WorldWideScience

Sample records for plasma heating

  1. NCSX Plasma Heating Methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    H.W. Kugel; D. Spong; R. Majeski; M. Zarnstorff

    2003-02-28

    The NCSX (National Compact Stellarator Experiment) has been designed to accommodate a variety of heating systems, including ohmic heating, neutral-beam injection, and radio-frequency. Neutral beams will provide one of the primary heating methods for NCSX. In addition to plasma heating, beams are also expected to provide a means for external control over the level of toroidal plasma rotation velocity and its profile. The plan is to provide 3 MW of 50 keV balanced neutral-beam tangential injection with pulse lengths of 500 msec for initial experiments, and to be upgradeable to pulse lengths of 1.5 sec. Subsequent upgrades will add 3 MW of neutral-beam injection. This Chapter discusses the NCSX neutral-beam injection requirements and design issues, and shows how these are provided by the candidate PBX-M (Princeton Beta Experiment-Modification) neutral-beam injection system. In addition, estimations are given for beam-heating efficiencies, scaling of heating efficiency with machine size an d magnetic field level, parameter studies of the optimum beam-injection tangency radius and toroidal injection location, and loss patterns of beam ions on the vacuum chamber wall to assist placement of wall armor and for minimizing the generation of impurities by the energetic beam ions. Finally, subsequent upgrades could add an additional 6 MW of radio-frequency heating by mode-conversion ion-Bernstein wave (MCIBW) heating, and if desired as possible future upgrades, the design also will accommodate high-harmonic fast-wave and electron-cyclotron heating. The initial MCIBW heating technique and the design of the radio-frequency system lend themselves to current drive, so that if current drive became desirable for any reason only minor modifications to the heating system described here would be needed. The radio-frequency system will also be capable of localized ion heating (bulk or tail), and possibly ion-Bernstein-wave-generated sheared flows.

  2. NCSX Plasma Heating Methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kugel, H. W.; Spong, D.; Majeski, R.; Zarnstorff, M.

    2008-01-18

    The National Compact Stellarator Experiment (NCSX) has been designed to accommodate a variety of heating systems, including ohmic heating, neutral beam injection, and radio-frequency (rf). Neutral beams will provide one of the primary heating methods for NCSX. In addition to plasma heating, neutral beams are also expected to provide a means for external control over the level of toroidal plasma rotation velocity and its profile. The experimental plan requires 3 MW of 50-keV balanced neutral beam tangential injection with pulse lengths of 500 ms for initial experiments, to be upgradeable to pulse lengths of 1.5 s. Subsequent upgrades will add 3MW of neutral beam injection (NBI). This paper discusses the NCSX NBI requirements and design issues and shows how these are provided by the candidate PBX-M NBI system. In addition, estimations are given for beam heating efficiencies, scaling of heating efficiency with machine size and magnetic field level, parameter studies of the optimum beam injection tangency radius and toroidal injection location, and loss patterns of beam ions on the vacuum chamber wall to assist placement of wall armor and for minimizing the generation of impurities by the energetic beam ions. Finally, subsequent upgrades could add an additional 6 MW of rf heating by mode conversion ion Bernstein wave (MCIBW) heating, and if desired as possible future upgrades, the design also will accommodate high-harmonic fast-wave and electron cyclotron heating. The initial MCIBW heating technique and the design of the rf system lend themselves to current drive, so if current drive became desirable for any reason, only minor modifications to the heating system described here would be needed. The rf system will also be capable of localized ion heating (bulk or tail), and possiblyIBW-generated sheared flows.

  3. Plasma-heating by induction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrington, K.; Thorpe, M. L.

    1969-01-01

    Induction-heated plasma torch operates with an input of 1 Mw of direct current of which 71 percent is transferred to the plasma and the remainder is consumed by electrical losses in the system. Continuous operation of the torch should be possible for as long as 5,000 hours.

  4. Plasma heating by electric field compression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avinash, K; Kaw, P K

    2014-05-09

    Plasma heating by compression of electric fields is proposed. It is shown that periodic cycles of external compression followed by the free expansion of electric fields in the plasma cause irreversible, collisionless plasma heating and corresponding entropy generation. As a demonstration of general ideas and scalings, the heating is shown in the case of a dusty plasma, where electric fields are created due to the presence of charged dust. The method is expected to work in the cases of compression of low frequency or dc electric fields created by other methods. Applications to high power laser heating of plasmas using this scheme are discussed.

  5. Inductance of rf-wave-heated plasmas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farshi, E; Todo, Y

    2003-03-14

    The inductance of rf-wave-heated plasmas is derived. This inductance represents the inductance of fast electrons located in a plateau during their acceleration due to electric field or deceleration due to collisions and electric field. This inductance has been calculated for small electric fields from the two-dimensional Fokker-Planck equation as the flux crossing the surface of critical energy mv(2)(ph)/2 in the velocity space. The new expression may be important for radio-frequency current drive ramp-up, current drive efficiency, current profile control, and so on in tokamaks. This inductance may be incorporated into transport codes that study plasma heating by rf waves.

  6. Plasma Heating of Titan's Exobase and Corona

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karn, M.; Smith, H. T.; Tucker, O. J.; Johnson, R. E.; de La Haye, V.; Waite, J. H.; Young, D. A.

    2007-12-01

    Cassini data have shown that the dominant heating process for Titan's atmospheric corona and exobase region is as yet uncertain (DeLaHaye et al. 2007). We have speculated that the incident plasma, both the slowed and deflected ambient ions and the pick-up ions, may be responsible for all or a significant fraction of the non-thermal component of Titan's corona (De La Haye et al. 2007). Our earlier models of the net incident plasma heating (Michael et al. 2004; 2005) fall short in describing the coronal structure seen by INMS on Ta, Tb and T5. Since heating of the corona and exobase affects atmospheric escape, it is critical for describing the evolution of Titan's atmosphere (Johnson 2004). Here we describe an empirical approach to this problem. INMS data and the preliminary CAPS flux data clearly indicate, not surprisingly, that the heating is spatially non-uniform and is variable, but there is as yet no correlation with the plasma flow models. Therefore, we haev analyzed INMS data for the atmospheric structure near the exobase for a large number of Cassini passes through the exobase region and we have analyzed certain CAPS data for the plasma flow near the exobase. The goal is to develop a model for the spatial variations in the plasma heating near the exobase with the goal of improving our knowledge of atmospheric escape. De La Haye, V.. et al., JGR 112, A07309, doi:10.1029/2006JA012222, 2007 Johnson, R.E. ApJ 609, L99, 2004 Michael, M., and R. E. Johnson. PSS 53, 1510, 2005. Michael, M., et al. Icarus, 175, 263, 2005.

  7. Plasma heating effects during laser welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, G. K.; Dixon, R. D.

    Laser welding is a relatively low heat input process used in joining precisely machined components with minimum distortion and heat affects to surrounding material. The CO2 (10.6 (MU)m) and Nd-YAG (1.06 (MU)m) lasers are the primary lasers used for welding in industry today. Average powers range up to 20 kW for CO2 and 400 W for Nd-YAG with pulse lengths of milliseconds to continuous wave. Control of the process depends on an understanding of the laser-plasma-material interaction and characterization of the laser beam being used. Inherent plasma formation above the material surface and subsequent modulation of the incident laser radiation directly affect the energy transfer to the target material. The temporal and spatial characteristics of the laser beam affect the available power density incident on the target, which is important in achieving repeatability in the process. Other factors such as surface texture, surface contaminants, surface chemistry, and welding environment affect plasma formation which determines the weld penetration. This work involves studies of the laser-plasma-material interaction process and particularly the effect of the plasma on the coupling of laser energy to a material during welding. A pulsed Nd-YAG laser was used with maximum average power of 400 W.

  8. Radiation Heat Waves in Gold Plasma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG Jia-Min; XU Yan; DING Yao-Nan; LAI Dong-Xian; DING Yong-Kun; JIANG Shao-En; ZHENG Zhi-Jian; MIAO Wen-Yong

    2003-01-01

    Eight beams 0.35/um laser with pulse duration of about 1.0ns and energy of 260 J per beam was injected into a cylindrical cavity to generate intense x-ray radiation on the "Shengguang I" high power laser facility. Gold foils with a thickness in the range of 0.09-0.52/j,m were attached on the diagnostic hole of the cavity and ablated by the intense x-ray radiation. The propagating radiation heat wave in the high-Z gold plasma was observed clearly. For comparison, we also simulated the experimental results.

  9. Transient flow and heating characteristics in a pinched plasma column.

    Science.gov (United States)

    York, T. M.; Stover, E. K.

    1972-01-01

    The generation of axial flow and heating of an argon plasma in a pinched plasma column of a pulsed, linear z-pinch device was examined experimentally and analytically. Transient (about 5 microsec) axial pressure profiles identify three characteristic periods in the column history. These include (1) strong axial pressure asymmetry indicative of plasma streaming, (2) isotropic, rapidly rising plasma pressure indicative of plasma heating, and (3) column breakup. An efficient conversion of radial collapse to axial streaming velocity is identified. Mechanisms for such an effect and subsequent heating are evaluated; significance to transients in pulsed plasma accelerators is identified.

  10. Behaviors of Electron Heat Transportation in HT-7 Sawtoothing Plasma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hu Liqun; Xu Yi; Wan Baonian; Shi Yuejiang; Zhen Xiangjun; Chen Zhongyong; Lin Shiyao; HT-7 Team

    2005-01-01

    It is found that in HT-7 ohmic plasma, main energy loss comes from electron heat conduction, hence quantitative data of electron heat diffusivity is a very important issue for investigation of electron heat transportation behavior in different target plasmas so as to get high performance plasma. A time-to-peak method of the heat pulse propagation originating from the sawtooth activity on the soft x-ray intensity signal has been adopted to experimentally determine electron heat diffusivity XHPe on the HT-7 tokamak. Aiming to improve the signal-to-noise (S/N)ratio of the original signal to get a stable and reasonable electron heat diffusivity XHDe value, some data processing methods, including average of tens of sawteeth, is discussed. The electron heat diffusivity XHPe is larger than XPBe which is determined from the balance of background plasma power. Based on variation of the measured electron heat diffusivity XHPe, performances of different high confinement plasmas are analyzed.

  11. Cathode heating mechanisms in pseudospark plasma switches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sommerer, Timothy J.; Pak, Hoyoung; Kushner, Mark J.

    1992-10-01

    Pseudosparks, and the back-lighted thyratron (BLT) in particular, are finding increasing application as pulse power switches. An attractive feature of BLTs is that high current densities (≥ tens of kA cm-2) can be sustained from metal cathodes without auxiliary heating. The source of this current is believed to be electric-field-enhanced thermionic emission resulting from heating of the cathode by ion bombardment during commutation which ultimately melts the surface of the cathode. It is proposed that a photon-driven ionization mechanism in the interelectrode gap of the BLT is responsible for initiating the observed patterns of cathode surface melting and electron emission. A 21/2-dimensional computer model is presented that incorporates a photo-induced ionization mechanism to spread the plasma into the interelectrode gap. It predicts a melting of the cathode in a pattern similar to that which is experimentally observed, and predicts a rate of field-enhanced thermionic electron emission that is sufficient to explain the high BLT conduction current density. In the absence of these mechanisms, the model does not predict the observed large-area melting of the face of the cathode. The cathode heating rate during the BLT switching phase is maximum for operating parameters that are very close to the limit for which the switch will close (that is, the smallest possible pressure-electrode spacing product and smallest possible electrode holes).

  12. Plasma heating via adiabatic magnetic compression-expansion cycle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avinash, K.; Sengupta, M.; Ganesh, R.

    2016-06-01

    Heating of collisionless plasmas in closed adiabatic magnetic cycle comprising of a quasi static compression followed by a non quasi static constrained expansion against a constant external pressure is proposed. Thermodynamic constraints are derived to show that the plasma always gains heat in cycles having at least one non quasi static process. The turbulent relaxation of the plasma to the equilibrium state at the end of the non quasi static expansion is discussed and verified via 1D Particle in Cell (PIC) simulations. Applications of this scheme to heating plasmas in open configurations (mirror machines) and closed configurations (tokamak, reverse field pinche) are discussed.

  13. PECULIAR FEATURES OF ELECTROLYTIC-PLASMA HEATING DURING ELECTROCHEMICAL HEAT-TREATMENT OF STEEL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu. Alekseev

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Thermo-physical peculiar features of  anode electrolytic-plasma heating applied for heat and chemical heat-treatment have been investigated in the paper. The paper presents  results of the investigations pertaining  to influence of the operating voltage on current density, temperature and heating rate, heating power and  changes in heat portion passing to the anode. Peculiar features of layer formation which are hardened  by electrolytic-plasma carburizing  have been presented in the paper.

  14. Heat conduction in 2D strongly-coupled dusty plasmas

    CERN Document Server

    Hou, Lu-Jing

    2008-01-01

    We perform non-equilibrium simulations to study heat conduction in two-dimensional strongly coupled dusty plasmas. Temperature gradients are established by heating one part of the otherwise equilibrium system to a higher temperature. Heat conductivity is measured directly from the stationary temperature profile and heat flux. Particular attention is paid to the influence of damping effect on the heat conduction. It is found that the heat conductivity increases with the decrease of the damping rate, while its magnitude confirms previous experimental measurement.

  15. Plasma Heating Suring a Coronal Mass Ejection Observed by SOHO

    CERN Document Server

    Murphy, N A; Korreck, K E

    2011-01-01

    We perform a time-dependent ionization analysis to constrain plasma heating requirements during a fast partial halo coronal mass ejection (CME) observed on 2000 June 28 by the Ultraviolet Coronagraph Spectrometer (UVCS) aboard the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO). We use two methods to derive densities from the UVCS measurements, including a density sensitive O V line ratio at 1213.85 and 1218.35 Angstroms, and radiative pumping of the O VI 1032,1038 doublet by chromospheric emission lines. The most strongly constrained feature shows cumulative plasma heating comparable to or greater than the kinetic energy, while features observed earlier during the event show cumulative plasma heating comparable to or less than the kinetic energy. SOHO Michelson Doppler Imager (MDI) observations are used to estimate the active region magnetic energy. We consider candidate plasma heating mechanisms and provide constraints when possible. Because this CME was associated with a relatively weak flare, the contribution b...

  16. Observations of rotation in JET plasmas with electron heating by ion cyclotron resonance heating

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hellsten, T.; Johnson, T. J.; Van Eester, D.; Lerche, E.; Lin, Y.; Mayoral, M. L.; Ongena, J.; Calabro, G.; Crombe, K.; Frigione, D.; Giroud, C.; Lennholm, M.; Mantica, P.; Nave, M. F. F.; Naulin, V.; Sozzi, C.; Studholme, W.; Tala, T.; Versloot, T.

    2012-01-01

    The rotation of L-mode plasmas in the JET tokamak heated by waves in the ion cyclotron range of frequencies (ICRF) damped on electrons, is reported. The plasma in the core is found to rotate in the counter-current direction with a high shear and in the outer part of the plasma with an almost constan

  17. Temporal structure of double plasma frequency emission of thin beam-heated plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Postupaev, V. V.; Ivanov, I. A.; Arzhannikov, A. V.; Vyacheslavov, L. N. [Budker Institute of Nuclear Physics, 11 Lavrentjev Avenue, 630090 Novosibirsk (Russian Federation); Novosibirsk State University, 2 Pirogova st., 630090 Novosibirsk (Russian Federation); Burdakov, A. V.; Polosatkin, S. V. [Budker Institute of Nuclear Physics, 11 Lavrentjev Avenue, 630090 Novosibirsk (Russian Federation); Novosibirsk State Technical University, 20 Karl Marks Avenue, 630092 Novosibirsk (Russian Federation); Sklyarov, V. F.; Gavrilenko, D. Ye.; Kandaurov, I. V.; Kurkuchekov, V. V.; Mekler, K. I.; Popov, S. S.; Rovenskikh, A. F.; Sudnikov, A. V.; Sulyaev, Yu. S.; Trunev, Yu. A. [Budker Institute of Nuclear Physics, 11 Lavrentjev Avenue, 630090 Novosibirsk (Russian Federation); Kasatov, A. A. [Novosibirsk State University, 2 Pirogova st., 630090 Novosibirsk (Russian Federation)

    2013-09-15

    In the work presented here dynamics of spiky microwave emission of a beam-heated plasma near the double plasma frequency in ∼100 GHz band was studied. The plasma is heated by 80 keV, ∼2 MW, sub-ms electron beam that is injected into the multiple-mirror trap GOL-3. The beam-heated plasma diameter is of the order of the emitted wavelength. Modulation of individual emission spikes in the microwave radiation is found. The radiation dynamics observed can be attributed to a small number of compact emitting zones that are periodically distorted.

  18. Measurement of Heat Propagation in a Laser Produced Plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gregori, G; Glenzer, S H; Knight, J; Niemann, C; Price, D; Froula, D H; Edwards, J; Town, R P J; Brantov, A; Bychenkov, V Y; Rozmus, W

    2003-08-22

    We present the observation of a nonlocal heat wave by measuring spatially and temporally resolved electron temperature profiles in a laser produced nitrogen plasma. Absolutely calibrated measurements have been performed by resolving the ion-acoustic wave spectra across the plasma volume with Thomson scattering. We find that the experimental electron temperature profiles disagree with flux-limited models, but are consistent with transport models that account for the nonlocal effects in heat conduction by fast electrons.

  19. Electron Cyclotron Resonance Heating of a High-Density Plasma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, F. Ramskov

    1986-01-01

    Various schemes for electron cyclotron resonance heating of tokamak plasmas with the ratio of electron plasma frequency to electron cyclotron frequency, "»pe/^ce* larger than 1 on axis, are investigated. In particular, a mode conversion scheme is investigated using ordinary waves at the fundamental...

  20. Theory of nonlocal heat transport in fully ionized plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maximov, A.V. (Tesla Labs., Inc., La Jolla, CA (United States)); Silin, V.P. (P.N. Lebedev Inst., Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow (Russia))

    1993-01-25

    A new analytic solution of the electron kinetic equation describing the interacting of the electromagnetic heating field with plasma is obtained in the region of plasma parameters where the Spitzer-Harm classical theory is invalid. A novel expression for the nonlocal electron thermal conductivity is derived. (orig.).

  1. Interaction of adhered metallic dust with transient plasma heat loads

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ratynskaia, S.; Tolias, P.; I. Bykov,; Rudakov, D.; de Angeli, M.; Vignitchouk, L.; Ripamonti, D.; Riva, G.; Bardin, S.; van der Meiden, H.; Vernimmen, J.; Bystrov, K.; De Temmerman, G.

    2016-01-01

    The first study of the interaction of metallic dust (tungsten, aluminum) adhered on tungsten substrates with transient plasma heat loads is presented. Experiments were carried out in the Pilot-PSI linear device with transient heat fluxes up to 550 MW m −2 and in the DIII-D divertor tokamak. The cent

  2. Investigation of electron heating in laser-plasma interaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A Parvazian

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available  In this paper, stimulated Raman scattering (SRS and electron heating in laser plasma propagating along the plasma fusion is investigated by particle-in cell simulation. Applying an external magnetic field to plasma, production of whistler waves and electron heating associated with whistler waves in the direction perpendicular to external magnetic field was observed in this simulation. The plasma waves with low phase velocities, generated in backward-SRS and dominateing initially in time and space, accelerated the backward electrons by trapping them. Then these electrons promoted to higher energies by the forward-SRS plasma waves with high phase velocities. This tow-stage electron acceleration is more efficient due to the coexistence of these two instabilities.

  3. High heat flux plasma generator for new divertor plasma simulator in Nagoya University

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Narita, S.; Ezumi, N.; Ohno, N.; Uesugi, Y.; Takamura, S. [Nagoya Univ. (Japan)

    1997-12-31

    A new divertor simulator called NAGDIS-II has been constructed in order to investigate edge plasma physics in fusion devices. Improved TP-D type plasma source, which consists of LaB{sub 6} cathode with a Mo hollow shield and external heating system, water-cooled intermediate electrode and anode was employed to make a high density plasma in the NAGDIS-II. The performance and reliability of the discharge system was confirmed by quantitatively measuring neutral pressure, heating efficiency and plasma parameters. (author)

  4. Predicting high harmonic ion cyclotron heating efficiency in Tokamak plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Green, David L [ORNL; Jaeger, E. F. [XCEL; Berry, Lee A [ORNL; Chen, Guangye [ORNL; Ryan, Philip Michael [ORNL; Canik, John [ORNL

    2011-01-01

    Observations of improved radio frequency (RF) heating efficiency in high-confinement (H-) mode plasmas on the National Spherical Tokamak Experiment (NSTX) are investigated by whole-device linear simulation. We present the first full-wave simulation to couple kinetic physics of the well confined core plasma to the poorly confined scrape-off plasma. The new simulation is used to scan the launched fast-wave spectrum and examine the steady-state electric wave field structure for experimental scenarios corresponding to both reduced, and improved RF heating efficiency. We find that launching toroidal wave-numbers that required for fast-wave propagation excites large amplitude (kVm 1 ) coaxial standing modes in the wave electric field between the confined plasma density pedestal and conducting vessel wall. Qualitative comparison with measurements of the stored plasma energy suggest these modes are a probable cause of degraded heating efficiency. Also, the H-mode density pedestal and fast-wave cutoff within the confined plasma allow for the excitation of whispering gallery type eigenmodes localised to the plasma edge.

  5. Particle model for nonlocal heat transport in fusion plasmas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bufferand, H; Ciraolo, G; Ghendrih, Ph; Lepri, S; Livi, R

    2013-02-01

    We present a simple stochastic, one-dimensional model for heat transfer in weakly collisional media as fusion plasmas. Energies of plasma particles are treated as lattice random variables interacting with a rate inversely proportional to their energy schematizing a screened Coulomb interaction. We consider both the equilibrium (microcanonical) and nonequilibrium case in which the system is in contact with heat baths at different temperatures. The model exhibits a characteristic length of thermalization that can be associated with an interaction mean free path and one observes a transition from ballistic to diffusive regime depending on the average energy of the system. A mean-field expression for heat flux is deduced from system heat transport properties. Finally, it is shown that the nonequilibrium steady state is characterized by long-range correlations.

  6. Baseline high heat flux and plasma facing materials for fusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ueda, Y.; Schmid, K.; Balden, M.; Coenen, J. W.; Loewenhoff, Th.; Ito, A.; Hasegawa, A.; Hardie, C.; Porton, M.; Gilbert, M.

    2017-09-01

    In fusion reactors, surfaces of plasma facing components (PFCs) are exposed to high heat and particle flux. Tungsten and Copper alloys are primary candidates for plasma facing materials (PFMs) and coolant tube materials, respectively, mainly due to high thermal conductivity and, in the case of tungsten, its high melting point. In this paper, recent understandings and future issues on responses of tungsten and Cu alloys to fusion environments (high particle flux (including T and He), high heat flux, and high neutron doses) are reviewed. This review paper includes; Tritium retention in tungsten (K. Schmid and M. Balden), Impact of stationary and transient heat loads on tungsten (J.W. Coenen and Th. Loewenhoff), Helium effects on surface morphology of tungsten (Y. Ueda and A. Ito), Neutron radiation effects in tungsten (A. Hasegawa), and Copper and copper alloys development for high heat flux components (C. Hardie, M. Porton, and M. Gilbert).

  7. MHD discontinuities in solar flares: continuous transitions and plasma heating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ledentsov, Leonid; Somov, Boris

    The conservation laws on a surface of discontinuity in the ideal magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) allow changing a discontinuity type with gradual (continuous) changes in conditions of plasma. Then there are the so-called transition solutions that satisfy simultaneously two types of discontinuities. We obtain all transition solutions on the basis of a complete system of boundary conditions for the MHD equations. We also found an expression describing a jump of internal energy of the plasma flowing through the discontinuity. It allows, firstly, to construct a generalized scheme of possible transitions between MHD discontinuities, and secondly, to examine the dependence of plasma heating by plasma density and configuration of the magnetic field near the surface of the discontinuity (i.e., by the type of the MHD discontinuity). The problem of the heating of "superhot" plasma (with the electron temperature is greater than 10 keV) in solar flares are discussed. It is shown that the best conditions for heating are carried out in the vicinity of the reconnecting current layer near the areas of reverse currents. Bibl.: B.V.Somov. Plasma Astrophysics, Part II: Reconnection and Flares, Second Edition. (New York: Springer SBM, 2013).

  8. Relativistic heat conduction and thermoelectric properties of nonuniform plasmas

    CERN Document Server

    Honda, M

    2003-01-01

    Relativistic heat transport in electron-two-temperature plasmas with density gradients has been investigated. The Legendre expansion analysis of relativistically modified kinetic equations shows that strong inhibition of heat flux appears in relativistic temperature regimes, suppressing the classical Spitzer-H{\\"a}rm conduction. The Seebeck coefficient, the Wiedemann-Franz law, and the thermoelectric figure of merit are derived in the relativistic regimes.

  9. ICRF heating of deuterium-tritium plasmas in TFTR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taylor, G.; Murakami, M.; Adler, H.

    1995-03-01

    The first experiments to heat D-T plasmas in the ion cyclotron range of frequencies (ICRF) have been performed on the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR). These experiments have two major objectives: to study the RF physics of ICRF-heated D-T plasmas and to enhance the performance of D-T discharges. Experiments have been conducted at 43 MHz with out-of-phase current strap excitation to explore n{sub T}/n{sub e} concentrations up to approximately 40%. In these experiments n{sub T}/n{sub e} was limited by D recycling from the carbon walls. The location of the T resonance was varied by changing the toroidal magnetic field, and the RF power was modulated (f{sub mod}=5-10 Hz) to elucidate competing heating mechanisms. Up to 5.8 MW of ICRF heating has been coupled into D-T plasmas. The addition of 5.5 MW of ICRF heating to a D-T supershot resulted in an increase in central ion temperature from 26 to 36 keV and an increase in central electron temperature from 8 to 10.5 keV. Up to 80% of the absorbed ICRF power was coupled directly to ions, in good agreement with computer code predictions. These results extrapolate to efficient T heating in future devices such as ITER.

  10. Electron cyclotron resonance heating in a short cylindrical plasma system

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Vipin K Yadav; D Bora

    2004-09-01

    Electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) plasma is produced and studied in a small cylindrical system. Microwave power is delivered by a CW magnetron at 2.45 GHz in TE10 mode and launched radially to have extraordinary (X) wave in plasma. The axial magnetic field required for ECR in the system is such that the first two ECR surfaces ( = 875.0 G and = 437.5 G) reside in the system. ECR plasma is produced with hydrogen with typical plasma density e as 3.2 × 1010 cm-3 and plasma temperature e between 9 and 15 eV. Various cut-off and resonance positions are identified in the plasma system. ECR heating (ECRH) of the plasma is observed experimentally. This heating is because of the mode conversion of X-wave to electron Bernstein wave (EBW) at the upper hybrid resonance (UHR) layer. The power mode conversion efficiency is estimated to be 0.85 for this system. The experimental results are presented in this paper.

  11. Observations of rotation in JET plasmas with electron heating by ion cyclotron resonance heating

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hellsten, T.; Johnson, T. J.; Van Eester, D.

    2012-01-01

    The rotation of L-mode plasmas in the JET tokamak heated by waves in the ion cyclotron range of frequencies (ICRF) damped on electrons, is reported. The plasma in the core is found to rotate in the counter-current direction with a high shear and in the outer part of the plasma with an almost...... constant angular rotation. The core rotation is stronger in magnitude than observed for scenarios with dominating ion cyclotron absorption. Two scenarios are considered: the inverted mode conversion scenarios and heating at the second harmonic He-3 cyclotron resonance in H plasmas. In the latter case......, electron absorption of the fast magnetosonic wave by transit time magnetic pumping and electron Landau damping (TTMP/ELD) is the dominating absorption mechanism. Inverted mode conversion is done in (He-3)-H plasmas where the mode converted waves are essentially absorbed by electron Landau damping. Similar...

  12. Heat Transport Effects in Rotating Gases and Plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolmes, Elijah; Geyko, Vasily; Fisch, Nathaniel

    2016-10-01

    In some contexts, rotating gases and plasmas exhibit heat transport effects that are substantially different from what would be found in the absence of rotation. For instance, a Ranque-Hilsch vortex tube is a device which separates an input stream of (neutral) gas into hot and cold streams by setting up a rotating flow in a specially designed cylindrical chamber. One class of vortex tube models involves radial motion that carries gas up and down the pressure gradients set up by the centrifugal potential inside the tube and which results in adiabatic heating and cooling of the radially moving material. The approach of producing heat transport in a rotating flow using pressure gradients and motion along those gradients may have applications in plasma systems. We discuss possible applications for rotational heat transport effects in plasma systems, including Z-pinch configurations. Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory; U.S. Defense Reduction Agency Grant No. HDTRA1-11-1-0037; and the NNSA SSAA Program through DOE Research Grant No. DE-NA0002948.

  13. Plasma heating via electron Bernstein wave heating using ordinary and extraodinary mode

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Parvazian

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Magnetically confined plasma can be heated with high power microwave sources. In spherical torus the electron plasma frequency exeeds the electron cyclotron frequency (EC and, as a consequence, electromagnetic waves at fundamental and low harmonic EC cannot propagate within the plasma. In contrast, electron Bernstein waves (EBWs readily propagate in spherical torus plasma and are absorbed strongly at the electron cyclotron resonances. In order to proagate EBWs beyond the upper hybrid resonance (UHR, that surrounds the plasma, the EBWs must convert via one of two processes to either ordinary (O-mode or extraordinary (X-mode electromagnetic waves. O-mode and X-mode electromagnetic waves lunched at the plasma edge can convert to the electron Bernstein waves (EBWs which can propagate without and cut-off into the core of the plasma and damp on electrons. Since the electron Bernstein wave (EBW has no cut-off limits, it is well suited to heat an over-dense plasma by resonant absorption. An important problem is to calculate mode conversion coefficient that is very sensitive to density. Mode conversion coefficient depends on Budden parameter ( ñ and density scale length (Ln in upper hybrid resonance (UHR. In Mega Ampere Spherical Tokamak (MAST, the optimized conversion efficiency approached 72.5% when Ln was 4.94 cm and the magnetic field was 0.475 Tesla in the core of the plasma.

  14. MHD discontinuities in solar flares: continuous transitions and plasma heating

    CERN Document Server

    Ledentsov, L S

    2015-01-01

    The boundary conditions for the ideal MHD equations on a plane dis- continuity surface are investigated. It is shown that, for a given mass flux through a discontinuity, its type depends only on the relation between inclina- tion angles of a magnetic field. Moreover, the conservation laws on a surface of discontinuity allow changing a discontinuity type with gradual (continu- ous) changes in the conditions of plasma flow. Then there are the so-called transition solutions that satisfy simultaneously two types of discontinuities. We obtain all transition solutions on the basis of the complete system of boundary conditions for the MHD equations. We also found the expression describing a jump of internal energy of the plasma flowing through the dis- continuity. Firstly, this allows constructing a generalized scheme of possible continuous transitions between MHD discontinuities. Secondly, it enables the examination of the dependence of plasma heating by plasma density and configuration of the magnetic field near t...

  15. Characterization of the Inductively Heated Plasma Source IPG6-B

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dropmann, Michael; Laufer, Rene; Herdrich, Georg; Matthews, Lorin; Hyde, Truell

    2014-10-01

    In close collaboration between the Center for Astrophysics, Space Physics and Engineering Research (CASPER) at Baylor University, Texas, and the Institute of Space Systems (IRS) at the University of Stuttgart, Germany, two plasma facilities have been established using the Inductively heated Plasma Generator 6 (IPG6). The facility at Baylor University (IPG6-B) works at a frequency of 13.56 MHz and a maximum power of 15 kW. A vacuum pump of 160 m3/h in combination with a butterfly valve allows pressure control over a wide range. Intended fields of research include basic investigation into thermo-chemistry and plasma radiation, space plasma environments and high heat fluxes e.g. those found in fusion devices or during atmospheric re-entry of spacecraft. After moving the IPG6-B facility to the Baylor Research and Innovation Collaborative (BRIC) it was placed back into operation during the summer of 2014. Initial characterization in the new lab, using a heat flux probe, Pitot probe and cavity calorimeter, has been conducted for Air, Argon and Helium. The results of this characterization are presented.

  16. Particle Acceleration and Plasma Heating in the Chromosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaitsev, V. V.; Stepanov, A. V.

    2015-12-01

    We propose a new mechanism of electron acceleration and plasma heating in the solar chromosphere, based on the magnetic Rayleigh-Taylor instability. The instability develops at the chromospheric footpoints of a flare loop and deforms the local magnetic field. As a result, the electric current in the loop varies, and a resulting inductive electric field appears. A pulse of the induced electric field, together with the pulse of the electric current, propagates along the loop with the Alfvén velocity and begins to accelerate electrons up to an energy of about 1 MeV. Accelerated particles are thermalized in the dense layers of the chromosphere with the plasma density n ≈10^{14} - 10^{15} cm^{-3}, heating them to a temperature of about several million degrees. Joule dissipation of the electric current pulse heats the chromosphere at heights that correspond to densities n ≤10^{11} - 10^{13} cm^{-3}. Observations with the New Solar Telescope at Big Bear Solar Observatory indicate that chromospheric footpoints of coronal loops might be heated to coronal temperatures and that hot plasma might be injected upwards, which brightens ultra-fine loops from the photosphere to the base of the corona. Thereby, recent observations of the Sun and the model we propose stimulate a déjà vu - they are reminiscent of the concept of the chromospheric flare.

  17. Cryogenic heat loads analysis from SST-1 plasma experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bairagi, N.; Tanna, V. L.; Pradhan, S.

    2017-02-01

    Cryogenic heat load analysis is an important aspect for stable operation of Tokamaks employing large scale superconducting magnets. Steady State Superconducting Tokamak (SST-1) at IPR is equipped with superconducting magnets system (SCMS) comprising sixteen numbers of modified ‘D’ shaped toroidal field (TF) and nine poloidal field (PF) superconducting coils which are wound using NbTi/Cu based cable-in conduit conductor (CICC). SST-1 magnets operation has flexibility to cool either in two-phase with sub-cooling, two-phase without sub-cooling or single phase (supercritical) helium using a dedicated 1.3 kW helium refrigerator cum liquefier (HRL). Here, we report gross heat losses for integrated TF superconducting magnets of SST-1 during the plasma campaign using cryogenic helium supply/return thermodynamic data from cryoplant. Heat loads mainly comprising of steady state as well as transient loads are smoothly absorbed by SST-1 cryogenic helium plant during plasma experiments. The corresponding heat produced in the coils is totally released to the helium flowing through the TF coils, which in turn is dumped into liquid helium stored in main control Dewar. These results are very useful reference for heat loss analysis for TF as well as PF coils and provides database for future operation of SST-1 machine.

  18. Entropy production and inward heat pinch of plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Itoh, Kimitaka [National Inst. for Fusion Science, Nagoya (Japan); Itoh, Sanae

    1996-02-01

    Heat pinch phenomena in the plasma with peripheral heating is discussed from the view point of thermodynamics. The entropy production rate associated with inward energy flow in the presence of energy exchange between electrons and ions is calculated. The inward energy flow can increase the total entropy production rate. It is conjectured that the outward energy flow of colder species (say ions) could sustain the energy flux of hotter species (say electrons) in the core, which flows into the direction of higher temperature. (author)

  19. Study of Volumetrically Heated Ultra-High Energy Density Plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rocca, Jorge J. [Colorado State Univ., Fort Collins, CO (United States)

    2016-10-27

    Heating dense matter to millions of degrees is important for applications, but requires complex and expensive methods. The major goal of the project was to demonstrate using a compact laser the creation of a new ultra-high energy density plasma regime characterized by simultaneous extremely high temperature and high density, and to study it combining experimental measurements and advanced simulations. We have demonstrated that trapping of intense femtosecond laser pulses deep within ordered nanowire arrays can heat near solid density matter into a new ultra hot plasma regime. Extreme electron densities, and temperatures of several tens of million degrees were achieved using laser pulses of only 0.5 J energy from a compact laser. Our x-ray spectra and simulations showed that extremely highly ionized plasma volumes several micrometers in depth are generated by irradiation of gold and Nickel nanowire arrays with femtosecond laser pulses of relativistic intensities. We obtained extraordinarily high degrees of ionization (e.g. we peeled 52 electrons from gold atoms, and up to 26 electrons from nickel atoms). In the process we generated Gigabar pressures only exceeded in the central hot spot of highly compressed thermonuclear fusion plasmas.. The plasma created after the dissolved wires expand, collide, and thermalize, is computed to have a thermal energy density of 0.3 GJ cm-3 and a pressure of 1-2 Gigabar. These are pressures only exceeded in highly compressed thermonuclear fusion plasmas. Scaling these results to higher laser intensities promises to create plasmas with temperatures and pressures exceeding those in the center of the sun.

  20. Geodesic acoustic mode in anisotropic plasma with heat flux

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ren, Haijun, E-mail: hjren@ustc.edu.cn [CAS Key Laboratory of Geospace Environment and Department of Modern Physics, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei 230026 (China)

    2015-10-15

    Geodesic acoustic mode (GAM) in an anisotropic tokamak plasma is investigated in fluid approximation. The collisionless anisotropic plasma is described within the 16-momentum magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) fluid closure model, which takes into account not only the pressure anisotropy but also the anisotropic heat flux. It is shown that the GAM frequency agrees better with the kinetic result than the standard Chew-Goldberger-Low (CGL) MHD model. When zeroing the anisotropy, the 16-momentum result is identical with the kinetic one to the order of 1/q{sup 2}, while the CGL result agrees with the kinetic result only on the leading order. The discrepancies between the results of the CGL fluid model and the kinetic theory are well removed by considering the heat flux effect in the fluid approximation.

  1. Compound sawtooth study in ohmically heated TFTR plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamada, H.; McGuire, K.; Colchin, D.; Efthimion, P.C.; Fredrickson, E.; Hill, K.; Kiraly, J.; Pare, V.; Taylor, G.; Sauthoff, N.

    1985-09-01

    Compound sawtooth activity has been observed in ohmically heated, high current, high density TFTR plasmas. Commonly called ''double sawteeth,'' such sequences consist of a repetitive series of subordinate relaxations followed by a main relaxation with a different inversion radius. The period of such compound sawteeth can be as long as 100 msec. In other cases, however, no compound sawteeth or bursts of them can be observed in discharges with essentially the same parameters.

  2. Alpha Heating and Burning Plasmas in Inertial Confinement Fusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Betti, R.; Christopherson, A. R.; Bose, A.; Woo, K. M.

    2016-05-01

    Assessing the degree to which fusion alpha particles contribute to the fusion yield is essential to understanding the onset of the thermal runaway process of thermonuclear ignition. It is shown that in inertial confinement fusion, the yield enhancement due to alpha particle heating (before ignition occurs) depends on the generalized Lawson parameter that can be inferred from experimental observables. A universal curve valid for arbitrary laser-fusion targets shows the yield amplification due to alpha heating for a given value of the Lawson parameter. The same theory is used to determine the onset of the burning plasma regime when the alpha heating exceeds the compression work. This result can be used to assess the performance of current ignition experiments at the National Ignition Facility.

  3. Inverse bremsstrahlung heating rate for dense plasmas in laser fields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dey, R. [D-203, Samruddhi Residency, Motera, Ahmedabad-380009, Gujarat (India); Roy, A. C. [School of Mathematical Sciences, Ramakrishna Mission Vivekananda University, Belur Math 711202, West Bengal (India)

    2013-07-15

    We report a theoretical analysis of inverse bremsstrahlung heating rate in the eikonal approximation. The present analysis is performed for a dense plasma using the screened electron-ion interaction potential for the ion charge state Z{sub i} = 1 and for both the weak and strong plasma screening cases. We have also compared the eikonal results with the first Born approximation (FBA) [M. Moll et al., New J. Phys. 14, 065010 (2012)] calculation. We find that the magnitudes of inverse bremsstrahlung heating rate within the eikonal approximation (EA) are larger than the FBA values in the weak screening case (κ = 0.03 a.u.) in a wide range of field strength for three different initial electron momenta (2, 3, and 4 a.u.). But for strong screening case (κ = 0.3 a.u.), the heating rates predicted by the two approximations do not differ much after reaching their maximum values. Furthermore, the individual contribution of photoemission and photoabsorption processes to heating rate is analysed for both the weak and strong screening cases. We find that the single photoemission and photoabsorption rates are the same throughout the field strength while the multiphoton absorption process dominates over the multiphoton emission process beyond the field strength ≈ 4×10{sup 8} V/cm. The present study of the dependence of heating rate on the screening parameter ranging from 0.01 to 20 shows that whereas the heating rate predicted by the EA is greater than the FBA up to the screening parameter κ = 0.3 a.u., the two approximation methods yield results which are nearly identical beyond the above value.

  4. Versatile and Rapid Plasma Heating Device for Steel and Aluminum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reddy, G.S.

    2006-03-14

    The main objective of the research was to enhance steel and aluminum manufacturing with the development of a new plasma RPD device. During the project (1) plasma devices were manufactured (2) testing for the two metals were carried out and (3) market development strategies were explored. Bayzi Corporation has invented a Rapid Plasma Device (RPD) which produces plasma, comprising of a mixture of ionized gas and free electrons. The ions, when they hit a conducting surface, deposit heat in addition to the convective heat. Two generic models called the RPD-Al and RPD-S have been developed for the aluminum market and the steel market. Aluminum melting rates increased to as high as 12.7 g/s compared to 3 g/s of the current industrial practice. The RPD melting furnace operated at higher energy efficiency of 65% unlike most industrial processes operating in the range of 13 to 50%. The RPD aluminum melting furnace produced environment friendly cleaner melts with less than 1% dross. Dross is the residue in the furnace after the melt is poured out. Cast ingots were extremely clean and shining. Current practices produce dross in the range of 3 to 12%. The RPD furnace uses very low power ~0.2 kWh/Lb to melt aluminum. RPDs operate in one atmosphere using ambient air to produce plasma while the conventional systems use expensive gases like argon, or helium in air-tight chambers. RPDs are easy to operate and do not need intensive capital investment. Narrow beam, as well as wide area plasma have been developed for different applications. An RPD was developed for thermal treatments of steels. Two different applications have been pursued. Industrial air hardening steel knife edges were subjected to plasma beam hardening. Hardness, as measured, indicated uniform distribution without any distortion. The biggest advantage with this method is that the whole part need not be heated in a furnace which will lead to oxidation and distortion. No conventional process will offer localized

  5. Heat Transfer in the Anode Region in Plasma-Electrolytic Heating of a Cylindrical Sample

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhirov, A. V.; Belkin, P. N.; Shadrin, S. Yu.

    2017-07-01

    The energy balance in a three-phase system "anode-vapor/gas envelope-electrolyte" and the results of experimental determination of the heat fluxes acting in the vapor-gas envelope are considered. To determine the fluxes quantitatively, the calorimetric method and the theory of inverse problems of the thermal conductivity of solid bodies are used. It is shown that heat fluxes into the anode and electrolyte increase with the voltage delivered to the electrochemical cell, whereas the heat flux associated with the vapor release to the atmosphere remains practically unchanged. An increase in the concentration of the current-conducting component in the electrolyte leads to a certain growth of the heat flux into the anode and to a decrease of the flux into the electrolyte. The stages of a nonstationary period of the process of plasma-electrolytic heating have been revealed, and it has been established that the time of heating the vapor-gas envelope is several times shorter than the time of heating a sample.

  6. Heat flow effect on the plasma line frequency

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kofman, W.; St.Maurice, J.P. (Centre d' Etude des Phenomenes Aleatories et Geophysique, St. Martin d' Heres (France)); Eyken A.P. van (EISCAT Scientific Association, Ramfjordmoen (Norway))

    1993-04-01

    The authors report on new electron plasma line experiments performed from the Tromso radar station, in the backscatter mode, which means they used the downshifted and upshifted plasma lines. The data were collected in May, 1992, on three days which were very quiet magnetically. They observe a bias between the upshifted and downshifted lines and the calculated results from evaluation of the standard dispersion relations. The authors are able to account for this difference by adding a heat flow term involving electrons to the standard theoretical model. This correction is important if one is looking at systematics in the differences in these two measurement modes with accuracies in the kHz range. It is also a factor of import if one is making measurements in areas where the temperature gradient can be 1 K/km or more.

  7. Plasma-ion Induced Sputtering and Heating of Titan's Atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, R. E.; Tucker, O. J.

    2007-05-01

    Titan is unique among the outer solar system icy satellites in having an atmosphere with a column density about ten times that of the Earth's atmosphere and an atmospheric mass to solid mass ratio comparable to that of Venus. Atmospheres equivalent in size to that at Titan would have been removed from the icy Galilean satellites by the plasma trapped in the Jovian magnetosphere (Johnson 2004). Therefore, the use of Cassini data to determine the present erosion rate of Titan's atmosphere provides an important end point for studying the erosion and heating of planetary and satellite atmospheres by an ambient plasma. In this paper we describe the deposition of energy, the erosion and the expansion of the upper atmosphere of Titan using Direct Simulation Monte Carlo models (Shematovich et al. 2003; Michael et al. 2005; Michael and Johnson 2005). These calculations are used to calibrate semi-empirical models of atmospheric sputtering (Johnson 1994) that are used to interpret Cassini data at Titan. Using a number of plasma conditions, the temperature and density vs. altitude above the exobase and the rate of escape are calculated. References: Johnson, R.E. "Plasma-induced Sputtering of an Atmosphere" in Space Science Reviews 69 215-253 (1994). Johnson. R.E., " The magnetospheric plasmadriven evolution of satellite atmospheres" Astrophys. J. 609, L99-L102 (2004). Michael, M. and R.E. Johnson, "Energy deposition of pickup ions and heating of Titan's atmosphere", Planetary & Space Sci.53, 1510-1514 (2005). Michael M., R.E. Johnson, F. Leblanc, M. Liu, J.G. Luhmann, and V.I. Shematovich, "Ejection of nitrogen from Titan's atmosphere by magnetospheric ions and pick-up ions", Icarus 175, 263-267 (2005). Shematovich, V.I., R.E. Johnson, M. Michael, and J.G. Luhmann, "Nitrogen loss from Titan", JGR 108, No. E8, 5087, doi:10.1029/2003JE002094 (2003).

  8. Electron Heating in a Relativistic, Weibel-Unstable Plasma

    CERN Document Server

    Kumar, Rahul; Gedalin, Michael

    2015-01-01

    The dynamics of two initially unmagnetized relativistic counter-streaming homogeneous ion-electron plasma beams are simulated in two dimensions using the particle-in-cell (PIC) method. It is shown that current filaments, which form due to the Weibel instability, develop a large scale longitudinal electric field in the direction opposite to the current carried by the filaments as predicted by theory. Fast moving ions in the current filaments decelerate due to this longitudinal electric field. The same longitudinal electric field, which is partially inductive and partially electrostatic, is identified as the main source of acceleration of electrons in the current filaments. The transverse electric field, though larger than the longitudinal one, is shown to play a smaller role in heating electrons, contrary to previous claims. It is found that, in 1D, the electrons become strongly magnetized and are \\textit{not} accelerated beyond their initial kinetic energy. Rather, the heating of the electrons is enhanced by ...

  9. Plasma heating and current drive using intense, pulsed microwaves

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cohen, B.I.; Cohen, R.H.; Nevins, W.M.; Rognlien, T.D.; Bonoli, P.T.; Porkolab, M.

    1988-01-01

    The use of powerful new microwave sources, e.g., free-electron lasers and relativistic gyrotrons, provide unique opportunities for novel heating and current-drive schemes in the electron-cyclotron and lower-hybrid ranges of frequencies. These high-power, pulsed sources have a number of technical advantages over conventional, low-intensity sources; and their use can lead to improved current-drive efficiencies and better penetration into a reactor-grade plasma in specific cases. The Microwave Tokamak Experiment at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory will provide a test for some of these new heating and current-drive schemes. This paper reports theoretical progress both in modeling absorption and current drive for intense pulses and in analyzing some of the possible complications that may arise, e.g., parametric instabilities and nonlinear self-focusing. 22 refs., 9 figs., 1 tab.

  10. Plasma heating with multi-MeV neutral atom beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grisham, L.R.; Post, D.E.; Mikkelsen, D.R.; Eubank, H.P.

    1981-10-01

    We explore the utility and feasibility of neutral beams of greater than or equal to 6 AMU formed from negative ions, and also of D/sup 0/ formed from D/sup -/. The negative ions would be accelerated to approx. 1 to 2 MeV/AMU and neutralized, whereupon the neutral atoms would be used to heat and, perhaps, to drive current in magnetically confined plasmas. Such beams appear feasible and offer the promise of significant advantages relative to conventional neutral beams based on positive deuterium ions at approx. 150 keV.

  11. Fundamental ion cyclotron resonance heating of JET deuterium plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krasilnikov, A. V. [Troitsk Institute of Nuclear Physics (TRINITI), Russia; Van Eester, D. [Laboratory for Plasma Physics-ERM/KMS (LPP-ERM/KMS), Brussels, Belgium; Lerche, E. [Laboratory for Plasma Physics-ERM/KMS (LPP-ERM/KMS), Brussels, Belgium; Ongena, J. [Laboratory for Plasma Physics-ERM/KMS (LPP-ERM/KMS), Brussels, Belgium; Amosov, V. N. [Troitsk Institute of Nuclear Physics (TRINITI), Russia; Biewer, Theodore M [ORNL; Bonheure, G. [Laboratory for Plasma Physics-ERM/KMS (LPP-ERM/KMS), Brussels, Belgium; Crombe, K. [Ghent University, Belgium; Ericsson, G. [Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden; Esposito, Basilio [ENEA, Frascati; Giacomelli, L. [Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden; Hellesen, C. [Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden; Hjalmarsson, A. [Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden; Jachmich, S. [EURATOM / UKAEA, UK; Kallne, J. [Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden; Kaschuck, Yu A [Troitsk Institute of Nuclear Physics (TRINITI), Russia; Kiptily, V. [EURATOM / UKAEA, UK; Leggate, H. [EURATOM / UKAEA, UK; Mailloux, J. [EURATOM / UKAEA, UK; Marocco, D. [ENEA, Frascati; Mayoral, M.-L. [EURATOM / UKAEA, UK; Popovichev, S. [EURATOM / UKAEA, UK; Riva, M. [ENEA, Frascati; Santala, M. [EURATOM / UKAEA, UK; Stamp, M. F. [EURATOM / UKAEA, UK; Vdovin, V. [Russian Research Center, Kurchatov Institute, Moscow, Russia; Walden, A. [EURATOM / UKAEA, UK

    2009-03-01

    Radio frequency heating of majority ions is of prime importance for understanding the basic role of auxiliary heating in the activated D T phase of ITER. Majority deuterium ion cyclotron resonance heating (ICRH) experiments at the fundamental cyclotron frequency were performed in JET. In spite of the poor antenna coupling at 25 MHz, this heating scheme proved promising when adopted in combination with D neutral beam injection (NBI). The effect of fundamental ICRH of a D population was clearly demonstrated in these experiments: by adding ~25% of heating power the fusion power was increased up to 30 50%, depending on the type of NBI adopted. At this power level, the ion and electron temperatures increased from Ti ~ 4.0 keV and Te ~ 4.5 keV (NBI-only phase) to Ti ~ 5.5 keV and Te ~ 5.2 keV (ICRH + NBI phase), respectively. The increase in the neutron yield was stronger when 80 keV rather than 130 keV deuterons were injected in the plasma. It is shown that the neutron rate, the diamagnetic energy and the electron as well as the ion temperature scale roughly linearly with the applied RF power. A synergistic effect of the combined use of ICRF and NBI heating was observed: (i) the number of neutron counts measured by the neutron camera during the combined ICRF + NBI phases of the discharges exceeded the sum of the individual counts of the NBI-only and ICRF-only phases; (ii) a substantial increase in the number of slowing-down beam ions was detected by the time of flight neutron spectrometer when ICRF power was switched on; (iii) a small D subpopulation with energies slightly above the NBI launch energy was detected by the neutral particle analyzer and -ray spectroscopy.

  12. Conceptual design of NBI beamline for VEST plasma heating

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, T.S., E-mail: tskim@kaeri.re.kr; In, S.R.; Jeong, S.H.; Park, M.; Chang, D.H.; Jung, B.K.; Lee, K.W.

    2016-11-01

    Highlights: • VEST NBI injector is conceptually designed to support further VEST plasma experiment. • VEST NBI injector composed of 2 sets of 20 keV/25A magnetic cusp type bucket ion source, neutralizer ducts, electrostatic ion dumps, NB vessel with cryopump, and rotating calorimerter. • The vacuum vessel of the beamline is divided into two parts for high injection efficiency and different direction (co- and counter-current) of neutral beam injection. • An ion source for the VEST NBI system was also designed to deliver neutral hydrogen beams with a power of 0.3 MW. The plasma generator of the VEST NB ion source has modified TFTR bucket multi-cusp chamber. The plasma generator has twelve hair-pin shaped tungsten filaments used as a cathode and an arc chamber including a bucket and an electron dump which serve as anode. The accelerator system consists of three grids, each having extraction area of 100 mm × 320 mm and 64 shaped slits of 3 mm spacing. • The preliminary structure design and the layout of the main components of the injector have been completed. Simulation and calculation for optimization of the NB beamline design results prove that the parameters of ion source, neutralization efficiency (76%:95% equilibrium neutralization efficiency), and beam power transmission efficiency (higher than 90%) are in agreement with design targets of the VEST NB beamline. • This VEST NBI system will provide a neutral beam of ∼0.6 MW for both heating and current drive in torus plasma. - Abstract: A 10 m s-pulsed NBI (Neutral Beam Injection) system for VEST (Versatile Experiment Spherical Torus) plasma heating is designed to provide a beam power of more than 0.6 MW with 20 keV H° neutrals. The VEST NBI injector is composed of 2 sets of 20 keV/25A magnetic cusp type bucket ion source, neutralizer ducts, residual ion dump, NB vessel with a cryopump, and rotating calorimeter. The position and size of these beamline components are roughly determined with geometric

  13. Second-harmonic ion cyclotron resonance heating scenarios of Aditya tokamak plasma

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Asim Kumar Chattopadhyay; S V Kulkarni; R Srinivasan; Aditya Team

    2015-10-01

    Plasma heating with the fast magnetosonic waves in the ion cyclotron range of frequencies (ICRF) is one of the auxiliary heating schemes of Aditya tokamak. Numerical simulation of second-harmonic resonance heating scenarios in low-temperature, low-density Aditya plasma has been carried out for fast magnetosonic wave absorption in ICRF range, using full-wave ion cyclotron heating code TORIC combined with Fokker–Planck quasilinear solver SSFPQL and the results are explained. In such low-temperature, low-density plasma, ion absorption for second-harmonic resonance heating is less but significant amount of direct electron heating is observed.

  14. Plasma heating inside ICMEs by Alfvenic fluctuations dissipation

    CERN Document Server

    Li, Hui; He, Jiansen; Zhang, Lingqian; Richardson, John D; Belcher, John W; Tu, Cui

    2016-01-01

    Nonlinear cascade of low-frequency Alfvenic fluctuations (AFs) is regarded as one candidate of the energy sources to heat plasma during the non-adiabatic expansion of interplanetary coronal mass ejections (ICMEs). However, AFs inside ICMEs were seldom reported in the literature. In this study, we investigate AFs inside ICMEs using observations from Voyager 2 between 1 and 6 au. It is found that AFs with high degree of Alfvenicity frequently occurred inside ICMEs, for almost all the identified ICMEs (30 out of 33 ICMEs), and 12.6% of ICME time interval. As ICMEs expand and move outward, the percentage of AF duration decays linearly in general. The occurrence rate of AFs inside ICMEs is much less than that in ambient solar wind, especially within 4 au. AFs inside ICMEs are more frequently presented in the center and at the boundaries of ICMEs. In addition, the proton temperature inside ICME has a similar distribution. These findings suggest significant contribution of AFs on local plasma heating inside ICMEs.

  15. Sawtooth Activity in Ohmically Heated Plasma on HT-7 Tokamak

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Sawtooth activity on HT-7 tokamak has been investigated experimentally mainly by using soft x-ray diode array and magnetic probes. Their behaviors and occurrences are correlatedclosely to the discharge conditions: the electron density Ne, the electron temperature Te, the safetyfactor qa on plasma boundary and wall condition etc. When central line-averaged electron densityNe(0) is over 2.0×1013cm-3, major sawtooth activity emerges with a period of up to 6.5 ms and afluctuation amplitude of up to 2~30 % of SXR radiation signal. In some cases such as the safetyfactor between 4.2~4.7 and Zeff=3.0~6.0, a monster sawtooth activity often emerges withoutapparent deterioration of plasma confinement and without major disruption. During these events,abundant MHD phenomena are observed including partial sawtooth oscillations. In this paper, theobserved sawtooth behaviors and their dependence on the and their dependence density Ne andwall condition in ohmically heated plasma are introduced, the results are discussed and presented.

  16. Influence and Analysis of Concentrate Degree of Plasma Arc for Heat Process of Hardening Treatment

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Shuo-gui; YAN Hong-ri

    2004-01-01

    According to the practicable model of the plasma arc surface quench, the influence law of the heat process、cooling course、 temperature field about surface quench treatment by plasma arc due to the concentrate degree of plasma arc heat source are discussed in this paper. It shows that the concentrate degree of plasma arc heat source can change the width of the hardening zone and can not change the maximum harden depth. With the increase of the concentrate degree, the area of the heat influence zone is decreased and its shape is narrowed after the heat source. Relative to cooling rate, the influence of the heat source concentrate degree for heat absorption is bigger. The correctness of the practical model are proved with experimental results for quench hardening of 45# steel by plasma arc.

  17. Influence and Analysis of Concentrate Degree of Plasma Arc for Heat Process of Hardening Treatment

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANGShuo-gui; YANHong-ri

    2004-01-01

    According to the practicable model of the plasma arc surtace quench, the influence law ot me heat process, cooling course, temperature field about surface quench treatment by plasma arc due to the concentrate degree of plasma arc heat source are discussed in this paper. It shows that the concentrate degree of plasma arc heat source can change the width of the hardening zone and can not change the maximum harden depth. With the increase of the concentrate degree, the area of the heat influence zone is decreased and its shape is narrowed after the heat source. Relative to cooling rate, the influence of the heat source concentrate degree for heat absorption is bigger. The correctness of the practical model are proved with experimental results for quench hardening of 45# steel by plasma arc.

  18. Electron Heating in a Relativistic, Weibel-unstable Plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Rahul; Eichler, David; Gedalin, Michael

    2015-06-01

    The dynamics of two initially unmagnetized relativistic counter-streaming homogeneous ion-electron plasma beams are simulated in two dimensions (2D) using the particle-in-cell (PIC) method. It is shown that current filaments, which form due to the Weibel instability, develop a large-scale longitudinal electric field in the direction opposite to the current carried by the filaments as predicted by theory. This field, which is partially inductive and partially electrostatic, is identified as the main source of net electron acceleration, greatly exceeding that due to magnetic field decay at later stages. The transverse electric field, although larger than the longitudinal field, is shown to play a smaller role in heating electrons, contrary to previous claims. It is found that in one dimension, the electrons become strongly magnetized and are not accelerated beyond their initial kinetic energy. Rather, the heating of the electrons is enhanced by the bending and break up of the filaments, which releases electrons that would otherwise be trapped within a single filament and slow the development of the Weibel instability (i.e., the magnetic field growth) via induction as per Lenz’s law. In 2D simulations, electrons are heated to about one quarter of the initial kinetic energy of ions. The magnetic energy at maximum is about 4%, decaying to less than 1% by the end of the simulation. The ions are found to gradually decelerate until the end of the simulation, by which time they retain a residual anisotropy of less than 10%.

  19. High Power, Solid-State RF Generation for Plasma Heating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prager, James; Ziemba, Timothy; Miller, Kenneth; Pierren, Chris

    2016-10-01

    Radio Frequency heating systems are rarely used by the small-scale validation platform experiments due to the high cost and complexity of these systems. Eagle Harbor Technologies (EHT), Inc. is developing an all-solid-state RF plasma heating system that uses EHT's nanosecond pulser technology in an inductive adder configuration to drive nonlinear transmission lines (NLTL). The system under development does not require the use of vacuum tube technology, is inherently lower cost, and is more robust than traditional high power RF heating schemes. The inductive adder can produce 0 to20 kV pulses into 50 Ohms with sub-10 ns rise times. The inductive adder has been used to drive NLTLs near 2 GHz with other frequencies to be tested in the future. EHT will present experimental results, including RF measurements with D-dot probes and capacitve voltage probes. During this program, EHT will test the system on Helicity Injected Torus at the University of Washington and the High Beta Tokamak at Columbia University.

  20. ELECTRON HEATING IN A RELATIVISTIC, WEIBEL-UNSTABLE PLASMA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumar, Rahul; Eichler, David; Gedalin, Michael [Physics Department, Ben-Gurion University, Be’er-Sheba 84105 (Israel)

    2015-06-20

    The dynamics of two initially unmagnetized relativistic counter-streaming homogeneous ion–electron plasma beams are simulated in two dimensions (2D) using the particle-in-cell (PIC) method. It is shown that current filaments, which form due to the Weibel instability, develop a large-scale longitudinal electric field in the direction opposite to the current carried by the filaments as predicted by theory. This field, which is partially inductive and partially electrostatic, is identified as the main source of net electron acceleration, greatly exceeding that due to magnetic field decay at later stages. The transverse electric field, although larger than the longitudinal field, is shown to play a smaller role in heating electrons, contrary to previous claims. It is found that in one dimension, the electrons become strongly magnetized and are not accelerated beyond their initial kinetic energy. Rather, the heating of the electrons is enhanced by the bending and break up of the filaments, which releases electrons that would otherwise be trapped within a single filament and slow the development of the Weibel instability (i.e., the magnetic field growth) via induction as per Lenz’s law. In 2D simulations, electrons are heated to about one quarter of the initial kinetic energy of ions. The magnetic energy at maximum is about 4%, decaying to less than 1% by the end of the simulation. The ions are found to gradually decelerate until the end of the simulation, by which time they retain a residual anisotropy of less than 10%.

  1. High heat flux capabilities of the Magnum-PSI linear plasma device

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De Temmerman, G., E-mail: g.c.detemmerman@differ.nl; Berg, M.A. van den; Scholten, J.; Lof, A.; Meiden, H.J. van der; Eck, H.J.N. van; Morgan, T.W.; Kruijf, T.M. de; Zeijlmans van Emmichoven, P.A.; Zielinski, J.J.

    2013-10-15

    Magnum-PSI is an advanced linear plasma device uniquely capable of producing plasma conditions similar to those expected in the divertor of ITER both steady-state and transients. The machine is designed both for fundamental studies of plasma–surface interactions under high heat and particle fluxes, and as a high-heat flux facility for the tests of plasma-facing components under realistic plasma conditions. To study the effects of transient heat loads on a plasma-facing surface, a novel pulsed plasma source system as well as a high power laser is available. In this article, we will describe the capabilities of Magnum-PSI for high-heat flux tests of plasma-facing materials.

  2. Quark-gluon plasma connected to finite heat bath

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Biro, Tamas S.; Gabor Barnafoeldi, Gergely; Van, Peter [Wigner Research Centre for Physics of the HAS, P.O.Box 49, Budapest (Hungary)

    2013-09-15

    We derive entropy formulas for finite reservoir systems, S{sub q}, from universal thermostat independence and obtain the functional form of the corresponding generalized entropy-probability relation. Our result interprets thermodynamically the subsystem temperature, T{sub 1}, and the index q in terms of the temperature, T, entropy, S, and heat capacity, C of the reservoir as T{sub 1}=T exp (-S/C) and q=1-1/C. In the infinite C limit, irrespective of the value of S, the Boltzmann-Gibbs approach is fully recovered. We apply this framework for the experimental determination of the original temperature of a finite thermostat, T, from the analysis of hadron spectra produced in high-energy collisions, by analyzing frequently considered simple models of the quark-gluon plasma. (orig.)

  3. Plasma Heating and Current Drive for Fusion Reactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holtkamp, Norbert

    2010-02-01

    ITER (in Latin ``the way'') is designed to demonstrate the scientific and technological feasibility of fusion energy. Fusion is the process by which two light atomic nuclei combine to form a heavier one and thus release energy. In the fusion process two isotopes of hydrogen - deuterium and tritium - fuse together to form a helium atom and a neutron. Thus fusion could provide large scale energy production without greenhouse effects; essentially limitless fuel would be available all over the world. The principal goals of ITER are to generate 500 megawatts of fusion power for periods of 300 to 500 seconds with a fusion power multiplication factor, Q, of at least 10. Q >= 10 (input power 50 MW / output power 500 MW). In a Tokamak the definition of the functionalities and requirements for the Plasma Heating and Current Drive are relevant in the determination of the overall plant efficiency, the operation cost of the plant and the plant availability. This paper summarise these functionalities and requirements in perspective of the systems under construction in ITER. It discusses the further steps necessary to meet those requirements. Approximately one half of the total heating will be provided by two Neutral Beam injection systems at with energy of 1 MeV and a beam power of 16 MW into the plasma. For ITER specific test facility is being build in order to develop and test the Neutral Beam injectors. Remote handling maintenance scheme for the NB systems, critical during the nuclear phase of the project, will be developed. In addition the paper will give an overview over the general status of ITER. )

  4. Understanding Solar Coronal Heating through Atomic and Plasma Physics Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savin, Daniel Wolf; Arthanayaka, Thusitha; Bose, Sayak; Hahn, Michael; Beiersdorfer, Peter; Brown, Gregory V.; Gekelman, Walter; Vincena, Steve

    2017-08-01

    Recent solar observations suggest that the Sun's corona is heated by Alfven waves that dissipate at unexpectedly low heights in the corona. These observations raise a number of questions. Among them are the problems of accurately quantifying the energy flux of the waves and that of describing the physical mechanism that leads to the wave damping. We are performing laboratory experiments to address both of these issues.The energy flux depends on the electron density, which can be measured spectroscopically. However, spectroscopic density diagnostics have large uncertainties, because they depend sensitively on atomic collisional excitation, de-excitation, and radiative transition rates for multiple atomic levels. Essentially all of these data come from theory and have not been experimentally validated. We are conducting laboratory experiments using the electron beam ion trap (EBIT) at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory that will provide accurate empirical calibrations for spectroscopic density diagnostics and which will also help to guide theoretical calculations.The observed rapid wave dissipation is likely due to inhomogeneities in the plasma that drive flows and currents at small length scales where energy can be more efficiently dissipated. This may take place through gradients in the Alfvén speed along the magnetic field, which causes wave reflection and generates turbulence. Alternatively, gradients in the Alfvén speed across the field can lead to dissipation through phase-mixing. Using the Large Plasma Device (LAPD) at the University of California Los Angeles, we are studying both of these dissipation mechanisms in the laboratory in order to understand their potential roles in coronal heating.

  5. Turbulent transport and heating of trace heavy ions in hot, magnetized plasmas

    CERN Document Server

    Barnes, M; Dorland, W

    2012-01-01

    Scaling laws for the transport and heating of trace heavy ions in low-frequency, magnetized plasma turbulence are derived and compared with direct numerical simulations. The predicted dependences of turbulent fluxes and heating on ion charge and mass number are found to agree with numerical results for both stationary and differentially rotating plasmas. Heavy ion momentum transport is found to increase with mass, and heavy ions are found to be preferentially heated, implying a mass-dependent ion temperature for very weakly collisional plasmas and for partially-ionized heavy ions in strongly rotating plasmas.

  6. Propinquity of current and vortex structures: effects on collisionless plasma heating

    CERN Document Server

    Parashar, Tulasi N

    2016-01-01

    Intermittency of heating in weakly collisional plasma turbulence is an active subject of research, with significant potential impact on understanding of the solar wind, solar corona and astrophysical plasmas. Recent studies suggest a role of vorticity in plasma heating. In magnetohydrodynamics small scale vorticity is generated near current sheets and this effect persists in kinetic plasma, as demonstrated here with hybrid and fully kinetic Particle-In-Cell (PIC) simulations. Furthermore, vorticity enhances local kinetic effects, with a generalized resonance condition selecting sign-dependent enhancements or reductions of proton heating and thermal anisotropy. In such plasmas heating is correlated with vorticity and current density, but more strongly with vorticity. These results help explain several prior results that find kinetic effects and energization near to, but not centered on, current sheets. Evidently intermittency in kinetic plasma involves multiple physical quantities, and the associated coherent ...

  7. Operation of a microwave plasma source for electron heating and antenna testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caughman, J. B. O.; Bigelow, T. S.; Diem, S. J.; Goulding, R. H.; Rasmussen, D. A.; Schaich, C. R.; White, T. L.

    2011-10-01

    One of the major challenges for magnetic fusion is the interaction of the plasma with materials. Linear plasma-material interaction test stands can benefit from additional electron heating of the high-density source plasma to increase the total plasma heat flux at the target to better simulate fusion reactor conditions (10-20 MW/m2). A microwave-based plasma experiment has begun at ORNL to study electron heating of over-dense plasmas and to provide a plasma environment for antenna testing. The plasma is generated by high-field launched whistler waves at 18 GHz to create a moderate-density plasma (ne ~1018/m3). Electron heating of the over-dense plasma is provided by either whistler waves or electron Bernstein waves at 6 GHz. In addition, a single strap mockup antenna, designed to operate at 40-50 MHz, is being constructed to study near-field plasma interactions. The antenna will be placed in the experiment's central vacuum chamber, which will act as an rf test facility. ORNL is managed by UT-Battelle, LLC, for the U.S. DOE under contract DE-AC-05-00OR22725.

  8. Numerical investigation of plasma edge transport and limiter heat fluxes in Wendelstein 7-X startup plasmas with EMC3-EIRENE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Effenberg, F.; Feng, Y.; Schmitz, O.; Frerichs, H.; Bozhenkov, S. A.; Hölbe, H.; König, R.; Krychowiak, M.; Pedersen, T. Sunn; Reiter, D.; Stephey, L.; W7-X Team

    2017-03-01

    The results of a first systematic assessment of plasma edge transport processes for the limiter startup configuration at Wendelstein 7-X are presented. This includes an investigation of transport from intrinsic and externally injected impurities and their impact on the power balance and limiter heat fluxes. The fully 3D coupled plasma fluid and kinetic neutral transport Monte Carlo code EMC3-EIRENE is used. The analysis of the magnetic topology shows that the poloidally and toroidally localized limiters cause a 3D helical scrape-off layer (SOL) consisting of magnetic flux tubes of three different connection lengths L C. The transport in the helical SOL is governed by L C as topological scale length for the parallel plasma loss channel to the limiters. A clear modulation of the plasma pressure with L C is seen. The helical flux tube topology results in counter streaming sonic plasma flows. The heterogeneous SOL plasma structure yields an uneven limiter heat load distribution with localized peaking. Assuming spatially constant anomalous transport coefficients, increasing plasma density yields a reduction of the maximum peak heat loads from 12 MWm-2 to 7.5 MWm-2 and a broadening of the deposited heat fluxes. The impact of impurities on the limiter heat loads is studied by assuming intrinsic carbon impurities eroded from the limiter surfaces with a gross chemical sputtering yield of 2 % . The resulting radiative losses account for less than 10% of the input power in the power balance with marginal impact on the limiter heat loads. It is shown that a significant mitigation of peak heat loads, 40-50%, can be achieved with controlled impurity seeding with nitrogen and neon, which is a method of particular interest for the later island divertor phase.

  9. Experimental Electron Heat Diffusion in TJ-II ECRH Plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vargas, V.I.; Lopez-Bruna, D.; Herranz, J.; Castejon, F.

    2006-07-01

    Interpretative transport has been used to revisit the global scalings of TJ-II ECRH plasmas from a local perspective. Density, rotational transform and ERCH power scans were analysed based upon Thomson Scattering data (electron density and temperature) in steady state discharges. A simple formula to obtain the thermal conductivity, assuming pure diffusion and negligible convective heat fluxes was used in a set of 161 discharges. All the analysis was performed with the ASTRA transport shell. The density scan indicates that inside n=0,4 there is no significant change of e with density in the range studied (0.4 (1019m-3) 1.0), while in 0,5 <0,8 approximately, e decreases with density. In the rotational transform scan it is found that the values of e when a low order rational of the rotational transform is present locally seem to be smaller for the corresponding range, although it is apparent a general beneficial effect of the corresponding change in magnetic structure. Finally, in the ECRH power scan, e is found to have an overall increment in 0,2

  10. Electromagnetic instability in plasmas heated by a laser field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bendib, A.; Bendib-Kalache, K.; Cros, B.; Deutsch, C.; Maynard, G.

