WorldWideScience

Sample records for plasma facing materials

  1. Neutron irradiation effects on plasma facing materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barabash, V.; Federici, G.; Rödig, M.; Snead, L. L.; Wu, C. H.

    2000-12-01

    This paper reviews the effects of neutron irradiation on thermal and mechanical properties and bulk tritium retention of armour materials (beryllium, tungsten and carbon). For each material, the main properties affected by neutron irradiation are described and the specific tests of neutron irradiated armour materials under thermal shock and disruption conditions are summarized. Based on current knowledge, the expected thermal and structural performance of neutron irradiated armour materials in the ITER plasma facing components are analysed.

  2. Analytical method for thermal stress analysis of plasma facing materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    You, J. H.; Bolt, H.

    2001-10-01

    The thermo-mechanical response of plasma facing materials (PFMs) to heat loads from the fusion plasma is one of the crucial issues in fusion technology. In this work, a fully analytical description of the thermal stress distribution in armour tiles of plasma facing components is presented which is expected to occur under typical high heat flux (HHF) loads. The method of stress superposition is applied considering the temperature gradient and thermal expansion mismatch. Several combinations of PFMs and heat sink metals are analysed and compared. In the framework of the present theoretical model, plastic flow and the effect of residual stress can be quantitatively assessed. Possible failure features are discussed.

  3. Candidate plasma-facing materials for EUV lithography source components

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassanein, Ahmed; Burtseva, Tatiana; Brooks, Jeff N.; Konkashbaev, Isak K.; Rice, Bryan J.

    2003-06-01

    Material selection and lifetime issues for extreme ultraviolet (EUV) lithography are of critical importance to the success of this technology for commercial applications. This paper reviews current trends in production and use of plasma-facing electrodes, insulators, and wall materials for EUV type sources. Ideal candidate materials should be able to: withstand high thermal shock from the short pulsed plasma; withstand high thermal loads without structural failure; reduce debris generation during discharge; and be machined accurately. We reviewed the literature on current and proposed fusion plasma-facing materials as well as current experience with plasma gun and other simulation devices. Both fusion and EUV source materials involve issues of surface erosion by particle sputtering and heat-induced evaporation/melting. These materials are either bare structural materials or surface coatings. EUV materials can be divided into four categories: wall, electrode, optical, and insulator materials. For electric discharge sources, all four types are required, whereas laser-produced plasma EUV sources do not require electrode and insulator materials. Several types of candidate alloy and other materials and methods of manufacture are recommended for each component of EUV lithography light sources.

  4. Mixed-material coating formation on plasma-facing components

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doerner, R. P.; Grossman, A. A.; Luckhardt, S.; Seraydarian, R.; Sze, F. C.; Whyte, D. G.

    When any plasma confinement device is fabricated from more than a single material which can come into contact with either particle or heat flux, there is the potential for migration of one of these materials to the locations of other materials. This combination of materials, or mixed materials, can have substantially different properties than either of the original materials. The PISCES-B linear plasma device is examining the formation conditions and properties of mixed-material surface layers which can form on plasma-facing components. The PISCES-B device has been modified to incorporate an impurity gas (CD 4, CO, O 2, etc.) puffing system in the target interaction region. It is, therefore, possible to control the fraction of impurities in the incident plasma and to perform systematic tests on the conditions necessary to form mixed-materials surface layers. The concentration of the species in the plasma column is measured spectroscopically, as well as by a residual gas monitor on the vacuum chamber. Measurements of the rate of growth of the thickness of the mixed material layer are performed. A simple erosion model can adequately describe the growth rate of the mixed-material layer and may allow for growth rate predictions in other plasma environments. It is also important to investigate the role of redeposition of metallic impurities in the formation of mixed material layers. A beryllium evaporator has been independently installed upstream of the target-interaction region to allow seeding of the incident plasma with beryllium. The presence of beryllium on the sample surface is observed to reduce the chemical erosion of the graphite by more than the reduction of the surface carbon concentration. And finally, the hydrogen isotope retention properties of carbon-containing layers on beryllium could have serious implications for tritium accumulation in ITER.

  5. Baseline high heat flux and plasma facing materials for fusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ueda, Y.; Schmid, K.; Balden, M.; Coenen, J. W.; Loewenhoff, Th.; Ito, A.; Hasegawa, A.; Hardie, C.; Porton, M.; Gilbert, M.

    2017-09-01

    In fusion reactors, surfaces of plasma facing components (PFCs) are exposed to high heat and particle flux. Tungsten and Copper alloys are primary candidates for plasma facing materials (PFMs) and coolant tube materials, respectively, mainly due to high thermal conductivity and, in the case of tungsten, its high melting point. In this paper, recent understandings and future issues on responses of tungsten and Cu alloys to fusion environments (high particle flux (including T and He), high heat flux, and high neutron doses) are reviewed. This review paper includes; Tritium retention in tungsten (K. Schmid and M. Balden), Impact of stationary and transient heat loads on tungsten (J.W. Coenen and Th. Loewenhoff), Helium effects on surface morphology of tungsten (Y. Ueda and A. Ito), Neutron radiation effects in tungsten (A. Hasegawa), and Copper and copper alloys development for high heat flux components (C. Hardie, M. Porton, and M. Gilbert).

  6. Radiation damage in ceramic plasma-facing materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Itoh, Noriaki; Morita, Kenji

    1988-07-01

    The present status of the studies of radiation damage of plasma-facing materials is reviewed. Emphasis is placed on the extent of the understanding in terms of the critical issues for materials in use as plasma interactive components. Understanding of the basic problems of radiation effects, which are important for long term development of fusion reactors, is also emphasized. It is pointed out that for low-Z materials radiation damage by fission neutrons is a good measure of the effects of radiation damage by fusion neutrons. The understanding of the fission neutron damage of major candidate materials is surveyed. Existing data on the effects of transmuted helium gas in beryllium are inferred and the data needs for the He effects on graphite are stressed. For radiation damage by plasma particles, the importance of understanding of the dynamic behaviors of the materials which are composite because of redeposition and hydrogen implantation. Some of the features of such composite materials under radiation are presented.

  7. Hydrogen in tungsten as plasma-facing material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roth, Joachim; Schmid, Klaus

    2011-12-01

    Materials facing plasmas in fusion experiments and future reactors are loaded with high fluxes (1020-1024 m-2 s-1) of H, D and T fuel particles at energies ranging from a few eV to keV. In this respect, the evolution of the radioactive T inventory in the first wall, the permeation of T through the armour into the coolant and the thermo-mechanical stability after long-term exposure are key parameters determining the applicability of a first wall material. Tungsten exhibits fast hydrogen diffusion, but an extremely low solubility limit. Due to the fast diffusion of hydrogen and the short ion range, most of the incident ions will quickly reach the surface and recycle into the plasma chamber. For steady-state operation the solute hydrogen for the typical fusion reactor geometry and wall conditions can reach an inventory of about 1 kg. However, in short-pulse operation typical of ITER, solute hydrogen will diffuse out after each pulse and the remaining inventory will consist of hydrogen trapped in lattice defects, such as dislocations, grain boundaries and irradiation-induced traps. In high-flux areas the hydrogen energies are too low to create displacement damage. However, under these conditions the solubility limit will be exceeded within the ion range and the formation of gas bubbles and stress-induced damage occurs. In addition, simultaneous neutron fluxes from the nuclear fusion reaction D(T,n)α will lead to damage in the materials and produce trapping sites for diffusing hydrogen atoms throughout the bulk. The formation and diffusive filling of these different traps will determine the evolution of the retained T inventory. This paper will concentrate on experimental evidence for the influence different trapping sites have on the hydrogen inventory in W as studied in ion beam experiments and low-temperature plasmas. Based on the extensive experimental data, models are validated and applied to estimate the contribution of different traps to the tritium inventory in

  8. Interaction of candidate plasma facing materials with tokamak plasma in COMPASS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matějíček, Jiří; Weinzettl, Vladimír; Macková, Anna; Malinský, Petr; Havránek, Vladimír; Naydenkova, Diana; Klevarová, Veronika; Petersson, Per; Gasior, Pawel; Hakola, Antti; Rubel, Marek; Fortuna, Elzbieta; Kolehmainen, Jukka; Tervakangas, Sanna

    2017-09-01

    The interaction of tokamak plasma with several materials considered for the plasma facing components of future fusion devices was studied in a small-size COMPASS tokamak. These included mainly tungsten as the prime candidate and chromium steel as an alternative whose suitability was to be assessed. For the experiments, thin coatings of tungsten, P92 steel and nickel on graphite substrates were prepared by arc-discharge sputtering. The samples were exposed to hydrogen and deuterium plasma discharges in the COMPASS tokamak in two modes: a) short exposure (several discharges) on a manipulator in the proximity of the separatrix, close to the central column, and b) long exposure (several months) at the central column, aligned with the other graphite tiles. During the discharges, standard plasma diagnostics were used and a local emission of spectral lines in the visible near ultraviolet regions, corresponding to the material erosion, was monitored. Before and after the plasma exposures, the sample surfaces were observed using scanning electron microscopy, the coatings thickness was measured using Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy, and the concentration profiles of hydrogen and deuterium were measured by elastic recoil detection analysis. The uniformity of the coatings and their thickness was verified before the exposure. After the exposure, no reduction of the thickness was observed, indicating the absence of 'global' erosion. Erosion was observed only in isolated spots, and attributed to unipolar arcing. Slightly larger erosion was found on the steel coatings compared to the tungsten ones. Incorporation of deuterium in a thin surface layer was observed, in dependence on the exposure mode. Additionally, boron enrichment of the long-exposure samples was observed, as a result of the tokamak chamber boronization.

  9. Plasma-Facing Materials Research For Fusion Reactors At FOM Rijnhuizen

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rapp, J.; De Temmerman, G.; van Rooij, G. J.; van Emmichoven, P. A. Zeijlma; Kleyn, A. W.

    2011-01-01

    In next generation magnetic fusion devices such as ITER, plasma-facing materials are exposed to unprecedented high ion, power and neutron fluxes. Those extreme conditions cannot be recreated in current fusion devices from the tokamak type. The plasma-surface interaction is still an area of great unc

  10. Plasma-facing materials research for fusion reactors at Fom Rijnhuizen

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rapp, J.; De Temmerman, G.; van Rooij, G.J.; Zeijlmans van Emmichoven, P.A.; Kleijn, A.W.

    2011-01-01

    In next generation magnetic fusion devices such as ITER, plasma-facing materials are exposed to unprecedented high ion, power and neutron fluxes. Those extreme conditions cannot be recreated in current fusion devices from the tokamak type. The plasma-surface interaction is still an area of great unc

  11. Plasma-Facing Materials Research For Fusion Reactors At FOM Rijnhuizen

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rapp, J.; De Temmerman, G.; van Rooij, G. J.; van Emmichoven, P. A. Zeijlma; Kleyn, A. W.

    2011-01-01

    In next generation magnetic fusion devices such as ITER, plasma-facing materials are exposed to unprecedented high ion, power and neutron fluxes. Those extreme conditions cannot be recreated in current fusion devices from the tokamak type. The plasma-surface interaction is still an area of great unc

  12. Plasma-facing materials research for fusion reactors at Fom Rijnhuizen

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rapp, J.; De Temmerman, G.; van Rooij, G.J.; Zeijlmans van Emmichoven, P.A.; Kleijn, A.W.

    2011-01-01

    In next generation magnetic fusion devices such as ITER, plasma-facing materials are exposed to unprecedented high ion, power and neutron fluxes. Those extreme conditions cannot be recreated in current fusion devices from the tokamak type. The plasma-surface interaction is still an area of great unc

  13. Effects of Low Energy and High Flux Helium/Hydrogen Plasma Irradiation on Tungsten as Plasma Facing Material

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ye Minyou

    2005-01-01

    The High-Z material tungsten (W) has been considered as a plasma facing material in the divertor region of ITER (International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor). In ITER, the divertor is expected to operate under high particle fluxes (> 1023 m-2s-1) from the plasma as well as from intrinsic impurities with a very low energy (< 200 eV). During the past dacade, the effects of plasma irradiation on tungsten have been studied extensively as functions of the ion energy,fluence and surface temperature in the burning plasma conditions. In this paper, recent results concerning blister and bubble formations on the tungsten surface under low energy (< 100 eV) and high flux (> 1021 m-2s-1) He/H plasma irradiation are reviewed to gain a better understanding of the performance of tungsten as a plasma facing material under the burning plasma conditions.

  14. Ductile-Phase-Toughened Tungsten for Plasma-Facing Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cunningham, Kevin Hawkins

    A variety of processing approaches were employed to fabricate ductile-phase-toughened (DPT) tungsten (W) composites. Mechanical testing and analytical modeling were used to guide composite development. This work provides a basis for further development of W composites to be used in structural divertor components of future fusion reactors. W wire was tested in tension, showing significant ductility and strength. Coatings of copper (Cu) or tungsten carbide (WC) were applied to the W wire via electrodeposition and carburization, respectively. Composites were fabricated using spark plasma sintering (SPS) to consolidate W powders together with each type of coated W wire. DPT behavior, e.g. crack arrest and crack bridging, was not observed in three-point bend testing of the sintered composites. A laminate was fabricated by hot pressing W and Cu foils together with W wires, and subsequently tested in tension. This laminate was bonded via hot pressing to thick W plate as a reinforcing layer, and the composite was tested in three-point bending. Crack arrest was observed along with some fiber pullout, but significant transverse cracking in the W plate confounded further fracture toughness analysis. The fracture toughness of thin W plate was measured in three-point bending. W plates were brazed with Cu foils to form a laminate. Crack arrest and crack bridging were observed in three-point bend tests of the laminate, and fracture resistance curves were successfully calculated for this DPT composite. An analytical model of crack bridging was developed using the basis described by Chao in previous work by the group. The model uses the specimen geometry, matrix properties, and the stress-displacement function of a ductile reinforcement ("bridging law") to calculate the fracture resistance curve (R-curve) and load-displacement curve (P-D curve) for any test specimen geometry. The code was also implemented to estimate the bridging law of an arbitrary composite using R-curve data

  15. The materials irradiation experiment for testing plasma facing materials at fusion relevant conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garrison, L. M.; Zenobia, S. J.; Egle, B. J.; Kulcinski, G. L.; Santarius, J. F.

    2016-08-01

    The Materials Irradiation Experiment (MITE-E) was constructed at the University of Wisconsin-Madison Inertial Electrostatic Confinement Laboratory to test materials for potential use as plasma-facing materials (PFMs) in fusion reactors. PFMs in fusion reactors will be bombarded with x-rays, neutrons, and ions of hydrogen and helium. More needs to be understood about the interactions between the plasma and the materials to validate their use for fusion reactors. The MITE-E simulates some of the fusion reactor conditions by holding samples at temperatures up to 1000 °C while irradiating them with helium or deuterium ions with energies from 10 to 150 keV. The ion gun can irradiate the samples with ion currents of 20 μA-500 μA; the typical current used is 72 μA, which is an average flux of 9 × 1014 ions/(cm2 s). The ion gun uses electrostatic lenses to extract and shape the ion beam. A variable power (1-20 W), steady-state, Nd:YAG laser provides additional heating to maintain a constant sample temperature during irradiations. The ion beam current reaching the sample is directly measured and monitored in real-time during irradiations. The ion beam profile has been investigated using a copper sample sputtering experiment. The MITE-E has successfully been used to irradiate polycrystalline and single crystal tungsten samples with helium ions and will continue to be a source of important data for plasma interactions with materials.

  16. Manufacturing and characterization of PIM-W materials as plasma facing materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pintsuk, G.; Antusch, S.; Rieth, M.; Wirtz, M.

    2016-02-01

    Powder injection molding (PIM) was used to produce pure and particle reinforced W materials to be qualified for the use as plasma facing material. As alloying elements La2O3, Y2O3, TiC, and TaC were chosen with a particle size between 50 nm and 2.5 μm, depending on the alloying element. The fabrication of alloyed materials was done for different compositions using powder mixtures. Final sintering was performed in H2 atmosphere at 2400 °C resulting in plates of 55 × 22 × 4 mm3 with ˜98% theoretical density. The qualification of the materials was done via high heat flux testing in the electron beam facility JUDITH-1. Thereby, ELM-like 1000 thermal shock loads of 0.38 GW m-2 for 1 ms and 100 disruption like loads of 1.13 GW m-2 for 1 ms at a base temperature of 1000 °C were applied. The obtained damage characteristics, i.e. surface roughening and crack formation, were qualified versus an industrially manufactured pure reference tungsten material and linked to the material’s microstructure and mechanical properties.

  17. New electron beam facility for irradiated plasma facing materials testing in hot cell

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sakamoto, N.; Kawamura, H. [Oarai Research Establishment, Ibaraki-ken (Japan); Akiba, M. [Naka Research Establishment, Ibaraki-ken (Japan)

    1995-09-01

    Since plasma facing components such as the first wall and the divertor for the next step fusion reactors are exposed to high heat loads and high energy neutron flux generated by the plasma, it is urgent to develop of plasma facing components which can resist these. Then, we have established electron beam heat facility ({open_quotes}OHBIS{close_quotes}, Oarai Hot-cell electron Beam Irradiating System) at a hot cell in JMTR (Japan Materials Testing Reactor) hot laboratory in order to estimate thermal shock resistivity of plasma facing materials and heat removal capabilities of divertor elements under steady state heating. In this facility, irradiated plasma facing materials (beryllium, carbon based materials and so on) and divertor elements can be treated. This facility consists of an electron beam unit with the maximum beam power of 50kW and the vacuum vessel. The acceleration voltage and the maximum beam current are 30kV (constant) and 1.7A, respectively. The loading time of electron beam is more than 0.1ms. The shape of vacuum vessel is cylindrical, and the mainly dimensions are 500mm in inner diameter, 1000mm in height. The ultimate vacuum of this vessel is 1 x 10{sup -4}Pa. At present, the facility for thermal shock test has been established in a hot cell. And performance estimation on the electron beam is being conducted. Presently, the devices for heat loading tests under steady state will be added to this facility.

  18. Development of advanced high heat flux and plasma-facing materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linsmeier, Ch.; Rieth, M.; Aktaa, J.; Chikada, T.; Hoffmann, A.; Hoffmann, J.; Houben, A.; Kurishita, H.; Jin, X.; Li, M.; Litnovsky, A.; Matsuo, S.; von Müller, A.; Nikolic, V.; Palacios, T.; Pippan, R.; Qu, D.; Reiser, J.; Riesch, J.; Shikama, T.; Stieglitz, R.; Weber, T.; Wurster, S.; You, J.-H.; Zhou, Z.

    2017-09-01

    Plasma-facing materials and components in a fusion reactor are the interface between the plasma and the material part. The operational conditions in this environment are probably the most challenging parameters for any material: high power loads and large particle and neutron fluxes are simultaneously impinging at their surfaces. To realize fusion in a tokamak or stellarator reactor, given the proven geometries and technological solutions, requires an improvement of the thermo-mechanical capabilities of currently available materials. In its first part this article describes the requirements and needs for new, advanced materials for the plasma-facing components. Starting points are capabilities and limitations of tungsten-based alloys and structurally stabilized materials. Furthermore, material requirements from the fusion-specific loading scenarios of a divertor in a water-cooled configuration are described, defining directions for the material development. Finally, safety requirements for a fusion reactor with its specific accident scenarios and their potential environmental impact lead to the definition of inherently passive materials, avoiding release of radioactive material through intrinsic material properties. The second part of this article demonstrates current material development lines answering the fusion-specific requirements for high heat flux materials. New composite materials, in particular fiber-reinforced and laminated structures, as well as mechanically alloyed tungsten materials, allow the extension of the thermo-mechanical operation space towards regions of extreme steady-state and transient loads. Self-passivating tungsten alloys, demonstrating favorable tungsten-like plasma-wall interaction behavior under normal operation conditions, are an intrinsic solution to otherwise catastrophic consequences of loss-of-coolant and air ingress events in a fusion reactor. Permeation barrier layers avoid the escape of tritium into structural and cooling

  19. Analysis of singular interface stresses in dissimilar material joints for plasma facing components

    Science.gov (United States)

    You, J. H.; Bolt, H.

    2001-10-01

    Duplex joint structures are typical material combinations for the actively cooled plasma facing components of fusion devices. The structural integrity under the incident heat loads from the plasma is one of the most crucial issues in the technology of these components. The most critical domain in a duplex joint component is the free surface edge of the bond interface between heterogeneous materials. This is due to the fact that the thermal stress usually shows a singular intensification in this region. If the plasma facing armour tile consists of a brittle material, the existence of the stress singularity can be a direct cause of failure. The present work introduces a comprehensive analytical tool to estimate the impact of the stress singularity for duplex PFC design and quantifies the relative stress intensification in various materials joints by use of a model formulated by Munz and Yang. Several candidate material combinations of plasma facing armour and metallic heat sink are analysed and the results are compared with each other.

  20. Comparison of tokamak behaviour with tungsten and low-Z plasma facing materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Philipps, V.; Neu, R.; Rapp, J.; Samm, U.; Tokar, M.; Tanabe, T.; Rubel, M.

    2000-12-01

    Graphite wall materials are used in present day fusion devices in order to optimize plasma core performance and to enable access to a large operational space. A large physics database exists for operation with these plasma facing materials, which also indicate their use in future devices with extended burn times. The radiation from carbon impurities in the edge and divertor regions strongly helps to reduce the peak power loads on the strike areas, but carbon radiation also supports the formation of MARFE instabilities which can hinder access to high densities. The main concerns with graphite are associated with its strong chemical affinity to hydrogen, which leads to chemical erosion and to the formation of hydrogen-rich carbon layers. These layers can store a significant fraction of the total tritium fuel, which might prevent the use of these materials in future tritium devices. High-Z plasma facing materials are much more advantageous in this sense, but these advantages compete with the strong poisoning of the plasma if they enter the plasma core. New promising experiences have been obtained with high-Z wall materials in several devices, about which a survey is given in this paper and which also addresses open questions for future research and development work.

  1. Analysis of Residual Thermal Stress in CVD-W Coating as Plasma Facing Material

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    朱大焕; 王坤; 王先平; 陈俊凌; 方前锋

    2012-01-01

    Chemical vapor deposition-tungsten (CVD-W) coating covering the surface of the plasma facing component (PFC) is an effective method to implement the tungsten material as plasma facing material (PFM) in fusion devices. Residual thermal stress in CVD-W coating due to thermal mismatch between coating and substrate was successfully simulated by using a finite element method (ANSYS 10.0 code). The deposition parametric effects, i.e., coating thickness and deposition temperature, and interlayer were investigated to get a description of the residual thermal stress in the CVD-W coating-substrate system. And the influence of the substrate materials on the generation of residual thermal stress in the CVD-W coating was analyzed with respect to the CVD-W coating application as PFM. This analysis is beneficial for the preparation and application of CVD-W coating.

  2. Analysis of Residual Thermal Stress in CVD-W Coating as Plasma Facing Material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Dahuan; Wang, Kun; Wang, Xianping; Chen, Junling; Fang, Qianfeng

    2012-07-01

    Chemical vapor deposition-tungsten (CVD-W) coating covering the surface of the plasma facing component (PFC) is an effective method to implement the tungsten material as plasma facing material (PFM) in fusion devices. Residual thermal stress in CVD-W coating due to thermal mismatch between coating and substrate was successfully simulated by using a finite element method (ANSYS 10.0 code). The deposition parametric effects, i.e., coating thickness and deposition temperature, and interlayer were investigated to get a description of the residual thermal stress in the CVD-W coating-substrate system. And the influence of the substrate materials on the generation of residual thermal stress in the CVD-W coating was analyzed with respect to the CVD-W coating application as PFM. This analysis is beneficial for the preparation and application of CVD-W coating.

  3. Recent Advances on Hydrogenic Retention in ITER's Plasma-Facing Materials: BE, C, W.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Skinner, C H; Alimov, Kh; Bekris, N; Causey, R A; Clark, R.E.H.; Coad, J P; Davis, J W; Doerner, R P; Mayer, M; Pisarev, A; Roth, J

    2008-03-29

    Management of tritium inventory remains one of the grand challenges in the development of fusion energy and the choice of plasma-facing materials is a key factor for in-vessel tritium retention. The Atomic and Molecular Data Unit of the International Atomic Energy Agency organized a Coordinated Research Project (CRP) on the overall topic of tritium inventory in fusion reactors during the period 2001-2006. This dealt with hydrogenic retention in ITER's plasma-facing materials, Be, C, W, and in compounds (mixed materials) of these elements as well as tritium removal techniques. The results of the CRP are summarized in this article together with recommendations for ITER. Basic parameters of diffusivity, solubility and trapping in Be, C and W are reviewed. For Be, the development of open porosity can account for transient hydrogenic pumping but long term retention will be dominated by codeposition. Codeposition is also the dominant retention mechanism for carbon and remains a serious concern for both Be and C containing layers. Hydrogenic trapping in unirradiated tungsten is low but will increase with ion and neutron damage. Mixed materials will be formed in a tokamak and these can also retain significant amounts of hydrogen isotopes. Oxidative and photon-based techniques for detritiation of plasma-facing components are described.

  4. Molecular dynamics simulations of interactions between energetic dust and plasma-facing materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Niu, Guo-jian, E-mail: niugj@ipp.ac.cn [Institute of Plasma Physics Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei (China); Li, Xiao-chun; Xu, Qian; Yang, Zhong-shi [Hefei Center Physical Science and Technology, Hefei (China); Luo, Guang-nan [Institute of Plasma Physics Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei (China); Hefei Center Physical Science and Technology, Hefei (China); Hefei Science Center of CAS, Hefei (China)

    2015-11-15

    The interactions between dust and plasma-facing material (PFM) relate to the lifetime of PFM and impurity production. Series results have been obtained theoretically and experimentally but more detailed studies are needed. In present research, we investigate the evolution of kinetic, potential and total energy of plasma-facing material (PFM) in order to understand the dust/PFM interaction process. Three typical impacting energy are selected, i.e., 1, 10 and 100 keV/dust for low-, high- and hyper-energy impacting cases. For low impacting energy, dust particles stick on PFM surface without damaging it. Two typical time points exist and the temperature of PFM grows all the time but PFM structure experience a modifying process. Under high energy case, three typical points appear. The temperature curve fluctuates in the whole interaction process which indicates there are dust/PFM and kinetic/potential energy exchanges. In the hyper-energy case in present simulation, the violence dust/PFM interactions cause sputtering and crater investigating on energy evolution curves. We further propose the statistics of energy distribution. Results show that about half of impacting energy consumes on heating plasma-facing material meanwhile the other half on PFM structure deformation. Only a small proportion becomes kinetic energy of interstitial or sputtering atoms.

  5. Material testing facilities and programs for plasma-facing component testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linsmeier, Ch.; Unterberg, B.; Coenen, J. W.; Doerner, R. P.; Greuner, H.; Kreter, A.; Linke, J.; Maier, H.

    2017-09-01

    Component development for operation in a large-scale fusion device requires thorough testing and qualification for the intended operational conditions. In particular environments are necessary which are comparable to the real operation conditions, allowing at the same time for in situ/in vacuo diagnostics and flexible operation, even beyond design limits during the testing. Various electron and neutral particle devices provide the capabilities for high heat load tests, suited for material samples and components from lab-scale dimensions up to full-size parts, containing toxic materials like beryllium, and being activated by neutron irradiation. To simulate the conditions specific to a fusion plasma both at the first wall and in the divertor of fusion devices, linear plasma devices allow for a test of erosion and hydrogen isotope recycling behavior under well-defined and controlled conditions. Finally, the complex conditions in a fusion device (including the effects caused by magnetic fields) are exploited for component and material tests by exposing test mock-ups or material samples to a fusion plasma by manipulator systems. They allow for easy exchange of test pieces in a tokamak or stellarator device, without opening the vessel. Such a chain of test devices and qualification procedures is required for the development of plasma-facing components which then can be successfully operated in future fusion power devices. The various available as well as newly planned devices and test stands, together with their specific capabilities, are presented in this manuscript. Results from experimental programs on test facilities illustrate their significance for the qualification of plasma-facing materials and components. An extended set of references provides access to the current status of material and component testing capabilities in the international fusion programs.

  6. Investigation of tin-lithium eutectic as a liquid plasma facing material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruzic, David; Szott, Matthew; Christenson, Michael; Shchelkanov, Ivan; Kalathiparambil, Kishor Kumar

    2016-10-01

    Innovative materials and techniques need to be utilized to address the high heat and particle flux incident on plasma facing components in fusion reactors. A liquid metal diverter module developed at UIUC with self circulating lithium has been successfully demonstrated to be capable of handling the relevant heat flux in plasma gun based tests and on operational tokamaks. The proper geometry of the liquid lithium trenches to minimize droplet ejection during transient plasma events have also been identified. Although lithium has proven to be effective in improved plasma performance and contributes to other advantageous factors like reduction in the fuel recycling, impurity gettering and, owing to the low Z, a significantly reduced impact on plasma as compared to the solid wall materials, it still poses several drawbacks related to its high reactivity and high vapor pressure at the relevant tokamak wall temperatures. The evaporation properties of a new eutectic mixture of tin and lithium (20% Sn) shows that lithium segregates to the surface at melting temperatures and hence is an effective replacement for pure lithium. Also, the vapor from the eutectic is dominated by lithium, minimizing the entry of high Z Sn into the plasma. At UIUC experiments for the synthesis and characterization of the eutectic - measurement of the critical wetting parameters and Seebeck coefficients with respect to the trench materials have been performed to ensure lithium wetting and flow in the trenches. The results will be presented. DOE project DEFG02- 99ER54515.

  7. Development and evaluation of plasma facing materials for future thermonuclear fusion reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Linke, J.; Pintsuk, G.; Roedig, M.; Schmidt, A.; Thomser, C. [Forschungszentrum Juelich GmbH, EURATOM Association, Juelich (Germany)

    2010-07-01

    More and more attention is directed towards thermonuclear fusion as a possible future energy source. Major advantages of this energy conversion technology are the almost inexhaustible resources and the option to produce energy without CO{sub 2}-emissions. However, in the most advanced field of magnetic plasma confinement a number of technological challenges have to be met. In particular high-temperature resistant and plasma compatible meterials have to be developed and qualified which are able to withstand the extreme environments in a commercial thermonuclear power reactor. The plasma facing materials (PEMs) and components (PFCs) in such fusion devices, i.e. the first wall (FW), the limiters and the divertor, are strongly affected by the plasma wall interaction processes and the applied intense thermal loads during plasma operation. On the one hand, these mechanisms have a strong influence on the plasma performance; on the other hand, they have major impact on the lifetime of the plasma facing armour. Materials for plasma facing components have to fulfill a number of requirements. First of all the materials have to be plasma compatible, i.e. they should exhibit a low atomic number to avoid radiative losses whenever atoms from the wall material will be ionized in the plasma. In addition, the materials must have a high melting point, a high thermal conductivity, and adequate mechanical properties. To select the most suitable material candidates, a comprehensive data base is required which includes all thermo-physical and mechanical properties. In present-day and next step devices the resulting thermal steady state heat loads to the first wall remain below 1 MWm{sup -2}, meanwhile the limiters and the divertor are expected to be exposed to power densities being at least one order of magnitude above the FW-level, i.e. up to 20 MWm{sup -2} for next step tokamaks such as ITER or DEMO. These requirements are responsible for high demands on the selection of qualified PFMs

  8. Tracer techniques for the assessment of material migration and surface modification of plasma-facing components

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rubel, M., E-mail: rubel@kth.se [Department of Fusion Plasma Physics, Royal Institute of Technology, 100 44 Stockholm (Sweden); Weckmann, A.; Ström, P.; Petersson, P.; Garcia-Carrasco, A. [Department of Fusion Plasma Physics, Royal Institute of Technology, 100 44 Stockholm (Sweden); Brezinsek, S.; Coenen, J.; Kreter, A.; Möller, S.; Wienhold, P. [Institute of Energy and Climate Research, Forschungszentrum Jülich, 52425 Jülich (Germany); Wauters, T. [LPP-ERM/KMS, Association EURATOM-Belgian State, 1000 Brussels (Belgium); Fortuna-Zaleśna, E. [Faculty of Materials Science, Warsaw University of Technology, 02-507 Warsaw (Poland)

    2015-08-15

    Highlights: • Tracer techniques were used in the TEXTOR tokamak to determine high-Z metal migration and the retention of species used for plasma edge cooling or wall cleaning under different operation conditions. • Volatile molybdenum hexa-fluoride, nitrogen-15 and oxygen-18 were used as markers in tokamak or ion cyclotron wall conditioning discharges (ICWC). • The objective was to obtain qualitative and quantitative of a global and local deposition pattern and material mixing effects. • The deposition and retention was studied on plasma-facing components, collector probes and test limiters. • Optical spectroscopy and ex-situ analysis techniques were used to determine the plasma response to tracer injection and surface composition modification. - Abstract: Tracer techniques were used in the TEXTOR tokamak to determine high-Z metal migration and the deposition of species used for plasma edge cooling or wall conditioning under different types of operation conditions. Volatile molybdenum hexa-fluoride, nitrogen-15 and oxygen-18 were used as markers in tokamak or ion cyclotron wall conditioning discharges (ICWC). The objective was to obtain qualitative and quantitative of a global and local deposition pattern and material mixing effects. The deposition and retention was studied on plasma-facing components, collector probes and test limiters. Optical spectroscopy and ex-situ analysis techniques were used to determine the plasma response to tracer injection and the modification of surface composition. Molybdenum and light isotopes were detected on all types of limiters and short-term probes retrieved from the vessel showing that both helium and nitrogen are trapped following wall conditioning and edge cooling. Only small amounts below 1 × 10{sup 19} m{sup −2} of {sup 18}O were detected on surfaces treated by oxygen-assisted ICWC.

  9. Experimental measurements of surface damage and residual stresses in micro-engineered plasma facing materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivera, David; Wirz, Richard E.; Ghoniem, Nasr M.

    2017-04-01

    The thermomechanical damage and residual stresses in plasma-facing materials operating at high heat flux are experimentally investigated. Materials with micro-surfaces are found to be more resilient, when exposed to cyclic high heat flux generated by an arc-jet plasma. An experimental facility, dedicated to High Energy Flux Testing (HEFTY), is developed for testing cyclic heat flux in excess of 10 MW/m2. We show that plastic deformation and subsequent fracture of the surface can be controlled by sample cooling. We demonstrate that W surfaces with micro-pillar type surface architecture have significantly reduced residual thermal stresses after plasma exposure, as compared to those with flat surfaces. X-ray diffraction (XRD) spectra of the W-(110) peak reveal that broadening of the Full Width at Half Maximum (FWHM) for micro-engineered samples is substantially smaller than corresponding flat surfaces. Spectral shifts of XRD signals indicate that residual stresses due to plasma exposure of micro-engineered surfaces build up in the first few cycles of exposure. Subsequent cyclic plasma heat loading is shown to anneal out most of the built-up residual stresses in micro-engineered surfaces. These findings are consistent with relaxation of residual thermal stresses in surfaces with micro-engineered features. The initial residual stress state of highly polished flat W samples is compressive (≈ -1.3 GPa). After exposure to 50 plasma cycles, the surface stress relaxes to -1.0 GPa. Micro-engineered samples exposed to the same thermal cycling show that the initial residual stress state is compressive at (- 250 MPa), and remains largely unchanged after plasma exposure.

  10. Liquid Metals as Plasma-facing Materials for Fusion Energy Systems: From Atoms to Tokamaks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stone, Howard A. [Princeton Univ., NJ (United States); Koel, Bruce E. [Princeton Univ., NJ (United States); Bernasek, Steven L. [Princeton Univ., NJ (United States); Carter, Emily A. [Princeton Univ., NJ (United States); Debenedetti, Pablo G. [Princeton Univ., NJ (United States); Panagiotopoulos, Athanassios Z. [Princeton Univ., NJ (United States)

    2017-06-23

    The objective of our studies was to advance our fundamental understanding of liquid metals as plasma-facing materials for fusion energy systems, with a broad scope: from atoms to tokamaks. The flow of liquid metals offers solutions to significant problems of the plasma-facing materials for fusion energy systems. Candidate metals include lithium, tin, gallium, and their eutectic combinations. However, such liquid metal solutions can only be designed efficiently if a range of scientific and engineering issues are resolved that require advances in fundamental fluid dynamics, materials science and surface science. In our research we investigated a range of significant and timely problems relevant to current and proposed engineering designs for fusion reactors, including high-heat flux configurations that are being considered by leading fusion energy groups world-wide. Using experimental and theoretical tools spanning atomistic to continuum descriptions of liquid metals, and bridging surface chemistry, wetting/dewetting and flow, our research has advanced the science and engineering of fusion energy materials and systems. Specifically, we developed a combined experimental and theoretical program to investigate flows of liquid metals in fusion-relevant geometries, including equilibrium and stability of thin-film flows, e.g. wetting and dewetting, effects of electromagnetic and thermocapillary fields on liquid metal thin-film flows, and how chemical interactions and the properties of the surface are influenced by impurities and in turn affect the surface wetting characteristics, the surface tension, and its gradients. Because high-heat flux configurations produce evaporation and sputtering, which forces rearrangement of the liquid, and any dewetting exposes the substrate to damage from the plasma, our studies addressed such evaporatively driven liquid flows and measured and simulated properties of the different bulk phases and material interfaces. The range of our studies

  11. Selection of materials for tokamak plasma facing elements based on a liquid tin capillary pore system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyublinski, I. E.; Vertkov, A. V.; Zharkov, M. Yu; Sevryukov, O. N.; Dzhumaev, P. S.; Shumskiy, V. A.; Ivannikov, A. A.

    2016-09-01

    Capillary-Pore Systems (CPS) filled by liquid metals are considered as an alternative solution of materials choice for plasma facing component of tokamak reactor. Tin is viewed as one of the candidates for CPS because it has lower corrosiveness than gallium and lower saturated vapour pressure compared to lithium. The corrosion resistance of Mo, Nb and W in pure liquid tin was investigated. The corrosion tests were carried out in the static isothermal conditions at a temperature up to 1050°C. As a result of the corrosion study, it was found that Mo does not corrode in liquid Sn, as opposed to Nb and is compatible with liquid tin in temperatures of up to approx. 1000°C. This allows considering Mo as an alloy base material of the in-vessel tokamak elements based on liquid tin capillary pore systems.

  12. Plasma facing materials and components for future fusion devices—development, characterization and performance under fusion specific loading conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linke, J.

    2006-04-01

    The plasma exposed components in existing and future fusion devices are strongly affected by the plasma material interaction processes. These mechanisms have a strong influence on the plasma performance; in addition they have major impact on the lifetime of the plasma facing armour and the joining interface between the plasma facing material (PFM) and the heat sink. Besides physical and chemical sputtering processes, high heat quasi-stationary fluxes during normal and intense thermal transients are of serious concern for the engineers who develop reliable wall components. In addition, the material and component degradation due to intense fluxes of energetic neutrons is another critical issue in D-T-burning fusion devices which requires extensive R&D. This paper presents an overview on the materials development and joining, the testing of PFMs and components, and the analysis of the neutron irradiation induced degradation.

  13. Report of a technical evaluation panel on the use of beryllium for ITER plasma facing material and blanket breeder material

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ulrickson, M.A. [ed.] [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Manly, W.D. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Dombrowski, D.E. [Brush Wellman, Inc., Cleveland, OH (United States)] [and others

    1995-08-01

    Beryllium because of its low atomic number and high thermal conductivity, is a candidate for both ITER first wall and divertor surfaces. This study addresses the following: why beryllium; design requirements for the ITER divertor; beryllium supply and unirradiated physical/mechanical property database; effects of irradiation on beryllium properties; tritium issues; beryllium health and safety; beryllium-coolant interactions and safety; thermal and mechanical tests; plasma erosion of beryllium; recommended beryllium grades for ITER plasma facing components; proposed manufacturing methods to produce beryllium parts for ITER; emerging beryllium materials; proposed inspection and maintenance techniques for beryllium components and coatings; time table and costs; and the importance of integrating materials and manufacturing personnel with designers.

  14. Dynamic outgassing of deuterium, helium and nitrogen from plasma-facing materials under DEMO relevant conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Möller, S.; Matveev, D.; Martynova, Y.; Unterberg, B.; Rasinski, M.; Wegener, T.; Kreter, A.; Linsmeier, Ch.

    2017-01-01

    In confined plasma magnetic fusion devices significant amounts of the hydrogen isotopes used for the fusion reaction can be stored in the plasma-facing materials by implantation. The desorption of this retained hydrogen was seen to follow a t α law with α  ≈  -0.7 in tokamaks. For a pulsed fusion reactor this outgassing can define the inter-pulse waiting time. This work presents new experimental data on the dynamic outgassing in ITER grade tungsten exposed under the well-defined conditions of PSI-2 to pure and mixed D2 plasmas. A peak ion flux of 1022 D+ m-2 s is applied for up to 6 h at sample temperatures of up to 900 K. Pure D2 and mixed D2  +  He, D2  +  N2 and D2  +  He  +  N2 plasmas are applied to the sample at 68 V bias. The D2, He, N outgassing at 293 K and 580 k are observed via in-vacuo quadrupole mass spectrometry covering the range of 40 s-200 000 s after exposure. The outgassing decay follows a single power law with exponents α  =  -0.7  to  -1.1 at 293 K, but at 580 K a drop from α  =  -0.25 to  -2.35 is found. For DEMO a pump-down time to 0.5 mPa in the order of 1-5 h can be expected. The outgassing is in all cases dominated by D2.

  15. Advanced tungsten materials for plasma-facing components of DEMO and fusion power plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neu, R., E-mail: Rudolf.Neu@ipp.mpg.de [Max-Planck-Institut für Plasmaphysik, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Fakultät für Maschinenbau, Technische Universität München, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Riesch, J. [Max-Planck-Institut für Plasmaphysik, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Coenen, J.W. [Forschungszentrum Jülich GmbH, Institut für Energie- und Klimaforschung – Plasmaphysik, D-52425 Jülich (Germany); Brinkmann, J. [Max-Planck-Institut für Plasmaphysik, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Forschungszentrum Jülich GmbH, Institut für Energie- und Klimaforschung – Plasmaphysik, D-52425 Jülich (Germany); Calvo, A. [CEIT and Tecnun (University of Navarra), E-20018 San Sebastian (Spain); Elgeti, S. [Max-Planck-Institut für Plasmaphysik, D-85748 Garching (Germany); García-Rosales, C. [CEIT and Tecnun (University of Navarra), E-20018 San Sebastian (Spain); Greuner, H.; Hoeschen, T.; Holzner, G. [Max-Planck-Institut für Plasmaphysik, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Klein, F. [Forschungszentrum Jülich GmbH, Institut für Energie- und Klimaforschung – Plasmaphysik, D-52425 Jülich (Germany); Koch, F. [Max-Planck-Institut für Plasmaphysik, D-85748 Garching (Germany); and others

    2016-11-01

    Highlights: • Development of W-fibre enhanced W-composites incorporating extrinsic toughening mechanisms. • Production of a large sample (more than 2000 long fibres) for mechanical and thermal testing. • Even in a fully embrittled state, toughening mechanisms are still effective. • Emissions of volatile W-oxides can be suppressed by alloying W with elements forming stable oxides. • WCr10Ti2 has been successfully tested under accidental conditions and high heat fluxes. - Abstract: Tungsten is the major candidate material for the armour of plasma facing components in future fusion devices. To overcome the intrinsic brittleness of tungsten, which strongly limits its operational window, a W-fibre enhanced W-composite material (W{sub f}/W) has been developed incorporating extrinsic toughening mechanisms. Small W{sub f}/W samples show a large increase in toughness. Recently, a large sample (50 mm × 50 mm × 3 mm) with more than 2000 long fibres has been successfully produced allowing further mechanical and thermal testing. It could be shown that even in a fully embrittled state, toughening mechanisms as crack bridging by intact fibres, as well as the energy dissipation by fibre-matrix interface debonding and crack deflection are still effective. A potential problem with the use of pure W in a fusion reactor is the formation of radioactive and highly volatile WO{sub 3} compounds and their potential release under accidental conditions. It has been shown that the oxidation of W can be strongly suppressed by alloying with elements forming stable oxides. WCr10Ti2 alloy has been produced on a technical scale and has been successfully tested in the high heat flux test facility GLADIS. Recently, W-Cr-Y alloys have been produced on a lab-scale. They seem to have even improved properties compared to the previously investigated W alloys.

  16. Experimental studies of lithium-based surface chemistry for fusion plasma-facing materials applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Allain, J.P., E-mail: allain@purdue.ed [Purdue University, West Lafayette, 400 Central Drive, IN 47907 (United States); Rokusek, D.L.; Harilal, S.S. [Purdue University, West Lafayette, 400 Central Drive, IN 47907 (United States); Nieto-Perez, M. [CICATA-IPN, Cerro Blanco 141 Cimatario, Queretaro, QRO 76090 (Mexico); Skinner, C.H.; Kugel, H.W. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton, NJ 08543 (United States); Heim, B. [Purdue University, West Lafayette, 400 Central Drive, IN 47907 (United States); Kaita, R.; Majeski, R. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton, NJ 08543 (United States)

    2009-06-15

    Lithium has enhanced the operational performance of fusion devices such as: TFTR, CDX-U, FTU, T-11 M, and NSTX. Lithium in the solid and liquid state has been studied extensively in laboratory experiments including its erosion and hydrogen-retaining properties. Reductions in physical sputtering up to 40-60% have been measured for deuterated solid and liquid lithium surfaces. Computational modeling indicates that up to a 1:1 deuterium volumetric retention in lithium is possible. This paper presents the results of systematic in situ laboratory experimental studies on the surface chemistry evolution of ATJ graphite under lithium deposition. Results are compared to post-mortem analysis of similar lithium surface coatings on graphite exposed to deuterium discharge plasmas in NSTX. Lithium coatings on plasma-facing components in NSTX have shown substantial reduction of hydrogenic recycling. Questions remain on the role lithium surface chemistry on a graphite substrate has on particle sputtering (physical and chemical) as well as hydrogen isotope recycling. This is particularly due to the lack of in situ measurements of plasma-surface interactions in tokamaks such as NSTX. Results suggest that the lithium bonding state on ATJ graphite is lithium peroxide and with sufficient exposure to ambient air conditions, lithium carbonate is generated. Correlation between both results is used to assess the role of lithium chemistry on the state of lithium bonding and implications on hydrogen pumping and lithium sputtering. In addition, reduction of factors between 10 and 30 reduction in physical sputtering from lithiated graphite compared to pure lithium or carbon is also measured.

  17. Unraveling wall conditioning effects on plasma facing components in NSTX-U with the Materials Analysis Particle Probe (MAPP)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bedoya, F.; Allain, J. P.; Kaita, R.; Skinner, C. H.; Buzi, L.; Koel, B. E.

    2016-11-01

    A novel Plasma Facing Components (PFCs) diagnostic, the Materials Analysis Particle Probe (MAPP), has been recently commissioned in the National Spherical Torus Experiment Upgrade (NSTX-U). MAPP is currently monitoring the chemical evolution of the PFCs in the NSTX-U lower divertor at 107 cm from the tokamak axis on a day-to-day basis. In this work, we summarize the methodology that was adopted to obtain qualitative and quantitative descriptions of the samples chemistry. Using this methodology, we were able to describe all the features in all our spectra to within a standard deviation of ±0.22 eV in position and ±248 s-1 eV in area. Additionally, we provide an example of this methodology with data of boronized ATJ graphite exposed to NSTX-U plasmas.

  18. FOREWORD: 12th International Workshop on Plasma-Facing Materials and Components for Fusion Applications 12th International Workshop on Plasma-Facing Materials and Components for Fusion Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kreter, Arkadi; Linke, Jochen; Rubel, Marek

    2009-12-01

    The 12th International Workshop on Plasma-Facing Materials and Components for Fusion Applications (PFMC-12) was held in Forschungszentrum Jülich (FZJ) in Germany in May 2009. This symposium is the successor to the International Workshop on Carbon Materials for Fusion Applications series. Between 1985 and 2003, 10 'Carbon Workshops' were organized in Jülich, Stockholm and Hohenkammer. After this time, the scope of the symposium was redefined to reflect the new requirements of ITER and the ongoing evolution of the field. The workshop was first organized under its new name in 2006 in Greifswald, Germany. The main objective of this conference series is to provide a discussion forum for experts from research institutions and industry dealing with materials for plasma-facing components in present and future controlled fusion devices. The operation of ASDEX-Upgrade with tungsten-coated wall, the fast progress of the ITER-Like Wall Project at JET, the plans for the EAST tokamak to install tungsten, the start of ITER construction and a discussion about the wall material for DEMO all emphasize the importance of plasma-wall interactions and component behaviour, and give much momentum to the field. In this context, the properties and behaviour of beryllium, carbon and tungsten under plasma impact are research topics of foremost relevance and importance. Our community realizes both the enormous advantages and serious drawbacks of all the candidate materials. As a result, discussion is in progress as to whether to use carbon in ITER during the initial phase of operation or to abandon this element and use only metal components from the start. There is broad knowledge about carbon, both in terms of its excellent power-handling capabilities and the drawbacks related to chemical reactivity with fuel species and, as a consequence, about problems arising from fuel inventory and dust formation. We are learning continuously about beryllium and tungsten under fusion conditions, but our

  19. Evaluation of W-Si-C thick coating as a plasma facing material

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seok, Hyun Kwang [Korea Institute of Science and Technology, Seoul 136-791 (Korea, Republic of)], E-mail: drstone@kist.re.kr; Jung, Kyung Ho; Kim, Yu Chan; Shim, Jae-Hyeok; Kim, Dong-Ik; Han, Seung-Hee [Korea Institute of Science and Technology, Seoul 136-791 (Korea, Republic of); Baik, Kyeong Ho [ChungNam National University, Deajeon 305-764 (Korea, Republic of); Cha, Pil-Ryung [School of Advanced Materials Engineering, Kooknin University, Seoul 136-702 (Korea, Republic of)

    2009-04-30

    We present tungsten alloy coating of 150-200 {mu}m thickness with improved plasma erosion resistance fabricated by plasma spraying of granular W-SiC composite powders. During increasing the SiC concentration to 8 wt%, we observed the increase in the hardness of the coating from 250 to 440 Hv. The plasma erosion depth of the coating decreased by 10 times compared with pure tungsten in the same erosion environment.

  20. Simulation experiment of interaction of plasma facing materials and transient heat loads in ITER divertor by use of magnetized coaxial plasma gun

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakatsuka, M.; Ando, K.; Higashi, T.; Kikuchi, Y.; Fukumoto, N.; Nagata, M.

    2009-11-01

    Interaction of plasma facing materials and transient head loads such as type I ELMs is one of the critical issues in ITER divertor. The heat load to the ITER divertor during type I ELMs is estimated to be 0.5-3 MJ/m^2 with a pulse length of 0.1-0.5 ms. We have developed a magnetized coaxial plasma gun (MCPG) for the simulation experiment of transient heat load during type I ELMs in ITER divertor. The MCPG has inner and outer electrodes made of stainless steel 304. In addition, the inner electrode is covered with molybdenum so as to suppress the release of impurities from the electrode during the discharge. The diameters of inner and outer electrodes are 0.06 m and 0.14 m, respectively. The power supply for the MCPG is a capacitor bank (7 kV, 1 mF, 25 kJ). The plasma velocity estimated by the time of flight measurement of the magnetic fields was about 50 km/s, corresponding to the ion energy of 15 eV (H) or 30 eV (D). The absorbed energy density of the plasma stream was measured a calorimeter made of graphite. It was found that the absorbed energy density was 0.9 MJ/m^2 with a pulse width of 0.5 ms at the distance of 100 mm from the inner electrode. In the conference, experimental results of plasma exposure on the plasma facing materials in ITER divertor will be shown.

  1. Erosion products of plasma facing materials formed under ITER-like transient load and deuterium retention in them

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Putrik, A. B., E-mail: putrik@triniti.ru; Klimov, N. S. [State Research Center of the Russian Federation Troitsk Institute for Innovation & Fusion Research (Russian Federation); Gasparyan, Yu. M., E-mail: yura@plasma.mephi.ru; Efimov, V. S. [National Research Nuclear University Moscow Engineering Physics Institute (Russian Federation); Barsuk, V. A.; Podkovyrov, V. L., E-mail: podk@triniti.ru; Zhitlukhin, A. M., E-mail: zhitlukh@triniti.ru; Yarochevskaya, A. D.; Kovalenko, D. V., E-mail: kovalenko@triniti.ru [State Research Center of the Russian Federation Troitsk Institute for Innovation & Fusion Research (Russian Federation)

    2015-12-15

    Erosion of the plasma-facing materials in particular evaporation of the materials in a fusion reactor under intense transient events is one of the problems of the ITER. The current experimental data are insufficient to predict the properties of the erosion products, a significant part of which will be formed during transient events (edge-localized modes (ELMs) and disruptions). The paper concerns the experimental investigation of the graphite and tungsten erosion products deposited under pulsed plasma load at the QSPA-T: heat load on the target was 2.6 MJ/m{sup 2} with 0.5 ms pulse duration. The designed diagnostics for measuring the deposition rate made it possible to determine that the deposition of eroded material occurs during discharge, and the deposition rate is in the range (0.1–100) × 10{sup 19} at/(cm{sup 2} s), which is much higher than that for stationary processes. It is found that the relative atomic concentrations D/C and D/(W + C) in the erosion products deposited during the pulse process are on the same level as for the stationary processes. An exposure of erosion products to photonic energy densities typical of those expected at mitigated disruptions in the ITER (pulse duration of 0.5–1 ms, integral energy density of radiation of 0.1–0.5 MJ/m2) significantly decreases the concentration of trapped deuterium.

  2. Development and Study of Hard-Facing Materials on the Base of Heat-Resisting High-Hardness Steels for Plasma-Jet Hard- Facing in Shielding-Doping Nitrogen Atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malushin, N. N.; Kovalev, A. P.; Valuev, D. V.; Shats, E. A.; Borovikov, I. F.

    2016-08-01

    The authors develop hard-facing materials on the base of heat-resisting highhardness steels for plasma-jet hard-facing in nitrogen atmosphere for manufacturing parts of mining and metallurgic equipment which significantly simplify the production process and effect a saving when producing bimetallic parts and tools.

  3. Thermal conductivity reduction of tungsten plasma facing material due to helium plasma irradiation in PISCES using the improved 3-omega method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Shuang; Simmonds, Michael; Qin, Wenjing; Ren, Feng; Tynan, George R.; Doerner, Russell P.; Chen, Renkun

    2017-04-01

    The near-surface region of plasma facing material (PFM) plays an important role in thermal management of fusion reactors. In this work, we measured thermal conductivity of tungsten (W) surface layers damaged by He plasma in PISCES at UCSD. We studied the damage effect on both bulk, and thin film, W. We observed that the surface morphology of both bulk and thin film was altered after exposure to He plasma with the fluence of 1 × 1026 m-2 (bulk) and 2 × 1024 m-2 (thin film). Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) analysis reveals that the depth of the irradiation damaged layer was approximately 20 nm on the bulk W exposed to He plasma at 773 K for 2000 s. In order to measure the thermal conductivity of this exceedingly thin damaged layer in the bulk W, we adopted the well-established '3-omega' method and employed novel nanofabrication techniques to improve the measurement sensitivity. For the damaged W thin film sample, we measured the reduction in electrical conductivity and used the Wiedemann-Franz (W-F) law to extract the thermal conductivity. Results from both measurements show that thermal conductivity in the damaged layers was reduced by at least ∼80% compared to that of undamaged W. This large reduction in thermal conductivity can be attributed to the scattering of electrons, the dominant heat carriers in W, caused by defects introduced by He plasma irradiation.

  4. High heat flux testing of divertor plasma facing materials and components using the HHF test facility at IPR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patil, Yashashri; Khirwadkar, S. S.; Belsare, Sunil; Swamy, Rajamannar; Tripathi, Sudhir; Bhope, Kedar; Kanpara, Shailesh

    2016-02-01

    The High Heat Flux Test Facility (HHFTF) was designed and established recently at Institute for Plasma Research (IPR) in India for testing heat removal capability and operational life time of plasma facing materials and components of the ITER-like tokamak. The HHFTF is equipped with various diagnostics such as IR cameras and IR-pyrometers for surface temperature measurements, coolant water calorimetry for absorbed power measurements and thermocouples for bulk temperature measurements. The HHFTF is capable of simulating steady state heat load of several MW m-2 as well as short transient heat loads of MJ m-2. This paper presents the current status of the HHFTF at IPR and high heat flux tests performed on the curved tungsten monoblock type of test mock-ups as well as transient heat flux tests carried out on pure tungsten materials using the HHFTF. Curved tungsten monoblock type of test mock-ups were fabricated using hot radial pressing (HRP) technique. Two curved tungsten monoblock type test mock-ups successfully sustained absorbed heat flux up to 14 MW m-2 with thermal cycles of 30 s ON and 30 s OFF duration. Transient high heat flux tests or thermal shock tests were carried out on pure tungsten hot-rolled plate material (Make:PLANSEE) with incident power density of 0.49 GW m-2 for 20 milliseconds ON and 1000 milliseconds OFF time. A total of 6000 thermal shock cycles were completed on pure tungsten material. Experimental results were compared with mathematical simulations carried out using COMSOL Multiphysics for transient high heat flux tests.

  5. Tungsten nitride coatings obtained by HiPIMS as plasma facing materials for fusion applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiron, Vasile; Velicu, Ioana-Laura; Porosnicu, Corneliu; Burducea, Ion; Dinca, Paul; Malinský, Petr

    2017-09-01

    In this work, tungsten nitride coatings with nitrogen content in the range of 19-50 at% were prepared by reactive multi-pulse high power impulse magnetron sputtering as a function of the argon and nitrogen mixture and further exposed to a deuterium plasma jet. The elemental composition, morphological properties and physical structure of the samples were investigated by Rutherford backscattering spectrometry, atomic force microscopy and X-ray diffraction. Deuterium implantation was performed using a deuterium plasma jet and its retention in nitrogen containing tungsten films was investigated using thermal desorption spectrometry. Deuterium retention and release behaviour strongly depend on the nitrogen content in the coatings and the films microstructure. All nitride coatings have a polycrystalline structure and retain a lower deuterium level than the pure tungsten sample. Nitrogen content in the films acts as a diffusion barrier for deuterium and leads to a higher desorption temperature, therefore to a higher binding energy.

  6. Assessment of database for interaction of tritium with ITER plasma facing materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dolan, T.J.; Anderl, R.A.

    1994-09-01

    The present work surveys recent literature on hydrogen isotope interactions with Be, SS and Inconels, Cu, C, and V, and alloys of Cu and V. The goals are (1) to provide input to the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) team to help with tritium source term estimates for the Early Safety and Environmental Characterization Study and (2) to provide guidance for planning additional research that will be needed to fill gaps in the present materials database. Properties of diffusivity, solubility, permeability, chemical reactions, Soret effect, recombination coefficient, surface effects, trapping, porosity, layered structures, interfaces, and oxides are considered. Various materials data are tabulated, and a matrix display shows an assessment of the quality of the data available for each main property of each material. Recommendations are made for interim values of diffusivity and solubility to be used, pending further discussion by the ITER community.

  7. A Luminescence Characterization of Adsorbed Hydrogen Atoms on Plasma Facing Materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grankin, V.P. [Azov Sea State Technical Univ., Mariupol (Ukraine). Computer Science Dept.; Styrov, V.V. [Azov Sea State Technical Univ., Mariupol (Ukraine). Phisics Dept.

    2004-06-01

    An atomic probe technique for characterization of hydrogen atoms on fusion related materials is described. The technique for determining surface coverage by hydrogen atoms or isotopes under both non-steady-state and stationary conditions is based on detection of heterogeneous chemiluminescence (HCL) excited in the interaction between adsorbed atoms and the pulsed normalized probing atomic flow. The recombination of hydrogen atoms from the gas phase was found to occur in general case via both collision Rideal-Eley (RE) and diffusion Langmuir-Hinshelwood (LH) mechanisms. The instantaneous optical response allows extracting the contributions of these two mechanisms to the overall reaction rate for various experimental conditions. The HCL method is also applicable for quick measurement of the reactivity of adatoms (in terms of the recombination coefficient {gamma}) for all the materials including metals. The spectra and kinetics of HCL are useful for estimation of heats of adsorption for hydrogen atoms or isotopes.

  8. Microstructure and performance of rare earth element-strengthened plasma-facing tungsten material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Laima; Shi, Jing; Lin, Jinshan; Zan, Xiang; Zhu, Xiaoyong; Xu, Qiu; Wu, Yucheng

    2016-09-01

    Pure W and W-(2%, 5%, 10%) Lu alloys were manufactured via mechanical alloying for 20 h and a spark plasma sintering process at 1,873 K for 2 min. The effects of Lu doping on the microstructure and performance of W were investigated using various techniques. For irradiation performance analysis, thermal desorption spectroscopy (TDS) measurements were performed from room temperature to 1,000 K via infrared irradiation with a heating rate of 1 K/s after implantations of He+ and D+ ions. TDS measurements were conducted to investigate D retention behavior. Microhardness was dramatically enhanced, and the density initially increased and then decreased with Lu content. The D retention performance followed the same trend as the density. Second-phase particles identified as Lu2O3 particles were completely distributed over the W grain boundaries and generated an effective grain refinement. Transgranular and intergranular fracture modes were observed on the fracture surface of the sintered W-Lu samples, indicating some improvement of strength and toughness. The amount and distribution of Lu substantially affected the properties of W. Among the investigated alloy compositions, W-5%Lu exhibited the best overall performance.

  9. Damage modelling in plasma facing components

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martin, E. [Universite Bordeaux 1, UMR 5801 (CNRS-SPS-CEA-UB1), Laboratoire des Composites Thermostructuraux, F-33600 Pessac (France)], E-mail: martin@lcts.u-bordeaux1.fr; Camus, G. [Universite Bordeaux 1, UMR 5801 (CNRS-SPS-CEA-UB1), Laboratoire des Composites Thermostructuraux, F-33600 Pessac (France); Schlosser, J.; Chevet, G. [Association Euratom-CEA, DSM/DRFC, CEA Cadarache, St. Paul Lez Durance (France)

    2009-04-30

    The plasma facing components of controlled fusion devices are submitted to high heat fluxes in operating conditions (from 10 to 20 MW/m{sup 2}). These components are made of a carbon/carbon composite tile bonded to a copper alloy heat sink. Due to the thermal expansion mismatch between the composite and the copper alloy, significant stresses may develop during fabrication and under heat load inducing damage in the composite material as well as at the copper/composite interface. The present study describes a modelling approach aimed at predicting damage development in plasma facing components. For this purpose, damage laws related to the non-linear behaviour of both the composite material and the copper/composite joint have been identified. These constitutive laws were then introduced in a numerical model representative of a plasma facing component. Results show the development of damage within the assembly submitted to a heat load.

  10. Elaboration and thermomechanical characterization of W/Cu functionally graded materials produced by Spark Plasma Sintering for plasma facing components

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Autissier, E., E-mail: manu.autissier@orange.fr [CEA, IRFM, F-13108 Saint-Paul-Lez-Durance (France); Richou, M. [CEA, IRFM, F-13108 Saint-Paul-Lez-Durance (France); Minier, L. [Laboratoire Interdisciplinaire Carnot de Bourgogne, UMR 6303 CNRS-UB, 9 Av. Alain Savary, BP 47870, 21078 Dijon Cedex (France); Gardarein, J.-L. [Aix Marseille Univ, IUSTI, UMR CNRS 7343, F-13453 Marseille (France); Bernard, F. [Laboratoire Interdisciplinaire Carnot de Bourgogne, UMR 6303 CNRS-UB, 9 Av. Alain Savary, BP 47870, 21078 Dijon Cedex (France)

    2015-10-15

    Highlights: • Different W-Cu powders were sintered by Spark Plasma Sintering. • The relative density increase with the temperature and Cu concentration. • Thermal conductivity of W-Cu samples has been measured in function of density. • Assembly of a three-layer W-Cu between a W block and a CuCrZr block was realized. • 40 min is the minimum time to complete bonding between W and W{sub 80}Cu{sub 20}. - Abstract: The assembly of W block with a CuCrZr block has been produced by adding compliant W-Cu layers. Firstly, three W-Cu powders (W{sub 80}Cu{sub 20}, W{sub 60}Cu{sub 40} and W{sub 40}Cu{sub 60}) were sintered by spark plasma sintering (SPS) to investigate the influences of sintering temperature and pressure on relative density and microstructure. The experimental results indicated that the relative density increases with temperature and Cu concentration, achieving a value of 94.1% for the W{sub 40}Cu{sub 60} sample sintered at 1000 °C and a value of 83.1% for the W{sub 80}Cu{sub 20} sample sintered at the same temperature. Then, a three-layer W-Cu assembly between a W block and a CuCrZr block was fabricated using similar sintering conditions to the W-Cu powders. The sintering temperature was limited at 1000 °C due to the CuCrZr melting temperature (1083 °C). The experimental results indicated that loading time, when the right sintering temperature and pressure are applied, is the most important parameter.

  11. Effect of surface segregation and mobility on erosion of plasma-facing materials in magnetic fusion systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sizyuk, Tatyana; Hassanein, Ahmed

    2015-03-15

    Highlights: • We integrated collisional and thermal processes to study tungsten erosion by carbon ions. • We analyzed effects of radiation enhanced diffusion and surface segregation. • Self-consistent simulations allowed explaining experimental results. • Difference in tungsten erosion at various temperatures was explained. - Abstract: The present work studies the combined effects of collisional sputtering and mixing processes of carbon impurities in tungsten plasma-facing material integrated with thermal processes including surface segregation and diffusion. We used our ITMC-DYN package, which includes description of all collisional and thermal processes, for the analysis of recent experimental results of tungsten erosion and carbon implantation at various target temperatures. Self-consistent integrated modeling predicted thermal processes effects on erosion/deposition dynamics and defined decisive parameters range and their importance. Critical parameters were estimated based on available experimental data. The integrated simulation reproduced the experimental results and predicted the transition from enhanced tungsten erosion to significant carbon coverage on the tungsten surface. These effects for wider range of system conditions with C/H ions irradiation and for reactor conditions can be predicted by including detailed modeling of chemical erosion processes in a self-consistent manner.

  12. A new vision of plasma facing components

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nygren, Richard E., E-mail: renygre@sandia.gov [Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM (United States); Youchison, Dennis L. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Wirth, Brian D. [University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States); Snead, Lance L.

    2016-11-01

    Highlights: • New approach recommended to develop refractory fusion plasma facing components. • Need to develop engineered materials architecture with nano-features. • Need to develop PFCs with gas jet cooling with very fine scale for jet arrays. • Emphasis on role of additive manufacturing as needed method for fabrication. - Abstract: This paper advances a vision for plasma facing components (PFCs) that includes the following points. The solution for plasma facing materials likely consists of engineered structures in which the layer of plasma facing material (PFM) is integrated with an engineered structure that cools the PFM and may also transition with graded composition. The key to achieving this PFC architecture will likely lie in advanced manufacturing methods, e.g., additive manufacturing, that can produce layers with controlled porosity and features such as micro-fibers and/or nano-particles that can collect He and transmutation products, limit tritium retention, and do all this in a way that maintains adequate robustness for a satisfactory lifetime. This vision has significant implications for how we structure a development program.

  13. FOREWORD: 13th International Workshop on Plasma-Facing Materials and Components for Fusion Applications/1st International Conference on Fusion Energy Materials Science 13th International Workshop on Plasma-Facing Materials and Components for Fusion Applications/1st International Conference on Fusion Energy Materials Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacob, Wolfgang; Linsmeier, Christian; Rubel, Marek

    2011-12-01

    The 13th International Workshop on Plasma-Facing Materials and Components (PFMC-13) jointly organized with the 1st International Conference on Fusion Energy Materials Science (FEMaS-1) was held in Rosenheim (Germany) on 9-13 May 2011. PFMC-13 is a successor of the International Workshop on Carbon Materials for Fusion Applications series. Between 1985 and 2003 ten 'Carbon Workshops' were organized in Jülich, Stockholm and Hohenkammer. Then it was time for a change and redefinition of the scope of the symposium to reflect the new requirements of ITER and the ongoing evolution in the field. Under the new name (PFMC-11), the workshop was first organized in 2006 in Greifswald, Germany and PFMC-12 took place in Jülich in 2009. Initially starting in 1985 with about 40 participants as a 1.5 day workshop, the event has continuously grown to about 220 participants at PFMC-12. Due to the joint organization with FEMaS-1, PFMC-13 set a new record with more than 280 participants. The European project Fusion Energy Materials Science, FEMaS, coordinated by the Max-Planck-Institut für Plasmaphysik (IPP), organizes and stimulates cooperative research activities which involve large-scale research facilities as well as other top-level materials characterization laboratories. Five different fields are addressed: benchmarking experiments for radiation damage modelling, the application of micro-mechanical characterization methods, synchrotron and neutron radiation-based techniques and advanced nanoscopic analysis based on transmission electron microscopy. All these fields need to be exploited further by the fusion materials community for timely materials solutions for a DEMO reactor. In order to integrate these materials research fields, FEMaS acted as a co-organizer for the 2011 workshop and successfully introduced a number of participants from research labs and universities into the PFMC community. Plasma-facing materials experience particularly hostile conditions as they are

  14. Developing Structural, High-heat flux and Plasma Facing Materials for a near-term DEMO Fusion Power Plant: the EU Assessment

    CERN Document Server

    Stork, D; Boutard, J-L; Buckthorpe, D; Diegele, E; Dudarev, S L; English, C; Federici, G; Gilbert, M R; Gonzalez, S; Ibarra, A; Linsmeier, Ch; Puma, A Li; Marbach, G; Morris, P F; Packer, L W; Raj, B; Rieth, M; Tran, M Q; Ward, D J; Zinkle, S J

    2014-01-01

    The findings of the EU 'Materials Assessment Group' (MAG), within the 2012 EU Fusion Roadmap exercise, are discussed. MAG analysed the technological readiness of structural, plasma facing and high heat flux materials for a DEMO concept to be constructed in the early 2030s, proposing a coherent strategy for R&D up to a DEMO construction decision. Technical consequences for the materials required and the development, testing and modelling programmes, are analysed using: a systems engineering approach, considering reactor operational cycles, efficient maintenance and inspection requirements, and interaction with functional materials/coolants; and a project-based risk analysis, with R&D to mitigate risks from material shortcomings including development of specific risk mitigation materials.

