WorldWideScience

Sample records for plasma cell kinetics

  1. The Fluid-Kinetic Particle-in-Cell Solver for Plasma Simulations

    CERN Document Server

    Markidis, Stefano; Lapenta, Giovanni; Ronnmark, Kjell; Hamrin, Maria; Meliani, Zakaria; Laure, Erwin

    2013-01-01

    A new method that solves concurrently the multi-fluid and Maxwell's equations has been developed for plasma simulations. By calculating the stress tensor in the multi-fluid momentum equation by means of computational particles moving in a self-consistent electromagnetic field, the kinetic effects are retained while solving the multi-fluid equations. The Maxwell's and multi-fluid equations are discretized implicitly in time enabling kinetic simulations over time scales typical of the fluid simulations. The fluid-kinetic Particle-in-Cell solver has been implemented in a three-dimensional electromagnetic code, and tested against the ion cyclotron resonance and magnetic reconnection problems. The new method is a promising approach for coupling fluid and kinetic methods in a unified framework.

  2. Photon kinetics in plasmas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V.G. Morozov

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available We present a kinetic theory of radiative processes in many-component plasmas with relativistic electrons and nonrelativistic heavy particles. Using the non-equilibrium Green's function technique in many-particle QED, we show that the transverse field correlation functions can be naturally decomposed into sharply peaked (non-Lorentzian parts that describe resonant (propagating photons and off-shell parts corresponding to virtual photons in the medium. Analogous decompositions are obtained for the longitudinal field correlation functions and the correlation functions of relativistic electrons. We derive a kinetic equation for the resonant photons with a finite spectral width and show that the off-shell parts of the particle and field correlation functions are essential to calculate the local radiating power in plasmas and recover the results of vacuum QED. The plasma effects on radiative processes are discussed.

  3. Kinetics of plasma membrane and mitochondrial alterations in cells undergoing apoptosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lizard, G.; Fournel, S.; Genestier, L.; Dhedin, N. [Hospital Edouard Herriot, Lyon (France)] [and others

    1995-11-01

    Programmed cell death or apoptosis is characterized by typical morphological alterations. By transmission electron microscopy, apoptotic cells are identified by condensation of the chromatin in tight apposition to the nuclear envelope, alteration of the nuclear envelope and fragmentation of the nucleus, whereas integrity of the plasma membrane and organelles is preserved. Conversely cells undergoing necrosis display and early desintegration of cytoplasmic membrane and swelling of mitochondria. In this study we assessed by flow cytometry the sequential alterations of forward angle light scatter, 90{degrees} light scatter, and fluorescence associated with fluorescein diacetate, rhodamine 123, and propidium iodide in two human B cell lines undergoing apoptosis induced by the topoisomerase II inhibitor VP-16. The kinetics of these modifications were compared to those of cells undergoing necrosis induced by the topoisomerase II inhibitor VP-16. The kinetics of these modifications were compared to those of cells undergoing necrosis induced by sodium azide. At the same time intervals, cells were examined by transmission electron microscopy and by UV microscopy after staining with Hoechst 33342. We report that sequential changes in light scatters and fluorescein diacetate are similar in cells undergoing apoptosis or necrosis, whereas apoptosis is characterized by a slightly delayed decrease of mitochondrial activity as assessed by rhodamine 123 staining. Surprisingly, a part of cells undergoing apoptosis displayed an early uptake of propidium iodide followed by a condensation and then a fragmentation of their nuclei. It is concluded that uptake of propidium iodide is a very early marker of cell death which does not discriminate between necrosis and apoptosis. Along with biochemical criteria, nuclear morphology revealed by staining with Hoechst 33342 would seem to be of the most simple and most discriminative assay of apoptosis. 33 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  4. Measuring Kinetic Plasma Eigenmodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattingly, Sean; Berumen, Jorge; Chu, Feng; Hood, Ryan; Skiff, Fred

    2015-11-01

    We present a method for measuring kinetic plasma eigenmodes of a cylindrical axially magnetized (1 kG) laboratory plasma (n ~109cm-3 , Te ~ 5eV , Ti ~ 0 . 06eV) by measuring velocity space correlation functions. This method simultaneously observes two separate laser induced fluorescence schemes. Each scheme has its own indepedently tunable laser and its own set of collection optics. With this setup, we are able to measure the time - averaged correlation function as a function of position on the cylindrical axis parallel to the magnetic field (z) and velocity on the deconvolved ion velocity distribution function (v) : C (z , v ,z' ,v' , τ) = t. The freedom of two lasers allows us to measure a two dimensional velocity correlation matrix. This matrix is investigated with the Vlasov equation in the collisionless and weakly collisional regime. The former case, which is continuous, is diagonalized with an integral transform defined by P. J. Morrison while the latter case, which is discrete, is diagonalized through the use of Hermite polynomials.

  5. Kinetics of plasma membrane and mitochondrial alterations in cells undergoing apoptosis

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Lizard, G; Fournel, S; Genestier, L; Dhedin, N; Chaput, C; Flacher, M; Mutin, M; Panaye, G; Revillard, J P

    1995-01-01

    ... of the nucleus, whereas integrity of the plasma membrane and organelles is preserved. Conversely cells undergoing necrosis display an early desintegration of cytoplasmic membrane and swelling of mitochondria...

  6. Rotavirus NSP4: Cell type-dependent transport kinetics to the exofacial plasma membrane and release from intact infected cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parr Rebecca D

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Rotavirus NSP4 localizes to multiple intracellular sites and is multifunctional, contributing to RV morphogenesis, replication and pathogenesis. One function of NSP4 is the induction of early secretory diarrhea by binding surface receptors to initiate signaling events. The aims of this study were to determine the transport kinetics of NSP4 to the exofacial plasma membrane (PM, the subsequent release from intact infected cells, and rebinding to naïve and/or neighboring cells in two cell types. Methods Transport kinetics was evaluated using surface-specific biotinylation/streptavidin pull-downs and exofacial exposure of NSP4 was confirmed by antibody binding to intact cells, and fluorescent resonant energy transfer. Transfected cells similarly were monitored to discern NSP4 movement in the absence of infection or other viral proteins. Endoglycosidase H digestions, preparation of CY3- or CY5- labeled F(ab2 fragments, confocal imaging, and determination of preferential polarized transport employed standard laboratory techniques. Mock-infected, mock-biotinylated and non-specific antibodies served as controls. Results Only full-length (FL, endoglycosidase-sensitive NSP4 was detected on the exofacial surface of two cell types, whereas the corresponding cell lysates showed multiple glycosylated forms. The C-terminus of FL NSP4 was detected on exofacial-membrane surfaces at different times in different cell types prior to its release into culture media. Transport to the PM was rapid and distinct yet FL NSP4 was secreted from both cell types at a time similar to the release of virus. NSP4-containing, clarified media from both cells bound surface molecules of naïve cells, and imaging showed secreted NSP4 from one or more infected cells bound neighboring cell membranes in culture. Preferential sorting to apical or basolateral membranes also was distinct in different polarized cells. Conclusions The intracellular transport of NSP4 to

  7. Kinetic effects in edge plasma: kinetic modeling for edge plasma and detached divertor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takizuka, T.

    2017-03-01

    Detached divertor is considered a solution for the heat control in magnetic-confinement fusion reactors. Numerical simulations using the comprehensive divertor codes based on the plasma fluid modeling are indispensable for the design of the detached divertor in future reactors. Since the agreement in the results between detached-divertor experiments and simulations has been rather fair but not satisfactory, further improvement of the modeling is required. The kinetic effect is one of key issues for improving the modeling. Complete kinetic behaviors are able to be simulated by the kinetic modeling. In this paper at first, major kinetic effects in edge plasma and detached divertor are listed. One of the most powerful kinetic models, particle-in-cell (PIC) model, is described in detail. Several results of PIC simulations of edge-plasma kinetic natures are presented. Future works on PIC modeling and simulation for the deeper understanding of edge plasma and detached divertor are discussed.

  8. Influence of instrumental parameters on the kinetic energy of ions and plasma temperature for a hexapole collision/reaction-cell-based inductively coupled plasma quadrupole mass spectrometer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Favre, Georges; Brennetot, René; Chartier, Frédéric; Tortajada, Jeanine

    2009-02-01

    Inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) is widely used in inorganic analytical chemistry for element and/or isotope ratio measurements. The presence of interferences, which is one of the main limitations of this method, has been addressed in recent years with the introduction of collision/reaction cell devices on ICP-MS apparatus. The study of ion-molecule reactions in the gas phase then became of great importance for the development of new analytical strategies. Knowing the kinetic energy and the electronic states of the ions prior to their entrance into the cell, i.e., just before they react, thereby constitutes crucial information for the interpretation of the observed reactivities. Such studies on an ICP-MS commonly used for routine analyses require the determination of the influence of different instrumental parameters on the energy of the ions and on the plasma temperature from where ions are sampled. The kinetic energy of ions prior to their entrance into the cell has been connected to the voltage applied to the hexapole according to a linear relationship determined from measurements of ion energy losses due to collisions with neutral gas molecules. The effects of the plasma forward power, sampling depth, and the addition of a torch shield to the ICP source were then examined. A decrease of the plasma potential due to the torch shielding, already mentioned in the literature, has been quantified in this study at about 3 V.

  9. Kinetics of complex plasmas

    CERN Document Server

    Sodha, Mahendra Singh

    2014-01-01

    The presentation in the book is based on charge balance on the dust particles, number and energy balance of the constituents and atom-ion-electron interaction in the gaseous plasma. Size distribution of dust particles, statistical mechanics, Quantum effects in electron emission from and accretion on dust particles and nonlinear interaction of complex plasmas with electric and electromagnetic fields have been discussed in the book. The book introduces the reader to basic concepts and typical applications. The book should be of use to researchers, engineers and graduate students.

  10. Low frequency, electrodynamic simulation of kinetic plasmas with the DArwin Direct Implicit Particle-In-Cell (DADIPIC) method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gibbons, M.R.

    1995-06-01

    This dissertation describes a new algorithm for simulating low frequency, kinetic phenomena in plasmas. DArwin Direct Implicit Particle-in-Cell (DADIPIC), as its name implies, is a combination of the Darwin and direct implicit methods. One of the difficulties in simulating plasmas lies in the enormous disparity between the fundamental scale lengths of a plasma and the scale lengths of the phenomena of interest. The objective is to create models which can ignore the fundamental constraints without eliminating relevant plasma properties. Over the past twenty years several PIC methods have been investigated for overcoming the constraints on explicit electrodynamic PIC. These models eliminate selected high frequency plasma phenomena while retaining kinetic phenomena at low frequency. This dissertation shows that the combination of Darwin and Direct Implicit allows them to operate better than they have been shown to operate in the past. Through the Darwin method the hyperbolic Maxwell`s equations are reformulated into a set of elliptic equations. Propagating light waves do not exist in the formulation so the Courant constraint on the time step is eliminated. The Direct Implicit method is applied only to the electrostatic field with the result that electrostatic plasma oscillations do not have to be resolved for stability. With the elimination of these constraints spatial and temporal discretization can be much larger than that possible with explicit, electrodynamic PIC. The code functions in a two dimensional Cartesian region and has been implemented with all components of the particle velocities, the E-field, and the B-field. Internal structures, conductors or dielectrics, may be placed in the simulation region, can be set at desired potentials, and driven with specified currents.

  11. Kinetics of Circulating Plasma Cell-Free DNA in Paediatric Classical Hodgkin Lymphoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Primerano, Simona; Burnelli, Roberta; Carraro, Elisa; Pillon, Marta; Elia, Caterina; Farruggia, Piero; Sala, Alessandra; Vinti, Luciana; Buffardi, Salvatore; Basso, Giuseppe; Mascarin, Maurizio; Mussolin, Lara

    2016-01-01

    Levels of plasma cell-free DNA (cfDNA) of a large series of children with classical Hodgkin lymphoma (cHL) were evaluated and analyzed at diagnosis and during chemotherapy treatment in relation with clinical characteristics. CfDNA levels in cHL patients were significantly higher compared with controls (p=0.002). CfDNA at diagnosis was correlated with presence of B symptoms (p=0.027) and high erythrocyte sedimentation rate (p=0.049). We found that the increasing of plasma cfDNA after first chemotherapy cycle seems to be associated with a worse prognosis (p=0.049). Levels of plasma cfDNA might constitute an interesting non-invasive tool in cHL patients' management. PMID:26918050

  12. Modeling the chemical kinetics of atmospheric plasma for cell treatment in a liquid solution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, H. Y.; Kang, S. K.; Lee, H. Wk. [Department of Electrical Engineering, Pohang University of Science and Technology, Pohang 790-784 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, H. W. [Medipl Corporation, Pohang 790-834 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, G. C. [Medipl Corporation, Pohang 790-834 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Oral Anatomy and Cell Biology, School of Dentistry, Pusan National University, Pusan 602-739 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, J. K. [Department of Electrical Engineering, Pohang University of Science and Technology, Pohang 790-784 (Korea, Republic of); Medipl Corporation, Pohang 790-834 (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-07-15

    Low temperature atmospheric pressure plasmas have been known to be effective for living cell inactivation in a liquid solution but it is not clear yet which species are key factors for the cell treatment. Using a global model, we elucidate the processes through which pH level in the solution is changed from neutral to acidic after plasma exposure and key components with pH and air variation. First, pH level in a liquid solution is changed by He{sup +} and He(2{sup 1}S) radicals. Second, O{sub 3} density decreases as pH level in the solution decreases and air concentration decreases. It can be a method of removing O{sub 3} that causes chest pain and damages lung tissue when the density is very high. H{sub 2}O{sub 2}, HO{sub 2}, and NO radicals are found to be key factors for cell inactivation in the solution with pH and air variation.

  13. Kinetic imaging of NPC1L1 and sterol trafficking between plasma membrane and recycling endosomes in hepatoma cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hartwig Petersen, Nicole; Færgeman, Nils J; Yu, Liqing;

    2008-01-01

    Niemann-Pick C1-like 1 (NPC1L1) is a recently identified protein that mediates intestinal cholesterol absorption and regulates biliary cholesterol excretion. The itineraries and kinetics of NPC1L1 trafficking remain uncertain. In this study, we have visualized movement of NPC1L1-enhanced green...... fluorescent protein (NPC1L1-EGFP) and cholesterol analogues in hepatoma cells. At steady state about 42% of NPC1L1 resided in the transferrin (Tf) positive, sterol enriched endocytic recycling compartment (ERC), while time-lapse microscopy demonstrated NPC1L1 traffic between plasma membrane and ERC...... exclusively in the canalicular membrane, where the protein is highly mobile. Our study demonstrates dynamic trafficking of NPC1L1 between cell surface and intracellular compartments and suggests that this transport is involved in NPC1L1 mediated cellular sterol uptake....

  14. Kinetics of Ca2+- and ATP-dependent, voltage-controlled anion conductance in the plasma membrane of mesophyll cells of Pisum sativum

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Elzenga, J.T.M.; van Volkenburgh, E.

    1997-01-01

    Whole-cell patch-clamp techniques were used to measure anion currents through the plasma membrane of protoplasts of mesophyll cells of expanding pea (Pisum sativum L.) leaves. Voltage-induced changes of the currents could be modelled with single exponential activation and deactivation kinetics. The

  15. Kinetics and spectroscopy of low temperature plasmas

    CERN Document Server

    Loureiro, Jorge

    2016-01-01

    This is a comprehensive textbook designed for graduate and advanced undergraduate students. Both authors rely on more than 20 years of teaching experience in renowned Physics Engineering courses to write this book addressing the students’ needs. Kinetics and Spectroscopy of Low Temperature Plasmas derives in a full self-consistent way the electron kinetic theory used to describe low temperature plasmas created in the laboratory with an electrical discharge, and presents the main optical spectroscopic diagnostics used to characterize such plasmas. The chapters with the theoretical contents make use of a deductive approach in which the electron kinetic theory applied to plasmas with basis on the electron Boltzmann equation is derived from the basic concepts of Statistical and Plasma Physics. On the other hand, the main optical spectroscopy diagnostics used to characterize experimentally such plasmas are presented and justified from the point of view of the Atomic and Molecular Physics. Low temperature plasmas...

  16. Electron Kinetics in Hypersonic Plasmas Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The goal of this SBIR project is to advance the state-of-the-art in computations of hypersonic plasmas by adding high-fidelity kinetic models for electrons. Electron...

  17. Kinetic Theory of the Inner Magnetospheric Plasma

    CERN Document Server

    Khazanov, George V

    2011-01-01

    This book provides a broad introduction to the kinetic theory of space plasma physics with the major focus on the inner magnetospheric plasma. It is designed to provide a comprehensive description of the different kinds of transport equations for both plasma particles and waves with an emphasis on the applicability and limitations of each set of equations. The major topics are: Kinetic Theory of Superthermal Electrons, Kinetic Foundation of the Hydrodynamic Description of Space Plasmas (including wave-particle interaction processes), and Kinetic Theory of the Terrestrial Ring Current. Distinguishable features of this book are the analytical solutions of simplified transport equations. Approximate analytic solutions of transport phenomena are very useful because they help us gain physical insight into how the system responds to varying sources of mass, momentum and energy and also to various external boundary conditions. They also provide us a convenient method to test the validity of complicated numerical mod...

  18. NLTE4 Plasma Population Kinetics Database

    Science.gov (United States)

    SRD 159 NLTE4 Plasma Population Kinetics Database (Web database for purchase)   This database contains benchmark results for simulation of plasma population kinetics and emission spectra. The data were contributed by the participants of the 4th Non-LTE Code Comparison Workshop who have unrestricted access to the database. The only limitation for other users is in hidden labeling of the output results. Guest users can proceed to the database entry page without entering userid and password.

  19. Kinetic Simulations of Dense Plasma Focus Breakdown

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, A.; Higginson, D. P.; Jiang, S.; Link, A.; Povilus, A.; Sears, J.; Bennett, N.; Rose, D. V.; Welch, D. R.

    2015-11-01

    A dense plasma focus (DPF) device is a type of plasma gun that drives current through a set of coaxial electrodes to assemble gas inside the device and then implode that gas on axis to form a Z-pinch. This implosion drives hydrodynamic and kinetic instabilities that generate strong electric fields, which produces a short intense pulse of x-rays, high-energy (>100 keV) electrons and ions, and (in deuterium gas) neutrons. A strong factor in pinch performance is the initial breakdown and ionization of the gas along the insulator surface separating the two electrodes. The smoothness and isotropy of this ionized sheath are imprinted on the current sheath that travels along the electrodes, thus making it an important portion of the DPF to both understand and optimize. Here we use kinetic simulations in the Particle-in-cell code LSP to model the breakdown. Simulations are initiated with neutral gas and the breakdown modeled self-consistently as driven by a charged capacitor system. We also investigate novel geometries for the insulator and electrodes to attempt to control the electric field profile. The initial ionization fraction of gas is explored computationally to gauge possible advantages of pre-ionization which could be created experimentally via lasers or a glow-discharge. Prepared by LLNL under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  20. Fundamental aspects of plasma chemical physics kinetics

    CERN Document Server

    Capitelli, Mario; Colonna, Gianpiero; Esposito, Fabrizio; Gorse, Claudine; Hassouni, Khaled; Laricchiuta, Annarita; Longo, Savino

    2016-01-01

    Describing non-equilibrium "cold" plasmas through a chemical physics approach, this book uses the state-to-state plasma kinetics, which considers each internal state as a new species with its own cross sections. Extended atomic and molecular master equations are coupled with Boltzmann and Monte Carlo methods to solve the electron energy distribution function. Selected examples in different applied fields, such as microelectronics, fusion, and aerospace, are presented and discussed including the self-consistent kinetics in RF parallel plate reactors, the optimization of negative ion sources and the expansion of high enthalpy flows through nozzles of different geometries. The book will cover the main aspects of the state-to-state kinetic approach for the description of nonequilibrium cold plasmas, illustrating the more recent achievements in the development of kinetic models including the self-consistent coupling of master equations and Boltzmann equation for electron dynamics. To give a complete portrayal, the...

  1. Magnetic null points in kinetic simulations of space plasmas

    OpenAIRE

    Olshevsky, Vyacheslav; Deca, Jan; Divin, Andrey; Peng, Ivy Bo; Markidis, Stefano; Innocenti, Maria Elena; Cazzola, Emanuele; Lapenta, Giovanni

    2015-01-01

    We present a systematic attempt to study magnetic null points and the associated magnetic energy conversion in kinetic Particle-in-Cell simulations of various plasma configurations. We address three-dimensional simulations performed with the semi-implicit kinetic electromagnetic code iPic3D in different setups: variations of a Harris current sheet, dipolar and quadrupolar magnetospheres interacting with the solar wind; and a relaxing turbulent configuration with multiple null points. Spiral n...

  2. Kinetic Alfven wave turbulence in space plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sharma, R.P. [Plasma Simulation Laboratory, Centre for Energy Studies, Indian Institute of Technology, Delhi-110016, New Delhi (India); Kumar, Sachin, E-mail: dynamicalfven@gmail.co [Plasma Simulation Laboratory, Centre for Energy Studies, Indian Institute of Technology, Delhi-110016, New Delhi (India)

    2010-07-26

    This work presents the derivation of nonlinear coupled equations for the evolution of solar wind turbulence. These equations are governing the coupled dynamics of kinetic Alfven wave and ion acoustic wave. Numerical simulation of these equations is also presented. The ponderomotive nonlinearity is incorporated in the wave dynamics. Filamentation of kinetic Alfven wave and the turbulent spectra are presented in intermediate-{beta} plasmas at heliocentric distances (0.3 AU{<=}r<1.0 AU). The growing filaments and steeper turbulent spectra (of power law k{sup -S}, 5/3{<=}S{<=}3) can be responsible for plasma heating and particle acceleration in solar wind.

  3. Kinetic theory of nonideal gases and nonideal plasmas

    CERN Document Server

    Klimontovich, Yu L

    2013-01-01

    Kinetic Theory of Nonideal Gases and Nonideal Plasmas presents the fundamental aspects of the kinetic theory of gases and plasmas. The book consists of three parts, which attempts to present some of the ideas, methods and applications in the study of the kinetic processes in nonideal gases and plasmas. The first part focuses on the classical kinetic theory of nonideal gases. The second part discusses the classical kinetic theory of fully ionized plasmas. The last part is devoted to the quantum kinetic theory of nonideal gases and plasmas. A concluding chapter is included, which presents a shor

  4. Distinct kinetics of memory B-cell and plasma-cell responses in peripheral blood following a blood-stage Plasmodium chabaudi infection in mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eunice W Nduati

    Full Text Available B cell and plasma cell responses take place in lymphoid organs, but because of the inaccessibility of these organs, analyses of human responses are largely performed using peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC. To determine whether PBMC are a useful source of memory B cells and plasma cells in malaria, and whether they reflect Plasmodium-specific B cell responses in spleen or bone marrow, we have investigated these components of the humoral response in PBMC using a model of Plasmodium chabaudi blood-stage infections in C57BL/6 mice. We detected memory B cells, defined as isotype-switched IgD(- IgM(- CD19(+ B cells, and low numbers of Plasmodium chabaudi Merozoite Surface Protein-1 (MSP1-specific memory B cells, in PBMC at all time points sampled for up to 90 days following primary or secondary infection. By contrast, we only detected CD138(+ plasma cells and MSP1-specific antibody-secreting cells within a narrow time frame following primary (days 10 to 25 or secondary (day 10 infection. CD138(+ plasma cells in PBMC at these times expressed CD19, B220 and MHC class II, suggesting that they were not dislodged bone-marrow long-lived plasma cells, but newly differentiated migratory plasmablasts migrating to the bone marrow; thus reflective of an ongoing or developing immune response. Our data indicates that PBMC can be a useful source for malaria-specific memory B cells and plasma cells, but extrapolation of the results to human malaria infections suggests that timing of sampling, particularly for plasma cells, may be critical. Studies should therefore include multiple sampling points, and at times of infection/immunisation when the B-cell phenotypes of interest are likely to be found in peripheral blood.

  5. Multirate Particle-in-Cell Time Integration Techniques of Vlasov-Maxwell Equations for Collisionless Kinetic Plasma Simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Guangye [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Chacon, Luis [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Knoll, Dana Alan [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Barnes, Daniel C [Coronado Consulting

    2015-07-31

    A multi-rate PIC formulation was developed that employs large timesteps for slow field evolution, and small (adaptive) timesteps for particle orbit integrations. Implementation is based on a JFNK solver with nonlinear elimination and moment preconditioning. The approach is free of numerical instabilities (ωpeΔt >>1, and Δx >> λD), and requires many fewer dofs (vs. explicit PIC) for comparable accuracy in challenging problems. Significant gains (vs. conventional explicit PIC) may be possible for large scale simulations. The paper is organized as follows: Vlasov-Maxwell Particle-in-cell (PIC) methods for plasmas; Explicit, semi-implicit, and implicit time integrations; Implicit PIC formulation (Jacobian-Free Newton-Krylov (JFNK) with nonlinear elimination allows different treatments of disparate scales, discrete conservation properties (energy, charge, canonical momentum, etc.)); Some numerical examples; and Summary.

  6. A kinetic model of plasma turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Servidio, S.; Valentini, F.; Perrone, D.; Greco, A.; Califano, F.; Matthaeus, W. H.; Veltri, P.

    2015-01-01

    A Hybrid Vlasov-Maxwell (HVM) model is presented and recent results about the link between kinetic effects and turbulence are reviewed. Using five-dimensional (2D in space and 3D in the velocity space) simulations of plasma turbulence, it is found that kinetic effects (or non-fluid effects) manifest through the deformation of the proton velocity distribution function (DF), with patterns of non-Maxwellian features being concentrated near regions of strong magnetic gradients. The direction of the proper temperature anisotropy, calculated in the main reference frame of the distribution itself, has a finite probability of being along or across the ambient magnetic field, in general agreement with the classical definition of anisotropy T ⊥/T ∥ (where subscripts refer to the magnetic field direction). Adopting the latter conventional definition, by varying the global plasma beta (β) and fluctuation level, simulations explore distinct regions of the space given by T ⊥/T ∥ and β∥, recovering solar wind observations. Moreover, as in the solar wind, HVM simulations suggest that proton anisotropy is not only associated with magnetic intermittent events, but also with gradient-type structures in the flow and in the density. The role of alpha particles is reviewed using multi-ion kinetic simulations, revealing a similarity between proton and helium non-Maxwellian effects. The techniques presented here are applied to 1D spacecraft-like analysis, establishing a link between non-fluid phenomena and solar wind magnetic discontinuities. Finally, the dimensionality of turbulence is investigated, for the first time, via 6D HVM simulations (3D in both spaces). These preliminary results provide support for several previously reported studies based on 2.5D simulations, confirming several basic conclusions. This connection between kinetic features and turbulence open a new path on the study of processes such as heating, particle acceleration, and temperature

  7. Plasma interfacial mixing layers: Comparisons of fluid and kinetic models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vold, Erik; Yin, Lin; Taitano, William; Albright, B. J.; Chacon, Luis; Simakov, Andrei; Molvig, Kim

    2016-10-01

    We examine plasma transport across an initial discontinuity between two species by comparing fluid and kinetic models. The fluid model employs a kinetic theory approximation for plasma transport in the limit of small Knudsen number. The kinetic simulations include explicit particle-in-cell simulations (VPIC) and a new implicit Vlasov-Fokker-Planck code, iFP. The two kinetic methods are shown to be in close agreement for many aspects of the mixing dynamics at early times (to several hundred collision times). The fluid model captures some of the earliest time dynamic behavior seen in the kinetic results, and also generally agrees with iFP at late times when the total pressure gradient relaxes and the species transport is dominated by slow diffusive processes. The results show three distinct phases of the mixing: a pressure discontinuity forms across the initial interface (on times of a few collisions), the pressure perturbations propagate away from the interfacial mixing region (on time scales of an acoustic transit) and at late times the pressure relaxes in the mix region leaving a non-zero center of mass flow velocity. The center of mass velocity associated with the outward propagating pressure waves is required to conserve momentum in the rest frame. Work performed under the auspices of the U.S. DOE by the LANS, LLC, Los Alamos National Laboratory under Contract No. DE-AC52-06NA25396. Funding provided by the Advanced Simulation and Computing (ASC) Program.

  8. Effects of annealing temperature on crystallisation kinetics and properties of polycrystalline Si thin films and solar cells on glass fabricated by plasma enhanced chemical vapour deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tao Yuguo, E-mail: yuguo.tao@hotmail.com [Photovoltaics Centre of Excellence, University of New South Wales, Sydney NSW 2052 (Australia); Varlamov, Sergey; Jin, Guangyao [Photovoltaics Centre of Excellence, University of New South Wales, Sydney NSW 2052 (Australia); Wolf, Michael; Egan, Renate [CSG Solar Pty Ltd, Sydney, NSW (Australia)

    2011-10-31

    Solid-phase crystallisation of Si thin films on glass fabricated by plasma enhanced chemical vapour deposition is compared at different annealing temperatures. Four independent techniques, optical transmission microscopy, Raman and UV reflectance spectroscopy, and X-ray diffraction, are used to characterise the crystallisation kinetics and film properties. The 1.5 {mu}m thick films with the n+/p-/p+ solar cell structure have incubation times of about 300, 53, and 14 min and full crystallisation times of about 855, 128, and 30 min at 600 deg. C, 640 deg. C, and 680 deg. C respectively. Estimated activation energies for incubation and crystal growth are 2.7 and 3.2 eV respectively. The average grain size in the resulting polycrystalline Si films measured from scanning electron microscopy images gradually decreases with a higher annealing temperature and the crystal quality becomes poorer according to the Raman, UV reflection, and X-ray diffraction results. The dopant activation and majority carrier mobilities in heavily doped n+ and p+ layers are similar for all crystallisation temperatures. Both the open-circuit voltage and the spectral response are lower for the cells crystallised at higher temperatures and the minority carrier diffusion lengths are shorter accordingly although they are still longer than the cell thickness for all annealing temperatures. The results indicate that shortening the crystallisation time by merely increasing the crystallisation temperature offers little or no merits for PECVD polycrystalline Si thin-film solar cells on glass.

  9. Kinetics of wet sodium vapor complex plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishra, S. K.; Sodha, M. S.

    2014-04-01

    In this paper, we have investigated the kinetics of wet (partially condensed) Sodium vapor, which comprises of electrons, ions, neutral atoms, and Sodium droplets (i) in thermal equilibrium and (ii) when irradiated by light. The formulation includes the balance of charge over the droplets, number balance of the plasma constituents, and energy balance of the electrons. In order to evaluate the droplet charge, a phenomenon for de-charging of the droplets, viz., evaporation of positive Sodium ions from the surface has been considered in addition to electron emission and electron/ion accretion. The analysis has been utilized to evaluate the steady state parameters of such complex plasmas (i) in thermal equilibrium and (ii) when irradiated; the results have been graphically illustrated. As a significant outcome irradiated, Sodium droplets are seen to acquire large positive potential, with consequent enhancement in the electron density.

  10. Hydrogen atom kinetics in capacitively coupled plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nunomura, Shota; Katayama, Hirotaka; Yoshida, Isao

    2017-05-01

    Hydrogen (H) atom kinetics has been investigated in capacitively coupled very high frequency (VHF) discharges at powers of 16-780 mW cm-2 and H2 gas pressures of 0.1-2 Torr. The H atom density has been measured using vacuum ultra violet absorption spectroscopy (VUVAS) with a micro-discharge hollow cathode lamp as a VUV light source. The measurements have been performed in two different electrode configurations of discharges: conventional parallel-plate diode and triode with an intermediate mesh electrode. We find that in the triode configuration, the H atom density is strongly reduced across the mesh electrode. The H atom density varies from ˜1012 cm-3 to ˜1010 cm-3 by crossing the mesh with 0.2 mm in thickness and 36% in aperture ratio. The fluid model simulations for VHF discharge plasmas have been performed to study the H atom generation, diffusion and recombination kinetics. The simulations suggest that H atoms are generated in the bulk plasma, by the electron impact dissociation (e + H2 \\to e + 2H) and the ion-molecule reaction (H2 + + H2 \\to {{{H}}}3+ + H). The diffusion of H atoms is strongly limited by a mesh electrode, and thus the mesh geometry influences the spatial distribution of the H atoms. The loss of H atoms is dominated by the surface recombination.

  11. Accelerated simulation methods for plasma kinetics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caflisch, Russel

    2016-11-01

    Collisional kinetics is a multiscale phenomenon due to the disparity between the continuum (fluid) and the collisional (particle) length scales. This paper describes a class of simulation methods for gases and plasmas, and acceleration techniques for improving their speed and accuracy. Starting from the Landau-Fokker-Planck equation for plasmas, the focus will be on a binary collision model that is solved using a Direct Simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) method. Acceleration of this method is achieved by coupling the particle method to a continuum fluid description. The velocity distribution function f is represented as a combination of a Maxwellian M (the thermal component) and a set of discrete particles fp (the kinetic component). For systems that are close to (local) equilibrium, this reduces the number N of simulated particles that are required to represent f for a given level of accuracy. We present two methods for exploiting this representation. In the first method, equilibration of particles in fp, as well as disequilibration of particles from M, due to the collision process, is represented by a thermalization/dethermalization step that employs an entropy criterion. Efficiency of the representation is greatly increased by inclusion of particles with negative weights. This significantly complicates the simulation, but the second method is a tractable approach for negatively weighted particles. The accelerated simulation method is compared with standard PIC-DSMC method for both spatially homogeneous problems such as a bump-on-tail and inhomogeneous problems such as nonlinear Landau damping.

  12. Generalized Langmuir Waves in Magnetized Kinetic Plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willes, A. J.; Cairns, Iver H.

    2000-01-01

    The properties of unmagnetized Langmuir waves and cold plasma magnetoionic waves (x, o, z and whistler) are well known. However, the connections between these modes in a magnetized kinetic plasma have not been explored in detail. Here, wave properties are investigated by numerically solving the dispersion equation derived from the Vlasov equations both with and without a beam instability present. For omega(sub p)>Omega(sub e), it is shown that the generalized Langmuir mode at oblique propagation angles has magnetic z-mode characteristics at low wave numbers and thermal Langmuir mode characteristics at high wave numbers. For omega(sub p)Langmuir mode instead connects to the whistler mode at low wave numbers. The transition from the Langmuir/z mode to the Langmuir/whistler mode near omega(sub p) = Omega(sub e) is rapid. In addition, the effects on wave dispersion and polarization after adding a beam are investigated. Applications of this theory to magnetized Langmuir waves in Earth's foreshock and the solar wind, to waves observed near the plasma frequency in the auroral regions, and to solar type III bursts are discussed.

  13. Kinetic intermittency in magnetized plasma turbulence

    CERN Document Server

    Teaca, Bogdan; Told, Daniel; Jenko, Frank

    2016-01-01

    We employ magnetized plasma turbulence, described by a gyrokinetic formalism in an interval ranging from the end of the fluid scales to the electron gyroradius, to introduce the first study of kinetic intermittency, in which nonlinear structures formed directly in the distribution functions are analyzed by accounting for velocity space correlations generated by linear (Landau resonance) and nonlinear phase mixing. Electron structures are found to be strongly intermittent and dominated by linear phase mixing, while nonlinear phase mixing dominates the weakly intermittent ions. This is the first time spatial intermittency and linear phase mixing are shown to be self-consistently linked for the electrons and, as the magnetic field follows the intermittency of the electrons at small scales, explain why magnetic islands are places dominated by Landau damping in steady state turbulence.

  14. Atomic kinetics of a neon photoionized plasma experiment at Z

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayes, Daniel C.; Mancini, Roberto; E Bailey, James; Loisel, Guillaume; Rochau, Gregory

    2017-06-01

    We discuss an experimental effort to study the atomic kinetics in neon photoionized plasmas via K-shell line absorption spectroscopy. The experiment employs the intense x-ray flux emitted at the collapse of a Z-pinch to heat and backlight a photoionized plasma contained within a cm-scale gas cell placed at various distances from the Z-pinch and filled with neon gas pressures in the range from 3.5 to 30 torr. The experimental platform affords an order of magnitude range in the ionization parameter characterizing the photoionized plasma from about 3 to 80 erg*cm/s. Thus, the experiment allows for the study of trends in ionization distribution as a function of the ionization parameter. An x-ray crystal spectrometer capable of collecting both time-integrated and time-gated spectra is used to collect absorption spectra. A suite of IDL programs has been developed to process the experimental data to produce transmission spectra. The spectra show line absorption by several ionization stages of neon, including Be-, Li-, He-, and H-like ions. Analysis of these spectra yields ion areal-densities and charge state distributions, which can be compared with results from atomic kinetics codes. In addition, the electron temperature is extracted from level population ratios of nearby energy levels in Li- and Be-like ions, which can be used to test heating models of photoionized plasmas.

  15. Quantum kinetic theories in degenerate plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brodin, Gert; Ekman, Robin; Zamanian, Jens

    2017-01-01

    In this review we give an overview of the recent work on quantum kinetic theories of plasmas. We focus, in particular, on the case where the electrons are fully degenerate. For such systems, perturbation methods using the distribution function can be problematic. Instead we present a model that considers the dynamics of the Fermi surface. The advantage of this model is that, even though the value of the distribution function can be greatly perturbed outside the equilibrium Fermi surface, deformation of the Fermi surface is small up to very large amplitudes. Next, we investigate the short-scale dynamics for which the Wigner-Moyal equation replaces the Vlasov equation. In particular, we study wave-particle interaction, and deduce that new types of wave damping can occur due to the simultaneous absorption (or emission) of multiple wave quanta. Finally, we consider exchange effects within a quantum kinetic formalism to find a model that is more accurate than those using exchange potentials from density functional theory. We deduce the exchange corrections to the dispersion relations for Langmuir and ion-acoustic waves. In comparison to results based on exchange potentials deduced from density functional theory we find that the latter models are reasonably accurate for Langmuir waves, but rather inaccurate for ion acoustic waves.

  16. Ion-neutral gas reactions in a collision/reaction cell in inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry: Correlation of ion signal decrease to kinetic rate constants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gray, Patrick J. [Trace Element Research Laboratory, School of Earth Sciences, The Ohio State University, 125 S. Oval Mall, Columbus, OH 43210 (United States); Department of Chemistry, The Ohio State University, 120 18th Avenue, Columbus, OH 43210 (United States); Olesik, John W., E-mail: olesik.2@osu.edu [Trace Element Research Laboratory, School of Earth Sciences, The Ohio State University, 125 S. Oval Mall, Columbus, OH 43210 (United States)

    2015-03-01

    Reaction gas flow rate dependent Ar{sub 2}{sup +} and Ar{sup +} signals are correlated to fundamental kinetic rate coefficients. A simple calculation, assuming that gas exits the reaction cell due only to effusion, is described to estimate the gas pressure in the reaction cell. The value of the product of the kinetic rate constant and the ion residence time in the reaction cell can be determined from experimental measurement of the decrease in an ion signal as a function of reaction gas flow rate. New kinetic rate constants are determined for the reaction of CH{sub 3}F with Ar{sup +} and Ar{sub 2}{sup +}. - Highlights: • How to determine pressure and the product of the kinetic rate constant times the ion residence time in reaction cell • Relate measured ICP-DRC-MS signals versus gas flow rate to kinetic rate constants measured previously using SIFT-MS • Describe how to determine previously unmeasured kinetic rate constants using ICP-DRC-MS.

  17. Note on quantitatively correct simulations of the kinetic beam-plasma instability

    CERN Document Server

    Lotov, K V; Mesyats, E A; Snytnikov, A V; Vshivkov, V A

    2014-01-01

    A large number of model particles is shown necessary for quantitatively correct simulations of the kinetic beam-plasma instability with the clouds-in-cells method. The required number of particles scales inversely with the expected growth rate, as in the kinetic regime only a narrow interval of beam velocities is resonant with the wave.

  18. Note on quantitatively correct simulations of the kinetic beam-plasma instability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lotov, K. V.; Timofeev, I. V. [Budker Institute of Nuclear Physics SB RAS, 630090 Novosibirsk (Russian Federation); Novosibirsk State University, 630090 Novosibirsk (Russian Federation); Mesyats, E. A.; Snytnikov, A. V.; Vshivkov, V. A. [Institute of Computational Mathematics and Mathematical Geophysics SB RAS, 630090 Novosibirsk (Russian Federation)

    2015-02-15

    A large number of model particles are shown necessary for quantitatively correct simulations of the kinetic beam-plasma instability with the clouds-in-cells method. The required number of particles scales inversely with the expected growth rate, as only a narrow interval of beam velocities is resonant with the wave in the kinetic regime.

  19. Gingival plasma cell granuloma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Phadnaik Mangesh

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Plasma cell granuloma is a rare reactive lesion composed of polyclonal plasma cells. It manifests primarily in the lungs, but may occur in various other anatomic locations like the oral cavity. Intraoral plasma cell granulomas involving the tongue, lip, oral mucosa and gingiva have been reported in the past. This case presents a 54-year-old female with chronic periodontitis and mandibular anterior gingival overgrowth treated by Phase I therapy (scaling and root planing and excisional biopsy. Histological examination revealed inflammatory cell infiltrate containing sheets of plasma cells. Immunohistochemistry for kappa and lambda light chains showed a polyclonal staining pattern confirming a diagnosis of plasma cell granuloma. This case highlights the need to biopsy for unusual lesions to rule out potential neoplasms.

  20. [Acute plasma cell leukemia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monsalbe, V; Domíngues, C; Roa, I; Busel, D; González, S

    1989-01-01

    Plasma Cell Leukemia is a very rare form of plasmocytic dyscrasia, whose clinical and pathological characteristics warrant its recognition as a distinct subentity. We report the case of a 60 years old man who presented a rapidly fatal acute plasma cell leukemia, with multiple osteolytic lesions, hipercalcemia, renal and cardiac failure.

  1. "Angular" plasma cell cheilitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Cunha Filho, Roberto Rheingantz; Tochetto, Lucas Baldissera; Tochetto, Bruno Baldissera; de Almeida, Hiram Larangeira; Lorencette, Nádia Aparecida; Netto, José Fillus

    2014-03-17

    Plasma cell cheilitis is an extremely rare disease, characterized by erythematous-violaceous, ulcerated and asymptomatic plaques, which evolve slowly. The histological characteristics include dermal infiltrate composed of mature plasmocytes. We report a case of Plasma cell angular cheilitis in a 58-year-old male, localized in the lateral oral commissure.

  2. "Angular" plasma cell cheilitis

    OpenAIRE

    da Cunha Filho, Roberto Rheingantz; Tochetto, Lucas Baldissera; Tochetto, Bruno Baldissera; de Almeida Jr, Hiram Larangeira; Lorencette, Nadia Aparecida; Netto, Jose Fillus

    2014-01-01

    Plasma cell cheilitis is an extremely rare disease, characterized by erythematous-violaceous, ulcerated and asymptomatic plaques, which evolve slowly. The histological characteristics include dermal infiltrate composed of mature plasmocytes. We report a case of Plasma cell angular cheilitis in a 58-year-old male, localized in the lateral oral commissure.

  3. Fully implicit kinetic modelling of collisional plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mousseau, V.A.

    1996-05-01

    This dissertation describes a numerical technique, Matrix-Free Newton Krylov, for solving a simplified Vlasov-Fokker-Planck equation. This method is both deterministic and fully implicit, and may not have been a viable option before current developments in numerical methods. Results are presented that indicate the efficiency of the Matrix-Free Newton Krylov method for these fully-coupled, nonlinear integro-differential equations. The use and requirement for advanced differencing is also shown. To this end, implementations of Chang-Cooper differencing and flux limited Quadratic Upstream Interpolation for Convective Kinematics (QUICK) are presented. Results are given for a fully kinetic ion-electron problem with a self consistent electric field calculated from the ion and electron distribution functions. This numerical method, including advanced differencing, provides accurate solutions, which quickly converge on workstation class machines. It is demonstrated that efficient steady-state solutions can be achieved to the non-linear integro-differential equation, obtaining quadratic convergence, without incurring the large memory requirements of an integral operator. Model problems are presented which simulate plasma impinging on a plate with both high and low neutral particle recycling typical of a divertor in a Tokamak device. These model problems demonstrate the performance of the new solution method.

  4. Gingival plasma cell granuloma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amitkumar B Pandav

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Plasma cell granuloma, also known as inflammatory pseudotumor is a tumor-like lesion that manifests primarily in the lungs. But it may occur in various other anatomic locations like orbit, head and neck, liver and rarely in the oral cavity. We here report an exceedingly rare case of gingival plasma cell granuloma in a 58 year old woman who presented with upper gingival polypoidal growth. The histopathological examination revealed a mass composed of proliferation of benign spindle mesenchymal cells in a loose myxoid and fibrocollagenous stroma along with dense infiltrate of chronic inflammatory cells predominantly containing plasma cells. Immunohistochemistry for kappa and lambda light chains showed a polyclonal staining pattern confirming a diagnosis of plasma cell granuloma.

  5. Application of Nonlocal Electron Kinetics to Plasma Technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaganovich, Igor D.

    2011-10-01

    Partially ionized plasmas are typically in a highly non-equilibrium thermodynamic state: the electrons are not in equilibrium with the neutral particle species or the ions, and the electrons are also not in equilibrium within their own ensemble, which results in a significant departure of the electron velocity distribution function (EVDF) from a Maxwellian. These non-equilibrium conditions provide considerable freedom to choose optimal plasma parameters for applications, which make gas-discharge plasmas remarkable tools for a variety of plasma applications, including plasma processing, discharge lighting, plasma propulsion, particle beam sources, and nanotechnology. Significant progress in understanding the formation of non-Maxwellian EVDF in the self-consistent electric fields has been one of the major achievements in the low-temperature plasmas during the last decade. This progress was made possible by a synergy between full-scale particle-in-cell simulations, analytical models, and experiments. Specific examples include rf discharges, dc discharges with auxiliary electrodes, Hall thruster discharges. In each example, nonlocal kinetic effects are identified as the main mechanisms responsible for the surprising degree of discharge self-organization. These phenomena include: explosive generation of cold electrons with rf power increase in low-pressure rf discharges; abrupt changes in discharge structure with increased bias voltage on a third electrode in a dc discharge with hot cathode; absence of a steady-state regime in Hall thruster discharges with intense secondary electron emission due to coupling of the sheath properties and the EVDF. In collaboration with Y. Raitses, A.V. Khrabrov, M. Campanell, V. I. Demidov, D. Sydorenko, I. Schweigert, and A. S. Mustafaev. Research supported by the U.S. Department of Energy.

  6. A Global Modeling Framework for Plasma Kinetics: Development and Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parsey, Guy Morland

    The modern study of plasmas, and applications thereof, has developed synchronously with com- puter capabilities since the mid-1950s. Complexities inherent to these charged-particle, many- body, systems have resulted in the development of multiple simulation methods (particle-in-cell, fluid, global modeling, etc.) in order to both explain observed phenomena and predict outcomes of plasma applications. Recognizing that different algorithms are chosen to best address specific topics of interest, this thesis centers around the development of an open-source global model frame- work for the focused study of non-equilibrium plasma kinetics. After verification and validation of the framework, it was used to study two physical phenomena: plasma-assisted combustion and the recently proposed optically-pumped rare gas metastable laser. Global models permeate chemistry and plasma science, relying on spatial averaging to focus attention on the dynamics of reaction networks. Defined by a set of species continuity and energy conservation equations, the required data and constructed systems are conceptually similar across most applications, providing a light platform for exploratory and result-search parameter scan- ning. Unfortunately, it is common practice for custom code to be developed for each application-- an enormous duplication of effort which negatively affects the quality of the software produced. Presented herein, the Python-based Kinetic Global Modeling framework (KGMf) was designed to support all modeling phases: collection and analysis of reaction data, construction of an exportable system of model ODEs, and a platform for interactive evaluation and post-processing analysis. A symbolic ODE system is constructed for interactive manipulation and generation of a Jacobian, both of which are compiled as operation-optimized C-code. Plasma-assisted combustion and ignition (PAC/PAI) embody the modernization of burning fuel by opening up new avenues of control and optimization

  7. Plasma Cell Cheilitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thami Gurvinder P

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available A case of plasma cell cheilitis with good response to glucocorticoids, is described for its rarity and probable aetiological correlation with habit of use of nasal snuff is discussed.

  8. Magnetic Null Points in Kinetic Simulations of Space Plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olshevsky, Vyacheslav; Deca, Jan; Divin, Andrey; Peng, Ivy Bo; Markidis, Stefano; Innocenti, Maria Elena; Cazzola, Emanuele; Lapenta, Giovanni

    2016-03-01

    We present a systematic attempt to study magnetic null points and the associated magnetic energy conversion in kinetic particle-in-cell simulations of various plasma configurations. We address three-dimensional simulations performed with the semi-implicit kinetic electromagnetic code iPic3D in different setups: variations of a Harris current sheet, dipolar and quadrupolar magnetospheres interacting with the solar wind, and a relaxing turbulent configuration with multiple null points. Spiral nulls are more likely created in space plasmas: in all our simulations except lunar magnetic anomaly (LMA) and quadrupolar mini-magnetosphere the number of spiral nulls prevails over the number of radial nulls by a factor of 3-9. We show that often magnetic nulls do not indicate the regions of intensive energy dissipation. Energy dissipation events caused by topological bifurcations at radial nulls are rather rare and short-lived. The so-called X-lines formed by the radial nulls in the Harris current sheet and LMA simulations are rather stable and do not exhibit any energy dissipation. Energy dissipation is more powerful in the vicinity of spiral nulls enclosed by magnetic flux ropes with strong currents at their axes (their cross sections resemble 2D magnetic islands). These null lines reminiscent of Z-pinches efficiently dissipate magnetic energy due to secondary instabilities such as the two-stream or kinking instability, accompanied by changes in magnetic topology. Current enhancements accompanied by spiral nulls may signal magnetic energy conversion sites in the observational data.

  9. Magnetic null points in kinetic simulations of space plasmas

    CERN Document Server

    Olshevsky, Vyacheslav; Divin, Andrey; Peng, Ivy Bo; Markidis, Stefano; Innocenti, Maria Elena; Cazzola, Emanuele; Lapenta, Giovanni

    2015-01-01

    We present a systematic attempt to study magnetic null points and the associated magnetic energy conversion in kinetic Particle-in-Cell simulations of various plasma configurations. We address three-dimensional simulations performed with the semi-implicit kinetic electromagnetic code iPic3D in different setups: variations of a Harris current sheet, dipolar and quadrupolar magnetospheres interacting with the solar wind; and a relaxing turbulent configuration with multiple null points. Spiral nulls are more likely created in space plasmas: in all our simulations except lunar magnetic anomaly and quadrupolar mini-magnetosphere the number of spiral nulls prevails over the number of radial nulls by a factor of 3-9. We show that often magnetic nulls do not indicate the regions of intensive energy dissipation. Energy dissipation events caused by topological bifurcations at radial nulls are rather rare and short-lived. The so-called X-lines formed by the radial nulls in the Harris current sheet and lunar magnetic ano...

  10. Kinetic Signatures and Intermittent Turbulence in the Solar Wind Plasma

    CERN Document Server

    Osman, K T; Hnat, B; Chapman, S C

    2012-01-01

    A connection between kinetic processes and intermittent turbulence is observed in the solar wind plasma using measurements from the Wind spacecraft at 1 AU. In particular, kinetic effects such as temperature anisotropy and plasma heating are concentrated near coherent structures, such as current sheets, which are non-uniformly distributed in space. Furthermore, these coherent structures are preferentially found in plasma unstable to the mirror and firehose instabilities. The inhomogeneous heating in these regions, which is present in both the magnetic field parallel and perpendicular temperature components, results in protons at least 3--4 times hotter than under typical stable plasma conditions. These results offer a new understanding of kinetic processes in a turbulent regime, where linear Vlasov theory is not sufficient to explain the inhomogeneous plasma dynamics operating near non-Gaussian structures.

  11. Kinetic signatures and intermittent turbulence in the solar wind plasma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osman, K T; Matthaeus, W H; Hnat, B; Chapman, S C

    2012-06-29

    A connection between kinetic processes and intermittent turbulence is observed in the solar wind plasma using measurements from the Wind spacecraft at 1 A.U. In particular, kinetic effects such as temperature anisotropy and plasma heating are concentrated near coherent structures, such as current sheets, which are nonuniformly distributed in space. Furthermore, these coherent structures are preferentially found in plasma unstable to the mirror and firehose instabilities. The inhomogeneous heating in these regions, which is present in both the magnetic field parallel and perpendicular temperature components, results in protons at least 3-4 times hotter than under typical stable plasma conditions. These results offer a new understanding of kinetic processes in a turbulent regime, where linear Vlasov theory is not sufficient to explain the inhomogeneous plasma dynamics operating near non-Gaussian structures.

  12. Local kinetic effects in two-dimensional plasma turbulence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Servidio, S; Valentini, F; Califano, F; Veltri, P

    2012-01-27

    Using direct numerical simulations of a hybrid Vlasov-Maxwell model, kinetic processes are investigated in a two-dimensional turbulent plasma. In the turbulent regime, kinetic effects manifest through a deformation of the ion distribution function. These patterns of non-Maxwellian features are concentrated in space nearby regions of strong magnetic activity: the distribution function is modulated by the magnetic topology, and can elongate along or across the local magnetic field. These results open a new path on the study of kinetic processes such as heating, particle acceleration, and temperature anisotropy, commonly observed in astrophysical and laboratory plasmas.

  13. Good relationship between saliva cotinine kinetics and plasma cotinine kinetics after smoking one cigarette.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuki, Dai; Kikuchi, Akira; Miura, Naoki; Kakehi, Aoi; Onozawa, Masahiro

    2013-11-01

    This study investigated the relationship between plasma and saliva cotinine kinetics after smoking one cigarette and the relationship between cotinine kinetics and estimated nicotine intake, which was calculated as mouth level exposure (MLE) of nicotine, from smoking two test cigarettes with different nicotine yields. This study was conducted in 16 healthy adult Japanese smokers, who did not have null nor reduced-activity alleles of CYP2A6, with a quasi-randomized crossover design of smoking a low-tar cigarette or a high-tar cigarette. Saliva cotinine showed similar concentration profiles to plasma cotinine, and all of the calculated pharmacokinetic parameters of cotinine showed the same values in plasma and saliva. The Cmax and AUC of cotinine showed almost the same dose-responsiveness to the estimated MLE of nicotine between plasma and saliva, but the tmax and t1/2 of cotinine were not affected by the estimated MLE of nicotine in either plasma or saliva. The results show that saliva cotinine kinetics reflects plasma cotinine kinetics, and measurement of saliva cotinine concentration gives the same information as plasma cotinine on the nicotine intake. Thus, saliva cotinine would be a good and less-invasive exposure marker of cigarette smoke, reflecting the plasma cotinine concentration and kinetics.

  14. Kinetic study of ion-acoustic plasma vortices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khan, S. A. [National Centre for Physics (NCP), Quaid-i-Azam University Campus, Islamabad 45320 (Pakistan); Aman-ur-Rehman, E-mail: amansadiq@gmail.com [Pakistan Institute of Engineering and Applied Sciences (PIEAS), P.O. Nilore, Islamabad 45650 (Pakistan); Mendonca, J. T. [IPFN, Instituto Superior Téchnico, Av. Rovisco Pais 1, 1049-001 Lisboa (Portugal)

    2014-09-15

    The kinetic theory of electron plasma waves with finite orbital angular momentum has recently been introduced by Mendonca. This model shows possibility of new kind of plasma waves and instabilities. We have extended the theory to ion-acoustic plasma vortices carrying orbital angular momentum. The dispersion equation is derived under paraxial approximation which exhibits a kind of linear vortices and their Landau damping. The numerical solutions are obtained and compared with analytical results which are in good agreement. The physical interpretation of the ion-acoustic plasma vortices and their Landau resonance conditions are given for typical case of Maxwellian plasmas.

  15. Plasma cell leukemia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fernández de Larrea, C; Kyle, R A; Durie, B G M

    2013-01-01

    Plasma cell leukemia (PCL) is a rare and aggressive variant of myeloma characterized by the presence of circulating plasma cells. It is classified as either primary PCL occurring at diagnosis or as secondary PCL in patients with relapsed/refractory myeloma. Primary PCL is a distinct clinic......-pathological entity with different cytogenetic and molecular findings. The clinical course is aggressive with short remissions and survival duration. The diagnosis is based upon the percentage (≥ 20%) and absolute number (≥ 2 × 10(9)/l) of plasma cells in the peripheral blood. It is proposed that the thresholds...... regimens and bortezomib-based regimens are recommended followed by high-dose therapy with autologous stem cell transplantation if feasible. Allogeneic transplantation can be considered in younger patients. Prospective multicenter studies are required to provide revised definitions and better understanding...

  16. Advances in petascale kinetic plasma simulation with VPIC and Roadrunner

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bowers, Kevin J [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Albright, Brian J [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Yin, Lin [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Daughton, William S [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Roytershteyn, Vadim [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Kwan, Thomas J T [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2009-01-01

    VPIC, a first-principles 3d electromagnetic charge-conserving relativistic kinetic particle-in-cell (PIC) code, was recently adapted to run on Los Alamos's Roadrunner, the first supercomputer to break a petaflop (10{sup 15} floating point operations per second) in the TOP500 supercomputer performance rankings. They give a brief overview of the modeling capabilities and optimization techniques used in VPIC and the computational characteristics of petascale supercomputers like Roadrunner. They then discuss three applications enabled by VPIC's unprecedented performance on Roadrunner: modeling laser plasma interaction in upcoming inertial confinement fusion experiments at the National Ignition Facility (NIF), modeling short pulse laser GeV ion acceleration and modeling reconnection in magnetic confinement fusion experiments.

  17. Energy Conservation Tests of a Coupled Kinetic-kinetic Plasma-neutral Transport Code

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stotler, D. P.; Chang, C. S.; Ku, S. H.; Lang, J.; Park, G.

    2012-08-29

    A Monte Carlo neutral transport routine, based on DEGAS2, has been coupled to the guiding center ion-electron-neutral neoclassical PIC code XGC0 to provide a realistic treatment of neutral atoms and molecules in the tokamak edge plasma. The DEGAS2 routine allows detailed atomic physics and plasma-material interaction processes to be incorporated into these simulations. The spatial pro le of the neutral particle source used in the DEGAS2 routine is determined from the uxes of XGC0 ions to the material surfaces. The kinetic-kinetic plasma-neutral transport capability is demonstrated with example pedestal fueling simulations.

  18. Plasma Cell Disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castillo, Jorge J

    2016-12-01

    Plasma cell disorders are benign, premalignant, and malignant conditions characterized by the presence of a monoclonal paraprotein detected in serum or urine. These conditions are biologically, pathologically, and clinically heterogeneous. There have been major advances in the understanding of the biology of these diseases, which are promoting the development of therapies with novel mechanisms of action. Novel agents such as proteasome inhibitors, immunomodulatory drugs, and monoclonal antibodies have gained approval in the United States and Europe for the treatment of plasma cell disorders. Such therapies are translating into higher rates of response and survival and better toxicity profiles. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Suppression of phase mixing in drift-kinetic plasma turbulence

    CERN Document Server

    Parker, J T; Schekochihin, A A; Dellar, P J

    2016-01-01

    Transfer of free energy from large to small velocity-space scales by phase mixing leads to Landau damping in a linear plasma. In a turbulent drift-kinetic plasma, this transfer is statistically nearly canceled by an inverse transfer from small to large velocity-space scales due to "anti-phase-mixing" modes excited by a stochastic form of plasma echo. Fluid moments (density, velocity, temperature) are thus approximately energetically isolated from the higher moments of the distribution function, so phase mixing is ineffective as a dissipation mechanism when the plasma collisionality is small.

  20. Effective potential kinetic theory for strongly coupled plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baalrud, Scott D.; Daligault, Jérôme

    2016-11-01

    The effective potential theory (EPT) is a recently proposed method for extending traditional plasma kinetic and transport theory into the strongly coupled regime. Validation from experiments and molecular dynamics simulations have shown it to be accurate up to the onset of liquid-like correlation parameters (corresponding to Γ ≃ 10-50 for the one-component plasma, depending on the process of interest). Here, this theory is briefly reviewed along with comparisons between the theory and molecular dynamics simulations for self-diffusivity and viscosity of the one-component plasma. A number of new results are also provided, including calculations of friction coefficients, energy exchange rates, stopping power, and mobility. The theory is also cast in the Landau and Fokker-Planck kinetic forms, which may prove useful for enabling efficient kinetic computations.

  1. The influence of gas-kinetic evolution on plasma reactions

    CERN Document Server

    Diver, D A; MacLachlan, C S; Potts, H E

    2008-01-01

    Plasmas in which there is a threshold for a dominant reaction to take place (such as recombination or attachment) will have particle distributions that evolve as the reaction progresses. The form of the Boltzmann collision term in such a context will cause the distribution to drift from its initial form, and so cause for example temperature fluctuations in the plasma if the distribution is originally Maxwellian. This behaviour will impact on the relevant reaction rates in a feedback loop that is missing from simple chemical kinetic descriptions since the plasma cannot be considered to be isothermal, as is the case in the latter approach. In this article we present a simple kinetic model that captures these essential features, showing how cumulative differences in the instantaneous species levels can arise over the purely chemical kinetic description, with implications for process yields and efficiencies.

  2. MAGNETIC NULL POINTS IN KINETIC SIMULATIONS OF SPACE PLASMAS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Olshevsky, Vyacheslav; Innocenti, Maria Elena; Cazzola, Emanuele; Lapenta, Giovanni [Centre for Mathematical Plasma Astrophysics (CmPA), KU Leuven (Belgium); Deca, Jan [Laboratory for Atmospheric and Space Physics (LASP), University of Colorado Boulder, Boulder, CO (United States); Divin, Andrey [St. Petersburg State University, St. Petersburg (Russian Federation); Peng, Ivy Bo; Markidis, Stefano, E-mail: sya@mao.kiev.ua [High Performance Computing and Visualization (HPCViz), KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Stockholm (Sweden)

    2016-03-01

    We present a systematic attempt to study magnetic null points and the associated magnetic energy conversion in kinetic particle-in-cell simulations of various plasma configurations. We address three-dimensional simulations performed with the semi-implicit kinetic electromagnetic code iPic3D in different setups: variations of a Harris current sheet, dipolar and quadrupolar magnetospheres interacting with the solar wind, and a relaxing turbulent configuration with multiple null points. Spiral nulls are more likely created in space plasmas: in all our simulations except lunar magnetic anomaly (LMA) and quadrupolar mini-magnetosphere the number of spiral nulls prevails over the number of radial nulls by a factor of 3–9. We show that often magnetic nulls do not indicate the regions of intensive energy dissipation. Energy dissipation events caused by topological bifurcations at radial nulls are rather rare and short-lived. The so-called X-lines formed by the radial nulls in the Harris current sheet and LMA simulations are rather stable and do not exhibit any energy dissipation. Energy dissipation is more powerful in the vicinity of spiral nulls enclosed by magnetic flux ropes with strong currents at their axes (their cross sections resemble 2D magnetic islands). These null lines reminiscent of Z-pinches efficiently dissipate magnetic energy due to secondary instabilities such as the two-stream or kinking instability, accompanied by changes in magnetic topology. Current enhancements accompanied by spiral nulls may signal magnetic energy conversion sites in the observational data.

  3. Hydrodynamization and transient modes of expanding plasma in kinetic theory

    CERN Document Server

    Heller, Michal P; Spalinski, Michal

    2016-01-01

    We study the transition to hydrodynamics in a weakly-coupled model of quark-gluon plasma given by kinetic theory in the relaxation time approximation. Our studies uncover qualitative similarities to the results on hydrodynamization in strongly coupled gauge theories. In particular, we demonstrate that the gradient expansion in this model has vanishing radius of convergence. The asymptotic character of the hydrodynamic gradient expansion is crucial for the recently discovered applicability of hydrodynamics at large gradients. Furthermore, the analysis of the resurgent properties of the series provides, quite remarkably, indication for the existence of a novel transient, damped oscillatory mode of expanding plasmas in kinetic theory.

  4. KINETIC THEORY OF PLASMA WAVES: Part II: Homogeneous Plasma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Westerhof, E.

    2010-01-01

    The theory of electromagnetic waves in a homogeneous plasma is reviewed. The linear response of the plasma to the waves is obtained in the form of the dielectric tensor. Waves ranging from the low frequency Alfven to the high frequency electron cyclotron waves are discussed in the limit of the cold

  5. Kinetic theory of plasma waves: Part II homogeneous plasma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Westerhof, E.

    2000-01-01

    The theory of electromagnetic waves in a homogeneous plasma is reviewed. The linear response of the plasma to the waves is obtained in the form of the dielectric tensor. Waves ranging from the low frequency Alfven to the high frequency electron cyclotron waves are discussed in the limit of the cold

  6. Kinetic theory of plasma waves - Part II: Homogeneous plasma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Westerhof, E.

    2008-01-01

    The theory of electromagnetic waves in a homogeneous plasma is reviewed. The linear response of the plasma to the waves is obtained in the form of the dielectric tensor. Waves ranging from the low frequency Alfven to the high frequency electron cyclotron waves axe discussed in the limit of the cold

  7. Kinetic theory of plasma waves: Part II homogeneous plasma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Westerhof, E.

    2000-01-01

    The theory of electromagnetic waves in a homogeneous plasma is reviewed. The linear response of the plasma to the waves is obtained in the form of the dielectric tensor. Waves ranging from the low frequency Alfven to the high frequency electron cyclotron waves are discussed in the limit of the cold

  8. KINETIC THEORY OF PLASMA WAVES: Part II: Homogeneous Plasma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Westerhof, E.

    2010-01-01

    The theory of electromagnetic waves in a homogeneous plasma is reviewed. The linear response of the plasma to the waves is obtained in the form of the dielectric tensor. Waves ranging from the low frequency Alfven to the high frequency electron cyclotron waves are discussed in the limit of the cold

  9. Kinetic theory of plasma waves - Part II: Homogeneous plasma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Westerhof, E.

    2008-01-01

    The theory of electromagnetic waves in a homogeneous plasma is reviewed. The linear response of the plasma to the waves is obtained in the form of the dielectric tensor. Waves ranging from the low frequency Alfven to the high frequency electron cyclotron waves axe discussed in the limit of the cold

  10. Fully kinetic simulations of megajoule-scale dense plasma focus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmidt, A.; Link, A.; Tang, V.; Halvorson, C.; May, M. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore California 94550 (United States); Welch, D. [Voss Scientific, LLC, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87108 (United States); Meehan, B. T.; Hagen, E. C. [National Security Technologies, LLC, Las Vegas, Nevada 89030 (United States)

    2014-10-15

    Dense plasma focus (DPF) Z-pinch devices are sources of copious high energy electrons and ions, x-rays, and neutrons. Megajoule-scale DPFs can generate 10{sup 12} neutrons per pulse in deuterium gas through a combination of thermonuclear and beam-target fusion. However, the details of the neutron production are not fully understood and past optimization efforts of these devices have been largely empirical. Previously, we reported on the first fully kinetic simulations of a kilojoule-scale DPF and demonstrated that both kinetic ions and kinetic electrons are needed to reproduce experimentally observed features, such as charged-particle beam formation and anomalous resistivity. Here, we present the first fully kinetic simulation of a MegaJoule DPF, with predicted ion and neutron spectra, neutron anisotropy, neutron spot size, and time history of neutron production. The total yield predicted by the simulation is in agreement with measured values, validating the kinetic model in a second energy regime.

