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Sample records for plasma circulating cell

  1. Circulating human B and plasma cells. Age-associated changes in counts and detailed characterization of circulating normal CD138(-) and CD138(+) plasma cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Caraux, Anouk; Klein, Bernard; Paiva, Bruno; Bret, Caroline; Schmitz, Alexander; Fuhler, Gwenny M.; Bos, Nico A.; Johnsen, Hans E.; Orfao, Alberto; Perez-Andres, Martin

    2010-01-01

    Generation of B and plasma cells involves several organs with a necessary cell trafficking between them. A detailed phenotypic characterization of four circulating B-cell subsets (immature-, naive-, memory- B-lymphocytes and plasma cells) of 106 healthy adults was realized by multiparametric flow cy

  2. Circulating human B and plasma cells. Age-associated changes in counts and detailed characterization of circulating normal CD138- and CD138+ plasma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caraux, Anouk; Klein, Bernard; Paiva, Bruno; Bret, Caroline; Schmitz, Alexander; Fuhler, Gwenny M; Bos, Nico A; Johnsen, Hans E; Orfao, Alberto; Perez-Andres, Martin

    2010-06-01

    Generation of B and plasma cells involves several organs with a necessary cell trafficking between them. A detailed phenotypic characterization of four circulating B-cell subsets (immature-, naïve-, memory- B-lymphocytes and plasma cells) of 106 healthy adults was realized by multiparametric flow cytometry. We show that CD10, CD27 and CD38 is the minimal combination of subsetting markers allowing unequivocal identification of immature (CD10(+)CD27(-)CD38(+), 6+/-6 cells/microL), naïve (CD10(-)CD27(-)CD38(-), 125+/-90 cells/microL), memory B lymphocytes (CD10(-)CD27(+)CD38(-), 58+/-42 cells/microL), and plasma cells (CD10(-)CD27(++)CD38(++), 2.1+/-2.1 cells/microL) within circulating CD19(+) cells. From these four subsets, only memory B lymphocytes and plasma cells decreased with age, both in relative and absolute counts. Circulating plasma cells split into CD138(-) (57+/-12%) and CD138(+) (43+/-12%) cells, the latter displaying a more mature phenotypic profile: absence of surface immunoglobulin, lower CD45 positivity and higher amounts of cytoplasmic immunoglobulin, CD38 and CD27. Unlike B lymphocytes, both populations of plasma cells are KI-67(+) and show weak CXCR4 expression.

  3. Circulating human B and plasma cells. Age-associated changes in counts and detailed characterization of circulating normal CD138- and CD138+ plasma cells. : Blood B-lymphocytes and plasma cells in adults

    OpenAIRE

    2010-01-01

    International audience; Generation of B and plasma cells involves several organs with a necessary cell trafficking between them. A detailed phenotypic characterization of four circulating B-cell subsets (immature-, naïve-, memory- B-lymphocytes and plasma cells) of 106 healthy adults was realized by multiparametric flow cytometry. We show that CD10, CD27 and CD38 is the minimal combination of subsetting markers allowing unequivocal identification of immature (CD10(+)CD27(-)CD38(+), 6+/-6 cell...

  4. Circulating plasma cells in multiple myeloma: characterization and correlation with disease stage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rawstron, A C; Owen, R G; Davies, F E; Johnson, R J; Jones, R A; Richards, S J; Evans, P A; Child, J A; Smith, G M; Jack, A S; Morgan, G J

    1997-04-01

    The aim of this study was to develop a flow cytometric test to quantitate low levels of circulating myeloma plasma cells, and to determine the relationship of these cells with disease stage. Cells were characterized using five-parameter flow cytometric analysis with a panel of antibodies, and results were evaluated by comparison with fluorescent consensus-primer IgH-PCR. Bone marrow myeloma plasma cells, defined by high CD38 and Syndecan-1 expression, did not express CD10, 23, 30, 34 or 45RO, and demonstrated weak expression of CD37 and CD45. 65% of patients had CD19- 56+ plasma cells, 30% CD19- 56(low), and 5% CD19+ 56+, and these two antigens discriminated myeloma from normal plasma cells, which were all CD19+ 56(low). Peripheral blood myeloma plasma cells had the same composite phenotype, but expressed significantly lower levels of CD56 and Syndecan-1, and were detected in 75% (38/51) of patients at presentation, 92% (11/12) of patients in relapse, and 40% (4/10) of stem cell harvests. Circulating plasma cells were not detectable in patients in CR (n = 9) or normals (n = 10), at a sensitivity of up to 1 in 10,000 cells. There was good correlation between the flow cytometric test and IgH-PCR results: myeloma plasma cells were detectable by flow cytometry in all PCR positive samples, and samples with no detectable myeloma plasma cells were PCR negative. Absolute numbers decreased in patients responding to treatment, remained elevated in patients with refractory disease, and increased in patients undergoing relapse. We conclude that flow cytometry can provide an effective aternative to IgH-PCR that will allow quantitative assessment of low levels of residual disease.

  5. Increased plasma levels of circulating cell-free mitochondrial DNA in suicide attempters: associations with HPA-axis hyperactivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindqvist, D; Fernström, J; Grudet, C; Ljunggren, L; Träskman-Bendz, L; Ohlsson, L; Westrin, Å

    2016-12-06

    Preclinical data suggest that chronic stress may cause cellular damage and mitochondrial dysfunction, potentially leading to the release of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) into the bloodstream. Major depressive disorder has been associated with an increased amount of mtDNA in leukocytes from saliva samples and blood; however, no previous studies have measured plasma levels of free-circulating mtDNA in a clinical psychiatric sample. In this study, free circulating mtDNA was quantified in plasma samples from 37 suicide attempters, who had undergone a dexamethasone suppression test (DST), and 37 healthy controls. We hypothesized that free circulating mtDNA would be elevated in the suicide attempters and would be associated with hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA)-axis hyperactivity. Suicide attempters had significantly higher plasma levels of free-circulating mtDNA compared with healthy controls at different time points (pre- and post-DST; all P-valuesSuicide attempters may have elevated plasma levels of free-circulating mtDNA, which are related to impaired HPA-axis negative feedback. This peripheral index is consistent with an increased cellular or mitochondrial damage. The specific cells and tissues contributing to plasma levels of free-circulating mtDNA are not known, as is the specificity of this finding for suicide attempters. Future studies are needed in order to better understand the relevance of increased free-circulating mtDNA in relation to the pathophysiology underlying suicidal behavior and depression.

  6. Circulating plasma cells detected by flow cytometry as a predictor of survival in 302 patients with newly diagnosed multiple myeloma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nowakowski, Grzegorz S; Witzig, Thomas E; Dingli, David; Tracz, Michal J; Gertz, Morie A; Lacy, Martha Q; Lust, John A; Dispenzieri, Angela; Greipp, Philip R; Kyle, Robert A; Rajkumar, S Vincent

    2005-10-01

    We detected circulating plasma cells (PCs) by flow cytometry in 302 patients with newly diagnosed multiple myeloma (MM) by gating on CD38+CD45- cells. The number of circulating PCs per 50 000 mononuclear cells was reported. In 80 (27%) patients, no circulating PC were seen; 106 (35%) patients had 1 to 10 and 115 (38%) patients had more than 10 circulating PCs. Median overall survival for the 302 patients was 47 months. Patients with 10 or fewer circulating PCs had a median survival of 58.7 months, whereas patients with more than 10 circulating PCs had a median survival of 37.3 months (P = .001). On multivariate analysis, the prognostic value of circulating PCs was independent of beta2-microglobulin, albumin, and C-reactive protein. There was only a weak correlation between tumor mass and circulating PCs, suggesting that the appearance of circulating PCs may be a reflection of tumor biology. We conclude that the number of circulating PCs measured by flow cytometry in patients with newly diagnosed MM is an independent predictor of survival.

  7. Levels of plasma circulating cell free nuclear and mitochondrial DNA as potential biomarkers for breast tumors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diesch Claude

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background With the aim to simplify cancer management, cancer research lately dedicated itself more and more to discover and develop non-invasive biomarkers. In this connection, circulating cell-free DNA (ccf DNA seems to be a promising candidate. Altered levels of ccf nuclear DNA (nDNA and mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA have been found in several cancer types and might have a diagnostic value. Methods Using multiplex real-time PCR we investigated the levels of ccf nDNA and mtDNA in plasma samples from patients with malignant and benign breast tumors, and from healthy controls. To evaluate the applicability of plasma ccf nDNA and mtDNA as a biomarker for distinguishing between the three study-groups we performed ROC (Receiver Operating Characteristic curve analysis. We also compared the levels of both species in the cancer group with clinicopathological parameters. Results While the levels of ccf nDNA in the cancer group were significantly higher in comparison with the benign tumor group (P P P P = 0.022. The level of ccf nDNA was also associated with tumor-size (2 cmP = 0.034. Using ROC curve analysis, we were able to distinguish between the breast cancer cases and the healthy controls using ccf nDNA as marker (cut-off: 1866 GE/ml; sensitivity: 81%; specificity: 69%; P P Conclusion Our data suggests that nuclear and mitochondrial ccf DNA have potential as biomarkers in breast tumor management. However, ccf nDNA shows greater promise regarding sensitivity and specificity.

  8. Isolation of Circulating Plasma Cells in Multiple Myeloma Using CD138 Antibody-Based Capture in a Microfluidic Device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qasaimeh, Mohammad A.; Wu, Yichao C.; Bose, Suman; Menachery, Anoop; Talluri, Srikanth; Gonzalez, Gabriel; Fulciniti, Mariateresa; Karp, Jeffrey M.; Prabhala, Rao H.; Karnik, Rohit

    2017-04-01

    The necessity for bone marrow aspiration and the lack of highly sensitive assays to detect residual disease present challenges for effective management of multiple myeloma (MM), a plasma cell cancer. We show that a microfluidic cell capture based on CD138 antigen, which is highly expressed on plasma cells, permits quantitation of rare circulating plasma cells (CPCs) in blood and subsequent fluorescence-based assays. The microfluidic device is based on a herringbone channel design, and exhibits an estimated cell capture efficiency of ~40-70%, permitting detection of <10 CPCs/mL using 1-mL sample volumes, which is difficult using existing techniques. In bone marrow samples, the microfluidic-based plasma cell counts exhibited excellent correlation with flow cytometry analysis. In peripheral blood samples, the device detected a baseline of 2-5 CD138+ cells/mL in healthy donor blood, with significantly higher numbers in blood samples of MM patients in remission (20-24 CD138+ cells/mL), and yet higher numbers in MM patients exhibiting disease (45-184 CD138+ cells/mL). Analysis of CPCs isolated using the device was consistent with serum immunoglobulin assays that are commonly used in MM diagnostics. These results indicate the potential of CD138-based microfluidic CPC capture as a useful ‘liquid biopsy’ that may complement or partially replace bone marrow aspiration.

  9. A flow cytometric method for characterization of circulating cell-derived microparticles in plasma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Morten Hjuler; Beck-Nielsen, Henning; Andersen, Morten Nørgaard;

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND AIM: Previous studies on circulating microparticles (MPs) indicate that the majority of MPs are of a size below the detection limit of most standard flow cytometers. The objective of the present study was to establish a method to analyze MP subpopulations above the threshold...... of detection of a new generation BD FACSAria™ III digital flow cytometer. METHODS: We analyzed MP subpopulations in plasma from 24 healthy individuals (9 males and 15 females). MPs were identified according to their size (.... The sensitivity of the flow cytometer was tested against that of a previous-generation instrument FC500. Reproducibility of the FACSAria and our set-up was investigated, and the percentage of phosphatidylserine (PS) exposing MPs binding Lactadherin was determined. RESULTS: By using a flow cytometric approach we...

  10. Kinetics of Circulating Plasma Cell-Free DNA in Paediatric Classical Hodgkin Lymphoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Primerano, Simona; Burnelli, Roberta; Carraro, Elisa; Pillon, Marta; Elia, Caterina; Farruggia, Piero; Sala, Alessandra; Vinti, Luciana; Buffardi, Salvatore; Basso, Giuseppe; Mascarin, Maurizio; Mussolin, Lara

    2016-01-01

    Levels of plasma cell-free DNA (cfDNA) of a large series of children with classical Hodgkin lymphoma (cHL) were evaluated and analyzed at diagnosis and during chemotherapy treatment in relation with clinical characteristics. CfDNA levels in cHL patients were significantly higher compared with controls (p=0.002). CfDNA at diagnosis was correlated with presence of B symptoms (p=0.027) and high erythrocyte sedimentation rate (p=0.049). We found that the increasing of plasma cfDNA after first chemotherapy cycle seems to be associated with a worse prognosis (p=0.049). Levels of plasma cfDNA might constitute an interesting non-invasive tool in cHL patients' management. PMID:26918050

  11. In-depth characterization of viral isolates from plasma and cells compared with plasma circulating quasispecies in early HIV-1 infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Judith Dalmau

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The use of in vitro models to unravel the phenotypic characteristics of circulating viral variants is key to understanding HIV-1 pathogenesis but limited by the availability of primary viral isolates from biological samples. However, overall in vivo genetic variability of HIV-1 within a subject may not be reflected in the viable viral population obtained after isolation. Although several studies have tried to determine whether viral populations expanded in vitro are representative of in vivo findings, the answer remains unclear due to the reduced number of clonal sequences analyzed or samples compared. In order to overcome previous experimental limitations, here we applied Deep Pyrosequencing (DPS technology in combination with phenotypic experiments to analyze and compare with unprecedented detail the composition of viral isolates and in vivo quasispecies. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We amplified by DPS HIV-1 genomic regions covering gag, protease, integrase and env-V3 to characterize paired isolates from plasma and peripheral blood mononuclear cells and compare them with total plasma viral RNA in four recently HIV-1 infected subjects. Our study demonstrated the presence of unique haplotypes scattered between sample types with conservation of major variants. In addition, no differences in intra- and inter-population encoded protein variability were found between the different types of isolates or when these were compared to plasma viral RNA within subjects. Additionally, in vitro experiments demonstrated phenotypic similarities in terms of replicative capacity and co-receptor usage between viral isolates and plasma viral RNA. CONCLUSION: This study is the first in-depth comparison and characterization of viral isolates from different sources and plasma circulating quasispecies using DPS in recently HIV-1 infected subjects. Our data supports the use of primary isolates regardless of their plasma or cellular origin to define

  12. Increased plasma levels of circulating cell-free mitochondrial DNA in suicide attempters: associations with HPA-axis hyperactivity

    OpenAIRE

    Lindqvist, D.; Fernström, J; Grudet, C; Ljunggren, L; Träskman-Bendz, L; Ohlsson, L; Westrin, Å

    2016-01-01

    Preclinical data suggest that chronic stress may cause cellular damage and mitochondrial dysfunction, potentially leading to the release of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) into the bloodstream. Major depressive disorder has been associated with an increased amount of mtDNA in leukocytes from saliva samples and blood; however, no previous studies have measured plasma levels of free-circulating mtDNA in a clinical psychiatric sample. In this study, free circulating mtDNA was quantified in plasma samp...

  13. Differential regulation of self-reactivity discriminates between IgG+ human circulating memory B cells and bone marrow plasma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheid, Johannes F; Mouquet, Hugo; Kofer, Juliane; Yurasov, Sergey; Nussenzweig, Michel C; Wardemann, Hedda

    2011-11-01

    Long-term humoral immunity is maintained by the formation of high-affinity class-switched memory B cells and long-lived antibody-secreting plasma cells. In healthy humans, a substantial fraction of IgG-positive memory B cells express self-reactive and polyreactive IgG antibodies that frequently develop by somatic mutations. Whether self- and polyreactive IgG-secreting B cells are also tolerated in the long-lived plasma cell pool is not known. To address this question, we cloned and expressed the Ig genes from 177 IgG-producing bone marrow plasma cells of four healthy donors. All antibodies were highly mutated but the frequency of self- and polyreactive IgG antibodies was significantly lower than that found in circulating memory B cells. The data suggest that in contrast to the development of memory B cells, entry into the bone marrow plasma cell compartment requires previously unappreciated selective regulation by mechanisms that limit the production of self- and polyreactive serum IgG antibodies.

  14. Circulating plasma cells in newly diagnosed symptomatic multiple myeloma as a possible prognostic marker for patients with standard-risk cytogenetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vagnoni, Davide; Travaglini, Fosco; Pezzoni, Valerio; Ruggieri, Miriana; Bigazzi, Catia; Dalsass, Alessia; Mestichelli, Francesca; Troiani, Emanuela; Falcioni, Sadia; Mazzotta, Serena; Natale, Annalisa; Angelini, Mario; Ferretti, Silvia; Angelini, Stefano; Galieni, Piero

    2015-08-01

    Detection of circulating plasma cells (PCs) in multiple myeloma (MM) patients is a well-known prognostic factor. We evaluated circulating PCs by flow cytometry (FC) in 104 patients with active MM at diagnosis by gating on CD38(+)  CD45(-) cells and examined their relationship with cytogenetic risk. Patients had an average follow-up of 36 months. By using a receiver operating characteristics analysis, we estimated the optimal cut-off of circulating PCs for defining poor prognosis to be 41. Patients with high-risk cytogenetics (n = 24) had poor prognosis, independently of circulating PC levels [PC cytogenetics (n = 65) showed a better prognosis when associated with a lower number of circulating PCs (PC cytogenetics confirmed that the co-presence of circulating PCs ≥ 41, older age, Durie-Salmon stage >I and lack of maintenance adversely affected PFS, while OS was adversely affected only by lactate dehydrogenase, older age and lack of maintenance. Our results indicate that the quantification of circulating PCs by a simple two-colour FC analysis can provide useful prognostic information in newly diagnosed MM patients with standard-risk cytogenetics.

  15. Formation and plasma circulation of solar prominences

    CERN Document Server

    Xia, Chun

    2016-01-01

    Solar prominences are long-lived cool and dense plasma curtains in the hot and rarefied outer solar atmosphere or corona. The physical mechanism responsible for their formation and especially for their internal plasma circulation has been uncertain for decades. The observed ubiquitous down flows in quiescent prominences are difficult to interpret as plasma with high conductivity seems to move across horizontal magnetic field lines. Here we present three-dimensional numerical simulations of prominence formation and evolution in an elongated magnetic flux rope as a result of in-situ plasma condensations fueled by continuous plasma evaporation from the solar chromosphere. The prominence is born and maintained in a fragmented, highly dynamic state with continuous reappearance of multiple blobs and thread structures that move mainly downward dragging along mass-loaded field lines. The prominence plasma circulation is characterized by the dynamic balance between the drainage of prominence plasma back to the chromos...

  16. Circulating levels of maternal plasma cell-free pregnancy-associated placenta-specific microRNAs are associated with placental weight.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miura, K; Morisaki, S; Abe, S; Higashijima, A; Hasegawa, Y; Miura, S; Tateishi, S; Mishima, H; Yoshiura, K; Masuzaki, H

    2014-10-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the relationship between plasma concentration of cell-free pregnancy-associated placenta-specific microRNAs and clinical variables (placental weight, maternal body mass index, and neonatal birth weight). Circulating levels of cell-free pregnancy-associated placenta-specific microRNAs (miR-515-3p, miR-517a, miR-517c and miR-518b) in maternal plasma were measured by quantitative real-time RT-PCR in sixty-two pregnant women. The levels of cell-free pregnancy-associated placenta-specific microRNAs were significantly associated with placental weight, but not associated with body mass index or birth weight. Therefore, the measurement of cell-free pregnancy-associated placenta-specific miRNAs levels in maternal plasma may reflect the pregnancy status related to placenta volume.

  17. FORMATION AND PLASMA CIRCULATION OF SOLAR PROMINENCES

    OpenAIRE

    Xia, Chun; Keppens, Rony

    2016-01-01

    Solar prominences are long-lived cool and dense plasma curtains in the hot and rarefied outer solar atmosphere or corona. The physical mechanism responsible for their formation and especially for their internal plasma circulation has been uncertain for decades. The observed ubiquitous down flows in quiescent prominences are difficult to interpret as plasma with high conductivity seems to move across horizontal magnetic field lines. Here we present three-dimensional numerical simulations of pr...

  18. Formation and Plasma Circulation of Solar Prominences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, C.; Keppens, R.

    2016-05-01

    Solar prominences are long-lived cool and dense plasma curtains in the hot and rarefied outer solar atmosphere or corona. The physical mechanism responsible for their formation and especially for their internal plasma circulation has been uncertain for decades. The observed ubiquitous downflows in quiescent prominences are difficult to interpret because plasma with high conductivity seems to move across horizontal magnetic field lines. Here we present three-dimensional numerical simulations of prominence formation and evolution in an elongated magnetic flux rope as a result of in situ plasma condensations fueled by continuous plasma evaporation from the solar chromosphere. The prominence is born and maintained in a fragmented, highly dynamic state with continuous reappearance of multiple blobs and thread structures that move mainly downward, dragging along mass-loaded field lines. The circulation of prominence plasma is characterized by the dynamic balance between the drainage of prominence plasma back to the chromosphere and the formation of prominence plasma via continuous condensation. Plasma evaporates from the chromosphere, condenses into the prominence in the corona, and drains back to the chromosphere, establishing a stable chromosphere-corona plasma cycle. Synthetic images of the modeled prominence with the Solar Dynamics Observatory Atmospheric Imaging Assembly closely resemble actual observations, with many dynamical threads underlying an elliptical coronal cavity.

  19. ENO1 Protein Levels in the Tumor Tissues and Circulating Plasma Samples of Non-small Cell Lung Cancer Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ying ZHANG

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Background and objective Proper tumor markers are useful to diagnosis, prognosis and treatment for lung cancer. The aim of this study is to examine the levels of alpha-enolase (ENO1 protein in the tumor tissues and peripheral plasma samples obtained from non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC patients, and evaluate its potential clinical significance. Methods The ENO1 protein levels in the tumor tissues and corresponding normal tissues from 16 cases of lung squamous cell carcinoma were analyzed by Western blot. The ENO1 protein levels in the plasma samples from 42 healthy individuals, 34 patients with lung benign disease and 84 patients with NSCLC were measured by double antibody sandwich enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Results For 87.5% (14/16 of the patients with lung squamous cell carcinoma, the ENO1 protein level in the tumor tissues was higher than that in the corresponding normal lung tissues. The ENO1 protein level in the plasma of NSCLC patients was significantly higher than that in the plasma of healthy individuals (P=0.031 and patients with lung benign disease (P=0.019. Furthermore, the ENO1 protein level was significantly higher in the plasma of patients with lung adenocarcinoma than that of patients with lung squamous cell carcinoma. Conclusion The elevated levels of ENO1 protein in the tumor tissues and the plasma samples from NSCLC patients indicate ENO1 may be a candidate biomarker of lung cancer.

  20. Isolation and characterization of circulating micro(nano)vesicles in the plasma of colorectal cancer patients and their interactions with tumor cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stec, Małgorzata; Baj-Krzyworzeka, Monika; Baran, Jarosław; Węglarczyk, Kazimierz; Zembala, Maria; Barbasz, Jakub; Szczepanik, Antoni; Zembala, Marek

    2015-11-01

    Micro(nano)vesicles (MV) are regarded as important messengers in cell-to-cell communication. There is also evidence for their pivotal role in cancer progression. Circulating MV are of different body cells origin, including tumor cell‑derived MV (TMV) in cancer patients. Determination of circulating TMV is of importance because of their potential diagnostic and therapeutic applications. In the present study, an analysis of circulating MV in colorectal cancer (CRC) patients was undertaken. Plasma from healthy donors was used as the control. In order to define MV characteristics, two plasma fractions: obtained by sequential centrifugation at 15,000 x g (MV15) and 50,000 x g (MV50) were used for analysis. The two fractions possessed a large range of sizes: 70(80)-1,300(1,400) nm and the most common particles with sizes 70-90 nm, both in patients and controls. Atomic force microscopy images of MV50 revealed a heterogeneous population of particles with different shapes and sizes. MV15 contained an increased level of CD41+ and CD61+ particles, suggesting their platelet origin. No difference between patients and controls was observed. A more precise analysis of MV50 showed the increased level of particles expressing EGFR (HER-1/Erb B1), HER-2/neu and Mucin1 (MUC1), suggesting their tumor origin. The total level of MV50‑expressing EGFR, HER-2/neu and MUC1 was enhanced in CRC patients. MV50 both of patients and controls attached to a colon cancer cell line (SW480) and to isolated blood monocytes at 2 h and were engulfed at 24 h. This uptake showed the lack of specificity. Thus, apart from the direct delivery of MV to the tumor site by plasma, monocytes carrying MV may also be involved in their transportation. Taken together, the presented data indicate that MV15 contain mainly platelet‑derived particles, while MV50 from CRC patients are enriched in TMV. Interaction of MV with cancer cells may pin-point their role in communication between tumor cells, resulting

  1. Plasma cell leukemia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fernández de Larrea, C; Kyle, R A; Durie, B G M

    2013-01-01

    Plasma cell leukemia (PCL) is a rare and aggressive variant of myeloma characterized by the presence of circulating plasma cells. It is classified as either primary PCL occurring at diagnosis or as secondary PCL in patients with relapsed/refractory myeloma. Primary PCL is a distinct clinic......-pathological entity with different cytogenetic and molecular findings. The clinical course is aggressive with short remissions and survival duration. The diagnosis is based upon the percentage (≥ 20%) and absolute number (≥ 2 × 10(9)/l) of plasma cells in the peripheral blood. It is proposed that the thresholds...... regimens and bortezomib-based regimens are recommended followed by high-dose therapy with autologous stem cell transplantation if feasible. Allogeneic transplantation can be considered in younger patients. Prospective multicenter studies are required to provide revised definitions and better understanding...

  2. Advances on circulating fetal DNA in maternal plasma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    FU Xian-hu; CHEN Han-ping

    2007-01-01

    @@ The discovery of cell-free fetal DNA in maternal plasma in 1997 has opened up new possibilities for noninvasive diagnosis.1 By RT-PCR, circulating fetal DNA can be detected in the plasma of pregnant women,even in the first trimester of pregnancy,2,3 and thus can be used for noninvasive prenatal diagnosis of sex-linked disorders,4-6 the RhD status of fetuses,7 and single gene disorders such as beta-thalassaemia,8,9 congenital adrenal hyperplasia,10 and achondroplasia.11 In addition,quantitative aberrations of circulating fetal DNA may indicate various pregnancy-associated disorders,including1 Preeclampsia,12-14 preterm labor15,16 and fetal trisomy 21.17

  3. Evidence of cell damages caused by circulating bubbles: high level of free mitochondrial DNA in plasma of rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vallée, Nicolas; Gaillard, Sandrine; Peinnequin, André; Risso, Jean-Jacques; Blatteau, Jean-Eric

    2013-11-01

    Bubble formation can occur in the vascular system after diving, leading to decompression sickness (DCS). DCS signs and symptoms range from minor to death. Too often, patients are admitted to a hyperbaric center with atypical symptoms, as bubbles cannot be detected anymore. In the absence of a relevant biomarker for humans, the therapeutic management remains difficult. As circulating DNA was found in the blood of healthy humans and animals, our study was made to correlate the extracellular mitochondrial DNA (mDNA) concentration with the occurrence of clinical DCS symptoms resulting from initial bubble-induced damages. Therefore, 109 rats were subjected to decompression from a simulated 90-m sea water dive, after which, 78 rats survived (71.6%). Among the survivors, 15.6% exhibited typical DCS symptoms (DCS group), whereas the remaining 56% showed no detectable symptoms (noDCS group). Here, we report that the symptomatic rats displayed both a circulating mDNA level (DNADCS → 2.99 ± 2.62) and a bubble grade (median Spencer score = 3) higher than rats from the noDCS group (DNAnoDCS → 1.49 ± 1.27; Spencer score = 1). These higher levels could be correlated with the platelet and leukocyte consumption induced by the pathogenic decompression. Rats with no detectable bubble had lower circulating mDNA than those with higher bubble scores. We determined that in rats, a level of circulating mDNA >1.91 was highly predictive of DCS with a positive-predictive value of 87.3% and an odds ratio of 4.57. Thus circulating mDNA could become a relevant biomarker to diagnose DCS and should be investigated further to confirm its potential application in humans.

  4. Fetal RHD Genotyping from Circulating Cell-Free Fetal DNA in Plasma of Rh Negative Pregnant Women in Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmadi, Mohammad Hossein; Hantuoshzadeh, Sedigheh; Okhovat, Mohammad Ali; Nasiri, Nahid; Azarkeivan, Azita; Amirizadeh, Naser

    2016-12-01

    The prenatal determination of the fetal Rh genotype could lead to a substantial reduction in the use of anti-D immunoglobulin and prevention of unnecessary exposure of pregnant women carrying RhD negative fetus. The aim of this study was fetal RHD genotyping through the analysis of cffDNA in plasma samples of RhD negative pregnant women by real-time PCR technique. In this experiment, 30 plasma samples were collected from RhD negative pregnant women. DNA were extracted and real-time PCR reactions were done by specific primers for RHD, SRY and beta-globin (GLO) genes. The Rh phenotypes of mothers and their babies were determined by agglutination method and specific anti-serums. From the 30 maternal plasma samples considered for SRY genotyping, 16 samples revealed the presence of the SRY gene. Regarding the fetal RHD genotyping, 26 samples were positive for RhD and 4 samples were negative. In all cases, the predicted RhD and SRY genotypes were in concordance with the serologically determined phenotypes. The sensitivity, specificity and precision of the fetal RHD and SRY genotyping test were calculated 100 % (p value <0.0005; K = 100 %). The present study confirms the precision of fetal RHD and SRY genotyping in maternal plasma by real-time PCR technique. This method helps RhD negative pregnant women about the appropriate use of anti-D immunoglobulin and also on the management and prevention of HDFN. However, superior and confirmatory studies are recommended before fetal RHD genotyping by real-time PCR is introduced as a non-invasive prenatal screening test.

  5. PLASMA CELL LEUKEMIA

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Larrea, Carlos Fernandez; Kyle, Robert A.; Durie, Brian GM; Ludwig, Heinz; Usmani, Saad; Vesole, David H.; Hajek, Roman; Miguel, Jésus San; Sezer, Orhan; Sonneveld, Pieter; Kumar, Shaji K.; Mahindra, Anuj; Comenzo, Ray; Palumbo, Antonio; Mazumber, Amitabha; Anderson, Kenneth C.; Richardson, Paul G.; Badros, Ashraf Z.; Caers, Jo; Cavo, Michele; LeLeu, Xavier; Dimopoulos, Meletios A.; Chim, CS; Schots, Rik; Noeul, Amara; Fantl, Dorotea; Mellqvist, Ulf-Henrik; Landgren, Ola; Chanan-Khan, Asher; Moreau, Philippe; Fonseca, Rafael; Merlini, Giampaolo; Lahuerta, JJ; Bladé, Joan; Orlowski, Robert Z.; Shah, Jatin J.

    2014-01-01

    Plasma cell leukemia (PCL) is a rare and aggressive variant of myeloma characterized by the presence of circulating plasma cells. It is classified as either primary PCL occurring at diagnosis or as secondary PCL in patients with relapsed/refractory myeloma. Primary PCL is a distinct clinic-pathologic entity with different cytogenetic and molecular findings. The clinical course is aggressive with short remissions and survival duration. The diagnosis is based upon the percentage (≥ 20%) and absolute number (≥ 2 × 10 9/L) of plasma cells in the peripheral blood. It is proposed that the thresholds for diagnosis be reexamined and consensus recommendations are made for diagnosis, as well as, response and progression criteria. Induction therapy needs to begin promptly and have high clinical activity leading to rapid disease control in an effort to minimize the risk of early death. Intensive chemotherapy regimens and bortezomib-based regimens are recommended followed by high-dose therapy with autologous stem-cell transplantation (HDT/ASCT) if feasible. Allogeneic transplantation can be considered in younger patients. Prospective multicenter studies are required to provide revised definitions and better understanding of the pathogenesis of PCL. PMID:23288300

  6. Chromosomal aberrations are shared by malignant plasma cells and a small fraction of circulating CD19+ cells in patients with myeloma and monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Zojer, Niklas; Schuster-Kolbe, Judith; Assmann, Irene; Ackermann, Jutta; Strasser, Kathrin; Hubl, Wolfgang; Drach, Johannes; Ludwig, Heinz

    2002-01-01

    In the present study, we aimed to identify distinct structural and numerical chromosomal aberrations in peripheral blood B cells of patients with myeloma and monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance (MGUS...

  7. Plasma circulating fibrinogen stability and moderate beer consumption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorinstein, Shela; Caspi, Abraham; Zemser, Marina; Libman, Imanuel; Goshev, Ivan; Trakhtenberg, Simon

    2003-12-01

    MODERATE BEER CONSUMPTION (MBC) IS CARDIOPROTECTIVE: it positively influences plasma lipid levels and plasma antioxidant activity in beer-consuming individuals. The connection between MBC and blood coagulation is not clearly defined. Forty-two volunteers were equally divided into experimental (EG) and control (CG) groups following coronary bypass surgery. For 30 consecutive days, only patients of the EG consumed 330 mL of beer per day (about 20 g of alcohol). A comprehensive clinical investigation of 42 patients was done. Blood samples were collected before and after the investigation for a wide range of laboratory tests. The plasma fibrinogen was denatured with 8 M urea and intrinsic fluorescence (IF), hydrophobicity and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) were used to reveal possible qualitative changes. After 30 days of moderate beer consumption, positive changes in the plasma lipid levels, plasma anticoagulant and plasma antioxidant activities were registered in patients of the EG group. In 17 out of 21 patients of the same group, differences in plasma circulating fibrinogen's (PCF), secondary and tertiary structures were found. The stability of fibrinogen, expressed in thermodynamic parameters, has shown that the loosening of the structure takes place under ethanol and urea denaturation. Also fluorescence stability of PCF was decreased. No changes in the lipid levels, anticoagulant and antioxidant activity or changes in PCF were detected in patients of CG. In conclusion, for the first time after a short term of moderate beer consumption some qualitative changes in the plasma circulating fibrinogen were detected: differences in the emission peak response, fluorescence intensity and all thermodynamic data. Together, with the decrease in the PCF concentration it may lead to an elevation of the blood anticoagulant activity.

  8. Elevated circulating plasma endothelin-1 concentrations in cirrhosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Søren; Emmeluth, C; Henriksen, Jens Henrik

    1993-01-01

    veins on the one hand and the femoral artery on the other (P > 0.1), indicating no major net elimination or release in the liver, kidney or lower limb. A significant negative correlation was found between systolic and diastolic blood pressures on the one hand and circulating ET-1 on the other (r = -0.......70, P vein catheterization (n = 8), no significant differences were found in ET-1 plasma concentration between the liver, renal, or femoral...

  9. IMP 8 observations of a poleward plasma circulation: Evidence of entry into the plasma mantle?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolpak, M. A.; Paularena, K. I.; Richardson, J. D.; Siscoe, G. L.

    Plasma data from IMP 8 are used to map the spatial structure of plasma flow in Earth's magnetosheath. Plasma and magnetic field data from instruments on ISEE-3 and WIND are used to normalize the IMP 8 magnetosheath data to upstream solar wind conditions. For the majority of the data, the magnitude and direction of plasma flow inside the magnetosheath agree well with gas-dynamic models. About 8% of the ISEE-3-normalized velocity vectors and 3% of the WIND-normalized velocity vectors exhibit a poleward circulation in the YZ plane. The observed circulation is consistent with predictions for flow within the plasma mantle. The occurrence frequency of these poleward flows increases further down the tail, consistent with predictions that the mantle width increases tailward. Densities are lower where this flow is observed, consistent with expectations for the plasma mantle, but temperatures are higher and the magnetic field magnitudes lower, the opposite of theoretical expectations.

  10. Gingival plasma cell granuloma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Phadnaik Mangesh

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Plasma cell granuloma is a rare reactive lesion composed of polyclonal plasma cells. It manifests primarily in the lungs, but may occur in various other anatomic locations like the oral cavity. Intraoral plasma cell granulomas involving the tongue, lip, oral mucosa and gingiva have been reported in the past. This case presents a 54-year-old female with chronic periodontitis and mandibular anterior gingival overgrowth treated by Phase I therapy (scaling and root planing and excisional biopsy. Histological examination revealed inflammatory cell infiltrate containing sheets of plasma cells. Immunohistochemistry for kappa and lambda light chains showed a polyclonal staining pattern confirming a diagnosis of plasma cell granuloma. This case highlights the need to biopsy for unusual lesions to rule out potential neoplasms.

  11. CellTracks cytometer for detection of circulating tumor cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tibbe, A.G.J.; Kooi, van der A.; Groot, de M.R.; Vermes, I.

    2003-01-01

    Introduction: In patients with carcinomas, tumor cells are shed into the circulation. The number of the circulating tumor cells is low and technology is needed that has sufficient sensitivity and specificity to enumerate and characterize these cells. The CellTracks system was developed to provide an

  12. [Acute plasma cell leukemia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monsalbe, V; Domíngues, C; Roa, I; Busel, D; González, S

    1989-01-01

    Plasma Cell Leukemia is a very rare form of plasmocytic dyscrasia, whose clinical and pathological characteristics warrant its recognition as a distinct subentity. We report the case of a 60 years old man who presented a rapidly fatal acute plasma cell leukemia, with multiple osteolytic lesions, hipercalcemia, renal and cardiac failure.

  13. "Angular" plasma cell cheilitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Cunha Filho, Roberto Rheingantz; Tochetto, Lucas Baldissera; Tochetto, Bruno Baldissera; de Almeida, Hiram Larangeira; Lorencette, Nádia Aparecida; Netto, José Fillus

    2014-03-17

    Plasma cell cheilitis is an extremely rare disease, characterized by erythematous-violaceous, ulcerated and asymptomatic plaques, which evolve slowly. The histological characteristics include dermal infiltrate composed of mature plasmocytes. We report a case of Plasma cell angular cheilitis in a 58-year-old male, localized in the lateral oral commissure.

  14. "Angular" plasma cell cheilitis

    OpenAIRE

    da Cunha Filho, Roberto Rheingantz; Tochetto, Lucas Baldissera; Tochetto, Bruno Baldissera; de Almeida Jr, Hiram Larangeira; Lorencette, Nadia Aparecida; Netto, Jose Fillus

    2014-01-01

    Plasma cell cheilitis is an extremely rare disease, characterized by erythematous-violaceous, ulcerated and asymptomatic plaques, which evolve slowly. The histological characteristics include dermal infiltrate composed of mature plasmocytes. We report a case of Plasma cell angular cheilitis in a 58-year-old male, localized in the lateral oral commissure.

  15. Assessment of Circulating microRNAs in Plasma of Lung Cancer Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Orazio Fortunato

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Lung cancer is the most common cause of cancer deaths worldwide and numerous ongoing research efforts are directed to identify new strategies for its early detection. The development of non-invasive blood-based biomarkers for cancer detection in its preclinical phases is crucial to improve the outcome of this deadly disease. MicroRNAs (miRNAs are a new promising class of circulating biomarkers for cancer detection and prognosis definition, but lack of consensus on data normalization methods for circulating miRNAs and the critical issue of haemolysis, has affected the identification of circulating miRNAs with diagnostic potential. We describe here an interesting approach for profiling circulating miRNAs in plasma samples based on the evaluation of reciprocal miRNA levels measured by quantitative Real-Time PCR. By monitoring changes of plasma miRNA-ratios, it is possible to assess the deregulation of tumor-related miRNAs and identify signatures with diagnostic and prognostic value. In addition, to avoid bias due to the release of miRNAs from blood cells, a miRNA-ratios signature distinguishing haemolyzed samples was identified. The method described was validated in plasma samples of lung cancer patients, but given its reproducibility and reliability, could be potentially applied for the identification of diagnostic circulating miRNAs in other diseases.

  16. Gingival plasma cell granuloma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amitkumar B Pandav

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Plasma cell granuloma, also known as inflammatory pseudotumor is a tumor-like lesion that manifests primarily in the lungs. But it may occur in various other anatomic locations like orbit, head and neck, liver and rarely in the oral cavity. We here report an exceedingly rare case of gingival plasma cell granuloma in a 58 year old woman who presented with upper gingival polypoidal growth. The histopathological examination revealed a mass composed of proliferation of benign spindle mesenchymal cells in a loose myxoid and fibrocollagenous stroma along with dense infiltrate of chronic inflammatory cells predominantly containing plasma cells. Immunohistochemistry for kappa and lambda light chains showed a polyclonal staining pattern confirming a diagnosis of plasma cell granuloma.

  17. [Haemodynamic role of blood-plasma circulating cell-free DNA and contained therein high-molecular-weight CpG-rich fraction in pathogenesis of arterial hypertension and atherosclerosis obliterans of carotid arteries].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konorova, I L; Veĭko, N N; Ershova, E S; Antelava, A L; Chechetkin, A O

    2009-01-01

    The hydrodynamic resistance (HR) of blood is one of the components of the total peripheral resistance. High-molecular-weight DNA appears to decrease the HR in accordance with the Toms's effect. The present study was undertaken to investigate the HR and properties of cell-free DNA circulating in the blood plasma (hereinafter referred to as pDNA) of the control donors, patients suffering from either arterial hypertension (AH) alone or that combined with atherosclerotic lesions of the carotid arteries (CAs). Within the normal concentrations of pDNA, we revealed an inverse dependence of the HR thereupon and upon the content in pDNA of the high-molecular-weight CpG-rich fraction (CpG-DNA), i. e., a transcribed region of the ribosomal repeat (rDNA). A decrease or an increase in the pDNA concentration in all the patients examined was accompanied by an elevation of the rDNA concentration in the blood plasma. Exceeding a certain level thereof appeared to give rise to an increase in both the HR and arterial pressure (AP). Patients presenting with degree I essential AH were found to have a decreased endonuclease activity of the blood plasma, with the pDNA concentration being more than two-fold higher with no change in the rDNA content. Their HR appeared to be increased (parteries were typically revealed on the background of a lowered HR (parterial intima. In some of them, the pDNA concentration does not differ from the normal values, but in its composition, there is an increased content of rDNA, elevating as obliteration of the vessels' lumen increases, with the HR being decreased. The majority of them have degree II AH. In others, the pDNA concentration is by an order of magnitude higher than the normal values, while the rDNA content in pDNA is decreased, with the HR being elevated. Most of them have degree III AH. Pronounced and rough stenoses take an asymptomatic course in patients with decreased values of the HR and a slightly elevated level of pDNA and/or rDNA in the

  18. Circulating human IgG reactive to apoptotic cells are masked by plasma proteins%血浆蛋白可屏蔽人类循环中IgG抗体对凋亡细胞的反应活性

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    荣春书; 连鑫; 王伟刚; 郑宗宇; 高宝山

    2016-01-01

    Objective To confirm the influence of plasma proteins on the reactivity of circulating IgG to apoptotic cells and to develop an optimal methodology for studying these antibodies.Methods IgG reactivity to apoptotic cells was assessed before and after purification.The following sources of IgG were used:(1)Plasma specimens from 10 kid-ney transplant recipients with AMR;(2)purified IgG from the same 10 AMR patients;(3)supernatant from IgG-pro-ducing immortalized B cell clones;(4)purified IgG from the same B cell clone supernatants.Results Results Plasma IgG reactivity to apoptotic cells was dramatically increased following purification.We observed that reactivity to apop-totic cells could only be detected after purification for some monoclonal IgG produced by B cell clones.Fetal calf serum (FCS)partially reversed the apoptotic-binding potential of purified IgG.Conclusion The reactivity of circulating IgG to apoptotic cells is modified in the presence of plasma proteins.These antibodies must first be purified to remove plasma proteins in order to accurately assess their reactivity.%目的:明确血浆蛋白影响循环中 IgG抗体对凋亡细胞的反应性,并探索检测此类抗体活性的最佳条件。方法分别检测纯化前及纯化后的 IgG抗体对凋亡细胞的反应性。检测所用样本来源于:(1)10例发生移植肾抗体介导排异反应(AMR)患者的血浆样本;(2)从以上10例患者血浆中纯化的IgG抗体;(3)分泌IgG抗体的永生化B淋巴细胞克隆培养上清液;(4)从同一永生化B淋巴细胞克隆培养上清液中纯化的 IgG抗体。结果当 IgG从血浆中纯化出来时,其对凋亡细胞的反应性显著增强。对于某些单克隆 B细胞分泌的 IgG抗体,只有将此抗体从细胞培养上清液中纯化,才能检测到其对凋亡细胞的反应性。而胎牛血清(FCS)可部分阻滞纯化 IgG抗体对凋亡细胞的反应性。结论当血

  19. Plasma Cell Cheilitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thami Gurvinder P

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available A case of plasma cell cheilitis with good response to glucocorticoids, is described for its rarity and probable aetiological correlation with habit of use of nasal snuff is discussed.

  20. Redefining circulating tumor cells by image processing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ligthart, Sjoerd

    2012-01-01

    Circulating tumor cells (CTC) in the blood of patients with metastatic carcinomas are associated with poor survival and can be used to guide therapy. However, CTC are very heterogeneous in size and shape, and are present at very low frequencies. Missing or misjudging a few events may have great

  1. Redefining circulating tumor cells by image processing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ligthart, S.T.

    2012-01-01

    Circulating tumor cells (CTC) in the blood of patients with metastatic carcinomas are associated with poor survival and can be used to guide therapy. However, CTC are very heterogeneous in size and shape, and are present at very low frequencies. Missing or misjudging a few events may have great cons

  2. Redefining circulating tumor cells by image processing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ligthart, Sjoerd

    2012-01-01

    Circulating tumor cells (CTC) in the blood of patients with metastatic carcinomas are associated with poor survival and can be used to guide therapy. However, CTC are very heterogeneous in size and shape, and are present at very low frequencies. Missing or misjudging a few events may have great cons

  3. 血浆循环microRNA-126在非小细胞肺癌诊断中的应用%Application of plasma circulation microRNA - 126 to diagnosis of non - small cell lung cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘沙; 杨季云

    2011-01-01

    目的 探讨血浆循环microRNA - 126浓度与非小细胞肺癌(NSCLC)的相关性及其诊断价值.方法 采用实时荧光定量PCR方法检测130例NSCLC患者和作为对照的170例健康人的血浆循环microRNA - 126浓度.结果 对照组血浆循环microRNA - 126浓度显著高于NSCLC组(P<0.01).血浆循环microRNA - 126浓度ROC曲线下面积(area under the ROC curve,AUC)为0.758,95%CI为0.704~0.811(P<0.01).当血浆microRNA - 126浓度为1051 fmol/L时,血浆microRNA - 126对NSCLC诊断的特异度为90.0%,灵敏度为46.4%.其浓度与患者的年龄、性别、吸烟,病理分型和分期均无显著的相关性(P>0.05).结论 血浆循环microRNA - 126浓度对NSCLC有一定的临床诊断意义,联合其他血浆microRNA或肿瘤标志物,如神经元特异性烯醇化酶、癌胚抗原和细胞角蛋白片段21 - 1,可以弥补单一检测的局限性,以提高肺癌的阳性检出率,为临床提供可靠的依据.%Objective To discuss the correlation between the concentration of plasma circulation microRNA - 126 and the non - small cell lung cancer( NSCLC ), and to study its diagnostic value. Methods The concentration of plasma circulation micro RNA - 126 in 130 patients with NSCLC( NSCLC group )and 170 healthy people( control group )was detected through the method of real time fluorescent quantitation PCR. Results The concentration of microRNA - 126 in the control group was significantly higher than that in the NSCLC group( P < 0. 01 ). The area under the receiver operating characteristic curve of the concentration was 0. 758, and the 95% CI was 0. 704 - 0. 81l( P < 0. 01 ). When the concentration of plasma microRNA - 126 was 1051 fmol/L, its specificity in the diagnosis of NSCLC was 90% ,and its sensitivity was 46. 4%. There were not obvious correlations between the concentration and age, gender, smoking, pathological typing and staging of the 130 patients. Conclusion The concentration of plasma circulation microRNA -126 has

  4. Plasma Cell Disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castillo, Jorge J

    2016-12-01

    Plasma cell disorders are benign, premalignant, and malignant conditions characterized by the presence of a monoclonal paraprotein detected in serum or urine. These conditions are biologically, pathologically, and clinically heterogeneous. There have been major advances in the understanding of the biology of these diseases, which are promoting the development of therapies with novel mechanisms of action. Novel agents such as proteasome inhibitors, immunomodulatory drugs, and monoclonal antibodies have gained approval in the United States and Europe for the treatment of plasma cell disorders. Such therapies are translating into higher rates of response and survival and better toxicity profiles. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Construction of a Sequencing Library from Circulating Cell-Free DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Nan; Löffert, Dirk; Akinci-Tolun, Rumeysa; Heitz, Katja; Wolf, Alexander

    2016-04-01

    Circulating DNA is cell-free DNA (cfDNA) in serum or plasma that can be used for non-invasive prenatal testing, as well as cancer diagnosis, prognosis, and stratification. High-throughput sequence analysis of the cfDNA with next-generation sequencing technologies has proven to be a highly sensitive and specific method in detecting and characterizing mutations in cancer and other diseases, as well as aneuploidy during pregnancy. This unit describes detailed procedures to extract circulating cfDNA from human serum and plasma and generate sequencing libraries from a wide concentration range of circulating DNA.

  6. Reproducibility of Circulating MicroRNAs in Stored Plasma Samples.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monica L Bertoia

    Full Text Available Most studies of microRNA (miRNA and disease have examined tissue-specific expression in limited numbers of samples. The presence of circulating miRNAs in plasma samples provides the opportunity to examine prospective associations between miRNA expression and disease in initially healthy individuals. However, little data exist on the reproducibility of miRNAs in stored plasma.We used Real-Time PCR to measure 61 pre-selected microRNA candidates in stored plasma. Coefficients of variation (CVs were used to assess inter-assay reliability (n = 15 and within-person stability over one year (n = 80. Intraclass correlation coefficients (ICCs and polychoric correlation coefficients were used to assess within-person stability and delayed processing reproducibility (whole blood stored at 4°C for 0, 24 and 48 hours; n = 12 samples.Of 61 selected miRNAs, 23 were detected in at least 50% of samples and had average CVs below 20% for inter-assay reproducibility and 31 for delayed processing reproducibility. Ten miRNAs were detected in at least 50% of samples, had average CVs below 20% and had ICCs above 0.4 for within-person stability over 1-2 years, six of which satisfied criteria for both interassay reproducibility and short-term within-person stability (miR-17-5p, -191-5p, -26a-5p, -27b-3p, -320a, and -375 and two all three types of reproducibility (miR-27b-3p and -26a-5p. However, many miRNAs with acceptable average CVs had high maximum CVs, most had low expression levels, and several had low ICCs with delayed processing.About a tenth of miRNAs plausibly related to chronic disease were reliably detected in stored samples of healthy adults.

  7. Glioblastoma Circulating Cells: Reality, Trap or Illusion?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Lombard

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Metastases are the hallmark of cancer. This event is in direct relationship with the ability of cancer cells to leave the tumor mass and travel long distances within the bloodstream and/or lymphatic vessels. Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM, the most frequent primary brain neoplasm, is mainly characterized by a dismal prognosis. The usual fatal issue for GBM patients is a consequence of local recurrence that is observed most of the time without any distant metastases. However, it has recently been documented that GBM cells could be isolated from the bloodstream in several studies. This observation raises the question of the possible involvement of glioblastoma-circulating cells in GBM deadly recurrence by a “homing metastasis” process. Therefore, we think it is important to review the already known molecular mechanisms underlying circulating tumor cells (CTC specific properties, emphasizing their epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT abilities and their possible involvement in tumor initiation. The idea is here to review these mechanisms and speculate on how relevant they could be applied in the forthcoming battles against GBM.

  8. Circulating Tumor Cells Measurements in Hepatocellular Carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Franck Chiappini

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Liver cancer is the fifth most common cancer in men and the seventh in women. During the past 20 years, the incidence of HCC has tripled while the 5-year survival rate has remained below 12%. The presence of circulating tumor cells (CTC reflects the aggressiveness nature of a tumor. Many attempts have been made to develop assays that reliably detect and enumerate the CTC during the development of the HCC. In this case, the challenges are (1 there are few markers specific to the HCC (tumor cells versus nontumor cells and (2 they can be used to quantify the number of CTC in the bloodstream. Another technical challenge consists of finding few CTC mixed with million leukocytes and billion erythrocytes. CTC detection and identification can be used to estimate prognosis and may serve as an early marker to assess antitumor activity of treatment. CTC can also be used to predict progression-free survival and overall survival. CTC are an interesting source of biological information in order to understand dissemination, drug resistance, and treatment-induced cell death. Our aim is to review and analyze the different new methods existing to detect, enumerate, and characterize the CTC in the peripheral circulation of patients with HCC.

  9. The biology of circulating tumor cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pantel, K; Speicher, M R

    2016-03-10

    Metastasis is a biologically complex process consisting of numerous stochastic events which may tremendously differ across various cancer types. Circulating tumor cells (CTCs) are cells that are shed from primary tumors and metastatic deposits into the blood stream. CTCs bear a tremendous potential to improve our understanding of steps involved in the metastatic cascade, starting from intravasation of tumor cells into the circulation until the formation of clinically detectable metastasis. These efforts were propelled by novel high-resolution approaches to dissect the genomes and transcriptomes of CTCs. Furthermore, capturing of viable CTCs has paved the way for innovative culturing technologies to study fundamental characteristics of CTCs such as invasiveness, their kinetics and responses to selection barriers, such as given therapies. Hence the study of CTCs is not only instrumental as a basic research tool, but also allows the serial monitoring of tumor genotypes and may therefore provide predictive and prognostic biomarkers for clinicians. Here, we review how CTCs have contributed to significant insights into the metastatic process and how they may be utilized in clinical practice.

  10. Circulating tumor cells: highlight on practical implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gazzaniga, Paola; Raimondi, Cristina; Gradilone, Angela; Naso, Giuseppe; Cortesi, Enrico; Frati, Luigi

    2012-02-01

    Circulating tumor cells (CTCs) are cells of presumed epithelial origin, whose prognostic and predictive value in metastatic cancer patients has recently been demonstrated. To date, the count of CTCs through the CellSearch® system represents a valid approach for monitoring disease status in patients with metastatic colorectal, breast, and prostate cancer; in these cancer types, a rise in the CTC count at any time during treatment predicts a poor outcome. Nevertheless, the clinical utility of monitoring CTC counts remains controversial, and what to do when CTC counts rise during therapy still remains an unanswered question. In this report, we suggest how to integrate CTC counts with their molecular characterization to better translate biologic information obtained on CTCs into daily clinical practice.

  11. Circulating tumor cells in melanoma patients.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gary A Clawson

    Full Text Available Circulating tumor cells (CTCs are of recognized importance for diagnosis and prognosis of cancer patients. With melanoma, most studies do not show any clear relationship between CTC levels and stage of disease. Here, CTCs were enriched (∼400X from blood of melanoma patients using a simple centrifugation device (OncoQuick, and 4 melanocyte target RNAs (TYR, MLANA, MITF, and MIF were quantified using QPCR. Approximately one-third of melanoma patients had elevated MIF and MLANA transcripts (p<0.0001 and p<0.001, respectively compared with healthy controls. In contrast, healthy controls had uniformly higher levels of TYR and MITF than melanoma patients (p<0.0001. There was a marked shift of leukocytes into the CTC-enriched fractions (a 430% increase in RNA recovery, p<0.001, and no relationship between CTC levels and stage of disease was found. CTCs were captured on microfabricated filters and cultured. Captured melanoma CTCs were large cells, and consisted of 2 subpopulations, based on immunoreactivity. One subpopulation (∼50% stained for both pan-cytokeratin (KRT markers and the common leukocyte marker CD-45, whereas the second subpopulation stained for only KRT. Since similar cells are described in many cancers, we also examined blood from colorectal and pancreatic cancer patients. We observed analogous results, with most captured CTCs staining for both CD-45/KRT markers (and for the monocyte differentiation marker CD-14. Our results suggest that immature melanocyte-related cells (expressing TYR and MITF RNA may circulate in healthy controls, although they are not readily detectable without considerable enrichment. Further, as early-stage melanomas develop, immature melanocyte migration into the blood is somehow curtailed, whereas a significant proportion of patients develop elevated CTC levels (based on MIF and MLANA RNAs. The nature of the captured CTCs is consistent with literature describing leukocyte/macrophage-tumor cell fusion hybrids

  12. Variety of RNAs in Peripheral Blood Cells, Plasma, and Plasma Fractions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna V. Savelyeva

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Human peripheral blood contains RNA in cells and in extracellular membrane vesicles, microvesicles and exosomes, as well as in cell-free ribonucleoproteins. Circulating mRNAs and noncoding RNAs, being internalized, possess the ability to modulate vital processes in recipient cells. In this study, with SOLiD sequencing technology, we performed identification, classification, and quantification of RNAs from blood fractions: cells, plasma, plasma vesicles pelleted at 16,000g and 160,000g, and vesicle-depleted plasma supernatant of healthy donors and non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC patients. It was determined that 16,000g blood plasma vesicles were enriched with cell-free mitochondria and with a set of mitochondrial RNAs. The variable RNA set of blood plasma 160,000g pellets reflected the prominent contribution of U1, U5, and U6 small nuclear RNAs’ fragments and at the same time was characterized by a remarkable depletion of small nucleolar RNAs. Besides microRNAs, the variety of fragments of mRNAs and snoRNAs dominated in the set of circulating RNAs differentially expressed in blood fractions of NSCLC patients. Taken together, our data emphasize that not only extracellular microRNAs but also circulating fragments of messenger and small nuclear/nucleolar RNAs represent prominent classes of circulating regulatory ncRNAs as well as promising circulating biomarkers for the development of disease diagnostic approaches.

  13. Variety of RNAs in Peripheral Blood Cells, Plasma, and Plasma Fractions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savelyeva, Anna V; Kuligina, Elena V; Bariakin, Dmitry N; Kozlov, Vadim V; Ryabchikova, Elena I; Richter, Vladimir A; Semenov, Dmitry V

    2017-01-01

    Human peripheral blood contains RNA in cells and in extracellular membrane vesicles, microvesicles and exosomes, as well as in cell-free ribonucleoproteins. Circulating mRNAs and noncoding RNAs, being internalized, possess the ability to modulate vital processes in recipient cells. In this study, with SOLiD sequencing technology, we performed identification, classification, and quantification of RNAs from blood fractions: cells, plasma, plasma vesicles pelleted at 16,000g and 160,000g, and vesicle-depleted plasma supernatant of healthy donors and non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients. It was determined that 16,000g blood plasma vesicles were enriched with cell-free mitochondria and with a set of mitochondrial RNAs. The variable RNA set of blood plasma 160,000g pellets reflected the prominent contribution of U1, U5, and U6 small nuclear RNAs' fragments and at the same time was characterized by a remarkable depletion of small nucleolar RNAs. Besides microRNAs, the variety of fragments of mRNAs and snoRNAs dominated in the set of circulating RNAs differentially expressed in blood fractions of NSCLC patients. Taken together, our data emphasize that not only extracellular microRNAs but also circulating fragments of messenger and small nuclear/nucleolar RNAs represent prominent classes of circulating regulatory ncRNAs as well as promising circulating biomarkers for the development of disease diagnostic approaches.

  14. Relevance of circulating tumor cells, extracellular nucleic acids, and exosomes in breast cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Friel, Anne M.; Corcoran, Claire; Crown, John; O'Driscoll, Lorraine

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Early detection of cancer is vital to improved overall survival rates. At present, evidence is accumulating for the clinical value of detecting occult tumor cells in peripheral blood, plasma, and serum specimens from cancer patients. Both molecular and cellular approaches, which differ in sensitivity and specificity, have been used for such means. Circulating tumor cells and extracellular nucleic acids have been detected within blood, plasma, and sera of cancer patients. A...

  15. Circulating Tumor Cells in Prostate Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hu, Brian [Institute of Urology, University of Southern California, 1441 Eastlake Avenue, Suite 7416, Los Angeles, CA 90033 (United States); Rochefort, Holly [Department of Surgery, University of Southern California, 1520 San Pablo Street, HCT 4300, Los Angeles, CA 90033 (United States); Goldkorn, Amir, E-mail: agoldkor@usc.edu [Department of Internal Medicine and Norris Comprehensive Cancer Center, University of Southern California Keck School of Medicine, 1441 Eastlake Avenue, Suite 3440, Los Angeles, CA 90033 (United States)

    2013-12-04

    Circulating tumor cells (CTCs) can provide a non-invasive, repeatable snapshot of an individual patient’s tumor. In prostate cancer, CTC enumeration has been extensively studied and validated as a prognostic tool and has received FDA clearance for use in monitoring advanced disease. More recently, CTC analysis has been shifting from enumeration to more sophisticated molecular characterization of captured cells, which serve as a “liquid biopsy” of the tumor, reflecting molecular changes in an individual’s malignancy over time. Here we will review the main CTC studies in advanced and localized prostate cancer, highlighting the important gains as well as the challenges posed by various approaches, and their implications for advancing prostate cancer management.

  16. Circulating tumor cells: utopia or reality?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conteduca, Vincenza; Zamarchi, Rita; Rossi, Elisabetta; Condelli, Valentina; Troiani, Laura; Aieta, Michele

    2013-09-01

    Circulating tumor cells (CTCs) could be considered a sign of tumor aggressiveness, but highly sensitive and specific methods of CTC detection are necessary owing to the rarity and heterogeneity of CTCs in peripheral blood. This review summarizes recent studies on tumor biology, with particular attention to the metastatic cascade, and the molecular characterization and clinical significance of CTCs. Recent technological approaches to enrich and detect these cells and challenges of CTCs for individualized cancer treatment are also discussed. This review also provides an insight into the positive and negative features of the future potential applications of CTC detection, which sometimes remains still a 'utopia', but its actual utility remains among the fastest growing research fields in oncology.

  17. Isolation of tumorigenic circulating melanoma cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Jie; Lin, Jennifer Y.; Alloo, Allireza; Wilson, Brian J.; Schatton, Tobias; Zhan, Qian; Murphy, George F.; Waaga-Gasser, Ana-Maria; Gasser, Martin; Hodi, F. Stephen; Frank, Natasha Y.; Frank, Markus H.

    2010-01-01

    Circulating tumor cells (CTC) have been identified in several human malignancies, including malignant melanoma. However, whether melanoma CTC are tumorigenic and cause metastatic progression is currently unknown. Here we isolate for the first time viable tumorigenic melanoma CTC and demonstrate that this cell population is capable of metastasis formation in human-to-mouse xenotransplantation experiments. The presence of CTC among peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) of murine recipients of subcutaneous (s.c.) human melanoma xenografts could be detected based on mRNA expression for human GAPDH and/or ATP-binding cassette subfamily B member 5 (ABCB5), a marker of malignant melanoma-initiating cells previously shown to be associated with metastatic disease progression in human patients. ABCB5 expression could also be detected in PBMC preparations from human stage IV melanoma patients but not healthy controls. The detection of melanoma CTC in human-to-mouse s.c. tumor xenotransplantation models correlated significantly with pulmonary metastasis formation. Moreover, prospectively isolated CTC from murine recipients of s.c. melanoma xenografts were capable of primary tumor initiation and caused metastasis formation upon xenotransplantation to secondary murine NOD-scid IL2Rγnull recipients. Our results provide initial evidence that melanoma CTC are tumorigenic and demonstrate that CTC are capable of causing metastatic tumor progression. These findings suggest a need for CTC eradication to inhibit metastatic progression and provide a rationale for assessment of therapeutic responses of this tumorigenic cell population to promising emerging melanoma treatment modalities. PMID:20977885

  18. Plasma cell granuloma of lip

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B Sabarinath

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Plasma cells are medium-sized round-to-oval cells with eccentrically placed nuclei, usually found in the red pulp of the spleen, tonsils, medulla of the lymph nodes, nasal mucosa, upper airway, lamina propria of the gastrointestinal tract, and sites of inflammation. Plasma cell granuloma is a rare reactive tumor-like proliferation composed chiefly of plasmacytic infiltrate. Here, we present a case of plasma cell granuloma of lip in a female patient.

  19. Isolation of Circulating Tumor Cells by Dielectrophoresis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gascoyne, Peter R. C., E-mail: pgascoyn@mdanderson.org [Department of Imaging Physics Research, The University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center Unit 951, 1515 Holcombe Boulevard, Houston, TX 77030 (United States); Shim, Sangjo [Department of Imaging Physics Research, The University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center Unit 951, 1515 Holcombe Boulevard, Houston, TX 77030 (United States); Department of Biomedical Engineering, The University of Texas at Austin, 1 University Station, C0800, Austin, TX 78712 (United States); Present address: Micro & Nanotechnology Laboratory, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, 208 North Wright Street, Urbana, IL 61801 (United States)

    2014-03-12

    Dielectrophoresis (DEP) is an electrokinetic method that allows intrinsic dielectric properties of suspended cells to be exploited for discrimination and separation. It has emerged as a promising method for isolating circulation tumor cells (CTCs) from blood. DEP-isolation of CTCs is independent of cell surface markers. Furthermore, isolated CTCs are viable and can be maintained in culture, suggesting that DEP methods should be more generally applicable than antibody-based approaches. The aim of this article is to review and synthesize for both oncologists and biomedical engineers interested in CTC isolation the pertinent characteristics of DEP and CTCs. The aim is to promote an understanding of the factors involved in realizing DEP-based instruments having both sufficient discrimination and throughput to allow routine analysis of CTCs in clinical practice. The article brings together: (a) the principles of DEP; (b) the biological basis for the dielectric differences between CTCs and blood cells; (c) why such differences are expected to be present for all types of tumors; and (d) instrumentation requirements to process 10 mL blood specimens in less than 1 h to enable routine clinical analysis. The force equilibrium method of dielectrophoretic field-flow fractionation (DEP-FFF) is shown to offer higher discrimination and throughput than earlier DEP trapping methods and to be applicable to clinical studies.

  20. Isolation of Circulating Tumor Cells by Dielectrophoresis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter R. C. Gascoyne

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Dielectrophoresis (DEP is an electrokinetic method that allows intrinsic dielectric properties of suspended cells to be exploited for discrimination and separation. It has emerged as a promising method for isolating circulation tumor cells (CTCs from blood. DEP-isolation of CTCs is independent of cell surface markers. Furthermore, isolated CTCs are viable and can be maintained in culture, suggesting that DEP methods should be more generally applicable than antibody-based approaches. The aim of this article is to review and synthesize for both oncologists and biomedical engineers interested in CTC isolation the pertinent characteristics of DEP and CTCs. The aim is to promote an understanding of the factors involved in realizing DEP-based instruments having both sufficient discrimination and throughput to allow routine analysis of CTCs in clinical practice. The article brings together: (a the principles of DEP; (b the biological basis for the dielectric differences between CTCs and blood cells; (c why such differences are expected to be present for all types of tumors; and (d instrumentation requirements to process 10 mL blood specimens in less than 1 h to enable routine clinical analysis. The force equilibrium method of dielectrophoretic field-flow fractionation (DEP-FFF is shown to offer higher discrimination and throughput than earlier DEP trapping methods and to be applicable to clinical studies.

  1. Circulating Tumor Cells, Enumeration and Beyond

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jian-Mei Hou

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available The detection and enumeration of circulating tumor cells (CTCs has shown significant clinical utility with respect to prognosis in breast, colorectal and prostate cancers. Emerging studies show that CTCs can provide pharmacodynamic information to aid therapy decision making. CTCs as a ‘virtual and real-time biopsy’ have clear potential to facilitate exploration of tumor biology, and in particular, the process of metastasis. The challenge of profiling CTC molecular characteristics and generating CTC signatures using current technologies is that they enrich rather than purify CTCs from whole blood; we face the problem of looking for the proverbial ‘needle in the haystack’. This review summarizes the current methods for CTC detection and enumeration, focuses on molecular characterization of CTCs, unveils some aspects of CTC heterogeneity, describes attempts to purify CTCs and scans the horizon for approaches leading to comprehensive dissection of CTC biology.

  2. Circulating osteogenic cells: implications for injury, repair, and regeneration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pignolo, Robert J; Kassem, Moustapha

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this review is to provide a critical reading of recent literature pertaining to the presence of circulating, fluid-phase osteoblastic cells and their possible contribution to bone formation. We have termed this group of cells collectively as circulating osteogenic precursor (COP) cells...

  3. Circulating Tumor Cell and Cell-free Circulating Tumor DNA in Lung Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nurwidya, Fariz; Zaini, Jamal; Putra, Andika Chandra; Andarini, Sita; Hudoyo, Achmad; Syahruddin, Elisna; Yunus, Faisal

    2016-09-01

    Circulating tumor cells (CTCs) are tumor cells that are separated from the primary site or metastatic lesion and disseminate in blood circulation. CTCs are considered to be part of the long process of cancer metastasis. As a 'liquid biopsy', CTC molecular examination and investigation of single cancer cells create an important opportunity for providing an understanding of cancer biology and the process of metastasis. In the last decade, we have seen dramatic development in defining the role of CTCs in lung cancer in terms of diagnosis, genomic alteration determination, treatment response and, finally, prognosis prediction. The aims of this review are to understand the basic biology and to review methods of detection of CTCs that apply to the various types of solid tumor. Furthermore, we explored clinical applications, including treatment monitoring to anticipate therapy resistance as well as biomarker analysis, in the context of lung cancer. We also explored the potential use of cell-free circulating tumor DNA (ctDNA) in the genomic alteration analysis of lung cancer.

  4. [Circulating tumor cells and prostate cancer prognosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capoun, Otakar; Soukup, Viktor; Mikulová, Veronika; Jančíková, Markéta; Honová, Hana; Kološtová, Katarína; Zima, Tomáš; Hanuš, Tomáš

    2014-01-01

    Prostate cancer (PC) is the most common malignant disease in men. Prognosis of patients with metastatic PC is generally unfavourable; however there are significant differences in survival at this stage of the disease. The definition of prognosis is essential for the selection of therapy, respecting an individual risk. In recent years, the association between circulating tumor cells (CTC) detection and response to PC treatment has been widely investigated. Detection of CTC is based on a metastatic process theory and uses well-known tumor-specific antigens on the cell surface. Individual methods assess CTC with different sensitivity and are not yet efficient at the localised PC stage. Only the method of immunomagnetic separation and semi-automatic visualisation (CellSearchTM) has been validated and approved for the use in the PC management. Assessment of the CTC count directly correlates with the prognosis of patients with castration-resistant PC. Change in the CTC count during the therapy also considerably improves risk estimation and represents a marker of overall survival. New methods of CTC cultivation and gene profiling may contribute to individualisation of the treatment similarly to breast cancer. The authors present a review article about theory, methods of detection and clinical use of CTC in castration-resistant PC.

  5. Circulating Cell Free DNA in the Diagnosis of Trophoblastic Tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Openshaw, Mark R.; Harvey, Richard A.; Sebire, Neil J.; Kaur, Baljeet; Sarwar, Naveed; Seckl, Michael J.; Fisher, Rosemary A.

