad band, Eu2+-based red emission for use as a color conversion material in white-light emitting diodes (LEDs. The potential application of rare-earth doped binary alkaline-earth sulfides, like CaS and SrS, thiogallates, thioaluminates and thiosilicates as conversion phosphors is discussed. Finally, this review concludes with the size-dependent luminescence in intrinsic colloidal quantum dots like PbS and CdS, and with the luminescence in doped nanoparticles.

  5. Luminescent 1-hydroxy-2-pyridinone chelates of lanthanides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raymond, Kenneth N.; Xu, Jide; Moore, Evan G.; Werner, Eric J.

    2013-10-15

    The present invention provides luminescent complexes between a lanthanide ion and an organic ligand which contains 1,2-hydroxypyridinone units. The complexes of the invention are stable in aqueous solutions and are useful as molecular probes, for example in medical diagnostics and bioanalytical assay systems. The invention also provides methods of using the complexes of the invention.

  6. Salicylamide-lanthanide complexes for use as luminescent markers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raymond, Kenneth N.; Petoud, Stephane; Cohen, Seth; Xu, Jide

    2002-01-01

    The present invention provides luminescent lanthanide metal chelates comprising a metal ion of the lanthanide series and a complexing agent comprising at least one salicylamidyl moiety. Also provided are probes incorporating the salicylamidyl ligands of the invention and methods utilizing the ligands of the invention and probes comprising the ligands of the invention.

  7. Phthalamide-lanthanide complexes for use as luminescent markers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raymond, Kenneth N.; Petoud, Stephane; Cohen, Seth; Xu, Jide

    2008-10-28

    The present invention provides luminescent lanthanide metal chelates comprising a metal ion of the lanthanide series and a complexing agent comprising at least one phthalamidyl moiety. Also provided are probes incorporating the phthalamidyl ligands of the invention and methods utilizing the ligands of the invention and probes comprising the ligands of the invention.

  8. Phthalamide lanthanide complexes for use as luminescent markers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raymond, Kenneth N.; Petoud, Stephane; Cohen, Seth M.; Xu, Jide

    2003-01-01

    The present invention provides luminescent lanthanide metal chelates comprising a metal ion of the lanthanide series and a complexing agent comprising at least one phthalamidyl moiety. Also provided are probes incorporating the phthalamidyl ligands of the invention and methods utilizing the ligands of the invention and probes comprising the ligands of the invention.

  9. Systematic development of new thermoluminescence and optically stimulated luminescence materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yukihara, E.G., E-mail: eduardo.yukihara@okstate.edu [Physics Department, 145 Physical Sciences II, Oklahoma State University, Stillwater, OK 74078 (United States); Milliken, E.D.; Oliveira, L.C. [Physics Department, 145 Physical Sciences II, Oklahoma State University, Stillwater, OK 74078 (United States); Orante-Barron, V.R. [Departamento de Investigacion en Polimeros y Materiales, Universidad de Sonora, Hermosillo, Sonora 83000, Mexico (Mexico); Jacobsohn, L.G. [Center for Optical Materials Science and Engineering Technologies (COMSET), and School of Materials Science and Engineering, Clemson University, Clemson, SC (United States); Blair, M.W. [Materials Science and Technology Division, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States)

    2013-01-15

    This paper presents an overview of a systematic study to develop new thermoluminescence (TL) and optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) materials using solution combustion synthesis (SCS) for applications such as personal OSL dosimetry, 2D dose mapping, and temperature sensing. A discussion on the material requirements for these applications is included. We present X-ray diffraction (XRD) data on single phase materials obtained with SCS, as well as radioluminescence (RL), TL and OSL data of lanthanide-doped materials. The results demonstrate the possibility of producing TL and OSL materials with sensitivity similar to or approaching those of commercial TL and OSL materials used in dosimetry (e.g., LiF:Mg,Ti and Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}:C) using SCS. The results also show that the luminescence properties can be improved by Li co-doping and annealing. The presence of an atypical TL background and anomalous fading are discussed and deserve attention in future investigations. We hope that these preliminary results on the use of SCS for production of TL and OSL materials are helpful to guide future efforts towards the development of new luminescence materials for different applications. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer TL and OSL material produced with sensitivity similar to commercial materials. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Luminescence properties improved by Li co-doping and annealing. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The presence of atypical TL background and anomalous fading observed.