  11. The Gaussian radial basis function method for plasma kinetic theory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hirvijoki, E., E-mail: eero.hirvijoki@chalmers.se [Department of Applied Physics, Chalmers University of Technology, SE-41296 Gothenburg (Sweden); Candy, J.; Belli, E. [General Atomics, PO Box 85608, San Diego, CA 92186-5608 (United States); Embréus, O. [Department of Applied Physics, Chalmers University of Technology, SE-41296 Gothenburg (Sweden)

    2015-10-30

    Description of a magnetized plasma involves the Vlasov equation supplemented with the non-linear Fokker–Planck collision operator. For non-Maxwellian distributions, the collision operator, however, is difficult to compute. In this Letter, we introduce Gaussian Radial Basis Functions (RBFs) to discretize the velocity space of the entire kinetic system, and give the corresponding analytical expressions for the Vlasov and collision operator. Outlining the general theory, we also highlight the connection to plasma fluid theories, and give 2D and 3D numerical solutions of the non-linear Fokker–Planck equation. Applications are anticipated in both astrophysical and laboratory plasmas. - Highlights: • A radically new method to address the velocity space discretization of the non-linear kinetic equation of plasmas. • Elegant and physically intuitive, flexible and mesh-free. • Demonstration of numerical solution of both 2-D and 3-D non-linear Fokker–Planck relaxation problem.

  12. Complexity Reduction of Collisional-Radiative Kinetics for Atomic Plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-23

    tioned (e.g., for non - Maxwellian kinetics), one must be able to correctly apportion the changes in energy, e.g., to Ee and Eh (for heavy particles) and (b...or disclose the work. 14. ABSTRACT Thermal non -equilibrium processes in partially ionized plasmas can be most accurately modeled by collisional...prohibitively large, making multidimensional and unsteady simulations of non -equilibrium radiating plasma particularly challenging. In this paper, we

  13. Electron plasma wave filamentation in the kinetic regime

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lushnikov, Pavel; Rose, Harvey; Silantyev, Denis

    2016-10-01

    We consider nonlinear electron plasma wave (EPW) dynamics in the kinetic wavenumber regime, 0.25 Bernstein-Greene-Kruskal (BGK) mode. Transverse perturbations of any of these initial conditions grow with time eventually producing strongly nonlinear filamentation followed by plasma turbulence. We compared these simulations with the theoretical results on growth rates of the transverse instability BGK mode showing the satisfactory agreement. Supported by the New Mexico Consortium and NSF DMS-1412140.

  14. Abnormal Kinetic Energy of Charged Dust Particles in Plasmas

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Norman, G.; Stegailov, V.; Timofeev, A.

    A mechanism of the increase of the average kinetic energy of charged dust particles in gas discharge plasmas is suggested. Particle charge fluctuation is the reason for the appearance of forced resonance, which heals vertical oscillations. The energy transfer from vertical oscillations to the

  15. Abnormal Kinetic Energy of Charged Dust Particles in Plasmas

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Norman, G.; Stegailov, V.; Timofeev, A.

    2010-01-01

    A mechanism of the increase of the average kinetic energy of charged dust particles in gas discharge plasmas is suggested. Particle charge fluctuation is the reason for the appearance of forced resonance, which heals vertical oscillations. The energy transfer from vertical oscillations to the horizo

  16. PLASMA CELL LEUKEMIA

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Larrea, Carlos Fernandez; Kyle, Robert A.; Durie, Brian GM; Ludwig, Heinz; Usmani, Saad; Vesole, David H.; Hajek, Roman; Miguel, Jésus San; Sezer, Orhan; Sonneveld, Pieter; Kumar, Shaji K.; Mahindra, Anuj; Comenzo, Ray; Palumbo, Antonio; Mazumber, Amitabha; Anderson, Kenneth C.; Richardson, Paul G.; Badros, Ashraf Z.; Caers, Jo; Cavo, Michele; LeLeu, Xavier; Dimopoulos, Meletios A.; Chim, CS; Schots, Rik; Noeul, Amara; Fantl, Dorotea; Mellqvist, Ulf-Henrik; Landgren, Ola; Chanan-Khan, Asher; Moreau, Philippe; Fonseca, Rafael; Merlini, Giampaolo; Lahuerta, JJ; Bladé, Joan; Orlowski, Robert Z.; Shah, Jatin J.

    2014-01-01

    Plasma cell leukemia (PCL) is a rare and aggressive variant of myeloma characterized by the presence of circulating plasma cells. It is classified as either primary PCL occurring at diagnosis or as secondary PCL in patients with relapsed/refractory myeloma. Primary PCL is a distinct clinic-pathologic entity with different cytogenetic and molecular findings. The clinical course is aggressive with short remissions and survival duration. The diagnosis is based upon the percentage (≥ 20%) and absolute number (≥ 2 × 10 9/L) of plasma cells in the peripheral blood. It is proposed that the thresholds for diagnosis be reexamined and consensus recommendations are made for diagnosis, as well as, response and progression criteria. Induction therapy needs to begin promptly and have high clinical activity leading to rapid disease control in an effort to minimize the risk of early death. Intensive chemotherapy regimens and bortezomib-based regimens are recommended followed by high-dose therapy with autologous stem-cell transplantation (HDT/ASCT) if feasible. Allogeneic transplantation can be considered in younger patients. Prospective multicenter studies are required to provide revised definitions and better understanding of the pathogenesis of PCL. PMID:23288300

  17. The Gaussian radial basis function method for plasma kinetic theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirvijoki, E.; Candy, J.; Belli, E.; Embréus, O.

    2015-10-01

    Description of a magnetized plasma involves the Vlasov equation supplemented with the non-linear Fokker-Planck collision operator. For non-Maxwellian distributions, the collision operator, however, is difficult to compute. In this Letter, we introduce Gaussian Radial Basis Functions (RBFs) to discretize the velocity space of the entire kinetic system, and give the corresponding analytical expressions for the Vlasov and collision operator. Outlining the general theory, we also highlight the connection to plasma fluid theories, and give 2D and 3D numerical solutions of the non-linear Fokker-Planck equation. Applications are anticipated in both astrophysical and laboratory plasmas.

  18. On the drift kinetic equation driven by plasma flows

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shaing, K C [Plasma and Space Science Center and ISAPS, National Cheng Kung University, Tainan 70101, Taiwan (China); Department of Engineering Physics, University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI 53706 (United States)

    2010-07-15

    A drift kinetic equation that is driven by plasma flows has previously been derived by Shaing and Spong 1990 (Phys. Fluids B 2 1190). The terms that are driven by particle speed that is parallel to the magnetic field B have been neglected. Here, such terms are discussed to examine their importance to the equation and to show that these terms do not contribute to the calculations of plasma viscosity in large aspect ratio toroidal plasmas, e.g. tokamaks and stellarators. (brief communication)

  19. Emergence of Kinetic Behavior in Streaming Ultracold Neutral Plasmas

    CERN Document Server

    McQuillen, P; Bradshaw, S; Killian, T C

    2014-01-01

    We create streaming ultracold neutral plasmas by tailoring the photoionizing laser beam that creates the plasma. By varying the electron temperature, we control the relative velocity of the streaming populations, and, in conjunction with variation of the plasma density, this controls the ion collisionality of the colliding streams. Laser-induced fluorescence is used to map the spatially resolved density and velocity distribution function for the ions. We identify the lack of local thermal equilibrium and distinct populations of interpenetrating, counter-streaming ions as signatures of kinetic behavior. Experimental data is compared with results from a one-dimensional, two-fluid numerical simulation.

  20. Modified Enskog Kinetic Theory for Strongly Coupled Plasmas

    CERN Document Server

    Baalrud, Scott D

    2015-01-01

    Concepts underlying the Enskog kinetic theory of hard-spheres are applied to include short-range correlation effects in a model for transport coefficients of strongly coupled plasmas. The approach is based on an extension of the effective potential transport theory [S.~D.~Baalrud and J.~Daligault, Phys.~Rev.~Lett.~{\\bf 110}, 235001 (2013)] to include an exclusion radius surrounding individual charged particles that is associated with Coulomb repulsion. This is obtained by analogy with the finite size of hard spheres in Enskog's theory. Predictions for the self-diffusion and shear viscosity coefficients of the one-component plasma are tested against molecular dynamics simulations. The theory is found to accurately capture the kinetic contributions to the transport coefficients, but not the potential contributions that arise at very strong coupling ($\\Gamma \\gtrsim 30$). Considerations related to a first-principles generalization of Enskog's kinetic equation to continuous potentials are also discussed.

  1. Modified Enskog kinetic theory for strongly coupled plasmas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baalrud, Scott D; Daligault, Jérôme

    2015-06-01

    Concepts underlying the Enskog kinetic theory of hard-spheres are applied to include short-range correlation effects in a model for transport coefficients of strongly coupled plasmas. The approach is based on an extension of the effective potential transport theory [S. D. Baalrud and J. Daligault, Phys. Rev. Lett. 110, 235001 (2013)] to include an exclusion radius surrounding individual charged particles that is associated with Coulomb repulsion. This is obtained by analogy with the finite size of hard spheres in Enskog's theory. Predictions for the self-diffusion and shear viscosity coefficients of the one-component plasma are tested against molecular dynamics simulations. The theory is found to accurately capture the kinetic contributions to the transport coefficients, but not the potential contributions that arise at very strong coupling (Γ≳30). Considerations related to a first-principles generalization of Enskog's kinetic equation to continuous potentials are also discussed.

  2. Preliminary scaling laws for plasma current, ion kinetic temperature, and plasma number density in the NASA Lewis bumpy torus plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roth, J. R.

    1976-01-01

    Parametric variation of independent variables which may affect the characteristics of bumpy torus plasma have identified those which have a significant effect on the plasma current, ion kinetic temperature, and plasma number density, and those which do not. Empirical power law correlations of the plasma current, and the ion kinetic temperature and number density were obtained as functions of potential applied to the midplane electrode rings, the background neutral gas pressure, and the magnetic field strength. Additional parameters studied included the type of gas, the polarity of the midplane electrode rings, the mode of plasma operation, and the method of measuring the plasma number density. No significant departures from the scaling laws appear to occur at the highest ion kinetic temperatures or number densities obtained to date.

  3. Kinetic Modeling of Plasma Methane Conversion Using Gliding Arc

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Antonius Indarto; Jae-Wook Choi; Hwaung Lee; Hyung Keun Song

    2005-01-01

    Plasma methane (CH4) conversion in gliding arc discharge was examined. The result data of experiments regarding the performance of gliding arc discharge were presented in this paper. A simulation which is consisted some chemical kinetic mechanisms has been provided to analyze and describe the plasma process. The effect of total gas flow rate and input frequency refers to power consumption have been studied to evaluate the performance of gliding arc plasma system and the reaction mechanism of decomposition.Experiment results indicated that the maximum conversion of CH4 reached 50% at the total gas flow rate of 1 L/min. The plasma reaction was occurred at the atmospheric pressure and the main products were C (solid), hydrogen, and acetylene (C2H2). The plasma reaction of methane conversion was exothermic reaction which increased the product stream temperature around 30-50 ℃.

  4. Modeling the heating and atomic kinetics of a photoionized neon plasma experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lockard, Tom E.

    Motivated by gas cell photoionized plasma experiments performed by our group at the Z facility of Sandia National Laboratories, we discuss in this dissertation a modeling study of the heating and ionization of the plasma for conditions characteristic of these experiments. Photoionized plasmas are non-equilibrium systems driven by a broadband x-ray radiation flux. They are commonly found in astrophysics but rarely seen in the laboratory. Several modeling tools have been employed: (1) a view-factor computer code constrained with side x-ray power and gated monochromatic image measurements of the z-pinch radiation, to model the time-history of the photon-energy resolved x-ray flux driving the photoionized plasma, (2) a Boltzmann self-consistent electron and atomic kinetics model to simulate the electron distribution function and configuration-averaged atomic kinetics, (3) a radiation-hydrodynamics code with inline non-equilibrium atomic kinetics to perform a comprehensive numerical simulation of the experiment and plasma heating, and (4) steady-state and time-dependent collisional-radiative atomic kinetics calculations with fine-structure energy level description to assess transient effects in the ionization and charge state distribution of the plasma. The results indicate that the photon-energy resolved x-ray flux impinging on the front window of the gas cell is very well approximated by a linear combination of three geometrically-diluted Planckian distributions. Knowledge of the spectral details of the x-ray drive turned out to be important for the heating and ionization of the plasma. The free electrons in the plasma thermalize quickly relative to the timescales associated with the time-history of the x-ray drive and the plasma atomic kinetics. Hence, electrons are well described by a Maxwellian energy distribution of a single temperature. This finding is important to support the application of a radiation-hydrodynamic model to simulate the experiment. It is found

  5. New Combustion Regimes and Kinetic Studies of Plasma Assisted Combustion

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-11-01

    Tasks 8 and 9: Kinetic model validation) Today’s Presentation 2. Multispecies diagnostics in a flow reactor with Mid-IR and molecular beam mass...S-Curve Competition between low T RO2 kinetics high T chain branching reactions 0.00 0.02 0.04 0.06 0.08 0.10 0.12 1x10 5 2x10 5 3x10 5 4x10...in Plasma assisted combustion • LTC in turbulent combustion at engine time scales 0-D modeling of DME /O2/He (0.03/0.1/0.896) ignition, P = 72

  6. Plasma cell granuloma of lip

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B Sabarinath

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Plasma cells are medium-sized round-to-oval cells with eccentrically placed nuclei, usually found in the red pulp of the spleen, tonsils, medulla of the lymph nodes, nasal mucosa, upper airway, lamina propria of the gastrointestinal tract, and sites of inflammation. Plasma cell granuloma is a rare reactive tumor-like proliferation composed chiefly of plasmacytic infiltrate. Here, we present a case of plasma cell granuloma of lip in a female patient.

  7. Kinetic models for the VASIMR thruster helicon plasma source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batishchev, Oleg; Molvig, Kim

    2001-10-01

    Helicon gas discharge [1] is widely used by industry because of its remarkable efficiency [2]. High energy and fuel efficiencies make it very attractive for space electrical propulsion applications. For example, helicon plasma source is used in the high specific impulse VASIMR [3] plasma thruster, including experimental prototypes VX-3 and upgraded VX-10 [4] configurations, which operate with hydrogen (deuterium) and helium plasmas. We have developed a set of models for the VASIMR helicon discharge. Firstly, we use zero-dimensional energy and mass balance equations to characterize partially ionized gas condition/composition. Next, we couple it to one-dimensional hybrid model [6] for gas flow in the quartz tube of the helicon. We compare hybrid model results to a purely kinetic simulation of propellant flow in gas feed + helicon source subsystem. Some of the experimental data [3-4] are explained. Lastly, we discuss full-scale kinetic modeling of coupled gas and plasmas [5-6] in the helicon discharge. [1] M.A.Lieberman, A.J.Lihtenberg, 'Principles of ..', Wiley, 1994; [2] F.F.Chen, Plas. Phys. Contr. Fus. 33, 339, 1991; [3] F.Chang-Diaz et al, Bull. APS 45 (7) 129, 2000; [4] J.Squire et al., Bull. APS 45 (7) 130, 2000; [5] O.Batishchev et al, J. Plasma Phys. 61, part II, 347, 1999; [6] O.Batishchev, K.Molvig, AIAA technical paper 2000-3754, -14p, 2001.

  8. Formation of plasma around a small meteoroid: 1. Kinetic theory

    CERN Document Server

    Dimant, Y S

    2016-01-01

    Every second millions of small meteoroids enter the Earth's atmosphere producing dense plasmas. Radars easily detect these plasmas and researchers use this data to characterize both the meteoroids and the atmosphere. This paper develops a first-principle kinetic theory describing the behavior of particles, ablated from a fast-moving meteoroid, that colliside with the atmospheric molecules. This theory produces analytic expressions describing the spatial structure and velocity distributions of ions and neutrals near the ablating meteoroid. This analytical model will serve as a basis for a more accurate quantitative interpretation of radar measurements and should help calculate meteoroid and atmosphere parameters from radar head-echo observations.

  9. Comparison of linear modes in kinetic plasma models

    CERN Document Server

    Camporeale, Enrico

    2016-01-01

    We compare, in an extensive and systematic way, linear theory results obtained with the hybrid (ion-kinetic and electron-fluid), the gyrokinetic and the fully-kinetic plasma models. We present a test case with parameters that are relevant for solar wind turbulence at small scales, which is a topic now recognized to need a kinetic treatment, to a certain extent. We comment on the comparison of low-frequency single modes (Alfv\\'{e}n/ion-cyclotron, ion-acoustic, and fast modes) for a wide range of propagation angles, and on the overall spectral properties of the linear operators, for quasi-perpendicular propagation. The methodology and the results presented in this paper will be valuable when choosing which model should be used in regimes where the assumptions of each model are not trivially satisfied.

  10. On bias of kinetic temperature measurements in complex plasmas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kantor, M.; Moseev, D.; Salewski, Mirko

    2014-01-01

    The kinetic temperature in complex plasmas is often measured using particle tracking velocimetry. Here, we introduce a criterion which minimizes the probability of faulty tracking of particles with normally distributed random displacements in consecutive frames. Faulty particle tracking results...... in a measurement bias of the deduced velocity distribution function and hence the deduced kinetic temperature. For particles with a normal velocity distribution function, mistracking biases the obtained velocity distribution function towards small velocities at the expense of large velocities, i.e., the inferred...... velocity distribution is more peaked and its tail is less pronounced. The kinetic temperature is therefore systematically underestimated in measurements. We give a prescription to mitigate this type of error....

  11. Kinetic simulation study of one dimensional collisional bounded plasma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1999-01-01

    A self-consistent kinetic simulation study ofone dimensional collisional bounded plasma is presented.The formation of stable sheath potential is investigated.It is found that mass ratio of electron and ion not onlyaffects the level of sheath potential, but also affectsthe ion temperature of system. It is clarified that the effects of secondaryemission electron on both the total potential dropand the temperature are not important.

  12. New aspects of plasma sheet dynamics - MHD and kinetic theory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Wiechen

    Full Text Available Magnetic reconnection is a process of fundamental importance for the dynamics of the Earth's plasma sheet. In this context, the development of thin current sheets in the near-Earth plasma sheet is a topic of special interest because they could be a possible cause of microscopic fluctuations acting as collective non-idealness from a macroscopic point of view. Simulations of the near-Earth plasma sheet including boundary perturbations due to localized inflow through the northern (or southern plasma sheet boundary show developing thin current sheets in the near-Earth plasma sheet about 810 RE tailwards of the Earth. This location is largely independent from the localization of the perturbation. The second part of the paper deals with the problem of the macroscopic non-ideal consequences of microscopic fluctuations. A new model is presented that allows the quantitative calculation of macroscopic non-idealness without considering details of microscopic instabilities or turbulence. This model is only based on the assumption of a strongly fluctuating, mixing dynamics on microscopic scales in phase space. The result of this approach is an expression for anomalous non-idealness formally similar to the Krook resistivity but now describing the macroscopic consequences of collective microscopic fluctuations, not of collisions.

    Key words. Magnetospheric physics (plasma sheet · Space plasma physics (kinetic and MHD theory; magnetic reconnection

  13. A First-Principle Kinetic Theory of Meteor Plasma Formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dimant, Yakov; Oppenheim, Meers

    2015-11-01

    Every second millions of tiny meteoroids hit the Earth from space, vast majority too small to observe visually. However, radars detect the plasma they generate and use the collected data to characterize the incoming meteoroids and the atmosphere in which they disintegrate. This diagnostics requires a detailed quantitative understanding of formation of the meteor plasma. Fast-descending meteoroids become detectable to radars after they heat due to collisions with atmospheric molecules sufficiently and start ablating. The ablated material then collides into atmospheric molecules and forms plasma around the meteoroid. Reflection of radar pulses from this plasma produces a localized signal called a head echo. Using first principles, we have developed a consistent collisional kinetic theory of the near-meteoroid plasma. This theory shows that the meteoroid plasma develops over a length-scale close to the ion mean free path with a non-Maxwellian velocity distribution. The spatial distribution of the plasma density shows significant deviations from a Gaussian law usually employed in head-echo modeling. This analytical model will serve as a basis for more accurate quantitative interpretation of the head echo radar measurements. Work supported by NSF Grant 1244842.

  14. Kinetic and thermodynamic characterization of the interactions between the components of human plasma kinin-forming system and isolated and purified cell wall proteins of Candida albicans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seweryn, Karolina; Karkowska-Kuleta, Justyna; Wolak, Natalia; Bochenska, Oliwia; Kedracka-Krok, Sylwia; Kozik, Andrzej; Rapala-Kozik, Maria

    2015-01-01

    Cell wall proteins of Candida albicans, besides their best known role in the adhesion of this fungal pathogen to host's tissues, also bind some soluble proteins, present in body fluids and involved in maintaining the biochemical homeostasis of the human organism. In particular, three plasma factors - high-molecular-mass kininogen (HK), factor XII (FXII) and prekallikrein (PPK) - have been shown to adhere to candidal cells. These proteins are involved in the surface-contact-catalyzed production of bradykinin-related peptides (kinins) that contribute to inflammatory states associated with microbial infections. We recently identified several proteins, associated with the candidal cell walls, and probably involved in the binding of HK. In our present study, a list of potential FXII- and PPK-binding proteins was proposed, using an affinity selection (on agarose-coupled FXII or PPK) from a whole mixture of β-1,3-glucanase-extrated cell wall-associated proteins and the mass-spectrometry protein identification. Five of these fungal proteins, including agglutinin-like sequence protein 3 (Als3), triosephosphate isomerase 1 (Tpi1), enolase 1 (Eno1), phosphoglycerate mutase 1 (Gpm1) and glucose-6-phosphate isomerase 1 (Gpi1), were purified and characterized in terms of affinities to the human contact factors, using the surface plasmon resonance measurements. Except Gpm1 that bound only PPK, and Als3 that exhibited an affinity to HK and FXII, the other isolated proteins interacted with all three contact factors. The determined dissociation constants for the identified protein complexes were of 10(-7) M order, and the association rate constants were in a range of 10(4)-10(5) M(-1)s(-1). The identified fungal pathogen-host protein interactions are potential targets for novel anticandidal therapeutic approaches.

  15. Kinetic modeling and sensitivity analysis of plasma-assisted combustion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Togai, Kuninori

    Plasma-assisted combustion (PAC) is a promising combustion enhancement technique that shows great potential for applications to a number of different practical combustion systems. In this dissertation, the chemical kinetics associated with PAC are investigated numerically with a newly developed model that describes the chemical processes induced by plasma. To support the model development, experiments were performed using a plasma flow reactor in which the fuel oxidation proceeds with the aid of plasma discharges below and above the self-ignition thermal limit of the reactive mixtures. The mixtures used were heavily diluted with Ar in order to study the reactions with temperature-controlled environments by suppressing the temperature changes due to chemical reactions. The temperature of the reactor was varied from 420 K to 1250 K and the pressure was fixed at 1 atm. Simulations were performed for the conditions corresponding to the experiments and the results are compared against each other. Important reaction paths were identified through path flux and sensitivity analyses. Reaction systems studied in this work are oxidation of hydrogen, ethylene, and methane, as well as the kinetics of NOx in plasma. In the fuel oxidation studies, reaction schemes that control the fuel oxidation are analyzed and discussed. With all the fuels studied, the oxidation reactions were extended to lower temperatures with plasma discharges compared to the cases without plasma. The analyses showed that radicals produced by dissociation of the reactants in plasma plays an important role of initiating the reaction sequence. At low temperatures where the system exhibits a chain-terminating nature, reactions of HO2 were found to play important roles on overall fuel oxidation. The effectiveness of HO2 as a chain terminator was weakened in the ethylene oxidation system, because the reactions of C 2H4 + O that have low activation energies deflects the flux of O atoms away from HO2. For the

  16. Plasma cell granuloma of gingiva

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Balaji Manohar

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Plasma cell granuloma is a rare benign lesion characterized by the infiltration of plasma cells; primarily occurring in the lungs. It is also seen to occur in the brain, kidney stomach, heart, and so on. In the intraoral region it is seen to involve the tongue, oral mucosa, and gingiva. This case presents a 42-year-old female, with an enlargement in the maxillary anterior region, treated by excisional biopsy. Histological evaluation revealed plasma cell infiltrates in the connective tissue. The immunohistochemistry revealed kappa and lambda light chains with a polyclonal staining pattern, which confirmed the diagnosis of plasma cell granuloma.

  17. Elementary Processes and Kinetic Modeling for Hydrogen and Helium Plasmas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberto Celiberto

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available We report cross-sections and rate coefficients for excited states colliding with electrons, heavy particles and walls useful for the description of H 2 /He plasma kinetics under different conditions. In particular, the role of the rotational states in resonant vibrational excitations of the H 2 molecule by electron impact and the calculation of the related cross-sections are illustrated. The theoretical determination of the cross-section for the rovibrational energy exchange and dissociation of H 2 molecule, induced by He atom impact, by using the quasi-classical trajectory method is discussed. Recombination probabilities of H atoms on tungsten and graphite, relevant for the determination of the nascent vibrational distribution, are also presented. An example of a state-to-state plasma kinetic model for the description of shock waves operating in H 2 and He-H 2 mixtures is presented, emphasizing also the role of electronically-excited states in affecting the electron energy distribution function of free electrons. Finally, the thermodynamic properties and the electrical conductivity of non-ideal, high-density hydrogen plasma are finally discussed, in particular focusing on the pressure ionization phenomenon in high-pressure high-temperature plasmas.

  18. The kinetic theory of a dilute ionized plasma

    CERN Document Server

    García-Colin, L S

    2008-01-01

    This book results from recent studies aimed at answering questions raised by astrophycists who use values of transport coefficients that are old and often unsatisfactory. The few books dealing with the rigorous kinetic theory of a ionized plasma are based on the so called Landau (Fokker-Planck) equation and they seldom relate the microscopic results with their macroscopic counterpart provided by classical non-equilibrium thermodynamics. In this book both issues are thoroughly covered. Starting from the full Boltzmann equation for inert dilute plasmas and using the Hilbert-Chapman-Enskog method to solve the first two approximations in Knudsen´s parameter, we construct all the transport properties of the system within the framework of linear irreversible thermodynamics. This includes a systematic study of all possible cross effects (which, except for a few cases, were never treated in the literature) as well as the famous H-theorem. The equations of magneto-hydrodynamics for dilute plasmas, including the rathe...

  19. [Kinetics of inhibitory effect of calix[4]arene C-90 on activity of transporting plasma membrane Ca2+, Mg2+-ATPase of smooth muscle cells].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veklich, T O; Shkrabak, O A; Mazur, Iu Iu; Rodik, R V; Kal'chenko, V I; Kosterin, S O

    2014-01-01

    In experiments on the suspension of myometrium cell plasma membrane, processed by 0.1% digitonin, the inhibitory action of calix[4]arene C-90 (5,11,17,23-tetra(threeftor)methyl(phenilsulphonilimino)-methylamino-25,26,27,28-tetrapropoxy-calix[4]arene) on the activity of Ca2+,Mg2+-ATPase was investigated. The authors also examined the influence of calix[4]arene in different concentration on affinity of enzyme (Ca2,Mg2+-ATPase) for the ATP and ions of Mg and Ca, and its influence on cooperative effect and maximum velocity of ATP hydrolysis. It is shown that calix[4]arene does not influence the affinity of Ca2+,Mg2+-ATPase for the ATP, which means that these two compounds have different binding centers. Also calix[4]arene has no influence on affinity and cooperative effect of Ca ions, if it is used in concentration lower than 50 μM. Calix[4]arene slightly increases coefficient of Ca2+,Mg2+-ATPase activation by magnesium chloride. In all three cases, where ATP, Mg and Ca ions are used to test the impact of calix[4]arene, maximum velocity of ATP hydrolysis significantly decreases. All these results clarify that calix[4]arene implements its inhibitory action through mechanism of uncompetitive inhibition of Ca2+,Mg2+-ATPase activity.

  20. Kinetic and Related Determinants of Plasma Triglyceride Concentration in Abdominal Obesity: Multicenter Tracer Kinetic Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borén, Jan; Watts, Gerald F; Adiels, Martin; Söderlund, Sanni; Chan, Dick C; Hakkarainen, Antti; Lundbom, Nina; Matikainen, Niina; Kahri, Juhani; Vergès, Bruno; Barrett, P Hugh R; Taskinen, Marja-Riitta

    2015-10-01

    Patients with obesity and diabetes mellitus have increased risk of cardiovascular disease. A major cause is an atherogenic dyslipidemia related primarily to elevated plasma concentrations of triglyceride-rich lipoproteins. The aim of this study was to clarify determinants of plasma triglyceride concentration. We focused on factors that predict the kinetics of very-low density lipoprotein 1 (VLDL1) triglycerides. A multicenter study using dual stable isotopes (deuterated leucine and glycerol) and multicompartmental modeling was performed to elucidate the kinetics of triglycerides and apoB in VLDL1 in 46 subjects with abdominal obesity and additional cardiometabolic risk factors. Results showed that plasma triglyceride concentrations were dependent on both the secretion rate (r=0.44, Ptriglycerides and VLDL1-apoB. Liver fat mass was independently and directly associated with secretion rates of VLDL1-triglycerides (r=0.56, Ptriglycerides (r=0.48, Ptriglyceride concentrations in abdominal obesity are determined by the kinetics of VLDL1 subspecies, catabolism being mainly dependent on apoC-III concentration and secretion on liver fat content. Reduction in liver fat and targeting apoC-III may be an effective approach for correcting triglyceride metabolism atherogenic dyslipidemia in obesity. © 2015 American Heart Association, Inc.

  1. 一维动理学数值模拟激光与等离子体的相互作用%Study of laser plasma interactions using one-dimensional particle-in-cell co de in kinetic regime

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    邹长林; 叶文华; 卢新培

    2014-01-01

    利用一维(1D3V)、显式、全电磁、相对论粒子模拟代码研究动理学范畴内激光与等离子体相互作用中的受激拉曼散射,给出了粒子代码的控制方程及其数值离散的详细方案。研究表明:动理学效应在受激拉曼散射不稳定性中十分重要;时间平均的反射率在阈值强度处跃升,在更高的激光强度处达到饱和;受激拉曼背向散射周期性地在次皮秒内爆发,离子效应延迟背向拉曼散射的发生;电子俘获导致了背向拉曼散射出现爆发;Langmuir波的非线性频移使得背向散射达到饱和。%Stimulated Raman scatting (SRS), which is one of the parametric processes of laser-plasma interactions, is examined by an explicit, electromagnetic, relativistic kinetic particle-in-cell code in one dimension. The code algorithm and implementation details are discussed. It is found that kinetic effects are important to SRS instability. Time-averaged reflectivity onsets at threshold intensity, and saturates at higher intensity. Backward SRS bursts in sub-picosecond, periodically. Kinetic ions initially delay the growth of SRS. Electron trapping results in the SRS bursts. The saturation of SRS results from the nonlinear frequency shift of Langmuir wave. Work is underway to add binary Coulomb collision to parallelize it, and to extend the code to 2D3V.

  2. Fully-kinetic simulations of the Rayleigh-Taylor instability in high-energy-density plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alves, E. Paulo; Mori, Warren B.; Fiuza, Frederico

    2016-10-01

    The Rayleigh-Taylor instability (RTI) in high-energy-density (HED) plasmas is a central problem in a wide range of scenarios. It dictates, for instance, the dynamics of supernovae in astrophysical plasmas, and is also recognized as a critical challenge to achieving ignition in inertial confinement fusion. In some of these conditions the Larmor radius or Coulomb mean free path (m.f.p.) is finite, allowing kinetic effects to become important, and it is not fully clear how the development of the RTI deviates from standard hydrodynamic behavior. In order to obtain an accurate description of the RTI in these HED conditions it is essential to capture the self-consistent interplay between collisional and collisionless plasma processes, and the role of self-generated electric and magnetic fields. We have explored the dynamics of the RTI in HED plasma conditions using first-principles particle-in-cell simulations combined with Monte Carlo binary collisions. Our simulations capture the role of kinetic diffusion as well as the self-generated electric (e.g. space-charge) and magnetic (e.g. Biermann battery) fields on the growth rate and nonlinear evolution of the RTI for different plasma conditions. We will discuss how different collisional m.f.p. relative to the collisionless plasma skin depth affect the RTI development. This work was supported by the DOE Office of Science, Fusion Energy Science (FWP 100182).

  3. Closed inductively coupled plasma cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manning, Thomas J.; Palmer, Byron A.; Hof, Douglas E.

    1990-01-01

    A closed inductively coupled plasma cell generates a relatively high power, low noise plasma for use in spectroscopic studies. A variety of gases can be selected to form the plasma to minimize spectroscopic interference and to provide a electron density and temperature range for the sample to be analyzed. Grounded conductors are placed at the tube ends and axially displaced from the inductive coil, whereby the resulting electromagnetic field acts to elongate the plasma in the tube. Sample materials can be injected in the plasma to be excited for spectroscopy.

  4. Neutron Generation and Kinetic Energy of Expanding Laser Plasmas

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HUANG Yong-Sheng; WANG Nai-Yan; DUAN Xiao-Jiao; LAN Xiao-Fei; TAN Zhi-Xin; TANG Xiu-Zhang; HE Ye-Xi

    2007-01-01

    We investigate the kinetic energy of expanding plasma of a solid target heated by a ultra-short and ultra-intense laser pulse and the efficiency of energy coupling between the ultra-intense laser pulse and the solid target, in order to increase the utilization ratio of laser energy and to raise the neutron generation farther. Some new ideas about improving the energy utilization by head-on collisions between the expanding plasmas are proposed. The significance is the raise of generation of shorter duration neutron, of the order of picoseconds, which allows for an increase of energy resolution in time-of-flight experiments and also for the investigation of the dynamics of nuclear processes with high temporal resolution.

  5. Transient processes in cell proliferation kinetics

    CERN Document Server

    Yakovlev, Andrej Yu

    1989-01-01

    A mathematician who has taken the romantic decision to devote himself to biology will doubtlessly look upon cell kinetics as the most simple and natural field of application for his knowledge and skills. Indeed, the thesaurus he is to master is not so complicated as, say, in molecular biology, the structural elements of the system, i. e. ceils, have been segregated by Nature itself, simple considerations of balance may be used for deducing basic equations, and numerous analogies in other areas of science also superficial add to one"s confidence. Generally speaking, this number of impression is correct, as evidenced by the very great theoretical studies on population kinetics, unmatched in other branches of mathematical biology. This, however, does not mean that mathematical theory of cell systems has traversed in its development a pathway free of difficulties or errors. The seeming ease of formalizing the phenomena of cell kinetics not infrequently led to the appearance of mathematical models lacking in adequ...

  6. A physiologically based in silico kinetic model predicting plasma cholesterol concentrations in humans

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pas, van de N.C.A.; Woutersen, R.A.; Ommen, van B.; Rietjens, I.M.C.M.; Graaf, de A.A.

    2012-01-01

    Increased plasma cholesterol concentration is associated with increased risk of cardiovascular disease. This study describes the development, validation, and analysis of a physiologically based kinetic (PBK) model for the prediction of plasma cholesterol concentrations in humans. This model was dire

  7. A physiologically based in silico kinetic model predicting plasma cholesterol concentrations in humans

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pas, N.C.A. van de; Woutersen, R.A.; Ommen, B. van; Rietjens, I.M.C.M.; Graaf, A.A. de

    2012-01-01

    Increased plasma cholesterol concentration is associated with increased risk of cardiovascular disease. This study describes the development, validation, and analysis of a physiologically based kinetic (PBK) model for the prediction of plasma cholesterol concentrations in humans. This model was

  8. Plasma Etching Improves Solar Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bunyan, S. M.

    1982-01-01

    Etching front surfaces of screen-printed silicon photovoltaic cells with sulfur hexafluoride plasma found to increase cell performance while maintaining integrity of screen-printed silver contacts. Replacement of evaporated-metal contacts with screen-printed metal contacts proposed as one way to reduce cost of solar cells for terrestrial applications.

  9. Kinetic Study of Nonequilibrium Plasma-Assisted Methane Steam Reforming

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongtao Zheng

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available To develop a detailed reaction mechanism for plasma-assisted methane steam reforming, a comprehensive numerical and experimental study of effect laws on methane conversion and products yield is performed at different steam to methane molar ratio (S/C, residence time s, and reaction temperatures. A CHEMKIN-PRO software with sensitivity analysis module and path flux analysis module was used for simulations. A set of comparisons show that the developed reaction mechanism can accurately predict methane conversion and the trend of products yield in different operating conditions. Using the developed reaction mechanism in plasma-assisted kinetic model, the reaction path flux analysis was carried out. The result shows that CH3 recombination is the limiting reaction for CO production and O is the critical species for CO production. Adding 40 wt.% Ni/SiO2 in discharge region has significantly promoted the yield of H2, CO, or CO2 in dielectric packed bed (DPB reactor. Plasma catalytic hybrid reforming experiment verifies the reaction path flux analysis tentatively.

  10. Causal kinetic equation of non-equilibrium plasmas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. A. Treumann

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Statistical plasma theory far from thermal equilibrium is subject to Liouville's equation, which is at the base of the BBGKY hierarchical approach to plasma kinetic theory, from which, in the absence of collisions, Vlasov's equation follows. It is also at the base of Klimontovich's approach which includes single-particle effects like spontaneous emission. All these theories have been applied to plasmas with admirable success even though they suffer from a fundamental omission in their use of the electrodynamic equations in the description of the highly dynamic interactions in many-particle conglomerations. In the following we extend this theory to taking into account that the interaction between particles separated from each other at a distance requires the transport of information. Action needs to be transported and thus, in the spirit of the direct-interaction theory as developed by Wheeler and Feynman (1945, requires time. This is done by reference to the retarded potentials. We derive the fundamental causal Liouville equation for the phase space density of a system composed of a very large number of charged particles. Applying the approach of Klimontovich (1967, we obtain the retarded time evolution equation of the one-particle distribution function in plasmas, which replaces Klimontovich's equation in cases when the direct-interaction effects have to be taken into account. This becomes important in all systems where the distance between two points |Δq| ∼ ct is comparable to the product of observation time and light velocity, a situation which is typical in cosmic physics and astrophysics.

  11. Air plasma kinetics under the influence of sprites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordillo-Vázquez, F. J.

    2008-12-01

    A full time-dependent kinetic study is presented for the main microscopic collisional and radiative processes underlying the optical flashes associated with an impulsive (τ = 5 µs) discharge in the form of a single sprite streamer passing through an air region of the mesosphere at three different altitudes (63, 68 and 78 km). The kinetic formalism developed includes the coupling of the rate equations of each of the different species considered (electrons, ions, atoms and molecules) with the Boltzmann transport equation so that, in this way, all the kinetics is self-consistent, although, in the present approach, the electrodynamics (no Poisson equation is considered) is not coupled. The chemical model set up for air plasmas includes more than 75 species and almost 500 reactions. In addition, a complete set of reactions (more than 110) has been considered to take into account the possible impact of including H2O (humid chemistry) in the generated air plasmas. This study also considers the vibrational kinetics of N2 and CO2 and explicitly evaluates the optical emissions associated with a number of excited states of N2, O2, O in the visible, CO2 in the infrared (IR) and ultraviolet (UV) emissions of sprite streamers due to the N2 Lyman-Birge-Hopfield (LBH) and the NO-γ band systems. All the calculations are conducted for midnight conditions in mid-latitude regions (+38°N) and 0° longitude, using as initial values for the neutral species those provided by the latest version of the Whole Atmosphere Community Climate Model (WACCM). According to our calculations, the impact of 4 ppm of H2O is only slightly visible in O_{3}^{-} at 68 and 78 km while it strongly affects the behaviour of the anion CO_{4}^{-} at all the altitudes investigated. The local enhancement of NOx predicted by the present model varies with the altitude. At 68 km, the concentrations of NO and NO2 increase by about one order of magnitude while that of NO3 exhibits a remarkable growth of up to almost

  12. Wakes in complex plasmas: A self-consistent kinetic theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kompaneets, Roman; Morfill, Gregor E; Ivlev, Alexei V

    2016-06-01

    In ground-based experiments with complex (dusty) plasmas, charged microparticles are levitated against gravity by an electric field, which also drives ion flow in the parent gas. Existing analytical approaches to describe the electrostatic interaction between microparticles in such conditions generally ignore the field and ion-neutral collisions, assuming free ion flow with a certain approximation for the ion velocity distribution function (usually a shifted Maxwellian). We provide a comprehensive analysis of our previously proposed self-consistent kinetic theory including the field, ion-neutral collisions, and the corresponding ion velocity distribution. We focus on various limiting cases and demonstrate how the interplay of these factors results in different forms of the shielding potential.

  13. Wakes in complex plasmas: A self-consistent kinetic theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kompaneets, Roman; Morfill, Gregor E.; Ivlev, Alexei V.

    2016-06-01

    In ground-based experiments with complex (dusty) plasmas, charged microparticles are levitated against gravity by an electric field, which also drives ion flow in the parent gas. Existing analytical approaches to describe the electrostatic interaction between microparticles in such conditions generally ignore the field and ion-neutral collisions, assuming free ion flow with a certain approximation for the ion velocity distribution function (usually a shifted Maxwellian). We provide a comprehensive analysis of our previously proposed self-consistent kinetic theory including the field, ion-neutral collisions, and the corresponding ion velocity distribution. We focus on various limiting cases and demonstrate how the interplay of these factors results in different forms of the shielding potential.

  14. The Gaussian Radial Basis Function Method for Plasma Kinetic Theory

    CERN Document Server

    Hirvijoki, Eero; Belli, Emily; Embréus, Ola

    2015-01-01

    A fundamental macroscopic description of a magnetized plasma is the Vlasov equation supplemented by the nonlinear inverse-square force Fokker-Planck collision operator [Rosenbluth et al., Phys. Rev., 107, 1957]. The Vlasov part describes advection in a six-dimensional phase space whereas the collision operator involves friction and diffusion coefficients that are weighted velocity-space integrals of the particle distribution function. The Fokker-Planck collision operator is an integro-differential, bilinear operator, and numerical discretization of the operator is far from trivial. In this letter, we describe a new approach to discretize the entire kinetic system based on an expansion in Gaussian Radial Basis functions (RBFs). This approach is particularly well-suited to treat the collision operator because the friction and diffusion coefficients can be analytically calculated. Although the RBF method is known to be a powerful scheme for the interpolation of scattered multidimensional data, Gaussian RBFs also...

  15. Limitation of the ECRIS performance by kinetic plasma instabilities (invited)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tarvainen, O., E-mail: olli.tarvainen@jyu.fi; Kalvas, T.; Koivisto, H.; Komppula, J.; Kronholm, R.; Laulainen, J. [Department of Physics, University of Jyväskylä, 40500 Jyväskylä (Finland); Izotov, I.; Mansfeld, D. [Institute of Applied Physics, RAS, 46 Ul’yanova St., 603950 Nizhny Novgorod (Russian Federation); Skalyga, V. [Institute of Applied Physics, RAS, 46 Ul’yanova St., 603950 Nizhny Novgorod (Russian Federation); Lobachevsky State University of Nizhny Novgorod (UNN), 23 Gagarina St., 603950 Nizhny Novgorod (Russian Federation); Toivanen, V. [European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN), 1211 Geneva 23 (Switzerland); Machicoane, G. [National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory, Michigan State University, East Lansing, Michigan 48824 (United States)

    2016-02-15

    Electron cyclotron resonance ion source (ECRIS) plasmas are prone to kinetic instabilities due to anisotropic electron velocity distribution. The instabilities are associated with strong microwave emission and periodic bursts of energetic electrons escaping the magnetic confinement. The instabilities explain the periodic ms-scale oscillation of the extracted beam current observed with several high performance ECRISs and restrict the parameter space available for the optimization of extracted beam currents of highly charged ions. Experiments with the JYFL 14 GHz ECRIS have demonstrated that due to the instabilities the optimum B{sub min}-field is less than 0.8B{sub ECR}, which is the value suggested by the semiempirical scaling laws guiding the design of ECRISs.

  16. The Kelvin-Helmholtz instability of boundary-layer plasmas in the kinetic regime

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinbusch, Benedikt; Gibbon, Paul; Sydora, Richard D.

    2016-05-01

    The dynamics of the Kelvin-Helmholtz instability are investigated in the kinetic, high-frequency regime with a novel, two-dimensional, mesh-free tree code. In contrast to earlier studies which focused on specially prepared equilibrium configurations in order to compare with fluid theory, a more naturally occurring plasma-vacuum boundary layer is considered here with relevance to both space plasma and linear plasma devices. Quantitative comparisons of the linear phase are made between the fluid and kinetic models. After establishing the validity of this technique via comparison to linear theory and conventional particle-in-cell simulation for classical benchmark problems, a quantitative analysis of the more complex magnetized plasma-vacuum layer is presented and discussed. It is found that in this scenario, the finite Larmor orbits of the ions result in significant departures from the effective shear velocity and width underlying the instability growth, leading to generally slower development and stronger nonlinear coupling between fast growing short-wavelength modes and longer wavelengths.

  17. Kinetics of virus production from single cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timm, Andrea; Yin, John

    2012-03-01

    The production of virus by infected cells is an essential process for the spread and persistence of viral diseases, the effectiveness of live-viral vaccines, and the manufacture of viruses for diverse applications. Yet despite its importance, methods to precisely measure virus production from cells are lacking. Most methods test infected-cell populations, masking how individual cells behave. Here we measured the kinetics of virus production from single cells. We combined simple steps of liquid-phase infection, serial dilution, centrifugation, and harvesting, without specialized equipment, to track the production of virus particles from BHK cells infected with vesicular stomatitis virus. Remarkably, cell-to-cell differences in latent times to virus release were within a factor of two, while production rates and virus yields spanned over 300-fold, highlighting an extreme diversity in virus production for cells from the same population. These findings have fundamental and technological implications for health and disease.

  18. Release kinetics of platelet-derived and plasma-derived growth factors from autologous plasma rich in growth factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anitua, Eduardo; Zalduendo, Mari Mar; Alkhraisat, Mohammad Hamdan; Orive, Gorka

    2013-10-01

    Many studies have evaluated the biological effects of platelet rich plasma reporting the final outcomes on cell and tissues. However, few studies have dealt with the kinetics of growth factor delivery by plasma rich in growth factors. Venous blood was obtained from three healthy volunteers and processed with PRGF-Endoret technology to prepare autologous plasma rich in growth factors. The gel-like fibrin scaffolds were then incubated in triplicate, in a cell culture medium to monitor the release of PDGF-AB, VEGF, HGF and IGF-I during 8 days of incubation. A leukocyte-platelet rich plasma was prepared employing the same technology and the concentrations of growth factors and interleukin-1β were determined after 24h of incubation. After each period, the medium was collected, fibrin clot was destroyed and the supernatants were stored at -80°C until analysis. The growth factor delivery is diffusion controlled with a rapid initial release by 30% of the bioactive content after 1h of incubation and a steady state release when almost 70% of the growth factor content has been delivered. Autologous fibrin matrix retained almost 30% of the amount of the growth factors after 8 days of incubation. The addition of leukocytes to the formula of platelet rich plasma did not increase the concentration of the growth factors, while it drastically increased the presence of pro-inflammatory IL-1β. Further studies employing an in vitro inflammatory model would be interesting to study the difference in growth factors and pro-inflammatory cytokines between leukocyte-free and leukocyte-rich platelet rich plasma.

  19. Kinetic modelling of runaway electron avalanches in tokamak plasmas

    CERN Document Server

    Nilsson, E; Peysson, Y; Granetz, R S; Saint-Laurent, F; Vlainic, M

    2015-01-01

    Runaway electrons (REs) can be generated in tokamak plasmas if the accelerating force from the toroidal electric field exceeds the collisional drag force due to Coulomb collisions with the background plasma. In ITER, disruptions are expected to generate REs mainly through knock-on collisions, where enough momentum can be transferred from existing runaways to slow electrons to transport the latter beyond a critical momentum, setting off an avalanche of REs. Since knock-on runaways are usually scattered off with a significant perpendicular component of the momentum with respect to the local magnetic field direction, these particles are highly magnetized. Consequently, the momentum dynamics require a full 3-D kinetic description, since these electrons are highly sensitive to the magnetic non-uniformity of a toroidal configuration. A bounce-averaged knock-on source term is derived. The generation of REs from the combined effect of Dreicer mechanism and knock-on collision process is studied with the code LUKE, a s...

  20. Construction of reduced transport model by gyro-kinetic simulation with kinetic electrons in helical plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toda, S.; Nakata, M.; Nunami, M.; Ishizawa, A.; Watanabe, T.-H.; Sugama, H.

    2016-10-01

    A reduced model of the turbulent ion heat diffusivity is proposed by the gyrokinetic simulation code (GKV-X) with the adiabatic electrons for the high-Ti Large Helical Device discharge. The plasma parameter region of the short poloidal wavelength is studied, where the ion temperature gradient mode becomes unstable. The ion heat diffusivity by the nonlinear simulation with the kinetic electrons is found to be several times larger than the simulation results using the adiabatic electrons in the radial region 0.46 ion energy flux. The model of the turbulent diffusivity is derived as the function of the squared electrostatic potential fluctuation and the squared zonal flow potential. Next, the squared electrostatic potential fluctuation is approximated with the mixing length estimate. The squared zonal flow potential fluctuation is shown as the linear zonal flow response function. The reduced model of the turbulent diffusivity is derived as the function of the physical parameters by the linear GKV-X simulation with the kinetic electrons. This reduced model is applied to the transport code with the same procedure as.

  1. Toroidal Electromagnetic Particle-in-Cell Code with Gyro-kinetic Electron and Fully-kinetic ion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Jingbo; Zhang, Wenlu; Liu, Pengfei; Li, Ding

    2016-10-01

    A kinetic simulation model has been developed using gyro-kinetic electron and fully-kinetic ion by removing fast gyro motion of electrons using the Lie-transform perturbation theory. A particle-in-cell kinetic code is developed based on this model in general magnetic flux coordinate systems, which is particularly suitable for simulations of toroidally confined plasma. Single particle motion and field solver are successfully verified respectively. Integrated electrostatic benchmark, for example the lower-hybrid wave (LHW) and ion Bernstein wave (IBW), shows a good agreement with theoretical results. Preliminary electromagnetic benchmark of fast wave at lower hybrid frequency range is also presented. This code can be a first-principal tool to investigate high frequency nonlinear phenomenon, such as parametric decay instability, during lower-hybrid current drive (LHCD) and ion cyclotron radio frequency heating (ICRF) with complex geometry effect included. Supported by National Special Research Program of China For ITER and National Natural Science Foundation of China.

  2. Kinetic analysis of negative power deposition in low pressure plasmas

    CERN Document Server

    Trieschmann, Jan

    2016-01-01

    The negative power absorption in low pressure plasmas is investigated by means of an analyical model which couples Boltzmann's equation and the quasi-stationary Maxwell's equation. Exploiting standard Hilbert space methods an explicit solution for both, the electric field and the distribution function of the electrons for a bounded discharge configuration subject to an unsymmetrical excitation has been found for the first time. The model is applied to a low pressure inductively coupled plasma discharge. In this context particularly the anomalous skin effect and the effect of phase mixing is discussed. The analytical solution is compared with results from electromagnetic full wave particle in cell simulations. Excellent agreement between the analytical and the numerical results is found.

  3. Charged particle dynamics and molecular kinetics in the hydrogen postdischarge plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diomede, P.; Longo, S.; Capitelli, M.

    2006-11-01

    The afterglow of a parallel plate radio frequency discharge in hydrogen is studied by numerical modelling to compare ion dynamics and chemical effects on the behavior of negative ions. While the ion dynamics requires a kinetic description of space dependent plasma relaxation (at least 1D), chemical effects require a vibrational kinetics of hydrogen molecules. Since previous models did not include both features it has not been possible until now to realize both effects in a single simulation. We apply an updated version of the 1D Bari model which includes a 1.5D (1Dr2Dv) Particle in Cell/Monte Carlo (PIC/MC) multispecies module coupled to the space and time dependent master equation for H2(X1Σg+,v=0,…,14) vibrational level population. Negative ion fronts are described in hydrogen for the first time and their impact on the plasma limiting surfaces produces a negative ion current evolution compatible with experimental findings. In the same conditions, the attachment rate overshoot is found to contribute about 7% to the average ion density in the plasma.

  4. Hybrid Kinetic-Fluid Electromagnetic Simulations of Imploding High Energy Density Plasmas for IFE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welch, Dale; Rose, Dave; Thoma, Carsten; Genoni, Thomas; Bruner, Nichelle; Clark, Robert; Stygar, William; Leeper, Ramon

    2011-10-01

    A new simulation technique is being developed to study high current and moderate density-radius product (ρR) z-pinch plasmas relevant to Inertial Fusion Energy (IFE). Fully kinetic, collisional, and electromagnetic simulations of the time evolution of up to 40-MA current (deuterium and DT) z-pinches, but with relatively low ρR, have yielded new insights into the mechanisms of neutron production. At fusion relevant conditions (ρR > 0.01 gm/cm2) , however, this technique requires a prohibitively large number of cells and particles. A new hybrid implicit technique has been developed that accurately describes high-density and magnetized imploding plasmas. The technique adapts a recently published algorithm, that enables accurate descriptions of highly magnetized particle orbits, to high density plasmas and also makes use of an improved kinetic particle remap technique. We will discuss the new technique, stable range of operation, and application to an IFE relevant z-pinch design at 60 MA. Work supported by Sandia National Laboratories.

  5. Magnetohydrodynamic Model for Plasma Instabilities in the Ion-Kinetic Regime

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kuvshinov, B. N.

    1994-01-01

    A magnetized plasma is considered. It is shown that the MHD model provides an adequate description of plasma instabilities in the ion-kinetic regime, where the characteristic scales of the plasma motion fall below the ion Larmor radius. This conclusion is the consequence of the fact that the well kn

  6. Kinetic and radiation-hydrodynamic modeling of x-ray heating in laboratory photoionized plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mancini, Roberto

    2017-06-01

    In experiments performed at the Z facility of Sandia National Laboratories a cm-scale cell filled with neon gas was driven by the burst of broadband x-rays emitted at the collapse of a wire-array z-pinch turning the gas into a photoionized plasma. Transmission spectroscopy of a narrowband portion of the x-ray flux was used to diagnose the plasma. The data show a highly-ionized neon plasma with a rich line absorption spectrum that permits the extraction of the ionization distribution among Be-, Li-, He- and H-like ions. Analysis of the spectra produced atomic ground and low excited state areal densities in these ions, and from the ratio of first-excited to ground state populations in Li-like neon a temperature of 19±4eV was extracted to characterize the x-ray heating of the plasma. To interpret this observation, we have performed data-constrained view-factor calculations of the spectral distribution of the x-ray drive, self-consistent modeling of electron and atomic kinetics, and radiation-hydrodynamic simulations. For the conditions of the experiment, the electron distribution thermalizes quickly, has a negligible high-energy tail, and is very well approximated by a single Maxwellian distribution. Radiation-hydrodynamic simulations with either LTE or NLTE (i.e. non-equilibrium) atomic physics provide a more complete modeling of the experiment. We found that in order to compute electron temperatures consistent with observation inline non-equilibrium collisional-radiative neon atomic kinetics needs to be taken into account. We discuss the details of LTE and NLTE simulations, and the impact of atomic physics on the radiation heating and cooling rates that determine the plasma temperature. This work was sponsored in part by DOE Office of Science Grant DE-SC0014451, and the Z Facility Fundamental Science Program of SNL.

  7. Kinetic effects in the transverse filamentation instability of pair plasmas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D'Angelo M.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The evolution of the filamentation instability produced by two counter-streaming pair plasmas is studied with particle-in-cell (PIC simulations in both one (1D and two (2D spatial dimensions. Radiation friction effects on particles are taken into account. During the nonlinear stage of the instability, a strong broadening of the particle energy spectrum occurs accompanied by the formation of a peak at twice their initial energy. A simple theory of the peak formation is presented. The presence of radiative losses does not change the dynamics of the instability but affects the structure of the particle spectra.

  8. On the modeling of planetary plasma environments by a fully kinetic electromagnetic global model HYB-em

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Pohjola

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available We have developed a fully kinetic electromagnetic model to study instabilities and waves in planetary plasma environments. In the particle-in-a-cell (PIC model both ions and electrons are modeled as particles. An important feature of the developed global kinetic model, called HYB-em, compared to other electromagnetic codes is that it is built up on an earlier quasi-neutral hybrid simulation platform called HYB and that it can be used in conjunction with earlier hybrid models. The HYB models have been used during the past ten years to study globally the flowing plasma interaction with various Solar System objects: Mercury, Venus, the Moon, Mars, Saturnian moon Titan and asteroids. The new stand-alone fully kinetic model enables us to (1 study the stability of various planetary plasma regions in three-dimensional space, (2 analyze the propagation of waves in a plasma environment derived from the other global HYB models. All particle processes in a multi-ion plasma which are implemented on the HYB platform (e.g. ion-neutral-collisions, chemical processes, particle loss and production processes are also automatically included in HYB-em model.

    In this brief report we study the developed approach by analyzing the propagation of high frequency electromagnetic waves in non-magnetized plasma in two cases: We study (1 expansion of a spherical wave generated from a point source and (2 propagation of a plane wave in plasma. The analysis shows that the HYB-em model is capable of describing these space plasma situations successfully. The analysis also suggests the potential of the developed model to study both high density-high magnetic field plasma environments, such as Mercury, and low density-low magnetic field plasma environments, such as Venus and Mars.

  9. Early kinetics of plasma cytomegalovirus DNA load in allogeneic stem cell transplant recipients in the era of highly sensitive real-time PCR assays: does it have any clinical value?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giménez, Estela; Muñoz-Cobo, Beatriz; Solano, Carlos; Amat, Paula; Navarro, David

    2014-02-01

    We report that in a population of allogeneic stem cell transplant recipients, determination of the viral doubling time (dt) of the cytomegalovirus (CMV) DNA plasma load predicted the eventual need for inception of preemptive antiviral therapy, whereas the level of the initial plasma CMV DNA load did not. The data thus indicated that determination of the dt of CMV DNA may be useful in the therapeutic management of CMV infection in this clinical setting.

  10. Modelling dimercaptosuccinic acid (DMSA) plasma kinetics in humans

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Eijkeren, Jan C H; Olie, J Daniël N; Bradberry, Sally M; Vale, J Allister; de Vries, Irma; Meulenbelt, Jan; Hunault, Claudine C

    2016-01-01

    CONTEXT: No kinetic models presently exist which simulate the effect of chelation therapy on lead blood concentrations in lead poisoning. OBJECTIVE: Our aim was to develop a kinetic model that describes the kinetics of dimercaptosuccinic acid (DMSA; succimer), a commonly used chelating agent, that c

  11. Multigrid Particle-in-cell Simulations of Plasma Microturbulence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    J.L.V. Lewandowski

    2003-06-17

    A new scheme to accurately retain kinetic electron effects in particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations for the case of electrostatic drift waves is presented. The splitting scheme, which is based on exact separation between adiabatic and on adiabatic electron responses, is shown to yield more accurate linear growth rates than the standard df scheme. The linear and nonlinear elliptic problems that arise in the splitting scheme are solved using a multi-grid solver. The multi-grid particle-in-cell approach offers an attractive path, both from the physics and numerical points of view, to simulate kinetic electron dynamics in global toroidal plasmas.

  12. Kinetic corrections from analytic non-Maxwellian distribution functions in magnetized plasmas

    OpenAIRE

    Izacard, Olivier

    2016-01-01

    In magnetized plasma physics, almost all developed analytic theories assume a Maxwellian distribution function (MDF) and in some cases small deviations are described using the perturbation theory. The deviations with respect to the Maxwellian equilibrium, called kinetic effects, are required to be taken into account specially for fusion reactor plasmas. Generally, because the perturbation theory is not consistent with observed steady-state non-Maxwellians, these kinetic effects are numericall...

  13. Capacitively coupled hydrogen plasmas sustained by tailored voltage waveforms: vibrational kinetics and negative ions control

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Diomede, P.; Bruneau, B.; Longo, S.; Johnson, E.; Booth, J. P.

    2017-01-01

    A comprehensive hybrid model of a hydrogen capacitively coupled plasmas (CCP), including a detailed description of the molecular vibrational kinetics, has been applied to the study of the effect of tailored voltage waveforms (TVWs) on the production kinetics and transport of negative ions in these

  14. Personalized Whole-Cell Kinetic Models of Metabolism for Discovery in Genomics and Pharmacodynamics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bordbar, Aarash; McCloskey, Douglas; Zielinski, Daniel C

    2015-01-01

    challenge. Here, we constructed multi-omic, data-driven, personalized whole-cell kinetic models of erythrocyte metabolism for 24 healthy individuals based on fasting-state plasma and erythrocyte metabolomics and whole-genome genotyping. We show that personalized kinetic rate constants, rather than......-induced anemia) and how genetic variation (inosine triphosphatase deficiency) may protect against this side effect. This study demonstrates the feasibility of personalized kinetic models, and we anticipate their use will accelerate discoveries in characterizing individual metabolic variation....

  15. Kinetic theory of self-diffusion in a moderately dense one-component plasma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Suttorp, L.G.

    1980-01-01

    A microscopic description of self-diffusion in a moderately dense classical one-component plasma is given on the basis of renormalized kinetic theory. The effects of close binary collisions and of collective interactions in the plasma are taken into account through the use of a composite memory kern

  16. BRIEF COMMUNICATION: On the drift kinetic equation driven by plasma flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaing, K. C.

    2010-07-01

    A drift kinetic equation that is driven by plasma flows has previously been derived by Shaing and Spong 1990 (Phys. Fluids B 2 1190). The terms that are driven by particle speed that is parallel to the magnetic field B have been neglected. Here, such terms are discussed to examine their importance to the equation and to show that these terms do not contribute to the calculations of plasma viscosity in large aspect ratio toroidal plasmas, e.g. tokamaks and stellarators.

  17. Magnetic nulls in three-dimensional kinetic simulations of space plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olshevsky, Vyacheslav; Deca, Jan; Divin, Andrey; Peng, Ivy Bo; Markidis, Stefano; Innocenti, Maria Elena; Cazzola, Emanuele; Lapenta, Giovanni

    2016-04-01

    We present a survey of magnetic nulls and associated energy dissipation in different three-dimensional kinetic particle-in-cell simulations of space plasmas. The configurations under study include: a traditional Harris current sheet and current sheets with asymmetric density distribution, dipolar and quadrupolar planetary magnetospheres, lunar magnetic anomalies, and decaying turbulence. Nulls are detected in the simulation snapshots by the topological degree method. In all runs except the quadrupolar magnetospere the dominating majority of nulls are of spiral topological type. When supported by strong currents, these nulls indicate the regions of strong energy dissipation. Dissipation, often accompanied by the changes in magnetic topology, is caused by plasma instabilities in the current channels or on their interfaces. Radial nulls show less activity, they can be created or destroyed in pairs, via topological bifurcations. Although such events demonstrate energy release, they are rather rare and short-living. An important implication of our study to observations is that magnetic topology should not be considered independently of other plasma properties such as currents.

  18. A Unified Gas Kinetic Scheme for Multi-scale Plasma Transport

    CERN Document Server

    Liu, Chang

    2016-01-01

    A unified gas kinetic scheme (UGKS) for multi-scale and multi-component plasma transport is constructed. The current scheme is a direct modeling method, where the time evolution solutions from the Vlasov-BGK equations for both electron and ion, and the Maxwell equations are used to construct the scale-dependent plasma simulation. As a result, based on the modeling scales of mesh size and time step, the discretized governing equations for the whole plasma regimes are obtained. The UGKS takes into account the electron inertia, full electromagnetic field equations, and separate electron and ion evolution. The physics recovered in UGKS ranges from the kinetic Vlasov equation to the hydrodynamic magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) equations, with a unified treatment in all scales from the collisionless particle transport to the hydrodynamic wave interactions. The UGKS presents a plasma description which is more general than the Vlasov equation in the kinetic scale and all kinds of MHD equations in the hydrodynamic scale, su...

  19. Kinetic description of rotating Tokamak plasmas with anisotropic temperatures in the collisionless regime

    CERN Document Server

    Cremaschini, Claudio

    2011-01-01

    A largely unsolved theoretical issue in controlled fusion research is the consistent \\textit{kinetic} treatment of slowly-time varying plasma states occurring in collisionless and magnetized axisymmetric plasmas. The phenomenology may include finite pressure anisotropies as well as strong toroidal and poloidal differential rotation, characteristic of Tokamak plasmas. Despite the fact that physical phenomena occurring in fusion plasmas depend fundamentally on the microscopic particle phase-space dynamics, their consistent kinetic treatment remains still essentially unchalleged to date. The goal of this paper is to address the problem within the framework of Vlasov-Maxwell description. The gyrokinetic treatment of charged particles dynamics is adopted for the construction of asymptotic solutions for the quasi-stationary species kinetic distribution functions. These are expressed in terms of the particle exact and adiabatic invariants. The theory relies on a perturbative approach, which permits to construct asym...

  20. Air plasma kinetics under the influence of sprites

    OpenAIRE

    Gordillo Vázquez, Francisco J.

    2008-01-01

    A full time-dependent kinetic study is presented for the main microscopic collisional and radiative processes underlying the optical flashes associated with an impulsive (τ = 5 μs) discharge in the form of a single sprite streamer passing through an air region of the mesosphere at three different altitudes (63, 68 and 78 km). The kinetic formalism developed includes the coupling of the rate equations of each of the different species considered (electrons, ions, atoms and molecules) with the B...

  1. Quasi-linear landau kinetic equations for magnetized plasmas: compact propagator formalism, rotation matrices and interaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Misguich, J.H

    2004-04-01

    As a first step toward a nonlinear renormalized description of turbulence phenomena in magnetized plasmas, the lowest order quasi-linear description is presented here from a unified point of view for collisionless as well as for collisional plasmas in a constant magnetic field. The quasi-linear approximation is applied to a general kinetic equation obtained previously from the Klimontovich exact equation, by means of a generalised Dupree-Weinstock method. The so-obtained quasi-linear description of electromagnetic turbulence in a magnetoplasma is applied to three separate physical cases: -) weak electrostatic turbulence, -) purely magnetic field fluctuations (the classical quasi-linear results are obtained for cosmic ray diffusion in the 'slab model' of magnetostatic turbulence in the solar wind), and -) collisional kinetic equations of magnetized plasmas. This mathematical technique has allowed us to derive basic kinetic equations for turbulent plasmas and collisional plasmas, respectively in the quasi-linear and Landau approximation. In presence of a magnetic field we have shown that the systematic use of rotation matrices describing the helical particle motion allows for a much more compact derivation than usually performed. Moreover, from the formal analogy between turbulent and collisional plasmas, the results derived here in detail for the turbulent plasmas, can be immediately translated to obtain explicit results for the Landau kinetic equation.

  2. Electron kinetics in capacitively coupled plasmas modulated by electron injection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ya; Peng, Yanli; Innocenti, Maria Elena; Jiang, Wei; Wang, Hong-yu; Lapenta, Giovanni

    2017-09-01

    The controlling effect of an electron injection on the electron energy distribution function (EEDF) and on the energetic electron flux, in a capacitive radio-frequency argon plasma, is studied using a one-dimensional particle-in-cell/Monte Carlo collisions model. The input power of the electron beam is as small as several tens of Watts with laboratory achievable emission currents and energies. With the electron injection, the electron temperature decreases but with a significant high energy tail. The electron density, electron temperature in the sheath, and electron heating rate increase with the increasing emission energy. This is attributed to the extra heating of the energetic electrons in the EEDF tail. The non-equilibrium EEDF is obtained for strong non-local distributions of the electric field, electron heating rate, excitation, and ionization rate, indicating the discharge has transited from a volume heating (α-mode dominated) into a sheath heating (γ-mode dominated) type. In addition, the electron injection not only modifies the self-bias voltage, but also enhances the electron flux that can reach the electrodes. Moreover, the relative population of energetic electrons significantly increases with the electron injection compared to that without the electron injection, relevant for modifying the gas and surface chemistry reactions.

