WorldWideScience

Sample records for plasma dynamo driven

  1. Plasma dynamo

    CERN Document Server

    Rincon, F; Schekochihin, A A; Valentini, F

    2015-01-01

    Magnetic fields pervade the entire Universe and, through their dynamical interactions with matter, affect the formation and evolution of astrophysical systems from cosmological to planetary scales. How primordial cosmological seed fields arose and were further amplified to $\\mu$Gauss levels reported in nearby galaxy clusters, near equipartition with kinetic energy of plasma motions and on scales of at least tens of kiloparsecs, is a major theoretical puzzle still largely unconstrained by observations. Extragalactic plasmas are weakly collisional (as opposed to collisional magnetohydrodynamic fluids), and whether magnetic-field growth and its sustainment through an efficient dynamo instability driven by chaotic motions is possible in such plasmas is not known. Fully kinetic numerical simulations of the Vlasov equation in a six-dimensional phase space necessary to answer this question have until recently remained beyond computational capabilities. Here, we show by means of such simulations that magnetic-field a...

  2. Laminar Plasma Dynamos

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, Z; Barnes, C W; Barnes, D C; Wang, Zhehui; Pariev, Vladimir I.; Barnes, Cris W.; Barnes, Daniel C.

    2002-01-01

    A new kind of dynamo utilizing flowing laboratory plasmas has been identified. Conversion of plasma kinetic energy to magnetic energy is verified numerically by kinematic dynamo simulations for magnetic Reynolds numbers above 210. As opposed to intrinsically-turbulent liquid-sodium dynamos, the proposed plasma dynamos correspond to laminar flow topology. Modest plasma parameters, 1-20 eV temperatures, 10^{19}-10^{20} m^{-3} densities in 0.3-1.0 m scale-lengths driven by velocities on the order of the Alfven Critical Ionization Velocity (CIV), self-consistently satisfy the conditions needed for the magnetic field amplication. Growth rates for the plasma dynamos are obtained numerically with different geometry and magnetic Reynolds numbers. Magnetic-field-free coaxial plasma guns can be used to sustain the plasma flow and the dynamo.

  3. Slow plasma dynamo driven by electric current helicity in non-compact Riemann surfaces of negative curvature

    CERN Document Server

    de Andrade, Garcia

    2009-01-01

    Boozer addressed the role of magnetic helicity in dynamos [Phys Fluids \\textbf{B},(1993)]. He pointed out that the magnetic helicity conservation implies that the dynamo action is more easily attainable if the electric potential varies over the surface of the dynamo. This provided us with motivation to investigate dynamos in Riemannian curved surfaces [Phys Plasmas \\textbf{14}, (2007);\\textbf{15} (2008)]. Thiffeault and Boozer [Phys Plasmas (2003)] discussed the onset of dissipation in kinematic dynamos. When curvature is constant and negative, a simple simple laminar dynamo solution is obtained on the flow topology of a Poincare disk, whose Gauss curvature is $K=-1$. By considering a laminar plasma dynamo [Wang et al, Phys Plasmas (2002)] the electric current helicity ${\\lambda}\\approx{2.34m^{-1}}$ for a Reynolds magnetic number of $Rm\\approx{210}$ and a growth rate of magnetic field $|{\\gamma}|\\approx{0.022}$. Negative constant curvature non-compact $\\textbf{H}^{2}$, has also been used in one-component elec...

  4. COSMIC PLASMA DYNAMO

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    A new dynamo model based on the polarization of plasma is presented in this paper.From the Maxwell equations in a moving medium, a magnetization vector can be causedwith Rongon current. The steady solar magnetic field is solved from the equations. Onthe assumption that the meridianal flow is ignored, the distribution of magnetic field isput out. In the model, there is no additional parameter considered. The intensity ofmagnetic field inside the sun ranges from 1-6T. The surface magnetic field around thepole is in the order of 1×10-3T, at low latitude the calculated surface magnetic fieldhas the order of 1×10-2 T. The maximum magnetic field is around 30° in latitude.

  5. Turbulent dynamo in a collisionless plasma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rincon, François; Califano, Francesco; Schekochihin, Alexander A; Valentini, Francesco

    2016-04-12

    Magnetic fields pervade the entire universe and affect the formation and evolution of astrophysical systems from cosmological to planetary scales. The generation and dynamical amplification of extragalactic magnetic fields through cosmic times (up to microgauss levels reported in nearby galaxy clusters, near equipartition with kinetic energy of plasma motions, and on scales of at least tens of kiloparsecs) are major puzzles largely unconstrained by observations. A dynamo effect converting kinetic flow energy into magnetic energy is often invoked in that context; however, extragalactic plasmas are weakly collisional (as opposed to magnetohydrodynamic fluids), and whether magnetic field growth and sustainment through an efficient turbulent dynamo instability are possible in such plasmas is not established. Fully kinetic numerical simulations of the Vlasov equation in a 6D-phase space necessary to answer this question have, until recently, remained beyond computational capabilities. Here, we show by means of such simulations that magnetic field amplification by dynamo instability does occur in a stochastically driven, nonrelativistic subsonic flow of initially unmagnetized collisionless plasma. We also find that the dynamo self-accelerates and becomes entangled with kinetic instabilities as magnetization increases. The results suggest that such a plasma dynamo may be realizable in laboratory experiments, support the idea that intracluster medium turbulence may have significantly contributed to the amplification of cluster magnetic fields up to near-equipartition levels on a timescale shorter than the Hubble time, and emphasize the crucial role of multiscale kinetic physics in high-energy astrophysical plasmas.

  6. The Alpha Dynamo Effects in Laboratory Plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hantao Ji; Stewart C. Prager

    2001-10-16

    A concise review of observations of the alpha dynamo effect in laboratory plasmas is given. Unlike many astrophysical systems, the laboratory pinch plasmas are driven magnetically. When the system is overdriven, the resultant instabilities cause magnetic and flow fields to fluctuate, and their correlation induces electromotive forces along the mean magnetic field. This alpha-effect drives mean parallel electric current, which, in turn, modifies the initial background mean magnetic structure towards the stable regime. This drive-and-relax cycle, or the so-called self-organization process, happens in magnetized plasmas in a timescale much shorter than resistive diffusion time, thus it is a fast and unquenched dynamo process. The observed alpha-effect redistributes magnetic helicity (a measure of twistedness and knottedness of magnetic field lines) but conserves its total value. It can be shown that fast and unquenched dynamos are natural consequences of a driven system where fluctuations are statistically either not stationary in time or not homogeneous in space, or both. Implications to astrophysical phenomena will be discussed.

  7. Introduction to Plasma Dynamo, Reconnection and Shocks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Intrator, Thomas P. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2012-08-30

    In our plasma universe, most of what we can observe is composed of ionized gas, or plasma. This plasma is a conducting fluid, which advects magnetic fields when it flows. Magnetic structure occurs from the smallest planetary to the largest cosmic scales. We introduce at a basic level some interesting features of non linear magnetohydrodynamics (MHD). For example, in our plasma universe, dynamo creates magnetic fields from gravitationally driven flow energy in an electrically conducting medium, and conversely magnetic reconnection annihilates magnetic field and accelerates particles. Shocks occur when flows move faster than the local velocity (sonic or Alfven speed) for the propagation of information. Both reconnection and shocks can accelerate particles, perhaps to gigantic energies, for example as observed with 10{sup 20} eV cosmic rays.

  8. ECH on the Madison Plasma Dynamo Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milhone, Jason; Clark, Mike; Collins, Cami; Cooper, Chris; Katz, Noam; Nonn, Paul; Wallace, John; Forest, Cary

    2012-10-01

    The Madison Plasma Dynamo Experiment (MPDX) is a 3 meter diameter sphere consisting of 36 axisymmetric rings of samarium cobalt magnets in a ring-cusp configuration. Electrostatic electrodes on the edge will be used to spin the plasma. The purpose of MPDX is to study flow-driven magnetohydrodynamic instabilities. Electron cyclotron heating will be used for the ionization and heating of the plasma. A benefit of the ECH is the plasma will have hot electrons leading to good electrical conduction and high magnetic Reynolds number. In addition, direct heating of the electrons helps to obtain a large ionization fraction and a low neutral density. The ECH system on MPDX will consist of 5 separate lines distributed at various positions around the vacuum vessel. Each line will have a 20 kW magnetron operating in continuous wave mode at 2.45 GHz outputting in WR-340 waveguide. The power will be transferred to the vacuum vessel through WR-284 waveguide. Each line will contain a directional coupler for measuring reflected power. A manual 3-stub tuner will be used for impedance matching. The purpose of these elements is to optimize the efficiency of energy transfer to the plasma.

  9. Solar Dynamo Driven by Periodic Flow Oscillation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayr, Hans G.; Hartle, Richard E.; Einaudi, Franco (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    We have proposed that the periodicity of the solar magnetic cycle is determined by wave mean flow interactions analogous to those driving the Quasi Biennial Oscillation in the Earth's atmosphere. Upward propagating gravity waves would produce oscillating flows near the top of the radiation zone that in turn would drive a kinematic dynamo to generate the 22-year solar magnetic cycle. The dynamo we propose is built on a given time independent magnetic field B, which allows us to estimate the time dependent, oscillating components of the magnetic field, (Delta)B. The toroidal magnetic field (Delta)B(sub phi) is directly driven by zonal flow and is relatively large in the source region, (Delta)(sub phi)/B(sub Theta) much greater than 1. Consistent with observations, this field peaks at low latitudes and has opposite polarities in both hemispheres. The oscillating poloidal magnetic field component, (Delta)B(sub Theta), is driven by the meridional circulation, which is difficult to assess without a numerical model that properly accounts for the solar atmosphere dynamics. Scale-analysis suggests that (Delta)B(sub Theta) is small compared to B(sub Theta) in the dynamo region. Relative to B(sub Theta), however, the oscillating magnetic field perturbations are expected to be transported more rapidly upwards in the convection zone to the solar surface. As a result, (Delta)B(sub Theta) (and (Delta)B(sub phi)) should grow relative to B(sub Theta), so that the magnetic fields reverse at the surface as observed. Since the meridional and zonai flow oscillations are out of phase, the poloidal magnetic field peaks during times when the toroidal field reverses direction, which is observed. With the proposed wave driven flow oscillation, the magnitude of the oscillating poloidal magnetic field increases with the mean rotation rate of the fluid. This is consistent with the Bode-Blackett empirical scaling law, which reveals that in massive astrophysical bodies the magnetic moment tends

  10. Constraints on dynamo action in plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helander, P.; Strumik, M.; Schekochihin, A. A.

    2016-12-01

    Upper bounds are derived on the amount of magnetic energy that can be generated by dynamo action in collisional and collisionless plasmas with and without external forcing. A hierarchy of mathematical descriptions is considered for the plasma dynamics: ideal magnetohydrodynamics (MHD), visco-resistive MHD, the double-adiabatic theory of Chew, Goldberger and Low (CGL), kinetic MHD and other kinetic models. It is found that dynamo action is greatly constrained in models where the magnetic moment of any particle species is conserved. In the absence of external forcing, the magnetic energy then remains small at all times if it is small in the initial state. In other words, a small `seed' magnetic field cannot be amplified significantly, regardless of the nature of flow, as long as the collision frequency and gyroradius are small enough to be negligible. A similar conclusion also holds if the system is subject to external forcing as long as this forcing conserves the magnetic moment of at least one plasma species and does not greatly increase the total energy of the plasma (i.e. in practice, is subsonic). Dynamo action therefore always requires collisions or some small-scale kinetic mechanism for breaking the adiabatic invariance of the magnetic moment.

  11. An Instability-driven Dynamo for $\\gamma$ Ray Bursts

    CERN Document Server

    Araya-Gochez, R A

    2000-01-01

    We show that an MHD-instability driven dynamo (IDD) operating in a hot accretion disk is capable of generating energetically adequate magnetic flux deposition rates above and below a mildly advective accretion disk structure. The dynamo is driven by the magnetorotational instability (MRI) of a toroidal field in a shear flow and is limited by the buoyancy of `horizontal' flux and by reconnection in the turbulent medium. The efficiency of magnetic energy deposition is estimated to be comparable to the neutrino losses although an MHD collimation mechanism may deem this process a more viable alternative to neutrino-burst-driven models of gamma ray bursts.

  12. Constraints on dynamo action in plasmas

    CERN Document Server

    Helander, P; Schekochihin, A A

    2016-01-01

    Upper bounds are derived on the amount of magnetic energy that can be generated by dynamo action in collisional and collisionless plasmas with and without external forcing. A hierarchy of mathematical descriptions is considered for the plasma dynamics: ideal MHD, visco-resistive MHD, the double-adiabatic theory of Chew, Goldberger and Low (CGL), kinetic MHD, and other kinetic models. It is found that dynamo action is greatly constrained in models where the magnetic moment of any particle species is conserved. In the absence of external forcing, the magnetic energy then remains small at all times if it is small in the initial state. In other words, a small "seed" magnetic field cannot be amplified significantly, regardless of the nature of flow, as long as the collision frequency and gyroradius are small enough to be negligible. A similar conclusion also holds if the system is subject to external forcing as long as this forcing conserves the magnetic moment of at least one plasma species and does not greatly i...

  13. TIDALLY DRIVEN DYNAMOS IN A ROTATING SPHERE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cébron, D.; Hollerbach, R., E-mail: david.cebron@ujf-grenoble.fr, E-mail: r.hollerbach@leeds.ac.uk [Institut für Geophysik, Sonneggstrasse 5, ETH Zürich, Zürich CH-8092 (Switzerland)

    2014-07-01

    Large-scale planetary or stellar magnetic fields generated by a dynamo effect are mostly attributed to flows forced by buoyancy forces in electrically conducting fluid layers. However, these large-scale fields may also be controlled by tides, as previously suggested for the star τ-boo, Mars, or the early Moon. By simulating a small local patch of a rotating fluid, Barker and Lithwick have recently shown that tides can drive small-scale dynamos by exciting a hydrodynamic instability, the so-called elliptical (or tidal) instability. By performing global magnetohydrodynamic simulations of a rotating spherical fluid body, we investigate if this instability can also drive the observed large-scale magnetic fields. We are thus interested in the dynamo threshold and the generated magnetic field in order to test if such a mechanism is relevant for planets and stars. Rather than solving the problem in a geometry deformed by tides, we consider a spherical fluid body and add a body force to mimic the tidal deformation in the bulk of the fluid. This allows us to use an efficient spectral code to solve the magnetohydrodynamic problem. We first compare the hydrodynamic results with theoretical asymptotic results and numerical results obtained in a truly deformed ellipsoid, which confirms the presence of elliptical instability. We then perform magnetohydrodynamic simulations and investigate the dynamo capability of the flow. Kinematic and self-consistent dynamos are finally simulated, showing that the elliptical instability is capable of generating a dipole-dominated large-scale magnetic field in global simulations of a fluid rotating sphere.

  14. Dynamo effect in a driven helical flow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feudel, F; Gellert, M; Rüdiger, S; Witt, A; Seehafer, N

    2003-10-01

    The Roberts flow, a helical flow in the form of convectionlike rolls, is known to be capable of both kinematic and nonlinear dynamo action. We study the Roberts dynamo with particular attention being paid to the spatial structure of the generated magnetic field and its back-reaction on the flow. The dynamo bifurcation is decisively determined by the symmetry group of the problem, which is given by a subgroup of discrete transformations and a continuous translational invariance of the flow. In the bifurcation the continuous symmetry is broken while the discrete subgroup symmetry completely survives. Its actions help in understanding the spatial structures of the magnetic field and of the modified flow. In accordance with experimental observations, the magnetic field component perpendicular to the originally invariant direction is much stronger than the component in this direction. Furthermore, the magnetic field is largely concentrated in layers separating the convectionlike rolls of the flow and containing, in particular, its stagnation points, which are isolated for the modified flow while they are line filling for the original Roberts flow. The magnetic field is strongest near beta-type stagnation points, with a two-dimensional unstable and a one-dimensional stable manifold, and is weak near alpha-type stagnation points, with a two-dimensional stable and a one-dimensional unstable manifold. This contrasts with the usual picture that dynamo action is promoted at the alpha points and impeded at the beta points. Both the creation of isolated stagnation points and the concentration of strong fields at the beta points may be understood as a result of the way in which the Roberts dynamo saturates. It is also found that, while the original Roberts flow is regular, the modified flow is chaotic in the layers between the convectionlike rolls where the magnetic field is concentrated. This chaoticity, which results from the back-reaction of the magnetic field on the flow

  15. Dynamos driven by poloidal flows in untwisted, curved and flat Riemannian diffusive flux tubes

    CERN Document Server

    de Andrade, L C Garcia

    2010-01-01

    Recently Vishik anti-fast dynamo theorem, has been tested against non-stretching flux tubes [Phys Plasmas 15 (2008)]. In this paper, another anti-dynamo theorem, called Cowling's theorem, which states that axisymmetric magnetic fields cannot support dynamo action, is carefully tested against thick tubular and curved Riemannian untwisted flows, as well as thin flux tubes in diffusive and diffusionless media. In the non-diffusive media the Cowling's theorem is not violated in thin Riemann-flat untwisted flux tubes, where the Frenet curvature is negative. Nevertheless the diffusion action in the thin flux tube leads to a a dynamo action driven by poloidal flows as shown by Love and Gubbins (Geophysical Res.) in the context of geodynamos. Actually it is shown that a slow dynamo action is obtained. In this case the Frenet and Riemann curvature still vanishes. In the case of magnetic filaments in diffusive media dynamo action is obtained when the Frenet scalar curvature is negative. Since the Riemann curvature tens...

  16. Convection-driven dynamos in the limit of rapid rotation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calkins, Michael; Long, Louie; Nieves, David; Julien, Keith; Tobias, Steven

    2016-11-01

    Most large-scale planetary magnetic fields are thought to be driven by rapidly rotating convection. Direct numerical simulation (DNS) remains an important tool for investigating the physics of dynamos, but remains severely restricted in parameter space relative to geo- and astrophysical systems. Asymptotic models provide a complimentary approach to DNS that have the ability to access planetary-like magnetohydrodynamical regimes. We utilize an asymptotic dynamo model to investigate the influence of convective flow regime on dynamo action. We find that the spatial characteristics of the large-scale magnetic field are dependent only weakly on changes in flow behavior. In contrast, the behavior of the small-scale magnetic field is directly dependent on, and therefore shows significant variations with, the small-scale convective flow field. These results may suggest why many previous DNS studies, which reside in a vastly different parameter space relative to planets, are nonetheless successful in reproducing many of the observed features of planetary magnetic fields.

  17. Shear-driven dynamo waves at high magnetic Reynolds number.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tobias, S M; Cattaneo, F

    2013-05-23

    Astrophysical magnetic fields often display remarkable organization, despite being generated by dynamo action driven by turbulent flows at high conductivity. An example is the eleven-year solar cycle, which shows spatial coherence over the entire solar surface. The difficulty in understanding the emergence of this large-scale organization is that whereas at low conductivity (measured by the magnetic Reynolds number, Rm) dynamo fields are well organized, at high Rm their structure is dominated by rapidly varying small-scale fluctuations. This arises because the smallest scales have the highest rate of strain, and can amplify magnetic field most efficiently. Therefore most of the effort to find flows whose large-scale dynamo properties persist at high Rm has been frustrated. Here we report high-resolution simulations of a dynamo that can generate organized fields at high Rm; indeed, the generation mechanism, which involves the interaction between helical flows and shear, only becomes effective at large Rm. The shear does not enhance generation at large scales, as is commonly thought; instead it reduces generation at small scales. The solution consists of propagating dynamo waves, whose existence was postulated more than 60 years ago and which have since been used to model the solar cycle.

  18. The Turbulent Dynamo in Highly Compressible Supersonic Plasmas

    CERN Document Server

    Federrath, Christoph; Bovino, Stefano; Schleicher, Dominik R G

    2014-01-01

    The turbulent dynamo may explain the origin of cosmic magnetism. While the exponential amplification of magnetic fields has been studied for incompressible gases, little is known about dynamo action in highly-compressible, supersonic plasmas, such as the interstellar medium of galaxies and the early Universe. Here we perform the first quantitative comparison of theoretical models of the dynamo growth rate and saturation level with three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamical simulations of supersonic turbulence with grid resolutions of up to 1024^3 cells. We obtain numerical convergence and find that dynamo action occurs for both low and high magnetic Prandtl numbers Pm = nu/eta = 0.1-10 (the ratio of viscous to magnetic dissipation), which had so far only been seen for Pm >= 1 in supersonic turbulence. We measure the critical magnetic Reynolds number, Rm_crit = 129 (+43, -31), showing that the compressible dynamo is almost as efficient as in incompressible gas. Considering the physical conditions of the present a...

  19. The Madison plasma dynamo experiment: A facility for studying laboratory plasma astrophysics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, C. M.; Wallace, J.; Brookhart, M.; Clark, M.; Collins, C.; Ding, W. X.; Flanagan, K.; Khalzov, I.; Li, Y.; Milhone, J.; Nornberg, M.; Nonn, P.; Weisberg, D.; Whyte, D. G.; Zweibel, E.; Forest, C. B.

    2014-01-01

    The Madison plasma dynamo experiment (MPDX) is a novel, versatile, basic plasma research device designed to investigate flow driven magnetohydrodynamic instabilities and other high-β phenomena with astrophysically relevant parameters. A 3 m diameter vacuum vessel is lined with 36 rings of alternately oriented 4000 G samarium cobalt magnets, which create an axisymmetric multicusp that contains ˜14 m3 of nearly magnetic field free plasma that is well confined and highly ionized (>50%). At present, 8 lanthanum hexaboride (LaB6) cathodes and 10 molybdenum anodes are inserted into the vessel and biased up to 500 V, drawing 40 A each cathode, ionizing a low pressure Ar or He fill gas and heating it. Up to 100 kW of electron cyclotron heating power is planned for additional electron heating. The LaB6 cathodes are positioned in the magnetized edge to drive toroidal rotation through J × B torques that propagate into the unmagnetized core plasma. Dynamo studies on MPDX require a high magnetic Reynolds number Rm > 1000, and an adjustable fluid Reynolds number 10 1). Initial results from MPDX are presented along with a 0-dimensional power and particle balance model to predict the viscosity and resistivity to achieve dynamo action.

  20. Rotating convection-driven dynamos at low Ekman number.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rotvig, Jon; Jones, Chris A

    2002-11-01

    We present a fully 3D self-consistent convection-driven dynamo model with reference to the geodynamo. A relatively low Ekman number regime is reached, with the aim of investigating the dynamical behavior at low viscosity. This regime is computationally very demanding, which has prompted us to adopt a plane layer model with an inclined rotation vector, and to make use of efficiently parallelized code. No hyperdiffusion is used, all diffusive operators are in the classical form. Our model has infinite Prandtl number, a Rayleigh number that scales as E(-1/3) (E being the Ekman number), and a constant Roberts number. The optimized model allows us to study dynamos with Ekman numbers in the range [10(-5),10(-4)]. In this regime we find strong-field dynamos where the induced magnetic fields satisfy Taylor's constraint to good accuracy. The solutions are characterized by (i) a MAC balance within the bulk, i.e., Coriolis, pressure, Lorentz, and buoyancy forces are of comparable magnitude, while viscous forces are only significant in thin boundary layers, (ii) the Elsasser number is O(10), (iii) the strong magnetic fields cannot prevent small-scale structures from becoming dominant over the large-scale components, (iv) the Taylor-Proudman effect is detectable, (v) the Taylorization decreases as the Ekman number is lowered, and (vi) the ageostrophic velocity component makes up 80% of the flow.

  1. An impact-driven dynamo for the early Moon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Bars, M; Wieczorek, M A; Karatekin, O; Cébron, D; Laneuville, M

    2011-11-09

    The origin of lunar magnetic anomalies remains unresolved after their discovery more than four decades ago. A commonly invoked hypothesis is that the Moon might once have possessed a thermally driven core dynamo, but this theory is problematical given the small size of the core and the required surface magnetic field strengths. An alternative hypothesis is that impact events might have amplified ambient fields near the antipodes of the largest basins, but many magnetic anomalies exist that are not associated with basin antipodes. Here we propose a new model for magnetic field generation, in which dynamo action comes from impact-induced changes in the Moon's rotation rate. Basin-forming impact events are energetic enough to have unlocked the Moon from synchronous rotation, and we demonstrate that the subsequent large-scale fluid flows in the core, excited by the tidal distortion of the core-mantle boundary, could have powered a lunar dynamo. Predicted surface magnetic field strengths are on the order of several microteslas, consistent with palaeomagnetic measurements, and the duration of these fields is sufficient to explain the central magnetic anomalies associated with several large impact basins.

  2. Magnetohydrodynamic dynamo: global flow generation in plasma turbulence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yokoi, Nobumitsu; Yoshizawa, Akira [Tokyo Univ. (Japan). Inst. of Industrial Science; Itoh, Kimitaka; Itoh, Sanae-I.

    1999-07-01

    Generation mechanism of the spontaneous plasma rotation observed in an improved confinement mode in tokamak's is examined from the viewpoint of the turbulent magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) dynamo. A dynamo model, where the concept of cross helicity (velocity/magnetic-field correlation) plays a key role, is applied to the reversed shear (RS) modes. The concave electric-current profile occurred in the RS modes is shown to be a cause of the global plasma rotation through a numerical simulation of the cross-helicity turbulence model. (author)

  3. Measurement of the dynamo effect in a plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ji, H. [Princeton Univ., NJ (United States). Plasma Physics Lab.; Prager, S.C.; Almagri, A.F.; Sarff, J.S. [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States). Dept. of Physics; Hirano, Y. [Electrotechnical Lab., Tsukuba, Ibaraki (Japan). Plasma Section; Toyama, H. [Univ. of Tokyo (Japan). Dept. of Physics

    1995-11-01

    A series of the detailed experiments has been conducted in three laboratory plasma devices to measure the dynamo electric field along the equilibrium field line (the {alpha} effect) arising from the correlation between the fluctuating flow velocity and magnetic field. The fluctuating flow velocity is obtained from probe measurement of the fluctuating E x B drift and electron diamagnetic drift. The three major findings are (1) the {alpha} effect accounts for the dynamo current generation, even in the time dependence through a ``sawtooth`` cycle; (2) at low collisionality the dynamo is explained primarily by the widely studied pressureless Magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) model, i.e., the fluctuating velocity is dominated by the E x B drift; (3) at high collisionality, a new ``electron diamagnetic dynamo`` is observed, in which the fluctuating velocity is dominated by the diamagnetic drift. In addition, direct measurements of the helicity flux indicate that the dynamo activity transports magnetic helicity from one part of the plasma to another, but the total helicity is roughly conserved, verifying J.B. Taylor`s conjecture.

  4. The Madison plasma dynamo experiment: a facility for studying laboratory plasma astrophysics

    CERN Document Server

    Cooper, C M; Brookhart, M; Clark, M; Collins, C; Ding, W X; Flanagan, K; Khalzov, I; Li, Y; Milhone, J; Nornberg, M; Nonn, P; Weisberg, D; Whyte, D G; Zweibel, E; Forest, C B

    2013-01-01

    The Madison plasma dynamo experiment (MPDX) is a novel, versatile, basic plasma research device designed to investigate flow driven magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) instabilities and other high-$\\beta$ phenomena with astrophysically relevant parameters. A 3 m diameter vacuum vessel is lined with 36 rings of alternately oriented 4000 G samarium cobalt magnets which create an axisymmetric multicusp that contains $\\sim$14 m$^{3}$ of nearly magnetic field free plasma that is well confined and highly ionized $(>50\\%)$. At present, up to 8 lanthanum hexaboride (LaB$_6$) cathodes and 10 molybdenum anodes are inserted into the vessel and biased up to 500 V, drawing 40 A each cathode, ionizing a low pressure Ar or He fill gas and heating it. Up to 100 kW of electron cyclotron heating (ECH) power is planned for additional electron heating. The LaB$_6$ cathodes are positioned in the magnetized edge to drive toroidal rotation through ${\\bf J}\\times{\\bf B}$ torques that propagate into the unmagnetized core plasma. Dynamo studies...

  5. Large-scale dynamo action driven by velocity shear and rotating convection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, David W; Proctor, Michael R E

    2009-01-30

    By incorporating a large-scale shear flow into turbulent rotating convection, we show that a sufficiently strong shear can promote dynamo action in flows that are otherwise nondynamos. Our results are consistent with a dynamo driven either by the shear-current effect or by a fluctuating alpha effect interacting with the shear, but not with either a classical alpha(2) or alpha omega dynamo.

  6. Structure and variability of dynamo driven accretion discs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pudritz, R.E. (Cambridge Univ. (UK). Inst. of Astronomy); Fahlman, G.G. (British Columbia Univ., Vancouver (Canada). Dept. of Geophysics and Astronomy)

    1982-02-01

    A turbulent dynamo operating in an accretion disc around a black hole can produce fields strong enough so that the Maxwell stress due to the fluctuations dominates. In this dynamo driven limit, enormous localized fluctuations can be expected because the Kepler flow energy density is efficiently tapped. The detailed radial structure of this model is calculated, which for Cyg X-1, predicts a cool (Tsub(max) approximately < 10/sup 8/ K), dense, thin (z/sub 0//r approximately < 10/sup -2/), and optically thick disc. A mean field B approximately < 10/sup 8/ G can be generated. Fluctuations of order b approximately 10/sup 12/ G at the inner accretion disc radius (rsub(*) approximately 1), falling to b approximately 10/sup 10/ G at rsub(*) approximately 30, provide an explanation for the Cyg X-1 millisecond bursts and shot noise in terms of flares on the disc surface. This is established by means of model independent, scaled reconnection experiments. The optical variability of 3C 273 could be explained as arising from flares on an accretion disc around a 10/sup 9/ solar masses black hole, with flare fields of b approximately 10/sup 7/ G at rsub(*) approximately 1.

  7. THE TURBULENT DYNAMO IN HIGHLY COMPRESSIBLE SUPERSONIC PLASMAS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Federrath, Christoph [Research School of Astronomy and Astrophysics, The Australian National University, Canberra, ACT 2611 (Australia); Schober, Jennifer [Universität Heidelberg, Zentrum für Astronomie, Institut für Theoretische Astrophysik, Albert-Ueberle-Strasse 2, D-69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Bovino, Stefano; Schleicher, Dominik R. G., E-mail: christoph.federrath@anu.edu.au [Institut für Astrophysik, Georg-August-Universität Göttingen, Friedrich-Hund-Platz 1, D-37077 Göttingen (Germany)

    2014-12-20

    The turbulent dynamo may explain the origin of cosmic magnetism. While the exponential amplification of magnetic fields has been studied for incompressible gases, little is known about dynamo action in highly compressible, supersonic plasmas, such as the interstellar medium of galaxies and the early universe. Here we perform the first quantitative comparison of theoretical models of the dynamo growth rate and saturation level with three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamical simulations of supersonic turbulence with grid resolutions of up to 1024{sup 3} cells. We obtain numerical convergence and find that dynamo action occurs for both low and high magnetic Prandtl numbers Pm = ν/η = 0.1-10 (the ratio of viscous to magnetic dissipation), which had so far only been seen for Pm ≥ 1 in supersonic turbulence. We measure the critical magnetic Reynolds number, Rm{sub crit}=129{sub −31}{sup +43}, showing that the compressible dynamo is almost as efficient as in incompressible gas. Considering the physical conditions of the present and early universe, we conclude that magnetic fields need to be taken into account during structure formation from the early to the present cosmic ages, because they suppress gas fragmentation and drive powerful jets and outflows, both greatly affecting the initial mass function of stars.

  8. Cosmic ray driven dynamo in galactic disks. A parameter study

    CERN Document Server

    MichałHanasz,; Kowal, Grzegorz; Lesch, Harald

    2008-01-01

    We present a parameter study of the magnetohydrodynamical dynamo driven by cosmic rays in the interstellar medium (ISM) focusing on the efficiency of magnetic field amplification and the issue of energy equipartition between magnetic, kinetic and cosmic ray (CR) energies. We perform numerical CR-MHD simulations of the ISM using the extended version of ZEUS-3D code in the shearing box approximation and taking into account the presence of Ohmic resistivity, tidal forces and vertical disk gravity. CRs are supplied in randomly distributed supernova (SN) remnants and are described by the diffusion-advection equation, which incorporates an anisotropic diffusion tensor. The azimuthal magnetic flux and total magnetic energy are amplified depending on a particular choice of model parameters. We find that the most favorable conditions for magnetic field amplification correspond to magnetic diffusivity of the order of $3\\times 10^{25} \\cm^2\\s^{-1}$, SN rates close to those observed in the Milky Way, periodic SN activity...

  9. Dynamo-driven plasmoid formation from a current-sheet instability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebrahimi, F.

    2016-12-01

    Axisymmetric current-carrying plasmoids are formed in the presence of nonaxisymmetric fluctuations during nonlinear three-dimensional resistive MHD simulations in a global toroidal geometry. We utilize the helicity injection technique to form an initial poloidal flux in the presence of a toroidal guide field. As helicity is injected, two types of current sheets are formed from (1) the oppositely directed field lines in the injector region (primary reconnecting current sheet), and (2) the poloidal flux compression near the plasma edge (edge current sheet). We first find that nonaxisymmetric fluctuations arising from the current-sheet instability isolated near the plasma edge have tearing parity but can nevertheless grow fast (on the poloidal Alfven time scale). These modes saturate by breaking up the current sheet. Second, for the first time, a dynamo poloidal flux amplification is observed at the reconnection site (in the region of the oppositely directed magnetic field). This fluctuation-induced flux amplification increases the local Lundquist number, which then triggers a plasmoid instability and breaks the primary current sheet at the reconnection site. The plasmoids formation driven by large-scale flux amplification, i.e., a large-scale dynamo, observed here has strong implications for astrophysical reconnection as well as fast reconnection events in laboratory plasmas.

  10. Acceleration of Plasma Flows Due to Inverse Dynamo Mechanism

    CERN Document Server

    Mahajan, S M; Mikeladze, S V; Sigua, K I; Mahajan, Swadesh M.; Shatashvili, Nana L.; Mikeladze, Solomon V.; Sigua, Ketevan I.

    2005-01-01

    The "inverse-dynamo" mechanism - the amplification/generation of fast plasma flows by short scale (turbulent) magnetic fields via magneto-fluid coupling is recognized and explored. It is shown that large-scale magnetic fields and flows are generated simultaneously and proportionately from short scale fields and flows. The stronger the short-scale driver, the stronger are the large-scale products. Stellar and astrophysical applications are suggested.

  11. Convection-driven kinematic dynamos at low Rossby and magnetic Prandtl numbers: single mode solutions

    CERN Document Server

    Calkins, Michael A; Tobias, Steven M; Aurnou, Jonathan M; Marti, Philippe

    2015-01-01

    The onset of dynamo action is investigated within the context of a newly developed low Rossby, low magnetic Prandtl number, convection-driven dynamo model. The model represents an asymptotically exact form of an $\\alpha^2$ mean field dynamo model in which the small-scale convection is represented explicitly by the finite amplitude, single mode convective solutions first investigated by Bassom and Zhang (Geophys.~Astrophys.~Fluid Dyn., \\textbf{76}, p.223, 1994). Both steady and oscillatory convection are considered for a variety of horizontal planforms. The kinematic helicity is observed to be a monotonically increasing function of the Rayleigh number; as a result, very small magnetic Prandtl number dynamos can be found for a sufficiently large Rayleigh number. All dynamos are found to be oscillatory with an oscillation frequency that increases as the strength of the convection is increased and the magnetic Prandtl number is reduced. Single mode solutions which exhibit boundary layer behavior in the kinematic ...

  12. COHERENT NONHELICAL SHEAR DYNAMOS DRIVEN BY MAGNETIC FLUCTUATIONS AT LOW REYNOLDS NUMBERS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Squire, J.; Bhattacharjee, A., E-mail: jsquire@caltech.edu [Department of Astrophysical Sciences and Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ 08543 (United States)

    2015-11-01

    Nonhelical shear dynamos are studied with a particular focus on the possibility of coherent dynamo action. The primary results—serving as a follow up to the results of Squire and Bhattacharjee—pertain to the “magnetic shear-current effect” as a viable mechanism to drive large-scale magnetic field generation. This effect raises the interesting possibility that the saturated state of the small-scale dynamo could drive large-scale dynamo action, and is likely to be important in the unstratified regions of accretion disk turbulence. In this paper, the effect is studied at low Reynolds numbers, removing the complications of small-scale dynamo excitation and aiding analysis by enabling the use of quasi-linear statistical simulation methods. In addition to the magnetically driven dynamo, new results on the kinematic nonhelical shear dynamo are presented. These illustrate the relationship between coherent and incoherent driving in such dynamos, demonstrating the importance of rotation in determining the relative dominance of each mechanism.

  13. A long-lived lunar dynamo driven by continuous mechanical stirring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dwyer, C A; Stevenson, D J; Nimmo, F

    2011-11-09

    Lunar rocks contain a record of an ancient magnetic field that seems to have persisted for more than 400 million years and which has been attributed to a lunar dynamo. Models of conventional dynamos driven by thermal or compositional convection have had difficulty reproducing the existence and apparently long duration of the lunar dynamo. Here we investigate an alternative mechanism of dynamo generation: continuous mechanical stirring arising from the differential motion, due to Earth-driven precession of the lunar spin axis, between the solid silicate mantle and the liquid core beneath. We show that the fluid motions and the power required to drive a dynamo operating continuously for more than one billion years and generating a magnetic field that had an intensity of more than one microtesla 4.2 billion years ago are readily obtained by mechanical stirring. The magnetic field is predicted to decrease with time and to shut off naturally when the Moon recedes far enough from Earth that the dissipated power is insufficient to drive a dynamo; in our nominal model, this occurred at about 48 Earth radii (2.7 billion years ago). Thus, lunar palaeomagnetic measurements may be able to constrain the poorly known early orbital evolution of the Moon. This mechanism may also be applicable to dynamos in other bodies, such as large asteroids.

  14. Hemispherical Parker waves driven by thermal shear in planetary dynamos

    CERN Document Server

    Dietrich, Wieland; Wicht, Johannes

    2014-01-01

    Planetary and stellar magnetic fields are thought to be sustained by helical motions ($\\alpha$-effect) and, if present, differential rotation ($\\Omega$-effect). In the Sun, the strong differential rotation in the tachocline is responsible for an efficient $\\Omega$-effect creating a strong axisymmetric azimuthal magnetic field. This is a prerequisite for Parker dynamo waves that may be responsible for the solar cycle. In the liquid iron cores of terrestrial planets, the Coriolis force organizes convection into columns with a strong helical flow component. These likely dominate magnetic field generation while the $\\Omega$-effect is of secondary importance. Here we use numerical simulations to show that the planetary dynamo scenario may change when the heat flux through the outer boundary is higher in one hemisphere than in the other. A hemispherical dynamo is promoted that is dominated by fierce thermal wind responsible for a strong $\\Omega$-effect. As a consequence Parker dynamo waves are excited equivalent to...

  15. Wave-driven dynamo action in spherical magnetohydrodynamic systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reuter, K; Jenko, F; Tilgner, A; Forest, C B

    2009-11-01

    Hydrodynamic and magnetohydrodynamic numerical studies of a mechanically forced two-vortex flow inside a sphere are reported. The simulations are performed in the intermediate regime between the laminar flow and developed turbulence, where a hydrodynamic instability is found to generate internal waves with a characteristic m=2 zonal wave number. It is shown that this time-periodic flow acts as a dynamo, although snapshots of the flow as well as the mean flow are not dynamos. The magnetic fields' growth rate exhibits resonance effects depending on the wave frequency. Furthermore, a cyclic self-killing and self-recovering dynamo based on the relative alignment of the velocity and magnetic fields is presented. The phenomena are explained in terms of a mixing of nonorthogonal eigenstates of the time-dependent linear operator of the magnetic induction equation. The potential relevance of this mechanism to dynamo experiments is discussed.

  16. Role of a continuous MHD dynamo in the formation of 3D equilibria in fusion plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piovesan, P.; Bonfiglio, D.; Cianciosa, M.; Luce, T. C.; Taylor, N. Z.; Terranova, D.; Turco, F.; Wilcox, R. S.; Wingen, A.; Cappello, S.; Chrystal, C.; Escande, D. F.; Holcomb, C. T.; Marrelli, L.; Paz-Soldan, C.; Piron, L.; Predebon, I.; Zaniol, B.; DIII-D, The; RFX-Mod Teams

    2017-07-01

    Stationary 3D equilibria can form in fusion plasmas via saturation of magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) instabilities or stimulated by external 3D fields. In these cases the current profile is anomalously broad due to magnetic flux pumping produced by the MHD modes. Flux pumping plays an important role in hybrid tokamak plasmas, maintaining the minimum safety factor above unity and thus removing sawteeth. It also enables steady-state hybrid operation, by redistributing non-inductive current driven near the center by electron cyclotron waves. A validated flux pumping model is not yet available, but it would be necessary to extrapolate hybrid operation to future devices. In this work flux pumping physics is investigated for helical core equilibria stimulated by external 3D fields in DIII-D hybrid plasmas. We show that flux pumping can be produced in a continuous way by an MHD dynamo emf. The same effect maintains helical equilibria in reversed-field pinch (RFP) plasmas. The effective MHD dynamo loop voltage is calculated for experimental 3D equilibrium reconstructions, by balancing Ohm’s law over helical flux surfaces, and is consistent with the expected current redistribution. Similar results are also obtained with more sophisticated nonlinear MHD simulations. The same modelling approach is applied to helical RFP states forming spontaneously in RFX-mod as the plasma current is raised above 0.8-1 MA. This comparison allows to identify the underlying physics common to tokamak and RFP: a helical core displacement modulates parallel current density along flux tubes, which requires a helical electrostatic potential to build up, giving rise to a helical MHD dynamo flow.

  17. Microphysics of cosmic ray driven plasma instabilities

    CERN Document Server

    Bykov, A M; Malkov, M A; Osipov, S M

    2013-01-01

    Energetic nonthermal particles (cosmic rays, CRs) are accelerated in supernova remnants, relativistic jets and other astrophysical objects. The CR energy density is typically comparable with that of the thermal components and magnetic fields. In this review we discuss mechanisms of magnetic field amplification due to instabilities induced by CRs. We derive CR kinetic and magnetohydrodynamic equations that govern cosmic plasma systems comprising the thermal background plasma, comic rays and fluctuating magnetic fields to study CR-driven instabilities. Both resonant and non-resonant instabilities are reviewed, including the Bell short-wavelength instability, and the firehose instability. Special attention is paid to the longwavelength instabilities driven by the CR current and pressure gradient. The helicity production by the CR current-driven instabilities is discussed in connection with the dynamo mechanisms of cosmic magnetic field amplification.

  18. Precession-driven dynamos in a full sphere and the role of large scale cyclonic vortices

    CERN Document Server

    Lin, Yufeng; Noir, Jerome; Jackson, Andrew

    2016-01-01

    Precession has been proposed as an alternative power source for planetary dynamos. Previous hydrodynamic simulations suggested that precession can generate very complex flows in planetary liquid cores [Y. Lin, P. Marti, and J. Noir, "Shear-driven parametric instability in a precessing sphere," Physics of Fluids 27, 046601 (2015)]. In the present study, we numerically investigate the magnetohydrodynamics of a precessing sphere. We demonstrate precession driven dynamos in different flow regimes, from laminar to turbulent flows. In particular, we highlight the magnetic field generation by large scale cyclonic vortices, which has not been explored previously. In this regime, dynamos can be sustained at relatively low Ekman numbers and magnetic Prandtl numbers, which paves the way for planetary applications.

  19. Convection-driven spherical shell dynamos at varying Prandtl numbers

    CERN Document Server

    Käpylä, P J; Olspert, N; Warnecke, J; Brandenburg, A

    2016-01-01

    (abidged) Context: Stellar convection zones are characterized by vigorous high-Reynolds number turbulence at low Prandtl numbers. Aims: We study the dynamo and differential rotation regimes at varying levels of viscous, thermal, and magnetic diffusion. Methods: We perform three-dimensional simulations of stratified fully compressible magnetohydrodynamic convection in rotating spherical wedges at various thermal and magnetic Prandtl numbers. Results: We find that the rotation profiles for high thermal diffusivity show a monotonically increasing angular velocity from the bottom of the convection zone to the top and from the poles toward the equator. For sufficiently rapid rotation, a region of negative radial shear develops at mid-latitudes as the thermal diffusivity is decreased. This coincides with a change in the dynamo mode from poleward propagating activity belts to equatorward propagating ones. Furthermore, the cyclic solutions disappear at the highest magnetic Reynolds numbers. The total magnetic energy ...

  20. Magnetorotational Turbulence and Dynamo in a Collisionless Plasma

    CERN Document Server

    Kunz, Matthew W; Quataert, Eliot

    2016-01-01

    We present results from the first 3D kinetic numerical simulation of magnetorotational turbulence and dynamo, using the local shearing-box model of a collisionless accretion disc. The kinetic magnetorotational instability grows from a subthermal magnetic field having zero net flux over the computational domain to generate self-sustained turbulence and outward angular-momentum transport. Significant Maxwell and Reynolds stresses are accompanied by comparable viscous stresses produced by field-aligned ion pressure anisotropy, which is regulated primarily by the mirror and ion-cyclotron instabilities through particle trapping and pitch-angle scattering. The latter endow the plasma with an effective viscosity that is biased with respect to the magnetic-field direction and spatio-temporally variable. Energy spectra suggest an Alfv\\'en-wave cascade at large scales and a kinetic-Alfv\\'en-wave cascade at small scales, with strong small-scale density fluctuations and weak non-axisymmetric density waves. Ions undergo n...

  1. Colloidal Plasmas : Dynamo transformation of the collisional R-T in a weakly ionized plasma

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    C B Dwivedi

    2000-11-01

    Theoretical prediction of a new kind of normal mode behaviour of electro-mechanical nature was first time reported by Dwivedi and Das in 1992 in the context of mesospheric modeling of observed neutral induced turbulence. Local dynamo action (due to relative neutral flow) governs the basic physical principle for linear excitation of the neutral induced low frequency instability (NILF) in mesospheric plasma, which comprises of weakly ionized inhomogeneous gas confined by the external gravity and ambient magnetic field. The present contribution offers physical explanation in terms of dynamo transformation of neutral drag effect as a source to understand complete suppression of the usual collisional R-T and in turn linear driving of the NILF. It is therefore emphasized, worth calling it as the dynamo instability.

  2. Plasmoid ejections driven by dynamo action underneath a spherical surface

    CERN Document Server

    Warnecke, Jörn; Mitra, Dhrubaditya

    2010-01-01

    We present a unified three-dimensional model of the convection zone and upper atmosphere of the Sun in spherical geometry. In this model, magnetic fields, generated by a helically forced dynamo in the convection zone, emerge without the assistance of magnetic buoyancy. We use an isothermal equation of state with gravity and density stratification. Recurrent plasmoid ejections, which rise through the outer atmosphere, is observed. In addition, the current helicity of the small--scale field is transported outwards and form large structures like magnetic clouds.

  3. Convection-driven kinematic dynamos at low Rossby and magnetic Prandtl numbers

    CERN Document Server

    Calkins, Michael A; Nieves, David; Julien, Keith; Tobias, Steven M

    2016-01-01

    Most large-scale planetary magnetic fields are thought to be driven by low Rossby number convection of a low magnetic Prandtl number fluid. Here kinematic dynamo action is investigated with an asymptotic, rapidly rotating dynamo model for the plane layer geometry that is intrinsically low magnetic Prandtl number. The thermal Prandtl number and Rayleigh number are varied to illustrate fundamental changes in flow regime, ranging from laminar cellular convection to geostrophic turbulence in which an inverse energy cascade is present. A decrease in the efficiency of the convection to generate a dynamo, as determined by an increase in the critical magnetic Reynolds number, is observed as the buoyancy forcing is increased. This decreased efficiency may result from both the loss of correlations associated with the increasingly disordered states of flow that are generated, and boundary layer behavior that enhances magnetic diffusion locally. We find that the spatial characteristics of $\\alpha$, and thus the large-sca...

  4. Ricci dynamo stretch-shear plasma flows and magnetic energy bounds

    CERN Document Server

    de Andrade, Garcia

    2009-01-01

    Geometrical tools, used in Einstein's general relativity (GR), are applied to dynamo theory, in order to obtain fast dynamo action bounds to magnetic energy, from Killing symmetries in Ricci flows. Magnetic field is shown to be the shear flow tensor eigendirection, in the case of marginal dynamos. Killing symmetries of the Riemann metric, bounded by Einstein space, allows us to reduce the computations. Techniques used are similar to those strain decomposition of the flow in Sobolev space, recently used by Nu\\~nez [JMP \\textbf{43} (2002)] to place bounds in the magnetic energy in the case of hydromagnetic dynamos with plasma resistivity. Contrary to Nu\\~nez case, we assume that the dynamos are kinematic, and the velocity flow gradient is decomposed into expansion, shear and twist. The effective twist vanishes by considering that the frame vorticity coincides with Ricci rotation coefficients. Eigenvalues are here Lyapunov exponents. In analogy to GR, where curvature plays the role of gravity, here Ricci curvatu...

  5. Numerical modeling of laser-driven experiments aiming to demonstrate magnetic field amplification via turbulent dynamo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tzeferacos, P.; Rigby, A.; Bott, A.; Bell, A. R.; Bingham, R.; Casner, A.; Cattaneo, F.; Churazov, E. M.; Emig, J.; Flocke, N.; Fiuza, F.; Forest, C. B.; Foster, J.; Graziani, C.; Katz, J.; Koenig, M.; Li, C.-K.; Meinecke, J.; Petrasso, R.; Park, H.-S.; Remington, B. A.; Ross, J. S.; Ryu, D.; Ryutov, D.; Weide, K.; White, T. G.; Reville, B.; Miniati, F.; Schekochihin, A. A.; Froula, D. H.; Gregori, G.; Lamb, D. Q.

    2017-04-01

    The universe is permeated by magnetic fields, with strengths ranging from a femtogauss in the voids between the filaments of galaxy clusters to several teragauss in black holes and neutron stars. The standard model behind cosmological magnetic fields is the nonlinear amplification of seed fields via turbulent dynamo to the values observed. We have conceived experiments that aim to demonstrate and study the turbulent dynamo mechanism in the laboratory. Here, we describe the design of these experiments through simulation campaigns using FLASH, a highly capable radiation magnetohydrodynamics code that we have developed, and large-scale three-dimensional simulations on the Mira supercomputer at the Argonne National Laboratory. The simulation results indicate that the experimental platform may be capable of reaching a turbulent plasma state and determining the dynamo amplification. We validate and compare our numerical results with a small subset of experimental data using synthetic diagnostics.

  6. Numerical modeling of laser-driven experiments aiming to demonstrate magnetic field amplification via turbulent dynamo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tzeferacos, P. [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois 60637, USA; Department of Physics, University of Oxford, Oxford OX1 3PU, United Kingdom; Rigby, A. [Department of Physics, University of Oxford, Oxford OX1 3PU, United Kingdom; Bott, A. [Department of Physics, University of Oxford, Oxford OX1 3PU, United Kingdom; Bell, A. R. [Department of Physics, University of Oxford, Oxford OX1 3PU, United Kingdom; Bingham, R. [Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Chilton, Didcot OX11 0QX, United Kingdom; Department of Physics, University of Strathclyde, Glasgow G4 0NG, United Kingdom; Casner, A. [CEA, DAM, DIF, F-91297 Arpajon, France; Cattaneo, F. [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois 60637, USA; Churazov, E. M. [Max Planck Institute for Astrophysics, D-85741 Garching, Germany; Space Research Institute (IKI), Moscow 117997, Russia; Emig, J. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550, USA; Flocke, N. [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois 60637, USA; Fiuza, F. [SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Menlo Park, California 94025, USA; Forest, C. B. [Physics Department, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, Wisconsin 53706, USA; Foster, J. [AWE, Aldermaston, Reading, West Berkshire, RG7 4PR, United Kingdom; Graziani, C. [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois 60637, USA; Katz, J. [Laboratory for Laser Energetics, University of Rochester, Rochester, New York 14623, USA; Koenig, M. [Laboratoire pour l' Utilisation de Lasers Intenses, UMR7605, CNRS CEA, Université Paris VI Ecole Polytechnique, France; Li, C. -K. [Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139, USA; Meinecke, J. [Department of Physics, University of Oxford, Oxford OX1 3PU, United Kingdom; Petrasso, R. [Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139, USA; Park, H. -S. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550, USA; Remington, B. A. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550, USA; Ross, J. S. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550, USA; Ryu, D. [Department of Physics, UNIST, Ulsan 689-798, South Korea; Ryutov, D. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550, USA; Weide, K. [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois 60637, USA; White, T. G. [Department of Physics, University of Oxford, Oxford OX1 3PU, United Kingdom; Reville, B. [School of Mathematics and Physics, Queens University Belfast, Belfast BT7 1NN, United Kingdom; Miniati, F. [Department of Physics, ETH Zürich, CH-8093 Zürich, Switzerland; Schekochihin, A. A. [Department of Physics, University of Oxford, Oxford OX1 3PU, United Kingdom; Froula, D. H. [Laboratory for Laser Energetics, University of Rochester, Rochester, New York 14623, USA; Gregori, G. [Department of Physics, University of Oxford, Oxford OX1 3PU, United Kingdom; Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois 60637, USA; Lamb, D. Q. [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois 60637, USA

    2017-03-22

    The universe is permeated by magnetic fields, with strengths ranging from a femtogauss in the voids between the filaments of galaxy clusters to several teragauss in black holes and neutron stars. The standard model behind cosmological magnetic fields is the nonlinear amplification of seed fields via turbulent dynamo to the values observed. We have conceived experiments that aim to demonstrate and study the turbulent dynamo mechanism in the laboratory. Here, we describe the design of these experiments through simulation campaigns using FLASH, a highly capable radiation magnetohydrodynamics code that we have developed, and large-scale three-dimensional simulations on the Mira supercomputer at the Argonne National Laboratory. The simulation results indicate that the experimental platform may be capable of reaching a turbulent plasma state and determining the dynamo amplification. We validate and compare our numerical results with a small subset of experimental data using synthetic diagnostics.

  7. Convection-driven spherical shell dynamos at varying Prandtl numbers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Käpylä, P. J.; Käpylä, M. J.; Olspert, N.; Warnecke, J.; Brandenburg, A.

    2017-02-01

    Context. Stellar convection zones are characterized by vigorous high-Reynolds number turbulence at low Prandtl numbers. Aims: We study the dynamo and differential rotation regimes at varying levels of viscous, thermal, and magnetic diffusion. Methods: We perform three-dimensional simulations of stratified fully compressible magnetohydrodynamic convection in rotating spherical wedges at various thermal and magnetic Prandtl numbers (from 0.25 to 2 and from 0.25 to 5, respectively). Differential rotation and large-scale magnetic fields are produced self-consistently. Results: We find that for high thermal diffusivity, the rotation profiles show a monotonically increasing angular velocity from the bottom of the convection zone to the top and from the poles toward the equator. For sufficiently rapid rotation, a region of negative radial shear develops at mid-latitudes as the thermal diffusivity is decreased, corresponding to an increase of the Prandtl number. This coincides with and results in a change of the dynamo mode from poleward propagating activity belts to equatorward propagating ones. Furthermore, the clearly cyclic solutions disappear at the highest magnetic Reynolds numbers and give way to irregular sign changes or quasi-stationary states. The total (mean and fluctuating) magnetic energy increases as a function of the magnetic Reynolds number in the range studied here (5-151), but the energies of the mean magnetic fields level off at high magnetic Reynolds numbers. The differential rotation is strongly affected by the magnetic fields and almost vanishes at the highest magnetic Reynolds numbers. In some of our most turbulent cases, however, we find that two regimes are possible, where either differential rotation is strong and mean magnetic fields are relatively weak, or vice versa. Conclusions: Our simulations indicate a strong nonlinear feedback of magnetic fields on differential rotation, leading to qualitative changes in the behaviors of large

  8. Fast magnetic and electric dynamos in flat Klein bottle plasma flows

    CERN Document Server

    de Andrade, L C Garcia

    2009-01-01

    Recently Shukurov et al [Phys Rev \\textbf{E} (2008)] presented a numerical solution of a Moebius strip dynamo flow, to investigate its use in modelling dynamo flows in Perm torus of liquid sodium dynamo experiments. Here, by analogy one presents an electric dynamo on a twisted torus or Klein bottle topology. An exact solution in the form of flat Klein bottle dynamo flow is obtained. It is shown that even in the absence of magnetic dynamos initial electric fields can be amplified in distinct points of the Klein bottle. In this case diffusion is taken as ${\\eta}\\approx{5.0{\\times}10^{-3}{\\Omega}-m}$ the electric potential is obtained. The difference of electric fields at the beginning of plasma flow profile is ${\\Delta}E_{Dyn}\\approx{468\\frac{V}{m}}$, which is stronger than the electric dynamo field obtained in the magnetic axis of spheromaks, which is of the order of $E_{Dyn}\\approx{200\\frac{V}{m}}$. The potential of the dynamo at the surface of the Earth computed by Boozer [Phys Fluids \\textbf{B} (1993)] of $...

  9. Magnetorotational Turbulence and Dynamo in a Collisionless Plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kunz, Matthew W.; Stone, James M.; Quataert, Eliot

    2016-12-01

    We present results from the first 3D kinetic numerical simulation of magnetorotational turbulence and dynamo, using the local shearing-box model of a collisionless accretion disk. The kinetic magnetorotational instability grows from a subthermal magnetic field having zero net flux over the computational domain to generate self-sustained turbulence and outward angular-momentum transport. Significant Maxwell and Reynolds stresses are accompanied by comparable viscous stresses produced by field-aligned ion pressure anisotropy, which is regulated primarily by the mirror and ion-cyclotron instabilities through particle trapping and pitch-angle scattering. The latter endow the plasma with an effective viscosity that is biased with respect to the magnetic-field direction and spatiotemporally variable. Energy spectra suggest an Alfvén-wave cascade at large scales and a kinetic-Alfvén-wave cascade at small scales, with strong small-scale density fluctuations and weak nonaxisymmetric density waves. Ions undergo nonthermal particle acceleration, their distribution accurately described by a κ distribution. These results have implications for the properties of low-collisionality accretion flows, such as that near the black hole at the Galactic center.

  10. Convection-driven kinematic dynamos at low Rossby and magnetic Prandtl numbers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calkins, Michael A.; Long, Louie; Nieves, David; Julien, Keith; Tobias, Steven M.

    2016-12-01

    Most large-scale planetary magnetic fields are thought to be driven by low Rossby number convection of a low magnetic Prandtl number fluid. Here kinematic dynamo action is investigated with an asymptotic, rapidly rotating dynamo model for the plane layer geometry that is intrinsically low magnetic Prandtl number. The thermal Prandtl number and Rayleigh number are varied to illustrate fundamental changes in flow regime, ranging from laminar cellular convection to geostrophic turbulence in which an inverse energy cascade is present. A decrease in the efficiency of the convection to generate a dynamo, as determined by an increase in the critical magnetic Reynolds number, is observed as the buoyancy forcing is increased. This decreased efficiency may result from both the loss of correlations associated with the increasingly disordered states of flow that are generated, and boundary layer behavior that enhances magnetic diffusion locally. We find that the spatial characteristics of the large-scale magnetic field is dependent only weakly on changes in flow behavior. In contrast, the behavior of the small-scale magnetic field is directly dependent on, and therefore shows significant variations with, the small-scale convective flow field. However, our results are limited to the linear, kinematic dynamo regime; future simulations that include the Lorentz force are therefore necessary to assess the robustness of these results.

  11. DynamO: a free O(N) general event-driven molecular dynamics simulator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bannerman, M N; Sargant, R; Lue, L

    2011-11-30

    Molecular dynamics algorithms for systems of particles interacting through discrete or "hard" potentials are fundamentally different to the methods for continuous or "soft" potential systems. Although many software packages have been developed for continuous potential systems, software for discrete potential systems based on event-driven algorithms are relatively scarce and specialized. We present DynamO, a general event-driven simulation package, which displays the optimal O(N) asymptotic scaling of the computational cost with the number of particles N, rather than the O(N) scaling found in most standard algorithms. DynamO provides reference implementations of the best available event-driven algorithms. These techniques allow the rapid simulation of both complex and large (>10(6) particles) systems for long times. The performance of the program is benchmarked for elastic hard sphere systems, homogeneous cooling and sheared inelastic hard spheres, and equilibrium Lennard-Jones fluids. This software and its documentation are distributed under the GNU General Public license and can be freely downloaded from http://marcusbannerman.co.uk/dynamo.

  12. Dynamo activities driven by magneto-rotational instability and Parker instability in galactic gaseous disk

    OpenAIRE

    Machida, Mami; NAKAMURA, Kenji E.; Kudoh, Takahiro; Akahori, Takuya; Yoshiaki, SOFUE; Matsumoto, Ryoji

    2013-01-01

    We carried out global three-dimensional magneto-hydrodynamic simulations of dynamo activities in galactic gaseous disks without assuming equatorial symmetry. Numerical results indicate the growth of azimuthal magnetic fields non-symmetric to the equatorial plane. As magneto-rotational instability (MRI) grows, the mean strength of magnetic fields is amplified until the magnetic pressure becomes as large as 10% of the gas pressure. When the local plasma $\\beta$ ($ = p_{\\rm gas}/p_{\\rm mag}$) be...

  13. Global Simulations of Dynamo and Magnetorotational Instability in Madison Plasma Experiments and Astrophysical Disks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ebrahimi, Fatima [Univ. of New Hampshire, Durham, NH (United States)

    2014-07-31

    Large-scale magnetic fields have been observed in widely different types of astrophysical objects. These magnetic fields are believed to be caused by the so-called dynamo effect. Could a large-scale magnetic field grow out of turbulence (i.e. the alpha dynamo effect)? How could the topological properties and the complexity of magnetic field as a global quantity, the so called magnetic helicity, be important in the dynamo effect? In addition to understanding the dynamo mechanism in astrophysical accretion disks, anomalous angular momentum transport has also been a longstanding problem in accretion disks and laboratory plasmas. To investigate both dynamo and momentum transport, we have performed both numerical modeling of laboratory experiments that are intended to simulate nature and modeling of configurations with direct relevance to astrophysical disks. Our simulations use fluid approximations (Magnetohydrodynamics - MHD model), where plasma is treated as a single fluid, or two fluids, in the presence of electromagnetic forces. Our major physics objective is to study the possibility of magnetic field generation (so called MRI small-scale and large-scale dynamos) and its role in Magneto-rotational Instability (MRI) saturation through nonlinear simulations in both MHD and Hall regimes.

  14. Ab initio Simulations of a Supernova Driven Galactic Dynamo in an Isolated Disk Galaxy

    CERN Document Server

    Butsky, Iryna; Kim, Ji-hoon; Yang, Hung-I; Abel, Tom

    2016-01-01

    We study the magnetic field evolution of an isolated spiral galaxy, using isolated Milky Way-mass galaxy formation simulations and a novel prescription for magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) supernova feedback. Our main result is that a galactic dynamo can be seeded and driven by supernova explosions, resulting in magnetic fields whose strength and morphology is consistent with observations. In our model, supernovae supply thermal energy, and a low level magnetic field along with their ejecta. The thermal expansion drives turbulence, which serves a dual role by efficiently mixing the magnetic field into the interstellar medium, and amplifying it by means of turbulent dynamo. The computational prescription for MHD supernova feedback has been implemented within the publicly available ENZO code, and is fully described in this paper. This improves upon ENZO's existing modules for hydrodynamic feedback from stars and active galaxies. We find that the field attains $\\mu G$-levels over Gyr-time scales throughout the disk. Th...

  15. Thermonuclear dynamo inside ultracentrifuge with supersonic plasma flow stabilization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Winterberg, F. [University of Nevada, Reno, Reno, Nevada (United States)

    2016-01-15

    Einstein's general theory of relativity implies the existence of virtual negative masses in the rotational reference frame of an ultracentrifuge with the negative mass density of the same order of magnitude as the positive mass density of a neutron star. In an ultracentrifuge, the repulsive gravitational field of this negative mass can simulate the attractive positive mass of a mini-neutron star, and for this reason can radially confine a dense thermonuclear plasma placed inside the centrifuge, very much as the positive mass of a star confines its plasma by its own attractive gravitational field. If the centrifuge is placed in an externally magnetic field to act as the seed field of a magnetohydrodynamic generator, the configuration resembles a magnetar driven by the release of energy through nuclear fusion, accelerating the plasma to supersonic velocities, with the magnetic field produced by the thermomagnetic Nernst effect insulating the hot plasma from the cold wall of the centrifuge. Because of the supersonic flow and the high plasma density the configuration is stable.

  16. Magnetic material in mean-field dynamos driven by small scale helical flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giesecke, A.; Stefani, F.; Gerbeth, G.