    2015-01-01

    Gestational trophoblastic neoplasia (GTN) represents a group of diseases characterized by production of human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG). Since non-gestational tumors may occasionally secrete hCG, histopathological diagnosis is important for appropriate clinical management. However, a histopathological diagnosis is not always available. We therefore investigated the feasibility of extracting cell free DNA (cfDNA) from the plasma of women with GTN for use as a “liquid biopsy” in patients without histopathological diagnosis. cfDNA was prepared from the plasma of 20 women with a diagnosis of GTN and five with hCG-secreting tumors of unknown origin. Genotyping of cfDNA from the patient, genomic DNA from her and her partner and DNA from the tumor tissue identified circulating tumor DNA (ctDNA) (from 9% to 53% of total cfDNA) in 12 of 20 patients with GTN. In one case without a tissue diagnosis, ctDNA enabled a diagnosis of GTN originating in a non-molar conception and in another a diagnosis of non-gestational tumor, based on the high degree of allelic instability and loss of heterozygosity in the ctDNA. In summary ctDNA can be detected in the plasma of women with GTN and can facilitate the diagnosis of both gestational and non-gestational trophoblastic tumors in cases without histopathological diagnosis. PMID:26981554

  6. Circulating Cell Free DNA in the Diagnosis of Trophoblastic Tumors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark R. Openshaw

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Gestational trophoblastic neoplasia (GTN represents a group of diseases characterized by production of human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG. Since non-gestational tumors may occasionally secrete hCG, histopathological diagnosis is important for appropriate clinical management. However, a histopathological diagnosis is not always available. We therefore investigated the feasibility of extracting cell free DNA (cfDNA from the plasma of women with GTN for use as a “liquid biopsy” in patients without histopathological diagnosis. cfDNA was prepared from the plasma of 20 women with a diagnosis of GTN and five with hCG-secreting tumors of unknown origin. Genotyping of cfDNA from the patient, genomic DNA from her and her partner and DNA from the tumor tissue identified circulating tumor DNA (ctDNA (from 9% to 53% of total cfDNA in 12 of 20 patients with GTN. In one case without a tissue diagnosis, ctDNA enabled a diagnosis of GTN originating in a non-molar conception and in another a diagnosis of non-gestational tumor, based on the high degree of allelic instability and loss of heterozygosity in the ctDNA. In summary ctDNA can be detected in the plasma of women with GTN and can facilitate the diagnosis of both gestational and non-gestational trophoblastic tumors in cases without histopathological diagnosis.

  7. Plasma cell granuloma of gingiva

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Balaji Manohar

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Plasma cell granuloma is a rare benign lesion characterized by the infiltration of plasma cells; primarily occurring in the lungs. It is also seen to occur in the brain, kidney stomach, heart, and so on. In the intraoral region it is seen to involve the tongue, oral mucosa, and gingiva. This case presents a 42-year-old female, with an enlargement in the maxillary anterior region, treated by excisional biopsy. Histological evaluation revealed plasma cell infiltrates in the connective tissue. The immunohistochemistry revealed kappa and lambda light chains with a polyclonal staining pattern, which confirmed the diagnosis of plasma cell granuloma.

  8. Prolonging the plasma circulation of proteins by nano-encapsulation with phosphorylcholine-based polymer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Linlin Zhang; Yang Liu; Gan Liu; Duo Xu; Sheng Liang; Xinyuan Zhu; Yunfeng Lu

    2016-01-01

    Short in vivo circulation is a major hindrance to the widespread adoption of protein therapeutics.Protein nanocapsules generated by encapsulating proteins with a thin layer of phosphorylcholine-based polymer via a two-step encapsulation process exhibited significantly prolonged plasma half-life.Furthermore,by constructing nanocapsules with similar sizes but different surface charges and chemistry,we demonstrated a generic strategy for prolonging the plasma half-life of therapeutic proteins.In an in vitro experiment,four types of bovine serum albumin (BSA) nanocapsules were incubated with fetal bovine serum (FBS) in phosphate buffer saline (PBS);the cell uptake by HeLa cells was monitored to systematically evaluate the characteristics of the surface chemistry during drculation.Single positron emission tomography-computed tomography (SPECT)was employed to allow real-time observation of the BSA nanoparticle distribution in vivo,as well as quantification of the plasma concentration after intravenous administration.This study offers a practical method for translating a broad range of proteins for clinical use.

  9. Circulating CCR7+ICOS+ Memory T Follicular Helper Cells in Patients with Multiple Sclerosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xueli Fan

    Full Text Available This study is aimed at examining the potential roles of circulating memory T follicular helper (Tfh cells in patients with multiple sclerosis (MS.The numbers of different subsets of circulating memory Tfh cells in 25 patients with relapsed MS before and after treatment as well as 14 healthy controls (HC were examined by flow cytometry. The levels of plasma IL-21 in all patients and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF IL-21 in some MS patients and controls with non-inflammatory neuronal diseases (NND were measured by ELISA.In comparison with that in the HC, the numbers of circulating CD3+CD4+CXCR5+CD45RA-, ICOS+, CCR7+ and CCR7+ICOS+ memory Tfh cells and the levels of plasma IL-21 significantly increased in MS patients, but significantly decreased in the patients with complete remission (CR. The levels of CSF IL-21 were significantly higher in the MS patients than that in the NND patients. The numbers of CCR7+ICOS+ memory Tfh cells were positively correlated with the EDSS scores, the levels of plasma and CSF IL-21, IgG, MBP-Ab or MOG-Ab.Our findings indicated that circulating memory Tfh cells, especially CCR7+ICOS+ memory Tfh cells, may be associated with the relapse of MS and may serve as a new therapeutic target.

  10. Single-cell analyses of circulating tumor cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xi-Xi Chen; Fan Bai

    2015-01-01

    Circulating tumor cells (CTCs) are a population of tumor cells mediating metastasis, which results in most of the cancer related deaths. hTe number of CTCs in the peripheral blood of patients is rare, and many platforms have been launched for detection and enrichment of CTCs. Enumeration of CTCs has already been used as a prognosis marker predicting the survival rate of cancer patients. Yet CTCs should be more potential. Studies on CTCs at single cell level may help revealing the underlying mechanism of tumorigenesis and metastasis. Though far from developed, this area of study holds much promise in providing new clinical application and deep understanding towards metastasis and cancer development.

  11. 冠心病患者血浆循环miR-126的表达及其对血管内皮细胞的影响%Plasma circulating miR-126 in patients with coronary artery heart disease and its effect on vascular endothelial cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郑志伟; 劳海燕; 余细勇; 陈纪言; 林秋雄; 麦丽萍; 钟诗龙

    2011-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the role of plasma circulating miR - 126 and miR - 16 in the patients with coronary artery heart disease and to explore the influence of miR - 126 on vascular endothelial cells. METHODS: Plasma total RNA was isolated from 52 patients with stable coronary artery disease and 52 healthy volunteers. The circulating miR -126 and miR -16 in those people were detected using specific primers. Endothelial cell line EA. Hy926 was transfected with a miR - 126 inhibitor, and total RNA of the cells was isolated 30 h after transfection to detect the expression level of vascular endothelial growth factor ( VEGF ). RESULTS: The expression of plasma circulating miR - 126 was significantly decreased in the patients with coronary artery heart disease compared with healthy controls ( P 0. 05 ). The expression of VEGF in the endothelial cell line EA. Hy926 transfected with miR - 126 inhibitor was 2.08 times higher than that in negative control cells 30 h after transfection ( P 0.05);(2)内皮细胞株EA.hy926中miR-126被抑制后,血管内皮生长因子的表达为对照组的2.08倍(P<0.05).结论:血浆循环miR-126在冠心病患者表达下降,血浆循环miR-16在人群中的表达较稳定;miR-126通过负性调节血管内皮生长因子的表达,对血管内皮细胞产生调节作用.

  12. Elevated levels of cell-free circulating DNA in patients with acute dengue virus infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tran Thi Ngoc Ha

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Apoptosis is thought to play a role in the pathogenesis of severe dengue and the release of cell-free DNA into the circulatory system in several medical conditions. Therefore, we investigated circulating DNA as a potential biomarker for severe dengue. METHODS AND FINDINGS: A direct fluorometric degradation assay using PicoGreen was performed to quantify cell-free DNA from patient plasma. Circulating DNA levels were significantly higher in patients with dengue virus infection than with other febrile illnesses and healthy controls. Remarkably, the increase of DNA levels correlated with the severity of dengue. Additionally, multivariate logistic regression analysis showed that circulating DNA levels independently correlated with dengue shock syndrome. CONCLUSIONS: Circulating DNA levels were increased in dengue patients and correlated with dengue severity. Additional studies are required to show the benefits of this biomarker in early dengue diagnosis and for the prognosis of shock complication.

  13. Plasma cell treatment device Plasma-on-Chip: Monitoring plasma-generated reactive species in microwells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Jun-Seok; Kojima, Shinya; Sasaki, Minoru; Hatta, Akimitsu; Kumagai, Shinya

    2017-01-01

    We have developed a plasma cell treatment device called Plasma-on-Chip that enables the real-time monitoring of a single cell culture during plasma treatment. The device consists of three parts: 1) microwells for cell culture, 2) a microplasma device for generating reactive oxygen and nitrogen species (RONS) for use in cell treatment, and 3) through-holes (microchannels) that connect each microwell with the microplasma region for RONS delivery. Here, we analysed the delivery of the RONS to the liquid culture medium stored in the microwells. We developed a simple experimental set-up using a microdevice and applied in situ ultraviolet absorption spectroscopy with high sensitivity for detecting RONS in liquid. The plasma-generated RONS were delivered into the liquid culture medium via the through-holes fabricated into the microdevice. The RONS concentrations were on the order of 10–100 μM depending on the size of the through-holes. In contrast, we found that the amount of dissolved oxygen was almost constant. To investigate the process of RONS generation, we numerically analysed the gas flow in the through-holes. We suggest that the circulating gas flow in the through-holes promotes the interaction between the plasma (ionised gas) and the liquid, resulting in enhanced RONS concentrations. PMID:28176800

  14. Closed inductively coupled plasma cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manning, Thomas J.; Palmer, Byron A.; Hof, Douglas E.

    1990-01-01

    A closed inductively coupled plasma cell generates a relatively high power, low noise plasma for use in spectroscopic studies. A variety of gases can be selected to form the plasma to minimize spectroscopic interference and to provide a electron density and temperature range for the sample to be analyzed. Grounded conductors are placed at the tube ends and axially displaced from the inductive coil, whereby the resulting electromagnetic field acts to elongate the plasma in the tube. Sample materials can be injected in the plasma to be excited for spectroscopy.

  15. Elevated circulating plasma endothelin-1 concentrations in cirrhosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, S; Emmeluth, C; Henriksen, Jens Henrik Sahl

    1993-01-01

    As endothelin-1 (ET-1), a potent vasoconstricting peptide, may play a role in the circulatory derangement and renal impairment in cirrhosis, the aim of the present study was to investigate plasma concentrations of ET-1 in different vascular beds in relation to clinical and biochemical parameters.......70, P plasma concentration between the liver, renal, or femoral...

  16. Circulating folic acid in plasma: relation to folic acid fortification

    Science.gov (United States)

    The implementation of folic acid fortification in the United States has resulted in unprecedented amounts of this synthetic form of folate in the American diet. Folic acid in circulation may be a useful measure of physiologic exposure to synthetic folic acid, and there is a potential for elevated co...

  17. Formation of germline chimera Gaok chicken used circulation primordial germ cells (circulation PGCs fresh and thawed

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kostaman T

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Formation of germline chimeras by transfer of chicken primordial germ cells (PGCs is one of the effective techniques for preservation and regeneration of genetic resources in chickens. This study attempted to form germline chimeras of Gaok chicken buy purifying circulated PGCs of donor embryo before it is transferred to the recipient (White Leghorn chickens=WL and studied the ability of recipient embryo on survival in incubators, and hatchability. This study used 200 fertile eggs of Gaok and 90 fertile WL breed all of the eggs was incubated at 380C and 60% humidity in a portable incubator. PGCs-circulation of the blood collected Gaok embryos at stage 14-16 were taken from the dorsal aorta, and then purified by centrifugation method using nycodenz. PGCs-circulation results further purification frozen in liquid nitrogen before being transferred to the recipient embryo. The results showed that for the development of embryos transferred to the fresh circulation of PGCs-circulation as many as 25 cells can survive up to day 14, while one of the transferred of 50 and 100 cells into recipient embryos was hatched (10%. On the contrari recipient embryos that are transferred to the frozen PGCs-circulation the embryos development was shorter, and only survived until day 10th (treatment 25 cells, day 14th (treatment of 50 cells and day 17th (treatment of 100 cells. It is concluded that the amount of PGCs-circulation embryos transferred to the recipient is one factor that influence the success of the development germline chimeras.

  18. Carboxybetaine methacrylate oligomer modified nylon for circulating tumor cells capture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Chaoqun; Wang, Huiyu; Zhang, Zhuo; Zhang, Tao; Liu, Baorui

    2014-10-15

    Circulating tumor cells (CTC) capture is one of the most effective approaches in diagnosis and treatment of cancers in the field of personalized cancer medicine. In our study, zwitterionic carboxybetaine methacrylate (CBMA) oligomers were grafted onto nylon via atomic transfer random polymerization (ATRP) which would serve as a novel material for the development of convenient CTC capture interventional medical devices. The chemical, physical and biological properties of pristine and modified nylon surfaces were assessed by Fourier transform infrared spectra, atomic force microscope, water contact angle measurements, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, protein adsorption, platelet adhesion, and plasma recalcification time (PRT) determinations, etc. The results, including the significant decrease of proteins adsorption and platelets adhesion, as well as prolonged PRTs demonstrated the extraordinary biocompatibility and blood compatibility of the modified surface. Furthermore, we showed that upon immobilization of anti-epithelial cell adhesion molecular (anti-EpCAM) antibody onto the CBMA moiety, the modified nylon surface can selectively capture EpCAM positive tumor cells from blood with high efficiency, indicating the potential of the modified nylon in the manufacture of convenient interventional CTC capture medical devices.

  19. In vivo acoustic and photoacoustic focusing of circulating cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galanzha, Ekaterina I.; Viegas, Mark G.; Malinsky, Taras I.; Melerzanov, Alexander V.; Juratli, Mazen A.; Sarimollaoglu, Mustafa; Nedosekin, Dmitry A.; Zharov, Vladimir P.

    2016-03-01

    In vivo flow cytometry using vessels as natural tubes with native cell flows has revolutionized the study of rare circulating tumor cells in a complex blood background. However, the presence of many blood cells in the detection volume makes it difficult to count each cell in this volume. We introduce method for manipulation of circulating cells in vivo with the use of gradient acoustic forces induced by ultrasound and photoacoustic waves. In a murine model, we demonstrated cell trapping, redirecting and focusing in blood and lymph flow into a tight stream, noninvasive wall-free transportation of blood, and the potential for photoacoustic detection of sickle cells without labeling and of leukocytes targeted by functionalized nanoparticles. Integration of cell focusing with intravital imaging methods may provide a versatile biological tool for single-cell analysis in circulation, with a focus on in vivo needleless blood tests, and preclinical studies of human diseases in animal models.

  20. Aberrant Circulating Th17 Cells in Patients with B-Cell Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Ting; Yu, Shuang; Liu, Yan; Yin, Congcong; Ye, Jingjing; Liu, Zhi; Ma, Daoxin; Ji, Chunyan

    2016-01-01

    Non-Hodgkin's lymphomas (NHLs) are a heterogeneous group of neoplasm in which 90% are B-cell lymphomas and 10% T-cell lymphomas. Although T-helper 17 (Th17) cells have been implicated to be essential in the pathogenesis of autoimmune and inflammatory diseases, its role in B-cell non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (B-NHL) remains unknown. In this study, we observed a significantly decreased frequency of Th17 cells in peripheral blood from B-NHL patients compared with healthy individuals, accompanied with increased Th1 cells. IL-17AF plasma levels were remarkably decreased in B-NHL patients, accompanied with undetectable IL-17FF and unchangeable IL-17AA. Moreover, Th17 and Th1 cells became normalized after one or two cycles of chemotherapy. Interestingly, in B-NHL, circulating Th17 cells frequencies were significantly higher in relapsed patients than those in untreated patients or normal individuals. Meanwhile, there was no statistical difference regarding the frequencies of Th1 cells between relapsed and untreated patients. Taken these data together, circulating Th17 subset immune response may be associated with the response of patients to treatment and with different stages of disease.

  1. Semicarbazide-sensitive amine oxidase (SSAO): from cell to circulation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    F. Boomsma (Frans); H. Hut; U. Bagghoe; A.H. van den Meiracker (Anton)

    2005-01-01

    textabstractSemicarbazide-sensitive amine oxidase (SSAO) is a multi-functional enzyme widely present in nature. It converts primary amines into their corresponding aldehydes, while generating H(2)O(2) and NH(3). In mammals, SSAO circulates in plasma, while a membrane-bound form (of

  2. Semicarbazide-sensitive amine oxidase (SSAO): from cell to circulation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    F. Boomsma (Frans); H. Hut; U. Bagghoe; A.H. van den Meiracker (Anton)

    2005-01-01

    textabstractSemicarbazide-sensitive amine oxidase (SSAO) is a multi-functional enzyme widely present in nature. It converts primary amines into their corresponding aldehydes, while generating H(2)O(2) and NH(3). In mammals, SSAO circulates in plasma, while a membrane-bound form

  3. Application of circulating plasma/serum EBV DNA in the clinical management of nasopharyngeal carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yip, Timothy T C; Ngan, Roger K C; Fong, Alvin H W; Law, Stephen C K

    2014-06-01

    Elevated levels of circulating cell-free Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) DNA have been detected in plasma and serum samples from nasopharyngeal cancer (NPC) patients by quantitative real time PCR (qPCR) test. This qPCR test for circulating EBV DNA was found to be useful in the clinical management of NPC patients. For instance, EBV DNA qPCR test has good sensitivity and specificity in the detection of NPC at disease onset. Increase of the viral DNA load was found in NPC patients at late stages of disease. High EBV DNA load at disease onset or detectable viral load post-treatment was associated with poor survival or frequent relapse in NPC patients. Residual EBV DNA load after primary treatment could be a useful indicator to justify adjuvant chemotherapy. The qPCR test might also be applied to define a poor prognostic group in patients at early stage (I/II) for implementing concurrent chemo-radiotherapy (chemo-RT) to improve patients' outcome. The test is also useful to monitor distant metastases or response to radiotherapy, chemo-RT or surgery. Supplementary tests, however, are needed to pick up EBV negative WHO type I NPC and test improvement is needed to increase sensitivity in detecting stage I disease and local recurrence.

  4. Circulating nucleic acids in plasma and serum (CNAPS: applications in oncology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    González-Masiá JA

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available José A González-Masiá,1 Damián García-Olmo,2 Dolores C García-Olmo31General Surgery Service, General University Hospital of Albacete, Albacete, 2Department of Surgery, Universidad Autónoma de Madrid and La Paz University Hospital, IdiPaz, Madrid, 3Experimental Research Unit, General University Hospital of Albacete, Albacete, SpainAbstract: The presence of small amounts of circulating nucleic acids in plasma and serum (CNAPS is not a new finding. The verification that such amounts are significantly increased in cancer patients, and that CNAPS might carry a variety of genetic and epigenetic alterations related to cancer development and progression, has aroused great interest in the scientific community in the last decades. Such alterations potentially reflect changes that occur during carcinogenesis, and include DNA mutations, loss of heterozygosity, viral genomic integration, disruption of microRNA, hypermethylation of tumor suppressor genes, and changes in the mitochondrial DNA. These findings have led to many efforts toward the implementation of new clinical biomarkers based on CNAPS analysis. In the present article, we review the main findings related to the utility of CNAPS analysis for early diagnosis, prognosis, and monitoring of cancer, most of which appear promising. However, due to the lack of harmonization of laboratory techniques, the heterogeneity of disease progression, and the small number of recruited patients in most of those studies, there has been a poor translation of basic research into clinical practice. In addition, many aspects remain unknown, such as the release mechanisms of cell-free nucleic acids, their biological function, and the way by which they circulate in the bloodstream. It is therefore expected that in the coming years, an improved understanding of the relationship between CNAPS and the molecular biology of cancer will lead to better diagnosis, management, and treatment.Keywords: plasma, cancer, clinical

  5. Plasma Etching Improves Solar Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bunyan, S. M.

    1982-01-01

    Etching front surfaces of screen-printed silicon photovoltaic cells with sulfur hexafluoride plasma found to increase cell performance while maintaining integrity of screen-printed silver contacts. Replacement of evaporated-metal contacts with screen-printed metal contacts proposed as one way to reduce cost of solar cells for terrestrial applications.

  6. Circulating clonotypic B cells in multiple myeloma and monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thiago, Leandro S; Perez-Andres, Martin; Balanzategui, Ana; Sarasquete, Maria E; Paiva, Bruno; Jara-Acevedo, Maria; Barcena, Paloma; Sanchez, Maria Luz; Almeida, Julia; González, Marcos; San Miguel, Jesus F; Garcia-Sanz, Ramón; Orfao, Alberto

    2014-01-01

    The B-cell compartment in which multiple myeloma stem cells reside remains unclear. We investigated the potential presence of mature, surface-membrane immunoglobulin-positive B lymphocytes clonally related to the tumor bone marrow plasma cells among different subsets of peripheral blood B cells from ten patients (7 with multiple myeloma and 3 with monoclonal gammopathies of undetermined significance). The presence of clonotypic immunoglobulin heavy chain gene rearrangements was determined in multiple highly-purified fractions of peripheral blood B-lymphocytes including surface-membrane IgM(+) CD27(-) naïve B-lymphocytes, plus surface-membrane IgG(+), IgA(+) and IgM(+) memory CD27(+) B cells, and normal circulating plasma cells, in addition to (mono)clonal plasma cells, by a highly-specific and sensitive allele-specific oligonucleotide polymerase chain reaction directed to the CDR3 sequence of the rearranged IGH gene of tumor plasma cells from individual patients. Our results showed systematic absence of clonotypic rearrangements in all the different B-cell subsets analyzed, including M-component isotype-matched memory B-lymphocytes, at frequencies undetermined significance are usually devoid of clonotypic B cells while the presence of immunophenotypically aberrant myeloma plasma cells in peripheral blood of myeloma patients is a relatively frequent finding.

  7. Circulating tumor cells in oral squamous cell carcinoma: An insight

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B V Prakruthi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Circulating tumor cells (CTCs are those cells present in the blood and have antigenic and/or genetic characteristics of a specific tumor type. CTCs can be detected in the peripheral blood of cancer patients. Various techniques are available for detection of CTCs, which provide evidence for future metastasis. CTCs may provide new insight into the biology of cancer and process of metastasis in oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC. The detection of CTCs may represent a new diagnostic tool for predicting the occurrence of metastatic disease in OSCC and endow with the treatment strategies to efficiently treat and prevent cancer metastasis. This review gives an insight into the significance of CTCs and different techniques for detection of CTCs.

  8. Circulating tumour-derived microvesicles in plasma of gastric cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baran, Jaroslaw; Baj-Krzyworzeka, Monika; Weglarczyk, Kazimierz; Szatanek, Rafal; Zembala, Maria; Barbasz, Jakub; Czupryna, Antoni; Szczepanik, Antoni; Zembala, Marek

    2010-06-01

    Cell membrane microfragments called microvesicles (MV) originating from different cells are circulating in the blood of healthy subjects and their elevated numbers are found in different diseases, including cancer. This study was designed to characterise MV present in plasma of gastric cancer patients. Since majority of MV in blood are platelets-derived (PMV), plasma samples deprived of PMV were used. In comparison to control, the number of MV in patients was significantly elevated in all stages, higher in more advanced disease. Patients' MV showed an increased membrane expression of CCR6 and HER-2/neu. The proportion of MV carrying some leucocyte determinants was low and similar in patients and control. Transmission electron microscopy showed their substantial heterogeneity in size and shape. The size determined by dynamic light scattering analysis confirmed this heterogeneity. The MV size distribution in patients was broader within the range of 10-800 nm, while in control MV showed 3-mode distribution within the range of 10-400 nm. Atomic force microscopy confirmed MV size heterogeneity with implication that larger objects represented aggregates of smaller microparticles. Patients' MV exhibited increased absolute values of zeta potential, indicating a higher surface charge. Tumour markers HER-2/neu, MAGE-1, c-MET and EMMPRIN were detected both in control and patients' samples with stronger expression in the latter. Significantly higher expression of MAGE-1 and HER-2/neu mRNA was observed in individual patients. All together, it suggests that at least some MV in plasma of gastric cancer patients are tumour-derived. However, their role in cancer requires further studies.

  9. Catabolism of circulating enzymes: plasma clearance, endocytosis, and breakdown of lactate dehydrogenase-1 in rabbits

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smit, M.J.; Beekhuis, H.; Duursma, A.M.; Bouma, J.M.; Gruber, M.

    1988-12-01

    Lactate dehydrogenase-1, intravenously injected into rabbits, was cleared with first-order kinetics (half-life 27 min), until at least 80% of the injected activity had disappeared from plasma. Radioactivity from injected SVI-labeled enzyme disappeared at this same rate. Trichloroacetic-acid-soluble breakdown products started to appear in the circulation shortly after injection of the labeled enzyme. Body scans of the rabbits for 80 min after injection of T I-labeled enzyme revealed rapid accumulation of label in the liver, peaking 10-20 min after injection. Subsequently, activity in the liver declined and radioactivity (probably labeled breakdown products of low molecular mass) steadily accumulated in the bladder. Tissue fractionation of liver, 19 min after injection of labeled enzyme, indicated that the radioactivity was present both in endosomes and in lysosomes, suggesting uptake by endocytosis, followed by breakdown in the lysosomes. Measurements of radioactivity in liver and plasma suggest that the liver is responsible for the breakdown of at least 75% of the injected enzyme. Radioautography of tissue sections of liver and spleen showed accumulated radioactivity in sinusoidal liver cells and red pulpa, respectively. These results are very similar to those for lactate dehydrogenase-5, creatine kinase MM, and several other enzymes that we have previously studied in rats.

  10. Catabolism of circulating enzymes: plasma clearance, endocytosis, and breakdown of lactate dehydrogenase-1 in rabbits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smit, M J; Beekhuis, H; Duursma, A M; Bouma, J M; Gruber, M

    1988-12-01

    Lactate dehydrogenase-1 (EC 1.1.1.27), intravenously injected into rabbits, was cleared with first-order kinetics (half-life 27 min), until at least 80% of the injected activity had disappeared from plasma. Radioactivity from injected 125I-labeled enzyme disappeared at this same rate. Trichloroacetic-acid-soluble breakdown products started to appear in the circulation shortly after injection of the labeled enzyme. Body scans of the rabbits for 80 min after injection of 131I-labeled enzyme revealed rapid accumulation of label in the liver, peaking 10-20 min after injection. Subsequently, activity in the liver declined and radioactivity (probably labeled breakdown products of low molecular mass) steadily accumulated in the bladder. Tissue fractionation of liver, 19 min after injection of labeled enzyme, indicated that the radioactivity was present both in endosomes and in lysosomes, suggesting uptake by endocytosis, followed by breakdown in the lysosomes. Measurements of radioactivity in liver and plasma suggest that the liver is responsible for the breakdown of at least 75% of the injected enzyme. Radioautography of tissue sections of liver and spleen showed accumulated radioactivity in sinusoidal liver cells and red pulpa, respectively. These results are very similar to those for lactate dehydrogenase-5, creatine kinase MM, and several other enzymes that we have previously studied in rats.

  11. Cerebral malaria is associated with low levels of circulating endothelial progenitor cells in African children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gyan, Ben; Goka, Bamenla Quarm; Adjei, George O; Tetteh, John K A; Kusi, Kwadwo Asamoah; Aikins, Anastasia; Dodoo, Daniel; Lesser, Martin L; Sison, Cristina P; Das, Sanchita; Howard, Marion E; Milbank, Elizabeth; Fischer, Kimberly; Rafii, Shahin; Jin, David; Golightly, Linnie M

    2009-04-01

    Damage to the cerebral microvasculature is a feature of cerebral malaria. Circulating endothelial progenitor cells are needed for microvascular repair. Based on this knowledge, we hypothesized that the failure to mobilize sufficient circulating endothelial progenitor cells to the cerebral microvasculature is a pathophysiologic feature of cerebral malaria. To test this hypothesis, we compared peripheral blood levels of CD34 (+)/VEGFR2(+) and CD34 (+)/CD133(+) cells and plasma levels of the chemokine stromal cell-derived growth factor 1 (SDF-1) in 214 children in Accra, Ghana. Children with cerebral malaria had lower levels of CD34 (+)/VEGFR2(+) and CD34 (+)/CD133(+) cells compared with those with uncomplicated malaria, asymptomatic parasitemia, or healthy controls. SDF-1 levels were higher in children with acute malaria compared with healthy controls. Together, these results uncover a potentially novel role for endothelial progenitor cell mobilization in the pathophysiology of cerebral malaria.

  12. Circulating Endothelial Cells and Endothelial Progenitor Cells in Pediatric Sepsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zahran, Asmaa Mohamad; Elsayh, Khalid Ibrahim; Mohamad, Ismail Lotfy; Hassan, Gamal Mohamad; Abdou, Madleen Adel A

    2016-03-01

    The aim of the study was to measure the number of circulating endothelial cells (CECs) and circulating endothelial progenitor cells (CEPs) in pediatric patients with sepsis and correlating it with the severity of the disease and its outcome. The study included 19 children with sepsis, 26 with complicated sepsis, and 30 healthy controls. The patients were investigated within 48 hours of pediatric intensive care unit admission together with flow cytometric detection of CECs and CEPs. The levels of both CECs and CEPs were significantly higher in patient with sepsis and complicated sepsis than the controls. The levels of CECs were higher in patients with complicated sepsis, whereas the levels of CEPs were lower in patients with complicated sepsis. Comparing the survival and nonsurvival septic patients, the levels of CEPs were significantly higher in the survival than in nonsurvival patients, whereas the levels of CECs were significantly lower in the survival than in nonsurvival patients. Serum albumin was higher in survival than in nonsurvival patients. Estimation of CECs and CEPs and their correlation with other parameters such as serum albumen could add important information regarding prognosis in septic pediatric patients.

  13. The concept of a plasma centrifuge with a high frequency rotating magnetic field and axial circulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borisevich, V. D.; Potanin, E. P.

    2017-07-01

    The possibility of using a rotating magnetic field (RMF) in a plasma centrifuge (PC), with axial circulation to multiply the radial separation effect in an axial direction, is considered. For the first time, a traveling magnetic field (TMF) is proposed to drive an axial circulation flow in a PC. The longitudinal separation effect is calculated for a notional model, using specified operational parameters and the properties of a plasma, comprising an isotopic mixture of 20Ne-22Ne and generated by a high frequency discharge. The optimal intensity of a circulation flow, in which the longitudinal separation effect reaches its maximum value, is studied. The optimal parameters of the RMF and TMF for effective separation, as well as the centrifuge performance, are calculated.

  14. Circulating mesenchymal stem cells and their clinical implications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liangliang Xu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Circulating mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs is a new cell source for tissue regeneration and tissue engineering. The characteristics of circulating MSCs are similar to those of bone marrow-derived MSCs (BM-MSCs, but they exist at a very low level in healthy individuals. It has been demonstrated that MSCs are able to migrate to the sites of injury and that they have some distinct genetic profiles compared to BM-MSCs. The current review summaries the basic knowledge of circulating MSCs and their potential clinical applications, such as mobilizing the BM-MSCs into circulation for therapy. The application of MSCs to cure a broad spectrum of diseases is promising, such as spinal cord injury, cardiovascular repair, bone and cartilage repair. The current review also discusses the issues of using of allogeneic MSCs for clinical therapy.

  15. Chemokines and chemokine receptors in stem cell circulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beider, Katia; Abraham, Michal; Peled, Amnon

    2008-05-01

    Stem cells are rare, pluripotent, self-renewing cells that give rise to all mature cells during development and adult life. Due to their proliferative capabilities and their ability to home and contribute to the regeneration of damage tissue, stem cells can be transformed into established tumors. Stem cells can function as a double-edged sword--they have the ability to circulate and migrate throughout the developing and mature adult organism, which is essential for their normal function; however, transformed stem cells are also endowed with the machinery to metastasize into various organs. Chemokine and chemokine receptors play a critical role in directing the trafficking of these cells. It is therefore evident that understanding the role of chemokines and their receptors in stem cell circulation is critical for the successful use of these cells in therapy for a wide variety of pathological conditions.

  16. Surface Modification of Fine Particle by Plasma Grafting in a Circulating Fluidized Bed Reactor under Reduced Pressure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Sounghee [Woosuk University, Jinchon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-10-15

    A plasma surface modification of powders has been carried out in a circulating fluidized bed reactor under reduced pressure. Polystyrene (PS) particles treated by plasma are grafted with polyethylene glycol (PEG) on the surface. The virgin, plasma-treated and grafted powders were characterized by DPPH method, FTIR, SEM and contact angle meter. The plasma-treated PS powders have well formed peroxide on the surface, By PEG grafting polymerization, PEG is well grafted and dispersed on the surface of the plasma-treated PS powders. The PEG-g-PS particle was successfully synthesized using the plasma circulating fluidized bed reactor under reduced pressure.

  17. Bystander apoptosis in human cells mediated by irradiated blood plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vinnikov, Volodymyr, E-mail: vlad.vinnikov@mail.ru [Grigoriev Institute for Medical Radiology of the National Academy of Medical Science of Ukraine (Ukraine); Lloyd, David; Finnon, Paul [Centre for Radiation, Chemical and Environmental Hazards of the Health Protection Agency of the United Kingdom (United Kingdom)

    2012-03-01

    Following exposure to high doses of ionizing radiation, due to an accident or during radiotherapy, bystander signalling poses a potential hazard to unirradiated cells and tissues. This process can be mediated by factors circulating in blood plasma. Thus, we assessed the ability of plasma taken from in vitro irradiated human blood to produce a direct cytotoxic effect, by inducing apoptosis in primary human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBM), which mainly comprised G{sub 0}-stage lymphocytes. Plasma was collected from healthy donors' blood irradiated in vitro to 0-40 Gy acute {gamma}-rays. Reporter PBM were separated from unirradiated blood with Histopaque and held in medium with the test plasma for 24 h at 37 Degree-Sign C. Additionally, plasma from in vitro irradiated and unirradiated blood was tested against PBM collected from blood given 4 Gy. Apoptosis in reporter PBM was measured by the Annexin V test using flow cytometry. Plasma collected from unirradiated and irradiated blood did not produce any apoptotic response above the control level in unirradiated reporter PBM. Surprisingly, plasma from irradiated blood caused a dose-dependent reduction of apoptosis in irradiated reporter PBM. The yields of radiation-induced cell death in irradiated reporter PBM (after subtracting the respective values in unirradiated reporter PBM) were 22.2 {+-} 1.8% in plasma-free cultures, 21.6 {+-} 1.1% in cultures treated with plasma from unirradiated blood, 20.2 {+-} 1.4% in cultures with plasma from blood given 2-4 Gy and 16.7 {+-} 3.2% in cultures with plasma from blood given 6-10 Gy. These results suggested that irradiated blood plasma did not cause a radiation-induced bystander cell-killing effect. Instead, a reduction of apoptosis in irradiated reporter cells cultured with irradiated blood plasma has implications concerning oncogenic risk from mutated cells surviving after high dose in vivo irradiation (e.g. radiotherapy) and requires further study.

  18. Monitoring of organ transplants through genomic analyses of circulating cell-free DNA

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Vlaminck, Iwijn

    Solid-organ transplantation is the preferred treatment for patients with end-stage organ diseases, but complications due to infection and acute rejection undermine its long-term benefits. While clinicians strive to carefully monitor transplant patients, diagnostic options are currently limited. My colleagues and I in the lab of Stephen Quake have found that a combination of next-generation sequencing with a phenomenon called circulating cell-free DNA enables non-invasive diagnosis of both infection and rejection in transplantation. A substantial amount of small fragments of cell-free DNA circulate in blood that are the debris of dead cells. We discovered that donor specific DNA is released in circulation during injury to the transplant organ and we show that the proportion of donor DNA in plasma is predictive of acute rejection in heart and lung transplantation. We profiled viral and bacterial DNA sequences in plasma of transplant patients and discovered that the relative representation of different viruses and bacteria is informative of immunosuppression. This discovery suggested a novel biological measure of a person's immune strength, a finding that we have more recently confirmed via B-cell repertoire sequencing. Lastly, our studies highlight applications of shotgun sequencing of cell-free DNA in the broad, hypothesis free diagnosis of infection.

  19. Diagnostic technologies for circulating tumour cells and exosomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shao, Huilin; Chung, Jaehoon; Issadore, David

    2015-11-24

    Circulating tumour cells (CTCs) and exosomes are promising circulating biomarkers. They exist in easily accessible blood and carry large diversity of molecular information. As such, they can be easily and repeatedly obtained for minimally invasive cancer diagnosis and monitoring. Because of their intrinsic differences in counts, size and molecular contents, CTCs and exosomes pose unique sets of technical challenges for clinical translation-CTCs are rare whereas exosomes are small. Novel technologies are underway to overcome these specific challenges to fully harness the clinical potential of these circulating biomarkers. Herein, we will overview the characteristics of CTCs and exosomes as valuable circulating biomarkers and their associated technical challenges for clinical adaptation. Specifically, we will describe emerging technologies that have been developed to address these technical obstacles and the unique clinical opportunities enabled by technological innovations.

  20. Tumor-derived circulating endothelial cell clusters in colorectal cancer.

    KAUST Repository

    Cima, Igor

    2016-06-29

    Clusters of tumor cells are often observed in the blood of cancer patients. These structures have been described as malignant entities for more than 50 years, although their comprehensive characterization is lacking. Contrary to current consensus, we demonstrate that a discrete population of circulating cell clusters isolated from the blood of colorectal cancer patients are not cancerous but consist of tumor-derived endothelial cells. These clusters express both epithelial and mesenchymal markers, consistent with previous reports on circulating tumor cell (CTC) phenotyping. However, unlike CTCs, they do not mirror the genetic variations of matched tumors. Transcriptomic analysis of single clusters revealed that these structures exhibit an endothelial phenotype and can be traced back to the tumor endothelium. Further results show that tumor-derived endothelial clusters do not form by coagulation or by outgrowth of single circulating endothelial cells, supporting a direct release of clusters from the tumor vasculature. The isolation and enumeration of these benign clusters distinguished healthy volunteers from treatment-naïve as well as pathological early-stage (≤IIA) colorectal cancer patients with high accuracy, suggesting that tumor-derived circulating endothelial cell clusters could be used as a means of noninvasive screening for colorectal cancer. In contrast to CTCs, tumor-derived endothelial cell clusters may also provide important information about the underlying tumor vasculature at the time of diagnosis, during treatment, and throughout the course of the disease.

  1. The thrombotic potential of circulating tumor microemboli: computational modeling of circulating tumor cell-induced coagulation

    OpenAIRE

    Phillips, Kevin G.; Lee, Angela M.; Tormoen, Garth W.; Rigg, Rachel A.; Kolatkar, Anand; Luttgen, Madelyn; Bethel, Kelly; Bazhenova, Lyudmila; Kuhn, Peter; Newton, Paul; McCarty, Owen J.T.

    2014-01-01

    Thrombotic events can herald the diagnosis of cancer, preceding any cancer-related clinical symptoms. Patients with cancer are at a 4- to 7-fold increased risk of suffering from venous thromboembolism (VTE), with ∼7,000 patients with lung cancer presenting from VTEs. However, the physical biology underlying cancer-associated VTE remains poorly understood. Several lines of evidence suggest that the shedding of tissue factor (TF)-positive circulating tumor cells (CTCs) and microparticles from p...

  2. Transient depletion of T cells with high LFA-1 expression from peripheral circulation during acute Plasmodium falciparum malaria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hviid, L; Theander, T G; Abdulhadi, N H

    1991-01-01

    Acute P. falciparum malaria is associated with loss of in vitro T cell responsiveness to antigenic stimulation, and with high plasma levels of soluble interleukin 2 receptor (IL 2R). In the present study peripheral T cells from acute P. falciparum malaria patients from a malaria-endemic area......-bound IL 2R (CD25) and ICAM-1 (CD54) did not reveal in vivo activated T cells in the peripheral blood of the patients. Taken together, these data suggest that circulating T cells recognizing parasite antigens are temporarily withdrawn from peripheral circulation during P. falciparum malaria....

  3. Public speaking stress-induced neuroendocrine responses and circulating immune cell redistribution in irritable bowel syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elsenbruch, Sigrid; Lucas, Ayscha; Holtmann, Gerald; Haag, Sebastian; Gerken, Guido; Riemenschneider, Natalie; Langhorst, Jost; Kavelaars, Annemieke; Heijnen, Cobi J; Schedlowski, Manfred

    2006-10-01

    Augmented neuroendocrine stress responses and altered immune functions may play a role in the manifestation of functional gastrointestinal (GI) disorders. We tested the hypothesis that IBS patients would demonstrate enhanced psychological and endocrine responses, as well as altered stress-induced redistribution of circulating leukocytes and lymphocytes, in response to an acute psychosocial stressor when compared with healthy controls. Responses to public speaking stress were analyzed in N = 17 IBS patients without concurrent psychiatric conditions and N = 12 healthy controls. At baseline, immediately following public speaking, and after a recovery period, state anxiety, acute GI symptoms, cardiovascular responses, serum cortisol and plasma adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) were measured, and numbers of circulating leukocytes and lymphocyte subpopulations were analyzed by flow cytometry. Public speaking led to significant cardiovascular activation, a significant increase in ACTH, and a redistribution of circulating leukocytes and lymphocyte subpopulations, including significant increases in natural killer cells and cytotoxic/suppressor T cells. IBS patients demonstrated significantly greater state anxiety both at baseline and following public speaking. However, cardiovascular and endocrine responses, as well as the redistribution of circulating leukocytes and lymphocyte subpopulations after public speaking stress, did not differ for IBS patients compared with controls. In IBS patients without psychiatric comorbidity, the endocrine response as well as the circulation pattern of leukocyte subpopulations to acute psychosocial stress do not differ from healthy controls in spite of enhanced emotional responses. Future studies should discern the role of psychopathology in psychological and biological stress responses in IBS.

  4. Adiponectin levels are associated with the number and activity of circulating endothelial progenitor cells in patients with coronary artery disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhi-qiang YING; Dan-dan ZHONG; Geng XU; Miao-yan CHEN; Qing-yu CHEN

    2009-01-01

    Objective: To study the relationship between plasma adiponectin concentration and the functional activities of circulating endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) in patients with coronary artery disease (CAD). Methods: Circulating EPCs were enumerated as AC133+/KDR+ cells via flow cytometry and identified by co-staining with Dii-acLDL and fluorescein isothiocy-anate (FITC)-conjugated lectin under a fluorescent microscope. The migratory capacity of EPCs was measured by modified Boyden chamber assay. Adhesion capacity was performed to count adherent cells after replating EPCs on six-well culture dishes coated with fibronectin. Results: The number of circulating EPCs (AC133+/KDR+ cells) decreased significantly in CAD patients, compared with control subjects [(74.2±12.3) vs (83.5±12.9) cells/ml blood, P<0.0\\]. In addition, the number of EPCs also decreased in CAD patients after ex vivo cultivation [(54.4±8.6) vs (71.9±11.6) EPCs/field, P<0.01]. Both circulating EPCs and differentiated EPCs were positively correlated with plasma adiponectin concentration. The functional activities of EPCs from CAD patients, such as migratory and adherent capacities, were also impaired, compared with control subjects, and positively correlated with plasma adiponectin concentration. Conclusion: The study demonstrates that the impairment of the number and functional activities of EPCs in CAD patients is correlated with their lower plasma adiponectin concentrations.

  5. Circulating cell-free DNA in sickle cell disease: is it a potentially useful biomarker?

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Al-Humood, Salah; Zueriq, Rajaa; Al-Faris, Lama; Marouf, Rajaa; Al-Mulla, Fahd

    2014-01-01

    .... This study investigates plasma cell-free DNA concentrations in sickle cell disease patients, and aims at exploring the significance of plasma cell-free DNA as a potential biomarker in predicting its complications...

  6. Identification of circulating fetal cell markers by microarray analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brinch, Marie; Hatt, Lotte; Singh, Ripudaman

    2012-01-01

    identified by XY fluorescence in situ hybridization and confirmed by reverse-color fluorescence in situ hybridization were shot off microscope slides by laser capture microdissection. The expression pattern of a subset of expressed genes was compared between fetal cells and maternal blood cells using stem......OBJECTIVE: Different fetal cell types have been found in the maternal blood during pregnancy in the past, but fetal cells are scarce, and the proportions of the different cell types are unclear. The objective of the present study was to identify specific fetal cell markers from fetal cells found...... in the maternal blood circulation at the end of the first trimester. METHOD: Twenty-three fetal cells were isolated from maternal blood by removing the red blood cells by lysis or combining this with removal of large proportions of maternal white blood cells by magnetic-activated cell sorting. Fetal cells...

  7. Plasma gelsolin depletion and circulating actin in sepsis: a pilot study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Po-Shun Lee

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Depletion of the circulating actin-binding protein, plasma gelsolin (pGSN has been described in septic patients and animals. We hypothesized that the extent of pGSN reduction correlates with outcomes of septic patients and that circulating actin is a manifestation of sepsis. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We assayed pGSN in plasma samples from non-surgical septic patients identified from a pre-existing database which prospectively enrolled patients admitted to adult intensive care units at an academic hospital. We identified 21 non-surgical septic patients for the study. Actinemia was detected in 17 of the 21 patients, suggesting actin released into circulation from injured tissues is a manifestation of sepsis. Furthermore, we documented the depletion of pGSN in human clinical sepsis, and that the survivors had significantly higher pGSN levels than the non-survivors (163+/-47 mg/L vs. 89+/-48 mg/L, p = 0.01. pGSN levels were more strongly predictive of 28-day mortality than APACHE III scores. For every quartile reduction in pGSN, the odds of death increased 3.4-fold. CONCLUSION: We conclude that circulating actin and pGSN deficiency are associated with early sepsis. The degree of pGSN deficiency correlates with sepsis mortality. Reversing pGSN deficiency may be an effective treatment for sepsis.

  8. Liquid Biopsy for Cancer: Circulating Tumor Cells, Circulating Free DNA or Exosomes?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Wei; Xia, Wenjie; Lv, Zhengye; Ni, Chao; Xin, Yin; Yang, Liu

    2017-01-01

    Precision medicine and personalized medicine are based on the development of biomarkers, and liquid biopsy has been reported to be able to detect biomarkers that carry information on tumor development and progression. Compared with traditional 'solid biopsy', which cannot always be performed to determine tumor dynamics, liquid biopsy has notable advantages in that it is a noninvasive modality that can provide diagnostic and prognostic information prior to treatment, during treatment and during progression. In this review, we describe the source, characteristics, technology for detection and current situation of circulating tumor cells, circulating free DNA and exosomes used for diagnosis, recurrence monitoring, prognosis assessment and medication planning. © 2017 The Author(s)Published by S. Karger AG, Basel.

  9. Circulating Tumor Cells Versus Circulating Tumor DNA in Colorectal Cancer: Pros and Cons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Carlyn Rose C; Zhou, Lanlan; El-Deiry, Wafik S

    2016-06-01

    Circulating tumor cells (CTCs) and circulating tumor DNA (ctDNA) are emerging noninvasive multifunctional biomarkers in liquid biopsy allowing for early diagnosis, accurate prognosis, therapeutic target selection, spatiotemporal monitoring of metastasis, as well as monitoring response and resistance to treatment. CTCs and ctDNA are released from different tumor types at different stages and contribute complementary information for clinical decision. Although big strides have been taken in technology development for detection, isolation and characterization of CTCs and sensitive and specific detection of ctDNA, CTC-, and ctDNA-based liquid biopsies may not be widely adopted for routine cancer patient care until the suitability, accuracy, and reliability of these tests are validated and more standardized protocols are corroborated in large, independent, prospectively designed trials. This review covers CTC- and ctDNA-related technologies and their application in colorectal cancer. The promise of CTC-and ctDNA-based liquid biopsies is envisioned.

  10. After clouds sun again shines on circulating tumor cells research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barriere, Guislaine; Rigaud, Michel

    2013-07-01

    In the Science issue of first February 2013 Yu M et al. characterized epithelial and mesenchymal circulating tumor cells (CTC) by RNA-in situ hybridization. In this editorial we comment their results and emphasize the different CTC subpopulations arising from epithelial mesenchymal transition (EMT).

  11. Identification of novel circulating coffee metabolites in human plasma by liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Redeuil, Karine; Smarrito-Menozzi, Candice; Guy, Philippe; Rezzi, Serge; Dionisi, Fabiola; Williamson, Gary; Nagy, Kornél; Renouf, Mathieu

    2011-07-22

    This study reports a liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry method for the detection of polyphenol-derived metabolites in human plasma without enzymatic treatment after coffee consumption. Separation of available standards was achieved by reversed-phase ultra performance liquid chromatography and detection was performed by high resolution mass spectrometry in negative electrospray ionization mode. This analytical method was then applied for the identification and relative quantification of circulating coffee metabolites. A total of 34 coffee metabolites (mainly reduced, sulfated and methylated forms of caffeic acid, coumaric acid, caffeoylquinic acid and caffeoylquinic acid lactone) were identified based on mass accuracy (<4 ppm for most metabolites), specific fragmentation pattern and co-chromatography (when standard available). Among them, 19 circulating coffee metabolites were identified for the first time in human plasma such as feruloylquinic acid lactone, sulfated and glucuronidated forms of feruloylquinic acid lactone and sulfated forms of coumaric acid. Phenolic acid derivatives such as dihydroferulic acid, dihydroferulic acid 4'-O-sulfate, caffeic acid 3'-O-sulfate, dimethoxycinnamic acid, dihydrocaffeic acid and coumaric acid O-sulfate appeared to be the main metabolites circulating in human plasma after coffee consumption. The described method is a sensitive and reliable approach for the identification of coffee metabolites in biological fluids. In future, this analytical method will give more confidence in compound identification to provide a more comprehensive assessment of coffee polyphenol bioavailability studies in humans.

  12. Cytomorphology of Circulating Colorectal Tumor Cells: A Small Case Series

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dena Marrinucci

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Several methodologies exist to enumerate circulating tumor cells (CTCs from the blood of cancer patients; however, most methodologies lack high-resolution imaging, and thus, little is known about the cytomorphologic features of these cells. In this study of metastatic colorectal cancer patients, we used immunofluorescent staining with fiber-optic array scanning technology to identify CTCs, with subsequent Wright-Giemsa and Papanicolau staining. The CTCs were compared to the corresponding primary and metastatic tumors. The colorectal CTCs showed marked intrapatient pleomorphism. In comparison to the corresponding tissue biopsies, cells from all sites showed similar pleomorphism, demonstrating that colorectal CTCs retain the pleomorphism present in regions of solid growth. They also often retain particular cytomorphologic features present in the patient's primary and/or metastatic tumor tissue. This study provides an initial analysis of the cytomorphologic features of circulating colon cancer cells, providing a foundation for further investigation into the significance and metastatic potential of CTCs.

  13. Alemtuzumab treatment alters circulating innate immune cells in multiple sclerosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmetspahic, Diana; Ruck, Tobias; Schulte-Mecklenbeck, Andreas; Schwarte, Kathrin; Jörgens, Silke; Scheu, Stefanie; Windhagen, Susanne; Graefe, Bettina; Melzer, Nico; Klotz, Luisa; Arolt, Volker; Wiendl, Heinz; Meuth, Sven G.

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To characterize changes in myeloid and lymphoid innate immune cells in patients with relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis (MS) during a 6-month follow-up after alemtuzumab treatment. Methods: Circulating innate immune cells including myeloid cells and innate lymphoid cells (ILCs) were analyzed before and 6 and 12 months after onset of alemtuzumab treatment. Furthermore, a potential effect on granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) and interleukin (IL)–23 production by myeloid cells and natural killer (NK) cell cytolytic activity was determined. Results: In comparison to CD4+ T lymphocytes, myeloid and lymphoid innate cell subsets of patients with MS expressed significantly lower amounts of CD52 on their cell surface. Six months after CD52 depletion, numbers of circulating plasmacytoid dendritic cells (DCs) and conventional DCs were reduced compared to baseline. GM-CSF and IL-23 production in DCs remained unchanged. Within the ILC compartment, the subset of CD56bright NK cells specifically expanded under alemtuzumab treatment, but their cytolytic activity did not change. Conclusions: Our findings demonstrate that 6 months after alemtuzumab treatment, specific DC subsets are reduced, while CD56bright NK cells expanded in patients with MS. Thus, alemtuzumab specifically restricts the DC compartment and expands the CD56bright NK cell subset with potential immunoregulatory properties in MS. We suggest that remodeling of the innate immune compartment may promote long-term efficacy of alemtuzumab and preserve immunocompetence in patients with MS. PMID:27766281

  14. The challenges of detecting circulating tumour cells in sarcoma

    OpenAIRE

    Tellez-Gabriel, M.; Brown, H K; Young, R.; Heymann, M. F.; Heymann, D

    2016-01-01

    International audience; Sarcomas are a heterogenous group of malignant neoplasms of mesenchymal origin, many of which have a propensity to develop distant metastases. Cancer cells that have escaped from the primary tumour are able to invade into surrounding tissues, to intravasate into the bloodstream to become Circulating Tumour Cells (CTCs), and are responsible for the generation of distant metastases. Due to the rarity of these tumours and the absence of specific markers expressed by sarco...

  15. Photoacoustic imaging of single circulating melanoma cells in vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lidai; Yao, Junjie; Zhang, Ruiying; Xu, Song; Li, Guo; Zou, Jun; Wang, Lihong V.

    2015-03-01

    Melanoma, one of the most common types of skin cancer, has a high mortality rate, mainly due to a high propensity for tumor metastasis. The presence of circulating tumor cells (CTCs) is a potential predictor for metastasis. Label-free imaging of single circulating melanoma cells in vivo provides rich information on tumor progress. Here we present photoacoustic microscopy of single melanoma cells in living animals. We used a fast-scanning optical-resolution photoacoustic microscope to image the microvasculature in mouse ears. The imaging system has sub-cellular spatial resolution and works in reflection mode. A fast-scanning mirror allows the system to acquire fast volumetric images over a large field of view. A 500-kHz pulsed laser was used to image blood and CTCs. Single circulating melanoma cells were imaged in both capillaries and trunk vessels in living animals. These high-resolution images may be used in early detection of CTCs with potentially high sensitivity. In addition, this technique enables in vivo study of tumor cell extravasation from a primary tumor, which addresses an urgent pre-clinical need.

  16. Detection and isolation of circulating melanoma cells using photoacoustic flowmetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Brien, Christine M; Rood, Kyle; Sengupta, Shramik; Gupta, Sagar K; DeSouza, Thiago; Cook, Aaron; Viator, John A

    2011-11-25

    Circulating tumor cells (CTCs) are those cells that have separated from a macroscopic tumor and spread through the blood and lymph systems to seed secondary tumors(1,2,3). CTCs are indicators of metastatic disease and their detection in blood samples may be used to diagnose cancer and monitor a patient's response to therapy. Since CTCs are rare, comprising about one tumor cell among billions of normal blood cells in advanced cancer patients, their detection and enumeration is a difficult task. We exploit the presence of pigment in most melanoma cells to generate photoacoustic, or laser induced ultrasonic waves in a custom flow cytometer for detection of circulating melanoma cells (CMCs)(4,5). This process entails separating a whole blood sample using centrifugation and obtaining the white blood cell layer. If present in whole blood, CMCs will separate with the white blood cells due to similar density. These cells are resuspended in phosphate buffered saline (PBS) and introduced into the flowmeter. Rather than a continuous flow of the blood cell suspension, we induced two phase flow in order to capture these cells for further study. In two phase flow, two immiscible liquids in a microfluidic system meet at a junction and form alternating slugs of liquid(6,7). PBS suspended white blood cells and air form microliter slugs that are sequentially irradiated with laser light. The addition of a surfactant to the liquid phase allows uniform slug formation and the user can create different sized slugs by altering the flow rates of the two phases. Slugs of air and slugs of PBS with white blood cells contain no light absorbers and hence, do not produce photoacoustic waves. However, slugs of white blood cells that contain even single CMCs absorb laser light and produce high frequency acoustic waves. These slugs that generate photoacoustic waves are sequestered and collected for cytochemical staining for verification of CMCs.

  17. Prognostic value of circulating CD34+ cells in myelodysplastic syndromes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cesana, Clara; Klersy, Catherine; Brando, Bruno; Nosari, Annamaria; Scarpati, Barbara; Scampini, Linda; Molteni, Alfredo; Nador, Guido; Santoleri, Luca; Formenti, Marta; Valentini, Marina; Mazzone, Antonino; Morra, Enrica; Cairoli, Roberto

    2008-11-01

    We studied circulating (C)CD34(+) cells by flow cytometry in 96 patients with myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) at diagnosis, and in a subset of 35 cases during follow-up. CCD34(+) counts were stratified within both International Prognostic Scoring System (IPSS) and World Health Organization (WHO) categories. Counts >10/microl were associated with poorer leukemia-free survival, a prognostic value for evolution independent from that of WHO, and a higher progression probability within intermediate-risk IPSS and WHO classes. When serial measurements were performed, counts >10/microl more frequently correlated to evolution. Separating newly diagnosed patients on the basis of 10/microl cut-off of circulating CD34(+) cells retains prognostic utility, especially in intermediate-risk MDS.

  18. Differential expression of circulating miRNAs in maternal plasma in pregnancies with fetal macrosomia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ge, Qinyu; Zhu, Yanan; Li, Hailing; Tian, Fei; Xie, Xueying; Bai, Yunfei

    2015-01-01

    Macrosomia is associated with problems at birth and has life-long health implications for the infant. The aim of this study was to profile the plasma microRNAs (miRNAs or miRs) and evaluate the potential of circulating miRNAs to predict fetal macrosomia. The expression levels of miRNAs in plasma samples obtained from pregnant women with fetal macrosomia and from women with normal pregnancies (controls) were analyzed using TaqMan Low-Density Arrays (TLDAs) followed by quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR) validation and analysis. The TLDA data revealed that 143 miRNAs were differentially expressed in the plasma samples from pregnant women with fetal macrosomia compared with the controls (43 upregulated and 100 downregulated miRNAs). Twelve of these miRNAs were selected for RT-qPCR analysis. Receiver operational characteristic (ROC) curve analysis indicated that several miRNAs (e.g., miR‑141-3p and miR-200c-3p) were clearly distinguished between pregnancies with fetal macrosomia and other types of abnormal pregnancy and healthy pregnancies with high sensitivity and specificity (AUC >0.9). The expression of miRNA clusters also showed a similar trend in pregnancies with fetal macrosomia. This study provides a platform for profiling circulating miRNAs in maternal plasma. Our data also suggest that altered levels of maternal plasma miRNAs have great potential to serve as non-invasive biomarkers and as a mechanistic indicator of abnormal pregnancies.

  19. Cardiomyocyte regeneration from circulating bone marrow cells in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuramochi, Yukio; Fukazawa, Ryuji; Migita, Makoto; Hayakawa, Jun; Hayashida, Mari; Uchikoba, Yohko; Fukumi, Daichi; Shimada, Takashi; Ogawa, Shunichi

    2003-09-01

    We investigated the role of circulating bone marrow cells (BMC) in cardiomyocyte regeneration. BMC, isolated from transgenic mice expressing enhanced green fluorescent protein (GFP), were transplanted into lethally irradiated C57BL6 mice. Five weeks after bone marrow transplantation (BMT), flow cytometric analysis for GFP-positive cells confirmed reconstitution of transplanted bone marrow. Bone marrow transplant mice subsequently underwent left coronary artery ligation (myocardial infarction) or sham-operation, and were killed at 1 mo or 3 mo after operation. Infarct size was similar in bone marrow transplant mice at 1 mo (47.1 +/- 5.9%) and at 3 mo (45.3 +/- 7.8%), and echocardiography at 2 and 8 wk revealed decreasing left ventricular function. In infarcted heart, GFP-positive cells that expressed desmin and troponin T-C were identified by confocal microscopy. GFP and troponin T-C double-positive cells were predominantly in the peri-infarcted region (1 mo, 365 +/- 45 cells/50 sections; 3 mo: 458 +/- 100 cells/50 sections; p infarct, and sham-operated regions). Furthermore, BMC mobilization and differentiation into cardiomyocytes was found to be complete within 1 mo after myocardial infarction. These results demonstrate that circulating BMC undergo mobilization and differentiation in cardiac cells after myocardial infarction. Future studies are required to determine the molecular signaling mechanisms responsible for this phenomenon.

  20. Circulating Cell-Free Tumour DNA in the Management of Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Glenn Francis

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available With the development of new sensitive molecular techniques, circulating cell-free tumour DNA containing mutations can be identified in the plasma of cancer patients. The applications of this technology may result in significant changes to the care and management of cancer patients. Whilst, currently, these “liquid biopsies” are used to supplement the histological diagnosis of cancer and metastatic disease, in the future these assays may replace the need for invasive procedures. Applications include the monitoring of tumour burden, the monitoring of minimal residual disease, monitoring of tumour heterogeneity, monitoring of molecular resistance and early diagnosis of tumours and metastatic disease.

  1. Circulation control on a rounded trailing-edge wind turbine airfoil using plasma actuators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baleriola, S.; Leroy, A.; Loyer, S.; Devinant, P.; Aubrun, S.

    2016-09-01

    This experimental study focuses on the implementation via plasma actuators of a circulation control strategy on a wind turbine aerofoil with a rounded trailing-edge with the objective of reducing the aerodynamic load fluctuations on blades. Three sets of multi-DBD (Dielectric Barrier Discharge) actuators with different positions around the trailing-edge are studied. These actuators create a tangential jet that adheres to the blade model wall and diffuses along it. According to the jet direction, lift is increased or decreased. Load and pressure measurements as well as Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) show respectively the actuation effectiveness in terms of load modification and flow topology alteration.

  2. Fluid Flow Modeling of Arc Plasma and Bath Circulation in DC Electric Arc Furnace

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Feng-hua; JIN Zhi-jian; ZHU Zi-shu

    2006-01-01

    A mathematical model describing the flow field, heat transfer and the electromagnetic phenomenon in a DC electric arc furnace has been developed. First the governing equations in the arc plasma region are solved and the calculated results of heat transfer, current density and shear stresses on the anode surface are used as boundary conditions in a model of molten bath. Then a two-dimensional time-dependent model is used to describe the flow field and electromagnetic phenomenon in the molten bath. Moreover, the effect of bottom electrode diameter on the circulation of molten bath is studied.

  3. Circulating Tumor Cells: From Theory to Nanotechnology-Based Detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ming, Yue; Li, Yuanyuan; Xing, Haiyan; Luo, Minghe; Li, Ziwei; Chen, Jianhong; Mo, Jingxin; Shi, Sanjun

    2017-01-01

    Cancer stem cells with stem-cell properties are regarded as tumor initiating cells. Sharing stem-cell properties, circulating tumor cells (CTCs) are responsible for the development of metastasis, which significant affects CTC analysis in clinical practice. Due to their extremely low occurrence in blood, however, it is challenging to enumerate and analyze CTCs. Nanotechnology is able to address the problems of insufficient capture efficiency and low purity of CTCs owing to the unique structural and functional properties of nanomaterials, showing strong promise for CTC isolation and detection. In this review, we discuss the role of stem-like CTCs in metastases, provide insight into recent progress in CTC isolation and detection approaches using various nanoplatforms, and highlight the role of nanotechnology in the advancement of CTC research.

  4. Circulating Tumor Cells: From Theory to Nanotechnology-Based Detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ming, Yue; Li, Yuanyuan; Xing, Haiyan; Luo, Minghe; Li, Ziwei; Chen, Jianhong; Mo, Jingxin; Shi, Sanjun

    2017-01-01

    Cancer stem cells with stem-cell properties are regarded as tumor initiating cells. Sharing stem-cell properties, circulating tumor cells (CTCs) are responsible for the development of metastasis, which significant affects CTC analysis in clinical practice. Due to their extremely low occurrence in blood, however, it is challenging to enumerate and analyze CTCs. Nanotechnology is able to address the problems of insufficient capture efficiency and low purity of CTCs owing to the unique structural and functional properties of nanomaterials, showing strong promise for CTC isolation and detection. In this review, we discuss the role of stem-like CTCs in metastases, provide insight into recent progress in CTC isolation and detection approaches using various nanoplatforms, and highlight the role of nanotechnology in the advancement of CTC research. PMID:28203204

  5. Relevance of circulating tumor cells, extracellular nucleic acids, and exosomes in breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friel, Anne M; Corcoran, Claire; Crown, John; O'Driscoll, Lorraine

    2010-10-01

    Early detection of cancer is vital to improved overall survival rates. At present, evidence is accumulating for the clinical value of detecting occult tumor cells in peripheral blood, plasma, and serum specimens from cancer patients. Both molecular and cellular approaches, which differ in sensitivity and specificity, have been used for such means. Circulating tumor cells and extracellular nucleic acids have been detected within blood, plasma, and sera of cancer patients. As the presence of malignant tumors are clinically determined and/or confirmed upon biopsy procurement-which in itself may have detrimental effects in terms of stimulating cancer progression/metastases-minimally invasive methods would be highly advantageous to the diagnosis and prognosis of breast cancer and the subsequent tailoring of targeted treatments for individuals, if reliable panels of biomarkers suitable for such an approach exist. Herein, we review the current advances made in the detection of such circulating tumor cells and nucleic acids, with particular emphasis on extracellular nucleic acids, specifically extracellular mRNAs and discuss their clinical relevance.

  6. Nanobiotechnology for the capture and manipulation of circulating tumor cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, Andrew D; King, Michael R

    2012-01-01

    A necessary step in metastasis is the dissemination of malignant cells into the bloodstream, where cancer cells travel throughout the body as circulating tumor cells (CTC) in search of an opportunity to seed a secondary tumor. CTC represent a valuable diagnostic tool: evidence indicates that the quantity of CTC in the blood has been shown to relate to the severity of the illness, and samples are readily obtained through routine blood draws. As such, there has been a push toward developing technologies to reliably detect CTC using a variety of molecular and immunocytochemical techniques. In addition to their use in diagnostics, CTC detection systems that isolate CTC in such a way that the cells remain viable will allow for the performance of live-cell assays to facilitate the development of personalized cancer therapies. Moreover, techniques for the direct manipulation of CTC in circulation have been developed, intending to block metastasis in situ. We review a number of current and emerging micro- and nanobiotechnology approaches for the detection, capture, and manipulation of rare CTC aimed at advancing cancer treatment.

  7. Circulating angiogenic cells can be derived from cryopreserved peripheral blood mononuclear cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tanja Sofrenovic

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Cell transplantation for regenerative medicine has become an appealing therapeutic method; however, stem and progenitor cells are not always freshly available. Cryopreservation offers a way to freeze cells as they are generated, for storage and transport until required for therapy. This study was performed to assess the feasibility of cryopreserving peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs for the subsequent in vitro generation of their derived therapeutic population, circulating angiogenic cells (CACs. METHODS: PBMCs were isolated from healthy human donors. Freshly isolated cells were either analyzed immediately or cryopreserved in media containing 6% plasma serum and 5% dimethyl sulfoxide. PBMCs were thawed after being frozen for 1 (early thaw or 28 (late thaw days and analyzed, or cultured for 4 days to generate CACs. Analysis of the cells consisted of flow cytometry for viability and phenotype, as well as functional assays for their adhesion and migration potential, cytokine secretion, and in vivo angiogenic potential. RESULTS: The viability of PBMCs and CACs as well as their adhesion and migration properties did not differ greatly after cryopreservation. Phenotypic changes did occur in PBMCs and to a lesser extent in CACs after freezing; however the potent CD34(+VEGFR2(+CD133(+ population remained unaffected. The derived CACs, while exhibiting changes in inflammatory cytokine secretion, showed no changes in the secretion of important regenerative and chemotactic cytokines, nor in their ability to restore perfusion in ischemic muscle. CONCLUSION: Overall, it appears that changes do occur in cryopreserved PBMCs and their generated CACs; however, the CD34(+VEGFR2(+CD133(+ progenitor population, the secretion of pro-vasculogenic factors, and the in vivo angiogenic potential of CACs remain unaffected by cryopreservation.

  8. Combined Influence of EGF+61G>A and TGFB+869T>C Functional Polymorphisms in Renal Cell Carcinoma Progression and Overall Survival: The Link to Plasma Circulating MiR-7 and MiR-221/222 Expression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teixeira, Ana L.; Dias, Francisca; Ferreira, Marta; Gomes, Mónica; Santos, Juliana I.; Lobo, Francisco; Maurício, Joaquina; Machado, José Carlos; Medeiros, Rui

    2015-01-01

    The epidermal growth factor (EGF) is responsible for the activation of intracellular signal transducers that act on cell-cycle progression, cell motility, angiogenesis and inhibition of apoptosis. However, cells can block these effects activating opposite signaling pathways, such as the transforming growth factor beta 1 (TGFβ1) pathway. Thus changes in expression levels of EGF and TGFB1 in renal cells might modulate the renal cell carcinoma (RCC) development, in consequence of changes in regulatory elements of signaling networks such as the microRNAs (miRNAs). Our purpose was to investigate the synergic role of EGF+61G>A and TGFB1+869T>C polymorphisms in RCC development. Genetic polymorphisms were studied by allelic discrimination using real-time PCR in 133 RCC patients vs. 443 healthy individuals. The circulating EGF/EGFR-MAPK-related miR-7, miR-221 and miR-222 expression was analyzed by a quantitative real-time PCR in plasma from 22 RCC patients vs. 27 healthy individuals. The intermediate/high genetic proliferation profile patients carriers present a significantly reduced time-to-progression and a higher risk of an early relapse compared with the low genetic proliferation profile carriers (HR = 8.8, P = 0.038) with impact in a lower overall survival (Log rank test, P = 0.047). The RCC patients presented higher circulating expression levels of miR-7 than healthy individuals (6.1-fold increase, P<0.001). Moreover, the intermediate/high genetic proliferation profile carriers present an increase in expression levels of miR-7, miR-221 and miR-222 during the RCC development and this increase is not observed in low genetic proliferation profile (P<0.001, P = 0.004, P<0.001, respectively). The stimulus to angiogenesis, cell-cycle progression and tumoral cells invasion, through activation of EGFR/MAPK signaling pathway in intermediate/high proliferation profile carriers is associated with an early disease progression, resulting in a poor overall survival. We also

  9. Filtration parameters influencing circulating tumor cell enrichment from whole blood.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frank A W Coumans

    Full Text Available Filtration can achieve circulating tumor cell (CTC enrichment from blood. Key parameters such as flow-rate, applied pressure, and fixation, vary largely between assays and their influence is not well understood. Here, we used a filtration system, to monitor these parameters and determine their relationships. Whole blood, or its components, with and without spiked tumor cells were filtered through track-etched filters. We characterize cells passing through filter pores by their apparent viscosity; the viscosity of a fluid that would pass with the same flow. We measured a ratio of 5·10(4∶10(2∶1 for the apparent viscosities of 15 µm diameter MDA-231 cells, 10 µm white cells and 90 fl red cells passing through a 5 µm pore. Fixation increases the pressure needed to pass cells through 8 µm pores 25-fold and halves the recovery of spiked tumor cells. Filtration should be performed on unfixed samples at a pressure of ∼10 mbar for a 1 cm(2 track-etched filter with 5 µm pores. At this pressure MDA-231 cells move through the filter in 1 hour. If fixation is needed for sample preservation, a gentle fixative should be selected. The difference in apparent viscosity between CTC and blood cells is key in optimizing recovery of CTC.