  3. von K\\'arm\\'an energy decay and heating of protons and electrons in a kinetic plasma

    CERN Document Server

    Wu, P; Matthaeus, W H; Shay, M A; Swisdak, M

    2013-01-01

    Decay in time of undriven weakly collisional kinetic plasma turbulence in systems large compared to the ion kinetic scales is investigated using fully electromagnetic particle-in-cell simulations initiated with transverse flow and magnetic disturbances, constant density, and a strong guide field. The observed energy decay is consistent with the von K\\'arm\\'an hypothesis of similarity decay, in a formulation adapted to magnetohydrodyamics (MHD). Kinetic dissipation occurs at small scales, but the overall rate is apparently controlled by large scale dynamics. At small turbulence amplitude the electrons are preferentially heated. At larger amplitudes proton heating is the dominant effect. In the solar wind and corona the protons are typically hotter, suggesting that these natural systems are in large amplitude turbulence regime.

  4. Von Kármán energy decay and heating of protons and electrons in a kinetic turbulent plasma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, P; Wan, M; Matthaeus, W H; Shay, M A; Swisdak, M

    2013-09-20

    Decay in time of undriven weakly collisional kinetic plasma turbulence in systems large compared to the ion kinetic scales is investigated using fully electromagnetic particle-in-cell simulations initiated with transverse flow and magnetic disturbances, constant density, and a strong guide field. The observed energy decay is consistent with the von Kármán hypothesis of similarity decay, in a formulation adapted to magnetohydrodyamics. Kinetic dissipation occurs at small scales, but the overall rate is apparently controlled by large scale dynamics. At small turbulence amplitudes the electrons are preferentially heated. At larger amplitudes proton heating is the dominant effect. In the solar wind and corona the protons are typically hotter, suggesting that these natural systems are in the large amplitude turbulence regime.

  5. Plasma Boundaries and Kinetic-Scale Electric Field Structures in the Inner Magnetosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malaspina, David; Larsen, Brian; Ergun, R. E.; Skoug, Ruth; Wygant, John; Reeves, Geoffrey; Jaynes, Allison

    2016-07-01

    Recent advances in spacecraft instrumentation have enabled fresh examination of coupling between macro-scale and micro-scale physics in the terrestrial magnetosphere, demonstrating not only that cross-scale interactions are a key component of magnetospheric dynamics, but also that plasma boundaries play a crucial role in mediating cross-scale coupling. We use Van Allen Probe observations to study the cross-scale interaction between inner magnetospheric plasma boundaries (including the plasmapause and injection fronts) and kinetic-scale electric field structures including kinetic Alfven waves, double layers, phase space holes, and nonlinear whistler mode waves. We focus on the spatial distribution of these kinetic structures in the inner magnetosphere and their interaction with plasma boundaries. We demonstrate that both the occurrence probability and amplitude of these structures peak at plasma boundaries. Further, it is found that regions of kinetic-scale electric field structure activity travel with plasma boundaries. These observations imply that kinetic-scale electric field structures are continually generated by instabilities localized to these boundaries, constraining their ability to energize radiation belt particles over large spatial regions.

  6. Inertial-Range Kinetic Turbulence in Pressure-Anisotropic Astrophysical Plasmas

    CERN Document Server

    Kunz, M W; Chen, C H K; Abel, I G; Cowley, S C

    2015-01-01

    A theoretical framework for low-frequency electromagnetic (drift-)kinetic turbulence in a collisionless, multi-species plasma is presented. The result generalises reduced magnetohydrodynamics (RMHD) and kinetic RMHD (Schekochihin et al. 2009) for pressure-anisotropic plasmas, allowing for species drifts---a situation routinely encountered in the solar wind and presumably ubiquitous in hot dilute astrophysical plasmas (e.g. intracluster medium). Two main objectives are achieved. First, in a non-Maxwellian plasma, the relationships between fluctuating fields (e.g., the Alfven ratio) are order-unity modified compared to the more commonly considered Maxwellian case, and so a quantitative theory is developed to support quantitative measurements now possible in the solar wind. The main physical feature of low-frequency plasma turbulence survives the generalisation to non-Maxwellian distributions: Alfvenic and compressive fluctuations are energetically decoupled, with the latter passively advected by the former; the...

  7. Micronucleus formation induced by dielectric barrier discharge plasma exposure in brain cancer cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaushik, Nagendra K.; Uhm, Hansup; Ha Choi, Eun

    2012-02-01

    Induction of micronucleus formation (cytogenetic damage) in brain cancer cells upon exposure of dielectric barrier discharge plasma has been investigated. We have investigated the influence of exposure and incubation times on T98G brain cancer cells by using growth kinetic, clonogenic, and micronucleus formation assay. We found that micronucleus formation rate directly depends on the plasma exposure time. It is also shown that colony formation capacity of cells has been inhibited by the treatment of plasma at all doses. Cell death and micronucleus formation are shown to be significantly elevated by 120 and 240 s exposure of dielectric barrier discharge plasma.

  8. Plasma cells negatively regulate the follicular helper T cell program

    OpenAIRE

    2010-01-01

    B lymphocytes differentiate into antibody-secreting cells under the antigen-specific control of follicular helper T (TFH) cells. Here, we demonstrate that isotype-switched plasma cells expressed MHCII, CD80 and CD86 and intracellular machinery required for antigen presentation. Antigen-specific plasma cells could access, process and present sufficient antigen in vivo to induce multiple TH cell functions. Importantly, antigen-primed plasma cells failed to induce interleukin 21 or Bcl-6 in naïv...

  9. Gas Plasma Effects on Living Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoffels, E.; Sladek, R. E. J.; Kieft, I. E.

    This paper surveys the research activities at the Eindhoven University of Technology (The Netherlands) in the area of biomedical applications of gas discharge plasmas. A non-thermal atmospheric plasma source (the plasma needle) has been developed, and its interactions with living mammalian cells and bacteria are studied. It is concluded that plasma can efficiently kill bacteria without harming the cells, and also influence the cells without causing cell death (necrosis). In future it will lead to applications like skin (wound) and caries treatment.

  10. Kinetic plasma turbulence during the nonlinear stage of the Kelvin-Helmholtz instability

    CERN Document Server

    Kemel, Koen; Lapenta, Giovanni; Califano, Francesco; Markidis, Stefano

    2014-01-01

    Using a full kinetic, implicit particle-in-cell code, iPiC3D, we studied the properties of plasma kinetic turbulence, such as would be found at the interface between the solar wind and the Earth magnetosphere at low latitude during northwards periods. In this case, in the presence of a magnetic field B oriented mostly perpendicular to the velocity shear, turbulence is fed by the disruption of a Kelvin-Helmholtz vortex chain via secondary instabilities, vortex pairing and non-linear interactions. We found that the magnetic energy spectral cascade between ion and electron inertial scales, $d_i$ and $d_e$, is in agreement with satellite observations and other previous numerical simulations; however, in our case the spectrum ends with a peak beyond $d_e$ due to the occurrence of the lower hybrid drift instability. The electric energy spectrum is influenced by effects of secondary instabilities: anomalous resistivity, fed by the development of the lower hybrid drift instability, steepens the spectral decay and, de...

  11. Diffusion kinetics of nitrogen in tantalum during plasma-nitriding

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张德元; 林勤; 曾卫军; 李放; 许兰萍; 付青峰

    2001-01-01

    The activation energies of nitrogen in tantalum on plasma nitriding conditions were calculated according to the experimental data of hardness of plasma-nitriding of tantalum vs time and temperature. The activation energy calculated is 148.873±0.390  kJ/mol. The depth increasing of nitriding layer with time follows square root relation. The nitriding process of tantalum is controlled by diffusion of nitrogen atoms in tantalum solid solution.

  12. [Changes in Kinetics of Chemiluminescence of Plasma as a Measure of Systemic Oxidative Stress in Humans].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sozarukova, M M; Polimova, A M; Proskurnina, E V; Vladimirov, Yu A

    2016-01-01

    Oxidative stress is a pathogenetic factor of many diseases. The control of its level is important for early diagnosis and therapy adjustment. In this work, antioxidant status was estimated in blood plasma. In the system of 2,2'-azo-bis(2-amidinopropane)dihydrochloride-luminol a set of chemiluminescence kinetic curve parameters is proposed for oxidative stress level estimation (the latent period τ(lat) and the increasing of analytical signal ΔI(CL)). Uric acid and albumin were shown as the main components that responsible for changes in chemiluminescence kinetic curve of plasma. Serum albumin undergoes oxidative modification in dose-depend manner under the action of UV irradiation, it causes the enhancement of antioxidant properties. Changes in plasma chemiluminescence kinetics are proposed as a measure of oxidative stress in human body.

  13. Nonlinear kinetic Alfvén waves with non-Maxwellian electron population in space plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masood, W.; Qureshi, M. N. S.; Yoon, P. H.; Shah, H. A.

    2015-01-01

    The present work discusses the effects of non-Maxwellian electron distributions on kinetic Alfvén waves in low-beta plasmas. Making use of the two-potential theory and employing the Sagdeev potential approach, the existence of solitary kinetic Alfvén waves having arbitrary amplitude is investigated. It is found that the use of non-Maxwellian population of electrons in the study of kinetic Alfvén waves leads to solutions corresponding to solitary structures that do not exist for Maxwellian electrons. The present investigation solves the riddle of plasma density fluctuations associated with strong electromagnetic perturbations observed by the Freja satellite. The present findings can also be applied to regions of space where various satellite missions have observed the presence of suprathermal populations of plasma species and where the low β assumption is valid.

  14. Kinetic simulations of ladder climbing by electron plasma waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hara, Kentaro; Barth, Ido; Kaminski, Erez; Dodin, I. Y.; Fisch, N. J.

    2017-05-01

    The energy of plasma waves can be moved up and down the spectrum using chirped modulations of plasma parameters, which can be driven by external fields. Depending on whether the wave spectrum is discrete (bounded plasma) or continuous (boundless plasma), this phenomenon is called ladder climbing (LC) or autoresonant acceleration of plasmons. It was first proposed by Barth et al. [Phys. Rev. Lett. 115, 075001 (2015), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.115.075001] based on a linear fluid model. In this paper, LC of electron plasma waves is investigated using fully nonlinear Vlasov-Poisson simulations of collisionless bounded plasma. It is shown that, in agreement with the basic theory, plasmons survive substantial transformations of the spectrum and are destroyed only when their wave numbers become large enough to trigger Landau damping. Since nonlinear effects decrease the damping rate, LC is even more efficient when practiced on structures like quasiperiodic Bernstein-Greene-Kruskal (BGK) waves rather than on Langmuir waves per se.

  15. General Information about Plasma Cell Neoplasms (Including Multiple Myeloma)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Cell Neoplasms Treatment Research Plasma Cell Neoplasms (Including Multiple Myeloma) Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Plasma ... the throat can make it hard to swallow. Multiple myeloma In multiple myeloma , abnormal plasma cells ( myeloma cells ) ...

  16. Stages of Plasma Cell Neoplasms (Including Multiple Myeloma)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Cell Neoplasms Treatment Research Plasma Cell Neoplasms (Including Multiple Myeloma) Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Plasma ... the throat can make it hard to swallow. Multiple myeloma In multiple myeloma , abnormal plasma cells ( myeloma cells ) ...

  17. Treatment Options for Plasma Cell Neoplasms (Including Multiple Myeloma)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Cell Neoplasms Treatment Research Plasma Cell Neoplasms (Including Multiple Myeloma) Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Plasma ... the throat can make it hard to swallow. Multiple myeloma In multiple myeloma , abnormal plasma cells ( myeloma cells ) ...

  18. Treatment Option Overview (Plasma Cell Neoplasms Including Multiple Myeloma)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Cell Neoplasms Treatment Research Plasma Cell Neoplasms (Including Multiple Myeloma) Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Plasma ... the throat can make it hard to swallow. Multiple myeloma In multiple myeloma , abnormal plasma cells ( myeloma cells ) ...

  19. Kinetics of insulin disappearance from plasma in cortisone-treated normal subjects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ellemann, K; Thorsteinsson, B; Fugleberg, S

    1987-01-01

    The effect of glucocorticoid excess on insulin disappearance from plasma was examined in eight normal men during cortisone treatment (50 mg orally twice daily for 4 d) and in the absence of any medication (control) in random order. Constant infusion of insulin (1-5 mU/kg/min) was used to achieve...... infusions was significantly less in the cortisone study than in the control study, while the parameter estimates for the kinetics of insulin disappearance from plasma were unaffected by cortisone. Thus, insulin action and insulin kinetics in the steady state are dissociated in normal subjects rendered...... insulin resistant by short-term cortisone treatment....

  20. Ion probe beam experiments and kinetic modeling in a dense plasma focus Z-pinch

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmidt, A., E-mail: schmidt36@llnl.gov; Ellsworth, J., E-mail: schmidt36@llnl.gov; Falabella, S., E-mail: schmidt36@llnl.gov; Link, A., E-mail: schmidt36@llnl.gov; McLean, H., E-mail: schmidt36@llnl.gov; Rusnak, B., E-mail: schmidt36@llnl.gov; Sears, J., E-mail: schmidt36@llnl.gov; Tang, V., E-mail: schmidt36@llnl.gov [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, 7000 East Avenue, Livermore CA 94550 (United States); Welch, D. [Voss Scientific, LLC, 418 Washington St SE, Albuquerque NM 87108 (United States)

    2014-12-15

    The Z-pinch phase of a dense plasma focus (DPF) emits multiple-MeV ions in a ∼cm length. The mechanisms through which these physically simple devices generate such high energy beams in a relatively short distance are not fully understood. We are exploring the origins of these large gradients using measurements of an ion probe beam injected into a DPF during the pinch phase and the first kinetic simulations of a DPF Z-pinch. To probe the accelerating fields in our table top experiment, we inject a 4 MeV deuteron beam along the z-axis and then sample the beam energy distribution after it passes through the pinch region. Using this technique, we have directly measured for the first time the acceleration of an injected ion beam. Our particle-in-cell simulations have been benchmarked on both a kJ-scale DPF and a MJ-scale DPF. They have reproduced experimentally measured neutron yields as well as ion beams and EM oscillations which fluid simulations do not exhibit. Direct comparisons between the experiment and simulations enhance our understanding of these plasmas and provide predictive design capability for accelerator and neutron source applications.

  1. Adsorption kinetics of organophosphonic acids on plasma-modified oxide-covered aluminum surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giza, M; Thissen, P; Grundmeier, G

    2008-08-19

    Tailoring of oxide chemistry on aluminum by means of low-pressure water and argon plasma surface modification was performed to influence the kinetics of the self-assembly process of octadecylphosphonic acid monolayers. The plasma-induced surface chemistry was studied by in situ FTIR reflection-absorption spectroscopy (IRRAS). Ex situ IRRAS and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy were applied for the analysis of the adsorbed self-assembled monolayers. The plasma-induced variation of the hydroxide to oxide ratio led to different adsorption kinetics of the phosphonic acid from dilute ethanol solutions as measured by means of a quartz crystal microbalance. Water plasma treatment caused a significant increase in the density of surface hydroxyl groups in comparison to that of the argon-plasma-treated surface. The hydroxyl-rich surface led to significantly accelerated adsorption kinetics of the phosphonic acid with a time of monolayer formation of less than 1 min. On the contrary, decreasing the surface hydroxyl density slowed the adsorption kinetics.

  2. Quartz crystal microbalance for the cardiac markers/antibodies binding kinetic measurements in the plasma samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agafonova, L. E.; Shumyantseva, V. V.; Archakov, A. I.

    2014-06-01

    The quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) was exploited for cardiac markers detection and kinetic studies of immunochemical reaction of cardiac troponin I (cTnI) and human heart fatty acid binding protein (H-FABP) with the corresponding monoclonal antibodies in undiluted plasma (serum) and standard solutions. The QCM technique allowed to dynamically monitor the kinetic differences in specific interactions and nonspecific sorption, without multiple labeling procedures and separation steps. The affinity binding process was characterized by the association (ka) and the dissociation (kd) kinetic constants and the equilibrium association (K) constant, all of which were obtained from experimental data.

  3. Kinetics of HIV-1 in cerebrospinal fluid and plasma in cryptococcal meningitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorge A. Benetucci

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available In order to determine HIV-1 kinetics in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF and plasma in patients with cryptococcal meningitis (CM, we undertook a prospective collection of paired CSF/plasma samples from antiretroviral therapy- free HIV-infected patients with CM. Samples were obtained at baseline (S1 and at the second (S2 and third (S3 weeks of antifungal therapy. HIV-1 CSF concentrations were significantly lower in both S2 and S3 with respect to S1. Plasma concentrations remained stable. HIV-1 concentrations were higher in plasma than CSF in all cases. Patients who survived the episode of CM (but not those who died showed a decrease in CSF viral load, what suggests different viral kinetics of HIV-1 in the CSF according to the clinical course of this opportunistic disease.

  4. Kinetics of HIV-1 in cerebrospinal fluid and plasma in cryptococcal meningitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cecchini, Diego M.; Cañizal, Ana M.; Rojas, Haroldo; Arechavala, Alicia; Negroni, Ricardo; Bouzas, María B.; Benetucci, Jorge A.

    2012-01-01

    In order to determine HIV-1 kinetics in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and plasma in patients with cryptococcal meningitis (CM), we undertook a prospective collection of paired CSF/plasma samples from antiretroviral therapy-free HIV-infected patients with CM. Samples were obtained at baseline (S1) and at the second (S2) and third (S3) weeks of antifungal therapy. HIV-1 CSF concentrations were significantly lower in both S2 and S3 with respect to S1. Plasma concentrations remained stable. HIV-1 concentrations were higher in plasma than CSF in all cases. Patients who survived the episode of CM (but not those who died) showed a decrease in CSF viral load, what suggests different viral kinetics of HIV-1 in the CSF according to the clinical course of this opportunistic disease. PMID:24470944

  5. Kinetics of HIV-1 in cerebrospinal fluid and plasma in cryptococcal meningitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cecchini, Diego M; Cañizal, Ana M; Rojas, Haroldo; Arechavala, Alicia; Negroni, Ricardo; Bouzas, María B; Benetucci, Jorge A

    2012-04-27

    In order to determine HIV-1 kinetics in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and plasma in patients with cryptococcal meningitis (CM), we undertook a prospective collection of paired CSF/plasma samples from antiretroviral therapy-free HIV-infected patients with CM. Samples were obtained at baseline (S1) and at the second (S2) and third (S3) weeks of antifungal therapy. HIV-1 CSF concentrations were significantly lower in both S2 and S3 with respect to S1. Plasma concentrations remained stable. HIV-1 concentrations were higher in plasma than CSF in all cases. Patients who survived the episode of CM (but not those who died) showed a decrease in CSF viral load, what suggests different viral kinetics of HIV-1 in the CSF according to the clinical course of this opportunistic disease.

  6. Plasma Kinetics in the Ethanol/Water/Air Mixture in "Tornado" Type Electrical Discharge

    CERN Document Server

    Levko, D; Chernyak, V; Olszewski, S; Nedybaliuk, O

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents the results of a theoretical and experimental study of plasma-assisted reforming of ethanol into molecular hydrogen in a new modification of the "tornado" type electrical discharge. Numerical modeling clarifies the nature of the non-thermal conversion and explains the kinetic mechanism of nonequilibrium plasma-chemical transformations in the gas-liquid system and the evolution of hydrogen during the reforming as a function of discharge parameters and ethanol-to-water ratio in the mixture. We also propose a scheme of chemical reactions for plasma kinetics description. It is shown that some characteristics of the investigated reactor are at least not inferior to characteristics of other plasma chemical reactors.

  7. Evolution of Excited Convective Cells in Plasmas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pécseli, Hans; Juul Rasmussen, Jens; Sugai, H.

    1984-01-01

    Convective cells are excited externally in a fully ionized magnetized plasma and their space-time evolution is investigated by two-dimensional potential measurements. A positive cell is excited externally by control of the end losses in the 'scrape off' layer of a plasma column produced by surface...

  8. Decohesion Kinetics in Polymer Organic Solar Cells

    KAUST Repository

    Bruner, Christopher

    2014-12-10

    © 2014 American Chemical Society. We investigate the role of molecular weight (MW) of the photoactive polymer poly(3-hexylthiophene) (P3HT) on the temperature-dependent decohesion kinetics of bulk heterojunction (BHJ) organic solar cells (OSCs). The MW of P3HT has been directly correlated to its carrier field effect mobilities and the ambient temperature also affects OSC in-service performance and P3HT arrangement within the BHJ layer. Under inert conditions, time-dependent decohesion readily occurs within the BHJ layer at loads well below its fracture resistance. We observe that by increasing the MW of P3HT, greater resistance to decohesion is achieved. However, failure consistently occurs within the BHJ layer representing the weakest layer within the device stack. Additionally, it was found that at temperatures below the glass transition temperature (∼41-45 °C), decohesion was characterized by brittle failure via molecular bond rupture. Above the glass transition temperature, decohesion growth occurred by a viscoelastic process in the BHJ layer, leading to a significant degree of viscoelastic deformation. We develop a viscoelastic model based on molecular relaxation to describe the resulting behavior. The study has implications for OSC long-term reliability and device performance, which are important for OSC production and implementation.

  9. Exact kinetic theory for the instability of an electron beam in a hot magnetized plasma

    CERN Document Server

    Timofeev, I V

    2013-01-01

    Efficiency of collective beam-plasma interaction strongly depends on the growth rates of dominant instabilities excited in the system. Nevertheless, exact calculations of the full unstable spectrum in the framework of relativistic kinetic theory for arbitrary magnetic fields and particle distributions were unknown until now. In this paper we give an example of such a calculation answering the question whether the finite thermal spreads of plasma electrons are able to suppress the fastest growing modes in the beam-plasma system. It is shown that nonrelativistic temperatures of Maxwellian plasmas can stabilize only the oblique instabilities of relativistic beam. On the contrary, non-Maxwellian tails typically found in laboratory beam-plasma experiments are able to substantially reduce the growth rate of the dominant longitudinal modes affecting the efficiency of turbulent plasma heating.

  10. Kinetic theory of the interaction of gravitational waves with a plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Galtsov, D.V.; Melkumova, E.Iu.

    1983-01-01

    The interaction of weak gravitational waves (GWs) with a plasma is described in terms of kinetic equations and is reduced to the mutual excitation and a energy exchange between the GW, plasmons, and charged particles of the plasma. The approach used is based on elementary quantum considerations, which makes it possible to obtain a closed system of balance equations for the distribution functions of plasma particles, plasmons, and gravitons. The calculation of probabilities included in the balance equations is based on the correspondence principle, which makes it necessary to consider only those processes which accompany gravitational-wave emission. Particular consideration is given to the gravitational susceptibility of the plasma, gravitational-wave generation during the merging of plasma waves, and the 'super-light-speed' Cerenkov emission of gravitational waves from a plasma filament.

  11. Exact kinetic theory for the instability of an electron beam in a hot magnetized plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Timofeev, I. V.; Annenkov, V. V. [Budker Institute of Nuclear Physics SB RAS, Novosibirsk, Russia Novosibirsk State University, Novosibirsk (Russian Federation)

    2013-09-15

    Efficiency of collective beam-plasma interaction strongly depends on the growth rates of dominant instabilities excited in the system. Nevertheless, exact calculations of the full unstable spectrum in the framework of relativistic kinetic theory for arbitrary magnetic fields and particle distributions were unknown until now. In this paper, we give an example of such a calculation answering the question whether the finite thermal spreads of plasma electrons are able to suppress the fastest growing modes in the beam-plasma system. It is shown that nonrelativistic temperatures of Maxwellian plasmas can stabilize only the oblique instabilities of relativistic beam. On the contrary, non-Maxwellian tails typically found in laboratory beam-plasma experiments are able to substantially reduce the growth rate of the dominant longitudinal modes affecting the efficiency of turbulent plasma heating.

  12. Kinetics of binding and geometry of cells on molecular biochips

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chechetkin, V.R. [Theoretical Department of Division for Perspective Investigations, Troitsk Institute of Innovation and Thermonuclear Investigations (TRINITI), Troitsk 142190, Moscow Region (Russian Federation)]. E-mail: chechet@biochip.ru

    2007-07-02

    We examine how the shape of cells and the geometry of experiment affect the reaction-diffusion kinetics at the binding between target and probe molecules on molecular biochips. In particular, we compare the binding kinetics for the probes immobilized on surface of the hemispherical and flat circular cells, the limit of thin slab of analyte solution over probe cell as well as hemispherical gel pads and cells printed in gel slab over a substrate. It is shown that hemispherical geometry provides significantly faster binding kinetics and ensures more spatially homogeneous distribution of local (from a pixel) signals over a cell in the transient regime. The advantage of using thin slabs with small volume of analyte solution may be hampered by the much longer binding kinetics needing the auxiliary mixing devices. Our analysis proves that the shape of cells and the geometry of experiment should be included to the list of essential factors at biochip designing.

  13. The kinetic studies of direct methane oxidation to methanol in the plasma process

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    INDARTO Antonius; CHOI Jae-Wook; LEE Hwaung; SONG Hyung Keun

    2008-01-01

    The research outlined here includes a study of methanol production from direct methane conversion by means of thermal and plasma method. The kinetic study, derived from thermal-based approach, was carried out to investigate thoroughly the possible intermediate species likely to be presented in the process. A set of plasma experiments was undertaken by using dielectric barrier discharge (DBD), classified as non-thermal plasma, done at atmospheric pressure and room temperature. Plasma proc-ess yields more methanol than thermal process at the same methane conversion rates and methane to oxygen feed ratios. Oxidation reaction of thermal process resulted CO and CO2 as the most dominant products and the selectivity reached 19% and 68%, respectively. Moreover, more CO and less CO2 were produced in plasma process than in thermal process. The selectivity of CO and CO2 by plasma was 47% and 20%, respectively. Ethane (C2H6) was detected as the only higher hydrocarbon with a signifi-cant concentration. The concentration of ethane reached 9% of the total products in plasma process and 17% in thermal process. The maximum selectivity of methanol, the target material of this research, was 12% obtained by plasma method and less than 5% by thermal process. In some certain points, the kinetic model closely matched with the experimental results.

  14. Selecting B cells and plasma cells to memory

    OpenAIRE

    2005-01-01

    Humoral immunity appears to be based on immunological memory provided by memory plasma cells, which secrete protective antibodies, and memory B cells, which react to antigen challenge by differentiating into plasma cells. How these differentiation pathways relate to each other, how cells are selected into these memory populations, and how these populations are maintained remains enigmatic.

  15. Growth kinetics and initial stage growth during plasma-enhanced Ti atomic layer deposition

    CERN Document Server

    Kim, H

    2002-01-01

    We have investigated the growth kinetics of plasma-enhanced Ti atomic layer deposition (ALD) using a quartz crystal microbalance. Ti ALD films were grown at temperatures from 20 to 200 deg. C using TiCl sub 4 as a source gas and rf plasma-produced atomic H as the reducing agent. Postdeposition ex situ chemical analyses of thin films showed that the main impurity is oxygen, mostly incorporated during the air exposure prior to analysis. The thickness per cycle, corresponding to the growth rate, was measured by quartz crystal microbalance as a function of various key growth parameters, including TiCl sub 4 and H exposure time, rf plasma power, and sample temperature. The growth rates were independent of TiCl sub 4 exposure above 1x10 sup 3 L, indicating typical ALD mode growth. The key kinetic parameters for Cl extraction reaction and TiCl sub 4 adsorption kinetics were obtained and the growth kinetics were modeled to predict the growth rates based upon these results. Also, the dependency of growth kinetics on d...

  16. Energy transfer and dual cascade in kinetic magnetized plasma turbulence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plunk, G G; Tatsuno, T

    2011-04-22

    The question of how nonlinear interactions redistribute the energy of fluctuations across available degrees of freedom is of fundamental importance in the study of turbulence and transport in magnetized weakly collisional plasmas, ranging from space settings to fusion devices. In this Letter, we present a theory for the dual cascade found in such plasmas, which predicts a range of new behavior that distinguishes this cascade from that of neutral fluid turbulence. These phenomena are explained in terms of the constrained nature of spectral transfer in nonlinear gyrokinetics. Accompanying this theory are the first observations of these phenomena, obtained via direct numerical simulations using the gyrokinetic code AstroGK. The basic mechanisms that are found provide a framework for understanding the turbulent energy transfer that couples scales both locally and nonlocally.

  17. Effect of impurities on kinetic transport processes in fusion plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Braun, Stefanie

    2010-12-10

    Within the framework of this thesis, different problems arising in connection with impurities have been investigated. Collisional damping of zonal flows in tokamaks: Since the Coulomb collision frequency increases with increasing ion charge, heavy, highly charged impurities play an important role in this process. The effect of such impurities on the linear response of the plasma to an external potential perturbation, as caused by zonal flows, is calculated with analytical methods. In comparison with a pure plasma, the damping of the flows occurs, as expected, considerably faster; for experimentally relevant parameters, the enhancement exceeds the effective charge Z{sub eff} of the plasma. Impurity transport driven by microturbulence in tokamaks: With regard to impurities, it is especially important whether the resulting flows are directed inwards or outwards, since they are deleterious for core energy confinement on the one hand, but on the other hand help protecting plasma-facing components from too high energy fluxes in the edge region. A semi-analytical model is presented describing the resulting impurity fluxes and the stability boundary of the underlying mode. The main goal is to bridge the gap between, on the one hand, costly numerical simulations, which are applicable to a broad range of problems but yield scarcely traceable results, and, on the other hand, analytical theory, which might ease the interpretation of the results but is so far rather rudimentary. The model is based on analytical formulae whenever possible but resorts to a numerical treatment when the approximations necessary for an analytical solution would lead to a substantial distortion of the results. Both the direction of the impurity flux and the stability boundary are found to depend sensitively on the plasma parameters such as the impurity density and the temperature gradient. Pfirsch-Schlueter transport in stellarators: Due to geometry effects, collisional transport plays a much more

  18. Comparisons of dense-plasma-focus kinetic simulations with experimental measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmidt, A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Link, A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Welch, D. [Voss Scientific, Inc., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Ellsworth, J. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Falabella, S. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Tang, V. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2014-06-01

    Dense-plasma-focus (DPF) Z-pinch devices are sources of copious high-energy electrons and ions, x rays, and neutrons. The mechanisms through which these physically simple devices generate such high-energy beams in a relatively short distance are not fully understood and past optimization efforts of these devices have been largely empirical. Previously we reported on fully kinetic simulations of a DPF and compared them with hybrid and fluid simulations of the same device. Here we present detailed comparisons between fully kinetic simulations and experimental data on a 1.2 kJ DPF with two electrode geometries, including neutron yield and ion beam energy distributions. A more intensive third calculation is presented which examines the effects of a fully detailed pulsed power driver model. We also compare simulated electromagnetic fluctuations with direct measurement of radiofrequency electromagnetic fluctuations in a DPF plasma. These comparisons indicate that the fully kinetic model captures the essential physics of these plasmas with high fidelity, and provide further evidence that anomalous resistivity in the plasma arises due to a kinetic instability near the lower hybrid frequency.

  19. Comparisons of time explicit hybrid kinetic-fluid code Architect for Plasma Wakefield Acceleration with a full PIC code

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massimo, F.; Atzeni, S.; Marocchino, A.

    2016-12-01

    Architect, a time explicit hybrid code designed to perform quick simulations for electron driven plasma wakefield acceleration, is described. In order to obtain beam quality acceptable for applications, control of the beam-plasma-dynamics is necessary. Particle in Cell (PIC) codes represent the state-of-the-art technique to investigate the underlying physics and possible experimental scenarios; however PIC codes demand the necessity of heavy computational resources. Architect code substantially reduces the need for computational resources by using a hybrid approach: relativistic electron bunches are treated kinetically as in a PIC code and the background plasma as a fluid. Cylindrical symmetry is assumed for the solution of the electromagnetic fields and fluid equations. In this paper both the underlying algorithms as well as a comparison with a fully three dimensional particle in cell code are reported. The comparison highlights the good agreement between the two models up to the weakly non-linear regimes. In highly non-linear regimes the two models only disagree in a localized region, where the plasma electrons expelled by the bunch close up at the end of the first plasma oscillation.

  20. Non-thermal plasma destruction of allyl alcohol in waste gas: kinetics and modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeVisscher, A.; Dewulf, J.; Van Durme, J.; Leys, C.; Morent, R.; Van Langenhove, H.

    2008-02-01

    Non-thermal plasma treatment is a promising technique for the destruction of volatile organic compounds in waste gas. A relatively unexplored technique is the atmospheric negative dc multi-pin-to-plate glow discharge. This paper reports experimental results of allyl alcohol degradation and ozone production in this type of plasma. A new model was developed to describe these processes quantitatively. The model contains a detailed chemical degradation scheme, and describes the physics of the plasma by assuming that the fraction of electrons that takes part in chemical reactions is an exponential function of the reduced field. The model captured the experimental kinetic data to less than 2 ppm standard deviation.

  1. Kinetic analysis and energy efficiency of phenol degradation in a plasma-photocatalysis system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hui-juan; Chen, Xiao-yang

    2011-02-28

    Combination of two kinds of advanced oxidation processes (AOPs) is an effective approach to control wastewater pollution. In this research, a pulsed discharge plasma system with multi-point-to-plate electrode and an immobilized TiO(2) photocatalysis system is coupled to oxidize target pollutant in aqueous solution. Kinetic analysis (pseudo-first order kinetic constant, k) and energy efficiency (energy yield value at 50% phenol conversion, G(50)) of phenol oxidation in different reaction systems (plasma alone and plasma-photocatalysis) are reviewed to account for the synergistic mechanism of plasma and photocatalysis. The experimental results show that higher k and G(50) of phenol oxidation can be obtained in the plasma-photocatalysis system under the conditions of different gas bubbling varieties, initial solution pH and radical scavenger addition. Moreover, the investigation tested hydroxyl radical (OH) is the most important species for phenol removal in the synergistic system of plasma-photocatalysis as well as in the plasma alone system.

  2. HIDENEK: An implicit particle simulation of kinetic-MHD phenomena in three-dimensional plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Motohiko

    1993-05-01

    An advanced 'kinetic-MHD' simulation method and its applications to plasma physics are given in this lecture. This method is quite stable for studying strong nonlinear, kinetic processes associated with large space-scale, low-frequency electromagnetic phenomena of plasmas. A full set of the Maxwell equations, and the Newton-Lorentz equations of motion for particle ions and guiding-center electrons are adopted. In order to retain only the low-frquency waves and instabilities, implicit particle-field equations are derived. The present implicit-particle method is proved to reproduce the MHD eigenmodes such as Alfven, magnetosonic and kinetic Alfven waves in a thermally near-equilibrium plasma. In the second part of the lecture, several physics applications are shown. These include not only the growth of the instabilities of beam ions against the background plasmas and helical link of the current, but they also demonstrate nonlinear results such as pitch-angle scattering of the ions. Recent progress in the simulation of the Kelvin-Helmholtz instability is also presented with a special emphasis on the mixing of the plasma particles.

  3. Theoretical studies on kinetics of singlet oxygen in nonthermal plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frolov, Mikhail P.; Ionin, Andrei A.; Kotkov, Andrei A.; Kochetov, Igor V.; Napartovich, Anatolii P.; Podmarkov, Yurii P.; Seleznev, Leonid V.; Sinitsyn, Dmitrii V.; Vagin, Nikolai P.; Yuryshev, Nikolay N.

    2004-09-01

    An idea to replace singlet delta oxygen (SDO) generator working with wet chemistry by electric discharge generator has got much attention last years. Different kinds of discharge were examined for this purpose, but without a great success. The existing theoretical models are not validated by well-characterized experimental data. To describe complicated kinetics in gas discharge with oxygen one needs to know in detail processes involving numerous electronic excited oxygen molecules and atoms. To gain new knowledge about these processes experimental studies were made on electric discharge properties in gas mixture flow with independent control of inlet SDO concentration. The theoretical model extended to include minor additives like oxygen atoms, water molecules, ozone was developed. Comparison with careful experimental measurements of electric characteristics along with gas composition allows us to verify the model and make theoretical predictions more reliable. Results of numerical simulations using this model for an electron-beam sustained discharge are reported and compared with the experimental data.

  4. Kinetic theory of equilibrium axisymmetric collisionless plasmas in off-equatorial tori around compact objects

    CERN Document Server

    Cremaschini, Claudio; Slaný, Petr; Stuchlík, Zdeněk; Karas, Vladimír

    2013-01-01

    The possible occurrence of equilibrium off-equatorial tori in the gravitational and electromagnetic fields of astrophysical compact objects has been recently proved based on non-ideal MHD theory. These stationary structures can represent plausible candidates for the modelling of coronal plasmas expected to arise in association with accretion discs. However, accretion disc coronae are formed by a highly diluted environment, and so the fluid description may be inappropriate. The question is posed of whether similar off-equatorial solutions can be determined also in the case of collisionless plasmas for which treatment based on kinetic theory, rather than fluid one, is demanded. In this paper the issue is addressed in the framework of the Vlasov-Maxwell description for non-relativistic multi-species axisymmetric plasmas subject to an external dominant spherical gravitational and dipolar magnetic field. Equilibrium configurations are investigated and explicit solutions for the species kinetic distribution functio...

  5. Ion acoustic kinetic Alfvén rogue waves in two temperature electrons superthermal plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaur, Nimardeep; Saini, N. S.

    2016-10-01

    The propagation properties of ion acoustic kinetic Alfvén (IAKA) solitary and rogue waves have been investigated in two temperature electrons magnetized superthermal plasma in the presence of dust impurity. A nonlinear analysis is carried out to derive the Korteweg-de Vries (KdV) equation using the reductive perturbation method (RPM) describing the evolution of solitary waves. The effect of various plasma parameters on the characteristics of the IAKA solitary waves is studied. The dynamics of ion acoustic kinetic Alfvén rogue waves (IAKARWs) are also studied by transforming the KdV equation into nonlinear Schrödinger (NLS) equation. The characteristics of rogue wave profile under the influence of various plasma parameters (κc, μc, σ , θ) are examined numerically by using the data of Saturn's magnetosphere (Schippers et al. 2008; Sakai et al. 2013).

  6. Computer Simulation of Convective Plasma Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Carboni, Rodrigo; Frutos-Alfaro, Francisco

    2015-01-01

    Computer simulations of plasmas are relevant nowadays, because it helps us understand physical processes taking place in the sun and other stellar objects. We developed a program called PCell which is intended for displaying the evolution of the magnetic field in a 2D convective plasma cell with perfect conducting walls for different stationary plasma velocity fields. Applications of this program are presented. This software works interactively with the mouse and the users can create their ow...

  7. Plasma radioiron kinetics in man: explanation for the effect of plasma iron concentration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skarberg, K; Eng, M; Huebers, H; Marsaglia, G; Finch, C

    1978-03-01

    The plasma iron turnover was measured in 19 normal subjects. A correlation was found between plasma iron concentration and plasma iron turnover. In addition to the turnover of 55Fe at normal plasma iron concentration (predominantly monoferric transferrin), a second turnover in which the labeled plasma was saturated with iron (to produce predominantly diferric transferrin) was studied with 50Fe. It was demonstrated that diferric transferrin had a greater rate of iron turnover but that the distribution between erythroid and non-erythroid tissues was unchanged. It was concluded that plasma iron turnover is dependent on the monoferric/diferric transferrin ratio in the plasma but that the internal distribution of iron is unaffected.

  8. Plasma cell gingivitis: treatment with chlorpheniramine maleate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ranganathan, Aravindhan Thiruputkuzhi; Chandran, Chitraa R; Prabhakar, Priya; Lakshmiganthan, Mahalingam; Parthasaradhi, Thakkalapati

    2015-01-01

    Plasma cell gingivitis is a benign lesion of unknown etiology characterized by massive and diffuse infiltration of plasma cells into the gingival connective tissue. Clinically, it can be seen as a diffuse, erythematous, and edematous swelling involving the marginal gingiva and extending into the attached gingiva. Although usually painless, the lesion can be esthetically unappealing, especially when anterior gingiva is involved. Although the usual line of management is removal of the offending agent, this report describes the treatment of plasma cell gingivitis with the topical application of chlorpheniramine maleate (25 mg) for a period of 10 days.

  9. Nonlinear frequency shift of electrostatic waves in general collisionless plasma: unifying theory of fluid and kinetic nonlinearities

    CERN Document Server

    Liu, Chang

    2015-01-01

    The nonlinear frequency shift is derived in a transparent asymptotic form for intense Langmuir waves in general collisionless plasma. The formula describes both fluid and kinetic effects simultaneously. The fluid nonlinearity is expressed, for the ?first time, through the plasma dielectric function, and the kinetic nonlinearity accounts for both smooth distributions and trapped-particle beams. Various known limiting scalings are reproduced as special cases. The calculation avoids differential equations and can be extended straightforwardly to other nonlinear plasma waves.

  10. Nonthermal-plasma-mediated animal cell death

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Wanil; Woo, Kyung-Chul; Kim, Kyong-Tai [Department of Life Science, Division of Molecular and Life Science, Pohang University of Science and Technology, San 31, Hyoja Dong, Pohang 790-784 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Gyoo-Cheon, E-mail: ktk@postech.ac.kr [Department of Oral Anatomy and Cell Biology, School of Dentistry, Pusan National University, Yangsan 626-810 (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-01-12

    Animal cell death comprising necrosis and apoptosis occurred in a well-regulated manner upon specific stimuli. The physiological meanings and detailed molecular mechanisms of cell death have been continuously investigated over several decades. Necrotic cell death has typical morphological changes, such as cell swelling and cell lysis followed by DNA degradation, whereas apoptosis shows blebbing formation and regular DNA fragmentation. Cell death is usually adopted to terminate cancer cells in vivo. The current strategies against tumour are based on the induction of cell death by adopting various methods, including radiotherapy and chemotherapeutics. Among these, radiotherapy is the most frequently used treatment method, but it still has obvious limitations. Recent studies have suggested that the use of nonthermal air plasma can be a prominent method for inducing cancer cell death. Plasma-irradiated cells showed the loss of genomic integrity, mitochondrial dysfunction, plasma membrane damage, etc. Tumour elimination with plasma irradiation is an emerging concept in cancer therapy and can be accelerated by targeting certain tumour-specific proteins with gold nanoparticles. Here, some recent developments are described so that the mechanisms related to plasma-mediated cell death and its perspectives in cancer treatment can be understood. (topical review)

  11. Electromagnetic fluctuations in magnetized plasmas. I. The rigorous relativistic kinetic theory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schlickeiser, R., E-mail: rsch@tp4.rub.de, E-mail: yoonp@umd.edu [Institut für Theoretische Physik, Lehrstuhl IV: Weltraum- und Astrophysik, Ruhr-Universität Bochum, D-44780 Bochum (Germany); Yoon, P. H., E-mail: rsch@tp4.rub.de, E-mail: yoonp@umd.edu [Institute for Physical Science and Technology, University of Maryland, College Park, Maryland 20742 (United States); School of Space Research, Kyung Hee University, Yongin-Si, Gyeonggi-Do 446-701 (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-07-15

    Using the system of the Klimontovich and Maxwell equations, the general linear fluctuation theory for magnetized plasmas is developed. General expressions for the electromagnetic fluctuation spectra (electric and magnetic fields) from uncorrelated plasma particles in plasmas with a uniform magnetic field are derived, which are covariantly correct within the theory of special relativity. The general fluctuation spectra hold for plasmas of arbitrary composition, arbitrary momentum dependences of the plasma particle distribution functions, and arbitrary orientations of the wave vector with respect to the uniform magnetic field. Moreover, no restrictions on the values of the real and the imaginary parts of the frequency are made. The derived fluctuation spectra apply to both non-collective fluctuations and collective plasma eigenmodes in magnetized plasmas. In the latter case, kinetic equations for the components of fluctuating electric and magnetic fields in magnetized plasmas are derived that include the effect of spontaneous emission and absorption. In the limiting case of an unmagnetized plasmas, the general fluctuation spectra correctly reduce to the unmagnetized fluctuation spectra derived before.

  12. Downstream plasma parameters in laminar shocks from ion kinetics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gedalin, M.

    2016-10-01

    Ion dynamics in oblique shocks is governed by the macroscopic electric and magnetic fields of the shock front. In laminar shocks, these fields are time-independent and depend only on the coordinate along the shock normal. The shock ramp is narrow and the ion motion across the shock is manifestly non-adiabatic. The ion distribution just behind the ramp is significantly non-gyrotropic. Gyrotropy is achieved well behind the ramp mainly due to the gyrophase mixing. The asymptotic values of the ion density and temperature are determined by the eventual collisionless relaxation of the gyrating ion distribution. Given a distribution at the downstream edge of the ramp, the moments of the distribution after gyrophase mixing are derived using proper spatial averaging. The obtained expressions can be used for independent determination of the downstream plasma state and implementation in Rankine-Hugoniot relations.

  13. Effects of feeding on the plasma disposition kinetics of the anthelmintic albendazole in laying hens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bistoletti, M; Alvarez, L; Lanusse, C; Moreno, L

    2014-01-01

    1. To optimise the use of albendazole (ABZ) as an anthelmintic in hens, the effects of fasting and type of diet on the plasma kinetics of ABZ and its metabolites were evaluated. 2. Twenty-four hens were distributed into 4 groups: In experiment I the Fed group were fed ad libitum, while the Fasted group was fasted over a 12-h period. In experiment II the Pelleted group was fed with pelleted commercial food, while the Grain group was fed with cereal grains. All the groups were treated with ABZ by oral route. Blood samples were taken and plasma analysed by HPLC. 3. ABZ and its metabolites albendazole-sulphoxide (ABZSO) and albendazole-sulphone (ABZSO2) were recovered in plasma in all the groups. The 12-h fasting period did not modify the disposition kinetics of ABZ in hens. The type of feed affected ABZ kinetics. ABZSO concentration profile was higher and detected for longer in the Grain group compared to the Pelleted group. Statistical differences were not found for AUC0-∞ values, whereas the T1/2for and T1/2el were different between groups. 4. Factors affecting ABZ kinetic behaviour should be taken into account to optimise its use to ensure the sustainability of the limited available anthelmintic therapeutic tools in avian parasite control.

  14. Dust kinetic Alfvén solitary and rogue waves in a superthermal dusty plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saini, N. S., E-mail: nssaini@yahoo.com; Singh, Manpreet, E-mail: singhmanpreet185@gmail.com [Department of Physics, Guru Nanak Dev University, Amritsar 143005 (India); Bains, A. S., E-mail: bainsphysics@yahoo.co.in [Department of Physics and Engineering Physics, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, Saskatchewan S7N 5E2 (Canada)

    2015-11-15

    Dust kinetic Alfvén solitary waves (DKASWs) have been examined in a low-β dusty plasma comprising of negatively charged dust grains, superthermal electrons, and ions. A nonlinear Korteweg-de Vries (KdV) equation has been derived using the reductive perturbation method. The combined effects of superthermality of charged particles (via κ), plasma β, obliqueness of propagation (θ), and dust concentration (via f) on the shape and size of the DKASWs have been examined. Only negative potential (rarefactive) structures are observed. Further, characteristics of dust kinetic Alfvén rogue waves (DKARWs), by deriving the non-linear Schrödinger equation (NLSE) from the KdV equation, are studied. Rational solutions of NLSE show that rogue wave envelopes are supported by this plasma model. It is observed that the influence of various plasma parameters (superthermality, plasma β, obliqueness, and dust concentration) on the characteristics of the DKARWs is very significant. This fundamental study may be helpful in understanding the formation of coherent nonlinear structures in space and astrophysical plasma environments where superthermal particles are present.

  15. Arbitrary amplitude kinetic Alfven solitary waves in two temperature electron superthermal plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Manpreet; Singh Saini, Nareshpal; Ghai, Yashika

    2016-07-01

    Through various satellite missions it is observed that superthermal velocity distribution for particles is more appropriate for describing space and astrophysical plasmas. So it is appropriate to use superthermal distribution, which in the limiting case when spectral index κ is very large ( i.e. κ→∞), shifts to Maxwellian distribution. Two temperature electron plasmas have been observed in auroral regions by FAST satellite mission, and also by GEOTAIL and POLAR satellite in the magnetosphere. Kinetic Alfven waves arise when finite Larmor radius effect modifies the dispersion relation or characteristic perpendicular wavelength is comparable to electron inertial length. We have studied the kinetic Alfven waves (KAWs) in a plasma comprising of positively charged ions, superthermal hot electrons and Maxwellian distributed cold electrons. Sagdeev pseudo-potential has been employed to derive an energy balance equation. The critical Mach number has been determined from the expression of Sagdeev pseudo-potential to see the existence of solitary structures. It is observed that sub-Alfvenic compressive solitons and super-Alfvenic rarefactive solitons exist in this plasma model. It is also observed that various parameters such as superthermality of hot electrons, relative concentration of cold and hot electron species, Mach number, plasma beta, ion to cold electron temperature ratio and ion to hot electron temperature ratio have significant effect on the amplitude and width of the KAWs. Findings of this investigation may be useful to understand the dynamics of coherent non-linear structures (i.e. KAWs) in space and astrophysical plasmas.

  16. Glucose kinetics, plasma metabolites, and endocrine responses during experimental ketosis in steers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyle, R R; deBoer, G; Mills, S E; Russell, R W; Beitz, D C; Young, J W

    1984-10-01

    Phlorizin and 1,3-butanediol were used to determine effects of glucosuria and ketonemia on concentrations of metabolites in blood plasma and on kinetics of glucose metabolism. Four steers received four treatments (control; control plus dietary 1,3-butanediol; control plus phlorizin injections; and control plus phlorizin and 1,3-butanediol) in a Latin square design. Treatments lasted 14 days. All steers received a 30% grain, 70% forage ration in equal meals every 2 h. Metabolite concentrations in blood plasma and urine and glucose kinetics were measured on each of the last 3 days of each treatment period. Phlorizin caused glucosuria; decreased plasma glucose, glucose total entry rate, and glucose recycling; and increased plasma free fatty acids and glucose irreversible loss. Glucose pool size was increased by 1,3-butanediol. Phlorizin plus 1,3-butanediol caused glucosuria and ketonuria; decreased plasma glucose; and increased blood ketone bodies, plasma free fatty acids, glucose irreversible loss, and glucose pool size. Growth hormone, insulin, and glucagon were not affected by treatment. Physiological perturbations in these steers were characteristic of some of those in ketotic cows.

  17. Limitations of electron cyclotron resonance ion source performances set by kinetic plasma instabilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarvainen, O; Laulainen, J; Komppula, J; Kronholm, R; Kalvas, T; Koivisto, H; Izotov, I; Mansfeld, D; Skalyga, V

    2015-02-01

    Electron cyclotron resonance ion source (ECRIS) plasmas are prone to kinetic instabilities due to anisotropy of the electron energy distribution function stemming from the resonant nature of the electron heating process. Electron cyclotron plasma instabilities are related to non-linear interaction between plasma waves and energetic electrons resulting to strong microwave emission and a burst of energetic electrons escaping the plasma, and explain the periodic oscillations of the extracted beam currents observed in several laboratories. It is demonstrated with a minimum-B 14 GHz ECRIS operating on helium, oxygen, and argon plasmas that kinetic instabilities restrict the parameter space available for the optimization of high charge state ion currents. The most critical parameter in terms of plasma stability is the strength of the solenoid magnetic field. It is demonstrated that due to the instabilities the optimum Bmin-field in single frequency heating mode is often ≤0.8BECR, which is the value suggested by the semiempirical scaling laws guiding the design of modern ECRISs. It is argued that the effect can be attributed not only to the absolute magnitude of the magnetic field but also to the variation of the average magnetic field gradient on the resonance surface.

  18. Limitations of electron cyclotron resonance ion source performances set by kinetic plasma instabilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tarvainen, O., E-mail: olli.tarvainen@jyu.fi; Laulainen, J.; Komppula, J.; Kronholm, R.; Kalvas, T.; Koivisto, H. [Department of Physics, University of Jyväskylä, 40500 Jyväskylä (Finland); Izotov, I.; Mansfeld, D. [Institute of Applied Physics, RAS, 46 Ul‘yanova St., 603950 Nizhny Novgorod (Russian Federation); Skalyga, V. [Institute of Applied Physics, RAS, 46 Ul‘yanova St., 603950 Nizhny Novgorod (Russian Federation); Lobachevsky State University of Nizhny Novgorod (UNN), 23 Gagarina St., 603950 Nizhny Novgorod (Russian Federation)

    2015-02-15

    Electron cyclotron resonance ion source (ECRIS) plasmas are prone to kinetic instabilities due to anisotropy of the electron energy distribution function stemming from the resonant nature of the electron heating process. Electron cyclotron plasma instabilities are related to non-linear interaction between plasma waves and energetic electrons resulting to strong microwave emission and a burst of energetic electrons escaping the plasma, and explain the periodic oscillations of the extracted beam currents observed in several laboratories. It is demonstrated with a minimum-B 14 GHz ECRIS operating on helium, oxygen, and argon plasmas that kinetic instabilities restrict the parameter space available for the optimization of high charge state ion currents. The most critical parameter in terms of plasma stability is the strength of the solenoid magnetic field. It is demonstrated that due to the instabilities the optimum B{sub min}-field in single frequency heating mode is often ≤0.8B{sub ECR}, which is the value suggested by the semiempirical scaling laws guiding the design of modern ECRISs. It is argued that the effect can be attributed not only to the absolute magnitude of the magnetic field but also to the variation of the average magnetic field gradient on the resonance surface.

  19. Kinetic models in industrial biotechnology - Improving cell factory performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almquist, Joachim; Cvijovic, Marija; Hatzimanikatis, Vassily; Nielsen, Jens; Jirstrand, Mats

    2014-07-01

    An increasing number of industrial bioprocesses capitalize on living cells by using them as cell factories that convert sugars into chemicals. These processes range from the production of bulk chemicals in yeasts and bacteria to the synthesis of therapeutic proteins in mammalian cell lines. One of the tools in the continuous search for improved performance of such production systems is the development and application of mathematical models. To be of value for industrial biotechnology, mathematical models should be able to assist in the rational design of cell factory properties or in the production processes in which they are utilized. Kinetic models are particularly suitable towards this end because they are capable of representing the complex biochemistry of cells in a more complete way compared to most other types of models. They can, at least in principle, be used to in detail understand, predict, and evaluate the effects of adding, removing, or modifying molecular components of a cell factory and for supporting the design of the bioreactor or fermentation process. However, several challenges still remain before kinetic modeling will reach the degree of maturity required for routine application in industry. Here we review the current status of kinetic cell factory modeling. Emphasis is on modeling methodology concepts, including model network structure, kinetic rate expressions, parameter estimation, optimization methods, identifiability analysis, model reduction, and model validation, but several applications of kinetic models for the improvement of cell factories are also discussed.

  20. Plasma Cells For Hire: Prior Experience Required

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    Activation of IgG+ memory B cells accounts for much of the antibodies in secondary immune responses. Here, Khometani et al. (2013) demonstrate that reduced amounts of Bach2 in antigen-experienced memory B cells control the robust production of IgG1+ plasma cells.

  1. Cell Adhesion to Plasma-Coated PVC

    OpenAIRE

    Elidiane C. Rangel; Souza,Eduardo S. de; Francine S. de Moraes; Eliana A. R. Duek; Carolina Lucchesi; Schreiner, Wido H.; Durrant, Steven F.; Cruz, Nilson C.

    2014-01-01

    To produce environments suitable for cell culture, thin polymer films were deposited onto commercial PVC plates from radiofrequency acetylene-argon plasmas. The proportion of argon in the plasmas, P-Ar, was varied from 5.3 to 65.8%. The adhesion and growth of Vero cells on the coated surfaces were examined for different incubation times. Cytotoxicity tests were performed using spectroscopic methods. Carbon, O, and N were detected in all the samples using XPS. Roughness remained almost unchang...

  2. High-resolution hybrid simulations of kinetic plasma turbulence at proton scales

    CERN Document Server

    Franci, Luca; Matteini, Lorenzo; Verdini, Andrea; Hellinger, Petr

    2015-01-01

    We investigate properties of plasma turbulence from magneto-hydrodynamic (MHD) to sub-ion scales by means of two-dimensional, high-resolution hybrid particle-in-cell simulations. We impose an initial ambient magnetic field, perpendicular to the simulation box, and we add a spectrum of large-scale magnetic and kinetic fluctuations, with energy equipartition and vanishing correlation. Once the turbulence is fully developed, we observe a MHD inertial range, where the spectra of the perpendicular magnetic field and the perpendicular proton bulk velocity fluctuations exhibit power-law scaling with spectral indices of -5/3 and -3/2, respectively. This behavior is extended over a full decade in wavevectors and is very stable in time. A transition is observed around proton scales. At sub-ion scales, both spectra steepen, with the former still following a power law with a spectral index of ~-3. A -2.8 slope is observed in the density and parallel magnetic fluctuations, highlighting the presence of compressive effects ...

  3. Spectral evolution of two-dimensional kinetic plasma turbulence in the wavenumber-frequency domain

    CERN Document Server

    Comişel, H; Narita, Y; Motschmann, U

    2013-01-01

    We present a method for studying the evolution of plasma turbulence by tracking dispersion relations in the energy spectrum in the wavenumber-frequency domain. We apply hybrid plasma simulations in a simplified two-dimensional geometry to demonstrate our method and its applicability to plasma turbulence in the ion kinetic regime. We identify four dispersion relations: ion-Bernstein waves, oblique whistler waves, oblique Alfv\\'en/ion-cyclotron waves, and a zero-frequency mode. The energy partition and frequency broadening are evaluated for these modes. The method allows us to determine the evolution of decaying plasma turbulence in our restricted geometry and shows that it cascades along the dispersion relations during the early phase with an increasing broadening around the dispersion relations.

  4. Three species one-dimensional kinetic model for weakly ionized plasmas

    CERN Document Server

    Gonzalez, J; Tierno, S P

    2016-01-01

    A three species one-dimensional kinetic model is presented for a spatially homogeneous weakly ionized plasma subjected to the action of a time varying electric field. Planar geometry is assumed, which means that the plasma dynamics evolves in the privileged direction of the field. The energy transmitted to the charges is be channelized to the neutrals thanks to collisions and impacting the plasma dynamics. Charge-charge interactions have been designed as a one dimensional collision term equivalent to the Landau operator used for fully ionized plasmas. Charge-neutral collisions are modelled by a conservative drift diffusion operator in the Doughertys form. The resulting set of coupled drift diffusion equations is solved with the stable and robust Propagator Integral Method. This method feasibility accounts for non-linear effects without appealing to linearisation or simplifications, providing conservative physically meaningful solutions. It is found that charge neutral collisions exert a significant effect sin...

  5. Plasma adrenaline kinetics in type 1 (insulin-dependent) diabetic patients with and without autonomic neuropathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dejgaard, Anders; Hilsted, J; Henriksen, J H

    1989-01-01

    Plasma adrenaline kinetics (clearance, extraction across the forearm, initial plasma disappearance rate, mean sojourn time, volume of distribution) were studied in sixteen Type 1 (insulin-dependent) diabetic patients during constant i.v. infusion of tritium labelled adrenaline. In patients with (n...... = 8) and without (n = 8) neuropathy forearm venous plasma noradrenaline and adrenaline concentrations as well as plasma clearance of adrenaline based on arterial sampling (1.7 vs 2.1 l/min) were not significantly different. The initial disappearance time (T 1/2) after the infusion of the tritium...... labelled adrenaline had been stopped was significantly prolonged in Type 1 diabetic patients with neuropathy compared to those without (after 20 min infusion 2.7 vs 2.2 min, p less than 0.02, after 75 min infusion 3.7 vs 2.9 min, p less than 0.05). The corresponding values for the mean sojourn time...

  6. Plasma surface functionalization and dyeing kinetics of Pan-Pmma copolymers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Labay, C.; Canal, C.; Rodríguez, C.; Caballero, G.; Canal, J. M.

    2013-10-01

    Fiber surface modification with air corona plasma has been studied through dyeing kinetics under isothermal conditions at 30 °C on an acrylic-fiber fabric with a cationic dye (CI Basic Blue 3) analyzing the absorption, desorption and fixing on the surface of molecules having defined cationic character. The initial dyeing rate in the first 60 s indicates an increase of 58.3% in the dyeing rate due to the effect of corona plasma on the acrylic fiber surface. At the end of the dyeing process, the plasma-treated fabrics absorb 24.7% more dye, and the K/S value of the acrylic fabric increases by 8.8%. With selected dyestuff molecules, new techniques can be designed to amplify the knowledge about plasma-treated surface modifications of macromolecules.

  7. Numerical study of drift-kinetic evolution of collisional plasmas in tori

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beasley, Jr., C. O.; Meier, H. K.; van Rij, W. I.; McCune, J. E.

    1976-03-01

    Preliminary numerical results for the dynamics of toroidally confined plasmas in the drift-kinetic, Fokker--Planck description are discussed. These solutions were obtained by using the techniques inherent to the collisional plasma model (CPM) described in detail elsewhere. An initial value problem is solved in the local approximation in which collisions and particle dynamics compete in a given magnetic field to set up a quasi-equilibrium. Both the plasma (guiding center) distribution function and many macroscopic quantities of interest are monitored. Good agreement with corresponding but more approximate theories is obtained over a wide range of collisionality, particularly with regard to the neoclassical particle flux. Encouraging confirmation of earlier results for the distribution function is achieved when due account is taken of the differing collisionality of particles with differing energies. These initial results indicate the potential importance of certain non-local effects as well as inclusion of self-consistency between fields and plasma currents and densities.

  8. 3D Kinetic Simulation of Plasma Jet Penetration in Magnetic Field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galkin, Sergei A.; Bogatu, I. N.; Kim, J. S.

    2009-11-01

    A high velocity plasmoid penetration through a magnetic barrier is a problem of a great experimental and theoretical interest. Our LSP PIC code 3D fully kinetic numerical simulations of high density (10^16 cm-3) high velocity (30-140 km/sec) plasma jet/bullet, penetrating through the transversal magnetic field, demonstrate three different regimes: reflection by field, penetration by magnetic field expulsion and penetration by magnetic self-polarization. The behavior depends on plasma jet parameters and its composition: hydrogen, carbon (A=12) and C60-fullerene (A=720) plasmas were investigated. The 3D simulation of two plasmoid head-on injections along uniform magnetic field lines is analyzed. Mini rail plasma gun (accelerator) modeling is also presented and discussed.

  9. Solitary Kinetic Alfven Waves in a Low-β Dusty Plasma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Yin-Hua; LU Wei

    2000-01-01

    The nonlinear kinetic Alfven waves in a low-β(0<β<1)dusty plasma have been investigated with the fluid model of three-component plasma. The nonlinear equation governing the perturbation density of electrons in a form of the energy integral has been derived. In the approximation of small amplitude, the soliton solution for the perturbation density of electrons is found, and the characteristics of solitons in different range of plasma parameters is studied numerically. The results show that the density dip or hump can be formed in a dusty plasma for different ranges of parameters, the amplitude of density dip is enhanced and the amplitude of density hump is reduced with increasing dust grain content.

  10. Uptake of Photosensitizer 2-Devinyl-2-(1-methoxylethyl Chlorin f in Human Breast Cancer Cells: A Diffusion Kinetics Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ping Chen

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The kinetics of photosensitizer 2-devinyl-2-(1-methoxylethyl chlorin f (CPD4 uptake in MCF-7 human breast cancer cells is described by a diffusion kinetics model and experimentally investigated using laser scanning confocal microscopy (LSCM. CPD4 permeated into MCF-7 cells with increasing incubation time, which was followed by its binding to cell organelles. Subcellular distribution study revealed that CPD4 was primarily localized on the mitochondria and membranes, supporting that the mode of transmembrane transport was diffusion. A kinetics model describing CPD4 passing through the plasma membrane of MCF-7 cells was proposed based on Fick's first law of diffusion. The kinetics of cellular uptake of CPD4 was studied by three-dimensional LSCM. By fitting the experimental data using the above model, important cellular uptake and distribution parameters were obtained, which are of clinical significance in photodynamic therapy.

  11. Kinetic and Diagnostic Studies of Molecular Plasmas Using Laser Absorption Techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Welzel, S [INP-Greifswald, 17489 Greifswald, Felix-Hausdorff-Str. 2 (Germany); Rousseau, A [Laboratoire de Physique et Technologie des Plasmas, Ecole Polytechnique, CNRS, 91128 Palaiseau (France); Davies, P B [Department of Chemistry, University of Cambridge, Lensfield Road, Cambridge CB2 1EW (United Kingdom); Roepcke, J [INP-Greifswald, 17489 Greifswald, Felix-Hausdorff-Str. 2 (Germany)

    2007-10-15

    Within the last decade mid infrared absorption spectroscopy between 3 and 20 {mu}m, known as Infrared Laser Absorption Spectroscopy (IRLAS) and based on tuneable semiconductor lasers, namely lead salt diode lasers, often called tuneable diode lasers (TDL), and quantum cascade lasers (QCL) has progressed considerably as a powerful diagnostic technique for in situ studies of the fundamental physics and chemistry of molecular plasmas. The increasing interest in processing plasmas containing hydrocarbons, fluorocarbons, organo-silicon and boron compounds has lead to further applications of IRLAS because most of these compounds and their decomposition products are infrared active. IRLAS provides a means of determining the absolute concentrations of the ground states of stable and transient molecular species, which is of particular importance for the investigation of reaction kinetics. Information about gas temperature and population densities can also be derived from IRLAS measurements. A variety of free radicals and molecular ions have been detected, especially using TDLs. Since plasmas with molecular feed gases are used in many applications such as thin film deposition, semiconductor processing, surface activation and cleaning, and materials and waste treatment, this has stimulated the adaptation of infrared spectroscopic techniques to industrial requirements. The recent development of QCLs offers an attractive new option for the monitoring and control of industrial plasma processes as well as for highly time-resolved studies on the kinetics of plasma processes. The aim of the present article is threefold: (i) to review recent achievements in our understanding of molecular phenomena in plasmas (ii) to report on selected studies of the spectroscopic properties and kinetic behaviour of radicals, and (iii) to describe the current status of advanced instrumentation for TDLAS in the mid infrared.

  12. Kinetics of ions during the development of parametric instability of intensive Langmuir waves in plasma

    CERN Document Server

    Kirichok, A V; Pryjmak, A V; Zagorodny, A G

    2014-01-01

    Nonlinear regimes of one-dimensional parametric instabilities of long-wave plasma waves are considered for the cases when the average plasma field energy density is less (Zakharov's model) or greater (Silin's model) than the plasma thermal energy density. The hybrid models presented in this paper treat the electrons as a fluid by way of an equation for the high-frequency wave and treat the ions kinetically with a super-particle simulation. This makes possible consideration of non-resonant particles trapped by high-frequency oscillations and the influence of trajectory crossing on the development of the parametric instability. The evolution of ion energy distribution is studied. It is shown that after saturation of the instability, the ion kinetic energy density normalized to the initial field energy density is of the order of the ratio of linear growth rate to the plasma frequency, for the case when the initial field energy far exceeds the plasma thermal energy. In this case, the ion energy distribution is di...

  13. Kinetic Alfvén solitary and rogue waves in superthermal plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bains, A. S.; Li, Bo, E-mail: bbl@sdu.edu.cn; Xia, Li-Dong [Shandong Provincial Key Laboratory of Optical Astronomy and Solar-Terrestrial Environment, School of Space Science and Physics, Shandong University at Weihai, 264209 Weihai (China)

    2014-03-15

    We investigate the small but finite amplitude solitary Kinetic Alfvén waves (KAWs) in low β plasmas with superthermal electrons modeled by a kappa-type distribution. A nonlinear Korteweg-de Vries (KdV) equation describing the evolution of KAWs is derived by using the standard reductive perturbation method. Examining the dependence of the nonlinear and dispersion coefficients of the KdV equation on the superthermal parameter κ, plasma β, and obliqueness of propagation, we show that these parameters may change substantially the shape and size of solitary KAW pulses. Only sub-Alfvénic, compressive solitons are supported. We then extend the study to examine kinetic Alfvén rogue waves by deriving a nonlinear Schrödinger equation from the KdV equation. Rational solutions that form rogue wave envelopes are obtained. We examine how the behavior of rogue waves depends on the plasma parameters in question, finding that the rogue envelopes are lowered with increasing electron superthermality whereas the opposite is true when the plasma β increases. The findings of this study may find applications to low β plasmas in astrophysical environments where particles are superthermally distributed.