  15. Plasma-wall interactions data compendium-1. ''Hydrogen retention property, diffusion and recombination coefficients database for selected plasma-facing materials''

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iwakiri, Hirotomo [Kyushu Univ., Fukuoka (Japan). Research Inst. for Applied Mechanics; Matsuhiro, Kenjirou [Osaka Univ., Osaka (Japan); Hirooka, Yoshi [National Inst. for Fusion Science, Toki, Gifu (Japan); Yamamura, Yasunori [Okayama Univ. of Scinece, Okayama (Japan)

    2002-05-01

    A summary on the recent activities of the plasma-wall interactions database task group at the National Institute for Fusion Science is presented in this report. These activities are focused on the compilation of literature data on the key parameters related to wall recycling characteristics that affect dynamic particle balance during plasma discharges and also on-site tritium inventory. More specifically, in this task group a universal fitting formula has been proposed and successfully applied to help compile hydrogen implantation-induced retention data. Also, presented here are the data on hydrogen diffusion and surface recombination coefficients, both critical in modeling dynamic wall recycling behavior. Data compilation has been conducted on beryllium, carbon, tungsten and molybdenum, all currently used for plasma-facing components in magnetic fusion experiments. (author)

  16. A dislocation-based crystal viscoplasticity model with application to micro-engineered plasma-facing materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivera, David; Huang, Yue; Po, Giacomo; Ghoniem, Nasr M.

    2017-03-01

    Materials developed with special surface architecture are shown here to be more resilient to the transient thermomechanical environments imposed by intermittent exposures to high heat flux thermal loading typical of long-pulse plasma transients. In an accompanying article, we present experimental results that show the relaxation of residual thermal stresses in micro-engineered W surfaces. A dislocation-based model is extended here within the framework of large deformation crystal plasticity. The model is applied to the deformation of single crystals, polycrystals, and micro-engineered surfaces composed of a uniform density of micro-pillars. The model is utilized to design tapered surface micro-pillar architecture, composed of a Re core and W coatings. Residual stresses generated by cyclic thermomechanical loading of these architectures show that the surface can be in a compressive stress state, following a short shakedown plasma exposure, thus mitigating surface fracture.

  17. Towards a programme of testing and qualification for structural and plasma-facing materials in ‘fusion neutron’ environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stork, D.; Heidinger, R.; Muroga, T.; Zinkle, S. J.; Moeslang, A.; Porton, M.; Boutard, J.-L.; Gonzalez, S.; Ibarra, A.

    2017-09-01

    Materials damage by 14.1MeV neutrons from deuterium-tritium (D-T) fusion reactions can only be characterised definitively by subjecting a relevant configuration of test materials to high-intensity ‘fusion-neutron spectrum sources’, i.e. those simulating closely D-T fusion-neutron spectra. This provides major challenges to programmes to design and construct a demonstration fusion reactor prior to having a large-scale, high-intensity source of such neutrons. In this paper, we discuss the different aspects related to these ‘relevant configuration’ tests, including: • generic issues in materials qualification/validation, comparing safety requirements against those of investment protection; • lessons learned from the fission programme, enabling a reduced fusion materials testing programme; • the use and limitations of presently available possible irradiation sources to optimise a fusion neutron testing program including fission-neutron irradiation of isotopically and chemically tailored steels, ion damage by high-energy helium ions and self-ion beams, or irradiation studies with neutron sources of non-fusion spectra; and • the different potential sources of simulated fusion neutron spectra and the choice using stripping reactions from deuterium-beam ions incident on light-element targets.

  18. 新型钨基面向等离子体材料的研究进展%Development of New Tungsten-based Materials as Plasma Facing Materials

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    朱玲旭; 郭双全; 张宇; 葛昌纯

    2011-01-01

    The pure tungsten used in plasma facing materials for fusion reactors has disadvantage of difficult machining, high ductile-brittle transition temperature and low recrystallization temperature, etc. Tungsten-base material is a kind of broad application prospect of plasma facing materials, extensive research overseas and domestic. The preparation of new W-base plasma facing materials of the recent research progress is reviewed, using oxide dispersion strengthening, carbide particle dispersion enhanced, alloying enhance W-base materials and W-base composite reinforcement method. The corresponding enhancement method allows certain aspects of W-base materials performance improved, such as the flexural strength, hardness and fracture toughness, and good corrosion resistance and resistance to impact ductility, but in the thermal load, w-base materials will still fails, the relevant materials need to continue be studied about the craft and the properties.%纯钨应用于聚变堆中面向等离子体材料具有难加工、高的韧脆转变温度、低的再结晶温度等缺点,而钨基材料是一类具有广阔应用前景的面向等离子体材料,受到国内外的广泛研究.综述了采用氧化物颗粒弥散强化、碳化物颗粒弥散增强、合金化增强钨基材料和钨基复合材料等强化手段制备新型钨基面向等离子体材料的近年研究进展.采用相应的增强方法可使得钨基材料某些方面的性能得到提高,如显著提高抗弯强度、硬度和断裂韧性,具有较好的抗腐蚀性、延展性和抗冲击力等优点,但是在承受大的工作热负荷时,钨基材料仍会失效,尚需要继续进行相关材料的工艺、性能研究.

  19. Developing structural, high-heat flux and plasma facing materials for a near-term DEMO fusion power plant: The EU assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stork, D., E-mail: derek.stork@btinternet.com [Euratom – CCFE Association, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon, Oxfordshire OX14 3DB (United Kingdom); Agostini, P. [ENEA, Brasimone Research Centre, 40032 Cumugnano, Bologna (Italy); Boutard, J.L. [CEA, cab HC, Saclay, F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Buckthorpe, D. [AMEC, Booths Park, Chelford Road, Knutsford, Cheshire WA16 8QZ (United Kingdom); Diegele, E. [Karlsruhe Institute for Technology, IMF-I, D-7602 Karlsruhe (Germany); Dudarev, S.L. [Euratom – CCFE Association, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon, Oxfordshire OX14 3DB (United Kingdom); English, C. [National Nuclear Laboratory, Chadwick House, Warrington Road, Birchwood Park WA3 6AE (United Kingdom); Federici, G. [EFDA Power Plant Physics and Technology, Boltzmannstr. 2, Garching 85748 (Germany); Gilbert, M.R. [Euratom – CCFE Association, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon, Oxfordshire OX14 3DB (United Kingdom); Gonzalez, S. [EFDA Power Plant Physics and Technology, Boltzmannstr. 2, Garching 85748 (Germany); Ibarra, A. [CIEMAT, Avda. Complutense 40, Madrid (Spain); Linsmeier, Ch. [Forschungszentrum Jülich GmbH, Institut für Energie- und Klimaforschung – Plasmaphysik, EURATOM Association, 52425 Jülich (Germany); Li Puma, A. [CEA, DEN, Saclay, DM2S, SERMA, F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Marbach, G. [CEA, cab HC, Saclay, F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Morris, P.F. [Formerly of TATA Steel Europe, Swinden Technology Centre, Moorgate, Rotherham S60 3AR (United Kingdom); Packer, L.W. [Euratom – CCFE Association, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon, Oxfordshire OX14 3DB (United Kingdom); Raj, B. [Indian National Academy of Engineering, Shaheed Jeet Singh Marg, New Delhi 110016 (India); Rieth, M. [Karlsruhe Institute for Technology, IMF-I, D-7602 Karlsruhe (Germany); and others

    2014-12-15

    The findings of the EU ‘Materials Assessment Group’ (MAG), within the 2012 EU Fusion Roadmap exercise, are discussed. MAG analysed the technological readiness of structural, plasma facing and high heat flux materials for a DEMO concept to be constructed in the early 2030s, proposing a coherent strategy for R and D up to a DEMO construction decision. A DEMO phase I with a ‘Starter Blanket’ and ‘Starter Divertor’ is foreseen: the blanket being capable of withstanding ⩾2 MW yr m{sup −2} fusion neutron fluence (∼20 dpa in the front-wall steel). A second phase ensues for DEMO with ⩾5 MW yr m{sup −2} first wall neutron fluence. Technical consequences for the materials required and the development, testing and modelling programmes, are analysed using: a systems engineering approach, considering reactor operational cycles, efficient maintenance and inspection requirements, and interaction with functional materials/coolants; and a project-based risk analysis, with R and D to mitigate risks from material shortcomings including development of specific risk mitigation materials. The DEMO balance of plant constrains the blanket and divertor coolants to remain unchanged between the two phases. The blanket coolant choices (He gas or pressurised water) put technical constraints on the blanket steels, either to have high strength at higher temperatures than current baseline variants (above 650 °C for high thermodynamic efficiency from He-gas coolant), or superior radiation-embrittlement properties at lower temperatures (∼290–320 °C), for construction of water-cooled blankets. Risk mitigation proposed would develop these options in parallel, and computational and modelling techniques to shorten the cycle-time of new steel development will be important to achieve tight R and D timescales. The superior power handling of a water-cooled divertor target suggests a substructure temperature operating window (∼200–350 °C) that could be realised, as a

  20. Developing structural, high-heat flux and plasma facing materials for a near-term DEMO fusion power plant: The EU assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stork, D.; Agostini, P.; Boutard, J. L.; Buckthorpe, D.; Diegele, E.; Dudarev, S. L.; English, C.; Federici, G.; Gilbert, M. R.; Gonzalez, S.; Ibarra, A.; Linsmeier, Ch.; Li Puma, A.; Marbach, G.; Morris, P. F.; Packer, L. W.; Raj, B.; Rieth, M.; Tran, M. Q.; Ward, D. J.; Zinkle, S. J.

    2014-12-01

    The findings of the EU 'Materials Assessment Group' (MAG), within the 2012 EU Fusion Roadmap exercise, are discussed. MAG analysed the technological readiness of structural, plasma facing and high heat flux materials for a DEMO concept to be constructed in the early 2030s, proposing a coherent strategy for R&D up to a DEMO construction decision. A DEMO phase I with a 'Starter Blanket' and 'Starter Divertor' is foreseen: the blanket being capable of withstanding ⩾2 MW yr m-2 fusion neutron fluence (∼20 dpa in the front-wall steel). A second phase ensues for DEMO with ⩾5 MW yr m-2 first wall neutron fluence. Technical consequences for the materials required and the development, testing and modelling programmes, are analysed using: a systems engineering approach, considering reactor operational cycles, efficient maintenance and inspection requirements, and interaction with functional materials/coolants; and a project-based risk analysis, with R&D to mitigate risks from material shortcomings including development of specific risk mitigation materials. The DEMO balance of plant constrains the blanket and divertor coolants to remain unchanged between the two phases. The blanket coolant choices (He gas or pressurised water) put technical constraints on the blanket steels, either to have high strength at higher temperatures than current baseline variants (above 650 °C for high thermodynamic efficiency from He-gas coolant), or superior radiation-embrittlement properties at lower temperatures (∼290-320 °C), for construction of water-cooled blankets. Risk mitigation proposed would develop these options in parallel, and computational and modelling techniques to shorten the cycle-time of new steel development will be important to achieve tight R&D timescales. The superior power handling of a water-cooled divertor target suggests a substructure temperature operating window (∼200-350 °C) that could be realised, as a baseline-concept, using tungsten on a copper

  1. Understanding plasma facing surfaces in magnetic fusion devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skinner, C. H.; Capece, A. M.; Koel, B. E.; Roszell, J. P.

    2013-09-01

    The plasma-material interface is recognized to be the most critical challenge in the realization of fusion energy. Liquid metals offer a self-healing, renewable interface that bypasses present issues with solid, neutron-damaged materials such as tungsten. Lithium in particular has dramatically improved plasma performance in many tokamaks through a reduction of hydrogen recycling. However the detailed chemical composition and properties of the top few nm that interact with the plasma are often obscure. Surface analysis has proven to be a key tool in semiconductor processing and a new laboratory has been established at PPPL to apply surface science techniques to plasma facing materials. We have shown that lithiated PFC surfaces in tokamaks will likely be oxidized during the intershot interval. Present work is focused on deuterium uptake of solid and liquid metals for plasma density control and sub-micron scale wetting of liquid metals on their substrates. The long-term goal is to provide a material database for designing liquid metal plasma facing components for tokamaks such as National Spherical Torus Experiment-Upgrade (NSTX-U) and Fusion Nuclear Science Facility-ST (FNSF-ST). Support was provided through DOE-PPPL Contract Number is DE-AC02-09CH11466.

  2. Plasma-wall interactions data compendium-2. ''Hydrogen retention property, diffusion and recombination coefficients database for selected plasma-facing materials''

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matsuhiro, Kenjirou [Osaka Univ., Osaka (Japan); Iwakiri, Hirotomo [Kyushu Univ., Fukuoka (Japan). Research Inst. for Applied Mechanics; Hirooka, Yoshi [National Inst. for Fusion Science, Toki, Gifu (Japan); Yamamura, Yasunori [Okayama Univ. of Scinece, Okayama (Japan); Morita, Kenji [Nagoya Univ. (Japan)

    2002-08-01

    This report will present additional data to those included in the previous report of this series. These new data are on the hydrogen (deuterium) trapping properties of graphite materials. The units on the data on hydrogen (deuterium) diffusion and surface recombination coefficients have been updated to adopt the SI unit system. Also, the graphic representations of previously compiled data on hydrogen (deuterium) retention have been improved for better understanding. For the sake of completeness, this report will present all these data in the improved format. (author)

  3. Study of the hydrogen behavior in amorphous hydrogenated materials of type a - C:H and a - SiC:H facing fusion reactor plasma; Etude du comportament de l`hydrogene dans des materiaux amorphes hydrogenes de type a - C:H et a - SiC:H devant faire face au plasma des reacteurs a fusion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barbier, G. [Lyon-1 Univ., 69 - Villeurbanne (France). Inst. de Physique Nucleaire

    1997-04-10

    Plasma facing components of controlled fusion test devices (tokamaks) are submitted to several constraints (irradiation, high temperatures). The erosion (physical sputtering and chemical erosion) and the hydrogen recycling (retention and desorption) of these materials influence many plasma parameters and thus affect drastically the tokamak running. First, we will describe the different plasma-material interactions. It will be pointed out, how erosion and hydrogen recycling are strongly related to both chemical and physical properties of the material. In order to reduce these interactions, we have selected two amorphous hydrogenated materials (a-C:H and a-SiC:H), which are known for their good thermal and chemical qualities. Some samples have been then implanted with lithium ions at different fluences. Our materials have been then irradiated with deuterium ions at low energy. From our results, it is shown that both the lithium implantation and the use of an a - SiC:H substrate can be beneficial in enhancing the hydrogen retention. These results were completed with thermal desorption studies of these materials. It was evidenced that the hydrogen fixation was more efficient in a-SiC:H than in a-C:H substrate. Results in good agreement with those described above have been obtained by exposing a - C:H and a - SiC:H samples to the scrape off layer of the tokamak of Varennes (TdeV, Canada). A modelling of hydrogen diffusion under irradiation has been also proposed. (author) 176 refs.

  4. Damage modelling in Plasma Facing Components

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martin, E.; Camus, G. [Bordeaux-1 Univ. des Sciences et Technologies-3, LCTS, Lab. des Composites Thermostructuraux, CNRS-UMR 5801, 33 - Pessac, (France); Schlosser, J. [Association Euratom-CEA Cadarache, 13 - Saint-Paul-lez-Durance (France). Dept. de Recherches sur la Fusion Controlee

    2007-07-01

    Full text of publication follows: The plasma facing components (PFC) of controlled fusion devices are submitted to high heat fluxes in operating conditions (10 MW/m2 for Tore Supra and up to 20 MW/m{sup 2} for ITER, Cadarache, France). Active cooling is required to maintain a reasonable surface temperature and to avoid critical heat flux and melting of the components. The PFC developed for Tore Supra are made of a carbon/carbon (C/C) composite flat tile bonded to a copper alloy heat sink. Under operating conditions, because of the thermal expansion mismatch existing between the C/C composite and the copper alloy, these components withstand significant stresses which induce damage in the C/C material as well as at the copper/composite interface. Design tools are thus required in order to analyse the initiation and the propagation of damage in thermally loaded PFC. The present study describes a modelling approach aimed at predicting damage in actively cooled PFC. For this purpose, dedicated experimental procedures have been developed and sound constitutive laws taking into account the damage related non linear behaviour of both the C/C material and the Cu-C/C joint have been established. Various tests have first been performed on C/C samples in tension and compression, within the fibre axis and off-axis, as well as in shear using a Iosipescu type device, in order to carefully analyse the non-linear mechanical behaviour of this material. A constitutive law able to handle complex multiaxial loadings, established within a classical thermodynamical framework and using scalar damage variables, was then identified. Tensile and shear tests were also performed on C/C-Cu samples in order to identify a cohesive zone model representative of the damageable behaviour of the joint. These constitutive laws were then introduced in a numerical model representative of a PFC. Obtained results have evidenced the progressive development of damage which takes place in the assembly when

  5. Tungsten-microdiamond composites for plasma facing components

    Science.gov (United States)

    Livramento, V.; Nunes, D.; Correia, J. B.; Carvalho, P. A.; Mardolcar, U.; Mateus, R.; Hanada, K.; Shohoji, N.; Fernandes, H.; Silva, C.; Alves, E.

    2011-09-01

    Tungsten is considered as one of promising candidate materials for plasma facing component in nuclear fusion reactors due to its resistance to sputtering and high melting point. High thermal conductivity is also a prerequisite for plasma facing components under the unique service environment of fusion reactor characterised by the massive heat load, especially in the divertor area. The feasibility of mechanical alloying of nanodiamond and tungsten, and the consolidation of the composite powders with Spark Plasma Sintering (SPS) was previously demonstrated. In the present research we report on the use of microdiamond instead of nanodiamond in such composites. Microdiamond is more favourable than nanodiamond in view of phonon transport performance leading to better thermal conductivity. However, there is a trade off between densification and thermal conductivity as the SPS temperature increases tungsten carbide formation from microdiamond is accelerated inevitably while the consolidation density would rise.

  6. Carbon fiber composites application in ITER plasma facing components

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barabash, V.; Akiba, M.; Bonal, J. P.; Federici, G.; Matera, R.; Nakamura, K.; Pacher, H. D.; Rödig, M.; Vieider, G.; Wu, C. H.

    1998-10-01

    Carbon Fiber Composites (CFCs) are one of the candidate armour materials for the plasma facing components of the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER). For the present reference design, CFC has been selected as armour for the divertor target near the plasma strike point mainly because of unique resistance to high normal and off-normal heat loads. It does not melt under disruptions and might have higher erosion lifetime in comparison with other possible armour materials. Issues related to CFC application in ITER are described in this paper. They include erosion lifetime, tritium codeposition with eroded material and possible methods for the removal of the codeposited layers, neutron irradiation effect, development of joining technologies with heat sink materials, and thermomechanical performance. The status of the development of new advanced CFCs for ITER application is also described. Finally, the remaining R&D needs are critically discussed.

  7. Collaborative Research and Development on Liquid Metal Plasma Facing Components

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaworski, M. A.; Abrams, T.; Ellis, R.; Khodak, A.; Leblanc, B.; Menard, J.; Ono, M.; Skinner, C. H.; Stotler, D. P.; Detemmerman, G.; Gleeson, M. A.; Lof, A. R.; Scholten, J.; van den Berg, M. A.; van den Meiden, H. J.; Gray, T. K.; Sabbagh, S. A.; Soukhanovskii, V. A.; Hu, J.; Wang, L.; Zuo, G.

    2012-10-01

    Liquid metal plasma facing components (PFCs) provide the potential to avoid component replacement by continually replenishing the plasma-facing surface. Data during the NSTX liquid lithium divertor (LLD) campaign indicate that impurity accumulation on the static lithium resulted in a mixed-material surface. However, no lithium ejection nor substrate influx was observed during normal operation. This motivates research on flowing systems for near-term machines. Experiments on the Magnum-PSI linear test-stand and EAST tokamak have begun to explore issues related to near-surface lithium transport, surface evolution and coating lifetime for exposures of 5-10s. Technology development for a fully-flowing liquid lithium PFC is being conducted including construction of a liquid lithium flow loop and thermal-hydraulic studies of novel, capillary-restrained lithium PFCs for possible use on EAST and NSTX-U.

  8. 面向等离子体钨基材料的增韧研究最新进展%Recent progress on toughening of tungsten-based materials as plasma facing materials

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    何培; 姚伟志; 吕建明; 张向东

    2016-01-01

    Pure tungsten and tungsten-based materials are promising candidates as plasma facing materials in fu-sion application due to their high melting point,good thermal conductivity,low vapor pressure,low sputter rates and low radioactivity.However,the intrinsic brittleness is considered as the main restricting factor for tungsten-based materials and draws the maj or focus of the international fusion materials community.This paper reviews recent progress of three main strategies on toughening of tungsten-based materials:alloying,dispersion strengthening and composite.Presently only Rehnium addition is known to improve tungsten fracture properties by alloying.Proper mechanical working/treatment decreases ductile-brittle transition temperature of dispersion strengthened tungsten alloys.The ductile-brittle transition temperature of tungsten foil laminates by brazing is decreased to 150 ℃.%钨及钨基材料由于其高熔点、高热导率、低蒸气压、低溅射产额及低辐照放射性等优异性能,成为具有广阔应用前景的面向等离子体材料.然而,钨基材料的本征脆性成为其作为聚变材料的主要限制因素,也成为国际聚变材料界的研究热点.本文综述了通过合金化、弥散强化以及复合材料等3种途径来增加钨基材料韧性的最新研究进展.目前合金元素中只有铼的添加能够显著改善钨的韧性;单一弥散强化方式难以有效提高钨的韧性,适当的热机械加工能够明显降低钨基材料的韧脆转变温度;通过钨箔钎焊制备出的钨层压结构复合材料的韧脆转变温度降低到了150℃.

  9. Processing of W-Cu functionally graded materials (FGM) through the powder metallurgy route: application as plasma facing components for ITER-like thermonuclear fusion reactor; Elaboration de materiaux W-Cu a gradient de proprietes fonctionnelles (FGM) par metallurgie des poudres: application en tant que composants face au plasma de machines de fusion thermonucleaire de type Iter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raharijaona, J.J.

    2009-11-15

    The aim of this study was to study and optimize the sintering of W-Cu graded composition materials, for first wall of ITER-like thermonuclear reactor application. The graded composition in the material generates graded functional properties (Functionally Graded Materials - FGM). Rough thermomechanical calculations have shown the interest of W-Cu FGM to improve the lifetime of Plasma Facing Components (PFC). To process W-Cu FGM, powder metallurgy route was analyzed and optimized from W-CuO powder mixtures. The influence of oxide reduction on the sintering of powder mixtures was highlighted. An optimal heating treatment under He/H{sub 2} atmosphere was determined. The sintering mechanisms were deduced from the analysis of the effect of the Cu-content. Sintering of W-Cu materials with a graded composition and grain size has revealed two liquid migration steps: i) capillary migration, after the Cu-melting and, ii) expulsion of liquid, at the end of sintering, from the dense part to the porous part, due to the continuation of W-skeleton sintering. These two steps were confirmed by a model based on capillary pressure calculation. In addition, thermal conductivity measurements were conducted on sintered parts and showed values which gradually increase with the Cu-content. Hardness tests on a polished cross-section in the bulk are consistent with the composition profiles obtained and the differential grain size. (author)

  10. Graphene as a Coating for Plasma Facing Components

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navarro, Marcos; Rojas, Richard; Kulcisnki, Gerald; Lagally, Max; Santarius, John

    2016-10-01

    Graphene has been a source of interest for multiple applications because of its unusual electronic and mechanical properties. A number of experimental studies have established that defect-free graphene is an excellent chemical-barrier material, but there have been no reports of graphene proposed as a protective coating against ion and/or neutral interactions with material surfaces. In the presence of such irradiation, plasma facing components (PFC's) tend to develop ``fuzz/grass'' structures that lead to the sputtering of wall material, diminishing the lifetime of the PFC's and plasma performance. We have shown that graphene can reduce or eliminate changes on surface morphology due to energetic helium. In the case of graphene-covered tungsten, our results show that, compared to the uncovered W, graphene suppresses these morphologies that form on the surface of hot W. Using Raman spectroscopy as a diagnostic, the graphene coating shows little sign of damage after being irradiated, indicating that there is little to no sputtering of carbon impurities from the surface. We have also determined that the mass losses in W have been reduced significantly. Both decreases in impurities can lead to an improved plasma performance and longer lifetimes for PFC's. This work has been supported by GERS and TEAM-Science at the UW-Madison.

  11. Beryllium assessment and recommendation for application in ITER plasma facing components

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barabash, V.; Tanaka, S.; Matera, R. [ITER Joint Central Team, Muenchen (Germany)

    1998-01-01

    The design status of the ITER Plasma Facing Components (PFC) is presented. The operational conditions of the armour material for the different components are summarized. Beryllium is the reference armour material for the Primary Wall, Baffle and Limiter and the back-up material for the Divertor Dome. The activities on the selection of the Be grades and the joining technologies are reviewed. (author)

  12. Plasma chemistry for inorganic materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsumoto, O.

    1980-01-01

    Practical application of plasma chemistry to the development of inorganic materials using both low temperature and warm plasmas are summarized. Topics cover: the surface nitrification and oxidation of metals; chemical vapor deposition; formation of minute oxide particles; the composition of oxides from chloride vapor; the composition of carbides and nitrides; freezing high temperature phases by plasma arc welding and plasma jet; use of plasma in the development of a substitute for petroleum; the production of silicon for use in solar cell batteries; and insulating the inner surface of nuclear fusion reactor walls.

  13. Comprehensive simulation of vertical plasma instability events and their serious damage to ITER plasma facing components

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassanein, A.; Sizyuk, T.

    2008-11-01

    Safe and reliable operation is still one of the major challenges in the development of the new generation of ITER-like fusion reactors. The deposited plasma energy during major disruptions, edge-localized modes (ELMs) and vertical displacement events (VDEs) causes significant surface erosion, possible structural failure and frequent plasma contamination. While plasma disruptions and ELM will have no significant thermal effects on the structural materials or coolant channels because of their short deposition time, VDEs having longer-duration time could have a destructive impact on these components. Therefore, modelling the response of structural materials to VDE has to integrate detailed energy deposition processes, surface vaporization, phase change and melting, heat conduction to coolant channels and critical heat flux criteria at the coolant channels. The HEIGHTS 3D upgraded computer package considers all the above processes to specifically study VDE in detail. Results of benchmarking with several known laboratory experiments prove the validity of HEIGHTS implemented models. Beryllium and tungsten are both considered surface coating materials along with copper structure and coolant channels using both smooth tubes with swirl tape insert. The design requirements and implications of plasma facing components are discussed along with recommendations to mitigate and reduce the effects of plasma instabilities on reactor components.

  14. [Plasma technology for biomedical material applications].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Z; Li, X

    2000-03-01

    In this paper is introduced the plasma technology for the applications of several species biomaterial such as ophthalmological material, drug delivery system, tissue culture material, blood anticoagulant material as well as plasma surface clearing and plasma sterilization, and so on.

  15. Plasma Processing of Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    1985-02-22

    used in France. In this case, three ’ movable electrodes arranged about the central axis with a coaxial sheath gas are employed. Initially the...Demiocratic Republic plasma furnace. chrome -magnesite; the bottom section is lined with rammed chrome -magnesite refractory. Due to the high heat loads... sheath injector design, cathode tip shape, and degree of water cooling are important parameters in providing a stable, uncontaminating, long-lifetime

  16. Free surface stability of liquid metal plasma facing components

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiflis, P.; Christenson, M.; Szott, M.; Kalathiparambil, K.; Ruzic, D. N.

    2016-10-01

    An outstanding concern raised over the implementation of liquid metal plasma facing components in fusion reactors is the potential for ejection of liquid metal into the fusion plasma. The influences of Rayleigh-Taylor-like and Kelvin-Helmholtz-like instabilities were experimentally observed and quantified on the thermoelectric-driven liquid-metal plasma-facing structures (TELS) chamber at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. To probe the stability boundary, plasma currents and velocities were first characterized with a flush probe array. Subsequent observations of lithium ejection under exposure in the TELS chamber exhibited a departure from previous theory based on linear perturbation analysis. The stability boundary is mapped experimentally over the range of plasma impulses of which TELS is capable to deliver, and a new theory based on a modified set of the shallow water equations is presented which accurately predicts the stability of the lithium surface under plasma exposure.

  17. Counter-facing plasma guns for efficient extreme ultra-violet plasma light source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuroda, Yusuke; Yamamoto, Akiko; Kuwabara, Hajime; Nakajima, Mitsuo; Kawamura, Tohru; Horioka, Kazuhiko

    2013-11-01

    A plasma focus system composed of a pair of counter-facing coaxial guns was proposed as a long-pulse and/or repetitive high energy density plasma source. We applied Li as the source of plasma for improvement of the conversion efficiency, the spectral purity, and the repetition capability. For operation of the system with ideal counter-facing plasma focus mode, we changed the system from simple coaxial geometry to a multi-channel configuration. We applied a laser trigger to make synchronous multi-channel discharges with low jitter. The results indicated that the configuration is promising to make a high energy density plasma with high spectral efficiency.

  18. RACLETTE: a model for evaluating the thermal response of plasma facing components to slow high power plasma transients. Part II: Analysis of ITER plasma facing components

    Science.gov (United States)

    Federici, Gianfranco; Raffray, A. René

    1997-04-01

    The transient thermal model RACLETTE (acronym of Rate Analysis Code for pLasma Energy Transfer Transient Evaluation) described in part I of this paper is applied here to analyse the heat transfer and erosion effects of various slow (100 ms-10 s) high power energy transients on the actively cooled plasma facing components (PFCs) of the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER). These have a strong bearing on the PFC design and need careful analysis. The relevant parameters affecting the heat transfer during the plasma excursions are established. The temperature variation with time and space is evaluated together with the extent of vaporisation and melting (the latter only for metals) for the different candidate armour materials considered for the design (i.e., Be for the primary first wall, Be and CFCs for the limiter, Be, W, and CFCs for the divertor plates) and including for certain cases low-density vapour shielding effects. The critical heat flux, the change of the coolant parameters and the possible severe degradation of the coolant heat removal capability that could result under certain conditions during these transients, for example for the limiter, are also evaluated. Based on the results, the design implications on the heat removal performance and erosion damage of the variuos ITER PFCs are critically discussed and some recommendations are made for the selection of the most adequate protection materials and optimum armour thickness.

  19. Dependence of LTX plasma performance on surface conditions as determined by in situ analysis of plasma facing components

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lucia, M., E-mail: mlucia@pppl.gov [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL), Princeton, NJ 08543 (United States); Kaita, R.; Majeski, R. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL), Princeton, NJ 08543 (United States); Bedoya, F.; Allain, J.P. [University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign (UIUC), Urbana, IL 61801 (United States); Abrams, T.; Bell, R.E.; Boyle, D.P.; Jaworski, M.A.; Schmitt, J.C. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL), Princeton, NJ 08543 (United States)

    2015-08-15

    The Materials Analysis and Particle Probe (MAPP) diagnostic has been implemented on the Lithium Tokamak Experiment (LTX) at PPPL, providing the first in situ X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) surface characterization of tokamak plasma facing components (PFCs). MAPP samples were exposed to argon glow discharge conditioning (GDC), lithium evaporations, and hydrogen tokamak discharges inside LTX. Samples were analyzed with XPS, and alterations to surface conditions were correlated against observed LTX plasma performance changes. Argon GDC caused the accumulation of nm-scale metal oxide layers on the PFC surface, which appeared to bury surface carbon and oxygen contamination and thus improve plasma performance. Lithium evaporation led to the rapid formation of a lithium oxide (Li{sub 2}O) surface; plasma performance was strongly improved for sufficiently thick evaporative coatings. Results indicate that a 5 h argon GDC or a 50 nm evaporative lithium coating will both significantly improve LTX plasma performance.

  20. Power Deposition on Tokamak Plasma-Facing Components

    CERN Document Server

    Arter, Wayne; Fishpool, Geoff

    2014-01-01

    The SMARDDA software library is used to model plasma interaction with complex engineered surfaces. A simple flux-tube model of power deposition necessitates the following of magnetic fieldlines until they meet geometry taken from a CAD (Computer Aided Design) database. Application is made to 1) models of ITER tokamak limiter geometry and 2) MASTU tokamak divertor designs, illustrating the accuracy and effectiveness of SMARDDA, even in the presence of significant nonaxisymmetric ripple field. SMARDDA's ability to exchange data with CAD databases and its speed of execution also give it the potential for use directly in the design of tokamak plasma facing components.

  1. Face-to-face interaction of multisolitons in spin-1/2 quantum plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, Kaushik; Choudhury, Sourav; Chatterjee, Prasanta; Wong, C. S.

    2017-01-01

    We investigate the face-to-face collision between multisolitons in spin-1/2 quantum plasma. It is studied in the framework of the model proposed by Marklund et al in Phys. Rev. E 76, 067401 (2007). This study is done with the help of the extended Poincare-Lighthill-Kno (PLK) method. The extended PLK method is also used to obtain two Korteweg-de Vries (KdV) equations and the phase shifts and trajectories during the head-on collision of multisolitons. The collision-induced phase shifts (trajectory changes) are also obtained. The effects of the Zeeman energy, total mass density of the charged plasma particles, speed of the wave and the ratio of the sound speed to Alfvén speed on the phase shifts are studied. It is observed that the phase shifts are significantly affected by all these parameters.

  2. Face-to-face interaction of multisolitons in spin-1/2 quantum plasma

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    KAUSHIK ROY; SOURAV CHOUDHURY; PRASANTA CHATTERJEE; C S C S WONG

    2017-01-01

    We investigate the face-to-face collision between multisolitons in spin-1/2 quantum plasma. It is studied in the framework of the model proposed by Marklund et al in {\\it Phys. Rev.} E 76, 067401 (2007). This studyis done with the help of the extended Poincare–Lighthill–Kno (PLK) method. The extended PLK method is also used to obtain two Korteweg–de Vries (KdV) equations and the phase shifts and trajectories during the head-oncollision of multisolitons. The collision-induced phase shifts (trajectory changes) are also obtained. The effects of the Zeeman energy, total mass density of the charged plasma particles, speed of the wave and the ratio of the sound speed to Alfvén speed on the phase shifts are studied. It is observed that the phase shifts are significantly affected by all these parameters.

  3. The Future of Boundary Plasma and Material Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whyte, Dennis

    2012-03-01

    The boundary of magnetic confinement devices, from the pedestal through to the surrounding surfaces, encompasses an enormous range of plasma and material physics, and their integrated coupling. It is becoming clear that due to fundamental limits of plasma stability and material response the boundary will largely define the viability of an MFE reactor. However we face an enormous knowledge deficit in stepping from present devices and ITER towards a demonstration power plant. We outline the future of boundary research required to address this deficit. The boundary should be considered a multi-scale system of coupled plasma and material science regulated through the non-linear interface of the sheath. Measurement, theory and modeling across these scales are assessed. Dimensionless parameters, often used to organized core plasma transport on similarity arguments, can be extended to the boundary plasma, plasma-surface interactions and material response. This methodology suggests an intriguing way forward to prescribe and understand the boundary issues of an eventual reactor in intermediate devices. A particularly critical issue is that the physical chemistry of the material, which is mostly determined by the material temperature, has been too neglected; pointing to the requirement for boundary plasma experiments at appropriate material temperatures. Finally the boundary plasma requirements for quiescent heat exhaust and control of transient events, such as ELMs, will be examined.

  4. The baking analysis for vacuum vessel and plasma facing components of the KSTAR tokamak

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, K.H. [Chungnam National University Graduate School, Taejeon (Korea); Im, K.H.; Cho, S.Y. [Korea Basic Science Institute, Taejeon (Korea); Kim, J.B. [Hyundai Heavy Industries Co., Ltd. (Korea); Woo, H.K. [Chungnam National University, Taejeon (Korea)

    2000-11-01

    The base pressure of vacuum vessel of the KSTAR (Korea Superconducting Tokamak Advanced Research) Tokamak is to be a ultra high vacuum, 10{sup -6} {approx} 10{sup -7} Pa, to produce clean plasma with low impurity containments. for this purpose, the KSTAR vacuum vessel and plasma facing components need to be baked up to at least 250 deg.C, 350 deg.C respectively, within 24 hours by hot nitrogen gas from a separate baking/cooling line system to remove impurities from the plasma-material interaction surfaces before plasma operation. Here by applying the implicit numerical method to the heat balance equations of the system, overall temperature distributions of the KSTAR vacuum vessel and plasma facing components are obtained during the whole baking process. The model for 2-dimensional baking analysis are segmented into 9 imaginary sectors corresponding to each plasma facing component and has up-down symmetry. Under the resulting combined loads including dead weight, baking gas pressure, vacuum pressure and thermal loads, thermal stresses in the vacuum vessel during bakeout are calculated by using the ANSYS code. It is found that the vacuum vessel and its supports are structurally rigid based on the thermal stress analyses. (author). 9 refs., 11 figs., 1 tab.

  5. The baking analysis for vacuum vessel and plasma facing components of the KSTAR tokamak

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, K. H.; Woo, H. K. [Chungnam National Univ., Taejon (Korea, Republic of); Im, K. H.; Cho, S. Y. [korea Basic Science Institute, Taejon (Korea, Republic of); Kim, J. B. [Hyundai Heavy Industries Co., Ltd., Ulsan (Korea, Republic of)

    2000-07-01

    The base pressure of vacuum vessel of the KSTAR (Korea Superconducting Tokamak Advanced Research) Tokamak is to be a ultra high vacuum, 10{sup -6}{approx}10{sup -7}Pa, to produce clean plasma with low impurity containments. For this purpose, the KSTAR vacuum vessel and plasma facing components need to be baked up to at least 250 .deg. C, 350 .deg. C respectively, within 24 hours by hot nitrogen gas from a separate baking/cooling line system to remove impurities from the plasma-material interaction surfaces before plasma operation. Here by applying the implicit numerical method to the heat balance equations of the system, overall temperature distributions of the KSTAR vacuum vessel and plasma facing components are obtained during the whole baking process. The model for 2-dimensional baking analysis are segmented into 9 imaginary sectors corresponding to each plasma facing component and has up-down symmetry. Under the resulting combined loads including dead weight, baking gas pressure, vacuum pressure and thermal loads, thermal stresses in the vacuum vessel during bakeout are calculated by using the ANSYS code. It is found that the vacuum vessel and its supports are structurally rigid based on the thermal stress analyses.

  6. Counter-facing plasma guns for efficient extreme ultra-violet plasma light source

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kuroda Yusuke

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available A plasma focus system composed of a pair of counter-facing coaxial guns was proposed as a long-pulse and/or repetitive high energy density plasma source. We applied Li as the source of plasma for improvement of the conversion efficiency, the spectral purity, and the repetition capability. For operation of the system with ideal counter-facing plasma focus mode, we changed the system from simple coaxial geometry to a multi-channel configuration. We applied a laser trigger to make synchronous multi-channel discharges with low jitter. The results indicated that the configuration is promising to make a high energy density plasma with high spectral efficiency.

  7. Evaluation of runaway-electron effects on plasma-facing components for NET

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolt, H.; Calén, H.

    1991-03-01

    Runaway electrons which are generated during disruptions can cause serious damage to plasma facing components in a next generation device like NET. A study was performed to quantify the response of NET plasma facing components to runaway-electron impact. For the determination of the energy deposition in the component materials Monte Carlo computations were performed. Since the subsurface metal structures can be strongly heated under runaway-electron impact from the computed results damage threshold values for the thermal excursions were derived. These damage thresholds are strongly dependent on the materials selection and the component design. For a carbonmolybdenum divertor with 10 and 20 mm carbon armour thickness and 1 degree electron incidence the damage thresholds are 100 MJ/m 2 and 220 MJ/m 2. The thresholds for a carbon-copper divertor under the same conditions are about 50% lower. On the first wall damage is anticipated for energy depositions above 180 MJ/m 2.

  8. Facing Global Challenges with Materials Innovation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rizzo, Fernando

    2017-08-01

    The path of society evolution has long been associated with a growing demand for natural resources and continuous environmental degradation. During the last decades, this pace has accelerated considerably, despite the general concern with the legacy being left for the next generations. Looking ahead, the predicted growth of the world population, and the improvement of life conditions in most regions, point to an increasing demand for energy generation, resulting in additional pressure on the Earth's sustainability. Materials have had a key role in decreasing the use of natural resources, by either improving efficiency of existing technologies or enabling the development of radical new ones. The greenhouse effect (CO2 emissions) and the energy crisis are global challenges that can benefit from the development of new materials for the successful implementation of promising technologies and for the imperative replacement of fossil fuels by renewable sources.

  9. Facing Global Challenges with Materials Innovation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rizzo, Fernando

    2017-10-01

    The path of society evolution has long been associated with a growing demand for natural resources and continuous environmental degradation. During the last decades, this pace has accelerated considerably, despite the general concern with the legacy being left for the next generations. Looking ahead, the predicted growth of the world population, and the improvement of life conditions in most regions, point to an increasing demand for energy generation, resulting in additional pressure on the Earth's sustainability. Materials have had a key role in decreasing the use of natural resources, by either improving efficiency of existing technologies or enabling the development of radical new ones. The greenhouse effect (CO2 emissions) and the energy crisis are global challenges that can benefit from the development of new materials for the successful implementation of promising technologies and for the imperative replacement of fossil fuels by renewable sources.

  10. Vertical flow in the Thermoelectric Liquid Metal Plasma Facing Structures (TELS) facility at Illinois

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, W. [Center for Plasma-Material Interaction, Dept. Nuclear, Plasma, and Radiological Engineering, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana (United States); Fiflis, P., E-mail: fiflis1@illinois.edu [Center for Plasma-Material Interaction, Dept. Nuclear, Plasma, and Radiological Engineering, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana (United States); Szott, M.; Kalathiparambil, K.; Jung, S.; Christenson, M.; Haehnlein, I.; Kapat, A. [Center for Plasma-Material Interaction, Dept. Nuclear, Plasma, and Radiological Engineering, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana (United States); Andruczyk, D. [Center for Plasma-Material Interaction, Dept. Nuclear, Plasma, and Radiological Engineering, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana (United States); PPPL (United States); Curreli, D.; Ruzic, D.N. [Center for Plasma-Material Interaction, Dept. Nuclear, Plasma, and Radiological Engineering, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana (United States)

    2015-08-15

    Flowing liquid metal PFCs may offer a solution to the issues faced by solid divertor materials in tokamak plasmas. The Liquid–Metal Infused Trenches (LiMIT) concept of Illinois Ruzic et al. (2011) is a liquid metal plasma facing structure which employs thermoelectric magnetohydrodynamic (TEMHD) effects to self-propel lithium through a series of trenches. The combination of an incident heat flux and a magnetic field provide the driving mechanism. Tests have yielded experimental lithium velocities under different magnetic fields, which agree well with theoretical predictions Xu et al. (2013). The thermoelectric force is expected to overcome gravity and be able to drive lithium flow along an arbitrary direction and the strong surface tension of liquid lithium is believed to maintain the surface when Li flows in open trenches. This paper discusses the behavior of the LiMIT structure when inclined to an arbitrary angle with respect to the horizontal.

  11. Operational experience with a variety of plasma facing tile assemblies at JET

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Edwards, P. E-mail: paul.edwards@jet.uk; Altmann, H.; Loving, A.; Pedrick, L.; Tait, J.; Way, M

    2001-10-01

    During the June 1999 JET shutdown, 3000 plasma facing Tile Assemblies were found to be loose and had to be re-torqued remotely using the Mascot force reflecting manipulator. Whilst the integrity of these Tile Assemblies has been monitored during previous man access shutdowns, with the introduction of tritium to the machine in May 1996, the majority had not been checked since March 1996. This paper reviews typical plasma facing Tile Assembly designs within the JET torus and summarises the experience gained for use in future machine applications. This includes loosening processes/mechanisms and their prevention, applications of surface coatings to avoid seizing of un-lubricated assemblies, and the use of vibration resistant thread profiles. The design of attachments to minimise combined mechanical and thermal stresses in the tiles, material selection and other engineering aspects are also discussed.

  12. Towards intelligent video understanding applied to plasma facing component monitoring

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martin, V.; Bremond, F. [INRIA, Pulsa team-project, Sophia Antipolis (France); Travere, J.M. [CEA IRFM, Saint Paul-lez-Durance (France); Moncada, V.; Dunand, G. [Sophia Conseil Company, Sophia Antipolis (France)

    2011-07-01

    Infrared thermography has become a routine diagnostic in many magnetic fusion devices to monitor the heat loads on the plasma facing components (PFCs) for both physics studies and machine protection. The good results of the developed systems obtained so far motivate the use of imaging diagnostics for control, especially during long pulse tokamak operation (e.g. lasting several minutes). In this paper, we promote intelligent monitoring for both real-time purposes (machine protection issues) and post event analysis purposes (PWI understanding). We propose a vision-based system able to automatically detect and classify into different pre-defined categories phenomena as localized hot spots, transient thermal events (e.g. electrical arcing), and unidentified flying objects (UFOs) as dusts from infrared imaging data of PFCs. This original vision system is made intelligent by endowing it with high-level reasoning (i.e. integration of a priori knowledge of thermal event spatial and temporal properties to guide the recognition), self-adaptability to varying conditions (e.g. different plasma scenarios), and learning capabilities (e.g. statistical modelling of thermal event behaviour based on training samples). This approach has been already successfully applied to the recognition of one critical thermal event at Tore Supra. We present here latest results of its extension for the recognition of others thermal events (e.g., B{sub 4}C flakes, impact of fast particles, UFOs) and show how extracted information can be used during plasma operation at Tore Supra to improve the real time control system, and for further analysis of PFC aging. This document is composed of an abstract followed by the slides of the presentation. (authors)

  13. Face Coat Materials Through Sessile Drop and Investment Casting Methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Xu; Yuan, Chen; Blackburn, Stuart; Withey, Paul A.

    2014-06-01

    Investment casting is uniquely suited to the manufacture of Ti alloys for the production of near net-shape components, reducing material waste, and machining costs. Because of the high reactivity of titanium and its based alloy, the molds which are used in the investment casting process require high chemical inertness, which results in them being very costly and non-recyclable. In order to reduce the cost of these molds, traditionally using yttria as the face coat, two alternative molds are developed in this study with face coat materials of Y2O3-Al2O3 and Y2O3-Al2O3-ZrO2. The slurry properties and chemical inertness of the face coats were evaluated for viscosity, thermal expansion, friability, and phase development. The chemical inertness of these two molds were determined using both the sessile drop test and investment casting to identify the levels of interaction with a Ti-45Al-2Mn-2Nb-0.2B alloy. The results illustrated that the molds using Y2O3-Al2O3 and Y2O3-Al2O3-ZrO2 as the face coats both showed excellent sintering properties and chemical inertness when compared to the yttria face coat. They can consequently be used as two alternative face coats for the investment casting of TiAl alloys.

  14. Analysis of the thermal response of plasma facing components during a runaway electron impact

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward, Robert Cameron

    The generation of runaway electrons during a thermal plasma disruption is a concern for the safe and economical operation of a tokamak power system. Runaway electrons have high energy, 10--300 MeV, and may potentially cause extensive damage to plasma facing components through large temperature increases, melting of metallic components, surface erosion, and possible burnout of coolant tubes. The EPQ code system was developed to simulate the thermal response of plasma facing components to a runaway electron impact. The EPQ code system consists of several parts: UNIX scripts which control the operation of an electron-photon monte carlo code to calculate the interaction of the runaway electrons with the plasma facing materials; a finite difference code to calculate the thermal response, melting, and surface erosion of the materials using the modified heat conduction equation; a code to process, scale, transform, and convert the electron monte carlo data to volumetric heating rates for use in the thermal code; and several minor and auxiliary codes for the manipulation and post-processing of the data. The electron-photon monte carlo code used was the Electron-Gamma-Shower (EGS) code, developed and maintained by the National Research Center of Canada. The other codes were written in C++ for this study. The thermal code, called QTTN, solves the two-dimensional cylindrical modified heat conduction equation using the Quickest third-order accurate and stable explicit finite difference method and is capable of tracking melting or surface erosion. The EPQ code system was validated using a series of analytical solutions and simulations of experiments. QTTN and EPQ was verified and validated as able to calculate the temperature distribution, phase change, and surface erosion successfully. EPQ was then employed in a parametric study to simulate a typical runaway electron disruption impact on the FIRE design's plasma facing components. The results of the FIRE parametric study

  15. Proceedings of the 4th International Workshop on Tritium Effects in Plasma Facing Components

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    R. A. Causey

    1999-02-01

    The 4th International Workshop on Tritium Effects in Plasma Facing Components was held in Santa Fe, New Mexico on May 14-15, 1998. This workshop occurs every two years, and has previously been held in Livermore/California, Nagoya/Japan, and the JRC-Ispra Site in Italy. The purpose of the workshop is to gather researchers involved in the topic of tritium migration, retention, and recycling in materials used to line magnetic fusion reactor walls and provide a forum for presentation and discussions in this area. This document provides an overall summary of the workshop, the workshop agenda, a summary of the presentations, and a list of attendees.

  16. Beryllium plasma-facing components for the ITER-like wall project at JET

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rubel, M J; Sundelin, P [Alfven Laboratory, Royal Institute of Technology, Association Euratom-VR (Sweden); Bailescu, V [Nuclear Fuel Plant, Pitesti (Romania); Coad, J P; Matthews, G F; Pedrick, L; Riccardo, V; Villedieu, E [Culham Science Centre, Euratom-UKAEA Fusion Association, Abingdon (United Kingdom); Hirai, T; Linke, J [IEF-2, Forschungszentrum Juelich, Association Euratom-FZJ, Juelich (Germany); Likonen, J [VTT, Association Euratom-Tekes, 02044 VTT (Finland); Lungu, C P [NILPRP, Association Euratom-MEdC, Bucharest (Romania)], E-mail: rubel@kth.se

    2008-03-15

    ITER-Like Wall Project has been launched at the JET tokamak in order to study a tokamak operation with beryllium components on the main chamber wall and tungsten in the divertor. To perform this first comprehensive test of both materials in a thermonuclear fusion environment, a broad program has been undertaken to develop plasma-facing components and assess their performance under high power loads. The paper provides a concise report on scientific and technical issues in the development of a beryllium first wall at JET.

  17. Confocal microscopy: A new tool for erosion measurements on large scale plasma facing components in tokamaks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gauthier, E., E-mail: eric.gauthier@cea.fr [CEA/DSM/IRFM, CEA Cadarache, Saint-Paul-lez-Durance (France); Brosset, C.; Roche, H.; Tsitrone, E.; Pégourié, B.; Martinez, A. [CEA/DSM/IRFM, CEA Cadarache, Saint-Paul-lez-Durance (France); Languille, P. [PIIM, CNRS-Université de Provence, Centre de St Jérôme, 13397 Marseille, Cedex 20 (France); Courtois, X.; Lallier, Y. [CEA/DSM/IRFM, CEA Cadarache, Saint-Paul-lez-Durance (France); Salami, M. [AVANTIS CONCEPT, 75 Rue Marcelin Berthelot, 13858 Aix en Provence (France)

    2013-07-15

    A diagnostic based on confocal microscopy was developed at CEA Cadarache in order to measure erosion on large plasma facing components during shutdown in situ in Tore Supra. This paper describes the diagnostic and presents results obtained on Beryllium and Carbon Fibre Composite (CFC) materials. Erosion in the range of 800 μm was found on one sector of the Toroidal Pumped Limiter (TPL) which provides, by integration to the full limiter a net carbon erosion of about 900 g over the period 2002–2007.

  18. Preparation to manufacturing of ITER plasma facing components in Russia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mazul, I.V., E-mail: mazuliv@niiefa.spb.su [Efremov Institute, St. Petersburg, 196641 (Russian Federation); Belyakov, V.A.; Giniatulin, R.N.; Gervash, A.A.; Kuznetsov, V.E.; Makhankov, A.N. [Efremov Institute, St. Petersburg, 196641 (Russian Federation); Sizenev, V.S. [Corporation ' Kompozit' , Korolev, 141070 (Russian Federation)

    2011-10-15

    The preparation of the procurement activities for the ITER plasma-facing-components (PFC) is currently well underway. Three ITER procurement packages associated with PFCs are currently allocated to the Russian Federation (RF): delivery of the central assembly of the divertor (dome and reflector plates assemblies), delivery of 40% of the first-wall (FW) panels and high heat flux testing of divertor components during the qualification and subsequent manufacturing phases. The results of the qualification process for these tasks undertaken by RF industry are presented. Qualification mockups of the dome divertor structure were successfully manufactured in accordance with the ITER specifications and tested at heat fluxes exceeding operational ones. The maturity and reliability of the proposed design and manufacturing technologies, proposed by RF industry, was therefore demonstrated. To confirm the manufacturing readiness of technologies proposed for the fabrication of the ITER first wall, three qualification mockups were fabricated. Two were heat flux tested in two facilities abroad. In addition to launching the qualification process, the PFC team at Efremov Institute is preparing the industrial facilities for serial production of above mentioned components. A brief description of such facilities is presented in this paper, together with the manufacturing technologies to be used. Two electron beam facilities (Tsefey and IDTF) for various high heat flux testing of PFC components are also described.

  19. Pulsed Plasma Methods in Materials Processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rej, D. J.

    1996-05-01

    Plasmas are routinely used to synthesize advanced materials, because of their ability to produce reactant species that enable a wide variety of chemical reactions. For example, in microelectronics manufacturing, plasmas are used to etch, clean, ash photoresist, implant, deposit, polymerize, and metalize. The use of pulsed power may extend the utility of plasma processing. Pulsed devices such as coaxial plasma guns, cathodic arcs, pseudosparks have been employed to synthesize materials ranging from novel steel alloys and high-temperature superconductors to diamond coatings. In this talk, we will highlight plasma immersion ion implantation and deposition, methods that improve conventional steady-state chemical and physical vapor deposition techniques. Pulsed power enables energetic ion bombardment before plasma deposition to promote better film adhesion through the formation of a graded interface. Ion bombardment during deposition reduces residual stress in the deposited film, thereby enabling formation of thick layers. Also, pulsed plasma sources have advantages over steady-state devices in that they conserve electrical power and can produce high-density, fully-dissociated plasmas. As an example, we will review recent experiments on the formation of adherent diamond-like carbon films deposited onto relatively large batches of automotive components.

  20. Tritium inventory control during ITER operation under carbon plasma-facing components by nitrogen-based plasma chemistry: a review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabarés, F. L.

    2013-06-01

    In spite of being highly suited for advanced plasma performance operation of tokamaks, as demonstrated over at least two decades of fusion plasma research, carbon is not currently considered as an integrating element of the plasma-facing components (PFCs) for the active phase of ITER. The main reason preventing its use under the very challenging scenarios foreseen in this phase, with edge-localized modes delivering several tens of MW m-2 to the divertor target every second or less, is the existing concern about reaching the tritium inventory value of 1000 g used in safety assessments in a time shorter than the projected lifetime of the divertor materials eroded by the plasma, set at 3000 shots. Although several mechanisms of tritium trapping in carbon components have been identified, co-deposition of the carbon radicals arising from chemically eroded chlorofluorocarbons in remote areas appears to play a dominant role. Several possible ways to keep control of the tritium build-up during the full operation of ITER have been put forward, mostly based on the periodic removal of the co-deposits by chemical (thermo-oxidation, plasma chemistry) or physical (laser, flash lamps) methods. In this work, we review the techniques for the inhibition and removal of tritium-rich co-deposits based on the strong chemical reactivity of some N-bearing molecules with carbon. The integration of these techniques into a possible scheme for tritium inventory control in the active phase of ITER under carbon-based PFCs with minimum down-time is discussed and the existing caveats are addressed.

  1. Simulation of damage to tokamaks plasma facing components during intense abnormal power deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Genco, F., E-mail: fgenco@purdue.edu; Hassanein, A., E-mail: hassanein@purdue.edu

    2014-04-15

    Highlights: • HEIGHTS-PIC a new technique based on particle in cell method to study disruptions events, ELMS and VDE is benchmarked in this paper with the use of the MK-200 experiments. • Disruptions simulations results for erosion and erosion rate are proposed showing good agreement with published experimental available data for such conditions. • Results are also compared with other published results produced by FOREV1/FOREV2 computer package and the original HEIGHTS computer package. • Accuracy of the simulations results is proposed with specific aim to address the use of number of super particles adopted versus computational time. - Abstract: Intense power deposition on plasma facing components (PFC) is expected in tokamaks during loss of confinement events such as disruptions, vertical displacement events (VDE), runaway electrons (RE), or during normal operating conditions such as edge-localized modes (ELM). These highly energetic events are damaging enough to hinder long term operation and may not be easily mitigated without loss of structural or functional performance of the PFC. Surface erosion, melted/ablated-vaporized material splashing, and material transport into the bulk plasma are reliability-threatening for the machine and system performance. A novel particle-in-cell (PIC) technique has been developed and integrated into the existing HEIGHTS package in order to obtain a global view of the plasma evolution upon energy impingement. This newly developed PIC technique is benchmarked against plasma gun experimental data, the original HEIGHTS computer package, and laser experiments. Benchmarking results are shown in this paper for various relevant reactor and experimental devices. The evolution of the plasma vapor cloud is followed temporally and results are explained and commented as a function of the computational time needed and the accuracy of the calculation.

  2. Lithium-based surfaces controlling fusion plasma behavior at the plasma-material interfacea)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allain, Jean Paul; Taylor, Chase N.

    2012-05-01

    The plasma-material interface and its impact on the performance of magnetically confined thermonuclear fusion plasmas are considered to be one of the key scientific gaps in the realization of nuclear fusion power. At this interface, high particle and heat flux from the fusion plasma can limit the material's lifetime and reliability and therefore hinder operation of the fusion device. Lithium-based surfaces are now being used in major magnetic confinement fusion devices and have observed profound effects on plasma performance including enhanced confinement, suppression and control of edge localized modes (ELM), lower hydrogen recycling and impurity suppression. The critical spatial scale length of deuterium and helium particle interactions in lithium ranges between 5-100 nm depending on the incident particle energies at the edge and magnetic configuration. Lithium-based surfaces also range from liquid state to solid lithium coatings on a variety of substrates (e.g., graphite, stainless steel, refractory metal W/Mo/etc., or porous metal structures). Temperature-dependent effects from lithium-based surfaces as plasma facing components (PFC) include magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) instability issues related to liquid lithium, surface impurity, and deuterium retention issues, and anomalous physical sputtering increase at temperatures above lithium's melting point. The paper discusses the viability of lithium-based surfaces in future burning-plasma environments such as those found in ITER and DEMO-like fusion reactor devices.

  3. Plasma characterization studies for materials processing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pfender, E.; Heberlein, J. [Univ. of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN (United States)

    1995-12-31

    New applications for plasma processing of materials require a more detailed understanding of the fundamental processes occurring in the processing reactors. We have developed reactors offering specific advantages for materials processing, and we are using modeling and diagnostic techniques for the characterization of these reactors. The emphasis is in part set by the interest shown by industry pursuing specific plasma processing applications. In this paper we report on the modeling of radio frequency plasma reactors for use in materials synthesis, and on the characterization of the high rate diamond deposition process using liquid precursors. In the radio frequency plasma torch model, the influence of specific design changes such as the location of the excitation coil on the enthalpy flow distribution is investigated for oxygen and air as plasma gases. The diamond deposition with liquid precursors has identified the efficient mass transport in form of liquid droplets into the boundary layer as responsible for high growth, and the chemical properties of the liquid for the film morphology.

  4. Interfacial microstructures and hardness distributions of vacuum plasma spraying W-coated ODS ferritic steels for fusion plasma facing applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Noh, Sanghoon, E-mail: shnoh@kaeri.re.kr [Nuclear Materials Division, Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Kasada, Ryuta; Kimura, Akihiko [Institute of Advanced Energy, Kyoto University, Gokasho, Uji, Kyoto (Japan); Nagasaka, Takuya [National Institute for Fusion Science, Toki, Gifu (Japan); Sokolov, Mikhail A. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Kim, Tae Kyu [Nuclear Materials Division, Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-04-15

    In the present study, interfacial microstructures and hardness distributions of W-coated ODS steels as plasma facing structural materials were investigated. A vacuum plasma spraying (VPS) technique was employed to fabricate a W layer on the surface of the ODS ferritic steel substrates. The microstructural observations revealed that the VPS-W has very fine grains aligned toward the spraying direction, and a favorable interface between W and ODS ferritic steels by a mechanical inter-locking without an intermetallic layer. However, crack-type defects were found in VPS-W. Because a brittle inter-diffused layer does not exist at the joint interface, the hardness was gradually distributed in the joint region. After neutron irradiation, irradiation hardening significantly occurred in the VPS-W. However, the hardening of VPS-W was less than that of bulk W irradiated at 773 K. Thus, the VPS is considered to be one of the promising ways to join dissimilar materials between W and ODS steels, which can avoid the formation of an interfacial intermetallic layer and create favorable irradiation hardening resistance on the W coated layer.

  5. Counter-facing plasma focus system as a repetitive and/or long-pulse high energy density plasma source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aoyama, Yutaka; Nakajima, Mitsuo; Horioka, Kazuhiko

    2009-11-01

    A plasma focus system composed of a pair of counter-facing coaxial plasma guns is proposed as a long-pulse and/or repetitive high energy density plasma source. A proof-of-concept experiment demonstrated that with an assist of breakdown and outer electrode connections, current sheets evolved into a configuration for stable plasma confinement at the center of the electrodes. The current sheets could successively compress and confine the high energy density plasma every half period of the discharge current, enabling highly repetitive light emissions in extreme ultraviolet region with time durations in at least ten microseconds.

  6. Manufacturing and testing in reactor relevant conditions of brazed plasma facing components of the ITER divertor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bisio, M. [Ansaldo Ricerche s.p.a., C.so Perrone 25, I-16152 Genova (Italy); Branca, V. [Ansaldo Ricerche s.p.a., C.so Perrone 25, I-16152 Genova (Italy); Marco, M. Di [FN s.p.a., ss 35 bis dei Giovi km 15, I-15062 Bosco Marengo (Albania) (Italy); Federici, A. [Ansaldo Ricerche s.p.a., C.so Perrone 25, I-16152 Genova (Italy); Grattarola, M. [Ansaldo Ricerche s.p.a., C.so Perrone 25, I-16152 Genova (Italy)]. E-mail: grattarola@ansaldo.it; Gualco, G. [Ansaldo Ricerche s.p.a., C.so Perrone 25, I-16152 Genova (Italy); Guarnone, P. [Ansaldo Ricerche s.p.a., C.so Perrone 25, I-16152 Genova (Italy); Luconi, U. [Ansaldo Ricerche s.p.a., C.so Perrone 25, I-16152 Genova (Italy); Merola, M. [EFDA, Boltzmanstr. 2, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Ozzano, C. [Ansaldo Ricerche s.p.a., C.so Perrone 25, I-16152 Genova (Italy); Pasquale, G. [FN s.p.a., ss 35 bis dei Giovi km 15, I-15062 Bosco Marengo (AL) (Italy); Poggi, P. [Ansaldo Ricerche s.p.a., C.so Perrone 25, I-16152 Genova (Italy); Rizzo, S. [Ansaldo Ricerche s.p.a., C.so Perrone 25, I-16152 Genova (Italy); Varone, F. [Ansaldo Ricerche s.p.a., C.so Perrone 25, I-16152 Genova (Italy)

    2005-11-15

    A fabrication route based on brazing technology has been developed for the realization of the high heat flux components for the ITER vertical target and Dome-Liner. The divertor vertical target is armoured with carbon fiber reinforced carbon and tungsten in the lower straight part and in the upper curved part, respectively. The armour material is joined to heat sinks made of precipitation hardened copper-chromium-zirconium alloy. The plasma facing units of the dome component are based on a tungsten flat tile design with hypervapotron cooling. An innovative brazing technique based on the addition of carbon fibers to the active brazing alloy, developed by Ansaldo Ricerche for applications in the field of the energy production, has been used for the carbon fiber composite to copper joint to reduce residual stresses. The tungsten-copper joint has been realized by direct casting. A proper brazing thermal cycle has been studied to guarantee the required mechanical properties of the precipitation hardened alloy after brazing. The fabrication route of plasma facing components for the ITER vertical target and dome based on the brazing technology has been proved by means of thermal fatigue tests performed on mock-ups in reactor relevant conditions.

  7. Bulk-bronzied graphites for plasma-facing components in ITER (International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hirooka, Y.; Conn, R.W.; Doerner, R.; Khandagle, M. (California Univ., Los Angeles, CA (USA). Inst. of Plasma and Fusion Research); Causey, R.; Wilson, K. (Sandia National Labs., Livermore, CA (USA)); Croessmann, D.; Whitley, J. (Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (USA)); Holland, D.; Smolik, G. (Idaho National Engineering Lab., Idaho Falls, ID (USA)); Matsuda, T.; Sogabe, T. (Toyo Tanso Co. Ltd., O

    1990-06-01

    Newly developed bulk-boronized graphites and boronized C-C composites with a total boron concentration ranging from 1 wt % to 30 wt % have been evaluated as plasma-facing component materials for the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER). Bulk-boronized graphites have been bombarded with high-flux deuterium plasmas at temperatures between 200 and 1600{degree}C. Plasma interaction induced erosion of bulk-boronized graphites is observed to be a factor of 2--3 smaller than that of pyrolytic graphite, in regimes of physical sputtering, chemical sputtering and radiation enhanced sublimation. Postbombardment thermal desorption spectroscopy indicates that bulk-boronized graphites enhance recombinative desorption of deuterium, which leads to a suppression of the formation of deuterocarbon due to chemical sputtering. The tritium inventory in graphite has been found to decrease by an order of magnitude due to 10 wt % bulk-boronization at temperatures above 1000{degree}C. The critical heat flux to induce cracking for bulk-boronized graphites has been found to be essentially the same as that for non-boronized graphites. Also, 10 wt % bulk-boronization of graphite hinders air oxidation nearly completely at 800{degree}C and reduces the steam oxidation rate by a factor of 2--3 at around 1100 and 1350{degree}C. 38 refs., 5 figs.

  8. Modelling of Kelvin-Helmholtz instability and splashing of melt layers from plasma-facing components in tokamaks under plasma impact

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miloshevsky, G. V.; Hassanein, A.

    2010-11-01

    Plasma-facing components (PFCs) in tokamaks are exposed to high-heat loads during abnormal events such as plasma disruptions and edge-localized modes. The most significant erosion and plasma contamination problem is macroscopic melt splashes and losses from metallic divertor plates and wall materials into core plasma. The classical linear stability analysis is used to assess the initial conditions for development and growth of surface waves at the plasma-liquid metal interface. The maximum velocity difference and critical wavelengths are predicted. The effects of plasma density, surface tension and magnetic field on the stability of plasma-liquid tungsten flows are analytically investigated. The numerical modelling predicts that macroscopic motion and melt-layer losses involve the onset of disturbances on the surface of the tungsten melt layer with relatively long wavelengths compared with the melt thickness, the formation of liquid tungsten ligaments at wave crests and their elongation by the plasma stream with splitting of the bulk of the melt, and the development of extremely long, thin threads that eventually break into liquid droplets. Ejection of these droplets in the form of fine spray can lead to significant plasma contamination and enhanced erosion of PFCs. The numerical results advance the current understanding of the physics involved in the mechanism of melt-layer breakdown and droplet generation processes. These findings may also have implications for free surface liquid metal flows considered as the first wall in the design of several types of future fusion reactors.

  9. Plasma Processing of Lunar and Planetary Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Currier, R.; Blacic, J.

    2000-01-01

    Space exploration and colonization must include oxygen for propulsion and life support, as well as, structural materials for construction. To the extent possible, these should be derived from locally available planetary resources. We propose an extractive metallurgy and oxygen recovery process well-suited for resource utilization in space. Locally available minerals are placed in a radio frequency-generated hydrogen plasma. This is accomplished using a fluidized bed contacting device. Electromagnetic energy is coupled to the hydrogen gas forming a non-equilibrium plasma. The plasma produces the ideal reducing agent - atomic hydrogen - in direct and intimate contact with the solid particles. When using oxide minerals as a feed, atomic hydrogen extracts oxygen from the matrix through the formation of water. The water is subsequently split into oxygen and hydrogen (the hydrogen is then recycled back to the plasma reactor). The processed solids could then be refined to produce structural materials. A conceptual process flow diagram, which requires an initial charge of hydrogen, is given.

  10. Characterization and damaging law of CFC for high heat flux actively cooled plasma facing components

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chevet, G., E-mail: gaelle.chevet@cea.fr [Association EURATOM-CEA, DSM/IRFM, CEA Cadarache, F-13108 Saint Paul lez Durance (France); Martin, E., E-mail: martin@lcts.u-bordeaux1.fr [LCTS, CNRS UMR 5801, Universite Bordeaux 1, Bordeaux (France); Boscary, J., E-mail: jean.boscary@ipp.mpg.de [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Plasmaphysik, EURATOM Association, 85748 Garching (Germany); Camus, G., E-mail: camus@lcts.u-bordeaux1.fr [LCTS, CNRS UMR 5801, Universite Bordeaux 1, Bordeaux (France); Herb, V., E-mail: herb@lcts.u-bordeaux1.fr [LCTS, CNRS UMR 5801, Universite Bordeaux 1, Bordeaux (France); Schlosser, J., E-mail: jacques.schlosser@cea.fr [Association EURATOM-CEA, DSM/IRFM, CEA Cadarache, F-13108 Saint Paul lez Durance (France); Escourbiac, F., E-mail: frederic.escourbiac@cea.fr [Association EURATOM-CEA, DSM/IRFM, CEA Cadarache, F-13108 Saint Paul lez Durance (France); Missirlian, M., E-mail: marc.missirlian@cea.fr [Association EURATOM-CEA, DSM/IRFM, CEA Cadarache, F-13108 Saint Paul lez Durance (France)

    2011-10-01

    The carbon fiber reinforced carbon composite (CFC) Sepcarb N11 has been used in the Tore Supra (TS) tokamak (Cadarache, France) as armour material for the plasma facing components. For the fabrication of the Wendelstein 7-X (W7-X) divertor (Greifswald, Germany), the NB31 material was chosen. For the fabrication of the ITER divertor, two potential CFC candidates are the NB31 and NB41 materials. In the case of Tore Supra, defects such as microcracks or debonding were found at the interface between CFC tile and copper heat sink. A mechanical characterization of the behaviour of N11 and NB31 was undertaken, allowing the identification of a damage model and finite element calculations both for flat tiles (TS and W7-X) and monoblock (ITER) armours. The mechanical responses of these CFC materials were found almost linear under on-axis tensile tests but highly nonlinear under shear tests or off-axis tensile tests. As a consequence, damage develops within the high shear-stress zones.

  11. Characterization and damaging law of CFC for high heat flux actively cooled plasma facing components

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chevet, G.; Martin, E.; Boscary, J.; Camus, G.; Herb, V.; Schlosser, J.; Escourbiac, F.; Missirlian, M.

    2011-10-01

    The carbon fiber reinforced carbon composite (CFC) Sepcarb N11 has been used in the Tore Supra (TS) tokamak (Cadarache, France) as armour material for the plasma facing components. For the fabrication of the Wendelstein 7-X (W7-X) divertor (Greifswald, Germany), the NB31 material was chosen. For the fabrication of the ITER divertor, two potential CFC candidates are the NB31 and NB41 materials. In the case of Tore Supra, defects such as microcracks or debonding were found at the interface between CFC tile and copper heat sink. A mechanical characterization of the behaviour of N11 and NB31 was undertaken, allowing the identification of a damage model and finite element calculations both for flat tiles (TS and W7-X) and monoblock (ITER) armours. The mechanical responses of these CFC materials were found almost linear under on-axis tensile tests but highly nonlinear under shear tests or off-axis tensile tests. As a consequence, damage develops within the high shear-stress zones.

