WorldWideScience

Sample records for plasma cell leukemia

  1. [Acute plasma cell leukemia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monsalbe, V; Domíngues, C; Roa, I; Busel, D; González, S

    1989-01-01

    Plasma Cell Leukemia is a very rare form of plasmocytic dyscrasia, whose clinical and pathological characteristics warrant its recognition as a distinct subentity. We report the case of a 60 years old man who presented a rapidly fatal acute plasma cell leukemia, with multiple osteolytic lesions, hipercalcemia, renal and cardiac failure.

  2. Plasma cell leukemia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fernández de Larrea, C; Kyle, R A; Durie, B G M

    2013-01-01

    Plasma cell leukemia (PCL) is a rare and aggressive variant of myeloma characterized by the presence of circulating plasma cells. It is classified as either primary PCL occurring at diagnosis or as secondary PCL in patients with relapsed/refractory myeloma. Primary PCL is a distinct clinic......-pathological entity with different cytogenetic and molecular findings. The clinical course is aggressive with short remissions and survival duration. The diagnosis is based upon the percentage (≥ 20%) and absolute number (≥ 2 × 10(9)/l) of plasma cells in the peripheral blood. It is proposed that the thresholds...... regimens and bortezomib-based regimens are recommended followed by high-dose therapy with autologous stem cell transplantation if feasible. Allogeneic transplantation can be considered in younger patients. Prospective multicenter studies are required to provide revised definitions and better understanding...

  3. PLASMA CELL LEUKEMIA

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Larrea, Carlos Fernandez; Kyle, Robert A.; Durie, Brian GM; Ludwig, Heinz; Usmani, Saad; Vesole, David H.; Hajek, Roman; Miguel, Jésus San; Sezer, Orhan; Sonneveld, Pieter; Kumar, Shaji K.; Mahindra, Anuj; Comenzo, Ray; Palumbo, Antonio; Mazumber, Amitabha; Anderson, Kenneth C.; Richardson, Paul G.; Badros, Ashraf Z.; Caers, Jo; Cavo, Michele; LeLeu, Xavier; Dimopoulos, Meletios A.; Chim, CS; Schots, Rik; Noeul, Amara; Fantl, Dorotea; Mellqvist, Ulf-Henrik; Landgren, Ola; Chanan-Khan, Asher; Moreau, Philippe; Fonseca, Rafael; Merlini, Giampaolo; Lahuerta, JJ; Bladé, Joan; Orlowski, Robert Z.; Shah, Jatin J.

    2014-01-01

    Plasma cell leukemia (PCL) is a rare and aggressive variant of myeloma characterized by the presence of circulating plasma cells. It is classified as either primary PCL occurring at diagnosis or as secondary PCL in patients with relapsed/refractory myeloma. Primary PCL is a distinct clinic-pathologic entity with different cytogenetic and molecular findings. The clinical course is aggressive with short remissions and survival duration. The diagnosis is based upon the percentage (≥ 20%) and absolute number (≥ 2 × 10 9/L) of plasma cells in the peripheral blood. It is proposed that the thresholds for diagnosis be reexamined and consensus recommendations are made for diagnosis, as well as, response and progression criteria. Induction therapy needs to begin promptly and have high clinical activity leading to rapid disease control in an effort to minimize the risk of early death. Intensive chemotherapy regimens and bortezomib-based regimens are recommended followed by high-dose therapy with autologous stem-cell transplantation (HDT/ASCT) if feasible. Allogeneic transplantation can be considered in younger patients. Prospective multicenter studies are required to provide revised definitions and better understanding of the pathogenesis of PCL. PMID:23288300

  4. Primary Plasma Cell Leukemia: Identity Card 2016.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musto, Pellegrino; Simeon, Vittorio; Todoerti, Katia; Neri, Antonino

    2016-04-01

    Primary plasma cell leukemia (PPCL) is an aggressive and rare variant of multiple myeloma (MM), characterized by peculiar adverse clinical and biological features. Though the poor outcome of PPCL has been slightly improved by novel treatments during the last 10 years, due to the limited number of available studies in this uncommon disease, optimal therapy remains a classic unmet clinical need. Anyway, in the real-life practice, induction with a bortezomib-based three-drug combination, including dexamethasone and, possibly, lenalidomide, or, alternatively, thalidomide, cyclophosphamide, or doxorubicin, is a reasonable first-line option. This approach may be particularly advisable for patients with adverse cytogenetics, hyperleucocytosis, and rapidly progressive disease, in whom a fast response is required, or for those with suboptimal renal function, where, however, lenalidomide should be used with caution until renal activity is restored. In younger subjects, leukemia/lymphoma-like more intensive regimens, including hyperfractionated cyclophosphamide, vincristine, doxorubicin, and dexamethasone or continue-infusion cisplatin, doxorubicin, cyclophosphamide, and etoposide, may be also combined with bortezomib +/- thalidomide. Treatment must be started immediately after a diagnosis of PPCL is made to avoid the risk of irreversible disease complications and, in such a context, the prevention of tumor lysis syndrome is mandatory. In patients eligible for autologous stem cell transplantation (AuSCT), other alkylating agents, in particular melphalan, should be initially avoided in order to allow adequate collections of CD34+ peripheral blood stem cells (PBSC). A combination of lenalidomide and dexamethasone may be a valuable alternative option to manage older or unfit patients or those with slower disease evolution or with signs of neuropathy, contraindicating the use of bortezomib. Patients not suitable for transplant procedures should continue the treatment, if a

  5. Flow cytometric immunophenotypic characteristics of plasma cell leukemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbara Kruk

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this prospective study was to define the flow cytometric characteristics of simultaneously investigated bone marrow and peripheral blood plasma cells antigens expression in 36 plasma cell leukemia (PCL patients. The immunophenotypic profile of plasma cells was determined with a panel of monoclonal antibodies. The antigen expression intensity was calculated as relative fluorescence intensity (RFI. Bone marrow plasma cells showed expression of particular antigens in the following proportion of cases: CD49d 100%, CD29 94%, CD54 93%, CD44 83%, CD56 60%, CD18 26%, CD11b 29%, CD11a 19%, CD117 27%, CD71 30%, CD126 100% and CD19 0%, while the expression of those antigens on peripheral blood plasma cells was present in the following percentage of patients: CD49d 100%, CD29 96%, CD54 93%, CD44 95%, CD56 56%, CD18 50%, CD11b 53%, CD11a 29%, CD117 26%, CD71 28%, CD126 100% and CD19 0%. The expression of CD54 was significantly higher than that of adhesion molecules belonging to the integrin b2 family: CD11a, CD18 and CD11b, on both bone marrow and peripheral blood cells (p < 0.01. Expression of CD18, CD11a and CD11b was differential between two cell compartments: lower on bone marrow and higher on peripheral blood cells. We found that plasma cells in the bone marrow of patients with plasma cell leukaemia showed significantly greater granularity and size than those in the peripheral blood (p = 0.0001 and p = 0.04, respectively. However, no differences in cell size or granularity were revealed between bone marrow plasma cells from patients with PCL and multiple myeloma. In conclusion, impaired expression of adhesion molecules such as CD11a/CD18 (LFA-1 or CD56 may explain hematogenic dissemination characterizing PCL. The following pattern of adhesion molecule expression according to the proportion of plasma cells expressing a given antigen in peripheral blood and bone marrow and arranged in diminishing order may be established: CD49d > CD44 > CD54

  6. A rare case of plasma cell leukemia in a 35 year old

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rupal V Dosi

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Plasma cell leukemia is a rare, aggressive form of multiple myeloma. A 35-year-old male presented with backache, generalized weakness, and facial puffiness. His complete blood count showed anemia and a high WBC count with atypical cells on peripheral smear. Bone marrow examination showed more than 90% of atypical plasma cells, confirming a diagnosis of plasma cell leukemia. Patient also had azotemia, hypercalcemia, and hyperuricemia. The patient was started on chemotherapy along with supportive care. Patient improved dramatically and he was discharged on regular follow-up.

  7. Favorable response to aggressive chemotherapy in a patient with primary plasma cell leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lishner, M; Lang, R; Jutrin, I; Ravid, M

    1985-01-01

    Primary plasma cell leukemia was diagnosed in a previously healthy 58-year-old man. The unusual presentation with concomitant multiple osteolytic lesions and hepatosplenomegaly, the favorable response to aggressive chemotherapy with COAP, and the relatively long survival of 22 months prompted this report. This and several other cases recently reported should encourage an aggressive therapeutic approach to this disease.

  8. Molecular Classification and Pharmacogenetics of Primary Plasma Cell Leukemia: An Initial Approach toward Precision Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simeon, Vittorio; Todoerti, Katia; La Rocca, Francesco; Caivano, Antonella; Trino, Stefania; Lionetti, Marta; Agnelli, Luca; De Luca, Luciana; Laurenzana, Ilaria; Neri, Antonino; Musto, Pellegrino

    2015-07-30

    Primary plasma cell leukemia (pPCL) is a rare and aggressive variant of multiple myeloma (MM) which may represent a valid model for high-risk MM. This disease is associated with a very poor prognosis, and unfortunately, it has not significantly improved during the last three decades. New high-throughput technologies have allowed a better understanding of the molecular basis of this disease and moved toward risk stratification, providing insights for targeted therapy studies. This knowledge, added to the pharmacogenetic profile of new and old agents in the analysis of efficacy and safety, could contribute to help clinical decisions move toward a precision medicine and a better clinical outcome for these patients. In this review, we describe the available literature concerning the genomic characterization and pharmacogenetics of plasma cell leukemia (PCL).

  9. Radiographic features of plasma cell leukemia in the maxilla: A case report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wong, Phillip; Kashtwari, Deeba; Nair, Madhu K. [Dept. of Oral and Maxillofacial Radiology, Oral and Maxillofacial Diagnostic Sciences/Radiology, Colleges of Dentistry/Medicine, University of Florida, Gainesville (United States)

    2016-12-15

    Plasma cell leukemia (PCL) is an aggressive form of multiple myeloma where there is hematogenous spread of abnormal plasma cells into the periphery. This is opposed to multiple myeloma, where the abnormal plasma cells stay in the bone marrow. PCL is more common in males than females, and is also more common in African-Americans than Caucasians. Signs and symptoms of PCL include, but are not limited to, renal insufficiency, hypercalcemia, anemia, lytic bone lesions, thrombocytopenia, hepatomegaly, and splenomegaly. Here, we discussed a case of a 71-year-old Caucasian female recently diagnosed with primary PCL with radiographic features of this disease throughout the body, with an emphasis on the maxillofacial skeleton and relevance from a dental standpoint.

  10. Radiographic features of plasma cell leukemia in the maxilla: A case report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Phillip; Kashtwari, Deeba

    2016-01-01

    Plasma cell leukemia (PCL) is an aggressive form of multiple myeloma where there is hematogenous spread of abnormal plasma cells into the periphery. This is opposed to multiple myeloma, where the abnormal plasma cells stay in the bone marrow. PCL is more common in males than females, and is also more common in African-Americans than Caucasians. Signs and symptoms of PCL include, but are not limited to, renal insufficiency, hypercalcemia, anemia, lytic bone lesions, thrombocytopenia, hepatomegaly, and splenomegaly. Here, we discussed a case of a 71-year-old Caucasian female recently diagnosed with primary PCL with radiographic features of this disease throughout the body, with an emphasis on the maxillofacial skeleton and relevance from a dental standpoint. PMID:28035306

  11. Progression of cutaneous plasmacytoma to plasma cell leukemia in a dog.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rout, Emily D; Shank, Alba Maria M; Waite, Angharad H K; Siegel, Andrea; Avery, Anne C; Avery, Paul R

    2017-02-10

    A 5-year-old male neutered Bernese Mountain Dog was presented for cutaneous plasmacytoma, which was treated by surgical excision. Four months later, the dog developed multiple skin masses, hyphema, pericardial and mild bicavitary effusions, myocardial masses, and marked plasmacytosis in the peripheral blood. Circulating plasma cells expressed CD34 and MHC class II by flow cytometry. Immunocytochemistry demonstrated that these cells were strongly positive for multiple myeloma oncogene 1/interferon regulatory factor 4 (MUM-1) and weakly to moderately positive for Pax5. The dog was hypoglobulinemic but had a monoclonal IgA gammopathy detected by serum immunofixation electrophoresis. The PCR analysis of antigen receptor gene rearrangements (PARR) by fragment analysis using GeneScan methodology revealed that plasmacytoid cells in the original cutaneous plasmacytoma and peripheral blood had an identical immunoglobulin heavy chain gene (IgH) rearrangement, indicating that both populations were derived from the same neoplastic clone. Canine cutaneous plasmacytoma rarely progresses to a malignant form and plasma cell leukemia is rarely diagnosed in the dog. This report describes a case of cutaneous plasmacytoma progressing to plasma cell leukemia with a rapid and aggressive clinical course. This report also highlights the utility of flow cytometry, immunocytochemistry, immunofixation electrophoresis, and PARR by fragment analysis using GeneScan methodology in the diagnosis of this hematopoietic neoplasm.

  12. Plasma Cell Leukemia Presenting as a Chest Wall Mass: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmed Ali

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Plasma cell leukemia (PCL is an uncommon neoplasm of plasma cells, with an aggressive clinical course and poor outcome, even with current standard of care. It can occur either de novo (primary PCL or as a progression of multiple myeloma (MM. This disease has unique diagnostic criteria but certain genetic markers and clinical features may overlap with MM. Due to the low prevalence of PCL, guidelines on its management are extrapolated from the management of MM and based on small retrospective studies and cases reports/series. We present an interesting case of PCL in a middle-aged African-American male, who was diagnosed incidentally after chest wall imaging for an unrelated complaint. The diagnostic approach, management and outcomes of PCL are discussed.

  13. Plasma Cell Leukemia Presenting as a Chest Wall Mass: A Case Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Ahmed; Paul, Yonette; Nwabudike, Stanley Madu; Ogbonna, Onyekachi; Grantham, Mica; Taddesse-Heath, Lekidelu

    2016-01-01

    Plasma cell leukemia (PCL) is an uncommon neoplasm of plasma cells, with an aggressive clinical course and poor outcome, even with current standard of care. It can occur either de novo (primary PCL) or as a progression of multiple myeloma (MM). This disease has unique diagnostic criteria but certain genetic markers and clinical features may overlap with MM. Due to the low prevalence of PCL, guidelines on its management are extrapolated from the management of MM and based on small retrospective studies and cases reports/series. We present an interesting case of PCL in a middle-aged African-American male, who was diagnosed incidentally after chest wall imaging for an unrelated complaint. The diagnostic approach, management and outcomes of PCL are discussed. PMID:27462235

  14. Plasma Membrane Nucleolin Is a Receptor for the Anticancer Aptamer AS1411 in MV4-11 Leukemia Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Soundararajan, Sridharan; Wang, Li; Sridharan, Vijayalakshmi; Chen, Weiwei; Courtenay-Luck, Nigel; Jones, David; Spicer, Eleanor K.; Fernandes, Daniel J.

    2009-01-01

    AS1411 is a DNA aptamer that is in phase II clinical trials for relapsed or refractory acute myeloid leukemia and for renal cell carcinoma. AS1411 binds to nucleolin, a protein that is overexpressed in the cytoplasm and on the plasma membrane of some tumor cells compared with normal cells. Studies were performed to determine whether cell surface nucleolin is a receptor for AS1411 in the acute myeloid leukemia cell line MV4-11. Biotinylation of MV4-11 cell surface proteins followed by immunobl...

  15. Immunoglobulin D multiple myeloma, plasma cell leukemia and chronic myelogenous leukemia in a single patient treated simultaneously with lenalidomide, bortezomib, dexamethasone and imatinib

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naveed Ali

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Multiple myeloma (MM is a neoplastic lymphoproliferative disorder characterized by uncontrolled monoclonal plasma cell proliferation. Among different isotypes of MM, immunoglobulin D (IgD MM is very rare, representing only 1 to 2% of all isotypes. Chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML is a neoplastic myeloproliferative disorder of pluripotent hematopoietic stem cell, which is characterized by the uncontrolled proliferation of myeloid cells. An 88-year-old male was diagnosed simultaneously with IgD kappa MM and CML. A distinctive feature in this patient was the progression to plasma cell leukemia without any symptomatic myeloma stage. He was treated simultaneously with lenalidomide, bortezomib and imatinib. Synchronous occurrence of these rare hematological malignancies in a single patient is an exceedingly rare event. Multiple hypotheses to explain co-occurrence of CML and MM have been proposed; however, the exact etiological molecular pathophysiology remains elusive.

  16. Induction of apoptosis in human myeloid leukemia cells by remote exposure of resistive barrier cold plasma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thiyagarajan, Magesh; Anderson, Heather; Gonzales, Xavier F

    2014-03-01

    Cold atmospheric plasma (CAP), an ambient temperature ionized gas, is gaining extensive interest as a promising addition to anti-tumor therapy primarily due to the ability to generate and control delivery of electrons, ions, excited molecules, UV photons, and reactive species such as reactive oxygen species (ROS) and reactive nitrogen species (RNS) to a specific site. The heterogeneous composition of CAP offers the opportunity to mediate several signaling pathways that regulate tumor cells. Consequently, the array of CAP generated products has limited the identification of the mechanisms of action on tumor cells. The aim of this work is to assess the cell death response of human myeloid leukemia cells by remote exposure to CAP generated RNS by utilizing a novel resistive barrier discharge system that primarily produces RNS. The effect of variable treatments of CAP generated RNS was tested in THP-1 cell (human monocytic leukemia cell line), a model for hematological malignancy. The number of viable cells was evaluated with erythrosine-B staining, while apoptosis and necrosis was assessed by endonuclease cleavage observed by agarose gel electrophoresis and detection of cells with the exclusionary dye propidium iodide and fluorescently labeled annexin-V by flow cytometry and fluorescent microscopy. Our observations indicate that treatment dosage levels of 45 s of exposure to CAP emitted RNS-induced apoptotic cell death and for higher dosage conditions of ≥50 s of exposure to CAP induced necrosis. Overall the results suggest that CAP emitted RNS play a significant role in the anti-tumor potential of CAP.

  17. Therapeutic effect of bortezomib for primary plasma cell leukemia followed by auto/allo stem cell transplantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ozasa R

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Ryotaro Ozasa, Masaaki Hotta, Hideaki Yoshimura, Takahisa Nakanishi, Takeshi Tamaki, Shinya Fujita, Naoto Nakamichi, Michihiko Miyaji, Kazuyoshi Ishii, Tomoki Ito, Shosaku NomuraFirst Department of Internal Medicine, Kansai Medical University, Osaka, JapanAbstract: Plasma cell leukemia (PCL is a rare disease that represents approximately 4% of plasma cell malignant disorders. PCL consists of two variants: primary PCL presents in patients with no previous history of multiple myeloma, while secondary PCL consists of a leukemic transformation in a previously recognized multiple myeloma. Primary PCL is an extremely resistant, rapidly progressive, fatal disease, with a median overall survival of 6.8 months. There is no standard therapeutic strategy, because no treatment option has been prospectively evaluated. We describe a successful case of newly diagnosed primary PCL, treated with a regimen that included bortezomib, followed by auto stem cell transplantation and nonmyeloablative allogeneic stem cell transplantation. Our patient has maintained remission status for over 12 months since undergoing the allogeneic stem cell transplantation. This strategy is promising for PCL, which, though an extremely resistant disease, may become curable.Keywords: plasma cell leukemia, multiple myeloma, bortezomib, stem cell transplantation

  18. Prozone effect of serum IgE levels in a case of plasma cell leukemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Talamo Giampaolo

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract We describe a case of multiple myeloma (MM and secondary plasma cell leukemia (PCL secreting IgE-kappa immunoglobulin. To our knowledge, only 2 cases of IgE-producing secondary PCL have been reported in the medical literature. In our patient, the only tumor marker available for monitoring the therapeutic response to chemotherapy and allogeneic stem cell transplantation was the quantitative M component at serum protein electrophoresis (SPEP, because serum free light chains were in the normal range, Bence-Jones proteinuria was absent, and quantitative serum IgE levels provided inaccurate and erratic results, due to the prozone effect. This is a laboratory phenomenon that occurs when antigen excess interferes with antibody-based methods requiring immune complex formation for detection. It is important to recognize the presence of a prozone effect, because it can produce falsely normal results, and therefore it could lead clinicians to incorrect assessment of the response to therapy.

  19. A Diagnostic Dilemma: Waldenström's Macroglobulinemia/Plasma Cell Leukemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bhawna Sethi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Waldenström's macroglobulinemia is a B-cell neoplasm characterized by infiltration of the bone marrow by a lymphoplasmacytic infiltrate and an IgM monoclonal gammopathy. It is an uncommon disease with overall incidence of approximately 3 per million persons per year, accounting for approximately 1% to 2% of all hematologic cancers. It has only one-sixth the estimated prevalence of plasma cell myeloma. Disease symptoms can be due to infiltration of bone marrow and other tissue sites by malignant lymphoplasmacytic cells or due to the effects of elevated serum IgM levels. However, patients may present with constitutional symptoms only or may be asymptomatic. In our case, patient presented with chief complaints of fatigability and dyspnoea and was misdiagnosed as plasma cell leukemia on peripheral blood film and bone marrow morphology, but turned out to be a case of Waldenström's macroglobulinemia on cytoflorometry. The patient was referred for chemotherapy but expired on 10th day of admission. The suspected cause of death was cardiorespiratory failure.

  20. Whole-exome sequencing of primary plasma cell leukemia discloses heterogeneous mutational patterns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cifola, Ingrid; Lionetti, Marta; Pinatel, Eva; Todoerti, Katia; Mangano, Eleonora; Pietrelli, Alessandro; Fabris, Sonia; Mosca, Laura; Simeon, Vittorio; Petrucci, Maria Teresa; Morabito, Fortunato; Offidani, Massimo; Di Raimondo, Francesco; Falcone, Antonietta; Caravita, Tommaso; Battaglia, Cristina; De Bellis, Gianluca; Palumbo, Antonio; Musto, Pellegrino; Neri, Antonino

    2015-07-10

    Primary plasma cell leukemia (pPCL) is a rare and aggressive form of plasma cell dyscrasia and may represent a valid model for high-risk multiple myeloma (MM). To provide novel information concerning the mutational profile of this disease, we performed the whole-exome sequencing of a prospective series of 12 pPCL cases included in a Phase II multicenter clinical trial and previously characterized at clinical and molecular levels. We identified 1, 928 coding somatic non-silent variants on 1, 643 genes, with a mean of 166 variants per sample, and only few variants and genes recurrent in two or more samples. An excess of C > T transitions and the presence of two main mutational signatures (related to APOBEC over-activity and aging) occurring in different translocation groups were observed. We identified 14 candidate cancer driver genes, mainly involved in cell-matrix adhesion, cell cycle, genome stability, RNA metabolism and protein folding. Furthermore, integration of mutation data with copy number alteration profiles evidenced biallelically disrupted genes with potential tumor suppressor functions. Globally, cadherin/Wnt signaling, extracellular matrix and cell cycle checkpoint resulted the most affected functional pathways. Sequencing results were finally combined with gene expression data to better elucidate the biological relevance of mutated genes. This study represents the first whole-exome sequencing screen of pPCL and evidenced a remarkable genetic heterogeneity of mutational patterns. This may provide a contribution to the comprehension of the pathogenetic mechanisms associated with this aggressive form of PC dyscrasia and potentially with high-risk MM.

  1. Cold Atmospheric Plasma Induces Apoptosis and Oxidative Stress Pathway Regulation in T-Lymphoblastoid Leukemia Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eleonora Turrini

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Cold atmospheric plasma (CAP has shown its antitumor activity in both in vitro and in vivo systems. However, the mechanisms at the basis of CAP-cell interaction are not yet completely understood. The aim of this study is to investigate CAP proapoptotic effect and identify some of the molecular mechanisms triggered by CAP in human T-lymphoblastoid leukemia cells. CAP treatment was performed by means of a wand electrode DBD source driven by nanosecond high-voltage pulses under different operating conditions. The biological endpoints were assessed through flow cytometry and real-time PCR. CAP caused apoptosis in Jurkat cells mediated by p53 upregulation. To test the involvement of intrinsic and/or extrinsic pathway, the expression of Bax/Bcl-2 and caspase-8 was analyzed. The activation of caspase-8 and the upregulation of Bax and Bcl-2 were observed. Moreover, CAP treatment increased ROS intracellular level. The situation reverts after a longer time of treatment. This is probably due to compensatory cellular mechanisms such as the posttranscriptional upregulation of SOD1, CAT, and GSR2. According to ROS increase, CAP induced a significant increase in DNA damage at all treatment conditions. In conclusion, our results provide a deeper understanding of CAP potential in the oncological field and pose the basis for the evaluation of its toxicological profile.

  2. Plasma membrane nucleolin is a receptor for the anticancer aptamer AS1411 in MV4-11 leukemia cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soundararajan, Sridharan; Wang, Li; Sridharan, Vijayalakshmi; Chen, Weiwei; Courtenay-Luck, Nigel; Jones, David; Spicer, Eleanor K; Fernandes, Daniel J

    2009-11-01

    AS1411 is a DNA aptamer that is in phase II clinical trials for relapsed or refractory acute myeloid leukemia and for renal cell carcinoma. AS1411 binds to nucleolin, a protein that is overexpressed in the cytoplasm and on the plasma membrane of some tumor cells compared with normal cells. Studies were performed to determine whether cell surface nucleolin is a receptor for AS1411 in the acute myeloid leukemia cell line MV4-11. Biotinylation of MV4-11 cell surface proteins followed by immunoblotting of the biotinylated proteins showed that full-length (106 kDa) and truncated forms of nucleolin were present on the cell surface. In contrast, K-562 cells, which are 4-fold less sensitive than MV4-11 cells to AS1411, showed no full-length nucleolin and lesser amounts of the truncated forms of nucleolin on the cell surface. Incubation of MV4-11 cells with [(32)P]AS1411 and immunoprecipitation of the plasma membrane fraction with anti-nucleolin antibody demonstrated the presence of [(32)P]AS1411-nucleolin complexes. Anti-nucleolin antibody inhibited binding of fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC)-AS1411 to plasma membrane nucleolin 56 +/- 10% SE (P AS1411 only. Cellular uptake of [(32)P]AS1411 into MV4-11 cells was blocked by a 20-fold excess of unlabeled AS1411 but not by a 20-fold excess of the biologically inactive oligonucleotide CRO-26. Uptake was approximately 3-fold faster into MV4-11 cells than into K-562 cells. Partial knockdown of plasma membrane and cytosolic nucleolin in MCF-7 cells resulted in a 3-fold decrease in AS1411 uptake. These results provide evidence that plasma membrane nucleolin is a functional receptor for AS1411 in MV4-11 cells.

  3. Impact on cell to plasma ratio of miR-92a in patients with acute leukemia: in vivo assessment of cell to plasma ratio of miR-92a

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tanaka Masami

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Plasma microRNA (miRNA has become a promising biomarker for detecting cancer; however, it remains uncertain whether miRNA expression levels in plasma reflect those in tumor cells. Our aim was to determine the biological relevance of miR-92a, which has been implicated as an oncomiR in both plasma and leukemia cells in patients with acute leukemia and to evaluate whether it could be a novel biomarker for monitoring these patients. Results We quantified the expression level of miR-92a in both cells and plasma by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction in 91 patients with acute leukemia. We also determined miR-92a expression levels in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMNC from normal controls. We compared miR-92a expression in plasma with its expression in leukemia cells. Synthetic anti-miR-92a inhibitor was transfected into Raji and OM9;22 cells, and apoptosis was assessed. For in vivo assessment, 6-week-old female nude mice were injected with U937 cells, and miR-92a expression in plasma and tumors was measured. The level of miR-92a expression in fresh leukemia cells was highly variable compared with PBMNC, but significantly lower compared with CD34-positive cells obtained from healthy volunteers. We also noticed that miR-92a was preferentially expressed in acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL cells in comparison with acute myeloid leukemia (AML cells. More specifically, cellular miR-92a expression was significantly increased in a subset of ALL cells, and ALL patients with overexpressed miR-92a had poor prognoses. The anti-miR-92a inhibitor-treated Raji and OM9;22 cells revealed an increase of apoptotic cells. Notably, the cell to plasma ratio of miR-92a expression was significantly higher in both AML and ALL cells compared with PBMNC from healthy volunteers. In tumor-bearing mice, the plasma miR-92a level was significantly decreased in accordance with tumor growth, while tumor tissue was strongly positive for miR-92a

  4. Primary plasma cell leukemia: A report of two cases of a rare and aggressive variant of plasma cell myeloma with the review of literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prithal Gangadhar

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Plasma cell leukemia (PCL is a rare and aggressive variant of myeloma accounting for 2-3% of all plasma cell dyscrasias characterized by the presence of circulating plasma cells. The diagnosis is based on the % (≥20% and absolute number (≥2x10 9 /L of plasma cells in the peripheral blood. The incidence of primary PCL (pPCL is very rare and reported to occur in <1 in a million. It is classified as either pPCL occurring at diagnosis or as secondary PCL in patients with relapsed/refractory myeloma. pPCL is a distinct clinicopathological entity with different cytogenetic and molecular findings. The clinical course is aggressive with short remissions and survival duration. We report two cases of pPCL, both having acute onset of illness, varied clinical presentation with one of them showing "hairy cell morphology," with rapidly progressing renal failure, and was not suspected to be plasma cell dyscrasia clinically. A detailed hematopathological evaluation clinched the diagnosis in this case. It is recommended that techniques such as immunophenotyping by flow cytometry and protein electrophoresis must be performed for confirmatory diagnosis. A detailed report of two cases and a review of PCL are presented here.

  5. The relation between doses or post-plasma time points and apoptosis of leukemia cells induced by dielectric barrier discharge plasma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chao Wang

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The dielectric barrier discharge (DBD plasma was applied to induce apoptosis of LT-12 leukemia cells. Plasma effects on cell death was evaluated by MTT assay and FCM apoptosis assay with Annexin V/PI double staining, suggesting that plasma killing cells rate and inducing cell apoptosis rate both positively were related to the plasma doses or the post-plasma time points. The cell death rates increased from 15.2% to 33.1% and the apoptosis rate raise from 23.8% to 28% when the dose raise from 60s to 120 s at 8 h post-plasma, while they increased from 15.4% to 34.9% and from 48% to 55.3% respectively at the same doses at 12 h post-plasma. Furthermore, the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS, gene and protein expression for Caspases and Bcl-2 family members were measured for exploring the related apoptotic mechanisms phenomenon. We found ROS immediately increased to 1.24 times of the original amount, then increasing to 5.39-fold at 20 h after treatment. The gene and protein expression for Caspases and Bcl-2 family members are very active at 8-12 h post-plasma. Our results demonstrate that DBD plasma can effectively induce tumor cell death through primarily related apoptotic mechanisms.

  6. Enhancer mutations of Akv murine leukemia virus inhibit the induction of mature B-cell lymphomas and shift disease specificity towards the more differentiated plasma cell stage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Karina Dalsgaard; Kunder, Sandra; Quintanilla-Martinez, Leticia;

    2007-01-01

    This study investigates the role of the proviral transcriptional enhancer for B-lymphoma induction by exogenous Akv murine leukemia virus. Infection of newborn inbred NMRI mice with Akv induced 35% plasma cell proliferations (PCPs) (consistent with plasmacytoma), 33% diffuse large B-cell lymphomas...... showed that many of the tumors/cell proliferations induced by each virus were polyclonal. Our results indicate that enhancer mutations weaken the ability of Akv to induce mature B-cell lymphomas prior to the plasma cell stage, whereas development of plasma cell proliferations is less dependent of viral......, 25% follicular B-cell lymphomas and few splenic marginal zone and small B-cell lymphomas. Deleting one copy of the 99-bp proviral enhancer sequence still allowed induction of multiple B-cell tumor types, although PCPs dominated (77%). Additional mutation of binding sites for the glucocorticoid...

  7. Hypermethylation Is A Key Feature of the Transition of Multiple Myeloma to Plasma Cell Leukemia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Walker, Brian A.; Wardell, Christopher P.; Boyd, Kevin D.

    2010-01-01

    Abstract 535 PCL is associated with a failure of the plasma cells to retain their normal homing patterns to the bone marrow, is difficult to treat and developing targeted treatments based on its pathogenesis would be a step forward. PCL lies at the end of the multistep pathway from normal...... analyzed in GenomeStudio using the methylation module (Illumina). Further analyses were performed using R and the LIMMA package. Differential methylation between samples was identified using an empirical Bayes moderated t-test and the resulting p-values were adjusted using the Benjamini and Hochberg method...

  8. Hypermethylation Is A Key Feature of the Transition of Multiple Myeloma to Plasma Cell Leukemia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Walker, Brian A.; Wardell, Christopher P.; Boyd, Kevin D.

    2010-01-01

    epigenetically relevant therapeutic targets. We have previously analyzed 181 samples including B cell, normal plasma cells, MGUS and MM samples for methylation differences using the Illumina Infinium humanmethylation27 array, which interrogates 27,578 highly informative CpG sites per sample at the single......-nucleotide resolution using bisulfite converted DNA. Here we have added 32 PCL samples to our dataset in order to further investigate the methylation changes that occur on the transition from MM to PCL. Data are presented as an average beta-score where 1.0 is fully methylated and 0 is fully unmethylated. Data were...... analyzed in GenomeStudio using the methylation module (Illumina). Further analyses were performed using R and the LIMMA package. Differential methylation between samples was identified using an empirical Bayes moderated t-test and the resulting p-values were adjusted using the Benjamini and Hochberg method...

  9. Enhancer mutations of Akv murine leukemia virus inhibit the induction of mature B-cell lymphomas and shift disease specificity towards the more differentiated plasma cell stage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Karina Dalsgaard; Kunder, Sandra; Quintanilla-Martinez, Leticia

    2007-01-01

    This study investigates the role of the proviral transcriptional enhancer for B-lymphoma induction by exogenous Akv murine leukemia virus. Infection of newborn inbred NMRI mice with Akv induced 35% plasma cell proliferations (PCPs) (consistent with plasmacytoma), 33% diffuse large B-cell lymphomas......, 25% follicular B-cell lymphomas and few splenic marginal zone and small B-cell lymphomas. Deleting one copy of the 99-bp proviral enhancer sequence still allowed induction of multiple B-cell tumor types, although PCPs dominated (77%). Additional mutation of binding sites for the glucocorticoid...... receptor, Ets, Runx, or basic helix-loop-helix transcription factors in the proviral U3 region, however, shifted disease induction to almost exclusively PCPs, but had no major influence on tumor latency periods. Southern analysis of immunoglobulin rearrangements and ecotropic provirus integration patterns...

  10. Clinical features and outcomes of plasma cell leukemia: a single-institution experience in the era of novel agents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giampaolo Talamo

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Plasma cell leukemia (PCL is a rare hematologic malignancy with aggressive clinical and biologic features. Data regarding its prognosis with the use of the novel agents, i.e., the immunomodulatory drugs thalidomide and lenalidomide, and the proteasome inhibitor bortezomib, are limited. We retrospectively reviewed clinical outcomes, response to therapy, and survival of 17 patients seen at the Penn State Hershey Cancer Institute since the availability of novel agents (2006-2011. Twelve patients had primary PCL (pPCL, and 5 second- ary PCL (sPCL. PCL was associated with aggressive clinicobiological features, such as high-risk cytogenetics, elevated serum beta-2-microglobulin and lactate dehydrogenase, International Staging System stage III, and rapid relapse after therapy. With the use of thalidomide, lenalidomide, and bortezomib in 53%, 53%, and 88% patients, respectively, median overall survival (OS was 18 months in the whole group (95% confidence interval, 11-21 months, and 21 and 4 months in pPCL and sPCL, respectively (P=0.015. OS was inferior to that of 313 consecutive patients with multiple myeloma (MM treated in the same period, even when compared with a subset of 47 MM with high-risk cytogenetics. Although our data are limited by the small sample size, we conclude that novel agents may modestly improve survival in patients with PCL, when compared to historical controls. Novel therapies do not seem to overcome the negative prognosis of PCL as compared with MM.

  11. Mast cell leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Georgin-Lavialle, Sophie; Lhermitte, Ludovic; Dubreuil, Patrice; Chandesris, Marie-Olivia; Hermine, Olivier; Damaj, Gandhi

    2013-02-21

    Mast cell leukemia (MCL) is a very rare form of aggressive systemic mastocytosis accounting for mast cell activation-involvement of the liver, spleen, peritoneum, bones, and marrow-are frequent. Diagnosis is based on the presence of ≥ 20% atypical mast cells in the marrow or ≥ 10% in the blood; however, an aleukemic variant is frequently encountered in which the number of circulating mast cells is < 10%. The common phenotypic features of pathologic mast cells encountered in most forms of mastocytosis are unreliable in MCL. Unexpectedly, non-KIT D816V mutations are frequent and therefore, complete gene sequencing is necessary. Therapy usually fails and the median survival time is < 6 months. The role of combination therapies and bone marrow transplantation needs further investigation.

  12. Fludarabine Phosphate and Total-Body Irradiation Before Donor Peripheral Blood Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Patients With Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia or Small Lymphocytic Leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-07-18

    B-Cell Prolymphocytic Leukemia; Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Prolymphocytic Leukemia; Recurrent Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Refractory Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; T-Cell Prolymphocytic Leukemia

  13. Automated morphological analysis of bone marrow cells in microscopic images for diagnosis of leukemia: nucleus-plasma separation and cell classification using a hierarchical tree model of hematopoesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krappe, Sebastian; Wittenberg, Thomas; Haferlach, Torsten; Münzenmayer, Christian

    2016-03-01

    The morphological differentiation of bone marrow is fundamental for the diagnosis of leukemia. Currently, the counting and classification of the different types of bone marrow cells is done manually under the use of bright field microscopy. This is a time-consuming, subjective, tedious and error-prone process. Furthermore, repeated examinations of a slide may yield intra- and inter-observer variances. For that reason a computer assisted diagnosis system for bone marrow differentiation is pursued. In this work we focus (a) on a new method for the separation of nucleus and plasma parts and (b) on a knowledge-based hierarchical tree classifier for the differentiation of bone marrow cells in 16 different classes. Classification trees are easily interpretable and understandable and provide a classification together with an explanation. Using classification trees, expert knowledge (i.e. knowledge about similar classes and cell lines in the tree model of hematopoiesis) is integrated in the structure of the tree. The proposed segmentation method is evaluated with more than 10,000 manually segmented cells. For the evaluation of the proposed hierarchical classifier more than 140,000 automatically segmented bone marrow cells are used. Future automated solutions for the morphological analysis of bone marrow smears could potentially apply such an approach for the pre-classification of bone marrow cells and thereby shortening the examination time.

  14. Autologous Peripheral Blood Stem Cell Transplant Followed by Donor Bone Marrow Transplant in Treating Patients With High-Risk Hodgkin Lymphoma, Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma, Multiple Myeloma, or Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-06-17

    B-Cell Prolymphocytic Leukemia; Plasma Cell Leukemia; Progression of Multiple Myeloma or Plasma Cell Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Childhood Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Childhood Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Recurrent Plasma Cell Myeloma; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Refractory Childhood Hodgkin Lymphoma; Refractory Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Refractory Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Refractory Plasma Cell Myeloma; Refractory Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; T-Cell Prolymphocytic Leukemia; Waldenstrom Macroglobulinemia

  15. Leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leukemia is cancer of the white blood cells. White blood cells help your body fight infection. Your blood cells form in your bone marrow. In leukemia, the bone marrow produces abnormal white blood cells. ...

  16. Monoclonal antibodies reactive with hairy cell leukemia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Visser, L; Shaw, A; Slupsky, J; Vos, H; Poppema, S

    Monoclonal antibodies reactive with hairy cell leukemia were developed to aid in the diagnosis of this subtype of B cell chronic lymphocytic leukemia and to gain better insight into the origin of hairy cells. Three antibodies were found to be of value in the diagnosis of hairy cell leukemia.

  17. Monoclonal antibodies reactive with hairy cell leukemia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Visser, L; Shaw, A; Slupsky, J; Vos, H; Poppema, S

    1989-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies reactive with hairy cell leukemia were developed to aid in the diagnosis of this subtype of B cell chronic lymphocytic leukemia and to gain better insight into the origin of hairy cells. Three antibodies were found to be of value in the diagnosis of hairy cell leukemia. Antibod

  18. A Case of Plasmacytoid Dendritic Cell Leukemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Köpeczi Judit Beáta

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Plasmacytoid dendritic cell leukemia is a rare subtype of acute leukemia, which has recently been established as a distinct pathologic entity that typically follows a highly aggressive clinical course in adults. The aim of this report is to present a case of plasmacytoid dendritic cell leukemia due to its rarity and difficulty to recognize and diagnose it.

  19. Pharm GKB: Leukemia, B-Cell, Acute [PharmGKB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available UTR Alleles, Functions, and Amino Acid Translations are all sourced from dbSNP 144 Overview Alternate Names: Synonym Acute... B-Cell Leukemia; Acute B-Cell Leukemias; Acute B-Lymphocytic Leukemia; Acute... B-Lymphocytic Leukemias; Acute lymphoblastic leukaemia, Burkitt's type; Acute lymphoblastic leuka...emia, mature B-cell type; Acute lymphoblastic leukemia, Burkitt's type; Acute lymphoblastic leukemia, mature... B-cell type; B Cell Leukemia, Acute; B Lymphocytic Leukemia, Acute; B-ALL; B-Cell Leukemia, Acute

  20. Treatment of Aggressive NK-Cell Leukemia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boysen, Anders Kindberg; Jensen, Paw; Johansen, Preben

    2011-01-01

    Aggressive NK-cell leukemia is a rare malignancy with neoplastic proliferation of natural killer cells. It often presents with constitutional symptoms, a rapid declining clinical course, and a poor prognosis with a median survival of a few months. The disease is usually resistant to cytotoxic...... literature concerning treatment of aggressive NK-cell leukemia....

  1. Compromiso pleural en la leucemia de células plasmáticas: Reporte de un caso Pleural effusion in plasma cell leukemia: A case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    JORGE YÁÑEZ V

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available El mieloma múltiple es una neoplasia maligna de células plasmáticas que invade la médula ósea y otros tejidos. Las manifestaciones extramedulares son relativamente raras. El derrame pleural en el mieloma múltiple es poco frecuente (6% de los casos, y el derrame pleural neoplásico es extremadamente raro. La leucemia de células plasmáticas, que se produce de novo o en pacientes con mieloma múltiple, es la variedad menos común de discrasia de células plasmáticas. Los autores describen el cuadro clínico de un paciente de 63 años con leucemia de células plasmáticas, donde la primera manifestación de la enfermedad fue una neumonía neumocócica bacteriémica asociado a un derrame pleural contralateral, que correspondió a un exudado predominio mononuclear. El examen citológico reveló abundantes células plasmáticas inmaduras en el líquido pleural y la sangre periférica. El derrame pleural desapareció después del primer ciclo de quimioterapia (vincristina, adriamicina, dexametasona. Después de tres meses de remisión, la enfermedad neoplásica recidivó, siendo el paciente sometido a trasplante autólogo de médula ósea. El paciente se ha mantenido en remisión completa un año después del diagnóstico. El derrame pleural es una complicación poco común, pero importante, del mieloma múltiple y no necesariamente conlleva un mal pronóstico.Multiple myeloma is a low malignant, non-Hodgkin's lymphoma, which is characterized by infiltration of the bone marrow by clonal proliferation of atypical plasma cells. Extramedullary manifestations are relatively rare. Serous effusions in multiple myeloma are uncommon (6% of cases but a myelomatous pleural effusion occurring in these patients is extremely rare. Plasma cell leukemia, occurring either de novo or in patients with long standing multiple myeloma, is the least common type of plasma cell dyscrasia. The authors describe the course of plasmacellular leukemia in a 63-year-old male

  2. Leukemia in donor cells after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplant

    OpenAIRE

    2002-01-01

    The development of leukemia in donor cells after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplant is an extremely rare event. We report here the case of a patient who developed myelodysplastic syndrome/acute myeloid leukemia, in cells of donor origin 3.5 years after related donor HSCT for refractory chronic lymphocytic leukemia and therapy-induced myelodysplastic syndrome. The origin of the leukemia was determined by analysis of minisatillite polymorphism tested on CD34(+) cells.

  3. Chronic B-Cell Leukemias and Agent Orange

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Enter ZIP code here Enter ZIP code here Chronic B-cell Leukemias and Agent Orange Veterans who ... receive VA health care and disability compensation. About chronic B-cell leukemias Leukemia is a cancer of ...

  4. Leukemia microvesicles affect healthy hematopoietic stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Razmkhah, Farnaz; Soleimani, Masoud; Mehrabani, Davood; Karimi, Mohammad Hossein; Amini Kafi-Abad, Sedigheh; Ramzi, Mani; Iravani Saadi, Mahdiyar; Kakoui, Javad

    2017-02-01

    Microvesicles are released by different cell types and shuttle mRNAs and microRNAs which have the possibility to transfer genetic information to a target cell and alter its function. Acute myeloid leukemia is a malignant disorder, and leukemic cells occupy all the bone marrow microenvironment. In this study, we investigate the effect of leukemia microvesicles on healthy umbilical cord blood hematopoietic stem cells to find evidence of cell information transferring. Leukemia microvesicles were isolated from acute myeloid leukemia patients and were co-incubated with healthy hematopoietic stem cells. After 7 days, cell count, hematopoietic stem cell-specific cluster of differentiation (CD) markers, colony-forming unit assay, and some microRNA gene expressions were assessed. Data showed a higher number of hematopoietic stem cells after being treated with leukemia microvesicles compared with control (treated with no microvesicles) and normal (treated with normal microvesicles) groups. Also, increased levels of microRNA-21 and microRNA-29a genes were observed in this group, while colony-forming ability was still maintained and high ranges of CD34(+), CD34(+)CD38(-), CD90(+), and CD117(+) phenotypes were observed as stemness signs. Our results suggest that leukemia microvesicles are able to induce some effects on healthy hematopoietic stem cells such as promoting cell survival and some microRNAs deregulation, while stemness is maintained.

  5. Autologous and allogeneic typing of human leukemia cells: definition of surface antigens restricted to lymphocytic leukemia cells.

    OpenAIRE

    Naito, K.; Yamaguchi, H; Horibe, K; Shiku, H.; Takahashi, T.; Suzuki, S; Yamada, K.

    1983-01-01

    Serum from a patient (CO) with acute lymphoblastic leukemia was reactive in immunoadherence assays with autologous leukemia cells but not with autologous blood lymphocytes or bone marrow cells during complete remission. Extensive absorption tests with an array of leukemia cells and normal cells were performed in order to define the specificity of the reaction. The autologous leukemia reactivity was either completely or partially absorbed with acute lymphoblastic leukemia cells obtained from 1...

  6. Donor Umbilical Cord Blood Transplant With or Without Ex-vivo Expanded Cord Blood Progenitor Cells in Treating Patients With Acute Myeloid Leukemia, Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia, Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia, or Myelodysplastic Syndromes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-09-14

    Acute Biphenotypic Leukemia; Acute Erythroid Leukemia; Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in Remission; Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia; Acute Myeloid Leukemia Arising From Previous Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Blasts Under 10 Percent of Bone Marrow Nucleated Cells; Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia, BCR-ABL1 Positive; Mixed Phenotype Acute Leukemia; Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Myelodysplastic Syndrome With Excess Blasts; Pancytopenia; Refractory Anemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  7. Nivolumab in Treating Patients With HTLV-Associated T-Cell Leukemia/Lymphoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-07-26

    Acute Adult T-Cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Adult T-Cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; CD3 Positive; CD4-Positive Neoplastic Cells Present; Chronic Adult T-Cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; HTLV-1 Infection; Hypercalcemia; Lymphomatous Adult T-Cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult T-Cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Smoldering Adult T-Cell Leukemia/Lymphoma

  8. In vitro radiosensitivity of human leukemia cell lines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weichselbaum, R.R.; Greenberger, J.S.; Schmidt, A.; Karpas, A.; Moloney, W.C.; Little, J.B.

    1981-05-01

    The in vitro radiobiologic survival values (anti n, D/sub 0/) of four tumor lines derived from human hematopoietic tumors were studied. These cell lines were HL60 promyelocytic leukemia; K562 erythroleukemia; 45 acute lymphocytic leukemia; and 176 acute monomyelogenous leukemia. More cell lines must be examined before the exact relationship between in vitro radiosensitivity and clinical radiocurability is firmly established.

  9. General Information About Hairy Cell Leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of hairy cell leukemia include infections, tiredness, and pain below the ribs. These and other signs and symptoms may be ... of breath. Weight loss for no known reason. Pain or a feeling of fullness below the ribs. Painless lumps in the neck, underarm, stomach , or ...

  10. Induction of T-cell immunity against leukemia by dendritic cells pulsed with total RNA isolated from leukemia cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李牧; 尤胜国; 葛薇; 马双; 马楠; 赵春华

    2003-01-01

    Objectives To assess the feasibility and efficacy of eliciting leukemia-specific T-cell responses in syngeneic mice in vitro and in vivo using dendritic cells (DCs) pulsed with total RNA from leukemia cells.Methods DCs generated from bone marrow culture in vitro in the presence of combined cytokines were pulsed with cellular total RNA isolated from cultured L615 cells by cationic lipid 1,2-dioleoyloxy-3-(trimethylammonium) propane (DOTAP). T-cell responses were evaluated by in vitro proliferation, and cytotoxicity assay. And in vivo immune protection and proghosis of mice with leukemia were studied.Conclusions These data support the use of DCs/RNA vaccine as a feasible and effective route to elicit leukemia immunity against unidentified leukemia-associated antigens for treatment of leukemia-bearing animals.

  11. Overexpression of Rac1 in leukemia patients and its role in leukemia cell migration and growth

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Jiying [State Key Laboratory of Experimental Hematology, Institute of Hematology and Blood Diseases Hospital, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences and Peking Union Medical College, 288 Nanjing Road, Tianjin 300020 (China); Rao, Qing, E-mail: raoqing@gmail.com [State Key Laboratory of Experimental Hematology, Institute of Hematology and Blood Diseases Hospital, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences and Peking Union Medical College, 288 Nanjing Road, Tianjin 300020 (China); Wang, Min; Wei, Hui; Xing, Haiyan; Liu, Hang; Wang, Yanzhong; Tang, Kejing; Peng, Leiwen; Tian, Zheng; Wang, Jianxiang [State Key Laboratory of Experimental Hematology, Institute of Hematology and Blood Diseases Hospital, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences and Peking Union Medical College, 288 Nanjing Road, Tianjin 300020 (China)

    2009-09-04

    Rac1 belongs to the Rho family that act as critical mediators of signaling pathways controlling cell migration and proliferation and contributes to the interactions of hematopoietic stem cells with their microenvironment. Alteration of Rac1 might result in unbalanced interactions and ultimately lead to leukemogenesis. In this study, we analyze the expression of Rac1 protein in leukemia patients and determine its role in the abnormal behaviours of leukemic cells. Rac1 protein is overexpressed in primary acute myeloid leukemia cells as compared to normal bone marrow mononuclear cells. siRNA-mediated silencing of Rac1 in leukemia cell lines induced inhibition of cell migration, proliferation, and colony formation. Additionally, blocking Rac1 activity by an inhibitor of Rac1-GTPase, NSC23766, suppressed cell migration and growth. We conclude that overexpression of Rac1 contributes to the accelerated migration and high proliferation potential of leukemia cells, which could be implicated in leukemia development and progression.

  12. Ginsenoside Rh2 Mitigates Pediatric Leukemia Through Suppression of Bcl-2 in Leukemia Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoru Wang

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: Acute myeloid leukemia (AML is a severe malignant cancer worldwide, in both adult and pediatric patients. Since bone marrow cell transplantation is seriously limited by the availability of the immune-paired donor sources, the therapy for pediatric leukemia remains challenging. Ginsenoside Rh2 (GRh2 is a well-characterized component in red ginseng, and has established therapeutic effects for different diseases, although whether GRh2 may have a therapeutic effect on pediatric leukemia has not been investigated. Methods: We examined the effects of GRh2 on the survival of mice in an acute leukemia model. We analyzed the effects of GRh2 on the cell viability of leukemia cell lines in vitro, using a CCK-8 assay and an MTT assay. We analyzed the effects of GRh2 on the apoptosis of leukemia cell lines in vitro, by flow cytometry. We analyzed the levels of Bcl-2 and microRNA-21 (miR-21 in GRh2-treated leukemia cells. Prediction of binding between miR-21 and 3'-UTR of Bcl-2 mRNA was performed by a bioinformatics algorithm and confirmed by a dual luciferase reporter assay. Results: GRh2 significantly prolonged the survival of mice with pediatric leukemia. GRh2 significantly decreased the viability of leukemia cells in vitro, through induction of apoptosis. GRh2 significantly decreased the levels of an anti-apoptotic protein Bcl-2 in leukemia cells, possibly through induction of miR-21, which suppressed the translation of Bcl-2 mRNA via 3'-UTR binding. Conclusion: GRh2 may be an effective treatment for pediatric leukemia, and GRh2 may induce apoptosis of leukemia cells through miR-21-modulated suppression of Bcl-2.

  13. Biological Therapy in Treating Patients With Advanced Myelodysplastic Syndrome, Acute or Chronic Myeloid Leukemia, or Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia Who Are Undergoing Stem Cell Transplantation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-03-27

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); B-cell Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; B-cell Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Childhood Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Childhood Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Essential Thrombocythemia; Polycythemia Vera; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts in Transformation; Relapsing Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; T-cell Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; T-cell Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

  14. Mast cell leukemia: an extremely rare disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Dai-Yin; Gau, Jyh-Pyng; Hong, Ying-Chung; Liu, Chun-Yu; Yu, Yuan-Bin; Hsiao, Liang-Tsai; Liu, Jin-Hwang; Chen, Po-Min; Chiou, Tzeon-Jye; Tzeng, Cheng-Hwai

    2014-08-01

    Systemic mastocytosis is characterized by pathologic proliferation and accumulation of mast cells in at least one extracutaneous organ such as liver, spleen, bone marrow, or lymph nodes. The clinical features are highly variable depending on impairment of the involved organ systems. It often raises diagnostic challenges. Here we report a case of a 78-year-old patient with mast cell leukemia. The literature is reviewed regarding the diagnosis and updated management of this rare disease.

  15. Hairy Cell Leukemia: the good news of a bad disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mónica Seidi

    2017-03-01

    The authors decided to report a clinical case of hairy cells leukemia in an asymptomatic patient due to the rarity of this neoplasia (2% of all leukemias and less than 1% of limphoids neoplasms and because it corresponds to the most successfully treatable leukemia.

  16. Cx25 contributes to leukemia cell communication and chemosensitivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinyuk, Maksim; Alvarado, Alvaro G; Nesmiyanov, Pavel; Shaw, Jeremy; Mulkearns-Hubert, Erin E; Eurich, Jennifer T; Hale, James S; Bogdanova, Anna; Hitomi, Masahiro; Maciejewski, Jaroslaw; Huang, Alex Y; Saunthararajah, Yogen; Lathia, Justin D

    2015-10-13

    Leukemia encompasses several hematological malignancies with shared phenotypes that include rapid proliferation, abnormal leukocyte self-renewal, and subsequent disruption of normal hematopoiesis. While communication between leukemia cells and the surrounding stroma supports tumor survival and expansion, the mechanisms underlying direct leukemia cell-cell communication and its contribution to tumor growth are undefined. Gap junctions are specialized intercellular connections composed of connexin proteins that allow free diffusion of small molecules and ions directly between the cytoplasm of adjacent cells. To characterize homotypic leukemia cell communication, we employed in vitro models for both acute myeloid leukemia (AML) and acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) and measured gap junction function through dye transfer assays. Additionally, clinically relevant gap junction inhibitors, carbenoxolone (CBX) and 1-octanol, were utilized to uncouple the communicative capability of leukemia cells. Furthermore, a qRT-PCR screen revealed several connexins with higher expression in leukemia cells compared with normal hematopoietic stem cells. Cx25 was identified as a promising adjuvant therapeutic target, and Cx25 but not Cx43 reduction via RNA interference reduced intercellular communication and sensitized cells to chemotherapy. Taken together, our data demonstrate the presence of homotypic communication in leukemia through a Cx25-dependent gap junction mechanism that can be exploited for the development of anti-leukemia therapies.

  17. Reduced Intensity Preparative Regimen Followed by Stem Cell Transplant (FAB)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-03-29

    Myelodysplastic and Myeloproliferative Disorders; Acute Myelogenous Leukemia; Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Multiple Myeloma; Plasma Cell Dyscrasia; Lymphoproliferative Disorders; Hematologic Diseases

  18. Cell death sensitization of leukemia cells by opioid receptor activation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friesen, Claudia; Roscher, Mareike; Hormann, Inis; Fichtner, Iduna; Alt, Andreas; Hilger, Ralf A.; Debatin, Klaus-Michael; Miltner, Erich

    2013-01-01

    Cyclic AMP (cAMP) regulates a number of cellular processes and modulates cell death induction. cAMP levels are altered upon stimulation of specific G-protein-coupled receptors inhibiting or activating adenylyl cyclases. Opioid receptor stimulation can activate inhibitory Gi-proteins which in turn block adenylyl cyclase activity reducing cAMP. Opioids such as D,L-methadone induce cell death in leukemia cells. However, the mechanism how opioids trigger apoptosis and activate caspases in leukemia cells is not understood. In this study, we demonstrate that downregulation of cAMP induced by opioid receptor activation using the opioid D,L-methadone kills and sensitizes leukemia cells for doxorubicin treatment. Enhancing cAMP levels by blocking opioid-receptor signaling strongly reduced D,L-methadone-induced apoptosis, caspase activation and doxorubicin-sensitivity. Induction of cell death in leukemia cells by activation of opioid receptors using the opioid D,L-methadone depends on critical levels of opioid receptor expression on the cell surface. Doxorubicin increased opioid receptor expression in leukemia cells. In addition, the opioid D,L-methadone increased doxorubicin uptake and decreased doxorubicin efflux in leukemia cells, suggesting that the opioid D,L-methadone as well as doxorubicin mutually increase their cytotoxic potential. Furthermore, we found that opioid receptor activation using D,L-methadone alone or in addition to doxorubicin inhibits tumor growth significantly in vivo. These results demonstrate that opioid receptor activation via triggering the downregulation of cAMP induces apoptosis, activates caspases and sensitizes leukemia cells for doxorubicin treatment. Hence, opioid receptor activation seems to be a promising strategy to improve anticancer therapies. PMID:23633472

  19. Autonomous growth potential of leukemia blast cells is associated with poor prognosis in human acute leukemias

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jakubowski Ann A

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract We have described a severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID mouse model that permits the subcutaneous growth of primary human acute leukemia blast cells into a measurable subcutaneous nodule which may be followed by the development of disseminated disease. Utilizing the SCID mouse model, we examined the growth potential of leukemic blasts from 133 patients with acute leukemia, (67 acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL and 66 acute myeloid leukemia (AML in the animals after subcutaneous inoculation without conditioning treatment. The blasts displayed three distinct growth patterns: "aggressive", "indolent", or "no tumor growth". Out of 133 leukemias, 45 (33.8% displayed an aggressive growth pattern, 14 (10.5% displayed an indolent growth pattern and 74 (55.6% did not grow in SCID mice. The growth probability of leukemias from relapsed and/or refractory disease was nearly 3 fold higher than that from patients with newly diagnosed disease. Serial observations found that leukemic blasts from the same individual, which did not initiate tumor growth at initial presentation and/or at early relapse, may engraft and grow in the later stages of disease, suggesting that the ability of leukemia cells for engraftment and proliferation was gradually acquired following the process of leukemia progression. Nine autonomous growing leukemia cell lines were established in vitro. These displayed an aggressive proliferation pattern, suggesting a possible correlation between the capacity of human leukemia cells for autonomous proliferation in vitro and an aggressive growth potential in SCID mice. In addition, we demonstrated that patients whose leukemic blasts displayed an aggressive growth and dissemination pattern in SClD mice had a poor clinical outcome in patients with ALL as well as AML. Patients whose leukemic blasts grew indolently or whose leukemia cells failed to induce growth had a significantly longer DFS and more favorable clinical course.

  20. CAR-pNK Cell Immunotherapy in CD7 Positive Leukemia and Lymphoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-12-04

    Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Precursor T-Cell Lymphoblastic Leukemia-Lymphoma; T-cell Prolymphocytic Leukemia; T-cell Large Granular Lymphocytic Leukemia; Peripheral T-cell Lymphoma, NOS; Angioimmunoblastic T-cell Lymphoma; Extranodal NK/T-cell Lymphoma, Nasal Type; Enteropathy-type Intestinal T-cell Lymphoma; Hepatosplenic T-cell Lymphoma

  1. Targeting the acute myeloid leukemia stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krause, Alexandre; Luciana, M; Krause, Fontanari; Rego, Eduardo M

    2010-02-01

    The idea that within the bulk of leukemic cells there are immature progenitors which are intrinsically resistant to chemotherapy and able to repopulate the tumor after treatment is not recent. Nevertheless, the term leukemia stem cells (LSCs) has been adopted recently to describe these immature progenitors based on the fact that they share the most relevant features of the normal hematopoetic stem cells (HSCs), i.e. the self-renewal potential and quiescent status. LSCs differ from their normal counterparts and from the more differentiated leukemic cells regarding the default status of pathways regulating apoptosis, cell cycle, telomere maintenance and transport pumps activity. In addition, unique features regarding the interaction of these cells with the microenvironment have been characterized. Therapeutic strategies targeting these unique features are at different stages of development but the reported results are promising. The aim of this review is, by taking acute myeloid leukemia (AML) as a bona fide example, to discuss some of the mechanisms used by the LSCs to survive and the strategies which could be used to eradicate these cells.

  2. Human Lyb-2 homolog CD72 is a marker for progenitor B-cell leukemias.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwarting, R; Castello, R; Moldenhauer, G; Pezzutto, A; von Hoegen, I; Ludwig, W D; Parnes, J R; Dörken, B

    1992-11-01

    S-HCL 2 is the prototype antibody of the recently defined CD72 cluster (human Lyb-2). Under nonreducing conditions, S-HCL 2 monoclonal antibody (mAb) precipitates a glycoprotein of 80-86 kDa. Under reducing conditions, a dimer of 43 and 39 kDa, with core proteins of 40 and 36 kDa, is precipitated. CD72 expression in normal and malignant tissues is different from expression of all other previously described human B-cell antigens. In peripheral blood and bone marrow, the antigen appears to be present on all B lymphocytes, with the exception of plasma cells. In tissue, immunohistochemical staining revealed positivity for all known B-cell compartments; however, pulpa macrophages of the spleen and von Kupffer cells exhibited distinct positivity for CD72 also. Among 83 malignant non-Hodgkin's lymphomas examined by immunohistochemistry (alkaline phosphatase anti-alkaline phosphatase technique), all 54 B-cell lymphomas, including precursor B-cell lymphomas, Burkitt's lymphomas, germinal center lymphomas, chronic lymphocytic leukemias, and hairy cell leukemias, were CD72 positive, but no T-cell lymphomas were. Flow cytometry study of more than 80 mainly acute leukemias (52 B-cell leukemias) showed reactivity with S-HCL 2 mAb over the full range of B-cell differentiation. In particular, very early B cells in cytoplasmic Ig (cIg)-negative, CD19-positive pre-pre-B-cell leukemias and hybrid leukemias (mixed myeloid and B-cell type) were consistently positive for CD72 on the cell surface. Therefore, CD72 may become an important marker for progenitor B-cell leukemias.

  3. Quantification of BCR-ABL mRNA in Plasma/Serum of Patients with Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miwako Narita, Anri Saito, Aya Kojima, Minami Iwabuchi, Naoya Satoh, Takayoshi Uchiyama, Akie Yamahira, Tatsuo Furukawa, Hirohito Sone, Masuhiro Takahashi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Quantification of tumor-associated mRNA extracted from blood cells/tissues containing tumor cells is used for evaluation of treatment efficacy or residual tumor cell burden in tumors including leukemia. However, this method using tumor cell-containing blood/tissue is difficult to evaluate the whole tumor cell burden in the body. In order to establish an efficient method to evaluate the whole tumor cell burden in the body, we tried to quantify tumor-associated mRNA existing in plasma/serum instead of leukemia cell-containing blood cells in patients with chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML and compared the levels of BCR-ABL mRNA between plasma/serum and peripheral blood cells. mRNA of BCR-ABL, WT1 or GAPDH (control molecule was detected by real-time RT-PCR using RNA extracted from plasma/serum of almost all the patients with CML. Copy numbers of BCR-ABL mRNA were significantly correlated between plasma/serum and peripheral blood cells. However, levels of BCR-ABL mRNA extracted from serum were low compared with those extracted with peripheral blood cells. The present findings suggest that although real-time RT-PCR of mRNA existing in plasma/serum could be used for evaluating the whole tumor cell burden in the body, it's required to establish an efficient method to quantify plasma/serum mRNA by nature without degrading during the procedure.

  4. Leukemia Mediated Endothelial Cell Activation Modulates Leukemia Cell Susceptibility to Chemotherapy through a Positive Feedback Loop Mechanism.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bahareh Pezeshkian

    Full Text Available In acute myeloid leukemia (AML, the chances of achieving disease-free survival are low. Studies have demonstrated a supportive role of endothelial cells (ECs in normal hematopoiesis. Here we show that similar intercellular relationships exist in leukemia. We demonstrate that leukemia cells themselves initiate these interactions by directly modulating the behavior of resting ECs through the induction of EC activation. In this inflammatory state, activated ECs induce the adhesion of a sub-set of leukemia cells through the cell adhesion molecule E-selectin. These adherent leukemia cells are sequestered in a quiescent state and are unaffected by chemotherapy. The ability of adherent cells to later detach and again become proliferative following exposure to chemotherapy suggests a role of this process in relapse. Interestingly, differing leukemia subtypes modulate this process to varying degrees, which may explain the varied response of AML patients to chemotherapy and relapse rates. Finally, because leukemia cells themselves induce EC activation, we postulate a positive-feedback loop in leukemia that exists to support the growth and relapse of the disease. Together, the data defines a new mechanism describing how ECs and leukemia cells interact during leukemogenesis, which could be used to develop novel treatments for those with AML.

  5. Methylation of Gene CHFR Promoter in Acute Leukemia Cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GONG Hui; LIU Wengli; ZHOU Jianfeng; XU Huizhen

    2005-01-01

    Summary: In order to explore whether gene CHFR was inactivated by methylation in leukemia cells, the expression of CHFR was examined before and after treatment with demethylation agent in Molt-4, Jurkat and U937 leukemia cell lines by means of RT-PCR. The methylation of promoter in Molt-4, Jurkat and U937 cells as well as 41 acute leukemia patients was analyzed by MS-PCR. The results showed that methylation of CHFR promoter was inactivated and could be reversed by treatment with a demethylating agent in Molt-4, Jurkat and U937. CHFR promoter methylation was detected in 39 % of acute leukemia patients. There was no difference in incidence of CHFR promoter methylation between acute myelocytic leukemia and acute lymphocytic leukemia. In conclusion, CHFR is frequently inactivated in acute leukemia and is a good candidate for the leukemia supper gene. By affecting mitotic checkpoint function, CHFR inactivation likely plays a key role in tumorigenesis in acute leukemia. Moreover, the methylation of gene CHFR appears to be a good index with which to predict the sensitivity of acute leukemia to microtubule inhibitors.

  6. Role of Ikaros in T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Philippe; Kastner; Susan; Chan

    2011-01-01

    Ikaros is a zinc finger transcriptional regulator encoded by the Ikzf1 gene.Ikaros displays crucial functions in the hematopoietic system and its loss of function has been linked to the development of lymphoid leukemia.In particular,Ikaros has been found in recent years to be a major tumor suppressor involved in human B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia.Its role in T-cell leukemia,however,has been more controversial.While Ikaros deficiency appears to be very frequent in murine T-cell leukemias,loss of Ikaros appears to be rare in human T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL).We review here the evidence linking Ikaros to T-ALL in mouse and human systems.

  7. Bovine Leukemia ProVirus: Evidence of Presence of Part of Gag Gene in Seminal Plasma of Naturally Infected Bulls

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Razi Jafari

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available It is of critical importance to understand the modalities of BLV presence in semen, especially with regard to artificial insemination (AI. Presence of bovine leukemia provirus was demonstrated in fresh and frozen semen samples by researchers. In this study paired blood and semen samples from 45 bulls were assessed for the presence of part of gag gene and antibodies to BLV in blood, semen and cell-free fraction of the semen (seminal plasma. Proviral DNA was detected in 5 out of 45 seminal plasma samples. PCR products were sequenced and submitted to gene bank. This data strongly suggested that seminal plasma of seropositive bulls can be positive in PCR.

  8. Alvocidib in Treating Patients With B-Cell Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia or Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-01

    B-cell Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Contiguous Stage II Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Stage I Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Stage I Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Stage II Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Stage III Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Stage III Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Stage IV Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Stage IV Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma

  9. Small?molecule Hedgehog inhibitor attenuates the leukemia?initiation potential of acute myeloid leukemia cells

    OpenAIRE

    Fukushima, Nobuaki; Minami, Yosuke; Kakiuchi, Seiji; Kuwatsuka, Yachiyo; Hayakawa, Fumihiko; Jamieson, Catoriona; Kiyoi, Hitoshi; Naoe, Tomoki

    2016-01-01

    Aberrant activation of the Hedgehog signaling pathway has been implicated in the maintenance of leukemia stem cell populations in several model systems. PF?04449913 (PF?913) is a selective, small?molecule inhibitor of Smoothened, a membrane protein that regulates the Hedgehog pathway. However, details of the proof?of?concept and mechanism of action of PF?913 following administration to patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) are unclear. This study examined the role of the Hedgehog signali...