  14. Kinetic Studies on State of the Art Solid Oxide Cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Njodzefon, Jean-Claude; Graves, Christopher R.; Mogensen, Mogens Bjerg;

    2016-01-01

    Electrochemical reaction kinetics at the electrodes of Solid Oxide Cells (SOCs) were investigated at 700 °C for two cells with different fuel electrode microstructures as well as on a third cell with a reduced active electrode area. Three fuel mixtures were investigated – hydrogen/steam and refor......Electrochemical reaction kinetics at the electrodes of Solid Oxide Cells (SOCs) were investigated at 700 °C for two cells with different fuel electrode microstructures as well as on a third cell with a reduced active electrode area. Three fuel mixtures were investigated – hydrogen....../steam and reformate fuels hydrogen/carbon-dioxide and hydrogen/methane/steam. It was found that the kinetics at the fuel electrode were exactly the same in both reformates. The hydrogen/steam fuel displayed slightly faster kinetics than the reformate fuels. Furthermore the gas conversion impedance in the hydrogen...... into a single process as the gas conversion was reduced. The SOC with finer electrode microstructure displayed improved kinetics....

  15. Quantum Treatment of Kinetic Alfv\\'en Waves instability in a dusty plasma: Magnetized ions

    CERN Document Server

    Rubab, N

    2016-01-01

    The dispersion relation of kinetic Alfv\\'en wave in inertial regime is studied in a three component non-degenerate streaming plasma. A lin- ear dispersion relation using fluid- Vlasov equation for quantum plasma is also derived. The quantum correction CQ raised due to the insertion of Bohm potential in Vlasov model causes the suppression in the Alfven wave frequency and the growth rates of instability. A number of analytical expressions are derived for various modes of propagation. It is also found that many system parameters, i.e, streaming velocity, dust charge, num- ber density and quantum correction significantly influence the dispersion relation and the growth rate of instability.

  16. Small amplitude Kinetic Alfven waves in a superthermal electron-positron-ion plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adnan, Muhammad; Mahmood, Sahahzad; Qamar, Anisa; Tribeche, Mouloud

    2016-11-01

    We are investigating the propagating properties of coupled Kinetic Alfven-acoustic waves in a low beta plasma having superthermal electrons and positrons. Using the standard reductive perturbation method, a nonlinear Korteweg-de Vries (KdV) type equation is derived which describes the evolution of Kinetic Alfven waves. It is found that nonlinearity and Larmor radius effects can compromise and give rise to solitary structures. The parametric role of superthermality and positron content on the characteristics of solitary wave structures is also investigated. It is found that only sub-Alfvenic and compressive solitons are supported in the present model. The present study may find applications in a low β electron-positron-ion plasma having superthermal electrons and positrons.

  17. Kinetic corrections from analytic non-Maxwellian distribution functions in magnetized plasmas

    CERN Document Server

    Izacard, Olivier

    2016-01-01

    In magnetized plasma physics, almost all developed analytic theories assume a Maxwellian distribution function (MDF) and in some cases small deviations are described using the perturbation theory. The deviations with respect to the Maxwellian equilibrium, called kinetic effects, are required to be taken into account specially for fusion reactor plasmas. Generally, because the perturbation theory is not consistent with observed steady-state non-Maxwellians, these kinetic effects are numerically evaluated by very CPU-expensive codes, avoiding the analytic complexity of velocity phase space integrals. We develop here a new method based on analytic non-Maxwellian distribution functions constructed from non-orthogonal basis sets in order to (i) use as few parameters as possible, (ii) increase the efficiency to model numerical and experimental non-Maxwellians, (iii) help to understand unsolved problems such as diagnostics discrepancies from the physical interpretation of the parameters, and (iv) obtain analytic cor...

  18. Kinetic treatment of nonlinear magnetized plasma motions - General geometry and parallel waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khabibrakhmanov, I. KH.; Galinskii, V. L.; Verheest, F.

    1992-01-01

    The expansion of kinetic equations in the limit of a strong magnetic field is presented. This gives a natural description of the motions of magnetized plasmas, which are slow compared to the particle gyroperiods and gyroradii. Although the approach is 3D, this very general result is used only to focus on the parallel propagation of nonlinear Alfven waves. The derivative nonlinear Schroedinger-like equation is obtained. Two new terms occur compared to earlier treatments, a nonlinear term proportional to the heat flux along the magnetic field line and a higher-order dispersive term. It is shown that kinetic description avoids the singularities occurring in magnetohydrodynamic or multifluid approaches, which correspond to the degenerate case of sound speeds equal to the Alfven speed, and that parallel heat fluxes cannot be neglected, not even in the case of low parallel plasma beta. A truly stationary soliton solution is derived.

  19. Variable Charge State Impurities in Coupled Kinetic Plasma-Kinetic Neutral Transport Simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stotler, D. P.; Hager, R.; Kim, K.; Koskela, T.; Park, G.

    2015-11-01

    A previous version of the XGC0 neoclassical particle transport code with two fully stripped impurity species was used to study kinetic neoclassical transport in the DIII-D H-mode pedestal. To properly simulate impurities in the scrape-off layer and divertor and to account for radiative cooling, however, the impurity charge state distributions must evolve as the particles are transported into regions of different electron temperatures and densities. To do this, the charge state of each particle in XGC0 is included as a parameter in the list that represents the particle's location in phase space. Impurity ionizations and recombinations are handled with a dedicated collision routine. The associated radiative cooling is accumulated during the process and applied to the electron population later in the time step. The density profiles of the neutral impurities are simulated with the DEGAS 2 neutral transport code and then used as a background for electron impact ionization in XGC0 via a test particle Monte Carlo method analogous to that used for deuterium. This work supported by US DOE contracts DE-AC02-09CH11466.

  20. Kinetic treatment of nonlinear ion-acoustic waves in multi-ion plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, Zulfiqar; Ahmad, Mushtaq; Qamar, A.

    2017-09-01

    By applying the kinetic theory of the Valsove-Poisson model and the reductive perturbation technique, a Korteweg-de Vries (KdV) equation is derived for small but finite amplitude ion acoustic waves in multi-ion plasma composed of positive and negative ions along with the fraction of electrons. A correspondent equation is also derived from the basic set of fluid equations of adiabatic ions and isothermal electrons. Both kinetic and fluid KdV equations are stationary solved with different nature of coefficients. Their differences are discussed both analytically and numerically. The criteria of the fluid approach as a limiting case of kinetic theory are also discussed. The presence of negative ion makes some modification in the solitary structure that has also been discussed with its implication at the laboratory level.

  1. Fokker Planck kinetic modeling of suprathermal alpha-particles in a fusion plasma

    CERN Document Server

    Peigney, Benjamin-Edouard; Tikhonchuk, Vladimir

    2014-01-01

    We present an ion kinetic model describing the ignition and burn of the deuterium-tritium fuel of inertial fusion targets. The analysis of the underlying physical model enables us to develop efficient numerical methods to simulate the creation, transport and collisional relaxation of fusion reaction products (alpha-particles) at a kinetic level. A two-energy-scale approach leads to a self-consistent modeling of the coupling between suprathermal alpha-particles and the thermal bulk of the imploding plasma. This method provides an accurate numerical treatment of energy deposition and transport processes involving suprathermal particles. The numerical tools presented here are validated against known analytical results. This enables us to investigate the potential role of ion kinetic effects on the physics of ignition and thermonuclear burn in inertial confinement fusion schemes.

  2. Kinetic theory for radiation interacting with sound waves in ultrarelativistic pair plasmas

    CERN Document Server

    Marklund, M; Stenflo, L

    2006-01-01

    A kinetic theory for radiation interacting with sound waves in an ultrarelativistic electron-positron plasma is developed. It is shown that the effect of a spatial spectral broadening of the electromagnetic pulse is to introduce a reduction of the growth rates for the decay and modulational instabilities. Such spectral broadening could be due to a finite pulse coherence length, or through the use of random phase filters, and would stabilize the propagation of electromagnetic pulses.

  3. Ion kinetic dynamics in strongly-shocked plasmas relevant to ICF

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rinderknecht, H. G.; Amendt, P. A.; Rosenberg, M. J.; Li, C. K.; Frenje, J. A.; Gatu Johnson, M.; Sio, H.; Séguin, F. H.; Petrasso, R. D.; Zylstra, A. B.; Kagan, G.; Hoffman, N. M.; Svyatsky, D.; Wilks, S. C.; Glebov, V. Yu.; Stoeckl, C.; Sangster, T. C.

    2017-06-01

    Implosions of thin-shell capsules produce strongly-shocked (M  >  10), low-density (ρ ˜ 1 mg cc-1), high-temperature ({{T}\\text{i}}˜ keV) plasmas, comparable to those produced in the strongly-shocked DT-vapor in inertial confinement fusion (ICF) experiments. A series of thin-glass targets filled with mixtures of deuterium and Helium-3 gas ranging from 7% to 100% deuterium was imploded to investigate the impact of multi-species ion kinetic mechanisms in ICF-relevant plasmas over a wide range of Knudsen numbers ({{N}\\text{K}}\\equiv {λ\\text{ii}}/R ). Slightly kinetic implosions ({{N}\\text{K}}˜ 0.01 -0.05) follow the expected yield trend with experimentally-inferred N K, suggesting effects associated with long mean-free-paths (such as energetic tail-ion loss) provide the dominant yield reduction mechanisms. In contrast, highly kinetic implosions (Rinderknecht et al 2015 Phys. Rev. Lett. 114 025001) with inferred {{N}\\text{K}}>0.5 produce the opposite yield trend from the Knudsen-number prediction, confirming the dominance of multi-species physics in these experiments. The impact of the observed kinetic physics mechanisms on the formation of the hotspot in ICF experiments is discussed.

  4. CHEMKIN-III: A FORTRAN chemical kinetics package for the analysis of gas-phase chemical and plasma kinetics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kee, R.J.; Rupley, F.M.; Meeks, E.; Miller, J.A.

    1996-05-01

    This document is the user`s manual for the third-generation CHEMKIN package. CHEMKIN is a software package whose purpose is to facilitate the formation, solution, and interpretation of problems involving elementary gas-phase chemical kinetics. It provides a flexible and powerful tool for incorporating complex chemical kinetics into simulations of fluid dynamics. The package consists of two major software components: an Interpreter and a Gas-Phase Subroutine Library. The Interpreter is a program that reads a symbolic description of an elementary, user-specified chemical reaction mechanism. One output from the Interpreter is a data file that forms a link to the Gas-Phase Subroutine Library. This library is a collection of about 100 highly modular FORTRAN subroutines that may be called to return information on equations of state, thermodynamic properties, and chemical production rates. CHEMKIN-III includes capabilities for treating multi-fluid plasma systems, that are not in thermal equilibrium. These new capabilities allow researchers to describe chemistry systems that are characterized by more than one temperature, in which reactions may depend on temperatures associated with different species; i.e. reactions may be driven by collisions with electrons, ions, or charge-neutral species. These new features have been implemented in such a way as to require little or no changes to CHEMKIN implementation for systems in thermal equilibrium, where all species share the same gas temperature. CHEMKIN-III now has the capability to handle weakly ionized plasma chemistry, especially for application related to advanced semiconductor processing.

  5. Kinetic aspects of the formation of aluminium oxide by use of a microwave-induced plasma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quade, A; Steffen, H; Hippler, R; Wulff, H

    2002-10-01

    The oxidation of thin aluminium layers in a microwave plasma has been investigated to determine the kinetics of oxide growth. Thin Al-coatings were oxidized by means of a variety of gas mixtures, characterized by different partial pressures of oxygen, in microwave-induced plasmas of different power. To study the whole kinetic process the Al-metal and the oxide formed were investigated by means of a combination of grazing incidence X-ray reflectometry (GIXR) and grazing incidence X-ray diffractometry (GIXRD). XPS and FTIR spectroscopy confirmed the formation of stoichiometric Al(2)O(3). The alumina formed is X-ray amorphous. Quantitative description of oxide formation was achieved indirectly by determination of the decrease in the integrated intensity of the Al(111)-peak and the total thickness of the whole coating. These values enabled calculation of kinetic data. It was found that oxide growth was a combination of two simultaneous processes - diffusion and sputter processes. The diffusion coefficient D (cm(2) s(-1)) and the sputter rate S (nm s(-1)) were determined. The effect of the composition of the gas mixture, microwave power, and concentration of activated oxygen species on the oxidation process will be discussed. For calculation of the activation energy, E(A), of this plasma-enhanced diffusion process the temperature-dependence of D was investigated.

  6. Solving kinetic equations with adaptive mesh in phase space for rarefied gas dynamics and plasma physics (Invited)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kolobov, Vladimir [CFD Research Corporation, Huntsville, AL 35805, USA and The University of Alabama in Huntsville, Huntsville, AL 35805 (United States); Arslanbekov, Robert [CFD Research Corporation, Huntsville, AL 35805 (United States); Frolova, Anna [Computing Center of the Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow, 119333 (Russian Federation)

    2014-12-09

    The paper describes an Adaptive Mesh in Phase Space (AMPS) technique for solving kinetic equations with deterministic mesh-based methods. The AMPS technique allows automatic generation of adaptive Cartesian mesh in both physical and velocity spaces using a Tree-of-Trees data structure. We illustrate advantages of AMPS for simulations of rarefied gas dynamics and electron kinetics on low temperature plasmas. In particular, we consider formation of the velocity distribution functions in hypersonic flows, particle kinetics near oscillating boundaries, and electron kinetics in a radio-frequency sheath. AMPS provide substantial savings in computational cost and increased efficiency of the mesh-based kinetic solvers.

  7. Effect of pirenzepine on gastric endocrine cell kinetics during lansoprazole administration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omura, N; Kashiwagi, H; Gang, C; Omura, K; Aoki, T

    1998-10-01

    We studied the effect of pirenzepine on gastric secretion kinetics in rats in a hypochlorhydric state induced by lansoprazole, a proton pump inhibitor. Pirenzepine was administered intramuscularly at a dosage of 20 mg/kg twice daily; and lansorprazole, subcutaneously at 50 mg/kg once daily, both every day for 4 weeks. After the 4-week treatment, serum gastrin and plasma somatostatin levels were determined by radioimmunoassay. In addition, gastrin cells, somatostatin cells, and enterochromaffin-like cells were immunostained and counted. Serum gastrin levels were elevated, and gastrin and enterochromaffin-like cell numbers increased in the group on lansoprazole alone, compared with these values in the control group (which received distilled water). In the group on the lansoprazole and pirenzepine combination, serum gastrin levels decreased, and gastrin and enterochromaffin-like cell numbers were significantly decreased, compared with the respective variables in the group on lansoprazole alone, while the number of somatostatin cells increased in the group on the combination. Plasma somatostatin levels did not vary significantly in any group. It was thus demonstrated that pirenzepine corrects the abnormal gastric secretion kinetics resulting from treatment with lansoprazole alone, such as hypergastrinemia and gastrin and enterochromaffin-like cell hyperplasia.

  8. Astrophysical Gyrokinetics: Kinetic and Fluid Turbulent Cascades In Magentized Weakly Collisional Plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schekochihin, A. A.; Cowley, S. C.; Dorland, W.; Hammett, G. W.; Howes, G. G.; Quataert, E.; Tatsuno, T.

    2009-04-23

    This paper presents a theoretical framework for understanding plasma turbulence in astrophysical plasmas. It is motivated by observations of electromagnetic and density fluctuations in the solar wind, interstellar medium and galaxy clusters, as well as by models of particle heating in accretion disks. All of these plasmas and many others have turbulentmotions at weakly collisional and collisionless scales. The paper focuses on turbulence in a strong mean magnetic field. The key assumptions are that the turbulent fluctuations are small compared to the mean field, spatially anisotropic with respect to it and that their frequency is low compared to the ion cyclotron frequency. The turbulence is assumed to be forced at some system-specific outer scale. The energy injected at this scale has to be dissipated into heat, which ultimately cannot be accomplished without collisions. A kinetic cascade develops that brings the energy to collisional scales both in space and velocity. The nature of the kinetic cascade in various scale ranges depends on the physics of plasma fluctuations that exist there. There are four special scales that separate physically distinct regimes: the electron and ion gyroscales, the mean free path and the electron diffusion scale. In each of the scale ranges separated by these scales, the fully kinetic problem is systematically reduced to a more physically transparent and computationally tractable system of equations, which are derived in a rigorous way. In the "inertial range" above the ion gyroscale, the kinetic cascade separates into two parts: a cascade of Alfvenic fluctuations and a passive cascade of density and magnetic-fieldstrength fluctuations. The former are governed by the Reduced Magnetohydrodynamic (RMHD) equations at both the collisional and collisionless scales; the latter obey a linear kinetic equation along the (moving) field lines associated with the Alfvenic component (in the collisional limit, these compressive fluctuations

  9. Core Physics and Kinetics Calculations for the Fissioning Plasma Core Reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butler, C.; Albright, D.

    2007-01-01

    Highly efficient, compact nuclear reactors would provide high specific impulse spacecraft propulsion. This analysis and numerical simulation effort has focused on the technical feasibility issues related to the nuclear design characteristics of a novel reactor design. The Fissioning Plasma Core Reactor (FPCR) is a shockwave-driven gaseous-core nuclear reactor, which uses Magneto Hydrodynamic effects to generate electric power to be used for propulsion. The nuclear design of the system depends on two major calculations: core physics calculations and kinetics calculations. Presently, core physics calculations have concentrated on the use of the MCNP4C code. However, initial results from other codes such as COMBINE/VENTURE and SCALE4a. are also shown. Several significant modifications were made to the ISR-developed QCALC1 kinetics analysis code. These modifications include testing the state of the core materials, an improvement to the calculation of the material properties of the core, the addition of an adiabatic core temperature model and improvement of the first order reactivity correction model. The accuracy of these modifications has been verified, and the accuracy of the point-core kinetics model used by the QCALC1 code has also been validated. Previously calculated kinetics results for the FPCR were described in the ISR report, "QCALC1: A code for FPCR Kinetics Model Feasibility Analysis" dated June 1, 2002.

  10. Computer Simulation of Convective Plasma Cells

    CERN Document Server

    Carboni, Rodrigo

    2015-01-01

    Computer simulations of plasmas are relevant nowadays, because it helps us understand physical processes taking place in the sun and other stellar objects. We developed a program called PCell which is intended for displaying the evolution of the magnetic field in a 2D convective plasma cell with perfect conducting walls for different stationary plasma velocity fields. Applications of this program are presented. This software works interactively with the mouse and the users can create their own movies in MPEG format. The programs were written in Fortran and C. There are two versions of the program (GNUPLOT and OpenGL). GNUPLOT and OpenGL are used to display the simulation.

  11. A Kinetic Vlasov Model for Plasma Simulation Using Discontinuous Galerkin Method on Many-Core Architectures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reddell, Noah

    Advances are reported in the three pillars of computational science achieving a new capability for understanding dynamic plasma phenomena outside of local thermodynamic equilibrium. A continuum kinetic model for plasma based on the Vlasov-Maxwell system for multiple particle species is developed. Consideration is added for boundary conditions in a truncated velocity domain and supporting wall interactions. A scheme to scale the velocity domain for multiple particle species with different temperatures and particle mass while sharing one computational mesh is described. A method for assessing the degree to which the kinetic solution differs from a Maxwell-Boltzmann distribution is introduced and tested on a thoroughly studied test case. The discontinuous Galerkin numerical method is extended for efficient solution of hyperbolic conservation laws in five or more particle phase-space dimensions using tensor-product hypercube elements with arbitrary polynomial order. A scheme for velocity moment integration is integrated as required for coupling between the plasma species and electromagnetic waves. A new high performance simulation code WARPM is developed to efficiently implement the model and numerical method on emerging many-core supercomputing architectures. WARPM uses the OpenCL programming model for computational kernels and task parallelism to overlap computation with communication. WARPM single-node performance and parallel scaling efficiency are analyzed with bottlenecks identified guiding future directions for the implementation. The plasma modeling capability is validated against physical problems with analytic solutions and well established benchmark problems.

  12. Simulation of 2D Kinetic Effects in Plasmas using the Grid Based Continuum Code LOKI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banks, Jeffrey; Berger, Richard; Chapman, Tom; Brunner, Stephan

    2016-10-01

    Kinetic simulation of multi-dimensional plasma waves through direct discretization of the Vlasov equation is a useful tool to study many physical interactions and is particularly attractive for situations where minimal fluctuation levels are desired, for instance, when measuring growth rates of plasma wave instabilities. However, direct discretization of phase space can be computationally expensive, and as a result there are few examples of published results using Vlasov codes in more than a single configuration space dimension. In an effort to fill this gap we have developed the Eulerian-based kinetic code LOKI that evolves the Vlasov-Poisson system in 2+2-dimensional phase space. The code is designed to reduce the cost of phase-space computation by using fully 4th order accurate conservative finite differencing, while retaining excellent parallel scalability that efficiently uses large scale computing resources. In this poster I will discuss the algorithms used in the code as well as some aspects of their parallel implementation using MPI. I will also overview simulation results of basic plasma wave instabilities relevant to laser plasma interaction, which have been obtained using the code.

  13. Modulation of release kinetics by plasma polymerization of ampicillin-loaded β-TCP ceramics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Labay, C.; Buxadera-Palomero, J.; Avilés, M.; Canal, C.; Ginebra, M. P.

    2016-08-01

    Beta-tricalcium phosphate (β-TCP) bioceramics are employed in bone repair surgery. Their local implantation in bone defects puts them in the limelight as potential materials for local drug delivery. However, obtaining suitable release patterns fitting the required therapeutics is a challenge. Here, plasma polymerization of ampicillin-loaded β-TCP is studied for the design of a novel antibiotic delivery system. Polyethylene glycol-like (PEG-like) coating of β-TCP by low pressure plasma polymerization was performed using diglyme as precursor, and nanometric PEG-like layers were obtained by simple and double plasma polymerization processes. A significant increase in hydrophobicity, and the presence of plasma polymer was visible on the surface by SEM and quantified by XPS. As a main consequence of the plasma polymerisation, the release kinetics were successfully modified, avoiding burst release, and slowing down the initial rate of release leading to a 4.5 h delay in reaching the same antibiotic release percentage, whilst conservation of the activity of the antibiotic was simultaneously maintained. Thus, plasma polymerisation on the surface of bioceramics may be a good strategy to design controlled drug delivery matrices for local bone therapies.

  14. Axisymmetric Bernstein modes in a finite-length non-neutral plasma: simulation and kinetic theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hart, Grant; Peterson, Bryan G.; Spencer, Ross L.

    2016-10-01

    We are using a 2-D PIC code to model high-frequency (near the cyclotron frequency) axisymmetric oscillations in a finite-length pure-ion plasma. We previously modeled these modes for infinite-length plasmas, where they are not detectable in the surface charge on the walls because of axisymmetry and lack of z-dependence. This is not true in a finite-length plasma, however, because the eigenfunction of the oscillation has to have nodes a short distance beyond the ends of the plasma. This gives the modes a cos (kz z) or sin (kz z) dependence, with a kz such that an integral number (approximately) of half-wavelengths fit into the plasma. This z-dependence makes the mode detectable in the surface charge on the walls. The modes also have r-dependence. The radial-velocity eigenfunctions of the modes behave as J1 (kr r) . We have simulated the plasma with different kz and kr values and find that increasing kz introduces a small frequency shift, either upward or downward depending on which mode is measured. The damping of the modes also increases as kz or kr increases. We are developing an appropriate kinetic theory of these modes that will include both the finite-Larmour-radius effects and the axial bouncing motion of the particles.

  15. Kinetic theory of time correlation functions for a dense one-component plasma in a magnetic field

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schoolderman, A.J.; Suttorp, L.G.

    1988-01-01

    The time-dependent correlations of a one-component plasma in a uniform magnetic field are studied with the help of kinetic theory. The time correlation functions of the particle density, the momentum density, and the kinetic energy density are evaluated for large time intervals. In the collision-dom

  16. Gyrokinetic and kinetic particle-in-cell simulations of guide-field reconnection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munoz Sepulveda, Patricio Alejandro; Büchner, Jörg; Kilian, Patrick; Told, Daniel; Jenko, Frank

    2016-07-01

    Fully kinetic Particle-in-Cell (PIC) simulations of (strong) guide-field reconnection can be computationally very demanding, due to the intrinsic stability and accuracy conditions required by this numerical method. One convenient approach to circumvent this issue is using gyrokinetic theory, an approximation of the Vlasov-Maxwell equations for strongly magnetized plasmas that eliminates the fast gyromotion, and thus reduces the computational cost. Although previous works have started to compare the features of reconnection between both approaches, a complete understanding of the differences is far from being complete. This knowledge is essential to discern the limitations of the gyrokinetic simulations of magnetic reconnection when applied to scenarios with moderate guide fields, such as the Solar corona, in contrast to most of the fusion/laboratory plasmas. We extend a previous work by our group, focused in the differences in the macroscopic flows, by analyzing the heating processes and non-thermal features developed by reconnection between both plasma approximations. We relate these processes by identifying some high-frequency cross-streaming instabilities appearing only in the fully kinetic approach. We characterize the effects of these phenonema such as anisotropic electron heating, beam formation and turbulence under different parameter regimes. And finally, we identify the conditions under which these instabilities tends to become negligible in the fully kinetic model, and thus a comparison with gyrokinetic theory becomes more reliable.

  17. The influence of platelets, plasma and red blood cells on functional haemostatic assays

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bochsen, Louise; Johansson, Pär I.; Kristensen, Annemarie Thuri

    2011-01-01

    and combined, influenced the two methodologically different assays, thrombelastography (TEG) and impedance aggregometry (Multiplate). Platelet-rich plasma (200 × 10/l) or pure plasma (0 platelets), with and without added red blood cells (RBCs), hematocrit 0, 0.15 or 0.29, were produced in vitro from platelet...... concentrates, fresh frozen plasma and stored RBC. Pure platelets were investigated by removing plasma components from platelet concentrates by diafiltration against the platelet storage solution Intersol. Plasma was readded by diafiltration against plasma in Intersol. Haemostatic function was evaluated by TEG...... and Multiplate. In the TEG, increasing amounts of RBC reduced clot strength and clot kinetics (α-angle), most markedly in plasma/RBC without platelets. In contrast, RBC in a platelet concentrate matrix enhanced Multiplate aggregation in response to weak agonists (ADP and arachidonic acid). Furthermore, removing...

  18. Extended monod kinetics for substrate, product, and cell inhibition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, K; Levenspiel, O

    1988-08-05

    A generalized form of Monod kinetics is proposed to account for all kinds of product, cell, and substrate inhibition. This model assumes that there exists a critical inhibitor concentration above which cells cannot grow, and that the constants of the Monod equation are functions of this limiting inhibitor concentration. Methods for evaluating the constants of this rate form are presented. Finally the proposed kinetic form is compared with the available data in the literature, which unfortunately is very sparse. In all cases, this equation form fitted the data very well.

  19. Electron temperature anisotropy in an expanding plasma: Particle-in-Cell simulations

    CERN Document Server

    Camporeale, Enrico; 10.1088/0004-637X/710/2/1848

    2010-01-01

    We perform fully-kinetic particle-in-cell simulations of an hot plasma that expands radially in a cylindrical geometry. The aim of the paper is to study the consequent development of the electron temperature anisotropy in an expanding plasma flow as found in a collisionless stellar wind. Kinetic plasma theory and simulations have shown that the electron temperature anisotropy is controlled by fluctuations driven by electromagnetic kinetic instabilities. In this study the temperature anisotropy is driven self-consistently by the expansion. While the expansion favors an increase of parallel anisotropy ($T_\\parallel>T_\\perp$), the onset of the firehose instability will tend to decrease it. We show the results for a supersonic, subsonic, and static expansion flows, and suggest possible applications of the results for the solar wind and other stellar winds.

  20. Computation Molecular Kinetics Model of HZE Induced Cell Cycle Arrest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cucinotta, Francis A.; Ren, Lei

    2004-01-01

    Cell culture models play an important role in understanding the biological effectiveness of space radiation. High energy and charge (HZE) ions produce prolonged cell cycle arrests at the G1/S and G2/M transition points in the cell cycle. A detailed description of these phenomena is needed to integrate knowledge of the expression of DNA damage in surviving cells, including the determination of relative effectiveness factors between different types of radiation that produce differential types of DNA damage and arrest durations. We have developed a hierarchical kinetics model that tracks the distribution of cells in various cell phase compartments (early G1, late G1, S, G2, and M), however with transition rates that are controlled by rate-limiting steps in the kinetics of cyclin-cdk's interactions with their families of transcription factors and inhibitor molecules. The coupling of damaged DNA molecules to the downstream cyclin-cdk inhibitors is achieved through a description of the DNA-PK and ATM signaling pathways. For HZE irradiations we describe preliminary results, which introduce simulation of the stochastic nature of the number of direct particle traversals per cell in the modulation of cyclin-cdk and cell cycle population kinetics. Comparison of the model to data for fibroblast cells irradiated photons or HZE ions are described.

  1. Plasma Cell Dyscrasia; LCDD vs Immunotactoid glomerulopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jabur Wael

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Light chain deposit disease is a plasma cell disorder characterized by production of a large amount of monoclonal immunoglobulin light chain or part of it, which is usually deposited as an amorphous substance in the kidneys. Immunotactoid glomerulopathy is an uncommon disease, which might be related to plasma cell dyscrasia, and characteristically manifest as organized glomerular ultra structural fibrils or microtubules. In this article, we report a case of a combined presentation of light chain disease and immunotactoid glomerulopathy in a patient with multiple myeloma and reversible advanced renal failure.

  2. Kinetic theory of twisted waves: Application to space plasmas having superthermal population of species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arshad, Kashif; Poedts, Stefaan; Lazar, Marian

    2017-04-01

    ring shape morphology of a beam with orbital angular momentum (OAM) is ideal for the observation of solar corona around the sun where the intensity of the beam is minimum at the center, in solar experiments, and Earth's ionosphere. The twisted plasma modes carrying OAM are mostly studied either by the fluid theory or Maxwellian distributed Kinetic Theory. But most of the space plasmas and some laboratory plasmas have non-thermal distributions due to super-thermal population of the plasma particles. Therefore the Kinetic Theory of twisted plasma modes carrying OAM are recently studied using non-thermal (kappa) distribution of the super-thermal particles in the presence of the helical electric field and significant change in the damping rates are observed by tuning appropriate parameters.

  3. Kinetic Theory of Meteor Plasma in the Earth's atmosphere: Implications for Radar Head Echo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dimant, Y. S.; Oppenheim, M. M.

    2015-12-01

    Every second millions of tiny meteoroids hit the Earth from space, vast majority too small to be observed visually. However, radars detect the plasma they generate and use the collected data to characterize the incoming meteoroids and the atmosphere in which they disintegrate. This diagnostics requires a detailed quantitative understanding of formation of the meteor plasma and how it interacts with the Earth's atmosphere. Fast-descending meteoroids become detectable to radars after they heat due to collisions with atmospheric molecules sufficiently and start ablating. The ablated material then collides into atmospheric molecules and forms plasma around the meteoroid. Reflection of radar pulses from this plasma produces a localized signal called a head echo often accompanied by a much longer non-specular trail (see the Figure). Using first principles, we have developed a consistent collisional kinetic theory of the near-meteoroid plasma responsible for the radar head echo. This theory produces analytic expressions describing the ion and neutral velocity distributions along with the detailed 3-D spatial structure of the near-meteoroid plasma. These expressions predict a number of unexpected features such as shell-like velocity distributions. This theory shows that the meteoroid plasma develops over a length-scale close to the ion mean free path with a strongly non-Maxwellian velocity distribution. The spatial distribution of the plasma density shows significant deviations from a Gaussian law usually employed in head-echo modeling. This analytical model will serve as a basis for a more accurate quantitative interpretation of radar measurements, estimates of the ionization efficiency, and should help calculate meteoroid and atmosphere parameters from radar head-echo observations. This theory could also help clarify the physical nature of electromagnetic pulses observed during recent meteor showers and associated with the passage of fast-moving meteors through the

  4. PLASMA TURBULENCE AND KINETIC INSTABILITIES AT ION SCALES IN THE EXPANDING SOLAR WIND

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hellinger, Petr; Trávnícek, Pavel M. [Astronomical Institute, CAS, Bocni II/1401, CZ-14100 Prague (Czech Republic); Matteini, Lorenzo [Department of Physics, Imperial College London, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom); Landi, Simone; Verdini, Andrea; Franci, Luca, E-mail: petr.hellinger@asu.cas.cz [Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia, Università degli Studi di Firenze Largo E. Fermi 2, I-50125 Firenze (Italy)

    2015-10-01

    The relationship between a decaying strong turbulence and kinetic instabilities in a slowly expanding plasma is investigated using two-dimensional (2D) hybrid expanding box simulations. We impose an initial ambient magnetic field perpendicular to the simulation box, and we start with a spectrum of large-scale, linearly polarized, random-phase Alfvénic fluctuations that have energy equipartition between kinetic and magnetic fluctuations and vanishing correlation between the two fields. A turbulent cascade rapidly develops; magnetic field fluctuations exhibit a power-law spectrum at large scales and a steeper spectrum at ion scales. The turbulent cascade leads to an overall anisotropic proton heating, protons are heated in the perpendicular direction, and, initially, also in the parallel direction. The imposed expansion leads to generation of a large parallel proton temperature anisotropy which is at later stages partly reduced by turbulence. The turbulent heating is not sufficient to overcome the expansion-driven perpendicular cooling and the system eventually drives the oblique firehose instability in a form of localized nonlinear wave packets which efficiently reduce the parallel temperature anisotropy. This work demonstrates that kinetic instabilities may coexist with strong plasma turbulence even in a constrained 2D regime.

  5. Nonlinear coupling of kinetic Alfven waves with acoustic waves in a self-gravitating dusty plasma with adiabatic trapping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabeen, A.; Masood, W.; Qureshi, M. N. S.; Shah, H. A.

    2017-07-01

    In this paper, linear and nonlinear coupling of kinetic Alfven and acoustic waves has been studied in a dusty plasma in the presence of trapping and self-gravitation effects. In this regard, we have derived the linear dispersion relations for positively and negatively coupled dust kinetic Alfven-acoustic waves. Stability analysis of the coupled dust kinetic Alfven-acoustic wave has also been presented. The formation of solitary structures has been investigated following the Sagdeev potential approach by using the two-potential theory. Numerical results show that the solitary structures can be obtained only for sub-Alfvenic regimes in the scenario of space plasmas.

  6. Kinetic Alfv\\'{e}n solitary and rogue waves in superthermal plasmas

    CERN Document Server

    Bains, A; Xia, L -D

    2014-01-01

    We investigate the small but finite amplitude solitary Kinetic Alfv\\'{e}n waves (KAWs) in low $\\beta$ plasmas with superthermal electrons modeled by a kappa-type distribution. A nonlinear Korteweg-de Vries (KdV) equation describing the evolution of KAWs is derived by using the standard reductive perturbation method. Examining the dependence of the nonlinear and dispersion coefficients of the KdV equation on the superthermal parameter $\\kappa$, plasma $\\beta$ and obliqueness of propagation, we show that these parameters may change substantially the shape and size of solitary KAW pulses. Only sub-Alfv\\'enic, compressive solitons are supported. We then extend the study to examine kinetic Alfv\\'en rogue waves by deriving a nonlinear Schr\\"{o}dinger equation from {the KdV} equation. Rational solutions that form rogue wave envelopes are obtained. We examine how the behavior of rogue waves depends on the plasma parameters in question, finding that the rogue envelopes are lowered with increasing electron superthermal...

  7. Three species one-dimensional kinetic model for weakly ionized plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez, J.; Donoso, J. M.; Tierno, S. P.

    2016-06-01

    A three species one-dimensional kinetic model is presented for a spatially homogeneous weakly ionized plasma subjected to the action of a time varying electric field. Planar geometry is assumed, which means that the plasma evolves in the privileged direction of the field. The energy transmitted to the electric charges is channelized to the neutrals thanks to collisions, a mechanism that influences the plasma dynamics. Charge-charge interactions have been designed as a one-dimensional collision term equivalent to the Landau operator used for fully ionized plasmas. Charge-neutral collisions are modelled by a conservative drift-diffusion operator in the Dougherty's form. The resulting set of coupled integro-differential equations is solved with the stable and robust propagator integral method. This semi-analytical method feasibility accounts for non-linear effects without appealing to linearisation or simplifications, providing conservative physically meaningful solutions even for initial or emerging sharp velocity distribution function profiles. It is found that charge-neutral collisions exert a significant effect since a quite different plasma evolution arises if compared to the collisionless limit. In addition, substantial differences in the system motion are found for constant and temperature dependent collision frequencies cases.

  8. Three species one-dimensional kinetic model for weakly ionized plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gonzalez, J., E-mail: jorge.gonzalez@upm.es; Donoso, J. M.; Tierno, S. P. [Department of Applied Physics, Escuela Técnica Superior de Ingeniería Aeronáutica y del Espacio, Universidad Politécnica de Madrid, 28040 Madrid (Spain)

    2016-06-15

    A three species one-dimensional kinetic model is presented for a spatially homogeneous weakly ionized plasma subjected to the action of a time varying electric field. Planar geometry is assumed, which means that the plasma evolves in the privileged direction of the field. The energy transmitted to the electric charges is channelized to the neutrals thanks to collisions, a mechanism that influences the plasma dynamics. Charge-charge interactions have been designed as a one-dimensional collision term equivalent to the Landau operator used for fully ionized plasmas. Charge-neutral collisions are modelled by a conservative drift-diffusion operator in the Dougherty's form. The resulting set of coupled integro-differential equations is solved with the stable and robust propagator integral method. This semi–analytical method feasibility accounts for non–linear effects without appealing to linearisation or simplifications, providing conservative physically meaningful solutions even for initial or emerging sharp velocity distribution function profiles. It is found that charge-neutral collisions exert a significant effect since a quite different plasma evolution arises if compared to the collisionless limit. In addition, substantial differences in the system motion are found for constant and temperature dependent collision frequencies cases.

  9. Viriato: a Fourier-Hermite spectral code for strongly magnetised fluid-kinetic plasma dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loureiro, Nuno; Dorland, William; Fazendeiro, Luis; Kanekar, Anjor; Mallet, Alfred; Zocco, Alessandro

    2015-11-01

    We report on the algorithms and numerical methods used in Viriato, a novel fluid-kinetic code that solves two distinct sets of equations: (i) the Kinetic Reduced Electron Heating Model equations [Zocco & Schekochihin, 2011] and (ii) the kinetic reduced MHD (KRMHD) equations [Schekochihin et al., 2009]. Two main applications of these equations are magnetised (Alfvnénic) plasma turbulence and magnetic reconnection. Viriato uses operator splitting to separate the dynamics parallel and perpendicular to the ambient magnetic field (assumed strong). Along the magnetic field, Viriato allows for either a second-order accurate MacCormack method or, for higher accuracy, a spectral-like scheme. Perpendicular to the field Viriato is pseudo-spectral, and the time integration is performed by means of an iterative predictor-corrector scheme. In addition, a distinctive feature of Viriato is its spectral representation of the parallel velocity-space dependence, achieved by means of a Hermite representation of the perturbed distribution function. A series of linear and nonlinear benchmarks and tests are presented, with focus on 3D decaying kinetic turbulence. Work partially supported by Fundação para a Ciência e Tecnologia via Grants UID/FIS/50010/2013 and IF/00530/2013.

  10. Viriato: A Fourier-Hermite spectral code for strongly magnetized fluid-kinetic plasma dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loureiro, N. F.; Dorland, W.; Fazendeiro, L.; Kanekar, A.; Mallet, A.; Vilelas, M. S.; Zocco, A.

    2016-09-01

    We report on the algorithms and numerical methods used in Viriato, a novel fluid-kinetic code that solves two distinct sets of equations: (i) the Kinetic Reduced Electron Heating Model (KREHM) equations (Zocco and Schekochihin, 2011) (which reduce to the standard Reduced-MHD equations in the appropriate limit) and (ii) the kinetic reduced MHD (KRMHD) equations (Schekochihin et al., 2009). Two main applications of these equations are magnetized (Alfvénic) plasma turbulence and magnetic reconnection. Viriato uses operator splitting (Strang or Godunov) to separate the dynamics parallel and perpendicular to the ambient magnetic field (assumed strong). Along the magnetic field, Viriato allows for either a second-order accurate MacCormack method or, for higher accuracy, a spectral-like scheme composed of the combination of a total variation diminishing (TVD) third order Runge-Kutta method for the time derivative with a 7th order upwind scheme for the fluxes. Perpendicular to the field Viriato is pseudo-spectral, and the time integration is performed by means of an iterative predictor-corrector scheme. In addition, a distinctive feature of Viriato is its spectral representation of the parallel velocity-space dependence, achieved by means of a Hermite representation of the perturbed distribution function. A series of linear and nonlinear benchmarks and tests are presented, including a detailed analysis of 2D and 3D Orszag-Tang-type decaying turbulence, both in fluid and kinetic regimes.

  11. Construction of Larger Area Density-Uniform Plasma with Collisional Inductively Coupled Plasma Cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    OUYANG Liang; LIU Wandong; BAI Xiaoyan; CHEN Zhipeng; WANG Huihui; LI LUO Chen; JI Liangliang; HU Bei

    2007-01-01

    The plasma density and electron temperature of a multi-source plasma system composed of several collisional inductively coupled plasma (ICP) cells were measured by a double-probe. The discharges of the ICP cells were shown to be independent of each other. Furthermore, the total plasma density at simultaneous multi-cell discharge was observed to be approximately equal to the summation of the plasma density when the cells discharge separately. Based on the linear summation phenomenon, it was shown that a larger area plasma with a uniform density and temperature profile could be constructed with multi-collisional ICP cells.

  12. Cytology of plasma cell rich effusion in cases of plasma cell neoplasm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gochhait, Debasis; Dey, Pranab; Verma, Neelam

    2016-01-01

    Background: Multiple myeloma or plasmacytoma resulting in malignant effusion is rarely described in literature. Aims: In this paper, we have studied the seven rare cases of plasma cell infiltration in effusion fluid. Materials and Methods: We studied six cases of pleural fluid and one case of ascetic fluid. Detailed cytological features, clinical history, bone marrow examinations, serum electrophoresis, and immunofixation data were analyzed. Result: There were two cases of plasmacytoma, four cases of multiple myeloma, and one case of plasmablastic lymphoma. On cytology, all the cases showed excess plasma cells along with mesothelial cells and lymphocytes on effusion cytology smear. Conclusion: Plasma cell rich effusion in cases of plasma cell tumor is rare. However, on cytology these cases do not pose much problem if relevant history is known.

  13. Plasma Processes : A self-consistent kinetic modeling of a 1-D, bounded, plasma in equilibrium

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Monojoy Goswami; H Ramachandran

    2000-11-01

    A self-consistent kinetic treatment is presented here, where the Boltzmann equation is solved for a particle conserving Krook collision operator. The resulting equations have been implemented numerically. The treatment solves for the entire quasineutral column, making no assumptions about mfp/, where mfp is the ion-neutral collision mean free path and the size of the device. Coulomb collisions are neglected in favour of collisions with neutrals, and the particle source is modeled as a uniform Maxwellian. Electrons are treated as an inertialess but collisional fluid. The ion distribution function for the trapped and the transiting orbits is obtained. Interesting findings include the anomalous heating of ions as they approach the presheath, the development of strongly non-Maxwellian features near the last mfp, and strong modifications of the sheath criterion.

  14. Kinetics of cell division in epidermal maintenance

    CERN Document Server

    Klein, Allon M; Jones, Philip H; Simons, Benjamin D

    2007-01-01

    The rules governing cell division and differentiation are central to understanding the mechanisms of development, aging and cancer. By utilising inducible genetic labelling, recent studies have shown that the clonal population in transgenic mouse epidermis can be tracked in vivo. Drawing on these results, we explain how clonal fate data may be used to infer the rules of cell division and differentiation underlying the maintenance of adult murine tail-skin. We show that the rates of cell division and differentiation may be evaluated by considering the long-time and short-time clone fate data, and that the data is consistent with cells dividing independently rather than synchronously. Motivated by these findings, we consider a mechanism for cancer onset based closely on the model for normal adult skin. By analysing the expected changes to clonal fate in cancer emerging from a simple two-stage mutation, we propose that clonal fate data may provide a novel method for studying the earliest stages of the disease.

  15. Kinetic and spectral descriptions of autoionization phenomena associated with atomic processes in plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobs, Verne L.

    2017-06-01

    This investigation has been devoted to the theoretical description and computer modeling of atomic processes giving rise to radiative emission in energetic electron and ion beam interactions and in laboratory plasmas. We are also interested in the effects of directed electron and ion collisions and of anisotropic electric and magnetic fields. In the kinetic-theory description, we treat excitation, de-excitation, ionization, and recombination in electron and ion encounters with partially ionized atomic systems, including the indirect contributions from processes involving autoionizing resonances. These fundamental collisional and electromagnetic interactions also provide particle and photon transport mechanisms. From the spectral perspective, the analysis of atomic radiative emission can reveal detailed information on the physical properties in the plasma environment, such as non-equilibrium electron and charge-state distributions as well as electric and magnetic field distributions. In this investigation, a reduced-density-matrix formulation is developed for the microscopic description of atomic electromagnetic interactions in the presence of environmental (collisional and radiative) relaxation and decoherence processes. Our central objective is a fundamental microscopic description of atomic electromagnetic processes, in which both bound-state and autoionization-resonance phenomena can be treated in a unified and self-consistent manner. The time-domain (equation-of-motion) and frequency-domain (resolvent-operator) formulations of the reduced-density-matrix approach are developed in a unified and self-consistent manner. This is necessary for our ultimate goal of a systematic and self-consistent treatment of non-equilibrium (possibly coherent) atomic-state kinetics and high-resolution (possibly overlapping) spectral-line shapes. We thereby propose the introduction of a generalized collisional-radiative atomic-state kinetics model based on a reduced

  16. Plasma cell treatment device Plasma-on-Chip: Monitoring plasma-generated reactive species in microwells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Jun-Seok; Kojima, Shinya; Sasaki, Minoru; Hatta, Akimitsu; Kumagai, Shinya

    2017-01-01

    We have developed a plasma cell treatment device called Plasma-on-Chip that enables the real-time monitoring of a single cell culture during plasma treatment. The device consists of three parts: 1) microwells for cell culture, 2) a microplasma device for generating reactive oxygen and nitrogen species (RONS) for use in cell treatment, and 3) through-holes (microchannels) that connect each microwell with the microplasma region for RONS delivery. Here, we analysed the delivery of the RONS to the liquid culture medium stored in the microwells. We developed a simple experimental set-up using a microdevice and applied in situ ultraviolet absorption spectroscopy with high sensitivity for detecting RONS in liquid. The plasma-generated RONS were delivered into the liquid culture medium via the through-holes fabricated into the microdevice. The RONS concentrations were on the order of 10–100 μM depending on the size of the through-holes. In contrast, we found that the amount of dissolved oxygen was almost constant. To investigate the process of RONS generation, we numerically analysed the gas flow in the through-holes. We suggest that the circulating gas flow in the through-holes promotes the interaction between the plasma (ionised gas) and the liquid, resulting in enhanced RONS concentrations. PMID:28176800

  17. Jovian Plasmas Torus Interaction with Europa. Plasma Wake Structure and Effect of Inductive Magnetic Field: 3D Hybrid Kinetic Simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lipatov, A. S.; Cooper, J F.; Paterson, W. R.; Sittler, E. C., Jr.; Hartle, R. E.; Simpson, David G.

    2013-01-01

    The hybrid kinetic model supports comprehensive simulation of the interaction between different spatial and energetic elements of the Europa moon-magnetosphere system with respect to a variable upstream magnetic field and flux or density distributions of plasma and energetic ions, electrons, and neutral atoms. This capability is critical for improving the interpretation of the existing Europa flyby measurements from the Galileo Orbiter mission, and for planning flyby and orbital measurements (including the surface and atmospheric compositions) for future missions. The simulations are based on recent models of the atmosphere of Europa (Cassidy et al., 2007; Shematovich et al., 2005). In contrast to previous approaches with MHD simulations, the hybrid model allows us to fully take into account the finite gyroradius effect and electron pressure, and to correctly estimate the ion velocity distribution and the fluxes along the magnetic field (assuming an initial Maxwellian velocity distribution for upstream background ions). Photoionization, electron-impact ionization, charge exchange and collisions between the ions and neutrals are also included in our model. We consider the models with Oþ þ and Sþ þ background plasma, and various betas for background ions and electrons, and pickup electrons. The majority of O2 atmosphere is thermal with an extended non-thermal population (Cassidy et al., 2007). In this paper, we discuss two tasks: (1) the plasma wake structure dependence on the parameters of the upstream plasma and Europa's atmosphere (model I, cases (a) and (b) with a homogeneous Jovian magnetosphere field, an inductive magnetic dipole and high oceanic shell conductivity); and (2) estimation of the possible effect of an induced magnetic field arising from oceanic shell conductivity. This effect was estimated based on the difference between the observed and modeled magnetic fields (model II, case (c) with an inhomogeneous Jovian magnetosphere field, an inductive

  18. Growth kinetics of Thiobacillus ferrooxidans in bioelectrochemical cell

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李宏煦; 王淀佐; 邱冠周; 胡岳华

    2004-01-01

    Thiobacillus ferrooxidans might be the most important bacteria used in biometallurgy. The foundation way of its growth process is oxidizing ferrous in order to obtain energy needed for metabolism, but the variation of ferrous concentration and mixed potential of the culture media would have crucial effect on the bacteria growth.Based on the characteristics of Thiobacillus ferrooxidans growth and redox potential of ferric and ferrous, an electrochemical cell was designed conventionally to study growth rule and the relationship between redox potential and bacteria growth was built up, and some growth kinetics of Thiobacillus ferrooxidans were elucidated. It demonstrates that the variation of open potential of electrochemical cell △E shows the growth tendency of Thiobacillus ferrooxidans, at the initial growth stage, the value of △E increases slowly, when at logistic growth stage, it increases drastically, and the growth rate of bacteria is linear with the oxidation rate of ferrous. The bacteria growth kinetics model is proposed using Monod and Michealis-Menten equation, and the kinetics parameters are got. The consistence of the measured and the calculated results proves that it is proper to use the proposed kinetics model and the electrochemical cell method to describe the growth rule of Thiobacillus ferrooxidans.

  19. Impact of cold plasma on Citrobacter freundii in apple juice: inactivation kinetics and mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Surowsky, Björn; Fröhling, Antje; Gottschalk, Nathalie; Schlüter, Oliver; Knorr, Dietrich

    2014-03-17

    Various studies have shown that cold plasma is capable of inactivating microorganisms located on a variety of food surfaces, food packaging materials and process equipment under atmospheric pressure conditions; however, less attention has been paid to the impact of cold plasma on microorganisms in liquid foodstuffs. The present study investigates cold plasma's ability to inactivate Citrobacter freundii in apple juice. Optical emission spectroscopy (OES) and temperature measurements were performed to characterise the plasma source. The plasma-related impact on microbial loads was evaluated by traditional plate count methods, while morphological changes were determined using scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Physiological property changes were obtained through flow cytometric measurements (membrane integrity, esterase activity and membrane potential). In addition, mathematical modelling was performed in order to achieve a reliable prediction of microbial inactivation and to establish the basis for possible industrial implementation. C. freundii loads in apple juice were reduced by about 5 log cycles after a plasma exposure of 480s using argon and 0.1% oxygen plus a subsequent storage time of 24h. The results indicate that a direct contact between bacterial cells and plasma is not necessary for achieving successful inactivation. The plasma-generated compounds in the liquid, such as H2O2 and most likely hydroperoxy radicals, are particularly responsible for microbial inactivation.

  20. Kinetic theory of the filamentation instability in a collisional current-driven plasma with nonextensive distribution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khorashadizadeh, S. M., E-mail: smkhorashadi@birjand.ac.ir; Rastbood, E. [Physics Department, University of Birjand, Birjand 97179-63384 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Niknam, A. R. [Laser and Plasma Research Institute, Shahid Beheshti University, G.C., Tehran 19839-63113 (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2015-07-15

    The evolution of filamentation instability in a weakly ionized current-carrying plasma with nonextensive distribution was studied in the diffusion frequency region, taking into account the effects of electron-neutral collisions. Using the kinetic theory, Lorentz transformation formulas, and Bhatnagar-Gross-Krook collision model, the generalized dielectric permittivity functions of this plasma system were achieved. By obtaining the dispersion relation of low-frequency waves, the possibility of filamentation instability and its growth rate were investigated. It was shown that collisions can increase the maximum growth rate of instability. The analysis of temporal evolution of filamentation instability revealed that the growth rate of instability increased by increasing the q-parameter and electron drift velocity. Finally, the results of Maxwellian and q-nonextensive velocity distributions were compared and discussed.

  1. A linear dispersion relation for the hybrid kinetic-ion/fluid-electron model of plasma physics

    CERN Document Server

    Told, Daniel; Astfalk, Patrick; Jenko, Frank

    2016-01-01

    A dispersion relation for a commonly used hybrid model of plasma physics is developed, which combines fully kinetic ions and a massless-electron fluid description. Although this model and variations of it have been used to describe plasma phenomena for about 40 years, to date there exists no general dispersion relation to describe the linear wave physics contained in the model. Previous efforts along these lines are extended here to retain arbitrary wave propagation angles, temperature anisotropy effects, as well as additional terms in the generalized Ohm's law which determines the electric field. A numerical solver for the dispersion relation is developed, and linear wave physics is benchmarked against solutions of a full Vlasov-Maxwell dispersion relation solver. This work opens the door to a more accurate interpretation of existing and future wave and turbulence simulations using this type of hybrid model.

  2. The role of electron scattering with vibrationally excited nitrogen molecules on non-equilibrium plasma kinetics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Capitelli, Mario [Dipartimento di Chimica, Universitá di Bari, Via Orabona 4, 70125 Bari (Italy); CNR-IMIP, Via Amendola 122/D, 70126 Bari (Italy); Colonna, Gianpiero; D' Ammando, Giuliano; Laricchiuta, Annarita [CNR-IMIP, Via Amendola 122/D, 70126 Bari (Italy); Laporta, Vincenzo [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University College London, London WC1E 6BT (United Kingdom)

    2013-10-15

    Electron energy distribution functions have been calculated by a self-consistent model which couples the electron Boltzmann equation with vibrationally and electronically excited state kinetics and plasma chemistry. Moderate pressure nitrogen gas discharges in the E/N range from 30 to 60 Townsend are investigated comparing an electron-impact cross section set considering transitions starting from all the vibrational states, with reduced models, taking into account only collisions involving the ground vibrational level. The results, while confirming the important role of second kind collisions in affecting the eedf, show a large dependence of the eedf on the set of inelastic processes involving vibrationally and electronically excited molecules, pointing out the need of using a cross section database including processes linking excited states in non-equilibrium plasma discharge models.

  3. Hybrid electrodynamics and kinetics simulation for electromagnetic wave propagation in weakly ionized hydrogen plasmas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Qiang; Chen, Bin

    2012-10-01

    In this paper, a hybrid electrodynamics and kinetics numerical model based on the finite-difference time-domain method and lattice Boltzmann method is presented for electromagnetic wave propagation in weakly ionized hydrogen plasmas. In this framework, the multicomponent Bhatnagar-Gross-Krook collision model considering both elastic and Coulomb collisions and the multicomponent force model based on the Guo model are introduced, which supply a hyperfine description on the interaction between electromagnetic wave and weakly ionized plasma. Cubic spline interpolation and mean filtering technique are separately introduced to solve the multiscalar problem and enhance the physical quantities, which are polluted by numerical noise. Several simulations have been implemented to validate our model. The numerical results are consistent with a simplified analytical model, which demonstrates that this model can obtain satisfying numerical solutions successfully.

  4. Enhancing Understanding of High Energy Density Plasmas Using Fluid Modeling with Kinetic Closures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, David; Held, Eric; Srinivasan, Bhuvana; Masti, Robert; King, Jake

    2016-10-01

    This work seeks to understand possible stabilization mechanisms of the early-time electrothermal instability in the evolution of the Rayleigh-Taylor instability in MagLIF (Magnetized Liner Inertial Fusion) experiments. Such mechanisms may include electron thermal conduction, viscosity, and large magnetic fields. Experiments have shown that the high-energy density plasmas from wire-array implosions require physics modelling that goes well beyond simple models such as ideal MHD. The plan is to develop a multi-fluid extended-MHD model that includes kinetic closures for thermal conductivity, resistivity, and viscosity using codes that are easily available to the wider research community. Such an effort would provide the community with a well-benchmarked tool capable of advanced modeling of high-energy-density plasmas.

  5. Electron energy distribution functions for modelling the plasma kinetics in dielectric barrier discharges

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carman, R.J. [Department of Physics, Division of Information and Communications Sciences, Macquarie University, Sydney, NSW (Australia)). E-mail: rcarman@physics.mq.edu.au; Mildren, R.P. [Centre for Lasers and Applications, Division of Information and Communications Sciences, Macquarie University, Sydney, NSW (Australia)

    2000-10-07

    In modelling the plasma kinetics in dielectric barrier discharges (DBDs), the electron energy conservation equation is often included in the rate equation analysis (rather than utilizing the local-field approximation) with the assumption that the electron energy distribution function (EEDF) has a Maxwellian profile. We show that adopting a Maxwellian EEDF leads to a serious overestimate of the calculated ionization/excitation rate coefficients and the electron mobility for typical plasma conditions in a xenon DBD. Alternative EEDF profiles are trialed (Druyvesteyn, bi-Maxwellian and bi-Druyvesteyn) and benchmarked against EEDFs obtained from solving the steady-state Boltzmann equation. A bi-Druyvesteyn EEDF is shown to be more inherently accurate for modelling simulations of xenon DBDs. (author)

  6. Jovian plasma torus interaction with Europa. Plasma wake structure and effect of inductive magnetic field: 3D Hybrid kinetic simulation

    CERN Document Server

    Lipatov, A S; Paterson, W R; Sittler, E C; Hartle, R E; Simpson, D G

    2012-01-01

    The hybrid kinetic model supports comprehensive simulation of the interaction between different spatial and energetic elements of the Europa moon-magnetosphere system with respect a to variable upstream magnetic field and flux or density distributions of plasma and energetic ions, electrons, and neutral atoms. This capability is critical for improving the interpretation of the existing Europa flyby measurements from the Galileo Orbiter mission, and for planning flyby and orbital measurements (including the surface and atmospheric compositions) for future missions. The simulations are based on recent models of the atmosphere of Europa (Cassidy et al., 2007; Shematovich et al., 2005). In contrast to previous approaches with MHD simulations, the hybrid model allows us to fully take into account the finite gyroradius effect and electron pressure, and to correctly estimate the ion velocity distribution and the fluxes along the magnetic field (assuming an initial Maxwellian velocity distribution for upstream backgr...

  7. The Antigen Presenting Cells Instruct Plasma Cell Differentiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei eXu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The professional antigen presenting cells (APCs, including many subsets of dendritic cells and macrophages, not only mediate prompt but nonspecific response against microbes, but also bridge the antigen-specific adaptive immune response through antigen presentation. In the latter, typically activated B cells acquire cognate signals from T helper cells in the germinal center of lymphoid follicles to differentiate into plasma cells, which generate protective antibodies. Recent advances have revealed that many APC subsets provide not only signal 1 (the antigen, but also signal 2 to directly instruct the differentiation process of plasma cells in a T cell-independent manner. Herein, the different signals provided by these APC subsets to direct B cell proliferation, survival, class switching and terminal differentiation are discussed. We furthermore propose that the next generation of vaccines for boosting antibody response could be designed by targeting APCs.

  8. Kinetic study of electrostatic twisted waves instability in nonthermal dusty plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arshad, Kashif; Lazar, M.; Mahmood, Shahzad; Aman-ur-Rehman, Poedts, S.

    2017-03-01

    The kinetic theory of electrostatic twisted waves' instability in a dusty plasma is developed in the presence of orbital angular momentum of the helical (twisted) electric field in plasmas with kappa distributed electrons, ions, and dust particles. The kappa distributed electrons are considered to have a drift velocity. The perturbed distribution function and helical electric field are decomposed by Laguerre-Gaussian mode functions defined in cylindrical geometry. The Vlasov-Poisson equation is obtained and solved analytically to investigate the growth rates of the electrostatic twisted waves in a non-thermal dusty plasma. The growth rates of the dust ion acoustic twisted mode (DIATM) and dust acoustic twisted mode (DATM) are obtained analytically and also pictorial presented numerically. The instability condition for the DIATM and DATM is also discussed with different plasma parameters. The growth rates of DIATM and DATM are larger when the drifted electrons are non-Maxwellian distributed and smaller for the Maxwellian distributed drifted electrons in the presence of the helical electric field.

  9. Study of carbon dioxide gas treatment based on equations of kinetics in plasma discharge reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abedi-Varaki, Mehdi

    2017-08-01

    Carbon dioxide (CO2) as the primary greenhouse gas, is the main pollutant that is warming earth. CO2 is widely emitted through the cars, planes, power plants and other human activities that involve the burning of fossil fuels (coal, natural gas and oil). Thus, there is a need to develop some method to reduce CO2 emission. To this end, this study investigates the behavior of CO2 in dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) plasma reactor. The behavior of different species and their reaction rates are studied using a zero-dimensional model based on equations of kinetics inside plasma reactor. The results show that the plasma reactor has an effective reduction on the CO2 density inside the reactor. As a result of reduction in the temporal variations of reaction rate, the speed of chemical reactions for CO2 decreases and very low concentration of CO2 molecules inside the plasma reactor is generated. The obtained results are compared with the existing experimental and simulation findings in the literature.

  10. Kinetics of post-treatment structural transformations of nitrogen plasma ion immersion implanted polystyrene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kosobrodova, E., E-mail: elenak@physics.usyd.edu.au; Kondyurin, A.; McKenzie, D.R.; Bilek, M.M.M.

    2013-06-01

    The surface chemistry of a synthetic material in contact with a biological system has a strong influence on the adhesion of proteins to the surface of the material and requires careful consideration in biomedical applications. The structure of plasma immersion ion implantation (PIII) treated polymer and its surface free energy depend on the ion fluence delivered during the treatment and on the time after the PIII treatment. These dependences have been investigated using the example of nitrogen plasma implanted polystyrene (PS). Contact angle measurements, FTIR–ATR spectra and X-ray photoelectron (XPS) spectra were acquired as a function of ion fluence and time after treatment. The results showed a close relationship to the kinetics of free radicals that had been examined in a previous study. The kinetics of oxidation and surface free energy had two stages, one with a characteristic time of several hours and the other with a characteristic time of several days. The concentration of nitrogen-containing groups decreased with time after PIII treatment, partly, due to their release from the PS surface.

  11. Selfconsistent vibrational and free electron kinetics for CO2 dissociation in cold plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capitelli, Mario

    2016-09-01

    The activation of CO2 by cold plasmas is receiving new theoretical interest thanks to two European groups. The Bogaerts group developed a global model for the activation of CO2 trying to reproduce the experimental values for DBD and microwave discharges. The approach of Pietanza et al was devoted to understand the dependence of electron energy distribution function (eedf) of pure CO2 on the presence of concentrations of electronically and vibrationally excited states taken as parameter. To understand the importance of the vibrational excitation in the dissociation process Pietanza et al compared an upper limit to the dissociation process from a pure vibrational mechanism (PVM) with the corresponding electron impact dissociation rate, the prevalence of the two models depending on the reduced electric field and on the choice of the electron molecule cross section database. Improvement of the Pietanza et al model is being considered by coupling the time dependent Boltzmann solver with the non equilibrium vibrational kinetics of asymmetric mode and with simplified plasma chemistry kinetics describing the ionization/recombination process and the excitation-deexcitation of a metastable level at 10.5eV. A new PVM mechanism is also considered. Preliminary results, for both discharge and post discharge conditions, emphasize the action of superelastic collisions involving both vibrationally and electronically excited states in affecting the eedf. The new results can be used to plan a road map for future developments of numerical codes for rationalizing existing experimental values, as well as, for indicating new experimental situations.

  12. Benchmark of the Local Drift-kinetic Models for Neoclassical Transport Simulation in Helical Plasmas

    CERN Document Server

    Huang, B; Kanno, R; Sugama, H; Matsuoka, S

    2016-01-01

    The benchmarks of the neoclassical transport codes based on the several local drift-kinetic models are reported here. Here, the drift-kinetic models are ZOW, ZMD, DKES-like, and global, as classified in [Matsuoka et al., Physics of Plasmas 22, 072511 (2015)]. The magnetic geometries of HSX, LHD, and W7-X are employed in the benchmarks. It is found that the assumption of $\\boldsymbol E \\times \\boldsymbol B$ incompressibility causes discrepancy of neoclassical radial flux and parallel flow among the models, when $\\boldsymbol E \\times \\boldsymbol B$ is sufficiently large compared to the magnetic drift velocities. On the other hand, when $\\boldsymbol E \\times \\boldsymbol B$ and the magnetic drift velocities are comparable, the tangential magnetic drift, which is included in both the global and ZOW models, fills the role of suppressing unphysical peaking of neoclassical radial-fluxes found in the other local models at $E_r \\simeq 0$. In low collisionality plasmas, in particular, the tangential drift effect works w...

  13. Benchmark of the local drift-kinetic models for neoclassical transport simulation in helical plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, B.; Satake, S.; Kanno, R.; Sugama, H.; Matsuoka, S.

    2017-02-01

    The benchmarks of the neoclassical transport codes based on the several local drift-kinetic models are reported here. Here, the drift-kinetic models are zero orbit width (ZOW), zero magnetic drift, DKES-like, and global, as classified in Matsuoka et al. [Phys. Plasmas 22, 072511 (2015)]. The magnetic geometries of Helically Symmetric Experiment, Large Helical Device (LHD), and Wendelstein 7-X are employed in the benchmarks. It is found that the assumption of E ×B incompressibility causes discrepancy of neoclassical radial flux and parallel flow among the models when E ×B is sufficiently large compared to the magnetic drift velocities. For example, Mp≤0.4 where Mp is the poloidal Mach number. On the other hand, when E ×B and the magnetic drift velocities are comparable, the tangential magnetic drift, which is included in both the global and ZOW models, fills the role of suppressing unphysical peaking of neoclassical radial-fluxes found in the other local models at Er≃0 . In low collisionality plasmas, in particular, the tangential drift effect works well to suppress such unphysical behavior of the radial transport caused in the simulations. It is demonstrated that the ZOW model has the advantage of mitigating the unphysical behavior in the several magnetic geometries, and that it also implements the evaluation of bootstrap current in LHD with the low computation cost compared to the global model.

  14. Metabolism Kinetics of Glucose in Anchorage-dependent Cell Cultures

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    孙祥明; 张元兴

    2001-01-01

    The kinetic model of glucose metabolism was established and successfully applied to batchcultures of rCHO and rBHK cells. It was found that a large amount of glucose was utilized for cellmaintenance, and the overwhelming majority of maintenance energy from glucose was by its anaerobicmetabolism in both rBHK and rCHO cell cultures. The overall maintenance coefficients from aerobicmetabolism were 1.9×10-13 mmol/(cell.h) for rCHO cells and 7×10-13 mmol/(cell.h) for rBHK cells. Inaddition, all Go/T and Eo/T gradually increased with the same trend as the cell growth in the culture ofboth rCHO and rBHK cells. The overall molecule yield coefficients of lactate to glucose were 1.61 for rCHO cells and 1.38 for rBHK cells. The yield coefficients of cell to glucose were 4.5×108 cells/mmol for rCHO cells and 1.9 × 108 cells/mmol for rBHK cells, respectively.