    2014-07-01

    We perform kinematic simulations of dynamo action driven by a helical small scale flow of a conducting fluid in order to deduce mean-field properties of the combined induction action of small scale eddies. We examine two different flow patterns in the style of the G O Roberts flow but with a mean vertical component and with internal fixtures that are modelled by regions with vanishing flow. These fixtures represent either rods that lie in the center of individual eddies, or internal dividing walls that provide a separation of the eddies from each other. The fixtures can be made of magnetic material with a relative permeability larger than one which can alter the dynamo behavior. The investigations are motivated by the widely unknown induction effects of the forced helical flow that is used in the core of liquid sodium cooled fast reactors, and from the key role of soft iron impellers in the von-Kármán-sodium dynamo. For both examined flow configurations the consideration of magnetic material within the fluid flow causes a reduction of the critical magnetic Reynolds number of up to 25%. The development of the growth-rate in the limit of the largest achievable permeabilities suggests no further significant reduction for even larger values of the permeability. In order to study the dynamo behavior of systems that consist of tens of thousands of helical cells we resort to the mean-field dynamo theory (Krause and Rädler 1980 Mean-field Magnetohydrodynamics and Dynamo Theory (Oxford: Pergamon)) in which the action of the small scale flow is parameterized in terms of an α- and β-effect. We compute the relevant elements of the α- and the β-tensor using the so called testfield method. We find a reasonable agreement between the fully resolved models and the corresponding mean-field models for wall or rod materials in the considered range 1\\leqslant {{\\mu }_{r}}\\leqslant 20. Our results may be used for the development of global large scale models with recirculation

  17. Ab Initio Simulations of a Supernova-driven Galactic Dynamo in an Isolated Disk Galaxy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butsky, Iryna; Zrake, Jonathan; Kim, Ji-hoon; Yang, Hung-I.; Abel, Tom

    2017-07-01

    We study the magnetic field evolution of an isolated spiral galaxy, using isolated Milky Way-mass galaxy formation simulations and a novel prescription for magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) supernova feedback. Our main result is that a galactic dynamo can be seeded and driven by supernova explosions, resulting in magnetic fields whose strength and morphology are consistent with observations. In our model, supernovae supply thermal energy and a low-level magnetic field along with their ejecta. The thermal expansion drives turbulence, which serves a dual role by efficiently mixing the magnetic field into the interstellar medium and amplifying it by means of a turbulent dynamo. The computational prescription for MHD supernova feedback has been implemented within the publicly available ENZO code and is fully described in this paper. This improves upon ENZO's existing modules for hydrodynamic feedback from stars and active galaxies. We find that the field attains microgauss levels over gigayear timescales throughout the disk. The field also develops a large-scale structure, which appears to be correlated with the disk’s spiral arm density structure. We find that seeding of the galactic dynamo by supernova ejecta predicts a persistent correlation between gas metallicity and magnetic field strength. We also generate all-sky maps of the Faraday rotation measure from the simulation-predicted magnetic field, and we present a direct comparison with observations.

  18. Magnetic material in mean-field dynamos driven by small scale helical flows

    CERN Document Server

    Giesecke, Andre; Gerbeth, Gunter

    2014-01-01

    We perform kinematic simulations of dynamo action driven by a helical small scale flow of a conducting fluid in order to deduce mean-field properties of the combined induction action of small scale eddies. We examine two different flow patterns in the style of the G.O. Roberts flow but with a mean vertical component and with internal fixtures that are modelled by regions with vanishing flow. These fixtures represent either rods that lie in the center of individual eddies, or internal dividing walls that provide a separation of the eddies from each other. The fixtures can be made of magnetic material with a relative permeability larger than one which can alter the dynamo behavior. The investigations are motivated by the widely unknown induction effects of the forced helical flow that is used in the core of liquid sodium cooled fast reactors, and from the key role of soft iron impellers in the von-K\\'arm\\'an-Sodium (VKS) dynamo. For both examined flow configurations the consideration of magnetic material within...

  19. Laboratory experiments on rain-driven convection: Implications for planetary dynamos

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olson, Peter; Landeau, Maylis; Hirsh, Benjamin H.

    2017-01-01

    Compositional convection driven by precipitating solids or immiscible liquids has been invoked as a dynamo mechanism in planets and satellites throughout the solar system, including Mercury, Ganymede, and the Earth. Here we report laboratory experiments on turbulent rain-driven convection, analogs for the flows generated by precipitation within planetary fluid interiors. We subject a two-layer fluid to a uniform intensity rainfall, in which the rain is immiscible in the upper layer and miscible in the lower layer. Rain falls through the upper layer and accumulates as a two-fluid emulsion in the interfacial region between the layers. In experiments where the rain is denser than the lower fluid, rain-injected vortices evolve into small-scale plumes that rapidly coalesce into larger structures, resulting in turbulent convection throughout the lower layer. The turbulent convective velocity in our experiments increases approximately as the cube root of the rain buoyancy flux, implying little or no dependence on viscous and chemical diffusivities. Applying diffusion-free scaling laws for magnetic field generation, we find that precipitation-driven convection can be an effective dynamo mechanism in planetary cores provided the precipitation buoyancy flux is large and the convecting region is deep and nearly adiabatic.

  20. Dynamo-driven plasmoid formation from a current-sheet instability

    CERN Document Server

    Ebrahimi, F

    2016-01-01

    Axisymmetric current-carrying plasmoids are formed in the presence of nonaxisymmetric fluctuations during nonlinear three-dimensional resistive MHD simulations in a global toroidal geometry. We utilize the helicity injection technique to form an initial poloidal flux in the presence of a toroidal guide field. As helicity is injected, two types of current sheets are formed from 1) the oppositely directed field lines in the injector region (primary reconnecting current sheet), and 2) the poloidal flux compression near the plasma edge (edge current sheet). We first find that nonaxisymmetic fluctuations arising from the current-sheet instability isolated near the plasma edge have tearing parity but can nevertheless grow fast (on the poloidal Alfven time scale). These modes saturate by breaking up the current sheet. Second, for the first time a dynamo poloidal flux amplification is observed at the reconnetion site (in the region of the oppositely directed magnetic field). This fluctuation-induced flux amplificatio...

  1. A jet-driven dynamo from jets-inflated bubbles in cooling flows

    CERN Document Server

    Soker, Noam

    2016-01-01

    I suggest that the main process that amplifies magnetic fields in cooling flows in clusters and group of galaxies is a jet-driven dynamo (JEDD). The main processes that are behind the JEDD is the turbulence that is formed by the many vortices formed in the inflation processes of bubbles, and the large scale shear formed by the propagating jet. The typical amplification time of magnetic fields by the JEDD is approximately hundred million years. The vortices that create the turbulence are those that also transfer energy from the jets to the intra-cluster medium, by mixing shocked jet gas with the intra-cluster medium gas, and by exciting sound waves. The JEDD model adds magnetic fields to the cyclical behavior of energy and mass in the jet-feedback mechanism (JFM) in cooling flows.

  2. Helicity, Reconnection, and Dynamo Effects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ji, Hantao

    1998-11-01

    The inter-relationships between magnetic helicity, magnetic reconnection, and dynamo effects are discussed. In laboratory experiments, where two plasmas are driven to merge, the helicity content of each plasma strongly affects the reconnection rate, as well as the shape of the diffusion region. Conversely, magnetic reconnection events also strongly affect the global helicity, resulting in efficient helicity cancellation (but not dissipation) during counter-helicity reconnection and a finite helicity increase or decrease (but less efficiently than dissipation of magnetic energy) during co-helicity reconnection. Close relationships also exist between magnetic helicity and dynamo effects. The turbulent electromotive force along the mean magnetic field (alpha-effect), due to either electrostatic turbulence or the electron diamagnetic effect, transports mean-field helicity across space without dissipation. This has been supported by direct measurements of helicity flux in a laboratory plasma. When the dynamo effect is driven by electromagnetic turbulence, helicity in the turbulent field is converted to mean-field helicity. In all cases, however, dynamo processes conserve total helicity except for a small battery effect, consistent with the observation that the helicity is approximately conserved during magnetic relaxation.

  3. A simplified model of collision-driven dynamo action in small bodies

    CERN Document Server

    Wei, Xing

    2013-01-01

    We investigate numerically the self-sustained dynamo action in a spinning sphere whose sense of rotation reverses periodically. This system serves as a simple model of a dynamo in small bodies powered by frequent collisions. It is found that dynamo action is possible in some intervals of collision rates. At high Ekman numbers the laminar spin-up flow is helical in the boundary layers and the Ekman circulation together with the azimuthal shear powers the dynamo action. At low Ekman number a non-axisymmetric instability helps the dynamo action. The intermittency of magnetic field occurs at low Ekman number. A lower bound of magnetic energy is numerically obtained, and the space-averaged field in the fluid core and the surface field of a small body are roughly estimated.

  4. A jet-driven dynamo (JEDD) from jets-inflated bubbles in cooling flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soker, Noam

    2017-01-01

    I suggest that the main process that amplifies magnetic fields in cooling flows in clusters and group of galaxies is a jet-driven dynamo (JEDD). The main processes that are behind the JEDD is the turbulence that is formed by the many vortices formed in the inflation processes of bubbles, and the large scale shear formed by the propagating jet. It is sufficient that a strong turbulence exits in the vicinity of the jets and bubbles, just where the shear is large. The typical amplification time of magnetic fields by the JEDD near the jets and bubbles is approximately hundred million years. The amplification time in the entire cooling flow region is somewhat longer. The vortices that create the turbulence are those that also transfer energy from the jets to the intra-cluster medium, by mixing shocked jet gas with the intra-cluster medium gas, and by exciting sound waves. The JEDD model adds magnetic fields to the cyclical behavior of energy and mass in the jet-feedback mechanism (JFM) in cooling flows.

  5. Turbulent Dynamo Amplification of Magnetic Fields in Laser-Produced Plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tzeferacos, Petros

    2016-10-01

    Magnetic fields are ubiquitous in the Universe, as revealed by diffuse radio-synchrotron emission and Faraday rotation observations, with strengths from a few nG to tens of μG. The energy density of these fields is typically comparable to the energy density of the fluid motions of the plasma in which they are embedded, making magnetic fields essential players in the dynamics of the luminous matter in the Universe. The standard model for the origin of these intergalactic magnetic fields is through the amplification of seed fields via turbulent dynamo to the level consistent with current observations. We have conceived and conducted a series of experiments using high-power laser facilities to study the amplification of magnetic fields via turbulence. In these experiments, we characterize the properties of the fluid and the magnetic field turbulence using a comprehensive suite of plasma and magnetic field diagnostics. We describe the large-scale 3D simulations we performed with the radiation-MHD code FLASH on ANL's Mira to help design and interpret the experiments. We then discuss the results of the experiments, which indicate magnetic Reynolds numbers above the expected dynamo threshold are achieved and seed magnetic fields produced by the Biermann battery mechanism are amplified by turbulent dynamo. We relate our findings to processes occurring in galaxy clusters. We acknowledge funding and resources from the ERC (FP7/2007-2013, no. 256973 and 247039), and the U.S. DOE, Contract No. B591485 to LLNL, FWP 57789 to ANL, Grant No. DE-NA0002724 to the University of Chicago, and contract DE-AC02-06CH11357 to ALCF at ANL.

  6. Equatorial ionospheric plasma drifts and O+ concentration enhancements associated with disturbance dynamo during the 2015 St. Patrick's Day magnetic storm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Chao-Song; Wilson, Gordon R.; Hairston, Marc R.; Zhang, Yongliang; Wang, Wenbin; Liu, Jing

    2016-08-01

    Disturbance dynamo is an important dynamic process during magnetic storms. However, very few direct observations of dynamo-induced plasma drifts and ion composition changes in the equatorial ionosphere are available. In this study, we use measurements of the Defense Meteorological Satellite Program (DMSP) satellites to identify the characteristics of the disturbance dynamo process in the topside equatorial ionosphere near dawn during the magnetic storm with a minimum Dst of -223 nT on 17 March 2015. Data from four DMSP satellites with equatorial crossings at 0245, 0430, 0630, and 0730 LT are available for this case. The dynamo process was first observed in the postmidnight sector 3-4.7 h after the beginning of the storm main phase and lasted for 31 h, covering the second storm intensification and the initial 20 h of the recovery phase. The dynamo vertical ion drift was upward (up to 150-200 m s-1) in the postmidnight sector and downward (up to ~80 m s-1) in the early morning sector. The dynamo zonal ion drift was westward at these locations and reached ~100 m s-1. The dynamo process caused large enhancements of the O+ concentration (the ratio of the oxygen ion density to the total ion density) at the altitude of 840 km near dawn. The O+ concentration increased from below 60% during the prestorm period to 80-90% during the storm time. More specifically, the O+ density was increased, and the H+ density was decreased. The variations of the O+ concentration were well correlated with the vertical ion drift.

  7. Inertia-less convectively-driven dynamo models in the limit of low Rossby number

    CERN Document Server

    Calkins, Michael A; Tobias, Steven M

    2016-01-01

    Compositional convection is thought to be an important energy source for magnetic field generation within planetary interiors. The Prandtl number, $Pr$, characterizing compositional convection is significantly larger than unity, suggesting that the inertial force may not be important on the small scales of convection. We develop asymptotic dynamo models for the case of small Rossby number and large Prandtl number in which inertia is absent on the convective scale. The relevant diffusivity parameter for this limit is the compositional Roberts number, $q = D/\\eta$, which is the ratio of compositional and magnetic diffusivities. Dynamo models are developed for both order one $q$ and the more geophysically relevant low $q$ limit. For both cases the ratio of magnetic to kinetic energy densities, $M$, is asymptotically large and reflects the fact that Alfv\\'en waves have been filtered from the dynamics. Taken together with previous investigations of asymptotic dynamo models for $Pr=O(1)$, our results show that the ...

  8. Magnetic energy dissipation and mean magnetic field generation in planar convection-driven dynamos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tilgner, A

    2014-07-01

    A numerical study of dynamos in rotating convecting plane layers is presented which focuses on magnetic energies and dissipation rates and the generation of mean fields (where the mean is taken over horizontal planes). The scaling of the magnetic energy with the flux Rayleigh number is different from the scaling proposed in spherical shells, whereas the same dependence of the magnetic dissipation length on the magnetic Reynolds number is found for the two geometries. Dynamos both with and without mean field exist in rapidly rotating convecting plane layers.

  9. Towards the geophysical regime in numerical dynamo models: studies of rapidly-rotating convection driven dynamos with low Pm and constant heat flux boundary conditions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sheyko, A.A.; Finlay, Chris; Marti, P.

    We present a set of numerical dynamo models with the convection strength varied by a factor of 30 and the ratio of magnetic to viscous diffusivities by a factor of 20 at rapid rotation rates (E =nu/(2 Omega d^2 ) = 10-6 and 10-7 ) using a heat flux outer BC. This regime has been little explored...... on the structure of the dynamos and how this changes in relation to the selection of control parameters, a comparison with the proposed rotating convection and dynamo scaling laws, energy spectra of steady solutions and inner core rotation rates. Magnetic field on the CMB. E=2.959*10-7, Ra=6591.0, Pm=0.05, Pr=1....

  10. Interplay of CR-driven galactic wind, magnetic field, and galactic dynamo in spiral galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Krause, Marita

    2009-01-01

    From our radio observations of the magnetic field strength and large-scale pattern of spiral galaxies of different Hubble types and star formation rates (SFR) we conclude that - though a high SFR in the disk increases the total magnetic field strength in the disk and the halo - the SFR does not change the global field configuration nor influence the global scale heights of the radio emission. The similar scale heights indicate that the total magnetic field regulates the galactic wind velocities. The galactic wind itself may be essential for an effective dynamo action.

  11. Paleomagnetic evidence for dynamo activity driven by inward crystallisation of a metallic asteroid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bryson, James F. J.; Weiss, Benjamin P.; Harrison, Richard J.; Herrero-Albillos, Julia; Kronast, Florian

    2017-08-01

    The direction in which a planetary core solidifies has fundamental implications for the feasibility and nature of dynamo generation. Although Earth's core is outwardly solidifying, the cores of certain smaller planetary bodies have been proposed to inwardly solidify due to their lower central pressures. However, there have been no unambiguous observations of inwardly solidified cores or the relationship between this solidification regime and planetary magnetic activity. To address this gap, we present the results of complimentary paleomagnetic techniques applied to the matrix metal and silicate inclusions within the IVA iron meteorites. This family of meteorites has been suggested to originate from a planetary core that had its overlaying silicate mantle removed by collisions during the early solar system. This process is thought to have produced a molten ball of metal that cooled rapidly and has been proposed to have inwardly solidified. Recent thermal evolution models of such a body predict that it should have generated an intense, multipolar and time-varying dynamo field. This field could have been recorded as a remanent magnetisation in the outer, cool layers of a solid crust on the IVA parent core. We find that the different components in the IVA iron meteorites display a range of paleomagnetic fidelities, depending crucially on the cooling rate of the meteorite. In particular, silicate inclusions in the quickly cooled São João Nepomuceno meteorite are poor paleomagnetic recorders. On the other hand, the matrix metal and some silicate subsamples from the relatively slowly cooled Steinbach meteorite are far better paleomagnetic recorders and provide evidence of an intense (≳100 μT) and directionally varying (exhibiting significant changes on a timescale ≲200 kyr) magnetic field. This is the first demonstration that some iron meteorites record ancient planetary magnetic fields. Furthermore, the observed field intensity, temporal variability and dynamo

  12. Moffatt drift driven large scale dynamo due to $\\alpha$ fluctuations with nonzero correlation times

    CERN Document Server

    Singh, Nishant K

    2015-01-01

    We present a theory of large-scale dynamo action in a turbulent flow that has stochastic, zero-mean fluctuations of the $\\alpha$ parameter. We extend the Kraichnan-Moffatt model to explore effects of finite memory of $\\alpha$ fluctuations, in a spirit similar to that of Sridhar & Singh (2014), hereafter SS14. Using the first-order smoothing approximation, we derive a linear integro-differential equation governing the dynamics of the large-scale magnetic field, which is non-perturbative in the $\\alpha$-correlation time $\\tau_{\\alpha}$. We recover earlier results in the exactly solvable white-noise (WN) limit where the Moffatt drift does not contribute to the dynamo growth/decay. To study finite memory effects, we reduce the integro-differential equation to a partial differential equation by assuming that the $\\tau_{\\alpha}$ be small but nonzero and the large-scale magnetic field is slowly varying. We derive the dispersion relation and provide explicit expression for the growth rate as a function of four in...

  13. Proton driven plasma wakefield generation in a parabolic plasma channel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golian, Y.; Dorranian, D.

    2016-11-01

    An analytical model for the interaction of charged particle beams and plasma for a wakefield generation in a parabolic plasma channel is presented. In the suggested model, the plasma density profile has a minimum value on the propagation axis. A Gaussian proton beam is employed to excite the plasma wakefield in the channel. While previous works investigated on the simulation results and on the perturbation techniques in case of laser wakefield accelerations for a parabolic channel, we have carried out an analytical model and solved the accelerating field equation for proton beam in a parabolic plasma channel. The solution is expressed by Whittaker (hypergeometric) functions. Effects of plasma channel radius, proton bunch parameters and plasma parameters on the accelerating processes of proton driven plasma wakefield acceleration are studied. Results show that the higher accelerating fields could be generated in the PWFA scheme with modest reductions in the bunch size. Also, the modest increment in plasma channel radius is needed to obtain maximum accelerating gradient. In addition, the simulations of longitudinal and total radial wakefield in parabolic plasma channel are presented using LCODE. It is observed that the longitudinal wakefield generated by the bunch decreases with the distance behind the bunch while total radial wakefield increases with the distance behind the bunch.

  14. Wave-driven Countercurrent Plasma Centrifuge

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    A.J. Fetterman and N.J. Fisch

    2009-03-20

    A method for driving rotation and a countercurrent flow in a fully ionized plasma centrifuge is described. The rotation is produced by radiofrequency waves near the cyclotron resonance. The wave energy is transferred into potential energy in a manner similar to the α channeling effect. The countercurrent flow may also be driven by radiofrequency waves. By driving both the rotation and the flow pattern using waves instead of electrodes, physical and engineering issues may be avoided.

  15. RF Electron Gun with Driven Plasma Cathode

    CERN Document Server

    Khodak, Igor

    2005-01-01

    It's known that RF guns with plasma cathodes based on solid-state dielectrics are able to generate an intense electron beam. In this paper we describe results of experimental investigation of the single cavity S-band RF gun with driven plasma cathode. The experimental sample of the cathode based on ferroelectric ceramics has been designed. Special design of the cathode permits to separate spatially processes of plasma development and electron acceleration. It has been obtained at RF gun output electron beam with particle energy ~500 keV, pulse current of 4 A and pulse duration of 80 ns. Results of experimental study of beam parameters are referred in. The gun is purposed to be applied as the intense electron beam source for electron linacs.

  16. The Solar Dynamo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hathaway, David H.

    1998-01-01

    The solar dynamo is the process by which the Sun's magnetic field is generated through the interaction of the field with convection and rotation. In this, it is kin to planetary dynamos and other stellar dynamos. Although the precise mechanism by which the Sun generates its field remains poorly understood despite decades of theoretical and observational work, recent advances suggest that solutions to this solar dynamo problem may be forthcoming. Two basic processes are involved in dynamo activity. When the fluid stresses dominate the magnetic stresses (high plasma beta = 8(pi)rho/B(sup 2)), shear flows can stretch magnetic field lines in the direction of the shear (the "alpha effect") and helical flows can lift and twist field lines into orthogonal planes (the "alpha effect"). These two processes can be active anywhere in the solar convection zone but with different results depending upon their relative strengths and signs. Little is known about how and where these processes occur. Other processes, such as magnetic diffusion and the effects of the fine scale structure of the solar magnetic field, pose additional problems.

  17. Plasma-driven ultrashort bunch diagnostic

    CERN Document Server

    Dornmair, I; Floettmann, K; Marchetti, B; Maier, A R

    2016-01-01

    Ultrashort electron bunches are crucial for an increasing number of applications, however, diagnosing their longitudinal phase space remains a challenge. We propose a new method that harnesses the strong electric fields present in a laser driven plasma wakefield. By transversely displacing driver laser and witness bunch, a streaking field is applied to the bunch. This field maps the time information to a transverse momentum change and, consequently, to a change of transverse position. We illustrate our method with simulations where we achieve a time resolution in the attosecond range.

  18. Plasma-driven ultrashort bunch diagnostics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dornmair, I.; Schroeder, C. B.; Floettmann, K.; Marchetti, B.; Maier, A. R.

    2016-06-01

    Ultrashort electron bunches are crucial for an increasing number of applications, however, diagnosing their longitudinal phase space remains a challenge. We propose a new method that harnesses the strong electric fields present in a laser driven plasma wakefield. By transversely displacing driver laser and witness bunch, a streaking field is applied to the bunch. This field maps the time information to a transverse momentum change and, consequently, to a change of transverse position. We illustrate our method with simulations where we achieve a time resolution in the attosecond range.

  19. Radiative transfer dynamo effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munirov, Vadim R.; Fisch, Nathaniel J.

    2017-01-01

    Magnetic fields in rotating and radiating astrophysical plasma can be produced due to a radiative interaction between plasma layers moving relative to each other. The efficiency of current drive, and with it the associated dynamo effect, is considered in a number of limits. It is shown here, however, that predictions for these generated magnetic fields can be significantly higher when kinetic effects, previously neglected, are taken into account.

  20. Aneesur Rahman Prize for Computational Physics Talk: Numerical Modeling of Accretion Disk Dynamos driven by the MRI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stone, James

    2011-04-01

    Numerical methods have proved crucial for the study of the nonlinear regime of the magnetorotational instability (MRI) and resulting dynamo action. After a brief introduction to the methods, a variety of results from new simulations of the MRI in both local (shearing box approximation) and global domains will be presented. Previous work on the saturation level and numerical convergence in both stratified and unstratified domains with no net flux (both with and without explicit dissipation) will be described, and the connection to dynamo theory will be mentioned. Results from several groups in which the size of the computational domain, and the vertical boundary conditions, are varied will be discussed. Finally, new work on the direct comparison between high-resolution global and shearing box simulations will be presented, and new studies of stratified disks with radiative transfer will be introduced.

  1. Generation of Electrojets in Weakly Ionized Plasmas through a Collisional Dynamo

    CERN Document Server

    Dimant, Yakov S; Fletcher, Alex C

    2016-01-01

    Intense electric currents called electrojets occur in weakly ionized magnetized plasmas. An example occurs in the Earth's ionosphere near the magnetic equator where neutral winds drive the plasma across the geomagnetic field. Similar processes take place in the Solar chromosphere and MHD generators. This letter argues that not all convective neutral flows generate electrojets and it introduces the corresponding universal criterion for electrojet formation, $\

  2. Experimental realization of dynamo action: present status and prospects

    CERN Document Server

    Giesecke, Andre; Gundrum, Thomas; Gerbeth, Gunter; Nore, Caroline; Leorat, Jacques

    2012-01-01

    In the last decades, the experimental study of dynamo action has made great progress. However, after the dynamo experiments in Karlsruhe and Riga, the von-Karman-Sodium (VKS) dynamo is only the third facility that has been able to demonstrate fluid flow driven self-generation of magnetic fields in a laboratory experiment. Further progress in the experimental examination of dynamo action is expected from the planned precession driven dynamo experiment that will be designed in the framework of the liquid sodium facility DRESDYN (DREsden Sodium facility for DYNamo and thermohydraulic studies). In this paper, we briefly present numerical models of the VKS dynamo that demonstrate the close relation between the axisymmetric field observed in that experiment and the soft iron material used for the flow driving impellers. We further show recent results of preparatory water experiments and design studies related to the precession dynamo and delineate the scientific prospects for the final set-up.

  3. Turbulent dynamo with advective magnetic helicity flux

    CERN Document Server

    Del Sordo, Fabio; Brandenburg, Axel

    2012-01-01

    Many astrophysical bodies harbor magnetic fields that are thought to be sustained by dynamo processes. However, it has been argued that the production of large-scale magnetic fields by a mean-field dynamo is strongly suppressed at large magnetic Reynolds numbers owing to the conservation of magnetic helicity. This phenomenon is known as catastrophic quenching. Advection of magnetic field toward the outer boundaries and away from the dynamo is expected to alleviate such quenching. Examples are stellar and galactic winds. Such advection might be able to overcome the constraint imposed by the conservation of magnetic helicity, transporting a fraction of it outside the domain in which the dynamo operates. We study how the dynamo process is affected by advection. In particular, we study the relative roles played by advective and diffusive fluxes of magnetic helicity. We do this by performing direct numerical simulations of a turbulent dynamo of alpha^2 type driven by forced turbulence in a Cartesian domain in the ...

  4. A parallel implementation of an MHD code for the simulation of mechanically driven, turbulent dynamos in spherical geometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reuter, K.; Jenko, F.; Forest, C. B.; Bayliss, R. A.

    2008-08-01

    A parallel implementation of a nonlinear pseudo-spectral MHD code for the simulation of turbulent dynamos in spherical geometry is reported. It employs a dual domain decomposition technique in both real and spectral space. It is shown that this method shows nearly ideal scaling going up to 128 CPUs on Beowulf-type clusters with fast interconnect. Furthermore, the potential of exploiting single precision arithmetic on standard x86 processors is examined. It is pointed out that the MHD code thereby achieves a maximum speedup of 1.7, whereas the validity of the computations is still granted. The combination of both measures will allow for the direct numerical simulation of highly turbulent cases ( 1500

  5. Simulations of a Magnetic Fluctuation Driven Large Scale Dynamo and Comparison with a Two-scale Model

    CERN Document Server

    Park, Kiwan

    2012-01-01

    Models of large scale (magnetohydrodynamic) dynamos (LSD) which couple large scale field growth to total magnetic helicity evolution best predict the saturation of LSDs seen in simulations. For the simplest so called "{\\alpha}2" LSDs in periodic boxes, the electromotive force driving LSD growth depends on the difference between the time-integrated kinetic and current helicity associated with fluctuations. When the system is helically kinetically forced (KF), the growth of the large scale helical field is accompanied by growth of small scale magnetic (and current) helicity which ultimately quench the LSD. Here, using both simulations and theory, we study the complementary magnetically forced(MF) case in which the system is forced with an electric field that supplies magnetic helicity. For this MF case, the kinetic helicity becomes the back-reactor that saturates the LSD. Simulations of both MF and KF cases can be approximately modeled with the same equations of magnetic helicity evolution, but with complementa...

  6. Flow and dynamo measurements during the coaxial helicity injection on HIST

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ando, K.; Higashi, T.; Nakatsuka, M.; Kikuchi, Y.; Fukumoto, N.; Nagata, M.

    2009-11-01

    The current drive by Coaxial Helicity Injection (CHI-CD) was performed on HIST in a wide range of configurations from high-q ST to low-q ST and spheromak generated by the utilization of the toroidal field. It is a key issue to investigate the dynamo mechanism required to maintain each configuration. To identify the detail mechanisms, it is needed to manifest a role of plasma flows in the CHI-CD. For this purpose, we have measured the ion flow and the dynamo electric field using an ion Doppler spectrometer (IDS) system, a Mach probe and a dynamo probe. The new dynamo probe consists of 3-axis Mach probes and magnetic pick-up coils. The flow measurements have shown that the intermittent generation of the flow is correlated to the fluctuation seen on the electron density and current signals during the driven phase. At this time, the toroidal direction of the ion flow in the central open flux column is opposite to that of the toroidal current there, i.e. the same direction as electrons. After the plasma enters to the resistive decay phase, the toroidal flow tends to reverse to the same direction as the toroidal current. The results are consistent with the model of the repetitive plasmoid ejection and coalescence proposed for CHI-CD. The plasma jet emanating from the gun source and magnetic field generations through reconnection during the driven phase is well reflected in the 3D MHD simulation.

  7. Magnetic Helicity Conservation and Astrophysical Dynamos

    CERN Document Server

    Vishniac, E T; Vishniac, Ethan T.; Cho, Jungyeon

    2000-01-01

    We construct a magnetic helicity conserving dynamo theory which incorporates a calculated magnetic helicity current. In this model the fluid helicity plays a small role in large scale magnetic field generation. Instead, the dynamo process is dominated by a new quantity, derived from asymmetries in the second derivative of the velocity correlation function, closely related to the `twist and fold' dynamo model. The turbulent damping term is, as expected, almost unchanged. Numerical simulations with a spatially constant fluid helicity and vanishing resistivity are not expected to generate large scale fields in equipartition with the turbulent energy density. In fact, there seems to be little prospect for driving a fast dynamo in a closed box containing homogeneous turbulence. On the other hand, there is an efficient analog to the $\\alpha-\\Omega$ dynamo. Systems whose turbulence is driven by some anisotropic local instability in shearing flow, like real stars and accretion disks, and some computer simulations, ma...

  8. Beam-driven, Plasma-based Particle Accelerators

    CERN Document Server

    Muggli, P

    2016-01-01

    We briefly give some of the characteristics of the beam-driven, plasma-based particle accelerator known as the plasma wakefield accelerator (PWFA). We also mention some of the major results that have been obtained since the birth of the concept. We focus on high-energy particle beams where possible.

  9. Beam-driven, Plasma-based Particle Accelerators

    CERN Document Server

    Muggli, P.

    2016-01-01

    We briefly give some of the characteristics of the beam-driven, plasma-based particle accelerator known as the plasma wakefield accelerator (PWFA). We also mention some of the major results that have been obtained since the birth of the concept. We focus on high-energy particle beams where possible.

  10. On the drift kinetic equation driven by plasma flows

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shaing, K C [Plasma and Space Science Center and ISAPS, National Cheng Kung University, Tainan 70101, Taiwan (China); Department of Engineering Physics, University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI 53706 (United States)

    2010-07-15

    A drift kinetic equation that is driven by plasma flows has previously been derived by Shaing and Spong 1990 (Phys. Fluids B 2 1190). The terms that are driven by particle speed that is parallel to the magnetic field B have been neglected. Here, such terms are discussed to examine their importance to the equation and to show that these terms do not contribute to the calculations of plasma viscosity in large aspect ratio toroidal plasmas, e.g. tokamaks and stellarators. (brief communication)

  11. Magnetized Target Fusion Driven by Plasma Liners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thio, Y. C. Francis; Cassibry, Jason; Eskridge, Richard; Kirkpatrick, Ronald C.; Knapp, Charles E.; Lee, Michael; Martin, Adam; Smith, James; Wu, S. T.; Rodgers, Stephen L. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    For practical applications of magnetized target fusion, standoff drivers to deliver the imploding momentum flux to the target plasma remotely are required. Quasi-spherically converging plasma jets have been proposed as standoff drivers for this purpose. The concept involves the dynamic formation of a quasi-spherical plasma liner by the merging of plasma jets, and the use of the liner so formed to compress a spheromak or a field reversed configuration (FRC). Theoretical analysis and computer modeling of the concept are presented. It is shown that, with the appropriate choice of the flow parameters in the liner and the target, the impact between the liner and the target plasma can be made to be shockless in the liner or to generate at most a very weak shock in the liner. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  12. Dynamo and anomalous transport in the reversed field pinch

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prager, S.C.

    1998-08-01

    The reversed field pinch is an effective tool to study the macroscopic consequences of magnetic fluctuations, such as the dynamo effect and anomalous transport. Several explanations exist for the dynamo (the self-generation of plasma current)--the MHD dynamo, the kinetic dynamo, and the diamagnetic dynamo. There is some experimental evidence for each, particularly from measurements of ion velocity and electron pressure fluctuations. Magnetic fluctuations are known to produce energy and particle flux in the RFP core. Current profile control is able to decrease fluctuation-induced transport by a factor of five. Improved confinement regimes are also obtained at deep reversal and, possibly, with flow shear.

  13. Driven phase space vortices in plasmas with nonextensive velocity distribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trivedi, Pallavi; Ganesh, Rajaraman

    2017-03-01

    The evolution of chirp-driven electrostatic waves in unmagnetized plasmas is numerically investigated by using a one-dimensional (1D) Vlasov-poisson solver with periodic boundary conditions. The initial velocity distribution of the 1D plasma is assumed to be governed by nonextensive q distribution [C. Tsallis, J. Stat. Phys. 52, 479 (1988)]. For an infinitesimal amplitude of an external drive, we investigate the effects of chirp driven dynamics that leads to the formation of giant phase space vortices (PSV) for both Maxwellian (q = 1) and non-Maxwellian ( q ≠ 1 ) plasmas. For non-Maxwellian plasmas, the formation of giant PSV with multiple extrema and phase velocities is shown to be dependent on the strength of "q". Novel features such as "shark"-like and transient "honeycomb"-like structures in phase space are discussed. Wherever relevant, we compare our results with previous work.

  14. Plasma driven neutron/gamma generator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leung, Ka-Ngo; Antolak, Arlyn

    2015-03-03

    An apparatus for the generation of neutron/gamma rays is described including a chamber which defines an ion source, said apparatus including an RF antenna positioned outside of or within the chamber. Positioned within the chamber is a target material. One or more sets of confining magnets are also provided to create a cross B magnetic field directly above the target. To generate neutrons/gamma rays, the appropriate source gas is first introduced into the chamber, the RF antenna energized and a plasma formed. A series of high voltage pulses are then applied to the target. A plasma sheath, which serves as an accelerating gap, is formed upon application of the high voltage pulse to the target. Depending upon the selected combination of source gas and target material, either neutrons or gamma rays are generated, which may be used for cargo inspection, and the like.

  15. Dynamics of lane formation in driven binary complex plasmas

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sutterlin, K. R.; Wysocki, A.; Ivlev, A. V.; Rath, C.; Thomas, H. M.; Rubin-Zuzic, M.; W. J. Goedheer,; Fortov, V. E.; Lipaev, A. M.; Molotkov, V. I.; Petrov, O. F.; Morfill, G. E.; Lowen, H.

    2009-01-01

    The dynamical onset of lane formation is studied in experiments with binary complex plasmas under microgravity conditions. Small microparticles are driven and penetrate into a cloud of big particles, revealing a strong tendency towards lane formation. The observed time-resolved lane-formation proces

  16. Collision and recombination driven instabilities in variable charged dusty plasmas

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    S Bal; M Bose

    2013-04-01

    The dust-acoustic instability driven by recombination of electrons and ions on the surface of charged and variably-charged dust grains as well as by collisions in dusty plasmas with significant pressure of background neutrals have been theoretically investigated. The recombination driven instability is shown to be dominant in the long wavelength regime even in the presence of dust-neutral and ion-neutral collisions, while in the shorter wavelength regime, the dust-neutral collision is found to play a major role. In an earlier research work, the dust-neutral collision was neglected in comparison to the effect due to the recombination for estimating the dust-acoustic instability; later the other report shows that the recombination effect is negligible in the presence of dust-neutral collisions. In line of this present situation our investigation revealed that the recombination is more important than dust-neutral collisions in laboratory plasma and fusion plasma, while the dust-neutral collision frequency is dominant in the interstellar plasmas. The effects of ion and dust densities and ion streaming on the recombination and collision driven mode in parameter regimes relevant for many experimental studies on dusty plasmas have also been calculated.

  17. Simple Scaling Relationships For Stellar Dynamos

    Science.gov (United States)

    Augustson, Kyle; Mathis, Stéphane; Brun, Allan Sacha

    2016-12-01

    This paper provides a brief overview of dynamo scaling relationships for the degree of equipartition between magnetic and kinetic energies. Three basic approaches are adopted to explore these scaling relationships, with a first look at two simple models: one assuming magnetostrophy and another that includes the effects of inertia. Next, a third scaling relationship is derived that utilizes the assumptions that the dynamo possesses two integral spatial scales and that it is driven by the balance of buoyancy work and ohmic dissipation as studied in Davidson 2013. The results of which are then compared to a suite of convective dynamo simulations that possess a fully convective domain with a weak density stratification and that captured the behavior of the resulting dynamo for a range of convective Rossby numbers (Augustson et al. 2016).

  18. Theory of a beam-driven plasma antenna

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timofeev, I. V.; Volchok, E. P.; Annenkov, V. V.

    2016-08-01

    In this paper, we propose a theory describing generation of electromagnetic waves in a thin beam-plasma system with a characteristic transverse size comparable with the radiation wavelength. In fact, a thin plasma column with a longitudinal density modulation works like a plasma antenna in which an electron beam can excite a superluminal wave of electric current. It has previously been shown that, if the period of this modulation coincides with the wavelength of the most unstable beam-driven mode, radiation at a frequency slightly below the plasma frequency is emitted transversely to the plasma column and generated in thin boundary layers. For the plasma thickness comparable with the skin-depth, generation of the terahertz radiation can reach high efficiency ( ˜10 % ) in such a scheme, but the absolute power of this radiation cannot be increased by increasing the transverse plasma size. In this paper, we study whether the power of such an antenna can be increased in the regime of oblique emission when the magnetized plasma is transparent to the radiated electromagnetic waves and the whole plasma volume may be involved in their generation.

  19. Neutrino-driven wakefield plasma accelerator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rios, L. A.; Serbeto, A.

    2003-08-01

    Processos envolvendo neutrinos são importantes em uma grande variedade de fenômenos astrofísicos, como as explosões de supernovas. Estes objetos, assim como os pulsares e as galáxias starburst, têm sido propostos como aceleradores cósmicos de partículas de altas energias. Neste trabalho, um modelo clássico de fluidos é utilizado para estudar a interação não-linear entre um feixe de neutrinos e um plasma não-colisional relativístico de pósitrons e elétrons na presença de um campo magnético. Durante a interação, uma onda híbrida superior de grande amplitude é excitada. Para parâmetros típicos de supernovas, verificamos que partículas carregadas "capturadas" por essa onda podem ser aceleradas a altas energias. Este resultado pode ser importante no estudo de mecanismos aceleradores de partículas em ambientes astrofísicos.

  20. Modeling beam-driven and laser-driven plasma Wakefield accelerators with XOOPIC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bruhwiler, David L.; Giacone, Rodolfo; Cary, John R.; Verboncoeur, John P.; Mardahl, Peter; Esarey, Eric; Leemans, Wim

    2000-06-01

    We present 2-D particle-in-cell simulations of both beam-driven and laser-driven plasma wakefield accelerators, using the object-oriented code XOOPIC, which is time explicit, fully electromagnetic, and capable of running on massively parallel supercomputers. Simulations of laser-driven wakefields with low ({approximately} 10{sup 16} W/cm{sup 2}) and high ({approximately} 10{sup 18} W/cm{sup 2}) peak intensity laser pulses are conducted in slab geometry, showing agreement with theory. Simulations of the E-157 beam wakefield experiment at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center, in which a 30 GeV electron beam passes through 1 m of preionized lithium plasma, are conducted in cylindrical geometry, obtaining good agreement with previous work. We briefly describe some of the more significant modifications to XOOPIC required by this work, and summarize the issues relevant to modeling electron-neutral collisions in a particle-in-cell code.

  1. Current-driven plasma acceleration versus current-driven energy dissipation. I - Wave stability theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, A. J.; Jahn, R. G.; Choueiri, E. Y.

    1990-01-01

    The dominant unstable electrostatic wave modes of an electromagnetically accelerated plasma are investigated. The study is the first part of a three-phase program aimed at characterizing the current-driven turbulent dissipation degrading the efficiency of Lorentz force plasma accelerators such as the MPD thruster. The analysis uses a kinetic theory that includes magnetic and thermal effects as well as those of an electron current transverse to the magnetic field and collisions, thus combining all the features of previous models. Analytical and numerical solutions allow a detailed description of threshold criteria, finite growth behavior, destabilization mechanisms and maximized-growth characteristics of the dominant unstable modes. The lower hybrid current-driven instability is implicated as dominant and was found to preserve its character in the collisional plasma regime.

  2. Filamentation Instability of Counterstreaming Laser-Driven Plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fox, W.; Fiksel, G.; Bhattacharjee, A.; Chang, P.-Y.; Germaschewski, K.; Hu, S. X.; Nilson, P. M.

    2013-11-01

    Filamentation due to the growth of a Weibel-type instability was observed in the interaction of a pair of counterstreaming, ablatively driven plasma flows, in a supersonic, collisionless regime relevant to astrophysical collisionless shocks. The flows were created by irradiating a pair of opposing plastic (CH) foils with 1.8 kJ, 2-ns laser pulses on the OMEGA EP Laser System. Ultrafast laser-driven proton radiography was used to image the Weibel-generated electromagnetic fields. The experimental observations are in good agreement with the analytical theory of the Weibel instability and with particle-in-cell simulations.

  3. Filamentation instability of counter-streaming laser-driven plasmas

    CERN Document Server

    Fox, W; Bhattacharjee, A; Chang, P -Y; Germaschewski, K; Hu, S X; Nilson, P M

    2013-01-01

    Filamentation due to the growth of a Weibel-type instability was observed in the interaction of a pair of counter-streaming, ablatively-driven plasma flows, in a supersonic, collisionless regime relevant to astrophysical collisionless shocks. The flows were created by irradiating a pair of opposing plastic (CH) foils with 1.8 kJ, 2-ns laser pulses on the OMEGA EP laser system. Ultrafast laser-driven proton radiography was used to image the Weibel-generated electromagnetic fields. The experimental observations are in good agreement with the analytical theory of the Weibel instability and with particle-in-cell simulations.

  4. Fast Tunable Microwave Devices Using Self-driven Plasma Instabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biggs, David; Cappelli, Mark

    2016-10-01

    Tunable electromagnetic devices using plasmas are of interest for various applications such as high frequency communications and analog signal processing. At microwave frequencies of tens of gigahertz, low-pressure plasmas must be employed in order to avoid high wave damping from collisions. The drawback of low-pressure plasmas is that their diffusion timescales are long, on the order of hundreds of microseconds. Other mechanisms than diffusion must be employed to achieve fast tuning capabilities of these devices. One candidate mechanism is to use a self-driven plasma instability, which may allow for fast tuning of microwave resonant cavities. In this work, a microwave resonant cavity is studied consisting of a rectangular waveguide with two conducting posts spaced along the propagation direction to form a rectangular cavity. The cavity acts as a band pass filter and transmits microwave signals around its resonant frequency. Plasma may be introduced into the cavity between the conducting posts in order to change the refractive index and thus the resonant and transmission frequency of the device. The location of the plasma and its plasma density are important parameters in determining the resonant frequency, and both parameters are capable of being tuned with plasma instabilities. This work is supported by the Air Force Office of Scientific Research.

  5. Energetic-ion-driven global instabilities in stellarator/helical plasmas and comparison with tokamak plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Toi, K. [National Institute for Fusion Science, Toki, Japan; Ogawa, K. [Nagoya University, Japan; Isobe, M. [National Institute for Fusion Science, Toki, Japan; Osakabe, M. [National Institute for Fusion Science, Toki, Japan; Spong, Donald A [ORNL; Todo, Yasushi [National Institute for Fusion Science, Toki, Japan

    2011-01-01

    Comprehensive understanding of energetic-ion-driven global instabilities such as Alfven eigenmodes (AEs) and their impact on energetic ions and bulk plasma is crucially important for tokamak and stellarator/helical plasmas and in the future for deuterium-tritium (DT) burning plasma experiments. Various types of global modes and their associated enhanced energetic ion transport are commonly observed in toroidal plasmas. Toroidicity-induced AEs and ellipticity-induced AEs, whose gaps are generated through poloidal mode coupling, are observed in both tokamak and stellarator/helical plasmas. Global AEs and reversed shear AEs, where toroidal couplings are not as dominant were also observed in those plasmas. Helicity induced AEs that exist only in 3D plasmas are observed in the large helical device (LHD) and Wendelstein 7 Advanced Stellarator plasmas. In addition, the geodesic acoustic mode that comes from plasma compressibility is destabilized by energetic ions in both tokamak and LHD plasmas. Nonlinear interaction of these modes and their influence on the confinement of the bulk plasma as well as energetic ions are observed in both plasmas. In this paper, the similarities and differences in these instabilities and their consequences for tokamak and stellarator/helical plasmas are summarized through comparison with the data sets obtained in LHD. In particular, this paper focuses on the differences caused by the rotational transform profile and the 2D or 3D geometrical structure of the plasma equilibrium. Important issues left for future study are listed.

  6. A deep dynamo generating Mercury's magnetic field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christensen, Ulrich R

    2006-12-21

    Mercury has a global magnetic field of internal origin and it is thought that a dynamo operating in the fluid part of Mercury's large iron core is the most probable cause. However, the low intensity of Mercury's magnetic field--about 1% the strength of the Earth's field--cannot be reconciled with an Earth-like dynamo. With the common assumption that Coriolis and Lorentz forces balance in planetary dynamos, a field thirty times stronger is expected. Here I present a numerical model of a dynamo driven by thermo-compositional convection associated with inner core solidification. The thermal gradient at the core-mantle boundary is subadiabatic, and hence the outer region of the liquid core is stably stratified with the dynamo operating only at depth, where a strong field is generated. Because of the planet's slow rotation the resulting magnetic field is dominated by small-scale components that fluctuate rapidly with time. The dynamo field diffuses through the stable conducting region, where rapidly varying parts are strongly attenuated by the skin effect, while the slowly varying dipole and quadrupole components pass to some degree. The model explains the observed structure and strength of Mercury's surface magnetic field and makes predictions that are testable with space missions both presently flying and planned.

  7. Simulations of a beam-driven plasma antenna in the regime of plasma transparency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timofeev, I. V.; Berendeev, E. A.; Dudnikova, G. I.

    2017-09-01

    In this paper, the theoretically predicted possibility to increase the efficiency of electromagnetic radiation generated by a thin beam-plasma system in the regime of oblique emission, when a plasma column becomes transparent to radiation near the plasma frequency, is investigated using particle-in-cell simulations. If a finite-size plasma column has a longitudinal density modulation, such a system is able to radiate electromagnetic waves as a dipole antenna. This radiation mechanism is based on the conversion of an electron beam-driven potential plasma wave on the periodic perturbation of plasma density. In this case, the frequency of radiated waves appears to be slightly lower than the plasma frequency. That is why their fields enable the penetration into the plasma only to the skin-depth. This case is realized when the period of density modulation coincides with the wavelength of the most unstable beam-driven mode, and the produced radiation escapes from the plasma in the purely transverse direction. In the recent theoretical paper [I. V. Timofeev et al. Phys. Plasmas 23, 083119 (2016)], however, it has been found that the magnetized plasma can be transparent to this radiation at certain emission angles. It means that the beam-to-radiation power conversion can be highly efficient even in a relatively thick plasma since not only boundary layers but also the whole plasma volume can be involved in the generation of electromagnetic waves. Simulations of steady-state beam injection into a pre-modulated plasma channel confirm the existence of this effect and show limits of validity for the simplified theoretical model.

  8. Intense tera-hertz laser driven proton acceleration in plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, A.; Tibai, Z.; Hebling, J.

    2016-06-01

    We investigate the acceleration of a proton beam driven by intense tera-hertz (THz) laser field from a near critical density hydrogen plasma. Two-dimension-in-space and three-dimension-in-velocity particle-in-cell simulation results show that a relatively long wavelength and an intense THz laser can be employed for proton acceleration to high energies from near critical density plasmas. We adopt here the electromagnetic field in a long wavelength (0.33 THz) regime in contrast to the optical and/or near infrared wavelength regime, which offers distinct advantages due to their long wavelength ( λ = 350 μ m ), such as the λ 2 scaling of the electron ponderomotive energy. Simulation study delineates the evolution of THz laser field in a near critical plasma reflecting the enhancement in the electric field of laser, which can be of high relevance for staged or post ion acceleration.

  9. Study on low temperature plasma driven permeation of hydrogen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takizawa, Masayuki [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment

    1998-03-01

    It is one of the most important problem in PWI of fusion devices from the point of view of tritium leakage that hydrogen diffuses in the wall of the device and permeates through it, which results in hydrogen being released to the coolant side. In this study, plasma driven permeation experiments were carried out with several kinds of metal membranes in the low temperature plasma where ionic and atomic hydrogen as well as electron existed in order to survey PDP mechanism from the many view points. In addition, incident flux rate from the plasma to the membrane surface was evaluated by calculation analysis. As a result the mechanism of low temperature PDP was found out and described as PDP models. The simulation of the membrane pump system was executed and the system performance was estimated with the models. (author). 135 refs.

  10. Ocean Dynamics: Dynamo

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-30

    1 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. Ocean Dynamics: Dynamo Robert Pinkel Marine Physical...execution of the Dynamo Leg IV Experiment in December 2011. Our objective was to document the development of the diurnal surface layer and its...2. REPORT TYPE N/A 3. DATES COVERED - 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Ocean Dynamics: Dynamo 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM

  11. AWAKE: Advanced Proton Driven Plasma Wakefield Acceleration Experiment at CERN

    CERN Document Server

    Gschwendtner, E

    2014-01-01

    Plasma wakefield acceleration is a promising alternative reaching accelerating fields a magnitude of up to 3 higher (GV/m) when compared to conventional RF acceleration. AWAKE, world’s first proton-driven plasma wakefield experiment, was launched at CERN to verify this concept. In this experiment proton bunches at 400 GeV/c will be extracted from the CERN SPS and sent to the plasma cell, where the proton beam drives the plasma wakefields and creates a large accelerating field. This large gradient of ~GV/m can be achieved by relying on the self-modulation instability (SMI) of the proton beam; when seeded by ionization through a short laser pulse, a train of micro-bunches with a period on the order of the plasma wavelength (~mm) develops, which can drive such a large amplitude wake from a long proton bunch (~12 cm). An electron beam will be injected into the plasma to probe the accelerating wakefield. The AWAKE experiment is being installed at CERN in the former CNGS facility, which must be modified to mat...

  12. Studying astrophysical particle acceleration with laser-driven plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiuza, Frederico

    2016-10-01

    The acceleration of non-thermal particles in plasmas is critical for our understanding of explosive astrophysical phenomena, from solar flares to gamma ray bursts. Particle acceleration is thought to be mediated by collisionless shocks and magnetic reconnection. The microphysics underlying these processes and their ability to efficiently convert flow and magnetic energy into non-thermal particles, however, is not yet fully understood. By performing for the first time ab initio 3D particle-in-cell simulations of the interaction of both magnetized and unmagnetized laser-driven plasmas, it is now possible to identify the optimal parameters for the study of particle acceleration in the laboratory relevant to astrophysical scenarios. It is predicted for the Omega and NIF laser conditions that significant non-thermal acceleration can occur during magnetic reconnection of laser-driven magnetized plasmas. Electrons are accelerated by the electric field near the X-points and trapped in contracting magnetic islands. This leads to a power-law tail extending to nearly a hundred times the thermal energy of the plasma and that contains a large fraction of the magnetic energy. The study of unmagnetized interpenetrating plasmas also reveals the possibility of forming collisionless shocks mediated by the Weibel instability on NIF. Under such conditions, both electrons and ions can be energized by scattering out of the Weibel-mediated turbulence. This also leads to power-law spectra that can be detected experimentally. The resulting experimental requirements to probe the microphysics of plasma particle acceleration will be discussed, paving the way for the first experiments of these important processes in the laboratory. As a result of these simulations and theoretical analysis, there are new experiments being planned on the Omega, NIF, and LCLS laser facilities to test these theoretical predictions. This work was supported by the SLAC LDRD program and DOE Office of Science, Fusion

  13. Waves, Coriolis force and the dynamo effect

    CERN Document Server

    Mahajan, S M; Gómez, D O

    2004-01-01

    Dynamo activity caused by waves in a rotating magneto-plasma is investigated. In astrophysical environments such as accretion disks and at sufficiently small spatial scales, the Hall effect is likely to play an important role. It is shown that a combination of the Coriolis force and Hall effect can produce a finite $\\alpha$-effect by generating net helicity in the small scales. The shear/ion-cyclotron normal mode of the Hall plasma is the dominant contributor to the dynamo action for short scale motions.

  14. Non-LTE modeling of radiatively driven dense plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, H. A.

    2017-03-01

    There are now several experimental facilities that use strong X-ray fields to produce plasmas with densities ranging from ˜1 to ˜103 g/cm3. Large laser facilities, such as the National Ignition Facility (NIF) and the Omega laser reach high densities with radiatively driven compression, short-pulse lasers such as XFELs produce solid density plasmas on very short timescales, and the Orion laser facility combines these methods. Despite the high densities, these plasmas can be very far from LTE, due to large radiation fields and/or short timescales, and simulations mostly use collisional-radiative (CR) modeling which has been adapted to handle these conditions. These dense plasmas present challenges to CR modeling. Ionization potential depression (IPD) has received much attention recently as researchers work to understand experimental results from LCLS and Orion [1,2]. However, incorporating IPD into a CR model is only one challenge presented by these conditions. Electron degeneracy and the extent of the state space can also play important roles in the plasma energetics and radiative properties, with effects evident in recent observations [3,4]. We discuss the computational issues associated with these phenomena and methods for handling them.

  15. Persistence of magnetic field driven by relativistic electrons in a plasma

    CERN Document Server

    Flacco, A; Lifschitz, A; Sylla, F; Kahaly, S; Veltcheva, M; Silva, L O; Malka, V

    2015-01-01

    The onset and evolution of magnetic fields in laboratory and astrophysical plasmas is determined by several mechanisms, including instabilities, dynamo effects and ultra-high energy particle flows through gas, plasma and interstellar-media. These processes are relevant over a wide range of conditions, from cosmic ray acceleration and gamma ray bursts to nuclear fusion in stars. The disparate temporal and spatial scales where each operates can be reconciled by scaling parameters that enable to recreate astrophysical conditions in the laboratory. Here we unveil a new mechanism by which the flow of ultra-energetic particles can strongly magnetize the boundary between the plasma and the non-ionized gas to magnetic fields up to 10-100 Tesla (micro Tesla in astrophysical conditions). The physics is observed from the first time-resolved large scale magnetic field measurements obtained in a laser wakefield accelerator. Particle-in-cell simulations capturing the global plasma and field dynamics over the full plasma le...

  16. The Nonlinear Landau Damping Rate of a Driven Plasma Wave

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benisti, D; Strozzi, D J; Gremillet, L; Morice, O

    2009-08-04

    In this Letter, we discuss the concept of the nonlinear Landau damping rate, {nu}, of a driven electron plasma wave, and provide a very simple, practical, analytic formula for {nu} which agrees very well with results inferred from Vlasov simulations of stimulated Raman scattering. {nu} actually is more complicated an operator than a plain damping rate, and it may only be seen as such because it assumes almost constant values before abruptly dropping to 0. The decrease of {nu} to 0 is moreover shown to occur later when the wave amplitude varies in the direction transverse to its propagation.

  17. Editorial: Focus on Laser- and Beam-Driven Plasma Accelerators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joshi, Chan; Malka, Victor

    2010-04-01

    The ability of short but intense laser pulses to generate high-energy electrons and ions from gaseous and solid targets has been well known since the early days of the laser fusion program. However, during the past decade there has been an explosion of experimental and theoretical activity in this area of laser-matter interaction, driven by the prospect of realizing table-top plasma accelerators for research, medical and industrial uses, and also relatively small and inexpensive plasma accelerators for high-energy physics at the frontier of particle physics. In this focus issue on laser- and beam-driven plasma accelerators, the latest advances in this field are described. Focus on Laser- and Beam-Driven Plasma Accelerators Contents Slow wave plasma structures for direct electron acceleration B D Layer, J P Palastro, A G York, T M Antonsen and H M Milchberg Cold injection for electron wakefield acceleration X Davoine, A Beck, A Lifschitz, V Malka and E Lefebvre Enhanced proton flux in the MeV range by defocused laser irradiation J S Green, D C Carroll, C Brenner, B Dromey, P S Foster, S Kar, Y T Li, K Markey, P McKenna, D Neely, A P L Robinson, M J V Streeter, M Tolley, C-G Wahlström, M H Xu and M Zepf Dose-dependent biological damage of tumour cells by laser-accelerated proton beams S D Kraft, C Richter, K Zeil, M Baumann, E Beyreuther, S Bock, M Bussmann, T E Cowan, Y Dammene, W Enghardt, U Helbig, L Karsch, T Kluge, L Laschinsky, E Lessmann, J Metzkes, D Naumburger, R Sauerbrey, M. Scḧrer, M Sobiella, J Woithe, U Schramm and J Pawelke The optimum plasma density for plasma wakefield excitation in the blowout regime W Lu, W An, M Zhou, C Joshi, C Huang and W B Mori Plasma wakefield acceleration experiments at FACET M J Hogan, T O Raubenheimer, A Seryi, P Muggli, T Katsouleas, C Huang, W Lu, W An, K A Marsh, W B Mori, C E Clayton and C Joshi Electron trapping and acceleration on a downward density ramp: a two-stage approach R M G M Trines, R Bingham, Z Najmudin

  18. Magnetized Turbulent Dynamo in Protogalaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Malyshkin, L M; Malyshkin, Leonid; Kulsrud, Russell

    2002-01-01

    The prevailing theory for the origin of cosmic magnetic fields is that they have been amplified to their present values by the turbulent dynamo inductive action in the protogalactic and galactic medium. Up to now, in calculation of the turbulent dynamo, it has been customary to assume that there is no back reaction of the magnetic field on the turbulence, as long as the magnetic energy is less than the turbulent kinetic energy. This assumption leads to the kinematic dynamo theory. However, the applicability of this theory to protogalaxies is rather limited. The reason is that in protogalaxies the temperature is very high, and the viscosity is dominated by magnetized ions. As the magnetic field strength grows in time, the ion cyclotron time becomes shorter than the ion collision time, and the plasma becomes strongly magnetized. As a result, the ion viscosity becomes the Braginskii viscosity. Thus, in protogalaxies the back reaction sets in much earlier, at field strengths much lower than those which correspond...

  19. A compact and continuously driven supersonic plasma and neutral sourcea)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asai, T.; Itagaki, H.; Numasawa, H.; Terashima, Y.; Hirano, Y.; Hirose, A.

    2010-10-01

    A compact and repetitively driven plasma source has been developed by utilizing a magnetized coaxial plasma gun (MCPG) for diagnostics requiring deep penetration of a large amount of neutral flux. The system consists of a MCPG 95mm in length with a DN16 ConFlat connection port and an insulated gate bipolar transistor (IGBT) inverter power unit. The power supply consists of an array of eight IGBT units and is able to switch the discharge on and off at up to 10 kV and 600 A with a maximum repetitive frequency of 10 kHz. Multiple short duration discharge pulses maximize acceleration efficiency of the plasmoid. In the case of a 10 kHz operating frequency, helium-plasmoids in the velocity range of 20 km/s can be achieved.

  20. A compact and continuously driven supersonic plasma and neutral source.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asai, T; Itagaki, H; Numasawa, H; Terashima, Y; Hirano, Y; Hirose, A

    2010-10-01

    A compact and repetitively driven plasma source has been developed by utilizing a magnetized coaxial plasma gun (MCPG) for diagnostics requiring deep penetration of a large amount of neutral flux. The system consists of a MCPG 95mm in length with a DN16 ConFlat connection port and an insulated gate bipolar transistor (IGBT) inverter power unit. The power supply consists of an array of eight IGBT units and is able to switch the discharge on and off at up to 10 kV and 600 A with a maximum repetitive frequency of 10 kHz. Multiple short duration discharge pulses maximize acceleration efficiency of the plasmoid. In the case of a 10 kHz operating frequency, helium-plasmoids in the velocity range of 20 km/s can be achieved.

  1. The lunar dynamo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiss, Benjamin P; Tikoo, Sonia M

    2014-12-05

    The inductive generation of magnetic fields in fluid planetary interiors is known as the dynamo process. Although the Moon today has no global magnetic field, it has been known since the Apollo era that the lunar rocks and crust are magnetized. Until recently, it was unclear whether this magnetization was the product of a core dynamo or fields generated externally to the Moon. New laboratory and spacecraft measurements strongly indicate that much of this magnetization is the product of an ancient core dynamo. The dynamo field persisted from at least 4.25 to 3.56 billion years ago (Ga), with an intensity reaching that of the present Earth. The field then declined by at least an order of magnitude by ∼3.3 Ga. The mechanisms for sustaining such an intense and long-lived dynamo are uncertain but may include mechanical stirring by the mantle and core crystallization.

  2. Persistence and origin of the lunar core dynamo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suavet, Clément; Weiss, Benjamin P; Cassata, William S; Shuster, David L; Gattacceca, Jérôme; Chan, Lindsey; Garrick-Bethell, Ian; Head, James W; Grove, Timothy L; Fuller, Michael D

    2013-05-21

    The lifetime of the ancient lunar core dynamo has implications for its power source and the mechanism of field generation. Here, we report analyses of two 3.56-Gy-old mare basalts demonstrating that they were magnetized in a stable and surprisingly intense dynamo magnetic field of at least ~13 μT. These data extend the known lifetime of the lunar dynamo by ~160 My and indicate that the field was likely continuously active until well after the final large basin-forming impact. This likely excludes impact-driven changes in rotation rate as the source of the dynamo at this time in lunar history. Rather, our results require a persistent power source like precession of the lunar mantle or a compositional convection dynamo.

  3. Fluctuation dynamo based on magnetic reconnections

    OpenAIRE

    Baggaley, Andrew W.; Barenghi, Carlo F.; Shukurov, Anvar; Subramanian, Kandaswamy

    2009-01-01

    We develop a new model of the fluctuation dynamo in which the magnetic field is confined to thin flux ropes advected by a multi-scale flow which models turbulence. Magnetic dissipation occurs only via reconnections of flux ropes. The model is particularly suitable for rarefied plasma, such as the Solar corona or galactic halos. We investigate the kinetic energy release into heat, mediated by dynamo action, both in our model and by solving the induction equation with the same flow. We find tha...

  4. Viscously driven plasma flows in the deep geomagnetic tail

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Owen, C.J.; Slavin, J.A. (NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD (United States))

    1992-07-24

    The authors present an analysis, based on the principles of stress balance in a 1-dimensional current sheet, which considers the problem of closed magnetic flux transport into the deep tail by a viscous'-like interaction between the solar wind and the magnetosphere. They illustrate the analysis with an example of ISEE-3 data showing strong tailward plasma sheet flows on apparently closed field lines in the deep tail. Apart from narrow regions adjacent to the magnetopause, these flows are not driven by the scattering of magnetosheath plasma into the magnetosphere. They estimate the fraction of the magnetosheath momentum flux needed to be anomalously transferred into the plasma sheet to drive the flows. In their example this is [approximately] 6%. No previously suggested mechanism (e.g., the Kelvin-Helmholtz Instability) has been shown capable of providing anomalous momentum transport of this magnitude. Their current understanding of the viscous' interaction between the solar wind and magnetosphere is thus insufficient to explain these observations.

  5. Plasma wakefields driven by intense, broadband, incoherent electromagnetic radiation

    CERN Document Server

    Trines, R M G M; Mendonça, J T; Mori, W B; Norreys, P A; Bingham, R

    2014-01-01

    Non-linear wave-driven processes in plasmas are normally described by either a monochromatic pump wave that couples to other monochromatic waves, or as a random phase wave coupling to other random phase waves. An alternative approach involves an incoherent, random or broadband pump coupling to monochromatic and/or coherent structures in the plasma. This approach can be implemented through the wave kinetic model. In this model, the incoming pump wave is described by either a bunch (for coherent waves) or a sea (for random phase waves) of quasi-particles. A particle-in-cell type code has been developed to perform numerical simulations of such interactions using the quasi-particle approach. This code allows for a comparatively easy description of both random phase and coherent pump pulses coupling to slow electrostatic plasma waves, while providing an extended range of powerful diagnostics leading to a deeper physical insight into the dynamics of the fast waves. As an example, the propagation of short, intense l...

  6. Coronal influence on dynamos

    CERN Document Server

    Warnecke, Jörn

    2013-01-01

    We report on turbulent dynamo simulations in a spherical wedge with an outer coronal layer. We apply a two-layer model where the lower layer represents the convection zone and the upper layer the solar corona. This setup is used to study the coronal influence on the dynamo action beneath the surface. Increasing the radial coronal extent gradually to three times the solar radius and changing the magnetic Reynolds number, we find that dynamo action benefits from the additional coronal extent in terms of higher magnetic energy in the saturated stage. The flux of magnetic helicity can play an important role in this context.