  10. The Challenges of Detecting Circulating Tumor Cells in Sarcoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tellez-Gabriel, Marta; Brown, Hannah K.; Young, Robin; Heymann, Marie-Françoise; Heymann, Dominique

    2016-01-01

    Sarcomas are a heterogeneous group of malignant neoplasms of mesenchymal origin, many of which have a propensity to develop distant metastases. Cancer cells that have escaped from the primary tumor are able to invade into surrounding tissues, to intravasate into the bloodstream to become circulating tumor cells (CTCs), and are responsible for the generation of distant metastases. Due to the rarity of these tumors and the absence of specific markers expressed by sarcoma tumor cells, the characterization of sarcoma CTCs has to date been relatively limited. Current techniques for isolating sarcoma CTCs are based on size criteria, the identification of circulating cells that express either common mesenchymal markers, sarcoma-specific markers, such as CD99, CD81, or PAX3, and chromosomal translocations found in certain sarcoma subtypes, such as EWS-FLI1 in Ewing’s sarcoma, detection of osteoblast-related genes, or measurement of the activity of specific metabolic enzymes. Further studies are needed to improve the isolation and characterization of sarcoma CTCs, to demonstrate their clinical significance as predictive and/or prognostic biomarkers, and to utilize CTCs as a tool for investigating the metastatic process in sarcoma and to identify novel therapeutic targets. The present review provides a short overview of the most recent literature on CTCs in sarcoma. PMID:27656422

  11. Flow cytometric data analysis of circulating progenitor cell stability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahar, Ernestine A; Mou, Liping; Hayek, Salim S; Quyyumi, Arshed A; Waller, Edmund K

    2017-02-01

    A recent publication by Mekonnen et al. demonstrated that among women with non-obstructive coronary artery disease, higher levels of circulating progenitor cells in the blood (CPC), were associated with impaired coronary flow reserve [1]. We performed a quality control assessment of the stability of circulating blood progenitor cells in blood samples stored at 4 °C, to determine the time period during which blood samples can be analyzed and yield consistent data for progenitor cell content. Healthy volunteers (n=6) were recruited and underwent phlebotomy, and blood was stored in EDTA tubes at 4 °C. Flow cytometry was performed to quantitate progenitor cell subsets at 0-4 h, 24 h, and 48 h post phlebotomy. All processed samples were fixed with 1% Paraformaldehyde and 1,000,000 total data events were collected. We found no significant differences in PC data for both CD34+ (P=0.68 for one-way ANOVA) and CD34+/CD133+ (P=0.74 for one-way ANOVA).

  12. Plasma cells negatively regulate the follicular helper T cell program

    OpenAIRE

    2010-01-01

    B lymphocytes differentiate into antibody-secreting cells under the antigen-specific control of follicular helper T (TFH) cells. Here, we demonstrate that isotype-switched plasma cells expressed MHCII, CD80 and CD86 and intracellular machinery required for antigen presentation. Antigen-specific plasma cells could access, process and present sufficient antigen in vivo to induce multiple TH cell functions. Importantly, antigen-primed plasma cells failed to induce interleukin 21 or Bcl-6 in naïv...

  13. Gas Plasma Effects on Living Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoffels, E.; Sladek, R. E. J.; Kieft, I. E.

    This paper surveys the research activities at the Eindhoven University of Technology (The Netherlands) in the area of biomedical applications of gas discharge plasmas. A non-thermal atmospheric plasma source (the plasma needle) has been developed, and its interactions with living mammalian cells and bacteria are studied. It is concluded that plasma can efficiently kill bacteria without harming the cells, and also influence the cells without causing cell death (necrosis). In future it will lead to applications like skin (wound) and caries treatment.

  14. Influence of plasma processing on recovery and analysis of circulating nucleic acids.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karen Page

    Full Text Available Circulating nucleic acids (CNAs are under investigation as a liquid biopsy in cancer. However there is wide variation in blood processing and methods for isolation of circulating free DNA (cfDNA and microRNAs (miRNAs. Here we compare the extraction efficiency and reproducibility of 4 commercially available kits for cfDNA and 3 for miRNA using spike-in of reference templates. We also compare the effects of increasing time between venepuncture and centrifugation and differential centrifugation force on recovery of CNAs. cfDNA was quantified by TaqMan qPCR and targeted deep sequencing. miRNA profiles were assessed with TaqMan low-density arrays and assays. The QIAamp(® DNA Blood Mini and Circulating nucleic acid kits gave the highest recovery of cfDNA and efficient recovery (>90% of a 564bp spike-in. Moreover, targeted sequencing revealed overlapping cfDNA profiles and variant depth, including detection of HER2 gene amplification, using the Ion AmpliSeq™Cancer Hotspot Panel v2. Highest yields of miRNA and the synthetic Arabidopsis thaliana miR-159a spike-in were obtained using the miRNeasy Serum/Plasma kit, with saturation above 200 µl of plasma. miRNA profiles showed significant variation with increasing time before centrifugation (p 12 years, highlighting the potential for analysis of stored sample biobanks. In the era of the liquid biopsy, standardisation of methods is required to minimise variation, particularly for miRNA.

  15. Cell-free circulating tumour DNA as a liquid biopsy in breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Mattos-Arruda, Leticia; Caldas, Carlos

    2016-03-01

    Recent developments in massively parallel sequencing and digital genomic techniques support the clinical validity of cell-free circulating tumour DNA (ctDNA) as a 'liquid biopsy' in human cancer. In breast cancer, ctDNA detected in plasma can be used to non-invasively scan tumour genomes and quantify tumour burden. The applications for ctDNA in plasma include identifying actionable genomic alterations, monitoring treatment responses, unravelling therapeutic resistance, and potentially detecting disease progression before clinical and radiological confirmation. ctDNA may be used to characterise tumour heterogeneity and metastasis-specific mutations providing information to adapt the therapeutic management of patients. In this article, we review the current status of ctDNA as a 'liquid biopsy' in breast cancer.

  16. Cell-free Circulating miRNA Biomarkers in Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meng-Hsuan Mo, Liang Chen, Yebo Fu, Wendy Wang, Sidney W. Fu

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Considerable attention and an enormous amount of resources have been dedicated to cancer biomarker discovery and validation. However, there are still a limited number of useful biomarkers available for clinical use. An ideal biomarker should be easily assayed with minimally invasive medical procedures but possess high sensitivity and specificity. Commonly used circulating biomarkers are proteins in serum, most of which require labor-intensive analysis hindered by low sensitivity in early tumor detection. Since the deregulation of microRNA (miRNA is associated with cancer development and progression, profiling of circulating miRNAs has been used in a number of studies to identify novel minimally invasive miRNA biomarkers. In this review, we discuss the origin of the circulating cell-free miRNAs and their carriers in blood. We summarize the clinical use and function of potentially promising miRNA biomarkers in a variety of different cancers, along with their downstream target genes in tumor initiation and development. Additionally, we analyze some technical challenges in applying miRNA biomarkers to clinical practice.

  17. Circulating micro-RNA expression profiles in early stage nonsmall cell lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heegaard, Niels H H; Schetter, Aaron J; Welsh, Judith A; Yoneda, Mitsuhiro; Bowman, Elise D; Harris, Curtis C

    2012-03-15

    Circulating micro-RNA (miR) profiles have been proposed as promising diagnostic and prognostic biomarkers for cancer, including lung cancer. We have developed methods to accurately and reproducibly measure micro-RNA levels in serum and plasma. Here, we study paired serum and plasma samples from 220 patients with early stage nonsmall cell lung cancer (NSCLC) and 220 matched controls. We use qRT-PCR to measure the circulating levels of 30 different miRs that have previously been reported to be differently expressed in lung cancer tissue. Duplicate RNA extractions were performed for 10% of all samples, and micro-RNA measurements were highly correlated among those duplicates. This demonstrates high reproducibility of our assay. The expressions of miR-146b, miR-221, let-7a, miR-155, miR-17-5p, miR-27a and miR-106a were significantly reduced in the serum of NSCLC cases, while miR-29c was significantly increased. No significant differences were observed in plasma of patients compared with controls. Overall, expression levels in serum did not correlate well with levels in plasma. In secondary analyses, reduced plasma expression of let-7b was modestly associated with worse cancer-specific mortality in all patients, and reduced serum expression of miR-223 was modestly associated with cancer-specific mortality in stage IA/B patients. MiR profiles also showed considerable differences comparing African American and European Americans. In summary, we found significant differences in miR expression when comparing cases and controls and find evidence that expression of let-7b is associated with prognosis in NSCLC. Copyright © 2011 UICC.

  18. Single Cell Characterization of Prostate Cancer-Circulating Tumor Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-01

    al., 2010). In addition, there were a significant number of cell cycle and mitosis associated transcripts in the highly expressed gene set including...red blood cell lysis with 10 volumes of 16 PharmLyse (BD Biosciences) for 15 minutes at room temperature . Remaining cells were pelleted at 4uC for 15...processes (23%, GO:0008152) or the cell cycle (10%, GO:0007049), consistent with mitotically active cells (Fig. 4C). Cell cycle and mitosis associated

  19. Genetic engineering of platelets to neutralize circulating tumor cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jiahe; Sharkey, Charles C; Wun, Brittany; Liesveld, Jane L; King, Michael R

    2016-04-28

    Mounting experimental evidence demonstrates that platelets support cancer metastasis. Within the circulatory system, platelets guard circulating tumor cells (CTCs) from immune elimination and promote their arrest at the endothelium, supporting CTC extravasation into secondary sites. Neutralization of CTCs in blood circulation can potentially attenuate metastases to distant organs. Therefore, extensive studies have explored the blockade of platelet-CTC interactions as an anti-metastatic strategy. Such an intervention approach, however, may cause bleeding disorders since the platelet-CTC interactions inherently rely on the blood coagulation cascade including platelet activation. On the other hand, platelets have been genetically engineered to correct inherited bleeding disorders in both animal models and human clinical trials. In this study, inspired by the physical association between platelets and CTCs, platelets were genetically modified to express surface-bound tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL), a cytokine known to induce apoptosis specifically in tumor cells. The TRAIL-expressing platelets were demonstrated to kill cancer cells in vitro and significantly reduce metastases in a mouse model of prostate cancer metastasis. Our results suggest that using platelets to produce and deliver cancer-specific therapeutics can provide a Trojan-horse strategy of neutralizing CTCs to attenuate metastasis.

  20. Flow cytometric data analysis of circulating progenitor cell stability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ernestine A. Mahar

    2017-02-01

    We performed a quality control assessment of the stability of circulating blood progenitor cells in blood samples stored at 4 °C, to determine the time period during which blood samples can be analyzed and yield consistent data for progenitor cell content. Healthy volunteers (n=6 were recruited and underwent phlebotomy, and blood was stored in EDTA tubes at 4 °C. Flow cytometry was performed to quantitate progenitor cell subsets at 0–4 h, 24 h, and 48 h post phlebotomy. All processed samples were fixed with 1% Paraformaldehyde and 1,000,000 total data events were collected. We found no significant differences in PC data for both CD34+ (P=0.68 for one-way ANOVA and CD34+/CD133+ (P=0.74 for one-way ANOVA.

  1. Diurnal Variations of Human Circulating Cell-Free Micro-RNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heegaard, Niels H H; Carlsen, Anting Liu; Lilje, Berit; Ng, Kim Lee; Rønne, Mette E; Jørgensen, Henrik L; Sennels, Henriette; Fahrenkrug, Jan

    2016-01-01

    A 24-hour light and dark cycle-dependent rhythmicity pervades physiological processes in virtually all living organisms including humans. These regular oscillations are caused by external cues to endogenous, independent biological time-keeping systems (clocks). The rhythm is reflected by gene expression that varies in a circadian and specific fashion in different organs and tissues and is regulated largely by dynamic epigenetic and post-transcriptional mechanisms. This leads to well-documented oscillations of specific electrolytes, hormones, metabolites, and plasma proteins in blood samples. An emerging, important class of gene regulators is short single-stranded RNA (micro-RNA, miRNA) that interferes post-transcriptionally with gene expression and thus may play a role in the circadian variation of gene expression. MiRNAs are promising biomarkers by virtue of their disease-specific tissue expression and because of their presence as stable entities in the circulation. However, no studies have addressed the putative circadian rhythmicity of circulating, cell-free miRNAs. This question is important both for using miRNAs as biological markers and for clues to miRNA function in the regulation of circadian gene expression. Here, we investigate 92 miRNAs in plasma samples from 24 young male, healthy volunteers repeatedly sampled 9 times during a 24-hour stay in a regulated environment. We demonstrate that a third (26/79) of the measurable plasma miRNAs (using RT-qPCR on a microfluidic system) exhibit a rhythmic behavior and are distributed in two main phase patterns. Some of these miRNAs weakly target known clock genes and many have strong targets in intracellular MAPK signaling pathways. These novel findings highlight the importance of considering bio-oscillations in miRNA biomarker studies and suggest the further study of a set of specific circulating miRNAs in the regulation and functioning of biological clocks.

  2. General Information about Plasma Cell Neoplasms (Including Multiple Myeloma)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Cell Neoplasms Treatment Research Plasma Cell Neoplasms (Including Multiple Myeloma) Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Plasma ... the throat can make it hard to swallow. Multiple myeloma In multiple myeloma , abnormal plasma cells ( myeloma cells ) ...

  3. Stages of Plasma Cell Neoplasms (Including Multiple Myeloma)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Cell Neoplasms Treatment Research Plasma Cell Neoplasms (Including Multiple Myeloma) Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Plasma ... the throat can make it hard to swallow. Multiple myeloma In multiple myeloma , abnormal plasma cells ( myeloma cells ) ...

  4. Treatment Options for Plasma Cell Neoplasms (Including Multiple Myeloma)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Cell Neoplasms Treatment Research Plasma Cell Neoplasms (Including Multiple Myeloma) Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Plasma ... the throat can make it hard to swallow. Multiple myeloma In multiple myeloma , abnormal plasma cells ( myeloma cells ) ...

  5. Treatment Option Overview (Plasma Cell Neoplasms Including Multiple Myeloma)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Cell Neoplasms Treatment Research Plasma Cell Neoplasms (Including Multiple Myeloma) Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Plasma ... the throat can make it hard to swallow. Multiple myeloma In multiple myeloma , abnormal plasma cells ( myeloma cells ) ...

  6. Nanostructured Substrates for Capturing Circulating Tumor Cells in Whole Blood

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tseng, Hsian-Rong

    2009-03-01

    Over the past decade, circulating tumor cells (CTCs) has become an emerging ``biomarker'' for detecting early-stage cancer metastasis, predicting patient prognosis, as well as monitoring disease progression and therapeutic outcomes. However, isolation of CTCs has been technically challenging due to the extremely low abundance (a few to hundreds per ml) of CTCs among a high number of hematologic cells (109 per mL) in the blood. Our joint research team at UCLA has developed a new cell capture technology for quantification of CTCs in whole blood samples. Similar to most of the existing approaches, epithelial cell adhesion molecule antibody (anti-EpCAM) was grafted onto the surfaces to distinguish CTCs from the surrounding hematologic cells. The uniqueness of our technology is the use of nanostructured surfaces, which facilitates local topographical interactions between CTCs and substrates at the very first cell/substrate contacting time point. We demonstrated the ability of these nanostructured substrates to capture CTCs in whole blood samples with significantly improved efficiency and selectivity. The successful demonstration of this cell capture technology using brain, breast and prostate cancer cell lines encouraged us to test this approach in clinical setting. We have been able to bond our first validation study with a commercialized technology based on the use of immunomagnetic nanoparticles. A group of clinically well-characterized prostate cancer patients at UCLA hospital have been recruited and tested in parallel by these two technologies.

  7. Asbestos exposure correlates with alterations in circulating T cell subsets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, L.G.; Sparrow, D.; Ginns, L.C.

    1983-01-01

    Peripheral blood lymphocytes were analysed from 40 subjects with occupational asbestos exposure and 40 controls matched for age and smoking habits. Patients were classified by duration of exposure as short or long, and by chest radiograph as normal, pleural plaques or interstitial changes. As a group, subjects with asbestos exposure had decreased percentages of OKT3+ and OKT8+ cells and increased OKT4+/OKT8+ ratio compared to controls. Correcting for age and smoking, those with short exposure were similar to controls, while those with long exposure had decreased percentages OKT3+ and OKT8+ cells and an increased OKT4+/OKT8+ ratio. Among radiographic subgroups, those with normal radiographs were similar to controls, but those with plaques had increased circulating OKT4+ cells, and those with interstitial changes had decreased percentages OKT3+ and OKT8+ cells and OKT8+ cells/mm3, with an increased OKT4+/OKT8+ ratio. There were no differences between subjects and controls in OKT10+ cells and OKIa+ cells. There appears to be a progressive decrease in percentage OKT8+ cells and increase in OKT4+/OKT8+ ratio with increasing exposure to asbestos, as determined by length of exposure and by radiographic abnormalities.

  8. Filter characteristics influencing circulating tumor cell enrichment from whole blood.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frank A W Coumans

    Full Text Available A variety of filters assays have been described to enrich circulating tumor cells (CTC based on differences in physical characteristics of blood cells and CTC. In this study we evaluate different filter types to derive the properties of the ideal filter for CTC enrichment. Between 0.1 and 10 mL of whole blood spiked with cells from tumor cell lines were passed through silicon nitride microsieves, polymer track-etched filters and metal TEM grids with various pore sizes. The recovery and size of 9 different culture cell lines was determined and compared to the size of EpCAM+CK+CD45-DNA+ CTC from patients with metastatic breast, colorectal and prostate cancer. The 8 µm track-etched filter and the 5 µm microsieve had the best performance on MDA-231, PC3-9 and SKBR-3 cells, enriching >80% of cells from whole blood. TEM grids had poor recovery of ∼25%. Median diameter of cell lines ranged from 10.9-19.0 µm, compared to 13.1, 10.7, and 11.0 µm for breast, prostate and colorectal CTC, respectively. The 11.4 µm COLO-320 cell line had the lowest recovery of 17%. The ideal filter for CTC enrichment is constructed of a stiff, flat material, is inert to blood cells, has at least 100,000 regularly spaced 5 µm pores for 1 ml of blood with a ≤10% porosity. While cell size is an important factor in determining recovery, other factors must be involved as well. To evaluate a filtration procedure, cell lines with a median size of 11-13 µm should be used to challenge the system.

  9. Photo(chemotherapy reduces circulating Th17 cells and restores circulating regulatory T cells in psoriasis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takuya Furuhashi

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Photo(chemotherapy is widely used to treat psoriasis, the pathogenesis of which might be caused by an imbalance of Th17 cells/regulatory T cells (Treg. In the present study, we evaluated the effects of photo(chemotherapy on the Th17/Treg balance and Treg function. METHODS: Peripheral blood was obtained from psoriasis patients treated with bath-psoralen ultraviolet A (UVA, n = 50 or narrowband ultraviolet B (UVB, n = 18, and age-matched healthy volunteers (n = 20. CD3(+CD4(+IL-17A(+ or CD4(+CD25(+Foxp3(+cells were analyzed to estimate Th17 or Treg number by fluorescence-activated cell sorting. Moreover, CD4(+ CD25(- T cells from patients treated with PUVA(n = 14 were incubated in CFSE and activated with or without CD4(+ CD25(+T cells, and the suppressive function of CD4(+ CD25(+T cells were analyzed. RESULTS: Photo(chemotherapy significantly reduced Th17 levels from 5.66 ± 3.15% to 2.96 ± 2.89% in patients with increased Th17 (Th17/CD4>3.01% [mean+SD of controls]. In contrast, photo(chemotherapy significantly increased Treg levels from 2.77 ± 0.75 to 3.40 ± 1.88% in patients with less than 4.07% Treg level, defined as the mean of controls. Furthermore, while Treg suppressed the CD4(+CD25(- T cell proliferation to a greater extent in controls (Treg Functional Ratio 94.4 ± 4.28% than in patients (70.3±25.1%, PUVA significantly increased Treg Functional Ratio to 88.1 ± 6.47%. Th17 levels in severe patients (>30 PASI were significantly higher as compared to controls. Th17 levels that were left after treatment in the patients not achieving PASI 50 (3.78 ± 4.18% were significantly higher than those in the patients achieving PASI 75 (1.83±1.87%. Treg levels in patients achieving PASI 90 (4.89 ± 1.70% were significantly higher than those in the patients not achieving PASI 90 (3.90 ± 1.66%. Treg levels prior to treatment with Th17 high decreased group (5.16 ± 2.20% was significantly higher than that with Th17 high increased group

  10. Circulating tumor cells: exploring intratumor heterogeneity of colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raimondi, Cristina; Nicolazzo, Chiara; Gradilone, Angela; Giannini, Giuseppe; De Falco, Elena; Chimenti, Isotta; Varriale, Elisa; Hauch, Siegfried; Plappert, Linda; Cortesi, Enrico; Gazzaniga, Paola

    2014-05-01

    The hypothesis of the "liquid biopsy" using circulating tumor cells (CTCs) emerged as a minimally invasive alternative to traditional tissue biopsy to determine cancer therapy. Discordance for biomarkers expression between primary tumor tissue and circulating tumor cells (CTCs) has been widely reported, thus rendering the biological characterization of CTCs an attractive tool for biomarkers assessment and treatment selection. Studies performed in metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC) patients using CellSearch, the only FDA-cleared test for CTCs assessment, demonstrated a much lower yield of CTCs in this tumor type compared with breast and prostate cancer, both at baseline and during the course of treatment. Thus, although attractive, the possibility to use CTCs as therapy-related biomarker for colorectal cancer patients is still limited by a number of technical issues mainly due to the low sensitivity of the CellSearch method. In the present study we found a significant discordance between CellSearch and AdnaTest in the detection of CTCs from mCRC patients. We then investigated KRAS pathway activating mutations in CTCs and determined the degree of heterogeneity for KRAS oncogenic mutations between CTCs and tumor tissues. Whether KRAS gene amplification may represent an alternative pathway responsible for KRAS activation was further explored. KRAS gene amplification emerged as a functionally equivalent and mutually exclusive mechanism of KRAS pathway activation in CTCs, possibly related to transcriptional activation. The serial assessment of CTCs may represent an early biomarker of treatment response, able to overcome the intrinsic limit of current molecular biomarkers represented by intratumor heterogeneity.

  11. Evolution of Excited Convective Cells in Plasmas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pécseli, Hans; Juul Rasmussen, Jens; Sugai, H.

    1984-01-01

    Convective cells are excited externally in a fully ionized magnetized plasma and their space-time evolution is investigated by two-dimensional potential measurements. A positive cell is excited externally by control of the end losses in the 'scrape off' layer of a plasma column produced by surface...

  12. Identification of tissue-specific cell death using methylation patterns of circulating DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehmann-Werman, Roni; Neiman, Daniel; Zemmour, Hai; Moss, Joshua; Magenheim, Judith; Vaknin-Dembinsky, Adi; Rubertsson, Sten; Nellgård, Bengt; Blennow, Kaj; Zetterberg, Henrik; Spalding, Kirsty; Haller, Michael J; Wasserfall, Clive H; Schatz, Desmond A; Greenbaum, Carla J; Dorrell, Craig; Grompe, Markus; Zick, Aviad; Hubert, Ayala; Maoz, Myriam; Fendrich, Volker; Bartsch, Detlef K; Golan, Talia; Ben Sasson, Shmuel A; Zamir, Gideon; Razin, Aharon; Cedar, Howard; Shapiro, A M James; Glaser, Benjamin; Shemer, Ruth; Dor, Yuval

    2016-03-29

    Minimally invasive detection of cell death could prove an invaluable resource in many physiologic and pathologic situations. Cell-free circulating DNA (cfDNA) released from dying cells is emerging as a diagnostic tool for monitoring cancer dynamics and graft failure. However, existing methods rely on differences in DNA sequences in source tissues, so that cell death cannot be identified in tissues with a normal genome. We developed a method of detecting tissue-specific cell death in humans based on tissue-specific methylation patterns in cfDNA. We interrogated tissue-specific methylome databases to identify cell type-specific DNA methylation signatures and developed a method to detect these signatures in mixed DNA samples. We isolated cfDNA from plasma or serum of donors, treated the cfDNA with bisulfite, PCR-amplified the cfDNA, and sequenced it to quantify cfDNA carrying the methylation markers of the cell type of interest. Pancreatic β-cell DNA was identified in the circulation of patients with recently diagnosed type-1 diabetes and islet-graft recipients; oligodendrocyte DNA was identified in patients with relapsing multiple sclerosis; neuronal/glial DNA was identified in patients after traumatic brain injury or cardiac arrest; and exocrine pancreas DNA was identified in patients with pancreatic cancer or pancreatitis. This proof-of-concept study demonstrates that the tissue origins of cfDNA and thus the rate of death of specific cell types can be determined in humans. The approach can be adapted to identify cfDNA derived from any cell type in the body, offering a minimally invasive window for diagnosing and monitoring a broad spectrum of human pathologies as well as providing a better understanding of normal tissue dynamics.

  13. The Mutational Landscape of Circulating Tumor Cells in Multiple Myeloma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuji Mishima

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available The development of sensitive and non-invasive “liquid biopsies” presents new opportunities for longitudinal monitoring of tumor dissemination and clonal evolution. The number of circulating tumor cells (CTCs is prognostic in multiple myeloma (MM, but there is little information on their genetic features. Here, we have analyzed the genomic landscape of CTCs from 29 MM patients, including eight cases with matched/paired bone marrow (BM tumor cells. Our results show that 100% of clonal mutations in patient BM were detected in CTCs and that 99% of clonal mutations in CTCs were present in BM MM. These include typical driver mutations in MM such as in KRAS, NRAS, or BRAF. These data suggest that BM and CTC samples have similar clonal structures, as discordances between the two were restricted to subclonal mutations. Accordingly, our results pave the way for potentially less invasive mutation screening of MM patients through characterization of CTCs.

  14. Circulating tumor cells in high-risk nonmetastatic colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gazzaniga, Paola; Gianni, Walter; Raimondi, Cristina; Gradilone, Angela; Lo Russo, Giuseppe; Longo, Flavia; Gandini, Orietta; Tomao, Silverio; Frati, Luigi

    2013-10-01

    The identification of patients at higher risk of recurrence after primary colorectal cancer resection is currently one of the challenges facing medical oncologists. Circulating tumor cell (CTC) may represent a surrogate marker of an early spread of disease in patients without overt metastases. Thirty-seven high-risk stages II-III colorectal cancer patients were evaluated for the presence of CTC. Enumeration of CTCs in 7.5 ml of blood was carried out with the FDA-cleared CellSearch system. CTC count was performed after primary tumor resection and before the start of adjuvant therapy. CTC was detected in 22 % of patients with a significant correlation with regional lymph nodes involvement and stage of disease. No significant correlation was found among the presence of CTC and other clinicopathological parameters. These data suggest that CTCs detection might help in the selection of high-risk stage II colorectal cancer patient candidates for adjuvant chemotherapy.

  15. Controversies in circulating tumor cell count during therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raimondi, Cristina; Gradilone, Angela; Gazzaniga, Paola

    2013-06-01

    Circulating tumor cells (CTCs) are a potential biomarker for prognosis and predictor for therapeutic response. Besides enumeration, the molecular portrait of CTCs holds promise to reveal new insights into the biology of cancer. Although CTCs may represent a liquid biopsy useful for selection of personalized treatments, to date, inconclusive clinical data support the utility of such information in terms of measurable benefit for the individual cancer patient. To finally move CTCs from translational research to the clinical setting and incorporate CTC count/characterization in routine oncological practice, we still need a definitive validation. This is a goal that will be hard to achieve, since tracing a molecular profile of CTCs is hampered by the extremely high heterogeneity of these cells.

  16. Selecting B cells and plasma cells to memory

    OpenAIRE

    2005-01-01

    Humoral immunity appears to be based on immunological memory provided by memory plasma cells, which secrete protective antibodies, and memory B cells, which react to antigen challenge by differentiating into plasma cells. How these differentiation pathways relate to each other, how cells are selected into these memory populations, and how these populations are maintained remains enigmatic.

  17. Ionospheric Plasma Circulation Associated with Polar Cap Arcs Detached from the Auroral Oval

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yakymenko, K.; Koustov, A. V.; Hosokawa, K.; Shiokawa, K.

    2015-12-01

    Joint observations of the OMTI all-sky camera at Resolute Bay, NWT (Canada), the SuperDARN radars and Swarm satellites are considered to investigate horizontal plasma flows and vertical field-aligned currents (FACs) associated with polar cap arcs "detached" from the auroral oval but not penetrated deep into the polar cap. All cases are for the near winter solstice, positive IMF Bz and mostly dominating IMF By. We show that the arcs are usually co-exist with strong flow shears driven by electric fields of the converging type. The shears, being added to the background flow, produce unusual convection patterns, for example reverse (sunward) flows on the nightside, several MLT hours away from the noon-midnight line. We also investigate the distribution of FACs in the arcs' vicinity, both duskward and dawnward, for several Swarm passes. Electron density data onboard Swarm satellites are used to identify the arc and auroral oval boundaries, along with the ground-based optics. The data suggest that the arcs correspond to a separate current system excited in addition to the background plasma circulation governed by the reconnection processes.Joint observations of the OMTI all-sky camera at Resolute Bay, NWT (Canada), the SuperDARN radars and Swarm satellites are considered to investigate horizontal plasma flows and vertical field-aligned currents (FACs) associated with polar cap arcs "detached" from the auroral oval but not penetrated deep into the polar cap. All cases are for the near winter solstice, positive IMF Bz and mostly dominating IMF By. We show that the arcs are usually co-exist with strong flow shears driven by electric fields of the converging type. The shears, being added to the background flow, produce unusual convection patterns, for example reverse (sunward) flows on the nightside, several MLT hours away from the noon-midnight line. We also investigate the distribution of FACs in the arcs' vicinity, both duskward and dawnward, for several Swarm passes

  18. Differential effects of nebivolol and metoprolol on arterial stiffness, circulating progenitor cells, and oxidative stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayek, Salim S; Poole, Joseph C; Neuman, Robert; Morris, Alanna A; Khayata, Mohamed; Kavtaradze, Nino; Topel, Matthew L; Binongo, Jose G; Li, Qunna; Jones, Dean P; Waller, Edmund K; Quyyumi, Arshed A

    2015-03-01

    Unlike traditional beta receptor antagonists, nebivolol activates nitric oxide. We hypothesized that therapy with nebivolol compared with metoprolol would improve arterial stiffness, increase levels of circulating progenitor cells (PC), and decrease oxidative stress (OS). In a randomized, double-blind, cross-over study, 30 hypertensive subjects received either once daily nebivolol or metoprolol succinate for 3 months each. Pulse wave velocity and augmentation index were measured using tonometry. Flow cytometry was used to measure circulating PC. OS was measured as plasma aminothiols. Measurements were performed at baseline, and repeated at 3 and 6 months. No significant differences were present between the levels of OS, arterial stiffness, and PC numbers during treatment with metoprolol compared with nebivolol. In subgroup analyses of beta-blocker naïve subjects (n = 19), nebivolol reduced pulse wave velocity significantly compared with metoprolol (-1.4 ± 1.9 vs. -0.1 ± 2.2; P = .005). Both nebivolol and metoprolol increased circulating levels of CD34+/CD133 + PC similarly (P = .05), suggesting improved regenerative capacity.

  19. Plasma macrophage colony-stimulating factor levels during cardiopulmonary bypass with extracorporeal circulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Denizot

    1996-01-01

    Full Text Available Leukocytosis and thrombocytopenia occur during cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB with extracorporeal circulation (ECC. Elevated circulating concentrations of macrophage colony-stimulating factor (M-CSF are reported during thrombocytopenia and leukopenia of different origins. We have assessed M-CSF concentrations in 40 patients undergoing CPB with ECC. Plasma M-CSF concentrations were stable during ECC and increased at the 6th (7.3 ± 0.7 IU/μg protein and 24th (8.6 ± 0.8 IU/μg protein postoperative hour compared with pre-ECC values (4.9 ± 0.5 IU/μg protein. A deep thrombocytopenia was found during ECC and until the 24th postoperative hour. A drop of leukocyte counts was found during ECC followed by an increase after ECC weaning. While no correlation was found between M-CSF concentrations and the leukocyte counts, M-CSF values were positively correlated with platelet counts only before and during ECC. Thus, M-CSF is not implicated in the thrombocytopenia and the leukopenia generated during CPB with ECC. However the elevated levels of M-CSFa few hours after the end of ECC might play a role in the inflammatory process often observed after CPB.

  20. Non-invasive prenatal testing using cell-free fetal DNA in maternal circulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Gary J W; Gronowski, Ann M; Zhao, Zhen

    2014-01-20

    The identification of cell-free fetal DNA (cffDNA) in maternal circulation has made non-invasive prenatal testing (NIPT) possible. Maternal plasma cell free DNA is a mixture of maternal and fetal DNA, of which, fetal DNA represents a minor population in maternal plasma. Therefore, methods with high sensitivity and precision are required to detect and differentiate fetal DNA from the large background of maternal DNA. In recent years, technical advances in the molecular analysis of fetal DNA (e.g., digital PCR and massively parallel sequencing (MPS)) has enabled the successful implementation of noninvasive testing into clinical practice, such as fetal sex assessment, RhD genotyping, and fetal chromosomal aneuploidy detection.With the ability to decipher the entire fetal genome from maternal plasma DNA, we foresee that an increased number of non-invasive prenatal tests will be available for detecting many single-gene disorders in the near future. This review briefly summarizes the technical aspects of the NIPT and application of NIPT in clinical practice.

  1. A Fall in Plasma Free Fatty Acid (FFA) Level Activates the Hypothalamic-Pituitary-Adrenal Axis Independent of Plasma Glucose: Evidence for Brain Sensing of Circulating FFA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Young Taek; Oh, Ki-Sook; Kang, Insug

    2012-01-01

    The brain responds to a fall in blood glucose by activating neuroendocrine mechanisms for its restoration. It is unclear whether the brain also responds to a fall in plasma free fatty acids (FFA) to activate mechanisms for its restoration. We examined whether lowering plasma FFA increases plasma corticosterone or catecholamine levels and, if so, whether the brain is involved in these responses. Plasma FFA levels were lowered in rats with three independent antilipolytic agents: nicotinic acid (NA), insulin, and the A1 adenosine receptor agonist SDZ WAG 994 with plasma glucose clamped at basal levels. Lowering plasma FFA with these agents all increased plasma corticosterone, but not catecholamine, within 1 h, accompanied by increases in plasma ACTH. These increases in ACTH or corticosterone were abolished when falls in plasma FFA were prevented by Intralipid during NA or insulin infusion. In addition, the NA-induced increases in plasma ACTH were completely prevented by administration of SSR149415, an arginine vasopressin receptor antagonist, demonstrating that the hypothalamus is involved in these responses. Taken together, the present data suggest that the brain may sense a fall in plasma FFA levels and activate the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis to increase plasma ACTH and corticosterone, which would help restore FFA levels. Thus, the brain may be involved in the sensing and control of circulating FFA levels. PMID:22669895

  2. [Intracellular gold content of circulating blood cells using various gold compounds].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrlinger, J D; Beress, R; Hecker, U

    1984-01-01

    Evidence on the action mechanisms of gold salts in the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis is still inconclusive. The intracellular localization of the place of action is likely. Therefore not only the serum gold levels but also the intracellular concentration of gold are of special interest. We measured the gold concentration in the serum and in the blood cells after in vitro application of aurothiomalate (Tauredon), gold keratinate (Auro-Detoxin) and triethylphosphine-gold (Ridaura) and in blood samples of patients undergoing these gold salts treatments. Cell-bound concentrations were found to vary extensively as a function of the gold compound used. While no or very little gold was present intracellularly after administration of the 2 parenteral drugs, up to 40% of the circulating gold was found to bind to the cells after administration of the triethylphosphine compound for gastro-intestinal absorption. The red cell concentration was more or less the same as that in the extracellular compartment. Gold apparently accumulated in the white cells, because the cell-bound concentration relative to unit volume was up to 20 times higher than the plasma level. The method used did not offer any information on the actual binding site of gold in white cells, i.e. cytoplasm versus nucleus versus cell membrane.

  3. Site-Specific Zwitterionic Polymer Conjugates of a Protein Have Long Plasma Circulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattacharjee, Somnath; Liu, Wenge; Wang, Wei-Han; Weitzhandler, Isaac; Li, Xinghai; Qi, Yizhi; Liu, Jinyao; Pang, Yan; Hunt, Donald F; Chilkoti, Ashutosh

    2015-11-01

    Many proteins suffer from suboptimal pharmacokinetics (PK) that limit their utility as drugs. The efficient synthesis of polymer conjugates of protein drugs with tunable PK to optimize their in vivo efficacy is hence critical. We report here the first study of the in vivo behavior of a site-specific conjugate of a zwitterionic polymer and a protein. To synthesize the conjugate, we first installed an initiator for atom-transfer radical polymerization (ATRP) at the N terminus of myoglobin (Mb-N-Br). Subsequently, in situ ATRP was carried out in aqueous buffer to grow an amine-functionalized polymer from Mb-N-Br. The cationic polymer was further derivatized to two zwitterionic polymers by treating the amine groups of the cationic polymer with iodoacetic acid to obtain poly(carboxybetaine methacrylate) with a one-carbon spacer (PCBMA; C1 ), and sequentially with 3-iodopropionic acid and iodoacetic acid to obtain PCBMA(mix) with a mixture of C1 and C2 spacers. The Mb-N-PCBMA polymer conjugates had a longer in vivo plasma half-life than a PEG-like comb polymer conjugate of similar molecular weights (MW). The structure of the zwitterion plays a role in controlling the in vivo behavior of the conjugate, as the PCBMA conjugate with a C1 spacer had significantly longer plasma circulation than the conjugate with a mixture of C1 and C2 spacers.

  4. Detection and Characterization of Circulating Tumour Cells in Multiple Myeloma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liangxuan Zhang

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Multiple myeloma (MM remains an incurable disease despite recent therapeutic improvements. The ability to detect and characterize MM circulating tumour cells (CTCs in peripheral blood provides an alternative to replace or augment invasive bone marrow (BM biopsies with a simple blood draw, providing real-time, clinically relevant information leading to improved disease manage‐ ment and therapy selection. Here we have developed and qualified an enrichment-free, cell-based immunofluores‐ cence MM CTC assay that utilizes an automated digital pathology algorithm to distinguish MM CTCs from white blood cells (WBCs on the basis of CD138 and CD45 expression levels, as well as a number of morphological parameters. These MM CTCs were further characterized for expression of phospho-ribosomal protein S6 (pS6 as a readout for PI3K/AKT pathway activation. Clinical feasi‐ bility of the assay was established by testing blood samples from a small cohort of patients, where we detected popu‐ lations of both CD138pos and CD138neg MM CTCs. In this study, we developed an immunofluorescent cell-based assay to detect and characterize CTCs in MM.

  5. Recent Advances in the Molecular Characterization of Circulating Tumor Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lori E. Lowes

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Although circulating tumor cells (CTCs were first observed over a century ago, lack of sensitive methodology precluded detailed study of these cells until recently. However, technological advances have now facilitated the identification, enumeration, and characterization of CTCs using a variety of methods. The majority of evidence supporting the use of CTCs in clinical decision-making has been related to enumeration using the CellSearch® system and correlation with prognosis. Growing evidence also suggests that CTC monitoring can provide an early indication of patient treatment response based on comparison of CTC levels before and after therapy. However, perhaps the greatest potential that CTCs hold for oncology lies at the level of molecular characterization. Clinical treatment decisions may be more effective if they are based on molecular characteristics of metastatic cells rather than on those of the primary tumor alone. Molecular characterization of CTCs (which can be repeatedly isolated in a minimally invasive fashion provides the opportunity for a “real-time liquid biopsy” that allows assessment of genetic drift, investigation of molecular disease evolution, and identification of actionable genomic characteristics. This review focuses on recent advances in this area, including approaches involving immunophenotyping, fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH, multiplex RT-PCR, microarray, and genomic sequencing.

  6. Recent Advances in the Molecular Characterization of Circulating Tumor Cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lowes, Lori E. [London Regional Cancer Program, London Health Sciences Centre, London, ON N6A 4L6 (Canada); Department of Anatomy and Cell Biology, Schulich School of Medicine and Dentistry, Western University, London, ON N6A 5C1 (Canada); Department of Oncology, Schulich School of Medicine and Dentistry, Western University, London, ON N6A 4L6 (Canada); Allan, Alison L., E-mail: alison.allan@lhsc.on.ca [London Regional Cancer Program, London Health Sciences Centre, London, ON N6A 4L6 (Canada); Department of Anatomy and Cell Biology, Schulich School of Medicine and Dentistry, Western University, London, ON N6A 5C1 (Canada); Department of Oncology, Schulich School of Medicine and Dentistry, Western University, London, ON N6A 4L6 (Canada); Lawson Health Research Institute, London, ON N6C 2R5 (Canada)

    2014-03-13

    Although circulating tumor cells (CTCs) were first observed over a century ago, lack of sensitive methodology precluded detailed study of these cells until recently. However, technological advances have now facilitated the identification, enumeration, and characterization of CTCs using a variety of methods. The majority of evidence supporting the use of CTCs in clinical decision-making has been related to enumeration using the CellSearch{sup ®} system and correlation with prognosis. Growing evidence also suggests that CTC monitoring can provide an early indication of patient treatment response based on comparison of CTC levels before and after therapy. However, perhaps the greatest potential that CTCs hold for oncology lies at the level of molecular characterization. Clinical treatment decisions may be more effective if they are based on molecular characteristics of metastatic cells rather than on those of the primary tumor alone. Molecular characterization of CTCs (which can be repeatedly isolated in a minimally invasive fashion) provides the opportunity for a “real-time liquid biopsy” that allows assessment of genetic drift, investigation of molecular disease evolution, and identification of actionable genomic characteristics. This review focuses on recent advances in this area, including approaches involving immunophenotyping, fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH), multiplex RT-PCR, microarray, and genomic sequencing.

  7. Space weather circulation model of plasma clouds as background radiation medium of space environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalu, A. E.

    A model for Space Weather (SW) Circulation with Plasma Clouds as background radiation medium of Space Environment has been proposed and discussed. Major characteristics of the model are outlined and the model assumes a baroclinic Space Environment in view of observed pronounced horizontal electron temperature gradient with prevailing weak vertical temperature gradient. The primary objective of the study is to be able to monitor and realistically predict on real- or near real-time SW and Space Storms (SWS) affecting human economic systems on Earth as well as the safety and Physiologic comfort of human payload in Space Environment in relation to planned increase in human space flights especially with reference to the ISS Space Shuttle Taxi (ISST) Programme and other prolonged deep Space Missions. Although considerable discussions are now available in the literature on SW issues, routine Meteorological operational applications of SW forecast data and information for Space Environment are still yet to receive adequate attention. The paper attempts to fill this gap in the literature of SW. The paper examines the sensitivity and variability in 3-D continuum of Plasmas in response to solar radiation inputs into the magnetosphere under disturbed Sun condition. Specifically, the presence of plasma clouds in the form of Coronal Mass Ejections (CMEs) is stressed as a major source of danger to Space crews, spacecraft instrumentation and architecture charging problems as well as impacts on numerous radiation - sensitive human economic systems on Earth. Finally, the paper considers the application of model results in the form of effective monitoring of each of the two major phases of manned Spaceflights - take-off and re-entry phases where all-time assessment of spacecraft transient ambient micro-incabin and outside Space Environment is vital for all manned Spaceflights as recently evidenced by the loss of vital information during take-off of the February 1, 2003 US Columbia

  8. Multi-purpose utility of circulating plasma DNA testing in patients with advanced cancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perkins, Geraldine; Yap, Timothy A; Pope, Lorna; Cassidy, Amy M; Dukes, Juliet P; Riisnaes, Ruth; Massard, Christophe; Cassier, Philippe A; Miranda, Susana; Clark, Jeremy; Denholm, Katie A; Thway, Khin; Gonzalez De Castro, David; Attard, Gerhardt; Molife, L Rhoda; Kaye, Stan B; Banerji, Udai; de Bono, Johann S

    2012-01-01

    Tumor genomic instability and selective treatment pressures result in clonal disease evolution; molecular stratification for molecularly targeted drug administration requires repeated access to tumor DNA. We hypothesized that circulating plasma DNA (cpDNA) in advanced cancer patients is largely derived from tumor, has prognostic utility, and can be utilized for multiplex tumor mutation sequencing when repeat biopsy is not feasible. We utilized the Sequenom MassArray System and OncoCarta panel for somatic mutation profiling. Matched samples, acquired from the same patient but at different time points were evaluated; these comprised formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE) archival tumor tissue (primary and/or metastatic) and cpDNA. The feasibility, sensitivity, and specificity of this high-throughput, multiplex mutation detection approach was tested utilizing specimens acquired from 105 patients with solid tumors referred for participation in Phase I trials of molecularly targeted drugs. The median cpDNA concentration was 17 ng/ml (range: 0.5-1600); this was 3-fold higher than in healthy volunteers. Moreover, higher cpDNA concentrations associated with worse overall survival; there was an overall survival (OS) hazard ratio of 2.4 (95% CI 1.4, 4.2) for each 10-fold increase in cpDNA concentration and in multivariate analyses, cpDNA concentration, albumin, and performance status remained independent predictors of OS. These data suggest that plasma DNA in these cancer patients is largely derived from tumor. We also observed high detection concordance for critical 'hot-spot' mutations (KRAS, BRAF, PIK3CA) in matched cpDNA and archival tumor tissue, and important differences between archival tumor and cpDNA. This multiplex sequencing assay can be utilized to detect somatic mutations from plasma in advanced cancer patients, when safe repeat tumor biopsy is not feasible and genomic analysis of archival tumor is deemed insufficient. Overall, circulating nucleic acid

  9. Multi-purpose utility of circulating plasma DNA testing in patients with advanced cancers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Geraldine Perkins

    Full Text Available Tumor genomic instability and selective treatment pressures result in clonal disease evolution; molecular stratification for molecularly targeted drug administration requires repeated access to tumor DNA. We hypothesized that circulating plasma DNA (cpDNA in advanced cancer patients is largely derived from tumor, has prognostic utility, and can be utilized for multiplex tumor mutation sequencing when repeat biopsy is not feasible. We utilized the Sequenom MassArray System and OncoCarta panel for somatic mutation profiling. Matched samples, acquired from the same patient but at different time points were evaluated; these comprised formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE archival tumor tissue (primary and/or metastatic and cpDNA. The feasibility, sensitivity, and specificity of this high-throughput, multiplex mutation detection approach was tested utilizing specimens acquired from 105 patients with solid tumors referred for participation in Phase I trials of molecularly targeted drugs. The median cpDNA concentration was 17 ng/ml (range: 0.5-1600; this was 3-fold higher than in healthy volunteers. Moreover, higher cpDNA concentrations associated with worse overall survival; there was an overall survival (OS hazard ratio of 2.4 (95% CI 1.4, 4.2 for each 10-fold increase in cpDNA concentration and in multivariate analyses, cpDNA concentration, albumin, and performance status remained independent predictors of OS. These data suggest that plasma DNA in these cancer patients is largely derived from tumor. We also observed high detection concordance for critical 'hot-spot' mutations (KRAS, BRAF, PIK3CA in matched cpDNA and archival tumor tissue, and important differences between archival tumor and cpDNA. This multiplex sequencing assay can be utilized to detect somatic mutations from plasma in advanced cancer patients, when safe repeat tumor biopsy is not feasible and genomic analysis of archival tumor is deemed insufficient. Overall, circulating nucleic

  10. Advances in Research on Circulating Tumor Cells in Lung Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yingjian SONG

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Metastatic and recurrent tumors have been identified as the leading attribute to the lung cancer deaths. Cancer research has demonstrated the critical role circulating tumor cells (CTCs play in the metastatic spread of carcinomas and the recurrence of lung cancer. The rapid advancement of technology in targeted therapy resolves the embarrassing situation for those late-stage patients whose tumor tissues cannot be obtained. CTCs, as a substitute for the tumor tissues, represent a decisive tool to the cancer treatment strategy. Thus, CTCs exert a fundamental role in the early detection of micro-metastasis, assisting in diagnosis, prognosis and monitoring of the recurrent tumors, and subsequently choosing an individualized approach for the therapeutic treatment. This article will review the advances, which have been made in the research area of CTCs with the aid of its applications in cancer therapy.

  11. Uses of cell free fetal DNA in maternal circulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Melissa; Barrett, Angela N; White, Helen; Chitty, Lyn S

    2012-10-01

    For over a decade, researchers have focused their attention on the development of non-invasive prenatal diagnosis tests based on cell-free fetal DNA circulating in maternal blood. With the possibility of earlier and safer testing, non-invasive prenatal diagnosis has the potential to bring many positive benefits to prenatal diagnosis. Non-invasive prenatal diagnosis for fetal sex determination for women who are carriers of sex-linked conditions is now firmly established in clinical practice. Other non-invasive prenatal diagnosis-based tests are set to follow, as future applications, such as the detection of single-gene disorders and chromosomal abnormalities, are now well within reach. Here, we review recent developments in non-invasive prenatal diagnosis for genetic conditions and chromosomal abnormalities, and provide an overview of research into ethical concerns, social issues and stakeholder view points.

  12. Isolation and Molecular Characterization of Circulating Melanoma Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xi Luo

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Melanoma is an invasive malignancy with a high frequency of blood-borne metastases, but circulating tumor cells (CTCs have not been readily isolated. We adapted microfluidic CTC capture to a tamoxifen-driven B-RAF/PTEN mouse melanoma model. CTCs were detected in all tumor-bearing mice and rapidly declined after B-RAF inhibitor treatment. CTCs were shed early from localized tumors, and a short course of B-RAF inhibition following surgical resection was sufficient to dramatically suppress distant metastases. The large number of CTCs in melanoma-bearing mice enabled a comparison of RNA-sequencing profiles with matched primary tumors. A mouse melanoma CTC-derived signature correlated with invasiveness and cellular motility in human melanoma. CTCs were detected in smaller numbers in patients with metastatic melanoma and declined with successful B-RAF-targeted therapy. Together, the capture and molecular characterization of CTCs provide insight into the hematogenous spread of melanoma.

  13. Computer Simulation of Convective Plasma Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Carboni, Rodrigo; Frutos-Alfaro, Francisco

    2015-01-01

    Computer simulations of plasmas are relevant nowadays, because it helps us understand physical processes taking place in the sun and other stellar objects. We developed a program called PCell which is intended for displaying the evolution of the magnetic field in a 2D convective plasma cell with perfect conducting walls for different stationary plasma velocity fields. Applications of this program are presented. This software works interactively with the mouse and the users can create their ow...

  14. Plasma cell gingivitis: treatment with chlorpheniramine maleate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ranganathan, Aravindhan Thiruputkuzhi; Chandran, Chitraa R; Prabhakar, Priya; Lakshmiganthan, Mahalingam; Parthasaradhi, Thakkalapati

    2015-01-01

    Plasma cell gingivitis is a benign lesion of unknown etiology characterized by massive and diffuse infiltration of plasma cells into the gingival connective tissue. Clinically, it can be seen as a diffuse, erythematous, and edematous swelling involving the marginal gingiva and extending into the attached gingiva. Although usually painless, the lesion can be esthetically unappealing, especially when anterior gingiva is involved. Although the usual line of management is removal of the offending agent, this report describes the treatment of plasma cell gingivitis with the topical application of chlorpheniramine maleate (25 mg) for a period of 10 days.

  15. Nonthermal-plasma-mediated animal cell death

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Wanil; Woo, Kyung-Chul; Kim, Kyong-Tai [Department of Life Science, Division of Molecular and Life Science, Pohang University of Science and Technology, San 31, Hyoja Dong, Pohang 790-784 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Gyoo-Cheon, E-mail: ktk@postech.ac.kr [Department of Oral Anatomy and Cell Biology, School of Dentistry, Pusan National University, Yangsan 626-810 (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-01-12

    Animal cell death comprising necrosis and apoptosis occurred in a well-regulated manner upon specific stimuli. The physiological meanings and detailed molecular mechanisms of cell death have been continuously investigated over several decades. Necrotic cell death has typical morphological changes, such as cell swelling and cell lysis followed by DNA degradation, whereas apoptosis shows blebbing formation and regular DNA fragmentation. Cell death is usually adopted to terminate cancer cells in vivo. The current strategies against tumour are based on the induction of cell death by adopting various methods, including radiotherapy and chemotherapeutics. Among these, radiotherapy is the most frequently used treatment method, but it still has obvious limitations. Recent studies have suggested that the use of nonthermal air plasma can be a prominent method for inducing cancer cell death. Plasma-irradiated cells showed the loss of genomic integrity, mitochondrial dysfunction, plasma membrane damage, etc. Tumour elimination with plasma irradiation is an emerging concept in cancer therapy and can be accelerated by targeting certain tumour-specific proteins with gold nanoparticles. Here, some recent developments are described so that the mechanisms related to plasma-mediated cell death and its perspectives in cancer treatment can be understood. (topical review)

  16. Human circulating plasma DNA significantly decreases while lymphocyte DNA damage increases under chronic occupational exposure to low-dose gamma-neutron and tritium β-radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Korzeneva, Inna B., E-mail: inna.korzeneva@molgen.vniief.ru [Russian Federal Nuclear Center – All-Russian Research Institute of Experimental Physics (RFNC-VNIIEF) 607190, Sarov, 37 Mira ave., Nizhniy Novgorod Region (Russian Federation); Kostuyk, Svetlana V.; Ershova, Liza S. [Research Centre for Medical Genetics, Russian Academy of Medical Sciences, 115478 Moscow, 1 Moskvorechye str. (Russian Federation); Osipov, Andrian N. [Federal Medial and Biological Center named after Burnazyan of the Federal Medical and Biological Agency (FMBTz named after Burnazyan of FMBA), Moscow (Russian Federation); State Research Center - Burnasyan Federal Medical Biophysical Center of Federal Medical Biological Agency, Zhivopisnaya, 46, Moscow, 123098 (Russian Federation); Zhuravleva, Veronika F.; Pankratova, Galina V. [Russian Federal Nuclear Center – All-Russian Research Institute of Experimental Physics (RFNC-VNIIEF) 607190, Sarov, 37 Mira ave., Nizhniy Novgorod Region (Russian Federation); Porokhovnik, Lev N.; Veiko, Natalia N. [Research Centre for Medical Genetics, Russian Academy of Medical Sciences, 115478 Moscow, 1 Moskvorechye str. (Russian Federation)

    2015-09-15

    Highlights: • The chronic exposure to low-dose IR induces DSBs in human lymphocytes (TM index). • Exposure to IR decreases the level of human circulating DNA (cfDNA index). • IR induces an increase of DNase1 activity (DNase1 index) in plasma. • IR induces an increase of the level of antibodies to DNA (Ab DNA index) in plasma. • The ratio cfDNA/(DNase 1 × Ab DNA × TM) is a potential marker of human exposure to IR. - Abstract: The blood plasma of healthy people contains cell-fee (circulating) DNA (cfDNA). Apoptotic cells are the main source of the cfDNA. The cfDNA concentration increases in case of the organism’s cell death rate increase, for example in case of exposure to high-dose ionizing radiation (IR). The objects of the present research are the blood plasma and blood lymphocytes of people, who contacted occupationally with the sources of external gamma/neutron radiation or internal β-radiation of tritium N = 176). As the controls (references), blood samples of people, who had never been occupationally subjected to the IR sources, were used (N = 109). With respect to the plasma samples of each donor there were defined: the cfDNA concentration (the cfDNA index), DNase1 activity (the DNase1 index) and titre of antibodies to DNA (the Ab DNA index). The general DNA damage in the cells was defined (using the Comet assay, the tail moment (TM) index). A chronic effect of the low-dose ionizing radiation on a human being is accompanied by the enhancement of the DNA damage in lymphocytes along with a considerable cfDNA content reduction, while the DNase1 content and concentration of antibodies to DNA (Ab DNA) increase. All the aforementioned changes were also observed in people, who had not worked with the IR sources for more than a year. The ratio cfDNA/(DNase1 × Ab DNA × TM) is proposed to be used as a marker of the chronic exposure of a person to the external low-dose IR. It was formulated the assumption that the joint analysis of the cfDNA, DNase1, Ab

  17. Circulating microparticles and plasma levels of soluble E- and P-selectins in patients with systemic sclerosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Iversen, Lars; Østergaard, O; Ullman, S

    2013-01-01

    Microparticles (MPs) may be involved in the pathogenesis of systemic sclerosis (SSc), which includes vasculopathy, endothelial cell activation, and coagulation activation. Circulating MPs from SSc patients were characterized and their relationship with soluble markers of vascular activation...

  18. Circulating myeloid-derived suppressor cells in patients with pancreatic cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiao-Dong Xu; Jun Hu; Min Wang; Feng Peng; Rui Tian; Xing-Jun Guo; Yu Xie; Ren-Yi Qin

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs) are heterogeneous cell types that suppress T-cell responses in cancer patients and animal models, some MDSC subpopula-tions are increased in patients with pancreatic cancer. The present study was to investigate a specific subset of MDSCs in patients with pancreatic cancer and the mechanism of MDSCs increase in these patients. METHODS: Myeloid cells from whole blood were collected from 37 patients with pancreatic cancer, 17 with cholangiocarcinoma, and 47 healthy controls. Four pancreatic cancer cell lines were co-culturedwithnormalperipheralbloodmononuclearcells(PBMCs) to test the effect of tumor cells on the conversion of PBMCs to MDSCs. Levels of granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) and arginase activity in the plasma of cancer patients were analyzed by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. RESULTS: CD14+/CD11b+/HLA-DR- MDSCs were increased in patients with pancreatic or bile duct cancer compared with those in healthy controls, and this increase was correlated with clinical cancer stage. Pancreatic cancer cell lines induced PBMCs to MDSCs in a dose-dependent manner. GM-CSF and arginase activity levels were significantly increased in the se-rum of patients with pancreatic cancer. CONCLUSIONS: MDSCsweretumorrelated:tumorcellsinduced PBMCs to MDSCs in a dose-dependent manner and circulating CD14+/CD11b+/HLA-DR- MDSCs in pancreatic cancer patients were positively correlated with tumor burden. MDSCs might be useful markers for pancreatic cancer detection and progression.

  19. Photoacoustic monitoring of circulating tumor cells released during medical procedures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juratli, Mazen A.; Sarimollaoglu, Mustafa; Nedosekin, Dmitry A.; Galanzha, Ekaterina; Suen, James Y.; Zharov, Vladimir P.

    2013-03-01

    Many cancer deaths are related to metastasis to distant organs due to dissemination of circulating tumor cells (CTCs) shed from the primary tumor. For many years, oncologists believed some medical procedures may provoke metastasis; however, no direct evidence has been reported. We have developed a new, noninvasive technology called in vivo photoacoustic (PA) flow cytometry (PAFC), which provides ultrasensitive detection of CTCs. When CTCs with strongly light-absorbing intrinsic melanin pass through a laser beam aimed at a peripheral blood vessel, laser-induced acoustic waves from CTCs were detected using an ultrasound transducer. We focused on melanoma as it is one of the most metastatically aggressive malignancies. The goal of this research was to determine whether melanoma manipulation, like compression, incisional biopsy, or tumor excision, could enhance penetration of cancer cells from the primary tumor into the circulatory system. The ears of nude mice were inoculated with melanoma cells. Blood vessels were monitored for the presence of CTCs using in vivo PAFC. We discovered some medical procedures, like compression of the tumor, biopsy, and surgery may either initiate CTC release in the blood which previously contained no CTCs, or dramatically increased (10-30-fold) CTC counts above the initial level. Our results warn oncologists to use caution during physical examination, and surgery. A preventive anti-CTC therapy during or immediately after surgery, by intravenous drug administration could serve as an option to treat the resulting release of CTCs.

  20. Detection of circulating breast cancer cells using photoacoustic flow cytometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattacharyya, Kiran

    According to the American Cancer Society, more than 200,000 new cases of breast cancer are expected to be diagnosed this year. Moreover, about 40,000 women died from breast cancer last year alone. As breast cancer progresses in an individual, it can transform from a localized state to a metastatic one with multiple tumors distributed through the body, not necessarily contained within the breast. Metastasis is the spread of cancer through the body by circulating tumor cells (CTCs) which can be found in the blood and lymph of the diagnosed patient. Diagnosis of a metastatic state by the discovery of a secondary tumor can often come too late and hence, significantly reduce the patient's chance of survival. There is a current need for a CTC detection method which would diagnose metastasis before the secondary tumor occurs or reaches a size resolvable by current imaging systems. Since earlier detection would improve prognosis, this study proposes a method of labeling of breast cancer cells for detection with a photoacoustic flow cytometry system as a model for CTC detection in human blood. Gold nanoparticles and fluorescent polystyrene nanoparticles are proposed as contrast agents for T47D, the breast cancer cell line of choice. The labeling, photoacoustic detection limit, and sensitivity are first characterized and then applied to a study to show detection from human blood.

  1. Retracing Circulating Tumour Cells for Biomarker Characterization after Enumeration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anders S. Frandsen

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Background Retracing and biomarker characterization of individual circulating tumour cells (CTCs may potentially contribute to personalized metastatic cancer therapy. This is relevant when a biopsy of the metastasis is complicated or impossible to acquire. Methods A novel disc format was used to map and retrace individual CTCs from breast-cancer patients and nucleated cells from healthy blood donors using the CytoTrack platform. For proof of the retracing concept, CTC HER2 characterization by immunofluorescence was tested. Results CTCs were detected and enumerated in three of four blood samples from breast-cancer patients and the locations of each individual CTCs were mapped on the discs. Nucleated cells were retraced on seven discs with 96.6%±8.5% recovery on five fields of view on each disc. Shifting of field of view for retracing was measured to 4-29 μm. In a blood sample from a HER2-positive breast-cancer patient, CTC enumeration and mapping was followed by HER2 characterization and retracing to demonstrate downstream immunofluorescence analysis of the CTC. Conclusion Mapping and retracing of CTCs enables downstream analysis of individual CTCs for existing and future cancer genotypic and phenotypic biomarkers. Future studies will uncover this potential of the novel retracing technology.

  2. A cryogenic circulating advective multi-pass absorption cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stockett, M. H.; Lawler, J. E.

    2012-03-01

    A novel absorption cell has been developed to enable a spectroscopic survey of a broad range of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) under astrophysically relevant conditions and utilizing a synchrotron radiation continuum to test the still controversial hypothesis that these molecules or their ions could be carriers of the diffuse interstellar bands. The cryogenic circulating advective multi-pass absorption cell resembles a wind tunnel; molecules evaporated from a crucible or injected using a custom gas feedthrough are entrained in a laminar flow of cryogenically cooled buffer gas and advected into the path of the synchrotron beam. This system includes a multi-pass optical White cell enabling absorption path lengths of hundreds of meters and a detection sensitivity to molecular densities on the order of 107 cm-3. A capacitively coupled radio frequency dielectric barrier discharge provides ionized and metastable buffer gas atoms for ionizing the candidate molecules via charge exchange and the Penning effect. Stronger than expected clustering of PAH molecules has slowed efforts to record gas phase PAH spectra at cryogenic temperatures, though such clusters may play a role in other interstellar phenomena.

  3. Genetic profiling of tumours using both circulating free DNA and circulating tumour cells isolated from the same preserved whole blood sample.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rothwell, Dominic G; Smith, Nigel; Morris, Daniel; Leong, Hui Sun; Li, Yaoyong; Hollebecque, Antoine; Ayub, Mahmood; Carter, Louise; Antonello, Jenny; Franklin, Lynsey; Miller, Crispin; Blackhall, Fiona; Dive, Caroline; Brady, Ged

    2016-04-01

    Molecular information obtained from cancer patients' blood is an emerging and powerful research tool with immense potential as a companion diagnostic for patient stratification and monitoring. Blood, which can be sampled routinely, provides a means of inferring the current genetic status of patients' tumours via analysis of circulating tumour cells (CTCs) or circulating tumour DNA (ctDNA). However, accurate assessment of both CTCs and ctDNA requires all blood cells to be maintained intact until samples are processed. This dictates for ctDNA analysis EDTA blood samples must be processed with 4 h of draw, severely limiting the use of ctDNA in multi-site trials. Here we describe a blood collection protocol that is amenable for analysis of both CTCs and ctDNA up to four days after blood collection. We demonstrate that yields of circulating free DNA (cfDNA) obtained from whole blood CellSave samples are equivalent to those obtained from conventional EDTA plasma processed within 4 h of blood draw. Targeted and genome-wide NGS revealed comparable DNA quality and resultant sequence information from cfDNA within CellSave and EDTA samples. We also demonstrate that CTCs and ctDNA can be isolated from the same patient blood sample, and give the same patterns of CNA enabling direct analysis of the genetic status of patients' tumours. In summary, our results demonstrate the utility of a simple approach that enabling robust molecular analysis of CTCs and cfDNA for genotype-directed therapies in multi-site clinical trials and represent a significant methodological improvement for clinical benefit.

  4. Circulating Plasma microRNAs can differentiate Human Sepsis and Systemic Inflammatory Response Syndrome (SIRS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caserta, Stefano; Kern, Florian; Cohen, Jonathan; Drage, Stephen; Newbury, Sarah F; Llewelyn, Martin J

    2016-06-20

    Systemic inflammation in humans may be triggered by infection, termed sepsis, or non-infective processes, termed non-infective systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS). MicroRNAs regulate cellular processes including inflammation and may be detected in blood. We aimed to establish definitive proof-of-principle that circulating microRNAs are differentially affected during sepsis and non-infective SIRS. Critically ill patients with severe (n = 21) or non-severe (n = 8) intra-abdominal sepsis; severe (n = 23) or non-severe (n = 21) non-infective SIRS; or no SIRS (n = 16) were studied. Next-generation sequencing and qRT-PCR were used to measure plasma microRNAs. Detectable blood miRNAs (n = 116) were generally up-regulated in SIRS compared to no-SIRS patients. Levels of these 'circulating inflammation-related microRNAs' (CIR-miRNAs) were 2.64 (IQR: 2.10-3.29) and 1.52 (IQR: 1.15-1.92) fold higher for non-infective SIRS and sepsis respectively (p SIRS. Six CIR-miRNAs (miR-30d-5p, miR-30a-5p, miR-192-5p, miR-26a-5p, miR-23a-5p, miR-191-5p) provided good-to-excellent discrimination of severe sepsis from severe SIRS (0.742-0.917 AUC of ROC curves). CIR-miRNA levels inversely correlated with pro-inflammatory cytokines (IL-1, IL-6 and others). Thus, among critically ill patients, sepsis and non-infective SIRS are associated with substantial, differential changes in CIR-miRNAs. CIR-miRNAs may be regulators of inflammation and warrant thorough evaluation as diagnostic and therapeutic targets.

  5. Circulating angiogenic cell dysfunction in patients with hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liana Zucco

    Full Text Available Hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia (HHT is an autosomal dominant vascular disorder. Circulating angiogenic cells (CACs play an important role in vascular repair and regeneration. This study was designed to examine the function of CACs derived from patients with HHT. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMNCs isolated from patients with HHT and age- and gender-matched healthy volunteers were assessed for expression of CD34, CD133 and VEGF receptor 2 by flow cytometry. PBMNCs were cultured to procure early outgrowth CACs. Development of endothelial cell (EC phenotype in CACs was analyzed by fluorescence microscopy. CAC apoptosis was assayed with Annexin V staining, and CAC migration assessed by a modified Boyden chamber assay. mRNA expression of endoglin (ENG, activin receptor-like kinase-1 (ACVLR1 or ALK1 and endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS in CACs was measured by real time RT-PCR. The percentage of CD34+ cells in PBMNCs from HHT patients was significantly higher than in PBMNCs of healthy controls. CACs derived from patients with HHT not only showed a significant reduction in EC-selective surface markers following 7-day culture, but also a significant increase in the rate of basal apoptosis and blunted migration in response to vascular endothelial growth factor and stromal cell-derived factor-1. CACs from HHT patients expressed significantly lower levels of ENG, ALK1 and eNOS mRNAs. In conclusion, CACs from patients with HHT exhibited various functional impairments, suggesting a reduced regenerative capacity of CACs to repair the vascular lesions seen in HHT patients.

  6. Plasma Cells For Hire: Prior Experience Required

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    Activation of IgG+ memory B cells accounts for much of the antibodies in secondary immune responses. Here, Khometani et al. (2013) demonstrate that reduced amounts of Bach2 in antigen-experienced memory B cells control the robust production of IgG1+ plasma cells.

  7. Equine fetal sex determination using circulating cell-free fetal DNA (ccffDNA).

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Leon, Priscila Marques Moura; Campos, Vinicius Farias; Dellagostin, Odir Antônio; Deschamps, João Carlos; Seixas, Fabiana Kömmling; Collares, Tiago

    2012-02-01

    In this study, polymerase chain reaction (PCR) reamplification of the first PCR product (2nd-PCR) and a qPCR assay were used to detect the sex determining region Y (SRY) gene from circulating cell-free fetal DNA (ccffDNA) in blood plasma of pregnant mares to determine fetal sex. The ccffDNA was isolated from plasma of 20 Thoroughbred mares (5-13 y old) in the final 3 mo of pregnancy (fetal sex was verified after foaling). For controls, plasma from two non-pregnant mares and two virgin mares were used, in addition to the non-template control. The 182 bp nucleotide sequence corresponding to the SRY-PCR product was confirmed by DNA sequencing. Based on SRY/PCR, 8 of 11 male and 9 of 9 female fetuses were correctly identified, resulting in a sensitivity of 72.7% (for male fetuses) and an overall accuracy of 85%. Furthermore, using SRY/2nd-PCR and qPCR techniques, sensitivity and accuracy were 90.9 and 95%, respectively. In conclusion, this study is apparently the first report of fetal sex determination in mares using ccffDNA.

  8. Comparison of circulating and intratumoral regulatory T cells in patients with renal cell carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asma, Gati; Amal, Gorrab; Raja, Marrakchi; Amine, Derouiche; Mohammed, Chebil; Amel, Ben Ammar Elgaaied

    2015-05-01

    The clear evidence that tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes (TIL) exists in the tumor microenvironment raises the question why renal cell carcinoma (RCC) progresses. Numerous studies support the implication of CD4(+)CD25(high) regulatory T (Treg) cells in RCC development. We aimed in this study to characterize the phenotype and function of circulating and intratumoral Treg cells of RCC patient in order to evaluate their implication in the inhibition of the local antitumor immune response. Our results demonstrate that the proportion of Treg in TIL was, in average, similar to that found in circulating CD4(+) T cells of patients or healthy donors. However, intratumoral Treg exhibit a marked different phenotype when compared with the autologous circulating Treg. A higher CD25 mean level, HLA-DR, Fas, and GITR, and a lower CD45RA expression were observed in intratumoral Treg, suggesting therefore that these cells are effector in the tumor microenvironment. Additionally, intratumoral Treg showed a higher inhibitory function on autologous CD4(+)CD25(-) T cells when compared with circulating Treg that may be explained by an overexpression of FoxP3 transcription factor. These findings suggest that intratumoral Treg could be major actors in the impairment of local antitumor immune response for RCC patients.

  9. Cell Adhesion to Plasma-Coated PVC

    OpenAIRE

    Elidiane C. Rangel; Souza,Eduardo S. de; Francine S. de Moraes; Eliana A. R. Duek; Carolina Lucchesi; Schreiner, Wido H.; Durrant, Steven F.; Cruz, Nilson C.

    2014-01-01

    To produce environments suitable for cell culture, thin polymer films were deposited onto commercial PVC plates from radiofrequency acetylene-argon plasmas. The proportion of argon in the plasmas, P-Ar, was varied from 5.3 to 65.8%. The adhesion and growth of Vero cells on the coated surfaces were examined for different incubation times. Cytotoxicity tests were performed using spectroscopic methods. Carbon, O, and N were detected in all the samples using XPS. Roughness remained almost unchang...