  15. Epithelial cell-cell junctions and plasma membrane domains

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Giepmans, Ben N. G.; van Ijzendoorn, Sven C. D.

    Epithelial cells form a barrier against the environment, but are also required for the regulated exchange of molecules between an organism and its surroundings. Epithelial cells are characterised by a remarkable polarization of their plasma membrane, evidenced by the appearance of structurally,

  16. Epithelial cell-cell junctions and plasma membrane domains

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Giepmans, Ben N. G.; van Ijzendoorn, Sven C. D.

    2009-01-01

    Epithelial cells form a barrier against the environment, but are also required for the regulated exchange of molecules between an organism and its surroundings. Epithelial cells are characterised by a remarkable polarization of their plasma membrane, evidenced by the appearance of structurally, comp

  17. Capacitively coupled hydrogen plasmas sustained by tailored voltage waveforms: vibrational kinetics and negative ions control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diomede, P.; Bruneau, B.; Longo, S.; Johnson, E.; Booth, J.-P.

    2017-07-01

    A comprehensive hybrid model of a hydrogen capacitively coupled plasma, including a detailed description of the molecular vibrational kinetics, has been applied to the study of the effect of tailored voltage waveforms (TVWs) on the production kinetics and transport of negative ions in these discharges. Two kinds of TVWs are considered, valleys-to-peaks and saw-tooth, with amplitude and slope asymmetry respectively. By tailoring the voltage waveform only, it is possible to exert substantial control over the peak density and position of negative ions inside the discharge volume. This control is particularly effective for saw-tooth waveforms. Insight into the mechanisms allowing this control is provided by an analysis of the model results. This reveals the roles of the vibrational distribution function and of the electron energy distribution and their correlations, as well as changes in the negative ion transport in the electric field when using different TVWs. Considering the chemical reactivity of H- ions, the possibility of a purely electrical control of the negative ion cloud in a reactor operating with a feedstock gas diluted by hydrogen may find interesting applications. This is the first study of vibrational kinetics in the context of TVWs in molecular gases.

  18. Anomalous kinetic energy of a system of dust particles in a gas discharge plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Norman, G. E., E-mail: norman@ihed.ras.ru; Stegailov, V. V., E-mail: stegailov@gmail.com; Timofeev, A. V., E-mail: timofeevalvl@gmail.com [Russian Academy of Sciences, Joint Institute for High Temperatures (Russian Federation)

    2011-11-15

    The system of equations of motion of dust particles in a near-electrode layer of a gas discharge has been formulated taking into account fluctuations of the charge of a dust particle and the features of the nearelectrode layer of the discharge. The molecular dynamics simulation of the system of dust particles has been carried out. Performing a theoretical analysis of the simulation results, a mechanism of increasing the average kinetic energy of dust particles in the gas discharge plasma has been proposed. According to this mechanism, the heating of the vertical oscillations of dust particles is initiated by induced oscillations generated by fluctuations of the charge of dust particles, and the energy transfer from vertical to horizontal oscillations can be based on the parametric resonance phenomenon. The combination of the parametric and induced resonances makes it possible to explain an anomalously high kinetic energy of dust particles. The estimate of the frequency, amplitude, and kinetic energy of dust particles are close to the respective experimental values.

  19. Kinetic corrections from analytic non-Maxwellian distribution functions in magnetized plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Izacard, Olivier, E-mail: izacard@llnl.gov [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, 7000 East Avenue, L-637, Livermore, California 94550 (United States)

    2016-08-15

    In magnetized plasma physics, almost all developed analytic theories assume a Maxwellian distribution function (MDF) and in some cases small deviations are described using the perturbation theory. The deviations with respect to the Maxwellian equilibrium, called kinetic effects, are required to be taken into account especially for fusion reactor plasmas. Generally, because the perturbation theory is not consistent with observed steady-state non-Maxwellians, these kinetic effects are numerically evaluated by very central processing unit (CPU)-expensive codes, avoiding the analytic complexity of velocity phase space integrals. We develop here a new method based on analytic non-Maxwellian distribution functions constructed from non-orthogonal basis sets in order to (i) use as few parameters as possible, (ii) increase the efficiency to model numerical and experimental non-Maxwellians, (iii) help to understand unsolved problems such as diagnostics discrepancies from the physical interpretation of the parameters, and (iv) obtain analytic corrections due to kinetic effects given by a small number of terms and removing the numerical error of the evaluation of velocity phase space integrals. This work does not attempt to derive new physical effects even if it could be possible to discover one from the better understandings of some unsolved problems, but here we focus on the analytic prediction of kinetic corrections from analytic non-Maxwellians. As applications, examples of analytic kinetic corrections are shown for the secondary electron emission, the Langmuir probe characteristic curve, and the entropy. This is done by using three analytic representations of the distribution function: the Kappa distribution function, the bi-modal or a new interpreted non-Maxwellian distribution function (INMDF). The existence of INMDFs is proved by new understandings of the experimental discrepancy of the measured electron temperature between two diagnostics in JET. As main results, it

  20. Kinetic corrections from analytic non-Maxwellian distribution functions in magnetized plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Izacard, Olivier

    2016-08-01

    In magnetized plasma physics, almost all developed analytic theories assume a Maxwellian distribution function (MDF) and in some cases small deviations are described using the perturbation theory. The deviations with respect to the Maxwellian equilibrium, called kinetic effects, are required to be taken into account especially for fusion reactor plasmas. Generally, because the perturbation theory is not consistent with observed steady-state non-Maxwellians, these kinetic effects are numerically evaluated by very central processing unit (CPU)-expensive codes, avoiding the analytic complexity of velocity phase space integrals. We develop here a new method based on analytic non-Maxwellian distribution functions constructed from non-orthogonal basis sets in order to (i) use as few parameters as possible, (ii) increase the efficiency to model numerical and experimental non-Maxwellians, (iii) help to understand unsolved problems such as diagnostics discrepancies from the physical interpretation of the parameters, and (iv) obtain analytic corrections due to kinetic effects given by a small number of terms and removing the numerical error of the evaluation of velocity phase space integrals. This work does not attempt to derive new physical effects even if it could be possible to discover one from the better understandings of some unsolved problems, but here we focus on the analytic prediction of kinetic corrections from analytic non-Maxwellians. As applications, examples of analytic kinetic corrections are shown for the secondary electron emission, the Langmuir probe characteristic curve, and the entropy. This is done by using three analytic representations of the distribution function: the Kappa distribution function, the bi-modal or a new interpreted non-Maxwellian distribution function (INMDF). The existence of INMDFs is proved by new understandings of the experimental discrepancy of the measured electron temperature between two diagnostics in JET. As main results, it

  1. Kinetic analysis of spin current contribution to spectrum of electromagnetic waves in spin-1/2 plasma, Part I: Dielectric permeability tensor for magnetized plasmas

    CERN Document Server

    Andreev, Pavel A

    2016-01-01

    The dielectric permeability tensor for spin polarized plasmas is derived in terms of the spin-1/2 quantum kinetic model in six-dimensional phase space. Expressions for the distribution function and spin distribution function are derived in linear approximations on the path of dielectric permeability tensor derivation. The dielectric permeability tensor is derived the spin-polarized degenerate electron gas. It is also discussed at the finite temperature regime, where the equilibrium distribution function is presented by the spin-polarized Fermi-Dirac distribution. Consideration of the spin-polarized equilibrium states opens possibilities for the kinetic modeling of the thermal spin current contribution in the plasma dynamics.

  2. Nitric oxide kinetics in the afterglow of a diffuse plasma filament

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burnette, D.; Montello, A.; Adamovich, I. V.; Lempert, W. R.

    2014-08-01

    A suite of laser diagnostics is used to study kinetics of vibrational energy transfer and plasma chemical reactions in a nanosecond pulse, diffuse filament electric discharge and afterglow in N2 and dry air at 100 Torr. Laser-induced fluorescence of NO and two-photon absorption laser-induced fluorescence of O and N atoms are used to measure absolute, time-resolved number densities of these species after the discharge pulse, and picosecond coherent anti-Stokes Raman spectroscopy is used to measure time-resolved rotational temperature and ground electronic state N2(v = 0-4) vibrational level populations. The plasma filament diameter, determined from plasma emission and NO planar laser-induced fluorescence images, remains nearly constant after the discharge pulse, over a few hundred microseconds, and does not exhibit expansion on microsecond time scale. Peak temperature in the discharge and the afterglow is low, T ≈ 370 K, in spite of significant vibrational nonequilibrium, with peak N2 vibrational temperature of Tv ≈ 2000 K. Significant vibrational temperature rise in the afterglow is likely caused by the downward N2-N2 vibration-vibration (V-V) energy transfer. Simple kinetic modeling of time-resolved N, O, and NO number densities in the afterglow, on the time scale longer compared to relaxation and quenching time of excited species generated in the plasma, is in good agreement with the data. In nitrogen, the N atom density after the discharge pulse is controlled by three-body recombination and radial diffusion. In air, N, NO and O concentrations are dominated by the reverse Zel'dovich reaction, N + NO → N2 + O, and ozone formation reaction, O + O2 + M → O3 + M, respectively. The effect of vibrationally excited nitrogen molecules and excited N atoms on NO formation kinetics is estimated to be negligible. The results suggest that NO formation in the nanosecond pulse discharge is dominated by reactions of excited electronic states of nitrogen, occurring on

  3. Viral kinetics of Enterovirus 71 in human habdomyosarcoma cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jing Lu; Ya-Qing He; Li-Na Yi; Hong Zan; Hsiang-Fu Kung; Ming-Liang He

    2011-01-01

    AIM: To characterise the viral kinetics of enterovirus 71 (EV71). METHODS: In this study, human rhabdomyosarcoma (RD) cells were infected with EV71 at different multiplicity of infection (MOI). After infection, the cytopathic effect (CPE) was monitored and recorded using a phase contrast microscope associated with a CCD camera at different time points post viral infection (0, 6, 12, 24 h post infection). Cell growth and viability were measured by 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay in both EV71 infected and mock infected cells at each time point. EV71 replication kinetics in RD cells was determined by measuring the total intracellular viral RNA with real-time reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR). Also, the intracellular and extracellular virion RNA was isolated and quantified at different time points to analyze the viral package and secretion. The expression of viral protein was determined by analyze the levels of viral structure protein VP1 with Western blotting. RESULTS: EV71 infection induced a significant CPE as early as 6 h post infection (p.i.) in both RD cells infected with high ratio of virus (MOI 10) and low ratio of virus (MOI 1). In EV71 infected cells, the cell growth was inhibited and the number of viable cells was rapidly decreased in the later phase of infection. EV71 virions were uncoated immediately after entry. The intracellular viral RNA began to increase at as early as 3 h p.i. and the exponential increase was found between 3 h to 6 h p.i. in both infected groups. For viral structure protein synthesis, results from western-blot showed that intracellular viral protein VP1 could not be detected until 6 h p.i. in the cells infected at either MOI 1 or MOI 10; and reached the peak at 9 h p.i. in the cells infected with EV71 at both MOI 1 and MOI 10. Simultaneously, the viral package and secretion were also actively processed as the virus underwent rapid replication. The viral package kinetics

  4. Plasma kinetics, tissue distribution, and cerebrocortical sources of reverse triiodothyronine in the rat

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Obregon, M.J.; Larsen, P.R.; Silva, J.E.

    1985-06-01

    Studies in vitro have shown that rT3 is a potent and competitive inhibitor of T4 5'-deiodination (5'D). Recent studies in vivo have shown that cerebrocortical (Cx) T4 5'D-type II (5'D-II) activity (propylthiouracil (PTU) insensitive pathway), is reduced by T4 and rT3, the latter being more potent than T3 in Cx 5'D-II suppression. Some other reports had described rT3 production in rat brain as a very active pathway of thyroid hormone metabolism. To examine the possibility that rT3 plays a physiological role in regulating Cx 5'D-II, we have explored rT3 plasma kinetics, plasma to tissue exchange, and uptake by tissues in the rat, as well as the metabolic routes of degradation and the sources of rT3 in cerebral cortex (Cx). Plasma and tissue levels were assessed with tracer (/sup 125/I)rT3. Two main compartments were defined by plasma disappearance curves in euthyroid rats (K/sub 1/ = -6.2 h-1 and K/sub 2/ = -0.75 h-1). In Cx of euthyroid rats, (/sup 125/I)rT3 peaked 10 min after iv injection, tissue to plasma ratio being 0.016 +/- 0.004 (SE). In thyroidectomized rats, plasma and tissue (/sup 125/I)rT3 concentrations were higher than in euthyroid rats, except for the Cx that did not change. PTU caused further increases in all the tissues studied, except for the Cx and the pituitaries of thyroidectomized rats. From the effect of blocking 5'D-I with PTU or reducing its activity by making the animals hypothyroid, we concluded that 5'D-I accounts for most of the rT3 clearance from plasma. In contrast, in Cx and pituitary the levels of rT3 seem largely affected by 5'D-II activity. Since the latter results suggest that plasma rT3 does not play a major role in determining rT3 levels in these tissues, we explored the sources of rT3 in Cx using (/sup 125/I)T4. The (/sup 125/I)rT3 (T4) to (/sup 125/I)T4 ratio remained constant at 0.03 from 1 up to 5 h after injection of (/sup 125/I)T4.

  5. Plasma Cell Gingivitis: An Occasional Case Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishra, M B; Sharma, Swati; Sharma, Alok

    2015-01-01

    Plasma cell gingivitis, an infrequently observed oral condition, has been clinically characterized by diffuse gingival enlargement, erythema and sometimes desquamation. These lesions are usually asymptomatic, but invariably the patient will complain of a burning sensation in the gingiva and bleeding from the mouth. The diagnosis requires hematological screening in addition to clinical and histopathological examinations. This case report outlines one such case of plasma cell gingivitis in a 15-year-old female caused by use of an herbal, homemade toothpowder. The case presented here highlights the adverse effects and irrational use of herbal agents in dentifrices. At the same time, it emphasizes the need for comprehensive history taking, careful clinical examination and appropriate diagnostic tests in order to arrive at a definitive diagnosis and treatment plan for gingival conditions that are refractory to conventional therapy and to exclude certain malignancies and oral manifestations of systemic diseases.

  6. Cyberknife radiosurgery for cranial plasma cell tumor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alafaci, Cetty; Grasso, Giovanni; Conti, Alfredo; Caffo, Mariella; Salpietro, Francesco Maria; Tomasello, Francesco

    2014-01-01

    Cranial and intracranial involvement by myelomatous disease is relatively uncommon. Furthermore, systemic manifestations of multiple myeloma are present in the majority of these cases at the time of symptom onset. The authors report the case of a patient with serial appearance of multiple intracranial plasma cell tumor localizations as the first manifestations of a multiple myeloma. The patient was treated with CyberKnife radiosurgery for a lesion localized at the clivus and sella turcica with complete local control. With such a technique, based on high-dose conformality, the tumor was centered with an ablative dose of radiation and, at the same time, with a low dose spreading to the surrounding critical structures. The radiosensitivity of plasma cell tumors renders this treatment modality particularly advantageous for their localized manifestation. A technical description of this case is provided. To our knowledge, this is the first case of successful Cyberknife radiosurgery of multifocal intracranial plasmacytoma.

  7. A kinetic standard for precise calibration of spectrophotometer cell temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, P A; Berman, M C

    1981-05-01

    We describe a simple, highly reproducible kinetic technique for precisely measuring temperature in spectrophotometric systems having reaction cells that are inaccessible to conventional temperature probes. The method is based on the temperature dependence of pseudo-first-order rate constants for the acid-catalyzed hydrolysis of N-o-tolyl-D-glucosylamine. Temperatures of reaction cuvette contents are measured with a precision of +/- 0.05 degrees C (1 SD).

  8. Human plasma cells express granzyme B.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Wei; Narayanan, Priya; Kang, Ning; Clayton, Sandra; Ohne, Yoichiro; Shi, Peiqing; Herve, Marie-Cecile; Balderas, Robert; Picard, Capucine; Casanova, Jean-Laurent; Gorvel, Jean-Pierre; Oh, Sangkon; Pascual, Virginia; Banchereau, Jacques

    2014-01-01

    While studying the plasma cell (PC) compartment in human tonsils, we identified that immunoglobulin kappa or lambda chain-expressing PCs are the main cells expressing granzyme B (GrzB). In vitro studies revealed that activated B cells differentiated into GrzB-expressing PCs when co-cultured with macrophages and follicular helper T cells. This effect could be reproduced on combined stimulation of IL-15 (produced by macrophages) and IL-21 (produced by T follicular helper cells) in a STAT3-dependent manner. Whereas IL-21 triggers the transcription of mRNA of GrzB, IL-15 synergizes the translation of GrzB proteins. The precise role of GrzB in PC biology remains to be understood and studies in mice will not help as their PCs do not express GrzB.

  9. Cell kinetic modelling and the chemotherapy of cancer

    CERN Document Server

    Knolle, Helmut

    1988-01-01

    During the last 30 years, many chemical compounds that are active against tumors have been discovered or developed. At the same time, new methods of testing drugs for cancer therapy have evolved. nefore 1964, drug testing on animal tumors was directed to observation of the incfease in life span of the host after a single dose. A new approach, in which the effects of multiple doses on the proliferation kinetics of the tumor in vivo as well as of cell lines in vitro are investigated, has been outlined by Skipper and his co-workers in a series of papers beginning in 1964 (Skipper, Schabel and Wilcox, 1964 and 1965). They also investigated the influence of the time schedule in the treatment of experimental tumors. Since the publication of those studies, cell population kinetics cannot be left out of any discussion of the rational basis of chemotherapy. When clinical oncologists began to apply cell kinetic concepts in practice about 15 years ago, the theoretical basis was still very poor, in spite of Skipper's pro...

  10. Jovian Plasma Torus Interaction with Europa: 3D Hybrid Kinetic Simulation. First results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lipatov, A. S.; Cooper, J. F.; Paterson, W. R.; Sittler, E. C.; Hartle, R. E.; Simpson, D. G.

    2010-01-01

    The hybrid kinetic model supports comprehensive simulation of the interaction between different spatial and energetic elements of the Europa-moon-magnetosphere system with respect to variable upstream magnetic field and flux or density distributions of plasma and energetic ions, electrons, and neutral atoms. This capability is critical for improving the interpretation of the existing Europa flyby measurements from the Galileo orbiter mission, and for planning flyby and orbital measurements, (including the surface and atmospheric compositions) for future missions. The simulations are based on recent models of the atmosphere of Europa (Cassidy etal.,2007;Shematovichetal.,2005). In contrast to previous approaches with MHD simulations, the hybrid model allows us to fully take into account the finite gyro radius effect and electron pressure, and to correctly estimate the ion velocity distribution and the fluxes along the magnetic field (assuming an initial Maxwellian velocity distribution for upstream background ions).Non-thermal distributions of upstream plasma will be addressed in future work. Photoionization,electron-impact ionization, charge exchange and collisions between the ions and neutrals are also included in our model. We consider two models for background plasma:(a) with O(++) ions; (b) with O(++) and S(++) ions. The majority of O2 atmosphere is thermal with an extended cold population (Cassidyetal.,2007). A few first simulations already include an induced magnetic dipole; however, several important effects of induced magnetic fields arising from oceanic shell conductivity will be addressed in later work.

  11. Temporal evolution of linear kinetic Alfvén waves in inhomogeneous plasmas and turbulence generation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goyal, Ravinder; Sharma, R. P.

    2016-07-01

    The coronal ion heating in the Sun is primarily considered due to Alfvén wave dissipation. The Hinode data which has provided strong evidence for the presence of Alfvén waves in the corona and in coronal loops, has lead laboratory investigations and numerical simulations of Alfvén wave propagation and damping. The inhomogeneous plasmas with steep density gradients can be employed to study such phenomenon in relatively shorter systems. This article presents a model for the propagation of Kinetic Alfvén waves (KAWs) in inhomogeneous plasma when the inhomogeneity is in transverse and parallel directions relative to the background magnetic field. The semi-analytical technique and numerical simulations have been performed to study the KAW dynamics when plasma inhomogeneity is incorporated in the dynamics. The model equations are solved in order to study the localization of KAW and their magnetic power spectrum which indicates the direct transfer of energy from lower to higher wave numbers as well as frequencies. The inhomogeneity scale lengths in both directions may control the nature of fluctuations and localization of the waves and play a very important role in the turbulence generation and its level. We present a theoretical study of the localization of KAWs, variations in magnetic field amplitude in time, and variation in the frequency spectra arising from inhomogeneities. The relevance of the model to space and laboratory observations is discussed.

  12. Kinetic instabilities in a mirror-confined plasma sustained by high-power microwave radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shalashov, A. G.; Viktorov, M. E.; Mansfeld, D. A.; Golubev, S. V.

    2017-03-01

    This paper summarizes the studies of plasma kinetic instabilities in the electron cyclotron frequency range carried out over the last decade at the Institute of Applied Physics in Nizhny Novgorod. We investigate the nonequilibrium plasma created and sustained by high-power microwave radiation of a gyrotron under the electron cyclotron resonance condition. Resonant plasma heating results in the formation of at least two electron components, one of which, more dense and cold, determines the dispersion properties of the high-frequency waves, and the other, a small group of energetic electrons with a highly anisotropic velocity distribution, is responsible for the excitation of unstable waves. Dynamic spectra and the intensity of stimulated electromagnetic emission are studied with high temporal resolution. Interpretation of observed data is based on the cyclotron maser paradigm; in this context, a laboratory modeling of non-stationary wave-particle interaction processes has much in common with similar processes occurring in the magnetosphere of Earth, planets, and solar coronal loops.

  13. Nonlinear coupling of lower hybrid waves to the kinetic low-frequency plasma response in the auroral ionosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanbonmatsu, K. Y.; Goldman, M. V.; Newman, D. L.

    A hybrid kinetic-fluid model is developed which is relevant to lower hybrid spikelets observed in the topside auroral ionosphere [Vago et al., 1992; Eriksson et al., 1994]. In contrast to previous fluid models [Shapiro et al., 1995; Tam and Chang, 1995; Seyler, 1994; Shapiro et al., 1993] our linear low frequency plasma response is magnetized and kinetic. Fluid theory is used to incorporate the nonlinear wave coupling. Performing a linear stability analysis, we calculate the growth rate for the modulational instability, driven by a lower hybrid wave pump. We find that both the magnetic and kinetic effects inhibit the modulational instability.

  14. Exact relativistic kinetic theory of an electron beam-plasma system: hierarchy of the competing modes in the system parameter space

    CERN Document Server

    Bret, A; Benisti, D; Lefebvre, E

    2008-01-01

    Besides being one of the most fundamental basic issues of plasma physics, the stability analysis of an electron beam-plasma system is of critical relevance in many areas of physics. Surprisingly, decades of extensive investigation had not yet resulted in a realistic unified picture of the multidimensional unstable spectrum within a fully relativistic and kinetic framework. All attempts made so far in this direction were indeed restricted to simplistic distribution functions and/or did not aim at a complete mapping of the beam-plasma parameter space. The present paper comprehensively tackles this problem by implementing an exact linear model. We show that three kinds of modes compete in the linear phase, which can be classified according to the direction of their wavenumber with respect to the beam. We then determine their respective domain of preponderance in a three-dimensional parameter space. All these results are supported by multidimensional particle-in-cell simulations.

  15. Kinetic model of stimulated emission created by resonance pumping of aluminum laser-induced plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gornushkin, I. B.; Kazakov, A. Ya.

    2017-06-01

    Stimulated emission observed experimentally in an aluminum laser induced plasma is modeled via a kinetic approach. The simulated emission at several cascade transitions is created by a pump laser guided through the plasma at several microseconds after its creation and tuned in resonance with the strong 3s23p-3s24s transition at 266 nm. A two-dimensional space-time collisional radiative plasma model explains the creation of the population inversion and lasing at wavelengths of 2100 n m and 396.1 nm. The population inversion for lasing at 2100 n m is created by depopulation of the ground 3s23p state and population of the 3s25s state via the absorption of the resonant radiation at 266 nm. The population inversion for lasing at 396.1 nm occurs during the laser pulse via the decay of the population of the pumped 3s25s state to the excited 3s24s state via cascade transitions driven optically and by collisions. In particular, efficient are the mixing transitions between neighboring states separated by small gaps on the order of k T at plasma temperatures of 5000-10 000 K. The model predicts that the population inversion and corresponding gain may reach high values even at very moderate pump energy of several μJ per pulse. The efficiency of lasing at 2100 n m and 396.1 nm is estimated to be ˜3% and 0.05%, correspondingly with respect to the pump laser intensity. The gain for lasing at 396.1 nm can reach as high as ˜40 cm-1. The polarization effect that the pump radiation at 266 nm imposes on the stimulated emission at 396.1 nm is discussed. The calculated results are favorably compared to experimental data.

  16. Gelation of fibrinogen in plasma. A kinetic study by turbidity measurement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Regañon, E; Vila, V; Aznar, J

    1984-01-01

    Studies of the turbidity profiles of diluted (1/55, v/v) normal plasma, thrombin activity free serum plus commercial fibrinogen, and 0.15 M NaCl, pH 7.4, plus commercial fibrinogen, activated by thrombin or reptilase and measured at 350 nm, have shown that the latency time (LT) hardly varies for the fibrinogen concentration within limits of 0.03-0.15 mg/ml; however, it does vary for the thrombin concentration. The rate of gelation (RG) varies linearly with the fibrinogen (FG) concentration, conforming to the equation RG = 0.027 (FG)1.8; it hardly varies for thrombin concentrations greater than 0.50 NIH U/ml. On the other hand, RG values obtained for 0.46 NIH U/ml of thrombin or 0.92 BU/ml of reptilase show no significant differences. The variation in LT for the thrombin or reptilase concentration allows the rate of activation to be estimated, giving values of 5.9 X 10(-12) and 3.2 X 10(-12) mol/U/s, respectively, for a fibrinogen concentration in plasma of 1.1 X 10(-10) mol/ml. The mean value estimated for the ratio LT/FG in normal plasma is 35.76 +/- 18.3 and 85.62 +/- 18.3 s mg-1 ml for activation by thrombin and reptilase, respectively. We have studied in normal plasma the parameters that define the gelation of fibrin as measured by turbidity curves and their variation according to the fibrinogen concentration. This permits us to establish the kinetics of fibrin gel formation and normal range values.

  17. Nitrogen Fixation by Gliding Arc Plasma: Better Insight by Chemical Kinetics Modelling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Weizong; Patil, Bhaskar; Heijkers, Stjin; Hessel, Volker; Bogaerts, Annemie

    2017-05-22

    The conversion of atmospheric nitrogen into valuable compounds, that is, so-called nitrogen fixation, is gaining increased interest, owing to the essential role in the nitrogen cycle of the biosphere. Plasma technology, and more specifically gliding arc plasma, has great potential in this area, but little is known about the underlying mechanisms. Therefore, we developed a detailed chemical kinetics model for a pulsed-power gliding-arc reactor operating at atmospheric pressure for nitrogen oxide synthesis. Experiments are performed to validate the model and reasonable agreement is reached between the calculated and measured NO and NO2 yields and the corresponding energy efficiency for NOx formation for different N2 /O2 ratios, indicating that the model can provide a realistic picture of the plasma chemistry. Therefore, we can use the model to investigate the reaction pathways for the formation and loss of NOx . The results indicate that vibrational excitation of N2 in the gliding arc contributes significantly to activating the N2 molecules, and leads to an energy efficient way of NOx production, compared to the thermal process. Based on the underlying chemistry, the model allows us to propose solutions on how to further improve the NOx formation by gliding arc technology. Although the energy efficiency of the gliding-arc-based nitrogen fixation process at the present stage is not comparable to the world-scale Haber-Bosch process, we believe our study helps us to come up with more realistic scenarios of entering a cutting-edge innovation in new business cases for the decentralised production of fertilisers for agriculture, in which low-temperature plasma technology might play an important role. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  18. The influence of platelets, plasma and red blood cells on functional haemostatic assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bochsen, Louise; Johansson, Pär I; Kristensen, Annemarie T; Daugaard, Gedske; Ostrowski, Sisse R

    2011-04-01

    Functional whole blood haemostatic assays are used increasingly to guide transfusion therapy and monitor medical treatment and are also applied for in-vitro evaluations of the haemostatic potential of stored platelets. We investigated how the cellular and plasmatic elements, both isolated and combined, influenced the two methodologically different assays, thrombelastography (TEG) and impedance aggregometry (Multiplate). Platelet-rich plasma (200 × 10/l) or pure plasma (0 platelets), with and without added red blood cells (RBCs), hematocrit 0, 0.15 or 0.29, were produced in vitro from platelet concentrates, fresh frozen plasma and stored RBC. Pure platelets were investigated by removing plasma components from platelet concentrates by diafiltration against the platelet storage solution Intersol. Plasma was readded by diafiltration against plasma in Intersol. Haemostatic function was evaluated by TEG and Multiplate. In the TEG, increasing amounts of RBC reduced clot strength and clot kinetics (α-angle), most markedly in plasma/RBC without platelets. In contrast, RBC in a platelet concentrate matrix enhanced Multiplate aggregation in response to weak agonists (ADP and arachidonic acid). Furthermore, removing plasma from platelet concentrates eliminated the TEG response and diminished the Multiplate aggregation response, but readding plasma to the pure platelet concentrates restored the response. Each of the elements in whole blood, plasma, platelets and RBC, affected the Multiplate and TEG results differently. The results emphasize that the concentrations of all cellular and plasmatic components in whole blood should be taken into account when interpreting results obtained by TEG and multiplate.

  19. Application of atmospheric plasma sources in growth and differentiation of plant and mammalian stem cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puac, Nevena

    2014-10-01

    The expansion of the plasma medicine and its demand for in-vivo treatments resulted in fast development of various plasma devices that operate at atmospheric pressure. These sources have to fulfill all demands for application on biological samples. One of the sources that meet all the requirements needed for treatment of biological material is plasma needle. Previously, we have used this device for sterilization of planctonic samples of bacteria, MRSA biofilm, for improved differentiation of human periodontal stem cells into osteogenic line and for treatment of plant meristematic cells. It is well known that plasma generates reactive oxygen species (ROS) and reactive nitrogen species (RNS) that strongly affect metabolism of living cells. One of the open issues is to correlate external plasma products (electrons, ions, RNS, ROS, photons, strong fields etc.) with the immediate internal response which triggers or induces effects in the living cell. For that purpose we have studied the kinetics of enzymes which are typical indicators of the identity of reactive species from the plasma created environment that can trigger signal transduction in the cell and ensue cell activity. In collaboration with Suzana Zivkovicm, Institute for Biological Research ``Sinisa Stankovic,'' University of Belgrade; Nenad Selakovic, Institute of Physics, University of Belgrade; Milica Milutinovic, Jelena Boljevic, Institute for Biological Research ``Sinisa Stankovic,'' University of Belgrade; and Gordana Malovic, Zoran Lj. Petrovic, Institute of Physics, University of Belgrade. Grants III41011, ON171037 and ON173024, MESTD, Serbia.

  20. Analysis of Electromagnetic Wave Propagation in a Magnetized Re-Entry Plasma Sheath Via the Kinetic Equation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manning, Robert M.

    2009-01-01

    Based on a theoretical model of the propagation of electromagnetic waves through a hypersonically induced plasma, it has been demonstrated that the classical radiofrequency communications blackout that is experienced during atmospheric reentry can be mitigated through the appropriate control of an external magnetic field of nominal magnitude. The model is based on the kinetic equation treatment of Vlasov and involves an analytical solution for the electric and magnetic fields within the plasma allowing for a description of the attendant transmission, reflection and absorption coefficients. The ability to transmit through the magnetized plasma is due to the magnetic windows that are created within the plasma via the well-known whistler modes of propagation. The case of 2 GHz transmission through a re-entry plasma is considered. The coefficients are found to be highly sensitive to the prevailing electron density and will thus require a dynamic control mechanism to vary the magnetic field as the plasma evolves through the re-entry phase.

  1. Potential role of kinetic Alfvén waves and whistler waves in solar wind plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nandal, P.; Yadav, N.; Sharma, R. P.; Goldstein, M. L.

    2016-07-01

    Spacecraft observations indicate the signatures of highly oblique kinetic Alfvén waves (KAWs) and whistler waves in the solar wind plasma. In the present work, we explore the possible role of KAWs and whistler waves in the observed solar wind magnetic turbulent spectrum. The nonlinear spatial evolution of KAW is studied including the effects of the ponderomotive force which results in intense localized structures due to the background density modification. Weak quasi-transverse whistler wave propagating through these localized structures also gets localized in the form of small-scale localized structures. We present numerically calculated magnetic power spectra for both KAW as well as for whistler wave. Our obtained results demonstrate the important role that KAWs and whistler waves play in the energy cascading from larger to smaller scales. The relevance of these results to recent spacecraft observations is also pointed out.

  2. Kinetics of pesticide degradation by human fresh frozen plasma (FFP) in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    von der Wellen, Jens; Bierwisch, Anne; Worek, Franz; Thiermann, Horst; Wille, Timo

    2016-02-26

    There is an ongoing debate about the benefit of fresh frozen plasma (FFP) infusion in organophosphorus (OP) pesticide-poisoned patients. This prompted us to investigate the kinetics of OP pesticide degradation by FFP with an enzymatic assay in vitro. Degradation was rapid with shortest half-lives of 19.5s for chlorpyrifos-oxon, 6.3min for paraoxon-ethyl and 17.9min for dichlorvos. Heptenophos (78.0min), mevinphos (101.8min), profenofos (162.3min) and malaoxon (179.7min) showed half-lives of up to 3h. Substantial longer degradation half-lives of 69.7-80.8h were determined with chlorfenvinphos and bromfenvinphos. Methamidophos and omethoate showed no degradation by FFP indicated by half-lives similar to spontaneous hydrolysis. In conclusion, degradation by FFP depends on the particular OP pesticide and the used FFP batch.

  3. Kinetic simulations and reduced modeling of longitudinal sideband instabilities in non-linear electron plasma waves

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brunner, S. [Centre de Recherches en Physique des Plasmas, Association Euratom-Confédération Suisse, Ecole Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne, Lausanne, (Switzerland); Berger, R. L. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Cohen, B. I. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Hausammann, L. [Centre de Recherches en Physique des Plasmas, Association Euratom-Confédération Suisse, Ecole Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne, Lausanne, (Switzerland); Valeo, E. J. [Princeton Plasma Physics Lab. (PPPL), Princeton, NJ (United States)

    2014-10-01

    Kinetic Vlasov simulations of one-dimensional finite amplitude Electron Plasma Waves are performed in a multi-wavelength long system. A systematic study of the most unstable linear sideband mode, in particular its growth rate γ and quasi- wavenumber δk, is carried out by scanning the amplitude and wavenumber of the initial wave. Simulation results are successfully compared against numerical and analytical solutions to the reduced model by Kruer et al. [Phys. Rev. Lett. 23, 838 (1969)] for the Trapped Particle Instability (TPI). A model recently suggested by Dodin et al. [Phys. Rev. Lett. 110, 215006 (2013)], which in addition to the TPI accounts for the so-called Negative Mass Instability because of a more detailed representation of the trapped particle dynamics, is also studied and compared with simulations.

  4. Dual cascade and its possible variations in magnetized kinetic plasma turbulence

    CERN Document Server

    Zhu, Jian-Zhou

    2010-01-01

    An electrostatic gyrokinetic model for the deviation from Maxwellian distribution is used to study the dual cascade feature in the magnetized plasma (kinetic) turbulence in a 2D slab geometry. Only a finite range of spacial Fourier modes are kept and the Gibbs statistics are calculated with one ($E$) plus a continuum ($G(v)$) of constants of motion. The covariance density with continuous velocity is obtained by doing functional inversion and it is found that kinetic effects greatly enrich the physics of the absolute equilibria; but, the qualitative feature in physical space is similar to other 2D fluid models and that the conventional dual cascade arguments may be carried over \\textit{mutatis mutandis}. A finite extra contribution to the Fourier spectrum of $g^2$ emerges once a cutoff scale $\\Delta v$ of velocity arrises from the numerical discretization/coarse graining or other physical mechanisms. This contribution may seriously deteriorate the equipartition of $G(v)$ over the wave vectors and may drastical...

  5. Spectral-Kinetic Coupling and Effect of Microfield Rotation on Stark Broadening in Plasmas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander V. Demura

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The study deals with two conceptual problems in the theory of Stark broadening by plasmas. One problem is the assumption of the density matrix diagonality in the calculation of spectral line profiles. This assumption is closely related to the definition of zero wave functions basis within which the density matrix is assumed to be diagonal, and obviously violated under the basis change. A consistent use of density matrix in the theoretical scheme inevitably leads to interdependence of atomic kinetics, describing the population of atomic states with the Stark profiles of spectral lines, i.e., to spectral-kinetic coupling. The other problem is connected with the study of the influence of microfield fluctuations on Stark profiles. Here the main results of the perturbative approach to ion dynamics, called the theory of thermal corrections (TTC, are presented, within which the main contribution to effects of ion dynamics is due to microfield fluctuations caused by rotations. In the present study the qualitative behavior of the Stark profiles in the line center within predictions of TTC is confirmed, using non-perturbative computer simulations.

  6. Study of kinetic Alfven wave (KAW) in plasma - sheet-boundary- layer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shukla, Nidhi; Varma, P; Tiwari, M S, E-mail: tiwarims@rediffmail.co, E-mail: poornimavarma@yahoo.co, E-mail: nidhiphy.shukla@gmail.co [Department of Physics and Electronics, Dr. H. S. Gour University, Sagar (M.P.), 470003 (India)

    2010-02-01

    The effect of parallel electric field with general loss-cone distribution function on the dispersion relation and damping rate/growth rate of the kinetic Alfven wave (KAW) is evaluated by kinetic approach. The generation of KAW by the combined effect of parallel electric field and loss-cone distribution indices (J) at a particular range of k{sub p}erpendicular{rho}{sub i} (k{sub p}erpendicular{rho}{sub i} <1 and k{sub p}erpendicular{rho}{sub i} >1) is noticed, where k{sub p}erpendicular is perpendicular wave number and {rho}{sub i} is the ion-gyro radius. Thus the propagation of KAW and loss of the Poynting flux from plasma sheet boundary layer (PSBL) to the ionosphere can be explained on the basis of present investigation. It is found that the present study also shows that the loss-cone distribution index is an important parameter to study KAW in the PSBL.

  7. A Reduced-order NLTE Kinetic Model for Radiating Plasmas of Outer Envelopes of Stellar Atmospheres

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munafò, Alessandro; Mansour, Nagi N.; Panesi, Marco

    2017-04-01

    The present work proposes a self-consistent reduced-order NLTE kinetic model for radiating plasmas found in the outer layers of stellar atmospheres. A detailed collisional-radiative kinetic mechanism is constructed by leveraging the most up-to-date set of ab initio and experimental data available in the literature. This constitutes the starting point for the derivation of a reduced-order model, obtained by lumping the bound energy states into groups. In order to determine the needed thermo-physical group properties, uniform and Maxwell–Boltzmann energy distributions are used to reconstruct the energy population of each group. Finally, the reduced set of governing equations for the material gas and the radiation field is obtained based on the moment method. Applications consider the steady flow across a shock wave in partially ionized hydrogen. The results clearly demonstrate that adopting a Maxwell–Boltzmann grouping allows, on the one hand, for a substantial reduction of the number of unknowns and, on the other, to maintain accuracy for both gas and radiation quantities. Also, it is observed that, when neglecting line radiation, the use of two groups already leads to a very accurate resolution of the photo-ionization precursor, internal relaxation, and radiative cooling regions. The inclusion of line radiation requires adopting just one additional group to account for optically thin losses in the α, β, and γ lines of the Balmer and Paschen series. This trend has been observed for a wide range of shock wave velocities.

  8. Magnetic field generation in a jet-sheath plasma via the kinetic Kelvin-Helmholtz instability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K.-I. Nishikawa

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available We have investigated the generation of magnetic fields associated with velocity shear between an unmagnetized relativistic jet and an unmagnetized sheath plasma. We have examined the strong magnetic fields generated by kinetic shear (Kelvin–Helmholtz instabilities. Compared to the previous studies using counter-streaming performed by Alves et al. (2012, the structure of the kinetic Kelvin–Helmholtz instability (KKHI of our jet-sheath configuration is slightly different, even for the global evolution of the strong transverse magnetic field. In our simulations the major components of growing modes are the electric field Ez, perpendicular to the flow boundary, and the magnetic field By, transverse to the flow direction. After the By component is excited, an induced electric field Ex, parallel to the flow direction, becomes significant. However, other field components remain small. We find that the structure and growth rate of KKHI with mass ratios mi/me = 1836 and mi/me = 20 are similar. In our simulations saturation in the nonlinear stage is not as clear as in counter-streaming cases. The growth rate for a mildly-relativistic jet case (γj = 1.5 is larger than for a relativistic jet case (γj = 15.

  9. Particle-in-Cell/Test-Particle Simulations of Technological Plasmas: Sputtering Transport in Capacitive Radio Frequency Discharges

    OpenAIRE

    Trieschmann, Jan; Schmidt, Frederik; Mussenbrock, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    The paper provides a tutorial to the conceptual layout of a self-consistently coupled Particle-In-Cell/Test-Particle model for the kinetic simulation of sputtering transport in capacitively coupled plasmas at low gas pressures. It explains when a kinetic approach is actually needed and which numerical concepts allow for the inherent nonequilibrium behavior of the charged and neutral particles. At the example of a generic sputtering discharge both the fundamentals of the applied Monte Carlo me...

  10. Hydrodynamic and kinetic models for spin-1/2 electron-positron quantum plasmas: Annihilation interaction, helicity conservation, and wave dispersion in magnetized plasmas

    CERN Document Server

    Andreev, Pavel A

    2014-01-01

    We discuss complete theory of spin-1/2 electron-positron quantum plasmas, when electrons and positrons move with velocities mach smaller than the speed of light. We derive a set of two fluid quantum hydrodynamic equations consisting of the continuity, Euler, spin (magnetic moment) evolution equations for each species. We explicitly include the Coulomb, spin-spin, Darwin and annihilation interactions. The annihilation interaction is the main topic of the paper. We consider contribution of the annihilation interaction in the quantum hydrodynamic equations and in spectrum of waves in magnetized electron-positron plasmas. We consider propagation of waves parallel and perpendicular to an external magnetic field. We also consider oblique propagation of longitudinal waves. We derive set of quantum kinetic equations for electron-positron plasmas with the Darwin and annihilation interactions. We apply the kinetic theory for the linear wave behavior in absence of external fields. We calculate contribution of the Darwin...

  11. LONG-LIVED BONE MARROW PLASMA CELLS DURING IMMUNE RESPONSE TO ALPHA (1→3 DEXTRAN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. N. Chernyshova

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Production kinetics and some functional properties of long-lived marrow plasma cells were studied in mice immunized with T-independent type 2 antigens. Alpha (1→3 dextran was used as an antigen for immunization. The mice were immunized by dextran, and the numbers of IgM antibody producing cells were determined by ELISPOT method. The cell phenotype was determined by cytofluorimetric technique. In the area of normal bone marrow lymphocytes ~4% of T and ~85% of B cells were detected. About 35% of the cells expressed a plasmocyte marker (CD138; 3% were CD138+IgM+, and about 6% of the lymphocytes were double-positive for CD138+IgA+. Among spleen lymphocytes, 50% of T and 47% of B cells were detected. About 1.5% lymphocytes were CD138+, and 0.5% were positive for CD138 and IgM. Time kinetics of antibody-producing cells in bone marrow and spleen was different. In spleen populations, the peak amounts of antibody-secreting cells have been shown on the day 4; the process abated by the day 28. Vice versa, the numbers of the antibody-producing cells in bone marrow started to increase on the day 4. The process reached its maximum on day 14, and after 28th day became stationary. The in vitro experiments have shown that supplementation of bone marrow cells from immune mice with dextran did not influence their functional activity. It was previously shown for cells responding to T-dependent antigens only. A specific marker for the long-lived plasma cells is still unknown. However, these cells possess a common CD138 marker specific for all plasma cells. A method for isolation of bone marrow CD138+ cells was developed. The CD138+ cells were of 87-97% purity, being enriched in long-lived bone marrow cells, and produced monospecific antibodies. 

  12. Forced KLF4 expression increases the generation of mature plasma cells and uncovers a network linked with plasma cell stage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoenhals, Matthieu; Jourdan, Michel; Seckinger, Anja; Pantesco, Véronique; Hose, Dirk; Kassambara, Alboukadel; Moreaux, Jérôme; Klein, Bernard

    2016-07-17

    A role of the transcription factor Krüppel-like factor 4 (KLF4) in the generation of mature plasma cells (PC) is unknown. Indeed, KLF4 is critical in controlling the differentiation of various cell linages, particularly monocytes and epithelial cells. KLF4 is expressed at low levels in pro-B cells and its expression increases as they mature into pre-B cells, resting naïve B cells and memory B cells. We show here that KLF4 is expressed in human bone marrow plasma cells and its function was studied using an in vitro model of differentiation of memory B cells into long lived plasma cells. KLF4 is rapidly lost when memory B cells differentiate into highly cell cycling plasmablasts, poorly cycling early plasma cells and then quiescent long-lived plasma cells. A forced expression of KLF4 in plasmablasts enhances the yield of their differentiation into early plasma cell and long lived plasma cells, by inhibiting apoptosis and upregulating previously unknown plasma cell pathways.

  13. Cell adhesion to plasma-coated PVC.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rangel, Elidiane C; de Souza, Eduardo S; de Moraes, Francine S; Duek, Eliana A R; Lucchesi, Carolina; Schreiner, Wido H; Durrant, Steven F; Cruz, Nilson C

    2014-01-01

    To produce environments suitable for cell culture, thin polymer films were deposited onto commercial PVC plates from radiofrequency acetylene-argon plasmas. The proportion of argon in the plasmas, P(Ar), was varied from 5.3 to 65.8%. The adhesion and growth of Vero cells on the coated surfaces were examined for different incubation times. Cytotoxicity tests were performed using spectroscopic methods. Carbon, O, and N were detected in all the samples using XPS. Roughness remained almost unchanged in the samples prepared with 5.3 and 28.9% but tended to increase for the films deposited with P(Ar) between 28.9 and 55.3%. Surface free energy increased with increasing P(Ar), except for the sample prepared at 28.9% of Ar, which presented the least reactive surface. Cells proliferated on all the samples, including the bare PVC. Independently of the deposition condition there was no evidence of cytotoxicity, indicating the viability of such coatings for designing biocompatible devices.

  14. Cell Adhesion to Plasma-Coated PVC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elidiane C. Rangel

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available To produce environments suitable for cell culture, thin polymer films were deposited onto commercial PVC plates from radiofrequency acetylene-argon plasmas. The proportion of argon in the plasmas, PAr, was varied from 5.3 to 65.8%. The adhesion and growth of Vero cells on the coated surfaces were examined for different incubation times. Cytotoxicity tests were performed using spectroscopic methods. Carbon, O, and N were detected in all the samples using XPS. Roughness remained almost unchanged in the samples prepared with 5.3 and 28.9% but tended to increase for the films deposited with PAr between 28.9 and 55.3%. Surface free energy increased with increasing PAr, except for the sample prepared at 28.9% of Ar, which presented the least reactive surface. Cells proliferated on all the samples, including the bare PVC. Independently of the deposition condition there was no evidence of cytotoxicity, indicating the viability of such coatings for designing biocompatible devices.

  15. pypk - A Python extension module to handle chemical kinetics in plasma physics modeling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available PLASMAKIN is a package to handle physical and chemical data used in plasma physics modeling and to compute gas-phase and gas-surface kinetics data: particle production and loss rates, photon emission spectra and energy exchange rates. A large number of species properties and reaction types are supported, namely: gas or electron temperature dependent collision rate coefficients, vibrational and cascade levels, evaluation of branching ratios, superelastic and other reverse processes, three-body collisions, radiation imprisonment and photoelectric emission. Support of non-standard rate coefficient functions can be handled by a user-supplied shared library.

    The main block of the PLASMAKIN package is a Fortran module that can be included in an user's program or compiled as a shared library, libpk. pypk is a new addition to the package and provides access to libpk from Python programs. It is build on top of the ctypes foreign function library module and is prepared to work with several Fortran compilers. However pypk is more than a wrapper and provides its own classes and functions taking advantage of Python language characteristics. Integration with Python tools allows substantial productivity gains on program development and insight on plasma physics problems.

  16. Kinetic Alfven wave instability in a Lorentzian dusty plasma: Non-resonant particle approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rubab, N.; Biernat, H. K. [Space Research Institute, Austrian Academy of Sciences, Schmiedlstrasse 6, A-8042 Graz (Austria); Institute of Physics, University of Graz, Universitaetplatz 5, A-8010 Graz (Austria); Erkaev, V. [Institute of Computational Modelling, 660036 Krasnoyarsk, Russia and Siberian Federal University, 660041 Krasnoyarsk (Russian Federation); Langmayr, D. [Virtual Vehicle Competence Center (vif), Inffeldgasse 21a, 8010 Graz (Austria)

    2011-07-15

    Analysis of the electromagnetic streaming instability is carried out which is related to the cross field drift of kappa distributed ions. The linear dispersion relation for electromagnetic wave using Vlasov-fluid equations in a dusty plasma is derived. Modified two stream instability (MTSI) in a dusty plasma has been discussed in the limit {omega}{sub pd}{sup 2}/c{sup 2}k{sub perpendicular}{sup 2}<<1. Numerical calculations of the growth rate of instability have been carried out. Growth rates of kinetic Alfven instability are found to be small as compared to MTSI. Maximum growth rates for both instabilities occur in oblique directions for V{sub 0}{>=}V{sub A}. It is shown that the presence of both the charged dust particles and perpendicular ion beam sensibly modify the dispersion relation of low-frequency electromagnetic wave. The dispersion characteristics are found to be insensible to the superthermal character of the ion distribution function. Applications to different intersteller regions are discussed.

  17. Interaction of Low Temperature Plasmas with Prokaryotic and Eukaryotic Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laroussi, Mounir

    2008-10-01

    Due to promising possibilities for their use in medical applications such as wound healing, surface modification of biocompatible materials, and the sterilization of reusable heat-sensitive medical instruments, low temperature plasmas and plasma jets are making big strides as a technology that can potentially be used in medicine^1-2. At this stage of research, fundamental questions about the effects of plasma on prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells are still not completely answered. An in-depth understanding of the pathway whereby cold plasma interact with biological cells is necessary before real applications can emerge. In this paper, first an overview of non-equilibrium plasma sources (both low and high pressures) will be presented. Secondly, the effects of plasma on bacterial cells will be discussed. Here, the roles of the various plasma agents in the inactivation process will be outlined. In particular, the effects of UV and that of various reactive species (O3, O, OH) are highlighted. Thirdly, preliminary findings on the effects of plasma on few types of eukaryotic cells will be presented. How plasma affects eukaryotic cells, such as mammalian cells, is very important in applications where the viability/preservation of the cells could be an issue (such as in wound treatment). Another interesting aspect is the triggering of apoptosis (programmed cell death). Some investigators have claimed that plasma is able to induce apoptosis in some types of cancer cells. If successfully replicated, this can open up a novel method of cancer treatment. In this talk however, I will briefly focus more on the wound healing potential of cold plasmas. ^1E. A. Blakely, K. A. Bjornstad, J. E. Galvin, O. R. Monteiro, and I. G. Brown, ``Selective Neuron Growth on Ion Implanted and Plasma Deposited Surfaces'', In Proc. IEEE Int. Conf. Plasma Sci., (2002), p. 253. ^2M. Laroussi, ``Non-thermal Decontamination of Biological Media by Atmospheric Pressure Plasmas: Review, Analysis, and

  18. Living on three time scales: the dynamics of plasma cell and antibody populations illustrated for hepatitis a virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andraud, Mathieu; Lejeune, Olivier; Musoro, Jammbe Z; Ogunjimi, Benson; Beutels, Philippe; Hens, Niel

    2012-01-01

    Understanding the mechanisms involved in long-term persistence of humoral immunity after natural infection or vaccination is challenging and crucial for further research in immunology, vaccine development as well as health policy. Long-lived plasma cells, which have recently been shown to reside in survival niches in the bone marrow, are instrumental in the process of immunity induction and persistence. We developed a mathematical model, assuming two antibody-secreting cell subpopulations (short- and long-lived plasma cells), to analyze the antibody kinetics after HAV-vaccination using data from two long-term follow-up studies. Model parameters were estimated through a hierarchical nonlinear mixed-effects model analysis. Long-term individual predictions were derived from the individual empirical parameters and were used to estimate the mean time to immunity waning. We show that three life spans are essential to explain the observed antibody kinetics: that of the antibodies (around one month), the short-lived plasma cells (several months) and the long-lived plasma cells (decades). Although our model is a simplified representation of the actual mechanisms that govern individual immune responses, the level of agreement between long-term individual predictions and observed kinetics is reassuringly close. The quantitative assessment of the time scales over which plasma cells and antibodies live and interact provides a basis for further quantitative research on immunology, with direct consequences for understanding the epidemiology of infectious diseases, and for timing serum sampling in clinical trials of vaccines.

  19. Kinetic studies of NO formation in pulsed air-like low-pressure dc plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hübner, M.; Gortschakow, S.; Guaitella, O.; Marinov, D.; Rousseau, A.; Röpcke, J.; Loffhagen, D.

    2016-06-01

    The kinetics of the formation of NO in pulsed air-like dc plasmas at a pressure of 1.33 mbar and mean currents between 50 and 150 mA of discharge pulses with 5 ms duration has been investigated both experimentally and by self-consistent numerical modelling. Using time-resolved quantum cascade laser absorption spectroscopy, the densities of NO, NO2 and N2O have been measured in synthetic air as well as in air with 0.8% of NO2 and N2O, respectively. The temporal evolution of the NO density shows four distinct phases during the plasma pulse and the early afterglow in the three gas mixtures that were used. In particular, a steep density increase during the ignition phase and after termination of the discharge current pulse has been detected. The NO concentration has been found to reach a constant value of 0.57× {{10}14}~\\text{molecules}~\\text{c}{{\\text{m}}-3} , 1.05× {{10}14}~\\text{molecules}~\\text{c}{{\\text{m}}-3} , and 1.3× {{10}14}~\\text{molecules}~\\text{c}{{\\text{m}}-3} for mean plasma currents of 50 mA, 100 mA and 150 mA, respectively, in the afterglow. The measured densities of NO2 and N2O in the respective mixture decrease exponentially during the plasma pulse and remain almost constant in the afterglow, especially where the admixture of NO2 has a remarkable impact on the NO production during the ignition. The numerical results of the coupled solution of a set of rate equations for the various heavy particles and the time-dependent Boltzmann equation of the electrons agree quite well with the experimental findings for the different air-like plasmas. The main reaction processes have been analysed on the basis of the model calculations and the remaining differences between the experiment and modelling especially during the afterglow are discussed.

  20. Regulation of B Cell to Plasma Cell Transition within the Follicular B Cell Response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nera, K-P; Kyläniemi, M K; Lassila, O

    2015-09-01

    Persistent humoral immunity depends on the follicular B cell response and on the generation of somatically mutated high-affinity plasma cells and memory B cells. Upon activation by an antigen, cognately activated follicular B cells and follicular T helper (TFH ) cells initiate germinal centre (GC) reaction during which high-affinity effector cells are generated. The differentiation of activated follicular B cells into plasma cells and memory B cells is guided by complex selection events, both at the cellular and molecular level. The transition of B cell into a plasma cell during the GC response involves alterations in the microenvironment and developmental state of the cell, which are guided by cell-extrinsic signals. The developmental cell fate decisions in response to these signals are coordinated by cell-intrinsic gene regulatory network functioning at epigenetic, transcriptional and post-transcriptional levels.

  1. The kinetics of a recombination-nonequilibrium He-H sub 2 plasma in a beam-type discharge

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Demkin, V.P.; Derzhiev, V.I.; Zhidkov, A.G.; Koval' , A.V.; Kunchinskii, N.L. (Institut Obshchei Fiziki, Moscow (USSR))

    1989-06-01

    The kinetics of a nonsteady-state He-H{sub 2} plasma excited by an electron beam formed in a discharge is calculated. The kinetic model of plasma relaxation took 155 plasmochemical reactions into account. The time dependences of the plasma parameters, 3(3)S and 2(3)P lasing level concentrations, and the specific emission power at the lambda = 706.5 nm transition in He are analyzed for mixture pressures of 8 and 15 mm Hg, a mixture composition of He:H2 = 2:1, and pumping frequencies of 100 and 200/s. The basic mechanisms governing the lasing level population and their temporal dynamics are pointed out. 13 refs.

  2. Comparative kinetics of damage to the plasma and mitochondrial membranes by intra-cellularly synthesized and externally-provided photosensitizers using multi-color FACS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haupt, Sara; Malik, Zvi; Ehrenberg, Benjamin

    2014-01-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) of cancer involves inflicting lethal damage to the cells of malignant tumors, primarily by singlet oxygen that is generated following light-absorption in a photosensitizer molecule. Dysfunction of cells is manifested in many ways, including peroxidation of cellular components, membrane rupture, depolarization of electric potentials, termination of mitochondrial activity, onset of apoptosis and necrosis and eventually cell lysis. These events do not necessarily occur in linear fashion and different types of damage to cell components occur, most probably, in parallel. In this report we measured the relative rates of damage to two cellular membranes: the plasma membrane and the mitochondrial membrane. We employed photosensitizers of diverse hydrophobicities and used different incubation procedures, which lead to their different intra-cellular localizations. We monitored the damage that was inflicted on these membranes, by employing optical probes of membrane integrity, in a multi-color FACS experiment. The potentiometric indicator JC-1 monitored the electric cross-membrane potential of the mitochondria and the fluorometric indicator Draq7 monitored the rupture of the plasma membrane. We show that the electric depolarization of the mitochondrial membrane and the damage to the enveloping plasma membrane proceed with different kinetics that reflect the molecular character and intracellular location of the sensitizer: PpIX that is synthesized in the cells from ALA causes rapid mitochondrial damage and very slow damage to the plasma membrane, while externally added PpIX has an opposite effect. The hydrophilic sensitizer HypS4 can be taken up by the cells by different incubation conditions, and these affect its intracellular location, and as a consequence either the plasma membrane or the mitochondria is damaged first. A similar correlation was found for additional extracellularly-provided photosensitizers HP and PpIX.

  3. A Statistical study of plasma sheet oscillations with kinetic ballooning/interchange instability signatures using THEMIS spacecraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jurisic, Mirjana; Panov, Evgeny; Nakamura, Rumi; Baumjohann, Wolfgang

    2016-04-01

    We use THEMIS data from 2010-2012 tail seasons to collect observations of plasma sheet oscillations with kinetic ballooning/interchange instability (BICI) signatures. Over seventy observations with closely located THEMIS probes P3-P5 reveal that BICI-like plasma sheet oscillations may appear at different magnetic local time. For these, we derive background plasma sheet parameters such as BZ, δBZ/δx and plasma beta, and investigate solar wind conditions. We also estimate the proper parameters of BICI-like oscillations such as frequency and amplitude. Based on this, we search for a relation between the background plasma sheet parameters and the proper parameters of BICI-like oscillations.

  4. Limiting Energy Dissipation Induces Glassy Kinetics in Single-Cell High-Precision Responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Jayajit

    2016-03-08

    Single cells often generate precise responses by involving dissipative out-of-thermodynamic-equilibrium processes in signaling networks. The available free energy to fuel these processes could become limited depending on the metabolic state of an individual cell. How does limiting dissipation affect the kinetics of high-precision responses in single cells? I address this question in the context of a kinetic proofreading scheme used in a simple model of early-time T cell signaling. Using exact analytical calculations and numerical simulations, I show that limiting dissipation qualitatively changes the kinetics in single cells marked by emergence of slow kinetics, large cell-to-cell variations of copy numbers, temporally correlated stochastic events (dynamic facilitation), and ergodicity breaking. Thus, constraints in energy dissipation, in addition to negatively affecting ligand discrimination in T cells, can create a fundamental difficulty in determining single-cell kinetics from cell-population results. Copyright © 2016 Biophysical Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Influence of atomic kinetics in the simulation of plasma microscopic properties and thermal instabilities for radiative bow shock experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Espinosa, G.; Rodríguez, R.; Gil, J. M.; Suzuki-Vidal, F.; Lebedev, S. V.; Ciardi, A.; Rubiano, J. G.; Martel, P.

    2017-03-01

    Numerical simulations of laboratory astrophysics experiments on plasma flows require plasma microscopic properties that are obtained by means of an atomic kinetic model. This fact implies a careful choice of the most suitable model for the experiment under analysis. Otherwise, the calculations could lead to inaccurate results and inappropriate conclusions. First, a study of the validity of the local thermodynamic equilibrium in the calculation of the average ionization, mean radiative properties, and cooling times of argon plasmas in a range of plasma conditions of interest in laboratory astrophysics experiments on radiative shocks is performed in this work. In the second part, we have made an analysis of the influence of the atomic kinetic model used to calculate plasma microscopic properties of experiments carried out on magpie on radiative bow shocks propagating in argon. The models considered were developed assuming both local and nonlocal thermodynamic equilibrium and, for the latter situation, we have considered in the kinetic model different effects such as external radiation field and plasma mixture. The microscopic properties studied were the average ionization, the charge state distributions, the monochromatic opacities and emissivities, the Planck mean opacity, and the radiative power loss. The microscopic study was made as a postprocess of a radiative-hydrodynamic simulation of the experiment. We have also performed a theoretical analysis of the influence of these atomic kinetic models in the criteria for the onset possibility of thermal instabilities due to radiative cooling in those experiments in which small structures were experimentally observed in the bow shock that could be due to this kind of instability.

  6. Localized Castleman disease of plasma cell type in the abdomen

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LU Zhi-hua; WU Mei

    2011-01-01

    Castleman disease is a relatively rare entity,with the hyaline-vascular type the predominant form.Although the plasma cell type is uncommon,it still comprises approximately 10% of cases of localized diseases.In addition,the abdomen is a rare site for involvement and localized Castleman disease of the plasma cell type in the abdomen is rare.The radiologic features of localized plasma cell type in the abdomen are mostly limited to case reports.In addition to the conventional imaging findings,we present some new imaging findings of localized plasma cell type in the abdomen.

  7. Kinetic Temperature and Electron Density Measurement in an Inductively Coupled Plasma Torch using Degenerate Four-Wave Mixing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schafer, Julia; Lyons, Wendy; Tong, WIlliam G.; Danehy, Paul M.

    2008-01-01

    Laser wave mixing is presented as an effective technique for spatially resolved kinetic temperature measurements in an atmospheric-pressure radio-frequency inductively-coupled plasma. Measurements are performed in a 1 kW, 27 MHz RF plasma using a continuous-wave, tunable 811.5-nm diode laser to excite the 4s(sup 3)P2 approaches 4p(sup 3)D3 argon transition. Kinetic temperature measurements are made at five radial steps from the center of the torch and at four different torch heights. The kinetic temperature is determined by measuring simultaneously the line shape of the sub-Doppler backward phase-conjugate degenerate four-wave mixing and the Doppler-broadened forward-scattering degenerate four-wave mixing. The temperature measurements result in a range of 3,500 to 14,000 K+/-150 K. Electron densities measured range from 6.1 (+/-0.3) x 10(exp 15)/cu cm to 10.1 (+/-0.3) x 10(exp 15)/cu cm. The experimental spectra are analyzed using a perturbative treatment of the backward phase-conjugate and forward-geometry wave-mixing theory. Stark width is determined from the collisional broadening measured in the phase-conjugate geometry. Electron density measurements are made based on the Stark width. The kinetic temperature of the plasma was found to be more than halved by adding deionized water through the nebulizer.

  8. Intrinsic Kinetics of Dimethyl Ether Synthesis from Plasma Activation of CO2 Hydrogenation over Cu-Fe-Ce/HZSM-5.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Tongming; Zhou, Xinhui; Qin, Zuzeng; Ji, Hongbing

    2017-02-02

    CO2 is activated in a plasma reactor followed by hydrogenation over a Cu-Fe-Ce/HZSM-5 catalyst, and the intrinsic kinetics of the plasma catalytic process are studied. Compared with CO2 hydrogenation using Cu-Fe-Ce/HZSM-5 alone, the CO2 conversion and the dimethyl ether selectivity for the plasma catalytic process are increased by 16.3 %, and 10.1 %, respectively, indicating that the CO2 was activated by the plasma to promote hydrogenation. A study of the intrinsic kinetics shows that the activation energies of methanol formation, the reverse water-gas shift reaction, and methanol dehydration to dimethyl ether are 149.34, 75.47, and 73.18 kJ mol(-1) , respectively, which are lower than if Cu-Fe-Ce/HZSM-5 is used without plasma, indicating that the activation of CO2 in the plasma reduces the activation energy of the hydrogenation reaction and improves the yield of dimethyl ether.

  9. Plasmoacanthoma of oral cavity and plasma cell cheilitis: two sides of same disorder “oral plasma cell mucositis” ?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gayatri Khatri

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Plasmoacanthoma and plasma cell cheilitis are rare disorders of obscure etiology characterized by a plasma cell infiltrate an 80-year-old woman presented with a verrucous, fleshy, skin colored plaque over lips, gingiva, and the palate and painful swallowing for over a period of 6 months. Histopathology of the lesion showed dense infiltrate of plasma cells. The lesions resolved completely after intralesional triamcinolone acetonide. Another 52-year-old male had progressively enlarging, erosive lesion over vermilion border of lower lip for 6months resembling actinic cheilitis. Histology was diagnostic of plasma cell cheilitis. Treatment with topical clobetasol propionate was effective. Plasma cell cheilitis and plasmoacanthoma perhaps represent a spectrum of oral ”plasma cell mucositis” with plasmoacanthoma being an advanced version of the former.

  10. Fluid theory and kinetic simulation of two-dimensional electrostatic streaming instabilities in electron-ion plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jao, C.-S.; Hau, L.-N.

    2016-11-01

    Electrostatic streaming instabilities have been proposed as the generation mechanism for the electrostatic solitary waves observed in various space plasma environments. Past studies on the subject have been mostly based on the kinetic theory and particle simulations. In this paper, we extend our recent study based on one-dimensional fluid theory and particle simulations to two-dimensional regimes for both bi-streaming and bump-on-tail streaming instabilities in electron-ion plasmas. Both linear fluid theory and kinetic simulations show that for bi-streaming instability, the oblique unstable modes tend to be suppressed by the increasing background magnetic field, while for bump-on-tail instability, the growth rates of unstable oblique modes are increased with increasing background magnetic field. For both instabilities, the fluid theory gives rise to the linear growth rates and the wavelengths of unstable modes in good agreement with those obtained from the kinetic simulations. For unmagnetized and weakly magnetized systems, the formed electrostatic structures tend to diminish after the long evolution, while for relatively stronger magnetic field cases, the solitary waves may merge and evolve to steady one-dimensional structures. Comparisons between one and two-dimensional results are made and the effects of the ion-to-electron mass ratio are also examined based on the fluid theory and kinetic simulations. The study concludes that the fluid theory plays crucial seeding roles in the kinetic evolution of electrostatic streaming instabilities.