  10. An Immunocompetent Mouse Model for MLL/AF9 Leukemia Reveals the Potential of Spontaneous Cytotoxic T-Cell Response to an Antigen Expressed in Leukemia Cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kana Hasegawa

    Full Text Available Leukemia differs substantially with respect to stromal milieu from tumors that progress locally as solid masses, and the physiological importance of immunosurveillance in leukemia remains unclear. However, currently available mouse leukemia models have critical limitations in the context of analyzing immunological regulation of leukemia development. In this study, we transferred mouse MLL/AF9 leukemia-initiating cells into immunocompetent recipient mice without any pre-conditioning such as irradiation, and then analyzed the spontaneous T cell response to an immunogenic antigen expressed in leukemia cells. When the minimum numbers of leukemia-initiating cells for engraftment were transferred, leukemia cells were eradicated by the adaptive immune response in most, if not all, wild-type mice, but not in Rag2-/- recipient mice, which lack adaptive immunity. By contrast, mice transplanted with larger numbers of leukemia cells always developed leukemia. In mice with advanced leukemia, antigen-specific CTLs were also expanded, but were unresponsive to antigen stimulation and expressed high levels of PD-1 and LAG-3. These results provide the first clear demonstration that the spontaneous CTL response to a tumor-cell antigen has the potential to eradicate leukemia, whereas antigen-specific CTLs are exhausted in animals with advanced leukemia. This immunocompetent mouse leukemia model provides a useful platform for developing effective immunotherapies against leukemia.

  11. Dendritic cell-based immunotherapy for myeloid leukemias.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schürch, Christian M; Riether, Carsten; Ochsenbein, Adrian F

    2013-12-31

    Acute and chronic myeloid leukemia (AML, CML) are hematologic malignancies arising from oncogene-transformed hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells known as leukemia stem cells (LSCs). LSCs are selectively resistant to various forms of therapy including irradiation or cytotoxic drugs. The introduction of tyrosine kinase inhibitors has dramatically improved disease outcome in patients with CML. For AML, however, prognosis is still quite dismal. Standard treatments have been established more than 20 years ago with only limited advances ever since. Durable remission is achieved in less than 30% of patients. Minimal residual disease (MRD), reflected by the persistence of LSCs below the detection limit by conventional methods, causes a high rate of disease relapses. Therefore, the ultimate goal in the treatment of myeloid leukemia must be the eradication of LSCs. Active immunotherapy, aiming at the generation of leukemia-specific cytotoxic T cells (CTLs), may represent a powerful approach to target LSCs in the MRD situation. To fully activate CTLs, leukemia antigens have to be successfully captured, processed, and presented by mature dendritic cells (DCs). Myeloid progenitors are a prominent source of DCs under homeostatic conditions, and it is now well established that LSCs and leukemic blasts can give rise to "malignant" DCs. These leukemia-derived DCs can express leukemia antigens and may either induce anti-leukemic T cell responses or favor tolerance to the leukemia, depending on co-stimulatory or -inhibitory molecules and cytokines. This review will concentrate on the role of DCs in myeloid leukemia immunotherapy with a special focus on their generation, application, and function and how they could be improved in order to generate highly effective and specific anti-leukemic CTL responses. In addition, we discuss how DC-based immunotherapy may be successfully integrated into current treatment strategies to promote remission and potentially cure myeloid leukemias.

  12. Dendritic cell-based immunotherapy for myeloid leukemias

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian Martijn Schürch

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Acute and chronic myeloid leukemia (AML, CML are hematologic malignancies arising from oncogene-transformed hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells known as leukemia stem cells (LSCs. LSCs are selectively resistant to various forms of therapy including irradiation or cytotoxic drugs. The introduction of tyrosine kinase inhibitors has dramatically improved disease outcome in patients with CML. For AML, however, prognosis is still quite dismal. Standard treatments have been established more than 20 years ago with only limited advances ever since. Durable remission is achieved in less than 30% of patients. Minimal residual disease (MRD, reflected by the persistence of LSCs below the detection limit by conventional methods, causes a high rate of disease relapses. Therefore, the ultimate goal in the treatment of myeloid leukemia must be the eradication of LSCs. Active immunotherapy, aiming at the generation of leukemia-specific cytotoxic T cells (CTLs, may represent a powerful approach to target LSCs in the MRD situation. To fully activate CTLs, leukemia antigens have to be successfully captured, processed and presented by mature dendritic cells (DCs. Myeloid progenitors are a prominent source of DCs under homeostatic conditions, and it is now well established that LSCs and leukemic blasts can give rise to malignant DCs. These leukemia-derived DCs can express leukemia antigens and may either induce anti-leukemic T cell responses or favor tolerance to the leukemia, depending on co-stimulatory or -inhibitory molecules and cytokines. This review will concentrate on the role of DCs in myeloid leukemia immunotherapy with a special focus on their generation, application and function and how they could be improved in order to generate highly effective and specific anti-leukemic CTL responses. In addition, we discuss how DC-based immunotherapy may be successfully integrated into current treatment strategies to promote remission and potentially cure myeloid

  13. Gingival plasma cell granuloma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Phadnaik Mangesh

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Plasma cell granuloma is a rare reactive lesion composed of polyclonal plasma cells. It manifests primarily in the lungs, but may occur in various other anatomic locations like the oral cavity. Intraoral plasma cell granulomas involving the tongue, lip, oral mucosa and gingiva have been reported in the past. This case presents a 54-year-old female with chronic periodontitis and mandibular anterior gingival overgrowth treated by Phase I therapy (scaling and root planing and excisional biopsy. Histological examination revealed inflammatory cell infiltrate containing sheets of plasma cells. Immunohistochemistry for kappa and lambda light chains showed a polyclonal staining pattern confirming a diagnosis of plasma cell granuloma. This case highlights the need to biopsy for unusual lesions to rule out potential neoplasms.

  14. Expression of Bovine Leukemia Virus Genome is Blocked by a Nonimmunoglobulin Protein in Plasma from Infected Cattle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, P.; Ferrer, J. F.

    1982-01-01

    Plasma of cattle infected with bovine leukemia virus contains a soluble factor that blocks the expression of the viral genome in cultured lymphocytes. The blocking factor is not present in plasma of bovine leukemia virus-free cattle or of cattle infected with common bovine viruses. Blocking of bovine leukemia virus expression by the plasma factor is reversible, and seems to be mediated by a nonimmunoglobulin protein molecule.

  15. "Angular" plasma cell cheilitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Cunha Filho, Roberto Rheingantz; Tochetto, Lucas Baldissera; Tochetto, Bruno Baldissera; de Almeida, Hiram Larangeira; Lorencette, Nádia Aparecida; Netto, José Fillus

    2014-03-17

    Plasma cell cheilitis is an extremely rare disease, characterized by erythematous-violaceous, ulcerated and asymptomatic plaques, which evolve slowly. The histological characteristics include dermal infiltrate composed of mature plasmocytes. We report a case of Plasma cell angular cheilitis in a 58-year-old male, localized in the lateral oral commissure.

  16. "Angular" plasma cell cheilitis

    OpenAIRE

    da Cunha Filho, Roberto Rheingantz; Tochetto, Lucas Baldissera; Tochetto, Bruno Baldissera; de Almeida Jr, Hiram Larangeira; Lorencette, Nadia Aparecida; Netto, Jose Fillus

    2014-01-01

    Plasma cell cheilitis is an extremely rare disease, characterized by erythematous-violaceous, ulcerated and asymptomatic plaques, which evolve slowly. The histological characteristics include dermal infiltrate composed of mature plasmocytes. We report a case of Plasma cell angular cheilitis in a 58-year-old male, localized in the lateral oral commissure.

  17. Leukemia stem cells in drug resistance and metastasis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DENG Chao-hua; ZHANG Qiu-ping

    2010-01-01

    Objective To review the central role of leukemia stem cells (LSCs) in drug resistance and metastasis, aiming to provide key insights into leukemogenic pathology and developing novel therapeutic strategies against the relapse of leukemia.Data sources The data used in this review were obtained mainly from the studies reported in PubMed using the key terms "tumor-initiating cells", "leukemia stem cells", "drug resistance" and "metastasis".Study selection Relevant articles on studies of leukemia stem cells were selected.Results Increasing numbers of studies have suggested the importance of cancer stem cells (CSCs) in the initiation and maintenance of cancer, especially in leukemia. This review has summarized the origin, characteristics, isolation and identification of LSCs. It highlights the crucial role of LSCs in drug resistance and metastasis of leukemia by illustrating possible mechanisms and aims to provide novel therapeutic strategies for LSCs-targeted treatment.Conclusion LSCs play a crucial role in drug resistance and metastasis of leukemia and new promising LSCs-targeted therapies warrant investigation in both experimental models and clinical practice.

  18. Therapeutic Effects of Myeloid Cell Leukemia-1 siRNA on Human Acute Myeloid Leukemia Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hadi Karami

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Up-regulation of Mcl-1, a known anti-apoptotic protein, is associated with the survival and progression of various malignancies including leukemia. The aim of this study was to explore the effect of Mcl-1 small interference RNA (siRNA on the proliferation and apoptosis of HL-60 acute myeloid leukemia (AML cells. Methods: siRNA transfection was performed using Lipofectamine™2000 reagent. Relative mRNA and protein expressions were quantified by quantitative real-time PCR and Western blotting, respectively. Trypan blue assay was performed to assess tumor cell proliferation after siRNA transfection. The cytotoxic effect of Mcl-1 siRNA on leukemic cells was measured using MTT assay. Apoptosis was detected using ELISA cell death assay. Results: Mcl-1 siRNA clearly lowered both Mcl-1 mRNA and protein levels in a time-dependent manner, leading to marked inhibition of cell survival and proliferation. Furthermore, Mcl-1 down-regulation significantly enhanced the extent of HL-60 apoptotic cells. Conclusion: Our results suggest that the down-regulation of Mcl-1 by siRNA can effectively trigger apoptosis and inhibit the proliferation of leukemic cells. Therefore, Mcl-1 siRNA may be a potent adjuvant in AML therapy.

  19. BRAF mutation in hairy cell leukemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmad Ahmadzadeh

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available BRAF is a serine/threonine kinase with a regulatory role in the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK signaling pathway. A mutation in the RAF gene, especially in BRAF protein, leads to an increased stimulation of this cascade, causing uncontrolled cell division and development of malignancy. Several mutations have been observed in the gene coding for this protein in a variety of human malignancies, including hairy cell leukemia (HCL. BRAF V600E is the most common mutation reported in exon15 of BRAF, which is observed in almost all cases of classic HCL, but it is negative in other B-cell malignancies, including the HCL variant. Therefore it can be used as a marker to differentiate between these B-cell disorders. We also discuss the interaction between miRNAs and signaling pathways, including MAPK, in HCL. When this mutation is present, the use of BRAF protein inhibitors may represent an effective treatment. In this review we have evaluated the role of the mutation of the BRAF gene in the pathogenesis and progression of HCL.

  20. In vitro radiosensitivity of human leukemia cell lines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weichselbaum, R.R.; Greenberger, J.S.; Schmidt, A.; Karpas, A.; Moloney, W.C.; Little, J.B.

    1981-05-01

    The in vitro radiobiologic survival values (n, D0) of four tumor lines derived from human hematopoietic tumors were studied. These cell lines were HL50 (n . 1.3, D0 . 117 rad(1.17 Gy)), promyelocytic leukemia; K562 (n . 1.4, D0 . 165 rad(1.65 Gy)), erythroleukemia; 45 (n . 1.1, D0 . 147 rad(1.47 Gy)), acute lymphocyte leukemia; and 176 (n . 4.0, D0 . 76 rad(0.76 Gy)), acute monomyelogenous leukemia. More cell lines must be examined before the exact relationship between in vitro radiosensitivity and clinical radiocurability is firmly established.

  1. Treating Multiply Relapsed or Refractory Hairy Cell Leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    In this trial, patients with hairy cell leukemia who have not responded or relapsed after initial chemotherapy will be randomly assigned to receive rituximab combined with either pentostatin or bendamustine.

  2. Small-molecule Hedgehog inhibitor attenuates the leukemia-initiation potential of acute myeloid leukemia cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukushima, Nobuaki; Minami, Yosuke; Kakiuchi, Seiji; Kuwatsuka, Yachiyo; Hayakawa, Fumihiko; Jamieson, Catoriona; Kiyoi, Hitoshi; Naoe, Tomoki

    2016-10-01

    Aberrant activation of the Hedgehog signaling pathway has been implicated in the maintenance of leukemia stem cell populations in several model systems. PF-04449913 (PF-913) is a selective, small-molecule inhibitor of Smoothened, a membrane protein that regulates the Hedgehog pathway. However, details of the proof-of-concept and mechanism of action of PF-913 following administration to patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) are unclear. This study examined the role of the Hedgehog signaling pathway in AML cells, and evaluated the in vitro and in vivo effects of the Smoothened inhibitor PF-913. In primary AML cells, activation of the Hedgehog signaling pathway was more pronounced in CD34(+) cells than CD34(-) cells. In vitro treatment with PF-913 induced a decrease in the quiescent cell population accompanied by minimal cell death. In vivo treatment with PF-913 attenuated the leukemia-initiation potential of AML cells in a serial transplantation mouse model, while limiting reduction of tumor burden in a primary xenotransplant system. Comprehensive gene set enrichment analysis revealed that PF-913 modulated self-renewal signatures and cell cycle progression. Furthermore, PF-913 sensitized AML cells to cytosine arabinoside, and abrogated resistance to cytosine arabinoside in AML cells cocultured with HS-5 stromal cells. These findings imply that pharmacologic inhibition of Hedgehog signaling attenuates the leukemia-initiation potential, and also enhanced AML therapy by sensitizing dormant leukemia stem cells to chemotherapy and overcoming resistance in the bone marrow microenvironment. © 2016 The Authors. Cancer Science published by John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd on behalf of Japanese Cancer Association.

  3. Gingival plasma cell granuloma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amitkumar B Pandav

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Plasma cell granuloma, also known as inflammatory pseudotumor is a tumor-like lesion that manifests primarily in the lungs. But it may occur in various other anatomic locations like orbit, head and neck, liver and rarely in the oral cavity. We here report an exceedingly rare case of gingival plasma cell granuloma in a 58 year old woman who presented with upper gingival polypoidal growth. The histopathological examination revealed a mass composed of proliferation of benign spindle mesenchymal cells in a loose myxoid and fibrocollagenous stroma along with dense infiltrate of chronic inflammatory cells predominantly containing plasma cells. Immunohistochemistry for kappa and lambda light chains showed a polyclonal staining pattern confirming a diagnosis of plasma cell granuloma.

  4. Plasma Cell Cheilitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thami Gurvinder P

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available A case of plasma cell cheilitis with good response to glucocorticoids, is described for its rarity and probable aetiological correlation with habit of use of nasal snuff is discussed.

  5. PIG7 promotes leukemia cell chemosensitivity via lysosomal membrane permeabilization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jiazhuo; Peng, Leiwen; Niu, Ting; Wu, Yu; Li, Jianjun; Wang, Fangfang; Zheng, Yuhuan; Liu, Ting

    2016-01-26

    PIG7 localizes to lysosomal membrane in leukemia cells. Our previous work has shown that transduction of pig7 into a series of leukemia cell lines did not result in either apoptosis or differentiation of most tested cell lines. Interestingly, it did significantly sensitize these cell lines to chemotherapeutic drugs. Here, we further investigated the mechanism underlying pig7-induced improved sensitivity of acute leukemia cells to chemotherapy. Our results demonstrated that the sensitization effect driven by exogenous pig7 was more effective in drug-resistant leukemia cell lines which had lower endogenous pig7 expression. Overexpression of pig7 did not directly activate the caspase apoptotic pathway, but decreased the lysosomal stability. The expression of pig7 resulted in lysosomal membrane permeabilization (LMP) and lysosomal protease (e.g. cathepsin B, D, L) release. Moreover, we also observed increased reactive oxygen species (ROS) and decreased mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨm) induced by pig7. Some autophagy markers such as LC3I/II, ATG5 and Beclin-1, and necroptosis maker MLKL were also stimulated. However, intrinsic antagonism such as serine/cysteine protease inhibitors Spi2A and Cystatin C prevented downstream effectors from triggering leukemia cells, which were only on the "verge of apoptosis". When combined with chemotherapy, LMP increased and more proteases were released. Once this process was beyond the limit of intrinsic antagonism, it induced programmed cell death cooperatively via caspase-independent and caspase-dependent pathways.

  6. Activated allogeneic NK cells preferentially kill poor prognosis B-cell chronic lymphocytic leukemia cells

    OpenAIRE

    2016-01-01

    Mutational status of TP53 together with expression of wild type (wt) IGHV represents the most widely accepted biomarkers, establishing a very poor prognosis in B-cell chronic lymphocytic leukemia (B-CLL) patients. Adoptive cell therapy using allogeneic HLA mismatched Natural Killer (NK) cells has emerged as an effective and safe alternative in the treatment of acute myeloid and lymphoid leukemias that do not respond to traditional therapies. We have described that allogeneic activated NK cell...

  7. T-cell prolymphocytic leukemia and tuberculosis: a puzzling association.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cervera, Pascale; Gilhot, Amélie; Marzac, Christophe; Féger, Frédéric; Tang, Ruoping; Jaff, Nabaz; Coppo, Paul

    2017-09-01

    T-cell prolymphocytic leukemia can result in severe immune T-cell deficiency. Clinicians should be aware of this complication in this rare lymphoid malignancy, and opportunistic infections should be ruled out before the use of usual immunosuppressive procedures such as alemtuzumab and hematopoietic stem cell transplantation.

  8. Sirolimus, Cyclosporine, and Mycophenolate Mofetil in Preventing Graft-versus-Host Disease in Treating Patients With Hematologic Malignancies Undergoing Donor Peripheral Blood Stem Cell Transplant

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-09-06

    Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Adult Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma; Adult Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Adult Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Aggressive Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Childhood Diffuse Large B -Cell Lymphoma; Childhood Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Childhood Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia in Remission; Chronic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia, BCR-ABL1 Positive; Hematopoietic and Lymphoid Cell Neoplasm; Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Plasma Cell Myeloma; Prolymphocytic Leukemia; Recurrent Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Recurrent Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Hodgkin Lymphoma; Refractory Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; T-Cell Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; T-Cell Prolymphocytic Leukemia; Waldenstrom Macroglobulinemia

  9. ETV6 mutations in early immature human T cell leukemias

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Vlierberghe, Pieter; Ambesi-Impiombato, Alberto; Perez-Garcia, Arianne; Haydu, J. Erika; Rigo, Isaura; Hadler, Michael; Tosello, Valeria; Della Gatta, Giusy; Paietta, Elisabeth; Racevskis, Janis; Wiernik, Peter H.; Luger, Selina M.; Rowe, Jacob M.; Rue, Montserrat

    2011-01-01

    Early immature T cell acute lymphoblastic leukemias (T-ALLs) account for ∼5–10% of pediatric T-ALLs and are associated with poor prognosis. However, the genetic defects that drive the biology of these tumors remain largely unknown. In this study, analysis of microarray gene expression signatures in adult T-ALL demonstrated a high prevalence of early immature leukemias and revealed a close relationship between these tumors and myeloid leukemias. Many adult immature T-ALLs harbored mutations in myeloid-specific oncogenes and tumor suppressors including IDH1, IDH2, DNMT3A, FLT3, and NRAS. Moreover, we identified ETV6 mutations as a novel genetic lesion uniquely present in immature adult T-ALL. Our results demonstrate that early immature adult T-ALL represents a heterogeneous category of leukemias characterized by the presence of overlapping myeloid and T-ALL characteristics, and highlight the potential role of ETV6 mutations in these tumors. PMID:22162831

  10. Laboratory Treated T Cells in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia, Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma, or Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-07-06

    CD19-Positive Neoplastic Cells Present; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Recurrent Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Refractory Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Refractory Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma; Refractory Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Refractory Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Refractory Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma

  11. Plasma Cell Disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castillo, Jorge J

    2016-12-01

    Plasma cell disorders are benign, premalignant, and malignant conditions characterized by the presence of a monoclonal paraprotein detected in serum or urine. These conditions are biologically, pathologically, and clinically heterogeneous. There have been major advances in the understanding of the biology of these diseases, which are promoting the development of therapies with novel mechanisms of action. Novel agents such as proteasome inhibitors, immunomodulatory drugs, and monoclonal antibodies have gained approval in the United States and Europe for the treatment of plasma cell disorders. Such therapies are translating into higher rates of response and survival and better toxicity profiles. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Targeting leukemia stem cells: which pathways drive self-renewal activity in T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia?

    OpenAIRE

    Belmonte, M; Hoofd, C.; Weng, A. P.; V. Giambra

    2016-01-01

    T-Cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (t-all) is a malignancy of white blood cells, characterized by an uncontrolled accumulation of T-cell progenitors. During leukemic progression, immature T cells grow abnormally and crowd into the bone marrow, preventing it from making normal blood cells and spilling out into the bloodstream. Recent studies suggest that only discrete cell populations that possess the ability to recreate the entire tumour might be responsible for the initiation and propagatio...

  13. Laparoscopic Splenectomy for Hairy Cell Leukemia in Pregnancy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beni Adegoke Adeniji

    2010-01-01

    Conclusion. Hairy cell leukemia is a clonal B-Cell malignancy, for which there is very limited experience worldwide for its management when it occurs during pregnancy. Laparoscopic splenectomy should be considered as a therapeutic option, even with a significantly enlarged spleen, in order to avoid the risks of fetal exposure to chemotherapeutic agents. Unique considerations relating to pregnancy are highlighted.

  14. Alantolactone selectively ablates acute myeloid leukemia stem and progenitor cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yahui Ding

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The poor outcomes for patients diagnosed with acute myeloid leukemia (AML are largely attributed to leukemia stem cells (LSCs which are difficult to eliminate with conventional therapy and responsible for relapse. Thus, new therapeutic strategies which could selectively target LSCs in clinical leukemia treatment and avoid drug resistance are urgently needed. However, only a few small molecules have been reported to show anti-LSCs activity. Methods The aim of the present study was to identify alantolactone as novel agent that can ablate acute myeloid leukemia stem and progenitor cells from AML patient specimens and evaluate the anticancer activity of alantolactone in vitro and in vivo. Results The present study is the first to demonstrate that alantolactone, a prominent eudesmane-type sesquiterpene lactone, could specifically ablate LSCs from AML patient specimens. Furthermore, in comparison to the conventional chemotherapy drug, cytosine arabinoside (Ara-C, alantolactone showed superior effects of leukemia cytotoxicity while sparing normal hematopoietic cells. Alantolactone induced apoptosis with a dose-dependent manner by suppression of NF-kB and its downstream target proteins. DMA-alantolactone, a water-soluble prodrug of alantolactone, could suppress tumor growth in vivo. Conclusions Based on these results, we propose that alantolactone may represent a novel LSCs-targeted therapy and eudesmane-type sesquiterpene lactones offer a new scaffold for drug discovery towards anti-LSCs agents.

  15. Fludarabine Phosphate, Radiation Therapy, and Rituximab in Treating Patients Who Are Undergoing Donor Stem Cell Transplant Followed by Rituximab for High-Risk Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia or Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-03-27

    Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Prolymphocytic Leukemia; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Refractory Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Stage III Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Stage III Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Stage IV Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Stage IV Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; T-Cell Large Granular Lymphocyte Leukemia

  16. Graft-Versus-Host Disease Prophylaxis in Treating Patients With Hematologic Malignancies Undergoing Unrelated Donor Peripheral Blood Stem Cell Transplant

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-08-18

    Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Aggressive Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma; Hematopoietic and Lymphoid Cell Neoplasm; Indolent Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Myeloproliferative Neoplasm; Prolymphocytic Leukemia; Recurrent Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Recurrent Plasma Cell Myeloma; Refractory Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Refractory Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia, BCR-ABL1 Positive; Refractory Hodgkin Lymphoma; Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; T-Cell Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Waldenstrom Macroglobulinemia

  17. Identification and targeting leukemia stem cells: The path to the cure for acute myeloid leukemia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jianbiao; Zhou; Wee-Joo; Chng

    2014-01-01

    Accumulating evidence support the notion that acute myeloid leukemia(AML) is organized in a hierarchical system, originating from a special proportion of leukemia stem cells(LSC). Similar to their normal counterpart, hematopoietic stem cells(HSC), LSC possess selfrenewal capacity and are responsible for the continued growth and proliferation of the bulk of leukemia cells in the blood and bone marrow. It is believed that LSC are also the root cause for the treatment failure and relapse of AML because LSC are often resistant to chemotherapy. In the past decade, we have made significant advancement in identification and understanding the molecular biology of LSC, but it remains a daunting task to specifically targeting LSC, while sparing normalHSC. In this review, we will first provide a historical overview of the discovery of LSC, followed by a summary of identification and separation of LSC by either cell surface markers or functional assays. Next, the review will focus on the current, various strategies for eradicating LSC. Finally, we will highlight future directions and challenges ahead of our ultimate goal for the cure of AML by targeting LSC.

  18. Inducible T-cell receptor expression in precursor T-cells for leukemia control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoseini, Shahabuddin S; Hapke, Martin; Herbst, Jessica; Wedekind, Dirk; Baumann, Rolf; Heinz, Niels; Schiedlmeier, Bernhard; Vignali, Dario AA; van den Brink, Marcel R.M.; Schambach, Axel; Blazar, Bruce R.; Sauer, Martin G.

    2015-01-01

    Co-transplantation of hematopoietic stem cells with those engineered to express leukemia-reactive T cell receptors (TCRs) and differentiated ex vivo into precursor T cells (preTs) may reduce the risk of leukemia relapse. Since expression of potentially self-(leukemia-) reactive TCRs will lead to negative selection or provoke autoimmunity upon thymic maturation, we investigated a novel concept whereby TCR expression set under the control of an inducible promoter would allow timely controlled TCR expression. After in vivo maturation and gene induction, preTs developed potent anti-leukemia effects. Engineered preTs provided protection even after repeated leukemia challenges by giving rise to effector and central memory cells. Importantly, adoptive transfer of TCR-transduced allogeneic preTs mediated anti-leukemia effect without evoking graft-versus-host disease (GVHD). Earlier transgene induction forced CD8+ T cell development, was required to obtain a mature T cell subset of targeted specificity, allowed engineered T cells to efficiently pass positive selection and abrogated the endogenous T cell repertoire. Later induction favored CD4 differentiation and failed to produce a leukemia-reactive population emphasizing the dominant role of positive selection. Taken together, we provide new functional insights for the employment of TCR-engineered precursor cells as a controllable immunotherapeutic modality with significant anti-leukemia activity. PMID:25652739

  19. Plasma Exosomes as Markers of Therapeutic Response in Patients with Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chang-Sook eHong

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Exosomes isolated from the plasma of newly-diagnosed acute myeloid leukemia (AML patients have elevated protein and TGF-β1 contents and inhibit natural killer (NK cell cytotoxicity. A potential role of exosomes in predicting responses to chemotherapy (CT was evaluated in AML patients undergoing treatment. Experimental Design: Plasma was obtained from AML patients at diagnosis (n=16; post induction CT (n=9; during consolidation CT (n=10; in long-term remission (LTCR, n=5; and from healthy volunteers (n=7. Exosomes were isolated by exclusion chromatography and ultracentrifugation. The exosomal protein, soluble TGFβ-1 levels (ELISA and the TGF-β1 profiles (western blots were compared among patients’ cohorts. The results were correlated with the patients’ cytogenetic profile, percentage of leukemic blast and outcome. Results: At diagnosis, protein and TGF-β1 levels were higher (pConclusions: Changes in exosomal protein and/or TGF-β1 content may reflect responses to CT. The exosomal TGF-β1 profile suggests the presence of residual disease in patients considered to have achieved complete remission.

  20. Pentamidine sensitizes chronic myelogenous leukemia K562 cells to TRAIL-induced apoptosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Geng; Jiang, Jikai; Liu, Xiao-shan

    2012-11-01

    Pentamidine (PMD) is an anti-protozoa drug with potential anticancer activity. Here we show that PMD at clinically achievable plasma drug concentrations slightly inhibited the growth of human leukemia cell lines. PMD close to its therapeutic doses sensitized TRAIL-resistant K562 cells to the cytokine and potentiated TRAIL-induced apoptosis through activation of caspase-8 and -3. When we investigated the underlying mechanism, we observed that treatment with PMD increased DR5 expression at both mRNA and protein levels and down-regulated anti-apoptotic XIAP and Mcl-1 protein levels. This study provides a rationale for a more in-depth exploration into the combined treatment with PMD and TRAIL as a valuable strategy for leukemia therapy.

  1. B cell acute lymphocytic leukemia in pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bottsford-Miller, Justin; Haeri, Sina; Baker, Arthur M; Boles, Jeremiah; Brown, Mark

    2011-08-01

    Acute lymphocytic leukemia (ALL) is a rare occurrence in pregnancy and can be rapidly fatal if left untreated. The need for immediate treatment of ALL, coupled with the maternal-fetal risks from the chemotherapy regimen render a therapeutic dilemma in pregnant women with ALL. We report a case of ALL diagnosed in the 24th week of pregnancy to outline our management strategy, to demonstrate the feasibility of treatment with multi-agent chemotherapy, and to provide a review of the literature.

  2. Lysosomal disruption preferentially targets acute myeloid leukemia cells and progenitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sukhai, Mahadeo A.; Prabha, Swayam; Hurren, Rose; Rutledge, Angela C.; Lee, Anna Y.; Sriskanthadevan, Shrivani; Sun, Hong; Wang, Xiaoming; Skrtic, Marko; Seneviratne, Ayesh; Cusimano, Maria; Jhas, Bozhena; Gronda, Marcela; MacLean, Neil; Cho, Eunice E.; Spagnuolo, Paul A.; Sharmeen, Sumaiya; Gebbia, Marinella; Urbanus, Malene; Eppert, Kolja; Dissanayake, Dilan; Jonet, Alexia; Dassonville-Klimpt, Alexandra; Li, Xiaoming; Datti, Alessandro; Ohashi, Pamela S.; Wrana, Jeff; Rogers, Ian; Sonnet, Pascal; Ellis, William Y.; Corey, Seth J.; Eaves, Connie; Minden, Mark D.; Wang, Jean C.Y.; Dick, John E.; Nislow, Corey; Giaever, Guri; Schimmer, Aaron D.

    2012-01-01

    Despite efforts to understand and treat acute myeloid leukemia (AML), there remains a need for more comprehensive therapies to prevent AML-associated relapses. To identify new therapeutic strategies for AML, we screened a library of on- and off-patent drugs and identified the antimalarial agent mefloquine as a compound that selectively kills AML cells and AML stem cells in a panel of leukemia cell lines and in mice. Using a yeast genome-wide functional screen for mefloquine sensitizers, we identified genes associated with the yeast vacuole, the homolog of the mammalian lysosome. Consistent with this, we determined that mefloquine disrupts lysosomes, directly permeabilizes the lysosome membrane, and releases cathepsins into the cytosol. Knockdown of the lysosomal membrane proteins LAMP1 and LAMP2 resulted in decreased cell viability, as did treatment of AML cells with known lysosome disrupters. Highlighting a potential therapeutic rationale for this strategy, leukemic cells had significantly larger lysosomes compared with normal cells, and leukemia-initiating cells overexpressed lysosomal biogenesis genes. These results demonstrate that lysosomal disruption preferentially targets AML cells and AML progenitor cells, providing a rationale for testing lysosomal disruption as a novel therapeutic strategy for AML. PMID:23202731

  3. Rewired Metabolism in Drug-resistant Leukemia Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stäubert, Claudia; Bhuiyan, Hasanuzzaman; Lindahl, Anna; Broom, Oliver Jay; Zhu, Yafeng; Islam, Saiful; Linnarsson, Sten; Lehtiö, Janne; Nordström, Anders

    2015-01-01

    Cancer cells that escape induction therapy are a major cause of relapse. Understanding metabolic alterations associated with drug resistance opens up unexplored opportunities for the development of new therapeutic strategies. Here, we applied a broad spectrum of technologies including RNA sequencing, global untargeted metabolomics, and stable isotope labeling mass spectrometry to identify metabolic changes in P-glycoprotein overexpressing T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) cells, which escaped a therapeutically relevant daunorubicin treatment. We show that compared with sensitive ALL cells, resistant leukemia cells possess a fundamentally rewired central metabolism characterized by reduced dependence on glutamine despite a lack of expression of glutamate-ammonia ligase (GLUL), a higher demand for glucose and an altered rate of fatty acid β-oxidation, accompanied by a decreased pantothenic acid uptake capacity. We experimentally validate our findings by selectively targeting components of this metabolic switch, using approved drugs and starvation approaches followed by cell viability analyses in both the ALL cells and in an acute myeloid leukemia (AML) sensitive/resistant cell line pair. We demonstrate how comparative metabolomics and RNA expression profiling of drug-sensitive and -resistant cells expose targetable metabolic changes and potential resistance markers. Our results show that drug resistance is associated with significant metabolic costs in cancer cells, which could be exploited using new therapeutic strategies. PMID:25697355

  4. NALP3 inflammasome upregulation and CASP1 cleavage of the glucocorticoid receptor cause glucocorticoid resistance in leukemia cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S.W. Paugh (Steven); E.J. Bonten (Erik J.); D. Savic (Daniel); L.B. Ramsey (Laura B.); W.E. Thierfelder (William E.); P. Gurung (Prajwal); R.K.S. Malireddi (R. K. Subbarao); M. Actis (Marcelo); A. Mayasundari (Anand); J. Min (Jaeki); D.R. Coss (David R.); L.T. Laudermilk (Lucas T.); J.C. Panetta (John); J.R. McCorkle (J. Robert); Y. Fan (Yiping); K.R. Crews (Kristine R.); G. Stocco (Gabriele); M.R. Wilkinson (Mark R.); A.M. Ferreira (Antonio M.); C. Cheng (Cheng); W. Yang (Wenjian); S.E. Karol (Seth E.); C.A. Fernandez (Christian A.); B. Diouf (Barthelemy); C. Smith (Colton); J.K. Hicks (J Kevin); A. Zanut (Alessandra); A. Giordanengo (Audrey); D.J. Crona; J.J. Bianchi (Joy J.); L. Holmfeldt (Linda); C.G. Mullighan (Charles); M.L. den Boer (Monique); R. Pieters (Rob); S. Jeha (Sima); T.L. Dunwell (Thomas L.); F. Latif (Farida); D. Bhojwani (Deepa); W.L. Carroll (William L.); C.-H. Pui (Ching-Hon); R.M. Myers (Richard M.); R.K. Guy (R Kiplin); T.-D. Kanneganti (Thirumala-Devi); M.V. Relling (Mary); W.E. Evans (William)

    2015-01-01

    textabstractGlucocorticoids are universally used in the treatment of acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL), and resistance to glucocorticoids in leukemia cells confers poor prognosis. To elucidate mechanisms of glucocorticoid resistance, we determined the prednisolone sensitivity of primary leukemia ce

  5. Adult T-Cell Leukemia-Lymphoma during Pregnancy

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    Adult T-cell leukemia-lymphoma (ATL) is an uncommon highly aggressive T-cell lymphoma associated with human T-cell lymphotropic virus type 1 (HTLV-1) infection. It is rarely encountered during pregnancy and is particularly challenging to treat due to its aggressive nature and because of the lack of robust data on optimal chemotherapy. We report a case of a Jamaican immigrant diagnosed with ATL during pregnancy.

  6. Adult T-Cell Leukemia-Lymphoma during Pregnancy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Miguel Amor

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Adult T-cell leukemia-lymphoma (ATL is an uncommon highly aggressive T-cell lymphoma associated with human T-cell lymphotropic virus type 1 (HTLV-1 infection. It is rarely encountered during pregnancy and is particularly challenging to treat due to its aggressive nature and because of the lack of robust data on optimal chemotherapy. We report a case of a Jamaican immigrant diagnosed with ATL during pregnancy.

  7. Characterization of Drug Effect on Leukemia Cells Through Single Cell Assay With Optical Tweezers and Dielectrophoresis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Jundi; Luo, Tao; Ng, Ka Lam; Leung, Anskar Y H; Liang, Raymond; Sun, Dong

    2016-12-01

    One of the greatest challenges in acute myeloid leukemia (AML) treatment is preventing relapse. Leukemia cells can hide in bone marrow niche or vascular niche. Hence, many chemical drugs cannot kill these cells. To characterize migration and adhesion properties of leukemia cells in specific niches, CXCR4/SDF- 1α signal pathway has been widely used for investigation. AMD3100 is treated as one of the most common chemical drugs that can inhibit this signal. In the current study, we particularly investigate the effect of AMD3100 on the adhesion property of leukemia cells on stromal cells by using engineering tools, namely, optical tweezers (OT) and dielectrophoresis (DEP), to probe single cell property. AMD3100 not only inhibits the CXCR4/SDF- 1α signal pathway but also reduces gene expression of CXCR4 and VLA-4 on leukemia cells. The drug also softens leukemia cells. This work provides a new way to investigate cell behavior under drug treatment. The use of combined engineering tools will benefit drug discovery and assessment for leukemia treatment.

  8. Aberrant Signaling Pathways in T-Cell Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bongiovanni, Deborah; Saccomani, Valentina

    2017-01-01

    T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL) is an aggressive disease caused by the malignant transformation of immature progenitors primed towards T-cell development. Clinically, T-ALL patients present with diffuse infiltration of the bone marrow by immature T-cell blasts high blood cell counts, mediastinal involvement, and diffusion to the central nervous system. In the past decade, the genomic landscape of T-ALL has been the target of intense research. The identification of specific genomic alterations has contributed to identify strong oncogenic drivers and signaling pathways regulating leukemia growth. Notwithstanding, T-ALL patients are still treated with high-dose multiagent chemotherapy, potentially exposing these patients to considerable acute and long-term side effects. This review summarizes recent advances in our understanding of the signaling pathways relevant for the pathogenesis of T-ALL and the opportunities offered for targeted therapy. PMID:28872614

  9. HIGH EFFICIENCY RETROVIRUS-MEDIATED GENE TRANSFER TO LEUKEMIA CELLS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    FU Jian-xin; CHEN Zi-xing; CEN Jian-nong; WANG Wei; RUAN Chang-geng

    1999-01-01

    Objective: To establish an efficient and safe gene transfer system mediated by retrovirus for gene marking and gene therapy of human leukemia. Method: The retroviral vector LXSN, containing the neomycin resistance (NeoR) gene, was transferred into amphotropic packaging cells GP+envAm12 by liposome transfection or by ecotropic retrovirus transduction. Amphotropic retrovirus in supernatants with higher titer was used to infect human leukemic cell lines NB4, U937, and THP-1.The efficiency of gene transfer was assayed on colonies formed by transduced K562 cells. Results: The titer of DOSPER directly transfected GP+envAm12 cells determined on NIH3T3 cells was 8.0×105 CFU/ml, while that of producer infected with retrovirus was 1.6×107CFU/ml. Integration of NeoR gene into all leukemia cells was confirmed by polymerase chain reaction (PCR).Absence of replication-competent virus was proved by both nested PCR for env gene and marker gene rescue assay. Gene transfer with the efficiency as high as 93.3 to 100% in K562 cells was verified by seminested PCR for integrated NeoR gene on colonies after 7 days' culture.Conclusion: The efficiency and safety of retrovirus mediated gene transfer system might provide an optimal system in gene therapy for leukemia or genetic diseases.

  10. Cannabinoids induce incomplete maturation of cultured human leukemia cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murison, G.; Chubb, C.B.H.; Maeda, S.; Gemmell, M.A.; Huberman, E.

    1987-08-01

    Monocyte maturation markers were induced in cultured human myeloblastic ML-2 leukemia cells after treatment for 1-6 days with 0.03-30 ..mu..M ..delta../sup 9/-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), the major psychoactive component of marijuana. After a 2-day or longer treatment, 2- to 5-fold increases were found in the percentages of cells exhibiting reactivity with either the murine OKM1 monoclonal antibody of the Leu-M5 monoclonal antibody, staining positively for nonspecific esterase activity, and displaying a promonocyte morphology. The increases in these differentiation markers after treatment with 0.03-1 ..mu..M THC were dose dependent. At this dose range, THC did not cause an inhibition of cell growth. The THC-induced cell maturation was also characterized by specific changes in the patterns of newly synthesized proteins. The THC-induced differentiation did not, however, result in cells with a highly developed mature monocyte phenotype. However, treatment of these incompletely matured cells with either phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate of 1..cap alpha..,25-dihydroxycholecalciferol, which are inducers of differentiation in myeloid leukemia cells (including ML-2 cells), produced cells with a mature monocyte morphology. The ML-2 cell system described here may be a useful tool for deciphering critical biochemical events that lead to the cannabinoid-induced incomplete cell differentiation of ML-2 cells and other related cell types. Findings obtained from this system may have important implications for studies of cannabinoid effects on normal human bone-marrow progenitor cells.

  11. What Is Chronic Myeloid Leukemia?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Chronic Myeloid Leukemia (CML) About Chronic Myeloid Leukemia What Is Chronic Myeloid Leukemia? Cancer starts when cells ... their treatment is the same as for adults. What is leukemia? Leukemia is a cancer that starts ...

  12. What Is Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia (CLL) About Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia What Is Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia? Cancer starts when cells ... body, including the lymph nodes, liver, and spleen. What is leukemia? Leukemia is a cancer that starts ...

  13. Plasma cell granuloma of lip

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B Sabarinath

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Plasma cells are medium-sized round-to-oval cells with eccentrically placed nuclei, usually found in the red pulp of the spleen, tonsils, medulla of the lymph nodes, nasal mucosa, upper airway, lamina propria of the gastrointestinal tract, and sites of inflammation. Plasma cell granuloma is a rare reactive tumor-like proliferation composed chiefly of plasmacytic infiltrate. Here, we present a case of plasma cell granuloma of lip in a female patient.

  14. Kv3.4 potassium channel-mediated electrosignaling controls cell cycle and survival of irradiated leukemia cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palme, Daniela; Misovic, Milan; Schmid, Evi; Klumpp, Dominik; Salih, Helmut R; Rudner, Justine; Huber, Stephan M

    2013-08-01

    Aberrant ion channel expression in the plasma membrane is characteristic for many tumor entities and has been attributed to neoplastic transformation, tumor progression, metastasis, and therapy resistance. The present study aimed to define the function of these "oncogenic" channels for radioresistance of leukemia cells. Chronic myeloid leukemia cells were irradiated (0-6 Gy X ray), ion channel expression and activity, Ca(2+)- and protein signaling, cell cycle progression, and cell survival were assessed by quantitative reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction, patch-clamp recording, fura-2 Ca(2+)-imaging, immunoblotting, flow cytometry, and clonogenic survival assays, respectively. Ionizing radiation-induced G2/M arrest was preceded by activation of Kv3.4-like voltage-gated potassium channels. Channel activation in turn resulted in enhanced Ca(2+) entry and subsequent activation of Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent kinase-II, and inactivation of the phosphatase cdc25B and the cyclin-dependent kinase cdc2. Accordingly, channel inhibition by tetraethylammonium and blood-depressing substance-1 and substance-2 or downregulation by RNA interference led to release from radiation-induced G2/M arrest, increased apoptosis, and decreased clonogenic survival. Together, these findings indicate the functional significance of voltage-gated K(+) channels for the radioresistance of myeloid leukemia cells.

  15. ANKHD1 silencing inhibits Stathmin 1 activity, cell proliferation and migration of leukemia cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machado-Neto, João Agostinho; Lazarini, Mariana; Favaro, Patricia; de Melo Campos, Paula; Scopim-Ribeiro, Renata; Franchi Junior, Gilberto Carlos; Nowill, Alexandre Eduardo; Lima, Paulo Roberto Moura; Costa, Fernando Ferreira; Benichou, Serge; Olalla Saad, Sara Teresinha; Traina, Fabiola

    2015-03-01

    ANKHD1 is highly expressed in human acute leukemia cells and potentially regulates multiple cellular functions through its ankyrin-repeat domains. In order to identify interaction partners of the ANKHD1 protein and its role in leukemia cells, we performed a yeast two-hybrid system screen and identified SIVA, a cellular protein known to be involved in proapoptotic signaling pathways. The interaction between ANKHD1 and SIVA was confirmed by co-imunoprecipitation assays. Using human leukemia cell models and lentivirus-mediated shRNA approaches, we showed that ANKHD1 and SIVA proteins have opposing effects. While it is known that SIVA silencing promotes Stathmin 1 activation, increased cell migration and xenograft tumor growth, we showed that ANKHD1 silencing leads to Stathmin 1 inactivation, reduced cell migration and xenograft tumor growth, likely through the inhibition of SIVA/Stathmin 1 association. In addition, we observed that ANKHD1 knockdown decreases cell proliferation, without modulating apoptosis of leukemia cells, while SIVA has a proapoptotic function in U937 cells, but does not modulate proliferation in vitro. Results indicate that ANKHD1 binds to SIVA and has an important role in inducing leukemia cell proliferation and migration via the Stathmin 1 pathway. ANKHD1 may be an oncogene and participate in the leukemia cell phenotype.

  16. Optimizing Management of Patients with Adult T Cell Leukemia-Lymphoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean A. Yared

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Adult T cell leukemia-lymphoma is a rare disease with a high mortality rate, and is challenging for the clinician. Early allogeneic stem cell transplant can confer durable remission. As novel therapeutic agents become available to treat T cell malignancies, it is increasingly important that medical oncologists, hematologists, and hematopathologists recognize and accurately diagnose adult T cell leukemia-lymphoma. There is no uniform standard of treatment of adult T cell leukemia-lymphoma, and clinical trials remain critical to improving outcomes. Here we present one management approach based on the recent advances in treatment for adult T cell leukemia-lymphoma patients.

  17. Autophagy is associated with cucurbitacin D-induced apoptosis in human T cell leukemia cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakanishi, Tsukasa; Song, Yuan; He, Cuiying; Wang, Duo; Morita, Kentaro; Tsukada, Junichi; Kanazawa, Tamotsu; Yoshida, Yasuhiro

    2016-04-01

    We previously reported that the inflammasome inhibitor cucurbitacin D (CuD) induces apoptosis in human leukemia cell lines. In the present study, we investigated the effects of co-treatment with an additional Bcl-xL inhibitor, Z36. Treatment with Z36 induced cell death in leukemia cell lines, with MT-4 cells exhibiting the lowest sensitivity to Z36. Co-treatment of cells with Z36 and CuD resulted in a greater degree of cell death for Hut78 and Jurkat cells than treatment with CuD alone. In contrast, co-treatment of MT-4 cells with Z36 and CuD had a suppressive effect on cell death. The autophagy inhibitor 3-methyladenine (3-MA) suppressed the growth of leukemia cell lines HuT78, Jurkat, MT-1, and MT-4. CuD-induced cell death was enhanced by 3-MA in Jurkat cells, but inhibited in MT-4 cells. Western blotting results revealed cleavage of poly(ADP ribose) polymerase (PARP), supporting CuD-induced cell death; 3-MA enhanced CuD-Z36-induced PARP cleavage. Taken together, our results indicate that autophagy negatively regulates chemical-induced cell death of leukemia cells, and that controlling autophagy could be beneficial in the development of more effective chemotherapies against leukemia.

  18. [Donor cell leukemia (DCL): A prospective study of its identification and treatment].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz-Delgado, Guillermo J; Hernández-Reyes, Jesús; González-Ramírez, Mónica Patricia; Martagón-Herrera, Nora Ángela; Garcés-Eisele, Javier; Ruiz-Argüelles, Alejandro; González-Cortés, Angélica; Ruiz-Argüelles, Guillermo J

    2015-01-01

    Donor-derived malignancies after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation and after solid organ transplantation are considered as rare diseases. We have prospectively searched for donor cell leukemia in a 12-year period, in a single institution, in a group of 106 consecutive patients allografted because of leukemia. We have identified seven cases of donor cell leukemia; six were allografted because of relapsed acute lymphoblastic leukemia and one because of paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria/aplastic anemia. These figures suggest that the real incidence of donor cell leukemia has been underestimated. The six patients with lymphoblastic donor cell leukemia were treated prospectively with a pediatric-inspired combined chemotherapy schedule designed for de novo acute leukemia. A complete response was obtained in three out of six patients with lymphoblastic donor cell leukemia. It is possible to obtain favorable responses in donor cell leukemia patients employing combined chemotherapy. The long-term donor cell leukemia survivors remain as full chimeras and have not needed a second transplant.

  19. Laparoscopic Splenectomy for Hairy Cell Leukemia in Pregnancy

    OpenAIRE

    2010-01-01

    Objective. We present a successful case of laparoscopic splenectomy for a massively enlarged spleen at 25 weeks of gestation for hairy cell leukemia in pregnancy in a woman with initial hemoglobin of 4.3 gm/dl and platelet count of 18,000/mm3. Study Design. Case report. Results. This report provides an approach to management that may be applicable in those cases where thrombocytopenia or other clinical imperatives preclude delaying treatment till after pregnancy. Conclusion. Hairy ce...

  20. B-cell Prolymphocytic Leukemia in a Young Male

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kirana Pailoor

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available B-cell prolymphocytic leukemia [B-PLL] is a neoplasm of B prolymphocytes affecting the peripheral blood, bone marrow and spleen. The principal disease characteristics are massive splenomegaly with absent or minimal peripheral lymphadenopathy and a rapidly rising lymphocyte count. Here, we report a case of B-PLL in a 42 year old male who had come for routine health check up.

  1. Allogeneic stem cell transplantation in acute myeloid leukemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natasha Ali

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available We report a case series of 12 patients with acute myeloid leukemia who underwent allogeneic stem cell transplant with a matched related donor. Male to female ratio was 1:1. The main complication post-transplant was graft-versus-host disease (n=7 patients. Transplant-related mortality involved one patient; cause of death was multi-organ failure. After a median follow up of 36.0±11.3 months, overall survival was 16%.

  2. RESULTS OF HEMATOPOIETIC CELL TRANSPLANTATION IN PEDIATRIC LEUKEMIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Mousavi

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT is an accepted treatment for acute myeloid leukemia (AML in first remission, the treatment of choice for chronic myeloid leukemia (CML and high risk groups of ALL who relapse with conventional chemotherapy. We assessed results of HCT for pediatric leukemia in our center. A total of 92 children, 63 with diagnose of AML, 23 with ALL and 6 with CML received allogeneic transplantation from HLA full matched siblings (57.6% and autologous transplantation (42.4%. Source of hematopoietic cells were peripheral blood 83.7%, bone marrow 15.2% and cord blood 1.6%. The median transplanted nucleated cells were 6.4 ± 4.7 ×108 /Kg (body weight of patients and mononuclear cells were 5.5 ± 2.9×108/Kg. The most common conditioning regimens were cyclophosphamide + busulfan. Prophylaxis regimen for GVHD was cyclosporin ± methotrexate. GVHD occurred in 50 (54.3% patients. Eighty five of children had engraftment, 26 (28.6% relapsed and 57 (62% are alive. The most common cause of death was relapse (68.6%. Five years overall survival of patients with AML and ALL were 49% and 44% respectively and disease free survival of them were 52% and 49%. One year overall survival and disease free survival of CML was 57%. Overall survival increased with increasing age of patients at transplantation time (P = 0.06. Longer survival significantly related to earlier WBC and platelet recovery (P < 0.0001 and P = 0.006 respectively. Considering acceptable overall and disease free survival of patients after HCT, we concluded that is a good modality in treatment of leukemia of children.

  3. Chronic mast cell leukemia: a novel leukemia-variant with distinct morphological and clinical features.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valent, Peter; Sotlar, Karl; Sperr, Wolfgang R; Reiter, Andreas; Arock, Michel; Horny, Hans-Peter

    2015-01-01

    Mast cell leukemia (MCL) is a rare form of systemic mastocytosis characterized by leukemic expansion of mostly immature mast cells, organ damage, drug-resistance, and a poor prognosis. Even when treated with chemotherapy, most patients have a life-expectancy of less than one year. However, there are rare patients with MCL in whom the condition is less aggressive and does not cause organ damage within a short time. In these patients, mast cells exhibit a more mature morphology when compared to acute MCL. A recently proposed classification suggests that these cases are referred to as chronic MCL. In the present article, we discuss clinical, histopathological and morphological aspects of acute and chronic MCL.

  4. Leukemia-induced phenotypic and functional defects in natural killer cells predict failure to achieve remission in acute myeloid leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stringaris, Kate; Sekine, Takuya; Khoder, Ahmad; Alsuliman, Abdullah; Razzaghi, Bonnie; Sargeant, Ruhena; Pavlu, Jiri; Brisley, Gill; de Lavallade, Hugues; Sarvaria, Anushruthi; Marin, David; Mielke, Stephan; Apperley, Jane F; Shpall, Elizabeth J; Barrett, A John; Rezvani, Katayoun

    2014-05-01

    The majority of patients with acute myeloid leukemia will relapse, and older patients often fail to achieve remission with induction chemotherapy. We explored the possibility that leukemic suppression of innate immunity might contribute to treatment failure. Natural killer cell phenotype and function was measured in 32 consecutive acute myeloid leukemia patients at presentation, including 12 achieving complete remission. Compared to 15 healthy age-matched controls, natural killer cells from acute myeloid leukemia patients were abnormal at presentation, with downregulation of the activating receptor NKp46 (P=0.007) and upregulation of the inhibitory receptor NKG2A (P=0.04). Natural killer cells from acute myeloid leukemia patients had impaired effector function against autologous blasts and K562 targets, with significantly reduced CD107a degranulation, TNF-α and IFN-γ production. Failure to achieve remission was associated with NKG2A overexpression and reduced TNF-α production. These phenotypic and functional abnormalities were partially restored in the 12 patients achieving remission. In vitro co-incubation of acute myeloid leukemia blasts with natural killer cells from healthy donors induced significant impairment in natural killer cell TNF-α and IFN-γ production (P=0.02 and P=0.01, respectively) against K562 targets and a trend to reduced CD107a degranulation (P=0.07). Under transwell conditions, the inhibitory effect of AML blasts on NK cytotoxicity and effector function was still present, and this inhibitory effect was primarily mediated by IL-10. These results suggest that acute myeloid leukemia blasts induce long-lasting changes in natural killer cells, impairing their effector function and reducing the competence of the innate immune system, favoring leukemia survival.

  5. Plasma cell granuloma of gingiva

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Balaji Manohar

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Plasma cell granuloma is a rare benign lesion characterized by the infiltration of plasma cells; primarily occurring in the lungs. It is also seen to occur in the brain, kidney stomach, heart, and so on. In the intraoral region it is seen to involve the tongue, oral mucosa, and gingiva. This case presents a 42-year-old female, with an enlargement in the maxillary anterior region, treated by excisional biopsy. Histological evaluation revealed plasma cell infiltrates in the connective tissue. The immunohistochemistry revealed kappa and lambda light chains with a polyclonal staining pattern, which confirmed the diagnosis of plasma cell granuloma.

  6. Ex vivo detection of primary leukemia cells resistant to granule cytotoxin-induced cell death: a rapid isolation method to study granzyme-B-mediated cell death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grüllich, Carsten; Friske, Viktoria; Finke, Jürgen

    2008-09-01

    Cytotoxic T lymphocytes and natural killer cells (CTL/NK) induce cell death in leukemia cells by the granzyme B (grB)-dependent granule cytotoxin (GC) pathway. Resistance to GC may be involved in immune evasion of leukemia cells. The delivery of active grB into the cytoplasma is dependent on the presence of perforin (PFN) and grB complexes. We developed a rapid method for the isolation of GC to investigate GC-mediated cell death in primary leukemia cells. We isolated GC containing grB, grB complexes and PFN by detergent free hypotonic lysis of the human NK cell leukemia line YT. The GC induce grB-mediated, caspase-dependent apoptosis in live cells. The human leukemia cell lines KG-1, U937, K562 (myeloid leukemia), Jurkat, Daudi, and BV173 (lymphoblastic leukemia) treated with GC internalized grB and underwent cell death. In primary leukemia cells analyzed ex vivo, we found GC-resistant leukemia cells in three out of seven patients with acute myeloid leukemia and one out of six patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia. We conclude that our method is fast (approximately 1 h) and yields active GC that induce grB-dependent cell death. Furthermore, resistance to GC can be observed in acute leukemias and may be an important mechanism contributing to leukemia cell immune evasion.

  7. Tumefactive intracranial presentation of precursor B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Forester, Craig M. [University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT (United States); Braunreiter, Chi L. [University of Utah, Division of Pediatric Hematology Oncology, Primary Children' s Medical Center, Salt Lake City, UT (United States); Helen DeVos Children' s Hospital, Department of Pediatric Hematology Oncology, Grand Rapids, MI (United States); Yaish, Hasan; Afify, Zeinab [University of Utah, Division of Pediatric Hematology Oncology, Primary Children' s Medical Center, Salt Lake City, UT (United States); Hedlund, Gary L. [Primary Children' s Medical Center, Department of Pediatric Radiology, Salt Lake City, UT (United States)

    2009-11-15

    In children, leukemia is the most common malignancy, and approximately 75% of leukemias are acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). Central nervous system leukemia is found at diagnosis in fewer than 5% of children with ALL. Leukemic intracranial masses have been described with acute myeloid leukemia, but ALL presenting as a mass lesion is rare. We describe a unique case of an intracranial confirmed precursor B cell (pre-B) ALL mass in a 13-year-old girl that was diagnosed by brain CT, MRI and cerebral angiography, and confirmed by biopsy. This report details pertinent history and distinguishing imaging features of an intracranial ALL tumefaction. (orig.)

  8. Safety and Tolerability Study of PCI-32765 in B Cell Lymphoma and Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-10-09

    B-cell Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Diffuse Well-differentiated Lymphocytic Lymphoma; B Cell Lymphoma; Follicular Lymphoma; Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma; Waldenstrom Macroglobulinemia; Burkitt Lymphoma; B-Cell Diffuse Lymphoma

  9. A Study on Uptake and Localization of Merocyanine 540 (MC540) in Murine Myeloid Leukemia Cells by Confocal Laser Scanning Microscopy (CLSM)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    J. Y. Chen; N. H. Cheung; S. C. Chen; M. C. Fung; W. N. Leung; N. K. Mak

    2000-01-01

    The intracellular localization of merocyanine 540 (MC540), a photosensitizer commonly used in the photo-inactivation of leukemia cells, was studied using confocal laser scanning microscopy. It was found for the first time that MC540 not only localized in the plasma membrane but also in the cytoplasm and the nuclear membrane of the murine myeloid leukemia M1 and WEHI 3B (JCS) cells. Exposure of MC540 treated leukemia cells to light under conditions that could cause photobleaching did not cause the redistribution of cell-bound MC540. Rapid localization of MC540 in the cytoplasm was observed 5 minutes after exposure of leukemia cell to MC540, indicating that MC540 could promptly be internalized by these two leukemia cell lines. In contrast, localization of MC540 was limited only to the plasma membrane of erythrocytes. These results suggest that the binding pattern of MC540 is cell type dependent and may be related to the efficacy of photosenitization in photodynamic therapy.

  10. Neolignans from Nectandra megapotamica (Lauraceae Display in vitro Cytotoxic Activity and Induce Apoptosis in Leukemia Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vitor Ponci

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Nectandra megapotamica (Spreng. Mez. (Lauraceae is a well-known Brazilian medicinal plant that has been used in folk medicine to treat several diseases. In continuation of our ongoing efforts to discover new bioactive natural products from the Brazilian flora, this study describes the identification of cytotoxic compounds from the MeOH extract of N. megapotamica (Lauraceae leaves using bioactivity-guided fractionation. This approach resulted in the isolation and characterization of eight tetrahydrofuran neolignans: calopeptin (1, machilin-G (2, machilin-I (3, aristolignin (4, nectandrin A (5, veraguensin (6, ganschisandrin (7, and galgravin (8. Different assays were conducted to evaluate their cytotoxic activities and to determine the possible mechanism(s related to the activity displayed against human leukemia cells. The most active compounds 4, 5 and 8 gave IC50 values of 14.2 ± 0.7, 16.9 ± 0.8 and 16.5 ± 0.8 µg/mL, respectively, against human leukemia (HL-60 tumor cells. Moreover, these compounds induced specific apoptotic hallmarks, such as plasma membrane bleb formation, nuclear DNA condensation, specific chromatin fragmentation, phosphatidyl-serine exposure on the external leaflet of the plasma membrane, cleavage of PARP as well as mitochondrial damage, which as a whole could be related to the intrinsic apoptotic pathway.

  11. Cytotoxicity of (-)-vitisin B in human leukemia cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Shing-Sheng; Chen, Lih-Geeng; Lin, Ren-Jye; Lin, Shyr-Yi; Lo, Yueh-E; Liang, Yu-Chih

    2013-07-01

    Vitis thunbergii var. taiwaniana (VTT) is an indigenous Taiwanese wild grape and is used as a folk medicine in Taiwan. VTT is rich in polyphenols, especially quercetin and resveratrol derivatives, which were demonstrated to exhibit inhibitory activities against carcinogenesis and prevent some neurodegenerative diseases. (-)-Vitisin B is one of the resveratrol tetramers extracted from VTT. In this study, we investigated the mechanisms of (-)-vitisin B on the induction of apoptosis in human HL-60 promyelocytic leukemia cells. First, (-)-vitisin B significantly inhibited cell proliferation through inducing cell apoptosis. This effect appeared to occur in a time- and dose-dependent manner. Cell-cycle distribution was also examined, and we found that (-)-vitisin B significantly induced a sub-G1 population in a dose-dependent manner. In addition, (-)-vitisin B exhibited stronger inhibitory effects on cell proliferation than resveratrol. Second, (-)-vitisin B dose dependently induced apoptosis-related protein expressions, such as the cleavage form of caspase-3, caspase-8, caspase-9, poly(ADP ribose) polymerase, and the proapoptotic Bax protein. Third, (-)-vitisin B treatment also resulted in increases in c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) phosphorylation and Fas ligand (FasL) expression. Moreover, the (-)-vitisin B-induced FasL expression and caspase-3 activation could be reversed by a JNK inhibitor. These results suggest that (-)-vitisin B-induced apoptosis of leukemia cells might be mediated through activation of JNK and Fas death-signal transduction.

  12. Drug screen in patient cells suggests quinacrine to be repositioned for treatment of acute myeloid leukemia

    OpenAIRE

    Eriksson, Anna; Österroos, Albin; Hassan, Sadia Bashir; Gullbo, Joachim; Rickardson, Linda; Jarvius, Malin; Nygren, Peter; Fryknäs, Mårten; Höglund, Martin; Larsson, Rolf

    2015-01-01

    To find drugs suitable for repositioning for use against leukemia, samples from patients with chronic lymphocytic, acute myeloid and lymphocytic leukemias as well as peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) were tested in response to 1266 compounds from the LOPAC1280 library (Sigma). Twenty-five compounds were defined as hits with activity in all leukemia subgroups (<50% cell survival compared with control) at 10 mu M drug concentration. Only one of these compounds, quinacrine, showed low...

  13. Closed inductively coupled plasma cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manning, Thomas J.; Palmer, Byron A.; Hof, Douglas E.

    1990-01-01

    A closed inductively coupled plasma cell generates a relatively high power, low noise plasma for use in spectroscopic studies. A variety of gases can be selected to form the plasma to minimize spectroscopic interference and to provide a electron density and temperature range for the sample to be analyzed. Grounded conductors are placed at the tube ends and axially displaced from the inductive coil, whereby the resulting electromagnetic field acts to elongate the plasma in the tube. Sample materials can be injected in the plasma to be excited for spectroscopy.

  14. Amplified detection of leukemia cancer cells using an aptamer-conjugated gold-coated magnetic nanoparticles on a nitrogen-doped graphene modified electrode.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khoshfetrat, Seyyed Mehdi; Mehrgardi, Masoud A

    2017-04-01

    The increasing demands for early, accurate and ultrasensitive diagnosis of cancers demonstrate the importance of the development of new amplification strategies or diagnostic technologies. In the present study, an aptamer-based electrochemical biosensor for ultrasensitive and selective detection of leukemia cancer cells has been introduced. The thiolated sgc8c aptamer was immobilized on gold nanoparticles-coated magnetic Fe3O4 nanoparticles (Apt-GMNPs). Ethidium bromide (EB), intercalated into the stem of the aptamer hairpin, provides the read-out signal for the quantification of the leukemia cancer cells. After introduction of the leukemia cancer cells onto the Apt-GMNPs, the hairpin structure of the aptamer is disrupted and the intercalator molecules are released, resulting in a decrease of the electrochemical signal. The immobilization of nitrogen-doped graphene nanosheets on the electrode surface provides an excellent platform for amplifying the read-out signal. Under optimal conditions, the aptasensor exhibits a linear response over a wide dynamic range of leukemia cancer cells from 10 to 1×10(6)cellmL(-1). The present protocol provides a highly sensitive, selective, simple, and robust method for early stage detection of leukemia cancer. Furthermore, the fabricated aptasensor was successfully used for the detection of leukemia cancer cells in complex media such as human blood plasma, without any serious interference. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  15. Biology and relevance of human acute myeloid leukemia stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Daniel; Majeti, Ravindra

    2017-03-23

    Evidence of human acute myeloid leukemia stem cells (AML LSCs) was first reported nearly 2 decades ago through the identification of rare subpopulations of engrafting cells in xenotransplantation assays. These AML LSCs were shown to reside at the apex of a cellular hierarchy that initiates and maintains the disease, exhibiting properties of self-renewal, cell cycle quiescence, and chemoresistance. This cancer stem cell model offers an explanation for chemotherapy resistance and disease relapse and implies that approaches to treatment must eradicate LSCs for cure. More recently, a number of studies have both refined and expanded our understanding of LSCs and intrapatient heterogeneity in AML using improved xenotransplant models, genome-scale analyses, and experimental manipulation of primary patient cells. Here, we review these studies with a focus on the immunophenotype, biological properties, epigenetics, genetics, and clinical associations of human AML LSCs and discuss critical questions that need to be addressed in future research. © 2017 by The American Society of Hematology.

  16. Loss of blood group A in acute leukemia. Morphologic and biochemical studies of red cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atkinson, J B; Tanley, P C; Wallas, C H

    1987-01-01

    A patient with blood type A had acute myelomonocytic leukemia; his red cells (RBCs) typed as O and his serum had anti-B. RBC membranes were isolated from the patient as well as from controls with group A and O red cells. The membranes were incubated with uridine diphosphate (UDP)-N-acetyl-D-14C galactosamine in plasma from the patient and controls with group A and O red cells. RBC membranes from the patient behaved normally in that they incorporated the terminal carbohydrate responsible for blood group A activity. Scanning electron microscopy showed that the patient's RBCs had striking morphologic changes, with marked crenation and numerous knisocytes and dacryocytes. It was concluded that loss of the A antigen in this patient was not due to an abnormality of the enzyme required to convert H substance to A substance. It was postulated that weakening of the A antigen in some patients with leukemia may be related to a steric modification associated with abnormal red cell morphology.

  17. Canthin-6-one induces cell death, cell cycle arrest and differentiation in human myeloid leukemia cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vieira Torquato, Heron F; Ribeiro-Filho, Antonio C; Buri, Marcus V; Araújo Júnior, Roberto T; Pimenta, Renata; de Oliveira, José Salvador R; Filho, Valdir C; Macho, Antonio; Paredes-Gamero, Edgar J; de Oliveira Martins, Domingos T

    2017-04-01

    Canthin-6-one is a natural product isolated from various plant genera and from fungi with potential antitumor activity. In the present study, we evaluate the antitumor effects of canthin-6-one in human myeloid leukemia lineages. Kasumi-1 lineage was used as a model for acute myeloid leukemia. Cells were treated with canthin-6-one and cell death, cell cycle and differentiation were evaluated in both total cells (Lin(+)) and leukemia stem cell population (CD34(+)CD38(-)Lin(-/low)). Among the human lineages tested, Kasumi-1 was the most sensitive to canthin-6-one. Canthin-6-one induced cell death with apoptotic (caspase activation, decrease of mitochondrial potential) and necrotic (lysosomal permeabilization, double labeling of annexin V/propidium iodide) characteristics. Moreover, canthin-6-one induced cell cycle arrest at G0/G1 (7μM) and G2 (45μM) evidenced by DNA content, BrdU incorporation and cyclin B1/histone 3 quantification. Canthin-6-one also promoted differentiation of Kasumi-1, evidenced by an increase in the expression of myeloid markers (CD11b and CD15) and the transcription factor PU.1. Furthermore, a reduction of the leukemic stem cell population and clonogenic capability of stem cells were observed. These results show that canthin-6-one can affect Kasumi-1 cells by promoting cell death, cell cycle arrest and cell differentiation depending on concentration used. Canthin-6-one presents an interesting cytotoxic activity against leukemic cells and represents a promising scaffold for the development of molecules for anti-leukemic applications, especially by its anti-leukemic stem cell activity. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Novel combination treatments targeting chronic myeloid leukemia stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al Baghdadi, Tareq; Abonour, Rafat; Boswell, H Scott

    2012-04-01

    Chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) is currently considered incurable in most patients. Stem cell transplantation, an accepted curative option for which extensive experience has been gained, is limited by high morbidity and mortality rates, particularly in older patients. Tyrosine kinase inhibitors targeting BCR-ABL are widely used and induce remission in a high proportion of patients, but resistance and incomplete response to these agents portends eventual relapse and disease progression. Although BCR-ABL inhibitors eradicate most CML cells, they are largely ineffective against the reservoir of quiescent leukemic stem cells (LSCs). Thus a strong medical need exists for therapies that effectively eradicate LSCs and is currently a focus of extensive research. To date, evidence obtained from in vitro studies, animal models, and clinical CML specimens suggests that an effective approach may be to partner existing BCR-ABL inhibitors with compounds targeting key stem cell molecular effectors, including Wnt/β-catenin, hedgehog pathway components, histone deacetylase (HDAC), transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β), Janus kinase 2, promyelocytic leukemia protein, and arachidonate 5-lipoxygenase (ALOX5). Novel combinations may sensitize LSCs to BCR-ABL inhibitors, thereby overcoming resistance and creating the possibility of improving disease outcome beyond the current standard of care. Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  19. Oncogenic Kras initiates leukemia in hematopoietic stem cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amit J Sabnis

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available How oncogenes modulate the self-renewal properties of cancer-initiating cells is incompletely understood. Activating KRAS and NRAS mutations are among the most common oncogenic lesions detected in human cancer, and occur in myeloproliferative disorders (MPDs and leukemias. We investigated the effects of expressing oncogenic Kras(G12D from its endogenous locus on the proliferation and tumor-initiating properties of murine hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells. MPD could be initiated by Kras(G12D expression in a highly restricted population enriched for hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs, but not in common myeloid progenitors. Kras(G12D HSCs demonstrated a marked in vivo competitive advantage over wild-type cells. Kras(G12D expression also increased the fraction of proliferating HSCs and reduced the overall size of this compartment. Transplanted Kras(G12D HSCs efficiently initiated acute T-lineage leukemia/lymphoma, which was associated with secondary Notch1 mutations in thymocytes. We conclude that MPD-initiating activity is restricted to the HSC compartment in Kras(G12D mice, and that distinct self-renewing populations with cooperating mutations emerge during cancer progression.