  7. Final Technical Report for DOE DE-FG02-05ER54831 "Laboratory Studies of Dynamos."

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Forest, Cary B. [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States)

    2014-11-06

    Laboratory Studies of Dynamos: Executive Summary. The self-generation of magnetic fields by astrophysical bodies like planets, stars, accretion disks, galaxies, and even galaxy clusters arises due to a mechanism referred to as a homogeneous dynamo. It is quite simple to demonstrate the generation of a magnetic fi eld from a rotating copper disk coupled with a coil of wire, a device known as the homopolar dynamo. The device works like a magnetic fi eld ampli er with a feedback circuit: the differential rotation of a metal disk past an infinitesimally small seed magnetic field induces currents in the disk which, when coupled to a coil winding, can amplify the field until it becomes strong enough to slow the rotation of the disk. What is remarkable is that the same type of circuit may be achieved in a flowing conducting fluid such as a liquid metal in the case of planetary dynamos or a plasma in the case of astrophysical dynamos. The complexity of describing planetary and stellar dynamos despite their ubiquity and the plethora of observational data from the Earth and the Sun motivates the demonstration of a laboratory homogenous dynamo. To create a homogenous dynamo, one first needs a su fficiently large, fast flow of a highly conducting fluid that the velocity shear in the fluid can bend magnetic field lines. With a high Rm-flow, the magnetic fi eld can be ampli ed by the stretching action provided by di fferential rotation. The other critical ingredient is a flow geometry that provides feedback so that the ampli ed eld reinforces the initial in nitesimal seed field - a mechanism that recreates the feedback provided by the coil of wire in the homopolar dynamo. In the Madison Dynamo Experiment, this combination of magnetic ampli cation and feedback is feasible in the simple geometry of two counter-rotating helical vortices in a 1 meter-diameter spherical vessel lled with liquid sodium. For an optimal helical pitch of the flow the threshold for exciting a dynamo is

  8. Electromagnetically Driven Plasma-Field Dynamics in Modified Ionosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kochetov, Andrey; Terina, Galina

    Under sounding of an artificial ionospheric turbulence by short probing radio pulses of ordinary polarization the two types of scattered signals were observed: a "caviton" signal (CS) and a "plasma" signal (PS), which appeared with the heating transmitter switching on and disap-peared after its switching off (G.I. Terina J. Atm. Terr. Phys, 57, 1995, 273, Izv. VUZov, Radiofizika, 39, 1998, 203). The scattered signal of PS type was revealed also after the heating switching off. It was called an "aftereffect plasma signal" (AEPS) (G.I. Terina Izv .VUZov, Radiofizika, 43, 2000, 958). This signal had large time and spatial delays and appeared mostly when corresponding PS had envelope fluctuations. The aftereffect phenomenon was expressed at time on CS by amplitude increasing at once after the heating transmitter turning off. The theoretical model of this phenomenon is proposed in and some peculiarities of the aftereffect phenomena of the scattered signals in modified ionospheric plasma are considered and discussed. For theoretical interpretation of the characteristics of CS and AEPS the numerical solution of nonlinear Shrüdinger equation (NSE) with driven extension were carried out in inhomogeneous plasma layer with linear electron density profile (A.V. Kochetov, V.A. Mironov, G.I. Terina, Adv. Space Reseacrh, 29, 2002, 1369) and for the one with prescribed density depletion (and A.V. Kochetov, G.I. Terina, Adv. Space Reseacrh, 38, 2006, 2490). The simulation results obtained for linear inhomogeneous plasma layer and for plasma one with density depletion al-low us to interpret the aftereffect of CS and PS qualitatively. The field amplitude increase at relaxation stage displayed at calculations allows us to interpret of CS aftereffect. The large time delays of AEPS can be explained as a result of powerful radio waves trapping in the forming at the plasma resonance regions density depletions (E. Mjøhus, J. Geophys. Res. 103, 1998, 14711; B. Eliasson and L. Stenflo, J

  9. Dynamos and MHD theory of turbulence suppression

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoshizawa, Akira [Institute of Industrial Science, University of Tokyo, Komaba, Meguro-ku, Tokyo 153-8505 (Japan); Itoh, Sanae-I [Research Institute for Applied Mechanics, Kyushu University, 87, Kasuga 810- 8580 (Japan); Itoh, Kimitaka [National Institute for Fusion Science, Toki, Gifu 509-5292 (Japan); Yokoi, Nobumitsu [Institute of Industrial Science, University of Tokyo, Komaba, Meguro-ku, Tokyo 153-8505 (Japan)

    2004-03-01

    Characteristics of electrically conducting media are reviewed from the macroscopic viewpoint based on mean-field magnetohydrodynamics, while being compared using the methodology and knowledge in fluid mechanics. The themes covered in this review range from the mechanism of generating stellar magnetic fields (dynamo) to transport properties in fusion. The primary concern here is to see the characteristics common to these apparently different phenomena, within the framework of the mean-field theory. Owing to the intrinsic limitation of the approach, the present discussions are limited more or less to specific aspects of phenomena. They are supplemented with reference to theoretical, numerical, and observational approaches intrinsic to each theme. In the description of dynamo phenomena, emphasis is laid on the cross helicity dynamo. Features common to stellar magnetic-field generation and the rotational-motion drive in toroidal plasmas are illustrated on this basis. (topical review)

  10. The New Mexico alpha-omega Dynamo Experiment Modeling Astrophysical Dynamos

    CERN Document Server

    Colgate, S A; Beckley, H F; Ferrel, R; Romero, V D; Weatherall, J C

    2001-01-01

    A magnetic dynamo experiment is under construction at the New Mexico Institute of Mining and Technology. The experiment is designed to demonstrate in the laboratory the alpha-omega magnetic dynamo, which is believed to operate in many rotating and conducting astrophysical objects. The experiment uses the Couette flow of liquid sodium between two cylinders rotating with different angular velocities to model the omega-effect. The alpha-effect is created by the rising and expanding jets of liquid sodium driven through a pair of orifices in the end plates of the cylindrical vessel, presumably simulating plumes driven by buoyancy in astrophysical objects. The water analog of the dynamo device has been constructed and the flow necessary for the dynamo has been demonstrated. Results of the numerical simulations of the kinematic dynamo are presented. The toroidal field produced by the omega-effect is predicted to be B_{\\phi} \\simeq (R_m/2\\pi) B_{poloidal}\\simeq 20 \\times B_{poloidal} for the expected magnetic Reynold...

  11. Turbulence and dynamo interlinks

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Gouveia Dal Pino, E. M.; Santos-Lima, R.; Kowal, G.; Falceta-Gonçalves, D.

    2013-07-01

    The role of turbulence in astrophysical environments and its interplay with magnetic fields is still highly debated. In this lecture, we will discuss this issue in the framework of dynamo processes. We will first present a very brief summary of turbulent dynamo theories, then will focus on small scale turbulent dynamos and their particular relevance on the origin and maintenance of magnetic fields in the intra-cluster media (ICM) of galaxies. In these environments, the very low density of the flow requires a collisionless-MHD treatment. We will show the implications of this approach in the turbulent amplification of the magnetic fields in these environments. To finalize, we will also briefly address the connection between MHD turbulence and fast magnetic reconnection and its possible implications in the diffusion of magnetic flux in the dynamo process.

  12. Turbulence and Dynamo Interlinks

    CERN Document Server

    Pino, E M de Gouveia Dal

    2013-01-01

    The role of turbulence in astrophysical environments and its interplay with magnetic fields is still highly debated. In this lecture, we will discuss this issue in the framework of dynamo processes. We will first present a very brief summary of turbulent dynamo theories, then will focus on small scale turbulent dynamos and their particular relevance on the origin and maintenance of magnetic fields in the intra-cluster media (ICM) of galaxies. In these environments, the very low density of the flow requires a collisionless-MHD treatment. We will show the implications of this approach in the turbulent amplification of the magnetic fields in these environments. To finalize, we will also briefly address the connection between MHD turbulence and fast magnetic reconnection and its possible implications in the diffusion of magnetic flux in the dynamo process.

  13. Experimental observation of spatially localized dynamo magnetic fields.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallet, B; Aumaître, S; Boisson, J; Daviaud, F; Dubrulle, B; Bonnefoy, N; Bourgoin, M; Odier, Ph; Pinton, J-F; Plihon, N; Verhille, G; Fauve, S; Pétrélis, F

    2012-04-06

    We report the first experimental observation of a spatially localized dynamo magnetic field, a common feature of astrophysical dynamos and convective dynamo simulations. When the two propellers of the von Kármán sodium experiment are driven at frequencies that differ by 15%, the mean magnetic field's energy measured close to the slower disk is nearly 10 times larger than the one close to the faster one. This strong localization of the magnetic field when a symmetry of the forcing is broken is in good agreement with a prediction based on the interaction between a dipolar and a quadrupolar magnetic mode.

  14. Colliding ionization injection in a beam driven plasma accelerator

    CERN Document Server

    Wan, Y; Li, F; Wu, Y P; Hua, J F; Pai, C -H; Lu, W; Joshi, C; Mori, W B; Gu, Y Q

    2015-01-01

    The proposal of generating high quality electron bunches via ionization injection triggered by an counter propagating laser pulse inside a beam driven plasma wake is examined via two-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations. It is shown that electron bunches obtained using this technique can have extremely small slice energy spread, because each slice is mainly composed of electrons ionized at the same time. Another remarkable advantage is that the injection distance is changeable. A bunch with normalized emittance of 3.3 nm, slice energy spread of 15 keV and brightness of 7.2 A m$^{-2}$ rad$^{-2}$ is obtained with an optimal injection length which is achieved by adjusting the launch time of the drive beam or by changing the laser focal position. This makes the scheme a promising approach to generate high quality electron bunches for the fifth generation light source.

  15. CENTER FOR PULSED POWER DRIVEN HIGH ENERGY DENSITY PLASMA STUDIES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Professor Bruce R. Kusse; Professor David A. Hammer

    2007-04-18

    This annual report summarizes the activities of the Cornell Center for Pulsed-Power-Driven High-Energy-Density Plasma Studies, for the 12-month period October 1, 2005-September 30, 2006. This period corresponds to the first year of the two-year extension (awarded in October, 2005) to the original 3-year NNSA/DOE Cooperative Agreement with Cornell, DE-FC03-02NA00057. As such, the period covered in this report also corresponds to the fourth year of the (now) 5-year term of the Cooperative Agreement. The participants, in addition to Cornell University, include Imperial College, London (IC), the University of Nevada, Reno (UNR), the University of Rochester (UR), the Weizmann Institute of Science (WSI), and the P.N. Lebedev Physical Institute (LPI), Moscow. A listing of all faculty, technical staff and students, both graduate and undergraduate, who participated in Center research activities during the year in question is given in Appendix A.

  16. Sharp magnetic structures from dynamos with density stratification

    CERN Document Server

    Jabbari, Sarah; Kleeorin, Nathan; Rogachevskii, Igor

    2016-01-01

    Recent direct numerical simulations (DNS) of large-scale turbulent dynamos in strongly stratified layers have resulted in surprisingly sharp bipolar structures at the surface. Here we present new DNS of helically and non-helically forced turbulence with and without rotation and compare with corresponding mean-field simulations (MFS) to show that these structures are a generic outcome of a broader class of dynamos in density-stratified layers. The MFS agree qualitatively with the DNS, but the period of oscillations tends to be longer in the DNS. In both DNS and MFS, the sharp structures are produced by converging flows at the surface and are driven by the Lorentz force associated with the large-scale dynamo-driven magnetic field if the dynamo number is at least 5 times supercritical.

  17. Sharp magnetic structures from dynamos with density stratification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jabbari, Sarah; Brandenburg, Axel; Kleeorin, Nathan; Rogachevskii, Igor

    2017-01-01

    Recent direct numerical simulations (DNS) of large-scale turbulent dynamos in strongly stratified layers have resulted in surprisingly sharp bipolar structures at the surface. Here we present new DNS of helically and non-helically forced turbulence with and without rotation and compare with corresponding mean-field simulations (MFS) to show that these structures are a generic outcome of a broader class of dynamos in density-stratified layers. The MFS agree qualitatively with the DNS, but the period of oscillations tends to be longer in the DNS. In both DNS and MFS, the sharp structures are produced by converging flows at the surface and might be driven in nonlinear stage of evolution by the Lorentz force associated with the large-scale dynamo-driven magnetic field if the dynamo number is at least 2.5 times supercritical.

  18. Pulsed radiobiology with laser-driven plasma accelerators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giulietti, Antonio; Grazia Andreassi, Maria; Greco, Carlo

    2011-05-01

    Recently, a high efficiency regime of acceleration in laser plasmas has been discovered, allowing table top equipment to deliver doses of interest for radiotherapy with electron bunches of suitable kinetic energy. In view of an R&D program aimed to the realization of an innovative class of accelerators for medical uses, a radiobiological validation is needed. At the present time, the biological effects of electron bunches from the laser-driven electron accelerator are largely unknown. In radiobiology and radiotherapy, it is known that the early spatial distribution of energy deposition following ionizing radiation interactions with DNA molecule is crucial for the prediction of damages at cellular or tissue levels and during the clinical responses to this irradiation. The purpose of the present study is to evaluate the radio-biological effects obtained with electron bunches from a laser-driven electron accelerator compared with bunches coming from a IORT-dedicated medical Radio-frequency based linac's on human cells by the cytokinesis block micronucleus assay (CBMN). To this purpose a multidisciplinary team including radiotherapists, biologists, medical physicists, laser and plasma physicists is working at CNR Campus and University of Pisa. Dose on samples is delivered alternatively by the "laser-linac" operating at ILIL lab of Istituto Nazionale di Ottica and an RF-linac operating for IORT at Pisa S. Chiara Hospital. Experimental data are analyzed on the basis of suitable radiobiological models as well as with numerical simulation based on Monte Carlo codes. Possible collective effects are also considered in the case of ultrashort, ultradense bunches of ionizing radiation.

  19. Dynamo in protostars

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Mahendra K Verma; Bidya Binay Karak; Rohit Kumar

    2013-12-01

    In this paper, we estimate the magnetic Reynolds number of a typical protostar before and after deuterium burning, and claim for the existence of dynamo process in both the phases, because the magnetic Reynolds number of the protostar far exceeds the critical magnetic Reynolds number for dynamo action. Using the equipartition of kinetic and magnetic energies, we estimate the steady-state magnetic field of the protostar to be of the order of kilogauss, which is in good agreement with observations.

  20. Self-organization in a driven dissipative plasma system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaikh, Dastgeer; Dasgupta, B.; Hu, Q.; Zank, G. P.

    2010-02-01

    We perform a fully self-consistent three-dimensional numerical simulation for a compressible, dissipative magnetoplasma driven by large-scale perturbations, that contain a fairly broad spectrum of characteristic modes, ranging from largest scales to intermediate scales and down to the smallest scales, where the energy of the system is dissipated by collisional (ohmic) and viscous dissipations. Additionally, our simulation includes nonlinear interactions amongst a wide range of fluctuations that are initialized with random spectral amplitudes, leading to the cascade of spectral energy in the inertial range spectrum, and takes into account large-scale as well as small-scale perturbations that may have been induced by the background plasma fluctuations, as well as the non-adiabatic exchange of energy leading to the migration of energy from the energy-containing modes or randomly injected energy driven by perturbations and further dissipated by the smaller scales. Besides demonstrating the comparative decays of the total energy and the dissipation rate of the energy, our results show the existence of a perpendicular component of the current, thus clearly confirming that the self-organized state is non-force free.

  1. Behavior of Excited Argon Atoms in Inductively Driven Plasmas

    CERN Document Server

    Hebner, G A

    1999-01-01

    Laser induced fluorescence has been used to measure the spatial distribution of the two lowest energy argon excited states, 1s sub 5 and 1s sub 4 , in inductively driven plasmas containing argon, chlorine and boron trichloride. The behavior of the two energy levels with plasma conditions was significantly different, probably because the 1s sub 5 level is metastable and the 1s sub 4 level is radiatively coupled to the ground state but is radiation trapped. The argon data is compared with a global model to identify the relative importance of processes such as electron collisional mixing and radiation trapping. The trends in the data suggest that both processes play a major role in determining the excited state density. At lower rfpower and pressure, excited state spatial distributions in pure argon were peaked in the center of the discharge, with an approximately Gaussian profile. However, for the highest rfpowers and pressures investigated, the spatial distributions tended to flatten in the center of the disch...

  2. Experimental observations of driven and intrinsic rotation in tokamak plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rice, J. E.

    2016-08-01

    Experimental observations of driven and intrinsic rotation in tokamak plasmas are reviewed. For momentum sources, there is direct drive from neutral beam injection, lower hybrid and ion cyclotron range of frequencies waves (including mode conversion flow drive), as well as indirect \\mathbf{j}× \\mathbf{B} forces from fast ion and electron orbit shifts, and toroidal magnetic field ripple loss. Counteracting rotation drive are sinks, such as from neutral drag and toroidal viscosity. Many of these observations are in agreement with the predictions of neo-classical theory while others are not, and some cases of intrinsic rotation remain puzzling. In contrast to particle and heat fluxes which depend on the relevant diffusivity and convection, there is an additional term in the momentum flux, the residual stress, which can act as the momentum source for intrinsic rotation. This term is independent of the velocity or its gradient, and its divergence constitutes an intrinsic torque. The residual stress, which ultimately responds to the underlying turbulence, depends on the confinement regime and is a complicated function of collisionality, plasma shape, and profiles of density, temperature, pressure and current density. This leads to the rich intrinsic rotation phenomenology. Future areas of study include integration of these many effects, advancement of quantitative explanations for intrinsic rotation and development of strategies for velocity profile control.

  3. Neutron Generation by Laser-Driven Spherically Convergent Plasma Fusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, G.; Yan, J.; Liu, J.; Lan, K.; Chen, Y. H.; Huo, W. Y.; Fan, Z.; Zhang, X.; Zheng, J.; Chen, Z.; Jiang, W.; Chen, L.; Tang, Q.; Yuan, Z.; Wang, F.; Jiang, S.; Ding, Y.; Zhang, W.; He, X. T.

    2017-04-01

    We investigate a new laser-driven spherically convergent plasma fusion scheme (SCPF) that can produce thermonuclear neutrons stably and efficiently. In the SCPF scheme, laser beams of nanosecond pulse duration and 1 014- 1 015 W /cm2 intensity uniformly irradiate the fuel layer lined inside a spherical hohlraum. The fuel layer is ablated and heated to expand inwards. Eventually, the hot fuel plasmas converge, collide, merge, and stagnate at the central region, converting most of their kinetic energy to internal energy, forming a thermonuclear fusion fireball. With the assumptions of steady ablation and adiabatic expansion, we theoretically predict the neutron yield Yn to be related to the laser energy EL, the hohlraum radius Rh, and the pulse duration τ through a scaling law of Yn∝(EL/Rh1.2τ0.2 )2.5. We have done experiments at the ShengGuangIII-prototype facility to demonstrate the principle of the SCPF scheme. Some important implications are discussed.

  4. Vacuum ultraviolet radiation emitted by microwave driven argon plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Espinho, S.; Felizardo, E.; Henriques, J.; Tatarova, E.

    2017-04-01

    Vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) radiation emitted by microwave driven argon plasmas has been investigated at low-pressure conditions (0.36 mbar). A classical surface-wave sustained discharge at 2.45 GHz has been used as plasma source. VUV radiation has been detected by emission spectroscopy in the 30-125 nm spectral range. The spectrum exhibits atomic and ionic argon emissions with the most intense spectral lines corresponding to the atomic resonance lines, at 104.8 nm and 106.7 nm, and to the ion lines, at 92.0 nm and 93.2 nm. Emissions at lower wavelengths were also detected, including lines with no information concerning level transitions in the well-known NIST database (e.g., the atomic line at 89.4 nm). The dependence of the lines' intensity on the microwave power delivered to the launcher was investigated. The electron density was estimated to be around 1012 cm-3 using the Stark broadening of the hydrogen Hβ line at 486.1 nm. The main population and loss mechanisms considered in the model for the excited argon atom and ion states emitting in the VUV range are discussed. The experimental results were compared to self-consistent model predictions, and a good agreement was obtained.

  5. MTF Driven by Plasma Liner Dynamically Formed by the Merging of Plasma Jets: An Overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thio, Y. C. Francis; Eskridge, Richard; Martin, Adam; Smith, James; Lee, Michael; Rodgers, Stephen L. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    One approach for standoff delivery of the momentum flux for compressing the target in MTF consists of using a spherical array of plasma jets to form a spherical plasma shell imploding towards the center of a magnetized plasma, a compact toroid (Figure 1). A 3-year experiment (PLX-1) to explore the physics of forming a 2-D plasma liner (shell) by merging plasma jets is described. An overview showing how this 3-year project (PLX-1) fits into the program plan at the national and international level for realizing MTF for energy and propulsion is discussed. Assuming that there will be a parallel program in demonstrating and establishing the underlying physics principles of MTF using whatever liner is appropriate (e.g. a solid liner) with a goal of demonstrating breakeven by 2010, the current research effort at NASA MSFC attempts to complement such a program by addressing the issues of practical embodiment of MTF for propulsion. Successful conclusion of PLX-1 will be followed by a Physics Feasibility Experiment (PLX-2) for the Plasma Liner Driven MTF.

  6. Stretch fast dynamo mechanism via conformal mapping in Riemannian manifolds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia de Andrade, L. C.

    2007-10-01

    Two new analytical solutions of the self-induction equation in Riemannian manifolds are presented. The first represents a twisted magnetic flux tube or flux rope in plasma astrophysics, where the rotation of the flow implies that the poloidal field is amplified from toroidal field, in the spirit of dynamo theory. The value of the amplification depends on the Frenet torsion of the magnetic axis of the tube. Actually this result illustrates the Zeldovich stretch, twist, and fold method to generate dynamos from straight and untwisted ropes. Based on the fact that this problem was previously handled, using a Riemannian geometry of twisted magnetic flux ropes [Phys Plasmas 13, 022309 (2006)], investigation of a second dynamo solution, conformally related to the Arnold kinematic fast dynamo, is obtained. In this solution, it is shown that the conformal effect on the fast dynamo metric enhances the Zeldovich stretch, and therefore a new dynamo solution is obtained. When a conformal mapping is performed in an Arnold fast dynamo line element, a uniform stretch is obtained in the original line element.

  7. Magnetic Helicity and Planetary Dynamos

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shebalin, John V.

    2012-01-01

    A model planetary dynamo based on the Boussinesq approximation along with homogeneous boundary conditions is considered. A statistical theory describing a large-scale MHD dynamo is found, in which magnetic helicity is the critical parameter

  8. Analysis of plasma equilibrium based on orbit-driven current density profile in steady-state plasma on QUEST

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakamura, K., E-mail: nakamura@triam.kyushu-u.ac.jp [RIAM, Kyushu University, Kasuga 816-8580 (Japan); Alam, M.M. [IGSES, Kyushu University, Kasuga 816-8580 (Japan); Jiang, Y.Z. [Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Mitarai, O. [Tokai University, Kumamoto 862-8652 (Japan); Kurihara, K.; Kawamata, Y.; Sueoka, M.; Takechi, M. [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Naka 311-0193 (Japan); Hasegawa, M.; Tokunaga, K.; Araki, K.; Zushi, H.; Hanada, K.; Fujisawa, A.; Idei, H.; Nagashima, Y.; Kawasaki, S.; Nakashima, H.; Higashijima, A.; Nagata, T. [RIAM, Kyushu University, Kasuga 816-8580 (Japan); and others

    2016-11-01

    Highlights: • High energy particle guiding center orbit is calculated as a contour plot of conserved variable. • Current density profile is analyzed based on the orbit-driven current. • Plasma equilibrium is reconstructed by considering the hollow current profile. - Abstract: In the present RF-driven (ECCD) steady-state plasma on QUEST (B{sub t} = 0.25 T, R = 0.68 m, a = 0.40 m), plasma current seems to flow in the open magnetic surface outside of the closed magnetic surface in the low-field region according to plasma current fitting (PCF) method. We consider that the current in the open magnetic surface is due to orbit-driven current by high-energy particles in RF-driven plasma. So based on the analysis of current density profile based on the orbit-driven current, plasma equilibrium is to be calculated. We calculated high energy particles guiding center orbits as a contour plot of conserved variable in Hamiltonian formulation and considered particles initial position with different levels of energy and pitch angles that satisfy resonance condition. Then the profile of orbit-driven current is estimated by multiplying the particle density on the resonance surface and the velocity on the orbits. This analysis shows negative current near the magnetic axis and hollow current profile is expected even if pressure driven current is considered. Considering the hollow current profile shifted toward the low-field region, the equilibrium is fitted by J-EFIT coded by MATLAB.

  9. Mechanically-forced dynamos (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Bars, M.

    2013-12-01

    It is a commonly accepted hypothesis that convection is responsible for planetary dynamos. However, the validity of the convective dynamo model can be questioned in various planets and moons as well as in asteroids, where the constraints from thermal evolution and compositional core models are sometimes difficult to reconcile with available data from paleomagnetism and in situ measurements. Over the last few years, researches have thus been pursued to find alternative mechanisms for sustaining intense three-dimensional motions in liquid cores, a necessary ingredient for planetary dynamo. In particular, mechanical forcings driven by libration, precession, nutation and tides, have received a renewed interest, following the first studies by Malkus in the 60's. A huge reservoir of energy is available in the rotational and orbital motions of all planetary systems. If planetary bodies were completely rigid and rotating at a constant spin rate, their fluid layers in the absence of convection would also behave rigidly and follow the spin of their boundaries. But small periodic perturbations of the shape of the core/mantle boundary (i.e. dynamic tides) and/or small periodic perturbations of the direction of the spin vector (i.e. precession and nutation) and/or small periodic perturbations of the spin rate (i.e. libration) systematically perturb this rigid state. Then, each of these small perturbations is capable of triggering instabilities in fluid layers, conveying energy from the spin and orbital motions to drive intense three-dimensional flows in the liquid cores. With the view to establish a general framework for planetary applications, I will present here the basic physical ingredients of these instabilities, which involve a resonance between the considered mechanical forcing and two inertial waves of the core. I will then review the numerical and experimental validations of this generic principle, and the few magnetohydrodynamic validations of their dynamo capacity

  10. BRIEF COMMUNICATION: On the drift kinetic equation driven by plasma flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaing, K. C.

    2010-07-01

    A drift kinetic equation that is driven by plasma flows has previously been derived by Shaing and Spong 1990 (Phys. Fluids B 2 1190). The terms that are driven by particle speed that is parallel to the magnetic field B have been neglected. Here, such terms are discussed to examine their importance to the equation and to show that these terms do not contribute to the calculations of plasma viscosity in large aspect ratio toroidal plasmas, e.g. tokamaks and stellarators.

  11. Simple Model of the (alpha)(omega) Dynamo: Self-Excited Spheromaks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fowler, T K

    2010-01-26

    The astrophysical {alpha}{omega} dynamo converting angular momentum to magnetic energy can be interpreted as a self-excited Faraday dynamo together with magnetic relaxation coupling the dynamo poloidal field to the toroidal field produced by dynamo currents. Since both toroidal and poloidal fields are involved, the system can be modeled as helicity creation and transport, in a spheromak plasma configuration in quasi-equilibrium on the time scale of changes in magnetic energy. Neutral beams or plasma gun injection across field lines could create self-excited spheromaks in the laboratory.

  12. Evolution over Time of Magentic Dynamo Driven UV & X-ray Emissions of dG-M Stars and Effects on Hosted Planets

    CERN Document Server

    Guinan, Edward F

    2007-01-01

    The evolution over time of the magnetic activity and the resulting X-ray and UV coronal and chromospheric emissions of main-sequence dG, dK, and dM stars with widely different ages are discussed. Young cool stars spin rapidly and have correspondingly very robust magnetic dynamos and strong coronal and chromospheric X-ray - UV (XUV) emissions. However, these stars spin-down with time as they lose angular momentum via magnetized winds and their magnetic generated activity and emissions significantly decrease. Studies of dK-dM stars over a wide range of ages and rotations show similar (but not identical) behavior. Particular emphasis is given to discussing the effects that XUV emissions have on the atmospheres and evolution of solar system planets as well as the increasing number of extrasolar planets found hosted by dG-dM stars. The results from modeling the early atmospheres of Venus, Earth and Mars using recently determined XUV irradiances and inferred winds of the young Sun are also briefly discussed. For ex...

  13. Effect of small scale motions on dynamo actions generated by the Beltrami-like flows

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Mingtian, E-mail: mingtian@sdu.edu.cn

    2016-08-12

    The geodynamo and solar dynamo are driven by the turbulent flows which involve motions of various scales. Of particular interest is what role is played by the small scale motions in these dynamos. In this paper, the integral equation approach is employed to investigate the effect of the small scale motions on dynamo actions driven by multiscale Beltrami-like flows in a cylindrical vessel. The result shows that some small scale motions can trigger a transition of a dynamo from a steady to an unsteady state. Our results also show that when the poloidal components of the small and large scale flows share the same direction in the equatorial plane, the small scale flows have more positive or less detrimental effect on the onsets of the dynamo actions in comparison with the case that the poloidal components have different directions. These findings shed light on the effect of the small scale turbulence on dynamo actions. - Highlights: • Dynamo actions driven by multiscale Beltrami-like flows are investigated. • Some small scale motions induce transition of dynamo from steady to unsteady state. • Direction of small scale poloidal flow has a significant effect on dynamo threshold.

  14. A laboratory study of asymmetric magnetic reconnection in strongly driven plasmas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenberg, M J; Li, C K; Fox, W; Igumenshchev, I; Séguin, F H; Town, R P J; Frenje, J A; Stoeckl, C; Glebov, V; Petrasso, R D

    2015-02-04

    Magnetic reconnection, the annihilation and rearrangement of magnetic fields in a plasma, is a universal phenomenon that frequently occurs when plasmas carrying oppositely directed field lines collide. In most natural circumstances, the collision is asymmetric (the two plasmas having different properties), but laboratory research to date has been limited to symmetric configurations. In addition, the regime of strongly driven magnetic reconnection, where the ram pressure of the plasma dominates the magnetic pressure, as in several astrophysical environments, has also received little experimental attention. Thus, we have designed the experiments to probe reconnection in asymmetric, strongly driven, laser-generated plasmas. Here we show that, in this strongly driven system, the rate of magnetic flux annihilation is dictated by the relative flow velocities of the opposing plasmas and is insensitive to initial asymmetries. In addition, out-of-plane magnetic fields that arise from asymmetries in the three-dimensional plasma geometry have minimal impact on the reconnection rate, due to the strong flows.

  15. Strong Field Spherical Dynamos

    CERN Document Server

    Dormy, Emmanuel

    2014-01-01

    Numerical models of the geodynamo are usually classified in two categories: those denominated dipolar modes, observed when the inertial term is small enough, and multipolar fluctuating dynamos, for stronger forcing. I show that a third dynamo branch corresponding to a dominant force balance between the Coriolis force and the Lorentz force can be produced numerically. This force balance is usually referred to as the strong field limit. This solution co-exists with the often described viscous branch. Direct numerical simulations exhibit a transition from a weak-field dynamo branch, in which viscous effects set the dominant length scale, and the strong field branch in which viscous and inertial effects are largely negligible. These results indicate that a distinguished limit needs to be sought to produce numerical models relevant to the geodynamo and that the usual approach of minimizing the magnetic Prandtl number (ratio of the fluid kinematic viscosity to its magnetic diffusivity) at a given Ekman number is mi...

  16. The Global Solar Dynamo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cameron, R. H.; Dikpati, M.; Brandenburg, A.

    2017-09-01

    A brief summary of the various observations and constraints that underlie solar dynamo research are presented. The arguments that indicate that the solar dynamo is an alpha-omega dynamo of the Babcock-Leighton type are then shortly reviewed. The main open questions that remain are concerned with the subsurface dynamics, including why sunspots emerge at preferred latitudes as seen in the familiar butterfly wings, why the cycle is about 11 years long, and why the sunspot groups emerge tilted with respect to the equator (Joy's law). Next, we turn to magnetic helicity, whose conservation property has been identified with the decline of large-scale magnetic fields found in direct numerical simulations at large magnetic Reynolds numbers. However, magnetic helicity fluxes through the solar surface can alleviate this problem and connect theory with observations, as will be discussed.

  17. The Global Solar Dynamo

    CERN Document Server

    Cameron, R H; Brandenburg, A

    2016-01-01

    A brief summary of the various observations and constraints that underlie solar dynamo research are presented. The arguments that indicate that the solar dynamo is an alpha-omega dynamo of the Babcock-Leighton type are then shortly reviewed. The main open questions that remain are concerned with the subsurface dynamics, including why sunspots emerge at preferred latitudes as seen in the familiar butterfly wings, why the cycle is about 11 years long, and why the sunspot groups emerge tilted with respect to the equator (Joy's law). Next, we turn to magnetic helicity, whose conservation property has been identified with the decline of large-scale magnetic fields found in direct numerical simulations at large magnetic Reynolds numbers. However, magnetic helicity fluxes through the solar surface can alleviate this problem and connect theory with observations, as will be discussed.

  18. Current-less solar wind driven dust acoustic instability in cometary plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vranjes, J. [Belgian Institute for Space Aeronomy, Ringlaan 3, 1180 Brussels (Belgium)

    2011-08-15

    A quantitative analysis is presented of the dust acoustic wave instability driven by the solar and stellar winds. This is a current-less kinetic instability which develops in permeating plasmas, i.e.., when one quasi-neutral electron-ion wind plasma in its propagation penetrates through another quasi-neutral plasma which contains dust, electrons, and ions.

  19. Dynamos and anti-dynamos as thin magnetic flux ropes in Riemannian spaces

    CERN Document Server

    de Andrade, L Garcia

    2007-01-01

    Two examples of magnetic anti-dynamos in magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) are given. The first is a 3D metric conformally related to Arnold cat fast dynamo metric: ${ds_{A}}^{2}=e^{-{\\lambda}z}dp^{2}+e^{{\\lambda}z}dq^{2}+dz^{2}$ is shown to present a behaviour of non-dynamos where the magnetic field exponentially decay in time. The curvature decay as z-coordinates increases without bounds. Some of the Riemann curvature components such as $R_{pzpz}$ also undergoes dissipation while component $R_{qzqz}$ increases without bounds. The remaining curvature component $R_{pqpq}$ is constant on the torus surface. The other anti-dynamo which may be useful in plasma astrophysics is the thin magnetic flux rope or twisted magnetic thin flux tube which also behaves as anti-dynamo since it also decays with time. This model is based on the Riemannian metric of the magnetic twisted flux tube where the axis possesses Frenet curvature and torsion. Since in this last example the Frenet torsion of the axis of the rope is almost zero, o...

  20. Dynamos of giant planets

    CERN Document Server

    Busse, F H; 10.1017/S1743921307000920

    2009-01-01

    Possibilities and difficulties of applying the theory of magnetic field generation by convection flows in rotating spherical fluid shells to the Giant Planets are outlined. Recent progress in the understanding of the distribution of electrical conductivity in the Giant Planets suggests that the dynamo process occurs predominantly in regions of semiconductivity. In contrast to the geodynamo the magnetic field generation in the Giant Planets is thus characterized by strong radial conductivity variations. The importance of the constraint on the Ohmic dissipation provided by the planetary luminosity is emphasized. Planetary dynamos are likely to be of an oscillatory type, although these oscillations may not be evident from the exterior of the planets.

  1. Kinematic dynamo induced by helical waves

    OpenAIRE

    Wei, Xing

    2014-01-01

    We investigate numerically the kinematic dynamo induced by the superposition of two helical waves in a periodic box as a simplified model to understand the dynamo action in astronomical bodies. The effects of magnetic Reynolds number, wavenumber and wave frequency on the dynamo action are studied. It is found that this helical-wave dynamo is a slow dynamo. There exists an optimal wavenumber for the dynamo growth rate. A lower wave frequency facilitates the dynamo action and the oscillations o...

  2. Role of large-scale velocity fluctuations in a two-vortex kinematic dynamo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaplan, E J; Brown, B P; Rahbarnia, K; Forest, C B

    2012-06-01

    This paper presents an analysis of the Dudley-James two-vortex flow, which inspired several laboratory-scale liquid-metal experiments, in order to better demonstrate its relation to astrophysical dynamos. A coordinate transformation splits the flow into components that are axisymmetric and nonaxisymmetric relative to the induced magnetic dipole moment. The reformulation gives the flow the same dynamo ingredients as are present in more complicated convection-driven dynamo simulations. These ingredients are currents driven by the mean flow and currents driven by correlations between fluctuations in the flow and fluctuations in the magnetic field. The simple model allows us to isolate the dynamics of the growing eigenvector and trace them back to individual three-wave couplings between the magnetic field and the flow. This simple model demonstrates the necessity of poloidal advection in sustaining the dynamo and points to the effect of large-scale flow fluctuations in exciting a dynamo magnetic field.

  3. Fluctuation dynamo based on magnetic reconnections

    CERN Document Server

    Baggaley, Andrew W; Shukurov, Anvar; Subramanian, Kandaswamy

    2009-01-01

    We develop a new model of the fluctuation dynamo in which the magnetic field is confined to thin flux ropes advected by a multi-scale flow which models turbulence. Magnetic dissipation occurs only via reconnections of flux ropes. The model is particularly suitable for rarefied plasma, such as the Solar corona or galactic halos. We investigate the kinetic energy release into heat, mediated by dynamo action, both in our model and by solving the induction equation with the same flow. We find that the flux rope dynamo is more than an order of magnitude more efficient at converting mechanical energy into heat. The probability density of the magnetic energy released during reconnections has a power-law form with the slope -3, consistent with the Solar corona heating by nanoflares. We also present a nonlinear extension of the model. This shows that a plausible saturation mechanism of the fluctuation dynamo is the suppression of turbulent magnetic diffusivity, due to suppression of random stretching at the location o...

  4. Fluctuation dynamo based on magnetic reconnections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baggaley, A. W.; Shukurov, A.; Barenghi, C. F.; Subramanian, K.

    2010-01-01

    We develop a new model of the fluctuation dynamo in which the magnetic field is confined to thin flux ropes advected by a multi-scale flow which models turbulence. Magnetic dissipation occurs only via reconnections of flux ropes. The model is particularly suitable for rarefied plasma, such as the solar corona or galactic halos. We investigate the kinetic energy release into heat, mediated by dynamo action, both in our model and by solving the induction equation with the same flow. We find that the flux rope dynamo is more than an order of magnitude more efficient at converting mechanical energy into heat. The probability density of the magnetic energy released during reconnections has a power-law form with the slope -3, consistent with the solar corona heating by nanoflares. We also present a nonlinear extension of the model. This shows that a plausible saturation mechanism of the fluctuation dynamo is the suppression of turbulent magnetic diffusivity, due to suppression of random stretching at the location of the flux ropes. We confirm that the probability distribution function of the magnetic line curvature has a power-law form suggested by \\citet{Sheck:2002b}. We argue, however, using our results that this does not imply a persistent folded structure of magnetic field, at least in the nonlinear stage.

  5. Stochastic flux freezing and magnetic dynamo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eyink, Gregory L

    2011-05-01

    Magnetic flux conservation in turbulent plasmas at high magnetic Reynolds numbers is argued neither to hold in the conventional sense nor to be entirely broken, but instead to be valid in a statistical sense associated to the "spontaneous stochasticity" of Lagrangian particle trajectories. The latter phenomenon is due to the explosive separation of particles undergoing turbulent Richardson diffusion, which leads to a breakdown of Laplacian determinism for classical dynamics. Empirical evidence is presented for spontaneous stochasticity, including numerical results. A Lagrangian path-integral approach is then exploited to establish stochastic flux freezing for resistive hydromagnetic equations and to argue, based on the properties of Richardson diffusion, that flux conservation must remain stochastic at infinite magnetic Reynolds number. An important application of these results is the kinematic, fluctuation dynamo in nonhelical, incompressible turbulence at magnetic Prandtl number (Pr(m)) equal to unity. Numerical results on the Lagrangian dynamo mechanisms by a stochastic particle method demonstrate a strong similarity between the Pr(m)=1 and 0 dynamos. Stochasticity of field-line motion is an essential ingredient of both. Finally, some consequences for nonlinear magnetohydrodynamic turbulence, dynamo, and reconnection are briefly considered.

  6. AWAKE, The Advanced Proton Driven Plasma Wakefield Acceleration Experiment at CERN

    OpenAIRE

    Gschwendtner, E; Adli, E.; Bingham, R.; Biskup, B.; Bohl, T.; Bracco, C.; Burrows, P.N.; Burt, G.; Buttenschon, B.; Butterworth, A.(CERN, Geneva, Switzerland); Caldwell, A.; Cascella, M.; AMORIM, L.; Chevallay, E.; Cipiccia, S.

    2016-01-01

    The Advanced Proton Driven Plasma Wakefield Acceleration Experiment (AWAKE) aims at studying plasma wakefield generation and electron acceleration driven by proton bunches. It is a proof-of-principle R&D; experiment at CERN and the world׳s first proton driven plasma wakefield acceleration experiment. The AWAKE experiment will be installed in the former CNGS facility and uses the 400 GeV/c proton beam bunches from the SPS. The first experiments will focus on the self-modulation instability of ...

  7. The Karlsruhe Dynamo Experiment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available It has been shown theoretically in the past that homogeneous dynamos may occur in electrically conducting fluids for various vortical velocity fields. Roberts (1972 investigated spatially periodic, infinitely extended fields of vortices which Busse (1978, 1992 confined to a finite cylindrical domain. Based on Busse's vortex arrangement a conceptual design for an experimental homogeneous dynamo has been developed and a test facility was setup at the Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe. The first experiments demonstrated that permanent dynamo action can be generated in a cylindrical container filled with liquid sodium in which by means of guide tubes counterrotating and countercurrent spiral vortices are established. The dynamo is self-exciting and the magnetic field saturates at a mean value for fixed super-critical flow rates. The instantaneous magnetic field fluctuates around this mean value by an order of about 5%. As predicted by theory the mode of the observed magnetic field is non-axisymmetric. In a series of experiments a phase- and a bifurcation diagram has been derived as a function of the spiral and axial flow rates.

  8. Generation of powerful terahertz emission in a beam-driven strong plasma turbulence

    OpenAIRE

    Arzhannikov, A.V.; Timofeev, I. V.

    2012-01-01

    Generation of terahertz electromagnetic radiation due to coalescence of upper-hybrid waves in the long-wavelength region of strong plasma turbulence driven by a high-current relativistic electron beam in a magnetized plasma is investigated. The width of frequency spectrum as well as angular characteristics of this radiation for various values of plasma density and turbulence energy are calculated using the simple theoretical model adequately describing beam-plasma experiments at mirror traps....

  9. A global galactic dynamo with a corona constrained by relative helicity

    CERN Document Server

    Prasad, A

    2015-01-01

    We present a model for a global axisymmetric turbulent dynamo operating in a galaxy with a corona which treats the supernovae (SNe) and magneto-rotational instability (MRI) driven turbulence parameters under a common formalism. The nonlinear quenching of the dynamo is alleviated by inclusion of small-scale advective and diffusive magnetic helicity fluxes, which allow the gauge invariant magnetic helicity to be transferred outside the disk and consequently build up a corona during the course of dynamo action. The time-dependent dynamo equations are expressed in a separable form and solved through an eigenvector expansion constructed using the steady-state solutions of the dynamo equation. The parametric evolution of the dynamo solution allows us to estimate the final structure of the global magnetic field and the saturated value of the turbulence parameter $\\alpha_m$, even before solving the dynamical equations for evolution of magnetic fields in the disk and the corona, along with $\\alpha$-quenching. We then ...

  10. Kinetic Magnetorotational Turbulence and Dynamo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kunz, Matthew; Stone, James; Quataert, Eliot

    2016-10-01

    Low-luminosity black-hole accretion flows, such as that at the Galactic center, are collisionless. A kinetic approach is thus necessary to understand the transport of heat and angular momentum, the acceleration of particles, and the growth and structure of the magnetic field in these systems. We present results from the first 6D kinetic numerical simulation of magnetorotational turbulence and dynamo, using the local shearing-box model. Special attention will be paid to the enhanced transport of angular momentum by field-aligned pressure anisotropies, as well as to the ion-Larmor-scale kinetic instabilities (firehose, mirror, ion-cyclotron) which regulate those anisotropies. Energy spectra and phase-space evolution will be discussed. Time permitting, dedicated nonlinear studies of firehose and mirror instabilities in a shearing plasma will also be presented as a complement to the study of the magnetorotational instability. The profits, perils, and price of using a kinetic approach will be briefly mentioned.

  11. Searching for the fastest dynamo: laminar ABC flows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexakis, Alexandros

    2011-08-01

    The growth rate of the dynamo instability as a function of the magnetic Reynolds number R(M) is investigated by means of numerical simulations for the family of the Arnold-Beltrami-Childress (ABC) flows and for two different forcing scales. For the ABC flows that are driven at the largest available length scale, it is found that, as the magnetic Reynolds number is increased: (a) The flow that results first in a dynamo is the 2 1/2-dimensional flow for which A=B and C=0 (and all permutations). (b) The second type of flow that results in a dynamo is the one for which A=B≃2C/5 (and permutations). (c) The most symmetric flow, A=B=C, is the third type of flow that results in a dynamo. (d) As R(M) is increased, the A=B=C flow stops being a dynamo and transitions from a local maximum to a third-order saddle point. (e) At larger R(M), the A=B=C flow reestablishes itself as a dynamo but remains a saddle point. (f) At the largest examined R(M), the growth rate of the 2 1/2-dimensional flows starts to decay, the A=B=C flow comes close to a local maximum again, and the flow A=B≃2C/5 (and permutations) results in the fastest dynamo with growth rate γ≃0.12 at the largest examined R(M). For the ABC flows that are driven at the second largest available length scale, it is found that (a) the 2 1/2-dimensional flows A=B,C=0 (and permutations) are again the first flows that result in a dynamo with a decreased onset. (b) The most symmetric flow, A=B=C, is the second type of flow that results in a dynamo. It is, and it remains, a local maximum. (c) At larger R(M), the flow A=B≃2C/5 (and permutations) appears as the third type of flow that results in a dynamo. As R(M) is increased, it becomes the flow with the largest growth rate. The growth rates appear to have some correlation with the Lyapunov exponents, but constructive refolding of the field lines appears equally important in determining the fastest dynamo flow.

  12. Differential Rotation in Solar Convective Dynamo Simulations

    CERN Document Server

    Fan, Yuhong

    2015-01-01

    We carry out a magneto-hydrodynamic (MHD) simulation of convective dynamo in the rotating solar convective envelope driven by the solar radiative diffusive heat flux. The simulation is similar to that reported in Fan & Fang (2014) but with further reduced viscosity and magnetic diffusion. The resulting convective dynamo produces a large scale mean field that exhibits similar irregular cyclic behavior and polarity reversals, and self-consistently maintains a solar-like differential rotation. The main driver for the solar-like differential rotation (with faster rotating equator) is a net outward transport of angular momentum away from the rotation axis by the Reynolds stress, and we found that this transport is enhanced with reduced viscosity and magnetic diffusion.

  13. Helioseismic Data Assimilation in Solar Dynamo Models

    CERN Document Server

    Muñoz-Jaramillo, Andrés; Martens, Petrus C H

    2008-01-01

    An essential ingredient in kinematic dynamo models is the velocity field within the solar convection zone. In particular, the differential rotation is now well constrained by helioseismic observations. Helioseismology also gives us information about the depth-dependence of the meridional circulation in the near-surface layers. The typical velocity inputs used in solar dynamo models, however, continue to be an analytic fit to the observed differential rotation and a theoretically constructed meridional flow profile that matches only the peak flow speed at the surface. Here we take the first steps towards realistic helioseismic data assimilation, by presenting methodologies for constructing differential rotation and meridional circulation profiles that more closely conform to the observational constraints currently available. We also present simulations driven by the assimilated rotation and four plausible profiles for the internal meridional circulation -- all of which match the helioseismically inferred near-...

  14. Differential rotation in solar convective dynamo simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Yuhong; Fang, Fang

    2016-10-01

    We carry out a magneto-hydrodynamic (MHD) simulation of convective dynamo in the rotating solar convective envelope driven by the solar radiative diffusive heat flux. The simulation is similar to that reported in Fan and Fang (2014) but with further reduced viscosity and magnetic diffusion. The resulting convective dynamo produces a large scale mean field that exhibits similar irregular cyclic behavior and polarity reversals, and self-consistently maintains a solar-like differential rotation. The main driver for the solar-like differential rotation (with faster rotating equator) is a net outward transport of angular momentum away from the rotation axis by the Reynolds stress, and we found that this transport is enhanced with reduced viscosity and magnetic diffusion.

  15. Magnetic Helicities and Dynamo Action in Magneto-rotational Turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bodo, G.; Cattaneo, F.; Mignone, A.; Rossi, P.

    2017-07-01

    We examine the relationship between magnetic flux generation, taken as an indicator of large-scale dynamo action, and magnetic helicity, computed as an integral over the dynamo volume, in a simple dynamo. We consider dynamo action driven by magneto-rotational turbulence (MRT) within the shearing-box approximation. We consider magnetically open boundary conditions that allow a flux of helicity in or out of the computational domain. We circumvent the problem of the lack of gauge invariance in open domains by choosing a particular gauge—the winding gauge—that provides a natural interpretation in terms of the average winding number of pairwise field lines. We use this gauge precisely to define and measure the helicity and the helicity flux for several realizations of dynamo action. We find in these cases that the system as a whole does not break reflectional symmetry and that the total helicity remains small even in cases when substantial magnetic flux is generated. We find no particular connection between the generation of magnetic flux and the helicity or the helicity flux through the boundaries. We suggest that this result may be due to the essentially nonlinear nature of the dynamo processes in MRT.

  16. The Feasibility of Applying AC Driven Low-Temperature Plasma for Multi-Cycle Detonation Initiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Dianfeng

    2016-11-01

    Ignition is a key system in pulse detonation engines (PDE). As advanced ignition methods, nanosecond pulse discharge low-temperature plasma ignition is used in some combustion systems, and continuous alternating current (AC) driven low-temperature plasma using dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) is used for the combustion assistant. However, continuous AC driven plasmas cannot be used for ignition in pulse detonation engines. In this paper, experimental and numerical studies of pneumatic valve PDE using an AC driven low-temperature plasma igniter were described. The pneumatic valve was jointly designed with the low-temperature plasma igniter, and the numerical simulation of the cold-state flow field in the pneumatic valve showed that a complex flow in the discharge area, along with low speed, was beneficial for successful ignition. In the experiments ethylene was used as the fuel and air as oxidizing agent, ignition by an AC driven low-temperature plasma achieved multi-cycle intermittent detonation combustion on a PDE, the working frequency of the PDE reached 15 Hz and the peak pressure of the detonation wave was approximately 2.0 MPa. The experimental verifications of the feasibility in PDE ignition expanded the application field of AC driven low-temperature plasma. supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China (No. 51176001)

  17. Schlieren High Speed Imaging on Fluid Flow in Liquid Induced by Plasma-driven Interfacial Forces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Janis; Foster, John

    2016-10-01

    Effective plasma-based water purification depends heavily on the transport of plasma-derived reactive species from the plasma into the liquid. Plasma interactions at the liquid-gas boundary are known to drive circulation in the bulk liquid. This forced circulation is not well understood. A 2-D plasma- in-liquid water apparatus is currently being investigated as a means to study the plasma-liquid interface to understand not only reactive species flows but to also understand plasma- driven fluid dynamic effects in the bulk fluid. Using Schlieren high speed imaging, plasma-induced density gradients near the interfacial region and into the bulk solution are measured to investigate the nature of these interfacial forces. Plasma-induced flow was also measured using particle imaging velocimetry. NSF CBET 1336375 and DOE DE-SC0001939.

  18. Experimental Results on Current-Driven Turbulence in Plasmas - a Survey

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dekluiver, H.; Perepelkin, N. F.; Hirose, A.

    1991-01-01

    The experimental consequences of plasma turbulence driven by a current parallel to a magnetic field and concurrent anomalous plasma heating are reviewed, with an attempt to deduce universalities in key parameters such as the anomalous electrical conductivities observed in diverse devices. It has

  19. Parker's dynamo and geomagnetic reversals

    CERN Document Server

    Reshetnyak, M

    2011-01-01

    Fluctuations of the alpha-effect which break equatorial symmetry of the flow in the kinematic Parker's dynamo are considered. We show, that even small (a few percents) fluctuation can leed to the substantial assymmetry of the magnetic field in the hemispheres as well as the propagation of the dynamo wave through the equator plane. We also consider how change of the dynamo number can be used to explain different regimes of magnetic field generation in geodynamo.

  20. Oscillating two-stream instability of laser wakefield-driven plasma wave

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Nafis Ahmad; V K Tripathi; Moiz Ahmad; M Rafat

    2016-01-01

    The laser wakefield-driven plasma wave in a low-density plasma is seen to be susceptible to the oscillating two-stream instability (OTSI). The plasma wave couples to two short wavelength plasma wave sidebands. The pump plasma wave and sidebands exert a ponderomotive force on the electrons driving a low-frequency quasimode. The electron density perturbation associated with this mode couples with the pump-driven electron oscillatory velocity to produce nonlinear currents driving the sidebands. At large pump amplitude, the instability grows faster than the ion plasma frequency and ions do not play a significant role. The growth rate of the quasimode, at large pump amplitude scales faster than linear. The growth rate is maximum for an optimum wave number of the quasimode and also increases with pump amplitude. Nonlocal effects, however reduce the growth rate by about half.

  1. Mathematical aspects of natural dynamos

    CERN Document Server

    Dormy, Emmanuel

    2007-01-01

    Although the origin of Earth's and other celestial bodies' magnetic fields remains unknown, we do know that the motion of electrically conducting fluids generates and maintains these fields, forming the basis of magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) and, to a larger extent, dynamo theory. Answering the need for a comprehensive, interdisciplinary introduction to this area, ""Mathematical Aspects of Natural Dynamos"" provides a foundation in dynamo theory before moving on to modeling aspects of natural dynamos.Bringing together eminent international contributors, the book first introduces governing equatio

  2. Zonal flow driven by energetic particle during magneto-hydro-dynamic burst in a toroidal plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohshima, S.; Fujisawa, A.; Shimizu, A.; Nakano, H.; Iguchi, H.; Yoshimura, Y.; Nagaoka, K.; Minami, T.; Isobe, M.; Nishimura, S.; Suzuki, C.; Akiyama, T.; Takahashi, C.; Takeuchi, M.; Ito, T.; Watari, T.; Kumazawa, R.; Itoh, S.-I.; Itoh, K.; Matsuoka, K.; Okamura, S.

    2007-11-01

    The internal structural measurements of electric field and density using twin heavy ion beam probes have been performed to elucidate the nonlinear evolution of the magneto-hydro-dynamic (MHD) bursty phenomenon driven by the interaction with high-energy particles in a toroidal plasma. The results have given the finest observation of the internal structure of plasma quantities, such as electric field, density and magnetic field distortion, which nonlinearly develop during the MHD phenomenon. In particular, the finding of a new kind of oscillating zonal flow driven by interaction between energetic particles and MHD modes should be emphasized for burning state plasmas.

  3. AWAKE, The Advanced Proton Driven Plasma Wakefield Acceleration Experiment at CERN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gschwendtner, E.; Adli, E.; Amorim, L.; Apsimon, R.; Assmann, R.; Bachmann, A.-M.; Batsch, F.; Bauche, J.; Berglyd Olsen, V. K.; Bernardini, M.; Bingham, R.; Biskup, B.; Bohl, T.; Bracco, C.; Burrows, P. N.; Burt, G.; Buttenschön, B.; Butterworth, A.; Caldwell, A.; Cascella, M.; Chevallay, E.; Cipiccia, S.; Damerau, H.; Deacon, L.; Dirksen, P.; Doebert, S.; Dorda, U.; Farmer, J.; Fedosseev, V.; Feldbaumer, E.; Fiorito, R.; Fonseca, R.; Friebel, F.; Gorn, A. A.; Grulke, O.; Hansen, J.; Hessler, C.; Hofle, W.; Holloway, J.; Hüther, M.; Jaroszynski, D.; Jensen, L.; Jolly, S.; Joulaei, A.; Kasim, M.; Keeble, F.; Li, Y.; Liu, S.; Lopes, N.; Lotov, K. V.; Mandry, S.; Martorelli, R.; Martyanov, M.; Mazzoni, S.; Mete, O.; Minakov, V. A.; Mitchell, J.; Moody, J.; Muggli, P.; Najmudin, Z.; Norreys, P.; Öz, E.; Pardons, A.; Pepitone, K.; Petrenko, A.; Plyushchev, G.; Pukhov, A.; Rieger, K.; Ruhl, H.; Salveter, F.; Savard, N.; Schmidt, J.; Seryi, A.; Shaposhnikova, E.; Sheng, Z. M.; Sherwood, P.; Silva, L.; Soby, L.; Sosedkin, A. P.; Spitsyn, R. I.; Trines, R.; Tuev, P. V.; Turner, M.; Verzilov, V.; Vieira, J.; Vincke, H.; Wei, Y.; Welsch, C. P.; Wing, M.; Xia, G.; Zhang, H.

    2016-09-01

    The Advanced Proton Driven Plasma Wakefield Acceleration Experiment (AWAKE) aims at studying plasma wakefield generation and electron acceleration driven by proton bunches. It is a proof-of-principle R&D experiment at CERN and the world's first proton driven plasma wakefield acceleration experiment. The AWAKE experiment will be installed in the former CNGS facility and uses the 400 GeV/c proton beam bunches from the SPS. The first experiments will focus on the self-modulation instability of the long (rms ~12 cm) proton bunch in the plasma. These experiments are planned for the end of 2016. Later, in 2017/2018, low energy (~15 MeV) electrons will be externally injected into the sample wakefields and be accelerated beyond 1 GeV. The main goals of the experiment will be summarized. A summary of the AWAKE design and construction status will be presented.

  4. AWAKE, The Advanced Proton Driven Plasma Wakefield Acceleration Experiment at CERN

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gschwendtner, E. [CERN, Geneva (Switzerland); Adli, E. [University of Oslo, Oslo 0316 (Norway); Amorim, L. [GoLP/Instituto de Plasmas e Fusão Nuclear, Instituto Superior Técnico, Universidade de Lisboa, Lisbon (Portugal); Apsimon, R. [Cockcroft Institute, Warrington WA4 4AD (United Kingdom); Lancaster University, Lancaster LA1 4YR (United Kingdom); Assmann, R. [DESY, Notkestrasse 85, 22607 Hamburg (Germany); Bachmann, A.-M.; Batsch, F. [Max Planck Institute for Physics, Föhringer Ring 6, München 80805 (Germany); Bauche, J. [CERN, Geneva (Switzerland); Berglyd Olsen, V.K. [University of Oslo, Oslo 0316 (Norway); Bernardini, M. [CERN, Geneva (Switzerland); Bingham, R. [STFC Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Didcot OX11 0QX (United Kingdom); Biskup, B. [CERN, Geneva (Switzerland); Czech Technical University, Zikova 1903/4, 166 36 Praha 6 (Czech Republic); Bohl, T.; Bracco, C. [CERN, Geneva (Switzerland); Burrows, P.N. [John Adams Institute for Accelerator Science, Oxford (United Kingdom); University of Oxford, Oxford OX1 2JD (United Kingdom); Burt, G. [Cockcroft Institute, Warrington WA4 4AD (United Kingdom); Buttenschön, B. [Max Planck Institute for Plasma Physics, Wendelsteinstr. 1, Greifswald 17491 (Germany); Butterworth, A. [CERN, Geneva (Switzerland); Caldwell, A. [Max Planck Institute for Physics, Föhringer Ring 6, München 80805 (Germany); Cascella, M. [UCL, Gower Street, London WC1E 6BT (United Kingdom); and others

    2016-09-01

    The Advanced Proton Driven Plasma Wakefield Acceleration Experiment (AWAKE) aims at studying plasma wakefield generation and electron acceleration driven by proton bunches. It is a proof-of-principle R&D experiment at CERN and the world's first proton driven plasma wakefield acceleration experiment. The AWAKE experiment will be installed in the former CNGS facility and uses the 400 GeV/c proton beam bunches from the SPS. The first experiments will focus on the self-modulation instability of the long (rms ~12 cm) proton bunch in the plasma. These experiments are planned for the end of 2016. Later, in 2017/2018, low energy (~15 MeV) electrons will be externally injected into the sample wakefields and be accelerated beyond 1 GeV. The main goals of the experiment will be summarized. A summary of the AWAKE design and construction status will be presented.

  5. AWAKE, The Advanced Proton Driven Plasma Wakefield Acceleration Experiment at CERN

    CERN Document Server

    Gschwendtner, E.; Amorim, L.; Apsimon, R.; Assmann, R.; Bachmann, A.M.; Batsch, F.; Bauche, J.; Berglyd Olsen, V.K.; Bernardini, M.; Bingham, R.; Biskup, B.; Bohl, T.; Bracco, C.; Burrows, P.N.; Burt, G.; Buttenschon, B.; Butterworth, A.; Caldwell, A.; Cascella, M.; Chevallay, E.; Cipiccia, S.; Damerau, H.; Deacon, L.; Dirksen, P.; Doebert, S.; Dorda, U.; Farmer, J.; Fedosseev, V.; Feldbaumer, E.; Fiorito, R.; Fonseca, R.; Friebel, F.; Gorn, A.A.; Grulke, O.; Hansen, J.; Hessler, C.; Hofle, W.; Holloway, J.; Huther, M.; Jaroszynski, D.; Jensen, L.; Jolly, S.; Joulaei, A.; Kasim, M.; Keeble, F.; Li, Y.; Liu, S.; Lopes, N.; Lotov, K.V.; Mandry, S.; Martorelli, R.; Martyanov, M.; Mazzoni, S.; Mete, O.; Minakov, V.A.; Mitchell, J.; Moody, J.; Muggli, P.; Najmudin, Z.; Norreys, P.; Oz, E.; Pardons, A.; Pepitone, K.; Petrenko, A.; Plyushchev, G.; Pukhov, A.; Rieger, K.; Ruhl, H.; Salveter, F.; Savard, N.; Schmidt, J.; Seryi, A.; Shaposhnikova, E.; Sheng, Z.M.; Sherwood, P.; Silva, L.; Soby, L.; Sosedkin, A.P.; Spitsyn, R.I.; Trines, R.; Tuev, P.V.; Turner, M.; Verzilov, V.; Vieira, J.; Vincke, H.; Wei, Y.; Welsch, C.P.; Wing, M.; Xia, G.; Zhang, H.

    2016-01-01

    The Advanced Proton Driven Plasma Wakefield Acceleration Experiment (AWAKE) aims at studying plasma wakefield generation and electron acceleration driven by proton bunches. It is a proof-of-principle R&D experiment at CERN and the world's first proton driven plasma wakefield acceleration experiment. The AWAKE experiment will be installed in the former CNGS facility and uses the 400 GeV/c proton beam bunches from the SPS. The first experiments will focus on the self-modulation instability of the long (rms ~12 cm) proton bunch in the plasma. These experiments are planned for the end of 2016. Later, in 2017/2018, low energy (~15 MeV) electrons will be externally injected to sample the wakefields and be accelerated beyond 1 GeV. The main goals of the experiment will be summarized. A summary of the AWAKE design and construction status will be presented.

  6. Comparison of terrestrial and solar dynamos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Keke [Center for Geophysical and Astrophysical Fluid Dynamics, Department of Mathematical Sciences, University of Exeter, EX4 4QE (United Kingdom); Schubert, Gerald [Department of Earth and Space Sciences, Institute of Geophysics and Planetary Physics, University of California, Los Angeles, California 90095-1567 (United States)

    2006-05-01

    The Earth's magnetic field has undergone temporal and spatial variations including polarity reversals. Paleomagnetic and historical magnetic field measurements suggest persistent distinct patterns of variation of the geomagnetic field taking place in different regions of the Earth. These patterns can be explained by core-mantle thermal interaction in which lateral variations in heat flux across the core-mantle boundary drive core flows at the top of the Earth's fluid core. The solar magnetic field has also undergone variation on widely separated scales. It is generally believed that the nearly 22-year sunspot cycle and its spatial symmetry with respect to the equator are a consequence of magnetohydrodynamic processes taking place in a highly differentially rotating layer between the convective and radiative regions of the Sun. For the Earth, the task of modelling an Earth-like and self-sustaining dynamo remains a major challenge because of the length scale disparities associated with the extremely small Ekman number of the Earth's fluid outer core. The scale disparities are not only the root of severe difficulties in modelling the geodynamo but they are also characteristic of the geodynamo dynamics. For the Sun, the solar tachocline offers an ideal location for the generation and storage of the Sun's strong azimuthal magnetic fields while the large-scale solar surface magnetic activity represents the rising and emerging of deep-seated, strong toroidal magnetic fields driven by magnetic buoyancy. However, a global solar dynamo model which dynamically incorporates the radiative core and is capable of reproducing a self-consistent and nearly solid-body rotating core with an overlying strongly radial shear layer remains a major challenge. Significant progress has been made towards understanding the complex dynamo processes in the Earth and Sun. We discuss the main differences and similarities between the geomagnetic and solar magnetic fields. We

  7. Schlieren Cinematography of Current Driven Plasma Jet Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loebner, Keith; Underwood, Thomas; Cappelli, Mark

    2016-10-01

    Schlieren cinematography of a pulsed plasma deflagration jet is presented and analyzed. An ultra-high frame rate CMOS camera coupled to a Z-type laser Schlieren apparatus is used to obtain flow-field refractometry data for the continuous flow Z-pinch formed within the plasma deflagration jet. The 10 MHz frame rate for 256 consecutive frames provides high temporal resolution, enabling turbulent fluctuations and plasma instabilities to be visualized over the course of a single pulse (20 μs). The Schlieren signal is radiometrically calibrated to obtain a two dimensional mapping of the refraction angle of the axisymmetric pinch plasma, and this mapping is then Abel inverted to derive the plasma density distribution as a function radius, axial coordinate, and time. Analyses of previously unknown discharge characteristics and comparisons with prior work are discussed.

  8. Galactic dynamos supported by magnetic helicity fluxes

    CERN Document Server

    Sur, S; Subramanian, K; Sur, Sharanya; Shukurov, Anvar; Subramanian, Kandaswamy

    2006-01-01

    We present a simple semi-analytical model of nonlinear, mean-field galactic dynamos and use it to study the effects of various magnetic helicity fluxes. The dynamo equations are reduced using the `no-$z$' approximation to a nonlinear system of ordinary differential equations in time; we demonstrate that the model reproduces accurately earlier results, including those where nonlinear behaviour is driven by a magnetic helicity flux. We discuss the implications and interplay of two types of magnetic helicity flux, one produced by advection (e.g., due to the galactic fountain or wind) and the other, arising from anisotropy of turbulence as suggested by Vishniac & Cho(2001). We argue that the latter is significant if the galactic differential rotation is strong enough: in our model, for $\\Rw\\la-10$ in terms of the corresponding turbulent magnetic Reynolds number. We confirm that the intensity of gas outflow from the galactic disc optimal for the dynamo action is close to that expected for normal spiral galaxie...