  11. Theoretical analysis of ion kinetic energies and DLC film deposition by CH4+Ar (He) dielectric barrier discharge plasmas

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Liu Yan-Hong; Zhang Jia-Liang; Ma Teng-Cai; Li Jian; Liu Dong-Ping

    2007-01-01

    The kinetic energy of ions in dielectric barrier discharge plasmas are analysed theoretically using the model of binary collisions between ions and gas molecules. Langevin equation for ions in other gases, Blanc law for ions in mixed gases, and the two-temperature model for ions at higher reduced field are used to determine the ion mobility. The kinetic energies of ions in CH4 + Ar(He) dielectric barrier discharge plasma at a fixed total gas pressure and various Ar (He)concentrations are calculated. It is found that with increasing Ar (He) concentration in CH4 + Ar (He) from 20% to 83%,the CH4+ kinetic energy increases from 69.6 (43.9) to 92.1 (128.5)eV, while the Ar+ (He+) kinetic energy decreases from 97 (145.2) to 78.8 (75.5)eV. The increase of CH4+ kinetic energy is responsible for the increase of hardness of diamond-like carbon films deposited by CH4 + Ar (He) dielectric barrier discharge without bias voltage over substrates.

  12. The distinct character of anisotropy and intermittency in inertial and kinetic range solar wind plasma turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiyani, Khurom; Chapman, Sandra; Osman, Kareem; Sahraoui, Fouad; Hnat, Bogdan

    2014-05-01

    The anisotropic nature of the scaling properties of solar wind magnetic turbulence fluctuations is investigated scale by scale using high cadence in situ magnetic field measurements from the Cluster, ACE and STEREO spacecraft missions in both fast and slow quiet solar wind conditions. The data span five decades in scales from the inertial range to the electron Larmor radius. We find a clear transition in scaling behaviour between the inertial and kinetic range of scales, which provides a direct, quantitative constraint on the physical processes that mediate the cascade of energy through these scales. In the inertial (magnetohydrodynamic) range the statistical nature of turbulent fluctuations are known to be anisotropic, both in the vector components of the magnetic field fluctuations (variance anisotropy) and in the spatial scales of these fluctuations (wavevector or k-anisotropy). We show for the first time that, when measuring parallel to the local magnetic field direction, the full statistical signature of the magnetic and Elsasser field fluctuations is that of a non-Gaussian globally scale-invariant process. This is distinct from the classic multi-exponent statistics observed when the local magnetic field is perpendicular to the flow direction. These observations suggest the weakness, or absence, of a parallel magnetofluid turbulence energy cascade. In contrast to the inertial range, there is a successive increase toward isotropy between parallel and transverse power at scales below the ion Larmor radius, with isotropy being achieved at the electron Larmor radius. Computing higher-order statistics, we show that the full statistical signature of both parallel, and perpendicular fluctuations at scales below the ion Larmor radius are that of an isotropic globally scale-invariant non-Gaussian process. Lastly, we perform a survey of multiple intervals of quiet solar wind sampled under different plasma conditions (fast, slow wind; plasma beta etc.) and find that the

  13. Towards Stratified Medicine in Plasma Cell Myeloma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egan, Philip; Drain, Stephen; Conway, Caroline; Bjourson, Anthony J.; Alexander, H. Denis

    2016-01-01

    Plasma cell myeloma is a clinically heterogeneous malignancy accounting for approximately one to 2% of newly diagnosed cases of cancer worldwide. Treatment options, in addition to long-established cytotoxic drugs, include autologous stem cell transplant, immune modulators, proteasome inhibitors and monoclonal antibodies, plus further targeted therapies currently in clinical trials. Whilst treatment decisions are mostly based on a patient’s age, fitness, including the presence of co-morbidities, and tumour burden, significant scope exists for better risk stratification, sub-classification of disease, and predictors of response to specific therapies. Clinical staging, recurring acquired cytogenetic aberrations, and serum biomarkers such as β-2 microglobulin, and free light chains are in widespread use but often fail to predict the disease progression or inform treatment decision making. Recent scientific advances have provided considerable insight into the biology of myeloma. For example, gene expression profiling is already making a contribution to enhanced understanding of the biology of the disease whilst Next Generation Sequencing has revealed great genomic complexity and heterogeneity. Pathways involved in the oncogenesis, proliferation of the tumour and its resistance to apoptosis are being unravelled. Furthermore, knowledge of the tumour cell surface and its interactions with bystander cells and the bone marrow stroma enhance this understanding and provide novel targets for cell and antibody-based therapies. This review will discuss the development in understanding of the biology of the tumour cell and its environment in the bone marrow, the implementation of new therapeutic options contributing to significantly improved outcomes, and the progression towards more personalised medicine in this disorder. PMID:27775669

  14. Towards Stratified Medicine in Plasma Cell Myeloma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philip Egan

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Plasma cell myeloma is a clinically heterogeneous malignancy accounting for approximately one to 2% of newly diagnosed cases of cancer worldwide. Treatment options, in addition to long-established cytotoxic drugs, include autologous stem cell transplant, immune modulators, proteasome inhibitors and monoclonal antibodies, plus further targeted therapies currently in clinical trials. Whilst treatment decisions are mostly based on a patient’s age, fitness, including the presence of co-morbidities, and tumour burden, significant scope exists for better risk stratification, sub-classification of disease, and predictors of response to specific therapies. Clinical staging, recurring acquired cytogenetic aberrations, and serum biomarkers such as β-2 microglobulin, and free light chains are in widespread use but often fail to predict the disease progression or inform treatment decision making. Recent scientific advances have provided considerable insight into the biology of myeloma. For example, gene expression profiling is already making a contribution to enhanced understanding of the biology of the disease whilst Next Generation Sequencing has revealed great genomic complexity and heterogeneity. Pathways involved in the oncogenesis, proliferation of the tumour and its resistance to apoptosis are being unravelled. Furthermore, knowledge of the tumour cell surface and its interactions with bystander cells and the bone marrow stroma enhance this understanding and provide novel targets for cell and antibody-based therapies. This review will discuss the development in understanding of the biology of the tumour cell and its environment in the bone marrow, the implementation of new therapeutic options contributing to significantly improved outcomes, and the progression towards more personalised medicine in this disorder.

  15. Development of motorized plasma lithography for cell patterning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deguchi, Shinji; Nagasawa, Yohei; Saito, Akira C; Matsui, Tsubasa S; Yokoyama, Sho; Sato, Masaaki

    2014-03-01

    The micropatterning of cells, which restricts the adhesive regions on the substrate and thus controls cell geometry, is used to study mechanobiology-related cell functions. Plasma lithography is a means of providing such patterns and uses a spatially-selective plasma treatment. Conventional plasma lithography employs a positionally-fixed mask with which the geometry of the patterns is determined and thus is not suited for producing on-demand geometries of patterns. To overcome this, we have manufactured a new device with a motorized mask mounted in a vacuum chamber of a plasma generator, which we designate motorized plasma lithography. Our pilot tests indicate that various pattern geometries can be obtained with the control of a shielding mask during plasma treatment. Our approach can thus omit the laborious process of preparing photolithographically microfabricated masks required for the conventional plasma lithography.

  16. Cell Adhesion on Polycaprolactone Modified by Plasma Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nina Recek

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available We have investigated the influence of various plasma treatments of electrospun polycaprolactone (PCL scaffolds on the adhesion and proliferation of human umbilical endothelial cells (HUVEC. The PCL scaffolds were treated in plasmas created in O2, NH3 or SO2 gas at identical conditions. Surface functionalization of plasma-treated samples was determined using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Cell adhesion and morphology were investigated by scanning electron microscopy and the influence of plasma treatment on cell adhesion and viability was evaluated with cell viability assay (MTT assay. The results showed the highest metabolic activity of HUVEC on PCL samples treated with O2 and NH3 plasma. Accordingly, the cells reflected the best adhesion and morphology on O2 and NH3 plasma-treated PCL samples already at 3 h. Moreover, treatment with O2 and NH3 plasma even stimulated endothelial cell proliferation on PCL surfaces by 60% as measured at 24 h, showing significant improvement in endothelialization of this material. Contrarily, SO2 plasma appeared to be less promising in comparison with O2 and NH3 plasma; however, it was still better than without any plasma treatment. Thus, our results importantly contribute to the biocompatibility improvement of the PCL polymer, commonly used for scaffolds in tissue engineering.

  17. Thyrotropin binding to porcine thyroid plasma membranes: kinetic and thermodynamic analyses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saltiel, A R; Thomas, C G; Nayfeh, S N

    1982-01-01

    Evaluation of TSH binding to plasma membranes of porcine thyroid revealed unique sensitivity to pH and temperature. Analysis of apparent equilibrium binding yielded a linear Scatchard plot at the optimal pH of 6.0, indicating one class of binding sites. At physiological pH 7.4 a curvilinear Scatchard plot was obtained, resolved by computer analysis into two classes of binding sites of different affinities and capacities. Treatment of membranes with phospholipase C resulted in a 20% decrease in the number of high affinity sites, but no change occurred in binding affinity. In contrast, low affinity sites were not altered. To evaluate the significance of the curvilinear Scatchard plot, the kinetics of association were examined. The intrinsic Kd (kd/ka) was 0.20 nM, a value essentially equivalent to that of the high affinity binding component. The 'negative cooperativity' model of hormone binding was evaluated by examining the effect of excess unlabeled TSH on dissociation rate. Dissociation of bound 125I-labeled TSH was biphasic, and was enhanced by unlabeled hormone, regardless of whether the membranes were prelabeled at pH 6.0 or 7.4. This effect was not correlated with curvilinear Scatchard plots, and therefore not proof of negative cooperativity. Binding sites for TSH were further distinguished by their sensitivity to temperature. A van't Hoff plot of temperature dependence of the apparent Kd of the high affinity site was linear from 4 to 37 degrees C. In contrast, the apparent Kd of low affinity binding did not vary with respect to temperature. These results demonstrate that there are at least two independent binding sites for TSH on porcine thyroid plasma membranes, distinguishable by their equilibrium binding properties.

  18. Products and bioenergy from the pyrolysis of rice straw via radio frequency plasma and its kinetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tu, Wen-Kai; Shie, Je-Lung; Chang, Ching-Yuan; Chang, Chiung-Fen; Lin, Cheng-Fang; Yang, Sen-Yeu; Kuo, Jing T; Shaw, Dai-Gee; You, Yii-Der; Lee, Duu-Jong

    2009-03-01

    The radio frequency plasma pyrolysis technology, which can overcome the disadvantages of common pyrolysis methods such as less gas products while significant tar formation, was used for pyrolyzing the biomass waste of rice straw. The experiments were performed at various plateau temperatures of 740, 813, 843 and 880K with corresponding loading powers of 357, 482, 574 and 664W, respectively. The corresponding yields of gas products (excluding nitrogen) from rice straw are 30.7, 56.6, 62.5 and 66.5wt.% with respect to the original dried sample and the corresponding specific heating values gained from gas products are about 4548, 4284, 4469 and 4438kcalkg(-1), respectively, for the said cases. The corresponding combustible portions remained in the solid residues are about 64.7, 35, 28.2 and 23.5wt.% with specific heating values of 4106, 4438, 4328 and 4251kcalkg(-1) with respective to solid residues, while that in the original dried sample is 87.2wt.% with specific heating value of 4042kcalkg(-1). The results indicated that the amount of combustibles converted into gas products increases with increasing plateau temperature. The kinetic model employed to describe the pyrolytic conversion of rice straw at constant temperatures agrees well with the experimental data. The best curve fittings render the frequency factor of 5759.5s(-1), activation energy of 74.29kJ mol(-1) and reaction order of 0.5. Data and information obtained are useful for the future design and operation of pyrolysis of rice straw via radio frequency plasma.

  19. Particle-in-cell Simulations with Kinetic Electrons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    J.L.V. Lewandowski

    2004-02-12

    A new scheme, based on an exact separation between adiabatic and nonadiabatic electron responses, for particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations of drift-type modes is presented. The (linear and nonlinear) elliptic equations for the scalar fields are solved using a multi-grid solver. The new scheme yields linear growth rates in excellent agreement with theory and it is shown to conserve energy well into the nonlinear regime. It is also demonstrated that simulations with few electrons are reliable and accurate, suggesting that large-scale, PIC simulations with electron dynamics in toroidal geometry (e.g., tokamaks and stellarators plasmas) are within reach of present-day massively parallel supercomputers.

  20. Physiological and kinetic characterization of a suspended cell anammox culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lotti, T; Kleerebezem, R; Lubello, C; van Loosdrecht, M C M

    2014-09-01

    Anammox related technologies are currently widely applied for nitrogen removal from sewage sludge digester rejection water. Nevertheless, many aspects of the anammox process like the kinetic characteristics and the reaction stoichiometry are still subject of debate. Parameter values reported in literature are often hampered by mass transfer limitation or by the presence of a significant side population. In this study a membrane bioreactor (MBR) based method for growing a highly enriched anammox microbial community is described. The almost pure free-cells suspension of highly active anammox bacteria was used for detailed kinetic and stoichiometric analysis of the anammox process. The anammox culture enriched during this study had a biomass specific maximum growth rate of 0.21 d(-)(1) which is higher than ever reported before in literature. Using an experimental methodology based on imposing dynamic process conditions combined with process modeling and parameter estimation, the intrinsic nitrite half saturation constant was identified to be as low as 35 μg-N L(-)(1). This was confirmed to be an accurate estimation in the pH range of 6.8-7.5. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Substrate elasticity affects bovine satellite cell activation kinetics in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lapin, M R; Gonzalez, J M; Johnson, S E

    2013-05-01

    Satellite cells support efficient postnatal skeletal muscle hypertrophy through fusion into the adjacent muscle fiber. Nuclear contribution allows for maintenance of the fiber myonuclear domain and proficient transcription of myogenic genes. Niche growth factors affect satellite cell biology; however, the interplay between fiber elasticity and microenvironment proteins remains largely unknown. The objective of the experiment was to examine the effects of hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) and surface elasticity on bovine satellite cell (BSC) activation kinetics in vitro. Young's elastic modulus was calculated for the semimembranosus (SM) and LM muscles of young bulls (5 d; n = 8) and adult cows (27 mo; n = 4) cattle. Results indicate that LM elasticity decreased (P Young's modulus for the SM was noted. Bovine satellite cells were seeded atop polyacrylamide bioscaffolds with surface elasticities that mimic young bull and adult cow LM or traditional cultureware. Cells were maintained in low-serum media supplemented with 5 ng/mL HGF or vehicle only for 24 or 48 h. Activation was evaluated by proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) immunocytochemistry. Results indicate that BSC maintained on rigid surfaces were activated at 24 h and refractive to HGF supplementation. By contrast, fewer (P young bull (8.1 ± 1.7 kPa) or adult cow (14.6 ± 1.6 kPa) LM. Supplementation with HGF promoted activation of BSC cultured on bioscaffolds as measured by an increase (P muscle stem cells (P > 0.05). However, with increasing surface elasticity, an increase (P muscle progenitors was observed. These results confirm that biophysical and biochemical signals regulate BSC activation.

  2. Exciting and propagating characteristics of two coexisting kinetic geodesic acoustic modes in the edge of plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, D. F.; Liu, A. D.; Lan, T.; Yu, C. X.; Cheng, J.; Qiu, Z. Y.; Zhao, H. L.; Shen, H. G.; Yan, L. W.; Dong, J. Q.; Xu, M.; Zhao, K. J.; Duan, X. R.; Liu, Y.; Chen, R.; Zhang, S. B.; Sun, X.; Xie, J. L.; Li, H.; Liu, W. D.

    2017-04-01

    Coexisting dual kinetic geodesic acoustic modes (KGAMs) with similar characteristics have been observed with Langmuir probe arrays in the edge plasma of HL-2A tokamak with low density Ohmic discharge. The dual KGAMs are named a low-frequency GAM (LFGAM) and a high-frequency GAM (HFGAM), respectively. By changing the line averaged density from 1.0× {{10}19}~{{\\text{m}}-3} to 0.7× {{10}19}~{{\\text{m}}-3} , the study of n e and T e profiles indicate that collision damping rate plays a crucial role on exciting of dual KGAMs, especially for the higher frequency branch (HFGAM). With the application of modulating techniques, we provide direct proof that nonlinear interactions between GAMs and ambient turbulence (AT) show great difference at different radial positions. At the exciting position of GAM, the amplitude modulation of AT is dominant, indicating that GAM is generated in the energy-conserving triad interaction. After the exciting of GAMs, they will propagate both inward and outward. During the propagation, the phase modulation of AT is dominant, GAMs can rarely gain energy from AT, yet they can give back-reactions on AT through shearing effect.

  3. In vitro kinetics of nerve agent degradation by fresh frozen plasma (FFP).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wille, Timo; Thiermann, Horst; Worek, Franz

    2014-02-01

    Great efforts have been undertaken in the last decades to develop new oximes to reactivate acetylcholinesterase inhibited by organophosphorus compounds (OP). So far, a broad-spectrum oxime effective against structurally diverse OP is still missing, and alternative approaches, e.g. stoichiometric and catalytic scavengers, are under investigation. Fresh frozen plasma (FFP) has been used in human OP pesticide poisoning which prompted us to investigate the in vitro kinetics of OP nerve agent degradation by FFP. Degradation was rapid and calcium-dependent with the G-type nerve agents tabun, sarin, soman and cyclosarin with half-lives from 5 to 28 min. Substantially longer and calcium-independent degradation half-lives of 23-33 h were determined with the V-type nerve agents CVX, VR and VX. However, at all the tested conditions, the degradation of V-type nerve agents was several-fold faster than spontaneous hydrolysis. Albumin did not accelerate the degradation of nerve agents. In conclusion, the fast degradation of G-type nerve agents by FFP might be a promising tool, but would require transfusion shortly after poisoning. FFP does not seem to be suitable for detoxifying relevant agent concentrations in case of human poisoning by V-type nerve agents.

  4. Kinetic analysis of soil contained pyrene oxidation by a pulsed discharge plasma process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huijuan, Wang; Guangshun, Zhou; He, Guo; Cong, Geng

    2017-01-01

    A pulsed discharge plasma (PDP) reactor with net anode and net cathode was established for investigating the pyrene degradation in soil under different pulse peak voltage, air flow rate, pyrene content in soil, initial pH value and initial water content of the soil. Pyrene oxidation within the 60 min discharge time was fitting according to the pseudo-first order equation and the corresponding reaction kinetics constants (k values) were calculated. The obtained results show that pyrene oxidation under all the different reaction conditions obeyed the pseudo-first order equation well. Higher pulsed peak voltage and appropriate air flow rate were in favor of the increase of reaction rate of pyrene oxidation. A higher k value could be achieved in the lower initial pyrene content (the value was 100 mg kg-1). The k value of pyrene oxidation in the case of pH = 4 was 11.2 times higher than the value obtained under the condition of pH = 9, while the initial water content of the soil also has a large effect on the oxidation rate of pyrene due to the effect of PDP. Supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China (No. 21207052).

  5. Responses of cells in plasma-activated medium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Hiromasa; Mizuno, Masaaki; Ishikawa, Kenji; Takeda, Keigo; Hashizume, Hiroshi; Nakamura, Kae; Kajiyama, Hiroaki; Kano, Hiroyuki; Okazaki, Yasumasa; Toyokuni, Shinya; Maruyama, Shoichi; Kodera, Yasuhiro; Terasaki, Hiroko; Adachi, Tetsuo; Kato, Masashi; Kikkawa, Fumitaka; Hori, Masaru

    2015-09-01

    Plasma consists of electrons, ions, radicals, and lights, and produces various reactive species in gas and liquid phase. Cells receive various inputs from their circumstances, and induce several physiological outputs. Our goal is to clarify the relationships between plasma inputs and physiological outputs. Plasma-activated medium (PAM) is a circumstance that plasma provides cells and our previous studies suggest that PAM is a promising tool for cancer therapy. However, the mode of actions remains to be elucidated. We propose survival and proliferation signaling networks as well as redox signaling networks are key factors to understand cellular responses of PAM-treated glioblastoma cells.

  6. Dissociation against oxidation kinetics for the conversion of VOCs in non-thermal plasmas of atmospheric gases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasquiers, Stéphane; Blin-Simiand, Nicole; Magne, Lionel

    2016-08-01

    The kinetics of four volatile organic compounds (VOCs) (propene, propane, acetaldehyde, acetone) were studied in plasmas of atmospheric gases using a photo-triggered discharge (homogeneous plasma) or a dielectric barrier discharge (filamentary plasma). It was shown for the homogeneous plasma that quenchings of nitrogen metastable states, A3Ʃ+u and the group of singlets a' 1Ʃ-u, a 1Πg and w 1∆u, are important processes for the decomposition of such molecules. Recent measurements of the H2 concentration produced in the N2/C3H6 mixture emphasize that the hydrogen molecule can be an exit route for propene dissociation. It is also found that H2 and CO molecules are efficiently produced following the dissociation of CH3COCH3 and the subsequent chemical reactivity induced by radicals coming from acetone. Addition of oxygen to a N2/VOC mixture can change drastically the kinetics. However, the quenching processes of N2 metastables by the VOC are always present and compete with oxidation reactions for the conversion of the pollutant. At low temperature, oxidations by O or by OH are not always sufficiently effective to induce an increase of the molecule decomposition when oxygen is added to the mixture. In particular, the presence of O2 has a detrimental effect on the acetone removal. Also, as evidenced for acetaldehyde and propane, some kinetic analogies appear between filamentary and homogeneous plasmas. Contribution to the topical issue "6th Central European Symposium on Plasma Chemistry (CESPC-6)", edited by Nicolas Gherardi, Ester Marotta and Cristina Paradisi

  7. A Variational Formulation of Macro-Particle Algorithms for Kinetic Plasma Simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shadwick, B. A.

    2013-10-01

    Macro-particle based simulations methods are in widespread use in plasma physics; their computational efficiency and intuitive nature are largely responsible for their longevity. In the main, these algorithms are formulated by approximating the continuous equations of motion. For systems governed by a variational principle (such as collisionless plasmas), approximations of the equations of motion is known to introduce anomalous behavior, especially in system invariants. We present a variational formulation of particle algorithms for plasma simulation based on a reduction of the distribution function onto a finite collection of macro-particles. As in the usual Particle-In-Cell (PIC) formulation, these macro-particles have a definite momentum and are spatially extended. The primary advantage of this approach is the preservation of the link between symmetries and conservation laws. For example, nothing in the reduction introduces explicit time dependence to the system and, therefore, the continuous-time equations of motion exactly conserve energy; thus, these models are free of grid-heating. In addition, the variational formulation allows for constructing models of arbitrary spatial and temporal order. In contrast, the overall accuracy of the usual PIC algorithm is at most second due to the nature of the force interpolation between the gridded field quantities and the (continuous) particle position. Again in contrast to the usual PIC algorithm, here the macro-particle shape is arbitrary; the spatial extent is completely decoupled from both the grid-size and the ``smoothness'' of the shape; smoother particle shapes are not necessarily larger. For simplicity, we restrict our discussion to one-dimensional, non-relativistic, un-magnetized, electrostatic plasmas. We comment on the extension to the electromagnetic case. Supported by the US DoE under contract numbers DE-FG02-08ER55000 and DE-SC0008382.

  8. Diffusion Controlled Reactions, Fluctuation Dominated Kinetics, and Living Cell Biochemistry

    CERN Document Server

    Konkoli, Zoran

    2009-01-01

    In recent years considerable portion of the computer science community has focused its attention on understanding living cell biochemistry and efforts to understand such complication reaction environment have spread over wide front, ranging from systems biology approaches, through network analysis (motif identification) towards developing language and simulators for low level biochemical processes. Apart from simulation work, much of the efforts are directed to using mean field equations (equivalent to the equations of classical chemical kinetics) to address various problems (stability, robustness, sensitivity analysis, etc.). Rarely is the use of mean field equations questioned. This review will provide a brief overview of the situations when mean field equations fail and should not be used. These equations can be derived from the theory of diffusion controlled reactions, and emerge when assumption of perfect mixing is used.

  9. Delayed effects of cold atmospheric plasma on vascular cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stoffels, Eva; Roks, Anton J. M.; Deelmm, Leo E.

    2008-01-01

    We investigated the long-term behaviour of vascular cells (endothelial and smooth muscle) after exposure to a cold atmospheric plasma source. The cells were treated through a gas-permeable membrane, in order to simulate intravenous treatment with a gas plasma-filled catheter. Such indirect treatment

  10. Delayed effects of cold atmospheric plasma on vascular cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stoffels, Eva; Roks, Anton J. M.; Deelmm, Leo E.

    2008-01-01

    We investigated the long-term behaviour of vascular cells (endothelial and smooth muscle) after exposure to a cold atmospheric plasma source. The cells were treated through a gas-permeable membrane, in order to simulate intravenous treatment with a gas plasma-filled catheter. Such indirect treatment

  11. Evolution of Externally Excited Convective Cells in Plasmas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sugai, H.; Juul Rasmussen, Jens; Thomsen, Kenneth

    1983-01-01

    Convective cells are excited externally in a fully ionized magnetized plasma, and their space-time evolution is investigated by two-dimensional potential measurements. A positive cell is excited externally in the `scrape-off' layer of a plasma column produced by surface ionization. Its interaction...

  12. Awakening acceleration: AWAKE’s plasma cell arrive

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN Audiovisual Productions Service; Paola Catapano; Jacques Fichet; Paola Catapano

    2016-01-01

    Interview with Edda Gschwendtner, project leader of the AWAKE collaboration, on the day the AWAKE's plasma cell is transported from the surface hall were it was tested (EHN1 on CERN Prevessin) to the AWAKE tunnel in CERN's SPS decay tunnel. The Plasma Cell was built by the Max Planck Institute in Munich.

  13. Bystander apoptosis in human cells mediated by irradiated blood plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vinnikov, Volodymyr, E-mail: vlad.vinnikov@mail.ru [Grigoriev Institute for Medical Radiology of the National Academy of Medical Science of Ukraine (Ukraine); Lloyd, David; Finnon, Paul [Centre for Radiation, Chemical and Environmental Hazards of the Health Protection Agency of the United Kingdom (United Kingdom)

    2012-03-01

    Following exposure to high doses of ionizing radiation, due to an accident or during radiotherapy, bystander signalling poses a potential hazard to unirradiated cells and tissues. This process can be mediated by factors circulating in blood plasma. Thus, we assessed the ability of plasma taken from in vitro irradiated human blood to produce a direct cytotoxic effect, by inducing apoptosis in primary human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBM), which mainly comprised G{sub 0}-stage lymphocytes. Plasma was collected from healthy donors' blood irradiated in vitro to 0-40 Gy acute {gamma}-rays. Reporter PBM were separated from unirradiated blood with Histopaque and held in medium with the test plasma for 24 h at 37 Degree-Sign C. Additionally, plasma from in vitro irradiated and unirradiated blood was tested against PBM collected from blood given 4 Gy. Apoptosis in reporter PBM was measured by the Annexin V test using flow cytometry. Plasma collected from unirradiated and irradiated blood did not produce any apoptotic response above the control level in unirradiated reporter PBM. Surprisingly, plasma from irradiated blood caused a dose-dependent reduction of apoptosis in irradiated reporter PBM. The yields of radiation-induced cell death in irradiated reporter PBM (after subtracting the respective values in unirradiated reporter PBM) were 22.2 {+-} 1.8% in plasma-free cultures, 21.6 {+-} 1.1% in cultures treated with plasma from unirradiated blood, 20.2 {+-} 1.4% in cultures with plasma from blood given 2-4 Gy and 16.7 {+-} 3.2% in cultures with plasma from blood given 6-10 Gy. These results suggested that irradiated blood plasma did not cause a radiation-induced bystander cell-killing effect. Instead, a reduction of apoptosis in irradiated reporter cells cultured with irradiated blood plasma has implications concerning oncogenic risk from mutated cells surviving after high dose in vivo irradiation (e.g. radiotherapy) and requires further study.

  14. Convective Raman Amplification of Light Pulses Causing Kinetic Inflation in Inertial Fusion Plasmas

    CERN Document Server

    Ellis, Ian N; Winjum, Benjamin J; Tsung, Frank S; Grismayer, Thomas; Mori, Warren B; Fahlen, Jay E; Williams, Edward A

    2012-01-01

    We perform 1D particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations using OSIRIS, which model a short-duration (~500/{\\omega}0 FWHM) scattered light seed pulse in the presence of a constant counter-propagating pump laser with an intensity far below the absolute instability threshold. The seed undergoes linear convective Raman amplification and dominates over fluctuations due to particle discreteness. Our simulation results are in good agreement with results from a coupled mode solver when we take into account special relativity and the use of finite size PIC simulation particles. We present linear gain spectra including both effects. Extending the PIC simulations past when the seed exits the simulation domain reveals bursts of large-amplitude scattering in many cases, which does not occur in simulations without the seed pulse. These bursts can have amplitudes several times greater than the amplified seed pulse, and we demonstrate that this large-amplitude scattering is the result of kinetic inflation by examining trapped partic...

  15. Co-existence of Whistler Waves with Kinetic Alfven Wave Turbulence for the High-beta Solar Wind Plasma

    CERN Document Server

    Mithaiwala, Manish; Crabtree, Chris; Ganguli, Gurudas

    2012-01-01

    It is shown that the dispersion relation for whistler waves is identical for a high or low beta plasma. Furthermore in the high-beta solar wind plasma whistler waves meet the Landau resonance with electrons for velocities less than the thermal speed, and consequently the electric force is small compared to the mirror force. As whistlers propagate through the inhomogeneous solar wind, the perpendicular wave number increases through refraction, increasing the Landau damping rate. However, the whistlers can survive because the background kinetic Alfven wave turbulence creates a plateau by quasilinear diffusion in the solar wind electron distribution at small velocities. It is found that for whistler energy density of only ~10^-3 that of the kinetic Alfven waves, the quasilinear diffusion rate due to whistlers is comparable to KAW. Thus very small amplitude whistler turbulence can have a significant consequence on the evolution of the solar wind electron distribution function.

  16. Kinetic study of solid phase crystallisation of expanding thermal plasma deposited a-Si:H

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Law, F., E-mail: felixlaw@nus.edu.sg [Solar Energy Research Institute of Singapore (SERIS), National University of Singapore (Singapore); Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, National University of Singapore (Singapore); Hoex, B. [Solar Energy Research Institute of Singapore (SERIS), National University of Singapore (Singapore); Wang, J. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, National University of Singapore (Singapore); Luther, J. [Solar Energy Research Institute of Singapore (SERIS), National University of Singapore (Singapore); Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, National University of Singapore (Singapore); Sharma, K.; Creatore, M.; Van de Sanden, M.C.M. [Department of Applied Physics, Eindhoven University of Technology, Eindhoven (Netherlands)

    2012-06-30

    In-situ X-ray diffraction was used to study the dynamics of the solid phase crystallisation (SPC) of hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) films deposited by expanding thermal plasma technique. The Johnson-Mehl-Avrami-Kolmogorov model was used for the analysis of the dynamic data and the activation energy associated with the SPC process was 2.9 eV, which was lower than a-Si:H films deposited by other techniques. Relationships between the Avrami exponent n, the SPC process stability and the subsequent grain structure were demonstrated. Under certain conditions, the films exhibited columnar grain structure with indications of good grain quality, suggesting that these films are suitable to be further developed into solar cell devices. Structure of the grains and the SPC dynamics in this work lend support to prior work that vacancies decorated by hydrogen clusters are related to nucleation sites. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The crystallisation of expanding thermal plasma (ETP) deposited a-Si:H was studied. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Johnson-Mehl-Avrami-Kolmogorov model was used to model the crystallisation process. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Activation energy of the solid phase crystallisation process was 2.9 eV. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Vacancies decorated by hydrogen clusters are suggested nucleation sites. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer ETP is promising in the fabrication process of pc-Si thin film solar cells.

  17. The Mistral base case to validate kinetic and fluid turbulence transport codes of the edge and SOL plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dif-Pradalier, G., E-mail: gdifpradalier@ucsd.edu [Center for Astrophysics and Space Sciences, UCSD, La Jolla, CA 92093 (United States); Gunn, J. [CEA, IRFM, F-13108 Saint Paul lez Durance (France); Ciraolo, G. [M2P2, UMR 6181-CNRS, 38 Rue F. Joliot-Curie, 13451 Marseille (France); Chang, C.S. [Courant Institute of Mathematical Sciences, N.Y. University, New York, NY 10012 (United States); Chiavassa, G. [M2P2, UMR 6181-CNRS, 38 Rue F. Joliot-Curie, 13451 Marseille (France); Diamond, P. [Center for Astrophysics and Space Sciences, UCSD, La Jolla, CA 92093 (United States); Fedorczak, N. [CEA, IRFM, F-13108 Saint Paul lez Durance (France); Ghendrih, Ph., E-mail: philippe.ghendrih@cea.fr [CEA, IRFM, F-13108 Saint Paul lez Durance (France); Isoardi, L. [M2P2, UMR 6181-CNRS, 38 Rue F. Joliot-Curie, 13451 Marseille (France); Kocan, M. [CEA, IRFM, F-13108 Saint Paul lez Durance (France); Ku, S. [Courant Institute of Mathematical Sciences, N.Y. University, New York, NY 10012 (United States); Serre, E. [M2P2, UMR 6181-CNRS, 38 Rue F. Joliot-Curie, 13451 Marseille (France); Tamain, P. [CEA, IRFM, F-13108 Saint Paul lez Durance (France)

    2011-08-01

    Experimental data from the Tore Supra experiments are extrapolated in the SOL and edge to investigate the Kelvin-Helmholtz instability. The linear analysis indicates that a large part of the SOL is rather unstable. The effort is part of the set-up of the Mistral base case that is organised to validate the codes and address new issues on turbulent edges, including the comparison of kinetic and fluid modelling in the edge plasma.

  18. Kinetic model of a Penning Ne-laser with He-Ne-Ar and Ne-H2 beam plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Derzhiev, V.I.; Zhidkov, A.G.; Koval' , A.V.; Iakovlenko, S.I. (Institut Obshchei Fiziki, Moscow (USSR))

    1989-08-01

    A kinetic model of a Penning Ne-laser laser with Ne-He-Ar and Ne-H2 mixtures pumped by an electron beam is developed. Plasma parameters and characteristics of the Ne yellow line emission (585.3 nm) are calculated for both quasi-steady-state and nonsteady-state pumping. Theoretical results agree well with experimental data on lasing for a wide range of durations and densities of the pump current, and mixture pressures and compositions. 13 refs.

  19. Turbulent Cells in Stars: I. Fluctuations in Kinetic Energy

    CERN Document Server

    Arnett, W David

    2010-01-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) hydrodynamic simulations of shell oxygen burning (Meakin and Arnett 2007) exhibit bursty, recurrent fluctuations in turbulent kinetic energy. These are shown to be due to a general instability of the convective cell, requiring only a localized source of heating or cooling. Such fluctuations are shown to be suppressed in simulations of stellar evolution which use mixing-length theory (MLT). Quantitatively similar behavior occurs in the model of a convective roll (cell) of (Lorenz 1963), which is known to have a strange attractor that gives rise to chaotic fluctuations in time. Study of simulations suggests that the Lorenz convective roll may approximate the behavior of a cell in the large scale convective flow. Other flow patterns are also of interest (Chandrasekhar 1961); here we examine some implications of this simplest case, which is not a unique solution, but may be representative. A direct derivation of the Lorenz equations from the general fluid-dynamic equations for stars is pres...

  20. Plasma-cell-predominant B-cell pseudolymphoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nervi, Stephen J; Schwartz, R A

    2008-10-15

    A 46-year-old woman with no history of foreign travel presented to the New Jersey Medical School Dermatology Clinic in July, 2007, with pruritic ulcerating facial masses that had been present since October, 2006. Clinical and histopathologic findings were most consistent with a diagnosis of cutaneous plasma cell predominant B cell pseudolymphoma. An extensive search using special stains for an etiologic organism was negative. The term cutaneous pseudolymphoma has been coined to describe the accumulation of either T or B cell lymphocytes in the skin that is caused by a nonmalignant stimulus and encompasses several different terms depending on etiology. In cases of cutaneous pseudolymphoma where a cause is identified, treatment entails removing the underlying causative agent. Idiopathic cases tend to be recalcitrant to treatment.

  1. Plasma apolipoprotein B-48 transport in obese men: a new tracer kinetic study in the postprandial state.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Annette T Y; Chan, Dick C; Pang, Jing; Watts, Gerald F; Barrett, P Hugh R

    2014-01-01

    The mechanisms responsible for impaired chylomicron metabolism have not been adequately investigated in obese subjects. We aimed to compare apolipoprotein (apo) B-48 kinetics in obese and lean men by developing a new model to describe the kinetics of apoB-48 particles in the postprandial state. Seven obese and 13 age-matched lean men were given an oral fat load. apoB-48 tracer to tracee ratios were measured after intravenous d3-leucine administration using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. Kinetic parameters were derived using a multicompartmental model. Plasma total and incremental apoB-48 0-10 hour areas under the curve as well as apoB-48 secretion and fractional catabolic rate. Compared with lean men, fasting plasma triglyceride (+148%) and apoB-48 (+110%) concentrations as well as plasma total and incremental triglycerides (+184% and +185%, respectively) and apoB-48 (+182% and 224%, respectively) areas under the curve were significantly higher in obese men (Pkinetic model, which describes the non-steady-state postprandial metabolism of apoB-48.

  2. Chemical kinetics and relaxation of non-equilibrium air plasma generated by energetic photon and electron beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maulois, Melissa; Ribière, Maxime; Eichwald, Olivier; Yousfi, Mohammed; Azaïs, Bruno

    2016-04-01

    The comprehension of electromagnetic perturbations of electronic devices, due to air plasma-induced electromagnetic field, requires a thorough study on air plasma. In the aim to understand the phenomena at the origin of the formation of non-equilibrium air plasma, we simulate, using a volume average chemical kinetics model (0D model), the time evolution of a non-equilibrium air plasma generated by an energetic X-ray flash. The simulation is undertaken in synthetic air (80% N2 and 20% O2) at ambient temperature and atmospheric pressure. When the X-ray flash crosses the gas, non-relativistic Compton electrons (low energy) and a relativistic Compton electron beam (high energy) are simultaneously generated and interact with the gas. The considered chemical kinetics scheme involves 26 influent species (electrons, positive ions, negative ions, and neutral atoms and molecules in their ground or metastable excited states) reacting following 164 selected reactions. The kinetics model describing the plasma chemistry was coupled to the conservation equation of the electron mean energy, in order to calculate at each time step of the non-equilibrium plasma evolution, the coefficients of reactions involving electrons while the energy of the heavy species (positive and negative ions and neutral atoms and molecules) is assumed remaining close to ambient temperature. It has been shown that it is the relativistic Compton electron beam directly created by the X-ray flash which is mainly responsible for the non-equilibrium plasma formation. Indeed, the low energy electrons (i.e., the non-relativistic ones) directly ejected from molecules by Compton collisions contribute to less than 1% on the creation of electrons in the plasma. In our simulation conditions, a non-equilibrium plasma with a low electron mean energy close to 1 eV and a concentration of charged species close to 1013 cm-3 is formed a few nanoseconds after the peak of X-ray flash intensity. 200 ns after the flash

  3. Hydrodynamic and kinetic models for spin-1/2 electron-positron quantum plasmas: Annihilation interaction, helicity conservation, and wave dispersion in magnetized plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andreev, Pavel A., E-mail: andreevpa@physics.msu.ru [Faculty of Physics, Lomonosov Moscow State University, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2015-06-15

    We discuss the complete theory of spin-1/2 electron-positron quantum plasmas, when electrons and positrons move with velocities mach smaller than the speed of light. We derive a set of two fluid quantum hydrodynamic equations consisting of the continuity, Euler, spin (magnetic moment) evolution equations for each species. We explicitly include the Coulomb, spin-spin, Darwin and annihilation interactions. The annihilation interaction is the main topic of the paper. We consider the contribution of the annihilation interaction in the quantum hydrodynamic equations and in the spectrum of waves in magnetized electron-positron plasmas. We consider the propagation of waves parallel and perpendicular to an external magnetic field. We also consider the oblique propagation of longitudinal waves. We derive the set of quantum kinetic equations for electron-positron plasmas with the Darwin and annihilation interactions. We apply the kinetic theory to the linear wave behavior in absence of external fields. We calculate the contribution of the Darwin and annihilation interactions in the Landau damping of the Langmuir waves. We should mention that the annihilation interaction does not change number of particles in the system. It does not related to annihilation itself, but it exists as a result of interaction of an electron-positron pair via conversion of the pair into virtual photon. A pair of the non-linear Schrodinger equations for the electron-positron plasmas including the Darwin and annihilation interactions is derived. Existence of the conserving helicity in electron-positron quantum plasmas of spinning particles with the Darwin and annihilation interactions is demonstrated. We show that the annihilation interaction plays an important role in the quantum electron-positron plasmas giving the contribution of the same magnitude as the spin-spin interaction.

  4. Hydrodynamic and kinetic models for spin-1/2 electron-positron quantum plasmas: Annihilation interaction, helicity conservation, and wave dispersion in magnetized plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andreev, Pavel A.

    2015-06-01

    We discuss the complete theory of spin-1/2 electron-positron quantum plasmas, when electrons and positrons move with velocities mach smaller than the speed of light. We derive a set of two fluid quantum hydrodynamic equations consisting of the continuity, Euler, spin (magnetic moment) evolution equations for each species. We explicitly include the Coulomb, spin-spin, Darwin and annihilation interactions. The annihilation interaction is the main topic of the paper. We consider the contribution of the annihilation interaction in the quantum hydrodynamic equations and in the spectrum of waves in magnetized electron-positron plasmas. We consider the propagation of waves parallel and perpendicular to an external magnetic field. We also consider the oblique propagation of longitudinal waves. We derive the set of quantum kinetic equations for electron-positron plasmas with the Darwin and annihilation interactions. We apply the kinetic theory to the linear wave behavior in absence of external fields. We calculate the contribution of the Darwin and annihilation interactions in the Landau damping of the Langmuir waves. We should mention that the annihilation interaction does not change number of particles in the system. It does not related to annihilation itself, but it exists as a result of interaction of an electron-positron pair via conversion of the pair into virtual photon. A pair of the non-linear Schrodinger equations for the electron-positron plasmas including the Darwin and annihilation interactions is derived. Existence of the conserving helicity in electron-positron quantum plasmas of spinning particles with the Darwin and annihilation interactions is demonstrated. We show that the annihilation interaction plays an important role in the quantum electron-positron plasmas giving the contribution of the same magnitude as the spin-spin interaction.

  5. Performance of individually-measured vs population-based C-peptide kinetics to assess β-cell function in presence and absence of acute insulin resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varghese, Ron T; Dalla Man, Chiara; Laurenti, Marcello C; Piccinini, Francesca; Sharma, Anu; Shah, Meera; Bailey, Kent R; Rizza, Robert A; Cobelli, Claudio; Vella, Adrian

    2017-09-01

    Standardized, population-based kinetics of C-peptide distribution and clearance are used to estimate insulin secretion from plasma C-peptide concentrations without direct measurement of C-peptide kinetics. We then compared the performance of population-based kinetics to directly measured C-peptide kinetics when used to calculate β-cell responsivity indices. To ensure that population-based kinetics apply to all conditions where β-cell function is measured, subjects were studied in the presence and absence of acute insulin resistance. Somatostatin was used to inhibit endogenous insulin secretion in 56 nondiabetic subjects. Subsequently, a C-peptide bolus was administered and the changing concentrations used to calculate individual kinetic parameters of C-peptide clearance. In addition, they were studied on 2 occasions in random order using an oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT). On one occasion, free fatty acid (FFA) elevation to cause insulin resistance, was achieved by infusion of intralipid + heparin. Disposition Index (DI) was then estimated by the oral minimal model using either population-based or individual C-peptide kinetics. There were marked differences in the exchange parameters (k12 and k21 ) of the model describing C-peptide kinetics, but smaller differences in the fractional clearance, i.e. the irreversible loss from the accessible compartment (k01 ), obtained from population-based estimates compared to experimental measurement. Since it is predominantly influenced by k01 , DI estimated using individual kinetics correlated well with those estimated using population-based kinetics. These data support the use of population-based measures of C-peptide kinetics to estimate β-cell function during OGTT. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  6. Differential effects of lenalidomide during plasma cell differentiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jourdan, Michel; Cren, Maïlys; Schafer, Peter; Robert, Nicolas; Duperray, Christophe; Vincent, Laure; Ceballos, Patrice; Cartron, Guillaume; Rossi, Jean-François; Moreaux, Jérôme; Chopra, Rajesh; Klein, Bernard

    2016-01-01

    Thalidomide, lenalidomide and pomalidomide have greatly improved the outcome of patients with multiple myeloma. However, their effects on plasma cells, the healthy counterpart of myeloma cells, are unknown. Here, we investigated lenalidomide effects on normal human plasma cell generation using an in vitro model. Lenalidomide inhibited the generation of pre-plasmablasts and early plasma cells, while it moderately affected plasmablast production. It also reduced the expression level of Ikaros, Aiolos, and IRF4 transcription factors, in plasmablasts and early plasma cells. This suggests that their differential sensitivity to lenalidomide is not due to a difference in Ikaros or Aiolos degradation. Lenalidomide also inhibited long-lived plasma cell generation, but did not impair their long-term survival once generated. This last observation is in agreement with the finding that lenalidomide treatment for 3-18 months did not affect the bone marrow healthy plasma cell count in allografted patients with multiple myeloma. Our findings should prompt to investigate whether lenalidomide resistance in patients with multiple myeloma could be associated with the emergence of malignant plasmablasts or long-lived plasma cells that are less sensitive to lenalidomide. PMID:27057635

  7. Immunophenotype of normal and myelomatous plasma cell subsets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nelly eRobillard

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Plasma-cells are essentially characterized by the co-expression of CD138 and CD38, which allows their identification in flow cytometry in bone marrow, peripheral blood or cell suspensions from tissues. These terminally differentiated B-cells may lose the expression of surface CD19 and that of CD20 while retaining CD27. When malignant, they can gain a number of other markers such as CD28, CD33, CD56 or CD117 and lose CD27. Moreover, since each plasma cell is only able to produce a single type of immunoglobulins, they display isotypic restriction and clonal malignant plasma cells can be further characterized by their homogeneous expression of either kappa or lambda light chains. In multiple myeloma (MM, such plasma cell clones produce the immunoglobulin identified in plasma as an abnormal peak. In the bone marrow where they essentially accumulate, these plasma cells may however display various immunophenotypes. The latter were explored in a two-way approach. Firstly the various subsets delineated by the selective or common expression of CD19 together with combined CD56/CD28 were explored in normal and MM bone marrow. Then other aberrant markers’ expression was investigated, i.e. CD20, CD27, CD33, CD56, CD117. These data were compared to literature information. They underline the vast heterogeneity of MM plasma cells possibly accounting for the various answers to therapy of MM patients.

  8. Differential effects of lenalidomide during plasma cell differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jourdan, Michel; Cren, Maïlys; Schafer, Peter; Robert, Nicolas; Duperray, Christophe; Vincent, Laure; Ceballos, Patrice; Cartron, Guillaume; Rossi, Jean-François; Moreaux, Jérôme; Chopra, Rajesh; Klein, Bernard

    2016-05-10

    Thalidomide, lenalidomide and pomalidomide have greatly improved the outcome of patients with multiple myeloma. However, their effects on plasma cells, the healthy counterpart of myeloma cells, are unknown. Here, we investigated lenalidomide effects on normal human plasma cell generation using an in vitro model. Lenalidomide inhibited the generation of pre-plasmablasts and early plasma cells, while it moderately affected plasmablast production. It also reduced the expression level of Ikaros, Aiolos, and IRF4 transcription factors, in plasmablasts and early plasma cells. This suggests that their differential sensitivity to lenalidomide is not due to a difference in Ikaros or Aiolos degradation. Lenalidomide also inhibited long-lived plasma cell generation, but did not impair their long-term survival once generated. This last observation is in agreement with the finding that lenalidomide treatment for 3-18 months did not affect the bone marrow healthy plasma cell count in allografted patients with multiple myeloma. Our findings should prompt to investigate whether lenalidomide resistance in patients with multiple myeloma could be associated with the emergence of malignant plasmablasts or long-lived plasma cells that are less sensitive to lenalidomide.

  9. Production of nitric oxide using a microwave plasma torch and its application to fungal cell differentiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Na, Young Ho; Kumar, Naresh; Kang, Min-Ho; Cho, Guang Sup; Choi, Eun Ha; Park, Gyungsoon; Uhm, Han Sup

    2015-03-01

    The generation of nitric oxide by a microwave plasma torch is proposed for its application to cell differentiation. A microwave plasma torch was developed based on basic kinetic theory. The analytical theory indicates that nitric oxide density is nearly proportional to oxygen molecular density and that the high-temperature flame is an effective means of generating nitric oxide. Experimental data pertaining to nitric oxide production are presented in terms of the oxygen input in units of cubic centimeters per minute. The apparent length of the torch flame increases as the oxygen input increases. The various levels of nitric oxide are observed depending on the flow rate of nitrogen gas, the mole fraction of oxygen gas, and the microwave power. In order to evaluate the potential of nitric oxide as an activator of cell differentiation, we applied nitric oxide generated from the microwave plasma torch to a model microbial cell (Neurospora crassa: non-pathogenic fungus). Germination and hyphal differentiation of fungal cells were not dramatically changed but there was a significant increase in spore formation after treatment with nitric oxide. In addition, the expression level of a sporulation related gene acon-3 was significantly elevated after 24 h upon nitric oxide treatment. Increase in the level of nitric oxide, nitrite and nitrate in water after nitric oxide treatment seems to be responsible for activation of fungal sporulation. Our results suggest that nitric oxide generated by plasma can be used as a possible activator of cell differentiation and development.

  10. Development of plasma apparatus for plasma irradiation to living cell model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suda, Yoshiyuki; Kato, Ryo; Tanoue, Hideto; Takikawa, Hirofumi; Tero, Ryugo

    2012-10-01

    Atmospheric pressure plasma has been studied for the industrial applications of biotechnology and medical care. For the development of these fields, understanding the influence of atmospheric pressure plasma on living cell and the mechanism of cell death is necessary. We focus on a basic structure of cell membrane, called lipid bilayer. Lipid bilayer is composed of lipid molecules with an amphipathic property and can be formed on hydrophilic substrates. In this paper, we report the development of the plasma apparatus for the treatment of lipid bilayer. The plasma apparatus uses a typical dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) system and employs parallel plate electrodes with a gap distance of 1 mm [1]. Each electrode is covered with a quartz plate and the substrate temperature is kept constant by cooling medium. The lower quartz electrode has a dimple, in which the substrate coated with a lipid bilayer and buffer fluid are mounted. [4pt] [1] Y. Sugioka, et al, IEEE Trans. Plasma Sci., in press

  11. Microstructural evolution and growth kinetics of thermally grown oxides in plasma sprayed thermal barrier coatings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoju Liu

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The formation of thermally grown oxide (TGO during high temperature is a key factor to the degradation of thermal barrier coatings (TBCs applied on hot section components. In the present study both the CoNiCrAlY bond coat and ZrO2-8 wt.% Y2O3 (8YSZ ceramic coat of TBCs were prepared by air plasma spraying (APS. The composition and microstructure of TGO in TBCs were investigated using scanning electron microscopy (SEM, energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS and X-ray diffraction (XRD analysis. The growth rate of TGO for TBC and pure BC were gained after isothermal oxidation at 1100 °C for various times. The results showed that as-sprayed bond coat consisted of β and γ/γ′phases, β phase reducesd as the oxidation time increased. The TGO comprised α-Al2O3 formed in the first 2 h. CoO, NiO, Cr2O3 and spinel oxides appeared after 20 h of oxidation. Contents of CoO and NiO reduced while that of Cr2O3 and spinel oxides increased in the later oxidation stage. The TGO eventually consisted of a sub-Al2O3 layer with columnar microstructure and the upper porous CS clusters. The TGO growth kinetics for two kinds of samples followed parabolic laws, with oxidation rate constant of 0.344 μm/h0.5 for TBCs and 0.354 μm/h0.5 for pure BCs.

  12. Microstructural evolution and growth kinetics of thermally grown oxides in plasma sprayed thermal barrier coatings

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiaoju Liu; Teng Wang; Caicai Li; Zhenhuan Zheng; Qiang Li

    2016-01-01

    The formation of thermally grown oxide (TGO) during high temperature is a key factor to the degradation of thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) applied on hot section components. In the present study both the CoNiCrAlY bond coat and ZrO2-8 wt.% Y2O3 (8YSZ) ceramic coat of TBCs were prepared by air plasma spraying (APS). The composition and microstructure of TGO in TBCs were investigated using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) and X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis. The growth rate of TGO for TBC and pure BC were gained after isothermal oxidation at 1100 °C for various times. The results showed that as-sprayed bond coat consisted of β and γ/γ'phases,β phase reducesd as the oxidation time increased. The TGO comprised α-Al2O3 formed in the first 2 h. CoO, NiO, Cr2O3 and spinel oxides appeared after 20 h of oxidation. Contents of CoO and NiO reduced while that of Cr2O3 and spinel oxides increased in the later oxidation stage. The TGO eventually consisted of a sub-Al2O3 layer with columnar microstructure and the upper porous CS clusters. The TGO growth kinetics for two kinds of samples followed parabolic laws, with oxidation rate constant of 0.344 μm/h0.5 for TBCs and 0.354 μm/h0.5 for pure BCs.

  13. Computational Plasma Physics at the Bleeding Edge: Simulating Kinetic Turbulence Dynamics in Fusion Energy Sciences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, William

    2013-04-01

    Advanced computing is generally recognized to be an increasingly vital tool for accelerating progress in scientific research in the 21st Century. The imperative is to translate the combination of the rapid advances in super-computing power together with the emergence of effective new algorithms and computational methodologies to help enable corresponding increases in the physics fidelity and the performance of the scientific codes used to model complex physical systems. If properly validated against experimental measurements and verified with mathematical tests and computational benchmarks, these codes can provide more reliable predictive capability for the behavior of complex systems, including fusion energy relevant high temperature plasmas. The magnetic fusion energy research community has made excellent progress in developing advanced codes for which computer run-time and problem size scale very well with the number of processors on massively parallel supercomputers. A good example is the effective usage of the full power of modern leadership class computational platforms from the terascale to the petascale and beyond to produce nonlinear particle-in-cell simulations which have accelerated progress in understanding the nature of plasma turbulence in magnetically-confined high temperature plasmas. Illustrative results provide great encouragement for being able to include increasingly realistic dynamics in extreme-scale computing campaigns to enable predictive simulations with unprecedented physics fidelity. Some illustrative examples will be presented of the algorithmic progress from the magnetic fusion energy sciences area in dealing with low memory per core extreme scale computing challenges for the current top 3 supercomputers worldwide. These include advanced CPU systems (such as the IBM-Blue-Gene-Q system and the Fujitsu K Machine) as well as the GPU-CPU hybrid system (Titan).

  14. Kinetics of organic molecules in pulsed plasmas of nitrogen or N2/O2 mixtures at near atmospheric pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasquiers, S.; Blin-Simiand, N.; Magne, L.

    2013-12-01

    In plasmas of atmospheric gases, the kinetics of some aliphatic organic molecules belonging to the hydrocarbons (propene, propane), aldehydes (acetaldehyde) and ketones (acetone) families were studied using a photo-triggered discharge (homogeneous plasma). It was shown that quenchings of N2 metastable states, A\\,^{3}\\Sigma_{u}^{+} and the group of singlets a'\\,^{1}\\Sigma_{u}^{-} , a 1Πg and w 1Δu, are important processes for the decomposition of such molecules. It plays a fundamental role in the nitrogen plasma, but it is also present in air. At low temperature, the oxidation reactions by the oxygen atom or by the hydroxyl radical are not always sufficiently effective to induce an increase of the molecule decomposition when oxygen is added to the nitrogen/organic mixture. For most cases, quenching processes appear purely dissociative. However, recent results obtained for propene lead to the conclusion that a non-dissociative exit route could exist. The quenching of the singlet states induces a break of the double bound C = O for the acetaldehyde and acetone molecules. Some kinetic analogies appear between filamentary and homogeneous plasmas, which could be very useful to get a comprehensive understanding of the physico-chemical processes in dielectric barriers or corona discharges used for various applications.

  15. Kinetic transport in a magnetically confined and flux-constrained fusion plasma; Transport cinetique dans un plasma de fusion magnetique a flux force

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Darmet, G

    2007-11-15

    This work deals with the kinetic transport in a fusion plasma magnetically confined and flux-constrained. The author proposes a new interpretation of the dynamics of zonal flows. The model that has been studied is a gyrokinetic model reduced to the transport of trapped ions. The inter-change stability that is generated allows the study of the kinetic transport of trapped ions. This model has a threshold instability and can be simulated over a few tens confining time for either thermal bath constraint or flux constraint. For thermal baths constraint, the simulation shows a metastable state where zonal flows are prevailing while turbulence is non-existent. In the case of a flux-constraint, zonal flows appear and relax by exchanging energy with system's kinetic energy and turbulence energy. The competition between zonal flows and turbulence can be then simulated by a predator-prey model. 2 regimes can be featured out: an improved confining regime where zonal flows dominate transport and a turbulent regime where zonal flows and turbulent transport are of the same magnitude order. We show that flux as well as the Reynolds tensor play an important role in the dynamics of the zonal flows and that the gyrokinetic description is relevant for all plasma regions. (A.C.)

  16. Mechanism and Kinetics Analysis of NO/SO2/N2/O2 Dissociation Reactions in Non-Thermal Plasma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Xinliang; LI Tingting; WEI Dongxiang; WEI Yanli; GU Fan

    2008-01-01

    The kinetics mechanism of the dissociation reactions in a NO/SO2/N2/O2 system was investigated in consideration of energetic electrons' impacts on a non-thermal plasma. A model was derived from the Boltzmann equation and molecule collision theory to predict the dissociation reaction rate coefficients. Upon comparison with available literature, the model was confirmed to be acceptably accurate in general. Several reaction rate coefficients of the NO/SO2/N2/O2 dissociation system were derived according to the Arrhenius formula. The activation energies of each plasma reaction were calculated by quantum chemistry methods. The relation between the dissociation reaction rate coefficient and electron temperature was established to describe the importance of each reaction and to predict relevant processes of gaseous chemical reactions. The sensitivity of the mechanism of NO/SO2/N2/O2 dissociation reaction in a non-thermal plasma was also analysed.

  17. Dispersion and absorption of longitudinal electro-kinetic wave in ion-implanted GaN semiconductor plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soni, Dilip [Government P G Madhav Science College, Ujjain (M P) (India); Sharma, Giriraj, E-mail: grsharma@gmail.com [SRJ Government Girls’ College, Neemuch (M P) (India); Saxena, Ajay [Government College, Garoth, Dist. Mandsaur (M P) (India); Jadhav, Akhilesh [Government J Yoganandam Chhattisgarh College, Raipur (C G) (India)

    2015-07-31

    An analytical study on propagation characteristics of longitudinal electro-kinetic (LEK) waves is presented. Based on multi-fluid model of plasma, we have derived a dispersion relation for LEK waves in colloid laden GaN semiconductor plasmas. It is assumed that ions are implanted to form colloids in the GaN sample. The colloids are continuously bombarded by the plasma particles and stick on them, but they acquire a net negative charge due to relatively higher mobility of electrons. It is found from the dispersion relation that the presence of charged colloids not only modifies the existing modes but also supports new novel modes of LEKWs. It is hoped that the study would enhance understanding on dispersion and absorption of LEKWs and help in singling out the appropriate configurations in which GaN crystal would be better suited for fabrication of microwave devices.

  18. Kinetic Simulations of the Self-Focusing and Dissipation of Finite-Width Electron Plasma Waves

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Winjum, B. J. [Univ. of California, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Berger, R. L. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Chapman, T. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Banks, J. W. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Brunner, S. [Federal Inst. of Technology, Lausanne (Switzerland)

    2013-09-01

    Two-dimensional simulations, both Vlasov and particle-in-cell, are presented that show the evolution of the field and electron distribution of finite-width, nonlinear electron plasma waves. The intrinsically intertwined effects of self-focusing and dissipation of field energy caused by electron trapping are studied in simulated systems that are hundreds of wavelengths long in the transverse direction but only one wavelength long and periodic in the propagation direction. From various initial wave states, both the width at focus Δm relative to the initial width Δ0 and the maximum field amplitude at focus are shown to be a function of the growth rate of the transverse modulational instability γTPMI divided by the loss rate of field energy νE to electrons escaping the trapping region. With dissipation included, an amplitude threshold for self-focusing γTPMIE~1 is found that supports the analysis of Rose [Phys. Plasmas 12, 012318 (2005)].

  19. Rheumatic masks of plasma cell dyscrasias

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vladimir Ivanovich Vasilyev

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to consider clinical practice problems in the differential diagnosis of different types of plasma cell dyscrasias (PCD. Subjects and methods. Fourteen patients (8 men and 6 women aged 52±12 years, in whom rheumatic diseases (RD were ruled out and who were diagnosed as having primary PCD: different types of myeloma in 7 patients, myeloma + AL-amyloidosis in 2, AL-amyloidosis in 3, and Waldenstrom’s macroglobulinemia in 2, were examined. Results and discussion. The most common maldiagnosed RDs in patients with PCD were seronegative rheumatoid arthritis (RA, systemic lupus erythematosus, Sjogren’s disease, and different forms of vasculitis. The most frequent masks of RD were kidney (78% and osteoarticular system (64% lesions, vascular disorders (36%, peripheral polyneuropathies (36%, and enlarged salivary glands with xerostomia (28.5%. Serum and urine immunochemical study should be performed in all patients who have clinical manifestations of seropositive RA, spondyloarthritis, intensive bone pain syndrome, ulceronecrotic vasculitis, enlarged submandibular salivary glands with macroglossia in the absence of markers of autoimmune disease for the timely diagnosis of PCD and the exclusion of RD. The paper estimates the sensitivity and specificity of main methods used to diagnose different types of PCD.

  20. Factors affecting ion kinetic temperature, number density, and containment time in the NASA Lewis bumpy-torus plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roth, J. R.

    1977-01-01

    The degree of toroidal symmetry of the plasma, the number of midplane electrode rings, the configuration of electrode rings, and the location of the diagnostic instruments with respect to the electrode rings used to generate the plasma are discussed. Impurities were deliberately introduced into the plasma, and the effects of the impurity fraction on ion kinetic temperature and electron number density were observed. It is concluded that, if necessary precautions are taken, the plasma communicates extremely well along the magnetic field lines and displays a high degree of symmetry from sector to sector for a wide range of electrode ring configurations and operating conditions. Finally, some characteristic data taken under nonoptimized conditions are presented, which include the highest electron number density and the longest particle containment time (1.9 msec) observed. Also, evidence from a paired comparison test is presented which shows that the electric field acting along the minor radius of the toroidal plasma improves the plasma density and the calculated containment time more than an order of magnitude if the electric field points inward, relative to the values observed when it points (and pushes ions) radially outward.

  1. Electrochemical reduction of CO2 and H2O into fuels: Cell types and kinetic barriers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mogensen, Mogens Bjerg

    2013-01-01

    of production rate/cost. Production rate is determined mainly by electrode kinetics. Therefore, parallel to improving the electrodes of these electrolyser cells, other cell types, which have faster electrode kinetics, can electrolyse CO2 and have potential lower investment costs, are being researched......), and may be operated above 800 °C. A short review of the various types is presented, and the limitations of the kinetics are described. The pros and cons of high temperature and pressure as measures to increase the electrode kinetics are discussed. Naturally, the reaction rates increase with temperature...

  2. Kinetic turbulence in relativistic plasma: from thermal bath to non-thermal continuum

    CERN Document Server

    Zhdankin, Vladimir; Uzdensky, Dmitri A; Begelman, Mitchell C

    2016-01-01

    We present results from particle-in-cell simulations of driven turbulence in collisionless, relativistic pair plasma. We find that turbulent fluctuations are consistent with the classical $k_\\perp^{-5/3}$ magnetic energy spectrum at fluid scales and a steeper $k_\\perp^{-4}$ spectrum at sub-Larmor scales, where $k_\\perp$ is the wavevector perpendicular to the mean field. We demonstrate the development of a non-thermal, power-law particle energy distribution, $f(E) \\sim E^{-\\alpha}$, with index well fit by $\\alpha \\sim 1 + C_0 (\\sigma \\rho_e/L)^{-1/2}$, where $C_0$ is a constant, $\\sigma$ is magnetization, and $\\rho_e/L$ is the ratio of characteristic Larmor radius to system size. In the absence of asymptotic system-size independent scalings, our results challenge the viability of turbulent particle acceleration in high-energy astrophysical systems such as pulsar wind nebulae.

  3. Two-dimensional Hybrid Simulations of Kinetic Plasma Turbulence: Current and Vorticity vs Proton Temperature

    CERN Document Server

    Franci, Luca; Matteini, Lorenzo; Verdini, Andrea; Landi, Simone

    2016-01-01

    Proton temperature anisotropies between the directions parallel and perpendicular to the mean magnetic field are usually observed in the solar wind plasma. Here, we employ a high-resolution hybrid particle-in-cell simulation in order to investigate the relation between spatial properties of the proton temperature and the peaks in the current density and in the flow vorticity. Our results indicate that, although regions where the proton temperature is enhanced and temperature anisotropies are larger correspond approximately to regions where many thin current sheets form, no firm quantitative evidence supports the idea of a direct causality between the two phenomena. On the other hand, quite a clear correlation between the behavior of the proton temperature and the out-of-plane vorticity is obtained.

  4. Kinetic analysis of negative power deposition in inductive low pressure plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trieschmann, Jan; Mussenbrock, Thomas

    2017-02-01

    Negative power deposition in low pressure inductively coupled plasmas (ICPs) is investigated by means of an analytical model which couples Boltzmann’s equation and the quasi-stationary Maxwell’s equations. Exploiting standard Hilbert space methods an explicit solution for both, the electric field and the distribution function of the electrons for a bounded discharge configuration subject to an unsymmetrical excitation is found for the first time. The model is applied to a low pressure ICP discharge. In this context particularly the anomalous skin effect and the effect of phase mixing is discussed. The analytical solution is compared with results from electromagnetic full wave particle in cell simulations. Excellent agreement between the analytical and the numerical results is found.

  5. Kinetics of linear rouleaux formation studied by visual monitoring of red cell dynamic organization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barshtein, G; Wajnblum, D; Yedgar, S

    2000-05-01

    Red blood cells (RBCs) in the presence of plasma proteins or other macromolecules may form aggregates, normally in rouleaux formations, which are dispersed with increasing blood flow. Experimental observations have suggested that the spontaneous aggregation process involves the formation of linear rouleaux (FLR) followed by formation of branched rouleaux networks. Theoretical models for the spontaneous rouleaux formation were formulated, taking into consideration that FLR may involve both "polymerization," i.e., interaction between two single RBCs (e + e) and the addition of a single RBC to the end of an existing rouleau (e + r), as well as "condensation" between two rouleaux by end-to-end addition (r + r). The present study was undertaken to experimentally examine the theoretical models and their assumptions, by visual monitoring of the spontaneous FLR (from singly dispersed RBC) in plasma, in a narrow gap flow chamber. The results validate the theoretical model, showing that FLR involves both polymerization and condensation, and that the kinetic constants for the above three types of intercellular interactions are the same, i.e., k(ee) = k(er) = k(rr) = k, and for all tested hematocrits (0.625-6%) k < 0.13 +/- 0.03 s(-1).

  6. Replication Kinetics of Coxsackievirus A16 in Human Rhabdomyosarcoma Cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jun Jin; Mingming Han; Lin Xu; Dong An; Wei Kong; Chunlai Jiang

    2012-01-01

    Coxsackievirns A16(CVA16),together with enterovirus type 71(EV71),is responsible for most cases of hand,foot and mouth disease(HFMD) worldwide.Recent findings suggest that the recombination between CVA16 and EV71,and the co-circulation of these two viruses may have contributed to the increase of HFMD cases in China over the past few years.It is therefore important to further understand the virology,epidemlology,virus-host interactions and host pathogeuesis of CVA16.In this study,we describe the viral kinetics of CVAI6 in human rhabdomyosarcoma(RD) cells by analyzing the cytopathic effect(CPE),viral RNA replication,viral protein expression,viral RNA package and viral particle secretion in RD cells.We show that CVA16 appears to first attach,uncoat and enter into the host cell after adsorption for 1 h.Later on,CVA16 undergoes rapid replication from 3 to 6 h at MOI 1 and until 9 h at MOI 0.1.At MOI 0.1,CVA16 initiates a secondary infection as the virions were secreted before 9 h p.i.CPE was observed after 12 h p.i.,and viral antigen was first detected at 6 h p.i.at MOI 1 and at 9 h p.i.at MOI 0.1.Thus,our study provides important information for further investigation of CVA16 in order to better understand and ultimately control infections with this virus.