  10. Cell-free plasma microRNA in pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma and disease controls

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carlsen, Anting Liu; Joergensen, Maiken Thyregod; Knudsen, Steen;

    2013-01-01

    There are no tumor-specific biochemical markers for pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC). Tissue-specific gene expression including microRNA (miRNA) profiling, however, identifies specific PDAC signatures. This study evaluates associations between circulating, cell-free plasma-miRNA profiles...

  11. Plasma contact system activation drives anaphylaxis in severe mast cell-mediated allergic reactions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sala-Cunill, Anna; Björkqvist, Jenny; Senter, Riccardo; Guilarte, Mar; Cardona, Victoria; Labrador, Moises; Nickel, Katrin F; Butler, Lynn; Luengo, Olga; Kumar, Parvin; Labberton, Linda; Long, Andy; Di Gennaro, Antonio; Kenne, Ellinor; Jämsä, Anne; Krieger, Thorsten; Schlüter, Hartmut; Fuchs, Tobias; Flohr, Stefanie; Hassiepen, Ulrich; Cumin, Frederic; McCrae, Keith; Maas, Coen; Stavrou, Evi; Renné, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Anaphylaxis is an acute, potentially lethal, multisystem syndrome resulting from the sudden release of mast cell-derived mediators into the circulation. OBJECTIVES AND METHODS: We report here that a plasma protease cascade, the factor XII-driven contact system, critically contributes to

  12. Lipid signalling dynamics at the β-cell plasma membrane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wuttke, Anne

    2015-04-01

    Pancreatic β-cells are clustered in islets of Langerhans and secrete insulin in response to increased concentrations of circulating glucose. Insulin in turn acts on liver, muscle and fat tissue to store energy and normalize the blood glucose level. Inappropriate insulin release may lead to impaired glucose tolerance and diabetes. In addition to glucose, other nutrients, neural stimuli and hormonal stimuli control insulin secretion. Many of these signals are perceived at the plasma membrane, which is also the site where insulin granules undergo exocytosis. Therefore, it is not surprising that membrane lipids play an important role in the regulation of insulin secretion. β-cells release insulin in a pulsatile fashion. Signalling lipids integrate the nutrient and neurohormonal inputs to fine-tune, shape and co-ordinate the pulsatility. An important group of signalling lipids are phosphoinositides and their downstream messengers. This MiniReview will discuss new insights into lipid signalling dynamics in β-cells obtained from live-cell imaging experiments with fluorescent translocation biosensors. The plasma membrane concentration of several phosphoinositides and of their downstream messengers changes rapidly upon nutrient or neurohormonal stimulation. Glucose induces the most complex spatio-temporal patterns, typically involving oscillations of messenger concentrations, which sometimes are locally restricted. The tightly controlled levels of lipid messengers can mediate specific binding of downstream effectors to the plasma membrane, contributing to the appropriate regulation of insulin secretion.

  13. Tendon repair augmented with a novel circulating stem cell population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daher, Robert J; Chahine, Nadeen O; Razzano, Pasquale; Patwa, Sohum A; Sgaglione, Nicholas J; Grande, Daniel A

    2011-01-01

    Tendon ruptures are common sports-related injuries that are often treated surgically by the use of sutures followed by immobilization. However, tendon repair by standard technique is associated with long healing time and often suboptimal repair. Methods to enhance tendon repair time as well as the quality of repair are currently unmet clinical needs. Our hypothesis is that the introduction of a unique stem cell population at the site of tendon transection would result in an improved rate and quality of repair. Achilles tendons of fifty-one Sprague-Dawley rats were transected and suture-repaired. In half of the rats, a biodegradable scaffold seeded with allogenic circulating stem cells was placed as an onlay to the defect site in addition to the suture repair. The other half was treated with suture alone to serve as the control group. Animals were randomized to a two-, four-, or six-week time group. At the time of necropsy, tendons were harvested and prepared for either biomechanical or histological analysis. Histological slides were evaluated in a blinded fashion with the use of a grading scale. By two weeks, the experimental group demonstrated a significant improvement in repair compared to controls with no failures. Average histological scores of 0.6 and 2.6 were observed for the experimental and control group respectively. The experimental group demonstrated complete bridging of the transection site with parallel collagen fiber arrangement. By four weeks, both groups showed a continuing trend of healing, with the scaffold group exceeding the histological quality of the tissue repaired with suture alone. Biomechanically, the experimental group had a decreasing cross-sectional area with time which was also associated with a significant increase in the ultimate tensile strength of the tendons, reaching 4.2MPa by six weeks. The experimental group also achieved a significantly higher elastic toughness by six weeks and saw an increase in the tensile modulus, reaching

  14. Circulating dendritic cell number and intracellular TNF-α production in women with type 2 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blank, Sally E; Johnson, Emily Carolyn; Weeks, Debra K; Wysham, Carol H

    2012-12-01

    Human dendritic cell (DC) subsets perform specialized functions for surveillance against bacterial and viral infections essential for the management of type 2 diabetes (T2D). Production of tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) by DCs acts in autocrine fashion to regulate DC maturation and promotes the inflammatory response. This study was designed to compare circulating DC number and intracellular TNF-α production between post-menopausal women with T2D and healthy women. Blood samples were obtained (n = 21/group) and examined for plasma glucose and TNF-α concentrations, and dendritic cell subset immunophenotype (plasmacytoid, pDC, CD85k(ILT-3)(+)CD123(+)CD16(-)CD14(-) and myeloid, mDC, CD85k(ILT-3)(+)CD33(+)CD123(dim to neg)CD16(-)CD14(dim to neg)). Intracellular production of TNF-α was determined in unstimulated and stimulated DCs. Women with T2D had significantly (P TNF-α concentrations when compared to healthy women. Women with T2D having poor glycemic control (T2D Poor Control, HbA1c ≥ 7%) had fewer circulating pDCs than women with T2D having good glycemic control (T2D Good Control, HbA1c TNF-α in stimulated pDCs. Intracellular production of TNF-α in pDCs was significantly greater in healthy vs. T2D Poor Control (P production of TNF-α did not differ between groups. These findings indicate that TNF-α production by pDCs was reduced in women with T2D and circulating number of pDCs was associated with glycemic control.

  15. In Vivo Monitoring of Multiple Circulating Cell Populations Using Two-photon Flow Cytometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tkaczyk, Eric R; Zhong, Cheng Frank; Ye, Jing Yong; Myc, Andrzej; Thomas, Thommey; Cao, Zhengyi; Duran-Struuck, Raimon; Luker, Kathryn E; Luker, Gary D; Norris, Theodore B; Baker, James R

    2008-02-15

    To detect and quantify multiple distinct populations of cells circulating simultaneously in the blood of living animals, we developed a novel optical system for two-channel, two-photon flow cytometry in vivo. We used this system to investigate the circulation dynamics in live animals of breast cancer cells with low (MCF-7) and high (MDA-MB-435) metastatic potential, showing for the first time that two different populations of circulating cells can be quantified simultaneously in the vasculature of a single live mouse. We also non-invasively monitored a population of labeled, circulating red blood cells for more than two weeks, demonstrating that this technique can also quantify the dynamics of abundant cells in the vascular system for prolonged periods of time. These data are the first in vivo application of multichannel flow cytometry utilizing two-photon excitation, which will greatly enhance our capability to study circulating cells in cancer and other disease processes.

  16. Dynamic Fluctuation of Circulating Tumor Cells during Cancer Progression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mazen A. Juratli

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Circulating tumor cells (CTCs are a promising diagnostic and prognostic biomarker for metastatic tumors. We demonstrate that CTCs’ diagnostic value might be increased through real-time monitoring of CTC dynamics. Using preclinical animal models of breast cancer and melanoma and in vivo flow cytometry with photoacoustic and fluorescence detection schematics, we show that CTC count does not always correlate with the primary tumor size. Individual analysis elucidated many cases where the highest level of CTCs was detected before the primary tumor starts progressing. This phenomenon could be attributed to aggressive tumors developing from cancer stem cells. Furthermore, real-time continuous monitoring of CTCs reveals that they occur at highly variable rates in a detection point over a period of time (e.g., a range of 0–54 CTCs per 5 min. These same fluctuations in CTC numbers were observed in vivo in epithelial and non-epithelial metastatic tumors, in different stages of tumor progression, and in different vessels. These temporal CTC fluctuations can explain false negative results of a one-time snapshot test in humans. Indeed, we observed wide variations in the number of CTCs in subsequent blood samples taken from the same metastatic melanoma patient, with some samples being CTC-free. If these phenomena are confirmed in our ongoing in vivo clinical trials, this could support a personalized strategy of CTC monitoring for cancer patients.

  17. Dynamic Fluctuation of Circulating Tumor Cells during Cancer Progression

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Juratli, Mazen A.; Sarimollaoglu, Mustafa; Nedosekin, Dmitry A. [Phillips Classic Laser and Nanomedicine Laboratories, University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, Little Rock, AR 72205 (United States); Melerzanov, Alexander V. [Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology (MIPT), Moscow Region, 141700 (Russian Federation); Zharov, Vladimir P. [Phillips Classic Laser and Nanomedicine Laboratories, University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, Little Rock, AR 72205 (United States); Arkansas Nanomedicine Center, University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, Little Rock, AR 72205 (United States); Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology (MIPT), Moscow Region, 141700 (Russian Federation); Galanzha, Ekaterina I., E-mail: egalanzha@uams.edu [Phillips Classic Laser and Nanomedicine Laboratories, University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, Little Rock, AR 72205 (United States)

    2014-01-15

    Circulating tumor cells (CTCs) are a promising diagnostic and prognostic biomarker for metastatic tumors. We demonstrate that CTCs’ diagnostic value might be increased through real-time monitoring of CTC dynamics. Using preclinical animal models of breast cancer and melanoma and in vivo flow cytometry with photoacoustic and fluorescence detection schematics, we show that CTC count does not always correlate with the primary tumor size. Individual analysis elucidated many cases where the highest level of CTCs was detected before the primary tumor starts progressing. This phenomenon could be attributed to aggressive tumors developing from cancer stem cells. Furthermore, real-time continuous monitoring of CTCs reveals that they occur at highly variable rates in a detection point over a period of time (e.g., a range of 0–54 CTCs per 5 min). These same fluctuations in CTC numbers were observed in vivo in epithelial and non-epithelial metastatic tumors, in different stages of tumor progression, and in different vessels. These temporal CTC fluctuations can explain false negative results of a one-time snapshot test in humans. Indeed, we observed wide variations in the number of CTCs in subsequent blood samples taken from the same metastatic melanoma patient, with some samples being CTC-free. If these phenomena are confirmed in our ongoing in vivo clinical trials, this could support a personalized strategy of CTC monitoring for cancer patients.

  18. Opportunities and Challenges for Pancreatic Circulating Tumor Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagrath, Sunitha; Jack, Rhonda M; Sahai, Vaibhav; Simeone, Diane M

    2016-09-01

    Sensitive and reproducible platforms have been developed for detection, isolation, and enrichment of circulating tumor cells (CTCs)-rare cells that enter the blood from solid tumors, including those of the breast, prostate gland, lung, pancreas, and colon. These might be used as biomarkers in diagnosis or determination of prognosis. CTCs are no longer simply detected and quantified; they are now used in ex vivo studies of anticancer agents and early detection. We review what we have recently learned about CTCs from pancreatic tumors, describing advances in their isolation and analysis and challenges to their clinical utility. We summarize technologies used to isolate CTCs from blood samples of patients with pancreatic cancer, including immunoaffinity and label-free physical attribute-based capture. We explain methods of CTC analysis and how findings from these studies might be used to detect cancer at earlier stages, monitor disease progression, and determine prognosis. We review studies that have expanded CTCs for testing of anticancer agents and how these approaches might be used to personalize treatment. Advances in the detection, isolation, and analysis of CTCs have increased our understanding of the dissemination and progression of pancreatic cancer. However, standardization of methodologies and prospective studies are needed for this emerging technology to have a significant effect on clinical care.

  19. Sampling circulating tumor cells for clinical benefits: how frequent?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leong, Sai Mun; Tan, Karen M L; Chua, Hui Wen; Tan, Doreen; Fareda, Delly; Osmany, Saabry; Li, Mo-Huang; Tucker, Steven; Koay, Evelyn S C

    2015-06-25

    Circulating tumor cells (CTCs) are cells shed from tumors or metastatic sites and are a potential biomarker for cancer diagnosis, management, and prognostication. The majority of current studies use single or infrequent CTC sampling points. This strategy assumes that changes in CTC number, as well as phenotypic and molecular characteristics, are gradual with time. In reality, little is known today about the actual kinetics of CTC dissemination and phenotypic and molecular changes in the blood of cancer patients. Herein, we show, using clinical case studies and hypothetical simulation models, how sub-optimal CTC sampling may result in misleading observations with clinical consequences, by missing out on significant CTC spikes that occur in between sampling times. Initial studies using highly frequent CTC sampling are necessary to understand the dynamics of CTC dissemination and phenotypic and molecular changes in the blood of cancer patients. Such an improved understanding will enable an optimal, study-specific sampling frequency to be assigned to individual research studies and clinical trials and better inform practical clinical decisions on cancer management strategies for patient benefits.

  20. The circulating cell-free microRNA profile in systemic sclerosis is distinct from both healthy controls and systemic lupus erythematosus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Steen, Samantha O; Iversen, Line V; Carlsen, Anting Liu

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the expression profile of cell-free circulating microRNA (miRNA) in systemic sclerosis (SSc), healthy controls (HC), and systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). METHODS: Total RNA was purified from plasma and 45 different, mature miRNA were measured using quantitative PCR assays...

  1. Lab-on-chip platform for circulating tumor cells isolation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maurya, D. K.; Fooladvand, M.; Gray, E.; Ziman, M.; Alameh, K.

    2015-12-01

    We design, develop and demonstrate the principle of a continuous, non-intrusive, low power microfluidics-based lab-ona- chip (LOC) structure for Circulating Tumor Cell (CTC) separation. Cell separation is achieved through 80 cascaded contraction and expansion microchannels of widths 60 μm and 300 μm, respectively, and depth 60 μm, which enable momentum-change-induced inertial forces to be exerted on the cells, thus routing them to desired destinations. The total length of the developed LOC is 72 mm. The LOC structure is simulated using the COMSOL multiphysics software, which enables the optimization of the dimensions of the various components of the LOC structure, namely the three inlets, three filters, three contraction and expansion microchannel segments and five outlets. Simulation results show that the LOC can isolate CTCs of sizes ranging from 15 to 30 μm with a recovery rate in excess of 90%. Fluorescent microparticles of two different sizes (5 μm and 15 μm), emulating blood and CTC cells, respectively, are used to demonstrate the principle of the developed LOC. A mixture of these microparticles is injected into the primary LOC inlet via an electronically-controlled syringe pump, and the large-size particles are routed to the primary LOC outlet through the contraction and expansion microchannels. Experimental results demonstrate the ability of the developed LOC to isolate particles by size exclusion with an accuracy of 80%. Ongoing research is focusing on the LOC design improvement for better separation efficiency and testing of biological samples for isolation of CTCs.

  2. Haem Biosynthesis and Antioxidant Enzymes in Circulating Cells of Acute Intermittent Porphyria Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrer, Miguel D.; Mestre-Alfaro, Antonia; Martínez-Tomé, Magdalena; Carrera-Quintanar, Lucrecia; Capó, Xavier; Jiménez-Monreal, Antonia M.; García-Diz, Luis; Roche, Enrique; Murcia, María A.; Tur, Josep A.

    2016-01-01

    The aims of the present study were to explore the expression pattern of haem biosynthesis enzymes in circulating cells of patients affected by two types of porphyria (acute intermittent, AIP, and variegate porphyria, VP), together with the antioxidant enzyme pattern in AIP in order to identify a possible situation of oxidative stress. Sixteen and twelve patients affected by AIP and VP, respectively, were analysed with the same numbers of healthy matched controls. Erythrocytes, neutrophils and peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) were purified from blood, and RNA and proteins were extracted for quantitative real time PCR (qRT-PCR) and Western-blot analysis, respectively. Porhobilinogen deaminase (PBGD) and protoporphyrinogen oxidase (PPOX) gene and protein expression was analysed. Antioxidant enzyme activity and gene expression were additionally determined in blood cells, together with protein carbonyl content in plasma. PBMCs isolated from AIP patients presented low mRNA levels of PBGD when compared to controls, while PBMCs isolated from VP patients presented a decrease in PPOX mRNA. PPOX protein content was higher in AIP patients and lower in VP patients, compared to healthy controls. Regarding antioxidant enzymes, PBMCs and erythrocyte superoxide dismutase (SOD) presented statistically significant higher activity in AIP patients compared to controls, while catalase activity tended to be lower in these patients. No differences were observed regarding antioxidant gene expression in white blood cells. Circulating cells in AIP and VP patients present altered expression of haem biosynthetic enzymes, which could be useful for the differential diagnosis of these two types of porphyria in certain difficult cases. AIP patients present a condition of potential oxidative stress similar to VP patients, evidenced by the post-transcriptional activation of SOD and possible catalase impairment. PMID:27788171

  3. 3D microfilter device for viable circulating tumor cell (CTC) enrichment from blood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Siyang; Lin, Henry K; Lu, Bo; Williams, Anthony; Datar, Ram; Cote, Richard J; Tai, Yu-Chong

    2011-02-01

    Detection of circulating tumor cells has emerged as a promising minimally invasive diagnostic and prognostic tool for patients with metastatic cancers. We report a novel three dimensional microfilter device that can enrich viable circulating tumor cells from blood. This device consists of two layers of parylene membrane with pores and gap precisely defined with photolithography. The positions of the pores are shifted between the top and bottom membranes. The bottom membrane supports captured cells and minimize the stress concentration on cell membrane and sustain cell viability during filtration. Viable cell capture on device was investigated with scanning electron microscopy, confocal microscopy, and immunofluorescent staining using model systems of cultured tumor cells spiked in blood or saline. The paper presents and validates this new 3D microfiltration concept for circulation tumor cell enrichment application. The device provides a highly valuable tool for assessing and characterizing viable enriched circulating tumor cells in both research and clinical settings.

  4. 21 CFR 866.6020 - Immunomagnetic circulating cancer cell selection and enumeration system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Immunomagnetic circulating cancer cell selection..., DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Tumor Associated Antigen immunological Test Systems § 866.6020 Immunomagnetic circulating cancer cell selection...

  5. Circulatory shear flow alters the viability and proliferation of circulating colon cancer cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Rong; Emery, Travis; Zhang, Yongguo; Xia, Yuxuan; Sun, Jun; Wan, Jiandi

    2016-06-01

    During cancer metastasis, circulating tumor cells constantly experience hemodynamic shear stress in the circulation. Cellular responses to shear stress including cell viability and proliferation thus play critical roles in cancer metastasis. Here, we developed a microfluidic approach to establish a circulatory microenvironment and studied circulating human colon cancer HCT116 cells in response to a variety of magnitude of shear stress and circulating time. Our results showed that cell viability decreased with the increase of circulating time, but increased with the magnitude of wall shear stress. Proliferation of cells survived from circulation could be maintained when physiologically relevant wall shear stresses were applied. High wall shear stress (60.5 dyne/cm2), however, led to decreased cell proliferation at long circulating time (1 h). We further showed that the expression levels of β-catenin and c-myc, proliferation regulators, were significantly enhanced by increasing wall shear stress. The presented study provides a new insight to the roles of circulatory shear stress in cellular responses of circulating tumor cells in a physiologically relevant model, and thus will be of interest for the study of cancer cell mechanosensing and cancer metastasis.

  6. Isolation and number of circulated primordial germ cells (circulated-PGCs on stages of embryonic development of Gaok chicken

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kostaman T

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Avian primordial germ cell (PGCs show a unique migration pathway during early development. During the early embryonic development, as soon as the formation of blood vessels, PGCs enter the circulatory system and migrate to the gonadal primordial. The aim of this study was to examine the number of circulated-PGCs from Gaok chicken at different developmental stages of embryo. One hundred fertile eggs were divided into 5 groups and incubated in a portable incubator at 38oC and humidity 60%. Hatching was set according to the embryonic development stage between 14-18. The blood collection was done through the dorsal aorta using micropipette under microscope. The collected blood was grouped based on the embryonic stages and placed on a 1.5 ml eppendorf tube which had been filled with 1.000 µl of Calcium and Magnesium-free phosphate buffered saline (PBS -. The PGCs were then purified using nycodenz density gradient centrifugation. The results showed that the average number of circulated-PGCs per embryo from Gaok chicken were significantly affected by the stage of embryonic development (P < 0.05. The number of circulated-PGCs at stages 14, 15, 16, 17 and 18 were 42.8 ± 8.9, 51.0 ± 5.8, 37.6 ± 5.9, 32.8 ± 3.6 and 32.6 ± 3.2, respectively. However, the number of circulated-PGCs was no different between stage of 17 and 18. At Gaok chicken, the number of circulated-PGCs reach the peak at stage 15, it is recommended that collection of PGCs embryonic chicken from blood circulation was the best on stage 15. This information is useful in efficiency production of germline chimera and to preserve PGCs of other Indonesian native chicken.

  7. Lymph node and circulating T cell characteristics are strongly correlated in end-stage renal disease patients, but highly differentiated T cells reside within the circulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dedeoglu, B; de Weerd, A E; Huang, L; Langerak, A W; Dor, F J; Klepper, M; Verschoor, W; Reijerkerk, D; Baan, C C; Litjens, N H R; Betjes, M G H

    2017-05-01

    Ageing is associated with changes in the peripheral T cell immune system, which can be influenced significantly by latent cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection. To what extent changes in circulating T cell populations correlate with T cell composition of the lymph node (LN) is unclear, but is crucial for a comprehensive understanding of the T cell system. T cells from peripheral blood (PB) and LN of end-stage renal disease patients were analysed for frequency of recent thymic emigrants using CD31 expression and T cell receptor excision circle content, relative telomere length and expression of differentiation markers. Compared with PB, LN contained relatively more CD4(+) than CD8(+) T cells (P T cells and thymic output parameters showed a strong linear correlation between PB and LN. Highly differentiated CD28(null) T cells, being CD27(-) , CD57(+) or programmed death 1 (PD-1(+) ), were found almost exclusively in the circulation but not in LN. An age-related decline in naive CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cell frequency was observed (P = 0·035 and P = 0·002, respectively) within LN, concomitant with an increase in central memory CD8(+) T cells (P = 0·033). Latent CMV infection increased dramatically the frequency of circulating terminally differentiated T cells, but did not alter T cell composition and ageing parameters of LN significantly. Overall T cell composition and measures of thymic function in PB and LN are correlated strongly. However, highly differentiated CD28(null) T cells, which may comprise a large part of circulating T cells in CMV-seropositive individuals, are found almost exclusively within the circulation.

  8. Exercise intensity modulates the appearance of circulating microvesicles with proangiogenic potential upon endothelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilhelm, Eurico N; González-Alonso, José; Parris, Christopher; Rakobowchuk, Mark

    2016-11-01

    The effect of endurance exercise on circulating microvesicle dynamics and their impact on surrounding endothelial cells is unclear. Here we tested the hypothesis that exercise intensity modulates the time course of platelet (PMV) and endothelial-derived (EMV) microvesicle appearance in the circulation through hemodynamic and biochemical-related mechanisms, and that microvesicles formed during exercise would stimulate endothelial angiogenesis in vitro. Nine healthy young men had venous blood samples taken before, during, and throughout the recovery period after 1 h of moderate [46 ± 2% maximal oxygen uptake (V̇o2max)] or heavy (67 ± 2% V̇o2max) intensity semirecumbent cycling and a time-matched resting control trial. In vitro experiments were performed by incubating endothelial cells with rest and exercise-derived microvesicles to examine their effects on cell angiogenic capacities. PMVs (CD41(+)) increased from baseline only during heavy exercise (from 21 ± 1 × 10(3) to 55 ± 8 × 10(3) and 48 ± 6 × 10(3) PMV/μl at 30 and 60 min, respectively; P 0.05), whereas EMVs (CD62E(+)) were unchanged (P > 0.05). PMVs were related to brachial artery shear rate (r(2) = 0.43) and plasma norepinephrine concentrations (r(2) = 0.21) during exercise (P microvesicles enhanced endothelial proliferation, migration, and tubule formation compared with rest microvesicles (P microvesicles stimulate human endothelial cells by enhancing angiogenesis and proliferation. This involvement of microvesicles may be considered a novel mechanism through which exercise mediates vascular healing and adaptation. Copyright © 2016 the American Physiological Society.

  9. Circulating cell-free mitochondrial DNA as a novel cancer biomarker: opportunities and challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Man

    2012-10-01

    The unique characteristics of the mitochondrial genome, such as short length, simple molecular structure, and high copy number, have made monitoring aberrant changes of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) quantity an interesting molecular tool for early tumor detection with many advantages over the nuclear genome-based methods. Recently, circulating cell-free (ccf) mtDNA in blood has emerged on the platform as a non-invasive diagnostic and prognostic biomarker for many forms of solid tumors. Accumulating evidence demonstrate that plasma or serum ccf mtDNA levels are significantly different between cancer patients and healthy individuals. Furthermore, quantification of ccf mtDNA levels in circulation may assist in identifying patients from cancer-free healthy population. This minireview attempts to summarize our recent findings in this very promising field of cancer research. The potential technical challenges that we have encountered during the quantitative analysis of ccf mtDNA and mtDNA in general are also briefly discussed. Prospective studies with a larger cohort of patients in various cancer entities are beneficial to precisely define the clinical importance of assessing the ccf mtDNA amount for diagnosing and tracking malignant diseases and their progression.

  10. Cell-free circulating tumor DNA in cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhen Qin; Vladimir A Ljubimov; Cuiqi Zhou; Yunguang Tong; Jimin Liang

    2016-01-01

    Cancer is a common cause of death worldwide. Despite significant advances in cancer treatments, the morbidity and mortality are still enormous. Tumor heterogeneity, especially intratumoral heterogeneity, is a significant reason under-lying difculties in tumor treatment and failure of a number of current therapeutic modalities, even of molecularly targeted therapies. The development of a virtually noninvasive“liquid biopsy”from the blood has been attempted to characterize tumor heterogeneity. This review focuses on cell-free circulating tumor DNA (ctDNA) in the bloodstream as a versatile biomarker. ctDNA analysis is an evolving field with many new methods being developed and optimized to be able to successfully extract and analyze ctDNA, which has vast clinical applications. ctDNA has the potential to accurately genotype the tumor and identify personalized genetic and epigenetic alterations of the entire tumor. In addition, ctDNA has the potential to accurately monitor tumor burden and treatment response, while also being able to monitor minimal residual disease, reducing the need for harmful adjuvant chemotherapy and allowing more rapid detection of relapse. There are still many challenges that need to be overcome prior to this biomarker getting wide adoption in the clinical world, including optimization, standardization, and large multicenter trials.

  11. Raised levels of circulating endothelial cells in systemic sclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Fracchiolla

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Circulating endothelial cells (CECs have been described in different conditions with vascular injury. Vascular abnormalities play a key role in the pathogenesis of Systemic Sclerosis (SSc. The aim of our study was to look for the presence of CECs in SSc patients and to evaluate their clinical significance. Methods: We studied 52 SSc patients and 40 healthy controls (HC. Five-parameter, 3-color flow cytometry was performed with a FACScan. CECs were defined as CD45 negative, CD31 and P1H12 positive, and activated CECs as CD45 negative and P1H12, CD62, or CD106 positive. Results: Total and activated CEC counts were significantly higher in SSc patients when compared with HC and positively correlated with disease activity score. We found a significant association between CECs and disease activity; as regard with organ involvement, CEC number correlate with the severity of pulmonary hypertension. Conclusions: Raised counts of CECs may represent direct evidence of active vascular disease in SSc as regard as visceral involvement, the association between CECs and pulmonary hypertension suggest a relevant role for CECs as a marker of prominent endothelial involvement.

  12. Bone marrow plasma cells are a primary source of serum HIV-1-specific antibodies in chronically infected individuals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montezuma-Rusca, Jairo M; Moir, Susan; Kardava, Lela; Buckner, Clarisa M; Louie, Aaron; Kim, Leo J Y; Santich, Brian H; Wang, Wei; Fankuchen, Olivia R; Diaz, Gabriella; Daub, Janine R; Rosenzweig, Sergio D; Chun, Tae-Wook; Li, Yuxing; Braylan, Raul C; Calvo, Katherine R; Fauci, Anthony S

    2015-03-15

    Several potent and broadly neutralizing Abs to HIV-1 have been isolated recently from peripheral blood B cells of infected individuals, based on prescreening of Ab activity in the serum. However, little is known regarding the cells that make the Abs that circulate in the blood. Accordingly, we investigated the most likely source, the bone marrow, of chronically HIV-1-infected individuals who were not receiving antiretroviral therapy. Increased frequencies of plasma cells, as well as B cell precursors, namely preB-I and preB-II, and decreased frequencies of mature B cells were observed in bone marrow aspirates of these individuals compared with HIV-negative counterparts. Increased frequencies of bone marrow plasma cells are consistent with known hallmarks of HIV-1 infection, namely hypergammaglobulinemia and increased frequencies of peripheral blood plasmablasts. Levels of HIV-1 envelope (Env)-binding and HIV-1-neutralizing Abs were measured in serum, and corresponding frequencies of Ab-secreting or Env-binding cells were measured in the blood (plasmablasts and memory B cells) and in the bone marrow (plasma cells). A strong correlation was observed between serum HIV-1-specific Abs and Env-specific bone marrow-derived plasma cells, but not circulating plasmablasts or memory B cells. These findings demonstrate that, despite HIV-1-induced phenotypic and functional B cell dysregulation in the peripheral blood and secondary lymphoid tissues, bone marrow plasma cells remain a primary source for circulating HIV-1-specific Abs in HIV-1-infected individuals.

  13. Modification of pLL/DNA complexes with a multivalent hydrophilic polymer permits folate-mediated targeting in vitro and prolonged plasma circulation in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward, Christopher M; Pechar, Michal; Oupicky, David; Ulbrich, Karel; Seymour, Leonard W

    2002-01-01

    Gene delivery vectors based on poly(L-lysine) and DNA (pLL/DNA complexes) have limited use for targeted systemic application in vivo since they bind cells and proteins non-specifically. In this study we have attempted to form folate-targeted vectors with extended systemic circulation by surface modification of pLL/DNA complexes with hydrophilic polymers. pLL/DNA complexes were stabilised by surface modification with a multivalent reactive polymer based on alternating segments of poly(ethylene glycol) and tripeptides bearing reactive ester groups. Folate moieties were incorporated into the vectors either by direct attachment of folate to the polymer or via intermediate poly(ethylene glycol) spacers of 800 and 3400 Da. Polymer-coated complexes show similar morphology to uncoated complexes, their zeta potential is decreased towards zero, serum protein binding is inhibited and aqueous solubility is substantially increased. Intravenous (i.v.) administration to mice of coated complexes produced extended systemic circulation, with up to 2000-fold more DNA measured in the bloodstream after 30 min compared with simple pLL/DNA complexes. In further contrast to simple pLL/DNA complexes, coated complexes do not bind blood cells in vivo. Folate receptor targeting is shown to mediate targeted association with HeLa cells in vitro, leading to increased transgene expression. We demonstrate for the first time that DNA uptake via the folate receptor is dependent on pEG spacer length, with the transgene expression relatively independent of the level of internalised DNA. We show increased systemic circulation, decreased blood cell and protein binding, and folate-targeted transgene expression using pLL/DNA complexes surface-modified with a novel multireactive hydrophilic polymer. This work provides the basis for the development of plasma-circulating targeted vectors for in vivo applications. Copyright 2002 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  14. Biomarker utility of circulating tumor cells in metastatic cutaneous melanoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khoja, Leila; Lorigan, Paul; Zhou, Cong; Lancashire, Matthew; Booth, Jessica; Cummings, Jeff; Califano, Raffaele; Clack, Glen; Hughes, Andrew; Dive, Caroline

    2013-06-01

    The incidence of melanoma is increasing worldwide. Advances in targeted agents and immunotherapy have improved outcomes in metastatic disease, but biomarkers are required to optimize treatment. We determined the prevalence of circulating tumor cells (CTCs) and explored their utility as prognostic and pharmacodynamic biomarkers. A total of 101 patients with metastatic cutaneous melanoma were recruited prospectively. CTC number was determined using the CellSearch platform and melanoma kits in samples taken at baseline and serially during treatment. CTC numbers ranged between 0 and 36 per 7.5 ml blood; 26% of patients had ≥ 2 CTCs. Baseline CTC number was prognostic for median overall survival (OS) in univariate analysis (2.6 vs. 7.2 months (P<0.011) for patients with ≥ 2 CTCs vs. <2 CTCs, respectively). In multivariate analysis, CTC number was an independent prognostic biomarker of OS (hazard ratio (HR) 2.403, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.303-4.430, P=0.005). Patients receiving treatment in whom CTC number remained ≥ 2 CTCs during treatment had shorter median OS than those who maintained <2 CTCs (7 vs. 10 months, HR 0.34, 95% CI 0.14-0.81, log-rank test P=0.015). In conclusion, CTC number in metastatic cutaneous melanoma patients is prognostic for OS with a cutoff of 2 CTCs per 7.5 ml blood. CTC number measured before and throughout treatment provided additional prognostic information. Larger studies are warranted to confirm CTC biomarker utility in melanoma patients.

  15. Cell-free fetal DNA and intact fetal cells in maternal blood circulation: implications for first and second trimester non-invasive prenatal diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bischoff, Farideh Z; Sinacori, Mina K; Dang, Dianne D; Marquez-Do, Deborah; Horne, Cassandra; Lewis, Dorothy E; Simpson, Joe Leigh

    2002-01-01

    Both intact fetal cells as well as cell-free fetal DNA are present in the maternal circulation and can be recovered for non-invasive prenatal genetic diagnosis. Although methods for enrichment and isolation of rare intact fetal cells have been challenging, diagnosis of fetal chromosomal aneuploidy including trisomy 21 in first- and second-trimester pregnancies has been achieved with a 50-75% detection rate. Similarly, cell-free fetal DNA can be reliably recovered from maternal plasma and assessed by quantitative PCR to detect fetal trisomy 21 and paternally derived single gene mutations. Real-time PCR assays are robust in detecting low-level fetal DNA concentrations, with sensitivity of approximately 95-100% and specificity near 100%. Comparing intact fetal cell versus cell-free fetal DNA methods for non-invasive prenatal screening for fetal chromosomal aneuploidy reveals that the latter is at least four times more sensitive. These preliminary results do not support a relationship between frequency of intact fetal cells and concentration of cell-free fetal DNA. The above results imply that the concentration of fetal DNA in maternal plasma may not be dependent on circulating intact fetal cells but rather be a product of growth and cellular turnover during embryonic or fetal development.

  16. Dietary intervention with Okinawan vegetables increased circulating endothelial progenitor cells in healthy young women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mano, Rieko; Ishida, Akio; Ohya, Yusuke; Todoriki, Hidemi; Takishita, Shuichi

    2009-06-01

    Circulating endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) play a critical role in maintaining the integrity of vascular vessels. The number of EPCs inversely correlates with the number of atherosclerotic risk factors. Although nonpharmacological treatment represents the first approach to the primary prevention of atherosclerotic diseases, little is known about the effects of diet on EPCs. We investigated the effect of a dietary intervention with vegetables that are commonly eaten in Okinawa on the number of EPCs. Forty-five healthy young women were employed and randomized to a dietary intervention group (n=24) or a control group (n=21). Subjects in the intervention group received typical Okinawan vegetables through home-parcel delivery for 2 weeks. After the dietary intervention, urinary potassium and magnesium excretion increased only in the intervention group and changes were greater than in the control group (p=0.007, 0.010, respectively). The consumption of total vegetables correlated with changes in both urinary potassium and magnesium excretion. Serum folic acid increased and plasma homocysteine decreased in both groups but the change was significant only in the intervention group. The EPCs number significantly increased in the intervention group but did not in the control group. An inverse correlation was observed between EPC number and plasma homocysteine level (r=-0.272, p=0.016). Changes in the EPC number inversely correlated with changes in both serum total cholesterol and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol level (r=-0.555, p=0.0002; r=-0.626, p<0.0001, respectively). The consumption of vegetables increased the number of circulating EPCs; this change might be associated with a homocysteine-lowering effect.

  17. Computer Simulation of Convective Plasma Cells

    CERN Document Server

    Carboni, Rodrigo

    2015-01-01

    Computer simulations of plasmas are relevant nowadays, because it helps us understand physical processes taking place in the sun and other stellar objects. We developed a program called PCell which is intended for displaying the evolution of the magnetic field in a 2D convective plasma cell with perfect conducting walls for different stationary plasma velocity fields. Applications of this program are presented. This software works interactively with the mouse and the users can create their own movies in MPEG format. The programs were written in Fortran and C. There are two versions of the program (GNUPLOT and OpenGL). GNUPLOT and OpenGL are used to display the simulation.

  18. Carboxybetaine methacrylate-modified nylon surface for circulating tumor cell capture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Huiyu; Yue, Guofeng; Dong, Chaoqun; Wu, Fenglei; Wei, Jia; Yang, Yang; Zou, Zhengyun; Wang, Lifeng; Qian, Xiaoping; Zhang, Tao; Liu, Baorui

    2014-03-26

    Conventional in vitro circulating tumor cell (CTC) detection methods are always limited by blood sample volume because of the requirement of a large amount of blood. The aim of this study was to overcome the limitation by designing and making an in vivo CTC capture device. In this study, we designed and prepared a kind of proper material to serve the purpose of intervention. A method employing 3-aminopropyltriethoxysilane (γ-APS) as the coupling reagent to graft carboxybetaine methacrylate (CBMA) and to immobilize an anti-epithelial cell adhesion molecular (EpCAM) antibody on Nylon was developed. The results of X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy proved the successful graft of γ-APS and CBMA to Nylon. Furthermore, the predicted improvement in the biocompatibilities of our modified Nylon was confirmed by water contact angle measurement, bovine serum albumin adhesion, platelet adhesion, plasma recalcification time determination, and cytotoxicity tests. The tumor cells adhesion experiment revealed that Nylon with the antibody immobilized on it had an affinity for EpCAM positive tumor cells higher than that of pristine Nylon. Additionally, the capture ability of the CTCs was demonstrated in a nude mouse tumor model using the interventional device made of the modified Nylon wire. The positive results suggest that CBMA-grafted and anti-EpCAM antibody-immobilized Nylon is a promising new material for in vivo CTC capture devices.

  19. Circulating endothelial cells and circulating endothelial progenitors in kidney disease--victims, witnesses, or accomplices?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Závada, J; Kideryová, L; Pytlík, R; Tesar, V

    2008-01-01

    Nephrologists deal with a host of pathologic conditions involving renal and systemic endothelium. Both in native and transplanted kidneys, often the insult to the renal endothelium initiates the pathogenic process ultimately leading to the loss of organ function. Also, systemic atherosclerosis is accelerated in patients with renal dysfunction. In this review we would like to cover the possible role of CECs and their counterparts--circulating EPCs in the pathogenesis of endothelial dysfunction associated with chronic renal failure, ANCA-associated vasculitis, and progression of chronic renal disease.

  20. Circulating tumor cells in oral squamous cell carcinoma-an enigma or reality?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N Anitha

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC is ranking 1 st among males and 4 th among females in India. In spite of major advances in diagnosis and treatment of OSCC, survival rates, have remained poor. Circulating tumor cells (CTCs in the blood stream, play an important role in establishing metastases. It is important to identify patients suffering from nonlocalized tumor with "circulating" tumor cells to determine the tailor made, systemic therapy in addition to local resection and irradiation. Thus, detecting metastases at an early stage are needed for better prognosis and survival. CTCs as new prognostic marker to detect the metastatic potential will provide a novel insight into tumor burden and efficacy of therapy. The recent advances and its application in OSCC will be reviewed.

  1. Circulating plasma MiR-141 is a novel biomarker for metastatic colon cancer and predicts poor prognosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hanyin Cheng

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Colorectal cancer (CRC remains one of the major cancer types and cancer related death worldwide. Sensitive, non-invasive biomarkers that can facilitate disease detection, staging and prediction of therapeutic outcome are highly desirable to improve survival rate and help to determine optimized treatment for CRC. The small non-coding RNAs, microRNAs (miRNAs, have recently been identified as critical regulators for various diseases including cancer and may represent a novel class of cancer biomarkers. The purpose of this study was to identify and validate circulating microRNAs in human plasma for use as such biomarkers in colon cancer. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: By using quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction, we found that circulating miR-141 was significantly associated with stage IV colon cancer in a cohort of 102 plasma samples. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC analysis was used to evaluate the sensitivity and specificity of candidate plasma microRNA markers. We observed that combination of miR-141 and carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA, a widely used marker for CRC, further improved the accuracy of detection. These findings were validated in an independent cohort of 156 plasma samples collected at Tianjin, China. Furthermore, our analysis showed that high levels of plasma miR-141 predicted poor survival in both cohorts and that miR-141 was an independent prognostic factor for advanced colon cancer. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: We propose that plasma miR-141 may represent a novel biomarker that complements CEA in detecting colon cancer with distant metastasis and that high levels of miR-141 in plasma were associated with poor prognosis.

  2. Circulating Plasma MiR-141 Is a Novel Biomarker for Metastatic Colon Cancer and Predicts Poor Prognosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cogdell, David E.; Zheng, Hong; Schetter, Aaron J.; Nykter, Matti; Harris, Curtis C.; Chen, Kexin; Hamilton, Stanley R.; Zhang, Wei

    2011-01-01

    Background Colorectal cancer (CRC) remains one of the major cancer types and cancer related death worldwide. Sensitive, non-invasive biomarkers that can facilitate disease detection, staging and prediction of therapeutic outcome are highly desirable to improve survival rate and help to determine optimized treatment for CRC. The small non-coding RNAs, microRNAs (miRNAs), have recently been identified as critical regulators for various diseases including cancer and may represent a novel class of cancer biomarkers. The purpose of this study was to identify and validate circulating microRNAs in human plasma for use as such biomarkers in colon cancer. Methodology/Principal Findings By using quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction, we found that circulating miR-141 was significantly associated with stage IV colon cancer in a cohort of 102 plasma samples. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis was used to evaluate the sensitivity and specificity of candidate plasma microRNA markers. We observed that combination of miR-141 and carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA), a widely used marker for CRC, further improved the accuracy of detection. These findings were validated in an independent cohort of 156 plasma samples collected at Tianjin, China. Furthermore, our analysis showed that high levels of plasma miR-141 predicted poor survival in both cohorts and that miR-141 was an independent prognostic factor for advanced colon cancer. Conclusions/Significance We propose that plasma miR-141 may represent a novel biomarker that complements CEA in detecting colon cancer with distant metastasis and that high levels of miR-141 in plasma were associated with poor prognosis. PMID:21445232

  3. Plasma Cell Dyscrasia; LCDD vs Immunotactoid glomerulopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jabur Wael

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Light chain deposit disease is a plasma cell disorder characterized by production of a large amount of monoclonal immunoglobulin light chain or part of it, which is usually deposited as an amorphous substance in the kidneys. Immunotactoid glomerulopathy is an uncommon disease, which might be related to plasma cell dyscrasia, and characteristically manifest as organized glomerular ultra structural fibrils or microtubules. In this article, we report a case of a combined presentation of light chain disease and immunotactoid glomerulopathy in a patient with multiple myeloma and reversible advanced renal failure.

  4. Circulating endothelial cells in coronary artery disease and acute coronary syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schmidt, David E; Manca, Marco; Höfer, Imo E

    2015-01-01

    Circulating endothelial cells (CECs) have been put forward as a promising biomarker for diagnosis and prognosis of coronary artery disease and acute coronary syndromes. This review entails current insights into the physiology and pathobiology of CECs, including their relationship with circulating en

  5. Loss of circulating CD4 T cells with B cell helper function during chronic HIV infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristin L Boswell

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The interaction between follicular T helper cells (TFH and B cells in the lymph nodes and spleen has a major impact on the development of antigen-specific B cell responses during infection or vaccination. Recent studies described a functional equivalent of these cells among circulating CD4 T cells, referred to as peripheral TFH cells. Here, we characterize the phenotype and in vitro B cell helper activity of peripheral TFH populations, as well as the effect of HIV infection on these populations. In co-culture experiments we confirmed CXCR5+ cells from HIV-uninfected donors provide help to B cells and more specifically, we identified a CCR7(highCXCR5(highCCR6(highPD-1(high CD4 T cell population that secretes IL-21 and enhances isotype-switched immunoglobulin production. This population is significantly decreased in treatment-naïve, HIV-infected individuals and can be recovered after anti-retroviral therapy. We found impaired immunoglobulin production in co-cultures from HIV-infected individuals and found no correlation between the frequency of peripheral TFH cells and memory B cells, or with neutralization activity in untreated HIV infection in our cohort. Furthermore, we found that within the peripheral TFH population, the expression level of TFH-associated genes more closely resembles a memory, non-TFH population, as opposed to a TFH population. Overall, our data identify a heterogeneous population of circulating CD4 T cells that provides in vitro help to B cells, and challenges the origin of these cells as memory TFH cells.

  6. Sitagliptin, a dipeptidyl peptidase-4 inhibitor, increases the number of circulating CD34⁺CXCR4⁺ cells in patients with type 2 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aso, Yoshimasa; Jojima, T; Iijima, T; Suzuki, K; Terasawa, T; Fukushima, M; Momobayashi, A; Hara, K; Takebayashi, K; Kasai, K; Inukai, T

    2015-12-01

    We investigated the effects of sitagliptin, a dipeptidyl peptidase (DPP)-4 inhibitor, on the number of circulating CD34(+)CXCR4(+)cells, a candidate for endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs), plasma levels of stromal cell-derived factor (SDF)-1α, a ligand for CXCR4 receptor and a substrate for DPP-4, and plasma levels of interferon-inducible protein (IP)-10, for a substrate for DPP-4, in patients with type 2 diabetes. We studied 30 consecutive patients with type 2 diabetes who had poor glycemic control despite treatment with metformin and/or sulfonylurea. Thirty diabetic patients were randomized in a 2:1 ratio into a sitagliptin (50 mg/day) treatment group or an active placebo group (glimepiride 1 mg/day) for 12 weeks. Both groups showed similar improvements in glycemic control. The number of circulating CD34(+)CXCR4(+) cells was increased from 30.5 (20.0, 47.0)/10(6) cells at baseline to 55.5 (31.5, 80.5)/10(6) cells at 12 weeks of treatment with 50 mg/day sitagliptin (P = 0.0014), while showing no significant changes in patients treated with glimepiride. Plasma levels of SDF-1α and IP-10, both physiological substrates of endogenous DPP-4 and chemokines, were significantly decreased at 12 weeks of sitagliptin treatment. In conclusion, treatment with sitagliptin increased the number of circulating CD34(+)CXCR4(+) cells by approximately 2-fold in patients with type 2 diabetes.

  7. Statins Increase the Frequency of Circulating CD4+FOXP3+ Regulatory T Cells in Healthy Individuals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Lucía Rodríguez-Perea

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Statins have been shown to modulate the number and the suppressive function of CD4+FOXP3+ T cells (Treg in inflammatory conditions. However, it is not well established whether statin could also affect Treg in absence of inflammation. To address this question, eighteen normocholesterolemic male subjects were treated with lovastatin or atorvastatin daily for 45 days. The frequency and phenotype of circulating Treg were evaluated at days 0, 7, 30, and 45. mRNA levels of FOXP3, IDO, TGF-β, and IL-10 were measured in CD4+ T cells. We found that both statins significantly increased Treg frequency and FOXP3 mRNA levels at day 30. At day 45, Treg numbers returned to baseline values; however, TGF-β and FOXP3 mRNA levels remained high, accompanied by increased percentages of CTLA-4- and GITR-expressing Treg. Treg Ki-67 expression was decreased upon statin treatment. Treg frequency positively correlated with plasma levels of high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-c, suggesting a role for HDL-c in Treg homeostasis. Therefore, statins appear to have inflammation-independent immune-modulatory effects. Thus, the increase in Treg cells frequency likely contributes to immunomodulatory effect of statins, even in healthy individuals.

  8. Plasma Cell-Free DNA in Paediatric Lymphomas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mussolin, Lara; Burnelli, Roberta; Pillon, Marta; Carraro, Elisa; Farruggia, Piero; Todesco, Alessandra; Mascarin, Maurizio; Rosolen, Angelo

    2013-01-01

    Background: Extracellular circulating DNA (cfDNA) can be found in small amounts in plasma of healthy individuals. Increased levels of cfDNA have been reported in patients with cancer of breast, cervix, colon, liver and it was shown that cfDNA can originate from both tumour and non-tumour cells. Objectives: Levels of cfDNA of a large series of children with lymphoma were evaluated and analyzed in relation with clinical characteristics. Methods: plasma cfDNA levels obtained at diagnosis in 201 paediatric lymphoma patients [43 Hodgkin lymphomas (HL), 45 anaplastic large cell lymphomas (ALCL), 88 Burkitt lymphomas (BL), 17 lymphoblastic (LBL), 8 diffuse large B cell lymphoma (DLBCL)] and 15 healthy individuals were determined using a quantitative PCR assay for POLR2 gene and, in addition, for NPM-ALK fusion gene in ALCL patients. Wilcoxon rank sum test was used to compare plasma levels among different patient subgroups and controls and to analyze relationship between levels of cfDNA and clinical characteristics. Results: Levels of cfDNA in lymphoma patients were significantly higher compared with controls (p<0.0001). CfDNA was associated with median age (p=0.01) in HL, and with stage in ALCL (p=0.01). In HL patients high cfDNA levels were correlated with poor prognosis (p=0.03). In ALCL we found that most of the cfDNA (77%) was non-tumor DNA. Conclusion: level of plasma cfDNA might constitute an important non-invasive tool at diagnosis in lymphoma patients' management; in particular in patients with HL, cfDNA seems to be a promising prognostic biomarker. PMID:23678368

  9. Construction of Larger Area Density-Uniform Plasma with Collisional Inductively Coupled Plasma Cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    OUYANG Liang; LIU Wandong; BAI Xiaoyan; CHEN Zhipeng; WANG Huihui; LI LUO Chen; JI Liangliang; HU Bei

    2007-01-01

    The plasma density and electron temperature of a multi-source plasma system composed of several collisional inductively coupled plasma (ICP) cells were measured by a double-probe. The discharges of the ICP cells were shown to be independent of each other. Furthermore, the total plasma density at simultaneous multi-cell discharge was observed to be approximately equal to the summation of the plasma density when the cells discharge separately. Based on the linear summation phenomenon, it was shown that a larger area plasma with a uniform density and temperature profile could be constructed with multi-collisional ICP cells.

  10. Cytology of plasma cell rich effusion in cases of plasma cell neoplasm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gochhait, Debasis; Dey, Pranab; Verma, Neelam

    2016-01-01

    Background: Multiple myeloma or plasmacytoma resulting in malignant effusion is rarely described in literature. Aims: In this paper, we have studied the seven rare cases of plasma cell infiltration in effusion fluid. Materials and Methods: We studied six cases of pleural fluid and one case of ascetic fluid. Detailed cytological features, clinical history, bone marrow examinations, serum electrophoresis, and immunofixation data were analyzed. Result: There were two cases of plasmacytoma, four cases of multiple myeloma, and one case of plasmablastic lymphoma. On cytology, all the cases showed excess plasma cells along with mesothelial cells and lymphocytes on effusion cytology smear. Conclusion: Plasma cell rich effusion in cases of plasma cell tumor is rare. However, on cytology these cases do not pose much problem if relevant history is known.

  11. SDF1 gene variation is associated with circulating SDF1alpha level and endothelial progenitor cell number: the Bruneck Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qingzhong Xiao

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Stromal cell-derived factor-1 (SDF1 and its receptor CXC chemokine receptor 4 (CXCR4 play a critical role in progenitor cell homing, mobilization and differentiation. It would be interesting to assess the predictive value of SDF-1alpha level for EPC number, and to ascertain whether there is a relationship between SDF1 gene variation, plasma SDF-1alpha level, and the number and function of circulating EPCs. We also tested whether EPC number and function was related to CXCR4 gene variation. METHODOLOGY AND PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We genotyped a cohort of individuals who participated in the Bruneck Study for single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs in the SDF1 and CXCR4 genes, and measured blood SDF1alpha level as well as EPC number and function. SDF1alpha levels were correlated with age, gender, alcohol consumption, circulating reticulocyte numbers, and concentrations of matrix metalloproteinase-9, C-reactive protein, cystatin C, fibrinogen and homocytein. In blood samples taken in 2005, EPC number was inversely associated with SDF1alpha level (p<0.001. EPC number in 2005 was also inversely associated with SDF1alpha level in 2000 (p = 0.009, suggesting a predictive value of plasma SDF1alpha level for EPC number. There was an association between the SDF1 gene rs2297630 SNP A/A genotype, increased SDF1alpha level (p = 0.002 and lower EPC number (p = 0.006. CONCLUSIONS: Our data indicate that a SDF1 gene variation (rs2297630 has an influence on SDF1alpha level and circulating EPC number, and that plasma SDF1alpha level is a predictor of EPC number.

  12. Hindlimb-unloading suppresses B cell population in the bone marrow and peripheral circulation associated with OPN expression in circulating blood cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ezura, Yoichi; Nagata, Junji; Nagao, Masashi; Hemmi, Hiroaki; Hayata, Tadayoshi; Rittling, Susan; Denhardt, David T; Noda, Masaki

    2015-01-01

    Rodent hindlimb unloading (HU) by tail-suspension is a model to investigate disuse-induced bone loss in vivo. Previously, we have shown that osteopontin (OPN, also known as Spp1) is required for unloading-induced bone loss. However, how unloading affects OPN expression in the body is not fully understood. Here, we examined OPN expression in peripheral blood of mice subjected to HU. Real-time RT-PCR analysis indicated that OPN expression is increased in circulating peripheral blood cells. This HU-induced increase in OPN mRNA expression was specific in circulating peripheral blood cells, as OPN was not increased in the blood cells in bone marrow. HU-induced enhancement in OPN expression in peripheral blood cells was associated with an increase in the fraction of monocyte/macrophage lineage cells in the peripheral blood. In contrast, HU decreased the fraction size of B-lymphocytes in the peripheral blood. We further examined if B-lymphogenesis is affected in the mice deficient for osteopontin subjected to HU. In bone marrow, HU decreased the population of the B-lymphocyte lineage cells significantly, whereas it did not alter the population of monocyte/macrophage lineage cells. HU also increased the cells in T-lymphocyte lineage in bone marrow. Interestingly, these changes were observed similarly both in OPN-deficient and wild-type mice. These results indicate for the first time that HU increases OPN expression in circulating cells and suppresses bone marrow B-lymphogenesis.

  13. Administration of a polyvalent mechanical bacterial lysate to elderly patients with COPD: Effects on circulating T, B and NK cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lanzilli, Giulia; Traggiai, Elisabetta; Braido, Fulvio; Garelli, Valentina; Folli, Chiara; Chiappori, Alessandra; Riccio, Anna Maria; Bazurro, Gyada; Agazzi, Alessia; Magnani, Alessandra; Canonica, Giorgio Walter; Melioli, Giovanni

    2013-01-01

    The modifications of the subsets of circulating lymphocytes were evaluated in a group of patients with COPD undergoing treatment with a polyvalent mechanical bacterial lysate (PMBL), a drug that is able to significantly modify the natural history of these patients. Using multicolor immune-florescence and flow cytometry, T, B subsets and NK cells were extensively studied both in the group of treated patients and in a disease and age matched controls. Despite the age, in treated patients, T and NK cells were significantly increased in numbers of circulating cells, but not in percentages, while B cells remained unmodified. CD3+4+T cells were increased in treated patients, while CD3+CD8T cells were unmodified by the treatment. Activated T cells were increased but Treg, resulted reduced both in percentage than in absolute numbers. Transitional B cells resulted increased (in percentage and in absolute numbers) in their late maturation step (T3), while only early Naïve B cells were increased by the treatment, while other naïve subpopulations were unmodified. Memory B cells were reduced in percentage (but remained unmodified as absolute numbers), while the most immature form of memory B cells was significantly increased. Finally, both switch memory B cells and plasma cells resulted unmodified by the PMBL treatment. These results clearly indicated that the administration of the PMBL, even in elderly patients with COPD, was able to induce a significant immune-stimulation and these results, at cellular level, clearly support the evidence that the mechanism of action of PMBL is strictly related to a direct effect on immune-competent cells.

  14. Simultaneous quantitative assessment of circulating cell-free mitochondrial and nuclear DNA by multiplex real-time PCR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peng Xia

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Quantification of circulating nucleic acids in plasma and serum could be used as a non-invasive diagnostic tool for monitoring a wide variety of diseases and conditions. We describe here a rapid, simple and accurate multiplex real-time PCR method for direct synchronized analysis of circulating cell-free (ccf mitochondrial (mtDNA and nuclear (nDNA DNA in plasma and serum samples. The method is based on one-step multiplex real-time PCR using a FAM-labeled MGB probe and primers to amplify the mtDNA sequence of the ATP 8 gene, and a VIC-labeled MGB probe and primers to amplify the nDNA sequence of the glycerinaldehyde-3-phosphate-dehydrogenase (GAPDH gene, in plasma and serum samples simultaneously. The efficiencies of the multiplex assays were measured in serial dilutions. Based on the simulation of the PCR reaction kinetics, the relative quantities of ccf mtDNA were calculated using a very simple equation. Using our optimised real-time PCR conditions, close to 100% efficiency was obtained from the two assays. The two assays performed in the dilution series showed very good and reproducible correlation to each other. This optimised multiplex real-time PCR protocol can be widely used for synchronized quantification of mtDNA and nDNA in different samples, with a very high rate of efficiency.

  15. Primary plasma cell leukemia: A report of two cases of a rare and aggressive variant of plasma cell myeloma with the review of literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prithal Gangadhar

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Plasma cell leukemia (PCL is a rare and aggressive variant of myeloma accounting for 2-3% of all plasma cell dyscrasias characterized by the presence of circulating plasma cells. The diagnosis is based on the % (≥20% and absolute number (≥2x10 9 /L of plasma cells in the peripheral blood. The incidence of primary PCL (pPCL is very rare and reported to occur in <1 in a million. It is classified as either pPCL occurring at diagnosis or as secondary PCL in patients with relapsed/refractory myeloma. pPCL is a distinct clinicopathological entity with different cytogenetic and molecular findings. The clinical course is aggressive with short remissions and survival duration. We report two cases of pPCL, both having acute onset of illness, varied clinical presentation with one of them showing "hairy cell morphology," with rapidly progressing renal failure, and was not suspected to be plasma cell dyscrasia clinically. A detailed hematopathological evaluation clinched the diagnosis in this case. It is recommended that techniques such as immunophenotyping by flow cytometry and protein electrophoresis must be performed for confirmatory diagnosis. A detailed report of two cases and a review of PCL are presented here.

  16. The Antigen Presenting Cells Instruct Plasma Cell Differentiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei eXu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The professional antigen presenting cells (APCs, including many subsets of dendritic cells and macrophages, not only mediate prompt but nonspecific response against microbes, but also bridge the antigen-specific adaptive immune response through antigen presentation. In the latter, typically activated B cells acquire cognate signals from T helper cells in the germinal center of lymphoid follicles to differentiate into plasma cells, which generate protective antibodies. Recent advances have revealed that many APC subsets provide not only signal 1 (the antigen, but also signal 2 to directly instruct the differentiation process of plasma cells in a T cell-independent manner. Herein, the different signals provided by these APC subsets to direct B cell proliferation, survival, class switching and terminal differentiation are discussed. We furthermore propose that the next generation of vaccines for boosting antibody response could be designed by targeting APCs.

  17. KRAS G12V Mutation Detection by Droplet Digital PCR in Circulating Cell-Free DNA of Colorectal Cancer Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olmedillas López, Susana; García-Olmo, Dolores C; García-Arranz, Mariano; Guadalajara, Héctor; Pastor, Carlos; García-Olmo, Damián

    2016-04-01

    KRAS mutations are responsible for resistance to anti-epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) therapy in colorectal cancer patients. These mutations sometimes appear once treatment has started. Detection of KRAS mutations in circulating cell-free DNA in plasma ("liquid biopsy") by droplet digital PCR (ddPCR) has emerged as a very sensitive and promising alternative to serial biopsies for disease monitoring. In this study, KRAS G12V mutation was analyzed by ddPCR in plasma DNA from 10 colorectal cancer patients and compared to six healthy donors. The percentage of KRAS G12V mutation relative to wild-type sequences in tumor-derived DNA was also determined. KRAS G12V mutation circulating in plasma was detected in 9 of 10 colorectal cancer patients whose tumors were also mutated. Colorectal cancer patients had 35.62 copies of mutated KRAS/mL plasma, whereas in healthy controls only residual copies were found (0.62 copies/mL, p = 0.0066). Interestingly, patients with metastatic disease showed a significantly higher number of mutant copies than M0 patients (126.25 versus 9.37 copies/mL, p = 0.0286). Wild-type KRAS was also significantly elevated in colorectal cancer patients compared to healthy controls (7718.8 versus 481.25 copies/mL, p = 0.0002). In conclusion, KRAS G12V mutation is detectable in plasma of colorectal cancer patients by ddPCR and could be used as a non-invasive biomarker.

  18. Detection and Isolation of Circulating Tumor Cells in Urologic Cancers: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert D. Loberg

    2004-07-01

    Full Text Available The American Cancer Society has estimated that in 2003, there will be approximately 239,600 new cases of urologic cancer diagnosed and 54,600 urologic cancer-related deaths in the United States. To date, the majority of research and therapy design have focused on the microenvironment of the primary tumor site, as well as the microenvironment of the metastatic or secondary (target tumor site. Little attention has been placed on the interactions of the circulating tumor cells and the microenvironment of the circulation (i.e., the third microenvironment. The purpose of this review is to present the methods for the detection and isolation of circulating tumor cells and to discuss the importance of circulating tumor cells in the biology and treatment of urologic cancers.

  19. Circulating follicular helper T cells presented distinctively different responses toward bacterial antigens in primary biliary cholangitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Zun-Qiang; Tong, Da-Nian; Guan, Jiao; Li, Mei-Fang; Feng, Qi-Ming; Zhou, Min-Jie; Zhang, Zheng-Yun

    2017-10-01

    Primary biliary cholangitis (PBC) is a chronic and progressive cholestatic liver disease with unknown causes. The initiation of PBC is associated with bacterial infections and abnormal immune correlates, such as the presence of self-reactive anti-mitochondrial antibodies and shifted balance of T cell subsets. In particular, the CD4(+)CXCR5(+) follicular helper T (Tfh) cells are highly activated in PBC patients and are significantly associated with PBC severity, but the underlying reasons are unknown. In this study, we found that the circulating CD4(+)CXCR5(+) T cells were enriched with the interferon (IFN)-γ-secreting Th1-subtype and the interleukin (IL)-17-secreting Th17-subtype, but not the IL-4-secreting Th2 subtype. We further demonstrated that a host of microbial motifs, including Pam3CSK4, poly(I:C), LPS, imiquimod, and CpG, could significantly stimulate IFN-γ, IL-17, and/or IL-21 from circulating CD4(+)CXCR5(+) T cells in PBC patients, especially in the presence of monocytes and B cells. Whole bacterial cells of Escherichia coli, Novosphingobium aromaticivorans, and Mycobacterium gordonae, could also potently stimulate IFN-γ, IL-17, and/or IL-21 production from circulating CD4(+)CXCR5(+) T cells. But interestingly, while the whole cell could potently stimulate circulating CD4(+)CXCR5(+) T cells from both healthy controls and PBC patients, the cell protein lysate could only potently stimulate circulating CD4(+)CXCR5(+) T cells from PBC patients, but not those from healthy controls, suggesting that circulating CD4(+)CXCR5(+) T cells in PBC patients had distinctive antigen-specificity from those in healthy individuals. Together, these data demonstrated that bacterial antigen stimulation is a potential source of aberrant Tfh cell activation in PBC patients. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  20. Cornering metastases: therapeutic targeting of circulating tumor cells and stem cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bishoy eFaltas

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available The last decade has witnessed an evolution of our understanding of the biology of the metastatic cascade. Recent insights into the metastatic process show that it is complex, dynamic and multi-directional. This process starts at a very early stage in the natural history of solid tumor growth leading to early development of metastases that grow in parallel with the primary tumor. The role of stem cells in perpetuating cancer metastases is increasingly becoming more evident. At the same time, there is a growing recognition of the crucial role circulating tumor cells (CTCs play in the development of metastases. These insights have laid the biological foundations for therapeutic targeting of CTCs, a promising area of research that aims to reduce cancer morbidity and mortality by preventing the development of metastases at a very early stage. The hematogenous transport phase of the metastatic cascade provides critical access to CTCs for therapeutic targeting aiming to interrupt the metastatic process. Recent advances in the fields of nanotechnology and micro-fluidics have led to the development of several devices for in-vivo targeting of CTC during transit in the circulation. Selectin-coated tubes that target cell adhesion molecules, immuno-magnetic separators and in-vivo photoacoustic flow cytometers are currently being developed for this purpose. On the pharmacological front, several pharmacological and immunological agents targeting cancer stem cells are currently being developed. Such agents may ultimately prove to be effective against circulating tumor stem cells (CTSCs. Although still in its infancy, therapeutic targeting of CTCs and CTSCs offers an unprecedented opportunity to prevent the development of metastasis and potentially alter the natural history of cancer. By rendering cancer a local disease, these approaches could lead to major reductions in metastasis-related morbidity and mortality.

  1. Liquid Fluoride Salt Experimentation Using a Small Natural Circulation Cell

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoder Jr, Graydon L [ORNL; Heatherly, Dennis Wayne [ORNL; Williams, David F [ORNL; Elkassabgi, Yousri M. [Texas A& M University, Kingsville; Caja, Joseph [Electrochemical Systems, Inc.; Caja, Mario [ORNL; Jordan, John [Texas A& M University, Kingsville; Salinas, Roberto [Texas A& M University, Kingsville

    2014-04-01

    A small molten fluoride salt experiment has been constructed and tested to develop experimental techniques for application in liquid fluoride salt systems. There were five major objectives in developing this test apparatus: Allow visual observation of the salt during testing (how can lighting be introduced, how can pictures be taken, what can be seen) Determine if IR photography can be used to examine components submerged in the salt Determine if the experimental configuration provides salt velocity sufficient for collection of corrosion data for future experimentation Determine if a laser Doppler velocimeter can be used to quantify salt velocities. Acquire natural circulation heat transfer data in fluoride salt at temperatures up to 700oC All of these objectives were successfully achieved during testing with the exception of the fourth: acquiring velocity data using the laser Doppler velocimeter. This paper describes the experiment and experimental techniques used, and presents data taken during natural circulation testing.

  2. Implications for the offspring of circulating factors involved in beta cell adaptation in pregnancy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nalla, Amarnadh; Ringholm, Lene; Søstrup, Birgitte

    2014-01-01

    is able to stimulate proliferation of rat beta cells. We have identified several circulating factors that may contribute to beta cell adaptation to pregnancy. Further studies are needed to elucidate their possible role in glucose homeostasis in the mother and her offspring.......OBJECTIVE: Several studies have shown an increase in beta cell mass during pregnancy. Somatolactogenic hormones are known to stimulate the proliferation of existing beta cells in rodents whereas the mechanism in humans is still unclear. We hypothesize that in addition to somatolactogenic hormones...... there are other circulating factors involved in beta cell adaptation to pregnancy. This study aimed at screening for potential pregnancy-associated circulating beta cell growth factors. SAMPLES: Serum samples from nonpregnant and pregnant women. METHODS: The effect of serum from pregnant women...

  3. Human circulating plasma DNA significantly decreases while lymphocyte DNA damage increases under chronic occupational exposure to low-dose gamma-neutron and tritium β-radiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korzeneva, Inna B; Kostuyk, Svetlana V; Ershova, Liza S; Osipov, Andrian N; Zhuravleva, Veronika F; Pankratova, Galina V; Porokhovnik, Lev N; Veiko, Natalia N

    2015-09-01

    The blood plasma of healthy people contains cell-fee (circulating) DNA (cfDNA). Apoptotic cells are the main source of the cfDNA. The cfDNA concentration increases in case of the organism's cell death rate increase, for example in case of exposure to high-dose ionizing radiation (IR). The objects of the present research are the blood plasma and blood lymphocytes of people, who contacted occupationally with the sources of external gamma/neutron radiation or internal β-radiation of tritium N = 176). As the controls (references), blood samples of people, who had never been occupationally subjected to the IR sources, were used (N = 109). With respect to the plasma samples of each donor there were defined: the cfDNA concentration (the cfDNA index), DNase1 activity (the DNase1 index) and titre of antibodies to DNA (the Ab DNA index). The general DNA damage in the cells was defined (using the Comet assay, the tail moment (TM) index). A chronic effect of the low-dose ionizing radiation on a human being is accompanied by the enhancement of the DNA damage in lymphocytes along with a considerable cfDNA content reduction, while the DNase1 content and concentration of antibodies to DNA (Ab DNA) increase. All the aforementioned changes were also observed in people, who had not worked with the IR sources for more than a year. The ratio cfDNA/(DNase1×Ab DNA × TM) is proposed to be used as a marker of the chronic exposure of a person to the external low-dose IR. It was formulated the assumption that the joint analysis of the cfDNA, DNase1, Ab DNA and TM values may provide the information about the human organism's cell resistivity to chronic exposure to the low-dose IR and about the development of the adaptive response in the organism that is aimed, firstly, at the effective cfDNA elimination from the blood circulation, and, secondly - at survival of the cells, including the cells with the damaged DNA. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  4. Probing Androgen Receptor Signaling in Circulating Tumor Cells in Prostate Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-07-01

    translational prostate cancer research. 15. SUBJECT TERMS prostate cancer, circulating tumor cells , androgen receptor, castration-resistant prostate...Appendix, Fig. S2B). Twenty-eight cells were excluded given the presence of leukocyte transcripts suggestive of cellular contamination or...Single CTCs from an individual patient showed considerably greater intercellular heterogeneity in their transcriptional profiles than single cells

  5. International study on inter-reader variability for circulating tumor cells in breast cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M. Ignatiadis (Michael); S. Riethdorf (Sabine); F.-C. Bidard (François-Clement); I. Vaucher (Isabelle); M. Khazour (Mustapha); F. Rothé (Françoise); J. Metallo (Jessica); G. Rouas (Ghizlane); R.E. Payne (Rachel); R.C. Coombes (Raoul); I. Teufel (Ingrid); U. Andergassen (Ulrich); M. Apostolaki (Maria); E. Politaki (Eleni); D. Mavroudis (Dimitris); E. Bessi (Elena); M. Pestrin (Marta); A. Di Leo (Angelo); D. Campion (Dominique); M. Reinholz (Monica); E. Perez (Edith); M.J. Piccart (Martine); E. Borgen (Elin); B. Naume (Bjorn); J. Jimenez (Jose); C.M. Aura (Claudia); L. Zorzino (Laura); M.C. Cassatella (Maria); M.T. Sandri (Maria); B. Mostert (Bianca); S. Sleijfer (Stefan); J. Kraan (Jaco); W. Janni (Wolfgang); T. Fehm (Tanja); B. Rack (Brigitte); L.W.M.M. Terstappen (Leon); M. Repollet (Madeline); J.Y. Pierga (Jean Yves); C. Miller (Craig); C. Sotiriou (Christos); S. Michiels (Stefan); K. Pantel (Klaus)

    2014-01-01

    textabstractIntroduction: Circulating tumor cells (CTCs) have been studied in breast cancer with the CellSearch® system. Given the low CTC counts in non-metastatic breast cancer, it is important to evaluate the inter-reader agreement.Methods: CellSearch® images (N = 272) of either CTCs or white bloo

  6. Epithelial cell-cell junctions and plasma membrane domains

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Giepmans, Ben N. G.; van Ijzendoorn, Sven C. D.