  12. Microscopic theory of electron absorption by plasma-facing surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bronold, F. X.; Fehske, H.

    2017-01-01

    We describe a method for calculating the probability with which the wall of a plasma absorbs an electron at low energy. The method, based on an invariant embedding principle, expresses the electron absorption probability as the probability for transmission through the wall’s long-range surface potential times the probability to stay inside the wall despite of internal backscattering. To illustrate the approach we apply it to a SiO2 surface. Besides emission of optical phonons inside the wall we take elastic scattering at imperfections of the plasma-wall interface into account and obtain absorption probabilities significantly less than unity in accordance with available electron-beam scattering data but in disagreement with the widely used perfect absorber model.

  13. Microscopic theory of electron absorption by plasma-facing surfaces

    CERN Document Server

    Bronold, Franz X

    2016-01-01

    We describe a method for calculating the probability with which the wall of a plasma absorbs an electron at low energy. The method, based on an invariant embedding principle, expresses the electron absorption probability as the probability for transmission through the wall's long-range surface potential times the probability to stay inside the wall despite of internal backscattering. To illustrate the approach we apply it to a \\SiOTwo\\ surface. Besides emission of optical phonons inside the wall we take elastic scattering at imperfections of the plasma-wall interface into account and obtain absorption probabilities significantly less than unity in accordance with available electron-beam scattering data but in disagreement with the widely used perfect absorber model.

  14. Heat flux limits on the plasma-facing components for a commercial fusion reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, X.R.; Tillack, M.S. [Univ. of California, San Diego, La Jolla, CA (United States); Sze, D.K. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Wong, C.P.C. [General Atomics, San Diego, CA (United States)

    1995-12-31

    In this work, the heat flux limits of conventional plasma-facing components (PFC) were examined. The limits are based on maximum allowable temperature and stress levels in the structures. The substrate materials considered were V, SiC composite and HT-9. The use of Cu also was considered. However, low temperature limits, activation and very limited radiation damage life time, make the using of Cu in a commercial power plant unattractive. With selected heat transfer enhancement, the heat flux allowable is about 5.3 MW/m{sup 2} for lithium-cooled V-alloy, 2.7 MW/m{sup 2} for helium-cooled SiC composite, and 2.7 MW/m{sup 2} for helium/water-cooled HT-9. Compared with the maximum heat flux attainable with Cu and cold water (13.4 MW/m{sup 2}), acceptable power plant materials place severe restrictions on heat removal. The thermal conductivity of SiC composite at 1,000 C and after irradiation is a factor of several lowered than the value the authors used. This indicates a need to examine the heat transfer problems associated with PFC, in terms of material development and enhancement in heat transfer. Physics regimes which can provide low peak and average heat flux should be pursued.

  15. Counter-facing plasma focus system as an efficient and long-pulse EUV light source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuwabara, H.; Hayashi, K.; Kuroda, Y.; Nose, H.; Hotozuka, K.; Nakajima, M.; Horioka, K.

    2011-04-01

    A plasma focus system composed of a pair of counter-facing coaxial plasma guns is proposed as a long-pulse and efficient EUV light source. A proof-of-concept experiment demonstrated that with an assist of breakdown and outer electrode connections, current sheets evolved into a configuration for stable plasma confinement at the center of the electrode. The current sheets could successively compress and confine the high energy density plasma every half period of the discharge current, enabling highly repetitive light emissions in extreme ultraviolet region with time duration in at least ten microseconds for Xe plasma. Also, we confirmed operations of our system for Li plasma. We estimated the highest EUV energy in Li plasma operation at 93mJ/4π sr per 2% bandwidth per pulse.

  16. Qualification Program of Korea Heat Load Test Facility KoHLT-EB for ITER Plasma Facing Components

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Suk-Kwon; Park, Seoung Dae; Jin, Hyung Gon; Lee, Eo Hwak; Yoon, Jae-Sung; Lee, Dong Won [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Cho, Seungyon [National Fusion Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-10-15

    The qualification tests were performed to evaluate the high heat flux test facility for the PFCs and fusion reactor materials. For the thermal fatigue test, two types of tungsten mock-ups were fabricated. The cooling performance was tested under the similar operation condition of ITER and fusion reactor. After the completion of the preliminary mockup test and facility qualification, the high heat flux test facility will assess the performance test for the various plasma facing components in fusion reactor materials. Preliminary thermo-hydraulic and performance tests were conducted using various test mockups for the plasma facing components in the high heat flux test facilities of the world. The previous heat flux tests were performed by using the graphite heater facilities in Korea. Several facilities which equipped with an electron beam as the uniform heat source were fabricated for the tokamak PFCs in the EU, Russia and US. These heat flux test facilities are utilized for a cyclic heat flux test of the PFCs. Each facility working for their own purpose in EU FZJ, US SNL, and Russia Efremov institute. For this purpose, KoHLTEB was constructed and this facility will be used for ITER TBM performance test with the small-scale and large-scale mockups, and prototype. Also, it has been used for other fusion application for developing plasma facing component (PFC) for ITER FW, tungsten divertor, and heat transfer experiment and so on under the domestic R and D program. Korea heat load test facility by using electron beam KoHLT-EB was constructed for the high heat flux test to verify the plasma facing components, including ITER TBM first wall.

  17. Proceedings of 2nd Internaitonal workshop on tritium effects in plasma facing components

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morita, Kenji [Nagoya Univ. (Japan). School of Engineering; Noda, Nobuaki [eds.

    1994-08-01

    This workshop was held at Nagoya University on May 19 and 20, 1994. Approximately 1/3 of the lectures discussed the migration and retention of tritium in graphite and the other forms of carbon. As to this topic, most of the different aspects of the tritium reactions with carbon were generally agreed on. At the temperature lower than 800 K, tritium plasma interacts with graphite by forming a saturated layer on the surface, by forming a codeposited layer of sputtered carbon and tritium, and by allowing tritium diffusion through Pores. At the temperature higher than 800 K, the principal reaction of tritium with carbon is intergranular diffusion with high energy trapping. Because beryllium is the reference plasma-facing material for the ITER, several presentations on the reactions of tritium with beryllium were made. Also the tritium permeation through other metals was the topics. The results of TFTR D-T experiment were reported in the first talk. In this book, the gists of these lectures are collected. (K.I.).

  18. Main Directions and Recent Test Modeling Results of Lithium Capillary-Pore Systems as Plasma Facing Components

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    V.A. Evtikhin; V. M. Korzhavin; I.E. Lyublinski; A.V. Vertkov; E.A. Azizov; S.V. Mirnov; V. B. Lazarev; S. M. Sotnikov; V. M. Safronov; A. S. Prokhorov

    2004-01-01

    At present the most promising principal solution of the divertor problem appears to be the use of liquid metals and primarily of lithium Capillary-Pore Systems (CPS) as of plasma facing materials. A solid CPS filled with liquid lithium will have a high resistance to surface and volume damage because of neutron radiation effects, melting, splashing and thermal stressinduced cracking in steady state and during plasma transitions to provide the normal operation of divertor target plates and first-wall protecting elements. These materials will not be the sources of impurities inducing an increase of Zeff and they will not be collected as dust in the divertor area and in ducts.Experiments with lithium CPS under simulating conditions of plasma disruption on a hydrogenplasma accelerator MK-200 [~ (10 - 15) MJ/m2, ~ 50 μs] have been performed. The formation of a shielding layer of lithium plasma and the high stability of these systems have been shown.The new lithium limiter tests on an up-graded T-11M tokamak (plasma current up to 100 kA,pulse length ~0.3 s) have been performed. Sorption and desorption of plasma-forming gas, lithium emission into discharge, lithium erosion, deposited power of the limiter are investigated in these experiments. The first results of experiments are presented.

  19. Electron Emission from Nano and MicroStructured Materials for Plasma Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patino, Marlene; Raitses, Yevgeny; Wirz, Richard

    2016-09-01

    Secondary electron emission (SEE) from plasma-confining walls can lead to adverse effects (e.g. increased plasma heat flux to the wall) in plasma devices, including plasma processing, confinement fusion, and plasma thrusters. Reduction in SEE from engineered materials with nm to mm-sized structures (grooves, pores, fibers), has been previously observed for primary electrons incident normal to the material. Here we present SEE measurements from one such engineered material, carbon velvet with microfibers (5 μm diameter, 1-2 mm length), and from a plasma-structured material, tungsten fuzz with nm fibers (35-50 nm diameter, 100-200 nm length). Additionally, dependence of SEE on incident angle was explored for tungsten fuzz. Results for carbon velvet and tungsten fuzz at normal incidence show 75% and 50% decrease in total yield from smooth graphite and tungsten, respectively. More notable is the independence of SEE on the incident angle for tungsten fuzz, as opposed to inverse cosine dependence for smooth materials. Hence, the reduction in SEE from tungsten fuzz is more pronounced at grazing angles. This is important for plasma-facing materials where a retarding plasma sheath leads to increased likelihood of plasma electrons impacting at grazing angles. This work was supported by DOE contract DE-AC02-09CH11466; AFOSR grants FA9550-14-1-0053, FA9550-11-1-0282, AF9550-09-1-0695, and FA9550-14-10317; and DOE Office of Science Graduate Student Research Program.

  20. Overview of decade-long development of plasma-facing components at ASIPP

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, G.-N.; Liu, G. H.; Li, Q.; Qin, S. G.; Wang, W. J.; Shi, Y. L.; Xie, C. Y.; Chen, Z. M.; Missirlian, M.; Guilhem, D.; Richou, M.; Hirai, T.; Escourbiac, F.; Yao, D. M.; Chen, J. L.; Wang, T. J.; Bucalossi, J.; Merola, M.; Li, J. G.; EAST Team

    2017-06-01

    The first EAST (Experimental Advanced Superconducting Tokamak) plasma ignited in 2006 with non-actively cooled steel plates as the plasma-facing materials and components (PFMCs) which were then upgraded into full graphite tiles bolted onto water-cooled copper heat sinks in 2008. The first wall was changed further into molybdenum alloy in 2012, while keeping the graphite for both the upper and lower divertors. With the rapid increase in heating and current driving power in EAST, the W/Cu divertor project was launched around the end of 2012, aiming at achieving actively cooled full W/Cu-PFCs for the upper divertor, with heat removal capability up to 10 MW m-2. The W/Cu upper divertor was finished in the spring of 2014, consisting of 80 cassette bodies toroidally assembled. Commissioning of the EAST upper W/Cu divertor in 2014 was unsatisfactory and then several practical measures were implemented to improve the design, welding quality and reliability, which helped us achieve successful commissioning in the 2015 Spring Campaign. In collaboration with the IO and CEA teams, we have demonstrated our technological capability to remove heat loads of 5000 cycles at 10 MW m-2 and 1000 cycles at 20 MW m-2 for the small scale monoblock mockups, and surprisingly over 300 cycles at 20 MW m-2 for the flat-tile ones. The experience and lessons we learned from batch production and commissioning are undoubtedly valuable for ITER (International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor) engineering validation and tungsten-related plasma physics.

  1. Damage of actively cooled plasma facing components of magnetic confinement controlled fusion machines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chevet, G. [Association Euratom-CEA, DSM/DRFC, CEA Cadarache, Saint-Paul-Lez-Durance (France)], E-mail: gaelle.chevet@cea.fr; Schlosser, J. [Association Euratom-CEA, DSM/DRFC, CEA Cadarache, Saint-Paul-Lez-Durance (France); Martin, E.; Herb, V.; Camus, G. [Universite Bordeaux 1, UMR 5801 (CNRS-SAFRAN-CEA-UB1), Laboratoire des Composites Thermostructuraux, F-33600 Pessac (France)

    2009-03-31

    Plasma facing components (PFCs) of magnetic fusion machines have high manufactured residual stresses and have to withstand important stress ranges during operation. These actively cooled PFCs have a carbon fibre composite (CFC) armour and a copper alloy heat sink. Cracks mainly appear in the CFC near the composite/copper interface. In order to analyse damage mechanisms, it is important to well simulate the damage mechanisms both of the CFC and the CFC/Cu interface. This study focuses on the mechanical behaviour of the N11 material for which the scalar ONERA damage model was used. The damage parameters of this model were identified by similarity to a neighbour material, which was extensively analysed, according to the few characterization test results available for the N11. The finite elements calculations predict a high level of damage of the CFC at the interface zone explaining the encountered difficulties in the PFCs fabrication. These results suggest that the damage state of the CFC cells is correlated with a conductivity decrease to explain the temperature increase of the armour surface under fatigue heat load.

  2. Damage of actively cooled plasma facing components of magnetic confinement controlled fusion machines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chevet, G.; Schlosser, J.; Martin, E.; Herb, V.; Camus, G.

    2009-03-01

    Plasma facing components (PFCs) of magnetic fusion machines have high manufactured residual stresses and have to withstand important stress ranges during operation. These actively cooled PFCs have a carbon fibre composite (CFC) armour and a copper alloy heat sink. Cracks mainly appear in the CFC near the composite/copper interface. In order to analyse damage mechanisms, it is important to well simulate the damage mechanisms both of the CFC and the CFC/Cu interface. This study focuses on the mechanical behaviour of the N11 material for which the scalar ONERA damage model was used. The damage parameters of this model were identified by similarity to a neighbour material, which was extensively analysed, according to the few characterization test results available for the N11. The finite elements calculations predict a high level of damage of the CFC at the interface zone explaining the encountered difficulties in the PFCs fabrication. These results suggest that the damage state of the CFC cells is correlated with a conductivity decrease to explain the temperature increase of the armour surface under fatigue heat load.

  3. Digital Holography for in Situ Real-Time Measurement of Plasma-Facing-Component Erosion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    ThomasJr., C. E. [Third Dimension Technologies, LLC, Knoxville, TN; Granstedt, E. M. [Tri-Alpha Energy; Biewer, Theodore M [ORNL; Baylor, Larry R [ORNL; Combs, Stephen Kirk [ORNL; Meitner, Steven J [ORNL; Hillis, Donald Lee [ORNL; Majeski, R. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL); Kaita, R. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL)

    2014-01-01

    In situ, real time measurement of net plasma-facing-component (PFC) erosion/deposition in a real plasma device is challenging due to the need for good spatial and temporal resolution, sufficient sensitivity, and immunity to fringe-jump errors. Design of a high-sensitivity, potentially high-speed, dual-wavelength CO2 laser digital holography system (nominally immune to fringe jumps) for PFC erosion measurement is discussed.

  4. Pre-conceptual design activities for the materials plasma exposure experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lumsdaine, Arnold, E-mail: lumsdainea@ornl.gov; Rapp, Juergen; Varma, Venugopal; Bjorholm, Thomas; Bradley, Craig; Caughman, John; Duckworth, Robert; Goulding, Richard; Graves, Van; Giuliano, Dominic; Lessard, Timothy; McGinnis, Dean; Meitner, Steven

    2016-11-01

    Highlights: • The development of long-pulse nuclear fusion devices requires testing plasma facing components at reactor relevant conditions. • The pre-conceptual design of a proposed linear plasma facility is presented. • Engineering considerations for multiple systems—plasma source and heating, magnet, vacuum, water cooling, and target, are presented. - Abstract: The development of next step fusion facilities such as DEMO or a Fusion Nuclear Science Facility (FNSF) requires first closing technology gaps in some critical areas. Understanding the material-plasma interface is necessary to enable the development of divertors for long-pulse plasma facilities. A pre-conceptual design for a proposed steady-state linear plasma device, the Materials Plasma Exposure Experiment (MPEX), is underway. A helicon plasma source along with ion cyclotron and electron Bernstein wave heating systems will produce ITER divertor relevant plasma conditions with steady-state parallel heat fluxes of up to 40 MW/m{sup 2} with ion fluxes up to 10{sup 24}/m{sup 2} s on target. Current plans are for the device to use superconducting magnets to produce 1–2 T fields. As a steady-state device, active cooling will be required for components that interact with the plasma (targets, limiters, etc.), as well as for other plasma facing components (transport regions, vacuum tanks, diagnostic ports). Design concepts for the vacuum system, the cooling system, and the plasma heating systems have been completed. The device will include the capability for handling samples that have been neutron irradiated in order to consider the multivariate effects of neutrons, plasma, and high heat-flux on the microstructure of divertor candidate materials. A vacuum cask, which can be disconnected from the high field environment in order to perform in-vacuo diagnosis of the surface evolution is also planned for the facility.

  5. 49 CFR 587.14 - Deformable face component dimensions and material specifications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Deformable face component dimensions and material... BARRIERS Offset Deformable Barrier § 587.14 Deformable face component dimensions and material... and materials of the individual components are listed separately below. All dimensions allow a...

  6. Nonthermal Plasma Synthesis of Nanocrystals: Fundamental Principles, Materials, and Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kortshagen, Uwe R; Sankaran, R Mohan; Pereira, Rui N; Girshick, Steven L; Wu, Jeslin J; Aydil, Eray S

    2016-09-28

    Nonthermal plasmas have emerged as a viable synthesis technique for nanocrystal materials. Inherently solvent and ligand-free, nonthermal plasmas offer the ability to synthesize high purity nanocrystals of materials that require high synthesis temperatures. The nonequilibrium environment in nonthermal plasmas has a number of attractive attributes: energetic surface reactions selectively heat the nanoparticles to temperatures that can strongly exceed the gas temperature; charging of nanoparticles through plasma electrons reduces or eliminates nanoparticle agglomeration; and the large difference between the chemical potentials of the gaseous growth species and the species bound to the nanoparticle surfaces facilitates nanocrystal doping. This paper reviews the state of the art in nonthermal plasma synthesis of nanocrystals. It discusses the fundamentals of nanocrystal formation in plasmas, reviews practical implementations of plasma reactors, surveys the materials that have been produced with nonthermal plasmas and surface chemistries that have been developed, and provides an overview of applications of plasma-synthesized nanocrystals.

  7. CFC/Cu bond damage in actively cooled plasma facing components

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schlosser, J [Association Euratom-CEA, CEA/DSM/DRFC, CEA Cadarache, F-13108 Saint Paul Lez Durance (France); Martin, E [LCTS, CNRS UMR 5801, Universite Bordeaux 1, Pessac (France); Henninger, C [LMM, CNRS UMR 7607, Universite P. et M. Curie, Paris (France); Boscary, J [IPP-Euratom Association, Garching (Germany); Camus, G [LCTS, CNRS UMR 5801, Universite Bordeaux 1, Pessac (France); Escourbiac, F [Association Euratom-CEA, CEA/DSM/DRFC, CEA Cadarache, F-13108 Saint Paul Lez Durance (France); Leguillon, D [LMM, CNRS UMR 7607, Universite P. et M. Curie, Paris (France); Missirlian, M [Association Euratom-CEA, CEA/DSM/DRFC, CEA Cadarache, F-13108 Saint Paul Lez Durance (France); Mitteau, R [Association Euratom-CEA, CEA/DSM/DRFC, CEA Cadarache, F-13108 Saint Paul Lez Durance (France)

    2007-03-15

    Carbon fibre composite (CFC) armours have been successfully used for actively cooled plasma facing components (PFCs) of the Tore Supra (TS) tokamak. They were also selected for the divertor of the stellarator W7-X under construction and for the vertical target of the ITER divertor. In TS and W7-X a flat tile design for heat fluxes of 10 MW m{sup -2} has been chosen. To predict the lifetime of such PFCs, it is necessary to analyse the damage mechanisms and to model the damage propagation when the component is exposed to thermal cycling loads. Work has been performed to identify a constitutive law for the CFC and parameters to model crack propagation from the edge singularity. The aim is to predict damage rates and to propose geometric or material improvements to increase the strength and the lifetime of the interfacial bond. For ITER a tube-in-tile concept (monoblock), designed to sustain heat fluxes up to 20 MW m{sup -2}, has been developed. The optimization of the CFC/Cu bond, proposed for flat tiles, could be adopted for the monoblock concept.

  8. Response of plasma facing components in Tokamaks due to intense energy deposition using Particle-In-Cell (PIC) methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Genco, Filippo

    Damage to plasma-facing components (PFC) due to various plasma instabilities is still a major concern for the successful development of fusion energy and represents a significant research obstacle in the community. It is of great importance to fully understand the behavior and lifetime expectancy of PFC under both low energy cycles during normal events and highly energetic events as disruptions, Edge-Localized Modes (ELM), Vertical Displacement Events (VDE), and Run-away electron (RE). The consequences of these high energetic dumps with energy fluxes ranging from 10 MJ/m2 up to 200 MJ/m 2 applied in very short periods (0.1 to 5 ms) can be catastrophic both for safety and economic reasons. Those phenomena can cause a) large temperature increase in the target material b) consequent melting, evaporation and erosion losses due to the extremely high heat fluxes c) possible structural damage and permanent degradation of the entire bulk material with probable burnout of the coolant tubes; d) plasma contamination, transport of target material into the chamber far from where it was originally picked. The modeling of off-normal events such as Disruptions and ELMs requires the simultaneous solution of three main problems along time: a) the heat transfer in the plasma facing component b) the interaction of the produced vapor from the surface with the incoming plasma particles c) the transport of the radiation produced in the vapor-plasma cloud. In addition the moving boundaries problem has to be considered and solved at the material surface. Considering the carbon divertor as target, the moving boundaries are two since for the given conditions, carbon doesn't melt: the plasma front and the moving eroded material surface. The current solution methods for this problem use finite differences and moving coordinates system based on the Crank-Nicholson method and Alternating Directions Implicit Method (ADI). Currently Particle-In-Cell (PIC) methods are widely used for solving

  9. Progress in the engineering design and assessment of the European DEMO first wall and divertor plasma facing components

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barrett, Thomas R., E-mail: tom.barrett@ukaea.uk [CCFE, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon OX14 3DB (United Kingdom); Ellwood, G.; Pérez, G.; Kovari, M.; Fursdon, M.; Domptail, F.; Kirk, S.; McIntosh, S.C.; Roberts, S.; Zheng, S. [CCFE, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon OX14 3DB (United Kingdom); Boccaccini, L.V. [KIT, INR, Hermann-von-Helmholtz-Platz 1, 76344 Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen (Germany); You, J.-H. [Max Planck Institute for Plasma Physics, Boltzmannstr. 2, 85748 Garching (Germany); Bachmann, C. [EUROfusion, PPPT, Boltzmann Str. 2, 85748 Garching (Germany); Reiser, J.; Rieth, M. [KIT, IAM, Hermann-von-Helmholtz-Platz 1, 76344 Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen (Germany); Visca, E.; Mazzone, G. [ENEA, Unità Tecnica Fusione, ENEA C. R. Frascati, via E. Fermi 45, 00044 Frascati (Italy); Arbeiter, F. [KIT, INR, Hermann-von-Helmholtz-Platz 1, 76344 Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen (Germany); Domalapally, P.K. [Research Center Rez, Hlavní 130, 250 68 Husinec – Řež (Czech Republic)

    2016-11-01

    Highlights: • The engineering of the plasma facing components for DEMO is an extreme challenge. • PFC overall requirements, methods for assessment and designs status are described. • Viable divertor concepts for 10 MW/m{sup 2} surface heat flux appear to be within reach. • The first wall PFC concept will need to vary poloidally around the wall. • First wall coolant, structural material and PFC topology are open design choices. - Abstract: The European DEMO power reactor is currently under conceptual design within the EUROfusion Consortium. One of the most critical activities is the engineering of the plasma-facing components (PFCs) covering the plasma chamber wall, which must operate reliably in an extreme environment of neutron irradiation and surface heat and particle flux, while also allowing sufficient neutron transmission to the tritium breeding blankets. A systems approach using advanced numerical analysis is vital to realising viable solutions for these first wall and divertor PFCs. Here, we present the system requirements and describe bespoke thermo-mechanical and thermo-hydraulic assessment procedures which have been used as tools for design. The current first wall and divertor designs are overviewed along with supporting analyses. The PFC solutions employed will necessarily vary around the wall, depending on local conditions, and must be designed in an integrated manner by analysis and physical testing.

  10. EM wave propagation analysis in plasma covered radar absorbing material

    CERN Document Server

    Singh, Hema; Rawat, Harish Singh

    2017-01-01

    This book focuses on EM propagation characteristics within multilayered plasma-dielectric-metallic media. The method used for analysis is impedance transformation method. Plasma covered radar absorbing material is approximated as a multi-layered dielectric medium. The plasma is considered to be bounded homogeneous/inhomogeneous medium. The reflection coefficient and hence return loss is analytically derived. The role of plasma parameters, such as electron density, collision frequency, plasma thickness, and plasma density profile in the absorption behavior of multi-layered plasma-RAM structure is described. This book provides a clearer picture of EM propagation within plasma. The reader will get an insight of plasma parameters that play significant role in deciding the absorption characteristics of plasma covered surfaces.

  11. Thermoelectric-Driven Liquid-Metal Plasma-Facing Structures (TELS) Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ruzic, David [Univ. of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign, IL (United States)

    2016-12-17

    The Thermoelectric-Driven Liquid-Metal Plasma-Facing Structures (TELS) project was able to establish the experimental conditions necessary for flowing liquid metal surfaces in order to be utilized as surfaces facing fusion relevant energetic plasma flux. The work has also addressed additional developments along with progressing along the timeline detailed in the proposal. A no-cost extension was requested to conduct other relevant experiment- specifically regarding the characterization droplet ejection during energetic plasma flux impact. A specially designed trench module, which could accommodate trenches with different aspect ratios was fabricated and installed in the TELS setup and plasma gun experiments were performed. Droplet ejection was characterized using high speed image acquisition and also surface mounted probes were used to characterize the plasma. The Gantt chart below had been provided with the original proposal, indicating the tasks to be performed in the third year of funding. These tasks are listed above in the progress report outline, and their progress status is detailed below.

  12. MHD Effect of Liquid Metal Film Flows as Plasma-Facing Components

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Xiujie; XU Zengyu; PAN Chuanjie

    2008-01-01

    Stability of liquid metal film flow under gradient magnetic field is investigated. Three dimensional numerical simulations on magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) effect of free surface film flow were carried out, with emphasis on the film thickness variation and its surface stability. Three different MHD phenomena of film flow were observed in the experiment, namely, retardant, rivulet and flat film flow. From our experiment and numerical simulation it can be concluded that flat film flow is a good choice for plasma-facing components (PFCs)

  13. Performance Test of Korea Heat Load Test Facility (KoHLT-EB) for the Plasma Facing Components of Fusion Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Suk-Kwon; Jin, Hyung Gon; Lee, Eo Hwak; Yoon, Jae-Sung; Lee, Dong Won [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Cho, Seungyon [National Fusion Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-10-15

    The main components of the plasma facing components (PFCs) in the tokamak are the blanket first wall and divertor, which include the armour materials, the heat sink with the cooling mechanism, and the diagnostics devices for the temperature measurement. The Korea Heat Load Test facility by using electron beam (KoHLT-EB) has been operating for the plasma facing components to develop fusion engineering. This electron beam facility was constructed using a 300 kW electron gun and a cylindrical vacuum chamber. Performance tests were carried out for the calorimetric calibrations with Cu dummy mockup and for the heat load test of large Cu module. For the simulation of the heat load test of each mockup, the preliminary thermal-hydraulic analyses with ANSYS-CFX were performed. For the development of the plasma facing components in the fusion reactors, test mockups were fabricated and tested in the high heat flux test facility. To perform a beam profile test, an assessment of the possibility of electron beam Gaussian power density profile and the results of the absorbed power for that profile before the test starts are needed. To assess the possibility of a Gaussian profile, for the qualification test of the Gaussian heat load profile, a calorimeter mockup and large Cu module were manufactured to simulate real heat. For this high-heat flux test, the Korean high-heat flux test facility using an electron beam system was constructed. In this facility, a cyclic heat flux test will be performed to measure the surface heat flux, surface temperature profile, and cooling capacity.

  14. Developing the Science and Technology for the Material Plasma Exposure eXperiment (MPEX)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rapp, Juergen; Biewer, Theodore; Bigelow, Timothy; Caughman, John; Goulding, Richard; Lumsdaine, Arnold; MPEX Team Team

    2016-10-01

    The Material Plasma Exposure eXperiment (MPEX) is a device planned to address scientific and technological gaps for the development of viable plasma facing components for fusion reactor conditions (FNSF, DEMO). MPEX is designed to deliver those plasma conditions with a novel Radio Frequency plasma source able to produce high density plasmas and heat electron and ions separately with Electron Bernstein Wave (EBW) heating and Ion Cyclotron Resonance Heating (ICRH) with a total installed power of 800 kW. The science and technology for this source system is currently being tested on Proto-MPEX. This is a linear device utilizing 12 water-cooled copper coils able to achieve peak magnetic fields of 1.6T. The currently total installed heating power (for helicon, EBW and ICRH) is 330kW. An overview of the status of this development program is given with an outlook to the next steps.

  15. Design and Demonstration of a Material-Plasma Exposure Target Station for Neutron Irradiated Samples

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rapp, Juergen [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Aaron, A. M. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Bell, Gary L. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Burgess, Thomas W. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Ellis, Ronald James [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Giuliano, D. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Howard, R. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Kiggans, James O. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Lessard, Timothy L. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Ohriner, Evan Keith [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Perkins, Dale E. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Varma, Venugopal Koikal [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2015-10-20

    Fusion energy is the most promising energy source for the future, and one of the most important problems to be solved progressing to a commercial fusion reactor is the identification of plasma-facing materials compatible with the extreme conditions in the fusion reactor environment. The development of plasma–material interaction (PMI) science and the technology of plasma-facing components are key elements in the development of the next step fusion device in the United States, the so-called Fusion Nuclear Science Facility (FNSF). All of these PMI issues and the uncertain impact of the 14-MeV neutron irradiation have been identified in numerous expert panel reports to the fusion community. The 2007 Greenwald report classifies reactor plasma-facing materials (PFCs) and materials as the only Tier 1 issues, requiring a “. . . major extrapolation from the current state of knowledge, need for qualitative improvements and substantial development for both the short and long term.” The Greenwald report goes on to list 19 gaps in understanding and performance related to the plasma–material interface for the technology facilities needed for DEMO-oriented R&D and DEMO itself. Of the 15 major gaps, six (G7, G9, G10, G12, G13) can possibly be addressed with ORNL’s proposal of an advanced Material Plasma Exposure eXperiment. Establishing this mid-scale plasma materials test facility at ORNL is a key element in ORNL’s strategy to secure a leadership role for decades of fusion R&D. That is to say, our end goal is to bring the “signature facility” FNSF home to ORNL. This project is related to the pre-conceptual design of an innovative target station for a future Material–Plasma Exposure eXperiment (MPEX). The target station will be designed to expose candidate fusion reactor plasma-facing materials and components (PFMs and PFCs) to conditions anticipated in fusion reactors, where PFCs will be exposed to dense high-temperature hydrogen plasmas providing steady

  16. Engineering solutions for components facing the plasma in experimental fusion power reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Casini, G.; Farfaletti-Casali, F.

    1986-07-01

    An analysis is made of the engineering problems related to the structures facing the plasma in experimental tokamak-type reactors. Attention is focused on the so-called ''current first wall'', i.e. the wall side of the blanket segments facing the plasma, and on the collector plates of the impurity control system. The design of a first wall, developed at the JRC-Ispra for INTOR/NET and based on the idea of conceiving it as one of the sides, of a box which envelopes a blanket segment, is described. The progress in the structural analysis of the first wall box under operating and abnormal (plasma disruption) conditions is presented and discussed. The design of the collector plates of the single-null divertor of INTOR/NET, as developed at the JRC-Ispra, is described. This design is based on a W-Re protective layer and a water-cooled heat sink, including cooling channels iun Cu-alloys and a Cu-matrix for bonding. The results of the elastic and elasto-plastic evaluations are discussed, together with a layout of the experimental activity in progress. It is concluded that, even if the uncertainties related to the plasma-wall interaction are still relevant, the engineering solutions identified look manageable, although they require a large research and development effort.

  17. The Science and Technology Challenges of the Plasma-Material Interface for Magnetic Fusion Energy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whyte, Dennis

    2013-09-01

    The boundary plasma and plasma-material interactions of magnetic fusion devices are reviewed. The boundary of magnetic confinement devices, from the high-temperature, collisionless pedestal through to the surrounding surfaces and the nearby cold high-density collisional plasmas, encompasses an enormous range of plasma and material physics, and their integrated coupling. Due to fundamental limits of material response the boundary will largely define the viability of future large MFE experiments (ITER) and reactors (e.g. ARIES designs). The fusion community faces an enormous knowledge deficit in stepping from present devices, and even ITER, towards fusion devices typical of that required for efficient energy production. This deficit will be bridged by improving our fundamental science understanding of this complex interface region. The research activities and gaps are reviewed and organized to three major axes of challenges: power density, plasma duration, and material temperature. The boundary can also be considered a multi-scale system of coupled plasma and material science regulated through the non-linear interface of the sheath. Measurement, theory and modeling across these scales are reviewed, with a particular emphasis on establishing the use dimensionless parameters to understand this complex system. Proposed technology and science innovations towards solving the PMI/boundary challenges will be examined. Supported by US DOE award DE-SC00-02060 and cooperative agreement DE-FC02-99ER54512.

  18. Metallurgy and properties of plasma spray formed materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mckechnie, T. N.; Liaw, Y. K.; Zimmerman, F. R.; Poorman, R. M.

    1992-01-01

    Understanding the fundamental metallurgy of vacuum plasma spray formed materials is the key to enhancing and developing full material properties. Investigations have shown that the microstructure of plasma sprayed materials must evolve from a powder splat morphology to a recrystallized grain structure to assure high strength and ductility. A fully, or near fully, dense material that exhibits a powder splat morphology will perform as a brittle material compared to a recrystallized grain structure for the same amount of porosity. Metallurgy and material properties of nickel, iron, and copper base alloys will be presented and correlated to microstructure.

  19. Two dimensional soft material: new faces of graphene oxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jaemyung; Cote, Laura J; Huang, Jiaxing

    2012-08-21

    Graphite oxide sheets, now called graphene oxide (GO), can be made from chemical exfoliation of graphite by reactions that have been known for 150 years. Because GO is a promising solution-processable precursor for the bulk production of graphene, interest in this old material has resurged. The reactions to produce GO add oxygenated functional groups to the graphene sheets on their basal plane and edges, and this derivatization breaks the π-conjugated network, resulting in electrically insulating but highly water-dispersible sheets. Apart from making graphene, GO itself has many intriguing properties. Like graphene, GO is a two-dimensional (2D) sheet with feature sizes at two abruptly different length scales. The apparent thickness of the functionalized carbon sheet is approximately 1 nm, but the lateral dimensions can range from a few nanometers to hundreds of micrometers. Therefore, researchers can think of GO as either a single molecule or a particle, depending on which length scale is of greater interest. At the same time, GO can be viewed as an unconventional soft material, such as a 2D polymer, highly anisotropic colloid, membrane, liquid crystal, or amphiphile. In this Account, we highlight the soft material characteristics of GO. GO consists of nanographitic patches surrounded by largely disordered, oxygenated domains. Such structural characteristics effectively make GO a 2D amphiphile with a hydrophilic periphery and largely hydrophobic center. This insight has led to better understanding of the solution properties of GO for making thin films and new applications of GO as a surfactant. Changes in pH and sheet size can tune the amphiphilicity of GO, leading to intriguing interfacial activities. In addition, new all-carbon composites made of only graphitic nanostructures using GO as a dispersing agent have potential applications in photovoltaics and energy storage. On the other hand, GO can function as a 2D random diblock copolymer, one block graphitic and

  20. Plasma facing components: a conceptual design strategy for the first wall in FAST tokamak

    Science.gov (United States)

    Labate, C.; Di Gironimo, G.; Renno, F.

    2015-09-01

    Satellite tokamaks are conceived with the main purpose of developing new or alternative ITER- and DEMO-relevant technologies, able to contribute in resolving the pending issues about plasma operation. In particular, a high criticality needs to be associated to the design of plasma facing components, i.e. first wall (FW) and divertor, due to physical, topological and thermo-structural reasons. In such a context, the design of the FW in FAST fusion plant, whose operational range is close to ITER’s one, takes place. According to the mission of experimental satellites, the FW design strategy, which is presented in this paper relies on a series of innovative design choices and proposals with a particular attention to the typical key points of plasma facing components design. Such an approach, taking into account a series of involved physical constraints and functional requirements to be fulfilled, marks a clear borderline with the FW solution adopted in ITER, in terms of basic ideas, manufacturing aspects, remote maintenance procedure, manifolds management, cooling cycle and support system configuration.

  1. Reactor plasma facing component designs based on liquid metal concepts supported in porous systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabarés, F. L.; Oyarzabal, E.; Martin-Rojo, A. B.; Tafalla, D.; de Castro, A.; Soleto, A.

    2017-01-01

    The use of liquid metals (LMs) as plasma facing components in fusion devices was proposed as early as 1970 for a field reversed concept and inertial fusion reactors. The idea was extensively developed during the APEX Project, at the turn of the century, and it is the subject at present of the biennial International Symposium on Lithium Applications (ISLA), whose fourth meeting took place in Granada, Spain at the end of September 2015. While liquid metal flowing concepts were specially addressed in USA research projects, the idea of embedding the metal in a capillary porous system (CPS) was put forwards by Russian teams in the 1990s, thus opening the possibility of static concepts. Since then, many ideas and accompanying experimental tests in fusion devices and laboratories have been produced, involving a large fraction of countries within the international fusion community. Within the EUROFusion Roadmap, these activities are encompassed into the working programs of the plasma facing components (PFC) and divertor tokamak test (DTT) packages. In this paper, a review of the state of the art in concepts based on the CPS set-up for a fusion reactor divertor target, aimed at preventing the ejection of the liquid metal by electro-magnetic (EM) forces generated under plasma operation, is described and required R+D activities on the topic, including ongoing work at CIEMAT specifically oriented to filling the remaining gaps, are stressed.

  2. Plasma diagnostics in a pulsed accelerator used for material processing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhukeshov, A [Science Research Institute of Experimental and Theoretical Physics, al-Farabi Kazakh National University, 96a Tole bi str., 050012 Almaty (Kazakhstan)

    2007-04-15

    Results of research work of a pulsed plasma accelerator, designed as diagnostic and material science stands in SRIETP are presented. We present results on the development of electric and magnetic probes used for measurement of plasma parameters. The physical properties and changes in structure of vanadium alloy, common quality carbon and stainless steels have been investigated as well.

  3. HRP facility for fabrication of ITER vertical target divertor full scale plasma facing units

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Visca, Eliseo, E-mail: eliseo.visca@enea.it [Unità Tecnica Fusione, ENEA C. R. Frascati, via E. Fermi 45, IT-00044 Frascati (Roma) (Italy); Roccella, S. [Unità Tecnica Fusione, ENEA C. R. Frascati, via E. Fermi 45, IT-00044 Frascati (Roma) (Italy); Candura, D.; Palermo, M. [Ansaldo Nucleare S.p.A., Corso Perrone 25, IT-16152 Genova (Italy); Rossi, P.; Pizzuto, A. [Unità Tecnica Fusione, ENEA C. R. Frascati, via E. Fermi 45, IT-00044 Frascati (Roma) (Italy); Sanguinetti, G.P. [Ansaldo Nucleare S.p.A., Corso Perrone 25, IT-16152 Genova (Italy); Mancini, A.; Verdini, L.; Cacciotti, E.; Cerri, V.; Mugnaini, G.; Reale, A.; Giacomi, G. [Unità Tecnica Fusione, ENEA C. R. Frascati, via E. Fermi 45, IT-00044 Frascati (Roma) (Italy)

    2015-10-15

    Highlights: • R&D activities for the manufacturing of ITER divertor high heat flux plasma-facing components (HHFC). • ENEA and Ansaldo have jointly manufactured several actively cooled monoblock mock-ups and prototypical components. • ENEA and ANSALDO NUCLEARE jointly participate to the European program for the qualification of the manufacturing technology for the ITER divertor IVT. • Successful manufacturing by HRP (Hot Radial Pressing) of first full-scale full-W armored IVT qualification prototype. - Abstract: ENEA and Ansaldo Nucleare S.p.A. (ANN) have being deeply involved in the European development activities for the manufacturing of the ITER Divertor Inner Vertical Target (IVT) plasma-facing components. During normal operation the heat flux deposited on the bottom segment of divertor is 5–10 MW/m{sup 2} but the capability to remove up to 20 MW/m{sup 2} during transient events of 10 s must also be demonstrated. In order to fulfill ITER requirements, ENEA has set up and widely tested a manufacturing process, named Hot Radial Pressing (HRP). The last challenge is now to fabricate full-scale prototypes of the IVT, aimed to be qualified for the next step, i.e. the series production. On the basis of the experience of manufacturing hundreds of small mock-ups, ENEA designed and installed a new suitable HRP facility. The objective of getting a final shaped plasma facing unit (PFU) that satisfies these requirements is an ambitious target because tolerances set by ITER/F4E are very tight. The setting-up of the equipment started with the fabrication of full scale and representative ‘dummies’ in which stainless steel instead of CFC or W was used for monoblocks. The results confirmed that dimensions were compliant with the required tolerances. The paper reports a brief description of the innovative HRP equipment and the dimensional check results after HRP of the first full-scale full-W PFU.

  4. Simulated plasma facing component measurements for an in situ surface diagnostic on Alcator C-Moda)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartwig, Z. S.; Whyte, D. G.

    2010-10-01

    The ideal in situ plasma facing component (PFC) diagnostic for magnetic fusion devices would perform surface element and isotope composition measurements on a shot-to-shot (˜10 min) time scale with ˜1 μm depth and ˜1 cm spatial resolution over large areas of PFCs. To this end, the experimental adaptation of the customary laboratory surface diagnostic—nuclear scattering of MeV ions—to the Alcator C-Mod tokamak is being guided by ACRONYM, a Geant4 synthetic diagnostic. The diagnostic technique and ACRONYM are described, and synthetic measurements of film thickness for boron-coated PFCs are presented.

  5. Damaging impacts of energetic charge particles on materials in plasma energy explosive events

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Deng Bai-Quan; Peng Li-Lin; Yan Jian-Cheng; Luo Zheng-Ming; Chen Zhi

    2006-01-01

    To provide some reference data for estimation of the erosion rates and lifetimes of some candidate plasma facing component (PF3 materials in the plasma stored energy explosive events (PSEEE), this paper calculates the sputtering yields of Mo, W and deuterium saturated Li surface bombarded by energetic charged particles by a new sputtering physics description method based on bipartition model of charge particle transport theory. The comparisons with Monte Carlo data of TRIM code and experimental results are made. The dependences of maximum energy deposition,particle and energy reflection coefficients on the incident energy of energetic runaway electrons impinging on the different material surfaces are also calculated. Results may be useful for estimating the lifetime of PFC and analysing the impurity contamination extent, especially in the PSEEE for high power density and with high plasma current fusion reactor.

  6. Design and Demonstration of a Material-Plasma Exposure Target Station for Neutron Irradiated Samples

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rapp, Juergen [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Aaron, A. M. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Bell, Gary L. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Burgess, Thomas W. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Ellis, Ronald James [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Giuliano, D. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Howard, R. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Kiggans, James O. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Lessard, Timothy L. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Ohriner, Evan Keith [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Perkins, Dale E. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Varma, Venugopal Koikal [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2015-10-20

    Fusion energy is the most promising energy source for the future, and one of the most important problems to be solved progressing to a commercial fusion reactor is the identification of plasma-facing materials compatible with the extreme conditions in the fusion reactor environment. The development of plasma–material interaction (PMI) science and the technology of plasma-facing components are key elements in the development of the next step fusion device in the United States, the so-called Fusion Nuclear Science Facility (FNSF). All of these PMI issues and the uncertain impact of the 14-MeV neutron irradiation have been identified in numerous expert panel reports to the fusion community. The 2007 Greenwald report classifies reactor plasma-facing materials (PFCs) and materials as the only Tier 1 issues, requiring a “. . . major extrapolation from the current state of knowledge, need for qualitative improvements and substantial development for both the short and long term.” The Greenwald report goes on to list 19 gaps in understanding and performance related to the plasma–material interface for the technology facilities needed for DEMO-oriented R&D and DEMO itself. Of the 15 major gaps, six (G7, G9, G10, G12, G13) can possibly be addressed with ORNL’s proposal of an advanced Material Plasma Exposure eXperiment. Establishing this mid-scale plasma materials test facility at ORNL is a key element in ORNL’s strategy to secure a leadership role for decades of fusion R&D. That is to say, our end goal is to bring the “signature facility” FNSF home to ORNL. This project is related to the pre-conceptual design of an innovative target station for a future Material–Plasma Exposure eXperiment (MPEX). The target station will be designed to expose candidate fusion reactor plasma-facing materials and components (PFMs and PFCs) to conditions anticipated in fusion reactors, where PFCs will be exposed to dense high-temperature hydrogen plasmas providing steady

  7. An Experiment to Tame the Plasma Material Interface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goldston, R J; Menard, J E; Allain, J P; Brooks, J N; Canik, J M; Doerner, R; Fu, G; Gates, D A; Gentile, C A; Harris, J H; Hassanein, A; Gorelenkov, N N; Kaita, R; Kaye, S M; Kotschenreuther, M; Kramer, G J; Kugel, H W; Maingi, R; Mahajan, S M; Majeski, R; Neumeyer, C L; Nygren, R E; Ono, M; Owen, L W; Ramakrishnan, S; Rognlien, T D; Ruzic, D N; Ryutov, D D; Sabbagh, S A; Skinner, C H; Soukhanovskii, V A; Stevenson, T N; Ulrickson, M A; Valanju, P M; Woolley, R D

    2009-01-08

    The plasma material interface in Demo will be more challenging than that in ITER, due to requirements for approximately four times higher heat flux from the plasma and approximately five times higher average duty factor. The scientific and technological solutions employed in ITER may not extrapolate to Demo. The key questions to be resolved for Demo and the resulting key requirements for an experiment to 'tame the plasma material interface' are analyzed. A possible design point for such an experiment is outlined.

  8. Triggerless vacuum shunting plasma by metallic and solid materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yukimura, Ken; Tani, Yuuji; Masamune, Sadao

    2000-10-01

    Shunting discharge is an alternating capacitor discharge through a rod of solid-state or metallic materials. Optimization of the discharge condition has realized self-ignition of the arc discharge with low input power to the rod, leading to a much longer rod life time than in conventional shunting arc or peripheral arc. The shunting-arc-produced plasma contains mainly the ions of the solid-state material, and ion extraction from the plasma has also been demonstrated. Thus, the shunting arc works as a pulsed ion source for solid-state materials for plasma-based ion implantation (PBII) and ion processing. This article describes the characteristics of pulsed shunting arc, using the materials of carbon, niobium and silicon. The capacitor of 10 nF of which charging voltage is 10 to 25 kV using a thyratron as a closing switch. Glow discharge is firstly produced after the heat of the materials and then the plasma changes the style to the arc discharge. A negative high voltage pulse of -5 to -10 kV was applied to a target which was located at 30 cm away from the electrodes. We will discuss the ion species of the shunting plasma and ion extraction from the plasma using the time evolution of target current.

  9. Lithium Coatings on NSTX Plasma Facing Components and Its Effects On Boundary Control, Core Plasma Performance, and Operation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    H.W.Kugel, M.G.Bell, H.Schneider, J.P.Allain, R.E.Bell, R Kaita, J.Kallman, S. Kaye, B.P. LeBlanc, D. Mansfield, R.E. Nygen, R. Maingi, J. Menard, D. Mueller, M. Ono, S. Paul, S.Gerhardt, R.Raman, S.Sabbagh, C.H.Skinner, V.Soukhanovskii, J.Timberlake, L.E.Zakharov, and the NSTX Research Team

    2010-01-25

    NSTX high-power divertor plasma experiments have used in succession lithium pellet injection (LPI), evaporated lithium, and injected lithium powder to apply lithium coatings to graphite plasma facing components. In 2005, following wall conditioning and LPI, discharges exhibited edge density reduction and performance improvements. Since 2006, first one, and now two lithium evaporators have been used routinely to evaporate lithium onto the lower divertor region at total rates of 10-70 mg/min for periods 5-10 min between discharges. Prior to each discharge, the evaporators are withdrawn behind shutters. Significant improvements in the performance of NBI heated divertor discharges resulting from these lithium depositions were observed. These evaporators are now used for more than 80% of NSTX discharges. Initial work with injecting fine lithium powder into the edge of NBI heated deuterium discharges yielded comparable changes in performance. Several operational issues encountered with lithium wall conditions, and the special procedures needed for vessel entry are discussed. The next step in this work is installation of a Liquid Lithium Divertor surface on the outer part of the lower divertor.

  10. The potential of rapid cooling spark plasma sintering for metallic materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Faming Zhang

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Spark plasma sintering (SPS is a remarkable technique for consolidating a large variety of advanced materials with rapid heating rates. However, adjusting the cooling rates has so far faced limitations. This communication discusses the potentials of SPS integrated with a novel gas quenching system that can allow metallic materials to be sintered and rapidly quenched directly after the sintering step, saving energy and costs. Results on numerical simulations of rapid cooling-SPS and the mechanical properties and microstructures of Ti6Al4V alloy are discussed; exhibiting the feasibility of this rapid cooling SPS technique and the major implications for the field of SPS and metallic powder consolidation.

  11. Baking and helium glow discharge cleaning of SST-1 Tokamak with graphite plasma facing components

    Science.gov (United States)

    Semwal, P.; Khan, Z.; Raval, D. C.; Dhanani, K. R.; George, S.; Paravastu, Y.; Prakash, A.; Thankey, P.; Ramesh, G.; Khan, M. S.; Saikia, P.; Pradhan, S.

    2017-04-01

    Graphite plasma facing components (PFCs) were installed inside the SST-1 vacuum vessel. Prior to installation, all the graphite tiles were baked at 1000 °C in a vacuum furnace operated below 1.0 × 10-5 mbar. However due to the porous structure of graphite, they absorb a significant amount of water vapour from air during the installation process. Rapid desorption of this water vapour requires high temperature bake-out of the PFCs at ≥ 250 °C. In SST-1 the PFCs were baked at 250 °C using hot nitrogen gas facility to remove the absorbed water vapour. Also device with large graphite surface area has the disadvantage that a large quantity of hydrogen gets trapped inside it during plasma discharges which makes density control difficult. Helium glow discharge cleaning (He-GDC) effectively removes this stored hydrogen as well as other impurities like oxygen and hydrocarbon within few nano-meters from the surface by particle induced desorption. Before plasma operation in SST-1 tokamak, both baking of PFCs and He-GDC were carried out so that these impurities were removed effectively. The mean desorption yield of hydrogen was found to be 0.24. In this paper the results of baking and He-GDC experiments of SST-1 will be presented in detail.

  12. 2D surface temperature measurement of plasma facing components with modulated active pyrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amiel, S; Loarer, T; Pocheau, C; Roche, H; Gauthier, E; Aumeunier, M-H; Le Niliot, C; Rigollet, F; Courtois, X; Jouve, M; Balorin, C; Moncada, V

    2014-10-01

    In nuclear fusion devices, such as Tore Supra, the plasma facing components (PFC) are in carbon. Such components are exposed to very high heat flux and the surface temperature measurement is mandatory for the safety of the device and also for efficient plasma scenario development. Besides this measurement is essential to evaluate these heat fluxes for a better knowledge of the physics of plasma-wall interaction, it is also required to monitor the fatigue of PFCs. Infrared system (IR) is used to manage to measure surface temperature in real time. For carbon PFCs, the emissivity is high and known (ɛ ∼ 0.8), therefore the contribution of the reflected flux from environment and collected by the IR cameras can be neglected. However, the future tokamaks such as WEST and ITER will be equipped with PFCs in metal (W and Be/W, respectively) with low and variable emissivities (ɛ ∼ 0.1-0.4). Consequently, the reflected flux will contribute significantly in the collected flux by IR camera. The modulated active pyrometry, using a bicolor camera, proposed in this paper allows a 2D surface temperature measurement independently of the reflected fluxes and the emissivity. Experimental results with Tungsten sample are reported and compared with simultaneous measurement performed with classical pyrometry (monochromatic and bichromatic) with and without reflective flux demonstrating the efficiency of this method for surface temperature measurement independently of the reflected flux and the emissivity.

  13. Improvement of non destructive infrared test bed SATIR for examination of actively cooled tungsten armour Plasma Facing Components

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vignal, N., E-mail: nicolas.vignal@cea.fr; Desgranges, C.; Cantone, V.; Richou, M.; Courtois, X.; Missirlian, M.; Magaud, Ph.

    2013-10-15

    Highlights: • Non destructive infrared techniques for control ITER like PFCs. • Reflective surface such as W induce a measurement temperature error. • Numerical data processing by evaluation of the local emissivity. • SATIR test bed can control metallic surface with low and variable emissivity. -- Abstract: For steady state (magnetic) thermonuclear fusion devices which need large power exhaust capability and have to withstand heat fluxes in the range 10–20 MW m{sup −2}, advanced Plasma Facing Components (PFCs) have been developed. The importance of PFCs for operating tokamaks requests to verify their manufacturing quality before mounting. SATIR is an IR test bed validated and recognized as a reliable and suitable tool to detect cooling defaults on PFCs with CFC armour material. Current tokamak developments implement metallic armour materials for first wall and divertor; their low emissivity causes several difficulties for infrared thermography control. We present SATIR infrared thermography test bed improvements for W monoblocks components without defect and with calibrated defects. These results are compared to ultrasonic inspection. This study demonstrates that SATIR method is fully usable for PFCs with low emissivity armour material.

  14. Research on EM pulse protection property of plasma-microwave absorptive material-plasma sandwich structure

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    A plasma-microwave absorptive material (MAM)-plasma sandwich structure is presented to protect the electronic device against high power electromagnetic pulse. The model of electromagnetic wave reflected by and transmitting through the structure is established. Based on the characteristic parameters of plasma generated by discharge and usual MAM, the electromagnetic transmissive properties of the sandwich structure are investigated by the method of finite difference in time domain. The results indicate that in a rather broad frequency range, the electromagnetic attenuations by the structure are obviously better than the sum of attenuations resulted from plasma and MAM respectively. The models and results presented are instructive for electromagnetic pulse protection.

  15. Novel applications of atmospheric pressure plasma on textile materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cornelius, Carrie Elizabeth

    Various applications of atmospheric pressure plasma are investigated in conjunction with polymeric materials including paper, polypropylene non-woven fabric, and cotton. The effect of plasma on bulk and surface properties is examined by treating both cellulosic pulp and prefabricated paper with various plasma-gas compositions. After treatment, pulp is processed into paper and the properties are compared. The method of pulp preparation is found to be more significant than the plasma, but differences in density, strength, and surface roughness are apparent for the pulp vs. paper plasma treatments. The plasma is also used to remove sizes of PVA and starch from poly/cotton and cotton fabric respectively. In both cases plasma successfully removes a significant amount of size, but complete size removal is not achieved. Subsequent washes (PVA) or scouring (cotton) to remove the size are less successful than a control, suggesting the plasma is crosslinking the size that is not etched away. However, at short durations in cold water using an oxygen plasma, slightly more PVA is removed than with a control. For the starch sized samples, plasma and scouring are never as successful at removing starch as a conventional enzyme, but plasma improves dyeability without need for scouring. Plasma is also used to graft chemicals to the surface of polypropylene and cotton fabric. HTCC, an antimicrobial is grafted to polypropylene with successful grafting indicated by x-ray photoemission spectroscopy (XPS), dye tests, and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). Antimicrobial activity of the grafted samples is also characterized. 3ATAC, a vinyl monomer is also grafted to polypropylene and to cotton. Additives including Mohr's salt, potassium persulfate, and diacrylate are assessed to increase yield. Successful grafting of 3ATAC is confirmed by XPS and dye testing. A combination of all three additives is identified as optimum for maximizing graft yield.

  16. Functionalization of biomedical materials using plasma and related technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Ying; Yeung, Kelvin W. K.; Chu, Paul K.

    2014-08-01

    Plasma techniques are important to biomedical engineering and surface modification. By modifying selective surface characteristics, conventional materials can be designed with superior biological properties while the favorable bulk materials properties can be retained. In this mini-review, recent progress pertaining to surface modification of Mg-based and polymer-based biomaterials by plasma-based techniques such as gas or metal ion implantation, dual metal and gas ion implantation, as well as plasma immersion ion implantation and deposition is described. Plasma-based surface modification is promising in elevating the cell biocompatibility, blood compatibility, and antibacterial properties of Mg-based and polymer-based biomaterials and expected to be extensively applied to biomaterials.

  17. Heat Transfer Analysis of Two Kinds of Mechanically Jointed GBST1308/CuCrZr Plasma Facing Components of EAST

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHONG Fali; CHEN Junling; LI Jiangang; ZHENG Xuebin; EAST team

    2008-01-01

    Doped graphite GBST1308,mechanically jointed to CuCrZr alloys,will be applied on EAST superconducting as plasma facing material (PFM).Two joint structures called joint-1 and joint-2 were evaluated by means of thermal response tests using electron beam facility.The experimental results showed that the temperature differences of two joints were not significant,and the maximum surface temperature was about 1055℃ at a load of 4 MW/m2,which had a good agreement with the simulated results by ANSYS code.The results indicated that the doped graphite GBST1308/CuCrZr mock-up can withstand heat flux deposition of 4 MW/m2 except at the screw-fastened region,and joint-2 could be more suitable to higher heat flux region such as divertor target.But under the higher heat flux,both joints are unacceptable,an advanced PFM and its integration with the heat sink have to be developed,for example,vacuum plasma spraying tungsten coatings on the CuCrZr might be a good choice.

  18. Atmospheric pressure plasmas for aerosols processes in materials and environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borra, J. P.; Jidenko, N.; Bourgeois, E.

    2009-08-01

    The paper highlights applications of some atmospheric pressure plasmas (dc-corona, streamer and spark and ac-Dielectric Barrier Discharges) to aerosol processes for Materials and Environment (filtration, diagnostics). The production of vapor i.e. condensable gaseous species, leads to nano-sized particles by physical and chemical routes of nucleation in these AP plasmas: (i) when dc streamer and spark filamentary discharges as well as ac filamentary dielectric barrier discharges interact with metal or dielectric surfaces, and (ii) when discharges induce reactions with gaseous precursors in volume. It is shown how composition, size and structure of primary nano-particles are related to plasma parameters (energy, number per unit surface and time and thermal gradients). Then the growth by coagulation controls the final size of agglomerates versus plasma parameters and transit time in and after the plasma. Charging and electro-thermal collection are depicted to account for the related potential applications of controlled kinematics of charged aerosol.

  19. Plasma Interactions with Mixed Materials and Impurity Transport

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rognlien, T. D. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Beiersdorfer, Peter [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Chernov, A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Frolov, T. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Magee, E. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Rudd, R. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Umansky, M. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2016-10-28

    The project brings together three discipline areas at LLNL to develop advanced capability to predict the impact of plasma/material interactions (PMI) on metallic surfaces in magnetic fusion energy (MFE) devices. These areas are (1) modeling transport of wall impurity ions through the edge plasma to the core plasma, (2) construction of a laser blow-off (LBO) system for injecting precise amounts of metallic atoms into a tokamak plasma, and (3) material science analysis of fundamental processes that modify metallic surfaces during plasma bombardment. The focus is on tungsten (W), which is being used for the ITER divertor and in designs of future MFE devices. In area (1), we have worked with the University of California, San Diego (UCSD) on applications of the UEDGE/DUSTT coupled codes to predict the influx of impurity ions from W dust through the edge plasma, including periodic edge-plasma oscillations, and revived a parallel version of UEDGE to speed up these simulations. In addition, the impurity transport model in the 2D UEDGE code has been implemented into the 3D BOUT++ turbulence/transport code to allow fundamental analysis of the impact of strong plasma turbulence on the impurity transport. In area (2), construction and testing of the LBO injection system has been completed. The original plan to install the LBO on the National Spherical Torus Experiment Upgrade (NSTX-U) at Princeton and its use to validate the impurity transport simulations is delayed owing to NSTX-U being offline for substantial magnetic coil repair period. In area (3), an analytic model has been developed to explain the growth of W tendrils (or fuzz) observed for helium-containing plasmas. Molecular dynamics calculations of W sputtering by W and deuterium (D) ions shows that a spatial blending of interatomic potentials is needed to describe the near-surface and deeper regions of the material.

  20. Plasma deposition of amorphous silicon-based materials

    CERN Document Server

    Bruno, Giovanni; Madan, Arun

    1995-01-01

    Semiconductors made from amorphous silicon have recently become important for their commercial applications in optical and electronic devices including FAX machines, solar cells, and liquid crystal displays. Plasma Deposition of Amorphous Silicon-Based Materials is a timely, comprehensive reference book written by leading authorities in the field. This volume links the fundamental growth kinetics involving complex plasma chemistry with the resulting semiconductor film properties and the subsequent effect on the performance of the electronic devices produced. Key Features * Focuses on the plasma chemistry of amorphous silicon-based materials * Links fundamental growth kinetics with the resulting semiconductor film properties and performance of electronic devices produced * Features an international group of contributors * Provides the first comprehensive coverage of the subject, from deposition technology to materials characterization to applications and implementation in state-of-the-art devices.

  1. Development of laser lock-in thermography for plasma facing component surface characterisation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Courtois, X., E-mail: xavier.courtois@cea.fr [CEA, IRFM, Cadarache F-13108 Saint-Paul-Lez-Durance (France); Sortais, C.; Melyukov, D. [CEA, DEN, Saclay F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Gardarein, J.L. [IUSTI UMR-CNRS 65-95, Universite de Provence, Marseille (France); Semerok, A. [CEA, DEN, Saclay F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Grisolia, Ch. [CEA, IRFM, Cadarache F-13108 Saint-Paul-Lez-Durance (France)

    2011-10-15

    Infrared (IR) photothermal techniques are candidates for in situ characterisation of tokamak plasma facing components (PFC) surfaces, by means of an external thermal excitation coupled with an IR temperature measurement. Among these techniques, the laser lock-in thermography (LLIT) uses a modulated laser excitation which gives 2 major advantages: enhancement of signal to noise ratio and emissivity independence, which is a plus when the components have various and unpredictable surface quality. With this method, it is possible to develop a process, which could be used remotely, either mounted onto an in situ inspection device (articulated arm) or in a PFC test bed. This paper presents the results obtained with a continuous modulated laser heat source on particular samples (W coating on CFC substrate, C layer on graphite substrate). The identification of the experimental data with a theoretical model allows a quantitative characterisation of the layers.

  2. Definition of acceptance criteria for the ITER divertor plasma-facing components through systematic experimental analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Escourbiac, F; Richou, M; Guigon, R; Durocher, A; Schlosser, J; Grosman, A [CEA/IRFM, F-13108, Saint-Paul-lez-Durance (France); Constans, S [AREVA-NP, Le Creusot (France); Merola, M [ITER Organization, Cadarache (France); Riccardi, B [Fusion For Energy, Barcelona (Spain)], E-mail: frederic.escourbiac@cea.fr

    2009-12-15

    Experience has shown that a critical part of the high-heat flux (HHF) plasma-facing component (PFC) is the armour to heat sink bond. An experimental study was performed in order to define acceptance criteria with regards to thermal hydraulics and fatigue performance of the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) divertor PFCs. This study, which includes the manufacturing of samples with calibrated artificial defects relevant to the divertor design, is reported in this paper. In particular, it was concluded that defects detectable with non-destructive examination (NDE) techniques appeared to be acceptable during HHF experiments relevant to heat fluxes expected in the ITER divertor. On the basis of these results, a set of acceptance criteria was proposed and applied to the European vertical target medium-size qualification prototype: 98% of the inspected carbon fibre composite (CFC) monoblocks and 100% of tungsten (W) monoblock and flat tiles elements (i.e. 80% of the full units) were declared acceptable.

  3. Characterization of laser-irradiated co-deposited layers on plasma facing components from a tokamak

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gasior, P.; Badziak, J.; Czarnecka, A.; Parys, P.; Wolowski, J.; Rosinski, M. [Andrzej Soltan Inst. for Nuclear Studies, Otwock-Swierk (Poland); Rubel, Marek [Royal Inst. of Technology, Stockholm (Sweden). Alfven Laboratory; Philipps, V. [Forschungszentrum Juelich (Germany). Inst. fuer Plasmaphysik

    2006-04-15

    An experimental setup and ion diagnostic method for laser-induced fuel removal and decomposition of co-deposited layers on plasma facing components from tokamaks are described. Nd:YAG 3.5 ns pulse laser with a repetition rate of 10 Hz and single-pulse energy of up to 0.8 J at 1.06 {mu}m has been used for irradiation of a graphite limiter tile from the TEXTOR tokamak. Comparative studies have been performed for a pure graphite plate as a reference target. Energy of emitted ions has been measured using a time-of-flight method. Early results show that laser pulses efficiently ablate the co-deposit removing both fuel species and heavy components such as Si, Ni, Cr, Fe and W present in the layers. Surface topography of the irradiated targets is also presented.

  4. Active flow control over a backward-facing step using plasma actuation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruisi, R.; Zare-Behtash, H.; Kontis, K.; Erfani, R.

    2016-09-01

    Due to the more stringent aviation regulations on fuel consumption and noise reduction, the interest for smaller and mechanically less complex devices for flow separation control has increased. Plasma actuators are currently among the most studied typology of devices for active flow control purposes due to their small size and lightweight. In this study, a single dielectric barrier discharge (SDBD) actuator is used on a backward-facing step to assess its effects on the separated turbulent shear layer and its reattachment location. A range of actuating modulation frequencies, related to the natural frequencies of shear layer instability (flapping) and vortex shedding instability, are examined. The particle image velocimetry technique is used to analyse the flow over the step and the reattachment location. The bulk-flow experiments show negligible effects both on the shear layer and on the reattachment location for every frequency considered, and the actuator is not able to induce a sufficient velocity increase at the step separation point.

  5. Material measurement method based on femtosecond laser plasma shock wave

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Dong; Li, Zhongming

    2017-03-01

    The acoustic emission signal of laser plasma shock wave, which comes into being when femtosecond laser ablates pure Cu, Fe, and Al target material, has been detected by using the fiber Fabry-Perot (F-P) acoustic emission sensing probe. The spectrum characters of the acoustic emission signals for three kinds of materials have been analyzed and studied by using Fourier transform. The results show that the frequencies of the acoustic emission signals detected from the three kinds of materials are different. Meanwhile, the frequencies are almost identical for the same materials under different ablation energies and detection ranges. Certainly, the amplitudes of the spectral character of the three materials show a fixed pattern. The experimental results and methods suggest a potential application of the plasma shock wave on-line measurement based on the femtosecond laser ablating target by using the fiber F-P acoustic emission sensor probe.

  6. Beryllium processing technology review for applications in plasma-facing components

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Castro, R.G.; Jacobson, L.A.; Stanek, P.W.

    1993-07-01

    Materials research and development activities for the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER), i.e., the next generation fusion reactor, are investigating beryllium as the first-wall containment material for the reactor. Important in the selection of beryllium is the ability to process, fabricate and repair beryllium first-wall components using existing technologies. Two issues that will need to be addressed during the engineering design activity will be the bonding of beryllium tiles in high-heat-flux areas of the reactor, and the in situ repair of damaged beryllium tiles. The following review summarizes the current technology associated with welding and joining of beryllium to itself and other materials, and the state-of-the-art in plasma-spray technology as an in situ repair technique for damaged beryllium tiles. In addition, a review of the current status of beryllium technology in the former Soviet Union is also included.

  7. Electromagnetic and structural analyses of the vacuum vessel and plasma facing components for EAST

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Weiwei, E-mail: wwxu@ipp.ac.cn; Liu, Xufeng; Song, Yuntao; Li, Jun; Lu, Mingxuan

    2013-10-15

    Highlights: • The electromagnetic and structural responses of VV and PFCs for EAST are analyzed. • A detailed finite element model of the VV including PFCs is established. • The two most dangerous scenarios, major disruptions and downward VDEs are considered. • The distribution patterns of eddy currents, EMFs and torques on PFCs are analyzed. -- Abstract: During plasma disruptions, time-varying eddy currents are induced in the vacuum vessel (VV) and Plasma Facing Components (PFCs) of EAST. Additionally, halo currents flow partly through these structures during the vertical displacement events (VDEs). Under the high magnetic field circumstances, the resulting electromagnetic forces (EMFs) and torques are large. In this paper, eddy currents and EMFs on EAST VV, PFCs and their supports are calculated by analytical and numerical methods. ANSYS software is employed to evaluate eddy currents on VV, PFCs and their structural responses. To learn the electromagnetic and structural response of the whole structure more accurately, a detailed finite element model is established. The two most dangerous scenarios, major disruptions and downward VDEs, are examined. It is found that distribution patterns of eddy currents for various PFCs differ greatly, therefore resulting in different EMFs and torques. It can be seen that for certain PFCs the transient reaction force are severe. Results obtained here may set up a preliminary foundation for the future dynamic response research of EAST VV and PFCs which will provide a theoretical basis for the future engineering design of tokamak devices.

  8. LIBS for tokamak plasma facing components characterisation: Perspectives on in situ tritium cartography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Semerok, A., E-mail: alexandre.semerok@cea.fr [CEA, DEN, DPC/SEARS/LISL, F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Grisolia, C. [CEA, IRFM, F-13108 Saint-Paul-lez-Durance (France)

    2013-08-21

    Feasibility of in situ LIBS remote measurements with the plasma facing components (PFCs) from the European tokamaks (TORE SUPRA, CEA Cadarache, France and TEXTOR, Julich, Germany) has been studied in laboratory using Q-switched nanosecond Nd–YAG lasers. LIBS particular properties and optimal parameters were determined for in-depth PFCs characterisation. The LIBS method was in situ tested on the Joint European Torus (JET) in the UK with the EDGE LIDAR Laser System (Ruby laser, 3 J, 690 nm wavelength, 300 ps pulse duration, intensity up to 70 GW/cm{sup 2}). Several analytical spectral lines of H, CII, CrI, and BeII in plasma were observed and identified in 400–600 nm spectral range with the optimised LIBS and detection system. The LIBS in-depth cartography is in agreement with the surface properties of the tile under analysis, thus confirming feasibility of in situ LIBS. Further LIBS technique improvements required to provide tritium concentration measurements more accurately are discussed.

  9. Microgravity Production of Nanoparticles of Novel Materials Using Plasma Synthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frenklach, Michael; Fernandez-Pello, Carlos

    2001-01-01

    The research goal is to study the formation in reduced gravity of high quality nanoparticulate of novel materials using plasma synthesis. Particular emphasis will be placed on the production of powders of non-oxide materials like diamond, SiC, SiN, c-BN, etc. The objective of the study is to investigate the effect of gravity on plasma synthesis of these materials, and to determine how the microgravity synthesis can improve the quality and yield of the nanoparticles. It is expected that the reduced gravity will aid in the understanding of the controlling mechanisms of plasma synthesis, and will increase the yield, and quality of the synthesized powder. These materials have properties of interest in several industrial applications, such as high temperature load bearings or high speed metal machining. Furthermore, because of the nano-meter size of the particulate produced in this process, they have specific application in the fabrication of MEMS based combustion systems, and in the development and growth of nano-systems and nano-structures of these materials. These are rapidly advancing research areas, and there is a great need for high quality nanoparticles of different materials. One of the primary systems of interest in the project will be gas-phase synthesis of nanopowder of non-oxide materials.