  7. KINETICS OF PERITONEAL B-1A CELLS (CD5 B-CELLS) IN YOUNG-ADULT MICE

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    DEENEN, GJ; KROESE, FGM

    In the mouse, conventional B cells are continuously generated from precursor cells located in the bone marrow (BM), whereas the small subset of B-1 cells (formerly called Ly-1 B cells) constitute a self-replenishing population of cells. Here we studied the kinetics of murine peritoneal B-1a cells

  8. KINETICS OF PERITONEAL B-1A CELLS (CD5 B-CELLS) IN YOUNG-ADULT MICE

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    DEENEN, GJ; KROESE, FGM

    1993-01-01

    In the mouse, conventional B cells are continuously generated from precursor cells located in the bone marrow (BM), whereas the small subset of B-1 cells (formerly called Ly-1 B cells) constitute a self-replenishing population of cells. Here we studied the kinetics of murine peritoneal B-1a cells (i

  9. KINETICS OF PERITONEAL B-1A CELLS (CD5 B-CELLS) IN YOUNG-ADULT MICE

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    DEENEN, GJ; KROESE, FGM

    1993-01-01

    In the mouse, conventional B cells are continuously generated from precursor cells located in the bone marrow (BM), whereas the small subset of B-1 cells (formerly called Ly-1 B cells) constitute a self-replenishing population of cells. Here we studied the kinetics of murine peritoneal B-1a cells (i

  10. Plasma cell gingivitis with severe alveolar bone loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Vivek; Tripathi, Amitandra Kumar; Saimbi, Charanjit Singh; Sinha, Jolly

    2015-01-16

    Plasma cell gingivitis is a rare benign condition of the gingiva characterised by sharply demarcated erythaematous and oedematous gingiva often extending up to the muco gingival junction. It is considered a hypersensitive reaction. It presents clinically as a diffuse, erythaematous and papillary lesion of the gingiva, which frequently bleeds, with minimal trauma. This paper presents a case of a 42-year-old man who was diagnosed with plasma cell gingivitis, based on the presence of plasma cells in histological sections, and severe alveolar bone loss at the affected site, which was managed by surgical intervention.

  11. Cell proliferation kinetics and radiation response in 9L tumor spheroids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sweigert, S.E.

    1984-05-01

    Cell kinetic parameters, including population doubling-time, cell cycle time, and growth fraction, were measured in 9L gliosarcoma spheroids. These parameters were studied as the spheroids grew from 50 ..mu..m to over 900 ..mu..m in diameter. Experiments relating the cell kinetic parameters to the radiation response of 9L spheroids were also carried out. The major findings were that the average cell cycle time (T/sub c/), is considerably longer in large spheroids than in exponentially-growing monolayers, the radiosensitivity of noncycling (but still viable) cells in spheroids is not significantly different from that of cycling spheroid cells, and the radiation-induced division delay is approximately twice as long in spheroid cells as in monolayer cells given equal radiation doses. The cell loss factor for spheroids of various sizes was calculated, by using the measured kinetic parameters in the basic equations for growth of a cell population. 157 references, 6 figures, 3 tables.

  12. Predicting individual responses to pravastatin using a physiologically based kinetic model for plasma cholesterol concentrations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pas, N.C.A. van de; Rullmann, J.A.C.; Woutersen, R.A.; Ommen, B. van; Rietjens, I.M.C.M.; Graaf, A.A. de

    2014-01-01

    We used a previously developed physiologically based kinetic (PBK) model to analyze the effect of individual variations in metabolism and transport of cholesterol on pravastatin response. The PBK model is based on kinetic expressions for 21 reactions that interconnect eight different body

  13. Gyrokinetic and kinetic particle-in-cell simulations of guide-field reconnection. Part I: macroscopic effects of the electron flows

    CERN Document Server

    Muñoz, P A; Kilian, P; Büchner, J; Jenko, F

    2015-01-01

    In this work, we extend a comparison between gyrokinetic (GK) and fully kinetic Particle-in-Cell (PIC) simulations of magnetic reconnection in the limit of strong guide field started by TenBarge et al. [Phys. Plasmas 21, 020708 (2014)]. By using a different set of kinetic PIC and GK simulation codes (ACRONYM and GENE, respectively), we analyze the limits of applicability of the GK approach when comparing to the force free kinetic simulations in the low guide field (bg) regime. Here we report the first part of a much more extended comparison, focusing on the macroscopic effects of the electron flows. For a low beta plasma (beta_i = 0.01), it is shown that magnetic reconnection only displays similar features between both plasma models for higher kinetic PIC guide fields (bg>30) in the secondary magnetic islands than in the region close to the X points or separatrices (bg>5). Kinetic PIC low guide field runs (53) to be negligible due to the reduced reconnection rate and fluctuation level.

  14. Interleukin-24 inhibits the plasma cell differentiation program in human germinal center B cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maarof, Ghyath; Bouchet-Delbos, Laurence; Gary-Gouy, Hélène; Durand-Gasselin, Ingrid; Krzysiek, Roman; Dalloul, Ali

    2010-03-04

    Complex molecular mechanisms control B-cell fate to become a memory or a plasma cell. Interleukin-24 (IL-24) is a class II family cytokine of poorly understood immune function that regulates the cell cycle. We previously observed that IL-24 is strongly expressed in leukemic memory-type B cells. Here we show that IL-24 is also expressed in human follicular B cells; it is more abundant in CD27(+) memory B cells and CD5-expressing B cells, whereas it is low to undetectable in centroblasts and plasma cells. Addition of IL-24 to B cells, cultured in conditions shown to promote plasma cell differentiation, strongly inhibited plasma cell generation and immunoglobulin G (IgG) production. By contrast, IL-24 siRNA increased terminal differentiation of B cells into plasma cells. IL-24 is optimally induced by BCR triggering and CD40 engagement; IL-24 increased CD40-induced B-cell proliferation and modulated the transcription of key factors involved in plasma cell differentiation. It also inhibited activation-induced tyrosine phosphorylation of signal transducer and activator of transcription-3 (STAT-3), and inhibited the transcription of IL-10. Taken together, our results indicate that IL-24 is a novel cytokine involved in T-dependent antigen (Ag)-driven B-cell differentiation and suggest its physiologic role in favoring germinal center B-cell maturation in memory B cells at the expense of plasma cells.

  15. Kinetic simulation of the O-X conversion process in dense magnetized plasmas

    CERN Document Server

    Asgarian, M Ali; Parvazian, A; Trines, R

    2013-01-01

    The ordinary-extraordinary-Bernstein (O-X-B) double conversion is considered and simulated with a kinetic particle model vs full wave model for parameters of the TJ-II stellarator. This simulation has been done with the particle-in-cell code, XOOPIC (X11-based object-oriented particle-incell). XOOPIC is able to model the non-monotonic density and magnetic profile of TJ-II. The first step of conversion, O-X conversion, is observed clearly. By applying some optimizations such as increasing the number of computational particles in the region of the X-B conversion, the simulation of the second step is also possible. By considering the electric and magnetic components of launched and reflected waves, the O-mode wave and the X-mode wave can be easily detected. Via considering the power of launched O-mode wave and converted X-mode wave, the efficiency of O-X conversion for the best theoretical launch angle is obtained, which is in good agreement with previous computed efficiencies via full-wave simulations. For the ...

  16. Kinetics of antigen specific and non-specific polyclonal B-cell responses during lethal Plasmodium yoelii malaria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laurence Rolland

    1992-06-01

    Full Text Available In order to study the kinetics and composition of the polyclonal B-cell activation associated to malaria infection, antigen-specific and non-specific B-cell responses were evaluated in the spleens of mice infected with Plasmodium yoelii 17 XL or injected with lysed erythrocytes or plasma from P. yoelii infected mice or with P. falciparum culture supernatants. Spleen/body weigth ratio, numbers of nucleated spleen cells and Immunoglobulin-containing and Immunoglobulin-secreting cells increased progressively during the course of infection,in parallel to the parasitemia. A different pattern of kinetics was observed when anti-sheep red blood cell and anti-trinitrophenylated-sheep red blood cell plaque forming cells response were studied: maximum values were observed at early stages of infection, whereas the number of total Immunoglobulin-containing and Immunoglobulin-secreting cells were not yet altered. Conversely, at the end of infection, when these latter values reached their maximum, the anti-sheep red blood cell and anti-trinitrophenylated-sheep red blood cell specific responses were normal or even infranormal. In mice injected with Plasmodium-derived material, a higher increase in antigen-specific PFC was observed, as compared to the increase of Immunoglobulin-containing and Immunoglobulin-secreting cell numbers. This suggested a "preferential" (antigen-plus mitogen-induced stimulation of antigen-specific cells rather than a generalized non-specific (mitogen-induced triggering of B-lymphocytes. On the basis of these and previous results, it is suggested that polyclonal B-cell activation that takes place during the course of infection appears as a result of successive waves of antigen-specific B-cell activation.

  17. Flow cytometric immunophenotypic characteristics of plasma cell leukemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbara Kruk

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this prospective study was to define the flow cytometric characteristics of simultaneously investigated bone marrow and peripheral blood plasma cells antigens expression in 36 plasma cell leukemia (PCL patients. The immunophenotypic profile of plasma cells was determined with a panel of monoclonal antibodies. The antigen expression intensity was calculated as relative fluorescence intensity (RFI. Bone marrow plasma cells showed expression of particular antigens in the following proportion of cases: CD49d 100%, CD29 94%, CD54 93%, CD44 83%, CD56 60%, CD18 26%, CD11b 29%, CD11a 19%, CD117 27%, CD71 30%, CD126 100% and CD19 0%, while the expression of those antigens on peripheral blood plasma cells was present in the following percentage of patients: CD49d 100%, CD29 96%, CD54 93%, CD44 95%, CD56 56%, CD18 50%, CD11b 53%, CD11a 29%, CD117 26%, CD71 28%, CD126 100% and CD19 0%. The expression of CD54 was significantly higher than that of adhesion molecules belonging to the integrin b2 family: CD11a, CD18 and CD11b, on both bone marrow and peripheral blood cells (p < 0.01. Expression of CD18, CD11a and CD11b was differential between two cell compartments: lower on bone marrow and higher on peripheral blood cells. We found that plasma cells in the bone marrow of patients with plasma cell leukaemia showed significantly greater granularity and size than those in the peripheral blood (p = 0.0001 and p = 0.04, respectively. However, no differences in cell size or granularity were revealed between bone marrow plasma cells from patients with PCL and multiple myeloma. In conclusion, impaired expression of adhesion molecules such as CD11a/CD18 (LFA-1 or CD56 may explain hematogenic dissemination characterizing PCL. The following pattern of adhesion molecule expression according to the proportion of plasma cells expressing a given antigen in peripheral blood and bone marrow and arranged in diminishing order may be established: CD49d > CD44 > CD54

  18. AWAKE’s plasma cell arrives at its destination

    CERN Multimedia

    Antonella Del Rosso

    2016-01-01

    By harnessing the power of wakefields generated by a proton beam in a plasma cell, the AWAKE project aims to produce accelerator gradients hundreds of times higher than those achieved in current machines. Far from being just a dream, the AWAKE tunnel is progressively being filled with its vital components. This week, the plasma cell has been moved to its final position.   AWAKE's 10-metre-long plasma cell in the experiment tunnel. The proof-of-principle AWAKE experiment is being installed in the tunnel previously used by the CNGS facility. In AWAKE, a beam of protons from the SPS will be travelling through a plasma cell and will generate a wakefield that, in turn, will accelerate an electron beam. A laser will ionise the gas in the plasma cell and seed the self-modulation instability that will trigger the wakefield in the plasma. The project aims to prove that the plasma wakefield can be driven with protons and that its acceleration will be extremely powerful, hundreds of times more powe...

  19. Kinetic Space Weather: Toward a Global Hybrid Model of the Polar Ionosphere-Lower Magnetosphere Plasma Transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horwitz, James L.

    1996-01-01

    During the indicated period of performance, we had a number of publications concerned with kinetic polar ionosphere-lower magnetosphere plasma transport. For the IUGG 1991-4 Quadrennial Report, we reviewed aspects of U.S. accomplishments concerned with polar plasma transport, among other issues. In another review, we examined the computer simulations of multiple-scale processes in space plasmas, including polar plasma outflow and transport. We also examined specifically multiscale processes in ionospheric outflows. We developed a Generalized Semi-Kinetic(GSK) model for the topside-lower magnetosphere which explored the synergistic action of wave heating and electric potentials in the formation of auroral Ion conics, in particular the "pressure cooker" mechanism. We extended the GSK model all the way down to 120 km and applied this code to illustrate the response of the ionosphere- magnetosphere to soft-electron precipitation and convection-driven frictional ion heating, respectively. Later, the convection-driven heating work was extended to a paper for the Journal of Geophysical Research. In addition to the above full published papers, we also presented the first developments of the coupled fluid-semikinetic model for polar plasma transport during this period. The results from a steady-state treatment were presented, with the second presentation being concerned with the effects of photo-electrons on the polar wind, and the first garnering an outstanding student paper award from the American Geophysical Union. We presented the first results from a time-dependent version of this coupled fluid-semikinetic model.

  20. Plasma membranes from insect midgut cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Walter R. Terra

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Plasma membranes from insect midgut cells are separated into apical and basolateral domains. The apical domain is usually modified into microvilli with a molecular structure similar to other animals. Nevertheless, the microvillar structure should differ in some insects to permit the traffic inside them of secretory vesicles that may budd laterally or pinch-off from the tips of microvilli. Other microvillar modifications are associated with proton-pumping or with the interplay with an ensheathing lipid membrane (the perimicrovilllar membrane observed in the midgut cells of hemipterans (aphids and bugs. The perimicrovillar membranes are thought to be involved in amino acid absorption from diluted diets. The microvillar and perimicrovillar membranes have densities (and protein content that depend on the insect taxon. The role played by the microvillar and perimicrovillar proteins in insect midgut physiology is reviewed here trying to provide a coherent picture of data and highlighting further research areas.As membranas plasmáticas das células intestinais dos insetos apresentam um domínio apical e outro basal. O domínio apical é geralmente modificado em microvilosidades com organização molecular similar a de outros animais, embora possam diferir naqueles insetos que apresentam vesículas secretoras em trânsito que brotam lateralmente ou destacam-se das extremidades das microvilosidades. Outras modificações microvilares estão associadas a bombeamento de prótons ou a interrelações com uma membrana lipídica (a membrana perimicrovilar que reveste as microvilosidades de células intestinais de hemípteros (pulgões e percevejos. Admite-se que as membranas perimicrovilares estejam envolvidas na absorção de aminoácidos a partir de dietas diluídas. As membranas microvilares e perimicrovilares tem densidades distintas (e conteúdo protéico que dependem do táxon do inseto. O papel desempenhado pelas proteínas microvilares e

  1. Solar Plasma Radio Emission in the Presence of Imbalanced Turbulence of Kinetic-Scale Alfvén Waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyubchyk, O.; Kontar, E. P.; Voitenko, Y. M.; Bian, N. H.; Melrose, D. B.

    2017-09-01

    We study the influence of kinetic-scale Alfvénic turbulence on the generation of plasma radio emission in the solar coronal regions where the ratio β of plasma to magnetic pressure is lower than the electron-to-ion mass ratio me/mi. The present study is motivated by the phenomenon of solar type I radio storms that are associated with the strong magnetic field of active regions. The measured brightness temperature of the type I storms can be up to 10^{10} K for continuum emission, and can exceed 10^{11} K for type I bursts. At present, there is no generally accepted theory explaining such high brightness temperatures and some other properties of the type I storms. We propose a model with an imbalanced turbulence of kinetic-scale Alfvén waves that produce an asymmetric quasi-linear plateau on the upper half of the electron velocity distribution. The Landau damping of resonant Langmuir waves is suppressed and their amplitudes grow spontaneously above the thermal level. The estimated saturation level of Langmuir waves is high enough to generate observed type I radio emission at the fundamental plasma frequency. Harmonic emission does not appear in our model because the backward-propagating Langmuir waves undergo strong Landau damping. Our model predicts 100% polarization in the sense of the ordinary (o-) mode of type I emission.

  2. An improved approximation for the analytical treatment of the local linear gyro-kinetic plasma dispersion relation in toroidal geometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Migliano, P.; Zarzoso, D.; Artola, F. J.; Camenen, Y.; Garbet, X.

    2017-09-01

    The analytical treatment of plasma kinetic linear instabilities in toroidal geometry is commonly tackled employing a power series expansion of the resonant part of the dispersion relation. This expansion is valid under the assumption that the modulus of the mode frequency is smaller than the magnitude of the frequencies characterising the system (the drift, bounce and transit frequencies for example). We will refer to this approximation as high frequency approximation (HFA). In this paper the linear plasma dispersion relation is derived in the framework of the gyro-kinetic model, for the electrostatic case, in the local limit, in the absence of collisions, for a non rotating plasma, considering adiabatic electrons, in toroidal circular geometry, neglecting the parallel dynamics effect. A systematic analysis of the meaning and limitations of the HFA is performed. As already known, the HFA is not valid for tokamak relevant parameters. A new way to approximate the resonant part of the dispersion relation, called here Improved high frequency approximation (IHFA), is therefore proposed. A quantitative analysis of the ion temperature gradient (ITG) instability is presented. The IHFA is shown to be applicable to the treatment of the ITG instability in tokamaks.

  3. Dust kinetic Alfvén solitary and rogue waves in a dusty plasma with two temperature nonextensive ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saini, N. S.; Kaur, Barjinder; Singh, Manpreet; Bains, A. S.

    2017-07-01

    A theoretical investigation is carried out to study small amplitude dust kinetic Alfvén solitary waves (DKASWs) and rogue waves in a low-β, electron depleted plasma consisting of negatively charged dust grains and two temperature ions which are modelled by q-nonextensive distribution. A nonlinear Korteweg-de Vries equation, which governs the evolution of DKASWs, has been derived using the reductive perturbation method. Combined effects of the nonextensivity of ions, plasma beta, temperature ratio of low and high temperature ions, concentration of ions as well as dust, and angle of propagation (θ) have been studied in detail on the propagation properties of DKASWs. Only negative potential Alfvénic solitary waves are observed in the present study. Further, the study is extended for dust kinetic Alfvén rogue wave (DKARW) solutions. The properties of DKARWs, influenced by plasma parameters in question, are discussed in detail. The findings of this study may be useful to understand the formation of nonlinear coherent structures in Saturn's F-ring.

  4. Stem cell responses to plasma surface modified electrospun polyurethane scaffolds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zandén, Carl; Hellström Erkenstam, Nina; Padel, Thomas; Wittgenstein, Julia; Liu, Johan; Kuhn, H Georg

    2014-07-01

    The topographical effects from functional materials on stem cell behavior are currently of interest in tissue engineering and regenerative medicine. Here we investigate the influence of argon, oxygen, and hydrogen plasma surface modification of electrospun polyurethane fibers on human embryonic stem cell (hESC) and rat postnatal neural stem cell (NSC) responses. The plasma gases were found to induce three combinations of fiber surface functionalities and roughness textures. On randomly oriented fibers, plasma treatments lead to substantially increased hESC attachment and proliferation as compared to native fibers. Argon plasma was found to induce the most optimal combination of surface functionality and roughness for cell expansion. Contact guided migration of cells and alignment of cell processes were observed on aligned fibers. Neuronal differentiation around 5% was found for all samples and was not significantly affected by the induced variations of surface functional group distribution or individual fiber topography. In this study the influence of argon, oxygen, and hydrogen plasma surface modification of electrospun polyurethane fibers on human embryonic stem cell and rat postnatal neural stem cell (NSC) responses is studied with the goal of clarifying the potential effects of functional materials on stem cell behavior, a topic of substantial interest in tissue engineering and regenerative medicine. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Phagocytic plasma cells in a patient with multiple myeloma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    P.M. Vanhagen (P.); K. de Leeuw (K.); A. Hagemeijer (Anne); B. Löwenberg (Bob)

    1995-01-01

    textabstractPhagocytosis of blood cells by malignant plasma cells in multiple myeloma is an extremely rare condition. Here we present a 39-year-old woman with multiple myeloma. Bone marrow smear showed an extensive phagocytosis of erythrocytes and platelets by myeloma cells.

  6. Phagocytic plasma cells in a patient with multiple myeloma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    P.M. Vanhagen (P.); K. de Leeuw (K.); A. Hagemeijer (Anne); B. Löwenberg (Bob)

    1995-01-01

    textabstractPhagocytosis of blood cells by malignant plasma cells in multiple myeloma is an extremely rare condition. Here we present a 39-year-old woman with multiple myeloma. Bone marrow smear showed an extensive phagocytosis of erythrocytes and platelets by myeloma cells.

  7. Primary Plasma Cell Leukemia: Identity Card 2016.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musto, Pellegrino; Simeon, Vittorio; Todoerti, Katia; Neri, Antonino

    2016-04-01

    Primary plasma cell leukemia (PPCL) is an aggressive and rare variant of multiple myeloma (MM), characterized by peculiar adverse clinical and biological features. Though the poor outcome of PPCL has been slightly improved by novel treatments during the last 10 years, due to the limited number of available studies in this uncommon disease, optimal therapy remains a classic unmet clinical need. Anyway, in the real-life practice, induction with a bortezomib-based three-drug combination, including dexamethasone and, possibly, lenalidomide, or, alternatively, thalidomide, cyclophosphamide, or doxorubicin, is a reasonable first-line option. This approach may be particularly advisable for patients with adverse cytogenetics, hyperleucocytosis, and rapidly progressive disease, in whom a fast response is required, or for those with suboptimal renal function, where, however, lenalidomide should be used with caution until renal activity is restored. In younger subjects, leukemia/lymphoma-like more intensive regimens, including hyperfractionated cyclophosphamide, vincristine, doxorubicin, and dexamethasone or continue-infusion cisplatin, doxorubicin, cyclophosphamide, and etoposide, may be also combined with bortezomib +/- thalidomide. Treatment must be started immediately after a diagnosis of PPCL is made to avoid the risk of irreversible disease complications and, in such a context, the prevention of tumor lysis syndrome is mandatory. In patients eligible for autologous stem cell transplantation (AuSCT), other alkylating agents, in particular melphalan, should be initially avoided in order to allow adequate collections of CD34+ peripheral blood stem cells (PBSC). A combination of lenalidomide and dexamethasone may be a valuable alternative option to manage older or unfit patients or those with slower disease evolution or with signs of neuropathy, contraindicating the use of bortezomib. Patients not suitable for transplant procedures should continue the treatment, if a

  8. ZBTB32 is an early repressor of the CIITA and MHC class II gene expression during B cell differentiation to plasma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Hye Suk; Scharer, Christopher D; Majumder, Parimal; Davis, Carl W; Butler, Royce; Zinzow-Kramer, Wendy; Skountzou, Ioanna; Koutsonanos, Dimitrios G; Ahmed, Rafi; Boss, Jeremy M

    2012-09-01

    CIITA and MHC class II expression is silenced during the differentiation of B cells to plasma cells. When B cell differentiation is carried out ex vivo, CIITA silencing occurs rapidly, but the factors contributing to this event are not known. ZBTB32, also known as repressor of GATA3, was identified as an early repressor of CIITA in an ex vivo plasma cell differentiation model. ZBTB32 activity occurred at a time when B lymphocyte-induced maturation protein-1 (Blimp-1), the regulator of plasma cell fate and suppressor of CIITA, was minimally induced. Ectopic expression of ZBTB32 suppressed CIITA and I-A gene expression in B cells. Short hairpin RNA depletion of ZBTB32 in a plasma cell line resulted in re-expression of CIITA and I-A. Compared with conditional Blimp-1 knockout and wild-type B cells, B cells from ZBTB32/ROG-knockout mice displayed delayed kinetics in silencing CIITA during ex vivo plasma cell differentiation. ZBTB32 was found to bind to the CIITA gene, suggesting that ZBTB32 directly regulates CIITA. Lastly, ZBTB32 and Blimp-1 coimmunoprecipitated, suggesting that the two repressors may ultimately function together to silence CIITA expression. These results introduce ZBTB32 as a novel regulator of MHC-II gene expression and a potential regulatory partner of Blimp-1 in repressing gene expression.

  9. Surface structure and surface kinetics of InN grown by plasma-assisted atomic layer epitaxy: A HREELS study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Acharya, Ananta R., E-mail: aacharya@georgiasouthern.edu, E-mail: anantaach@gmail.com [Department of Physics, Georgia Southern University, Statesboro, Georgia 30460 (United States); Thoms, Brian D. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Georgia State University, Atlanta, Georgia 30303 (United States); Nepal, Neeraj [American Association for Engineering Education, 1818 N Street NW, Washington, DC 20034 (United States); Eddy, Charles R. [Electronics Science and Technology Division, U.S. Naval Research Laboratory, 4555 Overlook Avenue SW, Washington, DC 20375 (United States)

    2015-03-15

    The surface bonding configuration and kinetics of hydrogen desorption from InN grown by plasma-assisted atomic layer epitaxy have been investigated. High resolution electron energy loss spectra exhibited loss peaks assigned to a Fuchs–Kliewer surface phonon, N-N and N-H surface species. The surface N-N vibrations are attributed to surface defects. The observation of N-H but no In-H surface species suggested N-terminated InN. Isothermal desorption data were best fit by the first-order desorption kinetics with an activation energy of (0.88 ± 0.06) eV and pre-exponential factor of (1.5 ± 0.5) × 10{sup 5 }s{sup −1}.

  10. The kinetics of inactivation of spheroidal microbial cells by pulsed electric fields

    CERN Document Server

    Lebovka, Nikolai

    2007-01-01

    The nature of non-exponential kinetics in microbial cells inactivation by pulsed electric fields (PEF) is discussed. It was demonstrated that possible mechanism of non-exponential kinetics can be related to orientational disorder in suspension of microbial cells of anisotropic form. A numerical studies of spheroidal cell suspensions was carried out. The most pronounced deviations from the exponential kinetics were observed for disordered suspensions of prolate spheroids at small electric field strength $E$ or at large aspect ratio $a$. For partially oriented suspensions, efficiency of inactivation enhances with increasing of order parameter and field strength. A possibility of the PEF-induced orientational ordering in microbial suspensions is discussed.

  11. Particle-in-cell modeling for MJ scale dense plasma focus with varied anode shape

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Link, A., E-mail: link6@llnl.gov; Halvorson, C., E-mail: link6@llnl.gov; Schmidt, A. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, CA 94550 (United States); Hagen, E. C. [National Security Technologies, Las Vegas, NV 89030 (United States); Rose, D. V.; Welch, D. R. [Voss Scientific LLC, Albuquerque NM 87108 (United States)

    2014-12-15

    Megajoule scale dense plasma focus (DPF) Z-pinches with deuterium gas fill are compact devices capable of producing 10{sup 12} neutrons per shot but past predictive models of large-scale DPF have not included kinetic effects such as ion beam formation or anomalous resistivity. We report on progress of developing a predictive DPF model by extending our 2D axisymmetric collisional kinetic particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations from the 4 kJ, 200 kA LLNL DPF to 1 MJ, 2 MA Gemini DPF using the PIC code LSP. These new simulations incorporate electrodes, an external pulsed-power driver circuit, and model the plasma from insulator lift-off through the pinch phase. To accommodate the vast range of relevant spatial and temporal scales involved in the Gemini DPF within the available computational resources, the simulations were performed using a new hybrid fluid-to-kinetic model. This new approach allows single simulations to begin in an electron/ion fluid mode from insulator lift-off through the 5-6 μs run-down of the 50+ cm anode, then transition to a fully kinetic PIC description during the run-in phase, when the current sheath is 2-3 mm from the central axis of the anode. Simulations are advanced through the final pinch phase using an adaptive variable time-step to capture the fs and sub-mm scales of the kinetic instabilities involved in the ion beam formation and neutron production. Validation assessments are being performed using a variety of different anode shapes, comparing against experimental measurements of neutron yield, neutron anisotropy and ion beam production.

  12. Kinetics and thermodynamics of chemical reactions in Li/SOCl2 cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, Lee D.; Frank, Harvey

    1987-01-01

    Work is described that was designed to determine the kinetic constants necessary to extrapolate kinetic data on Li/SOCl2 cells over the temperature range from 25 to 75 C. A second objective was to characterize as far as possible the chemical reactions that occur in the cells since these reactions may be important in understanding the potential hazards of these cells. The kinetics of the corrosion processes in undischarged Li/SOCl2 cells were determined and separated according to their occurrence at the anode and cathode; the effects that switching the current on and off has on the corrosion reactions was determined; and the effects of discharge state on the kinetics of the corrosion process were found. A thermodynamic analysis of the current-producing reactions in the cell was done and is included.

  13. Kinetics and thermodynamics of chemical reactions in Li/SOCl2 cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, Lee D.; Frank, Harvey

    1987-01-01

    Work is described that was designed to determine the kinetic constants necessary to extrapolate kinetic data on Li/SOCl2 cells over the temperature range from 25 to 75 C. A second objective was to characterize as far as possible the chemical reactions that occur in the cells since these reactions may be important in understanding the potential hazards of these cells. The kinetics of the corrosion processes in undischarged Li/SOCl2 cells were determined and separated according to their occurrence at the anode and cathode; the effects that switching the current on and off has on the corrosion reactions was determined; and the effects of discharge state on the kinetics of the corrosion process were found. A thermodynamic analysis of the current-producing reactions in the cell was done and is included.

  14. Variety of RNAs in Peripheral Blood Cells, Plasma, and Plasma Fractions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna V. Savelyeva

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Human peripheral blood contains RNA in cells and in extracellular membrane vesicles, microvesicles and exosomes, as well as in cell-free ribonucleoproteins. Circulating mRNAs and noncoding RNAs, being internalized, possess the ability to modulate vital processes in recipient cells. In this study, with SOLiD sequencing technology, we performed identification, classification, and quantification of RNAs from blood fractions: cells, plasma, plasma vesicles pelleted at 16,000g and 160,000g, and vesicle-depleted plasma supernatant of healthy donors and non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC patients. It was determined that 16,000g blood plasma vesicles were enriched with cell-free mitochondria and with a set of mitochondrial RNAs. The variable RNA set of blood plasma 160,000g pellets reflected the prominent contribution of U1, U5, and U6 small nuclear RNAs’ fragments and at the same time was characterized by a remarkable depletion of small nucleolar RNAs. Besides microRNAs, the variety of fragments of mRNAs and snoRNAs dominated in the set of circulating RNAs differentially expressed in blood fractions of NSCLC patients. Taken together, our data emphasize that not only extracellular microRNAs but also circulating fragments of messenger and small nuclear/nucleolar RNAs represent prominent classes of circulating regulatory ncRNAs as well as promising circulating biomarkers for the development of disease diagnostic approaches.

  15. Variety of RNAs in Peripheral Blood Cells, Plasma, and Plasma Fractions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savelyeva, Anna V; Kuligina, Elena V; Bariakin, Dmitry N; Kozlov, Vadim V; Ryabchikova, Elena I; Richter, Vladimir A; Semenov, Dmitry V

    2017-01-01

    Human peripheral blood contains RNA in cells and in extracellular membrane vesicles, microvesicles and exosomes, as well as in cell-free ribonucleoproteins. Circulating mRNAs and noncoding RNAs, being internalized, possess the ability to modulate vital processes in recipient cells. In this study, with SOLiD sequencing technology, we performed identification, classification, and quantification of RNAs from blood fractions: cells, plasma, plasma vesicles pelleted at 16,000g and 160,000g, and vesicle-depleted plasma supernatant of healthy donors and non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients. It was determined that 16,000g blood plasma vesicles were enriched with cell-free mitochondria and with a set of mitochondrial RNAs. The variable RNA set of blood plasma 160,000g pellets reflected the prominent contribution of U1, U5, and U6 small nuclear RNAs' fragments and at the same time was characterized by a remarkable depletion of small nucleolar RNAs. Besides microRNAs, the variety of fragments of mRNAs and snoRNAs dominated in the set of circulating RNAs differentially expressed in blood fractions of NSCLC patients. Taken together, our data emphasize that not only extracellular microRNAs but also circulating fragments of messenger and small nuclear/nucleolar RNAs represent prominent classes of circulating regulatory ncRNAs as well as promising circulating biomarkers for the development of disease diagnostic approaches.

  16. Effects of Charge in Heavy Ions on Solitary Kinetic Alfvén Waves in Double-Ion Plasmas

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG Lei; WU De-Jin

    2006-01-01

    @@ After the charge of heavy ions is considered, a Sagdeev equation is obtained for the solitary kinetic Alfvén waves (SKAWs) in a low-β(me/mp<<β<<1 or mp/me>>α>>1), three-component (electrons, protons, and highly charged heavy ions) plasma. Numerical results show that the charge number q of heavy ions can cause the width of the solitary structure to decrease, but increase for the maximum of electron density nem≤1.2 and the initial abundance of heavy ions Cb0 ≤ 0.1. The parallel phase speed of the waves increases with larger q.

  17. Plasma Kinetics in Electrical Discharge in Mixture of Air, Water and Ethanol Vapors for Hydrogen Enriched Syngas Production

    CERN Document Server

    Shchedrin, A I; Ryabtsev, A V; Chernyak, V Ya; Yukhymenko, V V; Olszewski, S V; Naumov, V V; Prysiazhnevych, I V; Solomenko, E V; Demchina, V P; Kudryavtsev, V S

    2008-01-01

    The complex theoretical and experimental investigation of plasma kinetics of the electric discharge in the mixture of air and ethanol-water vapors is carried out. The discharge was burning in the cavity, formed by air jets pumping between electrodes, placed in aqueous ethanol solution. It is found out that the hydrogen yield from the discharge is maximal in the case when ethanol and water in the solution are in equal amounts. It is shown that the hydrogen production increases with the discharge power and reaches the saturation at high value. The concentrations of the main stable gas-phase components, measured experimentally and calculated numerically, agree well in the most cases.

  18. A model based on equations of kinetics to study nitrogen dioxide behavior within a plasma discharge reactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abedi-Varaki, Mehdi; Ganjovi, Alireza; Shojaei, Fahimeh; Hassani, Zahra

    2015-01-01

    In this work, a zero-dimensional kinetics model is used to study the temporal behavior of different species such as charged particles, radicals and excited states inside a Dielectric Barrier Discharge plasma reactor. It is shown that, the reactor significantly reduces the concentration of nitrogen monoxide as an environmental pollutant. After a drastic increase, a decrease in the concentration of the NO2 molecules inside the reactor is seen. Nitrogen monoxide molecules with a very low concentration are produced inside the reactor and its quick conversion to other products is proved. The obtained results are compared with the existing experimental and simulation findings, whenever possible.

  19. Particle-in-cell simulations of the relaxation of electron beams in inhomogeneous solar wind plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thurgood, Jonathan O.; Tsiklauri, David

    2016-12-01

    Previous theoretical considerations of electron beam relaxation in inhomogeneous plasmas have indicated that the effects of the irregular solar wind may account for the poor agreement of homogeneous modelling with the observations. Quasi-linear theory and Hamiltonian models based on Zakharov's equations have indicated that when the level of density fluctuations is above a given threshold, density irregularities act to de-resonate the beam-plasma interaction, restricting Langmuir wave growth on the expense of beam energy. This work presents the first fully kinetic particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations of beam relaxation under the influence of density irregularities. We aim to independently determine the influence of background inhomogeneity on the beam-plasma system, and to test theoretical predictions and alternative models using a fully kinetic treatment. We carry out one-dimensional (1-D) PIC simulations of a bump-on-tail unstable electron beam in the presence of increasing levels of background inhomogeneity using the fully electromagnetic, relativistic EPOCH PIC code. We find that in the case of homogeneous background plasma density, Langmuir wave packets are generated at the resonant condition and then quasi-linear relaxation leads to a dynamic increase of wavenumbers generated. No electron acceleration is seen - unlike in the inhomogeneous experiments, all of which produce high-energy electrons. For the inhomogeneous experiments we also observe the generation of backwards-propagating Langmuir waves, which is shown directly to be due to the refraction of the packets off the density gradients. In the case of higher-amplitude density fluctuations, similar features to the weaker cases are found, but also packets can also deviate from the expected dispersion curve in -space due to nonlinearity. Our fully kinetic PIC simulations broadly confirm the findings of quasi-linear theory and the Hamiltonian model based on Zakharov's equations. Strong density fluctuations

  20. Miniature Dielectric Barrier Discharge Nonthermal Plasma Induces Apoptosis in Lung Cancer Cells and Inhibits Cell Migration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eisenmann, Kathryn M.

    2017-01-01

    Traditional cancer treatments like radiotherapy and chemotherapy have drawbacks and are not selective for killing only cancer cells. Nonthermal atmospheric pressure plasmas with dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) can be applied to living cells and tissues and have emerged as novel tools for localized cancer therapy. The purpose of this study was to investigate the different effects caused by miniature DBD (mDBD) plasma to A549 lung cancer cells. In this study, A549 lung cancer cells cultured in 12 well plates were treated with mDBD plasma for specified treatment times to assess the changes in the size of the area of cell detachment, the viability of attached or detached cells, and cell migration. Furthermore, we investigated an innovative mDBD plasma-based therapy for localized treatment of lung cancer cells through apoptotic induction. Our results indicate that plasma treatment for 120 sec causes apoptotic cell death in 35.8% of cells, while mDBD plasma treatment for 60 sec, 30 sec, or 15 sec causes apoptotic cell death in 20.5%, 14.1%, and 6.3% of the cell population, respectively. Additionally, we observed reduced A549 cell migration in response to mDBD plasma treatment. Thus, mDBD plasma system can be a viable platform for localized lung cancer therapy. PMID:28243603

  1. Kinetic full wave analyses of O-X-B mode conversion of EC waves in tokamak plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukuyama, Atsushi; Khan, Shabbir Ahmad; Igami, Hiroe; Idei, Hiroshi

    2016-10-01

    For heating and current drive in a high-density plasma of tokamak, especially spherical tokamak, the use of electron Bernstein waves and the O-X-B mode conversion were proposed and experimental observations have been reported. In order to evaluate the power deposition profile and the current drive efficiency, kinetic full wave analysis using an integral form of dielectric tensor has been developed. The incident angle dependence of wave structure and O-X-B mode conversion efficiency is examined using one-dimensional analysis in the major radius direction. Two-dimensional analyses on the horizontal plane and the poloidal plane are also conducted, and the wave structure and the power deposition profile are compared with those of previous analyses using ray tracing method and cold plasma approximation. This work is supported by JSPS KAKENHI Grant Number JP26630471.

  2. Collisionless and Kinetic Phenomena of Interpenetrating Plasma Streams via Neutron Self-Emission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, J. S.; Higginson, D. P.; Hatarik, R.; Link, A.; Park, H.-S.; Ryutov, D. D.; Weber, S. V.; Wilks, S. C.; Fiuza, F.; Li, C. K.; Sio, H.; Zylstra, A. B.

    2016-10-01

    Recent NIF experiments focus on the generation and diagnosis of collisionless shocks relevant to astrophysical phenomena such as supernova remnants and gamma ray bursts. In the experiments, two opposing CD laser-generated plasmas flow into each other at high velocity ( 1000 km/s). As the ion-ion collisional mean-free-path is near to or greater than the system size, the flows interpenetrate and neutrons are generated via beam-beam deuteron interactions. We model this system using the hybrid particle-in-cell code LSP with electric and magnetic fields suppressed to capture the full temporal and spatial size of the experiment. These simulations show good agreement with the yield, spectrum and spatial/temporal profiles of the neutrons observed in the experiment. When one CD foil is replaced with CH an asymmetry develops in the neutron spectrum that is caused by the Doppler shift related to the flow velocity. Additionally, in this case the neutron yield is found to be lower in the simulations than is observed experimentally, which indicates that the deuterons thermalize more efficiently in the experiment. This suggests that another mechanism is responsible for this yield enhancement other than small angle scattering since it is included in the simulations. Possible mechanisms such as scattering across Weibel-mediated magnetic filaments and large-angle Coulomb scattering will be evaluated and discussed. Prepared by LLNL under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  3. CD27-triggering on primary plasma cell leukaemia cells has anti-apoptotic effects involving mitogen activated protein kinases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Guikema, JEJ; Vellenga, E; Abdulahad, WH; Hovenga, S; Bos, NA

    2004-01-01

    Primary plasma cell leukaemia (PCL) is a rare plasma cell malignancy, which is related to multiple myeloma (MM) and is characterized by a poor prognosis. In a previous study we demonstrated that PCL plasma cells display a high expression of CD27, in contrast to MM plasma cells. The present study was

  4. The singing comet 67P: utilizing fully kinetic simulations to study its interaction with the solar wind plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deca, J.; Divin, A. V.; Horanyi, M.; Henri, P.

    2016-12-01

    We present preliminary results of the first 3-D fully kinetic and electromagnetic simulations of the solar wind interaction with 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko at 3 AU, before the comet transitions into its high-activity phase. We focus on the global cometary environment and the electron-kinetic activity of the interaction. In addition to the background solar wind plasma flow, our model includes also plasma-driven ionization of cometary neutrals and collisional effects. We approximate mass loading of cold cometary oxygen and hydrogen using a hyperbolic relation with distance to the comet. We consider two primary cases: a weak outgassing comet (with the peak ion density 10x the solar wind density) and a moderately outgassing comet (with the peak ion density 50x the solar wind density). The weak comet is characterized by the formation of a narrow region containing a compressed solar wind (the density of the solar wind ion population is 3x the value far upstream of the comet) and a magnetic barrier ( 2x to 4x the interplanetary magnetic field). Blobs of plasma are detached continuously from this sheath region. Standing electromagnetic waves are excited in the cometary wake due to a strong anisotropy in the plasma pressure, as the density and the magnetic field magnitude are anti-correlated.The moderate mass-loading case shows more dynamics at the dayside region. The stagnation of the solar wind flow is accompanied by the formation of elongated density stripes, indicating the presence of a Rayleigh-Taylor instability. These density cavities are elongated in the direction of the magnetic field and encompass the dayside ionopause. To conclude, we believe that our results provide vital information to disentangle the observations made by the Rosetta spacecraft and compose a global solar wind - comet interaction model.

  5. Kinetic mechanism of molecular energy transfer and chemical reactions in low-temperature air-fuel plasmas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adamovich, Igor V; Li, Ting; Lempert, Walter R

    2015-08-13

    This work describes the kinetic mechanism of coupled molecular energy transfer and chemical reactions in low-temperature air, H2-air and hydrocarbon-air plasmas sustained by nanosecond pulse discharges (single-pulse or repetitive pulse burst). The model incorporates electron impact processes, state-specific N(2) vibrational energy transfer, reactions of excited electronic species of N(2), O(2), N and O, and 'conventional' chemical reactions (Konnov mechanism). Effects of diffusion and conduction heat transfer, energy coupled to the cathode layer and gasdynamic compression/expansion are incorporated as quasi-zero-dimensional corrections. The model is exercised using a combination of freeware (Bolsig+) and commercial software (ChemKin-Pro). The model predictions are validated using time-resolved measurements of temperature and N(2) vibrational level populations in nanosecond pulse discharges in air in plane-to-plane and sphere-to-sphere geometry; temperature and OH number density after nanosecond pulse burst discharges in lean H(2)-air, CH(4)-air and C(2)H(4)-air mixtures; and temperature after the nanosecond pulse discharge burst during plasma-assisted ignition of lean H2-mixtures, showing good agreement with the data. The model predictions for OH number density in lean C(3)H(8)-air mixtures differ from the experimental results, over-predicting its absolute value and failing to predict transient OH rise and decay after the discharge burst. The agreement with the data for C(3)H(8)-air is improved considerably if a different conventional hydrocarbon chemistry reaction set (LLNL methane-n-butane flame mechanism) is used. The results of mechanism validation demonstrate its applicability for analysis of plasma chemical oxidation and ignition of low-temperature H(2)-air, CH(4)-air and C(2)H(4)-air mixtures using nanosecond pulse discharges. Kinetic modelling of low-temperature plasma excited propane-air mixtures demonstrates the need for development of a more accurate

  6. Source of dietary protein influences kinetics of plasma gut regulatory peptide concentration in response to feeding in preruminant calves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    le Huërou-Luron, I; Gestin, M; Le Dréan, G; Romé, V; Bernard, C; Chayvialle, J A; Guilloteau, P

    1998-03-01

    The kinetics of the peripheral plasma concentrations of eight gut regulatory peptides were examined in response to feeding in preruminant calves. Two experiments were carried out in animals fed milk substitutes either based on milk protein (control diet) or in which casein had been replaced by hydrolyzed fish (fish diet in experiment 1) or whey (whey diet in experiment 2) protein concentrate. In contrast to the control diet, the latter two did not coagulate within the abomasum. No variation was observed in plasma concentrations of gut regulatory peptides during 1-1.4 hr before the morning meal regardless of the nature of the dietary protein. With the control diet, the meal was followed by an increase in cholecystokinin, gastrin and gastric inhibitory polypeptide and a fall in secretin, vasoactive intestinal polypeptide and motilin, whereas no significant change was observed for somatostatin and pancreatic polypeptide. The replacement of casein by protein substitutes did not greatly modify the pattern of plasma responses to feeding, but the prefeeding and postfeeding levels were highly affected. We conclude that the most important characteristic influencing plasma gut peptide concentrations is the ability of dietary protein to clot in the abomasum, consequently determining the pattern of gastric emptying, and that variations appear depending on the origin of protein substitutes in relation to the duodenal content and mainly to the digesta pH.

  7. A non-LTE kinetic model for quick analysis of K-shell spectra from Z-pinch plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, J., E-mail: s.duan@163.com; Huang, X. B., E-mail: s.duan@163.com; Cai, H. C., E-mail: s.duan@163.com; Yang, L. B., E-mail: s.duan@163.com; Xie, W. P., E-mail: s.duan@163.com; Duan, S. C., E-mail: s.duan@163.com [Key Lab of Pulsed Power, Institute of Fluid Physics, CAEP, P.O. Box 919-108, Mianyang, Sichuan 621999 (China)

    2014-12-15

    Analyzing and modeling K-shell spectra emitted by low-to moderate-atomic number plasma is a useful and effective way to retrieve temperature density of z-pinch plasmas. In this paper, a non-LTE population kinetic model for quick analysis of K-shell spectra was proposed. The model contains ionization stages from bare nucleus to neutral atoms and includes all the important atomic processes. In the present form of the model, the plasma is assumed to be both optically thin and homogeneous with constant temperature and density, and only steady-state situation is considered. According to the detailed calculations for aluminum plasmas, contours of ratios of certain K-shell lines in electron temperature and density plane as well as typical synthesized spectra were presented and discussed. The usefulness of the model is demonstrated by analyzing the spectrum from a neon gas-puff Z-pinch experiment performed on a 1 MA pulsed-power accelerator.

  8. Biomedical Applications of the Cold Atmospheric Plasma: Cell Responses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volotskova, Olga

    Current breakthrough research on cold atmospheric plasma (CAP) demonstrates that CAP has great potential in various areas, including medicine and biology, thus providing a new tool for living tissue treatment. Depending on the configuration the cold plasma sources can be used in the following areas: wound healing, skin diseases, hospital hygiene, sterilization, antifungal treatments, dental care, cosmetics targeted cell/tissue removal, and cancer treatments. This dissertation is focused on the studies of biomedical applications of cold atmospheric plasma jet based on helium flow and resultant cell responses to the cold plasma treatment. The studies were carried out on extra-cellular and intra-cellular levels in vitro. The main practical applications are wound healing and alternative to existing cancer therapy methods, areas of great interest and significant challenges. The CAP jet was built in the Micropropulsion and Nanotechnology Laboratory of Dr. Michael Keidar, as a part of multidisciplinary collaboration with the GW Medical School (Dr. M.A. Stepp) concerned with plasma medicine and bioengineering studies. Normal and cancer cells have two fundamental behavioral properties, proliferation and motility, which can be evaluated through cell migration rates and cell cycle progression. Various microscopic, spectroscopic and flow cytometry techniques were used to characterize cell responses to the cold plasma treatment. It was found that CAP effect on the cells is localized within the area of the treatment (of around ˜ 5mm in diameter). The migration rates of the normal skin cells can be reduced up to ˜ 40%. However, depending on the cell type the required treatment time is different, thus differential treatment of various cells presented in tissue is possible. The CAP effect on the migration was explained through the changes of the cell surface proteins/integrins. It was also found that normal and cancer cells respond differently to the CAP treatment under the same

  9. A New Kinetic Simulation Model with Self-Consistent Calculation of Regolith Layer Charging for Moon-Plasma Interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, D.; Wang, J.

    2015-12-01

    The moon-plasma interactions and the resulting surface charging have been subjects of extensive recent investigations. While many particle-in-cell (PIC) based simulation models have been developed, all existing PIC simulation models treat the surface of the Moon as a boundary condition to the plasma flow. In such models, the surface of the Moon is typically limited to simple geometry configurations, the surface floating potential is calculated from a simplified current balance condition, and the electric field inside the regolith layer cannot be resolved. This paper presents a new full particle PIC model to simulate local scale plasma flow and surface charging. A major feature of this new model is that the surface is treated as an "interface" between two mediums rather than a boundary, and the simulation domain includes not only the plasma but also the regolith layer and the bedrock underneath it. There are no limitations on the surface shape. An immersed-finite-element field solver is applied which calculates the regolith surface floating potential and the electric field inside the regolith layer directly from local charge deposition. The material property of the regolith layer is also explicitly included in simulation. This new model is capable of providing a self-consistent solution to the plasma flow field, lunar surface charging, the electric field inside the regolith layer and the bedrock for realistic surface terrain. This new model is applied to simulate lunar surface-plasma interactions and surface charging under various ambient plasma conditions. The focus is on the lunar terminator region, where the combined effects from the low sun elevation angle and the localized plasma wake generated by plasma flow over a rugged terrain can generate strongly differentially charged surfaces and complex dust dynamics. We discuss the effects of the regolith properties and regolith layer charging on the plasma flow field, dust levitation, and dust transport.

  10. B cells and plasma cells in coronaries of chronically rejected cardiac transplants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wehner, Jennifer R; Fox-Talbot, Karen; Halushka, Marc K; Ellis, Carla; Zachary, Andrea A; Baldwin, William M

    2010-05-15

    BACKGROUND.: Previously, we reported that transcripts of immunoglobulins were increased in coronary arteries dissected from cardiac transplants with arteriopathy, but the prevelance and patterns of B cell and plasma cell infiltration in cardiac allografts has not been documented. METHODS.: In this study, we documented the frequency and distribution of B cells and plasma cells in 16 cardiac transplants with advanced chronic rejection that were explanted during a second transplant procedure. Coronary arteries with pathologically confirmed allograft vasculopathy and controls with native atherosclerosis were immunohistologically stained for markers of T cells, B cells, plasma cells, IgG subclasses, C4d, CD21, and CXCL13. RESULTS.: We found that B cells and plasma cells were prevalent in most of the samples analyzed (14 of 16) and were distributed in three patterns: adventitial nodules, diffuse adventitial infiltrates, and neointimal infiltrates. These cells were found most frequently in nodules, some of which had distinct compartmentalization and granular C4d deposits on follicular dendritic cells (FDCs) that typify tertiary lymphoid nodules. FDCs also stained for CD21 and CXCL13. Diffuse infiltrates of B cells and plasma cells were found in fibrotic areas of the neointima and adventitia. Only a minority of control coronaries with atherosclerosis contained B cells. CONCLUSIONS.: B cells and plasma cell infiltrates are consistent findings in and around coronary arteries with allograft vasculopathy and are significantly more frequent than in coronaries with native atherosclerosis. The presence of C4d on FDCs in tertiary lymphoid nodules suggests active antigen presentation.

  11. Osteoblastlike cell adhesion on titanium surfaces modified by plasma nitriding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Silva, Jose Sandro Pereira; Amico, Sandro Campos; Rodrigues, Almir Olegario Neves; Barboza, Carlos Augusto Galvao; Alves, Clodomiro; Croci, Alberto Tesconi

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the characteristics of various titanium surfaces modified by cold plasma nitriding in terms of adhesion and proliferation of rat osteoblastlike cells. Samples of grade 2 titanium were subjected to three different surface modification processes: polishing, nitriding by plasma direct current, and nitriding by cathodic cage discharge. To evaluate the effect of the surface treatment on the cellular response, the adhesion and proliferation of osteoblastlike cells (MC3T3) were quantified and the results were analyzed by Kruskal-Wallis and Friedman statistical tests. Cellular morphology was observed by scanning electron microscopy. There was more MC3T3 cell attachment on the rougher surfaces produced by cathodic cage discharge compared with polished samples (P Plasma nitriding improves titanium surface roughness and wettability, leading to osteoblastlike cell adhesion.

  12. CD138-negative clonogenic cells are plasma cells but not B cells in some multiple myeloma patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosen, N; Matsuoka, Y; Kishida, S; Nakata, J; Mizutani, Y; Hasegawa, K; Mugitani, A; Ichihara, H; Aoyama, Y; Nishida, S; Tsuboi, A; Fujiki, F; Tatsumi, N; Nakajima, H; Hino, M; Kimura, T; Yata, K; Abe, M; Oka, Y; Oji, Y; Kumanogoh, A; Sugiyama, H

    2012-09-01

    Clonogenic multiple myeloma (MM) cells reportedly lacked expression of plasma cell marker CD138. It was also shown that CD19(+) clonotypic B cells can serve as MM progenitor cells in some patients. However, it is unclear whether CD138-negative clonogenic MM plasma cells are identical to clonotypic CD19(+) B cells. We found that in vitro MM colony-forming cells were enriched in CD138(-)CD19(-)CD38(++) plasma cells, while CD19(+) B cells never formed MM colonies in 16 samples examined in this study. We next used the SCID-rab model, which enables engraftment of human MM in vivo. CD138(-)CD19(-)CD38(++) plasma cells engrafted in this model rapidly propagated MM in 3 out of 9 cases, while no engraftment of CD19(+) B cells was detected. In 4 out of 9 cases, CD138(+) plasma cells propagated MM, although more slowly than CD138(-) cells. Finally, we transplanted CD19(+) B cells from 13 MM patients into NOD/SCID IL2Rγc(-/-) mice, but MM did not develop. These results suggest that at least in some MM patients CD138-negative clonogenic cells are plasma cells rather than B cells, and that MM plasma cells including CD138(-) and CD138(+) cells have the potential to propagate MM clones in vivo in the absence of CD19(+) B cells.

  13. Excitation of kinetic geodesic acoustic modes by drift waves in nonuniform plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qiu, Z. [Inst. Fusion Theory and Simulation, Zhejiang Univ., Hangzhou 310027 (China); Chen, L. [Inst. Fusion Theory and Simulation, Zhejiang Univ., Hangzhou 310027 (China); Dept. Physics and Astronomy, Univ. of California, Irvine, California 92697-4575 (United States); Zonca, F. [Inst. Fusion Theory and Simulation, Zhejiang Univ., Hangzhou 310027 (China); Associazione Euratom-ENEA sulla Fusione, C.P. 65 - I-00044 - Frascati (Italy)

    2014-02-15

    Effects of system nonuniformities and kinetic dispersiveness on the spontaneous excitation of Geodesic Acoustic Mode (GAM) by Drift Wave (DW) turbulence are investigated based on nonlinear gyrokinetic theory. The coupled nonlinear equations describing parametric decay of DW into GAM and DW lower sideband are derived and then solved both analytically and numerically to investigate the effects on the parametric decay process due to system nonuniformities, such as nonuniform diamagnetic frequency, finite radial envelope of DW pump, and kinetic dispersiveness. It is found that the parametric decay process is a convective instability for typical tokamak parameters when finite group velocities of DW and GAM associated with kinetic dispersiveness and finite radial envelope are taken into account. When, however, nonuniformity of diamagnetic frequency is taken into account, the parametric decay process becomes, time asymptotically, a quasi-exponentially growing absolute instability.

  14. Leukocyte-Reduced Platelet-Rich Plasma Alters Protein Expression of Adipose Tissue-Derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loibl, Markus; Lang, Siegmund; Hanke, Alexander; Herrmann, Marietta; Huber, Michaela; Brockhoff, Gero; Klein, Silvan; Nerlich, Michael; Angele, Peter; Prantl, Lukas; Gehmert, Sebastian

    2016-08-01

    Application of platelet-rich plasma and stem cells has become important in regenerative medicine. Recent literature supports the use of platelet-rich plasma as a cell culture media supplement to stimulate proliferation of adipose tissue-derived mesenchymal stem cells. The underlying mechanism of proliferation stimulation by platelet-rich plasma has not been investigated so far. Adipose tissue-derived mesenchymal stem cells were cultured in α-minimal essential medium supplemented with platelet-rich plasma or fetal calf serum. Cell proliferation was assessed with cell cycle kinetics using flow cytometric analyses after 48 hours. Differences in proteome expression of the adipose tissue-derived mesenchymal stem cells were analyzed using a reverse-phase protein array to quantify 214 proteins. Complementary Ingenuity Pathways Analysis and gene set enrichment analysis were performed using protein data, and confirmed by Western blot analysis. A higher percentage of adipose tissue-derived mesenchymal stem cells in the S phase in the presence of platelet-rich plasma advocates the proliferation stimulation. Ingenuity Pathways Analysis and gene set enrichment analysis confirm the involvement of the selected proteins in the process of cell growth and proliferation. Ingenuity Pathways Analysis revealed a participation in the top-ranked canonical pathways PI3K/AKT, PTEN, ILK, and IGF-1. Gene set enrichment analysis identified the authors' protein set as being part of significantly regulated protein sets with the focus on cell cycle, metabolism, and the Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes transforming growth factor-β signaling pathway. The present study provides evidence that platelet-rich plasma stimulates proliferation and induces a unique change in the proteomic profile of adipose tissue-derived mesenchymal stem cells. The interpretation of altered expression of regulatory proteins represents a step forward toward achieving good manufacturing practice-compliant criteria

  15. High-throughput quantitative analysis with cell growth kinetic curves for low copy number mutant cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xing, James Z; Gabos, Stephan; Huang, Biao; Pan, Tianhong; Huang, Min; Chen, Jie

    2012-10-01

    The mutation rate in cells induced by environmental genotoxic hazards is very low and difficult to detect using traditional cell counting assays. The established genetic toxicity tests currently recognized by regulatory authorities, such as conventional Ames and hypoxanthine guanine phosphoribosyl-transferase (HPRT) assays, are not well suited for higher-throughput screening as they require large amounts of test compounds and are very time consuming. In this study, we developed a novel cell-based assay for quantitative analysis of low numbers of cell copies with HPRT mutation induced by an environmental mutagen. The HPRT gene mutant cells induced by the mutagen were selected by 6-thioguanine (6-TG) and the cell's kinetic growth curve monitored by a real-time cell electronic sensor (RT-CES) system. When a threshold is set at a certain cell index (CI) level, samples with different initial mutant cell copies take different amounts of time in order for their growth (or CI accumulation) to cross this threshold. The more cells that are initially seeded in the test well, the faster the cell accumulation and therefore the shorter the time required to cross this threshold. Therefore, the culture time period required to cross the threshold of each sample corresponds to the original number of cells in the sample. A mutant cell growth time threshold (MT) value of each sample can be calculated to predict the number of original mutant cells. For mutagenesis determination, the RT-CES assay displayed an equal sensitivity (p > 0.05) and coefficients of variation values with good correlation to conventional HPRT mutagenic assays. Most importantly, the RT-CES mutation assay has a higher throughput than conventional cellular assays.

  16. Effects of Nonequilibrium Plasmas on Eukaryotic Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-05-01

    with cellulosic plates under their cell membrane, the diatom C. hystrix has a siliceous cell wall and organic layer, while A. sanguinea is an...unarmored (naked) dinoflagellate, i.e. without the cellulosic plates (see SEM micrographs below). Some non-motile cells recovered their motility and...formed a somewhat reticulate or porous structure as a cell covering. In the A. sanguinea sample where pH was adjusted to 3.0 (corresponds to the pH

  17. Kinetics of antibody-induced modulation of respiratory syncytial virus antigens in a human epithelial cell line

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gómez-Garcia Beatriz

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The binding of viral-specific antibodies to cell-surface antigens usually results in down modulation of the antigen through redistribution of antigens into patches that subsequently may be internalized by endocytosis or may form caps that can be expelled to the extracellular space. Here, by use of confocal-laser-scanning microscopy we investigated the kinetics of the modulation of respiratory syncytial virus (RSV antigen by RSV-specific IgG. RSV-infected human epithelial cells (HEp-2 were incubated with anti-RSV polyclonal IgG and, at various incubation times, the RSV-cell-surface-antigen-antibody complexes (RSV Ag-Abs and intracellular viral proteins were detected by indirect immunoflourescence. Results Interaction of anti-RSV polyclonal IgG with RSV HEp-2 infected cells induced relocalization and aggregation of viral glycoproteins in the plasma membrane formed patches that subsequently produced caps or were internalized through clathrin-mediated endocytosis participation. Moreover, the concentration of cell surface RSV Ag-Abs and intracellular viral proteins showed a time dependent cyclic variation and that anti-RSV IgG protected HEp-2 cells from viral-induced death. Conclusion The results from this study indicate that interaction between RSV cell surface proteins and specific viral antibodies alter the expression of viral antigens expressed on the cells surface and intracellular viral proteins; furthermore, interfere with viral induced destruction of the cell.

  18. Role of Convective Cells in Nonlinear Interaction of Kinetic Alfven Waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luk, Onnie

    The convective cells are observed in the auroral ionosphere and they could play an important role in the nonlinear interaction of Alfven waves and disrupt the kinetic Alfven wave (KAW) turbulence. Zonal fields, which are analogous to convective cells, are generated by microturbulence and regulate microturbulence inside toroidally confined plasmas. It is important to understand the role of convective cells in the nonlinear interaction of KAW leading to perpendicular cascade of spectral energy. A nonlinear gyrokinetic particle simulation has been developed to study the perpendicular spectral cascade of kinetic Alfven wave. However, convective cells were excluded in the study. In this thesis project, we have modified the formulation to implement the convective cells to study their role in the nonlinear interactions of KAW. This thesis contains detail description of the code formulation and convergence tests performed, and the simulation results on the role of convective cells in the nonlinear interactions of KAW. In the single KAW pump wave simulations, we observed the pump wave energy cascades to waves with shorter wavelengths, with three of them as dominant daughter waves. Convective cells are among those dominant daughter waves and they enhance the rate of energy transfer from pump to daughter waves. When zonal fields are present, the growth rates of the dominant daughter waves are doubled. The convective cell (zonal flow) of the zonal fields is shown to play a major role in the nonlinear wave interaction, while the linear zonal vector potential has little effects. The growth rates of the daughter waves linearly depends on the pump wave amplitude and the square of perpendicular wavenumber. On the other hand, the growth rates do not depend on the parallel wavenumber in the limit where the parallel wavenumber is much smaller than the perpendicular wavenumber. The nonlinear wave interactions with various perpendicular wavenumbers are also studied in this work. When

  19. Kinetic parameters and intraindividual fluctuations of ochratoxin A plasma levels in humans

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Studer-Rohr, I. [Inst. of Toxicology, Swiss Federal Inst. of Tech. and Univ. of Zurich, Schwerzenbach (Switzerland); Dept. of Food Science, Swiss Federal Inst. of Tech., Zurich (Switzerland); Schlatter, J. [Toxicology Section, Div. of Food Science, Swiss Federal Office of Public Health, Zurich (Switzerland); Dietrich, D.R. [Dept. of Environmental Toxicology, Univ. of Konstanz, Konstanz (Germany); Inst. of Toxicology, Swiss Federal Inst. of Tech. and Univ. of Zurich, Schwerzenbach (Switzerland)

    2000-11-01

    The mycotoxin ochratoxin A (OTA) is a rodent carcinogen produced by species of the ubiquitous fungal genera Aspergillus and Penicillium. OTA is found in a variety of food items and as a consequence is also found in human plasma (average concentrations found in this study: 0.1-1 ng OTA/ml plasma). To improve the scientific basis for cancer risk assessment the toxicokinetic profile of OTA was studied in one human volunteer following ingestion of 395 ng {sup 3}H-labeled OTA (3.8 {mu}Ci). A two-compartment open model consisting of a central compartment was found to best describe the in vivo data. This two-compartment model consisted of a fast elimination and distribution phase (T{sub 1/2} about 20 h) followed by a slow elimination phase (renal clearance about 0.11 ml/min.) and a calculated plasma half-life of 35.55 days. This half-life was approximately eight times longer than that determined previously in rats. In addition, the intraindividual fluctuation of OTA plasma levels was investigated in eight individuals over a period of 2 months. The concentrations determined ranged between 0.2 and 0.9 ng OTA/ml plasma. The plasma levels in some individuals remained nearly constant over time, while others varied considerably (e.g. increase of 0.4 ng/ml within 3 days, decrease of 0.3 ng/ml within 5 days) during the observation period. This intraindividual fluctuation in OTA plasma levels, which may represent differences in OTA exposure and/or metabolism, as well as the large difference in plasma half-life in humans compared to rats must be taken into consideration when the results of rat cancer study data are extrapolated to humans for risk assessment purposes. (orig.)

  20. Continuum Kinetic Model for Simulating Low-Collisionality Regimes in Plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-01

    properties for non -linear plasma phenomena require further investigation. VII. CONCLUSIONS A fourth order accurate algorithm in space and time has been...theory, each particle species is treated as a distribution function evolving in position-velocity phase space . For a collisionless plasma , the evolution... Maxwellian distribution in velocity space with a small position-dependent perturbation: f(x, v)|t=0 = 1√ 2π exp ( −v 2 2 ) (1 + a cos(kx)) , (16) with

  1. Roles of cell and microvillus deformation and receptor-ligand binding kinetics in cell rolling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pawar, Parag; Jadhav, Sameer; Eggleton, Charles D; Konstantopoulos, Konstantinos

    2008-10-01

    Polymorphonuclear leukocyte (PMN) recruitment to sites of inflammation is initiated by selectin-mediated PMN tethering and rolling on activated endothelium under flow. Cell rolling is modulated by bulk cell deformation (mesoscale), microvillus deformability (microscale), and receptor-ligand binding kinetics (nanoscale). Selectin-ligand bonds exhibit a catch-slip bond behavior, and their dissociation is governed not only by the force but also by the force history. Whereas previous theoretical models have studied the significance of these three "length scales" in isolation, how their interplay affects cell rolling has yet to be resolved. We therefore developed a three-dimensional computational model that integrates the aforementioned length scales to delineate their relative contributions to PMN rolling. Our simulations predict that the catch-slip bond behavior and to a lesser extent bulk cell deformation are responsible for the shear threshold phenomenon. Cells bearing deformable rather than rigid microvilli roll slower only at high P-selectin site densities and elevated levels of shear (>or=400 s(-1)). The more compliant cells (membrane stiffness=1.2 dyn/cm) rolled slower than cells with a membrane stiffness of 3.0 dyn/cm at shear rates >50 s(-1). In summary, our model demonstrates that cell rolling over a ligand-coated surface is a highly coordinated process characterized by a complex interplay between forces acting on three distinct length scales.