  9. Plasma transport driven by the Rayleigh-Taylor instability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, X.; Delamere, P. A.; Otto, A.

    2016-06-01

    Two important differences between the giant magnetospheres (i.e., Jupiter's and Saturn's magnetospheres) and the terrestrial magnetosphere are the internal plasma sources and the fast planetary rotation. Thus, there must be a radially outward flow to transport the plasma to avoid infinite accumulation of plasma. This radial outflow also carries the magnetic flux away from the inner magnetosphere due to the frozen-in condition. As such, there also must be a radial inward flow to refill the magnetic flux in the inner magnetosphere. Due to the similarity between Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) instability and the centrifugal instability, we use a three-dimensional RT instability to demonstrate that an interchange instability can form a convection flow pattern, locally twisting the magnetic flux, consequently forming a pair of high-latitude reconnection sites. This process exchanges a part of the flux tube, thereby transporting the plasma radially outward without requiring significant latitudinal convection of magnetic flux in the ionosphere.

  10. Particle balance in long duration RF driven plasmas on QUEST

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hanada, K., E-mail: hanada@triam.kyushu-u.ac.jp [Research Institute for Applied Mechanics, Kyushu University, 6-1, Kasuga-Koen, Kasuga, Fukuoka 812-8580 (Japan); Zushi, H.; Yoshida, N. [Research Institute for Applied Mechanics, Kyushu University, 6-1, Kasuga-Koen, Kasuga, Fukuoka 812-8580 (Japan); Yugami, N.; Honda, T. [Interdisciplinary Graduate School of Engineering Science, Kyushu University, 6-1, Kasuga-Koen, Kasuga, Fukuoka 816-8580 (Japan); Hasegawa, M. [Research Institute for Applied Mechanics, Kyushu University, 6-1, Kasuga-Koen, Kasuga, Fukuoka 812-8580 (Japan); Mishra, K. [Interdisciplinary Graduate School of Engineering Science, Kyushu University, 6-1, Kasuga-Koen, Kasuga, Fukuoka 816-8580 (Japan); Kuzmin, A.; Nakamura, K.; Fujisawa, A.; Idei, H.; Nagashima, Y.; Watanabe, O.; Onchi, T.; Watanabe, H.; Tokunaga, K.; Higashijima, A.; Kawasaki, S.; Nakashima, H. [Research Institute for Applied Mechanics, Kyushu University, 6-1, Kasuga-Koen, Kasuga, Fukuoka 812-8580 (Japan); Takase, Y. [Graduate School of Frontier Science, University of Tokyo (Japan); and others

    2015-08-15

    Global particle balance in non-inductive long-duration plasma on QUEST has been investigated. Approximately 70% of the fuel hydrogen (H) was retained in the wall and then was almost exhausted just after the discharge. The global recycling ratio (R{sub g}), defined as the ratio of the evacuated H{sub 2} flux to that injected, was found to gradually increase during discharges and subsequently rose rapidly. To study the growth of R{sub g}, the thermal desorption spectra after deuterium implantation in a specimen exposed to QUEST plasma was analyzed with a model which includes reflection, diffusion, solution, recombination, trapping, and plasma-induced desorption in the re-deposition layer. The model reconstructs the growth of R{sub g} during a long-duration plasma and indicates solution plays a dominant role in the growth.

  11. Study of Plasma Liner Driven Magnetized Target Fusion Via Advanced Simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Samulyak, Roman V. [State Univ. of New York (SUNY), Stony Brook, NY (United States); Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Parks, Paul [General Atomics, San Diego, CA (United States)

    2013-08-31

    The feasibility of the plasma liner driven Magnetized Target Fusion (MTF) via terascale numerical simulations will be assessed. In the MTF concept, a plasma liner, formed by merging of a number (60 or more) of radial, highly supersonic plasma jets, implodes on the target in the form of two compact plasma toroids, and compresses it to conditions of the fusion ignition. By avoiding major difficulties associated with both the traditional laser driven inertial confinement fusion and solid liner driven MTF, the plasma liner driven MTF potentially provides a low-cost and fast R&D path towards the demonstration of practical fusion energy. High fidelity numerical simulations of full nonlinear models associated with the plasma liner MTF using state-of-art numerical algorithms and terascale computing are necessary in order to resolve uncertainties and provide guidance for future experiments. At Stony Brook University, we have developed unique computational capabilities that ideally suite the MTF problem. The FronTier code, developed in collaboration with BNL and LANL under DOE funding including SciDAC for the simulation of 3D multi-material hydro and MHD flows, has beenbenchmarked and used for fundamental and engineering problems in energy science applications. We have performed 3D simulations of converging supersonic plasma jets, their merger and the formation of the plasma liner, and a study of the corresponding oblique shock problem. We have studied the implosion of the plasma liner on the magnetized plasma target by resolving Rayleigh-Taylor instabilities in 2D and 3D and other relevant physics and estimate thermodynamic conditions of the target at the moment of maximum compression and the hydrodynamic efficiency of the method.

  12. The dynamo bifurcation in rotating spherical shells

    CERN Document Server

    Morin, Vincent; 10.1142/S021797920906378X

    2010-01-01

    We investigate the nature of the dynamo bifurcation in a configuration applicable to the Earth's liquid outer core, i.e. in a rotating spherical shell with thermally driven motions. We show that the nature of the bifurcation, which can be either supercritical or subcritical or even take the form of isola (or detached lobes) strongly depends on the parameters. This dependence is described in a range of parameters numerically accessible (which unfortunately remains remote from geophysical application), and we show how the magnetic Prandtl number and the Ekman number control these transitions.

  13. Cause of equatorward migration in global convective dynamo simulations

    CERN Document Server

    Warnecke, Jörn; Käpylä, Maarit J; Brandenburg, Axel

    2014-01-01

    We present results from four convectively-driven stellar dynamo simulations in spherical wedge geometry. All of these simulations produce cyclic and migrating mean magnetic fields. Through detailed comparisons we show that the migration direction can be explained by an $\\alpha\\Omega$ dynamo wave following the Parker--Yoshimura rule. We conclude that the equatorward migration in this and previous work is due to a positive (negative) $\\alpha$ effect in the northern (southern) hemisphere and a negative radial gradient of $\\Omega$ outside the inner tangent cylinder of these models. This idea is supported by a strong correlation between negative radial shear and toroidal field strength in the region of equatorward propagation.

  14. Large Scale Dynamos in Stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vishniac, Ethan T.

    2015-01-01

    We show that a differentially rotating conducting fluid automatically creates a magnetic helicity flux with components along the rotation axis and in the direction of the local vorticity. This drives a rapid growth in the local density of current helicity, which in turn drives a large scale dynamo. The dynamo growth rate derived from this process is not constant, but depends inversely on the large scale magnetic field strength. This dynamo saturates when buoyant losses of magnetic flux compete with the large scale dynamo, providing a simple prediction for magnetic field strength as a function of Rossby number in stars. Increasing anisotropy in the turbulence produces a decreasing magnetic helicity flux, which explains the flattening of the B/Rossby number relation at low Rossby numbers. We also show that the kinetic helicity is always a subdominant effect. There is no kinematic dynamo in real stars.

  15. Properties of Nonlinear Dynamo Waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tobias, S. M.

    1997-01-01

    Dynamo theory offers the most promising explanation of the generation of the sun's magnetic cycle. Mean field electrodynamics has provided the platform for linear and nonlinear models of solar dynamos. However, the nonlinearities included are (necessarily) arbitrarily imposed in these models. This paper conducts a systematic survey of the role of nonlinearities in the dynamo process, by considering the behaviour of dynamo waves in the nonlinear regime. It is demonstrated that only by considering realistic nonlinearities that are non-local in space and time can modulation of the basic dynamo wave he achieved. Moreover, this modulation is greatest when there is a large separation of timescales provided by including a low magnetic Prandtl number in the equation for the velocity perturbations.

  16. A Proton-Driven Plasma Wakefield Acceleration experiment at CERN

    CERN Multimedia

    The AWAKE Collaboration has been formed in order to demonstrate protondriven plasma wakefield acceleration for the first time. This technology could lead to future colliders of high energy but of a much reduced length compared to proposed linear accelerators. The SPS proton beam in the CNGS facility will be injected into a 10m plasma cell where the long proton bunches will be modulated into significantly shorter micro-bunches. These micro-bunches will then initiate a strong wakefield in the plasma with peak fields above 1 GV/m that will be harnessed to accelerate a bunch of electrons from about 20MeV to the GeV scale within a few meters. The experimental program is based on detailed numerical simulations of beam and plasma interactions. The main accelerator components, the experimental area and infrastructure required as well as the plasma cell and the diagnostic equipment are discussed in detail. First protons to the experiment are expected at the end of 2016 and this will be followed by an initial 3–4 yea...

  17. Incoherent synchrotron emission of laser-driven plasma edge

    CERN Document Server

    Serebryakov, D A; Kostyukov, I Yu

    2015-01-01

    When a relativistically intense linearly polarized laser pulse is incident on an overdense plasma, a dense electron layer is formed on the plasma edge which relativistic motion results in high harmonic generation, ion acceleration and incoherent synchrotron emission of gamma-photons. Here we present a self-consistent analytical model that describes the edge motion and apply it to the problem of incoherent synchrotron emission by ultrarelativistic plasma electrons. The model takes into account both coherent radiation reaction from high harmonics and incoherent radiation reaction in the Landau-Lifshitz form. The analytical results are in agreement with 3D particle-in-cell simulations in a certain parameter region that corresponds to the relativistic electronic spring interaction regime.

  18. Incoherent synchrotron emission of laser-driven plasma edge

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Serebryakov, D. A., E-mail: dmserebr@gmail.com; Nerush, E. N.; Kostyukov, I. Yu. [Institute of Applied Physics of the Russian Academy of Sciences, 46 Ulyanov St., Nizhny Novgorod 603950 (Russian Federation); Nizhny Novgorod State University, 23 Gagarin Avenue, Nizhny Novgorod 603950 (Russian Federation)

    2015-12-15

    When a relativistically intense linearly polarized laser pulse is incident on an overdense plasma, a dense electron layer is formed on the plasma edge which relativistic motion results in high harmonic generation, ion acceleration, and incoherent synchrotron emission of gamma-photons. Here we present a self-consistent analytical model that describes the edge motion and apply it to the problem of incoherent synchrotron emission by ultrarelativistic plasma electrons. The model takes into account both coherent radiation reaction from high harmonics and incoherent radiation reaction in the Landau–Lifshitz form. The analytical results are in agreement with 3D particle-in-cell simulations in a certain parameter region that corresponds to the relativistic electronic spring interaction regime.

  19. Incoherent synchrotron emission of laser-driven plasma edge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serebryakov, D. A.; Nerush, E. N.; Kostyukov, I. Yu.

    2015-12-01

    When a relativistically intense linearly polarized laser pulse is incident on an overdense plasma, a dense electron layer is formed on the plasma edge which relativistic motion results in high harmonic generation, ion acceleration, and incoherent synchrotron emission of gamma-photons. Here we present a self-consistent analytical model that describes the edge motion and apply it to the problem of incoherent synchrotron emission by ultrarelativistic plasma electrons. The model takes into account both coherent radiation reaction from high harmonics and incoherent radiation reaction in the Landau-Lifshitz form. The analytical results are in agreement with 3D particle-in-cell simulations in a certain parameter region that corresponds to the relativistic electronic spring interaction regime.

  20. Laser-driven plasma waves in capillary tubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wojda, F; Cassou, K; Genoud, G; Burza, M; Glinec, Y; Lundh, O; Persson, A; Vieux, G; Brunetti, E; Shanks, R P; Jaroszynski, D; Andreev, N E; Wahlström, C-G; Cros, B

    2009-12-01

    The excitation of plasma waves over a length of up to 8 cm is demonstrated using laser guiding of intense laser pulses through hydrogen-filled glass capillary tubes. The plasma waves are diagnosed by spectral analysis of the transmitted laser radiation. The dependence of the spectral redshift-measured as a function of filling pressure, capillary tube length, and incident laser energy-is in excellent agreement with simulation results. The longitudinal accelerating field inferred from the simulations is in the range of 1-10 GV/m.

  1. A "slingshot" laser-driven acceleration mechanism of plasma electrons

    CERN Document Server

    Fiore, Gaetano; Fedele, Renato

    2016-01-01

    We briefly report on the recently proposed [G. Fiore, R. Fedele, U. de Angelis, Phys. Plasmas 21 (2014), 113105], [G. Fiore, S. De Nicola, arXiv:1509.04656] electron acceleration mechanism named "slingshot effect": under suitable conditions the impact of an ultra-short and ultra-intense laser pulse against the surface of a low-density plasma is expected to cause the expulsion of a bunch of superficial electrons with high energy in the direction opposite to that of the pulse propagation; this is due to the interplay of the huge ponderomotive force, huge longitudinal field arising from charge separation, and the finite size of the laser spot.

  2. Dynamo waves in Friedmann and Misner cosmologies

    OpenAIRE

    de Andrade, Garcia

    2015-01-01

    It is shown that Misner metric can be obtained as solution of dynamo waves equations and Friedmann hyperbolic metrics are obtained when the dynamo waves are absent. In the case of dynamo waves ICM fields are computed and galactic dynamos are obtained.

  3. Ion acceleration in non-equilibrium plasmas driven by fast drifting electron

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Castro, G. [INFN- Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, via S.Sofia 62, 95123 Catania (Italy); Università degli Studi di Catania, Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia, V. S.Sofia 64, 95123 Catania (Italy); Di Bartolo, F., E-mail: fdibartolo@unime.it [Università di Messina, V.le F. Stagno D’Alcontres 31, 98166, Messina (Italy); Gambino, N. [INFN- Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, via S.Sofia 62, 95123 Catania (Italy); Università degli Studi di Catania, Dipartimento di Metodologie Fisiche e Chimiche per L’ingegneria, Viale A.Doria 6, 95125 Catania (Italy); Mascali, D. [INFN- Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, via S.Sofia 62, 95123 Catania (Italy); CSFNSM, Viale A. Doria 6, 95125 Catania (Italy); Romano, F.P. [INFN- Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, via S.Sofia 62, 95123 Catania (Italy); CNR-IBAM Via Biblioteca 4, 95124 Catania (Italy); Anzalone, A.; Celona, L.; Gammino, S. [INFN- Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, via S.Sofia 62, 95123 Catania (Italy); Di Giugno, R. [INFN- Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, via S.Sofia 62, 95123 Catania (Italy); Università degli Studi di Catania, Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia, V. S.Sofia 64, 95123 Catania (Italy); Lanaia, D. [INFN- Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, via S.Sofia 62, 95123 Catania (Italy); Miracoli, R. [INFN- Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, via S.Sofia 62, 95123 Catania (Italy); Università degli Studi di Catania, Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia, V. S.Sofia 64, 95123 Catania (Italy); Serafino, T. [CSFNSM, Viale A. Doria 6, 95125 Catania (Italy); Tudisco, S. [INFN- Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, via S.Sofia 62, 95123 Catania (Italy); CSFNSM, Viale A. Doria 6, 95125 Catania (Italy)

    2013-05-01

    We hereby present results on ion acceleration mechanisms in non equilibrium plasmas generated by microwaves or high intensity laser pulses. Experiments point out that in magnetized plasmas X–B conversion takes place for under resonance values of the magnetic field, i.e. an electromagnetic mode is converted into an electrostatic wave. The strong self-generated electric field, of the order of 10{sup 7} V/m, causes a E × B drift which accelerates both ions and electrons, as it is evident by localized sputtering in the plasma chamber. These fields are similar (in magnitude) to the ones obtainable in laser generated plasmas at intensity of 10{sup 12} W/cm{sup 2}. In this latter case, we observe that the acceleration mechanism is driven by electrons drifting much faster than plasma bulk, thus generating an extremely strong electric field ∼10{sup 7} V/m. The two experiments confirm that ions acceleration at low energy is possible with table-top devices and following complementary techniques: i.e. by using microwave-driven (producing CW beams) plasmas, or non-equilibrium laser-driven plasmas (producing pulsed beams). Possible applications involve ion implantation, materials surface modifications, ion beam assisted lithography, etc.

  4. Filamentation instability of current-driven dust ion-acoustic waves in a collisional dusty plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Niknam, A. R. [Laser and Plasma Research Institute, Shahid Beheshti University, G.C., Tehran 19839-63113 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Haghtalab, T.; Khorashadizadeh, S. M. [Physics Department, Birjand University, Birjand 97179-63384 (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2011-11-15

    A theoretical investigation has been made of the dust ion-acoustic filamentation instability in an unmagnetized current-driven dusty plasma by using the Lorentz transformation formulas. The effect of collision between the charged particles with neutrals and their thermal motion on this instability is considered. Developing the filamentation instability of the current-driven dust ion-acoustic wave allows us to determine the period and the establishment time of the filamentation structure and threshold for instability development.

  5. Plasma-driven dissociation of CO2 for fuel synthesis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bongers, Waldo; Bouwmeester, Henny J.M.; Wolf, Bram; Peeters, Floran; Welzel, Stefan; Bekerom, van den Dirk; Harder, den Niek; Goede, Adelbert; Graswinckel, Martijn; Groen, Pieter Willem; Kopecki, Jochen; Leins, Martina; Rooij, van Gerard; Schulz, Andreas; Walker, Matthias; Sanden, van de Richard

    2016-01-01

    Power-to-gas is a storage technology aiming to convert surplus electricity from renewable energy sources like wind and solar power into gaseous fuels compatible with the current network infrastructure. Results of CO2 dissociation in a vortexstabilized microwave plasma reactor are presented. The micr

  6. The Kinematic Theory of Solar Dynamo

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    Generation of the Sun's magnetic fields by self-inductive processes inthe solar electrically conducting interior, the solar dynamo theory, is a fundamen-tally important subject in astrophysics. The kinematic dynamo theory concernshow the magnetic fields are produced by kinematically possible flows without beingconstrained by the dynamic equation. We review a number of basic aspects of thekinematic dynamo theory, including the magnetohydrodynamic approximation forthe dynamo equation, the impossibility of dynamo action with the solar differentialrotation, the Cowling's anti-dynamo theorem in the solar context, the turbulent al-pha effect and recently constructed three-dimensional interface dynamos controlledby the solar tachocline at the base of the convection zone.

  7. Galactic Dynamos and Galactic Winds

    CERN Document Server

    Beck, Rainer

    2007-01-01

    Spiral galaxies host dynamically important magnetic fields which can affect gas flows in the disks and halos. Total magnetic fields in spiral galaxies are strongest (up to 30 \\muG) in the spiral arms where they are mostly turbulent or tangled. Polarized synchrotron emission shows that the resolved regular fields are generally strongest in the interarm regions (up to 15 \\muG). Faraday rotation measures of radio polarization vectors in the disks of several spiral galaxies reveal large-scale patterns which are signatures of coherent fields generated by a mean-field dynamo. -- Magnetic fields are also observed in radio halos around edge-on galaxies at heights of a few kpc above the disk. Cosmic-ray driven galactic winds transport gas and magnetic fields from the disk into the halo. The magnetic energy density is larger than the thermal energy density, but smaller than the kinetic energy density of the outflow. The orientation of field lines allows to estimate the wind speed and direction. There is no observation ...

  8. Plasma ignition schemes for the SNS radio-frequency driven H- source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schenkel, T.; Staples, J.W.; Thomae, W.; Reijonen, J.; Gough, R.A.; Leung, K.N.; Keller, R.

    2001-09-06

    The H{sup -} ion source for the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) is a cesiated, radio-frequency driven (2 MHz) multicusp volume source which operates at a duty cycle of 6% (1 ms pulses and 60 Hz). In pulsed RF driven plasma sources, ignition of the plasma affects the stability of source operation and the antenna lifetime. We are reporting on investigations of different ignition schemes, based on secondary electron generation in the plasma chamber by UV light, a hot filament, a low power RF plasma (cw, 13.56 MHz), as well as source operation solely with the high power (40 kW) 2 MHz RF. We find that the dual frequency, single antenna scheme is most attractive for the operating conditions of the SNS H{sup -} source.

  9. Modelling the dynamo in fully convective M-stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yadav, Rakesh Kumar; Christensen, Ulrich; Morin, Julien; Wolk, Scott; Poppenhaeger, Katja; Reiners, Ansgar; gastine, Thomas

    2017-05-01

    M-stars are among the most active and numerous stars in our galaxy. Their activity plays a fundamentally important role in shaping the exoplanetary biosphere since the habitable zones are very close to these stars. Therefore, modeling M-star activity has become a focal point in habitability studies. The fully convective members of the M-star population demand more immediate attention due to the discovery of Earth-like exoplanets around our stellar neighbors Proxima Centauri and TRAPPIST-1 which are both fully convective. The activity of these stars is driven by their convective dynamo, which may be fundamentally different from the solar dynamo due the absence of radiative cores. We model this dynamo mechanism using high-resolution 3D anelastic MHD simulations. To understand the evolution of the dynamo mechanism we simulate two cases, one with a fast enough rotation period to model a star in the `saturated' regime of the rotation-activity realtionship and the other with a slower period to represent cases in the `unsaturated' regime. We find the rotation period fundamentally controls the behavior of the dynamo solution: faster rotation promotes strong magnetic fields (of order kG) on both small and large length scales and the dipolar component of the magnetic field is dominant and stable, however, slower rotation leads to weaker magnetic fields which exhibit cyclic behavior. In this talk, I will present the simulation results and discuss how we can use them to interpret several observed features of the M-star activity.

  10. Slowing of Magnetic Reconnection Concurrent with Weakening Plasma Inflows and Increasing Collisionality in Strongly Driven Laser-Plasma Experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenberg, M J; Li, C K; Fox, W; Zylstra, A B; Stoeckl, C; Séguin, F H; Frenje, J A; Petrasso, R D

    2015-05-22

    An evolution of magnetic reconnection behavior, from fast jets to the slowing of reconnection and the establishment of a stable current sheet, has been observed in strongly driven, β≲20 laser-produced plasma experiments. This process has been inferred to occur alongside a slowing of plasma inflows carrying the oppositely directed magnetic fields as well as the evolution of plasma conditions from collisionless to collisional. High-resolution proton radiography has revealed unprecedented detail of the forced interaction of magnetic fields and super-Alfvénic electron jets (V_{jet}∼20V_{A}) ejected from the reconnection region, indicating that two-fluid or collisionless magnetic reconnection occurs early in time. The absence of jets and the persistence of strong, stable magnetic fields at late times indicates that the reconnection process slows down, while plasma flows stagnate and plasma conditions evolve to a cooler, denser, more collisional state. These results demonstrate that powerful initial plasma flows are not sufficient to force a complete reconnection of magnetic fields, even in the strongly driven regime.

  11. Phenotype-Driven Plasma Biobanking Strategies and Methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erica A. Bowton

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Biobank development and integration with clinical data from electronic medical record (EMR databases have enabled recent strides in genomic research and personalized medicine. BioVU, Vanderbilt’s DNA biorepository linked to de-identified clinical EMRs, has proven fruitful in its capacity to extensively appeal to numerous areas of biomedical and clinical research, supporting the discovery of genotype-phenotype interactions. Expanding on experiences in BioVU creation and development, we have recently embarked on a parallel effort to collect plasma in addition to DNA from blood specimens leftover after routine clinical testing at Vanderbilt. This initiative offers expanded utility of BioVU by combining proteomic and metabolomic approaches with genomics and/or clinical outcomes, widening the breadth for potential research and subsequent future impact on clinical care. Here, we describe the considerations and components involved in implementing a plasma biobank program from a feasibility assessment through pilot sample collection.

  12. Modeling of high-explosive driven plasma compression opening switches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greene, A. E.; Lindemuth, I. R.; Goforth, J. H.

    The initial path of the current through a plasma compression switch is through a thin (500-nm thick) metal foil. The current explodes the foil to form the seed for the conducting plasma. The behavior of the foil at this point is the same as an exploding metal fuse for which we have a simple model. We have, therefore, chosen this model as our starting point. The fuse model assumes that the foil material is homogeneous and is characterized by a single temperature and density. The thickness of the foil is assumed to be much less than the magnetic diffusion skin depth so that the magnetic field varies linearly across the foil. For the present application we assume that the side of the foil away from the channel is fixed in space while the side by the channel is untamped. The foil/plasma will, therefore, cross the channel at the expansion velocity as the foil explodes. Equations for the electrical resistance of the foil, the magnetic fields, the motion of the foil, and the kinetic and internal energies are all solved selfconsistantly. The electrical resistivity, the pressure, and the specific energy of aluminum are taken from the Los Alamos SESAME EOS library. In the case of aluminum we have created a SESAME-style table based on the theory of More and Lee which we have modified to agree with experiment where possible.

  13. Objective vortex detection in an astrophysical dynamo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rempel, E. L.; Chian, A. C.-L.; Beron-Vera, F. J.; Szanyi, S.; Haller, G.

    2017-03-01

    A novel technique for detecting Lagrangian vortices is applied to a helical magnetohydrodynamic dynamo simulation. The vortices are given by tubular level surfaces of the Lagrangian averaged vorticity deviation, the trajectory integral of the normed difference of the vorticity from its spatial mean. This simple method is objective, i.e. invariant under time-dependent rotations and translations of the coordinate frame. We also adapt the technique to use it on magnetic fields and propose the method of integrated averaged current deviation to determine precisely the boundary of magnetic vortices. The relevance of the results for the study of vortices in solar plasmas is discussed.

  14. Letter of Intent for a Demonstration Experiment in Proton-Driven Plasma Wakefield Acceleration

    CERN Document Server

    Adli, E; Assmann, R; Bingham, R; Caldwell, A; Chattopadhyay, S; Delerue, N; Dias, F M; Efthymiopoulos, I; Elsen, E; Fartoukh, S; Ferreira, C M; Fonseca, R A; Geschonke, G; Goddard, B; Gruelke, O; Hessler, C; Hillenbrand, S; Holloway, J; Huang, C; Jarozinsky, D; Jolly, S; Joshi, C; Kumar, N; Lu, W; Lopes, N; Kaur, M; Lotov, K; Malka, V; Meddahi, M; Mete, O; Mori, W B; Mueller, A; Muggli, P; Najmudin, Z; Norreys, P; Osterhoff, J; Pozimski, J; Pukhov, A; Reimann, O; Roesler, S; Ruhl, H; Schlarb, H; Schmidt, B; Schmitt, H v d; Schoening, A; Seryi, A; Simon, F; Silva, L O; Tajima, T; Trines, R; Tueckmantel, T; Upadhyay, A; Vieira, J; Willi, O; Wing, M; Xia, G; Yakimenko, V; Yan, X; Zimmermann, F; CERN. Geneva. SPS and PS Experiments Committee; SPSC

    2011-01-01

    We propose an experiment on proton-driven plasma wakefield acceleration (PDPWA) which could lead to a future TeV-scale e+- collider of much reduced length compared to conventional designs. Proton bunches are ideal drivers for high energy lepton accelerators, with the potential of reducing drastically the number of required driver stages. By using a plasma to modulate a long proton bunch, a strong plasma wave can be generated by a series of ‘micro-bunches’, so that an experimental program can start today with the existing proton beams. In this letter of intent, we propose a demonstration experiment using the existing CERN SPS beam. This project would be the first beam-driven wakefield acceleration experiment in Europe, and the first proton-driven plasma-wakefield acceleration experiment worldwide. We have set as an initial goal the demonstration of 1 GeV energy gain for electrons in 10 m of plasma. A proposal for reaching 100 GeV within 100 m of plasma will be developed using results from the initial roun...

  15. Turbulent Dynamos and Magnetic Helicity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ji, Hantao

    1999-04-01

    It is shown that the turbulent dynamo alpha-effect converts magnetic helicity from the turbulent field to the mean field when the turbulence is electromagnetic while the magnetic helicity of the mean-field is transported across space when the turbulence is elcetrostatic or due to the elcetron diamagnetic effect. In all cases, however, the dynamo effect strictly conserves the total helicity expect for a battery effect which vanishes in the limit of magnetohydrodynamics. Implications for astrophysical situations, especially for the solar dynamo, are discussed.

  16. A Reconnecting Flux Rope Dynamo

    OpenAIRE

    Baggaley, Andrew W.; Barenghi, Carlo F.; Shukurov, Anvar; Subramanian, Kandaswamy

    2009-01-01

    We develop a new model of the fluctuation dynamo in which the magnetic field is confined in thin flux ropes advected by a multi-scale flow modeling turbulence. Magnetic dissipation occurs only via reconnection of the flux ropes. We investigate the kinetic energy release into heat, mediated by the dynamo action, both in our model and by solving the induction equation with the same flow. We find that a flux rope dynamo is an order of magnitude more efficient at converting mechanical energy into...

  17. Intermittency in spherical Couette dynamos

    CERN Document Server

    Raynaud, Raphaël; 10.1103/PhysRevE.87.033011

    2013-01-01

    We investigate dynamo action in three-dimensional numerical simulations of turbulent spherical Couette flows. Close to the onset of dynamo action, the magnetic field exhibits an intermittent behavior, characterized by a series of short bursts of the magnetic energy separated by low-energy phases. We show that this behavior corresponds to the so-called on-off intermittency. This behavior is here reported for dynamo action with realistic boundary conditions. We investigate the role of magnetic boundary conditions in this phenomenon.

  18. Laser plasma jet driven microparticles for DNA/drug delivery.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viren Menezes

    Full Text Available This paper describes a microparticle delivery device that generates a plasma jet through laser ablation of a thin metal foil and uses the jet to accomplish particle delivery into soft living targets for transferring biological agents. Pure gold microparticles of 1 µm size were coated with a plasmid DNA, pIG121Hm, and were deposited as a thin layer on one surface of an aluminum foil. The laser (Nd:YAG, 1064 nm wavelength ablation of the foil generated a plasma jet that carried the DNA coated particles into the living onion cells. The particles could effectively penetrate the target cells and disseminate the DNA, effecting the transfection of the cells. Generation of the plasma jet on laser ablation of the foil and its role as a carrier of microparticles was visualized using a high-speed video camera, Shimadzu HPV-1, at a frame rate of 500 kfps (2 µs interframe interval in a shadowgraph optical set-up. The particle speed could be measured from the visualized images, which was about 770 m/s initially, increased to a magnitude of 1320 m/s, and after a quasi-steady state over a distance of 10 mm with an average magnitude of 1100 m/s, started declining, which typically is the trend of a high-speed, pulsed, compressible jet. Aluminum launch pad (for the particles was used in the present study to make the procedure cost-effective, whereas the guided, biocompatible launch pads made of gold, silver or titanium can be used in the device during the actual clinical operations. The particle delivery device has a potential to have a miniature form and can be an effective, hand-held drug/DNA delivery device for biological applications.

  19. Stability study for matching in laser driven plasma acceleration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rossi, A.R., E-mail: andrea.rossi@mi.infn.it [INFN - MI, via Celoria 16, 20133 Milan (Italy); Anania, M.P. [INFN - LNF, v.le E. Fermi, 00044 Frascati (Italy); Bacci, A. [INFN - MI, via Celoria 16, 20133 Milan (Italy); Belleveglia, M.; Bisesto, F.G.; Chiadroni, E. [INFN - LNF, v.le E. Fermi, 00044 Frascati (Italy); Cianchi, A. [Tor Vergata University, Physics Department, via della Ricerca Scientifica 1, 00133 Rome (Italy); INFN - LNF, v.le E. Fermi, 00044 Frascati (Italy); Curcio, A.; Gallo, A.; Di Giovenale, D.; Di Pirro, G.; Ferrario, M. [INFN - LNF, v.le E. Fermi, 00044 Frascati (Italy); Marocchino, A.; Massimo, F. [La Sapienza University, SBAI Department, via A. Scarpa 14, 00161 Rome (Italy); Mostacci, A. [La Sapienza University, SBAI Department, via A. Scarpa 14, 00161 Rome (Italy); INFN - LNF, v.le E. Fermi, 00044 Frascati (Italy); Petrarca, M. [La Sapienza University, SBAI Department, via A. Scarpa 14, 00161 Rome (Italy); Pompili, R. [INFN - LNF, v.le E. Fermi, 00044 Frascati (Italy); Serafini, L. [INFN - MI, via Celoria 16, 20133 Milan (Italy); Tomassini, P. [University of Milan, Physics Department, via Celoria 16, 20133 Milan (Italy); Vaccarezza, C. [INFN - LNF, v.le E. Fermi, 00044 Frascati (Italy); and others

    2016-09-01

    In a recent paper [14], a scheme for inserting and extracting high brightness electron beams to/from a plasma based acceleration stage was presented and proved to be effective with an ideal bi-Gaussian beam, as could be delivered by a conventional photo-injector. In this paper, we extend that study, assessing the method stability against some jitters in the properties of the injected beam. We find that the effects of jitters in Twiss parameters are not symmetric in results; we find a promising configuration that yields better performances than the setting proposed in [14]. Moreover we show and interpret what happens when the beam charge profiles are modified.

  20. Pressure-driven reconnection and quasi periodical oscillations in plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paccagnella, R.

    2014-03-01

    This paper presents a model for an ohmically heated plasma in which a feedback exists between thermal conduction and transport, on one side, and the magneto-hydro-dynamical stability of the system, on the other side. In presence of a reconnection threshold for the magnetic field, a variety of periodical or quasi periodical oscillations for the physical quantities describing the system are evidenced. The model is employed to interpret the observed quasi periodical oscillations of electron temperature and perturbed magnetic field around the so called "Single Helical" state in the reversed field pinch, but its relevance for other periodical phenomena observed in magnetic confinement systems, especially in tokamaks, is suggested.

  1. Anomalous inverse bremsstrahlung heating of laser-driven plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kundu, Mrityunjay

    2016-05-01

    Absorption of laser light in plasma via electron-ion collision (inverse bremsstrahlung) is known to decrease with the laser intensity as I 0 -3/2 or with the electron temperature as T e -3/2 where Coulomb logarithm ln Λ = 0.5ln(1 + k 2 min/k 2 max) in the expression of electron-ion collision frequency v ei is assumed to be independent of ponderomotive velocity v 0 = E0/ω which is unjustified. Here k -1 min = v th/max(ω, ω p), and k -1 max = Z/v 2 th are maximum and minimum cut-off distances of the colliding electron from the ion, v th = √T e is its thermal velocity, ω, ω p are laser and plasma frequency. Earlier with a total velocity v = (v 2 0 + v 2 th)1/2 dependent ln Λ(v) it was reported that v ei and corresponding fractional laser absorption (α) initially increases with increasing intensity, reaches a maximum value, and then fall according to the conventional I 0 -3/2 scaling. This anomalous increase in v ei and α may be objected due to an artifact introduced in ln Λ(v) through k-1 min ∝ v. Here we show similar anomalous increase of v ei and α versus I 0 (in the low temperature and under-dense density regime) with quantum and classical kinetic models of v ei without using ln Λ, but a proper choice of the total velocity dependent inverse cut-off length kmax -1 ∝ v 2 (in classical case) or kmax ∝ v (in quantum case). For a given I 0 15 eV, anomalous growth of vei and a disappear. The total velocity dependent k max in kinetic models, as proposed here, may explain anomalous increase of a with I 0 measured in some earlier laser-plasma experiments. This work may be important to understand collisional absorption in the under-dense pre-plasma region due to low intensity pre-pulses and amplified spontaneous emission (ASE) pedestal in the context of laser induced inertial confinement fusion.

  2. Inductive inhibition of cold-plasma stabilization of curvature-driven modes in finite-length plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guest, G.E.; Miller, R.L.; Caponi, M.Z.

    1986-08-01

    A modified quasistatic theory that incorporates inductive effects in earlier electrostatic models connects the conventional electrostatic and magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) pictures of line tying by cold plasma. The modified theory predicts that curvature-driven flute modes in mirror-confined plasmas can be stabilized by moderate concentrations of cold plasma if the beta of the hot, mirror-confined plasma is less than a critical value. The maximum stable beta for an idealized stratified model of a hot-ion plasma, separated from conducting end walls by cold plasma, is given approximately by ..beta../sub crit/approx. =(4R-italic/sub p-italic/R-italic/sub c-italic//L-italic/sub h-italic/L-italic/sub c-italic/) x (..omega../sup 2//sub p-italic//sub e-italic//sub (cold)// (k-italic/sup 2//sub perpendicular/c-italic/sup 2/+..omega../sup 2//sub p-italic//sub e-italic//sub (cold)/)). For ..omega../sup 2//sub p-italic//sub e-italic//sub (cold)/ <driven modes can occur even in the presence of dense cold plasmas if the hot-plasma beta exceeds a limiting value estimated to be ..pi../sup 2/R-italic/sub p-italic/R-italic/sub c-italic//L-italic/sup 2/.

  3. Ion temperature gradient driven mode in presence of transverse velocity shear in magnetized plasmas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chakrabarti, N.; Juul Rasmussen, J.; Michelsen, Poul

    2005-01-01

    The effect of sheared poloidal flow on the toroidal branch of the ion temperature gradient driven mode of magnetized nonuniform plasma is studied. A novel "nonmodal" calculation is used to analyze the problem. It is shown that the transverse shear flow considerably reduced the growth...

  4. Shear dynamo, turbulence, and the magnetorotational instability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Squire, Jonathan

    The formation, evolution, and detailed structure of accretion disks remain poorly understood, with wide implications across a variety of astrophysical disciplines. While the most pressing question --- what causes the high angular momentum fluxes that are necessary to explain observations? --- is nicely answered by the idea that the disk is turbulent, a more complete grasp of the fundamental processes is necessary to capture the wide variety of behaviors observed in the night sky. This thesis studies the turbulence in ionized accretion disks from a theoretical standpoint, in particular focusing on the generation of magnetic fields in these processes, known as dynamo. Such fields are expected to be enormously important, both by enabling the magnetorotational instability (which evolves into virulent turbulence), and through large-scale structure formation, which may transport angular momentum in different ways and be fundamental for the formation of jets. The central result of this thesis is the suggestion of a new large-scale dynamo mechanism in shear flows --- the "magnetic shear-current effect" --- which relies on a positive feedback from small-scale magnetic fields. As well as being a very promising candidate for driving field generation in the central regions of accretion disks, this effect is interesting because small-scale magnetic fields have historically been considered to have a negative effect on the large-scale dynamo, damping growth and leading to dire predictions for final saturation amplitudes. Given that small-scale fields are ubiquitous in plasma turbulence above moderate Reynolds numbers, the finding that they could instead have a positive effect in some situations is interesting from a theoretical and practical standpoint. The effect is studied using direct numerical simulation, analytic techniques, and novel statistical simulation methods. In addition to the dynamo, much attention is given to the linear physics of disks and its relevance to

  5. Efficient cesiation in RF driven surface plasma negative ion source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Belchenko, Yu.; Ivanov, A.; Konstantinov, S.; Sanin, A., E-mail: sanin@inp.nsk.su; Sotnikov, O. [Budker Institute of Nuclear Physics, Siberian Branch of Russian Academy of Sciences, Novosibirsk (Russian Federation)

    2016-02-15

    Experiments on hydrogen negative ions production in the large radio-frequency negative ion source with cesium seed are described. The system of directed cesium deposition to the plasma grid periphery was used. The small cesium seed (∼0.5 G) provides an enhanced H{sup −} production during a 2 month long experimental cycle. The gradual increase of negative ion yield during the long-term source runs was observed after cesium addition to the source. The degraded H{sup −} production was recorded after air filling to the source or after the cesium washing away from the driver and plasma chamber walls. The following source conditioning by beam shots produces the gradual recovery of H{sup −} yield to the high value. The effect of H{sup −} yield recovery after cesium coverage passivation by air fill was studied. The concept of cesium coverage replenishment and of H{sup −} yield recovery due to sputtering of cesium from the deteriorated layers is discussed.

  6. PIC/MCC simulation for magnetized capacitively coupled plasmas driven by combined dc/rf sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Shali; Zhang, Ya; Jiang, Wei; Wang, Hongyu; Wang, Shuai

    2016-09-01

    Hybrid dc/rf capacitively coupled plasma (CCP) sources have been popular in substrate etching due to their simplicity in the device structure and better plasma property. In this work, the characteristics of magnetized capacitively coupled plasmas driven by combined dc/rf sources are described by a one-dimensional Particle-in-cell/Monte Carlo collision (PIC/MCC) model. The simulation is using a rf source of 13.56MHz in argon and at a low pressure of 50mTorr. The effects of dc voltage and magnetic field on the plasmas are examined for 200-400V and 0-200Gs. It is found that, to some extent, dc voltage will increase the plasma density, but plasma density drops with increasing dc voltage. The magnetic field will enhance the plasma density significantly, due to the magnetic field will increase the electron life time and decrease the loss to the electrodes. In the bulk plasma, electron temperature is increased with the magnetic field but decreased with the dc voltage. The electron temperature in sheath is higher than in bulk plasma, due to stochastic heating in sheath is greater than Ohmic heating in bulk plasma under low gas pressure. National Natural Science Foundation of China (11405067, 11105057, 11305032, 11275039).

  7. High quality electron beam generation in a proton-driven hollow plasma wakefield accelerator

    CERN Document Server

    Li, Yangmei; Lotov, Konstantin V; Sosedkin, Alexander P; Hanahoe, Kieran; Mete-Apsimon, Oznur

    2016-01-01

    Proton-driven plasma wakefield accelerators have numerically demonstrated substantially higher accelerating gradients compared to conventional accelerators and the viability of accelerating electrons to energy frontier in a single plasma stage. However, due to the intrinsic strong and radially varying transverse fields, the beam quality is still far from suitable for practical application in future colliders. Here we propose a new accelerating region which is free from both plasma electrons and ions in the proton-driven hollow plasma channel. The high quality electron beam is therefore generated with this scheme without transverse plasma fields. The results show that a 1 TeV proton driver can propagate and accelerate an electron beam to 0.62 TeV with correlated energy spread of 4.6% and well-preserved normalized emittance below 2.4 mm mrad in a single hollow plasma channel of 700 m. More importantly, the beam loading tolerance is significantly improved compared to the uniform plasma case. This high quality an...

  8. The Solar Dynamo Zoo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egeland, Ricky; Soon, Willie H.; Baliunas, Sallie L.; Hall, Jeffrey C.; Pevtsov, Alexei A.; Henry, Gregory W.

    2016-05-01

    We present composite time series of Ca II H & K line core emission indices of up to 50 years in length for a set of 27 solar-analog stars (spectral types G0-G5; within ~10% of the solar mass) and the Sun. These unique data are available thanks to the long-term dedicated efforts of the Mount Wilson Observatory HK project, the Lowell Observatory Solar-Stellar Spectrograph, and the National Solar Observatory/Air Force Research Laboratory/Sacremento Peak K-line monitoring program. The Ca II H & K emission originates in the lower chromosphere and is strongly correlated with the presence of magnetic plage regions in the Sun. These synoptic observations allow us to trace the patterns long-term magnetic variability and explore dynamo behavior over a wide range of rotation regimes and stellar evolution timescales.

  9. Liquid Metal Dynamo Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luh, W. J.; Choi, Y. H.; Hardy, B. S.; Brown, M. R.

    1997-11-01

    Detection of convected magnetic fields in a small-scale liquid metal dynamo is attempted. Initial experiments will focus on the conversion of toroidal to poloidal flux (a version of the ω effect). A precision vector magnetometer will be used to measure the effect of a rotating magnetofluid on a static magnetic field. Water will be used as a control medium and effects will be compared with a conducting medium (liquid sodium or NaK). A small spherical flask (0.16 m diameter) houses 2 liters of fluid, a teflon stirrer creates an asymmetrical flow pattern, and Helmholtz coils generate a constant magnetic field on the order of 10 gauss. The Reynold's number will be of order unity.

  10. Simulations of galactic dynamos

    CERN Document Server

    Brandenburg, Axel

    2014-01-01

    We review our current understanding of galactic dynamo theory, paying particular attention to numerical simulations both of the mean-field equations and the original three-dimensional equations relevant to describing the magnetic field evolution for a turbulent flow. We emphasize the theoretical difficulties in explaining non-axisymmetric magnetic fields in galaxies and discuss the observational basis for such results in terms of rotation measure analysis. Next, we discuss nonlinear theory, the role of magnetic helicity conservation and magnetic helicity fluxes. This leads to the possibility that galactic magnetic fields may be bi-helical, with opposite signs of helicity and large and small length scales. We discuss their observational signatures and close by discussing the possibilities of explaining the origin of primordial magnetic fields.

  11. Interface dynamos in supernova progenitors

    CERN Document Server

    Blackman, E G; Thomas, J H; Blackman, Eric G.; Nordhaus, Jason T.; Thomas, John H.

    2004-01-01

    Observational evidence for anisotropy in supernovae (SN) and their phenomenological connection to jetted sources such as gamma-ray bursts^Mhave revived considerations of the role magnetohydrodynamic outflows might play therein. Understanding the types of dynamos that might operate in supernova progenitors is therefore relevant. In contrast to previous work, here we study an ``interface dynamo'' for the conditions of a rapidly rotating neutron star surrounded by a convective envelope. Such dynamos have been studied for the Sun, naked white dwarfs,and post-AGB stars, where analogous configurations of strong shear layers surrounded by convective envelopes are present. The interface dynamo provides estimates of large-scale poloidal and toroidal fields, whose product enters the Poynting flux. Because the poloidal field is much weaker than the toroidal magnetic field, the actual average Poynting flux is lower than rough estimates which invoke the only the magnitude of the total magnetic energy. The lower value is s...

  12. Nuclear Fusion in Laser-Driven Counter-Streaming Collisionless Plasmas

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, Xiaopeng; Yuan, Dawei; Fu, Changbo; Bao, Jie; Chen, Liming; He, Jianjun; Hou, Long; Li, Liang; Li, Yanfei; Li, Yutong; Liao, Guoqiang; Rhee, Yongjoo; Sun, Yang; Xu, Skiwei; Zhao, Gang; Zhu, Baojun; Zhu, Jianqiang; Zhang, Zhe; Zhang, Jie

    2016-01-01

    Nuclear fusion reactions are the most important processes in nature to power stars and produce new elements, and lie at the center of the understanding of nucleosynthesis in the universe. It is critically important to study the reactions in full plasma environments that are close to true astrophysical conditions. By using laser-driven counter-streaming collisionless plasmas, we studied the fusion D$+$D$\\rightarrow n +^3$He in a Gamow-like window around 27 keV. The results show that astrophysical nuclear reaction yield can be modulated significantly by the self-generated electromagnetic fields and the collective motion of the plasma. This plasma-version mini-collider may provide a novel tool for studies of astrophysics-interested nuclear reactions in plasma with tunable energies in earth-based laboratories.

  13. Generation of powerful terahertz emission in a beam-driven strong plasma turbulence

    CERN Document Server

    Arzhannikov, A V

    2012-01-01

    Generation of terahertz electromagnetic radiation due to coalescence of upper-hybrid waves in the long-wavelength region of strong plasma turbulence driven by a high-current relativistic electron beam in a magnetized plasma is investigated. The width of frequency spectrum as well as angular characteristics of this radiation for various values of plasma density and turbulence energy are calculated using the simple theoretical model adequately describing beam-plasma experiments at mirror traps. It is shown that the power density of electromagnetic emission at the second harmonic of plasma frequency in the terahertz range for these laboratory experiments can reach the level of 1 ${MW/cm}^3$ with 1% conversion efficiency of beam energy losses to electromagnetic emission.

  14. A New Scheme for High-Intensity Laser-Driven Electron Acceleration in a Plasma 2

    CERN Document Server

    Sadykova, S P; Samkharadze, T G

    2015-01-01

    We propose a new approach to high-intensity relativistic laser-driven electron acceleration in a plasma. Here, we demonstrate that a plasma wave generated by a stimulated forward-scattering of an incident laser pulse can be in the longest acceleration phase with injected relativistic beam electrons. This is why the plasma wave has the maximum amplification coefficient which is determined by the acceleration time and the breakdown (overturn) electric field in which the acceleration of the injected beam electrons occurs. We must note that for the longest acceleration phase the relativity of the injected beam electrons plays a crucial role in our scheme. We estimate qualitatively the acceleration parameters of relativistic electrons in the field of a plasma wave generated at the stimulated forward-scattering of a high-intensity laser pulse in a plasma.

  15. Alfvén wave coupled with flow-driven fluid instability in interpenetrating plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vranjes, J. [Instituto de Astrofisica de Canarias, 38205 La Laguna, Tenerife, Spain and Departamento de Astrofisica, Universidad de La Laguna, 38205 La Laguna, Tenerife (Spain)

    2015-05-15

    The Alfvén wave is analyzed in case of one quasineutral plasma propagating with some constant speed v{sub 0} through another static quasineutral plasma. A dispersion equation is derived describing the Alfvén wave coupled with the flow driven mode ω=kv{sub 0} and solutions are discussed analytically and numerically. The usual solutions for two oppositely propagating Alfvén waves are substantially modified due to the flowing plasma. More profound is modification of the solution propagating in the negative direction with respect to the magnetic field and the plasma flow. For a large enough flow speed (exceeding the Alfvén speed in the static plasma), this negative solution may become non-propagating, with frequency equal to zero. In this case, it represents a spatial variation of the electromagnetic field. For greater flow speed it becomes a forward mode, and it may merge with the positive one. This merging of the two modes represents the starting point for a flow-driven instability, with two complex-conjugate solutions. The Alfvén wave in interpenetrating plasmas is thus modified and coupled with the flow-driven mode and this coupled mode is shown to be growing when the flow speed is large enough. The energy for the instability is macroscopic kinetic energy of the flowing plasma. The dynamics of plasma particles caused by such a coupled wave still remains similar to the ordinary Alfvén wave. This means that well-known stochastic heating by the Alfvén wave may work, and this should additionally support the potential role of the Alfvén wave in the coronal heating.

  16. Spatially resolved simulation of a radio frequency driven micro atmospheric pressure plasma jet and its effluent

    CERN Document Server

    Hemke, Torben; Gebhardt, Markus; Brinkmann, Ralf Peter; Mussenbrock, Thomas

    2011-01-01

    Radio frequency driven plasma jets are frequently employed as efficient plasma sources for surface modification and other processes at atmospheric pressure. The \\textit{radio-frequency driven micro-scaled atmospheric pressure plasma jet} ($\\mu$APPJ) is a particular variant of that concept whose geometry allows direct optical access. In this work, the characteristics of a $\\mu$APPJ operated with a helium-oxygen mixture and its interaction with a helium environment are studied by numerical simulation. The density and temperature of the electrons, as well as the concentration of all reactive species are studied both in the jet itself and in its effluent. It is found that the effluent is essentially free of charge carriers but contains a substantial amount of activated oxygen (O, O$_3$ and O$_2(^1\\Delta)$).

  17. Intense laser driven collision-less shock and ion acceleration in magnetized plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mima, K.; Jia, Q.; Cai, H. B.; Taguchi, T.; Nagatomo, H.; Sanz, J. R.; Honrubia, J.

    2016-05-01

    The generation of strong magnetic field with a laser driven coil has been demonstrated by many experiments. It is applicable to the magnetized fast ignition (MFI), the collision-less shock in the astrophysics and the ion shock acceleration. In this paper, the longitudinal magnetic field effect on the shock wave driven by the radiation pressure of an intense short pulse laser is investigated by theory and simulations. The transition of a laminar shock (electro static shock) to the turbulent shock (electromagnetic shock) occurs, when the external magnetic field is applied in near relativistic cut-off density plasmas. This transition leads to the enhancement of conversion of the laser energy into high energy ions. The enhancement of the conversion efficiency is important for the ion driven fast ignition and the laser driven neutron source. It is found that the total number of ions reflected by the shock increases by six time when the magnetic field is applied.

  18. VUV Emission of Microwave Driven Argon Plasma Source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henriques, Julio; Espinho, Susana; Felizardo, Edgar; Tatarova, Elena; Dias, Francisco; Ferreira, Carlos

    2013-09-01

    An experimental and kinetic modeling investigation of a low-pressure (0.1-1.2 mbar), surface wave (2.45 GHz) induced Ar plasma as a source vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) light is presented, using visible and VUV optical spectroscopy. The electron density and the relative VUV emission intensities of excited Ar atoms (at 104.8 nm and 106.6 nm) and ions (at 92.0 nm and 93.2 nm) were determined as a function of the microwave power and pressure. The experimental results were analyzed using a 2D self-consistent theoretical model based on a set of coupled equations including the electron Boltzmann equation, the rate balance equations for the most important electronic excited species and for charged particles, the gas thermal balance equation, and the wave electrodynamics. The principal collisional and radiative processes for neutral Ar(3p54s) and Ar(3p54p) and ionized Ar(3s3p6 2S1/2) levels are accounted for. Model predictions are in good agreement with the experimental measurements. This study was funded by the Foundation for Science and Technology, Portuguese Ministry of Education and Science, under the research contract PTDC/FIS/108411/2008.

  19. On the saturation of astrophysical dynamos

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dorch, Bertil; Archontis, Vasilis

    2004-01-01

    In the context of astrophysical dynamos we illustrate that the no-cosines flow, with zero mean helicity, can drive fast dynamo action and we study the dynamo's mode of operation during both the linear and non-linear saturation regimes. It turns out that in addition to a high growth rate in the li......In the context of astrophysical dynamos we illustrate that the no-cosines flow, with zero mean helicity, can drive fast dynamo action and we study the dynamo's mode of operation during both the linear and non-linear saturation regimes. It turns out that in addition to a high growth rate...

  20. Kinematic Dynamo In Turbulent Circumstellar Disks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stepinski, T.

    1993-01-01

    Many circumstellar disks associated with objects ranging from protoplanetary nebulae, to accretion disks around compact stars allow for the generation of magnetic fields by an (alpha)omega dynamo. We have applied kinematic dynamo formalism to geometrically thin accretion disks. We calculate, in the framework of an adiabatic approximation, the normal mode solutions for dynamos operating in disks around compact stars. We then describe the criteria for a viable dynamo in protoplanetary nebulae, and discuss the particular features that make accretion disk dynamos different from planetary, stellar, and galactic dynamos.

  1. Simulation of laser-driven plasma beat-wave propagation in collisional weakly relativistic plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaur, Maninder; Nandan Gupta, Devki

    2016-11-01

    The process of interaction of lasers beating in a plasma has been explored by virtue of particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations in the presence of electron-ion collisions. A plasma beat wave is resonantly excited by ponderomotive force by two relatively long laser pulses of different frequencies. The amplitude of the plasma wave become maximum, when the difference in the frequencies is equal to the plasma frequency. We propose to demonstrate the energy transfer between the laser beat wave and the plasma wave in the presence of electron-ion collision in nearly relativistic regime with 2D-PIC simulations. The relativistic effect and electron-ion collision both affect the energy transfer between the interacting waves. The finding of simulation results shows that there is a considerable decay in the plasma wave and the field energy over time in the presence of electron-ion collisions.

  2. Characteristics of Turbulence-driven Plasma Flow and Origin of Experimental Empirical Scalings of Intrinsic Rotation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, W. X.; Hahm, T. S.; Ethier, S.; Rewoldt, G.; Tang, W. M.; Lee, W. W.; Diamond, P. H.

    2011-03-20

    Toroidal plasma flow driven by turbulent torque associated with nonlinear residual stress generation is shown to recover the observed key features of intrinsic rotation in experiments. Specifically, the turbulence-driven intrinsic rotation scales close to linearly with plasma gradients and the inverse of the plasma current, qualitatively reproducing empirical scalings obtained from a large experimental data base. The effect of magnetic shear on the symmetry breaking in the parallel wavenumber spectrum is identified. The origin of the current scaling is found to be the enhanced kll symmetry breaking induced by increased radial variation of the safety factor as the current decreases. The physics origin for the linear dependence of intrinsic rotation on the pressure gradient comes from the fact that both turbulence intensity and the zonal flow shear, which are two key ingredients for driving the residual stress, are increased with the strength of the turbulence drives, which are R/LTe and R/Lne for the collisionless trapped electron mode (CTEM). Highlighted results also include robust radial pinches in toroidal flow, heat and particle transport driven by CTEM turbulence, which emerge "in phase", and are shown to play important roles in determining plasma profiles. Also discussed are experimental tests proposed to validate findings from these gyrokinetic simulations.

  3. Neutron Signatures of Non-Thermal Ion Distributions in Z-Pinch Driven ICF Plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knapp, Patrick; Jennings, Christopher; Sinars, Daniel

    2012-10-01

    In preparation for upcoming ICF experiments on the 26 MA Z machine (e.g., D2 gas puff, MagLIF [1]), we are studying the neutron energy spectra produced by magnetically-driven loads beyond the archetypal single temperature, uniform plasma. Z-pinch sources frequently exhibit evidence of unusual neutron spectra [2], which can be attributed to three-dimensional turbulent motion, high-energy beams, and other phenomena leading to non-Maxwellian ion distributions. Understanding the nature of our plasma neutron sources is critical for understanding how they scale with increasing current. We will show Monte Carlo and analytic calculations for plausible scenarios and discuss the corresponding signatures for the existing set of time-of-flight diagnostics on Z.[4pt] [1] S. A. Slutz et al. Phys. Plasmas 17, 056303 (2010)[0pt] [2] V.V. Vikhrev and V.D. Korolev, Plasma Dynamics, Vol. 33, No. 5 (2007)

  4. Alfven wave coupled with flow-driven fluid instability in interpenetrating plasmas

    CERN Document Server

    Vranjes, J

    2015-01-01

    The Alfven wave is analyzed in case of one quasineutral plasma propagating with some constant speed $v_0$ through another static quasineutral plasma. A dispersion equation is derived describing the Alfven wave coupled with the flow driven mode $\\omega= k v_0$ and solutions are discussed analytically and numerically. The usual solutions for two oppositely propagating Alfv\\'en waves are substantially modified due to the flowing plasma. More profound is modification of the solution propagating in the negative direction with respect to the magnetic field and the plasma flow. For a large enough flow speed (exceeding the Alfven speed in the static plasma), this negative solution may become non-propagating, with frequency equal to zero. In this case it represents a spatial variation of the electromagnetic field. For greater flow speed it becomes a forward mode, and it may merge with the positive one. This merging of the two modes represents the starting point for a flow-driven instability, with two complex-conjugate...

  5. Optimization of negative ion current in a compact microwave driven upper hybrid resonance multicusp plasma source.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahu, D; Bhattacharjee, S; Singh, M J; Bandyopadhyay, M; Chakraborty, A

    2012-02-01

    Performance of a microwave driven upper hybrid resonance multicusp plasma source as a volume negative ion source is reported. Microwaves are directly launched into the plasma chamber predominantly in the TE(11) mode. The source is operated at different discharge conditions to obtain the optimized negative H(-) ion current which is ∼33 μA (0.26 mA∕cm(2)). Particle balance equations are solved to estimate the negative ion density, which is compared with the experimental results. Future prospects of the source are discussed.

  6. Optimization of negative ion current in a compact microwave driven upper hybrid resonance multicusp plasma sourcea)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahu, D.; Bhattacharjee, S.; Singh, M. J.; Bandyopadhyay, M.; Chakraborty, A.

    2012-02-01

    Performance of a microwave driven upper hybrid resonance multicusp plasma source as a volume negative ion source is reported. Microwaves are directly launched into the plasma chamber predominantly in the TE11 mode. The source is operated at different discharge conditions to obtain the optimized negative H- ion current which is ˜33 μA (0.26 mA/cm2). Particle balance equations are solved to estimate the negative ion density, which is compared with the experimental results. Future prospects of the source are discussed.

  7. Bifurcation and hysteresis of plasma edge transport in a flux-driven system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, B.; Wang, X. Y.; Sun, C. K.; Zhou, A.; Liu, D.; Ma, C. H.; Wang, X. G.

    2016-10-01

    Transition dynamics and mean shear flow generation in plasma interchange turbulence are explored in a flux-driven system that resembles the plasma edge region. The nonlinear evolution of the interchange mode shows two confinement regimes with different transport levels. Large amplitude oscillations in the phase space of turbulence intensity and mean flow energy are observed and investigated. Both clockwise and counterclockwise oscillations occur during the transition between the two regimes. The Reynolds stress gradients are shown to play a critical role in the generation of mean sheared flows in the edge region. Both the forward and back transitions are simulated self-consistently and a significant hysteresis is found.

  8. Positron acceleration in plasma bubble wakefield driven by an ultraintense laser

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hou, Ya-Juan; Wan, Feng; Sang, Hai-Bo, E-mail: sanghb@bnu.edu.cn; Xie, Bai-Song [Key Laboratory of Beam Technology and Material Modification of Ministry of Education, and College of Nuclear Science and Technology, Beijing Normal University, Beijing 100875 (China); Beijing Radiation Center, Beijing 100875 (China)

    2016-01-15

    The dynamics of positrons accelerating in electron-positron-ion plasma bubble fields driven by an ultraintense laser is investigated. The bubble wakefield is obtained theoretically when laser pulses are propagating in the electron-positron-ion plasma. To restrict the positrons transversely, an electron beam is injected. Acceleration regions and non-acceleration ones of positrons are obtained by the numerical simulation. It is found that the ponderomotive force causes the fluctuation of the positrons momenta, which results in the trapping of them at a lower ion density. The energy gaining of the accelerated positrons is demonstrated, which is helpful for practical applications.

  9. The Solar Dynamo Zoo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egeland, Ricky; Soon, Willie; Baliunas, Sallie; Hall, Jeffrey C.; Pevtsov, Alexei A.; Henry, Gregory W.

    2016-07-01

    We present composite time series of Ca II H & K line core emission indices of up to 50 years in length for a set of 27 solar-analog stars (spectral types G0-G5; within 10% of the solar mass) and the Sun. These unique data are available thanks to the long-term dedicated efforts of the Mount Wilson Observatory HK project, the Lowell Observatory Solar-Stellar Spectrograph, and the National Solar Observatory/Air Force Research Laboratory/Sacramento Peak K-line monitoring program. The Ca II H & K emission originates in the lower chromosphere and is strongly correlated with the presence of magnetic plage regions in the Sun. These synoptic observations allow us to trace the patterns long-term magnetic variability and explore dynamo behavior over a wide range of rotation regimes and stellar evolution timescales.In this poster, the Ca HK observations are expressed using the Mount Wilson S-index. Each time series is accompanied by a Lomb-Scargle periodogram, fundemental stellar parameters derived from the Geneva-Copenhagen Survey, and statistics derived from the time series including the median S-index value and seasonal and long-term amplitudes. Statistically significant periodogram peaks are ranked according to a new cycle quality metric. We find that clear, simple, Sun-like cycles are the minority in this sample.

  10. The Dynamo Clinical Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayres, Thomas R.

    2016-04-01

    The Dynamo Clinical Trial evaluates long-term stellar magnetic health through periodic X-ray examinations (by the Chandra Observatory). So far, there are only three subjects enrolled in the DTC: Alpha Centauri A (a solar-like G dwarf), Alpha Cen B (an early K dwarf, more active than the Sun), and Alpha Canis Majoris A (Procyon, a mid-F subgiant similar in activity to the Sun). Of these, Procyon is a new candidate, so it is too early to judge how it will fare. Of the other two, Alpha Cen B has responded well, with a steady magnetic heartbeat of about 8 years duration. The sickest of the bunch, Alpha Cen A, was in magnetic cardiac arrest during 2005-2010, but has begun responding to treatment in recent years, and seems to be successfully cycling again, perhaps achieving a new peak of magnetic health in the 2016 time frame. If this is the case, it has been 20 years since A's last healthful peak, significantly longer than the middle-aged Sun's 11-year magnetic heartbeat, but perhaps in line with Alpha Cen A's more senescent state (in terms of "relative evolutionary age," apparently an important driver of activity). (By the way, don't miss the exciting movie of the Alpha Cen stars' 20-year X-ray dance.)

  11. Tsunami: ocean dynamo generator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugioka, Hiroko; Hamano, Yozo; Baba, Kiyoshi; Kasaya, Takafumi; Tada, Noriko; Suetsugu, Daisuke

    2014-01-08

    Secondary magnetic fields are induced by the flow of electrically conducting seawater through the Earth's primary magnetic field ('ocean dynamo effect'), and hence it has long been speculated that tsunami flows should produce measurable magnetic field perturbations, although the signal-to-noise ratio would be small because of the influence of the solar magnetic fields. Here, we report on the detection of deep-seafloor electromagnetic perturbations of 10-micron-order induced by a tsunami, which propagated through a seafloor electromagnetometer array network. The observed data extracted tsunami characteristics, including the direction and velocity of propagation as well as sea-level change, first to verify the induction theory. Presently, offshore observation systems for the early forecasting of tsunami are based on the sea-level measurement by seafloor pressure gauges. In terms of tsunami forecasting accuracy, the integration of vectored electromagnetic measurements into existing scalar observation systems would represent a substantial improvement in the performance of tsunami early-warning systems.

  12. Structure of parallel-velocity-shear driven mode in toroidal plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dong, J.Q.; Xu, W.B.; Zhang, Y.Z. [Southwestern Inst. of Physics, Chengdu (China); Horton, W. [Univ. of Texas, Austin, TX (United States). Inst. for Fusion Studies

    1998-09-15

    It is shown that the Fourier-ballooning representation is appropriate for the study of short wavelength drift-like perturbation in toroidal plasmas with a parallel velocity shear (PVS). The radial structure of the mode driven by a PVS is investigated in a torus. The Reynolds stress created by PVS turbulence and proposed as one of the sources for a sheared poloidal plasma rotation is analyzed. It is demonstrated that a finite ion temperature may strongly enhance the Reynolds stress creation ability from PVS driven turbulence. The correlation of this observation with the requirement that ion heating power be higher than a threshold value for the formation of an internal transport barrier is discussed.