  20. Targeted Elimination of Leukemia Stem Cells; a New Therapeutic Approach in Hemato-Oncology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    ten Cate, B.; de Bruyn, M.; Wei, Y.; Bremer, E.; Helfrich, W.

    Despite recent advances, treatment of leukemia is often not curative. New insights indicate that this may be attributable to a small population of therapy-resistant malignant cells with self-renewal capacity and the ability to generate large numbers of more differentiated leukemia cells. These

  1. Presence of Gumprecht shadows (smudge cells) in bovine leukemia virus-positive cattle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panei, Carlos Javier; Larsen, Alejandra; González, Ester Teresa; Echeverría, María Gabriela

    2013-11-01

    Enzootic Bovine Leukosis is a chronic disease caused by the bovine leukemia virus (BLV). Smudge cells, also known as Gumprecht shadows, are not simple artifacts of slide preparation, but ragged lymphoid cells found mainly in peripheral blood smears from human patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia. In this study, we report the presence of Gumprecht shadows in peripheral blood from BLV-positive cattle.

  2. 75 FR 54496 - Diseases Associated With Exposure to Certain Herbicide Agents (Hairy Cell Leukemia and Other...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-08

    ... AFFAIRS 38 CFR Part 3 RIN 2900-AN54 Diseases Associated With Exposure to Certain Herbicide Agents (Hairy Cell Leukemia and Other Chronic B-Cell Leukemias, Parkinson's Disease and Ischemic Heart Disease... adjudication regulations concerning the presumptive service connection for certain diseases based upon the...

  3. Marked Retroperitoneal Lymphadenopathy in Hairy Cell Leukemia: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R.E. Shackelford

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Hairy cell leukemia (HCL is uncommonly associated with lymphadenopathy, while retroperitoneal lymphadenopathy is extremely uncommon. We report on a patient with a 12-year history of HCL who developed painless jaundice and ascites, accompanied by positional discomfort with persistent nausea. Computed tomography examination revealed 2 large retroperitoneal masses, which at autopsy consisted of HCL with focally intermixed pancreatic and peripancreatic tissue. Lymphadenopathy was not identified above the diaphragm or below the aortic bifurcation. No vasculitis or an unusual HCL histology was identified. As previous reports, our findings suggest that HCL with massive lymphadenopathy has a specific site predilection, but it is not necessarily accompanied by vasculitis or an unusual histology.

  4. Abacavir, an anti–HIV-1 drug, targets TDP1-deficient adult T cell leukemia

    OpenAIRE

    Tada, K; Kobayashi, M.; Takiuchi, Y.; Iwai, F.; Sakamoto, T; Nagata, K.; Shinohara, M.; Io, K.; Shirakawa, K.; Hishizawa, M.; Shindo, K.; Kadowaki, N.; Hirota, K; Yamamoto, J.; Iwai, S.

    2015-01-01

    Adult T cell leukemia (ATL) is an aggressive T cell malignancy caused by human T cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1) and has a poor prognosis. We analyzed the cytotoxic effects of various nucleoside analog reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NRTIs) for HIV-1 on ATL cells and found that abacavir potently and selectively kills ATL cells. Although NRTIs have minimal genotoxicities on host cells, the therapeutic concentration of abacavir induced numerous DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) in the chrom...

  5. Pharm GKB: Leukemia, Biphenotypic, Acute [PharmGKB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Overview Alternate Names: Synonym Acute bilineal leukaemia; Acute bilineal leukemia; Acute... biphenotypic leukaemia; Acute biphenotypic leukemia; Acute mixed lineage leukaemia; Acute mixed line...age leukemia; B and T Cell Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; B and T Cell Leukemia, Acute; B- and T-Cell Acute L...ymphoblastic Leukemia; B- and T-Cell Leukemia, Acute; Leukemia, Lymphocytic, Acute..., Mixed Cell; Leukemia, Lymphocytic, Acute, Mixed-Cell; Leukemia, Mixed Cell; Leukemia, Mixed, B and T Cell

  6. Cellular Immunotherapy Following Chemotherapy in Treating Patients With Recurrent Non-Hodgkin Lymphomas, Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia or B-Cell Prolymphocytic Leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-07-29

    Post-transplant Lymphoproliferative Disorder; B-Cell Prolymphocytic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Refractory Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Refractory Hairy Cell Leukemia; B-Cell Lymphoma, Unclassifiable, With Features Intermediate Between Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma and Burkitt Lymphoma; B-Cell Lymphoma, Unclassifiable, With Features Intermediate Between Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma and Classical Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Lymphoplasmacytic Lymphoma

  7. Two Cases of Q-Fever in Hairy Cell Leukemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emanuele Ammatuna

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Hairy cell leukemia (HCL is a rare B-cell lymphoproliferative disorder accounting for about 2% of all leukemias. The clinical course is indolent, however HCL patients are particularly susceptible to infections. Here we report two cases of Q-fever as first manifestation of disease in two patients affected by HCL. Both patients described in this report showed an unusually sluggish clinical response to the antibiotic treatment with ciprofloxacin probably because of the marked immunodeficiency. However, treatment of HCL with cladribine administered soon after the resolution of QF pneumonitis was uneventful and led to a complete remission in both cases. Most probably the association of Coxiella burnetii (CB infection and HCL that we observed in two patients is due to chance. However, a hairy cell resembling transformation of freshly isolated human peripheral blood lymphocytes upon CB has been showed. We think that the possibility of CB infection in febrile HCL patient should be always taken in mind, especially in endemic areas. In addition the potential for such infections to become chronic in HCL patients should not be overlooked and the reporting of further cases should be encouraged.

  8. Arginine deprivation using pegylated arginine deiminase has activity against primary acute myeloid leukemia cells in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miraki-Moud, Farideh; Ghazaly, Essam; Ariza-McNaughton, Linda; Hodby, Katharine A; Clear, Andrew; Anjos-Afonso, Fernando; Liapis, Konstantinos; Grantham, Marianne; Sohrabi, Fareeda; Cavenagh, Jamie; Bomalaski, John S; Gribben, John G; Szlosarek, Peter W; Bonnet, Dominique; Taussig, David C

    2015-06-25

    The strategy of enzymatic degradation of amino acids to deprive malignant cells of important nutrients is an established component of induction therapy of acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Here we show that acute myeloid leukemia (AML) cells from most patients with AML are deficient in a critical enzyme required for arginine synthesis, argininosuccinate synthetase-1 (ASS1). Thus, these ASS1-deficient AML cells are dependent on importing extracellular arginine. We therefore investigated the effect of plasma arginine deprivation using pegylated arginine deiminase (ADI-PEG 20) against primary AMLs in a xenograft model and in vitro. ADI-PEG 20 alone induced responses in 19 of 38 AMLs in vitro and 3 of 6 AMLs in vivo, leading to caspase activation in sensitive AMLs. ADI-PEG 20-resistant AMLs showed higher relative expression of ASS1 than sensitive AMLs. This suggests that the resistant AMLs survive by producing arginine through this metabolic pathway and ASS1 expression could be used as a biomarker for response. Sensitive AMLs showed more avid uptake of arginine from the extracellular environment consistent with their auxotrophy for arginine. The combination of ADI-PEG 20 and cytarabine chemotherapy was more effective than either treatment alone resulting in responses in 6 of 6 AMLs tested in vivo. Our data show that arginine deprivation is a reasonable strategy in AML that paves the way for clinical trials.

  9. SET-NUP214 fusion in acute myeloid leukemia- and T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia-derived cell lines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zaborski Margarete

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background SET-NUP214 fusion resulting from a recurrent cryptic deletion, del(9(q34.11q34.13 has recently been described in T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL and in one case of acute myeloid leukemia (AML. The fusion protein appears to promote elevated expression of HOXA cluster genes in T-ALL and may contribute to the pathogenesis of the disease. We screened a panel of ALL and AML cell lines for SET-NUP214 expression to find model systems that might help to elucidate the cellular function of this fusion gene. Results Of 141 human leukemia/lymphoma cell lines tested, only the T-ALL cell line LOUCY and the AML cell line MEGAL expressed the SET(TAF-Iβ-NUP214 fusion gene transcript. RT-PCR analysis specifically recognizing the alternative first exons of the two TAF-I isoforms revealed that the cell lines also expressed TAF-Iα-NUP214 mRNA. Results of fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH and array-based copy number analysis were both consistent with del(9(q34.11q34.13 as described. Quantitative genomic PCR also confirmed loss of genomic material between SET and NUP214 in both cell lines. Genomic sequencing localized the breakpoints of the SET gene to regions downstream of the stop codon and to NUP214 intron 17/18 in both LOUCY and MEGAL cells. Both cell lines expressed the 140 kDa SET-NUP214 fusion protein. Conclusion Cell lines LOUCY and MEGAL express the recently described SET-NUP214 fusion gene. Of special note is that the formation of the SET exon 7/NUP214 exon 18 gene transcript requires alternative splicing as the SET breakpoint is located downstream of the stop codon in exon 8. The cell lines are promising model systems for SET-NUP214 studies and should facilitate investigating cellular functions of the the SET-NUP214 protein.

  10. Cordycepin regulates GSK-3β/β-catenin signaling in human leukemia cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bor-Sheng Ko

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Leukemia stem cells (LSCs are a limitless cell source for the initiation and maintenance of leukemia. Activation of the Wnt/β-catenin pathway is required for the survival and development of LSCs. Therefore, targeting β-catenin is considered a therapeutic strategy for the treatment of leukemia. The goal of this study was to explore whether cordycepin, an active component of the traditional medicine Cordyceps sinensis, regulates β-catenin expression in leukemia cells. METHODOLOGY AND PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In this study, we found that cordycepin significantly suppressed cell proliferation in all malignant cancer cells, including U937, K562, A549, HepG2, SK-Hep1 and MCF7 in a dose-dependent manner. However, cordycepin reduced β-catenin levels in U937, K562 and THP1 leukemia cells and had no effect on other solid cancer cells. In addition, treatment with cordycepin significantly suppressed leukemia colony formation in soft agar assay. Cordycepin enhanced proteasome-dependent degradation and inhibited nuclear translocation of β-catenin in leukemia cells. Cordycepin-reduced β-catenin stability was restored by the addition of a pharmacological inhibitor of GSK-3β, indicating that cordycepin-suppressed β-catenin stability is mediated by the activation of GSK-3β. Furthermore, cordycepin abolished the effect of Wnt3a-induced β-catenin in leukemia cells. In addition, cordycepin-impaired β-catenin is regulated by Akt activation but is not significantly influenced by AMPK or mTOR signal pathways. SIGNIFICANCE: Our findings show for the first time that codycepin selectively reduces β-catenin stability in leukemia but not in other solid tumor cells. This suppressive effect is mediated by regulating GSK-3β. A synergistic combination of cordycepin with other treatments should be used as a novel strategy to eradicate leukemia via elimination of LSCs.

  11. Increase in myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs) associated with minimal residual disease (MRD) detection in adult acute myeloid leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Hui; Li, Yi; Zhang, Zhi-fen; Ju, Ying; Li, Li; Zhang, Bing-chang; Liu, Bin

    2015-11-01

    Myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs) are thought to help provide a cellular microenvironments in many solid tumors, in which transformed cells proliferate, acquire new mutations, and evade host immunosurveillance. In the present study, we found that MDSCs (CD33 + CD11b + HLA-DR(low/neg)) in bone marrow were significantly increased in adult acute myeloid leukemia (AML) patients. MDSCs levels in newly diagnosed AML patients correlated well with extramedullary infiltration and plasma D-dimer levels. Remission rates in the MDSCs > 1500 group and MDSCs phenotype. These cells appear to impact the clinical course and prognosis of AML. This data may provide potentially important targets for novel therapies.

  12. Targeting of the BLT2 in chronic myeloid leukemia inhibits leukemia stem/progenitor cell function

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xiao, Meifang; Ai, Hongmei; Li, Tao [Department of Laboratory Medicine, JingZhou Hospital, Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science and Technology (HUST), Jingzhou (China); Rajoria, Pasupati; Shahu, Prakash [Department of Clinical Medicine, Medical School of Yangtze University, Jingzhou (China); Li, Xiansong, E-mail: lixiansongjz@hotmail.com [Department of Neurosurgery, JingZhou Hospital, Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science and Technology (HUST), Jingzhou (China)

    2016-04-15

    Imatinib, a tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI) has significantly improved clinical outcome for chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) patients. However, patients develop resistance when the disease progresses to the blast phase (BP) and the mechanisms are not well understood. Here we show that BCR-ABL activates BLT2 in hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells to promote leukemogenesis and this involves the p53 signaling pathway. Compared to normal bone marrow (NBM), the mRNA and protein levels of BLT2 are significantly increased in BP-CML CD34{sup +} stem/progenitor cells. This is correlated with increasing BCR-ABL expression. In contrast, knockdown of BCR-ABL or inhibition of its tyrosine kinase activity decreases Blt2 protein level. BLT2 inhibition induces apoptosis, inhibits proliferation, colony formation and self-renewal capacity of CD34{sup +} cells from TKI-resistant BP-CML patients. Importantly, the inhibitory effects of BCR-ABL TKI on CML stem/progenitor cells are further enhanced upon combination with BLT2 inhibition. We further show that BLT2 activation selectively suppresses p53 but not Wnt or BMP-mediated luciferase activity and transcription. Our results demonstrate that BLT2 is a novel pathway activated by BCR-ABL and critically involved in the resistance of BP-CML CD34{sup +} stem/progenitors to TKIs treatment. Our findings suggest that BLT2 and p53 can serve as therapeutic targets for CML treatment. - Highlights: • BCR-ABL regulates BLT2 expression to promote leukemogenesis. • BLT2 is essential to maintain CML cell function. • Activation of BLT2 suppresses p53 signaling pathway in CML cells. • Inhibition of BLT2 and BCR-ABL synergize in eliminating CML CD34{sup +} stem/progenitors.

  13. Plasma Etching Improves Solar Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bunyan, S. M.

    1982-01-01

    Etching front surfaces of screen-printed silicon photovoltaic cells with sulfur hexafluoride plasma found to increase cell performance while maintaining integrity of screen-printed silver contacts. Replacement of evaporated-metal contacts with screen-printed metal contacts proposed as one way to reduce cost of solar cells for terrestrial applications.

  14. REGULATORY T-CELLS IN CHRONIC LYMPHOCYTIC LEUKEMIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giovanni D'arena

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Regulatory T-cells (Tregs constitute a small subset of cells that are actively involved in maintaining self-tolerance, in immune homeostasis and in antitumor immunity. They are thought to play a significant role in the progression of cancer and are generally increased in patient with chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL. Their number correlates with more aggressive disease status and is predictive of the time to treatment, as well. Moreover, it is now clear that dysregulation in Tregs cell frequency and/or function may result in a plethora of autoimmune diseases, including multiple sclerosis, type 1 diabetes mellitus, myasthenia gravis, systemic lupus erythematosis, autoimmune lymphoproliferative disorders, rheumatoid arthritis, and psoriasis. Efforts are made aiming to develop approaches to deplete Tregs or inhibit their function in either cancer and autoimmune disorders.

  15. Synchronous Occurrence of Chronic Myeloid Leukemia and Mantle Cell Lymphoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prajwol Pathak

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Chronic myeloid leukemia (CML and mantle cell lymphoma (MCL are hematologic malignancies that originate from different oligopotent progenitor stem cells, namely, common myeloid and lymphoid progenitor cells, respectively. Although blastic transformation of CML can occur in the lymphoid lineage and CML has been related to non-Hodgkin lymphoma on transformation, to our knowledge, de novo and synchronous occurrence of CML and MCL has not been reported. Herein, we report the first case of synchronous CML and MCL in an otherwise healthy 38-year-old man. Potential etiologies and pathological relationships between the two malignancies are explored, including the possibility that the downstream effects of BCR-ABL may link it to an overexpression of cyclin D1, which is inherent to the etiology of MCL.

  16. Docosahexaenoic acid induces apoptosis in primary chronic lymphocytic leukemia cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Romain Guièze

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Chronic lymphocytic leukemia is an indolent disorder with an increased infectious risk remaining one of the main causes of death. Development of therapies with higher safety profile is thus a challenging issue. Docosahexaenoic acid (DHA, 22:6 is an omega-3 fatty acid, a natural compound of normal cells, and has been shown to display antitumor potency in cancer. We evaluated the potential in vitro effect of DHA in primary CLL cells. DHA induces high level of in vitro apoptosis compared to oleic acid in a dose-dependent and time-dependent manner. Estimation of IC50 was only of 4.813 μM, which appears lower than those reported in solid cancers. DHA is highly active on CLL cells in vitro. This observation provides a rationale for further studies aiming to understand its mechanisms of action and its potent in vivo activity.

  17. Cytokine-induced killer cells: NK-like T cells with cytotolytic specificity against leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linn, Y C; Hui, Kam M

    2003-09-01

    Cytokine-induced killer (CIK) cells are a unique population of cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL) with the characteristic CD3+CD56+ phenotype. These cells have demonstrated higher proliferative and cytolytic activities in comparison to the reported CD3-CD56+ lymphokine activated killer (LAK) cells that are essentially activated natural killer (NK) cells. CIK cells are non-MHC-restricted in target cell recognition and killing. We have shown the feasibility of generating CIK cells from a series of marrow samples of patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) collected at diagnosis. At maturity, the CIK cells exhibit potent cytotoxicity against autologous AML targets as well as allogeneic myeloid leukemia cells, regardless of the HLA types of these targets. This observed cytotoxicity is not entirely due to NK cells as prior pre-absorption of the NK cells cytolytic activities does not abolish the subsequent cytotolytic activities against leukemic targets. It has also been reported by others that CIK cells are cytolytic against chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) cells, both in vitro and in the SCID mouse tumor model. In a mouse transplant model across MHC barrier, the CIK cells generated from the donor do not induce graft vs. host disease as observed for unfractionated donor splenocytes. In comparison to untreated control mice, the infusion of CIK cells results in the prolonged survival of murine leukemia-bearing mice. CIK cells also express CD94, part of the NK receptor comprising of CD94-NKG2 heterodimer. However, only low level of the killer immunoglobulin-like receptors are expressed by the CIK cells. In addition, as reported for the classical CTL, CIK cells could interact with dendritic cells (DC) to result in the enhancement of cytotolytic activities against tumor cells. The characteristic biological properties of the CIK cells would, therefore, enable them to be exploited for anti-leukemic therapy.

  18. Late recurrence of childhood T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia frequently represents a second leukemia rather than a relapse: first evidence for genetic predisposition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Szczepanski, T.; Velden, V.H. van der; Waanders, E.; Kuiper, R.P.; Vlierberghe, P. Van; Gruhn, B.; Eckert, C.; Panzer-Grumayer, R.; Basso, G.; Cave, H.; Stadt, U.Z.; Campana, D.; Schrauder, A.; Sutton, R.; Wering, E. van; Meijerink, J.P.P.; Dongen, J.J. van

    2011-01-01

    PURPOSE: Relapse of childhood T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL) often occurs during treatment, but in some cases, leukemia re-emerges off therapy. On the basis of previous analyses of T-cell receptor (TCR) gene rearrangement patterns, we hypothesized that some late recurrences of T-ALL mig

  19. Engagement of SIRP alpha Inhibits Growth and Induces Programmed Cell Death in Acute Myeloid Leukemia Cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Irandoust, Mahban; Zarate, Julian Alvarez; Hubeek, Isabelle; van Beek, Ellen M.; Schornagel, Karin; Broekhuizen, Aart J. F.; Akyuz, Mercan; van de Loosdrecht, Arjan A.; Delwel, Ruud; Valk, Peter J.; Sonneveld, Edwin; Kearns, Pamela; Creutzig, Ursula; Reinhardt, Dirk; de Bont, Eveline S. J. M.; Coenen, Eva A.; van den Heuvel-Eibrink, Marry M.; Zwaan, C. Michel; Kaspers, Gertjan J. L.; Cloos, Jacqueline; van den Berg, Timo K.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Recent studies show the importance of interactions between CD47 expressed on acute myeloid leukemia (AML) cells and the inhibitory immunoreceptor, signal regulatory protein-alpha (SIRP alpha) on macrophages. Although AML cells express SIRP alpha, its function has not been investigated in

  20. Engagement of SIRPα Inhibits Growth and Induces Programmed Cell Death in Acute Myeloid Leukemia Cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M. Irandoust (Mahban); J. Alvarez Zarate (Julian); I. Hubeek (I.); E.M. van der Beek (Eline); K. Schornagel (Karin); A.J.F. Broekhuizen (Aart J.); M. Akyuz (Mercan); A.A. van de Loosdrecht (Arjan); H.R. Delwel (Ruud); P.J.M. Valk (Peter); E. Sonneveld (Edwin); P. Kearns (Pamela); U. Creutzig; D. Reinhardt (Dirk); E.S.J.M. de Bont (Eveline); E.A. Coenen (Eva); M.M. van den Heuvel-Eibrink (Marry); C.M. Zwaan (Christian Michel); G.J. Kaspers (Gertjan); J. Cloos (Jacqueline); T.K. van den Berg (Timo)

    2013-01-01

    textabstractBackground: Recent studies show the importance of interactions between CD47 expressed on acute myeloid leukemia (AML) cells and the inhibitory immunoreceptor, signal regulatory protein-alpha (SIRPα) on macrophages. Although AML cells express SIRPα, its function has not been investigated

  1. Prognostic significance of cell surface phenotype in acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shiek Aejaz Aziz

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: To find out the phenotypic character of lymphoblasts of acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL patients in our study cohort and their possible effect on the prognosis. Aims: To investigate the phenotype in ALL in our demographic population and to prognosticate various upfront current protocols employed in our hospital. Settings and Design: The study spanned over a period of 4 years with retrospective and prospective data of January 2008 through December 2011. Materials and Methods: 159 patients of all age groups were enrolled for the study, of which flow cytometry was done in 144 patients. Statistical Analysis Used: Analysis was done using the variables on SPSS (statistical package for social sciences software on computer. Survival curves were estimated by method of Kaplan-Meir. Results: Majority of the patients were of B-cell (68.1% and 30.6% patients were of T-cell lineage. Of these, 80.6% patients were having cALLa positivity. Complete remission (CR was achieved in 59.1%, 16.4% relapsed, and 20.1% patients died. Conclusions: Phenotyping has become an important and integral part of diagnosis, classification, management and prognosticating in ALL. B-cell has been found to have a better survival over T-cell lymphoblastic leukemia. cALLa antigen positivity has good impact in achieving CR in only B-cell lineage, myeloid coexpression has no significant effect on the outcome. BFM (Berlin-Frankfurt-Münster based protocols though showed a higher CR and survival vis-a-vis UKALL-XII. However, patients enrolled in former group being of low risk category and lesser in numbers cannot be compared statistically with a fair degree of confidence.

  2. Modeling mechanisms of in vivo variability in methotrexate accumulation and folate pathway inhibition in acute lymphoblastic leukemia cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John C Panetta

    Full Text Available Methotrexate (MTX is widely used for the treatment of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL. The accumulation of MTX and its active metabolites, methotrexate polyglutamates (MTXPG, in ALL cells is an important determinant of its antileukemic effects. We studied 194 of 356 patients enrolled on St. Jude Total XV protocol for newly diagnosed ALL with the goal of characterizing the intracellular pharmacokinetics of MTXPG in leukemia cells; relating these pharmacokinetics to ALL lineage, ploidy and molecular subtype; and using a folate pathway model to simulate optimal treatment strategies. Serial MTX concentrations were measured in plasma and intracellular MTXPG concentrations were measured in circulating leukemia cells. A pharmacokinetic model was developed which accounted for the plasma disposition of MTX along with the transport and metabolism of MTXPG. In addition, a folate pathway model was adapted to simulate the effects of treatment strategies on the inhibition of de novo purine synthesis (DNPS. The intracellular MTXPG pharmacokinetic model parameters differed significantly by lineage, ploidy, and molecular subtypes of ALL. Folylpolyglutamate synthetase (FPGS activity was higher in B vs T lineage ALL (p<0.005, MTX influx and FPGS activity were higher in hyperdiploid vs non-hyperdiploid ALL (p<0.03, MTX influx and FPGS activity were lower in the t(12;21 (ETV6-RUNX1 subtype (p<0.05, and the ratio of FPGS to γ-glutamyl hydrolase (GGH activity was lower in the t(1;19 (TCF3-PBX1 subtype (p<0.03 than other genetic subtypes. In addition, the folate pathway model showed differential inhibition of DNPS relative to MTXPG accumulation, MTX dose, and schedule. This study has provided new insights into the intracellular disposition of MTX in leukemia cells and how it affects treatment efficacy.

  3. Heterogeneity of clonogenic cells in acute myeloblastic leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabbath, K D; Ball, E D; Larcom, P; Davis, R B; Griffin, J D

    1985-02-01

    The expression of differentiation-associated surface antigens by the clonogenic leukemic cells from 20 patients with acute myeloblastic leukemia (AML) was studied with a panel of seven cytotoxic monoclonal antibodies (anti-Ia, -MY9, -PM-81, -AML-2-23, -Mol, -Mo2, and -MY3). The surface antigen phenotypes of the clonogenic cells were compared with the phenotypes of the whole leukemic cell population, and with the phenotypes of normal hematopoietic progenitor cells. In each case the clonogenic leukemic cells were found within a distinct subpopulation that was less "differentiated" than the total cell population. Clonogenic leukemic cells from different patients could be divided into three phenotype groups. In the first group (7 of 20 cases), the clonogenic cells expressed surface antigens characteristic of the normal multipotent colony-forming cell (Ia, MY9). These cases tended to have "undifferentiated" (FAB M1) morphology, and the total cell population generally lacked expression of "late" monocyte antigens such as MY3 and Mo2. A second group (seven cases) of clonogenic cells expressed surface antigens characteristic of an "early" (day 14) colony-forming unit granulocyte-monocyte (CFU-GM), and a third group (six cases) was characteristic of a "late" (day 7) CFU-GM. The cases in these latter two groups tended to have myelomonocytic (FAB M4) morphology and to express monocyte surface antigens. These results suggest that the clonogenic cells are a distinct subpopulation in all cases of AML, and may be derived from normal hematopoietic progenitor cells at multiple points in the differentiation pathway. The results further support the possibility that selected monoclonal antibodies have the potential to purge leukemic clonogenic cells from bone marrow in some AML patients without eliminating critical normal progenitor cells.

  4. Aptamer-Functionalized Fluorescent Silica Nanoparticles for Highly Sensitive Detection of Leukemia Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Juntao; Yang, Nuo; Hu, Zixi; Su, Jing; Zhong, Jianhong; Yang, Yang; Yu, Yating; Zhu, Jianmeng; Xue, Dabin; Huang, Yingying; Lai, Zongqiang; Huang, Yong; Lu, Xiaoling; Zhao, Yongxiang

    2016-06-01

    A simple, highly sensitive method to detect leukemia cells has been developed based on aptamer-modified fluorescent silica nanoparticles (FSNPs). In this strategy, the amine-labeled Sgc8 aptamer was conjugated to carboxyl-modified FSNPs via amide coupling between amino and carboxyl groups. Sensitivity and specificity of Sgc8-FSNPs were assessed using flow cytometry and fluorescence microscopy. These results showed that Sgc8-FSNPs detected leukemia cells with high sensitivity and specificity. Aptamer-modified FSNPs hold promise for sensitive and specific detection of leukemia cells. Changing the aptamer may allow the FSNPs to detect other types of cancer cells.

  5. Leydig cell damage after testicular irradiation for lymphoblastic leukemia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shalet, S.M.; Horner, A.; Ahmed, S.R.; Morris-Jones, P.H.

    1985-01-01

    The effect of testicular irradiation on Leydig cell function has been studied in a group of boys irradiated between 1 and 5 years earlier for a testicular relapse of acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Six of the seven boys irradiated during prepubertal life had an absent testosterone response to HCG stimulation. Two of the four boys irradiated during puberty had an appropriate basal testosterone level, but the testosterone response to HCG stimulation was subnormal in three of the four. Abnormalities in gonadotropin secretion consistent with testicular damage were noted in nine of the 11 boys. Evidence of severe Leydig cell damage was present irrespective of whether the boys were studied within 1 year or between 3 and 5 years after irradiation, suggesting that recovery is unlikely. Androgen replacement therapy has been started in four boys and will be required by the majority of the remainder to undergo normal pubertal development.

  6. Gene-expression patterns in drug-resistant acute lymphoblastic leukemia cells and response to treatment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A. Holleman (Amy); C. Cheng (Cheng); C.H. Pui (Ching-Hon); W.E. Evans (William); M.V. Relling (Mary); R. Pieters (Rob); G.E. Janka-Schaub (Gritta); M.H. Cheok (Meyling); M.L. den Boer (Monique); W. Yang; A.J. Veerman; K.M. Kazemier (Karin); D. Pei (Deqing)

    2004-01-01

    textabstractBACKGROUND: Childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is curable with chemotherapy in approximately 80 percent of patients. However, the cause of treatment failure in the remaining 20 percent of patients is largely unknown. METHODS: We tested leukemia cells from 173

  7. Unravelling Pathobiological Molecular Mechanisms of T-Cell Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    R.D. Mendes (Rui Daniel)

    2016-01-01

    markdownabstractT-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL) represents 10-15% of pediatric acute leukemias. Despite major therapeutic improvements due to treatment intensification and refined risk-adapted stratification during the past decade, ~30% of T-ALL cases relapse with very poor prognosis.

  8. Myeloid leukemia with transdifferentiation plasticity developing from T-cell progenitors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Riemke, P. (Pia); Czeh, M. (Melinda); Fischer, J. (Josephine); Walter, C. (Carolin); Ghani, S. (Saeed); Zepper, M. (Matthias); Agelopoulos, K. (Konstantin); Lettermann, S. (Stephanie); Gebhardt, M.L. (Marie L); Mah, N. (Nancy); Weilemann, A. (Andre); Grau, M. (Michael); Gröning, V. (Verena); T. Haferlach (Torsten); D. Lenze (Dido); H.R. Delwel (Ruud); M. Prinz (Marco); Andrade-Navarro, M.A. (Miguel A); Lenz, G. (Georg); Dugas, M. (Martin); C. Müller-Tidow (Carsten); Rosenbauer, F. (Frank)

    2016-01-01

    textabstractUnfavorable patient survival coincides with lineage plasticity observed in human acute leukemias. These cases are assumed to arise from hematopoietic stem cells, which have stable multipotent differentiation potential. However, here we report that plasticity in leukemia can result from

  9. The expression of PML in chronic myeloid leukemia and effect on cell proliferation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吴洁

    2013-01-01

    Objective To investigate whether PML is expressed differently in chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) patients and healthy controls,then explore the effect of PML on proliferation in leukemia cell lines K562.Methods Realtime PCR was used to detect the PML expression in

  10. Activated allogeneic NK cells preferentially kill poor prognosis B-cell chronic lymphocytic leukemia cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diego Sanchez-Martinez

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Mutational status of TP53 together with expression of wild type (wt IGHV represents the most widely accepted biomarkers, establishing a very poor prognosis in B-cell chronic lymphocytic leukemia (B-CLL patients. Adoptive cell therapy using allogeneic HLA mismatched Natural Killer (NK cells has emerged as an effective and safe alternative in the treatment of acute myeloid and lymphoid leukemias that do not respond to traditional therapies. We have described that allogeneic activated NK cells eliminate hematological cancer cell lines with multidrug resistance acquired by mutations in the apoptotic machinery. This effect depends on the activation protocol, being B-lymphoblastoid cell lines (LCLs the most effective stimulus to activate NK cells. Here we have further analyzed the molecular determinants involved in allogeneic NK cell recognition and elimination of B-CLL cells, including the expression of ligands of the main NK cell activating receptors (NKG2D and NCRs and HLA mismatch. We present preliminary data suggesting that B-CLL susceptibility significantly correlates with HLA mismatch between NK cell donor and B-CLL patient. Moreover, we show that the sensitivity of B-CLL cells to NK cells depends on the prognosis based on TP53 and IGHV mutational status. Cells from patients with worse prognosis (mutated TP53 and wt IGHV are the most susceptible to activated NK cells. Hence, B-CLL prognosis may predict the efficacy of allogenic activated NK cells and, thus, NK cell transfer represents a good alternative to treat poor prognosis B-CLL patients who present a very short life expectancy due to lack of effective treatments.□

  11. Clinical and In Vitro Studies on Impact of High-Dose Etoposide Pharmacokinetics Prior Allogeneic Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation for Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia on the Risk of Post-Transplant Leukemia Relapse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sobiak, Joanna; Kazimierczak, Urszula; Kowalczyk, Dariusz W; Chrzanowska, Maria; Styczyński, Jan; Wysocki, Mariusz; Szpecht, Dawid; Wachowiak, Jacek

    2015-10-01

    The impact of etoposide (VP-16) plasma concentrations on the day of allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (allo-HSCT) on leukemia-free survival in children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) was studied. In addition, the in vitro effects of VP-16 on the lymphocytes proliferation, cytotoxic activity and on Th1/Th2 cytokine responses were assessed. In 31 children undergoing allo-HSCT, VP-16 plasma concentrations were determined up to 120 h after the infusion using the HPLC-UV method. For mentioned in vitro studies, VP-16 plasma concentrations observed on allo-HSCT day were used. In 84 % of children, VP-16 plasma concentrations (0.1-1.5 μg/mL) were quantifiable 72 h after the end of the drug infusion, i.e. when allo-HSCT should be performed. In 20 (65 %) children allo-HSCT was performed 4 days after the end of the drug infusion, and VP-16 was still detectable (0.1-0.9 μg/mL) in plasma of 12 (39 %) of them. Post-transplant ALL relapse occurred in four children, in all of them VP-16 was detectable in plasma (0.1-0.8 μg/mL) on allo-HSCT day, while there was no relapse in children with undetectable VP-16. In in vitro studies, VP-16 demonstrated impact on the proliferation activity of stimulated lymphocytes depending on its concentration and exposition time. The presence of VP-16 in plasma on allo-HSCT day may demonstrate an adverse effect on graft-versus-leukemia (GvL) reaction and increase the risk of post-transplant ALL relapse. Therefore, if 72 h after VP-16 administration its plasma concentration is still above 0.1 μg/mL then the postponement of transplantation for next 24 h should be considered to protect GvL effector cells from transplant material.

  12. Current and emerging treatment options for hairy cell leukemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    López-Rubio M

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Montserrat López-Rubio,1 Jose Antonio Garcia-Marco2 1Department of Hematology, Hospital Universitario Príncipe de Asturias, Alcalá de Henares, 2Department of Hematology, Hospital Universitario Puerta de Hierro Majadahonda, Majadahonda, Madrid, Spain Abstract: Hairy cell leukemia (HCL is a lymphoproliferative B-cell disorder characterized by pancytopenia, splenomegaly, and characteristic cytoplasmic hairy projections. Precise diagnosis is essential in order to differentiate classic forms from HCL variants, such as the HCL-variant and VH4-34 molecular variant, which are more resistant to available treatments. The current standard of care is treatment with purine analogs (PAs, such as cladribine or pentostatin, which provide a high rate of long-lasting clinical remissions. Nevertheless, ~30%–40% of the patients relapse, and moreover, some of these are difficult-to-treat refractory cases. The use of the monoclonal antibody rituximab in combination with PA appears to produce even higher responses, and it is often employed to minimize or eliminate residual disease. Currently, research in the field of HCL is focused on identifying novel therapeutic targets and potential agents that are safe and can universally cure the disease. The discovery of the BRAF mutation and progress in understanding the biology of the disease has enabled the scientific community to explore new therapeutic targets. Ongoing clinical trials are assessing various treatment strategies such as the combination of PA and anti-CD20 monoclonal antibodies, recombinant immunotoxins targeting CD22, BRAF inhibitors, and B-cell receptor signal inhibitors. Keywords: hairy cell leukemia, purine analogs, rituximab, immunotoxins, vemurafenib, ibrutinib

  13. Leukemia cutis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Varuna Mallya

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Patients with leukemia may show involvement of the skin. This skin involvement can be due to infiltration of skin by leukemic cells or it may be a part of nonspecific cutaneous manifestations. Leukemia cutis is the infiltration of neoplastic leucocytes or their precursors into the skin resulting in extensive clinical manifestations. Described mostly in acute myeloid leukemia and acute myelocytic monocytic leukemia, it is rare in chronic myeloid leukemia and is seen mostly during the blast crises. Its presence signals poor prognosis.

  14. Functional expression of P2X family receptors in macrophages is affected by microenvironment in mouse T cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Shayan; Feng, Wenli; Yang, Xiao; Yang, Wanzhu; Ru, Yongxin; Liao, Jinfeng; Wang, Lina; Lin, Yongmin; Ren, Qian [State Key Laboratory of Experimental Hematology, Institute of Hematology and Blood Diseases Hospital, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences and Peking Union Medical College, Tianjin 300020 (China); Zheng, Guoguang, E-mail: zhengggtjchn@aliyun.com [State Key Laboratory of Experimental Hematology, Institute of Hematology and Blood Diseases Hospital, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences and Peking Union Medical College, Tianjin 300020 (China); Center for Stem Cell Medicine, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences, Beijing 100730 (China)

    2014-04-18

    Highlights: • We study the impact of leukemic microenvironment on P2X family receptors in Mφs. • Bone marrow and spleen Mφs are studied in Notch1-induced mouse leukemia model. • Increased expression of P2X7R is found in Mφs during the development of leukemia. • Elevated P2X7R-mediated calcium response is found in Mφs at late stage of leukemia. • More apoptotic Mφs are found in bone marrow and spleen at late stage of leukemia. - Abstract: Nucleotides are important players in intercellular signaling communication network. P2X family receptors (P2XRs) are ATP-gated plasma membrane ion channels with diverse biological functions. Macrophages are important components in the microenvironment of hematopoiesis participating in both physiological and pathological processes. However, the role of P2XRs in macrophages in leukemia has not been established. Here we investigated expression pattern and functions of P2XRs in macrophages from bone marrow (BM) and spleen of Notch1-induced T-ALL mice. Real-time PCR showed that P2XRs except P2X5R were expressed in BM and spleen macrophages. Furthermore, with the development of leukemia, the expression of P2X7R increased in both BM and spleen macrophages whereas expression of P2X1R increased in spleen macrophages. Live cell imaging recoding the Ca{sup 2+} response demonstrated that P2X7R expressed in macrophages was functional. TUNEL and electron microscopy analysis found that apoptotic macrophages were frequently observed in BM and spleen at late stage of leukemia, which was partly contributed by the activation of overexpressed P2X7R. Our results suggested that the intercellular communication mediated by nucleotides might orchestrate in the pathological process of leukemia and could be a potential target for the treatment of leukemia.

  15. Discrimination and classification of acute lymphoblastic leukemia cells by Raman spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Managò, Stefano; Valente, Carmen; Mirabelli, Peppino; De Luca, Anna Chiara

    2015-05-01

    Currently, a combination of technologies is typically required to identify and classify leukemia cells. These methods often lack the specificity and sensitivity necessary for early and accurate diagnosis. Here, we demonstrate the use of Raman spectroscopy to identify normal B cells, collected from healthy patients, and three ALL cell lines (RS4;11, REH and MN60 at different differentiation level, respectively). Raman markers associated with DNA and protein vibrational modes have been identified that exhibit excellent discriminating power for leukemia cell identification. Principal Component Analysis was finally used to confirm the significance of these markers for identify leukemia cells and classifying the data. The obtained results indicate a sorting accuracy of 96% between the three leukemia cell lines.

  16. Functional inhibition of mesenchymal stromal cells in acute myeloid leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geyh, S; Rodríguez-Paredes, M; Jäger, P; Khandanpour, C; Cadeddu, R-P; Gutekunst, J; Wilk, C M; Fenk, R; Zilkens, C; Hermsen, D; Germing, U; Kobbe, G; Lyko, F; Haas, R; Schroeder, T

    2016-03-01

    Hematopoietic insufficiency is the hallmark of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) and predisposes patients to life-threatening complications such as bleeding and infections. Addressing the contribution of mesenchymal stromal cells (MSC) to AML-induced hematopoietic failure we show that MSC from AML patients (n=64) exhibit significant growth deficiency and impaired osteogenic differentiation capacity. This was molecularly reflected by a specific methylation signature affecting pathways involved in cell differentiation, proliferation and skeletal development. In addition, we found distinct alterations of hematopoiesis-regulating factors such as Kit-ligand and Jagged1 accompanied by a significantly diminished ability to support CD34+ hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells in long-term culture-initiating cells (LTC-ICs) assays. This deficient osteogenic differentiation and insufficient stromal support was reversible and correlated with disease status as indicated by Osteocalcin serum levels and LTC-IC frequencies returning to normal values at remission. In line with this, cultivation of healthy MSC in conditioned medium from four AML cell lines resulted in decreased proliferation and osteogenic differentiation. Taken together, AML-derived MSC are molecularly and functionally altered and contribute to hematopoietic insufficiency. Inverse correlation with disease status and adoption of an AML-like phenotype after exposure to leukemic conditions suggests an instructive role of leukemic cells on bone marrow microenvironment.

  17. Enhancement of anti-leukemia activity of NK cells in vitro and in vivo by inhibition of leukemia cell-induced NK cell damage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arriga, Roberto; Caratelli, Sara; Coppola, Andrea; Spagnoli, Giulio Cesare; Venditti, Adriano; Amadori, Sergio; Lanzilli, Giulia; Lauro, Davide; Palomba, Patrizia; Sconocchia, Tommaso; Del Principe, Maria Ilaria; Maurillo, Luca; Buccisano, Francesco; Capuani, Barbara; Ferrone, Soldano; Sconocchia, Giuseppe

    2016-01-12

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) cells induce, in vitro, NK cell abnormalities (NKCAs) including apoptosis and activating receptor down-regulation. The potential negative impact of AML cells on the therapeutic efficacy of NK cell-based strategies prompted us to analyze the mechanisms underlying NKCAs and to develop approaches to protect NK cells from NKCAs. NKCA induction by the AML leukemia cells target a subpopulation of peripheral blood NK cells and is interleukin-2 independent but is abrogated by a long-term culture of NK (LTNK) cells at 37°C. LTNK cells displayed a significantly enhanced ability to damage AML cells in vitro and inhibited the subcutaneous growth of ML-2 cells grafted into CB17 SCID mice. Actinomycin D restored the susceptibility of LTNK cells to NKCAs while TAPI-0, a functional analog of the tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase (TIMP) 3, inhibits ML-2 cell-induced NKCAs suggesting that the generation of NK cell resistance to NKCAs involves RNA transcription and metalloproteinase (MPP) inactivation. This conclusion is supported by the reduced susceptibility to AML cell-induced NKCAs of LTNK cells in which TIMP3 gene and protein are over-expressed. This information may contribute to the rational design of targeted strategies to enhance the efficacy of NK cell-based-immunotherapy of AML with haploidentical NK cells.

  18. Mixed phenotype acute leukemia with t(9;22): success with nonacute myeloid leukemia-type intensive induction therapy and stem cell transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Onyee; Jamil, Abdur Rehman; Millius, Rebecca; Kaur, Ramandeep; Anwer, Faiz

    2017-04-01

    Mixed phenotype acute leukemia with t(9;22) is a rare disease with poor prognosis, and information on optimal treatment is limited. We describe a case where our patient experienced positive outcome after nonacute myeloid leukemia-type intensive induction therapy followed by postremission therapy with stem cell transplant.

  19. Mast cell leukemia with prolonged survival on PKC412/midostaurin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Xiangdong; Kreisel, Friederike H; Frater, John L; Hassan, Anjum

    2014-01-01

    Mast cell leukemia (MCL) is a rare and aggressive form of systemic mastocytosis. There are approximately 50 reported cases since 1950s. MCL is refractory to cytoreduction chemotherapy and the average survival is only six months. We report a MCL case in a 71 year-old woman with high tumor load at the initial presentation in 2005, who did not respond to either interleukin-2 or dasatinib therapy. After enrolled in a clinical trial of PKC412 (or Midostaurin) with a daily dose of 100 mg, the patient responded well to PKC412 and became transfusion independent in three months. Since then, her disease had been stably controlled. This is the first report of a high-tumor-load MCL case which achieved prolonged survival (101 months) by PKC 412. The 101-month overall survival is the longest among reported MCL cases in the English literature.

  20. Maintenance of leukemia-initiating cells is regulated by the CDK inhibitor Inca1.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicole Bäumer

    Full Text Available Functional differences between healthy progenitor and cancer initiating cells may provide unique opportunities for targeted therapy approaches. Hematopoietic stem cells are tightly controlled by a network of CDK inhibitors that govern proliferation and prevent stem cell exhaustion. Loss of Inca1 led to an increased number of short-term hematopoietic stem cells in older mice, but Inca1 seems largely dispensable for normal hematopoiesis. On the other hand, Inca1-deficiency enhanced cell cycling upon cytotoxic stress and accelerated bone marrow exhaustion. Moreover, AML1-ETO9a-induced proliferation was not sustained in Inca1-deficient cells in vivo. As a consequence, leukemia induction and leukemia maintenance were severely impaired in Inca1-/- bone marrow cells. The re-initiation of leukemia was also significantly inhibited in absence of Inca1-/- in MLL-AF9- and c-myc/BCL2-positive leukemia mouse models. These findings indicate distinct functional properties of Inca1 in normal hematopoietic cells compared to leukemia initiating cells. Such functional differences might be used to design specific therapy approaches in leukemia.

  1. Salinomycin inhibits Wnt signaling and selectively induces apoptosis in chronic lymphocytic leukemia cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Desheng; Choi, Michael Y; Yu, Jian; Castro, Januario E; Kipps, Thomas J; Carson, Dennis A

    2011-08-09

    Salinomycin, an antibiotic potassium ionophore, has been reported recently to act as a selective breast cancer stem cell inhibitor, but the biochemical basis for its anticancer effects is not clear. The Wnt/β-catenin signal transduction pathway plays a central role in stem cell development, and its aberrant activation can cause cancer. In this study, we identified salinomycin as a potent inhibitor of the Wnt signaling cascade. In Wnt-transfected HEK293 cells, salinomycin blocked the phosphorylation of the Wnt coreceptor lipoprotein receptor related protein 6 (LRP6) and induced its degradation. Nigericin, another potassium ionophore with activity against cancer stem cells, exerted similar effects. In otherwise unmanipulated chronic lymphocytic leukemia cells with constitutive Wnt activation nanomolar concentrations of salinomycin down-regulated the expression of Wnt target genes such as LEF1, cyclin D1, and fibronectin, depressed LRP6 levels, and limited cell survival. Normal human peripheral blood lymphocytes resisted salinomycin toxicity. These results indicate that ionic changes induced by salinomycin and related drugs inhibit proximal Wnt signaling by interfering with LPR6 phosphorylation, and thus impair the survival of cells that depend on Wnt signaling at the plasma membrane.

  2. Th17 cells and interleukin-17 increase with poor prognosis in patients with acute myeloid leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Yixiang; Ye, Aifang; Bi, Laixi; Wu, Jianbo; Yu, Kang; Zhang, Shenghui

    2014-08-01

    Although Th17 cells play crucial roles in the pathogenesis of many autoimmune and inflammatory disorders, their roles in malignancies are currently under debate. The role and mechanism of Th17 cells in patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) remain poorly understood. Here we demonstrated that the frequency of Th17 cells was significantly increased in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) and bone marrow mononuclear cells from AML patients compared with healthy donors. Plasma levels of interleukin (IL)-17, IL-22, IL-23, IL-1β, IL-6, and transforming growth factor (TGF)-β1 were significantly increased in blood and bone marrow in AML patients compared with healthy donors. The in vitro experiments demonstrated that IL-1β, IL-6, IL-23, but not TGF-β1 promoted the generation and differentiation of Th17 cells from naive CD4(+) T cells in humans. IL-17A, a signature cytokine secreted by Th17 cells, induced the proliferation of IL-17 receptor (IL-17R)-positive AML cells via IL-17R, in which activation of PI3K/Akt and Jak/Stat3 signaling pathway may play important roles. In addition, combination of IL-17A and IL-22 significantly reduced the generation of Th1 cells and the production of interferon (IFN)-γ from healthy donor or AML patient peripheral blood mononuclear cells. Patients with high Th17 cell frequency had poor prognosis, whereas patients with high Th1 cell frequency had prolonged survival. Combined analysis of Th1 and Th17 cell frequencies improved the ability to predict patient outcomes. In conclusion, Th17 cells play a crucial role in the pathogenesis of AML and may be an important therapeutic target and prognostic predictor.

  3. Gold nanoparticle-enhanced electroporation for leukemia cell transfection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Shuyan; Zu, Yingbo; Wang, Shengnian

    2014-01-01

    Electroporation serves as an attractive nonviral gene delivery approach for its effectiveness, operational simplicity, and no restrictions of probe or cell type. The commercial electroporation systems have been widely adopted in research and clinics with protocols usually compromising appropriate transfection efficiency and cell viability. By introducing gold nanoparticles (AuNPs), we demonstrated greatly enhanced performance of electroporation from two aspects: the highly conductive, naked AuNPs help reduce the potential drop consumed by the electroporation solution so that the majority of the applied voltage of an electric pulse is truly imposed on cells with enhanced field strength; AuNPs with targeting ligands (e.g., transferrin-AuNPs or Tf-AuNPs) are bound to the cell membrane, working as virtual microelectrodes to create pores on cells with limited opening area while from many different sites. The addition of AuNPs during electroporation therefore benefits not only quicker recovery and better survival of cells but also more efficient uptake of the subjected probes. Such enhancement was successfully confirmed on a chronic myeloid leukemia cell line (i.e., K562 cells) in both a commercial batch electroporation system and a homemade flow system with pWizGFP plasmid DNA probes. The efficiency was found to be dependent on the size, concentration, and mixing ratio of free AuNPs/Tf-AuNPs. An equivalent mixture of free AuNPs and Tf-AuNPs exhibited the best enhancement with the transfection efficiency increase of two to threefold at a minimum sacrifice of the cell viability.

  4. Ayanin diacetate-induced cell death is amplified by TRAIL in human leukemia cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marrero, Maria Teresa; Estevez, Sara; Negrin, Gledy; Quintana, Jose [Departamento de Bioquimica, Unidad Asociada al Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Cientificas, Universidad de Las Palmas de Gran Canaria, Plaza Dr. Pasteur s/n, 35016 Las Palmas de Gran Canaria (Spain); Lopez, Mariana; Perez, Francisco J.; Triana, Jorge [Departamento de Quimica, Universidad de Las Palmas de Gran Canaria, Instituto Canario de Investigacion del Cancer, 35017 Las Palmas de Gran Canaria (Spain); Leon, Francisco [Instituto de Productos Naturales y Agrobiologia, Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Cientificas, Avda. Astrofisico F. Sanchez 3, 38206 La Laguna, Tenerife (Spain); Estevez, Francisco, E-mail: festevez@dbbf.ulpgc.es [Departamento de Bioquimica, Unidad Asociada al Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Cientificas, Universidad de Las Palmas de Gran Canaria, Plaza Dr. Pasteur s/n, 35016 Las Palmas de Gran Canaria (Spain)

    2012-11-09

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Ayanin diacetate as apoptotic inducer in leukemia cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Cell death was prevented by caspase inhibitors and by the overexpression of Bcl-x{sub L}. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The intrinsic and the extrinsic pathways are involved in the mechanism of action. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Death receptors are up-regulated and TRAIL enhances apoptotic cell death. -- Abstract: Here we demonstrate that the semi-synthetic flavonoid ayanin diacetate induces cell death selectively in leukemia cells without affecting the proliferation of normal lymphocytes. Incubation of human leukemia cells with ayanin diacetate induced G{sub 2}-M phase cell cycle arrest and apoptosis which was prevented by the non-specific caspase inhibitor z-VAD-fmk and reduced by the overexpression of Bcl-x{sub L}. Ayanin diacetate-induced cell death was found to be associated with: (i) loss of inner mitochondrial membrane potential, (ii) the release of cytochrome c, (iii) the activation of multiple caspases, (iv) cleavage of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase and (v) the up-regulation of death receptors for TRAIL, DR4 and DR5. Moreover, the combined treatment with ayanin diacetate and TRAIL amplified cell death, compared to single treatments. These results provide a basis for further exploring the potential applications of this combination for the treatment of cancer.

  5. Targeting Aberrant Glutathione Metabolism to Eradicate Human Acute Myelogenous Leukemia Cells*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pei, Shanshan; Minhajuddin, Mohammad; Callahan, Kevin P.; Balys, Marlene; Ashton, John M.; Neering, Sarah J.; Lagadinou, Eleni D.; Corbett, Cheryl; Ye, Haobin; Liesveld, Jane L.; O'Dwyer, Kristen M.; Li, Zheng; Shi, Lei; Greninger, Patricia; Settleman, Jeffrey; Benes, Cyril; Hagen, Fred K.; Munger, Joshua; Crooks, Peter A.; Becker, Michael W.; Jordan, Craig T.

    2013-01-01

    The development of strategies to eradicate primary human acute myelogenous leukemia (AML) cells is a major challenge to the leukemia research field. In particular, primitive leukemia cells, often termed leukemia stem cells, are typically refractory to many forms of therapy. To investigate improved strategies for targeting of human AML cells we compared the molecular mechanisms regulating oxidative state in primitive (CD34+) leukemic versus normal specimens. Our data indicate that CD34+ AML cells have elevated expression of multiple glutathione pathway regulatory proteins, presumably as a mechanism to compensate for increased oxidative stress in leukemic cells. Consistent with this observation, CD34+ AML cells have lower levels of reduced glutathione and increased levels of oxidized glutathione compared with normal CD34+ cells. These findings led us to hypothesize that AML cells will be hypersensitive to inhibition of glutathione metabolism. To test this premise, we identified compounds such as parthenolide (PTL) or piperlongumine that induce almost complete glutathione depletion and severe cell death in CD34+ AML cells. Importantly, these compounds only induce limited and transient glutathione depletion as well as significantly less toxicity in normal CD34+ cells. We further determined that PTL perturbs glutathione homeostasis by a multifactorial mechanism, which includes inhibiting key glutathione metabolic enzymes (GCLC and GPX1), as well as direct depletion of glutathione. These findings demonstrate that primitive leukemia cells are uniquely sensitive to agents that target aberrant glutathione metabolism, an intrinsic property of primary human AML cells. PMID:24089526

  6. Asymptomatic T-cell large granular lymphocyte leukemia with an unusual immunophenotype

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Panagiota K. Petsa

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available T-cell large granular lymphocyte (T-LGL leukemia represents a clonal proliferation of cytotoxic T-cells which etiology has not been entirely elucidated. However, CD4+, CD4–,CD8–, CD4+, CD8+ cases have been described. The disease is usually characterized by cytopenias and a modest lymphocytosis. The majority of patients with T-LGL leukemia remains asymptomatic for a long period and will require treatment later during the course of their disease. Hereby we describe a case of T-LGL leukemia diagnosed by flow cytometry, which presented indolent course and required no treatment so far.

  7. Synergistic interactions between HDAC and sirtuin inhibitors in human leukemia cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michele Cea

    Full Text Available Aberrant histone deacetylase (HDAC activity is frequent in human leukemias. However, while classical, NAD(+-independent HDACs are an established therapeutic target, the relevance of NAD(+-dependent HDACs (sirtuins in leukemia treatment remains unclear. Here, we assessed the antileukemic activity of sirtuin inhibitors and of the NAD(+-lowering drug FK866, alone and in combination with traditional HDAC inhibitors. Primary leukemia cells, leukemia cell lines, healthy leukocytes and hematopoietic progenitors were treated with sirtuin inhibitors (sirtinol, cambinol, EX527 and with FK866, with or without addition of the HDAC inhibitors valproic acid, sodium butyrate, and vorinostat. Cell death was quantified by propidium iodide cell staining and subsequent flow-cytometry. Apoptosis induction was monitored by cell staining with FITC-Annexin-V/propidium iodide or with TMRE followed by flow-cytometric analysis, and by measuring caspase3/7 activity. Intracellular Bax was detected by flow-cytometry and western blotting. Cellular NAD(+ levels were measured by enzymatic cycling assays. Bax was overexpressed by retroviral transduction. Bax and SIRT1 were silenced by RNA-interference. Sirtuin inhibitors and FK866 synergistically enhanced HDAC inhibitor activity in leukemia cells, but not in healthy leukocytes and hematopoietic progenitors. In leukemia cells, HDAC inhibitors were found to induce upregulation of Bax, a pro-apoptotic Bcl2 family-member whose translocation to mitochondria is normally prevented by SIRT1. As a result, leukemia cells become sensitized to sirtuin inhibitor-induced apoptosis. In conclusion, NAD(+-independent HDACs and sirtuins cooperate in leukemia cells to avoid apoptosis. Combining sirtuin with HDAC inhibitors results in synergistic antileukemic activity that could be therapeutically exploited.

  8. Adult T-cell leukemia: a review of epidemiological evidence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masako eIwanaga

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Adult T-cell leukemia (ATL is an aggressive T-cell malignancy caused by human T-cell leukemia virus type I (HTLV-1 infection and often occurs in HTLV-1-endemic areas, such as southwestern Japan, the Caribbean islands, Central and South America, Intertropical Africa, and Middle East. To date, many epidemiological studies have been conducted to investigate the incidence of ATL among general population or HTLV-1 carriers and to identify a variety of laboratory, molecular, and host-specific markers to be possible predictive factors for developing ATL because HTLV-1 infection alone is not sufficient to develop ATL. This literature review focuses on the epidemiology of ATL and the risk factors for the development of ATL from HTLV-1 carriers, while keeping information on the epidemiology of HTLV-1 to a minimum. The main lines of epidemiological evidence are: (1 ATL occurs mostly in adults, at least 20–30 years after the HTLV-1 infection, (2 age at onset differs across geographic areas: the average age in the Central and South America (around 40 years old is younger than that in Japan (around 60 years old, (3 ATL occurs in those infected in childhood, but seldom occurs in those infected in adulthood, (4 male carriers have about a 3–5 fold higher risk of developing ATL than female, (5 the estimated life-time risk of developing ATL in HTLV-1 carriers is 6–7% for men and 2–3% for women in Japan, (6 a low anti-Tax reactivity, a high soluble interleukin-2 receptor level, a high anti-HTLV-1 titer, and high levels of circulating abnormal lymphocytes and white blood cell count are accepted risk factors for the development of ATL, and (7 a higher proviral load (more than 4 copies/100 peripheral blood mononuclear cells is an independent risk factor for progression of ATL. Nevertheless, the current epidemiological evidence is insufficient to fully understand the relationship between HTLV-1 infection and ATL. Further well-designed epidemiological studies

  9. Apigenin induces apoptosis in human leukemia cells and exhibits anti-leukemic activity in vivo

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Budhraja, Amit; Gao, Ning; Zhang, Zhuo; Son, Young-Ok; Cheng, Senping; Wang, Xin; Ding, Songze; Hitron, Andrew; Chen, Gang; Luo, Jia; Shi, Xianglin

    2012-01-01

    In this study, we investigated the functional role of Akt and c-jun-NH(2)-kinase (JNK) signaling cascades in apigenin-induced apoptosis in U937 human leukemia cells and anti-leukemic activity of apigenin in vivo...

  10. Allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation for chronic myelomonocytic leukemia:a report of 12 patients

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    孙于谦

    2013-01-01

    Objective To retrospectively review the efficacy of allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation(allo-HSCT)for chronic myelomonocytic leukemia(CMML).Methods The engraftment,graft versus host disease(GVHD)

  11. Leukemia cell microvesicles promote survival in umbilical cord blood hematopoietic stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Razmkhah, Farnaz; Soleimani, Masoud; Mehrabani, Davood; Karimi, Mohammad Hossein; Kafi-Abad, Sedigheh Amini

    2015-01-01

    Microvesicles can transfer their contents, proteins and RNA, to target cells and thereby transform them. This may induce apoptosis or survival depending on cell origin and the target cell. In this study, we investigate the effect of leukemic cell microvesicles on umbilical cord blood hematopoietic stem cells to seek evidence of apoptosis or cell survival. Microvesicles were isolated from both healthy donor bone marrow samples and Jurkat cells by ultra-centrifugation and were added to hematopoietic stem cells sorted from umbilical cord blood samples by magnetic associated cell sorting (MACS) technique. After 7 days, cell count, cell viability, flow cytometry analysis for hematopoietic stem cell markers and qPCR for P53 gene expression were performed. The results showed higher cell number, higher cell viability rate and lower P53 gene expression in leukemia group in comparison with normal and control groups. Also, CD34 expression as the most important hematopoietic stem cell marker, did not change during the treatment and lineage differentiation was not observed. In conclusion, this study showed anti-apoptotic effect of leukemia cell derived microvesicles on umbilical cord blood hematopoietic stem cells.

  12. The quality and quantity of leukemia-derived dendritic cells from patients with acute myeloid leukemia and myelodysplastic syndrome are a predictive factor for the lytic potential of dendritic cells-primed leukemia-specific T cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grabrucker, Christine; Liepert, Anja; Dreyig, Julia; Kremser, Andreas; Kroell, Tanja; Freudenreich, Markus; Schmid, Christoph; Schweiger, Cornelia; Tischer, Johanna; Kolb, Hans-Jochen; Schmetzer, Helga

    2010-06-01

    Adoptive immunotherapy is an important therapy option to reduce relapse rates after stem-cell transplantation in patients suffering from acute myeloid leukemia and myelodysplastic syndromes. Myeloid leukemic cells can regularly be induced to differentiate into leukemia-derived dendritic cells (DC(leu)), regaining the stimulatory capacity of professional dendritic cells (DCs) while presenting the known/unknown leukemic antigen repertoire. So far, induced antileukemic T-cell responses are variable or even mediate opposite effects. To further elicit DC/DC(leu)-induced T-cell-response patterns, we generated DC from 17 Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) and 2 myelodysplastic syndrome cases and carried out flowcytometry and (functional) nonradioactive fluorolysis assays before/after mixed lymphocyte cultures of matched (allogeneic) donor T cells (n=6), T cells prepared at relapse after stem-cell transplantation (n=4) or (autologous) patients' T cells (n=7) with blast containing mononuclear cells ("MNC") or DC(leu) ("DC"). Compared with "MNC", "DC" were better mediators of antileukemic-activity, although not in every case effective. We could define DC subtypes and cut-off proportions of DC subtypes/qualities (mature DC/DC(leu)) after "DC" priming, which were predictive for an antileukemic activity of primed T cells and the clinical course of the disease after immunotherapy (allogeneic stem-cell transplantation/donor lymphocytes infusion/therapy). In summary, our data show that the composition and quality of DC after a mixed lymphocyte culture-priming phase is predictive for a successful ex vivo antileukemic response, especially with respect to proportions of mature and leukemia-derived DC. These data contribute not only to predict DC-mediated functions or the clinical course of the diseases but also to develop and refine DC-vaccination strategies that may pave the way to develop and modify adoptive immunotherapy, especially for patients at relapse after allogeneic stem-cell

  13. B Cell Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia Presenting as a Bile Duct Stricture Diagnosed With Cholangioscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartel, Michael J.; Jiang, Liuyan; Lukens, Frank

    2016-01-01

    Indeterminate biliary strictures represent a diagnostic challenge requiring further work-up, which encompasses a variety of diagnostic modalities. We report a very rare case of B-cell acute lymphocytic leukemia presenting as a biliary stricture following remission of acute myeloid leukemia, which was initially treated with allogenic stem cell transplant. After multiple diagnostic modalities were implemented with no success, the use of cholangioscopy-guided biopsies was the key for the final diagnosis.

  14. Chaetoglobosin A preferentially induces apoptosis in chronic lymphocytic leukemia cells by targeting the cytoskeleton

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knudsen, Peter Boldsen; Hanna, B.; Ohl, S.

    2014-01-01

    Chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) is an incurable malignancy of mature B cells. One of the major challenges in treatment of CLL is the achievement of a complete remission to prevent relapse of disease originating from cells within lymphoid tissues and subsequent chemoresistance. In search for no...... with PI3K and BTK inhibitors, suggesting this compound as a novel potential drug for CLL.Leukemia accepted article preview online, 27 November 2013. doi:10.1038/leu.2013.360....

  15. Successful hematopoietic cell transplantation in a patient with X-linked agammaglobulinemia and acute myeloid leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abu-Arja, Rolla F; Chernin, Leah R; Abusin, Ghada; Auletta, Jeffery; Cabral, Linda; Egler, Rachel; Ochs, Hans D; Torgerson, Troy R; Lopez-Guisa, Jesus; Hostoffer, Robert W; Tcheurekdjian, Haig; Cooke, Kenneth R

    2015-09-01

    X-linked agammaglobulinemia (XLA) is a primary immunodeficiency characterized by marked reduction in all classes of serum immunoglobulins and the near absence of mature CD19(+) B-cells. Although malignancy has been observed in patients with XLA, we present the first reported case of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) in a patient with XLA. We also demonstrate the complete correction of the XLA phenotype following allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation for treatment of the patient's leukemia.

  16. Chronic Myeloid Leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leukemia is cancer of the white blood cells. White blood cells help your body fight infection. Your blood cells form in your bone marrow. In leukemia, the bone marrow produces abnormal white blood cells. ...

  17. Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leukemia is cancer of the white blood cells. White blood cells help your body fight infection. Your blood cells form in your bone marrow. In leukemia, the bone marrow produces abnormal white blood cells. ...

  18. [Ribonuclease binase induces death in T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia cells by apoptosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burnysheva, K M; Petrushanko, I Yu; Spirin, P V; Prassolov, V S; Makarov, A A; Mitkevich, V A

    2016-01-01

    Bacterial ribonuclease binase is a potential anticancer agent. In the present study, we have determined the toxic effect of binase towards cell lines of T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia Jurkat and CEMss. We have shown that binase induces apoptosis in these cells. At the same time, binase does not cause toxic effects in leukocytes of healthy donors, which suggests that binase activity towards leukemic cells is selective. We have found that the treatment of cancer cells with binase leads to a reduction in reactive oxygen species and transcription factor NFκB levels, and demonstrated that these effects are a common feature of the action of RNases on cancer cells.

  19. REGULATORY T-CELLS IN CHRONIC LYMPHOCYTIC LEUKEMIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giovanni D'arena

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available

    Regulatory T-cells (Tregs constitute a small subset of cells that are actively involved in maintaining self-tolerance, in immune homeostasis and in antitumor immunity. They are thought to play a significant role in the progression of cancer and are generally increased in patient with chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL. Their number correlates with more aggressive disease status and is predictive of the time to treatment, as well. Moreover, it is now clear that dysregulation in Tregs cell frequency and/or function may result in a plethora of autoimmune diseases, including multiple sclerosis, type 1 diabetes mellitus, myasthenia gravis, systemic lupus erythematosis, autoimmune lymphoproliferative disorders, rheumatoid arthritis, and psoriasis. Efforts are made aiming to develop approaches to deplete Tregs or inhibit their function in either cancer and autoimmune disorders.

  20. Apoptotic Mechanism of Human Leukemia K562/A02 Cells Induced by Magnetic Ferroferric Oxide Nanoparticles Loaded with Wogonin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miao-Xin Peng

    2016-01-01

    Conclusions: This study demonstrated that MNPs were the effective drug delivery vehicles to deliver wogonin to the leukemia cells. Through increasing cells arrested at G0/G1-phase and inducing apoptosis of K562/A02 cells, MNPs could enhance the therapeutic effects of wogonin on leukemia cells. These findings indicated that MNPs loaded with wogonin could provide a promising way for better leukemia treatment.

  1. The receptors for gibbon ape leukemia virus and amphotropic murine leukemia virus are not downregulated in productively infected cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eiden Maribeth V

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Over the last several decades it has been noted, using a variety of different methods, that cells infected by a specific gammaretrovirus are resistant to infection by other retroviruses that employ the same receptor; a phenomenon termed receptor interference. Receptor masking is thought to provide an earlier means of blocking superinfection, whereas receptor down regulation is generally considered to occur in chronically infected cells. Results We used replication-competent GFP-expressing viruses containing either an amphotropic murine leukemia virus (A-MLV or the gibbon ape leukemia virus (GALV envelope. We also constructed similar viruses containing fluorescence-labeled Gag proteins for the detection of viral particles. Using this repertoire of reagents together with a wide range of antibodies, we were able to determine the presence and availability of viral receptors, and detect viral envelope proteins and particles presence on the cell surface of chronically infected cells. Conclusions A-MLV or GALV receptors remain on the surface of chronically infected cells and are detectable by respective antibodies, indicating that these receptors are not downregulated in these infected cells as previously proposed. We were also able to detect viral envelope proteins on the infected cell surface and infected cells are unable to bind soluble A-MLV or GALV envelopes indicating that receptor binding sites are masked by endogenously expressed A-MLV or GALV viral envelope. However, receptor masking does not completely prevent A-MLV or GALV superinfection.