  2. Anti-cancer efficacy of nonthermal plasma dissolved in a liquid, liquid plasma in heterogeneous cancer cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Ngoc Hoan; Park, Hyung Jun; Yang, Sang Sik; Choi, Kyeong Sook; Lee, Jong-Soo

    2016-07-01

    The therapeutic potential of nonthermal plasma for cancer treatment has been reported recently. The heterogeneity of cancer cells need to be addressed to design effective anticancer treatments. Here, we show that treatment with nonthermal atmospheric-pressure plasma dissolved in a liquid (liquid plasma) induces oxidative stress in heterogeneous populations of cancer cells and ultimately kills these cells via apoptosis, regardless of genetic status, e.g., mutations in p53 and other DNA-damage-response genes. We found that liquid plasma markedly increased the concentration of intracellular and mitochondrial reactive oxygen species (ROS), reflecting an influx from the extracellular milieu. Liquid plasma contributed to mitochondrial accumulation of ROS and depolarization of mitochondrial membrane potential with consequent cell death. Healthy normal cells, however, were hardly affected by the liquid-plasma treatment. The antioxidant N-acetylcysteine blocked liquid-plasma-induced cell death. A knockdown of CuZn-superoxide dismutase or Mn-SOD enhanced the plasma-induced cell death, whereas expression of exogenous CuZn-SOD, Mn-SOD, or catalase blocked the cell death. These results suggest that the mitochondrial dysfunction mediated by ROS production is a key contributor to liquid-plasma-induced apoptotic cell death, regardless of genetic variation. Thus, liquid plasma may have clinical applications, e.g., the development of therapeutic strategies and prevention of disease progression despite tumor heterogeneity.

  3. Quantifying cell binding kinetics mediated by surface-bound blood type B antigen to immobilized antibodies

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI BaoXia; CHEN Juan; LONG Mian

    2008-01-01

    Cell adhesion is crucial to many biological processes, such as inflammatory responses, tumor metastasis and thrombosis formation. Recently a commercial surface plasmon resonance (SPR)-based BIAcore biosensor has been extended to determine cell binding mediated by surface-bound biomolecular interactions. How such cell binding is quantitatively governed by kinetic rates and regulating factors, however, has been poorly understood. Here we developed a novel assay to determine the binding kinetics of surface-bound biomolecular interactions using a commercial BIAcore 3000 biosensor. Human red blood cells (RBCs) presenting blood group B antigen and CM5 chip bearing immobilized anti-B monoclonal antibody (mAb) were used to obtain the time courses of response unit, or sensorgrams, when flowing RBCs over the chip surface. A cellular kinetic model was proposed to correlate the sensorgrams with kinetic rates. Impacts of regulating factors, such as cell concentration,flow duration and rate, antibody-presenting level, as well as Ph value and osmotic pressure of suspending medium were tested systematically, which imparted the confidence that the approach can be applied to kinetic measurements of cell adhesion mediated by surface-bound biomolecular interactions.These results provided a new insight into quantifying cell binding using a commercial SPR-based BIAcore biosensor.

  4. A particle-in-cell plus Monte Carlo study of plasma-induced damage of normal incidence collector optics used in extreme ultraviolet lithography

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wieggers, R. C.; W. J. Goedheer,; M.R. Akdim,; F. Bijkerk,; Zegeling, P. A.

    2008-01-01

    We present a kinetic simulation of the plasma formed by photoionization in the intense flux of an extreme ultraviolet lithography (EUVL) light source. The model is based on the particle-in-cell plus Monte Carlo approach. The photoelectric effect and ionization by electron collisions are included. Th

  5. Plasma cell gingivitis associated with cheilitis: A diagnostic dilemma!

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Presanthila Janam

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Plasma cell gingivitis is a rare condition characterized by diffuse and massive infiltration of plasma cells into the sub-epithelial connective tissue. Clinically, it appears as a diffuse reddening and edematous swelling of the gingiva with a sharp demarcation along the mucogingival border. Though considered as a hypersensitive reaction to an allergen, the etiology of this bizarre condition is still not properly understood. Here, we present an interesting case of plasma cell gingivitis associated with an enlarged and fissured upper lip, which is quite a rarity. The condition was diagnosed based on clinical and histopathologic findings and treated by gingivectomy. The associated cheilitis has dramatically reduced after treatment of the gingival lesion.

  6. Effect of feeding garlic leaves on rumen fermentation, methane emission, plasma glucose kinetics, and nitrogen utilization in sheep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panthee, Arvinda; Matsuno, Ayana; Al-Mamun, Mohammad; Sano, Hiroaki

    2017-01-01

    Garlic and its constituents are reported to have been effective in reducing methane emission and also influence glucose metabolism in body; however, studies in ruminants using garlic leaves are scarce. Garlic leaves contain similar compounds as garlic bulbs, but are discarded in field after garlic bulb harvest. We speculate that feeding garlic leaves might show similar effect as garlic constituents in sheep and could be potential animal feed supplement. Thus, we examined the effect of freeze dried garlic leaves (FDGL) on rumen fermentation, methane emission, plasma glucose kinetics and nitrogen utilization in sheep. Six sheep were fed Control diet (mixed hay and concentrate (60:40)) or FDGL diet (Control diet supplemented with FDGL at 2.5 g/kg BW(0.75) of sheep) using a crossover design. Methane gas emission was measured using open-circuit respiratory chamber. Plasma glucose turnover rate was measured using isotope dilution technique of [U-(13)C]glucose. Rumen fluid, feces and urine were collected to measure rumen fermentation characteristics and nitrogen utilization. No significant difference in rumen fermentation parameters was noticed except for rumen ammonia tended to be higher (0.05 glucose concentration was similar between diets and plasma glucose turnover rate tended to be higher in FDGL diet (0.05 glucose turnover rate and microbial nitrogen supply, further studies at higher dose would be necessary to conclude the merit of FDGL as supplement in ruminant feedstuff.

  7. Intrinsic Constraint on Plasmablast Growth and Extrinsic Limits of Plasma Cell Survival

    OpenAIRE

    2000-01-01

    B cells recruited into splenic antibody responses grow exponentially, either in extrafollicular foci as plasmablasts, or in follicles where they form germinal centers. Both responses yield plasma cells. Although many splenic plasma cells survive

  8. Kinetic theory of transport processes in partially ionized reactive plasma, II: Electron transport properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhdanov, V. M.; Stepanenko, A. A.

    2016-11-01

    The previously obtained in (Zhdanov and Stepanenko, 2016) general transport equations for partially ionized reactive plasma are employed for analysis of electron transport properties in molecular and atomic plasmas. We account for both elastic and inelastic interaction channels of electrons with atoms and molecules of plasma and also the processes of electron impact ionization of neutral particles and three-body ion-electron recombination. The system of scalar transport equations for electrons is discussed and the expressions for non-equilibrium corrections to electron ionization and recombination rates and the diagonal part of the electron pressure tensor are derived. Special attention is paid to analysis of electron energy relaxation during collisions with plasma particles having internal degrees of freedom and the expression for the electron coefficient of inelastic energy losses is deduced. We also derive the expressions for electron vector and tensorial transport fluxes and the corresponding transport coefficients for partially ionized reactive plasma, which represent a generalization of the well-known results obtained by Devoto (1967). The results of numerical evaluation of contribution from electron inelastic collisions with neutral particles to electron transport properties are presented for a series of molecular and atomic gases.

  9. Human muscle sympathetic nerve activity and plasma noradrenaline kinetics in space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ertl, Andrew C.; Diedrich, Andre; Biaggioni, Italo; Levine, Benjamin D.; Robertson, Rose Marie; Cox, James F.; Zuckerman, Julie H.; Pawelczyk, James A.; Ray, Chester A.; Buckey, Jay C Jr; Lane, Lynda D.; Shiavi, Richard; Gaffney, F. Andrew; Costa, Fernando; Holt, Carol; Blomqvist, C. Gunnar; Eckberg, Dwain L.; Baisch, Friedhelm J.; Robertson, David

    2002-01-01

    Astronauts returning from space have reduced red blood cell masses, hypovolaemia and orthostatic intolerance, marked by greater cardio-acceleration during standing than before spaceflight, and in some, orthostatic hypotension and presyncope. Adaptation of the sympathetic nervous system occurring during spaceflight may be responsible for these postflight alterations. We tested the hypotheses that exposure to microgravity reduces sympathetic neural outflow and impairs sympathetic neural responses to orthostatic stress. We measured heart rate, photoplethysmographic finger arterial pressure, peroneal nerve muscle sympathetic activity and plasma noradrenaline spillover and clearance, in male astronauts before, during (flight day 12 or 13) and after the 16 day Neurolab space shuttle mission. Measurements were made during supine rest and orthostatic stress, as simulated on Earth and in space by 7 min periods of 15 and 30 mmHg lower body suction. Mean (+/- S.E.M.) heart rates before lower body suction were similar pre-flight and in flight. Heart rate responses to -30 mmHg were greater in flight (from 56 +/- 4 to 72 +/- 4 beats min(-1)) than pre-flight (from 56 +/- 4 at rest to 62 +/- 4 beats min(-1), P < 0.05). Noradrenaline spillover and clearance were increased from pre-flight levels during baseline periods and during lower body suction, both in flight (n = 3) and on post-flight days 1 or 2 (n = 5, P < 0.05). In-flight baseline sympathetic nerve activity was increased above pre-flight levels (by 10-33 %) in the same three subjects in whom noradrenaline spillover and clearance were increased. The sympathetic response to 30 mmHg lower body suction was at pre-flight levels or higher in each subject (35 pre-flight vs. 40 bursts min(-1) in flight). No astronaut experienced presyncope during lower body suction in space (or during upright tilt following the Neurolab mission). We conclude that in space, baseline sympathetic neural outflow is increased moderately and sympathetic

  10. Fat oxidation, hormonal and plasma metabolite kinetics during a submaximal incremental test in lean and obese adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lanzi, Stefano; Codecasa, Franco; Cornacchia, Mauro; Maestrini, Sabrina; Salvadori, Alberto; Brunani, Amelia; Malatesta, Davide

    2014-01-01

    This study aimed to compare fat oxidation, hormonal and plasma metabolite kinetics during exercise in lean (L) and obese (O) men. Sixteen L and 16 O men [Body Mass Index (BMI): 22.9 ± 0.3 and 39.0 ± 1.4 kg · m(-2)] performed a submaximal incremental test (Incr) on a cycle-ergometer. Fat oxidation rates (FORs) were determined using indirect calorimetry. A sinusoidal model, including 3 independent variables (dilatation, symmetry, translation), was used to describe fat oxidation kinetics and determine the intensity (Fat(max)) eliciting maximal fat oxidation. Blood samples were drawn for the hormonal and plasma metabolite determination at each step of Incr. FORs (mg · FFM(-1) · min(-1)) were significantly higher from 20 to 30% of peak oxygen uptake (VO2peak) in O than in L and from 65 to 85% VO2peak in L than in O (p ≤ 0.05). FORs were similar in O and in L from 35 to 60% VO2peak. Fat max was 17% significantly lower in O than in L (p<0.01). Fat oxidation kinetics were characterized by similar translation, significantly lower dilatation and left-shift symmetry in O compared with L (p<0.05). During whole exercise, a blunted lipolysis was found in O [lower glycerol/fat mass (FM) in O than in L (p ≤ 0.001)], likely associated with higher insulin concentrations in O than in L (p<0.01). Non-esterified fatty acids (NEFA) were significantly higher in O compared with L (p<0.05). Despite the blunted lipolysis, O presented higher NEFA availability, likely due to larger amounts of FM. Therefore, a lower Fat(max), a left-shifted and less dilated curve and a lower reliance on fat oxidation at high exercise intensities suggest that the difference in the fat oxidation kinetics is likely linked to impaired muscular capacity to oxidize NEFA in O. These results may have important implications for the appropriate exercise intensity prescription in training programs designed to optimize fat oxidation in O.

  11. Electrode Kinetics and Gas Conversion in Solid Oxide Cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Njodzefon, Jean-Claude

    for operation in the different fuels, operation temperature and operation modes it is important to understand the kinetics of the SOC electrodes. This thesis was aimed at understanding the kinetics of the SOC under different operation conditions of temperature, polarization, and fuel mixture. For investigations...... conditions of temperature and current density nano particles were also found on Ni particles, identified as ZrO2 and attributed the major cause of fuel electrode ageing. In cyclic operation these enhancing conditions were not maintained long-enough for severe nickel precipitation. It is known...... compared well with those reported in literature and their evolution with temperature was similar to that reported in literature based on porous Ni/YSZ fuel electrodes. From the two investigated oxygen electrodes, the higher performing (La0.6Sr0.4)0.99CoO3/Ce0.9Gd0.1O1.95 (LSC/CGO) oxygen electrode showed...

  12. Influence of flotation cell volume and solids mass on kinetics of sulfide ore flotation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Plawski Michal

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents studies on the influence of flotation cell capacity and mass of solids in the suspension on the flotation kinetics of sulfide copper ore. A sample of copper ore that was collected from the Polkowice Mine of KGHM Polska Miedz S.A. in Poland was used in the experiments. It was determined that neither the volume of flotation cell nor the mass of solids had influence on the type of kinetics equation of flotation. Copper-bearing minerals floated according to the second-order equation, while the remaining components according to the first-order equation. The kinetic rate constants and maximum recovery of the studied components decreased with increasing solids mass in the flotation cell, regardless of the capacity of the cell. The best results were obtained for tests using a 1.0 dm3 cell, while the less favorable kinetics results were observed in the test with the smallest cell of 0.75 dm3 volume. The obtained results can be helpful in choosing the most appropriate methodology of upgrading the sulfide copper ore from Poland in order to obtain the best kinetics results.

  13. Flow-Induced New Channels of Energy Exchange in Multi-Scale Plasma Dynamics – Revisiting Perturbative Hybrid Kinetic-MHD Theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiraishi, Junya; Miyato, Naoaki; Matsunaga, Go

    2016-01-01

    It is found that new channels of energy exchange between macro- and microscopic dynamics exist in plasmas. They are induced by macroscopic plasma flow. This finding is based on the kinetic-magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) theory, which analyses interaction between macroscopic (MHD-scale) motion and microscopic (particle-scale) dynamics. The kinetic-MHD theory is extended to include effects of macroscopic plasma flow self-consistently. The extension is realised by generalising an energy exchange term due to wave-particle resonance, denoted by δ WK. The first extension is generalisation of the particle’s Lagrangian, and the second one stems from modification to the particle distribution function due to flow. These extensions lead to a generalised expression of δ WK, which affects the MHD stability of plasmas. PMID:27160346

  14. Kinetic study on non-thermal volumetric plasma decay in the early afterglow of air discharge generated by a short pulse microwave or laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Wei; Zhou, Qianhong; Dong, Zhiwei

    2016-08-01

    This paper reports a kinetic study on non-thermal plasma decay in the early afterglow of air discharge generated by short pulse microwave or laser. A global self-consistent model is based on the particle balance of complex plasma chemistry, electron energy equation, and gas thermal balance equation. Electron-ion Coulomb collision is included in the steady state Boltzmann equation solver to accurately describe the electron mobility and other transport coefficients. The model is used to simulate the afterglow of microsecond to nanosecond pulse microwave discharge in N2, O2, and air, as well as femtosecond laser filament discharge in dry and humid air. The simulated results for electron density decay are in quantitative agreement with the available measured ones. The evolution of plasma decay under an external electric field is also investigated, and the effect of gas heating is considered. The underlying mechanism of plasma density decay is unveiled through the above kinetic modeling.

  15. Collaborative Research: A Model of Partially Ionized Plasma Flows with Kinetic Treatment of Neutral Atoms and Nonthermal Ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pogorelov, Nikolai [Univ. of Alabama, Huntsville, AL (United States); Zhang, Ming [Florida Inst. of Technology, Melbourne, FL (United States)

    2016-07-31

    Interactions of flows of partially ionized, magnetized plasma are frequently accompanied by the presence of both thermal and non-thermal (pickup) ion components. Such interactions cannot be modeled using traditional MHD equations and require more advanced approaches to treat them. If a nonthermal component of ions is formed due to charge exchange and collisions between the thermal (core) ions and neutrals, it experiences the action of magnetic field, its distribution function is isotropized, and it soon acquires the velocity of the ambient plasma without being thermodynamically equilibrated. This situation, e. g., takes place in the outer heliosphere –- the part of interstellar space beyond the solar system whose properties are determined by the solar wind interaction with the local interstellar medium. This is also possible in laboratory, at million degrees and above, when plasma is conducting electricity far too well, which makes Ohmic heating ineffective. To attain the target temperatures one needs additional heating eventually playing a dominant role. Among such sources is a so-called neutral particle beam heating. This is a wide-spread technique (Joint European Torus and International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor experiments) based on the injection of powerful beams of neutral atoms into ohmically preheated plasma. In this project we have investigated the energy and density separation between the thermal and nonthermal components in the solar wind and interstellar plasmas. A new model has been developed in which we solve the ideal MHD equations for mixture of all ions and the kinetic Boltzmann equation to describe the transport of neutral atoms. As a separate capability, we can treat the flow of neutral atoms in a multi-component fashion, where neutral atoms born in each thermodynamically distinct region are governed by the Euler gas dynamic equations. We also describe the behavior of pickup ions either kinetically, using the Fokker--Planck equation

  16. Collaborative Research: A Model of Partially Ionized Plasma Flows with Kinetic Treatment of Neutral Atoms and Nonthermal Ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pogorelov, Nikolai [Univ. of Alabama, Huntsville, AL (United States). Dept. of Space Science. Center for Space Plasma and; Zhang, Ming [Florida Inst. of Technology, Melbourne, FL (United States). Physics and Space Sciences Dept.; Borovikov, Sergey [Univ. of Alabama, Huntsville, AL (United States). Dept. of Space Science. Center for Space Plasma and Aeronomic Research; Heerikhuisen, Jacob [Univ. of Alabama, Huntsville, AL (United States). Dept. of Space Science. Center for Space Plasma and Aeronomic Research; Zank, Gary [Univ. of Alabama, Huntsville, AL (United States). Dept. of Space Science. Center for Space Plasma and Aeronomic Research; Gamayunov, Konstantin [Florida Inst. of Technology, Melbourne, FL (United States). Physics and Space Sciences Dept.; Colella, Phillip [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2016-07-31

    Interactions of flows of partially ionized, magnetized plasma are frequently accompanied by the presence of both thermal and non-thermal (pickup) ion components. Such interactions cannot be modeled using traditional MHD equations and require more advanced approaches to treat them. If a nonthermal component of ions is formed due to charge exchange and collisions between the thermal (core) ions and neutrals, it experiences the action of magnetic field, its distribution function is isotropized, and it soon acquires the velocity of the ambient plasma without being thermodynamically equilibrated. This situation, e. g., takes place in the outer heliosphere - the part of interstellar space beyond the solar system whose properties are determined by the solar wind interaction with the local interstellar medium. This is also possible in laboratory, at million degrees and above, when plasma is conducting electricity far too well, which makes Ohmic heating ineffective. To attain the target temperatures one needs additional heating eventually playing a dominant role. Among such sources is a so-called neutral particle beam heating. This is a wide-spread technique (Joint European Torus and International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor experiments) based on the injection of powerful beams of neutral atoms into ohmically preheated plasma. In this project we have investigated the energy and density separation between the thermal and nonthermal components in the solar wind and interstellar plasmas. A new model has been developed in which we solve the ideal MHD equations for mixture of all ions and the kinetic Boltzmann equation to describe the transport of neutral atoms. As a separate capability, we can treat the flow of neutral atoms in a multi-component fashion, where neutral atoms born in each thermodynamically distinct regions are governed by the Euler gas dynamic equations. We also describe the behavior of pickup ions either kinetically, using the Fokker–Planck equation, or

  17. Distinct T helper cell dependence of memory B-cell proliferation versus plasma cell differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zabel, Franziska; Fettelschoss, Antonia; Vogel, Monique; Johansen, Pål; Kündig, Thomas M; Bachmann, Martin F

    2017-03-01

    Several memory B-cell subclasses with distinct functions have been described, of which the most effective is the class-switched (CS) memory B-cell population. We have previously shown, using virus-like particles (VLPs), that the proliferative potential of these CS memory B cells is limited and they fail to re-enter germinal centres (GCs). However, VLP-specific memory B cells quickly differentiated into secondary plasma cells (PCs) with the virtue of elevated antibody production compared with primary PCs. Whereas the induction of VLP(+) memory B cells was strongly dependent on T helper cells, we were wondering whether re-stimulation of VLP(+) memory B cells and their differentiation into secondary PCs would also require T helper cells. Global absence of T helper cells led to strongly impaired memory B cell proliferation and PC differentiation. In contrast, lack of interleukin-21 receptor-dependent follicular T helper cells or CD40 ligand signalling strongly affected proliferation of memory B cells, but differentiation into mature secondary PCs exhibiting increased antibody production was essentially normal. This contrasts with primary B-cell responses, where a strong dependence on CD40 ligand but limited importance of interleukin-21 receptor was seen. Hence, T helper cell dependence differs between primary and secondary B-cell responses as well as between memory B-cell proliferation and PC differentiation.

  18. Kinetic effect of high energy ions on the temperature profile in the boundary plasma region

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ezumi, N., E-mail: ezumi@nagano-nct.ac.jp [Nagano National College of Technology, 716 Tokuma, Nagano 381-8550 (Japan); Hayashi, Y.; Todoroki, K. [Nagano National College of Technology, 716 Tokuma, Nagano 381-8550 (Japan); Okazaki, K. [Graduated School of Engineering, Nagoya University, Nagoya 464-8603 (Japan); Tanaka, H.; Masuzaki, S. [National Institute for Fusion Science, Toki 509-5292 (Japan); Ohno, N. [Graduated School of Engineering, Nagoya University, Nagoya 464-8603 (Japan)

    2013-07-15

    Importance of ion dynamics in the boundary region has been discussed with experimental results of ion temperature (T{sub i}) measurements in linear plasma devices and its analytical model. Radial profiles of T{sub i} have been measured by using an ion sensitive probe in the linear devices CTP-HC and NAGDIS-II. The experiments indicate that T{sub i} is growing radially. Analytical ion-mean-energy profiles based on the ion Larmor motion are qualitatively consistent with the experimental T{sub i} profiles. These results clarify that the higher energy ions exist in the outside region of plasma flux tube.

  19. Disturbed B cell subpopulations and increased plasma cells in myasthenia gravis patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohler, Siegfried; Keil, Thomas Oskar Philipp; Swierzy, Marc; Hoffmann, Sarah; Schaffert, Hanne; Ismail, Mahmoud; Rückert, Jens Carsten; Alexander, Tobias; Hiepe, Falk; Gross, Christian; Thiel, Andreas; Meisel, Andreas

    2013-11-15

    Whether there is a general perturbation of B and plasma cell subsets in myasthenia gravis (MG) has not been investigated so far. Here we performed a detailed flow cytometric analysis of blood and if available thymic tissue in order to detect MG-specific and therapy-induced changes. We observed significant differences in the distribution of B cell subsets in MG patients, yet these were mainly attributable to medical treatment. Furthermore MG is associated with significantly increased frequencies of plasma cells that were especially activated in purely ocular disease manifestation. In contrast to thymoma, B cell subset distribution in hyperplastic thymus could be distinguished from peripheral blood, however both tissues were not significantly enriched with plasma cells. Thus B cell differentiation in general is not defective in MG, but modified by therapy and enhanced frequencies of plasma cells can be detected in MG patients.

  20. Exact relativistic kinetic theory of an electron beam-plasma system: hierarchy of the competing modes in the system parameter space

    OpenAIRE

    Bret, A.; Gremillet, L; Benisti, D.; Lefebvre, E.

    2008-01-01

    Besides being one of the most fundamental basic issues of plasma physics, the stability analysis of an electron beam-plasma system is of critical relevance in many areas of physics. Surprisingly, decades of extensive investigation had not yet resulted in a realistic unified picture of the multidimensional unstable spectrum within a fully relativistic and kinetic framework. All attempts made so far in this direction were indeed restricted to simplistic distribution functions and/or did not aim...

  1. Evaluation of germ-cell kinetics in infertile patients with proliferating cell nuclear antigen proliferating index

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li ZENG; Xiang-Tian KONG; Jin-Wei SU; Tong-Li XIA; Yan-Qun NA; Ying-Lu GUO

    2001-01-01

    To explore the usefulness of proliferating cell nuclear antigen proliferating index (PCNA PI) in the pathological diagnosis and treatment of male infertility. Methods: Testicular biopsy specimen obtained from 48 cases of male infertility and 2 normal controls were fixed and embedded. The sections were stained with anti-PCNA monoclonal antibodies or haematoxylin/eosin. Proliferating index (PI), expressed as the percentage of germ-cell nuclei positively stained with PCNA antibody, was assessed from more than 20 seminiferous tubules or 600 germ-cells. Results: The infertile patients were divided into 4 groups: Group 1, normal spermatogenesis ( 14 cases); Group 2, hypospermatogenesis (16 cases); Group 3, germinal arrest (10 cases); Group 4, Sertoli cell only syndrome (8 cases). The PCNA PI of normal control testis was 86.5% (mean value). Group 3 had a significantly lower PCNA PI (29.8%) than normal testis; Group 1 and 2 had similar Pis (82.3% and 82.3%, respectively) as the control testis. PI of the negative control (Group 4) was 0 as no germ-cells were found. Conclusion: PCNA PI is useful for assessing germ-cell kinetics, especially for pathological diagnosis of germinal arrest which is difficult to differentiate by routine HE staining technique. In germinal arrest, there is a significantly lowered PCNA PI, which is an indication of DNA synthesis deterioration, suggesting the use of therapies be different from those for hypospermatogenesis.

  2. Kinetic Model of Auroral Plasma Formation II: Simultaneous Multi-Satellite Ion Observations and Interpretations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1986-09-30

    survey particle spec- trogram of the University of California at San Diego (UCSD) plasma instrument on SCATHA e.g., Olsen, 1981], shown on Figure 4. In...Perraut, J.-A. Sauvaud, J.-M. Bosqued, A. Pedersen, and B. Aparicio , Drift boundary and ULF wave generation near noon at geostationary orbit, Geophys

  3. Kinetic temperature of dust particle motion in gas-discharge plasma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Norman, G. E.; Timofeev, A. V.

    2011-01-01

    A system of equations describing motion of dust particles in gas discharge plasma is formulated. This system is developed for a monolayer of dust particles with an account of dust particle charge fluctuations and features of the discharge near-electrode layer. Molecular dynamics simulation of the du

  4. A physiologically based kinetic model for the prediction of plasma cholesterol concentrations in mice and man

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pas, van de N.

    2011-01-01

    An increased plasma cholesterol concentration is associated with increased risk of cardiovascular disease. However, individuals vary largely in their response to cholesterol lowering drugs and 40% of them, do not reach their cholesterol-lowering target. Development of novel therapies, for example co

  5. Refractive index of quark-gluon plasma: Kinetic theory with a Bhatnagar-Gross-Krook collisional kernel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Bing-feng; Hou, De-fu; Li, Jia-rong

    2016-10-01

    We derive the electric permittivity ɛ and magnetic permeability μM of the quark-gluon plasma (QGP) with the kinetic theory associated with a Bhatnagar-Gross-Krook (BGK) collisional kernel. Based on them, we study the effect of collisions on the refractive index of QGP. Compared to the collisionless case, collisions change the ω -behavior of ɛ and μM dramatically, which is responsible for the fact that the real and imaginary parts of n2 and the Depine-Lakhtakia index nDL are smooth functions of ω . For a small collision rate ν , the Depine-Lakhtakia index nDL is negative in some frequency range. When the collision rate increases, the frequency range for nDLindex nDL is positive for all frequency regions, which indicates a normal refractive index. In contrast to the collisionless case, there exists some frequency range in which nDLnegative refractive index.

  6. Nature of turbulence, dissipation, and heating in space plasmas: From Alfvén waves to kinetic Alfvén waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, D. J.; Feng, H. Q.; Li, B.; He, J. S.

    2016-08-01

    The nature of turbulence, dissipation, and heating in plasma media has been an attractive and challenge problem in space physics as well as in basic plasma physics. A wide continuous spectrum of Alfvénic turbulence from large MHD-scale Alfvén waves (AWs) in the inertial turbulence regime to small kinetic-scale kinetic AWs (KAWs) in the dissipation turbulence regime is a typical paradigm of plasma turbulence. The incorporation of current remote observations of AWs in the solar atmosphere, in situ satellite measurements of Alfvénic turbulence in the solar wind, and experimental investigations of KAWs on large plasma devices in laboratory provides a chance synthetically to study the physics nature of plasma turbulence, dissipation, and heating. A session entitled "Nature of Turbulence, Dissipation, and Heating in Space Plasmas: From Alfvén Waves to Kinetic Alfvén Waves" was held as a part of the twelfth Asia Oceania Geosciences Society Annual Meeting, which took place in Singapore between 2 and 7 August 2015. This special section is organized based on the session.

  7. Comparative plasma disposition kinetics of albendazole and its new benzimidazol prodrug in dog.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khalil, Z; El Karbane, M; Faouzi, M E A; Ansar, M; Azougagh, M; El Harti, J; Taoufik, J

    2016-01-01

    The comparative pharmacokinetic behavior of albendazole (ABZ) and its new benzimidazol prodrug [1-tert-butyloxycarbonyl-5-propylthio-1-H-benzimidazol-2ylcarbamate of methyl] (ABZBoc), following their oral administration (10mg/kg) to healthy dogs was explored. Blood samples were obtained serially over a 24h period after treatment, then the plasma was analyzed by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) to search the albendazole metabolites (ABZSO and ABZSO2). However, the albendazole parent drug was not detectable at any time after both treatments (ABZ and ABZBoc). By albendazole metabolites (ABZSO and ABZSO2) were the analytes recovered in the plasma after oral administration of ABZ and ABZBoc. Furthermore, some amounts of ABZBoc were also available in the plasma samples treated with this new produg. The plasma profile of each analyte followed a similar pattern after both treatments, the active metabolite (ABZSO) was the major analyte recovered in plasma (between 1 and 24h post-treatment). The pharmacokinetic parameters of both groups were calculated (Cmax, Tmax, t1/2, AUC0-›∞), and analyzed using the Student's t-test, Palbendazole metabolites (ABZSO, ABZSO2) between the group treated with albendazole (group A) and that treated with ABZBoc prodrug (group B). Hence, the levels of the various pharmacokinetics parameters were low in the group treated with prodrug, as well they did not reach equivalent concentrations to that of albendazole. These differences between albendazole and its new prodrug may be explained by the fact that ABZBoc prodrug was not effectively reduced in the intestine of dogs.

  8. Kinetic analysis of acid orange 7 degradation by pulsed discharge plasma combined with activated carbon and the synergistic mechanism exploration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, He; Wang, Huijuan; Wu, Qiangshun; Zhou, Guangshun; Yi, Chengwu

    2016-09-01

    The synergistic technique of pulsed discharge plasma (PDP) and activated carbon (AC) was built to investigate the kinetics of acid orange 7 (AO7) degradation under different conditions of AC addition, electrode gap, initial pH value of solution, gas variety and gas flow rate. Emission spectra of OH and O, UV-vis absorption spectra of the AO7 solution and TOC removal were measured to illustrate the synergistic mechanism of the PDP and the AC. The obtained results indicated that the kinetic constant of AO7 degradation increased from 0.00947 min(-1) to 0.01419 min(-1) when 4 g AC was added into the PDP system; AO7 degradation was higher in the case of alkaline solution when oxygen was used as the flow gas in the PDP/AC system, 2 L/min oxygen flow was more favorable for the degradation. Results of the relative emission intensities of OH and O indicated the catalytic effect of the AC on the active species formation as well as the important role of the two radicals for the AO7 degradation. There was no new peaks appeared by the UV-vis analysis of the AO7 solution after 60 min treatment. The highest TOC removal in the PDP/AC system was 30.3%, which was achieved under the condition of 4 L/min air flow rate and 3 initial pH value.

  9. Human plasma triglyceride labeling after high sucrose feeding. II. Study on triglyceride kinetics and postheparin lipolytic activity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, C.H.; Shreeve, W.W.

    1975-06-01

    Kinetic studies of the very-low-density lipoprotein triglycerides (VLDL-TG) turnover by endogenous labeling with glycerol-2-/sup 3/H were performed in 13 patients in the postabsorptive state, first after 10-14 days on a low-sucrose high-starch-diet, then again after 10-14 days of isocaloric high-sucrose low-starch diet (HSD). After HSD, a significant decrease in the fractional turnover rates of VLDL-TG was observed, as well as a modest but significant increase in its pool size, but the net turn-over rates remained unchanged. Using Michaelis-Menten formulation, we have further calculated the V/sub max/ and Km's of the removal system for VLDL-TG and found that the V/sub max/ and Km's do not differ significantly between the two dietary periods. These results suggest that the removal mechanism for VLDL-TG has not changed after 10-14 days on the HSD, at least when the patients are studied in the postabsorptive state. Measurements of postheparin lipolytic activity under fed condition in 17 patients (including the 13 patients above) have shown a decrease after HSD. However, a defect in the removal of plasma-TG related to decreased activity of tissue-lipoprotein lipase in the fed state has not been conclusively uncovered by the kinetic studies performed in the postabsorptive state, and cannot contribute significantly to the expansion of VLDL-TG pool.

  10. Changes in red blood cell osmotic fragility induced by total plasma and plasma fractions obtained from rats bearing progressive and regressive variants of the Walker 256 tumor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cavalcanti T.C.

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Two variants (A and B of the widely employed Walker 256 rat tumor cells are known. When inoculated sc, the A variant produces solid, invasive, highly metastasizing tumors that cause severe systemic effects and death. We have obtained a regressive variant (AR whose sc growth is slower, resulting in 70-80% regression followed by development of immunity against A and AR variants. Simultaneously with the beginning of tumor regression, a temporary anemia developed (~8 days duration, accompanied by marked splenomegaly (~300% and changes in red blood cell osmotic fragility, with mean corpuscular fragility increasing from 4.1 to 6.5 g/l NaCl. The possibility was raised that plasma factors associated with the immune response induced these changes. In the present study, we identify and compare the osmotic fragility increasing activity of plasma fractions obtained from A and AR tumor bearers at different stages of tumor development. The results showed that by day 4 compounds precipitating in 60% (NH42SO4 and able to increase red blood cell osmotic fragility appeared in the plasma of A and AR tumor bearers. Later, these compounds disappeared from the plasma of A tumor bearers but slightly increased in the plasma of AR tumor bearers. Furthermore, by day 10, compounds precipitating between 60 and 80% (NH42SO4 and with similar effects appeared only in plasma of AR tumor bearers. The salt solubility, production kinetics and hemolytic activity of these compounds resemble those of the immunoglobulins. This, together with their preferential increase in rats bearing the AR variant, suggest their association with an immune response against this tumor.

  11. Single nucleus versus single-cell gel electrophoresis: kinetics of DNA track formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afanasieva, Katerina; Chopei, Marianna; Sivolob, Andrei

    2015-04-01

    Single-cell gel electrophoresis, or the comet assay, is usually performed with nucleoids prepared after a lysis of either whole cells (more often) or isolated cell nuclei (rarely). Electrophoretic properties of the second type of nucleoids have never been investigated carefully. We measured the kinetics of the DNA exit from nuclei-derived nucleoids in comparison with cell-derived nucleoids. The results show that general organization of the nuclei-derived nucleoids is not changed very much in comparison with nucleoids commonly obtained from whole cells. At the same time, in contrast to the cell-derived nucleoids, for which the exit is stepwise and cooperative, the DNA exit from the nuclei-derived nucleoids can be described by a simple monomolecular kinetics. This difference is probably due to agarose penetration into nuclei (but not into cells) before polymerization of the agarose gel. We suggest that single-nucleus gel electrophoresis may be a way for the comet assay standardization.

  12. Long-lived plasma cells in autoimmunity: lessons from B-cell depleting therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahévas, Matthieu; Michel, Marc; Weill, Jean-Claude; Reynaud, Claude-Agnès

    2013-12-27

    A large number of auto-immune diseases are treated with rituximab, an antibody against CD20 that depletes most of the B-cells in the organism. The response to this treatment depends largely on the disease and the type of lymphoid cells involved in the auto-immune process. We recently reported that B-cell depletion in immune thrombocytopenia induced the appearance of pathogenic long-lived plasma cells in the spleen, which were not present before treatment or in non-auto-immune conditions. The spleen of treated patients produced an excess of the cytokine B-cell activating factor, which in in vitro-cultured splenic cells, could increase the longevity of plasma cells. Our results suggested that, paradoxically, the B-cell depletion itself, by altering the splenic milieu, promoted the differentiation of short-lived auto-immune plasma cells into long-lived ones. We describe the cellular and cytokinic components of the splenic plasma cell niche, notably CD4(+) T cells and discuss possible survival factors that could be targeted simultaneously with rituximab-mediated B-cell depletion to interfere with plasma cell persistence.

  13. Controls to validate plasma samples for cell free DNA quantification

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pallisgaard, Niels; Spindler, Karen-Lise Garm; Andersen, Rikke Fredslund;

    2015-01-01

    Recent research has focused on the utility of cell free DNA (cfDNA) in serum and plasma for clinical application, especially in oncology. The literature holds promise of cfDNA as a valuable tumour marker to be used for treatment selection, monitoring and follow-up. The results, however, are diver...

  14. Calculated characteristics of an ac plasma display panel cell

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boeuf, J.P.; Pitchford, L.C. [Universite Paul Sabatier, Toulouse (France)

    1996-02-01

    Equipotential contours and contours of constant power deposition into excitation of xenon, calculated from a two-dimensional (2-D) fluid model, are presented at times during the evolution of a single discharge event in an ac plasma display panel cell with a dielectric barrier rib geometry.

  15. IRF4 Is a Critical Gene in Retinoic Acid-Mediated Plasma Cell Formation and Is Deregulated in Common Variable Immunodeficiency-Derived B Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Indrevær, Randi L; Moskaug, Jan Ø; Paur, Ingvild; Bøhn, Siv K; Jørgensen, Silje F; Blomhoff, Rune; Aukrust, Pål; Fevang, Børre; Blomhoff, Heidi K

    2015-09-15

    In the present study, we aimed at identifying the mechanisms whereby the vitamin A metabolite all-trans retinoic acid (RA) promotes the formation of plasma cells upon stimulation of B cells via the innate immunity receptors TLR9 and RP105. Most often, differentiation of B cells involves the sequential events of class switch recombination and somatic hypermutations characteristic of germinal center reactions, followed by plasma cell formation. By studying the regulatory networks known to drive these reactions, we revealed that RA enhances the expression of the plasma cell-generating transcription factors IFN regulatory factor (IRF)4 and Blimp1, and paradoxically also activation-induced deaminase (AID) involved in somatic hypermutations/class switch recombination, in primary human B cells. IRF4 was identified as a particularly important protein involved in the RA-mediated production of IgG in TLR9/RP105-stimulated B cells. Based on kinetic studies, we present a model suggesting that the initial induction of IRF4 by RA favors AID expression. According to this model, the higher level of IRF4 that eventually arises results in sustained elevated levels of Blimp1. Regarded as a master regulator of plasma cell development, Blimp1 will in turn suppress AID expression and drive the formation of IgG-secreting plasma cells. Notably, we demonstrated IRF4 to be deregulated in B cells from common variable immunodeficiency patients, contributing to the observed aberrant expression of AID in these patients. Taken together, the present study both provides new insight into the mechanisms whereby RA induces differentiation of B cells and identifies IRF4 as a key to understand the defective functions of B cells in common variable immunodeficiency patients.

  16. Systematization of the Mechanism by Which Plasma Irradiation Causes Cell Growth and Tumor Cell Death

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimizu, Nobuyuki

    2015-09-01

    New methods and technologies have improved minimally invasive surgical treatment and saved numerous patients. Recently, plasma irradiation has been demonstrated that might be useful in medical field and the plasma irradiation device is expected to become practically applicable. Mild plasma coagulator showed some advantages such as hemostasis and adhesion reduction in experimental animal model, but the mechanism of plasma irradiation remains unclear. Our study group aim to clarify the mechanism of plasma irradiation effects, mainly focusing on oxidative stress using cultured cell lines and small animal model. First, a study using cultured cell lines showed that the culture medium that was activated by plasma irradiation (we called this kind of medium as ``PAM'' -plasma activated medium-) induced tumor cell death. Although this effect was mainly found to be due to hydrogen peroxide, the remaining portion was considered as the specific effect of the plasma irradiation and we are now studying focusing on this effect. Second, we established a mouse intra-peritoneal adhesion model and checked biological reaction that occurred in the adhesion part. Histopathological study showed inflammatory cells infiltration into adhesion part and the expression of PTX3 that might involve tissue repair around adhesion part. We also confirmed that cytokines IL-6 and IL-10 might be useful as a marker of adhesion formation in this model. Applying ``PAM'' or mild plasma irradiation in this model, we examine the effects of plasma on inflamed cells. The samples in these experiments would be applied to targeted proteomics analysis, and we aim to demonstrate the systematization of the cell's reaction by plasma irradiation.

  17. Kinetics of Fluid Demixing in Complex Plasmas: Domain Growth Analysis using Minkowski Tensors

    CERN Document Server

    Böbel, Alexander

    2016-01-01

    A molecular dynamics simulation of the demixing process of a binary complex plasma is analysed and the role of distinct interaction potentials is discussed by using morphological Minkowski tensor analysis of the minority phase domain growth in a demixing simulated binary complex plasma. These Minkowski tensor methods are compared with previous results that utilized a power spectrum method based on the time-dependent average structure factor. It is shown that the Minkowski tensor methods are superior to the previously used power spectrum method in the sense of higher sensitivity to changes in domain size. By analysis of the slope of the temporal evolution of Minkowski tensor measures qualitative differences between the case of particle interaction with a single length scale compared to particle interactions with two different length scales (dominating long range interaction) are revealed. After proper scaling the graphs for the two length scale scenario coincide, pointing towards universal behaviour. The quali...

  18. Circulating human B and plasma cells. Age-associated changes in counts and detailed characterization of circulating normal CD138(-) and CD138(+) plasma cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Caraux, Anouk; Klein, Bernard; Paiva, Bruno; Bret, Caroline; Schmitz, Alexander; Fuhler, Gwenny M.; Bos, Nico A.; Johnsen, Hans E.; Orfao, Alberto; Perez-Andres, Martin

    2010-01-01

    Generation of B and plasma cells involves several organs with a necessary cell trafficking between them. A detailed phenotypic characterization of four circulating B-cell subsets (immature-, naive-, memory- B-lymphocytes and plasma cells) of 106 healthy adults was realized by multiparametric flow cy

  19. Kinetic Effects of Non-Equilibrium Plasma-Assisted Methane Oxidation on Diffusion Flame Extinction Limits

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    measured using the Two-photon Absorption Laser-Induced Fluorescence (TALIF) method (for atomic oxygen, O), Fourier Transform Infrared ( FTIR ) spectroscopy...photon Absorption Laser-Induced Fluorescence (TALIF) method (for atomic oxygen, O), Fourier Transform Infrared ( FTIR ) spectroscopy and Gas...and ozone (O3) from other plasma related species and shown that both (at concentrations of several thousand ppm) can enhance flame speeds by a few

  20. Kinetic Effects of Non-Equilibrium Plasma on Partially Premixed Flame Extinction

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    absorption laser- induced fluorescence (TALIF) method, Fourier Transform Infrared ( FTIR ) spectrometer , and Gas Chromatography (GC). The product...workers isolated singlet oxygen (O2(a1Δg)) and ozone (O3) effects and demonstrated that both (at concentrations of several thousand ppm) enhanced...measured by Fourier Transform Infrared spectroscopy ( FTIR ) and Gas Chromatography (GC). These experimental data were used to validate our current plasma

  1. Advanced Kinetic-Based Modeling Applied to Plasma and Neutral Flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-01

    equilibrium; ion, electron, and neutral temperatures strongly differ, and the electron distribution function is non - Maxwellian Strong impact of...density, MHD plasma High temperature, Te ~ 10 – 1000 eV Non -equilibrium Chemical (Air) / Ionization mechanisms Neutral gas entrainment MSNW FRC...thermal non -equilibrium ni weakly depends on U Electron T is very important Number of charge exchange reactions for T=10eV and U=20km/s was found to

  2. The AP-1 transcription factor Fra1 inhibits follicular B cell differentiation into plasma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grötsch, Bettina; Brachs, Sebastian; Lang, Christiane; Luther, Julia; Derer, Anja; Schlötzer-Schrehardt, Ursula; Bozec, Aline; Fillatreau, Simon; Berberich, Ingolf; Hobeika, Elias; Reth, Michael; Wagner, Erwin F; Schett, Georg; Mielenz, Dirk; David, Jean-Pierre

    2014-10-20

    The cornerstone of humoral immunity is the differentiation of B cells into antibody-secreting plasma cells. This process is tightly controlled by a regulatory gene network centered on the transcriptional repressor B lymphocyte-induced maturation protein 1 (Blimp1). Proliferation of activated B cells is required to foster Blimp1 expression but needs to be terminated to avoid overshooting immune reactions. Activator protein 1 (AP-1) transcription factors become quickly up-regulated upon B cell activation. We demonstrate that Fra1, a Fos member of AP-1, enhances activation-induced cell death upon induction in activated B cells. Moreover, mice with B cell-specific deletion of Fra1 show enhanced plasma cell differentiation and exacerbated antibody responses. In contrast, transgenic overexpression of Fra1 blocks plasma cell differentiation and immunoglobulin production, which cannot be rescued by Bcl2. On the molecular level, Fra1 represses Blimp1 expression and interferes with binding of the activating AP-1 member c-Fos to the Blimp1 promoter. Conversely, overexpression of c-Fos in Fra1 transgenic B cells releases Blimp1 repression. As Fra1 lacks transcriptional transactivation domains, we propose that Fra1 inhibits Blimp1 expression and negatively controls plasma cell differentiation through binding to the Blimp1 promoter. In summary, we demonstrate that Fra1 negatively controls plasma cell differentiation by repressing Blimp1 expression.

  3. Deciphering the kinetic binding mechanism of dimeric ligands using a potent plasma-stable dimeric inhibitor of postsynaptic density protein-95 as an example

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chi, Celestine N; Bach, Anders; Gottschalk, Marie

    2010-01-01

    addressed the kinetic mechanism of interaction of such bivalent ligands. We have investigated the binding interaction of a recently identified potent plasma-stable dimeric pentapeptide and PDZ1-2 of postsynaptic density protein-95 (PSD-95) using protein engineering in combination with fluorescence...

  4. Non-modal theory of the kinetic ion temperature gradient driven instability of plasma shear flows across the magnetic field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikhailenko, V. V.; Mikhailenko, V. S.; Lee, Hae June

    2016-06-01

    The temporal evolution of the kinetic ion temperature gradient driven instability and of the related anomalous transport of the ion thermal energy of plasma shear flow across the magnetic field is investigated analytically. This instability develops in a steady plasma due to the inverse ion Landau damping and has the growth rate of the order of the frequency when the ion temperature is equal to or above the electron temperature. The investigation is performed employing the non-modal methodology of the shearing modes which are the waves that have a static spatial structure in the frame of the background flow. The solution of the governing linear integral equation for the perturbed potential displays that the instability experiences the non-modal temporal evolution in the shearing flow during which the unstable perturbation becomes very different from a canonical modal form. It transforms into the non-modal structure with vanishing frequency and growth rate with time. The obtained solution of the nonlinear integral equation, which accounts for the random scattering of the angle of the ion gyro-motion due to the interaction of ions with ensemble of shearing waves, reveals similar but accelerated process of the transformations of the perturbations into the zero frequency structures. It was obtained that in the shear flow the anomalous ion thermal conductivity decays with time. It is a strictly non-modal effect, which originates from the temporal evolution of the shearing modes turbulence.

  5. Hybrid Particle-In-Cell (PIC) simulation of heat transfer and ionization balance in overdense plasmas irradiated by subpicosecond pulse lasers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhidkov, A.; Sasaki, Akira [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Neyagawa, Osaka (Japan). Kansai Research Establishment

    1998-11-01

    A 1D hybrid electromagnetic particle-in-cell code with new methods to include particle collisions and atomic kinetics is developed and applied to ultra-short-pulse laser plasma interaction. Using the Langevin equation to calculate the Coulomb collision term, the present code is shown to be fast and stable in calculating the particle motion in the PIC simulation. Furthermore, by noting that the scale length of the change of atomic kinetics is much longer than the Debye radius, we calculate ionization and X-ray emission on kinetics cells, which are determined by averaging plasma parameters such as the electron density and energy over number of PIC cells. The absorption of short-pulse laser by overdense plasmas is calculated in self-consistent manner, including the effect of rapid change of density and temperature caused by instantaneous heating and successive fast ionization of the target material. The calculated results agree well with those obtained from the Fokker-Planck simulation as well as experiments, for non-local heat transport in plasmas with steep temperature gradient, and for the absorption of a short laser pulse by solid density targets. These results demonstrate usefulness of the code and the computational method therein for understanding of physics of short pulse laser plasma interaction experiments, and for application to the gain calculation of short-pulse laser excited X-ray laser as well. (author)

  6. Cell and tissue kinetics of the subependymal layer in mouse brain following heavy charged particle irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Manley, N.B.; Fabrikant, J.I.; Alpen, E.L.

    1988-12-01

    The following studies investigate the cellular response and cell population kinetics of the subependymal layer in the mouse brain exposed to heavy charged particle irradiation. Partial brain irradiation with helium and neon ions was confined to one cortex of the brain. Both the irradiated and the unirradiated contralateral cortex showed similar disturbances of the cell and tissue kinetics in the subependymal layers. The irradiated hemisphere exhibited histological damage, whereas the unirradiated side appeared normal histologically. This study concerns the cell population and cell cycle kinetics of the subependymal layer in the mouse brain, and the effects of charged particle irradiations on this cell population. Quantitative high resolution autoradiography was used to study the kinetic parameters in this cell layer. This study should help in understanding the effects of these high-energy heavy ions on normal mammalian brain tissue. The response of the mammalian brain exposure to charged particle ionizing radiation may be extremely variable. It varies from minimal physiological changes to overt tissue necrosis depending on a number of factors such as: the administered dose, dose-rate, the volume of the irradiated tissue, and the biological end-point being examined.

  7. Kinetic assay shows that increasing red cell volume could be a treatment for sickle cell disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Quan; Henry, Eric R.; Hofrichter, James; Smith, Jeffrey F.; Cellmer, Troy; Dunkelberger, Emily B.; Metaferia, Belhu B.; Jones-Straehle, Stacy; Boutom, Sarah; Christoph, Garrott W.; Wakefield, Terri H.; Link, Mary E.; Staton, Dwayne; Vass, Erica R.; Miller, Jeffery L.; Hsieh, Matthew M.; Tisdale, John F.; Eaton, William A.

    2017-01-01

    Although it has been known for more than 60 years that the cause of sickle cell disease is polymerization of a hemoglobin mutant, hydroxyurea is the only drug approved for treatment by the US Food and Drug Administration. This drug, however, is only partially successful, and the discovery of additional drugs that inhibit fiber formation has been hampered by the lack of a sensitive and quantitative cellular assay. Here, we describe such a method in a 96-well plate format that is based on laser-induced polymerization in sickle trait cells and robust, automated image analysis to detect the precise time at which fibers distort (“sickle”) the cells. With this kinetic method, we show that small increases in cell volume to reduce the hemoglobin concentration can result in therapeutic increases in the delay time prior to fiber formation. We also show that, of the two drugs (AES103 and GBT440) in clinical trials that inhibit polymerization by increasing oxygen affinity, one of them (GBT440) also inhibits sickling in the absence of oxygen by two additional mechanisms. PMID:28096387

  8. Kinetics of decolorization of azo dye by bipolar pulsed barrier discharge in a three-phase discharge plasma reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang Ruobing [Graduate School at Shenzhen, Tsinghua University, Shenzhen 518055 (China)]. E-mail: zrbingdut@163.com; Zhang Chi [Graduate School at Shenzhen, Tsinghua University, Shenzhen 518055 (China); Cheng Xingxin [Graduate School at Shenzhen, Tsinghua University, Shenzhen 518055 (China); Wang Liming [Graduate School at Shenzhen, Tsinghua University, Shenzhen 518055 (China); Wu Yan [Institute of Electrostatics and Special Power, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116024 (China); Guan Zhicheng [Graduate School at Shenzhen, Tsinghua University, Shenzhen 518055 (China)

    2007-04-02

    Removal of amaranth, a commercial synthetic azo dye widely used in the dye and food industry, was examined as a possible remediation technology for treating dye-contaminated water. Effects of various parameters such as gas flow rate, solution conductivity, pulse repetition frequency, etc., on decolorization kinetics were investigated. Experimental results show that an aqueous solution of 24 mg/l dye is 81.24% decolorized following 30 min plasma treatment for a 50 kV voltage and 0.75 m{sup 3}/h gas flow rate. Decolorization reaction of amaranth in the plasma reactor is a pseudo first order reaction. Rate constant (k) of decolorization increases quickly with increasing the applied voltage, pulse repetition frequency and the gas flow rate. However, when the applied voltage is beyond 50 kV and increases further, increase rate of k decreases. In addition, k decreases quickly when the solution conductivity increases from 200 to 1481 {mu}S/cm. The decolorization reaction has a high rate constant (k = 0.0269 min{sup -1}) when the solution pH is beyond 10. Rate constant k decreases with the decrease of pH and reaches minimum at a pH of about 5 (k {sub min} = 0.01603 min{sup -1}), then increases to 0.02105 min{sup -1} when pH decreases to 3.07. About 15% of the initial TOC can be degraded only in about 120 min non-thermal plasma treatment.

  9. Influence of flotation cell volume and solids mass on kinetics of sulfide ore flotation

    OpenAIRE

    Plawski Michal; Bakalarz Alicja

    2016-01-01

    The paper presents studies on the influence of flotation cell capacity and mass of solids in the suspension on the flotation kinetics of sulfide copper ore. A sample of copper ore that was collected from the Polkowice Mine of KGHM Polska Miedz S.A. in Poland was used in the experiments. It was determined that neither the volume of flotation cell nor the mass of solids had influence on the type of kinetics equation of flotation. Copper-bearing minerals floated according to the second-order equ...

  10. Surgical treatment of unicentric plasma cell histological type Castleman's disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marić Nebojša

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Castleman’s disease or angiofollicular lymph hyperplasia is a rare disease with two identified clinical forms. Unicentric or localized form is characterized by isolated growth of lymph nodes, most often in mediastinum, and multicentric form is expressed as systemic disease with spread lymphadenopathy, organomegaly and presence of general symptoms of the disease. Histological types are hyalovascular, plasma-cell and transitive (mixed cell. Case report. This case report shows a woman, 59 years old, with unicentric form of plasma-cell type of Castleman’s disease. Unicentric form is usually shown as hyalovascular histological type, extremely rare as plasma-cell type, and transitive (mixed cell type was never described in literature as localized clinical form. The disease was manifested with chest pain, loss of body weight, exhaustion and weakness of legs. Further diagnostic procedures found the presence of enlarged lymph nodes paratracheally right, in a close contact with vena cava superior. The disease was confirmed by histopathological analysis of bioptated mediastinal lymph node after mediastinoscopy. Surgical treatment included extirpation of enlarged lymph nodes. After the regular postoperative condition, a full therapy effect was confirmed. Conclusion. Unicentric form of Castleman’s disease is expressed with enlarged lymph nodes on predilected places, usually in mediastinum. Surgical treatment is best method for the management of the disease and brings a full recovery of patient.

  11. The glycome of normal and malignant plasma cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas M Moehler

    Full Text Available The glycome, i.e. the cellular repertoire of glycan structures, contributes to important functions such as adhesion and intercellular communication. Enzymes regulating cellular glycosylation processes are related to the pathogenesis of cancer including multiple myeloma. Here we analyze the transcriptional differences in the glycome of normal (n = 10 and two cohorts of 332 and 345 malignant plasma-cell samples, association with known multiple myeloma subentities as defined by presence of chromosomal aberrations, potential therapeutic targets, and its prognostic impact. We found i malignant vs. normal plasma cells to show a characteristic glycome-signature. They can ii be delineated by a lasso-based predictor from normal plasma cells based on this signature. iii Cytogenetic aberrations lead to distinct glycan-gene expression patterns for t(11;14, t(4;14, hyperdiploidy, 1q21-gain and deletion of 13q14. iv A 38-gene glycome-signature significantly delineates patients with adverse survival in two independent cohorts of 545 patients treated with high-dose melphalan and autologous stem cell transplantation. v As single gene, expression of the phosphatidyl-inositol-glycan protein M as part of the targetable glycosyl-phosphatidyl-inositol-anchor-biosynthesis pathway is associated with adverse survival. The prognostically relevant glycome deviation in malignant cells invites novel strategies of therapy for multiple myeloma.

  12. Electromagnetic waves and living cells: A kinetic thermodynamic approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucia, Umberto

    2016-11-01

    Cells are complex thermodynamic systems. Their energy transfer, thermo-electro-chemical processes and transports phenomena can occur across the cells membranes, the border of the complex system. Moreover, cells can also actively modify their behaviours in relation to any change of their environment. All the living systems waste heat, which is no more than the result of their internal irreversibility. This heat is dissipated into their environment. But, this wasted heat represents also a sort of information, which outflows from the cell towards its environment, completely accessible to any observer. The analysis of irreversibility related to this wasted heat can represent a new useful approach to the study of the cells behaviour. This approach allows us to consider the living systems as black boxes and analyse only the inflows and outflows and their changes in relation to any environmental change. This analysis allows also the explanation of the effects of electromagnetic fields on the cell behaviour.

  13. Brief note about plasma catecholamines kinetics and submaximal exercise in untrained standardbreds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paolo Baragli

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Four untrained standardbred horses performed a standardized exercise test on the treadmill and an automated blood collection system programmed to obtain blood samples every 15 s was used for blood collection in order to evaluate the kinetics of adrenaline and noradrenaline. The highest average values obtained for adrenaline and noradrenaline were 15.0 ± 3.0 and 15.8 ± 2.8 nmol/l respectively, with exponential accumulation of adrenaline (r = 0.977 and noradrenaline (r = 0.976 during the test. Analysis of the correlation between noradrenaline and adrenaline for each phase of the test shows that correlation coefficient decreases as the intensity of exercise increases (from r = 0.909 to r = 0.788. This suggests that during submaximal exercise, the process for release, distribution and clearance of adrenaline into blood circulation differs from that of noradrenaline.

  14. Successful treatment of plasma cell cheilitis with topical tacrolimus: report of two cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanami, Yuka; Motoki, Yoshikazu; Yamamoto, Toshiyuki

    2011-02-15

    Plasma cell cheilitis is an uncommon chronic inflammatory dermatitis that presents with flat to slightly elevated erosive erythematous plaques. It is histologically characterized by plasma cell infiltrates into the mucosa. Other than the lip, genital areas are often involved, which is called plasma cell balanitis or vulvitis. Plasma cell cheilitis is sometimes resistant to conventional topical corticosteroid therapy. Other choices include oral griseofulvin, topical cyclosporine, and intralesional corticosteroid injection, all of which occasionally fail to produce satisfactory results. Recent reports show that topical calcineurin inhibitors are effective for plasma cell cheilitis, balanitis, and vulvitis. However, there are so far only 2 reports of plasma cell cheilitis successfully treated with topical pimecrolimus and tacrolimus. We present herein two cases of plasma cell cheilitis, in which topical tacrolimus showed beneficial effects, suggesting that this immunomodulatory agent is a promising option for plasma cell cheilitis.

  15. Phase mixing versus nonlinear advection in drift-kinetic plasma turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schekochihin, A. A.; Parker, J. T.; Highcock, E. G.; Dellar, P. J.; Dorland, W.; Hammett, G. W.

    2016-04-01

    > A scaling theory of long-wavelength electrostatic turbulence in a magnetised, weakly collisional plasma (e.g. drift-wave turbulence driven by ion temperature gradients) is proposed, with account taken both of the nonlinear advection of the perturbed particle distribution by fluctuating flows and of its phase mixing, which is caused by the streaming of the particles along the mean magnetic field and, in a linear problem, would lead to Landau damping. It is found that it is possible to construct a consistent theory in which very little free energy leaks into high velocity moments of the distribution function, rendering the turbulent cascade in the energetically relevant part of the wavenumber space essentially fluid-like. The velocity-space spectra of free energy expressed in terms of Hermite-moment orders are steep power laws and so the free-energy content of the phase space does not diverge at infinitesimal collisionality (while it does for a linear problem); collisional heating due to long-wavelength perturbations vanishes in this limit (also in contrast with the linear problem, in which it occurs at the finite rate equal to the Landau damping rate). The ability of the free energy to stay in the low velocity moments of the distribution function is facilitated by the `anti-phase-mixing' effect, whose presence in the nonlinear system is due to the stochastic version of the plasma echo (the advecting velocity couples the phase-mixing and anti-phase-mixing perturbations). The partitioning of the wavenumber space between the (energetically dominant) region where this is the case and the region where linear phase mixing wins its competition with nonlinear advection is governed by the `critical balance' between linear and nonlinear time scales (which for high Hermite moments splits into two thresholds, one demarcating the wavenumber region where phase mixing predominates, the other where plasma echo does).

  16. Kinetics of metastable atoms and non-Maxwellian electrons in two-temperature plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kunc, J. A.; Soon, W. H.

    1990-01-01

    Numerical and analytical solutions of the electron Boltzmann equation in two-temperature steady-state helium plasma are studied in a broad range of conditions T(a) = 5,000-20,000 K, T(e) = 10,000-20,000 K; N(a) = 10 to the 10th - 10 to the 18th per cu cm. The WKB analytical solution is found to be satisfactory in most situations. The deviation of the electron distribution from Maxwellian and a possibility of raising of the tail of the distribution in presence of sources of fast electrons is also discussed.

  17. Cold atmospheric plasma for selectively ablating metastatic breast cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Mian; Holmes, Benjamin; Cheng, Xiaoqian; Zhu, Wei; Keidar, Michael; Zhang, Lijie Grace

    2013-01-01

    Traditional breast cancer treatments such as surgery and radiotherapy contain many inherent limitations with regards to incomplete and nonselective tumor ablation. Cold atmospheric plasma (CAP) is an ionized gas where the ion temperature is close to room temperature. It contains electrons, charged particles, radicals, various excited molecules, UV photons and transient electric fields. These various compositional elements have the potential to either enhance and promote cellular activity, or disrupt and destroy them. In particular, based on this unique composition, CAP could offer a minimally-invasive surgical approach allowing for specific cancer cell or tumor tissue removal without influencing healthy cells. Thus, the objective of this research is to investigate a novel CAP-based therapy for selectively bone metastatic breast cancer treatment. For this purpose, human metastatic breast cancer (BrCa) cells and bone marrow derived human mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) were separately treated with CAP, and behavioral changes were evaluated after 1, 3, and 5 days of culture. With different treatment times, different BrCa and MSC cell responses were observed. Our results showed that BrCa cells were more sensitive to these CAP treatments than MSCs under plasma dose conditions tested. It demonstrated that CAP can selectively ablate metastatic BrCa cells in vitro without damaging healthy MSCs at the metastatic bone site. In addition, our study showed that CAP treatment can significantly inhibit the migration and invasion of BrCa cells. The results suggest the great potential of CAP for breast cancer therapy.

  18. Cold atmospheric plasma for selectively ablating metastatic breast cancer cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mian Wang

    Full Text Available Traditional breast cancer treatments such as surgery and radiotherapy contain many inherent limitations with regards to incomplete and nonselective tumor ablation. Cold atmospheric plasma (CAP is an ionized gas where the ion temperature is close to room temperature. It contains electrons, charged particles, radicals, various excited molecules, UV photons and transient electric fields. These various compositional elements have the potential to either enhance and promote cellular activity, or disrupt and destroy them. In particular, based on this unique composition, CAP could offer a minimally-invasive surgical approach allowing for specific cancer cell or tumor tissue removal without influencing healthy cells. Thus, the objective of this research is to investigate a novel CAP-based therapy for selectively bone metastatic breast cancer treatment. For this purpose, human metastatic breast cancer (BrCa cells and bone marrow derived human mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs were separately treated with CAP, and behavioral changes were evaluated after 1, 3, and 5 days of culture. With different treatment times, different BrCa and MSC cell responses were observed. Our results showed that BrCa cells were more sensitive to these CAP treatments than MSCs under plasma dose conditions tested. It demonstrated that CAP can selectively ablate metastatic BrCa cells in vitro without damaging healthy MSCs at the metastatic bone site. In addition, our study showed that CAP treatment can significantly inhibit the migration and invasion of BrCa cells. The results suggest the great potential of CAP for breast cancer therapy.

  19. Influence of electron injection into 27 cm audio plasma cell on the plasma diagnostics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haleem, N. A.; Ragheb, M. S.; Zakhary, S. G. [Accelerators Department, Nuclear Research Center, AEA, Cairo 13759 (Egypt); El Fiki, S. A.; Nouh, S. A. [Faculty of Science, Ain Shams University, Cairo 11566 (Egypt); El Disoki, T. M. [Faculty of Girls, Ain Shams University, Cairo 11566 (Egypt)

    2013-08-15

    In this article, the plasma is created in a Pyrex tube (L = 27 cm, φ= 4 cm) as a single cell, by a capacitive audio frequency (AF) discharge (f = 10–100 kHz), at a definite pressure of ∼0.2 Torr. A couple of tube linear and deviating arrangements show plasma characteristic conformity. The applied AF plasma and the injection of electrons into two gas mediums Ar and N{sub 2} revealed the increase of electron density at distinct tube regions by one order to attain 10{sup 13}/cm{sup 3}. The electrons temperature and density strengths are in contrast to each other. While their distributions differ along the plasma tube length, they show a decaying sinusoidal shape where their peaks position varies by the gas type. The electrons injection moderates electron temperature and expands their density. The later highest peak holds for the N{sub 2} gas, at electrons injection it changes to hold for the Ar. The sinusoidal decaying density behavior generates electric fields depending on the gas used and independent of tube geometry. The effect of the injected electrons performs a responsive impact on electrons density not attributed to the gas discharge. Analytical tools investigate the interaction of the plasma, the discharge current, and the gas used on the electrodes. It points to the emigration of atoms from each one but for greater majority they behave to a preferred direction. Meanwhile, only in the linear regime, small percentage of atoms still moves in reverse direction. Traces of gas atoms revealed on both electrodes due to sheath regions denote lack of their participation in the discharge current. In addition, atoms travel from one electrode to the other by overcoming the sheaths regions occurring transportation of particles agglomeration from one electrode to the other. The electrons injection has contributed to increase the plasma electron density peaks. These electrons populations have raised the generated electrostatic fields assisting the elemental ions

  20. High affinity germinal center B cells are actively selected into the plasma cell compartment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phan, Tri Giang; Paus, Didrik; Chan, Tyani D; Turner, Marian L; Nutt, Stephen L; Basten, Antony; Brink, Robert

    2006-10-30

    A hallmark of T cell-dependent immune responses is the progressive increase in the ability of serum antibodies to bind antigen and provide immune protection. Affinity maturation of the antibody response is thought to be connected with the preferential survival of germinal centre (GC) B cells that have acquired increased affinity for antigen via somatic hypermutation of their immunoglobulin genes. However, the mechanisms that drive affinity maturation remain obscure because of the difficulty in tracking the affinity-based selection of GC B cells and their differentiation into plasma cells. We describe a powerful new model that allows these processes to be followed as they occur in vivo. In contrast to evidence from in vitro systems, responding GC B cells do not undergo plasma cell differentiation stochastically. Rather, only GC B cells that have acquired high affinity for the immunizing antigen form plasma cells. Affinity maturation is therefore driven by a tightly controlled mechanism that ensures only antibodies with the greatest possibility of neutralizing foreign antigen are produced. Because the body can sustain only limited numbers of plasma cells, this "quality control" over plasma cell differentiation is likely critical for establishing effective humoral immunity.