    Epithelial cells form a barrier against the environment, but are also required for the regulated exchange of molecules between an organism and its surroundings. Epithelial cells are characterised by a remarkable polarization of their plasma membrane, evidenced by the appearance of structurally,

  7. Epithelial cell-cell junctions and plasma membrane domains

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Giepmans, Ben N. G.; van Ijzendoorn, Sven C. D.

    2009-01-01

    Epithelial cells form a barrier against the environment, but are also required for the regulated exchange of molecules between an organism and its surroundings. Epithelial cells are characterised by a remarkable polarization of their plasma membrane, evidenced by the appearance of structurally, comp

  8. Fourier-ring descriptor to characterize rare circulating cells from images generated using immunofluorescence microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emerson, Tegan; Kirby, Michael; Bethel, Kelly; Kolatkar, Anand; Luttgen, Madelyn; O'Hara, Stephen; Newton, Paul; Kuhn, Peter

    2015-03-01

    We address the problem of subclassification of rare circulating cells using data driven feature selection from images of candidate circulating tumor cells from patients diagnosed with breast, prostate, or lung cancer. We determine a set of low level features which can differentiate among candidate cell types. We have implemented an image representation based on concentric Fourier rings (FRDs) which allow us to exploit size variations and morphological differences among cells while being rotationally invariant. We discuss potential clinical use in the context of treatment monitoring for cancer patients with metastatic disease.

  9. Plasma L-cystine/L-glutamate imbalance increases tumor necrosis factor-alpha from CD14+ circulating monocytes in patients with advanced cirrhosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eiji Kakazu

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND AND AIMS: The innate immune cells can not normally respond to the pathogen in patients with decompensated cirrhosis. Previous studies reported that antigen-presenting cells take up L-Cystine (L-Cys and secrete substantial amounts of L-Glutamate (L-Glu via the transport system Xc- (4F2hc+xCT, and that this exchange influences the immune responses. The aim of this study is to investigate the influence of the plasma L-Cys/L-Glu imbalance observed in patients with advanced cirrhosis on the function of circulating monocytes. METHODS: We used a serum-free culture medium consistent with the average concentrations of plasma amino acids from patients with advanced cirrhosis (ACM, and examined the function of CD14+ monocytes or THP-1 under ACM that contained 0-300 nmol/mL L-Cys with LPS. In patients with advanced cirrhosis, we actually determined the TNF-alpha and xCT mRNA of monocytes, and evaluated the correlation between the plasma L-Cys/L-Glu ratio and TNF-alpha. RESULTS: The addition of L-Cys significantly increased the production of TNF alpha from monocytes under ACM. Monocytes with LPS and THP-1 expressed xCT and a high level of extracellular L-Cys enhanced L-Cys/L-Glu antiport, and the intracellular GSH/GSSG ratio was decreased. The L-Cys transport was inhibited by excess L-Glu. In patients with advanced cirrhosis (n = 19, the TNF-alpha and xCT mRNA of monocytes were increased according to the Child-Pugh grade. The TNF-alpha mRNA of monocytes was significantly higher in the high L-Cys/L-Glu ratio group than in the low ratio group, and the plasma TNF-alpha was significantly correlated with the L-Cys/L-Glu ratio. CONCLUSIONS: A plasma L-Cys/L-Glu imbalance, which appears in patients with advanced cirrhosis, increased the TNF-alpha from circulating monocytes via increasing the intracellular oxidative stress. These results may reflect the immune abnormality that appears in patients with decompensated cirrhosis.

  10. Circulating levels of adipocytokine omentin-1 in patients with renal cell cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Xu-Dong; Zhang, Li; Che, Hong; Zhang, Yang-Yang; Yang, Cheng; Zhou, Jun; Liang, Chao-Zhao

    2016-01-01

    Renal cell carcinoma (RCC) is the fifth most common cancer worldwide, and becomes one of the leading causes of genitourinary cancer-related death in both males and females. Genetic alternations, alcohol consumption, occupationally harmful exposure and even obesity are well-established risk factors of RCC. Omentin-1 is a plasma adipokine synthesized in visceral adipose tissue, and its circulating serum concentration alters not only in conditions associated with insulin resistance such as Polycystic Ovary Syndrome (PCOS), but also in colorectal cancer and prostate cancer. To our best knowledge, the relationship between omentin-1 and RCC has not been clarified previously. Thus, we evaluated serum omentin-1 levels in RCC patients in the current matched case-control study. Forty-one patients newly diagnosed with RCC and forty-two healthy controls confirmed by the comprehensive medical examination were assessed. The omentin-1 concentrations were determined via utilizing enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISA) in the paired groups, in which the patients and healthy controls had no statistically significant differences in gender, age, systolic blood pressure (SBP), diastolic blood pressure (DBP), waist-hip ratio (WHR), estimate glomerular filtration rate (eGFR), body-mass index (BMI) and biochemical parameters. The omentin-1 levels in healthy people were 9.86±1.44ng/mL and the circulating omentin-1 levels were dramatically decreased to 3.62±0.76ng/mL in RCC patients (p<0.001). Besides, we revealed a negative correlation between omentin-1 with WHR (r=-0.261, p=0.017) and BMI (r=-0.310, p=0.004), further indicating BMI was the main influential factor on omentin-1 levels (p=0.0091). Follow-up studies would be conducted to establish the concrete mechanisms underlying the altered circulating levels of omentin-1 and elucidate the interaction between "RCC complex system" and adipose tissues, which may together provide promising and novel pharmacological insights for RCC

  11. In vitro detection of circulating tumor cells compared by the CytoTrack and CellSearch methods

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hillig, T.; Horn, P.; Nygaard, Ann-Britt;

    2015-01-01

    Comparison of two methods to detect circulating tumor cells (CTC) CytoTrack and CellSearch through recovery of MCF-7 breast cancer cells, spiked into blood collected from healthy donors. Spiking of a fixed number of EpCAM and pan-cytokeratin positive MCF-7 cells into 7.5 mL donor blood was perfor...

  12. Plasma Cell Gingivitis: An Occasional Case Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishra, M B; Sharma, Swati; Sharma, Alok

    2015-01-01

    Plasma cell gingivitis, an infrequently observed oral condition, has been clinically characterized by diffuse gingival enlargement, erythema and sometimes desquamation. These lesions are usually asymptomatic, but invariably the patient will complain of a burning sensation in the gingiva and bleeding from the mouth. The diagnosis requires hematological screening in addition to clinical and histopathological examinations. This case report outlines one such case of plasma cell gingivitis in a 15-year-old female caused by use of an herbal, homemade toothpowder. The case presented here highlights the adverse effects and irrational use of herbal agents in dentifrices. At the same time, it emphasizes the need for comprehensive history taking, careful clinical examination and appropriate diagnostic tests in order to arrive at a definitive diagnosis and treatment plan for gingival conditions that are refractory to conventional therapy and to exclude certain malignancies and oral manifestations of systemic diseases.

  13. Cyberknife radiosurgery for cranial plasma cell tumor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alafaci, Cetty; Grasso, Giovanni; Conti, Alfredo; Caffo, Mariella; Salpietro, Francesco Maria; Tomasello, Francesco

    2014-01-01

    Cranial and intracranial involvement by myelomatous disease is relatively uncommon. Furthermore, systemic manifestations of multiple myeloma are present in the majority of these cases at the time of symptom onset. The authors report the case of a patient with serial appearance of multiple intracranial plasma cell tumor localizations as the first manifestations of a multiple myeloma. The patient was treated with CyberKnife radiosurgery for a lesion localized at the clivus and sella turcica with complete local control. With such a technique, based on high-dose conformality, the tumor was centered with an ablative dose of radiation and, at the same time, with a low dose spreading to the surrounding critical structures. The radiosensitivity of plasma cell tumors renders this treatment modality particularly advantageous for their localized manifestation. A technical description of this case is provided. To our knowledge, this is the first case of successful Cyberknife radiosurgery of multifocal intracranial plasmacytoma.

  14. Human plasma cells express granzyme B.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Wei; Narayanan, Priya; Kang, Ning; Clayton, Sandra; Ohne, Yoichiro; Shi, Peiqing; Herve, Marie-Cecile; Balderas, Robert; Picard, Capucine; Casanova, Jean-Laurent; Gorvel, Jean-Pierre; Oh, Sangkon; Pascual, Virginia; Banchereau, Jacques

    2014-01-01

    While studying the plasma cell (PC) compartment in human tonsils, we identified that immunoglobulin kappa or lambda chain-expressing PCs are the main cells expressing granzyme B (GrzB). In vitro studies revealed that activated B cells differentiated into GrzB-expressing PCs when co-cultured with macrophages and follicular helper T cells. This effect could be reproduced on combined stimulation of IL-15 (produced by macrophages) and IL-21 (produced by T follicular helper cells) in a STAT3-dependent manner. Whereas IL-21 triggers the transcription of mRNA of GrzB, IL-15 synergizes the translation of GrzB proteins. The precise role of GrzB in PC biology remains to be understood and studies in mice will not help as their PCs do not express GrzB.

  15. The regulation of circulating ghrelin - with recent updates from cell-based assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwakura, Hiroshi; Kangawa, Kenji; Nakao, Kazuwa

    2015-01-01

    Ghrelin is a stomach-derived orexigenic hormone with a wide range of physiological functions. Elucidation of the regulation of the circulating ghrelin level would lead to a better understanding of appetite control in body energy homeostasis. Earlier studies revealed that circulating ghrelin levels are under the control of both acute and chronic energy status: at the acute scale, ghrelin levels are increased by fasting and decreased by feeding, whereas at the chronic scale, they are high in obese subjects and low in lean subjects. Subsequent studies revealed that nutrients, hormones, or neural activities can influence circulating ghrelin levels in vivo. Recently developed in vitro assay systems for ghrelin secretion can assess whether and how individual factors affect ghrelin secretion from cells. In this review, on the basis of numerous human, animal, and cell-based studies, we summarize current knowledge on the regulation of circulating ghrelin levels and enumerate the factors that influence ghrelin levels.

  16. Streptococcus induces circulating CLA(+) memory T-cell-dependent epidermal cell activation in psoriasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferran, Marta; Galván, Ana B; Rincón, Catalina; Romeu, Ester R; Sacrista, Marc; Barboza, Erika; Giménez-Arnau, Ana; Celada, Antonio; Pujol, Ramon M; Santamaria-Babí, Luis F

    2013-04-01

    Streptococcal throat infection is associated with a specific variant of psoriasis and with HLA-Cw6 expression. In this study, activation of circulating psoriatic cutaneous lymphocyte-associated antigen (CLA)(+) memory T cells cultured together with epidermal cells occurred only when streptococcal throat extracts were added. This triggered the production of Th1, Th17, and Th22 cytokines, as well as epidermal cell mediators (CXCL8, CXCL9, CXCL10, and CXCL11). Streptococcal extracts (SEs) did not induce any activation with either CLA(-) cells or memory T cells cultured together with epidermal cells from healthy subjects. Intradermal injection of activated culture supernatants into mouse skin induced epidermal hyperplasia. SEs also induced activation when we used epidermal cells from nonlesional skin of psoriatic patients with CLA(+) memory T cells. Significant correlations were found between SE induced upregulation of mRNA expression for ifn-γ, il-17, il-22, ip-10, and serum level of antistreptolysin O in psoriatic patients. This study demonstrates the direct involvement of streptococcal infection in pathological mechanisms of psoriasis, such as IL-17 production and epidermal cell activation.

  17. Preliminary Evidence on the Diagnostic and Molecular Role of Circulating Soluble EGFR in Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Filippo Lococo

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Assessment of biological diagnostic factors providing clinically-relevant information to guide physician decision-making are still needed for diseases with poor outcomes, such as non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC. Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR is a promising molecule in the clinical management of NSCLC. While the EGFR transmembrane form has been extensively investigated in large clinical trials, the soluble, circulating EGFR isoform (sEGFR, which may have a potential clinical use, has rarely been considered. This study investigates the use of sEGFR as a potential diagnostic biomarker for NSCLC and also characterizes the biological function of sEGFR to clarify the molecular mechanisms involved in the course of action of this protein. Plasma sEGFR levels from a heterogeneous cohort of 37 non-advanced NSCLC patients and 54 healthy subjects were analyzed by using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. The biological function of sEGFR was analyzed in vitro using NSCLC cell lines, investigating effects on cell proliferation and migration. We found that plasma sEGFR was significantly decreased in the NSCLC patient group as compared to the control group (median value: 48.6 vs. 55.6 ng/mL respectively; p = 0.0002. Moreover, we demonstrated that sEGFR inhibits growth and migration of NSCLC cells in vitro through molecular mechanisms that included perturbation of EGF/EGFR cell signaling and holoreceptor internalization. These data show that sEGFR is a potential circulating biomarker with a physiological protective role, providing a first approach to the functional role of the soluble isoform of EGFR. However, the impact of these data on daily clinical practice needs to be further investigated in larger prospective studies.

  18. Lack of increased expression of cell surface markers for circulating fibrocyte progenitors in limited scleroderma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russo, R; Medbury, H; Guiffre, A; Englert, H; Manolios, N

    2007-07-01

    The aetiology and pathogenesis of scleroderma is incompletely understood. Recently, a cell called the fibrocyte has been shown to be derived from circulating monocytes with the ability to produce collagen. The aim of this study was to evaluate differences in the cell surface characteristics of circulating fibrocyte progenitors (monocytes) in patients with limited scleroderma compared to controls. A case-control study was performed in eight patients with limited scleroderma, which were matched with eight controls. Three-colour flow cytometry was used to assess the relative expression of cell surface markers. Statistical analysis then compared the relative expression between the two groups. In this preliminary study, there were no significant differences in the expression of circulating monocyte surface molecules involved with cell transformation, function, or migration presumed to give rise to fibrocytes, in a population of patients with limited scleroderma. Various explanations for the results are discussed.

  19. Diffuse fluorescence fiber probe for in vivo detection of circulating cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pera, Vivian; Tan, Xuefei; Runnels, Judith; Sardesai, Neha; Lin, Charles P.; Niedre, Mark

    2017-03-01

    There has been significant recent interest in the development of technologies for enumeration of rare circulating cells directly in the bloodstream in many areas of research, for example, in small animal models of circulating tumor cell dissemination during cancer metastasis. We describe a fiber-based optical probe that allows fluorescence detection of labeled circulating cells in vivo in a diffuse reflectance configuration. We validated this probe in a tissue-mimicking flow phantom model in vitro and in nude mice injected with fluorescently labeled multiple myeloma cells in vivo. Compared to our previous work, this design yields an improvement in detection signal-to-noise ratio of 10 dB, virtually eliminates problematic motion artifacts due to mouse breathing, and potentially allows operation in larger animals and limbs.

  20. The rationale for liquid biopsy in colorectal cancer: a focus on circulating tumor cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gazzaniga, Paola; Raimondi, Cristina; Nicolazzo, Chiara; Carletti, Raffaella; di Gioia, Cira; Gradilone, Angela; Cortesi, Enrico

    2015-01-01

    Capturing circulating tumor cells (CTCs) and/or circulating tumor DNA from blood, which represents a precious source of biological material derived from both primary and metastatic tumors, has been named a 'liquid biopsy'. While the circulating tumor DNA might be more representative of the bulk of the metastatic tumor, CTCs are thought to reflect more of the metastases-initiating cells. Consequently, a liquid biopsy made of tumor cells and tumor DNA that is able to track cancer evolution, as a fingerprint of the patient's individual tumor, and is easy to perform at every stage of the disease course, sounds attractive. This article mainly focuses on the applications of CTCs to track tumor dynamics in real time using colorectal cancer as a model system. The analysis of viable CTCs at DNA, RNA and protein levels, as well as their expansion in vitro, may allow deep investigation of the features of metastases-initiating cells.

  1. Circulating tumour cells lacking cytokeratin in breast cancer: the importance of being mesenchymal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gradilone, Angela; Raimondi, Cristina; Nicolazzo, Chiara; Petracca, Arianna; Gandini, Orietta; Vincenzi, Bruno; Naso, Giuseppe; Aglianò, Anna Maria; Cortesi, Enrico; Gazzaniga, Paola

    2011-05-01

    Circulating tumour cells (CTCs) are independent predictor of prognosis in metastatic breast cancer. Nevertheless, in one third of patients, circulating tumour cells are undetected by conventional methods. Aim of the study was to assess the prognostic value of circulating tumour cells expressing mesenchymal markers in metastatic breast cancer patients. We isolated CTC from blood of 55 metastatic breast cancer patients. CTC were characterized for cytokeratins and markers of epithelial mesenchymal transition. The gain of mesenchymal markers in CTC was correlated to prognosis of patients in a follow-up of 24 months. The presence of mesenchymal markers on CTC more accurately predicted worse prognosis than the expression of cytokeratins alone. Because of the frequent loss of epithelial antigens by CTC, assays targeting epithelial antigens may miss the most invasive cell population. Thus, there is an urgent need to improve detection methods to identify CTC which undergone epithelial mesenchymal transition program.

  2. Late Release of Circulating Endothelial Cells and Endothelial Progenitor Cells after Chemotherapy Predicts Response and Survival in Cancer Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeanine M. Roodhart

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available We and others have previously demonstrated that the acute release of progenitor cells in response to chemotherapy actually reduces the efficacy of the chemotherapy. Here, we take these data further and investigate the clinical relevance of circulating endothelial (progenitor cells (CE(PCs and modulatory cytokines in patients after chemotherapy with relation to progression-free and overall survival (PFS/OS. Patients treated with various chemotherapeutics were included. Blood sampling was performed at baseline, 4 hours, and 7 and 21 days after chemotherapy. The mononuclear cell fraction was analyzed for CE(PC by FACS analysis. Plasma was analyzed for cytokines by ELISA or Luminex technique. CE(PCs were correlated with response and PFS/OS using Cox proportional hazard regression analysis. We measured CE(PCs and cytokines in 71 patients. Only patients treated with paclitaxel showed an immediate increase in endothelial progenitor cell 4 hours after start of treatment. These immediate changes did not correlate with response or survival. After 7 and 21 days of chemotherapy, a large and consistent increase in CE(PC was found (P < .01, independent of the type of chemotherapy. Changes in CE(PC levels at day 7 correlated with an increase in tumor volume after three cycles of chemotherapy and predicted PFS/OS, regardless of the tumor type or chemotherapy. These findings indicate that the late release of CE(PC is a common phenomenon after chemotherapeutic treatment. The correlation with a clinical response and survival provides further support for the biologic relevance of these cells in patients' prognosis and stresses their possible use as a therapeutic target.

  3. Alterations in Circulating Immune Cells in Neovascular Age-Related Macular Degeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lechner, Judith; Chen, Mei; Hogg, Ruth E; Toth, Levente; Silvestri, Giuliana; Chakravarthy, Usha; Xu, Heping

    2015-11-17

    Neovascular age-related macular degeneration (nAMD) is the leading cause of irreversible blindness in developed countries. Recent advances have highlighted the essential role of inflammation in the development of the disease. In addition to local retinal chronic inflammatory response, systemic immune alterations have also been observed in AMD patients. In this study we investigated the association between the frequency of circulating leukocyte populations and the prevalence as well as clinical presentations of nAMD. Leukocyte subsets of 103 nAMD patients (most of them were receiving anti-VEGF therapy prior to enrolment) and 26 controls were analysed by flow cytometry by relative cell size, granularity and surface markers. Circulating CD11b(+) cells and CD16(hi)HLA-DR(-) neutrophils were significantly increased (P = 0.015 and 0.009 respectively) in nAMD when compared to controls. The percentage of circulating CD4(+) T-cells was reduced in nAMD patients without subretinal fibrosis (P = 0.026) compared to patients with subretinal fibrosis. There was no correlation between the percentage of circulating leukocytes and the responsiveness to anti-VEGF therapy in nAMD patients. Our results suggest that higher levels of circulating CD11b(+) cells and neutrophils are associated with nAMD and that reduced levels of CD4(+) T-cells are associated with the absence of subretinal fibrosis in nAMD.

  4. Quantitative cell-free DNA, KRAS, and BRAF mutations in plasma from patients with metastatic colorectal cancer during treatment with cetuximab and irinotecan

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Spindler, Karen-Lise Garm; Pallisgaard, Niels; Vogelius, Ivan Storgaard

    2012-01-01

    The present study investigated the levels of circulating cell-free DNA (cfDNA) in plasma from patients with metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC) in relation to third-line treatment with cetuximab and irinotecan and the quantitative relationship of cfDNA with tumor-specific mutations in plasma....

  5. Testosterone replacement therapy can increase circulating endothelial progenitor cell number in men with late onset hypogonadism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, C-H; Wu, Y-N; Lin, F-Y; Tsai, W-K; Liu, S-P; Chiang, H-S

    2013-07-01

    Circulating endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) are bone marrow-derived cells required for endothelial repair. A low EPC number can be considered as an independent predictor of endothelial dysfunction and future cardiovascular events. Recent evidence shows that patients with hypogonadal symptoms without other confounding risk factors have a low number of circulating progenitor cells (PCs) and EPCs, thus highlighting the role of testosterone in the proliferation and differentiation of EPCs. Here, we investigate if testosterone replacement therapy (TRT) can increase circulating EPC number in men with late onset hypogonadism. Forty-six men (age range, 40-73 years; mean age, 58.3 years) with hypogonadal symptoms were recruited, and 29 men with serum total testosterone (TT) levels less than 350 ng/dL received TRT using transdermal testosterone gel (Androgel; 1% testosterone at 5 g/day) for 12 months. Circulating EPC numbers (per 100 000 monocytes) were calculated using flow cytometry. There was no significant association between serum TT levels and the number of circulating EPCs before TRT. Compared with the number of mean circulating EPCs at baseline (9.5 ± 6.2), the number was significantly higher after 3 months (16.6 ± 11.1, p = 0.027), 6 months (20.3 ± 15.3, p = 0.006) and 12 months (27.2 ± 15.5, p = 0.017) of TRT. Thus, we conclude that serum TT levels before TRT are not significantly associated with the number of circulating EPCs in men with late onset hypogonadism. However, TRT can increase the number of circulating EPCs, which implies the benefit of TRT on endothelial function in hypogonadal men.

  6. CCR 20th Anniversary Commentary: Paving the Way for Circulating Tumor Cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Allard, W. Jeffrey; Terstappen, Leon W.M.M.

    2015-01-01

    Cancer cells can enter the bloodstream, form distant metastases, and ultimately lead to death. A study by Allard and colleagues, which was published in the October 15, 2004, issue of Clinical Cancer Research, concluded that the CellSearch system could be used as a reliable tool to investigate circul

  7. A new marker set that identifies fetal cells in maternal circulation with high specificity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hatt, Lotte; Brinch, Marie; Singh, Ripudaman;

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Fetal cells from the maternal circulation (FCMBs) have the potential to replace cells from amniotic fluid or chorionic villi in a diagnosis of common chromosomal aneuploidies. Good markers for enrichment and identification are lacking. METHOD: Blood samples from 78 normal pregnancies...

  8. Cytomegalovirus Infection Reduces Telomere Length of the Circulating T Cell Pool

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    P.J.E.J. van de Berg; S.J. Griffiths; S.L. Yong; R. Macaulay; F.J. Bemelman; S. Jackson; S.M. Henson; R.J.M. ten Berge; A.N. Akbar; R.A.W. van Lier

    2010-01-01

    Short telomeres of circulating leukocytes are a risk factor for age-related diseases, such as atherosclerosis, but the exact mechanisms generating variations in telomere length are unknown. We hypothesized that induction of differentiated T cells during chronic CMV infection would affect T cell telo

  9. Unbiased and automated identification of a circulating tumour cell definition that associates with overall survival

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ligthart, S.T.; Coumans, F.A.W.; Attard, G.; Mukick Cassidy, A.; Bono, de J.S.; Terstappen, L.W.M.M.

    2011-01-01

    Circulating tumour cells (CTC) in patients with metastatic carcinomas are associated with poor survival and can be used to guide therapy. Classification of CTC however remains subjective, as they are morphologically heterogeneous. We acquired digital images, using the CellSearch™ system, from blood

  10. Strenuous exercise decreases the percentage of type 1 T cells in the circulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Steensberg, A; Toft, A D; Bruunsgaard, H

    2001-01-01

    Prolonged strenuous exercise is followed by a temporary functional immune impairment. Low numbers of CD4+ T helper (Th) and CD8+ T cytotoxic (Tc) cells are found in the circulation. These cells can be divided according to their cytokine profile into type 1 (Th1 and Tc1), which produce interferon...

  11. Detection of circulating tumor cells by nested RT-PCR targeting ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Salwa H. Teama

    cancer compared with that of known markers of circulating cancer cells CEA and CK20. Subjects ..... Greene MI. ErbB receptors: from oncogenes to targeted cancer therapies. ... and prostate stem cell antigen RT-PCR in blood of patients with.

  12. Cell receptor and surface ligand density effects on dynamic states of adhering circulating tumor cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Xiangjun; Cheung, Luthur Siu-Lun; Schroeder, Joyce A; Jiang, Linan; Zohar, Yitshak

    2011-10-21

    Dynamic states of cancer cells moving under shear flow in an antibody-functionalized microchannel are investigated experimentally and theoretically. The cell motion is analyzed with the aid of a simplified physical model featuring a receptor-coated rigid sphere moving above a solid surface with immobilized ligands. The motion of the sphere is described by the Langevin equation accounting for the hydrodynamic loadings, gravitational force, receptor-ligand bindings, and thermal fluctuations; the receptor-ligand bonds are modeled as linear springs. Depending on the applied shear flow rate, three dynamic states of cell motion have been identified: (i) free motion, (ii) rolling adhesion, and (iii) firm adhesion. Of particular interest is the fraction of captured circulating tumor cells, defined as the capture ratio, via specific receptor-ligand bonds. The cell capture ratio decreases with increasing shear flow rate with a characteristic rate. Based on both experimental and theoretical results, the characteristic flow rate increases monotonically with increasing either cell-receptor or surface-ligand density within certain ranges. Utilizing it as a scaling parameter, flow-rate dependent capture ratios for various cell-surface combinations collapse onto a single curve described by an exponential formula.

  13. Label-free detection of circulating melanoma cells by in vivo photoacoustic flow cytometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiaoling; Yang, Ping; Liu, Rongrong; Niu, Zhenyu; Suo, Yuanzhen; He, Hao; Gao, Wenyuan; Tang, Shuo; Wei, Xunbin

    2016-03-01

    Melanoma is a malignant tumor of melanocytes. Melanoma cells have high light absorption due to melanin highly contained in melanoma cells. This property is employed for the detection of circulating melanoma cell by in vivo photoacoustic flow cytometry (PAFC), which is based on photoacoustic effect. Compared to in vivo flow cytometry based on fluorescence, PAFC can employ high melanin content of melanoma cells as endogenous biomarkers to detect circulating melanoma cells in vivo. We have developed in vitro experiments to prove the ability of PAFC system of detecting photoacoustic signals from melanoma cells. For in vivo experiments, we have constructed a model of melanoma tumor bearing mice by inoculating highly metastatic murine melanoma cancer cells, B16F10 with subcutaneous injection. PA signals are detected in the blood vessels of mouse ears in vivo. The raw signal detected from target cells often contains some noise caused by electronic devices, such as background noise and thermal noise. We choose the Wavelet denoising method to effectively distinguish the target signal from background noise. Processing in time domain and frequency domain would be combined to analyze the signal after denoising. This algorithm contains time domain filter and frequency transformation. The frequency spectrum image of the signal contains distinctive features that can be used to analyze the property of target cells or particles. The processing methods have a great potential for analyzing signals accurately and rapidly. By counting circulating melanoma cells termly, we obtain the number variation of circulating melanoma cells as melanoma metastasized. Those results show that PAFC is a noninvasive and label-free method to detect melanoma metastases in blood or lymph circulation.

  14. A Pilot Study of Circulating Tumor Cells in Stage IV Non-Small Cell Lung Carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Max Haid

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Measurement of the number of circulating tumor cells (CTCs in the bloodstream has been shown to have prognostic significance in treating breast carcinoma. This pilot study was formulated to determine if stage IV non-small cell lung carcinomas similarly shed malignant cells into the circulation and if their presence has prognostic significance. Methods: Patients with stage IV non-small cell lung carcinomas were tested once for CTCs in 7.5 ml of their blood prior to receiving any treatments. A proprietary blood collection kit produced by Veridex LLC (Raritan, NJ, which manufactures the instrument that performs the immunomagnetic CELLSEARCH® CTC assay, was used. Tumor measurements were determined in three dimensions by the same radiologist using computerized axial tomography. The three-dimensional sum was used to represent tumor size. Survival from the date of the pretreatment CTC assay was monitored and recorded. Data were analyzed statistically using NCSS8 statistical software (NCSS LLC, Kaysville, UT. Results: Of 19 evaluable patients, 10 had no detectable CTCs. There was no relation between intrapulmonary primary tumor size and the number of CTCs, nor between tumor size and survival. Survival was not affected by gender or age at entry into the trial. The mean survival of those with no detectable CTCs was 536 ± 91.1 days versus 239 ± 96.0 days for those with 1 or more detectable CTCs, a statistically significant advantage (P=0.034 favoring those without CTCs. Conclusions: Patients with a CTC score of 0 survived significantly longer than those with a CTC score of ≥ 1. Survival was not correlated with gender, age or primary tumor size. Recovery of CTCs potentially provides a noninvasive source of tumor cells for genomic profiling, which may enable development of a custom treatment plan for the individual patient. Further investigations are warranted and needed.

  15. Circulating FGF23 levels in response to acute changes in plasma Ca(2+).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gravesen, Eva; Mace, Maria L; Hofman-Bang, Jacob; Olgaard, Klaus; Lewin, Ewa

    2014-07-01

    The regulation of fibroblast growth factor 23 (FGF23) synthesis and secretion is still incompletely understood. FGF23 is an important regulator of renal phosphate excretion and has regulatory effects on the calciotropic hormones calcitriol and parathyroid hormone (PTH). Calcium (Ca) and phosphate homeostasis are closely interrelated, and it is therefore likely that Ca is involved in FGF23 regulation. It has recently been reported that dietary Ca influenced FGF23 levels, with high Ca increasing FGF23. The mechanism remains to be clarified. It remains unknown whether acute changes in plasma Ca influence FGF23 levels and whether a close relationship, similar that known for Ca and PTH, exists between Ca and FGF23. Thus, the aim of the present study was to examine whether acute hypercalcemia and hypocalcemia regulate FGF23 levels in the rat. Acute hypercalcemia was induced by an intravenous Ca infusion and hypocalcemia by infusion of ethylene glycol tetraacetic acid (EGTA) in normal and acutely parathyroidectomized rats. Intact plasma FGF23 and intact plasma PTH and plasma Ca(2+) and phosphate were measured. Acute hypercalcemia and hypocalcemia resulted as expected in adequate PTH secretory responses. Plasma FGF23 levels remained stable at all plasma Ca(2+) levels; acute parathyroidectomy did not affect FGF23 secretion. In conclusion, Ca is not a regulator of acute changes in FGF23 secretion.

  16. Developing Novel Therapeutic Approaches in Small Cell Lung Carcinoma Using Genetically Engineered Mouse Models and Human Circulating Tumor Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-10-01

    Using Genetically Engineered Mouse Models and Human Circulating Tumor Cells PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Jeffrey Engelman MD PhD CONTRACTING...SUBTITLE Developiing Novel Therapeutic Approaches in Small Cell Lung 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER Carcinoma Using Genetically Engineered Mouse Models and 5b...biomarkers. 15. SUBJECT TERMS Small cell lung cancer (SCLC), Genetically engineered mouse model (GEMM), BH3 mimetic, TORC inhibitor, Apoptosis

  17. Deficiencies of Circulating Mucosal-associated Invariant T Cells and Natural Killer T Cells in Patients with Multiple Trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jo, Young Goun; Choi, Hyun Jung; Kim, Jung Chul; Cho, Young Nan; Kang, Jeong Hwa; Jin, Hye Mi; Kee, Seung Jung; Park, Yong Wook

    2017-05-01

    Mucosal-associated invariant T (MAIT) cells and natural killer T (NKT) cells are known to play important roles in autoimmunity, infectious diseases and cancers. However, little is known about the roles of these invariant T cells in multiple trauma. The purposes of this study were to examine MAIT and NKT cell levels in patients with multiple trauma and to investigate potential relationships between these cell levels and clinical parameters. The study cohort was composed of 14 patients with multiple trauma and 22 non-injured healthy controls (HCs). Circulating MAIT and NKT cell levels in the peripheral blood were measured by flow cytometry. The severity of injury was categorised according to the scoring systems, such as Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation (APACHE) II score, Simplified Acute Physiology Score (SAPS) II, and Injury Severity Score (ISS). Circulating MAIT and NKT cell numbers were significantly lower in multiple trauma patients than in HCs. Linear regression analysis showed that circulating MAIT cell numbers were significantly correlated with age, APACHE II, SAPS II, ISS category, hemoglobin, and platelet count. NKT cell numbers in the peripheral blood were found to be significantly correlated with APACHE II, SAPS II, and ISS category. This study shows numerical deficiencies of circulating MAIT cells and NKT cells in multiple trauma. In addition, these invariant T cell deficiencies were found to be associated with disease severity. These findings provide important information for predicting the prognosis of multiple trauma. © 2017 The Korean Academy of Medical Sciences.

  18. Effects of lactation upon circulating plasma metabolites in cafeteria-fed rats

    OpenAIRE

    Salvadó, J.; Segués Piqué, Teresa; Alemany, Marià; Arola i Ferrer, Lluís

    1986-01-01

    1. The effects of "cafeteria feeding" on primiparous Wistar rats during lactation have been studied by measuring circulating levels of glucose, amino acids, lactate, urea and ammonia as well as glycogen levels in liver and muscle. 2. No significant changes in glucose levels were observed despite alterations in blood glucose compartmentation. 3. Compared with controls, the dams given the cafeteria diet had higher liver glycogen stores which were more easily mobilized at the peak of lactation. ...

  19. Modelling circulating tumour cells for personalised survival prediction in metastatic breast cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gianluca Ascolani

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Ductal carcinoma is one of the most common cancers among women, and the main cause of death is the formation of metastases. The development of metastases is caused by cancer cells that migrate from the primary tumour site (the mammary duct through the blood vessels and extravasating they initiate metastasis. Here, we propose a multi-compartment model which mimics the dynamics of tumoural cells in the mammary duct, in the circulatory system and in the bone. Through a branching process model, we describe the relation between the survival times and the four markers mainly involved in metastatic breast cancer (EPCAM, CD47, CD44 and MET. In particular, the model takes into account the gene expression profile of circulating tumour cells to predict personalised survival probability. We also include the administration of drugs as bisphosphonates, which reduce the formation of circulating tumour cells and their survival in the blood vessels, in order to analyse the dynamic changes induced by the therapy. We analyse the effects of circulating tumour cells on the progression of the disease providing a quantitative measure of the cell driver mutations needed for invading the bone tissue. Our model allows to design intervention scenarios that alter the patient-specific survival probability by modifying the populations of circulating tumour cells and it could be extended to other cancer metastasis dynamics.

  20. Mobilization of Viable Tumor Cells Into the Circulation During Radiation Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martin, Olga A. [Division of Radiation Oncology and Cancer Imaging, Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, East Melbourne, VIC (Australia); Molecular Radiation Biology Laboratory, Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, East Melbourne, VIC (Australia); The Sir Peter MacCallum Department of Oncology, University of Melbourne, Melbourne, VIC (Australia); Anderson, Robin L. [The Sir Peter MacCallum Department of Oncology, University of Melbourne, Melbourne, VIC (Australia); Metastasis Research Laboratory, Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, East Melbourne, VIC (Australia); Russell, Prudence A. [Department of Anatomical Pathology, St. Vincent Hospital, Fitzroy, VIC (Australia); Ashley Cox, R. [Division of Radiation Oncology and Cancer Imaging, Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, East Melbourne, VIC (Australia); Ivashkevich, Alesia [Molecular Radiation Biology Laboratory, Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, East Melbourne, VIC (Australia); Laboratory of DNA Repair and Genomics, Centre for Innate Immunity and Infectious Disease, Monash Institute for Medical Research, Monash University, Clayton, VIC (Australia); Swierczak, Agnieszka; Doherty, Judy P. [Metastasis Research Laboratory, Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, East Melbourne, VIC (Australia); Jacobs, Daphne H.M. [Division of Radiation Oncology and Cancer Imaging, Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, East Melbourne, VIC (Australia); Smith, Jai [Molecular Radiation Biology Laboratory, Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, East Melbourne, VIC (Australia); Siva, Shankar; Daly, Patricia E. [Division of Radiation Oncology and Cancer Imaging, Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, East Melbourne, VIC (Australia); Ball, David L. [Division of Radiation Oncology and Cancer Imaging, Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, East Melbourne, VIC (Australia); The Sir Peter MacCallum Department of Oncology, University of Melbourne, Melbourne, VIC (Australia); and others

    2014-02-01

    Purpose: To determine whether radiation therapy (RT) could mobilize viable tumor cells into the circulation of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients. Methods and Materials: We enumerated circulating tumor cells (CTCs) by fluorescence microscopy of blood samples immunostained with conventional CTC markers. We measured their DNA damage levels using γ-H2AX, a biomarker for radiation-induced DNA double-strand breaks, either by fluorescence-activated cell sorting or by immunofluorescence microscopy. Results: Twenty-seven RT-treated NSCLC patients had blood samples analyzed by 1 or more methods. We identified increased CTC numbers after commencement of RT in 7 of 9 patients treated with palliative RT, and in 4 of 8 patients treated with curative-intent RT. Circulating tumor cells were also identified, singly and in clumps in large numbers, during RT by cytopathologic examination (in all 5 cases studied). Elevated γ-H2AX signal in post-RT blood samples signified the presence of CTCs derived from irradiated tumors. Blood taken after the commencement of RT contained tumor cells that proliferated extensively in vitro (in all 6 cases studied). Circulating tumor cells formed γ-H2AX foci in response to ex vivo irradiation, providing further evidence of their viability. Conclusions: Our findings provide a rationale for the development of strategies to reduce the concentration of viable CTCs by modulating RT fractionation or by coadministering systemic therapies.

  1. Date Palm (Phoenix dactylifera) Fruits as a Potential Cardioprotective Agent: The Role of Circulating Progenitor Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alhaider, Ibrahim A; Mohamed, Maged E; Ahmed, K K M; Kumar, Arun H S

    2017-01-01

    Context: Date palms, along with their fruits' dietary consumption, possess enormous medicinal and pharmacological activities manifested in their usage in a variety of ailments in the various traditional systems of medicine. In recent years, the identification of progenitor cells in the adult organ systems has opened an altogether new approach to therapeutics, due to the ability of these cells to repair the damaged cells/tissues. Hence, the concept of developing therapeutics, which can mobilize endogenous progenitor cells, following tissue injury, to enhance tissue repair process is clinically relevant. Objectives: The present study investigates the potential of date of palm fruit extracts in repairing tissue injury following myocardial infarction (MI) potentially by mobilizing circulating progenitor cells. Methods: Extracts of four different varieties of date palm fruits common in Saudi Arabia eastern provision were scrutinized for their total flavonoid, total phenolic, in vitro antioxidant capacity, as well as their effects on two different rodent MI models. Results: High concentrations of phenolic and flavonoid compounds were observed in date palm fruit extracts, which contributed to the promising antioxidant activities of these extracts and the observed high protective effect against various induced in vivo MI. The extracts showed ability to build up reserves and to mobilize circulating progenitor cells from bone marrow and peripheral circulation to the site of myocardial infraction. Conclusion: Date palm fruit extracts have the potential to mobilize endogenous circulating progenitor cells, which can promote tissue repair following ischemic injury.

  2. Double-Cell Type Solar Meridional Circulation Based on Mean-Field Hydrodynamic Model

    CERN Document Server

    Bekki, Yuto

    2016-01-01

    The main object of the paper is to present the condition of the non-diffusive part of the Reynolds stress for driving the double-cell structure of the solar meridional circulation, which has been revealed by recent helioseismic observations. By conducting a set of mean-field hydrodynamic simulations, we confirm for the first time that the double-cell meridional circulation can be achieved along with the solar-like differential rotation when the Reynolds stress transports the angular momentum upward in the lower part and downward in the upper part of the convection zone. It is concluded that, in a stationary state, the accumulated angular momentum via the Reynolds stress in the middle layer is advected to both the upper and lower parts of the convection zone by each of the two meridional circulation cells, respectively.

  3. Significance of Micrometastases: Circulating Tumor Cells and Disseminated Tumor Cells in Early Breast Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catherine Oakman

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Adjuvant systemic therapy targets minimal residual disease. Our current clinical approach in the adjuvant setting is to presume, rather than confirm, the presence of minimal residual disease. Based on assessment of the primary tumor, we estimate an individual’s recurrence risk. Subsequent treatment decisions are based on characteristics of the primary tumor, with the presumption of consistent biology and treatment sensitivity between micrometastases and the primary lesion. An alternative approach is to identify micrometastatic disease. Detection of disseminated tumor cells (DTC in the bone marrow and circulating tumor cells (CTC from peripheral blood collection may offer quantification and biocharacterization of residual disease. This paper will review the prognostic and predictive potential of micrometastatic disease in early breast cancer.

  4. Prediagnostic circulating concentrations of plasma insulin-like growth factor-I and risk of lymphoma in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez-Cornago, Aurora; Appleby, Paul N; Tipper, Sarah; Key, Timothy J; Allen, Naomi E; Nieters, Alexandra; Vermeulen, Roel; Roulland, Sandrine; Casabonne, Delphine; Kaaks, Rudolf; Fortner, Renee T; Boeing, Heiner; Trichopoulou, Antonia; La Vecchia, Carlo; Klinaki, Eleni; Hansen, Louise; Tjønneland, Anne; Bonnet, Fabrice; Fagherazzi, Guy; Boutron-Ruault, Marie-Christine; Pala, Valeria; Masala, Giovanna; Sacerdote, Carlotta; Peeters, Petra H; Bueno-de-Mesquita, H B As; Weiderpass, Elisabete; Dorronsoro, Miren; Quirós, J Ramón; Barricarte, Aurelio; Gavrila, Diana; Agudo, Antonio; Borgquist, Signe; Rosendahl, Ann H; Melin, Beatrice; Wareham, Nick; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Gunter, Marc; Riboli, Elio; Vineis, Paolo; Travis, Ruth C

    2017-03-01

    Insulin-like growth factor (IGF)-I has cancer promoting activities. However, the hypothesis that circulating IGF-I concentration is related to risk of lymphoma overall or its subtypes has not been examined prospectively. IGF-I concentration was measured in pre-diagnostic plasma samples from a nested case-control study of 1,072 cases of lymphoid malignancies and 1,072 individually matched controls from the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition. Odds ratios (ORs) and confidence intervals (CIs) for lymphoma were calculated using conditional logistic regression. IGF-I concentration was not associated with overall lymphoma risk (multivariable-adjusted OR for highest versus lowest third = 0.77 [95% CI = 0.57-1.03], ptrend  = 0.06). There was no statistical evidence of heterogeneity in this association with IGF-I by sex, age at blood collection, time between blood collection and diagnosis, age at diagnosis, or body mass index (pheterogeneity for all  ≥ 0.05). There were no associations between IGF-I concentration and risk for specific BCL subtypes, T-cell lymphoma or Hodgkin lymphoma, although number of cases were small. In this European population, IGF-I concentration was not associated with risk of overall lymphoma. This study provides the first prospective evidence on circulating IGF-I concentrations and risk of lymphoma. Further prospective data are required to examine associations of IGF-I concentrations with lymphoma subtypes.

  5. Single-Cell RNA Sequencing Identifies Extracellular Matrix Gene Expression by Pancreatic Circulating Tumor Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David T. Ting

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Circulating tumor cells (CTCs are shed from primary tumors into the bloodstream, mediating the hematogenous spread of cancer to distant organs. To define their composition, we compared genome-wide expression profiles of CTCs with matched primary tumors in a mouse model of pancreatic cancer, isolating individual CTCs using epitope-independent microfluidic capture, followed by single-cell RNA sequencing. CTCs clustered separately from primary tumors and tumor-derived cell lines, showing low-proliferative signatures, enrichment for the stem-cell-associated gene Aldh1a2, biphenotypic expression of epithelial and mesenchymal markers, and expression of Igfbp5, a gene transcript enriched at the epithelial-stromal interface. Mouse as well as human pancreatic CTCs exhibit a very high expression of stromal-derived extracellular matrix (ECM proteins, including SPARC, whose knockdown in cancer cells suppresses cell migration and invasiveness. The aberrant expression by CTCs of stromal ECM genes points to their contribution of microenvironmental signals for the spread of cancer to distant organs.

  6. Clinical utility of KRAS status in circulating plasma DNA compared to archival tumour tissue from patients with metastatic colorectal cancer treated with anti-epidermal growth factor receptor therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Spindler, Karen-Lise Garm; Pallisgaard, Niels; Appelt, Ane Lindegaard

    2015-01-01

    by an in-house qPCR method. Results are presented according to REMARK. RESULTS: One-hundred-and-forty patients were included. Thirty-four percent had detectable KRAS mutations in the tumour, compared to 23% in plasma. KRAS detection in archival tumour tissue showed no correlation to survival, whereas...... in patients from metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC) prior to anti-epidermal growth factor receptor (anti-EGFR) therapy. Secondly, we investigated the concentration of total cfDNA in relation to clinical outcome. PATIENTS AND METHODS: Patients were resistant to 5-FU, oxaliplatin and irinotecan and treated......BACKGROUND: Circulating cell-free DNA (cfDNA) in plasma is a mixture of DNA from malignant and normal cells, and can be used as a liquid biopsy to detect and quantify tumour specific mutations e.g. KRAS. We investigated the clinical value of KRAS mutations when detected in plasma compared to tumour...

  7. Circulating rotavirus-specific T cells have a poor functional profile

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parra, Miguel; Herrera, Daniel [Instituto de Genética Humana, Facultad de Medicina, Pontificia Universidad Javeriana, Pontificia Universidad Javeriana, Carrera 7 # 40-62, Bogotá (Colombia); Jácome, María Fernanda; Mesa, Martha C. [Departamento de Microbiología, Facultad de Ciencias, Pontificia Universidad Javeriana, Bogotá (Colombia); Rodríguez, Luz-Stella [Instituto de Genética Humana, Facultad de Medicina, Pontificia Universidad Javeriana, Pontificia Universidad Javeriana, Carrera 7 # 40-62, Bogotá (Colombia); Guzmán, Carolina [Departamento de Pediatría, Hospital Universitario San Ignacio, Facultad de Medicina, Pontificia Universidad Javeriana, Bogotá (Colombia); Angel, Juana; Franco, Manuel A. [Instituto de Genética Humana, Facultad de Medicina, Pontificia Universidad Javeriana, Pontificia Universidad Javeriana, Carrera 7 # 40-62, Bogotá (Colombia)

    2014-11-15

    Frequencies of circulating T cells producing IFN-γ, TNF-α, and IL-2, and percentages of T cells proliferating after stimulation with rotavirus (RV), tetanus toxoid, and influenza were evaluated in PBMC derived from healthy adults and children. In addition, the potential anergic state of RV-specific T cells was analyzed by stimulation of PBMC with RV antigen in the presence of three anergy inhibitors (rIL-2, rIL-12, or DGKα-i). The quality and magnitude of RV-T cell responses were significantly lower than those of tetanus toxoid and influenza antigens. RV-CD4 T cell response was enriched in monofunctional IFN-γ{sup +} cells, while influenza-CD4 and tetanus toxoid-CD4 T cell responses were enriched in multifunctional T cells. Moreover, rIL-2 – unlike rIL-12 or DGKα-i – increased the frequencies of RV-CD4 TNF-α{sup +}, CD4 IFN-γ{sup +}, and CD8 IFN-γ{sup +} cells. Thus, circulating RV-T cells seem to have a relatively poor functional profile that may be partially reversed in vitro by the addition of rIL-2. - Highlights: • The quality and magnitude of circulating RV-T cell responses are relatively poor. • Circulating RV-CD4 T cells are enriched in monofunctional IFN-γ+ cells. • Treatment with rIL-2 increased the frequencies of cytokine secreting RV-T cells.

  8. Circulating CD34-positive cells, glomerular filtration rate and triglycerides in relation to hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimizu, Yuji; Sato, Shimpei; Koyamatsu, Jun; Yamanashi, Hirotomo; Nagayoshi, Mako; Kadota, Koichiro; Maeda, Takahiro

    2015-11-01

    Serum triglycerides have been reported to be independently associated with the development of chronic kidney disease (CKD), which is known to play a role in vascular disturbance. On the other hand, circulating CD34-positve cells, including endothelial progenitor cells, are reported to contribute to vascular repair. However, no studies have reported on the correlation between triglycerides and the number of CD34-positive cells. Since hypertension is well known factor for vascular impairment, the degree of correlation between serum triglycerides and circulating CD34-positve cells should account for hypertension status. We conducted a cross-sectional study of 274 elderly Japanese men aged ≥ 60 years (range 60-79 years) undergoing general health checkups. Multiple linear regression analysis of non-hypertensive subjects adjusting for classical cardiovascular risk factors showed that although triglyceride levels (1SD increments; 64 mg/dL) did not significantly correlate with glomerular filtration rate (GFR) (β = -2.06, p = 0.163), a significant positive correlation was seen between triglycerides and the number of circulating CD34-positive cells (β = 0.50, p = 0.004). In hypertensive subjects, a significant inverse correlation between triglycerides and GFR was observed (β = -2.66, p = 0.035), whereas no significant correlation between triglycerides and the number of circulating CD34-positive cells was noted (β = -0.004, p = 0.974). Since endothelial progenitor cells (CD34-positive cells) have been reported to contribute to vascular repair, our results indicate that in non-hypertensive subjects, triglycerides may stimulate an increase in circulating CD34-positive cells (vascular repair) by inducing vascular disturbance. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Forced KLF4 expression increases the generation of mature plasma cells and uncovers a network linked with plasma cell stage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoenhals, Matthieu; Jourdan, Michel; Seckinger, Anja; Pantesco, Véronique; Hose, Dirk; Kassambara, Alboukadel; Moreaux, Jérôme; Klein, Bernard

    2016-07-17

    A role of the transcription factor Krüppel-like factor 4 (KLF4) in the generation of mature plasma cells (PC) is unknown. Indeed, KLF4 is critical in controlling the differentiation of various cell linages, particularly monocytes and epithelial cells. KLF4 is expressed at low levels in pro-B cells and its expression increases as they mature into pre-B cells, resting naïve B cells and memory B cells. We show here that KLF4 is expressed in human bone marrow plasma cells and its function was studied using an in vitro model of differentiation of memory B cells into long lived plasma cells. KLF4 is rapidly lost when memory B cells differentiate into highly cell cycling plasmablasts, poorly cycling early plasma cells and then quiescent long-lived plasma cells. A forced expression of KLF4 in plasmablasts enhances the yield of their differentiation into early plasma cell and long lived plasma cells, by inhibiting apoptosis and upregulating previously unknown plasma cell pathways.

  10. The Concentrations of Circulating Plasma Oxytocin and the Pattern of Oxytocin Release in Mare during Oestrus and after Ovulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bae, Sung Eun

    Mares susceptible to persistent mating-induced endometritis (PMIE) accumulate intrauterine fluid after mating. One of the factors causing delayed uterine clearance is thought to be impaired uterine contractility. Oxytocin is central in controlling myometrial contractility. The objective of the present study was to describe peripheral oxytocin release during estrus and in the early postovulatory period in reproductively-normal mares and to compare the baseline circulating oxytocin concentrations in reproductively-normal mares and mares with PMIE. Blood samples were collected from reproductively-normal mares (n=5) from day -5 of estrus to day 2 postovulation and every 5 min for 30 min from reproductively-normal mares (n=5) and mares with PMIE (n=5) on day 3 of estrus. Pulsatile secretion of oxytocin was observed in all mares. Mean plasma oxytocin concentrations were significantly higher (Poxytocin concentrations tended to increase. On day 3 of estrus, plasma oxytocin concentrations were significantly higher (Poxytocin concentrations between mares to PMIE. The low plasma oxytocin concentrations in mares with PMIE may contribute to predisposing factors in their poor uterine clearance in these mares.

  11. Cell adhesion to plasma-coated PVC.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rangel, Elidiane C; de Souza, Eduardo S; de Moraes, Francine S; Duek, Eliana A R; Lucchesi, Carolina; Schreiner, Wido H; Durrant, Steven F; Cruz, Nilson C

    2014-01-01

    To produce environments suitable for cell culture, thin polymer films were deposited onto commercial PVC plates from radiofrequency acetylene-argon plasmas. The proportion of argon in the plasmas, P(Ar), was varied from 5.3 to 65.8%. The adhesion and growth of Vero cells on the coated surfaces were examined for different incubation times. Cytotoxicity tests were performed using spectroscopic methods. Carbon, O, and N were detected in all the samples using XPS. Roughness remained almost unchanged in the samples prepared with 5.3 and 28.9% but tended to increase for the films deposited with P(Ar) between 28.9 and 55.3%. Surface free energy increased with increasing P(Ar), except for the sample prepared at 28.9% of Ar, which presented the least reactive surface. Cells proliferated on all the samples, including the bare PVC. Independently of the deposition condition there was no evidence of cytotoxicity, indicating the viability of such coatings for designing biocompatible devices.

  12. Cell Adhesion to Plasma-Coated PVC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elidiane C. Rangel

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available To produce environments suitable for cell culture, thin polymer films were deposited onto commercial PVC plates from radiofrequency acetylene-argon plasmas. The proportion of argon in the plasmas, PAr, was varied from 5.3 to 65.8%. The adhesion and growth of Vero cells on the coated surfaces were examined for different incubation times. Cytotoxicity tests were performed using spectroscopic methods. Carbon, O, and N were detected in all the samples using XPS. Roughness remained almost unchanged in the samples prepared with 5.3 and 28.9% but tended to increase for the films deposited with PAr between 28.9 and 55.3%. Surface free energy increased with increasing PAr, except for the sample prepared at 28.9% of Ar, which presented the least reactive surface. Cells proliferated on all the samples, including the bare PVC. Independently of the deposition condition there was no evidence of cytotoxicity, indicating the viability of such coatings for designing biocompatible devices.

  13. Circulating endothelial cells and procoagulant microparticles in patients with glioblastoma: prognostic value.

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    Gaspar Reynés

    Full Text Available AIM: Circulating endothelial cells and microparticles are prognostic factors in cancer. However, their prognostic and predictive value in patients with glioblastoma is unclear. The objective of this study was to investigate the potential prognostic value of circulating endothelial cells and microparticles in patients with newly diagnosed glioblastoma treated with standard radiotherapy and concomitant temozolomide. In addition, we have analyzed the methylation status of the MGMT promoter. METHODS: Peripheral blood samples were obtained before and at the end of the concomitant treatment. Blood samples from healthy volunteers were also obtained as controls. Endothelial cells were measured by an immunomagnetic technique and immunofluorescence microscopy. Microparticles were quantified by flow cytometry. Microparticle-mediated procoagulant activity was measured by endogen thrombin generation and by phospholipid-dependent clotting time. Methylation status of MGMT promoter was determined by multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification. RESULTS: Pretreatment levels of circulating endothelial cells and microparticles were higher in patients than in controls (p<0.001. After treatment, levels of microparticles and thrombin generation decreased, and phospholipid-dependent clotting time increased significantly. A high pretreatment endothelial cell count, corresponding to the 99(th percentile in controls, was associated with poor overall survival. MGMT promoter methylation was present in 27% of tumor samples and was associated to a higher overall survival (66 weeks vs 30 weeks, p<0.004. CONCLUSION: Levels of circulating endothelial cells may have prognostic value in patients with glioblastoma.

  14. Innovative Flow Cytometry Allows Accurate Identification of Rare Circulating Cells Involved in Endothelial Dysfunction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boraldi, Federica; Bartolomeo, Angelica; De Biasi, Sara; Orlando, Stefania; Costa, Sonia; Cossarizza, Andrea; Quaglino, Daniela

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Although rare, circulating endothelial and progenitor cells could be considered as markers of endothelial damage and repair potential, possibly predicting the severity of cardiovascular manifestations. A number of studies highlighted the role of these cells in age-related diseases, including those characterized by ectopic calcification. Nevertheless, their use in clinical practice is still controversial, mainly due to difficulties in finding reproducible and accurate methods for their determination. Methods Circulating mature cells (CMC, CD45-, CD34+, CD133-) and circulating progenitor cells (CPC, CD45dim, CD34bright, CD133+) were investigated by polychromatic high-speed flow cytometry to detect the expression of endothelial (CD309+) or osteogenic (BAP+) differentiation markers in healthy subjects and in patients affected by peripheral vascular manifestations associated with ectopic calcification. Results This study shows that: 1) polychromatic flow cytometry represents a valuable tool to accurately identify rare cells; 2) the balance of CD309+ on CMC/CD309+ on CPC is altered in patients affected by peripheral vascular manifestations, suggesting the occurrence of vascular damage and low repair potential; 3) the increase of circulating cells exhibiting a shift towards an osteoblast-like phenotype (BAP+) is observed in the presence of ectopic calcification. Conclusion Differences between healthy subjects and patients with ectopic calcification indicate that this approach may be useful to better evaluate endothelial dysfunction in a clinical context. PMID:27560136

  15. Endothelial cell-derived pentraxin 3 limits the vasoreparative therapeutic potential of circulating angiogenic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Neill, Christina L; Guduric-Fuchs, Jasenka; Chambers, Sarah E J; O'Doherty, Michelle; Bottazzi, Barbara; Stitt, Alan W; Medina, Reinhold J

    2016-12-01

    Circulating angiogenic cells (CACs) promote revascularization of ischaemic tissues although their underlying mechanism of action and the consequences of delivering varying number of these cells for therapy remain unknown. This study investigates molecular mechanisms underpinning CAC modulation of blood vessel formation. CACs at low (2 × 10(5) cells/mL) and mid (2 × 10(6) cells/mL) cellular densities significantly enhanced endothelial cell tube formation in vitro, while high density (HD) CACs (2 × 10(7) cells/mL) significantly inhibited this angiogenic process. In vivo, Matrigel-based angiogenesis assays confirmed mid-density CACs as pro-angiogenic and HD CACs as anti-angiogenic. Secretome characterization of CAC-EC conditioned media identified pentraxin 3 (PTX3) as only present in the HD CAC-EC co-culture. Recombinant PTX3 inhibited endothelial tube formation in vitro and in vivo. Importantly, our data revealed that the anti-angiogenic effect observed in HD CAC-EC co-cultures was significantly abrogated when PTX3 bioactivity was blocked using neutralizing antibodies or PTX3 siRNA in endothelial cells. We show evidence for an endothelial source of PTX3, triggered by exposure to HD CACs. In addition, we confirmed that PTX3 inhibits fibroblast growth factor (FGF) 2-mediated angiogenesis, and that the PTX3 N-terminus, containing the FGF-binding site, is responsible for such anti-angiogenic effects. Endothelium, when exposed to HD CACs, releases PTX3 which markedly impairs the vascular regenerative response in an autocrine manner. Therefore, CAC density and accompanying release of angiocrine PTX3 are critical considerations when using these cells as a cell therapy for ischaemic disease. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Society of Cardiology.

  16. Interaction of Low Temperature Plasmas with Prokaryotic and Eukaryotic Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laroussi, Mounir

    2008-10-01

    Due to promising possibilities for their use in medical applications such as wound healing, surface modification of biocompatible materials, and the sterilization of reusable heat-sensitive medical instruments, low temperature plasmas and plasma jets are making big strides as a technology that can potentially be used in medicine^1-2. At this stage of research, fundamental questions about the effects of plasma on prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells are still not completely answered. An in-depth understanding of the pathway whereby cold plasma interact with biological cells is necessary before real applications can emerge. In this paper, first an overview of non-equilibrium plasma sources (both low and high pressures) will be presented. Secondly, the effects of plasma on bacterial cells will be discussed. Here, the roles of the various plasma agents in the inactivation process will be outlined. In particular, the effects of UV and that of various reactive species (O3, O, OH) are highlighted. Thirdly, preliminary findings on the effects of plasma on few types of eukaryotic cells will be presented. How plasma affects eukaryotic cells, such as mammalian cells, is very important in applications where the viability/preservation of the cells could be an issue (such as in wound treatment). Another interesting aspect is the triggering of apoptosis (programmed cell death). Some investigators have claimed that plasma is able to induce apoptosis in some types of cancer cells. If successfully replicated, this can open up a novel method of cancer treatment. In this talk however, I will briefly focus more on the wound healing potential of cold plasmas. ^1E. A. Blakely, K. A. Bjornstad, J. E. Galvin, O. R. Monteiro, and I. G. Brown, ``Selective Neuron Growth on Ion Implanted and Plasma Deposited Surfaces'', In Proc. IEEE Int. Conf. Plasma Sci., (2002), p. 253. ^2M. Laroussi, ``Non-thermal Decontamination of Biological Media by Atmospheric Pressure Plasmas: Review, Analysis, and

  17. Evaluation of Isolation Methods for Circulating Tumor Cells (CTCs

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    Galatea Kallergi

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: Detection of CTCs is a poor prognostic factor for many cancer types; however, their very low frequency represents an obstacle for their detection. The objective of the current study was to compare the performance of commonly used methods for CTCs isolation. Methods: The evaluated methods using spiking experiments of MCF7, SKBR3 and MDA MB-231 breast cancer cell lines were (i ficoll density gradient separation (DGS, (ii red blood cell lysis (Erythrolysis isolation, (iii positive immunomagnetic selection (EpCAM Dynal beads, (iv two different negative immunomagnetic separation systems (Dynal vs Miltenyi CD45 beads as well as (v the Cell Search platform and (vi the ISET system. Results: The recovery rates of Erythrolysis and DGS were 39% and 24%, respectively. Magnetic isolations are ranked from the worse to the best recovery rate as follows:, Myltenyi-anti-CD45 microbeads (24%; Dynal-anti-EpCAM beads (75%; Dynabeads-anti-CD45 (97%. CTCs isolation from blood samples using the CellSearch and ISET systems revealed that the recovery rate for Cell Search and ISET was 52% and 95%, respectively. Conclusions: Dynal-anti-CD45 beads have the best recovery rate compared to other magnetic methods. Furthermore the recovery rate of ISET was higher compared to Cell Search, especially for the more aggressive MDA-MB 231 cell line.

  18. Circulating cell-free DNA: an up-coming molecular marker in exercise physiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breitbach, Sarah; Tug, Suzan; Simon, Perikles

    2012-07-01

    The phenomenon of circulating cell-free DNA (cfDNA) concentrations is of importance for many biomedical disciplines including the field of exercise physiology. Increases of cfDNA due to exercise are described to be a potential hallmark for the overtraining syndrome and might be related to, or trigger adaptations of, immune function induced by strenuous exercise. At the same time, exercise provides a practicable model for studying the phenomenon of cfDNA that is described to be of pathophysiological relevance for different topics in clinical medicine like autoimmune diseases and cancer. In this review, we are summarizing the current knowledge of exercise-based acute and chronic alterations in cfDNA levels and their physiological significance. The effects of acute exercise on cfDNA concentrations have been investigated in resistance exercises and in continuous, stepwise and interval endurance exercises of different durations. cfDNA concentrations peaked immediately after acute exercise and showed a rapid return to baseline levels. Typical markers of skeletal muscle damage (creatine kinase, uric acid, C-reactive protein) show delayed kinetics compared with the cfDNA peak response. Exercise parameters such as intensity, duration or average energy expenditure do not explain the extent of increasing cfDNA concentrations after strenuous exercise. This could be due to complex processes inside the human organism during and after physical activity. Therefore, we hypothesize composite effects of different physiological stress parameters that come along with exercise to be responsible for increasing cfDNA concentrations. We suggest that due to acute stress, cfDNA levels increase rapidly by a spontaneous active or passive release mechanism that is not yet known. As a result of the rapid and parallel increase of cfDNA and lactate in an incremental treadmill test leading to exhaustion within 15-20 minutes, it is unlikely that cfDNA is released into the plasma by typical necrosis

  19. Regulation of B Cell to Plasma Cell Transition within the Follicular B Cell Response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nera, K-P; Kyläniemi, M K; Lassila, O

    2015-09-01

    Persistent humoral immunity depends on the follicular B cell response and on the generation of somatically mutated high-affinity plasma cells and memory B cells. Upon activation by an antigen, cognately activated follicular B cells and follicular T helper (TFH ) cells initiate germinal centre (GC) reaction during which high-affinity effector cells are generated. The differentiation of activated follicular B cells into plasma cells and memory B cells is guided by complex selection events, both at the cellular and molecular level. The transition of B cell into a plasma cell during the GC response involves alterations in the microenvironment and developmental state of the cell, which are guided by cell-extrinsic signals. The developmental cell fate decisions in response to these signals are coordinated by cell-intrinsic gene regulatory network functioning at epigenetic, transcriptional and post-transcriptional levels.

  20. Impairment of endothelial and subendothelial sites by a circulating plasma factor associated with minimal change disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cheung, PK; Baller, JFW; Bakker, WW

    1996-01-01

    Background. The pathogenesis of albuminuria in minimal change disease (MCD) is unknown. A human plasma factor (denoted as 100KF) is able to induce minimal change-like glomerular alterations, i.e. loss of glomerular sialoglycoproteins and decreased expression of glomerular ecto-ATPase, following in v

  1. Impairment of endothelial and subendothelial sites by a circulating plasma factor associated with minimal change disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cheung, PK; Baller, JFW; Bakker, WW

    1996-01-01

    Background. The pathogenesis of albuminuria in minimal change disease (MCD) is unknown. A human plasma factor (denoted as 100KF) is able to induce minimal change-like glomerular alterations, i.e. loss of glomerular sialoglycoproteins and decreased expression of glomerular ecto-ATPase, following in

  2. Impairment of endothelial and subendothelial sites by a circulating plasma factor associated with minimal change disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cheung, PK; Baller, JFW; Bakker, WW

    1996-01-01

    Background. The pathogenesis of albuminuria in minimal change disease (MCD) is unknown. A human plasma factor (denoted as 100KF) is able to induce minimal change-like glomerular alterations, i.e. loss of glomerular sialoglycoproteins and decreased expression of glomerular ecto-ATPase, following in v

  3. Circulating CLA(+) T cells in atopic dermatitis and their possible role as peripheral biomarkers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czarnowicki, T; Santamaria-Babí, L F; Guttman-Yassky, E

    2017-03-01

    Cutaneous lymphocyte-associated antigen (CLA(+) ) T cells are specialized for skin homing and represent the main T-cell population in atopic dermatitis (AD) lesions. CLA(+) is expressed on the surface of circulating CD45RO(+) memory T cells and most skin-infiltrating T cells. Mechanistic studies and thus treatment advancements are limited by the need of large number of skin biopsies. Circulating CLA(+) T cells may be a reliable surrogate marker of the inflammatory events occurring in the skin, and thus, the evaluation of CLA(+) T cells in the blood may eliminate the need for skin biopsies. Preliminary work in AD has established that disease-associated T-cell abnormalities can be approached by either a study of skin lesions or activated CLA(+) T-cell subsets in peripheral blood. Future studies in adults and children, across different skin disorders, correlating blood and skin phenotypes and determining skin-homing T-cell functional properties are needed to establish whether CLA(+) memory subsets can be used as biomarkers and a substitute for skin biopsies. This review summarizes the latest advancements reached on circulating CLA(+) in AD and the great potential they harbor in understanding AD mechanisms.

  4. Plasma in Saturn's nightside magnetosphere and the implications for global circulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mcandrews, Hazel J [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Wilson, R J [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Henderson, M G [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Tokar, R L [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Jackman, C M [IMPERIAL COLLEGE; Khurana, K K [UNIV OF CAL; Sittler, E C [NASA/GSFC; Coates, A J [MSSL; Dougherty, M K [IMPERIAL COLLEGE

    2009-01-01

    We present a bulk ion flow map from the nightside equatorial region of Saturn's magnetosphere derived from the Cassini CAPS ion mass spectrometer data. The map clearly demonstrates the dominance of corotation flow over radial flow and suggests that the flux tubes sampled are still closed and attached to the planet up to distances of 50 R{sub s}. The plasma characteristics in the near-midnight region are described and indicate a transition between the region of the magnetosphere containing plasma on closed drift paths and that containing flux tubes which may not complete a full rotation around the planet. Data from the electron spectrometer reveal two plasma states of high and low density. These are attributed either to the sampling of mass-loaded and depleted flux tubes, respectively, or to the latitudinal structure of the plasma sheet Depleted, returning flux tubes are not, in general, directly observed in the ions, although the electron observations suggest that such a process must take place in order to produce the low density population. Flux tube content is conserved below a limIt defined by the mass-loading and magnetic field strength and indicates that the flux tubes sampled may survive their passage through the tail. The conditions for mass release are evaluated using measured densities, angular velocities and magnetic field strength, The results suggest that for the relatively dense ion populations detectable by IMS, the condition for flux-tube breakage has not yet been exceeded, However, the low-density regimes observed in the electron data suggest that loaded flux tubes at greater distances do exceed the threshold for mass loss and subsequently return to the inner magnetosphere significantly depleted of plasma.

  5. Plasma in Saturn's nightside magnetosphere and the implications for global circulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mcandrews, Hazel J [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Thomsen, Michelle F [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Wilson, Robert J [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Henderson, Michael G [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Tokar, Robert L [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Arridge, Chris S [MSSL/UCL; Jackman, Caitriona M [IMPERIAL COLLEGE; Khurana, Krishan K [UCLA; Sittler, Edward C [GSFC; Coates, Andrew J [MSSL; Dougherty, Michele K [IMPERIAL COLLEGE

    2008-01-01

    We present a bulk ion flow map from the nightside, equatorial region of Saturn's magnetosphere derived from the Cassini CAPS ion mass spectrometer data. The map clearly demonstrates the dominance of corotation flow over radial flow and suggests that the flux tubes sampled are still closed and attached to the planet up to distances of 50 RS. The plasma characteristics in the near-midnight region are described and indicate a transition between the region of the magnetosphere containing plasma on closed drift paths and that containing flux tubes which may not complete a full rotation around the planet. Data from the electron spectrometer reveal two plasma states of high and low density. These are attributed either to the sampling of mass-loaded and depleted flux tubes, respectively, or to the latitudinal structure of the plasma sheet. Depleted, returning flux tubes are not, in general, directly observed in the ions, although the electron observations suggest that such a process must take place in order to produce the low density population. An example of such a low-density interval containing hot electrons with a dipolarised, swept-forward field configuration is described and strongly suggests that reconnection must have occurred planetward of Cassini. Flux tube content is conserved below a limit defined by the mass-loading and magnetic field strength and indicates that the flux tubes sampled may survive their passage through the tail. The conditions for mass release are evaluated using measured densities, angular velocities and magnetic field strength. The results suggest that for the relatively dense ion populations detectable by IMS, the condition for flux-tube breakage has not yet been exceeded. However, the low-density regimes observed in the electron data suggest that loaded flux tubes at greater distances do exceed the threshold for mass loss and subsequently return to the inner magnetosphere significantly depleted of plasma.