  2. Human T-cell leukemia virus type I (HTLV-I infection and the onset of adult T-cell leukemia (ATL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matsuoka Masao

    2005-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The clinical entity of adult T-cell leukemia (ATL was established around 1977, and human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-I was subsequently identified in 1980. In the 25 years since the discovery of HTLV-I, HTLV-I infection and its associated diseases have been extensively studied, and many of their aspects have been clarified. However, the detailed mechanism of leukemogenesis remains unsolved yet, and the prognosis of ATL patients still poor because of its resistance to chemotherapy and immunodeficiency. In this review, I highlight the recent progress and remaining enigmas in HTLV-I infection and its associated diseases, especially ATL.

  3. Oncogenic NRAS Primes Primary Acute Myeloid Leukemia Cells for Differentiation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cornelia Brendel

    Full Text Available RAS mutations are frequently found among acute myeloid leukemia patients (AML, generating a constitutively active signaling protein changing cellular proliferation, differentiation and apoptosis. We have previously shown that treatment of AML patients with high-dose cytarabine is preferentially beneficial for those harboring oncogenic RAS. On the basis of a murine AML cell culture model, we ascribed this effect to a RAS-driven, p53-dependent induction of differentiation. Hence, in this study we sought to confirm the correlation between RAS status and differentiation of primary blasts obtained from AML patients. The gene expression signature of AML blasts with oncogenic NRAS indeed corresponded to a more mature profile compared to blasts with wildtype RAS, as demonstrated by gene set enrichment analysis (GSEA and real-time PCR analysis of myeloid ecotropic viral integration site 1 homolog (MEIS1 in a unique cohort of AML patients. In addition, in vitro cell culture experiments with established cell lines and a second set of primary AML cells showed that oncogenic NRAS mutations predisposed cells to cytarabine (AraC driven differentiation. Taken together, our findings show that AML with inv(16 and NRAS mutation have a differentiation gene signature, supporting the notion that NRAS mutation may predispose leukemic cells to AraC induced differentiation. We therefore suggest that promotion of differentiation pathways by specific genetic alterations could explain the superior treatment outcome after therapy in some AML patient subgroups. Whether a differentiation gene expression status may generally predict for a superior treatment outcome in AML needs to be addressed in future studies.

  4. T-cell chronic lymphocytic leukemia or small-cell variant of T-cell prolymphocytic leukemia: a historical perspective and search for consensus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rashidi, Armin; Fisher, Stephen I

    2015-09-01

    There is a rich history behind the extinct entity 'T-cell chronic lymphocytic leukemia (T-CLL)' and the now-established replacement, small-cell variant of T-cell prolymphocytic leukemia (T-PLL-sv). Herein, we review the history of the events, observations, and discussions that led to this replacement. We also provide a systematic analysis of all previously reported cases of T-PLL-sv as well as our four new additional cases. Despite the higher frequency of a normal karyotype and perhaps an overrepresented CD4(-) CD8(-) immunophenotype among these patients (compared to T-PLL in general) as well as bland morphology (that makes them superficially appear more similar to B-CLL), we argue that the current World Health Organization (WHO)-based classification as T-PLL-sv is adequate and should continue for the time being. Morphologically, T-PLL-sv represents approximately one-fifth of all T-PLL cases. However, morphology alone does not determine the clinical course and should not be the basis for clinical decision making and prognostication. We propose a clonal evolution model in which mature T-cell leukemias classified in the past as T-CLL are perhaps T-PLL diagnosed early in the course of the disease. Future research using next-generation sequencing, comparative genomic hybridization, and molecular array studies, including serial analyses of individual cases over time, is needed to better identify this rarely diagnosed, inherently controversial form of T-cell leukemia. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. Emodin Induces Apoptotic Death in Murine Myelomonocytic Leukemia WEHI-3 Cells In Vitro and Enhances Phagocytosis in Leukemia Mice In Vivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuan-Chang Chang

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Emodin is one of major compounds in rhubarb (Rheum palmatum L., a plant used as herbal medicine in Chinese population. Although many reports have shown that emodin exhibits anticancer activity in many tumor cell types, there is no available information addressing emodin-affected apoptotic responses in the murine leukemia cell line (WEHI-3 and modulation of the immune response in leukemia mice. We investigated that emodin induced cytotoxic effects in vitro and affected WEHI-3 cells in vivo. This study showed that emodin decreased viability and induced DNA fragmentation in WEHI-3 cells. Cells after exposure to emodin for 24 h have shown chromatin condensation and DNA damage. Emodin stimulated the productions of ROS and Ca2+ and reduced the level of ΔΨm by flow cytometry. Our results from Western blotting suggest that emodin triggered apoptosis of WEHI-3 cells through the endoplasmic reticulum (ER stress, caspase cascade-dependent and -independent mitochondrial pathways. In in vivo study, emodin enhanced the levels of B cells and monocytes, and it also reduced the weights of liver and spleen compared with leukemia mice. Emodin promoted phagocytic activity by monocytes and macrophages in comparison to the leukemia mice group. In conclusions, emodin induced apoptotic death in murine leukemia WEHI-3 cells and enhanced phagocytosis in the leukemia animal model.

  6. EFFECTS OF CURCUMIN ON PROLIFERATION AND APOPTOSIS IN ACUTE MYELOID LEUKEMIA CELLS HL-60

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    To investigate the curcumin killing leukemia cells in vitro,. Methods: The myeloid leukemic cell line HL-60 was studied by using cell culture, flow cytometrydetermining DNA content and TUNEL method measuring apoptotic cell percentage. Results: The data showed that curcumin selectively inhibited proliferation of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) HL-60 cell lines in a dose- and time-dependent manner. The growth inhibition rate was gradually increased and reached the peak at concentration of 25 m mol/L curcumin at 24h. The sub-G1 peak appeared after 12h treatment and was increased to 34.4% at 24h. The TUNEL method further certified that apoptotic cells reached 41% at the same phase. Conclusion: curcumin possesses obvious potent of anti-leukemia cell proliferation, which is contributed to the induction of HL-60 cells apoptosis. The concentration and action time of curcumin in vitro provide some reference for clinical use.

  7. A case of systemic mastocytosis associated with acute myeloid leukemia terminating as aleukemic mast cell leukemia after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bae, Mi Hyun; Kim, Hyun-Ki; Park, Chan-Jeoung; Seo, Eul-Ju; Park, Sang Hyuk; Cho, Young-Uk; Jang, Seongsoo; Chi, Hyun-Sook; Lee, Kyu-Hyung

    2013-03-01

    In up to 40% of systemic mastocytosis (SM) cases, an associated clonal hematological non-mast cell lineage disease such as AML is diagnosed before, simultaneously with, or after the diagnosis of SM. A 40-yr-old man was diagnosed with AML with t(8;21)(q22;q22). Mast cells were not noted at diagnosis, but appeared as immature forms at relapse. After allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT), leukemic myeloblasts were not observed; however, neoplastic metachromatic blasts strikingly proliferated during the state of bone marrow aplasia, and finally, aleukemic mast cell leukemia developed. As the disease progressed, we observed serial morphologic changes from immature mast cells with myeloblasts to only metachromatic blasts and atypical mast cells as mast cell leukemia; FISH analysis showed that the neoplastic mast cells originated from the same clone as the leukemic myeloblasts of AML.

  8. The cytotoxic effect of 2-acylated-1,4-naphthohydroquinones on leukemia/lymphoma cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedroza, Diego A.; De Leon, Fernando; Varela-Ramirez, Armando; Lema, Carolina; Aguilera, Renato J.; Mito, Shizue

    2014-01-01

    Here, we tested seven 2-acylated-1,4-hydronaphthoquinones for their cytotoxic effects on a panel of cancer lymphoma/leukemia cells and compared to a non-cancer origin cell line. Several naphthohydroquinones exhibited selective cytotoxic effects on lymphoma/leukemia cells with lowest activity on non-cancer cells. The mode of cell death induced by an acylated naphthohydroquinone, which has a long alkyl chain, was found to be via apoptosis. Furthermore, the naphthohydroquinone provoked mitochondria depolarization and activation of its downstream effector, caspase-3, thus implicating the intrinsic apoptotic pathway as its mechanism to exert cell death. PMID:24368029

  9. Blood Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Patients With Hematologic Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-06-05

    Adult Langerhans Cell Histiocytosis; Childhood Langerhans Cell Histiocytosis; Leukemia; Lymphoma; Multiple Myeloma and Plasma Cell Neoplasm; Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Myelodysplastic/Myeloproliferative Neoplasms

  10. Leukemia cell proliferation and death in chronic lymphocytic leukemia patients on therapy with the BTK inhibitor ibrutinib.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burger, Jan A; Li, Kelvin W; Keating, Michael J; Sivina, Mariela; Amer, Ahmed M; Garg, Naveen; Ferrajoli, Alessandra; Huang, Xuelin; Kantarjian, Hagop; Wierda, William G; O'Brien, Susan; Hellerstein, Marc K; Turner, Scott M; Emson, Claire L; Chen, Shih-Shih; Yan, Xiao-Jie; Wodarz, Dominik; Chiorazzi, Nicholas

    2017-01-26

    BACKGROUND. Ibrutinib is an effective targeted therapy for patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) that inhibits Bruton's tyrosine kinase (BTK), a kinase involved in B cell receptor signaling. METHODS. We used stable isotopic labeling with deuterated water ((2)H2O) to measure directly the effects of ibrutinib on leukemia cell proliferation and death in 30 patients with CLL. RESULTS. The measured average CLL cell proliferation ("birth") rate before ibrutinib therapy was 0.39% of the clone per day (range 0.17%-1.04%); this decreased to 0.05% per day (range 0%-0.36%) with treatment. Death rates of blood CLL cells increased from 0.18% per day (average, range 0%-0.7%) prior to treatment to 1.5% per day (range 0%-3.0%) during ibrutinib therapy, and they were even higher in tissue compartments. CONCLUSIONS. This study provides the first direct in vivo measurements to our knowledge of ibrutinib's antileukemia actions, demonstrating profound and immediate inhibition of CLL cell proliferation and promotion of high rates of CLL cell death. TRIAL REGISTRATION. This trial was registered at clinicaltrials.gov (NCT01752426). FUNDING. This study was supported by a Cancer Center Support Grant (National Cancer Institute grant P30 CA016672), an NIH grant (CA081554) from the National Cancer Institute, MD Anderson's Moon Shots Program in CLL, and Pharmacyclics, an AbbVie company.

  11. Anti-leukemia activity of in vitro-expanded human gamma delta T cells in a xenogeneic Ph+ leukemia model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabrielle M Siegers

    Full Text Available Gamma delta T cells (GDTc lyse a variety of hematological and solid tumour cells in vitro and in vivo, and are thus promising candidates for cellular immunotherapy. We have developed a protocol to expand human GDTc in vitro, yielding highly cytotoxic Vgamma9/Vdelta2 CD27/CD45RA double negative effector memory cells. These cells express CD16, CD45RO, CD56, CD95 and NKG2D. Flow cytometric, clonogenic, and chromium release assays confirmed their specific cytotoxicity against Ph(+ cell lines in vitro. We have generated a fluorescent and bioluminescent Ph(+ cell line, EM-2eGFPluc, and established a novel xenogeneic leukemia model. Intravenous injection of EM-2eGFPluc into NOD.Cg-Prkdcscid Il2rgtm1Wjl/SzJ (NSG mice resulted in significant dose-dependent bone marrow engraftment; lower levels engrafted in blood, lung, liver and spleen. In vitro-expanded human GDTc injected intraperitoneally were found at higher levels in blood and organs compared to those injected intravenously; GDTc survived at least 33 days post-injection. In therapy experiments, we documented decreased bone marrow leukemia burden in mice treated with GDTc. Live GDTc were found in spleen and bone marrow at endpoint, suggesting the potential usefulness of this therapy.

  12. Mannose-exposing myeloid leukemia cells detected by the sCAR-PPA fusion protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Gong Chu; Li, Na; Zhang, Yan Hong; Li, Xin; Wang, Yi Gang; Liu, Xin Yuan; Qian, Wen Bin; Liu, Xiao Chuan

    2009-06-01

    Altered glycosylation may be a hallmark of malignant transformation and cancer progression. In the work described, a specific mannose-binding lectin, Pinellia pedatisecta agglutinin (PPA), was genetically fused with the extracellular domain of coxsackie-adenovirus receptor (CAR) to generate the soluble CAR (sCAR)-PPA fusion protein. The adenoviral transduction of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) cell lines Kasumi-1 and HL-60 was increased by sCAR-PPA, indicating that a fraction of AML cells exposing mannose residues was detected by PPA. However, sCAR-PPA did not increase the adenoviral infection of KG-1 cells, suggesting the mannose exposure of AML cells may be cell type specific. Furthermore, the infectious efficiency of Ad-EGFP in chronic myeloid leukemia cell line K562 was significantly increased by sCAR-PPA as well. We, herein, report that PPA recognized a fraction of myeloid leukemia cells showing mannose-exposing phenotype. The sCAR-PPA fusion protein combined with the adenoviral vector system may provide a useful tool for investigating myeloid leukemia cells exposing mannose residues and further elucidating the role of these cells in the leukemia development.

  13. Differentially expressed cytosolic proteins in human leukemia and lymphoma cell lines correlate with lineages and functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gez, Swetlana; Crossett, Ben; Christopherson, Richard I

    2007-09-01

    Identification of cytosolic proteins differentially expressed between types of leukemia and lymphoma may provide a molecular basis for classification and understanding their cellular properties. Two-dimensional fluorescence difference gel electrophoresis (DIGE) and mass spectrometry have been used to identify proteins that are differentially expressed in cytosolic extracts from four human leukemia and lymphoma cell lines: HL-60 (acute promyelocytic leukemia), MEC1 (B-cell chronic lymphocytic leukemia), CCRF-CEM (T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia) and Raji (B-cell Burkitt's lymphoma). A total of 247 differentially expressed proteins were identified between the four cell lines. Analysis of the data by principal component analysis identified 22 protein spots (17 different protein species) differentially expressed at more than a 95% variance level between these cell lines. Several of these proteins were differentially expressed in only one cell line: HL-60 (myeloperoxidase, phosphoprotein 32 family member A, ras related protein Rab-11B, protein disulfide-isomerase, ran-specific GTPase-activating protein, nucleophosmin and S-100 calcium binding protein A4), and Raji (ezrin). Several of these proteins were differentially expressed in two cell lines: Raji and MEC1 (C-1-tetrahydrofolate synthase, elongation factor 2, alpha- and beta-tubulin, transgelin-2 and stathmin). MEC1 and CCRF-CEM (gamma-enolase), HL-60 and CCRF-CEM (ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme E2 N). The differentially expressed proteins identified in these four cell lines correlate with cellular properties and provide insights into the molecular basis of these malignancies.

  14. Inhibitory effects of rapamycin on proliferation of chronic myelogenous leukemia cells and its mechanism

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李杰

    2012-01-01

    Objective To explore the inhibitory effects of rapamycin on proliferation of chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) cells and its possible mechanism. Methods The effects of rapamycin at various concentrations on cell proliferation of CML cell line K562 cells were analyzed by MTT. The expressions

  15. Total-Body Irradiation With or Without Fludarabine Phosphate Followed By Donor Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Patients With Hematologic Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-02-02

    Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in Remission; Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Aggressive Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Chronic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia, BCR-ABL1 Positive; Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma; Hematopoietic and Lymphoid Cell Neoplasm; Indolent Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Myelodysplastic/Myeloproliferative Neoplasm; Plasma Cell Myeloma; Refractory Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Refractory Hodgkin Lymphoma; Waldenstrom Macroglobulinemia

  16. Staphylococcal SSL5 Binding to Human Leukemia Cells Inhibits Cell Adhesion to Endothelial Cells and Platelets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annemiek M. E. Walenkamp

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Bacterial proteins provide promising tools for novel anticancer therapies. Staphylococcal superantigen-like 5 (SSL5 was recently described to bind P-selectin glycoprotein ligand-1 (PSGL-1 on leukocytes and to inhibit neutrophil rolling on a P-selectin surface. As leukocytes and tumor cells share many characteristics in migration and dissemination, we explored the potential of SSL5 as an antagonist of malignant cell behavior. Previously, it was demonstrated that rolling of human HL-60 leukemia cells on activated endothelial cells was mediated by P-selectin. In this study, we show that SSL5 targets HL-60 cells. Binding of SSL5 was rapid and without observed toxicity. Competition of SSL5 with the binding of three anti-PSGL-1 antibodies and P-selectin to HL-60 cells identified PSGL-1 as the ligand on HL-60 cells. Presence of sialyl Lewis x epitopes on PSGL-1 was crucial for its interaction with SSL5. Importantly, SSL5 not only inhibited the interaction of HL-60 cells with activated endothelial cells but also with platelets, which both play an important role in growth and metastasis of cancers. These data support the concept that SSL5 could be a lead in the search for novel strategies against hematological malignancies.

  17. Lactadherin inhibits secretory phospholipase A2 activity on pre-apoptotic leukemia cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steffen Nyegaard

    Full Text Available Secretory phospholipase A2 (sPLA2 is a critical component of insect and snake venoms and is secreted by mammalian leukocytes during inflammation. Elevated secretory PLA2 concentrations are associated with autoimmune diseases and septic shock. Many sPLA2's do not bind to plasma membranes of quiescent cells but bind and digest phospholipids on the membranes of stimulated or apoptotic cells. The capacity of these phospholipases to digest membranes of stimulated or apoptotic cells correlates to the exposure of phosphatidylserine. In the present study, the ability of the phosphatidyl-L-serine-binding protein, lactadherin to inhibit phospholipase enzyme activity has been assessed. Inhibition of human secretory phospholipase A2-V on phospholipid vesicles exceeded 90%, whereas inhibition of Naja mossambica sPLA2 plateaued at 50-60%. Lactadherin inhibited 45% of activity of Naja mossambica sPLA2 and >70% of human secretory phospholipase A2-V on the membranes of human NB4 leukemia cells treated with calcium ionophore A23187. The data indicate that lactadherin may decrease inflammation by inhibiting sPLA2.

  18. Immature MEF2C-dysregulated T-cell leukemia patients have an early T-cell precursor acute lymphoblastic leukemia gene signature and typically have non-rearranged T-cell receptors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuurbier, Linda; Gutierrez, Alejandro; Mullighan, Charles G.; Canté-Barrett, Kirsten; Gevaert, A. Olivier; de Rooi, Johan; Li, Yunlei; Smits, Willem K.; Buijs-Gladdines, Jessica G.C.A.M.; Sonneveld, Edwin; Look, A. Thomas; Horstmann, Martin; Pieters, Rob; Meijerink, Jules P.P.

    2014-01-01

    Three distinct immature T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia entities have been described including cases that express an early T-cell precursor immunophenotype or expression profile, immature MEF2C-dysregulated T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia cluster cases based on gene expression analysis (immature cluster) and cases that retain non-rearranged TRG@ loci. Early T-cell precursor acute lymphoblastic leukemia cases exclusively overlap with immature cluster samples based on the expression of early T-cell precursor acute lymphoblastic leukemia signature genes, indicating that both are featuring a single disease entity. Patients lacking TRG@ rearrangements represent only 40% of immature cluster cases, but no further evidence was found to suggest that cases with absence of bi-allelic TRG@ deletions reflect a distinct and even more immature disease entity. Immature cluster/early T-cell precursor acute lymphoblastic leukemia cases are strongly enriched for genes expressed in hematopoietic stem cells as well as genes expressed in normal early thymocyte progenitor or double negative-2A T-cell subsets. Identification of early T-cell precursor acute lymphoblastic leukemia cases solely by defined immunophenotypic criteria strongly underestimates the number of cases that have a corresponding gene signature. However, early T-cell precursor acute lymphoblastic leukemia samples correlate best with a CD1 negative, CD4 and CD8 double negative immunophenotype with expression of CD34 and/or myeloid markers CD13 or CD33. Unlike various other studies, immature cluster/early T-cell precursor acute lymphoblastic leukemia patients treated on the COALL-97 protocol did not have an overall inferior outcome, and demonstrated equal sensitivity levels to most conventional therapeutic drugs compared to other pediatric T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia patients. PMID:23975177

  19. Total-Body Irradiation and Fludarabine Phosphate Followed by Donor Peripheral Blood Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Patients With Hematologic Malignancies or Kidney Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-12-14

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in Remission; Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Childhood Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Childhood Renal Cell Carcinoma; Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Clear Cell Renal Cell Carcinoma; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Metastatic Renal Cell Cancer; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Progression of Multiple Myeloma or Plasma Cell Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Childhood Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Refractory Anemia; Refractory Anemia With Ringed Sideroblasts; Refractory Childhood Hodgkin Lymphoma; Refractory Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Renal Medullary Carcinoma; Type 1 Papillary Renal Cell Carcinoma; Type 2 Papillary Renal Cell Carcinoma; Untreated Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

  20. DOCK2 interacts with FLT3 and modulates the survival of FLT3-expressing leukemia cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, M; Hamaker, M; Li, L; Small, D; Duffield, A S

    2017-03-01

    The FMS-like tyrosine kinase-3 (FLT3) gene is the most commonly mutated gene in acute myeloid leukemia (AML), and patients carrying internal tandem duplication (ITD) mutations have a poor prognosis. Long-term inhibition of FLT3 activity in these patients has been elusive. To provide a more complete understanding of FLT3 biology, a mass spectroscopy-based screen was performed to search for FLT3-interacting proteins. The screen identified dedicator of cytokinesis 2 (DOCK2), which is a guanine nucleotide exchange factor for Rho GTPases, and its expression is limited to hematolymphoid cells. We show that DOCK2 is expressed in leukemia cell lines and primary AML samples, and DOCK2 co-immunoprecipitates with wild-type FLT3 and FLT3/ITD. Knockdown (KD) of DOCK2 by shRNA selectively reduced cell proliferation and colony formation in leukemia cell lines with increased FLT3 activity, and greatly sensitized these cells to cytarabine treatment, alone and in combination with FLT3 tyrosine kinase inhibitors. DOCK2 KD in an FLT3/ITD-positive leukemia cell line also significantly prolonged survival in a mouse xenograft model. These findings suggest that DOCK2 is a potential therapeutic target for novel AML treatments, as this protein regulates the survival of leukemia cells with elevated FLT3 activity and sensitizes FLT3/ITD leukemic cells to conventional antileukemic agents.

  1. Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leukemia is cancer of the white blood cells. White blood cells help your body fight infection. Your blood cells form in your bone marrow. In leukemia, however, the bone marrow produces abnormal white blood ...

  2. Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leukemia is cancer of the white blood cells. White blood cells help your body fight infection. Your blood cells form in your bone marrow. In leukemia, however, the bone marrow produces abnormal white blood ...

  3. RPS27a promotes proliferation, regulates cell cycle progression and inhibits apoptosis of leukemia cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Houcai; Yu, Jing; Zhang, Lixia; Xiong, Yuanyuan; Chen, Shuying; Xing, Haiyan; Tian, Zheng; Tang, Kejing; Wei, Hui; Rao, Qing; Wang, Min; Wang, Jianxiang, E-mail: wangjx@ihcams.ac.cn

    2014-04-18

    Highlights: • RPS27a expression was up-regulated in advanced-phase CML and AL patients. • RPS27a knockdown changed biological property of K562 and K562/G01 cells. • RPS27a knockdown affected Raf/MEK/ERK, P21 and BCL-2 signaling pathways. • RPS27a knockdown may be applicable for new combination therapy in CML patients. - Abstract: Ribosomal protein S27a (RPS27a) could perform extra-ribosomal functions besides imparting a role in ribosome biogenesis and post-translational modifications of proteins. The high expression level of RPS27a was reported in solid tumors, and we found that the expression level of RPS27a was up-regulated in advanced-phase chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) and acute leukemia (AL) patients. In this study, we explored the function of RPS27a in leukemia cells by using CML cell line K562 cells and its imatinib resistant cell line K562/G01 cells. It was observed that the expression level of RPS27a was high in K562 cells and even higher in K562/G01 cells. Further analysis revealed that RPS27a knockdown by shRNA in both K562 and K562G01 cells inhibited the cell viability, induced cell cycle arrest at S and G2/M phases and increased cell apoptosis induced by imatinib. Combination of shRNA with imatinib treatment could lead to more cleaved PARP and cleaved caspase-3 expression in RPS27a knockdown cells. Further, it was found that phospho-ERK(p-ERK) and BCL-2 were down-regulated and P21 up-regulated in RPS27a knockdown cells. In conclusion, RPS27a promotes proliferation, regulates cell cycle progression and inhibits apoptosis of leukemia cells. It appears that drugs targeting RPS27a combining with tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI) might represent a novel therapy strategy in TKI resistant CML patients.

  4. Understanding Leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... material presented in this publication Jane Liesveld, MD Professor, Department of Medicine, Hematology/Oncology Clinical Director, Blood ... of leukemia cell. The marrow has two main jobs. The first job is to form myeloid cells. ...

  5. Constant activation of the RAF-MEK-ERK pathway as a diagnostic and therapeutic target in hairy cell leukemia

    OpenAIRE

    Tiacci, Enrico; Schiavoni, Gianluca; Martelli, Maria Paola; Boveri, Emanuela; Pacini, Roberta; Tabarrini, Alessia; Zibellini, Silvia; Santi, Alessia; Pettirossi, Valentina; Fortini, Elisabetta; Ascani, Stefano; Arcaini, Luca; Inghirami, Giorgio; Paulli, Marco; Falini, Brunangelo

    2013-01-01

    The BRAF-V600E mutation defines genetically hairy cell leukemia among B-cell leukemias and lymphomas. In solid tumors, BRAF-V600E is known to aberrantly activate the oncogenic MEK-ERK pathway, and targeted BRAF and/or MEK inhibitors have shown remarkable efficacy in clinical trials in melanoma patients. However, the MEK-ERK pathway status in hairy cell leukemia has not been thoroughly investigated. We assessed phospho-ERK expression in 37 patients with hairy cell leukemia and 44 patients with...

  6. Treatment of hairy-cell leukemia with chemoradiotherapy and identical-twin bone-marrow transplantation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cheever, M.A. (Univ. of Washington, Seattle); Fefer, A.; Greenberg, P.D.; Appelbaum, F.; Armitage, J.O.; Buckner, C.D.; Sale, G.E.; Storb, R.; Witherspoon, R.P.; Thomas, E.D.

    1982-08-01

    A patient with progressive hairy-cell leukemia and a normal genetically identical twin presented an opportunity to determine the sensitivity of this disease to high-dose alkylating-agent chemotherapy and total-body irradiation, since the marrow aplasia induced could potentially be overcome by reconstitution with normal marrow stem cells from the twin. After such therapy the patient rapidly recovered normal marrow function with no evidence of infiltrating hairy cells; he is still in complete remission four years after transplantation. In contrast to other patients with this disorder, he has had no predisposition to infections since transplantation. These results demonstrate that hairy-cell leukemia is sensitive to high-dose cytotoxic therapy and is not associated with any microenvironmental abnormalities that prevent repopulation with normal stem cells. Thus, high-dose chemoradiotherapy followed by bone-marrow transplantation is an effective and potentially curative therapy for hairy-cell leukemia. (JMT)

  7. Eliciting cytotoxic T lymphocytes against acute myeloid leukemia-derived antigens: evaluation of dendritic cell-leukemia cell hybrids and other antigen-loading strategies for dendritic cell-based vaccination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galea-Lauri, Joanna; Darling, David; Mufti, Ghulam; Harrison, Phillip; Farzaneh, Farzin

    2002-08-01

    Dendritic cells (DC) have been successfully used in clinical pilot studies to induce tumor-specific immunity as well as clinical response in selected patients. However, DC-based immunotherapy remains a challenge and several parameters need to be examined in order to optimize the induction of anti-tumor immune responses. This study focuses on DC vaccination for leukemia and evaluates the in vitro efficacy of three different strategies for generating antigen-loaded DC-based vaccines for the induction of major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I-restricted anti-leukemia cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) responses. These included direct fusion of DC with leukemia cells to generate DC-leukemia cell hybrids, and DC pulsed with either apoptotic leukemia cell fragments or whole tumor cell lysates. Using either the U937 cell line or primary human acute myeloid leukemia blasts (AML), DC-leukemia cell hybrids were found to be the most potent in vitro inducers of CTL activity. DC pulsed with apoptotic tumor cell fragments were less efficient, but induced a more potent CTL response compared to tumor lysate-pulsed DC. The CTL responses were both MHC class I-restricted and antigen-specific, as shown by the inability of the CTL to lyse other control targets. The data presented here suggest that the method of antigen loading onto DC may be critical in the design of tumor vaccines.

  8. Radotinib Induces Apoptosis of CD11b+ Cells Differentiated from Acute Myeloid Leukemia Cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sook-Kyoung Heo

    Full Text Available Radotinib, developed as a BCR/ABL tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI, is approved for the second-line treatment of chronic myeloid leukemia (CML in South Korea. However, therapeutic effects of radotinib in acute myeloid leukemia (AML are unknown. In the present study, we demonstrate that radotinib significantly decreases the viability of AML cells in a dose-dependent manner. Kasumi-1 cells were more sensitive to radotinib than NB4, HL60, or THP-1 cell lines. Furthermore, radotinib induced CD11b expression in NB4, THP-1, and Kasumi-1 cells either in presence or absence of all trans-retinoic acid (ATRA. We found that radotinib promoted differentiation and induced CD11b expression in AML cells by downregulating LYN. However, CD11b expression induced by ATRA in HL60 cells was decreased by radotinib through upregulation of LYN. Furthermore, radotinib mainly induced apoptosis of CD11b+ cells in the total population of AML cells. Radotinib also increased apoptosis of CD11b+ HL60 cells when they were differentiated by ATRA/dasatinib treatment. We show that radotinib induced apoptosis via caspase-3 activation and the loss of mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨm in CD11b+ cells differentiated from AML cells. Our results suggest that radotinib may be used as a candidate drug in AML or a chemosensitizer for treatment of AML by other therapeutics.

  9. Cytologic Phenotypes of B-Cell Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia-

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramyar Asghar

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL is a malignant disorder of lymphoid precursor cells, which could be classified according to morphological and cytochemical methods as well as immunophenotyping. Twenty patients with ALL, who had been referred to the Children's Medical Center Hospital, during the year 2007, were enrolled in this study in order to evaluate the morphologic and immunophenotypic profile of these patients. Cytologic analysis of blood and bone marrow samples revealed that the frequency of ALL-L1 was 70%, followed by ALL-L2 and ALL-L3. The onset age of the patients with ALL-L1 was significantly lower than the patients with L2/L3. Severe anemia was significantly detected more in L1 group. Flow cytometic study of bone marrow showed that 10 cases had Pre-B1 ALL and 7 cases had Pre-B2 ALL, while three cases had Pro-B ALL. Comparisons of the characteristics and clinical manifestations among these groups did not show any appreciable difference. There were an increase percentage of CD20+ cells and a decrease CD10+ cells in pre-B2 group in comparison with pre-B1 group. Fifteen patients were in standard risk and five were in high risk. Although standard risk patients were more common in the group of pre-B1, this was not significant. Our results confirm the previous reports indicating heterogeneity of ALL. Immunophenotyping is not the only diagnostic test of importance, while morphological assessment still can be used in the diagnosis and classification of the disease.

  10. Iron overload in patients with acute leukemia or MDS undergoing myeloablative stem cell transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armand, Philippe; Kim, Haesook T; Rhodes, Joanna; Sainvil, Marie-Michele; Cutler, Corey; Ho, Vincent T; Koreth, John; Alyea, Edwin P; Hearsey, Doreen; Neufeld, Ellis J; Fleming, Mark D; Steen, Hanno; Anderson, Damon; Kwong, Raymond Y; Soiffer, Robert J; Antin, Joseph H

    2011-06-01

    Patients with hematologic malignancies undergoing allogeneic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) commonly have an elevated serum ferritin prior to HSCT, which has been associated with increased mortality after transplantation. This has led to the suggestion that iron overload is common and deleterious in this patient population. However, the relationship between serum ferritin and parenchymal iron overload in such patients is unknown. We report a prospective study of 48 patients with acute leukemia (AL) or myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) undergoing myeloablative HSCT, using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to estimate liver iron content (LIC) and cardiac iron. The median (and range) pre-HSCT value of serum ferritin was 1549 ng/mL (20-6989); serum hepcidin, 59 ng/mL (10-468); labile plasma iron, 0 LPI units (0.0-0.9). Eighty-five percent of patients had hepatic iron overload (HIO), and 42% had significant HIO (LIC ≥5.0 mg/gdw). Only 1 patient had cardiac iron overload. There was a strong correlation between pre-HSCT serum ferritin and estimated LIC (r = .75), which was mostly dependent on prior transfusion history. Serum hepcidin was appropriately elevated in patients with HIO. Labile plasma iron elevation was rare. A regression calibration analysis supported the hypothesis that elevated pre-HSCT LIC is significantly associated with inferior post-HSCT survival. These results contribute to our understanding of the prevalence, mechanism, and consequences of iron overload in HSCT.

  11. Fludarabine Phosphate, Cyclophosphamide, Total-Body Irradiation, and Donor Bone Marrow Transplant Followed by Donor Natural Killer Cell Therapy, Mycophenolate Mofetil, and Tacrolimus in Treating Patients With Hematologic Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-06-06

    Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Aggressive Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Recurrent Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Recurrent Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia, BCR-ABL1 Positive; Recurrent Indolent Adult Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Plasma Cell Myeloma; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Refractory Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Refractory Hodgkin Lymphoma; Refractory Plasma Cell Myeloma; Refractory Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Waldenstrom Macroglobulinemia

  12. Donor Peripheral Blood Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Patients With Hematologic Malignancies

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-07-15

    Acute Biphenotypic Leukemia; Acute Erythroid Leukemia in Remission; Acute Leukemia in Remission; Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia; Acute Myeloid Leukemia Arising From Previous Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Acute Myeloid Leukemia With FLT3/ITD Mutation; Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(3)(q21q26.2) or t(3;3)(q21;q26.2); RPN1-EVI1; Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(3)(q21q26.2); RPN1-EVI1; Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Multilineage Dysplasia; Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(6;9)(p23;q34); DEK-NUP214; Acute Undifferentiated Leukemia; Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in Complete Remission; B Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia With t(1;19)(q23;p13.3); E2A-PBX1 (TCF3-PBX1); B Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia With t(9;22)(q34;q11.2); BCR-ABL1; Burkitt Lymphoma; Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in Complete Remission; DS Stage II Plasma Cell Myeloma; DS Stage III Plasma Cell Myeloma; Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Recurrent Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Plasma Cell Myeloma; Refractory Plasma Cell Myeloma; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; T Lymphoblastic Lymphoma

  13. Monoclonal Antibody Therapy in Treating Patients With Ovarian Epithelial Cancer, Melanoma, Acute Myeloid Leukemia, Myelodysplastic Syndrome, or Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-09

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Atypical Chronic Myeloid Leukemia, BCR-ABL1 Negative; Myelodysplastic/Myeloproliferative Neoplasm, Unclassifiable; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Melanoma; Recurrent Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Recurrent Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IV Melanoma; Stage IV Non-small Cell Lung Cancer

  14. Variant B Cell Receptor Isotype Functions Differ in Hairy Cell Leukemia with Mutated BRAF and IGHV Genes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weston-Bell, Nicola J.; Forconi, Francesco; Kluin-Nelemans, Hanneke C.; Sahota, Surinder S.

    2014-01-01

    A functional B-cell receptor (BCR) is critical for survival of normal B-cells, but whether it plays a comparable role in B-cell malignancy is as yet not fully delineated. Typical Hairy Cell Leukemia (HCL) is a rare B-cell tumor, and unique in expressing multiple surface immunoglobulin (sIg) isotypes

  15. Niche-based screening identifies small-molecule inhibitors of leukemia stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartwell, Kimberly A; Miller, Peter G; Mukherjee, Siddhartha; Kahn, Alissa R; Stewart, Alison L; Logan, David J; Negri, Joseph M; Duvet, Mildred; Järås, Marcus; Puram, Rishi; Dancik, Vlado; Al-Shahrour, Fatima; Kindler, Thomas; Tothova, Zuzana; Chattopadhyay, Shrikanta; Hasaka, Thomas; Narayan, Rajiv; Dai, Mingji; Huang, Christina; Shterental, Sebastian; Chu, Lisa P; Haydu, J Erika; Shieh, Jae Hung; Steensma, David P; Munoz, Benito; Bittker, Joshua A; Shamji, Alykhan F; Clemons, Paul A; Tolliday, Nicola J; Carpenter, Anne E; Gilliland, D Gary; Stern, Andrew M; Moore, Malcolm A S; Scadden, David T; Schreiber, Stuart L; Ebert, Benjamin L; Golub, Todd R

    2013-12-01

    Efforts to develop more effective therapies for acute leukemia may benefit from high-throughput screening systems that reflect the complex physiology of the disease, including leukemia stem cells (LSCs) and supportive interactions with the bone marrow microenvironment. The therapeutic targeting of LSCs is challenging because LSCs are highly similar to normal hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPCs) and are protected by stromal cells in vivo. We screened 14,718 compounds in a leukemia-stroma co-culture system for inhibition of cobblestone formation, a cellular behavior associated with stem-cell function. Among those compounds that inhibited malignant cells but spared HSPCs was the cholesterol-lowering drug lovastatin. Lovastatin showed anti-LSC activity in vitro and in an in vivo bone marrow transplantation model. Mechanistic studies demonstrated that the effect was on target, via inhibition of HMG-CoA reductase. These results illustrate the power of merging physiologically relevant models with high-throughput screening.

  16. Animals Models of Human T Cell Leukemia Virus Type I Leukemogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niewiesk, Stefan

    2016-01-01

    Infection with human T cell leukemia virus type I (HTLV-I) causes adult T cell leukemia (ATL) in a minority of infected individuals after long periods of viral persistence. The various stages of HTLV-I infection and leukemia development are studied by using several different animal models: (1) the rabbit (and mouse) model of persistent HTLV-I infection, (2) transgenic mice to model tumorigenesis by HTLV-I specific protein expression, (3) ATL cell transfers into immune-deficient mice, and (4) infection of humanized mice with HTLV-I. After infection, virus replicates without clinical disease in rabbits and to a lesser extent in mice. Transgenic expression of both the transactivator protein (Tax) and the HTLV-I bZIP factor (HBZ) protein have provided insight into factors important in leukemia/lymphoma development. To investigate factors relating to tumor spread and tissue invasion, a number of immune-deficient mice based on the severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) or non-obese diabetic/SCID background have been used. Inoculation of adult T cell leukemia cell (lines) leads to lymphoma with osteolytic bone lesions and to a lesser degree to leukemia development. These mice have been used extensively for the testing of anticancer drugs and virotherapy. A recent development is the use of so-called humanized mice, which, upon transfer of CD34(+)human umbilical cord stem cells, generate human lymphocytes. Infection with HTLV-I leads to leukemia/lymphoma development, thus providing an opportunity to investigate disease development with the aid of molecularly cloned viruses. However, further improvements of this mouse model, particularly in respect to the development of adaptive immune responses, are necessary.

  17. Characterization of miRNomes in Acute and Chronic Myeloid Leukemia Cell Lines

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qian Xiong; Jiangwei Yan; Songnian Hu; Xiangdong Fang; Yadong Yang; Hai Wang; Jie Li; Shaobin Wang; Yanming Li; Yaran Yang; Kan Cai; Xiuyan Ruan

    2014-01-01

    Myeloid leukemias are highly diverse diseases and have been shown to be associated with microRNA (miRNA) expression aberrations. The present study involved an in-depth miRNome analysis of two human acute myeloid leukemia (AML) cell lines, HL-60 and THP-1, and one human chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) cell line, K562, via massively parallel signature sequenc-ing. mRNA expression profiles of these cell lines that were established previously in our lab facil-itated an integrative analysis of miRNA and mRNA expression patterns. miRNA expression profiling followed by differential expression analysis and target prediction suggested numerous miRNA signatures in AML and CML cell lines. Some miRNAs may act as either tumor suppres-sors or oncomiRs in AML and CML by targeting key genes in AML and CML pathways. Expres-sion patterns of cell type-specific miRNAs could partially reflect the characteristics of K562, HL-60 and THP-1 cell lines, such as actin filament-based processes, responsiveness to stimulus and phag-ocytic activity. miRNAs may also regulate myeloid differentiation, since they usually suppress dif-ferentiation regulators. Our study provides a resource to further investigate the employment of miRNAs in human leukemia subtyping, leukemogenesis and myeloid development. In addition, the distinctive miRNA signatures may be potential candidates for the clinical diagnosis, prognosis and treatment of myeloid leukemias.

  18. Novel murine B-cell lymphoma/leukemia model to study BCL2-driven oncogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meijerink, Jules P P; Van Lieshout, Esther M M; Beverloo, H Berna; Van Drunen, Ellen; Mensink, Ewald J B M; Macville, Merryn; Pieters, Rob

    2005-05-10

    The BCL-2 family has been implicated in the pathogenesis of various hematopoietic malignancies, including follicular non-Hodgkin lymphoma and B-cell chronic lymphocytic leukemia. To identify genes that act synergistically in BCL2-enforced leukemogenesis, we developed a murine B-cell lymphoma/leukemia model based on the IL-3-dependent Balb/C pro-B line (FL5.12). FL5.12 cells were stably transfected with antiapoptotic BCL-2 alone or in combination with proapoptotic BAX or nonfunctional mutant BAX, thereby creating various levels of imbalance within the BCL-2 family. Transfectants were intravenously injected into normal Balb/C mice. Whereas FL5.12 cells did not provoke leukemia, mice injected with stable transfectants died of leukemia over time. Disease incidence and latency time depended on the degree of imbalance in the BCL-2 family, supporting a model whereby BCL2 drives tumorigenesis. All mice presented with hepatosplenomegaly and leukemic FL5.12 cells in peripheral blood and bone marrow compartments. Leukemic conversion was accompanied by secondary genetic aberrations leading to clonal IL-3-responsive leukemia. Cellular transformation was independent of alterations in c-Myc or downstream apoptotic pathway. Leukemic clones retained a normal DNA damage response leading to elevated P53 and P21 levels and cell cycle arrest upon irradiation. In conclusion, our mouse model may prove a valuable tool to identify genes that cooperate in BCL2-enforced lymphoma/leukemogenesis.

  19. Establishment and genetic characterization of a novel mixed-phenotype acute leukemia cell line with EP300-ZNF384 fusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ping, Nana; Qiu, Huiying; Wang, Qian; Dai, Haiping; Ruan, Changgeng; Ehrentraut, Stefan; Drexler, Hans G; MacLeod, Roderick A F; Chen, Suning

    2015-08-21

    Herein, we describe the establishment and characterization of the first mixed-phenotype acute leukemia cell line (JIH-5). The JIH-5 cell line was established from leukemia cells with B lymphoid/myeloid phenotype from a female mixed-phenotype acute leukemia patient. JIH-5 cells exhibit an immunophenotype comprised of myeloid and B lymphoid antigens. Whole-exome sequencing revealed somatic mutations in nine genes in JIH-5 cells. Transcriptional sequencing of JIH-5 cells identified EP300-ZNF384 fusion transcript, which is a recurrent alteration in B cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Our results suggest that the JIH-5 cell line may serve as a tool for the study of mixed-phenotype acute leukemia or EP300-ZNF384.

  20. Role of CXCR4-mediated bone marrow colonization in CNS infiltration by T cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jost, Tanja Rezzonico; Borga, Chiara; Radaelli, Enrico; Romagnani, Andrea; Perruzza, Lisa; Omodho, Lorna; Cazzaniga, Giovanni; Biondi, Andrea; Indraccolo, Stefano; Thelen, Marcus; Te Kronnie, Geertruy; Grassi, Fabio

    2016-06-01

    Infiltration of the central nervous system is a severe trait of T cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Inhibition of CXC chemokine receptor 4 significantly ameliorates T cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia in murine models of the disease; however, signaling by CXC chemokine receptor 4 is important in limiting the divagation of peripheral blood mononuclear cells out of the perivascular space into the central nervous system parenchyma. Therefore, Inhibition of CXC chemokine receptor 4 potentially may untangle T cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia cells from retention outside the brain. Here, we show that leukemic lymphoblasts massively infiltrate cranial bone marrow, with diffusion to the meninges without invasion of the brain parenchyma, in mice that underwent xenotransplantation with human T cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia cells or that developed leukemia from transformed hematopoietic progenitors. We tested the hypothesis that T cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia neuropathology results from meningeal infiltration through CXC chemokine receptor 4-mediated bone marrow colonization. Inhibition of leukemia engraftment in the bone marrow by pharmacologic CXC chemokine receptor 4 antagonism significantly ameliorated neuropathologic aspects of the disease. Genetic deletion of CXCR4 in murine hematopoietic progenitors abrogated leukemogenesis induced by constitutively active Notch1, whereas lack of CCR6 and CCR7, which have been shown to be involved in T cell and leukemia extravasation into the central nervous system, respectively, did not influence T cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia development. We hypothesize that lymphoblastic meningeal infiltration as a result of bone marrow colonization is responsible for the degenerative alterations of the neuroparenchyma as well as the alteration of cerebrospinal fluid drainage in T cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia xenografts. Therefore, CXC chemokine receptor 4 may constitute a pharmacologic target for T cell acute lymphoblastic

  1. Inverse relationship of tumors and mononuclear cell leukemia infiltration in the lungs of F344 rats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lundgren, D.L.; Griffith, W.C.; Hahn, F.F.

    1995-12-01

    In 1970 and F344 rat, along with the B6C3F{sub 1} mouse, were selected as the standard rodents for the National Cancer Institute Carcinogenic Bioassay program for studies of potentially carcinogenic chemicals. The F344 rat has also been used in a variety of other carcinogenesis studies, including numerous studies at ITRI. A major concern to be considered in evaluating carcinogenic bioassay studies using the F344 rat is the relatively high background incidence of mononuclear cell leukemia (MCL) (also referred to as large granular lymphocytic leukemia, Fischer rat leukemia, or monocytic leukemia). Incidences of MCL ranging from 10 to 72% in male F344 rats to 6 to 31% in female F344 rats have been reported. Gaining the understanding of the mechanisms involved in the negative correlations noted should enhance our understanding of the mechanisms involved in the development of lung cancer.

  2. Natural History Study of Monoclonal B Cell Lymphocytosis (MBL), Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia/Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma (CLL/SLL), Lymphoplasmacytic Lymphoma (LPL)/Waldenstrom Macroglobulinemia (WM), and Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma (SMZL)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-10-05

    B-Cell Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Monoclonal B-Cell Lymphocytosis; Lymhoma, Small Lymphocytic; Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Lymphoplasmacytic Lymphoma; Waldenstrom Macroglobulinemia; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma

  3. Menin expression is regulated by transforming growth factor beta signaling in leukemia cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Hui; LIU Zu-guo; HUA Xian-xin

    2011-01-01

    Background Menin is a ubiquitously expressed protein encoded by the multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1 (MEN1)gene. Besides its importance in endocrine organs, menin has been shown to interact with the mixed lineage leukemia (MLL) protein, a histone H3 lysine 4 methyltransferase, and plays a critical role in hematopoiesis and leukemogenesis.Previous studies have shown that menin promotes transforming growth factor beta (TGF-β) signaling in endocrine cells.However, little is known regarding the impact of TGF-β pathway on menin in hematopoietic system. Here, with leukemia cell lines generated from conditional MEN1 or TGF-p receptor (TβRII) knockout mouse models, we investigated the possible cross-talk of these two pathways in leukemia cells.Methods MEN1 or TβRII conditional knockout mice were bred and the bone marrow cells were transduced with retroviruses expressing oncogeneic MLL-AF9 (a mixed lineage leukemia fusion protein) to generate two leukemia cell lines. Cell proliferation assays were performed to investigate the effect of TGF-β treatment on MLL-AF9 transformed leukemia cells with/without MEN1 or TβRII excision. Menin protein was detected with Western blotting and mRNA levels of cell proliferation-related genes Cyclin A2 and Cyclin E2 were examined with real-time RT-PCR for each treated sample.In vivo effect of TGF-p signal on menin expression was also investigated in mouse liver tissue after TβRII excision.Results TGF-β not only inhibited the proliferation of wild type MLL-AF9 transformed mouse bone marrow cells, but also up-regulated menin expression in these cells. Moreover, TGF-P failed to further inhibit the proliferation of Men1-null cells as compared to Men1-expressing control cells. Furthermore, excision of TβRII, a vital component in TGF-β signaling pathway, down-regulated menin expression in MLL-AF9 transformed mouse bone marrow cells. In vivo data also confirmed that menin expression was decreased in liver samples of conditional T

  4. Phenotypic, genotypic, and functional characterization of normal and acute myeloid leukemia-derived marrow endothelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pizzo, Russell J; Azadniv, Mitra; Guo, Naxin; Acklin, Joshua; Lacagnina, Kimberly; Coppage, Myra; Liesveld, Jane L

    2016-05-01

    In addition to participation in homing, egress, and transmigration of hematopoietic cells, marrow endothelium also contributes to cell proliferation and survival. Endothelial cells from multiple vascular beds are able to prevent spontaneous or therapy-induced apoptosis in acute myelogenous leukemia (AML) blasts. Marrow-derived endothelial cells from leukemia patients have not been well-characterized, and in this work, endothelial cells were purified from marrow aspirates from normal subjects or from newly diagnosed AML patients to compare these cells phenotypically and functionally. By reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction, these cells express CD31, Tie-2, vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), and endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS), supporting endothelial origin. They take up acetyl low-density lipoprotein and are able to form tubular structures. Culture of AML cells with endothelial cells from both normal and AML subjects supported adhesion, transmigration, and leukemia colony-forming unit outgrowth. RNA-sequencing analysis revealed 130 genes significantly up- or downregulated in AML-derived endothelial cells as compared with those derived from normal marrow. The genes differentially expressed (p phenotype and function to their normal marrow-derived counterparts, but genomic analysis suggests a differential signature with altered expression of genes, which could play a role in leukemogenesis or leukemia cell maintenance in the marrow microenvironment. Copyright © 2016 ISEH - International Society for Experimental Hematology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Boswellic acid acetate induces differentiation and apoptosis in leukemia cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jing, Y; Nakajo, S; Xia, L; Nakaya, K; Fang, Q; Waxman, S; Han, R

    1999-01-01

    Boswellic acid acetate (BC-4), a compound isolated from the herb Boswellia carterii Birdw., can induce differentiation and apoptosis of leukemia cells. Based on cell morphology and NBT reduction, BC-4 induced monocytic differentiation of myeloid leukemia HL-60, U937 and ML-1 cells at a dose under 12.5 microg/ml (24.2 microM). BC-4 was a potent inducer, with 90% of the cells showing morphologic changes and 80-90% of the cells showing NBT reduction. Specific and non-specific esterase were also increased by BC-4. Based on benzidine staining assay, BC-4 failed to induce erythroid leukemia DS-19 and K562 cells differentiation. In contrast to its selective differentiation effect, BC-4 strongly inhibited growth of all cell lines tested. The growth inhibition effect was dose- and time-dependent. In HL-60 cells, 20 microg/ml (38.8 microM) of BC-4 decreased viable cell number by 60% at 24 h, whereas at 3 days there was virtually no viable cells. Morphologic and DNA fragmentation analysis proved that BC-4 induced cell apoptosis. The dual apoptotic and differentiation effects of BC-4 suggest that it may be a powerful agent in the treatment of leukemia.

  6. Biguanides sensitize leukemia cells to ABT-737-induced apoptosis by inhibiting mitochondrial electron transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velez, Juliana; Pan, Rongqing; Lee, Jason T.C.; Enciso, Leonardo; Suarez, Marta; Duque, Jorge Eduardo; Jaramillo, Daniel; Lopez, Catalina; Morales, Ludis; Bornmann, William; Konopleva, Marina; Krystal, Gerald; Andreeff, Michael; Samudio, Ismael

    2016-01-01

    Metformin displays antileukemic effects partly due to activation of AMPK and subsequent inhibition of mTOR signaling. Nevertheless, Metformin also inhibits mitochondrial electron transport at complex I in an AMPK-independent manner, Here we report that Metformin and rotenone inhibit mitochondrial electron transport and increase triglyceride levels in leukemia cell lines, suggesting impairment of fatty acid oxidation (FAO). We also report that, like other FAO inhibitors, both agents and the related biguanide, Phenformin, increase sensitivity to apoptosis induction by the bcl-2 inhibitor ABT-737 supporting the notion that electron transport antagonizes activation of the intrinsic apoptosis pathway in leukemia cells. Both biguanides and rotenone induce superoxide generation in leukemia cells, indicating that oxidative damage may sensitize toABT-737 induced apoptosis. In addition, we demonstrate that Metformin sensitizes leukemia cells to the oligomerization of Bak, suggesting that the observed synergy with ABT-737 is mediated, at least in part, by enhanced outer mitochondrial membrane permeabilization. Notably, Phenformin was at least 10-fold more potent than Metformin in abrogating electron transport and increasing sensitivity to ABT-737, suggesting that this agent may be better suited for targeting hematological malignancies. Taken together, our results suggest that inhibition of mitochondrial metabolism by Metformin or Phenformin is associated with increased leukemia cell susceptibility to induction of intrinsic apoptosis, and provide a rationale for clinical studies exploring the efficacy of combining biguanides with the orally bioavailable derivative of ABT-737, Venetoclax. PMID:27283492

  7. STAT1 mediates differentiation of chronic lymphocytic leukemia cells in response to Bryostatin 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Battle, Traci E; Frank, David A

    2003-10-15

    Bryostatin 1 is known to exhibit in vitro and in vivo activity against chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) cells by inducing their further maturation into plasma-like cells. Signal transducer and activator of transcription (STAT) proteins play a central role in B-lymphocyte growth and function and are aberrantly phosphorylated on serine residues in CLL cells. To determine whether STAT transcription factors are important in Bryostatin 1-induced differentiation of CLL cells, primary CLL cells were examined for signaling events following exposure to Bryostatin 1 in vitro. Western analysis and electrophoretic mobility shift assays revealed that Bryostatin 1 induced tyrosine phosphorylation and DNA binding of STAT1, yet there was no effect on constitutive serine phosphorylation of STAT1. Bryostatin 1-induced STAT1 activation occurred in a manner that was dependent on protein kinase C (PKC), mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK), and Janus tyrosine kinase (JAK) activation. Evidence indicates that Bryostatin 1 induces STAT1 activation through an interferon gamma (IFN gamma) autocrine loop. However, STAT1 activation by IFN gamma stimulation alone was not sufficient to induce differentiation. This insufficiency is due to the broader effect on gene expression caused by Bryostatin 1 compared with IFN gamma, as demonstrated by microarray analysis. Both up-regulation of CD22 expression and immunoglobulin M (IgM) production, markers of CLL differentiation, were inhibited by a decoy oligonucleotide for STAT1, indicating that STAT1 is necessary for Bryostatin 1-induced differentiation of CLL cells. This study implicates STAT transcription factors as important mediators of Bryostatin 1-induced differentiation of CLL cells and could possibly lead to improved therapeutic approaches for the treatment of CLL.

  8. Cell size variations of large granular lymphocyte leukemia: Implication of a small cell subtype of granular lymphocyte leukemia with STAT3 mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanahashi, Takahiro; Sekiguchi, Nodoka; Matsuda, Kazuyuki; Takezawa, Yuka; Ito, Toshiro; Kobayashi, Hikaru; Ichikawa, Naoaki; Nishina, Sayaka; Senoo, Noriko; Sakai, Hitoshi; Nakazawa, Hideyuki; Ishida, Fumihiro

    2016-06-01

    Large granular lymphocyte leukemia (LGL-L) has been morphologically defined as a group of lymphoproliferative disorders, including T-cell large granular lymphocytic leukemia (T-LGL-L), chronic lymphoproliferative disorders of NK cells (CLPD-NK) and aggressive NK cell leukemia. We investigated the morphological features of LGL leukemic cells in 26 LGL-L patients in order to elucidate relationships with current classifications and molecular backgrounds. LGL-L cells were mostly indistinguishable from normal LGL. Patients with STAT3 SH2 domain mutations showed significantly smaller cells compared with patients without STAT3 mutations. Four patients with T-LGL-L showed smaller granular lymphocytes with a median diameter of less than 13μm, which were rarely seen in normal subjects. This small subtype of T-LGL-L was recognized among rather young patients and was associated with D661Y mutations in the STAT3 gene SH2 domain. In addition, all of them showed anemia including two cases with pure red cell aplasia. These results suggest the heterogeneity of T-LGL-L and a specific subtype with small variants of T-LGL-L. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. The clinical significance of tumor necrosis factor-alpha plasma level in patients having chronic lymphocytic leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrajoli, Alessandra; Keating, Michael J; Manshouri, Taghi; Giles, Francis J; Dey, Amanda; Estrov, Zeev; Koller, Charles A; Kurzrock, Razelle; Thomas, Deborah A; Faderl, Stefan; Lerner, Susan; O'Brien, Susan; Albitar, Maher

    2002-08-15

    Tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha), a cytokine possessing pleiotropic biological activities, is produced by leukemic lymphocytes in patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) and acts as an autocrine and paracrine growth factor in this disease. In this study, TNF-alpha levels were determined in 150 patients with CLL and correlated with disease characteristics, prognostic factors, and survival. The mean TNF-alpha plasma concentration in the patients with CLL was significantly higher than in the healthy control population (16.4 versus 8.7 pg/mL; P <.0001). Patients having an elevated TNF-alpha level had more advanced Rai and Binet stage disease, higher serum beta(2)-microglobulin (beta(2)M) levels, a greater percentage of cells expressing CD38, and lower hemoglobin and platelet levels. Patients having chromosomal abnormalities such as 11q deletion, trisomy 12, and chromosome 17 aberrations had a higher mean TNF-alpha level (27.5 pg/mL) than patients having a diploid karyotype or other miscellaneous cytogenetic abnormalities (14.2 pg/mL; P <.001). The TNF-alpha level was a predictor of survival when the Cox proportional hazards model was used with TNF-alpha entered as a continuous variable (P =.0001). Also, patients having a TNF-alpha level above the mean value of 14 pg/mL had significantly shorter survival duration (P =.00001). The TNF-alpha level remained predictive of survival in Cox multivariate analysis independent of Rai staging and beta(2)M, hemoglobin, prior therapy, white cell count, and platelet level (P =.005). We conclude that the TNF-alpha level serves as a prognostic factor in patients with CLL and that inhibition of TNF-alpha in these patients could have therapeutic importance.

  10. Regulatory T cells-derived IL-35 promotes the growth of adult acute myeloid leukemia blasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, Qianshan; Pan, Ying; Wang, Yiping; Wang, Huiping; Xiong, Shudao; Li, Qing; Wang, Jia; Tao, Lili; Wang, Zhitao; Wu, Fan; Zhang, Rui; Zhai, Zhimin

    2015-11-15

    Tumor immune escape mechanism mediated by CD4+CD25+regulatory T cells (Tregs) is a key factor in the pathogenesis of acute myeloid leukemia (AML). IL-35, as a novel inhibitory cytokine, is produced by Tregs specially and regulates functions of Tregs in murine. However, IL-35 expression of Tregs in human is still disputed, and its role in AML is yet to be elucidated. In this study, we found that IL-35 was expressed highly in peripheral blood plasma of adult patients with AML and significantly correlated with the clinical stages of malignancy. Tregs-derived from adult AML patients produced IL-35 in a stimulation-dependent manner. IL-35 promoted AML blasts immune escape by expanding Tregs and inhibiting CD4+CD25-effector T cells (Teffs). Furthermore, IL-35 directly promoted the proliferation of AML blasts and reduced the apoptosis of AML blasts. Together, our study demonstrates that IL-35-derived from Tregs promotes the growth of adult AML blasts, suggesting that IL-35 has an important role in the pathogenesis of AML.

  11. Induction of differentiation of myelogenous leukemia cells by humulone, a bitter in the hop.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Honma, Y; Tobe, H; Makishima, M; Yokoyama, A; Okabe-Kado, J

    1998-07-01

    The active form of vitamin D, 1alpha,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 (VD3), inhibits proliferation and induces differentiation of myelomonocytic leukemia cells, but its clinical use is limited by the adverse effect of hypercalcemia. VD3 mobilizes calcium stores from bone by inducing the dissolution of bone mineral and matrix. We have recently found that humulone, a bitter in the hop extract for beer brewing, effectively inhibits bone resorption. In this study we examined the effect of humulone on the differentiation of human myelogenous leukemia cells. Humulone alone inhibited the growth of monoblastic leukemia U937 cells while only slightly increasing differentiation markers such as nitroblue tetrazolium (NBT)-reducing and lysozyme activities. Humulone effectively enhanced the differentiation-inducing action of VD3. Other myelomonocytic leukemia cells were induced to differentiate by VD3 and this was also enhanced by humulone. Since humulone is a less-toxic inhibitor of bone resorption, the combination of humulone and VD3 may be useful in differentiation therapy of myelomonocytic leukemia.

  12. Antileukemic Effect of Tualang Honey on Acute and Chronic Leukemia Cell Lines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nik Man, Nik Muhd Khuzaimi; Hassan, Rosline; Ang, Cheng Yong; Abdullah, Abu Dzarr; Mohd Radzi, Muhammad Amiro Rasheeq; Sulaiman, Siti Amrah

    2015-01-01

    Complementary medicine using natural product as antitumor is on the rise. Much research has been performed on Tualang Honey and it was shown to have therapeutic potential in wound healing, and antimicrobial activity and be antiproliferative against several cancer models such as human osteosarcoma (HOS), human breast (MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231), and cervical (HeLa) cancer cell lines. To date, there was limited study on antileukemic properties of Tualang (Koompassia excelsa) Honey. The aim of this study was to evaluate the antileukemic effect of Tualang Honey on acute and chronic leukemia cell lines. Leukemia cell lines (K562 and MV4-11) and human mononuclear cell isolated from peripheral blood were grown in RPM1 1640 culture medium. The cells were incubated with increasing concentrations of Tualang Honey. After incubation, the evaluation of viability and apoptosis was performed. The morphological changes of leukemia cells were the presence of cytoplasmic blebs followed by apoptotic bodies and round shape of cells. IC50 against K562 and MV4-11 was determined. Tualang Honey gave 53.9% and 50.6% apoptosis activity on K562 and MV4-11, respectively, while on human mononuclear cell it was 37.4%. Tualang Honey has the apoptosis-inducing ability for acute and chronic myeloid leukemia (K562 and MV4-11) cell lines. PMID:26613081

  13. Antileukemic Effect of Tualang Honey on Acute and Chronic Leukemia Cell Lines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nik Muhd Khuzaimi Nik Man

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Complementary medicine using natural product as antitumor is on the rise. Much research has been performed on Tualang Honey and it was shown to have therapeutic potential in wound healing, and antimicrobial activity and be antiproliferative against several cancer models such as human osteosarcoma (HOS, human breast (MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231, and cervical (HeLa cancer cell lines. To date, there was limited study on antileukemic properties of Tualang (Koompassia excelsa Honey. The aim of this study was to evaluate the antileukemic effect of Tualang Honey on acute and chronic leukemia cell lines. Leukemia cell lines (K562 and MV4-11 and human mononuclear cell isolated from peripheral blood were grown in RPM1 1640 culture medium. The cells were incubated with increasing concentrations of Tualang Honey. After incubation, the evaluation of viability and apoptosis was performed. The morphological changes of leukemia cells were the presence of cytoplasmic blebs followed by apoptotic bodies and round shape of cells. IC50 against K562 and MV4-11 was determined. Tualang Honey gave 53.9% and 50.6% apoptosis activity on K562 and MV4-11, respectively, while on human mononuclear cell it was 37.4%. Tualang Honey has the apoptosis-inducing ability for acute and chronic myeloid leukemia (K562 and MV4-11 cell lines.

  14. Deoxycytidine in human plasma: potential for protecting leukemic cells during chemotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, J D; Strock, D J; Teik, J E; Katz, T B; Marcel, P D

    1997-06-24

    Degradation of DNA produces deoxycytidine. Metabolism of deoxycytidine to dCTP inhibits phosphorylation of cytosine arabinoside (araC), fludarabine (FaraA) and 2-chlorodeoxyadenosine (CdA) by deoxycytidine kinase. This study measured plasma deoxycytidine in healthy adults and two leukemia patients and then determined how clinically relevant deoxycytidine levels would affect drug toxicity in human leukemia and lymphoma cells. Deoxycytidine was well below 0.05 microM in ten healthy persons. In the leukemia patients it was <0.05 and 0.44 microM before chemotherapy, rising to 10.3 and 5.5 microM during treatment. A broad range of clinically relevant deoxycytidine levels were high enough to profoundly decrease araC, FaraA and CdA toxicity in MOLT3, CA46 and HL60 leukemia/lymphoma cells and to change dCTP, DNA synthesis and drug incorporation into DNA in a manner consistent with prior mechanistic studies. Varying deoxycytidine levels could be an important factor influencing leukemia therapy.

  15. Tumor suppressors BTG1 and IKZF1 cooperate during mouse leukemia development and increase relapse risk in B-cell precursor acute lymphoblastic leukemia patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheijen, Blanca; Boer, Judith M; Marke, René; Tijchon, Esther; van Ingen Schenau, Dorette; Waanders, Esmé; van Emst, Liesbeth; van der Meer, Laurens T; Pieters, Rob; Escherich, Gabriele; Horstmann, Martin A; Sonneveld, Edwin; Venn, Nicola; Sutton, Rosemary; Dalla-Pozza, Luciano; Kuiper, Roland P; Hoogerbrugge, Peter M; den Boer, Monique L; van Leeuwen, Frank N

    2017-03-01

    Deletions and mutations affecting lymphoid transcription factor IKZF1 (IKAROS) are associated with an increased relapse risk and poor outcome in B-cell precursor acute lymphoblastic leukemia. However, additional genetic events may either enhance or negate the effects of IKZF1 deletions on prognosis. In a large discovery cohort of 533 childhood B-cell precursor acute lymphoblastic leukemia patients, we observed that single-copy losses of BTG1 were significantly enriched in IKZF1-deleted B-cell precursor acute lymphoblastic leukemia (P=0.007). While BTG1 deletions alone had no impact on prognosis, the combined presence of BTG1 and IKZF1 deletions was associated with a significantly lower 5-year event-free survival (P=0.0003) and a higher 5-year cumulative incidence of relapse (P=0.005), when compared with IKZF1-deleted cases without BTG1 aberrations. In contrast, other copy number losses commonly observed in B-cell precursor acute lymphoblastic leukemia, such as CDKN2A/B, PAX5, EBF1 or RB1, did not affect the outcome of IKZF1-deleted acute lymphoblastic leukemia patients. To establish whether the combined loss of IKZF1 and BTG1 function cooperate in leukemogenesis, Btg1-deficient mice were crossed onto an Ikzf1 heterozygous background. We observed that loss of Btg1 increased the tumor incidence of Ikzf1(+/-) mice in a dose-dependent manner. Moreover, murine B cells deficient for Btg1 and Ikzf1(+/-) displayed increased resistance to glucocorticoids, but not to other chemotherapeutic drugs. Together, our results identify BTG1 as a tumor suppressor in leukemia that, when deleted, strongly enhances the risk of relapse in IKZF1-deleted B-cell precursor acute lymphoblastic leukemia, and augments the glucocorticoid resistance phenotype mediated by the loss of IKZF1 function. Copyright© Ferrata Storti Foundation.

  16. Compound MMH01 possesses toxicity against human leukemia and pancreatic cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yu-Jen; Chou, Cheng-Jen; Chang, Tun-Tschu

    2009-04-01

    MMH01 is a compound isolated from Antrodia cinnamomea. MMH01 markedly inhibited growth of human leukemia U937 and pancreatic cancer BxPC3 cells. It resulted in distinct patterns of cell cycle distribution in U937 (G2/M, sub-G1 and polyploidy) and BxPC3 cells (G0/G1 and sub-G1). The modes of cell death in U937 cells include apoptosis and mitotic catastrophe, whereas apoptosis-associated events or necrosis in BxPC3 cells. Neither mitochondrial membrane permeabilization nor caspase dependence was noted. Proteins involving mitotic catastrophe-associated cell death such as cyclin B1 and checkpoint kinase 2 were activated in U937 cells. Only slight to moderate viability inhibition was noted to human monocytes, the normal counterpart of these myeloid leukemic cells. In conclusion, MMH01 possesses cytotoxicity against human leukemia and pancreatic cancer cells.

  17. False leukemia-lymphoma cell lines: an update on over 500 cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drexler, H G; Dirks, W G; Matsuo, Y; MacLeod, R A F

    2003-02-01

    Human leukemia-lymphoma (LL) cell lines represent an extremely important resource for research in a variety of fields and disciplines. As the cell lines are used as in vitro model systems in lieu of primary cell material, it is crucial that the cells in the culture flasks faithfully correspond to the purported objects of study. Obviously, proper authentication of cell line derivation and precise characterization are indispensable requirements to use as model systems. A number of studies has shown an unacceptable level of LL cell lines to be false. We present here the results of authenticating a comprehensively large sample (n = 550) of LL cell lines mainly by DNA fingerprinting and cytogenetic evaluation. Surprisingly, near-identical incidences (ca 15%) of false cell lines were observed among cell lines obtained directly from original investigators (59/395: 14.9%) and from secondary sources (23/155: 14.8%) implying that most cross-contamination is perpetrated by originators, presumably during establishment. By comparing our data with those published, we were further able to subclassify the false cell lines as (1) virtual: cross-contaminated with and unretrievably overgrown by other cell lines during initiation, never enjoying independent existence; (2) misidentified: cross-contaminated subsequent to establishment so that an original prototype may still exist; or (3) misclassified: unwittingly established from an unintended (often normal) cell type. Prolific classic leukemia cell lines were found to account for the majority of cross-contaminations, eg CCRF-CEM, HL-60, JURKAT, K-562 and U-937. We discuss the impact of cross-contaminations on scientific research, the reluctance of scientists to address the problem, and consider possible solutions. These findings provide a rationale for mandating the procurement of reputably sourced LL cell lines and their regular authentication thereafter.