  10. Tm2+ luminescent materials for solar radiation conversion devices

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van der Kolk, E.

    2015-01-01

    A solar radiation conversion device is described that comprises a luminescent Tm 2+ inorganic material for converting solar radiation of at least part of the UV and/or visible and/or infra red solar spectrum into infrared solar radiation, preferably said infrared solar radiation having a wavelength

  11. Toxicity Evaluation of Pig Slurry Using Luminescent Bacteria and Zebrafish

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenyan Chen

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Biogas slurry has become a serious pollution problem and anaerobic digestion is widely applied to pig manure treatment for environmental protection and energy recovery. To evaluate environmental risk of the emission of biogas slurry, luminescent bacteria (Vibrio fischeri, larvae and embryos of zebrafish (Danio rerio were used to detect the acute and development toxicity of digested and post-treated slurry. Then the ability of treatment process was evaluated. The results showed that digested slurry displayed strong toxicity to both zebrafish and luminescent bacteria, while the EC50 for luminescent bacteria and the LC50 for larvae were only 6.81% (v/v and 1.95% (v/v respectively, and embryonic development was inhibited at just 1% (v/v. Slurry still maintained a high level of toxicity although it had been treated by membrane bioreactor (MBR, while the LC50 of larvae was 75.23% (v/v and there was a little effect on the development of embryos and V. fischeri; the results also revealed that the zebrafish larvae are more sensitive than embryos and luminescent bacteria to pig slurry. Finally, we also found the toxicity removal rate was higher than 90% after the treatment of MBR according to toxicity tests. In conclusion, further treatment should be used in pig slurry disposal or reused of final effluent.

  12. Luminescent Lanthanide Reporters for High-Sensitivity Novel Bioassays.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anstey, Mitchell R.; Fruetel, Julia A.; Foster, Michael E.; Hayden, Carl C.; Buckley, Heather L.; Arnold, John

    2013-09-01

    Biological imaging and assay technologies rely on fluorescent organic dyes as reporters for a number of interesting targets and processes. However, limitations of organic dyes such as small Stokes shifts, spectral overlap of emission signals with native biological fluorescence background, and photobleaching have all inhibited the development of highly sensitive assays. To overcome the limitations of organic dyes for bioassays, we propose to develop lanthanide-based luminescent dyes and demonstrate them for molecular reporting applications. This relatively new family of dyes was selected for their attractive spectral and chemical properties. Luminescence is imparted by the lanthanide atom and allows for relatively simple chemical structures that can be tailored to the application. The photophysical properties offer unique features such as narrow and non-overlapping emission bands, long luminescent lifetimes, and long wavelength emission, which enable significant sensitivity improvements over organic dyes through spectral and temporal gating of the luminescent signal.Growth in this field has been hindered due to the necessary advanced synthetic chemistry techniques and access to experts in biological assay development. Our strategy for the development of a new lanthanide-based fluorescent reporter system is based on chelation of the lanthanide metal center using absorbing chromophores. Our first strategy involves "Click" chemistry to develop 3-fold symmetric chelators and the other involves use of a new class of tetrapyrrole ligands called corroles. This two-pronged approach is geared towards the optimization of chromophores to enhance light output.