  10. Damage prediction of carbon fibre composite armoured actively cooled plasma-facing components under cycling heat loads

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chevet, G; Schlosser, J; Courtois, X; Escourbiac, F; Missirlian, M [CEA, IRFM, F-13108 Saint Paul Lez Durance (France); Herb, V; Martin, E; Camus, G [LCTS, CNRS UMR 5801, Universite Bordeaux 1, Pessac (France); Braccini, M [SIMaP, CNRS UMR 5266, Grenoble (France)], E-mail: gaelle.chevet@cea.fr

    2009-12-15

    In order to predict the lifetime of carbon fibre composite (CFC) armoured plasma-facing components in magnetic fusion devices, it is necessary to analyse the damage mechanisms and to model the damage propagation under cycling heat loads. At Tore Supra studies have been launched to better understand the damage process of the armoured flat tile elements of the actively cooled toroidal pump limiter, leading to the characterization of the damageable mechanical behaviour of the used N11 CFC material and of the CFC/Cu bond. Up until now the calculations have shown damage developing in the CFC (within the zone submitted to high shear stress) and in the bond (from the free edge of the CFC/Cu interface). Damage is due to manufacturing shear stresses and does not evolve under heat due to stress relaxation. For the ITER divertor, NB31 material has been characterized and the characterization of NB41 is in progress. Finite element calculations show again the development of CFC damage in the high shear stress zones after manufacturing. Stresses also decrease under heat flux so the damage does not evolve. The characterization of the CFC/Cu bond is more complex due to the monoblock geometry, which leads to more scattered stresses. These calculations allow the fabrication difficulties to be better understood and will help to analyse future high heat flux tests on various mock-ups.

  11. The Material Plasma Exposure eXperiment (MPEX)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rapp, J.; Biewer, T. M.; Bigelow, T. S.; Canik, J.; Caughman, J. B. O.; Duckworth, R. C.; Goulding, R. H.; Hillis, D. L.; Lore, J. D.; Lumsdaine, A.; McGinnis, W. D.; Meitner, S. J.; Owen, L. W.; Shaw, G. C.; Luo, G.-N.

    2014-10-01

    Next generation plasma generators have to be able to access the plasma conditions expected on the divertor targets in ITER and future devices. The Material Plasma Exposure eXperiment (MPEX) will address this regime with electron temperatures of 1--10 eV and electron densities of 1021--1020 m-3. The resulting heat fluxes are about 10 MW/m2. MPEX is designed to deliver those plasma conditions with a novel Radio Frequency plasma source able to produce high density plasmas and heat electron and ions separately with Electron Bernstein Wave (EBW) heating and Ion Cyclotron Resonance Heating (ICRH). Preliminary modeling has been used for pre-design studies of MPEX. MPEX will be capable to expose neutron irradiated samples. In this concept targets will be irradiated in ORNL's High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) or possibly at the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) and then subsequently (after a sufficient long cool-down period) exposed to fusion reactor relevant plasmas in MPEX. The current state of the pre-design of MPEX including the concept of handling irradiated samples will be presented. ORNL is managed by UT-Battelle, LLC, for the U.S. DOE under Contract DE-AC-05-00OR22725.

  12. Surface temperature measurement of the plasma facing components with the multi-spectral infrared thermography diagnostics in tokamaks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, C.; Gauthier, E.; Pocheau, C.; Balorin, C.; Pascal, J. Y.; Jouve, M.; Aumeunier, M. H.; Courtois, X.; Loarer, Th.; Houry, M.

    2017-03-01

    For the long-pulse high-confinement discharges in tokamaks, the equilibrium of plasma requires a contact with the first wall materials. The heat flux resulting from this interaction is of the order of 10 MW/m2 for steady state conditions and up to 20 MW/m2 for transient phases. The monitoring on surface temperatures of the plasma facing components (PFCs) is a major concern to ensure safe operation and to optimize performances of experimental operations on large fusion facilities. Furthermore, this measurement is also required to study the physics associated to the plasma material interactions and the heat flux deposition process. In tokamaks, infrared (IR) thermography systems are routinely used to monitor the surface temperature of the PFCs. This measurement requires an accurate knowledge of the surface emissivity. However, and particularly for metallic materials such as tungsten, this emissivity value can vary over a wide range with both the surface condition and the temperature itself, which makes instantaneous measurement challenging. In this context, the multi-spectral infrared method appears as a very promising alternative solution. Indeed, the system has the advantage to carry out a non-intrusive measurement on thermal radiation while evaluating surface temperature without requiring a mandatory surface emissivity measurement. In this paper, a conceptual design for the multi-spectral infrared thermography is proposed. The numerical study of the multi-channel system based on the Levenberg-Marquardt (LM) nonlinear curve fitting is applied. The numerical results presented in this paper demonstrate the design allows for measurements over a large temperature range with a relative error of less than 10%. Furthermore, laboratory experiments have been performed from 200 °C to 740 °C to confirm the feasibility for temperature measurements on stainless steel and tungsten. In these experiments, the unfolding results from the multi-channel detection provide good

  13. Plasma processing of fibre materials for enhanced impact protection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Creyghton, Y.L.M.; Simor, M.

    2009-01-01

    The performance of lightweight impact protective clothing depends on the constituting materials, their assembly in a system and interaction under various dynamic impact conditions. In this paper an overview of options for improved impact protective clothing systems based on a new plasma technology i

  14. Plasma processing of fibre materials for enhanced impact protection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Creyghton, Y.L.M.; Simor, M.

    2009-01-01

    The performance of lightweight impact protective clothing depends on the constituting materials, their assembly in a system and interaction under various dynamic impact conditions. In this paper an overview of options for improved impact protective clothing systems based on a new plasma technology i

  15. Plasma processing of fibre materials for enhanced impact protection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Creyghton, Y.L.M.; Simor, M.

    2009-01-01

    The performance of lightweight impact protective clothing depends on the constituting materials, their assembly in a system and interaction under various dynamic impact conditions. In this paper an overview of options for improved impact protective clothing systems based on a new plasma technology

  16. Material for electrodes of low temperature plasma generators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caplan, Malcolm; Vinogradov, Sergel Evge'evich; Ribin, Valeri Vasil'evich; Shekalov, Valentin Ivanovich; Rutberg, Philip Grigor'evich; Safronov, Alexi Anatol'evich

    2008-12-09

    Material for electrodes of low temperature plasma generators. The material contains a porous metal matrix impregnated with a material emitting electrons. The material uses a mixture of copper and iron powders as a porous metal matrix and a Group IIIB metal component such as Y.sub.2O.sub.3 is used as a material emitting electrons at, for example, the proportion of the components, mass %: iron: 3-30; Y.sub.2O.sub.3:0.05-1; copper: the remainder. Copper provides a high level of heat conduction and electric conductance, iron decreases intensity of copper evaporation in the process of plasma creation providing increased strength and lifetime, Y.sub.2O.sub.3 provides decreasing of electronic work function and stability of arc burning. The material can be used for producing the electrodes of low temperature AC plasma generators used for destruction of liquid organic wastes, medical wastes, and municipal wastes as well as for decontamination of low level radioactive waste, the destruction of chemical weapons, warfare toxic agents, etc.

  17. Plasma-material Interactions in Current Tokamaks and their Implications for Next-step Fusion Reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Federici, G.; Skinner, C.H.; Brooks, J.N.; Coad, J.P.; Grisolia, C. [and others

    2001-01-10

    The major increase in discharge duration and plasma energy in a next-step DT [deuterium-tritium] fusion reactor will give rise to important plasma-material effects that will critically influence its operation, safety, and performance. Erosion will increase to a scale of several centimeters from being barely measurable at a micron scale in today's tokamaks. Tritium co-deposited with carbon will strongly affect the operation of machines with carbon plasma-facing components. Controlling plasma wall interactions is critical to achieving high performance in present-day tokamaks and this is likely to continue to be the case in the approach to practical fusion reactors. Recognition of the important consequences of these phenomena has stimulated an internationally coordinated effort in the field of plasma-surface interactions supporting the Engineering Design Activities of the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) project and significant progress has been made in better under standing these issues. This paper reviews the underlying physical processes and the existing experimental database of plasma-material interactions both in tokamaks and laboratory simulation facilities for conditions of direct relevance to next-step fusion reactors. Two main topical groups of interactions are considered: (i) erosion/redeposition from plasma sputtering and disruptions, including dust and flake generation, (ii) tritium retention and removal. The use of modeling tools to interpret the experimental results and make projections for conditions expected in future devices is explained. Outstanding technical issues and specific recommendations on potential R and D [Research and Development] avenues for their resolution are presented.

  18. Present status of plasma-wall interactions research and materials development activities in the US

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hirooka, Y.; Conn, R.W.

    1989-08-01

    It is well known in the fusion engineering community that the plasma confinement performance in magnetic fusion devices is strongly affected by edge-plasma interactions with surface components. These plasma-material interactions (PMI) include fuel particle recycling and impurity generation both during normal and off-normal operation. To understand and then to control PMI effects, considerable effort has been made, particularly over the last decade in US, supported by Department of Energy, Division of Development and Technology. Also, because plasma-facing components are generally expected to receive significant amount of heat due to plasma bombardment and run-away electrons, materials must tolerate high-heat fluxes (HHF). The HHF-component research has been conducted in parallel with PMI research. One strong motivation for these research activities is that DT-burning experiments are currently planned in the Tokamak Test Fusion Reactor (TFTR) in early 1990s. Several different but mutually complementary approaches have been taken in the PMI+HHF research. The first approach is to conduct PMI experiments using toroidal fusion devices such as TFTR. The second one is to simulate elemental processes involved in PMI using ion beams and electron beams, etc. The last one but not least is to use non-tokamak plasma facilities. Along with these laboratory activities, new materials have been developed and evaluated from the PMI+HHF point of view. In this paper, several major PMI+HHF research facilities in US and their activities are briefly reviewed. 21 refs., 10 figs., 2 tabs.

  19. Surface modification of polymeric materials by cold atmospheric plasma jet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kostov, K. G.; Nishime, T. M. C.; Castro, A. H. R.; Toth, A.; Hein, L. R. O.

    2014-09-01

    In this work we report the surface modification of different engineering polymers, such as, polyethylene terephthalate (PET), polyethylene (PE) and polypropylene (PP) by an atmospheric pressure plasma jet (APPJ). It was operated with Ar gas using 10 kV, 37 kHz, sine wave as an excitation source. The aim of this study is to determine the optimal treatment conditions and also to compare the polymer surface modification induced by plasma jet with the one obtained by another atmospheric pressure plasma source - the dielectric barrier discharge (DBD). The samples were exposed to the plasma jet effluent using a scanning procedure, which allowed achieving a uniform surface modification. The wettability assessments of all polymers reveal that the treatment leads to reduction of more than 40° in the water contact angle (WCA). Changes in surface composition and chemical bonding were analyzed by x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and Fourier-Transformed Infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) that both detected incorporation of oxygen-related functional groups. Surface morphology of polymer samples was investigated by Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) and an increase of polymer roughness after the APPJ treatment was found. The plasma-treated polymers exhibited hydrophobic recovery expressed in reduction of the O-content of the surface upon rinsing with water. This process was caused by the dissolution of low molecular weight oxidized materials (LMWOMs) formed on the surface as a result of the plasma exposure.

  20. Plasma spray forming of functionally graded materials mould

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHAO Zi-yu; FANG Jian-cheng; LI Hong-you

    2005-01-01

    A new technology of functionally graded materials(FGM) mould fabricated by plasma spraying and arc spraying was developed. According to applied characteristic of plastic mould, the reasonable coatings of FGM were designed and their microstructures were analyzed. At the same time, some key problems were solved including spray mould fabricating, FGM forming and demoulding, etc. The results show that the service performance of the FGM mould is much more excellent than the one composed of the traditional materials, and the life span can also be greatly increased. The technology will have a significant influence on materials development in mould industry.

  1. NEW CATHODE MATERIALS FOR INERT AND OXIDIZING ATMOSPHERE PLASMA APPLICATION

    OpenAIRE

    1990-01-01

    This study has been carried out to develop new cathode materials for two types of thermionic cathode. First is concerning to the tungsten electrodes for the plasma furnace and welding torches. The second one is the electrodes for air plasma cutting torch. Tungsten electrodes activated with a single and combined additives of rare earth metal oxides, such as La2O3, Y2O3 and CeO2, are produced and pared with pure and thoriated tungsten electrode conventionally used, from the point of view of ele...

  2. Plasma Surface Treatment of Powder Materials — Process and Application

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monika Pavlatová

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Polyolefin particles are hydrophobic, and this prevents their use for various applications. Plasma treatment is an environment-friendly polyolefin hydrophilisation method. We developed an industrial-scale plant for plasma treatment of particles as small as micrometers in diameter. Materials such as PE waxes, UHMWPE and powders for rotomolding production were tested to verify their new surface properties. We achieved significantly increased wettability of the particles, so that they are very easily dispersive in water without agglomeration, and their higher surface energy is retained even after sintering in the case of rotomolding powders.

  3. Porous materials produced from incineration ash using thermal plasma technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Sheng-Fu; Chiu, Wen-Tung; Wang, To-Mai; Chen, Ching-Ting; Tzeng, Chin-Ching

    2014-06-01

    This study presents a novel thermal plasma melting technique for neutralizing and recycling municipal solid waste incinerator (MSWI) ash residues. MSWI ash residues were converted into water-quenched vitrified slag using plasma vitrification, which is environmentally benign. Slag is adopted as a raw material in producing porous materials for architectural and decorative applications, eliminating the problem of its disposal. Porous materials are produced using water-quenched vitrified slag with Portland cement and foaming agent. The true density, bulk density, porosity and water absorption ratio of the foamed specimens are studied here by varying the size of the slag particles, the water-to-solid ratio, and the ratio of the weights of the core materials, including the water-quenched vitrified slag and cement. The thermal conductivity and flexural strength of porous panels are also determined. The experimental results show the bulk density and the porosity of the porous materials are 0.9-1.2 g cm(-3) and 50-60%, respectively, and the pore structure has a closed form. The thermal conductivity of the porous material is 0.1946 W m(-1) K(-1). Therefore, the slag composite materials are lightweight and thermal insulators having considerable potential for building applications. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Integrated Prediction and Mitigation Methods of Materials Damage and Lifetime Assessment during Plasma Operation and Various Instabilities in Fusion Devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hassanein, Ahmed [Purdue Univ., West Lafayette, IN (United States)

    2015-03-31

    This report describes implementation of comprehensive and integrated models to evaluate plasma material interactions during normal and abnormal plasma operations. The models in full3D simulations represent state-of-the art worldwide development with numerous benchmarking of various tokamak devices and plasma simulators. In addition, significant number of experimental work has been performed in our center for materials under extreme environment (CMUXE) at Purdue to benchmark the effect of intense particle and heat fluxes on plasma-facing components. This represents one-year worth of work and resulted in more than 23 Journal Publications and numerous conferences presentations. The funding has helped several students to obtain their M.Sc. and Ph.D. degrees and many of them are now faculty members in US and around the world teaching and conducting fusion research. Our work has also been recognized through many awards.

  5. Crystal orientation effects on implantation of low-energy hydrogen, helium and hydrogen/helium mixtures in plasma-facing tungsten surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linn, Brian C.

    The development of plasma-facing materials (PFM) is one of the major challenges in. realizing fusion reactors. Materials deployed in PFMs must be capable of withstanding the high-flux of low-energy hydrogen and helium ions omitted from the plasma. while not hindering the plasma. Tungsten is considered a promising candidate material due to desirable material properties including its high melting temperature, good thermal conductivity and relatively low physical and chemical sputtering yields. This thesis uses molecular dynamic simulations to investigate helium and hydrogen bombardment of tungsten and the underlying physical effects (e.g. sputtering, erosion, blistering). Non-cumulative and cumulative bombardment simulations of helium, hydrogen, and hydrogen/helium bombardment of tungsten were modeled using the molecular dynamics code LAMMPS. Two orientations of monocrystalline bcc tungsten surfaces were considered, (001) and (111). Simulations were performed for temperatures ranging from 600K up to 1500K and helium / hydrogen incident energies of 20eV to 100eV . The results of these simulations showed the effect of temperature and incident particle energy on retention rates and implantation/deposition profiles in tungsten.

  6. Environmental and economic aspects of using marble fine waste in the manufacture of facing ceramic materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zemlyanushnov Dmitriy Yur'evich

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available This work considers economic expediency of using marble fine waste in facing ceramic materials manufacture by three-dimensional coloring method. Adding marble fine waste to the charge mixture reduces the production cost of the final product. This waste has a positive impact on the intensification of drying clay rocks and raw as a whole, which increases production efficiency. Using marble fine waste as a coloring admixture makes it possible to manufacture more environmentally friendly construction material with the use of wastes of hazard class 3 instead of class 4. At the same time, disposal areas and environmental load in the territories of mining and marble processing reduce significantly. Replacing ferrous pigments with manganese oxide for marble fine waste reduces the cost of the final product and the manufacture of facing ceramic brick of a wide range of colors - from dark brown to yellow.

  7. High heat flux actively cooled plasma facing components development, realization and first results in Tore Supra

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grosman, A. [Association Euratom-CEA, Centre d' Etudes de Cadarache, 13 - Saint-Paul-lez-Durance (France). Dept. de Recherches sur la Fusion Controlee

    2004-07-01

    The development, design, manufacture and testing of actively cooled high heat flux plasma facing components (PFC) has been an essential stage towards long powerful tokamak operations for Tore-Supra, it lasted about 10 years. This paper deals with the toroidal pumped limiter (TPL) that is able to sustain up to 10 MW/m{sup 2} of nominal heat flux. This device is based on hardened copper alloy heat sink structures covered by a carbon fiber composite armour, it resulted in the manufacturing of 600 elementary components, called finger elements, to achieve the 7.6 m{sup 2} TPL. This assembly has been operating in Tore-Supra since spring 2002. Some difficulties occurred during the manufacturing phase, the valuable industrial experience is summarized in the section 2. The permanent monitoring of PFC surface temperature all along the discharge is performed by a set of 6 actively cooled infrared endoscopes. The heat flux monitoring and control issue but also the progress made in our understanding of the deuterium retention in long discharges are described in the section 3. (A.C.)

  8. Data merging of infrared and ultrasonic images for plasma facing components inspection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Richou, M. [CEA, IRFM, F-13108 Saint Paul-lez-Durance (France)], E-mail: marianne.richou@cea.fr; Durocher, A. [CEA, IRFM, F-13108 Saint Paul-lez-Durance (France); Medrano, M. [Association EURATOM - CIEMAT, Avda. Complutense 22, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Martinez-Ona, R. [Tecnatom, 28703 S. Sebastian de los Reyes, Madrid (Spain); Moysan, J. [LCND, Universite de la Mediterranee, F-13625 Aix-en-Provence (France); Riccardi, B. [Fusion For Energy, 08019 Barcelona (Spain)

    2009-06-15

    For steady-state magnetic thermonuclear fusion devices which need large power exhaust capability, actively cooled plasma facing components have been developed. In order to guarantee the integrity of these components during the required lifetime, their thermal and mechanical behaviour must be assessed. Before the procurement of the ITER Divertor, the examination of the heat sink to armour joints with non-destructive techniques is an essential topic to be addressed. Defects may be localised at different bonding interfaces. In order to improve the defect detection capability of the SATIR technique, the possibility of merging the infrared thermography test data coming from SATIR results with the ultrasonic test data has been identified. The data merging of SATIR and ultrasonic results has been performed on Carbon Fiber Composite (CFC) monoblocks with calibrated defects, identified by their position and extension. These calibrated defects were realised with machining, with 'stop-off' or by a lack of CFC activation techniques, these last two representing more accurately a real defect. A batch of 56 samples was produced to simulate each possibility of combination with regards to interface location, position and extension and way of realising the defect. The use of a data merging method based on Dempster-Shafer theory improves significantly the detection sensibility and reliability of defect location and size.

  9. Energy deposition and thermal effects of runaway electrons in ITER-FEAT plasma facing components

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maddaluno, G. E-mail: maddaluno@frascati.enea.it; Maruccia, G.; Merola, M.; Rollet, S

    2003-03-01

    The profile of energy deposited by runaway electrons (RAEs) of 10 or 50 MeV in International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor-Fusion Energy Advanced Tokamak (ITER-FEAT) plasma facing components (PFCs) and the subsequent temperature pattern have been calculated by using the Monte Carlo code FLUKA and the finite element heat conduction code ANSYS. The RAE energy deposition density was assumed to be 50 MJ/m{sup 2} and both 10 and 100 ms deposition times were considered. Five different configurations of PFCs were investigated: primary first wall armoured with Be, with and without protecting CFC poloidal limiters, both port limiter first wall options (Be flat tile and CFC monoblock), divertor baffle first wall, armoured with W. The analysis has outlined that for all the configurations but one (port limiter with Be flat tile) the heat sink and the cooling tube beneath the armour are well protected for both RAE energies and for both energy deposition times. On the other hand large melting (W, Be) or sublimation (C) of the surface layer occurs, eventually affecting the PFCs lifetime.

  10. The heat removal capability of actively cooled plasma-facing components for the ITER divertor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Missirlian, M.; Richou, M.; Riccardi, B.; Gavila, P.; Loarer, T.; Constans, S.

    2011-12-01

    Non-destructive examination followed by high-heat-flux testing was performed for different small- and medium-scale mock-ups; this included the most recent developments related to actively cooled tungsten (W) or carbon fibre composite (CFC) armoured plasma-facing components. In particular, the heat-removal capability of these mock-ups manufactured by European companies with all the main features of the ITER divertor design was investigated both after manufacturing and after thermal cycling up to 20 MW m-2. Compliance with ITER requirements was explored in terms of bonding quality, heat flux performances and operational compatibility. The main results show an overall good heat-removal capability after the manufacturing process independent of the armour-to-heat sink bonding technology and promising behaviour with respect to thermal fatigue lifetime under heat flux up to 20 MW m-2 for the CFC-armoured tiles and 15 MW m-2 for the W-armoured tiles, respectively.

  11. Manufacturing and High Heat Flux Testing of Brazed Flat-Type W/CuCrZr Plasma Facing Components

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lian, Youyun; Liu, Xiang; Feng, Fan; Chen, Lei; Cheng, Zhengkui; Wang, Jin; Chen, Jiming

    2016-02-01

    Water-cooled flat-type W/CuCrZr plasma facing components with an interlayer of oxygen-free copper (OFC) have been developed by using vacuum brazing route. The OFC layer for the accommodation of thermal stresses was cast onto the surface of W at a temperature range of 1150 °C-1200 °C in a vacuum furnace. The W/OFC cast tiles were vacuum brazed to a CuCrZr heat sink at 940 °C using the silver-free filler material CuMnSiCr. The microstructure, bonding strength, and high heat flux properties of the brazed W/CuCrZr joint samples were investigated. The W/Cu joint exhibits an average tensile strength of 134 MPa, which is about the same strength as pure annealed copper. High heat flux tests were performed in the electron beam facility EMS-60. Experimental results indicated that the brazed W/CuCrZr mock-up experienced screening tests of up to 15 MW/m2 and cyclic tests of 9 MW/m2 for 1000 cycles without visible damage. supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China (No. 11205049) and the National Magnetic Confinement Fusion Science Program of China (No. 2011GB110004)

  12. Atmospheric-Pressure Plasma Interaction with Soft Materials as Fundamental Processes in Plasma Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takenaka, Kosuke; Miyazaki, Atsushi; Uchida, Giichiro; Setsuhara, Yuichi

    2015-03-01

    Molecular-structure variation of organic materials irradiated with atmospheric pressure He plasma jet have been investigated. Optical emission spectrum in the atmospheric-pressure He plasma jet has been measured. The spectrum shows considerable emissions of He lines, and the emission of O and N radicals attributed to air. Variation in molecular structure of Polyethylene terephthalate (PET) film surface irradiated with the atmospheric-pressure He plasma jet has been observed via X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR). These results via XPS and FT-IR indicate that the PET surface irradiated with the atmospheric-pressure He plasma jet was oxidized by chemical and/or physical effect due to irradiation of active species.

  13. Generation of nano roughness on fibrous materials by atmospheric plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulyk, I.; Scapinello, M.; Stefan, M.

    2012-12-01

    Atmospheric plasma technology finds novel applications in textile industry. It eliminates the usage of water and of hazard liquid chemicals, making production much more eco-friendly and economically convenient. Due to chemical effects of atmospheric plasma, it permits to optimize dyeing and laminating affinity of fabrics, as well as anti-microbial treatments. Other important applications such as increase of mechanical resistance of fiber sleeves and of yarns, anti-pilling properties of fabrics and anti-shrinking property of wool fabrics were studied in this work. These results could be attributed to the generation of nano roughness on fibers surface by atmospheric plasma. Nano roughness generation is extensively studied at different conditions. Alternative explanations for the important practical results on textile materials and discussed.

  14. RACLETTE: a model for evaluating the thermal response of plasma facing components to slow high power plasma transients. Part I: Theory and description of model capabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raffray, A. René; Federici, Gianfranco

    1997-04-01

    RACLETTE (Rate Analysis Code for pLasma Energy Transfer Transient Evaluation), a comprehensive but relatively simple and versatile model, was developed to help in the design analysis of plasma facing components (PFCs) under 'slow' high power transients, such as those associated with plasma vertical displacement events. The model includes all the key surface heat transfer processes such as evaporation, melting, and radiation, and their interaction with the PFC block thermal response and the coolant behaviour. This paper represents part I of two sister and complementary papers. It covers the model description, calibration and validation, and presents a number of parametric analyses shedding light on and identifying trends in the PFC armour block response to high plasma energy deposition transients. Parameters investigated include the plasma energy density and deposition time, the armour thickness and the presence of vapour shielding effects. Part II of the paper focuses on specific design analyses of ITER plasma facing components (divertor, limiter, primary first wall and baffle), including improvements in the thermal-hydraulic modeling required for better understanding the consequences of high energy deposition transients in particular for the ITER limiter case.

  15. Surface modification of polymeric materials by cold atmospheric plasma jet

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kostov, K.G., E-mail: kostov@feg.unesp.br [Faculty of Engineering in Guaratinguetá–FEG, Universidade Estadual Paulista–UNESP Guaratiguetá, 12516-410, SP (Brazil); Nishime, T.M.C.; Castro, A.H.R. [Faculty of Engineering in Guaratinguetá–FEG, Universidade Estadual Paulista–UNESP Guaratiguetá, 12516-410, SP (Brazil); Toth, A. [Institute of Material and Environmental Chemistry, Hungarian Academy of Science P.O. Box 17, H-1525, Budapest (Hungary); Hein, L.R.O. [Faculty of Engineering in Guaratinguetá–FEG, Universidade Estadual Paulista–UNESP Guaratiguetá, 12516-410, SP (Brazil)

    2014-09-30

    Highlights: • We investigate polymer surface modification by atmospheric pressure plasma jet APPJ. • Jet operation conditions for uniform surface modification were determined. • The APPJ added O atoms to the polymer surface and also enhanced the roughness. • The degree of polymer surface modification by APPJ and DBD were compared. • The APPJ is more efficient in attaching O atoms and produces less polymer fragments. - Abstract: In this work we report the surface modification of different engineering polymers, such as, polyethylene terephthalate (PET), polyethylene (PE) and polypropylene (PP) by an atmospheric pressure plasma jet (APPJ). It was operated with Ar gas using 10 kV, 37 kHz, sine wave as an excitation source. The aim of this study is to determine the optimal treatment conditions and also to compare the polymer surface modification induced by plasma jet with the one obtained by another atmospheric pressure plasma source – the dielectric barrier discharge (DBD). The samples were exposed to the plasma jet effluent using a scanning procedure, which allowed achieving a uniform surface modification. The wettability assessments of all polymers reveal that the treatment leads to reduction of more than 40° in the water contact angle (WCA). Changes in surface composition and chemical bonding were analyzed by x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and Fourier-Transformed Infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) that both detected incorporation of oxygen-related functional groups. Surface morphology of polymer samples was investigated by Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) and an increase of polymer roughness after the APPJ treatment was found. The plasma-treated polymers exhibited hydrophobic recovery expressed in reduction of the O-content of the surface upon rinsing with water. This process was caused by the dissolution of low molecular weight oxidized materials (LMWOMs) formed on the surface as a result of the plasma exposure.

  16. Human Lives Are More Valuable Than Material Possessions--My Reflections on "Face to Face with Hurricane Camille"

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    顾嘉祖

    1985-01-01

    @@ "Face to face with HurricaneCamille" is a piece of narration writ-ten by Joseph P. Blank. It has beenadopted by text-book compilers ofvarious countries ever since its firstpublication in The Readers Digest,March 1970. As early as 1973, Nat-ali C. Moreda, Katherlne M. Sin-clair andNancy J.Sparks put it intoa set of text-books entitled New Advanced.

  17. Interaction of powerful hot plasma and fast ion streams with materials in dense plasma focus devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chernyshova, M., E-mail: maryna.chernyshova@ipplm.pl [Institute of Plasma Physics and Laser Microfusion, Warsaw (Poland); Gribkov, V.A. [Institute of Plasma Physics and Laser Microfusion, Warsaw (Poland); Institution of Russian Academy of Sciences A.A. Baikov Institute of Metallurgy and Material Science RAS, Moscow (Russian Federation); Kowalska-Strzeciwilk, E.; Kubkowska, M.; Miklaszewski, R.; Paduch, M.; Pisarczyk, T.; Zielinska, E. [Institute of Plasma Physics and Laser Microfusion, Warsaw (Poland); Demina, E.V.; Pimenov, V.N.; Maslyaev, S.A. [Institution of Russian Academy of Sciences A.A. Baikov Institute of Metallurgy and Material Science RAS, Moscow (Russian Federation); Bondarenko, G.G. [National Research University Higher School of Economics (HSE), Moscow (Russian Federation); Vilemova, M.; Matejicek, J. [Institute of Plasma Physics of the CAS, Prague (Czech Republic)

    2016-12-15

    Highlights: • Materials perspective for use in mainstream nuclear fusion facilities were studied. • Powerful streams of hot plasma and fast ions were used to induce irradiation. • High temporal, spatial, angular and spectral resolution available in experiments. • Results of irradiation were investigated by number of analysis techniques. - Abstract: A process of irradiating and ablating solid-state targets with hot plasma and fast ion streams in two Dense Plasma Focus (DPF) devices – PF-6 and PF-1000 was examined by applying a number of diagnostics of nanosecond time resolution. Materials perspective for use in chambers of the mainstream nuclear fusion facilities (mainly with inertial plasma confinement like NIF and Z-machine), intended both for the first wall and for constructions, have been irradiated in these simulators. Optical microscopy, SEM, Atomic Emission Spectroscopy, images in secondary electrons and in characteristic X-ray luminescence of different elements, and X-ray elemental analysis, gave results on damageability for a number of materials including low-activated ferritic and austenitic stainless steels, β-alloy of Ti, as well as two types of W and a composite on its base. With an increase of the number of shots irradiating the surface, its morphology changes from weakly pronounced wave-like structures or ridges to strongly developed ones. At later stages, due to the action of the secondary plasma produced near the target materials they melted, yielding both blisters and a fracturing pattern: first along the grain and then “in-between” the grains creating an intergranular net of microcracks. At the highest values of power flux densities multiple bubbles appeared. Furthermore, in this last case the cracks were developed because of microstresses at the solidification of melt. Presence of deuterium within the irradiated ferritic steel surface nanolayers is explained by capture of deuterons in lattice defects of the types of impurity atoms

  18. Evaluation of energy and particle impact on the plasma facing components in DEMO

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Igitkhanov, Yuri, E-mail: juri.gitkhanov@ihm.fzk.de [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, IHM, Karlsruhe (Germany); Bazylev, Boris [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, IHM, Karlsruhe (Germany)

    2012-08-15

    -state operation heat transfer into the coolant must remain below the critical heat flux (CHF) to avoid the possible severe degradation of the coolant heat removal capability. From the plasma side it is particularly demanding to keep the bulk plasma contamination during the reactor long operational discharges below the fatal level. The possible damage of the FW materials due to the plasma sputtering erosion is estimated. The minimum thickness of the tungsten amour about 3 mm for W/EUROFER sandwich structure will keep the maximum EUROFER temperature below the critical limit for EUROFER steel under steady-state operation and ITER like cooling conditions.

  19. Feasibility of arc-discharge and plasma-sputtering methods in cleaning plasma-facing and diagnostics components of fusion reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hakola, Antti, E-mail: antti.hakola@vtt.fi [VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland, VTT (Finland); Likonen, Jari [VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland, VTT (Finland); Karhunen, Juuso; Korhonen, Juuso T. [Department of Applied Physics, Aalto University (Finland); Aints, Märt; Laan, Matti; Paris, Peeter [Department of Physics, University of Tartu (Estonia); Kolehmainen, Jukka; Koskinen, Mika; Tervakangas, Sanna [DIARC-Technology Oy, Espoo (Finland)

    2015-10-15

    Highlights: • Feasibility of the arc-discharge and plasma-sputtering techniques in removing deposited layers from ITER-relevant samples demonstrated. • Samples with the size of an A4 paper can be cleaned from 1-μm thick deposited layers in 10–20 minutes by the arc-discharge method. • The plasma-sputtering method is 5–10 times slower but the resulting surfaces are very smooth. • Arc-discharge method could be used for rapid cleaning of plasma-facing components during maintenance shutdowns of ITER, plasma sputtering is preferred for diagnostics mirrors. - Abstract: We have studied the feasibility of arc-discharge and plasma-sputtering methods in removing deposited layers from ITER-relevant test samples. Prototype devices have been designed and constructed for the experiments and the cleaning process is monitored by a spectral detection system. The present version of the arc-discharge device is capable of removing 1-μm thick layers from 350-mm{sup 2} areas in 4–8 s, but due to the increased roughness of the cleaned surfaces and signs of local melting, mirror-like surfaces cannot be treated by this technique. The plasma-sputtering approach, for its part, is some 5–10 times slower in removing the deposited layers but no changes in surface roughness or morphology of the samples could be observed after the cleaning phase. The arc-discharge technique could therefore be used for rapid cleaning of plasma-facing components during maintenance shutdowns of ITER while in the case of diagnostics mirrors plasma sputtering is preferred.

  20. An operational non destructive examination for ITER divertor plasma facing components

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Durocher, A.; Escourbiac, F.; Farjon, J.L.; Vignal, N.; Cismondi, F. [Association Euratom-CEA Cadarache, 13 - Saint-Paul-lez-Durance (France). Dept. de Recherches sur la Fusion Controlee; Merola, M. [ITER International Team, Cadarache, 13 - St Paul Lez Durance (France); Riccardi, B. [CEFDA CSU-Garching, Garching bei Munchen (Germany)

    2007-07-01

    Full text of publication follows: To meet the power exhaust - heat flux of 20 MW/m{sup 2} - requirements of Plasma Facing Components (PFCs) during plasma operation requires control of their thermal and mechanical integrity. As heat exhaust capability and lifetime of PFCs during in-situ operation are linked to the manufacturing quality, it is an absolute requirement to develop reliable nondestructive examination methods, in particular of the CFC-CuCrZr joint, throughout the manufacturing process. Within the framework of Tokamak Tore Supra upgrade, a pioneering activity has been developed to evaluate the capability of the PFC to be efficiently cooled. In 1998 a test bed - so called SATIR - based on the heat transient method was developed by the CEA and is used today as an inspection tool in order to guarantee the PFCs performances. The technical procurement plan of ITER Divertor targets stated that all Cu cast layers on CFC armour should be subjected to 100% thermographic examination. Each ITER Party should demonstrate its technical capability to carry out the PFC with the required cooling efficiently. The ITER Divertor PFCs pose new challenges especially for the mono-block CFC thickness, and the number of full scale units to be tested which is higher than on any existing or under construction fusion machine. The SATIR method as functional inspection has been identified as the basis test to decide upon the final acceptance of the Divertor PFCs. In order to increase the detection sensitivity of SATIR test bed, several possibilities have been assessed i) the increase of the convective heat transfer coefficient, which improved in a significant way the sensitivity of SATIR diagnostic on ITER components. ii) the installation of a digital infrared camera and the improvement of the thermal signal processing, has led to a considerable increase of performances iii) an innovative process based on spatial image autocorrelation will allow to localize the interlayer defect

  1. Design and operation results of nitrogen gas baking system for KSTAR plasma facing components

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Sang-Tae [National Fusion Research Institute, 113 Gwahang-ro, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 305-806 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Young-Jin, E-mail: k43689@nfri.re.kr [National Fusion Research Institute, 113 Gwahang-ro, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 305-806 (Korea, Republic of); Joung, Nam-Yong; Im, Dong-Seok; Kim, Kang-Pyo; Kim, Kyung-Min; Bang, Eun-Nam; Kim, Yaung-Soo [National Fusion Research Institute, 113 Gwahang-ro, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 305-806 (Korea, Republic of); Yoo, Seong-Yeon [Chungnam National University, 99 Daehak-ro, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 305-764 (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-11-15

    Highlights: • Vacuum pressure in a vacuum vessel arrived at 7.24 × 10{sup −8} mbar. • PFC temperature was reached maximum 250 °C by gas temperature at 300 °C. • PFC inlet gas temperature was changed 5 °C per hour during rising and falling. • PFC gas balancing was made temperature difference among them below 8.3 °C. • System has a pre-cooler and a three-way valve to save operation energy. -- Abstract: A baking system for the Korea Superconducting Tokamak Advanced Research (KSTAR) plasma facing components (PFCs) is designed and operated to achieve vacuum pressure below 5 × 10{sup −7} mbar in vacuum vessel with removing impurities. The purpose of this research is to prevent the fracture of PFC because of thermal stress during baking the PFC, and to accomplish stable operation of the baking system with the minimum life cycle cost. The uniformity of PFC temperature in each sector was investigated, when the supply gas temperature was varied by 5 °C per hour using a heater and the three-way valve at the outlet of a compressor. The alternative of the pipe expansion owing to hot gas and the cage configuration of the three-way valve were also studied. During the fourth campaign of the KSTAR in 2011, nitrogen gas temperature rose up to 300 °C, PFC temperature reached at 250 °C, the temperature difference among PFCs was maintained at below 8.3 °C, and vacuum pressure of up to 7.24 × 10{sup −8} mbar was achieved inside the vacuum vessel.

  2. Nanomaterials for Polymer Electrolyte Membrane Fuel Cells; Materials Challenges Facing Electrical Energy Storate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gopal Rao, MRS Web-Editor; Yury Gogotsi, Drexel University; Karen Swider-Lyons, Naval Research Laboratory

    2010-08-05

    Symposium T: Nanomaterials for Polymer Electrolyte Membrane Fuel Cells Polymer electrolyte membrane (PEM) fuel cells are under intense investigation worldwide for applications ranging from transportation to portable power. The purpose of this seminar is to focus on the nanomaterials and nanostructures inherent to polymer fuel cells. Symposium topics will range from high-activity cathode and anode catalysts, to theory and new analytical methods. Symposium U: Materials Challenges Facing Electrical Energy Storage Electricity, which can be generated in a variety of ways, offers a great potential for meeting future energy demands as a clean and efficient energy source. However, the use of electricity generated from renewable sources, such as wind or sunlight, requires efficient electrical energy storage. This symposium will cover the latest material developments for batteries, advanced capacitors, and related technologies, with a focus on new or emerging materials science challenges.

  3. Vacuum Plasma Spray (VPS) Material Applications for Thruster Components

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elam, Sandra; Holmes, Richard; Hickman, Robert

    2006-01-01

    A variety of vacuum plasma spray (VPS) material systems have been successfully applied to injector and thrust chamber components. VPS offers a versatile fabrication process with relatively low costs to produce near net shape parts. The materials available with VPS increase operating margins and improve component life by providing superior thermal and oxidation protection in specific engine environments. Functional gradient materials (FGM) formed with VPS allow thrust chamber liners to be fabricated with GRCop-84 (an alloy of copper, chrome, and niobium) and a protective layer of NiCrAlY on the hot wall. A variety of thrust chamber liner designs have been fabricated to demonstrate the versatility of the process. Hot-fire test results have confined the improved durability and high temperature performance of the material systems for thrust chamber liners. Similar FGM s have been applied to provide superior thermal protection on injector faceplates with NiCrAlY and zirconia coatings. The durability of the applied materials has been demonstrated with hot-fire cycle testing on injector faceplates in high temperature environments. The material systems can benefit the components used in booster and main engine propulsion systems. More recent VPS efforts are focused on producing rhenium based material systems for high temperature applications to benefit in-space engines like reaction control system (RCS) thrusters.

  4. ON JUSTIFICATION OF STANDARDS FOR NATURAL RADIONUCLIDE CONCENTRATION IN FACING PRODUCTS AND MATERIALS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. P. Stamat

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The article addresses issues of the population radiation protection regulatory framework development for the natural sources of radiation. Calculations for justification of standard for natural radionuclide concentration in the wide range of contemporary building materials - facing products - are formulated. The basic consideration of calculations is that implementation of these products could lead to the additional population exposure from natural sources less than 0,1 mSv/year. On the base of this assumption it is shown that effective specific activity of natural radionuclides in these products must not exceed 740 Bq/kg.

  5. Preliminary design of laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy for proto-Material Plasma Exposure eXperiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaw, G; Martin, M Z; Martin, R; Biewer, T M

    2014-11-01

    Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) is a technique for measuring surface matter composition. LIBS is performed by focusing laser radiation onto a target surface, ablating the surface, forming a plasma, and analyzing the light produced. LIBS surface analysis is a possible diagnostic for characterizing plasma-facing materials in ITER. Oak Ridge National Laboratory has enabled the initial installation of a laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy diagnostic on the prototype Material-Plasma Exposure eXperiment (Proto-MPEX), which strives to mimic the conditions found at the surface of the ITER divertor. This paper will discuss the LIBS implementation on Proto-MPEX, preliminary design of the fiber optic LIBS collection probe, and the expected results.

  6. Plasma-enhanced synthesis of green flame retardant cellulosic materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Totolin, Vladimir

    The natural fiber-containing fabrics and composites are more environmentally friendly, and are used in transportation (automobiles, aerospace), military applications, construction industries (ceiling paneling, partition boards), consumer products, etc. Therefore, the flammability characteristics of the composites based on polymers and natural fibers play an important role. This dissertation presents the development of plasma assisted - green flame retardant coatings for cellulosic substrates. The overall objective of this work was to generate durable flame retardant treatment on cellulosic materials. In the first approach sodium silicate layers were pre-deposited onto clean cotton substrates and cross linked using low pressure, non-equilibrium oxygen plasma. A statistical design of experiments was used to optimize the plasma parameters. The modified cotton samples were tested for flammability using an automatic 45° angle flammability test chamber. Aging tests were conducted to evaluate the coating resistance during the accelerated laundry technique. The samples revealed a high flame retardant behavior and good thermal stability proved by thermo-gravimetric analysis. In the second approach flame retardant cellulosic materials have been produced using a silicon dioxide (SiO2) network coating. SiO 2 network armor was prepared through hydrolysis and condensation of the precursor tetraethyl orthosilicate (TEOS), prior coating the substrates, and was cross linked on the surface of the substrates using atmospheric pressure plasma (APP) technique. Due to protection effects of the SiO2 network armor, the cellulosic based fibers exhibit enhanced thermal properties and improved flame retardancy. In the third approach, the TEOS/APP treatments were extended to linen fabrics. The thermal analysis showed a higher char content and a strong endothermic process of the treated samples compared with control ones, indicating a good thermal stability. Also, the surface analysis proved

  7. Dielectric material degradation monitoring of dielectric barrier discharge plasma actuators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanson, Ronald E.; Houser, Nicole M.; Lavoie, Philippe

    2014-01-01

    It is a known phenomenon that some dielectric materials used to construct plasma actuators degrade during operation. However, the rate at which this process occurs, to what extent, as well as a method to monitor is yet to be established. In this experimental study, it is shown that electrical measurements can be used to monitor changes in the material of the plasma actuators. The procedure we introduce for monitoring the actuators follows from the work of Kriegseis, Grundmann, and Tropea [Kriegseis et al., J. Appl. Phys. 110, 013305 (2011)], who used Lissajous figures to measure actuator power consumption and capacitance. In the present study, we quantify changes in both the power consumption and capacitance of the actuators over long operating durations. It is shown that the increase in the effective capacitance of the actuator is related to degradation (thinning) of the dielectric layer, which is accompanied by an increase in actuator power consumption. For actuators constructed from layers of Kapton® polyimide tape, these changes are self-limiting. Although the polyimide film degrades relatively quickly, the underlying adhesive layer appears to remain intact. Over time, the effective capacitance was found to increase by up to 36%, 25%, and 11% for actuators constructed with 2, 3, and 4 layers of Kapton tape, respectively. A method is presented to prevent erosion of the Kapton dielectric layer using a coating of Polydimethylsiloxane oil. It is shown the application of this treatment can delay the onset of degradation of the Kapton dielectric material.

  8. A New Type of Multielements-Doped, Carbon-based Materials Characterized by High-thermoconductiv ity, Low Chemical Sputtering, Low RES Yield and Exposure to Plasma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    许增裕; 刘翔; 谌继明; 王明旭; 宋进仁; 翟更太; 李承新

    2002-01-01

    Low-Z materials, such as carbon-based materials and Be, are major plasma-facing material (PFM) for current, even in future fusion devices. In this paper, a new type of multielement-doped carbon-based materials developed are presented along with experimental re sults of their properties. The results indicate a decrease in chemical sputtering yield by one order of magnitude, a decrease in both thermal shock resistance and radiation-enhanced sublimation, an evidently lower temperature desorption spectrum, and combined properties of exposing to plasma.

  9. A New Type of Multielements—Dpoed.Carbon—based Materials Characterized by High—Thermoconductivity,Low Chemical Syputtering.Low RES Yield and Exposure to Plasma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    许增裕; 宋进仁; 等

    2002-01-01

    Low-Z materials,such as carbon-based materials and Be,are major plasma-facing material (PFM) for current,even in future fusion devices.In this paper,new type of multielement-doped carbon-based materials developed are presented along with experimental results of their properties,The results indicate a decrease in chemical sputtering yield by one order of magnitude.a decrease in both thermal shock resistance and radiation-enhanced sublimation,an evidently lower temperature desorption spectrum ,and combined properties of exposing to plasma.

  10. Processing and characterization of B4C/Cu graded composite as plasma facing component for fusion reactors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    A new approach for fabricating B4C/Cu graded composite by rapid self-resistance sintering under ultra-high pressure was presented, by which a near dense B4C/Cu graded composite with a compositional spectrum of 0-100% was successfully fabricated. Plasma relevant performances ofsintered B4C/Cu composite were preliminarily characterized, it is found that its chemical sputtering yield is 70% lower than that of SMF800 nuclear graphite under 2.7 keV D+ irradiation, and almost no damages after 66 shots of in situ plasma discharge in HL-1 Tokamak facility, which indicates B4C/Cu plasma facing component has a good physical and chemical sputtering resistance performance compared with nuclear graphite.

  11. Heat loads on JET plasma facing components from ICRF and LH wave absorption in the SOL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacquet, P.; Colas, L.; Mayoral, M.-L.; Arnoux, G.; Bobkov, V.; Brix, M.; Coad, P.; Czarnecka, A.; Dodt, D.; Durodie, F.; Ekedahl, A.; Frigione, D.; Fursdon, M.; Gauthier, E.; Goniche, M.; Graham, M.; Joffrin, E.; Korotkov, A.; Lerche, E.; Mailloux, J.; Monakhov, I.; Noble, C.; Ongena, J.; Petrzilka, V.; Portafaix, C.; Rimini, F.; Sirinelli, A.; Riccardo, V.; Vizvary, Z.; Widdowson, A.; Zastrow, K.-D.; EFDA Contributors, JET

    2011-10-01

    In JET, lower hybrid (LH) and ion cyclotron resonance frequency (ICRF) wave absorption in the scrape-off layer can lead to enhanced heat fluxes on some plasma facing components (PFCs). Experiments have been carried out to characterize these heat loads in order to: (i) prepare JET operation with the Be wall which has a reduced power handling capability as compared with the carbon wall and (ii) better understand the physics driving these wave absorption phenomena and propose solutions for next generation systems to reduce them. When using ICRF, hot spots are observed on the antenna structures and on limiters close to the powered antennas and are explained by acceleration of ions in RF-rectified sheath potentials. High temperatures up to 800 °C can be reached on locations where a deposit has built up on tile surfaces. Modelling which takes into account the fast thermal response of surface layers can reproduce well the surface temperature measurements via infrared (IR) imaging, and allow evaluation of the heat fluxes local to active ICRF antennas. The flux scales linearly with the density at the antenna radius and with the antenna voltage. Strap phasing corresponding to wave spectra with lower kpar values can lead to a significant increase in hot spot intensity in agreement with antenna modelling that predicts, in that case, an increase in RF sheath rectification. LH absorption in front of the antenna through electron Landau damping of the wave with high Npar components generates hot spots precisely located on PFCs magnetically connected to the launcher. Analysis of the LH hot spot surface temperature from IR measurements allows a quantification of the power flux along the field lines: in the worst case scenario it is in the range 15-30 MW m-2. The main driving parameter is the LH power density along the horizontal rows of the launcher, the heat fluxes scaling roughly with the square of the LH power density. The local electron density in front of the grill increases

  12. Advanced plasma etching processes for dielectric materials in VLSI technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Juan Juan

    Manufacturable plasma etching processes for dielectric materials have played an important role in the Integrated Circuits (IC) industry in recent decades. Dielectric materials such as SiO2 and SiN are widely used to electrically isolate the active device regions (like the gate, source and drain from the first level of metallic interconnects) and to isolate different metallic interconnect levels from each other. However, development of new state-of-the-art etching processes is urgently needed for higher aspect ratio (oxide depth/hole diameter---6:1) in Very Large Scale Integrated (VLSI) circuits technology. The smaller features can provide greater packing density of devices on a single chip and greater number of chips on a single wafer. This dissertation focuses on understanding and optimizing of several key aspects of etching processes for dielectric materials. The challenges are how to get higher selectivity of oxide/Si for contact and oxide/TiN for vias; tight Critical Dimension (CD) control; wide process margin (enough over-etch); uniformity and repeatability. By exploring all of the parameters for the plasma etch process, the key variables are found and studied extensively. The parameters investigated here are Power, Pressure, Gas ratio, and Temperature. In particular, the novel gases such as C4F8, C5F8, and C4F6 were studied in order to meet the requirements of the design rules. We also studied CF4 that is used frequently for dielectric material etching in the industry. Advanced etch equipment was used for the above applications: the medium-density plasma tools (like Magnet-Enhanced Reactive Ion Etching (MERIE) tool) and the high-density plasma tools. By applying the Design of Experiments (DOE) method, we found the key factors needed to predict the trend of the etch process (such as how to increase the etch rates, selectivity, etc.; and how to control the stability of the etch process). We used JMP software to analyze the DOE data. The characterization of the

  13. Numerical simulation of the transient multiphase field during plasma deposition manufacturing composite materials

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    KONG FanRong; ZHANG HaiOu; WANG GuiLan

    2009-01-01

    A solid/liquid/gas unified model has been developed to investigate the gradient composition formation during the plasma deposition manufacturing (PDM) composite materials process. In this model, an enthalpy porosity model was applied to deal with the melting end solidification of the deposited layer, and a level-set approach was introduced to track the evolution of the free surface of the molten pool and the deposited layer. Moreover, complicated physical phenomena occurring at the liquid/gas inter-face, including forced convection heat loss, heat emission and plasma heat source, have been incor-porated into the governing equations by source terms. In this study, the numerical experiment of nickel base alloy powder deposited on the medium steel substrate by PDM technique was implemented based on the staggered grid and SlMPLEC algorithm. Concentration gradient distribution of the solute mate-rial at the composite material interface, fluid flow and temperature distribution in the molten pool and the deposited layer have been investigated in detail.

  14. Plasma Wall Interaction Phenomena on Tungsten Armour Materials for Fusion Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Uytdenhouwen, I. [SCK.CEN - The Belgian Nuclear Research Centre, Institute for Nuclear Materials Science, Boeretang 200, 2400 Mol (Belgium); Forschungszentrum Juelich GmbH, EURATOM-association, D-52425 Juelich (Germany); Department of Applied Physics, Ghent University, Rozier 44, 9000 Ghent (Belgium); Massaut, V. [Department of Applied Physics, Ghent University, Rozier 44, 9000 Ghent (Belgium); Linke, J. [Forschungszentrum Juelich GmbH, EURATOM-association, D-52425 Juelich (Germany); Van Oost, G. [Department of Applied Physics, Ghent University, Rozier 44, 9000 Ghent (Belgium)

    2008-07-01

    One of the most attractive future complements to present energy sources is nuclear fusion. A large progress was made throughout the last decade from both the physical as the technological area leading to the construction of the ITER machine. One of the key issues that recently received a large interest at international level is focused on the Plasma Wall Interaction (PWI). One of the promising Plasma Facing Materials (PFM) are Tungsten (W) and Tungsten alloys. However, despite the worldwide use and industrial availability of W, the database of physical and mechanical properties is very limited. Especially after fusion relevant neutron irradiation and PWI phenomena, most of the properties are still unknown. The plasma fuel consists out of deuterium (D) and tritium (T). Tritium is radio-active and therefore an issue from the safety point of view. During steady-state plasma operation of future fusion power plants, the PFM need to extract a power density of {approx}10-20 MW/m{sup 2}. On top of this heat, transient events will deposit an additional non-negligible amount of energy (Disruptions, Vertical Displacement Events, Edge Localized Modes) during short durations. These severe heat loads cause cracking and even melting of the surface resulting in a reduced lifetime and the creation of dust. A contribution to the understanding of cracking phenomena under the severe thermal loads is described as well as the properties degradation under neutron irradiation. Several W grades were irradiated in the BR2 reactor (SCK.CEN) and the thermal loads were simulated with the electron-beam facility JUDITH (FZJ). Since knowledge should be gained about the Tritium retention in the PFM for safety and licensing reasons, a unique test facility at SCK.CEN is being set-up. The plasmatron VISION-I will simulate steady state plasmas for Tritium retention studies. The formation of surface cracks and dust, the initial porosity, neutron induced traps, re-deposited material - change the Tritium

  15. US-Japan workshop Q-181 on high heat flux components and plasma-surface interactions for next devices: Proceedings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McGrath, R.T. [ed.] [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Yamashina, T. [ed.] [Hokkadio Univ. (Japan)

    1994-04-01

    This report contain viewgraphs of papers from the following sessions: plasma facing components issues for future machines; recent PMI results from several tokamaks; high heat flux technology; plasma facing components design and applications; plasma facing component materials and irradiation damage; boundary layer plasma; plasma disruptions; conditioning and tritium; and erosion/redeposition.

  16. Cryogenic Considerations for Superconducting Magnet Design for the Material Plasma Exposure eXperiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duckworth, Robert C [ORNL; Demko, Dr. Jonathan A [LeTourneau University, Texas; Lumsdaine, Arnold [ORNL; Caughman, John B [ORNL; Goulding, Richard Howell [ORNL; McGinnis, William Dean [ORNL; Bjorholm, Thomas P [ORNL; Rapp, Juergen [ORNL

    2015-01-01

    In order to determine long term performance of plasma facing components such as diverters and first walls for fusion devices, next generation plasma generators are needed. A Material Plasma Exposure eXperiment (MPEX) has been proposed to address this need through the generation of plasmas in front of the target with electron temperatures of 1-15 eV and electron densities of 1020 to 1021 m-3. Heat fluxes on target diverters could reach 20 MW/m2. In order generate this plasma, a unique radio frequency helicon source and heating of electrons and ions through Electron Bernstein Wave (EBW) and Ion Cyclotron Resonance Heating (ICRH) has been proposed. MPEX requires a series of magnets with non-uniform central fields up to 2 T over a 5m length in the heating and transport region and 1 T uniform central field over a 1-m length on a diameter of 1.3 m. Given the field requirements, superconducting magnets are under consideration for MPEX. In order to determine the best construction method for the magnets, the cryogenic refrigeration has been analyzed with respect to cooldown and operational performance criteria for open-cycle and closed-cycle systems, capital and operating costs of these system, and maturity of supporting technology such as cryocoolers. These systems will be compared within the context of commercially available magnet constructions to determine the most economical method for MPEX operation. The current state of the MPEX magnet design including details on possible superconducting magnet configurations will be presented.

  17. An in situ accelerator-based diagnostic for plasma-material interactions science on magnetic fusion devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartwig, Zachary S.; Barnard, Harold S.; Lanza, Richard C.; Sorbom, Brandon N.; Stahle, Peter W.; Whyte, Dennis G.

    2013-12-01

    This paper presents a novel particle accelerator-based diagnostic that nondestructively measures the evolution of material surface compositions inside magnetic fusion devices. The diagnostic's purpose is to contribute to an integrated understanding of plasma-material interactions in magnetic fusion, which is severely hindered by a dearth of in situ material surface diagnosis. The diagnostic aims to remotely generate isotopic concentration maps on a plasma shot-to-shot timescale that cover a large fraction of the plasma-facing surface inside of a magnetic fusion device without the need for vacuum breaks or physical access to the material surfaces. Our instrument uses a compact (˜1 m), high-current (˜1 milliamp) radio-frequency quadrupole accelerator to inject 0.9 MeV deuterons into the Alcator C-Mod tokamak at MIT. We control the tokamak magnetic fields - in between plasma shots - to steer the deuterons to material surfaces where the deuterons cause high-Q nuclear reactions with low-Z isotopes ˜5 μm into the material. The induced neutrons and gamma rays are measured with scintillation detectors; energy spectra analysis provides quantitative reconstruction of surface compositions. An overview of the diagnostic technique, known as accelerator-based in situ materials surveillance (AIMS), and the first AIMS diagnostic on the Alcator C-Mod tokamak is given. Experimental validation is shown to demonstrate that an optimized deuteron beam is injected into the tokamak, that low-Z isotopes such as deuterium and boron can be quantified on the material surfaces, and that magnetic steering provides access to different measurement locations. The first AIMS analysis, which measures the relative change in deuterium at a single surface location at the end of the Alcator C-Mod FY2012 plasma campaign, is also presented.

  18. Tribological Investigations of Hard-Faced Layers and Base Materials of Forging Dies with Different Kinds of Lubricants Applied

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Lazić

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper gives a procedure for choosing the right technology for reparative hard facing of damaged forging dies. Since they are subject to impact loads and cyclic temperature elevations, forging dies should be made of steel that is able to withstand great impact loads, maintain good mechanical properties at elevated temperatures and that is resistant to wear and thermal fatigue. For these reasons, forging dies are made of conditionally weldable alloy tool steels; however it makes hard facing of damaged tools even more difficult. In this paper, wear resistance of base materials, hard-faced layers and heat-affected zones are tribologically investigated when two different lubricants - pure synthetical oil LM 76 and LM 76 with 6% molybdenum disulfide (MoS2 are applied. Tribological investigations have shown that the wear resistance of the hard faced layers is considerably greater than the wear resistance of the base material. However, the base material has better properties concerning friction.

  19. Contribution to the beam plasma material interactions during material processing with TEA CO2 laser radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaschek, Rainer; Konrad, Peter E.; Mayerhofer, Roland; Bergmann, Hans W.; Bickel, Peter G.; Kowalewicz, Roland; Kuttenberger, Alfred; Christiansen, Jens

    1995-03-01

    The TEA-CO2-laser (transversely excited atmospheric pressure) is a tool for the pulsed processing of materials with peak power densities up to 1010 W/cm2 and a FWHM of 70 ns. The interaction between the laser beam, the surface of the work piece and the surrounding atmosphere as well as gas pressure and the formation of an induced plasma influences the response of the target. It was found that depending on the power density and the atmosphere the response can take two forms. (1) No target modification due to optical break through of the atmosphere and therefore shielding of the target (air pressure above 10 mbar, depending on the material). (2) Processing of materials (air pressure below 10 mbar, depending on the material) with melting of metallic surfaces (power density above 0.5 109 W/cm2), hole formation (power density of 5 109 W/cm2) and shock hardening (power density of 3.5 1010 W/cm2). All those phenomena are usually linked with the occurrence of laser supported combustion waves and laser supported detonation waves, respectively for which the mechanism is still not completely understood. The present paper shows how short time photography and spatial and temporal resolved spectroscopy can be used to better understand the various processes that occur during laser beam interaction. The spectra of titanium and aluminum are observed and correlated with the modification of the target. If the power density is high enough and the gas pressure above a material and gas composition specific threshold, the plasma radiation shows only spectral lines of the background atmosphere. If the gas pressure is below this threshold, a modification of the target surface (melting, evaporation and solid state transformation) with TEA-CO2- laser pulses is possible and the material specific spectra is observed. In some cases spatial and temporal resolved spectroscopy of a plasma allows the calculation of electron temperatures by comparison of two spectral lines.

  20. 3D imaging by serial block face scanning electron microscopy for materials science using ultramicrotomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashimoto, Teruo; Thompson, George E; Zhou, Xiaorong; Withers, Philip J

    2016-04-01

    Mechanical serial block face scanning electron microscopy (SBFSEM) has emerged as a means of obtaining three dimensional (3D) electron images over volumes much larger than possible by focused ion beam (FIB) serial sectioning and at higher spatial resolution than achievable with conventional X-ray computed tomography (CT). Such high resolution 3D electron images can be employed for precisely determining the shape, volume fraction, distribution and connectivity of important microstructural features. While soft (fixed or frozen) biological samples are particularly well suited for nanoscale sectioning using an ultramicrotome, the technique can also produce excellent 3D images at electron microscope resolution in a time and resource-efficient manner for engineering materials. Currently, a lack of appreciation of the capabilities of ultramicrotomy and the operational challenges associated with minimising artefacts for different materials is limiting its wider application to engineering materials. Consequently, this paper outlines the current state of the art for SBFSEM examining in detail how damage is introduced during slicing and highlighting strategies for minimising such damage. A particular focus of the study is the acquisition of 3D images for a variety of metallic and coated systems.

  1. New design aspects of cooling scheme for SST-1 plasma facing components

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paravastu, Yuvakiran, E-mail: pyuva@ipr.res.in; Khan, Ziauddin; Pradhan, Subrata

    2015-10-15

    Highlights: • SST-1 Tokamak PFCs were fabricated using graphite tiles embedded on CuCrZr and CuZr back plates. • PFC cooling is designed considering maximum heat load up to 0.6 MW/m{sup 2}. • Cooling scheme is such that the nucleate boiling will not occur. • The required mass flow rate and velocity for cooling water in each sub-connection are found to be 0.43 kg/s and 5.5 m/s for efficient heat extraction. • The header distribution scheme is modeled using AFT fathom which is in agreement to the required parameters with maximum 5% of deviation. - Abstract: PFC of SST-1 comprising of baffles, divertors and passive stabilizers have been designed and fabricated for a maximum heat load up to 1.0 MW/m{sup 2}. In operational condition, SST-1 divertors and passive stabilizers are expected to operate with a heat load of 0.6 and 0.25 MW/m{sup 2}, respectively. During plasma operation, the heat loads on PFC are required to be removed promptly and efficiently. Thereby the design of an efficient cooling scheme becomes extremely important for an efficient operation of PFC. PFCs are also baked up to 350 °C in order to remove absorbed moistures and other gases. 3D thermal analysis of PFC using ANSYS has been carried out to ensure its thermal stability. The cooling parameters have been calculated according to average incident flux on divertors and passive stabilizers. Engineering design demonstrated the required mass flow rate and velocity for cooling water in each sub-connection are optimized to be 0.43 kg/s and 5.5 m/s for efficient heat extraction under steady state heat load. Maximum temperature which PFC could be maintained is 355 °C and is well within threshold limits of material property degradation. The header distribution, modeled using AFT fathom, resulted for required parameters within maximum 5% of deviation.

  2. Development of a double plasma gun device for investigation of effects of vapor shielding on erosion of PFC materials under ELM-like pulsed plasma bombardment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakuma, I.; Iwamoto, D.; Kitagawa, Y.; Kikuchi, Y.; Fukumoto, N.; Nagata, M.

    2012-10-01

    It is considered that thermal transient events such as type I edge localized modes (ELMs) could limit the lifetime of plasma-facing components (PFCs) in ITER. We have investigated surface damage of tungsten (W) materials under transient heat and particle loads by using a magnetized coaxial plasma gun (MCPG) device at University of Hyogo. The capacitor bank energy for the plasma discharge is 144 kJ (2.88 mF, 10 kVmax). Surface melting of a W material was clearly observed at the energy density of ˜2 MJ/m2. It is known that surface melting and evaporation during a transient heat load could generate a vapor cloud layer in front of the target material [1]. Then, the subsequent erosion could be reduced by the vapor shielding effect. In this study, we introduce a new experiment using two MCPG devices (MCPG-1, 2) to understand vapor shielding effects of a W surface under ELM-like pulsed plasma bombardment. The capacitor bank energy of MCPG-2 is almost same as that of MCPG-1. The second plasmoid is applied with a variable delay time after the plasmoid produced by MCPG-1. Then, a vapor cloud layer could shield the second plasma load. To verify the vapor shielding effects, surface damage of a W material is investigated by changing the delay time. In the conference, the preliminary experimental results will be shown.[4pt] [1] A. Hassanein et al., J. Nucl. Mater. 390-391, pp. 777-780 (2009).

  3. Catalyst materials based on plasma-processed alumina nanopowder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dubencovs Konstantins

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available A platinum catalyst for glycerol oxidation by molecular oxygen has been developed applying the extractive-pyrolytic method and using, as a support, a fine alumina powder with an average particle size of 30-60 nm processed by plasma technology. The extractive-pyrolytic method (EPM allows affixing small amounts of catalytic metals (1-5% with the particle size ranging from several nanometers to several tens of nanometers onto the surface of the support. The prepared material - 4.8 wt. % platinum on nano-sized alumina - can be used as a catalyst for glycerol oxidation by oxygen with conversion up to 84%, in order to produce some organic acids (glyceric and lactic acid with a selectivity of about 60%.

  4. POD analysis of flow over a backward-facing step forced by right-angle-shaped plasma actuator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Bin; Li, Huaxing

    2016-01-01

    This study aims to present flow control over the backward-facing step with specially designed right-angle-shaped plasma actuator and analyzed the influence of various scales of flow structures on the Reynolds stress through snapshot proper orthogonal decomposition (POD). 2D particle image velocimetry measurements were conducted on region (x/h = 0-2.25) and reattachment zone in the x-y plane over the backward-facing step at a Reynolds number of Re h  = 27,766 (based on step height [Formula: see text] and free stream velocity [Formula: see text]. The separated shear layer was excited by specially designed right-angle-shaped plasma actuator under the normalized excitation frequency St h  ≈ 0.345 along the 45° direction. The spatial distribution of each Reynolds stress component was reconstructed using an increasing number of POD modes. The POD analysis indicated that the flow dynamic downstream of the step was dominated by large-scale flow structures, which contributed to streamwise Reynolds stress and Reynolds shear stress. The intense Reynolds stress localized to a narrow strip within the shear layer was mainly affected by small-scale flow structures, which were responsible for the recovery of the Reynolds stress peak. With plasma excitation, a significant increase was obtained in the vertical Reynolds stress peak. Under the dimensionless frequencies St h  ≈ 0.345 and [Formula: see text] which are based on the step height and momentum thickness, the effectiveness of the flow control forced by the plasma actuator along the 45° direction was ordinary. Only the vertical Reynolds stress was significantly affected.

  5. Discussion on electromagnetic crack face boundary conditions for the fracture mechanics of magneto-electro-elastic materials

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Baolin Wang; Jiecai Han

    2006-01-01

    This paper discusses electromagnetic boundary conditions on crack faces in magneto-electroelastic materials, where piezoelectric, piezomagnetic and magnetoelectric effects are coupled. A notch of finite thickness in these materials is also addressed. Four idealized electromagnetic boundary conditions assumed for the crack-faces are separately investigated, I.e.(a) electrically and magnetically impermeable(crack-face).(b) electrically impermeable and magnetically permeable,(C)electrically permeable and magnetically impermeable, and(d)electrically and magnetically permeable. The influence of the notch thickness on important parameters, such as the field intensity factors, the energy release rate at the notch tips and the electromagnetic fields inside the notch, are studied and the results are obtained in closed-form. Results under different idealized electromagnetic boundary conditions on the crack-face are compared, and the applicability of these idealized assumptions is discussed.

  6. Thermal plasma processed ferro-magnetically ordered face-centered cubic iron at room temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raut, Suyog A.; Kanhe, Nilesh S.; Bhoraskar, S. V.; Das, A. K.; Mathe, V. L.

    2014-10-01

    Here, we report tailor made phase of iron nanoparticles using homogeneous gas phase condensation process via thermal plasma route. It was observed that crystal lattice of nano-crystalline iron changes as a function of operating parameters of the plasma reactor. In the present investigation iron nanoparticles have been synthesized in presence of argon at operating pressures of 125-1000 Torr and fixed plasma input DC power of 6 kW. It was possible to obtain pure fcc, pure bcc as well as the mixed phases for iron nanoparticles in powder form as a function of operating pressure. The as synthesized product was characterized for understanding the structural and magnetic properties by using X-ray diffraction, vibrating sample magnetometer, and Mössbauer spectroscopy. The data reveal that fcc phase is ferromagnetically ordered with high spin state, which is unusual whereas bcc phase is found to be ferromagnetic as usual. Finally, the structural and magnetic properties are co-related.

  7. Application of plasma technology for the modification of polymer and textile materials

    OpenAIRE

    Radetić Maja M.; Petrović Zoran Lj.

    2004-01-01

    Plasma treatment is based on the physico-chemical changes of the material surface and as an ecologically and economically acceptable process it can be an attractive alternative to conventional modifications. The possibilities of plasma technology application to the modification of polymer and textile materials are discussed. Different specific properties of the material can be achieved by plasma cleaning, etching, functionalization or polymerization. The final effects are strongly influenced ...

  8. Examination of material performance of W exposed to high heat load: Postmortem analysis of W exposed to TEXTOR plasma and E-beam test stand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanabe, T.; Philipps, V.; Nakamura, K.; Fujine, M.; Ueda, Y.; Wada, M.; Schweer, B.; Pospieszczyk, A.; Unterberg, B.