    2017-02-01

    Electromagnetic instability is investigated in homogeneous plasmas heated by a laser wave in the range α =v02/vt2≤2 , where v0 is the electron quiver velocity and vt is the thermal velocity. The anisotropic electron distribution function that drives unstable quasistatic electromagnetic modes is calculated numerically with the Vlasov-Landau equation in the high ion charge number approximation. A dispersion relation of electromagnetic waves which accounts for further nonlinear terms on v02 from previous results is derived. In typical simulation with ion charge number Z =13 , a temperature T =5 keV , a density n =9.8 ×1020c m-3 , and a laser wavelength λlaser=1.06 μ m , growth rates larger than 1012s-1 in the quasicollisionless wave-number range were found for α ≥1 . In the same physical conditions and in the mildly collisional range a growth rate about 1011s-1 was also obtained. The extent of the growth wave-number region increases significantly with increasing α .

  11. The Effect of Correlations on the Heat Transport in a Magnetized Plasma

    CERN Document Server

    Ott, Torben; Donko, Zoltan

    2015-01-01

    In a classical ideal plasma, a magnetic field is known to reduce the heat conductivity perpendicular to the field whereas it does not alter the one along the field. Here we show that, in strongly correlated plasmas that are observed at high pressure or/and low temperature, a magnetic field reduces the perpendicular heat transport much less and even {\\it enhances} the parallel transport. These surprising observations are explained by the competition of kinetic, potential and collisional contributions to the heat conductivity. Our results are based on first principle molecular dynamics simulations of a one-component plasma.

  12. Development of Kabila rocket: A radioisotope heated thermionic plasma rocket engine

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    A new type of plasma rocket engine, the Kabila rocket, using a radioisotope heated thermionic heating chamber instead of a conventional combustion chamber or catalyst bed is introduced and it achieves specific impulses similar to the ones of conventional solid and bipropellant rockets. Curium-244 is chosen as a radioisotope heat source and a thermal reductive layer is also used to obtain precise thermionic emissions. The self-sufficiency principle is applied by simultaneously heating up the e...

  13. Fast wave heating in a mirror during plasma build-up

    OpenAIRE

    Moiseenko, Vladimir; Dreval, N.; Ågren, Olov; Stepanov, K.; A. Burdakov; Kalinin, P.; Tereshin, V.

    2010-01-01

    A heating method for partially ionized plasma has been described in reference [V.E. Moiseenko, Sov. J. Plasma Phys. 12, 427 (1986)]. It exploits the collisional damping of fast waves that is large owing to the high rate of charge exchange collisions. Since the time of heating is limited by the duration of neutral gas ionization, the heating needs to be strong enough to achieve a high final ion temperature. This heating method has been studied numerically in the framework of MHD-like (magneto-...

  14. ECH/EBW Plasma Coupling and Heating Experiments on the Proto-MPEX

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bigelow, Tim; Caughman, John; Caneses, Juan; Diem, Stephanie; Goulding, Richard; Kafle, Nischal; Rapp, Juergen

    2016-10-01

    ECH and EBW have been under development on the Proto-Material Plasma Exposure eXperiment device (Proto-MPEX) to provide additional plasma electron heating. Proto-MPEX has a linear magnetic field configuration and a helicon plasma source that forms a high-density medium-temperature central core plasma of typically 0.08m diameter. A plasma density of up to 6x1019m-3 is generated which is >6 times over-dense for 28 GHz microwave power available from the experiment's gyrotron system. Modeling using Genray-C code has indicated that some heating of the plasma core should be possible at this frequency using the optimum O-X-EBW coupling scheme. Several improvements to the waveguide system have been made to increase the reliable operating power level and launch beam quality. To improve the plasma heating efficiency, work is underway to optimize the beam launch by adding a remotely adjustable launch angle, adding a polarization rotating miter bend, moving the launch point closer to the plasma edge and providing some beam focusing. Preliminary heating experiments have indicated some over-dense heating has been achieved. A launch power of 75 kW has been achieved out of a possible 150 kW. This work was supported by the U.S. D.O.E. contract DE-AC05-00OR22725.

  15. THIN CURRENT SHEETS AND ASSOCIATED ELECTRON HEATING IN TURBULENT SPACE PLASMA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chasapis, A.; Retinò, A.; Sahraoui, F.; Canu, P. [Laboratoire de Physique des Plasmas, Ecole Polytechnique, Palaiseau, F-91128 (France); Vaivads, A.; Khotyaintsev, Yu. V. [Swedish Institute of Space Physics, Uppsala (Sweden); Sundkvist, D. [Space Sciences Laboratory, University of California, Berkeley, CA (United States); Greco, A. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita della Calabria (Italy); Sorriso-Valvo, L., E-mail: alexandros.chasapis@lpp.polytechnique.fr [IMIP-CNR, U.O.S. LICRYL di Cosenza (Italy)

    2015-05-01

    Intermittent structures, such as thin current sheets, are abundant in turbulent plasmas. Numerical simulations indicate that such current sheets are important sites of energy dissipation and particle heating occurring at kinetic scales. However, direct evidence of dissipation and associated heating within current sheets is scarce. Here, we show a new statistical study of local electron heating within proton-scale current sheets by using high-resolution spacecraft data. Current sheets are detected using the Partial Variance of Increments (PVI) method which identifies regions of strong intermittency. We find that strong electron heating occurs in high PVI (>3) current sheets while no significant heating occurs in low PVI cases (<3), indicating that the former are dominant for energy dissipation. Current sheets corresponding to very high PVI (>5) show the strongest heating and most of the time are consistent with ongoing magnetic reconnection. This suggests that reconnection is important for electron heating and dissipation at kinetic scales in turbulent plasmas.

  16. Thin Current Sheets and Associated Electron Heating in Turbulent Space Plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chasapis, A.; Retinò, A.; Sahraoui, F.; Vaivads, A.; Khotyaintsev, Yu. V.; Sundkvist, D.; Greco, A.; Sorriso-Valvo, L.; Canu, P.

    2015-05-01

    Intermittent structures, such as thin current sheets, are abundant in turbulent plasmas. Numerical simulations indicate that such current sheets are important sites of energy dissipation and particle heating occurring at kinetic scales. However, direct evidence of dissipation and associated heating within current sheets is scarce. Here, we show a new statistical study of local electron heating within proton-scale current sheets by using high-resolution spacecraft data. Current sheets are detected using the Partial Variance of Increments (PVI) method which identifies regions of strong intermittency. We find that strong electron heating occurs in high PVI (>3) current sheets while no significant heating occurs in low PVI cases (5) show the strongest heating and most of the time are consistent with ongoing magnetic reconnection. This suggests that reconnection is important for electron heating and dissipation at kinetic scales in turbulent plasmas.

  17. Experimental study of plasma energy transfer and material erosion under ELM-like heat loads

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garkusha, I.E., E-mail: garkusha@ipp.kharkov.u [Institute of Plasma Physics of the NSC KIPT, Akademicheskaya 1, 61108 Kharkov (Ukraine); Makhlaj, V.A.; Chebotarev, V.V. [Institute of Plasma Physics of the NSC KIPT, Akademicheskaya 1, 61108 Kharkov (Ukraine); Landman, I. [Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe, IHM, 76021 Karlsruhe (Germany); Tereshin, V.I.; Aksenov, N.N.; Bandura, A.N. [Institute of Plasma Physics of the NSC KIPT, Akademicheskaya 1, 61108 Kharkov (Ukraine)

    2009-06-15

    Main features of plasma-surface interaction and energy transfer to tokamak plasma facing components are studied at different heat loads in ELM simulation experiments with the plasma gun QSPA Kh-50. Repetitive plasma exposures of tungsten, graphite and different combined W-C targets were performed at the pulse duration of 0.25 ms and the heat loads varied in the range 0.2-2.5 MJ/m{sup 2}. The onset of vapor shield in front of the surface was investigated. The evaporation is immediately followed by a saturation of surface heat load if further increasing the impact energy. The presence of graphite essentially decreases the heat flux to the nearby tungsten surface, which is due to the carbon vapor shield. Droplet splashing at the tungsten surface and formation of hot spots on the graphite surface are discussed.

  18. Monster Sawtooth Activity in Ohmically Heated HT-7 Plasma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    胡立群; 石跃江; 刘胜侠

    2001-01-01

    Experimental properties of monster sawtooth activities in ohmic HT-7 plasma are presented in this paper. The monster sawtooth activities belong to global fluctuations and are characterized with a series of large core collapses on SXR intensity traces with a long period, a large amplitude fluctuation and a large inversion radius. However, they emerge without apparent deterioration of plasma confinement and without major plasma disruption. During the events,long partial sawtooth collapses and abundant MHD phenomena are also observed.

  19. An Electrothermal Plasma Source Developed for Simulation of Transient Heat Loads in Future Large Fusion Devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gebhart, Trey; Baylor, Larry; Winfrey, Leigh

    2016-10-01

    The realization of fusion energy requires materials that can withstand high heat and particle fluxes at the plasma material interface. In this work, an electrothermal (ET) plasma source has been designed as a possible transient heat flux source for a linear plasma material interaction device. An ET plasma source operates in the ablative arc regime, which is driven by a DC capacitive discharge. The current travels through the 4mm bore of a boron nitride liner and subsequently ablates and ionizes the liner material. This results in a high density plasma with a large unidirectional bulk flow out of the source exit. The pulse length for the ET source has been optimized using a pulse forming network to have a duration of 1ms at full-width half maximum. The peak currents and maximum source energies seen in this system are 2kA and 5kJ. The goal of this work is to show that the ET source produces electron densities and heat fluxes that are comparable to transient events in future large magnetic confinement fusion devices. Heat flux, plasma temperature, and plasma density were determined for each test shot using infrared imaging and optical spectroscopy techniques. This work will compare the ET source output (heat flux, temperature, and density) with and without an applied magnetic field. Research sponsored by the Laboratory Directed Research and Development Program of Oak Ridge National Laboratory, managed by UT-Battelle, LLC, for the U. S. Department of Energy.

  20. US-Japan workshop Q-181 on high heat flux components and plasma-surface interactions for next devices: Proceedings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McGrath, R.T. [ed.] [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Yamashina, T. [ed.] [Hokkadio Univ. (Japan)

    1994-04-01

    This report contain viewgraphs of papers from the following sessions: plasma facing components issues for future machines; recent PMI results from several tokamaks; high heat flux technology; plasma facing components design and applications; plasma facing component materials and irradiation damage; boundary layer plasma; plasma disruptions; conditioning and tritium; and erosion/redeposition.

  1. Computation of laminar heat transfer from gaseous plasmas in electromagnetic fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bose, T. K.

    1972-01-01

    Heat transfer analysis procedure is presented for two-temperature gaseous plasma. Analysis is based on laminar flow of singly-ionized, quasineutral plasma with variable properties. Sheath analysis is described for species in accelerating field, decelerating field, emitted from wall, and recombining at wall.

  2. Production of high transient heat and particle fluxes in a linear plasma device

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Temmerman, G.; Zielinski, J. J.; van der Meiden, H.; Melissen, W.; Rapp, J.

    2010-01-01

    We report on the generation of high transient heat and particle fluxes in a linear plasma device by pulsed operation of the plasma source. A capacitor bank is discharged into the source to transiently increase the discharge current up to 1.7 kA, allowing peak densities and temperature of 70x10(20) m

  3. Thermographic determination of the sheath heat transmission coefficient in a high density plasma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Berg, M. A.; Bystrov, K.; Pasquet, R.; Zielinski, J. J.; De Temmerman, G.

    2013-01-01

    Experiments were performed in the Pilot-PSI linear plasma device, to determine the sheath heat transmission coefficients in a high recycling regime under various conditions of density (1–20 × 1020 m−3) and plasma composition (H2, Ar, N2) relevant for the

  4. Thermographic determination of the sheath heat transmission coefficient in a high density plasma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Berg, M. A.; Bystrov, K.; Pasquet, R.; Zielinski, J. J.; De Temmerman, G.

    2013-01-01

    Experiments were performed in the Pilot-PSI linear plasma device, to determine the sheath heat transmission coefficients in a high recycling regime under various conditions of density (1–20 × 1020 m−3) and plasma composition (H2, Ar, N2) relevant for the

  5. Plasma diagnostics approach to welding heat source/molten pool interaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Key, J.F.; McIlwain, M.E.; Isaacson, L.

    1980-01-01

    Plasma diagnostic techniques show that weld fusion zone profile and loss of metal vapors from the molten pool are strongly dependent on both the intensity and distribution of the heat source. These plasma properties, are functions of cathode vertex angle and thermal conductivity of the shielding gas, especially near the anode.

  6. The evolution of interstellar clouds in a streaming hot plasma including heat conduction

    CERN Document Server

    Vieser, W

    2007-01-01

    To examine the evolution of giant molecular clouds in the stream of a hot plasma we performed two-dimensional hydrodynamical simulations that take full account of self-gravity, heating and cooling effects and heat conduction by electrons. We use the thermal conductivity of a fully ionized hydrogen plasma proposed by Spitzer and a saturated heat flux according to Cowie & McKee in regions where the mean free path of the electrons is large compared to the temperature scaleheight. Significant structural and evolutionary differences occur between simulations with and without heat conduction. Dense clouds in pure dynamical models experience dynamical destruction by Kelvin-Helmholtz (KH) instability. In static models heat conduction leads to evaporation of such clouds. Heat conduction acting on clouds in a gas stream smooths out steep temperature and density gradients at the edge of the cloud because the conduction timescale is shorter than the cooling timescale. This diminishes the velocity gradient between the...

  7. The behavior of neutron emissions during ICRF minority heating of plasma at EAST

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Guoqiang; Cao, Hongrui; Hu, Liqun; Zhou, Ruijie; Xiao, Min; Li, Kai; Pu, Neng; Huang, Juan; Liu, Guangzhu; Lin, Shiyao; Lyu, Bo; Liu, Haiqing; Zhang, Xinjun; EAST Team

    2016-07-01

    Ion cyclotron radio frequency (ICRF) wave heating is a primary method to heat ions in the Experimental Advanced Superconducting Tokamak (EAST). Through neutron diagnostics, effective ion heating was observed in hydrogenminority heating (MH) scenarios. At present, investigation of deuterium-deuterium (DD) fusion neutrons is mostly based on time-resolved flux monitor and spectrometer measurements. When the ICRF was applied, the neutron intensity became one order higher. The H/H  +  D ratio was in the range of 5-10%, corresponding to the hydrogen MH dominated scenario, and a strong high energy tail was not displayed on the neutron spectrum that was measured by a liquid scintillator. Moreover, ion temperature in the plasma center (T i) was inversely calculated by the use of neutron source strength (S n) and the plasma density based on classical fusion reaction equations. This result indicates that T i increases by approximately 30% in L-mode plasma, and by more than 50% in H-mode plasma during ICRF heating, which shows good agreement with x-ray crystal spectrometer (XCS) diagnostics. Finally, the DD neutron source strength scaling law, with regard to plasma current (I P) and ICRF coupling power (P RF) on the typical minority heating condition, was obtained by statistical analysis.

  8. First experimental demonstration of magnetic-field assisted fast heating of a dense plasma core

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujioka, Shinsuke; Sakata, Shohei; Lee, Seung Ho; Matsuo, Kazuki; Sawada, Hiroshi; Iwasa, Yuki; Law, King Fai Farley; Morita, Hitoki; Kojima, Sadaoki; Abe, Yuki; Yao, Akira; Hata, Masayasu; Johzaki, Tomoyuki; Sunahara, Atsushi; Ozaki, Tetsuo; Sakagami, Hitoshi; Morace, Alessio; Arikawa, Yasunobu; Yogo, Akifumi; Nishimura, Hiroaki; Nakai, Mitsuo; Shiraga, Hiroyuki; Sentoku, Yasuhiko; Nagatomo, Hideo; Azechi, Hiroshi; Firex Project Team

    2016-10-01

    Fast heating of a dense plasma core by an energetic electron beam is being studied on GEKKO-LFEX laser facility. Here, we introduce a laser-driven kilo-tesla external magnetic field to guide the diverging electron beam to the dense plasma core. This involve placing a spherical target in the magnetic field, compressing it with the GEKKO-XII laser beams and then using the LFEX laser beams injected into the dense plasma to generate the electron beam which do the fast heating. Cu-Ka emission is used to visualize transport or heating processes of a dense plasma. X-ray spectrum from a highly ionized Cu ions indicates several keV of the temperature increment induced by the LFEX.

  9. Hybrid Model of Inhomogeneous Solar Wind Plasma Heating by Alfven Wave Spectrum: Parametric Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ofman, L.

    2010-01-01

    Observations of the solar wind plasma at 0.3 AU and beyond show that a turbulent spectrum of magnetic fluctuations is present. Remote sensing observations of the corona indicate that heavy ions are hotter than protons and their temperature is anisotropic (T(sub perpindicular / T(sub parallel) >> 1). We study the heating and the acceleration of multi-ion plasma in the solar wind by a turbulent spectrum of Alfvenic fluctuations using a 2-D hybrid numerical model. In the hybrid model the protons and heavy ions are treated kinetically as particles, while the electrons are included as neutralizing background fluid. This is the first two-dimensional hybrid parametric study of the solar wind plasma that includes an input turbulent wave spectrum guided by observation with inhomogeneous background density. We also investigate the effects of He++ ion beams in the inhomogeneous background plasma density on the heating of the solar wind plasma. The 2-D hybrid model treats parallel and oblique waves, together with cross-field inhomogeneity, self-consistently. We investigate the parametric dependence of the perpendicular heating, and the temperature anisotropy in the H+-He++ solar wind plasma. It was found that the scaling of the magnetic fluctuations power spectrum steepens in the higher-density regions, and the heating is channeled to these regions from the surrounding lower-density plasma due to wave refraction. The model parameters are applicable to the expected solar wind conditions at about 10 solar radii.

  10. Hybrid Model of Inhomogeneous Solar Wind Plasma Heating by Alfven Wave Spectrum: Parametric Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ofman, L.

    2010-01-01

    Observations of the solar wind plasma at 0.3 AU and beyond show that a turbulent spectrum of magnetic fluctuations is present. Remote sensing observations of the corona indicate that heavy ions are hotter than protons and their temperature is anisotropic (T(sub perpindicular / T(sub parallel) >> 1). We study the heating and the acceleration of multi-ion plasma in the solar wind by a turbulent spectrum of Alfvenic fluctuations using a 2-D hybrid numerical model. In the hybrid model the protons and heavy ions are treated kinetically as particles, while the electrons are included as neutralizing background fluid. This is the first two-dimensional hybrid parametric study of the solar wind plasma that includes an input turbulent wave spectrum guided by observation with inhomogeneous background density. We also investigate the effects of He++ ion beams in the inhomogeneous background plasma density on the heating of the solar wind plasma. The 2-D hybrid model treats parallel and oblique waves, together with cross-field inhomogeneity, self-consistently. We investigate the parametric dependence of the perpendicular heating, and the temperature anisotropy in the H+-He++ solar wind plasma. It was found that the scaling of the magnetic fluctuations power spectrum steepens in the higher-density regions, and the heating is channeled to these regions from the surrounding lower-density plasma due to wave refraction. The model parameters are applicable to the expected solar wind conditions at about 10 solar radii.

  11. "Hot" Non-flaring Plasmas in Active Region Cores Heated by Single Nanoflares

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnes, Will Thomas; Cargill, Peter; Bradshaw, Stephen

    2016-05-01

    We use hydrodynamic modeling tools, including a two-fluid development of the EBTEL code, to investigate the properties expected of "hot" (i.e. between 106.7 and 107.2 K) non-flaring plasmas due to nanoflare heating in active regions. Here we focus on single nanoflares and show that while simple models predict an emission measure distribution extending well above 10 MK that is consistent with cooling by thermal conduction, many other effects are likely to limit the existence and detectability of such plasmas. These include: differential heating between electrons and ions, ionization non-equilibrium and, for short nanoflares, the time taken for the coronal density to increase. The most useful temperature range to look for this plasma, often called the "smoking gun" of nanoflare heating, lies between 1 MK and 10 MK. Signatures of the actual heating may be detectable in some instances.

  12. A thermally stable heating mechanism for the intracluster medium: turbulence, magnetic fields and plasma instabilities

    CERN Document Server

    Kunz, M W; Cowley, S C; Binney, J J; Sanders, J S

    2010-01-01

    We consider the problem of self-regulated heating and cooling in galaxy clusters and the implications for cluster magnetic fields and turbulence. Viscous heating of a weakly collisional magnetised plasma is regulated by the pressure anisotropy with respect to the local direction of the magnetic field. The intracluster medium is a high-beta plasma, where pressure anisotropies caused by the turbulent stresses and the consequent local changes in the magnetic field will trigger very fast microscale instabilities. We argue that the net effect of these instabilities will be to pin the pressure anisotropies at a marginal level, controlled by the plasma beta parameter. This gives rise to local heating rates that turn out to be comparable to the radiative cooling rates. Furthermore, we show that a balance between this heating and Bremsstrahlung cooling is thermally stable, unlike the often conjectured balance between cooling and thermal conduction. Given a sufficient (and probably self-regulating) supply of turbulent ...

  13. Plasma Volume during Heat Stress and Exercise in Women,

    Science.gov (United States)

    1986-11-01

    subjectively determined "thermoneutral" environment. Methods Five healthy women (Table 1), who were not using oral contraceptive agents, volunteered to...with no difference between phases. Blood volume was estimated by the method of Allen et al (1) using the weight of the subject measured during the...a hemoglobinometer (Coulter Electronics). Plasma protein concentration (Pp) was measured by refractometry . Plasma sodium (Na + ) and potassium (K

  14. Inflammatory cytokines and plasma redox status responses in hypertensive subjects after heat exposure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.F. Fonseca

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Hypertension is characterized by a pro-inflammatory status, including redox imbalance and increased levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines, which may be exacerbated after heat exposure. However, the effects of heat exposure, specifically in individuals with inflammatory chronic diseases such as hypertension, are complex and not well understood. This study compared the effects of heat exposure on plasma cytokine levels and redox status parameters in 8 hypertensive (H and 8 normotensive (N subjects (age: 46.5±1.3 and 45.6±1.4 years old, body mass index: 25.8±0.8 and 25.6±0.6 kg/m2, mean arterial pressure: 98.0±2.8 and 86.0±2.3 mmHg, respectively. They remained at rest in a sitting position for 10 min in a thermoneutral environment (22°C followed by 30 min in a heated environmental chamber (38°C and 60% relative humidity. Blood samples were collected before and after heat exposure. Plasma cytokine levels were measured using sandwich ELISA kits. Plasma redox status was determined by thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS levels and ferric reducing ability of plasma (FRAP. Hypertensive subjects showed higher plasma levels of IL-10 at baseline (P<0.05, although levels of this cytokine were similar between groups after heat exposure. Moreover, after heat exposure, hypertensive individuals showed higher plasma levels of soluble TNF receptor (sTNFR1 and lower TBARS (P<0.01 and FRAP (P<0.05 levels. Controlled hypertensive subjects, who use angiotensin-converting-enzyme inhibitor (ACE inhibitors, present an anti-inflammatory status and balanced redox status. Nevertheless, exposure to a heat stress condition seems to cause an imbalance in the redox status and an unregulated inflammatory response.

  15. Results of direct measurements of the plasma potential using a laser-heated emissive probe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schrittwieser, R.; Sarma, A.; Amarandei, G.; Ionita, C. [Univ. of Innsbruck (Austria). Inst. for Ion Physics; Klinger, T.; Grulke, O.; Vogelsang, A.; Windisch, T. [Max Planck Inst. for Plasma Physics, Greifswald (Germany)

    2006-04-15

    Reliable diagnostics of the plasma potential is one of the most important challenges in context with the production, control and confinement of a plasma. Emissive probes are readily available as direct diagnostic tools for the plasma potential with a good temporal and spatial resolution in many plasmas, even up to middle-sized fusion experiments. We present the results of investigations on the heating of lanthanum hexaboride and graphite with an infrared diode laser and on the development of a laser-heated emissive probe. Such a probe has a higher electron emission, much longer life time and better time response than a conventional emissive wire probe. We have observed that from both materials electron emission current can be achieved sufficiently strongly even for dense laboratory and experimental fusion plasmas.

  16. Heat Transport Simulation for Atmospheric-Pressure High-Density Microgap Plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kono, Akihiro; Shibata, Tomoyuki; Aramaki, Mitsutoshi

    2006-02-01

    Atmospheric-pressure cw high-density plasma can be produced in a microgap between two knife-edge electrodes by microwave excitation. A possible application of such a plasma is as an excimer light source and for this purpose the gas temperature in the plasma is a particularly important parameter. In this paper we report a fluid dynamic simulation of heat transport in the microgap plasma and compare the results with previously studied experimental gas temperature characteristics (e.g., dependence on the microwave power and the forced gas flow rate). The simulation explains reasonably well the experimental results when the effect of local gas density change on the gas heating process is taken into consideration. Discussion is given that the existence of thermally driven convection in the microgap plasma indicated in a preliminary report is incorrect.

  17. Numerical Simulation of the Self-Heating Effect Induced by Electron Beam Plasma in Atmosphere

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    邓永锋; 谭畅; 韩先伟; 谭永华

    2012-01-01

    For exploiting advantages of electron beam air plasma in some unusual applications, a Monte Carlo (MC) model coupled with heat transfer model is established to simulate the characteristics of electron beam air plasma by considering the self-heating effect. Based on the model, the electron beam induced temperature field and the related plasma properties are investigated. The results indicate that a nonuniform temperature field is formed in the electron beam plasma region and the average temperature is of the order of 600 K. Moreover, much larger volume pear-shaped electron beam plasma is produced in hot state rather than in cold state. The beam ranges can, with beam energies of 75 keV and 80 keV, exceed 1.0 m and 1.2 m in air at pressure of 100 torr, respectively. Finally, a well verified formula is obtained for calculating the range of high energy electron beam in atmosphere.

  18. Self-diffusion in a stochastically heated two-dimensional dusty plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheridan, T. E.

    2016-09-01

    Diffusion in a two-dimensional dusty plasma liquid (i.e., a Yukawa liquid) is studied experimentally. The dusty plasma liquid is heated stochastically by a surrounding three-dimensional toroidal dusty plasma gas which acts as a thermal reservoir. The measured dust velocity distribution functions are isotropic Maxwellians, giving a well-defined kinetic temperature. The mean-square displacement for dust particles is found to increase linearly with time, indicating normal diffusion. The measured diffusion coefficients increase approximately linearly with temperature. The effective collision rate is dominated by collective dust-dust interactions rather than neutral gas drag, and is comparable to the dusty-plasma frequency.

  19. INVESTIGATION OF MACHINABILITY IN Co AND Cr CONTAINING HARD MATERIALS HEATED BY PLASMA ARC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Halis Çelik

    1996-02-01

    Full Text Available Turning soft materials is not a problem in these days. But machinability of hard materials have been necessary. A lot of research has been done on machinability of difficult-to-cut materials. The aim of the present study is toinvestigate the machinability of three of hard materials after heating and softening. In this study for machining difficult-to-cut materials, different heating processes were applied and for heating, lately developed plasma heating method was used. To cut the hard material heated by plasma arc, tungsten carbide cutting tool was used. In the study, three different hard materials have been used. These were ferritic steel with 14 % Cr, Ti added cast iron, 8.5 % Cr cast steel and Co-Cr-W alloyed steel which is called stellite 6 and used in the textile industry andat power stations. In this study cutting forces, wear of cutting tool and surface roughness were investigated.

  20. Charging and Heating Dynamics of Nanoparticles in Nonthermal Plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kortshagen, Uwe R.

    2014-08-15

    The focus of this award was to understand the interactions of nanometer-sized particles with ionized gases, also called plasmas. Plasmas are widely used in the fabrication of electronic circuits such as microprocessors and memory devices, in plasma display panels, as well as in medical applications. Recently, these ionized gases are finding applications in the synthesis of advanced nanomaterials with novel properties, which are based on nanometer-sized particulate (nanoparticles) building blocks. As these nanoparticles grow in the plasma environment, they interact with the plasmas species such as electrons and ions which critically determines the nanoparticle properties. The University of Minnesota researchers conducting this project performed numerical simulations and developed analytical models that described the interaction of plasma-bound nanoparticles with the plasma ions. The plasma ions bombard the nanoparticle surface with substantial energy, which can result in the rearrangement of the nanoparticles’ atoms, giving them often desirable structures at the atomic scale. Being able to tune the ion energies allows to control the properties of nanoparticles produced in order to tailor their attributes for certain applications. For instance, when used in high efficiency light emitting devices, nanoparticles produced under high fluxes of highly energetic ions may show superior light emission to particles produced under low fluxes of less energetic ions. The analytical models developed by the University of Minnesota researchers enable the research community to easily determine the energy of ions bombarding the nanoparticles. The researchers extensively tested the validity of the analytical models by comparing them to sophisticated computer simulations based on stochastic particle modeling, also called Monte Carlo modeling, which simulated the motion of hundreds of thousands of ions and their interaction with the nanoparticle surfaces. Beyond the scientific

  1. Low energy, high power hydrogen neutral beam for plasma heating

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deichuli, P.; Davydenko, V.; Ivanov, A., E-mail: ivanov@inp.nsk.su; Mishagin, V.; Sorokin, A.; Stupishin, N. [Budker Institute of Nuclear Physics, Prospect Lavrentieva 11, 630090 Novosibirsk (Russian Federation); Korepanov, S.; Smirnov, A. [Tri Alpha Energy, Inc., Foothill Ranch, California 92610 (United States)

    2015-11-15

    A high power, relatively low energy neutral beam injector was developed to upgrade of the neutral beam system of the gas dynamic trap device and C2-U experiment. The ion source of the injector produces a proton beam with the particle energy of 15 keV, current of up to 175 A, and pulse duration of a few milliseconds. The plasma emitter of the ion source is produced by superimposing highly ionized plasma jets from an array of four arc-discharge plasma generators. A multipole magnetic field produced with permanent magnets at the periphery of the plasma box is used to increase the efficiency and improve the uniformity of the plasma emitter. Multi-slit grids with 48% transparency are fabricated from bronze plates, which are spherically shaped to provide geometrical beam focusing. The focal length of the Ion Optical System (IOS) is 3.5 m and the initial beam diameter is 34 cm. The IOS geometry and grid potentials were optimized numerically to ensure accurate beam formation. The measured angular divergences of the beam are ±0.01 rad parallel to the slits and ±0.03 rad in the transverse direction.

  2. Microwave heating systems for atmospheric pressure: Nonequilibrium plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guest, G.E.; Dandl, R.A. (AMPC, Inc., Carlsbad, CA (USA))

    1989-03-01

    Nonequilibrium plasma-chemical processing is attracting increasing interest because of the possibility of creating mixtures of active species that would not be available in thermal equilibrium. For significant throughput of reactants it would be advantageous to create nonequilibrium plasmas in large volumes of atmospheric-pressure mixtures of gases. Techniques for accomplishing this are very limited at present. Here they describe a novel microwave approach to creating nonequilibrium plasmas in large volumes of atmospheric-pressure gases using pulses of microwave radiation with very high peak power that are focused by quasi-optical techniques at one or more points in the interior of the reaction chamber. A new type of microwave source, the Plasma Electron Microwave Source (PEMS), is able to produce the require power levels by storing cw microwave power in a mirror-confined, relativistic-electron plasma and periodically transforming a fraction of that stored energy into intense microwave pulses. This approach avoids many of the limitations inherent in resonant cavity approaches and is expected to permit ultrahigh purity discharges to be produced.

  3. Low energy, high power hydrogen neutral beam for plasma heating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deichuli, P.; Davydenko, V.; Ivanov, A.; Korepanov, S.; Mishagin, V.; Smirnov, A.; Sorokin, A.; Stupishin, N.

    2015-11-01

    A high power, relatively low energy neutral beam injector was developed to upgrade of the neutral beam system of the gas dynamic trap device and C2-U experiment. The ion source of the injector produces a proton beam with the particle energy of 15 keV, current of up to 175 A, and pulse duration of a few milliseconds. The plasma emitter of the ion source is produced by superimposing highly ionized plasma jets from an array of four arc-discharge plasma generators. A multipole magnetic field produced with permanent magnets at the periphery of the plasma box is used to increase the efficiency and improve the uniformity of the plasma emitter. Multi-slit grids with 48% transparency are fabricated from bronze plates, which are spherically shaped to provide geometrical beam focusing. The focal length of the Ion Optical System (IOS) is 3.5 m and the initial beam diameter is 34 cm. The IOS geometry and grid potentials were optimized numerically to ensure accurate beam formation. The measured angular divergences of the beam are ±0.01 rad parallel to the slits and ±0.03 rad in the transverse direction.

  4. Formation of Multicharged Metal Ions in Vacuum Arc Plasma Heated by Gyrotron Radiation%Formation of Multicharged Metal Ions in Vacuum Arc Plasma Heated by Gyrotron Radiation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    G. Yu. YUSHKOV; K. P. SAVKIN; A. G. NIKOLAEV; E. M. OKS; A.V. VODOPYANOV; I. V. IZOTOV; D. A. MANSFELD

    2011-01-01

    A new method for the generation of high charged state metal ion beams is developed. This method is based on microwave heating of vacuum arc plasma in a magnetic trap under electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) conditions. Two gyrotrons for plasma heating were used, which were with the following parameters. The first is with a wave frequency of 37.5 GHz, a pulse duration of 1 ms and power of 100 kW, another is with 75 GHz, 0.15 ms and 400 kW. Two different magnetic traps were considered for vacuum arc plasma confinement. The first one is a simple mirror trap. Such system was already investigated and could provide high charge state ions. The second trap was with a cusp magnetic field configuration with native "minimum-B" field structure. Two different ways of metal plasma injection into the magnetic trap were used. The first one is an axial injection from an arc source located out of the trap, and the second is a radial injection from four arc sources mounted at the center of the trap. Both traps provide up to 200 eMA of ion beam current for platinum ions with highest charge state 10+. Ion beams were successfully extracted from the plasma and accelerated by a voltage of up to 20 kV.

  5. Predictions of Alpha Heating in ITER L-mode and H-mode Plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    R.V. Budny

    2011-01-06

    Predictions of alpha heating in L-mode and H-mode DT plasmas in ITER are generated using the PTRANSP code. The baseline toroidal field of 5.3 T, plasma current ramped to 15 MA and a flat electron density profile ramped to Greenwald fraction 0.85 are assumed. Various combinations of external heating by negative ion neutral beam injection, ion cyclotron resonance, and electron cyclotron resonance are assumed to start half-way up the density ramp. The time evolution of plasma temperatures and, for some cases, toroidal rotation are predicted assuming GLF23 and boundary parameters. Significant toroidal rotation and flow-shearing rates are predicted by GLF23 even in the L-mode phase with low boundary temperatures, and the alpha heating power is predicted to be significant if the power threshold for the transition to H-mode is higher than the planned total heating power. The alpha heating is predicted to be 8-76 MW in L-mode at full density. External heating mixes with higher beam injection power have higher alpha heating power. Alternatively if the toroidal rotation is predicted assuming that the ratio of the momentum to thermal ion energy conductivity is 0.5, the flow-shearing rate is predicted to have insignificant effects on the GLF23- predicted temperatures, and alpha heating is predicted to be 8-20 MW. In H-mode plasmas the alpha heating is predicted to depend sensitively on the assumed pedestal temperatures. Cases with fusion gain greater than 10 are predicted to have alpha heating greater than 80 MW.

  6. On RF heating of inhomogeneous collisional plasma under ion-cyclotron resonance conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Timofeev, A. V., E-mail: Timofeev-AV@nrcki.ru [Kurchatov Institute (Russian Federation)

    2015-11-15

    During ion-cyclotron resonance (ICR) heating of plasma by the magnetic beach method, as well as in some other versions of ICR heating, it is necessary to excite Alfvén oscillations. In this case, it is difficult to avoid the phenomenon of the Alfvén resonance, in which Alfvén oscillations transform into lower hybrid oscillations. The latter efficiently interact with electrons, due to which most of the deposited RF energy is spent on electron (rather than ion) heating. The Alfvén resonance takes place due to plasma inhomogeneity across the external magnetic field. Therefore, it could be expected that variations in the plasma density profile would substantially affect the efficiency of the interaction of RF fields with charged particles. However, the results obtained for different plasma density profiles proved to be nearly the same. In the present work, a plasma is considered the parameters of which correspond to those planned in future ICR plasma heating experiments on the PS-1 facility at the Kurchatov Institute. When analyzing the interaction of RF fields with charged particles, both the collisionless resonance interaction and the interaction caused by Coulomb collisions are taken into account, because, in those experiments, the Coulomb collision frequency will be comparable with the frequency of the heating field. Antennas used for ICR heating excite RF oscillations with a wide spectrum of wavenumbers along the magnetic field. After averaging over the spectrum, the absorbed RF energy calculated with allowance for collisions turns out to be close to that absorbed in collisionless plasma, the energy fraction absorbed by electrons being substantially larger than that absorbed by ions.

  7. On RF heating of inhomogeneous collisional plasma under ion-cyclotron resonance conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timofeev, A. V.

    2015-11-01

    During ion-cyclotron resonance (ICR) heating of plasma by the magnetic beach method, as well as in some other versions of ICR heating, it is necessary to excite Alfvén oscillations. In this case, it is difficult to avoid the phenomenon of the Alfvén resonance, in which Alfvén oscillations transform into lower hybrid oscillations. The latter efficiently interact with electrons, due to which most of the deposited RF energy is spent on electron (rather than ion) heating. The Alfvén resonance takes place due to plasma inhomogeneity across the external magnetic field. Therefore, it could be expected that variations in the plasma density profile would substantially affect the efficiency of the interaction of RF fields with charged particles. However, the results obtained for different plasma density profiles proved to be nearly the same. In the present work, a plasma is considered the parameters of which correspond to those planned in future ICR plasma heating experiments on the PS-1 facility at the Kurchatov Institute. When analyzing the interaction of RF fields with charged particles, both the collisionless resonance interaction and the interaction caused by Coulomb collisions are taken into account, because, in those experiments, the Coulomb collision frequency will be comparable with the frequency of the heating field. Antennas used for ICR heating excite RF oscillations with a wide spectrum of wavenumbers along the magnetic field. After averaging over the spectrum, the absorbed RF energy calculated with allowance for collisions turns out to be close to that absorbed in collisionless plasma, the energy fraction absorbed by electrons being substantially larger than that absorbed by ions.

  8. Heat loads in inboard limited L-mode plasmas in TCV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nespoli, F., E-mail: federico.nespoli@epfl.ch; Labit, B.; Furno, I.; Canal, G.P.; Fasoli, A.

    2015-08-15

    Infrared thermography is used in TCV to measure the heat flux deposited onto the graphite tiles of the inner wall. The heat flux radial profile is found to be well described by the sum of a main parallel component and a non negligible cross-field component. The latter accounts for about 20% of the deposited heat flux. The parallel component shows an enhancement around the contact point in all discharges under consideration. Main plasma parameters, such as density, current, elongation and triangularity have been varied, allowing for empirical scalings of the heat fluxes.

  9. Heat Transfer from a dc Laminar Plasma-Jet Flow to Different Solid Surfaces

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    孟显; 潘文霞; 吴承康

    2003-01-01

    The heat flux distributions were measured by using transient method for an argon dc laminar plasma-jet flow impinging normally on a plate surface embedded with copper probes. Different powders were coated on the probe surfaces and the effect of powder coatings on the heat transfer from jet flow to the probe surface was examined.Experimental results show that the maximum values of the heat flux to the probe increase with the coating of fine metal powders, while for the surfaces coated with fine ceramic powders, the maximum values of heat flux decrease, compared with that to the bare copper probe surface.

  10. Environmental heat effects on growth, plasma T3, and postheat compensatory effects on Holstein calves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baccari, F; Johnson, H D; Hahn, G L

    1983-07-01

    Five Holstein heifers, 5 months of age, were housed in the Missouri Climatic Laboratory and subjected to an experiment to measure the effects of heat stress on rates of growth, plasma triiodothyronine (T3) levels, and ability to compensate in rate of gain and thyroid function following the stress period. The experiment consisted of 3 weeks at thermoneutral (TN1), followed by 5 weeks of individually controlled heat stress conditions (32.5 to 34 degrees C) dependent on heat tolerance of individual animals. This was followed by a 4-week thermoneutral, postheat compensatory period (TN2). Average daily gains were significantly depressed during the heat stress period (HS). Following heat stress the average body weights attained the projected or expected levels within a 21- to 28-day period following return of animals to thermoneutral conditions. Ratios of feed intake/body weight (w0.75) were reduced during heat stress treatment indicating the thermal inhibition. Ratios or amount of feed intake per unit of gain were greater during HS treatment indicating less weight gain per unit of daily feed intake. Plasma T3 was reduced during heat treatment similarly to daily weight gain. Following the postheat treatment period (TN2) plasma T3 increased markedly as did daily weight gains to demonstrate strong compensatory responses in both measures. In summary, these results demonstrated parallel and positive changes of plasma T3 with daily weight gain during thermoneutral, heat, and postheat compensatory periods, and an inverse relationship of rectal temperature to weight gain and plasma T3.

  11. Plasma nitriding of AISI 52100 ball bearing steel and effect of heat treatment on nitrided layer

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Ravindra Kumar; J Alphonsa; Ram Prakash; K S Boob; J Ghanshyam; P A Rayjada; P M Raole; S Mukherjee

    2011-02-01

    In this paper an effort has been made to plasma nitride the ball bearing steel AISI 52100. The difficulty with this specific steel is that its tempering temperature (∼170–200°C) is much lower than the standard processing temperature (∼460–580°C) needed for the plasma nitriding treatment. To understand the mechanism, effect of heat treatment on the nitrided layer steel is investigated. Experiments are performed on three different types of ball bearing races i.e. annealed, quenched and quench-tempered samples. Different gas compositions and process temperatures are maintained while nitriding these samples. In the quenched and quench-tempered samples, the surface hardness has decreased after plasma nitriding process. Plasma nitriding of annealed sample with argon and nitrogen gas mixture gives higher hardness in comparison to the hydrogen–nitrogen gas mixture. It is reported that the later heat treatment of the plasma nitrided annealed sample has shown improvement in the hardness of this steel. X-ray diffraction analysis shows that the dominant phases in the plasma nitrided annealed sample are (Fe2−3N) and (Fe4N), whereas in the plasma nitrided annealed sample with later heat treatment only -Fe peak occurs.

  12. Electron heating via the self-excited plasma series resonance in geometrically symmetric multi-frequency capacitive plasmas

    CERN Document Server

    Schuengel, E; Donko, Z; Korolov, I; Derzsi, A; Schulze, J

    2016-01-01

    The self-excitation of Plasma Series Resonance (PSR) oscillations plays an important role in the electron heating dynamics in Capacitively Coupled Radio Frequency (CCRF) plasmas. In a combined approach of PIC/MCC simulations and a theoretical model based on an equivalent circuit, we investigate the self-excitation of PSR oscillations and their effect on the electron heating in geometrically symmetric CCRF plasmas driven by multiple consecutive harmonics. The discharge symmetry is controlled via the Electrical Asymmetry Effect, i.e. by varying the total number of harmonics and tuning the phase shifts between them. It is demonstrated that PSR oscillations will be self-excited under both symmetric and asymmetric conditions, if (i) the charge-voltage relation of the plasma sheaths deviates from a simple quadratic behavior and if (ii) the inductance of the plasma bulk exhibits a temporal modulation. These two effects have been neglected up to now, but we show that they must be included in the model in order to pro...

  13. Reduction of trapped ion anomalous heating by in situ surface plasma cleaning

    CERN Document Server

    McConnell, Robert; Chiaverini, John; Sage, Jeremy

    2015-01-01

    Anomalous motional heating is a major obstacle to scalable quantum information processing with trapped ions. While the source of this heating is not yet understood, several previous studies suggest that surface contaminants may be largely responsible. We demonstrate an improvement by a factor of four in the room-temperature heating rate of a niobium surface electrode trap by in situ plasma cleaning of the trap surface. This surface treatment was performed with a simple homebuilt coil assembly and commercially-available matching network and is considerably gentler than other treatments, such as ion milling or laser cleaning, that have previously been shown to improve ion heating rates. We do not see an improvement in the heating rate when the trap is operated at cryogenic temperatures, pointing to a role of thermally-activated surface contaminants in motional heating whose activity may freeze out at low temperatures.

  14. Observation of ion acceleration and heating during collisionless magnetic reconnection in a laboratory plasma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoo, Jongsoo; Yamada, Masaaki; Ji, Hantao; Myers, Clayton E

    2013-05-24

    The ion dynamics in a collisionless magnetic reconnection layer are studied in a laboratory plasma. The measured in-plane plasma potential profile, which is established by electrons accelerated around the electron diffusion region, shows a saddle-shaped structure that is wider and deeper towards the outflow direction. This potential structure ballistically accelerates ions near the separatrices toward the outflow direction. Ions are heated as they travel into the high-pressure downstream region.

  15. Non-thermal electron populations in microwave heated plasmas investigated with X-ray detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Belapure, Jaydeep Sanjay

    2013-04-15

    An investigation of the generation and dynamics of superthermal electrons in fusion plasma is carried out. A SDD+CsI(Tl) based X-ray diagnostic is constructed, characterized and installed at ASDEX Upgrade. In various plasma heating power and densities, the fraction and the energy distribution of the superthermal electrons is obtained by a bi-Maxwellian model and compared with Fokker-Planck simulations.

  16. Heat treatment process of new NdFeB magnet prepared by spark plasma sintering

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李涛; 岳明; 张久兴; 王公平; 肖耀福; 王润

    2003-01-01

    In recent years, spark plasma sintering technique(SPS) has been a focus in the field of material preparation due to its advantages. SPS technique is first introduced for preparation of high quality NdFeB magnets. The effects of heat treatment process on the magnetic properties of SPS NdFeB magnet were investigated. Meanwhile, the effects of heat treatment process on the microstructure, tropism and dimensional precision of the SPS NdFeB magnets were also studied. The high quality NdFeB magnets with fine grains were prepared under proper heat treatment process. The results show that the magnetic properties of SPS NdFeB can be further improved through proper heat treatment process. Meanwhile, the experiment also demonstrates that it is feasible to prepare near-net-shape NdFeB magnets with fine grains and high magnetic property by spark plasma sintering.

  17. Modeling of limiter heat loads and impurity transport in Wendelstein 7-X startup plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Effenberg, Florian; Feng, Y.; Frerichs, H.; Schmitz, O.; Hoelbe, H.; Koenig, R.; Krychowiak, M.; Pedersen, T. S.; Bozhenkov, S.; Reiter, D.

    2015-11-01

    The quasi-isodynamic stellarator Wendelstein 7-X starts plasma operation in a limiter configuration. The field consists of closed magnetic flux surfaces avoiding magnetic islands in the plasma boundary. Because of the small size of the limiters and the absence of wall-protecting elements in this phase, limiter heat loads and impurity generation due to plasma surface interaction become a concern. These issues are studied with the 3D fluid plasma edge and kinetic neutral transport code EMC3-Eirene. It is shown that the 3D SOL consists of three separate helical magnetic flux bundles of different field line connection lengths. A density scan at input power of 4MW reveals a strong modulation of the plasma paramters with the connection length. The limiter peak heat fluxes drop from 14 MWm-2 down to 10 MWm-2 with raising the density from 1 ×1018m-3 to 1.9 ×1019m-3, accompanied by an increase of the heat flux channel widths λq. Radiative power losses can help to avoid thermal overloads of the limiters at the upper margin of the heating power. The power removal feasibility of the intrinsic carbon and other extrinsic light impurities via active gas injection is discussed as a preparation of this method for island divertor operation. Work supported in part by start up funds of the Department of Engineering Physics at the University of Wisconsin - Madison, USA and by the U.S. Department of Energy under grant DE-SC0013911.

  18. Alpha Heating in ITER L-mode and H-mode Plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    R.V. Budny

    2011-07-18

    There are many uses of predictions of ITER plasma performance. One is assessing requirements of different plasma regimes. For instance, what current drive and control are needed for steady state. The heating, current drive, and torque systems planned for initial DT operation are negative ion neutral beam injection (NB), ion cyclotron resonance (IC), and electron cyclotron resonance (EC). Which combinations of heating are optimal. What are benefits of the torques, current drive, and fueling using NB. What are the shine-through power and optimum voltage for the NB? What are optimal locations and aiming of the EC launchers? Another application is nuclear licensing (e.g. System integrity, how many neutrons).

  19. Analytical model of particle and heat flux collection by dust immersed in dense magnetized plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vignitchouk, L.; Ratynskaia, S.; Tolias, P.

    2017-10-01

    A comprehensive analytical description is presented for the particle and heat fluxes collected by dust in dense magnetized plasmas. Compared to the widely used orbital motion limited theory, the suppression of cross-field transport leads to a strong reduction of the electron fluxes, while ion collection is inhibited by thin-sheath effects and the formation of a potential overshoot along the field lines. As a result, the incoming heat flux loses its sensitivity to the floating potential, thereby diminishing the importance of electron emission processes in dust survivability. Numerical simulations implementing the new model for ITER-like detached divertor plasmas predict a drastic enhancement of the dust lifetime.

  20. Heat Transfer to a Particle Exposed to a Rarefied Plasma with a Great Temperature Gradient

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XiChen; XinTao

    1993-01-01

    A kinetic-theory analysis is presented concerning the heat transfer from a rarefiled plasma to a spherical particle for the extreme case of free-molecule regime and thin phasma sheath.A great temperature gradient is assumed to exist in the plasma,and thus a non-Maxwellian velocity distribution function is employed for each of the gas species.Analytical results show that the existence of a temperature in employed for each of the gas species,Analytical results show that the existence of a temperature gradient in the plasma causes a nonuniform distribution of the local heat flux density on the sphere surface,while the total heat flux to the whole particle is independent of the temperature gradient.The nonuniformity of the local heat flux distributioln is small even for the case with a temperature gradient as great as 106 K/m,but it may significantly enhance the thermophoretic force on an evaporating particle,Heat transfer is mainly caused by atome at low gas temperatures with negligible ionization degree,while it can be attributed to ions and electrons at high plasma temperatures.

  1. Classical Heat-Flux Measurements in Coronal Plasmas from Collective Thomson-Scattering Spectra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henchen, R. J.; Hu, S. X.; Katz, J.; Froula, D. H.; Rozmus, W.

    2016-10-01

    Collective Thomson scattering was used to measure heat flux in coronal plasmas. The relative amplitude of the Thomson-scattered power into the up- and downshifted electron plasma wave features was used to determine the flux of electrons moving along the temperature gradient at three to four times the electron thermal velocity. Simultaneously, the ion-acoustic wave features were measured. Their relative amplitude was used to measure the flux of the return-current electrons. The frequencies of these ion-acoustic and electron plasma wave features provide local measurements of the electron temperature and density. These spectra were obtained at five locations along the temperature gradient in a laser-produced blowoff plasma. These measurements of plasma parameters are used to infer the Spitzer-Härm flux (qSH = - κ∇Te ) and are in good agreement with the values of the heat flux measured from the scattering-feature asymmetries. Additional experiments probed plasma waves perpendicular to the temperature gradient. The data show small effects resulting from heat flux compared to probing waves along the temperature gradient. This material is based upon work supported by the Department of Energy National Nuclear Security Administration under Award Number DE-NA0001944.

  2. Development and experimental evaluation of theoretical models for ion cyclotron resonance frequency heating of tokamak plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mantsinen, M. [Helsinki Univ. of Technology, Espoo (Finland). Dept. of Technical Physics

    1999-06-01

    Heating with electromagnetic waves in the ion cyclotron range of frequencies (ICRF) is a well-established method for auxiliary heating of present-day tokamak plasmas and is envisaged as one of the main heating techniques for the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) and future reactor plasmas. In order to predict the performance of ICRF heating in future machines, it is important to benchmark present theoretical modelling with experimental results on present tokamaks. This thesis reports on development and experimental evaluation of theoretical models for ICRF heating at the Joint European Torus (JET). Several ICRF physics effects and scenarios have been studied. Direct importance to the ITER is the theoretical analysis of ICRF heating experiments with deuterium-tritium (D-T) plasmas. These experiments clearly demonstrate the potential of ICRF heating for auxiliary heating of reactor plasmas. In particular, scenarios with potential for good bulk ion heating and enhanced D-T fusion reactivity have been identified. Good bulk ion heating is essential for reactor plasmas in order to obtain a high ion temperature and a high fusion reactivity. In JET good bulk ion heating with ICRF waves has been achieved in high-performance discharges by adding ICRF heating to neutral beam injection. In these experiments, as in other JET discharges where damping at higher harmonics of the ion cyclotron frequency takes place, so-called finite Larmor radius (FLR) effects play an important role. Due to FLR effects, the resonating ion velocity distribution function can have a strong influence on the power deposition. Evidence for this effect has been obtained from the third harmonic deuterium heating experiments. Because of FLR effects, the wave-particle interaction can also become weak at certain ion energies, which prevents resonating ions from reaching higher energies. When interacting with the wave, an ion receives not only a change in energy but also a change in

  3. Turbulent acceleration and heating in toroidal magnetized plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garbet, X.; Esteve, D.; Sarazin, Y.; Abiteboul, J.; Bourdelle, C.; Dif-Pradalier, G.; Ghendrih, P.; Grandgirard, V.; Latu, G. [CEA, IRFM, F-13108 St. Paul-lez-Durance cedex (France); Smolyakov, A. [Department of Physics and Engineering Physics, University of Saskatchewan, 116 Science Place, Saskatoon, Saskatchewan S7N 5E2 (Canada)

    2013-07-15

    It is shown that turbulence is responsible for a source of momentum, which cannot be recast as a divergence of a momentum flux. This process is similar to turbulent heating, with similar properties. The sum over all species vanishes up to polarization contributions. Hence, toroidal momentum is transferred from species to species, mediated by turbulence. As for momentum flux, symmetry breaking is needed. Flow shear is investigated as a source of symmetry breaking, leading to a source of momentum proportional to the shear rate. Turbulent acceleration is significant for ion species. It is found that it is proportional to the charge number Z, while turbulent heating scales as Z{sup 2}/A, where A is the mass number. It is maximum in the edge, where the E × B flow shear rate and turbulence intensity are maximum. When both are large enough, the turbulent torque may overcome the collisional friction between impurities and main ions, thus leading to different toroidal velocities.

  4. Turbulent acceleration and heating in toroidal magnetized plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garbet, X.; Esteve, D.; Sarazin, Y.; Abiteboul, J.; Bourdelle, C.; Dif-Pradalier, G.; Ghendrih, P.; Grandgirard, V.; Latu, G.; Smolyakov, A.

    2013-07-01

    It is shown that turbulence is responsible for a source of momentum, which cannot be recast as a divergence of a momentum flux. This process is similar to turbulent heating, with similar properties. The sum over all species vanishes up to polarization contributions. Hence, toroidal momentum is transferred from species to species, mediated by turbulence. As for momentum flux, symmetry breaking is needed. Flow shear is investigated as a source of symmetry breaking, leading to a source of momentum proportional to the shear rate. Turbulent acceleration is significant for ion species. It is found that it is proportional to the charge number Z, while turbulent heating scales as Z2/A, where A is the mass number. It is maximum in the edge, where the E × B flow shear rate and turbulence intensity are maximum. When both are large enough, the turbulent torque may overcome the collisional friction between impurities and main ions, thus leading to different toroidal velocities.

  5. Evaporation of Droplets in Plasma Spray-Physical Vapor Deposition Based on Energy Compensation Between Self-Cooling and Plasma Heat Transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Mei-Jun; Zhang, Meng; Zhang, Qiang; Yang, Guan-Jun; Li, Cheng-Xin; Li, Chang-Jiu

    2017-08-01

    In the plasma spray-physical vapor deposition process (PS-PVD), there is no obvious heating to the feedstock powders due to the free molecular flow condition of the open plasma jet. However, this is in contrast to recent experiments in which the molten droplets are transformed into vapor atoms in the open plasma jet. In this work, to better understand the heating process of feedstock powders in the open plasma jet of PS-PVD, an evaporation model of molten ZrO2 is established by examining the heat and mass transfer process of molten ZrO2. The results reveal that the heat flux in PS-PVD open plasma jet (about 106 W/m2) is smaller than that in the plasma torch nozzle (about 108 W/m2). However, the flying distance of molten ZrO2 in the open plasma jet is much longer than that in the plasma torch nozzle, so the heating in the open plasma jet cannot be ignored. The results of the evaporation model show that the molten ZrO2 can be partly evaporated by self-cooling, whereas the molten ZrO2 with a diameter heat transfer.

  6. Calorimetric measurement of heat load in full non-inductive LHCD plasmas on TRIAM-1M

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanada, K.; Shinoda, N.; Sugata, T.; Sasaki, K.; Zushi, H.; Nakamura, K.; Sato, K. N.; Sakamoto, M.; Idei, H.; Hasegawa, M.; Kawasaki, S.; Nakashima, H.; Higashijima, A.; Triam Group

    2007-06-01

    Calorimetric measurements using the temperature increment of cooling-water were carried out to estimate the heat load distribution on the plasma facing components (PFCs) in the limiter discharges on TRIAM-1M. Line averaged electron density, ne, and LH power, PLH, dependences of the heat load on PFCs were measured. The heat load on the limiters was proportional to ne1.5 in the range of ne = 0.2-1.0 × 1019 m-3 and PLH1 in the range of PLH = 0.005-0.09 MW. For PLH > 0.1 MW, the plasma transition to an enhanced current drive (ECD) mode appeared and the ne dependences on the heat load on the limiter moderated. This indicates that the heat flux to scrape-off layer (SOL) region was reduced due to the improvement of the plasma confinement. The up-down asymmetry of the heat load on the vacuum vessel was enhanced in the ECD mode, which may be caused by the increasing of the direct loss of energetic electrons.

  7. Neutron Flux Measurements in an ICRF Mode Conversion Regime Heating Plasmas on HT-7

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Xiao-Ling; WAN Bao-Nian; ZHONG Guo-Qiang; HU Li-Qun; LIN Shi-Yao; ZHANG Xin-Jun; ZANG Qing

    2011-01-01

    Ion cyclotron resonance heating experiments using antenna, in the high Reid side (HFS) have been carried out on HT-7 in different target plasmas. Unlike a standard-mode conversion heating scheme with dominant electron heating, anomalous ion heating and DD neutron fluxes higher than those estimated from thermal ions were observed in the present experiments with the ion-ion hybrid resonant layer near the center of plasma. The features of ion cyclotron range frequency (ICRF) antenna in HFS and experiments suggest that this is most probably due to the nonlinear 3/2 harmonic deuterium heating by the mode-converted ion Bernstein wave, which could produce a high energy tail on ion energy distribution.%Ion cyclotron resonance heating experiments using antenna in the high field side (HFS) have been carried out on HT-7 in different target plasmas.Unlike a standard-mode conversion heating scheme with dominant electron heating,anomalous ion heating and DD neutron fluxes higher than those estimated from thermal ions were observed in the present experiments with the ion-ion hybrid resonant layer near the center of plasma.The features of ion cyclotron range frequency (ICRF) antenna in HFS and experiments suggest that this is most probably due to the nonlinear 3/2 harmonic deuterium heating by the mode-converted ion Bernstein wave,which could produce a high energy tail on ion energy distribution.Neutron diagnostics have been applied in ion cyclotron range frequency (ICRF) plasmas on HT-7 for measurements of the fusion reaction product,which give a direct measure of the ICRF heating.The neutron emission is recorded by a 3He proportional counter,whose sensitive size is φ30 mm × 300 mm,gas pressure is 49.34 kPa and the responsibility to thermal neutrons is 133 cps/n.cm-2.s-1.It exploits large reaction cross sections and is therefore embedded in polythene moderators to thermalize the incident neutrons.

  8. Anomalous inverse bremsstrahlung heating of laser-driven plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kundu, Mrityunjay

    2016-05-01

    Absorption of laser light in plasma via electron-ion collision (inverse bremsstrahlung) is known to decrease with the laser intensity as I 0 -3/2 or with the electron temperature as T e -3/2 where Coulomb logarithm ln Λ = 0.5ln(1 + k 2 min/k 2 max) in the expression of electron-ion collision frequency v ei is assumed to be independent of ponderomotive velocity v 0 = E0/ω which is unjustified. Here k -1 min = v th/max(ω, ω p), and k -1 max = Z/v 2 th are maximum and minimum cut-off distances of the colliding electron from the ion, v th = √T e is its thermal velocity, ω, ω p are laser and plasma frequency. Earlier with a total velocity v = (v 2 0 + v 2 th)1/2 dependent ln Λ(v) it was reported that v ei and corresponding fractional laser absorption (α) initially increases with increasing intensity, reaches a maximum value, and then fall according to the conventional I 0 -3/2 scaling. This anomalous increase in v ei and α may be objected due to an artifact introduced in ln Λ(v) through k-1 min ∝ v. Here we show similar anomalous increase of v ei and α versus I 0 (in the low temperature and under-dense density regime) with quantum and classical kinetic models of v ei without using ln Λ, but a proper choice of the total velocity dependent inverse cut-off length kmax -1 ∝ v 2 (in classical case) or kmax ∝ v (in quantum case). For a given I 0 15 eV, anomalous growth of vei and a disappear. The total velocity dependent k max in kinetic models, as proposed here, may explain anomalous increase of a with I 0 measured in some earlier laser-plasma experiments. This work may be important to understand collisional absorption in the under-dense pre-plasma region due to low intensity pre-pulses and amplified spontaneous emission (ASE) pedestal in the context of laser induced inertial confinement fusion.

  9. Research methods of plasma stream interaction with heat-resistant materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tyuftyaev, A. S.; Gadzhiev, M. Kh; Sargsyan, M. A.; Chinnov, V. F.; Demirov, N. A.; Kavyrshin, D. I.; Ageev, A. G.; Khromov, M. A.

    2016-11-01

    An experimental automated system was designed and constructed for studying the parameters and characteristics of non-stationary interacting system high-enthalpy-plasma stream-investigated sample: enthalpy of plasma in the incident stream; speed and temperature of plasma stream; temperature of electrons and heavy particles, ionic composition and their spatial distribution; heat flux incident on the sample (kW/cm2); surface temperature of the sample; ablation of the sample material, and others. Measurements of achievable plasma heat flux levels are carried out by calorimetry of plasma streams incident on the surface of multisection copper calorimeter. Determination of acceleration characteristics for profiled plasma torch nozzle, as well as the gas flow rate is produced by measuring the total pressure using the Pitot tube. Video visualization of interacting system is carried out using synchronized high-speed cameras. Micropyrometry of the selected zone on the sample surface is carried out by high-speed, three-wavelength pyrometer. To measure the rate of mass loss of the sample, in addition to the weighing method of evaluation the methods of laser knife and two-position stereoscopy are used. Plasma and sample emission characteristics are performed with two separate spectrometers.

  10. Plasma hyperosmolality improves tolerance to combined heat stress and central hypovolemia in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gagnon, Daniel; Romero, Steven A; Ngo, Hai; Poh, Paula Y S; Crandall, Craig G

    2017-03-01

    Heat stress profoundly impairs tolerance to central hypovolemia in humans via a number of mechanisms including heat-induced hypovolemia. However, heat stress also elevates plasma osmolality; the effects of which on tolerance to central hypovolemia remain unknown. This study examined the effect of plasma hyperosmolality on tolerance to central hypovolemia in heat-stressed humans. With the use of a counterbalanced and crossover design, 12 subjects (1 female) received intravenous infusion of either 0.9% iso-osmotic (ISO) or 3.0% hyperosmotic (HYPER) saline. Subjects were subsequently heated until core temperature increased ~1.4°C, after which all subjects underwent progressive lower-body negative pressure (LBNP) to presyncope. Plasma hyperosmolality improved LBNP tolerance (ISO: 288 ± 193 vs. 382 ± 145 mmHg × min, P = 0.04). However, no differences in mean arterial pressure (P = 0.10), heart rate (P = 0.09), or muscle sympathetic nerve activity (P = 0.60, n = 6) were observed between conditions. When individual data were assessed, LBNP tolerance improved ≥25% in eight subjects but remained unchanged in the remaining four subjects. In subjects who exhibited improved LBNP tolerance, plasma hyperosmolality resulted in elevated mean arterial pressure (ISO: 62 ± 10 vs. 72 ± 9 mmHg, P < 0.01) and a greater increase in heart rate (ISO: +12 ± 24 vs. HYPER: +23 ± 17 beats/min, P = 0.05) before presyncope. No differences in these variables were observed between conditions in subjects that did not improve LBNP tolerance (all P ≥ 0.55). These results suggest that plasma hyperosmolality improves tolerance to central hypovolemia during heat stress in most, but not all, individuals. Copyright © 2017 the American Physiological Society.

  11. Joule-heating-supported plasma filamentation and branching during subcritical microwave irradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Masayuki; Kageyama, Yoshiaki; Ohnishi, Naofumi

    2017-05-01

    Breakdown physics induced by a subcritical microwave was numerically reproduced by using a two-dimensional effective diffusion model for plasma transport and combining it with Maxwell's equations and a neutral gas dynamics equation. A discrete plasma structure was obtained when E0,rms/Ec ≧0.69 , where E0,rms is the root-mean-square of the incident electric field and Ec is the breakdown threshold, because an overcritical field that exceeded the breakdown threshold was formed in a region away from the bulk plasma by the wave reflection when the plasma reflectivity was increased by joule heating. However, a continuous plasma structure with a branching pattern was formed when E0,rms/Ec <0.69 because the enhanced electric-field region away from the bulk plasma never exceeded the breakdown threshold even when the plasma reflectivity increased. The propagation speed of the plasma front drastically decreased when E0,rms/Ec <0.69 because the plasma propagation was sustained by strong gas expansion, which required more time than wave-reflection and ionization processes.

  12. Literature review of arc/plasma, combustion, and joule-heated melter vitrification systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Freeman, C.J.; Abrigo, G.P.; Shafer, P.J.; Merrill, R.A.

    1995-07-01

    This report provides reviews of papers and reports for three basic categories of melters: arc/plasma-heated melters, combustion-heated melters, and joule-heated melters. The literature reviewed here represents those publications which may lend insight to phase I testing of low-level waste vitrification being performed at the Hanford Site in FY 1995. For each melter category, information from those papers and reports containing enough information to determine steady-state mass balance data is tabulated at the end of each section. The tables show the composition of the feed processed, the off-gas measured via decontamination factors, gross energy consumptions, and processing rates, among other data.

  13. NIFS joint research meeting on plasma facing components, PSI, and heat/particle control

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamashina, T. [Hokkaido Univ., Sapporo (Japan)

    1997-10-01

    The LHD collaboration has been started in 1996. Particle and heat control is one of the categories for the collaboration, and a few programs have been nominated in these two years. A joint research meeting on PFC, PSI, heat and particle meeting was held at NIFS on June 27, 1997, in which present status of these programs were reported. This is a collection of the notes and view graphs presented in this meeting. Brief reviews and research plan of each program are included in relation to divertor erosion and sputtering, impurity generation, hydrogen recycling, edge plasma structure, edge transport and its control, heat removal, particle exhaust, wall conditioning etc. (author)

  14. ECE diagnostic of high temperature ECRH heated plasmas on FTU

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zerbini, M; Buratti, P; Tudisco, O; Giruzzi, G; Bruschi, A; Cirant, S; Granucci, G; Simonetto, A; Sozzi, C; Gandini, F; Pacella, D; Fournier, K B; Finkenthal, M

    2000-01-31

    The Electron Cyclotron Emission (ECE) diagnostic on FTU tokamak is routinely performed with a Michelson interferometer with spectral range extending up to 1300 GHz. The diagnostic allowed accurate electron temperature measurements during the recent 140 Ghz Electron Cyclotron Resonance Heating (ECRH) experiments on FTU. Very accurate measurements have been performed on a wide range of electron temperatures and profile peaking. The ECE measurements have been compared with Thomson Scattering and with observations of X-ray spectra from highly stripped molybdenum ions. The suprathermal emission in these conditions has been studied.

  15. Plasma heating, electric fields and plasma flow by electron beam ionospheric injection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winckler, J. R.; Erickson, K. N.

    1990-01-01

    The electric fields and the floating potentials of a Plasma Diagnostics Payload (PDP) located near a powerful electron beam injected from a large sounding rocket into the auroral zone ionosphere have been studied. As the PDP drifted away from the beam laterally, it surveyed a region of hot plasma extending nearly to 60 m radius. Large polarization electric fields transverse to B were imbedded in this hot plasma, which displayed large ELF wave variations and also an average pattern which has led to a model of the plasma flow about the negative line potential of the beam resembling a hydrodynamic vortex in a uniform flow field. Most of the present results are derived from the ECHO 6 sounding rocket mission.

  16. The First Principle Formula of the Relativistic Heat Conductivity of Coulomb Electronic Plasmas

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    TIAN Chu-Shun; ZHANG Chi; LU Quan-Kang

    2001-01-01

    Making use of the relativistic BBGKY technique,the relativistic generalization of Landau collision integral is obtained.Furthermore,we calculate the relativistic hydrodynamic modes up to the second order in the hydrodynamic wave number.Combining Résibois' method,we present the first principle formula of the relativistic heat conductivity of Coulomb electronic plasmas for low-order corrections.

  17. Synergistic effects of hydrogen plasma exposure, pulsed laser heating and temperature on rhodium surfaces

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Marot, L.; De Temmerman, G.; Doerner, R. P.; Umstadter, K.; Wagner, R. S.; Mathys, D.; Duggelin, M.; Meyer, E.

    2013-01-01

    The combined effect of hydrogen plasma exposure and surface heating, either continuous or by short laser pulses (5 ns), on the surface morphology of rhodium layers has been studied. Investigations were performed by reflectivity measurements, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray

  18. Finite element analysis of keyhole plasma arc welding based on an adaptive heat source mode

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hu Qingxian; Wu Chuansong; Zhang Yuming

    2007-01-01

    An adaptive heat source mode is proposed to account for the keyhole effect and the characteristics of volumetric distribution along the direction of the workpiece thickness. Finite element analysis of the temperature field in keyhole plasma arc welding is conducted and the weld geometry is obtained. The predicted results are in agreement with the measured ones.

  19. The Structure of Plasma Heating in Gyrokinetic Alfv\\'enic Turbulence

    CERN Document Server

    Navarro, A B; Told, D; Groselj, D; Crandall, P; Jenko, F

    2016-01-01

    We analyze plasma heating in weakly collisional kinetic Alfv\\'en wave (KAW) turbulence using high resolution gyrokinetic simulations spanning the range of scales between the ion and the electron gyroradii. Real space structures that have a higher than average heating rate are shown not to be confined to current sheets. This novel result is at odds with previous studies, which use the electromagnetic work in the local electron fluid frame, i.e. $\\mathbf{J} \\!\\cdot\\! (\\mathbf{E} + \\mathbf{v}_e\\times\\mathbf{B})$, as a proxy for turbulent dissipation to argue that heating follows the intermittent spatial structure of the electric current. Furthermore, we show that electrons are dominated by parallel heating while the ions prefer the perpendicular heating route. We comment on the implications of the results presented here.

  20. ELM simulation experiments on Pilot-PSI using simultaneous high flux plasma and transient heat/particle source

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Temmerman, G.; Zielinski, J. J.; van Diepen, S.; Marot, L.; Price, M.