  13. Linear Instabilities Driven by Differential Rotation in Very Weakly Magnetized Plasmas

    CERN Document Server

    Quataert, Eliot; Spitkovsky, Anatoly

    2014-01-01

    We study the linear stability of weakly magnetized differentially rotating plasmas in both collisionless kinetic theory and Braginskii's theory of collisional, magnetized plasmas. We focus on the very weakly magnetized limit that is important for understanding how astrophysical magnetic fields originate and are amplified at high redshift. We show that the single instability of fluid theory - the magnetorotational instability mediated by magnetic tension - is replaced by two distinct instabilities, one associated with ions and one with electrons. Each of these has a different way of tapping into the free energy of differential rotation. The ion instability is driven by viscous transport of momentum across magnetic field lines due to a finite ion cyclotron frequency (gyroviscosity); the fastest growing modes have wavelengths significantly longer than MHD and Hall MHD predictions. The electron instability is a whistler mode driven unstable by the temperature anisotropy generated by differential rotation; the gro...

  14. Turbulent dynamo in a disk

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ruzmaikin, A.A.; Sokolov, D.D.; Turchaninov, V.I.

    1980-03-01

    The large-scale magnetic field in a rotating, turbulent gaseous disk will be generated by a dynamo process (the ..cap alpha omega..-dynamo) determined by the differential rotation ..omega..(r) and the spirality function ..cap alpha..(z). The generation is best described by a difference approximation to the dynamo equations, using a step greater than the turbulence correlation length and a smooth function ..cap alpha..(z). The critical dynamo-number for exciting the lowest even quadrupole mode is D/sub q/ = -8. The odd dipole mode will be excited only for large dynamo-numberabsolute value (D/sub d/) > or approx. = 500. When absolute value (D) > or approx. = 20, all modes other than the lowest quadrupole mode (for which the threshold Dapprox. =-500) are oscillatory. The results are applied to the Galaxy (D approx. = -10; characteristic growth time, 3 x 10/sup 8/ yr) and to accretion disks in binary systems containing a black hole, where several oscillatory modes can be excited.

  15. Whittaker functions in beam driven plasma wakefield acceleration for a plasma with a parabolic density profile

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Golian, Y.; Dorranian, D., E-mail: d.dorranian@gmail.com [Laser Laboratory, Plasma Physics Research Center, Science and Research Branch, Islamic Azad University, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Aslaninejad, M., E-mail: m.aslaninejad@ipm.ir [Institute for Research in Fundamental Sciences (IPM), School of Particles and Accelerators, P.O. Box 19395-5531, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2016-01-15

    A model for the interaction of charged particle beams and plasma for a linear wakefield generation in a parabolic plasma channel is presented. The density profile has the maximum on the axis. A Gaussian proton beam is employed to excite the plasma wakefield in the channel. We have built a thorough analytical model and solved the governing equations for the wakefield acceleration of a charged particle beam. The longitudinal and radial wakefields are expressed by Whittaker functions, and for certain parameters of plasma and the beam, their behaviours in longitudinal and radial directions are investigated. It is observed that the radial electric field generated by the bunch increases with the distance behind the bunch.

  16. Whittaker functions in beam driven plasma wakefield acceleration for a plasma with a parabolic density profile

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golian, Y.; Aslaninejad, M.; Dorranian, D.

    2016-01-01

    A model for the interaction of charged particle beams and plasma for a linear wakefield generation in a parabolic plasma channel is presented. The density profile has the maximum on the axis. A Gaussian proton beam is employed to excite the plasma wakefield in the channel. We have built a thorough analytical model and solved the governing equations for the wakefield acceleration of a charged particle beam. The longitudinal and radial wakefields are expressed by Whittaker functions, and for certain parameters of plasma and the beam, their behaviours in longitudinal and radial directions are investigated. It is observed that the radial electric field generated by the bunch increases with the distance behind the bunch.

  17. Relativistic warm plasma theory of nonlinear laser-driven electron plasma waves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schroeder, C B; Esarey, E

    2010-05-01

    A relativistic, warm fluid model of a nonequilibrium, collisionless plasma is developed and applied to examine nonlinear Langmuir waves excited by relativistically intense, short-pulse lasers. Closure of the covariant fluid theory is obtained via an asymptotic expansion assuming a nonrelativistic plasma temperature. The momentum spread is calculated in the presence of an intense laser field and shown to be intrinsically anisotropic. Coupling between the transverse and longitudinal momentum variances is enabled by the laser field. A generalized dispersion relation is derived for Langmuir waves in a thermal plasma in the presence of an intense laser field. Including thermal fluctuations in three-velocity-space dimensions, the properties of the nonlinear electron plasma wave, such as the plasma temperature evolution and nonlinear wavelength, are examined and the maximum amplitude of the nonlinear oscillation is derived. The presence of a relativistically intense laser pulse is shown to strongly influence the maximum plasma wave amplitude for nonrelativistic phase velocities owing to the coupling between the longitudinal and transverse momentum variances.

  18. Capillarity-driven blood plasma separation on paper-based devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kar, Shantimoy; Maiti, Tapas Kumar; Chakraborty, Suman

    2015-10-01

    We demonstrate capillarity-driven plasma separation from whole blood on simple paper-based H-channels. This methodology, unlike other reported techniques, does not necessitate elaborate and complex instrumentation, and the usage of expensive consumables. We believe that this technique will be ideally suited to be implemented in rapid and portable blood diagnostic devices designed to be operative at locations with limited resources.

  19. Experimental Investigation of Turbulent-driven Sheared Parallel Flows in the CSDX Plasma Device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tynan, George; Hong, Rongjie; Li, Jiacong; Thakur, Saikat; Diamond, Patrick

    2016-10-01

    Parallel velocity and its radial shear is a key element for both accessing improved confinement regimes and controlling the impurity transport in tokamak devices. In this study, the development of radially sheared parallel plasma flows in plasmas without magnetic shear is investigated using laser induced fluorescence, multi-tip Langmuir and Mach probes in the CSDX helicon linear plasma device. Results show that a mean parallel velocity shear grows as the radial gradient of plasma density increased. The sheared flow onset corresponds to the onset of a finite parallel Reynolds stress that acts to reinforce the flow. As a result, the mean parallel flow gains energy from the turbulence that, in turn, is driven by the density gradient. This results in a flow away from the plasma source in the central region of the plasma and a reverse flow in far-peripheral region of the plasma column. The results motivate a model of negative viscosity induced by the turbulent stress which may help explain the origin of intrinsic parallel flow in systems without magnetic shear.

  20. Plasma-filled rippled wall rectangular backward wave oscillator driven by sheet electron beam

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    A Hadap; J Mondal; K C Mittal; K P Maheshwari

    2011-03-01

    Performance of the backward wave oscillator (BWO) is greatly enhanced with the introduction of plasma. Linear theory of the dispersion relation and the growth rate have been derived and analysed numerically for plasma-filled rippled wall rectangular waveguide driven by sheet electron beam. To see the effect of plasma on the TM01 cold wave structure mode and on the generated frequency, the parameters used are: relativistic factor = 1.5 (i.e. / = 0.741), average waveguide height 0 = 1.445 cm, axial corrugation period 0 = 1.67 cm, and corrugation amplitude = 0.225 cm. The plasma density is varied from zero to 2 × 1012 cm-3. The presence of plasma tends to raise the TM01 mode cut-off frequency (14 GH at 2 × 1012 cm-3 plasma density) relative to the vacuum cut-off frequency (5 GH) which also causes a decrease in the group velocity everywhere, resulting in a flattening of the dispersion relation. With the introduction of plasma, an enhancement in absolute instability was observed.

  1. Strongly Driven Magnetic Reconnection in a Magnetized High-Energy-Density Plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiksel, G.; Barnak, D. H.; Chang, P.-Y.; Haberberger, D.; Hu, S. X.; Ivancic, S.; Nilson, P. M.; Fox, W.; Deng, W.; Bhattacharjee, A.; Germaschewski, K.

    2014-10-01

    Magnetic reconnection in a magnetized high-energy-density plasma is characterized by measuring the dynamics of the plasma density and magnetic field between two counter-propagating and colliding plasma flows. The density and magnetic field were profiled using the 4 ω angular filter refractometry and fast proton deflectometry diagnostics, respectively. The plasma flows are created by irradiating oppositely placed plastic targets with 1.8-kJ, 2-ns laser beams on the OMEGA EP Laser System. The two plumes are magnetized by an externally controlled magnetic field with an x-type null point geometry with B = 0 at the midplane and B = 8 T at the targets. The interaction region is pre-filled with a low-density background plasma. The counterflowing super-Alfvénic plasma plumes sweep up and compress the magnetic field and the background plasma into a pair of magnetized ribbons, which collide, stagnate, and reconnect at the midplane, allowing for the first detailed observation of a stretched current sheet in laser-driven reconnection experiments. The measurements are in good agreement with first-principles particle-in-cell simulations. This material is based upon work supported by the Department of Energy National Nuclear Security Administration under Award Number DE-NA0001944 and NLUF Grant DE-SC0008655.

  2. Gravitational dynamos and the low-frequency geomagnetic secular variation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olson, P.

    2007-01-01

    Self-sustaining numerical dynamos are used to infer the sources of low-frequency secular variation of the geomagnetic field. Gravitational dynamo models powered by compositional convection in an electrically conducting, rotating fluid shell exhibit several regimes of magnetic field behavior with an increasing Rayleigh number of the convection, including nearly steady dipoles, chaotic nonreversing dipoles, and chaotic reversing dipoles. The time average dipole strength and dipolarity of the magnetic field decrease, whereas the dipole variability, average dipole tilt angle, and frequency of polarity reversals increase with Rayleigh number. Chaotic gravitational dynamos have large-amplitude dipole secular variation with maximum power at frequencies corresponding to a few cycles per million years on Earth. Their external magnetic field structure, dipole statistics, low-frequency power spectra, and polarity reversal frequency are comparable to the geomagnetic field. The magnetic variability is driven by the Lorentz force and is characterized by an inverse correlation between dynamo magnetic and kinetic energy fluctuations. A constant energy dissipation theory accounts for this inverse energy correlation, which is shown to produce conditions favorable for dipole drift, polarity reversals, and excursions. PMID:18048345

  3. Crunch-in regime - Non-linearly driven hollow-channel plasma

    CERN Document Server

    Sahai, Aakash A

    2016-01-01

    Plasma wakefields driven inside a hollow-channel plasma are significantly different from those driven in a homogeneous plasma. This work investigates the scaling laws of the accelerating and focusing fields in the "crunch-in" regime. This regime is excited due to the collapse of the electron-rings from the channel walls onto the propagation axis of the energy-source, in its wake. This regime is thus the non-linearly driven hollow channel, since the electron-ring displacement is of the order of the channel radius. We present the properties of the coherent structures in the "crunch-in" regime where the channel radius is matched to the beam properties such that channel-edge to on-axis collapse time has a direct correspondence to the energy source intensity. We also investigate the physical mechanisms that underlie the "crunch-in" wakefields by tuning the channel radius. Using a theoretical framework and results from PIC simulations the possible applications of the "crunch-in" regime for acceleration of positron ...

  4. Instabilities in Beam-Plasma Waves in a Model of the Beam-Driven FRC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicks, Bradley Scott; Necas, Ales; Tajima, Toshi; Tri Alpha Energy Team

    2016-10-01

    Using a semi-analytic solver, the kinetic properties of plasma waves are analyzed in various regimes in the presence of a beam. This analysis is done to model the strong beam-driven Field-Reversed Configuration (FRC) plasma kinetic instabilities in the neighborhood of the ion cyclotron frequency. As the frequency is relatively high, and wavelength small, the plasma is taken to be local and thus homogeneous, comprised of bulk ions, electrons, and beam ions, with a uniform background magnetic field. The beam ions are given an azimuthal drift velocity with respect to the magnetic field, but otherwise have various Maxwellian velocity distributions. First, the magnetic field is varied to create regimes of low and high β, and the mode structures are compared. The low- β case (corresponding to the scrape-off layer and near the separatrix) features primarily the beam-driven ion Bernstein instability. The high- β case (the core of FRC) is primarily electromagnetic and features the AIC instability when temperature anisotropy is included. The most unstable modes are incited by near-perpendicular beam injection with respect to the magnetic field. Finally, the results of the semi-analytic solver are compared with those from the EPOCH PIC code to evaluate the influence of nonlinear effects. This theoretical modeling was used in conjunction with EPOCH to investigate the beam driven instabilities in Tri Alpha Energy's C-2U experiment.

  5. Structure and dynamics of plasma interfaces in laser-driven hohlraums

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, C. K.; Sio, H.; Frenje, J. A.; Séguin, F. H.; Birkel, A.; Petrasso, R. D.; Wilks, S. C.; Amendt, P. A.; Remington, B. A.; Masson-Laborde, P.-E.; Laffite, S.; Tassin, V.; Betti, R.; Sanster, T. C.; Fitzsimmons, P.; Farrell, M.

    2016-10-01

    Understanding the structure and dynamics of plasma interfaces in laser-driven hohlraums is important because of their potential effects on capsule implosion dynamics. To that end, a series of experiments was performed to explore critical aspects of the hohlraum environment, with particular emphasis on the role of self-generated spontaneous electric and magnetic fields at plasma interfaces, including the interface between fill-gas and Au-blowoff. The charged fusion products (3-MeV DD protons and 14.7-MeV D3He protons generated in shock-driven, D3He filled backlighter capsule) pass through the subject hohlraum and form images on CR-39 nuclear track detectors, providing critical information. Important physics topics, including ion diffusive mix and Rayleigh-Taylor instabilities, will be studied to illuminate ion kinetic dynamics and hydrodynamic instability at plasma interfaces in laser-driven hohlraums. This work was supported in part by LLE, the U.S. DoE (NNSA, NLUF) and LLNL.

  6. Weibel instability mediated collisionless shocks using intense laser-driven plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palaniyappan, Sasi; Huang, Chengkun; Gautier, Donald; Fernandez, Juan; Ma, Wenjun; Schreiber, Jorg; LANL Collaboration; LMU Team

    2016-10-01

    The origin of cosmic rays remains a long-standing challenge in astrophysics and continues to fascinate physicists. It is believed that ``collisionless shocks'' - where the particle Coulomb mean free path is much larger that the shock transition - are a dominant source of energetic cosmic rays. These shocks are ubiquitous in astrophysical environments such as gamma-ray bursts, supernova remnants, pulsar wind nebula and coronal mass ejections from the sun. Several spacecraft observations have revealed acceleration of charged particles, mostly electrons, to very high energies with in the shock front. There is now also clear observational evidence that supernova remnant shocks accelerate both protons and electrons. The understanding of the microphysics behind collisionless shocks and their particle acceleration is tightly related with nonlinear basic plasma processes and remains a grand challenge. In this poster, we will present results from recent experiments at the LANL Trident laser facility studying collisionless shocks using intense ps laser (80J, 650 fs - peak intensity of 1020 W/cm2) driven near-critical plasmas using carbon nanotube foam targets. A second short pulse laser driven protons from few microns thick aluminum foil is used to image the laser-driven plasma.

  7. A Reconnecting Flux Rope Dynamo

    CERN Document Server

    Baggaley, Andrew W; Shukurov, Anvar; Subramanian, Kandaswamy

    2009-01-01

    We develop a new model of the fluctuation dynamo in which the magnetic field is confined in thin flux ropes advected by a multi-scale flow modeling turbulence. Magnetic dissipation occurs only via reconnection of the flux ropes. We investigate the kinetic energy release into heat, mediated by the dynamo action, both in our model and by solving the induction equation with the same flow. We find that a flux rope dynamo is an order of magnitude more efficient at converting mechanical energy into heat. The probability density of the magnetic energy release in reconnections has a power-law form with the slope -3, consistent with the Solar corona heating by nanoflares.

  8. Reconnecting flux-rope dynamo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baggaley, Andrew W.; Barenghi, Carlo F.; Shukurov, Anvar; Subramanian, Kandaswamy

    2009-11-01

    We develop a model of the fluctuation dynamo in which the magnetic field is confined to thin flux ropes advected by a multiscale model of turbulence. Magnetic dissipation occurs only via reconnection of the flux ropes. This model can be viewed as an implementation of the asymptotic limit Rm→∞ for a continuous magnetic field, where magnetic dissipation is strongly localized to small regions of strong-field gradients. We investigate the kinetic-energy release into heat mediated by the dynamo action, both in our model and by solving the induction equation with the same flow. We find that a flux-rope dynamo is an order of magnitude more efficient at converting mechanical energy into heat. The probability density of the magnetic energy release in reconnections has a power-law form with the slope -3 , consistent with the solar corona heating by nanoflares.

  9. Reconnecting flux-rope dynamo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baggaley, Andrew W; Barenghi, Carlo F; Shukurov, Anvar; Subramanian, Kandaswamy

    2009-11-01

    We develop a model of the fluctuation dynamo in which the magnetic field is confined to thin flux ropes advected by a multiscale model of turbulence. Magnetic dissipation occurs only via reconnection of the flux ropes. This model can be viewed as an implementation of the asymptotic limit R_{m}-->infinity for a continuous magnetic field, where magnetic dissipation is strongly localized to small regions of strong-field gradients. We investigate the kinetic-energy release into heat mediated by the dynamo action, both in our model and by solving the induction equation with the same flow. We find that a flux-rope dynamo is an order of magnitude more efficient at converting mechanical energy into heat. The probability density of the magnetic energy release in reconnections has a power-law form with the slope -3 , consistent with the solar corona heating by nanoflares.

  10. Computer simulation of a magnetohydrodynamic dynamo. II

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kageyama, Akira; Sato, Tetsuya; Complexity Simulation Group

    1995-05-01

    A computer simulation of a magnetohydrodynamic dynamo in a rapidly rotating spherical shell is performed. Extensive parameter runs are carried out changing electrical resistivity. When resistivity is sufficiently small, total magnetic energy can grow more than ten times larger than total kinetic energy of convection motion which is driven by an unlimited external energy source. When resistivity is relatively large and magnetic energy is comparable or smaller than kinetic energy, the convection motion maintains its well-organized structure. However, when resistivity is small and magnetic energy becomes larger than kinetic energy, the well-organized convection motion is highly irregular. The magnetic field is organized in two ways. One is the concentration of component parallel to the rotation axis and the other is the concentration of perpendicular component. The parallel component tends to be confined inside anticyclonic columnar convection cells, while the perpendicular component is confined outside convection cells.

  11. Radial structure of curvature-driven instabilities in a hot-electron plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spong, D.A.; Berk, H.L.; Van Dam, J.W.

    1983-10-01

    A nonlocal analysis of curvature-driven instabilities for a hot electron ring interacting with a warm background plasma has been made. We have examined four different instability modes characteristic of hot electron plasmas: the high-frequency hot electron interchange (at frequencies larger than the ion cyclotron frequency), the compressional Alfven instability, the interacting background pressure-driven interchange, and the conventional hot electron interchange (at frequencies below the ion cyclotron frequency). We have also examined the decoupling condition between core and hot electron plasmas as it influences the background and hot electron interchange stability requirements. The assumed equilibrium plasma profiles and resulting radial mode structure differ somewhat from those used in previous local analytic estimates; however, when the analysis is calibrated to the appropriate effective radial wavelength of the nonlocal calculation, reasonable agreement is obtained. Comparison with recent experimental measurements indicates that certain of these modes may play a role in establishing operating boundaries for the ELMO Bumpy Torus-Scale (EBT-S) experiment.

  12. Magnetic dynamo action in random flows with zero and finite correlation times

    CERN Document Server

    Mason, Joanne; Boldyrev, Stanislav; Cattaneo, Fausto

    2011-01-01

    Hydromagnetic dynamo theory provides the prevailing theoretical description for the origin of magnetic fields in the universe. Here we consider the problem of kinematic, small-scale dynamo action driven by a random, incompressible, non-helical, homogeneous and isotropic flow. In the Kazantsev dynamo model the statistics of the driving flow are assumed to be instantaneously correlated in time. Here we compare the results of the model with the dynamo properties of a simulated flow that has equivalent spatial characteristics as the Kazantsev flow but different temporal statistics. In particular, the simulated flow is a solution of the forced Navier-Stokes equations and hence has a finite correlation time. We find that the Kazantsev model typically predicts a larger magnetic growth rate and a magnetic spectrum that peaks at smaller scales. However, we show that by filtering the diffusivity spectrum at small scales it is possible to bring the growth rates into agreement and simultaneously align the magnetic spectr...

  13. Density bunching effects in a laser-driven, near-critical density plasma for ion acceleration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ettlinger, Oliver; Sahai, Aakash; Hicks, George; Ditter, Emma-Jane; Dover, Nicholas; Chen, Yu-Hsin; Helle, Michael; Gordon, Daniel; Ting, Antonio; Polyanskiy, Mikhail; Pogorelsky, Igor; Babzien, Marcus; Najmudin, Zulfikar

    2016-10-01

    We present work investigating the interaction of relativistic laser pulses with near-critical density gas targets exhibiting pre-plasma scale lengths of several laser wavelengths. Analytical and computational modelling suggest that the interaction dynamics in a low-Z plasma is a direct result of induced density bunching up to the critical surface. In fact, these bunches can themselves become overcritical and experience significant radiation pressure, accelerating ions to higher energies compared to an ``idealised'' plasma slab target. This work will be used to help explain the observation of ion energies exceeding those predicted by radiation pressure driven hole-boring in recent experiments using the TW CO2 laser at the Accelerator Test Facility at Brookhaven National Laboratory.

  14. Impact of plasma parameter on self-organization of electron temperature gradient driven turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawai, C.; Idomura, Y.; Maeyama, S.; Ogawa, Y.

    2017-04-01

    Self-organization in the slab electron temperature gradient driven (ETG) turbulence is investigated based on gyrokinetic simulations and the Hasegawa-Mima (HM) equation. The scale and the anisotropy of self-organized turbulent structures vary depending on the Rhines scale and the characteristic scale given by the adiabatic response term in the HM equation. The former is determined by competition between the linear wave dispersion and the nonlinear turbulent cascade, while the latter is given as the scale, at which the turbulent cascade is impeded. These scales are controlled by plasma parameters such as the density and temperature gradient, and the temperature ratio of ion to electron. It is found that depending on the plasma parameters, the ETG turbulence shows either isotropic turbulence or zonal flows, which give significantly different transport levels. Although the modulational instability excites zonal modes regardless of the plasma parameters, the final turbulent structure is determined by the self-organization process.

  15. Radiation-MHD Simulations of Plasma-Jet-Driven Magneto-Inertial Fusion Gain Using USim

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoltz, Peter; Beckwith, Kristian; Kundrapu, Mahdusudhan; Hsu, Scott; Langendorf, Samuel

    2016-10-01

    One goal of the modeling effort for the PLX- α project is to identify plasma-jet-driven magneto-inertial fusion (PJMIF) configurations with potential net fusion-energy gain. We use USim, which is a tool for modeling high-energy-density plasmas using multi-fluid models coupled to electromagnetics using fully-implicit iterative solvers, combined with finite volume discretizations on unstructured meshes. We include physical viscosity and advanced-EOS modeling capability, and are investigating the effects of different radiation (including flux-limited diffusion) and alpha-transport models. We compare 2D and 1D gain calculations for various liner geometries, parameters, and plasma species, and consider the effects of liner non-uniformities on fusion-gain degradation. Supported by the ARPA-E ALPHA Program.

  16. Semi-analytic model of plasma-jet-driven magneto-inertial fusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langendorf, Samuel J.; Hsu, Scott C.

    2017-03-01

    A semi-analytic model for plasma-jet-driven magneto-inertial fusion is presented. Compressions of a magnetized plasma target by a spherically imploding plasma liner are calculated in one dimension (1D), accounting for compressible hydrodynamics and ionization of the liner material, energy losses due to conduction and radiation, fusion burn and alpha deposition, separate ion and electron temperatures in the target, magnetic pressure, and fuel burn-up. Results show 1D gains of 3-30 at spherical convergence ratio energy, for cases in which the liner thickness is 1 cm and the initial radius of a preheated magnetized target is 4 cm. Some exploration of parameter space and physics settings is presented. The yields observed suggest that there is a possibility of igniting additional dense fuel layers to reach high gain.

  17. An $ep$ collider based on proton-driven plasma wakefield acceleration

    CERN Document Server

    Wing, M.; Mete, O.; Aimidula, A.; Welsch, C.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Mandry, S.

    2014-01-01

    Recent simulations have shown that a high-energy proton bunch can excite strong plasma wakefields and accelerate a bunch of electrons to the energy frontier in a single stage of acceleration. This scheme could lead to a future $ep$ collider using the LHC for the proton beam and a compact electron accelerator of length 170 m, producing electrons of energy up to 100 GeV. The parameters of such a collider are discussed as well as conceptual layouts within the CERN accelerator complex. The physics of plasma wakefield acceleration will also be introduced, with the AWAKE experiment, a proof of principle demonstration of proton-driven plasma wakefield acceleration, briefly reviewed, as well as the physics possibilities of such an $ep$ collider.

  18. IS THE SMALL-SCALE MAGNETIC FIELD CORRELATED WITH THE DYNAMO CYCLE?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karak, Bidya Binay; Brandenburg, Axel, E-mail: bbkarak@nordita.org [Nordita, KTH Royal Institute of Technology and Stockholm University, Roslagstullsbacken 23, SE-10691 Stockholm (Sweden)

    2016-01-01

    The small-scale magnetic field is ubiquitous at the solar surface—even at high latitudes. From observations we know that this field is uncorrelated (or perhaps even weakly anticorrelated) with the global sunspot cycle. Our aim is to explore the origin, and particularly the cycle dependence, of such a phenomenon using three-dimensional dynamo simulations. We adopt a simple model of a turbulent dynamo in a shearing box driven by helically forced turbulence. Depending on the dynamo parameters, large-scale (global) and small-scale (local) dynamos can be excited independently in this model. Based on simulations in different parameter regimes, we find that, when only the large-scale dynamo is operating in the system, the small-scale magnetic field generated through shredding and tangling of the large-scale magnetic field is positively correlated with the global magnetic cycle. However, when both dynamos are operating, the small-scale field is produced from both the small-scale dynamo and the tangling of the large-scale field. In this situation, when the large-scale field is weaker than the equipartition value of the turbulence, the small-scale field is almost uncorrelated with the large-scale magnetic cycle. On the other hand, when the large-scale field is stronger than the equipartition value, we observe an anticorrelation between the small-scale field and the large-scale magnetic cycle. This anticorrelation can be interpreted as a suppression of the small-scale dynamo. Based on our studies we conclude that the observed small-scale magnetic field in the Sun is generated by the combined mechanisms of a small-scale dynamo and tangling of the large-scale field.

  19. Plasma Sheet Actuator Driven by Repetitive Nanosecond Pulses with a Negative DC Component

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    宋慧敏; 张乔根; 李应红; 贾敏; 吴云; 梁华

    2012-01-01

    A type of electrical discharge called sliding discharge was developed to generate plasma aerodynamic actuation for flow control. A three-electrode plasma sheet actuator driven by repetitive nanosecond pulses with a negative DC component was used to generate sliding discharge, which can be called nanosecond-pulse sliding discharge. The phenomenology and behaviour of the plasma sheet actuator were investigated experimentally. Discharge morphology shows that the formation of nanosecond-pulse sliding discharge is dependent on the peak value of the repetitive nanosecond pulses and negative DC component applied on the plasma sheet actuator. Compared to dielectric barrier discharge (DBD), the extension of plasma in nanosecond-pulse sliding discharge is quasi-diffusive, stable, longer and more intensive. Test results of particle image velocimetry demonstrate that the negative DC component applied to a third electrode could significantly modify the topology of the flow induced by nanosecond-pulse DBD. Body force induced by the nanosecond-pulse sliding discharge can be approximately in the order of mN. Both the maximum velocity and the body force induced by sliding discharge increase significantly as compared to single DBD. Therefore, nanosecond-pulse sliding discharge is a preferable plasma aerodynamic actuation generation mode, which is very promising in the field of aerodynamics.

  20. Capillary flow-driven microfluidic device with wettability gradient and sedimentation effects for blood plasma separation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maria, M. Sneha; Rakesh, P. E.; Chandra, T. S.; Sen, A. K.

    2017-01-01

    We report a capillary flow-driven microfluidic device for blood-plasma separation that comprises a cylindrical well between a pair of bottom and top channels. Exposure of the well to oxygen-plasma creates wettability gradient on its inner surface with its ends hydrophilic and middle portion hydrophobic. Due to capillary action, sample blood self-infuses into bottom channel and rises up the well. Separation of plasma occurs at the hydrophobic patch due to formation of a ‘self-built-in filter’ and sedimentation. Capillary velocity is predicted using a model and validated using experimental data. Sedimentation of RBCs is explained using modified Steinour’s model and correlation between settling velocity and liquid concentration is found. Variation of contact angle on inner surface of the well is characterized and effects of well diameter and height and dilution ratio on plasma separation rate are investigated. With a well of 1.0 mm diameter and 4.0 mm height, 2.0 μl of plasma was obtained (from <10 μl whole blood) in 15 min with a purification efficiency of 99.9%. Detection of glucose was demonstrated with the plasma obtained. Wetting property of channels was maintained by storing in DI water under vacuum and performance of the device was found to be unaffected over three weeks. PMID:28256564

  1. Capillary flow-driven microfluidic device with wettability gradient and sedimentation effects for blood plasma separation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maria, M. Sneha; Rakesh, P. E.; Chandra, T. S.; Sen, A. K.

    2017-03-01

    We report a capillary flow-driven microfluidic device for blood-plasma separation that comprises a cylindrical well between a pair of bottom and top channels. Exposure of the well to oxygen-plasma creates wettability gradient on its inner surface with its ends hydrophilic and middle portion hydrophobic. Due to capillary action, sample blood self-infuses into bottom channel and rises up the well. Separation of plasma occurs at the hydrophobic patch due to formation of a ‘self-built-in filter’ and sedimentation. Capillary velocity is predicted using a model and validated using experimental data. Sedimentation of RBCs is explained using modified Steinour’s model and correlation between settling velocity and liquid concentration is found. Variation of contact angle on inner surface of the well is characterized and effects of well diameter and height and dilution ratio on plasma separation rate are investigated. With a well of 1.0 mm diameter and 4.0 mm height, 2.0 μl of plasma was obtained (from purification efficiency of 99.9%. Detection of glucose was demonstrated with the plasma obtained. Wetting property of channels was maintained by storing in DI water under vacuum and performance of the device was found to be unaffected over three weeks.

  2. Laser-driven electron beamlines generated by coupling laser-plasma sources with conventional transport systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Antici, P. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare (INFN), Laboratori Nazionali di Frascati, Via E. Fermi, 40, 00044 Frascati (Italy); SAPIENZA, University of Rome, Dip. SBAI, Via A. Scarpa 14, 00161 Rome (Italy); INFN - Sezione di Roma, c/o Dipartimento di Fisica - SAPIENZA, University of Rome, P.le Aldo Moro, 2 - 00185 Rome (Italy); Bacci, A.; Chiadroni, E.; Ferrario, M.; Rossi, A. R. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare (INFN), Laboratori Nazionali di Frascati, Via E. Fermi, 40, 00044 Frascati (Italy); Benedetti, C. [University of Bologna and INFN - Bologna (Italy); Lancia, L.; Migliorati, M.; Mostacci, A.; Palumbo, L. [SAPIENZA, University of Rome, Dip. SBAI, Via A. Scarpa 14, 00161 Rome (Italy); INFN - Sezione di Roma, c/o Dipartimento di Fisica - SAPIENZA, University of Rome, P.le Aldo Moro, 2 - 00185 Rome (Italy); Serafini, L. [INFN-Milan and Department of Physics, University of Milan, Via Celoria 16, 20133 Milan (Italy)

    2012-08-15

    Laser-driven electron beamlines are receiving increasing interest from the particle accelerator community. In particular, the high initial energy, low emittance, and high beam current of the plasma based electron source potentially allow generating much more compact and bright particle accelerators than what conventional accelerator technology can achieve. Using laser-generated particles as injectors for generating beamlines could significantly reduce the size and cost of accelerator facilities. Unfortunately, several features of laser-based particle beams need still to be improved before considering them for particle beamlines and thus enable the use of plasma-driven accelerators for the multiple applications of traditional accelerators. Besides working on the plasma source itself, a promising approach to shape the laser-generated beams is coupling them with conventional accelerator elements in order to benefit from both a versatile electron source and a controllable beam. In this paper, we perform start-to-end simulations to generate laser-driven beamlines using conventional accelerator codes and methodologies. Starting with laser-generated electrons that can be obtained with established multi-hundred TW laser systems, we compare different options to capture and transport the beams. This is performed with the aim of providing beamlines suitable for potential applications, such as free electron lasers. In our approach, we have analyzed which parameters are critical at the source and from there evaluated different ways to overcome these issues using conventional accelerator elements and methods. We show that electron driven beamlines are potentially feasible, but exploiting their full potential requires extensive improvement of the source parameters or innovative technological devices for their transport and capture.

  3. Laser-driven electron beamlines generated by coupling laser-plasma sources with conventional transport systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antici, P.; Bacci, A.; Benedetti, C.; Chiadroni, E.; Ferrario, M.; Rossi, A. R.; Lancia, L.; Migliorati, M.; Mostacci, A.; Palumbo, L.; Serafini, L.

    2012-08-01

    Laser-driven electron beamlines are receiving increasing interest from the particle accelerator community. In particular, the high initial energy, low emittance, and high beam current of the plasma based electron source potentially allow generating much more compact and bright particle accelerators than what conventional accelerator technology can achieve. Using laser-generated particles as injectors for generating beamlines could significantly reduce the size and cost of accelerator facilities. Unfortunately, several features of laser-based particle beams need still to be improved before considering them for particle beamlines and thus enable the use of plasma-driven accelerators for the multiple applications of traditional accelerators. Besides working on the plasma source itself, a promising approach to shape the laser-generated beams is coupling them with conventional accelerator elements in order to benefit from both a versatile electron source and a controllable beam. In this paper, we perform start-to-end simulations to generate laser-driven beamlines using conventional accelerator codes and methodologies. Starting with laser-generated electrons that can be obtained with established multi-hundred TW laser systems, we compare different options to capture and transport the beams. This is performed with the aim of providing beamlines suitable for potential applications, such as free electron lasers. In our approach, we have analyzed which parameters are critical at the source and from there evaluated different ways to overcome these issues using conventional accelerator elements and methods. We show that electron driven beamlines are potentially feasible, but exploiting their full potential requires extensive improvement of the source parameters or innovative technological devices for their transport and capture.

  4. Laminar and Turbulent Dynamos in Chiral Magnetohydrodynamics. I. Theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogachevskii, Igor; Ruchayskiy, Oleg; Boyarsky, Alexey; Fröhlich, Jürg; Kleeorin, Nathan; Brandenburg, Axel; Schober, Jennifer

    2017-09-01

    The magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) description of plasmas with relativistic particles necessarily includes an additional new field, the chiral chemical potential associated with the axial charge (i.e., the number difference between right- and left-handed relativistic fermions). This chiral chemical potential gives rise to a contribution to the electric current density of the plasma (chiral magnetic effect). We present a self-consistent treatment of the chiral MHD equations, which include the back-reaction of the magnetic field on a chiral chemical potential and its interaction with the plasma velocity field. A number of novel phenomena are exhibited. First, we show that the chiral magnetic effect decreases the frequency of the Alfvén wave for incompressible flows, increases the frequencies of the Alfvén wave and of the fast magnetosonic wave for compressible flows, and decreases the frequency of the slow magnetosonic wave. Second, we show that, in addition to the well-known laminar chiral dynamo effect, which is not related to fluid motions, there is a dynamo caused by the joint action of velocity shear and chiral magnetic effect. In the presence of turbulence with vanishing mean kinetic helicity, the derived mean-field chiral MHD equations describe turbulent large-scale dynamos caused by the chiral alpha effect, which is dominant for large fluid and magnetic Reynolds numbers. The chiral alpha effect is due to an interaction of the chiral magnetic effect and fluctuations of the small-scale current produced by tangling magnetic fluctuations (which are generated by tangling of the large-scale magnetic field by sheared velocity fluctuations). These dynamo effects may have interesting consequences in the dynamics of the early universe, neutron stars, and the quark–gluon plasma.

  5. Three dimensional Simulations of Self-Organization in a Driven Dissipative Plasma System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaikh, Dastgeer; Dasgupta, B.; Hu, Q.; Zank, G. P.

    2009-11-01

    We perform a fully self-consistent 3-D numerical simulation for a compressible, driven dissipative magneto-plasma driven by large-scale perturbations, that contain a fairly broader spectrum of characteristic modes, ranging from largest scales to intermediate scales and down to the smallest scales, where the energy of the system are dissipated by collisional (Ohmic) and viscous dissipations. Additionally, our simulation includes nonlinear interactions amongst a wide range of ?uctuations that are initialized with random spectral amplitudes, leading to the cascade of spectral energy in the inertial range spectrum, and takes into account large scale as well as small scale perturbation that may have been induced by the background plasma ?uctuations, also the non adiabatic exchange of energy leading to the migration of energy from the energy containing modes or randomly injected energy driven by perturbations and further dissipated by the smaller scales. Besides demonstrating the comparative decays of total energy and dissipation rate of energy, our results show the existence of a perpendicular component of current, thus clearly con?rming that the self-organized state is non-force free.

  6. Driving large magnetic Reynolds number flow in highly ionized, unmagnetized plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weisberg, D. B.; Peterson, E.; Milhone, J.; Endrizzi, D.; Cooper, C.; Désangles, V.; Khalzov, I.; Siller, R.; Forest, C. B.

    2017-05-01

    Electrically driven, unmagnetized plasma flows have been generated in the Madison plasma dynamo experiment with magnetic Reynolds numbers exceeding the predicted Rmcrit = 200 threshold for flow-driven MHD instability excitation. The plasma flow is driven using ten thermally emissive lanthanum hexaboride cathodes which generate a J ×B torque in helium and argon plasmas. Detailed Mach probe measurements of plasma velocity for two flow topologies are presented: edge-localized drive using the multi-cusp boundary field and volumetric drive using an axial Helmholtz field. Radial velocity profiles show that the edge-driven flow is established via ion viscosity but is limited by a volumetric neutral drag force, and measurements of velocity shear compare favorably to the Braginskii transport theory. Volumetric flow drive is shown to produce larger velocity shear and has the correct flow profile for studying the magnetorotational instability.

  7. Generation of Large-Scale Magnetic Fields by Small-Scale Dynamo in Shear Flows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Squire, J; Bhattacharjee, A

    2015-10-23

    We propose a new mechanism for a turbulent mean-field dynamo in which the magnetic fluctuations resulting from a small-scale dynamo drive the generation of large-scale magnetic fields. This is in stark contrast to the common idea that small-scale magnetic fields should be harmful to large-scale dynamo action. These dynamos occur in the presence of a large-scale velocity shear and do not require net helicity, resulting from off-diagonal components of the turbulent resistivity tensor as the magnetic analogue of the "shear-current" effect. Given the inevitable existence of nonhelical small-scale magnetic fields in turbulent plasmas, as well as the generic nature of velocity shear, the suggested mechanism may help explain the generation of large-scale magnetic fields across a wide range of astrophysical objects.

  8. Thermoelectric-Driven Liquid-Metal Plasma-Facing Structures (TELS) Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ruzic, David [Univ. of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign, IL (United States)

    2016-12-17

    The Thermoelectric-Driven Liquid-Metal Plasma-Facing Structures (TELS) project was able to establish the experimental conditions necessary for flowing liquid metal surfaces in order to be utilized as surfaces facing fusion relevant energetic plasma flux. The work has also addressed additional developments along with progressing along the timeline detailed in the proposal. A no-cost extension was requested to conduct other relevant experiment- specifically regarding the characterization droplet ejection during energetic plasma flux impact. A specially designed trench module, which could accommodate trenches with different aspect ratios was fabricated and installed in the TELS setup and plasma gun experiments were performed. Droplet ejection was characterized using high speed image acquisition and also surface mounted probes were used to characterize the plasma. The Gantt chart below had been provided with the original proposal, indicating the tasks to be performed in the third year of funding. These tasks are listed above in the progress report outline, and their progress status is detailed below.

  9. A Beam Driven Plasma-Wakefield Linear Collider: From Higgs Factory to Multi-TeV

    CERN Document Server

    Adli, Erik; Gessner, Spencer J; Hogan, Mark J; Raubenheimer, Tor; An, Weiming; Joshi, Chan; Mori, Warren

    2013-01-01

    Plasma wakefield acceleration (PWFA) holds much promise for advancing the energy frontier because it can potentially provide a 1000-fold or more increase in acceleration gradient with excellent power efficiency in respect with standard technologies. Most of the advances in beam-driven plasma wakefield acceleration were obtained by a UCLA/USC/SLAC collaboration working at the SLAC FFTB[ ]. These experiments have shown that plasmas can accelerate and focus both electron and positron high energy beams, and an accelerating gradient in excess of 50 GeV/m can be sustained in an 85 cm-long plasma. The FFTB experiments were essentially proof-of-principle experiments that showed the great potential of plasma accelerators. The FACET[ ] test facility at SLAC will in the period 2012-2016 further study several issues that are directly related to the applicability of PWFA to a high-energy collider, in particular two-beam acceleration where the witness beam experiences high beam loading (required for high efficiency), small...

  10. Statistical dynamo theory: Mode excitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoyng, P

    2009-04-01

    We compute statistical properties of the lowest-order multipole coefficients of the magnetic field generated by a dynamo of arbitrary shape. To this end we expand the field in a complete biorthogonal set of base functions, viz. B= summation operator_{k}a;{k}(t)b;{k}(r) . The properties of these biorthogonal function sets are treated in detail. We consider a linear problem and the statistical properties of the fluid flow are supposed to be given. The turbulent convection may have an arbitrary distribution of spatial scales. The time evolution of the expansion coefficients a;{k} is governed by a stochastic differential equation from which we infer their averages a;{k} , autocorrelation functions a;{k}(t)a;{k *}(t+tau) , and an equation for the cross correlations a;{k}a;{l *} . The eigenfunctions of the dynamo equation (with eigenvalues lambda_{k} ) turn out to be a preferred set in terms of which our results assume their simplest form. The magnetic field of the dynamo is shown to consist of transiently excited eigenmodes whose frequency and coherence time is given by Ilambda_{k} and -1/Rlambda_{k} , respectively. The relative rms excitation level of the eigenmodes, and hence the distribution of magnetic energy over spatial scales, is determined by linear theory. An expression is derived for |a;{k}|;{2}/|a;{0}|;{2} in case the fundamental mode b;{0} has a dominant amplitude, and we outline how this expression may be evaluated. It is estimated that |a;{k}|;{2}/|a;{0}|;{2} approximately 1/N , where N is the number of convective cells in the dynamo. We show that the old problem of a short correlation time (or first-order smoothing approximation) has been partially eliminated. Finally we prove that for a simple statistically steady dynamo with finite resistivity all eigenvalues obey Rlambda_{k}<0 .

  11. Proton-driven plasma wakefield acceleration: a path to the future of high-energy particle physics

    CERN Document Server

    Assmann, R; Bohl, T; Bracco, C; Buttenschön, B; Butterworth, A; Caldwell, A; Chattopadhyay, S; Cipiccia, S; Feldbaumer, E; Fonseca, R A; Goddard, B; Gross, M; Grulke, O; Gschwendtner, E; Holloway, J; Huang, C; Jaroszynski, D; Jolly, S; Kempkes, P; Lopes, N; Lotov, K; Machacek, J; Mandry, S R; McKenzie, J W; Meddahi, M; Militsyn, B L; Moschuering, N; Muggli, P; Najmudin, Z; Noakes, T C Q; Norreys, P A; Öz, E; Pardons, A; Petrenko, A; Pukhov, A; Rieger, K; Reimann, O; Ruhl, H; Shaposhnikova, E; Silva, L O; Sosedkin, A; Tarkeshian, R; Trines, R M G N; Tückmantel, T; Vieira, J; Vincke, H; Wing, M; Xia G , G

    2014-01-01

    New acceleration technology is mandatory for the future elucidation of fundamental particles and their interactions. A promising approach is to exploit the properties of plasmas. Past research has focused on creating large-amplitude plasma waves by injecting an intense laser pulse or an electron bunch into the plasma. However, the maximum energy gain of electrons accelerated in a single plasma stage is limited by the energy of the driver. Proton bunches are the most promising drivers of wakefields to accelerate electrons to the TeV energy scale in a single stage. An experimental program at CERN { the AWAKE experiment { has been launched to study in detail the important physical processes and to demonstrate the power of proton-driven plasma wakefield acceleration. Here we review the physical principles and some experimental considerations for a future proton-driven plasma wakefield accelerator.

  12. Proton-driven plasma wakefield acceleration: a path to the future of high-energy particle physics

    CERN Document Server

    Assmann, R; Bohl, T; Bracco, C; Buttenschon, B; Butterworth, A; Caldwell, A; Chattopadhyay, S; Cipiccia, S; Feldbaumer, E; Fonseca, R A; Goddard, B; Gross, M; Grulke, O; Gschwendtner, E; Holloway, J; Huang, C; Jaroszynski, D; Jolly, S; Kempkes, P; Lopes, N; Lotov, K; Machacek, J; Mandry, S R; McKenzie, J W; Meddahi, M; Militsyn, B L; Moschuering, N; Muggli, P; Najmudin, Z; Noakes, T C Q; Norreys, P A; Oz, E; Pardons, A; Petrenko, A; Pukhov, A; Rieger, K; Reimann, O; Ruhl, H; Shaposhnikova, E; Silva, L O; Sosedkin, A; Tarkeshian, R; Trines, R M G N; Tuckmantel, T; Vieira, J; Vincke, H; Wing, M; Xia, G

    2014-01-01

    New acceleration technology is mandatory for the future elucidation of fundamental particles and their interactions. A promising approach is to exploit the properties of plasmas. Past research has focused on creating large-amplitude plasma waves by injecting an intense laser pulse or an electron bunch into the plasma. However, the maximum energy gain of electrons accelerated in a single plasma stage is limited by the energy of the driver. Proton bunches are the most promising drivers of wakefields to accelerate electrons to the TeV energy scale in a single stage. An experimental program at CERN -- the AWAKE experiment -- has been launched to study in detail the important physical processes and to demonstrate the power of proton-driven plasma wakefield acceleration. Here we review the physical principles and some experimental considerations for a future proton-driven plasma wakefield accelerator.

  13. The small-scale turbulent dynamo in smoothed particle magnetohydrodynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Tricco, Terrence S; Federrath, Christoph

    2016-01-01

    Supersonic turbulence is believed to be at the heart of star formation. We have performed smoothed particle magnetohydrodynamics (SPMHD) simulations of the small-scale dynamo amplification of magnetic fields in supersonic turbulence. The calculations use isothermal gas driven at rms velocity of Mach 10 so that conditions are representative of star-forming molecular clouds in the Milky Way. The growth of magnetic energy is followed for 10 orders in magnitude until it reaches saturation, a few percent of the kinetic energy. The results of our dynamo calculations are compared with results from grid-based methods, finding excellent agreement on their statistics and their qualitative behaviour. The simulations utilise the latest algorithmic developments we have developed, in particular, a new divergence cleaning approach to maintain the solenoidal constraint on the magnetic field and a method to reduce the numerical dissipation of the magnetic shock capturing scheme. We demonstrate that our divergence cleaning met...

  14. Numerical demonstration of fluctuation dynamo at low magnetic Prandtl numbers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iskakov, A B; Schekochihin, A A; Cowley, S C; McWilliams, J C; Proctor, M R E

    2007-05-18

    Direct numerical simulations of incompressible nonhelical randomly forced MHD turbulence are used to demonstrate for the first time that the fluctuation dynamo exists in the limit of large magnetic Reynolds number Rm>1 and small magnetic Prandtl number Pmdynamo on the hydrodynamic Reynolds number Re is obtained for 1 less than or similar Re less than or similar 6700. In the limit Pmdynamo at large and moderate Prandtl numbers: Rmc less than or similar 200 for Re greater than or similar 6000 compared to Rmc approximately 60 for Pm>or=1. It is not yet possible to determine numerically whether the growth rate of the magnetic energy is proportional, Rm1/2 in the limit Rm-->infinity, as it should be if the dynamo is driven by the inertial-range motions at the resistive scale.

  15. Convective dynamo action in a spherical shell: symmetries and modulation

    CERN Document Server

    Raynaud, Raphaël

    2016-01-01

    We consider dynamo action driven by three-dimensional rotating anelastic convection in a spherical shell. Motivated by the behaviour of the solar dynamo, we examine the interaction of hydromagnetic modes with different symmetries and demonstrate how complicated interactions between convection, differential rotation and magnetic fields may lead to modulation of the basic cycle. For some parameters, Type 1 modulation occurs by the transfer of energy between modes of different symmetries with little change in the overall amplitude, for other parameters, the modulation is of Type 2, where the amplitude is significantly affected (leading to grand minima in activity) without significant changes in symmetry. Most importantly, we identify the presence of "supermodulation" in the solutions, where the activity switches chaotically between Type 1 and Type 2 modulation, this is believed to be an important process in solar activity.

  16. Anisotropy effects on curvature-driven flute instabilities in a hot-electron plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spong, D.A.; Berk, H.L.; Van Dam, J.W.; Rosenbluth, M.N.

    1982-08-01

    The effects of finite parallel temperature are investigated for a hot electron plasma with sufficiently large beta that the magnetic field scale length (..delta../sub B/) is small compared with the vacuum field radius of curvature (R). Numerical and analytical estimates of stability boundaries are obtained for the four possible modes that can be treated in this limit: the conventional hot electron interchange, the high frequency hot electron interchange (..omega.. > ..omega../sub ci/), the compressional Alfven mode, and the interacting pressure-driven interchange.

  17. Pressure Driven Magnetohydrodynamics Instabilities in Peaked Pressure Profile Reversed Magnetic Shear Plasmas

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    高庆弟; 张锦华; 曲洪鹏

    2001-01-01

    For a reversed magnetic shear plasma formed by early neutral beam injection into the HL-2A tokamak, magnetohydrodynamics instability analysis against ideal low-n modes and resistive interchange modes is carried out.Low-n modes located in the low shear region around the shear reversal point are driven unstable by a large pressure gradient, and they are of the characteristics of infernal modes. High pressure in the central negative shearregion drives resistive interchange modes with the unstable window extending to r /a ≈ 0.2, but not covering thelow shear region around the shear reversal point.

  18. Compact disposal of high-energy electron beams using passive or laser-driven plasma decelerating stage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bonatto, A.; Schroeder, C. B.; Vay, J. -L.; Geddes, C. R.; Benedetti, C.; Esarey and, E.; Leemans, W. P.

    2014-07-13

    A plasma decelerating stage is investigated as a compact alternative for the disposal of high-energy beams (beam dumps). This could benefit the design of laser-driven plasma accelerator (LPA) applications that require transportability and or high-repetition-rate operation regimes. Passive and laser-driven (active) plasma-based beam dumps are studied analytically and with particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations in a 1D geometry. Analytical estimates for the beam energy loss are compared to and extended by the PIC simulations, showing that with the proposed schemes a beam can be efficiently decelerated in a centimeter-scale distance.

  19. Mechanism and operation parameters of a plasma-driven micro-particle accelerator

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HUANG JianGuo; FENG ChunHua; HAN dianWei; LI HongWei; CAI MingHui; LI XiaoYin; ZHANG ZhenLong; CHEN ZhaoFeng; WANG Long; YANG XuanZong

    2009-01-01

    There is a large amount of micro debris ranging between millimeters and micrometers in space, which has significant influence on the reliability and life of spacecrafts through long-duration integrated im-pacts and has to be considered in designing a vehicle's suitability to the space environment. In order to simulate the micro-impacts on exposed materials, a plasma-driven micro-particle accelerator was de-veloped. The major processes, including the acceleration, compression and ejection of plasmas, were modeled. By comparing the theoretical simulations with the experimental results, the acceleration mechanism was clarified. Moreover, through a series of experiments, the optimum operation range was investigated, and the acceleration ability was primarily determined.

  20. Anomaly-driven inverse cascade and inhomogeneities in a magnetized chiral plasma in the early Universe

    CERN Document Server

    Gorbar, E V; Shovkovy, I A; Vilchinskii, S

    2016-01-01

    By making use of a simple model that captures the key features of the anomalous Maxwell equations, we study the role of inhomogeneities on the evolution of magnetic fields in a chiral plasma. We find that inhomogeneities of the chiral asymmetry by themselves do not prevent the anomaly-driven inverse cascade and, as in the homogeneous case, the magnetic helicity is transferred from shorter to longer wavelength helical modes of the magnetic field. However, we also find that the evolution appears to be sensitive to the effects of diffusion. In the case when diffusion is negligible, the inverse cascade slows down considerably compared to the homogeneous scenario. In the case of the primordial plasma, though, we find that the diffusion is substantial and efficiently suppresses chiral asymmetry inhomogeneities. As a result, the inverse cascade proceeds practically in the same way as in the chirally homogeneous model.

  1. A compact laser-driven plasma accelerator for megaelectronvolt-energy neutral atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajeev, R.; Madhu Trivikram, T.; Rishad, K. P. M.; Narayanan, V.; Krishnakumar, E.; Krishnamurthy, M.

    2013-03-01

    Tremendous strides have been made in charged-particle acceleration using intense, ultrashort laser pulses. Accelerating neutral atoms is an important complementary technology because such particles are unaffected by electric and magnetic fields and can thus penetrate deeper into a target than ions. However, compact laser-based accelerators for neutral atoms are limited at best to millielectronvolt energies. Here, we report the generation of megaelectronvolt-energy argon atoms from an optical-field-ionized dense nanocluster ensemble. Measurements reveal that nearly every laser-accelerated ion is converted to an energetic neutral atom as a result of highly efficient electron transfer from Rydberg excited clusters, within a sheath around the laser focus. This process, although optimal in nanoclusters, is generic and adaptable to most laser-produced plasmas. Such compact laser-driven energetic neutral atom sources could have applications in fast atom lithography for surface science and tokamak diagnostics in plasma technology.

  2. ISEE-3 observations of a viscously-driven plasma sheet: magnetosheath mass and/or momentum transfer?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. T. Mist

    Full Text Available A statistical analysis of data from the ISEE-3 distant tail campaign is presented. We investigate the mechanism driving slow, tailward flows observed in the plasma sheet. The possibility that these slow flows are driven by mass and/or momentum transfer across the distant tail magnetopause is explored. We establish that 40% of these flows could be driven by the transfer of approximately 4% of the magnetosheath momentum flux into the magnetotail. Current understanding of the Kelvin-Helmholtz instability suggests that this figure is consistent with the amount of momentum flux transfer produced by this mechanism. We also consider the possibility that these flows are solely driven by transferring magnetosheath plasma across the magnetopause. We find that there is sufficient mass observed on these field lines for this to be the sole driving mechanism for only 27% of the observed slow flows.

    Key words. Magnetospheric physics (magnetotail boundary layers; plasma convection; plasma sheet

  3. Experimental characterization of railgun-driven supersonic plasma jets motivated by high energy density physics applications

    CERN Document Server

    Hsu, S C; Moser, A L; Awe, T J; Brockington, S J E; Davis, J S; Adams, C S; Case, A; Cassibry, J T; Dunn, J P; Gilmore, M A; Lynn, A G; Messer, S J; Witherspoon, F D

    2012-01-01

    We report experimental results on the parameters, structure, and evolution of high-Mach-number (M) argon plasma jets formed and launched by a pulsed-power-driven railgun. The nominal initial average jet parameters in the data set analyzed are density \\approx 2 x 10^(16) cm^(-3), electron temperature \\approx 1.4 eV, velocity \\approx 30 km/s, M \\approx 14, ionization fraction \\approx 0.96, diameter \\approx 5 cm, and length \\approx 20 cm. These values approach the range needed by the Plasma Liner Experiment (PLX), which is designed to use merging plasma jets to form imploding spherical plasma liners that can reach peak pressures of 0.1-1 Mbar at stagnation. As these jets propagate a distance of approximately 40 cm, the average density drops by one order of magnitude, which is up to an order of magnitude less than the drop predicted by the ideal hydrodynamic theory of a constant-M jet.

  4. Experimental characterization of railgun-driven supersonic plasma jets motivated by high energy density physics applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hsu, S. C.; Moser, A. L.; Awe, T. J.; Davis, J. S.; Dunn, J. P. [Physics Division, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States); Merritt, E. C.; Adams, C. S. [Physics Division, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States); University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87131 (United States); Brockington, S. J. E.; Case, A.; Messer, S. J.; Witherspoon, F. D. [HyperV Technologies Corp., Chantilly, Virginia 20151 (United States); Cassibry, J. T. [Propulsion Research Center, University of Alabama in Huntsville, Huntsville, Alabama 35899 (United States); Gilmore, M. A.; Lynn, A. G. [University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87131 (United States)

    2012-12-15

    We report experimental results on the parameters, structure, and evolution of high-Mach-number (M) argon plasma jets formed and launched by a pulsed-power-driven railgun. The nominal initial average jet parameters in the data set analyzed are density Almost-Equal-To 2 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 16} cm{sup -3}, electron temperature Almost-Equal-To 1.4 eV, velocity Almost-Equal-To 30 km/s, M Almost-Equal-To 14, ionization fraction Almost-Equal-To 0.96, diameter Almost-Equal-To 5 cm, and length Almost-Equal-To 20 cm. These values approach the range needed by the Plasma Liner Experiment, which is designed to use merging plasma jets to form imploding spherical plasma liners that can reach peak pressures of 0.1-1 Mbar at stagnation. As these jets propagate a distance of approximately 40 cm, the average density drops by one order of magnitude, which is at the very low end of the 8-160 times drop predicted by ideal hydrodynamic theory of a constant-M jet.

  5. Preparation of magnetized nanodusty plasmas in a radio frequency-driven parallel-plate reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tadsen, Benjamin, E-mail: tadsen@physik.uni-kiel.de; Greiner, Franko; Piel, Alexander [IEAP, Christian-Albrechts-Universität, D-24098 Kiel (Germany)

    2014-10-15

    Nanodust is produced in an rf-driven push-pull parallel-plate reactor using argon with an acetylene admixture at 5–30 Pa. A scheme for the preparation of nanodust clouds with particle radii up to 400 nm for investigations in magnetized plasmas is proposed. The confinement that keeps the nanodust of different radii inside a moderately magnetized discharge (B ≤ 500 mT) is investigated by a comparison of 2d-Langmuir probe measurements in the dust-free plasma without and with a magnetic field and by the analysis of scattered light of nanodust clouds. It is shown that the dust cloud changes its shape when the dust density changes. This results in a reversed α-γ{sup ′} transition from a dense dust cloud with a central disk-like void to a dilute dust cloud with a toroidal void. When the dust density is further reduced, filaments are observed in the central part of the cloud, which were absent in the high-density phase. It is concluded that the dense nanodust cloud is able to suppress plasma filamentation in magnetized plasmas.

  6. Density-Gradient-Driven trapped-electron-modes in improved-confinement RFP plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duff, James

    2016-10-01

    Short wavelength density fluctuations in improved-confinement MST plasmas exhibit multiple features characteristic of the trapped-electron-mode (TEM), strong evidence that drift wave turbulence emerges in RFP plasmas when transport associated with MHD tearing is reduced. Core transport in the RFP is normally governed by magnetic stochasticity stemming from long wavelength tearing modes that arise from current profile peaking. Using inductive control, the tearing modes are reduced and global confinement is increased to values expected for a comparable tokamak plasma. The improved confinement is associated with a large increase in the pressure gradient that can destabilize drift waves. The measured density fluctuations have frequencies >50 kHz, wavenumbers k_phi*rho_sglobal tearing modes. Their amplitude increases with the local density gradient, and they exhibit a density-gradient threshold at R/L_n 15, higher than in tokamak plasmas by R/a. the GENE code, modified for RFP equilibria, predicts the onset of microinstability for these strong-gradient plasma conditions. The density-gradient-driven TEM is the dominant instability in the region where the measured density fluctuations are largest, and the experimental threshold-gradient is close to the predicted critical gradient for linear stability. While nonlinear analysis shows a large Dimits shift associated with predicted strong zonal flows, the inclusion of residual magnetic fluctuations causes a collapse of the zonal flows and an increase in the predicted transport to a level close to the experimentally measured heat flux. Similar circumstances could occur in the edge region of tokamak plasmas when resonant magnetic perturbations are applied for the control of ELMs. Work supported by US DOE.

  7. CO2 impact ionization-driven plasma instability observed by Pioneer Venus Orbiter at Periapsis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curtis, S. A.; Brace, L. H.; Niemann, H. B.; Scarf, F. L.

    1985-01-01

    Observations of enhanced ac electric field noise about Pioneer Venus periapsis are shown to be related to spacecraft-generated impact ionization of the ambient CO2. The frequency of the electric field noise is found to peak in the vicinity of the CO2(+) ion plasma frequency and to closely follow the form of the neutral CO2 density profile. When the electric field noise in all channels is normalized by the square root of the CO2 number density, the ratio is constant. Since the impact electron density measured by the Pioneer Venus Langmuir probe, is observed to scale directly with the neutral CO2, the growth of the electric field amplitude is found to be linear in time with a growth rate proportional to the CO2(+) ion plasma frequency. On the basis of these results the impact ionization-driven instability is shown to be the ion acoustic instability. Implications for the lack of observations by Pioneer Venus of reflected-O(+)-driven instabilities, as have been proposed for the space shuttle, are discussed.

  8. NRL Satellite Support for DYNAMO Field Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-30

    1 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. NRL Satellite Support for DYNAMO Field Program Jeffrey...Jeff.Hawkins@nrlmry.navy.mil Document Number: N0001412WX20870 LONG-TERM GOALS To provide the ONR-sponsored DYNAMO field program with a...the Indian Ocean. OBJECTIVES Develop a NRL-MRY near real-time web page that enables DYNAMO field program participants to view the evolving

  9. A Vorticity-Magnetic Field Dynamo Instability

    OpenAIRE

    1997-01-01

    We generalize the mean field magnetic dynamo to include local evolution of the mean vorticity in addition to the mean magnetic field. The coupled equations exhibit a general mean field dynamo instability that enables the transfer of turbulent energy to the magnetic field and vorticity on larger scales. The growth of the vorticity and magnetic field both require helical turbulence which can be supplied by an underlying global rotation. The dynamo coefficients are derived including the backreac...

  10. Measurement of Laser Plasma Instability (LPI) Driven Light Scattering from Plasmas Produced by Nike KrF Laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Jaechul; Weaver, J. L.; Phillips, L.; Obenschain, S. P.; Schmitt, A. J.; Kehne, D. M.; Serlin, V.; Lehmberg, R. H.; McLean, E. A.; Manka, C. K.

    2010-11-01

    With short wavelength (248 nm), large bandwidth (1˜3 THz), and ISI beam smoothing, Nike KrF laser provides unique research opportunities and potential for direct-drive inertial confinement fusion. Previous Nike experiments observed two plasmon decay (TPD) driven signals from CH plasmas at the laser intensities above ˜2x10^15 W/cm^2 with total laser energies up to 1 kJ of ˜350 ps FWHM pulses. We have performed a further experiment with longer laser pulses (0.5˜4.0 ns FWHM) and will present combined results of the experiments focusing on light emission data in spectral ranges relevant to the Raman (SRS) and TPD instabilities. Time- or space-resolved spectral features of TPD were detected at different viewing angles and the absolute intensity calibrated spectra of thermal background were used to obtain blackbody temperatures in the plasma corona. The wave vector distribution in k-space of the participating TPD plasmons will be also discussed. These results show promise for the proposed direct-drive designs.

  11. adidas Dynamo Formotion 2 Lo

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    随着天气越来越热,低帮款战靴也越来越受到球迷的喜爱。尤其是拥有高性能、低价位的战靴.会更加让人期待,而Dynamo Formotion 2 Lo就满足了以上两项要求。

  12. Extended MHD Modeling of Tearing-Driven Magnetic Relaxation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sauppe, Joshua

    2016-10-01

    Driven plasma pinch configurations are characterized by the gradual accumulation and episodic release of free energy in discrete relaxation events. The hallmark of this relaxation in a reversed-field pinch (RFP) plasma is flattening of the parallel current density profile effected by a fluctuation-induced dynamo emf in Ohm's law. Nonlinear two-fluid modeling of macroscopic RFP dynamics has shown appreciable coupling of magnetic relaxation and the evolution of plasma flow. Accurate modeling of RFP dynamics requires the Hall effect in Ohm's law as well as first order ion finite Larmor radius (FLR) effects, represented by the Braginskii ion gyroviscous stress tensor. New results find that the Hall dynamo effect from / ne can counter the MHD effect from - in some of the relaxation events. The MHD effect dominates these events and relaxes the current profile toward the Taylor state, but the opposition of the two dynamos generates plasma flow in the direction of equilibrium current density, consistent with experimental measurements. Detailed experimental measurements of the MHD and Hall emf terms are compared to these extended MHD predictions. Tracking the evolution of magnetic energy, helicity, and hybrid helicity during relaxation identifies the most important contributions in single-fluid and two-fluid models. Magnetic helicity is well conserved relative to the magnetic energy during relaxation. The hybrid helicity is dominated by magnetic helicity in realistic low-beta pinch conditions and is also well conserved. Differences of less than 1 % between magnetic helicity and hybrid helicity are observed with two-fluid modeling and result from cross helicity evolution through ion FLR effects, which have not been included in contemporary relaxation theories. The kinetic energy driven by relaxation in the computations is dominated by velocity components perpendicular to the magnetic field, an effect that had not been predicted. Work performed at University of Wisconsin

  13. SADE: Starspot and Dynamo Explorer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martens, P. C. H.

    2003-05-01

    In soft X-rays the solar coronal radiance varies by a factor of 70 over the solar activity cycle. A similar variation in most stars in the existing X-ray database has not been found (Stern 2001); even stars which exhibit chromospheric activity cycles show only marginal evidence for X-ray cycles. This is rather puzzling as the time span and multiple coverage of the X-ray sky should reveal at least a hint of such a pronounced cyclical variation. By the time of the meeting we will have submitted a SMEX proposal with the above acronym to determine the nature and amplitude of the variation in X-ray emission of nearby solar analogs that have a cyclic chromospheric Ca-K variability similar to that of the Sun. In doing so we aim to expand our knowledge of the parameter space of stellar dynamos, which will lead to a better understanding of the dynamo process in general -- an unresolved fundamental problem in astrophysics -- and the solar dynamo in particular. This is an investigation at the cross-section of the NASA themes ``Structure and Evolution of the Universe", and the ``Sun-Earth Connection". In my presentation I will describe the SADE instrument design, observing strategy, and possible science results. SADE is proposed by a consortium led by MSU, including Swales, CfA, LMSAL, UCL, OAP, and Bangalore.