    1997-02-01

    We have examined the behavior of high Z limiters exposed to TEXTOR edge plasma and found that under certain conditions high Z materials are compatible with plasmas. In high density Ohmic plasmas the accumulation of a high Z impurity in the plasma center with significant radiation is observed, whereas an auxiliary heating like NBI and ICRH enhances the impurity exhaust with saw tooth activity. For a practical use of high Z plasma facing materials, extremely high heat load from the plasma becomes a serious concern. In the present work we have conducted the high heat load tests of tungsten (W) using two different heat sources, one is the W limiter exposed to TEXTOR plasma and the other is various W samples heat loaded with an intense E-beam using the JEBIS facility in Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI). From the test results we have to conclude that W, if applied in the form of the bulk material, should be used above the ductile brittle transition temperature (DBTT) but below about 1500°C to avoid the recrystallization. Maximum heat load tolerable without surface melting is about 20 MW/m 2 for several seconds. The monocrystalline used at high temperatures shows very good performance, though the production of the monocrystalline with a desired shape is not easy. Considering its brittle nature, hard machining and heavy mass, bulk W cannot be a structure material but be used as a thin tile or deposited film on some structure materials. Unfortunately, however, the thermal expansion coefficient of W is so small that brazing of W to a heat sink material like Cu which has a much larger thermal expansion coefficient would easily result in cracking due to the large thermal stress. Thus the development of tungsten plasma facing component (PFC) needs much effort in future.

  9. Materials Analysis of Transient Plasma-Wall Interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-05-13

    model showing the importance sputter and re-deposition. plasma, pulsed plasma, directed energy, transient wall interaction, high energy density...each equipped with a 25kV copper- vapor thyratron start switch capable of sub-microsecond triggering resolution. Each start switch is paired with a...sample exposure positions within the plasma jet. The probe utilizes a PCB Piezotronics model 113B21 pressure sensor modified to work in the plasma jet

  10. Combustion and Plasma Synthesis of High-Temperature Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munir, Z. A.; Holt, J. B.

    1997-04-01

    KEYNOTE ADDRESS. Self-Propagating High-Temperature Synthesis: Twenty Years of Search and Findings (A. Merzhanov). SOLID-STATE COMBUSTION SYNTHESIS. Recent Progress in Combustion Synthesis of High-Performance Materials in Japan (M. Koizumi & Y. Miyamoto). Modeling and Numerical Computation of a Nonsteady SHS Process (A. Bayliss & B. Matkowsky). New Models of Quasiperiodic Burning in Combustion Synthesis (S. Margolis, et al.). Modeling of SHS Operations (V. Hlavacek, et al.). Combustion Theory for Sandwiches of Alloyable Materials (R. Armstrong & M. Koszykowski). Observations on the Combustion Reaction Between Thin Foils of Ni and Al (U. Anselmi-Tamburini & Z. Munir). Combustion Synthesis of Intermetallic Compounds (Y. Kaieda, et al.). Combustion Synthesis of Nickel Aluminides (B. Rabin, et al.). Self-Propagating High-Temperature Synthesis of NiTi Intermetallics (H. Yi & J. Moore). Shock-Induced Chemical Synthesis of Intermetallic Compounds (S. Work, et al.). Advanced Ceramics Via SHS (T. DeAngelis & D. Weiss). In-Situ Formation of SiC and SiC-C Blocked Solids by Self-Combustion Synthesis (S. Ikeda, et al.). Powder Purity and Morphology Effects in Combustion-Synthesis Reactions (L. Kecskes, et al.). Simultaneous Synthesis and Densification of Ceramic Components Under Gas Pressure by SHS (Y. Miyamoto & M. Koizumi). The Use of Self-Propagating High-Temperature Synthesis of High-Density Titanium Diboride (P. Zavitsanos, et al.). Metal--Ceramic Composite Pipes Produced by a Centrifugal-Thermit Process (O. Odawara). Simultaneous Combustion Synthesis and Densification of AIN (S. Dunmead, et al.). Fabrication of a Functionally Gradient Material by Using a Self-Propagating Reaction Process (N. Sata, et al.). Combustion Synthesis of Oxide-Carbide Composites (L. Wang, et al.). Heterogeneous Reaction Mechanisms in the Si-C System Under Conditions of Solid Combustion (R. Pampuch, et al.). Experimental Modeling of Particle-Particle Interactions During SHS of TiB2 -Al2O3 (K. Logan

  11. On thermionic emission from plasma-facing components in tokamak-relevant conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komm, M.; Ratynskaia, S.; Tolias, P.; Cavalier, J.; Dejarnac, R.; Gunn, J. P.; Podolnik, A.

    2017-09-01

    The first results of particle-in-cell simulations of the electrostatic sheath and magnetic pre-sheath of thermionically emitting planar tungsten surfaces in fusion plasmas are presented. Plasma conditions during edge localized modes (ELMs) and during inter-ELM periods have been considered for various inclinations of the magnetic field and for selected surface temperatures. All runs have been performed under two assumptions for the sheath potential drop; fixed or floating. The primary focus lies on the evaluation of the escaping thermionic current and the quantification of the suppression due to the combined effects of space-charge and Larmor gyration. When applicable, the results are compared with the predictions of analytical models. The heat balance in the presence of thermionic emission as well as the contribution of the escaping thermionic current to surface cooling are also investigated. Regimes are identified where emission needs to be considered in the energy budget.

  12. Thermal plasma processed ferro-magnetically ordered face-centered cubic iron at room temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raut, Suyog A.; Kanhe, Nilesh S.; Bhoraskar, S. V.; Mathe, V. L., E-mail: vlmathe@physics.unipune.ac.in [Department of Physics, Savitribai Phule Pune University, Pune 411007 (India); Das, A. K. [Laser and Plasma Technology Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Trombay, Mumbai 400085 (India)

    2014-10-28

    Here, we report tailor made phase of iron nanoparticles using homogeneous gas phase condensation process via thermal plasma route. It was observed that crystal lattice of nano-crystalline iron changes as a function of operating parameters of the plasma reactor. In the present investigation iron nanoparticles have been synthesized in presence of argon at operating pressures of 125–1000 Torr and fixed plasma input DC power of 6 kW. It was possible to obtain pure fcc, pure bcc as well as the mixed phases for iron nanoparticles in powder form as a function of operating pressure. The as synthesized product was characterized for understanding the structural and magnetic properties by using X-ray diffraction, vibrating sample magnetometer, and Mössbauer spectroscopy. The data reveal that fcc phase is ferromagnetically ordered with high spin state, which is unusual whereas bcc phase is found to be ferromagnetic as usual. Finally, the structural and magnetic properties are co-related.

  13. Ablation-erosion analyses of various fusion material surfaces and developments of surface erosion monitors for notification of fusion chamber maintenance times, as an example: Visible light transparent SiC and up-conversion phosphors applied to plasma facing surface structures, useful for versatile purposes to protect and diagnose fusion chambers and so on

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasuya, K.; Motokoshi, S.; Taniguchi, S.; Nakai, M.; Tokunaga, K.; Kolacek, K.; Schmidt, J.; Frolov, O.; Straus, J.; Matejicek, J.; Choukourov, A.

    2017-01-01

    Two kinds of pulsed lasers in Japan and Czech Republic were used to irradiate various sample materials to investigate the surface erosion thresholds under very hazardous environments including nuclear fusion chambers. The first was ArF laser in ILT and the second was XUV laser in IPP. These data were in-cooperated with our former data to build up our material strength data for our succeeding applications of various materials to a variety of fields. As an example, we proposed surface erosion monitors to notice the fusion chamber maintenance times with which the facilities can be protected from the collapses under very severe operation conditions. These kinds of monitors are expected to be useful for future different kinds of mechanical structures not only for the fusion chambers but also various chambers for many purposes. Special upconversion phosphors are also newly proposed to be used as the candidate materials to measure the thermal inputs onto the front surfaces of the armor structures. Optical transparent SiC was also newly tested to enrich our data base for our future diagnostic and protection possibilities.

  14. Properties of Atmospheric Pressure Ar Plasma Jet Depending on Treated Dielectric Material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prysiazhnyi, Vadym; Ricci Castro, Alonso H.; Kostov, Konstantin G.

    2017-02-01

    Atmospheric pressure plasma jet operated in argon was utilized to modify surfaces of glass, acrylic, and PTFE dielectrics. This paper describes the influence of the dielectric substrate on operation and properties of plasma. Two modes of operation (each of those have two patterns) were described. The transition from one mode to another, values of the dissipated power, and spreading of plasma over the dielectric surfaces strongly depended on the substrate material. Additionally, three methods of plasma spreading estimation were presented and discussed.

  15. Removal of carbon and nanoparticles from lithographic materials by plasma assisted cleaning by metastable atom neutralization (PACMAN)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lytle, W. M.; Lofgren, R. E.; Surla, V.; Neumann, M. J.; Ruzic, D. N.

    2010-04-01

    System cleanliness is a major issue facing the lithographic community as the prospects of integrating EUV lithography into integrated circuit manufacturing progress. Mask cleanliness, especially of particles in the sub-micron range, remains an issue for the implementation of EUV lithography since traditional mask cleaning processes are limited in their ability to remove nanometer scale contaminants. The result is lower wafer throughput due to errors in pattern transfer to the wafer from the particulate defects on the mask. Additionally, carbon contamination and growth on the collector optics due to energetic photon interactions degrade the mirror and shortens its functional life. Plasma cleaning of surfaces has been used for a variety of applications in the past, and now is being extended to cleaning surfaces for EUV, specifically the mask and collector optics, through a process developed in the Center for Plasma-Material Interactions (CPMI) called Plasma Assisted Cleaning by Metastable Atom Neutralization (PACMAN). This process uses energetic neutral atoms (metastables) in addition to a high-density plasma (Te ~ 3 eV and ne ~ 1017 m-3) to remove particles. The PACMAN process is a completely dry process and is carried out in a vacuum which makes it compatible with other EUV related processing steps. Experiments carried out on cleaning polystyrene latex (PSL) nanoparticles (30 nm to 500 nm) on silicon wafers, chrome coated mask blanks, and EUV mask blanks result in 100 % particle removal with a helium plasma and helium metastables. Removal rates greater than 20 nm/min have been achieved for PSL material. Similar removal rates have been achieved for the PACMAN cleaning of carbon from silicon wafers (simulating collector optic material) with 100% removal with helium plasma and helium metastables. The PACMAN cleaning technique has not caused any damage to the substrate type being cleaned either through roughening or surface sputtering. Current results of cleaning

  16. NIFS joint research meeting on plasma facing components, PSI, and heat/particle control

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamashina, T. [Hokkaido Univ., Sapporo (Japan)

    1997-10-01

    The LHD collaboration has been started in 1996. Particle and heat control is one of the categories for the collaboration, and a few programs have been nominated in these two years. A joint research meeting on PFC, PSI, heat and particle meeting was held at NIFS on June 27, 1997, in which present status of these programs were reported. This is a collection of the notes and view graphs presented in this meeting. Brief reviews and research plan of each program are included in relation to divertor erosion and sputtering, impurity generation, hydrogen recycling, edge plasma structure, edge transport and its control, heat removal, particle exhaust, wall conditioning etc. (author)

  17. Surface modifications of fusion reactor relevant materials on exposure to fusion grade plasma in plasma focus device

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Niranjan, Ram, E-mail: niranjan@barc.gov.in [Applied Physics Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai 400085 (India); Rout, R.K.; Srivastava, R. [Applied Physics Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai 400085 (India); Chakravarthy, Y. [Laser and Plasma Technology Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai 400085 (India); Mishra, P. [Materials Processing Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai 400085 (India); Kaushik, T.C.; Gupta, Satish C. [Applied Physics Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai 400085 (India)

    2015-11-15

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Exposure of materials (W, Ni, SS, Mo and Cu) to fusion plasma in a plasma focus device. • The erosion and the formations of blisters, pores, craters, micro-cracks after irradiation. • The structural phase transformation in the SS sample after irradiation. • The surface layer alloying of the samples with the plasma focus anode material. - Abstract: An 11.5 kJ plasma focus (PF) device was used here to irradiate materials with fusion grade plasma. The surface modifications of different materials (W, Ni, stainless steel, Mo and Cu) were investigated using various available techniques. The prominent features observed through the scanning electron microscope on the sample surfaces were erosions, cracks, blisters and craters after irradiations. The surface roughness of the samples increased multifold after exposure as measured by the surface profilometer. The X-ray diffraction analysis indicated the changes in the microstructures and the structural phase transformation in surface layers of the samples. We observed change in volumes of austenite and ferrite phases in the stainless steel sample. The energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopic analysis suggested alloying of the surface layer of the samples with elements of the PF anode. We report here the comparative analysis of the surface damages of materials with different physical, thermal and mechanical properties. The investigations will be useful to understand the behavior of the perspective materials for future fusion reactors (either in pure form or in alloy) over the long operations.

  18. Development of non-thermal atmospheric pressure plasma system for surface modification of polymeric materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasih, T. P.

    2017-04-01

    Non-thermal plasma has become one of the new technologies which are highly developed now days. This happens because the cold plasma using the principle of generated reactive gases that have the ability to modify the surface properties of a material or product without changing the original characteristics of the material. The purpose of this study is to develop a cold plasma system that operates at atmospheric pressure and investigates the effect of cold plasma treatment to change the surface characteristics of the polymer material polyethylene (PE) at various time conditions. We are successfully developing a non-thermal plasma system that can operate at atmospheric pressure and can be run with Helium or Argon gas. The characteristics of plasma will be discussed from the view of its electrical property, plasma discharge regime andoperation temperature. Experiment results on plasma treatment on PE material shows the changes of surface properties of originally hydrophobic material PE becomes hydrophilic by only few seconds of plasma treatment and level of hydrophilicity become greater with increasing duration of plasma treatment. Confirmation of this is shown by the measurement of contact angle of droplets of water on the surface of PE are getting smaller.

  19. Compatibility of lithium plasma-facing surfaces with high edge temperatures in the Lithium Tokamak Experiment (LTX)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majeski, Dick

    2016-10-01

    High edge electron temperatures (200 eV or greater) have been measured at the wall-limited plasma boundary in the Lithium Tokamak eXperiment (LTX). High edge temperatures, with flat electron temperature profiles, are a long-predicted consequence of low recycling boundary conditions. The temperature profile in LTX, measured by Thomson scattering, varies by as little as 10% from the plasma axis to the boundary, determined by the lithium-coated high field-side wall. The hydrogen plasma density in the outer scrape-off layer is very low, 2-3 x 1017 m-3 , consistent with a low recycling metallic lithium boundary. The plasma surface interaction in LTX is characterized by a low flux of high energy protons to the lithium PFC, with an estimated Debye sheath potential approaching 1 kV. Plasma-material interactions in LTX are consequently in a novel regime, where the impacting proton energy exceeds the peak in the sputtering yield for the lithium wall. In this regime, further increases in the edge temperature will decrease, rather than increase, the sputtering yield. Despite the high edge temperature, the core impurity content is low. Zeff is 1.2 - 1.5, with a very modest contribution (Gas puffing is used to increase the plasma density. After gas injection stops, the discharge density is allowed to drop, and the edge is pumped by the low recycling lithium wall. An upgrade to LTX which includes a 35A, 20 kV neutral beam injector to provide core fueling to maintain constant density, as well as auxiliary heating, is underway. Two beam systems have been loaned to LTX by Tri Alpha Energy. Additional results from LTX, as well as progress on the upgrade - LTX- β - will be discussed. Work supported by US DOE contracts DE-AC02-09CH11466 and DE-AC05-00OR22725.

  20. Nova tocha de plasma híbrida para o processamento de materiais New hybrid plasma torch for materials processing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard Thomas Lermen

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available O principal objetivo deste artigo foi apresentar um novo dispositivo para o processamento de materiais. Ele consiste em uma tocha de plasma híbrida, a qual é caracterizada pela formação simultânea de dois arcos plasma em apenas um dispositivo, gerando jato (de plasma com elevada densidade de energia. A tocha foi submetida aos seguintes testes experimentais: de funcionamento para verificar possíveis problemas de projeto e seus limites de operação; de caracterização, consistindo em determinar o comprimento do jato de plasma; de sua viabilidade para processamento de materiais (soldagem e corte. Com base nestes testes iniciais, alguns problemas de isolamento elétrico e térmico foram encontrados e resolvidos. Quanto aos resultados dos testes de caracterização, os parâmetros de funcionamento da tocha de plasma híbrida apresentaram influência significativa sobre o comprimento do jato de plasma. Os resultados obtidos nos testes de processamento de materiais foram satisfatórios, ou seja, é possível realizar soldagem e corte com esta tocha de plasma híbrida.The main aim of this paper was to present a new device for materials processing. It consist of a hybrid plasma torch which is characterized by the simultaneous formation of two plasma arcs in one device only, generating a (plasma jet with high energy density. The torch was submitted to the following trials: of operation to identify possible design problems and its operational torch limits; of characterization, consisting in plasma jet length determination; and of viability for materials processing (welding and cutting. Based on these initial trials, some electrical and thermal insulation problems were found and solved. Concerning the results of the characterization trials, the hybrid plasma torch parameters had a significant influence over the plasma jet length. The results obtained in the materials processing trials were satisfactory, i.e., it is possible to carry out welding and

  1. Dynamics of plasma expansion in the pulsed laser material interaction

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    N Kumar; S Dash; A K Tyagi; Baldev Raj

    2010-08-01

    A pulse Nd: YAG laser with pulse duration 5–10 ns, beam radius at focal point 0·2–0·4 mm, wavelengths 1064 nm, 532 nm and 238 nm with linearly polarized radiation and Gaussian beam profile, was impacted on a thin foil of titanium metal for generating plasma plume. Numerically, the above parameters were linked with average kinetic energy of the electrons and ions in the laser-induced plasma. In the present model, electrons having higher velocities are assumed to escape from plasma, that forms a negatively charged sheath around the plasma. It is seen from present computations that the forward directed nature of the laser evaporation process results from the anisotropic expansion velocities associated with different species. These velocities are mainly controlled by the initial dimension of the expanding plasma. An attempt was undertaken to estimate the length of the plume at different ambient gas pressures using an adiabatic expansion model. The rate of the plasma expansion for various Ar+ ion energies was derived from numerical calculations. A numerical definition of this plasma includes events like collisional/radiative, excitation/de-excitation and ionization/recombination processes involving multiples of energy levels with several ionization stages. Finally, based on a kinetic model, the plasma expansion rate across the laser beam axis was investigated.

  2. Understanding anisotropic plasma etching of two-dimensional polystyrene opals for advanced materials fabrication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akinoglu, Eser M; Morfa, Anthony J; Giersig, Michael

    2014-10-21

    Anisotropic deformation of polystyrene particles in an oxygenated (O2/Ar) plasma is observed for radio frequency (rf) plasma and inductively coupled plasma (ICP). A facile model based on a ratio of completely isotropic and completely anisotropic etching is presented to describe the anisotropy of the etching process and is implemented to determine the height of the spheroid-shaped polystyrene particles. In our systems, we find the plasma etching to be 54% isotropic in the rf plasma and 79% isotropic in the ICP. With this model, the maximum material deposition thickness for nanofabrication with plasma-etched nanosphere lithography or colloid lithography can be predicted. Moreover, the etching of polystyrene particles in an oxygenated plasma is investigated versus the etching time, gas flow, gas composition, temperature, substrate material, and particle size. The results of this study allow precise shape tuning during the fabrication of nanostructured surfaces with size-dependent properties for bionic, medical, and photonic applications.

  3. Application of plasma technology for the modification of polymer and textile materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Radetić Maja M.

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Plasma treatment is based on the physico-chemical changes of the material surface and as an ecologically and economically acceptable process it can be an attractive alternative to conventional modifications. The possibilities of plasma technology application to the modification of polymer and textile materials are discussed. Different specific properties of the material can be achieved by plasma cleaning, etching, functionalization or polymerization. The final effects are strongly influenced by the treatment parameters (treatment time, pressure, power, gas flow, the applied gas and nature of the material. The plasma treatment of polymers is predominantly focused on cleaning and activation of the surfaces to increase adhesion, binding, wettability, dye ability and printability. Current studies deal more with plasma polymerization where an ultra thin film of plasma polymer is deposited on the material surface and, depending on the applied monomer, different specific properties can be obtained (i.e. chemical and thermal resistance, abrasion resistance, antireflexion, water repellence, etc.. Plasma application to textiles is mostly oriented toward wool and synthetic fibres, though some studies also consider cotton, hemp, flax and silk. The main goal of plasma treatment is to impart a more hydrophilic fibre surface and accordingly increase wettability, dye ability, printability and particularly, shrink resistance in the case of wool. Recent studies have favored technical textiles, where plasma polymerization can offer a wide range of opportunities.

  4. Achieving atomistic control in materials processing by plasma-surface interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Jeffrey; Chang, Jane P.

    2017-06-01

    The continuous down-scaling of electronic devices and the introduction of functionally improved novel materials require a greater atomic level controllability in the synthesis and patterning of thin film materials, especially with regards to deposition uniformity and conformality as well as etching selectivity and anisotropy. The richness of plasma chemistry and the corresponding plasma-surface interactions provide the much needed processing flexibility and efficacy. To achieve the integration of the novel materials into devices, plasma-enhanced atomic layer processing techniques are emerging as the enabling factors to obtain atomic scale control of complex materials and nanostructures. This review focuses on an overview of the role of respective plasma species involved in plasma-surface interactions, addressing their respective and synergistic effects, which is followed by two distinct applications: plasma-enhanced atomic layer deposition (ALD) and atomic layer etching (ALE). For plasma-enhanced ALD, this review emphasizes the use of plasma chemistry to enable alternative pathways to synthesize complex materials at low temperatures and the challenges associated with deposition conformality. For plasma enabled ALE processes, the review focuses on the surface-specific chemical reactions needed to achieve desirable selectivity and anisotropy.

  5. Non-boronized compared with boronized operation of ASDEX Upgrade with full-tungsten plasma facing components

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kallenbach, A.; Dux, R.; Mayer, M.; Neu, R.; Pütterich, T.; Bobkov, V.; Fuchs, J. C.; Eich, T.; Giannone, L.; Gruber, O.; Herrmann, A.; Horton, L. D.; Maggi, C. F.; Meister, H.; Müller, H. W.; Rohde, V.; Sips, A.; Stäbler, A.; Stober, J.; ASDEX Upgrade Team

    2009-04-01

    After completion of the tungsten coating of all plasma facing components, ASDEX Upgrade has been operated without boronization for 1 1/2 experimental campaigns. This has allowed the study of fuel retention under conditions of relatively low D co-deposition with low-Z impurities as well as the operational space of a full-tungsten device for the unfavourable condition of a relatively high intrinsic impurity level. Restrictions in operation were caused by the central accumulation of tungsten in combination with density peaking, resulting in H-L backtransitions induced by too low separatrix power flux. Most important control parameters have been found to be the central heating power, as delivered predominantly by ECRH, and the ELM frequency, most easily controlled by gas puffing. Generally, ELMs exhibit a positive impact, with the effect of impurity flushing out of the pedestal region overbalancing the ELM-induced W source. The restrictions of plasma operation in the unboronized W machine occurred predominantly under low or medium power conditions. Under medium-high power conditions, stable operation with virtually no difference between boronized and unboronized discharges was achieved. Due to the reduced intrinsic radiation with boronization and the limited power handling capability of VPS coated divertor tiles (≈10 MW m-2), boronized operation at high heating powers was possible only with radiative cooling. To enable this, a previously developed feedback system using (thermo-)electric current measurements as approximate sensor for the divertor power flux was introduced into the standard AUG operation. To avoid the problems with reduced ELM frequency due to core plasma radiation, nitrogen was selected as radiating species since its radiative characteristic peaks at lower electron temperatures in comparison with Ne and Ar, favouring SOL and divertor radiative losses. Nitrogen seeding resulted not only in the desired divertor power load reduction but also in improved

  6. Thermodynamics estimation of copper plasma efficiency from secondary raw material

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Віктор Сергійович Козьмін

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The results of the thermodynamic evaluation of oxidative plasma copper refining efficiency recycled from impurities present in the feedstock are shown. It was established that the type of impurity factor increasing the efficiency of the plasma refining the potential change of Gibbs varies from 1,4 to 4, 8, and for silver, and of gold there is a transition from an unlikely to real positive state. 

  7. Development of an original active thermography method adapted to ITER plasma facing components control

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Durocher, A.; Vignal, N.; Escourbiac, F.; Farjon, J.L.; Schlosser, J. [CEA Cadarache, Dept. de Recherches sur la Fusion Controlee, 13 - Saint-Paul-lez-Durance (France); Cismondi, F. [Toulon Univ., 83 - La Garde (France)

    2004-07-01

    Among all Non-Destructive Examinations (NDE), active infrared thermography is becoming recognised as a technique available today for improving quality control of many materials and structures involved in heat transfer. The infrared thermography allows to characterise the bond between two materials having different thermal physical properties. In order to increase the defect detection limit of the SATIR test bed, several possibilities have been evaluated to improve the infrared thermography inspection. The implementation in 2003 of a micro-bolometer camera and the improving of the thermo-signal process allowed to increase considerably the detection sensitivity of the SATIR facility. The quality, the spatial stability of infrared image and the detection of edge defect have been also improved. The coupling on the same test bed of SATIR method with a lock-in thermography will be evaluated in this paper. An improvement of the global reliability is expected by data merging produced by the two thermal excitation sources. A new enhanced facility named SATIRPACA has been designed for the full Non Destructive Examination of the High Heat Flux ITER components taking into account these main improvements. These systematic acceptance tests obviously need tools for quality control of critical parts. (authors)

  8. The right circular polarized waves in the three-dimensional anisotropic dispersive photonic crystals consisting of the magnetized plasma and uniaxial material as the Faraday effects considered

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Hai-Feng, E-mail: hanlor@163.com, E-mail: lsb@nuaa.edu.cn [Key Laboratory of Radar Imaging and Microwave Photonics (Nanjing Univ. Aeronaut. Astronaut.), Ministry of Education, Nanjing University of Aeronautics and Astronautics, Nanjing 210016 (China); Nanjing Artillery Academy, Nanjing 211132 (China); Liu, Shao-Bin, E-mail: hanlor@163.com, E-mail: lsb@nuaa.edu.cn; Tang, Yi-Jun [Key Laboratory of Radar Imaging and Microwave Photonics (Nanjing Univ. Aeronaut. Astronaut.), Ministry of Education, Nanjing University of Aeronautics and Astronautics, Nanjing 210016 (China); Zhen, Jian-Ping [Nanjing Artillery Academy, Nanjing 211132 (China)

    2014-03-15

    In this paper, the properties of the right circular polarized (RCP) waves in the three-dimensional (3D) dispersive photonic crystals (PCs) consisting of the magnetized plasma and uniaxial material with face-centered-cubic (fcc) lattices are theoretically investigated by the plane wave expansion method, which the homogeneous anisotropic dielectric spheres (the uniaxial material) immersed in the magnetized plasma background, as the Faraday effects of magnetized plasma are considered (the incidence electromagnetic wave vector is parallel to the external magnetic field at any time). The equations for calculating the anisotropic photonic band gaps (PBGs) for the RCP waves in the first irreducible Brillouin zone are theoretically deduced. The anisotropic PBGs and a flatbands region can be obtained. The effects of the ordinary-refractive index, extraordinary-refractive index, anisotropic dielectric filling factor, plasma frequency, and plasma cyclotron frequency (the external magnetic field) on the properties of first two anisotropic PBGs for the RCP waves are investigated in detail, respectively. The numerical results show that the anisotropy can open partial band gaps in fcc lattices at U and W points, and the complete PBGs for the RCP waves can be achieved compared to the conventional 3D dispersive PCs composed of the magnetized plasma and isotropic material. It is also shown that the first two anisotropic PBGs can be tuned by those parameters as mentioned above. Those PBGs can be enlarged by introducing the uniaxial material into such 3D PCs as the Faraday effects are considered.

  9. Arc erosion of full metal plasma facing components at the inner baffle region of ASDEX Upgrade

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Rohde

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available At the inner baffle of the AUG divertor massive polished inserts of tungsten and P92 steel were installed to measure the erosion by arcing. For tungsten most of the traces are less than 0.4µm deep and a similar amount of tungsten is deposited close to the traces. Few craters up to 4µm resulting in an average erosion rate of 2×1013 at cm−2s−1 are observed. The behaviour for P92 steel is quite different: most of the traces are 4µm deep, up to 80µm were observed. An average erosion rate of 400×1013 at cm−2s−1, i.e. more than a factor of hundred higher compared to tungsten, is found. Therefore, erosion by arcing has to be taken into account to determine the optimal material mix for future fusion devices.

  10. Materials for Fusion Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiří Matějíček

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available An overview of materials foreseen for use or already used in fusion devices is given. The operating conditions, material requirements and characteristics of candidate materials in several specific application segments are briefly reviewed. These include: construction materials, electrical insulation, permeation barriers and plasma facing components. Special attention will be paid to the latter and to the issues of plasma-material interaction, materials joining and fuctionally graded interlayers.

  11. Synthesis by plasma of polymer-metal materials; Sintesis por plasma de materiales polimero-metal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fernandez R, G

    2004-07-01

    The objective of this work is the design of an experimental set-up to synthesize polymer- metal composites by plasma with versatility in the conditions of synthesis. The main components are a vacuum system capable to reach up to 10{sup -2} mbar and valves and accessories to control the pressure in the system. In order to generate the electrical discharges and the plasma, an electrical circuit with an inductive connection at 13.56 MHz of frequency was constructed. The electric field partially ionizes the reactor atmosphere where the polymer-metal composites were synthesized. The reactor has two metallic electrodes, one in front of the other, where the particles electrically charged collide against the electrodes producing ablation on them. The polymer-metal composites were synthesized by means of an inductive connection at 13.56 MHz. Aniline, 3-chlorine-ethylene and electrodes of silver (Ag) and copper (Cu) were used in a cylindrical reactor coupled with an external coil to generate glow discharges. The average pressures were 6.15 X 10{sup -1} and 5.2 X 10{sup -1} mbar for the synthesis of Poly aniline (P An) and Poly chloroethylene (PE-CI), respectively. The synthesis was performed during 60 and 180 minutes for P An and PE-CI, respectively. The polymers were formed, as films, with an average thickness of 6.42 {mu}m for P An and, in the case of PE-CI, with an approximately growing rate of 14 {eta}m/W. The power in the syntheses was 30, 50, 70 and 90 W for P An and 50, 100, 120, 140 170, and 200 W for PE-CI. The characterization of the polymer-metal composites was done by energy dispersive spectroscopy to study the composition and the relation of the elements involved in the synthesis. The morphology of the films was studied by means of scanning electron microscopy. The infrared analysis (IR) was done to study the chemicals bonds and the structure of these polymers. Another important study in these materials was the behavior of the electrical conductivity ({sigma

  12. Theory and experiments characterizing hypervelocity impact plasmas on biased spacecraft materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Nicolas; Close, Sigrid; Goel, Ashish; Lauben, David; Linscott, Ivan; Johnson, Theresa; Strauss, David; Bugiel, Sebastian; Mocker, Anna; Srama, Ralf

    2013-03-01

    Space weather including solar activity and background plasma sets up spacecraft conditions that can magnify the threat from hypervelocity impacts. Hypervelocity impactors include both meteoroids, traveling between 11 and 72 km/s, and orbital debris, with typical impact speeds of 10 km/s. When an impactor encounters a spacecraft, its kinetic energy is converted over a very short timescale into energy of vaporization and ionization, resulting in a small, dense plasma. This plasma can produce radio frequency (RF) emission, causing electrical anomalies within the spacecraft. In order to study this phenomenon, we conducted ground-based experiments to study hypervelocity impact plasmas using a Van de Graaff dust accelerator. Iron projectiles ranging from 10-16 g to 10-11 g were fired at speeds of up to 70 km/s into a variety of target materials under a range of surface charging conditions representative of space weather effects. Impact plasmas associated with bare metal targets as well as spacecraft materials were studied. Plasma expansion models were developed to determine the composition and temperature of the impact plasma, shedding light on the plasma dynamics that can lead to spacecraft electrical anomalies. The dependence of these plasma properties on target material, impact speed, and surface charge was analyzed. Our work includes three major results. First, the initial temperature of the impact plasma is at least an order of magnitude lower than previously reported, providing conditions more favorable for sustained RF emission. Second, the composition of impact plasmas from glass targets, unlike that of impact plasmas from tungsten, has low dependence on impact speed, indicating a charge production mechanism that is significant down to orbital debris speeds. Finally, negative ion formation has a strong dependence on target material. These new results can inform the design and operation of spacecraft in order to mitigate future impact-related space weather

  13. Surface modification of polymeric materials by plasma immersion ion implantation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fu, Ricky K.Y. [Department of Physics and Materials Science, City University of Hong Kong, Tat Chee Avenue, Kowloon, Hong Kong (China); Cheung, I.T.L. [Department of Physics and Materials Science, City University of Hong Kong, Tat Chee Avenue, Kowloon, Hong Kong (China); Mei, Y.F. [Department of Physics and Materials Science, City University of Hong Kong, Tat Chee Avenue, Kowloon, Hong Kong (China); Shek, C.H. [Department of Physics and Materials Science, City University of Hong Kong, Tat Chee Avenue, Kowloon, Hong Kong (China); Siu, G.G. [Department of Physics and Materials Science, City University of Hong Kong, Tat Chee Avenue, Kowloon, Hong Kong (China); Chu, Paul K. [Department of Physics and Materials Science, City University of Hong Kong, Tat Chee Avenue, Kowloon, Hong Kong (China)]. E-mail: paul.chu@cityu.edu.hk; Yang, W.M. [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Southwest Jiaotong University, Chengdu 610031 (China); Leng, Y.X. [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Southwest Jiaotong University, Chengdu 610031 (China); Huang, Y.X. [State Key Laboratory of Welding Production Technology, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin (China); Tian, X.B. [State Key Laboratory of Welding Production Technology, Harbin Institute of technology, Harbin (China); Yang, S.Q. [State Key Laboratory of Welding Production Technology, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin (China)

    2005-08-01

    Polymer surfaces typically have low surface tension and high chemical inertness and so they usually have poor wetting and adhesion properties. The surface properties can be altered by modifying the molecular structure using plasma immersion ion implantation (PIII). In this work, Nylon-6 was treated using oxygen/nitrogen PIII. The observed improvement in the wettability is due to the oxygenated and nitrogen (amine) functional groups created on the polymer surface by the plasma treatment. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) results show that nitrogen and oxygen plasma implantation result in C-C bond breaking to form the imine and amine groups as well as alcohol and/or carbonyl groups on the surface. The water contact angle results reveal that the surface wetting properties depend on the functional groups, which can be adjusted by the ratio of oxygen-nitrogen mixtures.

  14. Hardening of Metallic Materials Using Plasma Immersion Ion Implantation (PIII)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Yufan; Clark, Mike; Flanagan, Ken; Milhone, Jason; Nonn, Paul; Forest, Cary

    2016-10-01

    A new approach of Plasma Immersion Ion Implantation (PIII) has been developed with the Plasma Couette Experiment Upgrade (PCX-U). The new approach efficiently reduces the duty cycle under the same average power for PIII. The experiment uses a Nitrogen plasma at a relatively high density of 1010 1011 cm-3 with ion temperatures of working cycle. The samples (Alloy Steel 9310) are analyzed by a Vicker Hardness Tester to study the hardness and X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS) to study implantation density and depth. Different magnetic fields are also applied on samples to reduce the energy loss and secondary emission. Higher efficiency of implantation is expected from this experiment and the results will be presented. Hilldale Undergraduate/Faculty Research Fellowship of University of Wisconsin-Madison; Professor Cary Forest's Kellett Mid-Career Faculty Award.

  15. Outgassing of plasma facing antenna front for lower hybrid wave launcher

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maebara, Sunao E-mail: maebara@felsunl.tokai.jaeri.go.jp; Goniche, Marc; Kazarian, Fabienne; Seki, Masami; Ikeda, Yoshitaka; Imai, Tsuyoshi; Bibet, Philippe; Froissard, Philippe; Rey, Guy

    2000-11-01

    A 3.7 GHz mock-up antenna module using carbon fiber composite (CFC) was fabricated and tested for the development of a heat-resistive front of the lower hybrid current drive (LHCD) antenna. This module has four waveguides and a water cooling channel, the length is 206 mm. The CFC surface was coated with a thin titanium layer and was plated with copper in order to reduce RF losses, to bond rods and septum plates and to assemble them with cooling channel. The RF losses and the outgassing rates of this CFC module at high RF power were measured during long pulses. When the injected power varies between 30 and 100 kW, the RF losses measured by calorimetery, were found to be in the range of 1.0-1.2%. It is found that this experimental value is 2.5-3.0 times higher than the theoretical value of pure copper. Stationary operation of the CFC module with water cooling is performed at the RF power density of 45 MW m{sup -2} during 1000 s. The outgassing rates from the CFC module are in the range of 0.93{approx}1.3x10{sup -6} Pam{sup -3} s{sup -1} m{sup -2} at the module temperature of 120 deg. C, it is low enough for an antenna material. No significant bonding defects occurred during the steady-state operation. It is assessed that a CFC module is an attractive candidate for a heat-resistive front of LHCD antenna.

  16. Study on Filling Cross-Roadway in Fully-Mechanized Coal Faces with High Water-Content Material

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    周华强; 王光伟; 雷文成; 曲庆贺; 李峰

    2001-01-01

    A new method using high water-content material to mechanically fill cross-roadways to form artificial bottom for coal faces was introduced. The reasonable determination of filling range, the optimization of the compounding ratio of high water-content material, and the filling technique were discussed in detail. This new method has been spread after industrial testing in Baodian Colliery. Compared with the traditional method, the manual wooden chock method, the new one decreases about 40% of the filling range and cost in dealing every one set of cross-roadway in the testing condition.

  17. Comparison of platelet rich plasma and synthetic graft material for bone regeneration after third molar extraction

    OpenAIRE

    Nathani, Dipesh B.; Sequeira, Joyce; Rao, B. H. Sripathi

    2015-01-01

    Aims: To compare the efficacy of Platelet rich plasma and synthetic graft material for bone regeneration after bilateral third molar extraction. Material and Methods: This study was conducted in 10 patients visiting the outpatient department of Oral & Maxillofacial Surgery, Yenepoya Dental College & Hospital. Patients requiring extraction of bilateral mandibular third molars were taken for the study. Following extraction, PRP (Platelet Rich Plasma) was placed in one extraction socket and synt...

  18. Ground-Based Tests of Spacecraft Polymeric Materials under OXY-GEN Plasma-Beam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chernik, Vladimir; Novikov, Lev; Gaidar, Anna

    2016-07-01

    Spacecraft LEO mission is accompanied by destruction of polymeric material surface under influence of atomic oxygen flow. Sources of molecular, plasma and ion beams are used for the accelerated ground-based tests of spacecraft materials. In the work application of oxygen plasma accelerator of a duoplasmatron type is described. Plasma particles have been accelerated up to average speed of 13-16 km/s. Influence of such beam on materials leads to more intensive destruction of polymers than in LEO. This fact allows to execute tests in the accelerated time scale by a method of an effective fluence. Special measures were given to decrease a concentration of both gaseous and electrode material impurities in the oxygen beam. In the work the results of simulative tests of spacecraft materials and experiments on LEO are considered. Comparison of plasma beam simulation with LEO data has shown conformity for structures of a number of polymeric materials. The relative erosion yields (normalized with respect to polyimide) of the tested materials are shown practically equal to those in LEO. The obtained results give grounds for using the plasma-generation mode with ion energies of 20-30 eV to accelerated testing of spacecraft materials for long -term LEO missions.

  19. PREFACE: 26th Symposium on Plasma Science for Materials (SPSM-26)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-06-01

    26th Symposium on Plasma Science for Materials (SPSM-26) Takayuki Watanabe The 26th Symposium on Plasma Science for Materials (SPSM-26) was held in Fukuoka, Japan on September 23-24, 2013. SPSM has been held annually since 1988 under the sponsorship of The 153rd Committee on Plasma Materials Science, Japan Society for the Promotion of Science (JSPS). This symposium is one of the major activities of the Committee, which is organized by researchers in academia and industry for the purpose of advancing intersectional scientific information exchange and discussion of science and technology of plasma materials processing. Plasma processing have attracted extensive attention due to their unique advantages, and it is expected to be utilized for a number of innovative industrial applications such as synthesis of high-quality and high-performance nanomaterials. The advantages of plasmas including high chemical reactivity in accordance with required chemical reactions are beneficial for innovative processing. In recent years, plasma materials processing with reactive plasmas has been extensively employed in the fields of environmental issues and biotechnology. This conference seeks to bring different scientific communities together to create a forum for discussing the latest developments and issues. The conference provides a platform for the exploration of both fundamental topics and new applications of plasmas by the contacts between science, technology, and industry. The conference was organized in plenary lectures, invited, contributed oral presentations, and poster sessions. At this meeting, we had 142 participants from 10 countries and 104 presentations, including 11 invited presentations. This year, we arranged special topical sessions that cover Plasma Medicine and Biotechnologies, Business and Academia Cooperation, Plasma with Liquids, Plasma Processes for Nanomaterials, together with Basic, Electronics, and Thermal Plasma sessions. This special issue presents 28

  20. Interface modification and material synthesis of organic light-emitting diodes using plasma technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Rongqing; Ou, Qiongrong; Yang, Cheng; He, Kongduo; Yang, Xilu; Zhong, Shaofeng; plasma application Team

    2015-09-01

    Organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs), due to their unique properties of solution processability, compatibility with flexible substrates and with large-scale printing technology, attract huge interest in the field of lighting. The integration of plasma technology into OLEDs provides a new route to improve their performance. Here we demonstrate the modification of indium-tin-oxide (ITO) work function by plasma treatment, synthesis of thermally activated delayed fluorescence (TADF) materials using plasma grafting (polymerisation), and multi-layer solution processing achieved by plasma cross-linking.

  1. Experimental study of plasma energy transfer and material erosion under ELM-like heat loads

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garkusha, I.E., E-mail: garkusha@ipp.kharkov.u [Institute of Plasma Physics of the NSC KIPT, Akademicheskaya 1, 61108 Kharkov (Ukraine); Makhlaj, V.A.; Chebotarev, V.V. [Institute of Plasma Physics of the NSC KIPT, Akademicheskaya 1, 61108 Kharkov (Ukraine); Landman, I. [Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe, IHM, 76021 Karlsruhe (Germany); Tereshin, V.I.; Aksenov, N.N.; Bandura, A.N. [Institute of Plasma Physics of the NSC KIPT, Akademicheskaya 1, 61108 Kharkov (Ukraine)

    2009-06-15

    Main features of plasma-surface interaction and energy transfer to tokamak plasma facing components are studied at different heat loads in ELM simulation experiments with the plasma gun QSPA Kh-50. Repetitive plasma exposures of tungsten, graphite and different combined W-C targets were performed at the pulse duration of 0.25 ms and the heat loads varied in the range 0.2-2.5 MJ/m{sup 2}. The onset of vapor shield in front of the surface was investigated. The evaporation is immediately followed by a saturation of surface heat load if further increasing the impact energy. The presence of graphite essentially decreases the heat flux to the nearby tungsten surface, which is due to the carbon vapor shield. Droplet splashing at the tungsten surface and formation of hot spots on the graphite surface are discussed.

  2. Dynamics expansion of laser produced plasma with different materials in magnetic field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rabia Qindeel; Noriah Bte Bidin; Yaacob Mat daud [Laser Technology Laboratory, Physics Department, Universiti Teknologi Malaysia, Skudai 81310, Johor (Malaysia)], E-mail: plasmaqindeel@yahoo.com

    2008-12-01

    The dynamics expansion of the plasma generated by laser ablation of different materials has been investigated. The dynamics and confinement of laser generated plasma plumes are expanding across variable magnetic fields. A Q-switched neodymium-doped yttrium aluminum garnet laser with 1064 nm, 8 ns pulse width and 0.125 J laser energy was used to generate plasma that was allowed to expand across variable magnetic within 0.1 - 0.8 T. The expansions of laser-produced plasma of different materials are characterized by using constant laser power. CCD video camera was used to visualize and record the activities in the focal region. The plasma plume length, width and area were measured by using Matrox Inpector 2.1 and video Test 0.5 software. Spectrums of plasma beam from different materials are studied via spectrometer. The results show that the plasma generated by aluminum target is the largest than Brass and copper. The optical radiation from laser generated plasma beam spectrums are obtained in the range of UV to visible light.

  3. Plasma ARC Welding of High-Performance-Ship Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    1979-05-01

    the work piece dur- ing welding. During the course of development by industry of the plasma arc process as a welding tool, v&rious orifice...point for the intended keyhole weld although, of course , minor modification to the travel speed may have to be made. The curves may be used to estimate...8217 : ... .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. TABLE 2 - TENSILE TEST RESULTS SpOC imun Ytlld Strounth T’n mil• StrIe lngth I|loniinttirol Lwait IL’ ,i ifr pin

  4. Dynamics of electronegative plasmas for materials processing. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lichtenberg, A.J.; Lieberman, M.A.

    1996-12-31

    Purpose was to study equilibrium particle and energy balance and heating mechanisms in electronegative rf discharges. Attention is given to formation of non-Maxwellian electron distributions and their effect on macroscopic parameters. Research includes theory, particle- in-cell simulation, and experimental investigations. Sheath heating theory and simulation results for electropositive plasmas are used as guide. The investigation was centered on, but not limited to, study of oxygen feedstock gas in capacitively and inductively coupled rf discharges.

  5. Sound radiation and transmission loss characteristics of a honeycomb sandwich panel with composite facings: Effect of inherent material damping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arunkumar, M. P.; Jagadeesh, M.; Pitchaimani, Jeyaraj; Gangadharan, K. V.; Babu, M. C. Lenin

    2016-11-01

    This paper presents the results of numerical studies carried out on vibro-acoustic and sound transmission loss behaviour of aluminium honeycomb core sandwich panel with fibre reinforced plastic (FRP) facings. Layered structural shell element with equivalent orthotropic elastic properties of core and orthotropic properties of FRP facing layer is used to predict the free and forced vibration characteristics. Followed by this, acoustic response and transmission loss characteristics are obtained using Rayleigh integral. Vibration and acoustic characteristics of FRP sandwich panels are compared with aluminium sandwich panels. The result reveals that FRP panel has better vibro-acoustic and transmission loss characteristics due to high stiffness and inherent material damping associated with them. Resonant amplitudes of the response are fully controlled by modal damping factors calculated based on modal strain energy. It is also demonstrated that FRP panel can be used to replace the aluminium panel without losing acoustic comfort with nearly 40 percent weight reduction.

  6. INVESTIGATION OF MACHINABILITY IN Co AND Cr CONTAINING HARD MATERIALS HEATED BY PLASMA ARC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Halis Çelik

    1996-02-01

    Full Text Available Turning soft materials is not a problem in these days. But machinability of hard materials have been necessary. A lot of research has been done on machinability of difficult-to-cut materials. The aim of the present study is toinvestigate the machinability of three of hard materials after heating and softening. In this study for machining difficult-to-cut materials, different heating processes were applied and for heating, lately developed plasma heating method was used. To cut the hard material heated by plasma arc, tungsten carbide cutting tool was used. In the study, three different hard materials have been used. These were ferritic steel with 14 % Cr, Ti added cast iron, 8.5 % Cr cast steel and Co-Cr-W alloyed steel which is called stellite 6 and used in the textile industry andat power stations. In this study cutting forces, wear of cutting tool and surface roughness were investigated.

  7. Dynamics of electronegative plasmas for materials processing. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lichtenberg, A.J.; Lieberman, M.A.

    1996-12-31

    The purpose of this project is to study the equilibrium particle and energy balance and the heating mechanisms in electronegative r.f. discharges. Particular attention is given to the formation of non-Maxwellian electron distributions and their effect on the macroscopic parameters. The research includes theory, particle-in-cell simulation, and experimental investigations. The sheath heating theory and the simulation results developed for electropositive plasmas are used to guide the investigations. The investigation was centered on, but is not limited to, the study of oxygen feedstock gas in capacitively and inductively coupled r.f. discharges. 15 refs.

  8. Calculation of Threshold Conditions for Materials Charging in Maxwellian Plasmas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-09-26

    MateriaS . Charginq,"In Maxwellian Plasmas ALLEN G. RUBIN ’MAURICE TAUITz 25 January 1965 I. Appgvd for public relese; distribution unflmitgl. DTIC 1N...of the surface will be determined by a current balance equation of the form: J e(V) + Ji(V) - 0 a (1) 3. Prokopenko, S. , and Laframboise, J. G...bracket factor. In order for overall current balance to occur in Eq. (1), we must have J e(V) < 0. But from Eq. (8), the only way for this to occur is

  9. Energy deposition characteristics of nanosecond dielectric barrier discharge plasma actuators: Influence of dielectric material

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Correale, G.; Winkel, R.; Kotsonis, M.

    2015-01-01

    An experimental study aimed at the characterization of energy deposition of nanosecond Dielectric Barrier Discharge (ns-DBD) plasma actuators was carried out. Special attention was given on the effect of the thickness and material used for dielectric barrier. The selected materials for this study we

  10. Design of a high particle flux hydrogen helicon plasma source for used in plasma materials interaction studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goulding, Richard Howell [ORNL; Chen, Guangye [ORNL; Meitner, Steven J [ORNL; Baity Jr, F Wallace [ORNL; Caughman, John B [ORNL; Owen, Larry W [ORNL

    2009-01-01

    Existing linear plasma materials interaction (PMI) facilities all use plasma sources with internal electrodes. An rf-based helicon source is of interest because high plasma densities can be generated with no internal electrodes, allowing true steady state operation with minimal impurity generation. Work has begun at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) to develop a large (15 cm) diameter helicon source producing hydrogen plasmas with parameters suitable for use in a linear PMI device: n(e) >= 10(19)m(-3), T(e) = 4-10 eV, particle flux Gamma(p) > 10(23) m(-3) s(-1), and magnetic field strength |B| up to I T in the source region. The device, whose design is based on a previous hydrogen helicon source operated at ORNL[1], will operate at rf frequencies in the range 10 - 26 MHz, and power levels up to similar to 100 kW. Limitations in cooling will prevent operation for pulses longer than several seconds, but a major goal will be the measurement of power deposition on device structures so that a later steady state version can be designed. The device design, the diagnostics to be used, and results of rf modeling of the device will be discussed. These include calculations of plasma loading, resulting currents and voltages in antenna structures and the matching network, power deposition profiles, and the effect of high |B| operation on power absorption.

  11. Nanostructures formed on carbon-based materials with different levels of crystallinity using oxygen plasma treatment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ko, Tae-Jun [Institute for Multidisciplinary Convergence of Matter, Korea Institute of Science and Technology, Seoul 136-791 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Seoul National University, Seoul 151-742 (Korea, Republic of); Jo, Wonjin; Lee, Heon Ju [Institute for Multidisciplinary Convergence of Matter, Korea Institute of Science and Technology, Seoul 136-791 (Korea, Republic of); Oh, Kyu Hwan [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Seoul National University, Seoul 151-742 (Korea, Republic of); Moon, Myoung-Woon, E-mail: mwmoon@kist.re.kr [Institute for Multidisciplinary Convergence of Matter, Korea Institute of Science and Technology, Seoul 136-791 (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-09-01

    Nanostructure formation was explored for various carbon-based materials, such as diamond, carbon fiber, polyethylene terephthalate and poly (methyl methacrylate), which have different levels of crystallinity, ranging from perfect crystal to polymeric amorphous. After treatment of oxygen plasma glow discharge, the nanostructures on these carbon-based materials were found to evolve via preferential etching due to the co-deposition of metal elements sputtered from the metal cathode plate. Local islands or clusters formed by the metal co-deposition have a low etching rate compared to pristine regions on each material, resulting in anisotropic patterns on the carbon-based materials. This pattern formation mechanism was confirmed by covering the cathode or preventing the co-deposition of metallic sources with a polymeric material. Regardless of the level of crystallinity of the carbon-based materials, no patterns were observed on the surfaces covered with the polymeric material, and the surfaces were uniformly etched. It was found that the materials with low crystallinity had a high etching rate due to low carbon atom density, which thus easily formed high-aspect-ratio nanostructures for the same plasma treatment duration. - Highlight: • Reactive ion etching & metal deposition were occurred in oxygen plasma treatment. • High-aspect-ratio nanostructures can be fabricated on carbon-based materials. • Materials with low crystallinity easily formed high-aspect-ratio nanostructure. • Amount of etching inhibitors affects the pattern formation and configuration.

  12. Modification of Composite Material Fillers by Atmospheric Plasma Discharge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Tichy

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This work is focused on the observation of the influence of cold atmospheric dielectric barrier discharge (DBD on a modification of textile samples. The main objective of the experiment is to research wettability change of textiles modified by different exposure times and also the observation of the influence of a modification ageing effect. An ambient air was used as a working gas for DBD plasma. The wettability evaluation was carried out by a drop method, in which an imprint of the dropwas observed on the textile surface during various time intervals. An ageing effect of the modification was monitored within an interval of 28 days. Considerable increase of wettability of all modified samples has been proved. A fibre surface analysis was carried out by means of SEM.

  13. Effect of curing with a plasma light on the properties of polymerizable dental restorative materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Millar, B J; Nicholson, J W

    2001-06-01

    Specimens of light-curable dental restoratives have been prepared using either a conventional dental curing lamp (for 20 or 30 s) or a plasma light (for 1 or 2 s). The specimens were then stored in water until their mass equilibrated, then dried to constant mass. Most specimens lost material in this process but the losses in all specimens cured with the plasma light were significantly greater than those cured with the conventional lights (P cure times gave slightly reduced losses in water in most cases. The specimens were then returned to water and allowed to re-equilibrate and their equilibrium water uptake determined. There was no simple trend in this latter property because elution of loosely bound hydrophilic species may have resulted in a less hydrophilic specimen, whose equilibrium water content was therefore correspondingly lower. Overall, the losses through dissolution in water suggest that plasma curing is less effective for these materials than conventional light curing, as it probably results in material with lower molar mass. The losses for the resin-modified glass-ionomer were much greater than for other materials, and it was concluded that the more rapid polymerization with plasma light caused a significant inhibitation of the acid-base part of the setting process. These findings suggest that long-term durability of materials may be compromised by employing plasma light cure rather than a conventional cure system and further studies of this point are recommended.

  14. Plasma For-Injector of Separable Material Based on the Beam-Plasma Discharge for Ion-Atomic Separation Technologies. Conception

    OpenAIRE

    Skibenko, E. I.; Yu. V. Kovtun; V.B. Yuferov

    2010-01-01

    In the paper, the functional definition of a plasma for-injector of separable material is presented, and the requirements to it are formulated. The version of a device for the material separation into elements based on the beam-plasma discharge is under consideration. The dimensions of a pilot separating device are determined. The following quantities are estimated: the particle concentration per unit length of the separating device, effective length of the beam-plasma interaction (BPI) withi...

  15. Influence of direct current plasma magnetron sputtering parameters on the material characteristics of polycrystalline copper films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chan, K.-Y. [Thin Film Laboratory, Faculty of Engineering, Multimedia University, Jalan Multimedia, 63100 Cyberjaya, Selangor (Malaysia)], E-mail: k.y.chan@fz-juelich.de; Luo, P.-Q.; Zhou, Z.-B. [Department of Physics, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, 800 Dongchuan Road, 200240 Shanghai (China); Tou, T.-Y.; Teo, B.-S. [Thin Film Laboratory, Faculty of Engineering, Multimedia University, Jalan Multimedia, 63100 Cyberjaya, Selangor (Malaysia)

    2009-03-01

    Physical vapor processes using glow plasma discharge are widely employed in microelectronic industry. In particular magnetron sputtering is a major technique employed for the coating of thin films. This paper addresses the influence of direct current (DC) plasma magnetron sputtering parameters on the material characteristics of polycrystalline copper (Cu) thin films coated on silicon substrates. The influence of the sputtering parameters including DC plasma power and argon working gas pressure on the electrical and structural properties of the thin Cu films was investigated by means of surface profilometer, four-point probe and atomic force microscopy.

  16. Study on an Atmospheric Pressure Plasma Jet and its Application in Etching Photo-Resistant Materials

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李海江; 王守国; 赵玲利; 叶甜春

    2004-01-01

    An atmospheric pressure radio-frequency plasma jet that can eject cold plasma has been developed. In this paper, the configuration of this type of plasma jet is illustrated and its discharge characteristics curves are studied with a current and a voltage probe. A thermal couple is used to measure the temperature distribution along the axis of the jet stream. The temperature distribution curve is generated for the He/O2 jet stream at the discharge power of 150W. This jet can etch the photo-resistant material at an average rate of 100nm/min on the surface of silicon wafers at a right angle.

  17. Sterilizing tissue-materials using pulsed power plasma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heidarkhan Tehrani, Ashkan; Davari, Pooya; Singh, Sanjleena; Oloyede, Adekunle

    2014-04-01

    This paper investigates the potential of pulsed power to sterilize hard and soft tissues and its impact on their physico-mechanical properties. It hypothesizes that pulsed plasma can sterilize both vascular and avascular tissues and the transitive layers in between without deleterious effects on their functional characteristics. Cartilage/bone laminate was chosen as a model to demonstrate the concept, treated at low temperature, at atmospheric pressure, in short durations and in buffered environment using a purposed-built pulsed power unit. Input voltage and time of exposure were assigned as controlling parameters in a full factorial design of experiment to determine physical and mechanical alteration pre- and post-treatment. The results demonstrated that, discharges of 11 kV sterilized samples in 45 s, reducing intrinsic elastic modules from 1.4 ± 0.9 to 0.9 ± 0.6 MPa. There was a decrease of 14.1 % in stiffness and 27.8 % in elastic-strain energy for the top quartile. Mechanical impairment was directly proportional to input voltage (P value connective tissues with varying level of loss in mechanical robustness which we argue to be acceptable in certain medical and tissue engineering application.

  18. Simulated Irradiation of Samples in HFIR for use as Possible Test Materials in the MPEX (Material Plasma Exposure Experiment) Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ellis, Ronald James [ORNL; Rapp, Juergen [ORNL

    2014-01-01

    The importance of Plasma Material Interaction (PMI) is a major concern in fusion reactor design and analysis. The Material-Plasma Exposure eXperiment (MPEX) facility will explore PMI under fusion reactor plasma conditions. Samples with accumulated displacements per atom (DPA) damage produced by irradiations in the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) will be studied in the MPEX facility. The project presented in this paper involved performing assessments of the induced radioactivity and resulting radiation fields of a variety of potential fusion reactor materials. The scientific code packages MCNP and SCALE were used to simulate irradiation of the samples in HFIR; generation and depletion of nuclides in the material and the subsequent composition, activity levels, gamma radiation fields, and resultant dose rates as a function of cooling time. These state-of-the-art simulation methods were used in addressing the challenge of the MPEX project to minimize the radioactive inventory in the preparation of the samples for inclusion in the MPEX facility.

  19. Repetitive tabletop plasma focus to produce a tunable damage factor on materials for fusion reactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soto, Leopoldo; Pavez, Cristian; Inestrosa-Izurieta, Maria Jose; Moreno, Jose; Davis, Sergio; Bora, Biswajit; Avaria, Gonzalo; Jain, Jalaj; Altamirano, Luis; Panizo, Miguel; Gonzalez, Raquel; Rivera, Antonio

    2016-10-01

    Future thermonuclear reactors, both magnetic and inertial confinement approaches, need materials capable of withstanding the extreme radiation and heat loads expected from high repetition rate plasma. A damage factor (F = qτ1/2) in the order of 104 (W/cm2) s1/2 is expected. The axial plasma dynamics after the pinch in a tabletop plasma focus of hundred joules, PF-400J, was characterized by means of pulsed optical refractive diagnostics. The energy, interaction time and power flux of the plasma burst interacting with targets was obtained. Results show a high dependence of the damage factor with the distance from the anode top where the sample is located. A tunable damage factor in the range 10- 105(W/cm2) s1/2 can be obtained. At present the PF-400J operating at 0.077 Hz is being used to study the effects of fusion-relevant pulses on material target, including nanostructured materials. A new tabletop device to be operated up to 1Hz including tunable damage factor has been designed and is being constructed, thus thousand cumulative shots on materials could be obtained in few minutes. The scaling of the damage factor for plasma foci operating at different energies is discussed. Supported by CONICYT: PIA ACT-1115, PAI 79130026.

  20. Results of high heat flux testing of W/CuCrZr multilayer composites with percolating microstructure for plasma-facing components

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Greuner, Henri, E-mail: henri.greuner@ipp.mpg.de; Zivelonghi, Alessandro; Böswirth, Bernd; You, Jeong-Ha

    2015-10-15

    Highlights: • Improvement of the performance of plasma-facing components made of W and CuCrZr. • Functionally graded composite at the interface of W and CuCrZr to mitigate the CTE. • A three-layer composite system (W volume fraction: 70/50/30%) was developed. • Design of water-cooled divertor components up to 20 MW/m{sup 2} heat load for e.g. DEMO. • HHF tests up to 20 MW/m{sup 2} were successfully performed. - Abstract: Reliable joining of tungsten to copper is a major issue in the design of water-cooled divertor components for future fusion reactors. One of the suggested advanced engineering solutions is to use functionally graded composite interlayers. Recently, the authors have developed a novel processing route for fabricating multi-layer graded W/CuCrZr composites. Previous characterization confirmed that the composite materials possess enhanced strength compared to the matrix alloy and shows reasonable ductility up to 300 °C indicating large potential to extend the operation temperature limit. Furthermore, a three-layer composite system (W volume fraction: 70/50/30%) was developed as a graded interlayer between the W armour and CuCrZr heat sink. In this study, we investigated the structural performance of the graded joint. Three water-cooled mock-ups of a flat tile type component were fabricated using electron beam welding and thermally loaded at the hydrogen neutral beam test facility GLADIS. Cycling tests at 10 MW/m{sup 2} and screening tests up to 20 MW/m{sup 2} were successfully performed and confirmed the expected thermal performance of the compound. The measured temperature values were in good agreement with the prediction of finite element analysis. Microscopic investigation confirmed the structural integrity of the newly developed functionally graded composite after these tests.

  1. Surface functionalization of macroporous polymeric materials by treatment with air low temperature plasma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molina, R; Sole, I; Vílchez, A; Bertran, E; Solans, C; Esquena, J

    2013-04-01

    Polystyrene/divinylbenzene (PS-DVB) macroporous monoliths obtained using highly concentrated emulsions as templates show a superhydrophobic behaviour, restricting their potential technological applications, especially those related to adhesion and wetting. Air plasma treatments were carried out in order to modulate wetting properties, modifying the surface chemical composition of macroporous polystyrene/divinylbenzene materials. The superhydrophobic behaviour was rapidly suppressed by air plasma treatment, greatly reducing the water contact angle, from approximately 150 degrees to approximately 90 degrees, in only 10 seconds of treatment. The new surface chemical groups, promoted by plasma active species, were characterized by surface analysis techniques with different depth penetration specificity (contact angle, XPS, FTIR and SEM). Results demonstrated that very short treatment times produced different chemical functionalities, mainly C-O, C=O, O-C=O and C-N, which provide the materials with predominantly acidic surface properties. However, plasma active species did not penetrate deeply through the interconnected pores of the material. FTIR analysis evidenced that the new hydrophilic surface groups promoted by plasma active species are in a negligibly concentration compared to bulk chemical groups, and are located in a very thin surface region on the PS-DVB monolith surface (significantly below 2 microm). XPS analysis of treated monoliths revealed a progressive increase of oxygen and nitrogen content as a function of plasma treatment time. However, oxidation of the PS-DVB monoliths surface prevails over the incorporation of nitrogen atoms. Finally, SEM studies indicated that the morphology of the plasma treated PS-DVB does not significantly change even for the longest air plasma treatment time studied (120 s).

  2. The application of Cold Atmospheric Plasma (CAP) for the sterilisation of spacecraft materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rettberg, Petra; Barczyk, Simon; Morfill, Gregor; Thomas, Hubertus; Satoshi Shimizu, .; Shimizu, Tetsuji; Klaempfl, Tobias

    2012-07-01

    Plasma, oft called the fourth state of matter after solid, liquid and gas, is defined by its ionized state. Ionization can be induced by different means, such as a strong electromagnetic field applied with a microwave generator. The concentration and composition of reactive atoms and molecules produced in Cold Atmospheric Plasma (CAP) depends on the gases used, the gas flow, the power applied, the humidity level etc.. In medicine, low-temperature plasma is already used for the sterilization of surgical instruments, implants and packaging materials as plasma works at the atomic level and is able to reach all surfaces, even the interior of small hollow items like needles. Its ability to sterilise is due to the generation of biologically active bactericidal agents, such as free radicals and UV radiation. In the project PLASMA-DECON (DLR/BMWi support code 50JR1005) a prototype of a device for sterilising spacecraft material and components was built based on the surface micro-discharge (SMD) plasma technology. The produced plasma species are directed into a closed chamber which contains the parts that need to be sterilised. To test the inactivation efficiency of this new device bacterial spores were used as model organisms because in the COSPAR Planetary Protection Policy all bioburden constraints are defined with respect to the number of spores (and other heat-tolerant aerobic microorganisms). Spores from different Bacillus species and strains, i.e. wildtype strains from culture collections and isolates from spacecraft assembly cleanrooms, were dried on three different spacecraft relevant materials and exposed to CAP. The specificity, linearity, precision, and effective range of the device was investigated. From the results obtained it can be concluded that the application of CAP proved to be a suitable method for bioburden reduction / sterilisation in the frame of planetary protection measures and the design of a larger plasma device is planned in the future.

  3. Plasma-Material Interface Development for Future Spherical Tokamak-based Devices in NSTX.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    et. al, V

    2011-09-24

    The divertor plasma-material interface (PMI) must be able to withstand steady-state heat fluxes up to 10 MW/m{sup 2} (a limit imposed by the present day divertor material and engineering constraints) with minimal material erosion, as well as to provide impurity control and ion density pumping capabilities. In spherical tokamaks (STs), the compact divertor geometry and the requirement of low core electron collisionality n*{sub e} at n{sub e} < 0.5-0.7 n{sub G} (where n{sub G} is the Greenwald density) for increased neutral beam current drive efficiency impose much greater demands on divertor and first-wall particle and heat flux mitigation solutions. In NSTX, divertor heat flux mitigation and impurity control with an innovative 'snowflake' divertor configuration and ion density pumping by evaporated lithium wall and divertor coatings are studied. Lithium coatings have enabled ion density reduction up to 50% in NSTX through the reduction of wall and divertor recycling rates. The 'snowflake' divertor configuration was obtained in NSTX in 0.8-1 MA 4-6 MW NBI-heated H-mode lithium-assisted discharges using three divertor coils. The snowflake divertor formation was always accompanied by a partial detachment of the outer strike point with an up to 50% increase in divertor radiation from intrinsic carbon, the peak divertor heat flux reduction from 3-6 MW/m{sup 2} to 0.5-1 MW/m{sup 2}, and a significant increase in divertor volume recombination. High core confinement was maintained with the snowflake divertor, evidenced by the t{sub E}, W{sub MHD} and the H98(y,2) factors similar to those of the standard divertor discharges. Core carbon concentration and radiated power were reduced by 30-70%, apparently as a result of reduced divertor physical and chemical sputtering in the snowflake divertor and ELMs. In the SFD discharges, the MHD stability of the H-mode pedestal region was altered leading to the re-appearance of medium size (DW/W = 5-10%), Type I

  4. Application of cold plasma technology in fiber-reinforced composite materials

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    A study is presented concerning a cold plasma technique for improving the bondability of highstrength high-modulus multi-filament polyethylene fibers to polymer matrices and the fibers impregnation with the objective to fabricate composite materials (CMs). Strong bonding between the matrixes and reinforcing fibers during the production of composites appears in the case if interaction is chemical. The value of the activation energy of the chemical interaction for very high performance polyethylene fiber was estimated. It was 1.14 eV. This allows using the cold plasma technique for producing CMs. In order to understand the effect of cold plasma treatment treated and untreated fibers were used to fabricate CMs. The strong bond between the matrix and plasma-activated fibers affects both the properties and failure mode of composite. The properties and failure modes were compared to those of CMs reinforced with untreated fibers. After plasma treatment the properties of CMs are increased. CMs are broken as a unit whole under tension. The ideas of the activating the fibers by cold plasma treatment above the activation energy of the chemical interaction may be extended over other types of the fibers and matrices to produce new types of fiber-reinforced composite materials with high physicomechanical indices.

  5. Effect of Wall Material on H– Production in a Plasma Sputter-Type Ion Source

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. D. M. Ponce

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available The effect of wall material on negative hydrogen ion (H– production was investigated in a multicusp plasma sputter-type ion source (PSTIS. Steady-state cesium-seeded hydrogen plasma was generated by a tungsten filament, while H– was produced through surface production using a molybdenum sputter target. Plasma parameters and H– yields were determined from Langmuir probe and Faraday cup measurements, respectively. At an input hydrogen pressure of 1.2 mTorr and optimum plasma discharge parameters Vd = –90 V and Id = –2.25 A, the plasma parameters ne was highest and T–e was lowest as determined from Langmuir probe measurements. At these conditions, aluminum generates the highest ion current density of 0.01697 mA/cm2, which is 64% more than the 0.01085 mA/cm2 that stainless steel produces. The yield of copper, meanwhile, falls between the two materials at 0.01164 mA/cm2. The beam is maximum at Vt = –125 V. Focusing is achieved at VL = –70 V for stainless steel, Vt = –60 V for aluminum, and Vt = –50 V for copper. The results demonstrate that proper selection of wall material can greatly enhance the H– production of the PSTIS.

  6. Effect of structural steel ion plasma nitriding on material durability in pulsed high magnetic fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spirin, A. V.; Krutikov, V. I.; Koleukh, D. S.; Mamaev, A. S.; Paranin, S. N.; Gavrilov, N. V.; Kaigorodov, A. S.

    2017-05-01

    The work was aimed to study the influence of plasma nitriding on electrical and mechanical properties of structural steels and their durability in pulsed high magnetic field. The plates and cylindrical magnetic flux concentrators were made of several steel grades (30KhGS, 40Kh, 50KhGA, 38Kh2MYuA, and U8A), heat-treated, and subjected to the low-temperature (400, 500°C) plasma nitriding. Electrical and mechanical properties of materials, phase composition of steel surface layer, microstructure and microhardness profiles were investigated on the plates before and after plasma treatment. Microstructure and microhardness profiles across the subsurface layer of plasma treated and untreated concentrators applied for high magnetic field generation were also studied. Magnetic field of 50 T under tens of microseconds in duration inside the flux concentrators was generated by long-life outer coil.

  7. Research methods of plasma stream interaction with heat-resistant materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tyuftyaev, A. S.; Gadzhiev, M. Kh; Sargsyan, M. A.; Chinnov, V. F.; Demirov, N. A.; Kavyrshin, D. I.; Ageev, A. G.; Khromov, M. A.