    2011-01-01

    A new experimental setup has been developed for edge localized mode (ELM) simulation experiments with relevant steady-state plasma conditions and transient heat/particle source. The setup is based on the Pilot-PSI linear plasma device and allows the superimposition of a transient heat/particle pulse

  1. HHFW Heating and Current Drive Studies of NSTX H-Mode Plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    G. Taylor, P.T. Bonoli, D.L. Green, R.W. Harvey, J.C. Hosea, E.F. Jaeger, B.P. LeBlanc, R. Maingi, C.K. Phillips, P.M. Ryan, E.J. Valeo, J.R. Wilson, J.C. Wright, and the NSTX Team

    2011-06-08

    30 MHz high-harmonic fast wave (HHFW) heating and current drive are being developed to assist fully non-inductive plasma current (I{sub p}) ramp-up in NSTX. The initial approach to achieving this goal has been to heat I{sub p} = 300 kA inductive plasmas with current drive antenna phasing in order to generate an HHFW H-mode with significant bootstrap and RF-driven current. Recent experiments, using only 1.4 MW of RF power (P{sub RF}), achieved a noninductive current fraction, f{sub NI} {approx} 0.65. Improved antenna conditioning resulted in the generation of I{sub p} = 650 kA HHFW H-mode plasmas, with f{sub NI} {approx} 0.35, when P{sub RF} {ge} 2.5 MW. These plasmas have little or no edge localized mode (ELM) activity during HHFW heating, a substantial increase in stored energy and a sustained central electron temperature of 5-6 keV. Another focus of NSTX HHFW research is to heat an H-mode generated by 90 keV neutral beam injection (NBI). Improved HHFW coupling to NBI-generated H-modes has resulted in a broad increase in electron temperature profile when HHFW heating is applied. Analysis of a closely matched pair of NBI and HHFW+NBI H-mode plasmas revealed that about half of the antenna power is deposited inside the last closed flux surface (LCFS). Of the power damped inside the LCFS about two-thirds is absorbed directly by electrons and one-third accelerates fast-ions that are mostly promptly lost from the plasma. At longer toroidal launch wavelengths, HHFW+NBI H-mode plasmas can have an RF power flow to the divertor outside the LCFS that significantly reduces RF power deposition to the core. ELMs can also reduce RF power deposition to the core and increase power deposition to the edge. Recent full wave modeling of NSTX HHFW+NBI H-mode plasmas, with the model extended to the vessel wall, predicts a coaxial standing mode between the LCFS and the wall that can have large amplitudes at longer launch wavelengths. These simulation results qualitatively agree with HHFW

  2. ITER-relevant transient heat loads on tungsten exposed to plasma and beryllium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, J. H.; Doerner, R. P.; Dittmar, T.; Höschen, T.; Schwarz-Selinger, T.; Baldwin, M. J.

    2014-04-01

    Tungsten (W) is presently the most attractive plasma facing material for future fusion reactors. Off-normal transient events such as edge localized modes and disruptions are simulated with a pulsed laser system in the PISCES-B facility, providing pulses with 1-10 ms duration with absorbed heat flux factors up to ˜90 MJ m-2 s-1/2. This paper characterizes surface morphology changes and damage thresholds under transient heating on W exposed to He plasma or D plasma with and without Be coatings. W is damaged in the form of grain growth, surface roughening, melting and cracking. With a Be coating on the order of μm thick, the laser pulse produces a variety of Be surface changes including Be-W alloying, vaporization of the Be layer, melting and delamination.

  3. The effect of quantum correction on plasma electron heating in ultraviolet laser interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zare, S.; Yazdani, E.; Sadighi-Bonabi, R.; Anvari, A.; Hora, H.

    2015-04-01

    The interaction of the sub-picosecond UV laser in sub-relativistic intensities with deuterium is investigated. At high plasma temperatures, based on the quantum correction in the collision frequency, the electron heating and the ion block generation in plasma are studied. It is found that due to the quantum correction, the electron heating increases considerably and the electron temperature uniformly reaches up to the maximum value of 4.91 × 107 K. Considering the quantum correction, the electron temperature at the laser initial coupling stage is improved more than 66.55% of the amount achieved in the classical model. As a consequence, by the modified collision frequency, the ion block is accelerated quicker with higher maximum velocity in comparison with the one by the classical collision frequency. This study proves the necessity of considering a quantum mechanical correction in the collision frequency at high plasma temperatures.

  4. The effect of quantum correction on plasma electron heating in ultraviolet laser interaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zare, S.; Sadighi-Bonabi, R., E-mail: Sadighi@sharif.ir; Anvari, A. [Department of Physics, Sharif University of Technology, P.O. Box 11365-9567, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Yazdani, E. [Department of Energy Engineering and Physics, Amirkabir University of Technology, P.O. Box 15875-4413, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Hora, H. [Department of Theoretical Physics, University of New South Wales, Sydney 2052 (Australia)

    2015-04-14

    The interaction of the sub-picosecond UV laser in sub-relativistic intensities with deuterium is investigated. At high plasma temperatures, based on the quantum correction in the collision frequency, the electron heating and the ion block generation in plasma are studied. It is found that due to the quantum correction, the electron heating increases considerably and the electron temperature uniformly reaches up to the maximum value of 4.91 × 10{sup 7 }K. Considering the quantum correction, the electron temperature at the laser initial coupling stage is improved more than 66.55% of the amount achieved in the classical model. As a consequence, by the modified collision frequency, the ion block is accelerated quicker with higher maximum velocity in comparison with the one by the classical collision frequency. This study proves the necessity of considering a quantum mechanical correction in the collision frequency at high plasma temperatures.

  5. A study of quasi-mode parametric excitations in lower-hybrid heating of tokamak plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villalon, E.; Bers, A.

    1980-03-01

    A detailed linear and non-linear analysis of quasi-mode parametric excitations, relevant to experiments in supplementary heating of tokamak plasmas, is presented. The linear analysis includes the full ion-cyclotron harmonic quasi-mode spectrum, while the nonlinear one, considering depletion of the pump electric field, is applied to the recent Alcator A heating experiment. The quasi-mode excitations are studied independently for the plasma edge and the main bulk of the plasma, and for the two typical regimes in overall density. It is concluded that the excited spectrum has a frequency close to the initial pump frequency, while the wave-number spectrum may be different from the initial linear spectrum.

  6. Electron heat transport in current carrying and currentless thermonuclear plasmas. Tokamaks and stellarators compared

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peters, M.

    1996-01-16

    In the first experiment the plasma current in the RTP tokamak is varied. Here the underlying idea was to check whether at a low plasma current, transport in the tokamak resembles transport in stellarators more than at higher currents. Secondly, experiments have been done to study the relation of the diffusivity {chi} to the temperature and its gradient in both W7-AS and RTP. In this case the underlying idea was to find the explanation for the phenomenon observed in both tokamaks and stellarators that the quality of the confinement degrades when more heating is applied. A possible explanation is that the diffusivity increases with the temperature or its gradient. Whereas in standard tokamak and stellarator experiments the temperature and its gradient are strongly correlated, a special capability of the plasma heating system of W7-AS and RTP can force them to decouple. (orig.).

  7. Heat Transfer and Reconnection Diffusion in Turbulent Magnetized Plasmas

    CERN Document Server

    Lazarian, A

    2011-01-01

    It is well known that magnetic fields constrain motions of charged particles, impeding the diffusion of charged particles perpendicular to magnetic field direction. This modification of transport processes is of vital importance for a wide variety of astrophysical processes including cosmic ray transport, transfer of heavy elements in the interstellar medium, star formation etc. Dealing with these processes one should keep in mind that in realistic astrophysical conditions magnetized fluids are turbulent. In this review we single out a single transport process, namely, heat transfer and consider how it occurs in the presence of the magnetized turbulence. We show that the ability of magnetic field lines to constantly change topology and connectivity is at the heart of the correct description of the 3D magnetic field stochasticity in turbulent fluids. This ability is ensured by fast magnetic reconnection in turbulent fluids and puts forward the concept of reconnection diffusion at the core of the physical pictu...

  8. Plasma Heating in Highly Excited GaN/AlGaN Multiple Quantum Wells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Botchkarev, A; Chow, W W; Jiang, H X; Lin, J Y; Mair, R; Morkoc, H; Zeng, K C

    1998-10-09

    Plasma Heating in Highly Excited GaN/AIGaN Multiple Quantum @@lvEu Wells w f + 1998 %p, K. C. Zeng, R. Mair, J. Y. Liz and H. X. Jiang a) ` fabrication and understanding of MQW lasers [2-5]. For the design of these lasers, one on RT optical studies. Our results revealed that in the GaN/AIGaN MQWS, plasma heating strongly effects the carrier distribution between the confined and unconfined band-to-band and fke excitonic transitions [7]. In the MQW sample under low the unconfined states as determined from the band structure. sample under high Lxc, we varied the excitation intensity by one order of magnitude from 0.110 to IO. The carrier density is estimated to be about N=1012/cm2 (at UC= 0.1 Io) to 1013/cm2 (at 1=== l.). We plotted the PL spectra for four representative excitation fimction of injected carrier density N (open squares). The ratio starts at a value of about 18% for N=1012/cm2 (& = O. lb), and reaches a value over 64 `XO for N=1013/cm2 (& = regions is a loss to optical gain. The carrier density is ve~ high in our experiment and an electron-hole plasma (EHP) state is expected. Because the carrier transfer process plasma temperature. The laser pump energy is about 4.3 eV, which is far above the energy band gap of the sample studied here. This may result in a hot carrier population carrier densities and plasma temperatures. Using a phenomenological expression based The calculated ratio of carriers in the unconfked to the confined states (Ima~ kf) as a finction of carrier density at different temperatures are plotted in Fig. 3 (solid lines). The figure shows that the experiment results can only be explained by plasma heating of the injected carriers at high & ( TP > TJ. The transparency carrier densities for GaN/AIXGal.XN MQW structures with well thickness from 2 to 4 nm were calculated to be around 1x 1012/cm2 [10]. It is thus obvious from Fig. 3 that under high carrier injection density above the transparency density, the plasma temperature, TP, is no

  9. Simultaneous application of microbial transglutaminase and high hydrostatic pressure to improve heat induced gelation of pork plasma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fort, N; Lanier, T C; Amato, P M; Carretero, C; Saguer, E

    2008-11-01

    The effects of treating porcine plasma with microbial tranglutaminase (MTGase) under high hydrostatic pressure (HHP) were studied as a means of improving its gel-forming properties when subsequently heated at pH 5.5, near the pH of meats. Plasma containing varying levels of commercial MTGase was pressurized (400MPa, room temperature, pH 7) for different times, and adjusted to pH 5.5 prior to heating to induce gelation. MTGase-treatment under HHP led to greater enhancement of heat-induced plasma gel properties as compared to control samples. The greatest improvements were achieved by pressurising plasma with 43.3U MTGase/g protein for 30min, thereby achieving recoveries of 49% and 63% in fracture force (gel strength) and fracture distance (gel deformability) of the subsequently heat-induced gels, respectively, relative to gel properties obtained by heating untreated plasma at physiological conditions (pH 7.5).

  10. Diffusive, convective and Nernst-effect losses of magnetic flux and heat from a wall-confined magnetized plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velikovich, A. L.; Giuliani, J. L.; Zalesak, S. T.

    2013-10-01

    The recently proposed MAGLIF approach to inertial fusion ignition involves compression and heating of plasma with frozen-in magnetic flux by a heavy cylindrical liner. To reach fusion conditions, the compressed plasma should retain a large fraction of the magnetic flux and thermal energy enclosed by the liner. Magnetic flux and heat losses from strongly magnetized plasma to a cold liner wall are significantly influenced by the Nernst and Ettingshausen thermomagnetic effects. We present exact analytical solutions of 1D MHD equations with Ohmic heating, heat conductivity and thermomagnetic terms included and discuss relative roles of diffusive, conductive and Nernst-effect-related losses of magnetic flux and heat from the magnetized plasma to the wall. These solutions are compared to our 1D simulation results. They can serve for verification of plasma transport modeling by MHD codes. Work supported by DOE/NNSA.

  11. Observation of heat flux and plasma flow in scrape off layer in QUEST

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Onchi, T., E-mail: onchi@triam.kyushu-u.ac.jp [RIAM, Kyushu University, 6-1 Kasugakoen, Kasuga, Fukuoka 816-8580 (Japan); Mahira, Y. [IGSES, Kyushu University, 6-1 Kasugakoen, Kasuga, Fukuoka 816-8580 (Japan); Nagaoka, K. [National Institute for Fusion Science,322-6 Oroshi-cho, Toki 509-5292 (Japan); Tashima, S.; Banerjee, S.; Mishra, K. [IGSES, Kyushu University, 6-1 Kasugakoen, Kasuga, Fukuoka 816-8580 (Japan); Idei, H.; Hanada, K.; Nakamura, K.; Fujisawa, A.; Nagashima, Y.; Hasegawa, M. [RIAM, Kyushu University, 6-1 Kasugakoen, Kasuga, Fukuoka 816-8580 (Japan); Matsuoka, K. [National Institute for Fusion Science,322-6 Oroshi-cho, Toki 509-5292 (Japan); Kuzmin, A.; Watanabe, O.; Kawasaki, S.; Nakashima, H.; Higashijima, A. [RIAM, Kyushu University, 6-1 Kasugakoen, Kasuga, Fukuoka 816-8580 (Japan)

    2015-08-15

    Thermal probe with double function of thermocouples and Langmuir probe has been developed, and the initial data observed in far-SOL in QUEST is obtained. Heat flux of megawatt per square meters related to energetic electrons and sonic plasma flow in far-SOL have been observed in the current rump-up phase although no high power inductive force like ohmic winding is applied. The heat flux and the flow are suppressed after the current is built up. In the quasi-steady state, plasma current starts and keeps sawtooth-like oscillation with 20 Hz frequency. The heat flux and the flow in far-SOL have clear responses to the oscillation.

  12. MM-wave cyclotron auto-resonance maser for plasma heating

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ceccuzzi, S.; Ravera, G. L.; Tuccillo, A. A. [Associazione Euratom-ENEA sulla Fusione, C.R. Frascati, Via Enrico Fermi 45, 00044, Frascati, Roma (Italy); Dattoli, G.; Di Palma, E.; Doria, A.; Gallerano, G. P.; Giovenale, E.; Spassovsky, I.; Surrenti, V. [ENEA UTAPRAD, C.R. Frascati, Via Enrico Fermi 45, 00044, Frascati, Roma (Italy); Mirizzi, F. [Consorzio CREATE, Via Claudio 21, 80125, Napoli (Italy)

    2014-02-12

    Heating and Current Drive systems are of outstanding relevance in fusion plasmas, magnetically confined in tokamak devices, as they provide the tools to reach, sustain and control burning conditions. Heating systems based on the electron cyclotron resonance (ECRH) have been extensively exploited on past and present machines DEMO, and the future reactor will require high frequencies. Therefore, high power (≥1MW) RF sources with output frequency in the 200 - 300 GHz range would be necessary. A promising source is the so called Cyclotron Auto-Resonance Maser (CARM). Preliminary results of the conceptual design of a CARM device for plasma heating, carried out at ENEA-Frascati will be presented together with the planned R and D development.

  13. Fast ion generation and bulk plasma heating with three-ion ICRF scenarios

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kazakov, Ye. O., E-mail: yevgen.kazakov@rma.ac.be; Van Eester, D.; Ongena, J.; Lerche, E.; Messiaen, A. [Laboratory for Plasma Physics, LPP-ERM/KMS, EUROfusion Consortium Member, Brussels (Belgium); Dumont, R. [CEA, IRFM, F-13108 Saint-Paul-lez-Durance (France)

    2015-12-10

    Launching electromagnetic waves in the ion cyclotron range of frequencies (ICRF) is an efficient method of plasma heating, actively employed in most of fusion machines. ICRF has a number of important supplementary applications, including the generation of high-energy ions. In this paper, we discuss a new set of three-ion ICRF scenarios and the prospect of their use as a dedicated tool for fast ion generation in tokamaks and stellarators. A distinct feature of these scenarios is a strong absorption efficiency possible at very low concentrations of resonant minority ions (∼ 1% or even below). Such concentration levels are typical for impurities contaminating fusion plasmas. An alternative ICRF scenario for maximizing the efficiency of bulk D-T ion heating is suggested for JET and ITER tokamaks, which is based on three-ion ICRF heating of intrinsic Beryllium impurities.

  14. MM-wave cyclotron auto-resonance maser for plasma heating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ceccuzzi, S.; Dattoli, G.; Di Palma, E.; Doria, A.; Gallerano, G. P.; Giovenale, E.; Mirizzi, F.; Spassovsky, I.; Ravera, G. L.; Surrenti, V.; Tuccillo, A. A.

    2014-02-01

    Heating and Current Drive systems are of outstanding relevance in fusion plasmas, magnetically confined in tokamak devices, as they provide the tools to reach, sustain and control burning conditions. Heating systems based on the electron cyclotron resonance (ECRH) have been extensively exploited on past and present machines DEMO, and the future reactor will require high frequencies. Therefore, high power (≥1MW) RF sources with output frequency in the 200 - 300 GHz range would be necessary. A promising source is the so called Cyclotron Auto-Resonance Maser (CARM). Preliminary results of the conceptual design of a CARM device for plasma heating, carried out at ENEA-Frascati will be presented together with the planned R&D development.

  15. Fast ion generation and bulk plasma heating with three-ion ICRF scenarios

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kazakov, Ye. O.; Van Eester, D.; Dumont, R.; Ongena, J.; Lerche, E.; Messiaen, A.

    2015-12-01

    Launching electromagnetic waves in the ion cyclotron range of frequencies (ICRF) is an efficient method of plasma heating, actively employed in most of fusion machines. ICRF has a number of important supplementary applications, including the generation of high-energy ions. In this paper, we discuss a new set of three-ion ICRF scenarios and the prospect of their use as a dedicated tool for fast ion generation in tokamaks and stellarators. A distinct feature of these scenarios is a strong absorption efficiency possible at very low concentrations of resonant minority ions (˜ 1% or even below). Such concentration levels are typical for impurities contaminating fusion plasmas. An alternative ICRF scenario for maximizing the efficiency of bulk D-T ion heating is suggested for JET and ITER tokamaks, which is based on three-ion ICRF heating of intrinsic Beryllium impurities.

  16. Modeling the heating and atomic kinetics of a photoionized neon plasma experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lockard, Tom E.

    Motivated by gas cell photoionized plasma experiments performed by our group at the Z facility of Sandia National Laboratories, we discuss in this dissertation a modeling study of the heating and ionization of the plasma for conditions characteristic of these experiments. Photoionized plasmas are non-equilibrium systems driven by a broadband x-ray radiation flux. They are commonly found in astrophysics but rarely seen in the laboratory. Several modeling tools have been employed: (1) a view-factor computer code constrained with side x-ray power and gated monochromatic image measurements of the z-pinch radiation, to model the time-history of the photon-energy resolved x-ray flux driving the photoionized plasma, (2) a Boltzmann self-consistent electron and atomic kinetics model to simulate the electron distribution function and configuration-averaged atomic kinetics, (3) a radiation-hydrodynamics code with inline non-equilibrium atomic kinetics to perform a comprehensive numerical simulation of the experiment and plasma heating, and (4) steady-state and time-dependent collisional-radiative atomic kinetics calculations with fine-structure energy level description to assess transient effects in the ionization and charge state distribution of the plasma. The results indicate that the photon-energy resolved x-ray flux impinging on the front window of the gas cell is very well approximated by a linear combination of three geometrically-diluted Planckian distributions. Knowledge of the spectral details of the x-ray drive turned out to be important for the heating and ionization of the plasma. The free electrons in the plasma thermalize quickly relative to the timescales associated with the time-history of the x-ray drive and the plasma atomic kinetics. Hence, electrons are well described by a Maxwellian energy distribution of a single temperature. This finding is important to support the application of a radiation-hydrodynamic model to simulate the experiment. It is found

  17. Initial Operation of the Miniaturized Inductively Heated Plasma Generator IPG6

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dropmann, Michael; Herdrich, Georg; Laufer, Rene; Koch, Helmut; Gomringer, Chris; Cook, Mike; Schmoke, Jimmy; Matthews, Lorin; Hyde, Truell

    2012-10-01

    In close collaboration between the Center for Astrophysics, Space Physics and Engineering Research (CASPER) at Baylor University, Texas, and the Institute of Space Systems (IRS) at the University of Stuttgart, Germany, two plasma wind tunnel facilities of similar type have been established using the inductively heated plasma source IPG6 which is based on proven IRS designs. The facility at Baylor University (IPG6-B) works at a frequency of 13.56 MHz and a maximum power of 15 kW. A vacuum pump of 160m^3/h in combination with a butterfly valve allows pressure control in a wide range. First experiments have been conducted with Air, O2 and N2 as working gases and volumetric flow rates of up to 14 L/min at pressures of a few 100 Pa, although pressures below 1 Pa are achievable at lower flow rates. The maximum tested electric power so far was 8 kW. Plasma powers and total pressures in the plasma jet have been obtained. In the near future the set up of additional diagnostics, the use of other gases (i.e. H2, He), and the integration of a dust particle accelerator are planned. The intended fields of research are basic investigation in thermo-chemistry and plasma radiation, space plasma environments and high heat fluxes e.g. in fusion devices or during atmospheric entry of spacecraft.

  18. A Viscous Heating Mechanism for the Hot Plasma in the Galactic Center Region

    CERN Document Server

    Belmont, R

    2006-01-01

    In addition to lines originating in a soft phase at ~0.8 keV and to cold molecular clouds, the X-ray spectra from the Galactic center region also exhibit properties similar to those of a diffuse, thin, very hot plasma at 8 keV on a scale of hundreds of parsecs. This phase is surprising for more than one reason. First, such a hot plasma should not be bound to the Galactic plane and the power needed to sustain the escaping matter would be higher then any known source. Second, there is no known mechanism able to heat the plasma to more than a few keV. Recently we have suggested that, hydrogen having escaped, the hot plasma could be a helium plasma, heavy enough to be gravitationally confined. In this case, the required power is much more reasonable. We present here a possible heating mechanism which taps the gravitational energy of the molecular clouds. We note that the 8 keV plasma is highly viscous and we show how viscous friction of molecular clouds flowing within the hot phase can dissipate energy in the gas...

  19. High current multicharged metal ion source using high power gyrotron heating of vacuum arc plasma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vodopyanov, A V; Golubev, S V; Khizhnyak, V I; Mansfeld, D A; Nikolaev, A G; Oks, E M; Savkin, K P; Vizir, A V; Yushkov, G Yu

    2008-02-01

    A high current, multi charged, metal ion source using electron heating of vacuum arc plasma by high power gyrotron radiation has been developed. The plasma is confined in a simple mirror trap with peak magnetic field in the plug up to 2.5 T, mirror ratio of 3-5, and length variable from 15 to 20 cm. Plasma formed by a cathodic vacuum arc is injected into the trap either (i) axially using a compact vacuum arc plasma gun located on axis outside the mirror trap region or (ii) radially using four plasma guns surrounding the trap at midplane. Microwave heating of the mirror-confined, vacuum arc plasma is accomplished by gyrotron microwave radiation of frequency 75 GHz, power up to 200 kW, and pulse duration up to 150 micros, leading to additional stripping of metal ions by electron impact. Pulsed beams of platinum ions with charge state up to 10+, a mean charge state over 6+, and total (all charge states) beam current of a few hundred milliamperes have been formed.

  20. Development of plasma sources for ICRF heating experiment in KMAX mirror device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Xuan; Liu, Ming; Yi, Hongshen; Lin, Munan; Shi, Peiyun

    2016-10-01

    KMAX, Keda Mirror with AXisymmeticity, is a tandem mirror machine with a length of 10 meters and diameters of 1.2 meters in the central cell and 0.3 meters in the mirror throat. In the past experiments, the plasma was generated by helicon wave launched from the west end. We obtained the blue core mode in argon discharge, however, it cannot provide sufficient plasma for hydrogen discharge, which is at least 1012 cm-3 required for effective ICRF heating. Several attempts have thus been tried or under design to increase the central cell's plasma density: (1) a washer gun with aperture of 1cm has been successfully tested, and a plasma density of 1013 cm-3 was achieved in the west cell near the gun, however, the plasma is only 1011 cm-3 in the central cell possible due to the mirror trapping and/or neutral quenching effect (2) a larger washer gun with aperture of 2.5 cm and a higher power capacitor bank are being assembled in order to generate more plasmas. In addition, how to mitigate the neutrals is under consideration (3) A hot cathode is been designed and will be tested in combination with plasma gun or alone. Preliminary results from those plasma sources will be presented and discussed.

  1. Bulk ion acceleration and particle heating during magnetic reconnection in a laboratory plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoo, Jongsoo; Yamada, Masaaki; Ji, Hantao; Jara-Almonte, Jonathan; Myers, Clayton E. [Center for Magnetic Self-Organization, Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton, New Jersey 08543 (United States)

    2014-05-15

    Bulk ion acceleration and particle heating during magnetic reconnection are studied in the collisionless plasma of the Magnetic Reconnection Experiment (MRX). The plasma is in the two-fluid regime, where the motion of the ions is decoupled from that of the electrons within the ion diffusion region. The reconnection process studied here is quasi-symmetric since plasma parameters such as the magnitude of the reconnecting magnetic field, the plasma density, and temperature are compatible on each side of the current sheet. Our experimental data show that the in-plane (Hall) electric field plays a key role in ion heating and acceleration. The electrostatic potential that produces the in-plane electric field is established by electrons that are accelerated near the electron diffusion region. The in-plane profile of this electrostatic potential shows a “well” structure along the direction normal to the reconnection current sheet. This well becomes deeper and wider downstream as its boundary expands along the separatrices where the in-plane electric field is strongest. Since the in-plane electric field is 3–4 times larger than the out-of-plane reconnection electric field, it is the primary source of energy for the unmagnetized ions. With regard to ion acceleration, the Hall electric field causes ions near separatrices to be ballistically accelerated toward the outflow direction. Ion heating occurs as the accelerated ions travel into the high pressure downstream region. This downstream ion heating cannot be explained by classical, unmagnetized transport theory; instead, we conclude that ions are heated by re-magnetization of ions in the reconnection exhaust and collisions. Two-dimensional (2-D) simulations with the global geometry similar to MRX demonstrate downstream ion thermalization by the above mechanisms. Electrons are also significantly heated during reconnection. The electron temperature sharply increases across the separatrices and peaks just outside of the

  2. Development of Kabila rocket: A radioisotope heated thermionic plasma rocket engine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kalomba Mboyi

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available A new type of plasma rocket engine, the Kabila rocket, using a radioisotope heated thermionic heating chamber instead of a conventional combustion chamber or catalyst bed is introduced and it achieves specific impulses similar to the ones of conventional solid and bipropellant rockets. Curium-244 is chosen as a radioisotope heat source and a thermal reductive layer is also used to obtain precise thermionic emissions. The self-sufficiency principle is applied by simultaneously heating up the emitting material with the radioisotope decay heat and by powering the different valves of the plasma rocket engine with the same radioisotope decay heat using a radioisotope thermoelectric generator. This rocket engine is then benchmarked against a 1 N hydrazine thruster configuration operated on one of the Pleiades-HR-1 constellation spacecraft. A maximal specific impulse and power saving of respectively 529 s and 32% are achieved with helium as propellant. Its advantages are its power saving capability, high specific impulses and simultaneous ease of storage and restart. It can however be extremely voluminous and potentially hazardous. The Kabila rocket is found to bring great benefits to the existing spacecraft and further research should optimize its geometric characteristics and investigate the physical principals of its operation.

  3. Evolution of the electron temperature profile of ohmically heated plasmas in TFTR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taylor, G.; Efthimion, P.C.; Arunasalam, V.; Goldston, R.J.; Grek, B.; Hill, K.W.; Johnson, D.W.; McGuire, K.; Ramsey, A.T.; Stauffer, F.J.

    1985-08-01

    Blackbody electron cyclotron emission was used to ascertain and study the evolution and behavior of the electron temperature profile in ohmically heated plasmas in the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR). The emission was measured with absolutely calibrated millimeter wavelength radiometers. The temperature profile normalized to the central temperature and minor radius is observed to broaden substantially with decreasing limiter safety factor q/sub a/, and is insensitive to the plasma minor radius. Sawtooth activity was seen in the core of most TFTR discharges and appeared to be associated with a flattening of the electron temperature profile within the plasma core where q less than or equal to 1. Two types of sawtooth behavior were identified in large TFTR plasmas (minor radius, a less than or equal to 0.8 m) : a typically 35 to 40 msec period ''normal'' sawtooth, and a ''compound'' sawtooth with 70 to 80 msec period.

  4. Heat load and deuterium plasma effects on SPS and WSP tungsten

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vilémová Monika

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Tungsten is a prime choice for armor material in future nuclear fusion devices. For the realization of fusion, it is necessary to address issues related to the plasma–armor interactions. In this work, several types of tungsten material were studied, i.e. tungsten prepared by spark plasma sintering (SPS and by water stabilized plasma spraying (WSP technique. An intended surface porosity was created in the samples to model hydrogen/helium bubbles. The samples were subjected to a laser heat loading and a radiation loading of deuterium plasma to simulate edge plasma conditions of a nuclear fusion device (power density of 108 W/cm2 and 107 W/cm2, respectively, in the pulse intervals up to 200 ns. Thermally induced changes in the morphology and the damage to the studied surfaces are described. Possible consequences for the fusion device operation are pointed out.

  5. Heat flux limits on the plasma-facing components for a commercial fusion reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, X.R.; Tillack, M.S. [Univ. of California, San Diego, La Jolla, CA (United States); Sze, D.K. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Wong, C.P.C. [General Atomics, San Diego, CA (United States)

    1995-12-31

    In this work, the heat flux limits of conventional plasma-facing components (PFC) were examined. The limits are based on maximum allowable temperature and stress levels in the structures. The substrate materials considered were V, SiC composite and HT-9. The use of Cu also was considered. However, low temperature limits, activation and very limited radiation damage life time, make the using of Cu in a commercial power plant unattractive. With selected heat transfer enhancement, the heat flux allowable is about 5.3 MW/m{sup 2} for lithium-cooled V-alloy, 2.7 MW/m{sup 2} for helium-cooled SiC composite, and 2.7 MW/m{sup 2} for helium/water-cooled HT-9. Compared with the maximum heat flux attainable with Cu and cold water (13.4 MW/m{sup 2}), acceptable power plant materials place severe restrictions on heat removal. The thermal conductivity of SiC composite at 1,000 C and after irradiation is a factor of several lowered than the value the authors used. This indicates a need to examine the heat transfer problems associated with PFC, in terms of material development and enhancement in heat transfer. Physics regimes which can provide low peak and average heat flux should be pursued.

  6. Evaporation and Vapor Shielding of CFC Targets Exposed to Plasma Heat Fluxes Relevant to ITER ELMs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Safronov, V.; Arkhipov, N.I.; Toporkov, D.A.; Zhitlukhin, A.M. [Troitsk Inst. for Innovation and Fusion Research, TRINITI, Kostromskaya, 12A, 79, RU-142092 Troitsk, Moscow Region (Russian Federation); Landman, I. [FZK-Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe, Association Euratom-FZK, Technik und Umwelt, Postfach 3640, D-7602l Karlsruhe (Germany)

    2007-07-01

    Full text of publication follows: Carbon-fibre composite (CFC) is foreseen presently as armour material for the divertor target in ITER. During the transient processes such as instabilities of Edge Localized Modes (ELMs) the target as anticipated will be exposed to the plasma heat loads of a few MJ/m{sup 2} on the time scale of a fraction of ms, which causes an intense evaporation at the target surface and contaminates tokamak plasma by evaporated carbon. The ITER transient loads are not achievable at existing tokamaks therefore for testing divertor armour materials other facilities, in particular plasma guns are employed. In the present work the CFC targets have been tested for ITER at the plasma gun facility MK- 200 UG in Troitsk by ELM relevant heat fluxes. The targets in the applied magnetic field up to 2 T were irradiated by hydrogen plasma streams of diameter 6 - 8 cm, impact ion energy 2 - 3 keV, pulse duration 0.05 ms and energy density varying in the range 0.05 - 1 MJ/m{sup 2}. Primary attention has been focused on the measurement of evaporation threshold and investigation of carbon vapor properties. Fast infrared pyrometer, optical and VUV spectrometers, framing cameras and plasma calorimeters were applied as diagnostics. The paper reports the results obtained on the evaporation threshold of CFC, the evaporation rate of the carbon fibers oriented parallel and perpendicular to the exposed target surface, the velocity of carbon vapor motion along and across the magnetic field lines, and the parameters of carbon plasma such as temperature, density and ionization state measured up to the distance 15 cm at varying plasma load. First experimental results on investigation of the vapor shield onset conditions are presented also. (authors)

  7. Radiative heat transfer in plasma of pulsed high pressure caesium discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lapshin, V. F.

    2016-01-01

    Two-temperature many component gas dynamic model is used for the analysis of features of radiative heat transfer in pulsed high pressure caesium discharge plasma. It is shown that at a sufficiently high pressure the radial optical thickness of arc column is close to unit (τR (λ) ∼ 1) in most part of spectrum. In this case radiative heat transfer has not local character. In these conditions the photons which are emitted in any point of plasma volume are absorbed in other point remote from an emission point on considerable distance. As a result, the most part of the electric energy put in the discharge mainly near its axis is almost instantly redistributed on all volume of discharge column. In such discharge radial profiles of temperature are smooth. In case of low pressure, when discharge plasma is optically transparent for own radiation in the most part of a spectrum (τR(λ) << 1), the emission of radiation without reabsorption takes place. Radiative heat transfer in plasma has local character and profiles of temperature have considerable gradient.

  8. Growth enhancement effects of radish sprouts: atmospheric pressure plasma irradiation vs. heat shock

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarinont, T.; Amano, T.; Kitazaki, S.; Koga, K.; Uchida, G.; Shiratani, M.; Hayashi, N.

    2014-06-01

    We compare growth enhancement effects due to atmospheric air dielectric barrier discharge plasma irradiation and heat shock to seeds of radish sprouts (Raphanus sativus L.). Interactions between radicals and seeds in a short duration of 3 min. lead to the growth enhancement of radish sprouts in a long term of 7 days and the maximum average length is 3.7 times as long as that of control. The growth enhancement effects become gradually weak with time, and hence the ratio of the average length for plasma irradiation to that for control decreases from 3.7 for the first day to 1.3 for 7 day. The average length for heat shock of 60°C for 10 min. and 100°C for 3 min. is longer than that for control, and the maximum average length is 1.3 times as long as that of control. Heat shock has little contribution to the growth enhancement due to plasma irradiation, because the maximum temperature due to plasma irradiation is less than 60°C.

  9. Analysis and Interpretation of the Plasma Dynamic Response to Additional Heating Power using different Diagnostics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Manini, A

    2002-07-01

    The main goal in the research of nuclear fusion, and therefore in tokamak research as well, is the development of a high power, steady-state power plant. To obtain the high power required for igniting the plasma, the size of the device must be very large. The performance of the tokamak plasma depends in particular on the plasma shape and on the internal plasma profiles. These profiles include those of the current density and the pressure, two quantities that can be modified by means of auxiliary heating methods such as Electron Cyclotron Heating (ECH). ECH is a very important tool due to its capability of injecting highly localised and intense power. Off-axis ECH and Electron Cyclotron Current Drive (ECCD) modify both current density and electron temperature profiles, leading to modification of confinement and stability properties. in particular, complete stabilisation of magnetohydrodynamic modes using ECCD is feasible. Furthermore, ECH is crucial as a mean of increasing the bootstrap current fraction through the formation of internal transport barriers, so that confinement is also improved. Finally, it is also noted that modulated ECH (MECH) is a very effective tool for perturbative energy transport experiments in many different regimes. Experiments performed in the TCV and the ASDEX Upgrade tokamaks are presented. The role of TCV is very important due to its flexibility of varying the plasma shape, its versatile high power ECH system at both the second and third electron cyclotron harmonics, and due to the numerous diagnostics installed, e.g. the two soft X-ray (SXR) diagnostics which simultaneously allow high temporal and spatial resolutions. The importance of ASDEX Upgrade is related to its large size, which makes it a reactor-relevant experimental facility, and to the Neutral Beam Injection (NBI) and ECH heating facilities, which allow a study of heat and particle transport in either mostly ion-heated or mostly electron-heated regimes. Moreover, for the

  10. Effects of acute and chronic heat stress on plasma metabolites, hormones and oxidant status in restrictedly fed broiler breeders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Jingjing; Tang, Li; Lu, Lin; Zhang, Liyang; Lin, Xi; Liu, Hsiao-Ching; Odle, Jack; Luo, Xugang

    2015-07-01

    Heat tolerance can be improved by feed restriction in broiler chickens. It is unknown whether the same is true for broiler breeders, which are restrictedly fed. Therefore, the current study was conducted to study the effects of heat stress on plasma metabolites, hormones, and oxidative status of restricted fed broiler breeders with special emphases on the temperature and latency of heat exposure. In trial 1, 12 broiler breeders were kept either in a thermoneutral chamber (21°C, control, n = 6) or in a chamber with a step-wise increased environmental temperature from 21 to 33°C (21, 25, 29, 33°C, heat-stressed, n = 6). Changes in plasma total cholesterol, glucose, and triiodothyronine (T3) were closely related to the environmental temperature. When the temperature reached 29°C, plasma T3 (P stressed birds, whereas plasma glucose (P stressed birds than controls regardless of the temperatures applied. In Trial 2, 24 broiler breeders were divided into 2 groups and raised under 21°C and 32°C for 8 weeks, respectively. Total cholesterol was increased in chronic heat-stressed broiler breeders after 4 weeks. Plasma lactate dehydrogenase (LDH, P = 0.047) and glutamic-oxaloacetic transaminase (GOT, P = 0.036) was up-regulated after 6 weeks of thermal treatment, whereas plasma CK (P = 0.009) was increased at the end of thermal treatment. Plasma malonaldehyde, protein carbonyl content, activity of total superoxide dismutase (SOD), and corticosterone content were not altered after acute and prolonged heat challenges. Taken together, acute heat stress primarily resulted in disturbance of plasma metabolites, whereas chronic heat stress caused tissue damage reflected by increased plasma LDA, GOT, and CK. During acute heat stress, plasma metabolites were minimally disturbed in broiler breeders until the environmental temperature reached 33°C. © 2015 Poultry Science Association Inc.

  11. Thermal and electrical influences from bulk plasma in cathode heating modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Tang; Wang, Cheng; Zhang, Xiao-Ning; Zhang, Hao; Xia, Wei-Dong

    2017-02-01

    In this paper, a numerical calculation is performed for the purpose of estimating the thermal and electrical influences from bulk plasma in cathode heating modeling, in other words researching the necessity of a coupling bulk plasma in near-cathode layer modeling. The proposed model applied in the present work is an improved one from previous work. In this model, the near-cathode region is divided into two parts: the sheath and the ionization layer. The Schottky effect at the cathode surface is considered based on the analytic solution of a 1D sheath model. It is noted that the arc column is calculated simultaneously in the near-cathode region and the cathode bulk. An application is presented for an atmospheric free burning argon arc with arc currents of 50 A-600 A. The modeling results show three interesting points: (1) at the cathode surface, energy transport due to heat conduction of heavy particles and electrons is comparable to total heating flux, no matter whether the arc discharge is performed in a high (400 A) or low current (50 A) situation; (2) the electrical influence from bulk plasma on the cathode heating modeling becomes obvious in a high current situation (>400 A) for the spot mode; (3) the near-cathode layer voltage drop ({{U}\\text{tot}} ) is larger in the diffuse mode than in the spot mode for the same current, which is just the opposite to that for decoupled modeling.

  12. Plasma Sloshing in Pulse-heated Solar and Stellar Coronal Loops

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reale, F.

    2016-08-01

    There is evidence that coronal heating is highly intermittent, and flares are the high energy extreme. The properties of the heat pulses are difficult to constrain. Here, hydrodynamic loop modeling shows that several large amplitude oscillations (˜20% in density) are triggered in flare light curves if the duration of the heat pulse is shorter than the sound crossing time of the flaring loop. The reason for this is that the plasma does not have enough time to reach pressure equilibrium during heating, and traveling pressure fronts develop. The period is a few minutes for typical solar coronal loops, dictated by the sound crossing time in the decay phase. The long period and large amplitude make these oscillations different from typical magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) waves. This diagnostic can be applied both to observations of solar and stellar flares and to future observations of non-flaring loops at high resolution.

  13. Plasma sloshing in pulse-heated solar and stellar coronal loops

    CERN Document Server

    Reale, F

    2016-01-01

    There is evidence that coronal heating is highly intermittent, and flares are the high energy extreme. The properties of the heat pulses are difficult to constrain. Here hydrodynamic loop modeling shows that several large amplitude oscillations (~ 20% in density) are triggered in flare light curves if the duration of the heat pulse is shorter that the sound crossing time of the flaring loop. The reason is that the plasma has not enough time to reach pressure equilibrium during the heating and traveling pressure fronts develop. The period is a few minutes for typical solar coronal loops, dictated by the sound crossing time in the decay phase. The long period and large amplitude make these oscillations different from typical MHD waves. This diagnostic can be applied both to observations of solar and stellar flares and to future observations of non-flaring loops at high resolution.

  14. Core Fueling and Edge Particle Flux Analysis in Ohmically and Auxiliary Heated NSTX Plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    V.A. Soukhanovskii; R. Maingi; R. Raman; H.W. Kugel; B.P. LeBlanc; L. Roquemore; C.H. Skinner; NSTX Research Team

    2002-06-12

    The Boundary Physics program of the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) is focusing on optimization of the edge power and particle flows in b * 25% L- and H-mode plasmas of t {approx} 0.8 s duration heated by up to 6 MW of high harmonic fast wave and up to 5 MW of neutral beam injection. Particle balance and core fueling efficiencies of low and high field side gas fueling of L-mode homic and NBI heated plasmas have been compared using an analytical zero dimensional particle balance model and measured ion and neutral fluxes. Gas fueling efficiencies are in the range of 0.05-0.20 and do not depend on discharge magnetic configuration, density or poloidal location of the injector. The particle balance modeling indicates that the addition of HFS fueling results in a reversal of the wall loading rate and higher wall inventories. Initial particle source estimates obtained from neutral pressure and spectroscopic measurements indicate that ion flux into the divertor greatly exceeds midplane ion flux from the main plasma, suggesting that the scrape-off cross-field transport plays a minor role in diverted plasmas. Present analysis provides the basis for detailed fluid modeling of core and edge particle flows and particle confinement properties of NSTX plasmas. This research was supported by the U.S. Department of Energy under contracts No. DE-AC02-76CH03073, DE-AC05-00OR22725, and W-7405-ENG-36.

  15. Electron residual energy due to stochastic heating in field-ionized plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khalilzadeh, Elnaz [Department of Physics, Kharazmi University, 49 Mofateh Ave, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); The Plasma Physics and Fusion Research School, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Yazdanpanah, Jam, E-mail: jamal.yazdan@gmail.com; Chakhmachi, Amir [The Plasma Physics and Fusion Research School, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Jahanpanah, Jafar [Department of Physics, Kharazmi University, 49 Mofateh Ave, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Yazdani, Elnaz [Laser and Optics Research School, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2015-11-15

    The electron residual energy originated from the stochastic heating in under-dense field-ionized plasma is investigated here. Initially, the optical response of plasma is modeled by using two counter-propagating electromagnetic waves. In this case, the solution of motion equation of a single electron indicates that by including the ionization, the electron with higher residual energy compared with that without ionization could be obtained. In agreement with chaotic nature of the motion, it is found that the electron residual energy will be significantly changed by applying a minor change in the initial conditions. Extensive kinetic 1D-3V particle-in-cell simulations have been performed in order to resolve full plasma reactions. In this way, two different regimes of plasma behavior are observed by varying the pulse length. The results indicate that the amplitude of scattered fields in a proper long pulse length is high enough to act as a second counter-propagating wave and trigger the stochastic electron motion. On the contrary, the analyses of intensity spectrum reveal the fact that the dominant scattering mechanism tends to Thomson rather than Raman scattering by increasing the pulse length. A covariant formalism is used to describe the plasma heating so that it enables us to measure electron temperature inside and outside of the pulse region.

  16. Electron residual energy due to stochastic heating in field-ionized plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khalilzadeh, Elnaz; Yazdanpanah, Jam; Jahanpanah, Jafar; Chakhmachi, Amir; Yazdani, Elnaz

    2015-11-01

    The electron residual energy originated from the stochastic heating in under-dense field-ionized plasma is investigated here. Initially, the optical response of plasma is modeled by using two counter-propagating electromagnetic waves. In this case, the solution of motion equation of a single electron indicates that by including the ionization, the electron with higher residual energy compared with that without ionization could be obtained. In agreement with chaotic nature of the motion, it is found that the electron residual energy will be significantly changed by applying a minor change in the initial conditions. Extensive kinetic 1D-3V particle-in-cell simulations have been performed in order to resolve full plasma reactions. In this way, two different regimes of plasma behavior are observed by varying the pulse length. The results indicate that the amplitude of scattered fields in a proper long pulse length is high enough to act as a second counter-propagating wave and trigger the stochastic electron motion. On the contrary, the analyses of intensity spectrum reveal the fact that the dominant scattering mechanism tends to Thomson rather than Raman scattering by increasing the pulse length. A covariant formalism is used to describe the plasma heating so that it enables us to measure electron temperature inside and outside of the pulse region.

  17. Particle heating and acceleration during collisionless reconnection in a laboratory plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoo, Jongsoo

    2013-10-01

    Particle heating and acceleration during magnetic reconnection is studied in the collisionless plasma of the Magnetic Reconnection Experiment (MRX). For ion heating and acceleration, the role of the in-plane (Hall) electric field is emphasized. An in-plane electrostatic potential profile is established by electron acceleration near the X-point. The potential profile shows a well structure along the direction normal to the reconnection current sheet that becomes deeper and wider downstream as its boundary expands along the separatrices where the in-plane electric field is strongest. The Hall electric field ballistically accelerates ions near the separatrices toward the outflow direction. After ions are accelerated, they are heated as they travel into the high-pressure downstream region due to an effect called re-magnetization. Electrons are also significantly heated during reconnection. The electron temperature sharply increases across the separatrices and peaks just outside of the electron diffusion region. Classical Ohmic dissipation based on the perpendicular Spitzer resistivity is too small to compensate for the energy loss by parallel heat conduction, indicating the presence of anomalous electron heating. Finally, a total energy inventory is calculated based on analysis of the Poynting, enthalpy, flow energy, and heat flux in the measured diffusion layer. More than half of the incoming magnetic energy is converted to particle energy during reconnection. The author thanks contributions from M. Yamada, H. Ji, J. Jara-Almonte, and C. E. Myers. This work is supported by DOE and NSF.

  18. Spatiotemporal study of gas heating mechanisms in a radio-frequency electrothermal plasma micro-thruster

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amelia eGreig

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available A spatiotemporal study of neutral gas temperature during the first 100 s of operation for a radio-frequency electrothermal plasma micro-thruster operating on nitrogen at 60 W and 1.5 Torr is performed to identify the heating mechanisms involved. Neutral gas temperature is estimated from rovibrational band fitting of the nitrogen second positive system. A set of baffles are used to restrict the optical image and separate the heating mechanisms occurring in the central bulk discharge region and near the thruster walls.For each spatial region there are three distinct gas heating mechanisms being fast heating from ion-neutral collisions with timescales of tens of milliseconds, intermediate heating with timescales of 10 s from ion bombardment on the inner thruster tube surface creating wall heating, and slow heating with timescales of 100 s from gradual warming of the entire thruster housing. The results are discussed in relation to optimising the thermal properties of future thruster designs.

  19. Long-term heat stress induces the inflammatory response in dairy cows revealed by plasma proteome analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Min, Li; Zheng, Nan; Zhao, Shengguo; Cheng, Jianbo; Yang, Yongxin; Zhang, Yangdong; Yang, Hongjian; Wang, Jiaqi

    2016-03-04

    In this work we employed a comparative proteomic approach to evaluate seasonal heat stress and investigate proteomic alterations in plasma of dairy cows. Twelve lactating Holstein dairy cows were used and the treatments were: heat stress (n = 6) in hot summer (at the beginning of the moderate heat stress) and no heat stress (n = 6) in spring natural ambient environment, respectively. Subsequently, heat stress treatment lasted 23 days (at the end of the moderate heat stress) to investigate the alterations of plasma proteins, which might be employed as long-term moderate heat stress response in dairy cows. Changes in plasma proteins were analyzed by two-dimensional electrophoresis (2-DE) combined with mass spectrometry. Analysis of the properties of the identified proteins revealed that the alterations of plasma proteins were related to inflammation in long-term moderate heat stress. Furthermore, the increase in plasma tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) and interleukin-6 (IL-6) directly demonstrated that long-term moderate heat stress caused an inflammatory response in dairy cows.

  20. Analysis and Interpretation of the Plasma Dynamic Response to Additional Heating Power using different Diagnostics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Manini, A

    2002-07-01

    The main goal in the research of nuclear fusion, and therefore in tokamak research as well, is the development of a high power, steady-state power plant. To obtain the high power required for igniting the plasma, the size of the device must be very large. The performance of the tokamak plasma depends in particular on the plasma shape and on the internal plasma profiles. These profiles include those of the current density and the pressure, two quantities that can be modified by means of auxiliary heating methods such as Electron Cyclotron Heating (ECH). ECH is a very important tool due to its capability of injecting highly localised and intense power. Off-axis ECH and Electron Cyclotron Current Drive (ECCD) modify both current density and electron temperature profiles, leading to modification of confinement and stability properties. in particular, complete stabilisation of magnetohydrodynamic modes using ECCD is feasible. Furthermore, ECH is crucial as a mean of increasing the bootstrap current fraction through the formation of internal transport barriers, so that confinement is also improved. Finally, it is also noted that modulated ECH (MECH) is a very effective tool for perturbative energy transport experiments in many different regimes. Experiments performed in the TCV and the ASDEX Upgrade tokamaks are presented. The role of TCV is very important due to its flexibility of varying the plasma shape, its versatile high power ECH system at both the second and third electron cyclotron harmonics, and due to the numerous diagnostics installed, e.g. the two soft X-ray (SXR) diagnostics which simultaneously allow high temporal and spatial resolutions. The importance of ASDEX Upgrade is related to its large size, which makes it a reactor-relevant experimental facility, and to the Neutral Beam Injection (NBI) and ECH heating facilities, which allow a study of heat and particle transport in either mostly ion-heated or mostly electron-heated regimes. Moreover, for the

  1. On heat conduction in multicomponent, non-Maxwellian spherically symmetric solar wind plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuperman, S.; Dryer, M.

    1985-01-01

    A generalized expression for the steady-state heat flux in multicomponent, moderately non-Maxwellian spherically symmetric plasmas is presented and discussed. The work was motivated by the inability of the simple, Fourier-type formula for the thermal conductivity to explain the observed correlations in the solar wind. The results hold for situations not far from local thermodynamic equilibrium. The generalized expression includes not only correlations that have been observed but also correlations not sought for previously.

  2. Study of selective heating at ion cyclotron resonance for the plasma separation process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Compant La Fontaine, A.; Pashkovsky, V. G.

    1995-12-01

    The plasma separation process by ion cyclotron resonance heating (ICRH) is studied both theoretically and experimentally on two devices: the first one called ERIC (Ion Cyclotron Resonance Experiment) at Saclay (France) [P. Louvet, Proceedings of the 2nd Workshop on Separation Phenomena in Liquids and Gases, Versailles, France, 1989, edited by P. Louvet, P. Noe, and Soubbaramayer (Centre d'Etudes Nucléaires de Saclay and Cité Scientifique Parcs et Technopoles, Ile de France Sud, France, 1989), Vol. 1, p. 5] and the other one named SIRENA at the Kurchatov Institute, Moscow, Russia [A. I. Karchevskii et al., Plasma Phys. Rep. 19, 214 (1993)]. The radio frequency (RF) transversal magnetic field is measured by a magnetic probe both in plasma and vacuum and its Fourier spectrum versus the axial wave number kz is obtained. These results are in agreement with the electromagnetic (EM) field calculation model based on resolution of Maxwell equations by a time-harmonic scheme studied here. Various axial boundary conditions models used to compute the EM field are considered. The RF magnetic field is weakly influenced by the plasma while the electric field components are strongly disturbed due to space-charge effects. In the plasma the transversal electric field is enhanced and the kz spectrum is narrower than in vacuum. The calculation of the resonant isotope heating is made by the Runge-Kutta method. The influence of ion-ion collisions, inhomogeneity of the static magnetic field B0, and the RF transversal magnetic field component on the ion acceleration is examined. These results are successfully compared with experiments of a minor isotope 44Ca heating measurements, made with an energy analyzer.

  3. Study of selective heating at ion cyclotron resonance for the plasma separation process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Compant La Fontaine, A. [Direction du Cycle du Combustible/Departement des Procedes d` Enrichissement, Service de Physique, d` Experimentation et d` Analyse, Commissariat a l` Energie Atomique, Centre d` Etudes de Saclay, 91191 Gif-sur-Yvette Cedex (France); Pashkovsky, V.G. [Molecular Physics Institute, RRC Kurchatov Institute 123182, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    1995-12-01

    The plasma separation process by ion cyclotron resonance heating (ICRH) is studied both theoretically and experimentally on two devices: the first one called ERIC (Ion Cyclotron Resonance Experiment) at Saclay (France) [P. Louvet, {ital Proceedings} {ital of} {ital the} 2{ital nd} {ital Workshop} {ital on} {ital Separation} {ital Phenomena} {ital in} {ital Liquids} {ital and} {ital Gases}, Versailles, France, 1989, edited by P. Louvet, P. Noe, and Soubbaramayer (Centre d`Etudes Nucleaires de Saclay and Cite Scientifique Parcs et Technopoles, Ile de France Sud, France, 1989), Vol. 1, p. 5] and the other one named SIRENA at the Kurchatov Institute, Moscow, Russia [A. I. Karchevskii {ital et} {ital al}., Plasma Phys. Rep. {bold 19}, 214 (1993)]. The radio frequency (RF) transversal magnetic field is measured by a magnetic probe both in plasma and vacuum and its Fourier spectrum versus the axial wave number {ital k}{sub {ital z}} is obtained. These results are in agreement with the electromagnetic (EM) field calculation model based on resolution of Maxwell equations by a time-harmonic scheme studied here. Various axial boundary conditions models used to compute the EM field are considered. The RF magnetic field is weakly influenced by the plasma while the electric field components are strongly disturbed due to space-charge effects. In the plasma the transversal electric field is enhanced and the {ital k}{sub {ital z}} spectrum is narrower than in vacuum. The calculation of the resonant isotope heating is made by the Runge--Kutta method. The influence of ion--ion collisions, inhomogeneity of the static magnetic field {ital B}{sub 0}, and the RF transversal magnetic field component on the ion acceleration is examined. These results are successfully compared with experiments of a minor isotope {sup 44}Ca heating measurements, made with an energy analyzer. {copyright} {ital 1995} {ital American} {ital Institute} {ital of} {ital Physics}.

  4. Numerical study of plasma generation process and internal antenna heat loadings in J-PARC RF negative ion source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shibata, T., E-mail: shibat@post.j-parc.jp; Ueno, A.; Oguri, H.; Ohkoshi, K.; Ikegami, K.; Takagi, A.; Asano, H.; Naito, F. [J-PARC Center, Tokai-mura, Naka-gun, Ibaraki-ken 319-1195 (Japan); Nishida, K.; Mochizuki, S.; Hatayama, A. [Keio University, Hiyoshi, Kohoku-ku, Yokohama-shi, Kanagawa-ken 223-8522 (Japan); Mattei, S.; Lettry, J. [European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN), 1211 Geneva 23 (Switzerland)

    2016-02-15

    A numerical model of plasma transport and electromagnetic field in the J-PARC (Japan Proton Accelerator Research Complex) radio frequency ion source has been developed to understand the relation between antenna coil heat loadings and plasma production/transport processes. From the calculation, the local plasma density increase is observed in the region close to the antenna coil. Electrons are magnetized by the magnetic field line with absolute magnetic flux density 30–120 Gauss which leads to high local ionization rate. The results suggest that modification of magnetic configuration can be made to reduce plasma heat flux onto the antenna.

  5. submitter Numerical study of plasma generation process and internal antenna heat loadings in J-PARC RF negative ion source

    CERN Document Server

    Shibata, T; Mochizuki, S; Mattei, S; Lettry, J; Hatayama, A; Ueno, A; Oguri, H; Ohkoshi, K; Ikegami, K; Takagi, A; Asano, H; Naito, F

    2016-01-01

    A numerical model of plasma transport and electromagnetic field in the J-PARC (Japan Proton Accelerator Research Complex) radio frequency ion source has been developed to understand the relation between antenna coil heat loadings and plasma production/transport processes. From the calculation, the local plasma density increase is observed in the region close to the antenna coil. Electrons are magnetized by the magnetic field line with absolute magnetic flux density 30-120 Gauss which leads to high local ionization rate. The results suggest that modification of magnetic configuration can be made to reduce plasma heat flux onto the antenna.

  6. Characterization of SOL plasma flows and potentials in ICRF-heated plasmas in Alcator C-mod

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, R.; Wukitch, S. J.; Lin, Y.; Terry, J. L.; Cziegler, I.; Reinke, M. L.; Tynan, G. R.

    2017-10-01

    Gas-puff imaging techniques are employed to determine the far SOL region radial electric field and the plasma potential in ICRF heated discharges in the Alcator C-Mod tokamak. The two-dimensional velocity fields of the turbulent structures, which are advected by RF-induced {E}× {B} flows, are obtained via the time-delay estimation (TDE) techniques. Both the magnitude and radial extension of the radial electric field E r are observed to increase with the toroidal magnetic field strength B φ and the ICRF power. In particular, the RF-induced E r extends from the vicinity of the ICRF antenna to the separatrix when {B}\\varphi =7.9 {{T}} and {P}{ICRF}≳ 1 {MW}. In addition, low-Z impurity seeding near the antenna is found to substantially reduce the sheath potential associated with ICRF power. The TDE techniques have also been used to revisit and estimate ICRF-induced potentials in different antenna configurations: (1) conventional toroidally aligned (TA) antenna versus field-aligned (FA) antenna; (2) FA monopole versus FA dipole. It shows that FA and TA antennas produce similar magnitude of plasma potentials, and the FA monopole induced greater potential than the FA dipole phasing. The TDE estimations of RF-induced plasma potentials are consistent with previous results based on the poloidal phase velocity.

  7. Plasma membranes as heat stress sensors: from lipid-controlled molecular switches to therapeutic applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Török, Zsolt; Crul, Tim; Maresca, Bruno; Schütz, Gerhard J; Viana, Felix; Dindia, Laura; Piotto, Stefano; Brameshuber, Mario; Balogh, Gábor; Péter, Mária; Porta, Amalia; Trapani, Alfonso; Gombos, Imre; Glatz, Attila; Gungor, Burcin; Peksel, Begüm; Vigh, László; Csoboz, Bálint; Horváth, Ibolya; Vijayan, Mathilakath M; Hooper, Phillip L; Harwood, John L; Vigh, László

    2014-06-01

    The classic heat shock (stress) response (HSR) was originally attributed to protein denaturation. However, heat shock protein (Hsp) induction occurs in many circumstances where no protein denaturation is observed. Recently considerable evidence has been accumulated to the favor of the "Membrane Sensor Hypothesis" which predicts that the level of Hsps can be changed as a result of alterations to the plasma membrane. This is especially pertinent to mild heat shock, such as occurs in fever. In this condition the sensitivity of many transient receptor potential (TRP) channels is particularly notable. Small temperature stresses can modulate TRP gating significantly and this is influenced by lipids. In addition, stress hormones often modify plasma membrane structure and function and thus initiate a cascade of events, which may affect HSR. The major transactivator heat shock factor-1 integrates the signals originating from the plasma membrane and orchestrates the expression of individual heat shock genes. We describe how these observations can be tested at the molecular level, for example, with the use of membrane perturbers and through computational calculations. An important fact which now starts to be addressed is that membranes are not homogeneous nor do all cells react identically. Lipidomics and cell profiling are beginning to address the above two points. Finally, we observe that a deregulated HSR is found in a large number of important diseases where more detailed knowledge of the molecular mechanisms involved may offer timely opportunities for clinical interventions and new, innovative drug treatments. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Membrane Structure and Function: Relevance in the Cell's Physiology, Pathology and Therapy.

  8. An association between anisotropic plasma heating and instabilities in the solar wind

    CERN Document Server

    Kasper, J C; Bale, S D

    2009-01-01

    We present an analysis of the components of solar wind proton temperature perpendicular and parallel to the local magnetic field as a function of proximity to plasma instability thresholds. We find that $T_{\\perp p}$ is enhanced near the mirror instability threshold and $T_{\\parallel p}$ is enhanced near the firehose instability threshold. The increase in $T_{\\perp p}$ is consistent with cyclotron-resonant heating, but no similar explanation for hot plasma near the firehose limit is known. One possible explanation is that the firehose instability acts to convert bulk energy into thermal energy in the expanding solar wind, a result with significant implications for magnetized astrophysical plasma in general.

  9. Stochastic heating and acceleration of electrons in colliding laser fields in plasma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheng, Z-M; Mima, K; Sentoku, Y; Jovanović, M S; Taguchi, T; Zhang, J; Meyer-Ter-Vehn, J

    2002-02-01

    We propose a mechanism that leads to efficient acceleration of electrons in plasma by two counterpropagating laser pulses. It is triggered by stochastic motion of electrons when the laser fields exceed some threshold amplitudes, as found in single-electron dynamics. It is further confirmed in particle-in-cell simulations. In vacuum or tenuous plasma, electron acceleration in the case with two colliding laser pulses can be much more efficient than with one laser pulse only. In plasma at moderate densities, such as a few percent of the critical density, the amplitude of the Raman-backscattered wave is high enough to serve as the second counterpropagating pulse to trigger the electron stochastic motion. As a result, even with one intense laser pulse only, electrons can be heated up to a temperature much higher than the corresponding laser ponderomotive potential.

  10. Diagnosis of Ultrafast Laser-Heated Metal Surfaces and Plasma Expansion with Absolute Displacement Interferometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez, G.; Clarke, S. A.; Taylor, A. J.; Forsman, A.

    2004-07-01

    We report on the development of a novel technique to measure the critical surface displacement in intense, ultrashort, laser-solid target experiments. Determination of the critical surface position is important for understanding near solid density plasma dynamics and transport from warm dense matter systems, and for diagnosing short scale length plasma expansion and hydrodynamic surface motion from short pulse, laser-heated, solid targets. Instead of inferring critical surface motion from spectral power shifts using a time-delayed probe pulse or from phase shifts using ultrafast pump-probe frequency domain interferometry (FDI), this technique directly measures surface displacement using a single ultrafast laser heating pulse. Our technique is based on an application of a Michelson Stellar interferometer to microscopic rather than stellar scales, and we report plasma scale length motion as small as 10 nm. We will present results for motion of plasmas generated from several target materials (Au, Al, Au on CH plastic) for a laser pulse intensity range from 1011 to 1016 W/cm2. Varying both, the pulse duration and the pulse energy, explores the dependence of the expansion mechanism on the energy deposited and on the peak intensity. Comparisons with hydrocodes reveal the applicability of hydrodynamic models.

  11. Magnetic flux and heat losses by diffusive, advective, and Nernst effects in magnetized liner inertial fusion-like plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Velikovich, A. L.; Giuliani, J. L. [Plasma Physics Division, Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, DC 20375 (United States); Zalesak, S. T. [Berkeley Research Associates, Beltsville, Maryland 20705 (United States)

    2015-04-15

    The magnetized liner inertial fusion (MagLIF) approach to inertial confinement fusion [Slutz et al., Phys. Plasmas 17, 056303 (2010); Cuneo et al., IEEE Trans. Plasma Sci. 40, 3222 (2012)] involves subsonic/isobaric compression and heating of a deuterium-tritium plasma with frozen-in magnetic flux by a heavy cylindrical liner. The losses of heat and magnetic flux from the plasma to the liner are thereby determined by plasma advection and gradient-driven transport processes, such as thermal conductivity, magnetic field diffusion, and thermomagnetic effects. Theoretical analysis based on obtaining exact self-similar solutions of the classical collisional Braginskii's plasma transport equations in one dimension demonstrates that the heat loss from the hot compressed magnetized plasma to the cold liner is dominated by transverse heat conduction and advection, and the corresponding loss of magnetic flux is dominated by advection and the Nernst effect. For a large electron Hall parameter (ω{sub e}τ{sub e}≫1), the effective diffusion coefficients determining the losses of heat and magnetic flux to the liner wall are both shown to decrease with ω{sub e}τ{sub e} as does the Bohm diffusion coefficient cT/(16eB), which is commonly associated with low collisionality and two-dimensional transport. We demonstrate how this family of exact solutions can be used for verification of codes that model the MagLIF plasma dynamics.

  12. Magnetic flux and heat losses by diffusive, advective, and Nernst effects in magnetized liner inertial fusion-like plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velikovich, A. L.; Giuliani, J. L.; Zalesak, S. T.

    2015-04-01

    The magnetized liner inertial fusion (MagLIF) approach to inertial confinement fusion [Slutz et al., Phys. Plasmas 17, 056303 (2010); Cuneo et al., IEEE Trans. Plasma Sci. 40, 3222 (2012)] involves subsonic/isobaric compression and heating of a deuterium-tritium plasma with frozen-in magnetic flux by a heavy cylindrical liner. The losses of heat and magnetic flux from the plasma to the liner are thereby determined by plasma advection and gradient-driven transport processes, such as thermal conductivity, magnetic field diffusion, and thermomagnetic effects. Theoretical analysis based on obtaining exact self-similar solutions of the classical collisional Braginskii's plasma transport equations in one dimension demonstrates that the heat loss from the hot compressed magnetized plasma to the cold liner is dominated by transverse heat conduction and advection, and the corresponding loss of magnetic flux is dominated by advection and the Nernst effect. For a large electron Hall parameter ( ωeτe≫1 ), the effective diffusion coefficients determining the losses of heat and magnetic flux to the liner wall are both shown to decrease with ωeτe as does the Bohm diffusion coefficient c T /(16 e B ) , which is commonly associated with low collisionality and two-dimensional transport. We demonstrate how this family of exact solutions can be used for verification of codes that model the MagLIF plasma dynamics.

  13. Heat Transfer Affected by Transverse Magnetic Field using 3D Modeling of Arc Plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maeda, Yoshifumi; Tanaka, Tatsuro; Yamamoto, Shinji; Iwao, Toru

    2016-10-01

    Gas shielded metal arc welding is used to join the various metal because this is the high quality joining technology. Thus, this welding is used for a welding of large buildings such as bridges and LNG tanks. However, the welding defect caused by the heat transfer decrement may occur with increasing the wind velocity. This is because that the convection loss increases because the arc deflects to leeward side with increasing the wind velocity. In order to prevent from the arc deflection, it is used that the transverse magnetic field is applied to the arc. However, the arc deflection occurs with increasing the transverse magnetic field excessively. The energy balance of the arc is changed with increasing the convection loss caused by the arc deflection, and the heat transfer to the anode decreases. Therefore, the analysis including the arc and anode is necessary to elucidate the heat transfer to the anode. In this paper, the heat transfer affected by the transverse magnetic field using 3D modeling of the arc plasma is elucidated. The heat transfer to the anode is calculated by using the EMTF(electromagnetic thermal fluid) simulation with increasing the transverse magnetic field. As a result, the heat transfer decreased with increasing the transverse magnetic field.

  14. The heat removal capability of actively cooled plasma-facing components for the ITER divertor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Missirlian, M.; Richou, M.; Riccardi, B.; Gavila, P.; Loarer, T.; Constans, S.

    2011-12-01

    Non-destructive examination followed by high-heat-flux testing was performed for different small- and medium-scale mock-ups; this included the most recent developments related to actively cooled tungsten (W) or carbon fibre composite (CFC) armoured plasma-facing components. In particular, the heat-removal capability of these mock-ups manufactured by European companies with all the main features of the ITER divertor design was investigated both after manufacturing and after thermal cycling up to 20 MW m-2. Compliance with ITER requirements was explored in terms of bonding quality, heat flux performances and operational compatibility. The main results show an overall good heat-removal capability after the manufacturing process independent of the armour-to-heat sink bonding technology and promising behaviour with respect to thermal fatigue lifetime under heat flux up to 20 MW m-2 for the CFC-armoured tiles and 15 MW m-2 for the W-armoured tiles, respectively.

  15. Feedback control of plasma density and heating power for steady state operation in LHD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kamio, Shuji, E-mail: kamio@nifs.ac.jp; Kasahara, Hiroshi; Seki, Tetsuo; Saito, Kenji; Seki, Ryosuke; Nomura, Goro; Mutoh, Takashi

    2015-12-15

    Highlights: • We upgraded a control system for steady state operation in LHD. • This system contains gas fueling system and ICRF power control system. • Automatic power boost system is also attached for stable operation. • As a result, we achieved the long pulse up to 48 min in the electron density of more than 1 × 10{sup 19} m{sup −3}. - Abstract: For steady state operation, the feedback control of plasma density and heating power system was developed in the Large Helical Device (LHD). In order to achieve a record of the long pulse discharge, stable plasma density and heating power are needed. This system contains the radio frequency (RF) heating power control, interlocks, gas fueling, automatic RF phase control, ion cyclotron range of frequency (ICRF) antenna position control, and graphical user interface (GUI). Using the density control system, the electron density was controlled to the target density and using the RF heating power control system, the RF power injection could be stable. As a result of using this system, we achieved the long pulse up to 48 min in the electron density of more than 1 × 10{sup 19} m{sup −3}. Further, the ICRF hardware experienced no critical accidents during the 17th LHD experiment campaign in 2013.

  16. Time- and space- resolved pyrometry of dense plasmas heated by laser accelerated ion beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dyer, Gilliss; Roycroft, Rebecca; McCary, Eddie; Wagner, Craig; Jiao, Xuejing; Kupfer, Rotem; Gauthier, D. Cort; Bang, Woosuk; Palaniyappan, Sasikumar; Bradley, Paul A.; Hamilton, Christopher; Santiago Cordoba, Miguel A.; Vold, Erik L.; Yin, Lin; Fernandez, Juan C.; Alibright, Brian J.; Ditmire, Todd; Hegelich, Bjorn Manuel

    2016-10-01

    Laser driven ion sources have a variety of possible applications, including the rapid heating of matter to dense plasma states of several eV. Recent experiments at LANL and The University of Texas have explored ion heating in the context of mixing at high-Z / low-Z plasma interfaces, using different laser-based ion acceleration schemes. Quasi-monoenergetic and highly directed Al ions from ultra-thin foils were used in one set of experiments, while TNSA accelerated protons from an F/40 focused petawatt laser were used in the other. Using spatially and temporally resolved streaked optical pyrometry we have gained insight into the degree and uniformity of heating from various configurations of ion source and sample target. Here we present data and analysis from three experimental runs along with hydrodynamic modeling of the heated targets and geometric considerations. This work was supported by NNSA cooperative agreement DE- NA0002008 and the Los Alamos National Laboratory Directed Research and Development Program under the auspices of the U.S. DOE NNSAS, LLC, Los Alamos National Laboratory under Contract No. DE-AC52-0.

  17. Thermodynamic Structure of Collision-Dominated Expanding Plasma: Heating of Interplanetary Coronal Mass Injections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Y.; Richardson, J. D.; Belcher, J. W.; Kasper, J. C.; Elliott, H. A.

    2006-01-01

    We investigate the thermodynamic structure of interplanetary coronal mass ejections (ICMEs) using combined surveys of the ejecta between 0.3 and 20 AU. ICMEs are shown to have a moderate expansion in the solar wind compared with theoretical predictions. The expansion seems to be governed by a polytrope with gamma approx. 1.3 in this distance range. We find that Coulomb collisions are important contributors to the ion-ion equilibration process in the ICME plasma. The alpha-proton differential speed quickly drops to below 10 km/s due to strong Coulomb collisions. However, the two species of particles are far from thermal equilibrium with a temperature ratio T(sub alpha/T(sub p) = 4-6, suggestive of a preferential heating of alpha particles. The plasma heating rate as a function of heliocentric &stance required for the temperature profile is deduced by taking into account the expansion and energy transfer between protons and alphas via Coulomb collisions. The turbulence dissipation rate is also inferred from the inertial range power spectrum of magnetic fluctuations within ICMEs. Comparison of the turbulence dissipation rate with the required heating rate shows that turbulence dissipation seems sufficient to explain the ICME heating. Sources powering the turbulence are also investigated by examining the instabilities induced by temperature anisotropies and energy deposition by pickup ions.

  18. Bifurcation physics of magnetic islands and stochasticity explored by heat pulse propagation studies in toroidal plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ida, K.; Kobayashi, T.; Yoshinuma, M.; Suzuki, Y.; Narushima, Y.; Evans, T. E.; Ohdachi, S.; Tsuchiya, H.; Inagaki, S.; Itoh, K.