  14. Optimization of the magnetic dynamo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willis, Ashley P

    2012-12-21

    In stars and planets, magnetic fields are believed to originate from the motion of electrically conducting fluids in their interior, through a process known as the dynamo mechanism. In this Letter, an optimization procedure is used to simultaneously address two fundamental questions of dynamo theory: "Which velocity field leads to the most magnetic energy growth?" and "How large does the velocity need to be relative to magnetic diffusion?" In general, this requires optimization over the full space of continuous solenoidal velocity fields possible within the geometry. Here the case of a periodic box is considered. Measuring the strength of the flow with the root-mean-square amplitude, an optimal velocity field is shown to exist, but without limitation on the strain rate, optimization is prone to divergence. Measuring the flow in terms of its associated dissipation leads to the identification of a single optimal at the critical magnetic Reynolds number necessary for a dynamo. This magnetic Reynolds number is found to be only 15% higher than that necessary for transient growth of the magnetic field.

  15. Inverse problem in Parker's dynamo

    CERN Document Server

    Reshetnyak, M Yu

    2015-01-01

    The inverse solution of the 1D Parker dynamo equations is considered. The method is based on minimization of the cost-function, which characterize deviation of the model solution properties from the desired ones. The output is the latitude distribution of the magnetic field generation sources: the $\\alpha$- and $\\omega$-effects. Minimization is made using the Monte-Carlo method. The details of the method, as well as some applications, which can be interesting for the broad dynamo community, are considered: conditions when the invisible for the observer at the surface of the planet toroidal part of the magnetic field is much larger than the poloidal counterpart. It is shown that at some particular distributions of $\\alpha$ and $\\omega$ the well-known thesis that sign of the dynamo-number defines equatorial symmetry of the magnetic field to the equator plane, is violated. It is also demonstrated in what circumstances magnetic field in the both hemispheres have different properties, and simple physical explanati...

  16. Collisionless shocks and particle acceleration in laser-driven laboratory plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiuza, Frederico

    2012-10-01

    Collisionless shocks are pervasive in space and astrophysical plasmas, from the Earth's bow shock to Gamma Ray Bursters; however, the microphysics underlying shock formation and particle acceleration in these distant sites is not yet fully understood. Mimicking these extreme conditions in laboratory is a grand challenge that would allow for a better understanding of the physical processes involved. Using ab initio multi-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations, shock formation and particle acceleration are investigated for realistic laboratory conditions associated with the interaction of intense lasers with high-energy-density plasmas. Weibel-instability-mediated shocks are shown to be driven by the interaction of an ultraintense laser with overcritical plasmas. In this piston regime, the laser generates a relativistic flow that is Weibel unstable. The strong Weibel magnetic fields deflect the incoming flow, compressing it, and forming a shock. The resulting shock structure is consistent with previous simulations of relativistic astrophysical shocks, demonstrating for the first time the possibility of recreating these structures in laboratory. As the laser intensity is decreased and near-critical density plasmas are used, electron heating dominates over radiation pressure and electrostatic shocks can be formed. The electric field associated with the shock front can reflect ions from the background accelerating them to high energies. It is shown that high quality 200 MeV proton beams, required for tumor therapy, can be generated by using an exponentially decaying plasma profile to control competing accelerating fields. These results pave the way for the experimental exploration of space and astrophysical relevant shocks and particle acceleration with current laser systems.

  17. Numerical simulation of an atmospheric pressure RF-driven plasma needle and heat transfer to adjacent human skin using COMSOL.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schröder, Maximilian; Ochoa, Angel; Breitkopf, Cornelia

    2015-06-07

    Plasma medicine is an emerging field where plasma physics is used for therapeutical applications. Temperature is an important factor to take into account with respect to the applications of plasma to biological systems. During the treatment, the tissue temperature could increase to critical values. In this work, a model is presented, which is capable of predicting the skin temperature during a treatment with a radio frequency driven plasma needle. The main gas was helium. To achieve this, a discharge model was coupled to a heat transfer and fluid flow model. The results provide maximum application times for different power depositions in order to avoid reaching critical skin temperatures.

  18. Experimental, Numerical and Analytical Studies of the MHD-driven plasma jet, instabilities and waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhai, Xiang

    This thesis describes a series of experimental, numerical, and analytical studies involving the Caltech magnetohydrodynamically (MHD)-driven plasma jet experiment. The plasma jet is created via a capacitor discharge that powers a magnetized coaxial planar electrodes system. The jet is collimated and accelerated by the MHD forces. We present three-dimensional ideal MHD finite-volume simulations of the plasma jet experiment using an astrophysical magnetic tower as the baseline model. A compact magnetic energy/helicity injection is exploited in the simulation analogous to both the experiment and to astrophysical situations. Detailed analysis provides a comprehensive description of the interplay of magnetic force, pressure, and flow effects. We delineate both the jet structure and the transition process that converts the injected magnetic energy to other forms. When the experimental jet is sufficiently long, it undergoes a global kink instability and then a secondary local Rayleigh-Taylor instability caused by lateral acceleration of the kink instability. We present an MHD theory of the Rayleigh-Taylor instability on the cylindrical surface of a plasma flux rope in the presence of a lateral external gravity. The Rayleigh-Taylor instability is found to couple to the classic current-driven instability, resulting in a new type of hybrid instability. The coupled instability, produced by combination of helical magnetic field, curvature of the cylindrical geometry, and lateral gravity, is fundamentally different from the classic magnetic Rayleigh-Taylor instability occurring at a two-dimensional planar interface. In the experiment, this instability cascade from macro-scale to micro-scale eventually leads to the failure of MHD. When the Rayleigh-Taylor instability becomes nonlinear, it compresses and pinches the plasma jet to a scale smaller than the ion skin depth and triggers a fast magnetic reconnection. We built a specially designed high-speed 3D magnetic probe and

  19. Nonthermal Electron Energization from Magnetic Reconnection in Laser-Driven Plasmas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Totorica, Samuel R; Abel, Tom; Fiuza, Frederico

    2016-03-04

    The possibility of studying nonthermal electron energization in laser-driven plasma experiments of magnetic reconnection is studied using two- and three-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations. It is demonstrated that nonthermal electrons with energies more than an order of magnitude larger than the initial thermal energy can be produced in plasma conditions currently accessible in the laboratory. Electrons are accelerated by the reconnection electric field, being injected at varied distances from the X points, and in some cases trapped in plasmoids, before escaping the finite-sized system. Trapped electrons can be further energized by the electric field arising from the motion of the plasmoid. This acceleration gives rise to a nonthermal electron component that resembles a power-law spectrum, containing up to ∼8% of the initial energy of the interacting electrons and ∼24% of the initial magnetic energy. Estimates of the maximum electron energy and of the plasma conditions required to observe suprathermal electron acceleration are provided, paving the way for a new platform for the experimental study of particle acceleration induced by reconnection.

  20. Non-Thermal Electron Energization from Magnetic Reconnection in Laser-Driven Plasmas

    CERN Document Server

    Totorica, Samuel; Fiuza, Frederico

    2016-01-01

    The possibility of studying non-thermal electron energization in laser-driven plasma experiments of magnetic reconnection is studied using two- and three-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations. It is demonstrated that non-thermal electrons with energies more than an order of magnitude larger than the initial thermal energy can be produced in plasma conditions currently accessible in the laboratory. Electrons are accelerated by the reconnection electric field, being injected at varied distances from the X-points, and in some cases trapped in plasmoids, before escaping the finite-sized system. Trapped electrons can be further energized by the electric field arising from the motion of the plasmoid. This acceleration gives rise to a non-thermal electron component that resembles a power-law spectrum, containing up to ~ 8% of the initial energy of the interacting electrons and ~ 24 % of the initial magnetic energy. Estimates of the maximum electron energy and of the plasma conditions required to observe suprather...

  1. Boltzmann-equation simulations of radio-frequency-driven, low-temperature plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Drallos, P.J.; Riley, M.E.

    1995-01-01

    We present a method for the numerical solution of the Boltzmann equation (BE) describing plasma electrons. We apply the method to a capacitively-coupled, radio-frequency-driven He discharge in parallel-plate (quasi-1D) geometry which contains time scales for physical processes spanning six orders of magnitude. Our BE solution procedure uses the method of characteristics for the Vlasov operator with interpolation in phase space at early time, allowing storage of the distribution function on a fixed phase-space grid. By alternating this BE method with a fluid description of the electrons, or with a novel time-cycle-average equation method, we compute the periodic steady state of a He plasma by time evolution from startup conditions. We find that the results compare favorably with measured current-voltage, plasma density, and ``cited state densities in the ``GEC`` Reference Cell. Our atomic He model includes five levels (some are summed composites), 15 electronic transitions, radiation trapping, and metastable-metastable collisions.

  2. Wakefield-Induced Ionization injection in beam-driven plasma accelerators

    CERN Document Server

    de la Ossa, A Martinez; Streeter, M J V; Osterhoff, J

    2015-01-01

    We present a detailed analysis of the features and capabilities of Wakefield-Induced Ionization (WII) injection in the blowout regime of beam driven plasma accelerators. This mechanism exploits the electric wakefields to ionize electrons from a dopant gas and trap them in a well-defined region of the accelerating and focusing wake phase, leading to the formation of high-quality witness-bunches. The electron-beam drivers must feature high-peak currents ($I_b^0\\gtrsim 8.5~\\mathrm{kA}$) and a duration comparable to the plasma wavelength to excite plasma waves in the blowout regime and enable WII injection. In this regime, the disparity of the magnitude of the electric field in the driver region and the electric field in the rear of the ion cavity allows for the selective ionization and subsequent trapping from a narrow phase interval. The witness bunches generated in this manner feature a short duration and small values of the normalized transverse emittance ($k_p\\sigma_z \\sim k_p\\epsilon_n \\sim 0.1$). In additi...

  3. Proton acceleration by a relativistic laser frequency-chirp driven plasma snowplow

    CERN Document Server

    Sahai, Aakash A; Bingham, R A; Tsung, F S; Tableman, A R; Tzoufras, M; Mori, W B

    2014-01-01

    We analyze the use of a relativistic laser pulse with a controlled frequency chirp incident on a rising plasma density gradient to drive an acceleration structure for proton and light-ion acceleration. The Chirp Induced Transparency Acceleration (ChITA) scheme is described with an analytical model of the velocity of the snowplow at critical density on a pre-formed rising plasma density gradient that is driven by a positive-chirp in the frequency of a relativistic laser pulse. The velocity of the ChITA-snowplow is shown to depend upon rate of rise of the frequency of the relativistic laser pulse represented by $\\frac{\\epsilon_0}{\\theta}$ where, $\\epsilon_0 = \\frac{\\Delta\\omega_0}{\\omega_0}$ and chirping spatial scale-length, $\\theta$, the normalized magnetic vector potential of the laser pulse $a_0$ and the plasma density gradient scale-length, $\\alpha$. We observe using 1-D OSIRIS simulations the formation and forward propagation of ChITA-snowplow, being continuously pushed by the chirping laser at a velocity...

  4. Some consequences of shear on galactic dynamos with helicity fluxes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Hongzhe; Blackman, Eric G.

    2017-08-01

    Galactic dynamo models sustained by supernova (SN) driven turbulence and differential rotation have revealed that the sustenance of large-scale fields requires a flux of small-scale magnetic helicity to be viable. Here we generalize a minimalist analytic version of such galactic dynamos to explore some heretofore unincluded contributions from shear on the total turbulent energy and turbulent correlation time, with the helicity fluxes maintained by either winds, diffusion or magnetic buoyancy. We construct an analytic framework for modelling the turbulent energy and correlation time as a function of SN rate and shear. We compare our prescription with previous approaches that include only rotation. The solutions depend separately on the rotation period and the eddy turnover time and not just on their ratio (the Rossby number). We consider models in which these two time-scales are allowed to be independent and also a case in which they are mutually dependent on radius when a radial-dependent SN rate model is invoked. For the case of a fixed rotation period (or a fixed radius), we show that the influence of shear is dramatic for low Rossby numbers, reducing the correlation time of the turbulence, which, in turn, strongly reduces the saturation value of the dynamo compared to the case when the shear is ignored. We also show that even in the absence of winds or diffusive fluxes, magnetic buoyancy may be able to sustain sufficient helicity fluxes to avoid quenching.

  5. ISEE-3 observations of a viscously-driven plasma sheet: magnetosheath mass and/or momentum transfer?

    OpenAIRE

    Mist, R. T.; Owen, C.J.

    2002-01-01

    A statistical analysis of data from the ISEE-3 distant tail campaign is presented. We investigate the mechanism driving slow, tailward flows observed in the plasma sheet. The possibility that these slow flows are driven by mass and/or momentum transfer across the distant tail magnetopause is explored. We establish that 40% of these flows could be driven by the transfer of approximately 4% of the magnetosheath momentum flux into the magnetotail. Current understanding of the Kelvin-Helmholtz in...

  6. ISEE-3 observations of a viscously-driven plasma sheet: magnetosheath mass and/or momentum transfer?

    OpenAIRE

    Mist, R. T.; Owen, C.J.

    2002-01-01

    A statistical analysis of data from the ISEE-3 distant tail campaign is presented. We investigate the mechanism driving slow, tailward flows observed in the plasma sheet. The possibility that these slow flows are driven by mass and/or momentum transfer across the distant tail magnetopause is explored. We establish that 40% of these flows could be driven by the transfer of approximately 4% of the magnetosheath momentum flux into the magnetotail. Current understanding of the Kelvin-Helmh...

  7. Statistical Mechanics of Turbulent Dynamos

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shebalin, John V.

    2014-01-01

    Incompressible magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) turbulence and magnetic dynamos, which occur in magnetofluids with large fluid and magnetic Reynolds numbers, will be discussed. When Reynolds numbers are large and energy decays slowly, the distribution of energy with respect to length scale becomes quasi-stationary and MHD turbulence can be described statistically. In the limit of infinite Reynolds numbers, viscosity and resistivity become zero and if these values are used in the MHD equations ab initio, a model system called ideal MHD turbulence results. This model system is typically confined in simple geometries with some form of homogeneous boundary conditions, allowing for velocity and magnetic field to be represented by orthogonal function expansions. One advantage to this is that the coefficients of the expansions form a set of nonlinearly interacting variables whose behavior can be described by equilibrium statistical mechanics, i.e., by a canonical ensemble theory based on the global invariants (energy, cross helicity and magnetic helicity) of ideal MHD turbulence. Another advantage is that truncated expansions provide a finite dynamical system whose time evolution can be numerically simulated to test the predictions of the associated statistical mechanics. If ensemble predictions are the same as time averages, then the system is said to be ergodic; if not, the system is nonergodic. Although it had been implicitly assumed in the early days of ideal MHD statistical theory development that these finite dynamical systems were ergodic, numerical simulations provided sufficient evidence that they were, in fact, nonergodic. Specifically, while canonical ensemble theory predicted that expansion coefficients would be (i) zero-mean random variables with (ii) energy that decreased with length scale, it was found that although (ii) was correct, (i) was not and the expected ergodicity was broken. The exact cause of this broken ergodicity was explained, after much

  8. MHD Turbulence and Magnetic Dynamos

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shebalin, John V

    2014-01-01

    Incompressible magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) turbulence and magnetic dynamos, which occur in magnetofluids with large fluid and magnetic Reynolds numbers, will be discussed. When Reynolds numbers are large and energy decays slowly, the distribution of energy with respect to length scale becomes quasi-stationary and MHD turbulence can be described statistically. In the limit of infinite Reynolds numbers, viscosity and resistivity become zero and if these values are used in the MHD equations ab initio, a model system called ideal MHD turbulence results. This model system is typically confined in simple geometries with some form of homogeneous boundary conditions, allowing for velocity and magnetic field to be represented by orthogonal function expansions. One advantage to this is that the coefficients of the expansions form a set of nonlinearly interacting variables whose behavior can be described by equilibrium statistical mechanics, i.e., by a canonical ensemble theory based on the global invariants (energy, cross helicity and magnetic helicity) of ideal MHD turbulence. Another advantage is that truncated expansions provide a finite dynamical system whose time evolution can be numerically simulated to test the predictions of the associated statistical mechanics. If ensemble predictions are the same as time averages, then the system is said to be ergodic; if not, the system is nonergodic. Although it had been implicitly assumed in the early days of ideal MHD statistical theory development that these finite dynamical systems were ergodic, numerical simulations provided sufficient evidence that they were, in fact, nonergodic. Specifically, while canonical ensemble theory predicted that expansion coefficients would be (i) zero-mean random variables with (ii) energy that decreased with length scale, it was found that although (ii) was correct, (i) was not and the expected ergodicity was broken. The exact cause of this broken ergodicity was explained, after much

  9. Recent Progress in Understanding the Sun's Magnetic Dynamo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hathaway, David. H.

    2004-01-01

    100 years ago we thought that the Sun and stars shone as a result of slow gravitational contraction over a few tens of millions of years - putting astronomers at odds with geologists who claimed that the Earth was much, much older. That mystery was solved in the 1920s and 30s with the discovery of nuclear energy (proving that the geologists had it right all along). Other scientific mysteries concerning the Sun have come and gone but three major mysteries remain: 1) How does the Sun produce sunspots with an 11-year cycle? 2) What produces the huge explosions that result in solar flares, prominence eruptions, and coronal mass ejections? and 3) Why is the Sun's outer atmosphere, the corona, so darned hot? Recent progress in solar astronomy reveals a single key to understanding all three of these mysteries.The 11-year time scale for the sunspot cycle indicates the presence of a magnetic dynamo within the Sun. For decades this dynamo was though to operate within the Sun's convection zone - the outmost 30% of the Sun where convective currents transport heat and advect magnetic lines of force. The two leading theories for the dynamo had very different models for the dynamics of the convection zone. Actual measurements of the dynamics using the techniques of helioseismology showed that both of these models had to be wrong some 20 years ago. A thin layer of strongly sheared flow at the base of the convection zone (now called the tachocline) was then taken to be the seat of the dynamo. Over the last 10 years it has become apparent that a weak meridional circulation within the convection zone also plays a key role in the dynamo. This meridional circulation has plasma rising up from the tachocline in the equatorial regions, spreading out toward the poles at a top speed of about 10-20 m/s at the surface, sinking back down to the tachocline in the polar regions, and then flowing back toward the equator at a top speed of about 1-2 m/s in the tachocline itself. Recent dynamo

  10. Recent Progress in Understanding the Sun's Magnetic Dynamo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hathaway, David. H.

    2004-01-01

    100 years ago we thought that the Sun and stars shone as a result of slow gravitational contraction over a few tens of millions of years - putting astronomers at odds with geologists who claimed that the Earth was much, much older. That mystery was solved in the 1920s and 30s with the discovery of nuclear energy (proving that the geologists had it right all along). Other scientific mysteries concerning the Sun have come and gone but three major mysteries remain: 1) How does the Sun produce sunspots with an 11-year cycle? 2) What produces the huge explosions that result in solar flares, prominence eruptions, and coronal mass ejections? and 3) Why is the Sun's outer atmosphere, the corona, so darned hot? Recent progress in solar astronomy reveals a single key to understanding all three of these mysteries.The 11-year time scale for the sunspot cycle indicates the presence of a magnetic dynamo within the Sun. For decades this dynamo was though to operate within the Sun's convection zone - the outmost 30% of the Sun where convective currents transport heat and advect magnetic lines of force. The two leading theories for the dynamo had very different models for the dynamics of the convection zone. Actual measurements of the dynamics using the techniques of helioseismology showed that both of these models had to be wrong some 20 years ago. A thin layer of strongly sheared flow at the base of the convection zone (now called the tachocline) was then taken to be the seat of the dynamo. Over the last 10 years it has become apparent that a weak meridional circulation within the convection zone also plays a key role in the dynamo. This meridional circulation has plasma rising up from the tachocline in the equatorial regions, spreading out toward the poles at a top speed of about 10-20 m/s at the surface, sinking back down to the tachocline in the polar regions, and then flowing back toward the equator at a top speed of about 1-2 m/s in the tachocline itself. Recent dynamo

  11. Filamentation instability of nonextensive current-driven plasma in the ion acoustic frequency range

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khorashadizadeh, S. M., E-mail: smkhorashadi@birjand.ac.ir; Rastbood, E. [Physics Department of Birjand University, Birjand (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Niknam, A. R., E-mail: a-niknam@sbu.ac.ir [Laser and Plasma Research Institute, Shahid Beheshti University, G.C., Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2014-12-15

    The filamentation and ion acoustic instabilities of nonextensive current-driven plasma in the ion acoustic frequency range have been studied using the Lorentz transformation formulas. Based on the kinetic theory, the possibility of filamentation instability and its growth rate as well as the ion acoustic instability have been investigated. The results of the research show that the possibility and growth rate of these instabilities are significantly dependent on the electron nonextensive parameter and drift velocity. Besides, the increase of electrons nonextensive parameter and drift velocity lead to the increase of the growth rates of both instabilities. In addition, the wavelength region in which the filamentation instability occurs is more stretched in the presence of higher values of drift velocity and nonextensive parameter. Finally, the results of filamentation and ion acoustic instabilities have been compared and the conditions for filamentation instability to be dominant mode of instability have been presented.

  12. Relativistic electron beam driven longitudinal wake-wave breaking in a cold plasma

    CERN Document Server

    Bera, Ratan Kumar; Sengupta, Sudip; Das, Amita

    2016-01-01

    Space-time evolution of relativistic electron beam driven wake-field in a cold, homogeneous plasma, is studied using 1D-fluid simulation techniques. It is observed that the wake wave gradu- ally evolves and eventually breaks, exhibiting sharp spikes in the density profile and sawtooth like features in the electric field profile [1]. It is shown here that the excited wakefield is a longitudi- nal Akhiezer-Polovin mode [2] and its steepening (breaking) can be understood in terms of phase mixing of this mode, which arises because of relativistic mass variation effects. Further the phase mixing time (breaking time) is studied as a function of beam density and beam velocity and is found to follow the well known scaling presented in ref.[3].

  13. Sheared Flow Driven Drift Instability and Vortices in Dusty Plasmas with Opposite Polarity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mushtaq, A.; Shah, AttaUllah; Ikram, M.; Clark, R. E. H.

    2016-02-01

    Low-frequency electrostatic drift waves are studied in an inhomogeneous dust magnetoplasma containing dust with components of opposite polarity. The drift waves are driven by the magnetic-field-aligned (parallel) sheared flows in the presence of electrons and ions. Due to sheared flow in the linear regime, the electrostatic dust drift waves become unstable. The conditions of mode instability, with the effects of dust streaming and opposite polarity, are studied. These are excited modes which gain large amplitudes and exhibit interactions among themselves. The interaction is governed by the Hasegawa-Mima (HM) nonlinear equation with vector nonlinearity. The stationary solutions of the HM equation in the form of a vortex chain and a dipolar vortex, including effects of dust polarity and electron (ion) temperatures, are studied. The relevance of the present work to space and laboratory four component dusty plasmas is noted.

  14. Bifurcation Theory of the Transition to Collisionless Ion-temperature-gradient-driven Plasma Turbulence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kolesnikov, R.A.; Krommes, J.A.

    2005-09-22

    The collisionless limit of the transition to ion-temperature-gradient-driven plasma turbulence is considered with a dynamical-systems approach. The importance of systematic analysis for understanding the differences in the bifurcations and dynamics of linearly damped and undamped systems is emphasized. A model with ten degrees of freedom is studied as a concrete example. A four-dimensional center manifold (CM) is analyzed, and fixed points of its dynamics are identified and used to predict a ''Dimits shift'' of the threshold for turbulence due to the excitation of zonal flows. The exact value of that shift in terms of physical parameters is established for the model; the effects of higher-order truncations on the dynamics are noted. Multiple-scale analysis of the CM equations is used to discuss possible effects of modulational instability on scenarios for the transition to turbulence in both collisional and collisionless cases.

  15. Proton temperature-anisotropy-driven instabilities in weakly collisional plasmas: Hybrid simulations

    CERN Document Server

    Hellinger, Petr

    2014-01-01

    Kinetic instabilities in weakly collisional, high beta plasmas are investigated using two-dimensional hybrid expanding box simulations with Coulomb collisions modeled through the Langevin equation (corresponding to the Fokker-Planck one). The expansion drives a parallel or perpendicular temperature anisotropy (depending on the orientation of the ambient magnetic field). For the chosen parameters the Coulomb collisions are important with respect to the driver but are not strong enough to keep the system stable with respect to instabilities driven by the proton temperature anisotropy. In the case of the parallel temperature anisotropy the dominant oblique fire hose instability efficiently reduces the anisotropy in a quasilinear manner. In the case of the perpendicular temperature anisotropy the dominant mirror instability generates coherent compressive structures which scatter protons and reduce the temperature anisotropy. For both the cases the instabilities generate temporarily enough wave energy so that the ...

  16. Electrostatic plasma instabilities driven by neutral gas flows in the solar chromosphere

    CERN Document Server

    Gogoberidze, G; Poedts, S; De Keyser, J

    2013-01-01

    We investigate electrostatic plasma instabilities of Farley-Buneman (FB) type driven by quasi-stationary neutral gas flows in the solar chromosphere. The role of these instabilities in the chromosphere is clarified. We find that the destabilizing ion thermal effect is highly reduced by the Coulomb collisions and can be ignored for the chromospheric FB-type instabilities. On the contrary, the destabilizing electron thermal effect is important and causes a significant reduction of the neutral drag velocity triggering the instability. The resulting threshold velocity is found as function of chromospheric height. Our results indicate that the FB type instabilities are still less efficient in the global chromospheric heating than the Joule dissipation of the currents driving these instabilities. This conclusion does not exclude the possibility that the FB type instabilities develop in the places where the cross-field currents overcome the threshold value and contribute to the heating locally. Typical length-scales...

  17. Spatially resolved optical-emission spectroscopy of a radio-frequency driven iodine plasma source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dedrick, James; Doyle, Scott; Grondein, Pascaline; Aanesland, Ane

    2016-09-01

    Iodine is of interest for potential use as a propellant for spacecraft propulsion, and has become attractive as a replacement to xenon due to its similar mass and ionisation potential. Optical emission spectroscopy has been undertaken to characterise the emission from a low-pressure, radio-frequency driven inductively coupled plasma source operating in iodine with respect to axial distance across its transverse magnetic filter. The results are compared with axial profiles of the electron temperature and density for identical source conditions, and the spatial distribution of the emission intensity is observed to be closely correlated with the electron temperature. This work has been done within the LABEX Plas@Par project, and received financial state aid managed by the ``Agence Nationale de la Recherche'', as part of the ``Programme d'Investissements d'Avenir'' under the reference ANR-11-IDEX-0004-02.

  18. Magnetic compressibility and ion-temperature-gradient-driven microinstabilities in magnetically confined plasmas

    CERN Document Server

    Zocco, A; Connor, J W

    2015-01-01

    The electromagnetic theory of the strongly driven ion-temperature-gradient (ITG) instability in magnetically confined toroidal plasmas is developed. Stabilizing and destabilizing effects are identified, and a critical $\\beta_{e}$ (the ratio of the electron to magnetic pressure) for stabilization of the toroidal branch of the mode is calculated for magnetic equilibria independent of the coordinate along the magnetic field. Its scaling is $\\beta_{e}\\sim L_{Te}/R,$ where $L_{Te}$ is the characteristic electron temperature gradient length, and $R$ the major radius of the torus. We conjecture that a fast particle population can cause a similar stabilization due to its contribution to the equilibrium pressure gradient. For sheared equilibria, the boundary of marginal stability of the electromagnetic correction to the electrostatic mode is also given. For a general magnetic equilibrium, we find a critical length (for electromagnetic stabilization) of the extent of the unfavourable curvature along the magnetic field....

  19. Compact beam transport system for free-electron lasers driven by a laser plasma accelerator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Tao; Zhang, Tong; Wang, Dong; Huang, Zhirong

    2017-02-01

    Utilizing laser-driven plasma accelerators (LPAs) as a high-quality electron beam source is a promising approach to significantly downsize the x-ray free-electron laser (XFEL) facility. A multi-GeV LPA beam can be generated in several-centimeter acceleration distance, with a high peak current and a low transverse emittance, which will considerably benefit a compact FEL design. However, the large initial angular divergence and energy spread make it challenging to transport the beam and realize FEL radiation. In this paper, a novel design of beam transport system is proposed to maintain the superior features of the LPA beam and a transverse gradient undulator (TGU) is also adopted as an effective energy spread compensator to generate high-brilliance FEL radiation. Theoretical analysis and numerical simulations are presented based on a demonstration experiment with an electron energy of 380 MeV and a radiation wavelength of 30 nm.

  20. Optimizing density down-ramp injection for beam-driven plasma wakefield accelerators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez de la Ossa, A.; Hu, Z.; Streeter, M. J. V.; Mehrling, T. J.; Kononenko, O.; Sheeran, B.; Osterhoff, J.

    2017-09-01

    Density down-ramp (DDR) injection is a promising concept in beam-driven plasma wakefield accelerators for the generation of high-quality witness beams. We review and complement the theoretical principles of the method and employ particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations in order to determine constrains on the geometry of the density ramp and the current of the drive beam, regarding the applicability of DDR injection. Furthermore, PIC simulations are utilized to find optimized conditions for the production of high-quality beams. We find and explain the intriguing result that the injection of an increased charge by means of a steepened ramp favors the generation of beams with lower emittance. Exploiting this fact enables the production of beams with high charge (˜140 pC ), low normalized emittance (˜200 nm ) and low uncorrelated energy spread (0.3%) in sufficiently steep ramps even for drive beams with moderate peak current (˜2.5 kA ).

  1. Increase of the Density, Temperature and Velocity of Plasma Jets driven by a Ring of High Energy Laser Beams

    OpenAIRE

    Fu, Wen; Liang, Edison P.; Fatenejad, Milad; Lamb, Donald Q.; Grosskopf, Michael; Park, Hye-Sook; Remington, Bruce; Spitkovsky, Anatoly

    2012-01-01

    Supersonic plasma outflows driven by multi-beam, high-energy lasers, such as Omega and NIF, have been and will be used as platforms for a variety of laboratory astrophysics experiments. Here we propose a new way of launching high density and high velocity, plasma jets using multiple intense laser beams in a hollow ring formation. We show that such jets provide a more flexible and versatile platform for future laboratory astrophysics experiments. Using high resolution hydrodynamic simulations,...

  2. ON THE CAUSE OF SOLAR-LIKE EQUATORWARD MIGRATION IN GLOBAL CONVECTIVE DYNAMO SIMULATIONS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Warnecke, Jörn [Max-Planck-Institut für Sonnensystemforschung, Justus-von-Liebig-Weg 3, D-37077 Göttingen (Germany); Käpylä, Petri J.; Käpylä, Maarit J. [ReSoLVE Centre of Excellence, Department of Information and Computer Science, Aalto University, P.O. Box 15400, FI-00 076 Aalto (Finland); Brandenburg, Axel, E-mail: warnecke@mps.mpg.de [NORDITA, KTH Royal Institute of Technology and Stockholm University, Roslagstullsbacken 23, SE-10691 Stockholm (Sweden)

    2014-11-20

    We present results from four convectively driven stellar dynamo simulations in spherical wedge geometry. All of these simulations produce cyclic and migrating mean magnetic fields. Through detailed comparisons, we show that the migration direction can be explained by an αΩ dynamo wave following the Parker-Yoshimura rule. We conclude that the equatorward migration in this and previous work is due to a positive (negative) α effect in the northern (southern) hemisphere and a negative radial gradient of Ω outside the inner tangent cylinder of these models. This idea is supported by a strong correlation between negative radial shear and toroidal field strength in the region of equatorward propagation.

  3. Global Solar Dynamo Models: Simulations and Predictions

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Mausumi Dikpati; Peter A. Gilman

    2008-03-01

    Flux-transport type solar dynamos have achieved considerable success in correctly simulating many solar cycle features, and are now being used for prediction of solar cycle timing and amplitude.We first define flux-transport dynamos and demonstrate how they work. The essential added ingredient in this class of models is meridional circulation, which governs the dynamo period and also plays a crucial role in determining the Sun’s memory about its past magnetic fields.We show that flux-transport dynamo models can explain many key features of solar cycles. Then we show that a predictive tool can be built from this class of dynamo that can be used to predict mean solar cycle features by assimilating magnetic field data from previous cycles.

  4. New results on an equipartition dynamo

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dorch, S. B. F.; Archontis, V.

    2006-01-01

    This contribution presents results from numerical computer experiments with a 3-d steady sine flow (with zero mean helicity) that drives fast dynamo action. The mode of operation of this so-called ``no-cosines" dynamo (recently dubbed ``the Archontis dynamo"" by David Galloway) was studied during...... linear and non-linear saturation regimes. The means were 3-d non-linear MHD simulations and visualization using the high resolution numerical scheme by Nordlund, Galsgaard and others. We have found that the dynamo has a high growth rate in the linear regime, and that it can saturate at a level...... significantly higher that intermittent turbulent dynamos: Namely very close to energy equipartition for high Reynolds numbers. The equipartition solution however is not turbulent but a laminar solution that acts as an attractor to other modes. Similarities and differences, in the way the magnetic field...

  5. Dynamo transition in low-dimensional models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verma, Mahendra K; Lessinnes, Thomas; Carati, Daniele; Sarris, Ioannis; Kumar, Krishna; Singh, Meenakshi

    2008-09-01

    Two low-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic models containing three velocity and three magnetic modes are described. One of them (nonhelical model) has zero kinetic and current helicity, while the other model (helical) has nonzero kinetic and current helicity. The velocity modes are forced in both these models. These low-dimensional models exhibit a dynamo transition at a critical forcing amplitude that depends on the Prandtl number. In the nonhelical model, dynamo exists only for magnetic Prandtl number beyond 1, while the helical model exhibits dynamo for all magnetic Prandtl number. Although the model is far from reproducing all the possible features of dynamo mechanisms, its simplicity allows a very detailed study and the observed dynamo transition is shown to bear similarities with recent numerical and experimental results.

  6. A long-lived lunar core dynamo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shea, Erin K; Weiss, Benjamin P; Cassata, William S; Shuster, David L; Tikoo, Sonia M; Gattacceca, Jérôme; Grove, Timothy L; Fuller, Michael D

    2012-01-27

    Paleomagnetic measurements indicate that a core dynamo probably existed on the Moon 4.2 billion years ago. However, the subsequent history of the lunar core dynamo is unknown. Here we report paleomagnetic, petrologic, and (40)Ar/(39)Ar thermochronometry measurements on the 3.7-billion-year-old mare basalt sample 10020. This sample contains a high-coercivity magnetization acquired in a stable field of at least ~12 microteslas. These data extend the known lifetime of the lunar dynamo by 500 million years. Such a long-lived lunar dynamo probably required a power source other than thermochemical convection from secular cooling of the lunar interior. The inferred strong intensity of the lunar paleofield presents a challenge to current dynamo theory.

  7. Current Challenges in Dynamo Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glatzmaier, G. A.

    2001-12-01

    Three-dimensional, dynamically self-consistent, numerical simulations have been used for two decades to study the generation of global magnetic fields in the deep fluid interiors of planets and stars. In particular, the number of geodynamo models has increased significantly within the last five years. These simulations of magnetic field generation by laminar convection have provided considerable insight to the dynamo process and have produced large-scale fields similar to those observed. However, no global convective dynamo simulation has yet been able to afford the spatial resolution required to simulate turbulent convection, which surely must exist in these low-viscosity fluids. They have all employed greatly enhanced eddy diffusivities to stabilize the low resolution numerical solutions and crudely account for the transport and mixing by the unresolved turbulence. A grand challenge for the next generation of geodynamo models is to produce a simulation with the thermal and viscous (eddy) diffusivities set no larger than the actual magnetic diffusivity of the Earth's fluid core (2 m2/s), while using the core's dimensions, mass, rotation rate and heat flow. This would correspond to the Ekman and magnetic Ekman numbers both set to 10-9 and the Rayleigh number being many orders of magnitude greater than critical. Dynamo models for stars and planets present an additional complication: the large variation of density with radius. A grand challenge for the next generation of these models is to reach similarly low Ekman numbers and high Rayleigh numbers with a density that decreases by at least three orders of magnitude from the base of the convection zone to the model's outer boundary. The advances in numerical methods and massively parallel computing needed to meet these challenges will be discussed.

  8. 9 GeV Energy Gain in a Beam-Driven Plasma Wakefield Accelerator

    CERN Document Server

    Litos, M; Allen, J M; An, W; Clarke, C I; Corde, S; Clayton, C E; Frederico, J; Gessner, S J; Green, S Z; Hogan, M J; Joshi, C; Lu, W; Marsh, K A; Mori, W B; Schmeltz, M; Vafaei-Najafabadi, N; Yakimenko, V

    2015-01-01

    An electron beam has gained a maximum energy of 9 GeV per particle in a 1.3 m-long electron beam-driven plasma wakefield accelerator. The amount of charge accelerated in the spectral peak was 28.3 pC, and the root-mean-square energy spread was 5.0%. The mean accelerated charge and energy gain per particle of the 215 shot data set was 115 pC and 5.3 GeV, respectively, corresponding to an acceleration gradient of 4.0 GeV/m at the spectral peak. The mean energy spread of the data set was 5.1%. These results are consistent with the extrapolation of the previously reported energy gain results using a shorter, 36 cm-long plasma source to within 10%, evincing a non-evolving wake structure that can propagate distances of over a meter in length. Wake-loading effects were evident in the data through strong dependencies observed between various spectral properties and the amount of accelerated charge.

  9. Studies of bandwidth dependence of laser plasma instabilities driven by the Nike laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weaver, J.; Kehne, D.; Obenschain, S.; Serlin, V.; Schmitt, A. J.; Oh, J.; Lehmberg, R. H.; Brown, C. M.; Seely, J.; Feldman, U.

    2012-10-01

    Experiments at the Nike laser facility of the Naval Research Laboratory are exploring the influence of laser bandwidth on laser plasma instabilities (LPI) driven by a deep ultraviolet pump (248 nm) that incorporates beam smoothing by induced spatial incoherence (ISI). In early ISI studies with longer wavelength Nd:glass lasers (1054 nm and 527 nm),footnotetextObenschain, PRL 62(1989);Mostovych, PRL 62(1987);Peyser, Phys. Fluids B 3(1991). stimulated Raman scattering, stimulated Brillouin scattering, and the two plasmon decay instability were reduced when wide bandwidth ISI (δν/ν˜0.03-0.19%) pulses irradiated targets at moderate to high intensities (10^14-10^15 W/cm^2). The current studies will compare the emission signatures of LPI from planar CH targets during Nike operation at large bandwidth (δν˜1THz) to observations for narrower bandwidth operation (δν˜0.1-0.3THz). These studies will help clarify the relative importance of the short wavelength and wide bandwidth to the increased LPI intensity thresholds observed at Nike. New pulse shapes are being used to generate plasmas with larger electron density scale-lengths that are closer to conditions during pellet implosions for direct drive inertial confinement fusion.

  10. Pressure-anisotropy-driven microturbulence and magnetic-field evolution in shearing, collisionless plasma

    CERN Document Server

    Melville, S; Kunz, M W

    2015-01-01

    The nonlinear state of a high-beta collisionless plasma is investigated when an imposed linear shear amplifies or diminishes a uniform magnetic field, driving pressure anisotropies and hence firehose/mirror instabilities. The evolution of the resulting microscale turbulence is considered when the shear is switched off or reversed after one shear time (mimicking local behaviour of a macroscopic flow), so a new macroscale configuration is superimposed on the microscale state left behind by the previous one. There is a threshold value of plasma beta: when $\\beta\\ll\\Omega/S$ (ion cyclotron frequency/shear rate), the emergence of firehose/mirror fluctuations driven unstable by shear and their disappearance when the shear is removed/reversed are quasi-instantaneous compared to the shear time, viz., the decay time of these fluctuations is $\\sim\\beta/\\Omega \\ll 1/S$ (this result follows from the free decay of the fluctuations being constrained by the same marginal-stability thresholds as their growth). In contrast, w...

  11. Laser-driven, magnetized quasi-perpendicular collisionless shocks on the Large Plasma Device

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schaeffer, D. B., E-mail: dschaeffer@physics.ucla.edu; Everson, E. T.; Bondarenko, A. S.; Clark, S. E.; Constantin, C. G.; Vincena, S.; Van Compernolle, B.; Tripathi, S. K. P.; Gekelman, W.; Niemann, C. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of California - Los Angeles, Los Angeles, California 90095 (United States); Winske, D. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States)

    2014-05-15

    The interaction of a laser-driven super-Alfvénic magnetic piston with a large, preformed magnetized ambient plasma has been studied by utilizing a unique experimental platform that couples the Raptor kJ-class laser system [Niemann et al., J. Instrum. 7, P03010 (2012)] to the Large Plasma Device [Gekelman et al., Rev. Sci. Instrum. 62, 2875 (1991)] at the University of California, Los Angeles. This platform provides experimental conditions of relevance to space and astrophysical magnetic collisionless shocks and, in particular, allows a detailed study of the microphysics of shock formation, including piston-ambient ion collisionless coupling. An overview of the platform and its capabilities is given, and recent experimental results on the coupling of energy between piston and ambient ions and the formation of collisionless shocks are presented and compared to theoretical and computational work. In particular, a magnetosonic pulse consistent with a low-Mach number collisionless shock is observed in a quasi-perpendicular geometry in both experiments and simulations.

  12. The effect of intermediate frequency on sheath dynamics in collisionless current driven triple frequency capacitive plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, S.; Mishra, S. K.; Kaw, P. K.; Turner, M. M.

    2017-01-01

    The Capacitively Coupled Plasma discharge featuring operation in current driven triple frequency configuration has analytically been investigated, and the outcome is verified by utilising the 1D3V particle-in-cell (PIC) simulation code. In this analysis, the role of middle frequency component of the applied signal has precisely been explored. The discharge parameters are seen to be sensitive to the ratio of the chosen middle frequency to lower and higher frequencies for fixed amplitudes of the three frequency components. On the basis of analysis and PIC simulation results, the middle frequency component is demonstrated to act as additional control over sheath potential, electron sheath heating, and ion energy distribution function (iedf) of the plasma discharge. For the electron sheath heating, effect of the middle frequency is seen to be pronounced as it approaches to the lower frequency component. On the other hand, for the iedf, the control is more sensitive as the middle frequency approaches towards the higher frequency. The PIC estimate for the electron sheath heating is found to be in reasonably good agreement with the analytical prediction based on the Kaganovich formulation.

  13. On self-exciting coupled Faraday disk homopolar dynamos driving series motors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moroz, Irene M.; Hide, Raymond; Soward, Andrew M.

    1998-06-01

    We present the results of a preliminary analytical and numerical study of one of the simpler members of a hierarchy of N (where N ≥ 1) coupled self-exciting Faraday disk homopolar dynamos, incorporating motors as additional electrical elements driven by the dynamo-generated current, as proposed by Hide (1997). The hierarchy is a generalisation of a single disk dynamo ( N = 1) with just one electric motor in the system, and crucially, incorporating effects due to mechanical friction in both the disk and the motor, as investigated by Hide et al. (1996). This is describable by a set of three coupled autonomous nonlinear ordinary differential equations, which, due to the presence of the motor, has solutions corresponding to co-existing periodic states of increasing complexity, as well as to chaotic dynamics. We consider the case of two such homopolar dynamos ( N = 2) with generally dissimilar characteristics but coupled together magnetically, with the aim of determining the extent to which this coupled system differs in its behaviour from the single disk dynamo with a series motor (Hide et al. 1996). In the case when the units are identical, the behaviour of the double dynamo system (after initial transients have decayed away) is identical to that of the single dynamo system, with solutions (including “synchronised chaos”) locked in both amplitude and phase. When there is no motor in the system and the coefficient of mechanical friction in the disks is small, these transients resemble the well-known ‘non-synchronous’, but structurally unstable Rikitake solution.

  14. A GLOBAL GALACTIC DYNAMO WITH A CORONA CONSTRAINED BY RELATIVE HELICITY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prasad, A.; Mangalam, A., E-mail: avijeet@iiap.res.in, E-mail: mangalam@iiap.res.in [Indian Institute of Astrophysics, Sarjapur Road, Koramangala, Bangalore, 560034 (India)

    2016-01-20

    We present a model for a global axisymmetric turbulent dynamo operating in a galaxy with a corona that treats the parameters of turbulence driven by supernovae and by magneto-rotational instability under a common formalism. The nonlinear quenching of the dynamo is alleviated by the inclusion of small-scale advective and diffusive magnetic helicity fluxes, which allow the gauge-invariant magnetic helicity to be transferred outside the disk and consequently to build up a corona during the course of dynamo action. The time-dependent dynamo equations are expressed in a separable form and solved through an eigenvector expansion constructed using the steady-state solutions of the dynamo equation. The parametric evolution of the dynamo solution allows us to estimate the final structure of the global magnetic field and the saturated value of the turbulence parameter α{sub m}, even before solving the dynamical equations for evolution of magnetic fields in the disk and the corona, along with α-quenching. We then solve these equations simultaneously to study the saturation of the large-scale magnetic field, its dependence on the small-scale magnetic helicity fluxes, and the corresponding evolution of the force-free field in the corona. The quadrupolar large-scale magnetic field in the disk is found to reach equipartition strength within a timescale of 1 Gyr. The large-scale magnetic field in the corona obtained is much weaker than the field inside the disk and has only a weak impact on the dynamo operation.

  15. Simulations of the kinematic dynamo onset of spherical Couette flows with smooth and rough boundaries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finke, K; Tilgner, A

    2012-07-01

    We study numerically the dynamo transition of an incompressible electrically conducting fluid filling the gap between two concentric spheres. In a first series of simulations, the fluid is driven by the rotation of a smooth inner sphere through no-slip boundary conditions, whereas the outer sphere is stationary. In a second series a volume force intended to simulate a rough surface drives the fluid next to the inner sphere within a layer of thickness one-tenth of the gap width. We investigate the effect of the boundary layer thickness on the dynamo threshold in the turbulent regime. The simulations show that the boundary forcing simulating the rough surface lowers the necessary rotation rate, which may help to improve spherical dynamo experiments.

  16. ISEE-3 observations of a viscously-driven plasma sheet: magnetosheath mass and/or momentum transfer?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mist, R. T.; Owen, C. J.

    2002-05-01

    A statistical analysis of data from the ISEE-3 distant tail campaign is presented. We investigate the mechanism driving slow, tailward flows observed in the plasma sheet. The possibility that these slow flows are driven by mass and/or momentum transfer across the distant tail magnetopause is explored. We establish that 40% of these flows could be driven by the transfer of approximately 4% of the magnetosheath momentum flux into the magnetotail. Current understanding of the Kelvin-Helmholtz instability suggests that this figure is consistent with the amount of momentum flux transfer produced by this mechanism. We also consider the possibility that these flows are solely driven by transferring magnetosheath plasma across the magnetopause. We find that there is sufficient mass observed on these field lines for this to be the sole driving mechanism for only 27% of the observed slow flows.

  17. Mechanism of Cyclically Polarity Reversing Solar Magnetic Cycle as a Cosmic Dynamo

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Hirokazu Yoshimura

    2000-09-01

    We briefly describe historical development of the concept of solar dynamo mechanism that generates electric current and magnetic field by plasma flows inside the solar convection zone. The dynamo is the driver of the cyclically polarity reversing solar magnetic cycle. The reversal process can easily and visually be understood in terms of magnetic field line stretching and twisting and folding in three-dimensional space by plasma flows of differential rotation and global convection under influence of Coriolis force. This process gives rise to formation of a series of huge magnetic flux tubes that propagate along iso-rotation surfaces inside the convection zone. Each of these flux tubes produces one solar cycle. We discuss general characteristics of any plasma flows that can generate magnetic field and reverse the polarity of the magnetic field in a rotating body in the Universe. We also mention a list of problems which are currently being disputed concerning the solar dynamo mechanism together with observational evidences that are to be constraints as well as verifications of any solar cycle dynamo theories of short and long term behaviors of the Sun, particularly time variations of its magnetic field, plasma flows, and luminosity.

  18. Solar dynamo and geomagnetic activity

    CERN Document Server

    Georgieva, Katya

    2010-01-01

    The correlation between geomagnetic activity and the sunspot number in the 11-year solar cycle exhibits long-term variations due to the varying time lag between the sunspot-related and non-sunspot related geomagnetic activity, and the varying relative amplitude of the respective geomagnetic activity peaks. As the sunspot-related and non-sunspot related geomagnetic activity are caused by different solar agents, related to the solar toroidal and poloidal fields, respectively, we use their variations to derive the parameters of the solar dynamo transforming the poloidal field into toroidal field and back. We find that in the last 12 cycles the solar surface meridional circulation varied between 5 and 20 m/s (averaged over latitude and over the sunspot cycle), the deep circulation varied between 2.5 and 5.5 m/s, and the diffusivity in the whole of the convection zone was ~10**12 m2/s. In the last 12 cycles solar dynamo has been operating in moderately diffusion dominated regime in the bulk of the convection zone....

  19. The DYNAMO Project: An Introduction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. C. Ferrier

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available European concerns about the consequences of anthropogenic impacts on environmental quality have led to the establishment of various dynamic modelling approaches through which the consequences of impacts over time can be assessed. Similarly, throughout Europe, there has been extensive collection of regional data on 'environmental capital' resulting in the production of wide area mapping of environmental quality (soils, land use etc. The aim of the DYNAMO was to integrate data and models, specifically; (1 to enhance the existing process based models to evaluate the impacts of multiple drivers of environmental change; (2 to evaluate these models at intensively studied (and manipulated catchments and stands; (3 to scale up in time from observations collected over several years to predict the long term impacts over decades, and (4 to scale up in space from the individual site level to regional, National and European scale. The project aims to develop and enhance regional modelling approaches so that European scale impacts of acidic deposition, land use (forestry practices and global change can be determined without compromising process level understanding of ecosystem function. The DYNAMO project contributes to the EU TERI (Terrestrial Ecosystems Research Initiative framework of the Environment and Climate Programme of the European Commission.

  20. Measurements and modeling of the impact of weak magnetic fields on the plasma properties of a planar slot antenna driven plasma source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoshikawa, Jun, E-mail: jun.yoshikawa@tel.com; Susa, Yoshio; Ventzek, Peter L. G. [Tokyo Electron Ltd., Akasaka Biz Tower, 3-1 Akasaka 5-chome, Minato-ku, Tokyo 107-6325 (Japan)

    2015-05-15

    The radial line slot antenna plasma source is a type of surface wave plasma source driven by a planar slot antenna. Microwave power is transmitted through a slot antenna structure and dielectric window to a plasma characterized by a generation zone adjacent to the window and a diffusion zone that contacts a substrate. The diffusion zone is characterized by a very low electron temperature. This renders the source useful for soft etch applications and thin film deposition processes requiring low ion energy. Another property of the diffusion zone is that the plasma density tends to decrease from the axis to the walls under the action of ambipolar diffusion at distances far from where the plasma is generated. A previous simulation study [Yoshikawa and. Ventzek, J. Vac. Sci. Technol. A 31, 031306 (2013)] predicted that the anisotropy in transport parameters due to weak static magnetic fields less than 50 G could be leveraged to manipulate the plasma profile in the radial direction. These simulations motivated experimental tests in which weak magnetic fields were applied to a radial line slot antenna source. Plasma absorption probe measurements of electron density and etch rate showed that the magnetic fields remote from the wafer were able to manipulate both parameters. A summary of these results is presented in this paper. Argon plasma simulation trends are compared with experimental plasma and etch rate measurements. A test of the impact of magnetic fields on charge up damage showed no perceptible negative effect.

  1. Solar Dynamo Near Tachocline and Magnetic Monopoly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kryvodubskyj, Valery N.

    To explain the observed magnetic anomaly of the polar Sun's field the turbulent dynamo mechanism based on the joint action of mean helical turbulence and differential rotation (alpha-omega-dynamo) was used near tachocline in the solar convection zone (SCZ). The global magnetic field modes (odd or even ones) excited by dynamo depend on the eigenvalue Kh for a Parker dynamo-wave (K is the wave number of the dynamo-wave and h is the extent of the dynamo region). Estimations of the helicity-parameter and radial angular-velocity gradient based on the most recent helioseismological measurements at the growth phase of solar cycle 23 were obtained using the mixing-length approximation. For the SCZ model by Stix (1989) these estimations indicate that the alpha-omega-dynamo mechanism near the tachocline most efficiency excites the poloidal field main odd mode dipole (Kh ~ -7); while the physical conditions at latitudes above 50 degrees are more favourable for the exitation of the lowest even mode quadrupole (Kh ~ +8). The resulting north-south magnetic asymmetry of the poloidal field can explain the magnetic anomaly (""monopoly"" structure) of the polar fields observed near solar-cycle maxima.

  2. HYSTERESIS BETWEEN DISTINCT MODES OF TURBULENT DYNAMOS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karak, Bidya Binay; Brandenburg, Axel [Nordita, KTH Royal Institute of Technology and Stockholm University, Roslagstullsbacken 23, SE-10691 Stockholm (Sweden); Kitchatinov, Leonid L., E-mail: bbkarak@nordita.org [Institute of Solar-Terrestrial Physics, P.O. Box 291, Irkutsk 664033 (Russian Federation)

    2015-04-20

    Nonlinear mean-field models of the solar dynamo show long-term variability, which may be relevant to different states of activity inferred from long-term radiocarbon data. This paper is aimed at probing the dynamo hysteresis predicted by the recent mean-field models of Kitchatinov and Olemskoy with direct numerical simulations. We perform three-dimensional (3D) simulations of large-scale dynamos in a shearing box with helically forced turbulence. As an initial condition, we either take a weak random magnetic field or we start from a snapshot of an earlier simulation. Two quasi-stable states are found to coexist in a certain range of parameters close to the onset of the large-scale dynamo. The simulations converge to one of these states depending on the initial conditions. When either the fractional helicity or the magnetic Prandtl number is increased between successive runs above the critical value for onset of the dynamo, the field strength jumps to a finite value. However, when the fractional helicity or the magnetic Prandtl number is then decreased again, the field strength stays at a similar value (strong field branch) even below the original onset. We also observe intermittent decaying phases away from the strong field branch close to the point where large-scale dynamo action is just possible. The dynamo hysteresis seen previously in mean-field models is thus reproduced by 3D simulations. Its possible relation to distinct modes of solar activity such as grand minima is discussed.

  3. Nonlinear MHD dynamo operating at equipartition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Archontis, V.; Dorch, Bertil; Nordlund, Åke

    2007-01-01

    Context.We present results from non linear MHD dynamo experiments with a three-dimensional steady and smooth flow that drives fast dynamo action in the kinematic regime. In the saturation regime, the system yields strong magnetic fields, which undergo transitions between an energy-equipartition a......Context.We present results from non linear MHD dynamo experiments with a three-dimensional steady and smooth flow that drives fast dynamo action in the kinematic regime. In the saturation regime, the system yields strong magnetic fields, which undergo transitions between an energy......-equipartition and a turbulent state. The generation and evolution of such strong magnetic fields is relevant for the understanding of dynamo action that occurs in stars and other astrophysical objects. Aims.We study the mode of operation of this dynamo, in the linear and non-linear saturation regimes. We also consider...... the effect of varying the magnetic and fluid Reymolds number on the non-linear behaviour of the system. Methods.We perform three-dimensional non-linear MHD simulations and visualization using a high resolution numerical scheme. Results.We find that this dynamo has a high growth rate in the linear regime...

  4. Bounds on the growth of the magnetic energy for the Hall kinematic dynamo equation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nunez, Manuel [Departamento de Analisis Matematico Universidad de Valladolid 47005 Valladolid (Spain)

    2005-09-09

    While the magnetic induction equation in plasmas, governing kinematic dynamos, is a linear one admitting exponential growth of the magnetic energy for certain velocity fields, the addition of the Hall term turns it into a nonlinear parabolic equation. Local existence of solutions may be proved, but in contrast with the magnetohydrodynamics case, for a number of boundary conditions the magnetic energy grows at most linearly in time for stationary velocity fields, and like the square of the time in the general case. It appears that the Hall effect enhances diffusivity in some way to compensate for the positive contribution of the transport of the magnetic field by the flow occurring in fast dynamos.

  5. Comparison of current density profiles based on particle orbit-driven current in steady-state plasma on QUEST

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alam, Md Mahbub, E-mail: m.alam@triam.kyushu-u.ac.jp [IGSES, Kyushu University, 6-1 Kasuga-koen, Kasuga, Fukuoka 816-8580 (Japan); Nakamura, Kazuo [RIAM, Kyushu University, 6-1 Kasuga-koen, Kasuga, Fukuoka 816-8580 (Japan); Xia, Fan [CFS, SWIP, P.O. Box 432, 610041 Chengdu (China); Mitarai, Osamu [Tokai University, Kumamoto 862-8652 (Japan); Hasegawa, Makoto; Tokunaga, Kazutoshi; Araki, Kuniaki; Zushi, Hideki; Hanada, Kazuaki; Fujisawa, Akihide; Idei, Hiroshi; Nagashima, Yoshihiko; Kawasaki, Shoji; Nakashima, Hisatoshi; Higashijima, Aki; Nagata, Takahiro [RIAM, Kyushu University, 6-1 Kasuga-koen, Kasuga, Fukuoka 816-8580 (Japan)

    2016-11-01

    Highlights: • Electron cyclotron resonance heating (ECRH) of QUEST. • Particle guiding center orbit calculation. • Orbit-driven current density profile. • Hollow current density. • Equilibrium condition for steady-state operation of QUEST. - Abstract: In the present RF-driven divertor plasma of QUEST, it has been observed that orbit-driven current flows in the open magnetic surfaces outside of the closed magnetic surfaces. To observe this phenomenon and the characteristics of the orbit-driven current, current density profiles have been calculated on two different equilibrium conditions. We calculated current density profiles from particle guiding center orbits both for the fundamental and the second harmonic resonances for the 8.2 GHz electron cyclotron current drive. From this calculation, hollow current density profiles have been obtained with significant characteristics on both conditions. Only positive current distribution has been observed in the open magnetic surfaces outside of the closed magnetic surfaces.

  6. Some Recent Developments in Solar Dynamo Theory

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Arnab Rai Choudhuri

    2006-06-01

    We discuss the current status of solar dynamo theory and describe the dynamo model developed by our group. The toroidal magnetic field is generated in the tachocline by the strong differential rotation and rises to the solar surface due to magnetic buoyancy to create active regions. The decay of these active regions at the surface gives rise to the poloidal magnetic field by the Babcock–Leighton mechanism. This poloidal field is advected by the meridional circulation first to high latitudes and then down below to the tachocline. Dynamo models based on these ideas match different aspects of observational data reasonably well.

  7. Statistical simulation of the magnetorotational dynamo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Squire, J. [PPPL; Bhattacharjee, A. [PPPL

    2014-08-01

    We analyze turbulence and dynamo induced by the magnetorotational instability (MRI) using quasi-linear statistical simulation methods. We find that homogenous turbulence is unstable to a large scale dynamo instability, which saturates to an inhomogenous equilibrium with a very strong dependence on the magnetic Prandtl number (Pm). Despite its enormously reduced nonlinearity, the quasi-linear model exhibits the same qualitative scaling of angular momentum transport with Pm as fully nonlinear turbulence. This demonstrates the relationship of recent convergence problems to the large scale dynamo and suggests possible methods for studying astrophysically relevant regimes at very low or high Pm.

  8. Statistical Simulation of the Magnetorotational Dynamo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Squire, Jonathan [Princeton Plasma Physics Lab. (PPPL), Princeton, NJ (United States); Princeton Univ., NJ (United States). Dept. of Astrophysical Sciences; Bhattacharjee, Amitava [Princeton Plasma Physics Lab. (PPPL), Princeton, NJ (United States); Princeton Univ., NJ (United States). Dept. of Astrophysical Sciences; Max Planck Society, Garching (Germany). Max Planck Inst. for Astrophysik

    2015-02-01

    Turbulence and dynamo induced by the magnetorotational instability (MRI) are analyzed using quasilinear statistical simulation methods. It is found that homogenous turbulence is unstable to a large-scale dynamo instability, which saturates to an inhomogenous equilibrium with a strong dependence on the magnetic Prandtl number (Pm). Despite its enormously reduced nonlinearity, the dependence of the angular momentum transport on Pm in the quasilinear model is qualitatively similar to that of nonlinear MRI turbulence. This demonstrates the importance of the large-scale dynamo and suggests how dramatically simplified models may be used to gain insight into the astrophysically relevant regimes of very low or high Pm.

  9. Statistical simulation of the magnetorotational dynamo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Squire, J; Bhattacharjee, A

    2015-02-27

    Turbulence and dynamo induced by the magnetorotational instability (MRI) are analyzed using quasilinear statistical simulation methods. It is found that homogenous turbulence is unstable to a large-scale dynamo instability, which saturates to an inhomogenous equilibrium with a strong dependence on the magnetic Prandtl number (Pm). Despite its enormously reduced nonlinearity, the dependence of the angular momentum transport on Pm in the quasilinear model is qualitatively similar to that of nonlinear MRI turbulence. This demonstrates the importance of the large-scale dynamo and suggests how dramatically simplified models may be used to gain insight into the astrophysically relevant regimes of very low or high Pm.

  10. Laboratory astrophysics using differential rotation of unmagnetized plasma at large magnetic Reynolds number

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weisberg, David

    2016-10-01

    Differentially rotating plasma flow has been measured in the Madison Plasma Dynamo Experiment (MPDX). Spherical cusp-confined plasmas have been stirred both from the plasma boundary using electrostatic stirring in the magnetized edge and in the plasma core using weak global fields and cross-field currents to impose a body-force torque. Laminar velocity profiles conducive to shear-driven MHD instabilities like the dynamo and the MRI are now being generated and controlled with magnetic Reynolds numbers of Rm method for plasma heating, but limits on input heating power have been observed (believed to be caused by the formation of double-layers at anodes). These confinement studies have culminated in large (R = 1.4 m), warm (Te 1), steady-state plasmas. Results of the ambipolar transport model are good fits to measurements of pressure gradients and fluid drifts in the cusp, and offer a predictive tool for future cusp-confined devices. Hydrodynamic modeling is shown to be a good description for measured plasma flows, where ion viscosity proves to be an efficient mechanism for transporting momentum from the magnetized edge into the unmagnetized core. In addition, the body-force stirring technique produces velocity profiles conducive to MRI experiments where dΩ / dr research of flow-driven astrophysical MHD instabilities.

  11. Solar-wind/magnetospheric dynamos: MHD-scale collective entry of the solar wind energy, momentum and mass into the magnetosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Yan; Lysak, Robert L.

    1992-01-01

    A quasi open MHD (Magnetohydrodynamic) scale anomalous transport controlled boundary layer model is proposed, where the MHD collective behavior of magnetofluids (direct dynamo effect, anomalous viscous interaction and anomalous diffusion of the mass and the magnetic field) plays the main role in the conversion of the Solar Wind (SW) kinetic and magnetic energy into electromagnetic energy in the Magnetosphere (MSp). The so called direct and indirect dynamo effects are based on inductive and purely dissipative energy conversion, respectively. The self organization ability of vector fields in turbulent magnetofluids implies an inductive response of the plasma, which leads to the direct dynamo effect. The direct dynamo effect describes the direct formation of localized field aligned currents and the transverse Alfven waves and provides a source for MHD scale anomalous diffusivity and viscosity. The SW/MSp coupling depends on the dynamo efficiency.

  12. EPOCH code simulation of a non-thermal distribution driven by neutral beam injection in a high-beta plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Necas, A.; Tajima, T.; Nicks, S.; Magee, R.; Clary, R.; Roche, T.; Tri Alpha Energy Team

    2016-10-01

    In Tri Alpha Energy's C-2U experiment, advanced beam-driven field-reversed configuration (FRC) plasmas were sustained via tangential neutral beam injection. The dominant fast ion population made a dramatic impact on the overall plasma performance. To explain an experimentally observed anomalous neutron signal (100x thermonuclear), we use EPOCH PIC code to simulate possible beam driven non-destructive instabilities that transfer energy from fast ions to the plasma, causing phase space bunching. We propose that the hydrogen beam ion population drives collective modes in the deuterium target plasma, giving rise to the instability and increased fusion rate. The instability changes character from electrostatic in the low beta edge to fully electromagnetic in the core, with an associated reduction in growth rates. The DD reactivity enhancement is calculated using a two-body correlation function and compared to the experimentally observed neutron yield. The high-energy tails in the distributions of the plasma deuterons and beam protons are observed via a mass-resolving Neutral Particle Analyzer (NPA) diagnostic. This observation is qualitatively consistent with EPOCH simulation of the beam-plasma instability.

  13. Dynamics of a reconnection-driven runaway ion tail in a reversed field pinch plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, J. K.; Kim, J.; Bonofiglo, P. J.; Capecchi, W.; Eilerman, S.; Nornberg, M. D.; Sarff, J. S.; Sears, S. H.