  6. An overview of circulating cell-free microRNAs as putative biomarkers in Alzheimer's and Parkinson's Diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batistela, Meire Silva; Josviak, Nalini Drieli; Sulzbach, Carla Daniela; de Souza, Ricardo Lehtonen Rodrigues

    2016-07-20

    Circulating cell-free microRNAs (miRNAs) are stable in many biological fluids and their expression profiles can suffer changes under different physiological and pathological conditions. In the last few years, miRNAs have been proposed as putative noninvasive biomarkers in diagnosis, prognosis and response to treatment for several diseases, including neurodegenerative disorders as Alzheimer's disease (AD) and Parkinson's disease (PD). Cognitive and/or motor impairments are usually considered for establishing clinical diagnosis, and at this stage, the majority of the neurons may already be lost making difficult attempts of novel therapies. In this review, we intend to survey the circulating cell-free miRNAs found as dysregulated in cerebrospinal fluid, serum and plasma samples in AD and PD patients, and show how those miRNAs can be useful for early and differential diagnosis. Beyond that, we highlighted the miRNAs that are possibly related to common molecular mechanisms in the neurodegeneration process, as well those miRNAs related to specific disease pathways.

  7. Circulating tumor cells: clinically relevant molecular access based on a novel CTC flow cell.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jessamine P Winer-Jones

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Contemporary cancer diagnostics are becoming increasing reliant upon sophisticated new molecular methods for analyzing genetic information. Limiting the scope of these new technologies is the lack of adequate solid tumor tissue samples. Patients may present with tumors that are not accessible to biopsy or adequate for longitudinal monitoring. One attractive alternate source is cancer cells in the peripheral blood. These rare circulating tumor cells (CTC require enrichment and isolation before molecular analysis can be performed. Current CTC platforms lack either the throughput or reliability to use in a clinical setting or they provide CTC samples at purities that restrict molecular access by limiting the molecular tools available. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Recent advances in magetophoresis and microfluidics have been employed to produce an automated platform called LiquidBiopsy®. This platform uses high throughput sheath flow microfluidics for the positive selection of CTC populations. Furthermore the platform quantitatively isolates cells useful for molecular methods such as detection of mutations. CTC recovery was characterized and validated with an accuracy (<20% error and a precision (CV<25% down to at least 9 CTC/ml. Using anti-EpCAM antibodies as the capture agent, the platform recovers 78% of MCF7 cells within the linear range. Non specific recovery of background cells is independent of target cell density and averages 55 cells/mL. 10% purity can be achieved with as low as 6 CTCs/mL and better than 1% purity can be achieved with 1 CTC/mL. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The LiquidBiopsy platform is an automated validated platform that provides high throughput molecular access to the CTC population. It can be validated and integrated into the lab flow enabling CTC enumeration as well as recovery of consistently high purity samples for molecular analysis such as quantitative PCR and Next Generation Sequencing. This tool opens

  8. Enhanced in vivo protein synthesis in circulating immune cells of ICU patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Januszkiewicz, Anna; Klaude, Maria; Loré, Karin; Andersson, Jan; Ringdén, Olle; Rooyackers, Olav; Wernerman, Jan

    2007-11-01

    Insufficient function of the immune system contributes to a poor prognosis in intensive care unit (ICU) patients. However, the immune system function is not easily monitored and evaluated. In vivo protein synthesis determination in immune competent cells offers a possibility to quantify immunological activation. The aim of this descriptive study was to determine the in vivo fractional protein synthesis rate (FSR) in immune cells of ICU patients during the initial phase of the critical illness. Patients (n = 20) on ventilator treatment in the general ICU were studied during their first week of ICU stay. FSR was determined in circulating T lymphocytes, mononuclear cells, the whole population of blood leukocytes, and in stationary immune cells of palatine tonsils during a 90-min period by a flooding technique. Healthy, adult subjects (n = 11), scheduled for elective ear, nose, and throat surgery served as a control group. The FSR in leukocytes and mononuclear cells of ICU patients was higher compared with the control group. In contrast, the FSR of circulating T lymphocytes and of tonsillar cells was not different from that in the healthy subjects. In summary, the ICU patients showed a distinct polarization of metabolic responses during the initial phase of the critical illness. The in vivo rate of protein synthesis was high in the circulating mononuclear cells and leukocytes, reflecting enhanced metabolic activity in these cell populations. Determination of the in vivo protein synthesis rate may be used as a tool to obtain additional information on activation of the immune system.

  9. Association of obesity and circulating adipose stromal cells among breast cancer survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, Sagar; Hughes, Daniel; Parma, Dorothy Long; Ramirez, Amelie; Li, Rong

    2014-05-01

    A positive association of obesity with breast cancer incidence and mortality is well established. Recent reports indicate that adipose stromal cells (ASCs) play an important role in breast cancer development and progression by producing estrogens and tumor-promoting cytokines. Furthermore, circulating ASCs have been uniquely detected in obese individuals, which is likely due to increased tissue remodeling and cell mobilization. The number of circulating ASCs is even more prominent in obese patients with colon and prostate cancers, both of which are exacerbated by obesity. To determine whether a similar association exists for breast cancer, we collected blood samples from a cohort of breast cancer survivors and enumerated circulating ASCs by flow cytometry on the basis of the previously established ASC-associated immunophenotype (CD34+/CD31-/CD45-). We found significantly higher levels of circulating ASCs (pbreast cancer survivors with body mass index (BMI)≥30 kg/m2 than their non-obese counterparts (BMIobese subjects enrolled in a 6-month individualized exercise program, but found no statistically significant difference, likely due to limited number of subjects in the study. Our findings suggest that circulating ASCs can serve as a potential biomarker for future studies of the impacts of obesity and physical activity on breast cancer recurrence and survival.

  10. PEGylated long-circulating liposomes deliver homoharringtonine to suppress multiple myeloma cancer stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Miao; Shi, Fangfang; Fei, Xiong; Wu, Songyan; Wu, Di; Pan, Meng; Luo, Shouhua; Gu, Ning; Dou, Jun

    2017-05-01

    The goal of this investigation was to evaluate the inhibiting effect of high proportion polyethyleneglycol of long-circulating homoharringtonine liposomes on RPMI8226 multiple myeloma cancer stem cells. The CD138(-)CD34(-) multiple myeloma cancer stem cells isolated from RPMI8226 cell line using magnetic activated cell sorting system were, respectively, incubated with the optimized formulation of polyethyleneglycol of long-circulating homoharringtonine liposomes and the homoharringtonine in vitro, and the multiple myeloma cancer stem cell proliferation, colony formation, and cell cycle were analyzed. The inhibition of the multiple myeloma CD138(-)CD34(-) cancer stem cell growth was investigated in non-obese-diabetic/severe-combined-immunodeficiency mice that were implanted with multiple myeloma RPMI 8226 cancer stem cells and treated with the LCL-HHT-H-PEG. The results showed that the polyethyleneglycol of long-circulating homoharringtonine liposomes significantly inhibited MM cancer stem cell proliferation, colony formation, and induced cancer stem cell apoptosis in vitro as well as MM cancer stem cell growth in non-obese-diabetic/severe-combined-immunodeficiency mice compared with the homoharringtonine. In addition, the mouse bone mineral density and the red blood cell count were significantly increased in polyethyleneglycol of long-circulating homoharringtonine liposomes group. In conclusion, the data demonstrated that the developed polyethyleneglycol of long-circulating homoharringtonine liposomes formulation may serve as an efficient therapeutic drug for suppressing CD138(-)CD34(-) multiple myeloma cancer stem cell growth by inducing cancer stem cell apoptosis in non-obese-diabetic/severe-combined-immunodeficiency mouse model. Impact statement Multiple myeloma (MM) remains largely incurable until now. One of the main reasons is that there are cancer stem cells (CSCs) in MM, which are responsible for MM's drug resistance and relapse. In this study, we wanted

  11. In situ tissue engineering of functional small-diameter blood vessels by host circulating cells only

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Talacua, Hanna; Smits, Anthal I P M; Muylaert, Dimitri E P; Van Rijswijk, Jan Willem; Vink, Aryan; Verhaar, Marianne C.; Driessen-Mol, Anita; Van Herwerden, Lex A.; Bouten, Carlijn V C; Kluin, Jolanda; Baaijens, Frank P T

    2015-01-01

    Inflammation is a natural phase of the wound healing response, which can be harnessed for the in situ tissue engineering of small-diameter blood vessels using instructive, bioresorbable synthetic grafts. This process is dependent on colonization of the graft by host circulating cells and subsequent

  12. Targeted drug delivery to circulating tumor cells via platelet membrane-functionalized particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jiahe; Ai, Yiwei; Wang, Lihua; Bu, Pengcheng; Sharkey, Charles C; Wu, Qianhui; Wun, Brittany; Roy, Sweta; Shen, Xiling; King, Michael R

    2016-01-01

    Circulating tumor cells (CTCs) are responsible for metastases in distant organs via hematogenous dissemination. Fundamental studies in the past decade have suggested that neutralization of CTCs in circulation could represent an effective strategy to prevent metastasis. Current paradigms of targeted drug delivery into a solid tumor largely fall into two main categories: unique cancer markers (e.g. overexpression of surface receptors) and tumor-specific microenvironment (e.g. low pH, hypoxia, etc.). While relying on a surface receptor to target CTCs can be greatly challenged by cancer heterogeneity, targeting of tumor microenvironments has the advantage of recognizing a broader spectrum of cancer cells regardless of genetic differences or tumor types. The blood circulation, however, where CTCs transit through, lacks the same tumor microenvironment as that found in a solid tumor. In this study, a unique "microenvironment" was confirmed upon introduction of cancer cells of different types into circulation where activated platelets and fibrin were physically associated with blood-borne cancer cells. Inspired by this observation, synthetic silica particles were functionalized with activated platelet membrane along with surface conjugation of tumor-specific apoptosis-inducing ligand cytokine, TRAIL. Biomimetic synthetic particles incorporated into CTC-associated micro-thrombi in lung vasculature and dramatically decreased lung metastases in a mouse breast cancer metastasis model. Our results demonstrate a "Trojan Horse" strategy of neutralizing CTCs to attenuate metastasis.

  13. Circulating miRNAs as biomarkers for oral squamous cell carcinoma recurrence in operated patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yan, Yan; Wang, Xuan; Venø, Morten Trillingsgaard

    2017-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small regulatory non-coding RNAs for which altered expression in cancers can serve as potential biomarkers for diseases. We here investigated whether circulating miRNAs can serve as biomarkers for predicting post-operational recurrence of oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC)...

  14. In situ tissue engineering of functional small-diameter blood vessels by host circulating cells only

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Talacua, Hanna; Smits, Anthal I P M; Muylaert, Dimitri E P; Van Rijswijk, Jan Willem; Vink, Aryan; Verhaar, Marianne C.; Driessen-Mol, Anita; Van Herwerden, Lex A.; Bouten, Carlijn V C; Kluin, Jolanda; Baaijens, Frank P T

    2015-01-01

    Inflammation is a natural phase of the wound healing response, which can be harnessed for the in situ tissue engineering of small-diameter blood vessels using instructive, bioresorbable synthetic grafts. This process is dependent on colonization of the graft by host circulating cells and subsequent

  15. Tunable nanostructured coating for the capture and selective release of viable circulating tumor cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reátegui, Eduardo; Aceto, Nicola; Lim, Eugene J; Sullivan, James P; Jensen, Anne E; Zeinali, Mahnaz; Martel, Joseph M; Aranyosi, Alexander J; Li, Wei; Castleberry, Steven; Bardia, Aditya; Sequist, Lecia V; Haber, Daniel A; Maheswaran, Shyamala; Hammond, Paula T; Toner, Mehmet; Stott, Shannon L

    2015-03-04

    A layer-by-layer gelatin nanocoating is presented for use as a tunable, dual response biomaterial for the capture and release of circulating tumor cells (CTCs) from cancer patient blood. The entire nanocoating can be dissolved from the surface of microfluidic devices through biologically compatible temperature shifts. Alternatively, individual CTCs can be released through locally applied mechanical stress.

  16. Prognostic significance of circulating tumor cells in patients with metastatic colorectal cancer.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cohen, S.J.; Punt, C.J.A.; Iannotti, N.; Saidman, B.H.; Sabbath, K.D.; Gabrail, N.Y.; Picus, J.; Morse, M.A.; Mitchell, E.; Miller, M.C.; Doyle, G.V.; Tissing, H.; Terstappen, L.W.; Meropol, N.J.

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: We demonstrated that circulating tumor cell (CTC) number at baseline and follow-up is an independent prognostic factor in metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC). This analysis was undertaken to explore whether patient and treatment characteristics impact the prognostic value of CTCs. PATIEN

  17. Is a deep one-cell meridional circulation essential for the flux transport Solar Dynamo?

    CERN Document Server

    Hazra, Gopal; Choudhuri, Arnab Rai

    2014-01-01

    The solar activity cycle is successfully modeled by the flux transport dynamo, in which the meridional circulation of the Sun plays an important role. Most of the kinematic dynamo simulations assume a one-cell structure of the meridional circulation within the convection zone, with the equatorward return flow at its bottom. In view of the recent claims that the return flow occurs at a much shallower depth, we explore whether a meridional circulation with such a shallow return flow can still retain the attractive features of the flux transport dynamo (such as proper butterfly diagram, proper phase relation between the toroidal and poloidal fields). We consider additional cells of the meridional circulation below the shallow return flow---both the case of multiple cells radially stacked above one another and the case of more complicated cell patterns. As long as there is an equatorward flow in low latitudes at the bottom of the convection zone, we find that the solar behavior is approximately reproduced. Howeve...

  18. Targeted drug delivery to circulating tumor cells via platelet membrane-functionalized particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jiahe; Ai, Yiwei; Wang, Lihua; Bu, Pengcheng; Sharkey, Charles C.; Wu, Qianhui; Wun, Brittany; Roy, Sweta; Shen, Xiling; King, Michael R.

    2015-01-01

    Circulating tumor cells (CTCs) are responsible for metastases in distant organs via hematogenous dissemination. Fundamental studies in the past decade have suggested that neutralization of CTCs in circulation could represent an effective strategy to prevent metastasis. Current paradigms of targeted drug delivery into a solid tumor largely fall into two main categories: unique cancer markers (e.g. overexpression of surface receptors) and tumor-specific microenvironment (e.g. low pH, hypoxia, etc.). While relying on a surface receptor to target CTCs can be greatly challenged by cancer heterogeneity, targeting of tumor microenvironments has the advantage of recognizing a broader spectrum of cancer cells regardless of genetic differences or tumor types. The blood circulation, however, where CTCs transit through, lacks the same tumor microenvironment as that found in a solid tumor. In this study, a unique “microenvironment” was confirmed upon introduction of cancer cells of different types into circulation where activated platelets and fibrin were physically associated with blood-borne cancer cells. Inspired by this observation, synthetic silica particles were functionalized with activated platelet membrane along with surface conjugation of tumor-specific apoptosis-inducing ligand cytokine, TRAIL. Biomimetic synthetic particles incorporated into CTC-associated micro-thrombi in lung vasculature and dramatically decreased lung metastases in a mouse breast cancer metastasis model. Our results demonstrate a “Trojan Horse” strategy of neutralizing CTCs to attenuate metastasis. PMID:26519648

  19. Molecular profiling of circulating tumor cells links plasticity to the metastatic process in endometrial cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Alonso-Alconada, Lorena; Muinelo-Romay, Laura; Madissoo, Kadri; Diaz-Lopez, Antonio; Krakstad, Camilla; Trovik, Jone; Wik, Elisabeth; Hapangama, Dharani; Coenegrachts, Lieve; Cano, Amparo; Gil-Moreno, Antonio; Chiva, Luis; Cueva, Juan; Vieito, Maria; Ortega, Eugenia; Mariscal, Javier; Colas, Eva; Castellvi, Josep; Cusido, Maite; Dolcet, Xavier; Nijman, Hans W.; Bosse, Tjalling; Green, John A.; Romano, Andrea; Reventos, Jaume; Lopez-Lopez, Rafael; Salvesen, Helga B.; Amant, Frederic; Matias-Guiu, Xavier; Moreno-Bueno, Gema; Abal, Miguel

    2014-01-01

    Background: About 20% of patients diagnosed with endometrial cancer (EC) are considered high-risk with unfavorable prognosis. In the framework of the European Network for Individualized Treatment in EC (ENITEC), we investigated the presence and phenotypic features of Circulating Tumor Cells (CTC) in

  20. Low Number of Detectable Circulating Tumor Cells in Non-metastatic Colon Cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thorsteinsson, Morten; Söletormos, György; Jess, Per

    2011-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to detect circulating tumor cells (CTCs) in the peripheral blood of patients with non-metastatic colon cancer and to evaluate whether there is a diurnal variation in the CTC counts. Furthermore, the study aimed to examine the correlation between CTCs and TNM stage...

  1. Localized Castleman disease of plasma cell type in the abdomen

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LU Zhi-hua; WU Mei

    2011-01-01

    Castleman disease is a relatively rare entity,with the hyaline-vascular type the predominant form.Although the plasma cell type is uncommon,it still comprises approximately 10% of cases of localized diseases.In addition,the abdomen is a rare site for involvement and localized Castleman disease of the plasma cell type in the abdomen is rare.The radiologic features of localized plasma cell type in the abdomen are mostly limited to case reports.In addition to the conventional imaging findings,we present some new imaging findings of localized plasma cell type in the abdomen.

  2. Circulating nucleic acids in plasma and serum: applications in diagnostic techniques for noninvasive prenatal diagnosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gahan PB

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Peter B Gahan Anatomy and Human Sciences Department, King's College London, London Bridge, London, UK Abstract: The analysis of fetal nucleic acids in maternal blood 13 years ago has led to the initiation of noninvasive methods for the early determination of fetal gender, rhesus D status, and a number of aneuploid disorders and hemoglobinopathies. Subsequently, a comparatively large quantity of fetal DNA and RNA has been demonstrated in amniotic fluid as well as small amounts in premature infant saliva. The DNA and RNA in amniotic fluid has permitted an analysis of core transcriptomes, whilst the DNA and RNA in saliva allows the early detection and treatment monitoring of fetal developmental problems. These aspects are discussed together with the methodology and limits of analysis for noninvasive prenatal diagnosis in predictive, preventive, and personalized medicine. Keywords: fetal circulating DNA/RNA, amniotic fluid, saliva, aneuploidy, thalassemias

  3. Circulating innate lymphoid cells are unchanged in response to DAC HYP therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillard, Geoffrey O; Saenz, Steven A; Huss, David J; Fontenot, Jason D

    2016-05-15

    Innate lymphoid cells (ILCs) play an important role in immunity, inflammation, and tissue remodeling and their dysregulation is implicated in autoimmune and inflammatory disorders. We analyzed the impact of daclizumab, a humanized monoclonal anti-CD25 antibody, on circulating natural killer (NK) cells and ILCs in a cohort of multiple sclerosis patients. An increase in CD56(bright) NK cells and CD56(hi)CD16(intermediate) transitional NK cells was observed. No significant change in total ILCs or major ILC subpopulations was observed. These results refine our understanding of the impact of daclizumab on innate lymphoid cell populations.

  4. Retracing circulating tomour cells for biomarker characterization after enumeration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frandsen, Anders S.; Fabisiewicz, Anna; Jagiello-Gruszfeld, Agnieszka;

    2015-01-01

    to map and retrace individual CTCs from breast-cancer patients and nucleated cells from healthy blood donors using the CytoTrack platform. For proof of the retracing concept, CTC HER2 characterization by immunofluorescence was tested. Results: CTCs were detected and enumerated in three of four blood...... samples from breast-cancer patients and the locations of each individual CTCs were mapped on the discs. Nucleated cells were retraced on seven discs with 96.6%±8.5% recovery on five fields of view on each disc. Shifting of field of view for retracing was measured to 4-29 μm. In a blood sample from a HER2......-positive breast-cancer patient, CTC enumeration and mapping was followed by HER2 characterization and retracing to demonstrate downstream immunofluorescence analysis of the CTC. Conclusion: Mapping and retracing of CTCs enables downstream analysis of individual CTCs for existing and future cancer genotypic...

  5. Plasmoacanthoma of oral cavity and plasma cell cheilitis: two sides of same disorder “oral plasma cell mucositis” ?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gayatri Khatri

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Plasmoacanthoma and plasma cell cheilitis are rare disorders of obscure etiology characterized by a plasma cell infiltrate an 80-year-old woman presented with a verrucous, fleshy, skin colored plaque over lips, gingiva, and the palate and painful swallowing for over a period of 6 months. Histopathology of the lesion showed dense infiltrate of plasma cells. The lesions resolved completely after intralesional triamcinolone acetonide. Another 52-year-old male had progressively enlarging, erosive lesion over vermilion border of lower lip for 6months resembling actinic cheilitis. Histology was diagnostic of plasma cell cheilitis. Treatment with topical clobetasol propionate was effective. Plasma cell cheilitis and plasmoacanthoma perhaps represent a spectrum of oral ”plasma cell mucositis” with plasmoacanthoma being an advanced version of the former.

  6. Platelet-derived stromal cell-derived factor-1 is required for the transformation of circulating monocytes into multipotential cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noriyuki Seta

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: We previously described a primitive cell population derived from human circulating CD14(+ monocytes, named monocyte-derived multipotential cells (MOMCs, which are capable of differentiating into mesenchymal and endothelial lineages. To generate MOMCs in vitro, monocytes are required to bind to fibronectin and be exposed to soluble factor(s derived from circulating CD14(- cells. The present study was conducted to identify factors that induce MOMC differentiation. METHODS: We cultured CD14(+ monocytes on fibronectin in the presence or absence of platelets, CD14(- peripheral blood mononuclear cells, platelet-conditioned medium, or candidate MOMC differentiation factors. The transformation of monocytes into MOMCs was assessed by the presence of spindle-shaped adherent cells, CD34 expression, and the potential to differentiate in vitro into mesenchymal and endothelial lineages. RESULTS: The presence of platelets or platelet-conditioned medium was required to generate MOMCs from monocytes. A screening of candidate platelet-derived soluble factors identified stromal cell-derived factor (SDF-1 as a requirement for generating MOMCs. Blocking an interaction between SDF-1 and its receptor CXCR4 inhibited MOMC generation, further confirming SDF-1's critical role in this process. Finally, circulating MOMC precursors were found to reside in the CD14(+CXCR4(high cell population. CONCLUSION: The interaction of SDF-1 with CXCR4 is essential for the transformation of circulating monocytes into MOMCs.

  7. Squamous cell carcinoma of the oral cavity and circulating tumour cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wikner, Johannes; Gröbe, Alexander; Pantel, Klaus; Riethdorf, Sabine

    2014-05-10

    Due to a lack of substantial improvement in the outcome of patients suffering from oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) during the past decades, current staging methods need to be revised. This disease is associated with poor survival rates despite considerable advances in diagnosis and treatment. The early detection of metastases is an important indicator of survival, prognosis and relapse. Therefore, a better understanding of the mechanisms underlying metastasis is crucial. Exploring alternative measures apart from common procedures is needed to identify new prognostic markers. Similar to previous findings predominantly for other solid tumours, recently published studies demonstrate that circulating tumour cells (CTCs) and disseminated tumour cells (DTCs) might serve as prognostic markers and could supplement routine staging in OSCC. Thus, the detection of CTCs/DTCs is a promising tool to determine the individual need for therapeutic intervention. Encouraging results and new approaches point to the future use of targeted therapies for OSCC, an exceedingly heterogeneous subgroup of head and neck cancer. This review focuses on summarising technologies currently used to detect CTCs/DTCs. The translational relevance for OSCC is highlighted. The inherent challenges in detecting CTCs/DTCs will be emphasised.

  8. Monitoring multiple myeloma by next-generation sequencing of V(D)J rearrangements from circulating myeloma cells and cell-free myeloma DNA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oberle, Anna; Brandt, Anna; Voigtlaender, Minna; Thiele, Benjamin; Radloff, Janina; Schulenkorf, Anita; Alawi, Malik; Akyüz, Nuray; März, Manuela; Ford, Christopher T.; Krohn-Grimberghe, Artus; Binder, Mascha

    2017-01-01

    Recent studies suggest that circulating tumor cells and cell-free DNA may represent powerful non-invasive tools for monitoring disease in patients with solid and hematologic malignancies. Here, we conducted a pilot study in 27 myeloma patients to explore the clonotypic V(D)J rearrangement for monitoring circulating myeloma cells and cell-free myeloma DNA. Next-generation sequencing was used to define the myeloma V(D)J rearrangement and for subsequent peripheral blood tracking after treatment initiation. Positivity for circulating myeloma cells/cell-free myeloma was associated with conventional remission status (P<0.001) and 91% of non-responders/progressors versus 41% of responders had evidence of persistent circulating myeloma cells/cell-free myeloma DNA (P<0.001). About half of the partial responders showed complete clearance of circulating myeloma cells/cell-free myeloma DNA despite persistent M-protein, suggesting that these markers are less inert than the M-protein, rely more on cell turnover and, therefore, decline more rapidly after initiation of effective treatment. Positivity for circulating myeloma cells and for cell-free myeloma DNA were associated with each other (P=0.042), but discordant in 30% of cases. This indicates that cell-free myeloma DNA may not be generated entirely by circulating myeloma cells and may reflect overall tumor burden. Prospective studies need to define the predictive potential of high-sensitivity determination of circulating myeloma cells and DNA in the monitoring of multiple myeloma. PMID:28183851

  9. Circulating tumor cells in lung cancer: detection methods and clinical applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Na; Zhou, Jia; Cui, Fang; Tang, Xiaokui

    2015-04-01

    Circulating tumor cells (CTCs) are tumor cells that have disseminated from primary and metastatic sites, and circulate in the bloodstream. Advanced immunological and molecular-based methods can be used to detect and analyze the cells with the characteristics of tumor cells, and can be detected and analyzed in the blood of cancer patients. The most commonly used methods in lung cancer combine the processes of immunomagnetic enrichment and immunocytochemical detection, morphology-based enrichment coupled with reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), and RT-PCR alone. CTC analysis is considered a liquid biopsy approach for early diagnosis, risk stratification, evaluation of curative efficacy, and early detection of lung cancer relapse. In this review, we discuss the present techniques for analyzing CTCs, and the restrictions of using these methods in lung cancer. We also review the clinical studies in lung cancer and discuss the underlying associations between these studies and their future applications to this disease.

  10. Cytomorphology of Circulating Colorectal Tumor Cells:A Small Case Series

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marrinucci, Dena; Bethel, Kelly; Lazar, Daniel; Fisher, Jennifer; Huynh, Edward; Clark, Peter; Bruce, Richard; Nieva, Jorge; Kuhn, Peter

    2010-01-01

    Several methodologies exist to enumerate circulating tumor cells (CTCs) from the blood of cancer patients; however, most methodologies lack high-resolution imaging, and thus, little is known about the cytomorphologic features of these cells. In this study of metastatic colorectal cancer patients, we used immunofluorescent staining with fiber-optic array scanning technology to identify CTCs, with subsequent Wright-Giemsa and Papanicolau staining. The CTCs were compared to the corresponding primary and metastatic tumors. The colorectal CTCs showed marked intrapatient pleomorphism. In comparison to the corresponding tissue biopsies, cells from all sites showed similar pleomorphism, demonstrating that colorectal CTCs retain the pleomorphism present in regions of solid growth. They also often retain particular cytomorphologic features present in the patient's primary and/or metastatic tumor tissue. This study provides an initial analysis of the cytomorphologic features of circulating colon cancer cells, providing a foundation for further investigation into the significance and metastatic potential of CTCs. PMID:20111743

  11. Effects of Herceptin on circulating tumor cells in HER2 positive early breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, J-L; Yao, Q; Chen Y Wang, J-H; Wang, H; Fan, Q; Ling, R; Yi, J; Wang, L

    2015-03-20

    The objective of this study was to determine the changes in peripheral blood circulating tumor cells in HER2-positive early breast cancer before and after Herceptin therapy, and to explore the effects of the HER2 gene and Herceptin on circulating tumor cells. CK19 mRNA expression in peripheral blood was evaluated by qRT-PCR as an index of circulating tumor cells in 15 cases of HER-2-positive breast cancer and 18 cases of HER2-negative breast cancer before, and after chemotherapy as well. Ten cases of HER2-positive breast cancer continued on Herceptin therapy for 3 months after chemotherapy, and their peripheral blood was again drawn and assayed for CK-19 mRNA expression. Preoperatively, all cases of HER2-positive cancer were positive for CK19 mRNA in peripheral blood, but 6 cases of HER2-negative breast cancer were positive (33.3%), where there was a substantial difference between the two groups. After 6 cycles of adjuvant chemotherapy, CK19 positive rates in cases of HER2-positive and -negative breast cancer reduced by 93.3 and 11.1%, respectively, with a significant difference still existing. After 3 months of Herceptin therapy, expression of CK19 mRNA declined considerably in 10 cases of HER2 positive breast cancer (113.66 ± 88.65 vs 63.35 ± 49.27, P = 0.025). HER-2 gene expression closely correlated with circulating tumor cells in peripheral blood of early breast cancer patients. Moreover, Herceptin, a monoclonal antibody for HER2, can reduce the number of circulating tumor cells, which can be an early predictive factor for Herceptin therapy effectiveness against breast cancer.

  12. SDF1 Gene Variation Is Associated with Circulating SDF1 alpha Level and Endothelial Progenitor Cell Number-The Bruneck Study

    OpenAIRE

    Xiao, Q.; Ye, S.; Oberhollenzer, F; Mayr, A; Jahangiri, M; Willeit, J.; Kiechl, S; Xu, Q.

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Stromal cell-derived factor-1 (SDF1) and its receptor CXC chemokine receptor 4 (CXCR4) play a critical role in progenitor cell homing, mobilization and differentiation. It would be interesting to assess the predictive value of SDF-1alpha level for EPC number, and to ascertain whether there is a relationship between SDF1 gene variation, plasma SDF-1alpha level, and the number and function of circulating EPCs. We also tested whether EPC number and function was related to CXCR4 gene ...

  13. Innovative Microsystems: Novel Nanostructures to Capture Circulating Breast Cancer Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-05-01

    cancer, e.g., serum prostate specific antigen (PSA), digital rectal exami- nation, mammography, ultrasonography and needle biopsy .4–6 Since therapeutic...events under fine -controlled conditions. The fabrication starts with thermal growth and patterning of a 3000Å-thick oxide on a silicon wafer, 500μm in...maintained at 37°C in 5% CO2 in humid environment. Prior to experiments, the growth medium was aspirated and the cells were incubated with 4mM

  14. Towards Stratified Medicine in Plasma Cell Myeloma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egan, Philip; Drain, Stephen; Conway, Caroline; Bjourson, Anthony J.; Alexander, H. Denis

    2016-01-01

    Plasma cell myeloma is a clinically heterogeneous malignancy accounting for approximately one to 2% of newly diagnosed cases of cancer worldwide. Treatment options, in addition to long-established cytotoxic drugs, include autologous stem cell transplant, immune modulators, proteasome inhibitors and monoclonal antibodies, plus further targeted therapies currently in clinical trials. Whilst treatment decisions are mostly based on a patient’s age, fitness, including the presence of co-morbidities, and tumour burden, significant scope exists for better risk stratification, sub-classification of disease, and predictors of response to specific therapies. Clinical staging, recurring acquired cytogenetic aberrations, and serum biomarkers such as β-2 microglobulin, and free light chains are in widespread use but often fail to predict the disease progression or inform treatment decision making. Recent scientific advances have provided considerable insight into the biology of myeloma. For example, gene expression profiling is already making a contribution to enhanced understanding of the biology of the disease whilst Next Generation Sequencing has revealed great genomic complexity and heterogeneity. Pathways involved in the oncogenesis, proliferation of the tumour and its resistance to apoptosis are being unravelled. Furthermore, knowledge of the tumour cell surface and its interactions with bystander cells and the bone marrow stroma enhance this understanding and provide novel targets for cell and antibody-based therapies. This review will discuss the development in understanding of the biology of the tumour cell and its environment in the bone marrow, the implementation of new therapeutic options contributing to significantly improved outcomes, and the progression towards more personalised medicine in this disorder. PMID:27775669

  15. Towards Stratified Medicine in Plasma Cell Myeloma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philip Egan

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Plasma cell myeloma is a clinically heterogeneous malignancy accounting for approximately one to 2% of newly diagnosed cases of cancer worldwide. Treatment options, in addition to long-established cytotoxic drugs, include autologous stem cell transplant, immune modulators, proteasome inhibitors and monoclonal antibodies, plus further targeted therapies currently in clinical trials. Whilst treatment decisions are mostly based on a patient’s age, fitness, including the presence of co-morbidities, and tumour burden, significant scope exists for better risk stratification, sub-classification of disease, and predictors of response to specific therapies. Clinical staging, recurring acquired cytogenetic aberrations, and serum biomarkers such as β-2 microglobulin, and free light chains are in widespread use but often fail to predict the disease progression or inform treatment decision making. Recent scientific advances have provided considerable insight into the biology of myeloma. For example, gene expression profiling is already making a contribution to enhanced understanding of the biology of the disease whilst Next Generation Sequencing has revealed great genomic complexity and heterogeneity. Pathways involved in the oncogenesis, proliferation of the tumour and its resistance to apoptosis are being unravelled. Furthermore, knowledge of the tumour cell surface and its interactions with bystander cells and the bone marrow stroma enhance this understanding and provide novel targets for cell and antibody-based therapies. This review will discuss the development in understanding of the biology of the tumour cell and its environment in the bone marrow, the implementation of new therapeutic options contributing to significantly improved outcomes, and the progression towards more personalised medicine in this disorder.

  16. Prediagnostic circulating concentrations of plasma insulin-like growth factor-I and risk of lymphoma in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Perez-Cornago, Aurora; Appleby, Paul N.; Tipper, Sarah; Key, Timothy J.; Allen, Naomi E.; Nieters, Alexandra; Vermeulen, Roel; Roulland, Sandrine; Casabonne, Delphine; Kaaks, Rudolf; Fortner, Renee T.; Boeing, Heiner; Trichopoulou, Antonia; La Vecchia, Carlo; Klinaki, Eleni; Hansen, Louise; Tjønneland, Anne; Bonnet, Fabrice; Fagherazzi, Guy; Boutron-Ruault, Marie Christine; Pala, Valeria; Masala, Giovanna; Sacerdote, Carlotta; Peeters, Petra H.; Bueno-de-Mesquita, H. Bas; Weiderpass, Elisabete; Dorronsoro, Miren; Quirós, J. Ramón; Barricarte, Aurelio; Gavrila, Diana; Agudo, Antonio; Borgquist, Signe; Rosendahl, Ann H.; Melin, Beatrice; Wareham, Nick; Khaw, Kay Tee; Gunter, Marc; Riboli, Elio; Vineis, Paolo; Travis, Ruth C.

    2017-01-01

    Insulin-like growth factor (IGF)-I has cancer promoting activities. However, the hypothesis that circulating IGF-I concentration is related to risk of lymphoma overall or its subtypes has not been examined prospectively. IGF-I concentration was measured in pre-diagnostic plasma samples from a nested

  17. Development of motorized plasma lithography for cell patterning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deguchi, Shinji; Nagasawa, Yohei; Saito, Akira C; Matsui, Tsubasa S; Yokoyama, Sho; Sato, Masaaki

    2014-03-01

    The micropatterning of cells, which restricts the adhesive regions on the substrate and thus controls cell geometry, is used to study mechanobiology-related cell functions. Plasma lithography is a means of providing such patterns and uses a spatially-selective plasma treatment. Conventional plasma lithography employs a positionally-fixed mask with which the geometry of the patterns is determined and thus is not suited for producing on-demand geometries of patterns. To overcome this, we have manufactured a new device with a motorized mask mounted in a vacuum chamber of a plasma generator, which we designate motorized plasma lithography. Our pilot tests indicate that various pattern geometries can be obtained with the control of a shielding mask during plasma treatment. Our approach can thus omit the laborious process of preparing photolithographically microfabricated masks required for the conventional plasma lithography.

  18. Cell Adhesion on Polycaprolactone Modified by Plasma Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nina Recek

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available We have investigated the influence of various plasma treatments of electrospun polycaprolactone (PCL scaffolds on the adhesion and proliferation of human umbilical endothelial cells (HUVEC. The PCL scaffolds were treated in plasmas created in O2, NH3 or SO2 gas at identical conditions. Surface functionalization of plasma-treated samples was determined using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Cell adhesion and morphology were investigated by scanning electron microscopy and the influence of plasma treatment on cell adhesion and viability was evaluated with cell viability assay (MTT assay. The results showed the highest metabolic activity of HUVEC on PCL samples treated with O2 and NH3 plasma. Accordingly, the cells reflected the best adhesion and morphology on O2 and NH3 plasma-treated PCL samples already at 3 h. Moreover, treatment with O2 and NH3 plasma even stimulated endothelial cell proliferation on PCL surfaces by 60% as measured at 24 h, showing significant improvement in endothelialization of this material. Contrarily, SO2 plasma appeared to be less promising in comparison with O2 and NH3 plasma; however, it was still better than without any plasma treatment. Thus, our results importantly contribute to the biocompatibility improvement of the PCL polymer, commonly used for scaffolds in tissue engineering.

  19. Fluid phase biopsy for detection and characterization of circulating endothelial cells in myocardial infarction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bethel, Kelly; Luttgen, Madelyn S.; Damani, Samir; Kolatkar, Anand; Lamy, Rachelle; Sabouri-Ghomi, Mohsen; Topol, Sarah; Topol, Eric J.; Kuhn, Peter

    2014-02-01

    Elevated levels of circulating endothelial cells (CECs) occur in response to various pathological conditions including myocardial infarction (MI). Here, we adapted a fluid phase biopsy technology platform that successfully detects circulating tumor cells in the blood of cancer patients (HD-CTC assay), to create a high-definition circulating endothelial cell (HD-CEC) assay for the detection and characterization of CECs. Peripheral blood samples were collected from 79 MI patients, 25 healthy controls and six patients undergoing vascular surgery (VS). CECs were defined by positive staining for DAPI, CD146 and von Willebrand Factor and negative staining for CD45. In addition, CECs exhibited distinct morphological features that enable differentiation from surrounding white blood cells. CECs were found both as individual cells and as aggregates. CEC numbers were higher in MI patients compared with healthy controls. VS patients had lower CEC counts when compared with MI patients but were not different from healthy controls. Both HD-CEC and CellSearch® assays could discriminate MI patients from healthy controls with comparable accuracy but the HD-CEC assay exhibited higher specificity while maintaining high sensitivity. Our HD-CEC assay may be used as a robust diagnostic biomarker in MI patients.

  20. Technical Insights into Highly Sensitive Isolation and Molecular Characterization of Fixed and Live Circulating Tumor Cells for Early Detection of Tumor Invasion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laget, Sophie; Dhingra, Dalia M.; BenMohamed, Fatima; Capiod, Thierry; Osteras, Magne; Farinelli, Laurent; Jackson, Stephen; Paterlini-Bréchot, Patrizia

    2017-01-01

    Circulating Tumor Cells (CTC) and Circulating Tumor Microemboli (CTM) are Circulating Rare Cells (CRC) which herald tumor invasion and are expected to provide an opportunity to improve the management of cancer patients. An unsolved technical issue in the CTC field is how to obtain highly sensitive and unbiased collection of these fragile and heterogeneous cells, in both live and fixed form, for their molecular study when they are extremely rare, particularly at the beginning of the invasion process. We report on a new protocol to enrich from blood live CTC using ISET® (Isolation by SizE of Tumor/Trophoblastic Cells), an open system originally developed for marker-independent isolation of fixed tumor cells. We have assessed the impact of our new enrichment method on live tumor cells antigen expression, cytoskeleton structure, cell viability and ability to expand in culture. We have also explored the ISET® in vitro performance to collect intact fixed and live cancer cells by using spiking analyses with extremely low number of fluorescent cultured cells. We describe results consistently showing the feasibility of isolating fixed and live tumor cells with a Lower Limit of Detection (LLOD) of one cancer cell per 10 mL of blood and a sensitivity at LLOD ranging from 83 to 100%. This very high sensitivity threshold can be maintained when plasma is collected before tumor cells isolation. Finally, we have performed a comparative next generation sequencing (NGS) analysis of tumor cells before and after isolation from blood and culture. We established the feasibility of NGS analysis of single live and fixed tumor cells enriched from blood by our system. This study provides new protocols for detection and characterization of CTC collected from blood at the very early steps of tumor invasion. PMID:28060956

  1. Metabolic pathways that correlate with post-transfusion circulation of stored murine red blood cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Wolski, Karen; Fu, Xiaoyoun; Dumont, Larry J; Roback, John D; Waterman, Hayley; Odem-Davis, Katherine; Howie, Heather L; Zimring, James C

    2016-05-01

    Transfusion of red blood cells is a very common inpatient procedure, with more than 1 in 70 people in the USA receiving a red blood cell transfusion annually. However, stored red blood cells are a non-uniform product, based upon donor-to-donor variation in red blood cell storage biology. While thousands of biological parameters change in red blood cells over storage, it has remained unclear which changes correlate with function of the red blood cells, as opposed to being co-incidental changes. In the current report, a murine model of red blood cell storage/transfusion is applied across 13 genetically distinct mouse strains and combined with high resolution metabolomics to identify metabolic changes that correlated with red blood cell circulation post storage. Oxidation in general, and peroxidation of lipids in particular, emerged as changes that correlated with extreme statistical significance, including generation of dicarboxylic acids and monohydroxy fatty acids. In addition, differences in anti-oxidant pathways known to regulate oxidative stress on lipid membranes were identified. Finally, metabolites were identified that differed at the time the blood was harvested, and predict how the red blood cells perform after storage, allowing the potential to screen donors at time of collection. Together, these findings map out a new landscape in understanding metabolic changes during red blood cell storage as they relate to red blood cell circulation.

  2. DOES SINGLE INTRAMUSCULAR APPLICATION OF AUTOLOGOUS CONDITIONED PLASMA INFLUENCE SYSTEMIC CIRCULATING GROWTH FACTORS?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gert Schippinger

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Platelet-rich plasma (PRP has been employed to treat sports injuries to possibly accelerate healing and regeneration. This method offers some potential, especially for athletes. Growth factors are generally prohibited by the World Anti Doping Agency with exception to PRP which may induce adverse effects. The aim of this study was to evaluate any systemic increase of growth factors such as Insulin Like Growth Factor-1, Endothelial Growth Factors, Platelet-Derived Growth Factors, Fibroblast Growth Factors, Vascular-Endothelial Growth Factor and Transforming Growth Factors after local intramuscular administration of PRP in young, healthy male subjects keeping in mind adverse treatment effects. Enriched plasma from centrifuged blood samples was injected into the gluteus muscle. Venous blood was collected and serum prepared before as well as 0.5, 3 and 24 hours after PRP administration. Growth factors were analyzed using ELISA test kits. No significant systemic increase of growth factor levels was found after PRP injection except TGF-ß2. For that reason the PRP method may be applied for muscle injury treatment in elite athletes although further studies are necessary to clarify the response to the unspecific increased TGF-ß2 blood levels, which could increase the risk for local fibrosis

  3. INFLUENCE OF INTRAMUSCULAR APPLICATION OF AUTOLOGOUS CONDITIONED PLASMA ON SYSTEMIC CIRCULATING IGF-1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gert Schippinger

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Platelet-rich plasma (PRP to increase levels of platelets and growth factors has been used for the treatment of sports injuries suggesting to improve healing and regeneration. This method offers some potential especially for elite athletes. However, the insulin like growth factor-1 (IGF-1 is prohibited by the World Anti Doping Agency and, in addition, there may be a possible link between increased levels of IGF-1 and cancer risk. Aim of the study was to evaluate a systemic increase of IGF-1 after local intramuscular administration of PRP in young healthy moderately trained male subjects. Blood samples were drawn and PRP preparation was performed by means of centrifugation. Enriched plasma was injected into the gluteus muscle. Venous blood was collected and serum prepared before as well as after 0.5, 3 and 24 hours after PRP administration. IGF-1 analysis was performed applying an ELISA test kit. No significant systemic increase of mean IGF-1 was found after the PRP injection. Only one subject showed an increase after 24 h, but all IGF-1 values were found within reference limits. We conclude that a single intramuscular application of PRP does not significantly increase systemic IGF-1 levels. Therefore, a single application of PRP is safe with respect to systemic IGF-1 response and cancer risk and this should be allowed for treatment of muscle injuries in elite athletes

  4. Synthetic Circulating Cell-free DNA as Quality Control Materials for Somatic Mutation Detection in Liquid Biopsy for Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Rui; Peng, Rongxue; Li, Ziyang; Gao, Peng; Jia, Shiyu; Yang, Xin; Ding, Jiansheng; Han, Yanxi; Xie, Jiehong; Li, Jinming

    2017-09-01

    Detection of somatic genomic alterations in tumor-derived cell-free DNA (cfDNA) in the plasma is challenging owing to the low concentrations of cfDNA, variable detection methods, and complex workflows. Moreover, no proper quality control materials are available currently. We developed a set of synthetic cfDNA quality control materials (SCQCMs) containing spike-in cfDNA on the basis of micrococcal nuclease digestion carrying somatic mutations as simulated cfDNA and matched genomic DNA as genetic background to emulate paired tumor-normal samples in real clinical tests. Site-directed mutagenesis DNA that contained 1500-2000 bases with single-nucleotide variants or indels and genomic DNA from CRISPR/Cas9 edited cells with EML4-ALK rearrangements was fragmented, quantified, and added into micrococcal nuclease-digested DNA derived from HEK293T cells. To prove their suitability, the SCQCMs were compared with patient-derived plasma samples and validated in a collaborative study that encompassed 11 laboratories. The results of SCQCM analysis by next-generation sequencing showed strong agreement with those of patient-derived plasma samples, including the size profile of cfDNA and the quality control metrics of the sequencing data. More than 95% of laboratories correctly detected the SCQCMs with EGFR T790M, L858R, KRAS G12D, and a deletion in exon 19, as well as with EML4-ALK variant 2. The SCQCMs were successfully applied in a broad range of settings, methodologies, and informatics techniques. We conclude that SCQCMs can be used as optimal quality controls in test performance assessments for circulating tumor DNA somatic mutation detection. © 2017 American Association for Clinical Chemistry.

  5. Exploiting serum interactions with cationic biomaterials enables label-free circulating tumor cell isolation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castellanos, Carlos

    Herein we investigate the role charged biomaterials and fluid dielectric properties have on microfluidic capture and isolation of circulating tumor cells. We determine that heparan sulfate proteoglycans on cancer cell surfaces are responsible for elevated electric charge of cancer cells compared with white blood cells and that these proteoglycans help mediate adhesive interactions between cells and charged surfaces in albumin-containing fluids. Cancer cell firm adhesion to charged surfaces persists when cells are bathed in up to 1% (w/v) human albumin solution, while white blood cell adhesion is nearly abrogated. As many protocols rely on electrical interactions between cells and biomaterials, our study could reveal a new determinant of efficient adhesion and targeting of specific tissue types in the context of a biological fluid environment.

  6. Elevated levels of circulating cell-free DNA and neutrophil proteins are associated with neonatal sepsis and necrotizing enterocolitis in immature mice, pigs and infants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nguyen, Duc Ninh; Stensballe, Allan; Lai, Jacqueline Cy

    2017-01-01

    with cytokines in gut tissues. The changes in cfDNA levels were further studied in preterm pigs and neonatal mice with induced sepsis, and in preterm infants with or without LOS and/or NEC. Fifteen of 114 preterm pigs spontaneously developed both LOS and NEC, and they showed increased intestinal levels of IL-6......Preterm infants are highly susceptible to late-onset sepsis (LOS) and necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC), but disease pathogenesis and specific diagnostic markers are lacking. Circulating cell-free DNA (cfDNA) and immune cell-derived proteins are involved in multiple immune diseases in adults but have...... not been investigated in preterm neonates. We explored the relation of circulating neutrophil-associated proteins and cfDNA to LOS and/or NEC. Using a clinically relevant preterm pig model of spontaneous LOS and NEC development, we investigated neutrophil-associated proteins and cfDNA in plasma, together...

  7. Circulating Tumor Cells: A Review of Non-EpCAM-Based Approaches for Cell Enrichment and Isolation

    OpenAIRE

    Gabriel, Marta,; Calleja, Lidia,; Chalopin, Antoine; Ory, Benjamin; Heymann, Dominique

    2016-01-01

    International audience; Background: Circulating tumor cells (CTCs) are biomarkers for non-invasively measuring the evolution of tumor genotypes during treatment and disease progression. Recent technical progress has made it possible to detect and characterize CTCs at the single-cell level in blood. Content: Most current methods are based on epithelial cell adhesion molecule (EpCAM) detection, but numerous studies have demonstrated that EpCAM is not a universal marker for CTC detection since i...

  8. Responses of cells in plasma-activated medium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Hiromasa; Mizuno, Masaaki; Ishikawa, Kenji; Takeda, Keigo; Hashizume, Hiroshi; Nakamura, Kae; Kajiyama, Hiroaki; Kano, Hiroyuki; Okazaki, Yasumasa; Toyokuni, Shinya; Maruyama, Shoichi; Kodera, Yasuhiro; Terasaki, Hiroko; Adachi, Tetsuo; Kato, Masashi; Kikkawa, Fumitaka; Hori, Masaru

    2015-09-01

    Plasma consists of electrons, ions, radicals, and lights, and produces various reactive species in gas and liquid phase. Cells receive various inputs from their circumstances, and induce several physiological outputs. Our goal is to clarify the relationships between plasma inputs and physiological outputs. Plasma-activated medium (PAM) is a circumstance that plasma provides cells and our previous studies suggest that PAM is a promising tool for cancer therapy. However, the mode of actions remains to be elucidated. We propose survival and proliferation signaling networks as well as redox signaling networks are key factors to understand cellular responses of PAM-treated glioblastoma cells.

  9. Clinical utility of circulating tumor cells in patients with non-small-cell lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallo, Marianna; De Luca, Antonella; Maiello, Monica Rosaria; D'Alessio, Amelia; Esposito, Claudia; Chicchinelli, Nicoletta; Forgione, Laura; Piccirillo, Maria Carmela; Rocco, Gaetano; Morabito, Alessandro; Botti, Gerardo; Normanno, Nicola

    2017-08-01

    Several different studies have addressed the role of the circulating tumor cells (CTC) in non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). In particular, the potential of CTC analysis in the early diagnosis of NSCLC and in the prediction of the outcome of patients with early and advanced NSCLC have been explored. A major limit of these studies is that they used different techniques for CTC isolation and enumeration, they employed different thresholds to discriminate between high- and low-risk patients, and they enrolled heterogeneous and often small cohort of patients. Nevertheless, the results of many studies are concordant in indicating a correlation between high CTC count and poor prognosis in both early and advanced NSCLC. The reduction of CTC number following treatment might also represent an important indicator of sensitivity to therapy in patients with metastatic disease. Preliminary data also suggest the potential for CTC analysis in the early diagnosis of NSCLC in high-risk individuals. However, these findings need to be confirmed in large prospective trials in order to be transferred to the clinical practice. The molecular profiling of single CTC in NSCLC might provide important information on tumor biology and on the mechanisms involved in tumor dissemination and in acquired resistance to targeted therapies. In this respect, xenografts derived from CTC might represent a valuable tool to investigate these phenomena and to develop novel therapeutic strategies.

  10. Natalizumab treatment leads to an increase in circulating CXCR3-expressing B cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penttilä, Tarja-Leena; Airas, Laura

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To study the effects of natalizumab treatment on subgroups of circulating peripheral blood B cell populations. Methods: We studied the proportions and absolute numbers of CD19+CD20+, CD10+, and CD5+ B cell populations, and determined very late activation antigen-4 and chemokine receptor CXCR3, CCR5, and CCR6 expression on B cells in the peripheral blood of 14 natalizumab-treated patients with relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis. Five blood samples per patient were obtained longitudinally before and during the first year of treatment. Blood samples were analyzed by 6-color flow cytometry. Results: Proportions of B cells and CD10+ pre–B cells were significantly increased, and very late activation antigen-4 expression on the B cell surface was significantly decreased already after 1 week of natalizumab treatment. Natalizumab-induced sustained increase in the proportion and absolute number of CXCR3-expressing B cells was statistically significant after 1 month of treatment. There were no changes in the proportions of CCR5- or CCR6-expressing B cells. Conclusions: The rapid and persistent increase in circulating CXCR3-expressing B cells in response to natalizumab treatment possibly reflects the relevance of this chemokine receptor in controlling migration of B cells into the CNS in humans in vivo. PMID:27800533

  11. Detection, isolation, and capture of circulating breast cancer cells with photoacoustic flow cytometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattacharyya, Kiran; Njoroge, Martin; Goldschmidt, Benjamin S.; Gaffigan, Brian; Rood, Kyle; Viator, John A.

    2013-03-01

    According to the CDC, breast cancer is the most common cancer and the second leading cause of cancer related deaths among women. Metastasis, or the presence of secondary tumors caused by the spread of cancer cells via the circulatory or lymphatic systems, significantly worsens the prognosis of any breast cancer patient. In this study, a technique is developed to detect circulating breast cancer cells in human blood using a photoacoustic flow cytometry method. A Q-switched laser with a 5 ns pulse at 532 nm is used to interrogate thousands of cells with one pulse as they flow through the beam path. Cells which are pigmented, either naturally or artificially, emit an ultrasound wave as a result of the photoacoustic (PA) effect. Breast cancer cells are targeted with chromophores through immunochemistry in order to provide pigment. After which, the device is calibrated to demonstrate a single-cell detection limit. Cultured breast cancer cells are added to whole blood to reach a biologically relevant concentration of about 25-45 breast cancer cells per 1 mL of blood. An in vitro photoacoustic flow cytometer is used to detect and isolate these cells followed by capture with the use of a micromanipulator. This method can not only be used to determine the disease state of the patient and the response to therapy, it can also be used for genetic testing and in vitro drug trials since the circulating cell can be captured and studied.

  12. The multiple personality disorder phenotype(s) of circulating endothelial cells in cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertolini, Francesco; Mancuso, Patrizia; Braidotti, Paola; Shaked, Yuval; Kerbel, Robert S

    2009-08-01

    Circulating endothelial cells (CECs) and circulating endothelial progenitors (CEPs) are currently being investigated in a variety of diseases as markers of vascular turnover or damage and, also in the case of CEPs, vasculogenesis. CEPs appear to have a "catalytic" role in different steps of cancer progression and recurrence after therapy, and there are preclinical and clinical data suggesting that CEC enumeration might be useful to select and stratify patients who are candidates for anti-angiogenic treatments. In some types of cancer, CECs and CEPs might be one of the possible hidden identities of cancer stem cells. The definition of CEC and CEP phenotype and the standardization of CEC and CEP enumeration strategies are highly desirable goals in order to exploit these cells as reliable biomarkers in oncology clinical trials.

  13. Circulating FGF23 levels in response to acute changes in plasma Ca(2+)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gravesen, E; Mace, M.L.; Hofman-Bang, J.

    2014-01-01

    The regulation of fibroblast growth factor 23 (FGF23) synthesis and secretion is still incompletely understood. FGF23 is an important regulator of renal phosphate excretion and has regulatory effects on the calciotropic hormones calcitriol and parathyroid hormone (PTH). Calcium (Ca) and phosphate...... homeostasis are closely interrelated, and it is therefore likely that Ca is involved in FGF23 regulation. It has recently been reported that dietary Ca influenced FGF23 levels, with high Ca increasing FGF23. The mechanism remains to be clarified. It remains unknown whether acute changes in plasma Ca influence...... FGF23 levels and whether a close relationship, similar that known for Ca and PTH, exists between Ca and FGF23. Thus, the aim of the present study was to examine whether acute hypercalcemia and hypocalcemia regulate FGF23 levels in the rat. Acute hypercalcemia was induced by an intravenous Ca infusion...

  14. Delayed effects of cold atmospheric plasma on vascular cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stoffels, Eva; Roks, Anton J. M.; Deelmm, Leo E.

    2008-01-01

    We investigated the long-term behaviour of vascular cells (endothelial and smooth muscle) after exposure to a cold atmospheric plasma source. The cells were treated through a gas-permeable membrane, in order to simulate intravenous treatment with a gas plasma-filled catheter. Such indirect treatment

  15. Delayed effects of cold atmospheric plasma on vascular cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stoffels, Eva; Roks, Anton J. M.; Deelmm, Leo E.

    2008-01-01

    We investigated the long-term behaviour of vascular cells (endothelial and smooth muscle) after exposure to a cold atmospheric plasma source. The cells were treated through a gas-permeable membrane, in order to simulate intravenous treatment with a gas plasma-filled catheter. Such indirect treatment

  16. Evolution of Externally Excited Convective Cells in Plasmas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sugai, H.; Juul Rasmussen, Jens; Thomsen, Kenneth

    1983-01-01

    Convective cells are excited externally in a fully ionized magnetized plasma, and their space-time evolution is investigated by two-dimensional potential measurements. A positive cell is excited externally in the `scrape-off' layer of a plasma column produced by surface ionization. Its interaction...

  17. Awakening acceleration: AWAKE’s plasma cell arrive

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN Audiovisual Productions Service; Paola Catapano; Jacques Fichet; Paola Catapano

    2016-01-01

    Interview with Edda Gschwendtner, project leader of the AWAKE collaboration, on the day the AWAKE's plasma cell is transported from the surface hall were it was tested (EHN1 on CERN Prevessin) to the AWAKE tunnel in CERN's SPS decay tunnel. The Plasma Cell was built by the Max Planck Institute in Munich.

  18. Decrease in circulating plasmacytoid dendritic cells during short-term systemic normobaric hypoxia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yilmaz, Atilla; Ratka, Josi; Rohm, Ilonka; Pistulli, Rudin; Goebel, Bjorn; Asadi, Yahya; Petri, Alexander; Kiehntopf, Michael; Figulla, Hans R; Jung, Christian

    2016-02-01

    During exposure to high altitude, the immune system is altered. During hypoxia, an increase in interleukin (IL)-6 and high sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP), and an increase in natural killer cells and decrease in T cells in blood was shown. However, the impact of hypoxia on dendritic cells has not been investigated yet. Twelve healthy volunteers were subjected to a transient normobaric hypoxia for 6·5 h simulating an oxygen concentration at 5500 m. During exposure to hypoxia, blood samples were collected and analysed by flow cytometrical cell sorting (FACS) for circulating myeloid (mDCs) and plasmacytoid (pDCs) DCs. Serum levels of IL-6 and tumour necrosis factor (TNF)-α were analysed. In a cell culture hypoxia chamber, blood samples were subjected to the same hypoxia and analysed regarding DCs. Exposure to normobaric hypoxia induced a significant decrease in circulating pDCs about 45% (P = 0·001) but not of mDC compared to baseline normoxia. Furthermore, we observed a significant increase of TNF-α about 340% (P = 0·03) and of IL-6 about 286% (P = 0·002). In cell culture experiments exposure of blood to hypoxia led to no significant changes in DCs, so that a direct cytotoxic effect was excluded. During hypoxia, we observed a transient increase in stromal-derived factor 1 (SDF-1) which is important for pDC tissue recruitment. We show a significant decrease in circulating pDCs during hypoxia in parallel to a pro-inflammatory response. Further studies are necessary to evaluate whether the decrease in circulating pDCs might be the result of an enhanced tissue recruitment. © 2015 Stichting European Society for Clinical Investigation Journal Foundation.

  19. Effect of Natalizumab on Circulating CD4(+) T-Cells in Multiple Sclerosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Börnsen, Lars; Christensen, Jeppe Romme; Ratzer, Rikke

    2012-01-01

    -cells in general or myelin-reactive T-cells in particular showed signs of increased immune activation. Furthermore we examined the effects of natalizumab on CD4(+) T-cell responses to myelin in vitro. Natalizumab-treated MS patients had significantly increased numbers of effector-memory T-cells in the blood. In T......In multiple sclerosis (MS), treatment with the monoclonal antibody natalizumab effectively reduces the formation of acute lesions in the central nervous system (CNS). Natalizumab binds the integrin very late antigen (VLA)-4, expressed on the surface of immune cells, and inhibits VLA-4 dependent...... transmigration of circulating immune-cells across the vascular endothelium into the CNS. Recent studies suggested that natalizumab treated MS patients have an increased T-cell pool in the blood compartment which may be selectively enriched in activated T-cells. Proposed causes are sequestration of activated T...

  20. Rapid Changes in Circulating Tumor DNA in Serially Sampled Plasma During Treatment of Breast Cancer: A Case Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakagomi, Hiroshi; Hirotsu, Yosuke; Amemiya, Kenji; Nakada, Haruka; Inoue, Masayuki; Mochizuki, Hitoshi; Oyama, Toshio; Omata, Masao

    2017-01-01

    Patient: Female, 45 Final Diagnosis: Breast cancer Symptoms: Breast tumor Medication: — Clinical Procedure: Analysis of circulating tumor DNA Specialty: Oncology Objective: Unusual setting of medical care Background: The analysis of circulating tumor DNA (ctDNA) is expected to be a modality to determine the status of cancer in real time. This case indicated utilities and issues in measuring the ctDNA in cancer patients. Case Report: A 45-year-old woman with metastatic breast cancer was treated with bevacizumab and paclitaxel. The lung metastases were decreased but the meningitis carcinoma developed rapidly and she died. During the treatment with bevacizumab and paclitaxel, blood samples were taken serially and ctDNA was analyzed using a next-generation sequencer. TP53 frameshift mutation (TP53; p.Arg158fs with 7 nucleotides deletion) was identified in the tumor, and dynamic change in this mutation in ctDNA was observed in serially sampled plasma in this patient. We observed a rapid decrease of TP53 mutation at the beginning of treatment, then it increased as a sign of relapse. However, the high allelic fraction value of TP53 mutation was not consistent during the progression of cancer, suggesting that several factors affected the value of ctDNA. Conclusions: Although this is a single-case experience, it strongly suggests ctDNA could be a modality to determine the cancer status in real time. However, we found that several factors affected the value of ctDNA. Further investigations are needed to reveal the significance of these very high-sensitivity changes. PMID:28065930

  1. Taoren-Honghua herb pair and its main components promoting blood circulation through influencing on hemorheology, plasma coagulation and platelet aggregation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Li; Duan, Jin-ao; Tang, Yuping; Guo, Jianming; Yang, Nianyun; Ma, Hongyue; Shi, Xuqin

    2012-01-31

    Persicae Semen (Taoren) and Carthami Flos (Honghua) used in pair which is named as Taoren-Honghua (TH) herb pair has been used in traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) for promoting blood circulation to dissipate blood stasis for many years in China. This paper investigated the effects of TH and its main components amygdalin and hydroxysafflor yellow A (HSYA) on hemorheological disorders of blood stasis in rats. Rats were randomly divided into seven groups (control group, model group, TH group, amygdalin group, HSYA group, amygdalin+HSYA group, and aspirin group) with eight animals in each, whose gender was equally distributed throughout groups. All treatments were performed by gavage and administered seven times with an interval of 12h. After the fifth administration, the model rats except those in control group with blood stasis were established by being placed in ice-cold water during the interval between two injections of adrenaline hydrochloride (Adr); and blood samples were collected 30min after the last administration on the following day. TH could significantly decrease whole blood viscosity (WBV), plasma viscosity (PV) and packed cell volume (PCV). It also significantly prolonged thrombin time (TT) and thromboplastin time (APTT), increased prothrombin time (PT) and lowered fibrinogen content (FIB). HSYA which significantly decreased WBV and PV had no effect on plasma coagulation parameters. Amygdalin could significantly decrease PV, prolong APTT and decrease FIB, showing few effects on WBV. TH and its main components amygdalin and HSYA could significantly reduce platelet aggregation and protect vascular endothelial cells. Based on the above results, amygdalin and HSYA were responsible for the main curative effects of TH and usually had synergetic effects, such as decreasing PV and platelet aggregation percentage. The study may provide scientific information to further understanding of the mechanism(s) of TH and its main components in activating blood

  2. Circulating MicroRNAs as Non-Invasive Biomarkers for Early Detection of Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Magdalena B Wozniak

    Full Text Available Detection of lung cancer at an early stage by sensitive screening tests could be an important strategy to improving prognosis. Our objective was to identify a panel of circulating microRNAs in plasma that will contribute to early detection of lung cancer.Plasma samples from 100 early stage (I to IIIA non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC patients and 100 non-cancer controls were screened for 754 circulating microRNAs via qRT-PCR, using TaqMan MicroRNA Arrays. Logistic regression with a lasso penalty was used to select a panel of microRNAs that discriminate between cases and controls. Internal validation of model discrimination was conducted by calculating the bootstrap optimism-corrected AUC for the selected model.We identified a panel of 24 microRNAs with optimum classification performance. The combination of these 24 microRNAs alone could discriminate lung cancer cases from non-cancer controls with an AUC of 0.92 (95% CI: 0.87-0.95. This classification improved to an AUC of 0.94 (95% CI: 0.90-0.97 following addition of sex, age and smoking status to the model. Internal validation of the model suggests that the discriminatory power of the panel will be high when applied to independent samples with a corrected AUC of 0.78 for the 24-miRNA panel alone.Our 24-microRNA predictor improves lung cancer prediction beyond that of known risk factors.

  3. Isolation of circulating tumor cells by immunomagnetic enrichment and fluorescence-activated cell sorting (IE/FACS) for molecular profiling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magbanua, Mark Jesus M; Park, John W

    2013-12-01

    Circulating tumor cells (CTCs) are cells shed by the primary tumor into the blood stream capable of initiating distant metastasis. In the past decade, numerous assays have been developed to reliably detect these extremely rare cells. However, methods for purification of CTCs with little or no contamination of normal blood cells for molecular profiling are limited. We have developed a novel protocol to isolate CTCs by combining immunomagnetic enrichment and fluorescence-activated cell sorting (IE/FACS). The two-part assay includes (1) immunomagnetic capture using magnetic beads conjugated to monoclonal antibody against an epithelial cell adhesion marker (EpCAM) to enrich for tumor cells; and (2) FACS analysis using EpCAM to purify tumor cells away from mononuclear cells of hematopoietic lineage. Downstream molecular analyses of single and pooled cells confirmed the isolation of highly pure CTCs with characteristics typical that of malignant cells.

  4. Prediagnostic circulating concentrations of plasma insulin‐like growth factor‐I and risk of lymphoma in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Appleby, Paul N.; Tipper, Sarah; Key, Timothy J.; Allen, Naomi E.; Nieters, Alexandra; Vermeulen, Roel; Roulland, Sandrine; Casabonne, Delphine; Kaaks, Rudolf; Fortner, Renee T.; Boeing, Heiner; Trichopoulou, Antonia; La Vecchia, Carlo; Klinaki, Eleni; Hansen, Louise; Tjønneland, Anne; Bonnet, Fabrice; Fagherazzi, Guy; Boutron‐Ruault, Marie‐Christine; Pala, Valeria; Masala, Giovanna; Sacerdote, Carlotta; Peeters, Petra H.; Bueno‐de‐Mesquita, H. B(as); Weiderpass, Elisabete; Dorronsoro, Miren; Quirós, J. Ramón; Barricarte, Aurelio; Gavrila, Diana; Agudo, Antonio; Borgquist, Signe; Rosendahl, Ann H.; Melin, Beatrice; Wareham, Nick; Khaw, Kay‐Tee; Gunter, Marc; Riboli, Elio; Vineis, Paolo; Travis, Ruth C.

    2016-01-01

    Insulin‐like growth factor (IGF)‐I has cancer promoting activities. However, the hypothesis that circulating IGF‐I concentration is related to risk of lymphoma overall or its subtypes has not been examined prospectively. IGF‐I concentration was measured in pre‐diagnostic plasma samples from a nested case–control study of 1,072 cases of lymphoid malignancies and 1,072 individually matched controls from the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition. Odds ratios (ORs) and confidence intervals (CIs) for lymphoma were calculated using conditional logistic regression. IGF‐I concentration was not associated with overall lymphoma risk (multivariable‐adjusted OR for highest versus lowest third = 0.77 [95% CI = 0.57–1.03], p trend = 0.06). There was no statistical evidence of heterogeneity in this association with IGF‐I by sex, age at blood collection, time between blood collection and diagnosis, age at diagnosis, or body mass index (p heterogeneity for all ≥ 0.05). There were no associations between IGF‐I concentration and risk for specific BCL subtypes, T‐cell lymphoma or Hodgkin lymphoma, although number of cases were small. In this European population, IGF‐I concentration was not associated with risk of overall lymphoma. This study provides the first prospective evidence on circulating IGF‐I concentrations and risk of lymphoma. Further prospective data are required to examine associations of IGF‐I concentrations with lymphoma subtypes. PMID:27870006

  5. A gestational profile of placental exosomes in maternal plasma and their effects on endothelial cell migration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salomon, Carlos; Torres, Maria Jose; Kobayashi, Miharu; Scholz-Romero, Katherin; Sobrevia, Luis; Dobierzewska, Aneta; Illanes, Sebastian E; Mitchell, Murray D; Rice, Gregory E

    2014-01-01

    Studies completed to date provide persuasive evidence that placental cell-derived exosomes play a significant role in intercellular communication pathways that potentially contribute to placentation and development of materno-fetal vascular circulation. The aim of this study was to establish the gestational-age release profile and bioactivity of placental cell-derived exosome in maternal plasma. Plasma samples (n = 20 per pregnant group) were obtained from non-pregnant and pregnant women in the first (FT, 6-12 weeks), second (ST, 22-24 weeks) and third (TT, 32-38 weeks) trimester. The number of exosomes and placental exosome contribution were determined by quantifying immunoreactive exosomal CD63 and placenta-specific marker (PLAP), respectively. The effect of exosomes isolated from FT, ST and TT on endothelial cell migration were established using a real-time, live-cell imaging system (Incucyte). Exosome plasma concentration was more than 50-fold greater in pregnant women than in non-pregnant women (pexosomes present in maternal plasma increased significantly with gestational age by more that two-fold (pExosomes isolated from FT, ST and TT increased endothelial cell migration by 1.9±0.1, 1.6±0.2 and 1.3±0.1-fold, respectively compared to the control. Pregnancy is associated with a dramatic increase in the number of exosomes present in plasma and maternal plasma exosomes are bioactive. While the role of placental cell-derived exosome in regulating maternal and/or fetal vascular responses remains to be elucidated, changes in exosome profile may be of clinical utility in the diagnosis of placental dysfunction.

  6. A gestational profile of placental exosomes in maternal plasma and their effects on endothelial cell migration.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Salomon

    Full Text Available Studies completed to date provide persuasive evidence that placental cell-derived exosomes play a significant role in intercellular communication pathways that potentially contribute to placentation and development of materno-fetal vascular circulation. The aim of this study was to establish the gestational-age release profile and bioactivity of placental cell-derived exosome in maternal plasma. Plasma samples (n = 20 per pregnant group were obtained from non-pregnant and pregnant women in the first (FT, 6-12 weeks, second (ST, 22-24 weeks and third (TT, 32-38 weeks trimester. The number of exosomes and placental exosome contribution were determined by quantifying immunoreactive exosomal CD63 and placenta-specific marker (PLAP, respectively. The effect of exosomes isolated from FT, ST and TT on endothelial cell migration were established using a real-time, live-cell imaging system (Incucyte. Exosome plasma concentration was more than 50-fold greater in pregnant women than in non-pregnant women (p<0.001. During normal healthy pregnancy, the number of exosomes present in maternal plasma increased significantly with gestational age by more that two-fold (p<0.001. Exosomes isolated from FT, ST and TT increased endothelial cell migration by 1.9±0.1, 1.6±0.2 and 1.3±0.1-fold, respectively compared to the control. Pregnancy is associated with a dramatic increase in the number of exosomes present in plasma and maternal plasma exosomes are bioactive. While the role of placental cell-derived exosome in regulating maternal and/or fetal vascular responses remains to be elucidated, changes in exosome profile may be of clinical utility in the diagnosis of placental dysfunction.