    2016-09-01

    Bifurcation physics of a magnetic island was investigated using the heat pulse propagation technique produced by the modulation of electron cyclotron heating. There are two types of bifurcation phenomena observed in a large helical device (LHD) and DIII-D. One is a bifurcation of the magnetic topology between nested and stochastic fields. The nested state is characterized by the bi-directional (inward and outward) propagation of the heat pulse with slow propagation speed. The stochastic state is characterized by the fast propagation of the heat pulse with electron temperature flattening. The other bifurcation is between the magnetic island with larger thermal diffusivity and that with smaller thermal diffusivity. The damping of toroidal flow is observed at the O-point of the magnetic island both in helical plasmas and in tokamak plasmas during a mode locking phase with strong flow shears at the boundary of the magnetic island. Associated with the stochastization of the magnetic field, the abrupt damping of toroidal flow is observed in LHD. The toroidal flow shear shows a linear decay, while the ion temperature gradient shows an exponential decay. This observation suggests that this flow damping is due to the change in the non-diffusive term of momentum transport.

  19. Heat flux in a non-Maxwellian plasma. [in realistic solar coronal loop

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ljepojevic, N. N.; Macneice, P.

    1989-01-01

    A hybrid numerical scheme is applied to solve the Landau equation for the electron distribution function over all velocity space. Evidence is presented for the first time of the degree and character of the failure of the classical Spitzer-Haerm heat flux approximation in a realistic solar coronal loop structure. In the loop model used, the failure is so severe at some points that the role of the heat flux in the plasma's energy balance is completely misinterpreted. In the lower corona the Spitzer-Haerm approximation predicts that the heat flux should act as an energy source, whereas the more accurate distribution functions calculated here show this to be an energy sink.

  20. Dynamics of the electron thermal diffusivity at improved energy confinement during lower hybrid plasma heating in the FT-2 tokamak

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kouprienko, D. V.; Altukhov, A. B.; Gurchenko, A. D.; Gusakov, E. Z.; Kantor, M. Yu.; Lashkul, S. I.; Esipov, L. A.

    2010-05-01

    The dynamics of electron heat transport at improved energy confinement during lower hybrid plasma heating in the FT-2 tokamak was studied experimentally. Evolution of the profiles of the electron temperature and density was thoroughly investigated under conditions of fast variation in the plasma parameters. The energy balance in the electron channel is calculated with the help of the ASTRA code by using the measured plasma parameters. Correlation is revealed between the dynamics of electron heat transport and the behavior of small-scale drift turbulence measured using the enhanced scattering correlation diagnostics. The suppression of heat transfer and turbulence agrees well with the increase in the shear of poloidal plasma rotation calculated from experimental data in the neoclassical approximation.

  1. Neutron emission in neutral beam heated KSTAR plasmas and its application to neutron radiography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kwak, Jong-Gu, E-mail: jgkwak@nfri.re.kr; Kim, H.S.; Cheon, M.S.; Oh, S.T.; Lee, Y.S.; Terzolo, L.

    2016-11-01

    Highlights: • We measured the neutron emission from KSTAR plasmas quantitatively. • We confirmed that neutron emission is coming from neutral beam-plasma interactions. • The feasibility study shows that the fast neutron from KSTAR could be used for fast neutron radiography. - Abstract: The main mission of Korea Superconducting Tokamak Advanced Research (KSTAR) program is exploring the physics and technologies of high performance steady state Tokamak operation that are essential for ITER and fusion reactor. Since the successful first operation in 2008, the plasma performance is enhanced and duration of H-mode is extended to around 50 s which corresponds to a few times of current diffusion time and surpassing the current conventional Tokamak operation. In addition to long-pulse operation, the operational boundary of the H-mode discharge is further extended over MHD no-wall limit(β{sub N} ∼ 4) transiently and higher stored energy region is obtained by increased total heating power (∼6 MW) and plasma current (I{sub p} up to 1 MA for ∼10 s). Heating system consists of various mixtures (NB, ECH, LHCD, ICRF) but the major horse heating resource is the neutral beam(NB) of 100 keV with 4.5 MW and most of experiments are conducted with NB. So there is a lot of production of fast neutrons coming from via D(d,n){sup 3}He reaction and it is found that most of neutrons are coming from deuterium beam plasma interaction. Nominal neutron yield and the area of beam port is about 10{sup 13}–10{sup 14}/s and 1 m{sup 2} at the closest access position of the sample respectively and neutron emission could be modulated for application to the neutron radiography by varying NB power. This work reports on the results of quantitative analysis of neutron emission measurements and results are discussed in terms of beam-plasma interaction and plasma confinement. It also includes the feasibility study of neutron radiography using KSTAR.

  2. Hydrodynamic modelling of accretion impacts in classical T Tauri stars: radiative heating of the pre-shock plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, G.; Orlando, S.; Peres, G.; Argiroffi, C.; Bonito, R.

    2017-01-01

    Context. It is generally accepted that, in classical T Tauri stars, the plasma from the circumstellar disc accretes onto the stellar surface with free-fall velocity and the impact generates a shock. The impact region is expected to contribute to emission in different spectral bands; many studies have confirmed that the X-rays arise from the post-shock plasma but, otherwise, there are no studies in the literature investigating the origin of the observed UV emission which is apparently correlated to accretion. Aims: We investigated the effect of radiative heating of the infalling material by the post-shock plasma at the base of the accretion stream, with the aim to identify in which region a significant part of the UV emission originates. Methods: We developed a one-dimensional hydrodynamic model describing the impact of an accretion stream onto the stellar surface; the model takes into account the gravity, the radiative cooling of an optically thin plasma, the thermal conduction, and the heating due to absorption of X-ray radiation. The latter term represents the heating of the infalling plasma due to the absorption of X-rays emitted from the post-shock region. Results: We found that the radiative heating of the pre-shock plasma plays a non-negligible role in the accretion phenomenon. In particular, the dense and cold plasma of the pre-shock accretion column is gradually heated up to a few 105K due to irradiation of X-rays arising from the shocked plasma at the impact region. This heating mechanism does not affect significantly the dynamics of the post-shock plasma. On the other hand, a region of radiatively heated gas (that we consider a precursor) forms in the unshocked accretion column and contributes significantly to UV emission. Our model naturally reproduces the luminosity of UV emission lines correlated to accretion and shows that most of the UV emission originates from the precursor.

  3. Main-ion temperature and plasma rotation measurements based on scattering of electron cyclotron heating waves in ASDEX Upgrade

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Morten Stejner; Rasmussen, Jesper; Nielsen, Stefan Kragh

    2017-01-01

    We demonstrate measurements of spectra of O-mode electron cyclotron resonance heating (ECRH) waves scattered collectively from microscopic plasma fluctuations in ASDEX Upgrade discharges with an ITER-like ECRH scenario. The measured spectra are shown to allow determination of the main ion...... temperature and plasma rotation velocity. This demonstrates that ECRH systems can be exploited for diagnostic purposes alongside their primary heating purpose in a reactor relevant scenario....

  4. Main-ion temperature and plasma rotation measurements based on scattering of electron cyclotron heating waves in ASDEX Upgrade

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stejner, M.; Rasmussen, J.; Nielsen, S. K.; Jacobsen, A. S.; Korsholm, S. B.; Leipold, F.; McDermott, R. M.; Salewski, M.; Schubert, M.; Stober, J.; Wagner, D. H.; the ASDEX Upgrade Team; the EUROfusion MST1 Team

    2017-07-01

    We demonstrate measurements of spectra of O-mode electron cyclotron resonance heating (ECRH) waves scattered collectively from microscopic plasma fluctuations in ASDEX Upgrade discharges with an ITER-like ECRH scenario. The measured spectra are shown to allow determination of the main ion temperature and plasma rotation velocity. This demonstrates that ECRH systems can be exploited for diagnostic purposes alongside their primary heating purpose in a reactor relevant scenario.

  5. Two-dimensional hybrid models of H+-He++ expanding solar wind plasma heating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ofman, L.; Viñas, A. F.; Maneva, Y.

    2014-06-01

    Preferential heating and acceleration of the solar wind He++ ions compared to protons in fast solar wind streams have been known for decades, thanks to in situ spacecraft measurements at 0.29-5 AU. Turbulent magnetic field fluctuations with approximate power law spectra have been observed as well. However, the exact causes of these processes are still not known due to the lack of detailed information on the magnetic field fluctuations and ion velocity distributions in the acceleration region of the solar wind. Here the collisionless heating processes in expanding solar wind plasma are investigated using 2-D hybrid modeling with parameters appropriate to the heliocentric distance of 10 RS. In this study the ion dynamics is described kinetically, while electrons are treated as a background massless fluid in an expanding solar wind model. The source of free energy for the heating is introduced through an initial nonequilibrium state of the plasma with large He++ ion temperature anisotropy or with super-Alfvénic relative ion drift. We also employ an externally imposed spectrum of magnetic fluctuations in the frequency range below the proton gyroresonant frequency to heat the He++ ions. We investigate the effects of solar wind radial expansion by modeling several values of the expansion rate in a parametric study. We find that the preferential ion heating is attained in both nonexpanding and expanding solar wind models. Thus, the expansion has little effect on the preferential He++ ion heating by the processes considered here. Moreover, the expansion leads to faster evolution of the magnetosonic drift instability, reducing the drift velocity to lower values sooner, and the corresponding generation of the magnetic fluctuations that heat the ions, compared to the nonexpanding case. This is due to the reduction of the perpendicular particle velocities in the expanding (inflated) frame. For cases with little proton perpendicular heating, the solar wind expansion leads to

  6. Two-stage plasma gun based on a gas discharge with a self-heating hollow emitter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vizir, A V; Tyunkov, A V; Shandrikov, M V; Oks, E M

    2010-02-01

    The paper presents the results of tests of a new compact two-stage bulk gas plasma gun. The plasma gun is based on a nonself-sustained gas discharge with an electron emitter based on a discharge with a self-heating hollow cathode. The operating characteristics of the plasma gun are investigated. The discharge system makes it possible to produce uniform and stable gas plasma in the dc mode with a plasma density up to 3x10(9) cm(-3) at an operating gas pressure in the vacuum chamber of less than 2x10(-2) Pa. The device features high power efficiency, design simplicity, and compactness.

  7. Investigating the laser heating of underdense plasmas at conditions relevant to MagLIF

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harvey-Thompson, Adam

    2015-11-01

    The magnetized Liner Inertial Fusion (MagLIF) scheme has achieved thermonuclear fusion yields on Sandia's Z Facility by imploding a cylindrical liner filled with D2 fuel that is preheated with a multi-kJ laser and pre-magnetized with an axial field Bz = 10 T. The challenge of fuel preheating in MagLIF is to deposit several kJ's of energy into an underdense (ne/ncritMagLIF. In particular, magnetization of the preheated plasma suppresses electron thermal conduction, which can modify laser energy coupling. Providing an experimental dataset in this regime is essential to not only understand the dynamics of a MagLIF implosion and stagnation, but also to validate magnetized transport models and better understand the physics of laser propagation in magnetized plasmas. In this talk, we present data and analysis of several experiments conducted at OMEGA-EP and at Z to investigate laser propagation and plasma heating in underdense D2 plasmas under a range of conditions, including densities (ne = 0.05-0.1 nc) and magnetization parmaters (ωceτe ~ 0-10). The results show differences in the electron temperature of the heated plasma and the velocity of the laser burn wave with and without an applied magnetic field. We will show comparisons of these experimental results to 2D and 3D HYDRA simulations, which show that the effect of the magnetic field on the electron thermal conduction needs to be taken into account when modeling laser preheat. Sandia is a multiprogram laboratory operated by Sandia Corporation, a Lockheed Martin Company, for the National Nuclear Security Administration under Contract No. DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  8. ELM simulation experiments using transient heat and particle load produced by a magnetized coaxial plasma gun

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shoda, K.; Sakuma, I.; Iwamoto, D.; Kikuchi, Y.; Fukumoto, N.; Nagata, M.

    2011-10-01

    It is considered that thermal transient events such as type I edge-localized modes (ELMs) and disruptions will limit the lifetime of plasma-facing components (PFCs) in ITER. It is predicted that the heat load onto the PFCs during type I ELMs in ITER is 0.2-2MJ/m2 with pulse length of ~0.1-1ms. We have investigated interaction between transient heat and particle load and the PFCs by using a magnetized coaxial plasma gun (MCPG) at University of Hyogo. In the experiment, a pulsed plasma with duration of ~0.5ms, incident ion energy of ~30eV, and surface absorbed energy density of ~0.3-0.7MJ/m2 was produced by the MCPG. However, no melting occurred on a tungsten surface exposed to a single plasma pulse of ~0.7MJ/m2, while cracks clearly appeared at the edge part of the W surface. Thus, we have recently started to improve the performance of the MCPG in order to investigate melt layer dynamics of a tungsten surface such as vapor cloud formation. In the modified MCPG, the capacitor bank energy for the plasma discharge is increased from 24.5 kJ to 144 kJ. In the preliminary experiments, the plasmoid with duration of ~0.6 ms, incident ion energy of ~ 40 eV, and the surface absorbed energy density of ~2 MJ/m2 was successfully produced at the gun voltage of 6 kV.

  9. Kinetic and radiation-hydrodynamic modeling of x-ray heating in laboratory photoionized plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mancini, Roberto

    2017-06-01

    In experiments performed at the Z facility of Sandia National Laboratories a cm-scale cell filled with neon gas was driven by the burst of broadband x-rays emitted at the collapse of a wire-array z-pinch turning the gas into a photoionized plasma. Transmission spectroscopy of a narrowband portion of the x-ray flux was used to diagnose the plasma. The data show a highly-ionized neon plasma with a rich line absorption spectrum that permits the extraction of the ionization distribution among Be-, Li-, He- and H-like ions. Analysis of the spectra produced atomic ground and low excited state areal densities in these ions, and from the ratio of first-excited to ground state populations in Li-like neon a temperature of 19±4eV was extracted to characterize the x-ray heating of the plasma. To interpret this observation, we have performed data-constrained view-factor calculations of the spectral distribution of the x-ray drive, self-consistent modeling of electron and atomic kinetics, and radiation-hydrodynamic simulations. For the conditions of the experiment, the electron distribution thermalizes quickly, has a negligible high-energy tail, and is very well approximated by a single Maxwellian distribution. Radiation-hydrodynamic simulations with either LTE or NLTE (i.e. non-equilibrium) atomic physics provide a more complete modeling of the experiment. We found that in order to compute electron temperatures consistent with observation inline non-equilibrium collisional-radiative neon atomic kinetics needs to be taken into account. We discuss the details of LTE and NLTE simulations, and the impact of atomic physics on the radiation heating and cooling rates that determine the plasma temperature. This work was sponsored in part by DOE Office of Science Grant DE-SC0014451, and the Z Facility Fundamental Science Program of SNL.

  10. Blood Biochemistry and Plasma Corticosterone Concentration in Broiler Chickens Under Heat Stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elvis Alexander Díaz López

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available High ambient temperatures cause susceptibility to heat stress in broiler chickens, generating metabolic changes. This paper seeks to determine the changes in blood biochemistry and plasma corticosterone concentration, as well as in glucose, total protein, albumin, globulin, sodium, chlorine, potassium, magnesium, phosphorus, and calcium in broiler chickens under chronic heat stress and at ambient temperature conditions at the Colombian Amazonian piedmont. 21-days-old male chickens of two lines were studied, distributed in an unrestricted random design, in a two-factor scheme, with four treatments. Five repetitions per treatment were performed, and 25 animals per experimental unit examined. Broilers were fed a basic diet of corn and soybean meal with 3,100 kcal ME and 19.5% protein until they reached 42 days of age. The line factor had no effect on the evaluated variables (p ≥ 0.05. However, there was statistically significant difference (p ≤ 0.05 in all variables when concentrations of metabolites in broilers under chronic heat stress were compared to those of chickens exposed to ambient temperatures at the Colombian Amazon piedmont. In conclusion, blood biochemistry suffered significant changes under both experimental temperatures, with more physiological detriment in broilers under chronic heat stress. Concentration of corticosterone became the most sensitive and consistent indicator of the physiological condition of chronic heat stress.

  11. Combined impact of transient heat loads and steady-state plasma exposure on tungsten

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huber, Alexander, E-mail: A.Huber@fz-juelich.de [Forschungszentrum Jülich GmbH, Institut für Energie- und Klimaforschung, 52425 Jülich (Germany); Wirtz, Marius; Sergienko, Gennady; Steudel, Isabel [Forschungszentrum Jülich GmbH, Institut für Energie- und Klimaforschung, 52425 Jülich (Germany); Arakcheev, Aleksey; Burdakov, Aleksander [Budker Institute of Nuclear Physics (BINP), Novosibirsk 630090 (Russian Federation); Esser, Hans Guenter; Freisinger, Michaele; Kreter, Arkadi; Linke, Jochen; Linsmeier, Christian; Mertens, Philippe; Möller, Sören; Philipps, Volker; Pintsuk, Gerald; Reinhart, Michael; Schweer, Bernd [Forschungszentrum Jülich GmbH, Institut für Energie- und Klimaforschung, 52425 Jülich (Germany); Shoshin, Andrey [Budker Institute of Nuclear Physics (BINP), Novosibirsk 630090 (Russian Federation); Terra, Alexis; Unterberg, Bernhard [Forschungszentrum Jülich GmbH, Institut für Energie- und Klimaforschung, 52425 Jülich (Germany)

    2015-10-15

    Highlights: • W-samples under combined loading conditions show a lower damage threshold. • The pre-loaded W-samples show a lower damage threshold due to the D- embrittlement. • Pronounced increase of the D retention has been observed during the combined loads. • Enhanced blister formation has been observed under combined loading conditions. - Abstract: Cracking thresholds and crack patterns in tungsten targets have been studied in recent experiments after repetitive ITER-like ELM heat pulses in combination with plasma exposure in PSI-2 (Γ{sub target} = 2.5–4.0 × 10{sup 21} m{sup −2} s{sup −1}, ion energy on surface E{sub ion} = 60 eV, T{sub e} ≈ 10 eV). The heat pulses were simulated by laser irradiation. A Nd:YAG laser with energy per pulse of up to 32 J and a duration of 1 ms at the fundamental wavelength (λ = 1064 nm, repetition rate 0.5 Hz) was used to irradiate ITER-grade W samples with repetitive heat loads. In contrast to pure thermal exposure with a laser beam where the damage threshold under pure heat loads for ITER-grade W lies between 0.38 and 0.76 GW/m{sup 2}, the experiments with pre-loaded W-samples as well as under combined loading conditions show a lower damage threshold of 0.3 GW/m{sup 2}. This is probably due to deuterium embrittlement and/or a higher defect concentration in a region close to the surface due to supersaturation with deuterium. A pronounced increase in the D retention (more than a factor of five) has been observed during the combined transient heat loads and plasma exposure. Enhanced blister formation has been observed under these combined loading conditions.

  12. Fusion performances and alpha heating in future JET D-T plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Balet, B.; Cordey, J.G.; Gibson, A.; Lomas, P.; Stubberfield, P.M.; Thomas, P. [Commission of the European Communities, Abingdon (United Kingdom). JET Joint Undertaking

    1994-07-01

    The new pump divertor installed at JET should allow high performance pulses of a few seconds duration by both preventing the impurity influx and controlling the density evolution. The TRANSP code has been used in a predictive mode to assess the possible fusion performance of such plasmas fuelled with a 50:50 mixture of D and T, and the effect of alpha particles heating on Te and Ti. Several cases are considered: 50:50 D-T mix; 50:50 D-T mix, no C bloom; 50:50 D-T mix, VH phase, density control; 50:50 D-T mix, VH phase, density control, 6 Ma. The predictions show that if the the bloom and MHD instabilities can be controlled at higher plasma currents using a higher toroidal field to keep a reasonable beta value, then a higher fusion performance steady state plasma with Q{sub DT} superior to 2.5 should be possible. The alpha heating power of 4.9 MW would lead to a 74% increase in Te. 4 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  13. Electric field and radial transport during ICRF heating in the edge plasma of JET

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tagle, J.A.; Brinkschulte, H.; Bures, M.; De Kock, L. (Commission of the European Communities, Abingdon (UK). JET Joint Undertaking); Laux, M. (Akademie der Wissenschaften der DDR, Berlin. Zentralinstitut fuer Elektronenphysik (United Kingdom)); Clement, S. (Centro de Investigaciones Energeticas, Medioambientales y Tecnologicas, Madrid (Spain)); Erents, S.K. (UKAEA Culham Lab., Abingdon (United Kingdom))

    1990-04-01

    The plasma boundary in front of and outside the JET ICRF antenna Faraday screen has been studied using Langmuir probes. Plasma densities of n{sub e} {approx equal}10{sup 15}-10{sup 16} m{sup -3} and electron temperatures Tc {approx equal} 20-80 eV have been measured at the Faraday screen. Both n{sub e} and T{sub e} scale almost linearly with total input power (P{sub RF} up to 12 MW). DC electric fields up to 20 V/cm, with a large poloidal component perpendicular to the magnetic field lines were generated during ICRF heating. The total electric field intensity depends on the minority gas (H or {sup 3}He) and is also linearly dependent on the applied RF power. Spatially resolved measurements of the plasma space potential up to 50-100 V at the limiter flux surface were measured. The relevance of these fields to the transport in the scrape off layer (SOL), to the local particle balance at the boundary and to the impurity production during RF heating is discussed. (orig.).

  14. Time evolution of the particle and heat flux of the detached plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pianpanit, Theerasarn; Ishiguro, Seiji; Hasegawa, Hiroki

    2016-10-01

    The detached plasma is a regime when the particle and heat flux of the plasma are largely reduced before reaching the divertor target. Linear devices experiment data show that when the neutral gas pressure in front of the target increases the heat flux to the target largely decreases. The 1D-3V particle simulation with Monte Carlo collision and cumulative scattering angle Coulomb collision has been developed to study the kinetic effect of the detached plasma. The simulation was performed with the constant temperature and pressure of neutral gas in front of the target. A large decrease in the electron temperature from 5eV to below 1 eV follows a large decrease in the ion temperature inside the neutral gas area in the case with high neutral gas pressure in front of the target. The energy flux at the target decreases in the process of attaining the detached state. This work was performed with the support and under the auspices of the NIFS Collaboration Research programs NIFS14KNXN279 and NIFS14KNSS059.

  15. Propagation of a laser beam in a time-varying waveguide. [plasma heating for controlled fusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapman, J. M.; Kevorkian, J.

    1978-01-01

    The propagation of an axisymmetric laser beam in a plasma column having a radially parabolic electron density distribution is reported. For the case of an axially uniform waveguide it is found that the basic characteristics of alternating focusing and defocusing beams are maintained. However, the intensity distribution is changed at the foci and outer-beam regions. The features of paraxial beam propagation are discussed with reference to axially varying waveguides. Laser plasma coupling is considered noting the case where laser heating produces a density distribution radially parabolic near the axis and the energy absorbed over the focal length of the plasma is small. It is found that: (1) beam-propagation stability is governed by the relative magnitude of the density fluctuations existing in the axial variation of the waveguides due to laser heating, and (2) for beam propagation in a time-varying waveguide, the global instability of the propagation is a function of the initial fluctuation growth rate as compared to the initial time rate of change in the radial curvature of the waveguide.

  16. Wall ablation of heated compound-materials into non-equilibrium discharge plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Weizong; Kong, Linghan; Geng, Jinyue; Wei, Fuzhi; Xia, Guangqing

    2017-02-01

    The discharge properties of the plasma bulk flow near the surface of heated compound-materials strongly affects the kinetic layer parameters modeled and manifested in the Knudsen layer. This paper extends the widely used two-layer kinetic ablation model to the ablation controlled non-equilibrium discharge due to the fact that the local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE) approximation is often violated as a result of the interaction between the plasma and solid walls. Modifications to the governing set of equations, to account for this effect, are derived and presented by assuming that the temperature of the electrons deviates from that of the heavy particles. The ablation characteristics of one typical material, polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) are calculated with this improved model. The internal degrees of freedom as well as the average particle mass and specific heat ratio of the polyatomic vapor, which strongly depends on the temperature, pressure and plasma non-equilibrium degree and plays a crucial role in the accurate determination of the ablation behavior by this model, are also taken into account. Our assessment showed the significance of including such modifications related to the non-equilibrium effect in the study of vaporization of heated compound materials in ablation controlled arcs. Additionally, a two-temperature magneto-hydrodynamic (MHD) model accounting for the thermal non-equilibrium occurring near the wall surface is developed and applied into an ablation-dominated discharge for an electro-thermal chemical launch device. Special attention is paid to the interaction between the non-equilibrium plasma and the solid propellant surface. Both the mass exchange process caused by the wall ablation and plasma species deposition as well as the associated momentum and energy exchange processes are taken into account. A detailed comparison of the results of the non-equilibrium model with those of an equilibrium model is presented. The non-equilibrium results

  17. Modeling ohmic heating in the drying zone of the plasma shaft electric furnace, when recycling the technogenic waste

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aliferov, A. I.; Anshakov, A. S.; Sinitsyn, V. A.; Domarov, P. V.; Danilenko, A. A.

    2016-10-01

    Efficient use of ohmic heating in the drying zone of the plasma shaft furnace for gasification of organic and technogenic wastes is studied. It is shown that by using ohmic heating in the drying zone, energy release takes place in the filling along the entire zone.

  18. Heat Flux Characterization of DC Laminar-plasma Jets Impinging on a Flat Plate at Atmospheric Pressure

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    孟显; 潘文霞; 张文宏; 吴承康

    2001-01-01

    By using steady and transient methods, the total heat fluxes and the distributions of the heat flux were measured experimentally for an argon DC laminar plasma jet impinging normally on a flat plate at atmospheric pressure. Results show that the total heat fluxes measured with a steady method are a little bit higher than those with a transient method. Numerical simulation work was executed to compare with the experimental results.

  19. MW-scale ICRF plasma heating using IGBT switches in a multi-pulse scheme

    Science.gov (United States)

    Be'ery, I.; Kogan, K.; Seemann, O.

    2015-06-01

    Solid-state silicon switches are cheap and reliable option for 1-10 MHz RF power sources, required for plasma ion cyclotron RF heating (ICRF). The large `on' resistance of MOSFET and similar devices limits their power delivery to a few tens of kW per switch. Low resistivity devices, such as IGBT, suffer from large `off' switching time, which limits their useful frequency range and increases the power dissipated in the switch. Here we demonstrate more than 0.8 MW circulated RF power at 2 MHz using only three high voltage IGBT switches. The circuit uses the fast `on' switching capability of the IGBTs to generate high-Q pulse train. This operation mode also simplifies the measurement of RF coupling between the antenna and the plasma.

  20. Observation of Electron Energy Pinch in HT-7 ICRF Heated Plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Siye; Wan, Baonian; Wang, Lu; Ti, Ang; Zhang, Xinjun; Liu, Zixi; Qian, Jinping; Zhong, Guoqiang; Duan, Yanmin

    2014-09-01

    Inward energy transport (pinch phenomenon) in the electron channel is observed in HT-7 plasmas using off-axis ion cyclotron resonance frequency (ICRF) heating. Experimental results and power balance transport analysis by TRANSP code are presented in this article. With the aids of GLF23 and Chang-Hinton transport models, which predict energy diffusivity in experimental conditions, the estimated electron pinch velocity is obtained by experimental data and is found reasonably comparable to the results in the previous study, such as Song on Tore Supra. Density scanning shows that the energy convective velocity in the electron channel has a close relation to density scale length, which is qualitatively in agreement with Wang's theoretical prediction. The parametric dependence of electron energy convective velocity on plasma current is still ambiguous and is worthy of future research on EAST.

  1. Electron residual energy due to stochastic heating in field-ionized plasma

    CERN Document Server

    Khalilzadeh, Elnaz; Jahanpanah, Jafar; Chakhmachi, Amir; Yazdani, Elnaz

    2015-01-01

    The electron residual energy originated from the stochastic heating in under-dense field-ionized plasma is here investigated. The optical response of plasma is initially modeled by using the concept of two counter-propagating electromagnetic waves. The solution of motion equation of a single electron indicates that by including the ionization, the electron with higher residual energy compared to the case without ionization could be obtained. In agreement with chaotic nature of the motion, it is found that the electron residual energy will significantly be changed by applying a minor change to the initial conditions. Extensive kinetic 1D-3V particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations have been performed in order to resolve full plasma reactions. In this way, two different regimes of plasma behavior are observed by varying the pulse length. The results indicate that the amplitude of scattered fields in sufficient long pulse length is high enough to act as a second counter-propagating wave for triggering the stochastic e...

  2. Magnetic flux and heat losses by diffusive, advective, and Nernst effects in MagLIF-like plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Velikovich, A. L., E-mail: sasha.velikovich@nrl.navy.mil; Giuliani, J. L., E-mail: sasha.velikovich@nrl.navy.mil [Plasma Physics Division, Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, DC 20375 (United States); Zalesak, S. T. [Berkeley Research Associates, Beltsville, MD 20705 (United States)

    2014-12-15

    The MagLIF approach to inertial confinement fusion involves subsonic/isobaric compression and heating of a DT plasma with frozen-in magnetic flux by a heavy cylindrical liner. The losses of heat and magnetic flux from the plasma to the liner are thereby determined by plasma advection and gradient-driven transport processes, such as thermal conductivity, magnetic field diffusion and thermomagnetic effects. Theoretical analysis based on obtaining exact self-similar solutions of the classical collisional Braginskii's plasma transport equations in one dimension demonstrates that the heat loss from the hot plasma to the cold liner is dominated by the transverse heat conduction and advection, and the corresponding loss of magnetic flux is dominated by advection and the Nernst effect. For a large electron Hall parameter ω{sub e}τ{sub e} effective diffusion coefficients determining the losses of heat and magnetic flux are both shown to decrease with ω{sub e}τ{sub e} as does the Bohm diffusion coefficient, which is commonly associated with low collisionality and two-dimensional transport. This family of exact solutions can be used for verification of codes that model the MagLIF plasma dynamics.

  3. Magnetic flux and heat losses by diffusive, advective, and Nernst effects in MagLIF-like plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velikovich, A. L.; Giuliani, J. L.; Zalesak, S. T.

    2014-12-01

    The MagLIF approach to inertial confinement fusion involves subsonic/isobaric compression and heating of a DT plasma with frozen-in magnetic flux by a heavy cylindrical liner. The losses of heat and magnetic flux from the plasma to the liner are thereby determined by plasma advection and gradient-driven transport processes, such as thermal conductivity, magnetic field diffusion and thermomagnetic effects. Theoretical analysis based on obtaining exact self-similar solutions of the classical collisional Braginskii's plasma transport equations in one dimension demonstrates that the heat loss from the hot plasma to the cold liner is dominated by the transverse heat conduction and advection, and the corresponding loss of magnetic flux is dominated by advection and the Nernst effect. For a large electron Hall parameter ωeτe effective diffusion coefficients determining the losses of heat and magnetic flux are both shown to decrease with ωeτe as does the Bohm diffusion coefficient, which is commonly associated with low collisionality and two-dimensional transport. This family of exact solutions can be used for verification of codes that model the MagLIF plasma dynamics.

  4. A new ICRF scenario for bulk ion heating in D-T plasmas: How to utilize intrinsic impurities in fusion devices in our favour

    CERN Document Server

    Kazakov, Y O; Van Eester, D; Bilato, R; Dumont, R; Lerche, E; Mantsinen, M; Messiaen, A

    2015-01-01

    A fusion reactor requires plasma pre-heating before the rate of deuterium-tritium fusion reactions becomes significant. In ITER, radiofrequency (RF) heating of 3He ions, additionally puffed into the plasma, is one of the main options considered for increasing bulk ion temperature during the ramp-up phase of the pulse. In this paper, we propose an alternative scenario for bulk ion heating with RF waves, which requires no extra 3He puff and profits from the presence of intrinsic Beryllium impurities in the plasma. The discussed method to heat Be impurities in D-T plasmas is shown to provide an even larger fraction of fuel ion heating.

  5. Quasi-optical theory of microwave plasma heating in open magnetic trap

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shalashov, A. G.; Balakin, A. A.; Gospodchikov, E. D.; Khusainov, T. A.

    2016-11-01

    Microwave heating of a high-temperature plasma confined in a large-scale open magnetic trap, including all important wave effects like diffraction, absorption, dispersion, and wave beam aberrations, is described for the first time within the first-principle technique based on consistent Maxwell's equations. With this purpose, the quasi-optical approach is generalized over weakly inhomogeneous gyrotrotropic media with resonant absorption and spatial dispersion, and a new form of the integral quasi-optical equation is proposed. An effective numerical technique for this equation's solution is developed and realized in a new code QOOT, which is verified with the simulations of realistic electron cyclotron heating scenarios at the Gas Dynamic Trap at the Budker Institute of Nuclear Physics (Novosibirsk, Russia).

  6. Self-Organization and Heating by Inward Diffusion in Magnetospheric Plasmas

    CERN Document Server

    Sato, N; Kawazura, Y

    2015-01-01

    Through the process of inward diffusion, a strongly localized clump of plasma is created in a magnetosphere. The creation of the density gradient, instead of the usual flattening by a diffusion process, can be explained by the topological constraints given by the adiabatic invariants of magnetized particles. After developing a canonical formalism for the standard guiding center dynamics in a dipole magnetic field, we complete our attempt to build a statistical mechanics on a constrained phase space by discussing the construction principles of the associated diffusion operator. We then investigate the heating mechanism associated with inward diffusion: as particles move toward regions of higher magnetic field, they experience preferential heating of the perpendicular (with respect to the magnetic field) temperature in order to preserve the magnetic moment. A relationship between conservation of bounce action and temperature isotropy emerged. We further show that this behavior is scaled by the diffusion paramet...

  7. Quasi-optical theory of microwave plasma heating in open magnetic trap

    CERN Document Server

    Shalashov, A G; Gospodchikov, E D; Khusainov, T A

    2016-01-01

    Microwave heating of a high-temperature plasma confined in a large-scale open magnetic trap, including all important wave effects like diffraction, absorption, dispersion and wave beam aberrations, is described for the first time within the first-principle technique based on consistent Maxwell's equations. With this purpose, the quasi-optical approach is generalized over weakly inhomogeneous gyrotrotropic media with resonant absorption and spatial dispersion, and a new form of the integral quasi-optical equation is proposed. An effective numerical technique for this equation's solution is developed and realized in a new code QOOT, which is verified with the simulations of realistic electron cyclotron heating scenarios at the Gas Dynamic Trap at the Budker Institute of Nuclear Physics (Novosibirsk, Russia).

  8. In Situ Observations of Ion Scale Current Sheets and Associated Electron Heating in Turbulent Space Plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chasapis, A.; Retino, A.; Sahraoui, F.; Greco, A.; Vaivads, A.; Khotyaintsev, Y. V.; Sundkvist, D. J.; Canu, P.

    2014-12-01

    We present a statistical study of ion-scale current sheets in turbulent space plasma. The study was performed using in situ measurements from the Earth's magnetosheath downstream of the quasi-parallel shock. Intermittent structures were identified using the Partial Variance of Increments method. We studied the distribution of the identified structures as a function of their magnetic shear angle, the PVI index and the electron heating. The properties of the observed current sheets were different for high (>3) and low (3) structures that accounted for ~20% of the total. Those current sheets have high magnetic shear (>90 degrees) and were observed mostly in close proximity to the bow shock with their numbers reducing towards the magnetopause. Enhancement of the estimated electron temperature within these current sheets suggest that they are important for local electron heating and energy dissipation.

  9. 15-MeV proton emission from ICRF-heated plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jarvis, O.N.; Conroy, S.W.; Hone, M.; Sadler, G.J.; Van Belle, P. [Commission of the European Communities, Luxembourg (Luxembourg)

    1994-07-01

    {sup 3} He-d fusion reaction protons emitted from ICRF-heated discharges were recorded with a silicon diode detector installed in the JET tokamak. The detection rates demonstrated that sawtooth crashes eject fast particles from the inner region of the plasma. The energy spectra of the fusion product protons using H minority provided evidence for the second harmonic acceleration of deuterons at sub-MW levels of RF power and those with {sup 3} He minority did not possess the expected twin-lobed shape predicted by kinematics calculations. (authors). 5 refs., 6 figs.

  10. Conversion Efficiency of Kilovolt X- Ray Line Emission in Laser-heated NaF Plasma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    孔令华; 淳于书泰; 何绍堂; 陈涵德; 杨向东; 李孝昌; 王永国

    1994-01-01

    This paper reports the theoretical and experimental work on converting focused Nd-glass laser radiation of LI-11 facility into kilovolt X-ray line emission in laser-heated NaF plasma.This conversion efficiency ε turns out to he in the range from 0.2% to 1% for the laser (λ=1.06μm) power density changing from 10×1013 to 3.5×1013 W/cm2 The relationship between ε and λ has also been discussed.Simultaneously,theoretical results are compared with the experimental.

  11. Electronic excitation as a mode of heat dissipation in laser-driven cluster plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rajeev, R.; Rishad, K. P. M.; Madhu Trivikram, T.; Krishnamurthy, M. [Tata Institute of Fundamental Research, Homi Bhabha Road, Mumbai-5 (India)

    2013-12-15

    Electrons streaming out of laser plasma are known for non-local heat transport and energy deposition by the ionization wave. At 100 eV electron temperature, since the electronic excitation cross section is comparable to that of ionization for Ar and CO{sub 2}, a non-local excitation wave akin to the ionization wave is envisaged where energy deposition in excitations forms a excited cluster sheath beyond the laser focus. Here, we show that nano-cluster systems have the right parameters to form such an exciton sheath and experimentally demonstrate this via charge transfer reactions.

  12. Inference of Heating Properties from "Hot" Non-flaring Plasmas in Active Region Cores. I. Single Nanoflares

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnes, W. T.; Cargill, P. J.; Bradshaw, S. J.

    2016-09-01

    The properties that are expected of “hot” non-flaring plasmas due to nanoflare heating in active regions are investigated using hydrodynamic modeling tools, including a two-fluid development of the Enthalpy Based Thermal Evolution of Loops code. Here we study a single nanoflare and show that while simple models predict an emission measure distribution extending well above 10 MK, which is consistent with cooling by thermal conduction, many other effects are likely to limit the existence and detectability of such plasmas. These include: differential heating between electrons and ions, ionization non-equilibrium, and for short nanoflares, the time taken for the coronal density to increase. The most useful temperature range to look for this plasma, often called the “smoking gun” of nanoflare heating, lies between 106.6 and 107 K. Signatures of the actual heating may be detectable in some instances.

  13. Inference of Heating Properties from "Hot" Non-flaring Plasmas in Active Region Cores I. Single Nanoflares

    CERN Document Server

    Barnes, W T; Bradshaw, S J

    2016-01-01

    The properties expected of "hot" non-flaring plasmas due to nanoflare heating in active regions are investigated using hydrodynamic modeling tools, including a two-fluid development of the EBTEL code. Here we study a single nanoflare and show that while simple models predict an emission measure distribution extending well above 10 MK that is consistent with cooling by thermal conduction, many other effects are likely to limit the existence and detectability of such plasmas. These include: differential heating between electrons and ions, ionization non-equilibrium and, for short nanoflares, the time taken for the coronal density to increase. The most useful temperature range to look for this plasma, often called the "smoking gun" of nanoflare heating, lies between $10^{6.6}$ and $10^7$ K. Signatures of the actual heating may be detectable in some instances.

  14. Artificial plasma cusp generated by upper hybrid instabilities in HF heating experiments at HAARP

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuo, Spencer; Snyder, Arnold

    2013-05-01

    High Frequency Active Auroral Research Program digisonde was operated in a fast mode to record ionospheric modifications by the HF heating wave. With the O mode heater of 3.2 MHz turned on for 2 min, significant virtual height spread was observed in the heater off ionograms, acquired beginning the moment the heater turned off. Moreover, there is a noticeable bump in the virtual height spread of the ionogram trace that appears next to the plasma frequency (~ 2.88 MHz) of the upper hybrid resonance layer of the HF heating wave. The enhanced spread and the bump disappear in the subsequent heater off ionograms recorded 1 min later. The height distribution of the ionosphere in the spread situation indicates that both electron density and temperature increases exceed 10% over a large altitude region (> 30 km) from below to above the upper hybrid resonance layer. This "mini cusp" (bump) is similar to the cusp occurring in daytime ionograms at the F1-F2 layer transition, indicating that there is a small ledge in the density profile reminiscent of F1-F2 layer transitions. Two parametric processes exciting upper hybrid waves as the sidebands by the HF heating waves are studied. Field-aligned purely growing mode and lower hybrid wave are the respective decay modes. The excited upper hybrid and lower hybrid waves introduce the anomalous electron heating which results in the ionization enhancement and localized density ledge. The large-scale density irregularities formed in the heat flow, together with the density irregularities formed through the parametric instability, give rise to the enhanced virtual height spread. The results of upper hybrid instability analysis are also applied to explain the descending feature in the development of the artificial ionization layers observed in electron cyclotron harmonic resonance heating experiments.

  15. Development of injection gas heating system for introducing large droplets to inductively coupled plasma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaburaki, Yuki; Nomura, Akito; Ishihara, Yukiko; Iwai, Takahiro; Miyahara, Hidekazu; Okino, Akitoshi

    2013-01-01

    We developed an injection gas heating system for introducing large droplets, because we want to effectively to measure elements in a single cell. This system was applied to ICP-atomic emission spectrometry (ICP-AES), to evaluate it performance. To evaluate the effect of the emission intensity, the emission intensity of Ca(II) increased to a maximum of tenfold at 147°C and the peak was shifted upstream of the plasma. To investigate in detail the effect of an injection gas heating system, we studied different conditions of the injection gas temperature and droplet volume. When the injection gas temperature was 89°C, smaller droplets were easily ionized. At 147°C, the emission intensity ratio and the absolute amount of the sample including the droplet exhibited close agreement. These results show the advantages of the injection gas heating system for large droplet introduction, and the sufficient reduction in the solvent load. The solvent load could be reduced by heating to 147°C using the system.

  16. High heat flux actively cooled plasma facing components development, realization and first results in Tore Supra

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grosman, A. [Association Euratom-CEA, Centre d' Etudes de Cadarache, 13 - Saint-Paul-lez-Durance (France). Dept. de Recherches sur la Fusion Controlee

    2004-07-01

    The development, design, manufacture and testing of actively cooled high heat flux plasma facing components (PFC) has been an essential stage towards long powerful tokamak operations for Tore-Supra, it lasted about 10 years. This paper deals with the toroidal pumped limiter (TPL) that is able to sustain up to 10 MW/m{sup 2} of nominal heat flux. This device is based on hardened copper alloy heat sink structures covered by a carbon fiber composite armour, it resulted in the manufacturing of 600 elementary components, called finger elements, to achieve the 7.6 m{sup 2} TPL. This assembly has been operating in Tore-Supra since spring 2002. Some difficulties occurred during the manufacturing phase, the valuable industrial experience is summarized in the section 2. The permanent monitoring of PFC surface temperature all along the discharge is performed by a set of 6 actively cooled infrared endoscopes. The heat flux monitoring and control issue but also the progress made in our understanding of the deuterium retention in long discharges are described in the section 3. (A.C.)

  17. Heat load behaviors of plasma sprayed tungsten coatings on copper alloys with different compliant layers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chong, F.L. [Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei 230031 (China)], E-mail: flch@ipp.ac.cn; Chen, J.L.; Li, J.G. [Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei 230031 (China); Hu, D.Y.; Zheng, X.B. [Shanghai Institute of Ceramics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 200051 (China)

    2008-04-15

    Plasma sprayed tungsten (PS-W) coatings with the compliant layers of titanium (Ti), nickel-chromium-aluminum (NiCrAl) alloys and W/Cu mixtures were fabricated on copper alloys, and their properties of the porosity, oxygen content, thermal conductivity and bonding strength were measured. High heat flux tests of actively cooled W coatings were performed by means of an electron beam facility. The results indicated that APS-W coating showed a poorer heat transfer capability and thermo-mechanical properties than VPS-W coating, and the compliant layers improved W coating performance under the heat flux load. Among three compliant layers, W/Cu was the preferable because of its better effects on heat removal and stress alleviating. The optimization of W/Cu compliant layer found that 0.1 mm and 25 vol.%W was optimum compliant layer structure for 1 mm W coating, which induced a 23% reduction of the maximum stress compared to the sharp interface, and the plastic strain was reduced to 0.01% from 1.55%.

  18. Heat load behaviors of plasma sprayed tungsten coatings on copper alloys with different compliant layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chong, F. L.; Chen, J. L.; Li, J. G.; Hu, D. Y.; Zheng, X. B.

    2008-04-01

    Plasma sprayed tungsten (PS-W) coatings with the compliant layers of titanium (Ti), nickel-chromium-aluminum (NiCrAl) alloys and W/Cu mixtures were fabricated on copper alloys, and their properties of the porosity, oxygen content, thermal conductivity and bonding strength were measured. High heat flux tests of actively cooled W coatings were performed by means of an electron beam facility. The results indicated that APS-W coating showed a poorer heat transfer capability and thermo-mechanical properties than VPS-W coating, and the compliant layers improved W coating performance under the heat flux load. Among three compliant layers, W/Cu was the preferable because of its better effects on heat removal and stress alleviating. The optimization of W/Cu compliant layer found that 0.1 mm and 25 vol.%W was optimum compliant layer structure for 1 mm W coating, which induced a 23% reduction of the maximum stress compared to the sharp interface, and the plastic strain was reduced to 0.01% from 1.55%.

  19. On initial enhancement of mesospheric dust associated plasma irregularities subsequent to radiowave heating

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. A. Scales

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Important observational manifestations of subvisible mesospheric dust are Polar Mesospheric Summer Echoes PMSE which are produced by scattering from electron irregularities produced by dust charging. It has been observed that the PMSE strength can be artificially modified by using a ground-based ionospheric heating facility to perturb the electron irregularity source region that is believed to produce PMSE. Recently it has become evident that significant diagnostic information may be available about the dust layer from the temporal behavior of the electron irregularities during the heating process which modifies the background electron temperature. Particularly interesting and important periods of the temporal behavior are during the turn-on and turn-off of the radiowave heating. Although a number of past theoretical and experimental investigations have considered the turn-off period, the objective here is to consider futher possibilities for diagnostic information available as well as the underlying physical processes. Approximate analytical models are developed and compared to a more accurate full computational model as a reference. Then from the temporal behavior of the electron irregularities during the turn-off of the radiowave heating, the analytical models are used to obtain possible diagnostic information for various charged dust and background plasma quantities.

  20. Numerical simulation of an atmospheric pressure RF-driven plasma needle and heat transfer to adjacent human skin using COMSOL.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schröder, Maximilian; Ochoa, Angel; Breitkopf, Cornelia

    2015-06-07

    Plasma medicine is an emerging field where plasma physics is used for therapeutical applications. Temperature is an important factor to take into account with respect to the applications of plasma to biological systems. During the treatment, the tissue temperature could increase to critical values. In this work, a model is presented, which is capable of predicting the skin temperature during a treatment with a radio frequency driven plasma needle. The main gas was helium. To achieve this, a discharge model was coupled to a heat transfer and fluid flow model. The results provide maximum application times for different power depositions in order to avoid reaching critical skin temperatures.

  1. Investigation of inter-ELM ion heat transport in the H-mode pedestal of ASDEX Upgrade plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viezzer, E.; Fable, E.; Cavedon, M.; Angioni, C.; Dux, R.; Laggner, F. M.; Bernert, M.; Burckhart, A.; McDermott, R. M.; Pütterich, T.; Ryter, F.; Willensdorfer, M.; Wolfrum, E.; the ASDEX Upgrade Team; the EUROfusion MST1 Team

    2017-02-01

    The ion heat transport in the pedestal of H-mode plasmas is investigated in various H-mode discharges with different pedestal ion collisionalities. Interpretive modelling suggests that in all analyzed discharges the ion heat diffusivity coefficient, {χ\\text{i}} , in the pedestal is close to the neoclassical prediction within the experimental uncertainties. The impact of changing the deposition location of the electron cyclotron resonance heating on the ion heat transport has been studied. The effect on the background profiles is small. The pre-ELM (edge localized modes) edge profiles as well as the behaviour of the electron temperature and density, ion temperature and impurity toroidal rotation during the ELM cycle are very similar in discharges with on- and off-axis ECRH heating. No significant deviation of {χ\\text{i}} from neoclassics is observed when changing the ECRH deposition location to the plasma edge.

  2. Tailoring the heat transfer on the injection moulding cavity by plasma sprayed ceramic coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bobzin, K.; Hopmann, Ch; Öte, M.; Knoch, M. A.; Alkhasli, I.; Dornebusch, H.; Schmitz, M.

    2017-03-01

    Inhomogeneous material shrinkage in injection moulding can cause warpage in thermoplastic components. To minimise the deformations of the injection moulding parts, the heat transfer during the cooling phase can be adjusted according to the local cooling demand on the surface of the mould cavity by means of plasma sprayed coatings with locally variable thermal resistance over the surface of the mould. Thermal resistance is a function of thermal conductivity and thickness of the coatings, where thermal conductivity of thermal barrier coatings can be adjusted by altering the chemical composition and the microstructure, which is depending on the thickness. This work evaluates the application of plasma sprayed coatings with variable thickness as thermal barrier coatings in the mould cavity. The thermal resistance of the coating and thereby the heat transfer from the melt into the mould will be influenced locally by varying the coating thickness over the cavity area according to the local cooling demand. Using the laser flash method, the thermal conduction of coatings with different thicknesses will be determined. On the basis of the experimentally determined thermal conduction, the effect of the coatings on the temperature field of the mould cavity will be numerically calculated and the required thickness distribution of the coating for an optimal temperature gradient will be determined.

  3. Coronal Heating Driven by Magnetic-gradient Pumping Mechanism in Solar Plasmas

    CERN Document Server

    Tan, Baolin

    2014-01-01

    The solar coronal heating is a longstanding mystery in astrophysics. Considering that the solar magnetic field is spatially inhomogeneous with considerable magnetic gradient from solar surface to the corona, this work proposes a magnetic gradient pumping (MGP) mechanism and try to explain the formation of hot plasma upflows, such as the hot type II spicules and hot plasma ejections, etc. In MGP mechanism, the magnetic gradients drive the energetic particles to move upwards from the underlying solar atmosphere and form hot upflows. These upflow energetic particles deposit in corona and make it becoming very hot. Roughly estimations indicate that the solar corona can be heated to above 1 million degrees, and the upflow velocity is about 40 km/s in chromosphere and about 130 km/s in the corona. The solar magnetic flux tubes act as pumpers to extract energetic particles from the underlying thermal photosphere, convey them and deposit in the corona. The deposition of energetic particles will make the corona become...

  4. Qualification Program of Korea Heat Load Test Facility KoHLT-EB for ITER Plasma Facing Components

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Suk-Kwon; Park, Seoung Dae; Jin, Hyung Gon; Lee, Eo Hwak; Yoon, Jae-Sung; Lee, Dong Won [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Cho, Seungyon [National Fusion Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-10-15

    The qualification tests were performed to evaluate the high heat flux test facility for the PFCs and fusion reactor materials. For the thermal fatigue test, two types of tungsten mock-ups were fabricated. The cooling performance was tested under the similar operation condition of ITER and fusion reactor. After the completion of the preliminary mockup test and facility qualification, the high heat flux test facility will assess the performance test for the various plasma facing components in fusion reactor materials. Preliminary thermo-hydraulic and performance tests were conducted using various test mockups for the plasma facing components in the high heat flux test facilities of the world. The previous heat flux tests were performed by using the graphite heater facilities in Korea. Several facilities which equipped with an electron beam as the uniform heat source were fabricated for the tokamak PFCs in the EU, Russia and US. These heat flux test facilities are utilized for a cyclic heat flux test of the PFCs. Each facility working for their own purpose in EU FZJ, US SNL, and Russia Efremov institute. For this purpose, KoHLTEB was constructed and this facility will be used for ITER TBM performance test with the small-scale and large-scale mockups, and prototype. Also, it has been used for other fusion application for developing plasma facing component (PFC) for ITER FW, tungsten divertor, and heat transfer experiment and so on under the domestic R and D program. Korea heat load test facility by using electron beam KoHLT-EB was constructed for the high heat flux test to verify the plasma facing components, including ITER TBM first wall.

  5. Heat and Radiofrequency Plasma Glow Discharge Pretreatment of a Titanium Alloy: Eveidence for Enhanced Osteoinductive Properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rapuano, Bruce E.; Singh, Herman; Boskey, Adele L.; Doty, Stephen B.; MacDonald, Daniel E.

    2013-01-01

    It is believed that orthopedic and implant longevity can be improved by optimizing fixation, or direct bone-implant contact, through the stimulation of new bone formation around the implant. The purpose of this study was to determine whether heat (600°C) or radiofrequency plasma glow discharge (RFGD) pretreatment of Ti6Al4V stimulated calcium-phosphate mineral formation in cultures of attached MC3T3 osteoprogenitor cells with or without a fibronectin coating. Calcium-phosphate mineral was analyzed by flame atomic absorption spectrophotometry, scanning electron microscopy (SEM)/electron dispersive X-ray microanalysis (EDAX) and Fourier transformed infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). RFGD and heat pretreatments produced a general pattern of increased total soluble calcium levels, although the effect of heat pretreatment was greater than that of RFGD. SEM/EDAX showed the presence of calcium-and phosphorus-containing particles on untreated and treated disks that were more numerous on fibronectin-coated disks. These particles were observed earliest (1 week) on RFGD-pretreated surfaces. FTIR analyses showed that the heat pretreatment produced a general pattern of increased levels of apatite mineral at 2–4 weeks; a greater effect was observed for fibronectin-coated disks compared to uncoated disks. The observed findings suggest that heat pretreatment of Ti6Al4V increased the total mass of the mineral formed in MC3T3 osteoprogenitor cell cultures more than RFGD while the latter pretreatment hastened the early deposition of mineral. These findings help to support the hypothesis that the pretreatments enhance the osteoinductive properties of the alloy. PMID:23494951

  6. [Effect of plasma membrane ion permeability modulators on respiration and heat output of wheat roots].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alekseeva, V A; Gordon, L Kh; Loseva, N L; Rakhimova, G G; Tsentsevitskiĭ, A N

    2006-01-01

    A study was made of changes in the rates of respiration, heat production, and membrane characteristics in cells of excised roots of wheat seedlings under the modulation of plasma membrane ion permeability by two membrane active compounds: valinomycin (20 microM (V50)) and chlorpromazine (50 microM (CP50) and 100 microM (CP100)). Both compounds increased the loss of potassium ions, which correlated with the lowering of membrane potential, rate of respiration, and heat production after a 2 h exposure. The differences in alteration of these parameters were due to specific action of either compound on the membrane and to the extent of ion homeostasis disturbance. V20 had a weak effect on the studied parameters. V50 caused an increase of the rate of respiration and heat production, which enhanced following a prolonged action (5 h) and were associated with ion homeostatis restoration. The extent of alteration of membrane characteristics (an increase of potassium loss by roots, and lowering of cell membrane potential) as well as energy expense under the action of CP50 during the first period were more pronounced than in the presence of V50. During a prolonged action of CP50, the increase of respiration intensity and heat production correlated with partial recovery of ion homeostatis in cells. Essential lowering of membrane potential and substantial loss of potassium by cells, starting from the early stages of their response reaction, were followed by inhibition of respiration rate and heat production. Alterations of the structure and functional characteristics of excised root cells indicate the intensification of the membrane-tropic effect of a prolonged action of CP100, and the lack of cell energy resources.

  7. Modification of argon impurity transport by electron cyclotron heating in KSTAR H-mode plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Joohwan; Henderson, S. S.; Kim, Kimin; Seon, C. R.; Song, Inwoo; Lee, H. Y.; Jang, Juhyeok; Park, Jae Sun; Lee, S. G.; Lee, J. H.; Lee, Seung Hun; Hong, Suk-Ho; Choe, Wonho

    2017-03-01

    Experiments with a small amount of Ar gas injection as a trace impurity were conducted in the Korea Superconducting Tokamak Advanced Research (KSTAR) H-mode plasma ({{B}\\text{T}}   =  2.8 T, {{I}\\text{P}}   =  0.6 MA, and {{P}\\text{NBI}}   =  4.0 MW). 170 GHz electron cyclotron resonance heating (ECH) at 600 and 800 kW was focused along the mid-plane with a fixed major radial position of R   =  1.66 m. The emissivity of the Ar16+ (3.949 {\\mathring{\\text{A}}} ) and Ar15+ (353.860 {\\mathring{\\text{A}}} ) spectral lines were measured by x-ray imaging crystal spectroscopy (XICS) and a vacuum UV (VUV) spectrometer, respectively. ECH reduces the peak Ar15+ emission and increases the Ar16+ emission, an effect largest with 800 kW. The ADAS-SANCO impurity transport code was used to evaluate the Ar transport coefficients. It was found that the inward convective velocity found in the plasma core without ECH was decreased with ECH, while diffusion remained approximately constant resulting in a less-peaked Ar density profile. Theoretical results from the NEO code suggest that neoclassical transport is not responsible for the change in transport, while the microstability analysis using GKW predicts a dominant ITG mode during both ECH and non-ECH plasmas.

  8. Particle Heating and Energization During Magnetic Reconnection Events in MST Plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubois, Ami M.; Almagri, A. F.; Anderson, J. K.; den Hartog, D. J.; Forest, C.; Nornberg, M.; Sarff, J. S.

    2015-11-01

    Magnetic reconnection plays an important role in particle transport, energization, and acceleration in space, astrophysical, and laboratory plasmas. In MST reversed field pinch plasmas, discrete magnetic reconnection events release large amounts of energy from the equilibrium magnetic field, resulting in non-collisional ion heating. However, Thomson Scattering measures a decrease in the thermal electron temperature. Recent fast x-ray measurements show an enhancement in the high energy x-ray flux during reconnection, where the coupling between edge and core tearing modes is essential for enhanced flux. A non-Maxwellian energetic electron tail is generated during reconnection, where the power law spectral index (γ) decreases from 4.3 to 1.8 and is dependent on density, plasma current, and the reversal parameter. After the reconnection event, γ increases rapidly to 5.8, consistent with the loss of energetic electrons due to stochastic thermal transport. During the reconnection event, the change in γ is correlated with the change in magnetic energy stored in the equilibrium field, indicating that the released magnetic energy may be an energy source for electron energization. Recent experimental and computational results of energetic electron tail formation during magnetic reconnection events will be presented. This work is supported by the U.S. DOE and the NSF.

  9. Momentum and heat transfer from lower hybrid antennas to the tokamak edge plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fuchs, V.; Goniche, M.; Gunn, J.; Petrzilka, V

    2001-02-01

    The momentum and heat transfer from the Lower Hybrid (LH) grill electric field to tokamak edge plasma are derived within the framework of quasi-linear theory. Results are supported by test electron simulations. An LH power loss of the order of 1- 5% of total radiated power is found to occur in an interaction layer of the size of about 0.3 cm in the radial direction limited by electron Landau damping of the LH slow wave. The underlying electron distribution function describing fast electrons generated in both the parallel and anti-parallel (to{sup {yields}} B{sub 0}) directions is approximated by a sum of drifting Maxwellian with and <{delta}v{sup 2}{sub II} > determined here from the test particle simulations. Non-zero momentum transfer from the antenna field not only leads to fast electron beam formation discussed earlier [V. Fuchs, et al., Phys. Plasmas 3, 4023 (1996)], but also causes charge separation in front of the antenna [V. Petrzilka et al., Czech. Journ. Phys. S3, 127 (1999)]. The resulting electric field is calculated for electrons in equilibrium with the ambient plasma an terms which are likely to modify the ion dynamics are identified. (authors)

  10. Plasma column development in the CO2 laser-heated solenoid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tighe, W.; Offenberger, A. A.; Capjack, C. E.

    1987-08-01

    Axial and radial plasma dynamics in the CO2 laser-heated solenoid have been studied experimentally and numerically. The axial behavior is found to be well described by a self-regulated bleaching wave model. The radial expansion is found to be strongly dependent on the focusing ratio of the input laser beam. With a fast focus ( f/5), the early radial expansion rate is twice that found with a slower focusing arrangement ( f/15). The faster focusing ratio also results in a significantly wider plasma column. On the other hand, no significant dependence of f/♯ on the axial propagation was found. A finite ionization time and the rapid formation of a density minimum on axis are observed and verify earlier experimental results. Detailed comparisons are made with a 2-D magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) and laser propagation code. The axial and radial plasma behavior and, in particular, the dependence of the radial behavior on the focal ratio of the laser are reasonably well supported by the simulation results. Computational results are also in good agreement with experimental measurements of temperature and density using stimulated scattering (Brillouin, Raman) and interferometry diagnostic techniques.

  11. Multi-machine scaling of the main SOL parallel heat flux width in tokamak limiter plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horacek, J.; Pitts, R. A.; Adamek, J.; Arnoux, G.; Bak, J.-G.; Brezinsek, S.; Dimitrova, M.; Goldston, R. J.; Gunn, J. P.; Havlicek, J.; Hong, S.-H.; Janky, F.; LaBombard, B.; Marsen, S.; Maddaluno, G.; Nie, L.; Pericoli, V.; Popov, Tsv; Panek, R.; Rudakov, D.; Seidl, J.; Seo, D. S.; Shimada, M.; Silva, C.; Stangeby, P. C.; Viola, B.; Vondracek, P.; Wang, H.; Xu, G. S.; Xu, Y.; Contributors, JET

    2016-07-01

    As in many of today’s tokamaks, plasma start-up in ITER will be performed in limiter configuration on either the inner or outer midplane first wall (FW). The massive, beryllium armored ITER FW panels are toroidally shaped to protect panel-to-panel misalignments, increasing the deposited power flux density compared with a purely cylindrical surface. The chosen shaping should thus be optimized for a given radial profile of parallel heat flux, {{q}||} in the scrape-off layer (SOL) to ensure optimal power spreading. For plasmas limited on the outer wall in tokamaks, this profile is commonly observed to decay exponentially as {{q}||}={{q}0}\\text{exp} ~≤ft(-r/λ q\\text{omp}\\right) , or, for inner wall limiter plasmas with the double exponential decay comprising a sharp near-SOL feature and a broader main SOL width, λ q\\text{omp} . The initial choice of λ q\\text{omp} , which is critical in ensuring that current ramp-up or down will be possible as planned in the ITER scenario design, was made on the basis of an extremely restricted L-mode divertor dataset, using infra-red thermography measurements on the outer divertor target to extrapolate to a heat flux width at the main plasma midplane. This unsatisfactory situation has now been significantly improved by a dedicated multi-machine ohmic and L-mode limiter plasma study, conducted under the auspices of the International Tokamak Physics Activity, involving 11 tokamaks covering a wide parameter range with R=\\text{0}\\text{.4--2}\\text{.8} \\text{m}, {{B}0}=\\text{1}\\text{.2--7}\\text{.5} \\text{T}, {{I}\\text{p}}=\\text{9--2500} \\text{kA}. Measurements of λ q\\text{omp} in the database are made exclusively on all devices using a variety of fast reciprocating Langmuir probes entering the plasma at a variety of poloidal locations, but with the majority being on the low field side. Statistical analysis of the database reveals nine reasonable engineering and dimensionless scalings. All yield, however, similar

  12. Control of plasma renin activity in heat-stressed baboons on varied salt intake.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Proppe, D W

    1987-04-01

    The characteristics and control of the increase in plasma renin activity (PRA) during environmental heating (EH) were determined in 12 unanesthetized, chronically catheterized baboons. Each EH experiment consisted of a 1.5- to 4-h exposure to an ambient temperature of 39-44 degrees C until core temperature (Tc) reached 39.5-40.0 degrees C. These EH experiments were done on the baboon in an unblocked state and during beta-adrenergic receptor blockade produced by propranolol when on normal-to-high salt intake (NHSI) and on low-salt intake (LSI). PRA rose linearly with Tc during EH, but the increase in PRA was considerably larger when the baboon was on LSI. The PRA-Tc linear regression coefficients were 2.32 and 5.98 ng angiotensin I X ml-1 X h-1 X degrees C-1 in NHSI and LSI states, respectively. This rise in PRA during EH was completely eliminated during beta-blockade in both NHSI and LSI states. It is concluded that heat stress activates the sympathetic nervous system to stimulate beta-receptor-mediated renin secretion by the kidney, this activation is controlled primarily by internal thermoreceptors, and variations in salt intake alters only the magnitude of the increase in PRA during heat stress, not the mechanisms that produce it.

  13. Solid-State Radio Frequency Plasma Heating Using a Nonlinear Transmission Line

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Kenneth; Ziemba, Timothy; Prager, James; Slobodov, Ilia

    2015-11-01

    Radio Frequency heating systems are rarely used by the small-scale validation platform experiments due to the high cost and complexity of these systems, which typically require high power gyrotrons or klystrons, associated power supplies, waveguides and vacuum systems. The cost and complexity of these systems can potentially be reduced with a nonlinear transmission line (NLTL) based system. In the past, NLTLs have lacked a high voltage driver that could produce long duration high voltage pulses with fast rise times at high pulse repetition frequency. Eagle Harbor Technologies, Inc. (EHT) has created new high voltage nanosecond pulser, which combined with NLTL technology will produce a low-cost, fully solid-state architecture for the generation of the RF frequencies (0.5 to 10 GHz) and peak power levels (~ 10 MW) necessary for plasma heating and diagnostic systems for the validation platform experiments within the fusion science community. The proposed system does not require the use of vacuum tube technology, is inherently lower cost, and is more robust than traditional high power RF heating schemes. Design details and initial bench testing results for the new RF system will be presented. This work is supported under DOE Grant # DE-SC0013747.

  14. Performance Test of Korea Heat Load Test Facility (KoHLT-EB) for the Plasma Facing Components of Fusion Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Suk-Kwon; Jin, Hyung Gon; Lee, Eo Hwak; Yoon, Jae-Sung; Lee, Dong Won [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Cho, Seungyon [National Fusion Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-10-15

    The main components of the plasma facing components (PFCs) in the tokamak are the blanket first wall and divertor, which include the armour materials, the heat sink with the cooling mechanism, and the diagnostics devices for the temperature measurement. The Korea Heat Load Test facility by using electron beam (KoHLT-EB) has been operating for the plasma facing components to develop fusion engineering. This electron beam facility was constructed using a 300 kW electron gun and a cylindrical vacuum chamber. Performance tests were carried out for the calorimetric calibrations with Cu dummy mockup and for the heat load test of large Cu module. For the simulation of the heat load test of each mockup, the preliminary thermal-hydraulic analyses with ANSYS-CFX were performed. For the development of the plasma facing components in the fusion reactors, test mockups were fabricated and tested in the high heat flux test facility. To perform a beam profile test, an assessment of the possibility of electron beam Gaussian power density profile and the results of the absorbed power for that profile before the test starts are needed. To assess the possibility of a Gaussian profile, for the qualification test of the Gaussian heat load profile, a calorimeter mockup and large Cu module were manufactured to simulate real heat. For this high-heat flux test, the Korean high-heat flux test facility using an electron beam system was constructed. In this facility, a cyclic heat flux test will be performed to measure the surface heat flux, surface temperature profile, and cooling capacity.

  15. Effect of heat stress and drinking water salt supplements on plasma electrolytes and aldosterone concentration in broiler chickens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deyhim, F.; Teeter, R. G.

    1995-12-01

    An experiment was conducted to evaluate the effects of supplementing drinking water with isomolar (0.067 mol/l) KCl or NaCl on mass gain, food and water consumption, rectal temperature, and plasma concentrations of aldosterone, Na+, and K+ in broiler chickens reared in thermoneutral and cycling heat stressing environments. Heat stress decreased ( P≤0.05) mass gain, food consumption, and plasma concentrations of Na+ and K+, while increases ( P≤0.05) in plasma concentrations of aldosterone, rectal temperature, and water consumption were observed. Drinking water supplemented with either KCl or NaCl increased ( P≤0.05) broiler mass gain and water consumption, but had no effect ( P>0.1) on the other variables evaluated. The results of this study indicate that broiler chickens in a heat stress environment are under osmotic stress and supplementing drinking water with 0.067 mol/1 KCl or NaCl does not lessen this stress.

  16. Development of advanced high heat flux and plasma-facing materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linsmeier, Ch.; Rieth, M.; Aktaa, J.; Chikada, T.; Hoffmann, A.; Hoffmann, J.; Houben, A.; Kurishita, H.; Jin, X.; Li, M.; Litnovsky, A.; Matsuo, S.; von Müller, A.; Nikolic, V.; Palacios, T.; Pippan, R.; Qu, D.; Reiser, J.; Riesch, J.; Shikama, T.; Stieglitz, R.; Weber, T.; Wurster, S.; You, J.-H.; Zhou, Z.

    2017-09-01

    Plasma-facing materials and components in a fusion reactor are the interface between the plasma and the material part. The operational conditions in this environment are probably the most challenging parameters for any material: high power loads and large particle and neutron fluxes are simultaneously impinging at their surfaces. To realize fusion in a tokamak or stellarator reactor, given the proven geometries and technological solutions, requires an improvement of the thermo-mechanical capabilities of currently available materials. In its first part this article describes the requirements and needs for new, advanced materials for the plasma-facing components. Starting points are capabilities and limitations of tungsten-based alloys and structurally stabilized materials. Furthermore, material requirements from the fusion-specific loading scenarios of a divertor in a water-cooled configuration are described, defining directions for the material development. Finally, safety requirements for a fusion reactor with its specific accident scenarios and their potential environmental impact lead to the definition of inherently passive materials, avoiding release of radioactive material through intrinsic material properties. The second part of this article demonstrates current material development lines answering the fusion-specific requirements for high heat flux materials. New composite materials, in particular fiber-reinforced and laminated structures, as well as mechanically alloyed tungsten materials, allow the extension of the thermo-mechanical operation space towards regions of extreme steady-state and transient loads. Self-passivating tungsten alloys, demonstrating favorable tungsten-like plasma-wall interaction behavior under normal operation conditions, are an intrinsic solution to otherwise catastrophic consequences of loss-of-coolant and air ingress events in a fusion reactor. Permeation barrier layers avoid the escape of tritium into structural and cooling

  17. A Proposal for a Novel H- Ion Source Based on Electron Cyclotron Resonance Plasma Heating and Surface Ionization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarvainen, O.; Kurennoy, S.

    2009-03-01

    A design for a novel H- ion source based on electron cyclotron resonance plasma heating and surface ionization is presented. The plasma chamber of the source is an rf-cavity designed for TE111 eigenmode at 2.45 GHz. The desired mode is excited with a loop antenna. The ionization process takes place on a cesiated surface of a biased converter electrode. The H- ion beam is further "self-extracted" through the plasma region. The magnetic field of the source is optimized for plasma generation by electron cyclotron resonance heating, and beam extraction. The design features of the source are discussed in detail and the attainable H- ion current, beam emittance and duty factor of the novel source are estimated.

  18. Effects of chronic heat stress on plasma concentration of secreted heat shock protein 70 in growing feedlot cattle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaughan, J B; Bonner, S L; Loxton, I; Mader, T L

    2013-01-01

    Sixty Angus steers (449.2±11.0 kg) with implanted body temperature (BT) transmitters were used in a 110-d study to determine the effect of chronic stress (housing, diet, and climate) on extracellular heat shock protein 70 (eHsp70) concentration in plasma. The steers were a subset of a larger study involving 164 steers. Before the start of the study (d -31), 63 steers were implanted with a BT transmitter between the internal abdominal muscle and the peritoneum at the right side flank. Steers were housed in 20 pens (10 with shade and 10 without). Within each pen, 3 steers had a transmitter, and BT was recorded at 30-min intervals throughout the study. On d 0, 30, 60, 90, and 110, steers were weighed, BCS assessed (1 to 9 scale in which 1=emaciated and 9=obese), and 10 mL of blood from the coccygeal vein was collected for determination of inducible heat shock protein 70 (Hsp70) concentration by ELISA. Climatic variables (ambient temperature, relative humidity, solar radiation, black globe temperature, and wind speed) were obtained every 30 min from an on-site weather station. The relationship between the climatic variables and Hsp70 concentration were examined. As we failed to detect an effect of shade, all data were pooled. Mean BT over the duration of the study was 39.6±0.10°C. Mean BT was lowest (38.7±0.10°C) on d 0 and highest on d 110 (40.2°C±0.10). The Hsp70 concentration was least on d 0 (2.33±0.47 ng/mL) and greatest on d 30 (8.08±0.78 ng/mL). The Hsp70 concentration decreased from d 30 but remained above the d-0 concentrations on d 60, 90, and 110. There was a strong relationship between Hsp70 concentration and ambient temperature (r2=0.86; P38.6°C. The Hsp70 concentration is a reliable indicator of chronic stress but is not a reliable indicator of a single stressor when animals are exposed to multiple chronic stressors.