    2016-05-01

    While reconnection-driven ion heating is common in laboratory and astrophysical plasmas, the underlying mechanisms for converting magnetic to kinetic energy remain not fully understood. Reversed field pinch discharges are often characterized by rapid ion heating during impulsive reconnection, generating an ion distribution with an enhanced bulk temperature, mainly perpendicular to magnetic field. In the Madison Symmetric Torus, a subset of discharges with the strongest reconnection events develop a very anisotropic, high energy tail parallel to magnetic field in addition to bulk perpendicular heating, which produces a fusion neutron flux orders of magnitude higher than that expected from a Maxwellian distribution. Here, we demonstrate that two factors in addition to a perpendicular bulk heating mechanism must be considered to explain this distribution. First, ion runaway can occur in the strong parallel-to-B electric field induced by a rapid equilibrium change triggered by reconnection-based relaxation; this effect is particularly strong on perpendicularly heated ions which experience a reduced frictional drag relative to bulk ions. Second, the confinement of ions varies dramatically as a function of velocity. Whereas thermal ions are governed by stochastic diffusion along tearing-altered field lines (and radial diffusion increases with parallel speed), sufficiently energetic ions are well confined, only weakly affected by a stochastic magnetic field. High energy ions traveling mainly in the direction of toroidal plasma current are nearly classically confined, while counter-propagating ions experience an intermediate confinement, greater than that of thermal ions but significantly less than classical expectations. The details of ion confinement tend to reinforce the asymmetric drive of the parallel electric field, resulting in a very asymmetric, anisotropic distribution.

  14. Dynamics of electron acceleration in laser-driven wakefields. Acceleration limits and asymmetric plasma waves

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Popp, Antonia

    2011-12-16

    The experiments presented in this thesis study several aspects of electron acceleration in a laser-driven plasma wave. High-intensity lasers can efficiently drive a plasma wave that sustains electric fields on the order of 100 GV/m. Electrons that are trapped in this plasma wave can be accelerated to GeV-scale energies. As the accelerating fields in this scheme are 3-4 orders of magnitude higher than in conventional radio-frequency accelerators, the necessary acceleration distance can be reduced by the same factor, turning laser-wakefield acceleration (LWFA) into a promising compact, and potentially cheaper, alternative. However, laser-accelerated electron bunches have not yet reached the parameter standards of conventional accelerators. This work will help to gain better insight into the acceleration process and to optimize the electron bunch properties. The 25 fs, 1.8 J-pulses of the ATLAS laser at the Max-Planck-Institute of Quantum Optics were focused into a steady-state flow gas cell. This very reproducible and turbulence-free gas target allows for stable acceleration of electron bunches. Thus the sensitivity of electron parameters to subtle changes of the experimental setup could be determined with meaningful statistics. At optimized experimental parameters, electron bunches of {approx}50 pC total charge were accelerated to energies up to 450 MeV with a divergence of {approx}2 mrad FWHM. As, in a new design of the gas cell, its length can be varied from 2 to 14 mm, the electron bunch energy could be evaluated after different acceleration distances, at two different electron densities. From this evolution important acceleration parameters could be extracted. At an electron density of 6.43. 10{sup 18} cm{sup -3} the maximum electric field strength in the plasma wave was determined to be {approx}160 GV/m. The length after which the relativistic electrons outrun the accelerating phase of the electric field and are decelerated again, the so-called dephasing length

  15. Comments on the kinetic dynamo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fowler, T.K.

    1995-08-24

    It is conjectured that transport by parallel mass flow in a braided magnetic field, rather than hyper-resistivity, drives the dynamo effect after stochasticity is established. In this paper the authors do not attempt a rigorous proof of this conjecture, which requires showing that braiding introduces correlations analogous to those giving rise to the neoclassical bootstrap current. The authors do offer plausible arguments for the conjecture and show that it leads to interesting consequences if true. Namely, magnetic fluctuations would then scale with the magnetic Reynolds number S like {tilde B}/B {approximately} S{sup {minus}1/2} and the Rechester-Rosenbluth thermal diffusivity like {chi}e {proportional_to} S{sup {minus}1} . This scaling would explain the highest temperatures obtained in the CTX spheromak. It also suggests that a fully-bootstrapped current drive experiment could be carried out on-the DIII-D tokamak.

  16. Phase-mixing self-injection into plasma-wakefield acceleration structures driven in a rising density gradient

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahai, Aakash Ajit

    We model the phase-mixing self-injection of electrons into plasma-wakefield acceleration structures driven in a longitudinally rising density gradient. Self-injection is the process where some of the plasma electrons lose coherence with the wave due to non-linearities. The non-linearity is inherently and intentionally induced in the plasma oscillations due to the variation of the restoring force along the rising density gradient. These electrons then get trapped in and propagate with the accelerating phase of the plasma-wave. The electron oscillations driven by matched energy-sources are shown to get trapped in the wakefields similar in scaling to the phase-mixing of free oscillations. The onset of trapping is shown to scale with the gradient of rising density and the amplitude of oscillations. The planar longitudinal electron oscillations undergo trajectory crossing above a threshold amplitude or in a density inhomogeneity leading to phase-mixing and trapping of the oscillating electrons to a phase of the wave. In this thesis, we analyze the scaling of the phase-mixing based trapping of electron oscillations, independent of a threshold, in planar geometry driven by an electron beam in a rising density gradient. The cylindrical and spherical geometry electron oscillations undergo phase-mixing irrespective of the amplitude of oscillations. Here, driven radial electron oscillations in cylindrical geometry are shown to undergo phase-mixing leading to trapping of the plasma electrons in a longitudinally rising density gradient. We also present preliminary scaling results of phase-mixing based trapping of radially oscillating electrons in a rising density gradient.

  17. Dynamo generated by the centrifugal instability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcotte, Florence; Gissinger, Christophe

    2016-10-01

    We present a scenario for magnetic field amplification where an electrically conducting fluid is confined in a differentially rotating, spherical shell with thin aspect ratio. When the angular momentum sufficiently decreases outwards, a hydrodynamic instability develops in the equatorial region, characterized by pairs of counter-rotating toroidal vortices similar to those observed in cylindrical Couette flow. These spherical Taylor-Couette vortices generate a subcritical dynamo magnetic field dominated by nonaxisymmetric components. We show that the critical magnetic Reynolds number seems to reach a constant value at large Reynolds number and that the global rotation can strongly decrease the dynamo onset. Our numerical results are understood within the framework of a simple dynamical system, and we propose a low-dimensional model for subcritical dynamo bifurcations. Implications for both laboratory dynamos and astrophysical magnetic fields are finally discussed.

  18. Statistical tests of galactic dynamo theory

    CERN Document Server

    Chamandy, Luke; Taylor, A Russ

    2016-01-01

    Mean-field galactic dynamo theory is the leading theory to explain the prevalence of regular magnetic fields in spiral galaxies, but its systematic comparison with observations is still incomplete and fragmentary. Here we compare predictions of mean-field dynamo models to observational data on magnetic pitch angle and the strength of the mean magnetic field. We demonstrate that a standard $\\alpha^2\\Omega$ dynamo model produces pitch angles of the regular magnetic fields of nearby galaxies that are reasonably consistent with available data. The dynamo estimates of the magnetic field strength are generally within a factor of a few of the observational values. Reasonable agreement between theoretical and observed pitch angles generally requires the turbulent correlation time $\\tau$ to be in the range 10-20 Myr, in agreement with standard estimates. Moreover, good agreement also requires that the ratio of the ionized gas scale height to root-mean-square turbulent velocity increases with radius. Our results thus w...

  19. Dynamo generated by the centrifugal instability

    CERN Document Server

    Marcotte, Florence

    2016-01-01

    We present a new scenario for magnetic field amplification where an electrically conducting fluid is confined in a differentially rotating, spherical shell with thin aspect-ratio. When the angular momentum sufficiently decreases outwards, an hydrodynamic instability develops in the equatorial region, characterised by pairs of counter-rotating toroidal vortices similar to those observed in cylindrical Couette flow. These spherical Taylor-Couette vortices generate a subcritical dynamo magnetic field dominated by non-axisymmetric components. We show that the critical magnetic Reynolds number seems to reach a constant value at large Reynolds number and that the global rotation can strongly decrease the dynamo onset. Our numerical results are understood within the framework of a simple dynamical system, and we propose a low-dimensional model for subcritical dynamo bifurcations. Implications for both laboratory dynamos and astrophysical magnetic fields are finally discussed.

  20. Progress in Magnetohydrodynamic Dynamo Experiments and Analysis of the Results%磁流体发电机实验进展及分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郭开明; 杨志良; 景海荣; 陈荣; 郑建川; 潘业欣

    2016-01-01

    阐述了磁流体发电机实验的发展过程并介绍了发电机实验的主要结果.磁流体发电机实验基于磁流体发电机理论,利用液态金属钠作为导电流体,在多种速度场和不同雷诺系数情况下,探测到发电机效应,得到自激发磁场、磁场饱和及磁场反转现象.但磁场强度与实验参数之间的具体相关关系还有待进一步验证.%This paper describes state-of-the-art experiments of magnetohydrodynamic dy-namo and the main results of the current dynamo experiments. We first introduce the the-oretical basis of dynamos, which contains kinematic dynamo theory and dynamic dynamo theory. Then we describe the magnetohydrodynamic dynamo experiments based on the cur-rent theories. The experiments simulated liquid sodium as plasma, analysed the dynamo effects of different velocity distributions and the relation of velocity field and magnetic field. In the Riga dynamo experiment, the frequency of the magnetic field reversal was a constant if the plasma rotates with a constant speed. In the VKG magnetohydrodynamic dynamo experiment, the magnetic field inversed when the rotational frequencies of Propellers were different. However, Lyon also got the inverse field when he made use of external magnified circulation simulation effect in the VKG experiment. We can turn to study MHD instability and fluctuation after we testified the dynamo theory.

  1. Bunch decompression for laser-plasma driven free-electron laser demonstration schemes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Seggebrock

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available X-ray free-electron lasers (FELs require a very high electron beam quality in terms of emittance and energy spread. Since 2004 high quality electrons produced by laser-wakefield accelerators have been demonstrated, but the electron quality up to now did not allow the operation of a compact x-ray FEL using these electrons. Maier et al. [Phys. Rev. X 2, 031019 (2012PRXHAE2160-330810.1103/PhysRevX.2.031019] suggested a concept for a proof-of-principle experiment allowing FEL operation in the vacuum ultraviolet range based on an optimized undulator and bunch decompression using electron bunches from a laser-plasma accelerator as currently available. In this paper we discuss in more detail how a chicane can be used as a bunch stretcher instead of a bunch compressor to allow the operation of a laser-wakefield accelerator driven FEL using currently available electrons. A scaling characterizing the impact of bunch decompression on the gain length is derived and the feasibility of the concept is tested numerically in a demanding scenario.

  2. Vacuum ultraviolet emission from hydrogen microwave plasmas driven by surface waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Espinho, S.; Felizardo, E.; Tatarova, E.

    2016-10-01

    The vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) radiation emitted by hydrogen surface-wave-driven plasmas operating at microwave frequency (2.45 GHz) and low-pressure conditions (0.1-2 mbar) was investigated, in particular the influence of microwave power and gas pressure on the intensity of the emissions. The strong emission of Lyman H2 ≤ft(\\text{B}{}1 Σ u+-\\text{X}{}1 Σ g+\\right) and Werner H2 ≤ft(\\text{C}{}1{{ \\Pi }u}-\\text{X}{}1 Σ g+\\right) molecular bands in the 80-125 nm spectral range was detected, while the most intense atomic emissions observed correspond to Lyman-α and Lyman-β lines at 121.6 nm and 102.6 nm respectively. An increase of the atomic lines and molecular bands intensities with increasing microwave power at pressure 0.1 mbar was observed. At 2 mbar the VUV spectra are entirely dominated by molecular bands. Theoretical predictions, as obtained from a collisional-radiative model, were validated by the experimental results.

  3. Bandwidth Dependence of Laser Plasma Instabilities Driven by the Nike KrF Laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weaver, J. L.; Oh, J.; Seely, J.; Kehne, D.; Brown, C. M.; Obenschain, S.; Serlin, V.; Schmitt, A. J.; Phillips, L.; Lehmberg, R. H.; McLean, E.; Manka, C.; Feldman, U.

    2011-10-01

    The Nike krypton-fluoride (KrF) laser at the Naval Research Laboratory operates in the deep UV (248 nm) and employs beam smoothing by induced spatial incoherence (ISI). In the first ISI studies at longer wavelengths (1054 nm and 527 nm) [Obenschain, PRL 62, 768(1989);Mostovych, PRL, 59, 1193(1987); Peyser, Phys. Fluids B 3, 1479(1991)], stimulated Raman scattering, stimulated Brillouin scattering, and the two plasmon decay instability were reduced when wide bandwidth ISI (δν / ν ~ 0.03-0.19%) pulses irradiated targets at moderate to high intensities (1014-1015W/cm2) . Recent Nike work showed that the threshold for quarter critical instabilities increased with the expected wavelength scaling, without accounting for the large bandwidth (δν ~ 1-3 THz). New experiments will compare laser plasma instabilities (LPI) driven by narrower bandwidth pulses to those observed with the standard operation. The bandwidth of KrF lasers can be reduced by adding narrow filters (etalons or gratings) in the initial stages of the laser. This talk will discuss the method used to narrow the output spectrum of Nike, the laser performance for this new operating mode, and target observations of LPI in planar CH targets. Work supported by DoE/NNSA.

  4. A New Hybrid Scheme for Simulations of Highly Collisional RF-Driven Plasmas

    CERN Document Server

    Eremin, Denis; Mussenbrock, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    This work describes a new 1D hybrid approach for modeling atmospheric pressure discharges featuring complex chemistry. In this approach electrons are described fully kinetically using Particle-In-Cell/Monte-Carlo (PIC/MCC) scheme, whereas the heavy species are modeled within a fluid description. Validity of the popular drift-diffusion approximation is verified against a "full" fluid model accounting for the ion inertia and a fully kinetic PIC/MCC code for ions as well as electrons. The fluid models require knowledge of the momentum exchange frequency and dependence of the ion mobilities on the electric field when the ions are in equilibrium with the latter. To this end an auxiliary Monte-Carlo scheme is constructed. It is demonstrated that the drift-diffusion approximation can overestimate ion transport in simulations of RF-driven discharges with heavy ion species operated in the $\\gamma$ mode at the atmospheric pressure or in all discharge simulations for lower pressures. This can lead to exaggerated plasma ...

  5. Energetic particle driven geodesic acoustic mode in a toroidally rotating tokamak plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Haijun

    2017-01-01

    Energetic particle (EP) driven geodesic acoustic modes (EGAMs) in toroidally rotating tokamak plasmas are analytically investigated using the hybrid kinetic-fluid model and gyrokinetic equations. By ignoring high-order terms and ion Landau damping, the kinetic dispersion relation is reduced to the hybrid one in the large safety factor limit. There is one high-frequency branch with a frequency larger than {ωt0} , the transit frequency of EPs with initial energy, which is always stable. Two low-frequency solutions with a frequency smaller than {ωt0} are complex conjugates in the hybrid limit. In the presence of ion Landau damping, the growth rate of the unstable branch is decreased and the damping rate of the damped branch is increased. The toroidal Mach number is shown to increase {{ Ω }\\text{r}} , the normalized real frequency of both branches. Although not affecting the instability critical condition, the Mach number decreases the growth rate when {{ Ω }\\text{r}} is larger than a critical value Ω \\text{r}\\text{cri} and enlarges the growth rate when {{ Ω }\\text{r}}Landau damping effect is negligible for large M. But the discrepancy between the kinetic dispersion relation and the hybrid one becomes ignorable only for q≳ 7 .

  6. Improvement of stability of sinusoidally driven atmospheric pressure plasma jet using auxiliary bias voltage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyun-Jin Kim

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available In this study, we have proposed the auxiliary bias pulse scheme to improve the stability of atmospheric pressure plasma jets driven by an AC sinusoidal waveform excitation source. The stability of discharges can be significantly improved by the compensation of irregular variation in memory voltage due to the effect of auxiliary bias pulse. From the parametric study, such as the width, voltage, and onset time of auxiliary bias pulse, it has been demonstrated that the auxiliary bias pulse plays a significant role in suppressing the irregular discharges caused by the irregular variation in memory voltage and stable discharge can be initiated with the termination of the auxiliary bias pulse. As a result of further investigating the effects of the auxiliary pulse scheme on the jet stability under various process conditions such as the distance between the jet head and the counter electrode, and carrier gas flow, the jet stability can be improved by adjusting the amplitude and number of the bias pulse depending on the variations in the process conditions.

  7. Evidence for dust-driven, radial plasma transport in Saturn's inner radiation belts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roussos, E.; Krupp, N.; Kollmann, P.; Paranicas, C.; Mitchell, D. G.; Krimigis, S. M.; Andriopoulou, M.

    2016-08-01

    A survey of Cassini MIMI/LEMMS data acquired between 2004 and 2015 has led to the identification of 13 energetic electron microsignatures that can be attributed to particle losses on one of the several faint rings of the planet. Most of the signatures were detected near L-shells that map between the orbits of Mimas and Enceladus or near the G-ring. Our analysis indicates that it is very unlikely for these signatures to have originated from absorption on Mimas, Enceladus or unidentified Moons and rings, even though most were not found exactly at the L-shells of the known rings of the saturnian system (G-ring, Methone, Anthe, Pallene). The lack of additional absorbers is apparent in the L-shell distribution of MeV ions which are very sensitive for tracing the location of weakly absorbing material permanently present in Saturn's radiation belts. This sensitivity is demonstrated by the identification, for the first time, of the proton absorption signatures from the asteroid-sized Moons Pallene, Anthe and/or their rings. For this reason, we investigate the possibility that the 13 energetic electron events formed at known saturnian rings and the resulting depletions were later displaced radially by one or more magnetospheric processes. Our calculations indicate that the displacement magnitude for several of those signatures is much larger than the one that can be attributed to radial flows imposed by the recently discovered noon-to-midnight electric field in Saturn's inner magnetosphere. This observation is consistent with a mechanism where radial plasma velocities are enhanced near dusty obstacles. Several possibilities are discussed that may explain this observation, including a dust-driven magnetospheric interchange instability, mass loading by the pick-up of nanometer charged dust grains and global magnetospheric electric fields induced by perturbed orbits of charged dust due to the act of solar radiation pressure. Indirect evidence for a global scale interaction

  8. Saturation of the turbulent dynamo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schober, J; Schleicher, D R G; Federrath, C; Bovino, S; Klessen, R S

    2015-08-01

    The origin of strong magnetic fields in the Universe can be explained by amplifying weak seed fields via turbulent motions on small spatial scales and subsequently transporting the magnetic energy to larger scales. This process is known as the turbulent dynamo and depends on the properties of turbulence, i.e., on the hydrodynamical Reynolds number and the compressibility of the gas, and on the magnetic diffusivity. While we know the growth rate of the magnetic energy in the linear regime, the saturation level, i.e., the ratio of magnetic energy to turbulent kinetic energy that can be reached, is not known from analytical calculations. In this paper we present a scale-dependent saturation model based on an effective turbulent resistivity which is determined by the turnover time scale of turbulent eddies and the magnetic energy density. The magnetic resistivity increases compared to the Spitzer value and the effective scale on which the magnetic energy spectrum is at its maximum moves to larger spatial scales. This process ends when the peak reaches a characteristic wave number k☆ which is determined by the critical magnetic Reynolds number. The saturation level of the dynamo also depends on the type of turbulence and differs for the limits of large and small magnetic Prandtl numbers Pm. With our model we find saturation levels between 43.8% and 1.3% for Pm≫1 and between 2.43% and 0.135% for Pm≪1, where the higher values refer to incompressible turbulence and the lower ones to highly compressible turbulence.

  9. Chaotic flows and fast magnetic dynamos

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finn, John M.; Ott, Edward

    1988-01-01

    The kinematic dynamo problem is considered in the R(m) approaching infinity limit. It is shown that the magnetic field tends to concentrate on a zero volume fractal set; moreover, it displays arbitrarily fine-scaled oscillations between parallel and antiparallel directions. Consideration is given to the relationship between the dynamo growth rate and quantitative measures of chaos, such as the Liapunov element and topological entropy.

  10. Heat flux modulation in domino dynamo model

    CERN Document Server

    Reshetnyak, Maxim

    2012-01-01

    Using domino dynamo model we show how variations of the heat flux at the core-mantle boundary change frequency of geomagnetic field reversals. In fact, we are able to demonstrate effect known from the modern 3D planetary dynamo models using ensemble of the interacting spins, which obey equations of the Langevin-type with a random force. We also consider applications to the giant- planets and offer explanations of some specific episodes of the geomagnetic field in the past.

  11. Magnetic field reversals and galactic dynamos

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    We argue that global magnetic field reversals similar to those observed in the Milky Way occur quite frequently in mean-field galactic dynamo models that have relatively strong, random, seed magnetic fields that are localized in discrete regions. The number of reversals decreases to zero with reduction of the seed strength, efficiency of the galactic dynamo and size of the spots of the seed field. A systematic observational search for magnetic field reversals in a representative sample of spi...

  12. Tailoring electron energy distribution functions through energy confinement in dual radio-frequency driven atmospheric pressure plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    O' Neill, C.; Waskoenig, J. [Centre for Plasma Physics, School of Maths and Physics, Queen' s University Belfast, Belfast BT7 1NN (United Kingdom); Gans, T. [Centre for Plasma Physics, School of Maths and Physics, Queen' s University Belfast, Belfast BT7 1NN (United Kingdom); York Plasma Institute, Department of Physics, University of York, York YO10 5DD (United Kingdom)

    2012-10-08

    A multi-scale numerical model based on hydrodynamic equations with semi-kinetic treatment of electrons is used to investigate the influence of dual frequency excitation on the effective electron energy distribution function (EEDF) in a radio-frequency driven atmospheric pressure plasma. It is found that variations of power density, voltage ratio, and phase relationship provide separate control over the electron density and the mean electron energy. This is exploited to directly influence both the phase dependent and time averaged effective EEDF. This enables tailoring the EEDF for enhanced control of non-equilibrium plasma chemical kinetics at ambient pressure and temperature.

  13. Numerical study of secondary electron emission in a coaxial radio-frequency driven plasma jet at atmospheric pressure

    CERN Document Server

    Hemke, Torben; Wollny, Alexander; Brinkmann, Ralf Peter; Mussenbrock, Thomas

    2011-01-01

    In this work we investigate a numerical model of a coaxial RF-driven plasma jet operated at atmospheric pressure. Due to the cylindrical symmetry an adequate 2-D representation of the otherwise 3-dimensional structure is used. A helium-oxygen chemistry reaction scheme is applied. We study the effect of secondary electrons emitted at the inner electrode as well as the inserted dielectric tube and discuss their impact on the discharge behavior. We conclude that a proper choice of materials can improve the desired mode of operation of such plasma jets in terms of materials and surface processing.

  14. Effects of Ions Charge-Mass Ratio on Energy and Energy Spread of Accelerated Ions in Laser Driven Plasma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SANG Hai-Bo; DENG Shi-Qiang; XIE Bai-Song

    2013-01-01

    Effects of ions charge-mass ratio on energy and energy spread of accelerated ions in laser driven plasma are investigated in detail by proposing a simple double-layer model for a foil target driven by an ultrastrong laser.The radiation pressure acceleration mechanism plays an important role on the studied problem.For the ions near the plasma mirror,i.e.electrons layer,the dependence of ions energy on their charge-mass ratio is derived theoretically.It is found that the larger the charge-mass ratio is,the higher the accelerated ions energy gets.For those ions far away from the layer,the dependence of energy and energy spread on ions charge-mass ratio are also obtained by numerical performance.It exhibits that,as ions charge-mass ratio increases,not only the accelerated ions energy but also the energy spread will become large.

  15. Stretch-Twist-Fold and slow filamentary dynamos in liquid sodium Madison Dynamo Experiments

    CERN Document Server

    de Andrade, Garcia

    2009-01-01

    Recently Ricca and Maggione [MHD (2008)] have presented a very simple and interesting model of stretch-twist-fold dynamo in diffusive media based on numerical simulations of Riemannian flux tubes. In this paper we present a yet simpler way of analytically obtaining fast and slow dynamo, generated by by the curvature energy of magnetic filaments in diffusive media. geometrical model for the galactic or accretion disk dynamo in shear flows is presented. In the fast dynamo case it is shown that the absence of stretching leads to the absence of fast dynamos and when torsion of filaments vanishes the dynamo action cannot be support as well. This is the Cowling-Zeldovich theorem for planar flows. Isotropy of the magnetic fields hypothesis is used to compute the fast nature of dynamo. A similar result using non-holonomic Frenet frame has been recently obtained for filamentary dynamos [Garcia de Andrade, AN (2008)]. The stretch-twist-fold (STF) filamented models discussed here may serve to formulate future experiment...

  16. Vehicle Exhaust Gas Clearance by Low Temperature Plasma-Driven Nano-Titanium Dioxide Film Prepared by Radiofrequency Magnetron Sputtering

    OpenAIRE

    Shuang Yu; Yongdong Liang; Shujun Sun; Kai Zhang; Jue Zhang; Jing Fang

    2013-01-01

    A novel plasma-driven catalysis (PDC) reactor with special structure was proposed to remove vehicle exhaust gas. The PDC reactor which consisted of three quartz tubes and two copper electrodes was a coaxial dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) reactor. The inner and outer electrodes firmly surrounded the outer surface of the corresponding dielectric barrier layer in a spiral way, respectively. Nano-titanium dioxide (TiO2) film prepared by radiofrequency (RF) magnetron sputtering was coated on t...

  17. Laser-Driven Ultra-Relativistic Plasmas - Nuclear Fusion in Coulomb Shock Waves, Rouge Waves, and Background Matter

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-05-05

    AND SUBTITLE LASER-DRIVEN ULTRA-RELATIVISTIC PLASMAS - NUCLEAR FUSION IN COULOMB SHOCK WAVES, ROUGE WAVES, AND BACKGROUND MATTER. 5a.  CONTRACT...blackbody radiation on free electrons .........................9 2.vi. Proposal of ultimate test of laser nuclear fusion efficiency in clusters...domain of energies and temperatures, with applications in particular to controlled nuclear fusion . 2. Final technical report on the grant #F49620-11-1

  18. Self-consistent simulations of a von Kármán type dynamo in a spherical domain with metallic walls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guervilly, Céline; Brummell, Nicholas H

    2012-10-01

    We have performed numerical simulations of boundary-driven dynamos using a three-dimensional nonlinear magnetohydrodynamical model in a spherical shell geometry. A conducting fluid of magnetic Prandtl number Pm=0.01 is driven into motion by the counter-rotation of the two hemispheric walls. The resulting flow is of von Kármán type, consisting of a layer of zonal velocity close to the outer wall and a secondary meridional circulation. Above a certain forcing threshold, the mean flow is unstable to non-axisymmetric motions within an equatorial belt. For fixed forcing above this threshold, we have studied the dynamo properties of this flow. The presence of a conducting outer wall is essential to the existence of a dynamo at these parameters. We have therefore studied the effect of changing the material parameters of the wall (magnetic permeability, electrical conductivity, and thickness) on the dynamo. In common with previous studies, we find that dynamos are obtained only when either the conductivity or the permeability is sufficiently large. However, we find that the effect of these two parameters on the dynamo process are different and can even compete to the detriment of the dynamo. Our self-consistent approach allow us to analyze in detail the dynamo feedback loop. The dynamos we obtain are typically dominated by an axisymmetric toroidal magnetic field and an axial dipole component. We show that the ability of the outer shear layer to produce a strong toroidal field depends critically on the presence of a conducting outer wall, which shields the fluid from the vacuum outside. The generation of the axisymmetric poloidal field, on the other hand, occurs in the equatorial belt and does not depend on the wall properties.

  19. Magnetorotational dynamo chimeras. The missing link to turbulent accretion disk dynamo models?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riols, A.; Rincon, F.; Cossu, C.; Lesur, G.; Ogilvie, G. I.; Longaretti, P.-Y.

    2017-02-01

    In Keplerian accretion disks, turbulence and magnetic fields may be jointly excited through a subcritical dynamo mechanisminvolving magnetorotational instability (MRI). This dynamo may notably contribute to explaining the time-variability of various accreting systems, as high-resolution simulations of MRI dynamo turbulence exhibit statistical self-organization into large-scale cyclic dynamics. However, understanding the physics underlying these statistical states and assessing their exact astrophysical relevance is theoretically challenging. The study of simple periodic nonlinear MRI dynamo solutions has recently proven useful in this respect, and has highlighted the role of turbulent magnetic diffusion in the seeming impossibility of a dynamo at low magnetic Prandtl number (Pm), a common regime in disks. Arguably though, these simple laminar structures may not be fully representative of the complex, statistically self-organized states expected in astrophysical regimes. Here, we aim at closing this seeming discrepancy by reporting the numerical discovery of exactly periodic, yet semi-statistical "chimeral MRI dynamo states" which are the organized outcome of a succession of MRI-unstable, non-axisymmetric dynamical stages of different forms and amplitudes. Interestingly, these states, while reminiscent of the statistical complexity of turbulent simulations, involve the same physical principles as simpler laminar cycles, and their analysis further confirms the theory that subcritical turbulent magnetic diffusion impedes the sustainment of an MRI dynamo at low Pm. Overall, chimera dynamo cycles therefore offer an unprecedented dual physical and statistical perspective on dynamos in rotating shear flows, which may prove useful in devising more accurate, yet intuitive mean-field models of time-dependent turbulent disk dynamos. Movies associated to Fig. 1 are available at http://www.aanda.org

  20. A plasma source driven predator-prey like mechanism as a potential cause of spiraling intermittencies in linear plasma devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reiser, D. [Research Center Jülich GmbH, Institute for Energy and Climate Research—Plasma Physics, D-52425 Jülich (Germany); Ohno, N. [Department of Energy Engineering and Science, Graduate School of Engineering, Nagoya University, Furo-cho, Chikusa-ku, Nagoya 464-8603 (Japan); Tanaka, H. [National Institute for Fusion Science, Toki 509-5292 (Japan); Vela, L. [Physics Department, Universidad Carlos III de Madrid, Avda de la Universidad 30, 28911-Leganés, Madrid (Spain)

    2014-03-15

    Three-dimensional global drift fluid simulations are carried out to analyze coherent plasma structures appearing in the NAGDIS-II linear device (nagoya divertor plasma Simulator-II). The numerical simulations reproduce several features of the intermittent spiraling structures observed, for instance, statistical properties, rotation frequency, and the frequency of plasma expulsion. The detailed inspection of the three-dimensional plasma dynamics allows to identify the key mechanism behind the formation of these intermittent events. The resistive coupling between electron pressure and parallel electric field in the plasma source region gives rise to a quasilinear predator-prey like dynamics where the axisymmetric mode represents the prey and the spiraling structure with low azimuthal mode number represents the predator. This interpretation is confirmed by a reduced one-dimensional quasilinear model derived on the basis of the findings in the full three-dimensional simulations. The dominant dynamics reveals certain similarities to the classical Lotka-Volterra cycle.

  1. A plasma source driven predator-prey like mechanism as a potential cause of spiraling intermittencies in linear plasma devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reiser, D.; Ohno, N.; Tanaka, H.; Vela, L.

    2014-03-01

    Three-dimensional global drift fluid simulations are carried out to analyze coherent plasma structures appearing in the NAGDIS-II linear device (nagoya divertor plasma Simulator-II). The numerical simulations reproduce several features of the intermittent spiraling structures observed, for instance, statistical properties, rotation frequency, and the frequency of plasma expulsion. The detailed inspection of the three-dimensional plasma dynamics allows to identify the key mechanism behind the formation of these intermittent events. The resistive coupling between electron pressure and parallel electric field in the plasma source region gives rise to a quasilinear predator-prey like dynamics where the axisymmetric mode represents the prey and the spiraling structure with low azimuthal mode number represents the predator. This interpretation is confirmed by a reduced one-dimensional quasilinear model derived on the basis of the findings in the full three-dimensional simulations. The dominant dynamics reveals certain similarities to the classical Lotka-Volterra cycle.

  2. Magneto-Vortex Dynamo Model in Solar convection zone

    CERN Document Server

    Ershkov, Sergey V

    2011-01-01

    Here is presented a new magneto-vortex dynamo model for modeling & predicting of a processes in Solar plasma convection zone. Solar convection zone is located above the level r > 0,6-0,7 R, where R is a Solar radius. A key feature of such a model is that equation of Solar plasma motion as well as equation of magnetic fields evolution - are reduced to Helmholtz's vortex equation, which is up-graded in according with alpha-effect (Coriolis force forms an additional vorticity field or magnetic field due to Sun's differential rotation). Such an additional vorticity or magnetic field are proved to be concentrated at the proper belt in Solar convection zone under the influence of Coriolis force (at the middle latitudes of the Sun in respect to equator). Besides, such an an additional vorticity & magnetic fields are to be the basic sources of well-known phenomena "Maunder's butterfly" diagram.

  3. Inductively Driven, 3D Liner Compression of a Magnetized Plasma to Megabar Energy Densities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Slough, John [MSNW LLC, Redmond, WA (United States)

    2015-02-01

    To take advantage of the smaller scale, higher density regime of fusion an efficient method for achieving the compressional heating required to reach fusion gain conditions must be found. What is proposed is a more flexible metallic liner compression scheme that minimizes the kinetic energy required to reach fusion. It is believed that it is possible to accomplish this at sub-megajoule energies. This however will require operation at very small scale. To have a realistic hope of inexpensive, repetitive operation, it is essential to have the liner kinetic energy under a megajoule which allows for the survivability of the vacuum and power systems. At small scale the implosion speed must be reasonably fast to maintain the magnetized plasma (FRC) equilibrium during compression. For limited liner kinetic energy, it becomes clear that the thinnest liner imploded to the smallest radius consistent with the requirements for FRC equilibrium lifetime is desired. The proposed work is directed toward accomplishing this goal. Typically an axial (Z) current is employed for liner compression. There are however several advantages to using a θ-pinch coil. With the θ-pinch the liner currents are inductively driven which greatly simplifies the apparatus and vacuum system, and avoids difficulties with the post implosion vacuum integrity. With fractional flux leakage, the foil liner automatically provides for the seed axial compression field. To achieve it with optimal switching techniques, and at an accelerated pace however will require additional funding. This extra expense is well justified as the compression technique that will be enabled by this funding is unique in the ability to implode individual segments of the liner at different times. This is highly advantageous as the liner can be imploded in a manner that maximizes the energy transfer to the FRC. Production of shaped liner implosions for additional axial compression can thus be readily accomplished with the modified power

  4. Investigation of heavy ions diffusion under the influence of current-driven mechanism and compositional waves in plasma

    CERN Document Server

    Urpin, Vadim

    2016-01-01

    We consider diffusion caused by a combined influence of the Hall effect and electric currents, and argue that such diffusion forms chemical inhomogeneities in plasma. The considered mechanism can be responsible for the formation of element spots in laboratory and astrophysical plasmas. Such current-driven diffusion can be accompanied by the propagation of a particular type of waves which have not been considered earlier. In these waves, the impurity number density oscillare alone and their frequency is determined by the electric currents and sort of impurity ions. These compositional waves exist if the magnetic pressure in plasma is much greater than the gas pressure. Such waves lead to local variations of chemical composition and, hence, can manifest themselves by variations of the emission in spectral lines.

  5. Constraining Fully Convective Magnetic Dynamos using Brown Dwarf Auroral Radio Emission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kao, Melodie; Hallinan, Gregg; Pineda, J. Sebastian; Escala, Ivanna; Burgasser, Adam; Bourke, Stephen; Stevenson, David

    2017-05-01

    An important outstanding problem in dynamo theory is understanding how magnetic fields are generated and sustained in fully convective objects, spanning stars through planets. For fully convective dynamo models to accurately predict exoplanet magnetic fields, pushing measurements to include the coolest T and Y dwarfs at the substellar-planetary boundary is critical. A number of models for possible dynamo mechanisms in this regime have been proposed but constraining data on magnetic field strengths and topologies across a wide range of mass, age, rotation rate, and temperature are sorely lacking, particularly in the brown dwarf regime.Detections of highly circularly polarized pulsed radio emission provide our only window into magnetic field measurements for objects in the ultracool brown dwarf regime. However, these detections are very rare; previous radio surveys encompassing ∼60 L6 or later targets have yielded only one detection. We have developed a selection strategy for biasing survey targets by leveraging the emergence of magnetic activity that is driven by planet-like auroral processes in the coolest brown dwarfs. Using our selection strategy, we previously observed six late L and T dwarfs with the Jansky Very Large Array (VLA) at 4-8 GHz and detected the presence of highly circularly polarized radio emission for five targets. Our initial detections provided the most robust constraints on dynamo theory in this regime, confirming magnetic fields >2.5 kG. To further probe the mechanisms driving fully convective dynamos at the substellar-planetary boundary, we present magnetic field constraints for two Y-dwarfs and 8-12 GHz radio observations of late L and T dwarfs corresponding to >3.6 kG surface fields. We additionally present initial results for a comprehensive L and T dwarf survey spanning a wide range of rotation periods to test rotation-dominated dynamo models. Finally, we present a method for comparing magnetic field measurements derived from

  6. RF Pre-Ionization to Create Faster, Hotter MHD-Driven Jets and Studies of Plasma Expansion Into a Vacuum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaplin, Vernon; Bellan, Paul

    2013-10-01

    We are studying MHD-driven jets relevant to astrophysical jets and fusion plasmas. Previous experiments at Caltech have focused on plasmas created by breaking down neutral gas using high voltage. The Paschen breakdown criterion governing this process sets an undesirable lower limit for the jet density. To overcome this constraint, we have developed a pre-ionization system powered by a pulsed, battery-powered, 3 kW 13.56 MHz RF amplifier. Pre-ionization of plasma in a tube behind the jet experiment's center electrode is expected to enable the formation of lower density, hotter, faster jets. Thus far, argon jets have been created with v >30 km/s, twice as fast as was previously achievable. The expansion of the RF plasma into the chamber prior to the discharge of the main capacitor bank involves surprisingly complex dynamics. There are two phases: initially plasma expansion along the background magnetic field is inhibited and the primary source of emission away from the RF antenna appears to be neutral atoms excited by fast electrons or photons from the RF source. At a later time, either before or after RF turn-off depending on the magnetic field configuration, a relatively high density (ne >1018 m-3) , cold (Te < 0.5 eV) cloud of plasma emerges from the source tube.

  7. Diagnostics of an AC driven atmospheric pressure non-thermal plasma jet and its use for radially directed jet array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, W.; Wang, R.

    2017-08-01

    An alternating current atmospheric pressure plasma jet is generated with noble gas or noble gas/oxygen admixture as working gas. A "core plasma filament" is observed at the center of the dielectric tube and extends to the plasma jet at higher peak-to-peak voltages. This type of plasma jet is believed to be of the same nature with the reported plasma bullet driven by pulsed DC power sources. Double current probes are used to assess the speed of the plasma bullet and show that the speed is around 104-105 m/s. The time dependence of the downstream bullet speed is attributed to the gas heating and in turn the increase of the reduced electric field E/N. Optical emission spectra show the dependence of helium and oxygen emission intensities on the concentration of oxygen additive in the carrier gas, with peak values found at 0.5% O2. Multiple radial jets are realized on dielectric tubes of different sizes. As a case study, one of these multi-jet devices is used to treat B. aureus on the inner surface of a plastic beaker and is shown to be more effective than a single jet.

  8. Multicolored Dynamos on Toroidal Meshes

    CERN Document Server

    Brunetti, Sara; Quattrociocchi, Walter

    2010-01-01

    Detecting on a graph the presence of the minimum number of nodes (target set) that will be able to "activate" a prescribed number of vertices in the graph is called the target set selection problem (TSS) proposed by Kempe, Kleinberg, and Tardos. In TSS's settings, nodes have two possible states (active or non-active) and the threshold triggering the activation of a node is given by the number of its active neighbors. Dealing with fault tolerance in a majority based system the two possible states are used to denote faulty or non-faulty nodes, and the threshold is given by the state of the majority of neighbors. Here, the major effort was in determining the distribution of initial faults leading the entire system to a faulty behavior. Such an activation pattern, also known as dynamic monopoly (or shortly dynamo), was introduced by Peleg in 1996. In this paper we extend the TSS problem's settings by representing nodes' states with a "multicolored" set. The extended version of the problem can be described as foll...

  9. Laer Pulse Driven THz Generation via Resonant Transition Radiation in Inhomogeneous Plasmas

    CERN Document Server

    Miao, Chenlong; Antonsen, Thomas M

    2016-01-01

    An intense, short laser pulse propagating across a plasma boundary ponderomotively drives THz radiation. Full format PIC simulations and theoretical analysis are conducted to investigate the properties of this radiation. Simulation results show the THz emission originates in regions of varying density and covers a broad spectrum with maximum frequency close to the maximum plasma frequency. In the case of a sharp vacuum-plasma boundary, the radiation is generated symmetrically at the plasma entrance and exit, and its properties are independent of plasma density when the density exceeds a characteristic value determined by the product of the plasma frequency and the laser pulse duration. For a diffuse vacuum-plasma boundary, the emission from the plasma entrance and exit is asymmetric: increasing and decreasing density ramps enhance and diminish the radiated energy respectively. Enhancements by factors of 50 are found and simulations show that a 1.66 J, 50 fs driver pulse can generate ~400 \\mu J of THz radiatio...

  10. Statistical Tests of Galactic Dynamo Theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chamandy, Luke; Shukurov, Anvar; Taylor, A. Russ

    2016-12-01

    Mean-field galactic dynamo theory is the leading theory to explain the prevalence of regular magnetic fields in spiral galaxies, but its systematic comparison with observations is still incomplete and fragmentary. Here we compare predictions of mean-field dynamo models to observational data on magnetic pitch angle and the strength of the mean magnetic field. We demonstrate that a standard {α }2{{Ω }} dynamo model produces pitch angles of the regular magnetic fields of nearby galaxies that are reasonably consistent with available data. The dynamo estimates of the magnetic field strength are generally within a factor of a few of the observational values. Reasonable agreement between theoretical and observed pitch angles generally requires the turbulent correlation time τ to be in the range of 10-20 {Myr}, in agreement with standard estimates. Moreover, good agreement also requires that the ratio of the ionized gas scale height to root-mean-square turbulent velocity increases with radius. Our results thus widen the possibilities to constrain interstellar medium parameters using observations of magnetic fields. This work is a step toward systematic statistical tests of galactic dynamo theory. Such studies are becoming more and more feasible as larger data sets are acquired using current and up-and-coming instruments.

  11. Physical processes of driven magnetic reconnection in collisionless plasmas: Zero guide field case

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, C. Z.; Inoue, S.; Ono, Y.; Horiuchi, R.

    2015-10-01

    The key physical processes of the electron and ion dynamics, the structure of the electric and magnetic fields, and how particles gain energy in the driven magnetic reconnection in collisionless plasmas for the zero guide field case are presented. The key kinetic physics is the decoupling of electron and ion dynamics around the magnetic reconnection region, where the magnetic field is reversed and the electron and ion orbits are meandering, and around the separatrix region, where electrons move mainly along the field line and ions move mainly across the field line. The decoupling of the electron and ion dynamics causes charge separation to produce a pair of in-plane bipolar converging electrostatic electric field ( E→ e s ) pointing toward the neutral sheet in the magnetic field reversal region and the monopolar E→ e s around the separatrix region. A pair of electron jets emanating from the reconnection current layer generate the quadrupole out-of-plane magnetic field, which causes the parallel electric field ( E→ || ) from E→ i n d to accelerate particles along the magnetic field. We explain the electron and ion dynamics and their velocity distributions and flow structures during the time-dependent driven reconnection as they move from the upstream to the downstream. In particular, we address the following key physics issues: (1) the decoupling of electron and ion dynamics due to meandering orbits around the field reversal region and the generation of a pair of converging bipolar electrostatic electric field ( E→ e s ) around the reconnection region; (2) the slowdown of electron and ion inflow velocities due to acceleration/deceleration of electrons and ions by E→ e s as they move across the neutral sheet; (3) how the reconnection current layer is enhanced and how the orbit meandering particles are accelerated inside the reconnection region by E→ i n d ; (4) why the electron outflow velocity from the reconnection region reaches super-Alfvenic speed

  12. Numerical simulation of Martian historical dynamo: Impact of the Rayleigh number on the dynamo state

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG TianYuan; KUANG WeiJia; MA ShiZhuang

    2009-01-01

    The observed Mars remnant magnetism suggests that there was an active dynamo in the Martian core.We use the MoSST core dynamics model to simulate the Martian historical dynamo,focusing on the variation of the dynamo states with the Rayleigh number Ra (a non-dimensional parameter describing the buoyancy force in the core).Our numerical results show that the mean field length scale does not vary monotonically with the Rayleigh number,and the field morphology at the core mantle boundary changes with Rayleigh number.In particular,it drifts westward with a speed decreasing with Rayleigh number.

  13. Numerical simulation of Martian historical dynamo:Impact of the Rayleigh number on the dynamo state

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    The observed Mars remnant magnetism suggests that there was an active dynamo in the Martian core. We use the MoSST core dynamics model to simulate the Martian historical dynamo, focusing on the variation of the dynamo states with the Rayleigh number Ra (a non-dimensional parameter describing the buoyancy force in the core). Our numerical results show that the mean field length scale does not vary monotonically with the Rayleigh number, and the field morphology at the core mantle boundary changes with Rayleigh number. In particular, it drifts westward with a speed decreasing with Rayleigh number.

  14. Problems and Progress in Astrophysical Dynamos

    CERN Document Server

    Vishniac, E T; Cho, J

    2002-01-01

    Astrophysical objects with negligible resistivity are often threaded by large scale magnetic fields. The generation of these fields is somewhat mysterious, since a magnetic field in a perfectly conducting fluid cannot change the flux threading a fluid element, or the field topology. Classical dynamo theory evades this limit by assuming that magnetic reconnection is fast, even for vanishing resistivity, and that the large scale field can be generated by the action of kinetic helicity. Both these claims have been severely criticized, and the latter appears to conflict with strong theoretical arguments based on magnetic helicity conservation and a series of numerical simulations. Here we discuss recent efforts to explain fast magnetic reconnection through the topological effects of a weak stochastic magnetic field component. We also show how mean-field dynamo theory can be recast in a form which respects magnetic helicity conservation, and how this changes our understanding of astrophysical dynamos. Finally, we ...

  15. Towards understanding dynamo action in M dwarfs

    CERN Document Server

    Shulyak, D; Kitchatinov, L; Moss, D

    2015-01-01

    Recent progress in observational studies of magnetic activity in M dwarfs urgently requires support from ideas of stellar dynamo theory. We propose a strategy to connect observational and theoretical studies. In particular, we suggest four magnetic configurations that appear relevant to dwarfs from the viewpoint of the most conservative version of dynamo theory, and discuss observational tests to identify the configurations observationally. As expected, any such identification contains substantial uncertainties. However the situation in general looks less pessimistic than might be expected. Several identifications between the phenomenology of individual stars and dynamo models are suggested. Remarkably, all models discussed predict substantial surface magnetic activity at rather high stellar latitudes. This prediction looks unexpected from the viewpoint of our experience observing the Sun (which of course differs in some fundamental ways from these late-type dwarfs). We stress that a fuller understanding of t...

  16. Magnetic Field Amplification via Protostellar Disc Dynamos

    CERN Document Server

    Dyda, Sergei; Ustyugova, Galina V; Koldoba, Alexander V; Wasserman, Ira

    2015-01-01

    We model the generation of a magnetic field in a protostellar disc using an \\alpha-dynamo and perform axisymmetric magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) simulations of a T Tauri star. We find that for small values of the dimensionless dynamo parameter $\\alpha_d$ the poloidal field grows exponentially at a rate ${\\sigma} \\propto {\\Omega}_K \\sqrt{\\alpha_d}$ , before saturating to a value $\\propto \\sqrt{\\alpha_d}$ . The dynamo excites dipole and octupole modes, but quadrupole modes are suppressed, because of the symmetries of the seed field. Initial seed fields too weak to launch MHD outflows are found to grow sufficiently to launch winds with observationally relevant mass fluxes of order $10^{-9} M_{\\odot}/\\rm{yr}$ for T Tauri stars. For large values of $\\alpha_d$ magnetic loops are generated over the entire disc. These quickly come to dominate the disc dynamics and cause the disc to break up due to the magnetic pressure.

  17. Dynamo Models of the Solar Cycle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charbonneau Paul

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper reviews recent advances and current debates in modeling the solar cycle as a hydromagnetic dynamo process. Emphasis is placed on (relatively simple dynamo models that are nonetheless detailed enough to be comparable to solar cycle observations. After a brief overview of the dynamo problem and of key observational constraints, we begin by reviewing the various magnetic field regeneration mechanisms that have been proposed in the solar context. We move on to a presentation and critical discussion of extant solar cycle models based on these mechanisms. We then turn to the origin of fluctuations in these models, including amplitude and parity modulation, chaotic behavior, and intermittency. The paper concludes with a discussion of our current state of ignorance regarding various key questions, the most pressing perhaps being the identification of the physical mechanism(s responsible for the generation of the Sun's poloidal magnetic field component.

  18. Shear dynamo problem: Quasilinear kinematic theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sridhar, S; Subramanian, Kandaswamy

    2009-04-01

    Large-scale dynamo action due to turbulence in the presence of a linear shear flow is studied. Our treatment is quasilinear and kinematic but is nonperturbative in the shear strength. We derive the integrodifferential equation for the evolution of the mean magnetic field by systematic use of the shearing coordinate transformation and the Galilean invariance of the linear shear flow. For nonhelical turbulence the time evolution of the cross-shear components of the mean field does not depend on any other components excepting themselves. This is valid for any Galilean-invariant velocity field, independent of its dynamics. Hence the shear-current assisted dynamo is essentially absent, although large-scale nonhelical dynamo action is not ruled out.

  19. The Shear Dynamo: quasilinear kinematic theory

    CERN Document Server

    Sridhar, S

    2008-01-01

    Large--scale dynamo action due to turbulence in the presence of a linear shear flow is studied. Our treatment is quasilinear and kinematic but is non perturbative in the strength of the background shear. We derive expressions for the turbulent transport coefficients of the mean magnetic field, by systematic use of the shearing coordinate transformation and the Galilean invariance of the linear shear flow. We prove that, for non helical turbulence, the equation governing the time evolution of the cross shear component of the mean magnetic field is closed, in the sense that it is independent of the other two components. This result is valid for any Galilean--invariant velocity field, independent of its dynamics. Thus we find the shear--current assisted dynamo is essentially absent, although large--scale non helical dynamo action is not ruled out.

  20. Mean-field magnetohydrodynamics and dynamo theory

    CERN Document Server

    Krause, F

    2013-01-01

    Mean-Field Magnetohydrodynamics and Dynamo Theory provides a systematic introduction to mean-field magnetohydrodynamics and the dynamo theory, along with the results achieved. Topics covered include turbulence and large-scale structures; general properties of the turbulent electromotive force; homogeneity, isotropy, and mirror symmetry of turbulent fields; and turbulent electromotive force in the case of non-vanishing mean flow. The turbulent electromotive force in the case of rotational mean motion is also considered. This book is comprised of 17 chapters and opens with an overview of the gen

  1. What is a large-scale dynamo?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nigro, G.; Pongkitiwanichakul, P.; Cattaneo, F.; Tobias, S. M.

    2017-01-01

    We consider kinematic dynamo action in a sheared helical flow at moderate to high values of the magnetic Reynolds number (Rm). We find exponentially growing solutions which, for large enough shear, take the form of a coherent part embedded in incoherent fluctuations. We argue that at large Rm large-scale dynamo action should be identified by the presence of structures coherent in time, rather than those at large spatial scales. We further argue that although the growth rate is determined by small-scale processes, the period of the coherent structures is set by mean-field considerations.

  2. Spectral gaps, inertial manifolds and kinematic dynamos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nunez, Manuel [Departamento de Analisis Matematico, Universidad de Valladolid, 47005 Valladolid (Spain)]. E-mail: mnjmhd@am.uva.es

    2005-10-17

    Inertial manifolds are desirable objects when ones wishes a dynamical process to behave asymptotically as a finite-dimensional ones. Recently [Physica D 194 (2004) 297] these manifolds are constructed for the kinematic dynamo problem with time-periodic velocity. It turns out, however, that the conditions imposed on the fluid velocity to guarantee the existence of inertial manifolds are too demanding, in the sense that they imply that all the solutions tend exponentially to zero. The inertial manifolds are meaningful because they represent different decay rates, but the classical dynamos where the magnetic field is maintained or grows are not covered by this approach, at least until more refined estimates are found.

  3. Higher helicity invariants and solar dynamo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sokolov, D. D.; Illarionov, E. A.; Akhmet'ev, P. M.

    2017-01-01

    Modern models of nonlinear dynamo saturation in celestial bodies (specifically, on the Sun) are largely based on the consideration of the balance of magnetic helicity. This physical variable has also a topological meaning: it is associated with the linking coefficient of magnetic tubes. In addition to magnetic helicity, magnetohydrodynamics has a number of topological integrals of motion (the so-called higher helicity moments). We have compared these invariants with magnetic helicity properties and concluded that they can hardly serve as nonlinear constraints on dynamo action.

  4. Plasma Formation and Evolution on Cu, Al, Ti, and Ni Surfaces Driven by a Mega-Ampere Current Pulse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yates, Kevin C.

    Metal alloy mm-diameter rods have been driven by a 1-MA, 100-ns current pulse from the Zebra z-pinch. The intense current produces megagauss surface magnetic fields that diffuse into the load, ohmically heating the metal until plasma forms. Because the radius is much thicker than the skin depth, the magnetic field reaches a much higher value than around a thin-wire load. With the "barbell" load design, plasma formation in the region of interest due to contact arcing or electron avalanche is avoided, allowing for the study of ohmically heated loads. Work presented here will show first evidence of a magnetic field threshold for plasma formation in copper 101, copper 145, titanium, and nickel, and compare with previous work done with aluminum. Copper alloys 101 and 145, titanium grade II, and nickel alloy 200 form plasma when the surface magnetic field reaches 3.5, 3.0, 2.2, and 2.6 megagauss, respectively. Varying the element metal, as well as the alloy, changes multiple physical properties of the load and affects the evolution of the surface material through the multiple phase changes. Similarities and differences between these metals will be presented, giving motivation for continued work with different material loads. During the current rise, the metal is heated to temperatures that cause multiple phase changes. When the surface magnetic field reaches a threshold, the metal ionizes and the plasma becomes pinched against the underlying cooler, dense material. Diagnostics fielded have included visible light radiometry, two-frame shadowgraphy (266 and 532 nm wavelengths), time-gated EUV spectroscopy, single-frame/2ns gated imaging, and multi-frame/4ns gated imaging with an intensified CCD camera (ICCD). Surface temperature, expansion speeds, instability growth, time of plasma formation, and plasma uniformity are determined from the data. The time-period of potential plasma formation is scrutinized to understand if and when plasma forms on the surface of a heated

  5. A One-Dimensional Hybrid Simulation of DC/RF Combined Driven Capacitive Plasma%A One-Dimensional Hybrid Simulation of DC/RF Combined Driven Capacitive Plasma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王帅; 徐翔; 王友年

    2012-01-01

    We developed a one-dimensional hybrid model to simulate the DC/RF combined driven capacitively coupled plasma for argon discharges. The numerical results are used to analyze the influence of the DC source on the plasma density distribution, ion energy distributions (IEDs) and ion angle distributions (IADs) on both the RF and DC electrodes. The increase in DC voltage drives more high-energy ions to the electrode applied to the DC source, which makes the IEDs at the DC electrode shift towards higher energy, and the peaks in the IADs shift towards small angle regions. At the same time, it also decreases the ion energy at the RF electrode and enlarges the incident angles of the ions, which strike the RF electrode.

  6. DC-driven plasma gun: self-oscillatory operation mode of atmospheric-pressure helium plasma jet comprised of repetitive streamer breakdowns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xingxing; Shashurin, Alexey

    2017-02-01

    This paper presents and studies helium atmospheric pressure plasma jet comprised of a series of repetitive streamer breakdowns, which is driven by pure DC high voltage (self-oscillatory behavior). The repetition frequency of the breakdowns is governed by the geometry of discharge electrodes/surroundings and gas flow rate. Each next streamer is initiated when the electric field on the anode tip recovers after the previous breakdown and reaches the breakdown threshold value of about 2.5 kV cm-1. One type of the helium plasma gun designed using this operational principle is demonstrated. The gun operates on about 3 kV DC high voltage and is comprised of the series of the repetitive streamer breakdowns at a frequency of about 13 kHz.

  7. Generation of high-power electromagnetic radiation by a beam-driven plasma antenna

    Science.gov (United States)

    Annenkov, V. V.; Volchok, E. P.; Timofeev, I. V.

    2016-04-01

    In this paper we study how efficiently electromagnetic radiation can be generated by a relativistic electron beam with a gigawatt power level during its injection into a thin magnetized plasma. It is shown that, if the transverse beam and plasma size is compared with the radiation wavelength and the plasma density is modulated along the magnetic field, such a beam-plasma system can radiate electromagnetic waves via the antenna mechanism. We propose a theoretical model describing generation of electromagnetic waves by this plasma antenna and calculate its main radiation characteristics. In the two-dimensional case theoretical predictions on the radiation efficiency are shown to be confirmed by the results of particle-in-cell simulations, and the three-dimensional variant of this theory is used to estimate the peak power of sub-terahertz radiation that can be achieved in beam-plasma experiments in mirror traps.

  8. Dynamo transition in a five-mode helical model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Rohit; Wahi, Pankaj

    2017-09-01

    We construct a five-mode helical dynamo model containing three velocity and two magnetic modes and solve it analytically. This model exhibits dynamo transition via supercritical pitchfork bifurcation. We show that the critical magnetic Reynolds number for dynamo transition (Rmc) asymptotes to constant values for very low and very high magnetic Prandtl numbers (Pm). Beyond dynamo transition, secondary bifurcations lead to periodic, quasi-periodic, and chaotic dynamo states as the forcing amplitude is increased and chaos appears through a quasi-periodic route.

  9. A fibre based triature interferometer for measuring rapidly evolving, ablatively driven plasma densities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macdonald, J.; Bland, S. N.; Threadgold, J.

    2015-08-01

    We report on the first use of a fibre interferometer incorporating triature analysis for measuring rapidly evolving plasma densities of ne ˜ 1013/cm3 and above, such as those produced by simple coaxial plasma guns. The resultant system is extremely portable, easy to field in experiments, relatively cheap to produce, and—with the exception of a small open area in which the plasma is sampled—safe in operation as all laser light is enclosed.

  10. Electron properties and air mixing in radio frequency driven argon plasma jets at atmospheric pressure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gessel, Bram van; Bruggeman, Peter [Department of Applied Physics, Eindhoven University of Technology, PO Box 513, 5600 MB Eindhoven (Netherlands); Brandenburg, Ronny [Department of Applied Physics, Eindhoven University of Technology, PO Box 513, 5600 MB Eindhoven (Netherlands); Leibniz Institute for Plasma Science and Technology (INP Greifswald), Felix-Hausdorff-Str. 2, D-17489 Greifswald (Germany)

    2013-08-05

    A time modulated radio frequency (RF) plasma jet operated with an Ar mixture is investigated by measuring the electron density and electron temperature using Thomson scattering. The measurements have been performed spatially resolved for two different electrode configurations and as a function of the plasma dissipated power and air concentration admixed to the Ar. Time resolved measurements of electron densities and temperatures during the RF cycle and after plasma power switch-off are presented. Furthermore, the influence of the plasma on the air entrainment into the effluent is studied using Raman scattering.

  11. Strategies for Observing Self-excitation in the Madison Dynamo Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, N. Z.; Kaplan, E. J.; Kendrick, R. D.; Nornberg, M. D.; Rahbarnia, K.; Rasmus, A. M.; Forest, C. B.; Spence, E. J.

    2010-11-01

    In the Madison Dynamo Experiment(MDE) two counter-rotating impellers drive a turbulent flow of liquid sodium in a one meter-diameter sphere. One of the goals of the experiment is to observe the spontaneous generation of magnetic field. Initial runs of the MDE saw intermittent bursts of a transverse dipole field similar to the induced field predicted by laminar kinematics, but no sustained self-excited field was observed. This poster will present recent results from the MDE after an equatorial baffle was installed to stabilize the position of the shear layer between the two counterrotating hemispheres and to help in the reduction of of large-scale turbulence and the motors were run up to maximum power. Required motor power indicates that the baffle has decreased the amount of turbulence in the flow. When run up to full power still no self-excited dynamo was observed, but there was significant amplification of the transverse dipole field with extended decay rates indicating we may be approaching the dynamo threshold. Future modifications to the experiment will also be presented exploring a subcritical dynamo transition by supplying a sufficiently strong magnetic field and the addition of poloidal baffles to optimize the helicity of the mean flow. This work is supported by the NSF/DOE partnership in plasma physics.

  12. A comparison between grid and particle methods on the small-scale dynamo in magnetised supersonic turbulence

    CERN Document Server

    Tricco, Terrence S; Federrath, Christoph

    2016-01-01

    We perform a comparison between the smoothed particle magnetohydrodynamics (SPMHD) code, Phantom, and the Eulerian grid-based code, Flash, on the small-scale turbulent dynamo in driven, Mach 10 turbulence. We show, for the first time, that the exponential growth and saturation of an initially weak magnetic field via the small-scale dynamo can be successfully reproduced with SPMHD. The two codes agree on the behaviour of the magnetic energy spectra, the saturation level of magnetic energy, and the distribution of magnetic field strengths during the growth and saturation phases. The main difference is that the dynamo growth rate, and its dependence on resolution, differs between the codes, caused by differences in the numerical dissipation and shock capturing schemes leading to differences in the effective Prandtl number in Phantom and Flash.

  13. Limited role of spectra in dynamo theory: coherent versus random dynamos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tobias, Steven M; Cattaneo, Fausto

    2008-09-19

    We discuss the importance of phase information and coherence times in determining the dynamo properties of turbulent flows. We compare the kinematic dynamo properties of three flows with the same energy spectrum. The first flow is dominated by coherent structures with nontrivial phase information and long eddy coherence times, the second has random phases and long-coherence time, the third has nontrivial phase information, but short coherence time. We demonstrate that the first flow is the most efficient kinematic dynamo, owing to the presence of sustained stretching and constructive folding. We argue that these results place limitations on the possible inferences of the dynamo properties of flows from the use of spectra alone, and that the role of coherent structures must always be accounted for.

  14. Inductively Driven, 3D Liner Compression of a Magnetized Plasma to Megabar Energy Densities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Slough, John [MSNW LLC, Redmond, WA (United States)

    2015-02-01

    To take advantage of the smaller scale, higher density regime of fusion an efficient method for achieving the compressional heating required to reach fusion gain conditions must be found. What is proposed is a more flexible metallic liner compression scheme that minimizes the kinetic energy required to reach fusion. It is believed that it is possible to accomplish this at sub-megajoule energies. This however will require operation at very small scale. To have a realistic hope of inexpensive, repetitive operation, it is essential to have the liner kinetic energy under a megajoule which allows for the survivability of the vacuum and power systems. At small scale the implosion speed must be reasonably fast to maintain the magnetized plasma (FRC) equilibrium during compression. For limited liner kinetic energy, it becomes clear that the thinnest liner imploded to the smallest radius consistent with the requirements for FRC equilibrium lifetime is desired. The proposed work is directed toward accomplishing this goal. Typically an axial (Z) current is employed for liner compression. There are however several advantages to using a θ-pinch coil. With the θ-pinch the liner currents are inductively driven which greatly simplifies the apparatus and vacuum system, and avoids difficulties with the post implosion vacuum integrity. With fractional flux leakage, the foil liner automatically provides for the seed axial compression field. To achieve it with optimal switching techniques, and at an accelerated pace however will require additional funding. This extra expense is well justified as the compression technique that will be enabled by this funding is unique in the ability to implode individual segments of the liner at different times. This is highly advantageous as the liner can be imploded in a manner that maximizes the energy transfer to the FRC. Production of shaped liner implosions for additional axial compression can thus be readily accomplished with the modified power

  15. Photoelectron Emission from Metal Surfaces Induced by VUV-emission of Filament Driven Hydrogen Arc Discharge Plasma

    CERN Document Server

    Laulainen, J; Koivisto, H; Komppula, J; Tarvainen, O

    2015-01-01

    Photoelectron emission measurements have been performed using a filament-driven multi-cusp arc discharge volume production H^- ion source (LIISA). It has been found that photoelectron currents obtained with Al, Cu, Mo, Ta and stainless steel (SAE 304) are on the same order of magnitude. The photoelectron currents depend linearly on the discharge power. It is shown experimentally that photoelectron emission is significant only in the short wavelength range of hydrogen spectrum due to the energy dependence of the quantum efficiency. It is estimated from the measured data that the maximum photoelectron flux from plasma chamber walls is on the order of 1 A per kW of discharge power.

  16. Photoelectron emission from metal surfaces induced by VUV-emission of filament driven hydrogen arc discharge plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laulainen, J.; Kalvas, T.; Koivisto, H.; Komppula, J.; Tarvainen, O.

    2015-04-01

    Photoelectron emission measurements have been performed using a filament-driven multi-cusp arc discharge volume production H- ion source (LIISA). It has been found that photoelectron currents obtained with Al, Cu, Mo, Ta and stainless steel (SAE 304) are on the same order of magnitude. The photoelectron currents depend linearly on the discharge power. It is shown experimentally that photoelectron emission is significant only in the short wavelength range of hydrogen spectrum due to the energy dependence of the quantum efficiency. It is estimated from the measured data that the maximum photoelectron flux from plasma chamber walls is on the order of 1 A per kW of discharge power.

  17. Plasma-Jet-Driven Magneto-Inertial Fusion (PJMIF): Physics and Design for a Plasma Liner Formation Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Scott; Cassibry, Jason; Witherspoon, F. Douglas

    2014-10-01

    Spherically imploding plasma liners are a potential standoff compression driver for magneto-inertial fusion, which is a hybrid of and operates in an intermediate density between those of magnetic and inertial fusion. We propose to use an array of merging supersonic plasma jets to form a spherically imploding plasma liner. The jets are to be formed by pulsed coaxial guns with contoured electrodes that are placed sufficiently far from the location of target compression such that no hardware is repetitively destroyed. As such, the repetition rate can be higher (e.g., 1 Hz) and ultimately the power-plant economics can be more attractive than most other MIF approaches. During the R&D phase, a high experimental shot rate at reasonably low cost (e.g., gun plasma-liner-formation experiment, which will provide experimental data on: (i) scaling of peak liner ram pressure versus initial jet parameters, (ii) liner non-uniformity characterization and control, and (iii) control of liner profiles for eventual gain optimization.