  13. MHD control in burning plasmas MHD control in burning plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donné, Tony; Liang, Yunfeng

    2012-07-01

    Fusion physics focuses on the complex behaviour of hot plasmas confined by magnetic fields with the ultimate aim to develop a fusion power plant. In the future generation of tokamaks like ITER, the power generated by the fusion reactions substantially exceeds the external input power (Pfusion}/Pin >= 10). When this occurs one speaks of a burning plasma. Twenty per cent of the generated fusion power in a burning plasma is carried by the charged alpha particles, which transfer their energy to the ambient plasma in collisions, a process called thermalization. A new phenomenon in burning plasmas is that the alpha particles, which form a minority but carry a large fraction of the plasma kinetic energy, can collectively drive certain types of magneto-hydrodynamic (MHD) modes, while they can suppress other MHD modes. Both types of MHD modes can have desirable effects on the plasma, as well as be detrimental to the plasma. For example, the so-called sawtooth instability, on the one hand, is largely responsible for the transport of the thermalized alpha particles out of the core, but, on the other hand, may result in the loss of the energetic alphas before they have fully thermalized. A further undesirable effect of the sawtooth instability is that it may trigger other MHD modes such as neoclassical tearing modes (NTMs). These NTMs, in turn, are detrimental to the plasma confinement and in some cases may even lead to disruptive termination of the plasma. At the edge of the plasma, finally, so-called edge localized modes or ELMs occur, which result in extremely high transient heat and particle loads on the plasma-facing components of a reactor. In order to balance the desired and detrimental effects of these modes, active feedback control is required. An additional complication occurs in a burning plasma as the external heating power, which is nowadays generally used for plasma control, is small compared to the heating power of the alpha particles. The scientific challenge

  14. Assessment of clinical feedback given to medical students via an electronic feedback system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaughness, Gabrielle; Georgoff, Patrick E; Sandhu, Gurjit; Leininger, Lisa; Nikolian, Vahagn C; Reddy, Rishindra; Hughes, David T

    2017-10-01

    The feedback medical students receive during clinical rotations, traditionally verbal and not formally captured, plays a critical role in student development. This study evaluates written daily feedback given to students through a novel web-based feedback system. A Minute Feedback System was used to collect feedback given to medical students during their surgery clerkship from May 2015-April 2016. Using qualitative content analysis, feedback comments were categorized as: encouraging, corrective, specific, and nonspecific. Effective feedback was a combination of specific and either corrective or encouraging feedback; ineffective feedback contained only nonspecific comments; mediocre feedback contained elements of both effective and ineffective comments. 3191 feedback requests were sent by medical students and 2029 faculty/resident feedback responses were received. The overall response rate was 62%. Nonspecific feedback comprised 80% of faculty, 83% of senior resident, and 78% of junior resident comments. Specific feedback was given by only 35% of faculty, 17% of senior residents, and 26% of junior residents. Faculty provided Effective feedback in only 16% of comments, senior residents 8%, and junior residents 17%. Mediocre feedback comprised 13% of faculty, 9% of senior resident, and 7% of junior resident comments. Ineffective feedback comprised 67% of all feedback: 60% of faculty, 72% of senior resident, and 68% of junior resident feedback. The majority of resident and faculty feedback to medical students using an electronic, email-based application during their surgery clerkship was nonspecific and encouraging and therefore of limited effectiveness. This presents an opportunity for resident/faculty development and education regarding optimal feedback techniques. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Random distributed feedback fibre lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turitsyn, Sergei K.; Babin, Sergey A.; Churkin, Dmitry V.; Vatnik, Ilya D.; Nikulin, Maxim; Podivilov, Evgenii V.