  19. Transient heating of metals by Microsecond-duration CO/sub 2/ laser pulses with air plasma ignition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McKay, J.A.; Schriempf, J.T.

    1979-04-15

    We present a theoretical model for the heating of metal targets by CO/sub 2/ laser pulses, with air plasma ignition. Such modeling is necessary for deduction of the details of the thermal transient at the target surface, direct measurement of the transient being difficult or impossible, and the thermal flux being determined by the plasma coupling efficiency rather than the laser flux. Our model permits calculation of the thermal transient from simple time-integrated thermal fluence and energy deposition data.

  20. Magnetic reconnection in plasma under inertial confinement fusion conditions driven by heat flux effects in Ohm's law.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joglekar, A S; Thomas, A G R; Fox, W; Bhattacharjee, A

    2014-03-14

    In the interaction of high-power laser beams with solid density plasma there are a number of mechanisms that generate strong magnetic fields. Such fields subsequently inhibit or redirect electron flows, but can themselves be advected by heat fluxes, resulting in complex interplay between thermal transport and magnetic fields. We show that for heating by multiple laser spots reconnection of magnetic field lines can occur, mediated by these heat fluxes, using a fully implicit 2D Vlasov-Fokker-Planck code. Under such conditions, the reconnection rate is dictated by heat flows rather than Alfvènic flows. We find that this mechanism is only relevant in a high β plasma. However, the Hall parameter ωcτei can be large so that thermal transport is strongly modified by these magnetic fields, which can impact longer time scale temperature homogeneity and ion dynamics in the system.

  1. Magnetic reconnection in plasma under inertial confinement fusion conditions driven by heat flux effects in Ohm's law

    CERN Document Server

    Joglekar, A S; Fox, W; Bhattacharjee, A

    2015-01-01

    In the interaction of high-power laser beams with solid density plasma there are a number of mechanisms that generate strong magnetic fields. Such fields subsequently inhibit or redirect electron flows, but can themselves be advected by heat fluxes, resulting in complex interplay between thermal transport and magnetic fields.We show that for heating by multiple laser spots reconnection of magnetic field lines can occur, mediated by these heat fluxes, using a fully implicit 2D Vlasov-Fokker-Planck code. Under such conditions, the reconnection rate is dictated by heat flows rather than Alfv\\`enic flows. We find that this mechanism is only relevant in a high $\\beta$ plasma. However, the Hall parameter $\\omega_c \\tau_{ei}$ can be large so that thermal transport is strongly modified by these magnetic fields, which can impact longer time scale temperature homogeneity and ion dynamics in the system.

  2. Impact of ns-DBD plasma actuation on the boundary layer transition using convective heat transfer measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ullmer, Dirk; Peschke, Philip; Terzis, Alexandros; Ott, Peter; Weigand, Bernhard

    2015-09-01

    This paper demonstrates that the impact of nanosecond pulsed dielectric barrier discharge (ns-DBD) actuators on the structure of the boundary layer can be investigated using quantitative convective heat transfer measurements. For the experiments, the flow over a flat plate with a C4 leading edge thickness distribution was examined at low speed incompressible flow (6.6-11.5 m s-1). An ns-DBD plasma actuator was mounted 5 mm downstream of the leading edge and several experiments were conducted giving particular emphasis on the effect of actuation frequency and the freestream velocity. Local heat transfer distributions were measured using the transient liquid crystal technique with and without plasma activated. As a result, any effect of plasma on the structure of the boundary layer is interpreted by local heat transfer coefficient distributions which are compared with laminar and turbulent boundary layer correlations. The heat transfer results, which are also confirmed by hot-wire measurements, show the considerable effect of the actuation frequency on the location of the transition point elucidating that liquid crystal thermography is a promising method for investigating plasma-flow interactions very close to the wall. Additionally, the hot-wire measurements indicate possible velocity oscillations in the near wall flow due to plasma activation.

  3. Determination of anticonvulsants in human plasma using SPME in a heated interface coupled online to liquid chromatography (SPME-LC)

    OpenAIRE

    Alves, Claudete; Gomes, Paulo Clairmont Feitosa de Lima; Neto, Álvaro José dos Santos; Rodrigues, Jose Carlos; Lanças, Fernando Mauro

    2012-01-01

    A simple and sensitive method using solid phase microextraction (SPME) and liquid chromatography (LC) with heated online desorption (SPME-LC) was developed and validated to analyze anticonvulsants (AEDs) in human plasma samples. A heated lab-made interface chamber was used in the desorption procedure, which allowed the transference of the whole extracted sample. The SPME conditions were optimized by applying an experimental design. Important factors are discussed such as fiber coating types, ...

  4. Application of powerful quasi-steady-state plasma accelerators for simulation of ITER transient heat loads on divertor surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tereshin, V I [Institute of Plasma Physics of the NSC KIPT, Kharkov 61108 (Ukraine); Bandura, A N [Institute of Plasma Physics of the NSC KIPT, Kharkov 61108 (Ukraine); Byrka, O V [Institute of Plasma Physics of the NSC KIPT, Kharkov 61108 (Ukraine); Chebotarev, V V [Institute of Plasma Physics of the NSC KIPT, Kharkov 61108 (Ukraine); Garkusha, I E [Institute of Plasma Physics of the NSC KIPT, Kharkov 61108 (Ukraine); Landman, I [Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe, IHM, Karlsruhe 76021 (Germany); Makhlaj, V A [Institute of Plasma Physics of the NSC KIPT, Kharkov 61108 (Ukraine); Neklyudov, I M [Institute of Plasma Physics of the NSC KIPT, Kharkov 61108 (Ukraine); Solyakov, D G [Institute of Plasma Physics of the NSC KIPT, Kharkov 61108 (Ukraine); Tsarenko, A V [Institute of Plasma Physics of the NSC KIPT, Kharkov 61108 (Ukraine)

    2007-05-15

    The paper presents the investigations of high power plasma interaction with material surfaces under conditions simulating the ITER disruptions and type I ELMs. Different materials were exposed to plasma with repetitive pulses of 250 {mu}s duration, the ion energy of up to 0.6 keV, and the heat loads varying in the 0.5-25 MJ m{sup -2} range. The plasma energy transfer to the material surface versus impact load has been analysed. The fraction of plasma energy that is absorbed by the target surface is rapidly decreased with the achievement of the evaporation onset for exposed targets. The distributions of evaporated material in front of the target surface and the thickness of the shielding layer are found to be strongly dependent on the target atomic mass. The surface analysis of tungsten targets exposed to quasi-steady-state plasma accelerators plasma streams is presented together with measurements of the melting onset load and evaporation threshold, and also of erosion patterns with increasing heat load and the number of plasma pulses.

  5. Plasma Sprayed Ni-Al Coatings for Safe Ending Heat Exchanger Tubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Allen, M.L.; Berndt, C.C.; Otterson, D.

    1998-11-01

    Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) has developed thermally conductive composite liners for corrosion and scale protection in heat exchanger tubes exposed to geothermal brine. The liners cannot withstand roller expansion to connect the tubes to the tubesheet. It is not possible to line the ends of the tubes with the same material after roller expansion due to the nature of the current liner application process. It was requested that BNL evaluate plasma sprayed Ni-Al coatings for safe ending heat exchanger tubes exposed to geothermal brine. The tubes of interest had an internal diameter of 0.875 inches. It is not typical to thermal spray small diameter components or use such small standoff distances. In this project a nozzle extension was developed by Zatorski Coating Company to spray the tube ends as well as flat coupons for testing. Four different Ni-Al coatings were investigated. One of these was a ductilized Ni-AlB material developed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The coatings were examined by optical and scanning electron microscopy. In addition, the coatings were analyzed by X-ray diffraction and subjected to corrosion, tensile adhesion, microhardness and field tests in a volcanic pool in New Zealand.

  6. Diagnostic development in precise opacity measurement of radiatively heated Al plasma on Shenguang II laser facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhao Yang [Wuhan National Laboratory for Optoelectronics, Institute of Optoelectronics Science and Engineering, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430074 (China); Research Center of Laser Fusion, China Academy of Engineering Physics, Mianyang 621900 (China); Yang Jiamin; Zhang Jiyan [Research Center of Laser Fusion, China Academy of Engineering Physics, Mianyang 621900 (China); Liu Jinsong; Yuan Xiao [Wuhan National Laboratory for Optoelectronics, Institute of Optoelectronics Science and Engineering, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430074 (China); Jin Fengtao [Research Center of Laser Fusion, China Academy of Engineering Physics, Mianyang 621900 (China); Department of Physics, National University of Defense Technology, Changsha 410073 (China)

    2009-04-15

    Simultaneous measurements of the self-emission spectrum, the backlighting source spectrum, and the transmission spectrum in one shot, which reduce the experimental uncertainties from shot-to-shot fluctuation, are essential for precise opacity experiments. In order to achieve precise absorption spectrum of Al plasmas, a special half sample sandwich target was designed and short backlighter was used to provide time- and space-resolving diagnostics on the Shenguang II high power laser facility. In the measurement, a cylindrical cavity with CH foam baffles was used to provide a clean x-ray radiation environment for sample heating. The x-ray source spectrum, the transmission spectrum, and the self-emission spectrum of the soft x-ray heated Al sample were recorded in one shot with a penta-erythritol tetrakis (hydroxymethy) methane C(CH{sub 2}OH){sub 4} (PET) crystal spectrometer by using the point-projection method. Experimental results have been compared with the calculation results of a detailed level accounting opacity code.

  7. Inertially confined fusion plasmas dominated by alpha-particle self-heating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurricane, O. A.; Callahan, D. A.; Casey, D. T.; Dewald, E. L.; Dittrich, T. R.; Döppner, T.; Haan, S.; Hinkel, D. E.; Berzak Hopkins, L. F.; Jones, O.; Kritcher, A. L.; Le Pape, S.; Ma, T.; Macphee, A. G.; Milovich, J. L.; Moody, J.; Pak, A.; Park, H.-S.; Patel, P. K.; Ralph, J. E.; Robey, H. F.; Ross, J. S.; Salmonson, J. D.; Spears, B. K.; Springer, P. T.; Tommasini, R.; Albert, F.; Benedetti, L. R.; Bionta, R.; Bond, E.; Bradley, D. K.; Caggiano, J.; Celliers, P. M.; Cerjan, C.; Church, J. A.; Dylla-Spears, R.; Edgell, D.; Edwards, M. J.; Fittinghoff, D.; Barrios Garcia, M. A.; Hamza, A.; Hatarik, R.; Herrmann, H.; Hohenberger, M.; Hoover, D.; Kline, J. L.; Kyrala, G.; Kozioziemski, B.; Grim, G.; Field, J. E.; Frenje, J.; Izumi, N.; Gatu Johnson, M.; Khan, S. F.; Knauer, J.; Kohut, T.; Landen, O.; Merrill, F.; Michel, P.; Moore, A.; Nagel, S. R.; Nikroo, A.; Parham, T.; Rygg, R. R.; Sayre, D.; Schneider, M.; Shaughnessy, D.; Strozzi, D.; Town, R. P. J.; Turnbull, D.; Volegov, P.; Wan, A.; Widmann, K.; Wilde, C.; Yeamans, C.

    2016-08-01

    Alpha-particle self-heating, the process of deuterium-tritium fusion reaction products depositing their kinetic energy locally within a fusion reaction region and thus increasing the temperature in the reacting region, is essential for achieving ignition in a fusion system. Here, we report new inertial confinement fusion experiments where the alpha-particle heating of the plasma is dominant with the fusion yield produced exceeding the fusion yield from the work done on the fuel (pressure times volume change) by a factor of two or more. These experiments have achieved the highest yield (26 +/- 0.5 kJ) and stagnation pressures (≍220 +/- 40 Gbar) of any facility-based inertial confinement fusion experiments, although they are still short of the pressures required for ignition on the National Ignition Facility (~300-400 Gbar). These experiments put us in a new part of parameter space that has not been extensively studied so far because it lies between the no-alpha-particle-deposition regime and ignition.

  8. Nitrogen-Doped Carbon Fiber Paper by Active Screen Plasma Nitriding and Its Microwave Heating Properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Naishu; Ma, Shining; Sun, Xiaofeng

    2016-12-28

    In this paper, active screen plasma nitriding (ASPN) treatment was performed on polyacrylonitrile carbon fiber papers. Electric resistivity and microwave loss factor of carbon fiber were described to establish the relationship between processing parameters and fiber's ability to absorb microwaves. The surface processing effect of carbon fiber could be characterized by dynamic thermal mechanical analyzer testing on composites made of carbon fiber. When the process temperature was at 175 °C, it was conducive to obtaining good performance of dynamical mechanical properties. The treatment provided a way to change microwave heating properties of carbon fiber paper by performing different treatment conditions, such as temperature and time parameters. Atomic force microscope, scanning electron microscope, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analysis showed that, during the course of ASPN treatment on carbon fiber paper, nitrogen group was introduced and silicon group was removed. The treatment of nitrogen-doped carbon fiber paper represented an alternative promising candidate for microwave curing materials used in repairing and heating technology, furthermore, an efficient dielectric layer material for radar-absorbing structure composite in metamaterial technology.

  9. The influence of heating rate on superconducting characteristics of MgB2 obtained by spark plasma sintering technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aldica, G.; Burdusel, M.; Popa, S.; Enculescu, M.; Pasuk, I.; Badica, P.

    2015-12-01

    Superconducting bulks of MgB2 were obtained by the Spark Plasma Sintering (SPS) technique. Different heating rates of 20, 100, 235, 355, and 475 °C/min were used. Samples have high density, above 95%. The onset critical temperature Tc, is about 38.8 K. There is an optimum heating rate of ∼100 °C/min to maximize the critical current density Jc0, the irreversibility field Hirr, the product (Jc0 x μ0Hirr), and to partially avoid formation of undesirable flux jumps at low temperatures. Significant microstructure differences were revealed for samples processed with low and high heating rates in respect to grain boundaries.

  10. The influence of heating rate on superconducting characteristics of MgB{sub 2} obtained by spark plasma sintering technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aldica, G. [National Institute of Materials Physics, Atomistilor 105bis, 077125 Magurele (Romania); Burdusel, M. [National Institute of Materials Physics, Atomistilor 105bis, 077125 Magurele (Romania); Faculty of Materials Science and Engineering, University ’Politehnica’ of Bucharest, Splaiul Independentei 313, 060042 Bucharest (Romania); Popa, S.; Enculescu, M.; Pasuk, I. [National Institute of Materials Physics, Atomistilor 105bis, 077125 Magurele (Romania); Badica, P., E-mail: badica2003@yahoo.com [National Institute of Materials Physics, Atomistilor 105bis, 077125 Magurele (Romania)

    2015-12-15

    Highlights: • MgB{sub 2} was obtained by ex-situ spark plasma sintering for different heating rates. • Heating rates were 20–475 °C/min: the optimum heating rate is ∼100 °C/min. • For 100 °C/min, J{sub c0}, H{sub irr} and (J{sub c0} x μ{sub 0}H{sub irr}) have maximum values. • For 100 °C/min, macro flux jumps are partially suppressed at 5 K. • Grain boundaries are modified depending on the heating rate. - Abstract: Superconducting bulks of MgB{sub 2} were obtained by the Spark Plasma Sintering (SPS) technique. Different heating rates of 20, 100, 235, 355, and 475 °C/min were used. Samples have high density, above 95%. The onset critical temperature T{sub c}, is about 38.8 K. There is an optimum heating rate of ∼100 °C/min to maximize the critical current density J{sub c0}, the irreversibility field H{sub irr}, the product (J{sub c0} x μ{sub 0}H{sub irr}), and to partially avoid formation of undesirable flux jumps at low temperatures. Significant microstructure differences were revealed for samples processed with low and high heating rates in respect to grain boundaries.

  11. The Nonlinear Ohm's Law: Plasma Heating by Strong Electric Fields and its Effects on the Ionization Balance in Protoplanetary Disks

    CERN Document Server

    Okuzumi, Satoshi

    2014-01-01

    The MHD of protoplanetary disks crucially depends on the ionization state of the disks. Recent simulations suggest that MHD turbulence in the disks can generate a strong electric field in the local rest frame. Such a strong field can heat up plasmas and thereby change the ionization balance. To study this effect, we construct a charge reaction model that includes plasma heating by electric fields and impact ionization by heated electrons, as well as plasma accretion by dust grains. The resulting Ohm's law is nonlinear in the electric field strength. We find that the gas-phase electron abundance decreases with increasing the electric field strength when plasma accretion onto grains dominates over gas-phase recombination, because electron heating accelerates electron--grain collisions. This leads to an increase in the magnetic resistivity, and possibly to a self-regulation of the MHD turbulence. In some cases, even the electric current decreases with increasing the field strength in a certain field range. The N...

  12. Nanoindentation study of the combined effects of crystallography, heat treatment and exposure to high-flux deuterium plasma in tungsten

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zayachuk, Y.; Armstrong, D. E. J.; Bystrov, K.; van Boxel, S.; Morgan, T.; Roberts, S. G.

    2017-01-01

    Tungsten samples were heat-treated to achieve partial recrystallization and exposed to high ion flux deuterium plasma at different temperatures and fluences. Continuous stiffness nanoindentation measurements of near-surface hardness were performed in the grains of specific annealing states and of sp

  13. Proceedings of US/Japan workshop, Q219 on high heat flux components and plasma surface interactions for next fusion devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ulrickson, M.A.; Stevens, P.L.; Hino, T.; Hirohata, Y. [eds.

    1996-12-01

    This report contains the viewgraphs from the proceedings of US/Japan Workshop on High Heat Flux Components and Plasma Surface Interactions for Next Fusion Devices. Some of the general topics covered by this report are: PFC/PSI in tokamak and helical devices; development of high heat flux components; PSIS and plasma facing materials;tritium; and material damage.

  14. Generation of high charge state metal ion beams by electron cyclotron resonance heating of vacuum arc plasma in cusp trap.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikolaev, A G; Savkin, K P; Oks, E M; Vizir, A V; Yushkov, G Yu; Vodopyanov, A V; Izotov, I V; Mansfeld, D A

    2012-02-01

    A method for generating high charge state heavy metal ion beams based on high power microwave heating of vacuum arc plasma confined in a magnetic trap under electron cyclotron resonance conditions has been developed. A feature of the work described here is the use of a cusp magnetic field with inherent "minimum-B" structure as the confinement geometry, as opposed to a simple mirror device as we have reported on previously. The cusp configuration has been successfully used for microwave heating of gas discharge plasma and extraction from the plasma of highly charged, high current, gaseous ion beams. Now we use the trap for heavy metal ion beam generation. Two different approaches were used for injecting the vacuum arc metal plasma into the trap--axial injection from a miniature arc source located on-axis near the microwave window, and radial injection from sources mounted radially at the midplane of the trap. Here, we describe preliminary results of heating vacuum arc plasma in a cusp magnetic trap by pulsed (400 μs) high power (up to 100 kW) microwave radiation at 37.5 GHz for the generation of highly charged heavy metal ion beams.

  15. Report on the joint meeting of the Division of Development and Technology Plasma/Wall Interaction and High Heat Flux Materials and Components Task Groups

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilson, K.L. (ed.)

    1985-10-01

    This report of the Joint Meeting of the Division of Development and Technology Plasma/Wall Interaction and High Heat Flux Materials and Components Task Groups contains contributing papers in the following areas: Plasma/Materials Interaction Program and Technical Assessment, High Heat Flux Materials and Components Program and Technical Assessment, Pumped Limiters, Ignition Devices, Program Planning Activities, Compact High Power Density Reactor Requirements, Steady State Tokamaks, and Tritium Plasma Experiments. All these areas involve the consideration of High Heat Flux on Materials and the Interaction of the Plasma with the First Wall. Many of the Test Facilities are described as well. (LSP)

  16. Heat loads on JET plasma facing components from ICRF and LH wave absorption in the SOL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacquet, P.; Colas, L.; Mayoral, M.-L.; Arnoux, G.; Bobkov, V.; Brix, M.; Coad, P.; Czarnecka, A.; Dodt, D.; Durodie, F.; Ekedahl, A.; Frigione, D.; Fursdon, M.; Gauthier, E.; Goniche, M.; Graham, M.; Joffrin, E.; Korotkov, A.; Lerche, E.; Mailloux, J.; Monakhov, I.; Noble, C.; Ongena, J.; Petrzilka, V.; Portafaix, C.; Rimini, F.; Sirinelli, A.; Riccardo, V.; Vizvary, Z.; Widdowson, A.; Zastrow, K.-D.; EFDA Contributors, JET

    2011-10-01

    In JET, lower hybrid (LH) and ion cyclotron resonance frequency (ICRF) wave absorption in the scrape-off layer can lead to enhanced heat fluxes on some plasma facing components (PFCs). Experiments have been carried out to characterize these heat loads in order to: (i) prepare JET operation with the Be wall which has a reduced power handling capability as compared with the carbon wall and (ii) better understand the physics driving these wave absorption phenomena and propose solutions for next generation systems to reduce them. When using ICRF, hot spots are observed on the antenna structures and on limiters close to the powered antennas and are explained by acceleration of ions in RF-rectified sheath potentials. High temperatures up to 800 °C can be reached on locations where a deposit has built up on tile surfaces. Modelling which takes into account the fast thermal response of surface layers can reproduce well the surface temperature measurements via infrared (IR) imaging, and allow evaluation of the heat fluxes local to active ICRF antennas. The flux scales linearly with the density at the antenna radius and with the antenna voltage. Strap phasing corresponding to wave spectra with lower kpar values can lead to a significant increase in hot spot intensity in agreement with antenna modelling that predicts, in that case, an increase in RF sheath rectification. LH absorption in front of the antenna through electron Landau damping of the wave with high Npar components generates hot spots precisely located on PFCs magnetically connected to the launcher. Analysis of the LH hot spot surface temperature from IR measurements allows a quantification of the power flux along the field lines: in the worst case scenario it is in the range 15-30 MW m-2. The main driving parameter is the LH power density along the horizontal rows of the launcher, the heat fluxes scaling roughly with the square of the LH power density. The local electron density in front of the grill increases

  17. In Situ Nanocalorimetric Investigations of Plasma Assisted Deposited Poly(ethylene oxide)-like Films by Specific Heat Spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madkou, Sherif; Melnichu, Iurii; Choukourov, Andrei; Krakovsky, Ivan; Biederman, Hynek; Schönhals, Andreas

    2016-04-28

    In recent years, highly cross-linked plasma polymers have started to unveil their potential in numerous biomedical applications in thin-film form. However, conventional diagnostic methods often fail due to their diverse molecular dynamics conformations. Here, glassy dynamics and the melting transition of thin PEO-like plasma assisted deposited (ppPEO) films (thickness 100 nm) were in situ studied by a combination of specific heat spectroscopy, utilizing a pJ/K sensitive ac-calorimeter chip, and composition analytical techniques. Different cross-linking densities were obtained by different plasma powers during the deposition of the films. Glassy dynamics were observed for all values of the plasma power. It was found that the glassy dynamics slows down with increasing the plasma power. Moreover, the underlying relaxation time spectra broaden indicating that the molecular motions become more heterogeneous with increasing plasma power. In a second set of the experiment, the melting behavior of the ppPEO films was studied. The melting temperature of ppPEO was found to decrease with increasing plasma power. This was explained by a decrease of the order in the crystals due to formation of chemical defects during the plasma process.

  18. High heat flux testing of divertor plasma facing materials and components using the HHF test facility at IPR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patil, Yashashri; Khirwadkar, S. S.; Belsare, Sunil; Swamy, Rajamannar; Tripathi, Sudhir; Bhope, Kedar; Kanpara, Shailesh

    2016-02-01

    The High Heat Flux Test Facility (HHFTF) was designed and established recently at Institute for Plasma Research (IPR) in India for testing heat removal capability and operational life time of plasma facing materials and components of the ITER-like tokamak. The HHFTF is equipped with various diagnostics such as IR cameras and IR-pyrometers for surface temperature measurements, coolant water calorimetry for absorbed power measurements and thermocouples for bulk temperature measurements. The HHFTF is capable of simulating steady state heat load of several MW m-2 as well as short transient heat loads of MJ m-2. This paper presents the current status of the HHFTF at IPR and high heat flux tests performed on the curved tungsten monoblock type of test mock-ups as well as transient heat flux tests carried out on pure tungsten materials using the HHFTF. Curved tungsten monoblock type of test mock-ups were fabricated using hot radial pressing (HRP) technique. Two curved tungsten monoblock type test mock-ups successfully sustained absorbed heat flux up to 14 MW m-2 with thermal cycles of 30 s ON and 30 s OFF duration. Transient high heat flux tests or thermal shock tests were carried out on pure tungsten hot-rolled plate material (Make:PLANSEE) with incident power density of 0.49 GW m-2 for 20 milliseconds ON and 1000 milliseconds OFF time. A total of 6000 thermal shock cycles were completed on pure tungsten material. Experimental results were compared with mathematical simulations carried out using COMSOL Multiphysics for transient high heat flux tests.

  19. Momentum, Heat, and Neutral Mass Transport in Convective Atmospheric Pressure Plasma-Liquid Systems and Implications for Aqueous Targets

    CERN Document Server

    Lindsay, Alexander; Slikboer, Elmar; Shannon, Steven; Graves, David

    2015-01-01

    There is a growing interest in the study of plasma-liquid interactions with application to biomedicine, chemical disinfection, agriculture, and other fields. This work models the momentum, heat, and neutral species mass transfer between gas and aqueous phases in the context of a streamer discharge; the qualitative conclusions are generally applicable to plasma-liquid systems. The problem domain is discretized using the finite element method. The most interesting and relevant model result for application purposes is the steep gradients in reactive species at the interface. At the center of where the reactive gas stream impinges on the water surface, the aqueous concentrations of OH and ONOOH decrease by roughly 9 and 4 orders of magnitude respectively within 50 $\\mu$m of the interface. Recognizing the limited penetration of reactive plasma species into the aqueous phase is critical to discussions about the therapeutic mechanisms for direct plasma treatment of biological solutions. Other interesting results fro...

  20. Stochastic heating of dust particles in complex plasmas as an energetic instability of a harmonic oscillator with random frequency

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marmolino, Ciro [Dipartimento di Scienze e Tecnologie dell' Ambiente e del Territorio-DiSTAT, Universita del Molise, Contrada Fonte Lappone, I-86090 Pesche (Italy)

    2011-10-15

    The paper describes the occurrence of stochastic heating of dust particles in dusty plasmas as an energy instability due to the correlations between dust grain charge and electric field fluctuations. The possibility that the mean energy (''temperature'') of dust particles can grow in time has been found both from the self-consistent kinetic description of dusty plasmas taking into account charge fluctuations [U. de Angelis, A. V. Ivlev, V. N. Tsytovich, and G. E. Morfill, Phys. Plasmas 12(5), 052301 (2005)] and from a Fokker-Planck approach to systems with variable charge [A. V. Ivlev, S. K. Zhdanov, B. A. Klumov, and G. E. Morfill, Phys. Plasmas 12(9), 092104 (2005)]. Here, a different derivation is given by using the mathematical techniques of the so called multiplicative stochastic differential equations. Both cases of ''fast'' and ''slow'' fluctuations are discussed.

  1. PLASMA SPRAYED Ni-Al COATINGS FOR SAFE ENDING HEAT EXCHANGER TUBES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    ALLAN,M.L.; OTTERSON,D.; BERNDT,C.C.

    1998-11-01

    Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) has developed thermally conductive composite liners for corrosion and scale protection in heat exchanger tubes exposed to geothermal brine. The liners cannot withstand roller expansion to connect the tubes to the tubesheet. It is not possible to line the ends of the tubes with the same material after roller expansion due to the nature of the current liner application process. It was requested that BNL evaluate plasma sprayed Ni-Al coatings for safe ending heat exchanger tubes exposed to geothermal brine. The tubes of interest had an internal diameter of 0.875 inches. It is not typical to thermal spray small diameter components or use such small standoff distances. In this project a nozzle extension was developed by Zatorski Coating Company to spray the tube ends as well as flat coupons for testing. Four different Ni-Al coatings were investigated. One of these was a ductilized Ni-AIB material developed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The coatings were examined by optical and scanning electron microscopy. In addition, the coatings were analyzed by X-ray diffraction and subjected to corrosion, tensile adhesion, microhardness and field tests in a volcanic pool in New Zealand. It was determined that the Ni-Al coatings could be applied to a depth of two inches on the tube ends. When sprayed on flat coupons the coatings exhibited relatively high adhesion strength and microhardness. Polarization curves showed that the coating performance was variable. Measured corrosion potentials indicated that the Ni-Al coatings are active towards steel coated with thermally conductive polymers, thereby suggesting preferential corrosion. Corrosion also occurred on the coated coupons tested in the volcanic pool. This may have been exacerbated by the difficulty in applying a uniform coating to the coupon edges. The Ni-Al coatings applied to the tubes had significant porosity and did not provide adequate corrosion protection. This is associated with

  2. Simulation experiment of interaction of plasma facing materials and transient heat loads in ITER divertor by use of magnetized coaxial plasma gun

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakatsuka, M.; Ando, K.; Higashi, T.; Kikuchi, Y.; Fukumoto, N.; Nagata, M.

    2009-11-01

    Interaction of plasma facing materials and transient head loads such as type I ELMs is one of the critical issues in ITER divertor. The heat load to the ITER divertor during type I ELMs is estimated to be 0.5-3 MJ/m^2 with a pulse length of 0.1-0.5 ms. We have developed a magnetized coaxial plasma gun (MCPG) for the simulation experiment of transient heat load during type I ELMs in ITER divertor. The MCPG has inner and outer electrodes made of stainless steel 304. In addition, the inner electrode is covered with molybdenum so as to suppress the release of impurities from the electrode during the discharge. The diameters of inner and outer electrodes are 0.06 m and 0.14 m, respectively. The power supply for the MCPG is a capacitor bank (7 kV, 1 mF, 25 kJ). The plasma velocity estimated by the time of flight measurement of the magnetic fields was about 50 km/s, corresponding to the ion energy of 15 eV (H) or 30 eV (D). The absorbed energy density of the plasma stream was measured a calorimeter made of graphite. It was found that the absorbed energy density was 0.9 MJ/m^2 with a pulse width of 0.5 ms at the distance of 100 mm from the inner electrode. In the conference, experimental results of plasma exposure on the plasma facing materials in ITER divertor will be shown.

  3. Effects of Dietary Supplementation of Some Antioxidants on Liver Antioxidant Status and Plasma Biochemistry Parameters of Heat-Stressed Quail

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Senay Sarıca

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to compare the dietary supplementation of oleuropein (O and α-tocopherol acetate (TA alone or with organic selenium (Se on liver antioxidant status and some plasma biochemistry parameters in Japanese quails reared under heat stress (HS. A total of 800, two-weeks old quails were kept in wire cages in the temperature-controlled rooms at either 22°C or 34°C for 8 h/d and fed on a basal diet (NC or the diets supplemented with TA (TA200 or O (O200 at 200 mg/kg alone or with OSe (TA200+OSe and O200+OSe to the NC diet. HS decreased the total antioxidant status (TAS and increased the total oxidative stress (TOS and oxidative stress index (OSI of liver compared to thermoneutral temperature (TN. The TA200, O200, TA200+OSe and O200+OSe diets increased TAS and decreased TOS of liver compared to those of quails fed NC. OSI was decreased by the TA200, O200 and TA200+OSe diets compared to NC and O200+OSe diets. HS reduced plasma albumin (A and total protein (TP concentrations, on the other hand, increased plasma glucose (G, total cholesterol (CHO and triglyceride (TG levels compared to TN. The TA200, O200, TA200+OSe and O200+OSe diets reduced plasma total CHO and TG levels and increased plasma A level. The TA200 and TA200+OSe diets reduced plasma G level and increased plasma TP levels compared to those of quails fed the other diets. In conclusion, dietary supplementation of vitamin E and oleuropein alone or with organic selenium is necessary to remove the negative effects of heat stress on liver antioxidant status and some plasma parameters of quails.

  4. NUMERICAL MODELING OF HEAT TRANSFER AND FLUID FLOW IN KEYHOLE PLASMA ARC WELDING OF DISSIMILAR STEEL JOINTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. A. Daha

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available The evolution of temperature profiles and weld pool geometry during dissimilar welding between 2205 duplex stainless steel and A36 low carbon steel using keyhole plasma arc welding has been simulated using a three dimensional numerical heat transfer and fluid flow model. An adaptive heat source is proposed as a heat source model for performing a non-linear transient thermal analysis, based on the configuration feature of keyhole plasma arc welds. Temperature profiles and solidified weld pool geometry are presented for three different welding heat input. The reversed bugle shape parameters (width of fusion zone at both top and bottom surfaces of the weld pool geometry features for a dissimilar 2205–A36 weld joint are summarized to successfully explain the observations. The model was also applied to keyhole plasma welding of 6.8 mm thick similar 2205 duplex stainless steel joint for validation. The simulation results were compared with independently obtained experimental data and good agreements have been obtained.

  5. Neutral gas density depletion due to neutral gas heating and pressure balance in an inductively coupled plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimada, Masashi; Tynan, George R.; Cattolica, Robert

    2007-02-01

    The spatial distribution of neutral gas temperature and total pressure have been measured for pure N2, He/5%N2 and Ar/5%N2 in an inductively coupled plasma (ICP) reactor, and a significant rise in the neutral gas temperature has been observed. When thermal transpiration is used to correct total pressure measurements, the total pressure remains constant regardless of the plasma condition. Neutral pressure is depleted due to the pressure balance when the plasma pressure (mainly electron pressure) becomes comparable to the neutral pressure in high density plasma. Since the neutral gas follows the ideal gas law, the neutral gas density profile was obtained from the neutral gas temperature and the corrected neutral pressure measurements. The results show that the neutral gas density at the centre of the plasma chamber (factor of 2-4 ×) decreases significantly in the presence of a plasma discharge. Significant spatial variation in neutral gas uniformity occurs in such plasmas due to neutral gas heating and pressure balance.

  6. EDITORIAL: Special section on the physics and technology of plasma heating by ICRF power

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noterdaeme, Jean-Marie; Van Eester, Dirk

    2006-07-01

    This special section brings together much of what is currently at the forefront of ion cyclotron resonance frequency (ICRF) research. Which theories are people working on? Where is progress being made? What results are being obtained? The present Nuclear Fusion section on ICRF is not—and was explicitly meant not to be—an overview or review of ICRF systems, research achievements or theories. It is more a snapshot of the leading edge of the investigations. It is based, in part, on presentations to the 16th Topical Conference on RF Power in Plasmas, Park City, Utah, USA, April 2005. The forefront of ICRF research currently being actively pursued covers a wide range of topics: theoretical, experimental and technological. As can be expected, most of the papers in this section have direct relevance to ITER. Elements that will be important in ITER, and that are being addressed and developed in the papers, are the presence of fast particles with their influence on wave propagation and damping, the non-linear mechanisms in the edge—in particular close to the wave launcher—and steady-state aspects. Specific ITER components as well as RF scenarios are studied. Continued efforts to improve the analytical description of wave damping and absorption and the availability of gradually more powerful computers led to significant progress in incorporating the effect of particles with non-thermal velocity distributions—the presence of which has already become significant in present-day machines due to massive RF and/or NBI heating which forces the particles away from thermo-dynamical equilibrium (Brambilla et al, Jaeger et al). The exact role that RF-created and fusion-born fast particles will play is still a matter of lively debate. As shown in the papers by Choi et al and Pinsker et al, the presence of energetic particles is a significant factor in the wave absorption, even at high harmonics. Accounting for the actual magnetic topology allows the capture of RF induced

  7. Study of electronic heat transport in plasma through diagnosis based on modulated electron cyclotron heating; Etudes de transport de la chaleur electronique par injection modulee d'ondes a la frequence cyclotronique electronique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clemencon, A.; Guivarch, C

    2003-07-01

    In order to make nuclear fusion energetically profitable, it is crucial to heat and confine the plasma efficiently. Studying the behavior of the heat diffusion coefficient is a key issue in this matter. The use of modulated electron cyclotron heating as a diagnostic has suggested the existence of a transport barrier under certain plasma conditions. We have determined the solution to the heat transport equation, for several heat diffusion coefficient profiles. By comparing the analytical solutions with experimental data; we are able to study the heat diffusion coefficient profile. Thus, in certain experiments, we can confirm that the heat diffusion coefficient switches from low to high values at the radius where the electron cyclotron heat deposition is made. (authors)

  8. Characterization and damaging law of CFC for high heat flux actively cooled plasma facing components

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chevet, G., E-mail: gaelle.chevet@cea.fr [Association EURATOM-CEA, DSM/IRFM, CEA Cadarache, F-13108 Saint Paul lez Durance (France); Martin, E., E-mail: martin@lcts.u-bordeaux1.fr [LCTS, CNRS UMR 5801, Universite Bordeaux 1, Bordeaux (France); Boscary, J., E-mail: jean.boscary@ipp.mpg.de [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Plasmaphysik, EURATOM Association, 85748 Garching (Germany); Camus, G., E-mail: camus@lcts.u-bordeaux1.fr [LCTS, CNRS UMR 5801, Universite Bordeaux 1, Bordeaux (France); Herb, V., E-mail: herb@lcts.u-bordeaux1.fr [LCTS, CNRS UMR 5801, Universite Bordeaux 1, Bordeaux (France); Schlosser, J., E-mail: jacques.schlosser@cea.fr [Association EURATOM-CEA, DSM/IRFM, CEA Cadarache, F-13108 Saint Paul lez Durance (France); Escourbiac, F., E-mail: frederic.escourbiac@cea.fr [Association EURATOM-CEA, DSM/IRFM, CEA Cadarache, F-13108 Saint Paul lez Durance (France); Missirlian, M., E-mail: marc.missirlian@cea.fr [Association EURATOM-CEA, DSM/IRFM, CEA Cadarache, F-13108 Saint Paul lez Durance (France)

    2011-10-01

    The carbon fiber reinforced carbon composite (CFC) Sepcarb N11 has been used in the Tore Supra (TS) tokamak (Cadarache, France) as armour material for the plasma facing components. For the fabrication of the Wendelstein 7-X (W7-X) divertor (Greifswald, Germany), the NB31 material was chosen. For the fabrication of the ITER divertor, two potential CFC candidates are the NB31 and NB41 materials. In the case of Tore Supra, defects such as microcracks or debonding were found at the interface between CFC tile and copper heat sink. A mechanical characterization of the behaviour of N11 and NB31 was undertaken, allowing the identification of a damage model and finite element calculations both for flat tiles (TS and W7-X) and monoblock (ITER) armours. The mechanical responses of these CFC materials were found almost linear under on-axis tensile tests but highly nonlinear under shear tests or off-axis tensile tests. As a consequence, damage develops within the high shear-stress zones.

  9. Characterization and damaging law of CFC for high heat flux actively cooled plasma facing components

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chevet, G.; Martin, E.; Boscary, J.; Camus, G.; Herb, V.; Schlosser, J.; Escourbiac, F.; Missirlian, M.

    2011-10-01

    The carbon fiber reinforced carbon composite (CFC) Sepcarb N11 has been used in the Tore Supra (TS) tokamak (Cadarache, France) as armour material for the plasma facing components. For the fabrication of the Wendelstein 7-X (W7-X) divertor (Greifswald, Germany), the NB31 material was chosen. For the fabrication of the ITER divertor, two potential CFC candidates are the NB31 and NB41 materials. In the case of Tore Supra, defects such as microcracks or debonding were found at the interface between CFC tile and copper heat sink. A mechanical characterization of the behaviour of N11 and NB31 was undertaken, allowing the identification of a damage model and finite element calculations both for flat tiles (TS and W7-X) and monoblock (ITER) armours. The mechanical responses of these CFC materials were found almost linear under on-axis tensile tests but highly nonlinear under shear tests or off-axis tensile tests. As a consequence, damage develops within the high shear-stress zones.

  10. Parameter Study of Plasma-Induced Atmospheric Sputtering and Heating at Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williamson, Hayley N.; Johnson, Robert E.; Leblanc, Francois

    2014-11-01

    Atoms and molecules in Mars’ upper atmosphere are lost predominately through sputtering, caused by the impact of ions into the exosphere, dissociative recombination, and thermal escape. While all three processes are thought to occur on Mars, a detailed understanding must ascertain the relative importance of each process, due to time variations in pick-up and solar wind ions. In this project, using case studies of an oxygen atmosphere modeled with Direct Simulation Monte Carlo techniques, we have endeavored to categorize when the momentum transfer or thermal escape is more likely to occur. To do this, we vary the incident plasma flux and energy based on models of the interaction of the solar wind with the Martian atmosphere. We first repeat the heating and sputtering rates due to a flux of pick-up O+ examined previously (Johnson et al. 2000; Michael and Johnson 2005; Johnson et al 2013). We have used multiple examples of particle fluxes for various solar wind conditions, from steady solar wind conditions (Luhmann et al. 1992; Chaufray et al. 2007) to more extreme cases (Fang et al. 2013; Wang et al. 2014), which are thought to increase escape by several orders of magnitude. The goal is to explore the escape parameter space in preparation for the expected data from MAVEN on hot atoms and molecules in the Martian exosphere.

  11. Using xRage to Model Heat Flow for Experiments to Measure Opacities in HED Plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elgin, L.; Vandervort, R.; Keiter, P.; Drake, R. P.; Mussack, K.; Orban, C.

    2015-11-01

    We are developing a NIF proposal to measure opacities of C, N and O at temperatures and densities relevant to the base of the solar convection zone. Our proposed experiments would provide the first opacity measurements for these elements within this HED regime. A critical feature of our experimental platform is a super-sonic radiation front propagating within the targets. Under these conditions, density remains constant across the radiation front for a couple nanoseconds, enabling a window during which the opacities of the hot and cold target may be measured simultaneously. Afterwards, hydrodynamic effects create temperature and density gradients, which would obfuscate analysis of opacity data. We are using xRage to simulate heat flow within our targets in order to estimate the time scale over which temperature and density gradients evolve. These simulations will better inform our target design and diagnostic requirements. If successful, our experiments could yield the data necessary to validate existing opacity models or provide physical insights to inform the development of new opacity models. Accurate opacity models are essential to the understanding of radiation transport within HED systems, with applications ranging from astrophysics to ICF. U.S. Department of Energy, through the NNSA-DS and SC-OFES Joint Program in High-Energy-Density Laboratory Plasmas, grant #DE-NA0001840. Los Alamos National Laboratory, LA-UR-15-25490.

  12. Microwave diagnostic for the determination of the electron temperature of a low density shock-heated argon plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, C. P.; Exberger, R. J.

    1978-01-01

    The diffraction, defocusing and beam bending effects of microwaves transmitted through a bounded shock-heated argon plasma with low electron density are investigated with the purpose of developing an accurate method for electron temperature (Te) determination. This report describes the evaluation technique and presents results for an argon plasma with pressure between 3 and 10 torr, and T2 between 5500 and 9500 K. The electron temperature values obtained have a range of uncertainty between -20% and +10% only. The electron temperature is equal or lower by approximately 1000 K in comparison to the heavy particle temperature (T2).

  13. Effect of impurities on the transition between minority ion and mode conversion ICRH heating in (3He)-H tokamak plasmas

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    Hydrogen majority plasmas will be used in the initial non-activated phase of ITER operation. Optimizing ion cyclotron resonance heating (ICRH) in such scenarios will help in achieving H-mode in these plasmas. Past JET experiments with the carbon wall revealed a significant impact of intrinsic impurities on the ICRH performance in (3He)-H plasmas relevant for the full-field initial ITER phase. High plasma contamination with carbon impurities resulted in the appearance of a supplementary mode c...

  14. The effect of heating rate and composition on the properties of spark plasma sintered zirconium diboride based composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Snyder, Alexandra; Bo Zhenyu [School of Materials Engineering, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN 47907 (United States); Hodson, Stephen; Fisher, Timothy [School of Mechanical Engineering, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN 47907 (United States); Stanciu, Lia, E-mail: lstanciu@purdue.edu [School of Materials Engineering, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN 47907 (United States)

    2012-03-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We investigated the effect of heating rate on spark plasma sintering of ZrB{sub 2}-SiC-ZrC composites. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Adding SiC up to 10 wt.% had a positive effect on densification and strength. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Increasing heating rate promoted densification and retarded grain growth when SiC and ZrC content was above 15 wt.%, respectively. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Increasing heating rate had a slight negative effect on densification when SiC and ZrC content was at 10%, respectively. - Abstract: Five different compositions of ZrB{sub 2}-SiC-ZrC were prepared and then processed by spark plasma sintering (SPS) to a maximum temperature of 2000 Degree-Sign C, with heating rates of 100 Degree-Sign C/min and 200 Degree-Sign C/min. Grain size, density, Rockwell hardness, flexural strength, and thermal conductivity were evaluated for the processed composites. Adding SiC up to 10 wt.% had a positive effect on densification and strength. Increasing the heating rate promoted densification and less overall grain growth for samples with SiC and ZrC above 15 wt.% each, and had a slight negative effect on densification when these values were at 10%.

  15. Survey of the TS-ECE Discrepancy and recent investigations in ICRF heated plasmas at Alcator C-Mod

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reinke M. L.

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper reports on a new investigation of the long-standing, unresolved discrepancy between Thomson Scattering (TS and Electron Cyclotron Emission (ECE measurements of electron temperature in high temperature tokamak plasmas. At the Alcator C-Mod tokamak, ion cyclotron range of frequency (ICRF heating is used to produce high temperature conditions where the TS- ECE discrepancy, as observed in the past at JET and TFTR, should appear. Plasmas with Te(0 up to 8 keV are obtained using three different heating scenarios: Ion Cyclotron Resonance Heating (ICRH, ICRF mode conversion heating and a combination of the two heating methods. This is done in order to explore the hypothesis that ICRH-generated fast ions may be related to the discrepancy. In all high temperature cases at C-Mod, we find no evidence for the type of discrepancy reported at JET and TFTR. Here we present the C-Mod results along with a summary of past work on the TS-ECE discrepancy.

  16. A new ion cyclotron range of frequency scenario for bulk ion heating in deuterium-tritium plasmas: How to utilize intrinsic impurities in our favour

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kazakov, Ye. O.; Ongena, J.; Van Eester, D.; Lerche, E.; Messiaen, A. [Laboratory for Plasma Physics, LPP-ERM/KMS, EUROfusion Consortium Member, Brussels (Belgium); Bilato, R. [Max-Planck-Institut für Plasmaphysik, Garching (Germany); Dumont, R. [CEA, IRFM, F-13108 Saint-Paul-lez-Durance (France); Mantsinen, M. [Catalan Institution for Research and Advanced Studies, Barcelona (Spain); Barcelona Supercomputing Center (BSC), Barcelona (Spain)

    2015-08-15

    A fusion reactor requires plasma pre-heating before the rate of deuterium-tritium fusion reactions becomes significant. In ITER, radio frequency (RF) heating of {sup 3}He ions, additionally puffed into the plasma, is one of the main options considered for increasing bulk ion temperature during the ramp-up phase of the pulse. In this paper, we propose an alternative scenario for bulk ion heating with RF waves, which requires no extra {sup 3}He puff and profits from the presence of intrinsic Beryllium impurities in the plasma. The discussed method to heat Be impurities in D-T plasmas is shown to provide an even larger fraction of fuel ion heating.

  17. The effect of plasma shear flow on drift Alfven instabilities of a finite beta plasma and on anomalous heating of ions by ion cyclotron turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jo, Young Hyun; Lee, Hae June; Mikhailenko, Vladimir V.; Mikhailenko, Vladimir S.

    2016-01-01

    It was derived that the drift-Alfven instabilities with the shear flow parallel to the magnetic field have significant difference from the drift-Alfven instabilities of a shearless plasma when the ion temperature is comparable with electron temperature for a finite plasma beta. The velocity shear not only modifies the frequency and the growth rate of the known drift-Alfven instability, which develops due to the inverse electron Landau damping, but also triggers a combined effect of the velocity shear and the inverse ion Landau damping, which manifests the development of the ion kinetic shear-flow-driven drift-Alfven instability. The excited unstable waves have the phase velocities along the magnetic field comparable with the ion thermal velocity, and the growth rate is comparable with the frequency. The development of this instability may be the efficient mechanism of the ion energization in shear flows. The levels of the drift--Alfven turbulence, resulted from the development of both instabilities, are determined from the renormalized nonlinear dispersion equation, which accounts for the nonlinear effect of the scattering of ions by the electromagnetic turbulence. The renormalized quasilinear equation for the ion distribution function, which accounts for the same effect of the scattering of ions by electromagnetic turbulence, is derived and employed for the analysis of the ion viscosity and ions heating, resulted from the interactions of ions with drift-Alfven turbulence. In the same way, the phenomena of the ion cyclotron turbulence and anomalous anisotropic heating of ions by ion cyclotron plasma turbulence has numerous practical applications in physics of the near-Earth space plasmas. Using the methodology of the shearing modes, the kinetic theory of the ion cyclotron turbulence of the plasma with transverse current with strong velocity shear has been developed.

  18. The effect of electrode heating on the discharge parameters in complex plasma experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Land, Victor; Carmona-Reyes, Jorge; Creel, James; Schmoke, Jimmy; Cook, Mike; Matthews, Lorin; Hyde, Truell, E-mail: victor_land@baylor.edu [Center for Astrophysics, Space Physics, and Engineering Research, Baylor University, Waco, TX, 76798-7316 (United States)

    2011-02-15

    Thermophoresis is a tool often applied in complex plasma experiments. One of the usual stated benefits over other experimental tools is that electrode temperature changes required to induce thermophoresis do not directly influence the plasma parameters. From electronic data, plasma emission profiles in the sheath, and Langmuir probe data in the plasma bulk, we conclude that this assumption does not hold. An important effect on the levitation of dust particles in argon plasma is observed as well. The reason behind the changes in plasma parameters seems to be the change in neutral atom density accompanying the increased gas temperature while running at constant pressure.

  19. Restoration of the plasma discharge during density limit disruptions in the T-10 tokamak using electron cyclotron heating and ohmic power supply system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savrukhin, P. V.; Shestakov, E. A.

    2016-11-01

    Experiments in the T-10 tokamak [Alikaev et al., Plasma Phys. Controlled Fusion 30, 381 (1988)] have demonstrated the possibility of control of the plasma current and prevention of formation of the non-thermal (Eγ > 150 keV) electron beams after an energy quench at the density limit disruption using electron cyclotron heating (ECRH) and controlled operation of the Ohmic power supply system. Quasi-stable plasma operation with repetitive sawtooth oscillations can be restored after an energy quench using high auxiliary power Pec > 2-5 Poh. Optimal conditions of the plasma discharge recovery after an energy quench using auxiliary heating are identified. At high auxiliary power, restoration of the plasma discharge can be provided with the location of the EC resonance zone within the whole plasma cross section. The auxiliary power required for discharge restoration is minimal when the power is deposited around the m = 2, n = 1 magnetic island (here m and n poloidal and toroidal wave numbers). The threshold ECRH power increases linearly with plasma current. Prevention of the non-thermal electron beams during density limit disruption is associated with stabilization of bursts of the magnetohydrodynamic modes, creation of the saturated magnetic islands, and heating of the background plasma using ECRH. Plasma discharge recovery after an energy quench in a tokamak reactor using auxiliary heating and controllable reduction of the plasma current is discussed.

  20. An Experimental Research to Study the Microwaves Transmission Characteristics of Ablating Material in Arc-Heated Plasma Flow

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    In this paper, an experimental research the effect of ablating material on the reflection and the transmission of microwaves in arc-heated plasma flow is presented by using the C band microwave measuring system. The results show that the ablating material with accidented surface and its high temperature have remarkably affected the reflection and the transmission of microwaves. The experiment proves that the system has outstanding precision and reliability.

  1. Prediction of heating rate controlled viscous flow activation energy during spark plasma sintering of amorphous alloy powders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul, Tanaji; Harimkar, Sandip P.

    2017-07-01

    The viscous flow behavior of Fe-based amorphous alloy powder during isochronal spark plasma sintering was analyzed under the integrated theoretical background of the Arrhenius and directional structural relaxation models. A relationship between viscous flow activation energy and heating rate was derived. An extension of the pertinent analysis to Ti-based amorphous alloys confirmed the broad applicability of such a relationship for predicting the activation energy for sintering below the glass transition temperature (T g) of the amorphous alloy powders.

  2. Effect of high-flux H/He plasma exposure on tungsten damage due to transient heat loads

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De Temmerman, G., E-mail: gregory.detemmerman@iter.org [FOM Institute DIFFER, Dutch Institute for Fundamental Energy Research, Association EURATOM-FOM, Trilateral Euregion Cluster, Postbus 1207, 3430BE Nieuwegein (Netherlands); ITER Organization, Route de Vinon sur Verdon, CS 90 096, 13067 Saint Paul-lez-Durance (France); Morgan, T.W.; Eden, G.G. van; Kruif, T. de [FOM Institute DIFFER, Dutch Institute for Fundamental Energy Research, Association EURATOM-FOM, Trilateral Euregion Cluster, Postbus 1207, 3430BE Nieuwegein (Netherlands); Wirtz, M. [Forschungszentrum Jülich GmbH, Institute of Energy and Climate Research – Microstructure and Properties of Materials (IEK-2), EURATOM Association, 52425 Jülich (Germany); Matejicek, J.; Chraska, T. [Institute of Plasma Physics, Association EURATOM-IPP, CR Prague (Czech Republic); Pitts, R.A. [ITER Organization, Route de Vinon sur Verdon, CS 90 096, 13067 Saint Paul-lez-Durance (France); Wright, G.M. [MIT Plasma Science and Fusion Center, 77 Massachusetts Ave., Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States)

    2015-08-15

    The thermal shock behaviour of tungsten exposed to high-flux plasma is studied using a high-power laser. The cases of laser-only, sequential laser and hydrogen (H) plasma and simultaneous laser plus H plasma exposure are studied. H plasma exposure leads to an embrittlement of the material and the appearance of a crack network originating from the centre of the laser spot. Under simultaneous loading, significant surface melting is observed. In general, H plasma exposure lowers the heat flux parameter (F{sub HF}) for the onset of surface melting by ∼25%. In the case of He-modified (fuzzy) surfaces, strong surface deformations are observed already after 1000 laser pulses at moderate F{sub HF} = 19 MJ m{sup −2} s{sup −1/2}, and a dense network of fine cracks is observed. These results indicate that high-fluence ITER-like plasma exposure influences the thermal shock properties of tungsten, lowering the permissible transient energy density beyond which macroscopic surface modifications begin to occur.

  3. Residual gas entering high density hydrogen plasma: rarefaction due to rapid heating

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    N. den Harder,; D.C. Schram,; W. J. Goedheer,; de Blank, H. J.; M. C. M. van de Sanden,; van Rooij, G. J.

    2015-01-01

    The interaction of background molecular hydrogen with magnetized (0.4 T) high density (1–5 × 10 20  m −3 ) low temperature (∼3 eV) hydrogen plasma was inferred from the Fulcher band emission in the linear plasma generator Pilot-PSI. In the plasma center,

  4. Hydrodynamic Modeling of Accretion Impacts in Classical T Tauri Stars: Radiative Heating of the Pre-shock Plasma

    CERN Document Server

    Costa, G; Peres, G; Argiroffi, C; Bonito, R

    2016-01-01

    Context. It is generally accepted that, in Classical T Tauri Stars, the plasma from the circumstellar disc accretes onto the stellar surface with free fall velocity, and the impact generates a shock. The impact region is expected to contribute to emission in different spectral bands; many studies have confirmed that the X-rays arise from the post-shock plasma but, otherwise, there are no studies in the literature investigating the origin of the observed UV emission which is apparently correlated to accretion. Aims. We investigated the effect of radiative heating of the infalling material by the post-shock plasma at the base of the accretion stream with the aim to identify in which region a significant part of the UV emission originates. Methods. We developed a 1D hydrodynamic model describing the impact of an accretion stream onto the stellar surface; the model takes into account the gravity, the radiative cooling of an optically thin plasma, the thermal conduction, and the heating due to absorption of X-ray ...

  5. Heat flux and plasma flow in the scrape off layer on the spherical tokamak QUEST with inboard poloidal field null configuration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onchi, Takumi; Zushi, Hideki; Mishra, Kishore; Hanada, Kazuaki; Idei, Hiroshi; Nakamura, Kazuo; Fujisawa, Akihide; Nagashima, Yoshihiko; Hasegawa, Makoto; Kuzmin, Arseny; Nagaoka, Kenichi; QUEST Team

    2014-10-01

    Heat flux and plasma flow in the scrape off layer (SOL) are examined in the inboard poloidal null (IPN) configuration on the spherical tokamak (ST) QUEST. In the ST, trapped energetic electrons on the low field side are widely excursed from the last closed flux surface to SOL so that significant heat loss occurs. Interestingly, plasma flows in the core and the SOL are also observed in IPN though no inductive force like ohmic heating is applied. High heat flux (>1 MW/m2) and sonic flow (M > 1) in far-SOL arise in current ramp-up phase. In quasi-steady state, sawtooth-like oscillation of plasma current with 20 Hz has been observed. Heat flux and subsonic plasma flow in far-SOL are well correlated to plasma current oscillation. The toroidal Mach number largely increases from Mφ ~ 0.1 to ~ 0.5 and drops although the amplitude of plasma current is about 10% of that. Note that such flow modification occurs before plasma current crash, there may be some possibility that phenomena in the SOL or the edge trigger reactions in the core plasma. This work is supported by Grants-in-aid for Scientific Research (S24226020), NIFS Collaboration Research Program (NIFS12KUTR081), and the Collaborative Research Program of Research Institute for Applied Mechanics, Kyushu University.

  6. Neutron generator for BNCT based on high current ECR ion source with gyrotron plasma heating.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skalyga, V; Izotov, I; Golubev, S; Razin, S; Sidorov, A; Maslennikova, A; Volovecky, A; Kalvas, T; Koivisto, H; Tarvainen, O

    2015-12-01

    BNCT development nowadays is constrained by a progress in neutron sources design. Creation of a cheap and compact intense neutron source would significantly simplify trial treatments avoiding use of expensive and complicated nuclear reactors and accelerators. D-D or D-T neutron generator is one of alternative types of such sources for. A so-called high current quasi-gasdynamic ECR ion source with plasma heating by millimeter wave gyrotron radiation is suggested to be used in a scheme of D-D neutron generator in the present work. Ion source of that type was developed in the Institute of Applied Physics of Russian Academy of Sciences (Nizhny Novgorod, Russia). It can produce deuteron ion beams with current density up to 700-800 mA/cm(2). Generation of the neutron flux with density at the level of 7-8·10(10) s(-1) cm(-2) at the target surface could be obtained in case of TiD2 target bombardment with deuteron beam accelerated to 100 keV. Estimations show that it is enough for formation of epithermal neutron flux with density higher than 10(9) s(-1) cm(-2) suitable for BNCT. Important advantage of described approach is absence of Tritium in the scheme. First experiments performed in pulsed regime with 300 mA, 45 kV deuteron beam directed to D2O target demonstrated 10(9) s(-1) neutron flux. This value corresponds to theoretical estimations and proofs prospects of neutron generator development based on high current quasi-gasdynamic ECR ion source.

  7. Heat Transfer Analysis of Two Kinds of Mechanically Jointed GBST1308/CuCrZr Plasma Facing Components of EAST

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHONG Fali; CHEN Junling; LI Jiangang; ZHENG Xuebin; EAST team

    2008-01-01

    Doped graphite GBST1308,mechanically jointed to CuCrZr alloys,will be applied on EAST superconducting as plasma facing material (PFM).Two joint structures called joint-1 and joint-2 were evaluated by means of thermal response tests using electron beam facility.The experimental results showed that the temperature differences of two joints were not significant,and the maximum surface temperature was about 1055℃ at a load of 4 MW/m2,which had a good agreement with the simulated results by ANSYS code.The results indicated that the doped graphite GBST1308/CuCrZr mock-up can withstand heat flux deposition of 4 MW/m2 except at the screw-fastened region,and joint-2 could be more suitable to higher heat flux region such as divertor target.But under the higher heat flux,both joints are unacceptable,an advanced PFM and its integration with the heat sink have to be developed,for example,vacuum plasma spraying tungsten coatings on the CuCrZr might be a good choice.

  8. Enhancing the radiative heat dissipation from high-temperature SF6 gas plasma by using selective absorbers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuda, Shinichiro; Horinouchi, Katsuhiko; Yugami, Hiroo

    2017-09-01

    Radiative cooling accomplished by tailoring the properties of spectral thermal emission is an interesting method for energy harvesting and high-efficiency passive cooling of terrestrial structures. This strategy, however, has not been extended to cool enclosed heat sources, common in engineering applications, and heat sources in high-temperature environments where radiative transfer plays a dominant role. Here we show a radiative cooling scheme for a high-temperature gaseous medium, using radiative heat extraction with selective absorbers matched to the gas-selective emission properties. We used SF6 gas plasma as a model, because this gas is used in gas circuit breakers, which require effective cooling of the hot insulating gas. Our theoretical analysis confirms that a copper photonic absorber, matched to the ultraviolet-to-near-infrared-selective emission properties of the gas, effectively extracts heat from the high-temperature gas plasma and lowers the radiative equilibrium gas temperature by up to 1270 K, exceeding both blackbody-like and metallic surfaces in practical operating conditions.

  9. The role of parallel heat transport in the relation between upstream scrape-off layer widths and target heat flux width in H-mode plasmas of NSTX.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahn, J W; Boedo, J A; Maingi, R; Soukhanovskii, V A

    2009-01-05

    The physics of parallel heat transport was tested in the Scrape-off Layer (SOL) plasma of the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) [M. Ono, et al., Nucl. Fusion 40, 557 (2000) and S. M. Kaye, et al., Nucl. Fusion 45, S168 (2005)] tokamak by comparing the upstream electron temperature (T{sub e}) and density (n{sub e}) profiles measured by the mid-plane reciprocating probe to the heat flux (q{sub {perpendicular}}) profile at the divertor plate measured by an infrared (IR) camera. It is found that electron conduction explains the near SOL width data reasonably well while the far SOL, which is in the sheath limited regime, requires an ion heat flux profile broader than the electron one to be consistent with the experimental data. The measured plasma parameters indicate that the SOL energy transport should be in the conduction-limited regime for R-R{sub sep} (radial distance from the separatrix location) < 2-3 cm. The SOL energy transport should transition to the sheath-limited regime for R-R{sub sep} > 2-3cm. The T{sub e}, n{sub e}, and q{sub {perpendicular}} profiles are better described by an offset exponential function instead of a simple exponential. The conventional relation between mid plane electron temperature decay length ({lambda}{sub Te}) and target heat flux decay length ({lambda}{sub q}) is {lambda}{sub Te} = 7/2{lambda}{sub q}, whereas the newly-derived relation, assuming offset exponential functional forms, implies {lambda}{sub Te} = (2-2.5){lambda}{sub q}. The measured values of {lambda}{sub Te}/{lambda}{sub q} differ from the new prediction by 25-30%. The measured {lambda}{sub q} values in the far SOL (R-R{sub sep} > 2-3cm) are 9-10cm, while the expected values are 2.7 < {lambda}{sub q} < 4.9 cm (for sheath-limited regime). We propose that the ion heat flux profile is substantially broader than the electron heat flux profile as an explanation for this discrepancy in the far SOL.

  10. Studies of plasma breakdown and electron heating on a 14 GHz ECR ion source through measurement of plasma bremsstrahlung

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ropponen, T; Machicoane, G; Leitner, D [National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory, MSU, East Lansing, MI 48824 (United States); Tarvainen, O; Toivanen, V; Koivisto, H; Kalvas, T; Peura, P; Jones, P [University of Jyvaeskylae, Department of Physics, PO Box 35 (YFL), 40500 Jyvaeskylae (Finland); Izotov, I; Skalyga, V; Zorin, V [Institute of Applied Physics, RAS, 46 Ulyanov St., 603950 Nizhny Novgorod (Russian Federation); Noland, J, E-mail: tommi.ropponen@gmail.com, E-mail: olli.tarvainen@jyu.fi [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States)

    2011-10-15

    Temporal evolution of plasma bremsstrahlung emitted by a 14 GHz electron cyclotron resonance ion source (ECRIS) operated in pulsed mode is presented in the energy range 1.5-400 keV with 100 {mu}s resolution. Such a high temporal resolution together with this energy range has never been measured before with an ECRIS. Data are presented as a function of microwave power, neutral gas pressure, magnetic field configuration and seed electron density. The saturation time of the bremsstrahlung count rate is almost independent of the photon energy up to 100 keV and exhibits similar characteristics with the neutral gas balance. The average photon energy during the plasma breakdown is significantly higher than that during the steady state and depends strongly on the density of seed electrons. The results are consistent with a theoretical model describing the evolution of the electron energy distribution function during the preglow transient.

  11. New-Measurement Techniques to Diagnose Charged Dust and Plasma Layers in the Near-Earth Space Environment Using Ground-Based Ionospheric Heating Facilities

    OpenAIRE

    Mahmoudian, Alireza

    2013-01-01

    Recently, experimental observations have shown that radar echoes from the irregularitysource region associated with mesospheric dusty space plasmas may be modulated by radio wave heating with ground-based ionospheric heating facilities. These experiments show great promise as a diagnostic for the associated dusty plasma in the Near-Earth Space Environment which is believed to have links to global change. This provides an alternative to more complicated and costly space-based observational app...

  12. Nanoindentation study of the combined effects of crystallography, heat treatment and exposure to high-flux deuterium plasma in tungsten

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zayachuk, Y.; Armstrong, D. E. J.; Bystrov, K.; Van Boxel, S.; Morgan, T.; Roberts, S. G.

    2017-04-01

    tungsten samples were heat-treated to achieve partial recrystallization and exposed to high ion flux deuterium plasma at different temperatures and fluences. Continuous stiffness nanoindentation measurements of near-surface hardness were performed in the grains of specific annealing states and of specific crystallographic orientation, determined by electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD); indentation pile-up was investigated using surface profilometry. Bulk hardness of unexposed tungsten does not strongly depend on grain orientation, but depends on the annealing state of the grain, with values between ∼4.3 GPa for recrystallized grains and ∼5.5 for non-recrystallized ones. Grains with surface normal orientation feature the least pile-up, while grains with orientation the most; pile-up also depends on the annealing state, being generally lower in recrystallized grains. Plasma exposure leads to the increase of hardness, most significantly near the surface. The width of plasma-affected zone increases with the increase of exposure temperature and fluence, as well in recrystallized grains, correlating with the increase of diffusion depth. Plasma exposure does not lead to the emergence of orientation-dependence of hardness. Both indentation pile-up and near-surface indentation pop-ins are generally suppressed by plasma exposure.

  13. Association of Plasma Heat Shock Protein 70, Interleukin 6, and Creatine Kinase Concentrations in a Healthy, Young Adult Population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carmen Contreras-Sesvold

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Variations of baseline plasma concentrations of creatine kinase (CK, heat shock protein 70 (HSP70, and interleukin 6 (IL-6 have been reported. We report categorical associations which may influence these protein levels. Methods. Blood was harvested for DNA and plasma protein analysis from 567 adults. Mean protein levels of CK, HSP70, and IL-6 were compared by sex, ethnicity, genetic variants—CKMM Nco1 (rs1803285, HSPA1B +A1538G (rs1061581, and IL6 G-174C (rs1800795—self-reported history of exercise, oral contraceptive use, and dietary supplement use. Results. SNP major allele frequencies for CKMM, HSPA1B, and IL6 were 70% A, 57% A, and 60%. Mean CK statistically differed by sex, ethnicity, oral contraceptives, and caffeine. Plasma HSP70 differed by caffeine and protein. Mean IL-6 concentration differed by sex, ethnicity, and genotype. Plasma IL-6 was significantly lower (29% in males (1.92 ± 0.08 pg/mL and higher (29% among African Americans (2.85 ± 0.50 pg/mL relative to the others. IL6 G-174C GG genotype (2.23 ± 0.14 pg/mL was 19% greater than CG or CC genotypes. Conclusion. Differences in baseline CK and IL-6 plasma protein concentrations are associated with genetics, sex, ethnicity, and the use of oral contraceptives, caffeine, and protein supplements in this young and athletic population.

  14. The effect of heat- or ultra violet ozone-treatment of titanium on complement deposition from human blood plasma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linderbäck, Paula; Harmankaya, Necati; Askendal, Agneta; Areva, Sami; Lausmaa, Jukka; Tengvall, Pentti

    2010-06-01

    Titanium (Ti) is a well known metallic biomaterial extensively used in dental, orthopaedic-, and occasionally also in blood contacting applications. It integrates well to bone and soft tissues, and is shown upon blood plasma contact to activate the intrinsic pathway of coagulation and bind complement factor 3b. The material properties depend largely on those of the nm-thick dense layer of TiO(2) that becomes rapidly formed upon contact with air and water. The spontaneously formed amorphous Ti-oxide has a pzc approximately 5-6 and its water solubility is at the order of 1-2 micromolar. It is often subjected to chemical- and heat treatments in order to increase the anatase- and rutile crystallinity, to modify the surface topography and to decrease the water solubility. In this work, we prepared sol-gel derived titanium and smooth PVD titanium surfaces, and analysed their oxide and protein deposition properties in human blood plasma before and after annealing at 100-500 degrees C or upon UVO-treatment for up to 96 hours. The blood plasma results show that complement deposition vanished irreversibly after heat treatment at 250-300 degrees C for 30 minutes or after UVO exposure for 24 hours or longer. XPS and infrared spectroscopy indicated change of surface water/hydroxyl binding upon the heat- and UVO treatments, and increased Ti oxidation. XRD analysis confirmed an increased crystallinity and both control (untreated) and annealed smooth titanium displayed low XRD-signals indicating some nanocrystallinity, with predominantly anatase phase. The current results show that the behaviour of titanium dioxide in blood contact can be controlled through relatively simple means, such as mild heating and illumination in UV-light, which both likely irreversibly change the stoichiometry and structure of the outmost layers of titanium dioxide and its OH/H(2)O binding characteristics.

  15. Momentum, heat, and neutral mass transport in convective atmospheric pressure plasma-liquid systems and implications for aqueous targets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindsay, Alexander; Anderson, Carly; Slikboer, Elmar; Shannon, Steven; Graves, David

    2015-10-01

    There is a growing interest in the study of plasma-liquid interactions with application to biomedicine, chemical disinfection, agriculture, and other fields. This work models the momentum, heat, and neutral species mass transfer between gas and aqueous phases in the context of a streamer discharge; the qualitative conclusions are generally applicable to plasma-liquid systems. The problem domain is discretized using the finite element method. The most interesting and relevant model result for application purposes is the steep gradients in reactive species at the interface. At the center of where the reactive gas stream impinges on the water surface, the aqueous concentrations of OH and ONOOH decrease by roughly 9 and 4 orders of magnitude respectively within 50 μ m of the interface. Recognizing the limited penetration of reactive plasma species into the aqueous phase is critical to discussions about the therapeutic mechanisms for direct plasma treatment of biological solutions. Other interesting results from this study include the presence of a 10 K temperature drop in the gas boundary layer adjacent to the interface that arises from convective cooling. Though the temperature magnitudes may vary among atmospheric discharge types (different amounts of plasma-gas heating), this relative difference between gas and liquid bulk temperatures is expected to be present for any system in which convection is significant. Accounting for the resulting difference between gas and liquid bulk temperatures has a significant impact on reaction kinetics; factor of two changes in terminal aqueous species concentrations like H2O2, NO2- , and NO3- are observed in this study if the effect of evaporative cooling is not included.

  16. Resonance between heat-carrying electrons and Langmuir waves in inertial confinement fusion plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rozmus, W. [Department of Physics, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta T6G 2G7 (Canada); Chapman, T.; Berger, R. L. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94551 (United States); Brantov, A.; Bychenkov, V. Yu. [P.N. Lebedev Physics Institute, Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow 119991 Russia and Center for Fundamental and Applied Research, VNIIA, ROSATOM, 127055 Moscow (Russian Federation); Winjum, B. J. [Department of Electrical Engineering, UCLA, Los Angeles, California 90095 (United States); Brunner, S. [Association EURATOM-Confederation Suisse, EPFL, 1015 Lausanne (Switzerland); Tableman, A.; Tzoufras, M. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, UCLA, Los Angeles, California 90095 (United States); Glenzer, S. [LCLS, Stanford, California 94025 (United States)

    2016-01-15

    In ignition scale hot plasmas, temperature gradients and thermal transport modify electron distributions in a velocity range resonant with Langmuir waves typical of those produced by stimulated Raman scattering. We examine the resultant changes to the Landau damping experienced by these Langmuir waves and the levels of thermal plasma fluctuations. The form factor and Thomson scattering cross-section in such plasmas display unique characteristics of the background conditions. A theoretical model and high-order Vlasov-Fokker-Planck simulations are used in our analysis. An experiment to measure changes in thermal plasma fluctuation levels due to a thermal gradient is proposed.