  18. Identification of a novel SEPT9-ABL1 fusion gene in a patient with T-cell prolymphocytic leukemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rikio Suzuki

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available T-cell prolymphocytic leukemia (T-PLL, a rare type of peripheral T-cell leukemia, is characterized by marked splenomegaly with rapidly progressive lymphocytosis and a poor prognosis. Nine kinds of ABL1 chimeric genes have been identified in various kinds of hematological malignancies, such as chronic myeloid leukemia and B- or T-lymphoblastic leukemia. However, there have been no reports describing T-PLL cases with ABL1 rearrangements. We herein report a case of T-PLL with a novel SEPT9-ABL1 fusion gene which induced strong resistance to tyrosine kinase inhibitors such as imatinib and dasatinib.

  19. Treosulfan, Fludarabine Phosphate, and Total-Body Irradiation Before Donor Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Patients With High-Risk Acute Myeloid Leukemia, Myelodysplastic Syndrome, Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-29

    Accelerated Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in Remission; Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Childhood Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Childhood Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Untreated Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Untreated Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

  20. Antiproliferative effect of rapamycin on human T-cell leukemia cell line Jurkat by cell cycle arrest and telomerase inhibition

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yan-min ZHAO; Qian ZHOU; Yun XU; Xiao-yu LAI; He HUANG

    2008-01-01

    Aim:To examine the ability of rapamycin to suppress growth and regulate telomerase activity in the human T-cell leukemia cell line Jurkat. Methods:Cell proliferation was assessed after exposure to rapamycin by 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide assay. Cell cycle progression and apoptosis were determined by flow cytometry. The proteins important for cell cycle progres-sion and Akt/mammalian target of rapamycin signaling cascade were assessed by Western blotting. Telomerase activity was quantified by telomeric repeat amplication protocol assay. The human telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT) mRNA levels were determined by semi-quantitative RT-PCR. Results:Rapamycin inhibited the proliferation of Jurkat, induced G1 phase arrest, unregulated the pro-tein level of p21 as well as p27, and downregulated cyclinD3, phospho-p70s6k, and phospho-s6, but had no effect on apoptosis. Treatment with rapamycin reduced telomerase activity, and reduced hTERT mRNA and protein expression. Conclusion:Rapamycin displayed a potent antileukemic effect in the human T-cell leukemia cell line by inhibition of cell proliferation through G1 cell cycle arrest and also through the suppression of telomerase activity, suggesting that rapamycin may have potential clinical implications in the treatment of some leukemias.

  1. Apigenin decreases cell viability and telomerase activity in human leukemia cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jayasooriya, R G P T; Kang, Sang-Hyuck; Kang, Chang-Hee; Choi, Yung Hyun; Moon, Dong-Oh; Hyun, Jin-Won; Chang, Weon-Young; Kim, Gi-Young

    2012-08-01

    Recent studies have shown that apigenin (4',5,7-trihydroxyflavone inhibits human malignant cancer cell growth through cell cycle arrest and apoptosis. However, the underlying relationship between apoptosis and telomerase activity in response to apigenin exposure is not well understood. In this study, we found that apigenin significantly induces direct cytotoxicity in human leukemia cells (U937, THP-1 and HL60) through activation of the caspase pathway. As we presumed, treatment with apigenin was found to increase the level of intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS), whereas pretreatment with antioxidants, N-acetyl-cysteine (NAC) or glutathione (GSH), completely attenuated ROS generation. Surprisingly, these antioxidants did not promote recuperation from apigenin-induced cell death. We further showed that apigenin downregulates telomerase activity in caspase-dependent apoptosis and observed that apigenin dosing results in downregulation of telomerase activity by suppression of c-Myc-mediated telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT) expression. In addition, treatment of apigenin-dosed cells with the two antioxidants did not restore telomerase activity. Taken together, this data suggests that ROS is not essential for suppression of apigenin-mediated apoptosis associated with the activation of caspases and regulation of telomerase activity via suppression of hTERT. We conclude that apigenin has a direct cytotoxic effect and the loss of telomerase activity in leukemia cells. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Acute hepatitis A induction of precursor B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia: a causal relationship?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senadhi, V; Emuron, D; Gupta, R

    2010-09-01

    Precursor B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia accounts for 2% of all lymphoid neoplasms in the United States and occurs most frequently in childhood, but can also occur in adults with a median age of 39 years. It is more commonly seen in males and in Caucasians. We present a case of a 51-year-old Caucasian female with the development of precursor B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia after suffering acute hepatitis A 4 weeks prior to her diagnosis. She presented with malaise for a month without spontaneous bruising/bleeding, infections, or B-symptoms, such as fevers, night sweats, or unintentional weight loss. Nonspecific viral transformation of bone marrow has been discussed in the literature, but we specifically describe hepatitis A-induced adult-onset precursor B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia, which is the first reported case in the literature.

  3. Targeting 6-phosphogluconate dehydrogenase in the oxidative PPP sensitizes leukemia cells to antimalarial agent dihydroartemisinin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elf, S; Lin, R; Xia, S; Pan, Y; Shan, C; Wu, S; Lonial, S; Gaddh, M; Arellano, M L; Khoury, H J; Khuri, F R; Lee, B H; Boggon, T J; Fan, J; Chen, J

    2017-01-12

    The oxidative pentose phosphate pathway (PPP) is crucial for cancer cell metabolism and tumor growth. We recently reported that targeting a key oxidative PPP enzyme, 6-phosphogluconate dehydrogenase (6PGD), using our novel small-molecule 6PGD inhibitors Physcion and its derivative S3, shows anticancer effects. Notably, humans with genetic deficiency of either 6PGD or another oxidative PPP enzyme, glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase, exhibit non-immune hemolytic anemia upon exposure to aspirin and various antimalarial drugs. Inspired by these clinical observations, we examined the anticancer potential of combined treatment with 6PGD inhibitors and antimalarial drugs. We found that stable knockdown of 6PGD sensitizes leukemia cells to antimalarial agent dihydroartemisinin (DHA). Combined treatment with DHA and Physcion activates AMP-activated protein kinase, leading to synergistic inhibition of human leukemia cell viability. Moreover, our combined therapy synergistically attenuates tumor growth in xenograft nude mice injected with human K562 leukemia cells and cell viability of primary leukemia cells from human patients, but shows minimal toxicity to normal hematopoietic cells in mice as well as red blood cells and mononucleocytes from healthy human donors. Our findings reveal the potential for combined therapy using optimized doses of Physcion and DHA as a novel antileukemia treatment without inducing hemolysis.

  4. Development Refractoriness of MLL-Rearranged Human B Cell Acute Leukemias to Reprogramming into Pluripotency

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Á. Muñoz-López (Álvaro); D. Romero-Moya (Damià); C. Prieto (Cristina); Ramos-Mejía, V. (Verónica); Agraz-Doblas, A. (Antonio); I. Varela (Ignacio); Buschbeck, M. (Marcus); Palau, A. (Anna); Carvajal-Vergara, X. (Xonia); Giorgetti, A. (Alessandra); Ford, A. (Anthony); M. Lako (Majlinda); Granada, I. (Isabel); Ruiz-Xivillé, N. (Neus); Rodríguez-Perales, S. (Sandra); Torres-Ruíz, R. (Raul); R.W. Stam (Ronald); Fuster, J.L. (Jose Luis); M.F. Fraga (Mario F.); Nakanishi, M. (Mahito); G. Cazzaniga (Gianni); Bardini, M. (Michela); Cobo, I. (Isabel); Bayon, G.F. (Gustavo F.); A.F. Fernández (Agustin F.); C. Bueno (C.); P. Menéndez (Pablo)

    2016-01-01

    textabstractInduced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) are a powerful tool for disease modeling. They are routinely generated from healthy donors and patients from multiple cell types at different developmental stages. However, reprogramming leukemias is an extremely inefficient process. Few studies gen

  5. The significance of change of Th22 cells in patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘立民

    2013-01-01

    Objective To investigate the proportion of Th22 cells in peripheral blood of patients with acute lympho-blastic leukemia(ALL) and evaluate its significance.Methods The proportions of Th22 cells in peripheral blood of B-ALL and T-ALL patients before therapy(group 1),

  6. In childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia, blasts at different stages of immunophenotypic maturation have stem cell properties

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    le Viseur, Christoph; Hotfilder, Marc; Bomken, Simon; Wilson, Kerrie; Roettgers, Silja; Schrauder, Andre; Rosemann, Annegret; Irving, Julie; Stam, Ronald W.; Shultz, Leonard D.; Harbott, Jochen; Juergens, Heribert; Schrappe, Martin; Pieters, Rob; Vormoor, Josef

    We examined the leukemic stem cell potential of blasts at different stages of maturation in childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). Human leukemic bone marrow was transplanted intrafemorally into NOD/scid mice. Cells sorted using the B precursor differentiation markers CD19, CD20, and CD34

  7. Epigenetic inactivation of TWIST2 in acute lymphoblastic leukemia modulates proliferation, cell survival and chemosensitivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thathia, Shabnam H.; Ferguson, Stuart; Gautrey, Hannah E.; van Otterdijk, Sanne D.; Hili, Michela; Rand, Vikki; Moorman, Anthony V.; Meyer, Stefan; Brown, Robert; Strathdee, Gordon

    2012-01-01

    Background Altered regulation of many transcription factors has been shown to be important in the development of leukemia. TWIST2 modulates the activity of a number of important transcription factors and is known to be a regulator of hematopoietic differentiation. Here, we investigated the significance of epigenetic regulation of TWIST2 in the control of cell growth and survival and in response to cytotoxic agents in acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Design and Methods TWIST2 promoter methylation status was assessed quantitatively, by combined bisulfite and restriction analysis (COBRA) and pyrosequencing assays, in multiple types of leukemia and TWIST2 expression was determined by quantitative reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction analysis. The functional role of TWIST2 in cell proliferation, survival and response to chemotherapy was assessed in transient and stable expression systems. Results We found that TWIST2 was inactivated in more than 50% of cases of childhood and adult acute lymphoblastic leukemia through promoter hypermethylation and that this epigenetic regulation was especially prevalent in RUNX1-ETV6-driven cases. Re-expression of TWIST2 in cell lines resulted in a dramatic reduction in cell growth and induction of apoptosis in the Reh cell line. Furthermore, re-expression of TWIST2 resulted in increased sensitivity to the chemotherapeutic agents etoposide, daunorubicin and dexamethasone and TWIST2 hypermethylation was almost invariably found in relapsed adult acute lymphoblastic leukemia (91% of samples hypermethylated). Conclusions This study suggests a dual role for epigenetic inactivation of TWIST2 in acute lymphoblastic leukemia, initially through altering cell growth and survival properties and subsequently by increasing resistance to chemotherapy. PMID:22058208

  8. Dose- and Time-Dependent Response of Human Leukemia (HL-60 Cells to Arsenic Trioxide Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul B. Tchounwou

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available The treatment of acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL has been based on the administration of all-trans retinoic acid plus anthracycline chemotherapy, which is very effective as first line therapy; however 25 to 30% of patients will relapse with their disease becoming refractory to conventional therapy. Recently, studies have shown arsenic trioxide to be effective in the treatment of acute promyelocytic leukemia. In this study, we used the human leukemia (HL-60 cell line as a model to evaluate the cytoxicity of arsenic trioxide based on the MTT assay. Data obtained from this assay indicated that arsenic trioxide significantly reduced the viability of HL-60 cells, showing LD50 values of 14.26 + 0.5μg/mL, 12.54 + 0.3μg/mL, and 6.4 + 0.6μg/mL upon 6, 12, and 24 hours of exposure, respectively; indicating a dose- and time-dependent response relationship. Findings from the present study indicate that arsenic trioxide is highly cytotoxic to human leukemia (HL-60 cells, supporting its use as an effective therapeutic agent in the management of acute promyelocytic leukemia.

  9. Organizing pneumonia appearing in B-cell chronic leukemia malignancy progression - a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polaczek, Mateusz Marek; Zych, Jacek; Opoka, Lucyna; Maksymiuk, Beata; Roszkowski-Sliż, Kazimierz

    2015-01-01

    Patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia or non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma are at risk of infectious diseases of respiratory system because of immunodeficiency. Occurrence of organizing pneumonia in leukemic patients is most commonly correlated with bone marrow transplant or treatment with antimitotic agents. There have been only four reported cases of organizing pneumonia related solitarily to leukemia or lymphoma. We present a case of 65-year old gentlemen, diagnosed 8 months earlier with B-cell chronic lymphocytic leukemia with no previous hematologic treatment, who presented symptoms of persistent pneumonia with no significant reaction to antibiotics. Chest computed tomography scans showed well-localized consolidation with ground glass opacities and some air bronchogram, suggesting infectious disease. All results of microbiological examinations were negative. Due to radiological progression of parenchymal consolidation despite two intravenous courses of antibiotics open lung biopsy was performed. The histologic examination of lung specimen revealed structures typical for organizing pneumonia pattern. There was no evidence for leukemic involvement in lung tissue, as no sign for infectious factors from histological staining was observed. In the inferior mediastinal lymph node sample progression of chronic lymphatic leukemia to mixed cell lymphoma was diagnosed. Patient was commenced on prednisone 60 mg/daily with fast improvement. We believe that this is the first case of organizing pneumonia as a reaction to the conversion of B-cell chronic lymphocytic leukemia progression to more malignant stage.

  10. Lapatinib induces autophagic cell death and differentiation in acute myeloblastic leukemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen YJ

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Yu-Jen Chen,1–4 Li-Wen Fang,5 Wen-Chi Su,6,7 Wen-Yi Hsu,1 Kai-Chien Yang,1 Huey-Lan Huang8 1Department of Medical Research, 2Department of Radiation Oncology, Mackay Memorial Hospital, 3Institute of Traditional Medicine, School of Medicine, National Yang-Ming University, 4Institute of Pharmacology, Taipei Medical University, Taipei, 5Department of Nutrition, I-Shou University, Kaohsiung, 6Research Center for Emerging Viruses, China Medical University Hospital, 7Graduate Institute of Clinical Medical Science, China Medical University, Taichung, 8Department of Bioscience Technology, College of Health Science, Chang Jung Christian University, Tainan, Taiwan, Republic of China Abstract: Lapatinib is an oral-form dual tyrosine kinase inhibitor of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR or ErbB/Her superfamily members with anticancer activity. In this study, we examined the effects and mechanism of action of lapatinib on several human leukemia cells lines, including acute myeloid leukemia (AML, chronic myeloid leukemia (CML, and acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL cells. We found that lapatinib inhibited the growth of human AML U937, HL-60, NB4, CML KU812, MEG-01, and ALL Jurkat T cells. Among these leukemia cell lines, lapatinib induced apoptosis in HL-60, NB4, and Jurkat cells, but induced nonapoptotic cell death in U937, K562, and MEG-01 cells. Moreover, lapatinib treatment caused autophagic cell death as shown by positive acridine orange staining, the massive formation of vacuoles as seen by electronic microscopy, and the upregulation of LC3-II, ATG5, and ATG7 in AML U937 cells. Furthermore, autophagy inhibitor 3-methyladenine and knockdown of ATG5, ATG7, and Beclin-1 using short hairpin RNA (shRNA partially rescued lapatinib-induced cell death. In addition, the induction of phagocytosis and ROS production as well as the upregulation of surface markers CD14 and CD68 was detected in lapatinib-treated U937 cells, suggesting the induction of

  11. BMP4 is involved in the chemoresistance of myeloid leukemia cells through regulating autophagy-apoptosis balance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Xielan; Liu, Juan; Peng, Minyuan; Liu, Jing; Chen, Fangping

    2013-10-01

    This study showed that silencing BMP4 expression significantly activated caspase-2, 3, and 9, while decreasing Matrigel colony formation in Cytarabine (Ara-C)-treated leukemia HL-60 cells. In contrast, Ara-C significantly upregulated Atg5 and Beclin-1 expression, the ratio of LC3-II/LC3-I, and CDK1 and cyclin B1 expression in leukemia cells expressing BMP4. BafA significantly sensitized the apoptotic effect of Ara-C in leukemia cells. Injection of Ara-C significantly inhibited tumor growth in mice inoculated with leukemia cells with BMP4 silenced. In conclusion, BMP4 plays a crucial role in the chemoresistance of leukemia cells through the activation of autophagy and subsequent inhibition of apoptosis.

  12. Mutation of the NPM1 gene contributes to the development of donor cell-derived acute myeloid leukemia after unrelated cord blood transplantation for acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-Macías, Gabriela; Martínez-Laperche, Carolina; Gayoso, Jorge; Noriega, Víctor; Serrano, David; Balsalobre, Pascual; Muñoz-Martínez, Cristina; Díez-Martín, José L; Buño, Ismael

    2013-08-01

    Donor cell leukemia (DCL) is a rare but severe complication after allogeneic stem cell transplantation. Its true incidence is unknown because of a lack of correct recognition and reporting, although improvements in molecular analysis of donor-host chimerism are contributing to a better diagnosis of this complication. The mechanisms of leukemogenesis are unclear, and multiple factors can contribute to the development of DCL. In recent years, cord blood has emerged as an alternative source of hematopoietic progenitor cells, and at least 12 cases of DCL have been reported after unrelated cord blood transplantation. We report a new case of DCL after unrelated cord blood transplantation in a 44-year-old woman diagnosed as having acute lymphoblastic leukemia with t(1;19) that developed acute myeloid leukemia with normal karyotype and nucleophosmin (NPM1) mutation in donor cells. To our knowledge, this is the first report of NPM1 mutation contributing to DCL development.

  13. Disruption of Annexin II /p11 Interaction Suppresses Leukemia Cell Binding, Homing and Engraftment, and Sensitizes the Leukemia Cells to Chemotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gopalakrishnapillai, Anilkumar; Kolb, E Anders; Dhanan, Priyanka; Mason, Robert W; Napper, Andrew; Barwe, Sonali P

    2015-01-01

    The bone marrow microenvironment plays an important role in acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) cell proliferation, maintenance, and resistance to chemotherapy. Annexin II (ANX2) is abundantly expressed on bone marrow cells and complexes with p11 to form ANX2/p11-hetero-tetramer (ANX2T). We present evidence that p11 is upregulated in refractory ALL cell lines and patient samples. A small molecule inhibitor that disrupts ANX2/p11 interaction (ANX2T inhibitor), an anti-ANX2 antibody, and knockdown of p11, abrogated ALL cell adhesion to osteoblasts, indicating that ANX2/p11 interaction facilitates binding and retention of ALL cells in the bone marrow. Furthermore, ANX2T inhibitor increased the sensitivity of primary ALL cells co-cultured with osteoblasts to dexamethasone and vincristine induced cell death. Finally, in an orthotopic leukemia xenograft mouse model, the number of ALL cells homing to the bone marrow was reduced by 40-50% in mice injected with anti-ANX2 antibody, anti-p11 antibody or ANX2T inhibitor compared to respective controls. In a long-term engraftment assay, the percentage of ALL cells in mouse blood, bone marrow and spleen was reduced in mice treated with agents that disrupt ANX2/p11 interaction. These data show that disruption of ANX2/p11 interaction results in reduced ALL cell adhesion to osteoblasts, increased ALL cell sensitization to chemotherapy, and suppression of ALL cell homing and engraftment.

  14. Preclinical validation: LV/IL-12 transduction of patient leukemia cells for immunotherapy of AML

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ju Huang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Interleukin-12 (IL-12 is a potent cytokine that may be harnessed to treat cancer. To date, nearly 100 IL-12-based clinical trials have been initiated worldwide. Yet systemic administration of IL-12 is toxic. Different strategies are being developed to reduce such toxicities by restricting IL-12 distribution. Our previous studies employed lentivector-mediated expression of murine IL-12 in tumor cells and demonstrated effective protection in both mouse leukemia and solid tumor challenge models. In this study, we carried out preclinical validation studies using a novel lentivector to engineer expression of human IL-12 in acute myeloid leukemia blast cells isolated from 21 patients. Acute myeloid leukemia cells were transduced with a bicistronic lentivector that encodes the human IL-12 cDNA as a fusion, as well as a LNGFR (ΔLNGFR/mutant thymidylate kinase cassette as a marking and cell-fate control element. A range of 20–70% functional transduction efficiencies was achieved. Transduced acute myeloid leukemia cells produced bioactive IL-12 protein and displayed dose-dependent sensitivity to the prodrug 3′-azido-3′-deoxythymidine. In vitro immortalization assays using transduced mouse hematopoietic stem cells demonstrated minimal genotoxic risk from our IL-12 vector. Scale-up transduction and cell processing was subsequently validated in a GMP facility to support our (now approved Clinical Trial Application (CTA.

  15. Allogeneic hematopoietic stem-cell transplantation for acute myeloid leukemia in remission

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nagler, Arnon; Rocha, Vanderson; Labopin, Myriam

    2013-01-01

    Cyclophosphamide (Cy) combined with total-body irradiation (TBI) or with busulfan (Bu) are currently the most common myeloablative regimens used in allogeneic stem-cell transplantation (alloSCT) in adults with acute myelogenous leukemia (AML). Intravenous (IV) Bu has more predictable bioavailabil......Cyclophosphamide (Cy) combined with total-body irradiation (TBI) or with busulfan (Bu) are currently the most common myeloablative regimens used in allogeneic stem-cell transplantation (alloSCT) in adults with acute myelogenous leukemia (AML). Intravenous (IV) Bu has more predictable...

  16. In vitro effect of imatinib mesylate loaded on polybutylcyanoacrylate nanoparticles on leukemia cell line K562.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasandoost, Leyla; Akbarzadeh, Azim; Attar, Hossein; Heydarinasab, Amir

    2017-05-01

    The study aimed to prepare imatinib mesylate-loaded polybutylcyanoacrylate (PBCA) nanoparticles and evaluate their efficacy on leukemia cell line K562. The formulation was prepared by miniemulsion polymerization technique. Nanoparticles were characterized by dynamic light scattering (DLS), spectrophotometry, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), dialysis membrane, and 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-Yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) techniques. Nanoscale particles with high encapsulation efficiency (86%) and physical entrapment of drug were observed. In addition, nanoparticles showed suitable drug retention capability and potentiate the cytotoxicity effects of imatinib mesylate. Findings of study suggested PBCA nanoparticles are promising carrier for imatinib mesylate delivery to leukemia cell line K562.

  17. Trigeminal nerve involvement in T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia: value of MR imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karadag, Demet; Karaguelle, Ayse Tuba; Erden, Ilhan; Erden, Ayse E-mail: erden@ada.net.tr

    2002-10-01

    A 30-year-old male with T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia presented with facial numbness. Neurological examination revealed paresthesia of the left trigeminal nerve. Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) cytology showed no atypical cells. Gadolinium-enhanced magnetic resonance (MR) imaging demonstrated enlargement and enhancement of intracranial portions of the left trigeminal nerve. The abnormal MR imaging findings almost completely resolved after the chemotherapy. Gadolinium-enhanced MR imaging is not only a useful procedure for the early diagnosis of cranial nerve invasion by leukemia but it might be helpful to follow the changes after the treatment.

  18. T Cell Receptor Vβ Staining Identifies the Malignant Clone in Adult T cell Leukemia and Reveals Killing of Leukemia Cells by Autologous CD8+ T cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aileen G Rowan

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available There is growing evidence that CD8+ cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL responses can contribute to long-term remission of many malignancies. The etiological agent of adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma (ATL, human T lymphotropic virus type-1 (HTLV-1, contains highly immunogenic CTL epitopes, but ATL patients typically have low frequencies of cytokine-producing HTLV-1-specific CD8+ cells in the circulation. It remains unclear whether patients with ATL possess CTLs that can kill the malignant HTLV-1 infected clone. Here we used flow cytometric staining of TCRVβ and cell adhesion molecule-1 (CADM1 to identify monoclonal populations of HTLV-1-infected T cells in the peripheral blood of patients with ATL. Thus, we quantified the rate of CD8+-mediated killing of the putative malignant clone in ex vivo blood samples. We observed that CD8+ cells from ATL patients were unable to lyse autologous ATL clones when tested directly ex vivo. However, short in vitro culture restored the ability of CD8+ cells to kill ex vivo ATL clones in some donors. The capacity of CD8+ cells to lyse HTLV-1 infected cells which expressed the viral sense strand gene products was significantly enhanced after in vitro culture, and donors with an ATL clone that expressed the HTLV-1 Tax gene were most likely to make a detectable lytic CD8+ response to the ATL cells. We conclude that some patients with ATL possess functional tumour-specific CTLs which could be exploited to contribute to control of the disease.

  19. T Cell Receptor Vβ Staining Identifies the Malignant Clone in Adult T cell Leukemia and Reveals Killing of Leukemia Cells by Autologous CD8+ T cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowan, Aileen G; Witkover, Aviva; Melamed, Anat; Tanaka, Yuetsu; Cook, Lucy B M; Fields, Paul; Taylor, Graham P; Bangham, Charles R M

    2016-11-01

    There is growing evidence that CD8+ cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) responses can contribute to long-term remission of many malignancies. The etiological agent of adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma (ATL), human T lymphotropic virus type-1 (HTLV-1), contains highly immunogenic CTL epitopes, but ATL patients typically have low frequencies of cytokine-producing HTLV-1-specific CD8+ cells in the circulation. It remains unclear whether patients with ATL possess CTLs that can kill the malignant HTLV-1 infected clone. Here we used flow cytometric staining of TCRVβ and cell adhesion molecule-1 (CADM1) to identify monoclonal populations of HTLV-1-infected T cells in the peripheral blood of patients with ATL. Thus, we quantified the rate of CD8+-mediated killing of the putative malignant clone in ex vivo blood samples. We observed that CD8+ cells from ATL patients were unable to lyse autologous ATL clones when tested directly ex vivo. However, short in vitro culture restored the ability of CD8+ cells to kill ex vivo ATL clones in some donors. The capacity of CD8+ cells to lyse HTLV-1 infected cells which expressed the viral sense strand gene products was significantly enhanced after in vitro culture, and donors with an ATL clone that expressed the HTLV-1 Tax gene were most likely to make a detectable lytic CD8+ response to the ATL cells. We conclude that some patients with ATL possess functional tumour-specific CTLs which could be exploited to contribute to control of the disease.

  20. STUDY ON EFFECTS OF QUERCETIN ON PML GENE AND PROTEIN IN LEUKEMIA CELL LINES

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    钟璐; 陈芳源; 韩洁英; 邵念贤; 欧阳仁荣

    2003-01-01

    Objective To investigate the effect of quercetin on PML gene and protein expression and localization in leukemia cell lines. MethodsCell morphology was assayed by Wright,s stain and fluorescence stain, and PML Mrna expression by RT-PCR, PML protein localization by immuno fluorescence.ResultsNB4 and HL-60 cells differentiated morphologically after treatment with all trans retinoic acid (ATRA) while K562 cells did not differentiate. Typical apoptosis was found in each cell line after treatment with quercetin. Immuno fluorescence analysis showed, after treatment with ATRA, the fusion protein disappeared in NB4 cells and PML protein relocated, while HL-60 and K562 cells had no difference from control cells. After treatment with quercetin, the fusion protein disappeared in NB4 cells, PML protein relocated, then degraded. In HL-60 cells and K562 cells, PML protein also located and then degraded. The expression of PML Mrna was not changed in all three cell lines after treatment with ATRA or quercetin. ConclusionPML plays the role of differentiation and apoptosis inducer in leukemia cells at the translational level. PML in POD plays the role of apoptosis inducer and the growth control of leukemia cells.

  1. Precursor B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia presenting as obstructive jaundice: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Awasum Michael

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Acute leukemias very rarely present with jaundice. Herein we report a case of precursor B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia that presented with jaundice in an adult. Case presentation A 44-year-old Hispanic man presented with right upper quadrant abdominal pain and jaundice. His initial blood work revealed pancytopenia and hyperbilirubinemia. Direct bilirubin was more than 50% of the total. His imaging studies were unremarkable except for hepatomegaly. All blood screening tests for various hepatocellular etiologies were normal. A diagnosis of precursor B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia was made upon liver biopsy. It also showed lymphocytic infiltration of the hepatic parenchyma leading to bile stasis. The diagnosis was subsequently confirmed upon bone marrow biopsy. The patient was treated with a hyperfractionated cyclophosphamide/vincristine/doxorubicin/dexamethasone regimen. Conclusion Acute lymphoblastic leukemia should be one of the differential diagnoses that should be considered when initial work-up for jaundice is inconclusive. Some cases of acute lymphoblastic leukemia have been reported in both adults and children to have presented with the initial manifestation of jaundice, but only a few had no radiographic evidence of biliary obstruction. Such presentation can pose a serious diagnostic dilemma for clinicians. This manuscript attempts to highlight it. Moreover, we believe that if acute lymphoblastic leukemia presentations similar to this case continue to be reported in adults or children, a specific immunophenotypic expression and cytogenetic abnormality may be found to be associated with hepatic infiltration by leukemia. This may substantially contribute to the further understanding of the pathophysiology of this hematologic disease.

  2. Engagement of SIRPα inhibits growth and induces programmed cell death in acute myeloid leukemia cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahban Irandoust

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Recent studies show the importance of interactions between CD47 expressed on acute myeloid leukemia (AML cells and the inhibitory immunoreceptor, signal regulatory protein-alpha (SIRPα on macrophages. Although AML cells express SIRPα, its function has not been investigated in these cells. In this study we aimed to determine the role of the SIRPα in acute myeloid leukemia. DESIGN AND METHODS: We analyzed the expression of SIRPα, both on mRNA and protein level in AML patients and we further investigated whether the expression of SIRPα on two low SIRPα expressing AML cell lines could be upregulated upon differentiation of the cells. We determined the effect of chimeric SIRPα expression on tumor cell growth and programmed cell death by its triggering with an agonistic antibody in these cells. Moreover, we examined the efficacy of agonistic antibody in combination with established antileukemic drugs. RESULTS: By microarray analysis of an extensive cohort of primary AML samples, we demonstrated that SIRPα is differentially expressed in AML subgroups and its expression level is dependent on differentiation stage, with high levels in FAB M4/M5 AML and low levels in FAB M0-M3. Interestingly, AML patients with high SIRPα expression had a poor prognosis. Our results also showed that SIRPα is upregulated upon differentiation of NB4 and Kasumi cells. In addition, triggering of SIRPα with an agonistic antibody in the cells stably expressing chimeric SIRPα, led to inhibition of growth and induction of programmed cell death. Finally, the SIRPα-derived signaling synergized with the activity of established antileukemic drugs. CONCLUSIONS: Our data indicate that triggering of SIRPα has antileukemic effect and may function as a potential therapeutic target in AML.

  3. Engagement of SIRPα Inhibits Growth and Induces Programmed Cell Death in Acute Myeloid Leukemia Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hubeek, Isabelle; van Beek, Ellen M.; Schornagel, Karin; Broekhuizen, Aart J. F.; Akyuz, Mercan; van de Loosdrecht, Arjan A.; Delwel, Ruud; Valk, Peter J.; Sonneveld, Edwin; Kearns, Pamela; Creutzig, Ursula; Reinhardt, Dirk; de Bont, Eveline S. J. M.; Coenen, Eva A.; van den Heuvel-Eibrink, Marry M.; Zwaan, C. Michel; Kaspers, Gertjan J. L.; Cloos, Jacqueline; van den Berg, Timo K.

    2013-01-01

    Background Recent studies show the importance of interactions between CD47 expressed on acute myeloid leukemia (AML) cells and the inhibitory immunoreceptor, signal regulatory protein-alpha (SIRPα) on macrophages. Although AML cells express SIRPα, its function has not been investigated in these cells. In this study we aimed to determine the role of the SIRPα in acute myeloid leukemia. Design and Methods We analyzed the expression of SIRPα, both on mRNA and protein level in AML patients and we further investigated whether the expression of SIRPα on two low SIRPα expressing AML cell lines could be upregulated upon differentiation of the cells. We determined the effect of chimeric SIRPα expression on tumor cell growth and programmed cell death by its triggering with an agonistic antibody in these cells. Moreover, we examined the efficacy of agonistic antibody in combination with established antileukemic drugs. Results By microarray analysis of an extensive cohort of primary AML samples, we demonstrated that SIRPα is differentially expressed in AML subgroups and its expression level is dependent on differentiation stage, with high levels in FAB M4/M5 AML and low levels in FAB M0–M3. Interestingly, AML patients with high SIRPα expression had a poor prognosis. Our results also showed that SIRPα is upregulated upon differentiation of NB4 and Kasumi cells. In addition, triggering of SIRPα with an agonistic antibody in the cells stably expressing chimeric SIRPα, led to inhibition of growth and induction of programmed cell death. Finally, the SIRPα-derived signaling synergized with the activity of established antileukemic drugs. Conclusions Our data indicate that triggering of SIRPα has antileukemic effect and may function as a potential therapeutic target in AML. PMID:23320069

  4. Stereotypical chronic lymphocytic leukemia B-cell receptors recognize survival promoting antigens on stromal cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mascha Binder

    Full Text Available Chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL is the most common leukemia in the Western world. Survival of CLL cells depends on their close contact with stromal cells in lymphatic tissues, bone marrow and blood. This microenvironmental regulation of CLL cell survival involves the stromal secretion of chemo- and cytokines as well as the expression of adhesion molecules. Since CLL survival may also be driven by antigenic stimulation through the B-cell antigen receptor (BCR, we explored the hypothesis that these processes may be linked to each other. We tested if stromal cells could serve as an antigen reservoir for CLL cells, thus promoting CLL cell survival by stimulation through the BCR. As a proof of principle, we found that two CLL BCRs with a common stereotyped heavy chain complementarity-determining region 3 (previously characterized as "subset 1" recognize antigens highly expressed in stromal cells--vimentin and calreticulin. Both antigens are well-documented targets of autoantibodies in autoimmune disorders. We demonstrated that vimentin is displayed on the surface of viable stromal cells and that it is present and bound by the stereotyped CLL BCR in CLL-stroma co-culture supernatant. Blocking the vimentin antigen by recombinant soluble CLL BCR under CLL-stromal cell co-culture conditions reduces stroma-mediated anti-apoptotic effects by 20-45%. We therefore conclude that CLL BCR stimulation by stroma-derived antigens can contribute to the protective effect that the stroma exerts on CLL cells. This finding sheds a new light on the understanding of the pathobiology of this so far mostly incurable disease.

  5. Plasma cells negatively regulate the follicular helper T cell program

    OpenAIRE

    2010-01-01

    B lymphocytes differentiate into antibody-secreting cells under the antigen-specific control of follicular helper T (TFH) cells. Here, we demonstrate that isotype-switched plasma cells expressed MHCII, CD80 and CD86 and intracellular machinery required for antigen presentation. Antigen-specific plasma cells could access, process and present sufficient antigen in vivo to induce multiple TH cell functions. Importantly, antigen-primed plasma cells failed to induce interleukin 21 or Bcl-6 in naïv...

  6. Gas Plasma Effects on Living Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoffels, E.; Sladek, R. E. J.; Kieft, I. E.

    This paper surveys the research activities at the Eindhoven University of Technology (The Netherlands) in the area of biomedical applications of gas discharge plasmas. A non-thermal atmospheric plasma source (the plasma needle) has been developed, and its interactions with living mammalian cells and bacteria are studied. It is concluded that plasma can efficiently kill bacteria without harming the cells, and also influence the cells without causing cell death (necrosis). In future it will lead to applications like skin (wound) and caries treatment.

  7. A model with competition between the cell lines in leukemia under treatment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Halanay, A.; Cândea, D.; Rădulescu, R. [POLITEHNICA University of Bucharest Department of Mathematics and Informatics Splaiul Independentei 313 RO-060042 Bucharest (Romania)

    2014-12-10

    The evolution of leukemia is modeled with a delay differential equation model of four cell populations: two populations (healthy and leukemic) ) of stem-like cells involving a larger category consisting of proliferating stem and progenitor cells with self-renew capacity and two populations (healthy and leukemic) of mature cells, considering the competition of healthy vs. leukemic cell populations and three types of division that a stem-like cell can exhibit: self-renew, asymmetric division and differentiation. In the model it is assumed that the treatment acts on the proliferation rate of the leukemic stem cells and on the apoptosis of stem and mature cells. The emphasis in this model is on establishing relevant parameters for chronic and acute manifestations of leukemia. Stability of equilibria is investigated and sufficient conditions for local asymptotic stability will be given using a Lyapunov-Krasovskii functional.

  8. Purification and characterization of fetal hematopoietic cells that express the common acute lymphoblastic leukemia antigen (CALLA)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hokland, P; Rosenthal, P; Griffin, J D

    1983-01-01

    Fetal hematopoietic cells that express the common acute lymphoblastic leukemia antigen (CALLA) were purified from both fetal liver and fetal bone marrow by immune rosetting with sheep erythrocytes coated with rabbit anti-mouse immunoglobulin and by fluorescence-activated cell sorting. Dual...... lymphoblastic leukemia cell with respect to surface marker phenotype. A population of CALLA- cells devoid of mature erythroid and myeloid surface markers was found to contain higher numbers of TdT+ cells but lower numbers of cyto-mu, B1, and Ia+ cells than the CALLA+ subset. In vitro analysis of normal...... antigen. Furthermore, using methanol-fixed cells, it could be shown that approximately 20% contained intracytoplasmic mu chains (cyto-mu) and that approximately 15% were positive for the terminal transferase enzyme (TdT) marker. The CALLA+ fetal cells thus closely resemble the childhood acute...

  9. Hairy cell leukemia: A decade long experience of North Indian Hematology Center

    OpenAIRE

    Venkatesan Somasundaram; Abhishek Purohit; Mukul Aggarwal; Prabhu Manivannan; Pravas Mishra; Tulika Seth; Seema Tyagi; Manoranjan Mahapatra; Hara P Pati; Renu Saxena

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Hairy cell leukemia is a rare chronic B-cell disorder that follows an indolent but progressive course. This disorder is characterized by pancytopenia, splenomegaly, bone marrow fibrosis and the presence of atypical lymphoid cells with hairy projections in peripheral blood, bone marrow and spleen. Treatment is mainly with nucleoside analog cladribine, which induces complete remission in up to 85% cases. Materials and Methods: This is a retrospective analysis of Hairy cell Leukemi...

  10. Continuously expanding CAR NK-92 cells display selective cytotoxicity against B-cell leukemia and lymphoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oelsner, Sarah; Friede, Miriam E; Zhang, Congcong; Wagner, Juliane; Badura, Susanne; Bader, Peter; Ullrich, Evelyn; Ottmann, Oliver G; Klingemann, Hans; Tonn, Torsten; Wels, Winfried S

    2017-02-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells can rapidly respond to transformed and stressed cells and represent an important effector cell type for adoptive immunotherapy. In addition to donor-derived primary NK cells, continuously expanding cytotoxic cell lines such as NK-92 are being developed for clinical applications. To enhance their therapeutic utility for the treatment of B-cell malignancies, we engineered NK-92 cells by lentiviral gene transfer to express chimeric antigen receptors (CARs) that target CD19 and contain human CD3ζ (CAR 63.z), composite CD28-CD3ζ or CD137-CD3ζ signaling domains (CARs 63.28.z and 63.137.z). Exposure of CD19-positive targets to CAR NK-92 cells resulted in formation of conjugates between NK and cancer cells, NK-cell degranulation and selective cytotoxicity toward established B-cell leukemia and lymphoma cells. Likewise, the CAR NK cells displayed targeted cell killing of primary pre-B-ALL blasts that were resistant to parental NK-92. Although all three CAR NK-92 cell variants were functionally active, NK-92/63.137.z cells were less effective than NK-92/63.z and NK-92/63.28.z in cell killing and cytokine production, pointing to differential effects of the costimulatory CD28 and CD137 domains. In a Raji B-cell lymphoma model in NOD-SCID IL2R γ(null) mice, treatment with NK-92/63.z cells, but not parental NK-92 cells, inhibited disease progression, indicating that selective cytotoxicity was retained in vivo. Our data demonstrate that it is feasible to generate CAR-engineered NK-92 cells with potent and selective antitumor activity. These cells may become clinically useful as a continuously expandable off-the-shelf cell therapeutic agent. Copyright © 2017 International Society for Cellular Therapy. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Study on Taxol in Inhibiting Human Leukemia Cell Proliferation and Inducing Apoptosis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    赵小英; 张晓红; 徐磊; 张行

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To explore the effects of Taxol in inhibiting human leukemia k562 cell proliferation and inducing apoptosis in vitro. Methods: Human leukemia K562 cells were treated with Taxol of different concentrations for 12-72 hrs. Cell proliferation was evaluated by MTT assay and morphological changes of apoptosis were examined by microscopy. Cell apoptosis was determined by flow cytometry (FCM) and DNA gel electrophoresis. Results: Growth of K562 cells was inhibited by Taxol with an IC50 value of 0.84 μg/mi.Typical nuclear condensation and apoptosis bodies were observed as early as 24 hrs after a 0.5 μg/ml Taxol treatment; Apoptotic rate of the Taxol-treated K562 cells increased from 3.7% to 24.0% in 24 hrs. No DNA ladder was observed by DNA gel electrophoresis. Conclusion: Taxol could inhibit K562 cell growth and induce apoptosis in vitro.

  12. Tumor therapy with Amanita phalloides (death cap): stabilization of B-cell chronic lymphatic leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riede, Isolde

    2010-10-01

    Molecular events that cause tumor formation upregulate a number of HOX genes, called switch genes, coding for RNA polymerase II transcription factors. Thus, in tumor cells, RNA polymerase II is more active than in other somatic cells. Amanita phalloides contains amanitin, inhibiting RNA polymerase II. Partial inhibition with amanitin influences tumor cell--but not normal cell--activity. To widen the treatment spectrum, homeopathic dilutions of Amanita phalloides, containing amanitin, were given to a patient with leukemia. Monitoring the leukemic cell count, different doses of amanitin were given. The former duplication time of leukemic cells was 21 months. Within a period of 21 months, the cell count is stabilized to around 10(5)/μL. No leukemia-associated symptoms, liver damage, or continuous erythrocyte deprivation occur. This new principle of tumor therapy shows high potential to provide a gentle medical treatment.

  13. Transplantability of human lymphoid cell line, lymphoma, and leukemia in splenectomized and/or irradiated nude mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Watanabe, S.; Shimosato, Y.; Kuroki, M.; Sato, Y.; Nakajima, T.

    1980-07-01

    The effects of splenectomy and/or whole-body irradiation of nude mice before xenotransplantation of lymphoid cell lines, lymphoma, and leukemia were studied. Transplantation after whole-body irradiation resulted in the increased ''take'' rate of three cultured cell lines (two of T-cell-derived acute lymphocytic leukemia and one of B-cell derived acute lymphocytic leukemia) and in the tumorous growth of Burkitt-derived Raji and spontaneously transformed lymphoblastoid cell lines. With splenectomy plus irradiation as a pretreatment, tumorous growth occurred in four other cell lines which were not transplantable after irradiation only (two cell lines of Epstein-Barr virus-transformed cord blood cells and one each of null acute lymphocytic leukemia and nodular lymphoma-derived cell lines). Direct transplantation of leukemia and lymphoma cells into the pretreated mice was successful in 7 of 24 cases (29%). B-cell-derived diffuse large lymphoid lymphoma was transplantable in three of seven cases (43%). However, lymphoma and leukemia of peripheral T-cell origin was difficult to transplant even with pretreatment, and only one pleomorphic T-cell lymphoma grew to a significant size (2 cm). One tumor each of B-cell-derived diffuse large lymphoid and T-cell diffuse lymphoblastic lymphoma became transplantable.

  14. Evidence that high-migration drug-surviving MOLT4 leukemia cells exhibit cancer stem cell-like properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Xiaoxing; Xiong, Meng; Jin, Yujie; Deng, Chaohua; Xu, Hui; An, Changqing; Hao, Ling; Yang, Xiangyong; Deng, Xinzhou; Tu, Zhenbo; Li, Xinran; Xiao, Ruijing; Zhang, Qiuping

    2016-07-01

    Leukemia represents a spectrum of hematological malignancies threatening human health. Resistance to treatments and metastasis of leukemia are the main causes of death in patients. Leukemia stem cells (LSCs) are the initiating cells of leukemia as well as the main source of drug resistance, invasion and metastasis. Consequently, eliminating LSCs is a prerequisite to eradicate leukemia. Preliminary studies in our laboratory have shown that chemokines and their related receptors play an important role in the drug resistance and metastasis of leukemic cells. In this study, we obtained high migration drug-surviving (short term) MOLT4 cells (hMDSCs-MOLT4) with treatment of doxorubicin (DOX) after Transwell assay. Then we detected stem cell-associated molecular markers on hMDSCs-MOLT4 cells and the parental MOLT4 cells by FCM, QPCR, western blotting, H&E staining and immunohisto-chemistry experimental techniques in vitro and in vivo. Moreover, we explored its impact on drug resistance and tumor formation. Then we found that compared with the parental MOLT4 cells, the mRNA expression levels of stem cell-related factors Sox2, Oct4, C-myc, Klf4, Nanog, Bmi-1, CXCR4 are increased in hMDSCs-MOLT4 cells, together with the protein expression levels of Sox2, Oct4, Klf4, Nanog, CXCR4 and CD34. Our results indicated that hMDSCs-MOLT4 cells exhibited strong drug resistance and certain cancer stem cell-like characteristics. It is the first indication that the targeting stemness factors such as Sox2, Oct4, Klf4, Nanog and CXCR4 may represent plausible options for eliminating T-ALL stem-like cells. The present findings shed light on the relationship between drug-tolerant leukemic cells and cancer stem cells.

  15. Cytotoxic effects of tetracycline analogues (doxycycline, minocycline and COL-3 in acute myeloid leukemia HL-60 cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hairong Song

    Full Text Available Tetracycline analogues (TCNAs have been shown to inhibit matrix metalloproteinases and to induce apoptosis in several cancer cell types. In the present study, the cytotoxic effects of TCNAs doxycycline (DOXY, minocycline (MINO and chemically modified tetracycline-3 (COL-3 were investigated in the human acute myeloid leukemia HL-60 cell line. Cells were incubated with TCNAs in final concentrations of 0.5-100 µg/ml for 24 h. Viability of the leukemic cells was inhibited in a concentration-dependent manner using resazurin assay. The estimated IC50s were 9.2 µg/ml for DOXY, 9.9 µg/ml for MINO and 1.3 µg/ml for COL-3. All three TCNAs induced potent cytotoxic effects and cell death. Apoptosis, which was assessed by morphological changes and annexin V positivity, was concentration- and time-dependent following incubation with any one of the drugs. TCNAs induced DNA double strand breaks soon after treatment commenced as detected by γH2AX and western blot. The loss of mitochondrial membrane potential (Δψm, caspase activation and cleavage of PARP and Bcl-2 were observed; however, the sequence of events differed among the drugs. Pancaspase inhibitor Z-VAD-FMK improved survival of TCNAs-treated cells and decreased TCNAs-induced apoptosis. In summary, we demonstrated that TCNAs had a cytotoxic effect on the HL-60 leukemic cell line. Apoptosis was induced via mitochondria-mediated and caspase-dependent pathways in HL-60 cells by all three TCNAs. COL-3 exerted the strongest anti-proliferative and pro-apoptotic effects in concentrations that have been achieved in human plasma in reported clinical trials. These results indicate that there is a therapeutic potential of TCNAs in leukemia.

  16. Cytotoxic effects of tetracycline analogues (doxycycline, minocycline and COL-3) in acute myeloid leukemia HL-60 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Hairong; Fares, Mona; Maguire, Kim R; Sidén, Ake; Potácová, Zuzana

    2014-01-01

    Tetracycline analogues (TCNAs) have been shown to inhibit matrix metalloproteinases and to induce apoptosis in several cancer cell types. In the present study, the cytotoxic effects of TCNAs doxycycline (DOXY), minocycline (MINO) and chemically modified tetracycline-3 (COL-3) were investigated in the human acute myeloid leukemia HL-60 cell line. Cells were incubated with TCNAs in final concentrations of 0.5-100 µg/ml for 24 h. Viability of the leukemic cells was inhibited in a concentration-dependent manner using resazurin assay. The estimated IC50s were 9.2 µg/ml for DOXY, 9.9 µg/ml for MINO and 1.3 µg/ml for COL-3. All three TCNAs induced potent cytotoxic effects and cell death. Apoptosis, which was assessed by morphological changes and annexin V positivity, was concentration- and time-dependent following incubation with any one of the drugs. TCNAs induced DNA double strand breaks soon after treatment commenced as detected by γH2AX and western blot. The loss of mitochondrial membrane potential (Δψm), caspase activation and cleavage of PARP and Bcl-2 were observed; however, the sequence of events differed among the drugs. Pancaspase inhibitor Z-VAD-FMK improved survival of TCNAs-treated cells and decreased TCNAs-induced apoptosis. In summary, we demonstrated that TCNAs had a cytotoxic effect on the HL-60 leukemic cell line. Apoptosis was induced via mitochondria-mediated and caspase-dependent pathways in HL-60 cells by all three TCNAs. COL-3 exerted the strongest anti-proliferative and pro-apoptotic effects in concentrations that have been achieved in human plasma in reported clinical trials. These results indicate that there is a therapeutic potential of TCNAs in leukemia.

  17. Assembly of the murine leukemia virus is directed towards sites of cell-cell contact.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing Jin

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available We have investigated the underlying mechanism by which direct cell-cell contact enhances the efficiency of cell-to-cell transmission of retroviruses. Applying 4D imaging to a model retrovirus, the murine leukemia virus, we directly monitor and quantify sequential assembly, release, and transmission events for individual viral particles as they happen in living cells. We demonstrate that de novo assembly is highly polarized towards zones of cell-cell contact. Viruses assembled approximately 10-fold more frequently at zones of cell contact with no change in assembly kinetics. Gag proteins were drawn to adhesive zones formed by viral Env glycoprotein and its cognate receptor to promote virus assembly at cell-cell contact. This process was dependent on the cytoplasmic tail of viral Env. Env lacking the cytoplasmic tail while still allowing for contact formation, failed to direct virus assembly towards contact sites. Our data describe a novel role for the viral Env glycoprotein in establishing cell-cell adhesion and polarization of assembly prior to becoming a fusion protein to allow virus entry into cells.

  18. General Information about Plasma Cell Neoplasms (Including Multiple Myeloma)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Cell Neoplasms Treatment Research Plasma Cell Neoplasms (Including Multiple Myeloma) Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Plasma ... the throat can make it hard to swallow. Multiple myeloma In multiple myeloma , abnormal plasma cells ( myeloma cells ) ...

  19. Stages of Plasma Cell Neoplasms (Including Multiple Myeloma)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Cell Neoplasms Treatment Research Plasma Cell Neoplasms (Including Multiple Myeloma) Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Plasma ... the throat can make it hard to swallow. Multiple myeloma In multiple myeloma , abnormal plasma cells ( myeloma cells ) ...

  20. Treatment Options for Plasma Cell Neoplasms (Including Multiple Myeloma)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Cell Neoplasms Treatment Research Plasma Cell Neoplasms (Including Multiple Myeloma) Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Plasma ... the throat can make it hard to swallow. Multiple myeloma In multiple myeloma , abnormal plasma cells ( myeloma cells ) ...

  1. Treatment Option Overview (Plasma Cell Neoplasms Including Multiple Myeloma)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Cell Neoplasms Treatment Research Plasma Cell Neoplasms (Including Multiple Myeloma) Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Plasma ... the throat can make it hard to swallow. Multiple myeloma In multiple myeloma , abnormal plasma cells ( myeloma cells ) ...

  2. Small-Molecule Disruption of the Myb/p300 Cooperation Targets Acute Myeloid Leukemia Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uttarkar, Sagar; Piontek, Therese; Dukare, Sandeep; Schomburg, Caroline; Schlenke, Peter; Berdel, Wolfgang E; Müller-Tidow, Carsten; Schmidt, Thomas J; Klempnauer, Karl-Heinz

    2016-12-01

    The transcription factor c-Myb is essential for the proliferation of hematopoietic cells and has been implicated in the development of leukemia and other human cancers. Pharmacologic inhibition of Myb is therefore emerging as a potential therapeutic strategy for these diseases. By using a Myb reporter cell line, we have identified plumbagin and several naphthoquinones as potent low-molecular weight Myb inhibitors. We demonstrate that these compounds inhibit c-Myb by binding to the c-Myb transactivation domain and disrupting the cooperation of c-Myb with the coactivator p300, a major driver of Myb activity. Naphthoquinone-induced inhibition of c-Myb suppresses Myb target gene expression and induces the differentiation of the myeloid leukemia cell line HL60. We demonstrate that murine and human primary acute myeloid leukemia cells are more sensitive to naphthoquinone-induced inhibition of clonogenic proliferation than normal hematopoietic progenitor cells. Overall, our work demonstrates for the first time the potential of naphthoquinones as small-molecule Myb inhibitors that may have therapeutic potential for the treatment of leukemia and other tumors driven by deregulated Myb. Mol Cancer Ther; 15(12); 2905-15. ©2016 AACR. ©2016 American Association for Cancer Research.

  3. A cationic amphiphilic peptide ABP-CM4 exhibits selective cytotoxicity against leukemia cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yu Qing; Min, Cui; Sang, Ming; Han, Yang Yang; Ma, Xiao; Xue, Xiao Qing; Zhang, Shuang Quan

    2010-08-01

    Some cationic antibacterial peptides exhibit a broad spectrum of cytotoxic activity against cancer cells, which could provide a new class of anticancer drugs. In the present study, the anticancer activity of ABP-CM4, an antibacterial peptide from Bombyx mori, against leukemic cell lines THP-1, K562 and U937 was evaluated, and the cytotoxicity compared with the effects on non-cancerous mammalian cells, including peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs), HEK-293 and erythrocytes. ABP-CM4 reduced the number of viable cells of the leukemic cell lines after exposure for 24h. The reduction was concentration dependent, and the IC50 values ranged from 14 to 18 microM. Conversely, ABP-CM4, even at 120 microM, exhibited no cytotoxicity toward HEK-293 or PBMCs, indicating that there was no significant effect on these two types of non-cancer cells. ABP-CM4 at a concentration of 200 microM had no hemolytic activity on mammalian erythrocytes. Together, these results suggested a selective cytotoxicity in leukemia cells. Flow cytometry demonstrated that the binding activity of ABP-CM4 to leukemia cells was much higher than that to HEK-293 or PBMCs, and there was almost no binding to erythrocytes. FITC-labeled ABP-CM4 molecules were examined under a confocal microscope and found to be concentrated at the surface of leukemia cells and changes of the cell membrane were determined by a cell permeability assay, which led us to the conclusion that ABP-CM4 could act at the cell membrane for its anticancer activity on leukemia cells. Collectively, our results indicated that ABP-CM4 has the potential for development as a novel antileukemic agent.

  4. Evaluation of the Efficacy of the Plasma Pencil Against Cancer Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohades, Soheila; Barekzi, Nazir; Razavi, Hamid; Laroussi, Mounir

    2014-10-01

    The plasma pencil generates low temperature and atmospheric pressure plasma. To generate the plasma, high voltage pulses with short width (from nanosecond to microsecond) are applied to a noble gas. The working gas can be helium, argon or a mixture of these with air or oxygen. Generating plasma with helium provides a tolerable temperature for biological cells and tissues. Diagnostic measurements on the plasma plume has revealed the presence of active agents such as reactive oxygen species (ROS) and nitrogen reactive species (RNS), which are known to have biological implications. Recently, low temperature plasma has drawn attention to its potential in cancer therapy. In our lab, the plasma pencil has been used to treat leukemia, prostate and epithelial cancer cells. The cancer cell line used here is the SCaBER (ATCC®HTB3™) cell line originating from a human bladder cancer. The results indicate that specific species induce the molecular mechanisms associated with cell death. The death of cells after plasma treatment will be studied using assays, such as DNA laddering and Caspase-3 activation, to elucidate the mechanism of the apoptotic or necrotic pathways.

  5. Kelainan Hemostasis pada Leukemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zelly Dia Rofinda

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available AbstrakLatar belakang: Leukemia adalah penyakit keganasan pada jaringan hematopoietik yang ditandai denganpenggantian elemen sumsum tulang normal oleh sel darah abnormal atau sel leukemik. Salah satu manifestasi klinisdari leukemia adalah perdarahan yang disebabkan oleh berbagai kelainan hemostasis.Kelainan hemostasis yang dapat terjadi pada leukemia berupa trombositopenia, disfungsi trombosit,koagulasi intravaskuler diseminata, defek protein koagulasi, fibrinolisis primer dan trombosis. Patogenesis danpatofosiologi kelainan hemostasis pada leukemia tersebut terjadi dengan berbagai mekanisme.Kata kunci: leukemia, kelainan hemostasisAbstractBackground: AbstractLeukemia is a malignancy of hematopoietic tissue which is characterized bysubstituted of bone marrow element with abnormal blood cell or leukemic cell. One of clinical manifestation ofleukemia is bleeding that is caused by several hemostasis disorders.Hemostasis disorders in leukemia such asthrombocytopenia, platelet dysfunction, disseminated intravascular coagulation, coagulation protein defect, primaryfibrinolysis and thrombosis. Pathogenesis and pathophysiology of thus hemostasis disorders in leukemia occur withdifferent mechanism.Keywords: leukemia, hemostasis disorder

  6. Modulatory Effects and Action Mechanisms of Tryptanthrin on Murine Myeloid Leukemia Cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hoi-Ling Chan; Hon-Yan Yip; Nai-Ki Mak; Kwok-Nam Leung

    2009-01-01

    Leukemia is the disorder of hematopoietic cell development and is characterized by an uncoupling of cell proliferation and differentiation. There is a pressing need for the development of novel tactics for leukemia therapy as conventional treatments often have severe adverse side effects. Tryptanthrin (6,12-dihydro-6,12-dioxoindolo-(2,1-b)-quinazoline) is a naturally-occurring, weakly basic alkaloid isolated from the dried roots of medicinal indigo plants (Ban-Lan-Gen). It has been reported to have various biological and pharmacological activities, including anti-microbial, anti-inflammatory, immunomodulatory and anti-tumor effects. However, its modulatory effects and action mechanisms on myeloid cells remain poorly understood. In this study, tryptanthrin was shown to suppress the proliferation of the murine myeloid leukemia WEHI-3B JCS cells in a dose- and time-dependent manner. It also significantly reduced the growth of WEHI-3B JCS cells in vivo in syngeneic BALB/c mice. However, it exhibited no significant direct cytotoxicity on normal murine peritoneal macrophages. Flow cytometric analysis showed an obvious cell cycle arrest of the tryptanthrin-treated WEHI-3B JCS cells at the G0/G1 phase. The expression of cyclin D2,D3, Cdk 2, 4 and 6 genes in WEHI-3B JCS cells was found to be down-regulated at 24 h as measured by RT-PCR. Morphological and functional studies revealed that tryptanthrin could induce differentiation in WEHI-3B JCS cells, as shown by the increases in vacuolation, cellular granularity and NBT-reducing activity in tryptanthrin-treated cells. Collectively, our findings suggest that tryptanthrin might exert its anti-tumor effect on the murine myelomonocytic leukemia WEHI-3B JCS cells by causing cell cycle arrest and by triggering cell differentiation. Cellular & Molecular Immunology. 2009;6(5):335-342.

  7. Alloreactive natural killer cells for the treatment of acute myeloid leukemia: from stem cell transplantation to adoptive immunotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Loredana eRuggeri

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Natural killer cells express activating and inhibitory receptors which recognize MHC class I alleles, termed Killer cell Immunoglobulin-like Receptors (KIRs. Preclinical and clinical data from haploidentical T-cell depleted stem cell transplantation have demonstrated that alloreactive KIR-L mismatched natural killer cells play a major role as effectors against acute myeloid leukemia. Outside the transplantation setting, several reports have proven the safety and feasibility of natural killer cell infusion in acute myeloid leukemia patients and, in some cases, provided evidence that transferred NK cells are functionally alloreactive and may have a role in disease control. Aim of the present work is to briefly summarize the most recent advances in the field by moving from the first preclinical and clinical demonstration of donor NK alloreactivity in the transplantation setting to the most recent attempts of exploiting the use of alloreactive NK cell infusion as a means of adoptive immunotherapy against acute myeloid leukemia. Altogether, these data highlight the pivotal role of NK cells for the development of novel immunological approaches in the clinical management of acute myeloid leukemia.

  8. Role of NOXA and its ubiquitination in proteasome inhibitor-induced apoptosis in chronic lymphocytic leukemia cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Baou, M.; Kohlhaas, S.L.; Butterworth, M.; Vogler, M.; Dinsdale, D.; Walewska, R.; Majid, A.; Eldering, E.; Dyer, M.J.S.; Cohen, G.M.

    2010-01-01

    Background Bortezomib has been successfully used in the treatment of multiple myeloma and has been proposed as a potential treatment for chronic lymphocytic leukemia. In this study we investigated the mechanism by which bortezomib induces apoptosis in chronic lymphocytic leukemia cells. Design and M

  9. Revisiting the biology of infant t(4;11)/MLL-AF4+ B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A. Sanjuan-Pla (Alejandra); C. Bueno (C.); C. Prieto (Cristina); P. Acha (Pamela); R.W. Stam (Ronald); R. Marschalek (Rolf); P. Menéndez (Pablo)

    2015-01-01

    textabstractInfant B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (B-ALL) accounts for 10% of childhood ALL. The genetic hallmark of most infant B-ALL is chromosomal rearrangements of the mixed-lineage leukemia (MLL) gene. Despite improvement in the clinicalmanagement and survival (∼85-90%) of childhood B-ALL,

  10. Refined diagnostic criteria and classification of mast cell leukemia (MCL) and myelomastocytic leukemia (MML): a consensus proposal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valent, P; Sotlar, K; Sperr, W R; Escribano, L; Yavuz, S; Reiter, A; George, T I; Kluin-Nelemans, H C; Hermine, O; Butterfield, J H; Hägglund, H; Ustun, C; Hornick, J L; Triggiani, M; Radia, D; Akin, C; Hartmann, K; Gotlib, J; Schwartz, L B; Verstovsek, S; Orfao, A; Metcalfe, D D; Arock, M; Horny, H-P

    2014-09-01

    Mast cell leukemia (MCL), the leukemic manifestation of systemic mastocytosis (SM), is characterized by leukemic expansion of immature mast cells (MCs) in the bone marrow (BM) and other internal organs; and a poor prognosis. In a subset of patients, circulating MCs are detectable. A major differential diagnosis to MCL is myelomastocytic leukemia (MML). Although criteria for both MCL and MML have been published, several questions remain concerning terminologies and subvariants. To discuss open issues, the EU/US-consensus group and the European Competence Network on Mastocytosis (ECNM) launched a series of meetings and workshops in 2011-2013. Resulting discussions and outcomes are provided in this article. The group recommends that MML be recognized as a distinct condition defined by mastocytic differentiation in advanced myeloid neoplasms without evidence of SM. The group also proposes that MCL be divided into acute MCL and chronic MCL, based on the presence or absence of C-Findings. In addition, a primary (de novo) form of MCL should be separated from secondary MCL that typically develops in the presence of a known antecedent MC neoplasm, usually aggressive SM (ASM) or MC sarcoma. For MCL, an imminent prephase is also proposed. This prephase represents ASM with rapid progression and 5%-19% MCs in BM smears, which is generally accepted to be of prognostic significance. We recommend that this condition be termed ASM in transformation to MCL (ASM-t). The refined classification of MCL fits within and extends the current WHO classification; and should improve prognostication and patient selection in practice as well as in clinical trials.

  11. Triptolide induced cell death through apoptosis and autophagy in murine leukemia WEHI-3 cells in vitro and promoting immune responses in WEHI-3 generated leukemia mice in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Shih-Feng; Chen, Ya-Yin; Lin, Jen-Jyh; Liao, Ching-Lung; Ko, Yang-Ching; Tang, Nou-Ying; Kuo, Chao-Lin; Liu, Kuo-Ching; Chung, Jing-Gung

    2017-02-01

    Triptolide, a traditional Chinese medicine, obtained from Tripterygium wilfordii Hook F, has anti-inflammatory, antiproliferative, and proapoptotic properties. We investigated the potential efficacy of triptolide on murine leukemia by measuring the triptolide-induced cytotoxicity in murine leukemia WEHI-3 cells in vitro. Results indicated that triptolide induced cell morphological changes and induced cytotoxic effects through G0/G1 phase arrest, induction of apoptosis. Flow cytometric assays showed that triptolide increased the production of reactive oxygen species, Ca(2+) release and mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨm ), and activations of caspase-8, -9, and -3. Triptolide increased protein levels of Fas, Fas-L, Bax, cytochrome c, caspase-9, Endo G, Apaf-1, PARP, caspase-3 but reduced levels of AIF, ATF6α, ATF6β, and GRP78 in WEHI-3 cells. Triptolide stimulated autophagy based on an increase in acidic vacuoles, monodansylcadaverine staining for LC-3 expression and increased protein levels of ATG 5, ATG 7, and ATG 12. The in vitro data suggest that the cytotoxic effects of triptolide may involve cross-talk between cross-interaction of apoptosis and autophagy. Normal BALB/c mice were i.p. injected with WEHI-3 cells to generate leukemia and were oral treatment with triptolide at 0, 0.02, and 0.2 mg/kg for 3 weeks then animals were weighted and blood, liver, spleen samples were collected. Results indicated that triptolide did not significantly affect the weights of animal body, spleen and liver of leukemia mice, however, triptolide significant increased the cell populations of T cells (CD3), B cells (CD19), monocytes (CD11b), and macrophage (Mac-3). Furthermore, triptolide increased the phagocytosis of macrophage from peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) but not effects from peritoneum. Triptolide promoted T and B cell proliferation at 0.02 and 0.2 mg/kg treatment when cells were pretreated with Con A and LPS stimulation, respectively; however, triptolide

  12. Leukemia cutis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angoori G Rao

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Leukemia cutis is the infiltration of neoplastic leukocytes or their precursors into the epidermis, the dermis, or the subcutis, resulting in clinically identifiable cutaneous lesions. Leukemia cutis may follow, precede or occur concomitantly with the diagnosis of systemic leukemia. A 50-year-old woman presented with asymptomatic multiple cutaneous nodules all over the body of 4 months duration. Cutaneous examination showed multiple hyperpigmented nodules and plaques involving face, trunk, and extremities. Peripheral smear showed abnormally elevated leucocyte count (TLC-70,000 with abnormal cells: myeloblasts 40%, promyelocytes 8% and myelocytes 39%. Auer rods were present in few myeloblasts. Bone marrow aspiration showed increased cellularity, erythroid hyperplasia with megaloblastic change, increased myeloblasts with maturation arrest. Immunohistochemistry showed strongly positive myeloperoxidase infiltrating cells and negative for CD20 and CD3 consistent with the diagnosis of AML-M 2 with leukemia cutis. This case is reported for its rarity.

  13. Evolution of Excited Convective Cells in Plasmas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pécseli, Hans; Juul Rasmussen, Jens; Sugai, H.

    1984-01-01

    Convective cells are excited externally in a fully ionized magnetized plasma and their space-time evolution is investigated by two-dimensional potential measurements. A positive cell is excited externally by control of the end losses in the 'scrape off' layer of a plasma column produced by surface...

  14. Successful Treatment of Fanconi Anemia and T-Cell Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Terrie Flatt

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Fanconi anemia is associated with an increased risk of malignancy. Patients are sensitive to the toxic effects of chemotherapy. We report the case of a patient with Fanconi anemia who developed T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia. He experienced chemotherapy-related complications including prolonged neutropenia, grade IV vincristine neuropathy, and disseminated aspergillosis. He was successfully treated with modified dosing of cytarabine and intrathecal methotrexate followed by allogeneic bone marrow transplant. The aspergillosis was treated with systemic antifungal treatment and surgical resection. Now 30 months after bone marrow transplant the patient is without evidence of aspergillosis or leukemia.

  15. Activity of vinorelbine on B-chronic lymphocytic leukemia cells in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernabei, P A; Landini, I; Bartolozzi, B; Banchelli, I; Degli Innocenti o Nocentini, A; Santini, V; Ematologia, U O

    1999-01-01

    Vinorelbine (VNR) is a new semi-synthetic Vinca rosea alkaloid that has been employed both in combination and as a single agent, showing a significant antitumour activity. Since little is known about VNR in human leukemia, we studied the in vitro cytotoxic effect of VNR on peripheral blood lymphocytes from 18 patients affected by B-chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL), employing the INT assay. VNR inhibited fresh B-CLL cells from 15/18 patients in primary cultures, the ID50 doses ranging from 4 ng/ml to 83 micrograms/ml. These data strongly suggest that VNR could be effective in the treatment of B-CLL.

  16. Kinetics of indium-111-labeled leukemic cells in patients with acute nonlymphocytic leukemia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamauchi, K.; Suzuki, Y.; Sugihara, M.; Nagao, T.; Arimori, S.

    1984-08-01

    The distribution within the body of autologous leukemic cells labeled with indium-111 oxine was studied in seven patients with acute nonlymphocytic leukemia. The leukemic blood cells initially entered the spleen and liver, and the major site of localization was the former rather than the latter. The majority of the leukemic cells had not left the spleen and liver within 48 hr. Liver radioactivity fell transitorily up to the third hr after the initial rise. The clearance curve of radioactivity from the blood showed a plateau or the appearance of a ''hump'' from 1 to 5 hr after injection of labeled leukemic cells. These results might reflect recirculation of a portion of the leukemic cells between these organs and the bloodstream. In a patient with acute monoblastic leukemia. OKM1 monoclonal-antibody-treated monoblasts showed the lowest recovery into the blood and a greater increase of liver than splenic radioactivity at 30 min after injection. These results suggest the removal of damaged cells by the cytotoxic effects of antibody mediated by reticuloendothelial clearance mainly of the liver and others. In one patient with acute promyelocytic leukemia, leukemic cells accumulated in both kidneys, indicating the possible infiltration of these cells. Since indium-111 oxine stays firmly attached to the cells in spite of the possibility of radiation damaged in a long-term survey, it seems an ideal label for studying leukemic cell kinetics.