  7. Detection of mycoplasma infection in circulating tumor cells in patients with hepatocellular carcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Hong Seo; Lee, Hyun Min; Kim, Won-Tae; Kim, Min Kyu [Department of Bioscience and Biotechnology, Institute of Bioscience, Sejong University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Chang, Hee Jin [Center for Colorectal Cancer, Research Institute and Hospital of National Cancer Center, Goyang-si (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Hye Ran [Department of Internal Medicine, Inje University Ilsan Paik Hospital, Goyang-si (Korea, Republic of); Joh, Jae-Won [Department of Surgery, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Dae Shick, E-mail: oncorkim@skku.edu [Department of Pathology, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Ryu, Chun Jeih, E-mail: cjryu@sejong.ac.kr [Department of Bioscience and Biotechnology, Institute of Bioscience, Sejong University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-04-04

    Highlights: • This study generates a monoclonal antibody CA27 against the mycoplasmal p37 protein. • CA27 isolates circulating tumor cells (CTCs) from the blood of liver cancer patients. • Results show the first evidence for mycoplasma infected-CTCs in cancer patients. - Abstract: Many studies have shown that persistent infections of bacteria promote carcinogenesis and metastasis. Infectious agents and their products can modulate cancer progression through the induction of host inflammatory and immune responses. The presence of circulating tumor cells (CTCs) is considered as an important indicator in the metastatic cascade. We unintentionally produced a monoclonal antibody (MAb) CA27 against the mycoplasmal p37 protein in mycoplasma-infected cancer cells during the searching process of novel surface markers of CTCs. Mycoplasma-infected cells were enriched by CA27-conjugated magnetic beads in the peripheral blood mononuclear cells in patients with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) and analyzed by confocal microscopy with anti-CD45 and CA27 antibodies. CD45-negative and CA27-positive cells were readily detected in three out of seven patients (range 12–30/8.5 ml blood), indicating that they are mycoplasma-infected circulating epithelial cells. CA27-positive cells had larger size than CD45-positive hematological lineage cells, high nuclear to cytoplasmic ratios and irregular nuclear morphology, which identified them as CTCs. The results show for the first time the existence of mycoplasma-infected CTCs in patients with HCC and suggest a possible correlation between mycoplasma infection and the development of cancer metastasis.

  8. Polymer microfilters with nanostructured surfaces for the culture of circulating cancer cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Makarova, Olga V. [Creatv MicroTech, Inc., 2242 West Harrison St., Chicago 60612, IL (United States); Adams, Daniel L., E-mail: dan@creatvmicrotech.com [Creatv MicroTech, Inc., 1 Deer Park Drive, Monmouth Junction, NJ 08852 (United States); Divan, Ralu; Rosenmann, Daniel [Center for Nanoscale Materials, Argonne National Laboratory, 9700 South Cass Ave., Argonne 60439, IL (United States); Zhu, Peixuan; Li, Shuhong; Amstutz, Platte; Tang, Cha-Mei [Creatv MicroTech, Inc., 11609 Lake Potomac Drive, Potomac 20854, MD (United States)

    2016-09-01

    There is a critical need to improve the accuracy of drug screening and testing through the development of in vitro culture systems that more effectively mimic the in vivo environment. Surface topographical features on the nanoscale level, in short nanotopography, effect the cell growth patterns, and hence affect cell function in culture. We report the preliminary results on the fabrication, and subsequent cellular growth, of nanoscale surface topography on polymer microfilters using cell lines as a precursor to circulating tumor cells (CTCs). To create various nanoscale features on the microfilter surface, we used reactive ion etching (RIE) with and without an etching mask. An anodized aluminum oxide (AAO) membrane fabricated directly on the polymer surface served as an etching mask. Polymer filters with a variety of modified surfaces were used to compare the effects on the culture of cancer cell lines in blank culture wells, with untreated microfilters or with RIE-treated microfilters. We then report the differences of cell shape, phenotype and growth patterns of bladder and glioblastoma cancer cell lines after isolation on the various types of material modifications. Our data suggest that RIE modified polymer filters can isolate model cell lines while retaining ell viability, and that the RIE filter modification allows T24 monolayering cells to proliferate as a structured cluster. - Highlights: • Surface topographical effects the growth patterns and cell function of cancer cells • Nanoscale surface topography on polymer filters for circulating tumor cell culture • Membrane fabricated directly on polymer surfaces utilized for polymer etching • Nanotopography alters cell shape, phenotype and growth patterns of cancer cells • Nanoscale surface topography dictates monolayering or 3D structured cell culture.

  9. Plasma-cell-predominant B-cell pseudolymphoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nervi, Stephen J; Schwartz, R A

    2008-10-15

    A 46-year-old woman with no history of foreign travel presented to the New Jersey Medical School Dermatology Clinic in July, 2007, with pruritic ulcerating facial masses that had been present since October, 2006. Clinical and histopathologic findings were most consistent with a diagnosis of cutaneous plasma cell predominant B cell pseudolymphoma. An extensive search using special stains for an etiologic organism was negative. The term cutaneous pseudolymphoma has been coined to describe the accumulation of either T or B cell lymphocytes in the skin that is caused by a nonmalignant stimulus and encompasses several different terms depending on etiology. In cases of cutaneous pseudolymphoma where a cause is identified, treatment entails removing the underlying causative agent. Idiopathic cases tend to be recalcitrant to treatment.

  10. Real-time photoacoustic flow cytography and photothermolysis of single circulating melanoma cells in vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Yun; Wang, Lidai; Shi, Junhui; Yao, Junjie; Li, Lei; Zhang, Ruiying; Huang, Chih-Hsien; Zou, Jun; Wang, Lihong V.

    2017-03-01

    Metastasis is responsible for as many as 90% of cancer-related deaths, and the deadliest skin cancer, melanoma, has a high propensity for metastasis. Since hematogenous spread of circulating tumor cells (CTCs) is cancer's main route of metastasis, detecting and destroying CTCs can impede metastasis and improve patients' prognoses. Extensive studies employing exogenous agents to detect tumor-specific biomarkers and guide therapeutics to CTCs have achieved promising results, but biosafety remains a critical concern. Taking another approach, physical detection and destruction of CTCs is a safer way to evaluate and reduce metastasis risks. Melanoma cells strongly express melanosomes, providing a striking absorption contrast with the blood background in the red to near-infrared spectrum. Exploiting this intrinsic optical absorption contrast of circulating melanoma cells, we coupled dual-wavelength photoacoustic flow cytography with a nanosecond-pulsed laser killing mechanism that specifically targets melanoma CTCs. We have successfully achieved in vivo label-free imaging of rare single CTCs and CTC clusters in mice. Further, the photoacoustic signal from a CTC immediately hardware-triggers a lethal pinpoint laser irradiation that lyses it on the spot in a thermally confined manner. Our technology can facilitate early inhibition of metastasis by clearing circulating tumor cells from vasculature.

  11. The effect of clomethiazole on plasma concentrations of interleukin-6, -8, -1beta, tumor necrosis factor-alpha, and neutrophil adhesion molecule expression during experimental extracorporeal circulation.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Harmon, D

    2012-02-03

    Clomethiazole (CMZ), a neuroprotective drug, has antiinflammatory actions. We investigated the effects of CMZ administration on plasma concentrations of interleukin (IL)-6, IL-8, IL-1beta, tumor necrosis factor-alpha, and neutrophil adhesion molecule expression during experimental extracorporeal circulation. Five healthy volunteers each donated 500 mL of blood, which was subsequently divided into equal portions. Identical extracorporeal circuits were simultaneously primed with donated blood (250 mL) and circulated for 2 h at 37 degrees C. CMZ was added to 1 of the circuits of each pair to achieve a total plasma concentration of 40 micro mol\\/L. Blood samples were withdrawn at (i) donation, (ii) immediately after addition of CMZ, and at (iii) 30, 60, 90, and 120 min after commencing circulation. Plasma concentrations of IL-6, IL-8, and tumor necrosis factor-alpha were less in the CMZ group compared with control after 60 min of circulation (2.2 [0.3] versus 3.2 [0.4], 14.9 [4.8] versus 21.9 [18.4], 63.3 [43.5] versus 132.2 [118.9] pg\\/mL, respectively, P < 0.05). After 120 min of circulation, neutrophils from CMZ-treated circuits showed significantly less CD18 expression compared with control (237.5 [97.4] versus 280.5 [111.5], P = 0.03). The addition of CMZ to experimental extracorporeal circuits decreases the inflammatory response. This effect may be of clinical benefit by decreasing inflammatory-mediated neurological injury during cardiopulmonary bypass. IMPLICATIONS: Enhancement of gamma-aminobutyric acid(A)-mediated effects by clomethiazole (CMZ) and associated neuroprotection has been established in animal models of cerebral ischemia. In an ex vivo study, we demonstrated antiinflammatory activity of CMZ in experimental extracorporeal circulation. This represents a potential neuroprotective mechanism of CMZ in patients undergoing coronary artery bypass surgery.

  12. A pilot study to explore circulating tumour cells in pancreatic cancer as a novel biomarker

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khoja, L; Backen, A; Sloane, R; Menasce, L; Ryder, D; Krebs, M; Board, R; Clack, G; Hughes, A; Blackhall, F; Valle, J W; Dive, C

    2012-01-01

    Background: Obtaining tissue for pancreatic carcinoma diagnosis and biomarker assessment to aid drug development is challenging. Circulating tumour cells (CTCs) may represent a potential biomarker to address these unmet needs. We compared prospectively the utility of two platforms for CTC enumeration and characterisation in pancreatic cancer patients in a pilot exploratory study. Patients and methods: Blood samples were obtained prospectively from 54 consenting patients and analysed by CellSearch and isolation by size of epithelial tumour cells (ISET). CellSearch exploits immunomagnetic capture of CTCs-expressing epithelial markers, whereas ISET is a marker independent, blood filtration device. Circulating tumour cell expression of epithelial and mesenchymal markers was assessed to explore any discrepancy in CTC number between the two platforms. Results: ISET detected CTCs in more patients than CellSearch (93% vs 40%) and in higher numbers (median CTCs/7.5 ml, 9 (range 0–240) vs 0 (range 0–144)). Heterogeneity observed for epithelial cell adhesion molecule, pan-cytokeratin (CK), E-Cadherin, Vimentin and CK 7 expression in CTCs may account for discrepancy in CTC number between platforms. Conclusion: ISET detects more CTCs than CellSearch and offers flexible CTC characterisation with potential to investigate CTC biology and develop biomarkers for pancreatic cancer patient management. PMID:22187035

  13. Clinical validation of an ultra high-throughput spiral microfluidics for the detection and enrichment of viable circulating tumor cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bee Luan Khoo

    Full Text Available Circulating tumor cells (CTCs are cancer cells that can be isolated via liquid biopsy from blood and can be phenotypically and genetically characterized to provide critical information for guiding cancer treatment. Current analysis of CTCs is hindered by the throughput, selectivity and specificity of devices or assays used in CTC detection and isolation.Here, we enriched and characterized putative CTCs from blood samples of patients with both advanced stage metastatic breast and lung cancers using a novel multiplexed spiral microfluidic chip. This system detected putative CTCs under high sensitivity (100%, n = 56 (Breast cancer samples: 12-1275 CTCs/ml; Lung cancer samples: 10-1535 CTCs/ml rapidly from clinically relevant blood volumes (7.5 ml under 5 min. Blood samples were completely separated into plasma, CTCs and PBMCs components and each fraction were characterized with immunophenotyping (Pan-cytokeratin/CD45, CD44/CD24, EpCAM, fluorescence in-situ hybridization (FISH (EML4-ALK or targeted somatic mutation analysis. We used an ultra-sensitive mass spectrometry based system to highlight the presence of an EGFR-activating mutation in both isolated CTCs and plasma cell-free DNA (cf-DNA, and demonstrate concordance with the original tumor-biopsy samples.We have clinically validated our multiplexed microfluidic chip for the ultra high-throughput, low-cost and label-free enrichment of CTCs. Retrieved cells were unlabeled and viable, enabling potential propagation and real-time downstream analysis using next generation sequencing (NGS or proteomic analysis.

  14. Lenalidomide, Melphalan, and Prednisone Association Is an Effective Salvage Therapy in Relapsed Plasma Cell Leukaemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tommasina Guglielmelli

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Plasma cell leukemia (PCL is a rare and aggressive plasma cell disorder, characterized by the presence of a peripheral blood absolute plasma cell count of at least 2×109/l and more than 20% circulating plasma cells. The prognosis of PCL patients remains poor. Even by using autologous or allogenic transplant procedures, median survival does not exceed 3 years (Saccaro et al., 2005. Thalidomide, bortezomib and lenalidomide (Revlimid have emerged as high active agents in the treatment of PCL (Johnston and abdalla, 2002; Musto et al., 2007; Finnegan et al., 2006. In particular, Lenalidomide is a structural analogue of thalidomide with similar but more potent biological activity; it is used as first line therapy in MM (Palumbo et al., 2007; Niesvizky et al., 2007, although information regarding its associated use with dexamethasone use as salvage therapy in PCL derives from anecdotal single case reports (Musto et al., 2008. We would like to describe a case of primary PCL with adverse cytogenetic in which excellent response was achieved with the combination of lenalidomide, melphalan, and prednisone as salvage therapy.

  15. Detection of free circulating Epstein-Barr virus DNA in plasma of patients with Hodgkin’s disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juliane Garcez Musacchio

    Full Text Available CONTEXT AND OBJECTIVE: Free circulating Epstein-Barr virus (EBV DNA is often present in the plasma of Hodgkin’s disease patients. The aim here was to evaluate the prevalence of this finding, its correlation with the immunohistochemical expression of LMP-1 (latent membrane protein 1 and the influence of other clinical factors. DESIGN AND SETTING: Prospective study in two public tertiary institutions: Hematology Service, Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro, and Oncology Service, Instituto Nacional do Câncer, Rio de Janeiro. METHODS: A cohort of 30 patients with newly diagnosed Hodgkin’s disease was studied. The control group consisted of 13 healthy adult volunteers. EBV DNA was determined by conventional polymerase chain reaction (PCR. RESULTS: The median age was 28 years, and 16 patients were women. Advanced disease was present in 19 patients, and six were HIV-positive. EBV DNA was present in the plasma of 13 patients and one control (43% versus 8%, p = 0.03. EBV DNA prevalence was higher in HIV-positive patients (100% versus 29%, p = 0.0007 and those with advanced disease (63% versus 9%, p = 0.006. Among HIV-negative patients alone, EBV DNA prevalence remained higher in those with advanced disease. EBV DNA was found in 10/11 patients with LMP-1 expression in the lymph nodes, and in 3/19 without LMP-1 expression (kappa coefficient = 0.72. CONCLUSION: EBV DNA was present in 91% of patients with EBV-associated Hodgkin’s disease, and in all patients with HIV-associated Hodgkin’s disease. EBV DNA prevalence was higher in patients with advanced disease, irrespective of HIV status.

  16. Circulating nucleic acids damage DNA of healthy cells by integrating into their genomes

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Indraneel Mittra; Naveen Kumar Khare; Gorantla Venkata Raghuram; Rohan Chaubal; Fatema Khambatti; Deepika Gupta; Ashwini Gaikwad; Preeti Prasannan; Akshita Singh; Aishwarya Iyer; Ankita Singh; Pawan Upadhyay; Naveen Kumar Nair; Pradyumna Kumar Mishra; Amit Dutt

    2015-03-01

    Whether nucleic acids that circulate in blood have any patho-physiological functions in the host have not been explored. We report here that far from being inert molecules, circulating nucleic acids have significant biological activities of their own that are deleterious to healthy cells of the body. Fragmented DNA and chromatin (DNAfs and Cfs) isolated from blood of cancer patients and healthy volunteers are readily taken up by a variety of cells in culture to be localized in their nuclei within a few minutes. The intra-nuclear DNAfs and Cfs associate themselves with host cell chromosomes to evoke a cellular DNA-damage-repair-response (DDR) followed by their incorporation into the host cell genomes. Whole genome sequencing detected the presence of tens of thousands of human sequence reads in the recipient mouse cells. Genomic incorporation of DNAfs and Cfs leads to dsDNA breaks and activation of apoptotic pathways in the treated cells. When injected intravenously into Balb/C mice, DNAfs and Cfs undergo genomic integration into cells of their vital organs resulting in activation of DDR and apoptotic proteins in the recipient cells. Cfs have significantly greater activity than DNAfs with respect to all parameters examined, while both DNAfs and Cfs isolated from cancer patients are more active than those from normal volunteers. All the above pathological actions of DNAfs and Cfs described above can be abrogated by concurrent treatment with DNase I and/or anti-histone antibody complexed nanoparticles both in vitro and in vivo. Taken together, our results that circulating DNAfs and Cfs are physiological, continuously arising, endogenous DNA damaging agents with implications to ageing and a multitude of human pathologies including initiation of cancer.

  17. How circulating tumor cells escape from multidrug resistance: translating molecular mechanisms in metastatic breast cancer treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gradilone, Angela; Raimondi, Cristina; Naso, Giuseppe; Silvestri, Ida; Repetto, Lazzaro; Palazzo, Antonella; Gianni, Walter; Frati, Luigi; Cortesi, Enrico; Gazzaniga, Paola

    2011-12-01

    Resistance to anthracyclines is responsible for treatment failure in most patients with metastatic breast cancer. According to recent studies, the expression of specific drug transporters (MRPs) on circulating tumor cells is predictive of prognosis in different cancer types. We observed that patients whose circulating tumor cells expressed MRP1 and MRP2, two drug-export pumps responsible for anthracyclines efflux, who received conventional anthracyclines had a significantly shorter time to progression compared with patients sharing same characteristics who received non pegylated liposomal doxorubicin (P < 0.005). These results may highlight a new appealing role of the liposomal doxorubicin formulation, not only because of its reduced cardiac toxicity but especially referring to its theoretical efficacy in anthracycline-resistant breast cancer patients.

  18. Prognostic Value of Circulating Inflammatory Cells in Patients with Stable and Acute Coronary Artery Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John A. L. Meeuwsen

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Atherosclerosis is a lipid driven chronic inflammatory disease underlying the majority of ischemic events such as myocardial infarction or stroke. Clinical management of ischemic events has improved considerably in the past decades. Accordingly, survival rates have increased. Nevertheless, 12% of patients die within 6 months after the initial event. To improve secondary prevention, appropriate risk prediction is key. However, up to date, there is no clinically available routine marker to identify patients at high risk for recurrent cardiovascular events. Due to the central role of inflammation in atherosclerotic lesion progression and destabilization, many studies have focused on the role of circulating inflammatory cells in these processes. This review summarizes the current evidence on the potential of circulating inflammatory cells as biomarkers for recurrent adverse manifestations in acute coronary syndrome and stable coronary artery disease patients.

  19. Do circulating tumor cells, exosomes, and circulating tumor nucleic acids have clinical utility? A report of the association for molecular pathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gold, Bert; Cankovic, Milena; Furtado, Larissa V; Meier, Frederick; Gocke, Christopher D

    2015-05-01

    Diagnosing and screening for tumors through noninvasive means represent an important paradigm shift in precision medicine. In contrast to tissue biopsy, detection of circulating tumor cells (CTCs) and circulating tumor nucleic acids provides a minimally invasive method for predictive and prognostic marker detection. This allows early and serial assessment of metastatic disease, including follow-up during remission, characterization of treatment effects, and clonal evolution. Isolation and characterization of CTCs and circulating tumor DNA (ctDNA) are likely to improve cancer diagnosis, treatment, and minimal residual disease monitoring. However, more trials are required to validate the clinical utility of precise molecular markers for a variety of tumor types. This review focuses on the clinical utility of CTCs and ctDNA testing in patients with solid tumors, including somatic and epigenetic alterations that can be detected. A comparison of methods used to isolate and detect CTCs and some of the intricacies of the characterization of the ctDNA are also provided.

  20. Differential effects of lenalidomide during plasma cell differentiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jourdan, Michel; Cren, Maïlys; Schafer, Peter; Robert, Nicolas; Duperray, Christophe; Vincent, Laure; Ceballos, Patrice; Cartron, Guillaume; Rossi, Jean-François; Moreaux, Jérôme; Chopra, Rajesh; Klein, Bernard

    2016-01-01

    Thalidomide, lenalidomide and pomalidomide have greatly improved the outcome of patients with multiple myeloma. However, their effects on plasma cells, the healthy counterpart of myeloma cells, are unknown. Here, we investigated lenalidomide effects on normal human plasma cell generation using an in vitro model. Lenalidomide inhibited the generation of pre-plasmablasts and early plasma cells, while it moderately affected plasmablast production. It also reduced the expression level of Ikaros, Aiolos, and IRF4 transcription factors, in plasmablasts and early plasma cells. This suggests that their differential sensitivity to lenalidomide is not due to a difference in Ikaros or Aiolos degradation. Lenalidomide also inhibited long-lived plasma cell generation, but did not impair their long-term survival once generated. This last observation is in agreement with the finding that lenalidomide treatment for 3-18 months did not affect the bone marrow healthy plasma cell count in allografted patients with multiple myeloma. Our findings should prompt to investigate whether lenalidomide resistance in patients with multiple myeloma could be associated with the emergence of malignant plasmablasts or long-lived plasma cells that are less sensitive to lenalidomide. PMID:27057635

  1. Immunophenotype of normal and myelomatous plasma cell subsets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nelly eRobillard

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Plasma-cells are essentially characterized by the co-expression of CD138 and CD38, which allows their identification in flow cytometry in bone marrow, peripheral blood or cell suspensions from tissues. These terminally differentiated B-cells may lose the expression of surface CD19 and that of CD20 while retaining CD27. When malignant, they can gain a number of other markers such as CD28, CD33, CD56 or CD117 and lose CD27. Moreover, since each plasma cell is only able to produce a single type of immunoglobulins, they display isotypic restriction and clonal malignant plasma cells can be further characterized by their homogeneous expression of either kappa or lambda light chains. In multiple myeloma (MM, such plasma cell clones produce the immunoglobulin identified in plasma as an abnormal peak. In the bone marrow where they essentially accumulate, these plasma cells may however display various immunophenotypes. The latter were explored in a two-way approach. Firstly the various subsets delineated by the selective or common expression of CD19 together with combined CD56/CD28 were explored in normal and MM bone marrow. Then other aberrant markers’ expression was investigated, i.e. CD20, CD27, CD33, CD56, CD117. These data were compared to literature information. They underline the vast heterogeneity of MM plasma cells possibly accounting for the various answers to therapy of MM patients.

  2. Differential effects of lenalidomide during plasma cell differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jourdan, Michel; Cren, Maïlys; Schafer, Peter; Robert, Nicolas; Duperray, Christophe; Vincent, Laure; Ceballos, Patrice; Cartron, Guillaume; Rossi, Jean-François; Moreaux, Jérôme; Chopra, Rajesh; Klein, Bernard

    2016-05-10

    Thalidomide, lenalidomide and pomalidomide have greatly improved the outcome of patients with multiple myeloma. However, their effects on plasma cells, the healthy counterpart of myeloma cells, are unknown. Here, we investigated lenalidomide effects on normal human plasma cell generation using an in vitro model. Lenalidomide inhibited the generation of pre-plasmablasts and early plasma cells, while it moderately affected plasmablast production. It also reduced the expression level of Ikaros, Aiolos, and IRF4 transcription factors, in plasmablasts and early plasma cells. This suggests that their differential sensitivity to lenalidomide is not due to a difference in Ikaros or Aiolos degradation. Lenalidomide also inhibited long-lived plasma cell generation, but did not impair their long-term survival once generated. This last observation is in agreement with the finding that lenalidomide treatment for 3-18 months did not affect the bone marrow healthy plasma cell count in allografted patients with multiple myeloma. Our findings should prompt to investigate whether lenalidomide resistance in patients with multiple myeloma could be associated with the emergence of malignant plasmablasts or long-lived plasma cells that are less sensitive to lenalidomide.

  3. Development of plasma apparatus for plasma irradiation to living cell model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suda, Yoshiyuki; Kato, Ryo; Tanoue, Hideto; Takikawa, Hirofumi; Tero, Ryugo

    2012-10-01

    Atmospheric pressure plasma has been studied for the industrial applications of biotechnology and medical care. For the development of these fields, understanding the influence of atmospheric pressure plasma on living cell and the mechanism of cell death is necessary. We focus on a basic structure of cell membrane, called lipid bilayer. Lipid bilayer is composed of lipid molecules with an amphipathic property and can be formed on hydrophilic substrates. In this paper, we report the development of the plasma apparatus for the treatment of lipid bilayer. The plasma apparatus uses a typical dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) system and employs parallel plate electrodes with a gap distance of 1 mm [1]. Each electrode is covered with a quartz plate and the substrate temperature is kept constant by cooling medium. The lower quartz electrode has a dimple, in which the substrate coated with a lipid bilayer and buffer fluid are mounted. [4pt] [1] Y. Sugioka, et al, IEEE Trans. Plasma Sci., in press

  4. Orally administered S-1 suppresses circulating endothelial cell counts in metastatic breast cancer patients.

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    [Background]S-1 is an oral cytotoxic preparation that contains tegafur. Gamma-butyrolactone (GBL) is a metabolite of tegafur that is known to suppress vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)-mediated angiogenic activity. The aim of this study was to determine the change in circulating endothelial cell (CEC) counts, GBL levels, and angiogenesis-related factors during S-1 administration in metastatic breast cancer (MBC) patients. [Methods]Patients with HER2-negative MBC were eligible. S-1 was...

  5. Studying circulating prostate cancer cells by in-vivo flow cytometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Jin; Gu, Zhengqin; Chen, Tong; Wang, Cheng; Wei, Xunbin

    2012-03-01

    Prostate cancer is the most common malignancy in American men and the second leading cause of deaths from cancer, after lung cancer. The tumor usually grows slowly and remains confined to the gland for many years. As the cancer advances, however, it can metastasize throughout other areas of the body, such as the bones, lungs, and liver. Surgical resection, hormonal therapy, chemotherapy and radiation therapy are the foundation of current prostate cancer therapies. Treatments for prostate cause both short- and long-term side effects that may be difficult to accept. Molecular mechanisms of prostate cancer metastasis need to be understood better and new therapies must be developed to selectively target to unique characteristics of cancer cell growth and metastasis. We have developed the "in vivo microscopy" to study the mechanisms that govern prostate cancer cell spread through the microenvironment in vivo in real-time confocal near-infrared fluorescence imaging. A recently developed "in vivo flow cytometer" and optical imaging are used to assess prostate cancer cell spreading and the circulation kinetics of prostate cancer cells. We have measured the depletion kinetics of cancer cells with different metastatic potential. Interestingly, more invasive PC-3 prostate cancer cells are depleted faster from the circulation than LNCaP cells.

  6. Regulation of Circulating Hematopoietic Stem/Progenitor Cells in Preterm Infants with Septicemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leung, Kam Tong; Lam, Hugh Simon; Chan, Kathy Yuen Yee; Sit, Tony; Wong, Raymond Pui On; Yu, Jasmine Wai Sum; Li, Karen; Ng, Pak Cheung

    2016-12-01

    Preterm infants are at high risk of developing severe sepsis. Circulating hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPCs; CD45(+)CD34(+)) have been suggested to play a vital role in the host immunological defense against invading pathogens. The objectives were to investigate the regulation of circulating HSPCs in preterm infants during infection episodes, and to assess the relationship of CD45(+)CD34(+) cells with immunological mediators and differential leukocyte populations. First, we conducted a cross-sectional case-control study comparing these parameters among infected infants (n = 23), gestational and postnatal age-matched noninfected infants (n = 46), and "healthy" control (CTL) infants (n = 12). Second, we investigated the longitudinal change of CD45(+)CD34(+) cell concentrations in infected infants before, during, and after an infection episode, and compared them with the other two groups. Our cross-sectional results showed that CD45(+)CD34(+) cell count and percentage were significantly reduced in infected infants during systemic infection, compared with the noninfected or CTL infants. There were significant positive correlation between levels of CD45(+)CD34(+) cells and lymphocytes or monocytes, and significant negative correlation between CD45(+)CD34(+) cells and neutrophils or interleukin (IL)-6 in infected infants. Longitudinal analysis showed that changes of CD45(+)CD34(+) cells at the onset of sepsis relative to levels 1 week prior and 1 week postsepsis in infected infants were significantly different from those changes in the corresponding time points for the other two groups. Our findings suggested that circulating HSPCs were dynamically regulated during septicemia and could play an important role in the defense mechanism, plausibly contributing to replenishment of leukocytes during sepsis in preterm infants.

  7. Rheumatic masks of plasma cell dyscrasias

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vladimir Ivanovich Vasilyev

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to consider clinical practice problems in the differential diagnosis of different types of plasma cell dyscrasias (PCD. Subjects and methods. Fourteen patients (8 men and 6 women aged 52±12 years, in whom rheumatic diseases (RD were ruled out and who were diagnosed as having primary PCD: different types of myeloma in 7 patients, myeloma + AL-amyloidosis in 2, AL-amyloidosis in 3, and Waldenstrom’s macroglobulinemia in 2, were examined. Results and discussion. The most common maldiagnosed RDs in patients with PCD were seronegative rheumatoid arthritis (RA, systemic lupus erythematosus, Sjogren’s disease, and different forms of vasculitis. The most frequent masks of RD were kidney (78% and osteoarticular system (64% lesions, vascular disorders (36%, peripheral polyneuropathies (36%, and enlarged salivary glands with xerostomia (28.5%. Serum and urine immunochemical study should be performed in all patients who have clinical manifestations of seropositive RA, spondyloarthritis, intensive bone pain syndrome, ulceronecrotic vasculitis, enlarged submandibular salivary glands with macroglossia in the absence of markers of autoimmune disease for the timely diagnosis of PCD and the exclusion of RD. The paper estimates the sensitivity and specificity of main methods used to diagnose different types of PCD.

  8. Update on the pathogenesis of Scleroderma: focus on circulating progenitor cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunasso, Alexandra Maria Giovanna; Massone, Cesare

    2016-01-01

    In systemic sclerosis (SSc), the development of fibrosis seems to be a consequence of the initial ischemic process related to an endothelial injury. The initial trigger event in SSc is still unknown, but circulating progenitor cells (CPCs) might play a key role. Such cells have the ability to traffic into injury sites, exhibiting inflammatory features of macrophages, tissue remodeling properties of fibroblasts, and vasculogenesis functions of endothelial cells. The different subsets of CPCs described thus far in SSc arise from a pool of circulating monocyte precursors (CD14 + cells) and probably correspond to a different degree of differentiation of a single cell of origin. Several subsets of CPCs have been described in patients with SSc, all have a monocytic origin but may or may not express CD14, and all of these cells have the ability to give origin to endothelial cells, or collagen (Col)-producing cells, or both. We were able to identify six subsets of CPCs: pluripotent stem cells (CD14 +, CD45 +, and CD34 +), monocyte-derived multipotential cells (MOMCs) or monocyte-derived mesenchymal progenitors (CD14 +, CD45 +, CD34 +, Col I +, CD11b +, CD68 +, CD105 +, and VEGFR1 +), early endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) or monocytic pro-angiogenic hematopoietic cells or circulating hematopoietic cells (CD14 +, CD45 +, CD34 low/−, VEGFR2 +/−, CXCR4 +, c-kit +, and DC117 +), late EPCs (CD14 −, CD133 +, VEGFR2 +, CD144 + [VE-cadherin +], and CD146 +), fibroblast-like cells (FLCs)/circulating Col-producing monocytes (CD14 +, CD45 +, CD34 +/−, and Col I +), and fibrocytes (CD14 −, CD45 +, CD34 +, Col I +, and CXCR4 +). It has been demonstrated that circulating CD14 + monocytes with an activated phenotype are increased in patients with SSc when compared with normal subjects. CD14 +, CD34 +, and Col I + spindle-shaped cells have been found in increased numbers in lungs of SSc patients with interstitial lung disease. Elevated blood amounts of early EPCs have been

  9. Chemically Modified Plastic Tube for High Volume Removal and Collection of Circulating Tumor Cells.

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    Angelo Gaitas

    Full Text Available In this preliminary effort, we use a commercially available and chemically modified tube to selectively capture circulating tumor cells (CTCs from the blood stream by immobilizing human anti-EpCAM antibodies on the tube's interior surface. We describe the requisite and critical steps required to modify a tube into a cancer cell-capturing device. Using these simple modifications, we were able to capture or entrap about 85% of cancer cells from suspension and 44% of cancer cells from spiked whole blood. We also found that the percentage of cells captured was dependent on the tube's length and also the number of cancer cells present. It is our strong belief that with the utilization of appropriate tube lengths and procedures, we can ensure capture and removal of nearly the entire CTC population in whole blood. Importantly after a patient's entire blood volume has circulated through the tube, the tube can then be trypsinized to release the captured live CTCs for further analysis and testing.

  10. Minimal residual disease in breast cancer: an overview of circulating and disseminated tumour cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tachtsidis, A; McInnes, L M; Jacobsen, N; Thompson, E W; Saunders, C M

    2016-08-01

    Within the field of cancer research, focus on the study of minimal residual disease (MRD) in the context of carcinoma has grown exponentially over the past several years. MRD encompasses circulating tumour cells (CTCs)-cancer cells on the move via the circulatory or lymphatic system, disseminated tumour cells (DTCs)-cancer cells which have escaped into a distant site (most studies have focused on bone marrow), and resistant cancer cells surviving therapy-be they local or distant, all of which may ultimately give rise to local relapse or overt metastasis. Initial studies simply recorded the presence and number of CTCs and DTCs; however recent advances are allowing assessment of the relationship between their persistence, patient prognosis and the biological properties of MRD, leading to a better understanding of the metastatic process. Technological developments for the isolation and analysis of circulating and disseminated tumour cells continue to emerge, creating new opportunities to monitor disease progression and perhaps alter disease outcome. This review outlines our knowledge to date on both measurement and categorisation of MRD in the form of CTCs and DTCs with respect to how this relates to cancer outcomes, and the hurdles and future of research into both CTCs and DTCs.

  11. Aptamers Selected to Postoperative Lung Adenocarcinoma Detect Circulating Tumor Cells in Human Blood

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zamay, Galina S; Kolovskaya, Olga S; Zamay, Tatiana N; Glazyrin, Yury E; Krat, Alexey V; Zubkova, Olga; Spivak, Ekaterina; Wehbe, Mohammed; Gargaun, Ana; Muharemagic, Darija; Komarova, Mariia; Grigorieva, Valentina; Savchenko, Andrey; Modestov, Andrey A; Berezovski, Maxim V; Zamay, Anna S

    2015-01-01

    Circulating tumor cells (CTCs) are rare cells and valuable clinical markers of prognosis of metastasis formation and prediction of patient survival. Most CTC analyses are based on the antibody-based detection of a few epithelial markers; therefore miss an important portion of mesenchymal cancer cells circulating in blood. In this work, we selected and identified DNA aptamers as specific affinity probes that bind to lung adenocarcinoma cells derived from postoperative tissues. The unique feature of our selection strategy is that aptamers are produced for lung cancer cell biomarkers in their native state and conformation without previous knowledge of the biomarkers. The aptamers did not bind to normal lung cells and lymphocytes, and had very low affinity to A549 lung adenocarcinoma culture. We applied these aptamers to detect CTCs, apoptotic bodies, and microemboli in clinical samples of peripheral blood of lung cancer and metastatic lung cancer patients. We identified aptamer-associated protein biomarkers for lung cancer such as vimentin, annexin A2, annexin A5, histone 2B, neutrophil defensin, and clusterin. Tumor-specific aptamers can be produced for individual patients and synthesized many times during anticancer therapy, thereby opening up the possibility of personalized diagnostics. PMID:26061649

  12. Effect of Weight Reduction on Cardiovascular Risk Factors and CD34-positive Cells in Circulation

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    Nina A Mikirova, Joseph J Casciari, Ronald E Hunninghake, Margaret M Beezley

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Being overweight or obese is associated with an increased risk for the development of non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus, hypertension, and cardiovascular disease. Dyslipidemia of obesity is characterized by elevated fasting triglycerides and decreased high-density lipoprotein-cholesterol concentrations. Endothelial damage and dysfunction is considered to be a major underlying mechanism for the elevated cardiovascular risk associated with increased adiposity. Alterations in endothelial cells and stem/endothelial progenitor cell function associated with overweight and obesity predispose to atherosclerosis and thrombosis.In our study, we analyzed the effect of a low calorie diet in combination with oral supplementation by vitamins, minerals, probiotics and human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG, 125-180 IUs on the body composition, lipid profile and CD34-positive cells in circulation.During this dieting program, the following parameters were assessed weekly for all participants: fat free mass, body fat, BMI, extracellular/intracellular water, total body water and basal metabolic rate. For part of participants blood chemistry parameters and circulating CD34-positive cells were determined before and after dieting.The data indicated that the treatments not only reduced body fat mass and total mass but also improved the lipid profile. The changes in body composition correlated with the level of lipoproteins responsible for the increased cardiovascular risk factors. These changes in body composition and lipid profile parameters coincided with the improvement of circulatory progenitor cell numbers.As the result of our study, we concluded that the improvement of body composition affects the number of stem/progenitor cells in circulation.

  13. EpCAM-independent capture of circulating tumor cells with a 'universal CTC-chip'.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chikaishi, Yasuhiro; Yoneda, Kazue; Ohnaga, Takashi; Tanaka, Fumihiro

    2017-01-01

    Capture of circulating tumor cells (CTCs), which are shed from the primary tumor site and circulate in the blood, remains a technical challenge. CellSearch® is the only clinically approved CTC detection system, but has provided only modest sensitivity in detecting CTCs mainly because epithelial cell adhesion molecule (EpCAM)-negative tumor cells may not be captured. To achieve more sensitive CTC‑capture, we have developed a novel microfluidic platform, a 'CTC-chip' comprised of light-curable resins that has a unique advantage in that any capture antibody is easily conjugated. In the present study, we showed that EpCAM-negative tumor cells as well as EpCAM-positive cells were captured with the novel 'universal CTC-chip' as follows: i) human lung cancer cells (PC-9), with strong EpCAM expression, were efficiently captured with the CTC-chip coated with an anti-EpCAM antibody (with an average capture efficiency of 101% when tumor cells were spiked in phosphate‑buffered saline (PBS) and 88% when spiked in blood); ii) human mesothelioma cells (ACC-MESO-4), with no EpCAM expression but with podoplanin expression, were captured with the CTC-chip coated with an anti-podoplanin antibody (average capture efficiency of 78% when tumor cells were spiked in PBS and 38% when spiked in blood), whereas ACC-MESO-4 cells were not captured with the CTC-chip coated with the anti-EpCAM antibody. These results indicate that the novel 'CTC-chip' can be useful in sensitive EpCAM-independent detection of CTCs, which may provide new insights into personalized medicine.

  14. Plasma cell gingivitis with severe alveolar bone loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Vivek; Tripathi, Amitandra Kumar; Saimbi, Charanjit Singh; Sinha, Jolly

    2015-01-16

    Plasma cell gingivitis is a rare benign condition of the gingiva characterised by sharply demarcated erythaematous and oedematous gingiva often extending up to the muco gingival junction. It is considered a hypersensitive reaction. It presents clinically as a diffuse, erythaematous and papillary lesion of the gingiva, which frequently bleeds, with minimal trauma. This paper presents a case of a 42-year-old man who was diagnosed with plasma cell gingivitis, based on the presence of plasma cells in histological sections, and severe alveolar bone loss at the affected site, which was managed by surgical intervention.

  15. Circulating apoptotic endothelial cell-derived microparticles are predicted metabolically unhealthy obesity

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    Alexander E. Berezin

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Circulating apoptotic endothelial cell-derived micro particles (EMPs are a marker of endothelial dysfunction and cardiovascular (CV risk in type 2 diabetes mellitus patients. There is evidence regarding association between apoptotic EMP number and CV disease in obese individuals. The aim of the study to investigate whether increased number of circulating apoptotic EMPs may predict transformation of Met-HO into Met-UHO. Methods: The study was retrospectively evolved 89 patients with established abdominal obesity (47 patients with Met-UHO determined as MetS and 42 subjects with Met-HO from the large cohort of abdominal obesity patients (n=268. Thirty five healthy volunteers matched for age and sex were involved in the study as a control cohort. Obesity-related biomarker (adiponectin, leptin, vistafin and EMPs were measured at baseline. Flow cytometry was used to determine EMPs with immune phenotype CD31+/annexin V+ and CD144+/annexin V+. Results: There was not found a significant difference between numbers of EMPs labeled CD31+/ Annexin V+ in Met-UHO and Met-HO patients, while Met-UHO patients had a significantly increased level of circulating CD144+/ Annexin V+ compared with Met-HO individuals. Multivariate logistic regression analysis has revealed the HOMA-IR, number of CV risk factors, serum leptin and hs-CRP independently predicted numbers of circulating CD31+/ Annexin V+ and CD144+/ Annexin V+ EMPs in Met-UHO. In Met-HO patients HOMA-IR remained an independent predictor of increased numbers of circulating CD31+/ Annexin V+ and CD144+/ Annexin V+ EMPs. Conclusion: in the investigation we found that the increased number of CD31+/Annexin V+ and CD144+/ Annexin V+ EMPs added to the based predictive model (HOMA-IR may predict transformation of Met-HO into Met-UHO.

  16. Integrated proteomic analysis of human cancer cells and plasma from tumor bearing mice for ovarian cancer biomarker discovery.

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    Sharon J Pitteri

    Full Text Available The complexity of the human plasma proteome represents a substantial challenge for biomarker discovery. Proteomic analysis of genetically engineered mouse models of cancer and isolated cancer cells and cell lines provide alternative methods for identification of potential cancer markers that would be detectable in human blood using sensitive assays. The goal of this work is to evaluate the utility of an integrative strategy using these two approaches for biomarker discovery.We investigated a strategy that combined quantitative plasma proteomics of an ovarian cancer mouse model with analysis of proteins secreted or shed by human ovarian cancer cells. Of 106 plasma proteins identified with increased levels in tumor bearing mice, 58 were also secreted or shed from ovarian cancer cells. The remainder consisted primarily of host-response proteins. Of 25 proteins identified in the study that were assayed, 8 mostly secreted proteins common to mouse plasma and human cancer cells were significantly upregulated in a set of plasmas from ovarian cancer patients. Five of the eight proteins were confirmed to be upregulated in a second independent set of ovarian cancer plasmas, including in early stage disease.Integrated proteomic analysis of cancer mouse models and human cancer cell populations provides an effective approach to identify potential circulating protein biomarkers.

  17. Opposed circulating plasma levels of endothelin-1 and C-type natriuretic peptide in children with Plasmodium falciparum malaria

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    Issifou Saadou

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Molecular mechanisms involved in the pathogenesis of severe Plasmodium falciparum malaria (SM, are not yet fully understood. Both endothelin-1 (ET-1 and C-type natriuretic peptide (CNP are produced by vascular endothelium and act locally as paracrine regulators of vascular tone, ET-1 being a potent vasoconstrictor and CNP having strong vasorelaxant properties. Methods Plasma levels of ET-1 and N-terminal fragments of CNP (NT-proCNP were studied on admission and after 24 hours of treatment, using enzyme-linked-immunosorbent-assay (ELISA technique, in Gabonese children with severe falciparum malaria (SM, n = 50, with uncomplicated malaria (UM, n = 39 and healthy controls (HC, n = 25. Results Compared to HC, malaria patients had significantly higher plasma levels of ET-1 and significantly lower levels of NT-proCNP (p p p = 0.034, whereas UM was not significantly different to HC. In the SM group we found a trend towards lower ET-1 levels compared to UM (p = 0.085. Conclusion In the present study, an imbalance between the vasoconstricitve and vasorelaxant endothelium-derived substances ET-1 and CNP in the plasma of children with falciparum malaria is demonstrated, presumably in favor of vasoconstrictive and pro-inflammatory effects. These results may indicate involvement of ET-1 and CNP in malaria pathogenesis. Furthermore, results of lower ET-1 and CNP levels in SM may reflect endothelial cell damage.

  18. Whole Genome Amplification in Genomic Analysis of Single Circulating Tumor Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gasch, Christin; Pantel, Klaus; Riethdorf, Sabine

    2015-01-01

    Investigation of the genome of organisms is one of the major basics in molecular biology to understand the complex organization of cells. While genomic DNA can easily be isolated from tissues or cell cultures of plant, animal or human origin, DNA extraction from single cells is still challenging. Here, we describe three techniques for the amplification of genomic DNA of fixed single circulating tumor cells (CTC) isolated from blood of cancer patients. This amplification is aimed to increase DNA amounts from those of one cell to yields sufficient for different DNA analyses such as mutational analysis including next-generation sequencing, array-comparative genome hybridization (CGH), and quantitative measurement of gene amplifications. Molecular analysis of CTC as liquid biopsy can be used to identify therapeutic targets in personalized medicine directed, e.g. against human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) or epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and to stratify the patients to those therapies.

  19. Strategies to target long-lived plasma cells for treating hemophilia A inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chao Lien; Lyle, Meghan J; Shin, Simon C; Miao, Carol H

    2016-03-01

    Long-lived plasma cells (LLPCs) can persistently produce anti-factor VIII (FVIII) antibodies which disrupt therapeutic effect of FVIII in hemophilia A patients with inhibitors. The migration of plasma cells to BM where they become LLPCs is largely controlled by an interaction between the chemokine ligand CXCL12 and its receptor CXCR4. AMD3100 combined with G-CSF inhibit their interactions, thus facilitating the mobilization of CD34(+) cells and blocking the homing of LLPCs. These reagents were combined with anti-CD20 to reduce B-cells and the specific IL-2/IL-2mAb (JES6-1) complexes to induce Treg expansion for targeting anti-FVIII immune responses. Groups of mice primed with FVIII plasmid and protein respectively were treated with the combined regimen for six weeks, and a significant reduction of anti-FVIII inhibitor titers was observed, associated with the dramatic decrease of circulating and bone marrow CXCR4(+) plasma cells. The combination regimens are highly promising in modulating pre-existing anti-FVIII antibodies in FVIII primed subjects.

  20. Progression of cutaneous plasmacytoma to plasma cell leukemia in a dog.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rout, Emily D; Shank, Alba Maria M; Waite, Angharad H K; Siegel, Andrea; Avery, Anne C; Avery, Paul R

    2017-02-10

    A 5-year-old male neutered Bernese Mountain Dog was presented for cutaneous plasmacytoma, which was treated by surgical excision. Four months later, the dog developed multiple skin masses, hyphema, pericardial and mild bicavitary effusions, myocardial masses, and marked plasmacytosis in the peripheral blood. Circulating plasma cells expressed CD34 and MHC class II by flow cytometry. Immunocytochemistry demonstrated that these cells were strongly positive for multiple myeloma oncogene 1/interferon regulatory factor 4 (MUM-1) and weakly to moderately positive for Pax5. The dog was hypoglobulinemic but had a monoclonal IgA gammopathy detected by serum immunofixation electrophoresis. The PCR analysis of antigen receptor gene rearrangements (PARR) by fragment analysis using GeneScan methodology revealed that plasmacytoid cells in the original cutaneous plasmacytoma and peripheral blood had an identical immunoglobulin heavy chain gene (IgH) rearrangement, indicating that both populations were derived from the same neoplastic clone. Canine cutaneous plasmacytoma rarely progresses to a malignant form and plasma cell leukemia is rarely diagnosed in the dog. This report describes a case of cutaneous plasmacytoma progressing to plasma cell leukemia with a rapid and aggressive clinical course. This report also highlights the utility of flow cytometry, immunocytochemistry, immunofixation electrophoresis, and PARR by fragment analysis using GeneScan methodology in the diagnosis of this hematopoietic neoplasm.

  1. Clinical Observation on Influence of Chinese Medicines for Promoting Blood Circulation to Remove Blood Stasis on FIB and DD in Plasma of Patients with Cerebral Thrombosis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    梁晖; 陈甦; 陈少芳

    2002-01-01

    Objective: to study the influence of Chinese medicines for promoting blood circulation to remove blood stasis on fibrinogen (FIB) and D-dimer (DD) in plasma of patients with cerebral thrombosis. Method: 73 inpatients with acute cerebral thrombosis were randomly divided into a control group of 34 cases and a treatment group of 39 cases. The content of FIB and DD in plasma was detected before treatment and on the 7th and 14th days after treatment. Result: FIB content in plasma after treatment was lower than that before treatment in the control group (P<0.01) and more remarkable in the treatment group (P<0.001). There was an obvious difference in DD content before and after treatment in both groups. DD content on the 7th and 14th days after treatment in the treatment group was obviously higher than that in the control group (P<0.01 and P<0.05 respectively). Conclusion: Chinese medicines for promoting blood circulation to remove blood stasis can reduce the FIB content in plasma of patients with cerebral thrombosis, raise the DD content in plasma, cause the peak of DD content appear earlier and obviously improve hypercoagulability of blood in patients with cerebral thrombosis.

  2. Circulating endothelial progenitor cells in traumatic brain injury: an emerging therapeutic target?

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WEI Hui-jie; JIANG Rong-cai; LIU Li; ZHANG Jian-ning

    2010-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a major cause ofmortality and morbidity in the world. Recent clinical investigations and basic researches suggest that strategies to improve angiogenesis following TBI may provide promising opportunities to improve clinical outcomes and brain functional recovery. More and more evidences show that circulating endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs), which have been identified in the peripheral blood, may play an important role in the pathologic and physiological angiogenesis in adults. Moreover, impressive data demonstrate that EPCs are mobilized from bone marrow to blood circulation in response to traumatic or inflammatory stimulations.In this review, we discussed the role of EPCs in the repair of brain injury and the possible therapeutic implication for functional recovery of TBl in the future.

  3. Circulating tumor cell clusters: What we know and what we expect (Review)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Yupeng; Fang, Francia; Zhang, Qi

    2016-01-01

    The major cause of cancer-associated mortality is tumor metastasis, a disease that is far from understood. Many studies have observed circulating tumor cells (CTCs) in patients' circulation systems, and a few latest investigations showed that CTC clusters have a potentially high capacity of metastasis. The capture and analysis of CTC clusters offer new insights into tumor metastasis and can facilitate the development of cancer treatments. We reviewed the research history of the CTC clusters, as well as the technologies used for detecting and isolating CTC clusters. In addition, we discuss the characteristics of CTC clusters and their roles in tumor dissemination. Clinical relevance of CTC clusters was also implicated in currently limited data. Moving forward, the next frontier in this field is to develop more efficient capture methods and decipher conundrums of characterization of CTC clusters. This will ultimately identify the clinical value of CTC clusters as a biomarker and therapeutic target. PMID:27779656

  4. Current understanding of circulating tumor cells – potential value in malignancies of the central nervous system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lukasz A. Adamczyk

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Detection of circulating tumor cells (CTCs in the blood via so-called 'liquid biopsies' carries enormous clinical potential in malignancies of the central nervous system (CNS because of the potential to follow disease evolution with a blood test, without the need for repeat neurosurgical procedures with their inherent risk of patient morbidity. To date studies in non-CNS malignancies, particularly in breast cancer, show increasing reproducibility of detection methods for these rare tumor cells in the circulation. However, no method has yet received full recommendation to use in clinical practice, in part because of lack of a sufficient evidence base regarding clinical utility. In CNS malignancies one of the main challenges is finding a suitable biomarker for identification of these cells, because automated systems such as the widely used Cell Search system are reliant on markers such as the epithelial cell adhesion molecule (EpCAM which are not present in CNS tumors. This review examines methods for CTC enrichment and detection, and reviews the progress in non-CNS tumors and the potential for using this technique in human brain tumors.

  5. Folic acid functionalized surface highlights 5-methylcytosine-genomic content within circulating tumor cells

    KAUST Repository

    Malara, Natalia

    2014-07-01

    Although the detection of methylated cell free DNA represents one of the most promising approaches for relapse risk assessment in cancer patients, the low concentration of cell-free circulating DNA constitutes the biggest obstacle in the development of DNA methylation-based biomarkers from blood. This paper describes a method for the measurement of genomic methylation content directly on circulating tumor cells (CTC), which could be used to deceive the aforementioned problem. Since CTC are disease related blood-based biomarkers, they result essential to monitor tumor\\'s stadiation, therapy, and early relapsing lesions. Within surface\\'s bio-functionalization and cell\\'s isolation procedure standardization, the presented approach reveals a singular ability to detect high 5-methylcytosine CTC-subset content in the whole CTC compound, by choosing folic acid (FA) as transducer molecule. Sensitivity and specificity, calculated for FA functionalized surface (FA-surface), result respectively on about 83% and 60%. FA-surface, allowing the detection and characterization of early metastatic dissemination, provides a unique advance in the comprehension of tumors progression and dissemination confirming the presence of CTC and its association with high risk of relapse. This functionalized surface identifying and quantifying high 5-methylcytosine CTC-subset content into the patient\\'s blood lead significant progress in cancer risk assessment, also providing a novel therapeutic strategy.© 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  6. Imaging circulating tumor cells in freely moving awake small animals using a miniaturized intravital microscope.

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    Laura Sarah Sasportas

    Full Text Available Metastasis, the cause for 90% of cancer mortality, is a complex and poorly understood process involving the invasion of circulating tumor cells (CTCs into blood vessels. These cells have potential prognostic value as biomarkers for early metastatic risk. But their rarity and the lack of specificity and sensitivity in measuring them render their interrogation by current techniques very challenging. How and when these cells are circulating in the blood, on their way to potentially give rise to metastasis, is a question that remains largely unanswered. In order to provide an insight into this "black box" using non-invasive imaging, we developed a novel miniature intravital microscopy (mIVM strategy capable of real-time long-term monitoring of CTCs in awake small animals. We established an experimental 4T1-GL mouse model of metastatic breast cancer, in which tumor cells express both fluorescent and bioluminescent reporter genes to enable both single cell and whole body tumor imaging. Using mIVM, we monitored blood vessels of different diameters in awake mice in an experimental model of metastasis. Using an in-house software algorithm we developed, we demonstrated in vivo CTC enumeration and computation of CTC trajectory and speed. These data represent the first reported use we know of for a miniature mountable intravital microscopy setup for in vivo imaging of CTCs in awake animals.

  7. Studying depletion kinetics of circulating prostate cancer cells by in vivo flow cytometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Guangda; Gu, Zhengqin; Guo, Jin; Li, Yan; Chen, Yun; Chen, Tong; Wang, Cheng; Wei, Xunbin

    2011-03-01

    Prostate cancer is the most common malignancy in American men and the second leading cause of deaths from cancer, after lung cancer. The tumor usually grows slowly and remains confined to the gland for many years. During this time, the tumor produces little or no symptoms or outward signs. As the cancer advances, however, it can metastasize throughout other areas of the body, such as the bones, lungs, and liver. Surgical resection, hormonal therapy, chemotherapy and radiation therapy are the foundation of current prostate cancer therapies. Treatments for prostate cause both short- and long-term side effects that may be difficult to accept. Molecular mechanisms of prostate cancer metastasis need to be understood better and new therapies must be developed to selectively target to unique characteristics of cancer cell growth and metastasis. We have developed the "in vivo microscopy" to study the mechanisms that govern prostate cancer cell spread through the microenvironment in vivo in real-time confocal near-infrared fluorescence imaging. A recently developed "in vivo flow cytometer" and optical imaging are used to assess prostate cancer cell spreading and the circulation kinetics of prostate cancer cells. A real- time quantitative monitoring of circulating prostate cancer cells by the in vivo flow cytometer will be useful to assess the effectiveness of the potential therapeutic interventions.

  8. A rapid imageable in vivo metastasis assay for circulating tumor cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menen, Rhiana S; Pinney, Emmett; Kolostova, Katerina; Bobek, Vladimir; Suetsugu, Atsushi; Zhang, Nan; Bouvet, Michael; Hoffman, Robert M

    2011-10-01

    Circulating tumor cells (CTCs) are of great importance for cancer diagnosis, prognosis and treatment. It is necessary to improve the ability to image and analyze them for their biological properties which determine their behavior in the patient. In the present study, using immunomagnetic beads, CTCs were rapidly isolated from the circulation of mice orthotopically implanted with human PC-3 prostate cancer cells stably expressing green fluorescent protein (GFP). The PC-3-GFP CTCs were then expanded in culture in parallel with the parental PC-3-GFP cell line. Both cell types were then inoculated onto the chorioallentoic membrane (CAM) of chick embryos. Eight days later, embryos were harvested and the brains were processed for frozen sections. The IV-100 intravital laser scanning microscope enabled rapid identification of fluorescent metastatic foci within the chick embryonic brain. Inoculation of embryos with PC-3-GFP CTCs resulted in a 3 to 10-fold increase in brain metastasis when compared to those with the parental PC-3-GFP cells (passay of metastatic potential for CTCs. The chick embryo assay has future clinical application for individualizing patient therapy based on the metastatic profile of their CTCs.

  9. [THE NEW APPROACH TO EVALUATION OF ENDOTHELIUM DYSFUNCTION: DETECTION OF NUMBER OF CIRCULATING ENDOTHELIUM CELLS USING FLOW CYTOMETRY TECHNIQUE].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feoktistova, V S; Vavilkova, T V; Sirotkina, O V; Boldueva, S A; Gaikovaia, L B; Leonova, I A; Laskovets, A B; Ermakov, A I

    2015-04-01

    The endothelium dysfunction takes leading place in pathogenesis of development of cardiovascular diseases. The circulating endothelium cells of peripheral blood can act as a direct cell marker of damage and remodeling of endothelium. The study was carried out to develop a new approach to diagnose of endothelium dysfunction by force of determination of number of circulating endothelium cells using flow cytometry technique and to apply determination of circulating endothelium cells for evaluation of risk of development of ischemic heart disease in women of young and middle age. The study embraced 62 female patients with angiography confirmed ischemic heart disease, exertional angina pectoris at the level of functional class I-II (mean age 51 ± 6 years) and 49 women without anamnesis of ischemic heart disease (mean age 52 ± 9 years). The occurrence of more than three circulating endothelium cells by 3 x 105 leukocytes in peripheral blood increases relative risk of development of ischemic heart disease up to 4 times in women of young and middle age and risk of development of acute myocardial infarction up to 8 times in women with ischemic heart disease. The study demonstrated possibility to apply flow cytometry technique to quantitatively specify circulating endothelium cells in peripheral blood and forecast risk of development of ischemic heart disease in women of young and middle age depending on level of circulating endothelium cells.

  10. Interleukin-24 inhibits the plasma cell differentiation program in human germinal center B cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maarof, Ghyath; Bouchet-Delbos, Laurence; Gary-Gouy, Hélène; Durand-Gasselin, Ingrid; Krzysiek, Roman; Dalloul, Ali

    2010-03-04

    Complex molecular mechanisms control B-cell fate to become a memory or a plasma cell. Interleukin-24 (IL-24) is a class II family cytokine of poorly understood immune function that regulates the cell cycle. We previously observed that IL-24 is strongly expressed in leukemic memory-type B cells. Here we show that IL-24 is also expressed in human follicular B cells; it is more abundant in CD27(+) memory B cells and CD5-expressing B cells, whereas it is low to undetectable in centroblasts and plasma cells. Addition of IL-24 to B cells, cultured in conditions shown to promote plasma cell differentiation, strongly inhibited plasma cell generation and immunoglobulin G (IgG) production. By contrast, IL-24 siRNA increased terminal differentiation of B cells into plasma cells. IL-24 is optimally induced by BCR triggering and CD40 engagement; IL-24 increased CD40-induced B-cell proliferation and modulated the transcription of key factors involved in plasma cell differentiation. It also inhibited activation-induced tyrosine phosphorylation of signal transducer and activator of transcription-3 (STAT-3), and inhibited the transcription of IL-10. Taken together, our results indicate that IL-24 is a novel cytokine involved in T-dependent antigen (Ag)-driven B-cell differentiation and suggest its physiologic role in favoring germinal center B-cell maturation in memory B cells at the expense of plasma cells.

  11. Raman-based identification of circulating tumor cells for cancer diagnosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krafft, Christoph; Beleites, Claudia; Schie, Iwan W.; Clement, Joachim H.; Popp, Jürgen

    2016-03-01

    Circulating tumor cells (CTCs) that can be extracted from body fluids offer new prospects in cancer diagnostics. An overview about our recent achievements is presented to use Raman-based methodologies to distinguish cancer cells from normal blood cells. In a first approach, a microfluidic chip was developed to collect Raman spectra from optically trapped cells. Whereas sensitivities and specificities were promising, the throughput was not compatible with the expected low number of CTCs per million white blood cells. A second strategy immobilized up to 200,000 cells onto a microhole array made of silicon nitride. Rapid microscopic screening can be applied to pre-select a subset of cells from which Raman spectra are collected for specific CTC identification. As this approach is compatible with living cells and Raman spectroscopy with 785 nm excitation is non-destructive, a robotic arm can select positively identified CTCs for in-depth biochemical assessment. Finally, an in vivo approach directly collects CTCs from the blood stream. This way reduces the cell number to a manageable size that is subjected to Raman spectroscopy for cell typing and enumeration. An integrated acquisition mode was introduced to further increase the throughput and robustness of single cell classification.

  12. Flow cytometric immunophenotypic characteristics of plasma cell leukemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbara Kruk

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this prospective study was to define the flow cytometric characteristics of simultaneously investigated bone marrow and peripheral blood plasma cells antigens expression in 36 plasma cell leukemia (PCL patients. The immunophenotypic profile of plasma cells was determined with a panel of monoclonal antibodies. The antigen expression intensity was calculated as relative fluorescence intensity (RFI. Bone marrow plasma cells showed expression of particular antigens in the following proportion of cases: CD49d 100%, CD29 94%, CD54 93%, CD44 83%, CD56 60%, CD18 26%, CD11b 29%, CD11a 19%, CD117 27%, CD71 30%, CD126 100% and CD19 0%, while the expression of those antigens on peripheral blood plasma cells was present in the following percentage of patients: CD49d 100%, CD29 96%, CD54 93%, CD44 95%, CD56 56%, CD18 50%, CD11b 53%, CD11a 29%, CD117 26%, CD71 28%, CD126 100% and CD19 0%. The expression of CD54 was significantly higher than that of adhesion molecules belonging to the integrin b2 family: CD11a, CD18 and CD11b, on both bone marrow and peripheral blood cells (p < 0.01. Expression of CD18, CD11a and CD11b was differential between two cell compartments: lower on bone marrow and higher on peripheral blood cells. We found that plasma cells in the bone marrow of patients with plasma cell leukaemia showed significantly greater granularity and size than those in the peripheral blood (p = 0.0001 and p = 0.04, respectively. However, no differences in cell size or granularity were revealed between bone marrow plasma cells from patients with PCL and multiple myeloma. In conclusion, impaired expression of adhesion molecules such as CD11a/CD18 (LFA-1 or CD56 may explain hematogenic dissemination characterizing PCL. The following pattern of adhesion molecule expression according to the proportion of plasma cells expressing a given antigen in peripheral blood and bone marrow and arranged in diminishing order may be established: CD49d > CD44 > CD54

  13. AWAKE’s plasma cell arrives at its destination

    CERN Multimedia

    Antonella Del Rosso

    2016-01-01

    By harnessing the power of wakefields generated by a proton beam in a plasma cell, the AWAKE project aims to produce accelerator gradients hundreds of times higher than those achieved in current machines. Far from being just a dream, the AWAKE tunnel is progressively being filled with its vital components. This week, the plasma cell has been moved to its final position.   AWAKE's 10-metre-long plasma cell in the experiment tunnel. The proof-of-principle AWAKE experiment is being installed in the tunnel previously used by the CNGS facility. In AWAKE, a beam of protons from the SPS will be travelling through a plasma cell and will generate a wakefield that, in turn, will accelerate an electron beam. A laser will ionise the gas in the plasma cell and seed the self-modulation instability that will trigger the wakefield in the plasma. The project aims to prove that the plasma wakefield can be driven with protons and that its acceleration will be extremely powerful, hundreds of times more powe...

  14. Early Diagnosis of Clear Cell Kidney Cancer via VHL/HIF Pathway Regulated-Circulating microRNA

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-05-01

    Award Number: W81XWH-11-1-0715 TITLE: Early Diagnosis of Clear Cell Kidney Cancer via VHL/HIF Pathway -Regulated Circulating microRNA PRINCIPAL...TITLE AND SUBTITLE Sa. CONTRACT NUMBER Early Diagnosis of Clear Cell Kidney Cancer via VHL/HIF Pathway - Regulated Circulating microRNA Sb. GRANT NUMBER...panel of diagnostic miRNAs that are measurable in serum and will be able to identify kidney cancer in its earliest stages. We hypothesized that serum

  15. Plasma membranes from insect midgut cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Walter R. Terra

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Plasma membranes from insect midgut cells are separated into apical and basolateral domains. The apical domain is usually modified into microvilli with a molecular structure similar to other animals. Nevertheless, the microvillar structure should differ in some insects to permit the traffic inside them of secretory vesicles that may budd laterally or pinch-off from the tips of microvilli. Other microvillar modifications are associated with proton-pumping or with the interplay with an ensheathing lipid membrane (the perimicrovilllar membrane observed in the midgut cells of hemipterans (aphids and bugs. The perimicrovillar membranes are thought to be involved in amino acid absorption from diluted diets. The microvillar and perimicrovillar membranes have densities (and protein content that depend on the insect taxon. The role played by the microvillar and perimicrovillar proteins in insect midgut physiology is reviewed here trying to provide a coherent picture of data and highlighting further research areas.As membranas plasmáticas das células intestinais dos insetos apresentam um domínio apical e outro basal. O domínio apical é geralmente modificado em microvilosidades com organização molecular similar a de outros animais, embora possam diferir naqueles insetos que apresentam vesículas secretoras em trânsito que brotam lateralmente ou destacam-se das extremidades das microvilosidades. Outras modificações microvilares estão associadas a bombeamento de prótons ou a interrelações com uma membrana lipídica (a membrana perimicrovilar que reveste as microvilosidades de células intestinais de hemípteros (pulgões e percevejos. Admite-se que as membranas perimicrovilares estejam envolvidas na absorção de aminoácidos a partir de dietas diluídas. As membranas microvilares e perimicrovilares tem densidades distintas (e conteúdo protéico que dependem do táxon do inseto. O papel desempenhado pelas proteínas microvilares e

  16. Stem cell responses to plasma surface modified electrospun polyurethane scaffolds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zandén, Carl; Hellström Erkenstam, Nina; Padel, Thomas; Wittgenstein, Julia; Liu, Johan; Kuhn, H Georg

    2014-07-01

    The topographical effects from functional materials on stem cell behavior are currently of interest in tissue engineering and regenerative medicine. Here we investigate the influence of argon, oxygen, and hydrogen plasma surface modification of electrospun polyurethane fibers on human embryonic stem cell (hESC) and rat postnatal neural stem cell (NSC) responses. The plasma gases were found to induce three combinations of fiber surface functionalities and roughness textures. On randomly oriented fibers, plasma treatments lead to substantially increased hESC attachment and proliferation as compared to native fibers. Argon plasma was found to induce the most optimal combination of surface functionality and roughness for cell expansion. Contact guided migration of cells and alignment of cell processes were observed on aligned fibers. Neuronal differentiation around 5% was found for all samples and was not significantly affected by the induced variations of surface functional group distribution or individual fiber topography. In this study the influence of argon, oxygen, and hydrogen plasma surface modification of electrospun polyurethane fibers on human embryonic stem cell and rat postnatal neural stem cell (NSC) responses is studied with the goal of clarifying the potential effects of functional materials on stem cell behavior, a topic of substantial interest in tissue engineering and regenerative medicine. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. In Vivo Fluorescence Imaging and Tracking of Circulating Cells and Therapeutic Nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markovic, Stacey

    Noninvasive enumeration of rare circulating cells in small animals is of great importance in many areas of biomedical research, but most existing enumeration techniques involve drawing and enriching blood which is known to be problematic. Recently, small animal "in vivo flow cytometry" (IVFC) techniques have been developed, where cells flowing through small arterioles are counted continuously and noninvasively in vivo. However, higher sensitivity IVFC techniques are needed for studying low-abundance (cells. To this end, we developed a macroscopic fluorescence imaging system and automated computer vision algorithm that allows in vivo detection, enumeration and tracking of circulating fluorescently labeled cells from multiple large blood vessels in the ear of a mouse. This technique ---"computer vision IVFC" (CV-IVFC) --- allows cell detection and enumeration at concentrations of 20 cells/mL. Performance of CV-IVFC was also characterized for low-contrast imaging scenarios, representing conditions of weak cell fluorescent labeling or high background tissue autofluorescence, and showed efficient tracking and enumeration of circulating cells with 50% sensitivity in contrast conditions degraded 2 orders of magnitude compared to in vivo testing supporting the potential utility of CV-IVFC in a range of biological models. Refinement of prior work in our lab of a separate rare-cell detection platform - "diffuse fluorescence flow cytometry" (DFFC) --- implemented a "frequency encoding" scheme by modulating two excitation lasers. Fluorescent light from both lasers can be simultaneously detected and split by frequency allowing for better discrimination of noise, sensitivity, and cell localization. The system design is described in detail and preliminary data is shown. Last, we developed a broad-field transmission fluorescence imaging system to observe nanoparticle (NP) diffusion in bulk biological tissue. Novel, implantable NP spacers allow controlled, long-term release of

  18. Dietary fatty acids modulate associations between genetic variants and circulating fatty acids in plasma and erythrocyte membranes: meta-analysis of 9 studies in the CHARGE consortium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Caren E.; Follis, Jack L.; Nettleton, Jennifer A.; Foy, Millennia; Wu, Jason H.Y.; Ma, Yiyi; Tanaka, Toshiko; Manichakul, Ani W.; Wu, Hongyu; Chu, Audrey Y.; Steffen, Lyn M.; Fornage, Myriam; Mozaffarian, Dariush; Kabagambe, Edmond K.; Ferruci, Luigi; da Chen, Yii-Der I; Rich, Stephen S.; Djoussé, Luc; Ridker, Paul M.; Tang, Weihong; McKnight, Barbara; Tsai, Michael Y.; Bandinelli, Stefania; Rotter, Jerome I.; Hu, Frank B.; Chasman, Daniel I.; Psaty, Bruce M.; Arnett, Donna K.; King, Irena B.; Sun, Qi; Wang, Lu; Lumley, Thomas; Chiuve, Stephanie E.; Siscovick, David S; Ordovás, José M.; Lemaitre, Rozenn N.

    2015-01-01

    Scope Tissue concentrations of omega-3 fatty acids may reduce cardiovascular disease risk, and genetic variants are associated with circulating fatty acids concentrations. Whether dietary fatty acids interact with genetic variants to modify circulating omega-3 fatty acids is unclear. Objective We evaluated interactions between genetic variants and fatty acid intakes for circulating alpha-linoleic acid (ALA), eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA), docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) and docosapentaenoic acid (DPA). Methods and Results We conducted meta-analyses (N to 11,668) evaluating interactions between dietary fatty acids and genetic variants (rs174538 and rs174548 in FADS1 (fatty acid desaturase 1), rs7435 in AGPAT3 (1-acyl-sn-glycerol-3-phosphate), rs4985167 in PDXDC1 (pyridoxal-dependent decarboxylase domain-containing 1), rs780094 in GCKR (glucokinase regulatory protein) and rs3734398 in ELOVL2 (fatty acid elongase 2)). Stratification by measurement compartment (plasma vs. erthyrocyte) revealed compartment-specific interactions between FADS1 rs174538 and rs174548 and dietary ALA and linoleic acid for DHA and DPA. Conclusion Our findings reinforce earlier reports that genetically-based differences in circulating fatty acids may be partially due to differences in the conversion of fatty acid precursors. Further, fatty acids measurement compartment may modify gene-diet relationships, and considering compartment may improve the detection of gene-fatty acids interactions for circulating fatty acid outcomes. PMID:25626431

  19. Phagocytic plasma cells in a patient with multiple myeloma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    P.M. Vanhagen (P.); K. de Leeuw (K.); A. Hagemeijer (Anne); B. Löwenberg (Bob)

    1995-01-01

    textabstractPhagocytosis of blood cells by malignant plasma cells in multiple myeloma is an extremely rare condition. Here we present a 39-year-old woman with multiple myeloma. Bone marrow smear showed an extensive phagocytosis of erythrocytes and platelets by myeloma cells.