  17. Analysis of the heating of the Magnum-PSI and Pilot-PSI plasma in the GHz range

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koch, R.; van de Pol, M.; Louche, F.; Koppers, W. R.; Cardozo, N. J. Lopes

    2007-09-01

    Magnum-PSI [1] (under construction) and Pilot-PSI [2, 3] are linear plasma machines. The former is designed to study plasma-surface interactions in conditions relevant to the ITER divertor. To generate the power flux required by these studies, radio-frequency heating has been planned. Around typical Magnum-PSI conditions (B0 = 3 T, ne = 1020-1021m-3, T = 1-5 eV), after low frequency [4], higher-frequency schemes are investigated. These range from below the lower-hybrid frequency to the helicon wave range with a preference for 2.45 GHz where equipment is easily available. First experiments have been performed on the smaller machine Pilot-PSI (B0 = 0.4-1.6 T). In this paper the conditions for wave propagation and absorption are investigated for both machines in broad parameter ranges to determine the most favourable heating conditions. The importance of choosing suitable wave polarization and launched k∥-spectrum is discussed. A spectral code was developed to compute the coupling of a rectangular wave-guide field to cylindrical plasma. Results are discussed and conclusions for future developments are drawn.

  18. Alpha heating and isotopic mass effects in JET plasmas with sawteeth

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Budny, R. V. [Princeton Plasma Physics Lab. (PPPL), Princeton, NJ (United States); Team, JET [EUROfusion Consortium, JET, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon, OX14 3DB, UK

    2016-02-09

    The alpha heating experiment in the Joint European Torus (JET) 1997 DTE1 campaign is re-examined. Several effects correlated with tritium content and thermal hydrogenic isotopic mass < A> weaken the conclusion that alpha heating was clearly observed. These effects delayed the occurrence of significant sawtooth crashes allowing the electron and ion temperatures T e and T i to achieve higher values. Under otherwise equal circumstances T e and T i were typically higher for discharges with higher < A >, and significant scaling of T i, T e, and total stored energy with < A > were observed. The higher T i led to increased ion–electron heating rates with magnitudes comparable to those computed for alpha electron heating. Rates of other heating/loss processes also had comparable magnitudes. Simulations of T e assuming the observed scaling of T i are qualitatively consistent with the measured profiles, without invoking alpha heating

  19. Heat Diffusion across a Strong Stochastic Magnetic Field in Tokamak Plasmas

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GAO Hong; YU Qing-Quan

    2009-01-01

    We investigate heat diffusion across a local strong stochastic magnetic field by using eleven low-m perturbed magnetic islands.A maximum stochasticity of 38.82 between two neighboring rationed surfaces is attained.The correlation between the effective radied heat conductivity Xr and the ratio of the paredlel heat diffusion coefficient to the perpendicular coefficient,X||/X,is numericeally studied and compared with earlier work.

  20. Examination of material performance of W exposed to high heat load: Postmortem analysis of W exposed to TEXTOR plasma and E-beam test stand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanabe, T.; Philipps, V.; Nakamura, K.; Fujine, M.; Ueda, Y.; Wada, M.; Schweer, B.; Pospieszczyk, A.; Unterberg, B.

    1997-02-01

    We have examined the behavior of high Z limiters exposed to TEXTOR edge plasma and found that under certain conditions high Z materials are compatible with plasmas. In high density Ohmic plasmas the accumulation of a high Z impurity in the plasma center with significant radiation is observed, whereas an auxiliary heating like NBI and ICRH enhances the impurity exhaust with saw tooth activity. For a practical use of high Z plasma facing materials, extremely high heat load from the plasma becomes a serious concern. In the present work we have conducted the high heat load tests of tungsten (W) using two different heat sources, one is the W limiter exposed to TEXTOR plasma and the other is various W samples heat loaded with an intense E-beam using the JEBIS facility in Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI). From the test results we have to conclude that W, if applied in the form of the bulk material, should be used above the ductile brittle transition temperature (DBTT) but below about 1500°C to avoid the recrystallization. Maximum heat load tolerable without surface melting is about 20 MW/m 2 for several seconds. The monocrystalline used at high temperatures shows very good performance, though the production of the monocrystalline with a desired shape is not easy. Considering its brittle nature, hard machining and heavy mass, bulk W cannot be a structure material but be used as a thin tile or deposited film on some structure materials. Unfortunately, however, the thermal expansion coefficient of W is so small that brazing of W to a heat sink material like Cu which has a much larger thermal expansion coefficient would easily result in cracking due to the large thermal stress. Thus the development of tungsten plasma facing component (PFC) needs much effort in future.

  1. Soft x-ray intensity profile measurements of electron cyclotron heated plasmas using semiconductor detector arrays in GAMMA 10 tandem mirror.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minami, R; Imai, T; Kariya, T; Numakura, T; Eguchi, T; Kawarasaki, R; Nakazawa, K; Kato, T; Sato, F; Nanzai, H; Uehara, M; Endo, Y; Ichimura, M

    2014-11-01

    Temporally and spatially resolved soft x-ray analyses of electron cyclotron heated plasmas are carried out by using semiconductor detector arrays in the GAMMA 10 tandem mirror. The detector array has 16-channel for the measurements of plasma x-ray profiles so as to make x-ray tomographic reconstructions. The characteristics of the detector array make it possible to obtain spatially resolved plasma electron temperatures down to a few tens eV and investigate various magnetohydrodynamic activities. High power electron cyclotron heating experiment for the central-cell region in GAMMA 10 has been started in order to reduce the electron drag by increasing the electron temperature.

  2. Generation of Non-Inductive H-Mode Plasmas with 30 MHz Fast Wave Heating in NSTX-U

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, G.; Bertelli, N.; Gerhardt, S. P.; Hosea, J. C.; Mueller, D.; Perkins, R. J.; Poli, F. M.; Wilson, J. R.; Raman, R.

    2016-10-01

    A Fusion Nuclear Science Facility based on a spherical tokamak must generate the plasma current (Ip) with little or no central solenoid field. The NSTX-U non-inductive (NI) plasma research program is addressing this goal by developing NI start-up, ramp-up and sustainment scenarios separately. 4 MW of 30 MHz fast wave power is predicted to ramp Ip to 400 kA, a level sufficient to avoid significant shine-through of 90 keV ions from neutral beam injection. In 2010, experiments in NSTX demonstrated that 1.4 MW of 30 MHz high-harmonic fast wave (HHFW) power could generate an Ip = 300 kA H-mode discharge with a NI Ip fraction, fNI, around 0.7 at the maximum axial toroidal field (BT(0)) in NSTX of 0.55 T. NSTX-U is a major upgrade of NSTX that will eventually allow the generation of plasmas with BT(0) up to 1 T. Full wave simulations of 30 MHz HHFW heating in NSTX-U predict reduced FW power loss in the plasma edge as BT(0) is increased. HHFW experiments this year aim to couple 3 - 4 MW of 30 MHz HHFW power into an Ip = 250 - 350 kA plasma with BT(0) up to 0.75 T to generate a fNI = 1 H-mode plasma. These experiments should benefit from the improved fast wave coupling predicted at higher BT(0) in NSTX-U. Work supported by USDOE Contract No. DE-AC02-09CH11466.

  3. The influences of heat treatments and interdiffusion on the adhesion of plasma-sprayed NiCrAlY coatings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Richard, C.S. [Universite de Technologie de Compiegne (France). Departement de Genie Mecanique; Beranger, G. [Universite de Technologie de Compiegne (France). Departement de Genie Mecanique; Lu, J. [Universite de Technologie de Troyes, Departement de Genie des Systemes Mecaniques, 10000, Troyes (France); Flavenot, J.F. [Centre Technique des Industries Mecaniques (CETIM), Departement Materiaux, 60306 Senlis (France)

    1996-07-01

    Most coatings are applied with a specific aim in mind, such as improving the base material resistance to corrosion or wear, or providing a barrier against high temperatures. These aims can obviously only be achieved if the coating is properly bonded to the substrate. This study is focused on a NiCrAlY metallic bonding layer and its adhesion on to nickel-based superalloy substrate. It also looks at the influence of different spraying methods (atmospheric plasma spraying and vacuum plasma spraying) and the influence of a post-heat treatment on adhesion of the coatings. In order to determine adherence, a Vickers indentation test was performed at the substrate/coating interface. In each case, the residual stresses were evaluated by a step-by-step hole drilling method and these were taken into account in assessing the adhesion parameters. The results were supplemented by a microstructural study of the interface. (orig.)

  4. Axial heating and temperature of RF-excited non-neutral plasmas in Penning-Malmberg traps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maero, G.; Pozzoli, R.; Romé, M.; Chen, S.; Ikram, M.

    2016-09-01

    Electro-magnetostatic traps have been used for decades to provide long-term storage of charged particle samples or non-neutral plasmas. The dynamics and equilibrium states of these ideally simple systems can be strongly diverted from the usual working conditions (i.e. single-species, quiescent samples) in the presence of oppositely charged particles or external electric field perturbations. Both these conditions occur when the plasma is generated by means of a radio-frequency (RF) excitation continuously applied on a trap electrode. The application of RF drives of some volts over periods larger than typical collisional time scales leads to residual-gas ionization and to the accumulation of an electron plasma, a process that has previously been exploited as an alternative to thermionic or photoemission electron sources. The analysis of the axial energy distribution shows a deviation of the continuously excited final state from maxwellianity dependent on the radial position and the subsequent relaxation to equilibrium after the interruption of the drive. Systematic measurements also indicate the high sensitivity to the residual gas pressure of both the total confined charge and of the attainable densities and plasma profiles. The results are compared to the information obtained from a very simple one-dimensional electron heating model and show the validity of its most basic features together with its shortcomings.

  5. von K\\'arm\\'an energy decay and heating of protons and electrons in a kinetic plasma

    CERN Document Server

    Wu, P; Matthaeus, W H; Shay, M A; Swisdak, M

    2013-01-01

    Decay in time of undriven weakly collisional kinetic plasma turbulence in systems large compared to the ion kinetic scales is investigated using fully electromagnetic particle-in-cell simulations initiated with transverse flow and magnetic disturbances, constant density, and a strong guide field. The observed energy decay is consistent with the von K\\'arm\\'an hypothesis of similarity decay, in a formulation adapted to magnetohydrodyamics (MHD). Kinetic dissipation occurs at small scales, but the overall rate is apparently controlled by large scale dynamics. At small turbulence amplitude the electrons are preferentially heated. At larger amplitudes proton heating is the dominant effect. In the solar wind and corona the protons are typically hotter, suggesting that these natural systems are in large amplitude turbulence regime.

  6. Stochastic heating of a single Brownian particle by charge fluctuations in a radio-frequency produced plasma sheath.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Christian; Piel, Alexander

    2015-10-01

    The Brownian motion of a single particle in the plasma sheath is studied to separate the effect of stochastic heating by charge fluctuations from heating by collective effects. By measuring the particle velocities in the ballistic regime and by carefully determining the particle mass from the Epstein drag it is shown that for a pressure of 10 Pa, which is typical of many experiments, the proper kinetic temperature of the Brownian particle remains close to the gas temperature and rises only slightly with particle size. This weak effect is confirmed by a detailed model for charging and charge fluctuations in the sheath. A substantial temperature rise is found for decreasing pressure, which approximately shows the expected scaling with p(-2). The system under study is an example for non-equilibrium Brownian motion under the influence of white noise without corresponding dissipation.

  7. A modeling approach for heat conduction and radiation diffusion in plasma-photon mixture in temperature nonequilibrium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, Chong [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2016-08-09

    We present a simple approach for determining ion, electron, and radiation temperatures of heterogeneous plasma-photon mixtures, in which temperatures depend on both material type and morphology of the mixture. The solution technique is composed of solving ion, electron, and radiation energy equations for both mixed and pure phases of each material in zones containing random mixture and solving pure material energy equations in subdivided zones using interface reconstruction. Application of interface reconstruction is determined by the material configuration in the surrounding zones. In subdivided zones, subzonal inter-material energy exchanges are calculated by heat fluxes across the material interfaces. Inter-material energy exchange in zones with random mixtures is modeled using the length scale and contact surface area models. In those zones, inter-zonal heat flux in each material is determined using the volume fractions.

  8. Von Kármán energy decay and heating of protons and electrons in a kinetic turbulent plasma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, P; Wan, M; Matthaeus, W H; Shay, M A; Swisdak, M

    2013-09-20

    Decay in time of undriven weakly collisional kinetic plasma turbulence in systems large compared to the ion kinetic scales is investigated using fully electromagnetic particle-in-cell simulations initiated with transverse flow and magnetic disturbances, constant density, and a strong guide field. The observed energy decay is consistent with the von Kármán hypothesis of similarity decay, in a formulation adapted to magnetohydrodyamics. Kinetic dissipation occurs at small scales, but the overall rate is apparently controlled by large scale dynamics. At small turbulence amplitudes the electrons are preferentially heated. At larger amplitudes proton heating is the dominant effect. In the solar wind and corona the protons are typically hotter, suggesting that these natural systems are in the large amplitude turbulence regime.

  9. Applications of the SCENIC code package to the minority ion-cyclotron heating in Wendelstein 7-X plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Faustin, J. M., E-mail: jonathan.faustin@epfl.ch; Cooper, W. A.; Graves, J. P.; Pfefferlé, D. [Ecole Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne (EPFL), Centre de Recherches en Physique des Plasmas (CRPP), CH-1015 Lausanne (Switzerland); Geiger, J. [Max-Planck Institut für Plasmaphysik, D-17491 Greifswald (Germany)

    2015-12-10

    We present SCENIC simulations of a W7X 4He plasma with 1% H minority and with an antenna model close to the design foreseen for the W7X ICRF antenna [1, 2]. A high mirror and a standard equilibrium are considered. The injected wave frequency is fixed at 33.8 MHz and 39.6MHz respectively and only fundamental minority heating is considered. Included in this calculation is a new realistic model of the antenna, where it is found that the localization of the antenna geometry tends to break the five-fold periodicity of the system. We assess the heat transfer through the toroidal periods via Coulomb collisions.

  10. Anisotropic ion heating and tail generation during tearing mode magnetic reconnection in a high-temperature plasma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magee, R M; Den Hartog, D J; Kumar, S T A; Almagri, A F; Chapman, B E; Fiksel, G; Mirnov, V V; Mezonlin, E D; Titus, J B

    2011-08-05

    Complementary measurements of ion energy distributions in a magnetically confined high-temperature plasma show that magnetic reconnection results in both anisotropic ion heating and the generation of suprathermal ions. The anisotropy, observed in the C(+6) impurity ions, is such that the temperature perpendicular to the magnetic field is larger than the temperature parallel to the magnetic field. The suprathermal tail appears in the majority ion distribution and is well described by a power law to energies 10 times the thermal energy. These observations may offer insight into the energization process.

  11. The Effect of Multipole-Enhanced Diffusion on the Joule Heating of a Cold Non-Neutral Plasma

    CERN Document Server

    Chapman, Steven Francis

    One proposed technique for trapping anti-atoms is to superimpose a Ioffe-Pritchard style magnetic-minimum neutral trap on a standard Penning trap used to trap the charged atomic constituents. Adding a magnetic multipole field in this way removes the azimuthal symmetry of the ideal Penning trap and introduces a new avenue for radial diffusion. Enhanced diffusion will lead to increased Joule heating of a non-neutral plasma, potentially adversely affecting the formation rate of anti-atoms and increasing the required trap depth. We present a model of this effect, along with an approach to minimizing it, with comparison to measurements from an intended anti-atom trap.

  12. Hot bubbles of planetary nebulae with hydrogen-deficient winds I. Heat conduction in a chemically stratified plasma

    CERN Document Server

    Sandin, Christer; Schönberner, Detlef; Rühling, Ute

    2016-01-01

    Heat conduction has been found a plausible solution to explain discrepancies between expected and measured temperatures in hot bubbles of planetary nebulae (PNe). While the heat conduction process depends on the chemical composition, to date it has been exclusively studied for pure hydrogen plasmas in PNe. A smaller population of PNe show hydrogen-deficient and helium- and carbon-enriched surfaces surrounded by bubbles of the same composition; considerable differences are expected in physical properties of these objects in comparison to the pure hydrogen case. The aim of this study is to explore how a chemistry-dependent formulation of the heat conduction affects physical properties and how it affects the X-ray emission from PN bubbles of hydrogen-deficient stars. We extend the description of heat conduction in our radiation hydrodynamics code to work with any chemical composition. We then compare the bubble-formation process with a representative PN model using both the new and the old descriptions. We also ...

  13. Damage prediction of carbon fibre composite armoured actively cooled plasma-facing components under cycling heat loads

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chevet, G; Schlosser, J; Courtois, X; Escourbiac, F; Missirlian, M [CEA, IRFM, F-13108 Saint Paul Lez Durance (France); Herb, V; Martin, E; Camus, G [LCTS, CNRS UMR 5801, Universite Bordeaux 1, Pessac (France); Braccini, M [SIMaP, CNRS UMR 5266, Grenoble (France)], E-mail: gaelle.chevet@cea.fr

    2009-12-15

    In order to predict the lifetime of carbon fibre composite (CFC) armoured plasma-facing components in magnetic fusion devices, it is necessary to analyse the damage mechanisms and to model the damage propagation under cycling heat loads. At Tore Supra studies have been launched to better understand the damage process of the armoured flat tile elements of the actively cooled toroidal pump limiter, leading to the characterization of the damageable mechanical behaviour of the used N11 CFC material and of the CFC/Cu bond. Up until now the calculations have shown damage developing in the CFC (within the zone submitted to high shear stress) and in the bond (from the free edge of the CFC/Cu interface). Damage is due to manufacturing shear stresses and does not evolve under heat due to stress relaxation. For the ITER divertor, NB31 material has been characterized and the characterization of NB41 is in progress. Finite element calculations show again the development of CFC damage in the high shear stress zones after manufacturing. Stresses also decrease under heat flux so the damage does not evolve. The characterization of the CFC/Cu bond is more complex due to the monoblock geometry, which leads to more scattered stresses. These calculations allow the fabrication difficulties to be better understood and will help to analyse future high heat flux tests on various mock-ups.

  14. Plasma heating and generation of energetic ions with novel three-ion ICRF scenarios on Alcator C-Mod and JET tokamak facilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kazakov, Yevgen

    2016-10-01

    This talk will report the first experimental results of novel three-ion ICRF scenarios (two or more majority ion species and one minority) for plasma heating and generating energetic ions in fusion facilities. The key feature of these scenarios is strong absorption of RF power possible at lower concentrations of minority ions than in two-ion plasmas. Effective plasma heating by injecting a small amount of 3He ions into H-D plasma mixtures with nH /ne 70 % has been successfully demonstrated in Alcator C-Mod and JET tokamaks. In C-Mod, efficient plasma heating was observed for 3He concentrations from 0.4-2%. During the discharges, a strong increase in Alfvén eigenmode activity was found to coincide with the addition of 3He to the H-D plasmas. Even lower 3He concentrations ( 0.2 %) were utilized in recent JET experiments. The potential of the D-(3He) -H scenario for plasma heating and generating MeV-range ions in JET plasmas was confirmed by a set of independent measurements, including stabilization of sawteeth, characteristic γ-ray emission, fast-ion loss detector. Furthermore, toroidal Alfvén eigenmodes with a range of toroidal mode numbers n were detected, which is another indication for the presence of significant population of high-energy 3He ions in a plasma. The discussed mechanism of resonant wave-particle interaction opens up various unexplored opportunities for ICRF system, including new scenarios for plasma heating. Three-ion ICRF scenarios are also relevant for the experimental programme of ITER. The possibility of using intrinsic 9Be impurities as the minority (instead of 3He) was suggested for heating bulk ions in D-T plasmas of JET and ITER, as well as heating trace amounts of 3He and 4He ions in H majority plasmas of ITER. The latest results and simulation comparisons will be presented. On behalf of Alcator C-Mod Team (MIT-PSFC, US) and JET Contributors (Culham, UK). Work supported by the US DOE (C-Mod DE-FC02-99ER54512 and SciDAC DE-FC02-01ER54648

  15. Laboratory modeling of pulsed regimes of cyclotron instability in an ECR heated mirror-confined plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mansfeld, Dmitry; Viktorov, Mikhail; Golubev, Sergey; Vodopyanov, Alexander

    Despite more than half a century history, the studies of the interaction between electromagnetic waves and particles in magnetoactive plasma under electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) conditions still remain topical. One of the most interesting ECR manifestations is the generation of bursts of electromagnetic radiation that are related to the explosive growth of cyclotron instabilities of the magnetoactive plasma confined in magnetic traps of various kinds and that are accompanied by particle precipitations from the trap. Such phenomena are observed in a wide range of plasma parameters under various conditions: in the magnetospheres of the Earth and planets, in solar coronal loops, and in laboratory magnetic traps. We demonstrate the use of a laboratory setup based on a magnetic mirror trap with plasma sustained by a gyrotron radiation under ECR conditions for investigation of the cyclotron instabilities similar to the ones which take place in space plasmas. Three stages of pulsed ECR discharge offer the opportunity to study wave-particles interactions for essentially different plasma parameters: the initial stage, when the density of hot (relativistic) electrons (Nh) exceeds the density of cold electrons (Nc), the developed discharge (NhZ- or X- mode), propagating across the external magnetic field. The detailed investigation of spectral and temporal characteristics of non-stationary bursts of electromagnetic emission is presented. The interrelationship between the observed time-frequency spectrograms of electromagnetic emission with similar effects occurring in the inner magnetosphere is discussed in report.

  16. Ir Thermographic Measurements of Temperatures and Heat Fluxes in Hypersonic Plasma Flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardone, G.; Tortora, G.; del Vecchio, A.

    2005-02-01

    The technological development achieved in instruments and methodology concerning both flights and ground hypersonic experiment (employed in space plane planning) goes towards an updating and a standardization of the heat flux technical measurements. In fact, the possibility to simulate high enthalpy flow relative to reentry condition by hypersonic arc-jet facility needs devoted methods to measure heat fluxes. Aim of this work is to develop an experimental numerical technique for the evaluation of heat fluxes over Thermal Protection System (TPS) by means of InfraRed (IR) thermographic temperature measurements and a new heat flux sensor (IR-HFS). We tackle the numerical validation of IR-HFS, apply the same one to the Hyflex nose cap model and compare the obtained results with others ones obtained by others methodology.

  17. The effect of ambipolar electric fields on the electron heating in capacitive RF plasmas

    CERN Document Server

    Schulze, J; Derzsi, A; Korolov, I; Schuengel, E

    2016-01-01

    We investigate the electron heating dynamics in electropositive argon and helium capacitively coupled RF discharges driven at 13.56 MHz by Particle in Cell simulations and by an analytical model. The model allows to calculate the electric field outside the electrode sheaths, space and time resolved within the RF period. Electrons are found to be heated by strong ambipolar electric fields outside the sheath during the phase of sheath expansion in addition to classical sheath expansion heating. By tracing individual electrons we also show that ionization is primarily caused by electrons that collide with the expanding sheath edge multiple times during one phase of sheath expansion due to backscattering towards the sheath by collisions. A synergistic combination of these different heating events during one phase of sheath expansion is required to accelerate an electron to energies above the threshold for ionization. The ambipolar electric field outside the sheath is found to be time modulated due to a time modul...

  18. Gyrokinetic study of turbulent convection of heavy impurities in tokamak plasmas at comparable ion and electron heat fluxes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angioni, C.; Bilato, R.; Casson, F. J.; Fable, E.; Mantica, P.; Odstrcil, T.; Valisa, M.; ASDEX Upgrade Team; Contributors, JET

    2017-02-01

    In tokamaks, the role of turbulent transport of heavy impurities, relative to that of neoclassical transport, increases with increasing size of the plasma, as clarified by means of general scalings, which use the ITER standard scenario parameters as reference, and by actual results from a selection of discharges from ASDEX Upgrade and JET. This motivates the theoretical investigation of the properties of the turbulent convection of heavy impurities by nonlinear gyrokinetic simulations in the experimentally relevant conditions of comparable ion and electron heat fluxes. These conditions also correspond to an intermediate regime between dominant ion temperature gradient turbulence and trapped electron mode turbulence. At moderate plasma toroidal rotation, the turbulent convection of heavy impurities, computed with nonlinear gyrokinetic simulations, is found to be directed outward, in contrast to that obtained by quasi-linear calculations based on the most unstable linear mode, which is directed inward. In this mixed turbulence regime, with comparable electron and ion heat fluxes, the nonlinear results of the impurity transport can be explained by the coexistence of both ion temperature gradient and trapped electron modes in the turbulent state, both contributing to the turbulent convection and diffusion of the impurity. The impact of toroidal rotation on the turbulent convection is also clarified.

  19. Measurement of effect of electron cyclotron heating in a tandem mirror plasma using a semiconductor detector array and an electrostatic energy analyzer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minami, R.; Imai, T.; Kariya, T.; Numakura, T.; Uehara, M.; Tsumura, K.; Ebashi, Y.; Kajino, S.; Endo, Y.; Nakashima, Y.

    2016-11-01

    Temporally and spatially resolved soft x-ray and end-loss-electron analyses of the electron cyclotron heated plasmas are carried out by using a semiconductor detector array and an electrostatic energy analyzer in the GAMMA 10 tandem mirror. The flux and the energy spectrum of the end loss electrons are measured by a multi-grid energy analyzer. Recently, the electron cyclotron heating power modulation experiments have been started in order to generate and control the high heat flux and to make the edge localized mode-like intermittent heat load pattern for the divertor simulation studies by the use of these detectors for electron properties.

  20. Formularization of the confinement enhancement factor as a function of the heating profile for FFHR-d1 core plasma design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyazawa, J.; Goto, T.; Sakamoto, R.; Motojima, G.; Suzuki, C.; Funaba, H.; Morisaki, T.; Masuzaki, S.; Yamada, I.; Murakami, S.; Suzuki, Y.; Yokoyama, M.; Peterson, B. J.; Yamada, H.; Sagara, A.; the FFHR Design Group

    2012-12-01

    A quantitative estimation of the confinement enhancement due to the heating profile effect is introduced to the helical fusion DEMO reactor design of FFHR-d1, based on the experimental results of the Large Helical Device. By applying this to the direct profile extrapolation (DPE) method, radial profiles in the reactor are extrapolated from experimental results. In reactor plasmas, the heat deposition profile of alpha heating is expected to be peaked in the core region as in the case of tangential neutral beam (NB) injection on low-density plasmas. The height of the pressure profile normalized by the gyro-Bohm-type parameter dependence increases with the power (˜0.6) of the peaking factor of the heat deposition profile, as long as the core confinement degradation observed in low-density plasmas is ignored. According to this observation, the confinement enhancement factor expected under the self-ignition condition ranges from ˜1.1 to ˜1.7, for example, depending on the used data. Degradation of the global energy confinement observed in high-density NB-heated plasmas is mitigated and the gyro-Bohm-type parameter dependence reappears after introducing the confinement enhancement due to the heating profile effect. Finally, typical example profiles in FFHR-d1 are provided by the DPE method for future analyses.

  1. Monitoring Temperature in High Enthalpy Arc-heated Plasma Flows using Tunable Diode Laser Absorption Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Marcel Nations; Chang, Leyen S.; Jeffries, Jay B.; Hanson, Ronald K.; Nawaz, Anuscheh; Taunk, Jaswinder S.; Driver, David M.; Raiche, George

    2013-01-01

    A tunable diode laser sensor was designed for in situ monitoring of temperature in the arc heater of the NASA Ames IHF arcjet facility (60 MW). An external cavity diode laser was used to generate light at 777.2 nm and laser absorption used to monitor the population of electronically excited oxygen atoms in an air plasma flow. Under the assumption of thermochemical equilibrium, time-resolved temperature measurements were obtained on four lines-of-sight, which enabled evaluation of the temperature uniformity in the plasma column for different arcjet operating conditions.

  2. Prediction of Dissociation Process of Ceramic Powder Materials under Plasma Heating Conditions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WangBoyi; TianWendong

    1993-01-01

    A model of the thermal dissocition process has been developed for the numerical simulation of ceramic powder processing in a d.c. plasma reactor.The temperature histories of zircon grains were calculated based on this model.Comparisons were carried out to determine the effects of plasma gas (N2 and Ar),free stream temperature (6000-15000)K and Reynolds number (0.0-1.0) as well as particle diameter(20-200μm)on the zircon dissociation process.The influences of proper Nusselt numer correlation and variable transport properties were discussed in detail.

  3. SIRHEX—A new experimental facility for high heat flux testing of plasma facing components

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kunze, André, E-mail: andre.kunze@kit.edu [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), Institute for Neutron Physics and Reactor Technology (Germany); Ghidersa, Bradut-Eugen [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), Institute for Neutron Physics and Reactor Technology (Germany); Bonelli, Flavia [Politecnico di Torino, Dipartimento Energia (Italy)

    2015-10-15

    Highlights: • Commercial infrared heaters have been qualified for future First Wall experiments. • In first tests surface heat flux densities up to 470 kW/m were achieved. • The homogeneity of the heat distribution stayed within ±5% of the nominal value. • With the heaters a typical ITER pulse can be reproduced. • An adequate testing strategy will be required to improve heater lifetime. - Abstract: SIRHEX (“Surface Infrared Radiation Heating Experiment”) is a small-scale experimental facility at KIT, which has been built for testing and qualifying high heat flux radiation heaters for blanket specific conditions using an instrumented water cooled target. This paper describes the SIRHEX facility and the experimental set-up for the heater tests. The results of a series of tests focused on reproducing homogeneous surface heat flux densities up to 500 kW/m{sup 2} will be presented and the impact of the heater performance on the design of the First Wall test rig will be discussed.

  4. Effects of Plasma Drag on Low Earth Orbiting Satellites due to Heating of Earth's Atmosphere by Coronal Mass Ejections

    CERN Document Server

    Nwankwo, Victor U J

    2013-01-01

    Solar events, such as coronal mass ejections (CMEs) and solar flares, heat up the upper atmosphere and near-Earth space environment. Due to this heating and expansion of the outer atmosphere by the energetic ultraviolet, X-ray and particles expelled from the sun, the low Earth-Orbiting satellites (LEOS) become vulnerable to an enhanced drag force by the ions and molecules of the expanded atmosphere. Out of various types of perturbations, Earth directed CMEs play the most significant role. They are more frequent and intense during the active (solar maximum) phase of the sun's approximately 11-year cycle. As we are approaching another solar maximum later in 2013, it may be instructive to analyse the effects of the past solar cycles on the orbiting satellites using the archival data of space environment parameters as indicators. In this paper, we compute the plasma drag on a model LEOS due to the atmospheric heating by CMEs and other solar events as a function of the solar parameters. Using the current forecast ...

  5. Inference of Heating Properties from "Hot" Non-flaring Plasmas in Active Region Cores. II. Nanoflare Trains

    CERN Document Server

    Barnes, W T; Bradshaw, S J

    2016-01-01

    Despite its prediction over two decades ago, the detection of faint, high-temperature ("hot") emission due to nanoflare heating in non-flaring active region cores has proved challenging. Using an efficient two-fluid hydrodynamic model, this paper investigates the properties of the emission expected from repeating nanoflares (a nanoflare train) of varying frequency as well as the separate heating of electrons and ions. If the emission measure distribution ($\\mathrm{EM}(T)$) peaks at $T = T_m$, we find that $\\mathrm{EM}(T_m)$ is independent of details of the nanoflare train, and $\\mathrm{EM}(T)$ above and below $T_m$ reflects different aspects of the heating. Below $T_m$ the main influence is the relationship of the waiting time between successive nanoflares to the nanoflare energy. Above $T_m$ power-law nanoflare distributions lead to an extensive plasma population not present in a monoenergetic train. Furthermore, in some cases characteristic features are present in $\\mathrm{EM}(T)$. Such details may be detec...

  6. Manufacturing and High Heat Flux Testing of Brazed Flat-Type W/CuCrZr Plasma Facing Components

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lian, Youyun; Liu, Xiang; Feng, Fan; Chen, Lei; Cheng, Zhengkui; Wang, Jin; Chen, Jiming

    2016-02-01

    Water-cooled flat-type W/CuCrZr plasma facing components with an interlayer of oxygen-free copper (OFC) have been developed by using vacuum brazing route. The OFC layer for the accommodation of thermal stresses was cast onto the surface of W at a temperature range of 1150 °C-1200 °C in a vacuum furnace. The W/OFC cast tiles were vacuum brazed to a CuCrZr heat sink at 940 °C using the silver-free filler material CuMnSiCr. The microstructure, bonding strength, and high heat flux properties of the brazed W/CuCrZr joint samples were investigated. The W/Cu joint exhibits an average tensile strength of 134 MPa, which is about the same strength as pure annealed copper. High heat flux tests were performed in the electron beam facility EMS-60. Experimental results indicated that the brazed W/CuCrZr mock-up experienced screening tests of up to 15 MW/m2 and cyclic tests of 9 MW/m2 for 1000 cycles without visible damage. supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China (No. 11205049) and the National Magnetic Confinement Fusion Science Program of China (No. 2011GB110004)

  7. Plasma levels of heat shock protein 72 (HSP72) and beta-endorphin as indicators of stress, pain and prognosis in horses with colic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niinistö, Kati E; Korolainen, Raija V; Raekallio, Marja R; Mykkänen, Anna K; Koho, Ninna M; Ruohoniemi, Mirja O; Leppäluoto, Juhani; Pösö, A Reeta

    2010-04-01

    A prospective observational study was performed to evaluate whether the plasma concentration of heat shock protein 72 (HSP72) or beta-endorphin is related to clinical signs, blood chemistry, or severity of pain of colic. Seventy-seven horses with colic and 15 clinically healthy controls were studied. The horses were divided into four groups which reflected increasing severity of colic, from normal control horses to horses with mild, moderate and severe colic. Blood samples were collected before any treatment. Packed cell volume (PCV) and plasma HSP72, beta-endorphin, cortisol, adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) and lactate concentrations were measured. Plasma beta-endorphin was related with severity of colic and survival, as well as with plasma cortisol, ACTH and lactate concentrations, heart rate, PCV and pain score. High plasma HSP72 concentration may indicate circulatory deficits, but was not associated with clinical signs of colic. Plasma lactate still seemed to be the most useful single prognostic parameter in horses with colic.

  8. Fast-acting calorimeter measures heat output of plasma gun accelerator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dethlefson, R.; Larson, A. V.; Liebing, L.

    1967-01-01

    Calorimeter measures the exhaust energy from a shot of a pulsed plasma gun accelerator. It has a fast response time and requires only one measurement to determine the total energy. It uses a long ribbon of copper foil wound around a glass frame to form a reentrant cavity.

  9. Evolution of transiently melt damaged tungsten under ITER-relevant divertor plasma heat loading

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bardin, S., E-mail: s.bardin@differ.nl [FOM Institute DIFFER – Dutch Institute For Fundamental Energy Research, Ass EURATOM-FOM, Trilateral Euregio Cluster, Nieuwegein (Netherlands); Morgan, T.W. [FOM Institute DIFFER – Dutch Institute For Fundamental Energy Research, Ass EURATOM-FOM, Trilateral Euregio Cluster, Nieuwegein (Netherlands); Glad, X. [Université de Lorraine, Institut Jean Lamour, Vandoeuvre-les-Nancy (France); Pitts, R.A. [ITER Organization, CS 90 046, 13067 St Paul Lez Durance Cedex (France); De Temmerman, G. [FOM Institute DIFFER – Dutch Institute For Fundamental Energy Research, Ass EURATOM-FOM, Trilateral Euregio Cluster, Nieuwegein (Netherlands); ITER Organization, CS 90 046, 13067 St Paul Lez Durance Cedex (France)

    2015-08-15

    A high-repetition-rate ELM simulation system was used at both the Pilot-PSI and Magnum-PSI linear plasma devices to investigate the nature of W damage under multiple shallow melt events and the subsequent surface evolution under ITER relevant plasma fluence and high ELM number. First, repetitive shallow melting of two W monoblocks separated by a 0.5 mm gap was obtained by combined pulsed/steady-state hydrogen plasma loading at normal incidence in the Pilot-PSI device. Surface modifications including melting, cracking and strong net-reshaping of the surface are obtained. During the second step, the pre-damaged W sample was exposed to a high flux plasma regime in the Magnum-PSI device with a grazing angle of 35°. SEM analysis indicates no measurable change to the surface state after the exposure in Magnum-PSI. An increase in transient-induced temperature rise of 40% is however observed, indicating a degradation of thermal properties over time.

  10. Model of a laser heated plasma interacting with walls arising in laser keyhole welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tix, C.; Simon, G.

    1994-07-01

    In laser welding with laser intensities of approximately 1011 W/m2, a hole, called a keyhole, is formed in the material. In this keyhole a plasma is detected, which is characterized by high pressure as well as being influenced by the boundary of the keyhole. Experimental data on plasma parameters are rare and difficult to obtain [W. Sokolowski, G. Herziger, and E. Beyer, in High Power Lasers and Laser Machining Technology, edited by A. Quenzer, SPIE Proc. Vol. 1132 (SPIE, Bellingham, WA, 1989), pp. 288-295]. In a previous paper [C. Tix and G. Simon, J. Phys. D 26, 2066 (1993)] we considered just a simple plasma model without excited states and with constant ion-neutral-atom temperature. Therefore we neglected radiative transport of excitations and underestimated the ion-neutral-atom temperature and the ionization rate. Here we extend our previous model for a continuous CO2 laser and iron and take into account radiative transfer of excitations and a variable ion-neutral-atom temperature. We consider singly charged ions, electrons, and three excitation states of neutral atoms. The plasma is divided in plasma bulk, presheath, and sheath. The transport equations are solved with boundary conditions mainly determined through the appearance of walls. Some effort is made to clarify the energy transport mechanism from the laser beam into the material. Dependent on the incident laser power, the mean electron temperature and density are obtained to be 1.0-1.3 eV and 2.5×1023-3×1023 m-3. Radiative transport of excitations does not contribute significantly to the energy transport.

  11. Electron heating enhancement due to plasma series resonance in a capacitively coupled RF discharge: Electrical modeling and comparison to experimental measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Minglu; Lu, Yijia; Cheng, Jia; Ji, Linhong

    2016-09-01

    The electron heating enhancement due to the self-excitation of the plasma series resonance in capacitively coupled plasmas is revisited by a combination of an equivalent circuit model and experiments. To improve the model accuracy, measured voltage waveforms at the powered electrode are used instead of prescribing a sinusoidal voltage supply in series with a bias capacitance. The results calculated from the electrical model are consistent with the experimental measurements performed by a Langmuir probe with verification of a microwave interferometer, at pressures of 0.2 and 0.3 Torr. High harmonics occurring in the discharge currents agree with observations in previous research. The nonlinear plasma series resonance effect is found to have a notable contribution to both ohmic and stochastic heating evaluated by the electron heating efficiencies.

  12. Plasma autoantibodies against heat shock protein 70, enolase 1 and ribonuclease/angiogenin inhibitor 1 as potential biomarkers for cholangiocarcinoma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rucksak Rucksaken

    Full Text Available The diagnosis of cholangiocarcinoma (CCA is often challenging, leading to poor prognosis. CCA arises via chronic inflammation which may be associated with autoantibodies production. This study aims to identify IgG antibodies directed at self-proteins and tumor-associated antigens. Proteins derived from immortalized cholangiocyte cell line (MMNK1 and CCA cell lines (M055, M214 and M139 were separated using 2-dimensional electrophoresis and incubated with pooled plasma of patients with CCA and non-neoplastic controls by immunoblotting. Twenty five immunoreactive spots against all cell lines-derived proteins were observed on stained gels and studied by LC-MS/MS. Among these, heat shock protein 70 (HSP70, enolase 1 (ENO1 and ribonuclease/angiogenin inhibitor 1 (RNH1 obtained the highest matching scores and were thus selected for further validation. Western blot revealed immunoreactivity against HSP70 and RNH1 in the majority of CCA cases and weakly in healthy individuals. Further, ELISA showed that plasma HSP70 autoantibody level in CCA was significantly capable to discriminate CCA from healthy individuals with an area under the receiver operating characteristic curve of 0.9158 (cut-off 0.2630, 93.55% sensitivity and 73.91% specificity. Plasma levels of IgG autoantibodies against HSP70 were correlated with progression from healthy individuals to cholangitis to CCA (r = 0.679, P<0.001. In addition, circulating ENO1 and RNH1 autoantibodies levels were also significantly higher in cholangitis and CCA compared to healthy controls (P<0.05. Moreover, the combinations of HSP70, ENO1 or RNH1 autoantibodies positivity rates improved specificity to over 78%. In conclusion, plasma IgG autoantibodies against HSP70, ENO1 and RNH1 may represent new diagnostic markers for CCA.

  13. Plasma Autoantibodies against Heat Shock Protein 70, Enolase 1 and Ribonuclease/Angiogenin Inhibitor 1 as Potential Biomarkers for Cholangiocarcinoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rucksaken, Rucksak; Pairojkul, Chawalit; Pinlaor, Porntip; Khuntikeo, Narong; Roytrakul, Sittiruk; Selmi, Carlo; Pinlaor, Somchai

    2014-01-01

    The diagnosis of cholangiocarcinoma (CCA) is often challenging, leading to poor prognosis. CCA arises via chronic inflammation which may be associated with autoantibodies production. This study aims to identify IgG antibodies directed at self-proteins and tumor-associated antigens. Proteins derived from immortalized cholangiocyte cell line (MMNK1) and CCA cell lines (M055, M214 and M139) were separated using 2-dimensional electrophoresis and incubated with pooled plasma of patients with CCA and non-neoplastic controls by immunoblotting. Twenty five immunoreactive spots against all cell lines-derived proteins were observed on stained gels and studied by LC-MS/MS. Among these, heat shock protein 70 (HSP70), enolase 1 (ENO1) and ribonuclease/angiogenin inhibitor 1 (RNH1) obtained the highest matching scores and were thus selected for further validation. Western blot revealed immunoreactivity against HSP70 and RNH1 in the majority of CCA cases and weakly in healthy individuals. Further, ELISA showed that plasma HSP70 autoantibody level in CCA was significantly capable to discriminate CCA from healthy individuals with an area under the receiver operating characteristic curve of 0.9158 (cut-off 0.2630, 93.55% sensitivity and 73.91% specificity). Plasma levels of IgG autoantibodies against HSP70 were correlated with progression from healthy individuals to cholangitis to CCA (r = 0.679, P<0.001). In addition, circulating ENO1 and RNH1 autoantibodies levels were also significantly higher in cholangitis and CCA compared to healthy controls (P<0.05). Moreover, the combinations of HSP70, ENO1 or RNH1 autoantibodies positivity rates improved specificity to over 78%. In conclusion, plasma IgG autoantibodies against HSP70, ENO1 and RNH1 may represent new diagnostic markers for CCA. PMID:25058392

  14. Edge Recycling and Heat Fluxes in L- and H-mode NSTX Plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    V.A. Soukhanovskii; R. Maingi; R. Raman; H. Kugel; B. LeBlanc; A.L. Roquemore; C.J. Lasnier; the NSTX Research Team

    2003-08-05

    Introduction Edge characterization experiments have been conducted in NSTX to provide an initial survey of the edge particle and heat fluxes and their scaling with input power and electron density. The experiments also provided a database of conditions for the analyses of the NSTX global particle sources, core fueling, and divertor operating regimes.

  15. Responses of Plasma Atrial Natriuretic Peptide to High Intensity Submaximal Exercise in the Heat,

    Science.gov (United States)

    1987-06-01

    Natriuretic Peptide to LnHigh Intensity Submaximal Exercise in the Heat 0 " William J. Kraemer. Lawrence E. Armstrong, Roger W. Hubbard. :I[_] Louis J...atriopeptins in rat adrenal cells. Cir Res 57: 113-118. f V-0C -- V- - IF -I 7 - % 7 -. 17 Chartier L. Schiffrin EL. Thibault G (1984). Effects of atrial

  16. Characteristics of heat-annealed silicon homojunction infrared photodetector fabricated by plasma-assisted technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammadi, Oday A.

    2016-09-01

    In this work, the effect of thermal annealing on the characteristics of silicon homojunction photodetector was studied. This homojunction photodetector was fabricated by means of plasma-induced etching of p-type silicon substrate and plasma sputtering of n-type silicon target in vacuum. The electrical and spectral characteristics of this photodetector were determined and optimized before and after the annealing process. The maximum surface reflectance of 1.89% and 1.81%, the maximum responsivity of 0.495 A/W and 0.55 A/W, the ideality factor of 1.80 and 1.99, the maximum external quantum efficiency of 76% and 83.5%, and the built-in potential of 0.79 V and 0.72 V were obtained before and after annealing, respectively.

  17. Modification of atomic physics rates due to nonlocal electron parallel heat transport in divertor plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Allais, F. [INRS-Energie, Materiaux et Telecommunications, 1650 boul. Lionel Boulet, Varennes, Quebec, J3X 1S2 (Canada); Matte, J.P. [INRS-Energie, Materiaux et Telecommunications, 1650 boul. Lionel Boulet, Varennes, Quebec, J3X 1S2 (Canada)]. E-mail: matte@inrs-emt.uquebec.ca; Alouani-Bibi, F. [INRS-Energie, Materiaux et Telecommunications, 1650 boul. Lionel Boulet, Varennes, Quebec, J3X 1S2 (Canada); Kim, C.G. [INRS-Energie, Materiaux et Telecommunications, 1650 boul. Lionel Boulet, Varennes, Quebec, J3X 1S2 (Canada); Stotler, D.P. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton, NJ (United States); Rognlien, T.D. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, CA (United States)

    2005-03-01

    The effect of steep temperature gradients on the rate of ionization of atomic hydrogen is studied numerically with the electron kinetic code 'FPI' [Phys. Rev. Lett. 72 (1994) 1208]. A set of cross sections ['Atomic and Plasma-Material Interaction data for fusion'. Supplement to the journal Nucl. Fusion 4 (1993)] has been used which gives the same rates of radiation, ionization and recombination as in the well known edge modeling codes 'UEDGE' and 'DEGAS' for Maxwellian electron energy distribution functions. For this purpose, 30 energy levels are included in the computation, as stepwise ionization is dominant. The enhancement of the ionization rate by non-Maxwellian effects in the colder part of the plasma is significant.

  18. Plasma Wave Turbulence and Particle Heating Caused by Electron Beams, Radiation and Pinches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1979-11-01

    2 %4% , "a - II" 1000 I I- z C*1 S500 IH : (,) 1 0 as I. t\\./I’\\ ~ V i ,’i Initial Tema . O 5 10 15 20 RADIUS (cm) FIGURE 14 I. (a) Parallel current...de compression en pinch quand la fr~quence du plasma a,,, > coftV, l’absorp- tion du taisceau cit beaucoup plus importante que colic pr~vue en

  19. Limb-darkening opacity experiment using a laser-heated plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoffman, N.M.; Miller, L.W.; Mack, J.M.

    1978-10-01

    The limb-darkening technique, a method for measuring monochromatic opacity information, which has had successful astrophysical applications, is reviewed. The application of the technique to laser-produced plasmas in materials and regimes of temperature and density of interest to weapons designers is discussed, and the magnitude of the limb-darkening effect in such situations is estimated. Finally, an experimental study, now in progress, to evaluate the feasibility of this approach is described. 10 figures.

  20. Nature of turbulence, dissipation, and heating in space plasmas: From Alfvén waves to kinetic Alfvén waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, D. J.; Feng, H. Q.; Li, B.; He, J. S.

    2016-08-01

    The nature of turbulence, dissipation, and heating in plasma media has been an attractive and challenge problem in space physics as well as in basic plasma physics. A wide continuous spectrum of Alfvénic turbulence from large MHD-scale Alfvén waves (AWs) in the inertial turbulence regime to small kinetic-scale kinetic AWs (KAWs) in the dissipation turbulence regime is a typical paradigm of plasma turbulence. The incorporation of current remote observations of AWs in the solar atmosphere, in situ satellite measurements of Alfvénic turbulence in the solar wind, and experimental investigations of KAWs on large plasma devices in laboratory provides a chance synthetically to study the physics nature of plasma turbulence, dissipation, and heating. A session entitled "Nature of Turbulence, Dissipation, and Heating in Space Plasmas: From Alfvén Waves to Kinetic Alfvén Waves" was held as a part of the twelfth Asia Oceania Geosciences Society Annual Meeting, which took place in Singapore between 2 and 7 August 2015. This special section is organized based on the session.

  1. Two frequency ICRF heating of D-T plasmas on TFTR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rogers, J.H.; Majeski, R.; Wilson, J.R.; Hosea, J.C.; Schilling, G.; Stevens, J. [Princeton Univ., NJ (United States). Plasma Physics Lab.; Ho, Y.L. [Science Applications International Corp., San Diego, CA (United States); Raman, S. [Michigan Univ., Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Rasmussen, D.A. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1993-11-01

    Modifications have been made to allow two of the ICRF antennas (bays L and M) on TFTR to operate at either of two frequencies, 43 MHz or 64 MHz. This was accomplished by lengthening the resonant loops feeding the antennas (2{lambda} at 43 MHz, 3{lambda} at 64 MHz) and replacing the conventional quarter wave impedance transformers with a tapered impedance design. The other two antennas (bays K and N) will operate at a fixed frequency, 43 MHz. The two frequency operation allows a combination of {sup 3}He-minority (or T second harmonic) and H-minority heating at full toroidal field on TFIR. Multiple frequency operation may also be useful in direct electron heating and current drive experiments. Other modifications have been made which are expected to permit arbitrary phasing between the current straps on bays M and L. The system design of the antenna, resonant loops and impedance matching system as well as preliminary TFTR results are discussed.

  2. Electron heating in subpicosecond laser interaction with overdense and near-critical plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cialfi, L.; Fedeli, L.; Passoni, M.

    2016-11-01

    In this work we investigate electron heating induced by intense laser interaction with micrometric flat solid foils in the context of laser-driven ion acceleration. We propose a simple law to predict the electron temperature in a wider range of laser parameters with respect to commonly used existing models. An extensive two-dimensional (2D) and 3D numerical campaign shows that electron heating is due to the combined actions of j ×B and Brunel effect. Electron temperature can be well described with a simple function of pulse intensity and angle of incidence, with parameters dependent on pulse polarization. We then combine our model for the electron temperature with an existing model for laser-ion acceleration, using recent experimental results as a benchmark. We also discuss an exploratory attempt to model electron temperature for multilayered foam-attached targets, which have been proven recently to be an attractive target concept for laser-driven ion acceleration.

  3. Ionospheric plasma disturbances generated by naturally occurring large-scale anomalous heat sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pradipta, Rezy; Lee, Min-Chang; Coster, Anthea J.; Tepley, Craig A.; Sulzer, Michael P.; Gonzalez, Sixto A.

    2017-04-01

    We report the findings from our investigation on the possibility of large-scale anomalous thermal gradients to generate acoustic-gravity waves (AGWs) and traveling ionospheric disturbances (TIDs). In particular, here we consider the case of summer 2006 North American heat wave event as a concrete example of such large-scale natural thermal gradients. This special scenario of AGW/TID generation was formulated based on the results of our experiments at the Arecibo Observatory in July 2006, followed by a systematic monitoring/surveillance of total electron content (TEC) fluctuations over North America in 2005-2007 using the MIT Haystack Observatory's Madrigal database. The data from our Arecibo experiments indicate a continual occurrence of intense AGW/TID over the Caribbean on 21-24 July 2006, and the Madrigal TEC data analysis shows that the overall level of TID activity over North America had increased by ∼0.2 TECU during the summer 2006 heat wave event. Our proposed scenario is in agreement with these empirical observations, and is generally consistent with a number of past ionospheric HF heating experiments related to AGW/TID generation.

  4. Electron heating during E-H transition in inductively coupled RF plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wegner, Th; Küllig, C.; Meichsner, J.

    2015-08-01

    A planar inductively coupled RF discharge (13.56 MHz) in argon and oxygen was exemplarily studied using space and phase resolved optical emission spectroscopy. The characteristic excitation rate pattern due to the electron heating during the sheath expansion was found for both gases in the E-mode. Furthermore, an intensive pattern in oxygen appears during the sheath collapse. This is associated with the electron heating caused by electric field reversal due to the strong electronegativity. The transition from the E- to the H-mode may be stepwise or continuous, depending on the gas type and total gas pressure. In the H-mode, significant differences in the excitation rate patterns exist. A broad and weakly modulated pattern is found over the RF cycle in argon, whereas in oxygen two separated patterns appear representing the electron heating for each half cycle. The reason may be the different excitation processes of the investigated resonant states and the influence of metastable argon atoms as well as attachment/detachment processes and dissociative recombination in oxygen. The E-H transition in oxygen at 5 Pa develops continuously and was studied in detail through the excitation rate. During the transition, the E- and H-mode are present and a hybrid mode was observed.

  5. Finite Volume schemes on unstructured grids for non-local models: Application to the simulation of heat transport in plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goudon, Thierry, E-mail: thierry.goudon@inria.fr [Team COFFEE, INRIA Sophia Antipolis Mediterranee (France); Labo. J.A. Dieudonne CNRS and Univ. Nice-Sophia Antipolis (UMR 7351), Parc Valrose, 06108 Nice cedex 02 (France); Parisot, Martin, E-mail: martin.parisot@gmail.com [Project-Team SIMPAF, INRIA Lille Nord Europe, Park Plazza, 40 avenue Halley, F-59650 Villeneuve d' Ascq cedex (France)

    2012-10-15

    In the so-called Spitzer-Haerm regime, equations of plasma physics reduce to a nonlinear parabolic equation for the electronic temperature. Coming back to the derivation of this limiting equation through hydrodynamic regime arguments, one is led to construct a hierarchy of models where the heat fluxes are defined through a non-local relation which can be reinterpreted as well by introducing coupled diffusion equations. We address the question of designing numerical methods to simulate these equations. The basic requirement for the scheme is to be asymptotically consistent with the Spitzer-Haerm regime. Furthermore, the constraints of physically realistic simulations make the use of unstructured meshes unavoidable. We develop a Finite Volume scheme, based on Vertex-Based discretization, which reaches these objectives. We discuss on numerical grounds the efficiency of the method, and the ability of the generalized models in capturing relevant phenomena missed by the asymptotic problem.

  6. Induced emission of Alfvén waves in inhomogeneous streaming plasma: implications for solar corona heating and solar wind acceleration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galinsky, V L; Shevchenko, V I

    2013-07-05

    The results of a self-consistent kinetic model of heating the solar corona and accelerating the fast solar wind are presented for plasma flowing in a nonuniform magnetic field configuration of near-Sun conditions. The model is based on a scale separation between the large transit or inhomogeneity scales and the small dissipation scales. The macroscale instability of the marginally stable particle distribution function compliments the resonant frequency sweeping dissipation of transient Alfvén waves by their induced emission in inhomogeneous streaming plasma that provides enough energy for keeping the plasma temperature decaying not faster than r(-1) in close agreement with in situ heliospheric observations.

  7. L- and M-shell absorption measurements of radiatively heated Fe plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang Jiyan; Li Hang; Zhao Yang; Xiong Gang; Yuan Zheng; Zhang Haiying; Yang Guohong; Yang Jiamin; Liu Shenye; Jiang Shaoen; Ding Yongkun; Zhang Baohan; Zheng Zhijian [Research Center of Laser Fusion, P. O. Box 919-986, Mianyang 621900 (China); Xu Yan; Meng Xujun; Yan Jun [Institute of Applied Physics and Computational Mathematics, Beijing 100088 (China)

    2012-11-15

    Measurements of iron-plasma absorption spectrum over 150-1200 eV photon energy range were reported at temperature T = (72 {+-} 4) eV. The electron temperature was diagnosed with the absorption spectrum of aluminum mixed with iron. The density was not diagnosed directly but obtained from a radiative hydrodynamic simulation with the Multi-1D code. The broad photon energy range enables simultaneous observation of the L-shell and M-shell transitions that dominate the radiation transport at this temperature. The spectrally resolved transmission data were compared to the detailed-configuration-accounting model calculations and reasonable agreement was found.

  8. Studies of Plasma Instability Process Excited by Ground Based High Power HF (Heating) Facilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-11-02

    the altitude z = 285 km. Night time plasma line intensities were observed to be enhanced by a factor 10 ÷ 100 extended to altitude below 250 km. When HF...waves, whose wave vector is directed toward the radar, and the phase velocity vph is equal to the velocity of suprathermal electrons v vph =(1/2) λr...averaged and in final form depends on two scalar factors only: full power density P absorbed by fast electrons in the acceleration layer, and characteristic

  9. Responses of plasma glucose metabolism to exogenous insulin infusion in sheep-fed forage herb plantain and exposed to heat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Mamun, M; Shibuya, K; Kajita, M; Tamura, Y; Sano, H

    2017-01-16

    The use of herbal plants as traditional medicines has a century long history. Plantain (Plantago lanceolata L.) is a perennial herb containing bioactive components with free radical scavenging activities. An isotope dilution technique using [U-13C]glucose was conducted to determine the effect of plantain on the responses of plasma glucose metabolism to exogenous insulin infusion in sheep. Six crossbred sheep (three wethers and three ewes; mean initial BW=40±2 kg) were fed either a mixed hay of orchardgrass (Dactylis glomerata) and reed canarygrass (Phalaris arundinacea) (MH-diet) or mixed hay and fresh plantain (1 : 1 ratio, dry matter basis, PL-diet) and exposed to a thermoneutral (TN, 20°C; 70% relative humidity (RH)) environment or a heat exposure (HE, 30°C; 70% RH) for 5 days using a crossover design for two 23-day periods. The isotope dilution was conducted on days 18 and 23 of the experimental period during TN and HE, respectively. Plasma concentration of α-tocopherol was greater (Pinfusion.

  10. Possible evidence for partial demagnetization of electrons in the auroral E-region plasma during electron gas heating

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Haldoupis

    Full Text Available A previous study, based on incoherent and coherent radar measurements, suggested that during auroral E-region electron heating conditions, the electron flow in the auroral electrojet undergoes a systematic counterclockwise rotation of several degrees relative to the E×B direction. The observational evidence is re-examined here in the light of theoretical predictions concerning E-region electron demagnetization caused by enhanced anomalous cross-field diffusion during strongly-driven Farley-Buneman instability. It is shown that the observations are in good agreement with this theory. This apparently endorses the concept of wave-induced diffusion and anomalous electron collision frequency, and consequently electron demagnetization, under circumstances of strong heating of the electron gas in the auroral electrojet plasma. We recognize, however, that the evidence for electron demagnetization presented in this report cannot be regarded as definitive because it is based on a limited set of data. More experimental research in this direction is thus needed.

  11. Characterization and Wear Behavior of Heat-treated Ni3Al Coatings Deposited by Air Plasma Spraying

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehmood, K.; Rafiq, M. A.; Nusair Khan, A.; Ahmed, F.; Mudassar Rauf, M.

    2016-07-01

    Air plasma spraying was utilized to deposit Ni3Al coatings on AISI-321 steel substrate. The deposited coatings were isothermally heat-treated at various temperatures from 500 to 800 °C for 10, 30, 60, and 100 h. The x-ray diffraction analysis revealed NiO formation in Ni3Al at 500 °C after 100 h, and the percentage of NiO increased with increasing exposure time and temperature. The hardness of the coating increased with the formation of NiO. The DSC test showed the formation of minor phases, Al3Ni and Al3Ni2, within the coating along with the major phase Ni3Al. TGA revealed a slowing down of the oxidation rate upon surface oxide formation. The pin-on-disk wear test on the as-sprayed and heat-treated coatings showed that wear rate and coefficient of friction decreased with an increase in the NiO phase content.

  12. The speed of sound and specific heat in the QCD plasma: hydrodynamics, fluctuations and conformal symmetry

    CERN Document Server

    Gavai, R V; Mukherjee, S; Gavai, Rajiv V.; Gupta, Sourendu; Mukherjee, Swagato

    2004-01-01

    We report the continuum limits of the speed of sound, c_s, and the specific heat at constant volume, c_v, in quenched QCD at temperatures of 2Tc and 3Tc. At these temperatures, c_s is within 2-sigma of the ideal gas value, whereas c_v differs significantly from the ideal gas. However, both are compatible with results expected in a theory with conformal symmetry. We investigate effective measures of conformal symmetry in the high temperature phase of QCD.

  13. Natural gas pyrolysis in double-walled reactor tubes using thermal plasma or concentrated solar radiation as external heating source

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Stèphane Abanades; Stefania Tescari; Sylvain Rodat; Gilles Flamant

    2009-01-01

    The thermal pyrolysis of natural gas as a clean hydrogen production route is examined.The concept of a double-walled reactor tube is proposed and implemented.Preliminary experiments using an external plasma heating source are carded out to validate this concept.The results point out the efficient CH4 dissociation above 1850 K (CH4 conversion over 90%) and the key influence of the gas residence time.Simulations are performed to predict the conversion rate of CH4 at the reactor outlet,and are consistent with experimental tendencies.A solar reactor prototype featuring four independent double-walled tubes is then developed.The heat in high temperature process required for the endothermic reaction of natural gas pyrolysis is supplied by concentrated solar energy.The tubes are heated uniformly by radiation using the blackbody effect of a cavity-receiver absorbing the concentrated solar irradiation through a quartz window.The gas composition at the reactor outlet,the chemical conversion of CH4,and the yield to H2 are determined with respect to reaction temperature,inlet gas flow-rates,and feed gas composition.The longer the gas residence time,the higher the CH4 conversion and H2 yield,whereas the lower the amount of acetylene.A CH4 conversion of 99% and H2 yield of about 85% are measured at 1880 K with 30% CH4 in the feed gas (6 L/min injected and residence time of 18 ms).A temperature increase from 1870 K to 1970 K does not improve the H2 yield.

  14. Study of Divertor Heat Patterns Induced by LHCD L-Mode Plasmas Using an Infra-Red Camera System on EAST

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Bin; Gan, Kaifu; Gong, Xianzu; Zhang, Xiaodong; Wang, Fumin; Yang, Zhendong; Chen, Meiwen; Wang, Xiaoqiong

    2015-10-01

    Divertor heat patterns induced by Lower Hybrid Current Drive (LHCD) L-mode plasmas are investigated using an infra-red (IR) camera system on an Experimental Advanced Superconducting Tokamak (EAST). A two-dimensional finite element analysis code DFlux is used to compute heat flux along the poloidal divertor target and corresponding quantities. Outside the Origin Strike Zone (OSZ), a Second Peak Heat Flux (SPHF) zone, where the heat flux is even stronger than that at the OSZ, appears on the lower-outer (LO) divertor plates with LHCD and disappears immediately after switching off the LHCD. The main heat-flux shifts from the SPHF zone towards the OSZ when the divertor configuration converts from double null to lower single null, indicating that the growth of the SPHF zone is apparently affected by a plasma magnetic configuration. The heat patterns on the LO divertor plates are observed to be different from that on the lower-inner (LI) targets as the SPHF zone appears only on the LO divertor target. It is also found that the heat flux at the SPHF zone was obviously enhanced after the Supersonic Molecule Beam Injection (SMBI) pulse. supported by the National Magnetic Confinement Fusion Science Program of China (Nos. 2014GB101001 and 2014GB101002)

  15. High-volume plasma exchange in a patient with acute liver failure due to non-exertional heat stroke in a sauna.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Kuan-Jung; Chen, Tso-Hsiao; Sue, Yuh-Mou; Chen, Tzay-Jinn; Cheng, Chung-Yi

    2014-10-01

    Heat stroke is a life-threatening condition characterized by an increased core body temperature (over 40°C) and a systemic inflammatory response, which may lead to a syndrome of multiple organ dysfunction. Heat stroke may be due to either strenuous exercise or non-exercise-induced exposure to a high environmental temperature. Current management of heat stroke is mostly supportive, with an emphasis on cooling the core body temperature and preventing the development of multiple organ dysfunction. Prognosis of heat stroke depends on the severity of organ involvement. Here, we report a rare case of non-exercise-induced heat stroke in a 73-year-old male patient who was suffering from acute liver failure after prolonged exposure in a hot sauna room. We successfully managed this patient by administering high-volume plasma exchange, and the patient recovered completely after treatment.

  16. Self-organized helical equilibria as a new paradigm for ohmically heated fusion plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorenzini, R.; Martines, E.; Piovesan, P.; Terranova, D.; Zanca, P.; Zuin, M.; Alfier, A.; Bonfiglio, D.; Bonomo, F.; Canton, A.; Cappello, S.; Carraro, L.; Cavazzana, R.; Escande, D. F.; Fassina, A.; Franz, P.; Gobbin, M.; Innocente, P.; Marrelli, L.; Pasqualotto, R.; Puiatti, M. E.; Spolaore, M.; Valisa, M.; Vianello, N.; Martin, P.; Martin, P.; Apolloni, L.; Puiatti, M. E.; Adamek, J.; Agostini, M.; Alfier, A.; Annibaldi, S. V.; Antoni, V.; Auriemma, F.; Barana, O.; Baruzzo, M.; Bettini, P.; Bolzonella, T.; Bonfiglio, D.; Bonomo, F.; Brombin, M.; Brotankova, J.; Buffa, A.; Buratti, P.; Canton, A.; Cappello, S.; Carraro, L.; Cavazzana, R.; Cavinato, M.; Chapman, B. E.; Chitarin, G.; Dal Bello, S.; de Lorenzi, A.; de Masi, G.; Escande, D. F.; Fassina, A.; Ferro, A.; Franz, P.; Gaio, E.; Gazza, E.; Giudicotti, L.; Gnesotto, F.; Gobbin, M.; Grando, L.; Guazzotto, L.; Guo, S. C.; Igochine, V.; Innocente, P.; Liu, Y. Q.; Lorenzini, R.; Luchetta, A.; Manduchi, G.; Marchiori, G.; Marcuzzi, D.; Marrelli, L.; Martini, S.; Martines, E.; McCollam, K.; Milani, F.; Moresco, M.; Novello, L.; Ortolani, S.; Paccagnella, R.; Pasqualotto, R.; Peruzzo, S.; Piovan, R.; Piovesan, P.; Piron, L.; Pizzimenti, A.; Pomaro, N.; Predebon, I.; Reusch, J. A.; Rostagni, G.; Rubinacci, G.; Sarff, J. S.; Sattin, F.; Scarin, P.; Serianni, G.; Sonato, P.; Spada, E.; Soppelsa, A.; Spagnolo, S.; Spolaore, M.; Spizzo, G.; Taliercio, C.; Terranova, D.; Toigo, V.; Valisa, M.; Vianello, N.; Villone, F.; White, R. B.; Yadikin, D.; Zaccaria, P.; Zamengo, A.; Zanca, P.; Zaniol, B.; Zanotto, L.; Zilli, E.; Zohm, H.; Zuin, M.

    2009-08-01

    In the quest for new energy sources, the research on controlled thermonuclear fusion has been boosted by the start of the construction phase of the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER). ITER is based on the tokamak magnetic configuration, which is the best performing one in terms of energy confinement. Alternative concepts are however actively researched, which in the long term could be considered for a second generation of reactors. Here, we show results concerning one of these configurations, the reversed-field pinch (RFP). By increasing the plasma current, a spontaneous transition to a helical equilibrium occurs, with a change of magnetic topology. Partially conserved magnetic flux surfaces emerge within residual magnetic chaos, resulting in the onset of a transport barrier. This is a structural change and sheds new light on the potential of the RFP as the basis for a low-magnetic-field ohmic fusion reactor.

  17. Comparison of Two Models for Radiative Heat Transfer in High Temperature Thermal Plasmas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthieu Melot

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Numerical simulation of the arc-flow interaction in high-voltage circuit breakers requires a radiation model capable of handling high-temperature participating thermal plasmas. The modeling of the radiative transfer plays a critical role in the overall accuracy of such CFD simulations. As a result of the increase of computational power, CPU intensive methods based on the radiative transfer equation, leading to more accurate results, are now becoming attractive alternatives to current approximate models. In this paper, the predictive capabilities of the finite volume method (RTE-FVM and the P1 model are investigated. A systematic comparison between these two models and analytical solutions are presented for a variety of relevant test cases. Two implementations of each approach are compared, and a critical evaluation is presented.

  18. An Impurity Emission Survey in the near UV and Visible Spectral Ranges of Electron Cyclotron Heated (ECH) Plasma in the TJ-II Stellarator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McCarthy, K. J.; Zurro, B.; Baciero, A.

    2001-07-01

    We report on a near-ultraviolet and visible spectroscopic survey (220-600 nm) of electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) heated plasmas created in the TJ-II stellarator, with central electron temperatures up to 2 keV and central electron densities up to 1.7 x 10 ''19 m''-3. Approximately 1200 lines from thirteen elements have been identified. The purpose of the work is to identify the principal impurities and spectral lines present in TJ-II plasmas, as well as their possible origin to search for transitions from highly ionised ions. This work will act as a base for identifying suitable transitions for following the evolution of impurities under different operating regimens and multiplet systems for line polarisation studies. It is intended to use the database creates as a spectral line reference for comparing spectra under different operating and plasma heating regimes. (Author)

  19. Characteristics of edge pedestals in LHW and NBI heated H-mode plasmas on EAST

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zang, Q.; Wang, T.; Liang, Y.; Sun, Y.; Chen, H.; Xiao, S.; Han, X.; Hu, A.; Hsieh, C.; Zhou, H.; Zhao, J.; Zhang, T.; Gong, X.; Hu, L.; Liu, F.; Hu, C.; Gao, X.; Wan, B.; the EAST Team

    2016-10-01

    By using the recently developed Thomson scattering diagnostic, the pedestal structure of the H-mode with neutral beam injection (NBI) or/and lower hybrid wave (LHW) heating on EAST (Experimental Advanced Superconducting Tokamak) is analyzed in detail. We find that a higher ratio of the power of the NBI to the total power of the NBI and the lower hybrid wave (LHW) will produce a large and regular different edge-localized mode (ELM), and a lower ratio will produce a small and irregular ELM. The experiments show that the mean pedestal width has good correlation with β \\text{p,\\text{ped}}0.5 , The pedestal width appears to be wider than that on other similar machines, which could be due to lithium coating. However, it is difficult to draw any conclusion of correlation between ρ * and the pedestal width for limited ρ * variation and scattered distribution. It is also found that T e/\

  20. Transport of radial heat flux and second sound in fusion plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gürcan, Ö. D.; Diamond, P. H.; Garbet, X.; Berionni, V.; Dif-Pradalier, G.; Hennequin, P.; Morel, P.; Kosuga, Y.; Vermare, L.

    2013-02-01

    Simple flux-gradient relations that involve time delay and radial coupling are discussed. Such a formulation leads to a rather simple description of avalanches and may explain breaking of gyroBohm transport scaling. The generalization of the flux-gradient relation (i.e., constitutive relation), which involve both time delay and spatial coupling, is derived from drift-kinetic equation, leading to kinetic definitions of constitutive elements such as the flux of radial heat flux. This allows numerical simulations to compute these cubic quantities directly. The formulation introduced here can be viewed as an extension of turbulence spreading to include the effect of spreading of cross-phase as well as turbulence intensity, combined in such a way to give the flux. The link between turbulence spreading and entropy production is highlighted. An extension of this formulation to general quasi-linear theory for the distribution function in the phase space of radial position and parallel velocity is also discussed.

  1. Transport of radial heat flux and second sound in fusion plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guercan, Oe. D.; Berionni, V.; Hennequin, P.; Morel, P.; Vermare, L. [Laboratoire de Physique des Plasmas, Ecole Polytechnique, CNRS, 91128 Palaiseau Cedex (France); Diamond, P. H. [WCI Center for Fusion Theory, NFRI, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); CMTFO and CASS, UCSD, California 92093 (United States); Garbet, X.; Dif-Pradalier, G. [CEA, IRFM, F-13108 Saint Paul Lez Durance (France); Kosuga, Y. [WCI Center for Fusion Theory, NFRI, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-02-15

    Simple flux-gradient relations that involve time delay and radial coupling are discussed. Such a formulation leads to a rather simple description of avalanches and may explain breaking of gyroBohm transport scaling. The generalization of the flux-gradient relation (i.e., constitutive relation), which involve both time delay and spatial coupling, is derived from drift-kinetic equation, leading to kinetic definitions of constitutive elements such as the flux of radial heat flux. This allows numerical simulations to compute these cubic quantities directly. The formulation introduced here can be viewed as an extension of turbulence spreading to include the effect of spreading of cross-phase as well as turbulence intensity, combined in such a way to give the flux. The link between turbulence spreading and entropy production is highlighted. An extension of this formulation to general quasi-linear theory for the distribution function in the phase space of radial position and parallel velocity is also discussed.