  17. Adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma associated with HTLV-1 infection in a Brazilian adolescent

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    VALLE Antonio Carlos Francesconi do

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available We present the case of a 15-year-old patient infected with HTLV-1 who developed a cutaneous T-cell lymphoma, confirmed by histopathological and immunohistochemical examination, as well as clinically and hematologically confirmed leukemia. The patient died 3 months after initial presentation of the disease. The rarity of the disease in this age group justifies the present report.

  18. Pro-apoptotic effect of Persea americana var. Hass (avocado) on Jurkat lymphoblastic leukemia cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonilla-Porras, Angelica R; Salazar-Ospina, Andrea; Jimenez-Del-Rio, Marlene; Pereañez-Jimenez, Andres; Velez-Pardo, Carlos

    2013-11-05

    Abstract Context: Therapy for leukemia has a limited efficacy. There is a need to search for alternative anti-leukemia therapies. Persea americana Mill var. Hass (Lauraceae) is a tropical fruit (avocado) that might be used against cancer. Objective: To investigate whether P. americana induces death in Jurkat lymphoblastic leukemia cells. Materials and methods: Four ethanol extracts (0.1, 0.5, 1, 2 and 5 mg/mL) from avocado fruit (endocarp, whole seed, seed and leaves) were analyzed against Jurkat cells. Hydrogen peroxide generation by oxidation of 2',7'-dichlorodihydrofluorescein diacetate to the fluorescent compound 2',7'-dichlorfluorescein assay, acridine orange/ethidium bromide staining, flow cytometry analysis of annexin-V/7-amino-actinomycin, mitochondrial membrane potential and immunocytochemistry detection of transcription factor p53, caspase-3 and apoptosis-inducing factor (AIF) were evaluated. Results: Endocarp, seed, whole seed, and leaf (0.1 mg/mL) extracts induced significant apoptosis in Jurkat cells (p americana extracts function as a pro-apoptotic compound. Leukemic cells are eliminated through an oxidative stress mechanism. This study contributes to the understanding of the molecular mechanism of the avocado and its therapeutic action on leukemia.

  19. Autologous stem cell transplantation for therapy-related acute myeloid leukemia and myelodysplastic syndrome.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kroger, N.; Brand, R.; Biezen, A. van; Cahn, J.; Slavin, S.; Blaise, D.; Sierra, J.; Zander, A.; Niederwieser, D.; Witte, T.J.M. de

    2006-01-01

    We report the results of 65 patients with treatment-related myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS)/acute myelogenous leukemia (AML) who were transplanted from an autograft and reported to the EBMT. The median age was 39 years (range, 3-69), and stem cell source was bone marrow (n = 31), or peripheral blood

  20. A recurrent germline PAX5 mutation confers susceptibility to pre-B cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Shah, S.; Schrader, K.A.; Waanders, E.; Timms, A.E.; Vijai, J.; Miething, C.; Wechsler, J.; Yang, J.; Hayes, J.; Klein, R.J.; Zhang, Jinghui; Wei, L.; Wu, G.; Rusch, M.; Nagahawatte, P.; Ma, J; Chen, S.C.; Song, G.; Cheng, J.; Meyers, P.; Bhojwani, D.; Jhanwar, S.; Maslak, P.; Fleisher, M.; Littman, J.; Offit, L.; Rau-Murthy, R.; Fleischut, M.H.; Corines, M.; Murali, R.; Gao, X.; Manschreck, C.; Kitzing, T.; Murty, V.V.; Raimondi, S.C.; Kuiper, R.P.; Simons, A.; Schiffman, J.D.; Onel, K.; Plon, S.E.; Wheeler, D.A.; Ritter, D.; Ziegler, D.S.; Tucker, K.; Sutton, R.; Chenevix-Trench, G.; Li, J.; Huntsman, D.G.; Hansford, S.; Senz, J.; Walsh, T.; Lee, M. van der; Hahn, C.N.; Roberts, K.G.; King, M.C.; Lo, S.M.; Levine, R.L.; Viale, A.; Socci, N.D.; Nathanson, K.L.; Scott, H.S.; Daly, M.; Lipkin, S.M.; Lowe, S.W.; Downing, J.R.; Altshuler, D.; Sandlund, J.T.; Horwitz, M.S.; Mullighan, C.G.; Offit, K.

    2013-01-01

    Somatic alterations of the lymphoid transcription factor gene PAX5 (also known as BSAP) are a hallmark of B cell precursor acute lymphoblastic leukemia (B-ALL), but inherited mutations of PAX5 have not previously been described. Here we report a new heterozygous germline variant, c.547G>A (p.Gly1

  1. B-Cell Receptor Epitope Recognition Correlates With the Clinical Course of Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Binder, Mascha; Mueller, Fabian; Jackst, Antje; Lechenne, Barbara; Pantic, Milena; Bacher, Ulrike; Eulenburg, Christine Zu; Veelken, Hendrik; Mertelsmann, Roland; Pasqualini, Renata; Arap, Wadih; Trepel, Martin

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: B-cell receptors (BCRs) and their recognition of specific epitopes may play a pivotal role in the development and progression of chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL). In this study, the authors set up a model system to explore epitope reactivity and its clinical relevance in CLL. METHODS:

  2. T-Cell Large Granular Lymphocyte Leukemia in the Lower Eyelid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sia, Paul Ikgan; Figueira, Edwin; Kuss, Bryone; Craig, James; Selva, Dinesh

    The authors describe a case of T-cell large granular lymphocytic leukemia nodular lesion of the eyelid. To their knowledge, this has not been reported previously to occur in the eyelids. They have also reviewed previous literature reports on similar skin lesions in areas elsewhere.

  3. Plasma alemtuzumab levels in patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia treated with alemtuzumab combined with chemotherapy reflect the efficacy of the treatment: a hypothesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vojdeman, Fie Juhl; Jurlander, Jesper; van't Veer, Mars; Itälä-Remes, Maija; Kimby, Eva; Tjønnfjord, Geir Erland; Walewski, Jan; Kozák, Tomas; Polliack, Aaron; Montagna, Michela; Regazzi, Mario; Kirkby, Nikolai; van Oers, Marinus; Geisler, Christian Hartmann

    2013-04-01

    In the HOVON68 trial comparing subcutaneous low-dose alemtuzumab (LD-A) used together with fludarabine (F) and cyclophosphamide (C) with FC alone in high-risk chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL), LD-AFC resulted in significantly more clinical and molecular responses than FC, but also in more opportunistic infections. In a subgroup analysis of alemtuzumab trough levels during treatment by a sensitive enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) method, detectable levels were found in 4/6 complete and 0/3 partial responders. A relationship between alemtuzumab plasma levels, response and duration of lymphocytopenia was evident. We hypothesize that following combination therapy, the response may not be a function of the alemtuzumab levels, but the opposite, that plasma alemtuzumab levels are a function of the efficacy of the entire treatment, and the fewer leukemic target cells that are remaining, the higher are the levels of plasma alemtuzumab. This concept may well provide a guide for alemtuzumab dosage in future trials.

  4. Chronic lymphocytic leukemia cells diversify and differentiate in vivo via a nonclassical Th1-dependent, Bcl-6–deficient process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patten, Piers E.M.; Ferrer, Gerardo; Chen, Shih-Shih; Simone, Rita; Marsilio, Sonia; Yan, Xiao-Jie; Gitto, Zachary; Yuan, Chaohui; Kolitz, Jonathan E.; Barrientos, Jacqueline; Allen, Steven L.; Rai, Kanti R.; MacCarthy, Thomas; Chu, Charles C.

    2016-01-01

    Xenografting primary tumor cells allows modeling of the heterogeneous natures of malignant diseases and the influences of the tissue microenvironment. Here, we demonstrate that xenografting primary chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) B lymphocytes with activated autologous T cells into alymphoid mice results in considerable CLL B cell division and sizable T cell expansion. Nevertheless, most/all CD5+CD19+ cells are eventually lost, due in part to differentiation into antibody-secreting plasmablasts/plasma cells. CLL B cell differentiation is associated with isotype class switching and development of new IGHV-D-J mutations and occurs via an activation-induced deaminase-dependent pathway that upregulates IRF4 and Blimp-1 without appreciable levels of the expected Bcl-6. These processes were induced in IGHV-unmutated and IGHV-mutated clones by Th1-polarized T-bet+ T cells, not classical T follicular helper (Tfh) cells. Thus, the block in B cell maturation, defects in T cell action, and absence of antigen-receptor diversification, which are often cardinal characteristics of CLL, are not inherent but imposed by external signals and the microenvironment. Although these activities are not dominant features in human CLL, each occurs in tissue proliferation centers where the mechanisms responsible for clonal evolution operate. Thus, in this setting, CLL B cell diversification and differentiation develop by a nonclassical germinal center–like reaction that might reflect the cell of origin of this leukemia. PMID:27158669

  5. Lipoxygenase inhibitors protect acute lymphoblastic leukemia cells from ferroptotic cell death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Probst, Lukas; Dächert, Jasmin; Schenk, Barbara; Fulda, Simone

    2017-09-15

    Ferroptosis has recently been identified as a mode of programmed cell death. However, little is yet known about the signaling mechanism. Here, we report that lipoxygenases (LOX) contribute to the regulation of RSL3-induced ferroptosis in acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) cells. We show that the glutathione (GSH) peroxidase 4 (GPX4) inhibitor RSL3 triggers lipid peroxidation, production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and cell death in ALL cells. All these events are impeded in the presence of Ferrostatin-1 (Fer-1), a small-molecule inhibitor of lipid peroxidation. Also, lipid peroxidation and ROS production precede the induction of cell death, underscoring their contribution to cell death upon exposure to RSL3. Importantly, LOX inhibitors, including the selective 12/15-LOX inhibitor Baicalein and the pan-LOX inhibitor nordihydroguaiaretic acid (NDGA), protect ALL cells from RSL3-stimulated lipid peroxidation, ROS generation and cell death, indicating that LOX contribute to ferroptosis. RSL3 triggers lipid peroxidation and cell death also in FAS-associated Death Domain (FADD)-deficient cells which are resistant to death receptor-induced apoptosis indicating that the induction of ferroptosis may bypass apoptosis resistance. By providing new insights into the molecular regulation of ferroptosis, our study contributes to the development of novel treatment strategies to reactivate programmed cell death in ALL. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Metastatic Calcinosis Cutis: A Case in a Child with Acute Pre-B Cell Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Pablo Castanedo-Cázares

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Hypercalcemia in children with malignancy is an uncommon condition. It has been described in leukemia patients with impaired renal excretion of calcium or osteolytic lesions. Metastatic calcinosis cutis (MCC may develop if hypercalcemia persists. We report the case of a 5-year-old girl with an atypical dermatosis and unspecific gastrointestinal symptoms. Considered clinical diagnoses were xanthomas, histiocytosis, molluscum contagiosum, and nongenital warts. Cutaneous histological analysis showed amorphous basophilic deposits in the dermis suggestive of calcium deposits. Laboratory tests confirmed serum hypercalcemia. Extensive investigations such as bone marrow biopsy established the diagnosis of an acute pre-B cell lymphoblastic leukemia. Hypercalcemia in hematopoietic malignancies is unusual, especially as initial manifestation of the disease. Careful review of the literature fails to reveal previous reports of these peculiar cutaneous lesions of MCC in children with leukemia.

  7. Cytotoxic and apoptotic effects of prenylflavonoid artonin B in human acute lymphoblastic leukemia cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chun-chung LEE; Chun-nan LIN; Guey-mei JOW

    2006-01-01

    Aim: To investigate the anticancer effects and molecular mechanism of artonin B on the human acute lymphoblastic leukemia CCRF-CEM cells compared with other prenylflavonoid compounds. Methods: The effects of four prenylflavonoids on the growth of CCRF-CEM and HaCa cells were studied by 3-(4,5)-2,5-diphenyl-tetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay. Apoptosis were detected through Hoechst 33258 staining. The effect of artonin B on the cell cycle of CCRF-CEM cells were studied by propidium iodide method. The change in mitochondrial membrane potential was detected by rohdamine 123 staining. The cytochrome c release and caspase 3 activity were checked by immunoassay kits, respectively. The expression of Bcl-2 family proteins was detected by Western blot. Results: Our data revealed that artonin B strongly induced human CCRF-CEM leukemia cell death in a dose- and time-dependent manner by MTT assay, but not on normal epithelia cells (HaCa cells). Artonin B-induced cell death was considered to be apoptotic by observing the typical apoptotic morphological change by Hoechst 33258 staining. The induction of human CCRF-CEM leukemia cancer cell death was caused by an induction of apoptosis through mitochondrial membrane potential change, cytochrome c release, sub-G1 proportion increase, downregulation of Bcl-2 expression, upregulation of Bax and Bak expression and activation of caspase 3 pathways. Conclusion: These results clearly demonstrated that artonin B is able to inhibit proliferation by induction of hypoploid cells and cell apoptosis. Moreover, the anticancer effects of artonin B were related to mitochondrial pathway and caspase 3 activation in human CCRF-CEM leukemia cells.

  8. Duplication of the MYB oncogene in T cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lahortiga, Idoya; De Keersmaecker, Kim; Van Vlierberghe, Pieter; Graux, Carlos; Cauwelier, Barbara; Lambert, Frederic; Mentens, Nicole; Beverloo, H Berna; Pieters, Rob; Speleman, Frank; Odero, Maria D; Bauters, Marijke; Froyen, Guy; Marynen, Peter; Vandenberghe, Peter; Wlodarska, Iwona; Meijerink, Jules P P; Cools, Jan

    2007-05-01

    We identified a duplication of the MYB oncogene in 8.4% of individuals with T cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL) and in five T-ALL cell lines. The duplication is associated with a threefold increase in MYB expression, and knockdown of MYB expression initiates T cell differentiation. Our results identify duplication of MYB as an oncogenic event and suggest that MYB could be a therapeutic target in human T-ALL.

  9. Effects of the antitumoural dequalinium on NB4 and K562 human leukemia cell lines. Mitochondrial implication in cell death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galeano, Eva; Nieto, Elena; García-Pérez, Ana Isabel; Delgado, M Dolores; Pinilla, Montserrat; Sancho, Pilar

    2005-10-01

    Dequalinium (DQA) is a delocalized lipophylic cation that selectively targets the mitochondria of carcinoma cells. However, the underlying mechanisms of DQA action are not yet well understood. We have studied the effects of DQA on two different leukemia cell lines: NB4, derived from acute promyelocytic leukemia, and K562, derived from chronic myeloid leukemia. We found that DQA displays differential cytotoxic activity in these cell lines. In NB4 cells, a low DQA concentration (2microM) induces a mixture of apoptosis and necrosis, whereas a high DQA concentration (20microM) induces mainly necrosis. However, K562 cell death was always by necrosis as the cells showed a resistance to apoptosis at all time-periods and DQA concentrations assayed. In both cell lines, the cell death seems to be mediated by alterations of mitochondrial function as evidenced by loss of mitochondrial transmembrane potential, O2*- accumulation and ATP depletion. The current study improves the knowledge on DQA as a novel anticancer agent with a potential application in human acute promyelocytic leukemia chemotherapy.

  10. Effects of inorganic and organic arsenic compounds on growth and apoptosis of human T-lymphoblastoid leukemia cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hikita, Eri; Arai, Mariko; Tanaka, Sachiko; Onda, Kenji; Utsumi, Hiroya; Yuan, Bo; Toyoda, Hiroo; Hirano, Toshihiko

    2011-12-01

    To investigate the effects of inorganic and organic arsenic compounds on human T-lymphoblastoid leukemia cells. Cell proliferation was analyzed by 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5¬diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay. Apoptotic cell morphology was examined by cell staining with Hoechst 33342. Cellular caspase-3/7 activities were measured after arsenic treatment. The inhibitory concentration by 50% (IC(50)) values of As(2)O(3) towards MOLT-4 and daunorubicin- resistant MOLT-4/DNR cell proliferation were 0.87 and 0.92 μM, while the values for arsenic acid were 69.1 and 116.6 μM, respectively. These arsenic compounds also inhibited mitogen-induced proliferation of human peripheral blood mononuclear cells. Six organic arsenic compounds did not inhibit leukemia cell proliferation. As(2)O(3) and arsenic acid induced apoptotic cell morphology and increased caspase-3/7 activity in the leukemia cells. Ascorbic acid and buthionine sulfoxide enhanced, while N-acetyl-L-cysteine abated, the suppressive effects of inorganic arsenic compounds on leukemia cell proliferation. As(2)O(3) and arsenic acid inhibit proliferation and induce apoptosis in MOLT-4 and daunorubicine-resistant MOLT-4/DNR cells via glutathione-depletion and subsequent caspase-3/7 activation. Organic arsenic compounds have no inhibitory activity on the leukemia cell proliferation. Inorganic arsenic compounds are suggested as useful agents for treatment of T-lymphoblastoid leukemia.

  11. Selecting B cells and plasma cells to memory

    OpenAIRE

    2005-01-01

    Humoral immunity appears to be based on immunological memory provided by memory plasma cells, which secrete protective antibodies, and memory B cells, which react to antigen challenge by differentiating into plasma cells. How these differentiation pathways relate to each other, how cells are selected into these memory populations, and how these populations are maintained remains enigmatic.

  12. Interferon-γ affects leukemia cell apoptosis through regulating Fas/FasL signaling pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, H-L; Li, C-J; Hou, X-F; Zhang, H; Wu, Z-H; Wang, J

    2017-05-01

    Imbalance of hematopoietic cell proliferation and apoptosis is one of the major causes of leukemia. Enhanced cell proliferation and reduced apoptosis lead to hemocytes accumulation. Fas/FasL signaling pathway promotes cell apoptosis. This study investigated the impact of interferon γ (IFN-γ) on chronic myelogenous leukemia cell proliferation and apoptosis to elucidate its interaction with Fas/FasL signaling pathway. Leukemia K562 cells were routinely cultivated and treated with 10 U/ml, 100 U/ml, and 1000 U/ml interferon for 12 h, 24 h, and 48 h, respectively. MTT assay was applied to test cell proliferation. TUNEL assay was adopted to determine cell apoptosis. Western blot was selected to detect Fas/FasL expression. Different concentrations of IFN-γ inhibited cell proliferation at various time points. IFN-γ at 1000 U/ml treatment for 48 h exhibited the strongest suppressive effect on cell proliferation (p facilitating Fas and FasL proteins expressions.

  13. Epigenetic inactivation of Notch-Hes pathway in human B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shao-Qing Kuang

    Full Text Available The Notch pathway can have both oncogenic and tumor suppressor roles, depending on cell context. For example, Notch signaling promotes T cell differentiation and is leukemogenic in T cells, whereas it inhibits early B cell differentiation and acts as a tumor suppressor in B cell leukemia where it induces growth arrest and apoptosis. The regulatory mechanisms that contribute to these opposing roles are not understood. Aberrant promoter DNA methylation and histone modifications are associated with silencing of tumor suppressor genes and have been implicated in leukemogenesis. Using methylated CpG island amplification (MCA/DNA promoter microarray, we identified Notch3 and Hes5 as hypermethylated in human B cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL. We investigated the methylation status of other Notch pathway genes by bisulfite pyrosequencing. Notch3, JAG1, Hes2, Hes4 and Hes5 were frequently hypermethylated in B leukemia cell lines and primary B-ALL, in contrast to T-ALL cell lines and patient samples. Aberrant methylation of Notch3 and Hes5 in B-ALL was associated with gene silencing and was accompanied by decrease of H3K4 trimethylation and H3K9 acetylation and gain of H3K9 trimethylation and H3K27 trimethylation. 5-aza-2'-deoxycytidine treatment restored Hes5 expression and decreased promoter hypermethylation in most leukemia cell lines and primary B-ALL samples. Restoration of Hes5 expression by lentiviral transduction resulted in growth arrest and apoptosis in Hes5 negative B-ALL cells but not in Hes5 expressing T-ALL cells. These data suggest that epigenetic modifications are implicated in silencing of tumor suppressor of Notch/Hes pathway in B-ALL.

  14. MicroRNA expression profiling identifies activated B cell status in chronic lymphocytic leukemia cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shuqiang Li

    Full Text Available Chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL is thought to be a disease of resting lymphocytes. However, recent data suggest that CLL cells may more closely resemble activated B cells. Using microRNA (miRNA expression profiling of highly-enriched CLL cells from 38 patients and 9 untransformed B cells from normal donors before acute CpG activation and 5 matched B cells after acute CpG activation, we demonstrate an activated B cell status for CLL. Gene set enrichment analysis (GSEA identified statistically-significant similarities in miRNA expression between activated B cells and CLL cells including upregulation of miR-34a, miR-155, and miR-342-3p and downregulation of miR-103, miR-181a and miR-181b. Additionally, decreased levels of two CLL signature miRNAs miR-29c and miR-223 are associated with ZAP70(+ and IgV(H unmutated status and with shorter time to first therapy. These data indicate an activated B cell status for CLL cells and suggest that the direction of change of individual miRNAs may predict clinical course in CLL.

  15. Biological Therapy Following Chemotherapy and Peripheral Stem Cell Transplantation in Treating Patients With Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-25

    Breast Cancer; Chronic Myeloproliferative Disorders; Gestational Trophoblastic Tumor; Kidney Cancer; Leukemia; Lymphoma; Multiple Myeloma and Plasma Cell Neoplasm; Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Neuroblastoma; Ovarian Cancer; Sarcoma; Testicular Germ Cell Tumor

  16. Recognition of adult and pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia blasts by natural killer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torelli, Giovanni F; Peragine, Nadia; Raponi, Sara; Pagliara, Daria; De Propris, Maria S; Vitale, Antonella; Bertaina, Alice; Barberi, Walter; Moretta, Lorenzo; Basso, Giuseppe; Santoni, Angela; Guarini, Anna; Locatelli, Franco; Foà, Robin

    2014-07-01

    In this study, we aimed to investigate the pathways of recognition of acute lymphoblastic leukemia blasts by natural killer cells and to verify whether differences in natural killer cell activating receptor ligand expression among groups defined by age of patients, or presence of cytogenetic/molecular aberrations correlate with the susceptibility to recognition and killing. We analyzed 103 newly diagnosed acute lymphoblastic leukemia patients: 46 adults and 57 children. Pediatric blasts showed a significantly higher expression of Nec-2 (P=0.03), ULBP-1 (P=0.01) and ULBP-3 (P=0.04) compared to adult cells. The differential expression of these ligands between adults and children was confined to B-lineage acute lymphoblastic leukemia with no known molecular alterations. Within molecularly defined subgroups of patients, a high surface expression of NKG2D and DNAM1 ligands was found on BCR-ABL(+) blasts, regardless of patient age. Accordingly, BCR-ABL(+) blasts proved to be significantly more susceptible to natural killer-dependent lysis than B-lineage blasts without molecular aberrations (P=0.03). Cytotoxic tests performed in the presence of neutralizing antibodies indicated a pathway of acute lymphoblastic leukemia cell recognition in the setting of the Nec-2/DNAM-1 interaction. These data provide a biological explanation of the different roles played by alloreactive natural killer cells in pediatric versus adult acute lymphoblastic leukemia and suggest that new natural killer-based strategies targeting specific subgroups of patients, particularly those BCR-ABL(+), are worth pursuing further. Copyright© Ferrata Storti Foundation.

  17. Apigenin induces apoptosis in human leukemia cells and exhibits anti-leukemic activity in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Budhraja, Amit; Gao, Ning; Zhang, Zhuo; Son, Young-Ok; Cheng, Senping; Wang, Xin; Ding, Songze; Hitron, Andrew; Chen, Gang; Luo, Jia; Shi, Xianglin

    2012-01-01

    In this study, we investigated the functional role of Akt and c-jun-NH(2)-kinase (JNK) signaling cascades in apigenin-induced apoptosis in U937 human leukemia cells and anti-leukemic activity of apigenin in vivo. Apigenin induced apoptosis by inactivation of Akt with a concomitant activation of JNK, Mcl-1 and Bcl-2 downregulation, cytochrome c release from mitochondria, and activation of caspases. Constitutively active myristolated Akt prevented apigenin-induced JNK, caspase activation, and apoptosis. Conversely, LY294002 and a dominant-negative construct of Akt potentiated apigenin-induced apoptosis in leukemia cells. Interruption of the JNK pathway showed marked reduction in apigenin-induced caspase activation and apoptosis in leukemia cells. Furthermore, in vivo administration of apigenin resulted in attenuation of tumor growth in U937 xenografts accompanied by inactivation of Akt and activation of JNK. Attenuation of tumor growth in U937 xenografts by apigenin raises the possibility that apigenin may have clinical implications and can be further tested for incorporating in leukemia treatment regimens. ©2011 AACR.

  18. Autologous stem cell transplantation versus alternative allogeneic donor transplants in adult acute leukemias.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Claude Gorin, Norbert

    2016-04-01

    The availability of alternative sources of stem cells including most recently T-replete haploidentical marrow or peripheral blood, and the increasing use of reduced-intensity conditioning (RIC), renders feasible an allogeneic transplant to almost all patients with acute leukemia up to 70 years of age. Autologous stem cell transplantation (ASCT) for consolidation of complete remission (CR), however, offers in some circumstances an alternative option. Although associated with a higher relapse rate, autologous transplant benefits from a lower non-relapse mortality, the absence of graft-versus-host disease (GVHD), and a better quality of life for long-term survivors. The recent use of intravenous busulfan (IVBU) with high-dose melphalan, better monitoring of minimal residual disease (MRD), and maintenance therapy post autografting bring new interest. Few retrospective studies compared the outcome following alternative donor versus autologous transplants for remission consolidation. Genoidentical and phenoidentical allogeneic stem cell transplantations are undisputed gold standards, but there are no data showing the superiority of alternative allogeneic donor over autologous transplantation, at the time of undetectable MRD, in patients with good- and intermediate-1 risk acute myelocytic leukemia (AML) in first complete remission (CR1), acute promyelocytic leukemia in second complete remission (CR2), and Philadelphia chromosome-positive (Ph(+)) acute lymphocytic leukemia (ALL).

  19. Biomarker analysis and clinical relevance of TK1 on the cell membrane of Burkitt’s lymphoma and acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weagel EG

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Evita G Weagel,1 Wei Meng,1 Michelle H Townsend,1 Edwin J Velazquez,1 Rachel A Brog,1 Michael W Boyer,2 K Scott Weber,1 Richard A Robison,1 Kim L O’Neill1 1Department of Microbiology and Molecular Biology, Brigham Young University, Provo, 2Division of Hematology and Hematologic Malignancies, Department of Medicine, Huntsman Cancer Institute, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT, USA Abstract: TK1 is an enzyme involved in DNA synthesis and repair. TK1 is usually found elevated in cancer patients’ serum, which makes it a useful tumor proliferation biomarker that strongly correlates with cancer stage, metastatic capabilities, and recurrence risk. In this study, we show that TK1 is upregulated and localizes on the plasma membrane of Burkitt’s lymphoma, acute promyelocytic leukemia, T cell leukemia, and acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL. Using flow cytometry, we confirmed that TK1 localizes on the surface of Raji, HL60, and Jurkat cell lines and on ALL clinical samples. Using fluorescent microscopy, we found a strong association of TK1 with the plasma membrane in Raji, HL60, and Jurkat cell lines. These findings were also confirmed by scanning electron microscopy. Our study also shows that this phenomenon does not occur on normal resting or proliferating lymphocytes. In addition, we show that membrane TK1 is found in all oligomeric forms ranging from monomer to tetramer and exhibits enzymatic activity. These findings suggest TK1 as a possible target for immunotherapy with the potential to be utilized in the treatment of hematological cancers. Keywords: Burkitt’s lymphoma, acute lymphoblastic leukemia, ALL, thymidine kinase 1, surface antigen

  20. Cytotoxicity of apigenin on leukemia cell lines: implications for prevention and therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruela-de-Sousa, R R; Fuhler, G M; Blom, N; Ferreira, C V; Aoyama, H; Peppelenbosch, M P

    2010-01-01

    Natural-food-based compounds show substantial promise for prevention and biotherapy of cancers including leukemia. In general, their mechanism of action remains unclear, hampering rational use of these compounds. Herein we show that the common dietary flavonoid apigenin has anticancer activity, but also may decrease chemotherapy sensitivity, depending on the cell type. We analyzed the molecular consequences of apigenin treatment in two types of leukemia, the myeloid and erythroid subtypes. Apigenin blocked proliferation in both lineages through cell-cycle arrest in G2/M phase for myeloid HL60 and G0/G1 phase for erythroid TF1 cells. In both cell lines the JAK/STAT pathway was one of major targets of apigenin. Apigenin inhibited PI3K/PKB pathway in HL60 and induced caspase-dependent apoptosis. In contrast, no apoptosis was detected in TF1 cells, but initiation of autophagy was observed. The block in cell cycle and induction of autophagy observed in this erythroleukemia cell line resulted in a reduced susceptibility toward the commonly used therapeutic agent vincristine. Thus, this study shows that although apigenin is a potential chemopreventive agent due to the induction of leukemia cell-cycle arrest, caution in dietary intake of apigenin should be taken during disease as it potentially interferes with cancer treatment. PMID:21364620

  1. PFR peptide, one of the antimicrobial peptides identified from the derivatives of lactoferrin, induces necrosis in leukemia cells

    OpenAIRE

    2016-01-01

    LF11-322 (PFWRIRIRR-NH2) (PFR peptide), a nine amino acid-residue peptide fragment derived from human lactoferricin, possesses potent cytotoxicity against bacteria. We report here the discovery and characterization of its antitumor activity in leukemia cells. PFR peptide inhibited the proliferation of MEL and HL-60 leukemia cells by inducing cell death in the absence of the classical features of apoptosis, including chromatin condensation, Annexin V staining, Caspase activation and increase o...

  2. The significance of PTEN and AKT aberrations in pediatric T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuurbier, Linda; Petricoin, Emanuel F.; Vuerhard, Maartje J.; Calvert, Valerie; Kooi, Clarissa; Buijs-Gladdines, Jessica G.C.A.M.; Smits, Willem K.; Sonneveld, Edwin; Veerman, Anjo J.P.; Kamps, Willem A.; Horstmann, Martin; Pieters, Rob; Meijerink, Jules P.P.

    2012-01-01

    Background PI3K/AKT pathway mutations are found in T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia, but their overall impact and associations with other genetic aberrations is unknown. PTEN mutations have been proposed as secondary mutations that follow NOTCH1-activating mutations and cause cellular resistance to γ-secretase inhibitors. Design and Methods The impact of PTEN, PI3K and AKT aberrations was studied in a genetically well-characterized pediatric T-cell leukemia patient cohort (n=146) treated on DCOG or COALL protocols. Results PTEN and AKT E17K aberrations were detected in 13% and 2% of patients, respectively. Defective PTEN-splicing was identified in incidental cases. Patients without PTEN protein but lacking exon-, splice-, promoter mutations or promoter hypermethylation were present. PTEN/AKT mutations were especially abundant in TAL- or LMO-rearranged leukemia but nearly absent in TLX3-rearranged patients (P=0.03), the opposite to that observed for NOTCH1-activating mutations. Most PTEN/AKT mutant patients either lacked NOTCH1-activating mutations (P=0.006) or had weak NOTCH1-activating mutations (P=0.011), and consequently expressed low intracellular NOTCH1, cMYC and MUSASHI levels. T-cell leukemia patients without PTEN/AKT and NOTCH1-activating mutations fared well, with a cumulative incidence of relapse of only 8% versus 35% for PTEN/AKT and/or NOTCH1-activated patients (P=0.005). Conclusions PI3K/AKT pathway aberrations are present in 18% of pediatric T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia patients. Absence of strong NOTCH1-activating mutations in these cases may explain cellular insensitivity to γ-secretase inhibitors. PMID:22491738

  3. Deregulated expression of Cdc6 as BCR/ABL-dependent survival factor in chronic myeloid leukemia cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jia-Hua; He, Yan-Li; Zhu, Rui; Du, Wen; Xiao, Jun-Hua

    2017-06-01

    Chronic myeloid leukemia is characterized by the presence of the reciprocal translocation t(9;22) and the BCR/ABL oncogene. The BCR/ABL oncogene activates multiple signaling pathways and involves the dysregulation of oncogenes during the progression of chronic myeloid leukemia. The cell division cycle protein 6, an essential regulator of DNA replication, is elevated in some human cancer cells. However, the expression of cell division cycle protein 6 in chronic myeloid leukemia and the underlying regulatory mechanism remain to be elucidated. In this study, our data showed that cell division cycle protein 6 expression was significantly upregulated in primary chronic myeloid leukemia cells and the chronic myeloid leukemia cell line K562 cells, as compared to the normal bone marrow mononuclear cells. BCR/ABL kinase inhibitor STI571 or BCR/ABL small interfering RNA could significantly downregulate cell division cycle protein 6 messenger RNA expression in K562 cells. Moreover, phosphoinositide 3-kinase/AKT pathway inhibitor LY294002 and Janus kinase/signal transducer and activator of transcription pathway inhibitor AG490 could downregulate cell division cycle protein 6 expression in K562 cells, but not RAS/mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway inhibitor PD98059 had such effect. Cell division cycle protein 6 gene silencing by small interfering RNA effectively resulted in decrease of proliferation, increase of apoptosis, and arrest of cell cycle in K562 cells. These findings have demonstrated that cell division cycle protein 6 overexpression may contribute to the high proliferation and low apoptosis in chronic myeloid leukemia cells and can be regulated by BCR/ABL signal transduction through downstream phosphoinositide 3-kinase/Akt and Janus kinase/signal transducer and activator of transcription pathways, suggesting cell division cycle protein 6 as a potential therapeutic target in chronic myeloid leukemia.

  4. Differential expression of the ufo/axl oncogene in human leukemia-lymphoma cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Challier, C; Uphoff, C C; Janssen, J W; Drexler, H G

    1996-05-01

    The ufo protein (also termed axl) is a member of a new family of receptor tyrosine kinases and is encoded by a transforming gene that was initially isolated from primary human myeloid leukemia cells by DNA-mediated transformation of NIH/3T3 cells. The ligand, Gas6, a protein S-related molecule lacking any known function yet, has recently been identified. We report the expression pattern of ufo mRNA in a panel of 76 human continuous leukemia-lymphoma cell lines. The gene was not expressed in cell lines derived from lymphoid malignancies (n=28), but transcription was seen in 3/11 myeloid, 0/6 monocytic, 9/13 erythroid and 11/18 megakaryocytic cell lines. Several cell lines were treated with phorbol ester leading to significant upregulation of the ufo message in constitutively positive cells. An apparent ufo mRNA overexpression was not found in any of the positive leukemia cell lines, but was identified in the drug-resistant subclones of the cervix carcinoma cell line HeLa. Southern blot analysis of restriction enzyme-digested genomic DNA did not provide evidence for gene amplification, but the HeLa subclones showed banding patterns suggestive of gene rearrangement. Two main ufo mRNA bands of 3.2 and 5.0 kb were identified; no differences in the half-lives (t1/2 = 2.5 h) of these two mRNA species could be identified. In summary, ufo, representing a novel type of receptor tyrosine kinase, is expressed solely in myeloid and erythro-megakaryocytic leukemias but not in lymphoid malignancies. These and previous data suggest an involvement of the ufo receptor tyrosine kinase in normal and malignant myelopoiesis; however, its exact role, if any, and mode of operation in leukemogenesis remains to be determined.

  5. Microvesicles released from human embryonic stem cell derived-mesenchymal stem cells inhibit proliferation of leukemia cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Yuan; Ma, Yongbin; Chen, Xiang; Ji, Xianyan; Gao, Jianyi; Zhang, Lei; Ye, Kai; Qiao, Fuhao; Dai, Yao; Wang, Hui; Wen, Xiangmei; Lin, Jiang; Hu, Jiabo

    2017-08-01

    Human embryonic stem cell derived-mesenchymal stem cells (hESC‑MSCs) are able to inhibit proliferation of leukemia cells. Microvesicles released from human embryonic stem cell derived-mesenchymal stem cells (hESC‑MSC‑MVs) might play an important part in antitumor activity. Microvesicles were isolated by ultracentrifugation and identified under a scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscope separately. After 48-h cocultured with hESC‑MSCs and hESC‑MSC‑MVs, the number of K562 and HL60 was counted and tumor cell viability was measured by CCK8 assay. The expression of proteins Bcl-2 and Bax were estimated by western blotting. Transmission electron microscope and western blot analysis were adopted to evaluate the autophagy level. Results showed that both hESC‑MSCs and hESC‑MSC‑MVs inhibited proliferation of leukemia cells in a concentration-dependent manner. hESC‑MSC‑MVs reduced the ratio of Bcl/Bax, enhanced the protein level of Beclin-1 and LC3-II conversion, thus upregulating autophagy and apoptosis. In conclusion, microvesicles released from human embryonic stem cell derived-mesenchymal stem cells inhibited tumor growth and stimulated autophagy and excessive autophagy might induce apoptosis.

  6. Good syndrome presenting with CD8+ T-Cell large granular lymphocyte leukemia

    OpenAIRE

    Caperton, Caroline; Agrawal, Sudhanshu; Gupta, Sudhir

    2015-01-01

    Good Syndrome is an adult-onset combined immunodeficiency defined by hypogammaglobulinemia, low or absent number of B cells, T cell deficiency and thymic tumor. We have characterized CD8+ T cells from a patient with Good syndrome that presented with CD8+T-cell large granular lymphocytic leukemia (LGL). Characterization of peripheral blood CD8+ T cells revealed that majority of CD8+ T cells were terminally differentiated effector memory phenotype (TEMRA; CD8+CCR7-CD45RA+), and were PD-1high (C...

  7. Antitumor Effect of Betulinic Acid on Human Acute Leukemia K562 Cells in vitro

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吴秋玲; 何静; 方峻; 洪梅

    2010-01-01

    The effects of betulinic acid (BA), a pentacyclic lupane-type triterpene, on the cell viability, cell cycle and apoptosis in human leukemia K562 cells were investigated. The effects of BA on the growth of K562 cells were studied by MTT assay. Apoptosis was assayed through Annexin V/propidium iodide (PI) double-labeled cytometry. The effects of BA on the cell cycle of K562 cells were studied by a PI method. The expression of Bax and capase-3 was detected by using Western blot. The results showed that BA was ...

  8. Modeling of C/EBPalpha mutant acute myeloid leukemia reveals a common expression signature of committed myeloid leukemia-initiating cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kirstetter, Peggy; Schuster, Mikkel B; Bereshchenko, Oksana

    2008-01-01

    Mutations in the CEBPA gene are present in 7%-10% of human patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML). However, no genetic models exist that demonstrate their etiological relevance. To mimic the most common mutations affecting CEBPA-that is, those leading to loss of the 42 kDa C/EBPalpha isoform (p...... penetrance. p42-deficient leukemia could be transferred by a Mac1+c-Kit+ population that gave rise only to myeloid cells in recipient mice. Expression profiling of this population against normal Mac1+c-Kit+ progenitors revealed a signature shared with MLL-AF9-transformed AML....

  9. Inactivation of SAG E3 ubiquitin ligase blocks embryonic stem cell differentiation and sensitizes leukemia cells to retinoid acid.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mingjia Tan

    Full Text Available Sensitive to Apoptosis Gene (SAG, also known as RBX2 (RING box protein-2, is the RING component of SCF (SKP1, Cullin, and F-box protein E3 ubiquitin ligase. Our previous studies have demonstrated that SAG is an anti-apoptotic protein and an attractive anti-cancer target. We also found recently that Sag knockout sensitized mouse embryonic stem cells (mES to radiation and blocked mES cells to undergo endothelial differentiation. Here, we reported that compared to wild-type mES cells, the Sag(-/- mES cells were much more sensitive to all-trans retinoic acid (RA-induced suppression of cell proliferation and survival. While wild-type mES cells underwent differentiation upon exposure to RA, Sag(-/- mES cells were induced to death via apoptosis instead. The cell fate change, reflected by cellular stiffness, can be detected as early as 12 hrs post RA exposure by AFM (Atomic Force Microscopy. We then extended this novel finding to RA differentiation therapy of leukemia, in which the resistance often develops, by testing our hypothesis that SAG inhibition would sensitize leukemia to RA. Indeed, we found a direct correlation between SAG overexpression and RA resistance in multiple leukemia lines. By using MLN4924, a small molecule inhibitor of NEDD8-Activating Enzyme (NAE, that inactivates SAG-SCF E3 ligase by blocking cullin neddylation, we were able to sensitize two otherwise resistant leukemia cell lines, HL-60 and KG-1 to RA. Mechanistically, RA sensitization by MLN4924 was mediated via enhanced apoptosis, likely through accumulation of pro-apoptotic proteins NOXA and c-JUN, two well-known substrates of SAG-SCF E3 ligase. Taken together, our study provides the proof-of-concept evidence for effective treatment of leukemia patients by RA-MLN4924 combination.

  10. DNA Damage, Cell Cycle Arrest, and Apoptosis Induction Caused by Lead in Human Leukemia Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yedjou, Clement G; Tchounwou, Hervey M; Tchounwou, Paul B

    2015-12-22

    In recent years, the industrial use of lead has been significantly reduced from paints and ceramic products, caulking, and pipe solder. Despite this progress, lead exposure continues to be a significant public health concern. The main goal of this research was to determine the in vitro mechanisms of lead nitrate [Pb(NO₃)₂] to induce DNA damage, apoptosis, and cell cycle arrest in human leukemia (HL-60) cells. To reach our goal, HL-60 cells were treated with different concentrations of Pb(NO₃)₂ for 24 h. Live cells and necrotic death cells were measured by the propidium idiode (PI) assay using the cellometer vision. Cell apoptosis was measured by the flow cytometry and DNA laddering. Cell cycle analysis was evaluated by the flow cytometry. The result of the PI demonstrated a significant (p cell death in Pb(NO₃)₂-treated cells, indicative of membrane rupture by Pb(NO₃)₂ compared to the control. Data generated from the comet assay indicated a concentration-dependent increase in DNA damage, showing a significant increase (p cells (apoptotic cells) compared to the control. The flow cytometry assessment also indicated Pb(NO₃)₂ exposure caused cell cycle arrest at the G₀/G₁ checkpoint. The result of DNA laddering assay showed presence of DNA smear in the agarose gel with little presence of DNA fragments in the treated cells compared to the control. In summary, Pb(NO₃)₂ inhibits HL-60 cells proliferation by not only inducing DNA damage and cell cycle arrest at the G₀/G₁ checkpoint but also triggering the apoptosis through caspase-3 activation and nucleosomal DNA fragmentation accompanied by secondary necrosis. We believe that our study provides a new insight into the mechanisms of Pb(NO₃)₂ exposure and its associated adverse health effects.

  11. Three methods assess nutritional status of leukemia patients before hematopoietic stem cell transplantation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Peng; YAN Xia; WANG Bo-shi; XUXiao-dong

    2012-01-01

    Background Some leukemia patients before hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) have nutritional risk or undernutrition,which was one of the main reasons that caused series of complications during transplantation.The aim of this study was to find out some appropriate methods to learn about the nutritional status of leukemia patients before HSCT.Methods Nutritional status of patients with leukemia was assessed with three common methods of nutritional assessment (nutritional risk screening 2002 (NRS2002),mini nutritional assessment (MNA) and subjective global assessment (SGA)) before HSCT.The assessment results of NRS2002 and MNA were compared by paired x2 test.The consistency was analyzed by Kappa test.Results In this study,13 of 50 patients (26.0%) with leukemia had nutritional risk before HSCT assessed by NRS2002,including 7 patients (14.0%) with undernutrition.Of 50 patients assessed by SGA,only 1 case (2.0%) was mild or moderate undernutrition,and the remaining 49 patients (98.0%) were well-nutrition.Assessed by MNA,1 case (2.0%)was undernutrition,11 cases (22.0%) were potential undernutrition,and 38 cases (76.0%) were well-nutrition.Paired x2 test results showed that the difference between NRS2002 and MNA was statistically significant (x2=13.64,P <0.05);Kappa test results showed that they were consistent between NRS2002 and MNA (Kappa=0.62,P<0.05).Conclusions It is important to know the nutritional status of patients with leukemia before HSCT,and NRS2002 should be the first choice of nutritional assessment for patients with leukemia.If NRS2002 and MNA used at the same time,the accuracy and comprehensiveness of the assessment can be improved.

  12. Single-cell transcriptomics uncovers distinct molecular signatures of stem cells in chronic myeloid leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giustacchini, Alice; Thongjuea, Supat; Barkas, Nikolaos; Woll, Petter S; Povinelli, Benjamin J; Booth, Christopher A G; Sopp, Paul; Norfo, Ruggiero; Rodriguez-Meira, Alba; Ashley, Neil; Jamieson, Lauren; Vyas, Paresh; Anderson, Kristina; Segerstolpe, Åsa; Qian, Hong; Olsson-Strömberg, Ulla; Mustjoki, Satu; Sandberg, Rickard; Jacobsen, Sten Eirik W; Mead, Adam J

    2017-06-01

    Recent advances in single-cell transcriptomics are ideally placed to unravel intratumoral heterogeneity and selective resistance of cancer stem cell (SC) subpopulations to molecularly targeted cancer therapies. However, current single-cell RNA-sequencing approaches lack the sensitivity required to reliably detect somatic mutations. We developed a method that combines high-sensitivity mutation detection with whole-transcriptome analysis of the same single cell. We applied this technique to analyze more than 2,000 SCs from patients with chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) throughout the disease course, revealing heterogeneity of CML-SCs, including the identification of a subgroup of CML-SCs with a distinct molecular signature that selectively persisted during prolonged therapy. Analysis of nonleukemic SCs from patients with CML also provided new insights into cell-extrinsic disruption of hematopoiesis in CML associated with clinical outcome. Furthermore, we used this single-cell approach to identify a blast-crisis-specific SC population, which was also present in a subclone of CML-SCs during the chronic phase in a patient who subsequently developed blast crisis. This approach, which might be broadly applied to any malignancy, illustrates how single-cell analysis can identify subpopulations of therapy-resistant SCs that are not apparent through cell-population analysis.

  13. Segmentation and Classification of Bone Marrow Cells Images Using Contextual Information for Medical Diagnosis of Acute Leukemias.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reta, Carolina; Altamirano, Leopoldo; Gonzalez, Jesus A; Diaz-Hernandez, Raquel; Peregrina, Hayde; Olmos, Ivan; Alonso, Jose E; Lobato, Ruben

    2015-01-01

    Morphological identification of acute leukemia is a powerful tool used by hematologists to determine the family of such a disease. In some cases, experienced physicians are even able to determine the leukemia subtype of the sample. However, the identification process may have error rates up to 40% (when classifying acute leukemia subtypes) depending on the physician's experience and the sample quality. This problem raises the need to create automatic tools that provide hematologists with a second opinion during the classification process. Our research presents a contextual analysis methodology for the detection of acute leukemia subtypes from bone marrow cells images. We propose a cells separation algorithm to break up overlapped regions. In this phase, we achieved an average accuracy of 95% in the evaluation of the segmentation process. In a second phase, we extract descriptive features to the nucleus and cytoplasm obtained in the segmentation phase in order to classify leukemia families and subtypes. We finally created a decision algorithm that provides an automatic diagnosis for a patient. In our experiments, we achieved an overall accuracy of 92% in the supervised classification of acute leukemia families, 84% for the lymphoblastic subtypes, and 92% for the myeloblastic subtypes. Finally, we achieved accuracies of 95% in the diagnosis of leukemia families and 90% in the diagnosis of leukemia subtypes.

  14. Segmentation and Classification of Bone Marrow Cells Images Using Contextual Information for Medical Diagnosis of Acute Leukemias

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reta, Carolina; Altamirano, Leopoldo; Gonzalez, Jesus A.; Diaz-Hernandez, Raquel; Peregrina, Hayde; Olmos, Ivan; Alonso, Jose E.; Lobato, Ruben

    2015-01-01

    Morphological identification of acute leukemia is a powerful tool used by hematologists to determine the family of such a disease. In some cases, experienced physicians are even able to determine the leukemia subtype of the sample. However, the identification process may have error rates up to 40% (when classifying acute leukemia subtypes) depending on the physician’s experience and the sample quality. This problem raises the need to create automatic tools that provide hematologists with a second opinion during the classification process. Our research presents a contextual analysis methodology for the detection of acute leukemia subtypes from bone marrow cells images. We propose a cells separation algorithm to break up overlapped regions. In this phase, we achieved an average accuracy of 95% in the evaluation of the segmentation process. In a second phase, we extract descriptive features to the nucleus and cytoplasm obtained in the segmentation phase in order to classify leukemia families and subtypes. We finally created a decision algorithm that provides an automatic diagnosis for a patient. In our experiments, we achieved an overall accuracy of 92% in the supervised classification of acute leukemia families, 84% for the lymphoblastic subtypes, and 92% for the myeloblastic subtypes. Finally, we achieved accuracies of 95% in the diagnosis of leukemia families and 90% in the diagnosis of leukemia subtypes. PMID:26107374

  15. Antisense RNA of Survivin Gene Inhibits the Proliferation of Leukemia Cells and Sensitizes Leukemia Cell Line to Taxol-induced Apoptosis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wenhan LI; Xiaojuan WANG; Ping LEI; Qing YE; Huifen ZHU; Yue ZHANG; Jinfang SHAO; Jing YANG; Guanxin SHEN

    2008-01-01

    The effectS of survivin antisense RNA on proliferation of leukemia cell line HL-60 and taxol.induced chemotherapy was explorcd.A cDNA fragment of survivin obtained by RT-PCR was inserted into a plamid vector named pcDNA3 in the reverse direction.The vector encoding antisense RNA of survivin was confirmed by restriction enzyme digestion and DNA sequencing.The recombi-nant plasmid was delivered into HL-60 cells by electroporation.Growth curves were plotted based on cell counting.Trypan blue dye exclusion assay and MTT assay were carried out after the cells were incubated with taxol.DNA gel electrophoresis and nuclear staining were performed for cell apoptosis assay.The correct construction of the recombinant plasmid has been identificd bv restriction enzy.me digestion and DNA sequencing.A stable down.regulation has been achieved in HL-60 SVVas cells after G418 selection.Compared tO HL-60 cells.the proliferation of HL-60 SVVaS cells was signifi.cantly inhibited(P<0.05).Cytotoxicity assays indicated that IC50 of HL-60 SVVas for taxol was rela-tively lower than controls(P<0.01).Apoptosis assays revealed that taxol-induced apoptosis was de-tected in HL-60 sVVas cells incubated with 50 ng/ml taxol for 12 h,while in HL-60 cells incubated with 100 ng/ml taxol for 72 h.It was suggested that Survivin antisense RNA could inhibit the prolif-eration of HL-60 cells and enhance taxol-induced apoptosis in HL-60 cells.which may lay an ex-perimental foundation for further research on gene therapy in leukemia.

  16. B-cell prolymphocytic leukemia: a specific subgroup of mantle cell lymphoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Velden, Vincent H J; Hoogeveen, Patricia G; de Ridder, Dick; Schindler-van der Struijk, Magdalena; van Zelm, Menno C; Sanders, Mathijs; Karsch, Dennis; Beverloo, H Berna; Lam, King; Orfao, Alberto; Lugtenburg, Pieternella J; Böttcher, Sebastian; van Dongen, Jacques J M; Langerak, Anton W; Kappers-Klunne, Mies; van Lom, Kirsten

    2014-07-17

    B-cell prolymphocytic leukemia (B-PLL) is a rare mature B-cell malignancy that may be hard to distinguish from mantle cell lymphoma (MCL) and chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL). B-PLL cases with a t(11;14) were redefined as MCL in the World Health Organization 2008 classification. We evaluated 13 B-PLL patients [7 being t(11;14)-positive (B-PLL+) and 6 negative (B-PLL-)] and compared them with MCL and CLL patients. EuroFlow-based immunophenotyping showed significant overlap between B-PLL+ and B-PLL-, as well as between B-PLL and MCL, whereas CLL clustered separately. Immunogenotyping showed specific IGHV gene usage partly resembling MCL. Gene expression profiling showed no separation between B-PLL+ and B-PLL- but identified 3 subgroups. One B-PLL subgroup clustered close to CLL and another subgroup clustered with leukemic MCL; both were associated with prolonged survival. A third subgroup clustered close to nodal MCL and was associated with short survival. Gene expression profiles of both B-PLL+ and B-PLL- showed best resemblance with normal immunoglobulin M-only B-cells. Our data confirm that B-PLL+ is highly comparable to MCL, indicate that B-PLL- also may be considered as a specific subgroup of MCL, and suggest that B-PLL is part of a spectrum, ranging from CLL-like B-PLL, to leukemic MCL-like B-PLL, to nodal MCL-like B-PLL.

  17. Metastatic Renal Cell Carcinoma to the Parotid Gland in the Setting of Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert Deeb

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Renal cell carcinoma (RCC is infamous for its unpredictable behavior and metastatic potential. We report a case of a patient with a complex history of multifocal renal cell carcinoma and chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL, who subsequently developed a parotid mass. Total parotidectomy revealed this mass to be an additional site of metastasis which had developed 19 years after his initial diagnosis of RCC.

  18. [Key molecular mechanisms associated with cell malignant transformation in acute myeloid leukemia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orlova, N N; Lebedev, T D; Spirin, P V; Prassolov, V S

    2016-01-01

    Cancer, along with cardiovascular disorders, is one of the most important problems of healthcare. Pathologies of the hematopoietic system are the most prevalent in patients under 30 years of age, including acute myeloid leukemia (AML), which is widespread and difficult to treat. The review considers the mechanisms that play a significant role in AML cell malignant transformation and shows the contributions of certain genes to both remission and resistance of AML cells to various treatments.

  19. Clinically relevant deoxycytidine levels are high enough to profoundly alter 9-beta-D-arabinofuranosylguanine cytotoxicity for human T-cell acute leukemia cells in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, J D; Strock, D J; Teik, J E; LaGuardia, E A; Katz, T B

    1999-01-01

    Plasma deoxycytidine levels can vary markedly during chemotherapy, from < 0.05 microM to at least 10.3 microM in T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL). This study demonstrates that clinically relevant deoxycytidine levels can dramatically protect human T-ALL cells against 9-beta-D-arabinofuranosylguanine (araG), a promising drug in this leukemia. At 0.4, 1.2, 3.6, and 10.8 microM deoxycytidine, the dose of araG required to kill 50% of MOLT3 T-ALL cells increased 4.23 +/- 1.95-(mean +/- SEM), 23.1 +/- 5.42-, 39.3 +/- 19.3-, and 67.0 +/- 11.5-fold compared to araG without deoxycytidine. Such deoxycytidine concentrations sharply reduced intracellular araG levels and blocked inhibition of DNA synthesis even in the presence of 160 and 640 microM araG. These data offer the first evidence that clinically relevant deoxycytidine levels could profoundly modulate araG toxicity in T-ALL.

  20. Computer Simulation of Convective Plasma Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Carboni, Rodrigo; Frutos-Alfaro, Francisco

    2015-01-01

    Computer simulations of plasmas are relevant nowadays, because it helps us understand physical processes taking place in the sun and other stellar objects. We developed a program called PCell which is intended for displaying the evolution of the magnetic field in a 2D convective plasma cell with perfect conducting walls for different stationary plasma velocity fields. Applications of this program are presented. This software works interactively with the mouse and the users can create their ow...

  1. Lactobacillus in Preventing Infection in Patients Undergoing a Donor Stem Cell Transplant for Hematologic Cancer or Myelodysplastic Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-02-02

    Breast Cancer; Chronic Myeloproliferative Disorders; Leukemia; Lymphoma; Multiple Myeloma and Plasma Cell Neoplasm; Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Myelodysplastic/Myeloproliferative Neoplasms; Neuroblastoma; Ovarian Cancer; Testicular Germ Cell Tumor

  2. Plasma cell gingivitis: treatment with chlorpheniramine maleate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ranganathan, Aravindhan Thiruputkuzhi; Chandran, Chitraa R; Prabhakar, Priya; Lakshmiganthan, Mahalingam; Parthasaradhi, Thakkalapati

    2015-01-01

    Plasma cell gingivitis is a benign lesion of unknown etiology characterized by massive and diffuse infiltration of plasma cells into the gingival connective tissue. Clinically, it can be seen as a diffuse, erythematous, and edematous swelling involving the marginal gingiva and extending into the attached gingiva. Although usually painless, the lesion can be esthetically unappealing, especially when anterior gingiva is involved. Although the usual line of management is removal of the offending agent, this report describes the treatment of plasma cell gingivitis with the topical application of chlorpheniramine maleate (25 mg) for a period of 10 days.

  3. Nonthermal-plasma-mediated animal cell death

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Wanil; Woo, Kyung-Chul; Kim, Kyong-Tai [Department of Life Science, Division of Molecular and Life Science, Pohang University of Science and Technology, San 31, Hyoja Dong, Pohang 790-784 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Gyoo-Cheon, E-mail: ktk@postech.ac.kr [Department of Oral Anatomy and Cell Biology, School of Dentistry, Pusan National University, Yangsan 626-810 (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-01-12

    Animal cell death comprising necrosis and apoptosis occurred in a well-regulated manner upon specific stimuli. The physiological meanings and detailed molecular mechanisms of cell death have been continuously investigated over several decades. Necrotic cell death has typical morphological changes, such as cell swelling and cell lysis followed by DNA degradation, whereas apoptosis shows blebbing formation and regular DNA fragmentation. Cell death is usually adopted to terminate cancer cells in vivo. The current strategies against tumour are based on the induction of cell death by adopting various methods, including radiotherapy and chemotherapeutics. Among these, radiotherapy is the most frequently used treatment method, but it still has obvious limitations. Recent studies have suggested that the use of nonthermal air plasma can be a prominent method for inducing cancer cell death. Plasma-irradiated cells showed the loss of genomic integrity, mitochondrial dysfunction, plasma membrane damage, etc. Tumour elimination with plasma irradiation is an emerging concept in cancer therapy and can be accelerated by targeting certain tumour-specific proteins with gold nanoparticles. Here, some recent developments are described so that the mechanisms related to plasma-mediated cell death and its perspectives in cancer treatment can be understood. (topical review)

  4. Hairy cell leukemia: A decade long experience of North Indian Hematology Center

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Venkatesan Somasundaram

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Hairy cell leukemia is a rare chronic B-cell disorder that follows an indolent but progressive course. This disorder is characterized by pancytopenia, splenomegaly, bone marrow fibrosis and the presence of atypical lymphoid cells with hairy projections in peripheral blood, bone marrow and spleen. Treatment is mainly with nucleoside analog cladribine, which induces complete remission in up to 85% cases. Materials and Methods: This is a retrospective analysis of Hairy cell Leukemia cases diagnosed and treated in the Department of Hematology, All India Institute of Medical Sciences, New Delhi between 2002 and 2013. Various parameters such as clinical features, laboratory parameters including complete blood cell count, bone marrow findings, cytochemistry, immunophenotyping by flowcytometry or immunohistochemistry, treatment protocol and complications secondary to treatment and relapse were reviewed. Results: A total of 35 cases were diagnosed during this period of 12 years of which 27 received cladribine and went in to remission. Median follow-up duration was 26 months. 5 (18% cases had a relapse and all relapsed cases achieved second remission with cladribine; however, there was no case of second malignancy in our cohort. Conclusion: Cladribine has emerged as the treatment of choice for hairy cell leukemia given that the overwhelming majority of patients achieve long-lasting complete remissions. Upon relapse, these patients could be successfully salvaged with cladribine retreatment.

  5. Hepatic leukemia factor promotes resistance to cell death: Implications for therapeutics and chronotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Waters, Katrina M. [Computational Biology and Bioinformatics, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, WA 99354 (United States); Sontag, Ryan L. [Systems Toxicology Groups, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, WA 99354 (United States); Weber, Thomas J., E-mail: Thomas.Weber@pnl.gov [Systems Toxicology Groups, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, WA 99354 (United States)

    2013-04-15

    Physiological variation related to circadian rhythms and aberrant gene expression patterns are believed to modulate therapeutic efficacy, but the precise molecular determinants remain unclear. Here we examine the regulation of cell death by hepatic leukemia factor (HLF), which is an output regulator of circadian rhythms and is aberrantly expressed in human cancers, using an ectopic expression strategy in JB6 mouse epidermal cells and human keratinocytes. Ectopic HLF expression inhibited cell death in both JB6 cells and human keratinocytes, as induced by serum-starvation, tumor necrosis factor alpha and ionizing radiation. Microarray analysis indicates that HLF regulates a complex multi-gene transcriptional program encompassing upregulation of anti-apoptotic genes, downregulation of pro-apoptotic genes, and many additional changes that are consistent with an anti-death program. Collectively, our results demonstrate that ectopic expression of HLF, an established transcription factor that cycles with circadian rhythms, can recapitulate many features associated with circadian-dependent physiological variation. - Highlights: ► Circadian-dependent physiological variation impacts therapeutic efficacy. ► Hepatic leukemia factor inhibits cell death and is a candidate circadian factor. ► Hepatic leukemia factor anti-death program is conserved in murine and human cells. ► Transcriptomics indicates the anti-death program results from a systems response.

  6. Bryostatin 5 induces apoptosis in acute monocytic leukemia cells by activating PUMA and caspases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yiwei; Zhang, Jinbao; Wang, Qixia; Zhang, Tao; Yang, Yang; Yi, Yanghua; Gao, Guangxun; Dong, Hongjuan; Zhu, Huafeng; Li, Yue; Lin, Houwen; Tang, Haifeng; Chen, Xiequn

    2013-10-15

    Acute leukemia is a malignant clonal hematopoietic stem cell disease. In the current study, we examined the effects of bryostatin 5 on acute monocytic leukemia cells in vitro and in vivo. We also explored the mechanisms and pathways underlying the increase in apoptosis induced by bryostatin 5. Bryostatin 5 inhibited the growth of primary acute monocytic leukemia cells and U937 cells in a dose- and time-dependent manners. Bryostatin 5 also induced an increase in apoptosis and a decrease in the mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP) in U937 cells. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) revealed that bryostatin 5-treated cells displayed typical apoptotic characteristics (chromatin condensation, karyopyknosis and formation of crescents and apoptotic bodies). In addition, bryostatin 5 increased the expression of P53 upregulated modulator of apoptosis (PUMA) and slightly increased P53 expression. Bryostatin 5 also significantly decreased Bcl-XL expression and significantly increased the expression levels of Bak, Bax, cleaved caspase 9 and cleaved caspase 3. The pro-apoptotic activity of bryostatin 5 in U937 cells was inhibited by PUMA siRNA and z-LEHD-fmk (a specific caspase 9 inhibitor). In addition, the PUMA siRNA significantly affected the expression of cleaved caspase 9, whereas z-LEHD-fmk had little effect on the expression of PUMA. The results suggest that PUMA is located upstream of caspase 9 in this apoptotic signaling pathway. These novel findings provide mechanistic insight into the induction of apoptosis by bryostatin 5 and might facilitate the development of clinical strategies to enhance the therapeutic efficacy of treatments for acute monocytic leukemia. © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. [Effects of Sam68 gene silence on proliferation of acute T lymphoblastic leukemia cell line Jurkat].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chi-Juan; Xu, Hua; Zhang, Hai-Rui; Wang, Jian; Lin, Ya-Ni; Pang, Tian-Xiang; Li, Qing-Hua

    2014-08-01

    This study was purpose to investigate the effect of Sam68 gene silence on proliferation of human acute T lymphoblastic leukemia cell line Jurkat. The sequence of shRNA targeting the site 531-552 of Sam68 mRNA was designed and chemically synthesized, then a single-vector lentiviral, Tet-inducible shRNA-Sam68 system (pLKO-Tet-On) was constructed; next the Jurkat cells were infected with lentivirus to create stable cell clones with regulatable Sam68 gene expression. The inhibitory efficiency of Sam68 gene was assayed by Real-time PCR and Western blot; the cell activity of Jurkat cells was detected with MTT assay; the change of colony forming potential of Jurkat cells was analyzed by colony forming test; the cell cycle distribution was tested by flow cytometry. The results indicated that the expression of Sam68 in experimental cells was statistically decreased as compared with that of the control cells; the cells activity and colony forming capacity of the Jurkat cells with Sam68 gene silence were significantly inhibited; with Sam68 gene silencing, the percentage of S phase cells was significantly increased, while the percentage of G2 phase cells was significantly decreased. It is concluded that the silencing Sam68 gene using shRNA interference can effectively inhibit the proliferation of human acute T lymphoblastic leukemia cell line Jurkat.

  8. Pterostilbene Induces Cell Apoptosis and Cell Cycle Arrest in T-Cell Leukemia/Lymphoma by Suppressing the ERK1/2 Pathway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gaomei Chang

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Pterostilbene is a natural 3,5-dimethoxy analog of trans-resveratrol that has been reported to have antitumor, antioxidant, and anti-inflammatory effects. T-cell leukemia/lymphoma is one of the more aggressive yet uncommon non-Hodgkin lymphomas. Although there has been increasing research into T-cell leukemia/lymphoma, the molecular mechanisms of the antitumor effects of pterostilbene against this malignancy are still largely unknown. The aim of this study is to confirm the effects of pterostilbene in T-cell leukemia/lymphoma. Jurkat and Hut-78 cells treated with pterostilbene were evaluated for cell proliferation using Cell Counting Kit-8, and apoptosis, cell cycle progression, reactive oxygen species generation, and mitochondrial membrane potential were analyzed using flow cytometry. The level of protein expression was detected by western blot. The results demonstrated that pterostilbene significantly inhibited the growth of T-cell leukemia/lymphoma cell lines in vitro and induced apoptosis in a dose- and time-dependent manner. Moreover, pterostilbene treatment markedly induced S-phase cell cycle arrest, which was accompanied by downregulation of cdc25A, cyclin A2, and CDK2. Pterostilbene also induced the generation of reactive oxygen species and the loss of mitochondrial membrane potential and inhibited ERK1/2 phosphorylation. Taken together, our study demonstrated the potential of pterostilbene to be an effective treatment for T-cell leukemia/lymphoma.

  9. Central Nervous System Involvement of T-cell Prolymphocytic Leukemia Diagnosed with Stereotactic Brain Biopsy: Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Selçuk Göçmen

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Prolymphocytic leukemia (PLL is a generalized malignancy of the lymphoid tissue characterized by the accumulation of monoclonal lymphocytes, usually of B cell type. Involvement of the central nervous system (CNS is an extremely rare complication of T-cell prolymphocytic leukemia (T-PLL. We describe a case of T-PLL presenting with symptomatic infiltration of the brain that was histopathologically proven by stereotactic brain biopsy. We emphasize the importance of rapid diagnosis and immediate treatment for patients presenting with CNS involvement and a history of leukemia or lymphoma.

  10. Allogeneic stem cell transplantation for patients harboring T315I BCR-ABL mutated leukemias

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nicolini, Franck Emmanuel; Basak, Grzegorz W; Soverini, Simona;

    2011-01-01

    T315I(+) Philadelphia chromosome-positive leukemias are inherently resistant to all licensed tyrosine kinase inhibitors, and therapeutic options remain limited. We report the outcome of allogeneic stem cell transplantation in 64 patients with documented BCR-ABL(T315I) mutations. Median follow...... myeloid leukemia. The occurrence of chronic GVHD had a positive impact on overall survival (P = .047). Transplant-related mortality rates were low. Multivariate analysis identified only blast phase at transplantation (hazard ratio 3.68, P = .0011) and unrelated stem cell donor (hazard ratio 2.98, P = .011......) as unfavorable factors. We conclude that allogeneic stem cell transplantation represents a valuable therapeutic tool for eligible patients with BCR-ABL(T315I) mutation, a tool that may or may not be replaced by third-generation tyrosine kinase inhibitors....

  11. Silencing HCCR2 expression inhibits the proliferation of leukemia cells by inducing apoptosis and promoting cell cycle arrest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiao, Shu-Kai; Ren, Han-Yun; Shi, Yong-Jin; Liu, Wei

    2013-12-01

    The human cervical cancer oncogene (HCCR2) has been found to be overexpressed in a variety of human malignant tumors cells, and its function is related to cell cycle progression and survival. However, the molecular mechanisms of action of HCCR2 in leukemia remain unclear. In this study, we used the RNA interference strategy to investigate the effects of HCCR2 knockdown in the K562 leukemia cell line, and to explore the potential mechanisms involved. Following transfection with small interfering RNA (siRNA) targeting HCCR2 (HCCR2-siRNA), we examined the effects of HCCR2 knockdown on cell morphology, cell proliferation, cell cycle progression and apoptosis in K562 cells. Morphological changes were evaluated by Wright-Giemsa staining. Cell cycle progression and apoptosis were measured by flow cytometry. The expression levels of genes related to the cell cycle and apoptosis were detected by quantitative RT-PCR (qRT-PCR) and western blot analysis. HCCR2 expression at the mRNA and protein level was significantly decreased following transfection with plasmids expressing HCCR2-siRNA. Silencing HCCR2 expression significantly suppressed cell proliferation, induced G1 cell cycle arrest and promoted the apoptosis of K562 cells. Additionally, we found that the expression of Bax, p53 and p21 was significantly increased, while Bcl-2 expression was significantly decreased in the HCCR2-siRNA-transfected cells. However, the expression of p27 was not affected. These results suggest that the HCCR2 gene plays an important role in the tumorigenesis of leukemia, thus making it an attractive therapeutic target for acute leukemia.

  12. Comparison of outcomes after unrelated cord blood and unmanipulated haploidentical stem cell transplantation in adults with acute leukemia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ruggeri, A; Labopin, M; Sanz, G;

    2015-01-01

    Outcomes after unmanipulated haploidentical stem cell transplantation (Haplo) and after unrelated cord blood transplantation (UCBT) are encouraging and have become alternative options to treat patients with high-risk acute leukemia without human leukocyte antigen (HLA) matched donor. We compared ...