    2016-11-01

    An experimental automated system was designed and constructed for studying the parameters and characteristics of non-stationary interacting system high-enthalpy-plasma stream-investigated sample: enthalpy of plasma in the incident stream; speed and temperature of plasma stream; temperature of electrons and heavy particles, ionic composition and their spatial distribution; heat flux incident on the sample (kW/cm2); surface temperature of the sample; ablation of the sample material, and others. Measurements of achievable plasma heat flux levels are carried out by calorimetry of plasma streams incident on the surface of multisection copper calorimeter. Determination of acceleration characteristics for profiled plasma torch nozzle, as well as the gas flow rate is produced by measuring the total pressure using the Pitot tube. Video visualization of interacting system is carried out using synchronized high-speed cameras. Micropyrometry of the selected zone on the sample surface is carried out by high-speed, three-wavelength pyrometer. To measure the rate of mass loss of the sample, in addition to the weighing method of evaluation the methods of laser knife and two-position stereoscopy are used. Plasma and sample emission characteristics are performed with two separate spectrometers.

  8. Numerical study of the interaction of a helium atmospheric pressure plasma jet with a dielectric material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lijun; Zheng, Yashuang; Jia, Shenli

    2016-10-01

    This is a computational modeling study of a cold atmospheric pressure helium plasma jet impinging on a dielectric surface placed normal to the jet axis. This study provides insights into the propagation mechanism of the plasma jet, the electrical properties, and the total accumulated charge density at the dielectric surface. For the radial streamer propagation along the dielectric surface, Penning ionization and the electron impact ionization of helium atoms are the major ionization reactions in the streamer head, while Penning ionization is the only dominant contributor along the streamer body. In addition, the plasma bullet velocity along the dielectric surface is 10-100 times lower than that in the plasma column. Increasing tube radius or helium flow rate lowers air entrainment in the plasma jet, leading to a decrease of the radial electric field and the accumulated charge density at the dielectric surface. Furthermore, the tube radius has weaker influence on the plasma properties as tube radius increases. For a target dielectric with lower relative permittivity, a higher radial electric field penetrates into the material, and the surface ionization wave along the dielectric surface extends farther. Higher relative permittivity of the treated dielectric results in more charging at the dielectric surface and more electron density in the plasma column.

  9. Possible lattice formation of new materials within a piezoelectric semiconductor plasma

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    M Salimullah; S Ghosh; M R Amin

    2000-05-01

    The possible lattice formation of grains of chosen material in a magnetized current carrying -type piezoelectric semiconductor plasma has been examined. In addition to the repulsive Coulomb potential, there appears a non-Coulombic oscillatory potential among the highly charged grains due to the strong resonant collective interaction of the grains and the electron-acoustic mode of the host semiconductor giving rise to the possibility of the lattice formation of grains of new materials.

  10. The Many Faces of FOX-7: A Precursor to High-Performance Energetic Materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Haixiang; Shreeve, Jean'ne M

    2015-05-18

    New derivatives of 1,1-diamino-2, 2-dinitroethene (FOX-7) are reported. These highly oxygen- and nitrogen-rich compounds were fully characterized using IR and multinuclear NMR spectroscopy, elemental analysis (EA), and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). X-ray structure determination of (E)-1,2-bis{(E)-2-chloro-1-(chloroimino)-2,2-dinitroethyl}diazene) (10), N1, N2-dichloro-1, 2-diazenedicarboximidamide (11), and (E,E)-N,N'-1,2-ethanediylidenebis(2, 2-dinitro-2-chloro-ethanamine) (12) was helpful in their characterization. Heats of formation (HOF) were calculated (Gaussian 03) and combined with experimental densities to estimate the detonation velocities (D) and pressures (P) of the high-energy-density materials (HEDMs) (EXPLO5, v6.01). The compounds exhibit good thermal stability, high density, positive HOF, acceptable oxygen balances, and excellent detonation properties, which often are superior to that of 1,3,5-trinitroperhydro-1,3,5-triazine (RDX). © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  11. Patterning functional materials using channel diffused plasma-etched self-assembled monolayer templates

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    George, A.; Maijenburg, A.W.; Maas, M.G.; Blank, David H.A.; ten Elshof, Johan E.

    2011-01-01

    A simple and cost-effective methodology for large-area micrometer-scale patterning of a wide range of metallic and oxidic functional materials is presented. Self-assembled monolayers (SAM) of alkyl thiols on Au were micropatterned by channel-diffused oxygen plasma etching, a method in which selected

  12. Comparison of platelet rich plasma and synthetic graft material for bone regeneration after third molar extraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nathani, Dipesh B.; Sequeira, Joyce; Rao, B. H. Sripathi

    2015-01-01

    Aims: To compare the efficacy of Platelet rich plasma and synthetic graft material for bone regeneration after bilateral third molar extraction. Material and Methods: This study was conducted in 10 patients visiting the outpatient department of Oral & Maxillofacial Surgery, Yenepoya Dental College & Hospital. Patients requiring extraction of bilateral mandibular third molars were taken for the study. Following extraction, PRP (Platelet Rich Plasma) was placed in one extraction socket and synthetic graft material in form granules [combination of Hydroxyapatite (HA) and Bioactive glass (BG)] in another extraction socket. The patients were assessed for postoperative pain and soft tissue healing. Radiological assessment of the extraction site was done at 8, 12 and 16 weeks interval to compare the change in bone density in both the sockets. Results: Pain was less on PRP site when compared to HA site. Soft tissue evaluation done using gingival healing index given by Landry et al showed better healing on PRP site when compared to HA site. The evaluation of bone density by radiological assessment showed the grey level values calculated at 4 months at the PRP site were comparatively higher than HA site. Conclusion: The study showed that the platelet rich plasma is a better graft material than synthetic graft material in terms of soft tissue and bone healing. However a more elaborate study with a larger number of clinical cases is very much essential to be more conclusive regarding the efficacy of both the materials. PMID:26981473

  13. Degradation of carbon-based materials under ablative conditions produced by a high enthalpy plasma jet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gilberto Petraconi

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available A stationary experiment was performed to study the degradation of carbon-based materials by immersion in a plasma jet. In the experiment, graphite and C/C composite were chosen as the target materials, and the reactive plasma jet was generated by an air plasma torch. For macroscopic study of the material degradation, the sample’s mass losses were measured as function of the exposure time under various temperatures on the sample surface. A microscopic analysis was then carried out for the study of microscopic aspects of the erosion of material surface. These experiments showed that the mass loss per unit area is approximately proportional to the exposure time and strongly depends on the temperature of the material surface. The mass erosion rate of graphite was appreciably higher than the C/C composite. The ablation rate in the carbon matrix region in C/C composite was also noticeably higher than that in the fiber region. In addition, the latter varied according to the orientation of fibers relatively to the flow direction. These tests indicated an excellent ablation resistance of the C/C composite, thus being a reliable material for rocket nozzles and heat shielding elements of the protection systems of hypersonic apparatuses from aerodynamic heating.

  14. Unraveling atomic-level self-organization at the plasma-material interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allain, J. P.; Shetty, A.

    2017-07-01

    The intrinsic dynamic interactions at the plasma-material interface and critical role of irradiation-driven mechanisms at the atomic scale during exposure to energetic particles require a priori the use of in situ surface characterization techniques. Characterization of ‘active’ surfaces during modification at atomic-scale levels is becoming more important as advances in processing modalities are limited by an understanding of the behavior of these surfaces under realistic environmental conditions. Self-organization from exposure to non-equilibrium and thermalized plasmas enable dramatic control of surface morphology, topography, composition, chemistry and structure yielding the ability to tune material properties with an unprecedented level of control. Deciphering self-organization mechanisms of nanoscale morphology (e.g. nanodots, ripples) and composition on a variety of materials including: compound semiconductors, semiconductors, ceramics, polymers and polycrystalline metals via low-energy ion-beam assisted plasma irradiation are critical to manipulate functionality in nanostructured systems. By operating at ultra-low energies near the damage threshold, irradiation-driven defect engineering can be optimized and surface-driven mechanisms controlled. Tunability of optical, electronic, magnetic and bioactive properties is realized by reaching metastable phases controlled by atomic-scale irradiation-driven mechanisms elucidated by novel in situ diagnosis coupled to atomistic-level computational tools. Emphasis will be made on tailored surface modification from plasma-enhanced environments on particle-surface interactions and their subsequent modification of hard and soft matter interfaces. In this review, we examine current trends towards in situ and in operando surface and sub-surface characterization to unravel atomic-scale mechanisms at the plasma-material interface. This work will emphasize on recent advances in the field of plasma and ion

  15. Plasmas for environmental issues: from hydrogen production to 2D materials assembly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tatarova, E.; Bundaleska, N.; Sarrette, J. Ph; Ferreira, C. M.

    2014-12-01

    generation in water discharges of intense UV radiation, shock waves and active radicals (OH, O, H2O2, etc), which are all effective agents against many biological pathogens and harmful chemicals, make these discharges suitable for decontamination, sterilization and purification processes. Moreover, plasmas appear as invaluable tools for the synthesis and engineering of new nanomaterials and in particular 2D materials. A brief overview on plasma-synthesized carbon nanostructures shows the high potential of such materials for energy conversion and storage applications.

  16. Plasma technology for creation of protective and decorative coatings for building materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volokitin, Oleg; Volokitin, Gennady; Skripnikova, Nelli; Shekhovtsov, Valentin

    2016-01-01

    An experimental setup is developed to create a protective and decorative coating on the surface of building materials. Experimental study is conducted to create a protective coating using low-temperature plasma. The properties of the surface before and after the plasma treatment are investigated. At the increase of the plasma generator power (56-75 kW) the rate of the vitreous coating formation is significantly reduced, and the destruction of hydrous calcium silicates occurs at a lower depth (0.5-2.0 mm). In this case, the adhesive strength increases up to 2.34 MPa. At the increase of the exposure time at 56 kW (0.045 m/s melting rate) plasma generation power, the melt formation is observed not only at the surface but at depth of 0.7 mm and deeper. Also, a deep degradation of the material occurs and the adhesive strength decreases. The optimal heat flux density of plasma generator was established at 1.8-2.6 . 106 W/m2, which allows the achievement of the uniform layer formation on the wood surface that preserves its natural pattern visible.

  17. Apparent Surface Free Energy of Polymer/Paper Composite Material Treated by Air Plasma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Konrad Terpiłowski

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Surface plasma treatment consists in changes of surface properties without changing internal properties. In this paper composite polymer/paper material is used for production of packaging in cosmetic industry. There are problems with bonding this material at the time of packaging production due to its properties. Composite surface was treated by air plasma for 1, 10, 20, and 30 s. The advancing and receding contact angles of water, formamide, and diiodomethane were measured using both treated and untreated samples. Apparent surface free energy was estimated using the hysteresis (CAH and Van Oss, Good, Chaudhury approaches (LWAB. Surface roughness was investigated using optical profilometry and identification of after plasma treatment emerging chemical groups was made by means of the XPS (X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy technique. After plasma treatment the values of contact angles decreased which is particularly evident for polar liquids. Apparent surface free energy increased compared to that of untreated samples. Changes of energy value are due to the electron-donor parameter of energy. This parameter increases as a result of adding polar groups at the time of surface plasma activation. Changes of surface properties are combination of increase of polar chemical functional groups, increase on the surface, and surface roughness increase.

  18. Initial evaluation and comparison of plasma damage to atomic layer carbon materials using conventional and low T{sub e} plasma sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jagtiani, Ashish V.; Miyazoe, Hiroyuki; Chang, Josephine; Farmer, Damon B.; Engel, Michael; Neumayer, Deborah; Han, Shu-Jen; Engelmann, Sebastian U., E-mail: suengelm@us.ibm.com; Joseph, Eric A. [IBM, T. J. Watson Research Center, Yorktown Heights, New York 10598 (United States); Boris, David R.; Hernández, Sandra C.; Walton, Scott G. [Plasma Physics Division, Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, DC 20375 (United States); Lock, Evgeniya H. [Materials Science and Technology Division, Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, DC 20375 (United States)

    2016-01-15

    The ability to achieve atomic layer precision is the utmost goal in the implementation of atomic layer etch technology. Carbon-based materials such as carbon nanotubes (CNTs) and graphene are single atomic layers of carbon with unique properties and, as such, represent the ultimate candidates to study the ability to process with atomic layer precision and assess impact of plasma damage to atomic layer materials. In this work, the authors use these materials to evaluate the atomic layer processing capabilities of electron beam generated plasmas. First, the authors evaluate damage to semiconducting CNTs when exposed to beam-generated plasmas and compare these results against the results using typical plasma used in semiconductor processing. The authors find that the beam generated plasma resulted in significantly lower current degradation in comparison to typical plasmas. Next, the authors evaluated the use of electron beam generated plasmas to process graphene-based devices by functionalizing graphene with fluorine, nitrogen, or oxygen to facilitate atomic layer deposition (ALD). The authors found that all adsorbed species resulted in successful ALD with varying impact on the transconductance of the graphene. Furthermore, the authors compare the ability of both beam generated plasma as well as a conventional low ion energy inductively coupled plasma (ICP) to remove silicon nitride (SiN) deposited on top of the graphene films. Our results indicate that, while both systems can remove SiN, an increase in the D/G ratio from 0.08 for unprocessed graphene to 0.22 to 0.26 for the beam generated plasma, while the ICP yielded values from 0.52 to 1.78. Generally, while some plasma-induced damage was seen for both plasma sources, a much wider process window as well as far less damage to CNTs and graphene was observed when using electron beam generated plasmas.

  19. Roles of texture and latent hardening on plastic anisotropy of face-centered-cubic materials during multi-axial loading

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pham, M. S.; Creuziger, A.; Iadicola, M.; Rollett, A. D.

    2017-02-01

    This study investigates the joint impact of preferred texture and latent hardening on the plastic anisotropy of face centered cubic (FCC) materials. The main result is that both aspects have significant impact on the anisotropy, but the two can either counteract each other or synergistically reinforce each other to maximize anisotropy. Preferred texture results in significant anisotropy in plastic yielding. However, the latent hardening significantly alters the texture-induced anisotropy. In addition, one latent hardening type can cancel out the anisotropy of another type. Consequently, if all dislocation-based latent hardening types are included at the same level as the self-hardening, the result might not reveal the complexity of plastic anisotropy. The present study of the synergistic influence of detailed latent hardening and texture presented helps provide new insights into the complex anisotropic behavior of FCC materials during multi-axial forming. the stress at which the material initially yields is not a function of material orientation with respect to the frame of the test (i.e., isotropic yielding); there exists a multi-axial yield locus that is described by a single value of stress that corresponds to yield in uniaxial tension (i.e., stress equivalency); on hardening, the multi-axial yield locus expands by the same amount in every direction in the π-plane, which is the plane that has its normal parallel to [111] in the deviatoric stress space (i.e., isotropic hardening); there is an associated flow rule, i.e., the strain increment is normal to the yield locus.

  20. Direct Current and Pulsed Direct Current Plasma Nitriding of Ferrous Materials a Critical Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Łępicka Magdalena

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays, the improvement of ferrous materials performance is a problem of high interest. One of well-known wear- and corrosion properties improving technique is plasma nitriding, in which elemental nitrogen is introduced to the surface of a metal part for subsequent diffusion into the material. As a result, a compound, “white” layer and a diffusion zone are formed at the detail’s surface. Most of the authors positively describe the effects of surface ion nitiding. On the other hand, there are also reports on adverse effects of direct current and pulsed direct current plasma nitriding on ferrous materials performance. Therefore, an attempt to provide comprehensive summary on direct current and pulsed direct current ion nitriding and its influence on ferrous materials’ mechanical and corrosion properties has been made. According to the results, some of the technique drawbacks are hard to avoid in mass production.

  1. Numerical modeling of disperse material evaporation in axisymmetric thermal plasma reactor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefanović Predrag Lj.

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available A numerical 3D Euler-Lagrangian stochastic-deterministic (LSD model of two-phase flow laden with solid particles was developed. The model includes the relevant physical effects, namely phase interaction, panicle dispersion by turbulence, lift forces, particle-particle collisions, particle-wall collisions, heat and mass transfer between phases, melting and evaporation of particles, vapour diffusion in the gas flow. It was applied to simulate the processes in thermal plasma reactors, designed for the production of the ceramic powders. Paper presents results of extensive numerical simulation provided (a to determine critical mechanism of interphase heat and mass transfer in plasma flows, (b to show relative influence of some plasma reactor parameters on solid precursor evaporation efficiency: 1 - inlet plasma temperature, 2 - inlet plasma velocity, 3 - particle initial diameter, 4 - particle injection angle a, and 5 - reactor wall temperature, (c to analyze the possibilities for high evaporation efficiency of different starting solid precursors (Si, Al, Ti, and B2O3 powder, and (d to compare different plasma reactor configurations in conjunction with disperse material evaporation efficiency.

  2. Influence of the ion bombardment of O{sub 2} plasmas on low-k materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Verdonck, Patrick, E-mail: verdonck@imec.be [IMEC, Kapeldreef 75, 3001 Leuven (Belgium); Samara, Vladimir [IMEC, Kapeldreef 75, 3001 Leuven (Belgium); Open University, Materials Engineering, Walton Hall, Milton Keynes MK7 6AA (United Kingdom); Goodyear, Alec [Open University, Materials Engineering, Walton Hall, Milton Keynes MK7 6AA (United Kingdom); Ferchichi, Abdelkarim; Van Besien, Els; Baklanov, Mikhail R. [IMEC, Kapeldreef 75, 3001 Leuven (Belgium); Braithwaite, Nicholas [Open University, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Walton Hall, Milton Keynes MK7 6AA (United Kingdom)

    2011-10-31

    In this study, special tests were devised in order to investigate the influence of ion bombardment on the damage induced in low-k dielectrics by oxygen plasmas. By placing a sample that suffered a lot of ion bombardment and one which suffered little ion bombardment simultaneously in the same plasma, it was possible to verify that ion bombardment in fact helped to protect the low-k film against oxygen plasma induced damage. Exhaustive analyses (ellipsometry, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, porosimetry, capacitance-voltage (C-V) measurements, water contact angle analysis) show that ion bombardment induced the formation of a denser top layer in the film, which then hampered further penetration of active oxygen species deeper into the bulk. This was further confirmed by other tests combining capacitively and inductively coupled plasmas. Therefore, it was possible to conclude that, at least for these plasmas, ion bombardment may help to reduce plasma induced damage to low-k materials.

  3. Evaluation of observable phase space by fast ion loss detector by calculating particle orbits in consideration of plasma facing components and three dimensional magnetic field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shinohara, Kouji; Kim, Junghee; Kim, Jun Young; Rhee, Tongnyeol

    2016-11-01

    The orbits of lost ions can be calculated from the information obtained by a fast ion loss detector (FILD). The orbits suggest a source of the lost fast ions in a phase space. However, it is not obvious whether an observable set of orbits, or phase space, of a FILD appropriately covers the region of interest to be investigated since the observable phase space can be affected by plasma facing components (PFCs) and a magnetic configuration. A tool has been developed to evaluate the observable phase space of FILD diagnostic by calculating particle orbits by taking the PFCs and 3D magnetic field into account.

  4. Surface band bending and band alignment of plasma enhanced atomic layer deposited dielectrics on Ga- and N-face gallium nitride

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jialing; Eller, Brianna S.; Nemanich, Robert J.

    2014-09-01

    The effects of surface pretreatment, dielectric growth, and post deposition annealing on interface electronic structure and polarization charge compensation of Ga- and N-face bulk GaN were investigated. The cleaning process consisted of an ex-situ wet chemical NH4OH treatment and an in-situ elevated temperature NH3 plasma process to remove carbon contamination, reduce oxygen coverage, and potentially passivate N-vacancy related defects. After the cleaning process, carbon contamination decreased below the x-ray photoemission spectroscopy detection limit, and the oxygen coverage stabilized at ˜1 monolayer on both Ga- and N-face GaN. In addition, Ga- and N-face GaN had an upward band bending of 0.8 ± 0.1 eV and 0.6 ± 0.1 eV, respectively, which suggested the net charge of the surface states and polarization bound charge was similar on Ga- and N-face GaN. Furthermore, three dielectrics (HfO2, Al2O3, and SiO2) were prepared by plasma-enhanced atomic layer deposition on Ga- or N-face GaN and annealed in N2 ambient to investigate the effect of the polarization charge on the interface electronic structure and band offsets. The respective valence band offsets of HfO2, Al2O3, and SiO2 with respect to Ga- and N-face GaN were 1.4 ± 0.1, 2.0 ± 0.1, and 3.2 ± 0.1 eV, regardless of dielectric thickness. The corresponding conduction band offsets were 1.0 ± 0.1, 1.3 ± 0.1, and 2.3 ± 0.1 eV, respectively. Experimental band offset results were consistent with theoretical calculations based on the charge neutrality level model. The trend of band offsets for dielectric/GaN interfaces was related to the band gap and/or the electronic part of the dielectric constant. The effect of polarization charge on band offset was apparently screened by the dielectric-GaN interface states.

  5. Collaborative Research. Fundamental Science of Low Temperature Plasma-Biological Material Interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Graves, David Barry [Univ. California, Berkeley, CA (United States); Oehrlein, Gottlieb [Univ. of Maryland, College Park, MD (United States)

    2014-09-01

    atmospheric pressure using several types of low temperature plasma sources, for which radical induced interactions generally dominate due to short mean free paths of ions and VUV photons. For these conditions we demonstrated the importance of environmental interactions when atmospheric pressure plasma sources are used to modify biomolecules. This is evident from both gas phase characterization data and in-situ surface characterization of treated biomolecules. Environmental interactions can produce unexpected outcomes due to the complexity of reactions of reactive species with the atmosphere which determines the composition of reactive fluxes and atomistic changes of biomolecules. Overall, this work clarified a richer spectrum of scientific opportunities and challenges for the field of low temperature plasma-biomolecule surface interactions than initially anticipated, in particular for plasma sources operating at atmospheric pressure. The insights produced in this work, e.g. demonstration of the importance of environmental interactions, are generally important for applications of APP to materials modifications. Thus one major contributions of this research has been the establishment of methodologies to more systematically study the interaction of plasma with bio-molecules. In particular, our studies of atmospheric pressure plasma sources using very well-defined experimental conditions enabled to combine atomistic surface modifications of biomolecules with changes in their biological function. The clarification of the role of ions, VUV photons and radicals in deactivation of biomolecules during low pressure and atmospheric pressure plasma-biomolecule interaction has broad implications, e.g. for the emerging field of plasma medicine. The development of methods to detect the effects of plasma treatment on immune-active biomolecules will be helpful in many future studies.

  6. Spallation occurrence from polyamide materials irradiated by thermal plasma with water absorption

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakano, Tomoyuki; Tanaka, Yasunori; Nakagawa, T.; Shinsei, N.; Uesugi, Y.; Ishijima, T.

    2016-09-01

    This paper first describes the effect of water absorption in polyamide material irradiated by thermal plasmas on the occurrence of spallation phenomena. The interaction between polyamide materials and arc plasmas occurs particularly in the low voltage circuit breaker and aerospace fields. Spallation phenomena are those in which polymer particles are ejected from polymer bulk materials irradiated by high heat flux. To confirm the effect of water absorption into the polyamide material on spallation phenomena, polyamide specimens with and without water absorption were irradiated by Ar inductively coupled thermal plasma. The results show that the polyamide specimen with water absorption ejected spallation particles, whereas the polyamide specimen without water absorption were only slightly ejected, indicating that water absorption promotes the occurrence of spallation. The cooling effects of the spallation polyamide 66 (PA66) particles ablation were also estimated in hot air to assess the arc quenching ability from the spallation particle inclusion. This estimation showed that 10 and more PA66 particles inclusion might decrease the air temperature by 3000 K effectively, which can be useful to enhance arc quenching in circuit breakers working in air.

  7. Mechanical Properties of Air Plasma Sprayed Environmental Barrier Coating (EBC) Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richards, Bradley; Zhu, Dongming; Ghosn, Louis; Wadley, Haydn

    2015-01-01

    Development work in Environmental Barrier Coatings (EBCs) for Ceramic Matrix Composites (CMCs) has focused considerably on the identification of materials systems and coating architectures to meet application needs. The evolution of these systems has occurred so quickly that modeling efforts and requisite data for modeling lag considerably behind development. Materials property data exists for many systems in the bulk form, but the effects of deposition on the critical properties of strength and fracture behavior are not well studied. We have plasma sprayed bulk samples of baseline EBC materials (silicon, ytterbium disilicate) and tested the mechanical properties of these materials to elicit differences in strength and toughness. We have also endeavored to assess the mixed-mode fracture resistance, Gc, of silicon in a baseline EBC applied to SiCSiC CMC via four point bend test. These results are compared to previously determined properties of the comparable bulk material.

  8. Investigation of Atmospheric Plasma Discharge and Its Application to Surface Modification of Textile Materials

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    TANG Xiao-liang; QIU Gao; FENG Xian-ping; YAN Yong-hui; SHI Yun-cheng; YAN Zhi-ren; WANG Liang

    2005-01-01

    In this paper, an improved quasi-stable atmospheric pressure dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) plasma source is achieved after carefully controlled discharge voltage and current, discharge power, working gas, treatment period,and gap between the electrodes. This plasma source has been used to modify the surface of Polybutylene Terephthalate (PBT) melt-blown nonwovens and Polyester(PET) fabrics, and the various influences on surface modification and the aging effeet of treated polymeric materials have been systematically investigated. In addition, the method of spectrum analysis is also used for diagnosing plasma parameters such as electron temperature.Experimental results indicate that both the wettablity and permeation of treated PBT melt-blown nonwovens and dyeing ability of treated PET fabrics are certainly improved.

  9. Silica nanoparticles produced by DC arc plasma from a solid raw materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kosmachev, P. V.; Vlasov, V. A.; Skripnikova, N. K.

    2017-05-01

    Plasma synthesis of SiO2 nanoparticles in experimental atmospheric pressure plasma reactor on the basis of DC arc plasma generator was presented in this paper. Solid high-silica raw materials such as diatomite from Kamyshlovskoye deposit in Russia, quartzite from Chupinskoye deposit in Russia and milled window glass were used. The obtained nanoparticles were characterized based on their morphology, chemical composition and size distribution. Scanning electron microscopy, laser diffractometry, nitrogen absorption (Brunauer-Emmett-Teller method), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy were used to characterize the synthesized products. The obtained silica nanoparticles are agglomerated, have spherical shape and primary diameters between 10-300 nm. All samples of synthesized nanopowders were compared with commercial nanopowders.

  10. Basic features of low-temperature plasma formation in the course of composite coating synthesis at the active faces of complex contoured hard tools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brzhozovsky, B. M.; Zimnyakov, D. A.; Zinina, E. P.; Martynov, V. V.; Pleshakova, E. S.; Yuvchenko, S. A.

    2016-04-01

    Basic features of combined-discharge low-temperature plasma formation around the surfaces of complex-contoured metal units are considered. It is shown that it makes the possibilities for synthesis of hardened high-durable coatings of hard tools appropriate for material processing in extreme load-temperature conditions. Experimental study of the coating formation was carried out in combination with the analysis of emission spectra of a low-temperature plasma cloud. Some practical examples of the coating applications are presented.

  11. Nano-droplet ejection and nucleation of materials submitted to non-thermal plasma filaments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borra, J.-P.; Jidenko, N.; Dutouquet, C.; Aguerre, O.; Hou, J.; Weber, A.

    2011-11-01

    Methods to induce non-thermal atmospheric pressure plasma filaments are presented with related properties for micro, streamer and prevented spark discharges, respectively, induced in planar Dielectric Barrier Discharges with one electrode covered by dielectric material (mono-DBD) or point-to-plane Corona. Two mechanisms of nano-particles formation are depicted from aerosol size distributions and TEM analysis. 0.1-10 mJ prevented spark discharges produce 10-100 nm droplets ejected from melted craters as well as nucleated primary particles and subsequent 10-100 nm agglomerates, by nucleation and coagulation in expanding vapor jets. With smaller energy per filament, 0.1-10 μJ micro-discharges and 0.1-100 μJ streamers, the initial local vapor fluxes emitted from spots of interaction between plasma filaments and electrodes are reduced. Subsequent smaller primary particle density limits the local coagulation in the vapor plume since 2-10 nm non-agglomerated crystalline metal nano-particles are produced in mono-DBD with Au, Ag and Cu electrode. Besides, the evolution of the aerosol size from primary nano-particles to agglomerates with transit time suggests slow coagulation of these primary metal particles in mono-DBD. Aerosol properties depend on the energy per filament and on the electrode. The final size is controlled by plasma parameters and transit time in and after the plasma. The aim is to underline emerging applications of atmospheric pressure plasmas for the production of tailored particles with tunable size, composition and structure with non-thermal plasma filaments to control the resulting properties of nano-powders and materials. Production rates and related energetic yields are compared.

  12. Plasma immersion ion implantation for the efficient surface modification of medical materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Slabodchikov, Vladimir A., E-mail: dipis1991@mail.ru; Borisov, Dmitry P., E-mail: borengin@mail.ru; Kuznetsov, Vladimir M., E-mail: kuznetsov@rec.tsu.ru [National Research Tomsk State University, Tomsk, 634050 (Russian Federation)

    2015-10-27

    The paper reports on a new method of plasma immersion ion implantation for the surface modification of medical materials using the example of nickel-titanium (NiTi) alloys much used for manufacturing medical implants. The chemical composition and surface properties of NiTi alloys doped with silicon by conventional ion implantation and by the proposed plasma immersion method are compared. It is shown that the new plasma immersion method is more efficient than conventional ion beam treatment and provides Si implantation into NiTi surface layers through a depth of a hundred nanometers at low bias voltages (400 V) and temperatures (≤150°C) of the substrate. The research results suggest that the chemical composition and surface properties of materials required for medicine, e.g., NiTi alloys, can be successfully attained through modification by the proposed method of plasma immersion ion implantation and by other methods based on the proposed vacuum equipment without using any conventional ion beam treatment.

  13. Plasma methods of obtainment of multifunctional composite materials, dispersion-hardened by nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sizonenko, O. N.; Grigoryev, E. G.; Zaichenko, A. D.; Pristash, N. S.; Torpakov, A. S.; Lipyan, Ye V.; Tregub, V. A.; Zholnin, A. G.; Yudin, A. V.; Kovalenko, A. A.

    2016-04-01

    The new approach in developed plasma methods consists in that dispersionhardening additives (TiC, TiB2 in particular) are not mechanically added to powder mixture as additional component, as in conventional methods, but are instead synthesized during high voltage electric discharges (HVED) in disperse system “hydrocarbon liquid - powder” preservation of ultrafine structure is ensured due to use of spark plasma sintering (SPS) as a consolidation method. HVED in disperse system “hydrocarbon liquid - powder” due to impact of plasma discharge channel, electromagnetic fields, shock waves mechanical impact, hydro flows and volume microcavitation leads to synthesis of nanocarbon, metal powders dispersion and synthesis of micro- (from 10-6 to 10-7 m) and nanosized (from 10-7 to 10-9 m) composite powders of hardening phases. SPS is the passage of pulsed current (superposition of direct and alternating current) through powder with the simultaneous mechanical compressing. The formation of plasma is initiated in gaseous phase that fills gaps between particles. SPS allows targeted control of grain growth rate and thus allows obtainment of multifunctional composite materials dispersion hardened by nanoparticles. Processes of HVED synthesis of micro- and nanosized powders of new compositions from elemental metal powders and their mixtures with the subsequent application of high-speed SPS of obtained powders create conditions for increase of strength (by 10 - 20%), hardness and wear-resistance (by 30 - 60%) of obtained materials.

  14. The effect of plasma surface treatment on the bioactivity of titanium implant materials (in vitro).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdelrahim, Ramy A; Badr, Nadia A; Baroudi, Kusai

    2016-01-01

    The surface of an implantable biomaterial plays a very important role in determining the biocompatibility, osteoinduction, and osteointegration of implants because it is in intimate contact with the host bone and soft tissues. This study was aimed to assess the effect of plasma surface treatment on the bioactivity of titanium alloy (Ti-6Al-4V). Fifteen titanium alloy samples were used in this study. The samples were divided into three groups (with five samples in each group). Five samples were kept untreated and served as control (group A). Another five plasma samples were sprayed for nitrogen ion implantation on their surfaces (group B) and the last five samples were pre-etched with acid before plasma treatment (group C). All the investigated samples were immersed for 7 days in Hank's balanced salt solution (HBSS) which was used as a simulating body fluid (SBF) at pH 7.4 and 37°C. HBSS was renewed every 3 days. The different surfaces were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM), Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM), Energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDXA), and Fourier Transformation Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR). Nitriding of Ti-alloy samples via plasma nitrogen ion implantation increased the bioactivity of titanium. Moreover, the surface topography affected the chemical structure of the formed apatite. Increasing the surface roughness enhanced the bioactivity of the implant material. Nitridation can be exploited as an effective way to promote the formation of bone-like material on the implant surface.

  15. Characterization of the axial plasma shock in a table top plasma focus after the pinch and its possible application to testing materials for fusion reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soto, Leopoldo, E-mail: lsoto@cchen.cl; Pavez, Cristian; Moreno, José [Comisión Chilena de Energía Nuclear, Casilla 188-D, Santiago (Chile); Centro de Investigación y Aplicaciones en Física de Plasmas y Potencia Pulsada, P" 4, Santiago-Talca (Chile); Departamento de Ciencias Físicas, Facultad de Ciencias Exactas, Universidad Andrés Bello, República 220, Santiago (Chile); Inestrosa-Izurieta, María José [Comisión Chilena de Energía Nuclear, Casilla 188-D, Santiago (Chile); Centro de Investigación y Aplicaciones en Física de Plasmas y Potencia Pulsada, P" 4, Santiago-Talca (Chile); Veloso, Felipe [Instituto de Física, Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile, Santiago (Chile); Gutiérrez, Gonzalo [Departamento de Física, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad de Chile, Santiago (Chile); Vergara, Julio [Facultad de Ingeniería, Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile, Santiago (Chile); Clausse, Alejandro [CNEA-CONICET and Universidad Nacional del Centro, 7000 Tandil (Argentina); Bruzzone, Horacio [CONICET and Universidad de Mar del Plata, Mar del Plata (Argentina); Castillo, Fermín [Instituto de Ciencias Físicas, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, Cuernavaca, Morelos (Mexico); and others

    2014-12-15

    The characterization of plasma bursts produced after the pinch phase in a plasma focus of hundreds of joules, using pulsed optical refractive techniques, is presented. A pulsed Nd-YAG laser at 532 nm and 8 ns FWHM pulse duration was used to obtain Schlieren images at different times of the plasma dynamics. The energy, interaction time with a target, and power flux of the plasma burst were assessed, providing useful information for the application of plasma focus devices for studying the effects of fusion-relevant pulses on material targets. In particular, it was found that damage factors on targets of the order of 10{sup 4} (W/cm{sup 2})s{sup 1/2} can be obtained with a small plasma focus operating at hundred joules.

  16. Direct Synthesis of Porous Multilayer Graphene Materials Using Thermal Plasma at Low Pressure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ravil Amirov

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Porous multilayer graphenes have been synthesized by decomposition of hydrocarbons in a thermal plasma jet. Products of synthesis were characterized by electron microscopy, thermogravimetry, Raman spectroscopy, and X-ray diffraction. Possibility of producing a wide range of graphene materials with different morphology and structure has been shown. Influence of the experimental conditions on mesopores structure of the synthesis products has been investigated using the method of “limited evaporation.”

  17. Ceramic Top Coats of Plasma-Sprayed Thermal Barrier Coatings: Materials, Processes, and Properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakan, Emine; Vaßen, Robert

    2017-08-01

    The ceramic top coat has a major influence on the performance of the thermal barrier coating systems (TBCs). Yttria-partially-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) is the top coat material frequently used, and the major deposition processes of the YSZ top coat are atmospheric plasma spraying and electron beam physical vapor deposition. Recently, also new thermal spray processes such as suspension plasma spraying or plasma spray-physical vapor deposition have been intensively investigated for TBC top coat deposition. These new processes and particularly the different coating microstructures that can be deposited with them will be reviewed in this article. Furthermore, the properties and the intrinsic-extrinsic degradation mechanisms of the YSZ will be discussed. Following the TBC deposition processes and standard YSZ material, alternative ceramic materials such as perovskites and hexaaluminates will be summarized, while properties of pyrochlores with regard to their crystal structure will be discussed more in detail. The merits of the pyrochlores such as good CMAS resistance as well as their weaknesses, e.g., low fracture toughness, processability issues, will be outlined.

  18. Plasma Decontamination: A Case Study on Kill Efficacy of Geobacillus stearothermophilus Spores on Different Carrier Materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Semmler, Egmont; Novak, Wenzel; Allinson, Wilf; Wallis, Darren; Wood, Nigel; Awakowicz, Peter; Wunderlich, Joachim

    2016-01-01

    A new technology to the pharmaceutical field is presented: surface decontamination by plasmas The technology is comparable to established barrier systems like e-beam, volatile hydrogen peroxide, or radiation inactivation of microbiological contaminations. This plasma technology is part of a fully automated and validated syringe filling line at a major pharmaceutical company and is in production operation. Incoming pre-sterilized syringe containers ("tubs") are processed by plasma, solely on the outside, and passed into the aseptic filling isolator upon successful decontamination. The objective of this article is to present the operating principles and develop and establish a validation routine on the basis of standard commercial biological indicators. Their decontamination efficacies are determined and correlated to the actual inactivation efficacy on the pharmaceutical packaging material.The reference setup is explained in detail and a short presentation of the cycle development and the relevant plasma control parameters is given, with a special focus on the in-process monitor determining the cycle validity. Different microbial inactivation mechanisms are also discussed and evaluated for their contribution and interaction to enhance plasma decontamination. A material-dependent inactivation behavior was observed. In order to be able to correlate the tub surface inactivation of Geobacillus stearothermophilus endospores to metallic biological indicators, a comparative study was performed. Through consistently demonstrating the linear inactivation behavior between the different materials, it becomes possible to develop an effective and time-saving validation scheme. The challenge in new decontamination systems lies in a thorough validation of the inactivation efficacy under different operating regimes. With plasma, as an ionized gas, a new barrier concept is introduced into pharmaceutical aseptic processing of syringes. The presented system operates in vacuum and only

  19. Energy deposition characteristics of nanosecond dielectric barrier discharge plasma actuators: Influence of dielectric material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Correale, G.; Winkel, R.; Kotsonis, M.

    2015-08-01

    An experimental study aimed at the characterization of energy deposition of nanosecond Dielectric Barrier Discharge (ns-DBD) plasma actuators was carried out. Special attention was given on the effect of the thickness and material used for dielectric barrier. The selected materials for this study were polyimide film (Kapton), polyamide based nylon (PA2200), and silicone rubber. Schlieren measurements were carried out in quiescent air conditions in order to observe density gradients induced by energy deposited. Size of heated area was used to qualify the energy deposition coupled with electrical power measurements performed using the back-current shunt technique. Additionally, light intensity measurements showed a different nature of discharge based upon the material used for barrier, for a fixed thickness and frequency of discharge. Finally, a characterisation study was performed for the three tested materials. Dielectric constant, volume resistivity, and thermal conductivity were measured. Strong trends between the control parameters and the energy deposited into the fluid during the discharge were observed. Results indicate that efficiency of energy deposition mechanism relative to the thickness of the barrier strongly depends upon the material used for the dielectric barrier itself. In general, a high dielectric strength and a low volumetric resistivity are preferred for a barrier, together with a high heat capacitance and a low thermal conductivity coefficient in order to maximize the efficiency of the thermal energy deposition induced by an ns-DBD plasma actuator.

  20. Zirconium carbonitride pellets by internal sol gel and spark plasma sintering as inert matrix fuel material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hedberg, Marcus; Cologna, Marco; Cambriani, Andrea; Somers, Joseph; Ekberg, Christian

    2016-10-01

    Inert matrix fuel is a fuel type where the fissile material is blended with a solid diluent material. In this work zirconium carbonitride microspheres have been produced by internal sol gel technique, followed by carbothermal reduction. Material nitride purities in the produced materials ranged from Zr(N0.45C0.55) to Zr(N0.74C0.26) as determined by X-ray diffraction and application of Vegard's law. The zirconium carbonitride microspheres have been pelletized by spark plasma sintering (SPS) and by conventional cold pressing and sintering. In all SPS experiments cohesive pellets were formed. Maximum final density reached by SPS at 1700 °C was 87% theoretical density (TD) compared to 53% TD in conventional sintering at 1700 °C. Pore sizes in all the produced pellets were in the μm scale and no density gradients could be observed by computer tomography.

  1. Plasma-treated polyethylene film: A smart material applied for Salmonella Typhimurium detection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peng-Ubol, Triranat [Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science, Mahidol University, Rama 6 Rd, Phayathai, Bangkok 10400 (Thailand); Phinyocheep, Pranee, E-mail: scppo@mahidol.ac.th [Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science, Mahidol University, Rama 6 Rd, Phayathai, Bangkok 10400 (Thailand); Daniel, Philippe [Laboratoire de Physique de l' Etat Condense (LPEC-UMR CNRS 6087), Universite du Maine, Avenue Olivier Messiaen, 72085, Le Mans Cedex 9 (France); Panbangred, Watanalai [Department of Biotechnology and Mahidol University-Osaka University Collaborative Research Center for Bioscience and Biotechnology (MU-OU: CRC), Faculty of Science, Mahidol University, Rama 6 Rd, Phayathai, Bangkok 10400 (Thailand); Pilard, Jean-Francois [Unite de Chimie Organique Moleculaire et Macromoleculaire (UCO2M-UMR CNRS 6011), Universite du Maine, Avenue Olivier Messiaen, 72085 Le Mans Cedex 9 (France); Thouand, Gerald; Durand-Thouand, Marie-Jose [Genie des Procedes Environnement et Agroalimentaire (GEPEA UMR CNRS 6144), Departement Genie Biologique, IUT de la Roche/Yon, Universite de Nantes, 18 Bd G. Defferre, 85035 La Roche sur Yon (France)

    2012-12-01

    Salmonella is a major cause of foodborne illness worldwide and is not allowed to be present in any food in all countries. The purpose of this study is to develop a simple alternative method for the detection of Salmonella based on functionalized polyethylene (PE) surfaces. Salmonella Typhimurium was used as a model bacterium. PE film was treated using dielectric plasma in order to alter the wettability of the PE surface and consequently introduce functionality on the surface. The PE film characterized by ATR-FTIR spectroscopy revealed the presence of C=O stretching of ketones, aldehydes and carboxylic acids. The antibodies against O or H antigens of Salmonella and S. Typhimurium were then respectively immobilized on the PE surface after activation of the carboxylic group using NHS/EDC followed by protein A. The evidences from ATR-FTIR, scanning electron microscopy and optical microscopy showed the presence of S. Typhimurium attached to the plasma treated PE surfaces via the two types of anti-Salmonella antibody. The plasma treated PE film developed is simple and allows efficient association of bacterial cells on the treated surfaces without the necessity of time-consuming centrifugation and washing steps for isolation of the cells. This material is considered to be a smart material applicable for S. Typhimurium detection. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We developed a functionalized polyethylene film for bacterial detection. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We modified the surface of polyethylene film by plasma treatment. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer ATR-FTIR spectroscopy was used to analyze the functionality on the PE surface. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We introduced Salmonella Typhimurium on the modified PE film. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer SEM revealed the presence of S. Typhimurium on the plasma treated PE film.

  2. UV excimer laser and low temperature plasma treatments of polyamide materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yip, Yiu Wan Joanne

    Polyamides have found widespread application in various industrial sectors, for example, they are used in apparel, home furnishings and similar uses. However, the requirements for high quality performance products are continually increasing and these promote a variety of surface treatments for polymer modification. UV excimer laser and low temperature plasma treatments are ideally suited for polyamide modification because they can change the physical and chemical properties of the material without affecting its bulk features. This project aimed to study the modification of polyamides by UV excimer laser irradiation and low temperature plasma treatment. The morphological changes in the resulting samples were analysed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and tapping mode atomic force microscopy (TM-AFM). The chemical modifications were studied by x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (ToF-SIMS) and chemical force microscopy (CFM). Change in degree of crystallinity was examined by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). After high-fluence laser irradiation, topographical results showed that ripples of micrometer size form on the fibre surface. By contrast, sub-micrometer size structures form on the polyamide surface when the applied laser energy is well below its ablation threshold. After high-fluence laser irradiation, chemical studies showed that the surface oxygen content of polyamide is reduced. A reverse result is obtained with low-fluence treatment. The DSC result showed no significant change in degree of crystallinity in either high-fluence or low-fluence treated samples. The same modifications in polyamide surfaces were studied after low temperature plasma treatment with oxygen, argon or tetrafluoromethane gas. The most significant result was that the surface oxygen content of polyamide increased after oxygen and argon plasma treatments. Both treatments induced many hydroxyl (-OH) and carboxylic acid (-COOH

  3. Fast plasma sintering delivers functional graded materials components with macroporous structures and osseointegration properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godoy, R F; Coathup, M J; Blunn, G W; Alves, A L; Robotti, P; Goodship, A E

    2016-04-13

    We explored the osseointegration potential of two macroporous titanium surfaces obtained using fast plasma sintering (FPS): Ti macroporous structures with 400-600 µmØ pores (TiMac400) and 850-1000 µmØ pores (TiMac850). They were compared against two surfaces currently in clinical use: Ti-Growth® and air plasma spray (Ti-Y367). Each surface was tested, once placed over a Ti-alloy and once onto a CoCr bulk substrate. Implants were placed in medial femoral condyles in 24 sheep. Samples were explanted at four and eight weeks after surgery. Push-out loads were measured using a material-testing system. Bone contact and ingrowth were assessed by histomorphometry and SEM and EDX analyses. Histology showed early osseointegration for all the surfaces tested. At 8 weeks, TiMac400, TiMac850 and Ti-Growth® showed deep bone ingrowth and extended colonisation with newly formed bone. The mechanical push-out force was equal in all tested surfaces. Plasma spray surfaces showed greater bone-implant contact and higher level of pores colonisation with new bone than FPS produced surfaces. However, the void pore area in FPS specimens was significantly higher, yet the FPS porous surfaces allowed a deeper osseointegration of bone to implant. FPS manufactured specimens showed similar osseointegration potential to the plasma spray surfaces for orthopaedic implants. FPS is a useful technology for manufacturing macroporous titanium surfaces. Furthermore, its capability to combine two implantable materials, using bulk CoCr with macroporous titanium surfaces, could be of interest as it enables designers to conceive and manufacture innovative components. FPS delivers functional graded materials components with macroporous structures optimised for osseointegration.

  4. Microwave Plasma Synthesis of Materials—From Physics and Chemistry to Nanoparticles: A Materials Scientist’s Viewpoint

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dorothée Vinga Szabó

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available In this review, microwave plasma gas-phase synthesis of inorganic materials and material groups is discussed from the application-oriented perspective of a materials scientist: why and how microwave plasmas are applied for the synthesis of materials? First, key players in this research field will be identified, and a brief overview on publication history on this topic is given. The fundamental basics, necessary to understand the processes ongoing in particle synthesis—one of the main applications of microwave plasma processes—and the influence of the relevant experimental parameters on the resulting particles and their properties will be addressed. The benefit of using microwave plasma instead of conventional gas phase processes with respect to chemical reactivity and crystallite nucleation will be reviewed. The criteria, how to choose an appropriate precursor to synthesize a specific material with an intended application is discussed. A tabular overview on all type of materials synthesized in microwave plasmas and other plasma methods will be given, including relevant citations. Finally, property examples of three groups of nanomaterials synthesized with microwave plasma methods, bare Fe2O3 nanoparticles, different core/shell ceramic/organic shell nanoparticles, and Sn-based nanocomposites, will be described exemplarily, comprising perspectives of applications.

  5. Wall ablation of heated compound-materials into non-equilibrium discharge plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Weizong; Kong, Linghan; Geng, Jinyue; Wei, Fuzhi; Xia, Guangqing

    2017-02-01

    The discharge properties of the plasma bulk flow near the surface of heated compound-materials strongly affects the kinetic layer parameters modeled and manifested in the Knudsen layer. This paper extends the widely used two-layer kinetic ablation model to the ablation controlled non-equilibrium discharge due to the fact that the local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE) approximation is often violated as a result of the interaction between the plasma and solid walls. Modifications to the governing set of equations, to account for this effect, are derived and presented by assuming that the temperature of the electrons deviates from that of the heavy particles. The ablation characteristics of one typical material, polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) are calculated with this improved model. The internal degrees of freedom as well as the average particle mass and specific heat ratio of the polyatomic vapor, which strongly depends on the temperature, pressure and plasma non-equilibrium degree and plays a crucial role in the accurate determination of the ablation behavior by this model, are also taken into account. Our assessment showed the significance of including such modifications related to the non-equilibrium effect in the study of vaporization of heated compound materials in ablation controlled arcs. Additionally, a two-temperature magneto-hydrodynamic (MHD) model accounting for the thermal non-equilibrium occurring near the wall surface is developed and applied into an ablation-dominated discharge for an electro-thermal chemical launch device. Special attention is paid to the interaction between the non-equilibrium plasma and the solid propellant surface. Both the mass exchange process caused by the wall ablation and plasma species deposition as well as the associated momentum and energy exchange processes are taken into account. A detailed comparison of the results of the non-equilibrium model with those of an equilibrium model is presented. The non-equilibrium results

  6. The differing behavior of electrosurgical devices made of various electrode materials operating under plasma conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stalder, K. R.; Ryan, T. P.; Gaspredes, J.; Woloszko, J.

    2015-03-01

    Coblation® is an electrosurgical technology which employs electrically-excited electrodes in the presence of saline solution to produce a localized and ionized plasma that can cut, ablate, and otherwise treat tissues for many different surgical needs. To improve our understanding of how Coblation plasmas develop from devices made from different electrode materials we describe several experiments designed to elucidate material effects. Initial experiments studied simple, noncommercial cylindrical electrode test devices operating in buffered isotonic saline without applied suction. The applied RF voltage, approximately 300 V RMS, was sufficient to form glow discharges around the active electrodes. The devices exhibited significantly different operating characteristics, which we ascribe to the differing oxidation tendencies and other physical properties of the electrode materials. Parameters measured include RMS voltage and current, instantaneous voltage and current, temporally-resolved light emission and optical emission spectra, and electrode mass-loss measurements. We correlate these measured properties with some of the bulk characteristics of the electrode materials such as work functions, standard reduction potentials and sputter yields.

  7. PREFACE: 2nd International Meeting for Researchers in Materials and Plasma Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niño, Ely Dannier V.

    2013-11-01

    These proceedings present the written contributions of the participants of the 2nd International Meeting for Researchers in Materials and Plasma Technology, 2nd IMRMPT, which was held from February 27 to March 2, 2013 at the Pontificia Bolivariana Bucaramanga-UPB and Santander and Industrial - UIS Universities, Bucaramanga, Colombia, organized by research groups from GINTEP-UPB, FITEK-UIS. The IMRMPT, was the second version of biennial meetings that began in 2011. The three-day scientific program of the 2nd IMRMPT consisted in 14 Magisterial Conferences, 42 Oral Presentations and 48 Poster Presentations, with the participation of undergraduate and graduate students, professors, researchers and entrepreneurs from Colombia, Russia, France, Venezuela, Brazil, Uruguay, Argentina, Peru, Mexico, United States, among others. Moreover, the objective of IMRMPT was to bring together national and international researchers in order to establish scientific cooperation in the field of materials science and plasma technology; introduce new techniques of surface treatment of materials to improve properties of metals in terms of the deterioration due to corrosion, hydrogen embrittlement, abrasion, hardness, among others; and establish cooperation agreements between universities and industry. The topics covered in the 2nd IMRMPT include New Materials, Surface Physics, Laser and Hybrid Processes, Characterization of Materials, Thin Films and Nanomaterials, Surface Hardening Processes, Wear and Corrosion / Oxidation, Modeling, Simulation and Diagnostics, Plasma Applications and Technologies, Biomedical Coatings and Surface Treatments, Non Destructive Evaluation and Online Process Control, Surface Modification (Ion Implantation, Ion Nitriding, PVD, CVD). The editors hope that those interested in the are of materials science and plasma technology, enjoy the reading that reflect a wide range of topics. It is a pleasure to thank the sponsors and all the participants and contributors for

  8. Clinical implications of basic science discoveries: janus resurrected--two faces of B cell and plasma cell biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodle, E S; Rothstein, D M

    2015-01-01

    B cells play a complex role in the immune response. In addition to giving rise to plasma cells (PCs) and promoting T cell responses via antigen presentation, they perform immunoregulatory functions. This knowledge has created concerns regarding nonspecific B cell depletional therapy because of the potential to paradoxically augment immune responses. Recent studies now indicate that PCs have immune functions beyond immunoglobulin synthesis. Evidence for a new role for PCs as potent regulatory cells (via IL-10 and IL-35 production) is discussed including the implications for PC-targeted therapies currently being developed for clinical transplantation.

  9. A restricted access material for rapid analysis of [(11)C]-labeled radiopharmaceuticals and their metabolites in plasma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gillings, N.

    2009-01-01

    , sensitive and robust method for the measurement of plasma samples from PET studies using [(11)C]-labeled radiopharmaceuticals. METHODS: Unadulterated plasma samples were analyzed directly, following a simple filtration, by the use of a small extraction column, containing a restricted access material...

  10. Spark plasma sintering and thermal conductivity of carbon nanotube bulk materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, H. L.; Li, J.-F.; Yao, K. F.; Chen, L. D.

    2005-06-01

    Carbon nanotube (CNT) bulk samples were fabricated by spark plasma sintering (SPS), which, as a rapid consolidation technique, preserved the phase structure and diameter of cylindrical tubules of the CNTs even at high temperatures of up to 2000°C. The thermal conductivity of the resultant bulk samples was measured by the conventional laser-flash method, and the corresponding thermal conductivity was found to be as low as 4.2W/m/K at room temperature. This low thermal conductivity of the CNT bulk materials was explained on the basis of multiple physical elements including intensive tube-tube interactions. CNT bulk materials may find potential applications as thermoelectric materials that require low thermal conductivity, but high electrical conductivity.

  11. Estimates of RF-Induced Erosion at Antenna-Connected Beryllium Plasma-Facing Components in JET

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borodin, D. [Association EURATOM-FZJ, Julich, Germany; Groth, M. [Aalto University, Finland; Airila, M. [VTT Technical Research Centre, Finland; Colas, L. [French Atomic Energy Commission (CEA); Jacquet, P. [EURATOM / UKAEA, Abingdon, UK; Kirschner, A. [Forschungszentrum Julich, Germany; Lasa, A. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL)

    2016-01-01

    During high-power, ion cyclotron resonance heating (ICRH), RF sheath rectification and RF induced plasma-wall interactions (RF-PWI) can potentially limit long-pulse operation. With toroidally-spaced ICRH antennas, in an ITER-like wall (ILW) environment, JET provides an ideal environment for ITER-relevant, RF-PWI studies. JET pulses combining sequential toggling of the antennas with q95 (edge safety factor) sweeping were recently used to localize RF-enhanced Be I and Be II spectral line emission at outboard poloidal (beryllium) limiters. These measurements were carried out in the early stages of JET-ILW and in ICRF-only, L-mode discharges. The appearance of enhanced emission spots was explained by their magnetic connection to regions of ICRH antennas associated with higher RF-sheath rectification [1]. The measured emission lines were the same as those already qualified in ERO modelling of inboard limiter beryllium erosion in JET limiter plasmas [2]. In the present work, we revisit this spectroscopic study with the focus on obtaining estimates of the impact of these RF-PWI on sputtering and on net erosion of the affected limiter regions. To do this, the ERO erosion and re-deposition code [2] is deployed with the detailed geometry of a JET outboard limiter. The effect of RF-PWI on sputtering is represented by varying the surface negative biasing, which affects the incidence energy and the resulting sputtering yield. The observed variations in line emission, from [1], for JET pulse 81173 of about factor 3 can be reproduced with ~ 100 200 V bias. ERO simulations show that the influence of the respective E-field on the local Be transport is localized near the surface and relatively small. Still, the distribution of the 3D plasma parameters, shadowing and other geometrical effects are quite important. The plasma parameter simulated by Edge2D-EIRENE [3] are extrapolated towards the surface and mapped in 3D. These initial modelling results are consistent with the range of

  12. The third generation multi-purpose plasma immersion ion implanter for surface modification of materials

    CERN Document Server

    Tang Bao Yin; Wang Xiao Feng; Gan Kong Yin; Wang Song Yan; Chu, P K; Huang Nian Ning; Sun Hong

    2002-01-01

    The third generation multi-purpose plasma immersion ion implantation (PIII) equipment has been successfully used for research and development of surface modification of biomedical materials, metals and their alloys in the Southwest Jiaotong University. The implanter equipped with intense current, pulsed cathodic arc metal plasma sources which have both strong coating function and gas and metal ion implantation function. Its pulse high voltage power supply can provide big output current. It can acquire very good implantation dose uniformity. The equipment can both perform ion implantation and combine ion implantation with sputtering deposition and coating to form many kinds of synthetic surface modification techniques. The main design principles, features of important components and achievement of research works in recent time have been described

  13. Laser-induced removal of co-deposits from graphitic plasma-facing components: Characterization of irradiated surfaces and dust particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gąsior, P.; Irrek, F.; Petersson, P.; Penkalla, H. J.; Rubel, M.; Schweer, B.; Sundelin, P.; Wessel, E.; Linke, J.; Philipps, V.; Emmoth, B.; Wolowski, J.; Hirai, T.

    2009-06-01

    Laser-induced fuel desorption and ablation of co-deposited layers on limiter plates from the TEXTOR tokamak have been studied. Gas phase composition was monitored in situ, whereas the ex situ studies have been focused on the examination of irradiated surfaces and broad analysis of dust generated by ablation of co-deposits. The size of the dust grains is in the range of few nanometers to hundreds of micrometers. These are fuel-rich dust particles, as determined by nuclear reaction analysis. The presence of deuterium in dust indicates that not all fuel species are transferred to the gas phase during irradiation. This also suggests that photonic removal of fuel and the ablation of co-deposit from plasma-facing components may lead to the redistribution of fuel-containing dust to surrounding areas.

  14. Arc-plasma spraying and suctioncasting methods in magnetic materials manufacturing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.J. Wysłocki

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The paper discusses two new technologies for producing magnetic materials which have been successfully developed in recent years at the Institute of Physics of the Czestochowa University of Technology and discusses properties of the materials obtained with the use of these methods.Design/methodology/approach: In this research the arc-plasma deposition of Nd2Fe14B powders onto a substrate either cooled with water or heated up to a temperature in the range from 773 to1023 K was applied. In the second method the suction of an arc-melted alloy to a water-cooled copper mould (the suction-casting method was introduced. Moreover, microstructure, magnetic properties and domain structure of the produced samples were determined.Findings: It has been found that thin Nd2Fe14B strips obtained by the plasma method possess magnetic properties. It has also been demonstrated that the suction-casting method makes it possible to obtain both amorphous magnetically soft materials (e.g. Fe-Co-W-Zr-B, as well as magnetically hard nanocomposites (e.g. (Fe-Co-(Pr-Dy-B-Zr.Research limitations/implications: The main problem in the suction-casting method is to reduce the critical cooling rate required for the production of amorphous alloys and to increase the geometrical dimensions of amorphous specimens.Practical implications: Thin-layered Nd-Fe-B magnets produced by means of arc-plasma deposition can be applied directly onto the surface of electromagnetic equipment parts. Magnets with isotropic magnetic properties were obtained by applying layers onto the water-cooled copper substrate. Whereas, anisotropic magnets were obtained as a result of the arc-plasma deposition of powders onto the copper substrate heated up to 873 K. The most advantageous properties were achieved for the microcrystalline structure of a grain size close to the single-domain particle size (approx. 0.3 μm. Moreover, it has been demonstrated that the suction-casting method makes it possible

  15. 混凝土面板堆石坝垫层料上游坡面施工技术简介%Construction technology for cushion material upstream slope face of concrete face-slab rockfill dam

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李仙

    2014-01-01

    介绍了面板堆石坝的特点及垫层料上游坡面的主要施工方法,以及斜坡碾压固坡技术、挤压边墙施工技术、移动边墙施工技术和翻模固坡技术的施工工艺流程,及其在工程实施中的应用效果。%An introduction was made on the characteristics of face-slab rockfill dam,main construction technolo⁃gies for cushion material upstream slope face,the technical programs and application effects of slope roller compac⁃tion reinforcement technology,extrusion side wall construction technology,shift side wall construction technology and turn-over form slope reinforcement technology.

  16. Observation of Curie transition during spark plasma sintering of ferromagnetic materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumar Mani, Mahesh [Wolfson Centre for Magnetics, Cardiff School of Engineering, Cardiff University (United Kingdom); Viola, Giuseppe [School of Engineering and Materials Science, Queen Mary University of London (United Kingdom); Nanoforce Technology Ltd., London (United Kingdom); Hall, Jeremy P. [Wolfson Centre for Magnetics, Cardiff School of Engineering, Cardiff University (United Kingdom); Grasso, Salvatore; Reece, Mike J. [School of Engineering and Materials Science, Queen Mary University of London (United Kingdom); Nanoforce Technology Ltd., London (United Kingdom)

    2015-05-15

    The possibility of employing the ferromagnetic–paramagnetic phase transitions of magnetic materials to calibrate temperature during spark plasma sintering (SPS) was investigated using pure Fe and Fe–50Co alloy. A sharp and repeatable change was observed in the electrical current profile at the Curie temperature (T{sub c}) during both sintering and reheating of the sintered samples. Under a pulsed DC current, an abrupt change in the electrical resistance was observed at T{sub c} due to the sudden changes in the permeability and in turn, the skin depth during heating and cooling. These effects can be used to obtain a more accurate in-situ measurement of the sample temperature than the one provided by the pyrometers that are normally used for SPS processing. The temperature measured using a pyrometer was found to be significantly lower (up to 70 °C) than the actual temperature of the specimen. - Highlights: • Calibration of temperature during spark plasma sintering (SPS) remains a big challenge. • Temperature measured by non-contact pyrometers in SPS is not accurate. • Ferromagnetic materials exhibit abrupt change in permeability at Curie temperature (T{sub c}). • Iron and Fe–Co alloy showed sharp and reproducible changes in SPS electric current profiles at T{sub c}. • Ferromagnetic materials can be successfully used to calibrate pyrometers in SPS.

  17. Numerical simulation of the transient multiphase field during plasma deposition manufacturing composite materials

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    A solid/liquid/gas unified model has been developed to investigate the gradient composition formation during the plasma deposition manufacturing(PDM) composite materials process. In this model,an enthalpy porosity model was applied to deal with the melting and solidification of the deposited layer,and a level-set approach was introduced to track the evolution of the free surface of the molten pool and the deposited layer. Moreover,complicated physical phenomena occurring at the liquid/gas interface,including forced convection heat loss,heat emission and plasma heat source,have been incorporated into the governing equations by source terms. In this study,the numerical experiment of nickel base alloy powder deposited on the medium steel substrate by PDM technique was implemented based on the staggered grid and SIMPLEC algorithm. Concentration gradient distribution of the solute material at the composite material interface,fluid flow and temperature distribution in the molten pool and the deposited layer have been investigated in detail.

  18. Determination of additives in PVC material by UV laser ablation inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hemmerlin, M.; Mermet, J. M.; Bertucci, M.; Zydowicz, P.

    1997-04-01

    UV laser ablation inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry (LA-ICP-AES) has been applied to the direct determination of additives in solid poly(vinyl chloride) materials. A Nd:YAG laser, operating at its fourth harmonic (266 nm), was used with a beam masking device, in the most reproducible conditions, to introduce solid particles into the plasma torch of a simultaneous ICP-AES system. Emphasis was placed on both precision and accuracy in the analysis of PVC materials by LA-ICP-AES. A series of six in-house PVC reference materials was prepared by incorporating several additives in increasing concentrations. Three alternative methods were evaluated to certify the amount of incorporated elements: ICP-AES with sample dissolution, NAA and XRF. Satisfactory results and good agreement were obtained for seven elements (Al, Ca, Cd, Mg, Sb, Sn and Ti) among the ten incorporated. Sample homogeneity appeared to be satisfactory, and calibration graphs obtained by LA-ICP-AES for several elements are presented. Finally, the performance of the technique in terms of repeatability (1.6-5%), reproducibility (2-5%), and limits of detection was investigated.

  19. Improvement of Strength Characteristics of Aerospace Fiber Reinforced Composite Materials using Atmospheric Pressure Plasma-Graft Polymerization Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aoi, Tatsuji; Kuroki, Tomoyuki; Tahara, Mitsuru; Okubo, Masaaki

    The atmospheric pressure nonthermal plasma-graft polymerization treatment is applied for the surface modification of the organic fibers in order to enhance the strength of the aerospace structural composite material consisting of the laminated textiles. The influence of the treatment on the composite materials' strength properties is examined. As a result, the plasma-graft polymerization surface treatment is effective for the compression and bend of the composite materials. Because the interfacial bonding between each fiber and matrix resin is strengthened by the treatment, the strengths of the composite materials are increased.

  20. THERMAL AND ELECTRIC FIELDS AT SPARK PLASMA SINTERING OF THERMOELECTRIC MATERIALS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. P. Bulat

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Problem statement. Improvement of thermoelectric figure of merit is connected with the usage of nanostructured thermoelectric materials fabricated from powders by the spark plasma sintering (SPS method. Preservation of powder nanostructure during sintering is possible at optimum temperature modes of thermoelectrics fabrication. The choice of these modes becomes complicated because of anisotropic properties of semiconductor thermoelectric materials. The decision of the given problem by sintering process simulation demands the competent approach to the problem formulation, a correct specification of thermoelectric properties, the properties of materials forming working installation, and also corrects boundary conditions. The paper deals with the efficient model for sintering of thermoelectrics. Methods. Sintering process of the bismuth telluride thermoelectric material by means of SPS-511S installation is considered. Temperature dependences of electric and thermal conductivities of bismuth telluride, and also temperature dependences of installation elements materials are taken into account. It is shown that temperature distribution in the sample can be defined within the limits of a stationary problem. The simulation is carried out in the software product Comsol Multiphysics. Boundary conditions include convective heat exchange and also radiation under Stefan-Boltzmann law. Results. Computer simulation of electric and thermal processes at spark plasma sintering is carried out. Temperature and electric potential distributions in a sample are obtained at the sintering conditions. Determinative role of graphite compression mould in formation of the temperature field in samples is shown. The influence of geometrical sizes of a graphite compression mould on sintering conditions of nanostructured thermoelectrics is analyzed. Practical importance. The optimum sizes of a cylindrical compression mould for fabrication of volume homogeneous samples based on

  1. 钨/铜第一壁复合材料界面行为研究%Investigation on Interface Characteristic of W/Cu Plasma Facing Component

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    种法力

    2011-01-01

    通过等离子喷涂技术在铜合金基体上制备具有不同适配层的钨涂层第一壁复合材料,并对其界面行为进行研究.结果表明,Wu/Cu、NiCrAl和Ti适配层均能明显降低W/Cu界面热应力,但其界面仍是第一壁复合材料最可能失效的位置;W/Cu适配层能有效提高此复合材料界面的结合强度,增幅高达30%.%Tungsten coating was fabricated on copper ahoy by plasma spraying and its interface characteristic was investigated The results show that the compliant layers (W/Cu, NiCrAl and Ti) are heltpful to reduce W/Cu interface thermal stress, but the most possibility failure position of W / Cu plasma facing component is still in the interface. W / Cu adaptation layer can effectively enhance the bonding strength between tungsten coating and copper substrate by 30%.

  2. Plasma-based X-ray laser speckle and its application on ferroelectric material

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    TAI Ren-Zhong; NAMIKAWA Kazumichi

    2005-01-01

    A new type of soft X-ray source, i.e. a plasma-based X-ray laser, is found to be promising to conduct transient measurement. By means of picosecond X-ray laser speckles, the dynamic microscopic polarization clusters within cubic (paraelectric) BaTiO3 was directly observed and characterized in a microscopic scale for the first time.This opens a way to study this type of clusters, which usually manifest large external-field response for ferroelectric materials.

  3. Electrochemical behavior of the graphene materials synthesized using low temperature plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shavelkina, M. B.; Amirov, R. H.; Richagov, A. Y.; Shatalova, T. B.

    2017-01-01

    By means of DC plasma torch of up to 45 kW power, few-layered graphene sheets were obtained. Their properties and structure were characterized by using electron microscopy, thermal analysis, Raman and infrared (IR) spectroscopy. Boundary surface of samples have been investigated using the method of “limited evaporation” and BET method. Electrochemical examination of their properties was conducted. Due to the activity and stability of synthesized materials the conclusion was made regarding the possibility of the use of them as catalysts carriers for fuel cells electrodes, electric current sources, conducting additives for electrodes in non-aqueous electrolytes.

  4. Rapid Atmospheric-Pressure-Plasma-Jet Processed Porous Materials for Energy Harvesting and Storage Devices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jian-Zhang Chen

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Atmospheric pressure plasma jet (APPJ technology is a versatile technology that has been applied in many energy harvesting and storage devices. This feature article provides an overview of the advances in APPJ technology and its application to solar cells and batteries. The ultrafast APPJ sintering of nanoporous oxides and 3D reduced graphene oxide nanosheets with accompanying optical emission spectroscopy analyses are described in detail. The applications of these nanoporous materials to photoanodes and counter electrodes of dye-sensitized solar cells are described. An ultrashort treatment (1 min on graphite felt electrodes of flow batteries also significantly improves the energy efficiency.

  5. Spark plasma sintered bismuth telluride-based thermoelectric materials incorporating dispersed boron carbide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Williams, H.R., E-mail: hugo.williams@leicester.ac.uk [Department of Engineering, University of Leicester, University Road, Leicester LE1 7RH (United Kingdom); Ambrosi, R.M. [Space Research Centre, Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Leicester, University Road, Leicester LE1 7RH (United Kingdom); Chen, K. [School of Engineering and Materials Science, Queen Mary, University of London, Mile End Road, London E1 4NS (United Kingdom); Friedman, U. [Department of Engineering, University of Leicester, University Road, Leicester LE1 7RH (United Kingdom); Ning, H.; Reece, M.J. [School of Engineering and Materials Science, Queen Mary, University of London, Mile End Road, London E1 4NS (United Kingdom); Robbins, M.C.; Simpson, K. [European Thermodynamics Ltd., 8 Priory Business Park, Wistow Road, Kibworth LE8 0R (United Kingdom); Stephenson, K. [European Space Agency, ESTEC TEC-EP, Keplerlaan 1, 2201AZ Noordwijk (Netherlands)

    2015-03-25

    Highlights: • Nano-B{sub 4}C reinforced Bi{sub 0.5}Sb{sub 1.5}Te{sub 3} p-type thermoelectric produced by SPS. • Addition of B{sub 4}C up to 0.2 vol% to SPS’d material has little effect on zT. • Vickers hardness improved by 27% by adding 0.2 vol% B{sub 4}C. • Fracture toughness of SPS material: K{sub IC} = 0.80 MPa m{sup 1/2} by SEVNB. • Mechanical properties much better than commercial directionally solidified material. - Abstract: The mechanical properties of bismuth telluride based thermoelectric materials have received much less attention in the literature than their thermoelectric properties. Polycrystalline p-type Bi{sub 0.5}Sb{sub 1.5}Te{sub 3} materials were produced from powder using spark plasma sintering (SPS). The effects of nano-B{sub 4}C addition on the thermoelectric performance, Vickers hardness and fracture toughness were measured. Addition of 0.2 vol% B{sub 4}C was found to have little effect on zT but increased hardness by approximately 27% when compared to polycrystalline material without B{sub 4}C. The K{sub IC} fracture toughness of these compositions was measured as 0.80 MPa m{sup 1/2} by Single-Edge V-Notched Beam (SEVNB). The machinability of polycrystalline materials produced by SPS was significantly better than commercially available directionally solidified materials because the latter is limited by cleavage along the crystallographic plane parallel to the direction of solidification.