  2. Quasilinear diffusion coefficients in a finite Larmor radius expansion for ion cyclotron heated plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jungpyo; Wright, John; Bertelli, Nicola; Jaeger, Erwin F.; Valeo, Ernest; Harvey, Robert; Bonoli, Paul

    2017-05-01

    In this paper, a reduced model of quasilinear velocity diffusion by a small Larmor radius approximation is derived to couple the Maxwell's equations and the Fokker Planck equation self-consistently for the ion cyclotron range of frequency waves in a tokamak. The reduced model ensures the important properties of the full model by Kennel-Engelmann diffusion, such as diffusion directions, wave polarizations, and H-theorem. The kinetic energy change ( W ˙ ) is used to derive the reduced model diffusion coefficients for the fundamental damping (n = 1) and the second harmonic damping (n = 2) to the lowest order of the finite Larmor radius expansion. The quasilinear diffusion coefficients are implemented in a coupled code (TORIC-CQL3D) with the equivalent reduced model of the dielectric tensor. We also present the simulations of the ITER minority heating scenario, in which the reduced model is verified within the allowable errors from the full model results.

  3. Current scaling and plasma heating in relativistic laser-solid interaction

    CERN Document Server

    Kluge, Thomas; Huang, Lingen; Metzkes, Josefine; Cowan, Thomas E; Schramm, Ulrich

    2015-01-01

    Intense and energetic electron currents can be generated by ultra-intense lasers interacting with solid density targets. Especially for ultra-short laser pulses their temporal evolution needs to be taken into account for many non-linear processes as instantaneous currents may differ significantly from the average. Hence, a dynamic model including the temporal variation of the electron currents which goes beyond a simple bunching with twice the laser frequency but otherwise constant current is needed. Here we present a new time-dependent model to describe the laser generated currents and obtain simple expressions for the temporal evolution and resulting corrections of averages. To exemplify the model and its predictive capabilities we show the impact of temporal evolution, spectral distribution and spatial modulations on Ohmic heating of the bulk target material.

  4. Theory and experiments on RF plasma heating, current drive and profile control in TORE SUPRA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moreau, D.

    1994-01-01

    This paper reviews the main experimental and theoretical achievements related to the study of RF heating and non-inductive current drive and particularly phenomena related to the current density profile control and the potentiality of producing stationary enhanced performance regimes: description of the Lower Hybrid (LH) and Ion Cyclotron Resonant Frequency (ICRF) systems; long pulse coupling performance of the RF systems; observation of the transition to the so-called ``stationary LHEP regime`` in which the (flat) central current density and (peaked) electron temperature profiles are fully decoupled; experiments on ICRF sawtooth stabilization with the combined effect of LHCD modifying the current density profile; diffusion of fast electrons generated by LH waves; ramp-up experiments in which the LH power provided a significant part of the resistive poloidal flux and flux consumption scaling; theory of spectral wave diffusion and multipass absorption; fast wave current drive modelling with the Alcyon full wave code; a reflector LH antenna concept. 18 figs., 48 refs.

  5. Effect of impurities on the transition concentration of helium-3 ions in (3He)-H tokamak plasmas heated with ICRH

    CERN Document Server

    Kazakov, Ye O; Van Eester, D

    2013-01-01

    Hydrogen majority plasmas will be used in the initial non-activated phase of ITER operation. Optimizing ion cyclotron resonance heating (ICRH) in such scenarios will help in achieving H-mode in these plasmas. Past JET experiments with the carbon wall revealed a significant impact of intrinsic impurities on the ICRH performance in (3He)-H plasmas. High plasma contamination with carbon impurities resulted in the appearance of a supplementary mode conversion layer and significant reduction in the transition concentration of 3He minority ions, defined as the concentration at which the change from minority heating to mode conversion regime occurs. In view of the installation of the new ITER-like wall at JET, it is important to evaluate the effect of Be and W impurities on ICRH scenarios in (3He)-H plasmas. In this paper, an approximate analytical expression for the transition concentration of 3He minority ions is derived as a function of plasma and ICRH parameters, and accounting for typical impurity species at JE...

  6. Predictions on heat transport and plasma rotation from global gyrokinetic simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarazin, Y.; Grandgirard, V.; Abiteboul, J.; Allfrey, S.; Garbet, X.; Ghendrih, Ph.; Latu, G.; Strugarek, A.; Dif-Pradalier, G.; Diamond, P. H.; Ku, S.; Chang, C. S.; McMillan, B. F.; Tran, T. M.; Villard, L.; Jolliet, S.; Bottino, A.; Angelino, P.

    2011-10-01

    Flux-driven global gyrokinetic codes are now mature enough to make predictions in terms of turbulence and transport in tokamak plasmas. Some of the recent breakthroughs of three such codes, namely GYSELA, ORB5 and XGC1, are reported and compared wherever appropriate. In all three codes, turbulent transport appears to be mediated by avalanche-like events, for a broad range of ρ* = ρi/a values, ratio of the gyro-radius over the minor radius. Still, the radial correlation length scales with ρi, leading to the gyro-Bohm scaling of the effective transport coefficient below ρ* ≈ 1/300. The possible explanation could be due to the fact that avalanches remain meso-scale due to the interaction with zonal flows, whose characteristic radial wavelength appears to be almost independent of the system size. As a result of the radial corrugation of the turbulence driven zonal and mean flows, the shear of the radial electric field can be significantly underestimated if poloidal rotation is assumed to be governed by the neoclassical theory, especially at low collisionality. Indeed, the turbulence contribution to the poloidal rotation increases when collisionality decreases. Finally, the numerical verification of toroidal momentum balance shows that both neoclassical and turbulent contributions to the Reynolds' stress tensor play the dominant role. The phase space analysis further reveals that barely passing supra-thermal particles mostly contribute to the toroidal flow generation, consistently with quasi-linear predictions.

  7. A streaked X-ray spectroscopy platform for rapidly heated, near-solid density plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stillman, C. R.; Nilson, P. M.; Ivancic, S. T.; Mileham, C.; Begishev, I. A.; Junquist, R. K.; Nelson, D. J.; Froula, D. H.

    2016-11-01

    A picosecond, time-resolved, x-ray spectroscopy platform was developed to study the thermal line emission from rapidly heated solid targets containing buried aluminum or iron layers. The targets were driven by high-contrast 1ω or 2ω laser pulses at focused intensities up to 1 × 1019 W/cm2. The experimental platform combines time-integrating and time-resolved x-ray spectrometers. Picosecond time resolution was achieved with a pair of ultrafast x-ray streak cameras coupled to high-throughput Hall spectrometers. Time-integrated spectra were collected on each shot to correct the streaked data for variations in x-ray photocathode spectral sensitivity. The time-integrated spectrometer uses three elliptical crystals to disperse x rays with energies between 800 and 2100 eV with moderate (E/ΔE ˜ 450) resolving power. The streaked spectrometers accept four interchangeable conical crystals with higher resolving power (E/ΔE ˜ 650) to measure the brightest thermal lines in the 1300 to 1700 eV spectral range.

  8. Wave solutions of ion cyclotron heated plasmas with self-consistent velocity distributions in a tokamak

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jungpyo; Wright, John; Bonoli, Paul; Harvey, Robert

    2015-11-01

    We describe a numerical model for the propagation and absorption of ion cyclotron waves in a tokamak with a non-Maxwellian velocity space distribution function. The non-Maxwellian distribution is calculated by solving Maxwell's equations and the Fokker-Plank equation self-consistently. This approach will be useful to interpret measurements of minority hydrogen tail formation during ICRF heating experiments in Alcator C-Mod. To couple the Maxwell equation solver with Fokker-Plank equation solver, the quasilinear diffusion coefficients for the fundamental ion cyclotron absorption and the first harmonic absorption are calculated. In a previous study, the all-orders spectral algorithm wave solver (AORSA) was coupled with the Fokker-Plank code (CQL3D) to find the self-consistent non-Maxwellian distribution. We derive the modified quasilinear diffusion coefficients for the finite Larmor radius (FLR) approximation using a significantly faster wave solver (TORIC) following the approach by Jaeger. The coupled TORIC-CQL3D model will be compared against results from AORSA-CQL3D in order to verify the accuracy of the reduced FLR physics in TORIC. Work supported by US Department of Energy Contract No. DE-FC02-01ER54648.

  9. Ion sources with arc-discharge plasma box driven by directly heated LaB(6) electron emitter or cold cathode.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivanov, Alexander A; Davydenko, Vladimir I; Deichuli, Petr P; Shulzhenko, Grigori I; Stupishin, Nikolay V

    2008-02-01

    In the Budker Institute, Novosibirsk, an ion source with arc-discharge plasma box has been developed in the recent years for application in thermonuclear devices for plasma diagnostics. Several modifications of the ion source were provided with extracted current ranging from 1 to 7 A and pulse duration of up to 4 s. Initially, the arc-discharge plasma box with cold cathode was used, with which pulse duration is limited to 2 s by the cathode overheating and sputtering in local arc spots. Recently, a directly heated LaB(6) electron emitter was employed instead, which has extended lifetime compared to the cold cathode. In the paper, characteristics of the beam produced with both arrangements of the plasma box are presented.

  10. Processing of ash and slag waste of heating plants by arc plasma to produce construction materials and nanomodifiers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buyantuev, S. L.; Urkhanova, L. A.; Kondratenko, A. S.; Shishulkin, S. Yu; Lkhasaranov, S. A.; Khmelev, A. B.

    2017-01-01

    The resultsare presented of plasma processing slag and ash waste from coal combustion in heating plants. Melting mechanism of ashand slagraw material is considered by an electromagnetic technological reactor. The analysis was conducted of temperature and phase transformations of raw material when it is heated up to the melting point, and also determination of specific energy consumption by using a generalized model of the thermodynamic analysis of TERRA. The study of materials melting temperature conditions and plum of melt was carried with high-temperature thermal imaging method, followed by mapping and 3D-modeling of the temperature fields. The investigations to establish the principal possibilities of using slag waste of local coal as raw material for the production of mineral (ash and slag) fibers found that by chemical composition there are oxides in the following ranges: 45-65% SiO2; 10-25% Al2O3; 10-45% CaO; 5-10% MgO; other minerals (less than 5%). Thus, these technological wastes are principally suitable for melts to produce mineral wool by the plasma method. An analysis of the results shows the melting point of ash and slag waste - 1800-2000 °C. In this case the specific energy consumption of these processes keeps within the limits of 1.1-1.3 kW*h/kg. For comparison it should be noted that the unit cost of electricity in the known high-melting industrial installations 5-6 kW*h/kg. Upon melting ash and slag waste, which contains up to 2-5% of unburned carbon, carbon nanomaterials were discovered.in the form of ultrafine soot accumulating as a plaque on the water-cooled surfaces in the gas cleaning chamber. The process of formation of soot consists in sublimation-desublimation of part of carbon which is in ash and slag, and graphite electrode. Thus, upon melting of ash and slag in the electromagnetic reactor it is possible to obtain melt, and in the subsequent mineral high quality fiber, which satisfies the requirements of normative documents, and

  11. Qualifying plasma diagnostics for a high power microwave background of ECRH heated discharges

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hirsch, M.; Baldzuhn, J.; Endler, M.; Laux, M.; Zhang, D.; Laqua, H.P.; Noke, F.; Purps, F.; Ewert, K. [Max-Planck Institut fur Plasmaphysik, EURATOM Association, D-17491 Greifswald (Germany); Oosterbeek, J.W. [Technische Universiteit Eindhoven, Den Doelch 2, 5612 AZ Eindhoven (Netherlands); Jimenez, R. [Associacion EURATOM/CIEMAT, av. Complutense 22, 28040, Madrid (Spain)

    2011-07-01

    Microwave background radiation resulting from multiple reflected unabsorbed ECRH / ECCD power may cause severe problems for microwave absorbing in-vessel components such as gaskets, bellows, windows, isolators and cable insulations in particular during long pulse operation. For qualifying in-vessel components of W7-X in the environment of an isotropic 140 GHz radiation the Microwave Stray Radiation Launch facility, MISTRAL is operated at IPP. Power flux densities of 10-40 kW/m{sup 2} are obtained with a pulsed power gyrotron launching the microwave via a corrugated transmission line and a vacuum window to the MISTRAL vessel. The focus of the program was on cable isolations as required e.g. for in-vessel magnetic diagnostics. Sufficient shielding is obtained in nearly closed metal pipes only. Cryo pumps require a temperature < 12 K where Hydrogen desorption starts. The cryo pumps are usually shielded from plasma radiation by so called chevron structures. It is investigated whether coating of these chevrons with a microwave absorbing layer yields a sufficient reduction of the stray radiation level to ensure cryo pump operation. Diagnostic windows have been tested also. Although the temperature rise even of uncooled ZnSe and quartz windows at 10 kW/m{sup 2} is uncritical with respect to damage the associated refractive index changes may be too high for some diagnostic purposes e.g. for interferometry. A possible shielding are meshes or {mu}W absorbing coatings. Integrated diagnostic mock-ups such as for the diamagnetic loop, the inner Rogowski coils, Mirnov coils and the bolometer head also have been tested

  12. Physical processes in an electron current layer causing intense plasma heating and formation of x-lines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Nagendra; Khazanov, Igor; Wells, B. E.

    2015-05-01

    We study the evolution of an electron current layer (ECL) through its several stages by means of three-dimensional particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations with ion to electron mass ratio M/me = 400. An ECL evolves through the following stages: (i) Electrostatic (ES) current-driven instability (CDI) soon after its formation with half width w about 2 electron skin depth (de), (ii) current disruption in the central part of the ECL by trapping of electrons and generation of anomalous resistivity, (iii) electron tearing instability (ETI) with significantly large growth rates in the lower end of the whistler frequency range, (iv) widening of the ECL and modulation of its width by the ETI, (v) gradual heating of electrons by the CDI-driven ES ion modes create the condition that the electrons become hotter than the ions, (vi) despite the reduced electron drift associated with the current disruption by the CDI, the enhanced electron temperature continues to favor a slow growth of the ion waves reaching nonlinear amplitudes, (vii) the nonlinear ion waves undergo modulation and collapse into localized density cavities containing spiky electric fields like in double layers (DLs), (viii) such spiky electric fields are very effective in further rapid heating of both electrons and ions. As predicted by the electron magnetohydrodynamic (EMHD) theories, the ETI growth rate maximizes at wave numbers in the range 0.4 field and w is the evolving half width of the ECL. The developing ETI generates in-plane currents that support out-of-plane magnetic fields around the emerging x-lines. The ETI and the spiky electrostatic structures are accompanied by fluctuations in the magnetic fields near and above the lower-hybrid (ion plasma) frequency, including the whistler frequency range. We compare our results with experimental results and satellite observation.

  13. Hybrid Particle-In-Cell (PIC) simulation of heat transfer and ionization balance in overdense plasmas irradiated by subpicosecond pulse lasers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhidkov, A.; Sasaki, Akira [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Neyagawa, Osaka (Japan). Kansai Research Establishment

    1998-11-01

    A 1D hybrid electromagnetic particle-in-cell code with new methods to include particle collisions and atomic kinetics is developed and applied to ultra-short-pulse laser plasma interaction. Using the Langevin equation to calculate the Coulomb collision term, the present code is shown to be fast and stable in calculating the particle motion in the PIC simulation. Furthermore, by noting that the scale length of the change of atomic kinetics is much longer than the Debye radius, we calculate ionization and X-ray emission on kinetics cells, which are determined by averaging plasma parameters such as the electron density and energy over number of PIC cells. The absorption of short-pulse laser by overdense plasmas is calculated in self-consistent manner, including the effect of rapid change of density and temperature caused by instantaneous heating and successive fast ionization of the target material. The calculated results agree well with those obtained from the Fokker-Planck simulation as well as experiments, for non-local heat transport in plasmas with steep temperature gradient, and for the absorption of a short laser pulse by solid density targets. These results demonstrate usefulness of the code and the computational method therein for understanding of physics of short pulse laser plasma interaction experiments, and for application to the gain calculation of short-pulse laser excited X-ray laser as well. (author)

  14. Flare plasma dynamics obseved with the YOHKOH Bragg crystal spectrometer. III. Spectral signatures of electron-beam-heated atmospheres.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marriska, John. T.

    1995-05-01

    Using numerical simulations of an electon-beam-heated solar flare, we investigate the observational consequences of variations in the electron beam total energy flux and the low-energy cut off value for models with both low and high initial densities. To do this we use the evolution of the physical parameters of the simulated flares to synthesize the time evolution of the spectrum in the wavelength region surrounding tha Ca xix resonance line. These spectra are then summed over a 9 s time interval to simulate typical spectra from the Yohkoh Bragg crystal spectometer and the first three moments are computed for comparison with observational results. This comparison shows that no single low or high initial density model satisfies the observed average behavior of the Ca xix resonance line. Low initial density models produce too large a blue shift velocity, while high initial density model have lines that are too narrow. Comparison of these models with the Yohkok data suggests that the key problem for models of the impulsive phase ofa solar flare is producing significant amounts of stationary hot plasma early in the flare.

  15. Heat shock protein 27 is required for sex steroid receptor trafficking to and functioning at the plasma membrane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Razandi, Mahnaz; Pedram, Ali; Levin, Ellis R

    2010-07-01

    Classical sex steroid receptors (SRs) localize at the plasma membranes (PMs) of cells, initiating signal transduction through kinase cascades that contribute to steroid hormone action. Palmitoylation of the SRs is required for membrane localization and function, but the proteins that facilitate this modification and subsequent receptor trafficking are unknown. Initially using a proteomic approach, we identified that heat shock protein 27 (Hsp27) binds to a motif in estrogen receptor alpha (ERalpha) and promotes palmitoylation of the SR. Hsp27-induced acylation occurred on the ERalpha monomer and augmented caveolin-1 interactions with ERalpha, resulting in membrane localization, kinase activation, and DNA synthesis in breast cancer cells. Oligomerization of Hsp27 was required, and similar results were found for the trafficking of endogenous progesterone and androgen receptors to the PMs of breast and prostate cancer cells, respectively. Small interfering RNA (siRNA) knockdown of Hsp27 prevented sex SR trafficking to and signaling from the membrane. These results identify a conserved and novel function for Hsp27 with potential as a target for interrupting signaling from membrane sex SRs to tumor biology in hormone-responsive cancers.

  16. A theoretical interpretation of the main scrape-off layer heat-flux width scaling for tokamak inner-wall limited plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halpern, F. D.; Horacek, J.; Pitts, R. A.; Ricci, P.

    2016-08-01

    The International Tokamak Physics Activity Topical Group on scrape-off layer and divertor physics has amassed a database comprising hundreds of reciprocating Langmuir probe measurements of the main scrape-off layer heat-flux width {λq} in inner-wall limited discharges. We have carried out an analysis, based on turbulent transport theory, of the variation of {λq} with respect to the dimensionless plasma parameters. Restricting our analysis to circular plasmas, we find that a model based on non-linearly saturated turbulence can well reproduce the {λq} values found in the database.

  17. Sensitivity of porcine epidemic diarrhea virus (PEDV) to pH and heat treatment in the presence or absence of porcine plasma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quist-Rybachuk, G V; Nauwynck, H J; Kalmar, I D

    2015-12-31

    Emergence of porcine epidemic diarrhea virus (PEDV) resulted in massive neonatal mortality in the North-American and Asian pork industry. Measures to prevent its geographical spread are of utmost importance to safeguard susceptible porcine populations. The major infection route is direct or indirect faecal-oral contact. Adequate biosafety measures should be in place at all levels of the swine production chain, including feed and feed ingredients. Present study aimed to investigate the sensitivity of PEDV to thermal inactivation at neutral and alkaline pH in presence or absence of porcine plasma. Cell culture medium and porcine plasma at different pH (7.2, 9.2, 10.2) and temperature conditions (4 °C, 40 °C, 44 °C, 48 °C) were inoculated to a final titer of 5.5 log10 TCID50 PEDV/ml, incubated for up to 120 min and the residual infectivity was determined by endpoint dilution assay. Irrespective of presence of plasma, PEDV was not sensitive to pH 7.2-10.2 at 4 °C. At moderate temperatures (≥40 °C), both alkaline pH and presence of plasma potentiated thermal inactivation. Inactivation of 8 log10 TCID50/ml plasma within 30 min (8D valueplasma required heat treatment of 40 °C and alkalinization to pH 9.2 to achieve 8 log10 reduction within such time. At pH 10.2 and 48 °C, the 8D value was 4.6 min in plasma and 15.2 min in MEM. Here we propose heat-alkalinity-time (HAT) pasteurization as a highly efficient method to inactivate PEDV during industrial processing of porcine plasma.

  18. Interaction between fast ions and ion cyclotron heating in a tokamak plasma; Interaction des ions rapides avec les ondes a la frequence cyclotronique ionique dans un plasma de tokamak

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bergeaud, V

    2001-11-01

    In an ignited fusion reactor, the plasma temperature is sustained by the fusion reactions. However, before this regime is reached, it is necessary to bring an additional power to the plasma. One of the methods that enables the coupling of power is the use of an electromagnetic wave in the ion cyclotron range of frequencies (ICRF). This thesis deals with the interaction between ICRF heating and the fast ions. The thesis contains a theoretical study of the influence of ICRF heating on the ion distribution function. A particular emphasis is put on the importance of the toroidal spectrum of the modes of propagation of the wave in the tokamak. It is necessary to take into account all these modes in order to correctly assess the strength of the wave particle interaction, especially for high energy particles (of the order of hundreds of keV). The classical treatment of the wave particle interaction is based on the hypothesis that the cyclotron phase of the particle and the wave phase are de-correlated between successive resonant interactions. One is therefore led to consider ICRF heating as a diffusive process. This hypothesis is reconsidered in this thesis and it is shown that strong correlations exist in a large part of the velocity space. For this study, a numerical code that computes the full trajectory of particles interacting with a complete electromagnetic field has been developed. The thesis also deals with the problem of fast ion losses due to the breaking of the toroidal symmetry of the confinement magnetic field (called the ripple modulation). Between two toroidal coils, local magnetic wells exist, and particles can be trapped there. When trapped they undergo a vertical drift that makes them quit the plasma rapidly. The ripple modulation also causes an enhancement of the radial diffusion, thereby increasing the losses. A Monte Carlo model describing these mechanisms is presented. This model is validated thanks to a comparison with an experimental database from

  19. Direct growth of doping-density-controlled hexagonal graphene on SiO2 substrate by rapid-heating plasma CVD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kato, Toshiaki; Hatakeyama, Rikizo

    2012-10-23

    A transfer-free method for growing carrier-density-controlled graphene directly on a SiO(2) substrate has been realized for the first time by rapid-heating plasma chemical vapor deposition (RH-PCVD). Using this method, high-quality single-layer graphene sheets with a hexagonal domain can be selectively grown between a Ni film and a SiO(2) substrate. Systematic investigations reveal that the relatively thin Ni layer, rapid heating, and plasma CVD are critical to the success of this unique method of graphene growth. By applying this technique, an easy and scalable graphene-based field effect transistor (FET) fabrication is also demonstrated. The electrical transport type of the graphene-based FET can be precisely tuned by adjusting the NH(3) gas concentration during the RH-PCVD process.

  20. Application of the laser induced fluorescence to the investigation of highly magnetized plasmas, heated by ion cyclotron resonance; Fluorescence induite par laser sur des plasmas fortement magnetises, chauffes par resonnance cyclotron ionique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pailloux, A. [CEA Centre d`Etudes de Saclay, 91 - Gif-sur-Yvette (France). Dept. des Procedes d`Enrichissement]|[Universite Louis Pasteur, 67 - Strasbourg (France)

    1997-12-31

    This work has been achieved in the frame of isotopic separation studies by in cyclotron resonance. For this purpose, in a highly magnetized (2 to 3 Tesla) and non-collisional (10{sup 12} ions/cm{sup 3}) plasma, composed of metallic ions, a wave near the ion cyclotron frequency is thrown in order to heat selectively a given species. A laser induced fluorescence (LIP) has been developed on barium and gadolinium plasmas. The Larmor gyration of ions greatly modifies the interaction, which has been modelled through the time-dependent Schroedinger equation. The obtained excitation probably has been integrated over all the ions excited in the measurement volume in order to check that the LIF still leads to the distribution function of ion velocities. The influence of the Larmor motion of ions on the spectral distribution of LIF has been derived both theoretically and experimentally. The LIF diagnostics has been achieved with a dye O`ring laser. The barium ion has been excited on the transition 6142 angstrom, using rhodamine 6G dye, and the gadolinium ion on the pseudo-triplet 3861 angstrom, using exalite dye. Data treatment has been developed taking into account the Zeeman effect and the different heating of isotopes. The ionic temperature (from 1 eV to some hundreds eV) has been measured as a function of radiofrequency heating. Our experimental results are in good agreement with the selective heating theory. Also, the ion velocity distribution function has been found locally Maxwellian. And the behaviour of the plasma has been studied as a function of control parameters of the plasma source. (author) 62 refs.

  1. Observation of alpha particle loss from JET plasmas during ion cyclotron resonance frequency heating using a thin foil Faraday cup detector array

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Darrow, D. S. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton, New Jersey 08543 (United States); Cecil, F. E. [Physics Department, Colorado School of Mines, Golden, Colorado 80401 (United States); Kiptily, V.; Fullard, K.; Horton, A. [Culham Centre for Fusion Energy, Euratom/CCFE Fusion Assoc., Abingdon, Oxon OX14 3DB (United Kingdom); Murari, A. [Consorzio RFX-Associazione EURATOM ENEA per la Fusione, I-35127 Padova (Italy); Collaboration: JET EFDA Contributors

    2010-10-15

    The loss of MeV alpha particles from JET plasmas has been measured with a set of thin foil Faraday cup detectors during third harmonic heating of helium neutral beam ions. Tail temperatures of {approx}2 MeV have been observed, with radial scrape off lengths of a few centimeters. Operational experience from this system indicates that such detectors are potentially feasible for future large tokamaks, but careful attention to screening rf and MHD induced noise is essential.

  2. Proceedings of 1999 U.S./Japan Workshop (99FT-05) On High Heat Flux Components and Plasma Surface Interactions for Next Fusion Devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NYGREN,RICHARD E.; STAVROS,DIANA T.

    2000-06-01

    The 1999 US-Japan Workshop on High Heat Flux Components and Plasma Surface Interactions in Next Step Fusion Devices was held at the St. Francis Hotel in Santa Fe, New Mexico, on November 1-4, 1999. There were 42 presentations as well as discussion on technical issues and planning for future collaborations. The participants included 22 researchers from Japan and the United States as well as seven researchers from Europe and Russia. There have been important changes in the programs in both the US and Japan in the areas of plasma surface interactions and plasma facing components. The US has moved away from a strong focus on the ITER Project and has introduced new programs on use of liquid surfaces for plasma facing components, and operation of NSTX has begun. In Japan, the Large Helical Device began operation. This is the first large world-class confinement device operating in a magnetic configuration different than a tokamak. In selecting the presentations for this workshop, the organizers sought a balance between research in laboratory facilities or confinement devices related to plasma surface interactions and experimental research in the development of plasma facing components. In discussions about the workshop itself, the participants affirmed their preference for a setting where ''work-in-progress'' could be informally presented and discussed.

  3. Physical processes in an electron current layer causing intense plasma heating and formation of x-lines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singh, Nagendra; Wells, B. E. [Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Alabama, Huntsville, Alabama 35899 (United States); Khazanov, Igor [CSPAR, University of Alabama, Huntsville, Alabama 35899 (United States)

    2015-05-15

    We study the evolution of an electron current layer (ECL) through its several stages by means of three-dimensional particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations with ion to electron mass ratio M/m{sub e} = 400. An ECL evolves through the following stages: (i) Electrostatic (ES) current-driven instability (CDI) soon after its formation with half width w about 2 electron skin depth (d{sub e}), (ii) current disruption in the central part of the ECL by trapping of electrons and generation of anomalous resistivity, (iii) electron tearing instability (ETI) with significantly large growth rates in the lower end of the whistler frequency range, (iv) widening of the ECL and modulation of its width by the ETI, (v) gradual heating of electrons by the CDI-driven ES ion modes create the condition that the electrons become hotter than the ions, (vi) despite the reduced electron drift associated with the current disruption by the CDI, the enhanced electron temperature continues to favor a slow growth of the ion waves reaching nonlinear amplitudes, (vii) the nonlinear ion waves undergo modulation and collapse into localized density cavities containing spiky electric fields like in double layers (DLs), (viii) such spiky electric fields are very effective in further rapid heating of both electrons and ions. As predicted by the electron magnetohydrodynamic (EMHD) theories, the ETI growth rate maximizes at wave numbers in the range 0.4 < k{sub x}W < 0.8 where k{sub x} is the wave number parallel to the ECL magnetic field and w is the evolving half width of the ECL. The developing ETI generates in-plane currents that support out-of-plane magnetic fields around the emerging x-lines. The ETI and the spiky electrostatic structures are accompanied by fluctuations in the magnetic fields near and above the lower-hybrid (ion plasma) frequency, including the whistler frequency range. We compare our results with experimental results and satellite observation.

  4. Tissue-specific induction of Hsp90 mRNA and plasma cortisol response in chinook salmon following heat shock, seawater challenge, and handling challenge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmisano, Aldo N.; Winton, J.R.; Dickhoff, Walton W.

    2000-01-01

    In studying the whole-body response of chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) to various stressors, we found that 5-hour exposure to elevated temperature (mean 21.6??C; + 10.6??C over ambient) induced a marked increase in Hsp90 messenger RNA accumulation in heart, brain, gill, muscle, liver, kidney, and tail fin tissues. The most vital tissues (heart, brain, gill, and muscle) showed the greatest Hsp90-mRNA response, with heart tissue increasing approximately 35-fold, Heat shock induced no increase in plasma cortisol. In contrast, a standard handling challenge induced high plasma cortisol levels, but no elevation in Hsp90 mRNA in any tissue, clearly separating the physiological and cellular stress responses. We saw no increase either in tissue Hsp90 mRNA levels or in plasma cortisol concentrations after exposing the fish to seawater overnight.

  5. The effects of neutral gas heating on H mode transition and maintenance currents in a 13.56 MHz planar coil inductively coupled plasma reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jayapalan, Kanesh K.; Chin, Oi-Hoong

    2012-09-01

    The H mode transition and maintenance currents in a 13.56 MHz laboratory 6 turn planar coil inductively coupled plasma (ICP) reactor are simulated for low pressure argon discharge range of 0.02-0.3 mbar with neutral gas heating and at ambient temperature. An experimentally fitted 3D power evolution plot for 0.02 mbar argon pressure is also shown to visualize the effects of hysteresis in the system. Comparisons between simulation and experimental measurements show good agreement in the pressure range of 0.02-0.3 mbar for transition currents and 0.02-0.1 mbar for maintenance currents only when neutral gas heating is considered. This suggests that neutral gas heating plays a non-negligible role in determining the mode transition points of a rf ICP system.

  6. The present-day state and outlooks of using plasma-energy technologies in heat power industry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karpenko, E.; Messerle, V.; Buyantuev, S. [J.S. Co. `Gusinoozyorsk SDPS`, Gusinoozyorsk (Russian Federation)

    1997-12-31

    The urgency of using plasma-energy technologies in the power industry is outlined with the aim of increasing economical efficiency, decreasing of energy consumption and decreasing environmental pollution. Scientific and technical bases for plasma-energy technologies of fuel utilization, are presented, with results of theoretical, experimental and rig investigations of processes of plasma ignition, gasification, thermochemical preparation for burning and combined processing of coals. Results of realization of plasma technologies of residual-oil-free (mazout) pulverized coal boiler kindling, lighting of torch and stabilization of fluid slagging in furnaces with removal of fluid slag, are described. 6 refs.,1 fig., 2 tabs.

  7. Acute heat stress up-regulates neuropeptide Y precursor mRNA expression and alters brain and plasma concentrations of free amino acids in chicks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ito, Kentaro; Bahry, Mohammad A; Hui, Yang; Furuse, Mitsuhiro; Chowdhury, Vishwajit S

    2015-09-01

    Heat stress causes an increase in body temperature and reduced food intake in chickens. Several neuropeptides and amino acids play a vital role in the regulation of food intake. However, the responses of neuropeptides and amino acids to heat-stress-induced food-intake regulation are poorly understood. In the current study, the hypothalamic mRNA expression of some neuropeptides related to food intake and the content of free amino acids in the brain and plasma was examined in 14-day-old chicks exposed to a high ambient temperature (HT; 40±1 °C for 2 or 5 h) or to a control thermoneutral temperature (CT; 30±1 °C). HT significantly increased rectal temperature and plasma corticosterone level and suppressed food intake. HT also increased the expression of neuropeptide Y (NPY) and agouti-signaling protein (ASIP) precursor mRNA, while no change was observed in pro-opiomelanocortin, cholecystokinin, ghrelin, or corticotropin-releasing hormone precursor mRNA. It was further found that the diencephalic content of free amino acids - namely, tryptophan, leucine, isoleucine, valine and serine - was significantly higher in HT chicks with some alterations in their plasma amino acids in comparison with CT chicks. The induction of NPY and ASIP expression and the alteration of some free amino acids during HT suggest that these changes can be the results or causes the suppression of food intake.

  8. The ratio of specific heats for postshock plasmas of a detached bow shock - An MHD model. [in solar wind-earth interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chao, J. K.; Wiskerchen, M. J.

    1974-01-01

    The empirical relationship between the standoff distance of a detached bow shock (generated by the flow of a supersonic gas past an impenetrable obstacle), the size of the obstacle, the Mach number of the gas, and the ratio of specific heats has been generalized to include the magnetic field. The value of the ratio of specific heats (gamma-prime) in the postshock plasma has been calculated in terms of the preshock Alfvenic and sonic Mach numbers and orientation of the magnetic field. The empirical relationship is further generalized by taking into consideration the normal momentum and energy flux due to waves and/or turbulence and/or heat flow in association with high Mach number shocks. The computed value of gamma prime is substantially modified in comparison with that given by the MHD or the gas dynamic model. For this generalized model the computed gamma prime can be considered to be a more precise thermodynamic quantity, since the macroscopic parameters of the plasma have been separated out. Application of this empirical relationship to the earth's bow shock has been given.

  9. Alleviative effects of α-lipoic acid supplementation on acute heat stress-induced thermal panting and the level of plasma nonesterified fatty acids in hypothyroid broiler chickens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamano, Y

    2012-01-01

    1. The present study was conducted to examine the effects of α-lipoic acid on hypothyroidism-induced negative growth performance and whether α-lipoic acid alleviates acute heat stress in relation to hypothyroid status. 2. Female broiler chickens (14 d-old) were fed diets supplemented with α-lipoic acid (100 mg/kg) and an antithyroid substance, propylthiouracil (200 mg/kg), for 20 d under thermoneutral conditions (25°C). At 42 d of age, chickens were exposed to a high ambient temperature (36°C, 60% RH) for 4 h. 3. Under the thermoneutral condition, propylthiouracil administration decreased feed efficiency and concomitantly increased adipose tissue and thyroid gland weights. Plasma nonesterified fatty acids and triacylglycerol were also increased by propylthiouracil administration. However, α-lipoic acid supplementation did not affect the hypothyroidism-induced effects. 4. In hypothyroid chickens, the rise in respiratory rate induced by heat exposure was greatly inhibited by α-lipoic acid administration at 1 h, but this effect had disappeared at 4 h. In addition, a similar inhibitory effect on the concentrations of plasma nonesterified fatty acids was subsequently observed at 4 h. 5. Therefore, the present study suggested that α-lipoic acid alleviates acute heat stress if chickens are in a hypothyroid status.

  10. Measurements of ion temperature and plasma hydrogenic composition by collective Thomson scattering in neutral beam heated discharges at TEXTOR

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stejner Pedersen, Morten; Salewski, Mirko; Korsholm, Søren Bang

    2013-01-01

    A method is developed to perform plasma composition and ion temperature measurements across the plasma minor radius in TEXTOR based on ion cyclotron structures in collective Thomson scattering spectra. By gradually moving the scattering volume, we obtain measurements across the outer midplane...

  11. In vitro Stability of Heat Shock Protein 27 in Serum and Plasma Under Different Pre-analytical Conditions: Implications for Large-Scale Clinical Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimmermann, Matthias; Traxler, Denise; Simader, Elisabeth; Bekos, Christine; Dieplinger, Benjamin; Lainscak, Mitja; Ankersmit, Hendrik Jan; Mueller, Thomas

    2016-07-01

    The effects of storage temperatures, repeated freeze-thaw cycles, or delays in separating plasma or serum from blood samples are largely unknown for heat shock protein 27 (HSP27). We evaluated (1) the imprecision of the HSP27 assay used in this study; (2) the in vitro stability of HSP27 in blood samples stored at 4°C for up to 6 hr with immediate and delayed serum/plasma separation from cells; and (3) the in vitro stability of HSP27 in blood samples stored at -80°C after repeated freeze-thaw cycles. The ELISA to detect HSP27 in this study showed a within-run CV of studies.

  12. Surface cracking and melting of different tungsten grades under transient heat and particle loads in a magnetized coaxial plasma gun

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kikuchi, Y., E-mail: ykikuchi@eng.u-hyogo.ac.jp [Graduate School of Engineering, University of Hyogo, 2167 Shosha, Himeji, Hyogo 671-2280 (Japan); Sakuma, I.; Iwamoto, D.; Kitagawa, Y.; Fukumoto, N.; Nagata, M. [Graduate School of Engineering, University of Hyogo, 2167 Shosha, Himeji, Hyogo 671-2280 (Japan); Ueda, Y. [Graduate School of Engineering, Osaka University, 2-1 Yamadaoka, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan)

    2013-07-15

    Surface damage of pure tungsten (W), W alloys with 2 wt.% tantalum (W–Ta) and vacuum plasma spray (VPS) W coating on a reduced activation material of ferritic steel (F82H) due to repetitive ELM-like pulsed (∼0.3 ms) deuterium plasma irradiation has been investigated by using a magnetized coaxial plasma gun. Surface cracks appeared on a pure W sample exposed to 10 plasma pulses of ∼0.3 MJ m{sup −2}, while a W–Ta sample did not show surface cracks with similar pulsed plasma irradiation. The energy density threshold for surface cracking was significantly increased by the existence of the alloying element of tantalum. No surface morphology change of a VPS W coated F82H sample was observed under 10 plasma pulses of ∼0.3 MJ m{sup −2}, although surface melting and cracks in the resolidification layer occurred at higher energy density of ∼0.9 MJ m{sup −2}. There was no indication of exfoliation of the W coating from the substrate of F82H after the pulsed plasma exposures.

  13. Surface cracking and melting of different tungsten grades under transient heat and particle loads in a magnetized coaxial plasma gun

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kikuchi, Y.; Sakuma, I.; Iwamoto, D.; Kitagawa, Y.; Fukumoto, N.; Nagata, M.; Ueda, Y.

    2013-07-01

    Surface damage of pure tungsten (W), W alloys with 2 wt.% tantalum (W-Ta) and vacuum plasma spray (VPS) W coating on a reduced activation material of ferritic steel (F82H) due to repetitive ELM-like pulsed (˜0.3 ms) deuterium plasma irradiation has been investigated by using a magnetized coaxial plasma gun. Surface cracks appeared on a pure W sample exposed to 10 plasma pulses of ˜0.3 MJ m-2, while a W-Ta sample did not show surface cracks with similar pulsed plasma irradiation. The energy density threshold for surface cracking was significantly increased by the existence of the alloying element of tantalum. No surface morphology change of a VPS W coated F82H sample was observed under 10 plasma pulses of ˜0.3 MJ m-2, although surface melting and cracks in the resolidification layer occurred at higher energy density of ˜0.9 MJ m-2. There was no indication of exfoliation of the W coating from the substrate of F82H after the pulsed plasma exposures.

  14. THE NONLINEAR OHM'S LAW: PLASMA HEATING BY STRONG ELECTRIC FIELDS AND ITS EFFECTS ON THE IONIZATION BALANCE IN PROTOPLANETARY DISKS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Okuzumi, Satoshi [Department of Earth and Planetary Sciences, Tokyo Institute of Technology, Meguro-ku, Tokyo 152-8551 (Japan); Inutsuka, Shu-ichiro, E-mail: okuzumi@geo.titech.ac.jp [Department of Physics, Nagoya University, Nagoya, Aichi 464-8602 (Japan)

    2015-02-10

    The ionization state of the gas plays a key role in the magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) of protoplanetary disks. However, the ionization state can depend on the gas dynamics, because electric fields induced by MHD turbulence can heat up plasmas and thereby affect the ionization balance. To study this nonlinear feedback, we construct an ionization model that includes plasma heating by electric fields and impact ionization by heated electrons, as well as charging of dust grains. We show that when plasma sticking onto grains is the dominant recombination process, the electron abundance in the gas decreases with increasing electric field strength. This is a natural consequence of electron-grain collisions whose frequency increases with the electron's random velocity. The decreasing electron abundance may lead to a self-regulation of MHD turbulence. In some cases, not only the electron abundance but also the electric current decreases with increasing field strength in a certain field range. The resulting N-shaped current-field relation violates the fundamental assumption of the non-relativistic MHD that the electric field is uniquely determined by the current density. At even higher field strengths, impact ionization causes an abrupt increase of the electric current as expected by previous studies. We find that this discharge current is multi-valued (i.e., the current-field relation is S-shaped) under some circumstances, and that the intermediate branch is unstable. The N/S-shaped current-field relations may yield hysteresis in the evolution of MHD turbulence in some parts of protoplanetary disks.

  15. SiC Nanowires Synthesized by Rapidly Heating a Mixture of SiO and Arc-Discharge Plasma Pretreated Carbon Black

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Feng-Lei

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract SiC nanowires have been synthesized at 1,600 °C by using a simple and low-cost method in a high-frequency induction furnace. The commercial SiO powder and the arc-discharge plasma pretreated carbon black were mixed and used as the source materials. The heating-up and reaction time is less than half an hour. It was found that most of the nanowires have core-shell SiC/SiO2nanostructures. The nucleation, precipitation, and growth processes were discussed in terms of the oxide-assisted cluster-solid mechanism.

  16. Synergy effect of heat and UV photons on bacterial-spore inactivation in an N{sub 2}-O{sub 2} plasma-afterglow sterilizer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boudam, M K; Moisan, M, E-mail: michel.moisan@umontreal.c [Groupe de Physique des Plasmas, Universite de Montreal, C.P. 6128, Succursale Centre-Ville, Montreal H3C 3J7, Quebec (Canada)

    2010-07-28

    As a rule, medical devices (MDs) made entirely from metals and ceramics can withstand, for sterilization purposes, elevated temperatures such as those encountered in autoclaves (moist heat {>=}120 {sup 0}C) or Poupinel (Pasteur) ovens (dry heat {>=}160 {sup 0}C). This not the case with MDs containing polymers: 70 {sup 0}C seems to be a limit beyond which their structural and functional integrity will be compromised. Nonetheless, all the so-called low-temperature sterilization techniques, relying essentially on some biocidal chemistry (e.g. ethylene oxide, H{sub 2}O{sub 2}, O{sub 3}), are operated at temperatures close to 65 {sup 0}C, essentially to enhance the chemical reactivity of the biocidal agent. Based on this fact, we have examined the influence of increasing the temperature of the polystyrene Petri dish containing B. atrophaeus bacterial spores when exposing them to UV radiation coming from an N{sub 2}-O{sub 2} flowing plasma afterglow. We have observed that, for a given UV radiation intensity, the inactivation rate increases with the temperature of the Petri dish, provided heat and UV photons are applied simultaneously, a clear case of synergistic effect. More specifically, it means that (i) simply heating the spores at temperatures below 65 {sup 0}C without irradiating them with UV photons does not induce mortality; (ii) there is no additional increase in the inactivation rate when the Petri has been pre-heated and then brought back to ambient temperature before the spores are UV irradiated; (iii) no additional inactivation results from post-heating spores previously inactivated with UV radiation. Undoubtedly, the synergistic effect shows up only when the physico-chemical agents (UV photons and temperature) are simultaneously in action.

  17. Synergy effect of heat and UV photons on bacterial-spore inactivation in an N2-O2 plasma-afterglow sterilizer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boudam, M. K.; Moisan, M.

    2010-07-01

    As a rule, medical devices (MDs) made entirely from metals and ceramics can withstand, for sterilization purposes, elevated temperatures such as those encountered in autoclaves (moist heat >=120 °C) or Poupinel (Pasteur) ovens (dry heat >=160 °C). This not the case with MDs containing polymers: 70 °C seems to be a limit beyond which their structural and functional integrity will be compromised. Nonetheless, all the so-called low-temperature sterilization techniques, relying essentially on some biocidal chemistry (e.g. ethylene oxide, H2O2, O3), are operated at temperatures close to 65 °C, essentially to enhance the chemical reactivity of the biocidal agent. Based on this fact, we have examined the influence of increasing the temperature of the polystyrene Petri dish containing B. atrophaeus bacterial spores when exposing them to UV radiation coming from an N2-O2 flowing plasma afterglow. We have observed that, for a given UV radiation intensity, the inactivation rate increases with the temperature of the Petri dish, provided heat and UV photons are applied simultaneously, a clear case of synergistic effect. More specifically, it means that (i) simply heating the spores at temperatures below 65 °C without irradiating them with UV photons does not induce mortality; (ii) there is no additional increase in the inactivation rate when the Petri has been pre-heated and then brought back to ambient temperature before the spores are UV irradiated; (iii) no additional inactivation results from post-heating spores previously inactivated with UV radiation. Undoubtedly, the synergistic effect shows up only when the physico-chemical agents (UV photons and temperature) are simultaneously in action.

  18. Microstructural evolution and mechanical property of Ti-6Al-4V wall deposited by continuous plasma arc additive manufacturing without post heat treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Jianjun; Lv, Yaohui; Liu, Yuxin; Sun, Zhe; Wang, Kaibo; Li, Zhuguo; Wu, Yixiong; Xu, Binshi

    2017-05-01

    Plasma arc additive manufacturing (PAM) is a novel additive manufacturing (AM) technology due to its big potential in improving efficiency, convenience and being cost-savings compared to other AM processes of high energy bea\\m. In this research, several Ti-6Al-4V thin walls were deposited by optimized weld wire-feed continuous PAM process (CPAM), in which the heat input was gradually decreased layer by layer. The deposited thin wall consisted of various morphologies, which includes epitaxial growth of prior β grains, horizontal layer bands, martensite and basket weave microstructure, that depends on the heat input, multiple thermal cycles and gradual cooling rate in the deposition process. By gradually reducing heat input of each bead and using continuous current in the PAM process, the average yield strength (YS), ultimate tensile strength (UTS) and elongation reach about 877MPa, 968MPa and 1.5%, respectively, which exceed the standard level of forging. The mechanical property was strengthened and toughened due to weakening the aspect ratio of prior β grains and separating nano-dispersoids among α lamellar. Furthermore, this research demonstrates that the CPAM process has a potential to manufacture or remanufacture in AM components of metallic biomaterials without post-processing heat treatment. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Effect of neutral collision and radiative heat-loss function on self-gravitational instability of viscous thermally conducting partially-ionized plasma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sachin Kaothekar

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The problem of thermal instability and gravitational instability is investigated for a partially ionized self-gravitating plasma which has connection in astrophysical condensations. We use normal mode analysis method in this problem. The general dispersion relation is derived using linearized perturbation equations of the problem. Effects of collisions with neutrals, radiative heat-loss function, viscosity, thermal conductivity and magnetic field strength, on the instability of the system are discussed. The conditions of instability are derived for a temperature-dependent and density-dependent heat-loss function with thermal conductivity. Numerical calculations have been performed to discuss the effect of various physical parameters on the growth rate of the gravitational instability. The temperature-dependent heat-loss function, thermal conductivity, viscosity, magnetic field and neutral collision have stabilizing effect, while density-dependent heat-loss function has a destabilizing effect on the growth rate of the gravitational instability. With the help of Routh-Hurwitz's criterion, the stability of the system is discussed.

  20. Increased plasma levels of heat shock protein 70 associated with subsequent clinical conversion to mild cognitive impairment in cognitively healthy elderly.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sang Joon Son

    Full Text Available Heat shock proteins (HSPs have been regarded as cytoprotectants that protect brain cells during the progression of neurodegenerative diseases and from damage resulting from cerebral ischemia. In this study, we assessed the association between plasma HSP 70/27 levels and cognitive decline.Among participants in the community-based cohort study of dementia called the Gwangju Dementia and Mild Cognitive Impairment Study, subjects without cognitive impairment at baseline, who then either remained without impairment (non-conversion group, or suffered mild cognitive impairment (MCI (conversion group (non-conversion group, N = 36; conversion group, N = 30 were analyzed.After a five to six year follow-up period, comparison of the plasma HSP 70 and HSP 27 levels of the two groups revealed that only the plasma HSP 70 level was associated with a conversion to MCI after adjustments for age, gender, years of education, follow-up duration, APOE e4, hypertension, and diabetes (repeated measure analysis of variance: F = 7.59, p = 0.008. Furthermore, an increase in plasma HSP 70 level was associated with cognitive decline in language and executive function (linear mixed model: Korean Boston Naming Test, -0.426 [-0.781, -0.071], p = 0.019; Controlled Oral Word Association Test, -0.176 [-0.328, -0.023], p = 0.024; Stroop Test, -0.304 [-0.458, -0.150], p<0.001.These findings suggest that the plasma HSP 70 level may be related to cognitive decline in the elderly.

  1. Numerical Solution of the Electron Heat Transport Equation and Physics-Constrained Modeling of the Thermal Conductivity via Sequential Quadratic Programming Optimization in Nuclear Fusion Plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paloma, Cynthia S.

    The plasma electron temperature (Te) plays a critical role in a tokamak nu- clear fusion reactor since temperatures on the order of 108K are required to achieve fusion conditions. Many plasma properties in a tokamak nuclear fusion reactor are modeled by partial differential equations (PDE's) because they depend not only on time but also on space. In particular, the dynamics of the electron temperature is governed by a PDE referred to as the Electron Heat Transport Equation (EHTE). In this work, a numerical method is developed to solve the EHTE based on a custom finite-difference technique. The solution of the EHTE is compared to temperature profiles obtained by using TRANSP, a sophisticated plasma transport code, for specific discharges from the DIII-D tokamak, located at the DIII-D National Fusion Facility in San Diego, CA. The thermal conductivity (also called thermal diffusivity) of the electrons (Xe) is a plasma parameter that plays a critical role in the EHTE since it indicates how the electron temperature diffusion varies across the minor effective radius of the tokamak. TRANSP approximates Xe through a curve-fitting technique to match experimentally measured electron temperature profiles. While complex physics-based model have been proposed for Xe, there is a lack of a simple mathematical model for the thermal diffusivity that could be used for control design. In this work, a model for Xe is proposed based on a scaling law involving key plasma variables such as the electron temperature (Te), the electron density (ne), and the safety factor (q). An optimization algorithm is developed based on the Sequential Quadratic Programming (SQP) technique to optimize the scaling factors appearing in the proposed model so that the predicted electron temperature and magnetic flux profiles match predefined target profiles in the best possible way. A simulation study summarizing the outcomes of the optimization procedure is presented to illustrate the potential of the

  2. Plasma heating in a post eruption Current Sheet: a case study based on ultraviolet, soft, and hard X-ray data

    CERN Document Server

    Susino, Roberto; Krucker, Säm

    2013-01-01

    Off-limb observations of the solar corona after Coronal Mass Ejections (CMEs) often show strong, compact, and persistent UV sources behind the eruption. They are primarily observed by the SOHO/UVCS instrument in the "hot" Fe XVIII {\\lambda}974 {\\AA} line and are usually interpreted as a signature of plasma heating due to magnetic reconnection in the post-CME Current Sheet (CS). Nevertheless, the physical process itself and the altitude of the main energy release are currently not fully understood. In this work, we studied the evolution of plasma heating after the CME of 2004 July 28 by comparing UV spectra acquired by UVCS with soft X-ray (SXR) and hard X-ray (HXR)images of the post-flare loops taken by GOES/SXI and RHESSI. The X-ray data show a long-lasting extended source that is rising upwards, toward the high-temperature source detected by UVCS. UVCS data show the presence of significant non-thermal broadening in the CS (signature of turbulent motions) and a strong density gradient across the CS region. T...

  3. Treatment of spent ion-exchange resins in shaft-type reactor with fuel-plasma source of heating

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dmitriev, S. A.; Knyazev, I. A.; Lifanov, F. A.; Polkanov, M. A.; Shvetsov, S. Yu; Savkin, A. E. [Moscow Scientific and Industrial Association RADON, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    1999-07-01

    The method of high-temperature conditioning the spent radioactive ion-exchange resins in combination with other combustible and incombustible radioactive waste in the plasma shaft furnace with obtaining a crystalline glass-like matrix as a final product has been developed. The method was tested on the pilot plant consisted of ceramic plasma melter, steel water-cooled shaft furnace, lined by fire-resistant concrete, and system of gas purification. The capacity of the furnace was within the limits from 10 to 15 kg/h. The volume and mass reduction factors of treated waste were 36 and 7.6, accordingly. The content of gaseous products of thermal decomposition of a waste at an output of the shaft furnace and properties of obtained slag compound were determined. Based on test results the proposals on creation of compact plasma plant for treatment of mixed radioactive waste including spent ion exchange resins were developed. (author). 3 refs., 2 tabs., 2 figs.

  4. The influence of plasma horizontal position on the neutron rate and flux of neutral atoms in injection heating experiment on the TUMAN-3M tokamak

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kornev, V. A.; Chernyshev, F. V.; Melnik, A. D.; Askinazi, L. G.; Wagner, F.; Vildjunas, M. I.; Zhubr, N. A.; Krikunov, S. V.; Lebedev, S. V.; Razumenko, D. V.; Tukachinsky, A. S.

    2013-11-01

    Horizontal displacement of plasma along the major radius has been found to significantly influence the fluxes of 2.45 MeV DD neutrons and high-energy charge-exchange atoms from neutral beam injection (NBI) heated plasma of the TUMAN-3M tokamak. An inward shift by Δ R = 1 cm causes 1.2-fold increase in the neutron flux and 1.9-fold increase in the charge-exchange atom flux. The observed increase in the neutron flux is attributed to joint action of several factors-in particular, improved high-energy ion capture and confinement and, probably, decreased impurity inflow from the walls, which leads to an increase in the density of target ions. A considerable increase in the flux of charge-exchange neutrals in inward-shifted plasma is due to the increased number of captured high-energy ions and, to some extent, the increased density of the neutral target. As a result of the increase in the content of high-energy ions, the central ion temperature T i (0) increased from 250 to 350 eV. The dependence of the neutron rate on major radius R 0 should be taken into account when designing compact tokamak-based neutron sources.

  5. Probing the K-edge of a laser heated aluminum plasma using X-rays from betatron oscillations in a laser wakefield accelerator with femtosecond resolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behm, Keegan; Hussein, Amina; Zhao, Tony; Hill, Edward; Maksimchuk, Anatoly; Nees, John; Yanovsky, Victor; Mangles, Stuart; Krushelnick, Karl; Thomas, Alexander; CenterUltrafast Optical Science Team; Plasmas Group Team

    2016-10-01

    Presented here are data from a two-beam pump-probe experiment. We used synchrotron-like X-rays created by betatron oscillations to probe a thin metal foil that is pumped by the secondary laser beam. The Hercules Ti:Sapphire laser facility was operated with a pulse duration of 34 fs and a power of 80 TW split. A 75-25 beam splitter was used to drive a laser wakefield accelerator and heat the secondary target. We observed opacity changes around the K-edge of thin aluminum foil as it was heated by an ultrafast pump laser. To understand how the opacity is changing with heating and expansion of the plasma, the delay between the two laser paths was adjusted on a femtosecond time scale from 50 to 400 fs. Experimental data for aluminum shows variation in opacity around the K-edge with changes in the probe delay. The transmitted synchrotron-like spectrum was measured using single photon counting on an X-ray CCD camera and was available on a shot-by-shot basis. The success of this work demonstrates a practical application for X-rays produced from betatron oscillations in a wakefield accelerator. U.S. Department of Energy and the National Nuclear Security Administration.

  6. Hepatic heat shock protein 70 and plasma cortisol levels in rainbow trout after tagging with a passive integrated transponder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feldhaus, J.W.; Heppell, S.A.; Mesa, M.G.; Li, H.

    2008-01-01

    This study examined the potentially stressful effects of tagging juvenile rainbow trout Oncorhynchus mykiss with passive integrated transponder (PIT) tags by measuring short-term (shock protein 70 (hsp70). In a laboratory experiment, plasma cortisol levels were measured in fish before they were tagged (0 h) and at 2, 6, 24, and 120 h after being tagged. Hepatic hsp70 levels were measured at 0, 24, and 120 h. All results were compared with those for fish that were handled but not tagged. Plasma cortisol levels were significantly higher in both treatment groups (tagged and handled but not tagged) at 2 h than in the pretreatment groups (0 h). Plasma cortisol levels in the treatment groups returned to near pretreatment levels by 6 h. However, there was a significant difference in plasma cortisol levels between treatment groups at 6 h. There were no significant differences in hepatic hsp70 levels among the two treatment groups, and hepatic hsp70 levels did not change through time. Our results suggest that PIT tagging is a low-impact tagging procedure for juvenile salmonids. ?? Copyright by the American Fisheries Society 2008.

  7. Development of Ion-Plasma Refractory Metallic Layers of Heat-Insulating Coatings for Cooled Turbine Rotor Blades

    Science.gov (United States)

    Budinovskii, S. A.; Muboyadzhyan, S. A.; Gayamov, A. M.; Matveev, P. V.

    2014-03-01

    Alloys ZhS32 and ZhS36 with heat-protection coatings (HPC) consisting of external ceramic layers and internal refractory metallic layers are studied. The coated alloys are tested for heat fastness and high-temperature strength at 1100 - 1150°C. The HPC with a metallic layer of the (Ni - Cr - Al - Hf) + Al system are shown to be more advantageous than similar HPC based on an SPD-2 + VSDP-16 commercial refractory coating. The effect of the HPC on the characteristics of high-temperature strength and fatigue resistance of alloys ZhS32 and ZhS36 is investigated.

  8. Self-consistent full-wave and Fokker-Planck calculations for ion cyclotron heating in non-Maxwellian plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaeger, E. F.

    2005-10-01

    High-performance burning plasma devices such as ITER will contain significant concentrations of non-thermal plasma particles arising from fusion reactions, neutral beam injection, and wave-driven diffusion in velocity space. Initial studies in 1-D [1] and experimental results [2] show that non-thermal energetic ions can significantly alter wave propagation and absorption in the ion cyclotron range of frequencies. In addition, these ions can absorb power at high harmonics of the cyclotron frequency where conventional 2-D global-wave models are not valid. In this work, the all-orders, full-wave solver AORSA [3] is generalized to treat non-Maxwellian velocity distributions. Quasi-linear diffusion coefficients are derived directly from the global wave fields and used to calculate the energetic ion velocity distribution with the CQL3D Fokker-Planck code [4]. Alternately, the quasi-linear coefficients can be calculated numerically by integrating the Lorentz force equations along particle orbits. Self-consistency between the wave electric field and resonant ion distribution function is achieved by iterating between the full-wave and Fokker-Planck solutions.[1] R. J. Dumont, C. K. Phillips and D. N. Smithe, Phys. Plasmas 12, 042508 (2005).[2] A. L. Rosenberg, J. E. Menard, J. R. Wilson, et al., Phys. Plasmas 11, 2441(2004).[3] E. F. Jaeger, L. A. Berry, J. R. Myra, et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 90, 195001-1 (2003).[4] R. W. Harvey and M. G. McCoy, in Proceedings of the IAEA Technical Committee Meeting on Advances in Simulation and Modeling of Thermonuclear Plasmas (IAEA, Montreal, 1992).

  9. Effect of intake on fasting heat production, respiratory quotient and plasma metabolites measured using the washed rumen technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    The objective was to investigate the effect of intake prior to fasting on concentrations of metabolites and hormones, respiratory quotient (RQ) and fasting heat production (HP) using the washed rumen technique and to compare these values with those from the fed state. Six Holstein steers (360 ± 22 k...

  10. Comparative analysis of core heat transport of JET high density H-mode plasmas in carbon wall and ITER-like wall

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hyun-Tae; Romanelli, M.; Voitsekhovitch, I.; Koskela, T.; Conboy, J.; Giroud, C.; Maddison, G.; Joffrin, E.; contributors, JET

    2015-06-01

    A consistent deterioration of global confinement in H-mode experiments has been observed in JET [1] following the replacement of all carbon plasma facing components (PFCs) with an all metal (‘ITER-like’) wall (ILW). This has been correlated to the observed degradation of the pedestal confinement, as lower electron temperature (Te) values are routinely measured at the top of the edge barrier region. A comparative investigation of core heat transport in JET-ILW and JET-CW (carbon wall) discharges has been performed, to assess whether core confinement has also been affected by the wall change. The results presented here have been obtained by analysing a set of discharges consisting of high density JET-ILW H-mode plasmas and comparing them against their counterpart discharges in JET-CW having similar global operational parameters. The set contains 10 baseline ({βN}=1.5∼ 2 ) discharge-pairs with 2.7 T toroidal magnetic field, 2.5 MA plasma current, and 14 to 17 MW of neutral beam injection (NBI) heating. Based on a Te profile analysis using high resolution Thomson scattering (HRTS) data, the Te profile peaking (i.e. core Te (ρ = 0.3) / edge Te (ρ = 0.7)) is found to be similar, and weakly dependent on edge Te, for both JET-ILW and JET-CW discharges. When ILW discharges are seeded with N2, core and edge Te both increase to maintain a similar peaking factor. The change in core confinement is addressed with interpretative TRANSP simulations. It is found that JET-ILW H-mode plasmas have higher NBI power deposition to electrons and lower NBI power deposition to ions as compared to the JET-CW counterparts. This is an effect of the lower electron temperature at the top of the pedestal. As a result, the core electron energy confinement time is reduced in JET-ILW discharges, but the core ion energy confinement time is not decreased. Overall, the core energy confinement is found to be the same in the JET-ILW discharges compared to the JET-CW counterparts.

  11. On the effect of electron temperature fluctuations on turbulent heat transport in the edge plasma of tokamaks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baudoin, C.; Tamain, P.; Ciraolo, G.; Futtersack, R.; Gallo, A.; Ghendrih, P.; Nace, N.; Norscini, C. [CEA, IRFM, Saint-Paul-lez-Durance (France); Marandet, Y. [Aix-Marseille Universite, CNRS, PIIM, UMR 7345, Marseille (France)

    2016-08-15

    In this paper we study the impact of electron temperature fluctuations in a two-dimensional turbulent model. This modification adds a second linear instability, known as sheath-driven conducting-wall instability, with respect to the previous isothermal model only driven by the interchange instability. Non-linear simulations, backed up by the linear analysis, show that the additional mechanism can change drastically the dynamics of turbulence (scales, density-potential correlation, and statistical momentum). Moreover, its importance relatively to the interchange instability should be more significant in the private flux region than in the main scrape of layer. Its effect on heat transport is also investigated for different regimes of parameters, results show that both instabilities are at play in the heat transport. Finally, the sheath negative resistance instability could be responsible for the existence of corrugated heat flux profiles in the scrape-off layer leading to a multiple decay length. (copyright 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  12. Developing Structural, High-heat flux and Plasma Facing Materials for a near-term DEMO Fusion Power Plant: the EU Assessment

    CERN Document Server

    Stork, D; Boutard, J-L; Buckthorpe, D; Diegele, E; Dudarev, S L; English, C; Federici, G; Gilbert, M R; Gonzalez, S; Ibarra, A; Linsmeier, Ch; Puma, A Li; Marbach, G; Morris, P F; Packer, L W; Raj, B; Rieth, M; Tran, M Q; Ward, D J; Zinkle, S J

    2014-01-01

    The findings of the EU 'Materials Assessment Group' (MAG), within the 2012 EU Fusion Roadmap exercise, are discussed. MAG analysed the technological readiness of structural, plasma facing and high heat flux materials for a DEMO concept to be constructed in the early 2030s, proposing a coherent strategy for R&D up to a DEMO construction decision. Technical consequences for the materials required and the development, testing and modelling programmes, are analysed using: a systems engineering approach, considering reactor operational cycles, efficient maintenance and inspection requirements, and interaction with functional materials/coolants; and a project-based risk analysis, with R&D to mitigate risks from material shortcomings including development of specific risk mitigation materials.

  13. Study of Scrape-Off-Layer Width in Ohmic and Lower Hybrid Wave Heated Double-Null Divertor Plasma in EAST%Study of Scrape-Off-Layer Width in Ohmic and Lower Hybrid Wave Heated Double-Null Divertor Plasma in EAST

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王亮; 刘鹏; 蒋敏; 熊豪; 万宝年; 高翔; 郭后扬; 胡立群; 吴振伟; 朱思铮; 罗广南; 徐国盛; 常加峰; 张炜; 颜宁; 丁斯晔; 刘少承; 明廷凤; 汪惠乾

    2011-01-01

    Edge profiles in Ohmic and lower hybrid (LH) wave heated discharges in EAST are presented. A comparison of the measured profiles is made with those from the theoretical prediction for the scrape-off-layer (SOL) width. The edge plasma parameters are diagnosed by a triple probe divertor diagnostic system and fast reciprocating probes at the outer mid-plane. The experimental results show that the SOL width of double-null (DN) divertor plasmas in EAST appears to exhibit a negative dependence on the power crossing the separatrix, which is consistent with the collisional SOL scalings of JET and Alcator C-Mod. This will provide useful information for extrapolation to the ITER SOL width scaling for power deposition.

  14. Combined effects of crystallography, heat treatment and surface polishing on blistering in tungsten exposed to high-flux deuterium plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zayachuk, Y.; Tanyeli, I.; Van Boxel, S.; Bystrov, K.; Morgan, T. W.; Roberts, S. G.

    2016-08-01

    For tungsten exposed to low-energy hydrogen-plasmas, it has been thought that grains with surface normal are most susceptible to blistering while those with surface normal are virtually impervious to it. Here, we report results showing that non-uniformity of blister distribution depends on the state of the surface due to polishing. In electrochemically polished material blisters appear on the grains with all orientations, while in mechanically polished material blister-free areas associated with particular orientations emerge. On the other hand, blistering is shown to have a strong dependence on the level of deformation within particular grains in partially recrystallized material.

  15. Heights integrated model as instrument for simulation of hydrodynamic, radiation transport, and heat conduction phenomena of laser-produced plasma in EUV applications.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sizyuk, V.; Hassanein, A.; Morozov, V.; Sizyuk, T.; Mathematics and Computer Science

    2007-01-16

    The HEIGHTS integrated model has been developed as an instrument for simulation and optimization of laser-produced plasma (LPP) sources relevant to extreme ultraviolet (EUV) lithography. The model combines three general parts: hydrodynamics, radiation transport, and heat conduction. The first part employs a total variation diminishing scheme in the Lax-Friedrich formulation (TVD-LF); the second part, a Monte Carlo model; and the third part, implicit schemes with sparse matrix technology. All model parts consider physical processes in three-dimensional geometry. The influence of a generated magnetic field on laser plasma behavior was estimated, and it was found that this effect could be neglected for laser intensities relevant to EUV (up to {approx}10{sup 12} W/cm{sup 2}). All applied schemes were tested on analytical problems separately. Benchmark modeling of the full EUV source problem with a planar tin target showed good correspondence with experimental and theoretical data. Preliminary results are presented for tin droplet- and planar-target LPP devices. The influence of three-dimensional effects on EUV properties of source is discussed.

  16. Dynamics of multiple flux tubes in sawtoothing KSTAR plasmas heated by electron cyclotron waves: I. Experimental analysis of the tube structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choe, G. H.; Yun, G. S.; Nam, Y.; Lee, W.; Park, H. K.; Bierwage, A.; Domier, C. W.; Luhmann, N. C., Jr.; Jeong, J. H.; Bae, Y. S.; the KSTAR Team

    2015-01-01

    Multiple (two or more) flux tubes are commonly observed inside and/or near the q = 1 flux surface in KSTAR tokamak plasmas with localized electron cyclotron resonance heating and current drive (ECH/CD). Detailed 2D and quasi-3D images of the flux tubes obtained by an advanced imaging diagnostic system showed that the flux tubes are m/n = 1/1 field-aligned structures co-rotating around the magnetic axis. The flux tubes typically merge together and become like the internal kink mode of the usual sawtooth, which then collapses like a usual sawtooth crash. A systematic scan of ECH/CD beam position showed a strong correlation with the number of flux tubes. In the presence of multiple flux tubes close to the q = 1 surface, the radially outward heat transport was enhanced, which explains naturally temporal changes of electron temperature. We emphasize that the multiple flux tubes are a universal feature distinct from the internal kink instability and play a critical role in the control of sawteeth using ECH/CD.

  17. Influence of Isothermal Heat Treatment on Porosity and Crystallite Size in Axial Suspension Plasma Sprayed Thermal Barrier Coatings for Gas Turbine Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashish Ganvir

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Axial suspension plasma spraying (ASPS is an advanced thermal spraying technique, which enables the creation of specific microstructures in thermal barrier coatings (TBCs used for gas turbine applications. However, the widely varying dimensional scale of pores, ranging from a few nanometers to a few tenths of micrometers, makes it difficult to experimentally measure and analyze porosity in SPS coatings and correlate it with thermal conductivity or other functional characteristics of the TBCs. In this work, an image analysis technique carried out at two distinct magnifications, i.e., low (500× and high (10,000×, was adopted to analyze the wide range of porosity. Isothermal heat treatment of five different coatings was performed at 1150 °C for 200 h under a controlled atmosphere. Significant microstructural changes, such as inter-columnar spacing widening or coalescence of pores (pore coarsening, closure or densification of pores (sintering and crystallite size growth, were noticed in all the coatings. The noted changes in thermal conductivity of the coatings following isothermal heat treatment are attributable to sintering, crystallite size growth and pore coarsening.

  18. Abscisic acid and hydrogen peroxide induce modification of plasma membrane H(+)-ATPase from Cucumis sativus L. roots under heat shock.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janicka-Russak, Małgorzata; Kabała, Katarzyna

    2012-11-01

    We examined the effect of heat shock (HS), for 2 h at 48°C, on plasma membrane H(+)-ATPase (PM-H(+)-ATPase) measured as the hydrolytic and H(+)-pumping activity. Some of the plants were transferred after 2 h HS to control temperature for another 24 h, as post-stressed (PS) plants. A significant increase of PM-H(+)-ATPase in plants subjected to HS was observed. The stimulation of PM-H(+)-ATPase was higher in PS plants. Estimation of transcript levels of cucumber PM-H(+)-ATPase in roots indicated that the action of HS affected gene expression levels. Transcript levels of two isoforms, CsHA4 and CsHA8, in PS plants were elevated. The expression of PM-H(+)-ATPase genes was not affected in plants treated for 2 h with HS. HS elevated the endogenous level of abscisic acid (ABA) both in plants treated for 2 h with HS and in PS plants. Moreover, in PS plants, a distinctly higher level of H(2)O(2) was observed. It was also demonstrated that transcript levels of PM-H(+)-ATPase were elevated in cucumber roots after 24-h treatment of plants with ABA or H(2)O(2). Both of these compounds seem to play an important role in increasing ATPase activity during heat stress, because the use of the inhibitors tungstate and DPI restrained stimulation of PM-H(+)-ATPase activity by heat. Moreover, protein blot analysis with an antibody against phosphothreonine and 14-3-3 protein indicated that increased activity of PM-H(+)-ATPase under HS resulted from phosphorylation of the enzyme. Taken together, the data presented here suggest that, under post-heat stress conditions, abscisic acid and hydrogen peroxide are involved in PM-ATPase modification, through stimulation of gene expression of that PM proton pump. Moreover, heat treatment of cucumber plants results in increased phosphorylation of PM-ATPase and thus fast post-translational modification, leading to activation of the enzyme protein.