    2014-09-01

    The concept of random lasers exploiting multiple scattering of photons in an amplifying disordered medium in order to generate coherent light without a traditional laser resonator has attracted a great deal of attention in recent years. This research area lies at the interface of the fundamental theory of disordered systems and laser science. The idea was originally proposed in the context of astrophysics in the 1960s by V.S. Letokhov, who studied scattering with “negative absorption” of the interstellar molecular clouds. Research on random lasers has since developed into a mature experimental and theoretical field. A simple design of such lasers would be promising for potential applications. However, in traditional random lasers the properties of the output radiation are typically characterized by complex features in the spatial, spectral and time domains, making them less attractive than standard laser systems in terms of practical applications. Recently, an interesting and novel type of one-dimensional random laser that operates in a conventional telecommunication fibre without any pre-designed resonator mirrors-random distributed feedback fibre laser-was demonstrated. The positive feedback required for laser generation in random fibre lasers is provided by the Rayleigh scattering from the inhomogeneities of the refractive index that are naturally present in silica glass. In the proposed laser concept, the randomly backscattered light is amplified through the Raman effect, providing distributed gain over distances up to 100 km. Although an effective reflection due to the Rayleigh scattering is extremely small (˜0.1%), the lasing threshold may be exceeded when a sufficiently large distributed Raman gain is provided. Such a random distributed feedback fibre laser has a number of interesting and attractive features. The fibre waveguide geometry provides transverse confinement, and effectively one-dimensional random distributed feedback leads to the generation

  16. Sparsity Enhanced Decision Feedback Equalization

    CERN Document Server

    Ilic, Jovana

    2011-01-01

    For single-carrier systems with frequency domain equalization, decision feedback equalization (DFE) performs better than linear equalization and has much lower computational complexity than sequence maximum likelihood detection. The main challenge in DFE is the feedback symbol selection rule. In this paper, we give a theoretical framework for a simple, sparsity based thresholding algorithm. We feed back multiple symbols in each iteration, so the algorithm converges fast and has a low computational cost. We show how the initial solution can be obtained via convex relaxation instead of linear equalization, and illustrate the impact that the choice of the initial solution has on the bit error rate performance of our algorithm. The algorithm is applicable in several existing wireless communication systems (SC-FDMA, MC-CDMA, MIMO-OFDM). Numerical results illustrate significant performance improvement in terms of bit error rate compared to the MMSE solution.

  17. Star Cluster Formation and Feedback

    CERN Document Server

    Krumholz, Mark R; Arce, Hector G; Dale, James E; Gutermuth, Robert; Klein, Richard I; Li, Zhi-Yun; Nakamura, Fumitaka; Zhang, Qizhou

    2014-01-01

    Stars do not generally form in isolation. Instead, they form in clusters, and in these clustered environments newborn stars can have profound effects on one another and on their parent gas clouds. Feedback from clustered stars is almost certainly responsible for a number of otherwise puzzling facts about star formation: that it is an inefficient process that proceeds slowly when averaged over galactic scales; that most stars disperse from their birth sites and dissolve into the galactic field over timescales $\\ll 1$ Gyr; and that newborn stars follow an initial mass function (IMF) with a distinct peak in the range $0.1 - 1$ $M_\\odot$, rather than an IMF dominated by brown dwarfs. In this review we summarize current observational constraints and theoretical models for the complex interplay between clustered star formation and feedback.

  18. Random distributed feedback fibre lasers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Turitsyn, Sergei K., E-mail: s.k.turitsyn@aston.ac.uk [Aston Institute of Photonic Technologies, Aston University, Birmingham B4 7ET (United Kingdom); Novosibirsk State University, 2 Pirogova str., 630090, Novosibirsk (Russian Federation); Babin, Sergey A. [Novosibirsk State University, 2 Pirogova str., 630090, Novosibirsk (Russian Federation); Institute of Automation and Electrometry SB RAS, 1 Ac. Koptug. ave., 630090, Novosibirsk (Russian Federation); Churkin, Dmitry V. [Aston Institute of Photonic Technologies, Aston University, Birmingham B4 7ET (United Kingdom); Novosibirsk State University, 2 Pirogova str., 630090, Novosibirsk (Russian Federation); Institute of Automation and Electrometry SB RAS, 1 Ac. Koptug. ave., 630090, Novosibirsk (Russian Federation); Vatnik, Ilya D.; Nikulin, Maxim [Institute of Automation and Electrometry SB RAS, 1 Ac. Koptug. ave., 630090, Novosibirsk (Russian Federation); Podivilov, Evgenii V. [Novosibirsk State University, 2 Pirogova str., 630090, Novosibirsk (Russian Federation); Institute of Automation and Electrometry SB RAS, 1 Ac. Koptug. ave., 630090, Novosibirsk (Russian Federation)