  6. PREFACE: 11th Asia-Pacific Conference on Plasma Science and Technology (APCPST-11) and 25th Symposium on Plasma Science for Materials (SPSM-25)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Takayuki; Kaneko, Toshio; Sekine, Makoto; Tanaka, Yasunori

    2013-06-01

    The 11th Asia-Pacific Conference on Plasma Science and Technology (APCPST-11) was held in Kyoto, Japan on 2-5 October 2012 with the 25th Symposium on Plasma Science for Materials (SPSM-25). SPSM has been held annually since 1988 under the sponsorship of The 153rd Committee on Plasma Materials Science, Japan Society for the Promotion of Science (JSPS). This symposium is one of the major activities of the Committee, which is organized by researchers in academia and industry for the purpose of advancing intersectional scientific information exchange and discussion of science and technology of plasma materials processing. APCPST and SPSM are jointly held biennially to survey the current status of low temperature and thermal plasma physics and chemistry for industrial applications. The whole area of plasma processing was covered from fundamentals to applications. Previous meetings were held in China, Japan, Korea, and Australia, attended by scientists from the Asia-Pacific and other countries. The joint conference was organized in plenary lectures, invited, contributed oral presentations and poster sessions. At this meeting, we had 386 participants from 10 countries and 398 presentations, including 26 invited presentations. This year, we arranged special topical sessions that covered green innovation, life innovation, and technical reports from industry. This conference seeks to bring the plasma community together and to create a forum for discussing the latest developments and issues, the challenges ahead in the field of plasma research and applications among engineers and scientists in Asia, the Pacific Rim, as well as Europe. This volume presents 44 papers that were selected via a strict peer-review process from full papers submitted for the proceedings of the conference. The topics range from the basic physics and chemistry of plasma processing to a broad variety of materials processing and environmental applications. This volume offers an overview of recent

  7. Structural materialization of stainless steel molds and dies by the low temperature high density plasma nitriding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aizawa Tatsuhiko

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Various kinds of stainless steels have been widely utilized as a mold substrate material for injection molding and as a die for mold-stamping and direct stamping processes. Since they suffered from high temperature transients and thermal cycles in practice, they must be surface-treated by dry and wet coatings, or, by plasma nitriding. Martensitic stainless steel mold was first wet plated by the nickel phosphate (NiP, which was unstable at the high temperature stamping condition; and, was easy to crystalize or to fracture by itself. This issue of nuisance significantly lowered the productivity in fabrication of optical elements at present. In the present paper, the stainless steel mold was surface-treated by the low-temperature plasma nitriding. The nitrided layer by this surface modification had higher nitrogen solute content than 4 mass%; the maximum solid-solubility of nitrogen is usually 0.1 mass% in the equilibrium phase diagram. Owing to this solid-solution with high nitrogen concentration, the nitrided layer had high hardness of 1400 Hv within its thickness of 40 μm without any formation of nitrides after 14.4 ks plasma nitriding at 693 K. This nitrogen solid-solution treated stainless steel had thermal resistivity even at the mold-stamping conditions up to 900 K.

  8. Effects of plasma treatment time on modification of acrylic denture material

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Objective:To study the relationship between plasma treatment time and efficacy. Methods:Test specimens were prepared from an acrylic resin denture material in the size of 2 mm × 10 mm × 10 mm. Plasma treatment was carried out on the surface of Polymethyl methacrylate(PMMA) at different time. XPS studies, IR spectra studies and measurement of wetting angle were performed. Results: XPS showed the peak corresponding to C-O getting higher as the treatment proceeded, however at 120 seconds, the peak did not increase any longer and partly crossed with the peak at the duration of 60 seconds. IR spectra showed the wave corresponding to C-H was reduced as O2-plasma treatment proceeded, and then changed little. Wetting angle initially decreased dramatically, however, as the reaction proceeded, wetting angle increased slightly. Conclusion:Equilibrium was reached for introducing oxygen-containing groups and changing of C-H. As the treatment proceeded, wetting angle increased slightly.

  9. Composite materials obtained by the ion-plasma sputtering of metal compound coatings on polymer films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khlebnikov, Nikolai; Polyakov, Evgenii; Borisov, Sergei; Barashev, Nikolai; Biramov, Emir; Maltceva, Anastasia; Vereshchagin, Artem; Khartov, Stas; Voronin, Anton

    2016-01-01

    In this article, the principle and examples composite materials obtained by deposition of metal compound coatings on polymer film substrates by the ion-plasma sputtering method are presented. A synergistic effect is to obtain the materials with structural properties of the polymer substrate and the surface properties of the metal deposited coatings. The technology of sputtering of TiN coatings of various thicknesses on polyethylene terephthalate films is discussed. The obtained composites are characterized by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX), atomic force microscopy (AFM), and scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) is shown. The examples of application of this method, such as receiving nanocomposite track membranes and flexible transparent electrodes, are considered.

  10. Depolarization of D-T plasmas by recycling in material walls

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Greenside, H.S.; Budny, R.V.; Post, D.E.

    1984-02-01

    The feasibility of using polarized deuterium (D) and tritium (T) plasmas in fusion reactors may be seriously affected by recycling in material walls. Theoretical and experimental results are reviewed which show how the depolarization rates of absorbed D and T depend on first wall parameters such as the temperature, the bulk and surface diffusivities, the density of electronic states at the Fermi surface, the spectral density of microscopic fluctuating electric field gradients, and the concentration of paramagnetic impurities. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy of hydrogenated and deuterated amorphous semiconductors suggests that low-Z nonmetallic materials may provide a satisfactory first wall or limiter coating under reactor conditions with characteristic depolarization times of several seconds. Experiments are proposed to test the consequences of our analysis.

  11. Beryllium Dust Generation in PISCES-B Due to Plasma-Material Interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doerner, R.; Mays, C.; Hirooka, Y.; Luckhardt, S. C.; Sze, C. F.; Won, J.; Conn, R. W.

    1996-11-01

    The PISCES-B device has started plasma-beryllium experiments in its new location at U.C. San Diego. An improved controlled atmosphere enclosure was constructed to assure safe operation with beryllium materials. In the previous experimental campaign we found that a total of 600 mg of beryllium had been eroded during materials tests. This provided us with a unique opportunity to investigate the lost beryllium. Swipe sampling and vacuum sampling of the PISCES-B vacuum chamber revealed that 3% of the eroded beryllium resided as uniformly distributed loose dust within the vacuum chamber. An additional 33% of the eroded beryllium was coated onto the chamber wall. Filtering through a series of decreasing pore size meshes revealed a uniform distribution of particle sizes in the respirable range (between 10mm - 0.1mm), fewer larger particles (>50mm) were observed. This work is supported by USDOE under grant DE-FG03-95ER-54301.

  12. Influence of H2 and D2 plasmas on the work function of caesiated materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedl, R.; Fantz, U.

    2017-08-01

    Caesium-covered surfaces are used in negative hydrogen ion sources as a low work function converter for H-/D- surface production. The work function χ of the converter surface is one of the key parameters determining the performance of the ion source. Under idealized conditions, pure bulk Cs has 2.14 eV. However, residual gases at ion source background pressures of 10-7-10-6 mbar and the plasma surface interaction with the hydrogen discharge in front of the caesiated surface dynamically affect the actual surface work function. Necessary fundamental investigations on the resulting χ are performed at a dedicated laboratory experiment. Under the vacuum conditions of ion sources, the incorporation of impurities into the Cs layer leads to very stable Cs compounds. The result is a minimal work function of χvac ≈ 2.75 eV for Cs evaporation rates of up to 10 mg/h independent of substrate material and surface temperature (up to 260 °C). Moreover, a distinct degradation behavior can be observed in the absence of a Cs flux onto the surface leading to a deterioration of the work function by about 0.1 eV/h. However, in a hydrogen discharge with plasma parameters close to those of ion sources, fluxes of reactive hydrogen species and VUV photons impact on the surface which reduces the work function of the caesiated substrate down to about 2.6 eV even without Cs supply. Establishing a Cs flux onto the surface with ΓCs ≈ 1017 m-2 s-1 further enhances the work function obtaining values around 2.1 eV, which can be maintained stable for several hours of plasma exposure. Hence, Cs layers with work functions close to that of pure bulk Cs can be achieved for both H2 and D2 plasmas. Isotopic differences can be neglected within the measurement accuracy of about 0.1 eV due to comparable plasma parameters. Furthermore, after shutting down the Cs evaporation, continuing plasma exposure helps against degradation of the Cs layer resulting in a constant low work function for at least 1 h.

  13. Surface-mediated molecular events in material-induced blood-plasma coagulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatterjee, Kaushik

    Coagulation and thrombosis persist as major impediments associated with the use of blood-contacting medical devices. We are investigating the molecular mechanism underlying material-induced blood-plasma coagulation focusing on the role of the surface as a step towards prospective development of improved hemocompatible biomaterials. A classic observation in hematology is that blood/blood-plasma in contact with clean glass surface clots faster than when in contact with many plastic surfaces. The traditional biochemical theory explaining the underlying molecular mechanism suggests that hydrophilic surfaces, like that of glass, are specific activators of the coagulation cascade because of the negatively-charged groups on the surface. Hydrophobic surfaces are poor procoagulants or essentially "benign" because they lack anionic groups. Further, these negatively-charged surfaces are believed to not only activate blood factor XII (FXII), the key protein in contact activation, but also play a cofactor role in the amplification and propagation reactions that ultimately lead to clot formation. In sharp contrast to the traditional theory, our investigations indicate a need for a paradigm shift in the proposed sequence of contact activation events to incorporate the role of protein adsorption at the material surfaces. These studies have lead to the central hypothesis for this work proposing that protein adsorption to hydrophobic surfaces attenuates the contact activation reactions so that poorly-adsorbent hydrophilic surfaces appear to be stronger procoagulants relative to hydrophobic surfaces. Our preliminary studies measuring the plasma coagulation response of activated FXII (FXIIa) on different model surfaces suggested that the material did not play a cofactor role in the processing of this enzyme dose through the coagulation pathway. Therefore, we focused our efforts on studying the mechanism of initial production of enzyme at the procoagulant surface. Calculations for the

  14. Assessment Of Surface-Catalyzed Reaction Products From High Temperature Materials In Plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Luke Daniel

    Current simulations of atmospheric entry into both Mars and Earth atmospheres for the design of thermal protections systems (TPS) typically invoke conservative assumptions regarding surface-catalyzed recombination and the amount of energy deposited on the surface. The need to invoke such assumptions derives in part from lack of adequate experimental data on gas-surface interactions at trajectory relevant conditions. Addressing this issue, the University of Vermont's Plasma Test and Diagnostics Laboratory has done extensive work to measure atomic specie consumption by measuring the concentration gradient over various material surfaces. This thesis extends this work by attempting to directly diagnose molecular species production in air plasmas. A series of spectral models for the A-X and B-X systems of nitric oxide (NO), and the B-X system of boron monoxide (BO) have been developed. These models aim to predict line positions and strengths for the respective molecules in a way that is best suited for the diagnostic needs of the UVM facility. From the NO models, laser induced fluorescence strategies have been adapted with the intent of characterizing the relative quantity and thermodynamic state of NO produced bysurface-catalyzed recombination, while the BO model adds a diagnostic tool for the testing of diboride-based TPS materials. Boundary layer surveys of atomic nitrogen and NO have been carried out over water-cooled copper and nickel surfaces in air/argon plasmas. Translation temperatures and relative number densities throughout the boundary layer are reported. Additional tests were also conducted over a water-cooled copper surface to detect evidence of highly non-equilibrium effects in the form of excess population in elevated vibrational levels of the A-X system of NO. The tests showed that near the sample surface there is a much greater population in the upsilon'' = 1ground state than is predicted by a Boltzmann distribution.

  15. Tech-X Corporation releases simulation code for solving complex problems in plasma physics : VORPAL code provides a robust environment for simulating plasma processes in high-energy physics, IC fabrications and material processing applications

    CERN Multimedia

    2005-01-01

    Tech-X Corporation releases simulation code for solving complex problems in plasma physics : VORPAL code provides a robust environment for simulating plasma processes in high-energy physics, IC fabrications and material processing applications

  16. Fabrication of 200 mm Diameter Sintering Body of Skutterudite Thermoelectric Material by Spark Plasma Sintering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomida, T.; Sumiyoshi, A.; Nie, G.; Ochi, T.; Suzuki, S.; Kikuchi, M.; Mukaiyama, K.; Guo, J. Q.

    2016-11-01

    Filled skutterudite is a promising material for thermoelectric power generation because its ZT value is relatively high. However, mass production of high-performance thermoelectric materials remains a challenge. This study focused on the sintering process of thermoelectric materials. Large-diameter n-type (Yb or La, Ca, Al, Ga, In)0.8(Co, Fe)4Sb12 skutterudite sintering bodies with a small thickness were successfully produced by the spark plasma sintering (SPS) method. When direct current flows through the thermoelectric sintering body during the SPS pulse, the Peltier effect causes a temperature difference within the sintering body. To eliminate the Peltier effect, an electrical insulating material was inserted between the punch (electrode) and the sintering body. In this way, an n-type La-filled skutterudite sample with a diameter of 200 mm, thickness of 21 mm, and weight of 5 kg was successfully produced. The thermoelectric properties and microstructures of the sample were almost the same throughout the whole sintering body, and the dimensionless figure of merit reached 1.0 at 773 K.

  17. Real-time measurement of materials properties at high temperatures by laser produced plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Yong W.

    1990-01-01

    Determination of elemental composition and thermophysical properties of materials at high temperatures, as visualized in the context of containerless materials processing in a microgravity environment, presents a variety of unusual requirements owing to the thermal hazards and interferences from electromagnetic control fields. In addition, such information is intended for process control applications and thus the measurements must be real time in nature. A new technique is described which was developed for real time, in-situ determination of the elemental composition of molten metallic alloys such as specialty steel. The technique is based on time-resolved spectroscopy of a laser produced plasma (LPP) plume resulting from the interaction of a giant laser pulse with a material target. The sensitivity and precision were demonstrated to be comparable to, or better than, the conventional methods of analysis which are applicable only to post-mortem specimens sampled from a molten metal pool. The LPP technique can be applied widely to other materials composition analysis applications. The LPP technique is extremely information rich and therefore provides opportunities for extracting other physical properties in addition to the materials composition. The case in point is that it is possible to determine thermophysical properties of the target materials at high temperatures by monitoring generation and transport of acoustic pulses as well as a number of other fluid-dynamic processes triggered by the LPP event. By manipulation of the scaling properties of the laser-matter interaction, many different kinds of flow events, ranging from shock waves to surface waves to flow induced instabilities, can be generated in a controllable manner. Time-resolved detection of these events can lead to such thermophysical quantities as volume and shear viscosities, thermal conductivity, specific heat, mass density, and others.

  18. Titanium nitride plasma-chemical synthesis with titanium tetrachloride raw material in the DC plasma-arc reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirpichev, D. E.; Sinaiskiy, M. A.; Samokhin, A. V.; Alexeev, N. V.

    2017-04-01

    The possibility of plasmochemical synthesis of titanium nitride is demonstrated in the paper. Results of the thermodynamic analysis of TiCl4 - H2 - N2 system are presented; key parameters of TiN synthesis process are calculated. The influence of parameters of plasma-chemical titanium nitride synthesis process in the reactor with an arc plasmatron on characteristics on the produced powders is experimentally investigated. Structure, chemical composition and morphology dependencies on plasma jet enthalpy, stoichiometric excess of hydrogen and nitrogen in a plasma jet are determined.

  19. A mature industrial solution for ITER divertor plasma facing components: hypervapotron cooling concept adapted to Tore Supra flat tile technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Escourbiac, F.; Missirlian, M.; Schlosser, J. [Association EURATOM-CEA Cadarache, Departement de Recherches sur la Fusion Controlee, 13 - Saint Paul lez Durance (France); Bobin-Vastra, I. [AREVA Centre Technique de Framatome, 71 - Le Creusot (France); Kuznetsov, V. [Efremov Institute, Doroga na Metallostroy, St. Petersburg (Russian Federation); Schedler, B. [Plansee AG, Reutte (Austria)

    2004-07-01

    The use of flat tile technology to handle heat fluxes in the range of 20 MW/m{sup 2} with components relevant for fusion experiment applications is technically possible with the hypervapotron cooling concept. This paper deals with recent high heat flux performances operated with success on 2 identical mock-ups, based on this concept, that were tested in 2 different electron gun facilities. Each mock-up consisted of a CuCrZr heat sink armored with 25 flat tiles of the 3D carbon fibre composite material SEPcarb NS31 assembled with pure copper by active metal casting (AMC). The AMC tiles were electron beam welded on the CuCrZr bar, fins and slots on the neutral beam JET design were machined into the bar, then the bar was closed with a thick CuCrZr rear plug including hydraulic connections then the bar was electron beam welded onto the sidewalls. The testing results show that full ITER design specifications were achieved with margins, the critical heat flux limit was even higher than 30 MW/m{sup 2}. These results highlight the high potential of this technology for ITER divertor application.

  20. Spatial and Temporal characterization of plasma properties via emission spectroscopy in fusion materials testing device Proto-MPEX

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morean, Casey; Biewer, Theodore; Shaw, Guinevere; Beers, Josh; Ray, Holly

    2016-10-01

    The Prototype Material Plasma Exposure eXperiment (Proto-MPEX) is a linear plasma source, and is intended to study plasma-material interactions (PMI) in conditions similar to those found in future fusion reactors. A high-resolution McPherson Czerny-Turner visible range spectrometer has been utilized to study the behavior of ions in the plasma. Analysis of the spectral lines, D_beta, D_gamma, and D_delta yields valuable information regarding the temperature and density of plasma ions at various locations along Proto-MPEX. Spectroscopic temperature and density measurements are compared to double Langmuir probe measurements to determine plasma behavior as a function of radius. Temporal and spatial measurements along the length of Proto-MPEX are constructed and compared to a photomultiplier tube based diagnostic manufactured at ORNL to determine the plasma's axial behavior along Proto-MPEX. Relative emission of beta, gamma, and delta lines are used to assess recycling effects in the device. This work was supported by the U.S. D.O.E. contract DE-AC05-00OR22725.

  1. RECENT PROGRESS IN THE FABRICATION AND CHARACTERIZATION OF DUCTILE-PHASE-TOUGHENED TUNGSTEN LAMINATES FOR PLASMA-FACING MATERIALS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cunningham, Kevin; Odette, G Robert; Fields, Kirk A.; Gragg, David; Yamamoto, Takuya; Zok, Frank W.; Henager, Charles H.; Kurtz, Richard J.; Roosendaal, Timothy J.; Borlaug, Brennan A.

    2015-09-23

    A promising approach to increasing the fracture toughness of W-alloys is ductile-phase toughening (DPT). A ductile phase reinforcement in a brittle matrix increases toughness primarily by crack bridging. A W-Cu laminate was fabricated and the properties of the constituent metals were characterized along with those for the composite. Development of a design model for large-scale crack bridging continued.

  2. Melt-layer motion and droplet ejection under divertor-relevant plasma conditions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Temmerman, G.; Daniels, J.; Bystrov, K.; van den Berg, M. A.; Zielinski, J. J.

    2013-01-01

    Accidental melting of metallic plasma-facing materials in future fusion devices poses serious issues regarding the material lifetime and power-handling capabilities as well as core plasma performances. The behaviour of aluminium (as a proxy for beryllium) and tungsten materials was investigated in

  3. Study of laser-induced removal of co-deposits from tokamak plasma-facing components using ion diagnostics and optical spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolowski, J.; Gasior, P.; Hoffman, J.; Kubkowska, M.; Rosinski, M.; Szymanski, Z.

    2010-10-01

    The paper presents studies of the application of ion diagnostics and optical spectroscopy for on-line measurement of the amount and characteristics of co-deposits from the laser-ablated surface of the plasma-facing components (e.g. graphite tiles). For removal of the co-deposit layer a repetitive Nd:YAG laser was used. Determination of the characteristics of ions emitted from the laser-illuminated targets was performed using ion collectors (on the basis of a time-of-flight method) and an optical spectrometer. The main ion stream parameters and spectral lines of deuterium and carbon or tungsten ions were measured depending on laser pulse parameters. The research proved that optical spectroscopy could be a convenient method for on-line observation of the co-deposited layer removal by means of laser ablation. In combination with the investigation of collected co-deposit dust, the performed study made it possible to state that laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy can be useful as a diagnostic method for the ablative co-deposited layer removal and the wall conditioning. The properties of modified surfaces of samples and collected dust (evaporated co-deposit) were determined using different measuring methods.

  4. Be/W and W/Be bilayers deposited on Si substrates with hydrogenated Fe-Cr and Fe-Cr-Al interlayers for plasma facing components

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greculeasa, S. G.; Palade, P.; Schinteie, G.; Lungu, G. A.; Porosnicu, C.; Jepu, I.; Lungu, C. P.; Kuncser, V.

    2016-12-01

    Be/W and W/Be bilayers, of interest in regard to the specific behavior of plasma facing components (PFCs) were deposited on Si substrates by thermionic vacuum arc, with Fe, Fe-Cr and Fe-Cr-Al interlayers. The interlayers, with compositions approaching the one of the reduced activation steels used in supporting PFCs, were subsequently annealed in hydrogen atmosphere. The multilayers were characterized with respect to morphologic, structural, diffusional and atomic intermixing aspects via XRD, XRR, X-ray photoemission spectroscopy and Mössbauer spectroscopy. All as-prepared samples present partially amorphous structures. A main α-Fe phase is observed, as well as (superparamagnetic) secondary Fe oxides, metallic Fe with Si, Cr, W and Be neighbors, Be-rich Fe-Be and Fe-Si phases. High amounts of tungsten and tungsten oxides were also evidenced in the Fe layer. The strong atomic intermixing of W and Be layers was indirectly supported by the unusual densities of W and Be layers and 57Fe Mössbauer spectroscopy results.

  5. Fundamental Study of Interactions Between High-Density Pulsed Plasmas and Materials for Space Propulsion

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-01

    interactions studies (plasma too cold and too “dirty.”) We have built and tested a new, gas -fed, non- ablative, rep-rated capillary plasma source for our...those encountered in space propulsion devices including Pulsed Plasma Thrusters (PPT), Magneto-Plasma Dynamic (MPD) thrusters and capillary plasma...based thrusters . The ongoing research work brings together a team of researchers from the University of Texas at Austin (UT) and the University of

  6. Leak tightness tests on actively cooled plasma facing components: Lessons learned from Tore Supra experience and perspectives for the new fusion machines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chantant, M., E-mail: michel.chantant@cea.fr; Lambert, R.; Gargiulo, L.; Hatchressian, J.-C.; Guilhem, D.; Samaille, F.; Soler, B.

    2015-10-15

    Highlights: • Test procedures for the qualification of the tightness of actively cooled plasma facing components were defined. • The test is performed after the component manufacturing and before its set-up in the vacuum vessel. • It allows improving the fusion machine availability. • The lessons of tests over 20 years at Tore Supra are presented. - Abstract: The fusion machines under development or construction (ITER, W7X) use several hundreds of actively cooled plasma facing components (ACPFC). They are submitted to leak tightness requirements in order to get an appropriate vacuum level in the vessel to create the plasma. During the ACPFC manufacturing and before their installation in the machine, their leak tightness performance must be measured to check that they fulfill the vacuum requirements. A relevant procedure is needed which allows to segregate potential defects. It must also be optimized in terms of test duration and costs. Tore Supra, as an actively cooled Tokamak, experienced several leaks on ACPFCs during the commissioning and during the operation of the machine. A test procedure was then defined and several test facilities were set-up. Since 1990 the tightness of all the new ACPFCs is systematically tested before their installation in Tore Supra. During the qualification test, the component is set up in a vacuum test tank, and its cooling circuits are pressurized with helium. It is submitted to 3 temperature cycles from room temperature up to the baking temperature level in Tore Supra (200 °C) and two pressurization tests are performed (6 MPa at room temperature and 4 MPa at 200 °C) at each stage. At the end of the last cycle when the ACPFC is at room temperature and pressurized with helium at 6 MPa, the measured leak rate must be lower than 5 × 10{sup −11} Pa m{sup 3} s{sup −1}, the pressure in the test tank being <5 × 10{sup −5} Pa. A large experience has been gained on ACPFCs with carbon parts on stainless steel and Cu

  7. Low-temperature plasma synthesis of carbon nanotubes and graphene based materials and their fuel cell applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qi; Wang, Xiangke; Chai, Zhifang; Hu, Wenping

    2013-12-07

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) and graphene, and materials based on these, are largely used in multidisciplinary fields. Many techniques have been put forward to synthesize them. Among all kinds of approaches, the low-temperature plasma approach is widely used due to its numerous advantages, such as highly distributed active species, reduced energy requirements, enhanced catalyst activation, shortened operation time and decreased environmental pollution. This tutorial review focuses on the recent development of plasma synthesis of CNTs and graphene based materials and their electrochemical application in fuel cells.

  8. Unraveling the plasma-material interface with real time diagnosis of dynamic boron conditioning in extreme tokamak plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domínguez-Gutiérrez, F. Javier; Bedoya, Felipe; Krstić, Predrag S.; Allain, Jean P.; Irle, Stephan; Skinner, Charles H.; Kaita, Robert; Koel, Bruce

    2017-08-01

    We present a study of the role of boron and oxygen in the chemistry of deuterium retention in boronized ATJ graphite irradiated by the extreme environment of a tokamak deuterium plasma. The experimental results were obtained by the first XPS measurements inside the plasma chamber of the National Spherical Torus Experiment Upgrade, between the plasma exposures. The subtle interplay of boron, carbon, oxygen and deuterium chemistry is explained by reactive molecular dynamics simulations, verified by quantum-classical molecular dynamics and successfully compared to the measured data. The calculations deciphered the roles of oxygen and boron for the deuterium retention and predict deuterium uptake into a boronized carbon surface close in value to that previously predicted for a lithiated and oxidized carbon surface.

  9. Biomimetic apatite-based composite materials obtained by spark plasma sintering (SPS): physicochemical and mechanical characterizations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brouillet, Fabien; Laurencin, Danielle; Grossin, David; Drouet, Christophe; Estournes, Claude; Chevallier, Geoffroy; Rey, Christian

    2015-08-01

    Nanocrystalline calcium phosphate apatites are biomimetic compounds analogous to bone mineral and are at the origin of the bioactivity of most biomaterials used as bone substitutes. Their unique surface reactivity originates from the presence of a hydrated layer containing labile ions (mostly divalent ones). So the setup of 3D biocompatible apatite-based bioceramics exhibiting a high reactivity requests the development of «low» temperature consolidation processes such as spark plasma sintering (SPS), in order to preserve the characteristics of the hydrated nanocrystals. However, mechanical performances may still need to be improved for such nanocrystalline apatite bioceramics, especially in view of load-bearing applications. The reinforcement by association with biopolymers represents an appealing approach, while preserving the advantageous biological properties of biomimetic apatites. Herein, we report the preparation of composites based on biomimetic apatite associated with various quantities of microcrystalline cellulose (MCC, 1-20 wt%), a natural fibrous polymer. The SPS-consolidated composites were analyzed from both physicochemical (X-ray diffraction, Fourier transform infrared, solid state NMR) and mechanical (Brazilian test) viewpoints. The preservation of the physicochemical characteristics of apatite and cellulose in the final material was observed. Mechanical properties of the composite materials were found to be directly related to the polymer/apatite ratios and a maximum crushing strength was reached for 10 wt% of MCC.

  10. Influence of Wall Material on VUV Emission from Hydrogen Plasma in H- Source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bacal, M.; Glass-Maujean, M.; Ivanov, A. A., Jr; Nishiura, M.; Sasao, M.; Wada, M.

    2002-11-01

    The study of VUV emission from a hydrogen plasma produced in a filament discharge in a magnetic multicusp device showed that the use of tantalum and tungsten filaments leads to significant differences in the spectra. The effect of the filament material is interpreted in terms of the fresh film of this material, deposited on the wall. The synthetic spectrum convoluted with our apparatus function for the conditions of this experiment (gas temperature 500 K, electron energy 100 eV) agrees roughly well with the spectrum obtained with tungsten covered walls, but not with the spectrum obtained with tantalum covered walls. We show that in the case of tungsten covered walls the E-V singlet excitation is indeed a two-step Franck-Condon transition, going through either B or C state from an initial H2 molecule with v"=0, added to a Franck-Condon transition to highly excited states cascading to the B or C states. The excitation process to high v" states in the case of tantalum covered walls is a three step process, in which the first step is the formation by recombinative desorption on the wall of a vibrationally excited molecule with v"=1 or 2, which serves as the initial molecule in the subsequent E-V excitation through the B state. The results indicate a larger recombination coefficient of atoms on the tantalum covered wall.

  11. Report on the joint meeting of the Division of Development and Technology Plasma/Wall Interaction and High Heat Flux Materials and Components Task Groups

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilson, K.L. (ed.)

    1985-10-01

    This report of the Joint Meeting of the Division of Development and Technology Plasma/Wall Interaction and High Heat Flux Materials and Components Task Groups contains contributing papers in the following areas: Plasma/Materials Interaction Program and Technical Assessment, High Heat Flux Materials and Components Program and Technical Assessment, Pumped Limiters, Ignition Devices, Program Planning Activities, Compact High Power Density Reactor Requirements, Steady State Tokamaks, and Tritium Plasma Experiments. All these areas involve the consideration of High Heat Flux on Materials and the Interaction of the Plasma with the First Wall. Many of the Test Facilities are described as well. (LSP)

  12. Sputtering Yield Calculation of Some Candidate PFC Materials

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DENGBaiquan; YANJiancheng; HUANGJinhua

    2001-01-01

    In order to estimate the erosion rates of some plasma facing component materials, the sputtering yields of Mo, W and Li bombarded by charged particles H+, D+, T+ and He+ are calculated by application of sputtering theory based on bipartition model of ion transport. The comparisons with Monte-Carlo calculation results are made. These data might be useful to estimate the lifetime of plasma facing components and to analyze the impurity level in core plasma of fusion reactors.

  13. Plasma protein corona modulates the vascular wall interaction of drug carriers in a material and donor specific manner.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel J Sobczynski

    Full Text Available The nanoscale plasma protein interaction with intravenously injected particulate carrier systems is known to modulate their organ distribution and clearance from the bloodstream. However, the role of this plasma protein interaction in prescribing the adhesion of carriers to the vascular wall remains relatively unknown. Here, we show that the adhesion of vascular-targeted poly(lactide-co-glycolic-acid (PLGA spheres to endothelial cells is significantly inhibited in human blood flow, with up to 90% reduction in adhesion observed relative to adhesion in simple buffer flow, depending on the particle size and the magnitude and pattern of blood flow. This reduced PLGA adhesion in blood flow is linked to the adsorption of certain high molecular weight plasma proteins on PLGA and is donor specific, where large reductions in particle adhesion in blood flow (>80% relative to buffer is seen with ∼60% of unique donor bloods while others exhibit moderate to no reductions. The depletion of high molecular weight immunoglobulins from plasma is shown to successfully restore PLGA vascular wall adhesion. The observed plasma protein effect on PLGA is likely due to material characteristics since the effect is not replicated with polystyrene or silica spheres. These particles effectively adhere to the endothelium at a higher level in blood over buffer flow. Overall, understanding how distinct plasma proteins modulate the vascular wall interaction of vascular-targeted carriers of different material characteristics would allow for the design of highly functional delivery vehicles for the treatment of many serious human diseases.

  14. Non-destructive testing of high heat flux components of fusion devices by infrared thermography: modeling and signal processing; Controle non destructif par thermographie infrarouge des composants face au plasma des machines de fusion controlee

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cismondi, F

    2007-07-01

    In Plasma Facing Components (PFCs) the joint of the CFC armour material onto the metallic CuCrZr heat sink needs to be significant defects free. Detection of material flaws is a major issue of the PFCs acceptance protocol. A Non-Destructive Technique (NDT) based upon active infrared thermography allows testing PFCs on SATIR tests bed in Cadarache. Up to now defect detection was based on the comparison of the surface temperature evolution of the inspected component with that of a supposed 'defect-free' one (used as a reference element). This work deals with improvement of thermal signal processing coming from SATIR. In particular the contributions of the thermal modelling and statistical signal processing converge in this work. As for thermal modelling, the identification of a sensitive parameter to defect presence allows improving the quantitative estimation of defect Otherwise Finite Element (FE) modeling of SATIR allows calculating the so called deterministic numerical tile. Statistical approach via the Monte Carlo technique extends the numerical tile concept to the numerical population concept. As for signal processing, traditional statistical treatments allow a better localization of the bond defect processing thermo-signal by itself, without utilising a reference signal. Moreover the problem of detection and classification of random signals can be solved by maximizing the signal-to-noise ratio. Two filters maximizing the signal-to-noise ratio are optimized: the stochastic matched filter aims at detects detection and the constrained stochastic matched filter aims at defects classification. Performances are quantified and methods are compared via the ROC curves. (author)

  15. Lipoprotein interactions with a polyurethane and a polyethylene oxide-modified polyurethane at the plasma-material interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cornelius, Rena M; Macri, Joseph; Cornelius, Katherine M; Brash, John L

    2016-06-15

    Lipoproteins [high density lipoprotein (HDL), low density lipoprotein (LDL), and very low density lipoprotein (VLDL)] are present in blood in relatively high concentrations, and, given their importance in cardiovascular disease, the interactions of these species with blood contacting biomaterials and their possible role in thrombogenesis is of interest. In the present communication, quantitative data on the adsorption of apolipoprotein AI, apolipoprotein AII (the main protein components of HDL), and apolipoprotein B (the main protein component of LDL and VLDL), as well as the lipoproteins themselves from plasma to a biomedical grade polyurethane (PU) with and without a copolymer additive that contains polyethylene oxide (PEO) segments, were investigated. Adsorption from some binary solutions was also studied. Significant quantities of the apolipoproteins were found to adsorb from plasma to the PU, while adsorption to the PEO material was more than 90% lower, demonstrating strong protein resistance of the latter material. In contrast, significant quantities of the lipoproteins were found to adsorb to the PEO as well as to the PU material. From these and previously published results, it is concluded that the protein layer formed on the PU surface from plasma (and by extension from blood) contains apolipoproteins and lipoproteins in addition to other plasma proteins; the layer formed on the PEO surface, however, appears to contain minimal quantities of plasma proteins (including free apolipoproteins) but significant quantities of lipoproteins.

  16. Surface degradation mechanism during the fluorine-based plasma etching of a low-k material for nanoscale semiconductors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jong Kyu; Kang, Seung Hyun; Cho, Sung Il; Lee, Sung Ho; Kim, Kyong Nam; Yeom, G Y

    2014-12-01

    The degradation of a low-k material surface during the exposure to plasma etching is one of the most serious problems to be solved for the realization of high speed semiconductor devices. In this study, the factors causing the degradation of a low-k material surface during the etching using fluorine-based plasma etching have been investigated by using XPS. As the plasma factors, active radicals, bombardment energy, and charge of the ions were considered and, as the low-k material, methyl silsesquioxane (MSQ) has been used. The XPS results showed that the ion bombardment during the plasma etching of MSQ affects the breaking of MSQ bone structure by changing the Si-O bonds and Si-C bonds to Si-F mostly, while fluorine-based radicals in the plasma mostly affect the change of Si-CH3 bonds to Si-CH(x)F(y). By removing the charge of the ions during the bombardment, the MSQ properties were further improved. When F intensity which is related to the damage of the MSQ surface is estimated, the bombardment energy, reactive radical density, and charge of the ions were responsible for -18%, -53%, -19% of the F intensity in the MSQ. Therefore, by using the neutral beam etching instead of a conventional ICP etching, the degradation on the MSQ surface estimated by the F intensity remaining on the MSQ surface could be decreased to 10%.

  17. Numerical Analysis of the Arc Plasma in a Simplified Low-voltage Circuit Breaker Chamber with Ferromagnetic Materials

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wu Yi; Rong Mingzhe; Yang Qian; Hu Guangxia

    2005-01-01

    This paper is devoted to the simulation of the arc plasma in a simplified low-voltage circuit breaker chamber. Based on a group of coupled governing equations, a three-dimensional (3-D) arc plasma model is built and solved by a modified commercial code. Firstly, this paper presents a solution of the stationary state of the arc plasma and discusses the distribution of some parameters throughout the chamber. Secondly, with the ferromagnetic materials included,the balance of the stationary state is broken and a transient course is calculated. In light of the simulation results, the temperature distribution sequence, the arc motion and the plasma jet are then described and analyzed in detail.

  18. Influence of dielectric materials on uniformity of large-area capacitively coupled plasmas for N2/Ar discharges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Ying-Shuang; Zhang, Yu-Ru; Wang, You-Nian

    2016-10-01

    The effect of the dielectric ring on the plasma radial uniformity is numerically investigated in the practical 450-mm capacitively coupled plasma reactor by a two-dimensional self-consistent fluid model. The simulations were performed for N2/Ar discharges at the pressure of 300 Pa, and the frequency of 13.56 MHz. In the practical plasma treatment process, the wafer is always surrounded by a dielectric ring, which is less studied. In this paper, the plasma characteristics are systematically investigated by changing the properties of the dielectric ring, i.e., the relative permittivity, the thickness and the length. The results indicate that the plasma parameters strongly depend on the properties of the dielectric ring. As the ratio of the thickness to the relative permittivity of the dielectric ring increases, the electric field at the wafer edge becomes weaker due to the stronger surface charging effect. This gives rise to the lower ion density, flux and N atom density at the wafer edge. Thus the homogeneous plasma density is obtained by selecting optimal dielectric ring relative permittivity and thickness. In addition, we also find that the length of the dielectric ring should be as short as possible to avoid the discontinuity of the dielectric materials, and thus obtain the large area uniform plasma. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 11335004 and 11405019) and the Important National Science and Technology Specific Project of China (Grant No. 2011ZX02403-001).

  19. An Experimental Research to Study the Microwaves Transmission Characteristics of Ablating Material in Arc-Heated Plasma Flow

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    In this paper, an experimental research the effect of ablating material on the reflection and the transmission of microwaves in arc-heated plasma flow is presented by using the C band microwave measuring system. The results show that the ablating material with accidented surface and its high temperature have remarkably affected the reflection and the transmission of microwaves. The experiment proves that the system has outstanding precision and reliability.

  20. Atmospheric-Pressure Cold Plasmas Used to Embed Bioactive Compounds in Matrix Material for Active Packaging of Fruits and Vegetables

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandez, Sulmer; Pedrow, Patrick; Powers, Joseph; Pitts, Marvin

    2009-10-01

    Active thin film packaging is a technology with the potential to provide consumers with new fruit and vegetable products-if the film can be applied without deactivating bioactive compounds.Atmospheric pressure cold plasma (APCP) processing can be used to activate monomer with concomitant deposition of an organic plasma polymerized matrix material and to immobilize a bioactive compound all at or below room temperature.Aims of this work include: 1) immobilize an antimicrobial in the matrix; 2) determine if the antimicrobial retains its functionality and 3) optimize the reactor design.The plasma zone will be obtained by increasing the voltage on an electrode structure until the electric field in the feed material (argon + monomer) yields electron avalanches. Results will be described using Red Delicious apples.Prospective matrix precursors are vanillin and cinnamic acid.A prospective bioactive compound is benzoic acid.

  1. Structure and Properties of Sio2 Nanopowder Obtained From High-Silica Raw Materials by Plasma Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kosmachev, P. V.; Vlasov, V. A.; Skripnikova, N. K.

    2017-06-01

    The paper presents a plasma-assisted generation of nanodisperse powder obtained from diatomite, a natural high-silica material. The structure and properties of the obtained material are investigated using the transmission electron microscopy, energy dispersive X-Ray spectroscopy, infrared and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopies, and Brunauer-Emmett-Teller method. It is clearly shown that the obtained SiO2 nanoparticles are spherical, polydisperse and represented in the form of agglomerates. The specific surface of this nanopowder is 32 m2/g. Thermodynamic modeling of the plasma-assisted process is used to obtain the equilibrium compositions of condensed and gaseous reaction products. The plasma process is performed within the 300-5000 K temperature range.

  2. The bone regenerative effect of platelet-rich plasma in combination with an osteoconductive material in rat cranial defects.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Plachokova, A.S.; Dolder, J. van den; Stoelinga, P.J.W.; Jansen, J.A.

    2006-01-01

    The effect of platelet-rich plasma (PRP) on bone regeneration, in combination with an osteoconductive material, was evaluated in a rat model. Cranial defects, 6.2 mm in diameter, were filled with HA/beta-TCP particles, HA/beta-TCP particles combined with PRP and HA/beta-TCP particles combined with P

  3. Studies of the influence of nonequilibrium plasma thermal exposure on the characteristics of the capillary-porous polymer material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makhotkina, L. Yu; Khristoliubova, V. I.

    2017-01-01

    Capillary-porous materials, which include natural macromolecular tanning material, are exposed to a number of factors during the treatment by a nonequilibrium plasma. Plasma particles exchange the charge and energy with the atoms of the material during the interaction of the plasma with the surface. The results of treatment are desorption of atoms and molecules from the body surface, sputtering and evaporation of material’s particles, changes of the structure and phase state. In real terms during the modification of solids by nonequilibrium low-temperature plasma thermal effect influences the process. The energy supplied from the discharge during the process with low pressure, which is converted into heat, is significantly less than during the atmospheric pressure, but the thermal stability of high-molecular compounds used in the manufacture of materials and products of the tanning industry, is very limited and depends on the duration of the effect of temperature. Even short heating of hydrophilic polymers (proteins) (100-180 °C) causes a change in their properties. It decreases the collagen ability to absorb water vapor, to swell in water, acids, alkalis, and thus decreases their durability. Prolonged heating leads to a deterioration of the physical and mechanical properties. Higher heating temperatures it leads to the polymer degradation. The natural leather temperature during plasma exposure does not rise to a temperature of collagen degradation and does not result in changes of physical phase of the dermis. However, the thermal plasma exposure must be considered, since the high temperatures influence on physical and mechanical properties.

  4. Face pain

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... begin in other places in the body. Abscessed tooth (ongoing throbbing pain on one side of the lower face that ... face, and aggravated by eating. Call a dentist. Pain is persistent, ... by other unexplained symptoms. Call your primary provider.

  5. Application of DC plasma torch for synthesis of carbon nanostructured materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shavelkina, M. B.; Amirov, R. H.; Katarzhis, V. A.; Kiselev, V. I.

    2016-09-01

    The results of the synthesis of carbon nanostructures at high temperatures using a DC plasma torch are presented. Plasma was generated by introduction of argon, nitrogen and helium into the plasma torch with an anode in the form of an expanding channel. Sustainable modes of the plasma torch operation have been achieved by simultaneous tangential input of a plasma gas with a carbon source. Obtained solid products were studied using electron microscopy, thermogravimetry, Raman spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction to characterize their properties and morphological structures.

  6. Laser ablation inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry for analysis of pellets of plant materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gomes, Marcos S. [Departamento de Química, Universidade Federal de São Carlos, Rod. Washington Luís, km 235, 13565-905 São Carlos, SP (Brazil); Centro de Energia Nuclear na Agricultura, Universidade de São Paulo, Av. Centenário 303, 13416-000 Piracicaba, SP (Brazil); Schenk, Emily R. [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Florida International University, Miami, FL (United States); International Forensic Research Institute, Florida International University, Miami, FL (United States); Santos, Dário [Departamento de Ciências Exatas e da Terra, Universidade Federal de São Paulo, Rua Professor Arthur Riedel 275, Diadema, SP (Brazil); Krug, Francisco José [Centro de Energia Nuclear na Agricultura, Universidade de São Paulo, Av. Centenário 303, 13416-000 Piracicaba, SP (Brazil); Almirall, José R., E-mail: almirall@fiu.edu [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Florida International University, Miami, FL (United States); International Forensic Research Institute, Florida International University, Miami, FL (United States)

    2014-04-01

    An evaluation of laser ablation inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectroscopy (LAICP OES) for the direct analysis of pelleted plant material is reported. Ground leaves of orange citrus, soy and sugarcane were comminuted using a high-speed ball mill, pressed into pellets and sampled directly with laser ablation and analyzed by ICP OES. The limits of detection (LODs) for the method ranged from as low as 0.1 mg kg{sup −1} for Zn to as high as 94 mg kg{sup −1} for K but were generally below 6 mg kg{sup −1} for most of the elements of interest. A certified reference material consisting of a similar matrix (NIST SRM 1547 peach leaves) was used to check the accuracy of the calibration and the reported method resulted in an average bias of ∼ 5% for all the elements of interest. The precision for the reported method ranged from as low as 4% relative standard deviation (RSD) for Mn to as high as 17% RSD for Zn but averaged ∼ 6.5% RSD for all the elements (n = 10). The proposed method was tested for the determination of Ca, Mg, P, K, Fe, Mn, Zn and B, and the results were in good agreement with those obtained for the corresponding acid digests by ICP-OES, no differences being observed by applying a paired t-test at the 95% confidence level. The reported direct solid sampling method provides a fast alternative to acid digestion that results in similar and appropriate analytical figures of merit with regard to sensitivity, accuracy and precision for plant material analysis. - Highlights: • An evaluation of LA-ICP-OES for the direct analysis of pelleted plant material is reported. • Orange citrus, soy and sugarcane plants were pressed into pellets and sampled directly. • The element menu consisted of Ca, Mg, P, K, Fe, Mn, Zn and B. • LODs for the method ranged from 0.1 mg kg{sup −1} for Zn to 94 mg kg{sup −1} for K. • The precision ranged from 4% RSD for Mn to 17% RSD for Zn (∼ 6.5% RSD average)

  7. [Study on retention of veneering materials to the facing crown made of hard-type resin. Application etching to Ni-Cr alloys].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ichikawa, M

    1989-01-01

    In order to enhance adhesiveness between the resin and the metal in the facing crown made of hard-type resin, the bead application method has been widely utilized. A short-coming of this method is that the metal part of the facing must be made thicker for bead application. If, however, a retention is made beneath the surface of the metal part, the facing metal can be made thinner. The author studied the adhesiveness of metal to resin by producing pitting corrosion on the surface of four different kinds of Ni-Cr alloys, etching the surface with strong acid under various conditions, and compared the adhesiveness and failure conditions with those of the beaded specimens. The results were as follows: 1) The degree of corrosion of the surface of specimens was positively correlated with the duration of etching. However, the degree of corrosion differed depending on the kinds of etching solutions and specimen alloys. 2) In terms of adhesiveness, some of the etching groups were stronger than the beaded groups and some were weaker, depending on the kinds of alloys and etching conditions. 3) Condition of failure at the joint surface: in the beaded groups cohesive failure was the most prevalent type. In the etching groups, compound failure was the most prevalent. There was a positive correlation between adhesive strength and the amount of residual resin: the more residual resin, the greater the adhesive strength. 1) Electron microscopic observations: on the surface of specimens of the etching groups pitted roughness was observed, and the resin material was tightly attached to the metal surface. However, reciprocal diffusion of the elements from both materials was not indicated, nor was there any evidence of chemical bonding.

  8. Load Deflection of Dow Corning SE 1700 Face Centered Tetragonal Direct Ink Write Materials: Effect of Thickness and Filament Spacing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Small, Ward [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Pearson, Mark A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Metz, Tom R. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2016-03-09

    Dow Corning SE 1700 (reinforced polydimethylsiloxane) porous structures were made by direct ink writing (DIW) in a face centered tetragonal (FCT) configuration. The filament diameter was 250 μm. Structures consisting of 4, 8, or 12 layers were fabricated with center-to-center filament spacing (“road width” (RW)) of 475, 500, 525, 550, or 575 μm. Three compressive load-unload cycles to 2000 kPa were performed on four separate areas of each sample; three samples of each thickness and filament spacing were tested. At a given strain during the third loading phase, stress varied inversely with porosity. At 10% strain, the stress was nearly independent of the number of layers (i.e., thickness). At higher strains (20- 40%), the stress was highest for the 4-layer structure; the 8- and 12-layer structures were nearly equivalent suggesting that the load deflection is independent of number of layers above 8 layers. Intra-and inter-sample variability of the load deflection response was higher for thinner and less porous structures.

  9. Material fundamentals and clinical performance of plasma-sprayed hydroxyapatite coatings: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, L; Berndt, C C; Gross, K A; Kucuk, A

    2001-01-01

    The clinical use of plasma-sprayed hydroxyapatite (HA) coatings on metal implants has aroused as many controversies as interests over the last decade. Although faster and stronger fixation and more bone growth have been revealed, the performance of HA-coated implants has been doubted. This article will initially address the fundamentals of the material selection, design, and processing of the HA coating and show how the coating microstructure and properties can be a good predictor of the expected behavior in the body. Further discussion will clarify the major concerns with the clinical use of HA coatings and introduce a comprehensive review concerning the outcomes experienced with respect to clinical practice over the past 5 years. A reflection on the results indicates that HA coatings can promote earlier and stronger fixation but exhibit a durability that can be related to the coating quality. Specific relationships between coating quality and clinical performance are being established as characterization methods disclose more information about the coating.

  10. Unburned carbon behavior in sintered coal fly-ash bulk material by spark plasma sintering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hasezaki, K.; Nakashita, A.; Kaneko, G.Y.; Kakuda, H. [Shimane University, Shimane (Japan). Dept. of Material Science

    2007-12-15

    Coal fly-ash bulk materials were prepared by spark plasma sintering (SPS). The as-received coal fly ash produced by Misumi Power Station (The Chugoku Flectric Power Co., Inc.), had an average particle size of 19 {mu}m and contained about 2% carbon from unburned coal. The sintering temperature was 1000{sup o}C for 10 min. The mass density of the sintered compact was 2.4 x 10{sup 3} kg/m{sup 3}. After three-point flexural testing of the compact, the average flexural strength and Young's modulus were 25.6 MPa and 23.0 GPa, respectively. From the flexural strength, the Weibull modulus was found to be m = 6.13, indicating that the compact was a typical ceramics. Fractographic examination indicated that in all specimens the fracture origin was located on the bottom surface and was not an intrinsic flaw. Vickers indentation test showed that the fracture toughness was 0.61 MPa.m{sup 0.5} and the calculated critical flaw size, c{sub 0}, was 0.18 mm. This c{sub 0} value was larger than that of the voids and unburned carbon on the fracture surface. It is noteworthy that the mechanical strength of the sintered compact was not affected by the voids and unburned carbon.

  11. Mechanical properties of high dense coal fly-ash bulk materials by plasma spark sintering (SPS)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaneko, G.; Hasezaki, K.; Nakashita, A.; Kakuda, H. [Shimane University, Shimane (Japan). Dept. of Material Science

    2008-10-15

    Coal fly-ash bulk materials were prepared by spark plasma sintering (SPS). The as-received coal fly ash produced by Misumi Power Station (The Chugoku Electric Power Co. Inc.), had an average particle size of 19 mm and contained about 2% carbon from unburned coal. The sintering temperature was 1273 K for 10 min. The mass density of the sintered compact was 2.4 x 103 kg/m{sup 3}. After three-point flexural testing of the compact, the average flexural strength and Young's modulus were 25.6 MPa and 23.0 GPa, respectively. From the flexural strength, the Weibull modulus was found to be m = 6.13, indicating that the compact was a typical ceramics. Fractographic examination indicated that in all specimens the fracture origin was located on the bottom surface and was not an intrinsic flaw. Vickers indentation test showed that the fracture toughness was 0.61 MPa.m{sup 0.5} and the calculated critical flaw size c{sub 0}, was 0.18 mm. This c{sub 0} value was larger than that of the voids and the unburned carbon at the fracture surface. It is noteworthy that the mechanical strength of the sintered compact was not affected by the voids and unburned carbon.

  12. Study of Raw Materials Treatment by Melting and Gasification Process in Plasma Arc Reactor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter KURILLA

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available The world consumption of metals and energy has increased in last few decades and it is still increasing. Total volume production results to higher waste production. Raw material basis of majority metals and fossil fuels for energy production is more complex and current waste treatment has long term tendency. Spent power cells of different types have been unneeded and usually they are classified as dangerous waste. This important issue is the main topic of the thesis, in which author describes pyrometallurgical method for storage batteries – power cells and catalysts treatment. During the process there were tested a trial of spent NiMH, Li – ion power cells and spent copper catalysts with metal content treatment by melting and gasification process in plasma arc reactor. The synthetic gas produced from gasification process has been treated by cogenerations micro turbines units for energy recovery. The metal and slag from treatment process are produced into two separately phases and they were analyzing continually.

  13. A 160 kJ dual plasma focus (DuPF) for fusion-relevant materials testing and nano-materials fabrication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saw, S. H.; Damideh, V.; Chong, P. L.; Lee, P.; Rawat, R. S.; Lee, S.

    2014-08-01

    This paper summarizes PF-160 Dual Plasma Focus (DuPF) numerical experiments using the Lee Model code and preliminary 3D design drawings using SolidWorks software. This DuPF consists of two interchangeable electrodes enabling it to be optimized for both Slow Pinch Mode (SFM) and Fast Pinch Mode (FFM); the latter using a speed factor (SF) of 90 kA cm-1 Torr-0.5 for FFM in deuterium [S Lee et al, IEEE Trans Plasma Science 24, 1101-1105 (1996)]; and the former with SF of less than half that value for SFM. Starting with available 6 × 450 µF capacitors rated at 11kV (10% reversal), numerical experiments indicate safe operation at 9 kV, 6 Torr deuterium with FFM anode of 5 cm radius; producing intense ion beam and streaming plasma pulses which would be useful for studies of potential fusion reactor wall materials. On the other hand operating at 5 kV, 10 Torr deuterium with SFM anode of 10 cm radius leads to long-duration, uniform large-area flow which could be more suitable for synthesis of nano-materials. The dual plasma focus design is illustrated here with two figures showing FFM and SFM electrodes.

  14. Enhancement in biological response of Ag-nano composite polymer membranes using plasma treatment for fabrication of efficient bio materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agrawal, Narendra Kumar; Sharma, Tamanna Kumari; Chauhan, Manish; Agarwal, Ravi; Vijay, Y. K.; Swami, K. C.

    2016-05-01

    Biomaterials are nonviable material used in medical devices, intended to interact with biological systems, which are becoming necessary for the development of artificial material for biological systems such as artificial skin diaphragm, valves for heart and kidney, lenses for eye etc. Polymers having novel properties like antibacterial, antimicrobial, high adhesion, blood compatibility and wettability are most suitable for synthesis of biomaterial, but all of these properties does not exist in any natural or artificial polymeric material. Nano particles and plasma treatment can offer these properties to the polymers. Hence a new nano-biomaterial has been developed by modifying the surface and chemical properties of Ag nanocomposite polymer membranes (NCPM) by Argon ion plasma treatment. These membranes were characterized using different techniques for surface and chemical modifications occurred. Bacterial adhesion and wettability were also tested for these membranes, to show direct use of this new class of nano-biomaterial for biomedical applications.

  15. Development of Ca-doped LaCr03 feed material and its plasma coating for SOFC applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purohit, R. D.; Nair, Sathi R.; Prakash, Deep; Sinha, P. K.; Sharma, B. P.; Sreekumar, K. P.; Ananthapadmanabhan, P. V.; Das, A. K.; Gantayet, L. M.

    2010-02-01

    In order to realize SOFC as power generating devices, multiple cells are connected in series through an interconnect material to accumulate the voltage output. The interconnect should have very low permeability for the gases used. A novel solution combustion process has been developed for producing the phase pure, well-sinterable powders of Ca-doped LaCrO3 interconnect material. A process has been developed to produce the coarse granules as a feed material using combustion-synthesized powder for plasma spray through (a) preparation of granules through cold iso-static pressing followed by breaking and sieving (b) sintering of the green granules followed by sieving. The flow ability and deposition efficiency studies on +45-75 and 75-125 μm powders suggested that +45-75 powder is more suitable for the plasma spray coating. The plasma process parameters; plasma power, flow rate of carrier gases and distance between substrate and plasma gun have been optimized to achieve required coating characteristics. The as-produced coating using 20 kW power plasma gun on the porous Sr-doped LaMnO3 cathode substrates has been examined by SEM. An adherent coating of about 100 μm has been observed in the micrographs. No large cracks were observed throughout the coating. However, the coating was not found to be impervious in nature. Also the micrographs showed incomplete melting of the plasma-coated material. The similar experiments were performed using a higher power (approx 60 Kw) plasma gun. The coated coupons were tested for leakage by checking water penetration. It was found that water did not penetrate for quite a long time. Therefore, the coupon was further tested for leakage by keeping it over a port connected to vacuum pump. The vacuum attained was 7×10-3 mbar and it was maintained for four consecutive days. The SEM studies on the coated sample showed a quite dense coating along with a very few small local pores.

  16. Spectroscopy of reactive species produced by low-energy atmospheric-pressure plasma on conductive target material surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamada, Hiromasa; Sakakita, Hajime; Kato, Susumu; Kim, Jaeho; Kiyama, Satoru; Fujiwara, Masanori; Itagaki, Hirotomo; Okazaki, Toshiya; Ikehara, Sanae; Nakanishi, Hayao; Shimizu, Nobuyuki; Ikehara, Yuzuru

    2016-10-01

    A method for blood coagulation using low-energy atmospheric-pressure plasma (LEAPP) is confirmed as an alternative procedure to reduce tissue damage caused by heat. Blood coagulation using LEAPP behaves differently depending on working gas species; helium is more effective than argon in promoting fast coagulation. To analyse the difference in reactive species produced by helium and argon plasma, spectroscopic measurements were conducted without and with a target material. To compare emissions, blood coagulation experiments using LEAPP for both plasmas were performed under almost identical conditions. Although many kinds of reactive species such as hydroxyl radicals and excited nitrogen molecules were observed with similar intensity in both plasmas, intensities of nitrogen ion molecules and nitric oxide molecules were extremely strong in the helium plasma. It is considered that nitrogen ion molecules were mainly produced by penning ionization by helium metastable. Near the target, a significant increase in the emissions of reactive species is observed. There is a possibility that electron acceleration was induced in a local electric field formed on the surface. However, in argon plasma, emissions from nitrogen ion were not measured even near the target surface. These differences between the two plasmas may be producing the difference in blood coagulation behaviour. To control the surrounding gas of the plasma, a gas-component-controllable chamber was assembled. Filling the chamber with O2/He or N2/He gas mixtures selectively produces either reactive oxygen species or reactive nitrogen species. Through selective treatments, this chamber would be useful in studying the effects of specific reactive species on blood coagulation.

  17. Object-oriented sociology and organizing in the face of emergency: Bruno Latour, Graham Harman and the material turn.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierides, Dean; Woodman, Dan

    2012-12-01

    This paper explores the material turn in sociology and the tools it provides for understanding organizational problems highlighted by the Royal Commission into the 2009 'Black Saturday' bushfires during which 173 people died in the Australian State of Victoria. Often inspired by Bruno Latour's material-semiotic sociology of associations, organization scholars employing these tools focus on the messy details of organization otherwise overlooked by approaches assuming a macroscopic frame of analysis. In Latour's approach no object is reducible to something else - such as nature, the social, or atoms - it is instead a stabilized set of relations. A Latourian approach allows us to highlight how the Royal Commission and macroscopic models of organizing do unwitting damage to their objects of inquiry by purifying the 'natural' from the 'social'. Performative elements in their schemas are mistaken for descriptive ones. However, a long standing critique of this approach claims that it becomes its own form of reduction, to nothing but relations. Graham Harman, in his object-oriented philosophy develops this critique by showing that a 'relationist' metaphysics cannot properly accommodate the capacity of 'objects' to cause or mediate surprises. Through our case of the Victorian Bushfires Royal Commission, we argue that a purely relational model of objects loosens a productive tension between the structural and ephemeral that drives sociological analysis. By drawing on elements of Harman's ontology of objects we argue that it is necessary for material-semiotic sociology to retain a central place for the emergence of sociological objects. © London School of Economics and Political Science 2012.

  18. Atmospheric pressure plasma processing of polymeric materials utilizing close proximity indirect exposure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paulauskas, Felix L.; Bonds, Truman

    2016-09-20

    A plasma treatment method that includes providing treatment chamber including an intermediate heating volume and an interior treatment volume. The interior treatment volume contains an electrode assembly for generating a plasma and the intermediate heating volume heats the interior treatment volume. A work piece is traversed through the treatment chamber. A process gas is introduced to the interior treatment volume of the treatment chamber. A plasma is formed with the electrode assembly from the process gas, wherein a reactive species of the plasma is accelerated towards the fiber tow by flow vortices produced in the interior treatment volume by the electrode assembly.

  19. Ablation of high-Z material dust grains in edge plasmas of magnetic fusion devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marenkov, E. D.; Krasheninnikov, S. I.

    2014-12-01

    The model, including shielding effects of high-Z dust grain ablation in tokamak edge plasma, is presented. In a contrast to shielding models developed for pellets ablation in a hot plasma core, this model deals with the dust grain ablation in relatively cold edge plasma. Using some simplifications, a closed set of equations determining the grain ablation rate Γ is derived and analyzed both analytically and numerically. The scaling law for Γ versus grain radius and ambient plasma parameters is obtained and confirmed by the results of numerical solutions. The results obtained are compared with both dust grain models containing no shielding effects and the pellet ablation models.

  20. Efficacy of autologous platelet-rich plasma combined with fractional ablative carbon dioxide resurfacing laser in treatment of facial atrophic acne scars: A split-face randomized clinical trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gita Faghihi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Autologous platelet-rich plasma has recently attracted significant attention throughout the medical field for its wound-healing ability. Aims: This study was conducted to investigate the potential of platelet-rich plasma combined with fractional laser therapy in the treatment of acne scarring. Methods: Sixteen patients (12 women and 4 men who underwent split-face therapy were analyzed in this study. They received ablative fractional carbon dioxide laser combined with intradermal platelet-rich plasma treatment on one half of their face and ablative fractional carbon dioxide laser with intradermal normal saline on the other half. The injections were administered immediately after laser therapy. The treatment sessions were repeated after an interval of one month. The clinical response was assessed based on patient satisfaction and the objective evaluation of serial photographs by two blinded dermatologists at baseline, 1 month after the first treatment session and 4 months after the second. The adverse effects including erythema and edema were scored by participants on days 0, 2, 4, 6, 8, 15 and 30 after each session. Results: Overall clinical improvement of acne scars was higher on the platelet-rich plasma-fractional carbon dioxide laser treated side but the difference was not statistically significant either 1 month after the first treatment session (P = 0.15 or 4 months after the second (P = 0.23. In addition, adverse effects (erythema and edema on the platelet-rich plasma-fractional carbon dioxide laser-treated side were more severe and of longer duration. Limitations: Small sample size, absence of all skin phototypes within the study group and lack of objective methods for the evaluation of response to treatment and adverse effects were the limitations. Conclusion: This study demonstrated that adding platelet-rich plasma to fractional carbon dioxide laser treatment did not produce any statistically significant synergistic effects

  1. Efficacy of autologous platelet-rich plasma combined with fractional ablative carbon dioxide resurfacing laser in treatment of facial atrophic acne scars: A split-face randomized clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faghihi, Gita; Keyvan, Shima; Asilian, Ali; Nouraei, Saeid; Behfar, Shadi; Nilforoushzadeh, Mohamad Ali

    2016-01-01

    Autologous platelet-rich plasma has recently attracted significant attention throughout the medical field for its wound-healing ability. This study was conducted to investigate the potential of platelet-rich plasma combined with fractional laser therapy in the treatment of acne scarring. Sixteen patients (12 women and 4 men) who underwent split-face therapy were analyzed in this study. They received ablative fractional carbon dioxide laser combined with intradermal platelet-rich plasma treatment on one half of their face and ablative fractional carbon dioxide laser with intradermal normal saline on the other half. The injections were administered immediately after laser therapy. The treatment sessions were repeated after an interval of one month. The clinical response was assessed based on patient satisfaction and the objective evaluation of serial photographs by two blinded dermatologists at baseline, 1 month after the first treatment session and 4 months after the second. The adverse effects including erythema and edema were scored by participants on days 0, 2, 4, 6, 8, 15 and 30 after each session. Overall clinical improvement of acne scars was higher on the platelet-rich plasma-fractional carbon dioxide laser treated side but the difference was not statistically significant either 1 month after the first treatment session (P = 0.15) or 4 months after the second (P = 0.23). In addition, adverse effects (erythema and edema) on the platelet-rich plasma-fractional carbon dioxide laser-treated side were more severe and of longer duration. Small sample size, absence of all skin phototypes within the study group and lack of objective methods for the evaluation of response to treatment and adverse effects were the limitations. This study demonstrated that adding platelet-rich plasma to fractional carbon dioxide laser treatment did not produce any statistically significant synergistic effects and also resulted in more severe side effects and longer downtime.

  2. The role of energetic ions from plasma in the creation of nanostructured materials and stable polymer surface treatments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bilek, M.M.M. [Department of Applied and Plasma Physics, School of Physics, University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia)]. E-mail: mmmb@physics.usyd.edu.au; Newton-McGee, K. [Department of Applied and Plasma Physics, School of Physics, University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia); McKenzie, D.R. [Department of Applied and Plasma Physics, School of Physics, University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia); McCulloch, D.G. [Department of Applied and Plasma Physics, School of Physics, University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia)

    2006-01-15

    Plasma processes for the synthesis of new materials as thin films have enabled the production of a wide variety of new materials. These include meta-stable phases, which are not readily found in nature, and more recently, materials with structure on the nanoscale. Study of plasma synthesis processes at the fundamental level has revealed that ion energy, depositing flux and growth surface temperature are the critical parameters affecting the microstructure and the properties of the thin film materials formed. In this paper, we focus on the role of ion flux and impact energy in the creation of thin films with nanoscale structure in the form of multilayers. We describe three synthesis strategies, based on the extraction of ions from plasma sources and involving modulation of ion flux and ion energy. The microstructure, intrinsic stress and physical properties of the multilayered samples synthesized are studied and related back to the conditions at the growth surface during deposition. When energetic ions of a non-condensing species are used, it is possible to place active groups on the surfaces of materials such as polymers. These active groups can then be used as bonding sites in subsequent chemical attachment of proteins or other macromolecules. If the energy of the non-condensing ions is increased to a few keV then modified layers buried under the surface can be produced. Here we describe a method by which the aging effect, which is often observed in plasma surface modifications on polymers, can be reduced and even eliminated using high energy ion bombardment.

  3. Study of electrochemical properties of thin film materials obtained using plasma technologies for production of electrodes for pacemakers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obrezkov, O. I.; Vinogradov, V. P.; Krauz, V. I.; Mozgrin, D. V.; Guseva, I. A.; Andreev, E. S.; Zverev, A. A.; Starostin, A. L.

    2016-09-01

    Studies of thin film materials (TFM) as coatings of tips of pacemaker electrodes implanted into the human heart have been performed. TFM coatings were deposited in vacuum by arc magnetron discharge plasma, by pulsed discharge of “Plasma Focus”, and by electron beam evaporation. Simulation of electric charge transfer to the heart in physiological blood- imitator solution and determination of electrochemical properties of the coatings were carried out. TFM of highly developed surface of contact with tissue was produced by argon plasma spraying of titanium powder with subsequent coating by titanium nitride in vacuum arc assisted by Ti ion implantation. The TFM coatings of pacemaker electrode have passed necessary clinical tests and were used in medical practice. They provide low voltage myocardium stimulation thresholds within the required operating time.

  4. High-temperature thermo-mechanical behavior of functionally graded materials produced by plasma sprayed coating: Experimental and modeling results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Kang Hyun; Kim, Hyun-Su; Park, Chang Hyun; Kim, Gon-Ho; Baik, Kyoung Ho; Lee, Sung Ho; Kim, Taehyung; Kim, Hyoung Seop

    2016-09-01

    Thermal barrier coatings are widely used in aerospace industries to protect exterior surfaces from harsh environments. In this study, functionally graded materials (FGMs) were investigated with the aim to optimize their high temperature resistance and strength characteristics. NiCrAlY bond coats were deposited on Inconel-617 superalloy substrate specimens by the low vacuum plasma spraying technique. Functionally graded Ni-yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) coatings with gradually varying amounts of YSZ (20%-100%) were fabricated from composite powders by vacuum plasma spraying. Heat shield performance tests were conducted using a high- temperature plasma torch. The temperature distributions were measured using thermocouples at the interfaces of the FGM layers during the tests. A model for predicting the temperature at the bond coating-substrate interface was established. The temperature distributions simulated using the finite element method agreed well with the experimental results.

  5. Book of Abstracts (Plasma-Surface Interaction and Processing of Materials)

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989-09-22

    DISCHARGE USED FOR GaAs TREATMENT J. Bretagne *, 0. Jacquin*.** and R. Ferdinand*.** *Laboratoire de Physique des Gaz et des Plasmas Unitg Associee du...Sciences - Route de Laval - BP 535 - 72017 LE MANS CEDEX France J. Bretagne and A. Ricard Laboratoire de Physique des Gaz et des Plasmas, Universite de

  6. Cleaning of carbon materials from flat surfaces and castellation gaps by an atmospheric pressure plasma jet

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stancu, C. [National Institute for Laser, Plasma and Radiation Physics, Atomistilor Str. 409, PO Box Mg36, Magurele-Bucharest, 077125 (Romania); Alegre, D. [Laboratorio Nacional de Fusión, As. Euratom/Ciemat, Avda. Complutense 22, 28040, Madrid (Spain); Ionita, E.R.; Mitu, B. [National Institute for Laser, Plasma and Radiation Physics, Atomistilor Str. 409, PO Box Mg36, Magurele-Bucharest, 077125 (Romania); Grisolia, C. [CEA, IRFM, F-13108, Saint-Paul-lez-Durance (France); Tabares, F.L. [Laboratorio Nacional de Fusión, As. Euratom/Ciemat, Avda. Complutense 22, 28040, Madrid (Spain); Dinescu, G., E-mail: dinescug@infim.ro [National Institute for Laser, Plasma and Radiation Physics, Atomistilor Str. 409, PO Box Mg36, Magurele-Bucharest, 077125 (Romania)

    2016-02-15

    Highlights: • Atmospheric plasma jets operated with nitrogen, oxygen and their mixtures are used for cleaning surfaces of carbon residues • Efficient plasma jet cleaning of carbon deposits from flat surfaces and inside gaps of castellated surfaces is demonstrated • Plasma jet cleaning is more effective at the gaps entrance and on their bottom - Abstract: A study of the removal of carbon layers from flat and castellated surfaces by a plasma jet source operated in open atmosphere is presented. Amorphous hydrogenated carbon films deposited on silicon substrates, on aluminium made castellated surfaces, and graphitic carbon plates were used. The erosion effects of plasmas generated either in pure argon, nitrogen or in their mixtures with hydrogen, ammonia, oxygen are compared. Highest erosion was obtained with nitrogen and nitrogen/oxygen plasmas. Plasmas in argon and containing hydrogen, and ammonia have shown a low erosion rate. A large removal rate by pure nitrogen plasma jet of 3.2 mg/min was found by scanning graphitic carbon flat surfaces for optimum process parameters. Adding small quantities of oxygen led to a removal rate enhancement by a factor of 3. Finally, the integral removal rate of amorphous hydrogenated carbon deposited in gaps 23 mm deep and 0.5 mm wide was of the order of 0.35 mg/min. The layer elimination was more efficient at the top and at the bottom of the gaps, precisely where the thickest codeposits develop in a nuclear fusion device.