  19. Development and Study of Hard-Facing Materials on the Base of Heat-Resisting High-Hardness Steels for Plasma-Jet Hard- Facing in Shielding-Doping Nitrogen Atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malushin, N. N.; Kovalev, A. P.; Valuev, D. V.; Shats, E. A.; Borovikov, I. F.

    2016-08-01

    The authors develop hard-facing materials on the base of heat-resisting highhardness steels for plasma-jet hard-facing in nitrogen atmosphere for manufacturing parts of mining and metallurgic equipment which significantly simplify the production process and effect a saving when producing bimetallic parts and tools.

  20. Plasma antibodies against heat shock protein 70 correlate with the incidence and severity of asthma in a Chinese population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Qingyi

    2005-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The heat shock proteins (Hsps are induced by stresses such as allergic factors and inflammatory responses in bronchi epithelial cells and therefore may be detectable in patients with asthma. However, the etiologic link between anti-Hsps and asthma (its severity and related inflammatory responses such as interleukin-4 and immunoglobulin E has not been established. We determined whether antibodies against Hsp60 and Hsp70 were present in patients with asthma and evaluated their associations with risk and severity of asthma. Methods We determined the levels of anti-Hsp60 and anti-Hsp70 by immunoblot and their associations with risk and symptom severity of asthma in 95 patients with asthma and 99 matched non-symptomatic controls using multivariate logistic regression analysis. Results Compared to the controls, asthma patients were more likely to have detectable anti-Hsp60 (17.2% vs 5.1% and anti-Hsp70 (33.7% vs 8.1% (p ≤ 0.001. In particular, the presence of anti-Hsp70 was associated with a greater than 2 fold risk for asthma (adjusted OR = 2.21; 95% CI = 1.35~3.59. Furthermore, both anti-Hsp60 and anti-Hsp70 levels were positively correlated with symptom severity (p Conclusions These data suggest that anti-Hsp60 and especially anti-Hsp70 correlate with the attacks and severity of asthma. The underlying molecular mechanisms linking antibodies to heat shock proteins and asthma remain to be investigated.

  1. Chronic fatigue syndrome: acute infection and history of physical activity affect resting levels and response to exercise of plasma oxidant/antioxidant status and heat shock proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jammes, Y; Steinberg, J G; Delliaux, S

    2012-07-01

    A history of high-level physical activity and/or acute infection might constitute stress factors affecting the plasma oxidant-antioxidant status and levels of heat shock proteins (HSPs) in patients with chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS). This case-control study compared data from 43 CFS patients to results from a matched control group of 23 healthy sedentary subjects. Five patients had no relevant previous history (group I). Eighteen had practised high-level sport (group II), and severe acute infection had been diagnosed in nine patients (group III). A combination of sport practice and infection was noted in 11 patients (group IV). After examination at rest, all subjects performed a maximal cycling exercise test. Plasma levels of two markers of oxidative stress [thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS) and reduced ascorbic acid (RAA)] and both HSP27 and HSP70 were measured. At rest, compared with the control group, the TBARS level was higher in groups II, III and IV patients, and the RAA level was lower in groups III and IV. In addition, HSP70 levels were significantly lower in all CFS groups, compared with controls, but negative correlations were found between resting HSP27 and HSP70 levels and the history of physical activity. After exercise, the peak level of TBARS significantly increased in groups II, III and IV, and the variations in HSP27 and HSP70 were attenuated or suppressed, with the greatest effects in groups III and IV. The presence of stress factors in the history of CFS patients is associated with severe oxidative stress and the suppression of protective HSP27 and HSP70 responses to exercise. © 2011 The Association for the Publication of the Journal of Internal Medicine.

  2. Trace metal analysis in arctic aerosols by an inductively coupled plasma-time of flight-mass spectrometer combined with an inductively heated vaporizer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luedke, Christian [ISAS - Institute for Analytical Sciences, Department Berlin, Albert-Einstein-Str. 9, 12489 Berlin (Germany)]. E-mail: luedke@ansci.de; Skole, Jochen [ISAS - Institute for Analytical Sciences, Department Berlin, Albert-Einstein-Str. 9, 12489 Berlin (Germany); Taubner, Kerstin [ISAS - Institute for Analytical Sciences, Department Berlin, Albert-Einstein-Str. 9, 12489 Berlin (Germany); Kriews, Michael [Alfred Wegener Institute for Polar- and Marine Research, Am Handelshafen 12, 27570 Bremerhaven (Germany)

    2005-11-15

    Two newly developed instruments were combined to analyze the trace metal content in size separated arctic aerosols during the measurement campaign ASTAR 2004 (Arctic Study of Tropospheric Aerosols, Clouds and Radiation 2004) at Spitsbergen in May-June 2004. The aim of this extensive aerosol measurement campaign was to obtain a database for model-calculations of arctic aerosol, which play an important role in the global climate change. The ASTAR project was centered on two aircraft measurement campaigns, scheduled from 2004 to 2005, addressing both aerosol and cloud measurements, combined with ground-based and satellite observations. In the present paper one example for the analysis of ground-based aerosol particles is described. The sampling of aerosol particles was performed in a well-known manner by impaction of the particles on cleaned graphite targets. By means of a cascade impactor eight size classes between 0.35 and 16.6 {mu}m aerodynamic diameters were separated. To analyze the metal content in the aerosol particles the targets were rapidly heated up to 2700 deg. C in an inductively heated vaporizer system (IHVS). An argon flow transports the vaporized sample material into the inductively coupled plasma (ICP) used as ionization source for the time of flight-mass spectrometer (TOF-MS). The simultaneous extraction of the ions from the plasma, as realized in the TOF instrument, allows to obtain the full mass spectrum of the sample during the vaporization pulse without any limitation in the number of elements detected. With optimized experimental parameters the element content in arctic aerosol particles was determined in a mass range between {sup 7}Li and {sup 209}Bi. Comparing the size distribution of the elemental content of the aerosol particles, two different meteorological situations were verified. For calibration acidified reference solutions were placed on the cleaned target inside the IHVS. The limits of detection (LOD) for the element mass on the

  3. Results of high heat flux testing of W/CuCrZr multilayer composites with percolating microstructure for plasma-facing components

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Greuner, Henri, E-mail: henri.greuner@ipp.mpg.de; Zivelonghi, Alessandro; Böswirth, Bernd; You, Jeong-Ha

    2015-10-15

    Highlights: • Improvement of the performance of plasma-facing components made of W and CuCrZr. • Functionally graded composite at the interface of W and CuCrZr to mitigate the CTE. • A three-layer composite system (W volume fraction: 70/50/30%) was developed. • Design of water-cooled divertor components up to 20 MW/m{sup 2} heat load for e.g. DEMO. • HHF tests up to 20 MW/m{sup 2} were successfully performed. - Abstract: Reliable joining of tungsten to copper is a major issue in the design of water-cooled divertor components for future fusion reactors. One of the suggested advanced engineering solutions is to use functionally graded composite interlayers. Recently, the authors have developed a novel processing route for fabricating multi-layer graded W/CuCrZr composites. Previous characterization confirmed that the composite materials possess enhanced strength compared to the matrix alloy and shows reasonable ductility up to 300 °C indicating large potential to extend the operation temperature limit. Furthermore, a three-layer composite system (W volume fraction: 70/50/30%) was developed as a graded interlayer between the W armour and CuCrZr heat sink. In this study, we investigated the structural performance of the graded joint. Three water-cooled mock-ups of a flat tile type component were fabricated using electron beam welding and thermally loaded at the hydrogen neutral beam test facility GLADIS. Cycling tests at 10 MW/m{sup 2} and screening tests up to 20 MW/m{sup 2} were successfully performed and confirmed the expected thermal performance of the compound. The measured temperature values were in good agreement with the prediction of finite element analysis. Microscopic investigation confirmed the structural integrity of the newly developed functionally graded composite after these tests.

  4. Effect of intake on fasting heat production, respiratory quotient and plasma metabolites measured using the washed rumen technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, D H; McLeod, K R; Koontz, A F; Foote, A P; Klotz, J L; Harmon, D L

    2015-01-01

    The objective was to investigate the effect of intake before fasting on concentrations of metabolites and hormones, respiratory quotient (RQ) and fasting heat production (HP) using the washed rumen technique and to compare these values with those from the fed state. Six Holstein steers (360±22 kg) were maintained at 21°C and fed three different energy intakes within a replicated 3×3 Latin square design with 21-day periods. Steers were fed alfalfa cubes to provide 1.0, 1.5 and 2.0×NEm during 19 days of each experimental period. Steers were placed in individual metabolism stalls fitted with indirect calorimetry head-boxes on day 20 of each experimental period (FED steers) and fed their normal meal. On day 21 of each period the reticulorumen was emptied, washed and refilled with ruminal buffer (NaCl=96; NaHCO3=24; KHCO3=30; K2HPO4=2; CaCl2=1.5; MgCl2=1.5 mmol/kg of buffer) aerated with 75% N2 and 25% CO2 before introduction to the rumen (steers were not fed; WASHED steers). Each gas exchange was measured over 24 h. HP for 1.0, 1.5 and 2.0×NEm were 479, 597 and 714 kJ/daykg0.75 (s.e.m. =16), respectively. The plateau RQ was 0.756, 0.824 and 0.860 for the 1.0, 1.5 and 2.0×NEm intakes for the FED steers, respectively. After rumen washing, fasting HP was 331, 359 and 400 kJ/daykg0.75 (s.e.m.=13) for 1.0, 1.5, and 2.0×NEm intakes before fasting, respectively. The RQ for WASHED rumen steers was 0.717, 0.710 and 0.719, respectively. Cortisol and β-hydroxybutyrate concentrations in WASHED rumen steers did not exceed threshold levels for severe energy deficit and stress as can be induced from prolonged fasting. This study demonstrates that a fasting state can be emulated using the washed rumen technique, minimizing the time required as opposed to traditional fasting methodologies, without causing a severe energy deficit and stress.

  5. Influence of Heat Treatment on the Bond Coat Cyclic Oxidation Behaviour in an Air-plasma-sprayed Thermal Barrier Coating System

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    W.R. Chen; X. Wu; B.R. Marple; P.C. Patnaik

    2004-01-01

    It is generally believed that a thermally grown oxide (TGO) layer of alumina provides enhanced protection to the metallic bond coat in thermal barrier coating (TBC) systems at elevated temperatures. However, in an air-plasma-sprayed (APS) TBC system with Co-32Ni-21Cr-8A1-0.5Y (wt%) bond coat, the TGO layer formed upon thermal exposure in air was predominantly chromia and spinels, which would not effectively protect the bond coat at above 1000℃. In addition,mixed oxides of chromia, spinel and nickel oxide formed heterogeneously between the ceramic coating and CoNiCrAlY bond coat, which would promote crack initiation and lead to premature TBC failure. A heat treatment in a low-pressure condition was applied to the as-sprayed TBC system, with the aim to produce an alumina layer as well as reduce the amount of detrimental oxides. The influence of this low-pressure oxidation treatment (LPOT) on the bond coat cyclic oxidation behaviour of the TBC system was also investigated.

  6. Influence of Heat Treatment on the Bond Coat Cyclic Oxidation Behaviour in an Air-plasma-sprayed Thermal Barrier Coating System

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    W.R.Chen; X.Wu; B.R.Marple; P.C.Patnaik

    2004-01-01

    It is generally believed that a thermally grown oxide (TGO) layer of alumina provides enhanced protection to the metallic bond coat in thermal barrier coating (TBC) systems at elevated temperatures. However, in an air-plasma-sprayed (APS) TBC system with Co-32Ni-21Cr-8A1-0.5Y (wt%) bond coat, the TGO layer formed upon thermal exposure in air was predominantly chromia and spinels, which would not effectively protect the bond coat at above 1000℃. In addition, mixed oxides of chromia, spinel and nickel oxide formed heterogeneously between the ceramic coating and CoNiCrA1Y bond coat, which would promote crack initiation and lead to premature TBC failure. A heat treatment in a low-pressure condition was applied to the as-sprayed TBC system, with the aim to produce an alumina layer as well as reduce the amount of detrimental oxides. The influence of this low-pressure oxidation treatment (LPOT) on the bond coat cyclic oxidation behaviour of the TBC system was also investigated.

  7. Study of heat and synchrotron radiation transport in fusion tokamak plasmas. Application to the modelling of steady state and fast burn termination scenarios for the international experimental fusion reactor ITER

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Villar Colome, J. [Association Euratom-CEA, Centre d`Etudes de Cadarache, 13 - Saint-Paul-lez-Durance (France). Dept. de Recherches sur la Fusion Controlee]|[Universitat Polytechnica de Catalunya (Spain)

    1997-12-01

    The aim of this thesis is to give a global scope of the problem of energy transport within a thermonuclear plasma in the context of its power balance and the implications when modelling ITER operating scenarios. This is made in two phases. First, by furnishing new elements to the existing models of heat and synchrotron radiation transport in a thermonuclear plasma. Second, by applying the improved models to plasma engineering studies of ITER operating scenarios. The scenarios modelled are the steady state operating point and the transient that appears to have the biggest technological implications: the fast burn termination. The conduction-convection losses are modelled through the energy confinement time. This parameter is empirically obtained from the existing experimental data, since the underlying mechanisms are not well understood. In chapter 2 an expression for the energy confinement time is semi-analytically deduced from the Rebut-Lallia-Watkins local transport model. The current estimates of the synchrotron radiation losses are made with expressions of the dimensionless transparency factor deduced from a 0-dimensional cylindrical model proposed by Trubnikov in 1979. In chapter 3 realistic hypothesis for the cases of cylindrical and toroidal geometry are included in the model to deduce compact explicit expressions for the fast numerical computation of the synchrotron radiation losses. Numerical applications are provided for the cylindrical case. The results are checked against the existing models. In chapter 4, the nominal operating point of ITER and its thermal stability is studied by means of a 0-dimensional burn model of the thermonuclear plasma in ignition. This model is deduced by the elements furnished by the plasma particle and power balance. Possible heat overloading on the plasma facing components may provoke severe structural damage, implying potential safety problems related to tritium inventory and metal activation. In chapter 5, the assessment

  8. Adaptive capability as indicated by behavioral and physiological responses, plasma HSP70 level, and PBMC HSP70 mRNA expression in Osmanabadi goats subjected to combined (heat and nutritional) stressors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shilja, Shaji; Sejian, V.; Bagath, M.; Mech, A.; David, C. G.; Kurien, E. K.; Varma, Girish; Bhatta, Raghavendra

    2016-09-01

    A study was conducted to assess the impact of heat and nutritional stress simultaneously on the adaptive capability as indicated by behavioral and physiological responses, plasma heat shock protein 70 (HSP70) level, and peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) HSP70 gene expression in goats. Twenty-four adult Osmanabadi bucks (average body weight (BW) 16.0 kg) were used in the present study. The bucks were divided into four groups viz., C ( n = 6; control), HS ( n = 6; heat stress), NS ( n = 6; nutritional stress), and CS ( n = 6; combined stress). The study was conducted for a period of 45 days. C and HS bucks had ad libitum access to their feed while NS and CS bucks were under restricted feed (30 % intake of C bucks) to induce nutritional stress. The HS and CS bucks were exposed to solar radiation for 6 h a day between 10:00 a.m. and 4:00 p.m. to induce heat stress. The data was analyzed using repeated measures analysis of variance. The standing time differed significantly ( P adaptive capabilities of Osmanabadi bucks as compared to that would occur individually. Further, the study indicated that lying time, drinking frequency, RR, RT, plasma HSP70, and PBMC HSP70 gene expression may act as ideal biological markers for assessing the impact of CS on adaptive capabilities in bucks.

  9. Effect of heat treatment on the optical properties of perovskite BaZr0.5Ce0.3Y0.2O3-δ ceramic prepared by spark plasma sintering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xing, Bohang; Cheng, Zhi; Wang, Cao; Zhao, Zhe

    2017-09-01

    The effect of heat treatment on the in-line transmittance of BaZr0.5Ce0.3Y0.2O3-δ (BZCY532) ceramics prepared by spark plasma sintering method was investigated. The loss of Ba in transparent BZCY532 ceramics is the key reason for the loss of transmittance during the annealing process. This problem can be effectively alleviated by using a powder bed of BZCY532. Heat treatment atmospheres, wet air and dry air, were also found to be critical for obtaining high quality transparent ceramics. A highly transparent BZCY532 ceramic with the in-line transmittance (Tin) of 71.4% at 2000 nm can be obtained by using SPS method followed by an annealing in powder bed at 1500 °C in wet air.

  10. Effect of neonatal or adult heat acclimation on plasma fT3 level, testicular thyroid receptors expression in male rats and testicular steroidogenesis in vitro in response to triiodothyronine treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurowicka, B; Chrusciel, M; Zmijewska, A; Kotwica, G

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the effect of heat acclimation of neonatal and adult rats on their testes response to in vitro treatment with triiodothyronine (T3). Four groups of rats were housed from birth as: 1) control (CR) at 20°C for 90 days, 2) neonatal heat-acclimated (NHA) at 34°C for 90 days, 3) adult heat-acclimated (AHA) at 20°C for 45 days followed by 45 days at 34°C and 4) de-acclimated (DA) at 34°C for 45 days followed by 45 days at 20°C. Blood plasma and both testes were harvested from 90-day old rats. Testicular slices were then submitted to in vitro treatment with T3 (100 ng/ml) for 8 h. Plasma fT3 level was lower in AHA, NHA and DA groups than in CR group. Basal thyroid hormone receptor α1 (Thra1) expression was higher in testes of NHA and DA and β1 receptor (Thrb1) in DA rats vs. other groups. In the in vitro experiment, T3: 1) decreased Thra1 expression in all groups and Thrb1 in DA group, 2) increased Star expression in CR, NHA and DA groups, and Hsd17b3 expression in NHA group, 3) decreased the expression of Cyp11a1 in NHA and DA groups, and Cyp19a1 in all the groups, 4) did not affect the activity of steroidogenic enzymes and steroid secretion (A4, T, E2) in all the groups. These results indicate, that heat acclimation of rats, depending on their age, mainly affects the testicular expression of steroidogenic enzymes in response to short-lasting treatment with T3.

  11. Developing structural, high-heat flux and plasma facing materials for a near-term DEMO fusion power plant: The EU assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stork, D., E-mail: derek.stork@btinternet.com [Euratom – CCFE Association, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon, Oxfordshire OX14 3DB (United Kingdom); Agostini, P. [ENEA, Brasimone Research Centre, 40032 Cumugnano, Bologna (Italy); Boutard, J.L. [CEA, cab HC, Saclay, F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Buckthorpe, D. [AMEC, Booths Park, Chelford Road, Knutsford, Cheshire WA16 8QZ (United Kingdom); Diegele, E. [Karlsruhe Institute for Technology, IMF-I, D-7602 Karlsruhe (Germany); Dudarev, S.L. [Euratom – CCFE Association, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon, Oxfordshire OX14 3DB (United Kingdom); English, C. [National Nuclear Laboratory, Chadwick House, Warrington Road, Birchwood Park WA3 6AE (United Kingdom); Federici, G. [EFDA Power Plant Physics and Technology, Boltzmannstr. 2, Garching 85748 (Germany); Gilbert, M.R. [Euratom – CCFE Association, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon, Oxfordshire OX14 3DB (United Kingdom); Gonzalez, S. [EFDA Power Plant Physics and Technology, Boltzmannstr. 2, Garching 85748 (Germany); Ibarra, A. [CIEMAT, Avda. Complutense 40, Madrid (Spain); Linsmeier, Ch. [Forschungszentrum Jülich GmbH, Institut für Energie- und Klimaforschung – Plasmaphysik, EURATOM Association, 52425 Jülich (Germany); Li Puma, A. [CEA, DEN, Saclay, DM2S, SERMA, F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Marbach, G. [CEA, cab HC, Saclay, F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Morris, P.F. [Formerly of TATA Steel Europe, Swinden Technology Centre, Moorgate, Rotherham S60 3AR (United Kingdom); Packer, L.W. [Euratom – CCFE Association, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon, Oxfordshire OX14 3DB (United Kingdom); Raj, B. [Indian National Academy of Engineering, Shaheed Jeet Singh Marg, New Delhi 110016 (India); Rieth, M. [Karlsruhe Institute for Technology, IMF-I, D-7602 Karlsruhe (Germany); and others

    2014-12-15

    The findings of the EU ‘Materials Assessment Group’ (MAG), within the 2012 EU Fusion Roadmap exercise, are discussed. MAG analysed the technological readiness of structural, plasma facing and high heat flux materials for a DEMO concept to be constructed in the early 2030s, proposing a coherent strategy for R and D up to a DEMO construction decision. A DEMO phase I with a ‘Starter Blanket’ and ‘Starter Divertor’ is foreseen: the blanket being capable of withstanding ⩾2 MW yr m{sup −2} fusion neutron fluence (∼20 dpa in the front-wall steel). A second phase ensues for DEMO with ⩾5 MW yr m{sup −2} first wall neutron fluence. Technical consequences for the materials required and the development, testing and modelling programmes, are analysed using: a systems engineering approach, considering reactor operational cycles, efficient maintenance and inspection requirements, and interaction with functional materials/coolants; and a project-based risk analysis, with R and D to mitigate risks from material shortcomings including development of specific risk mitigation materials. The DEMO balance of plant constrains the blanket and divertor coolants to remain unchanged between the two phases. The blanket coolant choices (He gas or pressurised water) put technical constraints on the blanket steels, either to have high strength at higher temperatures than current baseline variants (above 650 °C for high thermodynamic efficiency from He-gas coolant), or superior radiation-embrittlement properties at lower temperatures (∼290–320 °C), for construction of water-cooled blankets. Risk mitigation proposed would develop these options in parallel, and computational and modelling techniques to shorten the cycle-time of new steel development will be important to achieve tight R and D timescales. The superior power handling of a water-cooled divertor target suggests a substructure temperature operating window (∼200–350 °C) that could be realised, as a

  12. Developing structural, high-heat flux and plasma facing materials for a near-term DEMO fusion power plant: The EU assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stork, D.; Agostini, P.; Boutard, J. L.; Buckthorpe, D.; Diegele, E.; Dudarev, S. L.; English, C.; Federici, G.; Gilbert, M. R.; Gonzalez, S.; Ibarra, A.; Linsmeier, Ch.; Li Puma, A.; Marbach, G.; Morris, P. F.; Packer, L. W.; Raj, B.; Rieth, M.; Tran, M. Q.; Ward, D. J.; Zinkle, S. J.

    2014-12-01

    The findings of the EU 'Materials Assessment Group' (MAG), within the 2012 EU Fusion Roadmap exercise, are discussed. MAG analysed the technological readiness of structural, plasma facing and high heat flux materials for a DEMO concept to be constructed in the early 2030s, proposing a coherent strategy for R&D up to a DEMO construction decision. A DEMO phase I with a 'Starter Blanket' and 'Starter Divertor' is foreseen: the blanket being capable of withstanding ⩾2 MW yr m-2 fusion neutron fluence (∼20 dpa in the front-wall steel). A second phase ensues for DEMO with ⩾5 MW yr m-2 first wall neutron fluence. Technical consequences for the materials required and the development, testing and modelling programmes, are analysed using: a systems engineering approach, considering reactor operational cycles, efficient maintenance and inspection requirements, and interaction with functional materials/coolants; and a project-based risk analysis, with R&D to mitigate risks from material shortcomings including development of specific risk mitigation materials. The DEMO balance of plant constrains the blanket and divertor coolants to remain unchanged between the two phases. The blanket coolant choices (He gas or pressurised water) put technical constraints on the blanket steels, either to have high strength at higher temperatures than current baseline variants (above 650 °C for high thermodynamic efficiency from He-gas coolant), or superior radiation-embrittlement properties at lower temperatures (∼290-320 °C), for construction of water-cooled blankets. Risk mitigation proposed would develop these options in parallel, and computational and modelling techniques to shorten the cycle-time of new steel development will be important to achieve tight R&D timescales. The superior power handling of a water-cooled divertor target suggests a substructure temperature operating window (∼200-350 °C) that could be realised, as a baseline-concept, using tungsten on a copper

  13. Study of heat fluxes on plasma facing components in a tokamak from measurements of temperature by infrared thermography; Etude des champs de flux thermique sur les composants faisant face au plasma dans un tokamak a partir de mesures de temperature par thermographie infrarouge

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Daviot, R.

    2010-05-15

    The goal of this thesis is the development of a method of computation of those heat loads from measurements of temperature by infrared thermography. The research was conducted on three issues arising in current tokamaks but also future ones like ITER: the measurement of temperature on reflecting walls, the determination of thermal properties for deposits observed on the surface of tokamak components and the development of a three-dimensional, non-linear computation of heat loads. A comparison of several means of pyrometry, monochromatic, bi-chromatic and photothermal, is performed on an experiment of temperature measurement. We show that this measurement is sensitive to temperature gradients on the observed area. Layers resulting from carbon deposition by the plasma on the surface of components are modeled through a field of equivalent thermal resistance, without thermal inertia. The field of this resistance is determined, for each measurement points, from a comparison of surface temperature from infrared thermographs with the result of a simulation, which is based on a mono-dimensional linear model of components. The spatial distribution of the deposit on the component surface is obtained. Finally, a three-dimensional and non-linear computation of fields of heat fluxes, based on a finite element method, is developed here. Exact geometries of the component are used. The sensitivity of the computed heat fluxes is discussed regarding the accuracy of the temperature measurements. This computation is applied to two-dimensional temperature measurements of the JET tokamak. Several components of this tokamak are modeled, such as tiles of the divertor, upper limiter and inner and outer poloidal limiters. The distribution of heat fluxes on the surface of these components is computed and studied along the two main tokamak directions, poloidal and toroidal. Toroidal symmetry of the heat loads from one tile to another is shown. The influence of measurements spatial resolution

  14. SUPERFAST THERMALIZATION OF PLASMA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, C.C.

    1962-06-12

    A method is given for the superfast thermalization of plasma by shock conversion of the kinetic energy stored in rotating plasma rings or plasmoids colliding at near supersonic speeds in a containment field to heat energy in the resultant confined plasma mass. The method includes means for generating rotating plasmoids at the opposite ends of a Pyrotron or Astron containment field. The plasmoids are magnetically accelerated towards each other into the opposite ends of time containment field. During acceleration of the plasmoids toward the center of the containment field, the intensity of the field is sequentially increased to adiabatically compress the plasmoids and increase the plasma energy. The plasmoids hence collide with a violent shock at the eenter of the containment field, causing the substantial kinetic energy stored in the plasmoids to be converted to heat in the resultant plasma mass. (AEC)

  15. Adaptive capability as indicated by behavioral and physiological responses, plasma HSP70 level, and PBMC HSP70 mRNA expression in Osmanabadi goats subjected to combined (heat and nutritional) stressors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shilja, Shaji; Sejian, V; Bagath, M; Mech, A; David, C G; Kurien, E K; Varma, Girish; Bhatta, Raghavendra

    2016-09-01

    A study was conducted to assess the impact of heat and nutritional stress simultaneously on the adaptive capability as indicated by behavioral and physiological responses, plasma heat shock protein 70 (HSP70) level, and peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) HSP70 gene expression in goats. Twenty-four adult Osmanabadi bucks (average body weight (BW) 16.0 kg) were used in the present study. The bucks were divided into four groups viz., C (n = 6; control), HS (n = 6; heat stress), NS (n = 6; nutritional stress), and CS (n = 6; combined stress). The study was conducted for a period of 45 days. C and HS bucks had ad libitum access to their feed while NS and CS bucks were under restricted feed (30 % intake of C bucks) to induce nutritional stress. The HS and CS bucks were exposed to solar radiation for 6 h a day between 10:00 a.m. and 4:00 p.m. to induce heat stress. The data was analyzed using repeated measures analysis of variance. The standing time differed significantly (P < 0.01) between ad libitum fed groups (C and HS) and restricted feeding groups (NS and CS). The highest (P < 0.01) lying time was recorded in the CS group while the lowest in the C and HS groups. The highest (P < 0.01) drinking frequency was also recorded in the CS group. Water intake recorded was significantly (P < 0.01) higher in both the HS and CS groups. The highest respiration rate (RR), pulse rate (PR), and rectal temperature (RT) during the afternoon were also recorded in the CS group. Further, skin temperature of the head, flank, and scrotum during the afternoon was also higher (P < 0.01) in the CS group. In addition, both plasma HSP70 concentration and PBMC HSP70 messenger RNA (mRNA) transcript expression were also significantly (P < 0.01) higher in the CS group. It can be concluded from this study that when two stressors occur simultaneously, they may have severe impact on adaptive capabilities of Osmanabadi bucks as compared to that would occur individually

  16. Target particle and heat loads in low-triangularity L-mode plasmas in JET with carbon and beryllium/tungsten walls

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Groth, M., E-mail: mathias.groth@aalto.fi [Aalto University, Association EURATOM-Tekes, Espoo (Finland); Brezinsek, S. [Institute for Energy and Climate Research, Association EURATOM-FZJ Jülich (Germany); Belo, P. [Institute of Plasmas and Nuclear Fusion, Association EURATOM-IST, Lisbon (Portugal); Corrigan, G. [Culham Centre of Fusion Energy, EURATOM-Association, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon (United Kingdom); Harting, D.; Wiesen, S. [Institute for Energy and Climate Research, Association EURATOM-FZJ Jülich (Germany); Beurskens, M.N.A.; Brix, M. [Culham Centre of Fusion Energy, EURATOM-Association, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon (United Kingdom); Clever, M.; Coenen, J.W. [Institute for Energy and Climate Research, Association EURATOM-FZJ Jülich (Germany); Eich, T. [Max-Planck Institute for Plasma Physics, EURATOM-Association, Garching (Germany); Flanagan, J.; Giroud, C. [Culham Centre of Fusion Energy, EURATOM-Association, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon (United Kingdom); Huber, A. [Institute for Energy and Climate Research, Association EURATOM-FZJ Jülich (Germany); Jachmich, S. [Association “EURATOM Belgium State”, Laboratory for Plasma Physics, Brussels (Belgium); Kruezi, U.; Lehnen, M. [Institute for Energy and Climate Research, Association EURATOM-FZJ Jülich (Germany); Lowry, C. [EFDA Close Support Unit, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon (United Kingdom); Maggi, C.F. [Max-Planck Institute for Plasma Physics, EURATOM-Association, Garching (Germany); Marsen, S. [Max-Planck-Institut for Plasma Physics, EURATOM-Association, Greifswald (Germany); and others

    2013-07-15

    Divertor radiation profiles, and power and particle fluxes to the target have been measured in attached JET L-mode plasmas with carbon and beryllium/tungsten wall materials. In the beryllium/tungsten configuration, factors of 2–3 higher power loads and peak temperatures at the low field side target were observed in high-recycling scrape-off layer conditions, whilst in close-to-sheath-limited conditions almost identical plasmas were obtained. The 30% reduction in total radiation with the beryllium/tungsten wall is consistent with a reduction of carbon as the dominant impurity radiator; however similar ion current to the plates, emission from recycling neutrals and neutral pressures in the pumping plenum were measured. Simulations with the EDGDE2/EIRENE code of these plasmas indicate a reduction of the total divertor radiation when carbon is omitted, but significantly higher power loads in high-recycling and detached conditions are predicted than measured.

  17. Electron cyclotron heating and current drive

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Westerhof, E.

    1996-01-01

    Plasma heating and non-inductive current drive by waves in the electron cyclotron range of frequencies are reviewed. Both theoretical aspects concerning wave properties, heating and current drive mechanisms, as well as the major experimental results are summarized.

  18. Ion heating, burnout of the high-frequency field, and ion sound generation under the development of a modulation instability of an intense Langmuir wave in a plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kirichok, A. V., E-mail: sandyrcs@gmail.com; Kuklin, V. M.; Pryimak, A. V. [Institute for High Technologies, V.N. Karazin Kharkiv National University, 4 Svobody Sq., Kharkiv 61022 (Ukraine); Zagorodny, A. G. [Bogolyubov Institute for Theoretical Physics, 14-b, Metrolohichna str., Kiev 03680 (Ukraine)

    2015-09-15

    The development of one-dimensional parametric instabilities of intense long plasma waves is considered in terms of the so-called hybrid models, with electrons being treated as a fluid and ions being regarded as particles. The analysis is performed for both cases when the average plasma field energy is lower (Zakharov's hybrid model—ZHM) or greater (Silin's hybrid model—SHM) than the plasma thermal energy. The efficiency of energy transfer to ions and to ion perturbations under the development of the instability is considered for various values of electron-to-ion mass ratios. The energy of low-frequency oscillations (ion-sound waves) is found to be much lower than the final ion kinetic energy. We also discuss the influence of the changes in the damping rate of the high-frequency (HF) field on the instability development. The decrease of the absorption of the HF field inhibits the HF field burnout within plasma density cavities and gives rise to the broadening of the HF spectrum. At the same time, the ion velocity distribution tends to the normal distribution in both ZHM and SHM.

  19. Inactivation of chemical and heat-resistant spores of Bacillus and Geobacillus by nitrogen cold atmospheric plasma and comparison to thermal and chemical based methods

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bokhorst-van de Veen, van H.; Xie, H.; Esveld, D.C.; Abee, T.; Mastwijk, H.C.; Nierop Groot, M.N.

    2015-01-01

    Bacterial spores are resistant to severe conditions and form a challenge to eradicate from food or food packaging material. Cold atmospheric plasma (CAP) treatment is receiving more attention as potential sterilization method at relatively mild conditions but the exact mechanism of inactivation is s

  20. Inactivation of chemical and heat-resistant spores of Bacillus and Geobacillus by nitrogen cold atmospheric plasma and comparison to thermal and chemical based methods

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bokhorst-van de Veen, van H.; Xie, H.; Esveld, D.C.; Abee, T.; Mastwijk, H.C.; Nierop Groot, M.N.

    2015-01-01

    Bacterial spores are resistant to severe conditions and form a challenge to eradicate from food or food packaging material. Cold atmospheric plasma (CAP) treatment is receiving more attention as potential sterilization method at relatively mild conditions but the exact mechanism of inactivation is

  1. Ion heating, burnout of the HF field and ion sound generation under the development of a modulation instability of an intense Langmuir wave in a plasma

    CERN Document Server

    Kirichok, A V; Pryimak, A V; Zagorodny, A G

    2015-01-01

    The development of one-dimensional parametric instabilities of intense long-wave plasma waves is considered in terms of the so-called hybrid models, when electrons are treated as a fluid and ions are regarded as particles. The analysis is performed for both cases when the average plasma field energy is lower (Zakharov's hybrid model -- ZHM) or greater (Silin's hybrid model -- SHM) than the plasma thermal energy. The efficiency of energy transfer to ions and to ion perturbations under the development of the instability is considered for various values of electron-to-ion mass ratios. The energy of low-frequency (LF) oscillations (ion-sound waves) is found to be much lower than the final ion kinetic energy. We also discuss the influence of the changes in the damping rate of the high-frequency (HF) field on the instability development. Reduced absorption of the HF field leads to the retardation of the HF field burnout within plasma density cavities and to the broadening of the HF spectrum. At the same time, the i...

  2. Ion heating, burnout of the high-frequency field, and ion sound generation under the development of a modulation instability of an intense Langmuir wave in a plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirichok, A. V.; Kuklin, V. M.; Pryimak, A. V.; Zagorodny, A. G.

    2015-09-01

    The development of one-dimensional parametric instabilities of intense long plasma waves is considered in terms of the so-called hybrid models, with electrons being treated as a fluid and ions being regarded as particles. The analysis is performed for both cases when the average plasma field energy is lower (Zakharov's hybrid model—ZHM) or greater (Silin's hybrid model—SHM) than the plasma thermal energy. The efficiency of energy transfer to ions and to ion perturbations under the development of the instability is considered for various values of electron-to-ion mass ratios. The energy of low-frequency oscillations (ion-sound waves) is found to be much lower than the final ion kinetic energy. We also discuss the influence of the changes in the damping rate of the high-frequency (HF) field on the instability development. The decrease of the absorption of the HF field inhibits the HF field burnout within plasma density cavities and gives rise to the broadening of the HF spectrum. At the same time, the ion velocity distribution tends to the normal distribution in both ZHM and SHM.

  3. Target particle and heat loads in low-triangularity L-mode plasmas in JET with carbon and beryllium/tungsten walls

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Groth, M.; Brezinsek, S.; Belo, P.; Corrigan, G.; Harting, D.; Wiesen, S.; Beurskens, M. N. A.; Brix, M.; Clever, M.; Coenen, J. W.; Eich, T.; Flanagan, J.; Giroud, C.; Huber, A.; Jachmich, S.; Kruezi, U.; Lehnen, M.; Lowry, C.; Maggi, C. F.; Marsen, S.; Meigs, A. G.; Sergienko, G.; Sieglin, B.; Silva, C.; Sirinelli, A.; Stamp, M. F.; van Rooij, G. J.

    2013-01-01

    Divertor radiation profiles, and power and particle fluxes to the target have been measured in attached \\{JET\\} L-mode plasmas with carbon and beryllium/tungsten wall materials. In the beryllium/tungsten configuration, factors of 2–3 higher power loads and peak temperatures at the low field side tar

  4. Electron heat flux instability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saeed, Sundas; Sarfraz, M.; Yoon, P. H.; Lazar, M.; Qureshi, M. N. S.

    2017-02-01

    The heat flux instability is an electromagnetic mode excited by a relative drift between the protons and two-component core-halo electrons. The most prominent application may be in association with the solar wind where drifting electron velocity distributions are observed. The heat flux instability is somewhat analogous to the electrostatic Buneman or ion-acoustic instability driven by the net drift between the protons and bulk electrons, except that the heat flux instability operates in magnetized plasmas and possesses transverse electromagnetic polarization. The heat flux instability is also distinct from the electrostatic counterpart in that it requires two electron species with relative drifts with each other. In the literature, the heat flux instability is often called the 'whistler' heat flux instability, but it is actually polarized in the opposite sense to the whistler wave. This paper elucidates all of these fundamental plasma physical properties associated with the heat flux instability starting from a simple model, and gradually building up more complexity towards a solar wind-like distribution functions. It is found that the essential properties of the instability are already present in the cold counter-streaming electron model, and that the instability is absent if the protons are ignored. These instability characteristics are highly reminiscent of the electron firehose instability driven by excessive parallel temperature anisotropy, propagating in parallel direction with respect to the ambient magnetic field, except that the free energy source for the heat flux instability resides in the effective parallel pressure provided by the counter-streaming electrons.

  5. Plasma Therapy: An Overview

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajkumar Diwan

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Definition: Plasma, the fourth state of matter, is a collection of charged particles (electrons, ions, neutral atoms. Recent demonstration of plasma technology in treatment of living cells, tissue and organs are creating a new field at the intersection of plasma science and technology with biology and medicine known as plasma medicine. Plasma medicine is one of the newest fields of modem applied plasma chemistry. It appeared several years ago and comprises studies concerning the direct action of low-temperature, one atmosphere air plasma (cold plasma/nonthermal plasmalnonequilibrium on body tissues for various noninvasive therapeutic treatments or diagnostics purpose. The study of plasma holds promise for a myriad of applications ranging from lasers and electronics, hazardous decontamination, sterilization and disinfection of foods, soil, water, instruments, to medical uses in wound healing and treating certain types of tumors and cancers. Plasma represents a new state-of-the-art sterilization and disinfection treatment for certain oral and environmental pathogens, heat-sensitive materials, hard and soft surfaces, and may assist health care facilities in the management of various health concerns. The role that low temperature atmospheric pressure plasma (LTAPP could play in the inactivation of pathogenic microorganisms might prove to be a new, faster, more economical alternative.

  6. Experiments with laser heated cavity targets for the investigation of heavy ion-plasma interaction; Experimente mit lasergeheizten Hohlraeumen fuer die Untersuchung der Wechselwirkung von Schwerionen mit ionisierter Materie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schaumann, G.

    2007-07-01

    This dissertation research aims to develop a cavity as a converter for laser radiation into soft X-rays, and to characterise this thermal radiation. The concept of indirect heating allows for the production of a spatially homogenous plasma at solid state density. For the purpose of this research, the Nhelix laser system has been extended by a second oscillator with a shorter pulse length, and the optical system layout has been redesigned for both beams. This dissertation presents data on the energy loss of Ar-ions in plasma targets generated by direct heating of carbon foils with the Nhelix laser. Due to the use of a new ion detector, the energy resolution ({delta}E/E{approx}0.1%) and the signal-to-noise ratio of the measurements were improved. Measurements with thin carbon foil showed the maximum energy loss in the plasma to be 31% above the energy loss in comparison with the cold foil. The transparency of thin carbon foils for laser light has been investigated as a function of foil thickness and pulse length, which resulted in a maximum laser pulse length applicable for a certain foil thickness and laser intensity. an interferometer was developed and constructed, with which the electron density could be determined with spatial resolution, and for the first time also at different times during the experiment. This diagnostic provides images of the interference pattern with a time difference of 1.5 ns and allows determination of the free electron density up to a maximum density of 2 x 10{sup 20} cm{sup -3}. In order to characterise the cavity radiation, a spectrometer with high time resolution was developed and calibrated in terms of absolute intensity units with a deuterium-lamp. While the laser heats the cavity, the rise in temperature was measured with a time resolution <1 ns up to a maximal radiation temperature of 73{+-}8 eV/k{sub B} (85 x 10{sup 4} C). For this particular cavity geometry, conversion efficiency (with time resolution) of laser energy to thermal

  7. Heat Waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heat Waves Dangers we face during periods of very high temperatures include: Heat cramps: These are muscular pains and ... having trouble with the heat. If a heat wave is predicted or happening… - Slow down. Avoid strenuous ...

  8. Heat Islands

    Science.gov (United States)

    EPA's Heat Island Effect Site provides information on heat islands, their impacts, mitigation strategies, related research, a directory of heat island reduction initiatives in U.S. communities, and EPA's Heat Island Reduction Program.

  9. Magnetic Fusion Energy Plasma Interactive and High Heat Flux Components: Volume 5, Technical assessment of critical issues in the steady state operation of fusion confinement devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1988-01-01

    Critical issues for the steady state operation of plasma confinement devices exist in both the physics and technology fields of fusion research. Due to the wide range and number of these issues, this technical assessment has focused on the crucial issues associated with the plasma physics and the plasma interactive components. The document provides information on the problem areas that affect the design and operation of a steady state ETR or ITER type confinement device. It discusses both tokamaks and alternative concepts, and provides a survey of existing and planned confinement machines and laboratory facilities that can address the identified issues. A universal definition of steady state operation is difficult to obtain. From a physics point of view, steady state is generally achieved when the time derivatives approach zero and the operation time greatly exceeds the characteristic time constants of the device. Steady state operation for materials depends on whether thermal stress, creep, fatigue, radiation damage, or power removal are being discussed. For erosion issues, the fluence and availability of the machine for continuous operation are important, assuming that transient events such as disruptions do not limit the component lifetimes. The panel suggests, in general terms, that steady state requires plasma operation from 100 to 1000 seconds and an availability of more than a few percent, which is similar to the expectations for an ETR type device. The assessment of critical issues for steady state operation is divided into four sections: physics issues; technology issues; issues in alternative concepts; and devices and laboratory facilities that can address these problems.

  10. Studies of Plasma Instabilities Excited by Ground-Based High Power HF (Heating) Facilities and of X and Gamma Ray Emission in Runaway Breakdown Processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-08-01

    latitude ( HAARP , TROMSO) and mid latitude (SURA) facilities [1]. The very strong and fully reproducible plasma perturbations in ionosphere are observed...beam propagating along magnetic field (θ = 0), in this case factor κs ≈ 1. As an a example we will consider now the HAARP facility. The ERP for HAARP ...as a function of fre- quency f0 is presented in the Table 1. ISTC 2236p 12 Table 1 ERP as function of wave frequency for HAARP (2001) f0 (MHz

  11. Surface modification and deuterium retention in reduced-activation steels under low-energy deuterium plasma exposure. Part II: steels pre-damaged with 20 MeV W ions and high heat flux

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogorodnikova, O. V.; Zhou, Z.; Sugiyama, K.; Balden, M.; Pintsuk, G.; Gasparyan, Yu.; Efimov, V.

    2017-03-01

    The reduced-activation ferritic/martensitic (RAFM) steels including Eurofer (9Cr) and oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) steels by the addition of Y2O3 particles investigated in Part I were pre-damaged either with 20 MeV W ions at room temperature at IPP (Garching) or with high heat flux at FZJ (Juelich) and subsequently exposed to low energy (~20-200 eV per D) deuterium (D) plasma up to a fluence of 2.9  ×  1025 D m-2 in the temperature range from 290 K to 700 K. The pre-irradiation with 20 MeV W ions at room temperature up to 1 displacement per atom (dpa) has no noticeable influence on the steel surface morphology before and after the D plasma exposure. The pre-irradiation with W ions leads to the same concentration of deuterium in all kinds of investigated steels, regardless of the presence of nanoparticles and Cr content. It was found that (i) both kinds of irradiation with W ions and high heat flux increase the D retention in steels compared to undamaged steels and (ii) the D retention in both pre-damaged and undamaged steels decreases with a formation of surface roughness under the irradiation of steels with deuterium ions with incident energy which exceeds the threshold of sputtering. The increase in the D retention in RAFM steels pre-damaged either with W ions (damage up to ~3 µm) or high heat flux (damage up to ~10 µm) diminishes with increasing the temperature. It is important to mention that the near surface modifications caused by either implantation of high energy ions or a high heat flux load, significantly affect the total D retention at low temperatures or low fluences but have a negligible impact on the total D retention at elevated temperatures and high fluences because, in these cases, the D retention is mainly determined by bulk diffusion.

  12. Manufacturing and high heat-flux testing of brazed actively cooled mock-ups with Ti-doped graphite and CFC as plasma-facing materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garcia-Rosales, C; Ordas, N; Lopez-Galilea, I [CEIT and Tecnun (University of Navarra), 20018 San Sebastian (Spain); Pintsuk, G; Linke, J [Forschungszentrum Juelich GmbH, EURATOM Association, 52425 Juelich (Germany); Gualco, C; Grattarola, M; Mataloni, F [Ansaldo Ricerche S.p.A., I-16152 Genoa (Italy); Ramos Fernandez, J M; MartInez Escandell, M [Departamento de Quimica Inorganica, University of Alicante, E-03690 Alicante (Spain); Centeno, A; Blanco, C [Instituto Nacional del Carbon (CSIC), Apdo. 73, E-33080 Oviedo (Spain)], E-mail: cgrosales@ceit.es

    2009-12-15

    In the frame of the EU project ExtreMat new Ti-doped isotropic graphites and carbon fibre-reinforced carbons (CFCs) with high thermal conductivity and reduced chemical erosion were brazed to a CuCrZr heat-sink to produce flat-tile actively cooled mock-ups (MUs). Brazing was done using a low CTE interlayer to shift the stresses to the metal-metal interface. These MUs were exposed to high heat-fluxes in the electron beam facility JUDITH. Screening tests were conducted increasing the heat load stepwise up to 15 MW m{sup -2}, followed by 100 cycles at 15 MW m{sup -2}, subsequent screening up to 20 MW m{sup -2} and 100 cycles at 20 MW m{sup -2}. All MUs withstood screening at 15 MW m{sup -2} and most of them survived screening at 20 MW m{sup -2}. Ti-doped CFC MUs showed a significant improvement compared with the undoped reference CFC, surviving several cycles at 20 MW m{sup -2} on all tiles. One of the Ti-doped graphite MUs withstood 100 cycles at 20 MW m{sup -2} on one tile, representing a promising result.

  13. Features of the Electromagnetic and Plasma Disturbances Induced at the Altitudes of the Earth's Outer Ionosphere by Modification of the Ionospheric F 2 Region Using High-Power Radio Waves Radiated by the SURA Heating Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frolov, V. L.; Rapoport, V. O.; Schorokhova, E. A.; Belov, A. S.; Parrot, M.; Rauch, J.-L.

    2016-08-01

    In this paper we systematize the results of studying the characteristics of the plasma-density ducts, which was conducted in 2005-2010 during the DEMETER-satellite operation. The ducts are formed at altitudes of about 700 km as a result of the ionospheric F 2 region modification by high-power high-frequency radio waves radiated by the midlatitude SURA heating facility. All the performed measurements are used as the basis for determining the formation conditions for such ducts, the duct characteristics are studied, and the opportunities for the duct influence on the ionosphere-magnetosphere coupling and propagation of radio waves of various frequency ranges are demonstrated. The results of numerical simulation of the formation of such ducts are presented.

  14. Inter-ELM evolution of the pedestal structures in type-I ELMy H-mode plasmas with LHW and NBI heating on EAST

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, X.; Zang, Q.; Xiao, S.; Wang, T.; Hu, A.; Tian, B.; Li, D.; Zhou, H.; Zhao, J.; Hsieh, C.; Li, M.; Yan, N.; Gong, X.; Hu, L.; Xu, G.; Gao, X.; the EAST Team

    2017-04-01

    The evolution characteristics of type-I ELMy high-confinement mode pedestal are examined in EAST based on the recently developed Thomson scattering system. The influence of the plasma current on pedestal evolvement has been confirmed experimentally. In the higher I p case (500 kA) the pedestal height shows an increase trend until the onset of next ELM and in the lower I p cases (300 and 400 kA), however, this buildup saturates at the first ∼30% of the ELM cycle. In contrast, the width increases only during the first ∼70% of the ELM cycle and then keeps almost stable in three I p cases, but resulting in different widening size of ∼1.5, 1 and 0.5 cm for 300, 400 and 500 kA respectively. Experimental results show that the pedestal pressure width has good correlation with poloidal beta as {{{Δ }}}{{p}{{e}},\\psi }=0.16\\sqrt{{{β }}{{p}{{o}}{{l}}}}, where the fitting coefficient 0.16 is not changed with different plasma currents but a little larger than that of other machines. For each current level, the pedestal density increases while the pedestal temperature decreases. But with increasing {I}{{p}} platforms, the pedestal height prior to the ELM onset shows a near quadratic (within error bars) increase. Experimental measurements demonstrate that the decrease of {{Δ }}{W}{{E}{{L}}{{M}}} with increasing {ν }{{p}{{e}}{{d}}}* comes mostly from the reduction of the plasma temperature drop, while the pedestal density height keeps relatively stable. Additional injection of LHW has been proved to modify the pedestal structure which should be responsible for the remaining scatter of the experimental data.

  15. Plasma parameters controlled by remote electron shower in a double plasma device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishra, M. K.; Phukan, A.

    2012-07-01

    The principal feature of this experiment is the electron showers consisting of three tungsten wires embedded by the plasma, which are heated up consequently emitting electrons inside the diffused plasma to control the plasma parameters in the discharge section of a double plasma device. These cold electrons emitted by the heated filament are free from maintenance of discharge which is sustained in the source section. The target plasma, where electrons are injected is produced as a result of diffusion from the source section. It is found that, plasma density and plasma potential can be effectively controlled in this way.

  16. Gyrokinetic simulation of particle and heat transport in the presence of Wide orbits and strong profile variations in the Edge plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heikkinen, J.A. [Euratom-Tekes Association, VTT, P.O. Box 1000, FI-02044 VTT (Finland); Henriksson, S.; Janhunen, S.; Kiviniemi, T.P. [Euratom-Tekes Association, Helsinki University of Technology, P.O. Box 2200, FI-02015 TKK (Finland); Ogando, F. [Euratom-Tekes Association, Helsinki University of Technology, P.O. Box 2200, FI-02015 TKK (Finland); Universidad Nacional de Educacion a Distancia, C/ Juan del Rosal, 12 28040 Madrid (Spain)

    2006-09-15

    A full f nonlinear 5D gyrokinetic electrostatic particle-in-cell code ELMFIRE using an implicit direct solution method for ion polarization drift and electron parallel velocity response to electric field and its validation are described. The developed code is applied for transport analysis in a tokamak plasma at steep pressure gradient. The role of turbulence and neoclassical equilibrium in determining the flux surface averaged radial electric field component are investigated, as well as the role of the latter in affecting the saturation level of the turbulence. (copyright 2006 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  17. [The Role of Membrane-Bound Heat Shock Proteins Hsp90 in Migration of Tumor Cells in vitro and Involvement of Cell Surface Heparan Sulfate Proteoglycans in Protein Binding to Plasma Membrane].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snigireva, A V; Vrublevskaya, V V; Skarga, Y Y; Morenkov, O S

    2016-01-01

    Heat shock protein Hsp90, detected in the extracellular space and on the membrane of cells, plays an important role in cell motility, migration, invasion and metastasis of tumor cells. At present, the functional role and molecular mechanisms of Hsp90 binding to plasma membrane are not elucidated. Using isoform-specific antibodies against Hsp90, Hsp9α and Hsp90β, we showed that membrane-bound Hsp90α and Hsp90β play a significant role in migration of human fibrosarcoma (HT1080) and glioblastoma (A-172) cells in vitro. Disorders of sulfonation of cell heparan sulfates, cleavage of cell heparan. sulfates by heparinase I/III as well as treatment of cells with heparin lead to an abrupt reduction in the expression level of Hsp90 isoforms. Furthermore, heparin significantly inhibits tumor cell migration. The results obtained demonstrate that two isoforms of membrane-bound Hsp90 are involved in migration of tumor cells in vitro and that cell surface heparan sulfate proteoglycans play a pivotal role in the "anchoring" of Hsp90α and Hsp90β to the plasma membrane.

  18. Acute stressor exposure modifies plasma exosome-associated heat shock protein 72 (Hsp72 and microRNA (miR-142-5p and miR-203.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lida A Beninson

    Full Text Available Exosomes, biologically active nanoparticles (40-100 nm released by hematopoietic and non-hematopoietic cells, contain a variety of proteins and small, non-coding RNA known as microRNA (miRNA. Exposure to various pathogens and disease states modifies the composition and function of exosomes, but there are no studies examining in vivo exosomal changes evoked by the acute stress response. The present study reveals that exposing male Fisher 344 rats to an acute stressor modulates the protein and miRNA profile of circulating plasma exosomes, specifically increasing surface heat shock protein 72 (Hsp72 and decreasing miR-142-5p and -203. The selected miRNAs and Hsp72 are associated with immunomodulatory functions and are likely a critical component of stress-evoked modulation of immunity. Further, we demonstrate that some of these stress-induced modifications in plasma exosomes are mediated by sympathetic nervous system (SNS activation of alpha-1 adrenergic receptors (ADRs, since drug-mediated blockade of the receptors significantly attenuates the stress-induced modifications of exosomal Hsp72 and miR-142-5p. Together, these findings demonstrate that activation of the acute stress response modifies the proteomic and miRNA profile of exosomes released into the circulation.

  19. On the role of ion heating in ICRF-heated discharges in Tore Supra

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eriksson, L.G.; Hoang, G.; Bergeaud, V

    2000-09-01

    The effect of bulk ion heating in Tore Supra has been investigated by studying discharges with varying concentrations of minority ions during ICRF hydrogen minority heating in Deuterium/{sup 4}He plasmas. As expected, the level of bulk ion heating is found to increase with the minority concentration. Higher levels of ion heating are shown to be accompanied by two significant effects: an improved energy confinement and a strong influence on the plasma rotation. (author)

  20. Measurements of the K -Shell Opacity of a Solid-Density Magnesium Plasma Heated by an X-Ray Free-Electron Laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Preston, T. R.; Vinko, S. M.; Ciricosta, O.; Hollebon, P.; Chung, H.-K.; Dakovski, G. L.; Krzywinski, J.; Minitti, M.; Burian, T.; Chalupský, J.; Hájková, V.; Juha, L.; Vozda, V.; Zastrau, U.; Lee, R. W.; Wark, J. S.

    2017-08-01

    We present measurements of the spectrally resolved x rays emitted from solid-density magnesium targets of varying sub-μ m thicknesses isochorically heated by an x-ray laser. The data exhibit a largely thickness-independent source function, allowing the extraction of a measure of the opacity to K -shell x rays within well-defined regimes of electron density and temperature, extremely close to local thermodynamic equilibrium conditions. The deduced opacities at the peak of the K α transitions of the ions are consistent with those predicted by detailed atomic-kinetics calculations.

  1. 微推力ECR离子推力器等离子体源电子获能计算分析%Calculation Analysis on Electron Heating within Plasma Source Used by Micro ECR Ion Thruster

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    汤明杰; 杨涓; 冯冰冰; 金逸舟; 罗立涛

    2015-01-01

    为满足小型航天器的微推进需求,开展了微推力电子回旋共振(ECR)离子推力器的计算研究。实现该推力器的关键是ECR等离子体源合理的磁场和电场分布数值计算,从而使电子在穿过ECR谐振区时能够获得最大能量。为此以双环形永磁材料结构作为磁路,分别以直线形、环形和盘形微波耦合天线产生微波电磁场,同时改变等离子体源特征长度,利用有限元软件计算并分析ECR等离子体源内磁场和微波电场的分布规律以及电子在ECR区的获能规律。结果以微波输入功率5W、频率4.2GHz为例,发现环形耦合天线与较短等离子体源特征长度的结构组合可使电子在ECR区的获能指标达到最大且分布最佳。%To satisfy the propulsion need of small spacecrafts,it is essential to calculate characteristics of mi⁃cro electron cyclotron resonance(ECR)ion thruster. To get the maximum energy absorbed by electrons when passing through ECR layer,calculation of reasonable magnetic and electric field distribution in the plasma source is a key problem. In this article,the conformation of magnetic circuit was formed by two annular permanent mag⁃nets,microwave electromagnetic fields were generated separately by the linear,ring and dish-shaped antennas, and characteristic lengths of plasma source were altered several times. Through the calculation by applying finite element method,the important distribution of magnetic and microwave electric fields,and energy to heat electron were obtained. It is found that with 5W power and 4.2GHz frequency of input microwave,the structural combina⁃tion of ring coupling antenna and shorter characteristic length of plasma source allows electron heating index to get the maximum value and the optimal distribution in ECR layer.

  2. Magnetic fusion energy plasma interactive and high heat flux components. Volume II. Technical assessment of the critical issues and problem areas in high heat flux materials and component development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abdou, M.A.; Boyd, R.D.; Easor, J.R.; Gauster, W.B.; Gordon, J.D.; Mattas, R.F.; Morgan, G.D.; Ulrickson, M.A,; Watson, R.D.; Wolfer, W.G,

    1984-06-01

    A technical assessment of the critical issues and problem areas for high heat flux materials and components (HHFMC) in magnetic fusion devices shows these problems to be of critical importance for the successful operation of near-term fusion experiments and for the feasibility and attractiveness of long-term fusion reactors. A number of subgroups were formed to assess the critical HHFMC issues along the following major lines: (1) source conditions, (2) systems integration, (3) materials and processes, (4) thermal hydraulics, (5) thermomechanical response, (6) electromagnetic response, (7) instrumentation and control, and (8) test facilities. The details of the technical assessment are presented in eight chapters. The primary technical issues and needs for each area are highlighted.

  3. Experimental Study on the Relation between the Thermal Radiative Properties and Plasma Wavelength of ITO Films for Heat Mirror Applications%ITO的热辐射性质与等离子波长关系的实验研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈颉; 葛新石; 胡行方

    2000-01-01

    热镜膜具有广泛的应用背景,特别是将其沉积在柔性的黑色底衬上,就能获得不同于通常的、必须用发射率很低的金属做衬底的太阳能选择性吸收表面. 采用衬底不加温的普通RF溅射技术制备单层ITO热镜膜,并对它们的热辐射性质与等离子波长之间的关系进行了实验研究. 研究表明,对于单层ITO热镜膜,同时具有最小的发射率和最小的对太阳辐射的反射率是困难的. 但是,等离子波长可以作为预测太阳能热利用领域使用的单层ITO热镜膜热辐射性质的一个判据.%There is an increasing interest for the heat mirror films, especially, deposited on rigid or flexible black substrates used as a spectral selective absorbing coating which differs from the common selective absorber needing a metal substrate with low emissivity. The single layer indium tin oxides heat mirror films (HMF) were deposited onto unheated glass and rigid or flexible plastic substrates by conventional RF sputtering technique. The relation between the thermal radiative properties and the plasma wavelength of indium tin oxides heat mirror films were obtained based on experimental studies. The results show that it is impossible to get ITO HMF simultaneously with maximum reflectance in thermal long wavelength region and minimum reflectance in the solar spectral region. However, the plasma wavelength can be take as a criterion to predict the thermal radiative properties of ITO HMF, approximately.

  4. Radiofrequency power in plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-12-31

    This document includes the various communications that were presented at the 11th topical conference on radio frequency power in plasmas which took place in Palm Springs in May 1995. It includes current diffusion studies to assess the non-inductive current deposition profiles, experiments for plasma to reach quickly an equilibrium state, and modelling of electrons in plasma. Some comparison studies also reveal the efficiency of the Quasi-Optical Grill antenna for reactor applications. Finally, a scenario for efficient mode conversion heating in the ion cyclotron range of frequency is presented. Separate abstracts were prepared for the 6 papers in this volume. (TEC).

  5. Experimental plasma research project summaries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1978-08-01

    This report contans descriptions of the activities supported by the Experimental Plasma Research Branch of APP. The individual project summaries were prepared by the principal investigators and include objectives and milestones for each project. The projects are arranged in six research categories: Plasma Properties; Plasma Heating; Plasma Measurements and Instrumentation; Atomic, Molecular and Nuclear Physics; Advanced Superconducting Materials; and the Fusion Plasma Research Facility (FPRF). Each category is introduced with a statement of objectives and recent progress and followed by descriptions of individual projects. An overall budget summary is provided at the beginning of the report.

  6. Experimental Plasma Research project summaries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1980-09-01

    This report contains descriptions of the activities supported by the Experimental Plasma Research Branch of APP. The individual project summaries were prepared by the principal investigators and include objectives and milestones for each project. The projects are arranged in six research categories: Plasma Properties; Plasma Heating; Plasma Diagnostics; Atomic, Molecular and Nuclear Physics; Advanced Superconducting Materials; and the Fusion Plasma Research Facility (FPRF). Each category is introduced with a statement of objectives and recent progress and followed by descriptions of individual projects. An overall budget summary is provided at the beginning of the report.

  7. Heat Stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Publications and Products Programs Contact NIOSH NIOSH HEAT STRESS Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir NEW OSHA- ... hot environments may be at risk of heat stress. Exposure to extreme heat can result in occupational ...

  8. Heating automation

    OpenAIRE

    Tomažič, Tomaž

    2013-01-01

    This degree paper presents usage and operation of peripheral devices with microcontroller for heating automation. The main goal is to make a quality system control for heating three house floors and with that, increase efficiency of heating devices and lower heating expenses. Heat pump, furnace, boiler pump, two floor-heating pumps and two radiator pumps need to be controlled by this system. For work, we have chosen a development kit stm32f4 - discovery with five temperature sensors, LCD disp...

  9. Supersonic Plasma Flow Control Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-12-01

    to liquid metals , for example, the conductivities of typical plasma and electrolyte flows are relatively low. Ref. 14 cites the conductivity of...heating is the dominant effect. 15. SUBJECT TERMS Supersonic, plasma , MHD , boundary-layer 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: 19a. NAME OF RESPONSIBLE...horns in operation on Mach 5 wind tunnel with a plasma discharge. 31 Figure 17 Front view of a 100 mA DC discharge generated with upstream pointing

  10. Inductive Electron Heating Revisited

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuszewski, M.

    1996-11-01

    Inductively Coupled Plasmas (ICPs) have been studied for over a century. Recently, ICPs have been rediscovered by the multi-billion dollar semiconductor industry as an important class of high-density, low-pressure plasma sources suitable for the manufacture of next-generation integrated circuits. Present low-pressure ICP development is among the most active areas of plasma research. However, this development remains largely empirical, a prohibitively expensive approach for upcoming 300-mm diameter wafers. Hence, there is an urgent need for basic ICP plasma physics research, including experimental characterization and predictive numerical modeling. Inductive radio frequency (rf) power absorption is fundamental to the ICP electron heating and the resulting plasma transport but remains poorly understood. For example, recent experimental measurements and supporting fluid calculationsfootnote M. Tuszewski, Phys. Rev. Lett. 77 in press (1996) on a commercial deposition tool prototype show that the induced rf magnetic fields in the source can cause an order of magnitude reduction in plasma conductivity and in electron heating power density. In some cases, the rf fields penetrate through the entire volume of the ICP discharges while existing models that neglect the induced rf magnetic fields predict rf absorption in a thin skin layer near the plasma surface. The rf magnetic fields also cause more subtle changes in the plasma density and in the electron temperature spatial distributions. These data will be presented and the role of basic research in the applied world of semiconductor manufacturing will be discussed. ^*This research was conducted under the auspices of the U.S. DOE, supported by funds provided by the University of California for discretionary research by Los Alamos National Laboratory.

  11. Plasma turbulence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Horton, W. [Univ. of Texas, Austin, TX (United States). Inst. for Fusion Studies; Hu, G. [Globalstar LP, San Jose, CA (United States)

    1998-07-01

    The origin of plasma turbulence from currents and spatial gradients in plasmas is described and shown to lead to the dominant transport mechanism in many plasma regimes. A wide variety of turbulent transport mechanism exists in plasmas. In this survey the authors summarize some of the universally observed plasma transport rates.

  12. Characterisation of plasma in a rail gun

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ray, P. K.

    1986-01-01

    The mechanism of plasma and projectile acceleration in a DC rail gun is described from a microscopic point of view through the establishment of the Hall field. The plasma conductivity is shown to be a tensor, indicating that there is a small component of current parallel to the direction of acceleration. The plasma characteristics are evaluated in the experiment of Bauer et. al., as a function of plasma mass through a simple fluid mechanical analysis of the plasma. By equating the energy dissipatated in the plasma with the radiation heat loss, the properties of the plasma are determined.

  13. Heat pumps

    CERN Document Server

    Macmichael, DBA

    1988-01-01

    A fully revised and extended account of the design, manufacture and use of heat pumps in both industrial and domestic applications. Topics covered include a detailed description of the various heat pump cycles, the components of a heat pump system - drive, compressor, heat exchangers etc., and the more practical considerations to be taken into account in their selection.

  14. Report of the Plasma Physics Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-03-01

    Theoretical and experimental work in plasma physics is summarized. Technological and engineering aspects of plasma experiments in the SPICA, TORTUR 2, and RINGBOOG 2 reactors are discussed with emphasis on screw pinch, turbulent heating, and gas blankets. The free boundary equilibrium in high beta Tokamak plasma, wave dynamics, and transport problems were investigated.

  15. Ultracold neutral plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyon, M.; Rolston, S. L.

    2017-01-01

    By photoionizing samples of laser-cooled atoms with laser light tuned just above the ionization limit, plasmas can be created with electron and ion temperatures below 10 K. These ultracold neutral plasmas have extended the temperature bounds of plasma physics by two orders of magnitude. Table-top experiments, using many of the tools from atomic physics, allow for the study of plasma phenomena in this new regime with independent control over the density and temperature of the plasma through the excitation process. Characteristic of these systems is an inhomogeneous density profile, inherited from the density distribution of the laser-cooled neutral atom sample. Most work has dealt with unconfined plasmas in vacuum, which expand outward at velocities of order 100 m/s, governed by electron pressure, and with lifetimes of order 100 μs, limited by stray electric fields. Using detection of charged particles and optical detection techniques, a wide variety of properties and phenomena have been observed, including expansion dynamics, collective excitations in both the electrons and ions, and collisional properties. Through three-body recombination collisions, the plasmas rapidly form Rydberg atoms, and clouds of cold Rydberg atoms have been observed to spontaneously avalanche ionize to form plasmas. Of particular interest is the possibility of the formation of strongly coupled plasmas, where Coulomb forces dominate thermal motion and correlations become important. The strongest impediment to strong coupling is disorder-induced heating, a process in which Coulomb energy from an initially disordered sample is converted into thermal energy. This restricts electrons to a weakly coupled regime and leaves the ions barely within the strongly coupled regime. This review will give an overview of the field of ultracold neutral plasmas, from its inception in 1999 to current work, including efforts to increase strong coupling and effects on plasma properties due to strong coupling.

  16. Plasma harmonics

    CERN Document Server

    Ganeev, Rashid A

    2014-01-01

    Preface; Why plasma harmonics? A very brief introduction Early stage of plasma harmonic studies - hopes and frustrations New developments in plasma harmonics studies: first successes Improvements of plasma harmonics; Theoretical basics of plasma harmonics; Basics of HHG Harmonic generation in fullerenes using few-cycle pulsesVarious approaches for description of observed peculiarities of resonant enhancement of a single harmonic in laser plasmaTwo-colour pump resonance-induced enhancement of odd and even harmonics from a tin plasmaCalculations of single harmonic generation from Mn plasma;Low-o

  17. Modelling the Plasma Jet in Multi-Arc Plasma Spraying

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bobzin, K.; Öte, M.; Schein, J.; Zimmermann, S.; Möhwald, K.; Lummer, C.

    2016-08-01

    Particle in-flight characteristics in atmospheric plasma spraying process are determined by impulse and heat energy transferred between the plasma jet and injected powder particles. One of the important factors for the quality of the plasma-sprayed coatings is thus the distribution of plasma gas temperatures and velocities in plasma jet. Plasma jets generated by conventional single-arc plasma spraying systems and their interaction with powder particles were subject matter of intensive research. However, this does not apply to plasma jets generated by means of multi-arc plasma spraying systems yet. In this study, a numerical model has been developed which is designated to dealing with the flow characteristics of the plasma jet generated by means of a three-cathode spraying system. The upstream flow conditions, which were calculated using a priori conducted plasma generator simulations, have been coupled to the plasma jet simulations. The significances of the relevant numerical assumptions and aspects of the models are analyzed. The focus is placed on to the turbulence and diffusion/demixing modelling. A critical evaluation of the prediction power of the models is conducted by comparing the numerical results to the experimental results determined by means of emission spectroscopic computed tomography. It is evident that the numerical models exhibit a good accuracy for their intended use.

  18. Investigation of energy confinement during ICRF heating on EAST

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Y. Q.; Zhang, X. J.; Zhao, Y. P.; Qin, C. M.; Cheng, Y.; Mao, Y. Z.; Yang, H.; Yuan, S.; Wang, L.; Ju, S. Q.; Chen, G.; Zhang, J. H.; Wang, J. H.; Chen, Z.; Wan, B. N.; Gong, X. Z.; Qian, J. P.; Zhang, T.; Li, J. G.; Song, Y. T.; Lin, Y.; Taylor, G.; Hosea, J. C.; Perkins, R. J.; Wukitch, S.; Noterdaeme, J. M.; Kumazawa, R.; Seki, T.; Saito, K.; Kasahara, H.

    2017-09-01

    A summary is given on recent experiments in L-mode with ion cyclotron resonance heating (ICRH) of hydrogen minority in deuterium plasmas on EAST. Experiments show a degradation of confinement with increasing power. Furthermore, the energy confinement time increases with plasma current and magnetic field, whereas it is insensitive to line averaged density. Minority heating has been found to be efficient, and parameters were optimized to maximize its efficiency. ICRH in lower hybrid waves heated plasma was also investigated.

  19. Heat pumps

    CERN Document Server

    Brodowicz, Kazimierz; Wyszynski, M L; Wyszynski

    2013-01-01

    Heat pumps and related technology are in widespread use in industrial processes and installations. This book presents a unified, comprehensive and systematic treatment of the design and operation of both compression and sorption heat pumps. Heat pump thermodynamics, the choice of working fluid and the characteristics of low temperature heat sources and their application to heat pumps are covered in detail.Economic aspects are discussed and the extensive use of the exergy concept in evaluating performance of heat pumps is a unique feature of the book. The thermodynamic and chemical properties o

  20. Electron heating in low pressure capacitive discharges revisited

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawamura, E.; Lieberman, M. A.; Lichtenberg, A. J.

    2014-12-01

    The electrons in capacitively coupled plasmas (CCPs) absorb energy via ohmic heating due to electron-neutral collisions and stochastic heating due to momentum transfer from high voltage moving sheaths. We use Particle-in-Cell (PIC) simulations to explore these heating mechanisms and to compare the PIC results with available theories on ohmic and stochastic heating. The PIC results for ohmic heating show good agreement with the ohmic heating calculation of Lafleur et al. [Phys. Plasmas 20, 124503 (2013)]. The PIC results for stochastic heating in low pressure CCPs with collisionless sheaths show good agreement with the stochastic heating model of Kaganovich et al. [IEEE Trans. Plasma Sci. 34, 696 (2006)], which revises the hard wall asymptotic model of Lieberman [IEEE Trans. Plasma Sci. 16, 638 (1988)] by taking current continuity and bulk oscillation into account.