  20. Phagocytic plasma cells in a patient with multiple myeloma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    P.M. Vanhagen (P.); K. de Leeuw (K.); A. Hagemeijer (Anne); B. Löwenberg (Bob)

    1995-01-01

    textabstractPhagocytosis of blood cells by malignant plasma cells in multiple myeloma is an extremely rare condition. Here we present a 39-year-old woman with multiple myeloma. Bone marrow smear showed an extensive phagocytosis of erythrocytes and platelets by myeloma cells.

  1. Primary Plasma Cell Leukemia: Identity Card 2016.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musto, Pellegrino; Simeon, Vittorio; Todoerti, Katia; Neri, Antonino

    2016-04-01

    Primary plasma cell leukemia (PPCL) is an aggressive and rare variant of multiple myeloma (MM), characterized by peculiar adverse clinical and biological features. Though the poor outcome of PPCL has been slightly improved by novel treatments during the last 10 years, due to the limited number of available studies in this uncommon disease, optimal therapy remains a classic unmet clinical need. Anyway, in the real-life practice, induction with a bortezomib-based three-drug combination, including dexamethasone and, possibly, lenalidomide, or, alternatively, thalidomide, cyclophosphamide, or doxorubicin, is a reasonable first-line option. This approach may be particularly advisable for patients with adverse cytogenetics, hyperleucocytosis, and rapidly progressive disease, in whom a fast response is required, or for those with suboptimal renal function, where, however, lenalidomide should be used with caution until renal activity is restored. In younger subjects, leukemia/lymphoma-like more intensive regimens, including hyperfractionated cyclophosphamide, vincristine, doxorubicin, and dexamethasone or continue-infusion cisplatin, doxorubicin, cyclophosphamide, and etoposide, may be also combined with bortezomib +/- thalidomide. Treatment must be started immediately after a diagnosis of PPCL is made to avoid the risk of irreversible disease complications and, in such a context, the prevention of tumor lysis syndrome is mandatory. In patients eligible for autologous stem cell transplantation (AuSCT), other alkylating agents, in particular melphalan, should be initially avoided in order to allow adequate collections of CD34+ peripheral blood stem cells (PBSC). A combination of lenalidomide and dexamethasone may be a valuable alternative option to manage older or unfit patients or those with slower disease evolution or with signs of neuropathy, contraindicating the use of bortezomib. Patients not suitable for transplant procedures should continue the treatment, if a

  2. In vivo label-free photoacoustic flow cytography and on-the-spot laser killing of single circulating melanoma cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Yun; Wang, Lidai; Shi, Junhui; Yao, Junjie; Li, Lei; Zhang, Ruiying; Huang, Chih-Hsien; Zou, Jun; Wang, Lihong V.

    2016-01-01

    Metastasis causes as many as 90% of cancer-related deaths, especially for the deadliest skin cancer, melanoma. Since hematogenous dissemination of circulating tumor cells is the major route of metastasis, detection and destruction of circulating tumor cells are vital for impeding metastasis and improving patient prognosis. Exploiting the exquisite intrinsic optical absorption contrast of circulating melanoma cells, we developed dual-wavelength photoacoustic flow cytography coupled with a nanosecond-pulsed melanoma-specific laser therapy mechanism. We have successfully achieved in vivo label-free imaging of rare single circulating melanoma cells in both arteries and veins of mice. Further, the photoacoustic signal from a circulating melanoma cell immediately hardware-triggers a lethal pinpoint laser irradiation to kill it on the spot in a thermally confined manner without causing collateral damage. A pseudo-therapy study including both in vivo and in vitro experiments demonstrated the performance and the potential clinical value of our method, which can facilitate early treatment of metastasis by clearing circulating tumor cells from vasculature. PMID:28000788

  3. In vivo label-free photoacoustic flow cytography and on-the-spot laser killing of single circulating melanoma cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Yun; Wang, Lidai; Shi, Junhui; Yao, Junjie; Li, Lei; Zhang, Ruiying; Huang, Chih-Hsien; Zou, Jun; Wang, Lihong V.

    2016-12-01

    Metastasis causes as many as 90% of cancer-related deaths, especially for the deadliest skin cancer, melanoma. Since hematogenous dissemination of circulating tumor cells is the major route of metastasis, detection and destruction of circulating tumor cells are vital for impeding metastasis and improving patient prognosis. Exploiting the exquisite intrinsic optical absorption contrast of circulating melanoma cells, we developed dual-wavelength photoacoustic flow cytography coupled with a nanosecond-pulsed melanoma-specific laser therapy mechanism. We have successfully achieved in vivo label-free imaging of rare single circulating melanoma cells in both arteries and veins of mice. Further, the photoacoustic signal from a circulating melanoma cell immediately hardware-triggers a lethal pinpoint laser irradiation to kill it on the spot in a thermally confined manner without causing collateral damage. A pseudo-therapy study including both in vivo and in vitro experiments demonstrated the performance and the potential clinical value of our method, which can facilitate early treatment of metastasis by clearing circulating tumor cells from vasculature.

  4. Circulating Tumor Cells Detection and Counting in Uveal Melanomas by a Filtration-Based Method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mazzini, Cinzia [Department of Translational Medicine and Surgery, Università di Firenze, Firenze 50134 (Italy); Pinzani, Pamela, E-mail: p.pinzani@dfc.unifi.it; Salvianti, Francesca [Department of Biomedical, Experimental and Clinical Sciences, Università di Firenze, Firenze 50139 (Italy); Scatena, Cristian; Paglierani, Milena; Ucci, Francesca [Department of Translational Medicine and Surgery, Università di Firenze, Firenze 50134 (Italy); Pazzagli, Mario [Department of Biomedical, Experimental and Clinical Sciences, Università di Firenze, Firenze 50139 (Italy); Massi, Daniela [Department of Translational Medicine and Surgery, Università di Firenze, Firenze 50134 (Italy)

    2014-02-07

    Uveal melanoma is one of the most deadly diseases in ophthalmology for which markers able to predict the appearance of metastasis are needed. The study investigates the role of circulating tumor cells (CTC) as a prognostic factor in this disease. We report the detection of circulating tumor cells by Isolation by Size of Epithelial Tumor cells (ISET) in a cohort of 31 uveal melanoma patients: we identified single CTCs or clusters of cells in 17 patients, while the control population, subjects with choroidal nevi, showed no CTC in peripheral blood. The presence of CTCs did not correlate with any clinical and pathological parameter, such as tumor larger basal diameter (LBD), tumor height and TNM. By stratifying patients in groups on the basis of the number of CTC (lower or higher than 10 CTC per 10 mL blood) and the presence of CTC clusters we found a significant difference in LBD (p = 0.019), Tumor height (p = 0.048), disease-free and overall survival (p < 0.05). In conclusion, we confirm the role of CTC as a negative prognostic marker in uveal melanoma patients after a long follow-up period. Further characterization of CTC will help understanding uveal melanoma metastasization and improve patient management.

  5. Detection of Circulating Tumour Cells from Blood of Breast Cancer Patients via RT-qPCR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andergassen, Ulrich; Kölbl, Alexandra C.; Hutter, Stefan; Friese, Klaus; Jeschke, Udo, E-mail: udo.jeschke@med.uni-muenchen.de [Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Ludwig Maximilians University of Munich, Munich, Maistrasse 11, D-80337 Munich (Germany)

    2013-09-25

    Breast cancer is still the most frequent cause of cancer-related death in women worldwide. Often death is not caused only by the primary tumour itself, but also by metastatic lesions. Today it is largely accepted, that these remote metastases arise out of cells, which detach from the primary tumour, enter circulation, settle down at secondary sites in the body and are called Circulating Tumour Cells (CTCs). The occurrence of such minimal residual diseases in the blood of breast cancer patients is mostly linked to a worse prognosis for therapy outcome and overall survival. Due to their very low frequency, the detection of CTCs is, still a technical challenge. RT-qPCR as a highly sensitive method could be an approach for CTC-detection from peripheral blood of breast cancer patients. This assumption is based on the fact that CTCs are of epithelial origin and therefore express a different gene panel than surrounding blood cells. For the technical approach it is necessary to identify appropriate marker genes and to correlate their gene expression levels to the number of tumour cells within a sample in an in vitro approach. After that, samples from adjuvant and metastatic patients can be analysed. This approach may lead to new concepts in diagnosis and treatment.

  6. Nanostructured Surfaces to Target and Kill Circulating Tumor Cells While Repelling Leukocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael J. Mitchell

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Hematogenous metastasis, the process of cancer cell migration from a primary to distal location via the bloodstream, typically leads to a poor patient prognosis. Selectin proteins hold promise in delivering drug-containing nanocarriers to circulating tumor cells (CTCs in the bloodstream, due to their rapid, force-dependent binding kinetics. However, it is challenging to deliver such nanocarriers while avoiding toxic effects on healthy blood cells, as many possess ligands that adhesively interact with selectins. Herein, we describe a nanostructured surface to capture flowing cancer cells, while preventing human neutrophil adhesion. Microtube surfaces with immobilized halloysite nanotubes (HNTs and E-selectin functionalized liposomal doxorubicin (ES-PEG L-DXR significantly increased the number of breast adenocarcinoma MCF7 cells captured from flow, yet also significantly reduced the number of captured neutrophils. Neutrophils firmly adhered and projected pseudopods on surfaces coated only with liposomes, while neutrophils adherent to HNT-liposome surfaces maintained a round morphology. Perfusion of both MCF7 cells and neutrophils resulted in primarily cancer cell adhesion to the HNT-liposome surface, and induced significant cancer cell death. This work demonstrates that nanostructured surfaces consisting of HNTs and ES-PEG L-DXR can increase CTC recruitment for chemotherapeutic delivery, while also preventing healthy cell adhesion and uptake of therapeutic intended for CTCs.

  7. Changes in Circulating B Cell Subsets Associated with Aging and Acute SIV Infection in Rhesus Macaques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez, Denise F.; Kieu, Hung T.; Castillo, Luis D.; Messaoudi, Ilhem; Shen, Xiaoying; Tomaras, Georgia D.; Shacklett, Barbara L.; Barry, Peter A.; Sparger, Ellen E.

    2017-01-01

    Aging and certain viral infections can negatively impact humoral responses in humans. To further develop the nonhuman primate (NHP) model for investigating B cell dynamics in human aging and infectious disease, a flow cytometric panel was developed to characterize circulating rhesus B cell subsets. Significant differences between human and macaque B cells included the proportions of cells within IgD+ and switched memory populations and a prominent CD21-CD27+ unswitched memory population detected only in macaques. We then utilized the expanded panel to analyze B cell alterations associated with aging and acute simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) infection in the NHP model. In the aging study, distinct patterns of B cell subset frequencies were observed for macaques aged one to five years compared to those between ages 5 and 30 years. In the SIV infection study, B cell frequencies and absolute number were dramatically reduced following acute infection, but recovered within four weeks of infection. Thereafter, the frequencies of activated memory B cells progressively increased; these were significantly correlated with the magnitude of SIV-specific IgG responses, and coincided with impaired maturation of anti-SIV antibody avidity, as previously reported for HIV-1 infection. These observations further validate the NHP model for investigation of mechanisms responsible for B cells alterations associated with immunosenescence and infectious disease. PMID:28095513

  8. Clinical significance of circulating dendritic cells in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Robak

    1992-01-01

    Full Text Available DENDRITIC cells are a complex group of mainly bone-marrow-derived leukocytes that play a role in autoimmune diseases. The total number of circulating dendritic cells (tDC, and their plasmacytoid dendritic cell (pDC and myeloid dendritic cell (mDC1 and mDC2 subpopulations were assessed using flow cytometry. The number of tDC and their subsets were significantly lower in systemic lupus erythematosus patients than in the control group. The count of tDC and their subsets correlated with the number of T cells. The number of tDC and pDC subpopulation were lower in the patients with lymphopenia and leucopoenia than in the patients without these symptoms. Our data suggest that fluctuations in blood dendritic cell count in systemic lupus erythematosus patients are much more significant in pDC than in mDC, what may be caused by their migration to the sites of inflammation including skin lesions. Positive correlation between dendritic cell number and TCD4+, TCD8+ and CD19+ B cells, testify of their interactions and influence on SLE pathogenesis. The association between dendritic cell number and clinical features seems to be less clear.

  9. It Is All in the Blood: The Multifaceted Contribution of Circulating Progenitor Cells in Diabetic Complications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gian Paolo Fadini

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Diabetes mellitus (DM is a worldwide growing disease and represents a huge social and healthcare problem owing to the burden of its complications. Micro- and macrovascular diabetic complications arise from excess damage through well-known biochemical pathways. Interestingly, microangiopathy hits the bone marrow (BM microenvironment with features similar to retinopathy, nephropathy and neuropathy. The BM represents a reservoir of progenitor cells for multiple lineages, not limited to the hematopoietic system and including endothelial cells, smooth muscle cells, cardiomyocytes, and osteogenic cells. All these multiple progenitor cell lineages are profoundly altered in the setting of diabetes in humans and animal models. Reduction of endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs along with excess smooth muscle progenitor (SMP and osteoprogenitor cells creates an imbalance that promote the development of micro- and macroangiopathy. Finally, an excess generation of BM-derived fusogenic cells has been found to contribute to diabetic complications in animal models. Taken together, a growing amount of literature attributes to circulating progenitor cells a multi-faceted role in the pathophysiology of DM, setting a novel scenario that puts BM and the blood at the centre of the stage.

  10. An increase in circulating B cell-activating factor in childhood-onset ocular myasthenia gravis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Motobayashi, Mitsuo; Inaba, Yuji; Nishimura, Takafumi; Kobayashi, Norimoto; Nakazawa, Yozo; Koike, Kenichi

    2015-04-01

    Myasthenia gravis is a B cell-mediated autoimmune disorder. The pathophysiology of childhood-onset ocular myasthenia gravis remains unclear. We investigated serum B cell-activating factor levels and other immunological parameters in child patients with ocular myasthenia gravis. Blood samples were obtained from 9 children with ocular myasthenia gravis and 20 age-matched controls. We assayed serum concentrations of B cell-activating factor, anti-acetylcholine receptor antibody titers, 7 types of cytokines (interleukins-2, -4, -6, -10, and -17A; interferon-γ; tumor necrosis factor-α) as well as the percentages of peripheral blood CD4+, CD8+, and CD19+ cells. Serum B cell-activating factor levels were significantly higher before immunosuppressive therapy in patients with childhood-onset ocular myasthenia gravis than in controls and decreased after immunosuppressive therapy. A significant positive correlation was observed between serum B cell-activating factor levels and anti-acetylcholine receptor antibody titers in patients with myasthenia gravis. Serum B cell-activating factor concentrations did not correlate with the percentages of CD4+, CD8+, and CD19+ cells or the CD4+/CD8+ ratio. No significant differences were observed in the levels of the 7 different types of cytokines examined, including interleukin-17A, between preimmunosuppressive therapy myasthenia gravis patients and controls. Circulating B cell-activating factor may play a key role in the pathophysiology of childhood-onset ocular myasthenia gravis. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. The presence of local and circulating autoreactive B cells in patients with advanced periodontitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berglundh, Tord; Liljenberg, Birgitta; Tarkowski, Andrej; Lindhe, Jan

    2002-04-01

    The aim of the present investigation was to study the local (gingival) and systemic occurrence of autoreactive B cells (CD5+CD19 positive) in subjects with a high or low susceptibility to periodontitis. 2 groups of subjects (Group A and B) susceptible to periodontitis were included. Group A consisted of 22 adult patients (7 females and 15 males, aged 24-66 years) with advanced and generalized chronic periodontitis and group B comprised 7 children (4 girls and 3 boys aged 9-13 years) with localized aggressive periodontitis. 26 periodontally healthy subjects, Group C (aged 23-80 years, mean 49.6+/-16.3), were also recruited. Assessment of clinical and radiographical characteristics of periodontal disease was performed. Gingival biopsies and peripheral blood samples were obtained and prepared for immunohistochemical analysis. Blood samples only were obtained from the periodontally healthy subjects (group C). The proportion of autoreactive B cells (CD5+CD19 positive) of peripheral blood lymphocytes was about 6 times higher in group A and 4 times higher in group B than in the samples from the control subjects (group C). About 40-50% of the B cells in the peripheral blood of the periodontitis susceptible individuals expressed markers for autoreactive features while less than 15% of the circulating B cells in the subjects of group C exhibited such markers. The periodontitis lesion in the adult periodontitis patients contained a substantial number of B cells out of which about 30% demonstrated autoreactive features. It is suggested that both circulating and local B cells in periodontitis susceptible individuals have a higher propensity to autoreactive properties than B cells of patients with a low susceptibility to periodontitis.

  12. Argonaute 2 complexes selectively protect the circulating microRNAs in cell-secreted microvesicles.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Limin Li

    Full Text Available Cell-secreted miRNAs are highly stable and can serve as biomarkers for various diseases and signaling molecules in intercellular communication. The mechanism underlying the stability of circulating miRNAs, however, remains incompletely understood. Here we show that Argonaute 2 (Ago2 complexes and microvesicles (MVs provide specific and non-specific protection for miRNA in cell-secreted MVs, respectively. First, the resistance of MV-encapsulated miRNAs to RNaseA was both depended on intact vesicular structure of MVs and protease-sensitive. Second, an immunoprecipitation assay using a probe complementary to human miR-16, a miRNA primarily located in the MVs and showed a strong, protease-sensitive resistance to RNaseA, identified Ago2 as a major miR-16-associated protein. Compared with protein-free miR-16, Ago2-associated miR-16 was resistant to RNaseA in a dose- and time-dependent fashion. Third, when the miR-16/Ago2 complex was disrupted by trypaflavine, the resistance of miR-16 to RNaseA was decreased. In contrast, when the association of miR-16 with the Ago2 complexes was increased during cell apoptosis, although the total amount of miR-16 and Ago2 remained unchanged, the resistance of miR-16 to RNaseA in the MVs was enhanced. A similar correlation between the increase of miR-223/Ago2 association and the resistance of miR-223 against RNaseA was observed during all trans retinoic acid (ATRA-induced cell differentiation of promyelocytic HL60 cells. In conclusion, the association of miRNAs with Ago2 complexes, an event that is linked to cell functional status, plays a critical role in stabilizing the circulating miRNAs in cell-secreted MVs.

  13. Phenotypic and Functional Alterations in Circulating Memory CD8 T Cells with Time after Primary Infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Matthew D.; Kim, Marie T.; Shan, Qiang; Sompallae, Ramakrishna; Xue, Hai-Hui; Harty, John T.; Badovinac, Vladimir P.

    2015-01-01

    Memory CD8 T cells confer increased protection to immune hosts upon secondary viral, bacterial, and parasitic infections. The level of protection provided depends on the numbers, quality (functional ability), and location of memory CD8 T cells present at the time of infection. While primary memory CD8 T cells can be maintained for the life of the host, the full extent of phenotypic and functional changes that occur over time after initial antigen encounter remains poorly characterized. Here we show that critical properties of circulating primary memory CD8 T cells, including location, phenotype, cytokine production, maintenance, secondary proliferation, secondary memory generation potential, and mitochondrial function change with time after infection. Interestingly, phenotypic and functional alterations in the memory population are not due solely to shifts in the ratio of effector (CD62Llo) and central memory (CD62Lhi) cells, but also occur within defined CD62Lhi memory CD8 T cell subsets. CD62Lhi memory cells retain the ability to efficiently produce cytokines with time after infection. However, while it is was not formally tested whether changes in CD62Lhi memory CD8 T cells over time occur in a cell intrinsic manner or are due to selective death and/or survival, the gene expression profiles of CD62Lhi memory CD8 T cells change, phenotypic heterogeneity decreases, and mitochondrial function and proliferative capacity in either a lymphopenic environment or in response to antigen re-encounter increase with time. Importantly, and in accordance with their enhanced proliferative and metabolic capabilities, protection provided against chronic LCMV clone-13 infection increases over time for both circulating memory CD8 T cell populations and for CD62Lhi memory cells. Taken together, the data in this study reveal that memory CD8 T cells continue to change with time after infection and suggest that the outcome of vaccination strategies designed to elicit protective memory

  14. Miniature Dielectric Barrier Discharge Nonthermal Plasma Induces Apoptosis in Lung Cancer Cells and Inhibits Cell Migration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eisenmann, Kathryn M.

    2017-01-01

    Traditional cancer treatments like radiotherapy and chemotherapy have drawbacks and are not selective for killing only cancer cells. Nonthermal atmospheric pressure plasmas with dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) can be applied to living cells and tissues and have emerged as novel tools for localized cancer therapy. The purpose of this study was to investigate the different effects caused by miniature DBD (mDBD) plasma to A549 lung cancer cells. In this study, A549 lung cancer cells cultured in 12 well plates were treated with mDBD plasma for specified treatment times to assess the changes in the size of the area of cell detachment, the viability of attached or detached cells, and cell migration. Furthermore, we investigated an innovative mDBD plasma-based therapy for localized treatment of lung cancer cells through apoptotic induction. Our results indicate that plasma treatment for 120 sec causes apoptotic cell death in 35.8% of cells, while mDBD plasma treatment for 60 sec, 30 sec, or 15 sec causes apoptotic cell death in 20.5%, 14.1%, and 6.3% of the cell population, respectively. Additionally, we observed reduced A549 cell migration in response to mDBD plasma treatment. Thus, mDBD plasma system can be a viable platform for localized lung cancer therapy. PMID:28243603

  15. The plasma protein fibrinogen stabilizes clusters of red blood cells in microcapillary flows

    CERN Document Server

    Brust, M; Thiebaud, M; Flormann, D; Verdier, C; Kaestner, L; Laschke, M W; Selmi, H; Benyoussef, A; Podgorski, T; Coupier, G; Misbah, C; Wagner, C

    2014-01-01

    The supply of oxygen and nutrients and the disposal of metabolic waste in the organs depend strongly on how blood, especially red blood cells, flow through the microvascular network. Macromolecular plasma proteins such as fibrinogen cause red blood cells to form large aggregates, called rouleaux, which are usually assumed to be disaggregated in the circulation due to the shear forces present in bulk flow. This leads to the assumption that rouleaux formation is only relevant in the venule network and in arterioles at low shear rates or stasis. Thanks to an excellent agreement between combined experimental and numerical approaches, we show that despite the large shear rates present in microcapillaries, the presence of either fibrinogen or the synthetic polymer dextran leads to an enhanced formation of robust clusters of red blood cells, even at haematocrits as low as 1%. Robust aggregates are shown to exist in microcapillaries even for fibrinogen concentrations within the healthy physiological range. These pers...

  16. Type 2 diabetes mellitus is associated with an imbalance in circulating endothelial and smooth muscle progenitor cell numbers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Ark, J.; Moser, J.; Lexis, C. P. H.; Bekkema, F.; Pop, I.; van der Horst, I. C. C.; Zeebregts, C. J.; van Goor, H.; Wolffenbuttel, B. H. R.; Hillebrands, J. L.

    2012-01-01

    Individuals with type 2 diabetes mellitus have increased rates of macrovascular disease (MVD). Endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs), circulating angiogenic cells (CACs) and smooth muscle progenitor cells (SMPCs) are suggested to play a role in the pathogenesis of MVD. The relationship between vasoreg

  17. Different Profile of Interleukin-10 Production in Circulating T Cells from Atopic Asthmatics Compared with Healthy Subjects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K Matsumoto

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Interleukin (IL-10 is a pleiotropic cytokine released from various cells, including T cells. Although IL-10 is suggested to inhibit allergic responses, its role in asthma remains uncertain. The purpose of the present study was to compare the profile of IL-10 in circulating T cells from stable atopic asthmatics, atopic nonasthmatics and healthy controls.

  18. Influence of elevated body temperature on circulating immunoglobulin-secreting cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kappel, M; Barington, T; Gyhrs, A

    1995-01-01

    This work was designed to investigate the effect of in vivo hyperthermia in man on circulating immunoglobulin-secreting cells. Eight healthy male volunteers were immersed into a hot waterbath (WI) (water temperature 39.5 degrees C) for 2 h, whereby their body temperature rose to 39.5 degrees C....... On another occasion they served as their own controls, being immersed into thermoneutral water (water temperature 34.5 degrees C) for 2 h. Blood samples were drawn before immersion, at body temperatures of 38, 39 and 39.5 degrees C, as well as 2 h after WI when their body temperatures were normalized...

  19. Circulating tumor cells count and characterization in a male breast cancer patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gazzaniga, Paola; Naso, Giuseppe; Raimondi, Cristina; Gradilone, Angela; Palazzo, Antonella; Gandini, Orietta; Petracca, Arianna; Nicolazzo, Chiara; Cortesi, Enrico; Frati, Luigi

    2011-09-01

    A 64-y-old man presented to Medical Oncology Department a metastatic invasive ductal breast carcinoma, positive for estrogen (ER) and progesterone receptors (PR) and Her2/neu negative. The patient was treated with different lines of therapy, with rapid radiological progression of disease. After four courses of a third-line chemotherapy, a radiological stable disease was maintained. The patient was followed by serial blood drawings for the characterization and count of circulating tumor cells (CTC). This is the first report concerning the predictive and prognostic value of CTC in a male breast cancer patient.

  20. The clinical significance of circulating tumor cells in non-metastatic colorectal cancer - A review

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thorsteinsson, M; Jess, Per

    2011-01-01

    with metastatic disease, but the prognostic role of CTC in non-metastatic colorectal cancer is less clear. The aim of this review is to examine the possible clinical significance of circulating tumor cells in non-metastatic colorectal cancer (TNM-stage I-III) with the primary focus on detection methods...... and prognosis. METHODS: The PubMed and Cochrane database and reference lists of relevant articles were searched for scientific literature published in English from January 2000 to June 2010. We included studies with non-metastatic colorectal cancer (TNM-stage I-III) and CTC detected pre- and/or post...

  1. Endothelial damage in major depression patients is modulated by SSRI treatment, as demonstrated by circulating biomarkers and an in vitro cell model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez-Vilchez, I; Diaz-Ricart, M; Navarro, V; Torramade, S; Zamorano-Leon, J; Lopez-Farre, A; Galan, A M; Gasto, C; Escolar, G

    2016-01-01

    There is a link between depression, cardiovascular events and inflammation. We have explored this connection through endothelial dysfunction, using in vivo and in vitro approaches. We evaluated circulating biomarkers of endothelial dysfunction in patients with major depression at their diagnosis (MD-0) and during antidepressant treatment with the selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor escitalopram, for 8 and 24 weeks (MD-8 and MD-24). Results were always compared with matched healthy controls (CON). We measured in vivo circulating endothelial cells (CECs) and endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) in blood samples, and assessed plasma levels of soluble von Willebrand factor (VWF) and vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1). CEC counts, soluble VWF and VCAM-1 were statistically elevated in MD-0 (Pcultured in the presence of sera from each study group. Elevated expression of the inflammation marker intercellular adhesion molecule-1 and oxidative stress, with lower presence of endothelial nitric oxide synthase and higher reactive oxygen species production, were found in cells exposed to MD-0 sera (Pcultured endothelial cells reproducing endothelial dysfunction in naive patients with major depression, demonstrating endothelial damage and inflammation at diagnosis, and recovering with selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor treatment for 24 weeks. PMID:27598970

  2. Manganese effects on haematopoietic cells and circulating coelomocytes of Asterias rubens (Linnaeus)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oweson, Carolina; Skoeld, Helen [Department of Marine Ecology, Goeteborg University, Kristineberg 566, 45034 Fiskebaeckskil (Sweden); Pinsino, Annalisa; Matranga, Valeria [Istituto di Biomedicina e Immunologia Molecolare ' A. Monroy' , Via Ugo La Malfa 153, 90146 Palermo (Italy); Hernroth, Bodil [The Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences, Kristineberg 566, 45034 Fiskebaeckskil (Sweden)], E-mail: bodil.hernroth@marecol.gu.se

    2008-08-29

    Manganese (Mn) is a naturally abundant metal in marine sediments where it mainly occurs as MnO{sub 2}. During hypoxic conditions it is converted into a bioavailable state, Mn{sup 2+}, and can reach levels that previously have shown effects on immune competent cells of the crustacean, Nephrops norvegicus. Here we investigated if Mn also affects circulating coelomocytes and their renewal in the common sea star, Asterias rubens, when exposed to concentrations of Mn that can be found in nature. When the sea stars were exposed to Mn it accumulated in the coelomic fluid and the number of circulating coelomocytes, in contrast to what was recorded in Nephrops, increased significantly. By using the substitute nucleotide, 5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine, BrdU, for tracing cell division and by recording mitotic index by nuclei staining, we found that Mn induced proliferation of cells from a putative haematopoietic tissue, the coelomic epithelium. In addition, the haematopoietic tissue and coelomocytes showed stress response in terms of changes in HSP70 levels and protein carbonyls, as judged by immunohistochemistry and Western blotting. Measurement of dehydrogenase activity, using MTS/PMS, revealed that Mn showed cytotoxic properties. We also found that the phagocytotic capacity of coelomocytes was significantly inhibited by Mn. It was concluded that the exposure of A. rubens to Mn induced renewal of coelomocytes and impaired their immune response.

  3. Seminal plasma enhances cervical adenocarcinoma cell proliferation and tumour growth in vivo.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jason R Sutherland

    Full Text Available Cervical cancer is one of the leading causes of cancer-related death in women in sub-Saharan Africa. Extensive evidence has shown that cervical cancer and its precursor lesions are caused by Human papillomavirus (HPV infection. Although the vast majority of HPV infections are naturally resolved, failure to eradicate infected cells has been shown to promote viral persistence and tumorigenesis. Furthermore, following neoplastic transformation, exposure of cervical epithelial cells to inflammatory mediators either directly or via the systemic circulation may enhance progression of the disease. It is well recognised that seminal plasma contains an abundance of inflammatory mediators, which are identified as regulators of tumour growth. Here we investigated the role of seminal plasma in regulating neoplastic cervical epithelial cell growth and tumorigenesis. Using HeLa cervical adenocarcinoma cells, we found that seminal plasma (SP induced the expression of the inflammatory enzymes, prostaglandin endoperoxide synthase (PTGS1 and PTGS2, cytokines interleukin (IL -6, and -11 and vascular endothelial growth factor-A (VEGF-A. To investigate the role of SP on tumour cell growth in vivo, we xenografted HeLa cells subcutaneously into the dorsal flank of nude mice. Intra-peritoneal administration of SP rapidly and significantly enhanced the tumour growth rate and size of HeLa cell xenografts in nude mice. As observed in vitro, we found that SP induced expression of inflammatory PTGS enzymes, cytokines and VEGF-A in vivo. Furthermore we found that SP enhances blood vessel size in HeLa cell xenografts. Finally we show that SP-induced cytokine production, VEGF-A expression and cell proliferation are mediated via the induction of the inflammatory PTGS pathway.

  4. CD27-triggering on primary plasma cell leukaemia cells has anti-apoptotic effects involving mitogen activated protein kinases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Guikema, JEJ; Vellenga, E; Abdulahad, WH; Hovenga, S; Bos, NA

    2004-01-01

    Primary plasma cell leukaemia (PCL) is a rare plasma cell malignancy, which is related to multiple myeloma (MM) and is characterized by a poor prognosis. In a previous study we demonstrated that PCL plasma cells display a high expression of CD27, in contrast to MM plasma cells. The present study was

  5. Nanoparticle-mediated binning and profiling of heterogeneous circulating tumor cell subpopulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohamadi, Reza M; Besant, Justin D; Mepham, Adam; Green, Brenda; Mahmoudian, Laili; Gibbs, Thaddeus; Ivanov, Ivaylo; Malvea, Anahita; Stojcic, Jessica; Allan, Alison L; Lowes, Lori E; Sargent, Edward H; Nam, Robert K; Kelley, Shana O

    2015-01-02

    The analysis of circulating tumor cells (CTCs) is an important capability that may lead to new approaches for cancer management. CTC capture devices developed to date isolate a bulk population of CTCs and do not differentiate subpopulations that may have varying phenotypes with different levels of clinical relevance. Here, we present a new device for CTC spatial sorting and profiling that sequesters blood-borne tumor cells with different phenotypes into discrete spatial bins. Validation data are presented showing that cancer cell lines with varying surface expression generate different binning profiles within the device. Working with patient blood samples, we obtain profiles that elucidate the heterogeneity of CTC populations present in cancer patients and also report on the status of CTCs within the epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT).

  6. Multi-Phenotypic subtyping of circulating tumor cells using sequential fluorescent quenching and restaining

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Daniel L.; Alpaugh, R. Katherine; Tsai, Susan; Tang, Cha-Mei; Stefansson, Steingrimur

    2016-09-01

    In tissue biopsies formalin fixed paraffin embedded cancer blocks are micro-sectioned producing multiple semi-identical specimens which are analyzed and subtyped proteomically, and genomically, with numerous biomarkers. In blood based biopsies (BBBs), blood is purified for circulating tumor cells (CTCs) and clinical utility is typically limited to cell enumeration, as only 2–3 positive fluorescent markers and 1 negative marker can be used. As such, increasing the number of subtyping biomarkers on each individual CTC could dramatically enhance the clinical utility of BBBs, allowing in depth interrogation of clinically relevant CTCs. We describe a simple and inexpensive method for quenching the specific fluors of fluorescently stained CTCs followed by sequential restaining with additional biomarkers. As proof of principle a CTC panel, immunosuppression panel and stem cell panel were used to sequentially subtype individual fluorescently stained patient CTCs, suggesting a simple and universal technique to analyze multiple clinically applicable immunomarkers from BBBs.

  7. Circulating Tumor Cells in Breast Cancer Patients: An Evolving Role in Patient Prognosis and Disease Progression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Holly Graves

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we examine the role of circulating tumor cells (CTCs in breast cancer. CTCs are tumor cells present in the peripheral blood. They are found in many different carcinomas but are not present in patients with benign disease. Recent advances in theories regarding metastasis support the role of early release of tumor cells in the neoplastic process. Furthermore, it has been found that phenotypic variation exists between the primary tumor and CTCs. Of particular interest is the incongruency found between primary tumor and CTC HER2 status in both metastatic and early breast cancer. Overall, CTCs have been shown to be a poor prognostic marker in metastatic breast cancer. CTCs in early breast cancer are not as well studied, however, several studies suggest that the presence of CTCs in early breast cancer may also suggest a poorer prognosis. Studies are currently underway looking at the use of CTC level monitoring in order to guide changes in therapy.

  8. Studying circulation times of liver cancer cells by in vivo flow cytometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, G; Li, Y; Fan, Z; Guo, J; Tan, X; Wei, X, E-mail: xwei@fudan.edu.cn [Institutes of Biomedical Sciences, Fudan University, 138 Yi Xue Yuan Road, Shanghai, 200032 (China)

    2011-02-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) may metastasize to lung kidney and many other organs. The survival rate is almost zero for metastatic HCC patients. Molecular mechanisms of HCC metastasis need to be understood better and new therapies must be developed. A recently developed 'in vivo flow cytometer' combined with real-time confocal fluorescence imaging are used to assess spreading and the circulation kinetics of liver tumor cells. The in vivo flow cytometer has the capability to detect and quantify continuously the number and flow characteristics of fluorescently labeled cells in vivo in real time without extracting blood sample. We have measured the depletion kinetics of two related human HCC cell lines high-metastatic HCCLM3 cells and low-metastatic HepG2 cells which were from the same origin and obtained by repetitive screenings in mice. >60% HCCLM3 cells are depleted within the first hour. Interestingly the low-metastatic HepG2 cells possess noticeably slower depletion kinetics. In comparison <40% HepG2 cells are depleted within the first hour. The differences in depletion kinetics might provide insights into early metastasis processes.

  9. Functional characterization of circulating tumor cells with a prostate-cancer-specific microfluidic device.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brian J Kirby

    Full Text Available Cancer metastasis accounts for the majority of cancer-related deaths owing to poor response to anticancer therapies. Molecular understanding of metastasis-associated drug resistance remains elusive due to the scarcity of available tumor tissue. Isolation of circulating tumor cells (CTCs from the peripheral blood of patients has emerged as a valid alternative source of tumor tissue that can be subjected to molecular characterization. However, issues with low purity and sensitivity have impeded adoption to clinical practice. Here we report a novel method to capture and molecularly characterize CTCs isolated from castrate-resistant prostate cancer patients (CRPC receiving taxane chemotherapy. We have developed a geometrically enhanced differential immunocapture (GEDI microfluidic device that combines an anti-prostate specific membrane antigen (PSMA antibody with a 3D geometry that captures CTCs while minimizing nonspecific leukocyte adhesion. Enumeration of GEDI-captured CTCs (defined as intact, nucleated PSMA+/CD45- cells revealed a median of 54 cells per ml identified in CRPC patients versus 3 in healthy donors. Direct comparison with the commercially available CellSearch® revealed a 2-400 fold higher sensitivity achieved with the GEDI device. Confocal microscopy of patient-derived GEDI-captured CTCs identified the TMPRSS2:ERG fusion protein, while sequencing identified specific androgen receptor point mutation (T868A in blood samples spiked with only 50 PC C4-2 cells. On-chip treatment of patient-derived CTCs with docetaxel and paclitaxel allowed monitoring of drug-target engagement by means of microtubule bundling. CTCs isolated from docetaxel-resistant CRPC patients did not show any evidence of drug activity. These measurements constitute the first functional assays of drug-target engagement in living circulating tumor cells and therefore have the potential to enable longitudinal monitoring of target response and inform the development of new

  10. Detection and prognostic value of recurrent exportin 1 mutations in tumor and cell-free circulating DNA of patients with classical Hodgkin lymphoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camus, Vincent; Stamatoullas, Aspasia; Mareschal, Sylvain; Viailly, Pierre-Julien; Sarafan-Vasseur, Nasrin; Bohers, Elodie; Dubois, Sydney; Picquenot, Jean Michel; Ruminy, Philippe; Maingonnat, Catherine; Bertrand, Philippe; Cornic, Marie; Tallon-Simon, Valérie; Becker, Stéphanie; Veresezan, Liana; Frebourg, Thierry; Vera, Pierre; Bastard, Christian; Tilly, Hervé; Jardin, Fabrice

    2016-09-01

    Classical Hodgkin lymphoma is one of the most common lymphomas and shares clinical and genetic features with primary mediastinal B-cell lymphoma. In this retrospective study, we analyzed the recurrent hotspot mutation of the exportin 1 (XPO1, p.E571K) gene, previously identified in primary mediastinal B-cell lymphoma, in biopsies and plasma circulating cell-free DNA from patients with classical Hodgkin lymphoma using a highly sensitive digital PCR technique. A total of 94 patients were included in the present study. This widely expressed XPO1 E571K mutation is present in one quarter of classical Hodgkin lymphoma patients (24.2%). Mutated and wild-type classical Hodgkin lymphomas were similar regarding the main clinical features. Patients with a detectable XPO1 mutation at the end of treatment displayed a tendency toward shorter progression-free survival, as compared to patients with undetectable mutation in plasma cell-free DNA (2-year progression-free survival: 57.1%, 95% confidence interval: 30.1-100% versus 2-year progression-free survival: 90.5%, 95% confidence interval: 78.8-100%, respectively, P=0.0601). To conclude, the detection of the XPO1 E571K mutation in biopsy and plasma cell-free DNA by digital PCR may be used as a novel biomarker in classical Hodgkin lymphoma for both diagnosis and minimal residual disease, and pinpoints a crucial role of XPO1 in classical Hodgkin lymphoma pathogenesis. The detection of somatic mutation in the plasma cell-free DNA of patients represents a major technological advance in the context of liquid biopsies and noninvasive management of classical Hodgkin lymphoma.

  11. Detection and prognostic value of recurrent exportin 1 mutations in tumor and cell-free circulating DNA of patients with classical Hodgkin lymphoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camus, Vincent; Stamatoullas, Aspasia; Mareschal, Sylvain; Viailly, Pierre-Julien; Sarafan-Vasseur, Nasrin; Bohers, Elodie; Dubois, Sydney; Picquenot, Jean Michel; Ruminy, Philippe; Maingonnat, Catherine; Bertrand, Philippe; Cornic, Marie; Tallon-Simon, Valérie; Becker, Stéphanie; Veresezan, Liana; Frebourg, Thierry; Vera, Pierre; Bastard, Christian; Tilly, Hervé; Jardin, Fabrice

    2016-01-01

    Classical Hodgkin lymphoma is one of the most common lymphomas and shares clinical and genetic features with primary mediastinal B-cell lymphoma. In this retrospective study, we analyzed the recurrent hotspot mutation of the exportin 1 (XPO1, p.E571K) gene, previously identified in primary mediastinal B-cell lymphoma, in biopsies and plasma circulating cell-free DNA from patients with classical Hodgkin lymphoma using a highly sensitive digital PCR technique. A total of 94 patients were included in the present study. This widely expressed XPO1 E571K mutation is present in one quarter of classical Hodgkin lymphoma patients (24.2%). Mutated and wild-type classical Hodgkin lymphomas were similar regarding the main clinical features. Patients with a detectable XPO1 mutation at the end of treatment displayed a tendency toward shorter progression-free survival, as compared to patients with undetectable mutation in plasma cell-free DNA (2-year progression-free survival: 57.1%, 95% confidence interval: 30.1–100% versus 2-year progression-free survival: 90.5%, 95% confidence interval: 78.8–100%, respectively, P=0.0601). To conclude, the detection of the XPO1 E571K mutation in biopsy and plasma cell-free DNA by digital PCR may be used as a novel biomarker in classical Hodgkin lymphoma for both diagnosis and minimal residual disease, and pinpoints a crucial role of XPO1 in classical Hodgkin lymphoma pathogenesis. The detection of somatic mutation in the plasma cell-free DNA of patients represents a major technological advance in the context of liquid biopsies and noninvasive management of classical Hodgkin lymphoma. PMID:27479820

  12. Operation method of circulation blower of fuel cell power generation system; Nenryo denchi hatsuden sochi no junkan buroa unten hoho

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iida, T. [Fuji Electric Co. Ltd., Tokyo (Japan)

    1998-02-13

    The conventional circulation blower of fuel cell power generation system has such problem as generating a big pressure difference between electrodes. When the blower is started, the pressure difference is caused by sudden start of suction of cell exhaust gas from the upper stream of the circulation blower since the starting is done in total voltage start by switch. When the blower is stopped, the pressure difference is also caused by sudden stop of suction of cell exhaust gas from the upper stream of the circulation blower. In the invention, the motor driving the circulation blower which circulates the cell exhaust gas of fuel cell power generation system to the cell inlet is equipped with a rotation control system (VVVF). When the blower is started, a smooth start of blower, or smooth start of suction of exhaust gas is given by the control system because the rotation speed is gradually increased from low speed. When the blower is stopped, a smooth stop of blower, or smooth stop of suction of exhaust gas is given by the control system because the rotation speed is gradually decreased from high speed to low speed. In this way, the generation of extreme pressure difference between electrodes of fuel cell can be suppressed. 2 figs.

  13. Biomedical Applications of the Cold Atmospheric Plasma: Cell Responses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volotskova, Olga

    Current breakthrough research on cold atmospheric plasma (CAP) demonstrates that CAP has great potential in various areas, including medicine and biology, thus providing a new tool for living tissue treatment. Depending on the configuration the cold plasma sources can be used in the following areas: wound healing, skin diseases, hospital hygiene, sterilization, antifungal treatments, dental care, cosmetics targeted cell/tissue removal, and cancer treatments. This dissertation is focused on the studies of biomedical applications of cold atmospheric plasma jet based on helium flow and resultant cell responses to the cold plasma treatment. The studies were carried out on extra-cellular and intra-cellular levels in vitro. The main practical applications are wound healing and alternative to existing cancer therapy methods, areas of great interest and significant challenges. The CAP jet was built in the Micropropulsion and Nanotechnology Laboratory of Dr. Michael Keidar, as a part of multidisciplinary collaboration with the GW Medical School (Dr. M.A. Stepp) concerned with plasma medicine and bioengineering studies. Normal and cancer cells have two fundamental behavioral properties, proliferation and motility, which can be evaluated through cell migration rates and cell cycle progression. Various microscopic, spectroscopic and flow cytometry techniques were used to characterize cell responses to the cold plasma treatment. It was found that CAP effect on the cells is localized within the area of the treatment (of around ˜ 5mm in diameter). The migration rates of the normal skin cells can be reduced up to ˜ 40%. However, depending on the cell type the required treatment time is different, thus differential treatment of various cells presented in tissue is possible. The CAP effect on the migration was explained through the changes of the cell surface proteins/integrins. It was also found that normal and cancer cells respond differently to the CAP treatment under the same

  14. Physical biology in cancer. 3. The role of cell glycocalyx in vascular transport of circulating tumor cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, Michael J; King, Michael R

    2014-01-15

    Circulating tumor cells (CTCs) in blood are known to adhere to the luminal surface of the microvasculature via receptor-mediated adhesion, which contributes to the spread of cancer metastasis to anatomically distant organs. Such interactions between ligands on CTCs and endothelial cell-bound surface receptors are sensitive to receptor-ligand distances at the nanoscale. The sugar-rich coating expressed on the surface of CTCs and endothelial cells, known as the glycocalyx, serves as a physical structure that can control the spacing and, thus, the availability of such receptor-ligand interactions. The cancer cell glycocalyx can also regulate the ability of therapeutic ligands to bind to CTCs in the bloodstream. Here, we review the role of cell glycocalyx on the adhesion and therapeutic treatment of CTCs in the bloodstream.

  15. The interaction between circulating complement proteins and cutaneous microvascular endothelial cells in the development of childhood Henoch-Schonlein Purpura.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yao-Hsu Yang

    Full Text Available In addition to IgA, the deposition of complement (C3 in dermal vessels is commonly found in Henoch-Schönlein purpura (HSP. The aim of this study is to elucidate the role of circulating complement proteins in the pathogenesis of childhood HSP.Plasma levels of C3a, C4a, C5a, and Bb in 30 HSP patients and 30 healthy controls were detected by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA. The expression of C3a receptor (C3aR, C5a receptor (CD88, E-selectin, intercellular adhesion molecule 1 (ICAM-1, C3, C5, interleukin (IL-8, monocyte chemotactic protein (MCP-1, and RANTES by human dermal microvascular endothelial cells (HMVEC-d was evaluated either by flow cytometry or by ELISA.At the acute stage, HSP patients had higher plasma levels of C3a (359.5 ± 115.3 vs. 183.3 ± 94.1 ng/ml, p < 0.0001, C5a (181.4 ± 86.1 vs. 33.7 ± 26.3 ng/ml, p < 0.0001, and Bb (3.7 ± 2.6 vs. 1.0 ± 0.6 μg/ml, p < 0.0001, but not C4a than healthy controls. Although HSP patient-derived acute phase plasma did not alter the presentation of C3aR and CD88 on HMVEC-d, it enhanced the production of endothelial C3 and C5. Moreover, C5a was shown in vitro to up-regulate the expression of IL-8, MCP-1, E-selectin, and ICAM-1 by HMVEC-d with a dose-dependent manner.In HSP, the activation of the complement system in part through the alternative pathway may have resulted in increased plasma levels of C3a and C5a, which, especially C5a, may play a role in the disease pathogenesis by activating endothelium of cutaneous small vessels.

  16. Circulating Hematopoietic Stem and Progenitor Cells in Aging Atomic Bomb Survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kyoizumi, Seishi; Kubo, Yoshiko; Misumi, Munechika; Kajimura, Junko; Yoshida, Kengo; Hayashi, Tomonori; Imai, Kazue; Ohishi, Waka; Nakachi, Kei; Young, Lauren F; Shieh, Jae-Hung; Moore, Malcolm A; van den Brink, Marcel R M; Kusunoki, Yoichiro

    2016-01-01

    It is not yet known whether hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPCs) are compromised in the aging population of atomic bomb (A-bomb) survivors after their exposure nearly 70 years ago. To address this, we evaluated age- and radiation-related changes in different subtypes of circulating HSPCs among the CD34-positive/lineage marker-negative (CD34(+)Lin(-)) cell population in 231 Hiroshima A-bomb survivors. We enumerated functional HSPC subtypes, including: cobblestone area-forming cells; long-term culture-initiating cells; erythroid burst-forming units; granulocyte and macrophage colony-forming units; and T-cell and natural killer cell progenitors using cell culture. We obtained the count of each HSPC subtype per unit volume of blood and the proportion of each HSPC subtype in CD34(+)Lin(-) cells to represent the lineage commitment trend. Multivariate analyses, using sex, age and radiation dose as variables, showed significantly decreased counts with age in the total CD34(+)Lin(-) cell population and all HSPC subtypes. As for the proportion, only T-cell progenitors decreased significantly with age, suggesting that the commitment to the T-cell lineage in HSPCs continuously declines with age throughout the lifetime. However, neither the CD34(+)Lin(-) cell population, nor HSPC subtypes showed significant radiation-induced dose-dependent changes in counts or proportions. Moreover, the correlations of the proportions among HSPC subtypes in the survivors properly revealed the hierarchy of lineage commitments. Taken together, our findings suggest that many years after exposure to radiation and with advancing age, the number and function of HSPCs in living survivors as a whole may have recovered to normal levels.

  17. Circulating hematopoietic stem cell count is a valuable predictor of prematurity complications in preterm newborns

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kotowski Maciej

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The frequency of preterm labour has risen over the last few years. Hence, there is growing interest in the identification of markers that may facilitate prediction and prevention of premature birth complications. Here, we studied the association of the number of circulating stem cell populations with the incidence of complications typical of prematurity. Methods The study groups consisted of 90 preterm (23–36 weeks of gestational age and 52 full-term (37–41 weeks infants. Non-hematopoietic stem cells (non-HSCs; CD45-lin-CD184+, enriched in very small embryonic-like stem cells (VSELs, expressing pluripotent (Oct-4, Nanog, early neural (β-III-tubulin, and oligodendrocyte lineage (Olig-1 genes as well as hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs; CD45+lin-CD184+, and circulating stem/progenitor cells (CSPCs; CD133+CD34+; CD133-CD34+ in association with characteristics of prematurity and preterm morbidity were analyzed in cord blood (CB and peripheral blood (PB until the sixth week after delivery. Phenotype analysis was performed using flow cytometry methods. Clonogenic assays suitable for detection of human hematopoietic progenitor cells were also applied. The quantitative parameters were compared between groups by the Mann–Whitney test and between time points by the Friedman test. Fisher’s exact test was used for qualitative variables. Results We found that the number of CB non-HSCs/VSELs is inversely associated with the birth weight of preterm infants. More notably, a high number of CB HSCs is strongly associated with a lower risk of prematurity complications including intraventricular hemorrhage, respiratory distress syndrome, infections, and anemia. The number of HSCs remains stable for the first six weeks of postnatal life. Besides, the number of CSPCs in CB is significantly higher in preterm infants than in full-term neonates (p  Conclusion We conclude that CB HSCs are markedly associated with the development of premature

  18. Deficit of circulating stem – progenitor cells in opiate addiction: a pilot study

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    Davidson Peter

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract A substantial literature describes the capacity of all addictive drugs to slow cell growth and potentiate apoptosis. Flow cytometry was used as a means to compare two lineages of circulating progenitor cells in addicted patients. Buprenorphine treated opiate addicts were compared with medical patients. Peripheral venous blood CD34+ CD45+ double positive cells were counted as haemopoietic stem cells (HSC's, and CD34+ KDR+ (VEGFR2+ cells were taken as endothelial progenitor cells (EPC's. 10 opiate dependent patients with substance use disorder (SUD and 11 non-addicted (N-SUD were studied. The ages were (mean + S.D. 36.2 + 8.6 and 56.4 + 18.6 respectively (P 0.15, OR = 0.09, 95% C.I. 0.01–0.97, a finding of some interest given the substantially older age of the N-SUD group. These laboratory data are thus consistent with clinical data suggesting accelerated ageing in addicted humans and implicate the important stem cell pool in both addiction toxicology and ageing. They carry important policy implications for understanding the fundamental toxicology of addiction, and suggest that the toxicity both of addiction itself and of indefinite agonist maintenance therapies may have been seriously underestimated.

  19. Cultured circulating tumor cells and their derived xenografts for personalized oncology

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    Ruoxiang Wang

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Recent cancer research has demonstrated the existence of circulating tumor cells (CTCs in cancer patient's blood. Once identified, CTC biomarkers will be invaluable tools for clinical diagnosis, prognosis and treatment. In this review, we propose ex vivo culture as a rational strategy for large scale amplification of the limited numbers of CTCs from a patient sample, to derive enough CTCs for accurate and reproducible characterization of the biophysical, biochemical, gene expressional and behavioral properties of the harvested cells. Because of tumor cell heterogeneity, it is important to amplify all the CTCs in a blood sample for a comprehensive understanding of their role in cancer metastasis. By analyzing critical steps and technical issues in ex vivo CTC culture, we developed a cost-effective and reproducible protocol directly culturing whole peripheral blood mononuclear cells, relying on an assumed survival advantage in CTCs and CTC-like cells over the normal cells to amplify this specified cluster of cancer cells.

  20. Characterization of microsieves recovery efficiency in isolation of circulating tumor cells

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    Osuchowska, Paulina Natalia; Sarzyński, Antoni; Strzelec, Marek; Bogdanowicz, Zdzisław; Marczak, Jan; Łapiński, Mariusz Piotr; Trafny, ElŻbieta Anna

    2016-12-01

    Isolation of circulating tumor cells (CTCs) from the blood is important in the diagnosis of malignant tumors and for monitoring therapeutic responses. The two main problems to be solved are extremely low CTCs numbers in the blood (average 1-10 CTC per 10 ml of whole blood) and the absence of one particular phenotype or genotype, which would allow for precise identification. Isolation of CTCs can be based on physical characteristics, e.g. the size of the cells (ISET, Isolation by Size of Epithelial Tumor cells) or the biological properties of these cells (the expression of specific proteins on their surface). In the IOE WAT the copper alloy microsieves with a pore diameter of 10.85 +/- 0.89 μm designed for cell isolation by ISET method were produced. The microsieves with 100 000 pores with a 50 μm interval was made using precise, percussion laser drilling. The performance microsieves filtration was determined using fluorescent beads with three dimensions: 4 μm, 10 μm and 15 μm. Furthermore, the suspensions of cells lines from different types of tumor were used in the process of filtration. The efficiency of the cells filtration process was affected by lack of biocompatibility of the material used for the microsieves production as well as the roughness and porosity of the microsieves surface. Moreover, the diameter of the pores and the course of the filtration process were also significant.

  1. Isolation of circulating tumor cells using a microvortex-generating herringbone-chip.

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    Stott, Shannon L; Hsu, Chia-Hsien; Tsukrov, Dina I; Yu, Min; Miyamoto, David T; Waltman, Belinda A; Rothenberg, S Michael; Shah, Ajay M; Smas, Malgorzata E; Korir, George K; Floyd, Frederick P; Gilman, Anna J; Lord, Jenna B; Winokur, Daniel; Springer, Simeon; Irimia, Daniel; Nagrath, Sunitha; Sequist, Lecia V; Lee, Richard J; Isselbacher, Kurt J; Maheswaran, Shyamala; Haber, Daniel A; Toner, Mehmet

    2010-10-26

    Rare circulating tumor cells (CTCs) present in the bloodstream of patients with cancer provide a potentially accessible source for detection, characterization, and monitoring of nonhematological cancers. We previously demonstrated the effectiveness of a microfluidic device, the CTC-Chip, in capturing these epithelial cell adhesion molecule (EpCAM)-expressing cells using antibody-coated microposts. Here, we describe a high-throughput microfluidic mixing device, the herringbone-chip, or "HB-Chip," which provides an enhanced platform for CTC isolation. The HB-Chip design applies passive mixing of blood cells through the generation of microvortices to significantly increase the number of interactions between target CTCs and the antibody-coated chip surface. Efficient cell capture was validated using defined numbers of cancer cells spiked into control blood, and clinical utility was demonstrated in specimens from patients with prostate cancer. CTCs were detected in 14 of 15 (93%) patients with metastatic disease (median = 63 CTCs/mL, mean = 386 ± 238 CTCs/mL), and the tumor-specific TMPRSS2-ERG translocation was readily identified following RNA isolation and RT-PCR analysis. The use of transparent materials allowed for imaging of the captured CTCs using standard clinical histopathological stains, in addition to immunofluorescence-conjugated antibodies. In a subset of patient samples, the low shear design of the HB-Chip revealed microclusters of CTCs, previously unappreciated tumor cell aggregates that may contribute to the hematogenous dissemination of cancer.

  2. Characterization of the gp120 of circulating HIV type 1 in a group of infected Chinese blood/plasma donors with asymptomatic and symptomatic stages of the disease.

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    Chen, Yue; Craigo, Jodi K; Ding, Ming; Guo, Yan; Shen, Shengli; Zhou, Yushen; Wu, Hao; Gupta, Phalguni

    2006-11-01

    The C2-V5 regions of the HIV envelope gene were cloned and sequenced from DNA samples of four asymptomatic and five AIDS patients from a cohort of HIV-1-infected Chinese plasma and blood donors. Sequence analysis revealed that regardless of the stage of disease, all the patient's HIV-1 belonged to either clade B' or circulating recombinant form 15 (CRF15) subtype. However, since these blood donors were infected at a time when circulating CRF15 was not known in that region, it is likely these HIV-1 types belong to clade B'. However, the C2-V5 sequences from AIDS patients clustered differently in the phylogenetic tree than those present in asymptomatic patients and showed a significantly higher divergence and lower diversity compared to those from asymptomatic patients. In addition, more syncytia-inducing viral genotypes were present in AIDS patients than in asymptomatic patients. These results contribute to a better understanding of the pathogenesis of circulating HIV-1 in infected Chinese plasma and blood donors, warrant additional investigation of the possible presence of CRF15 in Chinese blood donors, and may have important implications in the future design of therapeutic strategies for treating these infected patients.

  3. Smoking decreases the level of circulating CD34+ progenitor cells in young healthy women - a pilot study

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    Baumann Gert

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Decreased levels of circulating bone marrow-derived progenitor cells have been associated with risk factors and cardiovascular diseases. Smoking is the most important modifiable risk factor for atherosclerosis in young women. The aim of this pilot study was to assess in healthy premenopausal women without other risk factors for cardiovascular disease the influence of nicotine abuse on the number of circulating progenitor cells in relation to endothelial function. Methods The number of endothelial progenitor cells, measured as colony-forming units in a cell-culture assay (EPC-CFU and the number of circulating CD34 + and CD34 + /CD133 + cells, measured by flow cytometry, was estimated in 32 women at the menstrual phase of the menstrual cycle. In addition, flow-mediated dilation (FMD was assessed as a marker for vascular function. In a subgroup of these women (n = 20, progenitor cells were also investigated at the mid-follicular and luteal phases of the menstrual cycle. Results Compared to non-smokers, the abundance of circulating CD34 + cells was significantly lower in smoking women in the menstrual, mid-luteal, and mid-follicular phases of the menstrual cycle. The number of CD34 + progenitor cells was revealed to have significant positive correlation with FMD in young healthy women, whereas CD34 + /CD133 + progenitor cells and EPC-CFU showed no significant correlation. Conclusion The number of CD34 + progenitor cells positively correlates with FMD in young healthy women and is decreased by smoking.

  4. KRAS mutations in the circulating free DNA (cfDNA) of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients

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    Villatoro, Sergi; Teixidó, Cristina; Mayo, Clara; Martínez, Alejandro; de los Llanos Gil, Maria; Viteri, Santiago; Morales-Espinosa, Daniela; Rosell, Rafael

    2016-01-01

    Circulating free DNA (cfDNA) is obtained from serum or plasma by non-invasive methods such as a simple blood draw, a technique known as “liquid biopsy”. Genetic analyses of driver alterations in cfDNA have proved very effective to predict survival and treatment response of cancer patients according to tumoral cfDNA burden in blood. Non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients with higher concentration of tumoral cfDNA in blood have, on average, shorter progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS). Regarding specific genetic alterations, KRAS proto-oncogene, GTPase (KRAS) is one of the main genes involved in NSCLC and several studies have been performed to determine its value as a predictive and prognostic biomarker in liquid biopsy. Unfortunately, to date no strong conclusions can be drawn since they have yielded contradictory results. Therefore, further investigations are necessary to establish the value of KRAS testing in liquid biopsy as prognostic or predictive factor in NSCLC. Herein, we review the current knowledge on the importance of KRAS as prognostic and predictive biomarker using non-invasive approaches and the scientific data available regarding its application in clinical practice for treatment of NSCLC. PMID:27826532

  5. Prevalence and heterogeneity of circulating tumour cells in metastatic cutaneous melanoma.

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    Khoja, Leila; Shenjere, Patrick; Hodgson, Clare; Hodgetts, Jackie; Clack, Glen; Hughes, Andrew; Lorigan, Paul; Dive, Caroline

    2014-02-01

    We previously demonstrated that circulating tumour cells (CTCs) are detectable by the MelCAM and high molecular weight melanoma-associated antigen (HMW-MAA)-dependent CellSearch platform. However, CTCs which do not express these capture and detection markers are not detectable by CellSearch. Consequently, we explored the use of isolation by size of epithelial tumour cells (ISET), a marker independent, filtration-based device to determine the prevalence and heterogeneity of CTCs in metastatic cutaneous melanoma patients. Ninety patients were prospectively recruited and blood samples taken before treatment. Patients' blood was filtered using the ISET platform. CTCs were enumerated using dual immunohistochemistry with positive selection by S100 expression and exclusion of leucocytes and endothelial cells expressing CD45 or CD144, respectively. A panel of markers (Melan-A, MITF, MelCAM, high molecular melanoma-associated antigen, CD271 and MAGEC) was also examined. Fifty-one patients (57%) had CTCs (range 1-44 CTCs/4 ml blood) and 12 patients also had circulating tumour microemboli. Seven patients had S100- CTCs, 11 patients' CTCs were S100+ and 33 patients had S100+ and S100- CTCs. Substantial intrapatient and interpatient heterogeneity was observed for all other melanoma-associated markers. CTCs in metastatic cutaneous melanoma are detectable using the flexible marker-independent ISET platform. CTCs display significant marker expression heterogeneity implying that marker-dependent platforms would not detect all CTCs and multimarker assays are now required to reveal the biological significance of this CTC heterogeneity.

  6. Cytometric characterization of circulating tumor cells captured by microfiltration and their correlation to the CellSearch(®) CTC test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Daniel L; Stefansson, Steingrimur; Haudenschild, Christian; Martin, Stuart S; Charpentier, Monica; Chumsri, Saranya; Cristofanilli, Massimo; Tang, Cha-Mei; Alpaugh, R Katherine

    2015-02-01

    Recent studies reporting hundreds, to thousands, of circulating tumor cells (CTCs) in the blood of cancer patients have raised questions regarding the prevalence of CTCs, as enumerated by the CellSearch(®) CTC Test. Although CellSearch has been shown to consistently detect clinically relevant CTCs; the ability to only capture EpCAM positive cells has led to speculation that it captures limited subsets of CTCs. In contrast, alternative approaches to CTC isolation are often cited as capturing large numbers of CTCs from patient blood. Not surprisingly the number of cells isolated by alternative approaches show poor correlations when compared to CellSearch, even when accounting for EpCAM presence or absence. In an effort to address this discrepancy, we ran an exploratory method comparison study to characterize and compare the CTC subgroups captured from duplicate blood samples from 30 breast and prostate cancer patients using a microfiltration system (CellSieve™) and CellSearch. We then categorized the CellSieve Cytokeratin(CK)+/CD45-/DAPI+ cells into five morphologically distinct subpopulations for correlative analysis. Like other filtration techniques, CellSieve isolated greater numbers of CK+/CD45- cells than CellSearch. Furthermore, analysis showed low correlation between the total CK+/CD45- cells captured by these two assays, regardless of EpCAM presence. However, subgrouping of CK+/CD45-/DAPI+ cells based on distinct cytokeratin staining patterns and nuclear morphologies elucidated a subpopulation correlative to CellSearch. Using method comparison analyses, we identified a specific CTC morphology which is highly correlative between two distinct capture methods. These data suggests that although various morphologic CTCs with similar phenotypic expressions are present in the blood of cancer patients, the clinically relevant cells isolated by CellSearch can potentially be identified using non-EpCAM dependent isolation. © 2014 The Authors. Published by Wiley

  7. B cells and plasma cells in coronaries of chronically rejected cardiac transplants.

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    Wehner, Jennifer R; Fox-Talbot, Karen; Halushka, Marc K; Ellis, Carla; Zachary, Andrea A; Baldwin, William M

    2010-05-15

    BACKGROUND.: Previously, we reported that transcripts of immunoglobulins were increased in coronary arteries dissected from cardiac transplants with arteriopathy, but the prevelance and patterns of B cell and plasma cell infiltration in cardiac allografts has not been documented. METHODS.: In this study, we documented the frequency and distribution of B cells and plasma cells in 16 cardiac transplants with advanced chronic rejection that were explanted during a second transplant procedure. Coronary arteries with pathologically confirmed allograft vasculopathy and controls with native atherosclerosis were immunohistologically stained for markers of T cells, B cells, plasma cells, IgG subclasses, C4d, CD21, and CXCL13. RESULTS.: We found that B cells and plasma cells were prevalent in most of the samples analyzed (14 of 16) and were distributed in three patterns: adventitial nodules, diffuse adventitial infiltrates, and neointimal infiltrates. These cells were found most frequently in nodules, some of which had distinct compartmentalization and granular C4d deposits on follicular dendritic cells (FDCs) that typify tertiary lymphoid nodules. FDCs also stained for CD21 and CXCL13. Diffuse infiltrates of B cells and plasma cells were found in fibrotic areas of the neointima and adventitia. Only a minority of control coronaries with atherosclerosis contained B cells. CONCLUSIONS.: B cells and plasma cell infiltrates are consistent findings in and around coronary arteries with allograft vasculopathy and are significantly more frequent than in coronaries with native atherosclerosis. The presence of C4d on FDCs in tertiary lymphoid nodules suggests active antigen presentation.

  8. Circulating Tumor Cells: A Review of Present Methods and the Need to Identify Heterogeneous Phenotypes

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    Millner, Lori M.; Linder, Mark W.; Valdes, Roland

    2016-01-01

    The measurement and characterization of circulating tumor cells (CTCs) hold promise for advancing personalized therapeutics. CTCs are the precursor to metastatic cancer and thus have the potential to radically alter patient treatment and outcome. Currently, clinical information provided by the enumeration of CTCs is limited to predicting clinical outcome. Other areas of interest in advancing the practice of pathology include: using CTCs for early detection of potential metastasis, determining and monitoring the efficacy of individualized treatment regimens, and predicting site-specific metastasis. Important hurdles to overcome in obtaining this type of clinical information involve present limitations in defining, detecting, and isolating CTCs. Currently, CTCs are detected using epithelial markers. The definition of what distinguishes a CTC should be expanded to include CTCs with heterogeneous phenotypes, and markers should be identified to enable a more comprehensive capture. Additionally, most methods available for detecting CTCs do not capture functionally viable CTCs. Retaining functional viability would provide a significant advantage in characterizing CTC-subtypes that may predict the site of metastatic invasion and thus assist in selecting effective treatment regimens. In this review we describe areas of clinical interest followed by a summary of current circulating cell-separation technologies and present limitations. Lastly, we provide insight into what is required to overcome these limitations as they relate to applications in advancing the practice of pathology and laboratory medicine. PMID:23884225

  9. Effect of antihypertensive treatment on circulating endothelial progenitor cells in patients with mild essential hypertension.

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    de Ciuceis, Carolina; Pilu, Annamaria; Rizzoni, Damiano; Porteri, Enzo; Muiesan, Maria Lorenza; Salvetti, Massimo; Paini, Anna; Belotti, Eugenia; Zani, Francesca; Boari, Gianluca E M; Rosei, Claudia Agabiti; Rosei, Enrico Agabiti

    2011-04-01

    It has been reported that the number of circulating endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) reflects the endogenous vascular repair ability, with the EPCs pool declining in the presence of cardiovascular risk factors. However, their relationship with hypertension and the effects of anti-hypertensive treatment remain unclear. We randomized 29 patients with mild essential hypertension to receive barnidipine up to 20 mg or hydrochlorothiazide (HCT) up to 25 mg. Circulating EPCs were isolated from peripheral blood at baseline and after 3 and 6 months of treatment. Mononuclear cells were cultured with endothelial basal medium supplemented with EGM SingleQuots. EPCs were identified by positive double staining for both FITC-labeled Ulex europaeus agglutinin I and Dil-labeled acethylated low-density lipoprotein. After 3 and 6 months of treatment, systolic and diastolic blood pressure (BP) were significantly reduced. No difference was observed between drugs. An increase in the number of EPCs was observed after 3 and 6 months of anti-hypertensive treatment (p Barnidipine significantly increased EPCs after 3 and 6 months of treatment, whereas no effect was observed with HCT. No statistically significant correlation was observed between EPCs and clinical BP values. Our data suggest that antihypertensive treatment may increase the number of EPCs. However, we observed a different effect of barnidipine and HCT on EPCs, suggesting that, beyond its BP lowering effect, barnidipine may elicit additional beneficial properties, related to a healthier vasculature.

  10. Biodegradable polymeric micelle-encapsulated doxorubicin suppresses tumor metastasis by killing circulating tumor cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Senyi; Wu, Qinjie; Zhao, Yuwei; Zheng, Xin; Wu, Ni; Pang, Jing; Li, Xuejing; Bi, Cheng; Liu, Xinyu; Yang, Li; Liu, Lei; Su, Weijun; Wei, Yuquan; Gong, Changyang

    2015-03-01

    Circulating tumor cells (CTCs) play a crucial role in tumor metastasis, but it is rare for any chemotherapy regimen to focus on killing CTCs. Herein, we describe doxorubicin (Dox) micelles that showed anti-metastatic activity by killing CTCs. Dox micelles with a small particle size and high encapsulation efficiency were obtained using a pH-induced self-assembly method. Compared with free Dox, Dox micelles exhibited improved cytotoxicity, apoptosis induction, and cellular uptake. In addition, Dox micelles showed a sustained release behavior in vitro, and in a transgenic zebrafish model, Dox micelles exhibited a longer circulation time and lower extravasation from blood vessels into surrounding tissues. Anti-tumor and anti-metastatic activities of Dox micelles were investigated in transgenic zebrafish and mouse models. In transgenic zebrafish, Dox micelles inhibited tumor growth and prolonged the survival of tumor-bearing zebrafish. Furthermore, Dox micelles suppressed tumor metastasis by killing CTCs. In addition, improved anti-tumor and anti-metastatic activities were also confirmed in mouse tumor models, where immunofluorescent staining of tumors indicated that Dox micelles induced more apoptosis and showed fewer proliferation-positive cells. There were decreased side effects in transgenic zebrafish and mice after administration of Dox micelles. In conc