  7. The effect of dielectric top lids on materials processing in a low frequency inductively coupled plasma (LF-ICP) reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, J. W. M.; Chan, C. S.; Xu, L.; Xu, S.

    2014-08-01

    The advent of the plasma revolution began in the 1970's with the exploitation of plasma sources for anisotropic etching and processing of materials. In recent years, plasma processing has gained popularity, with research institutions adopting projects in the field and industries implementing dry processing in their production lines. The advantages of utilizing plasma sources would be uniform processing over a large exposed surface area, and the reduction of toxic emissions. This leads to reduced costs borne by manufacturers which could be passed down as consumer savings, and a reduction in negative environmental impacts. Yet, one constraint that plagues the industry would be the control of contaminants in a plasma reactor which becomes evident when reactions are conducted in a clean vacuum environment. In this work, amorphous silicon (a-Si) thin films were grown on glass substrates in a low frequency inductively coupled plasma (LF-ICP) reactor with a top lid made of quartz. Even though the chamber was kept at high vacuum ( 10-4 Pa), it was evident through secondary ion mass spectroscopy (SIMS) and Fourier-transform infra-red spectroscopy (FTIR) that oxygen contaminants were present. With the aid of optical emission spectroscopy (OES) the contaminant species were identified. The design of the LF-ICP reactor was then modified to incorporate an Alumina (Al2O3) lid. Results indicate that there were reduced amounts of contaminants present in the reactor, and that an added benefit of increased power transfer to the plasma, improving deposition rate of thin films was realized. The results of this study is conclusive in showing that Al2O3 is a good alternative as a top-lid of an LF-ICP reactor, and offers industries a solution in improving quality and rate of growth of thin films.

  8. Relativistic plasma optics enabled by near-critical density nanostructured material

    CERN Document Server

    Bin, J H; Wang, H Y; Streeter, M J V; Kreuzer, C; Kiefer, D; Yeung, M; Cousens, S; Foster, P S; Dromey, B; Yan, X Q; Meyer-ter-Vehn, J; Zepf, M; Schreiber, J

    2014-01-01

    The nonlinear optical properties of a plasma due to the relativistic electron motion in an intense laser field are of fundamental importance for current research and the generation of brilliant laser-driven sources of particles and photons1-15. Yet, one of the most interesting regimes, where the frequency of the laser becomes resonant with the plasma, has remained experimentally hard to access. We overcome this limitation by utilizing ultrathin carbon nanotube foam16 (CNF) targets allowing the strong relativistic nonlinearities at near- critical density (NCD) to be exploited for the first time. We report on the experimental realization of relativistic plasma optics to spatio-temporally compress the laser pulse within a few micrometers of propagation, while maintaining about half its energy. We also apply the enhanced laser pulses to substantially improve the properties of an ion bunch accelerated from a secondary target. Our results provide first insights into the rich physics of NCD plasmas and the opportuni...

  9. Non-equilibrium effects in the processing of materials using plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mangolini, Lorenzo [Univ. of California, Riverside, CA (United States)

    2016-06-02

    We have provided experimental evidence that nanoparticles in plasma are heated to temperatures that are significantly higher than that of the background gas. This result gives experimental confirmation to a number of theoretical/computational studies that predicted this behavior. Moreover, this study has provided with the first measurement of the temperature of nanoparticles in a processing dusty plasma, i.e. under conditions that are relevant for the growth and modification of nanopowders.

  10. Fundamental Study of Interactions Between Pulsed High-Density Plasmas and Materials for Space Propulsion

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-05-23

    thermal shock and allows for optical plasma diagnostics. The new capillary uses a flash lamp approach for triggering to eliminate the need for a...add silicon oxide to alumina processing to form relatively low- melting aluminosilicate phases to enhance densification/ sintering at temperatures well...pressure on the microstructure of spark plasma sintered silicon carbide,” Journal of Chemical Processing Research 16, 303 (2007). 5. O. Sharia

  11. Air plasma-material interactions at the oxidized surface of the PM1000 nickel-chromium superalloy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Panerai, Francesco, E-mail: panerai@vki.ac.be [Aeronautics and Aerospace Department, von Karman Institute for Fluid Dynamics, Chaussée de Waterloo 72, 1640 Rhode-Saint-Genèse (Belgium); Marschall, Jochen [Molecular Physics Program, SRI International, 333 Ravenswood Avenue, Menlo Park, CA 94025 (United States); Thömel, Jan [Aeronautics and Aerospace Department, von Karman Institute for Fluid Dynamics, Chaussée de Waterloo 72, 1640 Rhode-Saint-Genèse (Belgium); Vandendael, Isabelle; Hubin, Annick [Department of Materials and Chemistry, Research Group of Electrochemical and Surface Engineering, Vrije Universiteit Brussel, Pleinlaan 2, B-1050 Brussels (Belgium); Chazot, Olivier [Aeronautics and Aerospace Department, von Karman Institute for Fluid Dynamics, Chaussée de Waterloo 72, 1640 Rhode-Saint-Genèse (Belgium)

    2014-10-15

    Highlights: • A detail investigation on behavior of a Ni–Cr superalloy under air plasma is proposed. • The response of PM1000 specimens at high temperature/low pressure is characterized. • High volatility of Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} scale in presence of oxygen is found experimentally. • Stability of NiO scale at the surface is observed. • Computed thermodynamic volatility diagrams confirm the experimental observations. - Abstract: Nickel-based superalloys are promising options for the thermal protection systems of hypersonic re-entry vehicles operating under moderate aerothermal heating conditions. We present an experimental study on the interactions between PM1000, an oxide dispersion strengthened nickel-chromium superalloy, and air plasma at surface temperatures between 1000 and 1600 K and pressures of 1500, 7500 and 10,000 Pa. Pre-oxidized PM1000 specimens are tested in high-enthalpy reactive air plasma flows generated by the Plasmatron wind tunnel at the von Karman Institute for Fluid Dynamics. Microscopic analysis of plasma-exposed specimens shows enhanced damage to the chromia scale at the lowest plasma pressure. Elemental surface analysis reveals the loss of Cr and the enhancement of Ni at the scale surface. A thermodynamic analysis supports the accelerated volatilization of Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} and the relative stability of NiO in the presence of atomic oxygen. Changes in the reflectance and emissivity of the oxidized surfaces due to plasma-exposure are presented. The catalytic efficiencies for dissociated air species recombination are determined as a function of surface temperature and pressure through a numerical rebuilding procedure and are compared with values presented in the literature for the same material.

  12. Influence of polymer structure on plasma-polymer interactions in resist materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruce, Robert Lawson

    The controlled patterning of polymer resists by plasma plays an essential role in the fabrication of integrated circuits and nanostructures. As the dimensions of patterned structures continue to decrease, we require an atomistic understanding underlying the morphological changes that occur during plasma-polymer interactions. In this work, we investigated how plasma surface modifications and the initial polymer structure influenced plasma etch behavior and morphological changes in polymer resists. Using a prototypical argon discharge, we observed polymer modification by ions and vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) radiation from the plasma. A thin, highly dense modified layer was formed at the polymer surface due to ion bombardment. The thickness and physical properties of this ion-damaged layer was independent of polymer structure for the systems examined here. A relationship was observed that strongly suggests that buckling caused by ion-damaged layer formation on a polymer is the origin of roughness that develops during plasma etching. Our results indicate that with knowledge of the mechanical properties of the ion-damaged layer and the polymer being processed, plasma-induced surface roughness can be predicted and the surface morphology calculated. Examining a wide variety of polymer structures, the polymer poly(4-vinylpyridine) (P4VP) was observed to produce extremely smooth surfaces during high-ion energy plasma etching. Our data suggest that VUV crosslinking of P4VP below the ion-damaged layer may prevent wrinkling. We also studied another form of resists, silicon-containing polymers that form a SiO2 etch barrier layer during O2 plasma processing. In this study, we examined whether assisting SiO2 layer formation by adding Si-O bonds to the polymer structure would improve O2 etch behavior and reduce polymer surface roughness. Our results showed that while adding Si-O bonds decreased etch rates and silicon volatilization during O2 plasma exposure, the surface roughness

  13. Efficiency of Cs-free materials for negative ion production in H2 and D2 plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedl, R.; Kurutz, U.; Fantz, U.

    2017-08-01

    High power negative ion sources use caesium to reduce the work function of the converter surface which significantly increases the negative ion yield. Caesium, however, is a very reactive alkali-metal and shows complex redistribution dynamics in consequence of plasma-surface-interaction. Thus, maintaining a stable and homogenous low work function surface is a demanding task, which is not easily compatible with the RAMI issues (reliability, availability, maintainability, inspectability) for a future DEMO fusion reactor. Hence, Cs-free alternative materials for efficient negative ion formation are desirable. At the laboratory experiment HOMER materials which are referred to as promising are investigated under identical and ion source relevant parameters: the refractory metals Ta and W, non-doped and boron-doped diamond as well as materials with inherent low work function (lanthanum-doped molybdenum, MoLa and lanthanum hexaboride, LaB6). The results are compared to the effect of in-situ caesiation, which at HOMER leads to a maximal increase of the negative ion density by a factor of 2.5. Among the examined samples low work function materials are most efficient. In particular, MoLa leads to an increase of almost 50 % compared to pure volume formation. The difference to a caesiated surface can be attributed to the still higher work function of MoLa, which is expected to be slightly below 3 eV. Using deuterium instead of hydrogen leads to increased atomic and positive ion densities, while comparable negative ion densities are achieved. In contrast to the low work function materials, bulk samples of the refractory metals as well as carbon based materials have no enhancing effect on H-, where the latter materials furthermore show severe erosion due to the hydrogen plasma.

  14. Elimination of columnar microstructure in N-face InAlN, lattice-matched to GaN, grown by plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy in the N-rich regime

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahmadi, Elaheh; Wienecke, Steven; Keller, Stacia; Mishra, Umesh K. [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of California, Santa Barbara, California 93106 (United States); Shivaraman, Ravi; Wu, Feng; Kaun, Stephen W.; Speck, James S. [Materials Department, University of California, Santa Barbara, California 93106 (United States)

    2014-02-17

    The microstructure of N-face InAlN layers, lattice-matched to GaN, was investigated by scanning transmission electron microscopy and atom probe tomography. These layers were grown by plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy (PAMBE) in the N-rich regime. Microstructural analysis shows an absence of the lateral composition modulation that was previously observed in InAlN films grown by PAMBE. A room temperature two-dimensional electron gas (2DEG) mobility of 1100 cm{sup 2}/V s and 2DEG sheet charge density of 1.9 × 10{sup 13} cm{sup −2} was measured for N-face GaN/AlN/GaN/InAlN high-electron-mobility transistors with lattice-matched InAlN back barriers.

  15. Mercury determination in non- and biodegradable materials by cold vapor capacitively coupled plasma microtorch atomic emission spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frentiu, Tiberiu, E-mail: ftibi@chem.ubbcluj.ro [Faculty of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Babes-Bolyai University, Arany Janos 11, 400028 Cluj-Napoca (Romania); Mihaltan, Alin I., E-mail: alinblaj2005@yahoo.com [National Institute for Research and Development of Optoelectronics Bucharest - Research Institute for Analytical Instrumentation, Donath 67, 400293 Cluj-Napoca (Romania); Ponta, Michaela, E-mail: mponta@chem.ubbcluj.ro [Faculty of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Babes-Bolyai University, Arany Janos 11, 400028 Cluj-Napoca (Romania); Darvasi, Eugen, E-mail: edarvasi@chem.ubbcluj.ro [Faculty of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Babes-Bolyai University, Arany Janos 11, 400028 Cluj-Napoca (Romania); Frentiu, Maria, E-mail: frentiu.maria@yahoo.com [National Institute for Research and Development of Optoelectronics Bucharest - Research Institute for Analytical Instrumentation, Donath 67, 400293 Cluj-Napoca (Romania); Cordos, Emil, E-mail: emilcordos@gmail.com [National Institute for Research and Development of Optoelectronics Bucharest - Research Institute for Analytical Instrumentation, Donath 67, 400293 Cluj-Napoca (Romania)

    2011-10-15

    Highlights: {yields} Use of a miniaturized analytical system with microtorch plasma for Hg determination. {yields} Determination of Hg in non- and biodegradable materials using cold vapor generation. {yields} Figures of merit and advantages of the miniaturized system for Hg determination. - Abstract: A new analytical system consisting of a low power capacitively coupled plasma microtorch (20 W, 13.56 MHz, 150 ml min{sup -1} Ar) and a microspectrometer was investigated for the Hg determination in non- and biodegradable materials by cold-vapor generation, using SnCl{sub 2} reductant, and atomic emission spectrometry. The investigated miniaturized system was used for Hg determination in recyclable plastics from electronic equipments and biodegradable materials (shopping bags of 98% biodegradable polyethylene and corn starch) with the advantages of easy operation and low analysis costs. Samples were mineralized in HNO{sub 3}-H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} mixture in a high-pressure microwave system. The detection limits of 0.05 ng ml{sup -1} or 0.08 {mu}g g{sup -1} in solid sample were compared with those reported for other analytical systems. The method precision was 1.5-9.4% for Hg levels of 1.37-13.9 mg kg{sup -1}, while recovery in two polyethylene certified reference materials in the range 98.7 {+-} 4.5% (95% confidence level).

  16. Chlorine-rich plasma polymer coating for the prevention of attachment of pathogenic fungal cells onto materials surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamont-Friedrich, Stephanie J.; Michl, Thomas D.; Giles, Carla; Griesser, Hans J.; Coad, Bryan R.

    2016-07-01

    The attachment of pathogenic fungal cells onto materials surfaces, which is often followed by biofilm formation, causes adverse consequences in a wide range of areas. Here we have investigated the ability of thin film coatings from chlorinated molecules to deter fungal colonization of solid materials by contact killing of fungal cells reaching the surface of the coating. Coatings were deposited onto various substrate materials via plasma polymerization, which is a substrate-independent process widely used for industrial coating applications, using 1,1,2-trichloroethane as the process vapour. XPS surface analysis showed that the coatings were characterized by a highly chlorinated hydrocarbon polymer nature, with only a very small amount of oxygen incorporated. The activity of these coatings against human fungal pathogens was quantified using a recently developed, modified yeast assay and excellent antifungal activity was observed against Candida albicans and Candida glabrata. Plasma polymer surface coatings derived from chlorinated hydrocarbon molecules may therefore offer a promising solution to preventing yeast and mould biofilm formation on materials surfaces, for applications such as air conditioners, biomedical devices, food processing equipment, and others.

  17. About Face

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available Skip to Content Menu Closed (Tap to Open) Home Videos by Topic Videos by Type Search All ... What is AboutFace? Resources for Professionals Get Help Home Watch Videos by Topic Videos by Type Search ...

  18. About Face

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Home Videos by Topic Videos by Type Search All Videos PTSD Basics PTSD Treatment What is AboutFace? ... Watch Videos by Topic Videos by Type Search All Videos Learn More PTSD Basics PTSD Treatment What ...

  19. Face Forward

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    Last November, surgeons in France successfully performed the world's first face transplant surgery. Ten days later, Chen Huanran in Beijing began soliciting patients who were ready to accept a face transplant, searching for China's first such patient through an advertisement on his website and other channels. Chen, chief orthopedic surgeon at the Plastic Surgery Hospital under the Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences, has conducted more than 300 transsexual operations and was considered one of the top com...

  20. Extended First-Principles Molecular Dynamics Method From Cold Materials to Hot Dense Plasmas

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, Shen; Kang, Wei; Zhang, Ping; He, Xian-Tu

    2016-01-01

    An extended first-principles molecular dynamics (FPMD) method based on Kohn-Sham scheme is proposed to elevate the temperature limit of the FPMD method in the calculation of dense plasmas. The extended method treats the wave functions of high energy electrons as plane waves analytically, and thus expands the application of the FPMD method to the region of hot dense plasmas without suffering from the formidable computational costs. In addition, the extended method inherits the high accuracy of the Kohn-Sham scheme and keeps the information of elec- tronic structures. This gives an edge to the extended method in the calculation of the lowering of ionization potential, X-ray absorption/emission spectra, opacity, and high-Z dense plasmas, which are of particular interest to astrophysics, inertial confinement fusion engineering, and laboratory astrophysics.

  1. Toluene decomposition by DBD-type plasma combined with metal oxide catalysts supported on ferroelectric materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeong, Jin Guk; Lee, Hyeong Seok; Kang, Youngjin; Lee, Ki Bong; Yoo, Jung Whan

    2013-06-01

    We investigated toluene decomposition with a single-stage plasma catalytic system operated at atmospheric pressure and working at reduced temperature (T < 75 degrees C), where a synergistic catalyst was integrated on ferroelectric BaTiO3 beads with a high dielectric constant. The catalyst species were characterized by FE-SEM and XPS before and after the experiment. The MnO2/BaTiO3 catalyst showed high stability in igniting plasma during destruction of toluene for 230 hours in a lifetime test.

  2. Prediction of Dissociation Process of Ceramic Powder Materials under Plasma Heating Conditions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WangBoyi; TianWendong

    1993-01-01

    A model of the thermal dissocition process has been developed for the numerical simulation of ceramic powder processing in a d.c. plasma reactor.The temperature histories of zircon grains were calculated based on this model.Comparisons were carried out to determine the effects of plasma gas (N2 and Ar),free stream temperature (6000-15000)K and Reynolds number (0.0-1.0) as well as particle diameter(20-200μm)on the zircon dissociation process.The influences of proper Nusselt numer correlation and variable transport properties were discussed in detail.

  3. Synthesis of silicon carbide in a nitrogen plasma torch: rotational temperature determination and material analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ruiz-Camacho, J; Castell, R [Universidad Simon BolIvar, Departamento de Fisica, Caracas (Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of); Castro, A; Manrique, M [Universidad Simon BolIvar, Departamento de Ciencias de los Materiales, Caracas (Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of)], E-mail: jgruiz@usb.ve

    2008-09-07

    Experiments on silicon carbide synthesis were performed using a dc nitrogen plasma torch. Measurements of rotational temperature of nitrogen molecules by emission spectroscopy were performed, based on the band (0, 1) of the first negative system of nitrogen N{sub 2}{sup +}(B{sup 2}{sigma}{sub u}{sup +}{yields}X{sup 2}{sigma}{sub g}{sup +}) for the R branch. Three different plasma torch powers were studied in order to optimize the production of silicon carbide with our experimental set-up. The synthesized products were characterized by x-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy.

  4. Synthesis of silicon carbide in a nitrogen plasma torch: rotational temperature determination and material analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz-Camacho, J.; Castell, R.; Castro, A.; Manrique, M.

    2008-09-01

    Experiments on silicon carbide synthesis were performed using a dc nitrogen plasma torch. Measurements of rotational temperature of nitrogen molecules by emission spectroscopy were performed, based on the band (0, 1) of the first negative system of nitrogen N_2^+ (B\\,{}^2\\Sigma_u^+ \\to X\\,{}^2\\Sigma _g^+) for the R branch. Three different plasma torch powers were studied in order to optimize the production of silicon carbide with our experimental set-up. The synthesized products were characterized by x-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy.

  5. Hydrophobic coating of solid materials by plasma-polymerized thin film using tetrafluoroethylene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hozumi, K.; Kitamura, K.; Kitade, T.

    1980-01-01

    Glass slides were coated with plasma-polymerized tetrafluoroethylene films of different thickness using the glow discharge technique in a tube-shaped chamber, and the plasma conditions, film growth rates, light permeability of the polymer films, and particle bond strength in the polymer films were studied. Ashed sections of mouse organs and ashed bacillus spores were also coated to give them hydrophobic treatment without damaging their shapes or appearance. The hydrophobic coating of the specimens was successful, and the fine ash patterns were strongly fixed onto the glass slides, making permanent preparations.

  6. Aluminium content of some processed foods, raw materials and food additives in China by inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Gui-Fang; Li, Ke; Ma, Jing; Liu, Fen; Dai, Jing-Jing; Li, Hua-Bin

    2011-01-01

    The level of aluminium in 178 processed food samples from Shenzhen city in China was evaluated using inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry. Some processed foods contained a concentration of up to 1226 mg/kg, which is about 12 times the Chinese food standard. To establish the main source in these foods, Al levels in the raw materials were determined. However, aluminium concentrations in raw materials were low (0.10-451.5 mg/kg). Therefore, aluminium levels in food additives used in these foods was determined and it was found that some food additives contained a high concentration of aluminium (0.005-57.4 g/kg). The results suggested that, in the interest of public health, food additives containing high concentrations of aluminium should be replaced by those containing less. This study has provided new information on aluminium levels in Chinese processed foods, raw materials and a selection of food additives.

  7. High heat flux capabilities of the Magnum-PSI linear plasma device

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De Temmerman, G., E-mail: g.c.detemmerman@differ.nl; Berg, M.A. van den; Scholten, J.; Lof, A.; Meiden, H.J. van der; Eck, H.J.N. van; Morgan, T.W.; Kruijf, T.M. de; Zeijlmans van Emmichoven, P.A.; Zielinski, J.J.

    2013-10-15

    Magnum-PSI is an advanced linear plasma device uniquely capable of producing plasma conditions similar to those expected in the divertor of ITER both steady-state and transients. The machine is designed both for fundamental studies of plasma–surface interactions under high heat and particle fluxes, and as a high-heat flux facility for the tests of plasma-facing components under realistic plasma conditions. To study the effects of transient heat loads on a plasma-facing surface, a novel pulsed plasma source system as well as a high power laser is available. In this article, we will describe the capabilities of Magnum-PSI for high-heat flux tests of plasma-facing materials.

  8. Controlling Interface Adhesion and Fracture Properties in Composite Materials by Plasma Polymerisation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Goutianos, S.; Drews, J.; Fæster Nielsen, Søren

    2006-01-01

    The effect of plasma polymerization on the interface adhesion between carbon fibres and an epoxy matrix was investigated. This was done by loading with pure bending moments in nominal mode I planar glassy carbon/ epoxy specimens. The glassy carbon was used to simulate the carbon fibres. The exper...

  9. Mean excitation energies for stopping powers in various materials using local plasma oscillator strengths

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, J. W.; Xu, Y. J.; Kamaratos, E.; Chang, C. K.

    1984-01-01

    The basic model of Lindhard and Scharff, known as the local plasma model, is used to study the effects on stopping power of the chemical and physical state of the medium. Unlike previous work with the local plasma model, in which individual electron shifts in the plasma frequency were estimated empirically, he Pines correction derived for a degenerate Fermi gas is shown herein to provide a reasonable estimate, even on the atomic scale. Thus, the model is moved to a complete theoretical base requiring no empirical adjustments, as characteristic of past applications. The principal remaining error is in the overestimation of the low-energy absorption properties that are characteristic of the plasma model in the region of the atomic discrete spectrum, although higher-energy phenomena are accurately represented, and even excitation-to-ionization ratios are given to fair accuracy. Mean excitation energies for covalent-bonded gases and solids, for ionic gases and crystals, and for metals are calculated using first-order models of the bonded states.

  10. Controlling Interface Adhesion and Fracture Properties in Composite Materials by Plasma Polymerisation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Goutianos, S.; Drews, J.; Fæster Nielsen, Søren

    2006-01-01

    The effect of plasma polymerization on the interface adhesion between carbon fibres and an epoxy matrix was investigated. This was done by loading with pure bending moments in nominal mode I planar glassy carbon/ epoxy specimens. The glassy carbon was used to simulate the carbon fibres. The exper...

  11. Molecular surface structural changes of plasticized PVC materials after plasma treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiaoxian; Zhang, Chi; Hankett, Jeanne M; Chen, Zhan

    2013-03-26

    In this research, a variety of analytical techniques including sum frequency generation vibrational spectroscopy (SFG), coherent anti-Stokes Raman spectroscopy (CARS), and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) have been employed to investigate the surface and bulk structures of phthalate plasticized poly(vinyl chloride) (PVC) at the molecular level. Two types of phthalate molecules with different chain lengths, diethyl phthalate (DEP) and dibutyl phthalate (DBP), mixed with PVC in various weight ratios were examined to verify their different surface and bulk behaviors. The effects of oxygen and argon plasma treatment on PVC/DBP and PVC/DEP hybrid films were investigated on both the surface and bulk of films using SFG and CARS to evaluate the different plasticizer migration processes. Without plasma treatment, SFG results indicated that more plasticizers segregate to the surface at higher plasticizer bulk concentrations. SFG studies also demonstrated the presence of phthalates on the surface even at very low bulk concentration (5 wt %). Additionally, the results gathered from SFG, CARS, and XPS experiments suggested that the PVC/DEP system was unstable, and DEP molecules could leach out from the PVC under low vacuum after several minutes. In contrast, the PVC/DBP system was more stable; the migration process of DBP out of PVC could be effectively suppressed after oxygen plasma treatment. XPS results indicated the increase of C═O/C-O groups and decrease of C-Cl functionalities on the polymer surface after oxygen plasma treatment. The XPS results also suggested that exposure to argon plasma induced chemical bond breaking and formation of cross-linking or unsaturated groups with chain scission on the surface. Finally, our results indicate the potential risk of using DEP molecules in PVC since DEP can easily leach out from the polymeric bulk.

  12. Non-Thermal Atmospheric Plasma: Can it Be Taken as a Common Solution for the Surface Treatment of Dental Materials?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emre, Seker; Mehmet, Ali Kilicarslan; Serdar, Polat; Emre, Ozkir; Suat, Pat

    2016-04-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the surface roughness and wetting properties of various dental prosthetic materials after different durations of non-thermal atmospheric plasma (NTAP) treatment. One hundred and sixty discs of titanium (Ti) (n:40), cobalt chromium (Co-Cr) (n:40), yttrium stabilized tetragonal zirconia polycrystals (Y-TZP) (n:40) and polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) (n:40) materials were machined and smoothed with silicon carbide papers. The surface roughness was evaluated in a control group and in groups with different plasma exposure times [1-3-5 s]. The average surface roughness (Ra) and contact angle (CA) measurements were recorded via an atomic force microscope (AFM) and tensiometer, respectively. Surface changes were examined with a scanning electron microscope (SEM). Data were analyzed with two-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) and the Tukey HSD test α=0.05). According to the results, the NTAP surface treatment significantly affected the roughness and wettability properties (P dental materials. supported by the Department of Scientific Research, Eskisehir Osmangazi University, Turkey (No. 201441045)

  13. Extreme ultraviolet interferometry of laser plasma material between the critical and ablation surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gartside, L. M. R.; Tallents, G. J.; Rossall, A. K.; Wagenaars, E.; Whittaker, D. S.; Kozlová, M.; Nejdl, J.; Sawicka, M.; Polan, J.; Kalal, M.; Rus, B.

    2011-06-01

    Interferometric probing using an extreme ultraviolet (EUV) laser has measured both transmission and phase information through laser-irradiated plastic (parylene-N C 8H 8) targets (thickness 350 nm). Unusually, the probe beam is incident longitudinally in approximately the same direction as the incident optical laser. Agreement of the experimental interferometry results has been obtained with two-dimensional radiation hydrodynamic code (h2d) simulations of EUV (21.2 nm) probe transmissions and phase shifts. We show that the transmission of the EUV probe beam provides a measure of the rate of target ablation, as ablated plasma becomes close to transparent when the photon energy is less than the ionization energy of the predominate ion species. Here C 3+ ions with ionization energy 64.5 eV are transparent, while lower carbon ionization stages, present in the unablated target and close to the ablation surface, absorb the 58.5 eV photons. Similarly, we show that refractive indices η below the solid parylene-N ( ηsolid = 0.946) and expected plasma values are produced in the warm dense plasma created by laser irradiation due to bound-free absorption in C +.

  14. About Face

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... PTSD (posttraumatic stress disorder). Watch the intro This is AboutFace In these videos, Veterans, family members, and ... to hear what they have to say. What is PTSD? → How does PTSD affect loved ones? → Am ...

  15. About Face

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... traumatic event — like combat, an assault, or a disaster — it's normal to feel scared, keyed up, or sad at first. But if it's been months or years since the trauma and you're not feeling better, you may have PTSD (posttraumatic stress disorder). Watch the intro This is AboutFace In ...

  16. Experimental results on the irradiation of nuclear fusion relevant materials at the dense plasma focus ‘Bora’ device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cicuttin, A.; Crespo, M. L.; Gribkov, V. A.; Niemela, J.; Tuniz, C.; Zanolli, C.; Chernyshova, M.; Demina, E. V.; Latyshev, S. V.; Pimenov, V. N.; Talab, A. A.

    2015-06-01

    Samples of materials counted as perspective ones for use in the first-wall and construction elements in nuclear fusion reactors (FRs) with magnetic and inertial plasma confinement (W, Ti, Al, low-activated ferritic steel ‘Eurofer’ and some alloys) were irradiated in the dense plasma focus (DPF) device ‘Bora’ having a bank energy of ⩽5 kJ. The device generates hot dense (T ˜ 1 keV, n ˜ 1019 cm-3) deuterium plasma, powerful plasma streams (v ˜ 3 × 107 cm s-1) and fast (E ˜ 0.1 … 1.0 MeV) deuterons of power flux densities q up to 1010 and 1012 W cm-2 correspondingly. ‘Damage factor’ F = q × τ0.5 ensures an opportunity to simulate radiation loads (predictable for both reactors types) by the plasma/ion streams, which have the same nature and namely those parameters as expected in the FR modules. Before and after irradiation we provided investigations of our samples by means of a number of analytical techniques. Among them we used optical and scanning electron microscopy to understand character and parameters of damageability of the surface layers of the samples. Atomic force microscopy was applied to measure roughness of the surface after irradiation. These characteristics are quite important for understanding mechanisms and values of dust production in FR that may relate to tritium retention and emergency situations in FR facilities. We also applied two new techniques. For the surface we elaborated the portable x-ray diffractometer that combines x-ray single photon detection with high spectroscopic and angular resolutions. For bulk damageability investigations we applied an x-ray microCT system where x-rays were produced by a Hamamatsu microfocus source (150 kV, 500 µA, 5 µm minimum focal spot size). The detector was a Hamamatsu CMOS flat panel coupled to a fibre optic plate under the GOS scintillator. The reconstruction of three-dimensional data was run with Cobra 7.4 and DIGIX CT software while VG Studio Max 2.1, and Amira 5.3 were used for

  17. Electron beam treatment of non-conducting materials by a fore-pump-pressure plasma-cathode electron beam source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burdovitsin, V A; Klimov, A S; Medovnik, A V; Oks, E M, E-mail: burdov@fet.tusur.r [Tomsk State University of Control Systems and Radioelectronics, 634050, 40 Lenin Ave., Tomsk (Russian Federation)

    2010-10-15

    In the irradiation of an insulated target by an electron beam produced by a plasma-cathode electron beam source operating in the fore-vacuum pressure range (5-15 Pa), the target potential is much lower than the electron beam energy, offering the possibility of direct electron treatment of insulating materials. It is found that in the electron beam irradiation of a non-conducting target in a moderately high pressure range, the electron charge on the target surface is neutralized mainly by ions from a volume discharge established between the negatively charged target surface and the grounded walls of the vacuum chamber. This allows the possibility of direct electron beam treatment (heating, melting, welding) of ceramics and other non-conducting and semiconductor materials.

  18. Etch characteristics of magnetic tunnel junction materials using bias pulsing in the CH4/N2O inductively coupled plasma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeon, Min Hwan; Youn, Ji Youn; Yang, Kyung Chae; Yun, Deok Hyun; Lee, Du Yeong; Shim, Tae Hun; Park, Jea Gun; Yeom, Geun Young

    2014-12-01

    The etch characteristics of magnetic tunneling junction (MTJ) related materials such as CoFeB, MgO, FePt, Ru, and W as hard mask have been investigated as functions of rf pulse biasing, substrate heating, and CH4/N2O gas combination in an inductively coupled plasma system. When CH4/N2O gas ratio was varied, at CH4/N2O gas ratio of 2:1, not only the highest etch rates but also the highest etch selectivity over W could be obtained. By increasing the substrate temperature, the linear increase of both the etch rates of MTJ materials and the etch selectivity over W could be obtained. The use of the rf pulse biasing improved the etch selectivity of the MTJ materials over hard mask such as W further. The surface roughness and residual thickness remaining on the etched surface of the CoFeB were also decreased by using rf pulse biasing and with the decrease of rf duty percentage. The improvement of etch characteristics by substrate heating and rf pulse biasing was possibly related to the formation of more stable and volatile etch compounds and the removal of chemically reacted compounds more easily on the etched CoFeB surface. Highly selective etching of MTJ materials over the hard mask could be obtained by using the rf pulse biasing of 30% of duty ratio and by increasing the substrate temperature to 200 degrees C in the CH4/N2O (2:1) plasmas.

  19. Deposition of TiC film on titanium for abrasion resistant implant material by ion-enhanced triode plasma CVD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhu Yuhe, E-mail: zyh1120@hotmail.co.jp [School of Stomatology, China Medical University, Shen Yang (China); Wang Wei; Jia Xingya [School of Stomatology, China Medical University, Shen Yang (China); Akasaka, Tsukasa [Department of Health Science, School of Dental Medicine Hokkaido University, Sapporo (Japan); Liao, Susan [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Nanyang Technological University (Singapore); Watari, Fumio [Department of Health Science, School of Dental Medicine Hokkaido University, Sapporo (Japan)

    2012-12-01

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Deposition of Titanium Carbide (TiC) layer on titanium (Ti) surface has been demonstrated by an ion-enhanced triode plasma chemical vapor deposition (CVD) method. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The Vickers hardness of surface carbide was more than 2000, which confirmed its high abrasion resistance. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Physical and mechanical properties of the deposited TiC film on Ti were investigated to examine its potential application as an abrasion resistant implant material. - Abstract: Deposition of titanium carbide (TiC) layer on titanium (Ti) surface has been demonstrated by an ion-enhanced triode plasma chemical vapor deposition (CVD) method using a TiCl{sub 4} + CH{sub 4} + H{sub 2} gas mixture. Physical and mechanical properties of the deposited TiC film on Ti were investigated to examine its potential application as an abrasion resistant implant material. X-ray diffraction (XRD) showed that the specimen was consisted of TiC and Ti. Carbide layer of about 6 {mu}m thickness was observed on the cross section of the specimen by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The Vickers hardness of surface carbide was more than 2000, which confirmed its high abrasion resistance.

  20. Reading faces and Facing words

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Robotham, Julia Emma; Lindegaard, Martin Weis; Delfi, Tzvetelina Shentova

    It has long been argued that perceptual processing of faces and words is largely independent, highly specialised and strongly lateralised. Studies of patients with either pure alexia or prosopagnosia have strongly contributed to this view. The aim of our study was to investigate how visual...

  1. Reading faces and Facing words

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Robotham, Julia Emma; Lindegaard, Martin Weis; Delfi, Tzvetelina Shentova

    performed within normal range on at least one test of visual categorisation, strongly suggesting that their abnormal performance with words and faces does not represent a generalised visuo-perceptual deficit. Our results suggest that posterior areas in both hemispheres may be critical for both reading...

  2. Quantified Faces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Mette-Marie Zacher

    2016-01-01

    Abstract: The article presents three contemporary art projects that, in various ways, thematise questions regarding numerical representation of the human face in relation to the identification of faces, for example through the use of biometric video analysis software, or DNA technology. The Dutch...... and critically examine bias in surveillance technologies, as well as scientific investigations, regarding the stereotyping mode of the human gaze. The American artist Heather Dewey-Hagborg creates three-dimensional portraits of persons she has “identified” from their garbage. Her project from 2013 entitled....... The three works are analysed with perspectives to historical physiognomy and Francis Galton's composite portraits from the 1800s. It is argued that, rather than being a statistical compression like the historical composites, contemporary statistical visual portraits (composites) are irreversible...

  3. Early Career. Harnessing nanotechnology for fusion plasma-material interface research in an in-situ particle-surface interaction facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Allain, Jean Paul [Univ. of Illinois, Champaign, IL (United States)

    2014-08-08

    This project consisted of fundamental and applied research of advanced in-situ particle-beam interactions with surfaces/interfaces to discover novel materials able to tolerate intense conditions at the plasma-material interface (PMI) in future fusion burning plasma devices. The project established a novel facility that is capable of not only characterizing new fusion nanomaterials but, more importantly probing and manipulating materials at the nanoscale while performing subsequent single-effect in-situ testing of their performance under simulated environments in fusion PMI.

  4. Dynamic Control of Microwave Plasma Sources for Material Processing by Using Hyper-Simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yasaka, Yasuyoshi; Tsuji, Akihiro

    2010-11-01

    Uniformity of etching or deposition over a wafer is one of the key features for plasma processing with large-size wafers. The uniformity can be measured as a result of a process, and correction or improvement of the uniformity is made by changing device parameters such as power levels, gas flow rates, timings, and so on. Evaluation and control are, however, not combined or unified as a problem of plasma physics. They are assigned as the input and output of a black box of empirical transfer function obtained by expert systems or neural networks. We are going to establish a novel control system based on physics, in which a fluid simulation is used to obtain a power deposition profile necessary to produce the two-dimensional density distribution of desire. A control system of a microwave slot antenna then changes power distribution dynamically according to the output of the simulation. It should be noted that this simulation has inputs and outputs opposite to conventional ones, which, we call hyper-simulation, is one of the novel features of the control system.

  5. Processing of ash and slag waste of heating plants by arc plasma to produce construction materials and nanomodifiers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buyantuev, S. L.; Urkhanova, L. A.; Kondratenko, A. S.; Shishulkin, S. Yu; Lkhasaranov, S. A.; Khmelev, A. B.

    2017-01-01

    The resultsare presented of plasma processing slag and ash waste from coal combustion in heating plants. Melting mechanism of ashand slagraw material is considered by an electromagnetic technological reactor. The analysis was conducted of temperature and phase transformations of raw material when it is heated up to the melting point, and also determination of specific energy consumption by using a generalized model of the thermodynamic analysis of TERRA. The study of materials melting temperature conditions and plum of melt was carried with high-temperature thermal imaging method, followed by mapping and 3D-modeling of the temperature fields. The investigations to establish the principal possibilities of using slag waste of local coal as raw material for the production of mineral (ash and slag) fibers found that by chemical composition there are oxides in the following ranges: 45-65% SiO2; 10-25% Al2O3; 10-45% CaO; 5-10% MgO; other minerals (less than 5%). Thus, these technological wastes are principally suitable for melts to produce mineral wool by the plasma method. An analysis of the results shows the melting point of ash and slag waste - 1800-2000 °C. In this case the specific energy consumption of these processes keeps within the limits of 1.1-1.3 kW*h/kg. For comparison it should be noted that the unit cost of electricity in the known high-melting industrial installations 5-6 kW*h/kg. Upon melting ash and slag waste, which contains up to 2-5% of unburned carbon, carbon nanomaterials were discovered.in the form of ultrafine soot accumulating as a plaque on the water-cooled surfaces in the gas cleaning chamber. The process of formation of soot consists in sublimation-desublimation of part of carbon which is in ash and slag, and graphite electrode. Thus, upon melting of ash and slag in the electromagnetic reactor it is possible to obtain melt, and in the subsequent mineral high quality fiber, which satisfies the requirements of normative documents, and

  6. Spectroscopic investigations of plasma nitriding processes: A comparative study using steel and carbon as active screen materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamann, S.; Burlacov, I.; Spies, H.-J.; Biermann, H.; Röpcke, J.

    2017-04-01

    Low-pressure pulsed DC H2-N2 plasmas were investigated in the laboratory active screen plasma nitriding monitoring reactor, PLANIMOR, to compare the usage of two different active screen electrodes: (i) a steel screen with the additional usage of CH4 as carbon containing precursor in the feeding gas and (ii) a carbon screen without the usage of any additional gaseous carbon precursor. Applying the quantum cascade laser absorption spectroscopy, the evolution of the concentration of four stable molecular species, NH3, HCN, CH4, and C2H2, has been monitored. The concentrations were found to be in a range of 1012-1016 molecules cm-3. By analyzing the development of the molecular concentrations at variations of the screen plasma power, a similar behavior of the monitored reaction products has been found for both screen materials, with NH3 and HCN as the main reaction products. When using the carbon screen, the concentration of HCN and C2H2 was 30 and 70 times higher, respectively, compared to the usage of the steel screen with an admixture of 1% CH4. Considering the concentration of the three detected hydrocarbon reaction products, a combustion rate of the carbon screen of up to 69 mg h-1 has been found. The applied optical emission spectroscopy enabled the determination of the rotational temperature of the N2+ ion which has been in a range of 650-900 K increasing with the power in a similar way in the plasma of both screens. Also with power the ionic component of nitrogen molecules, represented by the N2+ (0-0) band of the first negative system, as well as the CN (0-0) band of the violet system increase strongly in relation to the intensity of the neutral nitrogen component, i.e., the N2 (0-0) band of the second positive system. In addition, steel samples have been treated with both the steel and the carbon screen resulting in a formation of a compound layer of up to 10 wt. % nitrogen and 10 wt. % carbon, respectively, depending on the screen material.

  7. Proceedings of US/Japan workshop, Q219 on high heat flux components and plasma surface interactions for next fusion devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ulrickson, M.A.; Stevens, P.L.; Hino, T.; Hirohata, Y. [eds.

    1996-12-01

    This report contains the viewgraphs from the proceedings of US/Japan Workshop on High Heat Flux Components and Plasma Surface Interactions for Next Fusion Devices. Some of the general topics covered by this report are: PFC/PSI in tokamak and helical devices; development of high heat flux components; PSIS and plasma facing materials;tritium; and material damage.

  8. A new method of dry cleaning after plasma etching of MRAM materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubo, Takuya; Kang, Song-Yun; Tokyo Electron Ltd. Team

    2015-09-01

    This paper describes a new method for dry cleaning after etching of MRAM materials. Problems such as repeatability or particle generation after etching of MRAM materials are due to the non-volatile nature of etch products. A new etch concept for MRAM is to etch each material such as carbon, metal, or silicon compounds step by step. There are 4 steps in this cleaning: 1) carbon removal by N2/H2, 2) metal removal by Ar, 3) silicon removal by CF4/O2, 4) carbon, oxygen, and fluorine removal by N2/H2. Etch repeatability and particle level reduction have been demonstrated to result from this cleaning method. Akasaka Biz Tower, 5-3-1 Akasaka Minato-ku, Tokyo 107-6325, Japan.

  9. Effect of Spraying Condition and Material Properties on the Residual Stress in Plasma Spraying

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiancheng ZHANG; Jianming GONG; Shandong TU

    2004-01-01

    The thermomechanical behavior and the distribution of residual stresses due to thermal spraying of NiCoCrAIY coating were studied by thermomechanical finite dement analysis. The effects of phase transformation due to solidifying process of coating particles, thickness and material properties of coating on the residual stresses were discussed.Results showed that residual stress decreases little with the stress relaxation due to the phase transformation. For the substrates with the same thickness, the residual stress increases with the increase in coating thickness. The state of residual stresses relates to the material properties of coating and substrate closely. The stress-induced failure model of coating is also discussed.

  10. Scientific report. Plasma-wall interaction studies related to fusion reactor materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Temmerman, G. De

    2006-07-01

    This scientific report summarises research done on erosion and deposition mechanisms affecting the optical reflectivity of potential materials for use in the mirrors used in fusion reactors. Work done in Juelich, Germany, at the Federal Institute of Technology in Lausanne, Switzerland, the JET laboratory in England and in Basle is discussed. Various tests made with the mirrors are described. Results obtained are presented in graphical and tabular form and commented on. The influence of various material choices on erosion and deposition mechanisms is discussed.

  11. Liquid Phase Plasma Synthesis of Iron Oxide/Carbon Composite as Dielectric Material for Capacitor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heon Lee

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Iron oxide/carbon composite was synthesized using a liquid phase plasma process to be used as the electrode of supercapacitor. Spherical iron oxide nanoparticles with the size of 5~10 nm were dispersed uniformly on carbon powder surface. The specific capacitance of the composite increased with increasing quantity of iron oxide precipitate on the carbon powder up to a certain quantity. When the quantity of the iron oxide precipitate exceeds the threshold, however, the specific capacitance was rather reduced by the addition of precipitate. The iron oxide/carbon composite containing an optimum quantity (0.33 atomic % of iron oxide precipitate exhibited the smallest resistance and the largest initial resistance slope.

  12. Plasma physics and engineering

    CERN Document Server

    Fridman, Alexander

    2011-01-01

    Part I: Fundamentals of Plasma Physics and Plasma ChemistryPlasma in Nature, in the Laboratory, and in IndustryOccurrence of Plasma: Natural and Man MadeGas DischargesPlasma Applications, Plasmas in IndustryPlasma Applications for Environmental ControlPlasma Applications in Energy ConversionPlasma Application for Material ProcessingBreakthrough Plasma Applications in Modern TechnologyElementary Processes of Charged Species in PlasmaElementary Charged Particles in Plasma and Their Elastic and Inelastic CollisionsIonization ProcessesMechanisms of Electron Losses: The Electron-Ion RecombinationEl

  13. INVESTIGATION OF PROCESSES ON TREATMENT OF PLASMA COATINGS MADE OF MATERIALS BASED ON MULTIFUNCTIONAL OXIDE CERAMICS WITH LASER IRRADIATION IMPULSES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. A. Okovity

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of the presented paper is to optimize technological parameters of hardening high-energy processing used for sprayed coatings made of materials based on oxide ceramics with inclusions of solid lubricant. The paper presents results of the investigations on influence of power density and total number of laser irradiation impulses in a spot treatment on thickness of treated coating layers made of materials based on oxide ceramics. The considered wear-resistant coatings require increased cohesive and adhesive strength. Therefore, the total number of impulses should ensure melting and sealing of the coatings along the whole thickness that will fully contribute to obtain hardened nano-crystalline and amorphous structures.The work is based on complex metallography, X-ray diffraction and electron-microscopic investigations on modified structural elements of composite coatings being treated with highly concentrated energy sources. The following main processes of hardened plasma coating formations have been revealed in the paper: com paction of sprayed materials due to thermal and shock-wave impacts of laser irradiation impulses. In this case material porosity is decreasing, cohesive and adhesive strength of coatings is increasing, grain structure is crushed, amorphous and nano-crystalline phases of higher strength are formed all these facts are evidenced by an increase in average micro-hardness of deposited compositions. Duration of thermal laser irradiation impulse impact on the material is sufficient to activate chemical processes in the boundaries of main phases of the composite coating. This leads to formation of finely dispersed (including nanoparticle size compounds that strengthen boundaries of the main phases and the coating as a whole. This is confirmed by the results of an X-ray diffraction analysis.

  14. Evaluation of bone response to synthetic bone grafting material treated with argon-based atmospheric pressure plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beutel, Bryan G., E-mail: bryanbeutel@gmail.com; Danna, Natalie R.; Gangolli, Riddhi; Granato, Rodrigo; Manne, Lakshmiprada; Tovar, Nick; Coelho, Paulo G.

    2014-12-01

    Bone graft materials are utilized to stimulate healing of bone defects or enhance osseointegration of implants. In order to augment these capabilities, various surface modification techniques, including atmospheric pressure plasma (APP) surface treatment, have been developed. This in vivo study sought to assess the effect of APP surface treatment on degradation and osseointegration of Synthograft™, a beta-tricalcium phosphate (β-TCP) synthetic bone graft. The experimental (APP-treated) grafts were subjected to APP treatment with argon for a period of 60 s. Physicochemical characterization was performed by environmental scanning electron microscopy, surface energy (SE), and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analyses both before and after APP treatment. Two APP-treated and two untreated grafts were surgically implanted into four critical-size calvarial defects in each of ten New Zealand white rabbits. The defect samples were explanted after four weeks, underwent histological analysis, and the percentages of bone, soft tissue, and remaining graft material were quantified by image thresholding. Material characterization showed no differences in particle surface morphology and that the APP-treated group presented significantly higher SE along with higher amounts of the base material chemical elements on it surface. Review of defect composition showed that APP treatment did not increase bone formation or reduce the amount of soft tissue filling the defect when compared to untreated material. Histologic cross-sections demonstrated osteoblastic cell lines, osteoid deposition, and neovascularization in both groups. Ultimately, argon-based APP treatment did not enhance the osseointegration or degradation of the β-TCP graft. Future investigations should evaluate the utility of gases other than argon to enhance osseointegration through APP treatment. - Highlights: • Degradation/osseointegration of bone graft treated with argon-based APP is studied. • APP treatment did

  15. Enhancing the plasma illumination behaviour of microplasma devices using microcrystalline/ultra-nanocrystalline hybrid diamond materials as cathodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Tinghsun; Lou, Shiucheng; Chen, Huangchin; Chen, Chulung; Lee, Chiyoung; Tai, Nyanhwa; Lin, Inan

    2013-08-21

    The properties of capacity-type microplasma devices were significantly enhanced due to the utilisation of hybrid diamond films as cathodes. The performance of the microplasma devices was closely correlated with the electron field emission (EFE) properties of the diamond cathode materials. The nanoemitters, which were prepared by growing duplex-structured diamond films [microcrystalline diamond (MCD)/ultra-nanocrystalline diamond (UNCD)] on Si-pyramid templates via a two-step microwave plasma enhanced chemical vapour deposition (MPE-CVD) process, exhibited improved EFE properties (E0 = 5.99 V μm(-1), J(e) = 1.10 mA cm(-2) at 8.50 V μm(-1) applied field), resulting in superior microplasma device performance (with a lower threshold field of 200 V mm(-1) and a higher plasma current density of 7.80 mA cm(-2)) in comparison with UNCD film devices prepared using a single-step MPE-CVD process. The superior EFE properties of the duplex-structured MCD-UNCD films relative to those of the UNCD films can be attributed to the unique granular structure of the diamond films. High-resolution transmission electron microscopy reveals that the MCD-UNCD films consisted of abundant graphitic phases located at the periphery of large diamond aggregates and at the boundaries between the ultra-small diamond grains. The presence of the graphite phase is presumed to be the prime factor that renders these films more conductive and causes these films to exhibit higher EFE properties, thus resulting in the improved plasma illumination properties of the microplasma devices.

  16. 适配层对钨铜第一壁材料热负荷性能的影响%Effects of Different Compliant Layers on the Heat Performance of W/Cu PFC (Plasma Facing Component)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    种法力

    2010-01-01

    介绍了W/Cu PFC(Plasma Facing Components)材料制备过程,并对不同适配层第一壁材料热负荷性能进行了研究.其结果显示,虽然W-Cu混合材料、Ti和NiCrAl适配层的应用均抬高了第一壁材料的表面温度,但是承受10 MW/m2热负荷时无任何损伤,而无适配层的材料在7.5 MW/m2时表面出现微裂纹损伤,由此判断适配层的应用能够增强W/Cu PFC的热负荷性能.

  17. Mercury determination in non- and biodegradable materials by cold vapor capacitively coupled plasma microtorch atomic emission spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frentiu, Tiberiu; Mihaltan, Alin I; Ponta, Michaela; Darvasi, Eugen; Frentiu, Maria; Cordos, Emil

    2011-10-15

    A new analytical system consisting of a low power capacitively coupled plasma microtorch (20 W, 13.56 MHz, 150 ml min(-1) Ar) and a microspectrometer was investigated for the Hg determination in non- and biodegradable materials by cold-vapor generation, using SnCl(2) reductant, and atomic emission spectrometry. The investigated miniaturized system was used for Hg determination in recyclable plastics from electronic equipments and biodegradable materials (shopping bags of 98% biodegradable polyethylene and corn starch) with the advantages of easy operation and low analysis costs. Samples were mineralized in HNO(3)-H(2)SO(4) mixture in a high-pressure microwave system. The detection limits of 0.05 ng ml(-1) or 0.08 μg g(-1) in solid sample were compared with those reported for other analytical systems. The method precision was 1.5-9.4% for Hg levels of 1.37-13.9 mg kg(-1), while recovery in two polyethylene certified reference materials in the range 98.7 ± 4.5% (95% confidence level).

  18. Bioactivity of freeze-dried platelet-rich plasma in an adsorbed form on a biodegradable polymer material.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakajima, Yu; Kawase, Tomoyuki; Kobayashi, Mito; Okuda, Kazuhiro; Wolff, Larry F; Yoshie, Hiromasa

    2012-01-01

    Owing to the necessity for the immediate preparation from patients' blood, autologous platelet-rich plasma (PRP) limits its clinical applicability. To address this concern and respond to emergency care and other unpredictable uses, we have developed a freeze-dried PRP in an adsorbed form on a biodegradable polymer material (Polyglactin 910). On the polymer filaments of PRP mesh, which was prepared by coating the polymer mesh with human fresh PRP and subsequent freeze-drying, platelets were incorporated, and related growth factors were preserved at high levels. This new PRP mesh preparation significantly and reproducibly stimulated the proliferation of human periodontal ligament cells in vitro and neovascularization in a chorioallantoic membrane assay. A full-thickness skin defect model in a diabetic mouse demonstrated the PRP mesh, although prepared from human blood, substantially facilitated angiogenesis, granulation tissue formation, and re-epithelialization without inducing severe inflammation in vivo. These data demonstrate that our new PRP mesh preparation functions as a bioactive material to facilitate tissue repair/regeneration. Therefore, we suggest that this bioactive material, composed of allogeneic PRP, could be clinically used as a promising alternative in emergency care or at times when autologous PRP is not prepared immediately before application.

  19. Effect of substrate materials on rutile crystalline orientation in plasma-sprayed TiO2 coatings

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG Guan-jun; LI Chang-jiu; WANG Yu-yue

    2004-01-01

    TiO2 coatings are of technical importance owing to their promising applications to photocatalytical, electrical, optical and tribological coatings. Thermal spraying process has been widely used to deposit both metallic and nonmetallic coatings. During thermal spraying, spray particle at fully or partially melted condition is projected to a substrate and subsequently flattens, rapidly cools and solidifies. Therefore, a coating in lamellar structure is usually formed as a quenched microstructure. TiO2 coatings were deposited on different substrates through plasma spraying with fused-crushed powder in rutile phase as feedstock to reveal the crystalline orientation in the coatings. XRD results show that the coatings consist of rutile phase with a fraction of anatase phase, and the rutile phase presents a preferable crystalline orientation along [101] direction. It is found that the orientation factors of rutile phase in the thin coatings are significantly influenced by substrate materials. The thick coatings yield the same orientation factors of 0.22 to 0.23 on all substrates in spite of substrate materials. It is considered that the thermal properties of substrate materials are the dominant factors for the preferable crystalline orientation in rutile phase within plasmasprayed TiO2 coating.

  20. Standard practice for analysis of aqueous leachates from nuclear waste materials using inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectrometry

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2010-01-01

    1.1 This practice is applicable to the determination of low concentration and trace elements in aqueous leachate solutions produced by the leaching of nuclear waste materials, using inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectroscopy (ICP-AES). 1.2 The nuclear waste material may be a simulated (non-radioactive) solid waste form or an actual solid radioactive waste material. 1.3 The leachate may be deionized water or any natural or simulated leachate solution containing less than 1 % total dissolved solids. 1.4 This practice should be used by analysts experienced in the use of ICP-AES, the interpretation of spectral and non-spectral interferences, and procedures for their correction. 1.5 No detailed operating instructions are provided because of differences among various makes and models of suitable ICP-AES instruments. Instead, the analyst shall follow the instructions provided by the manufacturer of the particular instrument. This test method does not address comparative accuracy of different devices...

  1. O HIV e o trabalhador de enfermagem frente ao acidente com material perfurocortante El VIH y el trabajador de enfermería frente a accidentes con material punzocortante HIV and the nursing professional in face of needlestick accidents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariana Vieira

    2008-12-01

    rea de trabajo, pues el número de casos con VIH esta en aumento.The goal of this study was to identify the scientific production about work-related needlestick accidents among nursing professionals involving HIV-contaminated biological material, as well as to characterize the pre-existing factors to such accidents, such as procedures occurring after the exposure to potentially HIV-contaminated needlestick material. This is a literature review, whose bibliographic search for keywords was carried out within the LILACS databases from the year 2000 onward. This study confirms that pre-existing factors for the occurrence of work-related needlestick accidents are related to work conditions as much as to individual conditions. In face of these accidents, the nursing workers need to know the conducts concerning post-exposure to potentially HIV-contaminated needlestick material. We conclude that the adoption of standardized precautions when working in healthcare is a fundamental condition for worker safety, independently of their area of expertise, given the increasing number of HIV cases.

  2. Nanostructured Al-ZrAl{sub 3} materials consolidated via spark plasma sintering: Evaluation of their mechanical properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodriguez, C.; Belzunce, F.J.; Betegon, C. [Escuela Politecnica de Ingenieria (University of Oviedo), Campus Universitario, 33203 Gijon (Spain); Goyos, L. [Centro de Investigacion en Nanomateriales y Nanotecnologia (CINN-CSIC-UNIOVI-PA), Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Cientificas-Universidad de Oviedo-Principado de Asturias, Parque Tecnologico de Asturias, Llanera (Spain); Diaz, L.A., E-mail: la.diaz@cinn.es [Centro de Investigacion en Nanomateriales y Nanotecnologia (CINN-CSIC-UNIOVI-PA), Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Cientificas-Universidad de Oviedo-Principado de Asturias, Parque Tecnologico de Asturias, Llanera (Spain); Torrecillas, R. [Centro de Investigacion en Nanomateriales y Nanotecnologia (CINN-CSIC-UNIOVI-PA), Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Cientificas-Universidad de Oviedo-Principado de Asturias, Parque Tecnologico de Asturias, Llanera (Spain)

    2013-02-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A surface modification of aluminium powders was carried out by means of a colloidal process. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer These powders were consolidated and sintered by spark plasma sintering. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Regarding the dwell time at the sintering temperature (625 Degree-Sign C), ZrAl{sub 3} intermetallic crystallizes. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The mechanical behaviour of this reinforcement was evaluated by Small Punch Test. - Abstract: Aluminium based nanostructured materials with additions of 0.5, 1 and 1.5 wt.% of zirconium have been produced and sintered using the spark plasma sintering technique in order to promote the nucleation of ZrAl{sub 3} platelets. The mechanical behaviour of all these nanocomposites was determined by means of the Small Punch Test. Zirconium additions significantly decrease the mechanical properties of these products when sintering time at the sintering temperature (625 Degree-Sign C) is short (3 min). Nevertheless, when the sintering time increases to 1 h (intermetallic crystallization), the zirconium additions show the expected effect: the stiffness and the yield strength increase while ductility and toughness decrease. The maximum load increases until a 0.5 wt.% Zr is attained and suddenly drops when the Zr content surpasses 1 wt.%.

  3. Compilation of erosion yields of metal-doped carbon materials by deuterium impact from ion beam and low temperature plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Balden, M., E-mail: Martin.Balden@ipp.mpg.de [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Plasmaphysik, EURATOM Association, 85748 Garching (Germany); Starke, P. [Lehrstuhl fuer Experimentelle Plasmaphysik, Institut fuer Physik, Universitaet Augsburg, D-86135 Augsburg (Germany); Garcia-Rosales, C. [CEIT and Tecnun (University of Navarra), E-20018 San Sebastian (Spain); Adelhelm, C.; Sauter, P.A. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Plasmaphysik, EURATOM Association, 85748 Garching (Germany); Lopez-Galilea, I.; Ordas, N. [CEIT and Tecnun (University of Navarra), E-20018 San Sebastian (Spain); Fernandez, J.M. Ramos; Escandell, M. Martinez [Departamento de Quimica Inorganica, University of Alicante, E-03690 Alicante (Spain)

    2011-10-01

    The erosion yield by deuterium impact was determined for various doped carbon-based materials. Ion beam bombardment with 30 and 200 eV at elevated temperatures (600-850 K) and low temperature plasma exposure with 30 eV ion energy ({approx}7 x 10{sup 20} ions/m{sup 2}s) and about 170 times higher thermal atomic deuterium flux at 300 K and 630 K were performed. The total yield of fine-grain graphites doped with 4 at.% Ti and Zr is reduced by a factor of 4 for 30 and 200 eV D impact at elevated temperatures at D fluences above 10{sup 24} m{sup -2} compared to undoped graphite. Extensive carbide particle loss can be excluded up to fluences of {approx}10{sup 25} m{sup -2}.

  4. The low cycle fatigue behavior of a plasma-sprayed coating material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gayda, J.; Gabb, T. P.; Miner, R. V., Jr.

    1986-01-01

    Single crystal nickel-base superalloys employed in turbine blade applications are often used with a plasma spray coating for oxidation and hot corrosion resistance. These coatings may also affect fatigue life of the superalloy substrate. As part of a large program to understand the fatigue behavior of coated single crystals, fully reversed, total strain controlled fatigue tests were run on a free standing NiCoCrAlY coating alloy, PWA 276, at 0.1 Hz. Fatigue tests were conducted at 650 C, where the NiCoCrAlY alloy has modest ductility, and at 1050 C, where it is extremely ductile, showing tensile elongation in excess of 100 percent. At the lower test temperature, deformation induced disordering softened the NiCoCrAlY alloy, while at the higher test temperature cyclic hardening was observed which was linked to gradual coarsening of the two phase microstructure. Fatigue life of the NiCoCrAlY alloy was significantly longer at the higher temperature. Further, the life of the NiCoCrAlY alloy exceeds that of coated, /001/-oriented PWA 1480 single crystals at 1050 C, but at 650 C the life of the coated crystal is greater than that of the NiCoCrAlY alloy on a total strain basis.

  5. Low cycle fatigue behaviour of a plasma-sprayed coating material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gayda, J.; Gabb, T. P.; Miner, R. V.

    1986-01-01

    Single crystal nickel-base superalloys employed in turbine blade applications are often used with a plasma spray coating for oxidation and hot corrosion resistance. These coatings may also affect fatigue life of the superalloy substrate. As part of a large program to understand the fatigue behavior of coated single crystals, fully reversed, total strain controlled fatigue tests were run on a free standing NiCoCrAlY coating alloy, PWA 276, at 0.1 Hz. Fatigue tests were conducted at 650 C, where the NiCoCrAlY alloy has modest ductility, and at 1050 C, where it is extremely ductile, showing tensile elongation in excess of 100 percent. At the lower test temperature, deformation induced disordering softened the NiCoCrAlY alloy, while at the higher test temperature cyclic hardening was observed which was linked to gradual coarsening of the two phase microstructure. Fatigue life of the NiCoCrAlY alloy was significantly longer at the higher temperature. Further, the life of the NiCoCrAlY alloy exceeds that of coated, /001/-oriented PWA 1480 single crystals at 1050 C but at 650 C the life of the coated crystal is greater than that of the NiCoCrAlY alloy on a total strain basis.

  6. Compositionally graded InGaN layers grown on vicinal N-face GaN substrates by plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hestroffer, Karine; Lund, Cory; Koksaldi, Onur; Li, Haoran; Schmidt, Gordon; Trippel, Max; Veit, Peter; Bertram, Frank; Lu, Ning; Wang, Qingxiao; Christen, Jürgen; Kim, Moon J.; Mishra, Umesh K.; Keller, Stacia

    2017-05-01

    This work reports on compositionally graded (0 0 0 1 bar) N-polar InxGa1-xN layers. The InGaN grades with different final In compositions xf up to 0.25 were grown by plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy on vicinal GaN base layers with a miscut angle of 4° towards the m-direction. When increasing xf the surface morphology evolved from an interlacing finger structure, attributed to the Ehrlich-Schwöbel effect, towards fully strain-relaxed columnar features. Regardless of the crystal morphology and the strain state each graded sample exhibited a bright photoluminescence signal at room temperature spanning the whole visible range. Cross-sectional nanoscale cathodoluminescence evidenced a red-shift of the luminesced signal from 420 to 580 nm along the grade and also showed strong lateral emission inhomogeneities.

  7. FACE RECOGNITION FROM FRONT-VIEW FACE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WuLifang; ShenLansun

    2003-01-01

    This letter presents a face normalization algorithm based on 2-D face model to rec-ognize faces with variant postures from front-view face.A 2-D face mesh model can be extracted from faces with rotation to left or right and the corresponding front-view mesh model can be estimated according to facial symmetry.Then based on the relationship between the two mesh models,the nrmalized front-view face is formed by gray level mapping.Finally,the face recognition will be finished based on Principal Component Analysis(PCA).Experiments show that better face recognition performance is achieved in this way.

  8. FACE RECOGNITION FROM FRONT-VIEW FACE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wu Lifang; Shen Lansun

    2003-01-01

    This letter presents a face normalization algorithm based on 2-D face model to recognize faces with variant postures from front-view face. A 2-D face mesh model can be extracted from faces with rotation to left or right and the corresponding front-view mesh model can be estimated according to the facial symmetry. Then based on the inner relationship between the two mesh models, the normalized front-view face is formed by gray level mapping. Finally, the face recognition will be finished based on Principal Component Analysis (PCA). Experiments show that better face recognition performance is achieved in this way.

  9. Corrosion Behavior and Strength of Dissimilar Bonding Material between Ti and Mg Alloys Fabricated by Spark Plasma Sintering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patchara Pripanapong

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Ti and solution treated Mg alloys such as AZ31B (ST, AZ61 (ST, AZ80 (ST and AZ91 (ST were successfully bonded at 475 °C by spark plasma sintering, which is a promising new method in welding field. The formation of Ti3Al intermetallic compound was found to be an important factor in controlling the bonding strength and galvanic corrosion resistance of dissimilar materials. The maximum bonding strength and bonding efficiency at 193 MPa and 96% were obtained from Ti/AZ91 (ST, in which a thick and uniform nano-level Ti3Al layer was observed. This sample also shows the highest galvanic corrosion resistance with a measured galvanic width and depth of 281 and 19 µm, respectively. The corrosion resistance of the matrix on Mg alloy side was controlled by its Al content. AZ91 (ST exhibited the highest corrosion resistance considered from its corrode surface after corrosion test in Kroll’s etchant. The effect of Al content in Mg alloy on bonding strength and corrosion behavior of Ti/Mg alloy (ST dissimilar materials is discussed in this work.

  10. Investigation on 316L/W functionally graded materials fabricated by mechanical alloying and spark plasma sintering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Chao; Wang, Guoyu; Ji, Lina; Tong, Yangang; Duan, Xuan-Ming

    2016-02-01

    316L-W (Tungsten) composite materials were fabricated by spark plasma sintering (SPS) of mechanically alloyed 316L-W powders for the development of functionally graded materials (FGMs). The effect of milling parameters on the morphology of the blended 316L/W powders and its subsequent effect on the transition between 316L and W particles during the SPS process were investigated. Samples were characterized by SEM, EDS and XRD analyses. The results so obtained show that with the increase of milling time, the mechanically activated W powder particles become thinner and smoother, with some broken fragments aggregated or inserted in the severely deformed 316L particles. A further SPS process under the conditions of 1050 °C × 45.5 MPa × 5 min leads to the densification of the powder compact and the formation of a distinguishable gray belt surrounding the retained W particles. Such a belt, which has a width of about 2-8 μm depending on different milling parameters and mainly contains Fe7W6, Fe3W3C and Fe2W phases, is bound to be a transitional region between the retained W particles and the 316L matrix. This favorable behavior with regards to the formation of a transitional belt, is accompanied by a substantial increase in the hardness values of the composite.

  11. Evaluation of the mineral profile of textile materials using inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry and chemometrics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Menezes, E.A.; Carapelli, R.; Bianchi, S.R. [Grupo de Analise Instrumental Aplicada, Departamento de Quimica, Universidade Federal de Sao Carlos, Sao Carlos, SP (Brazil); Embrapa Pecuaria Sudeste, C.P. 339, Sao Carlos, SP 13560-970 (Brazil); Souza, S.N.P. [Grupo de Analise Instrumental Aplicada, Departamento de Quimica, Universidade Federal de Sao Carlos, Sao Carlos, SP (Brazil); Matos, W.O. [Departamento de Quimica Analitica e Fisico-Quimica, Universidade Federal do Ceara, Fortaleza, CE (Brazil); Pereira-Filho, E.R. [Grupo de Analise Instrumental Aplicada, Departamento de Quimica, Universidade Federal de Sao Carlos, Sao Carlos, SP (Brazil); Nogueira, A.R.A., E-mail: anarita@cppse.embrapa.br [Embrapa Pecuaria Sudeste, C.P. 339, Sao Carlos, SP 13560-970 (Brazil)

    2010-10-15

    The content of Al, Ba, Ca, Cr, Cu, Fe, Ni, P, Zn, Cd and Pb was determined in textile material samples after microwave-assisted decomposition in a cavity oven and extraction with an artificial sweat solution. Radial viewing inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry (ICP OES) was the main detection technique, but Cd and Pb were determined by thermospray flame furnace atomic absorption spectrometry (TS-FF-AAS) to increase the sensitivity. Principal components analysis (PCA) was applied to the data sets to characterize the samples with respect to their geographic origin and color difference. The PCA for Brazilian single-color samples showed separation, with one group consisting of blue and green textiles and another with all the other materials evaluated. The geographic origin study showed a clear separation between Brazilian and Chinese textiles. The metals amount extracted with sweat extractable solution were lower than limits values pointed by the International Testing and Certification System for Textiles, Oko Tex Standard 100, in the all considered classes. Recoveries varied from 85 to 112% for additions ranging from 3.0 to 25 mg kg{sup -1} for Ca and from 0.3 to 7.0 mg kg{sup -1} for all other analytes through the microwave-assisted decomposition procedure.

  12. New Description Model of Sputtering on Material Surface

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    邓柏权; 严建成; 黄锦华; 彭利林

    2003-01-01

    In order to estimate the erosion rates of some plasma facing component materials, the sputtering yields of Mo, W and deuterium-saturated Li bombarded by fusion charged particles are calculated by application of new sputtering physics description methods based on the bipartition model of ion transport theory. The comparisons with Monte Carlo calculation and experimental results are made. These data might be useful to estimate the lifetime of plasma facing components and to analyse the impurity level in core plasma of fusion reactors.

  13. Famous face recognition, face matching, and extraversion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lander, Karen; Poyarekar, Siddhi

    2015-01-01

    It has been previously established that extraverts who are skilled at interpersonal interaction perform significantly better than introverts on a face-specific recognition memory task. In our experiment we further investigate the r