  13. DNA Methylation Adds Prognostic Value to Minimal Residual Disease Status in Pediatric T-Cell Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Borssén, Magnus; Haider, Zahra; Landfors, Mattias

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Despite increased knowledge about genetic aberrations in pediatric T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL), no clinically feasible treatment-stratifying marker exists at diagnosis. Instead patients are enrolled in intensive induction therapies with substantial side effects...

  14. Polyphenols are responsible for the proapoptotic properties of pomegranate juice on leukemia cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahlawi, Haytham; Jordan-Mahy, Nicola; Clench, Malcolm; McDougall, Gordon J; Maitre, Christine Lyn

    2013-03-01

    Pomegranates have shown great promise as anti-cancer agents in a number of cancers including clinical trials in prostate cancer. We have previously shown pomegranate juice (PGJ) induced apoptosis and preferentially alters the cell cycle in leukemia cell lines compared with nontumor control cells. However, the agents responsible have not yet been fully elucidated. Treatment of four leukemia cell lines with five fractions obtained from PGJ by solid phase extraction demonstrated that only the acetonitrile fractions decreased adenosine triphosphate (ATP) levels in all leukemia cell lines. Acetonitrile fractions also significantly activated caspase-3 and induced nuclear morphology characteristic of apoptosis. S phase arrest was induced by acetonitrile fractions which matched S phase arrest seen previously following whole PGJ treatments. The acetonitrile fractions contained higher phenol content than whole PGJ whereas only low levels of phenols were seen in any other fraction. Liquid chromatography mass spectrometry (LC-MS) analysis demonstrated that acetonitrile fractions were enriched in ellagitannins, ellagic acid, and hydroxycinnamic acid derivatives but depleted in anthocyanins. Individual treatments with identified compounds demonstrated that the ellagitannin: punicalagin was the most active and mimicked the responses seen following acetonitrile fraction treatment. Bioactive components within pomegranate were confined to the acetonitrile fraction of PGJ. The enrichment in ellagitannins and hydroxycinnamic acids suggest these may provide the majority of the bioactivities of PGJ. Individual treatments with compounds identified demonstrated that the ellagitannin: punicalagin was the most active agent, highlighting this compound as a key bioactive agent in PGJ.

  15. Development Refractoriness of MLL-Rearranged Human B Cell Acute Leukemias to Reprogramming into Pluripotency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alvaro Muñoz-López

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs are a powerful tool for disease modeling. They are routinely generated from healthy donors and patients from multiple cell types at different developmental stages. However, reprogramming leukemias is an extremely inefficient process. Few studies generated iPSCs from primary chronic myeloid leukemias, but iPSC generation from acute myeloid or lymphoid leukemias (ALL has not been achieved. We attempted to generate iPSCs from different subtypes of B-ALL to address the developmental impact of leukemic fusion genes. OKSM(L-expressing mono/polycistronic-, retroviral/lentiviral/episomal-, and Sendai virus vector-based reprogramming strategies failed to render iPSCs in vitro and in vivo. Addition of transcriptomic-epigenetic reprogramming “boosters” also failed to generate iPSCs from B cell blasts and B-ALL lines, and when iPSCs emerged they lacked leukemic fusion genes, demonstrating non-leukemic myeloid origin. Conversely, MLL-AF4-overexpressing hematopoietic stem cells/B progenitors were successfully reprogrammed, indicating that B cell origin and leukemic fusion gene were not reprogramming barriers. Global transcriptome/DNA methylome profiling suggested a developmental/differentiation refractoriness of MLL-rearranged B-ALL to reprogramming into pluripotency.

  16. Gene expression profiles of human promyelocytic leukemia cell lines exposed to volatile organic compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarma, Sailendra Nath; Kim, Youn-Jung; Ryu, Jae-Chun

    2010-05-27

    Benzene, toluene, o-xylene, ethylbenzene, trichloroethylene and dichloromethane are the most widely used volatile organic compounds (VOCs), and their toxic mechanisms are still undefined. This study analyzed the genome-wide expression profiles of human promyelocytic leukemia HL-60 cells exposed to VOCs using a 35-K whole human genome oligonucleotide microarray to ascertain potential biomarkers. Genes with a significantly increased expression levels (over 1.5-fold and p-values p53 signaling pathway, apoptosis, and natural killer cell-mediated cytotoxicity pathway. Functionally important immune response- and apoptosis-related genes were further validated by real-time RT-PCR. The results showed that IFIT1, IFIT2, IFIT3, USP18, INFGR2, PMAIP1, GADD45A, NFKBIA, TNFAIP3, and BIRC3 genes altered their expression profiles in a dose-dependent manner. Similar expressions profiles were also found in human erythromyeloblastoid leukemia K562 cells and in human leukemic monocyte lymphoma U937 cells. In conclusion, both gene expression profiles and gene ontology analysis have elucidated potential gene-based biomarkers and provided insights into the mechanism underlying the response of human leukemia cell lines to VOC exposure.

  17. Fucoidan Suppresses the Growth of Human Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia Cells In Vitro and In Vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atashrazm, Farzaneh; Lowenthal, Ray M; Woods, Gregory M; Holloway, Adele F; Karpiniec, Samuel S; Dickinson, Joanne L

    2016-03-01

    Fucoidan, a natural component of seaweeds, is reported to have immunomodulatory and anti-tumor effects. The mechanisms underpinning these activities remain poorly understood. In this study, the cytotoxicity and anti-tumor activities of fucoidan were investigated in acute myeloid leukemia (AML) cells. The human AML cell lines NB4, KG1a, HL60, and K562 were treated with fucoidan and cell cycle, cell proliferation, and expression of apoptotic pathways molecules were analyzed. Fucoidan suppressed the proliferation and induced apoptosis through the intrinsic and extrinsic pathways in the acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL) cell lines NB4 and HL60, but not in KG1a and K562 cells. In NB4 cells, apoptosis was caspase-dependent as it was significantly attenuated by pre-treatment with a pan-caspase inhibitor. P21/WAF1/CIP1 was significantly up-regulated leading to cell cycle arrest. Fucoidan decreased the activation of ERK1/2 and down-regulated the activation of AKT through hypo-phosphorylation of Thr(308) residue but not Ser(473). In vivo, a xenograft model using the NB4 cells was employed. Mice were fed with fucoidan and tumor growth was measured following inoculation with NB4 cells. Subsequently, splenic natural killer (NK) cell cytotoxic activity was also examined. Oral doses of fucoidan significantly delayed tumor growth in the xenograft model and increased cytolytic activity of NK cells. Taken together, these data suggest that the selective inhibitory effect of fucoidan on APL cells and its protective effect against APL development in mice warrant further investigation of fucoidan as a useful agent in treatment of certain types of leukemia.

  18. Expansion in vitro and cytotoxicity of dendritic cells from patients with chronic myeloid leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Lei; Xing, Pei-Ni; Wei, Xu-Cang; Wang, Tong; Li, Mei-Sheng; Zhang, Wang-Gang

    2005-04-01

    The study was aimed to investigate the extensive amplification and the cytotoxicity of dendritic cells (DC) derived from chronic myeloid leukemia cells. DC were cultured in two steps: firstly, extensive amplification in primary culture of CD34(+) or mononuclear cells isolated from CML patients' bone marrow and peripheral blood with rhFlt3-L and rhTPO for 7 days; secondly, inducing culture of DC with rhGM-CSF, rhTNF and rhIL-4 for 14 days. A system inducing DC directly were established for comparison. DC were identified by immunophenotype with flow cytometry, chromosome analysis by displaying G banding and electric microscopy analysis. The function of stimulating T cells proliferation and cytotoxicity of CML cells were confirmed through MTT assay. The results showed that after first extensive amplification in primary culture with rhFlt3-L and rhTPO for 7 days, CD34(+) cells had a total cell number with (77 +/- 5) fold expansion, and DC were (39 +/- 8)% of total cell respectively after induction culture of DC with rhGM-CSF, rhTNF and rhIL-4 for 14 days. Both the amplification of cell number and yield of DC were higher than the system without extensively culture (P < 0.01). Such DC could stimulate T cells to proliferate and kill leukemia cells finally. In conclusion, two-step culture method can obviously improve the cell number of DC required, that is better than inducing them directly. DC derived from CML cells induce the generation of anti-leukemia immunization.

  19. Metabolic adaptation to chronic inhibition of mitochondrial protein synthesis in acute myeloid leukemia cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bozhena Jhas

    Full Text Available Recently, we demonstrated that the anti-bacterial agent tigecycline preferentially induces death in leukemia cells through the inhibition of mitochondrial protein synthesis. Here, we sought to understand mechanisms of resistance to tigecycline by establishing a leukemia cell line resistant to the drug. TEX leukemia cells were treated with increasing concentrations of tigecycline over 4 months and a population of cells resistant to tigecycline (RTEX+TIG was selected. Compared to wild type cells, RTEX+TIG cells had undetectable levels of mitochondrially translated proteins Cox-1 and Cox-2, reduced oxygen consumption and increased rates of glycolysis. Moreover, RTEX+TIG cells were more sensitive to inhibitors of glycolysis and more resistant to hypoxia. By electron microscopy, RTEX+TIG cells had abnormally swollen mitochondria with irregular cristae structures. RNA sequencing demonstrated a significant over-representation of genes with binding sites for the HIF1α:HIF1β transcription factor complex in their promoters. Upregulation of HIF1α mRNA and protein in RTEX+TIG cells was confirmed by Q-RTPCR and immunoblotting. Strikingly, upon removal of tigecycline from RTEX+TIG cells, the cells re-established aerobic metabolism. Levels of Cox-1 and Cox-2, oxygen consumption, glycolysis, mitochondrial mass and mitochondrial membrane potential returned to wild type levels, but HIF1α remained elevated. However, upon re-treatment with tigecycline for 72 hours, the glycolytic phenotype was re-established. Thus, we have generated cells with a reversible metabolic phenotype by chronic treatment with an inhibitor of mitochondrial protein synthesis. These cells will provide insight into cellular adaptations used to cope with metabolic stress.

  20. Underground Adaptation to a Hostile Environment: Acute Myeloid Leukemia vs. Natural Killer Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dulphy, Nicolas; Chrétien, Anne-Sophie; Khaznadar, Zena; Fauriat, Cyril; Nanbakhsh, Arash; Caignard, Anne; Chouaib, Salem; Olive, Daniel; Toubert, Antoine

    2016-01-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is a heterogeneous group of malignancies which incidence increases with age. The disease affects the differentiation of hematopoietic stem or precursor cells in the bone marrow and can be related to abnormal cytogenetic and/or specific mutational patterns. AML blasts can be sensitive to natural killer (NK) cell antitumor response. However, NK cells are frequently defective in AML patients leading to tumor escape. NK cell defects affect not only the expression of the activating NK receptors, including the natural cytotoxicity receptors, the NK group 2, member D, and the DNAX accessory molecule-1, but also cytotoxicity and IFN-γ release. Such perturbations in NK cell physiology could be related to the adaptation of the AML to the immune pressure and more generally to patient’s clinical features. Various mechanisms are potentially involved in the inhibition of NK-cell functions in AML, including defects in the normal lymphopoiesis, reduced expression of activating receptors through cell-to-cell contacts, and production of immunosuppressive soluble agents by leukemic blasts. Therefore, the continuous cross-talk between AML and NK cells participates to the leukemia immune escape and eventually to patient’s relapse. Methods to restore or stimulate NK cells seem to be attractive strategies to treat patients once the complete remission is achieved. Moreover, our capacity in stimulating the NK cell functions could lead to the development of preemptive strategies to eliminate leukemia-initiating cells before the emergence of the disease in elderly individuals presenting preleukemic mutations in hematopoietic stem cells. PMID:27014273

  1. Cyanobacteria from terrestrial and marine sources contain apoptogens able to overcome chemoresistance in acute myeloid leukemia cells

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    In this study, we investigated forty cyanobacterial isolates from biofilms, gastropods, brackish water and symbiotic lichen habitats. Their aqueous and organic extracts were used to screen for apoptosis-inducing activity against acute myeloid leukemia cells. A total of 28 extracts showed cytotoxicity against rat acute myeloid leukemia (IPC-81) cells. The design of the screen made it possible to eliminate known toxins, such as microcystins and nodularin, or known metabolites with anti-leukemi...

  2. A comparison between allogeneic stem cell transplantation from unmanipulated haploidentical and unrelated donors in acute leukemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simona Piemontese

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In the absence of a HLA-matched related or matched unrelated donor, allogeneic stem cell transplantation (allo-SCT from mismatched unrelated donors or haploidentical donors are potential alternatives for patients with acute leukemia with an indication to allo-SCT. The objective of this study was to compare the outcome of allo-SCT from T cell-replete haploidentical (Haplo versus matched (MUD 10/10 or mismatched unrelated donor at a single HLA-locus (MMUD 9/10 for patients with acute leukemia in remission. Methods Two hundred sixty-five adult patients with de novo acute leukemia in first or second remission that received a Haplo-SCT between January 2007 and December 2013 were compared with 2490 patients receiving a MUD 10/10 and 813 receiving a MMUD 9/10. Propensity score weighted analysis was conducted in order to control for disease risk imbalances between the groups. Results The weighted 3-year non-relapse mortality and relapse incidence were 29 and 30% for Haplo, 21 and 29% for MUD 10/10, and 29 and 25% for MMUD 9/10, respectively. The weighted 3-year leukemia-free survival (LFS and overall survival (OS were 41 and 46% for Haplo, 50 and 56% for MUD 10/10, and 46 and 48% for MMUD 9/10, respectively. Using weighted Cox model, both LFS and OS were significantly higher in transplants from MUD 10/10 compared from those in Haplo but not different between transplants from MMUD 9/10 and Haplo. The type of donor was not significantly associated with neither acute nor chronic graft-versus-host disease. Conclusions Patients with acute leukemia in remission have better outcomes if transplanted from a MUD 10/10. We did not find any significant difference in outcome between transplants from MMUD 9/10 and Haplo, suggesting that both can be equally used in the absence of a 10/10 MUD. Key point 1 Better outcomes using fully (10/10 matched unrelated donor for allo-SCT in acute leukemia in remission. Key point 2 Similar outcomes after allo

  3. Small PARP inhibitor PJ-34 induces cell cycle arrest and apoptosis of adult T-cell leukemia cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Xue Tao; Moles, Ramona; Chaib-Mezrag, Hassiba; Nicot, Christophe

    2015-10-23

    HTLV-I is associated with the development of an aggressive form of lymphocytic leukemia known as adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma (ATLL). A major obstacle for effective treatment of ATLL resides in the genetic diversity of tumor cells and their ability to acquire resistance to chemotherapy regimens. As a result, most patients relapse and current therapeutic approaches still have limited long-term survival benefits. Hence, the development of novel approaches is greatly needed. In this study, we found that a small molecule inhibitor of poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP), PJ-34, is very effective in activating S/G2M cell cycle checkpoints, resulting in permanent cell cycle arrest and reactivation of p53 transcription functions and caspase-3-dependent apoptosis of HTLV-I-transformed and patient-derived ATLL tumor cells. We also found that HTLV-I-transformed MT-2 cells are resistant to PJ-34 therapy associated with reduced cleaved caspase-3 activation and increased expression of RelA/p65. Since PJ-34 has been tested in clinical trials for the treatment of solid tumors, our results suggest that some ATLL patients may be good candidates to benefit from PJ-34 therapy.

  4. Transformation of human fetal thymus and spleen lymphocytes by human t-cell leukemia virus type Ι

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akagi,Tadaatsu

    1985-04-01

    Full Text Available Co-cultivation of human thymus and spleen lymphocytes, which were obtained from 26-week and 27-week fetuses, with a lethally-irradiated human cord T-cell line harboring human T-cell leukemia virus type Ι(HTLV-Ι resultes in the establishment of T-cell lines positive for adult T-cell leukemia-associated antigens and producing HTLV-Ι. These cell lines had the phenotype of a helper/inducer subset of peripheral T-cells as evidenced by the reactivity with monoclonal antibodies to human T-cells.

  5. Nilotinib and Combination Chemotherapy in Treating Patients With Newly Diagnosed Philadelphia Chromosome-Positive Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia or Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-10-29

    B-cell Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia, BCR-ABL1 Positive; Philadelphia Chromosome Positive Adult Precursor Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

  6. Plasma Cells For Hire: Prior Experience Required

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    Activation of IgG+ memory B cells accounts for much of the antibodies in secondary immune responses. Here, Khometani et al. (2013) demonstrate that reduced amounts of Bach2 in antigen-experienced memory B cells control the robust production of IgG1+ plasma cells.

  7. Cell Adhesion to Plasma-Coated PVC

    OpenAIRE

    Elidiane C. Rangel; Souza,Eduardo S. de; Francine S. de Moraes; Eliana A. R. Duek; Carolina Lucchesi; Schreiner, Wido H.; Durrant, Steven F.; Cruz, Nilson C.

    2014-01-01

    To produce environments suitable for cell culture, thin polymer films were deposited onto commercial PVC plates from radiofrequency acetylene-argon plasmas. The proportion of argon in the plasmas, P-Ar, was varied from 5.3 to 65.8%. The adhesion and growth of Vero cells on the coated surfaces were examined for different incubation times. Cytotoxicity tests were performed using spectroscopic methods. Carbon, O, and N were detected in all the samples using XPS. Roughness remained almost unchang...

  8. Alemtuzumab and Combination Chemotherapy in Treating Patients With Untreated Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-03-20

    Acute Undifferentiated Leukemia; B-cell Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; B-cell Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; L1 Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; L1 Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; L2 Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; L2 Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Philadelphia Chromosome Negative Adult Precursor Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Philadelphia Chromosome Positive Adult Precursor Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Philadelphia Chromosome Positive Childhood Precursor Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; T-cell Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; T-cell Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Untreated Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

  9. MicroRNAs in Acute Myeloid Leukemia and Other Blood Disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yao Yuan

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Common blood disorders include hematopoietic cell malignancies or leukemias and plasma cell dyscrasia, all of which have associated microRNA abnormalities. In this paper, we discuss several leukemias including acute myeloid leukemia (AML and chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL and identify altered microRNAs and their targets. Immune disorders with altered blood levels of antibodies include autoimmune disorders, such as systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE with associated anti-self-autoantibodies and immunoglobulin A nephropathy (IgAN also have related microRNA abnormalities. The alterations in microRNAs may serve as therapeutic targets in these blood disorders.

  10. Regulatory T-cells in chronic lymphocytic leukemia: actor or innocent bystander?

    Science.gov (United States)

    D’Arena, Giovanni; Simeon, Vittorio; D’Auria, Fiorella; Statuto, Teodora; Sanzo, Paola Di; Martino, Laura De; Marandino, Aurelio; Sangiorgio, Michele; Musto, Pellegrino; Feo, Vincenzo De

    2013-01-01

    Regulatory T (Treg) cells are now under extensive investigation in chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL). This small subset of T-cells has been, in fact, considered to be involved in the pathogenesis and progression of CLL. However, whether Treg dysregulation in CLL plays a key role or it rather represents a simple epiphenomenon is still matter of debate. In the former case, Treg cells could be appealing for targeting therapies. Finally, Treg cells have also been proposed as a prognostic indicator of the disease clinical course. PMID:23358515

  11. Adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma presenting multiple lymphomatous polyposis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Akira Hokama; Nobuyuki Takasu; Jiro Fujita; Takeaki Tomoyose; Yu-ichi Yamamoto; Takako Watanabe; Tetsuo Hirata; Fukunori Kinjo; Seiya Kato; Koichi Ohshima; Hiroshi Uezato

    2008-01-01

    Multiple lymphomatous polyposis (HLP) is an unusual form of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma characterized by polyps throughout the gastrointestinal tract. It has been reported that most MLP are observed in cases with mantle cell lymphoma of B-cell type. We herein present a case of a 66-year-old man with adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma (ATLL). Colonoscopy revealed MLP throughout the colon and histopathological findings of ATLL cell infiltration. The patient died despite combination of chemotherapy. The literature of manifestations of colonic involvement of ATLL is reviewed and the importance of endoscopic evaluation to differentiate ATLL intestinal lesions from opportunistic infectious enterocolitis is discussed.

  12. Identifying arsenic trioxide (ATO) functions in leukemia cells by using time series gene expression profiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Hong; Lin, Shan; Cui, Jingru

    2014-02-10

    Arsenic trioxide (ATO) is presently the most active single agent in the treatment of acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL). In order to explore the molecular mechanism of ATO in leukemia cells with time series, we adopted bioinformatics strategy to analyze expression changing patterns and changes in transcription regulation modules of time series genes filtered from Gene Expression Omnibus database (GSE24946). We totally screened out 1847 time series genes for subsequent analysis. The KEGG (Kyoto encyclopedia of genes and genomes) pathways enrichment analysis of these genes showed that oxidative phosphorylation and ribosome were the top 2 significantly enriched pathways. STEM software was employed to compare changing patterns of gene expression with assigned 50 expression patterns. We screened out 7 significantly enriched patterns and 4 tendency charts of time series genes. The result of Gene Ontology showed that functions of times series genes mainly distributed in profiles 41, 40, 39 and 38. Seven genes with positive regulation of cell adhesion function were enriched in profile 40, and presented the same first increased model then decreased model as profile 40. The transcription module analysis showed that they mainly involved in oxidative phosphorylation pathway and ribosome pathway. Overall, our data summarized the gene expression changes in ATO treated K562-r cell lines with time and suggested that time series genes mainly regulated cell adhesive. Furthermore, our result may provide theoretical basis of molecular biology in treating acute promyelocytic leukemia. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Genomic Profiling of Adult and Pediatric B-cell Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuan-Fang Liu

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Genomic landscapes of 92 adult and 111 pediatric patients with B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (B-ALL were investigated using next-generation sequencing and copy number alteration analysis. Recurrent gene mutations and fusions were tested in an additional 87 adult and 93 pediatric patients. Among the 29 newly identified in-frame gene fusions, those involving MEF2D and ZNF384 were clinically relevant and were demonstrated to perturb B-cell differentiation, with EP300-ZNF384 inducing leukemia in mice. Eight gene expression subgroups associated with characteristic genetic abnormalities were identified, including leukemia with MEF2D and ZNF384 fusions in two distinct clusters. In subgroup G4 which was characterized by ERG deletion, DUX4-IGH fusion was detected in most cases. This comprehensive dataset allowed us to compare the features of molecular pathogenesis between adult and pediatric B-ALL and to identify signatures possibly related to the inferior outcome of adults to that of children. We found that, besides the known discrepancies in frequencies of prognostic markers, adult patients had more cooperative mutations and greater enrichment for alterations of epigenetic modifiers and genes linked to B-cell development, suggesting difference in the target cells of transformation between adult and pediatric patients and may explain in part the disparity in their responses to treatment.

  14. Artesunate induces ROS-mediated apoptosis in doxorubicin-resistant T leukemia cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Efferth

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: A major obstacle for successful cancer treatment often is the development of drug resistance in cancer cells during chemotherapy. Therefore, there is an urgent need for novel drugs with improved efficacy against tumor cells and with less toxicity on normal cells. Artesunate (ART, a powerful anti-malarial herbal compound, has been shown to inhibit growth of various tumor cell lines in vitro and of xenografted Kaposi's sarcoma in mice in vivo. However, the molecular mechanisms by which ART exerts its cytotoxicity have not been elucidated. The ART-class of anti-malarial compounds is attractive due to their activity against multidrug-resistant Plasmodium falciparum and Plasmodium vivax strains. Another salient feature of these compounds is the lack of severe side effects in malaria patients. METHODOLOGY AND PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In this study, we used T-cell leukemias as a model system to study the molecular mechanisms of ART-induced apoptosis. The most typical anticancer drugs are DNA intercalators such as Doxorubicin. To investigate drug sensitivity and resistance, we chose a Doxorubicin-resistant leukemia cell line and investigated the killing effect of ART on these cells. We show that ART induces apoptosis in leukemic T cells mainly through the mitochondrial pathway via generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS, a mechanism different from Doxorubicin. This is confirmed by the fact that the antioxidant N-Acetyle-Cysteine (NAC could completely block ROS generation and, consequently, inhibited ART-induced apoptosis. Therefore, ART can overcome the Doxorubicin-resistance and induce the Doxorubicin-resistant leukemia cells to undergo apoptosis. We also show that ART can synergize with Doxorubicin to enhance apoptotic cell death in leukemic T cells. This synergistic effect can be largely explained by the fact that ART and Doxorubicin use different killing mechanisms. CONCLUSIONS: Our studies raise the possibility to develop ART in

  15. Abacavir, an anti-HIV-1 drug, targets TDP1-deficient adult T cell leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tada, Kohei; Kobayashi, Masayuki; Takiuchi, Yoko; Iwai, Fumie; Sakamoto, Takashi; Nagata, Kayoko; Shinohara, Masanobu; Io, Katsuhiro; Shirakawa, Kotaro; Hishizawa, Masakatsu; Shindo, Keisuke; Kadowaki, Norimitsu; Hirota, Kouji; Yamamoto, Junpei; Iwai, Shigenori; Sasanuma, Hiroyuki; Takeda, Shunichi; Takaori-Kondo, Akifumi

    2015-04-01

    Adult T cell leukemia (ATL) is an aggressive T cell malignancy caused by human T cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1) and has a poor prognosis. We analyzed the cytotoxic effects of various nucleoside analog reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NRTIs) for HIV-1 on ATL cells and found that abacavir potently and selectively kills ATL cells. Although NRTIs have minimal genotoxicities on host cells, the therapeutic concentration of abacavir induced numerous DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) in the chromosomal DNA of ATL cells. DSBs persisted over time in ATL cells but not in other cell lines, suggesting impaired DNA repair. We found that the reduced expression of tyrosyl-DNA phosphodiesterase 1 (TDP1), a repair enzyme, is attributable to the cytotoxic effect of abacavir on ATL cells. We also showed that TDP1 removes abacavir from DNA ends in vitro. These results suggest a model in which ATL cells with reduced TDP1 expression are unable to excise abacavir incorporated into genomic DNA, leading to irreparable DSBs. On the basis of the above mechanism, we propose abacavir as a promising chemotherapeutic agent for ATL.

  16. Evaluation of Manisa propolis effect on leukemia cell line by telomerase activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunduz, Cumhur; Biray, Cigir; Kosova, Buket; Yilmaz, Berna; Eroglu, Zuhal; Sahin, Fahri; Omay, Serdar Bedii; Cogulu, Ozgur

    2005-11-01

    Propolis is a resinous substance which is used by bees to repair and maintain their hives. It has more than 180 compounds including flavonoids, phenolic acids and its esters which have anti-inflammatory, antibacterial, antiviral, immunomodulatory, antioxidant and antiproliferative effects. Propolis is shown to inhibit cell division and protein synthesis. However the exact mechanism underlying antitumor effect is not clearly described. On the other hand progressive telomere shortening to a critical level results with senescence of normal cells by inducing apoptosis and telomerase prevents erosion of telomeres. In this study we aimed to evaluate hTERT ratios in propolis-treated T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (CCFR-CEM) cell line. Cell counts and cell viability of propolis-treated and propolis-free T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (CCFR-CEM) cell line were assessed by trypan blue dye exclusion test and MTT assay. The LightCycler instrument was used (online real-time PCR) for the quantification of hTERT in CCFR-CEM cell line. The hTERT ratio significantly decreased 60 and 93% after 24 and 72 h respectively compared to the initial value of the cells incubated with propolis. It had almost no cytotoxic effect and caused 30, 30, 22 and 12% decrease in cell counts after 24, 48, 72 and 96 h respectively which is statistically significant. In conclusion propolis may show antitumor and apoptotic effect via inhibiting telomerase expression besides the mechanisms which have been described previously.

  17. Structure-activity relationship of lysophosphatidylcholines in HL-60 human leukemia cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Eun-heeLEE; Mi-ranYUN; Wei-hongWANG; JeeHJUNG; Dong-soonIM

    2004-01-01

    AIM: To explore the structure-activity relationship of lysophosphatidylcholine (LPC) and lysolipid molecules from a marine sponge and ladybirds. METHODS: We tested three synthetic LPCs and four natural lysolipids on Ca2+ mobilization in HL-60 human leukemia cells. RESULTS: We observed lysolipid-mediated Ca2+ mobilization. The activity was the same in both ester-and ether-linked lysolipids, and introduction of a double bond or methoxy group on the alkyl chain did not significantly modulate the activity. However, replacement of trimethylammonium moiety in the choline structure with ammonium moiety reduced the activity. Furthermore, change of the alkyl chain length influenced the Ca2+ response. CONCLUSION: LPC-induced Ca2+ mobilization might be dependent on the length of alkyl chain and the presence of choline moiety in HL-60 leukemia cells.

  18. Structure-activity relationship of lysophosphatidylcholines in HL-60 human leukemia cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Eun-hee LEE; Mi-ran YUN; Wei-hong WANG; Jee H JUNG; Dong-soon IM

    2004-01-01

    AIM: To explore the structure-activity relationship of lysophosphatidylcholine (LPC) and lysolipid molecules from a marine sponge and ladybirds. METHODS: We tested three synthetic LPCs and four natural lysolipids on Ca2+mobilization in HL-60 human leukemia cells. RESULTS: We observed lysolipid-mediated Ca2+ mobilization. The activity was the same in both ester- and ether-linked lysolipids, and introduction of a double bond or methoxy group on the alkyl chain did not significantly modulate the activity. However, replacement of trimethylammonium moiety in the choline structure with ammonium moiety reduced the activity. Furthermore, change of the alkyl chain length influenced the Ca2+ response. CONCLUSION: LPC-induced Ca2+ mobilization might be dependent on the length of alkyl chain and the presence of choline moiety in HL-60 leukemia cells.

  19. Inhibition of the checkpoint kinase Chk1 induces DNA damage and cell death in human Leukemia and Lymphoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bryant, Christopher; Scriven, Kirsten; Massey, Andrew J

    2014-06-10

    Chk1 forms a core component of the DNA damage response and small molecule inhibitors are currently being investigated in the clinic as cytotoxic chemotherapy potentiators. Recent evidence suggests that Chk1 inhibitors may demonstrate significant single agent activity in tumors with specific DNA repair defects, a constitutively activated DNA damage response or oncogene induced replicative stress. Growth inhibition induced by the small molecule Chk1 inhibitor V158411 was assessed in a panel of human leukemia and lymphoma cell lines and compared to cancer cell lines derived from solid tumors. The effects on cell cycle and DNA damage response markers were further evaluated. Leukemia and lymphoma cell lines were identified as particularly sensitive to the Chk1 inhibitor V158411 (mean GI50 0.17 μM) compared to colon (2.8 μM) or lung (6.9 μM) cancer cell lines. Chk1 inhibition by V158411 in the leukemia and lymphoma cell lines induced DNA fragmentation and cell death that was both caspase dependent and independent, and prevented cells undergoing mitosis. An analysis of in vitro pharmacodynamic markers identified a dose dependent decrease in Chk1 and cyclin B1 protein levels and Cdc2 Thr15 phosphorylation along with a concomitant increase in H2AX phosphorylation at Ser139 following V158411 treatment. These data support the further evaluation of Chk1 inhibitors in hematopoietic cancers as single agents as well as in combination with standard of care cytotoxic drugs.

  20. OPTIMIZATIONS FOR 5-AMINOLEVULINIC ACID BASED PHOTODYNAMIC THERAPY IN PURGING LEUKEMIA CELL HL60

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    Objective To optimize experimental parameters for the photosensitization of 5-aminolevulinic acid (ALA) in promyelocytic leukemia cell HL60 and compare them with normal human peripheral blood mononuclear cell (PBMC). Methods ALA incubation time, wavelength applied to irradiate, concentration of ALA incubated, irradiation fluence may modulate the effect of 5-aminolevulinic acid based Photodynamic Therapy (ALA-PDT).The high-pressure mercury lamps of 400W served as light source, the interference filter of 410nm, 432nm, 545nm, 577nm were used to select the specific wavelength. Fluorescence microscope was used to detect the fluorescence intensity and location of protoporphyrin IX (PpIX) endogenously produced by ALA. MTT assay was used to measure the survival of cell. Flow cytometry with ANNEXIN V FITC kit (contains annexin V FITC, binding buffer and PI) was used to detect the mode of cell death. Results ① 1mmol/L ALA incubated 1×105/mL HL60 cell line for 4 hours, the maximum fluorescence of ALA induced PpIX was detected in cytomembrane. ② Irradiated with 410nm for 14.4J/cm2 can result in the minimum survivability of HL60 cell. ③ The main mode of HL60 cell death caused by ALA-PDT is necrosis. Conclusion ALA for 1mmol/L, 4 hours for dark incubation time, 410nm for irradiation wavelength, 14.4J/cm2 for irradiation fluence were the optimal parameters to selectively eliminate promyelocytic leukemia cell HL60 by ALA based PDT. The photosensitization of ALA based PDT caused the necrosis of HL60 cell, so it could be used for inactivation of certain leukemia cells.

  1. RHAMNAZIN INHIBITS PROLIFERATION AND INDUCES APOPTOSIS OF HUMAN JURKAT LEUKEMIA CELLS IN VITRO.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Philchenkov, A A; Zavelevych, M P

    2015-01-01

    Antiproliferative and apoptogenic effects of rhamnazin, a dimethoxylated derivative of quercetin, were studied in human acute lymphoblastic leukemia Jurkat cells. The cytotoxicity and apoptogenic activity of rhamnazin in vitro are inferior to that of quercetin. The apoptogenic activity of rhamnazin is realized via mitochondrial pathway and associated with activation of caspase-9 and -3. The additive apoptogenic effect of rhamnazin and suboptimal doses of etoposide, a DNA topoisomerase II inhibitor, is demonstrated. Therefore, methylation of quercetin modifies its biological effects considerably.

  2. Autologous Stem Cell Transplantation in Patients with Acute Myeloid Leukemia: a Single-Centre Experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kakucs Enikő

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Autologous haemopoietic stem cell transplantation (SCT is an important treatment modality for patients with acute myeloid leukemia with low and intermediate risk disease. It has served advantages over allogenic transplantation, because it does not need a matched donor, there is no graft versus host disease, there are less complications and a faster immune reconstitution than in the allo-setting. The disadvantage is the lack of the graft versus leukaemia effect.

  3. Identification of Interconnected Markers for T-Cell Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    OpenAIRE

    Emine Guven Maiorov; Ozlem Keskin; Ozden Hatirnaz Ng; Ugur Ozbek; Attila Gursoy

    2013-01-01

    Hindawi Publishing Corporation BioMed Research International Volume 2013, Article ID 210253, 20 pages http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2013/210253 Research Article Identification of Interconnected Markers for T-Cell Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia Emine Guven Maiorov,1 Ozlem Keskin,1 Ozden Hatirnaz Ng,2 Ugur Ozbek,2 and Attila Gursoy1 1 Center for Computational Biology and Bioinformatics and College of Engineering, Koc¸ University, Rumelifeneri Yolu, Sariyer, 34450 Istanbu...

  4. Pure red cell aplasia and chronic lymphoid leukemia. Usefulness of ferrokinetic measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Viala, J.J.; Coiffier, B.; Rebattu, P.; Guastalla, J.P. (Lyon-1 Univ., 69 (France)); Ville, D. (Hopital Edouard-Herriot, 69 - Lyon (France))

    1981-11-01

    Erythroblastopenia is probably not rare in chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) but the diagnosis could be difficult. It produces a severe and rapidly developing anemia, without evidence of hemolysis. The chief differential diagnosis is the common bone marrow insufficiency of end-stage CLL. Iron kinetics measurements are typical, showing a total erythropoietic insufficiency, and a red cell utilization of radio-iron that is practically zero. Erythroblastopenia could be cured with corticosteroid or sometimes with immunosuppressive treatment.

  5. Bone Marrow Cells in Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia Create a Proinflammatory Microenvironment Influencing Normal Hematopoietic Differentiation Fates

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (B-ALL) is a serious public health problem in the pediatric population worldwide, contributing to 85% of deaths from childhood cancers. Understanding the biology of the disease is crucial for its clinical management and the development of therapeutic strategies. In line with that observed in other malignancies, chronic inflammation may contribute to a tumor microenvironment resulting in the damage of normal processes, concomitant to development and maintena...

  6. Quantitative Phenotyping-Based In Vivo Chemical Screening in a Zebrafish Model of Leukemia Stem Cell Xenotransplantation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Beibei; Shimada, Yasuhito; Kuroyanagi, Junya; Umemoto, Noriko; Nishimura, Yuhei; Tanaka, Toshio

    2014-01-01

    Zebrafish-based chemical screening has recently emerged as a rapid and efficient method to identify important compounds that modulate specific biological processes and to test the therapeutic efficacy in disease models, including cancer. In leukemia, the ablation of leukemia stem cells (LSCs) is necessary to permanently eradicate the leukemia cell population. However, because of the very small number of LSCs in leukemia cell populations, their use in xenotransplantation studies (in vivo) and the difficulties in functionally and pathophysiologically replicating clinical conditions in cell culture experiments (in vitro), the progress of drug discovery for LSC inhibitors has been painfully slow. In this study, we developed a novel phenotype-based in vivo screening method using LSCs xenotransplanted into zebrafish. Aldehyde dehydrogenase-positive (ALDH+) cells were purified from chronic myelogenous leukemia K562 cells tagged with a fluorescent protein (Kusabira-orange) and then implanted in young zebrafish at 48 hours post-fertilization. Twenty-four hours after transplantation, the animals were treated with one of eight different therapeutic agents (imatinib, dasatinib, parthenolide, TDZD-8, arsenic trioxide, niclosamide, salinomycin, and thioridazine). Cancer cell proliferation, and cell migration were determined by high-content imaging. Of the eight compounds that were tested, all except imatinib and dasatinib selectively inhibited ALDH+ cell proliferation in zebrafish. In addition, these anti-LSC agents suppressed tumor cell migration in LSC-xenotransplants. Our approach offers a simple, rapid, and reliable in vivo screening system that facilitates the phenotype-driven discovery of drugs effective in suppressing LSCs. PMID:24454867

  7. Antileukemic effect of zerumbone-loaded nanostructured lipid carrier in WEHI-3B cell-induced murine leukemia model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahman, Heshu Sulaiman; Rasedee, Abdullah; How, Chee Wun; Zeenathul, Nazariah Allaudin; Chartrand, Max Stanley; Yeap, Swee Keong; Abdul, Ahmad Bustamam; Tan, Sheau Wei; Othman, Hemn Hassan; Ajdari, Zahra; Namvar, Farideh; Arulselvan, Palanisamy; Fakurazi, Sharida; Mehrbod, Parvaneh; Daneshvar, Nasibeh; Begum, Hasina

    2015-01-01

    Cancer nanotherapy is progressing rapidly with the introduction of many innovative drug delivery systems to replace conventional therapy. Although the antitumor activity of zerumbone (ZER) has been reported, there has been no information available on the effect of ZER-loaded nanostructured lipid carrier (NLC) (ZER-NLC) on murine leukemia cells. In this study, the in vitro and in vivo effects of ZER-NLC on murine leukemia induced with WEHI-3B cells were investigated. The results from 3-[4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl]-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide, Hoechst 33342, Annexin V, cell cycle, and caspase activity assays showed that the growth of leukemia cells in vitro was inhibited by ZER-NLC. In addition, outcomes of histopathology, transmission electron microscopy, and Tdt-mediated dUTP nick-end labeling analyses revealed that the number of leukemia cells in the spleen of BALB/c leukemia mice significantly decreased after 4 weeks of oral treatment with various doses of ZER-NLC. Western blotting and reverse-transcription quantitative polymerase chain reaction assays confirmed the antileukemia effects of ZER-NLC. In conclusion, ZER-NLC was shown to induce a mitochondrial-dependent apoptotic pathway in murine leukemia. Loading of ZER in NLC did not compromise the anticancer effect of the compound, suggesting ZER-NLC as a promising and effective delivery system for treatment of cancers.

  8. Sulforaphane induces cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in acute lymphoblastic leukemia cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koramit Suppipat

    Full Text Available Acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL is the most common hematological cancer in children. Although risk-adaptive therapy, CNS-directed chemotherapy, and supportive care have improved the survival of ALL patients, disease relapse is still the leading cause of cancer-related death in children. Therefore, new drugs are needed as frontline treatments in high-risk disease and as salvage agents in relapsed ALL. In this study, we report that purified sulforaphane, a natural isothiocyanate found in cruciferous vegetables, has anti-leukemic properties in a broad range of ALL cell lines and primary lymphoblasts from pediatric T-ALL and pre-B ALL patients. The treatment of ALL leukemic cells with sulforaphane resulted in dose-dependent apoptosis and G2/M cell cycle arrest, which was associated with the activation of caspases (3, 8, and 9, inactivation of PARP, p53-independent upregulation of p21(CIP1/WAF1, and inhibition of the Cdc2/Cyclin B1 complex. Interestingly, sulforaphane also inhibited the AKT and mTOR survival pathways in most of the tested cell lines by lowering the levels of both total and phosphorylated proteins. Finally, the administration of sulforaphane to the ALL xenograft models resulted in a reduction of tumor burden, particularly following oral administration, suggesting a potential role as an adjunctive agent to improve the therapeutic response in high-risk ALL patients with activated AKT signaling.

  9. Pre-malignant lymphoid cells arise from hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells in chronic lymphocytic leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kikushige, Yoshikane; Miyamoto, Toshihiro

    2015-11-01

    Human malignancies progress through a multistep process that includes the development of critical somatic mutations over the clinical course. Recent novel findings have indicated that hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs), which have the potential to self-renew and differentiate into multilineage hematopoietic cells, are an important cellular target for the accumulation of critical somatic mutations in hematological malignancies and play a central role in myeloid malignancy development. In contrast to myeloid malignancies, mature lymphoid malignancies, such as chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL), are thought to originate directly from differentiated mature lymphocytes; however, recent compelling data have shown that primitive HSCs and hematopoietic progenitor cells contribute to the pathogenesis of mature lymphoid malignancies. Several representative mutations of hematological malignancies have been identified within the HSCs of CLL and lymphoma patients, indicating that the self-renewing long-lived fraction of HSCs can serve as a reservoir for the development of oncogenic events. Novel mice models have been established as human mature lymphoma models, in which specific oncogenic events target the HSCs and immature progenitor cells. These data collectively suggest that HSCs can be the cellular target involved in the accumulation of oncogenic events in the pathogenesis of mature lymphoid and myeloid malignancies.

  10. Tumor Suppressor Inactivation in the Pathogenesis of Adult T-Cell Leukemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christophe Nicot

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Tumor suppressor functions are essential to control cellular proliferation, to activate the apoptosis or senescence pathway to eliminate unwanted cells, to link DNA damage signals to cell cycle arrest checkpoints, to activate appropriate DNA repair pathways, and to prevent the loss of adhesion to inhibit initiation of metastases. Therefore, tumor suppressor genes are indispensable to maintaining genetic and genomic integrity. Consequently, inactivation of tumor suppressors by somatic mutations or epigenetic mechanisms is frequently associated with tumor initiation and development. In contrast, reactivation of tumor suppressor functions can effectively reverse the transformed phenotype and lead to cell cycle arrest or death of cancerous cells and be used as a therapeutic strategy. Adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma (ATLL is an aggressive lymphoproliferative disease associated with infection of CD4 T cells by the Human T-cell Leukemia Virus Type 1 (HTLV-I. HTLV-I-associated T-cell transformation is the result of a multistep oncogenic process in which the virus initially induces chronic T-cell proliferation and alters cellular pathways resulting in the accumulation of genetic defects and the deregulated growth of virally infected cells. This review will focus on the current knowledge of the genetic and epigenetic mechanisms regulating the inactivation of tumor suppressors in the pathogenesis of HTLV-I.

  11. An animal model of adult T-cell leukemia: humanized mice with HTLV-1-specific immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tezuka, Kenta; Xun, Runze; Tei, Mami; Ueno, Takaharu; Tanaka, Masakazu; Takenouchi, Norihiro; Fujisawa, Jun-ichi

    2014-01-16

    Human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1) is causally associated with adult T-cell leukemia (ATL), an aggressive T-cell malignancy with a poor prognosis. To elucidate ATL pathogenesis in vivo, a variety of animal models have been established; however, the mechanisms driving this disorder remain poorly understood due to deficiencies in each of these animal models. Here, we report a novel HTLV-1-infected humanized mouse model generated by intra-bone marrow injection of human CD133(+) stem cells into NOD/Shi-scid/IL-2Rγc null (NOG) mice (IBMI-huNOG mice). Upon infection, the number of CD4(+) human T cells in the periphery increased rapidly, and atypical lymphocytes with lobulated nuclei resembling ATL-specific flower cells were observed 4 to 5 months after infection. Proliferation was seen in both CD25(-) and CD25(+) CD4 T cells with identical proviral integration sites; however, a limited number of CD25(+)-infected T-cell clones eventually dominated, indicating an association between clonal selection of infected T cells and expression of CD25. Additionally, HTLV-1-specific adaptive immune responses were induced in infected mice and might be involved in the control of HTLV-1-infected cells. Thus, the HTLV-1-infected IBMI-huNOG mouse model successfully recapitulated the development of ATL and may serve as an important tool for investigating in vivo mechanisms of ATL leukemogenesis and evaluating anti-ATL drug and vaccine candidates.

  12. Natural Product Vibsanin A Induces Differentiation of Myeloid Leukemia Cells through PKC Activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Zu-Yin; Xiao, He; Wang, Li-Mei; Shen, Xing; Jing, Yu; Wang, Lin; Sun, Wen-Feng; Zhang, Yan-Feng; Cui, Yu; Shan, Ya-Jun; Zhou, Wen-Bing; Xing, Shuang; Xiong, Guo-Lin; Liu, Xiao-Lan; Dong, Bo; Feng, Jian-Nan; Wang, Li-Sheng; Luo, Qing-Liang; Zhao, Qin-Shi; Cong, Yu-Wen

    2016-05-01

    All-trans retinoic acid (ATRA)-based cell differentiation therapy has been successful in treating acute promyelocytic leukemia, a unique subtype of acute myeloid leukemia (AML). However, other subtypes of AML display resistance to ATRA-based treatment. In this study, we screened natural, plant-derived vibsane-type diterpenoids for their ability to induce differentiation of myeloid leukemia cells, discovering that vibsanin A potently induced differentiation of AML cell lines and primary blasts. The differentiation-inducing activity of vibsanin A was mediated through direct interaction with and activation of protein kinase C (PKC). Consistent with these findings, pharmacological blockade of PKC activity suppressed vibsanin A-induced differentiation. Mechanistically, vibsanin A-mediated activation of PKC led to induction of the ERK pathway and decreased c-Myc expression. In mouse xenograft models of AML, vibsanin A administration prolonged host survival and inhibited PKC-mediated inflammatory responses correlated with promotion of skin tumors in mice. Collectively, our results offer a preclinical proof of concept for vibsanin A as a myeloid differentiation-inducing compound, with potential application as an antileukemic agent. Cancer Res; 76(9); 2698-709. ©2016 AACR.

  13. Granulocyte Colony-stimulating Factor-primed Bone Marrow: An Excellent Stem-cell Source for Transplantation in Acute Myelocytic Leukemia and Chronic Myelocytic Leukemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuhang Li

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Steady-state bone marrow (SS-BM and granulocyte colony-stimulating growth factor-primed BM/peripheral blood stem-cell (G-BM/G-PBSC are the main stem-cell sources used in allogeneic hematopoietic stem-cell transplantation. Here, we evaluated the treatment effects of SS-BM and G-BM/G-PBSC in human leucocyte antigen (HLA-identical sibling transplantation. Methods: A total of 226 patients (acute myelogenous leukemia-complete remission 1, chronic myelogenous leukemia-chronic phase 1 received SS-BM, G-BM, or G-PBSC from an HLA-identical sibling. Clinical outcomes (graft-versus-host disease [GVHD], overall survival, transplant-related mortality [TRM], and leukemia-free survival [LFS] were analyzed. Results: When compared to SS-BM, G-BM gave faster recovery time to neutrophil or platelet (P 0.05. Conclusions: G-CSF-primed bone marrow shared the advantages of G-PBSC and SS-BM. We conclude that G-BM is an excellent stem-cell source that may be preferable to G-PBSC or SS-BM in patients receiving HLA-identical sibling hematopoietic stem-cell transplantation.

  14. NF-κB in T-cell Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia: Oncogenic Functions in Leukemic and in Microenvironmental Cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santos, Nuno R. dos, E-mail: nrsantos@ualg.pt; Ghezzo, Marinella N.; Silva, Ricardo C. da; Fernandes, Mónica T. [IBB-Institute for Biotechnology and Bioengineering, Centre for Molecular and Structural Biomedicine (CBME), University of Algarve, Campus de Gambelas, 8005-139 Faro (Portugal)

    2010-11-05

    Two main NF-κB signaling pathways, canonical and noncanonical, performing distinct functions in organisms have been characterized. Identification of mutations in genes encoding components of these NF-κB signaling pathways in lymphoid malignancies confirmed their key role in leukemogenesis. T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL) is an aggressive malignancy of thymocytes that despite significant therapeutic advances can still be fatal. Although mutations in NF-κB genes have not been reported in T-ALL, NF-κB constitutive activation in human T-ALL and in acute T-cell leukemia mouse models has been observed. Although these studies revealed activation of members of both canonical and noncanonical NF-κB pathways in acute T-cell leukemia, only inhibition of canonical NF-κB signaling was shown to impair leukemic T cell growth. Besides playing an important pro-oncogenic role in leukemic T cells, NF-κB signaling also appears to modulate T-cell leukemogenesis through its action in microenvironmental stromal cells. This article reviews recent data on the role of these transcription factors in T-ALL and pinpoints further research crucial to determine the value of NF-κB inhibition as a means to treat T-ALL.

  15. HTLV 1 associated adult T cell lymphoma/leukemia a clinicopathologic, immunophenotypic tale of three cases from non-endemic region of south India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Faiq Ahmed

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Adult T cell lymphoma/leukemia is a peripheral T-cell neoplasm caused by human T-cell lymphotrophic virus-1, affects mostly adults with systemic involvement and poor prognosis. Diagnosis of adult T-Cell leukemia/Lymphoma is challenging. The clinico-pathologic and immuno-phenotypic features of the three cases will be presented.

  16. Amsacrine suppresses matrix metalloproteinase-2 (MMP-2)/MMP-9 expression in human leukemia cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Wen-Hsin; Chen, Ying-Jung; Chien, Jen-Hung; Chang, Long-Sen

    2014-05-01

    This study explores the suppression mechanism of amsacrine (4-(9-Acridinylamino)-N-(methanesulfonyl)-m-anisidine hydrochloride) on matrix metalloproteinase-2 (MMP-2) and MMP-9 expression in human leukemia cells. Amsacrine attenuated cell invasion with decreased MMP-2/MMP-9 protein expression and mRNA levels in U937, Jurkat, HL-60, K562, KU812, and MEG-01 cells. Moreover, amsacrine reduced both MMP-2/MMP-9 promoter luciferase activity and MMP-2/MMP-9 mRNA stability in leukemia cells. Studies on amsacrine-treated U937 cells revealed that amsacrine-elicited ROS generation induced JNK and p38 MAPK activation but reduced the phospho-ERK level. Amsacrine-induced ERK inactivation and p38 MAPK/JNK activation were demonstrated to suppress MMP-2/MMP-9 promoter luciferase activity and promote MMP-2/MMP-9 mRNA decay, respectively. p38 MAPK/JNK activation led to up-regulation of protein phosphatase 2A catalytic subunit α (PP2Acα) in amsacrine-treated U937 cells. Okadaic acid (PP2A inhibitor) treatment increased MMP-2/MMP-9 mRNA stability in amsacrine-treated cells, whereas PP2Acα over-expression increased MMP-2/MMP-9 mRNA decay. Amsacrine-induced MMP-2/MMP-9 down-regulation was also related to PP2Acα up-regulation on Jurkat, HL-60, K562, KU812, and MEG-01 cells. Collectively, our data indicate that amsacrine induces MMP-2/MMP-9 down-regulation via simultaneous suppression of genetic transcription and mRNA stability in human leukemia cells.

  17. Pycnogenol induces differentiation and apoptosis in human promyeloid leukemia HL-60 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, W W; Yang, J S; Lin, C F; Ho, W J; Lee, M R

    2005-06-01

    Pycnogenol, rich of many phytochemicals of medical value, is a commercialized nutrient supplement extracted from the bark of European coastal pine. In this study, we investigated the anti-tumor effects of Pycnogenol on HL-60, U937 and K562 human leukemia cell lines. We found that Pycnogenol inhibited cell proliferation dose- and time-dependently, and the IC(50)s of Pycnogenol on HL-60, U937 and K562 cells were 150, 40 and 100 microg/ml, respectively. When HL-60 cells were incubated with low concentrations of Pycnogenol (50, 100 and 125 microg/ml) for 24 h, a prominent G0/G1 arrest was observed, followed by gradual accumulation of sub-G0/G1 nuclei. At 48 h of treatment, 50-70% of HL-60 cells differentiated, as evidenced by morphological changes, NBT reduction, induction of NSE activity, and increases of cell surface expression of CD11b. However, results from Annexin V/PI staining, DAPI staining and DNA fragmentation assay indicated that Pycnogenol induced HL-60, U937 and K562 cell apoptosis at their respective IC(50)s after 24 h of treatments. Pretreatment of z-DEVD-fmk, a caspase-3 specific inhibitor, not only decreased caspase-3 activity but also reduced the percentage of apoptotic cells induced by Pycnogenol. This indicated that caspase-3 activation was involved in Pycnogenol induced-apoptosis. In conclusion, Pycnogenol induced differentiation and apoptosis in leukemia cells. Our data suggest that Pycnogenol could serve as a potent cancer chemopreventive or chemotherapeutic agent for human leukemia.

  18. Inhibitors of XIAP sensitize CD40-activated chronic lymphocytic leukemia cells to CD95-mediated apoptosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kater, Arnon P.; Dicker, Frank; Mangiola, Massimo; Welsh, Kate; Houghten, Richard; Ostresh, John; Nefzi, Adel; Reed, John C.; Pinilla, Clemencia; Kipps, Thomas J.

    2005-01-01

    Patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) treated with adenovirus CD154 (Ad-CD154, CD40 ligand [CD40L]) gene therapy experienced rapid reductions in leukemia cell counts and lymph node size associated with the induced expression of Fas (CD95). However, CLL cells initially resist CD95-mediated apoptosis within the first 3 days after CD40 ligation in vitro. Thereafter, they become sensitive, which is associated with the CD40-induced expression of the proapoptotic protein B-cell leukemia 2 homology 3 (BH3) interacting domain death agonist (Bid). We hypothesized that the initial resistance to CD95-mediated apoptosis may be due to the high-level expression of X-linked inhibitor of apoptosis protein (XIAP) by CLL cells. Consistent with this, CLL cells from patients 1 day after treatment with autologous Ad-CD154-transduced CLL cells became sensitive to CD95-mediated apoptosis following treatment with a novel XIAP inhibitor, 1540-14. Similarly, 1540-14 specifically enhanced CD95-mediated apoptosis of CLL cells following CD40 ligation in vitro. Immunoblot analyses demonstrated that treatment with 1540-14 allowed CD40-stimulated CLL cells to experience high-level activation of caspases-8 and -3 and cleavage of poly(adenosine diphosphate [ADP]-ribose) polymerase following CD95 ligation. This study demonstrates that distal apoptosis regulators contribute to the initial resistance of CD40-activated CLL cells to CD95-mediated apoptosis and suggests that XIAP inhibitors might enhance the effectiveness of immune-based treatment strategies that target CD40, such as CD154 gene therapy. (Blood. 2005;106:1742-1748) PMID:15914559

  19. Purification and characterization of fetal hematopoietic cells that express the common acute lymphoblastic leukemia antigen (CALLA)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hokland, P; Rosenthal, P; Griffin, J D

    1983-01-01

    Fetal hematopoietic cells that express the common acute lymphoblastic leukemia antigen (CALLA) were purified from both fetal liver and fetal bone marrow by immune rosetting with sheep erythrocytes coated with rabbit anti-mouse immunoglobulin and by fluorescence-activated cell sorting. Dual...... antigen. Furthermore, using methanol-fixed cells, it could be shown that approximately 20% contained intracytoplasmic mu chains (cyto-mu) and that approximately 15% were positive for the terminal transferase enzyme (TdT) marker. The CALLA+ fetal cells thus closely resemble the childhood acute...... that these cells are relatively immature lymphoid cells, CALLA+ cells do not appear to contain either myeloid precursor cells (CFU-G/M) or the earliest lymphoid stem cells. Udgivelsesdato: 1983-Jan-1...

  20. How breast cancer chemotherapy increases the risk of leukemia: Thoughts about a case of diffuse large B-cell lymphoma and leukemia after breast cancer chemotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Bin; Zhang, Xia; Li, Minghuan; Kong, Li; Deng, Xiaoqin; Yu, Jinming

    2016-01-01

    The latest studies suggest that prophylactic chemotherapy or adjuvant chemotherapy for early stage breast cancer may increase the leukemia risk in patients. For patients with a low risk for breast cancer recurrence, physicians who make the choice for adjuvant therapy should consider the risk of its long-term side effects. Is the occurrence of lymphatic system cancer and leukemia after breast cancer treatment associated with chemotherapy? Can these types of leukemia be classified as therapy-related leukaemias? We believe that there may be correlations between any diseases, butwe cannot rush to conclusions or dismiss a correlation because we understand little about the diseases themselves.In this paper, we present a case of secondary diffuse large B-cell lymphoma and leukemia in patients after breast cancer chemotherapy, it is undeniable that this is a special event. For two distinct tumouroccurrences at different times, we cannot give a clear explanation because of thechanges in the genes that might link them together and we hope to attract the attention of other clinicians.

  1. Relationship between triterpenoid anticancer drug resistance, autophagy, and caspase-1 in adult T-cell leukemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tsukasa Nakanishi

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available We previously reported that the inflammasome inhibitor cucurbitacin D (CuD induces apoptosis in human leukemia cell lines. Here, we investigated the effects of CuD and a B-cell lymphoma extra-large (Bcl-xL inhibitor on autophagy in peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBL isolated from adult T-cell leukemia (ATL patients. CuD induced PBL cell death in patients but not in healthy donors. This effect was not significantly inhibited by treatment with rapamycin or 3-methyladenine (3-MA. The Bcl-xL inhibitor Z36 induced death in primary cells from ATL patients including that induced by CuD treatment, effects that were partly inhibited by 3-MA. Similarly, cell death induced by the steroid prednisolone was enhanced in the presence of Z36. A western blot analysis revealed that Z36 also promoted CuD-induced poly(ADP ribose polymerase cleavage. Interestingly, the effects of CuD and Z36 were attenuated in primary ATL patient cells obtained upon recurrence after umbilical cord blood transplantation, as compared to those obtained before chemotherapy. Furthermore, cells from this patient expressed a high level of caspase-1, and treatment with caspase-1 inhibitor-enhanced CuD-induced cell death. Taken together, these results suggest that rescue from resistance to steroid drugs can enhance chemotherapy, and that caspase-1 is a good marker for drug resistance in ATL patients.

  2. Ibrutinib Therapy Increases T Cell Repertoire Diversity in Patients with Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Qingsong; Sivina, Mariela; Robins, Harlan; Yusko, Erik; Vignali, Marissa; O'Brien, Susan; Keating, Michael J; Ferrajoli, Alessandra; Estrov, Zeev; Jain, Nitin; Wierda, William G; Burger, Jan A

    2017-02-15

    The Bruton's tyrosine kinase inhibitor ibrutinib is a highly effective, new targeted therapy for chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) that thwarts leukemia cell survival, growth, and tissue homing. The effects of ibrutinib treatment on the T cell compartment, which is clonally expanded and thought to support the growth of malignant B cells in CLL, are not fully characterized. Using next-generation sequencing technology, we characterized the diversity of TCRβ-chains in peripheral blood T cells from 15 CLL patients before and after 1 y of ibrutinib therapy. We noted elevated CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cell numbers and a restricted TCRβ repertoire in all pretreatment samples. After 1 y of ibrutinib therapy, elevated peripheral blood T cell numbers and T cell-related cytokine levels had normalized, and T cell repertoire diversity increased significantly. Dominant TCRβ clones in pretreatment samples declined or became undetectable, and the number of productive unique clones increased significantly during ibrutinib therapy, with the emergence of large numbers of low-frequency TCRβ clones. Importantly, broader TCR repertoire diversity was associated with clinical efficacy and lower rates of infections during ibrutinib therapy. These data demonstrate that ibrutinib therapy increases diversification of the T cell compartment in CLL patients, which contributes to cellular immune reconstitution.

  3. Knockdown of homeobox A5 by small hairpin RNA inhibits proliferation and enhances cytarabine chemosensitivity of acute myeloid leukemia cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Na; Jia, Xiuhong; Wang, Jianyong; Li, Youjie; Xie, Shuyang

    2015-11-01

    Homeobox genes encode transcription factors that are essential for embryonic morphogenesis and differentiation. Transcription factors containing the highly conserved homeobox motif show considerable promise as potential regulators of hematopoietic maturation events. Previous studies have suggested that the increased expression levels of homeobox (HOX)A genes was correlated with the cytogenetic findings associated with poor prognosis in acute myeloid leukemia and mixed lineage leukemia. The aim of the present study was to investigate the role of HOXA5 in leukemia. The U937 human leukemia cell line was transfected with a HOXA5‑targeted short hairpin RNA (shRNA) to determine the effects of downregulation of the HOXA5 on proliferation, apoptosis, cell cycle distribution and chemoresistance in leukemia cells. Reverse transcription‑quantitative polymerase chain reaction and western blot analyses demonstrated that the mRNA and protein expression levels of HOXA5 were markedly suppressed following transfection with an shRNA‑containing vector. Knockdown of HOXA5 significantly inhibited cell proliferation, as determined by Cell Counting kit‑8 assay. Flow cytometry revealed that reduced HOXA5 expression levels resulted in cell cycle arrest at the G1 phase, and induced apoptosis. In addition, western blot analysis demonstrated that HOXA5 knockdown increased the expression levels of caspase‑3, and reduced the expression levels of survivin in the U937 cells. Furthermore, knockdown of HOXA5 in the U937 cells enhanced their chemosensitivity to cytarabine. The results of the present study suggested that downregulation of HOXA5 by shRNA may trigger apoptosis and overcome drug resistance in leukemia cells. Therefore, HOXA5 may serve as a potential target for developing novel therapeutic strategies for leukemia.

  4. Improved outcome with hematopoietic stem cell transplantation in a poor prognostic subgroup of infants with mixed-lineage-leukemia (MLL)-rearranged acute lymphoblastic leukemia: results from the Interfant-99 Study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mann, Georg; Attarbaschi, Andishe; Schrappe, Martin;

    2010-01-01

    To define a role for hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) in infants with acute lymphoblastic leukemia and rearrangements of the mixed-lineage-leukemia gene (MLL(+)), we compared the outcome of MLL(+) patients from trial Interfant-99 who either received chemotherapy only or HSCT. Of 376...

  5. Extramedullary Involvement of Mast Cell Leukemia Detected by 18F-FDG PET/CT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Zhanli; Zhang, Jin; Liu, Meng; Li, Ziao; Li, Qian

    2016-07-01

    Mast cell leukemia (MCL) is a very rare subtype of systemic mastocytosis, characterized by the leukemic expansion of immature mast cells. We present a case of MCL with extramedullary involvement of cervical lymph node and lung demonstrated by the initial F-FDG PET/CT scan. After a transient complete remission by induction chemotherapy and allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation, the follow-up PET/CT showed extensive extramedullary relapse involving multiple lymph nodes and small bowel. F-FDG PET/CT may be a useful tool to comprehensively stage and follow-up MCL.

  6. Acute promyelocytic leukemia associated with a paraprotein that reacts with leukemic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atkins, H; Drouin, J; Izaguirre, C A; Sengar, D S

    1989-05-01

    A 29-year-old woman developed acute promyelocytic leukemia during pregnancy. At diagnosis, immediately postpartum, she was found to have IgG kappa immunoglobulin on the surface of the leukemic cells as well as a monoclonal protein of IgG kappa specificity in her serum. These resolved with chemotherapy which induced a complete remission. Immunoglobulin gene rearrangement was not found in the leukemic cells, thus indicating that the blasts were not secreting the monoclonal protein. The authors believe that the patient had an autoantibody directed at myeloid cells which was amplified by the development of the leukemic process.

  7. Clinical activity of azacitidine in patients who relapse after allogeneic stem cell transplantation for acute myeloid leukemia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Craddock, Charles; Labopin, Myriam; Robin, Marie

    2016-01-01

    Disease relapse is the most common cause of treatment failure after allogeneic stem cell transplantation for acute myeloid leukemia and myelodysplastic syndromes, yet treatment options for such patients remain extremely limited. Azacitidine is an important new therapy in high-risk myelodysplastic...... syndromes and acute myeloid leukemia but its role in patients who relapse post allograft has not been defined. We studied the tolerability and activity of azacitidine in 181 patients who relapsed after an allograft for acute myeloid leukemia (n=116) or myelodysplastic syndromes (n=65). Sixty-nine patients...... conclude that azacitidine represents an important new therapy in selected patients with acute myeloid leukemia/myelodysplastic syndromes who relapse after allogeneic stem cell transplantation. Prospective studies to confirm optimal treatment options in this challenging patient population are required....

  8. Flow cytometric analysis of hemetopoietic progenitor cells in peripheral blood stem cell harvest from patients with CD34 positive acute leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyazaki, T; Matsuda, I; Oguri, M; Amaya, H; Kiyosaki, M; Hamada, A; Tamaki, S; Tashiro, E; Kudo, Y; Taniguchi, O; Nakamura, T; Tomoyasu, S

    2001-01-01

    We analyzed CD34 positive cells in peripheral blood stem cell harvest (PBSCH) using flow cytometry. PBSCH from CD34 positive acute myelogeous leukemia (AML-M2) patient contained 1.87% CD34 positive cells, of which 1.21% was represented by MRD.PBSCH from CD34 positive acute lymphoblast leukemia (ALL) patient contained 3.14% CD34 positive cells, of which 0.11% was accounted for by minimal residual disease (MRD). If PBSCH from CD34 positive acute leukemia patient is analyzed for CD34 monoclonal antibody alone, the presence of CD34 positive MRD may escape attention so that CD34 positive hematopoietic progenitor cells may be overestimated. To avoid this risk, it is necessary to analyze PBSCH using both CD34 monoclonal antibody and characteristic markers of leukemia cells that were found pre-treatment.

  9. Clinical use of blinatumomab for B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia in adults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lee KJ

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Kum Ja Lee,1 Vivian Chow,1 Ashley Weissman,2 Sunil Tulpule,3 Ibrahim Aldoss,4 Mojtaba Akhtari5 1Department of Clinical Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Economics and Policy, University of Southern California, 2Department of Pharmacy, University of Southern California Norris Cancer Hospital, Los Angeles, CA, 3Department of Medicine, Raritan Bay Medical Center, Perth Amboy, NJ, 4Department of Hematology and Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation, City of Hope, Duarte, CA, 5Jane Anne Nohl Division of Hematology and Center for the Study of Blood Diseases, University of Southern California Norris Comprehensive Cancer Center, Los Angeles, CA, USA Abstract: Adults with relapsed or refractory B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia have a dismal prognosis with a short median overall survival that can be measured in months. Because most patients will have chemotherapy-resistant disease, allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation remains the only potentially curative treatment. Despite advances in current management, patients continue to have poor outcomes and lack of durable responses. Thus, new therapies with alternative modes of actions are currently being investigated. Blinatumomab is a novel bispecific T-cell engager that simultaneously binds CD3-positive cytotoxic T-cells and CD19-positive B-cells, resulting in selective lysis of tumor cells. It has shown promising results in patients with relapsed or refractory acute lymphoblastic leukemia or those achieving hematologic response with persistent minimum residual disease. Future clinical trials will answer questions regarding its optimal place in the treatment paradigm. Dose-limiting toxicities include immunological toxicities and cytokine release syndrome. However, most patients tolerate the therapy relatively well. This review will focus on the pharmacology, clinical efficacy, and safety of blinatumomab in the treatment of adult B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia while highlighting its unique drug

  10. Proteomic analysis of nuclear matrix proteins during arsenic trioxide induced apoptosis in leukemia K562 cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Zi-hui; YU Ding; CHEN Yan; HAO Jian-zhong

    2005-01-01

    Background Arsenic trioxide (As2O3) has been identified as a very potent anti-acute leukemic agent. However its role in apoptosis needs to be elucidated. As2O3 interferes with the proliferation and survival of tumor cells via a variety of mechanisms. Drug-target interactions at the level of nuclear matrix (NM) may be critical events in the induction of cell death by As2O3. This study dealt with As2O3-target interactions at the level of NM in chronic myelogenous leukemia cell line K562 by proteomics. Methods K562 cells were cultured in MEM and treated with different concentrations of As2O3. The nuclear matrix proteins were analyzed by high-resolution two-dimensional gel electrophoresis and computer-assisted image analysis. Results As2O3 significantly inhibited the growth of chronic myelogenous leukemia cell line K562 at low concentrations. While more than 200 protein spots were shared among the nuclear matrices, about 18 distinct spots in the nuclear matrices were found characteristic for As2O3 treated cells. Conclusions: As2O3 induces apoptosis in K562 cells in a dose and time-dependent manner. Our results demonstrated that for the detection of the onset of apoptosis, the alteration in the composition of nuclear matrix proteins was a more sensitive indicator than nucleosomal DNA fragmentation test. These results indicated that As2O3 might be clinically useful in the treatment of chronic myelogenous leukemia. The changes of nuclear matrix proteins in the treated cells can be used as a useful indicator for this treatment.