    2014-09-10

    The concept of random lasers exploiting multiple scattering of photons in an amplifying disordered medium in order to generate coherent light without a traditional laser resonator has attracted a great deal of attention in recent years. This research area lies at the interface of the fundamental theory of disordered systems and laser science. The idea was originally proposed in the context of astrophysics in the 1960s by V.S. Letokhov, who studied scattering with “negative absorption” of the interstellar molecular clouds. Research on random lasers has since developed into a mature experimental and theoretical field. A simple design of such lasers would be promising for potential applications. However, in traditional random lasers the properties of the output radiation are typically characterized by complex features in the spatial, spectral and time domains, making them less attractive than standard laser systems in terms of practical applications. Recently, an interesting and novel type of one-dimensional random laser that operates in a conventional telecommunication fibre without any pre-designed resonator mirrors–random distributed feedback fibre laser–was demonstrated. The positive feedback required for laser generation in random fibre lasers is provided by the Rayleigh scattering from the inhomogeneities of the refractive index that are naturally present in silica glass. In the proposed laser concept, the randomly backscattered light is amplified through the Raman effect, providing distributed gain over distances up to 100 km. Although an effective reflection due to the Rayleigh scattering is extremely small (∼0.1%), the lasing threshold may be exceeded when a sufficiently large distributed Raman gain is provided. Such a random distributed feedback fibre laser has a number of interesting and attractive features. The fibre waveguide geometry provides transverse confinement, and effectively one-dimensional random distributed feedback leads to the

  19. Comparing Simulations of AGN Feedback

    CERN Document Server

    Richardson, Mark L A; Devriendt, Julien; Slyz, Adrianne; Thacker, Robert J; Dubois, Yohan; Wurster, James; Silk, Joseph

    2016-01-01

    We perform adaptive mesh refinement (AMR) and smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH) cosmological zoom simulations of a region around a forming galaxy cluster, comparing the ability of the methods to handle successively more complex baryonic physics. In the simplest, non-radiative case, the two methods are in good agreement with each other, but the SPH simulations generate central cores with slightly lower entropies and virial shocks at slightly larger radii, consistent with what has been seen in previous studies. The inclusion of radiative cooling, star formation, and stellar feedback leads to much larger differences between the two methods. Most dramatically, at z=5, rapid cooling in the AMR case moves the accretion shock well within the virial radius, while this shock remains near the virial radius in the SPH case, due to excess heating, coupled with poorer capturing of the shock width. On the other hand, the addition of feedback from active galactic nuclei (AGN) to the simulations results in much better ag...

  20. Supernova Feedback Keeps Galaxies Simple

    CERN Document Server

    Chakraborti, Sayan

    2011-01-01

    Galaxies evolve continuously under the influence of self-gravity, rotation, accretion, mergers and feedback. The currently favored cold dark matter cosmological framework, suggests a hierarchical process of galaxy formation, wherein the present properties of galaxies are decided by their individual histories of being assembled from smaller pieces. However, recent studies have uncovered surprising correlations among the properties of galaxies, to the extent of forming a one-parameter set lying on a single fundamental line. It has been argued in the literature that such simplicity is hard to explain within the paradigm of hierarchical galaxy mergers. One of the puzzling results, is the simple linear correlation between the neutral hydrogen mass and the surface area, implying that widely different galaxies share very similar neutral hydrogen surface densities. In this work we show that self-regulated star formation, driven by the competition between gravitational instabilities and mechanical feedback from supern...