  18. Configuration Design of Novel Manually Operated Dynamo Flashlights

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Hong-Sen; Wang, Hsin-Te

    This paper synthesizes novel configurations of manually operated dynamo flashlights. Topology and motion characteristics of existing gear dynamos are modified and concluded. The structural sketches and corresponding graph representations for gear trains and dynamos with the defined induced magnetic circuits are defined. Through the concepts of generalization and specialization, the atlas of the structural sketches and graphs of the embedded gear dynamos is obtained subject to the defined design requirements and constraints. And, a systematic approach is proposed to synthesize the novel mechanisms of the embedded gear dynamos. As a result, the embedded three-link and four-link gear dynamos have 12 and 24 novel design configurations, respectively. One prototype of the embedded three-link and another of the embedded four-link gear dynamo are built.

  19. Kinematic dynamo action in square and hexagonal patterns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Favier, B; Proctor, M R E

    2013-11-01

    We consider kinematic dynamo action in rapidly rotating Boussinesq convection just above onset. The velocity is constrained to have either a square or a hexagonal pattern. For the square pattern, large-scale dynamo action is observed at onset, with most of the magnetic energy being contained in the horizontally averaged component. As the magnetic Reynolds number increases, small-scale dynamo action becomes possible, reducing the overall growth rate of the dynamo. For the hexagonal pattern, the breaking of symmetry between up and down flows results in an effective pumping velocity. For intermediate rotation rates, this additional effect can prevent the growth of any mean-field dynamo, so that only a small-scale dynamo is eventually possible at large enough magnetic Reynolds number. For very large rotation rates, this pumping term becomes negligible, and the dynamo properties of square and hexagonal patterns are qualitatively similar. These results hold for both perfectly conducting and infinite magnetic permeability boundary conditions.

  20. Dielectric permittivity tensor and low frequency instabilities of a magnetoactive current-driven plasma with nonextensive distribution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Niknam, A. R., E-mail: a-niknam@sbu.ac.ir [Laser and Plasma Research Institute, Shahid Beheshti University, G.C., Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Rastbood, E.; Khorashadizadeh, S. M. [Physics Department, University of Birjand, Birjand (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2015-12-15

    The dielectric permittivity tensor of a magnetoactive current-driven plasma is obtained by employing the kinetic theory based on the Vlasov equation and Lorentz transformation formulas with an emphasize on the q-nonextensive statistics. By deriving the q-generalized dispersion relation of the low frequency modes in this plasma system, the possibility and properties of filamentation and ion acoustic instabilities are then studied. It is shown that the occurrence and the growth rate of these instabilities depend strongly on the nonextensive parameters, external magnetic field strength, and drift velocity. It is observed that the growth rate of ion acoustic instability is affected by the magnetic field strength much more than that of the filamentation instability in the low frequency range. The external magnetic field facilitates the development of the ion-acoustic instability. It is also shown that the filamentation is the dominant instability only for the high value of drift velocity.

  1. Increase of the Density, Temperature and Velocity of Plasma Jets driven by a Ring of High Energy Laser Beams

    CERN Document Server

    Fu, Wen; Fatenejad, Milad; Lamb, Donald Q; Grosskopf, Michael; Park, Hye-Sook; Remington, Bruce; Spitkovsky, Anatoly

    2012-01-01

    Supersonic plasma outflows driven by multi-beam, high-energy lasers, such as Omega and NIF, have been and will be used as platforms for a variety of laboratory astrophysics experiments. Here we propose a new way of launching high density and high velocity, plasma jets using multiple intense laser beams in a hollow ring formation. We show that such jets provide a more flexible and versatile platform for future laboratory astrophysics experiments. Using high resolution hydrodynamic simulations, we demonstrate that the collimated jets can achieve much higher density, temperature and velocity when multiple laser beams are focused to form a hollow ring pattern at the target, instead of focused onto a single spot. We carried out simulations with different ring radii and studied their effects on the jet properties. Implications for laboratory collisionless shock experiments are discussed.

  2. High sensitivity far infrared laser diagnostics for the C-2U advanced beam-driven field-reversed configuration plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deng, B. H., E-mail: bdeng@trialphaenergy.com; Beall, M.; Schroeder, J.; Settles, G.; Feng, P.; Kinley, J. S.; Gota, H.; Thompson, M. C. [Tri Alpha Energy, Inc., P.O. Box 7010, Rancho Santa Margarita, California 92688 (United States)

    2016-11-15

    A high sensitivity multi-channel far infrared laser diagnostics with switchable interferometry and polarimetry operation modes for the advanced neutral beam-driven C-2U field-reversed configuration (FRC) plasmas is described. The interferometer achieved superior resolution of 1 × 10{sup 16} m{sup −2} at >1.5 MHz bandwidth, illustrated by measurement of small amplitude high frequency fluctuations. The polarimetry achieved 0.04° instrument resolution and 0.1° actual resolution in the challenging high density gradient environment with >0.5 MHz bandwidth, making it suitable for weak internal magnetic field measurements in the C-2U plasmas, where the maximum Faraday rotation angle is less than 1°. The polarimetry resolution data is analyzed, and high resolution Faraday rotation data in C-2U is presented together with direct evidences of field reversal in FRC magnetic structure obtained for the first time by a non-perturbative method.

  3. High sensitivity far infrared laser diagnostics for the C-2U advanced beam-driven field-reversed configuration plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, B. H.; Beall, M.; Schroeder, J.; Settles, G.; Feng, P.; Kinley, J. S.; Gota, H.; Thompson, M. C.

    2016-11-01

    A high sensitivity multi-channel far infrared laser diagnostics with switchable interferometry and polarimetry operation modes for the advanced neutral beam-driven C-2U field-reversed configuration (FRC) plasmas is described. The interferometer achieved superior resolution of 1 × 1016 m-2 at >1.5 MHz bandwidth, illustrated by measurement of small amplitude high frequency fluctuations. The polarimetry achieved 0.04° instrument resolution and 0.1° actual resolution in the challenging high density gradient environment with >0.5 MHz bandwidth, making it suitable for weak internal magnetic field measurements in the C-2U plasmas, where the maximum Faraday rotation angle is less than 1°. The polarimetry resolution data is analyzed, and high resolution Faraday rotation data in C-2U is presented together with direct evidences of field reversal in FRC magnetic structure obtained for the first time by a non-perturbative method.

  4. Trapped electron acceleration by a laser-driven relativistic plasma wave

    Science.gov (United States)

    Everett, M.; Lal, A.; Gordon, D.; Clayton, C. E.; Marsh, K. A.; Joshi, C.

    1994-04-01

    THE aim of new approaches for high-energy particle acceleration1 is to push the acceleration rate beyond the limit (~100 MeV m-1) imposed by radio-frequency breakdown in conventional accelerators. Relativistic plasma waves, having phase velocities very close to the speed of light, have been proposed2-6 as a means of accelerating charged particles, and this has recently been demonstrated7,8. Here we show that the charged particles can be trapped by relativistic plasma waves-a necessary condition for obtaining the maximum amount of energy theoretically possible for such schemes. In our experiments, plasma waves are excited in a hydrogen plasma by beats induced by two collinear laser beams, the difference in whose frequencies matches the plasma frequency. Electrons with an energy of 2 MeV are injected into the excited plasma, and the energy spectrum of the exiting electrons is analysed. We detect electrons with velocities exceeding that of the plasma wave, demonstrating that some electrons are 'trapped' by the wave potential and therefore move synchronously with the plasma wave. We observe a maximum energy gain of 28 MeV, corresponding to an acceleration rate of about 2.8 GeV m-1.

  5. Temperature dynamics and velocity scaling laws for interchange driven, warm ion plasma filaments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Jeppe Miki Busk; Madsen, Jens; Nielsen, Anders Henry

    2016-01-01

    The influence of electron and ion temperature dynamics on the radial convection of isolated structures in magnetically confined plasmas is investigated by means of numerical simulations. It is demonstrated that the maximum radial velocity of these plasma blobs roughly follows the inertial velocit...

  6. RUI: Structure and Behavior of RF-Driven Plasma Filaments in High-Pressure Gases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burin, Michael J. [California State Univ., San Marcos, CA (United States)

    2014-11-18

    The filamentary discharge seen within commercial plasma globes is commonly enjoyed, yet not well understood. We investigate filament properties in a plasma globe using a variable high voltage amplifier. Results from the 3-year grant period and their physics are discussed.

  7. Laser-driven Beat-Wave Current Drive in Dense Plasmas with Demo on CTIX

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Fei; Horton, Robert; Hwang, David; Zhu, Ben; Evans, Russell; Hong, Sean; Hsu, Scott

    2010-11-01

    The ability to remotely generate plasma current in dense plasmas hanging freely in vacuum in voluminous amount without obstruction to diagnostics will greatly enhance our ability to study the physics of high energy density plasmas in strong magnetic fields. Plasma current can be generated through nonlinear beat-wave process by launching two intense electromagnetic waves into unmagnetized plasma. Beat-wave acceleration of electrons has been demonstrated in a low-density plasma using microwaves [1]. The proposed PLX experimental facility presently under construction at Los Alamos offers the opportunity to test the method at a density level scalable to the study of HED plasmas. For PLX beat-wave experiments, CO2 lasers will be used as pump waves due to their high power and tunability. For a typical PLX density ne=10^17cm-3, two CO2 lasers can be separately tuned to 9P(28) and 10P(20) to match the 2.84THz plasma frequency. The beat-wave demo experiment will be conducted on CTIX. The laser arrangement is being converted to two independent single lasers. Frequency-tuning methods, optics focusing system and diagnostics system will be discussed. The laser measurements and results of synchronization of two lasers will be presented, and scaling to PLX experiments will be given. [1] Rogers, J. H. and Hwang, D. Q., PRL. v68 p3877 (1992).

  8. Demonstration of a positron beam-driven hollow channel plasma wakefield accelerator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gessner, Spencer; Adli, Erik; Allen, James M; An, Weiming; Clarke, Christine I; Clayton, Chris E; Corde, Sebastien; Delahaye, J P; Frederico, Joel; Green, Selina Z; Hast, Carsten; Hogan, Mark J; Joshi, Chan; Lindstrøm, Carl A; Lipkowitz, Nate; Litos, Michael; Lu, Wei; Marsh, Kenneth A; Mori, Warren B; O'Shea, Brendan; Vafaei-Najafabadi, Navid; Walz, Dieter; Yakimenko, Vitaly; Yocky, Gerald

    2016-06-02

    Plasma wakefield accelerators have been used to accelerate electron and positron particle beams with gradients that are orders of magnitude larger than those achieved in conventional accelerators. In addition to being accelerated by the plasma wakefield, the beam particles also experience strong transverse forces that may disrupt the beam quality. Hollow plasma channels have been proposed as a technique for generating accelerating fields without transverse forces. Here we demonstrate a method for creating an extended hollow plasma channel and measure the wakefields created by an ultrarelativistic positron beam as it propagates through the channel. The plasma channel is created by directing a high-intensity laser pulse with a spatially modulated profile into lithium vapour, which results in an annular region of ionization. A peak decelerating field of 230 MeV m(-1) is inferred from changes in the beam energy spectrum, in good agreement with theory and particle-in-cell simulations.

  9. Application of a pulsed, RF-driven, multicusp source for low energy plasma immersion ion implantation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wengrow, A.B.; Leung, K.N.; Perkins, L.T.; Pickard, D.S.; Rickard, M.; Williams, M.D. [Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States); Tucker, M. [Spectrum Sciences, Inc., Santa Clara, CA (United States)

    1996-06-01

    The multicusp ion source can produce large volumes of uniform, quiescent, high density plasmas. A plasma chamber suited for plasma immersion ion implantation (PIII) was readily made. Conventional PIII pulses the bias voltage applied to the substrate which is immersed in a CW mode plasma. Here, a method by which the plasma itself is pulsed was developed. Typically pulse lengths of 500 {mu}s are used and are much shorter than that of the substrate voltage pulse (5-15 ms). This approach, together with low gas pressures and low bias voltages, permits the constant energy implantation of an entire wafer simultaneously without glow discharge. Results show that this process can yield implant currents of up to 2.5 mA/cm{sup 2}; thus very short implant times can be achieved. Uniformity of the ion flux is also discussed. As this method can be scaled to any dimension, it can be made to handle any size wafer.

  10. Demonstration of a positron beam-driven hollow channel plasma wakefield accelerator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gessner, Spencer; Adli, Erik; Allen, James M.; An, Weiming; Clarke, Christine I.; Clayton, Chris E.; Corde, Sebastien; Delahaye, J. P.; Frederico, Joel; Green, Selina Z.; Hast, Carsten; Hogan, Mark J.; Joshi, Chan; Lindstrøm, Carl A.; Lipkowitz, Nate; Litos, Michael; Lu, Wei; Marsh, Kenneth A.; Mori, Warren B.; O'Shea, Brendan; Vafaei-Najafabadi, Navid; Walz, Dieter; Yakimenko, Vitaly; Yocky, Gerald

    2016-06-01

    Plasma wakefield accelerators have been used to accelerate electron and positron particle beams with gradients that are orders of magnitude larger than those achieved in conventional accelerators. In addition to being accelerated by the plasma wakefield, the beam particles also experience strong transverse forces that may disrupt the beam quality. Hollow plasma channels have been proposed as a technique for generating accelerating fields without transverse forces. Here we demonstrate a method for creating an extended hollow plasma channel and measure the wakefields created by an ultrarelativistic positron beam as it propagates through the channel. The plasma channel is created by directing a high-intensity laser pulse with a spatially modulated profile into lithium vapour, which results in an annular region of ionization. A peak decelerating field of 230 MeV m-1 is inferred from changes in the beam energy spectrum, in good agreement with theory and particle-in-cell simulations.

  11. Photochemical/Microchannel Plasma Reactors Driven By High Power Vacuum Ultraviolet Lamps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Chul; Park, Sung-Jin; Eden, Gary

    2016-09-01

    Experiments are being conducted in which molecular dissociation or other chemical reactions in microchannel plasmas are accelerated by the introduction of vacuum ultraviolet photons. Initial emphasis is being placed on recently-developed Xe2 lamps that are efficient sources of 172 nm (h ν 7.2 eV) photons. Thin, flat lamps, fabricated from fused silica and having microcavity arrays internal to the lamp, have been developed by the University of Illinois and Eden Park Illumination and produce intensities above 200 mW/cm2. Integrating such lamps into a microcavity plasma reactor yields a hybrid photochemical/plasma system in which product yield and power consumption can be optimized. The selectivity of photodissociation in generating radicals and atomic fragments offers new synergies in plasma processing. Data concerning CO2 dissociation in arrays of microchannel plasmas, and the modification of this process by external 172 nm radiation, will be presented.

  12. Plasma block acceleration via double targets driven by an ultraintense circularly polarized laser pulse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Yanxia; Wang, Jiaxiang; Qi, Xin; Li, Meng; Xing, Yifan; Yang, Lei; Zhu, Wenjun

    2017-03-01

    By using two-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations, plasma block acceleration via radiation pressure from an ultraintense circularly polarized laser pulse with intensity I ≈ 10 22 W / cm 2 is investigated based on a double-target scheme, in which the targets are composed of a pre-target with a relatively low plasma density and a main target with a high plasma density. It has been demonstrated that an appropriately selected pre-target can help to greatly enhance the charge separation field in the main target, which then leads to generation of a strongly accelerated and well directed plasma block with proton energy in GeV magnitude. This result can have potential applications in the plasma block ignition of proton-born fusion.

  13. Magnetic reversals from planetary dynamo waves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheyko, Andrey; Finlay, Christopher C; Jackson, Andrew

    2016-11-24

    A striking feature of many natural dynamos is their ability to undergo polarity reversals. The best documented example is Earth's magnetic field, which has reversed hundreds of times during its history. The origin of geomagnetic polarity reversals lies in a magnetohydrodynamic process that takes place in Earth's core, but the precise mechanism is debated. The majority of numerical geodynamo simulations that exhibit reversals operate in a regime in which the viscosity of the fluid remains important, and in which the dynamo mechanism primarily involves stretching and twisting of field lines by columnar convection. Here we present an example of another class of reversing-geodynamo model, which operates in a regime of comparatively low viscosity and high magnetic diffusivity. This class does not fit into the paradigm of reversal regimes that are dictated by the value of the local Rossby number (the ratio of advection to Coriolis force). Instead, stretching of the magnetic field by a strong shear in the east-west flow near the imaginary cylinder just touching the inner core and parallel to the axis of rotation is crucial to the reversal mechanism in our models, which involves a process akin to kinematic dynamo waves. Because our results are relevant in a regime of low viscosity and high magnetic diffusivity, and with geophysically appropriate boundary conditions, this form of dynamo wave may also be involved in geomagnetic reversals.

  14. Converting DYNAMO simulations to Powersim Studio simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Walker, La Tonya Nicole; Malczynski, Leonard A.

    2014-02-01

    DYNAMO is a computer program for building and running 'continuous' simulation models. It was developed by the Industrial Dynamics Group at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology for simulating dynamic feedback models of business, economic, and social systems. The history of the system dynamics method since 1957 includes many classic models built in DYANMO. It was not until the late 1980s that software was built to take advantage of the rise of personal computers and graphical user interfaces that DYNAMO was supplanted. There is much learning and insight to be gained from examining the DYANMO models and their accompanying research papers. We believe that it is a worthwhile exercise to convert DYNAMO models to more recent software packages. We have made an attempt to make it easier to turn these models into a more current system dynamics software language, Powersim © Studio produced by Powersim AS2 of Bergen, Norway. This guide shows how to convert DYNAMO syntax into Studio syntax.

  15. Azimuthal dynamo wave in spherical shell convection

    CERN Document Server

    Cole, Elizabeth; Mantere, Maarit J; Brandenburg, Axel

    2013-01-01

    We report the finding of an azimuthal dynamo wave of a low-order (m=1) mode in direct numerical simulations (DNS) of turbulent convection in spherical shells. Such waves are predicted by mean field dynamo theory and have been obtained previously in mean-field models. Observational results both from photometry and Doppler imaging have revealed persistent drifts of spots for several rapidly rotating stars, but, although an azimuthal dynamo wave has been proposed as a possible mechanism responsible for this behavior, it has been judged as unlikely, as practical evidence for such waves from DNS has been lacking. The large-scale magnetic field in our DNS, which is due to self-consistent dynamo action, is dominated by a retrograde m=1 mode. Its pattern speed is nearly independent of latitude and does not reflect the speed of the differential rotation at any depth. The extrema of magnetic m=1 structures coincide reasonably with the maxima of m=2 structures of the temperature. These results provide direct support for...

  16. Magnetic Helicity and the Solar Dynamo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canfield, Richard C.

    1997-01-01

    The objective of this investigation is to open a new window into the solar dynamo, convection, and magnetic reconnection through measurement of the helicity density of magnetic fields in the photosphere and tracing of large-scale patterns of magnetic helicity in the corona.

  17. Magnetic Helicity in a Cyclic Convective Dynamo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miesch, Mark S.; Zhang, Mei; Augustson, Kyle C.

    2016-05-01

    Magnetic helicity is a fundamental agent for magnetic self-organization in magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) dynamos. As a conserved quantity in ideal MHD, it establishes a strict topological coupling between large and small-scale magnetic fields. The generation of magnetic fields on scales larger than the velocity field is linked to an upscale transfer of magnetic helicity, either locally in spectral space as in the inverse cascade of magnetic helicity in MHD turbulence or non-locally, as in the turbulent alpha-effect of mean-field dynamo theory. Thus, understanding the generation, transport, and dissipation of magnetic helicity is an essential prerequisite to understanding manifestations of magnetic self-organization in the solar dynamo, including sunspots, the prominent dipole and quadrupole moments, and the 22-year magnetic activity cycle. We investigate the role of magnetic helicity in a convective dynamo model that exhibits regular magnetic cycles. The cycle is marked by coherent bands of toroidal field that persist within the convection zone and that are antisymmetric about the equator. When these toriodal bands interact across the equator, it initiates a global restructuring of the magnetic topology that contributes to the reversal of the dipole moment. Thus, the polar field reversals are preceeded by a brief reversal of the subsurface magnetic helicity. There is some evidence that the Sun may exhibit a similar magnetic helicity reversal prior to its polar field reversals.

  18. Fluctuation dynamos and their Faraday rotation signatures

    CERN Document Server

    Bhat, Pallavi

    2012-01-01

    Turbulence is ubiquitous in many astrophysical systems like galaxies, galaxy clusters and possibly even the IGM filaments. We study fluctuation dynamo action in turbulent systems focusing on one observational signature; the Faraday rotation measure (RM) from background radio sources seen through the magnetic field generated by such a dynamo. We simulate the fluctuation dynamo (FD) in periodic boxes up to resolutions of 512^3, with varying fluid and magnetic Reynolds numbers, and measure the resulting random RMs. We show that the resulting rms value of RM is quite significant, given that the FD produces intermittent fields. When the dynamo saturates, it is of order 40%-50% of the value expected in a model where fields of strength B_rms uniformly fill cells of the largest turbulent eddy but are randomly oriented from one cell to another. This level of RM dispersion obtains across different values of magnetic Reynolds number and Prandtl number explored. We also use the random RMs to probe the structure of the ge...

  19. Extrapolating Solar Dynamo Models Throughout the Heliosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cox, B. T.; Miesch, M. S.; Augustson, K.; Featherstone, N. A.

    2014-12-01

    There are multiple theories that aim to explain the behavior of the solar dynamo, and their associated models have been fiercely contested. The two prevailing theories investigated in this project are the Convective Dynamo model that arises from the pure solving of the magnetohydrodynamic equations, as well as the Babcock-Leighton model that relies on sunspot dissipation and reconnection. Recently, the supercomputer simulations CASH and BASH have formed models of the behavior of the Convective and Babcock-Leighton models, respectively, in the convective zone of the sun. These models show the behavior of the models within the sun, while much less is known about the effects these models may have further away from the solar surface. The goal of this work is to investigate any fundamental differences between the Convective and Babcock-Leighton models of the solar dynamo outside of the sun and extending into the solar system via the use of potential field source surface extrapolations implemented via python code that operates on data from CASH and BASH. The use of real solar data to visualize supergranular flow data in the BASH model is also used to learn more about the behavior of the Babcock-Leighton Dynamo. From the process of these extrapolations it has been determined that the Babcock-Leighton model, as represented by BASH, maintains complex magnetic fields much further into the heliosphere before reverting into a basic dipole field, providing 3D visualisations of the models distant from the sun.

  20. Modeling and simulation of plasma gas flow driven by a single nanosecond-pulsed dielectric barrier discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, S. Y.; Cai, J. S.; Li, J.

    2016-10-01

    A simplified (7 species and 9 processes) plasma kinetic model is proposed to investigate the mechanism of the plasma aerodynamic actuation driven by nanosecond-pulsed dielectric barrier discharge (NS-DBD). The governing equations include conservation equations for each species, the Poisson equation for the electric potential, and Navier-Stokes equations for the gas dynamic flow. Numerical simulations of plasma discharge and flow actuation on NS-DBD plasma actuators have been carried out. Key discharge characteristics and the responses of the quiescent air were reproduced and compared to those obtained in experiments and numerical simulations. Results demonstrate that the reduced plasma kinetic model is able to capture the dominant species and reactions to predict the actuation in complicated hydrodynamics. For the one-dimensional planar and two-dimensional symmetric NS-DBD, the forming of the sheath collapse is mainly due to the charge accumulation and secondary emission from the grounded electrode. Rapid species number density rise and electric field drop occur at the edge of the plasma sheath, where the space charge density gradient peaks. For the aerodynamic actuation with typical asymmetry electrodes, discharge characteristics have a core area on the right edge of the upper electrode, where the value can be much higher. The formation and propagation of the compression waves generated through rapid heating have also been performed and compared to those measured in a recent experiment. Energy release leads to gas expansion and forms a cylindrical shock wave, centering at the upper electrode tip with low gas acceleration. For the present single pulsed 12 kV case, the mean temperature of gas heating reaches about 575 K at 1 μs and decreases to about 460 K at 10 μs.

  1. Solar Cycle #24 and the Solar Dynamo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schatten, Kenneth; Pesnell, W. Dean

    2007-01-01

    We focus on two solar aspects related to flight dynamics. These are the solar dynamo and long-term solar activity predictions. The nature of the solar dynamo is central to solar activity predictions, and these predictions are important for orbital planning of satellites in low earth orbit (LEO). The reason is that the solar ultraviolet (UV) and extreme ultraviolet (EUV) spectral irradiances inflate the upper atmospheric layers of the Earth, forming the thermosphere and exosphere through which these satellites orbit. Concerning the dynamo, we discuss some recent novel approaches towards its understanding. For solar predictions we concentrate on a solar precursor method, in which the Sun's polar field plays a major role in forecasting the next cycle s activity based upon the Babcock-Leighton dynamo. With a current low value for the Sun s polar field, this method predicts that solar cycle #24 will be one of the lowest in recent times, with smoothed F10.7 radio flux values peaking near 130 plus or minus 30 (2 sigma), in the 2013 timeframe. One may have to consider solar activity as far back as the early 20th century to find a cycle of comparable magnitude. Concomitant effects of low solar activity upon satellites in LEO will need to be considered, such as enhancements in orbital debris. Support for our prediction of a low solar cycle #24 is borne out by the lack of new cycle sunspots at least through the first half of 2007. Usually at the present epoch in the solar cycle (approx. 7+ years after the last solar maximum), for a normal size following cycle, new cycle sunspots would be seen. The lack of their appearance at this time is only consistent with a low cycle #24. Polar field observations of a weak magnitude are consistent with unusual structures seen in the Sun s corona. Polar coronal holes are the hallmarks of the Sun's open field structures. At present, it appears that the polar coronal holes are relatively weak, and there have been many equatorial coronal holes

  2. Scheme for proton-driven plasma-wakefield acceleration of positively charged particles in a hollow plasma channel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Longqing Yi (易龙卿

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available A new scheme for accelerating positively charged particles in a plasma-wakefield accelerator is proposed. If the proton drive beam propagates in a hollow plasma channel, and the beam radius is of order of the channel width, the space charge force of the driver causes charge separation at the channel wall, which helps to focus the positively charged witness bunch propagating along the beam axis. In the channel, the acceleration buckets for positively charged particles are much larger than in the blowout regime of the uniform plasma, and stable acceleration over long distances is possible. In addition, phasing of the witness with respect to the wave can be tuned by changing the radius of the channel to ensure the acceleration is optimal. Two-dimensional simulations suggest that, for proton drivers likely available in future, positively charged particles can be stably accelerated over 1 km with the average acceleration gradient of 1.3  GeV/m.

  3. Physics and applications of high energy density plasmas. Extreme state driven by pulsed electromagnetic energy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Horioka, Kazuhiko (ed.)

    2002-06-01

    The papers presented at the symposium on ''Physics and application of high energy density plasmas, held December 20-21, 2001 at NIFS'' are collected in this proceedings. The topics covered in the meeting include dense z-pinches, plasma focus, intense charged particle beams, intense radiation sources, discharge pumped X-ray lasers, their diagnostics, and applications of them. The papers reflect the present status and trends in the research field of high energy density plasmas. (author)

  4. Second harmonic electromagnetic emission of a turbulent magnetized plasma driven by a powerful electron beam

    CERN Document Server

    Timofeev, I V

    2012-01-01

    The power of second harmonic electromagnetic emission is calculated for the case when strong plasma turbulence is excited by a powerful electron beam in a magnetized plasma. It is shown that the simple analytical model of strong plasma turbulence with the assumption of a constant pump power is able to explain experimentally observed bursts of electromagnetic radiation as a consequence of separate collapse events. It is also found that the electromagnetic emission power calculated for three-wave interaction processes occurring in the long-wavelength part of turbulent spectrum is in order-of-magnitude agreement with experimental results.

  5. Fast particle-driven ion cyclotron emission (ICE) in tokamak plasmas and the case for an ICE diagnostic in ITER

    CERN Document Server

    McClements, K G; Dendy, R O; Carbajal, L; Chapman, S C; Cook, J W S; Harvey, R W; Heidbrink, W W; Pinches, S D

    2014-01-01

    Fast particle-driven waves in the ion cyclotron frequency range (ion cyclotron emission or ICE) have provided a valuable diagnostic of confined and escaping fast ions in many tokamaks. This is a passive, non-invasive diagnostic that would be compatible with the high radiation environment of deuterium-tritium plasmas in ITER, and could provide important information on fusion {\\alpha}-particles and beam ions in that device. In JET, ICE from confined fusion products scaled linearly with fusion reaction rate over six orders of magnitude and provided evidence that {\\alpha}-particle confinement was close to classical. In TFTR, ICE was observed from super-Alfv\\'enic {\\alpha}-particles in the plasma edge. The intensity of beam-driven ICE in DIII-D is more strongly correlated with drops in neutron rate during fishbone excitation than signals from more direct beam ion loss diagnostics. In ASDEX Upgrade ICE is produced by both super-Alfv\\'enic DD fusion products and sub-Alfv\\'enic deuterium beam ions.

  6. Porcelain-coated antenna for radio-frequency driven plasma source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leung, Ka-Ngo; Wells, Russell P.; Craven, Glen E.

    1996-01-01

    A new porcelain-enamel coated antenna creates a clean plasma for volume or surface-conversion ion sources. The porcelain-enamel coating is hard, electrically insulating, long lasting, non fragile, and resistant to puncture by high energy ions in the plasma. Plasma and ion production using the porcelain enamel coated antenna is uncontaminated with filament or extraneous metal ion because the porcelain does not evaporate and is not sputtered into the plasma during operation. Ion beams produced using the new porcelain-enamel coated antenna are useful in ion implantation, high energy accelerators, negative, positive, or neutral beam applications, fusion, and treatment of chemical or radioactive waste for disposal. For ion implantation, the appropriate species ion beam generated with the inventive antenna will penetrate large or small, irregularly shaped conducting objects with a narrow implantation profile.

  7. Intrinsic rotation driven by non-Maxwellian equilibria in Tokamak plasmas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnes, M; Parra, F I; Lee, J P; Belli, E A; Nave, M F F; White, A E

    2013-08-02

    The effect of small deviations from a Maxwellian equilibrium on turbulent momentum transport in tokamak plasmas is considered. These non-Maxwellian features, arising from diamagnetic effects, introduce a strong dependence of the radial flux of cocurrent toroidal angular momentum on collisionality: As the plasma goes from nearly collisionless to weakly collisional, the flux reverses direction from radially inward to outward. This indicates a collisionality-dependent transition from peaked to hollow rotation profiles, consistent with experimental observations of intrinsic rotation.

  8. Intrinsic rotation driven by non-Maxwellian equilibria in tokamak plasmas

    CERN Document Server

    Barnes, M; Lee, J P; Belli, E A; Nave, M F F; White, A E

    2013-01-01

    The effect of small deviations from a Maxwellian equilibrium on turbulent momentum transport in tokamak plasmas is considered. These non-Maxwellian features, arising from diamagnetic effects, introduce a strong dependence of the radial flux of co-current toroidal angular momentum on collisionality: As the plasma goes from nearly collisionless to weakly collisional, the flux reverses direction from radially inward to outward. This indicates a collisionality-dependent transition from peaked to hollow rotation profiles, consistent with experimental observations of intrinsic rotation.

  9. Strong field dynamo action in rapidly rotating convection with no inertia

    CERN Document Server

    Hughes, David W

    2015-01-01

    The Earth's magnetic field is generated by dynamo action driven by convection in the outer core. Owing to the rapid rotation and small viscosity, the dynamical balance is believed to be between buoyancy, Coriolis and magnetic forces; inertial forces play no role. It is thus extremely important to produce explicit solutions with these features. However, from the traditional approach of solving the full governing equations at low Ekman numbers, it is not clear that the asymptotic regime has been captured. Here we adopt a complementary approach consisting of a model of rapidly rotating convection in which inertial forces are neglected from the outset. Within this framework we are able to construct a new branch of solutions in which the dynamo generates a strong magnetic field that satisfies the expected force balance. The resulting strongly magnetised convection is dramatically different to the corresponding solutions in which the magnetic field is weak.

  10. Saturation of Zeldovich Stretch-Twist-Fold Map Dynamos

    CERN Document Server

    Seta, Amit; Subramanian, Kandaswamy

    2014-01-01

    Zeldovich's stretch-twist fold (STF) dynamo provided a breakthrough in conceptual understanding of fast dynamos, including fluctuation or small scale dynamos. We study the evolution and saturation behaviour of two types of Baker's map dynamos, which have been used to model Zeldovich's STF dynamo process. Using such maps allows one to analyze dynamos at much higher magnetic Reynolds numbers $R_M$ as compared to direct numerical simulations. In the 2-strip map dynamo there is constant constructive folding while the 4-strip map dynamo also allows the possibility of field reversal. Incorporating a diffusive step parameterised by $R_M$, we find that the magnetic field $B(x)$ is amplified only above a critical $R_M=R_{crit} \\sim 4$ for both types of dynamos. We explore the saturation of these dynamos in 3 ways; by a renormalized decrease of the effective $R_M$ (Case I) or due to a decrease in the efficiency of field amplification by stretching (Case II), or a combination of both effects (Case III). For Case I, we s...

  11. Temporal and spatial profiles of emission intensities in atmospheric pressure helium plasma jet driven by microsecond pulse: Experiment and simulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Ruixue; Zhang, Cheng; Yan, Ping; Shao, Tao, E-mail: st@mail.iee.ac.cn [Institute of Electrical Engineering, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China); Key Laboratory of Power Electronics and Electric Drive, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China); Shen, Yuan [Institute of Electrical Engineering, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China); Zhu, Weidong [Department of Applied Science and Technology, Saint Peter' s University, Jersey City, New Jersey 07306 (United States); Babaeva, Natalia Yu.; Naidis, George V. [Joint Institute for High Temperatures, Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow 125412 (Russian Federation)

    2015-09-28

    A needle-circular electrode structure helium plasma jet driven by microsecond pulsed power is studied. Spatially resolved emission results show that the emission intensity of He(3{sup 3}S{sub 1}) line decreases monotonically along the axial direction, while those of N{sub 2}(C{sup 3}Π{sub u}), N{sub 2}{sup +}(B{sup 2}∑{sup +}{sub u}), and O(3p{sup 5}P) reach their maxima at 3 cm, 2.6 cm, and 1.4 cm, respectively. The plasma plume of the four species shows different characteristics: The N{sub 2} emission plume travels at a fast speed along the entire plasma jet; the N{sub 2}{sup +} emission plume is composed of a bright head and relatively weak tail and travels a shorter distance than the N{sub 2} emission plume; the He emission plume travels at a slower speed for only a very short distance; propagation of the O emission plume is not observed. Results of calculation of radiation fluxes emitted by positive streamers propagating along helium plasma jets are presented. It is shown, in agreement with the results of the present experiment and with other available experimental data, that the intensities of radiation of N{sub 2}(C{sup 3}Π{sub u}) molecules and He(3{sup 3}S{sub 1}) atoms vary with time (along the plasma jet) quite differently. The factors resulting in this difference are discussed.

  12. Gammaherpesvirus-driven plasma cell differentiation regulates virus reactivation from latently infected B lymphocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Xiaozhen; Collins, Christopher M; Mendel, Justin B; Iwakoshi, Neal N; Speck, Samuel H

    2009-11-01

    Gammaherpesviruses chronically infect their host and are tightly associated with the development of lymphoproliferative diseases and lymphomas, as well as several other types of cancer. Mechanisms involved in maintaining chronic gammaherpesvirus infections are poorly understood and, in particular, little is known about the mechanisms involved in controlling gammaherpesvirus reactivation from latently infected B cells in vivo. Recent evidence has linked plasma cell differentiation with reactivation of the human gammaherpesviruses EBV and KSHV through induction of the immediate-early viral transcriptional activators by the plasma cell-specific transcription factor XBP-1s. We now extend those findings to document a role for a gammaherpesvirus gene product in regulating plasma cell differentiation and thus virus reactivation. We have previously shown that the murine gammaherpesvirus 68 (MHV68) gene product M2 is dispensable for virus replication in permissive cells, but plays a critical role in virus reactivation from latently infected B cells. Here we show that in mice infected with wild type MHV68, virus infected plasma cells (ca. 8% of virus infected splenocytes at the peak of viral latency) account for the majority of reactivation observed upon explant of splenocytes. In contrast, there is an absence of virus infected plasma cells at the peak of latency in mice infected with a M2 null MHV68. Furthermore, we show that the M2 protein can drive plasma cell differentiation in a B lymphoma cell line in the absence of any other MHV68 gene products. Thus, the role of M2 in MHV68 reactivation can be attributed to its ability to manipulate plasma cell differentiation, providing a novel viral strategy to regulate gammaherpesvirus reactivation from latently infected B cells. We postulate that M2 represents a new class of herpesvirus gene products (reactivation conditioners) that do not directly participate in virus replication, but rather facilitate virus reactivation by

  13. Gammaherpesvirus-driven plasma cell differentiation regulates virus reactivation from latently infected B lymphocytes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaozhen Liang

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Gammaherpesviruses chronically infect their host and are tightly associated with the development of lymphoproliferative diseases and lymphomas, as well as several other types of cancer. Mechanisms involved in maintaining chronic gammaherpesvirus infections are poorly understood and, in particular, little is known about the mechanisms involved in controlling gammaherpesvirus reactivation from latently infected B cells in vivo. Recent evidence has linked plasma cell differentiation with reactivation of the human gammaherpesviruses EBV and KSHV through induction of the immediate-early viral transcriptional activators by the plasma cell-specific transcription factor XBP-1s. We now extend those findings to document a role for a gammaherpesvirus gene product in regulating plasma cell differentiation and thus virus reactivation. We have previously shown that the murine gammaherpesvirus 68 (MHV68 gene product M2 is dispensable for virus replication in permissive cells, but plays a critical role in virus reactivation from latently infected B cells. Here we show that in mice infected with wild type MHV68, virus infected plasma cells (ca. 8% of virus infected splenocytes at the peak of viral latency account for the majority of reactivation observed upon explant of splenocytes. In contrast, there is an absence of virus infected plasma cells at the peak of latency in mice infected with a M2 null MHV68. Furthermore, we show that the M2 protein can drive plasma cell differentiation in a B lymphoma cell line in the absence of any other MHV68 gene products. Thus, the role of M2 in MHV68 reactivation can be attributed to its ability to manipulate plasma cell differentiation, providing a novel viral strategy to regulate gammaherpesvirus reactivation from latently infected B cells. We postulate that M2 represents a new class of herpesvirus gene products (reactivation conditioners that do not directly participate in virus replication, but rather facilitate virus

  14. Dense-plasma-driven ultrafast formation of FePt organization on silicon substrate

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    ROHIT MEDWAL; NEERU SEHDEV; WANG YING; R S RAWAT; S ANNAPOORNI

    2017-02-01

    This article demonstrates the removal of organic capping and promotion of long-range 2D organization of chemically synthesized FePt nanoparticles dispersed on Si$\\langle 100\\rangle$ substrate by means of pulsed H+ energetic ion irradiation using a dense plasma focus (DPF) device. The irradiation of energetic H$^+$ ions on FePt nanoparticles clearly resulted in enhanced structural and magnetic behaviour of the FePt nanoparticles as a function ofplasma focused irradiation shots. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM)/scanning electron microscopy (SEM) images of the FePt nanoparticles clearly show a marked enhancement in average particle size from 2.5 nm for nonirradiated sample to about 28nm for four plasma focus shots irradiation. The gradual removal of organic capping over chemically synthesized FePt nanoparticles with increasing plasma focus shots exposure is confirmed usingRaman spectroscopy. A uniform 2D organization of bimetallic FePt nanoparticles over 1 cm $\\times$ 1 cm silicon substrate is obtained with three plasma focus shots with better magnetic properties as compared with plasma-untreated FePtnanoparticles.

  15. Probe characterization of high-current driven metal plasma in a vacuum-arc rail gun

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vijayan, T.; Roychowdhury, P.; Venkatramani, N.

    2004-10-01

    The characteristics of metal plasma launched by high-current electric arc in a vacuum-arc rail gun are determined by employing electrical and magnetic probes. These measurements are validated by results from theoretical simulations. The arc coupled nonlinear circuit equations are solved simultaneously with the Newtonian arc motion and revealed the undercritically damped behavior of the arc current identical to the arc-current signal recorded by the Rogowski magnetic probe. Similarly the arc velocity and displacement derived from the signatures of B-dot probes are shown to concur closely with the results of J ×B propulsion from simulation. The heating of plasma is formulated in a three-electron population regime with direct arc energy coupling through magnetohydrodynamic, ion-acoustic, Coulomb, and neutral interactions. This results in high temperature (Te) of hundreds of eV in the arc as revealed by the simulation. Hence Te of the rapidly cooling and equilibrating plasma that emerged from the muzzle is high around 80-90eV, which is confirmed by Langmuir electric probe measurements. Density ne of this metal plasma is shown to be in the range 4×1021-6×1021m-3 and includes multiple ion charge states. The exit velocity of the plasma measured by a pair of Langmuir probes is close to 2.2×106cm/s and matched well with the arc velocity determined by the B-dot probes and the results from simulation.

  16. High-Power Tunable Laser Pulse Driven Terahertz Generation in Corrugated Plasma Waveguides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miao, Chenlong; Palastro, John; Antonsen, Thomas

    2016-10-01

    Excitation of terahertz radiation by the interaction of an ultra-short laser pulse and the fields of a miniature, corrugated plasma waveguide is considered. Plasma structures of this type have been realized experimentally and they can support electromagnetic (EM) channel modes with properties that allow for radiation generation. In particular, the mode have subluminal field components, thus allowing phase matching between the generated THz modes and the ponderomotive potential of the laser pulse. Theoretical analysis and full format PIC simulations are conducted. We find THz generated by this slow wave phase matching mechanism is characterized by lateral emission and a coherent, narrow band, tunable spectrum with relatively high power and conversion efficiency. We investigated two different types of channels, and a range of realistic laser pulses and plasma profile parameters are considered with the goal of increasing the conversion of optical energy to THz radiation. We find high laser intensities strongly modify the THz spectrum by exciting higher order channel modes. Enhancement of a specific channel mode can be realized by using an optimum pulse duration and plasma density. As an example, a fixed drive pulse (0.55 J) with spot size of 15 µm and pulse duration of 15 fs excites 37.8 mJ of THz radiation in a 1.5 cm corrugated plasma waveguide with on axis average density of 1.4×1018cm-3, conversion efficiency exceeding 8% is achieved.

  17. Consequences of Giant Impacts on the Martian dynamo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monteux, J.; Amit, H.; Arkani-Hamed, J.; Choblet, G.; Langlais, B.; Tobie, G.; Johnson, C. L.; Jellinek, M.

    2015-12-01

    The Martian surface exhibits a strong dichotomy in elevation, crustal thickness and magnetization between the southern and northern hemispheres. A giant impact has been proposed to explain the formation of the Northern Lowlands on Mars. Such an impact probably led to strong and deep mantle heating and merging between the two cores. These processes will have implications on the thermal state and on the magnetic evolution of the planet. We model the effects of such an impact on the Martian magnetic field (1) by characterizing the thermochemical consequences of the sinking of the impactor's core as a single diapir, (2) by imposing a heat flux heterogeneity on the Martian core-mantle boundary (CMB). Our results show that large viscosity contrasts between the impactor's core and the surrounding mantle silicates can reduce the duration of the merging down to 1 kyr. Direct impact heating of Martian core favor thermal stratification of the core and core dynamo cessation. The merging of the impactor's core with the Martian core only delays the re-initiation of the dynamo for a very short time. While the core thermal stratification is likely to be evacuated rapidly, the impact induced thermal anomaly within the mantle is likely to remain stable for a longer timescale above the CMB. This thermal anomaly generates a large scale cooling heterogeneity at the CMB and a magnetic field dichotomy. A polar impactor leads to a north-south hemispheric magnetic dichotomy that is stronger than an east-west dichotomy created by an equatorial impactor. The amplitude of the magnetic dichotomy is mostly controlled by the horizontal Rayleigh number that represents the vigor of the convection driven by the lateral variations of the CMB heat flux. Our results imply that an impactor radius of 1000 km could have recorded the magnetic dichotomy observed in the Martian crustal field only if very rapid post-impact magma cooling took place.

  18. Simulation of an Ice Giant-style Dynamo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soderlund, K. M.; Aurnou, J. M.

    2010-12-01

    The Ice Giants, Uranus and Neptune, are unique in the solar system. These planets are the only known bodies to have multipolar magnetic fields where the quadrupole and octopole components have strengths comparable to or greater than that of the dipole. Cloud layer observations show that the planets also have zonal (east-west) flows that are fundamentally different from the banded winds of Jupiter and Saturn. The surface winds are characterized by strong retrograde equatorial jets that are flanked on either side by prograde jets at high latitudes. Thermal emission measurements of Neptune show that the surface energy flux pattern peaks in the equatorial and polar regions with minima at mid-latitudes. (The measurements for Uranus cannot adequately resolve the emission pattern.) The winds and magnetic fields are thought to be the result of convection in the planetary interior, which will also affect the heat flux pattern. Typically, it is implicitly assumed that the zonal winds are generated in a shallow layer, separate from the dynamo generation region. However, if the magnetic fields are driven near the surface, a single region can simultaneously generate both the zonal flows and the magnetic fields. Here, we present a novel numerical model of an Ice Giant-style dynamo to investigate this possibility. An order unity convective Rossby number (ratio of buoyancy to Coriolis forces) has been chosen because retrograde equatorial jets tend to occur in spherical shells when the effects of rotation are relatively weak. Our modeling results qualitatively reproduce all of the structural features of the global dynamical observations. Thus, a self-consistent model can generate magnetic field, zonal flow, and thermal emission patterns that agree with those of Uranus and Neptune. This model, then, leads us to hypothesize that the Ice Giants' zonal flows and magnetic fields are generated via dynamically coupled deep convection processes.

  19. Ontology driven decision support systems for medical diagnosis - an interactive form for consultation in patients with plasma cell disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donfack Guefack, Valéry; Bertaud Gounot, Valérie; Duvauferrier, Régis; Bourde, Annabel; Morelli, John; Lasbleiz, Jérémy

    2012-01-01

    Multiple myeloma (MM) is a malignant disorder characterized by the monoclonal proliferation of B cell derived plasma cells in the bone marrow. The diagnosis depends on the identification of abnormal monoclonal marrow plasma cells, monoclonal protein in the serum or urine, evidence of end-organ damage, and a clinical picture consistent with MM. The distinction between MM stages- monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance or indolent myeloma-is critical in guiding therapy. This paper describes how to produce ontology-driven semiological rules base (SRB) and a consultation form to aid in the diagnosis of plasma cells diseases. We have extracted the MM sub-ontology from the NCI Thesaurus. Using Protégé 3.4.2 and owl1, criteria in the literature for the diagnosis and staging of MM have been added to the ontology. All quantitative parameters have been transformed to a qualitative format. A formal description of MM variants and stages has been given. The obtained ontology has been checked by a reasoner and instantiated to obtain a SRB. The form created has been tested and evaluated utilizing 63 clinical medical reports. The likelihood for a disease being the correct diagnosis is determined by computing a ratio. The resulting tool is relevant for MM diagnosis and staging.

  20. Transition from interpulse to afterglow plasmas driven by repetitive short-pulse microwaves in a multicusp magnetic field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pandey, Shail; Sahu, Debaprasad; Bhattacharjee, Sudeep [Department of Physics, Indian Institute of Technology, Kanpur 208016 (India)

    2012-08-15

    In the power-off phase, plasmas generated by repetitive short-pulse microwaves in a multicusp magnetic field show a transitive nature from interpulse to afterglow as a function of pulse duration t{sub w} = 20-200 {mu}s. The ionized medium can be driven from a highly non equilibrium to an equilibrium state inside the pulses, thereby dictating the behavior of the plasma in the power-off phase. Compared to afterglows, interpulse plasmas observed for t{sub w} < 50 {mu}s are characterized by a quasi-steady-state in electron density that persists for {approx} 20-40 {mu}s even after the end of the pulse and has a relatively slower decay rate ({approx} 4.3 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 4} s{sup -1}) of the electron temperature, as corroborated by optical measurements. The associated electron energy probability function indicates depletion in low energy electrons which appear at higher energies just after the end of the pulse. The transition occurs at t{sub w} {approx} 50 {mu}s as confirmed by time evolution of integrated electron numbers densities obtained from the distribution function.

  1. Transition from interpulse to afterglow plasmas driven by repetitive short-pulse microwaves in a multicusp magnetic field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandey, Shail; Sahu, Debaprasad; Bhattacharjee, Sudeep

    2012-08-01

    In the power-off phase, plasmas generated by repetitive short-pulse microwaves in a multicusp magnetic field show a transitive nature from interpulse to afterglow as a function of pulse duration tw = 20-200 μs. The ionized medium can be driven from a highly non equilibrium to an equilibrium state inside the pulses, thereby dictating the behavior of the plasma in the power-off phase. Compared to afterglows, interpulse plasmas observed for tw < 50 μs are characterized by a quasi-steady-state in electron density that persists for ˜ 20-40 μs even after the end of the pulse and has a relatively slower decay rate (˜ 4.3 × 104 s-1) of the electron temperature, as corroborated by optical measurements. The associated electron energy probability function indicates depletion in low energy electrons which appear at higher energies just after the end of the pulse. The transition occurs at tw ˜ 50 μs as confirmed by time evolution of integrated electron numbers densities obtained from the distribution function.

  2. Linear and nonlinear dynamics of current-driven waves in dusty plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahmad, Ali [National Centre for Physics (NCP), Shahdara Valley Road, 44000 Islamabad (Pakistan); Department of Physics, COMSATS Institute of Information Technology (CIIT), Islamabad (Pakistan); Theoretical Plasma Physics Division, PINSTECH, P. O. Nilore, Islamabad (Pakistan); Ali Shan, S.; Haque, Q. [National Centre for Physics (NCP), Shahdara Valley Road, 44000 Islamabad (Pakistan); Theoretical Plasma Physics Division, PINSTECH, P. O. Nilore, Islamabad (Pakistan); Saleem, H. [National Centre for Physics (NCP), Shahdara Valley Road, 44000 Islamabad (Pakistan); Department of Physics, COMSATS Institute of Information Technology (CIIT), Islamabad (Pakistan)

    2012-09-15

    The linear and nonlinear dynamics of a recently proposed plasma mode of dusty plasma is studied using kappa distribution for electrons. This electrostatic wave can propagate in the plasma due to the sheared flow of electrons and ions parallel to the external magnetic field in the presence of stationary dust. The coupling of this wave with the usual drift wave and ion acoustic wave is investigated. D'Angelo's mode is also modified in the presence of superthermal electrons. In the nonlinear regime, the wave can give rise to dipolar vortex structures if the shear in flow is weaker and tripolar vortices if the flow has steeper gradient. The results have been applied to Saturn's magnetosphere corresponding to negatively charged dust grains. But the theoretical model is applicable for positively charged dust as well. This work will be useful for future observations and studies of dusty environments of planets and comets.

  3. Laser-driven hole boring and gamma-ray emission in high-density plasmas

    CERN Document Server

    Nerush, Evgeny

    2014-01-01

    Ion acceleration in laser-produced dense plasmas is a key topic of many recent investigations thanks to its potential applications. Besides, at forthcoming laser intensities ($I \\gtrsim 10^{23} \\text{W}\\,\\text{cm}^{-2}$) interaction of laser pulses with plasmas can be accompanied by copious gamma-ray emission. Here we demonstrate the mutual influence of gamma-ray emission and ion acceleration during relativistic hole boring in high-density plasmas with ultra-intense laser pulses. If gamma-ray emission is abundant, laser pulse reflection and hole-boring velocity are lower and gamma-ray radiation pattern is narrower than in the case of low emission. Conservation of energy and momentum allows one to elucidate the effects of gamma-ray emission which are more pronounced at higher hole-boring velocities.

  4. Study of plasma pressure evolution driven by strong picosecond laser pulse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, M.; Wang, J. X.; Xu, Y. X.; Zhu, W. J.

    2017-01-01

    Through one dimensional relativistic particle-in-cell simulation of strong laser interaction with the solid-density plasma, the evolution of the plasma impact pressure behind a thin foil has been investigated in details. An energy-compression mechanism has been proposed to help optimizing the laser and plasma parameters. It has been found that by using a picosecond laser with intensity 1015 W cm-2, an impact pressure as high as several hundreds of GPa order of magnitude can be obtained. The numerical analysis demonstrates that the peak pressure is mainly resulted from the ion contribution. These results are of potential application to the laser loading upon solids in order to study the material properties under extra-high dynamic pressure.

  5. Fast magnetic field annihilation driven by two laser pulses in underdense plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gu, Y. J.; Kumar, D.; Weber, S.; Korn, G. [Institute of Physics of the ASCR, ELI-Beamlines, 18221 Prague (Czech Republic); Klimo, O. [Institute of Physics of the ASCR, ELI-Beamlines, 18221 Prague (Czech Republic); FNSPE, Czech Technical University in Prague, 11519 Prague (Czech Republic); Bulanov, S. V.; Esirkepov, T. Zh. [Kansai Photon Science Institute, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, 8-1-7 Umemidai, Kizugawa-shi, Kyoto 619-0215 (Japan)

    2015-10-15

    Fast magnetic annihilation is investigated by using 2.5-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations of two parallel ultra-short petawatt laser pulses co-propagating in underdense plasma. The magnetic field generated by the laser pulses annihilates in a current sheet formed between the pulses. Magnetic field energy is converted to an inductive longitudinal electric field, which efficiently accelerates the electrons of the current sheet. This new regime of collisionless relativistic magnetic field annihilation with a timescale of tens of femtoseconds can be extended to near-critical and overdense plasma with the ultra-high intensity femtosecond laser pulses.

  6. High field terahertz emission from relativistic laser-driven plasma wakefields

    CERN Document Server

    Chen, Zi-Yu

    2015-01-01

    We propose a method to generate high field terahertz (THz) radiation with peak strength of GV/cm level in the THz frequency gap range 1-10 THz using a relativistic laser interaction with a gaseous plasma target. Due to the effect of local pump depletion, an initially Gaussian laser pulse undergoes leading edge erosion and eventually evolves to a state with leading edge being step function. Interacting with such a pulse, electrons gain transverse residual momentum and excite net transverse currents modulated by the relativistic plasma frequency. These currents give rise to the low frequency THz emission. We demonstrate this process with one and two dimensional particle-in-cell simulations.

  7. Microwave-driven plasmas in Hollow-Core Photonic Crystal Fibres

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alves, L. L.; Leroy, O.; Boisse-Laporte, C.; Leprince, P.; Debord, B.; Gerome, F.; Jamier, R.; Benabid, F.

    2013-09-01

    This paper reports on a novel solution to ignite and maintain micro-plasmas in gas-filled Hollow-Core Photonic Crystal Fibres (HC-PCFs), using CW microwave excitation (2.45 GHz). The original concept is based on a surfatron, generating argon micro-plasmas of few centimetres in length within a 100 μm core-diameter Kagome HC-PCF, at ~1 mbar on-gap gas-pressure using low powers (core diameter, pressure and electron density). Work supported by ANR and DGA (ASTRID-2011-UVfactor) and by FCT (Pest-OE/SADG/LA0010/2011).

  8. Accelerator Studies on a possible Experiment on Proton-Driven Plasma Wakefields at CERN

    CERN Document Server

    Assmann, R W; Fartoukh, S; Geschonke, G; Goddard, B; Hessler, C; Hillenbrand, S; Meddahi, M; Roesler, S; Zimmermann, F; Caldwell, A; Muggli, P; Xia, G

    2011-01-01

    There has been a proposal by Caldwell et al to use proton beams as drivers for high energy linear colliders. An experimental test with CERN’s proton beams is being studied. Such a test requires a transfer line for transporting the beam to the experiment, a focusing section for beam delivery into the plasma, the plasma cell and a downstream diagnostics and dump section. The work done at CERN towards the conceptual layout and design of such a test area is presented. A possible development of such a test area into a CERN test facility for high-gradient acceleration experiments is discussed.

  9. Stability of current-driven electrostatic waves in a magnetized and collisional negative ion plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Venugopal, Chandu; Varghese, Anu; S, Jyothi [School of Pure and Applied Physics, Mahatma Gandhi University, Priyadarshini Hills, Kottayam 686 560, Kerala (India); Issac, Molly [Department of Physics, All Saints' College, Thiruvananthapuram 695 007, Kerala (India); Renuka, G [Department of Physics, University of Kerala, Kariavattom, Thiruvananthapuram 695 581, Kerala (India)], E-mail: cvgmgphys@yahoo.co.in

    2008-10-15

    The stability of electrostatic waves, propagating nearly parallel to a uniform external magnetic field, is studied in a fully ionized, collisional plasma of positive and negative ions and a field-aligned current of drifting electrons. Expressions have been derived for the dispersion relation and growth rate using fluid theory and retaining the collisional and conductivity terms for the electrons. The plasma can, in general, support two modes, which have frequencies that are a composite of the ion acoustic and ion gyro frequencies. The growth rate of the modes increases with increasing drift velocities of the electrons and decreases with increasing negative ion densities.

  10. Design of Plasma Generator Driven by High-frequency High-voltage Power Supply

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Yong-Nong

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available In this research, a high-frequency high-voltage power supply designed for plasma generator is presented. The powersupply mainly consists of a series resonant converter with a high-frequency high-voltage boost transformer. Due to theindispensable high-voltage inheritance in the operation of plasma generator, the analysis of transformer needconsidering not only winding resistance, leakage inductance, magnetizing inductance, and core-loss resistance, butalso parasitic capacitance resulted from the insulation wrappings on the high-voltage side. This research exhibits asimple approach to measuring equivalent circuit parameters of the high-frequency, high-voltage transformer with straycapacitance being introduced into the conventional modeling. The proposed modeling scheme provides not only aprecise measurement procedure but also effective design information for series-load resonant converter. The plasmadischarging plate is designed as part of the electric circuit in the series load-resonant converter and the circuit modelof the plasma discharging plate is also conducted as well. Thus, the overall model of the high-voltage plasmagenerator is built and the designing procedures for appropriate selections of the corresponding resonant-circuitparameters can be established. Finally, a high-voltage plasma generator with 220V, 60Hz, and 1kW input, along witha 22 kHz and over 8kV output, is realized and implemented.

  11. Resonant-Cavity Driven Alfvén Waves in a Helium-Hydrogen Plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Mary; Dorfman, Seth; Vincena, Steve; Zhu, Ziyan; Carter, Troy

    2016-10-01

    Alfvén waves exist in many regimes. In fusion experiments, they can disrupt fusion processes by scattering particles, and in space, they are proposed to heat the solar corona. In these environments, multiple ion species usually occur. It is therefore relevant to study Alfvén waves carried by multiple ion species in a laboratory device. Here a resonant cavity launches them in UCLA's Large Plasma Device (LaPD) in a helium/hydrogen plasma. In a two-ion species plasma, Alfvén waves propagate in two bands: below the heavy ion cyclotron frequency and between a hybrid frequency and the light ion cyclotron frequency. We observe two Alfvén waves at different frequencies (in different bands) emerge when the resonant cavity is excited at one frequency: one at the driving frequency and one at a lower frequency. The two frequencies and wavelengths agree with the dispersion relation. The resonant cavity theory predicts that the wavelengths should be 4 times the cavity's length; only the high frequency lies close to this prediction. This work was funded by UCLA's Norton Rodman Award, and was performed at the Basic Plasma Science Facility, funded by DoE and NSF.

  12. History and results of the Riga dynamo experiments

    CERN Document Server

    Gailitis, Agris; Gundrum, Thomas; Lielausis, Olgerts; Platacis, Ernests; Stefani, Frank

    2008-01-01

    On 11 November 1999, a self-exciting magnetic eigenfield was detected for the first time in the Riga liquid sodium dynamo experiment. We report on the long history leading to this event, and on the subsequent experimental campaigns which provided a wealth of data on the kinematic and the saturated regime of this dynamo. The present state of the theoretical understanding of both regimes is delineated, and some comparisons with other laboratory dynamo experiments are made.

  13. Predictability and Coupled Dynamics of MJO During DYNAMO

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-02-03

    3. DATES COVERED (From - To) Jan 2013-Dec 2014 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Predictability and Coupled Dynamics of MJO During DYNAMO 5a. CONTRACT...release: distribution is unlimited. Predictability and Coupled Dynamics of MJO During DYNAMO Hyodae Seo Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution Woods...scientific goals of the proposed research are: 1. Examine the process by which the SST variability affects the MJO during the DYNAMO using a SCOAR2 regional

  14. Subcritical dynamo bifurcation in the Taylor-Green flow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ponty, Y; Laval, J-P; Dubrulle, B; Daviaud, F; Pinton, J-F

    2007-11-30

    We report direct numerical simulations of dynamo generation for flow generated using a Taylor-Green forcing. We find that the bifurcation is subcritical and show its bifurcation diagram. We connect the associated hysteretic behavior with hydrodynamics changes induced by the action of the Lorentz force. We show the geometry of the dynamo magnetic field and discuss how the dynamo transition can be induced when an external field is applied to the flow.

  15. Extracting scaling laws from numerical dynamo models

    CERN Document Server

    Stelzer, Z

    2013-01-01

    Earth's magnetic field is generated by processes in the electrically conducting, liquid outer core, subsumed under the term `geodynamo'. In the last decades, great effort has been put into the numerical simulation of core dynamics following from the magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) equations. However, the numerical simulations are far from Earth's core in terms of several control parameters. Different scaling analyses found simple scaling laws for quantities like heat transport, flow velocity, magnetic field strength and magnetic dissipation time. We use an extensive dataset of 116 numerical dynamo models compiled by Christensen and co-workers to analyse these scalings from a rigorous model selection point of view. Our method of choice is leave-one-out cross-validation which rates models according to their predictive abilities. In contrast to earlier results, we find that diffusive processes are not negligible for the flow velocity and magnetic field strength in the numerical dynamos. Also the scaling of the magneti...

  16. Dynamo theory prediction of solar activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schatten, Kenneth H.

    1988-01-01

    The dynamo theory technique to predict decadal time scale solar activity variations is introduced. The technique was developed following puzzling correlations involved with geomagnetic precursors of solar activity. Based upon this, a dynamo theory method was developed to predict solar activity. The method was used successfully in solar cycle 21 by Schatten, Scherrer, Svalgaard, and Wilcox, after testing with 8 prior solar cycles. Schatten and Sofia used the technique to predict an exceptionally large cycle, peaking early (in 1990) with a sunspot value near 170, likely the second largest on record. Sunspot numbers are increasing, suggesting that: (1) a large cycle is developing, and (2) that the cycle may even surpass the largest cycle (19). A Sporer Butterfly method shows that the cycle can now be expected to peak in the latter half of 1989, consistent with an amplitude comparable to the value predicted near the last solar minimum.

  17. SADE: The starspot and dynamo explorer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martens, P. C. H.; Acton, L. W. A.; Klumpar, D.; Kankelborg, C.; Stern, R. A.; Peres, G.; Culhane, J. L.

    2003-09-01

    We propose a mission called SADE, the Starspot And Dynamo Explorer, to study dynamo activity in nearby late-type stars. The onboard instruments will be a Ca-K telescope for magnetically dominated chromospheric emission, and an X-ray grazing incidence telescope to study coronal emission. We design the mission for a life-time of 15 years or longer to capture a full activity cycle for most solar-type stars. We aim to firmly establish the spectrum of the relation between chromospheric and corona' emission in late-type stars, and capture one or more stars going into or coming out of a Maunder type minimum. Operation costs will be kept to a minimum by automating mission operations to a maximum, and have the science operations be carried out by students at Montana State University.

  18. An ancient core dynamo in asteroid Vesta.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Roger R; Weiss, Benjamin P; Shuster, David L; Gattacceca, Jérôme; Grove, Timothy L; Suavet, Clément; Lima, Eduardo A; Li, Luyao; Kuan, Aaron T

    2012-10-12

    The asteroid Vesta is the smallest known planetary body that has experienced large-scale igneous differentiation. However, it has been previously uncertain whether Vesta and similarly sized planetesimals formed advecting metallic cores and dynamo magnetic fields. Here we show that remanent magnetization in the eucrite meteorite Allan Hills A81001 formed during cooling on Vesta 3.69 billion years ago in a surface magnetic field of at least 2 microteslas. This field most likely originated from crustal remanence produced by an earlier dynamo, suggesting that Vesta formed an advecting liquid metallic core. Furthermore, the inferred present-day crustal fields can account for the lack of solar wind ion-generated space weathering effects on Vesta.

  19. Universal nonlinear small-scale dynamo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beresnyak, A

    2012-01-20

    We consider astrophysically relevant nonlinear MHD dynamo at large Reynolds numbers (Re). We argue that it is universal in a sense that magnetic energy grows at a rate which is a constant fraction C(E) of the total turbulent dissipation rate. On the basis of locality bounds we claim that this "efficiency of the small-scale dynamo", C(E), is a true constant for large Re and is determined only by strongly nonlinear dynamics at the equipartition scale. We measured C(E) in numerical simulations and observed a value around 0.05 in the highest resolution simulations. We address the issue of C(E) being small, unlike the Kolmogorov constant which is of order unity.

  20. Invisible dynamo in mean-field models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reshetnyak, M. Yu.

    2016-07-01

    The inverse problem in a spherical shell to find the two-dimensional spatial distributions of the α-effect and differential rotation in a mean-field dynamo model has been solved. The derived distributions lead to the generation of a magnetic field concentrated inside the convection zone. The magnetic field is shown to have no time to rise from the region of maximum generation located in the lower layers to the surface in the polarity reversal time due to magnetic diffusion. The ratio of the maximum magnetic energy in the convection zone to its value at the outer boundary reaches two orders of magnitude or more. This result is important in interpreting the observed stellar and planetary magnetic fields. The proposed method of solving the inverse nonlinear dynamo problem is easily adapted for a wide class of mathematical-physics problems.