  11. Analysis of Normal Hematopoietic Stem and Progenitor Cell Contents in Childhood Acute Leukemia Bone Marrow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balandrán, Juan Carlos; Vadillo, Eduardo; Dozal, David; Reyes-López, Alfonso; Sandoval-Cabrera, Antonio; Laffont-Ortiz, Merle Denisse; Prieto-Chávez, Jessica L; Vilchis-Ordoñez, Armando; Quintela-Nuñez Del Prado, Henry; Mayani, Héctor; Núñez-Enríquez, Juan Carlos; Mejía-Aranguré, Juan Manuel; López-Martínez, Briceida; Jiménez-Hernández, Elva; Pelayo, Rosana

    2016-11-01

    Childhood acute leukemias (AL) are characterized by the excessive production of malignant precursor cells at the expense of effective blood cell development. The dominance of leukemic cells over normal progenitors may result in either direct suppression of functional hematopoiesis or remodeling of microenvironmental niches, contributing to BM failure and AL-associated mortality. We undertook this study to investigate the contents and functional activity of hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells (HSPC) and their relationship to immune cell production and risk status in AL pediatric patients. Multiparametric flow cytometry of BM aspirates was performed to classify AL on the basis of lineage and differentiation stages and to analyze HSPC and immune cell frequencies. Controlled co-culture systems were conducted to evaluate functional lineage potentials of primitive cells. Statistical correlations and inter-group significant differences were established. Among 113 AL BM aspirates, 26.5% corresponded to ProB, 19.5% to PreB and 32% contain ProB and PreB differentiation stages, whereas nearly 9% of the cases were T- and 13% myeloid-lineage leukemias. We identified ProB-ALL as the subtype endowed with the highest relative contents of HSPC, whereas T-ALL and PreB-ALL showed a critically reduced size of both HSC and MLP compartments. Notably, lower cell frequencies of HSPC in ProB-ALL correlated to high-risk prognosis at disease debut. HSPC abundance at initial diagnosis may aid to predict the clinical course of ALL and to identify high-risk patients. A clearer understanding of their population dynamics and functional properties in the leukemia setting will potentially pave the way for targeted therapies. Copyright © 2016 IMSS. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Granulocyte Colony-stimulating Factor-primed Bone Marrow: An Excellent Stem-cell Source for Transplantation in Acute Myelocytic Leukemia and Chronic Myelocytic Leukemia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yuhang Li; Min Jiang; Chen Xu; Jianlin Chen; Botao Li; Jun Wang; Jiangwei Hu

    2015-01-01

    Background:Steady-state bone marrow (SS-BM) and granulocyte colony-stimulating growth factor-primed BM/peripheral blood stem-cell (G-BM/G-PBSC) are the main stem-cell sources used in allogeneic hematopoietic stem-cell transplantation.Here,we evaluated the treatment effects of SS-BM and G-BM/G-PBSC in human leucocyte antigen (HLA)-identical sibling transplantation.Methods:A total of 226 patients (acute myelogenous leukemia-complete remission 1,chronic myelogenous leukemia-chronic phase 1) received SS-BM,G-BM,or G-PBSC from an HLA-identical sibling.Clinical outcomes (graft-versus-host disease [GVHD],overall survival,transplant-related mortality [TRM],and leukemia-free survival [LFS]) were analyzed.Results:When compared to SS-BM,G-BM gave faster recovery time to neutrophil or platelet (P < 0.05).Incidence of grade Ⅲ-Ⅳ acute GVHD and extensive chronic GVHD (cGVHD) was lower than seen with SS-BM (P < 0.05) and similar to G-PBSC.Although the incidence of cGVHD in the G-BM group was similar to SS-BM,both were lower than G-PBSC (P < 0.05).G-BM and G-PBSC exhibited similar survival,LFS,and TRM,but were significantly different from SS-BM (P < 0.05).There were no significant differences in leukemia relapse rates among the groups (P > 0.05).Conclusions:G-CSF-primed bone marrow shared the advantages of G-PBSC and SS-BM.We conclude that G-BM is an excellent stem-cell source that may be preferable to G-PBSC or SS-BM in patients receiving HLA-identical sibling hematopoietic stem-cell transplantation.

  13. Potential antioxidant activity, cytotoxic and apoptosis-inducing effects of Chelidonium majus L. extract on leukemia cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nadova, Slavomira; Miadokova, Eva; Alfoldiova, Lubica; Kopaskova, Marcela; Hasplova, Katarina; Hudecova, Alexandra; Vaculcikova, Dagmar; Gregan, Fridrich; Cipak, Lubos

    2008-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess whether a methanol extract isolated from the greater celandine Chelidonium majus L. (CME) had antioxidant effect and was able to inhibit proliferation and to induce apoptosis in leukemia cells in vitro. The potential antioxidant activity of CME was proved by the 1,1-diphenyl- 2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) radical scavenging assay. The cytotoxicity of CME was measured by the cell growth inhibition assay using murine leukemia L1210 cell line and human promyelocytic HL-60 leukemia cells. Apoptosis-inducing effect was determined by fluorescence microscopy (chromatin condensation and nuclear DNA fragmentation). In the DPPH assay CME acted as a scavenger of DPPH free radical. The results on antiproliferative properties assessment clearly demonstrated that CME had a cytotoxic effect towards both leukemia cell lines in a dose-dependent manner. In addition, the human promyelocytic HL-60 cells were more sensitive to CME treatment than the L1210 cells. We concluded that the extract of C. majus L. had a strong antioxidant potential and exerted the antiproliferative activity via apoptosis on leukemia cells. CME due to the presence of the isoquinoline alkaloids and the flavonoid components may play an important role in both cancer chemoprevention through its antioxidant activity and modern cancer chemotherapy as cytotoxic and apoptosis-inducing agent.

  14. Overexpression of P-glycoprotein induces acquired resistance to imatinib in chronic myelogenous leukemia cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xing-Xiang Peng; Amit K. Tiwari; Hsiang-Chun Wu; Zhe-Sheng Chen

    2012-01-01

    Imatinib,a breakpoint cluster region (BCR)-Abelson murine leukemia (ABL) tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI),has revolutionized the treatment of chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML).However,development of multidrug resistance(MDR) limits the use of imatinib.In the present study,we aimed to investigate the mechanisms of cellular resistance to imatinib in CML.Therefore,we established an imatinib-resistant human CML cell line (K562-imatinib) through a stepwise selection process.While characterizing the phenotype of these cells,we found that K562-imatinib cells were 124.6-fold more resistant to imatinib than parental K562 cells.In addition,these cells were cross-resistant to second- and third-generation BCR-ABL TKIs.Western blot analysis and reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction(RT-PCR) demonstrated that P-glycoprotein (P-gp) and MDR1 mRNA levels were increased in K562-imatinib cells.In addition,accumulation of [14C]6-mercaptopurine (6-MP) was decreased,whereas the ATP-dependent efflux of [14C] 6-MP and [3H]methotrexate transport were increased in K562-imatinib cells.These data suggest that the overexpression of P-gp may play a crucial role in acquired resistance to imatinib in CML K562-imatinib cells.

  15. Growth response of acute myeloblastic leukemia cells to recombinant human thrombopoietin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsumura, I; Kanakura, Y; Kato, T; Ikeda, H; Ishikawa, J; Horikawa, Y; Hashimoto, K; Moriyama, Y; Tsujimura, T; Nishiura, T

    1995-07-15

    Thrombopoietin (TPO) is a newly identified hematopoietic growth factor that stimulates both megakaryopoiesis and thrombopoiesis through its interaction with a specific cell surface receptor encoded by the c-mpl proto-oncogene. In an effort to investigate the effect of TPO on human myeloid leukemia cells, the expression of c-mpl and the proliferative response to recombinant human (rh) TPO were investigated in a series of patients with acute myeloblastic leukemia (AML). Of 50 cases of AML, the c-mpl mRNA was detectable by means of Northern blot analysis in 26 cases, and the in vitro treatment with rhTPO led to proliferation of AML cells in 22 cases. The c-mpl expression and proliferative response to rhTPO was observed in all subtypes of AML and did not correlate with French-American-British classification, whereas all cases of M7-type AML cells expressed c-mpl and proliferated in response to rhTPO. Furthermore, rhTPO-induced proliferation of AML cells was augmented with the addition of interleukin-3 (IL-3), IL-6, stem cell factor, or granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor. These results suggested that c-mpl may be functional in terms of supporting proliferation of various types of AML cells and that TPO may contribute, at least in part, to abnormal growth of the cells, especially in combination with other hematopoietic growth factors.

  16. Risk factors for therapy-related myelodysplastic syndrome and acute myeloid leukemia treated with allogeneic stem cell transplantation.

    OpenAIRE

    2009-01-01

    International audience; BACKGROUND: After successful treatment of malignant diseases, therapy-related myelodysplastic syndrome and acute myeloid leukemia have emerged as significant problems. DESIGN AND METHODS: The aim of this study was to investigate outcome and risk factors in patients with therapy-related myelodysplastic syndrome or acute myeloid leukemia who underwent allogeneic stem cell transplantation. Between 1981 and 2006, 461 patients with therapy-related myelodysplastic syndrome o...

  17. [Complete autologous bone marrow recovery after allogeneic stem cell transplantation in a child with acute monoblastic leukemia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balwierz, Walentyna; Chełmecka-Hanusiewic, Liliana; Klekawka, Tomasz; Wójcik, Beata; Kowalczyk, Jerzy R; Ksiazek, Teofila

    2010-01-01

    We present a case of autologous bone marrow recovery after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) in a 7-year old girl who was treated due to acute myelocytic leukemia. First complete remission is lasting for 81 months after the allo-HSCT. Presented case constitutes an exceptional clinical situation and it indicates that diagnosis of leukemia relapse should be cautiously considered once the autologous bone marrow recovery is observed after allogeneic HSCT.

  18. Stathmin 1 is involved in the highly proliferative phenotype of high-risk myelodysplastic syndromes and acute leukemia cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machado-Neto, João Agostinho; de Melo Campos, Paula; Favaro, Patricia; Lazarini, Mariana; Lorand-Metze, Irene; Costa, Fernando Ferreira; Olalla Saad, Sara Teresinha; Traina, Fabiola

    2014-02-01

    Stathmin 1 is an important cytoplasmic microtubule-destabilizing protein that plays critical roles in proliferation and accurate chromosome segregation through regulation of microtubule dynamics. High levels of Stathmin 1 expression have been reported in leukemia and solid tumors. However, Stathmin 1 has not been studied in myelodysplastic syndrome cells. We, herein, report that significantly higher Stathmin 1 levels were observed in proliferating hematopoietic cells, in high-risk MDS and acute leukemia cells. In addition, Stathmin 1 silencing in U937 and Namalwa leukemia cells reduced cell proliferation and clonogenicity. Our data suggest that Stathmin 1 expression may be related to the highly proliferative phenotype of hematopoietic cells and add new insights into the participation of Stathmin 1 in hematological malignancies.

  19. PFR peptide, one of the antimicrobial peptides identified from the derivatives of lactoferrin, induces necrosis in leukemia cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Yan; Zhang, Teng-Fei; Shi, Yue; Zhou, Han-Wei; Chen, Qi; Wei, Bu-Yun; Wang, Xi; Yang, Tian-Xin; Chinn, Y Eugene; Kang, Jian; Fu, Cai-Yun

    2016-02-10

    LF11-322 (PFWRIRIRR-NH2) (PFR peptide), a nine amino acid-residue peptide fragment derived from human lactoferricin, possesses potent cytotoxicity against bacteria. We report here the discovery and characterization of its antitumor activity in leukemia cells. PFR peptide inhibited the proliferation of MEL and HL-60 leukemia cells by inducing cell death in the absence of the classical features of apoptosis, including chromatin condensation, Annexin V staining, Caspase activation and increase of abundance of pro-apoptotic proteins. Instead, necrotic cell death as evidenced by increasing intracellular PI staining and LDH release, inducing membrane disruption and up-regulating intracellular calcium level, was observed following PFR peptide treatment. In addition to necrotic cell death, PFR peptide also induced G0/G1 cell cycle arrest. Moreover, PFR peptide exhibited favorable antitumor activity and tolerability in vivo. These findings thus provide a new clue of antimicrobial peptides as a potential novel therapy for leukemia.

  20. The Construction and Identification of Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells Derived from Acute Myelogenous Leukemia Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liang-Fang Zhu

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The present study aimed to establish an induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC line from acute myelogenous leukemia (AML cells in vitro and identify their biological characteristics. Methods: Cells from the AML-infiltrated skin from an M6 patient were infected with a lentivirus carrying OCT4, SOX2, KLF4 and C-MYC to induce iPSCs. The characteristics of the iPSCs were confirmed by alkaline phosphatase (ALP staining. The proliferation ability of iPSCs was detected with a CCK-8 assay. The expression of pluripotency markers was measured by immunostaining, and the expression of stem cell-related genes was detected by qRT-PCR; distortion during the induction process was detected by karyotype analysis; the differentiation potential of iPSCs was determined by embryoid body-formation and teratoma-formation assays. ALP staining confirmed that these cells exhibited positive staining and had the characteristics of iPSCs. Results: The CCK-8 assay showed that the iPSCs had the ability to proliferate. Immunostaining demonstrated that iPSC clones showed positive expression of NANOG, SSEA-3, SSEA-4, TRA-1-60 and TRA-1-81. qRT-PCR results revealed that the mRNA expression of Nanog, Lin28, Cripto, FOX3, DNMT3b, DPPA2, and DPPA4 significantly increased in iPSCs. Karyotype analysis found no chromosome aberration in the iPSCs. The results of the embryoid body-formation and teratoma-formation assays indicated that the iPSCs had the potential to differentiate into all three germ layers. Conclusion: Our study provided evidence that an iPSC line derived from AML cells was successfully established.

  1. Cardiac Relapse of Acute Myeloid Leukemia after Allogeneic Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez-Quintana, Ana; Quijada-Fumero, Alejandro; Laynez-Carnicero, Ana; Breña-Atienza, Joaquín; Poncela-Mireles, Francisco J.; Llanos-Gómez, Juan M.; Cabello-Rodríguez, Ana I.; Ramos-López, María

    2016-01-01

    Secondary or metastatic cardiac tumors are much more common than primary benign or malignant cardiac tumors. Any tumor can cause myocardial or pericardial metastasis, although isolated or combined tumor invasion of the pericardium is more common. Types of neoplasia with the highest rates of cardiac or pericardial involvement are melanoma, lung cancer, and breast and mediastinal carcinomas. Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is the most common type of acute leukemia in adults. Initial treatment involves chemotherapy followed by consolidation treatment to reduce the risk of relapse. In high-risk patients, the treatment of choice for consolidation is hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). Relapse of AML is the most common cause of HSCT failure. Extramedullary relapse is rare. The organs most frequently affected, called “sanctuaries,” are the testes, ovaries, and central nervous system. We present a case with extramedullary relapse in the form of a solid cardiac mass. PMID:27642531

  2. Computer Simulation of Convective Plasma Cells

    CERN Document Server

    Carboni, Rodrigo

    2015-01-01

    Computer simulations of plasmas are relevant nowadays, because it helps us understand physical processes taking place in the sun and other stellar objects. We developed a program called PCell which is intended for displaying the evolution of the magnetic field in a 2D convective plasma cell with perfect conducting walls for different stationary plasma velocity fields. Applications of this program are presented. This software works interactively with the mouse and the users can create their own movies in MPEG format. The programs were written in Fortran and C. There are two versions of the program (GNUPLOT and OpenGL). GNUPLOT and OpenGL are used to display the simulation.

  3. [BMMSC from blastic phase CML down-regulate leukemia cell apoptosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ying; Han, Yu-Xiang; Niu, Zhi-Yun; Wang, Xing-Zhe; Hua, Huan; Shang, Yin-Tao; Wang, Fu-Xu; Zhang, Xue-Jun; Luo, Jian-Min

    2014-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (BMMSC) from patients with chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) in blastic phase (Bp) on K562 cells and the primary CML-Bp cells, and to explore its potential mechanisms. K562 cells and primary CML-Bp cells were co-cultured with BMMSC of different groups; the cell proliferation was detected by MTT method, the cell apoptosis rate and mitochondrial membrane potential were measured by flow cytometry, the expression levels of Caspase-8, Caspase-9, and activated Caspase-3 in cells were measured by Western blot. The results showed that the CML-Bp BMMSC could enhance the survival rate of K562 cells treated with adviamycin (ADM) and display protective effect on K562 cells and primary CML-Bp mononuctear cells, inhibited ADM-induced leukimia cell apoptosis (P < 0.05); as compared with CML-chronic phase (CML-Cp) BMMSC and normal BMMSC, the CML-Bp BMMSC showed the highest protective effect on leukemic cells, the mitochondrial membrane potential of co-cultured cells slightly droped (P < 0.05). In the CML-Bp BMMSC cultured with K562 cells, the expression level of caspase-3 was more down-regulated than that in K562 alone plus ADM group, while the expression of caspase-9 significantly increased (P < 0.05). It is concluded that the CML-Bp BMMSC down-regulates ADM-induced leukemia cell appoptosis, its mechanism may relate with the inhibition of mitochondrial membrane potential drop, the stabilization of unactive expression of caspase-9 and down-regulation of caspase-3 expression.

  4. Advance in hematopoietic stem cells transplantation for leukemia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HUANG Xiao-jun

    2008-01-01

    @@ During the past 50 years, intensive studies into the characteristics of hematopoietic stem cell transplantation immunology and the emergence of new immunosuppressant and anti-infective drugs have significantly improved the clinical result of hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT).

  5. Treating Chronic Myeloid Leukemia by Phase

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Myeloid Leukemia (CML) Treating Chronic Myeloid Leukemia Treating Chronic Myeloid Leukemia by Phase Treatment options for people ... a stem cell donor with matching tissue type. Chronic phase The standard treatment for chronic phase CML ...

  6. The Sequence of Cyclophosphamide and Myeloablative Total Body Irradiation in Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation for Patients with Acute Leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holter-Chakrabarty, Jennifer L; Pierson, Namali; Zhang, Mei-Jie; Zhu, Xiaochun; Akpek, Görgün; Aljurf, Mahmoud D; Artz, Andrew S; Baron, Frédéric; Bredeson, Christopher N; Dvorak, Christopher C; Epstein, Robert B; Lazarus, Hillard M; Olsson, Richard F; Selby, George B; Williams, Kirsten M; Cooke, Kenneth R; Pasquini, Marcelo C; McCarthy, Philip L

    2015-07-01

    Limited clinical data are available to assess whether the sequencing of cyclophosphamide (Cy) and total body irradiation (TBI) changes outcomes. We evaluated the sequence in 1769 (CyTBI, n = 948; TBICy, n = 821) recipients of related or unrelated hematopoietic cell transplantation who received TBI (1200 to 1500 cGY) for acute leukemia from 2003 to 2010. The 2 cohorts were comparable for median age, performance score, type of leukemia, first complete remission, Philadelphia chromosome-positive acute lymphoblastic leukemia, HLA-matched siblings, stem cell source, antithymocyte globulin use, TBI dose, and type of graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) prophylaxis. The sequence of TBI did not significantly affect transplantation-related mortality (24% versus 23% at 3 years, P = .67; relative risk, 1.01; P = .91), leukemia relapse (27% versus 29% at 3 years, P = .34; relative risk, .89, P = .18), leukemia-free survival (49% versus 48% at 3 years, P = .27; relative risk, .93; P = .29), chronic GVHD (45% versus 47% at 1 year, P = .39; relative risk, .9; P = .11), or overall survival (53% versus 52% at 3 years, P = .62; relative risk, .96; P = .57) for CyTBI and TBICy, respectively. Corresponding cumulative incidences of sinusoidal obstruction syndrome were 4% and 6% at 100 days (P = .08), respectively. This study demonstrates that the sequence of Cy and TBI does not impact transplantation outcomes and complications in patients with acute leukemia undergoing hematopoietic cell transplantation with myeloablative conditioning.

  7. Lapatinib induces autophagy, apoptosis and megakaryocytic differentiation in chronic myelogenous leukemia K562 cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huey-Lan Huang

    Full Text Available Lapatinib is an oral, small-molecule, dual tyrosine kinase inhibitor of epidermal growth factor receptors (EGFR, or ErbB/Her in solid tumors. Little is known about the effect of lapatinib on leukemia. Using human chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML K562 cells as an experimental model, we found that lapatinib simultaneously induced morphological changes resembling apoptosis, autophagy, and megakaryocytic differentiation. Lapatinib-induced apoptosis was accompanied by a decrease in mitochondrial transmembrane potential and was attenuated by the pancaspase inhibitor z-VAD-fmk, indicating a mitochondria-mediated and caspase-dependent pathway. Lapatinib-induced autophagic cell death was verified by LC3-II conversion, and upregulation of Beclin-1. Further, autophagy inhibitor 3-methyladenine as well as autophagy-related proteins Beclin-1 (ATG6, ATG7, and ATG5 shRNA knockdown rescued the cells from lapatinib-induced growth inhibition. A moderate number of lapatinib-treated K562 cells exhibited features of megakaryocytic differentiation. In summary, lapatinib inhibited viability and induced multiple cellular events including apoptosis, autophagic cell death, and megakaryocytic differentiation in human CML K562 cells. This distinct activity of lapatinib against CML cells suggests potential for lapatinib as a therapeutic agent for treatment of CML. Further validation of lapatinib activity in vivo is warranted.

  8. Analysis of Gene Expression in the K562-n High Tumorigenitic Human Leukemia Cell Line

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shuqing Lü; Xiaoping Xu; Fang Xia; JianMin Wang

    2005-01-01

    OBJECTIVE The human leukemia K562-n cell line displays much higher tumorigenic actively in nude mice compared with its parental K562 cell line. The molecular mechanism of the differences in tumorigenicity between K562-n and K562 in nude mice was examined.METHODS The differences in gene expression between K562 and K562-n cells were analyzed by using cDNA microarrays.RESULTS Among the12,800 genes examined, there was a significant difference in expression of 139 genes between K562-n and K562 cells.Eighty-five of these genes have been registered in the GeneBank and 54are unknown. The genes accessible from the GeneBank include:1)oncogenes and tumor-supressor genes; 2) genes related to transcription regulation, the cell cycle and apoptosis; 3) genes related to the cytoskeleton and cytokinetics; 4) genes related to metabolism and transport; 5) genes related to immune function. There were also some differently expressed genes with mixed functions.CONCLUSION There are many genes differentially expressed between K562-n and K562 cells .The high tumorigenicity of the human leukemia K562-n cell line in nude mice might be related to its specific geneexpression profile.

  9. Barriers to Infection of Human Cells by Feline Leukemia Virus: Insights into Resistance to Zoonosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terry, Anne; Kilbey, Anna; Naseer, Asif; Levy, Laura S.; Ahmad, Shamim; Watts, Ciorsdaidh; Mackay, Nancy; Cameron, Ewan; Wilson, Sam

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The human genome displays a rich fossil record of past gammaretrovirus infections, yet no current epidemic is evident, despite environmental exposure to viruses that infect human cells in vitro. Feline leukemia viruses (FeLVs) rank high on this list, but neither domestic nor workplace exposure has been associated with detectable serological responses. Nonspecific inactivation of gammaretroviruses by serum factors appears insufficient to explain these observations. To investigate further, we explored the susceptibilities of primary and established human cell lines to FeLV-B, the most likely zoonotic variant. Fully permissive infection was common in cancer-derived cell lines but was also a feature of nontransformed keratinocytes and lung fibroblasts. Cells of hematopoietic origin were generally less permissive and formed discrete groups on the basis of high or low intracellular protein expression and virion release. Potent repression was observed in primary human blood mononuclear cells and a subset of leukemia cell lines. However, the early steps of reverse transcription and integration appear to be unimpaired in nonpermissive cells. FeLV-B was subject to G→A hypermutation with a predominant APOBEC3G signature in partially permissive cells but was not mutated in permissive cells or in nonpermissive cells that block secondary viral spread. Distinct cellular barriers that protect primary human blood cells are likely to be important in protection against zoonotic infection with FeLV. IMPORTANCE Domestic exposure to gammaretroviruses such as feline leukemia viruses (FeLVs) occurs worldwide, but the basis of human resistance to infection remains incompletely understood. The potential threat is evident from the human genome sequence, which reveals many past epidemics of gammaretrovirus infection, and from recent cross-species jumps of gammaretroviruses from rodents to primates and marsupials. This study examined resistance to infection at the cellular level

  10. Barriers to Infection of Human Cells by Feline Leukemia Virus: Insights into Resistance to Zoonosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terry, Anne; Kilbey, Anna; Naseer, Asif; Levy, Laura S; Ahmad, Shamim; Watts, Ciorsdaidh; Mackay, Nancy; Cameron, Ewan; Wilson, Sam; Neil, James C

    2017-03-01

    The human genome displays a rich fossil record of past gammaretrovirus infections, yet no current epidemic is evident, despite environmental exposure to viruses that infect human cells in vitro Feline leukemia viruses (FeLVs) rank high on this list, but neither domestic nor workplace exposure has been associated with detectable serological responses. Nonspecific inactivation of gammaretroviruses by serum factors appears insufficient to explain these observations. To investigate further, we explored the susceptibilities of primary and established human cell lines to FeLV-B, the most likely zoonotic variant. Fully permissive infection was common in cancer-derived cell lines but was also a feature of nontransformed keratinocytes and lung fibroblasts. Cells of hematopoietic origin were generally less permissive and formed discrete groups on the basis of high or low intracellular protein expression and virion release. Potent repression was observed in primary human blood mononuclear cells and a subset of leukemia cell lines. However, the early steps of reverse transcription and integration appear to be unimpaired in nonpermissive cells. FeLV-B was subject to G→A hypermutation with a predominant APOBEC3G signature in partially permissive cells but was not mutated in permissive cells or in nonpermissive cells that block secondary viral spread. Distinct cellular barriers that protect primary human blood cells are likely to be important in protection against zoonotic infection with FeLV.IMPORTANCE Domestic exposure to gammaretroviruses such as feline leukemia viruses (FeLVs) occurs worldwide, but the basis of human resistance to infection remains incompletely understood. The potential threat is evident from the human genome sequence, which reveals many past epidemics of gammaretrovirus infection, and from recent cross-species jumps of gammaretroviruses from rodents to primates and marsupials. This study examined resistance to infection at the cellular level with the most

  11. Cancer procoagulant and tissue factor are differently modulated by all-trans-retinoic acid in acute promyelocytic leukemia cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falanga, A; Consonni, R; Marchetti, M; Locatelli, G; Garattini, E; Passerini, C G; Gordon, S G; Barbui, T

    1998-07-01

    All-trans-retinoic acid (ATRA) downregulates the expression of two cellular procoagulants, tissue factor (TF) and cancer procoagulant (CP), in human promyelocytic leukemia cells. To evaluate whether or not changes of the procoagulant activities (PCAs) may share mechanisms with the ATRA-induced cyto-differentiation process, we have characterized the effect of ATRA on the TF and CP expression by NB4 cells, an ATRA maturation-inducible cell line, and two NB4-derived cell lines resistant to ATRA-induced maturation, the NB4. 306 and NB4.007/6 cells. Next, we evaluated the effect on the PCAs of the NB4 parental cells of three synthetic retinoid analogues, ie: AM580 (selective for the retinoic acid receptor [RAR] alpha), capable to induce the granulocytic differentiation of NB4 cells; and CD2019 (selective for RARbeta) and CD437 (selective for RARgamma), both lacking this capability. Cells were treated with either ATRA or the analogues (10(-6) to 10(-8) mol/L) for 96 hours. The effect on cell differentiation was evaluated by morphologic changes, cell proliferation, nitro blue tetrazolium reduction assay, and flow cytometry analysis of the CD33 and CD11b surface-antigen expression. PCA was first measured in 20 mmol/L Veronal Buffer cell extracts by the one-stage clotting assay of normal and FVII-deficient plasmas. Further TF and CP have been characterized and quantified in cell-sample preparations by chromogenic and immunological assays. In the first series of experiments, ATRA downregulates both TF and CP in NB4 parental cells, as expected. However, in the differentiation-resistant cell lines, it induced a significant loss of TF but had little or no effect on CP. In a second series of experiments, in the NB4 parental cells, the RARalpha agonist (AM580) induced cell maturation and reduced 91% CP expression, whereas CD437 and CD2019 had no cyto-differentiating effects and did not affect CP levels. On the other hand, in the same cells the TF expression was reduced by ATRA

  12. Lenalidomide With or Without Rituximab in Treating Patients With Progressive or Relapsed Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia, Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma, Prolymphocytic Leukemia, or Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma Previously Treated With Donor Stem Cell Transplant

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-07-24

    Adult Nasal Type Extranodal NK/T-cell Lymphoma; Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Angioimmunoblastic T-cell Lymphoma; Cutaneous B-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Hepatosplenic T-cell Lymphoma; Intraocular Lymphoma; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Noncutaneous Extranodal Lymphoma; Peripheral T-cell Lymphoma; Prolymphocytic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Recurrent Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Recurrent Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Refractory Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Refractory Hairy Cell Leukemia; Small Intestine Lymphoma; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; T-cell Large Granular Lymphocyte Leukemia; Testicular Lymphoma; Waldenström Macroglobulinemia

  13. Leukemia-specific T-cell reactivity induced by leukemic dendritic cells is augmented by 4-1BB targeting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houtenbos, Ilse; Westers, Theresia M; Dijkhuis, Annemiek; de Gruijl, Tanja D; Ossenkoppele, Gert J; van de Loosdrecht, Arjan A

    2007-01-01

    Acute myelogenous leukemia (AML) blasts are able to differentiate into leukemia-derived dendritic cells (AML-DC), thereby enabling efficient presentation of known and unknown leukemic antigens. Advances in culture techniques and AML-DC characterization justify clinical application. However, additional measures are likely needed to potentiate vaccines and overcome the intrinsic tolerant state of the patients' immune system. Engagement of the costimulatory molecule 4-1BB can break immunologic tolerance and increase CTL responses. In this study, we examined the role of the 4-1BB ligand (4-1BBL) on T-cell responses induced by AML-DC. In allogeneic and autologous cocultures of T cells and AML-DC, the effect of the addition of 4-1BBL on T-cell proliferation, T-cell subpopulations, and T-cell function was determined. Addition of 4-1BBL to cocultures of AML-DC and T cells induced a preferential increase in the proliferation of CD8(+) T cells. Increased differentiation into effector and central memory populations was observed in both CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells in the presence of 4-1BBL. AML-DC induce a T helper 1 response, characterized by high IFN-gamma production, which is significantly increased by targeting 4-1BB. T cells primed in the presence of 4-1BBL show specificity for the leukemia-associated antigen Wilms' tumor 1, whereas cytotoxicity assays with leukemic blast targets showed the cytolytic potential of T cells primed in the presence of 4-1BBL. We conclude that 4-1BBL is an effective adjuvant to enhance T-cell responses elicited by AML-DC.

  14. CELLULAR AND MOLECULAR BASIS OF HAPLOIDENTICAL HEMATOPOIETIC STEM CELL TRANSPLANTATION IN THE SUCCESSFUL TREATMENT OF HIGH RISK LEUKEMIAS.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    FRANCO eLOCATELLI

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Natural Killer (NK cells are involved in innate immune responses and play a major role in tumor surveillance and in defence against viruses. Human NK cells recognize HLA-class I molecules via surface receptors (KIR and NKG2A delivering signals that inhibit NK cell function and kill HLA-class I-deficient target cells, a frequent event in tumors or virus-infected cells. NK cell triggering is mediated by activating receptors that recognize ligands expressed primarily on tumors or virus-infected cells. NK cells play also a key role in the cure of high-risk leukemias. Thus, donor-derived alloreactive NK cells are fundamental effectors in adult acute myeloid leukemia (AML and in pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL patients undergoing haploidentical hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT. Alloreactive NK cells mediate killing of leukemia cells and patient’s DC, thus preventing respectively leukemic relapses and graft-versus-host responses. FACS analysis of KIRs expressed by NK cells allows to define the size of the alloreactive NK subset and the selection of the best potential donor. Recently, it has been shown that also the expression of activating KIRs, in particular the (C2-specific KIR2DS1, may contribute to donor NK alloreactivity. It has also been established a correlation between the size of the alloreactive NK cell population and the clinical outcome. Notably, the alloreactive NK cells derived from donor’s HSC are generated and persist in patients over time. The high survival rates of patients undergoing haploidentical HSCT highlight an important new reality in the setting of allograft performed to cure otherwise fatal leukemias. Novel approaches are in progress to further improve the clinical outcome based on the infusion of donor alloreactive NK cells either as a component of the transplanted cell population or as in vitro expanded NK cells.

  15. Inhibiting effect of CaMK Ⅱ N up-regulation on leukemia cells growth and its mechanism

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    侯军

    2014-01-01

    Objective To investigate the inhibitory effects of CaMKⅡN on acute myeloid leukemia cell line HL-60to explore a novel therapeutic target of leukemia.Methods Human CaMKⅡN gene expression vector pcDNA3.1/hCaMKⅡN or empty vector pcDNA3.1/myc-His(-)B was transfected into HL-60 cells by Lipofectamine2000.Human CaMKⅡN proteins of transfected cells were detected by Westem blot.Cell proliferation affected by human CaMKⅡN was determined by MTT.Colonyforming assay was performed by soft agar

  16. In Vivo Expansion of Co-Transplanted T Cells Impacts on Tumor Re-Initiating Activity of Human Acute Myeloid Leukemia in NSG Mice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M. von Bonin (Malte); M. Wermke (Martin); K.N. Cosgun (Kadriye Nehir); C. Thiede; M. Bornhäuser (Martin); G. Wagemaker (Gerard); C. Waskow (Claudia)

    2013-01-01

    textabstractHuman cells from acute myeloid leukemia (AML) patients are frequently transplanted into immune-compromised mouse strains to provide an in vivo environment for studies on the biology of the disease. Since frequencies of leukemia re-initiating cells are low and a unique cell surface

  17. Generation and preclinical characterization of an NKp80-Fc fusion protein for redirected cytolysis of natural killer (NK) cells against leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Gang; Zheng, Xiaodong; Zhou, Jing; Wei, Haiming; Tian, Zhigang; Sun, Rui

    2015-09-11

    The capacity of natural killer (NK) cells to mediate Fc receptor-dependent effector functions, such as antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC), largely contributes to their clinical application. Given that activation-induced C-type lectin (AICL), an identified ligand for the NK-activating receptor NKp80, is frequently highly expressed on leukemia cells, the lack of therapeutic AICL-specific antibodies limits clinical application. Here we explore a strategy to reinforce NK anti-leukemia reactivity by combining targeting AICL-expressing leukemia cells with the induction of NK cell ADCC using NKp80-Fc fusion proteins. The NKp80-Fc fusion protein we generated bound specifically to leukemia cells in an AICL-specific manner. Cell binding assays between NK and leukemia cells showed that NKp80-Fc significantly increased NK target cell conjugation. In functional analyses, treatment with NKp80-Fc clearly induced the ADCC effect of NK cells. NKp80-Fc not only promoted NK-mediated leukemia cell apoptosis in the early stage of cell conjugation but also enhanced NK cell degranulation and cytotoxicity activity in the late stage. The bifunctional NKp80-Fc could redirect NK cells toward leukemia cells and triggered NK cell killing in vitro. Moreover, NKp80-Fc enhanced the lysis of NK cells against tumors in leukemia xenograft non-obese diabetic/severe combined immunodeficiency mice. Taken together, our results demonstrate that NKp80-Fc potently amplifies NK cell anti-leukemia effects in vitro and in vivo through induction of the NK cell ADCC effect. This method could potentially be useful for molecular targeted therapy, and the fusion proteins may be a promising drug for immunotherapy of leukemia. © 2015 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  18. Deletions of the long arm of chromosome 5 define subgroups of T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    La Starza, Roberta; Barba, Gianluca; Demeyer, Sofie; Pierini, Valentina; Di Giacomo, Danika; Gianfelici, Valentina; Schwab, Claire; Matteucci, Caterina; Vicente, Carmen; Cools, Jan; Messina, Monica; Crescenzi, Barbara; Chiaretti, Sabina; Foà, Robin; Basso, Giuseppe; Harrison, Christine J; Mecucci, Cristina

    2016-08-01

    Recurrent deletions of the long arm of chromosome 5 were detected in 23/200 cases of T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Genomic studies identified two types of deletions: interstitial and terminal. Interstitial 5q deletions, found in five cases, were present in both adults and children with a female predominance (chi-square, P=0.012). Interestingly, these cases resembled immature/early T-cell precursor acute lymphoblastic leukemia showing significant down-regulation of five out of the ten top differentially expressed genes in this leukemia group, including TCF7 which maps within the 5q31 common deleted region. Mutations of genes known to be associated with immature/early T-cell precursor acute lymphoblastic leukemia, i.e. WT1, ETV6, JAK1, JAK3, and RUNX1, were present, while CDKN2A/B deletions/mutations were never detected. All patients had relapsed/resistant disease and blasts showed an early differentiation arrest with expression of myeloid markers. Terminal 5q deletions, found in 18 of patients, were more prevalent in adults (chi-square, P=0.010) and defined a subgroup of HOXA-positive T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia characterized by 130 up- and 197 down-regulated genes. Down-regulated genes included TRIM41, ZFP62, MAPK9, MGAT1, and CNOT6, all mapping within the 1.4 Mb common deleted region at 5q35.3. Of interest, besides CNOT6 down-regulation, these cases also showed low BTG1 expression and a high incidence of CNOT3 mutations, suggesting that the CCR4-NOT complex plays a crucial role in the pathogenesis of HOXA-positive T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia with terminal 5q deletions. In conclusion, interstitial and terminal 5q deletions are recurrent genomic losses identifying distinct subtypes of T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Copyright© Ferrata Storti Foundation.

  19. Specific induction of anti-leukemia effects by umbilical cord cell-derived CD8~+ T cytotoxic lymphocytes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘芯

    2006-01-01

    Objective To explore the specific anti-leukemia immune response of CD8+ cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) derived from cord blood (CB) ex vivo and evaluate the feasibilities and values of the CTL for specific immunotherapy. Methods Dendritic cells (DC) were induced from mononuclear cells (MNC) by combination cytokines in 10 CB samples. Loading U937 cell lysate antigen on

  20. Approaches for cytogenetic and molecular analyses of small flow-sorted cell populations from childhood leukemia bone marrow samples

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Obro, Nina Friesgaard; Madsen, Hans O.; Ryder, Lars Peter;

    2011-01-01

    defined cell populations with subsequent analyses of leukemia-associated cytogenetic and molecular marker. The approaches described here optimize the use of the same tube of unfixed, antibody-stained BM cells for flow-sorting of small cell populations and subsequent exploratory FISH and PCR-based analyses....

  1. mTOR inhibition by everolimus in childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia induces caspase-independent cell death.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rana Baraz

    Full Text Available Increasingly, anti-cancer medications are being reported to induce cell death mechanisms other than apoptosis. Activating alternate death mechanisms introduces the potential to kill cells that have defects in their apoptotic machinery, as is commonly observed in cancer cells, including in hematological malignancies. We, and others, have previously reported that the mTOR inhibitor everolimus has pre-clinical efficacy and induces caspase-independent cell death in acute lymphoblastic leukemia cells. Furthermore, everolimus is currently in clinical trial for acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Here we characterize the death mechanism activated by everolimus in acute lymphoblastic leukemia cells. We find that cell death is caspase-independent and lacks the morphology associated with apoptosis. Although mitochondrial depolarization is an early event, permeabilization of the outer mitochondrial membrane only occurs after cell death has occurred. While morphological and biochemical evidence shows that autophagy is clearly present it is not responsible for the observed cell death. There are a number of features consistent with paraptosis including morphology, caspase-independence, and the requirement for new protein synthesis. However in contrast to some reports of paraptosis, the activation of JNK signaling was not required for everolimus-induced cell death. Overall in acute lymphoblastic leukemia cells everolimus induces a cell death that resembles paraptosis.

  2. Molecular analysis of the apoptotic effects of BPA in acute myeloid leukemia cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Del Pozzo Giovanna

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background: BPA (bisphenol A or 2,2-bis(4-hydroxy-phenolpropane is present in the manufacture of polycarbonate plastic and epoxy resins, which can be used in impact-resistant safety equipment and baby bottles, as protective coatings inside metal food containers, and as composites and sealants in dentistry. Recently, attention has focused on the estrogen-like and carcinogenic adverse effects of BPA. Thus, it is necessary to investigate the cytotoxicity and apoptosis-inducing activity of this compound. Methods: Cell cycle, apoptosis and differentiation analyses; western blots. Results: BPA is able to induce cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in three different acute myeloid leukemias. Although some granulocytic differentiation concomitantly occurred in NB4 cells upon BPA treatment, the major action was the induction of apoptosis. BPA mediated apoptosis was caspase dependent and occurred by activation of extrinsic and intrinsic cell death pathways modulating both FAS and TRAIL and by inducing BAD phosphorylation in NB4 cells. Finally, also non genomic actions such as the early decrease of both ERK and AKT phosphorylation were induced by BPA thus indicating that a complex intersection of regulations occur for the apoptotic action of BPA. Conclusion: BPA is able to induce apoptosis in leukemia cells via caspase activation and involvement of both intrinsic and extrinsic pathways of apoptosis.

  3. Notch signalling drives bone marrow stromal cell-mediated chemoresistance in acute myeloid leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takam Kamga, Paul; Bassi, Giulio; Cassaro, Adriana; Midolo, Martina; Di Trapani, Mariano; Gatti, Alessandro; Carusone, Roberta; Resci, Federica; Perbellini, Omar; Gottardi, Michele; Bonifacio, Massimiliano; Nwabo Kamdje, Armel Hervé; Ambrosetti, Achille; Krampera, Mauro

    2016-04-19

    Both preclinical and clinical investigations suggest that Notch signalling is critical for the development of many cancers and for their response to chemotherapy. We previously showed that Notch inhibition abrogates stromal-induced chemoresistance in lymphoid neoplasms. However, the role of Notch in acute myeloid leukemia (AML) and its contribution to the crosstalk between leukemia cells and bone marrow stromal cells remain controversial. Thus, we evaluated the role of the Notch pathway in the proliferation, survival and chemoresistance of AML cells in co-culture with bone marrow mesenchymal stromal cells expanded from both healthy donors (hBM-MSCs) and AML patients (hBM-MSCs*). As compared to hBM-MSCs, hBM-MSCs* showed higher level of Notch1, Jagged1 as well as the main Notch target gene HES1. Notably, hBM-MSCs* induced expression and activation of Notch signalling in AML cells, supporting AML proliferation and being more efficientin inducing AML chemoresistance than hBM-MSCs*. Pharmacological inhibition of Notch using combinations of Notch receptor-blocking antibodies or gamma-secretase inhibitors (GSIs), in presence of chemotherapeutic agents, significant lowered the supportive effect of hBM-MSCs and hBM-MSCs* towards AML cells, by activating apoptotic cascade and reducing protein level of STAT3, AKT and NF-κB.These results suggest that Notch signalling inhibition, by overcoming the stromal-mediated promotion of chemoresistance,may represent a potential therapeutic targetnot only for lymphoid neoplasms, but also for AML.

  4. Pathogenetic, Clinical, and Prognostic Features of Adult t(4;11)(q21;q23)/MLL-AF4 Positive B-Cell Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    OpenAIRE

    Marchesi, F.; Girardi, K.; Avvisati, G.

    2011-01-01

    Translocation t(4;11)(q21;q23) leading to formation of MLL-AF4 fusion gene is found in about 10% of newly diagnosed B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) in adult patients. Patients expressing this chromosomal aberration present typical biological, immunophenotypic, and clinical features. This form of leukemia is universally recognized as high-risk leukemia and treatment intensification with allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) in first complete remission (CR) could b...

  5. Myelodysplastic Syndrome with Myelofibrosis Transformed to a Precursor B-Cell Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia: A Case Report with Review of the Literature

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    Myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) comprise a group of heterogeneous clonal hematopoietic cell disorders characterized by cytopenias, bone marrow hypercellularity, and increased risk of transformation to acute leukemias. MDS usually transformed to acute myeloid leukemia, and transformation to acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is rare. Herein, we report a unique patient who presented with MDS with myelofibrosis. Two months after the initial diagnosis, she progressed to a precursor B-cell acute l...

  6. Plasma Cell Dyscrasia; LCDD vs Immunotactoid glomerulopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jabur Wael

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Light chain deposit disease is a plasma cell disorder characterized by production of a large amount of monoclonal immunoglobulin light chain or part of it, which is usually deposited as an amorphous substance in the kidneys. Immunotactoid glomerulopathy is an uncommon disease, which might be related to plasma cell dyscrasia, and characteristically manifest as organized glomerular ultra structural fibrils or microtubules. In this article, we report a case of a combined presentation of light chain disease and immunotactoid glomerulopathy in a patient with multiple myeloma and reversible advanced renal failure.

  7. Integrated Cellular and Plasma Proteomics of Contrasting B-cell Cancers Reveals Common, Unique and Systemic Signatures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnston, Harvey E; Carter, Matthew J; Cox, Kerry L; Dunscombe, Melanie; Manousopoulou, Antigoni; Townsend, Paul A; Garbis, Spiros D; Cragg, Mark S

    2017-03-01

    Approximately 800,000 leukemia and lymphoma cases are diagnosed worldwide each year. Burkitt's lymphoma (BL) and chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) are examples of contrasting B-cell cancers; BL is a highly aggressive lymphoid tumor, frequently affecting children, whereas CLL typically presents as an indolent, slow-progressing leukemia affecting the elderly. The B-cell-specific overexpression of the myc and TCL1 oncogenes in mice induce spontaneous malignancies modeling BL and CLL, respectively. Quantitative mass spectrometry proteomics and isobaric labeling were employed to examine the biology underpinning contrasting Eμ-myc and Eμ-TCL1 B-cell tumors. Additionally, the plasma proteome was evaluated using subproteome enrichment to interrogate biomarker emergence and the systemic effects of tumor burden. Over 10,000 proteins were identified (qIL5) receptor. IL5 treatment promoted Eμ-TCL1 tumor proliferation, suggesting an amplification of IL5-induced AKT signaling by TCL1. Tumor plasma contained a substantial tumor lysis signature, most prominent in Eμ-myc plasma, whereas Eμ-TCL1 plasma contained signatures of immune-response, inflammation and microenvironment interactions, with putative biomarkers in early-stage cancer. These findings provide a detailed characterization of contrasting B-cell tumor models, identifying common and specific tumor mechanisms. Integrated plasma proteomics allowed the dissection of a systemic response and a tumor lysis signature present in early- and late-stage cancers, respectively. Overall, this study suggests common B-cell cancer signatures exist and illustrates the potential of the further evaluation of B-cell cancer subtypes by integrative proteomics.

  8. Allogeneic stem cell transplantation for advanced acute promyelocytic leukemia in the ATRA and ATO era.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramadan, Safaa M; Di Veroli, Ambra; Camboni, Agnese; Breccia, Massimo; Iori, Anna Paola; Aversa, Franco; Cupelli, Luca; Papayannidis, Cristina; Bacigalupo, Andrea; Arcese, William; Lo-Coco, Francesco

    2012-11-01

    The role of allogeneic stem cell transplant in advanced acute promyelocytic leukemia patients who received standard first- and second-line therapy is still unknown. We report the outcome of 31 acute promyelocytic leukemia patients (median age 39 years) who underwent allogeneic transplant in second remission (n=15) or beyond (n=16). Sixteen patients were real-time polymerase chain reaction positive and 15 negative for PML/RARA pre-transplant. The 4-year overall survival was 62% and 31% for patients transplanted in second remission and beyond, respectively (P=0.05), and 64% and 27% for patients with pre-transplant negative and positive real-time polymerase chain reaction, respectively (P=0.03). The 4-year cumulative incidence of relapse was 32% and 44% for patients transplanted in second remission and beyond, respectively (P=0.37), and 30% and 47% for patients transplanted with negative and positive real-time polymerase chain reaction, respectively (P=0.30). Transplant-related mortality was 19.6%. In conclusion, allogeneic transplant is effective in advanced acute promyelocytic leukemia in the all-trans-retinoic acid and arsenic trioxide era, and should be considered once relapse is diagnosed.

  9. UTX inhibition as selective epigenetic therapy against TAL1-driven T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benyoucef, Aissa; Palii, Carmen G.; Wang, Chaochen; Porter, Christopher J.; Chu, Alphonse; Dai, Fengtao; Tremblay, Véronique; Rakopoulos, Patricia; Singh, Kulwant; Huang, Suming; Pflumio, Francoise; Hébert, Josée; Couture, Jean-Francois; Perkins, Theodore J.; Ge, Kai; Dilworth, F. Jeffrey; Brand, Marjorie

    2016-01-01

    T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL) is a heterogeneous group of hematological tumors composed of distinct subtypes that vary in their genetic abnormalities, gene expression signatures, and prognoses. However, it remains unclear whether T-ALL subtypes differ at the functional level, and, as such, T-ALL treatments are uniformly applied across subtypes, leading to variable responses between patients. Here we reveal the existence of a subtype-specific epigenetic vulnerability in T-ALL by which a particular subgroup of T-ALL characterized by expression of the oncogenic transcription factor TAL1 is uniquely sensitive to variations in the dosage and activity of the histone 3 Lys27 (H3K27) demethylase UTX/KDM6A. Specifically, we identify UTX as a coactivator of TAL1 and show that it acts as a major regulator of the TAL1 leukemic gene expression program. Furthermore, we demonstrate that UTX, previously described as a tumor suppressor in T-ALL, is in fact a pro-oncogenic cofactor essential for leukemia maintenance in TAL1-positive (but not TAL1-negative) T-ALL. Exploiting this subtype-specific epigenetic vulnerability, we propose a novel therapeutic approach based on UTX inhibition through in vivo administration of an H3K27 demethylase inhibitor that efficiently kills TAL1-positive primary human leukemia. These findings provide the first opportunity to develop personalized epigenetic therapy for T-ALL patients. PMID:26944678

  10. Identification of small molecules that support human leukemia stem cell activity ex vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pabst, Caroline; Krosl, Jana; Fares, Iman; Boucher, Geneviève; Ruel, Réjean; Marinier, Anne; Lemieux, Sébastien; Hébert, Josée; Sauvageau, Guy

    2014-04-01

    Leukemic stem cells (LSCs) are considered a major cause of relapse in acute myeloid leukemia (AML). Defining pathways that control LSC self-renewal is crucial for a better understanding of underlying mechanisms and for the development of targeted therapies. However, currently available culture conditions do not prevent spontaneous differentiation of LSCs, which greatly limits the feasibility of cell-based assays. To overcome these constraints we conducted a high-throughput chemical screen and identified small molecules that inhibit differentiation and support LSC activity in vitro. Similar to reports with cord blood stem cells, several of these compounds suppressed the aryl-hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) pathway, which we show to be inactive in vivo and rapidly activated ex vivo in AML cells. We also identified a compound, UM729, that collaborates with AhR suppressors in preventing AML cell differentiation. Together, these findings provide newly defined culture conditions for improved ex vivo culture of primary human AML cells.

  11. Lis1 regulates asymmetric division in hematopoietic stem cells and in leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimdahl, Bryan; Ito, Takahiro; Blevins, Allen; Bajaj, Jeevisha; Konuma, Takaaki; Weeks, Joi; Koechlein, Claire S.; Kwon, Hyog Young; Arami, Omead; Rizzieri, David; Broome, H. Elizabeth; Chuah, Charles; Oehler, Vivian G.; Sasik, Roman; Hardiman, Gary; Reya, Tannishtha

    2014-01-01

    Cell fate can be controlled through asymmetric division and segregation of protein determinants. But the regulation of this process in the hematopoietic system is poorly understood. Here we show that the dynein binding protein Lis1 (Pafah1b1) is critically required for blood formation and hematopoietic stem cell function. Conditional deletion of Lis1 in the hematopoietic system led to a severe bloodless phenotype, depletion of the stem cell pool and embryonic lethality. Further, the loss of Lis1 accelerated cell differentiation, in part through defects in spindle positioning and inheritance of cell fate determinants. Finally, deletion of Lis1 blocked propagation of myeloid leukemia and led to a marked improvement in animal survival, suggesting that Lis1 is also required for oncogenic growth. These data identify a key role for Lis1 in hematopoietic stem cells, and mark the directed control of asymmetric division as a critical regulator of normal and malignant hematopoietic development. PMID:24487275

  12. Evaluation of dendritic cells loaded with apoptotic cancer cells or expressing tumour mRNA as potential cancer vaccines against leukemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sæbøe-Larssen Stein

    2005-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Leukemia is a clonal disorder characterized by uncontrolled proliferation of haematopoietic cells, and represents the most common form of cancer in children. Advances in therapy for childhood leukemia have relied increasingly on the use of high-dose chemotherapy often combined with stem-cell transplantation. Despite a high success rate and intensification of therapy, children still suffer from relapse and progressive disease resistant to further therapy. Thus, novel forms of therapy are required. Methods This study focuses on dendritic cell (DC vaccination of childhood leukemia and evaluates the in vitro efficacy of different strategies for antigen loading of professional antigen-presenting cells. We have compared DCs either loaded with apoptotic leukemia cells or transfected with mRNA from the same leukemia cell line, Jurkat E6, for their capacity to induce specific CD4+ and CD8+ T-cell responses. Monocyte-derived DCs from healthy donors were loaded with tumor antigen, matured and co-cultured with autologous T cells. After one week, T-cell responses against antigen-loaded DCs were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent spot (ELISPOT assay. Results DCs loaded with apoptotic Jurkat E6 cells or transfected with Jurkat E6-cell mRNA were both able to elicit specific T-cell responses in vitro. IFNγ-secreting T cells were observed in both the CD4+ and CD8+ subsets. Conclusion The results indicate that loading of DCs with apoptotic leukemia cells or transfection with tumour mRNA represent promising strategies for development of cancer vaccines for treatment of childhood leukemia.

  13. Ganoderma lucidum Polysaccharides Induce Macrophage-Like Differentiation in Human Leukemia THP-1 Cells via Caspase and p53 Activation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jia-Wei Hsu

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Differentiation therapy by induction of tumor cells is an important method in the treatment of hematological cancers such as leukemia. Tumor cell differentiation ends cancer cells' immortality, thus stopping cell growth and proliferation. In our previous study, we found that fucose-containing polysaccharide fraction F3 extracted from Ganoderma lucidum can bring about cytokine secretion and cell death in human leukemia THP-1 cells. This prompted us to further investigate on how F3 induces the differentiation in human leukemia cells. We integrated time-course microarray analysis and network modeling to study the F3-induced effects on THP-1 cells. In addition, we determined the differentiation effect using Liu's staining, nitroblue tetrazolium (NBT reduction assay, flow cytometer, western blotting and Q-PCR. We also examined the modulation and regulation by F3 during the differentiation process. Dynamic gene expression profiles showed that cell differentiation was induced in F3-treated THP-1 cells. Furthermore, F3-treated THP-1 cells exhibited enhanced macrophage differentiation, as demonstrated by changes in cell adherence, cell cycle arrest, NBT reduction and expression of differentiation markers including CD11b, CD14, CD68, matrix metalloproteinase-9 and myeloperoxidase. In addition, caspase cleavage and p53 activation were found to be significantly enhanced in F3-treated THP-1 cells. We unraveled the role of caspases and p53 in F3-induced THP-1 cells differentiation into macrophages. Our results provide a molecular explanation for the differentiation effect of F3 on human leukemia THP-1 cells and offer a prospect for a potential leukemia differentiation therapy.

  14. NRS2002 assesses nutritional status of leukemia patients undergoing hematopoietic stem cell transplantation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Peng Liu; Zhao-Feng Zhang; Jing-Jing Cai; Bo-Shi Wang; Xia Yan

    2012-01-01

    Objective:To discuss whether nutritional risk screening 2002 (NRS2002) is appropriate for nutritional risk screening for leukemia patients before and after hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT),and whether there are risk differences in other conditions,such as age,gender and matching degree; to find the methods and indicators of nutritional risk screening for these patients before and after HSCT,in order to give timely intervention to guarantee the successful completion of the entire transplantation process.Methods:Nutritional risk of 99 leukemia patients was screened with NRS2002 before and after HSCT.The x2 test was applied to compare the risk differences between groups such as age,gender and matching degree,while the differences of other enumeration data,such as recent (1-3 months) weight loss,reduced food intake within one week and BMI,were compared by continuity correction.Results:Of the 99 leukemia patients,22 cases (22.2%) had nutritional risk before HSCT,while all patients had nutritional risk after HSCT; there is no significant difference in nutritional risk between male and female,and patients of less than 30 years old,not-full matched,recent (1-3 months) weight loss,reduced food intake within a week or BMI <18.5 were more likely to have nutritional risk; and 77 cases (77.8%) had weight loss,among which 49 patients (63.6%) had more than 5% weight loss within one month.Conclusions:This study showed that leukemia patients should receive the nutritional risk screening conventionally before and after HSCT,and NRS2002 was only appropriate for nutritional risk screening before HSCT.More attention should be paid to the patients less than 30 years old or not-full matched.Weight change was one of the important nutritional indicators for patients after HSCT.

  15. EFFECTS OF PML AND PML/RMRa ANTISENCE OLIGO- NUCLEOTIDE ON PROMYELOCYTIC LEUKEMIA CELL NB4

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈烨; 缪金明; 方智雯; 朱学宏; 邵念贤; 欧阳仁荣

    2001-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the effects of anti-PML (promyelocytic leukemia) or anti-PML/RARa (promyelocytic leukemia/retionic acid receptora) antisense oligonucleotides on cell growth, expression of PML-RARa mRNA and PML-RARa/PML protein location of NB4 cell lines. Methods: RT-PCR was used for detecting PML-RARa mRNA expression, trypan blue exclusion for cell count, methylcellose assay for leukemic colony forming unit detection, immuno- fluorescence for PML-RARa/PML protein location. Results: Both anti-PML start codon region antisence (STAS) and anti-PML-RARa fusion region antisence (FUAS) could inhibit cell growth and the formation of acute myelocytic colony forming unit of cells(AML-CFU). Cells become partial differentiated at days 5, being more obvious in FUAS-treated cells than in STAS ones. Down regulation of PML-RARa mRNA expression occurred at 24 hours in STAS and FUAS-treated cells and maintained for up to 72 hours. Immuno-fluorescence analysis with anti-PML monoclonal antibody showed a remarkable decrease even complete disappearance of microgranules. The residual granules became enlarged as discrete dots (<10 per cell), similar to normal POD structure in some STAS-treated cells at 24 hours. At 72 hours, nearly all the granules disappeared. Similar changes were observed in FUAS-treated cells. Conclusion: Both PML and PML-RARa antisence oligonucleotides can specially block the expression of PML-RARa at mRNA and protein levels. PML protein is implicated in the regulations of cell differentiation.

  16. Cyclo-oxygenase 2 inhibitor, nabumetone, inhibits proliferation in chronic myeloid leukemia cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vural, Filiz; Ozcan, Mehmet Ali; Ozsan, Güner Hayri; Ateş, Halil; Demirkan, Fatih; Pişkin, Ozden; Undar, Bülent

    2005-05-01

    The anti-tumor effect of cyclo-oxygenase (COX) inhibitors has been documented in several studies. COX2 inhibitors have attracted more attention because of the fewer side-effects and the more prominent anti-tumor effects. However, experience with these drugs in hematological malignancies is limited. In our study, a potent COX2 inhibitor, nabumetone (NBT), was investigated for its anti-proliferative and apoptotic effects in K-562 and Meg-01 chronic myeloid leukemia blastic cell lines as a single agent or in combination with adriamycin (ADR) and interferon alpha (IFN-a). In these cell lines, a dose-dependent inhibition of proliferation was observed with NBT. We observed no significant apoptotic effect of NBT. However, NBT potentiated the apoptotic effect of ADR in the K-562 cell line. Bcl-2 expression was reduced by NBT (11% vs. 2%). The combination of NBT with IFN did not have any significant effect on the K-562 cell line. We suggest that NBT inhibits proliferation and potentiates the apoptotic effect of ADR in chronic myeloid leukemia cell lines.

  17. Mitochondrial uncoupling and the reprogramming of intermediary metabolism in leukemia cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juliana eVélez

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Nearly 60 years ago Otto Warburg proposed, in a seminal publication, that an irreparable defect in the oxidative capacity of normal cells supported the switch to glycolysis for energy generation and the appearance of the malignant phenotype (Warburg, 1956. Curiously, this phenotype was also observed by Warburg in embryonic tissues, and recent research demonstrated that normal stem cells may indeed rely on aerobic glycolysis – fermenting pyruvate to lactate in the presence of ample oxygen - rather than on the complete oxidation of pyruvate in the Krebs cycle - to generate cellular energy (Folmes et al., 2012. However, it remains to be determined whether this phenotype is causative for neoplastic development, or rather the result of malignant transformation. In addition, in light of mounting evidence demonstrating that cancer cells can carry out electron transport and oxidative phosphorylation, although in some cases predominantly using electrons from non-glucose carbon sources (Bloch-Frankenthal et al., 1965, Warburg´s hypothesis needs to be revisited. Lastly, recent evidence suggests that the leukemia bone marrow microenvironment promotes the Warburg phenotype adding another layer of complexity to the study of metabolism in hematological malignancies. In this review we will discuss some of the evidence for alterations in the intermediary metabolism of leukemia cells and present evidence for a concept put forth decades ago by lipid biochemist Feodor Lynen, and acknowledged by Warburg himself, that cancer cell mitochondria uncouple ATP synthesis from electron transport and therefore depend on glycolysis to meet their energy demands (Lynen, 1951;Warburg, 1956.

  18. Cell death induction by the acute promyelocytic leukemia-specific PML/RARα fusion protein

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrucci, Pier Francesco; Grignani, Francesco; Pearson, Mark; Fagioli, Marta; Nicoletti, Ildo; Pelicci, Pier Giuseppe

    1997-01-01

    PML/RARα is the abnormal protein product generated by the acute promyelocytic leukemia-specific t(15;17). Expression of PML/RARα in hematopoietic precursor cell lines induces block of differentiation and promotes survival. We report here that PML/RARα has a potent growth inhibitory effect on all nonhematopoietic cell lines and on the majority of the hematopoietic cell lines tested. Inducible expression of PML/RARα in fibroblasts demonstrated that the basis for the growth suppression is induction of cell death. Deletion of relevant promyelocytic leukemia (PML) and retinoic acid receptor (RARα) domains within the fusion protein revealed that its growth inhibitory effect depends on the integrity of the PML aminoterminal region (RING, B1, B2, and coiled coil regions) and the RARα DNA binding region. Analysis of the nuclear localization of the same PML/RARα deletion mutants by immunofluorescence and cell fractionation revealed that the biological activity of the fusion protein correlates with its microspeckled localization and its association to the nuclear matrix. The PML aminoterminal region, but not the RARα zinc fingers, is required for the proper nuclear localization of PML/RARα. We propose that the matrix-associated microspeckles are the active sites of PML/RARα and that targeting of RARα sequences to this specific nuclear subdomain through PML sequences is crucial to the activity of the fusion protein on survival regulation. PMID:9380732

  19. Spontaneous regression of Merkel cell carcinoma in a patient with chronic lymphocytic leukemia: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Turk Tamara

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Merkel cell carcinoma is a rare and aggressive primary cutaneous neuroendocrine malignant tumor. The tumor has a high rate of local recurrence after surgical removal. Spontaneous regression appears to be relatively common in this rare type of tumor. Case presentation We describe the clinical course, cytological and histological findings of a Merkel cell carcinoma in a 70-year-old Caucasian woman, simultaneously diagnosed with chronic lymphatic leukemia. The tumor showed clinical regression after fine needle aspiration. At primary presentation, the tumor had no apparent leukocyte infiltration, but was completely cleared by T-cell mediated immunity within 3 weeks after fine needle aspiration. Conclusion Fine needle aspiration may have acted as a mechanical trigger involved in the activation of cell-mediated immunity, leading to the clinical and histological regression of the tumor. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first case report of spontaneous regression of Merkel cell carcinoma in a patient with a co-malignancy, that is to say, chronic lymphocytic leukemia.

  20. Leukemia inhibitory factor (LIF)-dependent, pluripotent stem cells established from inner cell mass of porcine embryos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Telugu, Bhanu Prakash V L; Ezashi, Toshihiko; Sinha, Sunilima; Alexenko, Andrei P; Spate, Lee; Prather, Randall S; Roberts, R Michael

    2011-08-19

    The pig is important for agriculture and as an animal model in human and veterinary medicine, yet despite over 20 years of effort, there has been a failure to generate pluripotent stem cells analogous to those derived from mouse embryos. Here we report the production of leukemia inhibitory factor-dependent, so-called naive type, pluripotent stem cells from the inner cell mass of porcine blastocysts by up-regulating expression of KLF4 and POU5F1. The alkaline phosphatase-positive colonies resulting from reprogramming resemble mouse embryonic stem cells in colony morphology, cell cycle interval, transcriptome profile, and expression of pluripotent markers, such as POU5F1, SOX2, and surface marker SSEA1. They are dependent on leukemia inhibitory factor signaling for maintenance of pluripotency, can be cultured over extended passage, and have the ability to form teratomas. These cells derived from the inner cell mass of pig blastocysts are clearly distinct from the FGF2-dependent "primed" induced pluripotent stem cells described recently from porcine mesenchymal cells. The data are consistent with the hypothesis that the up-regulation of KLF4, as well as POU5F1, is required to create and stabilize the naive pluripotent state and may explain why the derivation of embryonic stem cells from pigs and other ungulates has proved so difficult.

  1. Expression of maturation-specific nuclear antigens in differentiating human myeloid leukemia cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murao, S.; Epstein, A.L.; Clevenger, C.V.; Huberman, E.

    1985-02-01

    The expression of three myeloid-specific nuclear antigens was studied by indirect immunofluorescence with murine monoclonal antibodies in human myeloid (HL-60, ML-2, KG-1, and B-II) leukemia cells treated with chemical inducers of cell differentiation. Treatment of the promyelocytic HL-60 cells with dimethyl sulfoxide or 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin DT induced the cells to acquire a phenotype that resembled that of granulocytes and monocytesmacrophages, respectively. These phenotypes were characterized by changes in cell growth, cell morphology, expression of specific cell surface antigens, and activities of lysozyme and nonspecific esterase enzymes. Induction of these differentiation markers in the HL-60 cells was associated with induction of the myeloid-specific nuclear antigens. The ML-2 cells, which are arrested at the myeloblast-promyelocyte stage, were also susceptible to the induction of cell differentiation and to changes in the expression of the nuclear antigens, but the degree of susceptibility was less than in the HL-60 cells. The less-differentiated KG-1 and B-II myeloid cells were either not responsive or responded only in a limited degree to the induction of cell differentiation or to changes in the expression of the nuclear antigens. The authors suggest that the reactivity of cells with monoclonal antibodies to specific nuclear antigens can be used as a maturational marker in cell differentiation studies. Furthermore, nuclear antigens expressed early in cellular differentiation may provide information about changes in regulatory elements in normal and malignant cells. 40 references, 2 figures, 1 table.

  2. Pathological glycogenesis through glycogen synthase 1 and suppression of excessive AMP kinase activity in myeloid leukemia cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nonami, Atsushi; Weisberg, Ellen L.; Bonal, Dennis; Kirschmeier, Paul T.; Salgia, Sabrina; Podar, Klaus; Galinsky, Ilene; Chowdary, Tirumala K.; Neuberg, Donna; Tonon, Giovanni; Stone, Richard M.; Asara, John; Griffin, James D.; Sattler, Martin

    2015-01-01

    The rapid proliferation of myeloid leukemia cells is highly dependent on increased glucose metabolism. Through an unbiased metabolomics analysis of leukemia cells, we found that the glycogenic precursor UDP-D-glucose is pervasively upregulated, despite low glycogen levels. Targeting the rate-limiting glycogen synthase 1 (GYS1) not only decreased glycolytic flux but also increased activation of the glycogen-responsive AMPK (AMP kinase), leading to significant growth suppression. Further, genetic and pharmacological hyper-activation of AMPK was sufficient to induce the changes observed with GYS1 targeting. Cancer genomics data also indicate that elevated levels of the glycogenic enzymes GYS1/2 or GBE1 (glycogen branching enzyme 1) are associated with poor survival in AML. These results suggest a novel mechanism whereby leukemic cells sustain aberrant proliferation by suppressing excess AMPK activity through elevated glycogenic flux and provide a therapeutic entry point for targeting leukemia cell metabolism. PMID:25703587

  3. HJC, a new arylnaphthalene lignan isolated from Justicia procumbens, causes apoptosis and caspase activation in K562 leukemia cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Jiaoyang; Kong, Weijun; Yang, Meihua

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate whether HJC, isolated from Justicia procumbens for the first time, can suppress the proliferation and induce apoptosis of human leukemia K562 cells and finally clarify its related mechanism. The chemical structure of HJC was validated by LC-ESI-MS/MS, cytotoxicity was assayed using MTT, and apoptosis was investigated by flow cytometry. These assays indicated that HJC remarkably inhibited the growth in K562 cells by decreasing cell proliferation, reducing the SOD activity, enhancing ROS levels and inducing apoptosis. Activation of caspase-3 indicated that HJC may be inducing intrinsic and extrinsic apoptosis pathways and that HJC-induced apoptosis was caspase-dependent. This study suggests that HJC is a high-potency anti-tumor agent, and it induces apoptosis through a caspase-dependent pathway in human leukemia K562 cells. It also presents a potential alternative to leukemia therapy.

  4. Blastic Plasmacytoid Dendritic Cell Leukemia in a Black Malian

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2017-06-28

    Jun 28, 2017 ... 2017 Nigerian Journal of Clinical Practice | Published by Wolters Kluwer ‑ ... The bone marrow biopsy and flow ... is the first reported case of BPDCN in black Afric